WorldWideScience

Sample records for arizona state route

  1. 76 FR 28079 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of... intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona... animal hair, 1 bag of sand, 1 lump of earth, 2 animal tails, 1 bundle of sticks, 2 carved wooden symbols...

  2. 2015 State Geodatabase for Arizona

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The 2015 TIGER Geodatabases are extracts of selected nation based and state based geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master...

  3. 78 FR 13889 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ...) to the Arizona Historical Society. In 1991, the object was transferred to the Arizona State Museum as... through identification by Hopi cultural specialists. Specific knowledge provided by the Society Priests of... by the Momngwit in the Hopi villages for the practice of the Hopi Religion. The Hopi...

  4. 75 FR 28649 - State of Arizona Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... statewide issues; Presentation on the California Condor Reintroduction Program; State Director Updates on the BLM Arizona National Landscape Conservation System (NLCS), Water and Renewable Energy Strategies...

  5. How Arizona's Dropout Crisis Affects Communities, Creates Economic Losses for the State of Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    WestEd, 2014

    2014-01-01

    One-in-five of Arizona's youth did not complete high school and a similarly large proportion of the state's youth is disconnected from either work or education. These youth face higher risks of unemployment and economic insecurity and are more reliant on government supports. This situation, which fails to ensure that the state's youth are…

  6. 77 FR 25737 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    .... History and Description of the Cultural Items In 1930, cultural items were removed from Queen Creek Ruin... donated to the Arizona State Museum. The 30 unassociated funerary objects are 12 ceramic bowls, 8 ceramic jars, 1 ceramic ladle, 3 ceramic pitchers, 5 ceramic scoops, and 1 ceramic sherd. Queen Creek Ruin...

  7. Language Policy and Bilingual Education in Arizona and Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric J.; Johnson, David Cassels

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we compare the bilingual/language education policies of Arizona and Washington to show that state-level language policy plays a critical role in shaping the appropriation of federal language policy [No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), Title III] and how different state-level language policies impact the district level of policy…

  8. 78 FR 21412 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... organizations, has determined that the cultural item listed in this notice meets the definition of unassociated... Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, that meets the definition of unassociated.... Architectural features, the mortuary program, ceramic types, and other items of material culture are...

  9. Arizona State's Origins Project Starts with a Big Bang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    For 12 hours at Arizona State University, a sold-out crowd of 3,000 people gave a group of famous scientists a pop-star welcome, cheering their remarks and lining up for autographs after a day full of discussion about black holes, string theory, and evolutionary biology. At a time when program cuts and faculty layoffs dominate the headlines of…

  10. Developing a Distributed Computing Architecture at Arizona State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armann, Neil; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Development of Arizona State University's computing architecture, designed to ensure that all new distributed computing pieces will work together, is described. Aspects discussed include the business rationale, the general architectural approach, characteristics and objectives of the architecture, specific services, and impact on the university…

  11. State of Outrage: Immigrant-Related Legislation and Education in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jeanne M.; Williams, Tiffany R.

    2012-01-01

    In April 2010, Arizona made national headlines when Governor Jan Brewer signed SB 1070, the "Support Our Law Enforcement and Safe Neighborhoods Act" which was aimed at deterring illegal immigration to Arizona. SB 1070 is the most prominent of a series of laws and other state policies targeting immigrants in Arizona that date back to the…

  12. 77 FR 25741 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ... Reservation, Arizona; and the Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona. History and Description of the Remains In 1930... individuals were identified. The three associated funerary objects are one ceramic bowl, one ceramic jar, and one ceramic pitcher. Queen Creek Ruin was a large habitation site that included trash mounds,...

  13. Roads, Routes, Streets and Trails of Grand Canyon National Park and Arizona

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — 'Pstreets' is a coverage adapted by the Park, from the ALRIS (Arizona Land Resource Information System) coverage 'streets'. Various road maintenance/usage...

  14. Astrobiology at Arizona State University: An Overview of Accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jack

    2005-01-01

    During our five years as an NAI charter member, Arizona State University sponsored a broadly-based program of research and training in Astrobiology to address the origin, evolution and distribution of life in the Solar System. With such a large, diverse and active team, it is not possible in a reasonable space, to cover all details of progress made over the entire five years. The following paragraphs provide an overview update of the specific research areas pursued by the Arizona State University (ASU) Astrobiology team at the end of Year 5 and at the end of the 4 month and subsequent no cost month extensions. for a more detailed review, the reader is referred to the individual annual reports (and Executive Summaries) submitted to the NAI at the end of each of our five years of membership. Appended in electronic form is our complete publication record for all five years, plus a tabulation of undergraduates, graduate students and post-docs supported by our program during this time. The overarching theme of ASU s Astrobiology program was "Exploring the Living Universe: Studies of the Origin, Evolution and Distribution of Life in the Solar System". The NAi-funded research effort was organized under three basic sub- themes: 1. Origins of the Basic Building Blocks of Life. 2. Early Biosphere Evolution. and 3. Exploring for Life in the Solar System. These sub-theme areas were in turn, subdivided into Co-lead research modules. In the paragraphs that follow, accomplishments for individual research modules are briefly outlined, and the key participants presented in tabular form. As noted, publications for each module are appended in hard copy and digital formats, under the name(s) of lead co-Is.

  15. SOUTHWESTERN STATES DEVELOPMENTAL PROJECT RELATING TO EDUCATIONAL NEEDS OF ADULT AGRICULTURAL MIGRANTS. THE ARIZONA REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOORE, HAROLD E.; SCHUFLETOWSKI, CHARLES

    A STUDY OF EDUCATIONAL NEEDS OF MIGRANTS WAS CONDUCTED FROM SEPTEMBER THROUGH DECEMBER, 1964, IN ARIZONA, COLORADO, NEW MEXICO, AND TEXAS. THIS REPORT, CONCERNED WITH THE ARIZONA STUDY, IDENTIFIED THE MOST COMPLICATED PROBLEM AS THE LACK OF A COORDINATED ATTACK ON MIGRANT SOCIAL, ECONOMIC, HEALTH, AND EDUCATIONAL RELATIONSHIPS BY LOCAL, STATE, AND…

  16. Spatial placement of state cycling routes

    OpenAIRE

    Milovanović, Klemen

    2009-01-01

    The national strategy and the traffic policy stimulate the development of unmotorized traffic, cycling infrastructure and the use of bicycles wherever possible. Regarding state interests, traffic engineer expert opinion and community involvment, the first draft of state cycling routes network was presented. Due to the document's merely informative nature, detailed spatial palacement studies are necessary. The main object of this Graduation Thesis is to define a detailed course,...

  17. Herpetofauna Inventory Survey Routes for 2002 Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (pisp_herp02)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile maps the survey routes of the Herp 2002 Inventory crews for Pipe Spring National Monument. The other parks visited were Arches, Bryce Canyon, Capitol...

  18. Herpetofauna Inventory Survey Routes for 2001 Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona(pisp_herp01)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile maps the survey routes of the Herp 2001 Inventory crews for Pipe Springs National Monument. The other parks visited were Bryce Canyon, Capitol Reef,...

  19. 75 FR 7518 - State of Arizona Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... public comment period will be provided at 11:30 a.m. on March 18, 2010, for any interested publics who... Green Valley, Arizona. The FS is proposing to make this property available to the public as an overnight... will consist of a summer rate of $110.00 per day without water/$140.00 per day with water, and a...

  20. Migrant Programs in the Southwestern States -- Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Migrant Information Clearinghouse, Austin, TX. Juarez-Lincoln Center.

    Part of the "Comprehensive National Survey of Migrant Programs" series, this directory was prepared for use by agencies working with migrant and seasonal farmworkers in the Southwestern states of Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. The directory lists programs, services, and resources available to migrants in these states.…

  1. State Education Policy Formation: The Case of Arizona's English Language Learner Legislation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Stephen B.

    2012-01-01

    This historical case study focuses on policy making at the state level by analyzing the development of a new policy for English language learners (ELLs) in Arizona. "New institutionalism" is used as a framework, with political culture and educational regimes acting as environmental factors affecting state policy choices. Key events occurred…

  2. An Extraordinary Partnership between Arizona State University and the City of Phoenix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Debra

    2009-01-01

    The Arizona State University Downtown Phoenix campus is a grand-scale exemplar of a city-university partnership. Its demonstrated impacts are economic, social, and educational, transforming both the city and the university. The magnitude of the investment of $223 million by the citizens of a city in a state university is unparalleled in higher…

  3. Optimal Differential Routing based on Finite State Machine Theory

    OpenAIRE

    M. S. Krishnamoorthy; Loy, James R.; McDonald, John F.

    1999-01-01

    Noise margins in high speed digital systems continue to erode. Full differential signal routing provides a mechanism for deferring these effects. This paper proposes a three stage routing process for solving the adjacent placement routing problem of differential signal pairs, and proves that it is optimal. The process views differential pairs as logical nets; routes the logical nets; then bifurcates the result to achieve a physical realization. Finite state machine theory provides the critica...

  4. 76 FR 14048 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... traditional Native American religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American religions by... the sacred object/object of cultural patrimony and the Navajo Nation of Arizona, New Mexico and Utah... sacred object/ object of cultural patrimony to the Navajo Nation of Arizona, New Mexico and Utah...

  5. 77 FR 22676 - Revisions to the Arizona State Implementation Plan, Pinal County Air Quality Control District

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the Arizona State Implementation Plan, Pinal County Air Quality Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing a limited approval and limited disapproval of a revision to the Pinal County Air Quality...

  6. 78 FR 49684 - Approval and Disapproval of Air Quality State Implementation Plans; Arizona; Regional Haze and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    ... INFORMATION: In Federal Register document 2013-18022 published in the Federal Register on July 30, 2013 (78 FR...; Regional Haze and Interstate Transport Requirements AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... of Arizona's State Implementation Plan (SIP) to implement the regional haze program for the...

  7. Jaguar taxonomy and genetic diversity for southern Arizona, United States, and Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Melanie; Hein, Alexander Ochoa

    2016-06-28

    Executive SummaryThe jaguar is the largest Neotropical felid and the only extant representative of the genus Panthera in the Americas. In recorded history, the jaguars range has extended from the Southern United States, throughout Mexico, to Central and South America, and they occupy a wide variety of habitats. A previous jaguar genetic study found high historical levels of gene flow among jaguar populations over broad areas but did not include any samples of jaguar from the States of Arizona, United States, or Sonora, Mexico. Arizona and Sonora have been part of the historical distribution of jaguars; however, poaching and habitat fragmentation have limited their distribution until they were declared extinct in the United States and endangered in Sonora. Therefore, a need was apparent to have this northernmost (Arizona/Sonora) jaguar population included in an overall jaguar molecular taxonomy and genetic diversity analyses. In this study, we used molecular genetic markers to examine diversity and taxonomy for jaguars in the Northwestern Jaguar Recovery Unit (NJRU; Sonora, Sinaloa, and Jalisco, Mexico; and southern Arizona and New Mexico, United States) relative to jaguars in other parts of the jaguar range (Central and South America). The objectives of this study were to:Collect opportunistic jaguar samples (hide, blood, hair, saliva, and scat), from historical and current individuals, that originated in NJRU areas of Arizona, New Mexico, and Sonora;Use these samples to assess molecular taxonomy of NJRU jaguars compared to data from a previous study of jaguars rangewide; andDevelop suggestions for conservation of NJRU jaguars based on the results.

  8. Cities, Towns and Villages, Point locations of cities and towns in Arizona., Published in 2006, Arizona State Land Department.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cities, Towns and Villages dataset as of 2006. It is described as 'Point locations of cities and towns in Arizona.'. Data by this publisher are often provided...

  9. 76 FR 6188 - Open Meeting of the Area 5 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Arizona, Arkansas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Missouri... to Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that a meeting of the...

  10. Preliminary list of the lepidopterous insects in the Arizona State University Hasbrouck Insect Collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangmi Lee

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Arizona State University Hasbrouck Insect Collection (ASUHIC is one of the vital Southwest Arthropod collections in America North of Mexico, providing important biological information. The principal objective of the Catalog is to give a complete list of the lepidopterous insects held in the ASUHIC. Furthermore, it will be an online catalog of the Lepidoptera of Arizona. The preliminary Lepidoptera checklist is presented, consisting of 1983 species and 175 subspecies of 55 families in approximately 60,000 holdings at the ASUHIC. This article follows the recent classification and nomenclature (Hodges RW. 1983. Check list of the Lepidoptera of America north of Mexico. London, UK: E.W. Classey Ltd. and the Wedge Entomological Research Foundation; Moth Photographers Group (MPG. 2014. http://mothphotographersgroup.msstate.edu/MainMenu.shtml.

  11. Explosive or Continuous: Incoherent state determines the route to synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Can; Gao, Jian; Sun, Yuting; Huang, Xia; Zheng, Zhigang

    2015-07-01

    Abrupt and continuous spontaneous emergence of collective synchronization of coupled oscillators have attracted much attention. In this paper, we propose a dynamical ensemble order parameter equation that enables us to grasp the essential low-dimensional dynamical mechanism of synchronization in networks of coupled oscillators. Different solutions of the dynamical ensemble order parameter equation build correspondences with diverse collective states, and different bifurcations reveal various transitions among these collective states. The structural relationship between the incoherent state and the synchronous state leads to different routes of transitions to synchronization, either continuous or discontinuous. The explosive synchronization is determined by the bistable state where the measure of each state and the critical points are obtained analytically by using the dynamical ensemble order parameter equation. Our method and results hold for heterogeneous networks with star graph motifs such as scale-free networks, and hence, provide an effective approach in understanding the routes to synchronization in more general complex networks.

  12. Higher Education Financing Policies: States/Institutions and Their Interaction. Proceedings of the Annual Finance Conference (Tucson, Arizona, December 1980).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Larry L., Ed.; Hyatt, James, Ed.

    Thirty papers from a 1980 University of Arizona conference on higher education financing policies and the state government-college relationship are presented. Papers and authors include the following: "Higher Education Financing Policies: A Context" (Ernest Boyer); "The State Board Perspective" (William Arceneaux); "The…

  13. Indian Education in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah: A Review of State and National Law, Board Rules, and Policy Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    West Comprehensive Center at WestEd, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The West Comprehensive Center (WCC) is working with the Arizona Department of Education (ADE), the Nevada Department of Education (NDE), and the Utah State Office of Education (USOE) to assist districts and schools that are implementing activities to improve outcomes for Indian students. As a first step, WCC staff reviewed state and national law,…

  14. 77 FR 12874 - Notice of Segregation of Public Lands in the State of Arizona Associated With the Proposed Mohave...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ... Wind Energy North America's Mohave County Wind Farm Project (Proposed Project). This segregation covers... in the State of Arizona from appropriation under the public land laws, including the mining law, but...: Eddie Arreola, Supervisory Project Manager; Telephone: 602-417-9505; Address: One North Central...

  15. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Arizona. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  16. 1999 Breeding Bird Survey Route Paths for the Lower 48 States - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer portrays a 1999 snapshot of the approximate route paths of active Breeding Bird Survey routes in the lower 48 States. The paths are a visual...

  17. 77 FR 21911 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Arizona; Prevention of Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    ... Air Pollution Emergency Episodes AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule... of Arizona to address the requirements regarding air pollution emergency episodes in Clean Air Act... air pollution emergency episodes and adequate contingency plans to implement such authority...

  18. Facile Solid-State Synthesis Route to Metal Nitride Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinxiao DU; Ming LEI; Hui YANG

    2008-01-01

    By a facile and efficient solid-state reaction route using an organic reagent cyanamide (CN2H2) as a precursor with another one being metal oxides, we successfully synthesized seven technologically important metal nitrides including cubic VN, CrN, NbN, hexagonal GaN, AIN, BN, and WN at moderate temperatures. The experimental results show that cyanamide (CN2H2) is a powerfully reducing and nitridizing reagent and the metal oxides are completely converted into the corresponding nitride nanoparticles at lower temperatures than that reported in the conventional methods. It is found that CN2H2 can exhibit some interesting condensation processes, and the final products, highly active carbon nitride species, play a crucial role in the reducing and nitridizing processes.

  19. 78 FR 46141 - Approval and Disapproval of Air Quality State Implementation Plans; Arizona; Regional Haze and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... NO X mean or refer to nitrogen oxides. (20) The initials NP mean or refer to National Park. (21) The...); Chemical Lime Nelson Plant (Nelson Lime Plant) Kilns 1 and 2; Arizona Public Service West Phoenix Power Plant (West Phoenix Power Plant) Combined Cycle Units 1 through 3; CalPortland Rillito Cement...

  20. "By the Time I Get to Arizona": Race, Language, and Education in America's Racist State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarota, Julio; Aguilera, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on research projects conducted primarily by first and second generation Mexican American high school students who document how school relationships are shaped by Arizona's racist political discourses. They conducted observations of their school experiences and then wrote up what they were observing in field notes. Field note…

  1. 78 FR 48326 - Partial Disapproval of State Implementation Plan; Arizona; Regional Haze Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ..., Physicians for Social Responsibility (Arizona Chapter), Dine' Citizens Against Ruining Our Environment, and... enterprises, and small governmental jurisdictions. This rule will not have a significant impact on a... and responsibilities among the various levels of government.'' Under Executive Order 13132, EPA may...

  2. 77 FR 62452 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Arizona; Prevention of Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-15

    ... Air Pollution Emergency Episodes AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule... address the requirements regarding air pollution emergency episodes in Clean Air Act (CAA or Act). DATES... Arizona to address the requirements regarding air pollution emergency episodes in CAA section...

  3. Nanocrystalline spinel ferrites by solid state reaction route

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T K Kundu; S Mishra

    2008-06-01

    Nanostructured NiFe2O4, MnFe2O4 and (NiZn)Fe2O4 were synthesized by aliovalent ion doping using conventional solid-state reaction route. With the doping of Nb2O5, the size of NiFe2O4 is reduced down to 33 nm. Similarly, nanostructured manganese ferrites (MnFe2O4) with diameters in the range of 45–30 nm were synthesized by Ti4+ ion doping. Particle diameters in all the specimens are found to decrease with increasing dopant content. The substitution of Nb5+ or Ti3+ ions essentially breaks up the ferrimagnetically active oxygen polyhedra. This created nanoscale regions of ferrites. Saturation magnetization and coercive field show a strong dependence on the size of the ferrite grains. Superparamagnetic behaviour is observed from the Mössbauer spectra of nanostructured NiFe2O4, if the particle size is reduced to 30 nm. Zero field cooled and field cooled curves from 30 nm sized MnFe2O4 particles showed a peak at B (∼ 125 K), typical of superparamagnetic blocking temperature. These results are explained in terms of core/shell structure of the materials. The d.c. resistivity of the doped specimens decreases by atleast five orders of magnitude compared to pure sample. This is ascribed to the presence of an interfacial amorphous phase between the sites.

  4. Equation of state of sticky-hard-sphere fluids in the chemical-potential route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmann, René D.; Santos, Andrés

    2014-04-01

    The coupling-parameter method, whereby an extra particle is progressively coupled to the rest of the particles, is applied to the sticky-hard-sphere fluid to obtain its equation of state in the so-called chemical-potential routeroute). As a consistency test, the results for one-dimensional sticky particles are shown to be exact. Results corresponding to the three-dimensional case (Baxter's model) are derived within the Percus-Yevick approximation by using different prescriptions for the dependence of the interaction potential of the extra particle on the coupling parameter. The critical point and the coexistence curve of the gas-liquid phase transition are obtained in the μ route and compared with predictions from other thermodynamics routes and from computer simulations. The results show that the μ route yields a general better description than the virial, energy, compressibility, and zero-separation routes.

  5. The Uneven Performance of Arizona's Charter Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chingos, Matthew M.; West, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Arizona enrolls a larger share of its students in charter schools than any other state in the country, but no comprehensive examination exists of the impact of those schools on student achievement. Using student-level data covering all Arizona students from 2006 to 2012, we find that the performance of charter schools in Arizona in improving…

  6. Reading in the 80's: Where Are We Going? Volume 5. Fifth Yearbook of the Arizona State University Reading Conference, 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Joan, Ed.

    Contained in this yearbook are the proceedings of the fifth annual Arizona State University Reading Conference. This edition reflects an emphasis on a wide range of topics, including study skills, oral language, and teaching strategies. Following a foreword, the conference articles discuss the following: (1) study skills across the curriculum, (2)…

  7. Assessing the Impact of Major Intercollegiate Sports Programs on Arizona State University at Tempe, and Developing a Solution Strategy. Societal Factors Affecting Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Charles R.

    This practicum evaluated the impact which Arizona State University (ASU) at Tempe's sports operation had on the university's ability to carry out its mission of education and research. Information was collected from library research on sports operations and educational institutions in general, and on the sports program at ASU. Personal interviews…

  8. Arizona's School Asbestos Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charette, Mike L.

    1982-01-01

    The state of Arizona Department of Education operates a successful program to remove asbestos-containing building materials from schools, drawing from the expertise of the Department of Health Services, Bureau of Environmental Hygiene and Sanitation, Bureau of Waste Control, and eliciting cooperation of school officials. Includes an asbestos…

  9. Reported Historic Asbestos Mines, Historic Asbestos Prospects, and Natural Asbestos Occurrences in the Southwestern United States (Arizona, Nevada, and Utah)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    This map and its accompanying dataset provide information for 113 natural asbestos occurrences in the Southwestern United States (U.S.), using descriptions found in the geologic literature. Data on location, mineralogy, geology, and relevant literature for each asbestos site are provided. Using the map and digital data in this report, the user can examine the distribution of previously reported asbestos occurrences and their geological characteristics in the Southwestern U.S., which includes sites in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah. This report is part of an ongoing study by the U.S. Geological Survey to identify and map reported natural asbestos occurrences in the U.S., which thus far includes similar maps and datasets of natural asbestos occurrences within the Eastern U.S. (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2005/1189/), the Central U.S. (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2006/1211/), and the Rocky Mountain States (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1182/. These reports are intended to provide State and local government agencies and other stakeholders with geologic information on natural occurrences of asbestos in the U.S.

  10. 75 FR 76522 - Open Meeting of the Area 5 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Arizona, Arkansas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas) AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that a meeting of the Area 5 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be...

  11. 76 FR 17994 - Open Meeting of the Area 5 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Arizona, Arkansas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas) AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that a meeting of the Area 5 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be held Thursday...

  12. 76 FR 32023 - Open Meeting of the Area 5 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Arizona, Arkansas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas) AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that a meeting of the Area 5 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be held Thursday...

  13. 76 FR 2195 - Open Meeting of the Area 5 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (including the states of Arizona, Arkansas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas) AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that a meeting of the Area 5 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be...

  14. 75 FR 39333 - Open Meeting of the Area 6 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Arizona, Colorado...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and... Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the...

  15. 75 FR 62631 - Open Meeting of the Area 6 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Arizona, Colorado...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and... Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the...

  16. 76 FR 37199 - Open Meeting of the Area 5 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Arizona, Arkansas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas) AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that a meeting of the Area 5 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be held Thursday...

  17. 76 FR 22169 - Open Meeting of the Area 5 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Arizona, Arkansas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas) AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that a meeting of the Area 5 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be held Thursday...

  18. 75 FR 25315 - Open Meeting of the Area 6 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Arizona, Colorado...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and... Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the...

  19. 75 FR 7540 - Open Meeting of the Area 6 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Arizona, Colorado...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and... Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the...

  20. 75 FR 10865 - Open Meeting of the Area 6 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Arizona, Colorado...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and... Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the...

  1. 75 FR 55404 - Open Meeting of the Area 6 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of Arizona, Colorado...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and... Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the...

  2. The Virtual Arizona Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, M. L.; Davis, R.; Conway, F. M.; Bellasai, R.

    2012-12-01

    To commemorate the once-in-a-lifetime event of Arizona's hundredth birthday, the Centennial Commission and the Governor of Arizona envisioned a museum and companion website that would capture the state's history, celebrate its people, and embrace its future. Working with world-renowned museum designers, the state began to seek ideas from across Arizona to create plans for a journey of discovery through science and the humanities. The museum would introduce visitors to some of the people who nurtured the state through its early years and others who are innovating its tomorrows. Showcases would include the resources and experiences that shaped the state's history and are transforming its present day, highlighting the ingenuity that tamed the wild frontier and is envisioning Arizona's next frontiers through science and technology. The Arizona Experience (www.arizonaexperience.org) was initially intended to serve as the web presence for the physical museum, but as delays occurred with the physical museum, the site has quickly developed an identify of its own as an interactive, multimedia experience, reaching a wider audience with functions that would be difficult or expensive to produce in a museum. As leaders in scientific and technological innovation in the state, the Arizona Geological Survey was tasked with designing and creating the Arizona Experience site. The general themes remain the same; however, the site has added content and applications that are better suited to the online environment in order to create a rich, dynamic supplement to a physical museum experience. The website offers the features and displays of the future museum with the interactive nature and learning environment of the web. This provides an encyclopedic overview of the State of Arizona by subject matter experts in a manner that is free and open to the public and erases socio-economic, political, and physical boundaries. Over the Centennial Year of 2012 the site will release a new theme and

  3. Enhanced solid-state metathesis routes to carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Julia J; Tari, Susanne; Kaner, Richard B

    2006-05-15

    Ignition of three solids creates multiwalled carbon nanotubes in seconds. A solid-state metathesis (exchange) reaction between hexachloroethane (C2Cl6) and lithium acetylide (Li2C2) with 5% cobalt dichloride (CoCl2) added as an initiator produces up to 7% carbon nanotubes, as observed via transmission electron microscopy. Using the concept that sulfur can promote nanotube growth, the reaction yield can be increased to 15% by switching to CoS as the initiator. The more readily available, inexpensive calcium carbide (CaC2) can be substituted for lithium acetylide while maintaining comparable yields. Switching initiators to FeS can be used to further enhance the yield. A systematic study of the C2Cl6/CaC2 reaction system indicates that a yield up to 25% can be realized by using 6% FeS as the initiator. Reaction temperatures for the C(2)Cl6/CaC2 system of up to 3550 degrees C are calculated using thermodynamic data assuming quantitative yield and adiabatic conditions.

  4. 77 FR 30437 - Proposed Amendment of Air Traffic Service Routes; Southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 RIN 2120-AA66 Proposed Amendment of Air Traffic Service Routes; Southwestern United States AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of... Administration, 800 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20591; telephone: (202) 267-8783....

  5. Peptide Folding: Many Routes to the Native State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roitberg, Adrian; Simmerling, Carlos

    2002-03-01

    Protein folding is only one example of an extremely complex kinetic process that is poorly understood due to experimental limitations. Several groups have published simulations of early folding stages in atomic detail, but kinetic processes are probabilistic in nature and single simulations may have little value. Clusters of computers can rapidly provide multiple data sets that can be combined to obtain greater insight. We have carried out the computational analog of temperature-jump protein folding. An ensemble of structures that represent the unfolded state is generated at 800K by molecular dynamics. Each structure was distributed to an individual node in the cluster, quenched to 298K and monitored during MD simulation. We have accumulated 2.3 microseconds of folding time in this way. While it is possible to perform this procedure using a single computer, perfect scaling is obtained with the cluster and the problem is solved far more quickly. We carried out a preliminary study on a nonapeptide fragment of influenza virus hemagluttinin using a Generalized Born aqueous solvation model. Under these conditions, the peptide has a high tendency to form a well-defined structure stabilized predominantly by backbone hydrogen bonds with a structure similar to that observed experimentally in the intact protein. Folding times of the ensemble of 188 unfolded structures varied from 2ps to over 100ns and at least three exponential curves are required to fit this data. Analysis of trajectories revealed four distinct folding pathways with kinetic properties that fit these individual curves, with two different pathways contributing to the slowest folding events. Folding time varies by an order of magnitude even on the same pathway. We obtained the important and potentially general result that folding kinetics depends strongly on the details of preparation of this ensemble. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time such detailed analysis of protein folding landscapes has

  6. QoS and security in Link State Routing protocols for MANETs

    OpenAIRE

    Cervera, Gimer; Barbeau, Michel; Garcia-Alfaro, Joaquin; Kranakis, Evangelos

    2013-01-01

    International audience; We study security issues in the Optimized Link State Routing (OLSR) protocol with Quality-of-Service (QoS). We propose the function k-robust-QANS, to construct a Quality Advertisement Neighbor Set (QANS). Given a node v, the one-hop nodes selected as part of its QANS generate routing information to advertise, when possible, a set with k+1 links to reach any two-hop neighbor. Several approaches have been proposed to construct a QANS. However, none of them guarantees tha...

  7. Geophysical lineaments of Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepley, L.K.

    1979-08-01

    Photolineaments seen on satellite images are usually expressions of deep crustal ruptures. However, photolineaments are omnipresent and an independent expression of regional discontinuities is needed to help rank the photolineaments. Published gravity and magnetic contour maps of Arizona were analyzed to produce a single geophysical lineament map to indicate trends of regional basement structures. This map shows that the southwestern quarter of Arizona is dominated by a NNW-ENE orthogonal system whereas the remainder of the state is gridded by a NW-NE system. North-south systems are present throughout the state, as are EW lineaments. Arizona is transected by the WNW Texas Strand, but other shorter systems trending in the Texas direction are found throughout the state south of the Strand. The major lineament systems as seen on Landsat, gravity, and magnetic maps correlate reasonably well with known geothermal manifestations. Many other systems are Precambrian, Paleozoic, and/or Mesozoic in age but appear to control the location of Quaternary volcanic systems.

  8. 77 FR 44555 - Partial Approval and Disapproval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Arizona; State Board...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ... identity or contact information unless you provide it in the body of your comment. If you send email... by State and local officials in the development of regulatory policies that have federalism... 13045, Protection of Children From Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks EPA interprets EO...

  9. Chemical-potential route: a hidden Percus-Yevick equation of state for hard spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Andrés

    2012-09-21

    The chemical potential of a hard-sphere fluid can be expressed in terms of the contact value of the radial distribution function of a solute particle with a diameter varying from zero to that of the solvent particles. Exploiting the explicit knowledge of such a contact value within the Percus-Yevick theory, and using standard thermodynamic relations, a hitherto unknown Percus-Yevick equation of state, p/ρk(B)T = -(9/η) ln(1-η)-(16-31η)/2(1-η)(2), is unveiled. This equation of state turns out to be better than the one obtained from the conventional virial route. Interpolations between the chemical-potential and compressibility routes are shown to be more accurate than the widely used Carnahan-Starling equation of state. The extension to polydisperse hard-sphere systems is also presented.

  10. Preliminary United States-Mexico border watershed analysis, twin cities area of Nogales, Arizona and Nogales, Sonora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Laura Margaret; Gray, Floyd; Castaneda, Mario; Bultman, Mark; Bolm, Karen Sue

    2002-01-01

    The United States - Mexico border area faces the challenge of integrating aspects of its binational physical boundaries to form a unified or, at least, compatible natural resource management plan. Specified geospatial components such as stream drainages, mineral occurrences, vegetation, wildlife, and land-use can be analyzed in terms of their overlapping impacts upon one another. Watersheds have been utilized as a basic unit in resource analysis because they contain components that are interrelated and can be viewed as a single interactive ecological system. In developing and analyzing critical regional natural resource databases, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other federal and non-governmental agencies have adopted a ?watershed by watershed? approach to dealing with such complicated issues as ecosystem health, natural resource use, urban growth, and pollutant transport within hydrologic systems. These watersheds can facilitate the delineation of both large scale and locally important hydrologic systems and urban management parameters necessary for sustainable, diversified land-use. The twin border cities area of Nogales, Sonora and Nogales, Arizona, provide the ideal setting to demonstrate the utility and application of a complete, cross-border, geographic information systems (GIS) based, watershed analysis in the characterization of a wide range of natural resource as well as urban features and their interactions. In addition to the delineation of a unified, cross-border watershed, the database contains sewer/water line locations and status, well locations, geology, hydrology, topography, soils, geomorphology, and vegetation data, as well as remotely sensed imagery. This report is preliminary and part of an ongoing project to develop a GIS database that will be widely accessible to the general public, researchers, and the local land management community with a broad range of application and utility.

  11. Arizona TeleMedicine Network: System Procurement Specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlantic Research Corp., Alexandria, VA.

    Providing general specifications and system descriptions for segments within the Arizona TeleMedicine Project (a telecommunication system designed to deliver health services to rurally isolated American Indians in Arizona), this document, when used with the appropriate route segment document, will completely describe the project's required…

  12. Assessment of Young English Language Learners in Arizona: Questioning the Validity of the State Measure of English Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Eugene E.; Lawton, Kerry; Diniz de Figueiredo, Eduardo H.

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzes the Arizona policy of utilizing a single assessment of English proficiency to determine if students should be exited from the ELL program, which is ostensibly designed to make it possible for them to succeed in the mainstream classroom without any further language support. The study examines the predictive validity of this…

  13. Arizona: In Search of the Displaced Homemaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Doris

    The model described offers information about displaced homemakers that, while specific to Arizona, can provide a guide to persons in any state responsible for program planning. The report presents results of an Arizona Department of Education study which was conducted to: (1) identify the "displaced homemaker;" (2) define the need for services;…

  14. 78 FR 57923 - Arizona Disaster #AZ-00029

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... ADMINISTRATION Arizona Disaster AZ-00029 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Arizona dated 09/13/2013. Incident: Yarnell Hill Fire. Incident Period: 06/28/2013 through 07/10/2013. Effective Date:...

  15. 76 FR 42156 - Arizona Disaster #AZ-00016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Arizona Disaster AZ-00016 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Arizona dated 07/11/2011. Incident: Monument Fire. Incident Period: 06/12/2011 and continuing. Effective Date:...

  16. 76 FR 45644 - Arizona Disaster #AZ-00016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... is hereby amended to modify the incident description for this disaster from Monument Fire to Monument... ADMINISTRATION Arizona Disaster AZ-00016 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Administrative declaration of disaster for the State of Arizona dated...

  17. Crystallization and solid-state reaction as a route to asymmetric synthesis from achiral starting materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, B S; Lahav, M

    1975-10-29

    Many molecules which are achiral can crystallize in chiral (enantiomorphic) crystals and, under suitable conditions, crystals of only one chirality may be obtained. The formation of right- or left-handed crystals in excess is equally probable. Lattice-controlled (topochemical) photochemical or thermal solid-state reactions may then afford stable, optically active products. In the presence of the chiral products, achiral reactants may preferentially produce crystals of one chirality, leading to a feedback mechanism for the generation and amplification of optical activity. Amplification of optical activity can also be achieved by solid-state reactions. The optical synthesis of biologically relevant compounds by such routes may be envisaged.

  18. Solid state RF power: The route to 1W per euro cent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heid, Oliver [Siemens AG, Mozartstrasse 57, Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-04-19

    In most particle accelerators RF power is a decisive design constraint due to high costs and relative inflexibility of current electron beam based RF sources, i.e. Klystrons, Magnetrons, Tetrodes etc. At VHF/UHF frequencies the transition to solid state devices promises to fundamentally change the situation. Recent progress brings 1 Watt per Euro cent installed cost within reach. We present a Silicon Carbide semiconductor solution utilising the Solid State Direct Drive technology at unprecedented efficiency, power levels and power densities. The proposed solution allows retrofitting of existing RF accelerators and opens the route to novel particle accelerator concepts.

  19. Folding rates and low-entropy-loss routes of two-state proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikl, Thomas R; Dill, Ken A

    2003-06-01

    We develop a simple model for computing the rates and routes of folding of two-state proteins from the contact maps of their native structures. The model is based on the graph-theoretical concept of effective contact order (ECO). The model predicts that proteins fold by "zipping up" in a sequence of small-loop-closure events, depending on the native chain fold. Using a simple equation, with a few physical rate parameters, we obtain a good correlation with the folding rates of 24 two-state folding proteins. The model rationalizes data from Phi-value analysis that have been interpreted in terms of delocalized or polarized transition states. This model indicates how much of protein folding may take place in parallel, not along a single reaction coordinate or with a single transition state.

  20. Security Issues in the Optimized Link State Routing Protocol Version 2 (OLSRV2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Herberg

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobile Ad hoc NETworks (MANETs are leaving the confines of research laboratories, to find place in real-world deployments. Outside specialized domains (military, vehicular, etc., city-wide communitynetworks are emerging, connecting regular Internet users with each other, and with the Internet, via MANETs. Growing to encompass more than a handful of “trusted participants”, the question of preserving the MANET network connectivity, even when faced with careless or malicious participants, arises, and must be addressed. A first step towards protecting a MANET is to analyze the vulnerabilities of the routing protocol, managing the connectivity. By understanding how the algorithms of the routing protocol operate,and how these can be exploited by those with ill intent, countermeasures can be developed, readying MANETs for wider deployment and use.This paper takes an abstract look at the algorithms that constitute the Optimized Link State Routing Protocolversion 2 (OLSRv2, and identifies for each protocol element the possible vulnerabilities and attacks in a certain way, provides a “cookbook” for how to best attack an operational OLSRv2 network, or for how to proceed with developing protective countermeasures against these attacks

  1. Routing protocol for wireless quantum multi-hop mesh backbone network based on partially entangled GHZ state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Pei-Ying; Yu, Xu-Tao; Zhang, Zai-Chen; Zhan, Hai-Tao; Hua, Jing-Yu

    2017-08-01

    Quantum multi-hop teleportation is important in the field of quantum communication. In this study, we propose a quantum multi-hop communication model and a quantum routing protocol with multihop teleportation for wireless mesh backbone networks. Based on an analysis of quantum multi-hop protocols, a partially entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state is selected as the quantum channel for the proposed protocol. Both quantum and classical wireless channels exist between two neighboring nodes along the route. With the proposed routing protocol, quantum information can be transmitted hop by hop from the source node to the destination node. Based on multi-hop teleportation based on the partially entangled GHZ state, a quantum route established with the minimum number of hops. The difference between our routing protocol and the classical one is that in the former, the processes used to find a quantum route and establish quantum channel entanglement occur simultaneously. The Bell state measurement results of each hop are piggybacked to quantum route finding information. This method reduces the total number of packets and the magnitude of air interface delay. The deduction of the establishment of a quantum channel between source and destination is also presented here. The final success probability of quantum multi-hop teleportation in wireless mesh backbone networks was simulated and analyzed. Our research shows that quantum multi-hop teleportation in wireless mesh backbone networks through a partially entangled GHZ state is feasible.

  2. Hurricane Evacuation Routes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Hurricane Evacuation Routes in the United States A hurricane evacuation route is a designated route used to direct traffic inland in case of a hurricane threat. This...

  3. Ecoregions of Arizona (poster)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Glenn E.; Omernik, James M.; Johnson, Colleen Burch; Turner, Dale S.

    2014-01-01

    Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources; they are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. By recognizing the spatial differences in the capacities and potentials of ecosystems, ecoregions stratify the environment by its probable response to disturbance. These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across federal agencies, state agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources within the same geographical areas. The Arizona ecoregion map was compiled at a scale of 1:250,000. It revises and subdivides an earlier national ecoregion map that was originally compiled at a smaller scale. The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions can be identified through the analysis of the spatial patterns and the composition of biotic and abiotic phenomena that affect or reflect differences in ecosystem quality and integrity. These phenomena include geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each characteristic varies from one ecological region to another regardless of the hierarchical level. A Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels of ecological regions. Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides the continent into 50 regions. At level III, the continental United States contains 105 ecoregions and the conterminous United States has 85 ecoregions. Level IV is a further subdivision of level III ecoregions. Arizona contains arid deserts and canyonlands, semiarid shrub- and grass-covered plains, woodland- and shrubland-covered hills, lava fields and volcanic plateaus, forested mountains, glaciated

  4. Thermogravimetric analysis and kinetic study of formation of lithium titanate by solid state route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonak, Sagar; Jain, Uttam [Fusion Reactor Materials Section, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sahu, Ashok Kumar [Glass and advanced Materials Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kumar, Sanjay; Krishnamurthy, Nagaiyar [Fusion Reactor Materials Section, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2015-02-15

    The kinetics of formation of lithium titanate from the solid state reaction of lithium carbonate and titanium oxide was studied using non-isothermal thermogravimetric technique. Thermogravimetric data for the reaction of lithium carbonate and titanium oxide was obtained at various heating rates. The methods such as Flynn–Wall–Ozawa and Kissinger–Akahira–Sunose were used to estimate the kinetic parameters from the obtained thermogravimetric data. The average activation energy for the formation of lithium titanate by solid state route was found to be 243 kJ/mol K. The reaction mechanism was determined by the method given by Malek. It was found that the three dimensional diffusion model best describes the reaction kinetics. A kinetic equation describing the reaction is proposed and reaction mechanism is discussed.

  5. Comparing injection and non-injection routes of administration for heroin, methamphetamine, and cocaine users in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Scott P; Kral, Alex H

    2011-01-01

    Research examining the demographic and substance use characteristics of illicit drug use in the United States has typically failed to consider differences in routes of administration or has exclusively focused on a single route of administration?injection drug use. Data from National Survey on Drug Use and Health were used to compare past-year injection drug users and non-injection drug users' routes of administration of those who use the three drugs most commonly injected in the United States: heroin, methamphetamine, and cocaine. Injection drug users were more likely than those using drugs via other routes to be older (aged 35 and older), unemployed, possess less than a high school education, and reside in rural areas. IDUs also exhibited higher rates of abuse/dependence, perceived need for substance abuse treatment, and co-occurring physical and psychological problems. Fewer differences between IDUs and non-IDUs were observed for heroin users compared with methamphetamine or cocaine users.

  6. Binational Dengue Outbreak Along the United States-Mexico Border - Yuma County, Arizona, and Sonora, Mexico, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jefferson M; Lopez, Benito; Adams, Laura; Gálvez, Francisco Javier Navarro; Núñez, Alfredo Sánchez; Santillán, Nubia Astrid Hernández; Plante, Lydia; Hemme, Ryan R; Casal, Mariana; Hunsperger, Elizabeth A; Muñoz-Jordan, Jorge; Acevedo, Veronica; Ernst, Kacey; Hayden, Mary; Waterman, Steve; Gomez, Diana; Sharp, Tyler M; Komatsu, Kenneth K

    2016-05-20

    Dengue is an acute febrile illness caused by any of four dengue virus types (DENV-1-4). DENVs are transmitted by mosquitos of the genus Aedes (1) and are endemic throughout the tropics (2). In 2010, an estimated 390 million DENV infections occurred worldwide (2). During 2007-2013, a total of three to 10 dengue cases were reported annually in Arizona and all were travel-associated. During September-December 2014, coincident with a dengue outbreak in Sonora, Mexico, 93 travel-associated dengue cases were reported in Arizona residents; 70 (75%) cases were among residents of Yuma County, which borders San Luis Río Colorado, Sonora, Mexico. San Luis Río Colorado reported its first case of locally acquired dengue in September 2014. To investigate the temporal relationship of the dengue outbreaks in Yuma County and San Luis Río Colorado and compare patient characteristics and signs and symptoms, passive surveillance data from both locations were analyzed. In addition, household-based cluster investigations were conducted near the residences of reported dengue cases in Yuma County to identify unreported cases and assess risk for local transmission. Surveillance data identified 52 locally acquired cases (21% hospitalized) in San Luis Río Colorado and 70 travel-associated cases (66% hospitalized) in Yuma County with illness onset during September-December 2014. Among 194 persons who participated in the cluster investigations in Yuma County, 152 (78%) traveled to Mexico at least monthly during the preceding 3 months. Four (2%) of 161 Yuma County residents who provided serum samples for diagnostic testing during cluster investigations had detectable DENV immunoglobulin M (IgM); one reported a recent febrile illness, and all four had traveled to Mexico during the preceding 3 months. Entomologic assessments among 105 households revealed 24 water containers per 100 houses colonized by Ae. aegypti. Frequent travel to Mexico and Ae. aegypti colonization indicate risk for local

  7. Toward enhanced capability for detecting and predicting dust events in the western United States: the Arizona case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, M.; Tong, D.; Lee, P.; Pan, L.; Tang, Y.; Stajner, I.; Pierce, R. B.; McQueen, J.; Wang, J.

    2015-11-01

    Dust aerosols affect human life, ecosystems, atmospheric chemistry and climate in various aspects. Some studies have revealed intensified dust activity in the western US during the past decades despite the weaker dust activity in non-US regions. It is important to extend the historical dust records, to better understand their temporal changes, and to use such information to improve the daily dust forecasting skill as well as the projection of future dust activity under the changing climate. This study develops dust records in Arizona in 2005-2013 using multiple observation data sets, including in situ measurements at the surface Air Quality System (AQS) and Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) sites, and level 2 deep blue aerosol product by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer. The diurnal and inter-annual variability of identified dust events are shown related to observed weather patterns (e.g., wind and soil moisture) and surface conditions (e.g., land cover type and vegetation conditions), suggesting a potential for use of satellite soil moisture and land products to help interpret and predict dust activity. Backtrajectories computed using NOAA's Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model indicate that the Sonoran and Chihuahuan deserts are important dust source regions during identified dust events in Phoenix, Arizona. Finally, we assess the impact of a recent strong dust event on western US air quality, using various observational and modeling data sets, during a period with a stratospheric ozone intrusion event. The capability of the current US National Air Quality Forecasting Capability (NAQFC) Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system to represent the magnitude and the temporal variability of aerosol concentrations is evaluated for this event. Directions for integrating observations to further improve dust emission modeling in CMAQ are also suggested.

