WorldWideScience

Sample records for arsenal production reactor

  1. Supplying the nuclear arsenal: Production reactor technology, management, and policy, 1942--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlisle, R.P.; Zenzen, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This book focuses on the lineage of America`s production reactors, those three at Hanford and their descendants, the reactors behind America`s nuclear weapons. The work will take only occasional sideways glances at the collateral lines of descent, the reactor cousins designed for experimental purposes, ship propulsion, and electric power generation. Over the decades from 1942 through 1992, fourteen American production reactors made enough plutonium to fuel a formidable arsenal of more than twenty thousand weapons. In the last years of that period, planners, nuclear engineers, and managers struggled over designs for the next generation of production reactors. The story of fourteen individual machines and of the planning effort to replace them might appear relatively narrow. Yet these machines lay at the heart of the nation`s nuclear weapons complex. The story of these machines is the story of arming the winning weapon, supplying the nuclear arms race. This book is intended to capture the history of the first fourteen production reactors, and associated design work, in the face of the end of the Cold War.

  2. Production and packaging of a biological arsenal: evolution of centipede venoms under morphological constraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undheim, Eivind A B; Hamilton, Brett R; Kurniawan, Nyoman D; Bowlay, Greg; Cribb, Bronwen W; Merritt, David J; Fry, Bryan G; King, Glenn F; Venter, Deon J

    2015-03-31

    Venom represents one of the most extreme manifestations of a chemical arms race. Venoms are complex biochemical arsenals, often containing hundreds to thousands of unique protein toxins. Despite their utility for prey capture, venoms are energetically expensive commodities, and consequently it is hypothesized that venom complexity is inversely related to the capacity of a venomous animal to physically subdue prey. Centipedes, one of the oldest yet least-studied venomous lineages, appear to defy this rule. Although scutigeromorph centipedes produce less complex venom than those secreted by scolopendrid centipedes, they appear to rely heavily on venom for prey capture. We show that the venom glands are large and well developed in both scutigerid and scolopendrid species, but that scutigerid forcipules lack the adaptations that allow scolopendrids to inflict physical damage on prey and predators. Moreover, we reveal that scolopendrid venom glands have evolved to accommodate a much larger number of secretory cells and, by using imaging mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that toxin production is heterogeneous across these secretory units. We propose that the differences in venom complexity between centipede orders are largely a result of morphological restrictions of the venom gland, and consequently there is a strong correlation between the morphological and biochemical complexity of this unique venom system. The current data add to the growing body of evidence that toxins are not expressed in a spatially homogenous manner within venom glands, and they suggest that the link between ecology and toxin evolution is more complex than previously thought. PMID:25775536

  3. Hydrogen Production in Fusion Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-01-01

    As one of methods of innovative energy production in fusion reactors without having a conventional turbine-type generator, an efficient use of radiation produced in a fusion reactor with utilizing semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas are studied. Taking the candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system for application of the new concepts, the expected efficiency and a concept of plant system are investigated.

  4. Reactor production of Thorium-229.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogle, Susan; Boll, Rose Ann; Murphy, Karen; Denton, David; Owens, Allison; Haverlock, Tamara J; Garland, Marc; Mirzadeh, Saed

    2016-08-01

    Limited availability of (229)Th for clinical applications of (213)Bi necessitates investigation of alternative production routes. In reactor production, (229)Th is produced from neutron transmutation of (226)Ra, (228)Ra, (227)Ac and (228)Th. Irradiations of (226)Ra, (228)Ra, and (227)Ac targets at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor result in yields of (229)Th at 26 days of 74.0±7.4MBq/g, 260±10MBq/g, and 1200±50MBq/g, respectively. Intermediate radionuclide yields and cross sections are also studied. PMID:27163437

  5. Savannah River Site production reactor technical specifications. K Production Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    These technical specifications are explicit restrictions on the operation of the Savannah River Site K Production Reactor. They are designed to preserve the validity of the plant safety analysis by ensuring that the plant is operated within the required conditions bounded by the analysis, and with the operable equipment that is assumed to mitigate the consequences of an accident. Technical specifications preserve the primary success path relied upon to detect and respond to accidents. This report describes requirements on thermal-hydraulic limits; limiting conditions for operation and surveillance for the reactor, power distribution control, instrumentation, process water system, emergency cooling and emergency shutdown systems, confinement systems, plant systems, electrical systems, components handling, and special test exceptions; design features; and administrative controls.

  6. Safety issues at the defense production reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States produces plutonium and tritium for use in nuclear weapons at the defense production reactors - the N Reactor in Washington and the Savannah River reactors in South Carolina. This report reaches general conclusions about the management of those reactors and highlights a number of safety and technical issues that should be resolved. The report provides an assessment of the safety management, safety review, and safety methodology employed by the Department of Energy and the private contractors who operate the reactors for the federal government. This report examines the safety objective established by the Department of Energy for the production reactors and the process the Department of its contractors use to implement the objective; focuses on a variety of uncertainties concerning the production reactors, particularly those related to potential vulnerabilities to severe accidents; and identifies ways in which the DOE approach to management of the safety of the production reactors can be improved

  7. Microstructured reactors for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aartun, Ingrid

    2005-07-01

    Small scale hydrogen production by partial oxidation (POX) and oxidative steam reforming (OSR) have been studied over Rh-impregnated microchannel Fecralloy reactors and alumina foams. Trying to establish whether metallic microchannel reactors have special advantages for hydrogen production via catalytic POX or OSR with respect to activity, selectivity and stability was of special interest. The microchannel Fecralloy reactors were oxidised at 1000 deg C to form a {alpha}-Al2O3 layer in the channels in order to enhance the surface area prior to impregnation. Kr-BET measurements showed that the specific surface area after oxidation was approximately 10 times higher than the calculated geometric surface area. Approximately 1 mg Rh was deposited in the channels by impregnation with an aqueous solution of RhCl3. Annular pieces (15 mm o.d.,4 mm i.d., 14 mm length) of extruded {alpha}-Al2O3 foams were impregnated with aqueous solutions of Rh(NO3)3 to obtain 0.01, 0.05 and 0.1 wt.% loadings, as predicted by solution uptake. ICP-AES analyses showed that the actual Rh loadings probably were higher, 0.025, 0.077 and 0.169 wt.% respectively. One of the microchannel Fecralloy reactors and all Al2O3 foams were equipped with a channel to allow for temperature measurement inside the catalytic system. Temperature profiles obtained along the reactor axes show that the metallic microchannel reactor is able to minimize temperature gradients as compared to the alumina foams. At sufficiently high furnace temperature, the gas phase in front of the Rh/Al2O3/Frecralloy microchannel reactor and the 0.025 wt.% Rh/Al2O3 foams ignites. Gas phase ignition leads to lower syngas selectivity and higher selectivity to total oxidation products and hydrocarbon by-products. Before ignition of the gas phase the hydrogen selectivity is increased in OSR as compared to POX, the main contribution being the water-gas shift reaction. After gas phase ignition, increased formation of hydrocarbon by-products

  8. New Production Reactors Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part I of this New Production Reactors (NPR) Program Plan: describes the policy basis of the NPR Program; describes the mission and objectives of the NPR Program; identifies the requirements that must be met in order to achieve the mission and objectives; and describes and assesses the technology and siting options that were considered, the Program's preferred strategy, and its rationale. The implementation strategy for the New Production Reactors Program has three functions: Linking the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities to policies requirements, and the process for selecting options. The development of an implementation strategy ensures that activities and procedures are consistent with the rationale and analysis underlying the Program. Organization of the Program. The strategy establishes plans, organizational structure, procedures, a budget, and a schedule for carrying out the Program. By doing so, the strategy ensures the clear assignment of responsibility and accountability. Management and monitoring of the Program. Finally, the strategy provides a basis for monitoring the Program so that technological, cost, and scheduling issues can be addressed when they arise as the Program proceeds. Like the rest of the Program Plan, the Implementation Strategy is a living document and will be periodically revised to reflect both progress made in the Program and adjustments in plans and policies as they are made. 21 figs., 5 tabs

  9. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technology for cobalt-60 production in CANDU reactors, designed and developed by MDS Nordion and AECL, has been safely,economically and successfully employed in CANDU reactors with over 195 reactor years of production. Today over forty percent of the world's disposable medical supplies are made safer through sterilization using cobalt-60 sources from MDS Nordion. Over the past 40 years, MDS Nordion with its CANDU reactor owner partners, has safely and reliably shipped more than 500 million curies of cobalt-60 sources to customers around the world

  10. Safety issues at the defense production reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States produces plutonium and tritium for use in nuclear weapons at the defense production reactors endash the N Reactor in Washington and the Savannah River reactors in South Carolina. This report reaches general conclusions about the management of those reactors and highlights a number of safety and technical issues that should be resolved. The report provides an assessment of the safety management, safety review, and safety methodology employed by the Department of Energy and the private contractors who operate the reactors for the federal government. The report is necessarily based on a limited review of the defense production reactors. It does not address whether any of the reactors are ''safe,'' because such an analysis would involve a determination of acceptable risk endash a matter of obvious importance, but one that was beyond the purview of the committee. It also does not address whether the safety of the production reactors is comparable to that of commercial nuclear power stations, because even this narrower question extended beyond the charge to the committee and would have involved detailed analyses that the committee could not undertake

  11. Alternatives to proposed replacement production reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To insure adequate supplies of plutonium and tritium for defense purposes, an independent evaluation was made by Los Alamos National Laboratory of the numerous alternatives to the proposed replacement production reactors (RPR). This effort concentrated on the defense fuel cycle operation and its technical implications in identifying the principal alternatives for the 1990s. The primary options were identified as (1) existing commercial reactors, (2) existing and planned government-owned facilities (not now used for defense materials production), and (3) other RPRs (not yet proposed) such as CANDU or CANDU-type heavy-water reactors (HWR) for both plutonium and tritium production. The evaluation considered features and differences of various options that could influence choice of RPR alternatives. Barring a change in the US approach to civilian and defense fuel cycles and precluding existing commercial reactors at government-owned sites, the most significant alternatives were identified as a CANDU-type HWR at Savannah River Plant (SRP) site or the Three Mile Island commercial reactor with reprocessing capability at Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant and at SRP

  12. Reactors Save Energy, Costs for Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    While examining fuel-reforming technology for fuel cells onboard aircraft, Glenn Research Center partnered with Garrettsville, Ohio-based Catacel Corporation through the Glenn Alliance Technology Exchange program and a Space Act Agreement. Catacel developed a stackable structural reactor that is now employed for commercial hydrogen production and results in energy savings of about 20 percent.

  13. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are (a) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons, (b) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles, (c) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas, and (d) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising. (author)

  14. Medical Radioisotopes Production Without A Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Keur, H.

    2010-05-15

    This report is answering the key question: Is it possible to ban the use of research reactors for the production of medical radioisotopes? Chapter 2 offers a summarized overview on the history of nuclear medicine. Chapter 3 gives an overview of the basic principles and understandings of nuclear medicine. The production of radioisotopes and its use in radiopharmaceuticals as a tracer for imaging particular parts of the inside of the human body (diagnosis) or as an agent in radiotherapy. Chapter 4 lists the use of popular medical radioisotopes used in nuclear imaging techniques and radiotherapy. Chapter 5 analyses reactor-based radioisotopes that can be produced by particle accelerators on commercial scale, other alternatives and the advantages of the cyclotron. Chapter 6 gives an overview of recent developments and prospects in worldwide radioisotopes production. Chapter 7 presents discussion, conclusions and recommendations, and is answering the abovementioned key question of this report: Is it possible to ban the use of a nuclear reactor for the production of radiopharmaceuticals? Is a safe and secure production of radioisotopes possible?.

  15. Health physics aspects of activation products from fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the activation products from fusion reactors and their attendant impacts is discussed. This includes a discussion on their production, expected inventories, and the status of metabolic data on these products

  16. NPR (New Production Reactor) capacity cost evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1988-07-01

    The ORNL Cost Evaluation Technical Support Group (CETSG) has been assigned by DOE-HQ Defense Programs (DP) the task defining, obtaining, and evaluating the capital and life-cycle costs for each of the technology/proponent/site/revenue possibilities envisioned for the New Production Reactor (NPR). The first part of this exercise is largely one of accounting, since all NPR proponents use different accounting methodologies in preparing their costs. In order to address this problem of comparing ''apples and oranges,'' the proponent-provided costs must be partitioned into a framework suitable for all proponents and concepts. If this is done, major cost categories can then be compared between concepts and major cost differences identified. Since the technologies proposed for the NPR and its needed fuel and target support facilities vary considerably in level of technical and operational maturity, considerable care must be taken to evaluate the proponent-derived costs in an equitable manner. The use of cost-risk analysis along with derivation of single point or deterministic estimates allows one to take into account these very real differences in technical and operational maturity. Chapter 2 summarizes the results of this study in tabular and bar graph form. The remaining chapters discuss each generic reactor type as follows: Chapter 3, LWR concepts (SWR and WNP-1); Chapter 4, HWR concepts; Chapter 5, HTGR concept; and Chapter 6, LMR concept. Each of these chapters could be a stand-alone report. 39 refs., 36 figs., 115 tabs.

  17. Fishery management scenarios : Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The fishery resources at Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) have been managed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service since the early 1960's. Management activities included...

  18. Arsenal tour shows signs of life

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Newspaper article about the first public tour of wildlife habitat on the Rocky Mountain Arsenal Wildlife Refuge prior to refuge establishment.

  19. Badgers on the Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Nineteen badgers (Taxidea taxus) were captured on the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) using Woodstream Softcatch traps and live snares. This represents a minimum...

  20. Fission product decay heat for thermal reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickens, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    In the past five years there have been new experimental programs to measure decay heat (i.e., time dependent beta- plus gamma-ray energy release rates from the decay of fission products) following thermal-neutron fission of /sup 235/U, /sup 239/Pu, and /sup 241/Pu for times after fission between 1 and approx. 10/sup 5/ sec. Experimental results from the ORNL program stress the very short times following fission, particularly in the first few hundred sec. Complementing the experimental effort, computer codes have been developed for the computation of decay heat by summation of calculated individual energies released by each one of the fission products. By suitably combining the results of the summation calculations with the recent experimental results, a new Decay Heat Standard has been developed for application to safety analysis of operations of light water reactors. The new standard indicates somewhat smaller energy release rates than those being used at present, and the overall uncertainties assigned to the new standard are much smaller than those being used at present.

  1. Mo-99 production on a LEU solution reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pilot homogenous reactor utilizing LEU has been developed by the Kurchatov Institute in Moscow along with their commercial partner TCI Medical. This solution reactor operates at levels up to 50 kilowatts and has successfully produced high quality Mo-99 and Sr-89. Radiochemical extraction of medical radionuclides from the reactor solution is performed by passing the solution across a series of inorganic sorbents. This reactor has commercial potential for medical radionuclide production using LEU UO2SO4 fuel. Additional development work is needed to optimize multiple 50 kilowatt cores while at the same time, optimizing production efficiency and capital expenditure. (author)

  2. Consequences of reactor fuel damage: - Production of radioactive wastes. - Radioactivity in the reactor cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the consequences of damage of reactor fuel cladding. The types of damage and the release of fission products into the reactor cooling system are described as well as detection methods. The report also gives suggestions to reduce the consequences of a damage. (62 figs., 13 tabs.)

  3. Technical Research for Dedicated Isotope Production Reactor of South Africa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU; Yao; LIU; Xing-min; CHEN; Hui-qiang; SUN; Zhen; WU; Yuan-yuan

    2012-01-01

    <正>Research reactor plays an important part in nuclear science and technology, application and power development. Currently, many countries in Middle East and Africa are ready to develop their own nuclear industry. South Africa sent its User Requirements Specification (URS) for a dedicated isotope production reactor to several institutes or companies, among of which Department of Reactor Engineering Research and Design (DRERD) in China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) is a competitive candidate.

  4. Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schenter, R.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-11-01

    The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted.

  5. Arsenal Workers During World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1945-01-01

    During World War II, Arsenal workers from Huntsville, Alabama. and surrounding areas responded to the call for civilian defense workers. This February 20, 1945 photo shows workers filling colored smoke grenades that were used for signaling. (Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public Library)

  6. Hydrogen production by water dissociation from a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This memento presents the production of hydrogen by water decomposition, the energy needed for the electrolysis, the thermochemical cycles for a decomposition at low temperature and the possible nuclear reactors associated. (A.L.B.)

  7. Method of producing gaseous products using a downflow reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortright, Randy D; Rozmiarek, Robert T; Hornemann, Charles C

    2014-09-16

    Reactor systems and methods are provided for the catalytic conversion of liquid feedstocks to synthesis gases and other noncondensable gaseous products. The reactor systems include a heat exchange reactor configured to allow the liquid feedstock and gas product to flow concurrently in a downflow direction. The reactor systems and methods are particularly useful for producing hydrogen and light hydrocarbons from biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons using aqueous phase reforming. The generated gases may find used as a fuel source for energy generation via PEM fuel cells, solid-oxide fuel cells, internal combustion engines, or gas turbine gensets, or used in other chemical processes to produce additional products. The gaseous products may also be collected for later use or distribution.

  8. A 5 MW TRIGA reactor design for radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production and preparation of commercial-scale quantities of radioisotopes has become an important activity as their medical and industrial applications continue to expand. There are currently various large multipurpose research reactors capable of producing ample quantities of radioisotopes. These facilities, however, have many competing demands placed upon them by a wide variety of researchers and scientific programs which severely limit their radioisotope production capability. A demonstrated need has developed for a simpler reactor facility dedicated to the production of radioisotopes on a commercial basis. This smaller, dedicated reactor could provide continuous fission and activation product radioisotopes to meet commercial requirements for the foreseeable future. The design of a 5 MW TRIGA reactor facility, upgradeable to 10 MW, dedicated to the production of industrial and medical radioisotopes is discussed. A TRIGA reactor designed specifically for this purpose with its demonstrated long core life and simplicity of operation would translate into increased radioisotope production. As an example, a single TRIGA could supply the entire US needs for Mo-99. The facility is based on the experience gained by General Atomics in the design, installation, and construction of over 60 other TRIGAs over the past 35 years. The unique uranium-zirconium hydride fuel makes TRIGA reactors inexpensive to build and operate, reliable in their simplicity, highly flexible due to unique passive safety, and environmentally friendly because of minimal power requirements and long-lived fuel. (author)

  9. Design of Continuous Reactor Systems for API Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Jønch

    lifecycle of the API and GMP can make a potential reactor setup non-feasible. If the pharmaceutical industry is to adapt to recent trends towards end-to-end and on-demand pharmaceutical production, access to standard reactor units for commonly-used chemical transformations and methods for timely decision...... in continuous reactor setups. Grignard chemistry encompasses a very powerful reaction type frequently applied in the pharmaceutical industry, for the formation of new carbon-carbon bonds. Three Grignard addition reactions have been studied, all having very different behaviors related to aspects of reaction......-scale production equipment enabled complete replacement of the existing batch production of this intermediate. The crowning achievement in this work was the realization of continuous laboratory reactor setups capable of manufacturing the entire GMP portion of the synthesis of melitracen HCl at H. Lundbeck A...

  10. Use of tower reactors for continuous ethanol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Viegas

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to develop a continuous fermentation system operating with a tower reactor using some flocculent yeast strains isolated from an industrial process. The strain was an used in the trial of the proposed system, composed of two serial glass tower reactor. The effects of the following variables were studied on the yield and productivity of the system: total reducing sugar (TRS, concentration in feeding, recycle flow in the second reactor, residence time and diameter/height ratio of the reactors. It was observed that the TRS concentration in feeding and residence time is the variables that interfere most with the productivity of the system. Yield was not affected by any of the variables within the range of values studied. All trials were performed according to a factorial experimental design (making up a total of 19 trials and the results were evaluated by response surface.

  11. Device for reducing radioactive corrosion product in FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns an FBR type reactor using liquid metal as coolants, connecting the reactor core with a heat exchanger by way of cooling system pipeways and recycling the coolant by the driving force of a pump. A bypass circuit is disposed to a portion of a cooling system, and a vessel inserted with fillers is disposed to a portion of the bypass circuit. The coolants are prepared with the same material as that for the reactor core constituent material. The filler suffered from corrosion with sodium coolants and to increase the concentration of the corrosion products in sodium. This suppresses the corrosion of nuclear fuel cans in the reactor core. Accordingly, leaching of radioactive corrosion products such as Mn or Co caused by the reduction in the wall thickness of the fuel can can be suppressed. (I.J.)

  12. Initial prediction of dust production in pebble bed reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rostamian

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the computational simulation of contact zones between pebbles in a pebble bed reactor. In this type of reactor, the potential for graphite dust generation from frictional contact of graphite pebbles and the subsequent transport of dust and fission products can cause significant safety issues at very high temperatures around 900 °C in HTRs. The present simulation is an initial attempt to quantify the amount of nuclear grade graphite dust produced within a very high temperature reactor.

  13. Preliminary design of the Delft Isotope Production Reactor (DIPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The abundant and strongly growing use of Technetium-99m in medical diagnostics depends on just a few producers and processors of Molybdenum-99 world-wide, making the molybdenum supply chain very sensitive to interruptions. New production routes are needed, especially be-cause some of the reactors used for the production of this isotope will soon reach the end of their economic lifetime. In this paper a preliminary design of a special purpose isotope production reactor, named DIPR, is presented, which could produce about 8% of the world-wide demand. The reactor design is based on aqueous homogeneous reactors studied in the past and has been evaluated using coupled neutronics and CFD calculations. Both steady state and transient analyses have been carried out, showing the mild behavior of the reactor in various situations. The consequences of an operation error leading to an increase of the uranium concentration in the fuel solution has to be investigated in greater detail, taking into account a more complete physics model. Until now, no show stopper has been identified and the DIPR seems a promising reactor for securing the isotope supply chain. (author)

  14. Syngas production via methane steam reforming with oxygen: plasma reactors versus chemical reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steam reforming with oxygen (SRO) is a combination of non-catalytic partial oxidation and steam reforming of methane, industrially used for syngas production. There are several models of the chemical reactors used for this purpose but in the last decade a new direction has developed - plasma devices. The aim of the present paper is to make a comparative analysis between the autothermal reformers, including their improved variants, and the plasma reactors. The study is conceived in terms of advantages and disadvantages coming from the exploitation parameters, methane conversion, selectivity, energy efficiency and investment costs. Although SRO by means of chemical reactors may be the most efficient, plasma reactors represent an incisive approach by their simplicity, compactness and low price. (author)

  15. High temperature fast reactor for hydrogen production in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main nuclear reactors technology for the Generation IV, on development phase for utilization after 2030, is the fast reactor type with high temperature output to improve the efficiency of the thermo-electric conversion process and to enable applications of the generated heat in industrial process. Currently, water electrolysis and thermo chemical cycles using very high temperature are studied for large scale and long-term hydrogen production, in the future. With the possible oil scarcity and price rise, and the global warming, this application can play an important role in the changes of the world energy matrix. In this context, it is proposed a fast reactor with very high output temperature, ∼ 1000 deg C. This reactor will have a closed fuel cycle; it will be cooled by lead and loaded with nitride fuel. This reactor may be used for hydrogen, heat and electricity production in Brazil. It is discussed a development strategy of the necessary technologies and some important problems are commented. The proposed concept presents characteristics that meet the requirements of the Generation IV reactor class. (author)

  16. Fission product chemistry in severe nuclear reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A specialist's meeting was held at JRC-Ispra from 15 to 17 January 1990 to review the current understanding of fission-product chemistry during severe accidents in light water reactors. Discussions focussed on the important chemical phenomena that could occur across the wide range of conditions of a damaged nuclear plant. Recommendations for future chemistry work were made covering the following areas: (a) fuel degradation and fission-product release, (b) transport and attenuation processes in the reactor coolant system, (c) containment chemistry (iodine behaviour and core-concrete interactions)

  17. Current utilization of research reactor on radioisotopes production in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yishu [Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu (China)

    2000-10-01

    The main technical parameters of the four research reactors and their current utilization status in radioisotope manufacture and labeling compounds preparation are described. The radioisotopes, such as Co-60 sealed source, Ir-192 sealed source, {gamma}-knife source, I-131, I-125, Sm-153, P-32 series products, In-113m generator, Tc-99m gel generator, Re-188 gel generator, C-14, Ba-131, Sr-89, {sup 90}Y, etc., and their labeling compounds prepared from the reactor produced radionuclides, such as I-131-MIBG, I-131-Hippure, I-131-capsul, Sm-153-EDTMP, Re-186-HEDP, Re-186-HA, C-14-urea, and radioimmunoassay kits etc. are presented as well. Future development plan of radioisotopes and labeling compounds in China is also given. Simultaneously, the possibility and methods of bilateral or multilateral co-operation in utilization of research reactor, personnel and technology exchange of radioisotope production and labeling compounds is also discussed. (author)

  18. NOVEL REACTOR FOR THE PRODUCTION OF SYNTHESIS GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilis Papavassiliou; Leo Bonnell; Dion Vlachos

    2004-12-01

    Praxair investigated an advanced technology for producing synthesis gas from natural gas and oxygen This production process combined the use of a short-reaction time catalyst with Praxair's gas mixing technology to provide a novel reactor system. The program achieved all of the milestones contained in the development plan for Phase I. We were able to develop a reactor configuration that was able to operate at high pressures (up to 19atm). This new reactor technology was used as the basis for a new process for the conversion of natural gas to liquid products (Gas to Liquids or GTL). Economic analysis indicated that the new process could provide a 8-10% cost advantage over conventional technology. The economic prediction although favorable was not encouraging enough for a high risk program like this. Praxair decided to terminate development.

  19. Coolant radiologic gas production in SP-100 class reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coolant radiologic helium gas production rates were calculated for an SP-100 type reactor using the discrete ordinates code TWODANT. Neutron cross sections were developed from ENDF/B-V data via the MATXS6s master cross section library. Calculations were performed using an S4/P1 approximation and 80 neutron energy groups. Results indicate that the primary helium production reactions in a reactor utilizing 0.1 at. pct Li-6 coolant are (Li-7)(n, n-prime t) (82 percent) followed by (Li-6)(n,t) (16 percent), and (Li-7)(n,gamma) (1 percent). A reactor operating at 2.5 MWt for 7.3 years using 0.1 at. pct Li-6 coolant is predicted to produce approximately 0.16 moles of helium gas in the coolant. For a reactor using natural lithium coolant, gas production is increased to 1.4 moles. A parametric study was conducted which enabled the development of an empirical correlation to predict helium production as a function of coolant Li-6 at. pct and void fraction. 9 refs

  20. distribution of Release Fission Products Through the Nuclear Reactor Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through the operation of nuclear reactors, radioactive fission products could be release to the environment as a result of severe accidents e.g. Chernobyl accident. Estimation of the atmospheric dispersion, distribution and transport of the radioactive fission products is essential to assessment of the risk to the public from such accidents. In this work, the polluted plume is treated as a matrix of isolated particles.These particles are the fission product isotopes, which compose the radioactive plume.The fission products were classified depending on its half live into three category, long-lived, medium lived and small half-life.The normalized concentrations of the fission product isotopes in the radioactive plume were calculated.The travel time (the time elapsed from the released instant till the deposited time) of each fission products was calculated. The area around the nuclear reactor stack was divided into different zones, started from the reactor stack position until 5 km.The deposited radioactive fission products in each zone was estimated.The calculations were done using the spherical Gaussian plume model

  1. A microBio reactor for hydrogen production.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volponi, Joanne V.; Walker, Andrew William

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore the potential of developing a microfluidic reactor capable of enzymatically converting glucose and other carbohydrates to hydrogen. This aggressive project was motivated by work in enzymatic hydrogen production done by Woodward et al. at OWL. The work reported here demonstrated that hydrogen could be produced from the enzymatic oxidation of glucose. Attempts at immobilizing the enzymes resulted in reduced hydrogen production rates, probably due to buffer compatibility issues. A novel in-line sensor was also developed to monitor hydrogen production in real time at levels below 1 ppm. Finally, a theoretical design for the microfluidic reactor was developed but never produced due to the low production rates of hydrogen from the immobilized enzymes. However, this work demonstrated the potential of mimicking biological systems to create energy on the microscale.

  2. Mercury audit at Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.M.; Jensen, M.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Anderson, G.M. [Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Denver, CO (United States)

    1994-02-01

    This report presents the results of an environmental compliance audit to identify potential mercury-containing equipment in 261 building and 197 tanks at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA). The RMA, located near Denver, Colorado, is undergoing clean up and decommissioning by the Department of the Army. Part of the decommissioning procedure is to ensure that all hazardous wastes are properly identified and disposed of. The purpose of the audit was to identify any mercury spills and mercury-containing instrumentation. The audit were conducted from April 7, 1992, through July 16, 1992, by a two-person team. The team interviewed personnel with knowledge of past uses of the buildings and tanks. Information concerning past mercury spills and the locations and types of instrumentation that contain mercury proved to be invaluable for an accurate survey of the arsenal. The team used a Jerome{reg_sign} 431-X{trademark} Mercury Vapor Analyzer to detect spills and confirm locations of mercury vapor. Twelve detections were recorded during the audit and varied from visible mercury spills to slightly elevated readings in the corners of rooms with past spills. The audit also identified instrumentation that contained mercury. All data have been incorporated into a computerized data base that is compatible with the RMA data base.

  3. Hybrid reactors: nuclear breeding or energy production?

    OpenAIRE

    Piera, Mireia; Lafuente Mazuecos, Antonio; Abánades Velasco, Alberto; Martínez-Val Peñalosa, Jose Maria

    2010-01-01

    After reviewing the long-standing tradition on hybrid research, an assessment model is presented in order to characterize the hybrid performance under different objectives. In hybrids, neutron multiplication in the subcritical blanket plays a major role, not only for energy production and nuclear breeding, but also for tritium breeding, which is fundamental requirement in fusion–fission hybrids. All three objectives are better achieved with high values of the neutron multiplication factor (k-...

  4. Outlook on radioisotope production at TRIGA SSR 14 MW reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INR Pitesti, endowed with a research nuclear reactor of TRIGA SSR 14 MW type, has developed activities of radioisotope production, being at present licensed for production and selling Ir-192 sources for industrial gamma radiography and Co-60 sources (2,000 Ci) for medical uses (cobalto therapy). A collaboration was initiated with the CPR Department of IFIN-HH Bucharest, particularly after the WWR-S reactor shutdown on December 21, 1997. In the frame of this program the INR Pitesti offers services of raw material irradiations followed by the radioisotope production performed subsequently at the Radioisotope Production Department (CPR) of IFIN-HH Bucharest which also deals with selling the product on internal market . The experimental facilities with the two TRIGA reactors (TRIGA SSR 14 MW and TRIGA ACPR) of INR Pitesti are described. The maximum neutron flux is 2.9 · 1014 n/cm2s. The irradiation channels are of two neutron spectra types. Also the neutron flux is characterized by radial and axial distribution which are taken into account when a given raw material is to be irradiated, to avoid perturbing non-homogeneities in the raw material activation. Five irradiation devices are presented. Preparations are currently under way for production of fission radioisotopes Mo-99, I-131 and Xe-133 and activation radioisotope I-125 for medical application

  5. Fuel performance and fission product behaviour in gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Validation of Predictive Methods for Fuel and Fission Product Behaviour was organized within the frame of the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors. This International Working Group serves as a forum for exchange of information on national programmes, provides advice to the IAEA on international co-operative activities in advanced technologies of gas cooled reactors (GCRs), and supports the conduct of these activities. The objectives of this CRP were to review and document the status of the experimental data base and of the predictive methods for GCR fuel performance and fission product behaviour; and to verify and validate methodologies for the prediction of fuel performance and fission product transport

  6. Un proyecto de arsenal para la Barceloneta (1743 / An Arsenal Project in La Barceloneta (1743

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo de la Fuente de Pablo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available En 1743 el ingeniero militar Miguel Marín diseñó un arsenal naval en Barcelona. En este artículo se estudia el contexto inmediato de este proyecto. Primeramente, la voluntad de trasladar la principal base naval mediterránea de Cartagena a la capital catalana. En segundo lugar, la relación centro-periferia y el papel del lobby catalán dentro del proceso.In 1743 Miguel Marín, a military engineer, designed the marine arsenal in Barcelona. In this paper, we study the background of this project. Firstly, the willingness to move the Mediterranean base of the Spanish Navy from Cartagena to the capital of Catalonia. Secondly, the centre-periphery relationship and the role of Catalan lobby in this process.

  7. Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  8. Research reactor production of radioisotopes for medical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 70% of all radioisotopes applied in medical diagnosis and research are currently produced in research reactors. Research reactors are also an important source of certain radioisotopes, such as 60Co, 90Y, 137Cs and 198Au, which are employed in teletherapy and brachytherapy. For regular medical applications, mainly 29 radionuclides produced in research reactors are used. These are now produced on an 'industrial scale' by many leading commercial manufacturers in industrialized countries as well as by national atomic energy establishments in developing countries. Five main neutron-induced reactions have been employed for the regular production of these radionuclides, namely: (n,γ), (n,p), (n,α), (n,γ) followed by decay, and (n, fission). In addition, the Szilard-Chalmers process has been used in low- and medium-flux research reactors to enrich the specific activity of a few radionuclides (mainly 51Cr) produced by the (n,γ) reaction. Extensive work done over the last three decades has resulted in the development of reliable and economic large-scale production methods for most of these radioisotopes and in the establishment of rigorous specifications and purity criteria for their manifold applications in medicine. A useful spectrum of other radionuclides with suitable half-lives and low to medium toxicity can be produced in research reactors, with the requisite purity and specific activity and at a reasonable cost, to be used as tracers. Thanks to the systematic work done in recent years by many radiopharmaceutical scientists, the radionuclides of several elements, such as arsenic, selenium, rhenium, ruthenium, palladium, cadmium, tellurium, antimony, platinum, lead and the rare earth elements, which until recently were considered 'exotic' in the biomedical field, are now gaining attention. (author)

  9. Hydrogen production using high temperature nuclear reactors : A feasibility study

    OpenAIRE

    Sivertsson, Viktor

    2010-01-01

    The use of hydrogen is predicted to increase substantially in the future, both as chemical feedstock and also as energy carrier for transportation. The annual world production of hydrogen amounts to some 50 million tonnes and the majority is produced using fossil fuels like natural gas, coal and naphtha. High temperature nuclear reactors (HTRs) represent a novel way to produce hydrogen at large scale with high efficiency and less carbon footprint. The aim of this master thesis has been to eva...

  10. Minimizing the Entropy Production of the Methanol Producing Reaction in a Methanol Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Kjelstrup, Signe; Bedeaux, Dick; Johannessen, Eivind; Rosjorde, Audun; Nummedal, Lars

    2000-01-01

    The entropy production of the reaction that produces methanol in a methanol reactor, has been minimized. The results show that the entropy production of the reaction can be reduced by more than 70%. The optimal path through the reactor is characterized by a driving force for the chemical reaction that is close to constant. The entropy production due to heat transfer across the reactor walls in this state is large, however. Variations of the reactor design show that it is possible to accomplis...

  11. Thermoradiation treatment of sewage sludge using reactor waste fission products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, M. C.; Hagengruber, R. L.; Zuppero, A. C.

    1974-06-01

    The hazards to public health associated with the application of municipal sewage sludge to land usage are reviewed to establish the need for disinfection of sludge prior to its distribution as a fertilizer, especially in the production of food and fodder. The use of ionizing radiation in conjunction with mild heating is shown to be an effective disinfection treatment and an economical one when reactor waste fission products are utilized. A program for researching and experimental demonstration of the process on sludges is also outlined.

  12. Thermoradiation treatment of sewage sludge using reactor waste fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hazards to public health associated with the application of municipal sewage sludge to land usage are reviewed to establish the need for disinfection of sludge prior to its distribution as a fertilizer, especially in the production of food and fodder. The use of ionizing radiation in conjunction with mild heating is shown to be an effective disinfection treatment and an economical one when reactor waste fission products are utilized. A program for researching and experimental demonstration of the process on sludges is also outlined

  13. Radioisotope Production Plan and Strategy of Kijang Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kye Hong; Lee, Jun Sig [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    This reactor will be located at Kijang, Busan, Korea and be dedicated to produce mainly medical radioisotopes. Tc-99m is very important isotope for diagnosis and more than 80% of radiation diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine depend on this isotope. There were, however, several times of insecure production of Mo-99 due to the shutdown of major production reactors worldwide. OECD/NEA is leading member countries to resolve the shortage of this isotope and trying to secure the international market of Mo-99. The radioisotope plan and strategy of Kijang Research Reactor (KJRR) should be carefully established to fit not only the domestic but also international demand on Mo-99. The implementation strategy of 6 principles of HLG-MR should be established that is appropriate to national environments. Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning and Ministry of Health and welfare should cooperate well to organize the national radioisotope supply structure, to set up the reasonable and competitive pricing of radioisotopes, and to cope with the international supply strategy.

  14. Computational prediction of dust production in pebble bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Finite element analysis of frictional contact. ► Plasticity taken into account for nuclear graphite at room temperature. ► Prediction of order of magnitude for dust loading in PBRs. ► Archard wear model for wear mass calculations. - Abstract: This paper describes the computational modeling and simulation of graphite pebbles in frictional contacts as anticipated in a pebble bed reactor. For the high temperature gas-cooled reactor, the potential dust generation from frictional contact at the surface of pebbles and the subsequent lift-off and transport of dust and absorbed fission products are of safety concern at elevated temperatures under an air ingress accident. The aim of this work is to perform a computational study to estimate the quantity of the nuclear grade graphite dust produces from a typical anticipated configuration.

  15. Productivity of a nuclear chemical reactor with gamma radioisotopic sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to an established mathematical model of successive Compton interaction processes the made calculations for major distances are extended checking the acceptability of the spheric geometry model for the experimental data for radioisotopic sources of Co-60 and Cs-137. Parameters such as the increasing factor and the absorbed dose served as comparative base. calculations for the case of a punctual source succession inside a determined volume cylinder are made to obtain the total dose, the deposited energy by each photons energetic group and the total absorbed energy inside the reactor. Varying adequately the height/radius relation for different cylinders, the distinct energy depositions are compared in each one of them once a time standardized toward a standard value of energy emitted by the reactor volume. A relation between the quantity of deposited energy in each point of the reactor and the conversion values of chemical species is established. They are induced by electromagnetic radiation and that are reported as ''G'' in the scientific literature (number of molecules formed or disappeared by each 100 e.v. of energy). Once obtained the molecular performance inside the reactor for each type of geometry, it is optimized the height/radius relation according to the maximum production of molecules by unity of time. It is completed a bibliographical review of ''G'' values reported by different types of aqueous solutions with the purpose to determine the maximum performance of molecular hydrogen as a function of pH of the solution and of the used type of solute among other factors. Calculations for the ethyl bromide production as an example of one of the industrial processes which actually work using the gamma radiation as reactions inductor are realized. (Author)

  16. Hydrogen production from fusion reactors coupled with high temperature electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and complement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Processes which may be considered for this purpose include electrolysis, thermochemical decomposition or thermochemical-electrochemical hybrid cycles. Preliminary studies at Brookhaven indicate that high temperature electrolysis has the highest potential efficiency for production of hydrogen from fusion. Depending on design electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60 percent and hydrogen production efficiencies of approximately 50 to 70 percent are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets

  17. China's nuclear arsenal and missile defence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last few years, major focus of the nuclear debate has been turned towards the United States' proposal to erect a National Missile Defence (NMD) shield for itself. Of the existing nuclear weapon powers, China has been the most vociferous critic of this proposal. As and when this shield does become a reality, China will be the first to lose credibility as a deterrent against USA's existing nuclear arsenal. Therefore taking countermeasures against such a proposal is quite natural. China's approach towards non-proliferation mechanisms is steeped in realpolitik and its ability to manoeuvre them in its favour as a P5 and N5 power. Further, the Chinese leadership have been clear about the capabilities and limitations of nuclear weapons and treated them as diplomatic and political tools. The underlying aim is to preserve China's status as a dominant player in the international system while checkmating other possible challengers. Such a pragmatic approach is of far-reaching significance to all nations, especially those that possess nuclear weapons themselves. It will also be in India's long-term strategic interest to assess and take necessary corrective measures in its national security strategy, and make the composition of Indian nuclear strategy meet the desired goal. (author)

  18. Products and Services of Research Reactor ETRR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority (EAEA) owns a new material testing research reactor (MTR) called ETRR-2. This reactor was commissioned in 1997 and is a swimming pool type using plate type Fuel elements with 20% enrichment. It is cooled and moderated by light water and uses beryllium as a reflector. Its maximum thermal power is 22 MW, with maximum thermal neutron flux of 2.7×l014 cm-2s-1 and can be operated up to one cycle, around 18 days, for the high fluence necessary for applying long irradiations for peaceful utilization and a wide range of applications. The reactor is a multipurpose utilization, containing different facilities for applying neutron activation analysis (NAA), radioisotope production (e.g., Ir-131, Co-60, P-32, Mo-99, etc.), neutron transmutation doping (NTD) of silicon ingots of 12.5 cm diameter and 30 cm in length, neutron radiography education for university students, research for scientists, and training for new operators. (author)

  19. Westinghouse independent safety review of Savannah River production reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation has performed a safety assessment of the Savannah River production reactors (K, L, and P) as requested by the US Department of Energy. This assessment was performed between November 1, 1988, and April 1, 1989, under the transition contract for the Westinghouse Savannah River Company's preparations to succeed E.I. du Pont de Nemours ampersand Company as the US Department of Energy contractor for the Savannah River Project. The reviewers were drawn from several Westinghouse nuclear energy organizations, embody a combination of commercial and government reactor experience, and have backgrounds covering the range of technologies relevant to assessing nuclear safety. The report presents the rationale from which the overall judgment was drawn and the basis for the committee's opinion on the phased restart strategy proposed by E.I. du Pont de Nemours ampersand Company, Westinghouse, and the US Department of Energy-Savannah River. The committee concluded that it could recommend restart of one reactor at partial power upon completion of a list of recommended upgrades both to systems and their supporting analyses and after demonstration that the organization had assimilated the massive changes it will have undergone. 37 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  20. Westinghouse independent safety review of Savannah River production reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, W.D.; McShane, W.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Liparulo, N.J.; McAdoo, J.D.; Strawbridge, L.E. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Nuclear and Advanced Technology Div.); Toto, G. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Nuclear Services Div.); Fauske, H.K. (Fauske and Associates, Inc., Burr Ridge, IL (USA)); Call, D.W. (Westinghouse Savannah R

    1989-04-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation has performed a safety assessment of the Savannah River production reactors (K,L, and P) as requested by the US Department of Energy. This assessment was performed between November 1, 1988, and April 1, 1989, under the transition contract for the Westinghouse Savannah River Company's preparations to succeed E.I. du Pont de Nemours Company as the US Department of Energy contractor for the Savannah River Project. The reviewers were drawn from several Westinghouse nuclear energy organizations, embody a combination of commercial and government reactor experience, and have backgrounds covering the range of technologies relevant to assessing nuclear safety. The report presents the rationale from which the overall judgment was drawn and the basis for the committee's opinion on the phased restart strategy proposed by E.I. du Pont de Nemours Company, Westinghouse, and the US Department of Energy-Savannah River. The committee concluded that it could recommend restart of one reactor at partial power upon completion of a list of recommended upgrades both to systems and their supporting analyses and after demonstration that the organization had assimilated the massive changes it will have undergone.

  1. Application of controlled thermonuclear reactor fusion energy for food production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Food and energy shortages in many parts of the world in the past two years raise an immediate need for the evaluation of energy input in food production. The present paper investigates systematically (1) the energy requirement for food production, and (2) the provision of controlled thermonuclear fusion energy for major energy intensive sectors of food manufacturing. Among all the items of energy input to the ''food industry,'' fertilizers, water for irrigation, food processing industries, such as beet sugar refinery and dough making and single cell protein manufacturing, have been chosen for study in detail. A controlled thermonuclear power reactor was used to provide electrical and thermal energy for all these processes. Conceptual design of the application of controlled thermonuclear power, water and air for methanol and ammonia synthesis and single cell protein production is presented. Economic analysis shows that these processes can be competitive. (auth)

  2. Bison Tissue Contaminant Study - Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — There is a well-documented history of disturbance and contamination from previous activities on the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge. In April 2013,...

  3. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge : Restoration Site Histories

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This project contains a collection of restoration site histories for the cleanup restoration at Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge. This project...

  4. Aquatic management plan : [Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The aquatic management plan for Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) provides management direction and guidance to ensure the conservation of...

  5. [Summer work study report for Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Report on research and observations at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal for the summer of 1982.This report is divided into 8 major sections or individual logs. The first...

  6. Rocky Mountain Arsenal is showing off its wildlife

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Newspaper article on the first tours of wildlife habitat at Rocky Mountain Arsenal prior to refuge establishment. Tours are sponsored by the Denver Audubon Society.

  7. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Habitat Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Habitat Management Plan identifies important wildlife resources on the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge and the management strategies that will...

  8. Reactor design for minimizing product inhibition during enzymatic lignocellulose hydrolysis II. Quantification of inhibition and suitability of membrane reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andric, Pavle; Meyer, Anne S.; Jensen, Peter Arendt;

    2010-01-01

    ideal reactor types, i.e. batch, continuous stirred, and plug-flow, is illustrated quantitatively by modeling different extents of cellulose conversion at different reaction conditions. The main operational challenges of membrane reactors for lignocellulose conversion are highlighted. Key membrane...... of the available literature data for glucose removal by membranes and for cellulose enzyme stability in membrane reactors are given. The treatise clearly shows that membrane reactors allowing continuous, complete, glucose removal during enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis, can provide for both higher cellulose...... hydrolysis rates and higher enzyme usage efficiency (kg(product/)kg(enzyme)). Current membrane reactor designs are however not feasible for large scale operations. The report emphasizes that the industrial realization of cellulosic ethanol requires more focus on the operational feasibility within...

  9. Analysis of tritium production in TRIGA Mark II reactor at JSI for the needs of fusion research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jazbec, Anze; Zerovnik, Gasper; Snoj, Luka; Trkov, Andrej [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-12-15

    In future, electricity could be produced in fusion power plants. One of the steps towards development of fusion power plants is the construction of an experimental fusion reactor ITER where deuterium (D) and tritium (T) will be fused and energy will be released. As natural concentrations of T are extremely low, the T as fusion fuel will have to be produced artificially. A series of calculations were made to investigate the possibility of producing small quantities of T for experimental fusion reactors such as JET and ITER in a small research reactor like the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI). The T production is the largest if all irradiation channels in reactor's reflector are filled with LiAlO{sub 2} samples. When samples are inserted, the excess reactivity decreases by around 200 pcm. In the second part of the work an estimate was made of how long the reactor can operate with current fuel supplies. Calculations were made with the TRIGLAV computer code. TRIGA can operate at full power for at least 2,860 days, during which 152 mg of T could be produced. We conclude that small TRIGA reactors can not produce any significant quantities of T for the needs of the future experimental fusion reactors. (orig.)

  10. Analysis of tritium production in TRIGA Mark II reactor at JSI for the needs of fusion research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In future, electricity could be produced in fusion power plants. One of the steps towards development of fusion power plants is the construction of an experimental fusion reactor ITER where deuterium (D) and tritium (T) will be fused and energy will be released. As natural concentrations of T are extremely low, the T as fusion fuel will have to be produced artificially. A series of calculations were made to investigate the possibility of producing small quantities of T for experimental fusion reactors such as JET and ITER in a small research reactor like the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI). The T production is the largest if all irradiation channels in reactor's reflector are filled with LiAlO2 samples. When samples are inserted, the excess reactivity decreases by around 200 pcm. In the second part of the work an estimate was made of how long the reactor can operate with current fuel supplies. Calculations were made with the TRIGLAV computer code. TRIGA can operate at full power for at least 2,860 days, during which 152 mg of T could be produced. We conclude that small TRIGA reactors can not produce any significant quantities of T for the needs of the future experimental fusion reactors. (orig.)

  11. Irradiation Scheme Design of 14C Production on 49-2 Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Zheng; LIU; Xing-min; XU; Zhi-long; ZHANG; Ya-dong

    2012-01-01

    <正>14C is a radioisotope of carbon, it is widely used in pharmacy, medical treatment, agriculture, reconnoiter and archaeology. 49-2 research reactor is a swimming pool style reactor which has operated for more than 40 years. The application of 49-2 reactor includes the radio nuclides production. Therefore, the technical scheme on 14C irradiation in 49-2 reactor should be prepared elaborately.

  12. Methane impurity production in the fusion reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion requires temperatures of the order of 108 degrees C. In order to attain the required temperature it will be essential to minimise the energy losses from the plasma. Impurities are a major cause of plasma cooling. Ionization of impurity species in the plasma leads to a subsequent decay and emission of radiation. The most common low Z contaminants to be consideed are water and methane produced by reaction of hydrogen isotopes with oxygen and carbon. This review focuses on the methane production problem. We will be concerned with the sources of carbon in the reactor and also with the reactivity of carbon with hydrogen molecules, atoms and ions and the synergistic effects which can arise from coincident fluxes of electrons and photons and the effects of radiation-induced damage of the materials involved. While the reactor first wall will provide the most hostile environment for methane producton, most of the reactions discussed can occur in breeder blankets and also in other tritium facilities such as fuel handling, purification and storage facilities

  13. Bio-hydrogen production from molasses by anaerobic fermentation in continuous stirred tank reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei; Li, Yong-feng; Chen, Hong; Deng, Jie-xuan; Yang, Chuan-ping

    2010-11-01

    A study of bio-hydrogen production was performed in a continuous flow anaerobic fermentation reactor (with an available volume of 5.4 L). The continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) for bio-hydrogen production was operated under the organic loading rates (OLR) of 8-32 kg COD/m3 reactor/d (COD: chemical oxygen demand) with molasses as the substrate. The maximum hydrogen production yield of 8.19 L/d was obtained in the reactor with the OLR increased from 8 kg COD/m3 reactor/d to 24 kg COD/m3 d. However, the hydrogen production and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) drastically decreased at an OLR of 32 kg COD/m3 reactor/d. Ethanoi, acetic, butyric and propionic were the main liquid fermentation products with the percentages of 31%, 24%, 20% and 18%, which formed the mixed-type fermentation.

  14. Biohydrogen production from tequila vinasses using a fixed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrón, Germán; Prato-Garcia, Dorian; Zhang, Axue

    2014-01-01

    In Mexico, the industrial production of tequila leads to the discharge of more than 31.2 million of m(3) of vinasse, which causes serious environmental issues because of its acidity, high organic load and the presence of recalcitrant compounds. The aim of this research was to study the feasibility of a fixed bed reactor for the production of biohydrogen by using tequila vinasse as substrate. The experiments were carried out in a continuous mode under mesophilic and acidic conditions. The maximum hydrogen yield and hydrogen production rate were 1.3 mol H2 mol/mol glucose and 72 ± 9 mL H2/(Lreactor h), respectively. Biogas consisted of carbon dioxide (36%) and hydrogen (64%); moreover methane was not observed. The electron-equivalent mass balance fitted satisfactorily (sink of electrons from 0.8 to 7.6%). For vinasses, hydrogen production accounted for 10.9% of the total available electron-equivalents. In the liquid phase, the principal metabolites identified were acetic, butyric and iso-butyric acids, which indicated a butyrate-acetate type fermentation. Tequila vinasses did not result in potential inhibition of the fermentative process. Considering the process as a water treatment system, only 20% of the original carbon was removed (as carbon dioxide and biomass) when the tequila vinasses are used.

  15. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djurcic, Zelimir; Detwiler, Jason A.; Piepke, Andreas; Foster Jr., Vince R.; Miller, Lester; Gratta, Giorgio

    2008-08-06

    Anti-neutrino emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined from thermal power measurements and fission rate calculations. The uncertainties in these quantities for commercial power plants and their impact on the calculated interaction rates in {bar {nu}}{sub e} detectors is examined. We discuss reactor-to-reactor correlations between the leading uncertainties, and their relevance to reactor {bar {nu}}{sub e} experiments.

  16. Improvement in reactor pressure vessel reliability through assembly production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of the Framatome nuclear programme requires the implementation of significant human and equipment resources for the manufacturing of a large number of reactor vessels, at a rate of six vessels per year. The time needed to fabricate one vessel is approximately three years and as many as eighteen vessels can be present, at the same time, on the assembly line in Framatome workshops. In order to cope with this mass-type production plan, Framatome is geared to transform most of the original manual welding operations into automatic welding processes, which result in a reduction of the number of weld defects and therefore in the number of required weld repairs. Another benefit is the marked improvement in the welders' working conditions. Both resulted in improving component reliability. These developments are described. (author)

  17. EVALUATING HYDROGEN PRODUCTION IN BIOGAS REFORMING IN A MEMBRANE REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. A. Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Syngas and hydrogen production by methane reforming of a biogas (CH4/CO2 = 2.85 using carbon dioxide was evaluated in a fixed bed reactor with a Pd-Ag membrane in the presence of a nickel catalyst (Ni 3.31% weight/γ-Al2O3 at 773 K, 823 K, and 873 K and 1.01×105 Pa. Operation with hydrogen permeation at 873 K increased the methane conversion to approximately 83% and doubled the hydrogen yield relative to operation without hydrogen permeation. A mathematical model was formulated to predict the evolution of the effluent concentrations. Predictions based on the model showed similar evolutions for yields of hydrogen and carbon monoxide at temperatures below 823 K for operations with and without the hydrogen permeation. The hydrogen yield reached approximately 21% at 823 K and 47% at 873 K under hydrogen permeation conditions.

  18. Minimizing the Entropy Production of the Methanol Producing Reaction in a Methanol Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Dick Bedeaux; Lars Nummedal; Audun Rosjorde; Eivind Johannessen; Signe Kjelstrup

    2000-01-01

    The entropy production of the reaction that produces methanol in a methanol reactor, has been minimized. The results show that the entropy production of the reaction can be reduced by more than 70%. The optimal path through the reactor is characterized by a driving force for the chemical reaction that is close to constant. The entropy production due to heat transfer across the reactor walls in this state is large, however. Variations of the reactor design show that it is possible to ...

  19. Styrene-maleic anhydride copolymerization in a recycle tubular reactor: reactor stability and product quality

    OpenAIRE

    Belkhiria, Sahbi; Meyer, Thierry; Renken, Albert

    1994-01-01

    A tubular recycle reactor was developed to ensure good homogeneity of concn. and temp. in the copolymn. of styrene and maleic anhydride. The compn. of the copolymer obtained is in good agreements with predicted values and the uniformity of compn. was measured for the entire mol.-wt. distribution. The characterization of the reactor (both hydrodynamic and stability) and the quality of the resulting polymer are presented herein. The limits of use of this reactor for the styrene-maleic anhydride...

