WorldWideScience

Sample records for arid mine-impacted catchments

  1. Identifying Catchment-Scale Predictors of Coal Mining Impacts on New Zealand Stream Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapcott, Joanne E.; Goodwin, Eric O.; Harding, Jon S.

    2016-03-01

    Coal mining activities can have severe and long-term impacts on freshwater ecosystems. At the individual stream scale, these impacts have been well studied; however, few attempts have been made to determine the predictors of mine impacts at a regional scale. We investigated whether catchment-scale measures of mining impacts could be used to predict biological responses. We collated data from multiple studies and analyzed algae, benthic invertebrate, and fish community data from 186 stream sites, including un-mined streams, and those associated with 620 mines on the West Coast of the South Island, New Zealand. Algal, invertebrate, and fish richness responded to mine impacts and were significantly higher in un-mined compared to mine-impacted streams. Changes in community composition toward more acid- and metal-tolerant species were evident for algae and invertebrates, whereas changes in fish communities were significant and driven by a loss of nonmigratory native species. Consistent catchment-scale predictors of mining activities affecting biota included the time post mining (years), mining density (the number of mines upstream per catchment area), and mining intensity (tons of coal production per catchment area). Mining was associated with a decline in stream biodiversity irrespective of catchment size, and recovery was not evident until at least 30 years after mining activities have ceased. These catchment-scale predictors can provide managers and regulators with practical metrics to focus on management and remediation decisions.

  2. Rapid Dissolution of Soluble Uranyl Phases in Arid, Mine-Impacted Catchments near Church Rock, NM

    OpenAIRE

    deLemos, Jamie L; Bostick, Benjamin C.; QUICKSALL, ANDREW N.; Landis, Joshua D.; GEORGE, CHRISTINE C.; Naomi L Slagowski; ROCK, TOMMY; Brugge, Doug; LEWIS, JOHNNYE; Durant, John L

    2008-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that runoff of uranium-bearing particles from mining waste disposal areas was a significant mechanism for redistribution of uranium in the northeastern part of the Upper Puerco River watershed (New Mexico). However, our results were not consistent with this hypothesis. Analysis of >100 sediment and suspended sediment samples collected adjacent to and downstream from uranium source areas indicated that uranium levels in the majority of the samples were not elevated abo...

  3. Rapid dissolution of soluble uranyl phases in arid, mine-impacted catchments near Church Rock, NM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deLemos, Jamie L; Bostick, Benjamin C; Quicksall, Andrew N; Landis, Joshua D; George, Christine C; Slagowski, Naomi L; Rock, Tommy; Brugge, Doug; Lewis, Johnnye; Durant, John L

    2008-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that runoff of uranium-bearing particles from mining waste disposal areas was a significant mechanism for redistribution of uranium in the northeastern part of the Upper Puerco River watershed (New Mexico). However, our results were not consistent with this hypothesis. Analysis of > 100 sediment and suspended sediment samples collected adjacent to and downstream from uranium source areas indicated that uranium levels in the majority of the samples were not elevated above background. Samples collected within 50 m of a known waste disposal site were subjected to detailed geochemical characterization. Uranium in these samples was found to be highly soluble; treatment with synthetic pore water for 24 h caused dissolution of 10--50% of total uranium in the samples. Equilibrium uranium concentrations in pore water were > 4.0 mg/L and were sustained in repeated wetting events, effectively depleting soluble uranium from the solid phase. The dissolution rate of uranium appeared to be controlled by solid-phase diffusion of uranium from within uranium-bearing mineral particles. X-ray adsorption spectroscopy indicated the presence of a soluble uranyl silicate, and possibly a uranyl phosphate. These phases were exhausted in transported sediment suggesting that uranium was readily mobilized from sediments in the Upper Puerco watershed and transported in the dissolved load. These results could have significance for uranium risk assessment as well as mining waste management and cleanup efforts.

  4. Rainfall-runoff relationship of some catchments with karstic geomorphology under arid to semi-arid conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vera, Maximo R.

    1984-02-01

    The relationship between rainfall and runoff of fourteen catchments with a total area of 5983 km 2 in the northeastern zone of Libya was reviewed in an attempt to determine the effect of karstic geomorphology on the runoff coefficient. Available data since 1965 were collated and eight wadis with at least eleven flood events were used for linear regression analysis. The selected catchments are under arid to semi-arid conditions with mean annual rainfall of 50-500 mm and with surface geology consisting mostly of marly limestone which is favourable to karstification phenomena. The ratio of runoff to rainfall is extremely variable with a range of 0.0001-0.830, and therefore it is not a reliable criterion for runoff estimation, especially with the limited data subjected to statistical analysis. The regression analysis shows correlation coefficients from 0.219 to 0.89 with no apparent effect of size of catchment area. As indicated by the coefficient of determination, 4.8-80.3% of the variation in runoff has been accounted for by the regression. The extent and degree of karstification, if properly quantified, can be a significant factor for runoff prediction, in addition to rainfall intensity and duration, antecedent soil moisture, effective catchment area and other geomorphological features.

  5. Runoff generation in a Mediterranean semi-arid landscape: Thresholds, scale, rainfall and catchment characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Fabian; Schmidt, Sebastian; Sauter, Martin; Lange, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Surface runoff acts as an integrated response of catchment characteristics and hydrological processes. In the Eastern Mediterranean region, a lack of runoff data has hindered a better understanding of runoff generation processes on the catchment scale, despite the importance of surface runoff as a water resource or flood hazard. Our main aim was to identify and explain differences in catchment runoff reactions across a variety of scales. Over a period of five years, we observed runoff in ephemeral streams of seven watersheds with sizes between 3 and 129 km2. Landuse and surface cover types (share of vegetation, bare soil and rock outcrops) were derived from aerial images by objective classification techniques. Using data from a dense rainfall network we analysed the effects of scale, catchment properties and aridity on runoff generation. Thereby we extracted rainfall and corresponding runoff events from our time-series to calculate event based rainfall characteristics and catchment runoff coefficients. Soil moisture observations provided additional information on antecedent moisture conditions, infiltration characteristics and the evolution of saturated areas. In contrast to the prevailing opinion that the proportion of Hortonian overland flow increases with aridity, we found that in our area the largest share (> 95 %) of runoff is generated by saturation excess overland flow in response to long lasting, rainfall events of high amount. This was supported by a strong correlation between event runoff and precipitation totals. Similar rainfall thresholds (50 mm) for runoff generation were observed in all investigated catchments. No scale effects on runoff coefficients were found; instead we identified up to three-fold runoff coefficients in catchments with larger extension of arid areas, higher percentage of rock outcrops and urbanization. Comparing two headwater catchments with noticeable differences in extent of olive orchards, no difference in runoff generation was