  8. New River and Phoenix City Streams, Arizona. Overall Master Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    State University , An Archeological Survey of the Cave Buttes Dam Alternative Site and Reservoir, Arizona, Anthropological Research Paper No. 8, by...Athletic fields will accommodate football, baseball, field hockey, and soccer games. Local interests will construct a bicyclists’ hostel and information...Arizona State University , An Archeological Survey of the Cave Buttes Dam All-’rnative Site and Reservoir, Arizona, Anthropological Research Paper No

  9. Hot and not-so-hot females: reproductive state and thermal preferences of female Arizona Bark Scorpions (Centruroides sculpturatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, M M; Gibbs, A G; Rodríguez-Robles, J A

    2015-02-01

    For ectotherms, environmental temperatures influence numerous life history characteristics, and the body temperatures (Tb ) selected by individuals can affect offspring fitness and parental survival. Reproductive trade-offs may therefore ensue for gravid females, because temperatures conducive to embryonic development may compromise females' body condition. We tested whether reproduction influenced thermoregulation in female Arizona Bark Scorpions (Centruroides sculpturatus). We predicted that gravid females select higher Tb and thermoregulate more precisely than nonreproductive females. Gravid C. sculpturatus gain body mass throughout gestation, which exposes larger portions of their pleural membrane, possibly increasing their rates of transcuticular water loss in arid environments. Accordingly, we tested whether gravid C. sculpturatus lose water faster than nonreproductive females. We determined the preferred Tb of female scorpions in a thermal gradient and measured water loss rates using flow-through respirometry. Gravid females preferred significantly higher Tb than nonreproductive females, suggesting that gravid C. sculpturatus alter their thermoregulatory behaviour to promote offspring fitness. However, all scorpions thermoregulated with equal precision, perhaps because arid conditions create selective pressure on all females to thermoregulate effectively. Gravid females lost water faster than nonreproductive animals, indicating that greater exposure of the pleural membrane during gestation enhances the desiccation risk of reproductive females. Our findings suggest that gravid C. sculpturatus experience a trade-off, whereby selection of higher Tb and increased mass during gestation increase females' susceptibility to water loss, and thus their mortality risk. Elucidating the mechanisms that influence thermal preferences may reveal how reproductive trade-offs shape the life history of ectotherms in arid environments.

  10. The vehicle routing problem with time windows: State-of-the-art exact solution methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desaulniers, Guy; Desrosiers, Jacques; Spoorendonk, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The vehicle routing problem with time windows (VRPTW) consists of finding least-cost vehicle routes to service given customers exactly once each while satisfying the vehicle capacity and customer time windows. The VRPTW has been widely studied. We present here a short survey on the successful exact...

  11. Ground-Water Flow Model of the Sierra Vista Subwatershed and Sonoran Portions of the Upper San Pedro Basin, Southeastern Arizona, United States, and Northern Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, D.R.; Dickinson, Jesse E.

    2007-01-01

    A numerical ground-water model was developed to simulate seasonal and long-term variations in ground-water flow in the Sierra Vista subwatershed, Arizona, United States, and Sonora, Mexico, portions of the Upper San Pedro Basin. This model includes the simulation of details of the groundwater flow system that were not simulated by previous models, such as ground-water flow in the sedimentary rocks that surround and underlie the alluvial basin deposits, withdrawals for dewatering purposes at the Tombstone mine, discharge to springs in the Huachuca Mountains, thick low-permeability intervals of silt and clay that separate the ground-water flow system into deep-confined and shallow-unconfined systems, ephemeral-channel recharge, and seasonal variations in ground-water discharge by wells and evapotranspiration. Steady-state and transient conditions during 1902-2003 were simulated by using a five-layer numerical ground- water flow model representing multiple hydrogeologic units. Hydraulic properties of model layers, streamflow, and evapotranspiration rates were estimated as part of the calibration process by using observed water levels, vertical hydraulic gradients, streamflow, and estimated evapotranspiration rates as constraints. Simulations approximate observed water-level trends throughout most of the model area and streamflow trends at the Charleston streamflow-gaging station on the San Pedro River. Differences in observed and simulated water levels, streamflow, and evapotranspiration could be reduced through simulation of climate-related variations in recharge rates and recharge from flood-flow infiltration.

  12. Transportation impacts to wildlife on state route 37 in northern San Pablo Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, Bryan R.; Takekawa, John Y.

    2002-01-01

    State Route 37 bisects conservation lands managed by San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge (U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service) and Napa-Sonoma Marshes Wildlife Area (California Department of Fish and Game) in Solano and Sonoma Counties. The 2-lane highway connects Interstates 101 and 80 in northern San Francisco Bay and experiences ~26,000 vehicles per day. Road-killed wildlife between Napa River and Tolay Creek bridges (14.7 km) were counted in 2000 to ascertain species composition, relative abundance, and relative occurence (animal fatality interval). The primary objectives of the study were to determine if endangered salt marsh harvest mice (Reithrodontomys raviventris), California clapper rails (Rallus longirostris), or other species of concern were represented, and to collect baseline data on transportation impacts to wildlife in the area. During 51 surveys, 291 dead birds (54.6%) and mammals (45.4%) were observed. Endangered species were not positively identified dead on the highway. In total, 28 bird, 10 mammal and 1 reptile species were positively identified along this section of highway that traverses tidal marsh and diked baylands (i.e., salt ponds, seasonal wetlands, and oat-hay agriculture fields). The mean animal fatality interval for both lanes was one road-kill every 2.1km (2.1 km SD).

  13. Guidebook of the Western United States: Part E - The Denver & Rio Grande Western Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Marius R.

    1922-01-01

    The United States of America comprise an area so vast in extent and so diverse in natural features as well as in characters due to human agency that the American citizen who knows thoroughly his own country must have traveled widely and observed wisely. To 'know America first' is a patriotic obligation, but to meet this obligation the railroad traveler needs to have his eyes directed toward the more important or essential things within his field of vision and then to have much that he sees explained by what is unseen in the swift passage of the train. Indeed, many things that attract his attention are inexplicable except as the story of the past is available to enable him to interpret the present. Herein lie the value and the charm of history, whether human or geologic. The present stimulus given to travel in the home country will encourage many thousands of Americans to study geography at first hand. To make this study most profitable the traveler needs a handbook that will answer the questions that come to his mind so readily along the way. Furthermore, the aim of such a guide should be to stimulate the eye in the selection of the essentials in the scene that so rapidly unfolds itself in the crossing of the continent. In recognition of the opportunity to render service of this kind to an unusually large number of American citizens, as well as to visitors from other countries, the United States Geological Survey has published a series of guidebooks covering four of the older railroad routes west of the Mississippi. The present volume is an addition to this series and covers one of the finest scenic routes of the continent. These books are educational in purpose, but the method adopted is to entertain the traveler by making more interesting what he sees from the car window. The plan of the series is to present authoritative information that may enable the reader to realize adequately the scenic and material resources of the region he is traversing, to comprehend

  14. 76 FR 37261 - Establishment of Helicopter Area Navigation (RNAV) Routes; Northeast United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ... by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) prefix ``TK'' followed by a 3-digit number. ICAO has allocated the number block 501 through 650 for U.S. use in identifying the routes. The two...

  15. Guidebook of the Western United States: Part D - The Shasta Route and Coast Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diller, Joseph Silas; ,

    1915-01-01

    The United States of America comprise an area so vast in extent and so diverse in natural features as well as in characters due to human agency that the American citizen who knows thoroughly his own country must have traveled widely and observed wisely. To 'know America first' is a patriotic obligation, but to meet this obligation the railroad traveler needs to have his eyes directed toward the more important or essential things within his field of vision and then to have much that he sees explained by what is unseen in the swift passage of the train. Indeed, many things that attract his attention are inexplicable except as the story of the past is available to enable him to interpret the present. Herein lie the value and the charm of history, whether human or geologic. The present stimulus given to travel in the home country will encourage many thousands of Americans to study geography at first hand. To make this study most profitable the traveler needs a handbook that will answer the questions that come to his mind so readily along the way. Furthermore, the aim of such a guide should be to stimulate the eye in the selection of the essentials in the scene that so rapidly unfolds itself in the crossing of the continent. In recognition of the opportunity afforded in 1915 to render service of this kind to an unusually large number of American citizens as well as to visitors from other countries, the United States Geological Survey has prepared a series of guidebooks covering four of the older railroad routes west of the Mississippi. These books are educational in purpose, but the method adopted is to entertain the traveler by making more interesting what he sees from the car window. The plan of the series is to present authoritative information that may enable the reader to realize adequately the scenic and material resources of the region he is traversing, to comprehend correctly the basis of its development, and above all to appreciate keenly the real value of the

  16. Self-Organized Link State Aware Routing for Multiple Mobile Agents in Wireless Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Akihiro; Nishi, Hiroaki

    Recently, the importance of data sharing structures in autonomous distributed networks has been increasing. A wireless sensor network is used for managing distributed data. This type of distributed network requires effective information exchanging methods for data sharing. To reduce the traffic of broadcasted messages, reduction of the amount of redundant information is indispensable. In order to reduce packet loss in mobile ad-hoc networks, QoS-sensitive routing algorithm have been frequently discussed. The topology of a wireless network is likely to change frequently according to the movement of mobile nodes, radio disturbance, or fading due to the continuous changes in the environment. Therefore, a packet routing algorithm should guarantee QoS by using some quality indicators of the wireless network. In this paper, a novel information exchanging algorithm developed using a hash function and a Boolean operation is proposed. This algorithm achieves efficient information exchanges by reducing the overhead of broadcasting messages, and it can guarantee QoS in a wireless network environment. It can be applied to a routing algorithm in a mobile ad-hoc network. In the proposed routing algorithm, a routing table is constructed by using the received signal strength indicator (RSSI), and the neighborhood information is periodically broadcasted depending on this table. The proposed hash-based routing entry management by using an extended MAC address can eliminate the overhead of message flooding. An analysis of the collision of hash values contributes to the determination of the length of the hash values, which is minimally required. Based on the verification of a mathematical theory, an optimum hash function for determining the length of hash values can be given. Simulations are carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm and to validate the theory in a general wireless network routing algorithm.

  17. A Study of Arizona's Teachers of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia; Gonzalez Canche, Manuel S.; Moll, Luis C.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: In September 2007, the Arizona State Board of Education adopted the Structured English Immersion (SEI) model proposed by the Arizona English Language Learner (ELL) Task Force.During the 2008-2009 academic year, it required all school districts to implement the SEI model.The SEI program, best known as the 4-hour English Language…

  18. Innovations in Arizona's Accountability Policies and Frameworks for Alternative Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlessman, Amy

    2014-01-01

    This study presents Arizona's innovations in academic accountability policy and academic accountability frameworks for alternative schools. A timeline of statutes and regulations including the State Board of Education approved alternative school definition provides Arizona's context for alternative school accountability policy and frameworks.…

  19. Pharmacokinetics and steady-state bioequivalence of treprostinil sodium (Remodulin) administered by the intravenous and subcutaneous route to normal volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laliberte, Kevin; Arneson, Carl; Jeffs, Roger; Hunt, Thomas; Wade, Michael

    2004-08-01

    Treprostinil sodium is a chemically stable analogue of prostacyclin administered as a chronic, continuous subcutaneous infusion for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). There has been significant clinical interest in determining the feasibility of delivering treprostinil by intravenous infusion. Therefore, a bioequivalence and comparative pharmacokinetics study of the two routes of administration was conducted in normal volunteers. A randomized, two-period, crossover study design was employed. Each subject was dosed at 10 ng/kg/min for 72 hours by each route, with the infusions separated by a 4-day wash-out period. In the 51 subjects who received at least 24 hours of treprostinil administered subcutaneously and intravenously, the steady-state ratios of the geometric means (i.v./s.c.) and 90% confidence intervals for AUCss and Cmaxss were 92.9% (89.8-96.1%) and 106% (99.4-113%), respectively. Secondary pharmacokinetic assessments confirmed the comparability of the two routes of administration at steady state, and also demonstrated that the elimination half-life of treprostinil was 4.4 and 4.6 hours following intravenous and subcutaneous administration, respectively. Based on these findings it was concluded that intravenously and subcutaneously administered treprostinil are bioequivalent at steady state.

  20. 77 FR 32024 - Designation of Areas for Air Quality Planning Purposes; State of Arizona; Pinal County; PM10

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-31

    ... causal relationship and upheld EPA's interpretation of ``contribute'' to mean ``sufficiently contribute... relationship between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and... redesignates an area for Clean Air Act planning purposes and does not alter the relationship or...

  1. Estimation of Potential Bridge Scour at Bridges on State Routes in South Dakota, 2003-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ryan F.; Fosness, Ryan L.

    2008-01-01

    Flowing water can erode (scour) soils and cause structural failure of a bridge by exposing or undermining bridge foundations (abutments and piers). A rapid scour-estimation technique, known as the level-1.5 method and developed by the U.S. Geological Survey, was used to evaluate potential scour at bridges in South Dakota in a study conducted in cooperation with the South Dakota Department of Transportation. This method was used during 2003-07 to estimate scour for the 100-year and 500-year floods at 734 selected bridges managed by the South Dakota Department of Transportation on State routes in South Dakota. Scour depths and other parameters estimated from the level-1.5 analyses are presented in tabular form. Estimates of potential contraction scour at the 734 bridges ranged from 0 to 33.9 feet for the 100-year flood and from 0 to 35.8 feet for the 500-year flood. Abutment scour ranged from 0 to 36.9 feet for the 100-year flood and from 0 to 45.9 feet for the 500-year flood. Pier scour ranged from 0 to 30.8 feet for the 100-year flood and from 0 to 30.7 feet for the 500-year flood. The scour depths estimated by using the level-1.5 method can be used by the South Dakota Department of Transportation and others to identify bridges that may be susceptible to scour. Scour at 19 selected bridges also was estimated by using the level-2 method. Estimates of contraction, abutment, and pier scour calculated by using the level-1.5 and level-2 methods are presented in tabular and graphical formats. Compared to level-2 scour estimates, the level-1.5 method generally overestimated scour as designed, or in a few cases slightly underestimated scour. Results of the level-2 analyses were used to develop regression equations for change in head and average velocity through the bridge opening. These regression equations derived from South Dakota data are compared to similar regression equations derived from Montana and Colorado data. Future level-1.5 scour investigations in South

  2. Monitoring Colonias Development along the United States-Mexico Border: A Process Application using GIS and Remote Sensing in Douglas, Arizona, and Agua Prieta, Sonora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Laura M.; Donelson, Angela J.; Pfeifer, Edwin L.; Lam, Alven H.; Osborn, Kenneth J.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have developed a joint project to create Internet-enabled geographic information systems (GIS) that will help cities along the United States-Mexico border deal with issues related to colonias. HUD defines colonias as rural neighborhoods in the United States-Mexico border region that lack adequate infrastructure or housing and other basic services. They typically have high poverty rates that make it difficult for residents to pay for roads, sanitary water and sewer systems, decent housing, street lighting, and other services through assessment. Many Federal agencies recognize colonias designations and provide funding assistance. It is the intention of this project to empower Arizona-Sonora borderland neighborhoods and community members by recognizing them as colonias. This recognition will result in eligibility for available economic subsidies and accessibility to geospatial tools and information for urban planning. The steps to achieve this goal include delineation of colonia-like neighborhoods, identification of their urbanization over time, development of geospatial databases describing their infrastructure, and establishment of a framework for distributing Web-based GIS decision support systems. A combination of imagery and infrastructure information was used to help delineate colonia boundaries. A land-use change analysis, focused on urbanization in the cities over a 30-year timeframe, was implemented. The results of this project are being served over the Internet, providing data to the public as well as to participating agencies. One of the initial study areas for this project was the City of Douglas, Ariz., and its Mexican sister-city Agua Prieta, Sonora, which are described herein. Because of its location on the border, this twin-cities area is especially well suited to international manufacturing and commerce, which has, in turn, led to an uncontrolled spread of

  3. Theoretical Studies of Possible Synthetic Routes for the High Energy Density Material Td N4: Excited Electronic States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2001-01-01

    Vertical electronic excitation energies for single states have been computed for the high energy density material (HEDM) Td N4 in order to assess possible synthetic routes that originate from excited electronic states of N2 molecules. Several ab initio theoretical approaches have been used, including complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF), state averaged CASSCF (SA-CASSCF), singles configuration interaction (CIS), CIS with second-order and third-order correlation corrections [CIS(D)) and CIS(3)], and linear response singles and doubles coupled-cluster (LRCCSD), which is the highest level of theory employed. Standard double zeta polarized (DZP) and triple zeta double polarized (TZ2P) one-particle basis sets were used. The CASSCF calculations are found to overestimate the excitation energies, while the SA-CASSCF approach rectifies this error to some extent, but not completely. The accuracy of the CIS calculations varied depending on the particular state, while the CIS(D), CIS(3), and LRCCSD results are in generally good agreement. Based on the LRCCSD calculations, the lowest six excited singlet states are 9.35(l(sup)T1), 10.01(l(sup)T2), 10.04(1(sup)A2), 10.07(1(sup)E), 10.12(2(sup)T1), and 10.42(2(sup)T2) eV above the ground state, respectively. Comparison of these excited state energies with the energies of possible excited states of N2+N2 fragments, leads us to propose that the most likely synthetic route for Td N4 involving this mechanism arises from combination of two bound quintet states of N2.

  4. Ethnic Segregation in Arizona Charter Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey D. Cobb

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the criticisms of charter schools is their potential to further stratify schools along ethnic and class lines. This study addressed whether Arizona charter schools are more ethnically segregated than traditional public schools. In 1996-97, Arizona had nearly one in four of all charter schools in the United States. The analysis involved a series of comparisons between the ethnic compositions of adjacent charter and public schools in Arizona's most populated region and its rural towns. This methodology differed from the approach of many evaluations of charter schools and ethnic stratification in that it incorporated the use of geographic maps to compare schools' ethnic make-ups. The ethnic compositions of 55 urban and 57 rural charter schools were inspected relative to their traditional public school neighbors.

  5. The vehicle routing problem: State of the art classification and review

    OpenAIRE

    Braekers, Kris; Ramaekers, Katrien; Van Nieuwenhuyse, Inneke

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, the Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP) and its variants have grown ever more popular in the academic literature. Yet, the problem characteristics and assumptions vary widely and few literature reviews have made an effort to classify the existing articles accordingly. In this article, we present a taxonomic review of the VRP literature published between 2009 and June 2015. Based on an adapted version of an existing comprehensive taxonomy, we classify 277 articles and analyze ...

  6. Update on Instrumentations for Cholecystectomies Performed via Transvaginal Route: State of the Art and Future Prospectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elia Pulvirenti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES is an innovative approach in which a flexible endoscope enters the abdominal cavity via the transesophageal, transgastric, transcolonic, transvaginal or transvescical route, combining the technique of minimally invasive surgery with flexible endoscopy. Several groups have described different modifications by using flexible endoscopes with different levels of laparoscopic assistance. Transvaginal cholecystectomy (TVC consists in accessing the abdominal cavity through a posterior colpotomy and using the vaginal incision as a visual or operative port. An increasing interest has arisen around the TVC; nevertheless, the most common and highlighted concern is about the lack of specific instruments dedicated to the vaginal access route. TVC should be distinguished between “pure”, in which the entire operation is performed through the transvaginal route, and “hybrid”, in which the colpotomy represents only a support to introduce instruments and the operation is performed mainly by the classic transabdominal-introduced instruments. Although this new technique seems very appealing for patients, on the other hand it is very challenging for the surgeon because of the difficulties related to the mode of access, the limited technology currently available and the risk of complications related to the organ utilized for access. In this brief review all the most recent advancements in the field of TVC's techniques and instrumentations are listed and discussed.

  7. Culturally Responsive Active Citizenship Education for Newcomer Students: A Cross-State Case Study of Two Teachers in Arizona and New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Pablo; Jaffee, Ashley Taylor

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines how two social studies teachers in New York and Arizona engage newcomer youth in active citizenship education. Using a framework of culturally responsive active citizenship education, this article sheds light on how two teachers, in two different social, political, and educational contexts, enact critical citizenship practices…

  8. Calibrating a Rainfall-Runoff and Routing Model for the Continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowfsky, S.; Li, S.; Assteerawatt, A.; Tillmanns, S.; Hilberts, A.

    2014-12-01

    Catastrophe risk models are widely used in the insurance industry to estimate the cost of risk. The models consist of hazard models linked to vulnerability and financial loss models. In flood risk models, the hazard model generates inundation maps. In order to develop country wide inundation maps for different return periods a rainfall-runoff and routing model is run using stochastic rainfall data. The simulated discharge and runoff is then input to a two dimensional inundation model, which produces the flood maps. In order to get realistic flood maps, the rainfall-runoff and routing models have to be calibrated with observed discharge data. The rainfall-runoff model applied here is a semi-distributed model based on the Topmodel (Beven and Kirkby, 1979) approach which includes additional snowmelt and evapotranspiration models. The routing model is based on the Muskingum-Cunge (Cunge, 1969) approach and includes the simulation of lakes and reservoirs using the linear reservoir approach. Both models were calibrated using the multiobjective NSGA-II (Deb et al., 2002) genetic algorithm with NLDAS forcing data and around 4500 USGS discharge gauges for the period from 1979-2013. Additional gauges having no data after 1979 were calibrated using CPC rainfall data. The model performed well in wetter regions and shows the difficulty of simulating areas with sinks such as karstic areas or dry areas. Beven, K., Kirkby, M., 1979. A physically based, variable contributing area model of basin hydrology. Hydrol. Sci. Bull. 24 (1), 43-69. Cunge, J.A., 1969. On the subject of a flood propagation computation method (Muskingum method), J. Hydr. Research, 7(2), 205-230. Deb, K., Pratap, A., Agarwal, S., Meyarivan, T., 2002. A fast and elitist multiobjective genetic algorithm: NSGA-II, IEEE Transactions on evolutionary computation, 6(2), 182-197.

  9. Full-Depth Pavement Reclamation with Foamed Asphalt: First-Level Analysis Report on HVS Testing on State Route 89

    OpenAIRE

    Theyse, Hecter; Long, Fenella; Jones, David; Harvey, John T

    2006-01-01

    This report focuses on the HVS testing of a foamed asphalt treated, reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) on State Route 89 near Sierraville. The report discusses the expected behavior of the HVS test sections, presents the results from field surveys done during June 2003, October 2003 and May 2004 as well as the 1st level analysis of HVS results from the test site. Results from field surveys done prior to, during and after HVS testing show that the pavement structure of the HVS test sections on S...

  10. Arizona Geophysical Data Base

    OpenAIRE

    McLeod, Ronald G.

    1981-01-01

    A series of digital data sets were compiled for input into a geophysical data base for a one degree quadrangle in Arizona. Using a Landsat digital mosaic as a base, information on topography, geology, gravity as well as Seasat radar imagery were registered. Example overlays and tabulations are performed.

  11. Arizona Academic Standards: Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication contains Arizona public schools' academic standards for kindergarten. The contents of this document include the following: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--Kindergarten; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Readiness (Kindergarten); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Readiness…

  12. A spatial model of potential jaguar habitat in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatten, J.R.; Averill-Murray, A.; van Pelt, W.E.

    2005-01-01

    The jaguar (Panthera onca) is an endangered species that occasionally visits the southwestern United States from Mexico. The number of jaguar sightings per decade has declined over the last 100 years in Arizona, USA, raising conservation concerns for the species at a local and national level. In 1997, state, federal, and local governments with land-management responsibilities agreed to characterize and identify potential jaguar habitat in Arizona and New Mexico. Specifically, the objectives of our analysis were 2-fold: (1) characterize potential jaguar habitat in Arizona from historic sighting records and (2) create a statewide habitat suitability map. We used a Geographic Information System (GIS) to characterize potential jaguar habitat by overlaying historic jaguar sightings (25) on landscape and habitat features believed important (e.g., vegetation biomes and series, elevation, terrain ruggedness, proximity to perennial or intermittent water sources, human density). The amount of Arizona (%) identified as potential jaguar habitat ranged from 21% to 30% depending on the input variables. Most jaguar sightings were in scrub grasslands between 1,220 and 1,829-m elevation in southeastern Arizona, in intermediately to extremely rugged terrain, and within 10 km of a water source. Conservation efforts should focus on protecting the most suitable jaguar habitat in southeastern Arizona (i.e., Santa Cruz, Pima, Cochise, Pinal, Graham counties), travel corridors within and outside Arizona, and jaguar habitat in the Sierra Madres of Sonora, Mexico.

  13. Modeling Routing Overhead Generated by Wireless Proactive Routing Protocols

    CERN Document Server

    Javaid, Nadeem; Javaid, Akmal; Malik, Shahzad A

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a detailed framework consisting of modeling of routing overhead generated by three widely used proactive routing protocols; Destination-Sequenced Distance Vector (DSDV), Fish-eye State Routing (FSR) and Optimized Link State Routing (OLSR). The questions like, how these protocols differ from each other on the basis of implementing different routing strategies, how neighbor estimation errors affect broadcast of route requests, how reduction of broadcast overhead achieves bandwidth, how to cope with the problem of mobility and density, etc, are attempted to respond. In all of the above mentioned situations, routing overhead and delay generated by the chosen protocols can exactly be calculated from our modeled equations. Finally, we analyze the performance of selected routing protocols using our proposed framework in NS-2 by considering different performance parameters; Route REQuest (RREQ) packet generation, End-to-End Delay (E2ED) and Normalized Routing Load (NRL) with respect to varyi...

  14. Finding optimal solutions for vehicle routing problem with pickup and delivery services with time windows: A dynamic programming approach based on state-space-time network representations

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Optimization of on-demand transportation systems and ride-sharing services involves solving a class of complex vehicle routing problems with pickup and delivery with time windows (VRPPDTW). This paper first proposes a new time-discretized multi-commodity network flow model for the VRPPDTW based on the integration of vehicles carrying states within space-time transportation networks, so as to allow a joint optimization of passenger-to-vehicle assignment and turn-by-turn routing in congested tr...

  15. August 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The August 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 8/27/14 at Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were about 30 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep and radiology communities. A presentation was given by Julie Reid of the American Lung Association in Arizona on their Lung Force initiative. This is an initiative to make women more aware that lung cancer is the number 1 cause of cancer deaths in women. There will be a fund raising Lung Force Walk on November 15, 2014 in Phoenix. More information can be found at http://www.lungforce.org/walk-events or http://www.lung.org/associations/states/arizona/local-offices/phoenix/ or contact Julie Reid at JReid@Lung Arizona.org or (602 258-7505. A discussion was instigated by Dr. Parides on whether there is an increased risk of clinical Valley Fever in patients previously treated who begin therapy with biological therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. The ...

  16. Phosphate Activation via Reduced Oxidation State Phosphorus (P. Mild Routes to Condensed-P Energy Currency Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire R. Cousins

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of mechanisms for phosphorylating organic and inorganic molecules is a key step en route to the earliest living systems. At the heart of all contemporary biochemical systems reside reactive phosphorus (P molecules (such as adenosine triphosphate, ATP as energy currency molecules to drive endergonic metabolic processes and it has been proposed that a predecessor of such molecules could have been pyrophosphate [P2O74−; PPi(V]. Arguably the most geologically plausible route to PPi(V is dehydration of orthophosphate, Pi(V, normally a highly endergonic process in the absence of mechanisms for activating Pi(V. One possible solution to this problem recognizes the presence of reactive-P containing mineral phases, such as schreibersite [(Fe,Ni3P] within meteorites whose abundance on the early Earth would likely have been significant during a putative Hadean-Archean heavy bombardment. Here, we propose that the reduced oxidation state P-oxyacid, H-phosphite [HPO32−; Pi(III] could have activated Pi(V towards condensation via the intermediacy of the condensed oxyacid pyrophosphite [H2P2O52−; PPi(III]. We provide geologically plausible provenance for PPi(III along with evidence of its ability to activate Pi(V towards PPi(V formation under mild conditions (80 °C in water.

  17. Phosphate Activation via Reduced Oxidation State Phosphorus (P). Mild Routes to Condensed-P Energy Currency Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Terence P.; Bryant, David E.; Herschy, Barry; Marriott, Katie E. R.; Cosgrove, Nichola E.; Pasek, Matthew A.; Atlas, Zachary D.; Cousins, Claire R.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of mechanisms for phosphorylating organic and inorganic molecules is a key step en route to the earliest living systems. At the heart of all contemporary biochemical systems reside reactive phosphorus (P) molecules (such as adenosine triphosphate, ATP) as energy currency molecules to drive endergonic metabolic processes and it has been proposed that a predecessor of such molecules could have been pyrophosphate [P2O74−; PPi(V)]. Arguably the most geologically plausible route to PPi(V) is dehydration of orthophosphate, Pi(V), normally a highly endergonic process in the absence of mechanisms for activating Pi(V). One possible solution to this problem recognizes the presence of reactive-P containing mineral phases, such as schreibersite [(Fe,Ni)3P] within meteorites whose abundance on the early Earth would likely have been significant during a putative Hadean-Archean heavy bombardment. Here, we propose that the reduced oxidation state P-oxyacid, H-phosphite [HPO32−; Pi(III)] could have activated Pi(V) towards condensation via the intermediacy of the condensed oxyacid pyrophosphite [H2P2O52−; PPi(III)]. We provide geologically plausible provenance for PPi(III) along with evidence of its ability to activate Pi(V) towards PPi(V) formation under mild conditions (80 °C) in water. PMID:25369812

  18. Kaljujooniste keskus Arizonas / Andres Kurg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kurg, Andres, 1975-

    1998-01-01

    Arhitekt William Bruderi projekteeritud kaljujooniste uurimis- ja eksponeerimiskeskus Phoenixis, Arizonas säilitab kivijooniseid, mille autoriteks olid sealset piirkonda kuni 16. sajandini asustanud hohokamid

  19. Kaljujooniste keskus Arizonas / Andres Kurg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kurg, Andres, 1975-

    1998-01-01

    Arhitekt William Bruderi projekteeritud kaljujooniste uurimis- ja eksponeerimiskeskus Phoenixis, Arizonas säilitab kivijooniseid, mille autoriteks olid sealset piirkonda kuni 16. sajandini asustanud hohokamid

  20. Libraries in Arizona: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Library → Libraries in Arizona URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/arizona.html Libraries in Arizona ... Candy Lane Cottonwood, AZ 86326 928-639-6444 http://nahealth.com Flagstaff Flagstaff Medical Center John B. ...

  1. Evaluation of the Arizona health care cost-containment system

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    This article evaluates Arizona's alternative to the acute portion of Medicaid, the Arizona Health Care Cost-Containment System (AHCCCS), during its first 18 months of operation from October 1982 through March 1984. It focuses on the program's implementation and describes and evaluates the program's innovative features. The features of the program outlined in the original AHCCCS legislation included: Competitive bidding, prepaid capitation of providers, capitation of the State by the Health Ca...

  2. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 13 (IRAVT013300133) on State Route 133, crossing an Ira Brook Tributary, Ira, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmler, Erick M.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure IRA-VT01330013 on State Route 133 crossing an Ira Brook Tributary, Ira, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  3. Results of the radiological survey at Essex Street and State Route 17 (MJ036), Maywood, New Jersey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-02-01

    As a result of the Energy and Water Appropriations Act of Fiscal Year 1984, the property discussed in this report and properties in its vicinity contaminated with residues from the former Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. As part of this project, DOE is conducting radiological surveys in the vicinity of the site to identify properties contaminated with residues derived from the MCW. The principal radionuclide of concern is thorium-232. The radiological survey discussed in this report is part of that effort and was conducted, at the request of DOE, by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A radiological survey of the commercial property at Essex Street and State Route 17, Maywood, New Jersey, was conducted during 1987. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Arizona Measure of Academic Progress: Growth in Arizona Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, David; Aportela, Anabel

    This document contains reports of school district results on the Arizona Measure of Academic Progress by school and grade level for the 1999-2000 school year. Lengthy tables present results for reading and mathematics showing the change in achievement between grades each year from grades 2 to 3 to grades 7 to 8. The Arizona Measure of Academic…

  5. Chemical-Potential Route: A Hidden Percus-Yevick Equation of State for Hard Spheres

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    The chemical potential of a hard-sphere fluid can be expressed in terms of the contact value of the radial distribution function of a solute particle with a diameter varying from zero to that of the solvent particles. Exploiting the explicit knowledge of such a contact value within the Percus--Yevick (PY) theory, and using standard thermodynamic relations, a hitherto unknown PY equation of state, $p/\\rho k_BT=-(9/\\eta)\\ln(1-\\eta)-(16-31\\eta)/2(1-\\eta)^2$, is unveiled. This equation of state t...

  6. Lords of the Silk Route: Violent Non-State Actors in Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-01

    achieve an understanding of the transformational process. Once Colonel Khudoiberdiyev’s private army emerges from the primal soup of a 8 weak state and...organization. This approach rejects primordial views of identity espoused by global chaos theorists, which see identity cleavages as the underlying

  7. Arizona Conserve Water Educators Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project WET Foundation, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This award-winning, 350-page, full-color book provides a thorough study of Arizona water resources from a water conservation perspective. Its background section contains maps, graphs, diagrams and photos that facilitate the teaching of 15 interactive, multi-disciplinary lessons to K-12 students. In addition, 10 Arizona case studies are highlighted…

  8. Rapid Solid-State Metathesis Routes to Nanostructured Silicon-Germainum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaner, Richard B. (Inventor); Bux, Sabah K. (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Rodriguez, Marc (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Methods for producing nanostructured silicon and silicon-germanium via solid state metathesis (SSM). The method of forming nanostructured silicon comprises the steps of combining a stoichiometric mixture of silicon tetraiodide (SiI4) and an alkaline earth metal silicide into a homogeneous powder, and initating the reaction between the silicon tetraiodide (SiI4) with the alkaline earth metal silicide. The method of forming nanostructured silicon-germanium comprises the steps of combining a stoichiometric mixture of silicon tetraiodide (SiI4) and a germanium based precursor into a homogeneous powder, and initiating the reaction between the silicon tetraiodide (SiI4) with the germanium based precursors.

  9. History of digital radiology at the University of Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capp, M. Paul; Roehrig, Hans; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.

    2014-09-01

    In the early 60s, the Arizona Board of Regents recruited a national committee, all outside the state of Arizona, and asked them two questions: 1. Is it time for the state of Arizona to begin its first medical school? 2. If affirmative, where should the medical school be located? The committee spent two years evaluating the question and returned the following answers: 1. Yes, the state has the population and resources to begin its first medical school. 2. It should be located at the University of Arizona in Tucson. The primary reason for recommending the U of A was its strong base and commitment to research. To avoid state politics the Arizona Board of Regents had previously decided to accept whatever recommendations came from the neutral national committee and these, word for word, would be sent to the state legislature. There was much political discussion. The legislature finally affirmed the recommendations of the board of regents and the medical school was then located at the U of A.

  10. Rapid solid-state metathesis route to transition-metal doped titanias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Nathaniel; Perera, Sujith; Gillan, Edward G.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid solid-state metathesis (SSM) reactions are often short-lived highly exothermic reactions that yield a molten alkali halide salt that aids in product growth and crystallization. SSM reactions may also produce kinetically stabilized structures due to the short (seconds) reaction times. This report describes the investigation of rapid SSM reactions in the synthesis of transition-metal doped titanias (M-TiO2). The dopant targeted compositions were ten mol percent and based on elemental analysis, many of the M-TiO2 samples were close to this targeted level. Based on surface analysis, some samples showed large enrichment in surface dopant content, particularly chromium and manganese doped samples. Due to the highly exothermic nature of these reactions, rutile structured TiO2 was observed in all cases. The M-TiO2 samples are visible colored and show magnetic and optical properties consistent with the dopant in an oxide environment. UV and visible photocatalytic experiments with these visibly colored rutile M-TiO2 powders showed that many of them are strongly absorbent for methylene blue dye and degrade the dye under both UV and visible light illumination. This work may open up SSM reactions as an alternate non-thermodynamic reaction strategy for dopant incorporation into a wide range of oxide and non-oxides.

  11. Rapid solid-state metathesis route to transition-metal doped titanias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Nathaniel; Perera, Sujith; Gillan, Edward G., E-mail: edward-gillan@uiowa.edu

    2015-12-15

    Rapid solid-state metathesis (SSM) reactions are often short-lived highly exothermic reactions that yield a molten alkali halide salt that aids in product growth and crystallization. SSM reactions may also produce kinetically stabilized structures due to the short (seconds) reaction times. This report describes the investigation of rapid SSM reactions in the synthesis of transition-metal doped titanias (M–TiO{sub 2}). The dopant targeted compositions were ten mol percent and based on elemental analysis, many of the M–TiO{sub 2} samples were close to this targeted level. Based on surface analysis, some samples showed large enrichment in surface dopant content, particularly chromium and manganese doped samples. Due to the highly exothermic nature of these reactions, rutile structured TiO{sub 2} was observed in all cases. The M–TiO{sub 2} samples are visible colored and show magnetic and optical properties consistent with the dopant in an oxide environment. UV and visible photocatalytic experiments with these visibly colored rutile M–TiO{sub 2} powders showed that many of them are strongly absorbent for methylene blue dye and degrade the dye under both UV and visible light illumination. This work may open up SSM reactions as an alternate non-thermodynamic reaction strategy for dopant incorporation into a wide range of oxide and non-oxides.

  12. Scripted Mobile Network Routing in a Contested Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Protocol Comparisons Iwata measures on-demand routing , such as AODV , Fisheye State Routing (FSR...comparison between DSDV, CGSR, The Wireless Routing Protocol (WRP), AODV , DSR, TORA, Associativity-Based Routing (ABR) and Signal Stability Routing (SSR...with AODV . The modified routing does not change AODV , and can be used with any routing protocol . AODV is tested with and without the plan

  13. Evaluation of geothermal cooling systems for Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

    1982-08-01

    Arizona consumes nearly 50 percent more electricity during the peak summer season of May through part of October, due to the high cooling load met by electrical-driven air conditioning units. This study evaluates two geothermal-driven cooling systems that consume less electricity, namely, absorption cooling and heat pumps. Adsorption cooling requires a geothermal resource above 105{sup 0}C (220{sup 0}F) in order to operate at a reasonable efficiency and capacity. Geothermal resources at these temperatures or above are believed existing in the Phoenix and Tucson areas, but at such depths that geothermal-driven absorption systems have high capital investments. Such capital investments are uneconomical when paid out over only five months of operation each year, but become economical when cascaded with other geothermal uses. There may be other regions of the state, where geothermal resources exist at 105{sup 0}C (220{sup 0}F) or higher at much less depth, such as the Casa Grande/Coolidge or Hyder areas, which might be attractive locations for future plants of the high-technology industries. Geothermal assisted heat pumps have been shown in this study to be economical for nearly all areas of Arizona. They are more economical and reliable than air-to-air heat pumps. Such systems in Arizona depend upon a low-temperature geothermal resource in the narrow range of 15.5 to 26.6{sup 0}C (60 to 80{sup 0}F), and are widely available in Arizona. The state has over 3000 known (existing) thermal wells, out of a total of about 30,000 irrigation wells.

  14. Routes and Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — he Routes_Stations table is composed of fixed rail transit systems within the Continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico....

  15. Analysis of Acceleration, Airspeed, and Gust-Velocity Data From a Four-Engine Transport Airplane Operating Over a Northwestern United States Alaska Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Jerome N.; Copp, Martin R.

    1959-01-01

    Acceleration, airspeed, and altitude data obtained with an NACA VGH recorder from a four-engine commercial transport airplane operating over a northwestern United States-Alaska route were evaluated to determine the magnitude and frequency of occurrence of gust and maneuver accelerations., operating airspeeds, and gust velocities. The results obtained were then compared with the results previously reported in NACA Technical Note 3475 for two similar airplanes operating over transcontinental routes in the United States. No large variations in the gust experience for the three operations were noted. The results indicate that the gust-load experience of the present operation closely approximated that of the central transcontinental route in the United States with which it is compared and showed differences of about 4 to 1 when compared with that of the southern transcontinental route in the United States. In general, accelerations due to gusts occurred much more frequently than those due to operational maneuvers. At a measured normal-acceleration increment of 0.5g, accelerations due to gusts occurred roughly 35 times more frequently than those due to operational maneuvers.

  16. Non-invasive genetic sampling of Southern Mule Deer (Odocoileus hemionus fuliginatus) reveals limited movement across California State Route 67 in San Diego County

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitelberg, Anna; Vandergast, Amy

    2016-01-01

    —The Southern Mule Deer is a mobile but non-migratory large mammal found throughout southern California and is a covered species in the San Diego Multi-Species Conservation Plan. We assessed deer movement and population connectivity across California State Route 67 and two smaller roads in eastern San Diego County using non-invasive genetic sampling. We collected deer scat pellets between April and November 2015, and genotyped pellets at 15 microsatellites and a sex determination marker. We successfully genotyped 71 unique individuals from throughout the study area and detected nine recapture events. Recaptures were generally found close to original capture locations (within 1.5 km). We did not detect recaptures across roads; however, pedigree analysis detected 21 first order relative pairs, of which approximately 20% were found across State Route 67. Exact tests comparing allele frequencies between groups of individuals in pre-defined geographic clusters detected significant genetic differentiation across State Route 67. In contrast, the assignment-based algorithm of STRUCTURE supported a single genetic cluster across the study area. Our data suggest that State Route 67 may reduce, but does not preclude, movement and gene flow of Southern Mule Deer.

  17. Ecofriendly and Simplified Synthetic Route for Polysulfone-based Solid-State Alkaline Electrolyte Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nittaya Pantamas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Recently the alkaline system for fuel cell enhance their presence because of possibility of no-precious-metal catalyst and low over potential at cathode reaction. The anion exchange membrane for alkaline membrane fuel cell should be a key technology in order to achieve the practical performance as fuel cells. Alkaline anion exchange membranes of high ionic conductivities are made from polysulfone by adding a chloromethyl pendant group to the polysulfone, follow by reacting the chloromethyl group with amine to form quarternary ammonium pendant groups which act as the counter ion for hydroxide anion. Chloromethyl methyl ether, N,N-dimethylformamide and methanol are commonly used as agent for providing excellent conversions, but they are now considered to be carcinogenic. To avoid the use of such hazardous materials, in our work we used paraformaldehyde, chlorotrimethylsilane, N-methylpyrrolidone and ethanol as agent for providing conversion. Approach: Polysulfone (PS was chloromethylated using chlorotrimethylsilane as a chloromethylation reagent, resulting in the formation of Chloromethylated Polysulfone (CMPS. CMPS was converted to a quaternized form using trimethylamine and precipitated into ethanol. The powder was dissolved in N-methylpyrrolidone, followed by aminated with a 25 wt% trimethylamine. Results: The resulting solution was cast onto a flat glass plate and dried in an oven. The membrane was immersed in KOH solution for 24 h to replace the Cl- anion in the polymer with OH-. Conclusion: The swelling behavior of polysulfone-based solid-state alkaline electrolyte membrane was closely related to the degree of water uptake (25 WU%, 7.5 SD% and the ion-exchange capacity was 1.05 mmol g-1, which is sufficient for electrolyte membranes used in alkaline fuel cells.

  18. SUPERSTITION WILDERNESS, ARIZONA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Donald W.; Jinks, Jimmie E.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic studies and mineral evaluations most of the Superstition Wilderness and adjoining areas are judged to have little promise for occurrence of mineral resources. However, two areas in an east-trending zone near the southern margin of the area, marked by spotty occurrences of mineralized rock, prospect pits, and a band of geochemical anomalies that coincides with aligned magnetic anomalies, are considered to have probable mineral-resource potential. This zone lies within about 6 mi of two productive mines in Arizona's great copper belt, and the trend of the zone is parallel to many of the significant mineralized structures of this belt. A small isolated uranium anomaly was found in the northeastern part of the wilderness, but no evidence of other energy resources, such as petroleum, coal, or geothermal, was found.

  19. Sequentially and alternatively developed heights for two representative bench marks: near Palmdale, California and along the Bill Williams River, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Thomas D.; Elliot, Michael R.