  20. Biohydrogen production from diary processing wastewater by anaerobic biofilm reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios-Gonzalez, L.J.; Moreno-Davila, I.M.; Rodriguez-Martinez, J.; Garza-Garcia, Y. [Universidad Autonoma de Coahuila, Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico)]. E-mail: leopoldo.rios@mail.uadec.mx

    2009-09-15

    This article describes biological hydrogen production from diary wastewater via anaerobic fermentation using pretreated heat shock (100 degrees Celsius, 30 min.) and acid (pH 3.0, 24 h) treatment procedures to selectively enrich the hydrogen producing mixed consortia prior to inoculation to batch reactors. Bioreactor used for immobilization consortia was operated at mesophilic (room) temperature (20{+-}3 degrees Celsius), under acidophilic conditions (pH 4.0-4.5), HRT (2h), and a natural support for generate hydrogen producing mixed consortia biofilm: Opuntia imbricata. Reactor was initially operated with sorbitol (5g/L) for 60 days of operation. Batch tests were conducted using 20{+-}0.02g of natural support with biofilm. Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of COD (2.9-21.1 g-COD/L), at initial pH of 7.0, 32{+-}1 degrees Celsius. Maximum hydrogen yield was obtained at 21.1 g-COD/L. Experiments of pH effect were conducted using the optimal substrate concentration (21.2 g-COD/L), at pH 4 to 7 and 11.32 (pH diary wastewater) ,and 32{+-}1 degrees Celsius. Experiments results indicate the optimum initial cultivation was pH 4.0, but we can consider also a stable hydrogen production at pH 11.32 (pH diary wastewater), so we can avoid to fit the pH, and use diary wastewater as it left the process of cheese manufacture. The operational pH of 4.0 is 1.5 units below that of previously reported hydrogen producing organisms. The influence of the effect of temperature were conducted using the optimal substrate concentration (21.2 g-COD/L), two pH levels: 4.0 and 11.32, and four different temperatures: 16{+-}3 degrees Celsius (room temperature), 3 C, 45{+-}1 degrees Celsius y 55{+-}1 degrees Celsius.Optimal temperature for hydrogen production from diary wastewater at pH 4.0 was 55{+-}1 degrees Celsius, and for pH 11.32 was 16{+-}3 degrees Celsius.Therefore, the results suggests biofilm reactors in a natural support like Opuntia imbricata have good potential

  1. Biogas production from UASB and polyurethane carrier reactors treating sisal processing wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubindamayugi, M.S.T.; Salakana, L.K.P. [Univ. of Dar es Salaam, Faculty of Science, Applied Microbiology Unit (Tanzania, United Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The fundamental benefits which makes anaerobic digestion technology (ADT) attractive to the poor developing include the low cost and energy production potential of the technology. In this study the potential of using UASB reactor and Polyurethane Carrier Reactor (PCR) as pollution control and energy recovery systems from sisal wastewater were investigated in lab-scale reactors. The PCR demonstrated the shortest startup period, whereas the UASB reactor showed the highest COD removal efficiency 79%, biogas production rate (4.5 l biogas/l/day) and process stability than the PCR under similar HRT of 15 hours and OLR of 8.2 g COD/l/day. Both reactor systems became overloaded at HRT of 6 hours and OLR of 15.7 g COD/l/day, biogas production ceased and reactors acidified to pH levels which are inhibiting to methanogenesis. Based on the combined results on reactor performances, the UASB reactor is recommended as the best reactor for high biogas production and treatment efficiency. It was estimated that a large-scale UASB reactor can be designed under the same loading conditions to produce 2.8 m{sup 3} biogas form 1 m{sup 3} of wastewater of 5.16 kg COD/m{sup 3}. Wastewater from one decortication shift can produce 9,446 m{sup 3} og biogas. The energy equivalent of such fuel energy is indicated. (au)

  2. Method of Fission Product Beta Spectra Measurements for Predicting Reactor Anti-neutrino Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Asner, D M; Campbell, L W; Greenfield, B; Kos, M S; Orrell, J L; Schram, M; VanDevender, B; Wood, 1 L S; Wootan, D W

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron anti-neutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to current precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent re-considerations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable i...

  3. Feasibility of biohydrogen production from cheese whey using a UASB reactor: Links between microbial community and reactor performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castello, E.; Garcia y Santos, C.; Borzacconi, L. [Chemical Engineering Institute, School of Engineering, University of the Republic, Herrera y Reissig 565, Montevideo (Uruguay); Iglesias, T.; Paolino, G.; Wenzel, J.; Etchebehere, C. [Microbiology Department, School of Science and School of Chemistry, University of the Republic, General Flores 2124, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2009-07-15

    The present study examines the feasibility of producing hydrogen by dark fermentation using unsterilised cheese whey in a UASB reactor. A lab-scale UASB reactor was operated for more than 250 days and unsterilised whey was used as the feed. The evolution of the microbial community was studied during reactor operation using molecular biology tools (T-RFLP, 16S rRNA cloning library and FISH) and conventional microbiological techniques. The results showed that hydrogen can be produced but in low amounts. For the highest loading rate tested (20 gCOD/L.d), hydrogen production was 122 mL H{sub 2}/L.d. Maintenance of low pH (mean = 5) was insufficient to control methanogenesis; methane was produced concomitantly with hydrogen, suggesting that the methanogenic biomass adapted to the low pH conditions. Increasing the loading rate to values of 2.5 gCOD/gVSS.d favoured hydrogen production in the reactor. Microbiological studies showed the prevalence of fermentative organisms from the genera Megasphaera, Anaerotruncus, Pectinatus and Lactobacillus, which may be responsible for hydrogen production. However, the persistence of methanogenesis and the presence of other fermenters, not clearly recognised as hydrogen producers indicates that competition for the substrate may explain the low hydrogen production. (author)

  4. Fission product release in accidents in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author deals with the three phases of release from the reactor core, from the reactor system, and finally from the containment. Particular interest is given to the release from the reactor core at temperatures which let the fuel rod cladding burst leading to meltdown of the fuel elements and evaporation from the core melt. The special case of the steam explosion with small nuclear fuel particles pouring out into an oxidating atmosphere is touched upon. The Rasmussen study is the basis of the statements. (orig./LH)

  5. Anaerobic biofilm reactors for dark fermentative hydrogen production from wastewater: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barca, Cristian; Soric, Audrey; Ranava, David; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Ferrasse, Jean-Henry

    2015-06-01

    Dark fermentation is a bioprocess driven by anaerobic bacteria that can produce hydrogen (H2) from organic waste and wastewater. This review analyses a relevant number of recent studies that have investigated dark fermentative H2 production from wastewater using two different types of anaerobic biofilm reactors: anaerobic packed bed reactor (APBR) and anaerobic fluidized bed reactor (AFBR). The effect of various parameters, including temperature, pH, carrier material, inoculum pretreatment, hydraulic retention time, substrate type and concentration, on reactor performances was investigated by a critical discussion of the results published in the literature. Also, this review presents an in-depth study on the influence of the main operating parameters on the metabolic pathways. The aim of this review is to provide to researchers and practitioners in the field of H2 production key elements for the best operation of the reactors. Finally, some perspectives and technical challenges to improve H2 production were proposed. PMID:25746594

  6. Design and operation of a filter reactor for continuous production of a selected pharmaceutical intermediate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim Müller; Pedersen, Michael Jønch; Dam-Johansen, Kim;

    2012-01-01

    flow reactor, where residual reactant is converted by titration. A chemical case study, production of the pharmaceutical intermediate allylcarbinol by a reaction between allylmagnesium chloride and 2-chloro-thioxanthone, in the presence of a side reaction is considered. The synthesis is conducted......A novel filter reactor system for continuous production of selected pharmaceutical intermediates is presented and experimentally verified. The filter reactor system consists of a mixed flow reactor equipped with a bottom filter, to retain solid reactant particles, followed by a conventional plug...... in tetrahydrofuran solvent. The use of the filter reactor design was explored by examining the transferability of a synthesis step in a present full-scale semi-batch pharmaceutical production into continuous processing. The main advantages of the new continuous minireactor system, compared to the conventional semi...

  7. Argon-41 production and evolution at the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, argon-41 concentrations were measured at various locations within the reactor facility to assess the accuracy of models used to predict argon-41 evolution from the reactor tank, and to determine the relationship between argon gas evolution from the tank and subsequent argon-41 concentrations throughout the reactor room. In particular, argon-41 was measured directly above the reactor tank with the reactor tank lids closed, at other accessible locations on the reactor top with the tank lids both closed and open, and at several locations on the first floor of the reactor room. These measured concentrations were then compared to values calculated using a modified argon-41 production and evolution model for TRIGA reactor tanks and ventilation values applicable to the OSTR facility. The modified model was based in part on earlier TRIGA models for argon-41 production and release, but added features which improved the agreement between predicted and measured values. The approximate dose equivalent rate due to the presence of argon-41 in reactor room air was calculated for several different locations inside the OSTR facility. These dose rates were determined using the argon-41 concentration measured at each specific location, and were subsequently converted to a predicted quarterly dose equivalent for each location based on the reactor's operating history. The predicted quarterly dose equivalent values were then compared to quarterly doses measured by film badges deployed as dose-integrating area radiation monitors at the locations of interest. The results indicate that the modified production and evolution model is able to predict argon-41 concentrations to within a factor of ten when compared to the measured data. Quarterly dose equivalents calculated from the measured argon-41 concentrations and the reactor's operating history seemed consistent with results obtained from the integrating area radiation monitors. Given the argon-41 concentrations measured

  8. Improvement of Biohydrogen Production under Increased the Reactor Size by C. acetobutylicum NCIMB 13357

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham S. Alshiyab

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: One of the main factors influenced the bacterial productivity and total yield of hydrogen is the partial pressure of produced gas. A novel solution to enhance the bacterial productivity was through reduction of gas pressure. Approach: Increasing the reactor size showed to enhance the bacterial production of hydrogen. Results: The technique of increasing reactor size resulted to enhance the hydrogen yield (YP/S from 269 mL g-1 glucose utilized to maximum yield of 448 mL g-1 glucose utilized by using 125 mL and 2 L reactor size respectively. The hydrogen productivity was also enhanced from 71 mL-1 h-1 to maximum of 91 mL L-1 h-1 was obtained by using 125 mL and 1 L reactor size respectively. Biomass concentration was enhanced from 1.03 g L-1 to maximum of 1.68 g L-1 by using 125 mL and 2 L reactor size were used respectively, hydrogen yield per biomass (YP/X of 267 mL g-1 L-1, biomass per substrate utilized (YX/S of 0.336 and produced hydrogen in gram per gram of glucose utilized (YH2/s of 0.04 when 2 L reactor size was employed. Conclusion: By using bigger reactor size, the effect of gaseous products in fermentation medium was reduced and enhanced both bacterial productivity and biomass concentration.

  9. The production of refined intermediate fuels with high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power plants can be divided into conventional steam plants, fueled with hard coal, lignite or liquid fuel, hydroelectric plants and nuclear plants, their chief use was or is the production of electric energy and - in certain cases only - of production of process heat, using steam or hot water for process heat in industry and district heating for residential and commercial purposes. The part played by electricity in the whole energy demand is of the order of 10% to 25% the total demand, the rest is necessary for supplying process heat below 2000C or above 2000C, up to some 15000C. The present distribution of energy demands is covered chiefly by liquid fuel, coal and lignite, water energy and increasing steps by nuclear fuel. It is well known that the erection of nuclear energy plants is a necessity for today and for the future. There is another necessity, i.e. to utilize the primary energy resources in a complex way i.e. to supply electricity as energy vector and other fuels as process heat as new energy vectors. These manmade fuels - whether in a gaseous or liquid phase - contain hydrogen, and one can believe, the world is entering a new energy civilisation in utilizing hydrogen and its compounds as second energy vector. The author has taken up the task to investigate this new problem of process, heat in the form of hydrogen and its compounds, by evaluating their present and future production, based on the utilization of natural gas, oil coal, water and the nuclear heat of helium, available in a closed circuit as primary coolant in a High - Temeprature Helium cooled reactor, which is symbolized in the paper as HTR. The paper deals in more detail with the following application of Nuclear Heat: hydrogasification, direct reduction of ore, mainly iron ores, ammonia synthesis, methanol synthesis Hydrocracking, long distance transfer of process heat (chemical heat pipe), hydrogenation of coal, Fischer - Tropsch synthesis, oxosynthesis, coal gasification, coal

  10. Analysis of 99Mo Production Capacity in Uranyl Nitrate Aqueous Homogeneous Reactor using ORIGEN and MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    99mTc is a very useful radioisotope in medical diagnostic procedure. 99mTc is produced from 99Mo decay. Currently, most of 99Mo is produced by irradiating 235U in the nuclear reactor. 99Mo mostly results from the fission reaction of 235U targets with a fission yield about 6.1%. A small additional amount is created from 98Mo neutron activation. Actually 99Mo is also created in the reactor fuel, but usually we do not extract it. The fuel will become spent fuel which is a highly radioactive waste. 99Mo production system in the aqueous homogeneous reactor offers a better method, because all of the 99Mo can be extracted from the fuel solution. Fresh reactor fuel solution consists of uranyl nitrate dissolved in water. There is no separation of target and fuel in an aqueous homogeneous reactor where target and fuel become one liquid solution, and there is no spent fuel generated from this reactor. Simulation of the extraction process is performed while reactor in operation (without reactor shutdown). With an extraction flow rate of 3.6 L/h, after 43 hours of reactor operation the production of 99Mo is relatively constant at about 98.6 curie/hour. (author)

  11. Analysis of 99Mo Production Capacity in Uranyl Nitrate Aqueous Homogeneous Reactor using ORIGEN and MCNP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Isnaeni

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available 99mTc is a very useful radioisotope in medical diagnostic procedure. 99mTc is produced from 99Mo decay. Currently, most of 99Mo is produced by irradiating 235U in the nuclear reactor. 99Mo mostly results from the fission reaction of 235U targets with a fission yield about 6.1%. A small additional amount is created from 98Mo neutron activation. Actually 99Mo is also created in the reactor fuel, but usually we do not extract it. The fuel will become spent fuel which is a highly radioactive waste. 99Mo production system in the aqueous homogeneous reactor offers a better method, because all of the 99Mo can be extracted from the fuel solution. Fresh reactor fuel solution consists of uranyl nitrate dissolved in water. There is no separation of target and fuel in an aqueous homogeneous reactor where target and fuel become one liquid solution, and there is no spent fuel generated from this reactor. Simulation of the extraction process is performed while reactor in operation (without reactor shutdown. With an extraction flow rate of 3.6 L/h, after 43 hours of reactor operation the production of 99Mo is relatively constant at about 98.6 curie/hour

  12. Anaerobic digestion of corn stovers for methane production in a novel bionic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meixia; Zhang, Guangming; Zhang, Panyue; Fan, Shiyang; Jin, Shuguang; Wu, Dan; Fang, Wei

    2014-08-01

    To improve the biogas production from corn stovers, a new bionic reactor was designed and constructed. The bionic reactor simulated the rumen digestion of ruminants. The liquid was separated from corn stovers and refluxed into corn stovers again, which simulated the undigested particles separated from completely digested materials and fed back again for further degradation in ruminant stomach. Results showed that the bionic reactor was effective for anaerobic digestion of corn stovers. The liquid amount and its reflux showed an obvious positive correlation with biogas production. The highest biogas production rate was 21.6 ml/gVS-addedd, and the total cumulative biogas production was 256.5 ml/gVS-added. The methane content in biogas ranged from 52.2% to 63.3%. The degradation of corn stovers were greatly enhanced through simulating the animal digestion mechanisms in this bionic reactor. PMID:24923659

  13. Fuels and fission products clean up for molten salt reactor of the incinerator type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignatiev, V.; Gorbunov, V.; Zakirov, R. [RRC-Karchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2000-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the feasibility of molten salt reactor technology for treatment of plutonium, minor actinides and fission products, when the reactor and fission product cleanup unit are planned as an integral system. This contribution summarizes the reasons which led to selection of the salt compositions for the molten salt reactor of the TRU incinerator type (MSB). Special characteristics of behavior of TRUs and fission products during power operation of MSB concepts are presented. The present paper briefly reviews the processing developments underlying the prior molten salt reactor (MSR) programs and relates then to the separation requirements for the MSB concept. Status and development needs in the thermodynamic properties of fluorides and fission product cleanup methods (with emphasis on actinides-lanthanides separation) are discussed. (authors)

  14. Fuels and fission products clean up for molten salt reactor of the incinerator type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the feasibility of molten salt reactor technology for treatment of plutonium, minor actinides and fission products, when the reactor and fission product cleanup unit are planned as an integral system. This contribution summarizes the reasons which led to selection of the salt compositions for the molten salt reactor of the TRU incinerator type (MSB). Special characteristics of behavior of TRUs and fission products during power operation of MSB concepts are presented. The present paper briefly reviews the processing developments underlying the prior molten salt reactor (MSR) programs and relates then to the separation requirements for the MSB concept. Status and development needs in the thermodynamic properties of fluorides and fission product cleanup methods (with emphasis on actinides-lanthanides separation) are discussed. (authors)

  15. CFD optimization of continuous stirred-tank (CSTR) reactor for biohydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jie; Wang, Xu; Zhou, Xue-Fei; Ren, Nan-Qi; Guo, Wan-Qian

    2010-09-01

    There has been little work on the optimal configuration of biohydrogen production reactors. This paper describes three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of gas-liquid flow in a laboratory-scale continuous stirred-tank reactor used for biohydrogen production. To evaluate the role of hydrodynamics in reactor design and optimize the reactor configuration, an optimized impeller design has been constructed and validated with CFD simulations of the normal and optimized impeller over a range of speeds and the numerical results were also validated by examination of residence time distribution. By integrating the CFD simulation with an ethanol-type fermentation process experiment, it was shown that impellers with different type and speed generated different flow patterns, and hence offered different efficiencies for biohydrogen production. The hydrodynamic behavior of the optimized impeller at speeds between 50 and 70 rev/min is most suited for economical biohydrogen production.

  16. Anaerobic digestion of corn stovers for methane production in a novel bionic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meixia; Zhang, Guangming; Zhang, Panyue; Fan, Shiyang; Jin, Shuguang; Wu, Dan; Fang, Wei

    2014-08-01

    To improve the biogas production from corn stovers, a new bionic reactor was designed and constructed. The bionic reactor simulated the rumen digestion of ruminants. The liquid was separated from corn stovers and refluxed into corn stovers again, which simulated the undigested particles separated from completely digested materials and fed back again for further degradation in ruminant stomach. Results showed that the bionic reactor was effective for anaerobic digestion of corn stovers. The liquid amount and its reflux showed an obvious positive correlation with biogas production. The highest biogas production rate was 21.6 ml/gVS-addedd, and the total cumulative biogas production was 256.5 ml/gVS-added. The methane content in biogas ranged from 52.2% to 63.3%. The degradation of corn stovers were greatly enhanced through simulating the animal digestion mechanisms in this bionic reactor.

  17. Specialists' meeting on fission product release and transport in gas-cooled reactors. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Meeting on Fission Product Release and Transport in Gas-Cooled Reactors was to compare and discuss experimental and theoretical results of fission product behaviour in gas-cooled reactors under normal and accidental conditions and to give direction for future development. The technical part of the meeting covered operational experience and laboratory research, activity release, and behaviour of released activity

  18. Production of RAFT imprinted smart hydrogel particles in a continuous flow micro-reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, Carla; Freitas, Ana; Kadhirvel, Porkodi; Dias, Rolando; Costa, Mário

    2014-01-01

    Feasibility of the production of RAFT imprinted smart hydrogel particles in continuous flow micro-reactor is here showed. Microfluidic continuous operation was combined with RAFT polymerization and molecular imprinting tecniques involving selected template molecules. New strategies for the production of advanced materials with tailored properties are thus developed. Particles syntetized in the continuous flow micro-reactor (set-up scheme depicted in the graphical abstract) were purified and c...

  19. Proposal of LDR Ir-192 Production in the TRIGA Mark II Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA MARK II research reactor in Vienna provides some irradiation positions with different flux distribution. In this regard, a case study is under investigation to appraise the possibility of medical radioisotope production in Vienna. For this purpose, neutron flux mapping and the axial neutron flux distribution are calculated by MCNP5 for the TRIGA Mark II core. This paper describes the feasibility of Low Dose Rate (LDR) 192Ir production in the core of the low power research reactor. (author)

  20. Decommissioning planning and the assessment of alternatives for the Hanford production reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several years ago, the US Department of Energy began assessing alternatives and planning the decommissioning of eight shut-down plutonium production reactors located on the DOE Hanford Site in Washington State. The first of these graphite-moderated, water-cooled, reactors was built and started up in 1944 as part of the World War II Manhattan Project. The last of them started up in 1955. The eight reactors each operated for 12 to 24 years, with all eight operating simultaneously for about 10 years. In the 1960's, production needs declined and the reactors were one-by-one permanently shut down, the last of them in 1971. (A ninth Hanford production reactor, N Reactor, was started up in 1963; it is still operating and is not within the scope of the decommissioning planning and alternatives assessment work reported in this paper). This paper provides an overview description of the decommissioning plan for the eight shut-down Hanford production reactors and their associated fuel storage basins. Included are descriptions of the decommissioning alternatives considered for the facilities, along with discussions of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process activities applicable to the Hanford decommissioning work. The criteria used in assessing decommissioning alternatives and the assumptions used in the decommissioning planning are identified. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Prediction of product distributions for methanol conversion to hydrocarbons in a pseudoadiabatic reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedran, U.A.; de Lasa, H.I. (Inst. de Investigaciones en Catalisis y Petroquimica, INCAPE, UNL-CONICET, Santiago del Estero 2654, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)); Sinard, F. (University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)); Ravella, A. (Esso Petroleum Canada, 453 Christina Street South, Sarnia, Ontario N7T 7M1 (Canada))

    1992-02-01

    This paper reports that a one-dimensional pseudohomogeneous model containing a new kinetic scheme for methanol conversion to hydrocarbons was used to simulate a pilot plant fixed-bed pseudoadiabatic catalytic reactor. A lumped-species kinetic model allowed the evaluation of product distributions under different experimental conditions, while experimentally measured temperature profiles along the reactor were followed closely. Furthermore, the kinetic parameters as calculated from the simulation were in agreement with those obtained in a kinetic study. Simulated concentration profiles inside the reactor showed the role of each kinetic lump and provided a basis for the selection of the operating conditions required to obtain desired product distributions.

  2. Practical reactor production of {sup 41}Ar from argon clathrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercer, J.R. E-mail: jmercer@pharmacy.ualberta.ca; Duke, M.J.M.; McQuarrie, S.A

    2000-06-01

    The radionuclide {sup 41}Ar has many ideal properties as a gas flow tracer. However, the modest cross-section of {sup 40}Ar for thermal neutron activation makes preparation of suitable activities of {sup 41}Ar technically difficult particularly for low flux reactors. Argon can however be trapped in a molecular complex called a clathrate that can then be irradiated. We prepared argon clathrate and explored its irradiation and stability characteristics. Argon clathrate can be used to provide gigabecquerel quantities of {sup 41}Ar even with low power reactors.

  3. Comparison of actinide production in traveling wave and pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geopolitical problems associated with civilian nuclear energy production arise in part from the accumulation of transuranics in spent nuclear fuel. A traveling wave reactor is a type of breed-burn reactor that could, if feasible, reduce the overall production of transuranics. In one possible configuration, a cylinder of natural or depleted uranium would be subjected to a fast neutron flux at one end. The neutrons would transmute the uranium, producing plutonium and higher actinides. Under the right conditions, the reactor could become critical, at which point a self-stabilizing fission wave would form and propagate down the length of the reactor cylinder. The neutrons from the fission wave would burn the fissile nuclides and transmute uranium ahead of the wave to produce additional fuel. Fission waves in uranium are driven largely by the production and fission of 239Pu. Simulations have shown that the fuel burnup can reach values greater than 400 MWd/kgIHM, before fission products poison the reaction. In this work we compare the production of plutonium and minor actinides produced in a fission wave to that of a UOX fueled light water reactor, both on an energy normalized basis. The nuclide concentrations in the spent traveling wave reactor fuel are computed using a one-group diffusion model and are verified using Monte Carlo simulations. In the case of the pressurized water reactor, a multi-group collision probability model is used to generate the nuclide quantities. We find that the traveling wave reactor produces about 0.187 g/MWd/kgIHM of transuranics compared to 0.413 g/MWd/kgIHM for a pressurized water reactor running fuel enriched to 4.95 % and burned to 50 MWd/kgIHM. (authors)

  4. Fission product release from defected nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release of gaseous (krypton and xenon) and iodine radioactive fission products from defective fuel elements is described with a semi-empirical model. The model assumes precursor-corrected 'Booth diffusional release' in the UO2 and subsequent holdup in the fuel-to-sheath gap. Transport in the gap is separately modelled with a phenomenological rate constant (assuming release from the gap is a first order rate process), and a diffusivity constant (assuming transport in the gap is dominated by a diffusional process). Measured release data from possessing various states of defection are use in this analysis. One element (irradiated in an earlier experiment by MacDonald) was defected with a small drilled hole. A second element was machined with 23 slits while a third element (fabricated with a porous end plug) displayed through-wall sheath hydriding. Comparison of measured release data with calculated values from the model yields estimates of empirical diffusion coefficients for the radioactive species in the UO2 (1.56 x 10-10 to 7.30 x 10-9 s-1), as well as escape rate constants (7.85 x 10-7 to 3.44 x 10-5 s-1) and diffusion coefficients (3.39 x 10-5 to 4.88 x 10-2 cm2/s) for these in the fuel-to-sheath gap. Analyses also enable identification of the various rate-controlling processes operative in each element. For the noble gas and iodine species, the rate-determining process in the multi-slit element is 'Booth diffusion'; however, for the hydrided element an additional delay results from diffusional transport in the fuel-to-heath gap. Furthermore, the iodine species exhibit an additional holdup in the drilled element because of significant trapping on the fuel and/or sheath surfaces. Using experimental release data and applying the theoretical results of this work, a systematic procedure is proposed to characterize fuel failures in commercial power reactors (i.e., the number of fuel failures and average leak size)

  5. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, David M.; Burns, Kimberly A.; Campbell, Luke W.; Greenfield, Bryce A.; Kos, Marek S.; Orrell, John L.; Schram, Malachi; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wood, Lynn S.; Wootan, David W.

    2015-03-01

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored.

  6. Origin and functional diversification of an amphibian defense peptide arsenal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Roelants

    Full Text Available The skin secretion of many amphibians contains an arsenal of bioactive molecules, including hormone-like peptides (HLPs acting as defense toxins against predators, and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs providing protection against infectious microorganisms. Several amphibian taxa seem to have independently acquired the genes to produce skin-secreted peptide arsenals, but it remains unknown how these originated from a non-defensive ancestral gene and evolved diverse defense functions against predators and pathogens. We conducted transcriptome, genome, peptidome and phylogenetic analyses to chart the full gene repertoire underlying the defense peptide arsenal of the frog Silurana tropicalis and reconstruct its evolutionary history. Our study uncovers a cluster of 13 transcriptionally active genes, together encoding up to 19 peptides, including diverse HLP homologues and AMPs. This gene cluster arose from a duplicated gastrointestinal hormone gene that attained a HLP-like defense function after major remodeling of its promoter region. Instead, new defense functions, including antimicrobial activity, arose by mutation of the precursor proteins, resulting in the proteolytic processing of secondary peptides alongside the original ones. Although gene duplication did not trigger functional innovation, it may have subsequently facilitated the convergent loss of the original function in multiple gene lineages (subfunctionalization, completing their transformation from HLP gene to AMP gene. The processing of multiple peptides from a single precursor entails a mechanism through which peptide-encoding genes may establish new functions without the need for gene duplication to avoid adaptive conflicts with older ones.

  7. 城区抗战遗址景区交通组织规划研究--以重庆汉阳兵工厂(抗战生产洞)遗址为例%Research on Transportation Planning of War Ruins Scenic Located in the City -Take Hanyang Arsenal of Chongqing (War Production Cave) Site as Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩玲; 钟超男; 陈霞

    2015-01-01

    The research aims to provide key points of planning of city tourism transportation planning , coordination relationship between tourism traffic and city traffic ,fully integrated use of city and scenic road traffic resources ,building traffic system and city tourism traffic coordination .Taking Chongqing city Hanyang Arsenal (the production of cave ) site traffic organization planning as an example ,from the current situation of the traffic problems ,based on the passenger volume forecasting of traffic demand ,road network planning ,public transportation ,pedestrian system planning ,parking system planning and traffic organization of several aspects ,and puts forward the planning ideas and the main research contents for the city traffic organization planning .%旨在为城市旅游交通提供规划要点,梳理旅游交通和城市交通的协调关系,充分整合利用城市与景区道路交通资源,构建旅游和城市交通相互协调的交通系统。以重庆市汉阳兵工厂(抗战生产洞)旧址交通组织规划为例,从交通现状存在的问题入手,对基于旅客容量的交通需求预测、道路网规划、公共交通规划、人行系统规划、停车系统规划和交通组织几个方面进行深入研究、梳理,为城市景区交通组织规划提出思路。

  8. Biological production of ethanol from coal. Task 4 report, Continuous reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    The production of ethanol from synthesis gas by the anaerobic bacterium C. ljungdahlii has been demonstrated in continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTRs), CSTRs with cell recycle and trickle bed reactors. Various liquid media were utilized in these studies including basal medium, basal media with 1/2 B-vitamins and no yeast extract and a medium specifically designed for the growth of C. ljungdahlii in the CSTR. Ethanol production was successful in each of the three reactor types, although trickle bed operation with C. ljungdahlii was not as good as with the stirred tank reactors. Operation in the CSTR with cell recycle was particularly promising, producing 47 g/L ethanol with only minor concentrations of the by-product acetate.

  9. Methane production in an UASB reactor operated under periodic mesophilic-thermophilic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourque, J-S; Guiot, S R; Tartakovsky, B

    2008-08-15

    Methane production was studied in a laboratory-scale 10 L anaerobic upflow sludge bed (UASB) reactor with periodic variations of the reactor temperature. On a daily basis the temperature was varied between 35 and 45 degrees C or 35 and 55 degrees C with a heating period of 6 h. Each temperature increase was accompanied by an increase in methane production and a decrease in the concentration of soluble organic matter in the effluent. In comparison to a reactor operated at 35 degrees C, a net increase in methane production of up to 22% was observed. Batch activity tests demonstrated a tolerance of mesophilic methanogenic populations to short-term, 2-6 h, temperature increases, although activity of acetoclastic methanogens decreased after 6 h exposure to a temperature of 55 degrees C. 16S sequencing of DGGE bands revealed proliferation of temperature-tolerant Methanospirillum hungatii sp. in the reactor.

  10. N Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The last of Hanfordqaodmasdkwaspemas7ajkqlsmdqpakldnzsdflss nine plutonium production reactors to be built was the N Reactor.This reactor was called a dual purpose...

  11. Dimethyl ether (DME) steam reforming process for hydrogen production by utilization of low temperature nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    he assessment of DME steam reforming process for hydrogen production by utilizing of low temperature nuclear reactor has been carried out. Difference with natural gas steam reforming that operates at high temperature (800-1000°C), the process operates at low temperature (300°C). This condition give the advantage since this process is not require high temperature materials for the plant, that economically more expensive. From the point of nuclear reactor application, all temperature range of nuclear reactors can be applied to supplied their heat for the process, include of commercially nuclear reactor in operation now. While, DME as raw material is free from sulfur content, so the operation unit of plant can be more compact, because the plant is not require the unit of desulfurization. The couple of the process with nuclear reactor is operate in cogeneration mode to produce electricity and hydrogen. The couple of low temperature nuclear reactor (LWR) with the process, with the configuration of upstream from turbine shows the potential of increasing efficiency from about 33% to 53% (30% efficiency of hydrogen production, and 23% electricity). While couple of the process with medium temperature nuclear reactor of FBR shows the potential of increasing efficiency from about 33% to 75% (49% efficiency of hydrogen production, and 26% electricity). (author)

  12. Stable hydrogen production by methane steam reforming in a two zone fluidized bed reactor: Experimental assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Moreno, L.; Soler, J.; Herguido, J.; Menéndez, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Two Zone Fluidized Bed Reactor concept is proposed for hydrogen production via the steam reforming of methane (SRM) including integrated catalyst regeneration. In order to study the effect of the contact mode, the oxidative SRM has been carried out over a Ni/Al2O3 catalyst using a fixed bed reactor (fBR), a conventional fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) and the proposed two-zone fluidized bed reactor (TZFBR). The technical feasibility of these reactors has been studied experimentally, investigating their performance (CH4 conversion, CO and H2 selectivity, and H2 global yield) and stability under different operating conditions. Coke generation in the process has been verified by several techniques. A stable performance was obtained in the TZFBR, where coke formation was counteracted with continuous catalyst regeneration. The viability of the TZFBR for carrying out this process with a valuable global yield to hydrogen is demonstrated.

  13. Synthesis gas and zinc production in a noncatalytic packed-bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimi, A.A.; Ebrahim, H.A.; Jamshidi, E.; Faramarzi, A.H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    A noncatalytic packed-bed reactor has been constructed for management of the reduction of ZnO by methane, which leads to co-production of synthesis gas and zinc. The reactor consisted of a simple vertical pipe filled with ZnO pellets. These pellets underwent reaction with a pure methane flow. Experimental tests were conducted in the temperature range 860-995 C at atmospheric pressure in an electrically heated reactor. The results showed complete chemical conversion of methane to synthesis gas in the aforementioned temperature range. In addition, analysis of the product solids indicated that the collected solids in the outlet of the reactor were entirely zinc. The maximum methane flow rates (149-744 mL min{sup -1}) were adjusted to ensure complete chemical conversion of methane. These adjustments were performed for different bed heights at various operating temperatures. Analysis of the product gases revealed high quality synthesis gas production without the influence of methane cracking or other undesired side reactions in the experimental tests. Finally, the governing partial differential equations of the reactor modeling were solved by the finite element method. Consequently, the gaseous profiles along the reactor and the breakthrough curves were predicted and compared with the experimental tests. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Engineering studies for the Surplus Production Reactor Decommissioning Project at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.L.; Powers, E.W. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Usher, J.M. [Ebasco Services, Inc., Augusta, GA (United States); Yannitell, D.M. [Ebasco Services, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1993-10-01

    In 1942, the Hanford Site (near Richland, WA) was commissioned as a facility for the production of plutonium. On location there are nine water cooled, graphite-moderated plutonium production reactors, which are now retired from service. Because the reactors contain irradiated reactor components, and because the buildings that house the reactors are contaminated with low levels of reactivity, the DOE has determined that there is a need for action and that some form of decommissioning or continued surveillance and maintenance is necessary. This report discusses assessments of the alternatives which have determined that while continued surveillance and maintenance adequately isolates remaining radioactive materials from the environment and properly protects human health and safety; decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) will ultimately be necessary. The project is technically complex and will likely be designated as a Department of Energy (DOE) Major System Acquisition or Major Project.

  15. Continuous production of chitooligosaccharides by an immobilized enzyme in a dual-reactor system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos-Moriano, Paloma; Woodley, John; Plou, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    profile (with chitotriose and chitobiose as major products, using chitosans of different polymerization and deacetylation degrees), but significantly increased the enzyme thermostability. A two-step process was proposed, in which chitosan was first hydrolyzed in a batch reactor to a viscosity that could...... flow through a packed-bead reactor (PBR), thus avoiding clogging of the column. The relationship between hydrolysis degree of chitosan (1% w/v) and viscosity of the solution was assessed in a batch reactor. A 50% hydrolyzed chitosan did not cause any clogging of the PBR. Under these conditions...

  16. Conceptual design of a new homogeneous reactor for medical radioisotope Mo-99/Tc-99m production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liem, Peng Hong [Nippon Advanced Information Service (NAIS Co., Inc.) Scientific Computational Division, 416 Muramatsu, Tokaimura, Ibaraki (Japan); Tran, Hoai Nam [Chalmers University of Technology, Dept. of Applied Physics, Div. of Nuclear Engineering, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Sembiring, Tagor Malem [National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), Center for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety, Kawasan Puspiptek, Serpong, Tangerang Selatan, Banten (Indonesia); Arbie, Bakri [PT MOTAB Technology, Kedoya Elok Plaza Blok DA 12, Jl. Panjang, Kebun Jeruk, Jakarta Barat (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30

    To partly solve the global and regional shortages of Mo-99 supply, a conceptual design of a nitrate-fuel-solution based homogeneous reactor dedicated for Mo-99/Tc-99m medical radioisotope production is proposed. The modified LEU Cintichem process for Mo-99 extraction which has been licensed and demonstrated commercially for decades by BATAN is taken into account as a key design consideration. The design characteristics and main parameters are identified and the advantageous aspects are shown by comparing with the BATAN's existing Mo-99 supply chain which uses a heterogeneous reactor (RSG GAS multipurpose reactor)

  17. Simulation, Control and Optimization of Single Cell Protein Production in a U-Loop Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engoulevent, Franck Guillaume; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2012-01-01

    potential for alternative sources of protein production. Single cell protein (SCP) is protein produced by growth of micro organisms. Among these micro organisms, Methylococcus Capsulatus is particular interesting as it can grow on either methane or methanol and contains 70% protein. The U-Loop reactor...... is particular useful for production of SCP by M. Capsulatus as it has good gas-liquid mass transfer capabilities and also the capability to remove the signicant amount of heat developed by the reaction. In this paper we describe an implementation of a model to simulate SCP production in the U-Loop reactor. We...... report simulation results. In addition we design and compare dierent regulatory control systems for regulation of SCP production in the U-Loop reactor. The purpose of the regulatory control systems is to keep the process at a steady state and to reject disturbances. We design and implement such control...

  18. Analysis of fission-product effects in a Fast Mixed-Spectrum Reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fast Mixed-Spectrum Reactor (FMSR) concept has been proposed by BNL as a means of alleviating certain nonproliferation concerns relating to civilian nuclear power. This breeder reactor concept has been tailored to operate on natural uranium feed (after initial startup), thus eliminating the need for fuel reprocessing. The fissile material required for criticality is produced, in situ, from the fertile feed material. This process requires that large burnup and fluence levels be achievable, which, in turn, necessarily implies that large fission-product inventories will exist in the reactor. It was the purpose of this study to investigate the effects of large fission-product inventories and to analyze the effect of burnup on fission-product nuclide distributions and effective cross sections. In addition, BNL requested that a representative 50-group fission-product library be generated for use in FMSR design calculations

  19. Fast-quench reactor for hydrogen and elemental carbon production from natural gas and other hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detering, Brent A.; Kong, Peter C.

    2006-08-29

    A fast-quench reactor for production of diatomic hydrogen and unsaturated carbons is provided. During the fast quench in the downstream diverging section of the nozzle, such as in a free expansion chamber, the unsaturated hydrocarbons are further decomposed by reheating the reactor gases. More diatomic hydrogen is produced, along with elemental carbon. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The product is a substantially clean-burning hydrogen fuel that leaves no greenhouse gas emissions, and elemental carbon that may be used in powder form as a commodity for several processes.

  20. Preventive maintenance program for a research and production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This program proposes a simple, rapid and efficient methodology for the task of developing a really preventive maintenance discipline. Moreover, the lower cost of its application -since it must satisfy the plant's budget-. To this purpose, an extremely economical and easily obtainable infrastructure is proposed. The following stage is referred to the commissioning system, subsequent supervision and follow-up. The experience gained from the two reactors as RA-6 (Bariloche Atomic Center) and NUR (RAE) of Argelia. Finally, the interacting characteristic of this program, since it may be rapidly adapted to different dimensions of plants, laboratories, etc., must be pointed out. (Author)

  1. MHTGR: New production reactor summary of experience base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worldwide interest in the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) stems from the capability of the system to retain the advanced fuel and thermal performance while providing unparalleled levels of safety. The small power level of the MHTGR and its passive systems give it a margin of safety not attained by other concepts being developed for power generation. This report covers the experience base for the key nuclear system, components, and processes related to the MHTGR-NPR. 9 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs

  2. 75 FR 43158 - Amended Record of Decision for the Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ... Register (FR) 48509), pursuant to the Final Environmental Impact Statement on Decommissioning of Eight... Analysis for the Surplus Production Reactors EIS, contact: Woody Russell, National Environmental Policy Act... based solely on the evaluation of environmental impacts. [Note that a ninth reactor, N Reactor, was...

  3. Energy production from distillery wastewater using single and double-phase upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muyodi, F.J.; Rubindamayugi, M.S.T. [Univ. of Dar es Salaam, Applied Microbiology Unit (Tanzania, United Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    A Single-phase (SP) and Double-phase (DP) Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors treating distillery wastewater were operated in parallel. The DP UASB reactor showed better performance than the SP UASB reactor in terms of maximum methane production rate, methane content and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) removal efficiency. (au) 20 refs.

  4. Plasma-arc reactor for production possibility of powdered nano-size materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadzhiyski, V; Mihovsky, M; Gavrilova, R, E-mail: plasmalab@uctm.edu, E-mail: mihovsky@uctm.edu, E-mail: r.gavrilova@abv.bg [University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy-Sofia, Plasma Metallurgy Research Laboratory ' PLASMALAB' (Bulgaria)

    2011-01-01

    Nano-size materials of various chemical compositions find increasing application in life nowadays due to some of their unique properties. Plasma technologies are widely used in the production of a range of powdered nano-size materials (metals, alloys, oxides, nitrides, carbides, borides, carbonitrides, etc.), that have relatively high melting temperatures. Until recently, the so-called RF-plasma generated in induction plasma torches was most frequently applied. The subject of this paper is the developments of a new type of plasma-arc reactor, operated with transferred arc system for production of disperse nano-size materials. The new characteristics of the PLASMALAB reactor are the method of feeding the charge, plasma arc control and anode design. The disperse charge is fed by a charge feeding system operating on gravity principle through a hollow cathode of an arc plasma torch situated along the axis of a water-cooled wall vertical tubular reactor. The powdered material is brought into the zone of a plasma space generated by the DC rotating transferred plasma arc. The arc is subjected to Auto-Electro-Magnetic Rotation (AEMR) by an inductor serially connected to the anode circuit. The anode is in the form of a water-cooled copper ring. It is mounted concentrically within the cylindrical reactor, with its lower part electrically insulated from it. The electric parameters of the arc in the reactor and the quantity of processed charge are maintained at a level permitting generation of a volumetric plasma discharge. This mode enables one to attain high mean mass temperature while the processed disperse material flows along the reactor axis through the plasma zone where the main physico-chemical processes take place. The product obtained leaves the reactor through the annular anode, from where it enters a cooling chamber for fixing the produced nano-structure. Experiments for AlN synthesis from aluminium power and nitrogen were carried out using the plasma reactor

  5. Arsenals : tummalt kõnekas / Lauri Kärk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kärk, Lauri, 1954-

    2008-01-01

    Tänavusel Riia filmifestivalil Arsenals nähtust, eelkõige huvitavatest tummfilmiajastu filmidest, sealhulgas Läti esimesest mängufilmist "Kus on tõde? Või juudi naiskursuslase tragöödia" (produtsent S. Mintus, 1913). Lisatud info "Eesti film võitis Riias mitu auhinda", millest nähtub, et Balti võistlusprogrammis oli parim mängufilm "Sügisball", parim dokfilm "Vastutuulesaal" ja publikupreemia ning ühe oikumeenilise žürii preemia sai "Klass"

  6. PRELIMINARY DESIGN OF OSCILLATORY FLOW BIODIESEL REACTOR FOR CONTINUOUS BIODIESEL PRODUCTION FROM JATROPHA TRIGLYCERIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AZHARI T. I. MOHD. GHAZI

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a continuous process in producing biodiesel from jatropha oil by using an Oscillatory Flow Biodiesel Reactor (OFBR is discussed in this paper. It has been recognized that the batch stirred reactor is a primary mode used in the synthesis of biodiesel. However, pulsatile flow has been extensively researcehed and the fundamental principles have been successfully developed upon which its hydrodynamics are based. Oscillatory flow biodiesel reactor offers precise control of mixing by means of the baffle geometry and pulsation which facilitates to continuous operation, giving plug flow residence time distribution with high turbulence and enhanced mass and heat transfer. In conjunction with the concept of reactor design, parameters such as reactor dimensions, the hydrodynamic studies and physical properties of reactants must be considered prior to the design work initiated recently. The OFBR reactor design involves the use of simulation software, ASPEN PLUS and the reactor design fundamentals. Following this, the design parameters shall be applied in fabricating the OFBR for laboratory scale biodiesel production.

  7. Preliminary Estimation of Activated Corrosion Products in the Coolant System of Fusion Demo Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second phase of the national program for fusion energy development in Korea starts from 2012 for design and construction of the fusion DEMO reactor. Radiological assessment for the fusion reactor is one of the key tasks to assure its licensability and the starting point of the assessment is determination of the source terms. As the first effort, the activities of the coolant due to activated corrosion product (ACP) were estimated. Data and experiences from fission reactors were used, in part, in the calculations of the ACP concentrations because of lack of operating experience for fusion reactors. The MCNPX code was used to determine neutron spectra and intensities at the coolant locations and the FISPACT code was used to estimate the ACP activities in the coolant of the fusion DEMO reactor. The calculated specific activities of the most nuclides in the fusion DEMO reactor coolant were 2-15 times lower than those in the PWR coolant, but the specific activities of 57Co and 57Ni were expected to be much higher than in the PWR coolant. The preliminary results of this study can be used to figure out the approximate radiological conditions and to establish a tentative set of radiological design criteria for the systems carrying coolant in the design phase of the fusion DEMO reactor.

  8. Air quality impact analysis in support of the new production reactor environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this air quality impact analysis for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this work was to provide Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with the required estimates of ground-level concentrations of five criteria air pollutants at the Hanford Site boundary from each of the stationary sources associated with the new production reactor (NPR) and its supporting facilities. The DOE proposes to provide new production capacity for the primary production of tritium and secondary production of plutonium to support the US nuclear weapons program. Three alternative reactor technologies are being considered by DOE: the light-water reactor, the low-temperature, heavy-water reactor, and the modular high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor. In this study, PNL provided estimates of the impacts of the proposed action on the ground-level concentration of the criteria air pollutants for each of the alternative technologies. The criteria pollutants were sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, total suspended particulates, and particulates with a diameter of less than 10 microns. Ground-level concentrations were estimated for the peak construction phase activities expected to occur in 1997 and for the operational phase activities beginning in the year 2000. Ground-level concentrations of the primary air pollutants were estimated to be well below any of the applicable national or state ambient air quality standards. 12 refs., 19 tabs

  9. Steam reforming of propane in a fluidized bed membrane reactor for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakib, Mohammad A.; Grace, John R.; Lim, C. Jim; Ghiasi, Bahman [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of British Columbia, 2360 East Mall, Vancouver BC (Canada); Elnashaie, Said S.E.H. [College of Engineering, Misr University for Science and Technology, Distinguished District, 6th of October Province (Egypt)

    2010-06-15

    Steam reforming of propane was carried out in a fluidized bed membrane reactor to investigate a feedstock other than natural gas for production of pure hydrogen. Close to equilibrium conditions were achieved inside the reactor with fluidized catalyst due to the very fast steam reforming reactions. Use of hydrogen permselective Pd{sub 77}Ag{sub 23} membrane panels to extract pure hydrogen shifted the reaction towards complete conversion of the hydrocarbons, including methane, the key intermediate product. Irreversible propane steam reforming is limited by the reversibility of the steam reforming of this methane. To assess the performance improvement due to pure hydrogen withdrawal, experiments were conducted with one and six membrane panels installed along the height of the reactor. The results indicate that a compact reformer can be achieved for pure hydrogen production for a light hydrocarbon feedstock like propane, at moderate operating temperatures of 475-550 C, with increased hydrogen yield. (author)

  10. Photolytic treatment of atrazine-contaminated water: products, kinetics, and reactor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xuejun; Chen, Daniel; Li, Kuyen; Wang, Bin; Hopper, Jack

    2007-08-01

    This study investigates the products, kinetics, and reactor design of atrazine photolysis under 254-nm ultraviolet-C (UVC) irradiation. With an initial atrazine concentration of 60 microg/L (60 ppbm), only two products remain in detectable levels. Up to 77% of decomposed atrazine becomes hydroxyatrazine, the major product. Both atrazine and hydroxyatrazine photodecompose following the first-order rate equation, but the hydroxyatrazine photodecomposition rate is significantly slower than that of atrazine. For atrazine photodecomposition, the rate constant is proportional to the square of UVC output, but inversely proportional to the reactor volume. For a photochemical reactor design, a series of equations are proposed to calculate the needed UVC output power, water treatment capacity, and atrazine outlet concentration.

  11. Effect of Catalytic Cylinders on Autothermal Reforming of Methane for Hydrogen Production in a Microchamber Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new multicylinder microchamber reactor is designed on autothermal reforming of methane for hydrogen production, and its performance and thermal behavior, that is, based on the reaction mechanism, is numerically investigated by varying the cylinder radius, cylinder spacing, and cylinder layout. The results show that larger cylinder radius can promote reforming reaction; the mass fraction of methane decreased from 26% to 21% with cylinder radius from 0.25 mm to 0.75 mm; compact cylinder spacing corresponds to more catalytic surface and the time to steady state is decreased from 40 s to 20 s; alteration of staggered and aligned cylinder layout at constant inlet flow rates does not result in significant difference in reactor performance and it can be neglected. The results provide an indication and optimize performance of reactor; it achieves higher conversion compared with other reforming reactors.

  12. Numerical simulation of titanium production in the plasma quench reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, R.A.; LaViolette, R.A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McGraw, R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A new and general method for modeling the nucleation of condensates in the steady-state supersonic nozzle flow generated in a plasma quench reactor (PQR). The method enables the authors to calculate the nucleation rates and the particle-size distribution along any streamline in the flow, without invoking the usual coarse-graining and truncation approximations for the particle-size distribution. The authors apply the method to titanium condensing in a model argon flow field. The method is directly applicable to simulation of condensation of other metals in other gas flows. They identify the regions in the nozzle of maximum nucleation rate, and show that for the same nucleation rate different particle-size distributions can develop in different regions of the nozzle.

  13. Rapid production of biodiesel in mesoscale oscillatory baffled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phan, A.N.; Harvey, A.P.; Eze, V. [School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Continuous alkali-catalyzed transesterification of rapeseed oil with methanol was carried out in three mesoreactor designs. The induction time decreased with oscillatory Reynolds number for all three reactors. Stable steady states were achieved within induction times of 1.5, 2.5, and 4.0 residence times for the integral, wire wool, and helical baffle designs, respectively. Both experimental and simulated results indicated that under the given conditions there is an optimal residence time for homogeneous transesterification. Higher residence times resulted in reduced fatty acid methyl ester content due to the saponification side reaction. The results demonstrate that biodiesel can be produced at an industrially acceptable level of conversion (> 95 %) in < 5 min residence time. This requires a combination of high catalyst concentration and good mixing. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Process and reactor design for biophotolytic hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburic, Bojan; Dechatiwongse, Pongsathorn; Zemichael, Fessehaye W; Maitland, Geoffrey C; Hellgardt, Klaus

    2013-07-14

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has the ability to produce molecular hydrogen (H2), a clean and renewable fuel, through the biophotolysis of water under sulphur-deprived anaerobic conditions. The aim of this study was to advance the development of a practical and scalable biophotolytic H2 production process. Experiments were carried out using a purpose-built flat-plate photobioreactor, designed to facilitate green algal H2 production at the laboratory scale and equipped with a membrane-inlet mass spectrometry system to accurately measure H2 production rates in real time. The nutrient control method of sulphur deprivation was used to achieve spontaneous H2 production following algal growth. Sulphur dilution and sulphur feed techniques were used to extend algal lifetime in order to increase the duration of H2 production. The sulphur dilution technique proved effective at encouraging cyclic H2 production, resulting in alternating Chlamydomonas reinhardtii recovery and H2 production stages. The sulphur feed technique enabled photobioreactor operation in chemostat mode, resulting in a small improvement in H2 production duration. A conceptual design for a large-scale photobioreactor was proposed based on these experimental results. This photobioreactor has the capacity to enable continuous and economical H2 and biomass production using green algae. The success of these complementary approaches demonstrate that engineering advances can lead to improvements in the scalability and affordability of biophotolytic H2 production, giving increased confidence that H2 can fulfil its potential as a sustainable fuel of the future. PMID:23689756

  15. Group Constants Generation of the Pseudo Fission Products for Fast Reactor Burnup Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Choong-Sup; Kim, Do Heon; Chang, Jonghwa

    2005-05-01

    The pseudo fission products for the burnup calculations of the liquid metal fast reactor were generated. The cross-section data and fission product yield data of ENDF/B-VI were used for the pseudo fission product data of U-235, U-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. The pseudo fission product data can be used with the KAFAX-F22 or -E66, which are the MATXS-format libraries for analyses of the liquid metal fast reactor at KAERI and were distributed through the OECD/NEA. The 80-group MATXS-format libraries of the 172 fission products were generated and the burnup chains for generation of the pseudo fission products were prepared.

  16. The Security of Russia's Nuclear Arsenal: The Human Factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assertions by the Russian military that all of their nuclear weapons are secure against theft and that nuclear units within the military are somehow insulated from the problems plaguing the Russian military should not be accepted uncritically. Accordingly, we should not give unwarranted credence to the pronouncements of military figures like Cal.-Gen. Igor Valynkin, Chief of the Defense Ministry's 12th Main Directorate, which oversees the country's nuclear arsenal. He contends that ''Russian nuclear weapons are under reliable supervision'' and that ''talk about the unreliability of our control over nuclear weapons has only one pragmatic goal--to convince international society that the country is incapable of maintaining nuclear safety and to introduce international oversight over those weapons, as it is done, for example, in Iraq.'' While the comparison to Iraq is preposterous, many analysts might agree with Valynkin's sanguine appraisal of the security of Russia's nuclear weapons. In contrast, I argue that the numerous difficulties confronting the military as a whole should cause concern in the West over the security of the Russian nuclear arsenal

  17. Production and use of 18F by TRIGA nuclear reactor: a first report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiation and radiochemical facilities at public research centre can contribute to the start up of the regional PET centre. In particular, the TRIGA reactor of Casaccia Research Centre could produce a sufficient amount of 18F to start up a PET centre and successively integrated the cyclotron production. This report establishes, in the light of the preliminary experimental works, a guideline to the reactor's production and extraction of 18F in a convenient form for the synthesis of the most representative PET radiopharmaceutical: 18F-FDG

  18. Design criteria, production and total integrity assessment of fuels of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the design criteria, production and total integrity of the HTTR fuels for the safety design of the reactor. The fuels were designed so that they should not lose their integrity even though taking account of various kinds of possible deteriorations during reactor service. Sufficiently low values of initial (as-produced) fuel failure fractions have been achieved, and experience of fuel production is enough for full core loading. Results of the present assessment have shown that total integrity of the fuels will be maintained successfully in terms of coating failure of the fuel particles, thermal and mechanical performance of the fuel compacts, graphite sleeves and fuel assemblies. (author)

  19. Utilization of material testing reactor for radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In April 2000, JAEA (former JAERI) and CTC reached an agreement that we took over the radioisotope production from JAEA. We set up our facility in the Tokai Research and Development Center Nuclear Science Research Institute and started services. In this paper, we state present status of the production of radioisotopes in Japan and development activities in the future. (author)

  20. Production of a Biopolymer at Reactor Scale: A Laboratory Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc, Rukan; Rodriguez-Couto, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Undergraduate students of biotechnology became familiar with several aspects of bioreactor operation via the production of xanthan gum, an industrially relevant biopolymer, by "Xanthomonas campestris" bacteria. The xanthan gum was extracted from the fermentation broth and the yield coefficient and productivity were calculated. (Contains 2 figures.)

  1. Reactor internals production under ideal conditions at Pensacola

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Westinghouse factory at Pensacola, Florida, which specialises in the production of pressure vessel internal components for PWRs, is described. Its excellent manufacturing and inspection facilities, supported by careful attention to staff training and motivation, are responsible for the extremely high level of quality and continual improvement in productivity. (U.K.)

  2. [Characteristics and operation of enhanced continuous bio-hydrogen production reactor using support carrier].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Nan-qi; Tang, Jing; Gong, Man-li

    2006-06-01

    A kind of granular activated carbon, whose granular size is no more than 2mm and specific gravity is 1.54g/cm3, was used as the support carrier to allow retention of activated sludge within a continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) using molasses wastewater as substrate for bio-hydrogen production. Continuous operation characteristics and operational controlling strategy of the enhanced continuous bio-hydrogen production system were investigated. It was indicated that, support carriers could expand the activity scope of hydrogen production bacteria, make the system fairly stable in response to organic load impact and low pH value (pH reactor at low HRT. The reactor with ethanol-type fermentation achieved an optimal hydrogen production rate of 0.37L/(g x d), while the pH value ranged from 3.8 to 4.4, and the hydrogen content was approximately 40% approximately 57% of biogas. It is effective to inhibit the methanogens by reducing the pH value of the bio-hydrogen production system, consequently accelerate the start-up of the reactor.