  6. Determining erosion and sedimentation chronology on semi-arid catchments using radioisotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakov, Viktor; Nichols, Mary; Nearing, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Semi-arid environment is defined by high magnitude, low frequency rainfalls that produce highly variable soil erosion rates. This study attempted to establish erosion dynamic of past 70 years on three small semi-arid catchments with history of grazing and vegetation change. Activity of Cs-137 and excess Pb-210 from 18 cores collected from sedimentation ponds were measured using gamma spectrometer. The sediment was dated using constant initial concentration (CIC) and constant rate of supply (CRS) models. These estimates were compared with direct measurement of aggradation from historic topographic surveys. Sedimentation in the ponds ranged between 3.1 and 5.4 cm/year and the long term average erosion rates on catchments varied between 0.8 and 1.4 t/ha/year. The distribution of excess Pb-210 in the cores was better described by CRS model. Estimated erosion rates were in agreement with those established by other methods for similar catchments in the region. Past variation in sedimentation rates were identified and correlated with recorded history of grazing, vegetation management, and anthropogenic disturbance. Cs-137 and Pb-210 methods are suitable for use in arid environment and can complement each other to increase reliability of sedimentation rate estimates under highly variable hydrologic regimes.

  7. Process-based modelling of a headwater catchment in semi-arid conditions: the influence of macropore flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaik, N.L.M.B.; Bronstert, A.; Jong, S.M.; Jetten, V.G.; Dam, van J.C.; Ritsema, C.J.; Schnabel, S.

    2014-01-01

    Subsurface stormflow is thought to occur mainly in humid environments with steep terrains. However, in semi-arid areas, preferential flow through macropores can also result in a significant contribution of subsurface stormflow to catchment runoff for varying catchment conditions. Most hydrological m

  8. Process-based modelling of a headwater catchment in a semi-arid area : The influence of macropore flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schaik, N. L M B; Bronstert, A.; de Jong, S. M.; Jetten, V. G.; van Dam, J. C.; Ritsema, C. J.; Schnabel, S.

    2014-01-01

    Subsurface stormflow is thought to occur mainly in humid environments with steep terrains. However, in semi-arid areas, preferential flow through macropores can also result in a significant contribution of subsurface stormflow to catchment runoff for varying catchment conditions. Most hydrological m

  9. What happens after the catchment caught the storm? Hydrological processes at the small, semi-arid Weatherley catchment, South-Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Uhlenbrook, S.; Wenninger, J.; Lorentz, S.

    2005-01-01

    International audience The knowledge of water flow pathways and residence times in a catchment are essential for predicting the hydrological response to a rain storm event. Different experimental techniques are available to study these processes, which are briefly reviewed in this paper. To illustrate this, recent findings from the Weatherley catchment a 1.5 km2 semi-arid headwater in South-Africa, are reported in this paper. Beside classical hydrometric measurements of precipitation and r...

  10. An empirical method for peak discharge prediction in ungauged arid and semi-arid region catchments based on morphological parameters and SCS curve number

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hames, A. S.

    2012-08-01

    SummaryAn empirical method that utilizes the SCS curve number and catchment characteristics has been developed to help in the prediction of peak discharge in ungauged arid and semi-arid region catchments. The morphological factors that were found to control peak discharge are catchment area and slope, and main channel length. The hydrological controls, however, are the effective rainfall that reflects the antecedent wetness condition of the catchment which was calculated from the determined catchment curve number (CN). The data incorporated in the developed method are easy to obtain from satellite images and by utilizing GIS techniques without the need for intensive field visits or relying on historical runoff records. The developed method has been calibrated and validated against 76 rainfall-runoff events from six different countries around the world and it has shown encouraging performance when compared with observed peak discharge data or the results from other models. The developed method performs very well with catchments larger than 45 km2 with coefficient of correlation of 0.92. However, for catchments with areas less than 45 km2 the obtained coefficient of correlation was 0.67. Also, the developed method performs very well with either event-based or return-period-based peak discharge prediction and it can be considered a good alternative to the rational method.

  11. Application of spatially varying storage capacity model for runoff parameterization in semi-arid catchment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-liang REN; Gui-zuo WANG; Fang LU; Tian-fang FANG

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces the method of designation of water storage capacity for each grid cell within a catchment, which considers topography, vegetation and soil synthetically. For the purpose of hydrological process simulation in semi-arid regions, a spatially varying storage capacity (VSC) model was developed based on the spatial distribution of water storage capacity and the vertical hybrid runoff mechanism. To verify the applicability of the VSC model, both the VSC model and a hybrid runoff model were used to simulate daily runoff processes in the catchment upstream of the Dianzi hydrological station from 1973 to 1979. The results showed that the annual average Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient was 0.80 for the VSC model, and only 0.67 for the hybrid runoff model. The higher annual average Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of the VSC model means that this hydrological model can better simulate daily runoff processes in semi-arid regions. Furthermore, as a distributed hydrological model, the VSC model can be applied in regional water resource management.

  12. What happens after the catchment caught the storm? Hydrological processes at the small, semi-arid Weatherley catchment, South-Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Uhlenbrook

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of water flow pathways and residence times in a catchment are essential for predicting the hydrological response to a rain storm event. Different experimental techniques are available to study these processes, which are briefly reviewed in this paper. To illustrate this, recent findings from the Weatherley catchment a 1.5 km2 semi-arid headwater in South-Africa, are reported in this paper. Beside classical hydrometric measurements of precipitation and runoff different experimental techniques were applied to explore flow paths (i.e. soil moisture and groundwater measurements, natural tracers, and 2-D electrical resistivity tomographies (ERT.

  13. Predicting forested catchment evapotranspiration and streamflow from stand sapwood area and Aridity Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Estimating the water balance of ungauged catchments has been the subject of decades of research. An extension of the fundamental problem of estimating the hydrology is then understanding how do changes in catchment attributes affect the water balance component? This is a particular issue in forest hydrology where vegetation exerts such a strong influence on evapotranspiration (ET), and consequent streamflow (Q). Given the primacy of trees in the water balance, and the potential for change to species and density through logging, fire, pests and diseases and drought, methods that directly relate ET/Q to vegetation structure, species, and stand density are very powerful. Plot studies on tree water use routinely use sapwood area (SA) to calculate transpiration and upscale to the stand/catchment scale. Recent work in south eastern Australian forests have found stand-wide SA to be linearly correlated (R2 = 0.89) with long term mean annual loss (P-Q), and hence, long term mean annual catchment streamflow. Robust relationships can be built between basal area (BA), tree density and stand SA. BA and density are common forest inventory measurements. Until now, no research has related the fundamental stand attribute of SA to streamflow. The data sets include catchments that have been thinned and with varying age classes. Thus far these analyses have been for energy limited systems in wetter forest types. SA has proven to be a more robust biometric than leaf area index which varies seasonally. That long term ET/Q is correlated with vegetation conforms to the Budyko framework. Use of a downscaled (20 m) Aridity Index (AI) has shown distinct correlations with stand SA, and therefore T. Structural patterns at a the hillslope scale not only correlate with SA and T, but also with interception (I) and forest floor evaporation (Es). These correlations between AI and I and Es have given R2 > 0.8. The result of these studies suggest an ability to estimate mean annual ET fluxes at sub

  14. Application of a hydrological model in a data-poor arid region catchment: a case study of Wadi Ham, United Arab Emirates

    OpenAIRE

    Al Mulla , Mohamed Mustafa

    2005-01-01

    Many arid region Wadi catchments are facing increasing water scarcity due to the unsustainable human practises such as the over expansion of irrigated agriculture and over exploitation of their groundwater aquifers. The “Soil and Water Assessment Tool” (SWAT) model, which is a comprehensive conceptual, semi-distributed watershed scale model, was selected after a review of the hydrological processes occurring in arid region catchments to simulate the hydrological processes of...