    1985-01-01

    This report consists chiefly of 41 tables that both describe and fully document the reconstructions of a series of alternately developed heights based on levelings leading into two representative bench marks in the southwestern United States. One of these marks, 3219, Vincent, California (fig. 1), lies within the area of the Pacific-North American plate boundary; the other, 22Q, Bill Williams River, Arizona (fig. 1), falls within what is believed to be a singularly stable section of southwestern Arizona. Because the levelings that produced these heights were characterized by especially disparate routes with respect to both terrain and climate, the resulting heights provide a test for the existence and magnitude of path-dependent error in geodetic leveling. These two marks were chosen both because of their relative stability with respect to adjacent marks and because their tectonic stability (or instability) can be inferred from the geologic record. Specifically, we can reasonably speculate that 3219 may have sustained measurably significant tectonic displacements during the 20th century, whereas 22Q probably has remained virtually invariant with respect to any fixed datum during the same period. Bench mark 3219 is a standard Geological Survey iron post stamped "3219" near the Southern Pacific Railroad station at Vincent (U.S. Geological Survey, 1898, p. 392); 22Q is a brass cap stamped "22Q (MWD)" set in a concrete post located in a gully immediately north of the Bill Williams River, Arizona (USC&GS Quad. 34114). 3219 was established by the Geological Survey no later than 1897 (Gannett and Baldwin, 1907, p. 365); 22Q was established by the Metropolitan Water District of southern California in advance of the 1931 control surveys along the projected route of the Colorado River Aqueduct.

  20. March 2017 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The March 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 at the HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There 11 attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, thoracic surgery and radiology communities. There was a discussion of supporting the Tobacco 21 bill which had been introduced into the Arizona State Legislature. The bill was assigned to the House Commerce Committee but was not scheduled for a hearing by the Chair-Representative, Jeff Wininger from Chandler. It seems likely that the bill will be reintroduced in the future and the Arizona Thoracic Society will support the bill in the future. Three cases were presented: 1. Dr. Bridgett Ronan presented a 57-year-old man with cough and shortness of breath. His physical examination and spirometry were unremarkable. A thoracic CT scan showed large calcified and noncalcified pleural plaques and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. …

  1. September 2017 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The September 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, September 27, 2017 at the HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 16 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. There was a discussion of the Tobacco 21 bill which had been introduced the last session in the Arizona State Legislature. Since it seems likely that the bill will be reintroduced, the Arizona Thoracic Society will support the bill in the future. Dr. Rick Robbins announced that the SWJPCC has applied to be included in PubMed. In addition, Dr. Robbins was assigned the task of tracking down the campaign contributions to congressional members from the tobacco PAC before the next election. There were 7 case presentations: 1.\tAshley L. Garrett, MD, pulmonary fellow at Mayo, presented an elderly man with insulin-dependent diabetes who felt he …

  2. DNA fingerprinting of Southern Mule Deer (Odocoileus hemionus fuliginatus) to determine movement across California State Route 67

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The goal of this project was to primarily assess east-west connectivity across Route 67 and secondarily, north-south connectivity across Scripps Poway Parkway and...

  3. 76 FR 42155 - Arizona Disaster #AZ-00017 Declaration of Economic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Arizona Disaster AZ-00017 Declaration of Economic Injury AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) declaration for the State of Arizona, dated 07/11/2011. Incident: Wallow Fire. Incident Period: 05/29/2011...

  4. Forgotten History: Mexican American School Segregation in Arizona from 1900-1951

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jeanne M.

    2008-01-01

    This article documents the efforts by Mexican Americans to challenge school segregation in Arizona in the first half of the twentieth century. As in Texas and California, although state law never formally mandated the segregation of Mexican American students, school districts in Arizona often established separate "Mexican Schools" for…

  5. The Achievement Progress of English Learner Students in Arizona. REL 2015-098

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Eric; Tran, Loan; Huang, Min; Yu, Airong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the learning trajectories of the growing numbers of English learner students in Arizona, especially those who struggle to pass state English language arts and math content tests. This study followed three cohorts of English learner students in Arizona (kindergarten, grade 3, and grade 6) over six school…

  6. A Cultural Resources Site Inventory at Painted Rock Reservoir, Maricopa County, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-01

    sherds" present (Teague and Baldwin 1978:31). It was postulated that site PRS-5 may represent residual artifactual material from site AZ Z:2:2. The... Agua Fria River Valley, Arizona. Arizona State University Anthropological Researach Paper, No. 7. Tempe. -88- 70-I3772 A CULTURAL RESOURCES SITE

  7. Voice Traffic over Mobile Ad Hoc Networks: A Performance Analysis of the Optimized Link State Routing Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-26

    Investigating MANETs in a VoIP Context. Prior research has inves- tigated the performance of MANETS carrying VoIP traffic. Thibodeau et al. studied whether...number of hops contained in the repaired route is observed. Thibodeau et al. concludes that node mobility and node density have limited influence on...testbeds. Most studies account for mobile nodes and study the routing protocols AODV and OLSR. For example, Thibodeau et al. study the effects of AODV

  8. Walk the Line: The Development of Route Selection Standards for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-level Radioactive Waste in the United States - 13519

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilger, Fred [Black Mountain Research, Henderson, NV 81012 (United States); Halstead, Robert J. [State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects, Carson City, NV 80906 (United States); Ballard, James D. [Department of Sociology, California State University, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Although storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) are widely dispersed throughout the United States, these materials are also relatively concentrated in terms of geographic area. That is, the impacts of storage occur in a very small geographic space. Once shipments begin to a national repository or centralized interim storage facility, the impacts of SNF and HLRW will become more geographically distributed, more publicly visible, and almost certainly more contentious. The selection of shipping routes will likely be a major source of controversy. This paper describes the development of procedures, regulations, and standards for the selection of routes used to ship spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States. The paper begins by reviewing the circumstances around the development of HM-164 routing guidelines. The paper discusses the significance of New York City versus the Department of Transportation and application of HM-164. The paper describes the methods used to implement those regulations. The paper will also describe the current HM-164 designated routes and will provide a summary data analysis of their characteristics. This analysis will reveal the relatively small spatial scale of the effects of HM 164. The paper will then describe subsequent developments that have affected route selection for these materials. These developments include the use of 'representative routes' found in the Department of Energy (DOE) 2008 Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the formerly proposed Yucca Mountain geologic repository. The paper will describe recommendations related to route selection found in the National Academy of Sciences 2006 report Going the Distance, as well as recommendations found in the 2012 Final Report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future. The paper will examine recently promulgated federal regulations (HM-232) for selection of rail

  9. Guidebook of the Western United States: Part B - The Overland Route, With a Side Trip to Yellowstone Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Willis Thomas; Stone, Ralph Walter; Gale, Hoyt Stoddard; ,

    1915-01-01

    The United States of America comprise an area so vast in extent and so diverse in natural features as well as in characters due to human agency that the American citizen who knows thoroughly his own country must have traveled widely and observed wisely. To 'know America first' is a patriotic obligation, but to meet this obligation the railroad traveler needs to have his eyes directed toward the more important or essential things within his field of vision and then to have much that he sees explained by what is unseen in the swift passage of the train. Indeed, many things that attract his attention are inexplicable except as the story of the past is available to enable him to interpret the present. Herein lie the value and the charm of history, whether human or geologic. The present stimulus given to travel in the home country will encourage many thousands of Americans to study geography at first hand. To make this study most profitable the traveler needs a handbook that will answer the questions that come to his mind so readily along the way. Furthermore, the aim of such a guide should be to stimulate the eye in the selection of the essentials in the scene that so rapidly unfolds itself in the crossing of the continent. In recognition of the opportunity afforded in 1915 to render service of this kind to an unusually large number of American citizens as well as to visitors from other countries, the United States Geological Survey has prepared a series of guidebooks covering four of the older railroad routes west of the Mississippi. These books are educational in purpose, but the method adopted is to entertain the traveler by making more interesting what he sees from the car window. The plan of the series is to present authoritative information that may enable the reader to realize adequately the scenic and material resources of the region he is traversing, to comprehend correctly the basis of its development, and above all to appreciate keenly the real value of the

  10. Structural and Magnetic Characterizations of Nano Sized Grain Zinc Ferrite/Hydroxyapatite Ceramic Prepared by Solid State Reaction Route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankaew, Piyapong; Klumdoung, Pattarinee

    2015-11-01

    A promising composite of bioactive hydroxyapatite (HAp) and zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4) has potentials for future bone reinforcing formation. In present study, HAp and ZnFe2O4 composite ceramic was prepared by solid state reaction route for easier control of structural and magnetic characteristics and with low cost. HAp powder was synthesized by precipitation method from chicken eggshell. Mixed powders with varying ZnFe2O4/HAp weight ratios from 2-10 wt% were milled together and uniaxially pressed and then sintered at 1200 degrees C for 3 hours. The XRD results showing no other phases of composite ceramics with only HAp and ZnFe2O4 phases were identified, indicating high stability of HAp property. Phase fractions of ZnFe2O4 were found to increase from 10.8 to 18.73 wt% with increasing content of ZnFe2O4. FT-IR results were only revealed vibration bands of standard HAp phase. SEM results revealed primary grains sizes of the prepared ceramics in nano scale. The BET surface area and pore volume increased with increasing content of ZnFe2O4 in composite ceramics. The VSM results of composites with increasing ZnFe2O4 content had been shown with increasing magnetization from 0.05 to 1.85 emu/g while their coercivities were decreased from 44 to 24 Oe. Higher magnetization as well as higher super paramagnetic behavior could be achieved with increasing the studied ZnFe2O4 weight ratios in ZnFe2O4/HAp composite ceramics, which can be tailored for specific applications.

  11. Geomorphic response of the North Fork Stillaguamish River to the State Route 530 landslide near Oso, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Scott A.; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Wallick, J. Rose; Mastin, Mark C.; Foreman, James R.

    2017-08-03

    On March 22, 2014, the State Route 530 Landslide near Oso, Washington mobilized 8 million cubic meters of unconsolidated Pleistocene material, creating a valley‑spanning deposit that fully impounded the North Fork Stillaguamish River. The river overtopped the 8-meter high debris impoundment within 25 hours and began steadily incising a new channel through the center of the deposit. Repeat topographic surveys, sediment transport measurements, bedload transport models, and observations of downstream channel change were used to document the establishment of that new channel through the landslide and assess the potential for downstream aggradation or channel change that might increase downstream flood hazards.Efficient erosion of the landslide deposit, associated with the steep knickzone formed by the downstream edge of the deposit, resulted in the re-establishment of a 20–40 meters wide, deeply inset channel through the entire deposit by May 2014, 2 months after the landslide. The mean water-surface elevation of the channel through the landslide decreased 7 meters during that 2-month period, and was about 1 meter above the pre-landslide profile in July 2014. The 2014–15 flood season, which included flows near the 0.5 annual exceedance probability discharge (2-year flood), widened the channel tens of meters, and further lowered the water-surface profile 0.5 meter. The planform position evolved slowly as a result of 5–20-meter high banks predominantly composed of clay-rich, cohesive lacustrine material. Erosion of the landslide deposit delivered a total of 820 thousand metric tons of sediment to the North Fork Stillaguamish River over the 18 months following the landslide. The sediment delivery from the deposit was predominantly fine grained: 77 percent (by mass) of the eroded material was silt or clay (less than 0.063 millimeter [mm]), 19 percent sand (0.063–2 mm), and 4 percent pebbles and cobbles (greater than 2 mm).Over the 18 months following the

  12. Barringer Meteor Crater, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Barringer Crater, also known as 'Meteor Crater,' is a 1,300-meter (0.8 mile) diameter, 174-meter (570-feet) deep hole in the flat-lying desert sandstones 30 kilometers (18.6 miles) west of Winslow, Arizona. Since the 1890s geologic studies here played a leading role in developing an understanding of impact processes on the Earth, the moon and elsewhere in the solar system.This view was acquired by the Landsat 4 satellite on December 14, 1982. It shows the crater much as a lunar crater might appear through a telescope. Morning sun illumination is from the southeast (lower right). The prominent gully meandering across the scene is known as Canyon Diablo. It drains northward toward the Little Colorado River and eventually to the Grand Canyon. The Interstate 40 highway crosses and nearly parallels the northern edge of the scene.The ejecta blanket around the crater appears somewhat lighter than the surrounding terrain, perhaps in part due to its altered mineralogic content. However, foot traffic at this interesting site may have scarred and lightened the terrain too. Also, the roughened surface here catches the sunlight on the southerly slopes and protects a highly reflective patchy snow cover in shaded northerly slopes, further lightening the terrain as viewed from space on this date.

  13. Representação em espaço de estados para a flexibilidade de roteamento Routing flexibility using state space representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Rosa Rohde

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo descreve uma representação em espaço de estados para a flexibilidade de roteamento em sistemas de manufatura. A flexibilidade de roteamento é representada em três níveis de detalhamento, como segue: (i grafo de precedências; (ii grafo de transição de estados para a flexibilidade de seqüência; e (iii grafo de transição de estados para a flexibilidade de roteamento. A terceira representação é a mais completa, sendo capaz de enumerar todas as possíveis rotas de uma peça no sistema de manufatura. Neste artigo ainda, será abordada a relação entre a representatividade e complexidade computacional para cada representação, auxiliando o processo de seleção do nível de representação mais adequado a um determinado contexto. A versatilidade desta representação permite que esta seja facilmente vinculada a outras ferramentas de análise e apoio, para o controle e projeto de sistemas flexíveis de manufatura, permitindo que estes sejam devidamente avaliados, compreendidos e mensurados. Por fim, a eficácia da representação é demonstrada por meio de sua aplicação em problemas de roteamento e mensuração da flexibilidade em sistemas de manufatura.This paper describes a state space representation for routing flexibility in manufacturing systems. Routing flexibility is represented on three different levels, as follows: (i Operations Precedence Graph; (ii State Transition Graph of Manufacturing Operation Sequences; and (iii State Transition Graph of Manufacturing Operation Routes. Each representation is able to represent routing flexibility in different degrees of detail. The third and most complete representation can enumerate all the possible manufacturing operation routes for a given part in the manufacturing system. Bounds for the computation of the representation levels are presented to help the user select the most suitable one for a given context. The versatility of this representation allows it to be linked

  14. Guidebook of the Western United States: Part A - The Northern Pacific Route, With a Side Trip to Yellowstone Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Marius R.; ,

    1915-01-01

    The United States of America comprise an area so vast in extent and so diverse in natural features as well as in characters due to human agency that the American citizen who knows thoroughly his own country must have traveled widely and observed wisely. To 'know America first' is a patriotic obligation, but to meet this obligation the railroad traveler needs to have his eyes directed toward the more important or essential things within his field of vision and then to have much that he sees explained by what is unseen in the swift passage of the train. Indeed, many things that attract his attention are inexplicable except as the story of the past is available to enable him to interpret the present. Herein lie the value and the charm of history, whether human or geologic. The present stimulus given to travel in the home country will encourage many thousands of Americans to study geography at first hand. To make this study most profitable the traveler needs a handbook that will answer the questions that come to his mind so readily along the way. Furthermore, the aim of such a guide should be to stimulate the eye in the selection of the essentials in the scene that so rapidly unfolds itself in the crossing of the continent. In recognition of the opportunity afforded in 1915 to render service of this kind to an unusually large number of American citizens, as well as to visitors from other countries, the United States Geological Survey has prepared a series of guidebooks covering four of the older railroad routes west of the Mississippi. These books are educational in purpose, but the method adopted is to entertain the traveler by making more interesting what he sees from the car window. The plan of the series is to present authoritative information that may enable the reader to realize adequately the scenic and material resources of the region he is traversing, to comprehend correctly the basis of its development, and above all to appreciate keenly the real value of the

  15. A Performance Analysis of the Optimized Link State Routing Protocol Using Voice Traffic Over Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    Thibodeau et al. [TYH06] simulate the effects of node density, number of data streams and route length on the performance of VoIP traffic using only the...International Conference, pp. 176-180. [TYH06] Eric Thibodeau , Mohamed Youssef, & Alain C. Houle. (2006). Investigating manet performance in a VOIP

  16. Adoption of Safe Routes to School in Canadian and the United States Contexts: Best Practices and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macridis, Soultana; García Bengoechea, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Background: Declines in physical activity (PA) in children and youth have contributed to increases in childhood overweight and obesity. The Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program was developed to promote school active transportation (AT) and reverse the trend. Methods: Adopting concepts of a realist approach, this article seeks to understand…

  17. Effective local dynamic routing strategy for air route networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Wenjun; Zhao Lingxi

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of air transportation, network service ability has attracted a lot of attention in academe. Aiming to improve the throughput of the air route network (ARN), we propose an effective local dynamic routing strategy in this paper. Several factors, such as the rout-ing distance, the geographical distance and the real-time local traffic, are taken into consideration. When the ARN is in the normal free-flow state, the proposed strategy can recover the shortest path routing (SPR) strategy. When the ARN undergoes congestion, the proposed strategy changes the paths of flights based on the real-time local traffic information. The throughput of the Chinese air route network (CARN) is evaluated. Results confirm that the proposed strategy can significantly improve the throughput of CARN. Meanwhile, the increase in the average flying distance and time is tiny. Results also indicate the importance of the distance related factors in a routing strategy designed for the ARN.

  18. A Study of Arizona's Teachers of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia; Gonzalez-Canche, Manuel; Moll, Luis C.

    2010-01-01

    In this study a representative sample of 880 elementary and secondary teachers currently teaching in 33 schools across the state of Arizona were asked about their perceptions of how their ELL students were faring under current instructional policies for ELL students. Teachers were surveyed during the Spring of 2010. Overall findings show that most…

  19. 77 FR 35285 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plan; Arizona; Attainment Plan for 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR 52 Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plan; Arizona; Attainment Plan for 1997 8-Hour... approving a state implementation plan (SIP) revision submitted by the State of Arizona on June 13, 2007, to demonstrate attainment of the 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) in the Phoenix...

  20. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 144 (ROCHVT01000144) on State Route 100, crossing the White River, Rochester, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Wild, Emily C.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ROCHVT01000144 on State Route 100 crossing the White River, Rochester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 68.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture with forest on the valley walls. In the study area, the White River has a meandering channel with a slope of approximately 0.003 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 119 ft and an average channel depth of 4 ft. The predominant channel bed material is gravel and cobbles with a median grain size (D50) of 72.5 mm (0.238 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 22, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable due to a cut-bank present on the upstream left bank and wide point bars upstream and downstream in the vicinity of this site. The State Route 100 crossing of the White Riveris a 103-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 101-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 8, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutment walls with spill-through embankments in front of each abutment wall and no wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-toroadway is

  1. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 9 (BLOOVT01020009) on State Route 102, crossing the Nulhegan River, Bloomfield, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayotte, Joseph D.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BLOOVT01020009 on State Route 102 crossing the Nulhegan River, Bloomfield, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the White Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 144-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except for the downstream right bank area which is shrub and brush land. The Nulhegan River flows into the Connecticut River 210 feet downstream of this bridge. In the study area, the Nulhegan River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.005 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 164 ft and an average channel depth of 5 ft. The predominant channel bed material is cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 152 mm (0.498 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 6, 1995, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable. This was due to numerous point bars and side bars indicating an unstable thalweg. The State Route 102 crossing of the Nulhegan River is a 134-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 130-foot steel-truss span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 4, 1994). The field measured clear span was 131.6 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with rip-rapped spill-through slopes. The

  2. Arizona geothermal institutional handbook: Arizona geothermal commercialization planning team, January 1-December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malysa, L.

    1980-05-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to assist in understanding the various procedures and requirements necessary for the development of geothermal energy in the State of Arizona. It contains the names of key persons and agencies who are directly or indirectly involved in the institutional process. A detailed assessment of all agencies and the role they play in geothermal energy development is provided. The handbook is divided into four sections: State and Local rules and regulations, the Federal rules and regulations, references, and a technical bibliography. (MHR)

  3. Bus Routes, RIPTA Park and Ride Bus Routes (September 2011); RIPTApkroutes0911; Rhode Island Public Transit Authority (RIPTA) statewide bus routes for public transit service serving park and ride lots. Contains individual route information effective September 2011., Published in 2011, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Bus Routes dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2011. It is described as 'RIPTA Park...

  4. Arizona TeleMedicine Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona Univ., Tucson. Coll. of Medicine.

    Designed to provide health services for American Indians living on rurally isolated reservations, the Arizona TeleMedicine Project proposes to link Phoenix and Tucson medical centers, via a statewide telecommunications system, with the Hopi, San Carlos Apache, Papago, Navajo, and White Mountain Apache reservations. Advisory boards are being…

  5. Boots on the Ground: Arizona

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-12-26

    In this podcast, we talk to CDC public health advisor Lisa Speissegger about her response efforts during the 2013 Arizona wildfires.  Created: 12/26/2013 by Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (PHPR).   Date Released: 12/26/2013.

  6. A Melioidosis Case in Arizona

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-10-03

    David Blaney, Medical Officer, Bacterial Special Pathogens Branch, discusses an unusual melioidosis case in Arizona.  Created: 10/3/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/5/2011.

  7. Eliminating livelock by assigning the same priority state to each message that is input into a flushable routing system during N time intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, V.

    1994-11-29

    Livelock-free message routing is provided in a network of interconnected nodes that is flushable in time T. An input message processor generates sequences of at least N time intervals, each of duration T. An input register provides for receiving and holding each input message, where the message is assigned a priority state p during an nth one of the N time intervals. At each of the network nodes a message processor reads the assigned priority state and awards priority to messages with priority state (p-1) during an nth time interval and to messages with priority state p during an (n+1) th time interval. The messages that are awarded priority are output on an output path toward the addressed output message processor. Thus, no message remains in the network for a time longer than T. 4 figures.

  8. January 2017 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesselius LJ

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The January 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 at the HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting (prime rib with case presentations. There was a good attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. There was a discussion of supporting the Tobacco 21 bill which has been introduced into the Arizona State Legislature. There was unanimous support for this bill. Another bill to allow school nurses to administer an albuterol inhaler without a doctor’s prescription was also discussed but the members wanted more information. The new CDC Ventilator-Associated Events (VAE criteria were also discussed. Before endorsing or opposing the this as a measure, the members wished more information. It was decided that a decision on both would be postponed until discussed at the next meeting. Three cases were presented: 1. Dr. Lewis Wesselius from the Mayo Clinic …

  9. Kinetics and mechanisms of pyrolysis of polyborosilazanes to thermally stable amorphous and crystalline states by a novel synthesis route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongsang

    A new type of SiBCN ceramic is being investigated and considered for a variety of high temperature applications. SiBCN ceramics have been produced by various synthesis methods in different monomer systems and subsequent pyrolysis processes at different temperatures. The final ceramic composition and structure are significantly affected by the selection of the polymer precursor material and the pyrolysis conditions. Although detailed studies or discussions of the synthesis of the preceramic materials are rather limited, considerable progress has been achieved by alternative synthesis approaches in recent decades. Our study introduced a novel synthesis route to produce thermally stable SiBCN-based ceramics. This route also is approximately an order of magnitude less costly, and processing is simpler and faster than other routes investigated to date. Polyborosilazane was synthesized by using three monomers. Polymerization is initiated by substituting chlorines attached to silicon and boron for trimethylsilylamino groups in hexamethyldisilazane (HMDZ). The polyborosilazane becomes an amorphous structure with crosslinked bonds during the elimination of [(CH3) 3SiCl]n. In a second stage, an intermolecular condensation reaction occurred, with the loss of HMDZ in the absence of crosslinking agents. This new route allows the SiBCN preceramic polymers to be produced with a high yield, and without a special filtering step. The polyborosilazane preceramic polymers were modified by altering the monomers and their respective molar ratios, and by optimizing the reaction temperature during polymerization. Remarkably, the pyrolyzed ceramic products remain amorphous to temperatures up to 1600°C. Results show that SiBCN-containing ceramics have enough thermal stability to retard crystallization. The chemical structure and composition of the polyborosilazane preceramic polymers were postulated and analyzed via a combination of structural and compositional analysis. By pyrolysis of

  10. 快速移动环境中上下文感知优化链路状态路由协议%Context-aware Optimized Link State Routing Protocol for Fast Movement Scene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张可; 张伟; 李炜; 曾家智

    2011-01-01

    提出了一种应用于快速移动环境的上下文感知优化链路状态协议CAOLSR(Context-aware Optimized Link State Routing Protocol).CAOLSR采用了一种上下文信息机制,将节点间相对移动预测、前后访问时间以及节点连接度情况引入MPR(Multi Point Relays)选择,并设计了CAOLSR-MPR算法.此外,CAOLSR通过引入Fisheye减少了移动性对路由精度的影响.模拟实验表明,在节点快速移动与拓扑快速变化环境下与HOLSR(Hierarchical Optimized Link State Routing Protocol),OLSR(Optimized Link State Routing Protocol),DSDV(Destination Sequenced Distance Vector)相比,CAOLSR具有更为良好的性能.%An Context-aware optimized link state routing protocol for networks with fast-moving nodes was proposed CAOLSR (Context-aware Optimized Link State Routing Protocol) adopts a context-aware mechanism,and selects MPR (Multi Point Relays) based on relative movement of nodes, recent access-time and connection number of nodes, and adopts a special flow of MPR selection. In addition, by the introduction of Fisheye, reduces the influence from mobility on the routing accuracy. Experimental results show that CAOLSR can achieve good performance and outperform HOLSR (Hierarchical Optimized Link State Routing Protocol), OLSR (Optimized Link State Routing Protocol) and DSDV (Destination Sequenced Distance Vector) in networks with fast-moving nodes.

  11. A Comprehensive Fusion Liaison Officer Program: The Arizona Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    TLO) Program has become an institution that is relied upon by pm1icipant jurisdictions for intelligence and information sharing between federal, state...vetted-out partners throughout the public safety community to assist jurisdictions in addressing many high-risk events and incidents. In the...State University of New York College (Cortland), 1990 M.A., Northern Arizona University , 1999 Submitted in partial fulfillment of the

  12. Willow Fire Near Payson, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    On July 3, 2004, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite acquired this image of the Willow fire near Payson, Arizona. The image is being used by the United States Department of Agriculture's Forest Service Remote Sensing Applications Center (RSAC). The image combines data from the visible and infrared wavelength regions to highlight: the burned areas in dark red; the active fires in red-orange; vegetation in green; and smoke in blue. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance. The U.S. Science Team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long- term research effort dedicated to understanding the Earth as an integrated system and applying Earth System Science to improve prediction of climate, weather, and natural hazards using the unique vantage point of space. Size: 34 by 41

  13. A ground-water model of the upper San Pedro Basin from the Mexico-United States International Boundary to Fairbank, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freethey, G.W.

    1982-01-01

    A definition of the hydrologic system of the upper San Pedro basin was obtained by developing a numerical ground-water model to evaluate a conceptual model of the system. Information on hydraulic properties of the basin fill, recharge from bordering mountain ranges, discharge by evapotranspiration, and exchange of water between aquifer and stream was available from previous measurements or estimates. The steady-state calibration procedure and subsequent transient simulations demonstrated that the original conceptualization can be reasonably simulated. An analysis of model sensitivity to increases and decreases in certain hydraulic properties indicated a low sensitivity to aquifer anisotropy and a low to moderate sensitivity to stream leakance and evapotranspiration rate. An analysis to investigate the effects of generalizing aquifer conductivity and recharge showed that flow components and water-level response to stress could be simulated adequately but that steady-state water-level conditions could not. During equilibrium conditions, recharge to and discharge from the basin was about 16,500 acre-feet per year. Modeling results indicated that by 1978 the storage depletion rate had reached 5,600 acre-feet per year resulting from a ground-water withdrawal rate of 10,500 acre-feet per year. (USGS)

  14. The Need for Speed: A Critical Discourse Analysis of the Reclassification of English Language Learners in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckie, Alisa G.; Kaplan, Suzanne E.; Rubinstein-Avila, Eliane

    2013-01-01

    Several states, including Arizona, have enacted English-only legislation, within the past decade, impacting the schooling of students who are identified as English language learner (ELLS). As a result, ELLS in Arizona are assigned to a prescriptive program--apart from their fluent English-speaking peers--for 4 h a day, during a time "not…

  15. SYCAMORE CANYON PRIMITIVE AREA, ARIZONA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Lyman C.; Raabe, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Sycamore Canyon Primitive Area, which occupies about 74 sq mi, lies about 24 mi southwest of Flagstaff, Arizona. To help evaluate the area for mineral resources, sediment samples were collected along Sycamore Creek and its tributaries. These were analyzed for traces of the ore metals without finding any local concentrations. In addition, a scintillometer was used to test rocks in the area without finding any abnormal radioactivity.

  16. Judicial Performance Review in Arizona: A Critical Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca White Berch

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Judicial performance evaluations are a relatively new tool for assessing judges and providing information to voters to help them determine whether to retain judges in contested or retention elections. Arizona implemented its judicial evaluation program about 20 years ago, and since that time, the state has continually strived to improve its process. The result is that today Arizona has one of the most progressive and comprehensive judicial performance evaluation programs in the United States. This article takes a critical look at the strengths and weaknesses of Arizona’s program, keeping in mind two key values that the system seeks to protect: judicial accountability and judicial independence. Las evaluaciones del rendimiento judicial son una herramienta relativamente nueva para evaluar a los jueces y ofrecer información a los votantes, que les ayude a decidir si quieren reelegir a los jueces en las elecciones. Arizona implementó su programa de evaluación judicial hace unos 20 años, y desde ese momento, el Estado se ha esforzado continuamente en mejorar el proceso. El resultado es que hoy en día, Arizona tiene uno de los programas de evaluación del rendimiento judicial más progresistas e integrales de los Estados Unidos. Este artículo ofrece una mirada crítica a las fortalezas y debilidades del programa de Arizona, teniendo en cuenta dos valores clave que el sistema trata de proteger: la responsabilidad judicial y la independencia judicial. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2533868

  17. Long-term decrease in satellite vegetation indices in response to environmental variables in an iconic desert riparian ecosystem: the Upper San Pedro, Arizona, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Uyen; Glenn, Edward P.; Nagler, Pamela L.; Scott, Russell L.

    2015-01-01

    The Upper San Pedro River is one of the few remaining undammed rivers that maintain a vibrant riparian ecosystem in the southwest United States. However, its riparian forest is threatened by diminishing groundwater and surface water inputs, due to either changes in watershed characteristics such as changes in riparian and upland vegetation, or human activities such as regional groundwater pumping. We used satellite vegetation indices to quantify the green leaf density of the groundwater-dependent riparian forest from 1984 to 2012. The river was divided into a southern, upstream (mainly perennial flow) reach and a northern, downstream (mainly intermittent and ephemeral flow) reach. Pre-monsoon (June) Landsat normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) values showed a 20% drop for the northern reach (P  0·05). NDVI and enhanced vegetation index values were positively correlated (P factor in reducing river flows. Climate change, regional groundwater pumping, changes in the intensity of monsoon rain events and lack of overbank flooding are feasible explanations for deterioration of the riparian forest in the northern reach.

  18. Optimum Route Selection for Vehicle Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalip

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of Optimum Route Selection for Vehicle Navigation System (ORSVNS article is to develop a system, which provides information about real time alternate routes to the drivers and also helps in selecting the optimal route among all the alternate routes from an origin to destination. Two types of query systems, special and general, are designed for drivers. Here, the criterion for route selection is introduced using primary and secondary road attributes. The presented methodology helps the drivers in better decision making to choose optimal route using fuzzy logic. For experimental results ORSVNS is tested over 220 km portion of Haryana state in India.

  19. A magnetic route to measure the average oxidation state of mixed-valent manganese in manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieves (OMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiong-Fei; Ding, Yun-Shuang; Liu, Jia; Han, Zhao-Hui; Budnick, Joseph I; Hines, William A; Suib, Steven L

    2005-05-04

    A magnetic route has been applied for measurement of the average oxidation state (AOS) of mixed-valent manganese in manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieves (OMS). The method gives AOS measurement results in good agreement with titration methods. A maximum analysis deviation error of +/-7% is obtained from 10 sample measurements. The magnetic method is able to (1) confirm the presence of mixed-valent manganese and (2) evaluate AOS and the spin states of d electrons of both single oxidation state and mixed-valent state Mn in manganese oxides. In addition, the magnetic method may be extended to (1) determine AOS of Mn in manganese oxide OMS with dopant "diamagnetic" ions, such as reducible V5+ (3d0) ions, which is inappropriate for the titration method due to interference of redox reactions between these dopant ions and titration reagents, such as KMnO4, (2) evaluate the dopant "paramagnetic" ions that are present as clusters or in the OMS framework, and (3) determine AOS of other mixed-valent/single oxidation state ion systems, such as Mo3+(3d3)-Mo4+(3d2) systems and Fe3+ in FeCl3.

  20. 21 CFR 866.3035 - Arizona spp. serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Arizona and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by these microorganisms. Arizona spp....

  1. Photovoltaic Power System Performance: A Case Study at Fort Huachuca, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-01

    12 Wire ampacity 20 amperes Type of cable THHN Type of connectors used (if any) None Means of wire routing In Conduit Module Mounting Technique...Photovoltaic Power System Performance: A Case Study at Fort Huachuca, Arizona by D. M. Joncich 7- R. A. Ducey A 5-kW-peak, grid-connected...photovoltaic (PV) power system is described. In this case study, the PV system in " service at the Holman Guest House, Fort Huachuca, AZ, is evaluated for

  2. The Threat of Convergence of Terror Groups with Transnational Criminal Organizations in Order to Utilize Existing Smuggling Routes and Techniques to Aid in the Covert Entry of Operatives into the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    THE THREAT OF CONVERGENCE OF TERROR GROUPS WITH TRANSNATIONAL CRIMINAL ORGANIZATIONS IN ORDER TO UTILIZE EXISTING SMUGGLING ROUTES AND......contraband into the United States since its existence. Terror groups have explicitly stated their intent to target the citizens, infrastructure, and

  3. Partial chiral symmetry-breaking as a route to spectrally isolated topological defect states in two-dimensional artificial materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Charles; Schomerus, Henning; Bellec, Matthieu; Kuhl, Ulrich; Mortessagne, Fabrice

    2017-06-01

    Bipartite quantum systems from the chiral universality classes admit topologically protected zero modes at point defects. However, in two-dimensional systems these states can be difficult to separate from compacton-like localized states that arise from flat bands, formed if the two sublattices support a different number of sites within a unit cell. Here we identify a natural reduction of chiral symmetry, obtained by coupling sites on the majority sublattice, which gives rise to spectrally isolated point-defect states, topologically characterized as zero modes supported by the complementary minority sublattice. We observe these states in a microwave realization of a dimerized Lieb lattice with next-nearest neighbour coupling, and also demonstrate topological mode selection via sublattice-staggered absorption.

  4. Bus Routes, Marta Bus Routes located in Transportation database, Published in unknown, City of Roswell, GA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Bus Routes dataset as of unknown. It is described as 'Marta Bus Routes located in Transportation database'. Data by this publisher are often provided in State...

  5. The Arizona Universities Library Consortium patron-driven e-book model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Richardson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Building on Arizona State University's patron-driven acquisitions (PDA initiative in 2009, the Arizona Universities Library Consortium, in partnership with the Ingram Content Group, created a cooperative patron-driven model to acquire electronic books (e-books. The model provides the opportunity for faculty and students at the universities governed by the Arizona Board of Regents (ABOR to access a core of e-books made accessible through resource discovery services and online catalogs. These books are available for significantly less than a single ABOR university would expend for the same materials. The patron-driven model described is one of many evolving models in digital scholarship, and, although the Arizona Universities Library Consortium reports a successful experience, patron-driven models pose questions to stakeholders in the academic publishing industry.

  6. Structural and Optical properties of poly-crystalline BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 prepared via solid state route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarabana, Kanaka M.; Mishra, Ashutosh; Bisen, Supriya

    2016-10-01

    Polycrystalline BaTiO3 (BTO) and SrTiO3 (STO) were synthesized by solid state route method and properties of made polycrystalline were characterized by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy & FTIR Spectroscopy. XRD analysis shows that samples are crystalline in nature. In Raman Spectroscopy measurement, the experiment has been done with the help of JOBIN-YOVN HORIBA LABRAM HR800 single monochromator, which is coupled with a “peltier cooled” charge coupled device (CCD). Raman Spectroscopy at low temperature measurement shows the phase transition above & below the curie temperature in samples. Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy was used to determine the Ti-O bond length position.

  7. Synthesis and structural characterization of some Pb(B$^{'}_{1/3}$Nb2/3)O3 type materials by two-stage solid-state route

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mukul Pastor; P K Bajpai; R N P Choudhary

    2005-06-01

    Two-stage columbite solid state reaction route has been used for the preparation of Pb (B$^{'}_{1/3}$Nb2/3)O3 materials (B′ = Mg, Ni and Cd). The columbite precursor phase was structurally characterized using diffraction data. MgNb2O6, NiNb2O6 and CdNb2O6 show orthorhombic structures i.e. pure columbite phase. Final phase materials get stabilized in mixed phase. The diffraction pattern shows that it is a mixture of cubic pyrochlore and perovskite phase. Percentage of perovskite phase was calculated using the band intensities of (110) perovskite and (222) pyrochlore peaks. The calculated percentages show the dominant perovskite phase. Possible reasons for mixed phase are discussed.

  8. Extension of Compressibility-Route Cubic Equations of State and the Radial Distribution Functions at Contact to Multi-Component Hard-Sphere Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiu-Xun; Jin, Ke; Cai, Ling-Cang; Wu, Qiang

    2014-08-01

    The equation of state (EOS) for hard-sphere fluid derived from compressibility routes of Percus-Yevick theory (PYC) is extended. The two parameters are determined by fitting well-known virial coefficients of pure fluid. The extended cubic EOS can be directly extended to multi-component mixtures, merely demanding the EOS of mixtures also is cubic and combining two physical conditions for the radial distribution functions at contact (RDFC) of mixtures. The calculated virial coefficients of pure fluid and predicted compressibility factors and RDFC for both pure fluid and mixtures are excellent as compared with the simulation data. The values of RDFC for mixtures with extremely large size ratio 10 are far better than the BGHLL expressions in literature.

  9. The quality of our Nation's waters: Water quality in basin-fill aquifers of the southwestern United States: Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah, 1993-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiros, Susan A.; Paul, Angela P.; Bexfield, Laura M.; Anning, David W.

    2015-01-01

    The Southwest Principal Aquifers consist of many basin-fill aquifers in California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and Colorado. Demands for irrigation and drinking water have substantially increased groundwater withdrawals and irrigation return flow to some of these aquifers. These changes have increased the movement of contaminants from geologic and human sources to depths used to supply drinking water in several basin-fill aquifers in the Southwest.

  10. Facile fabrication of all-solid-state flexible interdigitated MnO2 supercapacitor via in-situ catalytic solution route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xiao; Zeng, Zhigang; Guo, Erjuan; Shi, Xiaobo; Zhou, Haijun; Wang, Xiaohong

    2016-09-01

    With the rapid development of wearable and portable electronics, the demand for all-solid-state flexible energy storage devices with high performance, long-term cycling stability and bending stability has been aroused. Physical and chemical method for preparing thin-film materials has enabled planar flexible supercapacitors (SCs) to be fabricated for a variety of applications. In this work, we report on the facile fabrication of an all-solid-state flexible interdigitated supercapacitor with a convenient and efficient two-step method. 3-D nanostructured α-MnO2 has been prepared on the surface of interdigitated Pt metal pattern on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate as high-performance electrode material via in-situ catalytic solution route without any assistance of template or surfactant. The SCs are fabricated with PVA/H3PO4 as solid-state electrolyte, which exhibited good electrochemical performance with areal capacitance as much as 20 mF cm-2 at a scan rate of 10 mV s-1, relatively high energy density (3.6 × 10-7 Wh cm-2-1.9 × 10-6 Wh cm-2) and power density (9 × 10-5 W cm-2-1.6 × 10-4 W cm-2), and excellent long-term cycling stability with capacitance retention of 82.2% (10,000 times charge and discharge), and bending stability with capacitance retention of 89.6%.

  11. The Public Health Impact of Coccidioidomycosis in Arizona and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hector, Richard F.; Rutherford, George W.; Tsang, Clarisse A.; Erhart, Laura M.; McCotter, Orion; Anderson, Shoana M.; Komatsu, Kenneth; Tabnak, Farzaneh; Vugia, Duc J.; Yang, Ying; Galgiani, John N.

    2011-01-01

    The numbers of reported cases of coccidioidomycosis in Arizona and California have risen dramatically over the past decade, with a 97.8% and 91.1% increase in incidence rates from 2001 to 2006 in the two states, respectively. Of those cases with reported race/ethnicity information, Black/African Americans in Arizona and Hispanics and African/Americans in California experienced a disproportionately higher frequency of disease compared to other racial/ethnic groups. Lack of early diagnosis continues to be a problem, particularly in suspect community-acquired pneumonia, underscoring the need for more rapid and sensitive tests. Similarly, the inability of currently available therapeutics to reduce the duration and morbidity of this disease underscores the need for improved therapeutics and a preventive vaccine. PMID:21695034

  12. Local Routing in Convex Subdivisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bose, Prosenjit; Durocher, Stephane; Mondal, Debajyoti;

    2015-01-01

    In various wireless networking settings, node locations determine a network’s topology, allowing the network to be modelled by a geometric graph drawn in the plane. Without any additional information, local geometric routing algorithms can guarantee delivery to the target node only in restricted...... classes of geometric graphs, such as triangulations. In order to guarantee delivery on more general classes of geometric graphs (e.g., convex subdivisions or planar subdivisions), previous local geometric routing algorithms required Θ(logn) state bits to be stored and passed with the message. We present...... the first local geometric routing algorithm using only one state bit to guarantee delivery on convex subdivisions and the first local geometric memoryless routing algorithm that guarantees delivery on edge-augmented monotone subdivisions (including all convex subdivisions) when the algorithm has knowledge...

  13. Geothermal resources in Arizona: a bibliography. Circular 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, S.S.

    1982-01-01

    This bibliography references all reports and maps generated by the Arizona Bureau of Geology and Mineral Technology and the Arizona Geothermal Commercialization Team of the Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Arizona. To provide a more comprehensive listing of geothermal energy in Arizona, all available geothermal papers from other sources have been included. A total of 224 references are presented. (MHR)

  14. Arizona black rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis cerberus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Erika M.

    2006-01-01

    The Arizona black rattlesnake makes its home at higher elevations in Arizona and far western New Mexico. The snake's use of high-altitude habitat and its black coloration as an adult distinguishes it from other subspecies of the western rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis), which prefer lower elevations and range from tan to reddish in color as adults. These physical and habitat differences are also reflected in genetic differences that suggest that the Arizona black rattlesnake may be a new species of rattlesnake. Despite the species's limited range, basic biological information needed to make management decisions is lacking for most Arizona black rattlesnake populations. To address this need, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists conducted research on the species in Arizona national park units from 2003 to 2005. The research examined relative population abundance, movement patterns, range requirements, dietary habits, and winter and summer habitat. Research in Arizona national parks was made possible through the support of the Western National Parks Association, Tonto National Monument, and the USGS Science Internships for Workforce Diversity Program. Importantly, the park-based research was used to augment a long-term mark-recapture study of the species that has been conducted by USGS biologists at sites near Flagstaff, Arizona, since 1999. USGS researchers were the first to conduct extensive studies of this species in the wild.

  15. New TPG bus route 28

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Geneva's Public Transport services (TPG) have recently inaugurated a new bus line 28, connecting the La Tour Hospital in Meyrin to the international organisations in Geneva, via the airport. All signs associated with this route will be yellow in colour. Timetables and route details can be found at http://www.tpg.ch. Relations with the Host States Service http://www.cern.ch/relations/ Tel. 72848

  16. Chaotic sedimentation of particle pairs in a vertical channel at low Reynolds number: Multiple states and routes to chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verjus, Romuald; Guillou, Sylvain; Ezersky, Alexander; Angilella, Jean-Régis

    2016-12-01

    The sedimentation of a pair of rigid circular particles in a two-dimensional vertical channel containing a Newtonian fluid is investigated numerically, for terminal particle Reynolds numbers (ReT) ranging from 1 to 10, and for a confinement ratio equal to 4. While it is widely admitted that sufficiently inertial pairs should sediment by performing a regular DKT oscillation (Drafting-Kissing-Tumbling), the present analysis shows in contrast that a chaotic regime can also exist for such particles, leading to a much slower sedimentation velocity. It consists of a nearly horizontal pair, corresponding to a maximum effective blockage ratio, and performing a quasiperiodic transition to chaos while increasing the particle weight. For less inertial regimes, the classical oblique doublet structure and its complex behavior (multiple stable states and hysteresis, period-doubling cascade and chaotic attractor) are recovered, in agreement with previous work [Aidun, C. K. and Ding, E.-J., "Dynamics of particle sedimentation in a vertical channel: Period-doubling bifurcation and chaotic state," Phys. Fluids 15, 1612 (2003)]. As a consequence of these various behaviors, the link between the terminal Reynolds number and the non-dimensional driving force is complex: it contains several branches displaying hysteresis as well as various bifurcations. For the range of Reynolds number considered here, a global bifurcation diagram is given.