  3. Energy analysis for the production of biodiesel in a spiral reactor using supercritical tert-butyl methyl ether (MTBE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farobie, Obie; Matsumura, Yukihiko

    2015-11-01

    In this study, energy analysis was conducted for the production of biodiesel in a spiral reactor using supercritical tert-butyl methyl ether (MTBE). This study aims to determine the net energy ratio (NER) and energy efficiency for the production of biodiesel using supercritical MTBE and to verify the effectiveness of the spiral reactor in terms of heat recovery efficiency. The analysis results revealed that the NER for this process was 0.92. Meanwhile, the energy efficiency was 0.98, indicating that the production of biodiesel in a spiral reactor using supercritical MTBE is an energy-efficient process. By comparing the energy supply required for biodiesel production between spiral and conventional reactors, the spiral reactor was more efficient than the conventional reactor.

  4. Hybrid fusion reactor for production of nuclear fuel with minimum radioactive contamination of the fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velikhov, E. P.; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Azizov, E. A., E-mail: Azizov-EA@nrcki.ru; Ignatiev, V. V.; Subbotin, S. A., E-mail: subbotinSA@dhtp.nrcki.ru; Tsibulskiy, V. F., E-mail: sibulskiy-VF@nrcki.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The paper presents the results of the system research on the coordinated development of nuclear and fusion power engineering in the current century. Considering the increasing problems of resource procurement, including limited natural uranium resources, it seems reasonable to use fusion reactors as high-power neutron sources for production of nuclear fuel in a blanket. It is shown that the share of fusion sources in this structural configuration of the energy system can be relatively small. A fundamentally important aspect of this solution to the problem of closure of the fuel cycle is that recycling of highly active spent fuel can be abandoned. Radioactivity released during the recycling of the spent fuel from the hybrid reactor blanket is at least two orders of magnitude lower than during the production of the same number of fissile isotopes after the recycling of the spent fuel from a fast reactor.

  5. Numerical simulation of vortex pyrolysis reactors for condensable tar production from biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.S.; Bellan, J. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.

    1998-08-01

    A numerical study is performed in order to evaluate the performance and optimal operating conditions of vortex pyrolysis reactors used for condensable tar production from biomass. A detailed mathematical model of porous biomass particle pyrolysis is coupled with a compressible Reynolds stress transport model for the turbulent reactor swirling flow. An initial evaluation of particle dimensionality effects is made through comparisons of single- (1D) and multi-dimensional particle simulations and reveals that the 1D particle model results in conservative estimates for total pyrolysis conversion times and tar collection. The observed deviations are due predominantly to geometry effects while directional effects from thermal conductivity and permeability variations are relatively small. Rapid ablative particle heating rates are attributed to a mechanical fragmentation of the biomass particles that is modeled using a critical porosity for matrix breakup. Optimal thermal conditions for tar production are observed for 900 K. Effects of biomass identity, particle size distribution, and reactor geometry and scale are discussed.

  6. Hybrid fusion reactor for production of nuclear fuel with minimum radioactive contamination of the fuel cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikhov, E. P.; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Azizov, E. A.; Ignatiev, V. V.; Subbotin, S. A.; Tsibulskiy, V. F.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the results of the system research on the coordinated development of nuclear and fusion power engineering in the current century. Considering the increasing problems of resource procurement, including limited natural uranium resources, it seems reasonable to use fusion reactors as high-power neutron sources for production of nuclear fuel in a blanket. It is shown that the share of fusion sources in this structural configuration of the energy system can be relatively small. A fundamentally important aspect of this solution to the problem of closure of the fuel cycle is that recycling of highly active spent fuel can be abandoned. Radioactivity released during the recycling of the spent fuel from the hybrid reactor blanket is at least two orders of magnitude lower than during the production of the same number of fissile isotopes after the recycling of the spent fuel from a fast reactor.

  7. FiR 1 reactor in service for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and isotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FiR 1 reactor, a 250 kW Triga reactor, has been in operation since 1962. The main purpose for the existence of the reactor is now the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), but FiR 1 has also an important national role in providing local enterprises and research institutions in the fields of industrial measurements, pharmaceuticals, electronics etc. with isotope production and activation analysis services. In the 1990's a BNCT treatment facility was built at the FiR 1 reactor located at Technical Research Centre of Finland. A special new neutron moderator material FluentalTM (Al+AlF3+Li) developed at VTT ensures the superior quality of the neutron beam. Also the treatment environment is of world top quality after a major renovation of the whole reactor building in 1997. Recently the lithiated polyethylene neutron shielding of the beam aperture was modified to ease the positioning of the patient close to the beam aperture. Increasing the reactor power to 500 kW would allow positioning of the patient further away from the beam aperture. Possibilities to accomplish a safety analysis for this is currently under considerations. Over thirty patients have been treated at FiR 1 since May 1999, when the license for patient treatment was granted to the responsible BNCT treatment organization, Boneca Corporation. Currently three clinical trial protocols for tumours in the brain as well as in the head and neck region are recruiting patients. (author)

  8. Calculation of Radioactivity and Dose Rate of Activated Corrosion Products in Water-Cooled Fusion Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyu Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In water-cooled reactor, the dominant radioactive source term under normal operation is activated corrosion products (ACPs, which have an important impact on reactor inspection and maintenance. A three-node transport model of ACPs was introduced into the new version of ACPs source term code CATE in this paper, which makes CATE capable of theoretically simulating the variation and the distribution of ACPs in a water-cooled reactor and suitable for more operating conditions. For code testing, MIT PWR coolant chemistry loop was simulated, and the calculation results from CATE are close to the experimental results from MIT, which means CATE is available and credible on ACPs analysis of water-cooled reactor. Then ACPs in the blanket cooling loop of water-cooled fusion reactor ITER under construction were analyzed using CATE and the results showed that the major contributors are the short-life nuclides, especially Mn-56. At last a point kernel integration code ARShield was coupled with CATE, and the dose rate around ITER blanket cooling loop was calculated. Results showed that after shutting down the reactor only for 8 days, the dose rate decreased nearly one order of magnitude, which was caused by the rapid decay of the short-life ACPs.

  9. Removal of anaerobic soluble microbial products in a biological activated carbon reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaojing; Zhou, Weili; He, Shengbing

    2013-09-01

    The soluble microbial products (SMP) in the biological treatment effluent are generally of great amount and are poorly biodegradable. Focusing on the biodegradation of anaerobic SMP, the biological activated carbon (BAC) was introduced into the anaerobic system. The experiments were conducted in two identical lab-scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors. The high strength organics were degraded in the first UASB reactor (UASB1) and the second UASB (UASB2, i.e., BAC) functioned as a polishing step to remove SMP produced in UASB1. The results showed that 90% of the SMP could be removed before granular activated carbon was saturated. After the saturation, the SMP removal decreased to 60% on the average. Analysis of granular activated carbon adsorption revealed that the main role of SMP removal in BAC reactor was biodegradation. A strain of SMP-degrading bacteria, which was found highly similar to Klebsiella sp., was isolated, enriched and inoculated back to the BAC reactor. When the influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) was 10,000 mg/L and the organic loading rate achieved 10 kg COD/(m3 x day), the effluent from the BAC reactor could meet the discharge standard without further treatment. Anaerobic BAC reactor inoculated with the isolated Klebsiella was proved to be an effective, cheap and easy technical treatment approach for the removal of SMP in the treatment of easily-degradable wastewater with COD lower than 10,000 mg/L. PMID:24520716

  10. Modelling and operation of reactors for enzymatic biodiesel production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Jason Anthony

    to increase profits while reducing operating cost, as well as meeting government and regulatory pressures for processes to be environmentally friendly and sustainable. Current applications of biocatalysts, more specifically, enzymes for large scale bulk production of chemicals have been successfully applied...... to the production of high fructose corn syrup, upgrading of fats and oils and biodiesel production to name a few. Despite these examples of industrial enzymatic applications, it is still not “clear cut” how to implement biocatalyst in industry and how best to optimize the processes. This is because the processing...... strategy is usually different to most traditional catalytic processes. In nature, enzymes operate at much lower substrate and product concentrations compared to most industrial chemical processes. What this means is that the natural conditions for biocatalysts are normally much different from conventional...

  11. Zeolite Membrane Reactor for Water Gas Shift Reaction for Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jerry Y.S. [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2013-01-29

    Gasification of biomass or heavy feedstock to produce hydrogen fuel gas using current technology is costly and energy-intensive. The technology includes water gas shift reaction in two or more reactor stages with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given catalyst volume. This project is focused on developing a membrane reactor for efficient conversion of water gas shift reaction to produce a hydrogen stream as a fuel and a carbon dioxide stream suitable for sequestration. The project was focused on synthesizing stable, hydrogen perm-selective MFI zeolite membranes for high temperature hydrogen separation; fabricating tubular MFI zeolite membrane reactor and stable water gas shift catalyst for membrane reactor applications, and identifying experimental conditions for water gas shift reaction in the zeolite membrane reactor that will produce a high purity hydrogen stream. The project has improved understanding of zeolite membrane synthesis, high temperature gas diffusion and separation mechanisms for zeolite membranes, synthesis and properties of sulfur resistant catalysts, fabrication and structure optimization of membrane supports, and fundamentals of coupling reaction with separation in zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction. Through the fundamental study, the research teams have developed MFI zeolite membranes with good perm-selectivity for hydrogen over carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and water vapor, and high stability for operation in syngas mixture containing 500 part per million hydrogen sulfide at high temperatures around 500°C. The research teams also developed a sulfur resistant catalyst for water gas shift reaction. Modeling and experimental studies on the zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction have demonstrated the effective use of the zeolite membrane reactor for production of high purity hydrogen stream.

  12. Solar Thermophilic Anaerobic Reactor (STAR) for Renewable Energy Production

    OpenAIRE

    Mashad, El, H.

    2003-01-01

    Liquid and solid cattle manures are major waste streams inEgypt. The main objective of this research was maximising the net energy production from these wastes by using a solar energy heating system. High concentration of ammonia can strongly affect the gross methane production via inhibition of methanogenesis and reduced hydrolysis. The latter is only limited addressed so far in literature and therefore taken as a second objective of this study.To be able to design a solar thermophilic anaer...

  13. An experimental investigation of fission product release in SLOWPOKE-2 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing radiation fields due to a release of fission products in the reactor container of several SLOWPOKE-2 reactors fuelled with a highly-enriched uranium (HEU) alloy core have been observed. It is believed that these increases are associated with the fuel fabrication where a small amount of uranium-bearing material is exposed to the coolant at the end-welds of the fuel element. To investigate this phenomenon samples of reactor water and gas from the headspace above the water have been obtained and examined by gamma spectrometry methods for reactors of various burnups at the University of Toronto, Ecole Polytechnique and Kanata Isotope Production Facility. An underwater visual examination of the fuel core at Ecole Polytechnique has also provided information on the condition of the core. This report (Volume 1) summarizes the equipment, analysis techniques and results of tests conducted at the various reactor sites. The data report is published as Volume 2. (author). 30 refs., 9 tabs., 20 figs

  14. Thermochemical data for reactor materials and fission products: The ECN database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the authors regarding the compilation of a database of thermochemical properties for reactor materials and fission products is reviewed. The evaluation procedures and techniques are outlined and examples are given. In addition, examples of the use of thermochemical data for the application in the field of Nuclear Technology are given. (orig.)

  15. Zero valent iron simultaneously enhances methane production and sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiwen; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-05-15

    Zero valent iron (ZVI) packed anaerobic granular sludge reactors have been developed for improved anaerobic wastewater treatment. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to describe the enhanced methane production and sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge reactors with the addition of ZVI. The model is successfully calibrated and validated using long-term experimental data sets from two independent ZVI-enhanced anaerobic granular sludge reactors with different operational conditions. The model satisfactorily describes the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, sulfate reduction and methane production data from both systems. Results show ZVI directly promotes propionate degradation and methanogenesis to enhance methane production. Simultaneously, ZVI alleviates the inhibition of un-dissociated H2S on acetogens, methanogens and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) through buffering pH (Fe(0) + 2H(+) = Fe(2+) + H2) and iron sulfide precipitation, which improve the sulfate reduction capacity, especially under deterioration conditions. In addition, the enhancement of ZVI on methane production and sulfate reduction occurs mainly at relatively low COD/ [Formula: see text] ratio (e.g., 2-4.5) rather than high COD/ [Formula: see text] ratio (e.g., 16.7) compared to the reactor without ZVI addition. The model proposed in this work is expected to provide support for further development of a more efficient ZVI-based anaerobic granular system.

  16. CFD analysis and flow model reduction for surfactant production in helix reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikačević, N.M.; Thielen, L.; Twerda, A.; Hof, P.M.J. van den

    2014-01-01

    Flow pattern analysis in a spiral Helix reactor is conducted, for the application in the commercial surfactant production. Step change response curves (SCR) were obtained from numerical tracer experiments by three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Non-reactive flow is simul

  17. Modelling of packed bed membrane reactors for autothermal production of ultrapure hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiemersma, T.P.; Patil, C.S.; Sint Annaland, van M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The conceptual feasibility of a packed bed membrane reactor for the autothermal reforming (ATR) of methane for the production of ultrapure hydrogen was investigated. By integrating H2 permselective Pd-based membranes under autothermal conditions, a high degree of process integration and intensificat

  18. Assessement of Codes and Standards Applicable to a Hydrogen Production Plant Coupled to a Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. J. Russell

    2006-06-01

    This is an assessment of codes and standards applicable to a hydrogen production plant to be coupled to a nuclear reactor. The result of the assessment is a list of codes and standards that are expected to be applicable to the plant during its design and construction.

  19. Procurement of tritium for fusion reactor. A design study of facility for production of fusion fuel tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium, a developmental fuel for use in fusion reactors, has been produced in fission research reactors in Japan by extraction from neutron-irradiated 6Li-targets. This paper describes the preliminary design of a large-scale production facility capable of producing 500 g of tritium annually. The present status of tritium production technology in Japan is also discussed. (author)

  20. Effect of reactor configuration on biogas production from wheat straw hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaparaju, Prasad; Serrano, María; Angelidaki, Irini

    2009-12-01

    The potential of wheat straw hydrolysate for biogas production was investigated in continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors. The hydrolysate originated as a side stream from a pilot plant pretreating wheat straw hydrothermally (195 degrees C for 10-12 min) for producing 2nd generation bioethanol [Kaparaju, P., Serrano, M., Thomsen, A.B., Kongjan, P., Angelidaki, I., 2009. Bioethanol, biohydrogen and biogas production from wheat straw in a biorefinery concept. Bioresource Technology 100 (9), 2562-2568]. Results from batch assays showed that hydrolysate had a methane potential of 384 ml/g-volatile solids (VS)(added). Process performance in CTSR and UASB reactors was investigated by varying hydrolysate concentration and/or organic loading rate (OLR). In CSTR, methane yields increased with increase in hydrolysate concentration and maximum yield of 297 ml/g-COD was obtained at an OLR of 1.9 g-COD/l d and 100% (v/v) hydrolysate. On the other hand, process performance and methane yields in UASB were affected by OLR and/or substrate concentration. Maximum methane yields of 267 ml/g-COD (COD removal of 72%) was obtained in UASB reactor when operated at an OLR of 2.8 g-COD/l d but with only 10% (v/v) hydrolysate. However, co-digestion of hydrolysate with pig manure (1:3 v/v ratio) improved the process performance and resulted in methane yield of 219 ml/g-COD (COD removal of 72%). Thus, anaerobic digestion of hydrolysate for biogas production was feasible in both CSTR and UASB reactor types. However, biogas process was affected by the reactor type and operating conditions.

  1. Fission product filter for hot reactor cooling gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fission product filter for He consists of a winding body composed of two corrugated metal sheets simultaneously wound on a core laterally reversed. It is inserted into an enclosing tube and held at top and bottom by a star-shaped yoke. (DG)

  2. Innovative microbial fuel cell for electricity production from anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Min, Booki; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    (Pmax) of 218 mW m−2 and a saturation constant (Ks) of 244 mg L−1. The main limitations for achieving higher electricity production in the SMFC were identified as the high internal resistance at the electrolyte and the inefficient electron transfer at the cathode electrode. As the current increased...

  3. Bio-hydrogen production in an EGSB reactor under mesophilic, thermophilic and hyperthermophilic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Abreu, A. A.; Danko, Anthony S.; Alves, M. M.

    2007-01-01

    Mesophilic, thermophilic and hyperthermophilic bio-hydrogen production with an expanded granular sludge blanket (EGSB) fed with glucose and arabinose, without methane production, was demonstrated. Homoacetogenesis was observed on reactor when operated under mesophilic (37ºC) conditions but not under thermophilic (55ºC) and hyper-thermophilic conditions (70ºC). It was also found that under thermophilic and hyper-thermophilic conditions glucose is preferentially consumed than ara...

  4. Introduction to Decommissioning of Plutonium Production Reactors%钚生产堆退役简介

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永仙; 安凯媛; 刘东

    2013-01-01

      简要阐述几个国家钚生产堆的退役情况,以期对我国今后生产堆的退役提供借鉴。%  The paper provides briefly the information on the decommissiong of plutonium production reactors in several countries across the world and some suggestions for possible future decommissioning of production reac -tors in our country .

  5. Comparison of Single Loop and Dual Loop PP Reactors and PP Product Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Yunfeng; Jiang Rong; Feng Suogui

    2003-01-01

    The present status of PP technology in China is presented. Through a review of single loop and dual loop PP reactor technology as well as development and utilization of PP products it is concluded that import of PP technology should be based on the demand of PP products and market trend with consideration of local conditions. The existing problems and future development of PP technology in China are discussed.

  6. Achieving safety through the design process for the heavy water new product reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is presently completing the Conceptual Design Phase (CDP) for a heavy water new production reactor (NPR). In undertaking the development of requirements for the heavy water NPR, the DOE defined as a principal requirement that the reactor would be designed such that it would meet or exceed the level of safety and safety assurance achieved by modern commercial nuclear power plants. This paper discusses the strategy and methodology of implementing the line responsibilities for achieving safety in the design of the heavy water NPR

  7. Production of {sup 48}V in a nuclear reactor via secondary tritons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siri, S. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Ezeiza, Gerencia de Capacitacion, Quimica Nuclear y Ciencias de la Salud, Ezeiza, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cohen, I.M. [Univ. Tecnologica Nacional, Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-07-01

    The production of {sup 48}V in a nuclear reactor, induced on titanium by tritons generated from the {sup 6}Li(n, t){sup 4} He reaction, and eventually {sup 7}Li(n, n't){sup 4}He, is described. Samples of lithium titanate were irradiated for an irradiation cycle (120 h) in the RA-3 reactor, belonging to Ezeiza Atomic Centre. After a radiochemical separation, the characteristic radiations from {sup 48}V were identified in the gamma ray spectra of the vanadium fractions. (orig.)

  8. Fission product release phenomena during core melt accidents in metal fueled heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, P G; Hyder, M L; Monson, P R; Randolph, H W [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (USA); Hagrman, D L [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA); McClure, P R; Leonard, M T [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA)

    1990-01-01

    The phenomena that determine fission product release rates from a core melting accident in a metal-fueled, heavy water reactor are described in this paper. This information is obtained from the analysis of the current metal fuel experimental data base and from the results of analytical calculations. Experimental programs in place at the Savannah River Site are described that will provide information to resolve uncertainties in the data base. The results of the experiments will be incorporated into new severe accident computer codes recently developed for this reactor design. 47 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Research and development program of hydrogen production system with high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been developing a hydrogen production system with a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). While the HTGR hydrogen production system has the following advantages compared with a fossil-fired hydrogen production system; low operation cost (economical fuel cost), low CO2 emission and saving of fossil fuel by use of nuclear heat, it requires some items to be solved as follows; cost reduction of facility such as a reactor, coolant circulation system and so on, development of control and safety technologies. As for the control and safety technologies, JAERI plans demonstration test with hydrogen production system by steam reforming of methane coupling to 30 Wt HTGR, named high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). Prior to the demonstration test, a 1/30-scale out-of-pile test facility is in construction for safety review and detailed design of the HTTR hydrogen production system. Also, design study will start for reduction of facility cost. Moreover, basic study on hydrogen production process without CO2 emission is in progress by thermochemical water splitting. (orig.)

  10. Feasibility analysis of I-131 production in the Moroccan TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A feasibility analysis for I-131 production at the Moroccan TRIGA MARK II research reactor was conducted. • Two production scenarios were discussed with several TeO2 target masses. • The MCNPX v2.7 computer code with its depletion capabilities was used. • A production activity of about 4.63 Ci per 80 MWh irradiation period is obtained. - Abstract: Since the commissioning of the Moroccan 2 MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor hosted by the Centre National de l’Energie des Sciences et des Techniques Nucléaires (CNESTEN), the latter institution has established a radioisotope production program to supply radiopharmaceuticals for use in nuclear medicine. This paper presents a feasibility analysis for I-131 production using two in-core irradiation positions within the Moroccan TRIGA MARK II research reactor. The MCNPX v2.7 code, with its depletion capabilities, was used for the evaluation of two different production scenarios using several masses of TeO2 target samples. The maximum achievable activities were found to be 3.90 Ci/week for scenario 1 and 4.63 Ci/week for scenario 2. Thermal analysis shows that safety limits of capsules used for these experiments were not violated

  11. Methane production enhancement by an independent cathode in integrated anaerobic reactor with microbial electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weiwei; Han, Tingting; Guo, Zechong; Varrone, Cristiano; Wang, Aijie; Liu, Wenzong

    2016-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) represents a potential way to achieve energy recovery from waste organics. In this study, a novel bioelectrochemically-assisted anaerobic reactor is assembled by two AD systems separated by anion exchange membrane, with the cathode placing in the inside cylinder (cathodic AD) and the anode on the outside cylinder (anodic AD). In cathodic AD, average methane production rate goes up to 0.070 mL CH4/mL reactor/day, which is 2.59 times higher than AD control reactor (0.027 m(3) CH4/m(3)/d). And COD removal is increased ∼15% over AD control. When changing to sludge fermentation liquid, methane production rate has been further increased to 0.247 mL CH4/mL reactor/day (increased by 51.53% comparing with AD control). Energy recovery efficiency presents profitable gains, and economic revenue from increased methane totally self-cover the cost of input electricity. The study indicates that cathodic AD could cost-effectively enhance methane production rate and degradation of glucose and fermentative liquid.

  12. Measurement of tritium production rate distribution for a fusion-fission hybrid conceptual reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fusion-fission hybrid conceptual reactor is established. It consists of a DT neutron source and a spherical shell of depleted uranium and hydrogen lithium. The tritium production rate (TPR) distribution in the conceptual reactor was measured by DT neutrons using two sets of lithium glass detectors with different thicknesses in the hole in the vertical direction with respect to the D+ beam of the Cockcroft-Walton neutron generator in direct current mode. The measured TPR distribution is compared with the calculated results obtained by the three-dimensional Monte Carlo code MCNP5 and the ENDF/B-Ⅵ data file. The discrepancy between the measured and calculated values can be attributed to the neutron data library of the hydrogen lithium lack S(α, β) thermal scattering model, so we show that a special database of low-energy and thermal neutrons should be established in the physics design of fusion-fission hybrid reactors. (authors)

  13. Development of an Internally Circulating Fluidized Bed Membrane Reactor for Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Dong-lai; GRACE John R; LIM C Jim

    2006-01-01

    An innovative Internally Circulating Fluidized Bed Membrane Reactor (ICFBMR) was designed and operated for ultra-pure hydrogen production from natural gas. The reactor includes internal catalyst solids circulation for conveying heat between a reforming zone and an oxidation zone. In the reforming zone, catalyst particles are transported upwards by reactant gas where steam reforming reactions are taking place and hydrogen is permeating through the membrane surfaces. Air is injected into the oxidation zone to generate heat which is carried by catalyst particles to the reforming zone supporting the endothermic steam reforming reaction. The technology development process is introduced: cold model test,pilot plant and industrial demonstration unit. The process flow diagram and key components of each unit are described.The ICFBMR process has the potential to provide improved performance relative to conventional SMR fixed-bed tubular reactors.

  14. Development, Implementation and Experimental Validations of Activation Products Models for Water Pool Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some parameters were obtained both calculations and experiments in order to determined the source of the meaning activation products in water pool reactors. In this case, the study was done in RA-6 reactor (Centro Atomico Bariloche - Argentina).In normal operation, neutron flux on core activates aluminium plates.The activity on coolant water came from its impurities activation and meanly from some quantity of aluminium that, once activated, leave the cladding and is transported by water cooling system.This quantity depends of the 'recoil range' of each activation reaction.The 'staying time' on pool (the time that nuclides are circulating on the reactor pool) is another characteristic parameter of the system.Stationary state activity of some nuclides depends of this time.Also, several theoretical models of activation on coolant water system are showed, and their experimental validations

  15. Measurement of tritium production rate distribution for a fusion-fission hybrid conceptual reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin-Hua; GUO Hai-Ping; MOU Yun-Feng; ZHENG Pu; LIU Rong; YANG Xiao-Fei; YANG Jian

    2013-01-01

    A fusion-fission hybrid conceptual reactor is established.It consists of a DT neutron source and a spherical shell of depleted uranium and hydrogen lithium.The tritium production rate (TPR) distribution in the conceptual reactor was measured by DT neutrons using two sets of lithium glass detectors with different thicknesses in the hole in the vertical direction with respect to the D+ beam of the Cockcroft-Walton neutron generator in direct current mode.The measured TPR distribution is compared with the calculated results obtained by the threedimensional Monte Carlo code MCNP5 and the ENDF/B-Ⅵ data file.The discrepancy between the measured and calculated values can be attributed to the neutron data library of the hydrogen lithium lack S(α,β) thermal scattering model,so we show that a special database of low-energy and thermal neutrons should be established in the physics design of fusion-fission hybrid reactors.

  16. A novel rotary reactor configuration for simultaneous production of hydrogen and carbon nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinilla, J.L.; Utrilla, R.; Lazaro, M.J.; Suelves, I.; Moliner, R. [Instituto de Carboquimica CSIC, Miguel Luesma 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Palacios, J.M. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica CSIC, Cantoblanco, Marie Curie 2, 28049-Madrid (Spain)

    2009-10-15

    A novel reactor configuration, a rotary bed reactor (RBR), was used to study at large scale production the Catalytic Decomposition of Methane (CDM) into hydrogen and carbon nanofibers using a nickel-copper catalyst. The results were compared to those obtained in a fluidized bed reactor (FBR) under the same operating conditions. Tests carried out in the RBR provided higher hydrogen yields and more sustainable catalyst performance in comparison to the FBR. Additionally, the effect of the rotation speed and reaction temperature on the performance in the RBR of the nickel-copper catalyst was studied. The textural and structural properties of the carbon nanofibers produced were also studied by means of N{sub 2} adsorption, SEM and XRD, and compared to those obtained in the FBR set-up under the same operating conditions. (author)

  17. Production of biocrudes from biomass in a fixed-bed tubular reactor: product yields and compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putun, A.E.; Ozcan, A.; Gercel, H.F.; Putun, E. [Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture

    2001-08-10

    Fixed-bed pyrolysis in a tubular reactor was conducted on three biomass samples. Euphorbia rigida, sunflower (Helianthus annus L.) pressed bagasse and hazelnut (Corylus avellana) shells, to determine the possibility of each being a potential source of renewable fuels and chemical feedstocks. The effects of pyrolysis temperature and sweep gas (N{sub 2}) flow rate on the pyrolysis yields and chemical compositions of the biocrudes obtained were investigated. The maximum biocrude yield of 45.7 wt% was obtained from sunflower pressed bagasse in N{sub 2} atmosphere at a pyrolysis temperature of 823 K and fixed heating rate of 7 K min{sup -1}. However, this biocrude yield can be compared with the biocrude of Euphorbia rigida (31.5 wt%) at optimum conditions. The biocrude yield of sunflower pressed bagasse increased by 26.4% as the final temperature was increased from 673 to 823 K whereas the biocrude yield of Euphorbia rigida increased by 30.8% more than sunflower pressed bagasse when the final temperature was increased from 673 to 823 K. The pyrolysis products were characterized by elemental analysis, high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, and also compared with the currently utilized transport fuels by simulated distillation. The pentane subfractions of biocrudes were analyzed for the quantification of hydrocarbons by gas chromatography. The chemical characterizations have shown that the biocrudes obtained from Euphorbia rigida, sunflower pressed bagasse and hazelnut shells were quite similar to crude oil and shale oil. 30 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Reliability and safety of the electrical power supply complex of the Hanford production reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, F.D.

    1960-09-15

    Safety has been and must continue to be the inviolable modulus by which the operation of a nuclear reactor must be judged. A malfunction in any reactor may well result in a release of fission products which may dissipate over a wide geographical area. Such dissipation may place the health, happiness and even the lives of the people in the region in serious jeopardy. As a result, the property damage and liability cost may reach astronomical values in the order of magnitude of billions of dollars. Reliability of the electrical network is an indispensable factor in attaining a high order of safety assurance. Progress in the peaceful use of atomic energy may take the form of electrical power generation using the nuclear reactor as a source of thermal energy. In view of these factors it seems appropriate and profitable that a critical engineering study be made of the safety and reliability of the Hanford reactors without regard to cost economics. This individual and independent technical engineering analysis was made without regard to Hanford traditional engineering and administration assignments. The main objective has been to focus attention on areas which seem to merit further detailed study on conditions which seem to need adjustment but most of all on those changes which will improve reactor safety. This report is the result of such a study.

  19. Production test PTA-002, increased graphite temperature limit -- B, C and D Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, A.

    1965-12-17

    The fundamental objective of the graphite temperature limit is to prevent excessive oxidation of the graphite moderator blocks with carbon dioxide and water vapor in the reactor atmosphere. Laboratory tests have shown that 10% uniform oxidation of graphite results in a loss in strength of approximately 50%. Production Test IP-725 was conducted at F Reactor for a period of six months at graphite temperatures approximately 50 and 100 C higher than the present graphite temperature limit of 650 C. The results from the F Reactor test suggest that an increase in the graphite temperature limit from 650 C to 700 C is technically feasible from the standpoint of oxidation of the graphite moderator with CO{sub 2}. Any significant additional increase was shown to lead to excessively high oxidation rates and is therefore not considered feasible. The objective of this test, therefore, is to extend the higher temperature investigations to B, C, and D Reactors. For the duration of this test, the graphite temperature limit will be increased from 650 C and 700 C, corresponding to an increase in the graphite stringer temperature limit from 735 C to 790 C. The test is expected to last for approximately six months but may be terminated early on any or all the reactors.

  20. Use of LEU in the aqueous homogeneous medical isotope production reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, R.M. [Babock & Wilcox, Lynchburg, VA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The Medical Isotope Production Reactor (MIPR) is an aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate in water, contained in an aluminum cylinder immersed in a large pool of water which can provide both shielding and a medium for heat exchange. The control rods are inserted at the top through re-entrant thimbles. Provision is made to remove radiolytic gases and recombine emitted hydrogen and oxygen. Small quantities of the solution can be continuously extracted and replaced after passing through selective ion exchange columns, which are used to extract the desired products (fission products), e.g. molybdenum-99. This reactor type is known for its large negative temperature coefficient, the small amount of fuel required for criticality, and the ease of control. Calculation using TWODANT show that a 20% U-235 enriched system, water reflected can be critical with 73 liters of solution.

  1. Energy Neutral Phosphate Fertilizer Production Using High Temperature Reactors: A Philippine Case Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Philippines may profit from extracting uranium (U) from phosphoric acid during fertilizer production in a way that the recovered U can be beneficiated and taken as raw material for nuclear reactor fuel. Used in a high temperature reactor (HTR) that provides electricity and/or process heat for fertilizer processing and U extraction, energy-neutral fertilizer production, an idea first proposed by Haneklaus et al.,is possible. This paper presents a first case study of the concept regarding a representative phosphate fertilizer plant in the Philippines and exemplary HTR designs (HTR50S and GTHTR300C) developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Three different arrangements (version I-III), ranging from basic electricity supply to overall power supply including on site hydrogen production for ammonia conversion, are introduced and discussed

  2. Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oil over Plasma Reactor: Optimization of Biodiesel Yield using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Tri Nugroho

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel production has received considerable attention in the recent past as a renewable fuel. The production of biodiesel by conventional transesterification process employs alkali or acid catalyst and has been industrially accepted for its high conversion and reaction rates. However for alkali catalyst, there may be risk of free acid or water contamination and soap formation is likely to take place which makes the separation process difficult. Although yield is high, the acids, being corrosive, may cause damage to the equipment and the reaction rate was also observed to be low. This research focuses on empirical modeling and optimization for the biodiesel production over plasma reactor. The plasma reactor technology is more promising than the conventional catalytic processes due to the reducing reaction time and easy in product separation. Copyright (c 2009 by BCREC. All Rights reserved.[Received: 10 August 2009, Revised: 5 September 2009, Accepted: 12 October 2009][How to Cite: I. Istadi, D.D. Anggoro, P. Marwoto, S. Suherman, B.T. Nugroho (2009. Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oil over Plasma Reactor: Optimization of Biodiesel Yield using Response Surface Methodology. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 4(1: 23-31. doi:10.9767/bcrec.4.1.23.23-31][How to Link/ DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.4.1.23.23-31

  3. Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oil over Plasma Reactor: Optimization of Biodiesel Yield using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel production has received considerable attention in the recent past as a renewable fuel. The production of biodiesel by conventional transesterification process employs alkali or acid catalyst and has been industrially accepted for its high conversion and reaction rates. However for alkali catalyst, there may be risk of free acid or water contamination and soap formation is likely to take place which makes the separation process difficult. Although yield is high, the acids, being corrosive, may cause damage to the equipment and the reaction rate was also observed to be low. This research focuses on empirical modeling and optimization for the biodiesel production over plasma reactor. The plasma reactor technology is more promising than the conventional catalytic processes due to the reducing reaction time and easy in product separation. Copyright (c 2009 by BCREC. All Rights reserved.[Received: 10 August 2009, Revised: 5 September 2009, Accepted: 12 October 2009][How to Cite: I. Istadi, D.D. Anggoro, P. Marwoto, S. Suherman, B.T. Nugroho (2009. Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oil over Plasma Reactor: Optimization of Biodiesel Yield using Response Surface Methodology. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 4(1: 23-31.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.4.1.7115.23-31][How to Link/ DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.4.1.7115.23-31 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/7115

  4. Kinetic study on the effect of temperature on biogas production using a lab scale batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepanraj, B; Sivasubramanian, V; Jayaraj, S

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, biogas production from food waste through anaerobic digestion was carried out in a 2l laboratory-scale batch reactor operating at different temperatures with a hydraulic retention time of 30 days. The reactors were operated with a solid concentration of 7.5% of total solids and pH 7. The food wastes used in this experiment were subjected to characterization studies before and after digestion. Modified Gompertz model and Logistic model were used for kinetic study of biogas production. The kinetic parameters, biogas yield potential of the substrate (B), the maximum biogas production rate (Rb) and the duration of lag phase (λ), coefficient of determination (R(2)) and root mean square error (RMSE) were estimated in each case. The effect of temperature on biogas production was evaluated experimentally and compared with the results of kinetic study. The results demonstrated that the reactor with operating temperature of 50°C achieved maximum cumulative biogas production of 7556ml with better biodegradation efficiency.

  5. Commercial products and services of research reactors. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the number of operational research reactors is steadily decreasing, more than half of those that remain are greatly underutilized and, in most cases, underfunded. To continue to play a key role in the development of peaceful uses of nuclear technology, the remaining research reactors will need to provide useful products and services to private, national and regional customers, in some cases with adequate revenue generation for reliable, safe and secure facility management and operation. In the light of declining governmental financial support and the need for improved physical security and conversion to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, many research reactors have been challenged to generate income to offset increasing operational and maintenance costs. The renewed interest in nuclear power (and therefore in nuclear education and training), the global expansion of diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine, and the extensive use of semiconductors in electronics and in other areas have created new opportunities for research reactors, prominent among them, markets for products and services in regions and countries without such facilities. It is clear that such initiatives towards greater self-reliance will need to address such aspects as market surveys, marketing and business plans, and cost of delivery services. It will also be important to better inform present and future potential end users of research reactor services of the capabilities and products that can be provided. This publication is a compilation of material from an IAEA technical meeting on “Commercial Products and Services of Research Reactors”, held in Vienna, Austria, from 28 June to 2 July 2010. The overall objective of the meeting was to exchange information on good practices and to provide concrete examples, in technical presentations and brainstorming discussions, to promote and facilitate the development of commercial applications of research reactors. The meeting also aimed to

  6. Knowledges and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Knowledges and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operations: Savannah River Site (SRS) Production Reactors, provides the basis for the development of content-valid certification examinations for Senior Reactor Operators (SROs) and Central Control Room Supervisors (SUP). The position of Shift Technical Engineer (STE) has been included in the catalog for completeness. This new SRS reactor operating shift crew position is held by an individual holding a CCR Supervisor Certification who has received special engineering and technical training. Also, the STE has a Bachelor of Science degree in engineering or a related technical field. The SRS catalog contains approximately 2500 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for SROs and SUPs at heavy water moderated production reactors. Each K/A statement has been rated for its importance to the safe operation of the plant in a manner ensuring the health and safety of the public. The SRS K/A catalog is presently organized into five major sections: Plant Systems grouped by Safety Function, Plant Wide Generic K/As, Emergency Plant Evolutions, Theory and Components (to be developed)

  7. Hydrogen production by biomass gasification in supercritical water with a fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Y.J.; Jin, H.; Guo, L.J.; Zhang, X.M.; Cao, C.Q.; Guo, X. [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering (SKLMF), Xi' an Jiaotong University, 28 Xianning West Road, Xi' an 710049, Shaanxi (China)

    2008-11-15

    Hydrogen production by biomass gasification in supercritical water (SCW) is a promising technology for utilizing high moisture content biomass, but reactor plugging is a critical problem for biomass gasification in the tubular reactor. A novel SCW fluidized bed system for biomass gasification was developed successfully in State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering (SKLMF) to prevent the plugging and it was designed for the temperature up to 923 K and the pressure up to 30 MPa. Model compound (glucose) and real biomass (corn cob) were gasified under SCW conditions to generate hydrogen-rich fuel gas and a performance testing of the new SCW fluidized bed system was conducted. The product gas composed of H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, CO and small amount of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6} was obtained. The effects of solution concentration, temperature, pressure and oxidant concentration on gasification were studied. 30 wt% glucose and 18 wt% corn cob feedstocks were continually and stably gasified and reactor plugging was not observed. The results showed that using fluidized bed reactor for biomass gasification in SCW has many advantages and good prospects. (author)

  8. Methane production enhancement by an independent cathode in integrated anaerobic reactor with microbial electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Weiwei; Han, Tingting; Guo, Zechong;

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) represents a potential way to achieve energy recovery from waste organics. In this study, a novel bioelectrochemically-assisted anaerobic reactor is assembled by two AD systems separated by anion exchange membrane, with the cathode placing in the inside cylinder (cathodic...... AD) and the anode on the outside cylinder (anodic AD). In cathodic AD, average methane production rate goes up to 0.070 mL CH4/mL reactor/day, which is 2.59 times higher than AD control reactor (0.027 m3 CH4/m3/d). And COD removal is increased ~15% over AD control. When changing to sludge...... fermentation liquid, methane production rate has been further increased to 0.247 mL CH4/mL reactor/day (increased by 51.53% comparing with AD control). Energy recovery efficiency presents profitable gains, and economic revenue from increased methane totally self-cover the cost of input electricity. The study...

  9. Effect of organic loading rate on methane and volatile fatty acids productions from anaerobic treatment of palm oil mill effluent in UASB and UFAF reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Sumate Chaiprapat; Poonsuk Prasertsan; Piyarat Boonsawang; Ronnachai Chaisri

    2007-01-01

    Anaerobic treatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME) with the separation of the acidogenic and methanogenic phase was studied in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and an up-flowanaerobic filter (UFAF) reactor. Furthermore, the effect of OLR on methane and volatile fatty acid productions in UASB and UFAF reactors was investigated. In this research, UASB as acidogenic reactor wasused for volatile fatty acid production and UFAF as methanogenic reactor was used for methane produc...

  10. Biogas and methane production in an aerobic reactor; Produccion de biogas y metano en un reactor anaerobio UASB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez Borges, E.; Mendez Novelo, R.; Magana Pietra, A.

    1998-06-01

    On the basis of the results obtained during the evaluation of an anaerobic digester in treating pig farm sewage, mathematical models were constructed predicting the system`s efficiency in producing biogas from such waste, and the methane content of this gas, as a function of the influent`s hydraulic retention time(HRT) and chemical oxygen demand (COD). The experimental device consisted of a UASB reactor at the bottom and a high-rate sedimentator at the top with a total operational volume of 534 litres. The results obtained to establish the critical operating parameters are reported. The production of biogas was 259 1/m``3 and methane 217 1/m``3 with an HRT of 1.3 days when a load of 3.1 kg-COD/m``3 day was applied. The mathematical models presented analyses biogas production as a variable response and the influents` HRT and COD as independent variables to assess the efficiency of the system. (Author) 13 refs.

  11. A gas-phase reactor powered by solar energy and ethanol for H2 production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the view of H2 as the future energy vector, we presented here the development of a homemade photo-reactor working in gas phase and easily interfacing with fuel cell devices, for H2 production by ethanol dehydrogenation. The process generates acetaldehyde as the main co-product, which is more economically advantageous with respect to the low valuable CO2 produced in the alternative pathway of ethanol photoreforming. The materials adopted as photocatalysts are based on TiO2 substrates but properly modified with noble (Au) and not-noble (Cu) metals to enhance light harvesting in the visible region. The samples were characterized by BET surface area analysis, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and UV–visible Diffusive Reflectance Spectroscopy, and finally tested in our homemade photo-reactor by simulated solar irradiation. We discussed about the benefits of operating in gas phase with respect to a conventional slurry photo-reactor (minimization of scattering phenomena, no metal leaching, easy product recovery, etc.). Results showed that high H2 productivity can be obtained in gas phase conditions, also irradiating titania photocatalysts doped with not-noble metals. - Highlights: • A gas-phase photoreactor for H2 production by ethanol dehydrogenation was developed. • The photocatalytic behaviours of Au and Cu metal-doped TiO2 thin layers are compared. • Benefits of operating in gas phase with respect to a slurry reactor are presented. • Gas phase conditions and use of not-noble metals are the best economic solution

  12. CFD simulation of an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor for biohydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xu; Ding, Jie; Ren, Nan-Qi; Liu, Bing-Feng; Guo, Wan-Qian [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, 202 Haihe Road, Nangang District, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150090 (China)

    2009-12-15

    Understanding how a bioreactor functions is a necessary precursor for successful reactor design and operation. This paper describes a two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulation of three-phase gas-liquid-solid flow in an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor used for biohydrogen production. An Eulerian-Eulerian model was formulated to simulate reaction zone hydrodynamics in an EGSB reactor with various hydraulic retention times (HRT). The three-phase system displayed a very heterogeneous flow pattern especially at long HRTs. The core-annulus structure developed may lead to back-mixing and internal circulation behavior, which in turn gives poor velocity distribution. The force balance between the solid and gas phases is a particular illustration of the importance of the interphase rules in determining the efficiency of biohydrogen production. The nature of gas bubble formation influences velocity distribution and hence sludge particle movement. The model demonstrates a qualitative relationship between hydrodynamics and biohydrogen production, implying that controlling hydraulic retention time is a critical factor in biohydrogen-production. (author)

  13. Degradation of organic compounds and production of activated species in Dielectric Barrier Discharges and Glidarc reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Cormier, Jean Marie; Khacef, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Major sterilization mechanisms are related to atoms and radicals, charged parti-cles, excited molecules, ozone, and UV radiation. The ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) are well known as evildoers. These species are easily created in ambient air and water and they live long enough to reach the cell and attack the organic matter. Test molecules conversion in dry and wet air is studied using Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) and Gliding Arc Reactors (GAR). The effects of tem-perature and energy deposition into the media on the active species production and then on the organic compounds degradation are presented for two non thermal plasma reactors: DBD and GAR. Main production species investigated are OH, O3, NOx, CO and CxHyOz by-products. It is shown from experiment analysis that the reactive species production is quite different from one reactor to another. GAR and pulsed DBD are two chemical processing ways in which the temperature of heavy species in ionized gas is determinant. By reviewing the species producti...

  14. Simultaneous production and utilization of methanol for methyl formate synthesis in a looped heat exchanger reactor configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Goosheneshin; R.Maleki; D.Iranshahi; M.R.Rahimpour; A.Jahanmiri

    2012-01-01

    In this investigation,a novel thermally coupled reactor (TCR) containing methyl formate (MF) production in the endothermic side and methanol synthesis in the exothermic side has been investigated.The interesting feature of this TCR is that productive methanol in the exothermic side could be recycled and used as feed of endothermic side for MF synthesis.Other important advantages of the proposed system are high production rates of hydrogen and MF.The configuration consists of two thermally coupled concentric tubular reactors.In these coupled reactors,autothermal system is obtained within the reactor.A steady-state heterogeneous model is used for simulation of the coupled reactor.The proposed model has been utilized to compare the performance of TCR with the conventional methanol reactor (CMR).Noticeable enhancement can be obtained in the performance of the reactors.The influence of operational parameters is studied on reactor performance.The results show that coupling of these reactions could be feasible and beneficial.Experimental proof-of-concept is required to validate the operation of the novel reactor.

  15. Parametric Evaluation of Large-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Using Different Advanced Nuclear Reactor Heat Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE), when coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 C to 950 C, has the potential to efficiently produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs. To evaluate the potential benefits of nuclear-driven hydrogen production, the UniSim process analysis software was used to evaluate different reactor concepts coupled to a reference HTE process design concept. The reference HTE concept included an Intermediate Heat Exchanger and intermediate helium loop to separate the reactor primary system from the HTE process loops and additional heat exchangers to transfer reactor heat from the intermediate loop to the HTE process loops. The two process loops consisted of the water/steam loop feeding the cathode side of a HTE electrolysis stack, and the sweep gas loop used to remove oxygen from the anode side. The UniSim model of the process loops included pumps to circulate the working fluids and heat exchangers to recover heat from the oxygen and hydrogen product streams to improve the overall hydrogen production efficiencies. The reference HTE process loop model was coupled to separate UniSim models developed for three different advanced reactor concepts (a high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept and two different supercritical CO2 reactor concepts). Sensitivity studies were then performed to evaluate the affect of reactor outlet temperature on the power cycle efficiency and overall hydrogen production efficiency for each of the reactor power cycles. The results of these sensitivity studies showed that overall power cycle and hydrogen production efficiencies increased with reactor outlet temperature, but the power cycles producing the highest efficiencies varied depending on the temperature range considered

  16. Parametric evaluation of large-scale high-temperature electrolysis hydrogen production using different advanced nuclear reactor heat sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-temperature electrolysis (HTE), when coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800-950 oC, has the potential to efficiently produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs. To evaluate the potential benefits of nuclear-driven hydrogen production, the UniSim process analysis software was used to evaluate different reactor concepts coupled to a reference HTE process design concept. The reference HTE concept included an intermediate heat exchanger and intermediate helium loop to separate the reactor primary system from the HTE process loops and additional heat exchangers to transfer reactor heat from the intermediate loop to the HTE process loops. The two process loops consisted of the water/steam loop feeding the cathode side of a HTE electrolysis stack, and the sweep gas loop used to remove oxygen from the anode side. The UniSim model of the process loops included pumps to circulate the working fluids and heat exchangers to recover heat from the oxygen and hydrogen product streams to improve the overall hydrogen production efficiencies. The reference HTE process loop model was coupled to separate UniSim models developed for three different advanced reactor concepts (a high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept and two different supercritical CO2 reactor concepts). Sensitivity studies were then performed with the objective of evaluating the affect of reactor outlet temperature on the power cycle efficiency and overall hydrogen production efficiency of the integrated plant design for each of the reactor power cycles. The results of these sensitivity studies showed that overall power cycle and hydrogen production efficiencies increased with reactor outlet temperature, but the power cycles producing the highest efficiencies varied depending on the temperature range considered.

  17. Process intensification of biodiesel production using a continuous oscillatory flow reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, A.P.; Mackley, M.R.; Seliger, T. [University of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2003-07-01

    Oscillatory flow reactors (OFRs) are a novel type of continuous reactor, consisting of tubes containing equally spaced orifice plate baffles. An oscillatory motion is superimposed upon the net flow of the process fluid, creating flow patterns conducive to efficient heat and mass transfer, whilst maintaining plug flow. Unlike conventional plug flow reactors, where a minimum Reynolds number must be maintained, the degree of mixing is independent of the net flow, allowing long residence times to be achieved in a reactor of greatly reduced length-to-diameter ratio. Many long residence time processes are currently performed in batch, as conventional designs of plug flow reactor prove to be impractical due to their high length-to-diameter ratios, which lead to problems such as high capital cost, large 'footprint', high pumping costs and, also control is difficult. The OFR allows these processes to be converted to continuous, thereby intensifying the process. The transesterification of various natural oils to form 'biodiesel' is a 'long' reaction, usually performed in batch. Conversion to continuous processing should improve the economics of the process, as the improved mixing should generate a better product (rendering the downstream separation processes easier), at lower residence time (reduction in reactor volume). These improvements can decrease the price of 'biodiesel', making it a more realistic competitor to 'petrodiesel'. This paper shows that it is feasible to perform this reaction in an OFR at a lower residence time. The reaction was performed in a pilot-scale plant, using rapeseed oil and methanol as the feedstocks, and NaOH as the catalyst. (author)

  18. Removal of anaerobic soluble microbial products in a biological activated carbon reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojing Dong; Weili Zhou; Shengbing He

    2013-01-01

    The soluble microbial products (SMP) in the biological treatment effluent are generally of great amount and are poorly biodegradable.Focusing on the biodegradation of anaerobic SMP,the biological activated carbon (BAC) was introduced into the anaerobic system.The experiments were conducted in two identical lab-scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors.The high strength organics were degraded in the first UASB reactor (UASB1) and the second UASB (UASB2,i.e.,BAC) functioned as a polishing step to remove SMP produced in UASB1.The results showed that 90% of the SMP could be removed before granular activated carbon was saturated.After the saturation,the SMP removal decreased to 60% on the average.Analysis of granular activated carbon adsorption revealed that the main role of SMP removal in BAC reactor was biodegradation.A strain of SMP-degrading bacteria,which was found highly similar to Klebsiella sp.,was isolated,enriched and inoculated back to the BAC reactor.When the influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) was 10,000 mg/L and the organic loading rate achieved 10 kg COD/(m3·day),the effluent from the BAC reactor could meet the discharge standard without further treatment.Anaerobic BAC reactor inoculated with the isolated Klebsiella was proved to be an effective,cheap and easy technical treatment approach for the removal of SMP in the treatment of easily-degradable wastewater with COD lower than 10,000 mg/L.

  19. Simulation calculation of 232U productions in thorium-uranium transform process based on thermal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decay products of 232U produced in the thorium-uranium fuel cycle emit high energy γ-rays. This affects the fuel cycle greatly. In this paper, the 232U productions in thermal reactor using thorium fuel are analyzed by ORIGEN2, SCALE5 and the code based on the Bateman method. Under normal situation, 232U is mainly produced by 232Th (n, 2n) reaction chain, and more quantity of 230Th can be transformed into 232U while the neutron spectrum is softer. The burnup calculation of CANDU reactor and PWR assembly indicates that the 232U in uranium increase with the burnup, and 230Th in fresh thorium has linear correlation with 232U/Utotal or 232U/233U at discharge burnup. (authors)

  20. Comparison of actinides and fission products recycling scheme with the normal plutonium recycling scheme in fast reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salahuddin Asif

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple recycling of actinides and non-volatile fission products in fast reactors through the dry re-fabrication/reprocessing atomics international reduction oxidation process has been studied as a possible way to reduce the long-term potential hazard of nuclear waste compared to that resulting from reprocessing in a wet PUREX process. Calculations have been made to compare the actinides and fission products recycling scheme with the normal plutonium recycling scheme in a fast reactor. For this purpose, the Karlsruhe version of isotope generation and depletion code, KORIGEN, has been modified accordingly. An entirely novel fission product yields library for fast reactors has been created which has replaced the old KORIGEN fission products library. For the purposes of this study, the standard 26 groups data set, KFKINR, developed at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany, has been extended by the addition of the cross-sections of 13 important actinides and 68 most important fission products. It has been confirmed that these 68 fission products constitute about 95% of the total fission products yield and about 99.5% of the total absorption due to fission products in fast reactors. The amount of fissile material required to guarantee the criticality of the reactor during recycling schemes has also been investigated. Cumulative high active waste per ton of initial heavy metal is also calculated. Results show that the recycling of actinides and fission products in fast reactors through the atomics international reduction oxidation process results in a reduction of the potential hazard of radioactive waste.

  1. Methane production by treating vinasses from hydrous ethanol using a modified UASB reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    España-Gamboa Elda I

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A modified laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB reactor was used to obtain methane by treating hydrous ethanol vinasse. Vinasses or stillage are waste materials with high organic loads, and a complex composition resulting from the process of alcohol distillation. They must initially be treated with anaerobic processes due to their high organic loads. Vinasses can be considered multipurpose waste for energy recovery and once treated they can be used in agriculture without the risk of polluting soil, underground water or crops. In this sense, treatment of vinasse combines the elimination of organic waste with the formation of methane. Biogas is considered as a promising renewable energy source. The aim of this study was to determine the optimum organic loading rate for operating a modified UASB reactor to treat vinasse generated in the production of hydrous ethanol from sugar cane molasses. Results The study showed that chemical oxygen demand (COD removal efficiency was 69% at an optimum organic loading rate (OLR of 17.05 kg COD/m3-day, achieving a methane yield of 0.263 m3/kg CODadded and a biogas methane content of 84%. During this stage, effluent characterization presented lower values than the vinasse, except for potassium, sulfide and ammonia nitrogen. On the other hand, primers used to amplify the 16S-rDNA genes for the domains Archaea and Bacteria showed the presence of microorganisms which favor methane production at the optimum organic loading rate. Conclusions The modified UASB reactor proposed in this study provided a successful treatment of the vinasse obtained from hydrous ethanol production. Methanogen groups (Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales detected by PCR during operational optimum OLR of the modified UASB reactor, favored methane production.

  2. Resuspension of fission products during severe accidents in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report investigates the influence of resuspension phenomena on the overall radiological source term of core melt accidents in a pressurized water reactor. A review of the existing literature is given and the literature data are applied to calculations of the source term. A large scatter in the existing data was found. Depending on the scenario and on the data set chosen for the calculations the relative influence of resuspended fission products on the source term ranges from dominant to negligible. (orig.)

  3. Effect of Catalytic Cylinders on Autothermal Reforming of Methane for Hydrogen Production in a Microchamber Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Yunfei Yan; Hongliang Guo; Li Zhang; Junchen Zhu; Zhongqing Yang; Qiang Tang; Xin Ji

    2014-01-01

    A new multicylinder microchamber reactor is designed on autothermal reforming of methane for hydrogen production, and its performance and thermal behavior, that is, based on the reaction mechanism, is numerically investigated by varying the cylinder radius, cylinder spacing, and cylinder layout. The results show that larger cylinder radius can promote reforming reaction; the mass fraction of methane decreased from 26% to 21% with cylinder radius from 0.25 mm to 0.75 mm; compact cylinder spaci...