  15. Establishing the Ecological Status of Mining-Impacted Freshwaters from Abrud River Catchment Area Using Benthic Diatom Communities (Ros, ia MontanÄă, Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olenici, Adriana; Baciu, Calin; Momeu, Laura; Cozma, Alexandra; Brahaita, Dorian; Pop, Cristian; Lazar, Laura; Popita, Gabriela; Teodosiu, Gabriela

    2015-04-01

    Keywords: diatom communities, indicator species, mine waters, water quality, Romania. Diatoms are a very distinct group of algae, identifiable under the light microscope by their yellow - brown coloration and by the presence of a thick silica cell wall. The potential for freshwater organisms to reflect changes in environmental conditions was first noted by Kolenati (1848) and Cohn (1853), who observed that biota in polluted waters were different from those in non-polluted situations. Diatoms are widely used to monitor river pollution because they are sensitive to water chemistry, especially to ionic content, pH, dissolved organic matter and nutrients. Wide geographic distribution and well-studied ecology of most diatom species are mentioned as major advantages of using diatoms as indicator organisms. At the same time water quality has begun to deteriorate increasingly, mainly as a result of the physical, chemical and bacteriological alterations, and the aquatic ecosystems are evermore affected by various types of pollution, the anthropic one being almost always included. A good example is Abrud River and its main tributaries (Roșia Montană and surrounding areas, Romania), which has suffered along the years because of the mining waters discharge. In this context, this study presents data on benthic diatom communities from the Abrud River catchment area. Sixteen sites have been sampled seasonal and the best represented diatom genera were Navicula, Nitzschia, Cymbella, Gomphonema, Achnantes, Surirella and Fragilaria. Qualitatively, the number of diatom species exhibited significant variation among sampling sites, also suggesting seasonal dynamics. For instance, in some sampling sites, algal assemblages were absent, as diatom communities were strongly affected by acid mine waters, released from old mining works and waste rocks depots. Some dominant taxa have been observed as well, suggesting critical saprobic levels of the Abrud River and some of its tributaries. The

  16. Assessment of overland flow variation and blue water production in a farmed semi-arid water harvesting catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekki, I.; Albergel, J.; Ben Mechlia, N.; Voltz, M.

    Upgrading agriculture in semi-arid areas and ensuring its sustainability require an optimal management of rainfall partition between blue and green waters in the farmed water harvesting catchment. The main objective of this study is to analyze the influence of heterogeneous land use on the spatial and temporal variation of rainfall partitioning and blue water production within a typical farmed catchment located in north-eastern Tunisia. The catchment has an area of 2.6 km 2 and comprises at its outlet a dam, which retains the runoff water in a reservoir. Overland flow and soil water balance components were monitored during two cropping seasons (2000/2001 and 2001/2002) on a network of eleven plots of 2 m 2 each with different land use and soil characteristics. The hydrological balances of both the catchment and reservoir have been monitored since 1994. Observed data showed a very large temporal and spatial variability of overland flow within the catchment reflecting the great importance of total rainfall as well as land use. During the 2001/2002 season the results showed a large variation of the number of observed runoff events, from 27 to 39, and of the annual overland flow depths, from 8 mm (under vineyard on calcaric cambisols) up to 43 mm (under shrubs-pasture on haplic regosols), between the plots. The annual runoff amounts were moderate; they always corresponded to less than 15% of the annual rainfall amount whatever the observation scale. It was also observed that changes in land use in years with similar rainfall could lead to significant differences in blue water flow. An attempt for predicting the overland flow by the general linear regression approach showed an r2 of 31%, the predictors used are the class of soil infiltration capacity, the initial moisture saturation ratio of the soil surface layer and the total rainfall amounts. These experimental results indicate that the variation in land use in a semi-arid catchment is a main factor of variation in

  17. Rainfall estimation over the Wadi Dhuliel arid catchment, Jordan from GSMaP_MVK+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Abushandi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The GSMaP_MVK+ (Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation dataset was used to evaluate the precipitation rates over the Wadi Dhuliel arid catchment in Northeast Jordan for the period of January 2003 to March 2008. The scarcity of the ground rain gauge network alone did not adequately show the detailed structure of the rainfall distribution, independent form interpolation techniques used. This study combines GSMaP_MVK+ and ground rain gauges to produce accurate, high-resolution datasets. Three meteorological stations and six rain gauges were used to adjust and compare GSMaP_MVK+ estimates. Comparisons between GSMaP_MVK+ measurements and ground rain gauges records showed distinct regions where they correlate, as well as areas where GSMaP_MVK+ systematically over- and underestimated ground rain gauge records. A multiple linear regression (MLR model was used to derive the relationship between rainfall and GSMaP_MVK+ in conjunction with temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed. The MLR equations were defined for the three meteorological stations. The "best" fit of MLR model for each station was chosen and used to interpolate a multiscale temporal and spatial distribution. Results show that the rainfall distribution over the Wadi Dhuliel is characterized by clear west-east and north-south gradients. Estimates from the monthly MLR model were more reasonable than estimates obtained using daily data. The adjusted GSMaP_MVK+ performed well in capturing the spatial patterns of the rainfall at monthly and annual time scales while daily estimation showed some weakness in light and moderate storms.