  17. STRAWBERRY CRATER ROADLESS AREAS, ARIZONA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Edward W.; Light, Thomas D.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral survey conducted in the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas, Arizona, indicate little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral or fossil fuel resources in the area. The area contains deposits of cinder, useful for the production of aggregate block, and for deposits of decorative stone; however, similar deposits occur in great abundance throughout the San Francisco volcanic field outside the roadless areas. There is a possibility that the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas may overlie part of a crustal magma chamber or still warm pluton related to the San Francisco Mountain stratovolcano or to basaltic vents of late Pleistocene or Holocene age. Such a magma chamber or pluton beneath the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas might be an energy source from which a hot-, dry-rock geothermal energy system could be developed, and a probable geothermal resource potential is therefore assigned to these areas. 9 refs.

  18. Theory and New Primitives for Safely Connecting Routing Protocol Instances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    reliability, and load. The current route redistribution procedure handles this incompatibility in a crude fashion. It resets the metric of a redis ...routing instances can also be performed in a link-state manner whereby one routing instance passes on its entire link state database to another...routers B and A, respectively. However, route redis - tribution at multiple points can easily result in routing anomalies [8]. Hence, to support

  19. Synthesis and applications of SnO nanosheets: parallel control of oxidation state and nanostructure through an aqueous solution route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaushi, Ken; Oaki, Yuya; Uchiyama, Hiroaki; Hosono, Eiji; Zhou, Haoshen; Imai, Hiroaki

    2010-03-22

    Tin monoxide (SnO) nanosheets 5 nm in thickness are generated on substrates through an aqueous solution process under mild conditions. Parallel control of the oxidation state and morphology is achieved by a urea-mediated approach in aqueous solution. The SnO nanosheets form a porous thin film on substrates such as indium tin oxide and carbon nanofiber (CNF). The porous thin film of SnO nanosheets shows cathodic photocurrent generation upon irradiation by UV and visible light. In contrast, the photocurrent is not observed in the bulk SnO microcrystals. Composites of the SnO nanosheets and CNF perform as the anode material of lithium-ion batteries with improved charge-discharge reversible stability.

  20. Chaotic sedimentation of particle pairs in a vertical channel at low Reynolds number: multiple states and routes to chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Verjus, Romuald; Ezersky, Alexander; Angilella, Jean-Régis

    2016-01-01

    The sedimentation of a pair of rigid circular particles in a two-dimensional vertical channel containing a Newtonian fluid is investigated numerically, for terminal particle Reynolds numbers ranging from 1 to 10, and for a confinement ratio equal to 4. While it is widely admitted that sufficiently inertial pairs should sediment by performing a regular DKT oscillation (Drafting-Kissing-Tumbling), the present analysis shows in contrast that a chaotic regime can also exist for such particles, leading to a much slower sedimentation velocity. It consists of a nearly horizontal pair, corresponding to a maximum effective blockage ratio, and performing a quasiperiodic transition to chaos under increasing the particle weight. For less inertial regimes, the classical oblique doublet structure and its complex behavior (multiple stable states and hysteresis, period-doubling cascade and chaotic attractor) are recovered, in agreement with previous work [Aidun & Ding, Physics of Fluids 15(6), 2003]. As a consequence of ...

  1. Lateralization of route continuation and route order

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Ham, Ineke J M; Van Den Hoven, Jacco

    2014-01-01

    Navigation is a complex cognitive ability and its structure is still poorly understood. Memory for route continuation and route order are hypothesized to be at least partially separate components of navigation ability. In the current experiment, participants studied a route in virtual reality. The d

  2. Mg-doped biphasic calcium phosphate by a solid state reaction route: Characterization and evaluation of cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webler, Geovana D. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Maceió-AL 57072970 (Brazil); Correia, Ana C.C.; Barreto, Emiliano [Laboratório de Biologia Celular, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Maceió-AL 57072970 (Brazil); Fonseca, Eduardo J.S., E-mail: eduardo@fis.ufal.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Maceió-AL 57072970 (Brazil)

    2015-07-15

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) are widely used in tissue engineering because of their chemical similarity to the inorganic bone phase. In this work, we prepare biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP, a mixture of HAP and β-TCP) doped with different concentrations of magnesium to investigate the influence of magnesium on the BCP crystal structure. Magnesium is known to be an important element in the composition of bones and teeth. Recent research has shown that the doping of magnesium into BCP improves its bone metabolism and mechanical properties without affecting its biocompatibility. The samples were prepared by solid-state reaction from calcium carbonate, monobasic ammonium phosphate, and magnesium nitrate hexahydrate. Varying concentrations of magnesium were used and its modifications were examined by different characterization techniques. The phase composition and morphology of the ceramic powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The functional groups were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Cell viability experiments, using macrophage-like cell lines J774, showed that the synthesized Mg-doped BCP did not exhibit cytotoxicity regardless of the doses assayed or the different concentrations of magnesium used, suggesting it as a good material for potential biological applications. - Highlights: • Simple and fast method for the preparation of the Mg-BCP. • Study of the influence of the incorporation of Mg in the BCP. • Cell viability showed that the synthesized Mg-BCP did not exhibit cytotoxicity.

  3. Mechanical evaluation of calcium-zirconium-silicate (baghdadite) obtained by a direct solid-state synthesis route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Thomas C; Volkmann, Eike; Yilmaz, Rumeysa; Wolf, Artur; Treccani, Laura; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2014-06-01

    Ca3ZrSi2O9 (baghdadite) has become a major research focus within the biomaterial community due to its remarkable in-vitro and in-vivo bioactivity. Although baghdadite seems to exhibit interesting biological properties, as yet there has been no data published concerning its mechanical properties. This lack of knowledge hinders targeting this novel bioactive material towards potential applications. In this study we prepare dense Ca3ZrSi2O9 bulk ceramics for the first time, allowing the evaluation of its mechanical properties including hardness, bending strength, Young׳s modulus, and fracture toughness. The preparation of baghdadite has been accomplished by a direct solid-state synthesis in combination with conventional sintering at 1350-1450°C for 3h. Our results show that samples sintered at 1400°C exhibit the best mechanical properties, resulting in a bending strength, fracture toughness, and hardness of 98±16MPa, 1.3±0.1MPam(0.5), and 7.9±0.2GPa. With a comparable mechanical strength to hydroxyapatite, but with an increased fracture toughness by 30% and hardness by 13% baghdadite is highly suitable for potential applications in non-load bearing areas (e.g. coatings or filler materials).

  4. Evaluation of geothermal energy in Arizona. Arizona geothermal planning/commercialization team. Quarterly topical progress report, July 1-September 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.H.; Mancini, F.; Goldstone, L.A.; Malysa, L.

    1980-01-01

    Progress is reviewed on the following: area development plans, evaluation of geothermal applications, continued evaluation of geothermal resources, engineering and economic analyses, technical assistance in the state of Arizona, the impact of various growth patterns upon geothermal energy development, and the outreach program. (MHR)

  5. Chicana/o Students Respond to Arizona's Anti-Ethnic Studies Bill, SB 1108: Civic Engagement, Ethnic Identity, and Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Anna Ochoa; Romero, Andrea J.

    2011-01-01

    Arizona Senate Bill 1108, the "anti-ethnic studies bill," proposed to eliminate ethnic studies programs and ethnic-based organizations from state-funded education. Along with other anti-immigrant legislation, this bill is creating an oppressive climate of discrimination against individuals of Mexican descent in Arizona. This study investigates the…

  6. Sky View Factors from Synthetic Fisheye Photos for Thermal Comfort Routing—A Case Study in Phoenix, Arizona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Middel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Sky View Factor (SVF is a dimension-reduced representation of urban form and one of the major variables in radiation models that estimate outdoor thermal comfort. Common ways of retrieving SVFs in urban environments include capturing fisheye photographs or creating a digital 3D city or elevation model of the environment. Such techniques have previously been limited due to a lack of imagery or lack of full scale detailed models of urban areas. We developed a web based tool that automatically generates synthetic hemispherical fisheye views from Google Earth at arbitrary spatial resolution and calculates the corresponding SVFs through equiangular projection. SVF results were validated using Google Maps Street View and compared to results from other SVF calculation tools. We generated 5-meter resolution SVF maps for two neighborhoods in Phoenix, Arizona to illustrate fine-scale variations of intra-urban horizon limitations due to urban form and vegetation. To demonstrate the utility of our synthetic fisheye approach for heat stress applications, we automated a radiation model to generate outdoor thermal comfort maps for Arizona State University’s Tempe campus for a hot summer day using synthetic fisheye photos and on-site meteorological data. Model output was tested against mobile transect measurements of the six-directional radiant flux density. Based on the thermal comfort maps, we implemented a pedestrian routing algorithm that is optimized for distance and thermal comfort preferences. Our synthetic fisheye approach can help planners assess urban design and tree planting strategies to maximize thermal comfort outcomes and can support heat hazard mitigation in urban areas.

  7. July 2016 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first 150 words. The July 2016 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, July 27, 2016 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 14 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. Prior to the case presentations, a discussion was held on 4 issues. First, Dr. Rick Robbins gave a summary of ATS Hill Day. During Hill Day a presentation was given by a representative from the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. Their web site lists tobacco company contributions to members of Congress on their web site. Dr. Gary Ewart from the ATS office in Washington gave a presentation on the Traditional Cigar Manufacturing and Small Business Jobs Preservation Act before Congress (aka the Cigar Bill which the ATS opposes. He noted that cosponsors for the bill included several Congressmen from Southwestern states. Dr. Robbins combined the two ...

  8. Dynamic information routing in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirst, Christoph; Timme, Marc; Battaglia, Demian

    2016-01-01

    Flexible information routing fundamentally underlies the function of many biological and artificial networks. Yet, how such systems may specifically communicate and dynamically route information is not well understood. Here we identify a generic mechanism to route information on top of collective dynamical reference states in complex networks. Switching between collective dynamics induces flexible reorganization of information sharing and routing patterns, as quantified by delayed mutual information and transfer entropy measures between activities of a network's units. We demonstrate the power of this mechanism specifically for oscillatory dynamics and analyse how individual unit properties, the network topology and external inputs co-act to systematically organize information routing. For multi-scale, modular architectures, we resolve routing patterns at all levels. Interestingly, local interventions within one sub-network may remotely determine nonlocal network-wide communication. These results help understanding and designing information routing patterns across systems where collective dynamics co-occurs with a communication function. PMID:27067257

  9. Dynamic information routing in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirst, Christoph; Timme, Marc; Battaglia, Demian

    2016-04-01

    Flexible information routing fundamentally underlies the function of many biological and artificial networks. Yet, how such systems may specifically communicate and dynamically route information is not well understood. Here we identify a generic mechanism to route information on top of collective dynamical reference states in complex networks. Switching between collective dynamics induces flexible reorganization of information sharing and routing patterns, as quantified by delayed mutual information and transfer entropy measures between activities of a network's units. We demonstrate the power of this mechanism specifically for oscillatory dynamics and analyse how individual unit properties, the network topology and external inputs co-act to systematically organize information routing. For multi-scale, modular architectures, we resolve routing patterns at all levels. Interestingly, local interventions within one sub-network may remotely determine nonlocal network-wide communication. These results help understanding and designing information routing patterns across systems where collective dynamics co-occurs with a communication function.

  10. Printable Solid-State Lithium-Ion Batteries: A New Route toward Shape-Conformable Power Sources with Aesthetic Versatility for Flexible Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Hee; Choi, Keun-Ho; Cho, Sung-Ju; Choi, Sinho; Park, Soojin; Lee, Sang-Young

    2015-08-12

    Forthcoming flexible/wearable electronic devices with shape diversity and mobile usability garner a great deal of attention as an innovative technology to bring unprecedented changes in our daily lives. From the power source point of view, conventional rechargeable batteries (one representative example is a lithium-ion battery) with fixed shapes and sizes have intrinsic limitations in fulfilling design/performance requirements for the flexible/wearable electronics. Here, as a facile and efficient strategy to address this formidable challenge, we demonstrate a new class of printable solid-state batteries (referred to as "PRISS batteries"). Through simple stencil printing process (followed by ultraviolet (UV) cross-linking), solid-state composite electrolyte (SCE) layer and SCE matrix-embedded electrodes are consecutively printed on arbitrary objects of complex geometries, eventually leading to fully integrated, multilayer-structured PRISS batteries with various form factors far beyond those achievable by conventional battery technologies. Tuning rheological properties of SCE paste and electrode slurry toward thixotropic fluid characteristics, along with well-tailored core elements including UV-cured triacrylate polymer and high boiling point electrolyte, is a key-enabling technology for the realization of PRISS batteries. This process/material uniqueness allows us to remove extra processing steps (related to solvent drying and liquid-electrolyte injection) and also conventional microporous separator membranes, thereupon enabling the seamless integration of shape-conformable PRISS batteries (including letters-shaped ones) into complex-shaped objects. Electrochemical behavior of PRISS batteries is elucidated via an in-depth analysis of cell impedance, which provides a theoretical basis to enable sustainable improvement of cell performance. We envision that PRISS batteries hold great promise as a reliable and scalable platform technology to open a new concept of cell

  11. Arizona Measure of Academic Progress: A First Look at Growth in Arizona Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, David; Aportela, Anabel

    The Arizona Measure of Academic Progress (MAP) was developed using the Stanford 9 Achievement Test (SAT9) scores for the period from Spring 1998 to Spring 1999. The Research and Policy Division of the Arizona Department of Education matched students who took the SAT9 in Spring of 1998 and 1999. On average, 89% of students were matched per grade…

  12. Views from Inside a Pediatric Clinic: How Arizona's Political Climate Has Impacted Arizona's Youngest Latino Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Silva, Margarita; Cheatham, Gregory A.; Gomez, Laura

    2013-01-01

    It is critical that we examine impacts that recent immigration policies such as SB1070 are having on Arizona's youngest Latino learners.The large number of Latinos under the age of five, and the impact that this upcoming generation of Latinos will have on all aspects of life in Arizona merits a closer look. In this qualitative study, we examined…

  13. Routing and scheduling problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhardt, Line Blander

    be that the objects routed have an availability time window and a delivery time window or that locations on the path have a service time window. When routing moving transportation objects such as vehicles and vessels schedules are made in connection with the routing. Such schedules represent the time for the presence...... to a destination on a predefined network, the routing and scheduling of vessels in a liner shipping network given a demand forecast to be covered, the routing of manpower and vehicles transporting disabled passengers in an airport and the vehicle routing with time windows where one version studied includes edge...... of a connection between two locations. This could be an urban bus schedule where busses are routed and this routing creates a bus schedule which the passengers between locations use. In this thesis various routing and scheduling problems will be presented. The topics covered will be routing from an origin...

  14. Ferry Routes, This data set contains established commercial passenger and vehicle water ferry routes for Rhode Island ports and ferry docks. This data set was created for the general mapping for transporation planning. Ferry route Centerlines were originally digitized, Published in 2004, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Ferry Routes dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2004. It is described as 'This data set...

  15. The migration response to the Legal Arizona Workers Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Mark; Wright, Richard; Townley, Matthew; Copeland, Kristy

    2014-08-01

    The 2008 Legal Arizona Workers Act (LAWA) requires all public and private employers to authenticate the legal status of their workers using the federal employment verification system known as E-Verify. With LAWA, Arizona became the first state to have a universal mandate for employment verification. While LAWA targets unauthorized workers, most of whom are Latino immigrants, other groups could experience LAWA's effects, such as those who share households with undocumented workers. In addition, employers may seek to minimize their risk of LAWA penalties by not hiring those who appear to them as more likely to be unauthorized, such as naturalized Latino immigrants and US-born Latinos. Existing research has found a reduction in foreign-born Latino employment and population in response to LAWA. This paper asks a different question: have groups that are most likely to be affected by the law migrated to other states? We find a significant and sustained increase in the internal outmigration rate from Arizona of foreign-born, noncitizen Latinos - the group most likely to include the unauthorized - after the passage of LAWA. There was no significant LAWA internal migration response by foreign-born Latino citizens. US-born Latinos showed some signs of a LAWA-induced internal migration response after the law went into effect, but it is not sustained. The results indicate that local and state immigration policy can alter the settlement geography of the foreign born. This leads us to speculate about how immigrant settlement may adjust in the coming years to the intersecting geographies of post-recession economic opportunity and tiered immigration policies.

  16. Security Verification of Secure MANET Routing Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    the destination. The route discovery phase is complete upon receipt of the RREP at the requesting node. The DYMO protocol is a simpler version of AODV ...described in this appendix. The protocols are Secure AODV (SAODV), Secure Efficient Distance Vector (SEAD), and Secure Link State Routing Protocol (SLSP...SECURITY VERIFICATION OF SECURE MANET ROUTING PROTOCOLS THESIS Matthew F. Steele, Captain, USAF AFIT/GCS/ENG/12-03 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR

  17. The Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resource maps of the Ajo and Lukeville 1 degree x 2 degrees quadrangles, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Floyd; Tosdal, R.M.; Peterson, J.A.; Cox, D.P.; Miller, R.J.; Klein, D.P.; Theobald, P.K.; Haxel, G.B.; Grubensky, M.J.; Raines, G.L.; Barton, H.N.; Singer, D.A.; Eppinger, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    Encompassing about 21,000 km 2 in southwestern Arizona, the Ajo and Lukeville 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangles have been the subject of mineral resource investigations utilizing field and laboratory studies in the disciplines of geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and Landsat imagery. The results of these studies are published as a folio of maps, figures, and tables, with accompanying discussions. Past mineral production has been limited to copper from the Ajo Mining District. In addition to copper, the quadrangles contain potentially significant resources of gold and silver; a few other commodities, including molybdenum and evaporites, may also exist in the area as appreciable resources. This circular provides background information on the mineral deposits and on the investigations and integrates the information presented in the folio. The bibliography cites references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the two quadrangles.

  18. Visualizing Internet routing changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lad, Mohit; Massey, Dan; Zhang, Lixia

    2006-01-01

    Today's Internet provides a global data delivery service to millions of end users and routing protocols play a critical role in this service. It is important to be able to identify and diagnose any problems occurring in Internet routing. However, the Internet's sheer size makes this task difficult. One cannot easily extract out the most important or relevant routing information from the large amounts of data collected from multiple routers. To tackle this problem, we have developed Link-Rank, a tool to visualize Internet routing changes at the global scale. Link-Rank weighs links in a topological graph by the number of routes carried over each link and visually captures changes in link weights in the form of a topological graph with adjustable size. Using Link-Rank, network operators can easily observe important routing changes from massive amounts of routing data, discover otherwise unnoticed routing problems, understand the impact of topological events, and infer root causes of observed routing changes.

  19. Routing in opportunistic networks

    CERN Document Server

    Dhurandher, Sanjay; Anpalagan, Alagan; Vasilakos, Athanasios

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive guide to selected topics, both ongoing and emerging, in routing in OppNets. The book is edited by worldwide technical leaders, prolific researchers and outstanding academics, Dr. Isaac Woungang and co-editors, Dr. Sanjay Kumar Dhurandher, Prof. Alagan Anpalagan and Prof. Athanasios Vasilakos. Consisting of contributions from well known and high profile researchers and scientists in their respective specialties, the main topics that are covered in this book include mobility and routing, social-aware routing, context-based routing, energy-aware routing, incentive-aware routing, stochastic routing, modeling of intermittent connectivity, in both infrastructure and infrastructure-less OppNets. Key Features: Discusses existing and emerging techniques for routing in infrastructure and infrastructure-less OppNets. Provides a unified covering of otherwise disperse selected topics on routing in infrastructure and infrastructure-less OppNets.  Includes a set of PowerPoint slides and g...

  20. Enhancing Surveillance for Arboviral Infections in the Arizona Border Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCotter, Orion; Vanskike, Frank; Ernst, Kacey; Komatsu, Ken; Margolis, Harold; Waterman, Stephen; Tippit, Laura; Tomashek, Kay; Wertheimer, Anne; Montiel, Sonia; Golenko, Catherine; Hunsperger, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Objective To enhance arboviral surveillance and laboratory capacity to establish a surveillance baseline for the emerging threat of Dengue fever in the Arizona-Mexico border region. Introduction West Nile Virus (WNV) and dengue virus (DENV) are both arboviruses which are transmitted to humans by an infected mosquito bite during blood-meal feeding. The clinical presentations of non-neuroinvasive WNV and dengue fever are similar, and symptoms may include acute onset of high fever, headache, myalgia, arthralgia, nausea, vomiting, and often a maculopapular rash. More serious manifestations of these viruses include fatal encephalitis and meningitis in WNV patients and fatal hemorrhagic disease in dengue patients. Over the last decade, WNV has spread rapidly across North America, reaching Arizona in 2004, and has become a significant cause of human illness since that time. Even though dengue has been described as primarily a disease of the tropics and sub-tropical areas, there is a small but significant risk for dengue outbreaks in the continental United States as evidenced by surveillance efforts in Texas that identified local dengue transmission in 2005. In recent years, outbreaks of dengue have occurred in Mexico border states, most notably Sonora in 2010. That same year, Arizona had the highest incidence of WNV cases in the U.S. including number of neuroinvasive disease cases, total cases, and number of deaths per state. The emergence of DENV and WNV as important public health problems maybe have been due to non-effective mosquito control, global demographic changes (urbanization and population growth), increased air travel, and inadequate surveillance. Methods Vector mapping: Mapping techniques will be utilized to visually depict Aedes aegypti populations captured from previous seasonal public health environmental vector trapping programs. Laboratory capacity: Multi-state laboratory training by CDC Dengue Branch was held in October 2012. Surveillance: The WNV cases

  1. Preliminary assessment of aggradation potential in the North Fork Stillaguamish River downstream of the State Route 530 landslide near Oso, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magirl, Christopher S.; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Anderson, Scott W.; O'Connor, Jim; Robert Aldrich,; Mastin, Mark C.

    2015-12-28

    On March 22, 2014, the State Route 530 Landslide near Oso, Washington, traveled almost 2 kilometers (km), destroyed more than 40 structures, and impounded the North Fork Stillaguamish River to a depth of 8 meters (m) and volume of 3.3×106 cubic meters (m3). The landslide killed 43 people. After overtopping and establishing a new channel through the landslide, the river incised into the landslide deposit over the course of 10 weeks draining the impoundment lake and mobilizing an estimated 280,000±56,000 m3 of predominantly sand-sized and finer sediment. During the first 4 weeks after the landslide, this eroded sediment caused downstream riverbed aggradation of 1–2 m within 1 km of the landslide and 0.4 m aggradation at Whitman Road Bridge, 3.5 km downstream. Winter high flows in 2014–15 were anticipated to mobilize an additional 220,000±44,000 m3 of sediment, potentially causing additional aggradation and exacerbating flood risk downstream of the landslide. Analysis of unit stream power and bed-material transport capacity along 35 km of the river corridor indicated that most fine-grained sediment will transport out of the North Fork Stillaguamish River, although some localized additional aggradation was possible. This new aggradation was not likely to exceed 0.1 m except in reaches within a few kilometers downstream of the landslide, where additional aggradation of up to 0.5 m is possible. Alternative river response scenarios, including continued mass wasting from the landslide scarp, major channel migration or avulsion, or the formation of large downstream wood jams, although unlikely, could result in reaches of significant local aggradation or channel change.

  2. SOURCE PHENOMENOLOGY EXPERIMENTS IN ARIZONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jessie L. Bonner; Brian Stump; Mark Leidig; Heather Hooper; Xiaoning (David) Yang; Rongmao Zhou; Tae Sung Kim; William R. Walter; Aaron Velasco; Chris Hayward; Diane Baker; C. L. Edwards; Steven Harder; Travis Glenn; Cleat Zeiler; James Britton; James F. Lewkowicz

    2005-09-30

    The Arizona Source Phenomenology Experiments (SPE) have resulted in an important dataset for the nuclear monitoring community. The 19 dedicated single-fired explosions and multiple delay-fired mining explosions were recorded by one of the most densely instrumented accelerometer and seismometer arrays ever fielded, and the data have already proven useful in quantifying confinement and excitation effects for the sources. It is very interesting to note that we have observed differences in the phenomenology of these two series of explosions resulting from the differences between the relatively slow (limestone) and fast (granodiorite) media. We observed differences at the two SPE sites in the way the rock failed during the explosions, how the S-waves were generated, and the amplitude behavior as a function of confinement. Our consortium's goal is to use the synergy of the multiple datasets collected during this experiment to unravel the phenomenological differences between the two emplacement media. The data suggest that the main difference between single-fired chemical and delay-fired mining explosion seismograms at regional distances is the increased surface wave energy for the latter source type. The effect of the delay-firing is to decrease the high-frequency P-wave amplitudes while increasing the surface wave energy because of the longer source duration and spall components. The results suggest that the single-fired explosions are surrogates for nuclear explosions in higher frequency bands (e.g., 6-8 Hz Pg/Lg discriminants). We have shown that the SPE shots, together with the mining explosions, are efficient sources of S-wave energy, and our next research stage is to postulate the possible sources contributing to the shear-wave energy.

  3. March 2016 Arizona thoracic society ntoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The March 2016 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, March 23, 2016 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 17 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. Of note, Dr. Elijah Poulos drove from Flagstaff to attend the meeting. Dr. Rick Robbins gave a summary of ATS Hill Day and the possibility of collecting dues for the Arizona Thoracic Society along with American Thoracic Society dues. Dr. Robbins also presented the results of emailing the Table of Contents of the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care to the ATS members in Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Nevada along with listing the contents in Inspirations the California Thoracic Society newsletter. The number of page views doubled over usual the following day. Dr. George Parides presented a short presentation on whether coccidioidomycosis nodules ...

  4. March 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The March 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was a special meeting. In conjunction with the Valley Fever Center for Excellence and the Arizona Respiratory Center the Eighteenth Annual Farness Lecture was held in the Sonntag Pavilion at St. Joseph's Hospital at 6 PM on Friday, April 4, 2014. The guest speaker was Antonio "Tony" Catanzaro, MD from the University of California San Diego and current president of the Cocci Study Group. There were 57 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and infectious disease communities. After opening remarks by Arizona Thoracic Society president, Lewis Wesselius (a former fellow under Dr. Catanzaro at UCSD, John Galgiani, director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence, gave a brief history of the Farness lecture before introducing Dr. Catanzaro. The lecture is named for Orin J. Farness, a Tucson physician, who was the first to report culture positive coccidioidomycosis (cocci or Valley Fever. ...

  5. Taxing the Establishment Clause: —Revolutionary Decision of the Arizona Supreme Court

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin G. Welner

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the nature and implications of a 1999 decision of the Arizona Supreme Court, upholding the constitutionality of a state tax credit statute. The statute offers a $500 tax credit to taxpayers who donate money to non-profit organizations which, in turn, donate the money in grants to students in order to help defray the costs of attending private and parochial schools. The author concludes that the Arizona decision elevates cleverness in devising a statutory scheme above the substance of long-established constitutional doctrine.

  6. Secure Geographic Routing Protocols: Issues and Approaches

    CERN Document Server

    sookhak, Mehdi; Haghparast, Mahboobeh; ISnin, Ismail Fauzi

    2011-01-01

    In the years, routing protocols in wireless sensor networks (WSN) have been substantially investigated by researches. Most state-of-the-art surveys have focused on reviewing of wireless sensor network .In this paper we review the existing secure geographic routing protocols for wireless sensor network (WSN) and also provide a qualitative comparison of them.

  7. Secure Geographic Routing Protocols: Issues and Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi sookhak

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the years, routing protocols in wireless sensor networks (WSN have been substantially investigated by researches Most state-of-the-art surveys have focused on reviewing of wireless sensor network .In this paper we review the existing secure geographic routing protocols for wireless sensor network (WSN and also provide a qualitative comparison of them.

  8. Properties of the Multiple Measures in Arizona's Teacher Evaluation Model. REL 2015-050

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarev, Valeriy; Newman, Denis; Sharp, Alyssa

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the relationships among the components of the Arizona Department of Education's new teacher evaluation model, with a particular focus on the extent to which ratings from the state model's teacher observation instrument differentiated higher and lower performance. The study used teacher-level evaluation data collected by the…

  9. Arpaio Doesn't Control Anything: A Summer with El Hormiguero in Phoenix, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Juan F.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing from observations and interview data, this essay examines the role of "hormiguero agency" in nurturing empowered identities amongst Latin@s in Phoenix, Arizona. Specific links are made to how dehumanizing state level policies are resisted in multiple spaces, including schools, activist organizations, and within underground business…

  10. Impacts of Arizona's SB 1070 on Mexican American Students' Stress, School Attachment, and Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Richard; López, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the impacts of immigration legislation on Mexican ethnic students who are citizens of the United States is needed. This study investigates how passage of Arizona's antiimmigration law, SB 1070, in 2010 bears upon the schooling experiences of Mexican American high school students. Applying Meyer's Minority Stress Model as the…

  11. 76 FR 9772 - Adequacy of Arizona Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... AGENCY Adequacy of Arizona Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection... municipal solid waste landfill (MSWLF) permit program to allow the State to issue research, development, and... the use of special characters, any form of encryption, and be free of any defects or viruses. Docket...

  12. Racism and the Older Voter? Arizona's Rejection of a Paid Holiday to Honor Martin Luther King.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastenbaum, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Questions whether defeat of propositions to establish paid Martin Luther King holiday in Arizona was example of racism among primarily White senior adult voters of the state. Proposes three models to account for general pattern of election-related behavior and for vote itself: proactive racist; pragmatic self-interest; and fortress mentality.…

  13. The 2010 Citizens Clean Elections Voter Education Guide: Constructing the "Illegal Immigrant" in the Arizona Voter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Justin G.

    2013-01-01

    This "essay" (article) is a close and critical look at The 2010 Citizens Clean Elections Voter Education Guide, a document made available to the Arizona public prior to the 2010 state General elections. Though the guide is described as "a nonpartisan, plain-language handbook" by its authors, it can be implicated in the…

  14. Is Arizona's Approach to Educating Its ELS Superior to Other Forms of Instruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Wenzl, Mary; Perez, Karla; Gandara, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    In the Horne v Flores Supreme Court decision of June 25, 2009, the Court wrote that one basis for finding Arizona in compliance with federal law regarding the education of its English learners was that the state had adopted a "significantly more effective" than bilingual education instructional model for EL students --Structured…

  15. Implementing Structured English Immersion in Arizona: Benefits, Costs, Challenges, and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia; Gonzalez-Canche, Manuel; Moll, Luis C.

    2010-01-01

    This study conducted telephone interviews with 26 randomly selected English Language Coordinators from 26 Arizona school districts with enrollment patterns that were representative of the state as whole. Three primary questions were posed to the respondents: (a) How is the 4-hour ELD block being implemented?; (b) What are the benefits of the…

  16. Hazmat Routes (National)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Hazardous Material Routes (NTAD) were developed using the 2004 First Edition TIGER/Line files. The routes are...

  17. Geothermal resources in Arizona: a bibliography. Circular 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, S.S.

    1982-01-01

    All reports and maps generated by the Geothermal Project of the Arizona Bureau of Geology and Mineral Technology and the Arizona Geothermal Commercialization Team of the University of Arizona are listed. In order to provide a more comprehensive listing of geothermal papers from other sources have been included. There are 224 references in the bibliography. (MHR)

  18. Dynamic information routing in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Kirst, Christoph; Battaglia, Demian

    2015-01-01

    Flexible information routing fundamentally underlies the function of many biological and artificial networks. Yet, how such systems may specifically communicate and dynamically route information is not well understood. Here we identify a generic mechanism to route information on top of collective dynamical reference states in complex networks. Switching between collective dynamics induces flexible reorganization of information sharing and routing patterns, as quantified by delayed mutual information and transfer entropy measures between activities of a network's units. We demonstrate the power of this generic mechanism specifically for oscillatory dynamics and analyze how individual unit properties, the network topology and external inputs coact to systematically organize information routing. For multi-scale, modular architectures, we resolve routing patterns at all levels. Interestingly, local interventions within one sub-network may remotely determine non-local network-wide communication. These results help...

  19. Analysis of potential highway routes to Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathisan, S.K.; Parentela, E.M.; Lee, M.S. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1994-12-31

    States have been provided the authority to designate routes for the transport of highway route controlled quantity shipments of radioactive materials. The state of Nevada is currently evaluating alternative routes for such designation. This paper provides a preliminary assessment of potential system impacts of Nevada`s highway route designation for the shipment of High Level Radioactive Waste (HLRW) to the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A potential route being evaluated by Nevada was used to specify routing constraints for highway shipments to Yucca Mountain. Individual routes were determined for shipments from each origin using the HIGHWAY model for unconstrained and constrained routing scenarios. Results of the analysis indicate that the imposition of the routing constraint would result in increased travel times and shipment distances. These increases range from about 1.25 percent to about 80 percent. However, the magnitude of such increases is highly dependent on the geographic location of the origin.

  20. Integrated solid waste management of Scottsdale, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the city of Scottsdale, Arizona, integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. The document reports actual data from records kept by participants. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may per-form manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for municipal solid waste (MSW) management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption, for a 1-year period, of an operating IMSWM system. The report is organized into two main parts. The first part is the executive summary and case study portion of the report. The executive summary provides a basic description of the study area and selected economic and energy information. Within the case study are detailed descriptions of each component operating during the study period; the quantities of solid waste collected, processed, and marketed within the study boundaries; the cost of MSW in Scottsdale; an energy usage analysis; a review of federal, state, and local environmental requirement compliance; a reference section; and a glossary of terms. The second part of the report focuses on a more detailed discourse on the above topics. In addition, the methodology used to determine the economic costs and energy consumption of the system components is found in the second portion of this report. The methodology created for this project will be helpful for those professionals who wish to break out the costs of their own integrated systems.

  1. Measuring IPM Impacts in California and Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, J. J.; Baur, M. E.; Elliott, S. F.

    2016-01-01

    Integrated pest management (IPM) is a method of reducing economic, human health, and environmental risks from pests and pest management strategies. There are questions about the long-term success of IPM programs in relation to continued use of pesticides in agriculture. Total pounds of pesticides applied is a mis-measure of the impact of IPM in agriculture. A more complete measurement of the long-term impact of IPM includes consideration of changes in agricultural production practices and productivity, toxicity of the pesticides used, risks from human exposure to pesticides, and environmental sampling for pesticides in air and water resources. In recent decades, agricultural IPM programs have evolved to address invasive pests, shifts in endemic pest pressures, reductions in pest damage tolerance in markets, and increases in crop yields. Additionally, pesticide use data from Arizona and California revealed reduced use of pesticides in some toxicity categories but increased use of pesticides in a couple of categories. Data from federal and California programs that monitored pesticide residue on food have documented low pesticide risk to consumers. Environmental monitoring programs documented decreased pesticide levels in surface water resources in agricultural watersheds in the western United States and low levels of pesticides in air resources in agricultural areas in California. The focus of IPM assessment should be on reducing economic, human health, and environmental risks, not on pounds of pesticides applied. More broadly, IPM programs have evolved to address changes in pests and agricultural production systems while continuing to reduce human health and environmental risk from pesticides. PMID:27812396

  2. Assessment of selected inorganic constituents in streams in the Central Arizona Basins Study Area, Arizona and northern Mexico, through 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anning, David W.

    2003-01-01

    Stream properties and water-chemistry constituent concentrations from data collected by the National Water-Quality Assessment and other U.S. Geological Survey water-quality programs were analyzed to (1) assess water quality, (2) determine natural and human factors affecting water quality, and (3) compute stream loads for the surface-water resources in the Central Arizona Basins study area. Stream temperature, pH, dissolved-oxygen concentration and percent saturation, and dissolved-solids, suspended-sediment, and nutrient concentration data collected at 41 stream-water quality monitoring stations through water year 1998 were used in this assessment. Water-quality standards applicable to the stream properties and water-chemistry constituent concentration data for the stations investigated in this study generally were met, although there were some exceedences. In a few samples from the White River, the Black River, and the Salt River below Stewart Mountain Dam, the pH in reaches designated as a domestic drinking water source was higher than the State of Arizona standard. More than half of the samples from the Salt River below Stewart Mountain Dam and almost all of the samples from the stations on the Central Arizona Project Canal?two of the three most important surface-water sources used for drinking water in the Central Arizona Basins study area?exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level for dissolved solids. Two reach-specific standards for nutrients established by the State of Arizona were exceeded many times: (1) the annual mean concentration of total phosphorus was exceeded during several years at stations on the main stems of the Salt and Verde Rivers, and (2) the annual mean concentration of total nitrogen was exceeded during several years at the Salt River near Roosevelt and at the Salt River below Stewart Mountain Dam. Stream properties and water-chemistry constituent concentrations were related to

  3. Routing on Metacyclic Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenjun Xiao

    2002-01-01

    Wu, Lakshmivarahan and Dhall[5] recently described a deterministic, distributed routing scheme for some special classes of metacyclic graphs. However they have no proof of correctness that the scheme is a shortest path routing algorithm. In the note we give a suboptimal, deterministic routing algorithm.

  4. Intraosseous (IO) route .

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All drugs and fluids given via intravenous route were safely given through IO route with superior to ... was used widely during the Korean War, In 1950-1960. Intravenous ... In this article a brief review and analysis of cases managed by IO route ...

  5. Assessment of Vulnerability to Coccidioidomycosis in Arizona and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Kathryn C.; Benedict, Kaitlin; McCotter, Orion Z.; Bell, Jesse E.

    2017-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is a fungal infection endemic to the southwestern United States, particularly Arizona and California. Its incidence has increased, potentially due in part to the effects of changing climatic variables on fungal growth and spore dissemination. This study aims to quantify the county-level vulnerability to coccidioidomycosis in Arizona and California and to assess the relationships between population vulnerability and climate variability. The variables representing exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity were combined to calculate county level vulnerability indices. Three methods were used: (1) principal components analysis; (2) quartile weighting; and (3) percentile weighting. Two sets of indices, “unsupervised” and “supervised”, were created. Each index was correlated with coccidioidomycosis incidence data from 2000–2014. The supervised percentile index had the highest correlation; it was then correlated with variability measures for temperature, precipitation, and drought. The supervised percentile index was significantly correlated (p coccidioidomycosis incidence in both states. Moderate, positive significant associations (p coccidioidomycosis is associated with climate variability. PMID:28644403

  6. Arizona Twin Project: a focus on early resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Clifford, Sierra; McDonald, Kristy; O'Brien, T Caitlin; Valiente, Carlos

    2013-02-01

    The Arizona Twin Project is an ongoing longitudinal study designed to elucidate the genetic and environmental influences underlying the development of early competence and resilience to common mental and physical health problems during infancy and childhood. Participants are a sample of 600 twins (25% Hispanic) recruited from birth records in the state of Arizona, United States. Primary caregivers were interviewed on twins' development and early social environments when twins were 12 and 30 months of age. Measures include indices of prenatal and obstetrical risk coded from hospital medical records, as well as primary caregiver-report questionnaires assessing multiple indicators of environmental risk and resilience (e.g., parental warmth and control, family and social support), twins' developmental maturity, temperament, health, behavior problems, and competencies. Preliminary findings highlight the importance of the early environment for infant and toddler health and well-being, both directly and as a moderator of genetic influences. Future directions include a third longitudinal assessment in middle childhood examining daily bidirectional relations between sleep, health behaviors, stress, and mood.

  7. Lower Colorado River GRP Dams and Water Retention Structures, Arizona, 2012, Arizona Department of Environmental Quality

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Location of dams and water retention structures as compiled from multiple sources by the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ). The data are "sensitive"...

  8. Amphibian acoustic data from the Arizona 1, Pinenut, and Canyon breccia pipe uranium mines in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinck, Jo E.; Hossack, Blake R.; Honeycutt, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The data consists of a summary of amphibian acoustic recordings at Canyon, Arizona 1, and Pinenut mines near the Grand Canyon. USGS is currently conducting biological surveys associated with uranium mines on federal lands in Arizona. These surveys include determining the composition of the local amphibian community. Original raw acoustic recordings used to create this summary data table are archived at Columbia Environmental Research Center.

  9. Censorship and Arizona Schools: 1966-1968.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donelson, Kenneth L.

    1969-01-01

    This article reports the results of a survey of 277 secondary English teachers in 103 schools to determine the effect of censorship on English teaching in Arizona from 1966 to 1968. Listed are the numbers of teachers responding positively and negatively to each of 30 yes-or-no questions, revealing that 46.43% of the respondents had encountered…

  10. Lights, Camera, Read! Arizona Reading Program Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona State Dept. of Library, Archives and Public Records, Phoenix.

    This document is the manual for the Arizona Reading Program (ARP) 2003 entitled "Lights, Camera, Read!" This theme spotlights books that were made into movies, and allows readers to appreciate favorite novels and stories that have progressed to the movie screen. The manual consists of eight sections. The Introduction includes welcome letters from…

  11. Coccidiodomycosis in Arizona 2007-2008

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-13

    This podcast looks at the impact of Coccidioidomycosis, or Valley Fever, in Arizona in 2007 and early 2008. CDC epidemiologist Dr. Tom Chiller discusses what researchers learned about this fungal disease.  Created: 10/13/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/27/2010.

  12. 50 CFR 32.22 - Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., T.11N, R 17W as posted. Exceptions: Arizona Wildlife Management Areas 16A and 44A. D. Sport Fishing..., all Service property in Brown Canyon, all Service property within 1/4 mile (.4 km) of refuge.... There is no bag limit. 2. Conditions A1 through A3, B2, and B3 apply. D. Sport Fishing. Cabeza...

  13. Agents of Culture in Rural Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Penny

    1986-01-01

    Describes the Art in Arizona Towns Project, through which rural community colleges sponsor three- to six-day visits/residencies by performing artists who perform, lecture, and conduct classes and workshops for schools and community groups. Discusses the project's benefits for the rural communities and the artists, and logistical and financial…

  14. July 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The July 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, July 23, 2015 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 16 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. It was decided to continue holding the meeting on the fourth Wednesday of the odd numbered months. Lewis Wesselius relayed a request from the Mayo Clinic regarding a survey on how physicians in Arizona treat Valley Fever. There were no objections to using our mailing list to send out the survey. Dr. Parides formed a committee to encourage younger clinicians to attend the Arizona Thoracic Society meetings. Richard A. Robbins was chose as the Arizona Thoracic Society's nominee for clinician of the year. There were 3 case presentations: 1. George Parides presented a 58-year-old woman with a past medical history of cavitating coccidioidomycosis in both ...

  15. Geodatabase of the available top and bottom surface datasets that represent the Basin and Range basin-fill aquifers, Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, and Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geodatabase includes spatial datasets that represent the Basin and Range basin-fill aquifers in the States of Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico,...

  16. Dams and Obstructions along Iowa's Canoe Routes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This dataset represents obstruction to canoe and boat users of the canoe routes of Iowa. This may represent actual dams, rock dams (natural or man made), large...

  17. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 35, (ANDOVT00110035) on State Route 11, crossing the Middle Branch Williams River, Andover, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Ronda L.; Wild, Emily C.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ANDOVT00110035 on State Route 11 crossing the Middle Branch Williams River, Andover, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (Federal Highway Administration, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south-central Vermont. The 4.65-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest on the left bank and small trees and brush on the right bank upstream and downstream of the bridge. In the study area, the Middle Branch Williams River has an incised, meandering channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 57 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 31.4 mm (0.103 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 28, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable. There are cut-banks upstream and downstream of the bridge and an island in the channel upstream. The State Route 11 crossing of the Middle Branch Williams River is a 28-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 24-ft concrete tee-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 28, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 23.6 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 46 (CHESVT00110046) on Vermont State Route 11, crossing the Middle Branch Williams River, Chester, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Emily C.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CHESVT00110046 on State Route 11 crossing the Middle Branch Williams River, Chester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.The site is in the Green Mountain and New England Upland sections of the New England physiographic province in southeastern Vermont. The 28.0-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forested on the upstream left and downstream right overbanks. The upstream right and downstream left overbanks are pasture while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation.In the study area, the the Middle Branch Williams River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.013 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 81 ft and an average bank height of 11 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 70.7 mm (0.232 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on September 12, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable.The State Route 11 crossing of the Middle Branch Williams River is a 118-ft-long, two-lane steel stringer type bridge consisting of a 114-foot steel plate deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 109 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 41 (ANDOVT00110041) on State Route 11, crossing the Middle Branch Williams River, Andover, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Emily C.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ANDOVT00110041 on State Route 11 crossing the Middle Branch Williams River, Andover, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in southeastern Vermont. The 12.1-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is grass on the upstream right overbank while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. The upstream left overbank and downstream right overbank are brushland. The downstream left overbank is forested. In the study area, the Middle Branch Williams River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.018 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 71 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 85.0 mm (0.279 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on September 10, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable due to a cut-bank present on the upstream right bank and a wide channel bar with vegetation in the upstream reach. The State Route 11 crossing of the Middle Branch Williams River is a 46-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of a concrete 44-foot tee-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The opening length of

  20. Constraints to the possible alternatives from Arizona agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, K.E.

    1979-01-01

    The problems plaguing Arizona agriculture are outlined including the primary factors of declining groundwater supplies and increasing costs of energy to pump irrigation water. Two alternatives are suggested. The first alternative is to reduce or stabilize energy costs, an event that the authors acknowledge as being rather unlikely. Pumping costs using various fuels during the period 1891 to 1978 are reviewed. The second alternative involves developing cultivation techniques for drought-resistant plants native to arid regions, plants which have economic potential. Most of these plants would require little irrigation under cultivation and could substitute for cash crops being cultivated under heavy irrigation in Arizona. Four of these plants native to arid regions in the United States are discussed in some detail. Guayule (Parthenium argentatum) is a known rubber producer. Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) produces a liquid wax similar to the oil of the sperm whale, an endangered species. The gopher plant (Euphorbia lathyrus) is a potential producer of petrochemical feedstock for use as an energy source. Finally the buffalo gourd (Cucurbita foetidissima) is a possible source of food for both humans and livestock.