  4. Design and construction of demineralized water production and maintenance system for RA-O nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The normal operation of zero power RA-O Nuclear Reactor requires a production and maintenance of demineralized water system. This system was designed and built-up during the works for actualization, upgrading and new start up at Cordoba National University of this facility. This paper comments the relevant aspects about the didactical purpose of that system and the details considered for training and practices with it. Similarly, considerations about solids wastes and effluents treatment are discussed. (Author)

  5. Fuel and core testing plan for a target fueled isotope production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years there has been an unstable supply of the critical diagnostic medical isotope 99Tc. Several concepts and designs have been proposed to produce 99Mo the parent nuclide of 99Tc, at a commercial scale sufficient to stabilize the world supply. This work lays out a testing and experiment plan for a proposed 2 MW open pool reactor fueled by Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) 99Mo targets. The experiments and tests necessary to support licensing of the reactor design are described and how these experiments and tests will help establish the safe operating envelop for a medical isotope production reactor is discussed. The experiments and tests will facilitate a focused and efficient licensing process in order to bring on line a needed production reactor dedicated to supplying medical isotopes. The Target Fuel Isotope Reactor (TFIR) design calls for an active core region that is approximately 40 cm in diameter and 40 cm in fuel height. It contains up to 150 cylindrical, 1-cm diameter, LEU oxide fuel pins clad with Zircaloy (zirconium alloy), in an annular hexagonal array on a ∼2.0 cm pitch surrounded, radially, by a graphite or a Be reflector. The reactor is similar to U.S. university reactors in power, hardware, and safety/control systems. Fuel/target pin fabrication is based on existing light water reactor fuel fabrication processes. However, as part of licensing process, experiments must be conducted to confirm analytical predictions of steady-state power and accident conditions. The experiment and test plan will be conducted in phases and will utilize existing facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories. The first phase is to validate the predicted reactor core neutronics at delayed critical, zero power and very low power. This will be accomplished by using the Sandia Critical Experiment (CX) platform. A full scale TFIR core will be built in the CX and delayed critical measurements will be taken. For low power experiments, fuel

  6. Continuous fermentative hydrogen production from coffee drink manufacturing wastewater by applying UASB reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kyung-Won; Shin, Hang-Sik [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, KAIST, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Hoon [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Windsor, 401 Sunset Ave., Essex Hall, Windsor, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-12-15

    The feasibility of continuous H{sub 2} production from coffee drink manufacturing wastewater (CDMW) was tested in two different types of reactors: a completely-stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASBr). While the performance in CSTR was limited, it was significantly enhanced in UASBr. The maximum H{sub 2} yield of 1.29 mol H{sub 2}/mol hexose{sub added} was achieved at HRT of 6 h in UASBr operation. Non-hydrogenic, lactic acid was the dominant in CSTR, while butyric and caproic acids in UASBr. As caproic acid is generated by consuming acetic and butyric acids, all of which are related to H{sub 2} production, the presence of caproic acid in the broth also indicates H{sub 2} production, yielding 1.33 mol H{sub 2}/glucose. It was speculated that the enhanced performance in UASBr was attributed to the high concentration of biomass over 60,000 mg VSS/L in the blanket zone, which provided insufficient substrate for indigenous lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to survive. The abundance of LAB in CDMW was confirmed by natural fermentation of CDMW. That is without the addition of external inoculum, CDMW was mainly fermented into lactic acid under mesophilic condition. For the first time ever, H{sub 2} producing granules (HPG) with diameters of 2.1 mm were successfully formed by using actual waste as a substrate. (author)

  7. Basic study on high temperature gas cooled reactor technology for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual production of hydrogen in the world is about 500 billion m3. Currently hydrogen is consumed mainly in chemical industries. However hydrogen has huge potential to be consumed in transportation sector in coming decades. Assuming that 10% of fossil energy in transportation sector is substituted by hydrogen in 2020, the hydrogen in the sector will exceed current hydrogen consumption by more than 2.5 times. Currently hydrogen is mainly produced by steam reforming of natural gas. Steam reforming process is chiefest way to produce hydrogen for mass production. In the future, hydrogen has to be produced in a way to minimize CO2 emission during its production process as well as to satisfy economic competition. One of the alternatives to produce hydrogen under such criteria is using heat source of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The high-temperature gas-cooled reactor represents one type of the next generation of nuclear reactors for safe and reliable operation as well as for efficient and economic generation of energy

  8. Production of Polygalacturonases by Aspergillus section Nigri Strains in a Fixed Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Maciel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polygalacturonases (PG are pectinolytic enzymes that have technological, functional and biological applications in food processing, fruit ripening and plant-fungus interactions, respectively. In the present, a microtitre plate methodology was used for rapid screening of 61 isolates of fungi from Aspergillus section Nigri to assess production of endo- and exo-PG. Studies of scale-up were carried out in a fixed bed reactor operated under different parameters using the best producer strain immobilised in orange peels. Four experiments were conducted under the following conditions: the immobilised cells without aeration; immobilised cells with aeration; immobilised cells with aeration and added pectin; and free cells with aeration. The fermentation was performed for 168 h with removal of sample every 24 h. Aspergillus niger strain URM 5162 showed the highest PG production. The results obtained indicated that the maximum endo- and exo-PG activities (1.18 U·mL−1 and 4.11 U·mL−1, respectively were obtained when the reactor was operating without aeration. The microtitre plate method is a simple way to screen fungal isolates for PG activity detection. The fixed bed reactor with orange peel support and using A. niger URM 5162 is a promising process for PG production at the industrial level.

  9. Production of polygalacturonases by Aspergillus section Nigri strains in a fixed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Marília; Ottoni, Cristiane; Santos, Cledir; Lima, Nelson; Moreira, Keila; Souza-Motta, Cristina

    2013-01-28

    Polygalacturonases (PG) are pectinolytic enzymes that have technological, functional and biological applications in food processing, fruit ripening and plant-fungus interactions, respectively. In the present, a microtitre plate methodology was used for rapid screening of 61 isolates of fungi from Aspergillus section Nigri to assess production of endo- and exo-PG. Studies of scale-up were carried out in a fixed bed reactor operated under different parameters using the best producer strain immobilised in orange peels. Four experiments were conducted under the following conditions: the immobilised cells without aeration; immobilised cells with aeration; immobilised cells with aeration and added pectin; and free cells with aeration. The fermentation was performed for 168 h with removal of sample every 24 h. Aspergillus niger strain URM 5162 showed the highest PG production. The results obtained indicated that the maximum endo- and exo-PG activities (1.18 U · mL-1 and 4.11 U · mL-1, respectively) were obtained when the reactor was operating without aeration. The microtitre plate method is a simple way to screen fungal isolates for PG activity detection. The fixed bed reactor with orange peel support and using A. niger URM 5162 is a promising process for PG production at the industrial level.

  10. Biologic treatment of wastewater from cassava flour production using vertical anaerobic baffled reactor (VABR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleyce T Correia

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The estimate cassava production in Brazil in 2007 was of 25 million tons (= 15% of the world production and most of it is used in the production of flour. During its processing, waste that can cause environmental inequality is generated, if discharged inappropriately. One of the liquid waste generated, manipueira, is characterized by its high level of organic matter. The anaerobic treatment that uses a vertical anaerobic baffled reactor (VABR inoculated with granulated sludge, is one of the ways of treating this effluent. The anaerobic biodigestion phases are separated in this kind of reactor, allowing greater stability and resistance to load shocks. The VABR was built with a width/height rate of 1:2. The pH, acidity, alkalinity, turbidity and COD removal were analyzed in 6 different regions of the reactor, which was operated with an increasing feeding from ? 2000 to ? 10000 mg COD L?¹ and HRT between 6.0 and 2.5 days. The VABR showed decreasing acidity and turbidity, an increase in alkalinity and pH, and 96% efficiency in COD removal with 3-day HRT and feeding of 3800 mg COD L?¹.

  11. Nonthermal plasma reactors for the production of light hydrocarbon olefins from heavy oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Prieto

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, nonthermal plasma technology was applied in many different fields, focusing attention on the destruction of harmful compounds in the air. This paper deals with nonthermal plasma reactors for the conversion of heavy oil into light hydrocarbon olefins, to be employed as gasoline components or to be added in small amounts for the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide compounds in the treatment of exhaust gas at power plants. For the process, the plate-plate nonthermal plasma reactor driven by AC high voltage was selected. The reactor was modeled as a function of parameter characteristics, using the methodology provided by the statistical experimental design. The parameters studied were gap distance between electrodes, carrier gas flow and applied power. Results indicate that the reactions occurring in the process of heavy oil conversion have an important selective behavior. The products obtained were C1-C4 hydrocarbons with ethylene as the main compound. Operating the parameters of the reactor within the established operative window of the system and close to the optimum conditions, efficiencies as high as 70 (mul/joule were obtained. These values validate the process as an in-situ method to produce light olefins for the treatment of nitrogen oxides in the exhaust gas from diesel engines.

  12. Modeling of the HiPco process for carbon nanotube production. II. Reactor-scale analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcen, Tahir; Dateo, Christopher E.; Meyyappan, M.

    2002-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process, developed at Rice University, has been reported to produce single-walled carbon nanotubes from gas-phase reactions of iron carbonyl in carbon monoxide at high pressures (10-100 atm). Computational modeling is used here to develop an understanding of the HiPco process. A detailed kinetic model of the HiPco process that includes of the precursor, decomposition metal cluster formation and growth, and carbon nanotube growth was developed in the previous article (Part I). Decomposition of precursor molecules is necessary to initiate metal cluster formation. The metal clusters serve as catalysts for carbon nanotube growth. The diameter of metal clusters and number of atoms in these clusters are some of the essential information for predicting carbon nanotube formation and growth, which is then modeled by the Boudouard reaction with metal catalysts. Based on the detailed model simulations, a reduced kinetic model was also developed in Part I for use in reactor-scale flowfield calculations. Here this reduced kinetic model is integrated with a two-dimensional axisymmetric reactor flow model to predict reactor performance. Carbon nanotube growth is examined with respect to several process variables (peripheral jet temperature, reactor pressure, and Fe(CO)5 concentration) with the use of the axisymmetric model, and the computed results are compared with existing experimental data. The model yields most of the qualitative trends observed in the experiments and helps to understanding the fundamental processes in HiPco carbon nanotube production.

  13. Modelling and simulation the radioactive source-term of fission products in PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The source-term was defined with the purpose the quantify all radioactive nuclides released the nuclear reactor in the case of accidents. Nowadays the source-term is limited to the coolant of the primary circuit of reactors and may be measured or modelled with computer coders such as the TFP developed in this work. The calculational process is based on the linear chain techniques used in the CINDER-2 code. The TFP code considers forms of fission products release from the fuel pellet: Recoil, Knockout and Migration. The release from the gap to the coolant fluid is determined from the ratio between activity measured in the coolant and calculated activity in the gap. Considered the operational data of SURRY-1 reactor, the TFP code was run to obtain the source=term of this reactor. From the measured activities it was verified the reliability level of the model and the employed computational logic. The accuracy of the calculated quantities were compared to the measured data was considered satisfactory. (author)

  14. CFD analysis and flow model reduction for surfactant production in helix reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikačević N.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow pattern analysis in a spiral Helix reactor is conducted, for the application in the commercial surfactant production. Step change response curves (SCR were obtained from numerical tracer experiments by three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations. Non-reactive flow is simulated, though viscosity is treated as variable in the direction of flow, as it increases during the reaction. The design and operating parameters (reactor diameter, number of coils and inlet velocity are varied in CFD simulations, in order to examine the effects on the flow pattern. Given that 3D simulations are not practical for fast computations needed for optimization, scale-up and control, CFD flow model is reduced to one-dimensional axial dispersion (AD model with spatially variable dispersion coefficient. Dimensionless dispersion coefficient (Pe is estimated under different conditions and results are analyzed. Finally, correlation which relates Pe number with Reynolds number and number of coils from the reactor entrance is proposed for the particular reactor application and conditions.

  15. Performance comparison of a continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor and an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor for fermentative hydrogen production depending on substrate concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S-H; Han, S-K; Shin, H-S

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the performance of a continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) and an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) for fermentative hydrogen production at various substrate concentrations. Heat-treated anaerobic sludge was utilized as an inoculum, and hydraulic retention time (HRT) for each reactor was maintained at 12 h. At the influent sucrose concentration of 5 g COD/L, start-up was not successful in both reactors. The CSTR, which was started-up at 10 g COD/L, showed stable hydrogen production at the influent sucrose concentrations of 10-60 g COD/L during 203 days. Hydrogen production was dependent on substrate concentration, resulting in the highest performance at 30 g COD/L. At the lower substrate concentration, the hydrogen yield (based on hexose consumed) decreased with biomass reduction and changes in fermentation products. At the higher substrate concentration, substrate inhibition on biomass growth caused the decrease of carbohydrate degradation and hydrogen yield (based on hexose added). The ASBR showed higher biomass concentration and carbohydrate degradation efficiency than the CSTR, but hydrogen production in the ASBR was less effective than that in the CSTR at all the substrate concentrations.

  16. Modular Hybrid Plasma Reactor for Low Cost Bulk Production of Nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter C. Kong

    2011-12-01

    INL developed a bench scale modular hybrid plasma system for gas phase nanomaterials synthesis. The system was being optimized for WO3 nanoparticles production and scale model projection to a 300 kW pilot system. During the course of technology development many modifications had been done to the system to resolve technical issues that had surfaced and also to improve the performance. All project tasks had been completed except 2 optimization subtasks. These 2 subtasks, a 4-hour and an 8-hour continuous powder production runs at 1 lb/hr powder feeding rate, were unable to complete due to technical issues developed with the reactor system. The 4-hour run had been attempted twice and both times the run was terminated prematurely. The modular electrode for the plasma system was significantly redesigned to address the technical issues. Fabrication of the redesigned modular electrodes and additional components had been completed at the end of the project life. However, not enough resource was available to perform tests to evaluate the performance of the new modifications. More development work would be needed to resolve these problems prior to scaling. The technology demonstrated a surprising capability of synthesizing a single phase of meta-stable delta-Al2O3 from pure alpha-phase large Al2O3 powder. The formation of delta-Al2O3 was surprising because this phase is meta-stable and only formed between 973-1073 K, and delta-Al2O3 is very difficult to synthesize as a single phase. Besides the specific temperature window to form this phase, this meta-stable phase may have been stabilized by nanoparticle size formed in a high temperature plasma process. This technology may possess the capability to produce unusual meta-stable nanophase materials that would be otherwise difficult to produce by conventional methods. A 300 kW INL modular hybrid plasma pilot scale model reactor had been projected using the experimental data from PPG Industries 300 kW hot wall plasma reactor. The

  17. Status of pseudo-fission-product cross-sections for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of the Subgroup 17 (SG17) benchmark organized by a Working Party of the Nuclear Science Committee of the Nuclear Energy Agency (FR), a comparison of lumped or pseudo-fission-product cross-sections for fast reactors has been made. Several parameters have been compared: the one- group cross-sections and reactivity worths of the lumped nuclide for several partial absorption and scattering cross-sections, and the one-group cross sections of individual fission products. Graphs of the multi-group cross-sections and those of capture cross-sections for 27 nuclides have also been compared. (R.P.)

  18. Model to simulate the fission-product transport process in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, B.Y.C.

    1979-01-01

    When fission products are released from a cladding breach in EBR-II, they mix turbulently with the sodium in the core, in the upper plenum and in the intermediate heat exchanger. Eventually the fission products are discharged 12 to 13 s later into the primary tank. Fission gases migrate upward through a 9-ft layer of sodium and enter the cover gas. Loss of fission gas is due to decay, leakage of cover gas, cold trapping of iodine and bromine parents. Depending on the reactor operation requirement, it may purge with fresh argon. The assumptions made and differential equations used to develop a model for such transport are presented.

  19. Mass Transfer of Corrosion Products in the Nonisothermal Sodium Loop of a Fast Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varseev, E. V.; Alekseev, V. V.

    2014-11-01

    The mass transfer of the products of corrosion of the steel surface of the sodium loop of a fast nuclear power reactor was investigated for the purpose of optimization of its parameters. The problem of deposition of the corrosion products on the surface of the heat-exchange unit of the indicated loop was considered. Experimental data on the rate of accumulation of deposits in the channel of this unit and results of the dispersion analysis of the suspensions contained in the sodium coolant are presented.

  20. Production of Gadolinium-loaded Liquid Scintillator for the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Beriguete, Wanda; Ding, Yayun; Hans, Sunej; Heeger, Karsten M; Hu, Liangming; Huang, Aizhong; Luk, Kam-Biu; Nemchenok, Igor; Qi, Ming; Rosero, Richard; Sun, Hansheng; Wang, Ruiguang; Wang, Yifang; Wen, Liangjian; Yang, Yi; Yeh, Minfang; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhou, Li

    2014-01-01

    We report on the production and characterization of liquid scintillators for the detection of electron antineutrinos by the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. One hundred eighty-five tons of gadolinium-loaded (0.1% by mass) liquid scintillator (Gd-LS) and two hundred tons of unloaded liquid scintillator (LS) were successfully produced from a linear-alkylbenzene (LAB) solvent in six months. The scintillator properties, the production and purification systems, and the quality assurance and control (QA/QC) procedures are described.

  1. Relative fission product yield determination in the USGS TRIGA Mark I reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehl, Michael A.

    Fission product yield data sets are one of the most important and fundamental compilations of basic information in the nuclear industry. This data has a wide range of applications which include nuclear fuel burnup and nonproliferation safeguards. Relative fission yields constitute a major fraction of the reported yield data and reduce the number of required absolute measurements. Radiochemical separations of fission products reduce interferences, facilitate the measurement of low level radionuclides, and are instrumental in the analysis of low-yielding symmetrical fission products. It is especially useful in the measurement of the valley nuclides and those on the extreme wings of the mass yield curve, including lanthanides, where absolute yields have high errors. This overall project was conducted in three stages: characterization of the neutron flux in irradiation positions within the U.S. Geological Survey TRIGA Mark I Reactor (GSTR), determining the mass attenuation coefficients of precipitates used in radiochemical separations, and measuring the relative fission products in the GSTR. Using the Westcott convention, the Westcott flux, modified spectral index, neutron temperature, and gold-based cadmium ratios were determined for various sampling positions in the USGS TRIGA Mark I reactor. The differential neutron energy spectrum measurement was obtained using the computer iterative code SAND-II-SNL. The mass attenuation coefficients for molecular precipitates were determined through experiment and compared to results using the EGS5 Monte Carlo computer code. Difficulties associated with sufficient production of fission product isotopes in research reactors limits the ability to complete a direct, experimental assessment of mass attenuation coefficients for these isotopes. Experimental attenuation coefficients of radioisotopes produced through neutron activation agree well with the EGS5 calculated results. This suggests mass attenuation coefficients of molecular

  2. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge : Annual narrative report : January 1, 2001 - September 30, 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Rocky Mountain Arsenal outlines activities and accomplishments during the 2001 calendar year, and from January through September...

  3. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Area : Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : Fiscal year 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was prepared to guide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) study and work...

  4. Protocols for the collection of fortuitous specimens : [Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This protocol describes in detail every aspect of how fortuitous specimens from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) will be handled by the...

  5. Irondale Gulch : Draft Water Management Plan for Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal and Irondale Gulch draft Water Management Plan has been developed to meet the station objectives set forth in the Master Plan. The...

  6. Health of mule and white-tailed deer at Rocky Mountain Arsenal : March-April 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and white-tailed deer(~ virginianus), reside within the Arsenal. Little information about the health of these animals in relation to...

  7. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge : Fiscal year 1994 annual progress report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1994 fiscal year. The report begins with...

  8. Rocky Mountain Arsenal field office : Fiscal year 1990 annual progress report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 1990 fiscal year. The report begins with a...

  9. Rocky Mountain Arsenal field office : Fiscal year 1989 annual progress report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 1989 fiscal year. The report begins with a...

  10. Rocky Mountain Arsenal Field Office : Fiscal year 1991 annual progress report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 1991 fiscal year. The report begins with a...

  11. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge : Annual narrative report : Fiscal year 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Rocky Mountain Arsenal outlines activities and accomplishments during the 2003 fiscal year. The report begins with an introduction...

  12. [Draft] Black-tailed prairie dog management plan : Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This management plan provides a framework or set of guidelines providing for a sustainable black-tailed prairie dog population at Rocky Mountain Arsenal National...

  13. The potential effects of Rocky Mountain Arsenal cleanup and Denver metropolitan transportation development on bald eagles

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Army's Rocky Mountain Arsenal and Colorado's Barr Lake State Park provide habitats which support wintering and nesting bald eagles near metropolitan...

  14. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Area : Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : Fiscal year 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was prepared to guide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) study and work...

  15. Rocky Mountain Arsenal Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : Fiscal year 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was prepared to guide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) study and work...

  16. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge, Bison Tissue Contaminant Study, Data Summary Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge was created on a former Department of Defense site with a history of chemical contamination. This document...

  17. Rocky Mountain Arsenal Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : Fiscal year 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was prepared to guide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) study and work...

  18. Rocky Mountain Arsenal Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : Fiscal year 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was prepared to guide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) study and work...

  19. Natural resource management plan : Volume I : Department of the Army, Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Natural resource management plan for the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) was prepared by Colorado State University for the U.S. Government to guide management to...

  20. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Area : Fiscal year 1992 annual progress report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 1992 fiscal year. The report begins with a...

  1. Integrated Pest Management Plan For Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Rocky Mountain Arsenal...

  2. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The...

  3. Joule-Heated Molten Regolith Electrolysis Reactor Concepts for Oxygen and Metals Production on the Moon and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibille, Laurent; Dominques, Jesus A.

    2012-01-01

    The maturation of Molten Regolith Electrolysis (MRE) as a viable technology for oxygen and metals production on explored planets relies on the realization of the self-heating mode for the reactor. Joule heat generated during regolith electrolysis creates thermal energy that should be able to maintain the molten phase (similar to electrolytic Hall-Heroult process for aluminum production). Self-heating via Joule heating offers many advantages: (1) The regolith itself is the crucible material, it protects the vessel walls (2) Simplifies the engineering of the reactor (3) Reduces power consumption (no external heating) (4) Extends the longevity of the reactor. Predictive modeling is a tool chosen to perform dimensional analysis of a self-heating reactor: (1) Multiphysics modeling (COMSOL) was selected for Joule heat generation and heat transfer (2) Objective is to identify critical dimensions for first reactor prototype.

  4. Feasibility study Part I - Thermal hydraulic analysis of LEU target for 99Mo production in Tajoura reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Renewable Energies and Water Desalination Research Center (REWDRC), Libya, will implement the technology for 99Mo isotope production using LEU foil target, to obtain new revenue streams for the Tajoura nuclear research reactor and desiring to serve the Libyan hospitals by providing the medical radioisotopes. Design information is presented for LEU target with irradiation device and irradiation Beryllium (Be) unit in the Tajoura reactor core. Calculated results for the reactor core with LEU target at different level of power are presented for steady state and several reactivity induced accident situations. This paper will present the steady state thermal hydraulic design and transient analysis of Tajoura reactor was loaded with LEU foil target for 99Mo production. The results of these calculations show that the reactor with LEU target during the several cases of transient are in safe and no problems will occur. (author)

  5. Production and use of {sup 18}F by TRIGA nuclear reactor: a first report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgio, N.; Ciavola, C.; Festinesi, A.; Capannesi, G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1999-02-01

    The irradiation and radiochemical facilities at public research centre can contribute to the start up of the regional PET centre. In particular, the TRIGA reactor of Casaccia Research Centre could produce a sufficient amount of {sup 18}F to start up a PET centre and successively integrated the cyclotron production. This report establishes, in the light of the preliminary experimental works, a guideline to the reactor`s production and extraction of {sup 18}F in a convenient form for the synthesis of the most representative PET radiopharmaceutical: {sup 18}F-FDG. [Italiano] Le facilities di irraggiamento e i laboratori Radiochimici dei Centri Statali di Ricerca possono contribuire allo sviluppo di centri regionali PET (Tomografia ed Emissione Positronica). In particolare, il reattore TRIGA del Centro Ricerca Casaccia potrebbe produrre un quantitativo di {sup 18}F sufficiente alle attivita` formative propedeutiche al centro PET che, successivamente sarebbe in grado di avviare una propria produzione da ciclotrone. Questo rapporto stabilisce le linee guida sperimentali per la produzione del {sup 18}F da reattore nucleare e la sua successiva estrazione in una forma conveniente per la sintesi del piu` rappresentativo dei radiofarmaci PET: il {sup 18}F-FDG.

  6. CO2 Energy Reactor - Integrated Mineral Carbonation: Perspectives on Lab-Scale Investigation and Products Valorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael M Santos

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the challenges of mineral CO2 sequestration, Innovation Concepts B.V. is developing a unique proprietary Gravity Pressure Vessel (GPV reactor technology, and has focussed on generating reaction products of high economic value. The GPV provides intense process conditions through hydrostatic pressurization and heat exchange integration that harvests exothermic reaction energy, thereby reducing energy demand of conventional reactor designs, in addition to offering other benefits. In this paper, a perspective on the status of this technology and outlook for the future is provided. To date, laboratory-scale tests of the envisioned process have been performed in a tubular rocking autoclave reactor. The mineral of choice has been olivine (~Mg1.6Fe2+0.4(SiO4 + ppm Ni/Cr, although asbestos, steel slags and oil shale residues are also under investigation. The effect of several process parameters on reaction extent and product properties have been tested: CO2 pressure, temperature, residence time, additives (buffers, lixiviants, chelators, oxidizers, solids loading, and mixing rate. The products (carbonates, amorphous silica and chromite have been physically separated (based on size, density and magnetic properties, characterized (for chemistry, mineralogy and morphology and tested in intended applications (as pozzolanic carbon-negative building material. Economically, it is found that product value is the main driver for mineral carbonation, rather than, or in addition to, the sequestered CO2. The approach of using a GPV and focusing on valuable reaction products could thus make CO2 mineralization a feasible and sustainable industrial process.

  7. Assessment of fission product yields data needs in nuclear reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on the build-up of fission products in fast reactors have been performed, with particular emphasis on the effects related to the physics of the nuclear fission process. Fission product yields, which are required for burn-up calculations, depend on the proton and neutron number of the target nucleus as well as on the incident neutron energy. Evaluated nuclear data on fission product yields are available for all relevant target nuclides in reactor applications. However, the description of their energy dependence in evaluated data is still rather rudimentary, which is due to the lack of experimental fast fission data and reliable physical models. Additionally, physics studies of evaluated JEFF-3.1.1 fission yields data have shown potential improvements, especially for various fast fission data sets of this evaluation. In recent years, important progress in the understanding of the fission process has been made, and advanced model codes are currently being developed. This paper deals with the semi-empirical approach to the description of the fission process, which is used in the GEF code being developed by K.-H. Schmidt and B. Jurado on behalf of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, and with results from the corresponding author's diploma thesis. An extended version of the GEF code, supporting the calculation of spectrum weighted fission product yields, has been developed. It has been applied to the calculation of fission product yields in the fission rate spectra of a MOX fuelled sodium-cooled fast reactor. Important results are compared to JEFF-3.1.1 data and discussed in this paper. (authors)

  8. Comparison of actinides and fission products recycling scheme with the normal plutonium recycling scheme in fast reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Salahuddin Asif; Iqbal Masood

    2013-01-01

    Multiple recycling of actinides and non-volatile fission products in fast reactors through the dry re-fabrication/reprocessing atomics international reduction oxidation process has been studied as a possible way to reduce the long-term potential hazard of nuclear waste compared to that resulting from reprocessing in a wet PUREX process. Calculations have been made to compare the actinides and fission products recycling scheme with the normal plutonium recycling scheme in a fast reactor....

  9. Non-catalytic alcoholysis process for production of biodiesel fuel by using bubble column reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, S.; Nabetani, H.; Nakajima, M.

    2015-04-01

    Biodiesel fuel is a replacement for diesel as a fuel produced from biomass resources. It is usually defined as a fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) derived from vegetable oil or animal fat. In European countries, such as Germany and France, biodiesel fuel is commercially produced mainly from rapeseed oil, whereas in the United States and Argentina, soybean oil is more frequently used. In many other countries such as Japan and countries in Southeast Asia, lipids that cannot be used as a food source could be more suitable materials for the production of biodiesel fuel because its production from edible oils could result in an increase in the price of edible oils, thereby increasing the cost of some foodstuffs. Therefore, used edible oil, lipids contained in waste effluent from the oil milling process, byproducts from oil refining process and crude oils from industrial crops such as jatropha could be more promising materials in these countries. The materials available in Japan and Southeast Asia for the production of biodiesel fuel have common characteristics; they contain considerable amount of impurities and are high in free fatty acids (FFA). Superheated methanol vapor (SMV) reactor might be a promising method for biodiesel fuel production utilizing oil feedstock containing FFA such as waste vegetable oil and crude vegetable oil. In the conventional method using alkaline catalyst, FFA contained in waste vegetable oil is known to react with alkaline catalyst such as NaOH and KOH generating saponification products and to inactivate it. Therefore, the FFA needs to be removed from the feedstock prior to the reaction. Removal of the alkaline catalyst after the reaction is also required. In the case of the SMV reactor, the processes for removing FFA prior to the reaction and catalyst after the reaction can be omitted because it requires no catalyst. Nevertheless, detailed study on the productivity of biodiesel fuel produced from waste vegetable oils and other non

  10. Design of standardized WWER-1000 reactor power plant allowing industrialization of production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The improvement consists in the siting of the individual units which allows streamlined construction, the assembly of power units and improved quality of construction work. To protect it against vibrations the reactor building is designed as a symmetric box-shaped reinforced concrete structure. The heaviest equipment is placed in the lowest parts, which increases stability and facilitates the solution of the problem of the interaction of foundations and structure proper. The cylindrical part of the sealed envelope of the reactor part may be assembled of large units up to 100 t in weight and another design of the envelope copula allows the assembly of basic equipment to be started 3 to 4 months earlier. These and other improvements make it possible to shorten construction time by 35 to 40%, to reduce material consumption and to increase productivity. (E.S.)

  11. Production and release of 14C from a swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual production rate of 14C in the Apsara swimming pool reactor works out to be about 2.94 mCi. The concentration distribution of 14C in different compartments viz. pool water, reactor hall air and ion-exchange resin ranged from 200 to 440 pCi/l, 0.09 to 0.38 pCi/l, an average concentration of 8.16 pCi/g respectively. The mean residence time of 14C in pool water is evaluated to be about 7 days taking into account various sinks. The study revealed atmospheric exchange at the air-water interface as the dominant process responsible for the loss of 14C from the pool water. (author). 7 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  12. Use of a supercritical water-cooled reactor for process heat to support thermochemical hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SuperCritical Water-cooled nuclear Reactor (SCWR) is one of six Generation-IV nuclear-reactor concepts currently under development worldwide. It is designed to operate at pressures of 25 MPa and temperatures up to 625°C. These operating conditions make an SCW Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) suitable to support thermochemical-based hydrogen production. The Copper-Chlorine (Cu-Cl) cycle is a prospective thermochemical cycle with a maximum temperature requirement of ~530°C. Thermalhydraulic calculations are presented for a double-pipe counter-flow heat exchanger with smooth pipe conditions and enhanced local heat transfer coefficients of 25%, 50% and 75% above smooth pipe cases. (author)

  13. Production of tungsten-188 and osmium-194 in a nuclear reactor for new clinical generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzadeh, S.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Callahan, A.P.

    1991-01-01

    Rhenium-188 and iridium-194 are potential candidates for radioimmunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor-associated antigens. Both nuclei are short-lived and decay by high energy {Beta}{minus} emission. In addition, both nuclei emit {gamma}-rays with energy suitable for imaging. An important characteristics is availability of {sup 188}Re and {sup 194}Ir from decay of reactor-produced parents ({sup 188}W and {sup 194}Os, respectively) in convenient generator systems. The {sup 188}W and {sup 194}Os are produced by double neutron capture of {sup 186}W and {sup 192}Os, respectively. The large scale production yields of {sup 188}W in several nuclear reactors will be presented. We also report a new management for the cross-section of {sup 193}Os(n,{gamma}){sup 194}Os reaction and discuss the feasibility of producing sufficient quantities of {sup 194}Os. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. Production of tungsten-188 and osmium-194 in a nuclear reactor for new clinical generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhenium-188 and iridium-194 are potential candidates for radioimmunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor-associated antigens. Both nuclei are short-lived and decay by high energy β- emission. In addition, both nuclei emit γ-rays with energy suitable for imaging. An important characteristic is availability of 188Re and 194Ir from decay of reactor-produced parents (188W and 194Os, respectively) in covenient generator systems. The 188W and 194Os are produced by double neutron capture of 186W and 192Os, respectively. The large scale production yields of 188W in several nuclear reactors will be presented. We also report a new measurement for the cross-section of 193Os(n, γ)194Os reaction and discuss the feasibility of producing sufficient quantities of 194Os. (orig.)

  15. Production of structured lipids in a packed-bed reactor with Thermomyces lanuginosa lipase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Xuebing; Porsgaard, Trine; Zhang, Hong;

    2002-01-01

    Lipase-catalyzed interesterification between fish oil and medium-chain TAG has been investigated in a packed-bed reactor with a commercially immobilized enzyme. The enzyme, a Thermomyces lanuginosa lipase immobilized on silica by granulation (Lipozyme TL IM; Novozymes A/S, Bagsvaerd, Denmark), has...... recently been developed for fat modification. This study focuses on the new characteristics of the lipase in a packed-bed reactor when applied to interesterification of TAG. The degree of reaction was strongly related to the flow rate (residence time) and temperature, whereas formation of hydrolysis by......-products (DAG and FFA) were only slightly affected by reaction conditions. The degree of reaction reached equilibrium at 30-40 min residence time, and the most suitable temperature was 60degreesC or higher with respect to the maximal degree of reaction. The lipase was stable in a 2-wk continuous operation...

  16. Finalization of the feasibility study for Rocky Mountain arsenal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental remediation program at the Army's premier cleanup site, Rocky Mountain Arsenal, is fast approaching the climax of the study phase and will be moving into the cleanup phase. Selecting the cleanup approach for this extremely complex site involves addressing a number of precedent-setting issues. The Remedial Investigation (RI) for this 27-sq. mile former Army chemical munitions and commercial pesticide manufacturing facility, completed in January 1992, included the collection of over 50,000 samples from soil, surface water, groundwater, structures, air and plants and animals. Samples were analyzed for over 60 specific chemical analytes and screened for hundreds of others. The RI found a number of contaminated groundwater plumes, hundreds of contaminated structures, high concentrations of contaminants in soils in former disposal basins and manufacturing areas and buried munitions. Some of the major contaminants targeted for remediation include benzene, chloroform, tetrachloroethylene, dibromochloropropane, diisopropylmethyl phosphonate, aldrin, adieldrin, isodrin, chlordane, lead, arsenic and mercury. The Feasibility Study (FS) has reviewed potential remediation alternatives. The first phase of the FS, the Development and Screening of Alternatives (DSA) presented a range of alternatives. An equally complex and parallel study, the Integrated Endangerment Assessment, is in final stages. The goal of the second phase of the FS, the Detailed Analysis of Alternatives (DAA), is to analyze the soils, water and structures alternatives retained in the DSA in greater technical detail. The Army's draft version of the DAA, released in the Fall of 1993, has proposed a wide range of alternatives to remediate 27 different contamination groups and is included in the presentation

  17. Semicontinuous Production of Lactic Acid From Cheese Whey Using Integrated Membrane Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yebo; Shahbazi, Abolghasem; Coulibaly, Sekou; Mims, Michele M.

    Semicontinuous production of lactic acid from cheese whey using free cells of Bifidobacterium longum with and without nanofiltration was studied. For the semicontinuous fermentation without membrane separation, the lactic acid productivity of the second and third runs is much lower than the first run. The semicontinuous fermentation with nanoseparation was run semicontinuously for 72 h with lactic acid to be harvested every 24 h using a nanofiltration membrane unit. The cells and unutilized lactose were kept in the reactor and mixed with newly added cheese whey in the subsequent runs. Slight increase in the lactic acid productivity was observed in the second and third runs during the semicontinuous fermentation with nanofiltration. It can be concluded that nanoseparation could improve the lactic acid productivity of the semicontinuous fermentation process.

  18. Enhanced production of bacterial cellulose by using a biofilm reactor and its material property analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demirci Ali

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacterial cellulose has been used in the food industry for applications such as low-calorie desserts, salads, and fabricated foods. It has also been used in the paper manufacturing industry to enhance paper strength, the electronics industry in acoustic diaphragms for audio speakers, the pharmaceutical industry as filtration membranes, and in the medical field as wound dressing and artificial skin material. In this study, different types of plastic composite support (PCS were implemented separately within a fermentation medium in order to enhance bacterial cellulose (BC production by Acetobacter xylinum. The optimal composition of nutritious compounds in PCS was chosen based on the amount of BC produced. The selected PCS was implemented within a bioreactor to examine the effects on BC production in a batch fermentation. The produced BC was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. Among thirteen types of PCS, the type SFYR+ was selected as solid support for BC production by A. xylinum in a batch biofilm reactor due to its high nitrogen content, moderate nitrogen leaching rate, and sufficient biomass attached on PCS. The PCS biofilm reactor yielded BC production (7.05 g/L that was 2.5-fold greater than the control (2.82 g/L. The XRD results indicated that the PCS-grown BC exhibited higher crystallinity (93% and similar crystal size (5.2 nm to the control. FESEM results showed the attachment of A. xylinum on PCS, producing an interweaving BC product. TGA results demonstrated that PCS-grown BC had about 95% water retention ability, which was lower than BC produced within suspended-cell reactor. PCS-grown BC also exhibited higher Tmax compared to the control. Finally, DMA results showed that BC from the PCS biofilm reactor increased its mechanical property values, i.e., stress at break and Young's modulus when compared to

  19. Health status of mule deer and white-tailed deer herds on the Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creekmore, T.E.; Franson, J.C.; Sileo, L. [National Wildlife Health Research Center, Madison, WI (United States); Griess, J.M.; Roy, R.R. [Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, CO (United States); Baker, D.L. [Colorado Division of Wildlife, Ft. Collins, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Rocky Mountain Arsenal is a fenced, 6,900-ha Superfund site under remediation by the US Army and the Shell Oil Company. A variety of environmental contaminants including organochlorine pesticides, metals, and nerve-gas-production by-products are in the soil or in the water on the site. The authors evaluated the health of 18 radio-collared deer (13 mule deer [Odocoileus hemionus] and 5 white-tailed deer [O. virginianus]) collected by gunshot. Prior to collection, more than 4,000 locations of the 18 deer were plotted during a period of more than 2 years. Blood samples from the euthanized animals were collected for serologic, hematologic, and contaminant evaluations. Necropsies were preformed and tissues collected for histopathologic examinations and environmental contaminants analyses. Results indicate that the physical conditions of the mule deer were fair/good and of the white-tailed deer were good. Antibody prevalence against epizootic hemorrhagic disease serotype 2 was 85% and bovine virus diarrhea 56%. Two mule deer had severe testicular atrophy, and one of these animals also had antler deformities. Three mule deer had alopecia with dermatitis and hyperkeratosis. Results of heavy metal, and organochlorine pesticide analyses from blood and tissue samples and other analyses will be presented.

  20. [Continuous operation of hydrogen bio-production reactor with ethanol-type fermentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Nan-qi; Gong, Man-li; Xing, De-feng

    2004-11-01

    The natural response of a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) for hydrogen bio-production using molasses wastewater as substrate was investigated. Emphasis was placed on assessing the operational controlling strategy on the stable operation of CSTR with high efficiency. It was found that at an initial biomass of 15g/L, an equilibrial microbial community in the ethanol-type fermentation and efficient stable operation of CSTR could be established with following conditions: temperature of 35 degrees C +/- 1 degrees C, COD organic loading rate (OLR) of 40kg/(m3 x d), hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4h, pH value of 4.6 - 4.9 and oxidation reduction potential (ORP) of -450 - -470mV. Following that, hydrogen production in the reactor was relatively stable. The observed maximal hydrogen bio-production rate was 7.63m3/(m3 x d). The content of hydrogen in the biogas was about 40% - 58%. COD removal rate was between 22% - 26%. The total content of ethanol and acetic acid in the fermentative end products was above 80%.

  1. Enhanced Hydrogen Production Integrated with CO2 Separation in a Single-Stage Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahesh Iyer; Himanshu Gupta; Danny Wong; Liang-Shih Fan

    2005-09-30

    Hydrogen production from coal gasification can be enhanced by driving the equilibrium limited Water Gas Shift reaction forward by incessantly removing the CO{sub 2} by-product via the carbonation of calcium oxide. This project aims at using the OSU patented high-reactivity mesoporous precipitated calcium carbonate sorbent for removing the CO{sub 2} product. Preliminary experiments demonstrate the show the superior performance of the PCC sorbent over other naturally occurring calcium sorbents. Gas composition analyses show the formation of 100% pure hydrogen. Novel calcination techniques could lead to smaller reactor footprint and single-stage reactors that can achieve maximum theoretical H{sub 2} production for multicyclic applications. Sub-atmospheric calcination studies reveal the effect of vacuum level, diluent gas flow rate, thermal properties of the diluent gas and the sorbent loading on the calcination kinetics which play an important role on the sorbent morphology. Steam, which can be easily separated from CO{sub 2}, is envisioned to be a potential diluent gas due to its enhanced thermal properties. Steam calcination studies at 700-850 C reveal improved sorbent morphology over regular nitrogen calcination. A mixture of 80% steam and 20% CO{sub 2} at ambient pressure was used to calcine the spent sorbent at 820 C thus lowering the calcination temperature. Regeneration of calcium sulfide to calcium carbonate was achieved by carbonating the calcium sulfide slurry by bubbling CO{sub 2} gas at room temperature.

  2. Innovative self-powered submersible microbial electrolysis cell (SMEC) for biohydrogen production from anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-01-01

    A self-powered submersible microbial electrolysis cell (SMEC), in which a specially designed anode chamber and external electricity supply were not needed, was developed for in situ biohydrogen production from anaerobic reactors. In batch experiments, the hydrogen production rate reached 17.8 m......L/L/d at the initial acetate concentration of 410 mg/L (5 mM), while the cathodic hydrogen recovery (RH2) and overall systemic coulombic efficiency (CEos) were 93% and 28%, respectively, and the systemic hydrogen yield (YH2) peaked at 1.27 mol-H2/mol-acetate. The hydrogen production increased along with acetate...... and buffer concentration. The highest hydrogen production rate of 32.2 mL/L/d and YH2 of 1.43 mol-H2/mol-acetate were achieved at 1640 mg/L (20 mM) acetate and 100 mM phosphate buffer. Further evaluation of the reactor under single electricity-generating or hydrogen-producing mode indicated that further...

  3. Biohydrogen production from cassava wastewater in an anaerobic fluidized bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. S. Amorim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT and organic loading rate (OLR on biological hydrogen production was assessed using an anaerobic fluidized bed reactor fed with cassava wastewater. The HRT of this reactor ranged from 8 to 1 h (28 to 161 kg COD/m³-d. The inoculum was obtained from a facultative pond sludge derived from swine wastewater treatment. The effluent pH was approximately 5.00, while the influent chemical oxygen demand (COD measured 4000 mg COD/L. The hydrogen yield production increased from 0.13 to 1.91 mol H2/mol glucose as the HRT decreased from 8 to 2 h. The hydrogen production rate significantly increased from 0.20 to 2.04 L/h/L when the HRT decreased from 8 to 1 h. The main soluble metabolites were ethanol (1.87-100%, acetic acid (0.00-84.80%, butyric acid (0.00-66.78% and propionic acid (0.00-50.14%. Overall, we conclude that the best hydrogen yield production was obtained at an HRT of 2 h.

  4. Modelling Methane Production and Sulfate Reduction in Anaerobic Granular Sludge Reactor with Ethanol as Electron Donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Dai, Xiaohu; Wang, Qilin; Pan, Yuting; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a mathematical model based on growth kinetics of microorganisms and substrates transportation through biofilms was developed to describe methane production and sulfate reduction with ethanol being a key electron donor. The model was calibrated and validated using experimental data from two case studies conducted in granule-based Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket reactors. The results suggest that the developed model could satisfactorily describe methane and sulfide productions as well as ethanol and sulfate removals in both systems. The modeling results reveal a stratified distribution of methanogenic archaea, sulfate-reducing bacteria and fermentative bacteria in the anaerobic granular sludge and the relative abundances of these microorganisms vary with substrate concentrations. It also indicates sulfate-reducing bacteria can successfully outcompete fermentative bacteria for ethanol utilization when COD/SO42‑ ratio reaches 0.5. Model simulation suggests that an optimal granule diameter for the maximum methane production efficiency can be achieved while the sulfate reduction efficiency is not significantly affected by variation in granule size. It also indicates that the methane production and sulfate reduction can be affected by ethanol and sulfate loading rates, and the microbial community development stage in the reactor, which provided comprehensive insights into the system for its practical operation.

  5. Draft environmental impact statement siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 4, Appendices D-R

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-04-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains 15 appendices.

  6. The Oklo natural reactor: Cumulative fission yields and retentivity of the symmetric mass region fission products

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Laeter, J. R.; Rosman, K. J. R.; Smith, C. L.

    1980-10-01

    Solid source mass spectrometry has been used to determine the relative cumulative fission yields of five elements in three samples of uranium ore from reactor zones in the Oklo mine site. Eighteen fission chains covering the mass range from 105 ≤ A ≤ 130 have been measured for Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn and Te. These measurements have enabled a number of nuclear parameters to be calculated including the relative proportions of 235U, 238U and 239Pu involved in the fission process. The concentration of the five elements in the Oklo samples have also been measured using the stable isotope dilution technique. These values have then been compared to the estimates of the amount of these elements produced by fission under the conditions that are appropriate to the three samples. This procedure enables the retentivity of the elements in the reactor zones to be evaluated. Our work confirms the fact that Pd and Te are retained almost in their entirety in the samples, whereas the other three elements have been partially lost from the reactor site. Almost all the Cd fission products have been lost, and more than 50% of the Ag and Sn fission-produced material has been removed.

  7. Nuclear reactors and production of medicinal radioisotopes : case of the CNSTN's subcritical assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear reactors and cyclotrons are today the main producing facilities of artificial radioisotopes. These radionuclides are widely used, in particular, in nuclear medicine, such as in radiation therapy (utilizing the Cobalt-60 radioisotope) and medical imaging (utilizing the technetium-99 radioisotope). We propose to summarize, the basic information concerning the production of radioisotopes with research reactors, as well as information about the current project to implement a subcritical assembly-reactor in the National Centre of Nuclear Sciences and Technology (CNSTN). The CNSTN's subcritical assembly will serve as efficient tool for educating and training students and scientists. It would be then made available as a service to the community e.g. for industrial benefit and to academic organizations as an institutional benefit. The subcritical assembly is planned to be operational at the beginning of 2016 and will contribute for the initiation of the first steps (including the enacting of new legislation and the establishment of competent and independent nuclear safety regulator) needed for the development of the Tunisian nuclear power program and the related infrastructure, already considered. This project is carried out with the assistance and the support of the International Atomic Energy Agency. (Author)

  8. The Design and Control of Distillation Column with Side Reactors for Chlorobenzene Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薄翠梅; 汤吉海; 柏杨进; 乔旭; 丁良辉; 张湜

    2012-01-01

    The distillation column with side reactors (SRC) can overcome the temperature/pressure mismatch in the traditional reactive distillation, the column operates at temperature/pressure favorable for vapor-liquid separation, while the reactors operate at temperatures/pressures favorable for reaction kinetics. According to the smooth operation and automatic control problem of the distillation column with side reactors (SRC), the design, simulation calculation and dynamic control of the SCR process for chlorobenzene production are discussed in the paper. Firstly, the mechanism models, the integrated structure optimal design and process simulation systems are established, respectively. And then multivariable control schemes are designed, the controllability of SRC process based on the optimal steady-state integrated structure is explored. The dynamic response performances of closed-loop system against several disturbances are discussed to verify the effectiveness of control schemes for the SRC process. The simulating results show that the control structure using conventional control strategies can effectively overcome feeding disturbances in a specific range.

  9. On the fusion triple product and fusion power gain of tokamak pilot plants and reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costley, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    The energy confinement time of tokamak plasmas scales positively with plasma size and so it is generally expected that the fusion triple product, nTτ E, will also increase with size, and this has been part of the motivation for building devices of increasing size including ITER. Here n, T, and τ E are the ion density, ion temperature and energy confinement time respectively. However, tokamak plasmas are subject to operational limits and two important limits are a density limit and a beta limit. We show that when these limits are taken into account, nTτ E becomes almost independent of size; rather it depends mainly on the fusion power, P fus. In consequence, the fusion power gain, Q fus, a parameter closely linked to nTτ E is also independent of size. Hence, P fus and Q fus, two parameters of critical importance in reactor design, are actually tightly coupled. Further, we find that nTτ E is inversely dependent on the normalised beta, β N; an unexpected result that tends to favour lower power reactors. Our findings imply that the minimum power to achieve fusion reactor conditions is driven mainly by physics considerations, especially energy confinement, while the minimum device size is driven by technology and engineering considerations. Through dedicated R&D and parallel developments in other fields, the technology and engineering aspects are evolving in a direction to make smaller devices feasible.

  10. Optimization of a Pd-based membrane reactor for hydrogen production from methane steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assis, A.J.; Hori, C.E.; Silva, L.C.; Murata, V.V. [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). School of Chemical Engineering]. E-mail: adilsonjassis@gmail.com

    2008-07-01

    In this work, it is proposed a phenomenological model in steady state to describe the performance of a membrane reactor for hydrogen production through methane steam reform as well as it is performed an optimization of operating conditions. The model is composed by a set of ordinary differential equations from mass, energy and momentum balances and constitutive relations. They were used two different intrinsic kinetic expressions from literature. The results predicted by the model were validated using experimental data. They were investigated the effect of five important process parameters, inlet reactor pressure (PR0), methane feed flow rate (FCH40), sweep gas flow rate (FI), external reactor temperature (TW) and steam to methane feed flow ratio (M), both on methane conversion (XCH{sub 4} ) and hydrogen recovery (YH{sub 2}). The best operating conditions were obtained through simple parametric optimization and by a method based on gradient, which uses the computer code DIRCOL in FORTRAN. It is shown that high methane conversion (96%) as well as hydrogen recovery (91%) can be obtained, using the optimized conditions. (author)

  11. Analysis of the magnetic corrosion product deposits on a boiling water reactor cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlov, Andrey [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Degueldre, Claude, E-mail: claude.degueldre@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Wilfried [Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt, Leibstadt (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15

    The buildup of corrosion product deposits (CRUD) on the fuel cladding of the boiling water reactor (BWR) before and after zinc injection has been investigated by applying local experimental analytical techniques. Under the BWR water chemistry conditions, Zn addition together with the presence of Ni and Mn induce the formation of (Zn,Ni,Mn)[Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}] spinel solid solutions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) revealed inversion ratios of cation distribution in spinels deposited from the solid solution. Based on this information, a two-site ferrite spinel solid solution model is proposed. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) findings suggest the zinc-rich ferrite spinels formation on BWR fuel cladding mainly at lower pin. - Graphical Abstract: Analysis of spinels in corrosion product deposits on boiling water reactor fuel rod. Combining EPMA and XAFS results: schematic representation of the ferrite spinels in terms of the end members and their extent of inversion. Note that the ferrites are represented as a surface between the normal (upper plane, M[Fe{sub 2}]O{sub 4}) and the inverse (lower plane, Fe[MFe]O{sub 4}). Actual compositions red Black-Small-Square for the specimen at low elevation (810 mm), blue Black-Small-Square for the specimen at mid elevation (1800 mm). The results have an impact on the properties of the CRUD material. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Buildup of corrosion product deposits on fuel claddings of a boiling water reactor (BWR) are investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Under BWR water conditions, Zn addition with Ni and Mn induced formation of (Zn,Ni,Mn)[Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}]. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-Ray Adsorption Spectroscopy (XAS) revealed inversion of cations in spinel solid solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc-rich ferrite spinels are formed on BWR fuel cladding mainly at lower pin elevations.

  12. Assessing optimal fermentation type for bio-hydrogen production in continuous-flow acidogenic reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, N Q; Chua, H; Chan, S Y; Tsang, Y F; Wang, Y J; Sin, N

    2007-07-01

    In this study, the optimal fermentation type and the operating conditions of anaerobic process in continuous-flow acidogenic reactors was investigated for the maximization of bio-hydrogen production using mixed cultures. Butyric acid type fermentation occurred at pH>6, propionic acid type fermentation occurred at pH about 5.5 with E(h) (redox potential) >-278mV, and ethanol-type fermentation occurred at pHClostridium sp., Propionibacterium sp. and Bacteriodes sp., respectively. Ethanol fermentation was optimal type by comparing the operating stabilities and hydrogen production capacities between the fermentation types, which remained stable when the organic loading rate (OLR) reached the highest OLR at 86.1kgCOD/m(3)d. The maximum hydrogen production reached up to 14.99L/d.

  13. Product Characterization and Kinetics of Biomass Pyrolysis in a Three-Zone Free-Fall Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natthaya Punsuwan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis of biomass including palm shell, palm kernel, and cassava pulp residue was studied in a laboratory free-fall reactor with three separated hot zones. The effects of pyrolysis temperature (250–1050°C and particle size (0.18–1.55 mm on the distribution and properties of pyrolysis products were investigated. A higher pyrolysis temperature and smaller particle size increased the gas yield but decreased the char yield. Cassava pulp residue gave more volatiles and less char than those of palm kernel and palm shell. The derived solid product (char gave a high calorific value of 29.87 MJ/kg and a reasonably high BET surface area of 200 m2/g. The biooil from palm shell is less attractive to use as a direct fuel, due to its high water contents, low calorific value, and high acidity. On gas composition, carbon monoxide was the dominant component in the gas product. A pyrolysis model for biomass pyrolysis in the free-fall reactor was developed, based on solving the proposed two-parallel reactions kinetic model and equations of particle motion, which gave excellent prediction of char yields for all biomass precursors under all pyrolysis conditions studied.

  14. ACRR [Annular Core Research Reactor] fission product release tests: ST-1 and ST-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two experiments (ST-1 and ST-2) have been performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACER) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNLA) to obtain time-resolved data on the release of fission products from irradiated fuels under light water reactor (LWR) severe accident conditions. Both experiments were conducted in a highly reducing environment at maximum fuel temperatures of greater than 2400 K. These experiments were designed specifically to investigate the effect of increased total pressure on fission product release; ST-1 was performed at approximately 0.16 MPa and ST-2 was run at 1.9 MPa, whereas other parameters were matched as closely as possible. Release rate data were measured for Cs, I, Ba, Sr, Eu, Te, and U. The release rates were higher than predicted by existing codes for Ba, Sr, Eu, and U. Te release was very low, but Te did not appear to be sequestered by the zircaloy cladding; it was evenly distributed in the fuel. In addition, in posttest analysis a unique fuel morphology (fuel swelling) was observed which may have enhanced fission product release, especially in the high pressure test (ST-2). These data are compared with analytical results from the CORSOR correlation and the VICTORIA computer model. 8 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  15. The kinetics of nitrogen removal and biogas production in an anammox non-woven membrane reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Shou-Qing; Lee, Po-Heng; Sung, Shihwu

    2010-08-01

    The anammox non-woven membrane reactor (ANMR) is a novel reactor configuration to culture the slowly growing anammox bacteria. Different mathematical models were used to study the process kinetics of the nitrogen removal in the ANMR. The kinetics of nitrogen gas production of anammox process was first evaluated in this paper. For substrate removal kinetics, the modified Stover-Kincannon model and the Grau second-order model were more applicable to the ANMR than the first-order model and the Monod model. For nitrogen gas production kinetics, the Van der Meer and Heertjes model was more appropriate than the modified Stover-Kincannon model. Model evaluation was carried out by comparing experimental data with predicted values calculated from suitable models. Both model kinetics study and model testing showed that the Grau second-order model and the Van der Meer and Heertjes model seemed to be the best models to describe the nitrogen removal and nitrogen gas production in the ANMR, respectively.