  18. Land degradation assessment by geo-spatially modeling different soil erodibility equations in a semi-arid catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saygın, Selen Deviren; Basaran, Mustafa; Ozcan, Ali Ugur; Dolarslan, Melda; Timur, Ozgur Burhan; Yilman, F Ebru; Erpul, Gunay

    2011-09-01

    Land degradation by soil erosion is one of the most serious problems and environmental issues in many ecosystems of arid and semi-arid regions. Especially, the disturbed areas have greater soil detachability and transportability capacity. Evaluation of land degradation in terms of soil erodibility, by using geostatistical modeling, is vital to protect and reclaim susceptible areas. Soil erodibility, described as the ability of soils to resist erosion, can be measured either directly under natural or simulated rainfall conditions, or indirectly estimated by empirical regression models. This study compares three empirical equations used to determine the soil erodibility factor of revised universal soil loss equation prediction technology based on their geospatial performances in the semi-arid catchment of the Saraykoy II Irrigation Dam located in Cankiri, Turkey. A total of 311 geo-referenced soil samples were collected with irregular intervals from the top soil layer (0-10 cm). Geostatistical analysis was performed with the point values of each equation to determine its spatial pattern. Results showed that equations that used soil organic matter in combination with the soil particle size better agreed with the variations in land use and topography of the catchment than the one using only the particle size distribution. It is recommended that the equations which dynamically integrate soil intrinsic properties with land use, topography, and its influences on the local microclimates, could be successfully used to geospatially determine sites highly susceptible to water erosion, and therefore, to select the agricultural and bio-engineering control measures needed.

  19. Perched groundwater-surface interactions and their consequences in stream flow generation in a semi-arid headwater catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenat, Jerome; Bouteffeha, Maroua; Raclot, Damien; Bouhlila, Rachida

    2013-04-01

    In semi-arid headwater catchment, it is usually admitted that stream flow comes predominantly from Hortonian overland flow (infiltration excess overland flow). Consequently, subsurface flow processes, and especially perched or shallow groundwater flow, have not been studied extensively. Here we made the assumption that perched groundwater flow could play a significant role in stream flow generation in semi-arid catchment. To test this assumption, we analyzed stream flow time series of a headwater catchment in the Tunisian Cap Bon region and quantified the flow fraction coming from groundwater discharge and that from overland flow. Furthermore, the dynamics of the perched groundwater was analyzed, by focusing on the different perched groundwater-surface interaction processes : diffuse and local infiltration, diffuse exfiltration, and direct groundwater discharge to the stream channel. This work is based on the 2.6 km² Kamech catchment (Tunisia), which belongs to the long term Mediterranean hydrological observatory OMERE (Voltz and Albergel, 2002). Results show that even though Hortonian overland flow was the main hydrological process governing the stream flow generation, groundwater discharge contribution to the stream channel annually accounted for from 10% to 20 % depending on the year. Furthermore, at some periods, rising of groundwater table to the soil surface in bottom land areas provided evidences of the occurrence of saturation excess overland flow processes during some storm events. Reference Voltz , M. and Albergel , J., 2002. OMERE : Observatoire Méditerranéen de l'Environnement Rural et de l'Eau - Impact des actions anthropiques sur les transferts de masse dans les hydrosystèmes méditerranéens ruraux. Proposition d'Observatoire de Recherche en Environnement, Ministère de la Recherche.

  20. On the value of combined event runoff and tracer analysis to improve understanding of catchment functioning in a data-scarce semi-arid area

    OpenAIRE

    M. Hrachowitz; Bohte, R.; Mul, M.L.; Bogaard, T.A.; Savenije, H. H. G.; S. Uhlenbrook

    2011-01-01

    Hydrological processes in small catchments are not quite understood yet, which is true in particular for catchments in data scarce, semi-arid regions. This is in contrast with the need for a better understanding of water fluxes and the interactions between surface- and groundwater in order to facilitate sustainable water resources management in such environments, where both floods and droughts can result in severe crop loss. In this study, event runoff coefficient analysis and limited tracer ...

  1. Soil carbon storage in a small arid catchment in the Negev desert (Israel)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Ulrike; Kuhn, Nikolaus

    2010-05-01

    The mineral soil represents a major pool in the global carbon cycle. The behavior of mineral soil as a carbon reservoir in global climate and environmental issues is far from fully understood and causes a serious lack of comparable data on mineral soil organic carbon (SOC) at regional scale. To improve our understanding of soil carbon sequestration, it is necessary to acquire regional estimates of soil carbon pools in different ecosystem types. So far, little attention has been given to Dryland ecosystems, but they are often considered as highly sensitive to environmental change, with large and rapid responses to even smallest changes of climate conditions. Due to this fact, Drylands, as an ecosystem with extensive surface area across the globe (6.15 billion ha), have been suggested as a potential component for major carbon storage. A priori reasoning suggests that regional spatial patterns of SOC density (kg/m²) in Drylands are mostly affected by vegetation, soil texture, landscape position, soil truncation, wind erosion/deposition and the effect of water supply. Particularly unassigned is the interaction between soil volume, geomorphic processes and SOC density on regional scale. This study aims to enhance our understanding of regional spatial variability in dependence on soil volume, topography and surface parameters in areas susceptible to environmental change. Soil samples were taken in small transects at different representative slope positions across a range of elevations, soil texture, vegetation types, and terrain positions in a small catchment (600 ha) in the Negev desert. Topographic variables were extracted from a high resolution (0.5m) digital elevation model. Subsequently, we estimated the soil volume by excavating the entire soil at the representative sampling position. The volume was then estimated by laser scanning before and after soil excavation. SOC concentration of the soil samples was determined by CHN-analyser. For each sample, carbon

  2. Observed variability of drought and aridity and its impact on the hydrological regime in the Barlad catchment (Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcan, Mihaela; Cheval, Sorin; Chendes, Viorel

    2015-04-01

    The drought is a complex phenomenon with slow manifestation which engages, depending on its duration and intensity, a number of different components of the climatic, hydrologic, pedologic systems. This paper investigates the relationships between drought and aridity on one hand and hydrological regime, on the other hand, in Bârlad river basin, in the eastern part of Romania. Recent studies have revealed that both meteorological and hydrological drought events have a significant frequency and magnitude in the area, so that an important impact on the hydrological regime is likely to occur. For the next decades, climate change scenarios estimate increasing temperatures and relatively low decreasing of precipitation. Therefore, eventual changes in the aridity characteristics can be expected, and they might have a considerable impact on the water supply or agriculture in the Bârlad catchment. The analysis covers the period 1961-2013 and it is based on monthly data from meteorological and hydrological stations. Seasonal indices were calculated for characterising the drought (SPI, SFI, PDSI, PHDI) and aridity (UNEP, de Martonne, Pinna), while their temporal variability was further investigated in relations with specific hydrological parameters (monthly discharge time series). The spatial distribution of the selected indices was analysed in the same context using co-variables integrated in a GIS framework. The results show that the hydrological drought is influenced and determined mostly by the meteorological drought. The highest variability between the aridity indices has been identified for the summer season, where the time lag between the hydrological response to the meteorological impulse is up to 2 months. The work has been financed by the research project Changes in climate extremes and associated impact in hydrological events in Romania (CLIMHYDEX), Cod PN II-ID-2011-2-0073, sponsored by the National Authority for Scientific Research.