  1. Level III Ecoregions of Arizona

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  2. Level IV Ecoregions of Arizona

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  3. Routing and scheduling problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhardt, Line Blander

    In today’s globalized society, transport contributes to our daily life in many different ways. The production of the parts for a shelf ready product may take place on several continents and our travel between home and work, vacation travel and business trips has increased in distance the last......, the effectiveness of the network is of importance aiming at satisfying as many costumer demands as possible at a low cost. Routing represent a path between locations such as an origin and destination for the object routed. Sometimes routing has a time dimension as well as the physical paths. This may...... to a destination on a predefined network, the routing and scheduling of vessels in a liner shipping network given a demand forecast to be covered, the routing of manpower and vehicles transporting disabled passengers in an airport and the vehicle routing with time windows where one version studied includes edge...

  4. Partitioning a Steady State Sediment Budget to Represent Long tailed Distributions of Contaminant Residence Times: A Modeling Approach for Routing Tracers Through Alluvial Storage Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzuto, J. E.; Ackerman, T. R.

    2012-12-01

    the next FP reservoir with a lower inundation frequency (we modify the Malmon (2002) model to account for these fluxes). Deposition rates are the product of area and accumulation rates. Erosion rates are then determined that conserve the mass in each reservoir through time. The existing area and elevation range for each FP reservoir is assumed to remain in morphological steady state, which requires that the area eroded from a particular reservoir is replaced by an equal area transferring in, due to deposition, from a lower elevation reservoir. These functions are constrained by measurements of FP area and mass, the total exchange rate for the FP from the sediment budget, and conservation of mass within each FP sub-reservoir. Our revised model successfully fits Hg concentration histories in the FGCM, reproduces contemporary loading of mercury from bank erosion, and provides reasonable estimates of Hg concentration in the water column. Thus, alluvial sediment storage reservoirs should not be assumed to be well-mixed, and sediment budgets cannot be used to route contaminants through river valleys without accounting for the long-tailed distribution of residence times that may occur in these environments.

  5. Vehicle Routing in Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Hasle, Geir

    2010-01-01

    Solving the Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP) is a key to efficiency in transportation and supply chain management. The VRP is a computationally hard problem that comes in many guises. The VRP literature contains thousands of papers, and VRP research is regarded as one of the great successes of OR. In industry and the public sector, vehicle routing tools provide substantial savings every day. An industry of routing tool vendors has emerged. Exact optimization methods of today cannot consistently ...

  6. SPEED: A Real-Time Routing Protocol for Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    guarantees, which were not the main goals of previous location-based routing protocols . Reactive routing algorithms such as AODV [11], DSR[5] and TORA [10...1 SPEED: A Real-Time Routing Protocol for Sensor Networks1 Tian He John A Stankovic Chenyang Lu Tarek Abdelzaher Department of...control packet overhead. 2. State of thea Art A number of routing protocols (e.g., [2] [5] [8] [11] [12]) have been developed for ad hoc wireless

  7. Route Availabililty Planning Tool -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Route Availability Planning Tool (RAPT) is a weather-assimilated decision support tool (DST) that supports the development and execution of departure management...

  8. Contact Graph Routing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Contact Graph Routing (CGR) is a dynamic routing system that computes routes through a time-varying topology of scheduled communication contacts in a network based on the DTN (Delay-Tolerant Networking) architecture. It is designed to enable dynamic selection of data transmission routes in a space network based on DTN. This dynamic responsiveness in route computation should be significantly more effective and less expensive than static routing, increasing total data return while at the same time reducing mission operations cost and risk. The basic strategy of CGR is to take advantage of the fact that, since flight mission communication operations are planned in detail, the communication routes between any pair of bundle agents in a population of nodes that have all been informed of one another's plans can be inferred from those plans rather than discovered via dialogue (which is impractical over long one-way-light-time space links). Messages that convey this planning information are used to construct contact graphs (time-varying models of network connectivity) from which CGR automatically computes efficient routes for bundles. Automatic route selection increases the flexibility and resilience of the space network, simplifying cross-support and reducing mission management costs. Note that there are no routing tables in Contact Graph Routing. The best route for a bundle destined for a given node may routinely be different from the best route for a different bundle destined for the same node, depending on bundle priority, bundle expiration time, and changes in the current lengths of transmission queues for neighboring nodes; routes must be computed individually for each bundle, from the Bundle Protocol agent's current network connectivity model for the bundle s destination node (the contact graph). Clearly this places a premium on optimizing the implementation of the route computation algorithm. The scalability of CGR to very large networks remains a research topic

  9. Genetic algorithms for route discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelenbe, Erol; Liu, Peixiang; Lainé, Jeremy

    2006-12-01

    Packet routing in networks requires knowledge about available paths, which can be either acquired dynamically while the traffic is being forwarded, or statically (in advance) based on prior information of a network's topology. This paper describes an experimental investigation of path discovery using genetic algorithms (GAs). We start with the quality-of-service (QoS)-driven routing protocol called "cognitive packet network" (CPN), which uses smart packets (SPs) to dynamically select routes in a distributed autonomic manner based on a user's QoS requirements. We extend it by introducing a GA at the source routers, which modifies and filters the paths discovered by the CPN. The GA can combine the paths that were previously discovered to create new untested but valid source-to-destination paths, which are then selected on the basis of their "fitness." We present an implementation of this approach, where the GA runs in background mode so as not to overload the ingress routers. Measurements conducted on a network test bed indicate that when the background-traffic load of the network is light to medium, the GA can result in improved QoS. When the background-traffic load is high, it appears that the use of the GA may be detrimental to the QoS experienced by users as compared to CPN routing because the GA uses less timely state information in its decision making.

  10. November 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The November Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 11/20/2013 at Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 26 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, nursing, radiology, and infectious disease communities. As per the last meeting a separate area for upcoming meetings has been created in the upper left hand corner of the home page on the SWJPCC website. A short presentation was made by Timothy Kuberski MD, Chief of Infectious Disease at Maricopa Medical Center, entitled “Clinical Evidence for Coccidioidomycosis as an Etiology for Sarcoidosis”. Isaac Yourison, a medical student at the University of Arizona, will be working with Dr. Kuberski on his scholarly project. Mr. Yourison hypothesizes that certain patients diagnosed with sarcoidosis in Arizona really have coccidioidomycosis. It would be predicted that because of the immunosuppression, usually due to steroids, the sarcoidosis patients would eventually express the Coccidioides infection. The investigators will be …

  11. April 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The April 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 4/23/2014 at Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 15 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. It was announced that there will be a wine tasting with the California, New Mexico and Colorado Thoracic Societies at the American Thoracic Society International Meeting. The tasting will be led by Peter Wagner and is scheduled for the Cobalt Room in the Hilton San Diego Bayfront on Tuesday, May 20, from 4-8 PM. Guideline development was again discussed. The consensus was to await publication of the IDSA Cocci Guidelines and respond appropriately. George Parides, Arizona Chapter Representative, gave a presentation on Hill Day. Representatives of the Arizona, New Mexico and Washington Thoracic Societies met with their Congressional delegations, including Rep. David Schweikert, to discuss the Cigar Bill, NIH funding, and the Medicare Sustainable Growth ...

  12. February 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The February 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society was a dinner meeting sponsored by Select Specialty Hospital and held on Wednesday, 2/26/2014 at Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 14 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. Gerald Swartzberg was presented a plaque as the Arizona Thoracic Society clinician of the year by George Parides (Figure 1. A discussion was held about having a wine tasting in San Diego at the ATS International Conference. Peter Wagner (Slurping Around with PDW has agreed to lead the conference. It was decided to extend invitations to the New Mexico, Colorado and California Thoracic Societies along with the Mayo Clinic. A question was raised about guideline development. It was felt that we should review the Infectious Disease Society of America Valley Fever guidelines and determine if the Arizona Thoracic Society might have something to contribute. Three cases were presented: Lewis ...

  13. University of Arizona Compressed Air Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Joseph; Muralidharan, Krishna

    2012-12-31

    Boiled down to its essentials, the grant’s purpose was to develop and demonstrate the viability of compressed air energy storage (CAES) for use in renewable energy development. While everyone agrees that energy storage is the key component to enable widespread adoption of renewable energy sources, the development of a viable scalable technology has been missing. The Department of Energy has focused on expanded battery research and improved forecasting, and the utilities have deployed renewable energy resources only to the extent of satisfying Renewable Portfolio Standards. The lack of dispatchability of solar and wind-based electricity generation has drastically increased the cost of operation with these components. It is now clear that energy storage coupled with accurate solar and wind forecasting make up the only combination that can succeed in dispatchable renewable energy resources. Conventional batteries scale linearly in size, so the price becomes a barrier for large systems. Flow batteries scale sub-linearly and promise to be useful if their performance can be shown to provide sufficient support for solar and wind-base electricity generation resources. Compressed air energy storage provides the most desirable answer in terms of scalability and performance in all areas except efficiency. With the support of the DOE, Tucson Electric Power and Science Foundation Arizona, the Arizona Research Institute for Solar Energy (AzRISE) at the University of Arizona has had the opportunity to investigate CAES as a potential energy storage resource.

  14. December 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Robbins

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A breakfast meeting of the Arizona Thoracic Society and the Tucson winter lung series was held on Saturday, 12/14/2013 at Kiewit Auditorium on the University of Arizona Medical Center Campus beginning at 8:30 AM. There were 31 in attendance. A lecture was presented by Joe G. N. "Skip" Garcia, MD, the senior vice president for health sciences at the University of Arizona. The title of Garcia’s talk was “Personalizing Medicine in Cardiopulmonary Disorders: The Post ACA Landscape”. Garcia began with reiterating that the Affordable Care Act (ACA, Obamacare is fact and could pose a threat to academic medical centers. However, he views the ACA as an opportunity to develop personalized medicine which grew from the human genome project. Examples cited included the genetic variability among patients in determining the dose of warfarin and bronchodilator response to beta agonists in asthma (1,2. Garcia’s laboratory has studied predominately 6 diseases including the …

  15. Stability Analysis of Path-vector Routing

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitri, Papadimitriou

    2012-01-01

    Most studies on path-vector routing stability have been conducted empirically by means of ad-hoc analysis of BGP data traces. None of them consider prior specification of an analytic method including the use of stability measurement metrics for the systematic analysis of BGP traces and associated meta-processing for determining the local state of the routing system. In this paper, we define a set of metrics that characterize the local stability properties of path-vector routing such as BGP (Border Gateway Protocol). By means of these stability metrics, we propose a method to analyze the effects of BGP policy- and protocol-induced instability on local routers.

  16. Analysis of Path-vector Routing Stability

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitri, Papadimitriou

    2012-01-01

    Most studies on path-vector routing stability have been conducted empirically by means of ad-hoc analysis of BGP data traces. None of them consider prior specification of an analytic method including the use of stability measurement metrics for the systematic analysis of BGP traces and associated meta-processing for determining the local state of the routing system. In this paper, we define a set of metrics that characterize the local stability properties of path-vector routing such as BGP (Border Gateway Protocol). By means of these stability metrics, we propose a method to analyze the effects of BGP policy- and protocol-induced instability on local routers.

  17. Life history attributes data for Arizona Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum ammolegus) in Arizona 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Janet M.

    2017-01-01

    Ammodramus savannarum ammolegus (commonly referred to as the Arizona Grasshopper Sparrow) occurs in the desert and plains grasslands of southeastern Arizona, southwestern New Mexico, and northern Sonora, Mexico. Although a subspecies of conservation concern, this data was produced as part of the first intensive study of its life history and breeding ecology, providing baseline data and facilitating comparisons with other North American Grasshopper Sparrow subspecies. This study is described in the publication listed in the larger work citation of this metadata record. 

  18. Scallopleaf sage (salvia vaseyi: Lamiaceae) discovered in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, J.W.; Felger, R.S.; Jansen, B.D.; Krausman, P.R.

    2010-01-01

    During the course of field work in Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge, southwestern Arizona, in 2003, James Cain and Brian Jansen collected Salvia vaseyi, previously known only from the western edge of the Sonoran Desert in California and Baja California. Our findings indicate this shrub might be more widespread in southwestern Arizona mountains. Salvia vaseyi in Arizona seems to represent a relict population. There are other shrubby Salvia in Arizona, but S. vaseyi is the most xeric-mhabiting species and has the narrowest ecological and geographical range.

  19. Results of the Utah-Arizona stage-by-stage migrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, D.H.; Mellon, C.; Kinloch, M.; Dolbeare, T.; Ossi, D.P.

    2001-01-01

    In an effort to find a safer means of teaching cranes new migration routes, each year (in 1998 and 1999) we transported a group of greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) stage-by-stage, in a horse trailer, with stops for brief flights at about 30-km intervals, along a 1300-1400-km fall migration route from Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge (Fish Springs) in west-central Utah to the vicinity of Gila Bend, Arizona. Thereafter, we released them into a wild flock of sandhill cranes. All stage-by-stage birds were hand-reared with both a plastic crane decoy (to encourage them to roost in water) and a costume-draped humanoid form (called a scare-eagle and used for its namesake purpose). When these 2 teaching aids were placed in water, our cranes readily roosted nearby. All but 4 of our cranes proved cooperative (i.e., catchable at each of the ca 25-36 stops) during the migration. All were efficiently released into a wild flock and experienced good survival. The stage-by-stage method proved to be a safe means of transporting cranes south and giving them experience along the route. Some cranes apparently learned their route from the limited experience afforded by releasing them at intervals, and the 1999 cranes have made repealed migrations to or near our chosen northern terminus. However, after 1 winter in our chosen area, the birds have moved elsewhere to winter.

  20. Continental river routing model for water resources applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, N.; Clark, M. P.; Sampson, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation describes a stand-alone runoff routing tool, mizuRoute, which post-processes runoff outputs from any distributed hydrologic model or land surface model to produce spatially distributed streamflow at various spatial scales from headwater basins to continental-wide river systems. The tool utilizes vector-based river network data, which includes river segment lines and the associated drainage basin polygons. Streamflow estimates at any desired location in the river network can be easily extracted from the output of mizuRoute. The first step of the routing tool is hillslope routing, which uses a gamma distribution to construct a unit-hydrograph that represents the transport of runoff from a hillslope to an outlet of the catchment. The second step is river channel routing, which is performed with one of two routing scheme options: a) the kinematic wave tracking (KWT) routing procedure; and 2) the impulse response function - unit hydrograph (IRF-UH) routing procedure. This presentation demonstrate mizuRoute's capabilities to produce spatially distributed streamflow simulations based on the river network data from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Geospatial Fabric (GF) dataset, which contains over 54000 river segments across the contiguous United States (CONUS). We routed ensemble of 150 years runoff simulated with Variable Infiltration Capacity Model forced by climate data from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5. A brief analysis of the routing model parameter sensitivity is also presented.

  1. PNW River Reach Files -- 1:100k LLID Routed Streams (routes)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This feature class includes the ROUTE features from the 2001 version of the PNW River Reach files Arc/INFO coverage. Separate, companion feature classes are also...

  2. Improving Reactive Ad Hoc Routing Performance by Geographic Route Length

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yuan-da; YU Yan-bing; LU Di

    2005-01-01

    In order to help reactive ad hoc routing protocols select better-performance routes, a novel metric named geographic route length (GRL) is proposed. The relationship between GRL metric and routing performance is analyzed in detail. Combined with hop metric, GRL is applied into the original ad hoc on-demand distance vector (AODV) to demonstrate its effectiveness. Simulation experiments have shown that GRL can effectively reduce packet delay and route discovery frequency, thus can improve reactive ad hoc routing performance.

  3. A New Route Maintenance in Dynamic Source Routing Protocol

    CERN Document Server

    Shukla, Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Mobile ad-hoc network (MANET) is infrastructureless, self-organizable, multi hop packet switched network. A number of routing protocols for MANETs have been proposed in recent years. Dynamic Source Routing (DSR) protocol is one of the most popular routing protocol for ad hoc networks. This paper presents a novel method to enhance route maintenance part of DSR protocol. Our proposed route maintenance significantly increases the efficiency of the protocol at the time of route failures.

  4. Understanding individual routing behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Antonio; Stanojevic, Rade; Papagiannaki, Dina; Rodriguez, Pablo; González, Marta C

    2016-03-01

    Knowing how individuals move between places is fundamental to advance our understanding of human mobility (González et al. 2008 Nature 453, 779-782. (doi:10.1038/nature06958)), improve our urban infrastructure (Prato 2009 J. Choice Model. 2, 65-100. (doi:10.1016/S1755-5345(13)70005-8)) and drive the development of transportation systems. Current route-choice models that are used in transportation planning are based on the widely accepted assumption that people follow the minimum cost path (Wardrop 1952 Proc. Inst. Civ. Eng. 1, 325-362. (doi:10.1680/ipeds.1952.11362)), despite little empirical support. Fine-grained location traces collected by smart devices give us today an unprecedented opportunity to learn how citizens organize their travel plans into a set of routes, and how similar behaviour patterns emerge among distinct individual choices. Here we study 92 419 anonymized GPS trajectories describing the movement of personal cars over an 18-month period. We group user trips by origin-destination and we find that most drivers use a small number of routes for their routine journeys, and tend to have a preferred route for frequent trips. In contrast to the cost minimization assumption, we also find that a significant fraction of drivers' routes are not optimal. We present a spatial probability distribution that bounds the route selection space within an ellipse, having the origin and the destination as focal points, characterized by high eccentricity independent of the scale. While individual routing choices are not captured by path optimization, their spatial bounds are similar, even for trips performed by distinct individuals and at various scales. These basic discoveries can inform realistic route-choice models that are not based on optimization, having an impact on several applications, such as infrastructure planning, routing recommendation systems and new mobility solutions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  5. IP Routing Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolasco Pinto, Armando

    2002-03-01

    Uyless Black is a widely known expert in computer networks and data communications. He is author of more than ten books in the communication technologies field, which puts him in a good position to address this topic. In IP Routing Protocols he starts by providing the background and concepts required for understanding TCP/IP technology. This is done clearly and assumes little prior knowledge of the area. As might be expected, he emphasizes the IP route discovery problem. Later he details several routing protocols.

  6. Cumulative Vehicle Routing Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Kara, &#;mdat; Kara, Bahar Yeti&#;; Yeti&#;, M. Kadri

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a new objective function and corresponding formulations for the vehicle routing problem. The new cost function defined as the product of the distance of the arc and the flow on that arc. We call a vehicle routing problem with this new objective function as the Cumulative Vehicle Routing Problem (CumVRP). Integer programming formulations with O(n2) binary variables and O(n2) constraints are developed for both collection and delivery cases. We show that the CumVRP is a gener...

  7. Synoptic typing of high ozone events in Arizona (2011-2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jessica

    This thesis examines the synoptic characteristics associated with ozone exceedance events in Arizona during the time period of 2011 to 2013. Finding explanations and sources to the ground level ozone in this state is crucial to maintaining the state's adherence to federal air quality regulations. This analysis utilizes ambient ozone concentration data, surface meteorological conditions, upper air analyses, and HYSPLIT modeling to analyze the synoptic characteristics of ozone events. Based on these data and analyses, five categories were determined to be associated with these events. The five categories all exhibit distinct upper air patterns and surface conditions conducive to the formation of ozone, as well as distinct potential transport pathways of ozone from different nearby regions. These findings indicate that ozone events in Arizona can be linked to synoptic-scale patterns and potential regional transport of ozone. These results can be useful in the forecasting of high ozone pollution and influential on the legislative reduction of ozone pollution.

  8. Arizona Measure of Academic Progress: Third Annual Look at Growth in Arizona Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aportela, Anabel

    The 2001 results of Arizonas Measure of Academic Progress (MAP) mark the third annual release of this important school accountability tool. The 2001 MAP results are slightly different from the results of previous years in that they show the percent of students who achieve One Years Growth (OYG) and present results in a more accessible format. The…

  9. Examining Arizona's Policy Response Post "Flores v. Arizona" in Educating K-12 English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Silva, Margarita; Gomez, Laura; Cisneros, Jesus

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of Arizona's policy response in educating English language learners by conducting a narrative review. A critical Latina/o theory approach was used to analyze the data. This study reveals 5 salient policy responses: (a) severely limit bilingual education, (b) develop controversial funding solutions, (c) implement a…

  10. Class network routing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanot, Gyan; Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2009-09-08

    Class network routing is implemented in a network such as a computer network comprising a plurality of parallel compute processors at nodes thereof. Class network routing allows a compute processor to broadcast a message to a range (one or more) of other compute processors in the computer network, such as processors in a column or a row. Normally this type of operation requires a separate message to be sent to each processor. With class network routing pursuant to the invention, a single message is sufficient, which generally reduces the total number of messages in the network as well as the latency to do a broadcast. Class network routing is also applied to dense matrix inversion algorithms on distributed memory parallel supercomputers with hardware class function (multicast) capability. This is achieved by exploiting the fact that the communication patterns of dense matrix inversion can be served by hardware class functions, which results in faster execution times.

  11. Integrated route analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1981-01-01

    The integrated route analysis provides a data base for the second phase of the Arctic Pilot Project, the selection of a shipping corridor over which LNG icebreaking carriers will transport liquified...

  12. UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherfoord, John P. [University of Arizona; Johns, Kenneth A. [University of Arizona; Shupe, Michael A. [University of Arizona; Cheu, Elliott C. [University of Arizona; Varnes, Erich W. [University of Arizona; Dienes, Keith [University of Arizona; Su, Shufang [University of Arizona; Toussaint, William Doug [University of Arizona; Sarcevic, Ina [University of Arizona

    2013-07-29

    The High Energy Physics Group at the University of Arizona has conducted forefront research in elementary particle physics. Our theorists have developed new ideas in lattice QCD, SUSY phenomenology, string theory phenomenology, extra spatial dimensions, dark matter, and neutrino astrophysics. The experimentalists produced significant physics results on the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider and on the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. In addition, the experimentalists were leaders in detector development and construction, and on service roles in these experiments.

  13. Routed planar networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Aldous

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Modeling a road network as a planar graph seems very natural. However, in studying continuum limits of such networks it is useful to take {\\em routes} rather than {\\em edges} as primitives. This article is intended to introduce the relevant (discrete setting notion of {\\em routed network} to graph theorists. We give a naive classification of all 71 topologically different such networks on 4 leaves, and pose a variety of challenging research questions.

  14. Industrial Vehicle Routing

    OpenAIRE

    Hasle, Geir

    2008-01-01

    Solving the Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP) is a key to efficiency in transportation and supply chain management. The VRP is a computationally hard problem that comes in many guises. The VRP literature contains thousands of papers, and VRP research is regarded as one of the great successes of OR. An industry of routing tool vendors has emerged. Exact optimization methods of today cannot consistently solve VRP instances with more than 50-100 customers in reasonable time, which is generally a sma...

  15. Fate of the survivors of the 1995 and 1996 Arizona trucking migrations of costume-reared greater sandhill cranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mummert, D.P.; Ellis, D.H.; Chambers, C.L.

    2001-01-01

    In 1995 and 1996, we trained 2 groups of costume-reared greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) (10 in 1995, 14 in 1996) to follow a truck. Thereafter we led 10 in 1995 and 12 in 1996 from Garland Prairie, northern Arizona, to the Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge, southern Arizona (ca. 620 km). These techniques were being developed to create additional, disjunct populations of the whooping crane (G. americana). The cranes taught the migration route in 1995 did not follow the desired migration route in 1996 but did travel north 140 km along the route in spring 1997. By the summer of 1997, we did not know the locations of any of these birds. Results were better for the 1996 tracking cranes. Between 1997 and 1999 there was a 92% (11 of 12) success rate for the 1996 trucking cranes with known locations flying unassisted from the summering to wintering grounds. Through 1999, 7 of the 12 cranes became lost on flights from the wintering to summering grounds. (Some of the trucking cranes apparently followed wild cranes to or toward breeding grounds.)

  16. Centro Valley Phoenix, Arizona – (EE.UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welton Becket y Asociados, Arquitectos e ingenieros

    1974-10-01

    Full Text Available This office building is the administrative Centre for the National Valley Bank, Arizona. Being 155 m in height it is at present the highest building in the state. The construction consists of three towers, respectively 35, 37 and 39 storeys high, connected by means of a subterranean passage with an 8-storeyed parking building with a capacity of 1,700 vehicles. The first structure is of concrete in its nucleus and is enclosed by curtain walls which gives it a surface with extraordinary reflections. The entire parking building is of unfaced concrete. The bank occupies the floors 3-12, floor 36 and 38 and the remaining premises are for rent.Este edificio de oficinas es la central administrativa de la banca Valley National, de Arizona. Con 155 m de altura es, actualmente, el más alto del estado. Consta de tres torres de 35,37 y 39 plantas, adosadas y enlazadas, mediante un paso subterráneo, a un bloque de aparcamiento con ocho alturas y capacidad para 1.700 automóviles. El primero tiene estructura de hormigón en su núcleo central de comunicación vertical y cerramientos de muro-cortina, lo que le confiere una fisonomía brillante y reflectante de gran espectacularidad. El aparcamiento es todo él de hormigón visto. La banca ocupa las plantas 3 a 12, la 36 y la 38, destinándose el resto a alquiler.

  17. Transformational Leadership and Teacher Motivation in Southwestern Arizona High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between transformational leadership and teacher motivation in Southwestern Arizona high schools. Teachers in a school district in Southwestern Arizona comprised of high schools were surveyed using two instruments, Leithwood and Jantzi's (1998) The Leadership and Management of Schools in…

  18. 75 FR 3694 - Radio Broadcasting Services, Peach Springs, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services, Peach Springs, Arizona AGENCY: Federal Communications... Media Licenses, LLC, proposing the allotment of FM Channel 281C3 at Peach Springs, Arizona. The reference coordinates for Channel 281C3 at Peach Springs are 35-33-46 NL and 113-27-12 WL. DATES:...

  19. 78 FR 25861 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Peach Springs, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Peach Springs, Arizona AGENCY: Federal Communications... Springs, Arizona. (The symbol `` '' will be used to denote a channel reserved as a Tribal Allotment.) Channel 265A can be allotted at Peach Springs, consistent with the minimum distance...

  20. 7 CFR 1131.2 - Arizona marketing area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Arizona marketing area. 1131.2 Section 1131.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE ARIZONA MARKETING AREA Order...

  1. WATER SYSTEM OPERATOR TRAINING FOR THE CENTRAL ARIZONA PROJECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Central Arizona Project (CAP) is designed to bring about 1.5 million acre-feet of Colorado River water per year to Maricopa, Pima, and Pinal counties in Arizona. CAP carries water from Lake Havasu down to Tucson. The CAP canal system is a 336-mile long system of aqueducts, tunnels, pumping pla...

  2. 32 CFR 705.31 - USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. 705.31... NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.31 USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. (a) Limited space and the desirability of keeping the Memorial simple and dignified require...

  3. Untangling the web...spiders in Arizona fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many kinds of arthropod natural enemies (predators and parasitoids) inhabit crop fields in Arizona and can have a large negative impact on several pest insect species that also infest these crops. Many different species of spiders are common in cotton, alfalfa and other crops in Arizona. Among the ...

  4. A Survey on Underwater Acoustic Sensor Network Routing Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Martínez, José-Fernán; Meneses Chaus, Juan Manuel; Eckert, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASNs) have become more and more important in ocean exploration applications, such as ocean monitoring, pollution detection, ocean resource management, underwater device maintenance, etc. In underwater acoustic sensor networks, since the routing protocol guarantees reliable and effective data transmission from the source node to the destination node, routing protocol design is an attractive topic for researchers. There are many routing algorithms have been proposed in recent years. To present the current state of development of UASN routing protocols, we review herein the UASN routing protocol designs reported in recent years. In this paper, all the routing protocols have been classified into different groups according to their characteristics and routing algorithms, such as the non-cross-layer design routing protocol, the traditional cross-layer design routing protocol, and the intelligent algorithm based routing protocol. This is also the first paper that introduces intelligent algorithm-based UASN routing protocols. In addition, in this paper, we investigate the development trends of UASN routing protocols, which can provide researchers with clear and direct insights for further research. PMID:27011193

  5. A Survey on Underwater Acoustic Sensor Network Routing Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASNs have become more and more important in ocean exploration applications, such as ocean monitoring, pollution detection, ocean resource management, underwater device maintenance, etc. In underwater acoustic sensor networks, since the routing protocol guarantees reliable and effective data transmission from the source node to the destination node, routing protocol design is an attractive topic for researchers. There are many routing algorithms have been proposed in recent years. To present the current state of development of UASN routing protocols, we review herein the UASN routing protocol designs reported in recent years. In this paper, all the routing protocols have been classified into different groups according to their characteristics and routing algorithms, such as the non-cross-layer design routing protocol, the traditional cross-layer design routing protocol, and the intelligent algorithm based routing protocol. This is also the first paper that introduces intelligent algorithm-based UASN routing protocols. In addition, in this paper, we investigate the development trends of UASN routing protocols, which can provide researchers with clear and direct insights for further research.

  6. A Survey on Underwater Acoustic Sensor Network Routing Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Martínez, José-Fernán; Meneses Chaus, Juan Manuel; Eckert, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASNs) have become more and more important in ocean exploration applications, such as ocean monitoring, pollution detection, ocean resource management, underwater device maintenance, etc. In underwater acoustic sensor networks, since the routing protocol guarantees reliable and effective data transmission from the source node to the destination node, routing protocol design is an attractive topic for researchers. There are many routing algorithms have been proposed in recent years. To present the current state of development of UASN routing protocols, we review herein the UASN routing protocol designs reported in recent years. In this paper, all the routing protocols have been classified into different groups according to their characteristics and routing algorithms, such as the non-cross-layer design routing protocol, the traditional cross-layer design routing protocol, and the intelligent algorithm based routing protocol. This is also the first paper that introduces intelligent algorithm-based UASN routing protocols. In addition, in this paper, we investigate the development trends of UASN routing protocols, which can provide researchers with clear and direct insights for further research.

  7. 不同途径感染HIV人群的心理状态分析%Analysis of psychological state of HIV carriers infected via different routes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新蕊; 王常灏; 金燕; 杨慧; 胡艳霞; 张昌庆; 朱艳文; 阮师漫

    2011-01-01

    综合近年来国内外对艾滋病病毒(HIV)感染者及艾滋病(AIDS)病人心理健康的研究,分别对有偿献血、吸毒和经性途径感染HIV人群的心理状态进行分类分析,由此得出不同传播途径感染HIV人群的心理感受和心理状态是不同的.有偿献血人群存在严重的抑郁、焦虑情绪障碍;吸毒人群存在较严重的强迫、敌对、焦虑、抑郁、精神病性问题,可能丧失生活信心,产生报复社会的情绪;女性性工作者人际关系敏感、强迫症、偏执等表现较为突出,有更强烈的社会支持的心理需求;男男性行为者会产生强烈的负罪感,感到焦虑,羞耻、难以适应,产生自杀念头.文章提出,要掌握不同途径感染HIV人群的心理特点,心理干预工作才能事半功倍,才能更好地提高HIV感染者及AIDS病人的生存质量.%AIDS has become a worldwide disease which causes damage to both human physical and mental health. The mental health problems of HIV infected population have been gradually given serious attention. The mental health of HIV infected population has been studied at home and abroad in the recent years, and it has been concluded that different HIV carriers infected via different routes including paid blood donation, drug abuse and sexual contact,have different psychological feelings and mental health conditions . Paid blood donation have severe depression and anxiety disorder; drug abuse have significant obsession, anxiety, depression, hostility, psychiatric problems, possible loss of confidence in life, and social revenge mood) female sex workers, with interpersonal sensitivity, compulsive disorder, and prominent paranoid performance, have a strong social psychological support needs; men who have sex with men have a strong sense of guilt, anxiety, shame, difficulty to adapt, suicidal thoughts. The article indicates that psychological interventions could not succeed and patient's quality of life could not be

  8. Quantum chemistry-assisted synthesis route development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, Kenji; Sumimoto, Michinori [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamaguchi University, Tokiwadai, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8611 (Japan); Murafuji, Toshihiro [Graduate School of Medicine, Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi, Yamaguchi 753-8512 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    We have been investigating “quantum chemistry-assisted synthesis route development” using in silico screenings and applied the method to several targets. Another example was conducted to develop synthesis routes for a urea derivative, namely 1-(4-(trifluoromethyl)-2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl)urea. While five synthesis routes were examined, only three routes passed the second in silico screening. Among them, the reaction of 7-amino-4-(trifluoromethyl)-2H-chromen-2-one and O-methyl carbamate with BF{sub 3} as an additive was ranked as the first choice for synthetic work. We were able to experimentally obtain the target compound even though its yield was as low as 21 %. The theoretical result was thus consistent with that observed. The summary of transition state data base (TSDB) is also provided. TSDB is the key to reducing time of in silico screenings.

  9. Building a Sustained School Facilities Remedy: Arizona's Innovative Blueprint for Capital Funding. Education, Equity, and the Law. No. 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Molly A.

    2010-01-01

    For over ten years, the State of Arizona has implemented an innovative statewide process for financing and building school facilities and purchasing other capital items for its schools. Spawned by an education quality lawsuit, the 1998 Students FIRST Act established the School Facilities Board, which succeeded in helping rural, suburban, and urban…

  10. Racism and Power: Arizona Politicians' Use of the Discourse of Anti-Americanism against Mexican American Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    The article discusses a legislation that would effectively terminate Mexican American Studies programs in k-12 was passed in Arizona in 2010. In this article, the author traces how this legislation drew from discourses of anti-Americanism and wickedness initiated by the state's superintendent of public instruction against Mexican American Studies…

  11. A Hybrid Routing Algorithm Based on Ant Colony and ZHLS Routing Protocol for MANET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafsanjani, Marjan Kuchaki; Asadinia, Sanaz; Pakzad, Farzaneh

    Mobile Ad hoc networks (MANETs) require dynamic routing schemes for adequate performance. This paper, presents a new routing algorithm for MANETs, which combines the idea of ant colony optimization with Zone-based Hierarchical Link State (ZHLS) protocol. Ant colony optimization (ACO) is a class of Swarm Intelligence (SI) algorithms. SI is the local interaction of many simple agents to achieve a global goal. SI is based on social insect for solving different types of problems. ACO algorithm uses mobile agents called ants to explore network. Ants help to find paths between two nodes in the network. Our algorithm is based on ants jump from one zone to the next zones which contains of the proactive routing within a zone and reactive routing between the zones. Our proposed algorithm improves the performance of the network such as delay, packet delivery ratio and overhead than traditional routing algorithms.

  12. Routing Service Quality—Local Driver Behavior Versus Routing Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceikute, Vaida; Jensen, Christian S.

    2013-01-01

    experiments with real vehicle trajectory data and an existing online navigation service. It is found that the availability of information about previous trips enables better prediction of route travel time and makes it possible to provide the users with more popular routes than does a conventional navigation...... of the quality of one kind of location-based service, namely routing services. Specifically, the paper presents a framework that enables the comparison of the routes provided by routing services with the actual driving behaviors of local drivers. Comparisons include route length, travel time, and also route...

  13. An aqueous route to [Ta6O19]8- and solid-state studies of isostructural niobium and tantalum oxide complexes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyman, May D.; Anderson, Travis Mark; Alam, Todd Michael; Rodriguez, Mark A; Joel N. Bixler; Francois Bonhomme

    2007-10-01

    Tantalate materials play a vital role in our high technology society: tantalum capacitors are found in virtually every cell phone. Furthermore, electronic characteristics and the incredibly inert nature of tantalates renders them ideal for applications such as biomedical implants, nuclear waste forms, ferroelectrics, piezoelectrics, photocatalysts and optical coatings. The inert and insoluble nature of tantalates is not fundamentally understood; and furthermore poor solubility renders fabrication of novel or optimized tantalates very difficult. We have developed a soft chemical route to water-soluble tantalum oxide clusters that can serve as both precursors for novel tantalate materials and ideal models for experimental and computational approaches to understanding the unusually inert behavior of tantalates. The water soluble cluster, [Ta6O19]8- is small, highly symmetric, and contains the representative oxygen types of a metal oxide surface, and thus ideally mimics a complex tantalate surface in a simplistic form that can be studied unambiguously. Furthermore; in aqueous solution, these highly charged and super-basic clusters orchestrate surprising acid-base behavior that most likely plays an important role in the inertness of related oxide surfaces. Our unique synthetic approach to the [Ta6O19]8- cluster allowed for unprecedented enrichment with isotopic labels (17O), enabling detailed kinetic and mechanistic studies of the behavior of cluster oxygens, as well as their acid-base behavior. This SAND report is a collection of two publications that resulted from these efforts.

  14. Modeling Routing Overhead Generated by Wireless Reactive Routing Protocols

    CERN Document Server

    Javaid, Nadeem; Javaid, Akmal; Malik, Shahzad A

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we have modeled the routing over- head generated by three reactive routing protocols; Ad-hoc On-demand Distance Vector (AODV), Dynamic Source Routing (DSR) and DYnamic MANET On-deman (DYMO). Routing performed by reactive protocols consists of two phases; route discovery and route maintenance. Total cost paid by a protocol for efficient routing is sum of the cost paid in the form of energy consumed and time spent. These protocols majorly focus on the optimization performed by expanding ring search algorithm to control the flooding generated by the mechanism of blind flooding. So, we have modeled the energy consumed and time spent per packet both for route discovery and route maintenance. The proposed framework is evaluated in NS-2 to compare performance of the chosen routing protocols.

  15. 77 FR 38246 - Revisions to the Arizona State Implementation Plan, Arizona Department of Environmental Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ... Deviations,'' EPA, May 25, 1988 (the Bluebook). 2. ``Guidance Document for Correcting Common VOC & Other Rule... environmental effects with practical, appropriate, and legally permissible methods under Executive Order...

  16. 77 FR 52056 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    .... History and Description of the Cultural Items The unassociated funerary objects are six ceramic bowls, four ceramic jars, two ceramic pitchers, and three ceramic sherds. The funerary objects were removed... reported in a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register (73 FR 8356-8357, February 13,...

  17. November 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The November 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, November 19, 2014 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were about 30 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. Jud Tillinghast was nominated as the Arizona Thoracic Society physician of the year. Three cases were presented: 1. George Parides presented a case of a 70-year-old woman with a 3 areas of ground glass picked up incidentally on CT scan. She had some wheezing. A needle biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. The biopsy and radiologic pattern were consistent with adenocarcinoma in situ or minimally invasive adenocarcinoma. Discussion centered around treatment. Most felt that if the areas could be removed that surgical resection was indicated (1. 2. Lewis Wesselius presented a 60-year-old man with Marfan's syndrome and a history of an aortic valve replacement on chronic ...

  18. Garcia resigns as Arizona university VP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Dr. Joe G.N. "Skip" Garcia resigned his administrative duties as senior vice president for health sciences at the University of Arizona. Garcia said he would devote his full attention as a professor at the UA College of Medicine-Tucson according to the Arizona Republic (1. "After much thought and reflection, I have decided that the time is right for me to take a step back and focus on my continually growing research commitments," Garcia said. "Please know that this decision was an exceptionally difficult one and not reached lightly, and that I am humbled by all of your support during my time as senior vice president." Garcia was hired in 2013 to oversee the university's medical schools in Phoenix and Tucson, as well as the schools of nursing, pharmacy and public health. Shortly after Garcia was hired, he reorganized UA health sciences, recruited a roster of academics and tightened oversight of …

  19. May 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first 150 words. The May 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 5/28/2014 at Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 13 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep and radiology communities. A discussion was held regarding the Arizona Thoracic Society relationship with the American Lung Association. Several members volunteered to talk to the lung association regarding common ground to strengthen the relationship. The wine tasting with the California, New Mexico and Colorado Thoracic Societies at the American Thoracic Society International Meeting was a big success. There were about 55 at the meeting. The tasting will probably be held again next year. At the ATS meeting data was presented that pirfenidone was effective in reducing the progression of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. The data was published in the New England Journal of Medicine on 8/29/14 (1. Lewis Wesselius is one of the investigators enrolling patients in a phase ...

  20. June 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The June 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 6/25/14 at the Bio5 building on the University of Arizona Medical Center campus in Tucson beginning at 5:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were about 33 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. Four cases were presented: Eric Chase presented a 68 year old incarcerated man shortness of breath, chest pain and productive cough. The patient was a poor historian. He was supposed to be receiving morphine for back pain but this had been held. He also had a 45 pound weight loss over the past year. His PMH was positive for COPD, hypertension, congestive heart failure, chronic back pain and hepatitis C. Past surgical history included a back operation and some sort of chest operation. On physical examination he was tachypneic, tachycardic and multiple scars over his neck ...

  1. September 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The September Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 9/25/2013 at Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 13 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and pathology communities. After a brief discussion, Gerry Swartzberg was selected as Arizona’s 2014 nominee for Clinician of the Year. There was 1 case presented: Dr. Thomas Colby, pulmonary pathologist from Mayo Clinic Arizona, presented the case of a 67 year old woman with multiple pulmonary nodules. The largest was 1.2 cm CT scan. She had a fine needle aspiration of one of the nodules. The pathology revealed spindle-shaped cells which were synaptophysin + (also known as the major synaptic vesicle protein p38. Synaptophysin marks neuroendocrine tissue and on this basis the patient was diagnosed with multiple carcinoid tumors. Aguayo et al. (1 described six patients with diffuse hyperplasia and dysplasia of pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, multiple carcinoid tumorlets, and peribronchiolar fibrosis …

  2. August 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first 150 words. The August Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 8/28/2013 at Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 23 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and pathology communities. A brief discussion was held about the audio-visual aids available. It was generally agreed that our current projector is inadequate. Judd Tillinghast will inquire about using a hospital overhead projector. If that is not possible, it was agreed to purchase a new projector. Plans for telecasting the meeting between Phoenix and Tucson continue. A trial of a link between Shea and the University in Tucson failed. Once the link is successfully established, it is hoped that the meeting can be telecasted. There were 6 cases presented: 1. Dr. Thomas Colby, pulmonary pathologist from Mayo Clinic Arizona, presented the case of a 10 year old boy with chronic dyspnea for > 4 yrs. He had growth retardation since age …

  3. October 2012 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A dinner meeting was held on 10/24/2012 at Scottsdale Shea beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 23 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, infectious disease, pathology, and radiology communities. An announcement was made that the Colorado Thoracic Society has accepted an invitation to partner with the Arizona and New Mexico Thoracic Societies in the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine. Discussions continue to be held regarding a combined Arizona Thoracic Society meeting with Tucson either in Casa Grande or electronically. Six cases were presented: Dr. Tim Kuberski, chief of Infectious Disease at Maricopa Medical Center, presented a 48 year old female who had been ill for 2 weeks. A CT of the chest revealed a left lower lobe nodule and a CT of the abdomen showed hydronephrosis and a pelvic mass. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA was elevated. All turned out to be coccidioidomycosis on biopsy. CEA decreased …

  4. Location-routing problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laporte, G.

    1987-01-01

    Location-routing problems involve simultaneously locating a number of facilities among candidate sites and establishing delivery routes to a set of users in such a way that the total system cost is minimized. This paper presents a survey of such problems. It includes some applications and examples of location-routing problems, a description of the main heuristics that have been developed for such problems, and reviews of various formulations and algorithms used in solving these problems. A more detailed review is given of exact algorithms for the vehicle routing problem, three-index vehicle flow formulations, and two-index vehicle flow formulations and algorithms for symmetrical and non-symmetrical problems. It is concluded that location-routing problem research is a fast-growing area, with most developments occurring over the past few years; however, research is relatively fragmented, often addresses problems which are too specific and contains several voids which have yet to be filled. A number of promising research areas are identified. 137 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Identifying the needs of LGBTQ immigrants and refugees in Southern Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Karma R

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on the results of a needs assessment conducted for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) immigrants, asylees, refugees, and their allies in Southern Arizona, and it is the first study of its kind in the United States. Utilizing interview data collected with migrants, allies, and service providers in Tucson, Arizona, this article presents findings on the quality of service provision provided to this very underserved community pertaining to health care, housing, and legal services. The assessment shows that no services are provided specifically for LGBTQ migrants, and most LGBTQ migrants turn to family and friends when they have needs. The most significant result of this study pertains to the lack of cultural competence and an overall deficiency in terms of cultural awareness when it comes to the specific needs of LGBTQ migrants.