  16. Production of specific-structured lipids by enzymatic interesterification in a pilot continuous enzyme bed reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Xuebing; Balchen, Steen; Høy, Carl-Erik;

    1998-01-01

    Production of specific-structured lipids (interesterified lipids with a specific structure) by enzymatic interesterification was carried out in a continuous enzyme bed pilot scale reactor. Commercial immobilized lipase (Lipozyme IM) was used and investigations of acyl migration, pressure drop....... Incorporation of medium chain fatty acids was increased with increased residence time. Approximately 40% lipase activity was lost after a four-week run. External mass transfer was not a major problem in the linear flow range, but internal mass transfer did impose some transfer limitations....

  17. Environmental characterization of two potential locations at Hanford for a new production reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, E.C.; Becker, C.D.; Fitzner, R.E.; Gano, K.A.; Imhoff, K.L.; McCallum, R.F.; Myers, D.A.; Page, T.L.; Price, K.R.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Rice D.G.; Schreiber D.L.; Skumatz L.A.; Sommer D.J.; Tawil J.J.; Wallace R.W.; Watson D.G.

    1984-09-01

    This report describes various environmental aspects of two areas on the Hanford Site that are potential locations for a New Production Reactor (NPR). The area known as the Skagit Hanford Site is considered the primary or reference site. The second area, termed the Firehouse Site, is considered the alternate site. The report encompasses an environmental characterization of these two potential NPR locations. Eight subject areas are covered: geography and demography; ecology; meteorology; hydrology; geology; cultural resources assessment; economic and social effects of station construction and operation; and environmental monitoring. 80 refs., 68 figs., 109 tabs.

  18. Process development and modeling of fluidized-bed reactor with coimmobilized biocatalyst for fuel ethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, May Yongmei

    This research focuses on two steps of commercial fuel ethanol production processes: the hydrolysis starch process and the fermentation process. The goal of this research is to evaluate the performance of co-immobilized biocatalysts in a fluidized bed reactor with emphasis on economic and engineering aspects and to develop a predictive mathematical model for this system. The productivity of an FBR is higher than productivity of a traditional batch reactor or CSTR. Fluidized beds offer great advantages over packed beds for immobilized cells when small particles are used or when the reactant feed contains suspended solids. Plugging problems, excessive pressure drops (and thus attrition), or crushing risks may be avoided. No mechanical stirring is required as mixing occurs due to the natural turbulence in the fluidized process. Both enzyme and microorganism are immobilized in one catalyst bead which is called co-immobilization. Inside this biocatalyst matrix, starch is hydrolyzed by the enzyme glucoamylase to form glucose and then converted to ethanol and carbon dioxide by microorganisms. Two biocatalysts were evaluated: (1) co-immobilized yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae and glucoamylase. (2) co-immobilized Zymomonas mobilis and glucoamylase. A co-immobilized biocatalyst accomplishes the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF process). When compared to a two-step process involving separate saccharification and fermentation stages, the SSF process has productivity values twice that given by the pre-saccharified process when the time required for pre-saccharification (15--25 h) was taken into account. The SSF process should also save capital cost. The information about productivity, fermentation yield, concentration profiles along the bed, ethanol inhibition, et al., was obtained from the experimental data. For the yeast system, experimental results showed that: no apparent decrease of productivity occurred after two and half months, the productivity

  19. Preliminary Conceptual Design and Development of Core Technology of Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jong Hwa; Kang, H. S.; Gil, C. S. and others

    2006-05-15

    For the nuclear hydrogen production system, the VHTR technology and the IS cycle technology are being developed. A comparative evaluation on the block type reactor and the pebble type reactor is performed to decide a proper nuclear hydrogen production reactor. 100MWt prismatic type reactor is tentatively decided and its safety characteristics are roughly investigated. Computation codes of nuclear design, thermo-fluid design, safety-performance analysis are developed and verified. Also, the development of a risk informed design technology is started. Experiments for metallic materials and graphites are carried out for the selection of materials of VHTR components. Diverse materials for process heat exchanger are studied in various corrosive environments. Pyrolytic carbon and SiC coating technology is developed and fuel manufacturing technology is basically established. Computer program is developed to evaluate the performance of coated particle fuels.

  20. Biohydrogen production from glucose in upflow biofilm reactors with plastic carriers under extreme thermophilic conditions (70(degree)C)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, H.; Zeng, Raymond Jianxiong; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    with household solid waste. Kinetic analysis of the biohydrogen enrichment cultures show that substrate (glucose) likely inhibited hydrogen production when its concentration was higher than 1 g/L. Different start up strategies were applied for biohydrogen production in biofilm reactors operated at 70°C, and fed......Biohydrogen could efficiently be produced in glucose-fed biofilm reactors filled with plastic carriers and operated at 70°C. Batch experiments were, in addition, conducted to enrich and cultivate glucose-fed extremethermophilic hydrogen producing microorganisms from a biohydrogen CSTR reactor fed...... with synthetic medium with glucose as the only carbon and energy source. A biofilm reactor, started up with plastic carriers, that were previously inoculated with the enrichment cultures, resulted in higher hydrogen yield (2.21 mol H2/mol glucose consumed) but required longer start up time (1 month), while...

  1. Production of hydrogen in a granular sludge-based anaerobic continuous stirred tank reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Show, Kuan-Yeow [Faculty of Engineering and Science, University of Tunku Abdul Rahman, 53300 Setapak, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Zhang, Zhen-Peng; Tay, Joo-Hwa [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 (Singapore); Institute of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 637723 (Singapore); Tee Liang, David [Institute of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 637723 (Singapore); Lee, Duu-Jong [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan, RO (China); Jiang, Wen-Ju [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2007-12-15

    An investigation on biohydrogen production was conducted in a granular sludge-based continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The reactor performance was assessed at five different glucose concentrations of 2.5, 5, 10, 20 and 40 g/L and four hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 h, resulting in the organic loading rates (OLRs) ranged between 2.5 and 20 g-glucose/L h. Carbon flow was traced by analyzing the composition of gaseous and soluble metabolites as well as the cell yield. Butyrate, acetate and ethanol were found to be the major soluble metabolite products in the biochemical synthesis of hydrogen. Carbon balance analysis showed that more than half of the glucose carbon was converted into unidentified soluble products at an OLR of 2.5 g-glucose/L h. It was found that high hydrogen yields corresponded to a sludge loading rate in between 0.6 and 0.8 g-glucose/g-VSS h. Substantial suppression in hydrogen yield was noted as the sludge loading rate fell beyond the optimum range. It is deduced that decreasing the sludge loading rate induced the metabolic shift of biochemical reactions at an OLR of 2.5 g-glucose/L h, which resulted in a substantial reduction in hydrogen yield to 0.36-0.41 mol-H{sub 2}/mol-glucose. Optimal operation conditions for peak hydrogen yield (1.84 mol-H{sub 2}/mol-glucose) and hydrogen production rate (3.26 L/L h) were achieved at an OLR of 20 g-glucose/L h, which corresponded to an HRT of 0.5 h and an influent glucose concentration of 10 g/L. Influence of HRT and substrate concentration on the reactor performance was interrelated and the adverse impact on hydrogen production was noted as substrate concentration was higher than 20 g/L or HRT was shorter than 0.5 h. The experimental study indicated that a higher OLR derived from appropriate HRTs and substrate concentrations was desirable for hydrogen production in such a granule-based CSTR. (author)

  2. A physical description of fission product behavior fuels for advanced power reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaganas, G.; Rest, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Florida International Univ.

    2007-10-18

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is considering a list of reactors and nuclear fuels as part of its chartered initiative. Because many of the candidate materials have not been explored experimentally under the conditions of interest, and in order to economize on program costs, analytical support in the form of combined first principle and mechanistic modeling is highly desirable. The present work is a compilation of mechanistic models developed in order to describe the fission product behavior of irradiated nuclear fuel. The mechanistic nature of the model development allows for the possibility of describing a range of nuclear fuels under varying operating conditions. Key sources include the FASTGRASS code with an application to UO{sub 2} power reactor fuel and the Dispersion Analysis Research Tool (DART ) with an application to uranium-silicide and uranium-molybdenum research reactor fuel. Described behavior mechanisms are divided into subdivisions treating fundamental materials processes under normal operation as well as the effect of transient heating conditions on these processes. Model topics discussed include intra- and intergranular gas-atom and bubble diffusion, bubble nucleation and growth, gas-atom re-solution, fuel swelling and ?scion gas release. In addition, the effect of an evolving microstructure on these processes (e.g., irradiation-induced recrystallization) is considered. The uranium-alloy fuel, U-xPu-Zr, is investigated and behavior mechanisms are proposed for swelling in the {alpha}-, intermediate- and {gamma}-uranium zones of this fuel. The work reviews the FASTGRASS kinetic/mechanistic description of volatile ?scion products and, separately, the basis for the DART calculation of bubble behavior in amorphous fuels. Development areas and applications for physical nuclear fuel models are identified.

  3. Fission Product Transport and Source Terms in HTRs: Experience from AVR Pebble Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Moormann

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fission products deposited in the coolant circuit outside of the active core play a dominant role in source term estimations for advanced small pebble bed HTRs, particularly in design basis accidents (DBA. The deposited fission products may be released in depressurization accidents because present pebble bed HTR concepts abstain from a gas tight containment. Contamination of the circuit also hinders maintenance work. Experiments, performed from 1972 to 88 on the AVR, an experimental pebble bed HTR, allow for a deeper insight into fission product transport behavior. The activity deposition per coolant pass was lower than expected and was influenced by fission product chemistry and by presence of carbonaceous dust. The latter lead also to inconsistencies between Cs plate out experiments in laboratory and in AVR. The deposition behavior of Ag was in line with present models. Dust as activity carrier is of safety relevance because of its mobility and of its sorption capability for fission products. All metal surfaces in pebble bed reactors were covered by a carbonaceous dust layer. Dust in AVR was produced by abrasion in amounts of about 5 kg/y. Additional dust sources in AVR were ours oil ingress and peeling of fuel element surfaces due to an air ingress. Dust has a size of about 1  m, consists mainly of graphite, is partly remobilized by flow perturbations, and deposits with time constants of 1 to 2 hours. In future reactors, an efficient filtering via a gas tight containment is required because accidents with fast depressurizations induce dust mobilization. Enhanced core temperatures in normal operation as in AVR and broken fuel pebbles have to be considered, as inflammable dust concentrations in the gas phase.

  4. The concept of nuclear hydrogen production based on MHR-T reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept focused on nuclear power for steam reforming of methane and, later, on hydrogen production from water by high temperature solid oxide electrolysis. The programme arises from the premise that the use of hydrogen could grow world wide by a factor of about sixteen over the next century. Anticipating that the main source of hydrogen will continue to be steam reforming of natural gas during much of that period, by 2025, about a quarter of the world's production of natural gas would be devoted to hydrogen generation, considering both its use as both the energy source and the source of the raw material. The use of nuclear reactors instead of natural gas as the heat source for steam reforming of methane could reduce the total use of natural gas by almost half. Steam reforming of methane requires temperatures over 800 deg. C rather than the temperatures over 900 deg. C required for thermochemical generation of hydrogen from water, thus reducing the technological issues associated with process of hydrogen generation from water using a sulphur-iodine process. Further, the steam reforming process can have a hydrogen yield eight times that of thermochemical processes or high temperature electrolysis. These features make it economically very competitive, and Rosatom is examining possible advances that would make it even more so. In particular, reactor project MHR-T being designed in Russia has included adiabatic thermo-conversion technology that can control process conditions far more precisely than conventional processing equipment. (authors)

  5. Thermodynamic Investigation of Hydrogen Production by Methane Steam Reforming using Integrated Hydrogen-permselective Membrane Reactor with CO2 absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of hydrogen as an energy carrier became more important to the future energy system. Methane steam reforming (MSR) is one of the most important chemical processes in hydrogen production. To improve the conversion of methane to hydrogen, a hydrogen-permselective membrane reactor with a carbon dioxide absorbent was proposed and investigated. The conversion at 893 K in the integrated reactor with CaO as absorbent was almost equal to that at above 1000 K in the conventional reactor. Exergy analyses indicated that the a large portion of exergy loss for hydrogen production was chemical exergy loss in the case without methane recycle, while thermal exergy loss in the case with recycle use. The exergy loss of this process using the hydrogen-permselective membrane reactor with the CaO-absorbent was estimated about 70% of that by the conventional catalytic reactor. Efficiencies of the integrated reactor process, based on the energy and exergy losses were compared with those of other hydrogen production processes. (authors)

  6. Biosurfactants production in biofilm reactor and their recovery by pertraction [abstract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chtioui, O.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was focused on production and isolation of microbial surfactants with interesting properties for application in agriculture, petrol industry, pollution remediation and pharmaceutical fields. The biosurfactant production was performed by free and immobilized aerobic cells of Bacillus subtilis ATCC 21332. This strain produces lipopeptides of the surfactin and fengycin families. The colonizing behavior of Bacillus subtilis strain was evaluated under several experimental and cultural conditions at different sterile solid materials with modified surface properties. After preliminary screening tests with five polymer materials, polypropylene foamed with powder activated carbon (PPch was selected for cells immobilization and production of lipopeptides. The aims of work are to develop a new technology using the specificity of a biofilm reactor as well as a perspective continuous separation based on a liquid membrane technique (known also as pertraction. Using the classical aerated reactor the lipopeptides generate extensive foaming that imposes difficulties on plant-scale process realization. In order to avoid this drawback, while using the new type reactor conditions, the air was injected over the surface of cultural medium. With this configuration, the biofilm on the solid support and the culture medium are alimented in oxygen directly from the interfaces. The obtained results showed that the production of both lipopeptides and especially of the fengycin was greatly enhanced by the immobilization. The longer time of preliminary cells colonization enhanced highly the production of surfactin, especially at the beginning of fermentation process (the first 24 h. This effect was less evident after 48 h fermentation. To confirm the applicability of the liquid membrane process to lipopeptides recovery from aqueous media, including fermentation broth, extraction behavior of the lipopeptides into organic solvents was studied. For both lipopeptides

  7. Nitrous oxide production during nitrogen removal from domestic wastewater in lab-scale sequencing batch reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiuhong; PENG Yi; WU Changyong; AKIO Takigawa; PENG Yongzhen

    2008-01-01

    The production of N2O during nitrogen removal from real domestic wastewater was investigated in a lab-scale aerobic-anoxic sequencing batch reactor with a working volume of 14 L.The results showed that the total N2O-N production reached higher than 1.87 mg/L,and up to 4% of removed nitrogen was converted into N2O.In addition,N2O led to a much higher greenhouse effect than CO2 during aerobic reaction phase,this proved that N2O production could not be neglected.The N2O-N production during nitrification Was 1.85 mg/L,whereas,during denitrification,no N2O was produced,nitrification was the main source of N2O production during nitrogen removal.Furthermore,during denitrification,the dissolved N2O at the end of aeration Was found to be further reduced to N2.Denitrification thus had the potential of controlling N2O production.

  8. Modeling of Nitrous Oxide Production from Nitritation Reactors Treating Real Anaerobic Digestion Liquor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qilin; Ni, Bing-Jie; Lemaire, Romain; Hao, Xiaodi; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a mathematical model including both ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and heterotrophic bacteria (HB) is constructed to predict N2O production from the nitritation systems receiving the real anaerobic digestion liquor. This is for the first time that N2O production from such systems was modeled considering both AOB and HB. The model was calibrated and validated using experimental data from both lab- and pilot-scale nitritation reactors. The model predictions matched the dynamic N2O, ammonium, nitrite and chemical oxygen demand data well, supporting the capability of the model. Modeling results indicated that HB are the dominant contributor to N2O production in the above systems with the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of 0.5-1.0 mg O2/L, accounting for approximately 75% of N2O production. The modeling results also suggested that the contribution of HB to N2O production decreased with the increasing DO concentrations, from 75% at DO = 0.5 mg O2/L to 25% at DO = 7.0 mg O2/L, with a corresponding increase of the AOB contribution (from 25% to 75%). Similar to HB, the total N2O production rate also decreased dramatically from 0.65 to 0.25 mg N/L/h when DO concentration increased from 0.5 to 7.0 mg O2/L. PMID:27125491

  9. Modeling of Nitrous Oxide Production from Nitritation Reactors Treating Real Anaerobic Digestion Liquor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qilin; Ni, Bing-Jie; Lemaire, Romain; Hao, Xiaodi; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a mathematical model including both ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and heterotrophic bacteria (HB) is constructed to predict N2O production from the nitritation systems receiving the real anaerobic digestion liquor. This is for the first time that N2O production from such systems was modeled considering both AOB and HB. The model was calibrated and validated using experimental data from both lab- and pilot-scale nitritation reactors. The model predictions matched the dynamic N2O, ammonium, nitrite and chemical oxygen demand data well, supporting the capability of the model. Modeling results indicated that HB are the dominant contributor to N2O production in the above systems with the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of 0.5–1.0 mg O2/L, accounting for approximately 75% of N2O production. The modeling results also suggested that the contribution of HB to N2O production decreased with the increasing DO concentrations, from 75% at DO = 0.5 mg O2/L to 25% at DO = 7.0 mg O2/L, with a corresponding increase of the AOB contribution (from 25% to 75%). Similar to HB, the total N2O production rate also decreased dramatically from 0.65 to 0.25 mg N/L/h when DO concentration increased from 0.5 to 7.0 mg O2/L. PMID:27125491

  10. Reactor production of 64Cu and 67Cu using enriched zinc target material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initial development work and trial irradiations were conducted to produce the in-demand medical isotopes 64Cu and 67Cu via the reactor-based fast neutron 64Zn(n,p)64Cu and 67Zn(n,p)67Cu reactions using enriched zinc targets. Boron-nitride shielded sample holders were used to reduce the thermal neutron flux to the zinc targets and diminish the production of undesired 65Zn. Irradiated oxide targets were dissolved and preliminary separations achieved copper yields of ∼95 % and zinc separations factors greater than 103 after one ion exchange pass. Further development would allow the production of mCi levels of 64Cu and 67Cu per irradiation, providing sufficient activity for small mammal research studies. (author)

  11. Design and production process of bushing-type fuel elements for channel research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afanasiev, V.L.; Aleksandrov, A.B.; Enin, A.A. [NZHK, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1998-07-01

    The design of bushing-type fuel elements (FEs) based on the dioxide fuel composition UO{sub 2}+Al for channel research reactors is described. Commercial technological process for bushing-type FEs with up to 0.8 g/cm{sup 3} uranium concentration in the fuel core is presented. This technology is based on fuel core production using powder metallurgy with subsequent chemical treatment of its surface and enclosing into the finished cladding. Commercial technological process for bushing-type FEs with 0.8-3.8 g/cm{sup 3} uranium concentration in the fuel composition is considered. This process is based on fuel core production by means of extrusion technology followed by fuel core enclosing into the cladding. (author)

  12. Hydraulic retention time effects on wastewater nutrient removal and bioproduct production via rotating algal biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iman Shayan, Sahand; Agblevor, Foster A; Bertin, Lorenzo; Sims, Ronald C

    2016-07-01

    Rotating algal biofilm reactor (RABR) technology was successfully employed in an effective strategy to couple the removal of wastewater nutrients with accumulation of valuable bioproducts by grown algae. A secondary stage municipal wastewater was fed to the developed system and the effects of the hydraulic retention time (HRT) parameter on both nutrient removal and bioproduct production were evaluated under fed-batch operation mode. Two sets of bench scale RABRs were designed and operated with HRTs of 2 and 6days in order to provide competitive environment for algal growth. The HRT significantly affected nitrogen and phosphorus uptakes along with lipid and starch accumulations by microalgae in harvested biofilms. Domination of nitrogen removal in 2-day HRT with higher lipid accumulation (20% on dried weight basis) and phosphorus removal in 6-day HRT with higher starch production (27% on dried weight basis) was observed by comparing the performances of the RABRs in duplicate runs. PMID:27038261

  13. Comparative evaluation of two methods for 172Tm production in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative evaluation of two methods for the production of 172Tm in nuclear reactors is carried out. They are respectively based on two chains of double neutron capture reactions, 170Er(n,γ)171Er(n,γ)172Er(β-)172Tm and 170Er(n,γ)171Er(β-)171Tm(n,γ)172Tm, and a chain of triple neutron capture: 169Tm(n,γ)170Tm(n,γ)71Tm(n,γ)172Tm. Theoretical considerations with respect to both ways of production are formulated and the mathematical equation are solved. Experiments of irradiation of Er2O3 and Tm2O3 were performed. Advantages and drawbacks of both methods are discussed. (author)

  14. The economic and community impacts of closing Hanford's N Reactor and nuclear materials production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study discusses the negative economic impact on local cities and counties and the State of Washington of a permanent closure of nuclear materials production at the Hanford Site, located in the southeastern part of the state. The loss of nuclear materials production, the largest and most important of the five Department of Energy (DOE) missions at Hanford, could occur if Hanford's N Reactor is permanently closed and not replaced. The study provides estimates of statewide and local losses in jobs, income, and purchases from the private sector caused by such an event; it forecasts impacts on state and local government finances; and it describes certain local community and social impacts in the Tri-Cities (Richland, Kennewick, and Pasco) and surrounding communities. 33 refs., 8 figs., 22 tabs

  15. Tritium recovery as waste sub product in the Fluorine 18 production in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tritium is a radioisotope that can be used to carry out basic as applied research. The current researches on the labelling of the organic molecules as well as its application in diagnostic, radiotherapy and hydrology among others confirm the before said. Due to their utility, they have been carried out studies to recover it of radioactive or nuclear waste as well as, to concentrate it of the natural water, the one which due to the nuclear tests in the last decades has gotten rich in tritium. In this work previous studies to recover the tritium coming from the process that was used to produce F-18 following the reaction 6 Li (n, α) 3 H, 16 O (t, n) 18 F in made up of lithium oxygenated, in the TRIGA Mark III Nuclear Reactor of the Nuclear Center of Mexico. The method consists on purifying by ion exchange the waste solutions where F-18 took place, to distill them and to concentrate them for an electrochemical method. It was already adapts a system reported to concentrate big volumes (approximately 250 ml) in such a way that could be used for small volumes. It was recovered 30% of the considered initial quantity of tritium. A modification to the proposed methodology will allow to recover the waste tritium in a percentage greater to 80%. (Author)

  16. Biogas production from potato-juice, a by-product from potato-starch processing, in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Cheng; Boe, Kanokwan; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the utilization of potato-juice, the organic by-product from potato-starch processing, for biogas production was investigated in batch assay and in high rate anaerobic reactors. The maximum methane potential of the potato-juice determined by batch assay was 470mL-CH4/g......VS-added. Anaerobic digestion of potato-juice in an EGSB reactor could obtain a methane yield of 380mL-CH4/gVS-added at the organic loading rate of 3.2gCOD/(L-reactor.d). In a UASB reactor, higher organic loading rate of 5.1gCOD/(L-reactor.d) could be tolerated, however, it resulted in a lower methane yield of 240m......L-CH4/gVS-added. The treatment of reactor effluent was also investigated. By acidification with sulfuric acid to pH lower than 5, almost 100% of the ammonia content in the effluent could be retained during the successive up-concentration process step. The reactor effluent could be up...

  17. Progress in conceptual study of China fusion-based hydrogen production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: As one of the series of fusion system design concepts developed by the FDS Team of China, Fusion-based hydrogen production reactor (FDS-III) is designated to exploit the fusion energy advanced application for the production of hydrogen, and satisfy fusion development strategy in China. FDS-III is a cost competitive reactor concept with a fusion power of ∼2.5GW, whose parameters are selected based on the progress in recent magnetic confinement fusion. The neutron wall load of 3.5∼4MW/m2 and the surface heat flux of ∼0.8MW/m2 are considered. for high effective energy conversion. An innovative high temperature liquid lithium-lead blanket (HTL) concept based on the Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic steel (RAFM) as structural material is proposed as an option of the blanket concepts for FDS-III. The 'multilayer flow channel inserts (MFCIs)' have been adopted in the LiPb channels to attain high outlet temperature about 1000 deg C to satisfy the need of high efficiency production of hydrogen. The blanket combines advantage of the banana segment and large module to improve maintenance efficiency and reduce effect of electric magnetic force. The maintenance scheme considered is based on the removal of blanket segment and divertor cassettes through the big equatorial ports. In order to achieve a high energy conversion system, a carbon dioxide Brayton cycle is adopted which permit a high thermal efficiency. Preliminary cost analysis show FDS-III is a competition fusion reaction for hydrogen production. This paper gives the preliminary design and study of FDS-III. (author)

  18. Legionella pneumophila, armed to the hilt: justifying the largest arsenal of effectors in the bacterial world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensminger, Alexander W

    2016-02-01

    Many bacterial pathogens use dedicated translocation systems to deliver arsenals of effector proteins to their hosts. Once inside the host cytosol, these effectors modulate eukaryotic cell biology to acquire nutrients, block microbial degradation, subvert host defenses, and enable pathogen transmission to other hosts. Among all bacterial pathogens studied to date, the gram-negative pathogen, Legionella pneumophila, maintains the largest arsenal of effectors, with over 330 effector proteins translocated by the Dot/Icm type IVB translocation system. In this review, I will discuss some of the recent work on understanding the consequences of this large arsenal. I will also present several models that seek to explain how L. pneumophila has acquired and subsequently maintained so many more effectors than its peers. PMID:26709975

  19. Advanced Chemical Reactor Technologies for Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oils - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luqman Buchori

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is an alternative biofuel that can replace diesel oil without requiring modifications to the engine and advantageously produces cleaner emissions. Biodiesel can be produced through transesterification process between oil or fat and alcohol to form esters and glycerol. The transesterification can be carried out with or without a catalyst. The catalyzed production of biodiesel can be performed by using homogeneous, heterogeneous and enzyme. Meanwhile, non-catalytic transesterification with supercritical alcohol provides a new way of producing biodiesel. Microwave and ultrasound assisted transesterification significantly can reduce reaction time as well as improve product yields. Another process, a plasma technology is promising for biodiesel synthesis from vegetable oils due to very short reaction time, no soap formation and no glycerol as a by-product. This paper reviews briefly the technologies on transesterification reaction for biodiesel production using homogeneous, heterogeneous, and enzyme catalysts, as well as advanced methods (supercritical, microwave, ultrasonic, and plasma technology. Advantages and disadvantages of each method were described comprehensively. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 17th May 2016; Revised: 20th September 2016; Accepted: 20th September 2016 How to Cite: Buchori, L., Istadi, I., Purwanto, P. (2016. Advanced Chemical Reactor Technologies for Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oils - A Review. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (3: 406-430 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.3.490.406-430 Permalink/DOI: http://doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.3.490.406-430

  20. Gasification of refuse derived fuel in a fixed bed reactor for syngas production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steam gasification of two different refuse derived fuels (RDFs), differing slightly in composition as well as thermal stability, was carried out in a fixed-bed reactor at atmospheric pressure. The proximate and ultimate analyses reveal that carbon and hydrogen are the major components in RDFs. The thermal analysis indicates the presence of cellulose and plastic based materials in RDFs. H2 and CO are found to be the major products, along with CO2 and hydrocarbons resulting from gasification of RDFs. The effect of gasification temperature on H2 and CO selectivities was studied, and the optimum temperature for better H2 and CO selectivity was determined to be 725 deg. C. The calorific value of product gas produced at lower gasification temperature is significantly higher than that of gas produced at higher process temperature. Also, the composition of RDF plays an important role in distribution of products gas. The RDF with more C and H content is found to produce more amounts of CO and H2 under similar experimental conditions. The steam/waste ratio showed a notable effect on the selectivity of syngas as well as calorific value of the resulting product gas. The flow rate of carrier gas did not show any significant effect on products yield or their distribution

  1. Simulation of kefiran production of Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens JCM6985 in fed-batch reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamas Cheirsilp

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Kinetics of kefiran production by Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens JCM6985 has been investigated. A mathematical model taking into account the mechanism of exopolysaccharides production has been developed. Experiments were carried out in batch mode in order to obtain kinetic model parameters that were further applied to simulate fed-batch processes. A simplification of parameter fitting was also introduced for complicated model. The fed-batch mode allows more flexibility in the control of the substrate concentration as well as product concentration in the culture medium. Based on the batch mathematical model, a fed-batch model was developed and simulations were done. Simulation study in fed-batch reactor resulted that substrate concentration should be controlled at 20 g L-1 to soften the product inhibition and also to stimulate utilization of substrate and its hydrolysate. From simulation results of different feeding techniques, it was found that constant feeding at 0.01 L h-1 was most practically effective feeding profile for exopolysaccharides production in fed-batch mode.

  2. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  3. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  4. The IEA-R1 research reactor: 50 years of operating experience and utilization for research, teaching and radioisotopes production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes almost 50 years of operating experience and utilization of the IEA-R1 research reactor for research, teaching and radioisotopes production. The current and future program of upgrading the reactor is also described. IEA-R1 research reactor at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, Brazil is the largest power research reactor in Brazil, with a maximum power rating of 5 MWth. It is being used for basic and applied research in the nuclear and neutron related sciences, for the production of radioisotopes for medical and industrial applications, and for providing services of neutron activation analysis, real time neutron radiography, and neutron transmutation doping of silicon. IEA-R1 is a swimming pool reactor, with light water as the coolant and moderator, and graphite and beryllium as reflectors. The reactor was commissioned on September 16, 1957 and achieved its first criticality. It is currently operating at 3.5 MWth with a 64-hour cycle per week. In the early sixties, IPEN produced 131I, 32P, 198Au, 24Na, 35S, 51Cr and labeled compounds for medical use. In the year 1980, production of 99mTc generator kits from the fission 99Mo imported from Canada was started. This production is continuously increasing, with the current rate of about 16,000 Ci of 99mTC per year. The 99mTc generator kits, with activities varying from 250 mCi to 2,000 mCi, are distributed to more than 260 hospitals and clinics in Brazil. Several radiopharmaceutical products based on 131I , 32P, 51Cr and 153Sm are also produced. During the past several years, a concerted effort has been made in order to upgrade the reactor power to 5 MWth through refurbishment and modernization programs. One of the reasons for this decision was to produce 99Mo at IPEN. The reactor cycle will be gradually increased to 120 hours per week continuous operation. It is anticipated that these programs will assure the safe and sustainable operation of the IEA-R1 reactor for

  5. Biodiesel production in a magnetically-stabilized, fluidized bed reactor with an immobilized lipase in magnetic chitosan microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gui-Xiong; Chen, Guan-Yi; Yan, Bei-Bei

    2014-01-01

    Biodiesel production by immobilized Rhizopus oryzae lipase in magnetic chitosan microspheres (MCMs) was carried out using soybean oil and methanol in a magnetically-stabilized, fluidized bed reactor (MSFBR). The maximum content of methyl ester in the reaction mixture reached 91.3 (w/v) at a fluid flow rate of 25 ml/min and a magnetic field intensity of 150 Oe. In addition, the MCMs-immobilized lipase in the reactor showed excellent reusability, retaining 82 % productivity even after six batches, which was much better than that in a conventional fluidized bed reactor. These results suggested that a MSFRB using MCMs-immobilized lipase is a promising method for biodiesel production. PMID:24062133

  6. Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy for Gaseous Fission Products Trace Measurements in Sodium Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety and availability are key issues of the generation IV reactors. Hence, the three radionuclide confinement barriers, including fuel cladding, must stay tight during the reactor operation. During the primary gaseous failure, fission products xenon and krypton are released. Their fast and sensitive detection guarantees the first confinement barrier tightness. In the frame of the French ASTRID project, an optical spectroscopy technique - Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) - is investigated for the gaseous fission products measurement. A dedicated CRDS set-up is needed to detect the rare gases with a commercial laser. Indeed, the CRDS is coupled to a glow discharge plasma, which generates a population of metastable atoms. The xenon plasma conditions are optimized to 110 Pa and 1.3 W (3 mA). The production efficiency of metastable Xe is then 0.8 %, stable within 0.5% during hours. The metastable number density is proportional to the xenon over argon molar fraction. The spectroscopic parameters of the strong 823.16 nm xenon transition are calculated and/or measured in order to optimize the fit of the experimental spectra and make a quantitative measurement of the metastable xenon. The CRDS is coupled to the discharge cell. The laser intensity inside the cavity is limited by the optical saturation process, resulting from the strong optical pumping of the metastable state. The resulting weak CRDS signal requires a fast and very sensitive photodetector. A 600 ppt xenon molar fraction was measured by CRDS. With the present set-up, the detection limits are estimated from the baseline noise to approximately 20 ppt for each even isotope, 60 ppt for the 131Xe and 55 ppt for the 129Xe. This sensitivity matches the specifications required for gaseous leak measurement; approximately 100 ppt for 133Xe (4 GBq/m3) and 10 ppb for stable isotopes. The odd isotopes are selectively measured, whereas the even isotopes overlap, a spectroscopic feature that applies for stable or

  7. Catalogue of questions concerning the documentation of quality assurance during the production and the operation of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This catalogue of questions concerning the documentation of quality assurance during the production and the operation of reactor pressure vessels was made by order of the BMI (Bundesministerium des Innern). It includes questions relating to the fields of design, planning, manufacturing, in-service inspection, and neutron irradiation surveillance. With varying degrees of particularization, the answers to these questions supply information for a presentation of this issue specifically modelled to the problems of reactor pressure vessels. The catalogue of questions may be applied in an integral manner or limited to special fields. In its present form, the catalogue of questions shall be presented to the subcommittee for reactor pressure vessels of the Reactor Safety Commission with the request to take notice and comment upon it. (orig./HP)

  8. Cross sections for fuel depletion and radioisotope production calculations in TRIGA reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For TRIGA Reactors, the fuel depletion and isotopic inventory calculations, depends on the computer code and in the cross sections of some important actinides used. Among these we have U-235, U-238, Pu-239, Pu-240 and Pu-241. We choose ORIGEN2, a code with a good reputation in this kind of calculations, we observed the cross sections for these actinides in the libraries that we have (PWR's and BWR), the fission cross section for U-235 was about 50 barns. We used a PWR library and our results were not satisfactory, specially for standard elements. We decided to calculate cross sections more suitable for our reactor, for that purpose we simulate the standard and FLIP TRIGA cells with the transport code WIMS. We used the fuel average flux and COLAPS (a home made program), to generate suitable cross sections for ORIGEN2, by collapsing the WIMS library cross sections of these nuclides. For the radioisotope production studies using the Central Thimble, we simulate the A and B rings and used the A average flux to collapse cross sections. For these studies, the required nuclides sometimes are not present in WIMS library, for them we are planning to process the ENDF/B data, with NJOY system, and include the cross sections to WIMS library or to collapse them using the appropriate average-flux and the program COLAPS. (author)

  9. Hydrogen production in a zigzag and straight catalytic wall coated micro channel reactor by CFD modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazeli, Ali; Behnam, Mohsen [Gas Research Division, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), P.O. Box 14665-137, Tehran (Iran)

    2010-09-15

    Hydrogen production from steam reforming of methanol for fuel cell application was modeled in a wall coated micro channel reactor by CFD approach. Heat of steam reforming (SR) was supplied from catalytic total oxidation (TOX) of methanol on Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst and Heat conducts from TOX to SR zone through Steel divider wall between two channels. Heat integration was compared in zigzag and straight geometry of microreactor by CFD modeling. The model is two dimensional, steady state and containing five zones: TOX fluid, TOX catalyst layer, steel wall of the channel, SR catalyst layer and SR fluid. Set of partial differential equations (PDEs) including x and y momentum balance, continuity, partial mass balances and energy balance was solved by finite volume method. Stiff reaction rates were considered for methanol total oxidation (TOX), methanol steam reforming (SR), water gas shift (WGS) and methanol decomposition (MD) reactions. The results show that zigzag geometry is better than straight one because heat and mass transfer in zigzag reactor are more than straight. Conversion of methanol in zigzag geometry is greater than straight one. In the outlet of zigzag micro channels, carbon monoxide selectivity is less and hydrogen mole fraction is more than straight one. (author)

  10. Fluidized-bed reactor modeling for production of silicon by silane pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudukovic, M. P.; Ramachandran, P. A.; Lai, S.

    1986-02-01

    An ideal backmixed reactor model (CSTR) and a fluidized bed bubbling reactor model (FBBR) were developed for silane pyrolysis. Silane decomposition is assumed to occur via two pathways: homogeneous decomposition and heterogeneous chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Both models account for homogeneous and heterogeneous silane decomposition, homogeneous nucleation, coagulation and growth by diffusion of fines, scavenging of fines by large particles, elutriation of fines and CVD growth of large seed particles. At present the models do not account for attrition. The preliminary comparison of the model predictions with experimental results shows reasonable agreement. The CSTR model with no adjustable parameter yields a lower bound on fines formed and upper estimate on production rates. The FBBR model overpredicts the formation of fines but could be matched to experimental data by adjusting the unkown jet emulsion exchange efficients. The models clearly indicate that in order to suppress the formation of fines (smoke) good gas-solid contacting in the grid region must be achieved and the formation of the bubbles suppressed.

  11. Understanding the role of defect production in radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, D. E.

    1999-08-04

    Comparative experiments using high energy (10 MeV) electrons and test reactor neutrons have been undertaken to understand the role that primary damage state has on hardening (embrittlement) induced by irradiation at 300 C. Electrons produce displacement damage primarily by low energy atomic recoils, while fast neutrons produce displacements from considerably higher energy recoils. Comparison of changes resulting from neutron irradiation, in which nascent point defect clusters can form in dense cascades, with electron irradiation, where cascade formation is minimized, can provide insight into the role that the in-cascade point defect clusters have on the mechanisms of embrittlement. Tensile property changes induced by 10 MeV electrons or test reactor neutron irradiations of unalloyed iron and an Fe-0.9 wt.% Cu-1.0 wt.% Mn alloy were examined in the damage range of 9.0 x 10{sup {minus}5} dpa to 1.5 x 10{sup {minus}2} dpa. The results to date showed the ternary alloy experienced substantially greater embrittlement in both the electron and neutron irradiated samples relative to unalloyed iron. Surprisingly, despite their disparate nature of defect production, similar embrittlement trends with increasing radiation damage were observed for electrons and neutrons in both the ternary and unalloyed iron.

  12. Ethanol production potential from fermented rice noodle wastewater treatment using entrapped yeast cell sequencing batch reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siripattanakul-Ratpukdi, Sumana

    2012-03-01

    Fermented rice noodle production generates a large volume of starch-based wastewater. This study investigated the treatment of the fermented rice noodle wastewater using entrapped cell sequencing batch reactor (ECSBR) compared to traditional sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The yeast cells were applied because of their potential to convert reducing sugar in the wastewater to ethanol. In present study, preliminary treatment by acid hydrolysis was performed. A yeast culture, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with calcium alginate cell entrapment was used. Optimum yeast cell loading in batch experiment and fermented rice noodle treatment performances using ECSBR and SBR systems were examined. In the first part, it was found that the cell loadings (0.6-2.7 × 108 cells/mL) did not play an important role in this study. Treatment reactions followed the second-order kinetics with the treatment efficiencies of 92-95%. In the second part, the result showed that ECSBR performed better than SBR in both treatment efficiency and system stability perspectives. ECSBR maintained glucose removal of 82.5 ± 10% for 5-cycle treatment while glucose removal by SBR declined from 96 to 40% within the 5-cycle treatment. Scanning electron microscopic images supported the treatment results. A number of yeast cells entrapped and attached onto the matrix grew in the entrapment matrix.

  13. Fluidized-bed reactor modeling for production of silicon by silane pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudukovic, M. P.; Ramachandran, P. A.; Lai, S.

    1986-01-01

    An ideal backmixed reactor model (CSTR) and a fluidized bed bubbling reactor model (FBBR) were developed for silane pyrolysis. Silane decomposition is assumed to occur via two pathways: homogeneous decomposition and heterogeneous chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Both models account for homogeneous and heterogeneous silane decomposition, homogeneous nucleation, coagulation and growth by diffusion of fines, scavenging of fines by large particles, elutriation of fines and CVD growth of large seed particles. At present the models do not account for attrition. The preliminary comparison of the model predictions with experimental results shows reasonable agreement. The CSTR model with no adjustable parameter yields a lower bound on fines formed and upper estimate on production rates. The FBBR model overpredicts the formation of fines but could be matched to experimental data by adjusting the unkown jet emulsion exchange efficients. The models clearly indicate that in order to suppress the formation of fines (smoke) good gas-solid contacting in the grid region must be achieved and the formation of the bubbles suppressed.

  14. Geologic setting of the New Production Reactor within the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, V. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Fallaw, W.C. [Furman Univ., Greenville, SC (United States). Dept. of Geology; McKinney, J.B. [Exploration Resources, Inc., Athens, GA (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The geology and hydrology of the reference New Production Reactor (NPR) site at Savannah River Site (SRS) have been summarized using the available information from the NPR site and areas adjacent to the site, particularly the away from reactor spent fuel storage site (AFR site). Lithologic and geophysical logs from wells drilled near the NPR site do not indicate any faults in the upper several hundred feet of the Coastal Plain sediments. However, the Pen Branch Fault is located about 1 mile south of the site and extends into the upper 100 ft of the Coastal Plain sequence. Subsurface voids, resulting from the dissolution of calcareous portions of the sediments, may be present within 200 ft of the surface at the NPR site. The water table is located within 30 to 70 ft of the surface. The NPR site is located on a groundwater divide, and groundwater flow for the shallowest hydraulic zones is predominantly toward local streams. Groundwater flow in deeper Tertiary sediments is north to Upper Three Runs Creek or west to the Savannah River Swamp. Groundwater flow in the Cretaceous sediments is west to the Savannah River.

  15. Effect of fermented wastewaters from butter production on phosphates removal in a sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janczukowicz, Wojciech; Rodziewicz, Joanna; Thornton, Arthur; Czaplicka, Kamila

    2012-09-01

    This study determined the potential for fermented wastewaters from butter production plant to act as a carbon source to facilitate phosphates removal. Synthetic dairy wastewaters were treated using SBR, with doses of fermented wastewaters. An increase in the fermented wastewater doses were found to improve the effluent quality in respect of phosphates and nitrates. The lowest concentrations of phosphate and nitrates, respectively 0.10 ± 0.04 mg PO(4)-PL(-1) and 1.03 ± 0.22 mg NO(3)-NL(-1), were noted in the effluent from the reactor fed with fermented wastewaters in a dose of 0.25 L d(-1) per 0.45 L d(-1) of wastewaters fed to the reactor. In the case of the two highest doses, an increase in effluent COD was stated. The higher effectiveness resulted from the fact that the introduction of fermented wastewaters caused an increase in the easily-available carbon compounds content and the predominance of acetic acid amongst VFAs available to dephosphatating and denitrifying bacteria.

  16. The biokinetics of corrosion products from a water cooled reactor after deposition in the rat lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion of steels used in the fabrication of the primary cooling circuit of certain types of nuclear reactor results in the formation of oxide bearing debris which contains neutron activation products. These present a potential inhalation hazard during maintenance and decommissioning of the reactors. In this study, the biokinetics of a residue containing (by activity) 51Cr (6.8%), 54Mn (12.7%), 58Co (4.8%), 59Fe (4.6%), 60Co (60.2%) and 65Zn (10.9%) have been investigated in rats after intratracheal instillation. Transfer rates to blood for 54Mn, 59Fe, 60Co and 65Zn were obtained up to 282 days after exposure. Combination of these with the mechanical clearance rates from the alveolar region of the lung in the proposed ICRP lung model, provided estimates of biological half-times in the lung. Predicted biokinetics in man for 60Co, 65Zn and 59Fe were consistent with human data obtained after accidental intakes and experimental studies and hence would appear to validate the model used. (author)

  17. Influence of remaining fission products in low-decontaminated fuel on reactor core characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design study of core, fuel and related fuel cycle system with low-decontaminated fuel has been performed in the framework of the feasibility study (F/S) on commercialized fast reactor cycle systems. This report summarizes the influence on core characteristics of remaining fission products (FPs) in low-decontaminated fuel related to the reprocessing systems nominated in F/S phase I. For simple treatment of the remaining FPs in core neutronics calculation the representative nuclide method parameterized by the FP equivalent coefficient and the FP volume fraction was developed, which enabled an efficient evaluation procedure. As a result of the investigation on the sodium cooled fast reactor with MOX fuel designed in fiscal year 1999, it was found that the pyrochemical reprocessing with molten salt (the RIAR method) brought the largest influence. Nevertheless, it was still within the allowable range. Assuming an infinite-times recycling, the alternations in core characteristics were evaluated as follows: increment of burnup reactivity by 0.5%Δk/kk', decrement of breeding ratio by 0.04, increment of sodium void reactivity by 0.1x10-2Δk/kk' and decrement of Doppler constant (in absolute value) by 0.7x10-3 Tdk/dT. (author)

  18. Experiences in Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of former plutonium production reactors at the Hanford reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nine nuclear reactors were built at the Hanford reservation for plutonium production from 1943 to 1964. Eight of the reactors were shutdown by 1971, and the last in early 1987. Since then, disposition of the reactors has been incorporated into the Hanford cleanup program. The objective is to transition the reactors from their existing state of minimal maintenance and upkeep into a safe condition that can be maintained for several decades. This paper describes the decontamination and decommissioning (DandD) work performed on five of the nine reactors Reactor systems and structures, including subgrade systems such as piping were removed. An enclosure was built over the defueled reactor block. The resulting structure is called the Safe Storage Enclosure and is intended to safely house the core for at least 75 years. A permanent disposition for the facility will be determined at that time. Numerous hazards have been encountered and safely handled during this work, including the discovery of over a dozen irradiated fuel pins in one storage basin. This paper discusses how this work was integrated into the cleanup program and then moved through the DandD process. The goal is to facilitate site cleanup by quickly removing imminent hazards while not compromising safety standards during a time of reduced budgets and intense emphasis on efficiency. This paper demonstrates excellence in coordination of safety analysis and DandD field work that will soon place the reactors in a safe storage condition for several decades. Safety analysis and field programs, practices, and lessons-learned will be discussed. Efforts to convert B Reactor into a permanent museum will be briefly discussed

  19. Numerical study of methanol–steam reforming and methanol–air catalytic combustion in annulus reactors for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Performance of mini-scale integrated annulus reactors for hydrogen production. ► Flow rates fed to combustor and reformer control the reactor performance. ► Optimum performance is found from balance of flow rates to combustor and reformer. ► Better performance can be found when shell side is designed as combustor. -- Abstract: This study presents the numerical simulation on the performance of mini-scale reactors for hydrogen production coupled with liquid methanol/water vaporizer, methanol/steam reformer, and methanol/air catalytic combustor. These reactors are designed similar to tube-and-shell heat exchangers. The combustor for heat supply is arranged as the tube or shell side. Based on the obtained results, the methanol/air flow rate through the combustor (in terms of gas hourly space velocity of combustor, GHSV-C) and the methanol/water feed rate to the reformer (in terms of gas hourly space velocity of reformer, GHSV-R) control the reactor performance. With higher GHSV-C and lower GHSV-R, higher methanol conversion can be achieved because of higher reaction temperature. However, hydrogen yield is reduced and the carbon monoxide concentration is increased due to the reversed water gas shift reaction. Optimum reactor performance is found using the balance between GHSV-C and GHSV-R. Because of more effective heat transfer characteristics in the vaporizer, it is found that the reactor with combustor arranged as the shell side has better performance compared with the reactor design having the combustor as the tube side under the same operating conditions.

  20. Production and optimization of biodiesel using mixed immobilized biocatalysts in packed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkiyaraj, S; Syed, Mahin Basha; Devanesan, M G; Thangavelu, Viruthagiri

    2016-05-01

    Vegetable oils are used as raw materials for biodiesel production using transesterification reaction. Several methods for the production of biodiesel were developed using chemical (alkali and acidic compounds) and biological catalysts (lipases). Biodiesel production catalyzed by lipases is energy and cost-saving processes and is carried out at normal temperature and pressure. The need for an efficient method for screening larger number of variables has led to the adoption of statistical experimental design. In the present study, packed bed reactor was designed to study with mixed immobilized biocatalysts to have higher productivity under optimum conditions. Contrary to the single-step acyl migration mechanism, a two-step stepwise reaction mechanism involving immobilized Candida rugosa lipase and immobilized Rhizopus oryzae cells was employed for the present work. This method was chosen because enzymatic hydrolysis followed by esterification can tolerate high free fatty acid containing oils. The effects of flow rate and bed height on biodiesel yield were studied using two factors five-level central composite design (CCD) and response surface methodology (RSM). Maximum biodiesel yield of 85 and 81 % was obtained for jatropha oil and karanja oil with the optimum bed height and optimum flow rate of 32.6 cm and 1.35 L/h, and 32.6 cm and 1.36 L/h, respectively. PMID:25940482

  1. ENHANCED HYDROGEN PRODUCTION INTEGRATED WITH CO2 SEPARATION IN A SINGLE-STAGE REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himanshu Gupta; Mahesh Iyer; Bartev Sakadjian; Liang-Shih Fan

    2005-04-01

    Hydrogen production by the water gas shift reaction (WGSR) is equilibrium limited due to thermodynamic constrains. However, this can be overcome by continuously removing the product CO{sub 2}, thereby driving the WGSR in the forward direction to enhance hydrogen production. This project aims at using a high reactivity, mesoporous calcium based sorbent (PCC-CaO) for removing CO{sub 2} using reactive separation scheme. Preliminary results have shown that PCC-CaO dominates in its performance over naturally occurring limestone towards enhanced hydrogen production. However, maintenance of high reactivity of the sorbent over several reaction-regeneration cycles warrants effective regeneration methods. We have identified sub-atmospheric calcination (vacuum) as vital regeneration technique that helps preserve the sorbent morphology. Sub-atmospheric calcination studies reveal the significance of vacuum level, diluent gas flow rate, thermal properties of diluent gas, and sorbent loading on the kinetics of calcination and the morphology of the resultant CaO sorbent. Steam, which can be easily separated from CO{sub 2}, has been envisioned as a potential diluent gas due to its better thermal properties resulting in effective heat transfer. A novel multi-fixed bed reactor was designed which isolates the catalyst bed from the sorbent bed during the calcination step. This should prevent any potential catalyst deactivation due to oxidation by CO{sub 2} during the regeneration phase.

  2. Fission product chemistry in severe nuclear reactor accidents, specialists' meeting at JRC-Ispra, 15-17 January 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A specialists' meeting was held at JRC-Ispra from 15 to 17 January 1990 to review the current understanding of fission-product chemistry during severe accidents in light water reactors. Discussions focussed on the important chemical phenomena that could occur across the wide range of conditions of a damaged nuclear plant. Recommendations for future chemistry work were made covering the following areas: (a) fuel degradation and fission-product release, (b) transport and attenuation processes in the reactor coolant system, (c) containment chemistry (iodine behaviour and core-concrete interactions). (author)

  3. Evaluation of Selected Chemical Processes for Production of Low-cost Silicon, Phase 3. [using a fluidized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocher, J. M., Jr.; Browning, M. F.

    1979-01-01

    The construction and operation of an experimental process system development unit (EPSDU) for the production of granular semiconductor grade silicon by the zinc vapor reduction of silicon tetrachloride in a fluidized bed of seed particles is presented. The construction of the process development unit (PDU) is reported. The PDU consists of four critical units of the EPSDU: the fluidized bed reactor, the reactor by product condenser, the zinc vaporizer, and the electrolytic cell. An experimental wetted wall condenser and its operation are described. Procedures are established for safe handling of SiCl4 leaks and spills from the EPSDU and PDU.

  4. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  5. Effects of pH profiles on nisin production in biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongtharangkul, Thunyarat; Demirci, Ali

    2006-08-01

    Apart from its widely accepted commercial applications as a food preservative, nisin emerges as a promising alternative in medical applications for bacterial infection in both humans and livestock. Improving nisin production through optimization of fermentation parameters would make nisin more cost-effective for various applications. Since nisin production by Lactococcus lactis NIZO 22186 was highly influenced by the pH profile employed during fermentation, three different pH profiles were evaluated in this study: (1) a constant pH profile at 6.8 (profile 1), (2) a constant pH profile with autoacidification at 4 h (profile 2), and (3) a stepwise pH profile with pH adjustment every 2 h (profile 3). The results demonstrated that the low-pH stress exerted during the first 4 h of fermentation in profile 3 detrimentally affected nisin production, resulting in a very low maximum nisin concentration (593 IU ml(-1)). On the other hand, growth and lactic acid production were only slightly delayed, indicating that the loss in nisin production was not a result of lower growth or shifting of metabolic activity toward lactic acid production. Profile 2, in which pH was allowed to drop freely via autoacidification after 4 h of fermentation, was found to yield almost 1.9 times higher nisin (3,553 IU ml(-1)) than profile 1 (1,898 IU ml(-1)), possibly as a result of less adsorption of nisin onto producer cells. Therefore, a combination of constant pH and autoacidification period (profile 2) was recommended as the pH profile during nisin production in a biofilm reactor.