  3. Runoff controlling factors in various sized catchments in a semi-arid Mediterranean environment in Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, A.M.W. de

    2001-01-01

    Understanding land degradation in a semi-arid Mediterranean environment is very difficult because of the contributing factors: precipitation, infiltration vegetation cover and discontinuity of flow and the temporal and spatial levels of resolution at which these factors are acting. Therefore it is s

  4. Steam flow generation in semi-arid, forested and seasonally snow-covered catchments, Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F.; Bales, R. C.; Conklin, M. H.; Kostrzewski, J. M.

    2005-12-01

    Stream flow generation is poorly understood for semi-arid, forested and seasonally snow-covered catchments in southwest US. Here we report on initial results of a pioneer study on source waters and flowpaths using isotopic and geochemical tracers in two streams originated from Redondo Peak in Valles Caldera, New Mexico. The Valles Caldera is the latest collapse feature in the volcanic field and hosts high-temperature hydrothermal systems with several geothermal springs. It is currently covered by ponderosa pine in lower elevations and mixed conifer in higher elevations. Samples were collected from snow, hillslope groundwater, and stream water at Redondo Creek and La Jara Creek from December 2004 to July 2005. Using diagnostic tools of mixing models and end-member mixing analysis, it is suggested that stream water quantity and quality at Redondo Creek were primarily controlled by mixing of two end-members: hillslope subsurface water and geothermal springs. Hillslope subsurface water was sourced from snowmelt and then gradually released to stream flow through spring and summer. Infiltration-excess overland flow of snowmelt did not appear to occur. Contribution of hillslope subsurface water to stream flow was 90% on average from December 2004 to July 2005 and its percentage gradually increased from spring to summer with increase in discharge. Contribution of geothermal springs decreased on percentage over season with a peak (20%) in late march and lowest but relatively constant value (5%) through June and July. Stream flow generation at La Jara Creek was relatively simple, all from hillslope subsurface water. This information may improve our understanding of changes of hydrological and biogeochemical cycles in response to climate warming in these and similar catchments in southwest US.

  5. Implications of deep drainage through saline clay for groundwater recharge and sustainable cropping in a semi-arid catchment, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Timms

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The magnitude and timing of deep drainage and salt leaching through clay soils is a critical issue for dryland agriculture in semi-arid regions (<500 mm yr−1 rainfall, potential evapotranspiration >2000 mm yr−1 such as parts of Australia's Murray-Darling Basin (MDB. In this rare study, hydrogeological measurements and estimations of the historic water balance of crops grown on overlying Grey Vertosols were combined to estimate the contribution of deep drainage below crop roots to recharge and salinization of shallow groundwater. Soil sampling at two sites on the alluvial flood plain of the Lower Namoi catchment revealed significant peaks in chloride concentrations at 0.8–1.2 m depth under perennial vegetation and at 2.0–2.5 m depth under continuous cropping indicating deep drainage and salt leaching since conversion to cropping. Total salt loads of 91–229 t ha−1 NaCl equivalent were measured for perennial vegetation and cropping, with salinity to ≥ 10 m depth that was not detected by shallow soil surveys. Groundwater salinity varied spatially from 910 to 2430 mS m−1 at 21 to 37 m depth (N = 5, whereas deeper groundwater was less saline (290 mS m−1 with use restricted to livestock and rural domestic supplies in this area. The Agricultural Production Systems Simulator (APSIM software package predicted deep drainage of 3.3–9.5 mm yr−1 (0.7–2.1% rainfall based on site records of grain yields, rainfall, salt leaching and soil properties. Predicted deep drainage was highly episodic, dependent on rainfall and antecedent soil water content, and over a 39 yr period was restricted mainly to the record wet winter of 1998. During the study period, groundwater levels were unresponsive to major rainfall events (70 and 190 mm total, and most piezometers at about 18 m depth remained dry. In this area, at this time, recharge appears to be negligible due to low

  6. Implications of deep drainage through saline clay for groundwater recharge and sustainable cropping in a semi-arid catchment, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Timms

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The magnitude and timing of deep drainage and salt leaching through clay soils is a critical issue for dryland agriculture in semi-arid regions (<500 mm yr−1 rainfall, such as parts of Australia's Murray-Darling Basin (MDB. In this unique study, hydrogeological measurements and estimations of the historic water balance of crops grown on overlying Grey Vertosols were combined to estimate the contribution of deep drainage below crop roots to recharge and salinization of shallow groundwater. Soil sampling at two sites on the alluvial flood plain of the Lower Namoi catchment revealed significant peaks in chloride concentrations at 0.8–1.2 m depth under perennial vegetation and at 2.0–2.5 m depth under continuous cropping indicating deep drainage and salt leaching since conversion to cropping. Total salt loads of 91–229 t ha−1 NaCl equivalent were measured for perennial vegetation and cropping, with salinity to ≥10 m depth that is not detected by shallow soil surveys. Groundwater salinity varied spatially from 910 to 2430 mS m−1 at 21 to 37 m depth (N = 5, whereas deeper groundwater was less saline (290 mS m−1 with use restricted to livestock and rural domestic supplies in this area. The Agricultural Production Systems Simulator (APSIM software package predicted deep drainage of 3.3–9.5 mm yr−1 (0.7–2.1% rainfall based on site records of grain yields, rainfall, salt leaching and soil properties. Predicted deep drainage was highly episodic, dependent on rainfall and antecedent, and over a 39 yr period was restricted mainly to the record wet winter of 1998. During the study period, groundwater levels were unresponsive to major rainfall events (70 and 190 mm total, and most piezometers at about 18 m depth remained dry. In this area, at this time, recharge negligible due to low rainfall and large potential evapotranspiration, transient hydrological conditionsafter changes

  7. Assessment of vulnerability in karst aquifers using a quantitative integrated numerical model: catchment characterization and high resolution monitoring - Application to semi-arid regions- Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doummar, Joanna; Aoun, Michel; Andari, Fouad

    2016-04-01

    Karst aquifers are highly heterogeneous and characterized by a duality of recharge (concentrated; fast versus diffuse; slow) and a duality of flow which directly influences groundwater flow and spring responses. Given this heterogeneity in flow and infiltration, karst aquifers do not always obey standard hydraulic laws. Therefore the assessment of their vulnerability reveals to be challenging. Studies have shown that vulnerability of aquifers is highly governed by recharge to groundwater. On the other hand specific parameters appear to play a major role in the spatial and temporal distribution of infiltration on a karst system, thus greatly influencing the discharge rates observed at a karst spring, and consequently the vulnerability of a spring. This heterogeneity can only be depicted using an integrated numerical model to quantify recharge spatially and assess the spatial and temporal vulnerability of a catchment for contamination. In the framework of a three-year PEER NSF/USAID funded project, the vulnerability of a karst catchment in Lebanon is assessed quantitatively using a numerical approach. The aim of the project is also to refine actual evapotranspiration rates and spatial recharge distribution in a semi arid environment. For this purpose, a monitoring network was installed since July 2014 on two different pilot karst catchment (drained by Qachqouch Spring and Assal Spring) to collect high resolution data to be used in an integrated catchment numerical model with MIKE SHE, DHI including climate, unsaturated zone, and saturated zone. Catchment characterization essential for the model included geological mapping and karst features (e.g., dolines) survey as they contribute to fast flow. Tracer experiments were performed under different flow conditions (snow melt and low flow) to delineate the catchment area, reveal groundwater velocities and response to snowmelt events. An assessment of spring response after precipitation events allowed the estimation of the

  8. Arid land irrigation in the United States Pacific Northwest for 2001 summarized for NHDPlus v2 catchments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent the area of arid land irrigation in the Pacific Northwest region of the United...