  6. Element concentrations in surface soils of the Coconino Plateau, Grand Canyon region, Coconino County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2016-09-15

    This report provides the geochemical analyses of a large set of background soils collected from the surface of the Coconino Plateau in northern Arizona. More than 700 soil samples were collected at 46 widespread areas, sampled from sites that appear unaffected by mineralization and (or) anthropogenic contamination. The soils were analyzed for 47 elements, thereby providing data on metal concentrations in soils representative of the plateau. These background concentrations can be used, for instance, for comparison to metal concentrations found in soils potentially affected by natural and anthropogenic influences on the Coconino Plateau in the Grand Canyon region of Arizona.The soil sampling survey revealed low concentrations for the metals most commonly of environmental concern, such as arsenic, cobalt, chromium, copper, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, lead, uranium, vanadium, and zinc. For example, the median concentrations of the metals in soils of the Coconino Plateau were found to be comparable to the mean values previously reported for soils of the western United States.

  7. Salmonellosis in a free-ranging population of javelinas (Pecari tajacu) in south central Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shender, Lisa A; Glock, Robert D; Spraker, Terry R

    2009-10-01

    The javelina, or collared peccary (Pecari tajacu), is indigenous to Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas in the United States and ranges throughout Latin America. From June 2004 to April 2005, an estimated 105 javelinas died in a mortality event that occurred in Tucson, Arizona, and neighboring areas. Clinical signs observed in sick animals included emaciation, dehydration, lethargy, and diarrhea. In addition, some animals showed labored breathing and hind limb weakness. We necropsied 34 animals, and enteritis was the most frequent clinical sign, followed by colitis, pulmonary congestion, and pneumonia. The only consistent findings were isolations of Clostridium perfringens type A and multiple Salmonella serotypes. Although it is likely that these javelinas ultimately succumbed to salmonellosis, it is unclear whether other unidentified underlying factors were involved. This is the first reported case of widespread salmonellosis in free-ranging javelinas.

  8. Auger decay of 1{\\sigma}g and 1{\\sigma}u hole states of N2 molecule: disentangling decay routes from coincidence measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Semenov, S K; Titze, J; Petridis, N; Jahnke, T; Cole, K; Schmidt, L Ph H; Czasch, A; Akoury, D; Jagutzki, O; Williams, J B; Osipov, T; Lee, S; Prior, M H; Belkacem, A; Landers, A L; Schmidt-Böcking, H; Weber, Th; Cherepkov, N A; Dörner, R; 10.1103/PhysRevA.81.043426

    2010-01-01

    Results of the most sophisticated measurements in coincidence of the angular resolved K-shell photo- and Auger-electrons, and of two atomic ions produced by dissociation of N2 molecule, are analyzed. Detection of photoelectrons at certain angles allows separating the Auger decay processes of the 1{\\sigma}g and 1{\\sigma}u core hole states. The Auger electron angular distributions for each of these hole states are measured as a function of the kinetic energy release of two atomic ions and are compared with the corresponding theoretical angular distributions. From that comparison one can disentangle the contributions of different repulsive doubly charged molecular ion states to the Auger decay. Different kinetic energy release values are directly related to the different internuclear distances. In this way one can trace experimentally the behavior of the potential energy curves of dicationic final states inside the Frank-Condon region. Presentation of the Auger electron angular distributions as a function of kin...

  9. Synthetic routes to a nanoscale inorganic cluster [Ga13(μ3-OH)6(μ2-OH)18(H2O)](NO3)15 evaluated by solid-state 71Ga NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammann, Blake A.; Marsh, David A.; Ma, Zayd L.; Wood, Suzannah R.; Eric West, Michael; Johnson, Darren W.; Hayes, Sophia E.

    2016-10-01

    Solid-state 71Ga NMR was used to characterize a series of [Ga13(μ3-OH)6(μ2-OH)18(H2O)](NO3)15 "Ga13" molecular clusters synthesized by multiple methods. These molecular clusters are precursors to thin film electronics and may be employed in energy applications. The synthetic routes provide varying levels of impurities in the solid phase, and these impurities often elude traditional characterization techniques such as powder X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Solid-state NMR can provide a window into the gallium species even in amorphous phases. This information is vital in order to prevent the impurities from causing defect sites in the corresponding thin films upon gelation and condensation (polymerization) of the Ga13 clusters. This work demonstrates the resolving power of solid-state NMR to evaluate structure and synthetic quality in the solid state, and the application of high-field NMR to study quadrupolar species, such as 71Ga.

  10. Evaluating Wireless Proactive Routing Protocols under Scalability and Traffic Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Javaid, N; Khan, Z A; Khan, U; Djouani, K

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate and analyze the impact of different network loads and varying no. of nodes on distance vector and link state routing algorithms. We select three well known proactive protocols; Destination Sequenced Distance Vector (DSDV) operates on distance vector routing, while Fisheye State Routing (FSR) and Optimized Link State Routing (OLSR) protocols are based on link state routing. Further, we evaluate and compare the effects on the performance of protocols by changing the routing strategies of routing algorithms. We also enhance selected protocols to achieve high performance. We take throughput, End-to-End Delay (E2ED) and Normalized Routing Load (NRL) as performance metrics for evaluation and comparison of chosen protocols both with default and enhanced versions. Based upon extensive simulations in NS-2, we compare and discuss performance trade-offs of the protocols, i.e., how a protocol achieves high packet delivery by paying some cost in the form of increased E2ED and/or routing overhead...

  11. Multihop Wireless Networks Opportunistic Routing

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Kai; Li, Ming

    2011-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to opportunistic routing an emerging technology designed to improve the packet forwarding reliability, network capacity and energy efficiency of multihop wireless networks This book presents a comprehensive background to the technological challenges lying behind opportunistic routing. The authors cover many fundamental research issues for this new concept, including the basic principles, performance limit and performance improvement of opportunistic routing compared to traditional routing, energy efficiency and distributed opportunistic routing protocol desig

  12. Optimizing well intervention routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Ronaldo O. [PETROBRAS S.A., Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Schiozer, Denis J.; Bordalo, Sergio N. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Centro de Estudo do Petroleo (CEPETRO)]. E-mail: denis@dep.fem.unicamp.br; bordalo@dep.fem.unicamp.br

    2000-07-01

    This work presents a method for optimizing the itinerary of work over rigs, i.e., the search for the route of minimum total cost, and demonstrates the importance of the dynamics of reservoir behaviour. The total cost of a route includes the rig expenses (transport, assembly and operation), which are functions of time and distances, plus the losses of revenue in wells waiting for the rig, which are also dependent of time. A reservoir simulator is used to evaluate the monetary influence of the well shutdown on the present value of the production curve. Finally, search algorithms are employed to determine the route of minimal cost. The Simulated Annealing algorithm was also successful in optimizing the distribution of a list of wells among different work over rigs. The rational approach presented here is recommended for management teams as a standard procedure to define the priority of wells scheduled for work over. (author)

  13. Collective network routing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenicke, Dirk

    2014-12-02

    Disclosed are a unified method and apparatus to classify, route, and process injected data packets into a network so as to belong to a plurality of logical networks, each implementing a specific flow of data on top of a common physical network. The method allows to locally identify collectives of packets for local processing, such as the computation of the sum, difference, maximum, minimum, or other logical operations among the identified packet collective. Packets are injected together with a class-attribute and an opcode attribute. Network routers, employing the described method, use the packet attributes to look-up the class-specific route information from a local route table, which contains the local incoming and outgoing directions as part of the specifically implemented global data flow of the particular virtual network.

  14. Arizona Study of Aging and Neurodegenerative Disorders and Brain and Body Donation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Thomas G; Adler, Charles H; Sue, Lucia I; Serrano, Geidy; Shill, Holly A; Walker, Douglas G; Lue, LihFen; Roher, Alex E; Dugger, Brittany N; Maarouf, Chera; Birdsill, Alex C; Intorcia, Anthony; Saxon-Labelle, Megan; Pullen, Joel; Scroggins, Alexander; Filon, Jessica; Scott, Sarah; Hoffman, Brittany; Garcia, Angelica; Caviness, John N; Hentz, Joseph G; Driver-Dunckley, Erika; Jacobson, Sandra A; Davis, Kathryn J; Belden, Christine M; Long, Kathy E; Malek-Ahmadi, Michael; Powell, Jessica J; Gale, Lisa D; Nicholson, Lisa R; Caselli, Richard J; Woodruff, Bryan K; Rapscak, Steven Z; Ahern, Geoffrey L; Shi, Jiong; Burke, Anna D; Reiman, Eric M; Sabbagh, Marwan N

    2015-08-01

    The Brain and Body Donation Program (BBDP) at Banner Sun Health Research Institute (http://www.brainandbodydonationprogram.org) started in 1987 with brain-only donations and currently has banked more than 1600 brains. More than 430 whole-body donations have been received since this service was commenced in 2005. The collective academic output of the BBDP is now described as the Arizona Study of Aging and Neurodegenerative Disorders (AZSAND). Most BBDP subjects are enrolled as cognitively normal volunteers residing in the retirement communities of metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona. Specific recruitment efforts are also directed at subjects with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and cancer. The median age at death is 82. Subjects receive standardized general medical, neurological, neuropsychological and movement disorders assessments during life and more than 90% receive full pathological examinations by medically licensed pathologists after death. The Program has been funded through a combination of internal, federal and state of Arizona grants as well as user fees and pharmaceutical industry collaborations. Subsets of the Program are utilized by the US National Institute on Aging Arizona Alzheimer's Disease Core Center and the US National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke National Brain and Tissue Resource for Parkinson's Disease and Related Disorders. Substantial funding has also been received from the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research. The Program has made rapid autopsy a priority, with a 3.0-hour median post-mortem interval for the entire collection. The median RNA Integrity Number (RIN) for frozen brain and body tissue is 8.9 and 7.4, respectively. More than 2500 tissue requests have been served and currently about 200 are served annually. These requests have been made by more than 400 investigators located in 32 US states and 15 countries. Tissue from the BBDP has contributed to more than 350 publications and more than 200

  15. Prevention Of WormholeAttacks In Geographic Routing Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Poornima,

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As mobile ad hoc network applications are deployed, security emerges as a central requirement..Position aided routing protocols can offer a significant performance increase over traditional ad hoc routing protocols. Boundary State Routing (BSR is a geographic routing protocol which routes the data using the location of the nodes. Geographic routing protocols are known to be particularly susceptible to attacks.. In this paper we present the possible attacks on BSR protocol. One of the most popular and serious attacks in ad hoc networks is wormhole attack in which two or more colluding attackers record packets at one location, and tunnel them to another location for a replay at that remote location. A wormhole attack is very powerful, and preventing the attack has proven to be very difficult. In this paper, we devise efficient methods to detect and avoid wormhole attacks in the BSR protocol. The first method namely Reverse Routing Scheme (RRS attempts to detect the intrusion action .The second technique namely Authentication of Nodes Scheme (ANS uses cryptographic concepts to detect and prevent wormhole attacks. It not only detects the fake route but also adopts preventive measures against action wormhole nodes from reappearing during routing. The proposed system is designed in Boundary state routing (BSRprotocol and analysis and simulations are performed in network simulator (NS-2.

  16. Endophytic fungi associated with cacti in Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayanan, Trichur S; Wittlinger, Sally K; Faeth, Stanley H

    2005-05-01

    21 cactus species occurring in various localities within Arizona were screened for the presence of fungal endophytes. 900 endophyte isolates belonging to 22 fungal species were isolated. Cylindropuntia fulgida had the maximum endophyte species diversity, while C. ramosissima harboured the maximum number of endophyte isolates. Alternaria sp., Aureobasidium pullulans, and Phoma spp. were isolated from several cactus species. The diversity of the endophyte assemblages was low and no host specificity among endophytes was observed. However, the frequencies of colonization of the few endophyte species recovered were high and comparable to those reported for tropical plant hosts. Species of Colletotrichum, Phomopsis, and Phyllosticta, which are commonly isolated as endophytes from plants of more mesic habitats, were absent from these cacti.

  17. Aquarious Mountain Area, Arizona: APossible HDR Prospect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, F.G.; Laughlin, A.W.

    1979-05-01

    Exploration for Hot Dry Rock (HDR) requires the ability to delineate areas of thermal enhancement. It is likely that some of these areas will exhibit various sorts of anomalous conditions such as seismic transmission delays, low seismic velocities, high attenuation of seismic waves, high electrical conductivity in the crust, and a relatively shallow depth to Curie point of Magnetization. The Aquarius Mountain area of northwest Arizona exhibits all of these anomalies. The area is also a regional Bouguer gravity low, which may indicate the presence of high silica type rocks that often have high rates of radioactive heat generation. The one deficiency of the area as a HDR prospect is the lack of a thermal insulating blanket.

  18. The University of Arizona program in solid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramohalli, Kumar

    1989-01-01

    The University of Arizona program is aimed at introducing scientific rigor to the predictability and quality assurance of composite solid propellants. Two separate approaches are followed: to use the modern analytical techniques to experimentally study carefully controlled propellant batches to discern trends in mixing, casting, and cure; and to examine a vast bank of data, that has fairly detailed information on the ingredients, processing, and rocket firing results. The experimental and analytical work is described briefly. The principle findings were that: (1) pre- (dry) blending of the coarse and fine ammonium perchlorate can significantly improve the uniformity of mixing; (2) the Fourier transformed IR spectra of the uncured and cured polymer have valuable data on the state of the fuel; (3) there are considerable non-uniformities in the propellant slurry composition near the solid surfaces (blades, walls) compared to the bulk slurry; and (4) in situ measurements of slurry viscosity continuously during mixing can give a good indication of the state of the slurry. Several important observations in the study of the data bank are discussed.

  19. SET-Routes programme

    CERN Document Server

    CERN audiovisual service

    2009-01-01

    The SET-Routes programme, launched in 2007 with the goal of attracting girls and young women to careers in science, came to an end in April this year. The result of a collaboration between EMBL, EMBO and CERN, the programme established a network of "ambassadors", women scientists who went out to talk about their careers in science at schools and universities across Europe.

  20. SET-Routes programme

    CERN Multimedia

    Marietta Schupp, EMBL Photolab

    2008-01-01

    Dr Sabine Hentze, specialist in human genetics, giving an Insight Lecture entitled "Human Genetics – Diagnostics, Indications and Ethical Issues" on 23 September 2008 at EMBL Heidelberg. Activities in a achool in Budapest during a visit of Angela Bekesi, Ambassadors for the SET-Routes programme.

  1. Whirlpool routing for mobility

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Jung Woo

    2010-01-01

    We present the Whirlpool Routing Protocol (WARP), which efficiently routes data to a node moving within a static mesh. The key insight in WARP\\'s design is that data traffic can use an existing routing gradient to efficiently probe the topology, repair the routing gradient, and communicate these repairs to nearby nodes. Using simulation, controlled testbeds, and real mobility experiments, we find that using the data plane for topology maintenance is highly effective due to the incremental nature of mobility updates. WARP leverages the fact that converging flows at a destination make the destination have the region of highest traffic. We provide a theoretical basis for WARP\\'s behavior, defining an "update area" in which the topology must adjust when a destination moves. As long as packets arrive at a destination before it moves outside of the update area, WARP can repair the topology using the data plane. Compared to existing protocols, such as DYMO and HYPER, WARP\\'s packet drop rate is up to 90% lower while sending up to 90% fewer packets.

  2. Vehicle Routing Problem Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonči Carić

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Vehicle Routing Problem cannot always be solved exactly,so that in actual application this problem is solved heuristically.The work describes the concept of several concrete VRPmodels with simplified initial conditions (all vehicles are ofequal capacity and start from a single warehouse, suitable tosolve problems in cases with up to 50 users.

  3. Reliable Internet Routing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    reconfigurations. Proposals that optimize OSPF or IS-IS link weights with failures in mind, such as [34] and [72], must rely on shortest path IGP routing...tolerant layer 2 data center network fabric. In Proc. of ACM SIGCOMM, pages 39–50, 2009. [72] A. Nucci, S. Bhattacharyya, N. Taft, and C. Diot. IGP link

  4. Undocumentedness and public policy: the impact on communities, individuals, and families along the Arizona/Sonora border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Marylyn Morris; Boyle, Joyceen S; Hilfinger Messias, DeAnne K

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this article is the health impact and implications of undocumentedness along the U.S.-Mexico border, particularly the Arizona/Sonora region. We describe the direct and indirect influences of immigration policies on the health of individuals, families, and communities. The Arizona border region maintains close social, cultural, and linguistic ties to Mexico, and the amplified efforts to secure the border have been dramatic on the region and on the people who live there. The 261-mile stretch across the Arizona-Sonora Desert is the most deadly corridor for immigrants crossing into the United States because they are at risk of being killed, kidnapped, and coerced into smuggling drugs or dying in the desert. Gang-related violence is pushing more Central Americans, including unaccompanied minors, to the United States. The impact on individual migrants and their families has been devastating. We examine the health implications of policy and applaud the actions of the Arizona Nurses Association and the American Academy of Nursing to address the health needs of border communities.

  5. Issues of Simulation-Based Route Assignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, K.; Rickert, M.

    1999-07-20

    The authors use an iterative re-planning scheme with simulation feedback to generate a self-consistent route-set for a given street network and origin-destination matrix. The iteration process is defined by three parameters. They found that they have influence on the speed of the relaxation, but not necessarily on its final state.

  6. Real-time immune-inspired optimum state-of-charge trajectory estimation using upcoming route information preview and neural networks for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles fuel economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffari, Ahmad; Vajedi, Mahyar; Azad, Nasser L.

    2015-06-01

    The main proposition of the current investigation is to develop a computational intelligence-based framework which can be used for the real-time estimation of optimum battery state-of-charge (SOC) trajectory in plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The estimated SOC trajectory can be then employed for an intelligent power management to significantly improve the fuel economy of the vehicle. The devised intelligent SOC trajectory builder takes advantage of the upcoming route information preview to achieve the lowest possible total cost of electricity and fossil fuel. To reduce the complexity of real-time optimization, the authors propose an immune system-based clustering approach which allows categorizing the route information into a predefined number of segments. The intelligent real-time optimizer is also inspired on the basis of interactions in biological immune systems, and is called artificial immune algorithm (AIA). The objective function of the optimizer is derived from a computationally efficient artificial neural network (ANN) which is trained by a database obtained from a high-fidelity model of the vehicle built in the Autonomie software. The simulation results demonstrate that the integration of immune inspired clustering tool, AIA and ANN, will result in a powerful framework which can generate a near global optimum SOC trajectory for the baseline vehicle, that is, the Toyota Prius PHEV. The outcomes of the current investigation prove that by taking advantage of intelligent approaches, it is possible to design a computationally efficient and powerful SOC trajectory builder for the intelligent power management of PHEVs.

  7. Honeymoon Trail at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (honeytrl)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 1 arc that represents the Honeymoon Trail inside of Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The Honeymoon Trail was...

  8. Roads at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona 2006 (roads)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 30 arcs representing the roads in Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. Twenty-five of the road arcs were collected by a...

  9. Walkways at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (pisp_walkways)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 23 arcs representing the walkways (or sidewalks) at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The walkways were collected by...

  10. The Gates at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (gates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 7 points representing gates at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The gates were collected by a Trimble GeoXT GPS...

  11. The Tree Lines at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (treeline)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 7 arcs representing the tree lines at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The tree lines were collected by a Trimble...

  12. Developing Swing-Bed Programs in Rural Arizona Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Frank G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the development of six swing-bed programs in rural hospitals located in Arizona. Programs described illustrate the diversity across swing-bed sites and the need for an individualized hospital and community orientation. (Author)

  13. Contaminants in fish and wildlife of Lynx Lake, Arizona

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediment, water, crayfish, and fish were collected at Lynx Creek and Lynx Lake, Arizona in 2004 and 2005. Granite Basin Lake was used as a reference site. Both sites...

  14. mizuRoute version 1: A river network routing tool for a continental domain water resources applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Naoki; Clark, Martyn P.; Sampson, Kevin; Nijssen, Bart; Mao, Yixin; McMillan, Hilary; Viger, Roland; Markstrom, Steven; Hay, Lauren E.; Woods, Ross; Arnold, Jeffrey R.; Brekke, Levi D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the first version of a stand-alone runoff routing tool, mizuRoute. The mizuRoute tool post-processes runoff outputs from any distributed hydrologic model or land surface model to produce spatially distributed streamflow at various spatial scales from headwater basins to continental-wide river systems. The tool can utilize both traditional grid-based river network and vector-based river network data. Both types of river network include river segment lines and the associated drainage basin polygons, but the vector-based river network can represent finer-scale river lines than the grid-based network. Streamflow estimates at any desired location in the river network can be easily extracted from the output of mizuRoute. The routing process is simulated as two separate steps. First, hillslope routing is performed with a gamma-distribution-based unit-hydrograph to transport runoff from a hillslope to a catchment outlet. The second step is river channel routing, which is performed with one of two routing scheme options: (1) a kinematic wave tracking (KWT) routing procedure; and (2) an impulse response function – unit-hydrograph (IRF-UH) routing procedure. The mizuRoute tool also includes scripts (python, NetCDF operators) to pre-process spatial river network data. This paper demonstrates mizuRoute's capabilities to produce spatially distributed streamflow simulations based on river networks from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Geospatial Fabric (GF) data set in which over 54 000 river segments and their contributing areas are mapped across the contiguous United States (CONUS). A brief analysis of model parameter sensitivity is also provided. The mizuRoute tool can assist model-based water resources assessments including studies of the impacts of climate change on streamflow.

  15. mizuRoute version 1: a river network routing tool for a continental domain water resources applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Naoki; Clark, Martyn P.; Sampson, Kevin; Nijssen, Bart; Mao, Yixin; McMillan, Hilary; Viger, Roland J.; Markstrom, Steve L.; Hay, Lauren E.; Woods, Ross; Arnold, Jeffrey R.; Brekke, Levi D.

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the first version of a stand-alone runoff routing tool, mizuRoute. The mizuRoute tool post-processes runoff outputs from any distributed hydrologic model or land surface model to produce spatially distributed streamflow at various spatial scales from headwater basins to continental-wide river systems. The tool can utilize both traditional grid-based river network and vector-based river network data. Both types of river network include river segment lines and the associated drainage basin polygons, but the vector-based river network can represent finer-scale river lines than the grid-based network. Streamflow estimates at any desired location in the river network can be easily extracted from the output of mizuRoute. The routing process is simulated as two separate steps. First, hillslope routing is performed with a gamma-distribution-based unit-hydrograph to transport runoff from a hillslope to a catchment outlet. The second step is river channel routing, which is performed with one of two routing scheme options: (1) a kinematic wave tracking (KWT) routing procedure; and (2) an impulse response function - unit-hydrograph (IRF-UH) routing procedure. The mizuRoute tool also includes scripts (python, NetCDF operators) to pre-process spatial river network data. This paper demonstrates mizuRoute's capabilities to produce spatially distributed streamflow simulations based on river networks from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Geospatial Fabric (GF) data set in which over 54 000 river segments and their contributing areas are mapped across the contiguous United States (CONUS). A brief analysis of model parameter sensitivity is also provided. The mizuRoute tool can assist model-based water resources assessments including studies of the impacts of climate change on streamflow.

  16. Synthesis and characteristic of nanocrystalline La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 manganites by solid state reaction route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astik, Nidhi; Patil, Swapnilkumar; Bhargava, Parag; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2016-05-01

    Nanocrystalline stoichiometric La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (x=0.3) manganites have been synthesized through solid-state reaction by ball milling mechanical method at two different sintering temperatures 1250°C and 1350°C. The synthesized samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and found to have rhombohedral crystal structure (R-3c). The calcined samples exhibited a pure single phase perovskite, had a crystallite size of about 47-51 nm. The morphology of the prepared nanocrystalline manganites were recorded by the field emission gun-scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM) and EDAX.

  17. Route Repetition and Route Retracing: Effects of Cognitive Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Malte Wiener

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Retracing a recently traveled route is a frequent navigation task when learning novel routes or exploring unfamiliar environments. In the present study we utilized virtual environments technology to investigate age-related differences in repeating and retracing a learned route. In the training phase of the experiment participants were guided along a route consisting of multiple intersections each featuring one unique landmark. In the subsequent test phase, they were guided along short sections of the route and asked to indicate overall travel direction (repetition or retracing, the direction required to continue along the route, and the next landmark they would encounter. Results demonstrate age-related deficits in all three tasks. More specifically, in contrast to younger participants, the older participants had greater problems during route retracing than during route repetition. While route repetition can be solved with egocentric response or route strategies, successfully retracing a route requires allocentric processing. The age-related deficits in route retracing are discussed in the context of impaired allocentric processing and shifts from allocentric to egocentric navigation strategies as a consequence of age-related hippocampal degeneration.

  18. Hybrid Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett films of a viologen derivative and TCNQ in a mixed valence state: preparation route and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Santiago; Cea, Pilar; Lafuente, Carlos; Royo, Félix M.; López, María. C.

    2004-08-01

    Hybrid Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films containing two moieties of great chemical and electrochemical interest, namely a viologen derivative and tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) in a mixed valence state, were fabricated. To do so, positively ionized monolayers of 1,1 '-dioctadecyl 4,4 '-bipyridilium were prepared onto aqueous solutions of tetracyanoquinodimethane in a mixed valence state. Surface pressure vs. area ( π- A), surface potential vs. area (Δ V- A), and Brewster angle microscope (BAM) images were recorded and interpreted in terms of molecular interactions as well as the incorporation of the hydrophobic anions into the monolayer. After a comprehensive study, a 10 -6 M TCNQ aqueous solution was chosen as the best one to build hybrid LB films. Thus, the floating films were transferred onto solid substrates that were characterized using several techniques including ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis), infrared (IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) proving the incorporation of the TCNQ onto the film. These films show a good optical conductivity as well as a high degree of order and layers with a constant architecture.

  19. 亚利桑那的爵士%Arizona Jazz

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    布雷德利·惠勒

    2008-01-01

    @@ The complexion and complexity of Tucson,Arizona's urban core is experiencing dynamic improvement at the hands of a socially minded architect who is also the developer.This southern Arizona community,(city population 518,956/metropolitan area population 946,362)Iocated 96 kilometers(60 miles)north of the Mexican border,is an island of civilization amid the"magnificent desolation"of the Desert Southwest.

  20. DOE-University of Arizona Faculty Development Project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillerup, Joseph M.

    1980-09-08

    The DOE-University of Arizona Faculty Development Project on Energy successfully completed a faculty development program. There were three phases of the program consisting of: a three week energy workshop for teachers, participation and cooperation with Students for Safe Energy in presentation of an Alternative Energy Festival at the University of Arizona, and workshops for teachers conducted at Flowing Wells School District. Each of these is described. Attendees are listed and a director's evaluation of the workshop is given.

  1. Cost Effectiveness of Alternative Route Special Education Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindelar, Paul T.; Dewey, James F.; Rosenberg, Michael S.; Corbett, Nancy L.; Denslow, David; Lotfinia, Babik

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the authors estimated costs of alternative route preparation to provide states a basis for allocating training funds to maximize production. Thirty-one special education alternative route program directors were interviewed and completed cost tables. Two hundred and twenty-four program graduates were also surveyed. The authors…

  2. A Performance Comparison of Routing Protocols for Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham Zougagh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobile Ad hoc Network (MANET is a collection of mobile nodes in which the wireless links are frequently broken down due to mobility and dynamic infrastructure. Routing is a significant issue and challenge in ad hoc networks. Many routing protocols have been proposed like OLSR, AODV so far to improve the routing performance and reliability. In this paper, we describe the Optimized Link State Routing Protocol (OLSR and the Ad hoc On-Demand Distance Vector (AODV. We evaluate their performance through exhaustive simulations using the Network Simulator 2 (ns2 by varying conditions (node mobility, network density.

  3. A New Approach to VC Routing in ATM Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new ant-algorithm-based routing approach is proposed for the VC routing problem with considering the comprehensive effect between the resource utilization and the load balance in ATM networks. In the approach, the backup paths are calculated first, and then an ant algorithm based on the ability of ants to find the shortest path between their nest and the food source during their searching food, is constructed to optimize the VC global route.Simulation results show that the proposed approach can realize VC routing effectively according to the current traffic states in the networks and the user-specified delay requirements.

  4. Network Congestion Control with Markovian Multipath Routing

    CERN Document Server

    Cominetti, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider an integrated model for TCP/IP protocols with multipath routing. The model combines a Network Utility Maximization for rate control based on end-to-end queuing delays, with a Markovian Traffic Equilibrium for routing based on total expected delays. We prove the existence of a unique equilibrium state which is characterized as the solution of an unconstrained strictly convex program. A distributed algorithm for solving this optimization problem is proposed, with a brief discussion of how it can be implemented by adapting the current Internet protocols.

  5. Chemical-potential route for multicomponent fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Andrés; Rohrmann, René D.

    2013-05-01

    The chemical potentials of multicomponent fluids are derived in terms of the pair correlation functions for arbitrary number of components, interaction potentials, and dimensionality. The formally exact result is particularized to hard-sphere mixtures with zero or positive nonadditivity. As a simple application, the chemical potentials of three-dimensional additive hard-sphere mixtures are derived from the Percus-Yevick theory and the associated equation of state is obtained. This Percus-Yevick chemical-route equation of state is shown to be more accurate than the virial equation of state. An interpolation between the chemical-potential and compressibility routes exhibits a better performance than the well-known Boublík-Mansoori-Carnahan-Starling-Leland equation of state.

  6. Aerosol immunisation for TB: matching route of vaccination to route of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjaly Thomas, Zita-Rose; McShane, Helen

    2015-03-01

    TB remains a very significant global health burden. There is an urgent need for better tools for TB control, which include an effective vaccine. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the currently licensed vaccine, confers highly variable protection against pulmonary TB, the main source of TB transmission. Replacing BCG completely or boosting BCG with another vaccine are the two current strategies for TB vaccine development. Delivering a vaccine by aerosol represents a way to match the route of vaccination to the route of infection. This route of immunisation offers not only the scientific advantage of delivering the vaccine directly to the respiratory mucosa, but also practical and logistical advantages. This review summarises the state of current TB vaccine candidates in the pipeline, reviews current progress in aerosol administration of vaccines in general and evaluates the potential for TB vaccine candidates to be administered by the aerosol route.

  7. A new chemical route to a hybrid nanostructure: room-temperature solid-state reaction synthesis of Ag@AgCl with efficient photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Pengfei; Cao, Yali

    2012-08-07

    The room-temperature solid-state chemical reaction technique has been used to synthesize the silver nanoparticle-loaded semiconductor silver@silver chloride for the first time. It has the advantages of convenient operation, lower cost, less pollution, and mass production. This simple technique created a wide array of nanosized silver particles which had a strong surface plasmon resonance effect in the visible region, and built up an excellent composite structure of silver@silver chloride hybrid which exhibited high photocatalytic activity and stability towards decomposition of organic methyl orange under visible-light illumination. Moreover, this work achieved the control of composition of the silver@silver chloride composite simply by adjusting the feed ratio of reactants. It offers an alternative method for synthesising metal@semiconductor composites.

  8. Synthesis and characteristic of nanocrystalline La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} manganites by solid state reaction route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astik, Nidhi, E-mail: nidhiastik2002@gmail.com; Jha, Prafulla K. [Department of physics, Faculty of Science, The M. S. University of Baroda, Vadodara (India); Patil, Swapnilkumar, E-mail: patilswapnilkumar@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, M. K. Bhavnagar University, Bhavnagar (India); Bhargava, Parag [Department of Metallurgical Engineering & Material Science, IIT-Bombay (India)

    2016-05-06

    Nanocrystalline stoichiometric La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} (x=0.3) manganites have been synthesized through solid-state reaction by ball milling mechanical method at two different sintering temperatures 1250°C and 1350°C. The synthesized samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and found to have rhombohedral crystal structure (R-3c). The calcined samples exhibited a pure single phase perovskite, had a crystallite size of about 47-51 nm. The morphology of the prepared nanocrystalline manganites were recorded by the field emission gun-scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM) and EDAX.

  9. Pheromone-Based Ant Routing System for IP Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张林; 任勇; 山秀明

    2004-01-01

    The pheromone-based ant routing algorithm is a distributed routing algorithm with good scalability and robustness. A 2-D cellular automata (CA) model of the computer network was presented to analyze the algorithm. The results show that the procedure of establishing a stable route is self-organized towards the attractive peculiar state, and the duration of time for the routing establishment is power-law distributed. A practical ant routing protocol over an IP network was also presented, and two simulations were done to compare the performance dynamic and the load balancing performance between this protocol and the open shortest path first (OSPF) protocol. The results show that the ant routing protocol out-performs OSPF in these aspects.

  10. Increasingly minimal bias routing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bataineh, Abdulla; Court, Thomas; Roweth, Duncan

    2017-02-21

    A system and algorithm configured to generate diversity at the traffic source so that packets are uniformly distributed over all of the available paths, but to increase the likelihood of taking a minimal path with each hop the packet takes. This is achieved by configuring routing biases so as to prefer non-minimal paths at the injection point, but increasingly prefer minimal paths as the packet proceeds, referred to herein as Increasing Minimal Bias (IMB).

  11. Distance from Construction Site and Risk for Coccidioidomycosis, Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Hui H.; Ruiz, Yvette; Duffy, Stacy; Heinrich, Beth E.; Lake, Douglas F.

    2014-01-01

    Coccidioides spp. fungi, which are present in soil in the southwestern United States, can become airborne when the soil is disrupted, and humans who inhale the spores can become infected. In 2012, our institution in Maricopa County, Arizona, USA, began a building project requiring extensive excavation of soil. One year after construction began, we compared the acquisition of coccidioidomycosis in employees working adjacent to the construction site (campus A) with that of employees working 13 miles away (campus B). Initial testing indicated prior occult coccidioidal infection in 20 (11.4%) of 176 campus A employees and in 19 (13.6%) of 140 campus B employees (p = 0.55). At the 1-year follow-up, 3 (2.5%) of 120 employees from campus A and 8 (8.9%) of 90 from campus B had flow cytometric evidence of new coccidioidal infection (p = 0.04). The rate of coccidioidal acquisition differed significantly between campuses, but was not higher on the campus with construction. PMID:25148473

  12. Arizona Public Service - Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James E. Francfort

    2003-12-01

    Hydrogen has promise to be the fuel of the future. Its use as a chemical reagent and as a rocket propellant has grown to over eight million metric tons per year in the United States. Although use of hydrogen is abundant, it has not been used extensively as a transportation fuel. To assess the viability of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and the viability of producing hydrogen using off-peak electric energy, Pinnacle West Capital Corporation (PNW) and its electric utility subsidiary, Arizona Public Service (APS) designed, constructed, and operates a hydrogen and compressed natural gas fueling station—the APS Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant. This report summarizes the design of the APS Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and presents lessons learned from its design and construction. Electric Transportation Applications prepared this report under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity.

  13. Generalized routing protocols for multihop relay networks

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Fahd Ahmed

    2011-07-01

    Performance of multihop cooperative networks depends on the routing protocols employed. In this paper we propose the last-n-hop selection protocol, the dual path protocol, the forward-backward last-n-hop selection protocol and the forward-backward dual path protocol for the routing of data through multihop relay networks. The average symbol error probability performance of the schemes is analysed by simulations. It is shown that close to optimal performance can be achieved by using the last-n-hop selection protocol and its forward-backward variant. Furthermore we also compute the complexity of the protocols in terms of number of channel state information required and the number of comparisons required for routing the signal through the network. © 2011 IEEE.

  14. Electronic route information panels (DRIPs).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    Also in the Netherlands, the term Dynamic Route Information Panel (DRIP) is used for an electronic route information panel. A DRIP usually indicates whether there are queues on the various routes to a particular destination and how long they are. On certain locations DRIPS also give the estimated tr

  15. 75 FR 19921 - Revisions to the Arizona State Implementation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... Relating to VOC Regulation Cutpoints, Deficiencies, and Deviations; Clarification to Appendix D of November... effects, using practicable and legally permissible methods, under Executive Order 12898 (59 FR...

  16. May 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A dinner meeting was held on Wednesday, 5/15/2013 at Scottsdale Shea beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 13 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, thoracic surgery, and radiology communities. Dr. George Parides will have served his 2 year tenure as Arizona Thoracic Society President by July, 2013. However, he will be unable to attend the June meeting and for this reason Presidential elections were held. Dr. Lewis Wesselius was nominated and unanimously elected as President. Three cases were presented:1. Dr. Gerald Schwartzberg presented the case of a 49 year old woman with a history of Valley Fever in 2009. She was a nonsmoker and had no other known medical diseases. However, she developed shortness of breath beginning earlier this year along with a cough productive of clear, jelly-like sputum. Her physical was normal. Pulmonary function testing revealed restrictive disease with significant improvements in the FEV1 and FVC …

  17. January 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesselius LJ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Dr. Jud Tillinghast was presented a plaque in recognition of being chosen by his colleagues as the Arizona Thoracic Society Physician of the Year In 2014. Dr. Rajeev Saggar made a presentation entitled "Pulmonary fibrosis-associated pulmonary hypertension: a unique phenotype". This presentation focused on new echocardiographic methods of assessing right ventricular (RV function and the pathophysiology of RV dysfunction. Dr. Saggar presented data from a paper he authored on parenteral treprostinil in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary artery hypertension which was published in Thorax (1. There were 2 case presentations, both from the Phoenix VA by Dr. Elijah Poulos: 1. A 65 year-old man presented with cough and chills. His past medical history included multiple myeloma treated with chemotherapy, radiation therapy to spine and bone marrow transplant. He had a prior vertebroplasty. His symptoms did not improve with doxycycline. Computerized tomography angiography was done and showed areas of ...

  18. November 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The November 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, November 18, 2015 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 14 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. There were 3 case presentations: 1. Dr. Gerald Schwartzberg presented a case of a 56-year-old man with a history of diabetes, alcoholism and tobacco abuse who has a history of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI with a residual thin-walled cavity in his right upper lobe (RUL. After quitting drinking and smoking and years of being asymptomatic, he presented with hemoptysis. Chest x-ray showed increasing density in the RUL. CT scan showed an intracavitary density in his previous cavity presumably a fungus ball. Sputum cultures are pending. Discussion followed on management of fungus balls. Bronchoscopy was recommended to view the bronchial anatomy to exclude other diagnosis as well ...

  19. Isotopic paleoecology of Clovis mammoths from Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Jessica Z.; Longstaffe, Fred J.; Ballenger, Jesse A. M.; Vance Haynes, C., Jr.

    2011-11-01

    The causes of megafaunal extinctions in North America have been widely debated but remain poorly understood. Mammoths (Mammuthus spp.) in the American Southwest were hunted by Clovis people during a period of rapid climate change, just before the regional onset of Younger Dryas cooling and mammoth extirpation. Thus, these mammoths may provide key insights into late Pleistocene extinction processes. Here we reconstruct the seasonal diet and climatic conditions experienced by mammoths in the San Pedro Valley of Arizona, using the carbon (13C/12C) and oxygen (18O/16O) isotope compositions of tooth enamel. These records suggest that Clovis mammoths experienced a warm, dry climate with sufficient summer rainfall to support seasonal C4 plant growth. Monsoon intensity may have been reduced relative to the preceding time period, but there is no isotopic evidence for severe drought. However, it is possible that the "Clovis drought", inferred from stratigraphic evidence, occurred suddenly at the end of the animals' lives and thus was not recorded in the enamel isotopic compositions. Unlike mammoths that lived before the Last Glacial Maximum, Clovis mammoths regularly increased C4 grass consumption during summer, probably seeking seasonally green grasslands farther from the river valley. This predictable seasonal behavior may have made mammoths easier to locate by Clovis hunters. Furthermore, Clovis mammoths probably had no previous experience of such sudden climatic change as is believed to have occurred at the time of their extinction.

  20. Isotopic paleoecology of Clovis mammoths from Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Jessica Z; Longstaffe, Fred J; Ballenger, Jesse A M; Haynes, C Vance

    2011-11-01

    The causes of megafaunal extinctions in North America have been widely debated but remain poorly understood. Mammoths (Mammuthus spp.) in the American Southwest were hunted by Clovis people during a period of rapid climate change, just before the regional onset of Younger Dryas cooling and mammoth extirpation. Thus, these mammoths may provide key insights into late Pleistocene extinction processes. Here we reconstruct the seasonal diet and climatic conditions experienced by mammoths in the San Pedro Valley of Arizona, using the carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and oxygen ((18)O/(16)O) isotope compositions of tooth enamel. These records suggest that Clovis mammoths experienced a warm, dry climate with sufficient summer rainfall to support seasonal C(4) plant growth. Monsoon intensity may have been reduced relative to the preceding time period, but there is no isotopic evidence for severe drought. However, it is possible that the "Clovis drought", inferred from stratigraphic evidence, occurred suddenly at the end of the animals' lives and thus was not recorded in the enamel isotopic compositions. Unlike mammoths that lived before the Last Glacial Maximum, Clovis mammoths regularly increased C(4) grass consumption during summer, probably seeking seasonally green grasslands farther from the river valley. This predictable seasonal behavior may have made mammoths easier to locate by Clovis hunters. Furthermore, Clovis mammoths probably had no previous experience of such sudden climatic change as is believed to have occurred at the time of their extinction.

  1. Erosion of ejecta at Meteor Crater, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, John A.; Schultz, Peter H.

    1993-01-01

    New methods for estimating erosion at Meteor Crater, Arizona, indicate that continuous ejecta deposits beyond 1/4-1/2 crater radii from the rim have been lowered less than 1 m on the average. This conclusion is based on the results of two approaches: coarsening of unweathered ejecta into surface lag deposits and calculation of the sediment budget within a drainage basin on the ejecta. Preserved ejecta morphologies beneath thin alluvium revealed by ground-penetrating radar provide qualitative support for the derived estimates. Although slightly greater erosion of less resistant ejecta locally has occurred, such deposits were limited in extent, particularly beyond 0.25R-0.5R from the present rim. Subtle but preserved primary ejecta features further support our estimate of minimal erosion of ejecta since the crater formed about 50,000 years ago. Unconsolidated deposits formed during other sudden extreme events exhibit similarly low erosion over the same time frame; the common factor is the presence of large fragments or large fragments in a matrix of finer debris. At Meteor Crater, fluvial and eolian processes remove surrounding fines leaving behind a surface lag of coarse-grained ejecta fragments that armor surfaces and slow vertical lowering.

  2. November 2016 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The November 2016 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, November 17, 2016 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 14 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. Two cases were presented: Dr. Lewis Wesselius presented a case of a 29-year-old man from India on a work visa who complained of right pleuritic pain. Chest x-ray showed a large right pleural effusion. CT scan confirmed the presence of effusion with minimal lung parenchyma changes or mediastinal adenopathy. Gold quantiferon was positive and coccidioidomycosis serology was negative. Thoracentesis showed a lymphocytic predominant effusion and adenosine deaminase was borderline high. No acid-fast bacilli (AFB were seen in the fluid. PCR for M. tuberculosis was negative. The pleural biopsy did show AFB and eventually grew M. tuberculosis. The patient was started on a 4 drug …

  3. September 2012 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A dinner meeting was held on 9/26//2012 at Scottsdale Shea beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 18 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology, and radiology communities.A discussion was held on Pending Premium Cigar Legislation HR. 1639 and S.1461, the "Traditional Cigar Manufacturing and Small Business Jobs Preservation Act of 2011”. This bill would exempt "premium cigars" from FDA oversight. The definition of premium cigars is so broad that candy flavored cigars, cigarillos and blunts would be exempted from FDA regulation. Teenage cigar smoking is increasing and this legislation may result in a further increase. The Arizona Thoracic Society is opposed to this bill. Dr. Robbins is to put a link on the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care website linking to the ATS website. This will enable members to contact their Congressmen opposing this legislation. A discussion was also held on a proposed combined Tucson/Phoenix …

  4. March 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The March 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, March 25, 2014 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 14 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, radiology and oncology communities. Dr. Richard Robbins made a presentation entitled "The History of Exhaled Nitric Oxide Measurement" focusing on the development of exhaled nitric oxide in the early 1990's. There were 3 case presentations: 1. Sandra Till, a third year pulmonary fellow at the Good Samaritan/VA program, presented an elderly man admitted to the Phoenix VA with an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. His CT findings showed with centrilobular emphysema, bronchial edema, and scattered ground glass opacities. It was felt that the CT findings most likely represented a bronchiolitis from his exacerbation of COPD. 2. Richard Robbins presented a 49 year old man with a ...