  6. Effects of pH profiles on nisin production in biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongtharangkul, Thunyarat; Demirci, Ali

    2006-08-01

    Apart from its widely accepted commercial applications as a food preservative, nisin emerges as a promising alternative in medical applications for bacterial infection in both humans and livestock. Improving nisin production through optimization of fermentation parameters would make nisin more cost-effective for various applications. Since nisin production by Lactococcus lactis NIZO 22186 was highly influenced by the pH profile employed during fermentation, three different pH profiles were evaluated in this study: (1) a constant pH profile at 6.8 (profile 1), (2) a constant pH profile with autoacidification at 4 h (profile 2), and (3) a stepwise pH profile with pH adjustment every 2 h (profile 3). The results demonstrated that the low-pH stress exerted during the first 4 h of fermentation in profile 3 detrimentally affected nisin production, resulting in a very low maximum nisin concentration (593 IU ml(-1)). On the other hand, growth and lactic acid production were only slightly delayed, indicating that the loss in nisin production was not a result of lower growth or shifting of metabolic activity toward lactic acid production. Profile 2, in which pH was allowed to drop freely via autoacidification after 4 h of fermentation, was found to yield almost 1.9 times higher nisin (3,553 IU ml(-1)) than profile 1 (1,898 IU ml(-1)), possibly as a result of less adsorption of nisin onto producer cells. Therefore, a combination of constant pH and autoacidification period (profile 2) was recommended as the pH profile during nisin production in a biofilm reactor. PMID:16331455

  7. Gold nanoparticles production using reactor and cyclotron based methods in assessment of (196,198)Au production yields by (197)Au neutron absorption for therapeutic purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshidi, Abdollah

    2016-11-01

    Medical nano-gold radioisotopes is produced regularly using high-flux nuclear reactors, and an accelerator-driven neutron activator can turn out higher yield of (197)Au(n,γ)(196,198)Au reactions. Here, nano-gold production via radiative/neutron capture was investigated using irradiated Tehran Research Reactor flux and also simulated proton beam of Karaj cyclotron in Iran. (197)Au nano-solution, including 20nm shaped spherical gold and water, was irradiated under Tehran reactor flux at 2.5E+13n/cm(2)/s for (196,198)Au activity and production yield estimations. Meanwhile, the yield was examined using 30MeV proton beam of Karaj cyclotron via simulated new neutron activator containing beryllium target, bismuth moderator around the target, and also PbF2 reflector enclosed the moderator region. Transmutation in (197)Au nano-solution samples were explored at 15 and 25cm distances from the target. The neutron flux behavior inside the water and bismuth moderators was investigated for nano-gold particles transmutation. The transport of fast neutrons inside bismuth material as heavy nuclei with a lesser lethargy can be contributed in enhanced nano-gold transmutation with long duration time than the water moderator in reactor-based method. Cyclotron-driven production of βeta-emitting radioisotopes for brachytherapy applications can complete the nano-gold production technology as a safer approach as compared to the reactor-based method. PMID:27524041

  8. Decommissioning of eight surplus production reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first section of this volume summarizes the content of the draft environmental impact statement (DEIS) and this Addendum, which together constitute the final environmental impact statement (FEIS) prepared on the decommissioning of eight surplus plutonium production reactors at Hanford. The FEIS consists of two volumes. The first volume is the DEIS as written. The second volume (this Addendum) consists of a summary; Chapter 9, which contains comments on the DEIS and provides DOE's responses to the comments; Appendix F, which provides additional health effects information; Appendix K, which contains costs of decommissioning in 1990 dollars; Appendix L, which contains additional graphite leaching data; Appendix M, which contains a discussion of accident scenarios; Appendix N, which contains errata; and Appendix 0, which contains reproductions of the letters, transcripts, and exhibits that constitute the record for the public comment period

  9. Productivity of a nuclear chemical reactor with gamma radioisotopic sources; Rendimiento de un reactor quimico-nuclear con fuentes radioisotopicas gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anguis T, C

    1975-07-01

    According to an established mathematical model of successive Compton interaction processes the made calculations for major distances are extended checking the acceptability of the spheric geometry model for the experimental data for radioisotopic sources of Co-60 and Cs-137. Parameters such as the increasing factor and the absorbed dose served as comparative base. calculations for the case of a punctual source succession inside a determined volume cylinder are made to obtain the total dose, the deposited energy by each photons energetic group and the total absorbed energy inside the reactor. Varying adequately the height/radius relation for different cylinders, the distinct energy depositions are compared in each one of them once a time standardized toward a standard value of energy emitted by the reactor volume. A relation between the quantity of deposited energy in each point of the reactor and the conversion values of chemical species is established. They are induced by electromagnetic radiation and that are reported as ''G'' in the scientific literature (number of molecules formed or disappeared by each 100 e.v. of energy). Once obtained the molecular performance inside the reactor for each type of geometry, it is optimized the height/radius relation according to the maximum production of molecules by unity of time. It is completed a bibliographical review of ''G'' values reported by different types of aqueous solutions with the purpose to determine the maximum performance of molecular hydrogen as a function of pH of the solution and of the used type of solute among other factors. Calculations for the ethyl bromide production as an example of one of the industrial processes which actually work using the gamma radiation as reactions inductor are realized. (Author)

  10. Steady-state and dynamic modeling of biohydrogen production in an integrated biohydrogen reactor clarifier system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafez, Hisham; Naggar, M. Hesham El. [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Nakhla, George [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada)

    2010-07-15

    Steady-state operational data from the integrated biohydrogen reactor clarifier system (IBRCS) during anaerobic treatment of glucose-based synthetic wastewater at HRT of 8 h and SRT ranging from 26 to 50 h and organic loading rates of 6.5-206 gCOD/L-d were used to calibrate and verify a process model of the system developed using BioWin. The model accurately predicted biomass concentrations in both the bioreactor and the clarifier supernatant with average percentage errors (APEs) of 4.6% and 10%, respectively. Hydrogen production rates and hydrogen yields predicted by the model were in close agreement with the observed experimental results as reflected by an APE of less than 4%, while the hydrogen content was well correlated with an APE of 10%. The successful modeling culminated in the accurate prediction of soluble metabolites, i.e. volatile fatty acids in the reactor with an APE of 14%. The calibrated model confirmed the advantages of decoupling of the solids retention time (SRT) from the hydraulic retention time (HRT) in biohydrogen production, with the average hydrogen yield decreasing from 3.0 mol H{sub 2}/mol glucose to 0.8 mol H{sub 2}/mol glucose upon elimination of the clarifier. Dynamic modeling showed that the system responds favorably to short-term hydraulic and organic surges, recovering back to the original condition. Furthermore, the dynamic simulation revealed that with a prolonged startup periods of 10 and 30 days, the IBRCS can be operated at an HRT of 4 h and OLR as high as 206 gCOD/L-d without inhibition and/or marked performance deterioration. (author)

  11. High-temperature reactors for underground liquid-fuels production with direct carbon sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The world faces two major challenges: (1) reducing dependence on oil from unstable parts of the world and (2) minimizing greenhouse gas emissions. Oil provides 39% of the energy needs of the United States, and oil refineries consume over 7% of the total energy. The world is running out of light crude oil and is increasingly using heavier fossil feedstocks such as heavy oils, tar sands, oil shale, and coal for the production of liquid fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel). With heavier feedstocks, more energy is needed to convert the feedstocks into liquid fuels. In the extreme case of coal liquefaction, the energy consumed in the liquefaction process is almost twice the energy value of the liquid fuel. This trend implies large increases in carbon dioxide releases per liter of liquid transport fuel that is produced. It is proposed that high-temperature nuclear heat be used to refine hydrocarbon feedstocks (heavy oil, tar sands, oil shale, and coal) 'in situ ', i.e., underground. Using these resources for liquid fuel production would potentially enable the United States to become an exporter of oil while sequestering carbon from the refining process underground as carbon. This option has become potentially viable because of three technical developments: precision drilling, underground isolation of geological formations with freeze walls, and the understanding that the slow heating of heavy hydrocarbons (versus fast heating) increases the yield of light oils while producing a high-carbon solid residue. Required peak reactor temperatures are near 700 deg. C-temperatures within the current capabilities of high-temperature reactors. (authors)

  12. Utilization of a TRIGA nuclear reactor for neutron activation analysis and isotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, some examples of utilization of the TRIGA reactor at Casaccia research center of ENEA are described, including neutron activation analysis (NAA), isotope production and tritium release studies. 1) NAA - Determination of trace elements by NAA has been performed, in the last years upon a variety of matrices: a) environmental: suspended particulate matter (SPM) and sediments collected in some Italian seas and rivers were analyzed for about 30 elements. Different types of filters were also tested to choose the most suitable for the collection of SPM. b) forensic: many applications of NAA have been performed on request of Italian Courts for determination of gunshot residues; firing distances were also determined in some cases. c) agricultural: the uptake of Zn and Co by cereals has been studied in pot in co-operation with the Istituto per la Cerealicoltura of Rome. d) geological: some USGS reference materials were analyzed by thermal and epithermal NAA, for evaluating accuracy and precision of both methods. Rock samples from the basaltic plateau of Kenya were then analyzed by ENAA, chiefly for rare earth elements, whose concentration patterns can give useful informations about petrogenesis. e) reference materials: several elements have been determined in lake and river sediment samples and in three plant materials (tobacco, apple-tree and peach-tree), in order to provide data for their certification as reference materials to be used in different fields. f) nuclear materials: trace elements have been determined in LiAlO2 to be used in the blanket of fusion reactors, as well as in cements for building nuclear plants, in order to evaluate the activity at the time of plant decommissioning. 2) Isotope production a) A program for the utilization of TRIGA reactor at Casaccia to prepare a 191m-Ir generator to be used in pediatric angiography has been drawn up. b) Preparation of 18-F to be used in positron emission tomography (PET) for studies of cerebral diseases

  13. Benefit of sodium hydroxide pretreatment of ensiled sorghum forage on the anaerobic reactor stability and methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambusiti, C; Ficara, E; Malpei, F; Steyer, J P; Carrère, H

    2013-09-01

    The assessment of the pretreatment effect on the anaerobic digestion process is generally based on the results of batch tests, which may fail in truly predicting full-scale anaerobic reactors performance. Therefore, in this study, the effect of alkaline pretreatment on the anaerobic digestion of ensiled sorghum forage was evaluated by comparing the results of two semi-continuous CSTR (Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor) anaerobic reactors. Results showed that an alkaline pretreatment step, prior to the anaerobic digestion of ensiled sorghum forage, can have a beneficial effect both in enhancing methane production (an increase of 25% on methane production was observed, if compared to that of untreated sorghum) and in giving more stability to the anaerobic digestion process.

  14. Low enriched uranium foil targets with different geometries for the production of Molybdenum-99 in the BMR (Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new research reactor is being planned in Brazil to take care of the demand of radiopharmaceuticals in the country and conduct research in various areas. This new reactor, the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB), planned for 30 MW, is now in the conception design phase. Two low enriched (235U) metallic uranium foil targets (cylinder and plate geometries) are being considered for production of Molybdenum-99 (99Mo) by fission. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulics calculations were performed to compare the production of 99Mo for these targets in the RMB and to determine the temperatures achieved in the targets. For the neutronic calculations were utilized the computer codes HAMMER-TECHNION, CITATION and SCALE and for the thermal-hydraulics calculations were utilized the computer codes MTRCR-IEA-R1 and ANSYS CFX. (author)

  15. Simulation of a compact multichannel membrane reactor for the production of pure hydrogen via steam methane reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigneault, A.; Grace, J.R. [University of British Columbia, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Elnashaie, S.S.E.H. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, University Putra Malaysia (UPM), Serdang (Malaysia)

    2012-08-15

    A steady-state 2D model is developed for a multichannel membrane reactor (MCMR) to produce pure hydrogen. The model includes one reforming channel coupled with a PdAg membrane to produce H{sub 2} and one combustion channel to generate the heat needed for the reforming. Both isothermal and non-isothermal simulations are applied in designing a laboratory-scale proof-of-concept reactor. Isothermal sensitivity analysis indicates parameter adjustments practically available to improve reactor performance. In non-isothermal simulations, catalyst layer thickness and kinetic pre-exponential factor are varied along the reactor length. Predictions indicate that the reforming methane conversion increased from 74 % to 91 %, while avoiding hot spots. Compared with other membrane reactors, the MCMR has the potential for one to two orders of magnitude higher H{sub 2} production per reactor volume and per mass of catalyst. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. FCC Study of Canadian Heavy Gas Oils Comparisons of Product Yields and Qualities between Reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SiauwH.Ng; AdrianHumphries; CraigFairbridge; ZhuYuxia; SokYui

    2005-01-01

    Several series of cracking tests in a comprehensive study were conducted on separate occasions involving all or parts of ten Canadian vacuum gas oils (VGOs) and two catalysts with bottoms-cracking or octane-barrel capability.VGOs were cracked in fixed- and/or fluid-bed microactivity test (MAT) units, in an Advanced Cracking Evaluation (ACE)unit, and in a modified ARCO riser reactor. Individual yields of gas, liquid, and coke from the MATs at 55, 65, 70, and 81 wt% conversion levels were compared with their respective pilot plant data. Good linear correlations could be established between MAT and riser yields except for liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and light cycle oil (LCO). At a given conversion,correlations existed among the fixed- and fluid-bed MAT units and the ACE for each product yield. Liquid products from the fixed or fluid-bed MAT were analyzed for hydrocarbon types, sulfur, nitrogen and density, most of which showed good agreement with those obtained from the riser study. When cracking Canadian oil-sands-derived VGOs, the bottomscracking catalyst containing a large-pore active matrix was found to be more suitable than the octane-barrel catalyst with smaller pores to produce higher yields of valuable distillates, but with less superior qualities (in terms of sulfur and nitrogen contents). The advantages of hydrotreating some poor feeds to improve product yields and qualities were demonstrated and discussed.

  17. Gluconic acid production from sucrose in an airlift reactor using a multi-enzyme system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafra, Agnes Cristina Oliveira; Furlan, Felipe Fernando; Badino, Alberto Colli; Tardioli, Paulo Waldir

    2015-04-01

    Sucrose from sugarcane is produced in abundance in Brazil, which provides an opportunity to manufacture other high-value products. Gluconic acid (GA) can be produced by multi-enzyme conversion of sucrose using the enzymes invertase, glucose oxidase, and catalase. In this process, one of the byproducts is fructose, which has many commercial applications. This work concerns the batch mode production of GA in an airlift reactor fed with sucrose as substrate. Evaluation was made of the influence of temperature and pH, as well as the thermal stability of the enzymes. Operational conditions of 40 °C and pH 6.0 were selected, based on the enzymatic activity profiles and the thermal stabilities. Under these conditions, the experimental data could be accurately described by kinetic models. The maximum yield of GA was achieved within 3.8 h, with total conversion of sucrose and glucose and a volumetric productivity of around 7.0 g L(-1) h(-1).

  18. Cane molasses fermentation for continuous ethanol production in an immobilized cells reactor by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorbani, Farshid; Younesi, Habibollah; Esmaeili Sari, Abbas [Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Natural Resources and Marine Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Noor, P.O. Box: 64414-356 (Iran); Najafpour, Ghasem [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Noshirvani University of Technology, Babol (Iran)

    2011-02-15

    Sodium-alginate immobilized yeast was employed to produce ethanol continuously using cane molasses as a carbon source in an immobilized cell reactor (ICR). The immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was performed by entrapment of the cell cultured media harvested at exponential growth phase (16 h) with 3% sodium alginate. During the initial stage of operation, the ICR was loaded with fresh beads of mean diameter of 5.01 mm. The ethanol production was affected by the concentration of the cane molasses (50, 100 and 150 g/l), dilution rates (0.064, 0.096, 0.144 and 0.192 h{sup -1}) and hydraulic retention time (5.21, 6.94, 10.42 and 15.63 h) of the media. The pH of the feed medium was set at 4.5 and the fermentation was carried out at an ambient temperature. The maximum ethanol production, theoretical yield (Y{sub E/S}), volumetric ethanol productivity (Q{sub P}) and total sugar consumption was 19.15 g/l, 46.23%, 2.39 g l{sup -1} h{sup -1} and 96%, respectively. (author)

  19. Actinide, Activation Product and Fission Product Decay Data for Reactor-based Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UK Activation Product Decay Data Library was first released in September 1977 as UK-PADD1, to be followed by regular improvements on an almost yearly basis up to the assembly of UKPADD6.12 in March 2013. Similarly, the UK Heavy Element and Actinide Decay Data Library followed in December 1981 as UKHEDD1, with the implementation of various modifications leading to UKHEDD2.6, February 2008. Both the data content and evaluation procedures are defined, and the most recent evaluations are described in terms of specific radionuclides and the resulting consistency of their recommended decay-data files. New versions of the UKPADD and UKHEDD libraries are regularly submitted to the NEA Data Bank for possible inclusion in the JEFF library

  20. 78 FR 48183 - Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge, Commerce City, CO; Comprehensive Conservation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ...We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), intend to prepare a Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) and an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge in Commerce City, Colorado. The Service also intends to prepare a CCP and an Environmental Assessment for the Two Ponds National Wildlife Refuge in Arvada, Colorado. These refuges are......

  1. Corrosion Products Identification at Normal Water and Hydrogen Water Chemistry in Boiling Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion products sampled from condensate and feedwater systems of boiling water reactors (BWRs) at normal water chemistry (NWC) and hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) operating condition were analyzed with dissolution and instrumental simulation methods. The crystallite and amorphous of iron oxides were separated by means of dissolving method with appropriate chemical solution. The iron oxide composition and content were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) in this study. The insoluble iron oxides were obtained in influent and effluent of condensate demineralizer comprised mostly crystalline structure of hematite, magnetite and non-crystallite form of amorphous at NWC and HWC environments. Both goethite and lepidocrocite compositions are of minor importance in feed water system. Crystallite and amorphous compositions in the samples will be calculated from the new developing dissolution method. The crystalline phase of corrosion products are varied with water chemistry conditions in BWRs. The oxide characterization of system corrosion products includes compositions, morphology and particle size can effectively provide the ways of solving crud removal problem in different condition for the performance of condensate demineralizer. The feasibility of identifying other iron oxides and hydroxides in corrosion products is briefly discussed and the mechanisms of iron oxide formation formed around BWR piping will also be shown in detail in this report. Moreover, it will be figured out the properties of radioactive corrosion products growing in different operation periods. The results can also assist in plant units to improve the crud reduction countermeasures and to optimize the system water chemistry. (authors)

  2. Biomass pyrolysis in a fixed-bed reactor: Effects of pyrolysis parameters on product yields and characterization of products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slow pyrolysis of eastern giant fennel (Ferula orientalis L.) stalks has been performed in a fixed-bed tubular reactor with (ZnO, Al2O3) and without catalyst at six different temperatures ranging from 350 °C to 600 °C with heating rates of 15, 30, 50 °C/min. The amounts of bio-char, bio-oil and gas produced, as well as the compositions of the resulting bio-oils were determined by FT-IR and GC–MS. The effects of pyrolysis parameters such as temperature, catalyst and ratio of catalyst, particle size (Dp) and sweeping gas flow rate on product yields were investigated. According to results, temperature and catalyst seem to be the main factors effecting the conversion of F. orientalis L. into solid, liquid and gaseous products. The highest liquid yield (45.22%) including water was obtained with 15% zinc oxide catalyst at 500 °C temperature at a heating rate of 50 °C/min when 0.224 > Dp > 0.150 mm particle size raw material and 100 cm3/min of sweeping gas flow rate were used. - Highlights: • Ferula orientalis L. stalks were converted to solid, liquid and gaseous products. • Effects of various parameters on product yields were investigated. • 500 °C of temperature, heating rate of 50 °C/min and zinc oxide provide the optimum conditions for bio-oil formation. • 81 different compounds were identified by GC–MS in the bio-oils obtained at 500 °C

  3. Determination of production biology of cladocera in a reservoir receiving hyperthermal effluents from a nuclear production reactor. [Par Pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigerstad, T J

    1980-01-01

    The effects on zooplankton of residence in a cooling reservoir receiving hyperthermal effluents directly from a nuclear-production-reactor were studied. Rates of cladoceran population production were compared at two stations in the winter and summer of 1976 on Par Pond located on the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, SC. One station was located in an area of the reservoir directly receiving hyperthermal effluent (Station MAS) and the second was located about 4 km away in an area where surface temperatures were normal for reservoirs in the general geographical region (Station CAS). A non-parametric comparison between stations of standing stock and fecundity data for Bosmina longirostris, taken for the egg ratio model, was used to observe potential hyperthermal effluent effects. There was a statistically higher incidence of deformed eggs in the Bosmina population at Station MAS in the summer. Bosmina standing stock underwent two large oscillations in the winter and three large oscillations in the summer at Station MAS compared with two in the winter and one in the summer at Station CAS. These results are consistent with almost all other Par Pond studies which have found the two stations to be essentially similar in spectra composition but with some statistically significant differences in various aspects of the biology of the species.

  4. Nutrient Removal and Biomass Production in an Outdoor Pilot-Scale Phototrophic Biofilm Reactor for Effluent Polishing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelee, N.C.; Janssen, M.; Temmink, H.; Shrestha, R.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    An innovative pilot-scale phototrophic biofilm reactor was evaluated over a 5-month period to determine its capacity to remove nitrogen and phosphorus from Dutch municipal wastewater effluents. The areal biomass production rate ranged between 2.7 and 4.5 g dry weight/m2/day. The areal nitrogen and p

  5. Lipozyme IM-catalyzed interesterification for the production of margarine fats in a 1 kg scale stirred tank reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hong; Xu, Xuebing; Mu, Huiling;

    2000-01-01

    Lipozyme IM-catalyzed interesterification of the oil blend between palm stearin and coconut oil (75/25 w/w) was studied for the production of margarine fats in a 1 kg scale batch stirred tank reactor. Parameters such as lipase load, water content, temperature, and reaction time were investigated...

  6. Fluidised bed membrane reactor for ultrapure hydrogen production via methane steam reforming: Experimental demonstration and model validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, Charudatta S.; Sint Annaland, van Martin; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen is emerging as a future alternative for mobile and stationary energy carriers in addition to its use in chemical and petrochemical applications. A novel multifunctional reactor concept has been developed for the production of ultrapure hydrogen View the MathML source from light hydrocarbons

  7. Effects of plastic composite support and pH profiles on pullulan production in a biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kuan-Chen; Demirci, Ali; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2010-04-01

    Pullulan is a linear homopolysaccharide which is composed of glucose units and often described as alpha-1, 6-linked maltotriose. The applications of pullulan range from usage as blood plasma substitutes to environmental pollution control agents. In this study, a biofilm reactor with plastic composite support (PCS) was evaluated for pullulan production using Aureobasidium pullulans. In test tube fermentations, PCS with soybean hulls, defatted soy bean flour, yeast extract, dried bovine red blood cells, and mineral salts was selected for biofilm reactor fermentation (due to its high nitrogen content, moderate nitrogen leaching rate, and high biomass attachment). Three pH profiles were later applied to evaluate their effects on pullulan production in a PCS biofilm reactor. The results demonstrated that when a constant pH at 5.0 was applied, the time course of pullulan production was advanced and the concentration of pullulan reached 32.9 g/L after 7-day cultivation, which is 1.8-fold higher than its respective suspension culture. The quality analysis demonstrated that the purity of produced pullulan was 95.8% and its viscosity was 2.4 centipoise. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra also supported the supposition that the produced exopolysaccharide was mostly pullulan. Overall, this study demonstrated that a biofilm reactor can be successfully implemented to enhance pullulan production and maintain its high purity.

  8. Fermentative hydrogen production from liquid swine manure with glucose supplement using an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao

    2009-12-01

    The idea of coupling renewable energy production and agricultural waste management inspired this thesis. The production of an important future fuel---hydrogen gas---from high strength waste stream-liquid swine manure---using anaerobic treatment processes makes the most sustainable sense for both wastewater utilization and energy generation. The objectives of this thesis were to develop a fermentation process for converting liquid swine manure to hydrogen and to maximize hydrogen productivity. Anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) systems were constructed to carry out this fermentation process, and seed sludge obtained from a dairy manure anaerobic digester and pretreated by nutrient acclimation, heat and pH treatment was used as inoculum. High system stability was indicated by a short startup period of 12 days followed by stable hydrogen production, and successful sludge granulation occurred within 23 days of startup at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 24 hours. Operation at a progressively decreasing HRT from 24 to 8h gave rise to an increasing biogas production rate from 15.2-34.4L/d, while good linear relationships were observed between both total biogas and hydrogen production rates correlated to HRT, with R2 values of 0.993 and 0.997, respectively. The maximum hydrogen yield of 1.63 mol-H 2/mol-hexose-feed occurred at HRT of 16h, while the HRT of 12h was highly suggested to achieve both high production rate and efficient yield. Hexose utilization efficiencies over 98%, considerable hydrogen production rate up to 14.3 L/d and hydrogen percentage of off-gas up to 43% (i.e., a CO 2/H2 ratio of 1.2) with the absence of CH4 production throughout the whole course of experiment at a pH of 5.0 strongly validated the feasibility of the fermentative H2 production from liquid swine manure using an ASBR system. Ethanol as well as acetic, butyric and valeric acids were produced in the system accompanying the hydrogen production, with acetic acid being the dominant

  9. A stable, novel catalyst improves hydrogen production in a membrane reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irusta, S.; Munera, J.; Carrara, C.; Lombardo, E.A.; Cornaglia, L.M. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Catalisis y Petroquimica FIQ, UNL-CONICET, Santiago del Estero 2829, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2005-06-22

    The dry reforming of methane as a source of H{sub 2} was performed using a well-known catalyst, Rh/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, together with a novel one, Rh/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}, in a hydrogen-permeable membrane reactor. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, TPR, FTIR, H{sub 2} and CO chemisorption. In all lanthanum-based catalysts, the activity remained constant after 100h on stream at 823K. The basis of their high stability could be traced back to the strong metal-support interaction (TPR) in Rh/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. The La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} solids are also stable even though a weaker rhodium-lanthanum interaction (TPR) can be observed. The incorporation of the promoter (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to the silica support induces a parallel increase in the metal dispersion (CO adsorption). The effect of the operation variables upon the performance of the membrane reactor was also studied. The novel Rh (0.6%)/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} (27%)-SiO{sub 2} catalyst proved to be the best formulation. Operating the membrane reactor at 823K, both methane and CO{sub 2} conversions were 40% higher than the equilibrium values, producing 0.5mol H{sub 2}/mol CH{sub 4}. This catalyst, tested at W/F three times lower than Rh (0.6%)/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, showed a similar performance. Both the increase of the sweep gas flow rate and the decrease of the permeation area significantly affected methane conversion and H{sub 2} production. The presence of tiny amounts of graphite only detectable through LRS did not endanger membrane stability. The better performance of Rh (0.6%)/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} (27%)-SiO{sub 2} is related to the high dispersion.

  10. A Feasibility Study of a Steam Methane Reforming Hydrogen Production Plant with a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermal source for hydrogen production is an attractive utilization of nuclear energy. Hydrogen production from natural gas is a promising method in an early stage of hydrogen society, though hydrogen production with water splitting without carbon dioxide emission is the final goal. Steam methane reforming is a well-known method for producing hydrogen from natural gas. A hydrogen separation membrane makes the reforming temperature much lower than that of the equilibrium condition, and a sodium-cooled fast reactor, which supplies heat at ∼500 deg. C, can be used as a heat source for hydrogen production.In this study, a hydrogen production plant with the membrane reforming method using a sodium-cooled reactor as a thermal source has been designed, and its economic potential is roughly evaluated. The hydrogen production cost is estimated to be about $1.67/kg, achieving the economic target of $1.7/kg. The construction cost is largely shared by the reformers' cost, and it can be decreased using a more efficient hydrogen separation membrane. This shows that steam methane reforming hydrogen production with a sodium-cooled reactor has high economical potential

  11. Production of a datolite-based heavy concrete for shielding nuclear reactors and megavoltage radiotherapy rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological shielding of nuclear reactors has always been a great concern and decreasing the complexity and expense of these installations is of great interest. In this study, we used datolite and galena minerals for production of a high performance heavy concrete. Materials and Methods: Datolite and galena minerals which can be found in many parts of Iran were used in the concrete mix design. To measure the gamma radiation attenuation of the Datolite and galena concrete samples, they were exposed to both narrow and wide beams of gamma rays emitted from a cobalt-60 radiotherapy unit. An Am-Be neutron source was used for assessing the shielding properties of the samples against neutrons. To test the compression strengths, both types of concrete mixes (Datolite and galena and ordinary concrete) were investigated. Results: The concrete samples had a density of 4420-4650 kg/m3 compared to that of ordinary concrete (2300-2500 kg/m3) or barite high density concrete (up to 3500 kg/m3). The measured half value layer thickness of the Datolite and galena concrete samples for cobalt-60 gamma rays was much less than that of ordinary concrete (2.56 cm compared to 6.0 cm). Furthermore, the galena concrete samples had a significantly higher compressive strength as well as 20% more neutron absorption. Conclusion: The Datolite and galena concrete samples showed good shielding/engineering properties in comparison with other reported samples made, using high-density materials other than depleted uranium. It is also more economic than the high-density concretes. Datolite and galena concrete may be a suitable option for shielding nuclear reactors and megavoltage radiotherapy rooms.

  12. Corrosion product deposition on fuel element surfaces of a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last decade the problem of corrosion products deposition on light water reactor fuel elements has been extensively investigated in relation to the possibility of failures caused by them. The goal of the present study is to understand in a quantitative way the formation of such kind of deposits and to analytically understand the mechanism of formation and deposition with help of the quasi-steady state concentrations of a number of 3d metals in reactor water. Recent investigations on the complex corrosion product deposits on a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel cladding have shown that the observed layer locally presents unexpected magnetic properties. The buildup of magnetic corrosion product deposits (crud) on the fuel cladding of the BWR, Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt (KKL) Switzerland has hampered the Eddy-current based measurements of ZrO2 layer thickness. The magnetic behavior of this layer and its axial variation on BWR fuel cladding is of interest with respect to non-destructive cladding characterization. Consequently, a cladding from a BWR was cut at elevations of 810 mm, where the layer was observed to be magnetic, and of 1810 mm where it was less magnetic. The samples were subsequently analyzed using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), magnetic analysis and X-ray techniques (μXRF, μXRD and μXAFS). Both EPMA and μXRF have shown that the observed corrosion deposit layer which is situated on the Zircaloy corrosion layer consists mostly of 3-d elements’ oxides (Fe, Zn, Ni and Mn). The distribution of these elements within the investigated layer is rather complex and not homogeneous. The main components identified by 2D μXRD mapping inside the layer were hematite and spinel phases with the common formula (MxFey)[M(1-x)Fe(2-y)]O4, where M = Zn, Ni, Mn. With μXRD it was clearly shown that the cell parameter of analyzed spinel is different from the one of the pure endmembers (ZnFe2O4, NiFe2O4 and MnFe2O4) proving the existence of solid solutions. These

  13. Optimization of a whole-cell biocatalyst by employing genetically encoded product sensors inside nanolitre reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Andreas; Pellaux, René; Potot, Sébastien; Becker, Katja; Hohmann, Hans-Peter; Panke, Sven; Held, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Microcompartmentalization offers a high-throughput method for screening large numbers of biocatalysts generated from genetic libraries. Here we present a microcompartmentalization protocol for benchmarking the performance of whole-cell biocatalysts. Gel capsules served as nanolitre reactors (nLRs) for the cultivation and analysis of a library of Bacillus subtilis biocatalysts. The B. subtilis cells, which were co-confined with E. coli sensor cells inside the nLRs, converted the starting material cellobiose into the industrial product vitamin B2. Product formation triggered a sequence of reactions in the sensor cells: (1) conversion of B2 into flavin mononucleotide (FMN), (2) binding of FMN by a RNA riboswitch and (3) self-cleavage of RNA, which resulted in (4) the synthesis of a green fluorescent protein (GFP). The intensity of GFP fluorescence was then used to isolate B. subtilis variants that convert cellobiose into vitamin B2 with elevated efficiency. The underlying design principles of the assay are general and enable the development of similar protocols, which ultimately will speed up the optimization of whole-cell biocatalysts.

  14. Reduction of excess sludge production in sequencing batch reactor through incorporation of chlorine dioxide oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, chlorine dioxide (ClO2) instead of chlorine (Cl2) was proposed to minimize the formation of chlorine-based by-products and was incorporated into a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) for excess sludge reduction. The results showed that the sludge disintegrability of ClO2 was excellent. The waste activated sludge at an initial concentration of 15 g MLSS/L was rapidly reduced by 36% using ClO2 doses of 10 mg ClO2/g dry sludge which was much lower than that obtained using Cl2 based on similar sludge reduction efficiency. Maximum sludge disintegration was achieved at 10 mg ClO2/g dry sludge for 40 min. ClO2 oxidation can be successfully incorporated into a SBR for excess sludge reduction without significantly harming the bioreactor performance. The incorporation of ClO2 oxidation resulted in a 58% reduction in excess sludge production, and the quality of the effluent was not significantly affected.

  15. Immobilisation of Higher Activity Wastes from Nuclear Reactor Production of 99Mo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin W. A. Stewart

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of intermediate- and low-level liquid and solid wastes are produced from reactor production of 99Mo using UAl alloy or UO2 targets and in principle can be collectively or individually converted into waste forms. At ANSTO, we have legacy acidic uranyl-nitrate-rich intermediate level waste (ILW from the latter, and an alkaline liquid ILW, a U-rich filter cake, plus a shorter lived liquid stream that rapidly decays to low-level waste (LLW standards, from the former. The options considered consist of cementitious products, glasses, glass-ceramics, or ceramics produced by vitrification or hot isostatic pressing for intermediate-level wastes. This paper discusses the progress in waste form development and processing to treat ANSTO’s ILW streams arising from 99Mo. The various waste forms and the reason for the process option chosen will be reviewed. We also address the concerns over adapting our chosen process for use in a hot-cell environment.

  16. Green biodiesel production: a review on feedstock, catalyst, monolithic reactor, and supercritical fluid technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizo Edwin Gumba

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The advancement of alternative energy is primarily catalyzed by the negative environmental impacts and energy depletion caused by the excessive usage of fossil fuels. Biodiesel has emerged as a promising substitute to petrodiesel because it is biodegradable, less toxic, and reduces greenhouse gas emission. Apart from that, biodiesel can be used as blending component or direct replacements for diesel fuel in automotive engines. A diverse range of methods have been reported for the conversion of renewable feedstocks (vegetable oil or animal fat into biodiesel with transesterification being the most preferred method. Nevertheless, the cost of producing biodiesel is higher compared to fossil fuel, thus impeding its commercialization potentials. The limited source of reliable feedstock and the underdeveloped biodiesel production route have prevented the full-scale commercialization of biodiesel in many parts of the world. In a recent development, a new technology that incorporates monoliths as support matrices for enzyme immobilization in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2 for continuous biodiesel production has been proposed to solve the problem. The potential of SC-CO2 system to be applied in enzymatic reactors is not well documented and hence the purpose of this review is to highlight the previous studies conducted as well as the future direction of this technology.

  17. Combined production and purification of hydrogen from methanol using steam iron process in fixed bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, R.; Durán, P.; Plou, J.; Herguido, J.; Peña, J. A.

    2013-11-01

    A research work is being conducted to study the combined production and purification of hydrogen by means of redox processes departing from biomass fast pyrolysis oils (bio-oils). To achieve that goal, methanol has been used as featured material because it is the most representative compound of the alcoholic fraction of bio-oils. The study has been carried out in a fixed bed reactor where methanol decomposes in H2 and CO when gets in contact with a reactive solid based in an iron oxide at temperatures above 600 °C. During the first stage of the “steam-iron” process, reactive gases reduce the iron oxide to metallic iron. Afterward, in a following step, the previously reduced iron is reoxidized by steam producing a high purity hydrogen stream. Although coke deposition does exist during the reducing stage, this behaves as inert during the reoxidation process. Coke inert role has been corroborated by GC, SEM and TEM techniques, showing that carbon deposits were constituted by ordered structures (carbon nanotubes). The determination of the hydrogen production along successive cycles allowed the evaluation of the effect of temperature and alternating reactive atmospheres on the stability of the solid, as well as the optimum conditions for such purpose.

  18. Nuclear Data Requirements for the Production of Medical Isotopes in Fission Reactors and Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Garland, M A; Talbert, R J; Mashnik, S G; Wilson, W B

    1999-01-01

    Through decades of effort in nuclear data development and simulations of reactor neutronics and accelerator transmutation, a collection of reaction data is continuing to evolve with the potential of direct applications to the production of medical isotopes. At Los Alamos the CINDER'90 code and library have been developed for nuclide inventory calculations using neutron-reaction (En < 20 MeV) and/or decay data for 3400 nuclides; coupled with the LAHET Code System (LCS), irradiations in neutron and proton environments below a few GeV are tractable; additional work with the European Activation File, the HMS-ALICE code and the reaction models of MCNPX (CEM95, BERTINI, or ISABEL with or without preequilibrium, evaporation and fission) have been used to produce evaluated reaction data for neutrons and protons to 1.7 GeV. At the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, efforts have focused on production of medical isotopes and the identification of available neutron reaction data from results of integral measuremen...

  19. FiR 1 Reactor in Service for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) and Isotope Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FiR 1 reactor, a 250 kW Triga reactor, has been in operation since 1962. The main purpose to run the reactor is now the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Although BNCT dominates the current utilization of the reactor, it also has an important national role in providing local enterprises and research institutions in the fields of industrial measurements, pharmaceuticals, electronics, etc. with isotope produc- tion and activation analysis services. The whole reactor building has been renovated, creating a dedicated clinical BNCT facility at the reactor. Close to 30 patients have been treated since May 1999, when the licence for patient treatment was granted to the responsible BNCT treatment organization. The treatment organization has a close connection to the Helsinki University Central Hospital. (author)

  20. Bio Hydrogen Production from Pharmaceutical Waste Water Treatment by a Suspended Growth Reactor Using Environmental Anaerobic Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna, R. Hema; Mohan, S. Venkata; Swamy, A. V. V. S.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2) is considered as the future fuel. The present work on “Bio Hydrogen Production from Pharmaceutical Waste Water Treatment by a Suspended Growth Reactor Using Environmental Anaerobic Technology. This is an appreciated approach at wealth generation through value addition to wastes. The optimization process included the selection of ideal co-substrate (sucrose) and nitrogen source (DAP) to examine the feasibility of hydrogen production from industrial effluent in a 50%-50% mix...

  1. Commercial products and services of research reactors. Proceedings of a technical meeting held in Vienna 28 June - 2 July 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the number of operational research reactors is steadily decreasing, more than half of those that remain are greatly underutilized and, in most cases, underfunded. To continue to play a key role in the development of peaceful uses of nuclear technology, the remaining research reactors will need to provide useful products and services to private, national and regional customers, in some cases with adequate revenue generation for reliable, safe and secure facility management and operation. In the light of declining governmental financial support and the need for improved physical security and conversion to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, many research reactors have been challenged to generate income to offset increasing operational and maintenance costs. The renewed interest in nuclear power (and therefore in nuclear education and training), the global expansion of diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine, and the extensive use of semiconductors in electronics and in other areas have created new opportunities for research reactors, prominent among them, markets for products and services in regions and countries without such facilities. It is clear that such initiatives towards greater self-reliance will need to address such aspects as market surveys, marketing and business plans, and cost of delivery services. It will also be important to better inform present and future potential end users of research reactor services of the capabilities and products that can be provided. This publication is a compilation of material from an IAEA technical meeting on 'Commercial Products and Services of Research Reactors', held in Vienna, Austria, from 28 June to 2 July 2010. The overall objective of the meeting was to exchange information on good practices and to provide concrete examples, in technical presentations and brainstorming discussions, to promote and facilitate the development of commercial applications of research reactors. The meeting also aimed to enhance

  2. A robust fuzzy-logic-based controller for bio-methane production in anaerobic fixed-film reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Robles Martinez, Angel; Latrille, Eric; Ruano, M.V.; Steyer, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to develop a robust controller for bio-methane production in continuous anaerobic fixed-bed reactors. To this aim, a fuzzy-logic-based control system was developed, tuned and validated in an anaerobic fixed-bed reactor at pilot scale that treated raw winery wastewater. The proposed controller regulated the flow-rate of wastewater entering the system as a function of the gaseous outflow rate of methane and the effluent Volatile Fatty Acids (VFA) concentratio...

  3. Syngas Production By Thermochemical Conversion Of H2o And Co2 Mixtures Using A Novel Reactor Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearlman, Howard [Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc, Lancaster, PA (United States); Chen, Chien-Hua [Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc, Lancaster, PA (United States)

    2014-08-27

    The Department of Energy awarded Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) an SBIR Phase II contract (#DE-SC0004729) to develop a high-temperature solar thermochemical reactor for syngas production using water and/or carbon dioxide as feedstocks. The technology aims to provide a renewable and sustainable alternative to fossil fuels, promote energy independence and mitigate adverse issues associated with climate change by essentially recycling carbon from carbon dioxide emitted by the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. To commercialize the technology and drive down the cost of solar fuels, new advances are needed in materials development and reactor design, both of which are integral elements in this program.

  4. PRELIMINARY DESIGN OF OSCILLATORY FLOW BIODIESEL REACTOR FOR CONTINUOUS BIODIESEL PRODUCTION FROM JATROPHA TRIGLYCERIDES

    OpenAIRE

    AZHARI T. I. MOHD. GHAZI; M. F. M. GUNAM RESUL; R. YUNUS; T. C. SHEAN YAW

    2008-01-01

    The concept of a continuous process in producing biodiesel from jatropha oil by using an Oscillatory Flow Biodiesel Reactor (OFBR) is discussed in this paper. It has been recognized that the batch stirred reactor is a primary mode used in the synthesis of biodiesel. However, pulsatile flow has been extensively researcehed and the fundamental principles have been successfully developed upon which its hydrodynamics are based. Oscillatory flow biodiesel reactor offers precise control of mixing b...

  5. Continuous methane fermentation and the production of vitamin B12 in a fixed-bed reactor packed with loofah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingnan; Zhang, Zhenya; Lu, Jun; Maekawa, Takaaki

    2004-05-01

    A fixed-bed reactor with acclimated methanogens immobilized on a loofah support was studied on a laboratory scale to evaluate the system producing methane from the mixture of CO(2) and H(2) gas, with the production of vitamin B(12) as a by-product. Fermentation using CO(2)/H(2) acclimated methanogens was conducted in a jar fermentor with hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of three and six days. The performance of the reactor was mainly dependent on the HRT. With an HRT of three days, the methane production rate and the vitamin B(12) concentration in the culture broth were 6.18 l/l-reactor/h and 2.88 mg/l-culture liquid; these values were 11.96 l/l-reactor/h and 37.54 mg/l-culture liquid for an HRT of six days. A higher total cell mass of methanogens retained 42.5 g dry cell/l-culture liquid was achieved in the HRT of six days. The loofah carrier immobilized almost 95% of the methanogens, which led to a more effective bio-reaction. It was also observed that the fermentation system had a better ability to buffer pH, especially for an HRT of six days.

  6. The characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances and soluble microbial products in moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Liang; Jiang, Wei; Song, Yonghui; Xia, Siqing; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

    2013-11-01

    The characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and soluble microbial products (SMP) in conventional membrane bioreactor (MBR) and in moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactors (MBBR-MBR) were investigated in long-term (170 days) experiments. The results showed that all reactors had high removal efficiency of ammonium and COD, despite very different fouling conditions. The MBBR-MBR with media fill ratio of 26.7% had much lower total membrane resistance and no obvious fouling were detected during the whole operation. In contrast, MBR and MBBR-MBR with lower and higher media fill experienced more significant fouling. Low fouling at optimum fill ratio may be due to the higher percentage of small molecular size (100 kDa) of EPS and SMP in the reactor. The composition of EPS and SMP affected fouling due to different O-H bonds in hydroxyl functional groups, and less polysaccharides and lipids.

  7. Joule-Heated Molten Regolith Electrolysis Reactor Concepts for Oxygen and Metals Production on the Moon and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibille, Laurent; Dominguez, Jesus A.

    2012-01-01

    The technology of direct electrolysis of molten lunar regolith to produce oxygen and molten metal alloys has progressed greatly in the last few years. The development of long-lasting inert anodes and cathode designs as well as techniques for the removal of molten products from the reactor has been demonstrated. The containment of chemically aggressive oxide and metal melts is very difficult at the operating temperatures ca. 1600 C. Containing the molten oxides in a regolith shell can solve this technical issue and can be achieved by designing a Joule-heated (sometimes called 'self-heating') reactor in which the electrolytic currents generate enough Joule heat to create a molten bath. Solutions obtained by multiphysics modeling allow the identification of the critical dimensions of concept reactors.

  8. Hydrogen production by catalytic decomposition of methane using a Fe-based catalyst in a fluidized bed reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.Torres; S.de Llobet; J.L.Pinilla; M.J.Lázaro; I.Suelves; R.Moliner

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic decomposition of methane using a Fe-based catalyst for hydrogen production has been studied in this work.A Fe/Al2O3 catalyst previously developed by our research group has been tested in a fluidized bed reactor (FBR).A parametric study of the effects of some process variables,including reaction temperature and space velocity,is undertaken.The operating conditions strongly affect the catalyst performance.Methane conversion was increased by increasing the temperature and lowering the space velocity.Using temperatures between 700 and 900 ℃ and space velocities between 3 and 6 LN/(gcat·h),a methane conversion in the range of 25%-40% for the gas exiting the reactor could be obtained during a 6 h run.In addition,carbon was deposited in the form of nanofilaments (chain like nanofibers and multiwall nanotubes) with similar properties to those obtained in a fixed bed reactor.

  9. Utilization of the Net Heat Process Tail Gases in the Reactor for the Production of Oil-Furnace Carbon Black

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosak, Z.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Tail gases of low calorific value, which are the by-product of oil-furnace carbon black industrial production, can be efficiently used as energy before their final release into the atmosphere. Apart from being used mainly for heating dryers, production of steam, electricity, or flared, they can also be used as a substitute for fuel in the reactor for the production of oil-furnace carbon blacks, thus increasing the efficiency of the hydrocarbon raw feedstock.This technical paper represents the technical-technological solution for applying the waste heat of the low calorific tail gases in the reactor for the production of "hard" grade oil-furnace carbon blacks with savings of the hydrocarbon raw feedstock.The introduction of the preheated low calorific tail gases in the reactor for the production of "hard" grade oil-furnace carbon blacks is achieved by serial cascading of four fans. The system consists of fans designed to pneumatically transport the mixture of process tail gases and oil-furnace carbon black dust particles. This ensures a stable technological process for the introduction of the low calorific process tail gases into the reaction zone where the natural gas and preheated air are combusted.In the production of oil-furnace carbon black N220, it is shown that by using low calorific process tail gases in the amount from 1000 to 2000 m3 h–1 per reactor, savings from 10 to 20 % of natural gas and simultaneously 7 to 9 % of the hydrocarbon raw feedstoks were achieved.

  10. FABRICATION PROCESS AND PRODUCT QUALITY IMPROVEMENTS IN ADVANCED GAS REACTOR UCO KERNELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles M Barnes

    2008-09-01

    A major element of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program is developing fuel fabrication processes to produce high quality uranium-containing kernels, TRISO-coated particles and fuel compacts needed for planned irradiation tests. The goals of the AGR program also include developing the fabrication technology to mass produce this fuel at low cost. Kernels for the first AGR test (“AGR-1) consisted of uranium oxycarbide (UCO) microspheres that werre produced by an internal gelation process followed by high temperature steps tot convert the UO3 + C “green” microspheres to first UO2 + C and then UO2 + UCx. The high temperature steps also densified the kernels. Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) fabricated UCO kernels for the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, which went into the Advance Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory in December 2006. An evaluation of the kernel process following AGR-1 kernel production led to several recommendations to improve the fabrication process. These recommendations included testing alternative methods of dispersing carbon during broth preparation, evaluating the method of broth mixing, optimizing the broth chemistry, optimizing sintering conditions, and demonstrating fabrication of larger diameter UCO kernels needed for the second AGR irradiation test. Based on these recommendations and requirements, a test program was defined and performed. Certain portions of the test program were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), while tests at larger scale were performed by B&W. The tests at B&W have demonstrated improvements in both kernel properties and process operation. Changes in the form of carbon black used and the method of mixing the carbon prior to forming kernels led to improvements in the phase distribution in the sintered kernels, greater consistency in kernel properties, a reduction in forming run time, and simplifications to the forming process. Process parameter variation tests in both forming and sintering steps led

  11. CFD simulation with detailed chemistry of steam reforming of methane for hydrogen production in an integrated micro-reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Xuli; Cheng, Yinhong; Jin, Yong; Cheng, Yi [Department of Chemical Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Reaction Engineering and Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ding, Shi [Department of Chemical Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Reaction Engineering and Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Research Institute of Petroleum Processing, SINOPEC, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2010-06-15

    micro-reactor has drawn more and more attention in recent years due to the process intensification on basic transport phenomena in micro-channels, which would often lead to the improved reactor performance. Steam reforming of methane (SRM) in micro-reactor has great potential to realize a low-cost, compact process for hydrogen production via an evident shortening of reaction time from seconds to milliseconds. This work focuses on the detailed modeling and simulation of a micro-reactor design for SRM reaction with the integration of a micro-channel for Rh-catalyzed endothermic reaction, a micro-channel for Pt-catalyzed exothermic reaction and a wall in between with Rh or Pt-catalyst coated layer. The elementary reaction kinetics for SRM process is adopted in the CFD model, while the combustion channel is described by global reaction kinetics. The model predictions were quantitatively validated by the experimental data in the literature. For the extremely fast reactions in both channels, the simulations indicated the significance of the heat conduction ability of the reactor wall as well as the interplay between the exothermic and endothermic reactions (e.g., the flow rate ratio of fuel gas to reforming gas). The characteristic width of 0.5 mm is considered to be a suitable channel size to balance the trade-off between the heat transfer behavior in micro-channels and the easy fabrication of micro-channels. (author)

  12. Rice blast research: improving our arsenal and using it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice blast disease is a constant threat to U.S. rice production, and there have been sporadic outbreaks of the disease for many decades. However, the U.S. southern rice growing area has been fortunate because the pathogen population has been relatively stable compared to other rice producing areas i...

  13. Computation of fission product distribution in core and primary circuit of a high temperature reactor during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fission product release during normal operation from the core of a high temperature reactor is well known to be very low. A HTR-Modul-reactor with a reduced power of 170 MWth is examined under the aspect whether the contamination with Cs-137 as most important nuclide will be so low that a helium turbine in the primary circuit is possible. The program SPTRAN is the tool for the computations and siumlations of fission product transport in HTRs. The program initially developed for computations of accident events has been enlarged for computing the fission product transport under the conditions of normal operation. The theoretical basis, the used programs and data basis are presented followed by the results of the computations. These results are explained and discussed; moreover the consequences and future possibilities of development are shown. (orig./HP)

  14. A reverse flow catalytic membrane reactor for the production of syngas: an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, J.; Bekink, G.J.; Sint Annaland, van M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper experimental results are presented for a demonstration unit of a recently proposed novel integrated reactor concept (Smit et. al., 2005) for the partial oxidation of natural gas to syngas (POM), namely a Reverse Flow Catalytic Membrane Reactor (RFCMR). Natural gas has great potential a

  15. Production of Advanced Biofuels via Liquefaction - Hydrothermal Liquefaction Reactor Design: April 5, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knorr, D.; Lukas, J.; Schoen, P.

    2013-11-01

    This report provides detailed reactor designs and capital costs, and operating cost estimates for the hydrothermal liquefaction reactor system, used for biomass-to-biofuels conversion, under development at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Five cases were developed and the costs associated with all cases ranged from $22 MM/year - $47 MM/year.

  16. Ethanol production during semi-continuous syngas fermentation in a trickle bed reactor using Clostridium ragsdalei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarapalli, Mamatha; Atiyeh, Hasan K; Phillips, John R; Lewis, Randy S; Huhnke, Raymond L

    2016-06-01

    An efficient syngas fermentation bioreactor provides a mass transfer capability that matches the intrinsic kinetics of the microorganism to obtain high gas conversion efficiency and productivity. In this study, mass transfer and gas utilization efficiencies of a trickle bed reactor during syngas fermentation by Clostridium ragsdalei were evaluated at various gas and liquid flow rates. Fermentations were performed using a syngas mixture of 38% CO, 28.5% CO2, 28.5% H2 and 5% N2, by volume. Results showed that increasing the gas flow rate from 2.3 to 4.6sccm increased the CO uptake rate by 76% and decreased the H2 uptake rate by 51% up to Run R6. Biofilm formation after R6 increased cells activity with over threefold increase in H2 uptake rate. At 1662h, the final ethanol and acetic acid concentrations were 5.7 and 12.3g/L, respectively, at 200ml/min of liquid flow rate and 4.6sccm gas flow rate. PMID:26950756

  17. Water reactor fuel behaviour and fission products release in off-normal and accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present meeting was scheduled by the International Atomic Energy Agency upon the proposal of the Members of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology and held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 10 to 13 November 1986. Thirty participants from 17 countries and an international organization attended the meeting. Eighteen papers were presented from 13 countries and one international organization. The meeting was composed of four sessions and covered subjects related to: physico-chemical properties of core materials under off-normal conditions, and their interactions up to and after melt-down (5 papers); core materials deformation, relocation and core coolability under (severe) accident conditions (4 papers); fission products release: including experience, mechanisms and modelling (5 papers); power plant experience (4 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 18 papers. Four working groups covering the above-mentioned topics were held to discuss the present status of the knowledge and to develop recommendations for future activities in this field. Refs, figs and tabs

  18. Modeling of constituent redistribution and fission product migration in fast reactor U-Pu-Zr fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radial constituent redistribution in a fast reactor U-Pu-Zr fuel is an important phenomenon that occurs because the fuel alloy has thermal gradients and poly-phase fields at the typical operation temperature. In a typical temperature range (500-700degC), Zr moves from the mid-radius region to the fuel center region and the fuel surface region. Because of this phenomenon, the homogeneous fuel at beginning of life turns into locally heterogeneous fuel. Most of the thermophysical properties change locally, as does fuel performance. Fuel constituent redistribution of U-Pu-Zr is modeled by treating Pu as sessile element and therefore by assuming a pseudo-binary system. Fission product lanthanides (LA) migrate to the fuel surface. LA migration appears to be due both to direct vapor transport and diffusion through the fuel matrix. Large pores at the low Zr zone and fuel periphery may support for LA precipitates. LA diffusion through Pu also contributes to observed LA migration. Because Pu is relatively sessile, however, LA migration by diffusion through the fuel matrix is relatively small. Upon migration to the fuel surface, LA and Pu react with Fe-base alloy cladding such as HT9 and D9 whereas U and Zr do not. The LA and Pu reaction with cladding is via interdiffusion. (author)

  19. Characteristics and biogas production potential of municipal solid wastes pretreated with a rotary drum reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Baoning; Gikas, Petros; Zhang, Ruihong; Lord, James; Jenkins, Bryan; Li, Xiujin

    2009-02-01

    This study was conducted to determine the characteristics and biogas production potential of organic materials separated from municipal solid wastes using a rotary drum reactor (RDR) process. Four different types of wastes were first pretreated with a commercial RDR system at different retention times (1, 2 and 3 d) and the organic fractions were tested with batch anaerobic digesters with 2.6 g VS L(-1) initial loading. The four types of waste were: municipal solid waste (MSW), a mixture of MSW and paper waste, a mixture of MSW and biosolids, and a mixture of paper and biosolids. After 20 d of thermophilic digestion (50+/-1 degrees C), it was found that the biogas yields of the above materials were in the range of 457-557 mL g VS(-1) and the biogas contained 57.3-60.6% methane. The total solid and volatile solid reductions ranged from 50.2% to 65.0% and 51.8% to 66.8%, respectively. For each material, the change of retention time in the RDR from 1 to 3d did not show significant (alpha=0.05) influence on the biogas yields of the recovered organic materials. Further studies are needed to determine the minimum retention time requirements in the RDR system to achieve effective separation of organic from inorganic materials and produce suitable feedstock for anaerobic digesters. PMID:18849162

  20. Fission-product chemistry in severe reactor accidents: Review of relevant integral experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The attenuation of the radioactive fission-product emission from a severe reactor accident will depend on a combination of chemical, physical and thermal-hydraulic effects. Chemical species stabilised under the prevailing conditions will determine the extent of aerosol formation and any subsequent interaction, so defining the magnitude and physical forms of the eventual release into the environment. While several important integral tests have taken place in recent years, these experiments have tended to focus on the generation of mass-balance and aerosol-related data to test and validate materials-transport codes rather than study the impact of important chemical phenomena. This emphasis on thermal hydraulics, fuel behaviour and aerosol properties has occurred in many test (e.g. PBF, DEMONA, Marviken-V, LACE and ACE). Nevertheless, the generation and reaction of the chemical species in all of these programmes determined the transport properties of the resulting vapours and aerosols. Chemical effects have been studied in measurements somewhat subsidiary to the main aims of the tests. This work has been reviewed in detail with respect to Marviken-V, LACE, ACE and Falcon. Specific issues remain to be addressed, and these are discussed in terms of the proposed Phebus-FB programme. (author). 58 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab

  1. An investigation of sulfate production in clouds using a flow-through chemical reactor model approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, M. S.; Carmichael, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    A flow-through chemical reactor model is developed to describe the mass transfer and chemical processes that atmospheric gases undergo in clouds. The model includes the simultaneous absorption of SO2, NH3, O3, NO(x), HNO3, CO2 and H2O2, the accompanying dissociation and oxidation reactions in cloud water, considers electrical neutrality, and includes qualitative parameterization of cloud microphysics. The model is used to assess the importance of the oxidation reactions H2O2-S(IV), O3-S(IV), and S(IV)-Mn(2+) catalysis, and the effects of cloud parameters such as drop size, rain intensity, liquid water content, and updraft velocity. Both precipitating and nonprecipitating clouds are studied. Model results predict sulfate production rates varying from 3 percent/hr to 230 percent/hr. The actual rate is highly dependent on the chemical composition of the uptake air and the physical conditions of the cloud. Model results also show that both the H2O2 and the O3 oxidation reactions can be significant.