  9. Afforestation using micro-catchment water harvesting system with microphytic crust treatment on semi-arid Loess Plateau: A preliminary result

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao-hui; WANG Ke-qin; WANG Bin-rui; YU Chun-tang

    2005-01-01

    Water harvesting is one of main measures to solve water shortage resulting from less precipitation and erratically seasonal distribution in arid and semi-arid areas. Different types of anti-infiltration treatments including mechanical and chemical to micro-catchment and their runoff efficiencies had been reported. This paper, through 5 years experiment from 1992 to 1996, is aimed at studying the impacts of microcatchment water-harvesting system (MCWHS) with microphytic crust treatment on afforestation on semi-arid Loess Plateau. The results showed that after 3 years of crust inoculation, crust had covered majority of MCWHS and the function of water harvesting had also been demonstrated partially, there were significant difference in soil moisture of shallow soil layer in three typical spring stages between crust cover and control treatments (0.05 level), and about 0.9%-6.04% increase of monthly mean soil moisture within 1m soil layer in spring of late 3 years. The impact of severe spring drought can be alleviated effectively. In the meanwhile, as crust developed on the treated surface, there are significant differences (0.05 level) for tree height (H), diameter at breast height (DBH) and diameter at ground level (DGL) at the end of the study period (1996) with the increases by 22.38%, 17.34%, and 20.49% respectively compared with the control treatment. Microphytic crust, as one of biological infiltration-proof materials, may become the optimized option for revegetation in Chinese Great West Development Strategy due to its self-propagation, non-pollution to water qualities, long use duration and relatively cost effective. Further work should be focused on the selection of endemic crust species and their batch-culture in arid environment.

  10. Groundwater–surface water interactions, vegetation dependencies and implications for water resources management in the semi-arid Hailiutu River catchment, China – a synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhou

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, large-scale land use changes took place in the Hailiutu River catchment, a semi-arid area in northwest China. These changes had significant impacts on the water resources in the area. Insights into groundwater and surface water interactions and vegetation-water dependencies help to understand these impacts and formulate sustainable water resources management policies. In this study, groundwater and surface water interactions were identified using the baseflow index at the catchment scale, and hydraulic and water temperature methods as well as event hydrograph separation techniques at the sub-catchment scale. The results show that almost 90% of the river discharge consists of groundwater. Vegetation dependencies on groundwater were analysed from the relationship between the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI and groundwater depth at the catchment scale and along an ecohydrogeological cross-section, and by measuring the sap flow of different plants, soil water contents and groundwater levels at different research sites. The results show that all vegetation types, i.e. trees (willow (Salix matsudana and poplar (Populus simonii, bushes (salix – Salix psammophila, and agricultural crops (maize – Zea mays, depend largely on groundwater as the source for transpiration. The comparative analysis indicates that maize crops use the largest amount of water, followed by poplar trees, salix bushes, and willow trees. For sustainable water use with the objective of satisfying the water demand for socio-economical development and to prevent desertification and ecological impacts on streams, more water-use-efficient crops such as sorghum, barley or millet should be promoted to reduce the consumptive water use. Willow trees should be used as wind-breaks in croplands and along roads, and drought-resistant and less water-use intensive plants (for instance native bushes should be used to vegetate sand dunes.

  11. Modelling runoff and erosion for a semi-arid catchment using a multi-scale approach based on hydrological connectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lesschen, J.P.; Schoorl, J.M.; Cammeraat, L.H.

    2009-01-01

    Runoff and erosion processes are often non-linear and scale dependent, which complicate runoff and erosion modelling at the catchment scale. One of the reasons for scale dependency is the influence of sinks, i.e. areas of infiltration and sedimentation, which lower hydrological connectivity and decr

  12. The effect of spatial soil variation on the hydrology of a semi-arid Rocky Mountains catchment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diek, S.; Temme, A.J.A.M.; Teuling, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Soil properties can exhibit strong spatial variability, even at the small catchment scale. However, the hydrological implications of actual variability remain widely unknown since the required data are not easily collected. This is especially true for observations of covariation between local soil p

  13. Reliability of lumped hydrological modeling in a semi-arid mountainous catchment facing water-use changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hublart, Paul; Ruelland, Denis; García de Cortázar-Atauri, Inaki; Gascoin, Simon; Lhermitte, Stef; Ibacache, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    This paper explores the reliability of a hydrological modeling framework in a mesoscale (1515 km2) catchment of the dry Andes (30° S) where irrigation water use and snow sublimation represent a significant part of the annual water balance. To this end, a 20-year simulation period encompassing a wide range of climate and water-use conditions was selected to evaluate three types of integrated models referred to as A, B and C. These models share the same runoff generation and routing module but differ in their approach to snowmelt modeling and irrigation water use. Model A relies on a simple degree-day approach to estimate snowmelt rates and assumes that irrigation impacts can be neglected at the catchment scale. Model B ignores irrigation impacts just as Model A but uses an enhanced degree-day approach to account for the effects of net radiation and sublimation on melt rates. Model C relies on the same snowmelt routine as Model B but incorporates irrigation impacts on natural streamflow using a conceptual irrigation module. Overall, the reliability of probabilistic streamflow predictions was greatly improved with Model C, resulting in narrow uncertainty bands and reduced structural errors, notably during dry years. This model-based analysis also stressed the importance of considering sublimation in empirical snowmelt models used in the subtropics, and provided evidence that water abstractions from the unregulated river are impacting on the hydrological response of the system. This work also highlighted areas requiring additional research, including the need for a better conceptualization of runoff generation processes in the dry Andes.