  5. Robustness of airline route networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lordan, Oriol; Sallan, Jose M.; Escorihuela, Nuria; Gonzalez-Prieto, David

    2016-03-01

    Airlines shape their route network by defining their routes through supply and demand considerations, paying little attention to network performance indicators, such as network robustness. However, the collapse of an airline network can produce high financial costs for the airline and all its geographical area of influence. The aim of this study is to analyze the topology and robustness of the network route of airlines following Low Cost Carriers (LCCs) and Full Service Carriers (FSCs) business models. Results show that FSC hubs are more central than LCC bases in their route network. As a result, LCC route networks are more robust than FSC networks.

  6. Personal continuous route pattern mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian YE; Ling CHEN; Gen-cai CHEN

    2009-01-01

    In the daily life, people often repeat regular routes in certain periods. In this paper, a mining system is developed to find the continuous route patterns of personal past trips. In order to count the diversity of personal moving status, the mining system employs the adaptive GPS data recording and five data filters to guarantee the clean trips data. The mining system uses a client/server architecture to protect personal privacy and to reduce the computational load. The server conducts the main mining procedure but with insufficient information to recover real personal routes. In order to improve the scalability of sequential pattern mining, a novel pattern mining algorithm, continuous route pattern mining (CRPM), is proposed. This algorithm can tolerate the different disturbances in real routes and extract the frequent patterns. Experimental results based on nine persons' trips show that CRPM can extract more than two times longer route patterns than the traditional route pattern mining algorithms.

  7. Storage and flood routing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, R.W.; Godfrey, R.G.

    1960-01-01

    The basic equations used in flood routing are developed from the law of continuity. In each method the assumptions are discussed to enable the user to select an appropriate technique. In the stage-storage method the storage is related to the mean gage height in the reach under consideration. In the discharge-storage method the storage is determined, from weighted values of inflow and outflow discharge. In the reservoir-storage method the storage is considered as a function of outflow discharge alone. A detailed example is given for each method to illustrate that particular technique.

  8. Instability Free Routing: Beyond One Protocol Instance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    assigned a Rout- ing Information Base (RIB) [13]. This database is used to store the routing information related to the routing process (e.g., routes...presents routing anomalies that can derive from route selection by itself, i.e., without any route redis - tribution configured between the routing... redis - tributed into the RIP protocol, all RIP messages received from the neighbors are in fact discarded independently of the AD values. This

  9. LBR: Load Balancing Routing Algorithm for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daabaj, Khaled; Dixon, Mike; Koziniec, Terry

    2010-06-01

    Homogeneous wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are organized using identical sensor nodes, but the nature of WSNs operations results in an imbalanced workload on gateway sensor nodes which may lead to a hot-spot or routing hole problem. The routing hole problem can be considered as a natural result of the tree-based routing schemes that are widely used in WSNs, where all nodes construct a multi-hop routing tree to a centralized root, e.g., a gateway or base station. For example, sensor nodes on the routing path and closer to the base station deplete their own energy faster than other nodes, or sensor nodes with the best link state to the base station are overloaded with traffic from the rest of the network and experience a faster energy depletion rate than their peers. Routing protocols for WSNs are reliability-oriented and their use of reliability metric to avoid unreliable links makes the routing scheme worse. However, none of these reliability oriented routing protocols explicitly uses load balancing in their routing schemes. Since improving network lifetime is a fundamental challenge of WSNs, we present, in this chapter, a novel, energy-wise, load balancing routing (LBR) algorithm that addresses load balancing in an energy efficient manner by maintaining a reliable set of parent nodes. This allows sensor nodes to quickly find a new parent upon parent loss due to the existing of node failure or energy hole. The proposed routing algorithm is tested using simulations and the results demonstrate that it outperforms the MultiHopLQI reliability based routing algorithm.

  10. New Routing Metrics for ADHOC Network Routing Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, P. C.

    2014-12-01

    The performance and reliability of Internet is measured using different quantities. When the quantities measured are essential and have wide range of acceptance then they are called metrics. Performance metrics enable comparison and selection among the alternatives. In computer networks, metrics are used to evaluate an application, protocol etc. Routing in adhoc networks is nontrivial. Routing protocols for adhoc networks are still evolving and there is need for continuous evaluation of them. In the literature existing, several routing protocols are evaluated using standard metrics under different conditions. This paper proposes new metrics for evaluation of routing protocols and uses them to evaluate the adhoc network routing protocols AODV, DSR, DSDV and TORA. Simulation environment is created using NS-2 simulator. Typical range of speeds, pause times and data rates are used. The results provide new insights in to the working of the routing protocols.

  11. PN velocity beneath Western New Mexico and Eastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaksha, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    The experiment involved observing Pn arrivals on an areal array of 7 seismic stations located in the transition zone and along the Jemez lineament. Explosions in coal and copper mines in New Mexico and Arizona were used as energy sources as well as military detonations at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, Yuma, Arizona, and the Nevada Test Site. Very preliminary results suggest a Pn velocity of 7.94 km/s (with a fairly large uncertainty) beneath the study area. The Pn delay times, which can be converted to estimates of crustal thickness given knowledge of the velocity structure of the crust increase both to the north and east of Springerville, Arizona. As a constraint on the velocity of Pn, researchers analyzed the reversed refraction line GNOME-HARDHAT which passes through Springerville oriented NW to SE. This analysis resulted in a Pn velocity of 7.9-8.0 km/s for the transition zone. These preliminary results suggest that a normal Pn velocity might persist even though the crust thins (from north to south) by 15 km along the length of the Arizona-New Mexico border. If the upper mantle is currently hot anywhere in western New Mexico or eastern Arizona then the dimensions of the heat source (or sources) might be small compared to the intra-station distances of the seismic arrays used to estimate the velocity of Pn.

  12. 14 CFR 121.115 - Route width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Route width. (a) Routes and route segments over Federal airways, foreign airways, or advisory routes have a width equal to the designated width of those airways or advisory routes. Whenever the... clearance. (2) Minimum en route altitudes. (3) Ground and airborne navigation aids. (4) Air traffic density...

  13. An overview of smart grid routing algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junsheng; OU, Qinghai; Shen, Haijuan

    2017-08-01

    This paper summarizes the typical routing algorithm in smart grid by analyzing the communication business and communication requirements of intelligent grid. Mainly from the two kinds of routing algorithm is analyzed, namely clustering routing algorithm and routing algorithm, analyzed the advantages and disadvantages of two kinds of typical routing algorithm in routing algorithm and applicability.

  14. A Comparative Performance Analysis of Routing Protocols in MANET using NS3 Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Jha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to frequent topology changes and routing overhead, selection of routing protocol in Mobile Ad-hoc Network (MANET is a great challenge. A design issue for an efficient and effective routing protocol is to achieve optimum values of performance parameters under network scenarios. There are various routing protocols available for MANET. This paper involves study of four routing protocols (Ad-hoc On Demand Distance Vector Routing, Optimized Link State Routing, Dynamic Source Routing and Distance Sequenced Distance Vector, and performance comparisons between these routing protocols on the basis of performance metrics (throughput, packet delivery ratio, Packet dropped, jitter and end to end delay measured after simulation of network with the help of NS3 Simulator.

  15. Update Chain-based Approach for Checking Route Oscillation of BGP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun; HU Ziying; ZHANG Tao

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for checking route oscillation of border gateway protocol (BGP) quickly, by which the privacy of routing policies of autonomous system (AS) can be respected.Firstly, route update chain tag (RUCT) is constructed to track the forwarding of update report, and local routing library is made to record the changing history of update report.Then route oscillation can be identified by analyzing correlative state of RUCT and local routing library.The characteristic of this approach is that an arbitrary AS can check route oscillation alone only by sharing its network ID, which greatly respects the privacy of routing policies for each AS.This paper shows that both looping in RUCT and consecutive positive-negative report in local record are sufficient conditions for route oscillation.Comparative experiments demonstrate the availability and efficiency of the proposed approach.

  16. Reverse flood routing with the inverted Muskingum storage routing scheme

    OpenAIRE

    A. D. Koussis; K. Mazi; S. Lykoudis; Argiriou, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    This work treats reverse flood routing aiming at signal identification: inflows are inferred from observed outflows by orienting the Muskingum scheme against the wave propagation direction. Routing against the wave propagation is an ill-posed, inverse problem (small errors amplify, leading to large spurious responses); therefore, the reverse solution must be smoothness-constrained towards stability and uniqueness (regularised). Theoretical constrains on the coefficients of the reverse routing...

  17. Causes of sinks near Tucson, Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, John P.; Pool, Donald R.; Konieczki, A. D.; Carpenter, Michael C.

    Land subsidence in the form of sinks has occurred on and near farmlands near Tucson, Pima County, Arizona, USA. The sinks occur in alluvial deposits along the flood plain of the Santa Cruz River, and have made farmlands dangerous and unsuitable for farming. More than 1700 sinks are confined to the flood plain of the Santa Cruz River and are grouped along two north-northwestward-trending bands that are approximately parallel to the river and other flood-plain drainages. An estimated 17,000m3 of sediment have been removed in the formation of the sinks. Thirteen trenches were dug to depths of 4-6m to characterize near-surface sediments in sink and nonsink areas. Sediments below about 2m included a large percentage of dispersive clays in sink areas. Sediments in nonsink areas contain a large component of medium- to coarse-grained, moderately to well sorted sand that probably fills a paleochannel. Electromagnetic surveys support the association of silts and clays in sink areas that are highly electrically conductive relative to sand in nonsink areas. Sinks probably are caused by the near-surface process of subsurface erosion of dispersive sediments along pre-existing cracks in predominantly silt and clay sediments. The pre-existing cracks probably result from desiccation or tension that developed during periods of water-table decline and channel incision during the past 100 years or in earlier periods. Résumé Des effondrements en forme d'entonnoir se sont produits sur et près d'exploitations agricoles de Pima (Arizona). Ces entonnoirs apparaissent dans les alluvions le long de la plaine d'inondation de la rivière Santa Cruz ; ils ont rendu ces terrains dangereux et inexploitables pour l'agriculture. Plus de 1700 entonnoirs existent dans la plaine d'inondation de la rivière Santa Cruz et sont groupés en deux bandes orientées nord-nord-ouest, approximativement parallèles à la rivière et aux autres chenaux de la plaine d'inondation. Un volume de sédiments estim

  18. Reducing Motor Vehicle-Related Injuries at an Arizona Indian Reservation: Ten Years of Application of Evidence-Based Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Unintentional injury is a significant public health burden for American Indians and Alaska Natives and was the leading cause of death among those aged 1 to 44 years between 1999 and 2004. Of those deaths, motor vehicle-related deaths cause the most mortality, justifying the need for intervention at an American Indian Reservation in Arizona (United States). We describe motor vehicle injury prevention program operations from 2004 through 2013. This community-based approach led by a multidiscipl...

  19. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Arizona. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Arizona.

  20. Public Land Survey (Township, Range, and Section) for northern Arizona, including Grand Canyon National Park.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This ALRIS (Arizona Land Resource Information System) coverage contains Public Land Survey gridding and labels for Townships, Ranges, and Sections for Northern Arizona

  1. In-residence, multiple route exposures to chlorpyrifos and diazinon estimated by indirect method models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschandreas, D. J.; Kim, Y.; Karuchit, S.; Ari, H.; Lebowitz, M. D.; O'Rourke, M. K.; Gordon, S.; Robertson, G.

    One of the objectives of the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) is to estimate exposures to several pollutants in multiple media and determine their distributions for the population of Arizona. This paper presents modeling methods used to estimate exposure distributions of chlorpyrifos and diazinon in the residential microenvironment using the database generated in Arizona (NHEXAS-AZ). A four-stage probability sampling design was used for sample selection. Exposures to pesticides were estimated using the indirect method of exposure calculation by combining measured concentrations of the two pesticides in multiple media with questionnaire information such as time subjects spent indoors, dietary and non-dietary items they consumed, and areas they touched. Most distributions of in-residence exposure to chlorpyrifos and diazinon were log-normal or nearly log-normal. Exposures to chlorpyrifos and diazinon vary by pesticide and route as well as by various demographic characteristics of the subjects. Comparisons of exposure to pesticides were investigated among subgroups of demographic categories, including gender, age, minority status, education, family income, household dwelling type, year the dwelling was built, pesticide use, and carpeted areas within dwellings. Residents with large carpeted areas within their dwellings have higher exposures to both pesticides for all routes than those in less carpet-covered areas. Depending on the route, several other determinants of exposure to pesticides were identified, but a clear pattern could not be established regarding the exposure differences between several subpopulation groups.

  2. An evaluation of rail access routes to Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathisan, S.K.; Parentela, E.M. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This paper provides a preliminary evaluation and characterization of potential rail routes for the transport of high level radioactive waste from their current storage locations (76 power plants and 4 federal facilities) to the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Individual routes were determined for shipments from each origin using the INTERLINE model. They were characterized in terms of shipment distance, number of transfers and states transversed. Additionally, specific routing constraints were imposed for a selected subset of the origins to address policy and operational alternatives such as minimizing shipment distance, number of transfers or number of states traversed. Results of the analysis indicate that the imposition of the routing constraint count result in reducing shipment distances, and the number of states traversed. But a tradeoff between these factors and the number of transfers exists.

  3. Degree 3 Networks Topological Routing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez Lopez, Jose Manuel; Riaz, M. Tahir; Pedersen, Jens Myrup;

    2009-01-01

    Topological routing is a table free alternative to traditional routing methods. It is specially well suited for organized network interconnection schemes. Topological routing algorithms correspond to the type O(1), constant complexity, being very attractive for large scale networks. It has been...... proposed for many topologies and this work compares the algorithms for three degree three topologies using a more analytical approach than previous studies....

  4. Alternative routes of insulin delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ranjith K. Krishnankutty; Aju Mathew; Saikiran K. Sedimbi; Shrikumar Suryanarayan; Carani B. Sanjeevi

    2009-01-01

    Parenteral route of insulin administration has been the mode of treatment for all Type 1 diabetics and Type 2 diabetics with complications. Patient compliance has really been a major concern for this route of administration. Several alternative routes of administration are under consideration for effective glycemic control, including oral, inhaled, buccal, nasal, and patch routes. One of the approaches involving inhaled insulin has now reached the market. Several other candidates may reach the market in the near future, the promising one being oral insulin.

  5. A Primer of Multicast Routing

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenberg, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Whereas unicast routing determines a path from one source node to one destination node, multicast routing determines a path from one source to many destinations, or from many sources to many destinations. We survey multicast routing methods for when the set of destinations is static, and for when it is dynamic. While most of the methods we review are tree based, some non-tree methods are also discussed. We survey results on the shape of multicast trees, delay constrained multicast routing, aggregation of multicast traffic, inter-domain multicast, and multicast virtual private networks. We focu

  6. Alternative routes of insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnankutty, Ranjith K; Mathew, Aju; Sedimbi, Saikiran K; Suryanarayan, Shrikumar; Sanjeevi, Carani B

    2009-10-01

    Parenteral route of insulin administration has been the mode of treatment for all Type 1 diabetics and Type 2 diabetics with complications. Patient compliance has really been a major concern for this route of administration. Several alternative routes of administration are under consideration for effective glycemic control, including oral, inhaled, buccal, nasal, and patch routes. One of the approaches involving inhaled insulin has now reached the market. Several other candidates may reach the market in the near future, the promising one being oral insulin.

  7. Routing and advanced display technologies within STOMPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittu, Ranjeev; Uhlmann, Jeffrey K.; McCune, Justin

    1998-08-01

    This paper will discuss research conducted at the Naval Research Laboratory in the area of automated routing, advanced 3D displays and novel interface techniques for interacting with those displays. This research has culminated in the development of the strike optimized mission planing module (STOMPM). The STOMPM testbed incorporates new technologies/results in the aforementioned areas to address the deficiencies in current systems and advance the state of the art in military planing systems.

  8. Dynamic Route Guidance Using Improved Genetic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanke Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an improved genetic algorithm (IGA for dynamic route guidance algorithm. The proposed IGA design a vicinity crossover technique and a greedy backward mutation technique to increase the population diversity and strengthen local search ability. The steady-state reproduction is introduced to protect the optimized genetic individuals. Furthermore the junction delay is introduced to the fitness function. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  9. Children Are Listening: Conversations for Their Future. Proceedings of the Statewide Forums on Abused, Neglected, and Abandoned Children (Tucson, Tempe, Prescott, and Glendale, Arizona, 1997).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmann, Paulette

    Seeking solutions for a troubled child welfare system, the Children's Action Alliance in Arizona held four forums throughout the state in 1997 at which participants were invited to give testimony on their experiences with the child welfare system--its positives and negatives--and their solutions for change. Along with their comments, this report…

  10. Children Are Listening: Conversations for Their Future. Proceedings of the Statewide Forums on Child Care (Scottsdale, Prescott, Phoenix, and Tucson, Arizona, September and October 1996).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmann, Paulette

    Child care is an issue of profound significance for children and society, but it is faced with many unresolved difficulties. Children's Action Alliance in Arizona held a series of public forums around the state to give people a wider view of the child care dilemma and to provide a public hearing for those most affected by child care difficulties.…

  11. Reservation School Districts. Report of the Annual Indian Town Hall (6th, White Mountain Apache Reservation, Arizona, December 6-7, 1978).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    Forty-four representatives of American Indian tribes and the state of Arizona participated in the 2-day conference on reservation school districts. Terrance Leonard explained the legislative history and workings of Johnson-O'Malley funding, described supplementary Johnson-O'Malley programs, and commented on the Indian Education Act. Dr. Kenneth…

  12. On the Effectiveness of SB1070 in Arizona

    OpenAIRE

    Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes; Fernando Antonio Lozano

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the effectiveness of Arizona’s omnibus immigration law SB1070, which made it a misdemeanor crime for an alien to not carry proper documentation and asked police to determine the immigration status of any person suspected of being an illegal alien during a lawful stop. We find that SB1070’s enactment coincided with the stalling to slight recovery of the share of non-citizen Hispanics in Arizona three years after the enactment of an employment verification mandate to all empl...

  13. Lysine-iron agar in the detection of Arizona cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EDWARDS, P R; FIFE, M A

    1961-11-01

    A lysine-iron agar is described and recommended for the detection of Arizona strains which ferment lactose rapidly. Black colonies which appear on bismuth sulfite agar should be transferred to the medium. Salmonellae and Arizona cultures produce a distinctive reaction since they are the only recognized groups of enteric bacteria which regularly produce lysine decarboxylase rapidly and form large amounts of hydrogen sulfide. Use of the medium is particularly recommended in the examination of specimens from enteric infections in which shigellae and salmonellae are not detected.

  14. Arizona Likely Voter Survey on Proposed Legislation to Enhance School Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenski, Margaret C.

    2005-01-01

    This report contains the results of a telephone survey of 602 likely Arizona voters on various measures to enhance school choice in Arizona. This research was conducted by Arizona Opinion of Tucson for The Milton and Rose D. Friedman Foundation of Indianapolis. All fieldwork was conducted on March 23-26, and 28-29, 2005 by DataCall Inc. of…

  15. Towards seasonal Arctic shipping route predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melia, N.; Haines, K.; Hawkins, E.; Day, J. J.

    2017-08-01

    The continuing decline in Arctic sea-ice will likely lead to increased human activity and opportunities for shipping in the region, suggesting that seasonal predictions of route openings will become ever more important. Here we present results from a set of ‘perfect model’ experiments to assess the predictability characteristics of the opening of Arctic sea routes. We find skilful predictions of the upcoming summer shipping season can be made from as early as January, although typically forecasts show lower skill before a May ‘predictability barrier’. We demonstrate that in forecasts started from January, predictions of route opening date are twice as uncertain as predicting the closing date and that the Arctic shipping season is becoming longer due to climate change, with later closing dates mostly responsible. We find that predictive skill is state dependent with predictions for high or low ice years exhibiting greater skill than medium ice years. Forecasting the fastest open water route through the Arctic is accurate to within 200 km when predicted from July, a six-fold increase in accuracy compared to forecasts initialised from the previous November, which are typically no better than climatology. Finally we find that initialisation of accurate summer sea-ice thickness information is crucial to obtain skilful forecasts, further motivating investment into sea-ice thickness observations, climate models, and assimilation systems.

  16. Gravity Data for the State of Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gravity data for the entire state of Nevada and adjacent parts of California, Utah, and Arizona are presented. About 80,000 gravity stations were compiled primarily...

  17. Construction Planning and Technical Route of State Grid Cloud Data Center%构建国家电网云数据中心的规划与技术路线

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周一波; 朱朝勇; 霍燚

    2014-01-01

    国家电网公司通过 SG186、SG-ERP 等信息化建设,部署了大量重要管理信息系统,省公司和直属单位也结合自身业务开发并上线了数量众多的业务系统。北京亦庄、上海、西安集中式数据中心,以及各单位自身数据中心已经出现无法满足信息系统快速开发、部署和安全运行的情况,各单位独立运行维护本单位的信息系统软硬件资源也耗费巨大的人力成本。文章参考亚马逊、微软、IBM 等公司云数据中心建设理念,结合国家电网公司骨干网络和直属单位承载网建设的实际情况,在现有数据中心的基础上,探讨建立未来国家电网公司的云数据中心的规划和技术路线。%Through the SG186, SG-ERP and other information constructions, State Grid Corporation of China had deployed a large number of important management information systems. Provincial and subordinate units combined with their business development and launched a large number of business systems. Beijing Yizhuang ,Shanghai , Xi'an centralized data center , the unit's data center has been unable to meet the requirement for rapid development of the information systems,deployment and security operation, each subordinate unit operations independently and the maintenance of hardware and software resources information system consume a huge manpower cost . This reference to concept of cloud data center construction of Amazon, Microsoft and IBM, etc. Combined with the backbone network and units directly under the actual circumstances bearer network construction of State Grid Corporation of China, based on existing data center, discuss and establish of cloud data center and technical route for the future of State Grid Corporation of China.

  18. Radionuclide measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry at Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jull, A. J. T.; Donahue, D. J.; Zabel, T. H.

    1986-01-01

    Over the past years, Tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (TAMS) has become established as an important method for radionuclide analysis. In the Arizona system the accelerator is operated at a thermal voltage of 1.8MV for C-14 analysis, and 1.6 to 2MV for Be-10. Samples are inserted into a cesium sputter ion source in solid form. Negative ions sputtered from the target are accelerated to about 25kV, and the injection magnet selects ions of a particular mass. Ions of the 3+ charge state, having an energy of about 9MeV are selected by an electrostatic deflector, surviving ions pass through two magnets, where only ions of the desired mass-energy product are selected. The final detector is a combination ionization chamber to measure energy loss (and hence, Z), and a silicon surface-barrier detector which measures residual energy. After counting the trace iosotope for a fixed time, the injected ions are switched to the major isotope used for normalization. These ions are deflected into a Faraday cup after the first high-energy magnet. Repeated measurements of the isotope ratio of both sample and standards results in a measurement of the concentration of the radionuclide. Recent improvements in sample preparation for C-14 make preparation of high-beam current graphite targets directly from CO2 feasible. Except for some measurements of standards and backgrounds for Be-10 measurements to date have been on C-14. Although most results have been in archaeology and quaternary geology, studies have been expanded to include cosmogenic C-14 in meteorites. The data obtained so far tend to confirm the antiquity of Antarctic meteorites from the Allan Hills site. Data on three samples of Yamato meteorites gave terrestrial ages of between about 3 and 22 thousand years.

  19. Enhanced Contact Graph Routing (ECGR) MACHETE Simulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segui, John S.; Jennings, Esther H.; Clare, Loren P.

    2013-01-01

    Contact Graph Routing (CGR) for Delay/Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN) space-based networks makes use of the predictable nature of node contacts to make real-time routing decisions given unpredictable traffic patterns. The contact graph will have been disseminated to all nodes before the start of route computation. CGR was designed for space-based networking environments where future contact plans are known or are independently computable (e.g., using known orbital dynamics). For each data item (known as a bundle in DTN), a node independently performs route selection by examining possible paths to the destination. Route computation could conceivably run thousands of times a second, so computational load is important. This work refers to the simulation software model of Enhanced Contact Graph Routing (ECGR) for DTN Bundle Protocol in JPL's MACHETE simulation tool. The simulation model was used for performance analysis of CGR and led to several performance enhancements. The simulation model was used to demonstrate the improvements of ECGR over CGR as well as other routing methods in space network scenarios. ECGR moved to using earliest arrival time because it is a global monotonically increasing metric that guarantees the safety properties needed for the solution's correctness since route re-computation occurs at each node to accommodate unpredicted changes (e.g., traffic pattern, link quality). Furthermore, using earliest arrival time enabled the use of the standard Dijkstra algorithm for path selection. The Dijkstra algorithm for path selection has a well-known inexpensive computational cost. These enhancements have been integrated into the open source CGR implementation. The ECGR model is also useful for route metric experimentation and comparisons with other DTN routing protocols particularly when combined with MACHETE's space networking models and Delay Tolerant Link State Routing (DTLSR) model.

  20. 3D View of Grand Canyon, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The Grand Canyon is one of North America's most spectacular geologic features. Carved primarily by the Colorado River over the past six million years, the canyon sports vertical drops of 5,000 feet and spans a 445-kilometer-long stretch of Arizona desert. The strata along the steep walls of the canyon form a record of geologic time from the Paleozoic Era (250 million years ago) to the Precambrian (1.7 billion years ago).The above view was acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument aboard the Terra spacecraft. Visible and near infrared data were combined to form an image that simulates the natural colors of water and vegetation. Rock colors, however, are not accurate. The image data were combined with elevation data to produce this perspective view, with no vertical exaggeration, looking from above the South Rim up Bright Angel Canyon towards the North Rim. The light lines on the plateau at lower right are the roads around the Canyon View Information Plaza. The Bright Angel Trail, which reaches the Colorado in 11.3 kilometers, can be seen dropping into the canyon over Plateau Point at bottom center. The blue and black areas on the North Rim indicate a forest fire that was smoldering as the data were acquired on May 12, 2000.Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as

  1. Route Elimination Heuristic for Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sándor Csiszár

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the design of a route elimination (RE algorithm for thevehicle routing problem with time windows (VRPTW. The problem has two objectives, oneof them is the minimal number of routes the other is the minimal cost. To cope with theseobjectives effectively two-phase solutions are often suggested in the relevant literature. Inthe first phase the main focus is the route elimination, in the second one it is the costreduction. The algorithm described here is a part of a complete VRPWT study. The methodwas developed by studying the graph behaviour during the route elimination. For thispurpose a model -called “Magic Bricks” was developed. The computation results on theSolomon problem set show that the developed algorithm is competitive with the best ones.

  2. Road Routes for Waste Disposal, In order for the public to be able to view the Hazardous Material Routes reported to FMCSA, the data is being released in ESRI shapefile format for use in a GIS system., Published in 2006, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Louisiana State University.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Road Routes for Waste Disposal dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale as of 2006. It is described as 'In order for the public to be able to view the...

  3. Medical Cannabis in Arizona: Patient Characteristics, Perceptions, and Impressions of Medical Cannabis Legalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troutt, William D; DiDonato, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    Many advances have been made toward understanding the benefits of medical cannabis. However, less is known about medical cannabis patients themselves. Prior research has uncovered many important patient characteristics, but most of that work has been conducted with participants in California, who may not represent medical cannabis patients throughout the United States. Furthermore, it is unknown if medical cannabis legalization, which typically imposes strict regulations on cannabis cultivation and sale, impacts patients' experiences acquiring and using cannabis. The goal of this study was to address these limitations by (1) examining the characteristics, perceptions, and behaviors of medical cannabis patients in Arizona; and (2) questioning participants with a history of cannabis use regarding their experiences with cannabis before and after legalization. Patients in Arizona share many characteristics with those in California, but also key differences, such as average age and degree of cannabis consumption. Participants also had positive perceptions of the effect of medical cannabis legalization, reporting that feelings of safety and awareness were higher after legalization compared to before. The results are discussed in relation to evidence from patients in other states and in terms of their potential policy implications.

  4. A Transformative Approach to Academic Medicine: The Partnership Between the University of Arizona and Banner Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Charles B; Bollinger, Kathy; Garcia, Joe G N

    2017-01-01

    The University of Arizona Health Network (UAHN) was a modestly successful health care delivery organization with a vibrant academic portfolio and stable finances. By 2013, however, market forces, health care financing changes, and the burden of technology and informatics upgrades led to a compromised financial position at UAHN, a situation experienced by many academic medical centers. Concurrently, Banner Health had been interested in forming an academic partnership to enhance innovation, including the incorporation of new approaches into health care delivery, and to recruit high-quality providers to the organization. In 2015, the University of Arizona (UA) and Banner Health entered into a unique partnership known as Banner - University Medicine. The objective was to create a statewide system that provides reliable, compassionate, high-quality health care across all of its providers and facilities and to make a 30-year commitment to UA's College of Medicine in Tucson and the College of Medicine in Phoenix to support the State of Arizona's position as a first-tier research and training destination with world-class physicians. The goal of the Banner - University Medicine partnership is to create a nationally leading organization that transforms health care by delivering better care, enhanced service, and lower costs through new approaches focused on wellness. Key elements of this partnership are highlighted in this Commentary, including the unique governance structure of the Academic Management Council, the creation of the Academic Enhancement Fund to support the UA Colleges of Medicine in Tucson and Phoenix, and novel approaches to medical education, research, innovation, and care.

  5. Emotional Testimonies:An Ethnographic Study of Emotional Suffering Related to Migration from Mexico to Arizona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca eCrocker

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly argued that social and economic inequity poorly affect overall health. One of the means through which these inequities are translated to the body is via negative emotions, which carry known psychological and physiological responses. This paper examines migration-related psychosocial stressors impacting first generation Mexican immigrants in southern Arizona, and reports on the primary emotional experiences immigrants associate with these stressors. Data were drawn from a qualitative, ethnographic study conducted over the course of 14 months during 2013-2014 with first generation Mexican immigrants (N=40 residing in Tucson Arizona and service providers working directly in the immigrant community (N=32. Results indicate that the primary structural vulnerabilities that cause emotional hardship amongst immigrants are pre-migration stressors and adversity, dangerous border crossings, detention and deportation, undocumented citizenship status, family separation, and extreme poverty. Many of these factors have intensified over the past decade due to increased border security and state level anti-immigrant legislation in Arizona. Immigrants connected these hardships to the emotions of trauma (50%, fear (65%, depression (75%, loneliness (75%, sadness (80%, and stress (85%, and most respondents reported suffering from three or more of these emotions. Given the heavy emotional toll of migration and the direct impact that regional legislation and border security had on well-being, this paper argues that emotion be considered an important mechanism for health declines in the immigrant community. In order to stem the frequency and intensity of emotional stress in the Mexican immigrant community in Tucson, it is imperative to support organizations and policies that promote community building and support networks and also expand access to and availability of mental health services for immigrants regardless of documentation status.

  6. Route-external and route-internal landmarks in route descriptions : Effects of route length and map design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerbeek, Hans; Maes, Alfons

    2013-01-01

    Landmarks are basic ingredients in route descriptions. They often mark choice points: locations where travellers choose from different options how to continue the route. This study focuses on one of the loose ends in the taxonomy of landmarks. In a memory-based production experiment in which respond

  7. Perception bias in route choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, Jacob Dirk; Thomas, Tom; van Berkum, Eric C.; van Arem, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Travel time is probably one of the most studied attributes in route choice. Recently, perception of travel time received more attention as several studies have shown its importance in explaining route choice behavior. In particular, travel time estimates by travelers appear to be biased against

  8. Perception bias in route choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, Jacob Dirk; Thomas, Tom; van Berkum, Eric C.; van Arem, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Travel time is probably one of the most studied attributes in route choice. Recently, perception of travel time received more attention as several studies have shown its importance in explaining route choice behavior. In particular, travel time estimates by travelers appear to be biased against non-

  9. An enzymatic route to selenazolines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehnke, Jesko; Morawitz, Falk; Bent, Andrew F; Houssen, Wael E; Shirran, Sally L; Fuszard, Matthew A; Smellie, Iain A; Botting, Catherine H; Smith, Margaret C M; Jaspars, Marcel; Naismith, James H

    2013-03-18

    Ringing the changes: Selenazolines have applications in medicinal chemistry, but their synthesis is challenging. We report a new convenient and less toxic route to these heterocycles that starts from commercially available selenocysteine. The new route depends on a heterocyclase enzyme that creates oxazolines and thiazolines from serines/threonines and cysteines.

  10. Perception bias in route choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, J.D.; Thomas, T.; Berkum, van E.C.; Arem, van B.

    2014-01-01

    Travel time is probably one of the most studied attributes in route choice. Recently, perception of travel time received more attention as several studies have shown its importance in explaining route choice behavior. In particular, travel time estimates by travelers appear to be biased against non-

  11. Hardware Routing Lookup with SDRAMT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The authors present a routing lookup architecture, SDIR(SDRAM based Direct Index Routing). With pipeline and interleaving access technique, SDIR can provide scalable lookup speed from 16.7 MPPS(megapacket per second) to 133 MPPS with SDRAM running at 133MHz frequency.

  12. Low-temperature geothermal reservoir site evaluation in Arizona. Quarterly progress report, November 1, 1977--January 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahman, W.R. Sr.

    1978-03-01

    The Department of Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy, has charged the Bureau of Geology and Mineral Technology, Geological Survey Branch with development of a cost-effective exploration program for low- to moderate-temperature geothermal resources. As part of this program two or three demonstration projects in Arizona will be brought on stream. The site-specific exploration, evaluation and development program as well as the state wide reconnaissance exploration program is continuing. The compilation of data for the 1 : 500,000 geothermal energy resource map is continuing. Drafting and data collection for the 1 : 1,000,000 preliminary map, Geothermal Energy Resources of Arizona, Geothermal Map No. 1, requested the first week in January by DOE/DGE is nearing completion. This preliminary map should be published in March, 1978. All outside projects are either complete or on schedule.

  13. Climate Variation at Flagstaff, Arizona - 1950 to 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hereford, Richard

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Much scientific research demonstrates the existence of recent climate variation, particularly global warming. Climate prediction models forecast that climate will change; it will become warmer, droughts will increase in number and severity, and extreme climate events will recur often?desiccating aridity, extremely wet, unusually warm, or even frigid at times. However, the global models apply to average conditions in large grids approximately 150 miles on an edge (Thorpe, 2005), and how or whether specific areas within a grid are affected is unclear. Flagstaff's climate is mentioned in the context of global change, but information is lacking on the amount and trend of changes in precipitation, snowfall, and temperature. The purpose of this report is to understand what may be happening to Flagstaff's climate by reviewing local climate history. Flagstaff is in north-central Arizona south of San Francisco Mountain, which reaches 12,633 feet, the highest in Arizona (fig. 1). At 6,900 feet, surrounded by ponderosa pine forest, Flagstaff enjoys a four-season climate; winter-daytime temperatures are cool, averaging 45 degrees (Fahrenheit). Summer-daytime temperatures are comfortable, averaging 80 degrees, which is pleasant compared with nearby low-elevation deserts. Flagstaff?s precipitation averages 22-inches per year with a range of 9 to 39 inches. Snowfall occurs each season, averaging 97 inches annually. This report, written for the non-technical reader, interprets climate variation at Flagstaff as observed at the National Weather Service (NWS) station at Pulliam Field (or Airport), a first-order weather station staffed by meteorologists (Staudenmaier and others, 2007). The station is on a flat-topped ridge surrounded by forest 5-miles south of Flagstaff at an elevation of 7,003 feet. Data used in this analysis are daily measurements of precipitation (including snowfall) and temperature (maximum and minimum) covering the period from 1950, when the station

  14. Stochastic Vehicle Routing with Recourse

    CERN Document Server

    Goertz, Inge Li; Saket, Rishi

    2012-01-01

    We study the classic Vehicle Routing Problem in the setting of stochastic optimization with recourse. StochVRP is a two-stage optimization problem, where demand is satisfied using two routes: fixed and recourse. The fixed route is computed using only a demand distribution. Then after observing the demand instantiations, a recourse route is computed -- but costs here become more expensive by a factor lambda. We present an O(log^2 n log(n lambda))-approximation algorithm for this stochastic routing problem, under arbitrary distributions. The main idea in this result is relating StochVRP to a special case of submodular orienteering, called knapsack rank-function orienteering. We also give a better approximation ratio for knapsack rank-function orienteering than what follows from prior work. Finally, we provide a Unique Games Conjecture based omega(1) hardness of approximation for StochVRP, even on star-like metrics on which our algorithm achieves a logarithmic approximation.

  15. Stochastic vehicle routing with recourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørtz, Inge Li; Nagarajan, Viswanath; Saket, Rishi

    2012-01-01

    We study the classic Vehicle Routing Problem in the setting of stochastic optimization with recourse. StochVRP is a two-stage problem, where demand is satisfied using two routes: fixed and recourse. The fixed route is computed using only a demand distribution. Then after observing the demand...... instantiations, a recourse route is computed - but costs here become more expensive by a factor λ. We present an O(log2n ·log(nλ))-approximation algorithm for this stochastic routing problem, under arbitrary distributions. The main idea in this result is relating StochVRP to a special case of submodular...... orienteering, called knapsack rank-function orienteering. We also give a better approximation ratio for knapsack rank-function orienteering than what follows from prior work. Finally, we provide a Unique Games Conjecture based ω(1) hardness of approximation for StochVRP, even on star-like metrics on which our...

  16. Comparative use of riparian corridors and oases by migrating birds in southeast Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skagen, S.K.; Melcher, C.P.; Howe, W.H.; Knopf, F.L.

    1998-01-01

    The relative importance of cottonwood-willow riparian corridors and isolated oases to land birds migrating across southeastern Arizona was evaluated during four spring migrations, 1989 to 1994, based on patterns of species richness, relative abundance, density, and body condition of birds. We surveyed birds in 13 study sites ranging in size and connectivity from small isolated patches to extensive riparian forest, sampled vegetation and insects, and captured birds in mistnets. The continuous band of riparian vegetation along the San Pedro River does not appear to be functioning as a corridor for many migrating species, although it may for a few, namely Yellow-breasted Chats (Icteria virens), Summer Tanagers (Piranga rubra), and Northern Rough-winged Swallows (Steldigopteryx serripennis), which account for fewer than 10% of the individuals migrating through the area. Small, isolated oases hosted more avian species than the corridor sites, and the relative abundances of most migrating birds did not differ between sites relative to size-connectivity. There were few differences in between-year variability in the relative abundances of migrating birds between corridor and oasis sites. Between-year variability decreased with overall abundance of species and was greater for species with breeding ranges that centered north of 50??N latitude. Body condition of birds did not differ relative to the size-connectivity of the capture site, but individuals of species with more northerly breeding ranges had more body fat than species that breed nearby. Peak migration densities of several bird species far exceeded breeding densities reported for the San Pedro River, suggesting that large components of these species were en route migrants. Peak densities of Yellow Warblers (Dendroica petechia) reached 48.0 birds/ha, of Wilson's Warblers (Wilsonia pusilla) 33.7 birds/ha, and of Yellow-rumped Warblers (D. coronata) 30.1 birds/ha. Riparian vegetation is limited in extent in the

  17. Investigation of the geology and hydrology of the Coconino Plateau of northern Arizona: a project of the Arizona Rural Watershed Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Marilyn E.; Bills, Donald J.

    2002-01-01

    The water resources of the Coconino Plateau in northern Arizona are under increasing demand as a result of development. The population of this arid region continues to grow, and the number of visitors to the many national and state parks and monuments in the region has increased annually. The sustainability, protection, and maintenance of springs and seeps and associated riparian habitat on the Coconino Plateau are major issues that have broad public and governmental support. Regional stakeholders agree that an improved understanding of the regional hydrogeologic system is needed to address the concerns of water supply and ground-water sustainability. The base of information required to adequately describe the hydrogeology of the Coconino Plateau currently does not exist. Hydrogeologic data is most abundant for large population centers like Flagstaff and Sedona, but is sparse for less populated areas like Williams, Tusayan, Valle, and Cameron. There are still large parts of the Coconino Plateau for which there is no basic geologic or hydrologic information available. In order to develop a hydrogeologic framework for the Coconino Plateau, a comprehensive effort is needs to compile existent data and collect additional data to fill in data gaps and reinforce limited information. In 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began an assessment of the hydrogeology of the Coconino Plateau in cooperation with the Arizona Department of Water Resources (ADWR) as part of the Rural Watershed Initiative, a program established by the State of Arizona and managed by the ADWR. Assessments also are underway in the upper-middle Verde River watershed (Woodhouse and others, 2002) to the south and in the Mogollon Highlands to the southeast (Parker and Flynn, 2000). Each study has as its objectives: (1) the collection, compilation, and evaluation of all existing geologic, hydrologic, and related data pertaining to the study area and the creation of a database that is readily accessible

  18. Ant Colony Algorithm for Solving QoS Routing Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Li-juan; WANG Liang-jun; WANG Ru-chuan

    2004-01-01

    Based on the state transition rule, the local updating rule and the global updating rule of ant colony algorithm, we propose an improved ant colony algorithm of the least-cost quality of service (QoS) unicast routing. The algorithm is used for solving the routing problem with delay, delay jitter, bandwidth, and packet loss-constrained. In the simulation, about 52.33% ants find the successful QoS routing , and converge to the best. It is proved that the algorithm is efficient and effective.

  19. Post occupancy survey of the Arizona LEED NC population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Hugo Dixon

    Existing green building literature has not provided conclusive performance results for energy efficiency, water efficiency and the utilization and proper management of green building features. The few existing energy performance studies had not represented a significant portion of a population, were not random samples, did not included many structures from hot and dry climates and had generated heavily debated results. This thesis examines the fifty-three buildings comprising the Arizona Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for New Construction (LEED NC) building population and in doing so hypothesizes that Arizona's LEED NC buildings achieve expected energy and water performance and exhibit various energy efficiency correlations. The thesis also establishes a baseline understanding of Arizona's LEED NC population characteristics. Data collection efforts were successful for all desired deliverables with the exception of water performance metrics. Energy analysis results rejected the energy efficiency hypotheses by returning greater energy use intensities than the non-LEED national building stock as well as the design and baseline energy use simulations. The energy correlation analysis returned statistically significant results for a single system attribute and several managerial attributes. The results suggest that the LEED NC rating system requires immediate reevaluation to ensure future green building success in Arizona.

  20. Comparison studies of ozone precursors in Phoenix, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, C.; Guyton, J.; Lee, C.P. [Arizona Dept. of Environmental Quality, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Parmar, S. [Atmospheric Analysis and Consulting Co., Ventura, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This paper will present the comparison of the ozone precursors monitoring program for Phoenix, Arizona during 1992 and 1993. Specific details and methodologies will be presented involving collection of air samples and analysis of speciated measurements for reactive VOC and carbonyl precursors responsible for ozone formation. Quality control and quality assurance techniques will also be discussed.

  1. Developing a prediction model for Armillaria solidipes in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. B. Klopfenstein; J. W Hanna; M. L. Fairweather; J. D. Shaw; R. Mathiasen; C. Hoffman; E. Nelson; M. -S. Kim; A. L. Ross-Davis

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, a collaborative project was started to determine the distribution of Armillaria solidipes (= A. ostoyae) in Arizona. The methods and preliminary accomplishments of the 2010 and 2011 (ongoing) field surveys/collections are summarized. During the next phase of this project, surveys will be completed and remaining Armillaria isolates will be identified using DNA-...