  2. Effect of organic loading rate on methane and volatile fatty acids productions from anaerobic treatment of palm oil mill effluent in UASB and UFAF reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumate Chaiprapat

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic treatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME with the separation of the acidogenic and methanogenic phase was studied in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB reactor and an up-flowanaerobic filter (UFAF reactor. Furthermore, the effect of OLR on methane and volatile fatty acid productions in UASB and UFAF reactors was investigated. In this research, UASB as acidogenic reactor wasused for volatile fatty acid production and UFAF as methanogenic reactor was used for methane production. Therefore, POME without pH adjustment was used as influent for the UASB reactor. Moreover, the syntheticwastewater with pH adjustment to 6.00 was fed into the UFAF reactor. The inoculum source for both reactors was the combination of POME sludge collected from the CSTR of a POME treatment plant and granulesludge collected from the UASB reactor of a frozen sea food industry treatment plant. During experimental operation, the organic loading rate (OLR was gradually increased from 2.50 to 17.5 g COD/l/day in theUASB reactor and 1.10 to 10.0 g COD/l/day in the UFAF reactor. Consequently, hydraulic retention time (HRT ranged from 20.0 to 2.90 days in the UASB reactor and from 13.5 to 1.50 days in the UFAF reactor.The result showed that the COD removal efficiency from both reactors was greater than 60.0%. In addition, the total volatile fatty acids increased with the increasing OLR. The total volatile fatty acids and acetic acidproduction in the UASB reactor reached 5.50 g/l and 4.90 g/l, respectively at OLR of 17.5 g COD/l/day and HRT of 2.90 days before washout was observed. In the UFAF reactor, the methane and biogas productionincreased with increasing OLR until an OLR of 7.50 g COD/l/day. However, the methane and biogas production significantly decreased when OLR increased up to 10.0 g COD/l/day. Therefore, the optimum OLR inthe laboratory-scale UASB and UFAF reactors were concluded to be 15.5 and 7.50 g COD/l/day, respectively.

  3. [Start-up and continuous operation of bio-hydrogen production reactor at pH 5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Man-li; Ren, Nan-qi; Tang, Jing

    2005-03-01

    A continuous stirred-tank reactor(CSTR)for bio-hydrogen production using molasses wastewater as substrate was investigated. Emphasis was placed on assessing the start-up and continuous operation characteristics when keeping pH value constant. It was found that at pH of 5, biomass of 6g/L, organic loading rate (OLR) of 7.0kg/(m3 x d) and a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 6h, an equilibrial hydrogen-producing microbial community could be established within 30 days. Following that, oxidation redox potential (ORP) were kept within the ranges - 460mV - -480mV. Typical mixed acid type fermentation was exhibited in the reactor. Little difference was observed in the distribution of liquid end products. The liquid end products proportion of the total amount was 36% of acetic acid, 33% of ethanol, 18% of butyric acid, 13% of propionic acid and valeric acid, respectively. Hydrogen content in the biogas was about 30% - 35% . Maximal hydrogen production rate was 1.3m3/(m3 x d). The acid-producing fermentative bacteria were in the same preponderant status when the reactor showed mixed acid type fermentation. They are mostly cocci and bacilli.

  4. Mesophilic hydrogen production in acidogenic packed-bed reactors (APBR) using raw sugarcane vinasse as substrate: Influence of support materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes Ferraz Júnior, Antônio Djalma; Etchebehere, Claudia; Zaiat, Marcelo

    2015-08-01

    Bio-hydrogen production from sugarcane vinasse in anaerobic up-flow packed-bed reactors (APBR) was evaluated. Four types of support materials, expanded clay (EC), charcoal (Ch), porous ceramic (PC), and low-density polyethylene (LDP) were tested as support for biomass attachment. APBR (working volume - 2.3 L) were operated in parallel at a hydraulic retention time of 24 h, an organic loading rate of 36.2 kg-COD m(-3) d(-1), at 25 °C. Maximum volumetric hydrogen production values of 509.5, 404, 81.4 and 10.3 mL-H2 d(-1) L(-1)reactor and maximum yields of 3.2, 2.6, 0.4 and 0.05 mol-H2 mol(-1) carbohydrates total, were observed during the monitoring of the reactors filled with LDP, EC, Ch and PC, respectively. Thus, indicating the strong influence of the support material on H2 production. LDP was the most appropriate material for hydrogen production among the materials evaluated. 16S rRNA gene by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis and scanning electron microscopy confirmed the selection of different microbial populations. 454-pyrosequencing performed on samples from APBR filled with LDP revealed the presence of hydrogen-producing organisms (Clostridium and Pectinatus), lactic acid bacteria and non-fermentative organisms.

  5. [A new microfilaricide in the therapeutic arsenal of the ophthalmologist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toufic, N

    1990-01-01

    With no doubt the Ophthalmologist in Tropical African country is the practician most needed for ocular disorders which are precursors of blindness by onchocerciasis or loasis. So, he has to be well-informed concerning each new product able to bring a better efficacy in the treatment of his patients suffering from one or two of these endemic filariasis. He has to know as well how to use it perfectly to experiment it if needed. Ivermectine, MECTIZAN patented, is nowadays the microfilariacide most tolerated in human medicine and is very easy to use in mass therapeutic campaigns as it is easy to administer: one oral dose is available for at least six months. This work deals with the structure of this new anti-parasitary, its quite particular action mechanism, its quite easy dosage, its use precautions and possible contraindications. By this, each practicioner has not to wait an important medical advertisement on this product which is being tested to know the basic points on it and to know how to get it for a possible experimentation for a point of information. PMID:2135076

  6. The real world of bibliographic data: managing and exchanging marketing data at Arsenal Pulp Press

    OpenAIRE

    Grabham, Elizabeth Anne

    2007-01-01

    This report explores how Arsenal Pulp Press participated in a bibliographic data exchange network with its online retail and data aggregation partners in Canada from May 2005 to May 2006. Looking specifically at the data requirements of Amazon.ca, BookManager, Bowker’s Books In Print, and Indigo Books & Music, this report observes the challenges faced by this midsize, independent publisher when it used a bibliographic database management system to store and distribute industry-standard ma...

  7. Nuclear winter revisited with a modern climate model and current nuclear arsenals: Still catastrophic consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, Alan; Oman, Luke; Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2007-07-01

    Twenty years ago, the results of climate model simulations of the response to smoke and dust from a massive nuclear exchange between the superpowers could be summarized as "nuclear winter," with rapid temperature, precipitation, and insolation drops at the surface that would threaten global agriculture for at least a year. The global nuclear arsenal has fallen by a factor of three since then, but there has been an expansion of the number of nuclear weapons states, with additional states trying to develop nuclear arsenals. We use a modern climate model to reexamine the climate response to a range of nuclear wars, producing 50 and 150 Tg of smoke, using moderate and large portions of the current global arsenal, and find that there would be significant climatic responses to all the scenarios. This is the first time that an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model has been used for such a simulation and the first time that 10-year simulations have been conducted. The response to the 150 Tg scenario can still be characterized as "nuclear winter," but both produce global catastrophic consequences. The changes are more long-lasting than previously thought, however, because the new model, National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE, is able to represent the atmosphere up to 80 km, and simulates plume rise to the middle and upper stratosphere, producing a long aerosol lifetime. The indirect effects of nuclear weapons would have devastating consequences for the planet, and continued nuclear arsenal reductions will be needed before the threat of nuclear winter is removed from the Earth.

  8. High velocity continuous-flow reactor for the production of solar grade silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerner, L.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of a high volume, high velocity continuous reduction reactor as an economical means of producing solar grade silicon was tested. Bromosilanes and hydrogen were used as the feedstocks for the reactor along with preheated silicon particles which function both as nucleation and deposition sites. A complete reactor system was designed and fabricated. Initial preheating studies have shown the stability of tetrabromosilane to being heated as well as the ability to preheat hydrogen to the desired temperature range. Several test runs were made and some silicon was obtained from runs carried out at temperatures in excess of 1180 K.

  9. Design criteria -- Reactor plant modifications for increased production and 100-C Area Alterations (Sections A and B) CG-558. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ, M.H.

    1954-08-10

    This document defines the basic criteria to be used in the preparation of detailed design for Project CG-558, Reactor Plant Modification for Increased Production and for Project CG-600, 100-C Area Alterations. It has been determined that the most economical method of increasing plutonium production within the next five years is by the modernization and improvement of the 100-B, 100-C, 100-D, 100-DR, 100-F, and 100-H reactor plants. These reactors are currently incapable of operating at their maximum potential power levels because of a limited availability of process cooling water. As a result of this programs, it is estimated that 1650-2350 megawatts of total additional production will be achieved. The purpose of this document is to set forth the design for certain modifications and additions to Hanford reactors and their supporting facilities as required to obtain higher power levels and improve the safety of reactor operation.

  10. Production of synthesis gas by co-gasifying coke and natural gas in a fixed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of synthesis gas has gained increasing importance because of its use as raw material for various industrial syntheses. In this paper synthesis gas generation during the reaction of a coal/methane with steam and oxygen, which is called the co-gasification of coal and natural gas, was investigated using a laboratory scale fixed bed reactor. It is found that about 95% methane conversion and 80% steam decomposition have been achieved when the space velocity of input gas (oxygen and methane) is less than 200 h-1 and reaction temperature about 1000 oC. The product gas contains about 95% carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The reaction system is near the equilibrium when leaving the reactor

  11. Record of Decision for the Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Impact for the Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This record of decision (ROD) for the final environmental impact statement (EIS) for the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge, Colorado provides the...

  12. 2012 mule deer and white-tailed deer census and population density estimate : Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Report on the 2012 deer census survey at Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge. Census methods and survey results are discussed. A combination of census...

  13. Amendment to the Record of Decision for the On-Post Operable Unit, Rocky Mountain Arsenal Federal Facility Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This decision document amends the remedy decision for the Hex Pit project of the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) Federal Facility Site. The RMA is located in southern...

  14. Record of Decision for the Rocky Mountain Arsenal On-Post Operable Unit in southern Adams County, Commerce City, Colorado.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Record of Decision (ROD) presents the selected remedial action for the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) On-Post Operable Unit in southern Adams County (east of...

  15. Management of black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) populations on the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Located approximately ten miles from downtown Denver, the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge (RMANWR) encompasses 15,998 contiguous acres. Due to...

  16. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Project 279 IMCOM-Southeast Region: Redstone Arsenal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatley, Darrel D.; Goddard, James K.

    2010-09-30

    Report describing a building retuning workshop presented to staff at Redstone Arsenal. Document includes issues identified during building audits and recommendations for future activities to reduce energy use at the site.

  17. IN-SITU MONITORING OF PRODUCT STREAMS FROM A SPINNING TUBE-IN-TUBE REACTOR USING A METTLER-TOLEDO REACT-IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Mettler-Toledo ReactIR system has been used for in-line, real-time monitoring of the product stream from a spinning tube-in-tube reactor (STT®, Kreido Laboratories, Camarillo California). This combination of a process intensified continuous-flow reactor and an in-situ analytic...

  18. Fission product transport in the high temperature gas-cooled reactor: Theory, program development and verification by recalculation of experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high temperature gascooled reactor (HTGR) reaches a special standard in safety because of its high temperature resistent fuel element. After all the possibility of fission product releases can not be excluded without further investigations for HTGRs. The mechanisms of fission product releases, which occur in case of such hypothetical events, are the subject of this work. The main focus of the investigation is how the fission products, which have been released, are re-adsorpted and prevented through this mechanism from being released in the environment. A strong effect of re-adsorption is expected, because experiments have shown that graphite, which is 100% of the core material, has an excellent capability to hold back fission products. With the program tools developed to calculate the fission product transport mechanisms, the corresponding experiments are recalculated and also fission product release calculations are carried out. (orig./HP)

  19. Vented target elements for use in an isotope-production reactor. [LMFBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

    1982-08-19

    A method is described for producing tritium gas in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target material is placed in pins equipped with vents, and tritium gas is recovered from the coolant.

  20. Polyphenols: Potential Future Arsenals in the Treatment of Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solayman, Md; Ali, Yousuf; Alam, Fahmida; Islam, Md Asiful; Alam, Nadia; Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Gan, Siew Hua

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most common endocrine metabolic disorders. In addition to exercise and diet, oral anti-diabetic drugs have been used as a part of the management strategy worldwide. Unfortunately, none of the conventional anti-diabetic drugs are without side effects, and these drugs pose an economic burden. Therefore, the investigation of novel anti-diabetic regimens is a major challenge for researchers, in which nature has been the primary resource for the discovery of potential therapeutics. Many plants have been shown to act as anti-diabetic agents, in which the main active constituents are believed to be polyphenols. Natural products containing high polyphenol levels can control carbohydrate metabolism by various mechanisms, such as protecting and restoring beta-cell integrity, enhancing insulin releasing activity, and increasing cellular glucose uptake. Blackberries, red grapes, apricots, eggplant and popular drinks such as coffee, cocoa and green tea are all rich in polyphenols, which may dampen insulin resistance and be natural alternatives in the treatment of diabetes. Therefore, the aim of this review is to report on the available anti-diabetic polyphenols (medicinal plants, fruits and vegetables), their mechanisms in the various pathways of DM and their correlations with DM. Additionally, this review emphasizes the types of polyphenols that could be potential future resources in the treatment of DM via either novel regimens or as supplementary agents.

  1. Polyphenols: Potential Future Arsenals in the Treatment of Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solayman, Md; Ali, Yousuf; Alam, Fahmida; Islam, Md Asiful; Alam, Nadia; Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Gan, Siew Hua

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most common endocrine metabolic disorders. In addition to exercise and diet, oral anti-diabetic drugs have been used as a part of the management strategy worldwide. Unfortunately, none of the conventional anti-diabetic drugs are without side effects, and these drugs pose an economic burden. Therefore, the investigation of novel anti-diabetic regimens is a major challenge for researchers, in which nature has been the primary resource for the discovery of potential therapeutics. Many plants have been shown to act as anti-diabetic agents, in which the main active constituents are believed to be polyphenols. Natural products containing high polyphenol levels can control carbohydrate metabolism by various mechanisms, such as protecting and restoring beta-cell integrity, enhancing insulin releasing activity, and increasing cellular glucose uptake. Blackberries, red grapes, apricots, eggplant and popular drinks such as coffee, cocoa and green tea are all rich in polyphenols, which may dampen insulin resistance and be natural alternatives in the treatment of diabetes. Therefore, the aim of this review is to report on the available anti-diabetic polyphenols (medicinal plants, fruits and vegetables), their mechanisms in the various pathways of DM and their correlations with DM. Additionally, this review emphasizes the types of polyphenols that could be potential future resources in the treatment of DM via either novel regimens or as supplementary agents. PMID:26601968

  2. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip MacDonald; Jacopo Buongiorno; James Sterbentz; Cliff Davis; Robert Witt; Gary Was; J. McKinley; S. Teysseyre; Luca Oriani; Vefa Kucukboyaci; Lawrence Conway; N. Jonsson: Bin Liu

    2005-02-13

    The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) has been the object of interest throughout the nuclear Generation IV community because of its high potential: a simple, direct cycle, compact configuration; elimination of many traditional LWR components, operation at coolant temperatures much higher than traditional LWRs and thus high thermal efficiency. It could be said that the SWR was viewed as the water counterpart to the high temperature gas reactor.

  3. Fission product release from UO2 during irradiation. Diffusion data and their application to reactor fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Release of fission product species from UO2, and to a limited extent from (U, Pu)02 was studied using small scale in-reactor experiments in which these interacting variables may be separated, as far as is possible, and their influences assessed. Experiments were at fuel ratings appropriate to water reactor fuel elements and both single crystal and poly-crystalline specimens were used. They employed highly enriched uranium such that the relative number of fissions occurring in plutonium formed by neutron capture was small. The surface to volume ratio (S/V) of the specimens was well defined thus reducing the uncertainties in the derivation of diffusion coefficients. These experiments demonstrate many of the important characteristics of fission product behaviour in UO2 during irradiation. The samples used for these experiments were small being always less than 1g with a fissile content usually between 2 and 5mg. Polycrystalline materials were taken from batches of production fuel prepared by conventional pressing and sintering techniques. The enriched single crystals were grown from a melt of sodium and potassium chloride doped with UO2 powder 20% 235U content. The irradiations were performed in the DIDO reactor at Harwell. The neutron flux at the specimen was 4x1016 neutrons m-2s-1 providing a heat rating within the samples of 34.5 MW/teU

  4. Anaerobic Digestion and Biogas Production: Combine Effluent Treatment with Energy Generation in UASB Reactor as Biorefinery Annex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Berni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of residues and industrial effluents represents an unprecedented environmental challenge in terms of recovery, storage, and treatment. This work discusses the perspectives of treating effluents through anaerobic digestion as well as reporting the experience of using an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB reactor as biorefinery annex in a pulp and paper industrial plant to be burned in the boilers. The performance of the reactors has shown to be stable under considerable variations in load and showed a significant potential in terms of biogas production. The reactors UASB treated 3600.00 m3 of effluent daily from a production of 150.00 tons. The biogas generation was 234.000 kg/year/mill, equivalent in combustible oil. The results of methane gas generated by the anaerobic system UASB (8846.00 kcal/m3 dislocate the equivalent of 650.0 kg of combustible oil (10000.00 kcal/kg per day (or 234.000 kg/year. The production of 8846.00 Kcal/m3 of energy from biogas can make a run at industrial plant for 2 hours. This substitution can save US$ 128.700 annually (or US$ 550.0 of fuel oil/tons. The companies are invested in the use of the biogas in diesel stationary motors cycle that feed the boilers with water in case of storage electricity.

  5. Characterization of argon-41 production at N Reactor Hanford Reservation, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of normal N Reactor operation, approximately 50,000 curies of 41Ar are released to the atmosphere at Hanford each year. Although the total population whole-body dose of 1.1 man-rem/year due to these 41Ar emissions is very small compared to the total population whole-body dose of 27,000 man-rem/year due to natural background, efforts are being directed towards reducing the 41Ar emissions. Analyses of the potential sources of 41Ar in N Reactor systems have been conducted. At least 70 percent of the total quantity of Ar that is released to the atmosphere is attributable to Ar that is present within the reactor gas system. Sources of Ar that have been investigated include entrance of air within the gas dryers, back diffusion of air through a reactor wall seal, dissolved Ar in the reactor cooling water, Ar blanket on the control rod hydraulic fluid, entrance of air during reactor shutdown periods, and air within the flux monitor detectors

  6. A monolithic lipase reactor for biodiesel production by transesterification of triacylglycerides into fatty acid methyl esters

    KAUST Repository

    Urban, Jiří T.

    2011-09-26

    An enzymatic reactor with lipase immobilized on a monolithic polymer support has been prepared and used to catalyze the transesterification of triacylglycerides into the fatty acid methyl esters commonly used for biodiesel. A design of experiments procedure was used to optimize the monolithic reactor with variables including control of the surface polarity of the monolith via variations in the length of the hydrocarbon chain in alkyl methacrylate monomer, time of grafting of 1-vinyl-4,4-dimethylazlactone used to activate the monolith, and time used for the immobilization of porcine lipase. Optimal conditions involved the use of a poly(stearyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith, grafted first with vinylazlactone, then treated with lipase for 2h to carry out the immobilization of the enzyme. Best conditions for the transesterification of glyceryl tributyrate included a temperature of 37°C and a 10min residence time of the substrate in the bioreactor. The reactor did not lose its activity even after pumping through it a solution of substrate equaling 1,000 reactor volumes. This enzymatic reactor was also used for the transesterification of triacylglycerides from soybean oil to fatty acid methyl esters thus demonstrating the ability of the reactor to produce biodiesel. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The problems of mass transfer and formation of deposits of corrosion products on fuel assemblies of a VVER-1200 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionov, Yu. A.; Kritskii, V. G.; Berezina, I. G.; Gavrilov, A. V.

    2014-03-01

    On the basis of examination of materials published both in Russia and abroad, as well as their own investigations, the authors explain the reasons for the occurrence of such effects as AOA (Axial Offset Anomalies) and an increase in the coolant pressure difference in the core of nuclear reactors of the VVER type. To detect the occurrence of the AOA effect, the authors suggest using the specific activity of 58Co in the coolant. In the VVER-1200 design the thermohydraulic regime for fuel assemblies in the first year of their service life involves slight boiling of the coolant in the upper part of the core, which may induce the occurrence of the AOA effect, intensification of corrosion of fuel claddings, and abnormal increase in deposition of corrosion products. Radiolysis of the water coolant in the boiling section (boiling in pores of deposits) may intensify not only general corrosion but also a localized (nodular) one. As a result of intensification of the corrosion processes and growth of deposits, deterioration of the radiation situation in the rooms of the primary circuit of a VVER-1200 reactor as compared to that at nuclear power plants equipped with reactors of the VVER-1000 type is possible. Recommendations for preventing the AOA effect at nuclear power plants with VVER-1200 reactors on the matter of the direction of further investigations are made.

  8. Biohydrogen production from pig slurry in a CSTR reactor system with mixed cultures under hyper-thermophilic temperature (70 oC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) (750 cm3 working volume) was operated with pig slurry under hyper-thermophilic (70 oC) temperature for hydrogen production. The hydraulic retention time (HRT) was 24 h and the organic loading rate was 24.9 g d-1 of volatile solid (VS). The inoculum used in the hyper-thermophilic reactor was sludge obtained from a mesophilic methanogenic reactor. The continuous feeding with active biomass (inoculum) from the mesophilic methanogenic reactor was necessary in order to achieve hydrogen production. The hyper-thermophilic reactor started to produce hydrogen after a short adapted period of 4 days. During the steady state period the mean hydrogen yield was 3.65 cm3 g-1 of volatile solid added. The high operation temperature of the reactor enhanced the hydrolytic activity in pig slurry and increased the volatile fatty acids (VFA) production. The short HRT (24 h) and the hyper-thermophilic temperature applied in the reactor were enough to prevent methanogenesis. No pre-treatment methods or other control methods for preventing methanogenesis were necessary. Hyper-thermophilic hydrogen production was demonstrated for the first time in a CSTR system, fed with pig slurry, using mixed culture. The results indicate that this system is a promising one for biohydrogen production from pig slurry.

  9. Production of Fission Product 99Mo using High-Enriched Uranium Plates in Polish Nuclear Research Reactor MARIA: Technology and Neutronic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroszewicz Janusz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of 235U irradiation is to obtain the 99mTc isotope, which is widely used in the domain of medical diagnostics. The decisive factor determining its availability, despite its short lifetime, is a reaction of radioactive decay of 99Mo into 99mTc. One of the possible sources of molybdenum can be achieved in course of the 235U fission reaction. The paper presents activities and the calculation results obtained upon the feasibility study on irradiation of 235U targets for production of 99Mo in the MARIA research reactor. Neutronic calculations and analyses were performed to estimate the fission products activity for uranium plates irradiated in the reactor. Results of dummy targets irradiation as well as irradiation uranium plates have been presented. The new technology obtaining 99Mo is based on irradiation of high-enriched uranium plates in standard reactor fuel channel and calculation of the current fission power generation. Measurements of temperatures and the coolant flow in the molybdenum installation carried out in reactor SAREMA system give online information about the current fission power generated in uranium targets. The corrective factors were taken into account as the heat generation from gamma radiation from neighbouring fuel elements as well as heat exchange between channels and the reactor pool. The factors were determined by calibration measurements conducted with aluminium mock-up of uranium plates. Calculations of fuel channel by means of REBUS code with fine mesh structure and libraries calculated by means of WIMS-ANL code were performed.

  10. Continuous enzymatic biodiesel production from coconut oil in two-stage packed-bed reactor incorporating an extracting column to remove glycerol formed as by-product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa E Silva, William; Freitas, Larissa; Oliveira, Pedro C; de Castro, Heizir F

    2016-10-01

    The transesterification of coconut oil with ethanol catalyzed by Burkholderia cepacia lipase immobilized on polysiloxane-polyvinyl alcohol was performed in a continuous flow. The experimental design consisted of a two-stage packed-bed reactor incorporating a column with cationic resin (Lewatit GF 202) to remove the glycerol formed as by-product and the reactor performance was quantified for three different flow rates corresponding to space-times from 10 to 14 h. The influence of space-time on the ethyl ester (FAEE) concentrations, yields and productivities was determined. The reactor operation was demonstrated for space-time of 14 h attaining FAEE concentrations of 58.5 ± 0.87 wt%, FAEE yields of 97.3 ± 1.9 % and productivities of 41.6  ± 1.0 mgester g medium (-1)  h(-1). Biodiesel purified samples showed average kinematic viscosity values of 5.5 ± 0.3 mm(2) s(-1) that meet the criteria established by the American National Standard ASTM (D6751). The immobilized lipase was found to be stable regarding its morphological and catalytic characteristics, showing half-life time (t 1/2) around 1540 h. The continuous packed-bed reactor connected in series with simultaneous glycerol removal has a great potential to attain high level of transesterification yields, raising biodiesel productivity. PMID:27277745

  11. Continuous enzymatic biodiesel production from coconut oil in two-stage packed-bed reactor incorporating an extracting column to remove glycerol formed as by-product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa E Silva, William; Freitas, Larissa; Oliveira, Pedro C; de Castro, Heizir F

    2016-10-01

    The transesterification of coconut oil with ethanol catalyzed by Burkholderia cepacia lipase immobilized on polysiloxane-polyvinyl alcohol was performed in a continuous flow. The experimental design consisted of a two-stage packed-bed reactor incorporating a column with cationic resin (Lewatit GF 202) to remove the glycerol formed as by-product and the reactor performance was quantified for three different flow rates corresponding to space-times from 10 to 14 h. The influence of space-time on the ethyl ester (FAEE) concentrations, yields and productivities was determined. The reactor operation was demonstrated for space-time of 14 h attaining FAEE concentrations of 58.5 ± 0.87 wt%, FAEE yields of 97.3 ± 1.9 % and productivities of 41.6  ± 1.0 mgester g medium (-1)  h(-1). Biodiesel purified samples showed average kinematic viscosity values of 5.5 ± 0.3 mm(2) s(-1) that meet the criteria established by the American National Standard ASTM (D6751). The immobilized lipase was found to be stable regarding its morphological and catalytic characteristics, showing half-life time (t 1/2) around 1540 h. The continuous packed-bed reactor connected in series with simultaneous glycerol removal has a great potential to attain high level of transesterification yields, raising biodiesel productivity.

  12. Cellulase production by Trichoderma harzianum in static and mixed solid-state fermentation reactors under nonaseptic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschamps, F.; Giuliano, C.; Asther, M.; Huet, M.C.; Roussos, S.

    1985-09-01

    Cellulase production from lignocellulosic materials was studied in solid-state cultivation by both static and mixed techniques under nonaseptic conditions. The effects of fermentation conditions, such as moisture content, pH, temperature, and aeration, on cellulase production by Trichoderma harzianum using a mixture of wheat straw (80%) and bran (20%) were investigated. With a moisture content of 74% and a pH of 5.8, 18 IU filter paper activity and 198 IU endoglucanase activity/g initial substrate content were obtained in 66 hours. The extension from static column cultivation to stirred tank reactor of 65 l capacity gave similar yields of cellulase.

  13. PRODUCTION OF MEDIUM-CHAIN ACYLGLYCEROLS BY LIPASE ESTERIFICATION IN PACKED BED REACTOR: PROCESS OPTIMIZATION BY RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    ZANARIAH MOHD DOM; LING TAU CHUAN; ROZITA YUSOFF

    2014-01-01

    Medium-chain acylglycerols (or glycerides) are formed of mono-, di- and triacylglycerol classes. In this study, an alternative method to produce MCA from esterifying palm oil fatty acid distillate (PFAD) with the presence of oil palm mesocarp lipase (OPML) which is a plant-sourced lipase and PFAD is also cheap by-product is developed in a packed bed reactor. The production of medium-chain acylglycerols (MCA) by lipase-catalysed esterification of palm oil fatty acid distillate with glycerol ar...

  14. Practical limitations for the release of fission products during the operation of a research reactor: a case study of BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Failure of the cladding of a fuel element is an event occurring from time to time while operating a research reactor. As a consequence, fission products are released in the primary circuit of the reactor. This contamination means no direct hazard for the workers or for the environment in case the reactor has a closed primary circuit. The operator can decide to continue the irradiation to finish a scientific experiment or a commercial isotope production program. However, the operator cannot prolong the cycle regardless the concentration fission products in the primary loop. Beside the limitations imposed by the regulatory authorities, ALARA considerations should be taken into account. An untimely stop of the reactor can have serious financial consequences and prolonged operation causes higher radiation doses. This paper gives an overview of decision process applied in case of detection of fission products in the primary circuit of BR2. (author)

  15. Practical limitations for the release of fission products during the operation of a research reactor: a case study of BR2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joppen, F. [Health Physics and Safety Department, SCK-CEN, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    1998-07-01

    Failure of the cladding of a fuel element is an event occurring from time to time while operating a research reactor. As a consequence, fission products are released in the primary circuit of the reactor. This contamination means no direct hazard for the workers or for the environment in case the reactor has a closed primary circuit. The operator can decide to continue the irradiation to finish a scientific experiment or a commercial isotope production program. However, the operator cannot prolong the cycle regardless the concentration fission products in the primary loop. Beside the limitations imposed by the regulatory authorities, ALARA considerations should be taken into account. An untimely stop of the reactor can have serious financial consequences and prolonged operation causes higher radiation doses. This paper gives an overview of decision process applied in case of detection of fission products in the primary circuit of BR2. (author)

  16. Long-lived activation products in TRIGA Mark II research reactor concrete shield: calculation and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagar, Tomaz [Reactor Physics Department, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)]. E-mail: tomaz.zagar@ijs.si; Bozic, Matjaz [Nuklearna elektrarna Krsko, Vrbina 12, 8270 Krsko (Slovenia); Ravnik, Matjaz [Reactor Physics Department, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, a process of long-lived activity determination in research reactor concrete shielding is presented. The described process is a combination of experiment and calculations. Samples of original heavy reactor concrete containing mineral barite were irradiated inside the reactor shielding to measure its long-lived induced radioactivity. The most active long-lived ({gamma} emitting) radioactive nuclides in the concrete were found to be {sup 133}Ba, {sup 60}Co and {sup 152}Eu. Neutron flux, activation rates and concrete activity were calculated for actual shield geometry for different irradiation and cooling times using TORT and ORIGEN codes. Experimental results of flux and activity measurements showed good agreement with the results of calculations. Volume of activated concrete waste after reactor decommissioning was estimated for particular case of Jozef Stefan Institute TRIGA reactor. It was observed that the clearance levels of some important long-lived isotopes typical for barite concrete (e.g. {sup 133}Ba, {sup 41}Ca) are not included in the IAEA and EU basic safety standards.

  17. Long-lived activation products in TRIGA Mark II research reactor concrete shield: calculation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žagar, Tomaž; Božič, Matjaž; Ravnik, Matjaž

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, a process of long-lived activity determination in research reactor concrete shielding is presented. The described process is a combination of experiment and calculations. Samples of original heavy reactor concrete containing mineral barite were irradiated inside the reactor shielding to measure its long-lived induced radioactivity. The most active long-lived (γ emitting) radioactive nuclides in the concrete were found to be 133Ba, 60Co and 152Eu. Neutron flux, activation rates and concrete activity were calculated for actual shield geometry for different irradiation and cooling times using TORT and ORIGEN codes. Experimental results of flux and activity measurements showed good agreement with the results of calculations. Volume of activated concrete waste after reactor decommissioning was estimated for particular case of Jožef Stefan Institute TRIGA reactor. It was observed that the clearance levels of some important long-lived isotopes typical for barite concrete (e.g. 133Ba, 41Ca) are not included in the IAEA and EU basic safety standards.

  18. Evaluation of buildup of activated corrosion products for highly compact marine reactor DRX without primary coolant water purification system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odano, Naoteru; Ishida, Toshihisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-03-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has studied a highly compact reactor DRX for deep-sea research. The DRX has no purification system to achieve compact and light weight design by simplification of the system. The DRX is designed to operate for one month without purification of the primary coolant water. To quantitatively evaluate the validity of reactor operation without a purification system, a computer code CTAM-II has been developed to calculate accumulation of the activated corrosion products during and after reactor operation. The code is an improved and modified version of CTAM, which was developed for the shield modification project of the nuclear ship Mutsu. Validity of CTAM-II and parameters used in the code has been confirmed by comparison of the calculated data and experimental ones for measurement of the concentrations of radioactive materials in the primary coolant water. Estimation of buildup of the corrosion products for DRX using CTAM-II has been carried out and shielding calculations using source terms calculated from CTAM-II have been performed. A radiation safety assessment of the DRX without the purification system has been carried out by these shielding calculations. (author)

  19. System design study of a membrane reforming hydrogen production plant using a small sized sodium cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a membrane reforming hydrogen production plant using a small sized sodium cooled reactor was designed as one of promising concepts. In the membrane reformer, methane and steam are reformed into carbon dioxide and hydrogen with sodium heat at a temperature 500 deg-C. In the equilibrium condition, steam reforming proceeds with catalyst at a temperature more than 800 deg-C. Using membrane reformers, the steam reforming temperature can be decreased from 800 to 500 deg-C because the hydrogen separation membrane removes hydrogen selectively from catalyst area and the partial pressure of hydrogen is kept much lower than equilibrium condition. In this study, a hydrogen and electric co-production plant has been designed. The reactor thermal output is 375 MW and 25% of the thermal output is used for hydrogen production (70000 Nm3/h). The hydrogen production cost is estimated to 21 yen/Nm3 but it is still higher than the economical goal (17 yen/Nm3). The major reason of the high cost comes from the large size of hydrogen separation reformers because of the limit of hydrogen separation efficiency of palladium membrane. A new highly efficient hydrogen separation membrane is needed to reduce the cost of hydrogen production using membrane reformers. There is possibility of multi-tube failure in the membrane reformers. In future study, a design of measures against tube failure and elemental experiments of reaction between sodium and reforming gas will be needed. (authors)

  20. Thermal degradation of real-world waste plastics and simulated mixed plastics in a two-stage pyrolysis-catalysis reactor for fuel production

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad, C; Onwudili, JA; Williams, PT

    2015-01-01

    Real-world postconsumer mixed plastics and a simulated mixture of plastics were processed in a two-stage pyrolysis-catalysis fixed bed reactor in the presence of a zeolite HZSM-5 catalyst. In addition, single plastic polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, and polyethylene terephthalate were also processed in the two-stage reactor. The product yield, composition, and hydrocarbon distribution of the product oil was obtained in relation to plastic type. Noncatalytic pyrolysis of the plastics ...

  1. Application of a triga research reactor as the neutron source for a production neutron radiography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GA Technologies Inc. (GA) has developed a Stationary Neutron Radiography System (SNRS) using a 250-1000 KW TRIGA reactor as the neutron source. The partially below ground reactor will be equipped with four vertical beam tubes originating in the reactor graphite reflector and installed tangential to the core to provide a strong current of thermal neutrons with minimum gamma-ray contamination. The vertical beam tubes interface with rugged component positioning systems designed to handle intact F-111 aircraft wings, partial A-10 aircraft wings, pyrotechnics, and other honeycomb aircraft structures. The SNRS will be equipped with real-time, near-real-time, and film-radiographic imaging systems to provide a broad spectrum of capability for detection or corrosion of entrained moisture in large aircraft panels. (author)

  2. Biomass Gasification Behavior in an Entrained Flow Reactor: Gas Product Distribution and Soot Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Ke; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Lin, Weigang;

    2012-01-01

    . In comparison to pyrolysis, lower yields of soot, H2, and CO were produced during gasification. The yield of soot could be reduced by a longer residence time, larger feeder air flow, lower oxygen concentration, higher excess air ratio, higher steam/carbon ratio, and higher reactor temperature. Changes...... in residence time, feeder air flow, and oxygen concentration did not show a noticeable influence on H2 and CO yields. Increasing the excess air ratio decreased both the H2 and CO yields; increasing the steam/carbon ratio increased the H2 yield but decreased the CO yield; and increasing the reactor temperature......Biomass gasification and pyrolysis were studied in a laboratory-scale atmospheric pressure entrained flow reactor. Effects of operating parameters and biomass types on the syngas composition were investigated. In general, the carbon conversion during biomass gasification was higher than 90...

  3. Neutronic flux stability of production uranium graphite reactor conversion core relative to high-frequency oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary methodical simplified investigation into stability of the neutron field in the conversion load of industrial uranium-graphite reactors with regard to basic characteristics of the load in transient processes was carried out. Analysis was based on the calculated research into the behaviour of simplified single-point and one-dimensional models of the reactor core in transient regimes during the interconnected description of dynamics of neutron-physical and thermal properties of the load. Fundamental assumptions on the reactor characteristics used in the calculated model. In the context of accepted approximations the obtained results preclude the possibility for the occurrence of spontaneous high frequency oscillations resulting from the positive reactivity effect on the fuel temperature in the conversion load

  4. Reduction of Precursors of Chlorination By-products in Drinking Water Using Fluidized-bed Biofilm Reactor at Low Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHU-GUANG XIE; DONG-HUI WEN; DONG-WEN SHI; XIAO-YAN TANG

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the reduction of chlorination by-products (CBPs) precursors using the fluidized-bed biofilm reactor (FBBR). Methods Reduction of total organic carbon (TOC), ultraviolet absorbance (UV254), trihalomethane (THM)formation potential (THMFP), haloacetic acid (HAA) formation potential (HAAFP), and ammonia in FBBR were evaluated in detail. Results The reduction of TOC or UV254 was low, on average 12.6% and 4.7%, respectively, while the reduction of THMFP and HAAFP was significant. The reduction of ammonia was 30%-40% even below 3℃, however, it could quickly rise to over 50% above 3℃. Conclusions The FBBR effectively reduces CBPs and ammonia in drinking water even at low temperature and seems to be a very promising and competitive drinking water reactor for polluted surface source waters, especially in China.

  5. Fission product release assessment for end fitting failure in Candu reactor loaded with CANFLEX-NU fuel bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dirk Joo; Jeong, Chang Joon; Lee, Kang Moon; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Fission product release (FPR) assessment for End Fitting Failure (EFF) in CANDU reactor loaded with CANFLEX-natural uranium (NU) fuel bundles has been performed. The predicted results are compared with those for the reactor loaded with standard 37-element bundles. The total channel I-131 release at the end of transient for EFF accident is calculated to be 380.8 TBq and 602.9 TBq for the CANFLEX bundle and standard bundle channel cases, respectively. They are 4.9% and 7.9% of total inventory, respectively. The lower total releases of the CANFLEX bundle O6 channel are attributed to the lower initial fuel temperatures caused by the lower linear element power of the CANFLEX bundle compared with the standard bundle. 4 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs. (Author)

  6. Production of bio-hydrogen by mesophilic anaerobic fermentation in an acid-phase sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Dae-Yeol; Hansen, Conly L; Stevens, David K

    2007-02-15

    The pH and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) were varied to optimize the conversion of carbohydrate-rich synthetic wastewater into bio-hydrogen. A full factorial design using evolutionary operation (EVOP) was used to determine the effect of the factors and to find the optimum condition of each factor required for high hydrogen production rate. Experimental results from 20 runs indicate that a maximum hydrogen production rate of 4,460-5,540 mL/L/day under the volumetric organic loading rate (VOLR) of 75 g-COD/L/day obtained at an observed design point of HRT = 8 h and pH = 5.7. The hydrogen production rate was strongly dependent on the HRT, and the effect was statistically significant (P 0.05) was found for the pH on the hydrogen production rate. When the ASBR conditions were set for a maximum hydrogen production rate, the hydrogen production yield and specific hydrogen production rate were 60-74 mL/g-COD and 330-360 mL/g-VSS/day, respectively. The hydrogen composition was 43-51%, and no methanogenesis was observed. Acetate, propionate, butyrate, valerate, caproate, and ethanol were major liquid intermediate metabolites during runs of this ASBR. The dominant fermentative types were butyrate-acetate or ethanol-acetate, representing the typical anaerobic pathway of Clostridium species. This hydrogen-producing ASBR had a higher hydrogen production rate, compared with that produced using continuous-flow stirred tank reactors (CSTRs). This study suggests that the hydrogen-producing ASBR is a promising bio-system for prolonged and stable hydrogen production.

  7. Low enriched uranium UAlX-Al targets for the production of Molybdenum-99 in the IEA-R1 and RMB reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IEA-R1 reactor of IPEN/CNEN-SP in Brazil is a pool type research reactor cooled and moderated by demineralized water and having Beryllium and Graphite as reflectors. In 1997 the reactor received the operating licensing for 5 MW. A new research reactor is being planned in Brazil to replace the IEA-R1 reactor. This new reactor, the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB), planned for 30 MW, is now in the conception design phase. Low enriched uranium (LEU) (235U) UAlx dispersed in Al targets are being considered for production of Molybdenum-99 (99Mo) by fission. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulics calculations were performed, respectively, to compare the production of 99Mo for these targets in IEA-R1 reactor and RMB and to determine the temperatures achieved in the UAlx-Al targets during irradiation. For the neutronic calculations were utilized the computer codes HAMMER-TECHNION, CITATION and SCALE and for the thermal-hydraulics calculations was utilized the computer code MTRCR-IEAR1. (author)

  8. Monitoring of microbial community structure and succession in the biohydrogen production reactor by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING; Defeng; REN; Nanqi; GONG; Manli; LI; Jianzheng; LI; Q

    2005-01-01

    To study the structure of microbial communities in the biological hydrogen production reactor and determine the ecological function of hydrogen producing bacteria, anaerobic sludge was obtained from the continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) in different periods of time, and the diversity and dynamics of microbial communities were investigated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The results of DGGE demonstrated that an obvious shift of microbial population happened from the beginning of star-up to the 28th day, and the ethanol type fermentation was established. After 28 days the structure of microbial community became stable, and the climax community was formed. Comparative analysis of 16S rDNA sequences from reamplifying and sequencing the prominent bands indicated that the dominant population belonged to low G+C Gram-positive bacteria (Clostridium sp. And Ethanologenbacterium sp.), β- proteobacteria (Acidovorax sp.), γ-proteobacteria (Kluyvera sp.), Bacteroides (uncultured bacterium SJA-168), and Spirochaetes (uncultured eubacterium E1-K13), respectively. The hydrogen production rate increased obviously with the increase of Ethanologenbacterium sp., Clostridium sp. And uncultured Spirochaetes after 21 days, meanwhile the succession of ethanol type fermentation was formed. Throughout the succession the microbial diversity increased however it decreased after 21 days. Some types of Clostridium sp. Acidovorax sp., Kluyvera sp., and Bacteroides were dominant populations during all periods of time. These special populations were essential for the construction of climax community. Hydrogen production efficiency was dependent on both hydrogen producing bacteria and other populations. It implied that the co-metabolism of microbial community played a great role of biohydrogen production in the reactors.

  9. Monitoring of microbial community structure and succession in the biohydrogen production reactor by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Defeng; Ren, Nanqi; Gong, Manli; Li, Jianzheng; Li, Qiubo

    2005-04-01

    To study the structure of microbial communities in the biological hydrogen production reactor and determine the ecological function of hydrogen producing bacteria, anaerobic sludge was obtained from the continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) in different periods of time, and the diversity and dynamics of microbial communities were investigated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The results of DGGE demonstrated that an obvious shift of microbial population happened from the beginning of star-up to the 28th day, and the ethanol type fermentation was established. After 28 days the structure of microbial community became stable, and the climax community was formed. Comparative analysis of 16S rDNA sequences from reamplifying and sequencing the prominent bands indicated that the dominant population belonged to low G+C Gram-positive bacteria (Clostridium sp. and Ethanologenbacterium sp.), beta-proteobacteria (Acidovorax sp.), gamma-proteobacteria (Kluyvera sp.), Bacteroides (uncultured bacterium SJA-168), and Spirochaetes (uncultured eubacterium E1-K13), respectively. The hydrogen production rate increased obviously with the increase of Ethanologenbacterium sp., Clostridium sp. and uncultured Spirochaetes after 21 days, meanwhile the succession of ethanol type fermentation was formed. Throughout the succession the microbial diversity increased however it decreased after 21 days. Some types of Clostridium sp. Acidovorax sp., Kluyvera sp., and Bacteroides were dominant populations during all periods of time. These special populations were essential for the construction of climax community. Hydrogen production efficiency was dependent on both hydrogen producing bacteria and other populations. It implied that the co-metabolism of microbial community played a great role of biohydrogen production in the reactors.

  10. A CFD approach on simulation of hydrogen production from steam reforming of glycerol in a fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dou, Binlin; Song, Yongchen [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Key Laboratory of Ocean Energy Utilization and Energy Conservation of Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2010-10-15

    Hydrogen production from steam reforming of glycerol in a fluidized bed reactor has been simulated using a CFD method by an additional transport equation with a kinetic term. The Eulerian-Eulerian two-fluid approach was adopted to simulate hydrodynamics of fluidization, and chemical reactions were modelled by laminar finite-rate model. The bed expansion and pressure drop were predicted for different inlet gas velocities. The results showed that the flow system exhibited a more heterogeneous structure, and the core-annulus structure of gas-solid flow led to back-mixing and internal circulation behaviour, and thus gave a poor velocity distribution. This suggests the bed should be agitated to maintain satisfactory fluidizing conditions. Glycerol conversion and H{sub 2} production were decreased with increasing inlet gas velocity. The increase in the value of steam to carbon molar ratio increases the conversion of glycerol and H{sub 2} selectivity. H{sub 2} concentrations in the bed were uneven and increased downstream and high concentrations of H{sub 2} production were also found on walls. The model demonstrated a relationship between hydrodynamics and hydrogen production, implying that the residence time and steam to carbon molar ratio are important parameters. The CFD simulation will provide helpful data to design and operate a bench scale catalytic fluidized bed reactor. (author)

  11. Novel Magnetically Fluidized Bed Reactor Development for the Looping Process: Coal to Hydrogen Production R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Renwei; Hahn, David; Klausner, James; Petrasch, Jorg; Mehdizadeh, Ayyoub; Allen, Kyle; Rahmatian, Nima; Stehle, Richard; Bobek, Mike; Al-Raqom, Fotouh; Greek, Ben; Li, Like; Chen, Chen; Singh, Abhishek; Takagi, Midori; Barde, Amey; Nili, Saman

    2013-09-30

    prediction of hydrogen production rates over a large range of experimental conditions in the laboratory scale reactor and the bench-scale reactor. In the economic analysis, a comparison of the hydrogen production plants using iron/iron oxide looping cycle and the conventional process has been presented. Plant configurations are developed for the iron/iron oxide looping cycle. The study suggests a higher electric power generation but a lower hydrogen production efficiency comparing with the conventional process. Additionally, it was shown that the price of H{sub 2} obtained from our reactor can be as low as $1.7/kg, which is 22% lower than the current price of the H{sub 2} obtained from reforming plants.

  12. Production and validation of nuclear data for reactor and fuel cycle applications; Production et validation des donnees nucleaires pour les applications reacteurs et cycle du combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trakas, C. [Framatome ANP GmbH NBTT, Erlangen (Germany); Verwaerde, D. [Electricite de France EDF, 75 - Paris (France); Toubon, H. [Cogema, 78 - Velizy Villacoublay (France)] [and others

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this technical meeting is the improvement of the existing nuclear data and the production of new data of interest for the upstream and downstream of the fuel cycle (enrichment, fabrication, management, storage, transport, reprocessing), for the industrial reactors, the research reactors and the new reactor concepts (criticality, dimensioning, exploitation), for the instrumentation systems (external and internal sensors), the radioprotection, the residual power, the structures (neutron bombardment effect on vessels, rods etc..), and for the activation of steel structures (Fr, Ni, Co). The expected result is the collection of more reliable and accurate data in a wider spectrum of energies and temperatures thanks to more precise computer codes and measurement techniques. This document brings together the communications presented at this meeting and dealing with: the process of production and validation of nuclear data; the measurement facilities and the big international programs; the users needs and the industrial priorities; the basic nuclear data (BND) needs at Cogema; the expression and evaluation of BND; the evaluation work: the efficient cross-sections; the processing of data and the creation of activation libraries; from the integral measurement to the qualification and the feedback on nuclear data. (J.S.)

  13. Ethanol production from hydrothermal pretreated corn stover with a loop reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Jian; Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2010-01-01

    Hydrothermal pretreatment on raw corn stover (RCS) with a loop reactor was investigated at 195 °C for different times varying between 10 min and 30 min. After pretreatment, the slurry was separated into water-insoluble solid (WIS) and liquid phase. Glucan and xylan were found in the both phases...

  14. HEAT-TRANSFER AND PRODUCTION OF HYDROXYPROPYL STARCH IN A STATIC MIXER REACTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LAMMERS, G; BEENACKERS, AACM

    1994-01-01

    A new reactor is proposed for the chemical derivation of aqueous starch solutions based on the application of static mixers. In a novel approach, heat transfer in the static mixer was modelled using the Pseudohomogeneous Two-dimensional Heat Transfer (PTHT) model. Experimental results show the suita

  15. A two-stage ethanol-based biodiesel production in a packed bed reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yuan; Nordblad, Mathias; Woodley, John

    2012-01-01

    A two-stage enzymatic process for producing fatty acid ethyl ester (FAEE) in a packed bed reactor is reported. The process uses an experimental immobilized lipase (NS 88001) and Novozym 435 to catalyze transesterification (first stage) and esterification (second stage), respectively. Both stages...

  16. Dry storage of MTR spent fuel from the Argentine radioisotope production reactor RA-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fuel elements of the RA-3 reactor consist in 19 rectangular fuel plates held in position by two lateral structural plates. The whole assembly is coupled to the lower nozzles that fits in the reactor core grid. The inner plates are 1.5 mm thick, 70.5 mm wide and 655 mm long and the outer plates are 100 mm longer. The fuel plates are formed by a core of an AI-U alloy co-laminated between two plates of Al. Enrichment is 90% 235U. After being extracted from the reactor, the fuel elements have been let to cool down in the reactor storage pool and finally moved to the storage facility. This facility is a grid of vertical underground channels connected by a piping system. The system is filled with processed and controlled water. At the present the storage capacity of the facility is near to be depleted and some indications of deterioration of the fuel elements has been detected. Due to the present status of the facility and the spent fuel stored there, a decision has been taken to proceed to modify the present underwater storage to dry storage. The project consist in: a) Decontamination and conditioning of the storage channels to prepare them for dry storage. b) Disassembly of the fuel elements in hot cells in order to can only the active fuel plates in an adequate tight canister. c) The remnant structural pieces will be treated as low level waste. (author). 10 figs

  17. Residence Time Distribution Measurement and Analysis of Pilot-Scale Pretreatment Reactors for Biofuels Production: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, D.; Kuhn, E.; Tucker, M.; Stickel, J.; Wolfrum, E.

    2013-06-01

    Measurement and analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) data is the focus of this study where data collection methods were developed specifically for the pretreatment reactor environment. Augmented physical sampling and automated online detection methods were developed and applied. Both the measurement techniques themselves and the produced RTD data are presented and discussed.

  18. HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE FLOWSHEETS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorensek, M.

    2011-07-06

    Two hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process flowsheets intended for use with high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are presented. The flowsheets were developed for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program, and couple a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer for the SO2-depolarized electrolysis step with a silicon carbide bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step. One presumes an HTGR reactor outlet temperature (ROT) of 950 C, the other 750 C. Performance was improved (over earlier flowsheets) by assuming that use of a more acid-tolerant PEM, like acid-doped poly[2,2'-(m-phenylene)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole] (PBI), instead of Nafion{reg_sign}, would allow higher anolyte acid concentrations. Lower ROT was accommodated by adding a direct contact exchange/quench column upstream from the bayonet reactor and dropping the decomposition pressure. Aspen Plus was used to develop material and energy balances. A net thermal efficiency of 44.0% to 47.6%, higher heating value basis is projected for the 950 C case, dropping to 39.9% for the 750 C case.

  19. Flux perturbation factor in cobalt samples for the reactor production of Co-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total flux perturbation factor (F) is experimentally determined for hollow cylinder cobalt samples irradiated in the RA-3 reactor. F factor is studied for different thicknesses of the material and the values are compared with those theoretically estimated by Dwork for a similar. (author)

  20. Online marketing for book publishers: a case study of Arsenal Pulp Press and Chronicle Books

    OpenAIRE

    Boyd, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    The internet is changing how we go about our personal and professional lives—not only is web use increasing, the type of online tools that are becoming commonplace and the way they are being used is evolving. This paper examines the online marketing and publicity efforts of Arsenal Pulp Press and Chronicle Books, providing an overview of a number of online tools and considering the role of online marketing and publicity for book publishers in the age of web 2.0. Some of the online marketing t...

  1. The application of an innovative continuous multiple tube reactor as a strategy to control the specific organic loading rate for biohydrogen production by dark fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Simone D; Fuess, Lucas T; Penteado, Eduardo D; Lucas, Shaiane D M; Gotardo, Jackeline T; Zaiat, Marcelo

    2015-12-01

    Biohydrogen production in fixed-bed reactors often leads to unstable and decreasing patterns because the excessive accumulation of biomass in the bed negatively affects the specific organic loading rate (SOLR) applied to the reactor. In this context, an innovative reactor configuration, i.e., the continuous multiple tube reactor (CMTR), was assessed in an attempt to better control the SOLR for biohydrogen production. The CMTR provides a continuous discharge of biomass, preventing the accumulation of solids in the long-term. Sucrose was used as the carbon source and mesophilic temperature conditions (25°C) were applied in three continuous assays. The reactor showed better performance when support material was placed in the outlet chamber to enhance biomass retention within the reactor. Although the SOLR could not be effectively controlled, reaching values usually higher than 10gsucroseg(-1)VSSd(-1), the volumetric hydrogen production and molar hydrogen production rates peaked, respectively, at 1470mLH2L(-1)d(-1) and 45mmolH2d(-1), indicating that the CMTR was a suitable configuration for biohydrogen production. PMID:26340028

  2. The application of an innovative continuous multiple tube reactor as a strategy to control the specific organic loading rate for biohydrogen production by dark fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Simone D; Fuess, Lucas T; Penteado, Eduardo D; Lucas, Shaiane D M; Gotardo, Jackeline T; Zaiat, Marcelo

    2015-12-01

    Biohydrogen production in fixed-bed reactors often leads to unstable and decreasing patterns because the excessive accumulation of biomass in the bed negatively affects the specific organic loading rate (SOLR) applied to the reactor. In this context, an innovative reactor configuration, i.e., the continuous multiple tube reactor (CMTR), was assessed in an attempt to better control the SOLR for biohydrogen production. The CMTR provides a continuous discharge of biomass, preventing the accumulation of solids in the long-term. Sucrose was used as the carbon source and mesophilic temperature conditions (25°C) were applied in three continuous assays. The reactor showed better performance when support material was placed in the outlet chamber to enhance biomass retention within the reactor. Although the SOLR could not be effectively controlled, reaching values usually higher than 10gsucroseg(-1)VSSd(-1), the volumetric hydrogen production and molar hydrogen production rates peaked, respectively, at 1470mLH2L(-1)d(-1) and 45mmolH2d(-1), indicating that the CMTR was a suitable configuration for biohydrogen production.

  3. Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 3, Sections 7-12, Appendices A-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains references; a list of preparers and recipients; acronyms, abbreviations, and units of measure; a glossary; an index and three appendices.

  4. Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 2, Sections 1-6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    This (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains the analysis of programmatic alternatives, project alternatives, affected environment of alternative sites, environmental consequences, and environmental regulations and permit requirements.