  14. Determining the ecological water allocation in a hyper-arid catchment with increasing competition for water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Hongbo; Zhang, Pei; Xu, Hailiang; Zhang, Guangpeng

    2016-10-01

    Meeting ecological water requirement adequately plays a significant role in guaranteeing the stability of river basin ecosystems in arid lands. The amounts of water leaked through the riverbed and drawn by ecological brakes in Tarim River were ascertained. Based on data related to soil, hydrology, and vegetation of the river basin, the aims of this paper are to 1) analyse the variation in the size of soil particles and in hydraulic conductivity of four sections of the river; 2) calculate the amount of water that leaked from the riverbed and the percentage of ecological water requirement that can be guaranteed at different frequencies of water inflow; and 3) recommend - using a combination of particle size analysis, Darcy's Law, and GIS - the amount of water to be drawn from ecological brakes along both banks of the river for meeting ecological water requirement adequately. The results showed that 1) the size of soil particles in the riverbed ranged from 1.6 μm to 98.9 μm; 2) hydraulic conductivity followed the normal distribution from year to year but varied in spatial terms, that is across different section of the river; 3) riverbed leakage varied with water frequencies, being 11.36 × 108 m3, 10.62 × 108 m3, 9.84 × 108 m3, 9.32 × 108 m3, and 8.87 × 108 m3 at the frequencies of 10%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 90%, respectively; 4) the distance over which the leakage contributed to meeting ecological water requirement in the south bank was greater than or equal to the distance in the north bank; and 5) water drawn from ecological brakes on the north bank exceeded that drawn from the brakes on the south bank by 10.89 × 108 m3-11.28 × 108 m3. Ecological water requirement of the desert riparian vegetation was met mainly from riverbed leakage in the south and by drawing from ecological brakes in the north. The present research not only offers a scientific method that could be used for developing suitable schemes for meeting ecological water requirement but also

  15. Comparison of meteorological forcing (WFDEI, AGRI4CAST) to in-situ observations in a semi arid catchment. The case of Merguellil in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Page, Michel; Gosset, Cindy; Oueslati, Ines; Calvez, Roger; Zribi, Mehrez; Lilli Chabaane, Zohra

    2015-04-01

    Meteorological forcing is essential to hydrological and hydro-geological modeling. In the case of the semi-arid catchment of Merguellil in Tunisia, long term time series are only available in the plain for a SYNOP station. Other meteorological stations have been installed since 2010. Therefore, this study aims at qualifying the reliability of the meteorological forcing necessary for an integrated model conception. We compare the meteorological data from 7 stations (sources: WMO and our own station), inside and around the Merguellil catchment, with daily gridded data at 25*25 km from AGRI4CAST and 50*50km from WFDEI. AGRI4CAST (Biaveti et al, 2008) is an interpolated dataset based on actual weather stations produced by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) for the Monitoring Agricultural Resources Unit (MARS). The WFDEI second version dataset (Weedon et al, 2014) has been generated using the same methodology as the widely used WATCH Forcing Data (WFD) by making use of the ERA-Interim reanalysis data. The studied meteorological variables are Rs, Tmoy, U2, P, RH and ET0, with the scores RMSE, bias and R pearson. Regarding the AGRI4CAST dataset, the scores are established over different periods according to variables based on stepping between the observed and interpolated data. The scores show good correlations between the observed temperatures, but with a spatial variability bound to the stations elevations. The moderate and interpolated radiations also show a good concordance indicating a good reliability. The R pearson score obtained for the values of relative humidity show a good correlation between the observations and the interpolations, however, the short periods of comparisons do not allow obtaining significant information and the RMSE and bias are important. Wind speed has an important negative bias for a majority of stations (positively for only one). Only one station shows concordances between the data. The study of the data indicates that we shall have to adjust

  16. Interannual variability of a precipitation gradient along the semi-arid catchment areas for the metropolitan region of Lima- Peru in relation to atmospheric circulation at the mesoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Marco; Seidel, Jochen; Trachte, Katja

    2013-04-01

    The main moisture source for precipitation on the western slopes of the Central Andes is located east of the mountain range known as the Amazon basin. However, the Andean mountains, which reach up to 6000 m a.s.l., strongly influence climatic conditions along the Pacific coastline of South America as a climatic barrier for the low-level tropospheric flow and associated moisture transport from the Amazon basin. Additional, large scale subsidence caused by the South Pacific High inhabits convective rainfall at the Pacific coast where large metropolitan areas such as the Peruvian capital Lima are located. Two contrasts in precipitation can be found while crossing the Andean mountains from West to East. On the Pacific coast, at the location of the metropolitan area of Lima, no more than 10 mm mean annual rainfall occurs. In contrast, up to 1000 mm mean annual rainfall occur only 100 km east of Lima within the upper region (4000 m .a.s.l.) of the Western Cordillera. The transition takes place along the western slopes of the Western Cordillera and is characterised by a strong precipitation gradient. Here, catchment areas are located that provide most of the water resources needed to sustain an urban area of approximately 10 million people. This study investigates the interannual variability of the precipitation gradient between 1998 and 2012. The analysis is based on daily precipitation data of 22 rain gauge station, daily rainfall data of the Tropical Rainfall Mission (TRMM 3B42) at 0.25 degrees and reanalysis data at 36 km spatial resolution at the mesoscale. The reanalysis data was produced using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model. Station data was provided by the Peruvian weather service during the project "Sustainable Water and Wastewater Management in Urban Growth Centres Coping with Climate Change - Concepts for Lima Metropolitana (Peru) (LiWa)", which is financed by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). We are interested in the

  17. Impact and sustainability of low-head drip irrigation kits, in the semi-arid Gwanda and Beitbridge Districts, Mzingwane Catchment, Limpopo Basin, Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, Richard; Love, David; Mul, Marloes; Mupangwa, Walter; Twomlow, Steve

    Resource-poor smallholder farmers in the semi-arid Gwanda and Beitbridge districts face food insecurity on an annual basis due to a combination of poor and erratic rainfall (average 500 mm/a and 345 mm/a, respectively, for the period 1970-2003) and technologies inappropriate to their resource status. This impacts on both household livelihoods and food security. In an attempt to improve food security in the catchment a number of drip kit distribution programmes have been initiated since 2003 as part of an on-going global initiative aimed at 2 million poor households per year. A number of recent studies have assessed the technical performance of the drip kits in-lab and in-field. In early 2005 a study was undertaken to assess the impacts and sustainability of the drip kit programme. Representatives of the NGOs, local government, traditional leadership and agricultural extension officers were interviewed. Focus group discussions with beneficiaries and other villagers were held at village level. A survey of 114 households was then conducted in two districts, using a questionnaire developed from the output of the interviews and focus group discussions. The results from the study showed that the NGOs did not specifically target the distribution of the drip kits to poor members of the community (defined for the purpose of the study as those not owning cattle). Poor households made up 54% of the beneficiaries. This poor targeting of vulnerable households could have been a result of conditions set by some implementing NGOs that beneficiaries must have an assured water source. On the other hand, only 2% of the beneficiaries had used the kit to produce the expected 5 harvests over the 2 years, owing to problems related to water shortage, access to water and also pests and diseases. About 51% of the respondents had produced at least 3 harvests and 86% produced at least 2 harvests. Due to water shortages during the dry season 61% of production with the drip kit occurred during