  2. "Salmonella arizona" Infections in Latinos Associated with Rattlesnake Folk Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Stephen H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Conducted a case-control study to determine the magnitude of the problem of Latino patients who ingested rattlesnake capsules and then developed serious "Salmonella arizona" infections. Eighty-two percent of infected Latinos in 1986-87 who were questioned reported ingesting snake capsules. Discusses the association of ingesting snake…

  3. An exploration possibility at the Arizona mine, Pershing County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, R.E.; Tatlock, Donald Bruce

    1963-01-01

    At the Arizona mine in Pershing County, Nevada, a block of ground that may contain significant bodies of silver ore at a shallow depth .appears to have been very inadequately explored during early mining activity. The block approximates in arcal extent

  4. Implementing Structured English Immersion in Arizona: Benefits, Challenges, and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia; Gonzalez Canche, Manuel S.; Moll, Luis C.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: Arizona's most recent English Language Learner (ELL) legislation, starting in the school year 2008-2009, requires all such students be educated through a specific Structured English Immersion (SEI) model: the 4-hour English Language Development (ELD) block. The basic premise behind this particular model is that ELL students…

  5. Language Ideologies of Arizona Voters, Language Managers, and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons-Doolan, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Arizona is the site of many explicit language policies as well as ongoing scholarly discussions of related language ideologies--beliefs about the role of language in society. This study adds a critical piece to the investigation of the role of ideologies in language policy processes by thoroughly documenting language ideologies expressed by a…

  6. Language Ideologies of Arizona Voters, Language Managers, and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons-Doolan, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Arizona is the site of many explicit language policies as well as ongoing scholarly discussions of related language ideologies--beliefs about the role of language in society. This study adds a critical piece to the investigation of the role of ideologies in language policy processes by thoroughly documenting language ideologies expressed by a…

  7. Neoliberalism and the Battle over Ethnic Studies in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Sandra K.; Joseph, Miranda

    2010-01-01

    On May 14, 2010, Sandra K. Soto was the faculty convocation speaker for the University of Arizona College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. To a significant extent, she congratulated the parents and graduates and flattered the graduates by crediting them with having learned both skills and information, and urging graduates to make use of their…

  8. Arizona TeleMedicine Network: System Procurement Specifications, Phase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlantic Research Corp., Alexandria, VA.

    Defining the system procurement specifications for a telecommunications system designed to provide health services to rurally isolated American Indians living on reservations in Arizona, this document presents detailed specifications for: (1) a complete communications facility; (2) a mobile health communications treatment and diagnosis unit; (3)…

  9. Arizona TeleMedicine Network: Engineering Master Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlantic Research Corp., Alexandria, VA.

    As the planning document for establishing a statewide health communications system initially servicing the Papago, San Carlos and White Mountain Apache, Navajo, and Hopi reservations, this document prescribes the communications services to be provided by the Arizona TeleMedicine Network. Specifications include: (1) communications services for each…

  10. 78 FR 26739 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, Arizona AGENCY: Federal Communications... filed by S and H Broadcasting, LLC, proposing the substitution of Channel 228C2 for vacant Channel 286C2... Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Nazifa...

  11. "Democratic" Collaboration for School Turnaround in Southern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jeffrey V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the democratic nature of collaboration and related principal influences in one successful Southern Arizona elementary school in a changing demographic and border context in the US Southwest and where the principal did not share the same ethnic identity/cultural background.…

  12. Prevalence of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in desert bighorn sheep in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice-Allen, Anne E.; Luedtke, Clint J.; Overstreet, Matthew; Cain, James W.; Stephenson, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the potential for an epizootic of pneumonia to result from either natural immigration or translocation, we compared the seroprevalence to Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in several populations of desert bighorn sheep in Arizona. We collected blood samples and nasal or oropharyngeal swabs from 124 desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni) from 6 populations in Arizona in 2009 and 2010. M. ovipneumoniae organisms were detected by PCR in 22%, whereas antibodies to M. ovipneumoniae were detected in 47% of tested bighorn sheep. Mycoplasma antibodies were not found in 2 of 6 populations, indicating some bighorn sheep populations in Arizona are naïve to this bacterium. In contrast, others had seroprevalence rates up to 80%. We were able to compare seroprevalence rates and titers over time in 9 individuals (7 individuals included in the 124 bighorn sheep sampled in 2009 and 2010, and 2 individuals originally captured in 2006). Antibody titers persisted for 12 months in individuals from the Kofa National Wildlife Refuge (n = 7) while antibody titers appeared to decline in the Kanab Creek population (n = 2). M. ovipneumoniae is present or has been present in several, but not all, populations of bighorn sheep in Arizona. The results demonstrate the importance of routine health testing for future translocation efforts to reduce disease risk for naive populations.

  13. 14 CFR 121.95 - Route width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... (a) Approved routes and route segments over U.S. Federal airways or foreign airways (and advisory... designated width of those airways or routes. Whenever the Administrator finds it necessary to determine the width of other approved routes, he considers the following: (1) Terrain clearance. (2) Minimum en route...

  14. The University of Arizona College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture,Tucson,Arizona%亚和桑那大学的建筑和景观设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    布拉得利·韦勒

    2008-01-01

    @@ A textbook illustration of modern, sustainable, site specific and symbolically iconographic architecture stands as an addition to the renowned University of Arizona College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture.

  15. An Experimental Investigation of Hyperbolic Routing with a Smart Forwarding Plane in NDN

    CERN Document Server

    Lehman, Vince; Zhang, Beichuan; Zhang, Lixia; Aldecoa, Rodrigo; Krioukov, Dmitri; Wang, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Routing in NDN networks must scale in terms of forwarding table size and routing protocol overhead. Hyperbolic routing (HR) presents a potential solution to address the routing scalability problem, because it does not use traditional forwarding tables or exchange routing updates upon changes in network topologies. Although HR has the drawbacks of producing sub-optimal routes or local minima for some destinations, these issues can be mitigated by NDN's intelligent data forwarding plane. However, HR's viability still depends on both the quality of the routes HR provides and the overhead incurred at the forwarding plane due to HR's sub-optimal behavior. We designed a new forwarding strategy called Adaptive Smoothed RTT-based Forwarding (ASF) to mitigate HR's sub-optimal path selection. This paper describes our experimental investigation into the packet delivery delay and overhead under HR as compared with Named-Data Link State Routing (NLSR), which calculates shortest paths. We run emulation experiments using va...

  16. An opportunistic routing mechanism combined with long-term and short-term metrics for WMN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weifeng; Wang, Haotian; Piao, Xianglan; Qiu, Tie

    2014-01-01

    WMN (wireless mesh network) is a useful wireless multihop network with tremendous research value. The routing strategy decides the performance of network and the quality of transmission. A good routing algorithm will use the whole bandwidth of network and assure the quality of service of traffic. Since the routing metric ETX (expected transmission count) does not assure good quality of wireless links, to improve the routing performance, an opportunistic routing mechanism combined with long-term and short-term metrics for WMN based on OLSR (optimized link state routing) and ETX is proposed in this paper. This mechanism always chooses the highest throughput links to improve the performance of routing over WMN and then reduces the energy consumption of mesh routers. The simulations and analyses show that the opportunistic routing mechanism is better than the mechanism with the metric of ETX.

  17. MX Siting Investigation. Geotechnical Evaluation Conterminous United States. Volume I. Coarse Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-06-01

    Inventory of resources and uses, phase I, Arizona state water plan: State of Arizona, pl. 1. Ashford, T., 1972, Geoseismic history of Rincon Field...Resources Rept. 2, 60 p. Emery, 1971, Hydrology of the San Luis Valley, south-central Colorado: U.S. Geol. Survey Hydrol. Inv. Atlas HA-381. Erickson

  18. A Comparision Study of Common Routing Protocols Used In Wireless Ad-Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basim Alhadidi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to analyze and compare performance of both reactive and proactive Mobile Ad hoc Networks (MANETs routing protocols using different environments. Wireless networks are divided into two types: infrastructure and ad hoc network. In wireless ad hoc networks each node can be a sender, router and receiver, so these types of network are less structure compared to infrastructure network. Therefore wireless ad hoc networks need special routing protocols to overcome the limitations of wireless ad hoc networks. Wireless ad hoc networks routing protocols can be categorized into two types: reactive (on demand routing protocols and proactive routing protocols. In proactive routing protocols the nodes periodically send control messages across the network to build routing table. Different routing protocols have been simulated using GloMoSim (Global Mobile Information system simulation library and PARSEC compiler. Five multi-hop wireless ad hoc network routing protocols have been simulated to cover a range of design choices: Wireless Routing Protocol (WRP, Fisheye State Routing (FSR, Dynamic Source Routing (DSR, Ad hoc On-demand Distance Vector (AODV and Location Aided Routing (LAR. The protocols are evaluated in different environments to investigate performance metrics. Performance metric includes the following aspects: packets deliver ratio, end-to-end delay and end-to-end throughput.

  19. State Variability in Supply of Office-based Primary Care Providers: United States, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 6% in South Dakota ( Figure 3 ). In 19 states (Alaska, Arizona, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, South Dakota, Tennessee, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Wyoming), the ...

  20. 77 FR 30454 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Oregon; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... network, the ``Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments'' (IMPROVE) monitoring network... dealing with air quality in the West. WRAP member States include: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado... Tribal members include Campo Band of Kumeyaay Indians, Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes,...

  1. Application of Harmony Search to Vehicle Routing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong W.  Geem

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A phenomenon-inspired meta-heuristic algorithm, harmony search, imitating music improvisation process, is introduced and applied to vehicle routing problem, then compared with one of the popular evolutionary algorithms, genetic algorithm. The harmony search algorithm conceptualized a group of musicians together trying to search for better state of harmony. This algorithm was applied to a test traffic network composed of one bus depot, one school and ten bus stops with demand by commuting students. This school bus routing example is a multi-objective problem to minimize both the number of operating buses and the total travel time of all buses while satisfying bus capacity and time window constraints. Harmony search could find good solution within the reasonable amount of time and computation.

  2. Examining Arizona's Policy Response Post "Flores v. Arizona" in Educating K-12 English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Silva, Margarita; Gomez, Laura; Cisneros, Jesus

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of Arizona's policy response in educating English language learners by conducting a narrative review. A critical Latina/o theory approach was used to analyze the data. This study reveals 5 salient policy responses: (a) severely limit bilingual education, (b) develop controversial funding solutions, (c)…

  3. Epidemiology and Investigation of Melioidosis, Southern Arizona

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Tasha; Engelthaler, David M.; Blaney, David D.; Tuanyok, Apichai; Wangsness, Eric; Smith, Theresa L.; Pearson, Talima; Komatsu, Kenneth K.; Keim, Paul; Currie, Bart J.; Levy, Craig; Sunenshine, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a bacterium endemic to Southeast Asia and northern Australia, but it has not been found to occur endemically in the United States. We report an ostensibly autochthonous case of melioidosis in the United States. Despite an extensive investigation, the source of exposure was not identified.

  4. Epidemiology and investigation of melioidosis, Southern Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Tasha; Engelthaler, David M; Blaney, David D; Tuanyok, Apichai; Wangsness, Eric; Smith, Theresa L; Pearson, Talmia; Komatsu, Kenneth K; Keim, Paul; Currie, Bart J; Levy, Craig; Sunenshine, Rebecca

    2011-07-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a bacterium endemic to Southeast Asia and northern Australia, but it has not been found to occur endemically in the United States. We report an ostensibly autochthonous case of melioidosis in the United States. Despite an extensive investigation, the source of exposure was not identified.

  5. Road Routes for Waste Disposal - MDC_RecyclingRoute

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This CURBSIDE RECYCLING ROUTES BOUNDARIES LAYER IS A polygon feature class created for the Miami-Dade Department of Solid Waste Management (DSWM). It contains the...

  6. Electric Vehicle Green Routing with Possible En-Route Recharging

    OpenAIRE

    BAOUCHE, Fouad; BILLOT, Romain; Trigui, Rochdi; EL FAOUZI, Nour Eddin

    2014-01-01

    The deployment of Electric Vehicles (EVs) is constrained mainly by the restricted autonomy, the lack of charging stations, the battery recharge time and recuperation capability (e.g. braking phases or downhill). In this study we aim to develop a green routing tool to encourage the use of EV. To overcome the autonomy limitation we propose a methodology for the EV that includes a charging stations location model, an energy graph construction for EV routing and a resolution scheme for the routin...

  7. Pheromone based alternative route planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangbing Feng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we propose an improved alternative route calculation based on alternative figures, which is suitable for practical environments. The improvement is based on the fact that the main traffic route is the road network skeleton in a city. Our approach using nodes may generate a higher possibility of overlapping. We employ a bidirectional Dijkstra algorithm to search the route. To measure the quality of an Alternative Figures (AG, three quotas are proposed. The experiment results indicate that the improved algorithm proposed in this paper is more effective than others.

  8. Millimeter Wave Alternate Route Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    A0-AI02 303 HARRIS CORP MELBOURNE FL GOVERNMENT COMMUNICATION ST--ETC FIG 17/2.1 MILLIMETER WAVE ALENT ROUTE STUDT.(U) APR W C ADAMS J J PAN, W C...481-487. 4-7 abm ADAOO0 303 HARRIS CORP MELBOURNE FL GOVERNMENT COMMUNICATION S -ETC F/G 17/2.1 MILLIMETER WAVE ALTERNATE ROUTE STUDY.(U) APR 81 W C...7-21L’j r AD-A102 303 HARRIS CORP MELBOURNE FL GOVERNMENT COMMUNICATION ST--ETC F/A 17/2.1 MILLIMETER WAVE ALTERNATE ROUTE STUDY(U) APR 81 W C ADAMS

  9. Port Authority of Allegheny County Transit Routes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Shapefile of Transit Routes - Please refer to each resource for active dates of the route information. Routes change over time,

  10. Remote sensing approach to map riparian vegetation of the Colorado River Ecosystem, Grand Canyon area, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, U.; Glenn, E.; Nagler, P. L.; Sankey, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Riparian zones in the southwestern U.S. are usually a mosaic of vegetation types at varying states of succession in response to past floods or droughts. Human impacts also affect riparian vegetation patterns. Human- induced changes include introduction of exotic species, diversion of water for human use, channelization of the river to protect property, and other land use changes that can lead to deterioration of the riparian ecosystem. This study explored the use of remote sensing to map an iconic stretch of the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. The pre-dam riparian zone in the Grand Canyon was affected by annual floods from spring run-off from the watersheds of Green River, the Colorado River and the San Juan River. A pixel-based vegetation map of the riparian zone in the Grand Canyon, Arizona, was produced from high-resolution aerial imagery. The map was calibrated and validated with ground survey data. A seven-step image processing and classification procedure was developed based on a suite of vegetation indices and classification subroutines available in ENVI Image Processing and Analysis software. The result was a quantitative species level vegetation map that could be more accurate than the qualitative, polygon-based maps presently used on the Lower Colorado River. The dominant woody species in the Grand Canyon are now saltcedar, arrowweed and mesquite, reflecting stress-tolerant forms adapted to alternated flow regimes associated with the river regulation.

  11. The Arizona Galileoscope Project: A 5th Grade Rural Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Robert T.; Pompea, Stephen M.; Walker, Constance E.

    2015-01-01

    The Galileoscope is a low cost, high quality telescope kit developed for the International Year of Astronomy (IYA). Over 200,000 Galileoscopes have been sold and used by the public and education programs around the world.The National Optical Astronomy Observatory has been a leader in Galileoscope education programs. In 2009 we started the Arizona Galileoscope Star Party Program. We have partnered with rural school districts around the state including Flagstaff, Safford, Yuma, Globe and Payson to bring Galilesocope educational program to the students and teachers. The program begins with a professional development workshop where teachers learn about the optics of telescopes and how to assemble the Galileoscope and use it on a tripod. The teachers receive a Teaching With Telescopes (TWT) kit that contains a variety of lenses, lasers and lights to do all the activities in the workshop and a classroom supply of Galileoscopes and tripods to take back to their classroom. Their students learn about telescope optics and how to use a Galileoscope. Several weeks after the professional development workshop, a district wide star party is held for the parents, teachers and students.In the coming years, we are expanding the program in cooperation with Science Foundation Arizona. We are currently in the process of recruiting new cities to join the program in addition to supporting our previous communities. We will describe our past efforts, the evaluation of the program and our future expansion.

  12. Design, Simulation, and Analysis of Domestic Solar Water Heating Systems in Phoenix, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Fresart, Edouard Thomas

    Research was conducted to quantify the energy and cost savings of two different domestic solar water heating systems compared to an all-electric water heater for a four-person household in Phoenix, Arizona. The knowledge gained from this research will enable utilities to better align incentives and consumers to make more informed decisions prior to purchasing a solar water heater. Daily energy and temperature data were collected in a controlled, closed environment lab. Three mathematical models were designed in TRNSYS 17, a transient system simulation tool. The data from the lab were used to validate the TRNSYS models, and the TRNSYS results were used to project annual cost and energy savings for the solar water heaters. The projected energy savings for a four-person household in Phoenix, Arizona are 80% when using the SunEarthRTM system with an insulated and glazed flat-plate collector, and 49% when using the FAFCO RTM system with unglazed, non-insulated flat-plate collectors. Utilizing all available federal, state, and utility incentives, a consumer could expect to recoup his or her investment after the fifth year if purchasing a SunEarth RTM system, and after the eighth year if purchasing a FAFCO RTM system. Over the 20-year analysis period, a consumer could expect to save 2,519 with the SunEarthRTM system, and 971 with the FAFCORTM system.

  13. The conservation nexus: valuing interdependent water and energy savings in Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartos, Matthew D; Chester, Mikhail V

    2014-02-18

    Water and energy resources are intrinsically linked, yet they are managed separately--even in the water-scarce American southwest. This study develops a spatially explicit model of water-energy interdependencies in Arizona and assesses the potential for cobeneficial conservation programs. The interdependent benefits of investments in eight conservation strategies are assessed within the context of legislated renewable energy portfolio and energy efficiency standards. The cobenefits of conservation are found to be significant. Water conservation policies have the potential to reduce statewide electricity demand by 0.82-3.1%, satisfying 4.1-16% of the state's mandated energy-efficiency standard. Adoption of energy-efficiency measures and renewable generation portfolios can reduce nonagricultural water demand by 1.9-15%. These conservation cobenefits are typically not included in conservation plans or benefit-cost analyses. Many cobenefits offer negative costs of saved water and energy, indicating that these measures provide water and energy savings at no net cost. Because ranges of costs and savings for water-energy conservation measures are somewhat uncertain, future studies should investigate the cobenefits of individual conservation strategies in detail. Although this study focuses on Arizona, the analysis can be extended elsewhere as renewable portfolio and energy efficiency standards become more common nationally and internationally.

  14. Reverse flood routing with the inverted Muskingum storage routing scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Koussis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work treats reverse flood routing aiming at signal identification: inflows are inferred from observed outflows by orienting the Muskingum scheme against the wave propagation direction. Routing against the wave propagation is an ill-posed, inverse problem (small errors amplify, leading to large spurious responses; therefore, the reverse solution must be smoothness-constrained towards stability and uniqueness (regularised. Theoretical constrains on the coefficients of the reverse routing scheme assist in error control, but optimal grids are derived by numerical experimentation. Exact solutions of the convection-diffusion equation, for a single and a composite wave, are reverse-routed and in both instances the wave is backtracked well for a range of grid parameters. In the arduous test of a square pulse, the result is comparable to those of more complex methods. Seeding outflow data with random errors enhances instability; to cope with the spurious oscillations, the reversed solution is conditioned by smoothing via low-pass filtering or optimisation. Good-quality inflow hydrographs are recovered with either smoothing treatment, yet the computationally demanding optimisation is superior. Finally, the reverse Muskingum routing method is compared to a reverse-solution method of the St. Venant equations of flood wave motion and is found to perform equally well, at a fraction of the computing effort. This study leads us to conclude that the efficiently attained good inflow identification rests on the simplicity of the Muskingum reverse routing scheme that endows it with numerical robustness.

  15. Reverse flood routing with the inverted Muskingum storage routing scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koussis, A. D.; Mazi, K.; Lykoudis, S.; Argiriou, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    This work treats reverse flood routing aiming at signal identification: inflows are inferred from observed outflows by orienting the Muskingum scheme against the wave propagation direction. Routing against the wave propagation is an ill-posed, inverse problem (small errors amplify, leading to large spurious responses); therefore, the reverse solution must be smoothness-constrained towards stability and uniqueness (regularised). Theoretical constrains on the coefficients of the reverse routing scheme assist in error control, but optimal grids are derived by numerical experimentation. Exact solutions of the convection-diffusion equation, for a single and a composite wave, are reverse-routed and in both instances the wave is backtracked well for a range of grid parameters. In the arduous test of a square pulse, the result is comparable to those of more complex methods. Seeding outflow data with random errors enhances instability; to cope with the spurious oscillations, the reversed solution is conditioned by smoothing via low-pass filtering or optimisation. Good-quality inflow hydrographs are recovered with either smoothing treatment, yet the computationally demanding optimisation is superior. Finally, the reverse Muskingum routing method is compared to a reverse-solution method of the St. Venant equations of flood wave motion and is found to perform equally well, at a fraction of the computing effort. This study leads us to conclude that the efficiently attained good inflow identification rests on the simplicity of the Muskingum reverse routing scheme that endows it with numerical robustness.

  16. Traditional cultural use as a tool for inferring biogeography and provenance: a case study involving painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) and Hopi Native American culture in Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovich, Jeffrey E.; LaRue, Charles T.; Drost, Charles A.; Arundel, Terence R.

    2014-01-01

    Inferring the natural distribution and native status of organisms is complicated by the role of ancient and modern humans in utilization and translocation. Archaeological data and traditional cultural use provide tools for resolving these issues. Although the painted turtle (Chrysemys picta) has a transcontinental range in the United States, populations in the Desert Southwest are scattered and isolated. This pattern may be related to the fragmentation of a more continuous distribution as a result of climate change after the Pleistocene, or translocation by Native Americans who used turtles for food and ceremonial purposes. Because of these conflicting or potentially confounded possibilities, the distribution and status of C. picta as a native species in the state of Arizona has been questioned in the herpetological literature. We present evidence of a population that once occurred in the vicinity of Winslow, Arizona, far from current remnant populations on the upper Little Colorado River. Members of the Native American Hopi tribe are known to have hunted turtles for ceremonial purposes in this area as far back as AD 1290 and possibly earlier. Remains of C. picta are known from several pueblos in the vicinity including Homol'ovi, Awatovi, and Walpi. Given the great age of records for C. picta in Arizona and the concordance of its fragmented and isolated distribution with other reptiles in the region, we conclude that painted turtles are part of the native fauna of Arizona.

  17. Update: mercury poisoning associated with beauty cream--Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas, 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-07-26

    During September 1995-May 1996, the Texas Department of Health (TDH), the New Mexico Department of Health (NMDH), and the San Diego County (California) Health Department investigated three cases of mercury poisoning associated with the use of a mercury-containing beauty cream produced in Mexico. The ongoing investigation has found this product in shops and flea markets in the United States located near the U.S.-Mexico border, and a U.S. distributor has been identified in Los Angeles. The cream, marketed as "Crema de Belleza--Manning" for skin cleansing and prevention of acne, listed "calomel" (mercurous chloride [Hg2Cl2]) as an ingredient and contained 6% to 10% mercury by weight. This report presents findings of a continuing investigation by these health departments, the Arizona Dept of Health Services (ADHS), California State Department of Health Services (CSDHS), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and CDC.

  18. School Climate and the Relationship to Student Learning of Hispanic 10th Grade Students in Arizona Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Nava Delgado

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study provided an analysis of Hispanic 10th grade student academic achievement in the areas of mathematics, reading and writing as measured by the Arizona’s Instrument to Measure Standards. The study is based on data of 163 school districts and 25,103 (95% students in the state of Arizona as published by the Arizona Department of Education.  In the study, the quantitative correlations of four independent school climate-related variables with student learning (dependent variable were analyzed.  The independent variables were the following: teachers’ years of experience, teachers’ academic preparation, Limited English Proficiency (LEP student population and economically disadvantaged student population. The study sought to inform principals and the discipline of Education Administration about the complex school climate issues that relate to student learning in Arizona high schools among the Hispanic student population.  In so doing, the study offered informed arguments regarding the complex issue of narrowing the achievement gap of Hispanic students.

  19. Topological Routing in Large-Scale Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Myrup; Knudsen, Thomas Phillip; Madsen, Ole Brun

    2004-01-01

    A new routing scheme, Topological Routing, for large-scale networks is proposed. It allows for efficient routing without large routing tables as known from traditional routing schemes. It presupposes a certain level of order in the networks, known from Structural QoS. The main issues in applying...... Topological Routing to large-scale networks are discussed. Hierarchical extensions are presented along with schemes for shortest path routing, fault handling and path restoration. Further reserach in the area is discussed and perspectives on the prerequisites for practical deployment of Topological Routing...

  20. Topological Routing in Large-Scale Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Myrup; Knudsen, Thomas Phillip; Madsen, Ole Brun

    A new routing scheme, Topological Routing, for large-scale networks is proposed. It allows for efficient routing without large routing tables as known from traditional routing schemes. It presupposes a certain level of order in the networks, known from Structural QoS. The main issues in applying...... Topological Routing to large-scale networks are discussed. Hierarchical extensions are presented along with schemes for shortest path routing, fault handling and path restoration. Further reserach in the area is discussed and perspectives on the prerequisites for practical deployment of Topological Routing...

  1. Route Optimization in Network Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Hasan Tareque

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available NEtwork MObility (NEMO controls mobility of a number of mobile nodes in a comprehensive way using one or more mobile routers. To choose a route optimization scheme, it is very important to have a quantitative comparison of the available route optimization schemes. The focus of this paper is to analyze the degree of Route Optimization (RO, deploy-ability and type of RO supported by each class in general. The comparison shows the differences among the schemes in terms of issues, such as additional header, signaling and memory requirement. We classify the schemes established on the basic method for route optimization, and equal the schemes based on protocol overhead, such as header overhead, amount of signaling, and memory requirements. Lastly the performance of the classes of different schemes has to be estimated under norms such as available bandwidth, topology of the mobile network and mobility type.

  2. Embedding Assignment Routing Constraints through Multi Dimensional Network Construction for Solving the Multi Vehicle Routing Problem with Pickup and Delivery with Time Windows

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The multi Vehicle Routing Problem with Pickup and Delivery with Time Windows is a challenging version of the Vehicle Routing Problem. In this paper, by embedding many complex assignment routing constraints through constructing a multi dimensional network, we intend to reach optimality for local clusters derived from a reasonably large set of passengers on real world transportation networks. More specifically, we introduce a multi vehicle state space time network representation in which only t...

  3. Reverse flood routing with the inverted Muskingum storage routing scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koussis, A. D.; Mazi, K.; Lykoudis, S.; Argyriou, A.

    2010-09-01

    Motivation On occasion, flood related questions are posed in the reverse from the conventional sense, e.g.: Which inflow created the flow observed at cross-section X, or the flood profile observed along reach Y? This is a signal identification type problem (hydrologic forensics). A related question concerns the operation of a reservoir, via optimal outflow control, so as to minimise downstream flood damage. Solution of the aforementioned problems requires routing of floods in the upstream direction. This is an inverse problem, and as such it is not well posed. In routing against the wave propagation, small errors in the flow measurements, or rounding errors, are amplified leading to instability, i.e., to spurious, large changes in the response (inflow hydrograph). Therefore, for the reverse solution to be stable it must be constrained by a smoothness condition; this however does not ensure its uniqueness. Storage routing models as approximate diffusion wave models By appropriate choice of their parameter values, storage routing models approximate closely diffusion-wave (DW) behaviour, if dominant flood propagation mode is that of kinematic waves (KW), which is very often true. We solve the flood signal identification problem by reversing the Muskingum routing scheme. The Muskingum routing scheme derives from a first-order accurate FD discretisation of the KW equation yet yields second-order accurate DW solutions by matching the numerical diffusion coefficient of that KW equation solution scheme to the DW equation’s hydraulic diffusion coefficient. Formulation and testing of a reverse routing scheme based on Muskingum routing Theoretical analysis of the reversed Muskingum routing scheme yields nominal grid design rules; however, we study optimal grid design mainly by numerical experimentation. First, we reverse an exact outflow hydrograph (a single-wave solution of the convection-diffusion equation), and then demonstrate the scheme’s ability to reverse

  4. Congestion control and routing over satellite networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jinhua

    ) method and then develop a novel on-demand routing system named Cross Entropy Accelerated Ant Routing System (CEAARS) for regular constellation LEO satellite networks. By implementing simulations on an Iridium-like satellite network, we compare the proposed CEAARS algorithm with the two approaches to adaptive routing protocols on the Internet: distance-vector (DV) and link-state (LS), as well as with the original Cross Entropy Ant Routing System (CEARS). DV algorithms are based on distributed Bellman Ford algorithm, and LS algorithms are implementation of Dijkstras single source shortest path. The results show that CEAARS not only remarkably improves the convergence speed of achieving optimal or suboptimal paths, but also reduces the number of overhead ants (management packets).

  5. Rotas de síntese e a homogeneidade dos precursores de mulita e cordierita Routes of synthesis and the homogeneity of mullite and cordierite precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Tavares de Lima

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Multicomponent ceramics are mainly synthesized by conventional solid-state reaction route and sol-gel routes. In the sol-gel route, colloidal or polymeric gel are envolved. In this work, some principles of the chemistry of theses routes are discused and it is ilustrated a variety of strategies for obtaining a homogeneous multicomponent precursors.

  6. Geologic Map of Wupatki National Monument and Vicinity, Coconino County, Northern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, George H.; Priest, Susan S.; Felger, Tracey J.

    2007-01-01

    Wupatki National Monument. A paved Coconino County road provides a loop from Wupatki National Monument south to Sunset Crater National Monument and back to U.S. Highway 89 about 10 mi (16 km) north of Flagstaff, Arizona. Access to Coconino National Forest is via dirt roads maintained by the National Forest Service. Several unimproved dirt roads on Babbitt Ranch lands provide limited access to remote areas north of Wupatki National Monument. Travel is mostly restricted to paved roads within Wupatki National Monument, and a dirt road that crosses the Little Colorado River provides access to the Navajo Nation area east and northeast of the Little Colorado River. The Little Colorado River crossing is not bridged and can be impassable when the river is flowing. Four-wheel-drive vehicles are recommended but not necessary for travel in remote parts of the Navajo Nation. Extra food and water are highly recommended for travel in this sandy area. Land ownership north of Wupatki National Monument forms a checkerboard pattern between private and State land. Coconino National Forest manages lands south of Wupatki National Monument and the National Park Service manages Wupatki National Monument. The Leupp and Tolani Lake Chapters of the Navajo Nation manage the area northeast and east of the Little Colorado River (see land management boundaries on map). The geologic map of Wupatki National Monument provides updated geologic framework information for this part of the Colorado Plateau. The geologic information supports Federal, State, and private land managers when conducting geologic, biologic, and hydrologic investigations and will support future and ongoing geologic and associated scientific investigations of all disciplines within the Wupatki National Monument area.

  7. Hydrogeology of McMullen Valley, west-central Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The geohydrology of McMullen Valley, west-central Arizona, was investigated using geologic, geophysical, and hydrologic data and a numerical model of the groundwater system. Interpretation of geologic and geophysical information indicates that the main structure of McMullen Valley is a syncline that has been normal faulted on the southeast side. Basin fill that accumulated in the structural depression during late Miocene to Pleistocene time is the main aquifer and is divided into upper and lower units on the basis of lithologic information. The upper unit is a thin layer of coarse-grained sediments and generally is not saturated. The lower unit is 3,000 to 4,000 ft thick, includes a fine-grained facies in the upper 1,000 ft, and is the main source of water. The fine-grained facies is found in the southwest half of the basin and is further divided into upper and lower parts. The lower part of the fine-grained facies has: a higher percentage of silt and clay than the upper part, contains evaporites, does not yield water to wells, and separates the aquifer into shallow and deep systems. A numerical model was used to analyze the groundwater system for both steady-state and transient conditions. The transient model was used to analyze system response to pumping stress. The transient system is one of storage depletion, and water level declines are controlled by pumping and specific yield distributions. Water level declines are also influenced by hydraulic properties and areal extent of the fine-grained facies. Significant water level declines may extend to aquifer boundaries in most of the basin; in one area, impermeable boundary greatly influences declines. The location of the nearby boundary was estimated through gravity data modeling. Several hydrologic components, including hydraulic properties and areal extent of the fine-grained facies , storage properties, and aquifer boundaries, need better definition in order to develop a more accurate model of the groundwater

  8. An improved global dynamic routing strategy for scale-free network with tunable clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lina; Huang, Ning; Zhang, Yue; Bai, Yannan

    2016-08-01

    An efficient routing strategy can deliver packets quickly to improve the network capacity. Node congestion and transmission path length are inevitable real-time factors for a good routing strategy. Existing dynamic global routing strategies only consider the congestion of neighbor nodes and the shortest path, which ignores other key nodes’ congestion on the path. With the development of detection methods and techniques, global traffic information is readily available and important for the routing choice. Reasonable use of this information can effectively improve the network routing. So, an improved global dynamic routing strategy is proposed, which considers the congestion of all nodes on the shortest path and incorporates the waiting time of the most congested node into the path. We investigate the effectiveness of the proposed routing for scale-free network with different clustering coefficients. The shortest path routing strategy and the traffic awareness routing strategy only considering the waiting time of neighbor node are analyzed comparatively. Simulation results show that network capacity is greatly enhanced compared with the shortest path; congestion state increase is relatively slow compared with the traffic awareness routing strategy. Clustering coefficient increase will not only reduce the network throughput, but also result in transmission average path length increase for scale-free network with tunable clustering. The proposed routing is favorable to ease network congestion and network routing strategy design.

  9. Dynamic Routing of IP Traffic Based on QOS Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kriška

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article looks into the current state of the art of dynamic routing protocols with respect to their possibilities to react to changes in the Quality of Service when selecting the best route towards a destination network. New options that could leverage information about the ever changing QoS parameters for data communication are analysed and a Cisco Performance Routing solution is described more in detail. The practical part of this work focuses on a design and implementation of a test bed that provides ascalable laboratory architecture to manipulate QoS parameters of different data communications flowing through it. The test bed is used in various use cases that were used to evaluate Cisco Performance Routing optimization capabilities in different scenarios.

  10. Efficiency of Choice Set Generation Methods for Bicycle Routes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halldórsdóttir, Katrín; Rieser-Schüssler, Nadine; W. Axhausen, Kay

    behaviour, observed choices and alternatives composing the choice set of each cyclist are necessary. However, generating the alternative choice sets can prove challenging. This paper analyses the efficiency of various choice set generation methods for bicycle routes in order to contribute to our...... understanding of choice generation for highly detailed networks. There is a substantial amount of literature that studies cyclists’ route choices. Most studies have been based on stated preference (SP) data (see, e.g., [1,2]). Although SP data have a lot of benefits there are some disadvantages, e.......g. the challenge to, without bias, predefine what cyclists consider when choosing a route. There have been few revealed preference (RP) studies reported in the literature (see, e.g., [1,2]). One disadvantage with RP data is that generating alternative routes can prove difficult. The benefit of collecting...

  11. Floods of October 1977 in southern Arizona and March 1978 in central Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Byron Neil; Eychaner, James H.

    1984-01-01

    Major floods occurred in October 1977 and March 1978 in Arizona. As much as 14 inches of rain fell during October 6-9, 1977, over the mountains of southern Arizona and northern Mexico resulting in the highest discharge since at least 1892 on the Santa Cruz River upstream from Tucson. The flood inundated areas as much as 4 miles wide, covered at least 16,000 acres of farmland, and caused $15.2 million in damage. Residential losses occurred at Nogales, Amado, Green Valley, and Sahuarita. Severe erosional damage occurred along the Santa Cruz River, Agua Fria Canyon, Potrero Creek, and many small drainages in the Sonoita Creek basin. The peak discharge in Agua Fria Canyon was the highest since before 1900. Less severe flooding occurred along the San Pedro River and the Gila River downstream from the San Pedro. Widespread rainfall of 3 to 6 inches and 9 to 14 inches in some areas in the central mountains during February 27 to March 3, 1978, caused the highest discharge since 1920 on the Salt River in Phoenix and resulted in three deaths. Flooding along the Salt and Gila Rivers and several lesser streams caused statewide damage totaling $65.9 million, of which about $37 million occurred in Maricopa County. Nine counties were declared disaster areas. During the flood of March 1978, moderate peak discharges and unusually high volumes of runoff occurred on tributaries to the Salt and Verde Rivers upstream from a system of reservoirs. Flood magnitudes were greater at the main-stem gaging stations than on the tributaries. The peak discharge into Theodore Roosevelt Lake, which was 21 percent full at the start of the flood, was about 155,000 cubic feet per second, the largest known from 1890 to 1978. The reservoirs stored large quantities of water and greatly reduced the magnitude of the flood. The peak discharge of the Salt River was 125,000 cubic feet per second below Granite Reef Dam and 122,000 cubic feet per second at Phoenix. Discharges in excess of 100,000 cubic feet per

  12. Student research in criticality safety at the University of Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetrick, D.L.

    1997-06-01

    A very brief progress report on four University of Arizona student projects is given. Improvements were made in simulations of power pulses in aqueous solutions, including the TWODANT model. TWODANT calculations were performed to investigate the effect of assembly shape on the expansion coefficient of reactivity for solutions. Preliminary calculations were made of critical heights for the Los Alamos SHEBA assembly. Calculations to support French experiments to measure temperature coefficients of dilute plutonium solutions confirmed feasibility.

  13. Arizona Education Tax Credit and Hidden Considerations of Justice

    OpenAIRE

    Michele S. Moses

    2000-01-01

    The current debate over market-based ideas for educational reform is examined, focusing specifically on the recent movement toward education tax credits. Viewing the Arizona education tax credit law as a voucher plan in sheep's clothing, I argue that the concept of justice underlying the law is a crucial issue largely missing from the school choice debate. I question the libertarian conception of justice assumed by voucher and tax credit advocates, and argue instead that a contemporary libera...

  14. Benefits Analysis of Multi-Center Dynamic Weather Routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Kapil; McNally, David; Morando, Alexander; Clymer, Alexis; Lock, Jennifer; Petersen, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic weather routes are flight plan corrections that can provide airborne flights more than user-specified minutes of flying-time savings, compared to their current flight plan. These routes are computed from the aircraft's current location to a flight plan fix downstream (within a predefined limit region), while avoiding forecasted convective weather regions. The Dynamic Weather Routes automation has been continuously running with live air traffic data for a field evaluation at the American Airlines Integrated Operations Center in Fort Worth, TX since July 31, 2012, where flights within the Fort Worth Air Route Traffic Control Center are evaluated for time savings. This paper extends the methodology to all Centers in United States and presents benefits analysis of Dynamic Weather Routes automation, if it was implemented in multiple airspace Centers individually and concurrently. The current computation of dynamic weather routes requires a limit rectangle so that a downstream capture fix can be selected, preventing very large route changes spanning several Centers. In this paper, first, a method of computing a limit polygon (as opposed to a rectangle used for Fort Worth Center) is described for each of the 20 Centers in the National Airspace System. The Future ATM Concepts Evaluation Tool, a nationwide simulation and analysis tool, is used for this purpose. After a comparison of results with the Center-based Dynamic Weather Routes automation in Fort Worth Center, results are presented for 11 Centers in the contiguous United States. These Centers are generally most impacted by convective weather. A breakdown of individual Center and airline savings is presented and the results indicate an overall average savings of about 10 minutes of flying time are obtained per flight.

  15. Abstracts for the October 2012 meeting on Volcanism in the American Southwest, Flagstaff, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2013-01-01

    Though volcanic eruptions are comparatively rare in the American Southwest, the States of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, and Utah host Holocene volcanic eruption deposits and are vulnerable to future volcanic activity. Compared with other parts of the western United States, comparatively little research has been focused on this area, and eruption probabilities are poorly constrained. Monitoring infrastructure consists of a variety of local seismic networks, and ”backbone“ geodetic networks with little integration. Emergency response planning for volcanic unrest has received little attention by either Federal or State agencies. On October 18–20, 2012, 90 people met at the U.S. Geological Survey campus in Flagstaff, Arizona, providing an opportunity for volcanologists, land managers, and emergency responders to meet, converse, and begin to plan protocols for any future activity. Geologists contributed data on recent findings of eruptive ages, eruption probabilities, and hazards extents (plume heights, ash dispersal). Geophysicists discussed evidence for magma intrusions from seismic, geodetic, and other geophysical techniques. Network operators publicized their recent work and the relevance of their equipment to volcanic regions. Land managers and emergency responders shared their experiences with emergency planning for earthquakes. The meeting was organized out of the recognition that little attention had been paid to planning for or mitigation of volcanic hazards in the American Southwest. Moreover, few geological meetings have hosted a session specifically devoted to this topic. This volume represents one official outcome of the meeting—a collection of abstracts related to talks and poster presentations shared during the first two days of the meeting. In addition, this report includes the meeting agenda as a record of the proceedings. One additional intended outcome will be greater discussion and coordination among emergency responders, geologists

  16. Professional Development Through The University of Arizona Astronomy Club

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Allison M.; Nieberding, Megan N.; Austin, Carmen; Hardegree-Ullman, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The University of Arizona Astronomy Club creates a unique environment for undergraduates to accomplish goals early in their academic career. The club provides research opportunities with advisors, graduate students, and projects organized by fellow undergraduates. Undergraduates that work side-by-side develop strong working relationships which keeps students interested in astronomy and enables them to thrive in their studies and research. Club members are encouraged to attend and present their research at professional conferences where they are exposed early to the scientific research community, learn about internship and REU opportunities, and get information about graduate programs. In addition to preparing undergraduates to thrive in their academic career, the club also offers outreach opportunities for members to actively educate the southern Arizona community. Members of the club design and create many of their outreach materials including 3D models of our local stellar neighborhood and astronomical objects. Astronomy Club has had a positive impact on its members, the Department of Astronomy, and the southern Arizona community for the past seven years. The club continues to strive to improve undergraduate retention and prepare students for their future careers.

  17. State Legislatures Debate Tuition for Illegal Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Josh

    2007-01-01

    With plans for a sweeping federal immigration bill stuck in Congress, Arizona and a growing number of states have decided to try to deal with the in-state-tuition issue themselves. This spring lawmakers in at least 22 states have already considered or are debating legislation concerning in-state tuition to illegal immigrants. In about half of…

  18. Fatigue mitigation effects of en-route napping on commercial airline pilots flying international routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Jarret Taylor

    The introduction of ultra-long range commercial aircraft and the evolution of the commercial airline industry has provided new opportunities for air carriers to fly longer range international route segments while deregulation, industry consolidation, and the constant drive to reduce costs wherever possible has pressured airline managements to seek more productivity from their pilots. At the same time, advancements in the understanding of human physiology have begun to make their way into flight and duty time regulations and airline scheduling practices. In this complex and ever changing operating environment, there remains an essential need to better understand how these developments, and other daily realities facing commercial airline pilots, are affecting their fatigue management strategies as they go about their rituals of getting to and from their homes to work and performing their flight assignments. Indeed, the need for commercial airline pilots to have access to better and more effective fatigue mitigation tools to combat fatigue and insure that they are well rested and at the top of their game when flying long-range international route segments has never been greater. This study examined to what extent the maximum fatigue states prior to napping, as self-accessed by commercial airline pilots flying international route segments, were affected by a number of other common flight assignment related factors. The study also examined to what extent the availability of scheduled en-route rest opportunities, in an onboard crew rest facility, affected the usage of en-route napping as a fatigue mitigation strategy, and to what extent the duration of such naps affected the perceived benefits of such naps as self-accessed by commercial airline pilots flying international route segments. The study utilized an online survey tool to collect data on crew position, prior flight segments flown in the same duty period, augmentation, commuting, pre-flight rest obtained in the

  19. Plasmonic Route to Reconfigurable Polarization Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, L; Tang, X M; Wang, S M; Wang, Q J; Zhu, S N

    2014-01-01

    Surface plasmon polariton (SPP) as a bounded mode on a metal/dielectric interface intrinsically has a definite transverse magnetic (TM) polarization that usually lacks further manipulations. However, the in-plane longitudinal components of SPP field can produce versatile polarization states when two orthogonal propagating SPP interfere with each other. Here, we demonstrated a plasmonic polarization router by designing appropriate nanohole arrays that can selectively scatter the interfered SPP fields to desired light beams. It is well proved that our device is able to reconfigure a certain input polarization to all kinds of states with respect to a scattered light. Accompanied with a composite phase modulation by diffractions, multiple focusing beams with different polarization states are simultaneously achieved, promising the possibility in polarization multiplexing and related signal processing. Our design offers a new route for achieving full control of the optical polarizations as well as the optical spin-...

  20. Vehicle Routing With User Generated Trajectory Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceikute, Vaida; Jensen, Christian S.

    Rapidly increasing volumes of GPS data collected from vehicles provide new and increasingly comprehensive insight into the routes that drivers prefer. While routing services generally compute shortest or fastest routes, recent studies suggest that local drivers often prefer routes that are neithe...