  5. Production and Supplies of 99Mo: Lessons Learnt and New Options within Research Reactors and Neutron Sources Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past few years, the research reactor (RR) topic has occupied the centre stage being the major factor in the crisis faced world over in the supplies of medical isotopes, molybdenum-99 in particular. It is therefore an important aspect for discussion at the quadrennial international conference on research reactors organised by the IAEA. The November 2011 IAEA conference at Rabat, Morocco comes at a time when the international availability of 99Mo has fairly stabilised following the excellent technological efforts in terms of repairs done in the two large reactors, in Canada (NRU) and The Netherlands (HFR), serving the bulk of 99Mo users. The author, who had led and coordinated the IAEA activities in addressing the various issues and extending support to international efforts and initiatives during the period until March 2011, shares in this article his professional analysis of the field of 99Mo production, lessons and experience from the crisis as well as the aspects to be addressed to securing sustainable supplies of both 99Mo and 99mTc in future. In line with the suggestion of the International Programme Committee of the IAEA Conference, the scope of coverage is confined to sourcing 99Mo and 99mTc from RR and other neutron sources, while accelerator-based options are not included in this article. (author)

  6. Steam gasification of coal cokes by internally circulating fluidized-bed reactor by concentrated Xe-light radiation for solar syngas production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laboratory-scale prototype windowed reactor using a fluidized bed of coal coke particles was tested for thermochemical gasification using concentrated Xe light radiation as an energy source. The fluidized-bed reactor, designed to be combined with a solar reflective tower or beam-down optics, is evaluated for steam gasification of coal coke according to gasification performance: CO, H2, and CO2 production rates; carbon conversion; light-to-chemical efficiency. Internal circulation of coal coke particles inside the reactor increases gasification performance, which is further enhanced by higher steam partial pressure of the inlet gas. - Highlights: • A reactor prototype was designed for solar steam gasification by beam-down optics. • Particle circulation homogenizes temperature distribution across all bed layers. • The reactor design of internal circulation improved gasification performances

  7. ENERGY EFFICIENCY LIMITS FOR A RECUPERATIVE BAYONET SULFURIC ACID DECOMPOSITION REACTOR FOR SULFUR CYCLE THERMOCHEMICAL HYDROGEN PRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorensek, M.; Edwards, T.

    2009-06-11

    A recuperative bayonet reactor design for the high-temperature sulfuric acid decomposition step in sulfur-based thermochemical hydrogen cycles was evaluated using pinch analysis in conjunction with statistical methods. The objective was to establish the minimum energy requirement. Taking hydrogen production via alkaline electrolysis with nuclear power as the benchmark, the acid decomposition step can consume no more than 450 kJ/mol SO{sub 2} for sulfur cycles to be competitive. The lowest value of the minimum heating target, 320.9 kJ/mol SO{sub 2}, was found at the highest pressure (90 bar) and peak process temperature (900 C) considered, and at a feed concentration of 42.5 mol% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. This should be low enough for a practical water-splitting process, even including the additional energy required to concentrate the acid feed. Lower temperatures consistently gave higher minimum heating targets. The lowest peak process temperature that could meet the 450-kJ/mol SO{sub 2} benchmark was 750 C. If the decomposition reactor were to be heated indirectly by an advanced gas-cooled reactor heat source (50 C temperature difference between primary and secondary coolants, 25 C minimum temperature difference between the secondary coolant and the process), then sulfur cycles using this concept could be competitive with alkaline electrolysis provided the primary heat source temperature is at least 825 C. The bayonet design will not be practical if the (primary heat source) reactor outlet temperature is below 825 C.

  8. Using Monte Carlo transport to accurately predict isotope production and activation analysis rates at the University of Missouri research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP5) model of the University of Missouri research reactor (MURR) has been developed. The ability of the model to accurately predict isotope production rates was verified by comparing measured and calculated neutron- capture reaction rates for numerous isotopes. In addition to thermal (1/v) monitors, the benchmarking included a number of isotopes whose (n, γ) reaction rates are very sensitive to the epithermal portion of the neutron spectrum. Using the most recent neutron libraries (ENDF/ B-VII.0), the model was able to accurately predict the measured reaction rates in all cases. The model was then combined with ORIGEN 2.2, via MONTEBURNS 2.0, to calculate production of 99Mo from fission of low-enriched uranium foils. The model was used to investigate both annular and plate LEU foil targets in a variety of arrangements in a graphite irradiation wedge to optimize the production of 99Mo. (author)

  9. Production of biohythane from food waste via an integrated system of continuously stirred tank and anaerobic fixed bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeshanew, Martha M; Frunzo, Luigi; Pirozzi, Francesco; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni

    2016-11-01

    The continuous production of biohythane (mixture of biohydrogen and methane) from food waste using an integrated system of a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and anaerobic fixed bed reactor (AFBR) was carried out in this study. The system performance was evaluated for an operation period of 200days, by stepwise shortening the hydraulic retention time (HRT). An increasing trend of biohydrogen in the CSTR and methane production rate in the AFBR was observed regardless of the HRT shortening. The highest biohydrogen yield in the CSTR and methane yield in the AFBR were 115.2 (±5.3)L H2/kgVSadded and 334.7 (±18.6)L CH4/kgCODadded, respectively. The AFBR presented a stable operation and excellent performance, indicated by the increased methane production rate at each shortened HRT. Besides, recirculation of the AFBR effluent to the CSTR was effective in providing alkalinity, maintaining the pH in optimal ranges (5.0-5.3) for the hydrogen producing bacteria.

  10. Enrichment of specific electro-active microorganisms and enhancement of methane production by adding granular activated carbon in anaerobic reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Yeol; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Park, Hee-Deung

    2016-04-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) via conductive materials can provide significant benefits to anaerobic methane formation in terms of production amount and rate. Although granular activated carbon (GAC) demonstrated its applicability in facilitating DIET in methanogenesis, DIET in continuous flow anaerobic reactors has not been verified. Here, evidences of DIET via GAC were explored. The reactor supplemented with GAC showed 1.8-fold higher methane production rate than that without GAC (35.7 versus 20.1±7.1mL-CH4/d). Around 34% of methane formation was attributed to the biomass attached to GAC. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene demonstrated the enrichment of exoelectrogens (e.g. Geobacter) and hydrogenotrophic methanogens (e.g. Methanospirillum and Methanolinea) from the biomass attached to GAC. Furthermore, anodic and cathodic currents generation was observed in an electrochemical cell containing GAC biomass. Taken together, GAC supplementation created an environment for enriching the microorganisms involved in DIET, which increased the methane production rate. PMID:26836607

  11. Arrival time and magnitude of airborne fission products from the Fukushima, Japan, reactor incident as measured in Seattle, WA, USA

    CERN Document Server

    Leon, J Diaz; Knecht, A; Miller, M L; Robertson, R G H; Schubert, A G

    2011-01-01

    We report results of air monitoring started due to the recent natural catastrophe on March 11, 2011 in Japan and the severe ensuing damage to the Fukushima nuclear reactor complex. On March 17-18, 2011 we detected the first arrival of the airborne fission products 131-I, 132-I, 132-Te, 134-Cs, and 137-Cs in Seattle, WA, USA, by identifying their characteristic gamma rays using a germanium detector. The highest detected activity to date is <~32 mBq/m^3 of 131-I.

  12. Thermodynamic analysis of performance of steam methane reforming hydrogen production system connected with high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermodynamic analysis of performance of steam methane reforming hydrogen production system connected with High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor is presented, which provides a framework for further detailed research. Complete reaction model and equilibrium reaction model were developed. System efficiency and hydrogen output variation related to process parameters were researched. Limit value of performance index and optimum process parameter were determined. The comparison of equilibrium reaction model prediction to experimental data shows that the equilibrium reaction model is appropriate for preliminary analysis for the system. (authors)

  13. Numerical analysis of steam reformer of steam methane reforming hydrogen production system connected with high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to quantitatively analyze the performance of the helium-heated reformer used in steam methane reforming hydrogen production system connected with high temperature gas cooled reactor, a dynamic model has been set up based on one-dimension quasi-homogeneous phase model. And a computer program is development. Model verification is performed under steady state using test results of Japan Atomic Energy Institute. The steady state calculation results fit well with the experiment results. Reaction velocity is not the main factor influencing the performance. Reformer tube with finned central tube improves the performance remarkably comparing with smooth central tube. (authors)

  14. Molybdenum-99 production from reactor irradiation of molybdenum targets: a viable strategy for enhanced availability of technetium-99m.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, M R A; Knapp, F F Russ

    2012-08-01

    Fission-produced 99Mo (F 99Mo) is traditionally used for fabrication of 99Mo/99mTc alumina-based column generators. In this paper, several emerging strategies are discussed which are being pursued or have been suggested to overcome the continuing shortages of F 99Mo. In addition to the hopeful eventual success of these proposed new 99Mo and 99mTc production technologies, an additional attractive strategy is the alternative production and use of low specific activity (LSA) 99Mo. This strategy avoids fission and is accomplished by direct activation of molybdenum targets in nuclear reactors, which would preclude sole continued reliance on F 99Mo. The principal focus of this paper is a detailed discussion on the advantages and strategies for enhanced production of LSA 99Mo using an international network of research reactors. Several effective strategies are discussed to obtain 99mTc from LSA 99Mo as well as more efficient use of the alumina-based generator system. The delayed time period between 99Mo production and traditional 99Mo/99mTc alumina column generator manufacture and distribution to user sites results in the loss of more than 50% of 99Mo activity. Another strategy is a paradigm shift in the use of 99Mo by recovering clinical-grade 99mTc from 99Mo solution as an alternative to use of 99Mo/99mTc column generators, thereby avoiding substantial decreased availability of 99Mo from radioactive decay. Implementation of the suggested strategies would be expected to increase availability of 99mTc to the clinical user community by several fold. Additional important advantages for the use of LSA 99Mo include eliminating the need for fission product waste management and precluding proliferation concerns by phasing out the need for high (HEU)- and low (LEU)-enriched uranium targets required for F 99Mo production.

  15. Continuous Production of Structured Phospholipids in a Packed Red Reactor with Lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikbjerg, Anders Falk; Peng, Lifeng; Mu, Huiling;

    2005-01-01

    immobilized lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosa (Lipozyme TL IM) as catalyst. In the packed bed reactors, different parameters for the lipase-catalyzed acidolysis were elucidated such as solvent ratio (solvent system), temperature, substrate ratio, residence time, water content, and operation stability...... was favored by high substrate ratio between acyl donor and phospholipids, longer residence time, and higher reaction temperature. Under certain conditions, an incorporation of around 30% caprylic acid can be obtained in continuous operation with hexane as the solvent.......The possibilities of producing structured phospholipids by lipase-catalyzed acidolysis between soybean phospholipids and caprylic acid were examined in continuous packed bed enzyme reactors. Acidolysis reactions were performed in both a solvent system and a solvent-free system with the commercially...

  16. Design and installation of DC plasma reactor for SiC nanoparticle production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, I. K.; Rhee, J. H.; Cho, S.; Yoon, H. K.

    2009-04-01

    In order to get the high quality SiC nanopowders, a DC plasma reactor system with adjustable torch has been developed. SiC nanopowders were synthesized using this system and the synthesized primary particles have nearly spherical structures, mostly β-SiC phase with a particle size of 10-30 nm. Larger aggregate particles have been produced in our system probably due to longer particle growth times and faster collisions. The synthesized particles collected from the reactor wall and cyclone bottom have some free silicon and free carbon. To produce high quality silicon carbide nanopowders, it is highly necessary to improve the experimental conditions such as lower system pressures, shorter residence time, and higher quenching rates during powder synthesis.

  17. Process development of continuous hydrogen production by Enterobacter aerogenes in a packed column reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palazzi, E.; Fabiano, B.; Perego, P. [DICheP Chemical and Process Engineering Department ' ' G.B. Bonino' ' , University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy)

    2000-03-01

    Hydrogen bioproduction from agro-industrial residues by Enterobacter aerogenes in a continuous packed column has been investigated and a complete reactor characterization is presented. Experimental runs carried out at different residence time, liable of interest for industrial application, showed hydrogen yields ranging from 1.36 to 3.02 mmol{sub H2}mmol{sup -1}{sub glucose} or, in other words, from 37.5% to 75% of the theoretical hydrogen yield. A simple kinetic model of cell growth, validated by experimental results and allowing the prediction of biomass concentration profile along the reactor and the optimization of superficial velocity, is suggested. By applying the developed approach to the selected operative conditions, the identification of the optimum superficial velocity v{sub 0,opt} of about 2.2 cm h{sup -1} corresponding to the maximum hydrogen evolution rate H{sub 2g,max}, was performed. (orig.)

  18. Automatic Inspection of Nuclear-Reactor Tubes During Production and Processing, Using Eddy-Current Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibilities of automatic and semi-automatic inspection of tubes using eddy-current methods are described. The paper deals in particular with modem processes, compared to the use of other non-destructive methods. The essence of the paper is that the methods discussed are ideal for objective automatic inspection. Not only are the known methods described, but certain new methods and their application to the detection of flaws in reactor tubes are discussed. (author)

  19. Methane production by treating vinasses from hydrous ethanol using a modified UASB reactor

    OpenAIRE

    España-Gamboa Elda I; Mijangos-Cortés Javier O; Hernández-Zárate Galdy; Maldonado Jorge A Domínguez; Alzate-Gaviria Liliana M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background A modified laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor was used to obtain methane by treating hydrous ethanol vinasse. Vinasses or stillage are waste materials with high organic loads, and a complex composition resulting from the process of alcohol distillation. They must initially be treated with anaerobic processes due to their high organic loads. Vinasses can be considered multipurpose waste for energy recovery and once treated they can be used in ag...

  20. Integrated CFD Model for Nanoparticle Production in Inductively Coupled Plasma Reactor: Implementation and Application

    OpenAIRE

    Benros Santos Lopes, Silvania

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles represent a very exciting new area of research. Their small size, ranging from several nanometers to tens of nanometers, is responsible for many changes in the structural, thermal, electromagnetic, optical and mechanical properties in comparison with the bulk solid of the same materials. However, promoting the use of such material requires well-controlled synthesis techniques to be developed. Inductively coupled thermal plasma (ICTP) reactors have been shown to offer unique adva...

  1. Fluidized Bed Membrane Reactors for Ultra Pure H₂ Production--A Step forward towards Commercialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmi, Arash; Fernandez, Ekain; Melendez, Jon; Pacheco Tanaka, David Alfredo; Gallucci, Fausto; van Sint Annaland, Martin

    2016-03-19

    In this research the performance of a fluidized bed membrane reactor for high temperature water gas shift and its long term stability was investigated to provide a proof-of-concept of the new system at lab scale. A demonstration unit with a capacity of 1 Nm³/h of ultra-pure H₂ was designed, built and operated over 900 h of continuous work. Firstly, the performance of the membranes were investigated at different inlet gas compositions and at different temperatures and H₂ partial pressure differences. The membranes showed very high H₂ fluxes (3.89 × 10(-6) mol·m(-2)·Pa(-1)·s(-1) at 400 °C and 1 atm pressure difference) with a H₂/N₂ ideal perm-selectivity (up to 21,000 when integrating five membranes in the module) beyond the DOE 2015 targets. Monitoring the performance of the membranes and the reactor confirmed a very stable performance of the unit for continuous high temperature water gas shift under bubbling fluidization conditions. Several experiments were carried out at different temperatures, pressures and various inlet compositions to determine the optimum operating window for the reactor. The obtained results showed high hydrogen recovery factors, and very low CO concentrations at the permeate side (in average temperature PEM fuel cell.

  2. Fluidized Bed Membrane Reactors for Ultra Pure H₂ Production--A Step forward towards Commercialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmi, Arash; Fernandez, Ekain; Melendez, Jon; Pacheco Tanaka, David Alfredo; Gallucci, Fausto; van Sint Annaland, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this research the performance of a fluidized bed membrane reactor for high temperature water gas shift and its long term stability was investigated to provide a proof-of-concept of the new system at lab scale. A demonstration unit with a capacity of 1 Nm³/h of ultra-pure H₂ was designed, built and operated over 900 h of continuous work. Firstly, the performance of the membranes were investigated at different inlet gas compositions and at different temperatures and H₂ partial pressure differences. The membranes showed very high H₂ fluxes (3.89 × 10(-6) mol·m(-2)·Pa(-1)·s(-1) at 400 °C and 1 atm pressure difference) with a H₂/N₂ ideal perm-selectivity (up to 21,000 when integrating five membranes in the module) beyond the DOE 2015 targets. Monitoring the performance of the membranes and the reactor confirmed a very stable performance of the unit for continuous high temperature water gas shift under bubbling fluidization conditions. Several experiments were carried out at different temperatures, pressures and various inlet compositions to determine the optimum operating window for the reactor. The obtained results showed high hydrogen recovery factors, and very low CO concentrations at the permeate side (in average fuel cell. PMID:27007361

  3. A preliminary report on methods of measuring and reducing Argon-41 production by a TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods to accurately determine and techniques to reduce the Argon-41 released from the one-megawatt Geological Survey TRIGA Reactor facility have been developed. Knowledge of the composition of the exhaust-gas effluent is of prime importance to the U.S. Geological Survey in minimizing all radioactive releases to the environment. The counting systems and control measures have enabled the Geological Survey TRIGA Reactor staff to reduce the amount of Argon-41 released from the facility by a factor of two, with no reduction in operation level of the reactor. The counting system has also enabled the staff to categorize the principal sources of Argon-41. Under normal conditions, a fully-loaded rotating-specimen rack is by far the largest contributor. With the current counting system, 10-7 microcuries per cubic centimeter can be detected in the exhaust stack. It is intended to further improve this system to increase both the sensitivity and the reliability. The sensitivity is expected to be increased by utilizing a larger counting volume. To improve the reliability, it is planned to fabricate a loop parallel to the exhaust system, eliminating the need for a separate pump. (author)

  4. The Security of Russia's Nuclear Arsenal: The Human Factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, D.Y.

    1999-10-12

    Assertions by the Russian military that all of their nuclear weapons are secure against theft and that nuclear units within the military are somehow insulated from the problems plaguing the Russian military should not be accepted uncritically. Accordingly, we should not give unwarranted credence to the pronouncements of military figures like Cal.-Gen. Igor Valynkin, Chief of the Defense Ministry's 12th Main Directorate, which oversees the country's nuclear arsenal. He contends that ''Russian nuclear weapons are under reliable supervision'' and that ''talk about the unreliability of our control over nuclear weapons has only one pragmatic goal--to convince international society that the country is incapable of maintaining nuclear safety and to introduce international oversight over those weapons, as it is done, for example, in Iraq.'' While the comparison to Iraq is preposterous, many analysts might agree with Valynkin's sanguine appraisal of the security of Russia's nuclear weapons. In contrast, I argue that the numerous difficulties confronting the military as a whole should cause concern in the West over the security of the Russian nuclear arsenal.

  5. Effects of operational factors on soluble microbial products in a carrier anaerobic baffled reactor treating dilute wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Huajun; HU Lifang; SHAN Dan; FANG Chengran; HE Yonghua; SHEN Dongsheng

    2008-01-01

    The effects of feed strength,hydraulic residence time(HRT),and operational temperatures on soluble microbial product(SMP) production were investigated,to gain insights into the production mechanism.A carrier anaerobic batfled reactor (CABR) treating dilute wastewater was operated under a wide range of operational conditions,namely,feed strengths of 300-600 mg/L,HRTs of 9-18 h,and temperatures of 10-28℃.Generally, SMP production increased with increasing feed strength and decreasing temperature.At high temperature (28℃),SMP production increased with decreasing HRT. As the temperature Was decreased to 18 and 10℃.the SMP production was at its peak for 12 h HRT Therefore,temperature could be an important determinant of SMP production along with HRT. A higher SMP to soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) ratio Was found at high temperature and long HRT because of complete volatile fatty acid degradation.SMP accounted for 50%-75% of the SCOD in the last chamber of the CABR.As a secondary metabolite.some SMP could be consumed at lower feed strength.

  6. Hydrogen production by water dissociation from a nuclear reactor; Production d'hydrogene par dissociation de l'eau a partir d'un reacteur nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This memento presents the production of hydrogen by water decomposition, the energy needed for the electrolysis, the thermochemical cycles for a decomposition at low temperature and the possible nuclear reactors associated. (A.L.B.)

  7. Analysis of Fuel Temperature Reactivity Coefficients According to Burn-up and Pu-239 Production in CANDU Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resonances for some kinds of nuclides such as U-238 and Pu-239 are not easy to be accurately processed. In addition, the Pu-239 productions from burnup are also significant in CANDU, where the natural uranium is used as a fuel. In this study, the FTCs were analyzed from the viewpoints of the resonance self-shielding methodology and Pu-239 build-up. The lattice burnup calculations were performed using the TRITON module in the SCALE6 code system, and the BONAMI module was executed to obtain self-shielded cross sections using the Bondarenko approach. Two libraries, ENDF/B-VI.8 and ENDF/B-VII.0, were used to compare the Pu-239 effect on FTC, since the ENDF/B-VII has updated the Pu-239 cross section data. The FTCs of the CANDU reactor were newly analyzed using the TRITON module in the SCALE6 code system, and the BONAMI module was executed to apply the Bondarenko approach for self-shielded cross sections. When compared with some reactor physics codes resulting in slightly positive FTC in the specific region, the FTCs evaluated in this study showed a clear negativity over the entire fuel temperature range on fresh/equilibrium fuel. In addition, the FTCs at 960.15 K were slightly negative during the entire burnup. The effects on FTCs from the library difference between ENDF/B-VI.8 and ENDF/B-VII.0 are recognized to not be large; however, they appear more positive when more Pu-239 productions with burnup are considered. This feasibility study needs an additional benchmark evaluation for FTC calculations, but it can be used as a reference for a new FTC analysis in CANDU reactors

  8. An Analysis of Methanol and Hydrogen Production via High-Temperature Electrolysis Using the Sodium Cooled Advanced Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Richard D. Boardman; Robert S. Cherry; Wesley R. Deason; Michael G. McKellar

    2014-03-01

    Integration of an advanced, sodium-cooled fast spectrum reactor into nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) architectures is the focus of the present study. A techno-economic evaluation of several conceptual system designs was performed for the integration of a sodium-cooled Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR) with the electric grid in conjunction with wind-generated electricity. Cases in which excess thermal and electrical energy would be reapportioned within an integrated energy system to a chemical plant are presented. The process applications evaluated include hydrogen production via high temperature steam electrolysis and methanol production via steam methane reforming to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen which feed a methanol synthesis reactor. Three power cycles were considered for integration with the AFR, including subcritical and supercritical Rankine cycles and a modified supercritical carbon dioxide modified Brayton cycle. The thermal efficiencies of all of the modeled power conversions units were greater than 40%. A thermal efficiency of 42% was adopted in economic studies because two of the cycles either performed at that level or could potentially do so (subcritical Rankine and S-CO2 Brayton). Each of the evaluated hybrid architectures would be technically feasible but would demonstrate a different internal rate of return (IRR) as a function of multiple parameters; all evaluated configurations showed a positive IRR. As expected, integration of an AFR with a chemical plant increases the IRR when “must-take” wind-generated electricity is added to the energy system. Additional dynamic system analyses are recommended to draw detailed conclusions on the feasibility and economic benefits associated with AFR-hybrid energy system operation.

  9. Research Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published in English and in French, this large report first proposes an overview of the use and history of research nuclear reactors. It discusses their definition, and presents the various types of research reactors which can be either related to nuclear power (critical mock-ups, material test reactors, safety test reactors, training reactors, prototypes), or to research (basic research, industry, health), or to specific particle physics phenomena (neutron diffraction, isotope production, neutron activation, neutron radiography, semiconductor doping). It reports the history of the French research reactors by distinguishing the first atomic pile (ZOE), and the activities and achievements during the fifties, the sixties and the seventies. It also addresses the development of instrumentation for research reactors (neutron, thermal, mechanical and fission gas release measurements). The other parts of the report concern the validation of neutronics calculations for different reactors (the EOLE water critical mock-up, the MASURCA air critical mock-up dedicated to fast neutron reactor study, the MINERVE water critical mock-up, the CALIBAN pulsed research reactor), the testing of materials under irradiation (OSIRIS reactor, laboratories associated with research reactors, the Jules Horowitz reactor and its experimental programs and related devices, irradiation of materials with ion beams), the investigation of accident situations (on the CABRI, Phebus, Silene and Jules Horowitz reactors). The last part proposes a worldwide overview of research reactors

  10. A simplified Probabilistic Safety Assesment of a Steam-Methane Reforming Hydrogen Production Plant coupled to a High-Temperature Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson Edelstein, Pamela; Flores Flores, Alain; Francois Lacouture, Juan Luis

    2005-01-01

    A Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is being developed for a steam-methane reforming hydrogen production plant linked to a High-Temperature Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor (HTGR). This work is based on the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute’s (JAERI) High Temperature Test Reactor (HTTR) prototype in Japan. This study has two major objectives: calculate the risk to onsite and offsite individuals, and calculate the frequency of different types of damage to the complex. A simplified HAZOP...

  11. Using high temperature gas-cooled reactors for greenhouse gas reduction and energy neutral production of phosphate fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We estimate the energy requirements of wet- and thermal phosphate rock processing. • We estimate the amount of U needed to operate a representative HTGR. • Energy neutral phosphate fertilizer production is theoretically possible. - Abstract: This paper discusses how high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) could provide energy for phosphate rock (PR) processing while extracting uranium (U) from the processed PR that can again be used as raw material for nuclear reactor fuel that may power the greenhouse gas lean energy source employed. First estimates using a HTGR presently constructed in China (HTR-PM) conclude that a concentration of approximately 80 mg/kg U in PR is sufficiently high for energy neutral wet acid PR processing with waste treatment and a concentration of approximately 110 mg/kg U is adequate to promote energy intensive high quality thermal phosphoric acid production. In addition, the recovery of U from PRs yields beneficial side-effects in a way that U loads on agricultural soils are reduced and consequently contamination of groundwater with U will be diminished

  12. High-Rate Anaerobic Side-Stream Reactor (ASSR) Processes to Minimize the Production of Excess Sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul; Chon, Dong-Hyun

    2015-12-01

    High-rate anaerobic side-stream reactor (ASSR) processes were developed to minimize excess sludge production during wastewater treatment. New ASSRs were operated in 2.5-day solids retention time (SRT), much shorter than 10-day SRT used by the commercial sludge reduction process. The 2.5-day was selected based on literature review and preliminary studies, showing that maximum solublization of key floc components, such as divalent cations, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and protease, occur within 2 to 3 days of anaerobic digestion. The laboratory reactor study showed that 2.5-day ASSR systems produced approximately 60 and 20% less sludge than the control (no ASSR) and the 10-day ASSR, respectively. The experimental systems showed acceptable effluent quality, despite minimal sludge wastage. This was possible because sludge EPS were continuously released/degraded and regenerated as sludge underwent recirculation between ASSR and the aerobic basin. The results supported that the activated sludge process incorporating small ASSRs significantly decrease the production of excess sludge during wastewater treatment.

  13. Effect of continuously dosing Cu(II) on pollutant removal and soluble microbial products in a sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, YangWei; Wang, YuWen; Liu, Yan; Liu, Xiang; Yao, ChenChao; Ma, LuMing

    2015-01-01

    The effects of synthetic wastewater that contained 20 mg/L Cu(II) on the removal of organic pollutants in a sequencing batch reactor were investigated. Results of continuous 20 mg/L Cu(II) exposure for 120 days demonstrated that the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency decreased to 42% initially, followed by a subsequent gradual recovery, which peaked at 78% by day 97. Effluent volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration contributed 67 to 89% of the influent COD in the experimental reactor, which indicated that the degradation of the organic substances ceased at the VFA production step. Meanwhile, the varieties of soluble microbial products (SMP) content and main components (protein, polysaccharide, and DNA) were discussed to reveal the response of activated sludge to the toxicity of 20 mg/L Cu(II). The determination of Cu(II) concentrations in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and SMP throughout the experiment indicated an inverse relationship between extracellular Cu(II) concentration and COD removal efficiency. PMID:26524458

  14. The Phase Behavior Effect on the Reaction Engineering of Transesterification Reactions and Reactor Design for Continuous Biodiesel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csernica, Stephen N.

    transitions from two phases to a single phase, or pseudo-single phase. The transition to a single phase or pseudo-single phase is a function of the methanol content. Regardless, the maximum observed reaction rate occurs at the point of the phase transition, when the concentration of triglycerides in the methanol phase is largest. The phase transition occurs due to the accumulation of the primary product, biodiesel methyl esters. Through various experiments, it was determined that the rate of the triglyceride mass transfer into the methanol phase, as well as the solubility of triglycerides in methanol, increases with increasing methyl ester concentration. Thus, there exists some critical methyl ester concentration which favors the formation of a single or pseudo-single phase system. The effect of the by-product glycerol on the reaction kinetics was also investigated. It was determined that at low methanol to triglyceride molar ratios, glycerol acts to inhibit the reaction rate and limit the overall triglyceride conversion. This occurs because glycerol accumulates in the methanol phase, i.e. the primary reaction volume. When glycerol is at relatively high concentrations within the methanol phase, triglycerides become excluded from the reaction volume. This greatly reduces the reaction rate and limits the overall conversion. As the concentration of methanol is increased, glycerol becomes diluted and the inhibitory effects become dampened. Assuming pseudo-homogeneous phase behavior, a simple kinetic model incorporating the inhibitory effects of glycerol was proposed based on batch reactor data. The kinetic model was primarily used to theoretically compare the performance of different types of continuous flow reactors for continuous biodiesel production. It was determined that the inhibitory effects of glycerol result in the requirement of very large reactor volumes when using continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR). The reactor volume can be greatly reduced using tubular style

  15. Entropy production in a chemical system involving an autocatalytic reaction in an isothermal, continuous stirred tank reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Nobuo

    1990-02-01

    The rate of entropy production due to chemical reaction is calculated for various combinations of parameter values in the cubic autocatalator model in an isothermal, continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) proposed by Gray and Scott and by Escher and Ross. Values of the entropy production averaged over periods of limit cycle oscillations are compared with those in coexistent unstable stationary states. It is found that in ranges of the residence time over which there are limit cycles, the entropy production in coexisting stationary states increases as the residence time is shortened, i.e., as the system is removed farther from thermodynamic equilibrium. The average entropy production over a limit cycle is less than that in the corresponding stationary state over wide ranges of parameter values, but not necessarily for the whole oscillatory region. More specifically, the former inequality always prevails in ranges where the entropy production of stationary states is larger, i.e., the residence time is shorter, but in some cases the inequality is reversed in ranges of lower magnitudes of the entropy production.

  16. La salud y la enfermedad en el Real Hospital de la Armada del Arsenal de la Carraca (1756-1821)

    OpenAIRE

    J.M. García-Cubillana de la Cruz

    2015-01-01

    En el primer cuarto del siglo XVIII se crea el Arsenal de la Carraca, considerado como el principal astillero de la Armada Española. La masiva llegada de operarios civiles y militares ante la oferta de trabajo, motivó un problema asistencial sanitario, que se solventó a través de una improvisada enfermería de madera y otros hospitales provisionales instalados en la Isla de León. Finalmente, en 1756 se pudo fundar el «Real Hospital del Arsenal de la Carraca». Este nosocomio tuvo un papel cruci...

  17. History and Actual State of Non-HEU Fission-Based Mo-99 Production with Low-Performance Research Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dittrich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty years ago, one of the worldwide first industrial production processes to produce fission-Mo-99 for medical use had been started at ZfK Rossendorf (now: HZDR, Germany. On the occasion of this anniversary, it is worth to mention that this original process (called LITEMOL now together with its target concept used at that time can still be applied. LITEMOL can be adapted very easily to various research reactors and applied at each site, which maybe still of interest for very small-scale producers. Besides this original process, two further and actually proven processes are suitable as well and recommended for small-scale LEU fission Mo-99 production also. They are known under the names KSA/KSS COMPACT and ROMOL LITE and will be described below.

  18. Production of specifically structured lipids by enzymatic interesterification in a pilot enzyme bed reactor: process optimization by response surface methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Xuebing; Mu, Huiling; Høy, Carl-Erik;

    1999-01-01

    °C; substrate ratio, 5.5; and water content, 0.1%. The production of diacylglycerols was not well correlated with any of the parameters and the yield generally decreased with the experimental sequence. This was due to the stoichiometric water in the substrate mixture in the packed enzyme bed being......Pilot production of specifically structured lipids by Lipozyme IM-catalyzed interesterification was carried out in a continuous enzyme bed reactor without the use of solvent. Medium chain triacylglycerols and oleic acid were used as model substrates. Response surface methodology was applied...... was not identical for the sequential experiments in the same enzyme bed due to the deactivation of the Lipozyme IM. Therefore, the results were normalized based on enzyme deactivation models. Well-fitting quadratic models were obtained after normalizing the data for the incorporation of oleic acid...

  19. Hydrogen production by steam reforming of higher hydrocarbons in a novel circulating fluidized bed reactor-regenerator system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z.; Elnashaie, S.; Yan, Y. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Chemcial Engineering

    2003-07-01

    A mathematical model was developed to demonstrate the production of hydrogen by steam reforming of higher hydrocarbons in a circulating fluidized bed reactor-regenerator system (CFBRR). Heptane was the higher hydrocarbon used in this study. The process simulation of the riser steam reformer, catalyst regenerator, and downer indicate that the impact of catalyst deactivation is negligible because of the large mass flow ratio of solid to gas stream and the catalyst regenerator. The carbon deposited on the catalyst can be either gasified efficiently in the steam reformer or burned with air in the catalyst regenerator. The burning of carbon on the catalyst supplies the heat required for endothermic steam reforming of heptane and methane. This method has potential advantages for both energy consumption as well as hydrogen production.

  20. Lipozyme IM-catalyzed interesterification for the production of margarine fats in a 1 kg scale stirred tank reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hong; Xu, Xuebing; Mu, Huiling;

    2000-01-01

    Lipozyme IM-catalyzed interesterification of the oil blend between palm stearin and coconut oil (75/25 w/w) was studied for the production of margarine fats in a 1 kg scale batch stirred tank reactor. Parameters such as lipase load, water content, temperature, and reaction time were investigated...... interesterification. A Lipozyme IM load of 6% was required for a reaction of 6 h and at 60 °C, to reach a stable degree of interesterification. Temperature variation in the range of 50–75 °C did not affect the reaction degree as well as the contents of diacylglycerols, but the content of FFA slightly increased with...... higher temperature. Addition of water to the enzyme increased the contents of diacylglycerols and FFA in the products linearly. However, it had no effect on the degree of interesterification for the first batch when the enzyme was reused. Lipozyme IM was stable in the 10-batch test after adjusting the...

  1. Modeling of an immobilized lipase tubular reactor for the production of glycerol and fatty acids from oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in the design of a bioreactor in the fats and oils industry have permitted the hydrolysis of triglycerides in mild conditions and improved productivity while avoiding the formation of unwanted byproducts. The present work develops a mathematical model that describes the hydrolytic activity of a tubular reactor with immobilized lipases for the production of glycerol and fatty acids from the oil trade. Runge Kuttas numerical method of high order has been applied, considering that there is no accumulation of the substratum in the surface of the membrane, where the enzyme is. At the same time, different equations based on the kinetic model of Michaelis Mentens and the Ping-Pong bi-bi mechanism were examined. Experimental data in discontinuous systems are the basis for the development of the quantitative mathematical model that was used to simulate the process computationally. The obtained results allow for optimizing both the operative variables and the economic aspects of industrial processes. (Author)

  2. The economic and community impacts of closing Hanford's N Reactor and nuclear materials production facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, M.J.; Belzer, D.B.; Nesse, R.J.; Schultz, R.W.; Stokowski, P.A.; Clark, D.C.

    1987-08-01

    This study discusses the negative economic impact on local cities and counties and the State of Washington of a permanent closure of nuclear materials production at the Hanford Site, located in the southeastern part of the state. The loss of nuclear materials production, the largest and most important of the five Department of Energy (DOE) missions at Hanford, could occur if Hanford's N Reactor is permanently closed and not replaced. The study provides estimates of statewide and local losses in jobs, income, and purchases from the private sector caused by such an event; it forecasts impacts on state and local government finances; and it describes certain local community and social impacts in the Tri-Cities (Richland, Kennewick, and Pasco) and surrounding communities. 33 refs., 8 figs., 22 tabs.

  3. TRANCS, a computer code for calculating fission product release from high temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the calculation procedure of the TRANCS code, which deals with fission product transport in fuel rod of high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). The fundamental equation modeled in the code is a cylindrical one-dimensional diffusion equation with generation and decay terms, and the non-stationary solution of the equation is obtained numerically by a finite difference method. The generation terms consist of the diffusional release from coated fuel particles, recoil release from outer-most coating layer of the fuel particle and generation due to contaminating uranium in the graphite matrix of the fuel compact. The decay term deals with neutron capture as well as beta decay. Factors affecting the computation error has been examined, and further extention of the code has been discussed in the fields of radial transport of fission products from graphite sleeve into coolant helium gas and axial transport in the fuel rod. (author)

  4. Fluid-dynamic characterization of real-scale raceway reactors for microalgae production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fluid dynamic characterization of a 100 m length × 1 m wide channel raceway photobioreactor was carried out. The effects of water depth, liquid velocity and the presence, or absence, of sump baffles to improve the CO2 supply transfer were considered in relation to on the power consumption, residence time and mixing in the reactor was studied. When operated at a depth of 20 cm, the power consumption was between 1.5 and 8.4 W m−3 depending on the forward velocity, with higher values occurring when the baffle was in place. Residence times and the degree of mixing at each section of the raceway (paddlewheel, bends, channels and sump) were measured experimentally. Mixing occurred mainly in the sump, paddlewheel and bends, with a maximum dispersion coefficient of 0.07 m2 s−1. These sections, however, only contributed a small fraction to the total volume of the raceway. Bodenstein numbers from 200 to 540 for the channel sections indicated plug-flow characteristics. Mixing times ranged from 1.4 to 6 h, with the presence of the baffle greatly increasing these times despite higher specific power consumption. A total of 15–20 circuits of the raceway were needed to achieve complete mixing without the baffle, compared to 30–40 cycles with the baffle. Vertical mixing was very poor whereas axial mixing was similar to that achieved in closed photobioreactors. The methodologies applied were shown to be useful in determining the fluid dynamics of a raceway photobioreactor. Equations useful in simulating the power consumption as a function of the design and operation parameters have been validated. -- Highlights: •Power consumption due to accessories can limit the use of raceway reactors for energy purposes. •Use of baffle to enhance mass transfer dramatically increases the power consumption in this type of photobioreactors. •High mixing time, in the order of hours, in raceway reactors limits the operation mode of these systems

  5. Biomethane production from vinasse in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors inoculated with granular sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Valciney Gomes de; Duda, Rose Maria; Oliveira, Roberto Alves de

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the anaerobic conversion of vinasse into biomethane with gradual increase in organic loading rate (OLR) in two upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors, R1 and R2, with volumes of 40.5 and 21.5L in the mesophilic temperature range. The UASB reactors were operated for 230 days with a hydraulic detection time (HDT) of 2.8d (R1) and 2.8-1.8d (R2). The OLR values applied in the reactors were 0.2-7.5gtotalCOD (Ld)(-1) in R1 and 0.2-11.5gtotalCOD (Ld)(-1) in R2. The average total chemical oxygen demand (totalCOD) removal efficiencies ranged from 49% to 82% and the average conversion efficiencies of the removed totalCOD into methane were 48-58% in R1 and 39-65% in R2. The effluent recirculation was used for an OLR above 6gtotalCOD (Ld)(-1) in R1 and 8gtotalCOD (Ld)(-1) in R2 and was able to maintain the pH of the influent in R1 and R2 in the range from 6.5 to 6.8. However, this caused a decrease for 53-39% in the conversion efficiency of the removed totalCOD into methane in R2 because of the increase in the recalcitrant COD in the influent. The largest methane yield values were 0.181 and 0.185 (L) CH4 (gtotalCOD removed)(-1) in R1 and R2, respectively. These values were attained after 140 days of operation with an OLR of 5.0-7.5gtotalCOD (Ld)(-1) and totalCOD removal efficiencies around 70 and 80%. PMID:27289246

  6. Phospholipase C-catalyzed sphingomyelin hydrolysis in a membrane reactor for ceramide production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Long; Liang, Shanshan; Hellgren, Lars;

    2008-01-01

    of sphingomyelin has been proven to be a feasible method to produce ceramide. In the membrane reactor constructed, the aqueous phase and the organic phase were separated by a membrane containing the immobilized enzyme, while the organic phasewas continuously circulated. Among the 10 selected membranes, the enzyme...... immobilized in membrane RC 70PP had low immobilization efficiency, but retained the highest catalytic activity. Three immobilization methods, i.e. filtration (adsorption/entrapment), covalent binding, and cross-linking, were compared. The enzyme immobilized by filtration had the highest activity even under...

  7. Continuous glycerolysis in an immobilized enzyme packed reactor for industrial monoacylglycerol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and sunflower oil dissolved in a binary tert-butanol:tert-pentanol medium. Practical design-related issues such as required reaction time, enzyme capacity, expansion of the enzyme during wetting, and the effect of different column length-to-diameter ratios, fluid velocities and particle sizes of the enzymes....... In spite of optimal reaction conditions a complex heterogeneous reactant mixture with a glycerol in oil emulsion occurs. Hence, the movement of material from phase to phase as well as through the catalyst pores becomes important since it can influence the performance of the immobilized enzyme reactor...

  8. Production of high FFA Jatropa curcas oil biodiesel using oscillatory flow reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Supriyono, S.; Dias, J. M. M.; Dragone, Giuliano; Sulistyo, H.

    2013-01-01

    Jatropa Curcas is one of the most feasible sources for biodiesel feedstock. Some advantages of Jatropa curcas oil are non edible, growing in arid soil, and high oil yield from their seed, while it’s disadvantage is tend to oxidized and form high Free Fatty Acid (FFA) due to the oil composition. Oscillatory Flow Reactor is useful when reaction should performed for a long time in a turbulence flow, the other advantage is OFR have a compact size because substantially smaller length to diameter r...

  9. Integration of a turbine expander with an exothermic reactor loop--Flow sheet development and application to ammonia production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the direct integration of a gas turbine power cycle with an ammonia synthesis loop. Such a loop represents a typical reactor-separator system with a recycle stream and cold separation of the product from the recycle loop. The hot reaction products are expanded directly instead of raising steam in a waste heat boiler to drive a steam turbine. Two new combined power and chemicals production flow sheets are developed for the process. The flow sheets are simulated using the flow sheet simulator AspenPlus (licensed by Aspen Technology, Inc.) and compared to a simulated conventional ammonia synthesis loop. The comparison is based on energy as well as exergy analysis. It was found that the pressure ratio over the turbine expander plays an important role in optimisation of an integrated system, specifically due to the process comprising an equilibrium reaction. The inlet temperature to the reactor changes with changing pressure ratio, which in turn determines the conversion and consequently the heat of reaction that is available to produce power. In terms of the minimum work requirement per kg of product a 75% improvement over the conventional process could be obtained. The work penalty due to refrigeration needed for separation was also accounted for. Furthermore this integrated flow sheet also resulted in a decrease in exergy loss and the loss was more evenly distributed between the various unit operations. A detailed exergy analysis over the various unit operations proved to be useful in explaining the overall differences in exergy loss between the flow sheets

  10. Tritium analysis of fusion-based hydrogen production reactor FDS-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dynamic subsystem model of tritium fuel cycle for the FDS-III was developed, and the required minimum tritium supply for reactor startup and the doubling time for tritium breeding were calculated by using the Tritium Analysis Software (TAS). Some factors which would affect the tritium supply and doubling time were considered, such as the tritium fractional burnup in the plasma, tritium breeding ratio (TBR), the residence time of tritium in all subsystems, and tritium decay, etc. The results showed that the minimum tritium supply for startup was sensitive with the tritium fractional burnup in the plasma, but the effect of the TBR could be neglected. The double time for tritium breeding strongly depended on the TBR and the tritium fractional burnup. Based on the model, the analysis results predicted that the required initial minimum tritium supply was ∼9.9 kg for startup. After one year's operation, the total tritium inventory in fuel cycle system was ∼33 kg. And the total tritium release into environment was ∼4 mg, which was much lower than the allow level, i.e. 1 g-T/year. The tritium in fuel storage system would be doubled and could be extracted to supply for the other fusion power reactor's startup after ∼886 days operation.

  11. Tritium analysis of fusion-based hydrogen production reactor FDS-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Yong, E-mail: ysong@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Huang Qunying [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Ni Muyi [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China)

    2010-12-15

    A dynamic subsystem model of tritium fuel cycle for the FDS-III was developed, and the required minimum tritium supply for reactor startup and the doubling time for tritium breeding were calculated by using the Tritium Analysis Software (TAS). Some factors which would affect the tritium supply and doubling time were considered, such as the tritium fractional burnup in the plasma, tritium breeding ratio (TBR), the residence time of tritium in all subsystems, and tritium decay, etc. The results showed that the minimum tritium supply for startup was sensitive with the tritium fractional burnup in the plasma, but the effect of the TBR could be neglected. The double time for tritium breeding strongly depended on the TBR and the tritium fractional burnup. Based on the model, the analysis results predicted that the required initial minimum tritium supply was {approx}9.9 kg for startup. After one year's operation, the total tritium inventory in fuel cycle system was {approx}33 kg. And the total tritium release into environment was {approx}4 mg, which was much lower than the allow level, i.e. 1 g-T/year. The tritium in fuel storage system would be doubled and could be extracted to supply for the other fusion power reactor's startup after {approx}886 days operation.

  12. Use of Glucose Oxidase in a Membrane Reactor for Gluconic Acid Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Neves, Luiz Carlos Martins; Vitolo, Michele

    This article aims at the evaluation of the catalytic performance of glucose oxidase (GO) (EC.1.1.3.4) for the glucose/gluconic acid conversion in the ultrafiltration cell type membrane reactor (MB-CSTR). The reactor was coupled with a Millipore ultrafiltration-membrane (cutoff of 100 kDa) and operated for 24 h under agitation of 100 rpm, pH 5.5, and 30°C. The experimental conditions varied were the glucose concentration (2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 20.0, and 40.0 mM), the feeding rate (0.5, 1.0, 3.0, and 6.0/h), dissolved oxygen (8.0 and 16.0 mg/L), GO concentration (2.5, 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 UGO/mL), and the glucose oxidase/catalase activity ratio (UGO/UCAT)(1∶0, 1∶10, 1∶20, and 1∶30). A conversion yield of 80% and specific reaction rate of 40×10-4 mmol/h·UGO were attained when the process was carried out under the following conditions: D=3.0/h, dissolved oxygen=16.0 mg/L, [G]=40 mM, and (UGO/UCAT)=1∶20. A simplified model for explaining the inhibition of GO activity by hydrogen peroxide, formed during the glucose/gluconic acid conversion, was presented.

  13. Development of Alloy 718 tubular product for nuclear-reactor internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Upper Internals Structure (UIS) of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) provides mixing and flow direction of the core outlet flow. Alloy 718 tubes are the major components used in the UIS to provide this flow direction. The UIS is located directly above the reactor core and is exposed to a severe environment. This environment consists of high temperature sodium, alternating temperatures induced by mixing high temperature core assembly outlet flow with cooler core assembly outlet flow and rapid changes in temperature of the core outlet flow. The paper presents the UIS configuration, functions and environmental conditions that led to the selection of Alloy 718 as the material used to protect the basic UIS structure and to provide flow direction. The use of Alloy 718 is derived from the technology produced from the Department of Energy sponsored development programs. Alloy 718 tubes are made by a roll-extrusion process. The paper describes the tube fabrication process, the development of a finish sanding procedure and the results of high temperature thermal cycle testing. The high temperature thermal cycle testing generates peak strains on the metal surfaces, where the surface effects have a maximum influence on the fatigue strength. 9 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow, Picatinny Arsenal and vicinity, Morris County, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, L.M.; Rice, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water flow in glacial sediments and bedrock at Picatinny Arsenal, N.J., was simulated by use of a three-dimensional finite-difference ground- water-flow model. The modeled area includes a 4.3-square-mile area that extends from Picatinny Lake to the Rockaway River. Most of the study area is bounded by the natural hydrologic boundaries of the ground-water system. eophysical logs, lithologic logs, particle-size data, and core data from selected wells and surface geophysical data were analyzed to define the hydrogeologic framework. Hydrogeologic sections and thickness maps define six permeable and three low-permeability layers that are represented in the model as aquifers and confining units, respectively. Hydrologic data incorporated in the model include a rate of recharge from precipitation of 22 inches per year, estimated from long-term precipitation records and estimates of evapotranspiration. Additional recharge from infiltration along valleys was estimated from measured discharge of springs along the adjacent valley walls and from estimates of runoff from upland drainage that flows to the valley floor. Horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities of permeable and low-permeability layers were estimated from examination of aquifer-test data, gamma-ray logs, borehole cuttings, and previously published data. Horizontal hydraulic conductivities in glacial sediments range from 10 to 380 feet per day. Vertical hydraulic conductivities of the low-permeability layers range from 0.01 to 0.7 feet per day. The model was calibrated by simulating steady-state conditions during 1989-93 and by closely matching simulated and measured ground-water levels, vertical ground-water-head differences, and streamflow gain and loss. Simulated steady-state potentiometric- surface maps produced for the six permeable layers indicate that ground water in the unconfined material within Picatinny Arsenal flows predominantly toward the center of the valley, where it discharges to Green

  15. Production and packaging of a biological arsenal: Evolution of centipede venoms under morphological constraint

    OpenAIRE

    Undheim, Eivind A.B.; Hamilton, Brett R.; Kurniawan, Nyoman D.; Bowlay, Greg; Cribb, Bronwen W.; Merritt, David J.; Fry, Bryan G; Glenn F. King; Venter, Deon J.

    2015-01-01

    Venom peptides have attracted considerable attention because of their value as pharmacological tools and their potential for development as novel pharmaceuticals and bioinsecticides. There is also a growing interest in venoms as model evolutionary systems, particularly for understanding antagonistic coevolutionary processes. We previously demonstrated that although centipede venoms are rich in novel proteins and peptides, there are considerable differences in venom complexity between high-ord...

  16. Continuous production of cyclodextrins in an ultrafiltration membrane reactor, catalyzed by cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Bacillus circulans DF 9R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Gastón, Jorgelina A; Costa, Hernán; Ferrarotti, Susana A

    2015-01-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are cyclic oligosaccharides of wide industrial application, whose synthesis is catalyzed by Cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase) from starch. Here, CDs were produced using CGTase from Bacillus circulans DF 9R in continuous process and an ultrafiltration membrane reactor. The batch process was conducted as a control. This method allowed increasing the yield from 40 to 55.6% and the productivity from 26.1 to 99.5 mg of CD per unit of enzyme. The method also allowed obtaining a high-purity product. The flow rate remained at 50% of its initial value after 24 h of process, improving the results described in the literature for starch hydrolysis processes. CGTase remained active throughout the process, which could be explained by the protective effect of the substrate and reaction products on CGTase stability. In addition, batch processes were developed using starches from different sources. We concluded that any of the starches studied could be used as substrate for CD production with similar yields and product specificity.

  17. Life cycle assessment of hydrogen production from S-I thermochemical process coupled to a high temperature gas reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraldi, M. R.; Francois, J. L.; Castro-Uriegas, D. [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Paseo Cuauhnahuac No. 8532, Col. Progreso, C.P. 62550, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to quantify the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated to the hydrogen produced by the sulfur-iodine thermochemical process, coupled to a high temperature nuclear reactor, and to compare the results with other life cycle analysis (LCA) studies on hydrogen production technologies, both conventional and emerging. The LCA tool was used to quantify the impacts associated with climate change. The product system was defined by the following steps: (i) extraction and manufacturing of raw materials (upstream flows), (U) external energy supplied to the system, (iii) nuclear power plant, and (iv) hydrogen production plant. Particular attention was focused to those processes where there was limited information from literature about inventory data, as the TRISO fuel manufacture, and the production of iodine. The results show that the electric power, supplied to the hydrogen plant, is a sensitive parameter for GHG emissions. When the nuclear power plant supplied the electrical power, low GHG emissions were obtained. These results improve those reported by conventional hydrogen production methods, such as steam reforming. (authors)

  18. High temperature fast reactor for hydrogen production in Brazil; Reator nuclear rapido de altissima temperatura para producao de hidrogenio no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Jamil A. do; Ono, Shizuca; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA-IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Estudos Avancados]. E-mail: jamil@ieav.cta.br

    2008-07-01

    The main nuclear reactors technology for the Generation IV, on development phase for utilization after 2030, is the fast reactor type with high temperature output to improve the efficiency of the thermo-electric conversion process and to enable applications of the generated heat in industrial process. Currently, water electrolysis and thermo chemical cycles using very high temperature are studied for large scale and long-term hydrogen production, in the future. With the possible oil scarcity and price rise, and the global warming, this application can play an important role in the changes of the world energy matrix. In this context, it is proposed a fast reactor with very high output temperature, {approx} 1000 deg C. This reactor will have a closed fuel cycle; it will be cooled by lead and loaded with nitride fuel. This reactor may be used for hydrogen, heat and electricity production in Brazil. It is discussed a development strategy of the necessary technologies and some important problems are commented. The proposed concept presents characteristics that meet the requirements of the Generation IV reactor class. (author)

  19. Secondary charged particle activation method for measuring the tritium production rate in the breeding blankets of a fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovni, Istvan, E-mail: rovni@reak.bme.hu [Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME), Institute of Nuclear Techniques, 1111 Muegyetem rkp. 3-9 (Hungary); Szieberth, Mate; Feher, Sandor [Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME), Institute of Nuclear Techniques, 1111 Muegyetem rkp. 3-9 (Hungary)

    2012-10-21

    In this work, a new passive technique has been developed for measuring the tritium production rate in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) test blanket modules. This method is based on the secondary charged particle activation, in which the irradiated sample contains two main components: a tritium producing target ({sup 6}Li or {sup 7}Li) and an indicator nuclide, which has a relatively high cross-section for an incoming tritium particle (triton). During the neutron irradiation, the target produces a triton, which has sufficiently high energy to cause the so-called secondary charged particle activation on an indicator nuclide. If the product of this reaction is a radioactive nuclide, its activity must be proportional to the amount of generated tritium. A comprehensive set of irradiations were performed at the Training Reactor of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics. The following charged particle reactions were observed and investigated: {sup 27}Al(t,p){sup 29}Al; {sup 26}Mg(t,p){sup 28}Mg; {sup 26}Mg(t,n){sup 28}Al; {sup 32}S(t,n){sup 34m}Cl; {sup 16}O(t,n){sup 18}F; and {sup 18}O(t,{alpha}){sup 17}N. The optimal atomic ratio of the indicator elements and {sup 6}Li was also investigated. The reaction rates were estimated using calculations with the MCNPX Monte Carlo particle transport code. The trend of the measured and the simulated data are in good agreement, although accurate data for triton induced reaction cross-sections cannot be found in the literature. Once the technique is calibrated with a reference LSC (Liquid Scintillation Counting) measurement, a new passive method becomes available for tritium production rate measurements.

  20. Biomethane production and microbial community response according to influent concentration of molasses wastewater in a UASB reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jeonghee; Lee, Sang Don; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the interaction between methane production performance and active microbial community dynamics at different loading rates by increasing influent substrate concentration. The model system was an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor using molasses wastewater. The active microbial community was analyzed using a ribosomal RNA-based approach in order to reflect active members in the UASB system. The methane production rate (MPR) increased with an increase in organic loading rate (OLR) from 3.6 to 5.5 g COD·L(-1)·day(-1) and then it decreased with further OLR addition until 9.7 g COD·L(-1)·day(-1). The UASB reactor achieved a maximum methane production rate of 0.48 L·L(-1)·day(-1) with a chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency of 91.2 % at an influent molasses concentration of 16 g COD·L(-1) (OLR of 5.5 g COD·L(-1)·day(-1)). In the archaeal community, Methanosarcina was predominant irrespective of loading rate, and the relative abundance of Methanosaeta increased with loading rate. In the bacterial community, Firmicutes and Eubacteriaceae were relatively abundant in the loading conditions tested. The network analysis between operation parameters and microbial community indicated that MPR was positively associated with most methanogenic archaea, including the relatively abundant Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta, except Methanofollis. The most abundant Methanosarcina was negatively associated with Bifidobacterium and Methanosaeta, whereas Methanosaeta was positively associated with Bifidobacterium. PMID:26810080