  18. Effectiveness of Conservation Measures in Reducing Runoff and Soil Loss Under Different Magnitude-Frequency Storms at Plot and Catchment Scales in the Semi-arid Agricultural Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, T. X.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, multi-year stormflow data collected at both catchment and plot scales on an event basis were used to evaluate the efficiency of conservation. At the catchment scale, soil loss from YDG, an agricultural catchment with no conservation measures, was compared with that from CZG, an agricultural catchment with an implementation of a range of conservation measures. With an increase of storm recurrence intervals in the order of 20 years, the mean event sediment yield was 639, 1721, 5779, 15191, 19627, and 47924 t/km2 in YDG, and was 244, 767, 3077, 4679, 8388, and 15868 t/km2 in CZG, which represented a reduction effectiveness of 61.8, 55.4, 46.7, 69.2, 57.2, and 66.8 %, respectively. Storm events with recurrence intervals greater than 2 years contributed about two-thirds of the total runoff and sediment in both YDG and CZG catchments. At the plot scale, soil loss from one cultivated slopeland was compared with that from five conservation plots. The mean event soil loss was 1622 t/km2 on the cultivated slopeland, in comparison to 27.7 t/km2 on the woodland plot, 213 t/km2 on the grassland plot, 467 t/km2 on the alfalfa plot, 236 t/km2 on the terraceland plot, and 642 t/km2 on the earthbank plot. Soil loss per unit area from all the plots was significantly less than that from the catchments for storms of all categories of recurrence intervals.

  19. Effectiveness of Conservation Measures in Reducing Runoff and Soil Loss Under Different Magnitude-Frequency Storms at Plot and Catchment Scales in the Semi-arid Agricultural Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, T X

    2016-03-01

    In this study, multi-year stormflow data collected at both catchment and plot scales on an event basis were used to evaluate the efficiency of conservation. At the catchment scale, soil loss from YDG, an agricultural catchment with no conservation measures, was compared with that from CZG, an agricultural catchment with an implementation of a range of conservation measures. With an increase of storm recurrence intervals in the order of 20 years, the mean event sediment yield was 639, 1721, 5779, 15191, 19627, and 47924 t/km(2) in YDG, and was 244, 767, 3077, 4679, 8388, and 15868 t/km(2) in CZG, which represented a reduction effectiveness of 61.8, 55.4, 46.7, 69.2, 57.2, and 66.8 %, respectively. Storm events with recurrence intervals greater than 2 years contributed about two-thirds of the total runoff and sediment in both YDG and CZG catchments. At the plot scale, soil loss from one cultivated slopeland was compared with that from five conservation plots. The mean event soil loss was 1622 t/km(2) on the cultivated slopeland, in comparison to 27.7 t/km(2) on the woodland plot, 213 t/km(2) on the grassland plot, 467 t/km(2) on the alfalfa plot, 236 t/km(2) on the terraceland plot, and 642 t/km(2) on the earthbank plot. Soil loss per unit area from all the plots was significantly less than that from the catchments for storms of all categories of recurrence intervals.

  20. Imaging of hill-slope soil moisture wetting patterns in a semi-arid oak savanna catchment using time-lapse electromagnetic induction

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, David A.; Abdu, Hiruy; Lebron, Inma; Jones, Scott B.

    2012-01-01

    Soil moisture (θ) is a fundamental hydrological state variable and its spatial pattern is important for understanding hydrological processes. Determination of small catchment-scale soil moisture status and distribution at intermediate scales (0.01–1 km2) is challenging. Primarily because multi-point measurements using sensors are often impractical, while remote sensing resolution is often too coarse. Geophysical methods, e.g. electromagnetic induction (EMI), offer potential for bridging this ...

  1. Spatial rainfall variability and runoff response during an extreme event in a semi-arid catchment in the South Pare Mountains, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Mul

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an extreme flood event that occurred in the South Pare Mountains in northern Tanzania. A high spatial and temporal resolution data set was gathered in a previously ungauged catchment. This data was analysed using a multi-method approach, to gather information about the processes that resulted in the flood event. On 1 March 2006, extreme rainfall occurred in the Makanya catchment, (300 km2, where up to 100 mm were recorded in Bangalala village in only 3 h. Runoff was devastating, inundating large parts of the flood plain. The spatial variability of the rainfall during the event was very large, even in areas with the same altitude. The Vudee sub-catchment (25.8 km2 was in the centre of the rainfall event, receiving about 75 mm in 3 h divided over the two upstream tributaries: the Upper-Vudee and Ndolwa. The peak flow at the weir site has been determined using the slope-area method and gradually varied flow calculations, indicating a peak discharge of 32 m3 s−1. Rise and fall of the flood was very sharp, with the peak flow occurring just one hour after the peak of the rainfall. The flow receded to 1% of the maximum flow within 24 h. Hydrograph separation using hydrochemical parameters indicates that at the peak of the flow 50% was generated by direct surface runoff (also indicated by the large amount of sediments in the samples, whereas the recession originated from displaced groundwater (>90 %. The subsequent base flow in the river remained at 75 l s−1 for the rest of the season, which is substantially higher than the normal base flow observed during the previous rainy seasons (15 l s−1 indicating significant groundwater recharge during this extreme event.

  2. Accumulation of arsenic, lead, copper, and zinc, and synthesis of phytochelatins by indigenous plants of a mining impacted area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Estrada, Blenda; Calderón, Jaqueline; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Rodríguez-Zavala, José S

    2013-06-01

    Several native plants, able to grow in an unconfined mining impacted area that is now in close vicinity with urban areas, were evaluated for their ability to accumulate heavy metals. The main soil contaminants were As, Pb, Cu, and Zn. Sampling of the rhizospheric metal polluted soil showed that Euphorbia prostrata Aiton, Parthenium incanum Kunth, and Zinnia acerosa (DC.) A. Gray were able to grow in the presence of high amounts of mixtures of these elements. The plants accumulated the metals in the above ground parts and increased the synthesis of thiol molecules. E. prostrata showed the highest capacity for accumulation of the mixture of elements (588 μg g DW(-1)). Analysis of the thiol-molecules profile showed that these plants synthesized high amounts of long-chain phytochelatins, accompanied by low amounts of monothiol molecules, which may be related to their higher resistance to As and heavy metals. The three plants showed translocation factors from roots to leaves >1 for As, Pb, Cu, and Zn. Thus, by periodically removing aerial parts, these plants could be useful for the phytoremediation of semi-arid and arid mining impacted areas, in which metal hyper-accumulator plants are not able to grow.

  3. 77 FR 31353 - An Assessment of Potential Mining Impacts on Salmon Ecosystems of Bristol Bay, AK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... AGENCY An Assessment of Potential Mining Impacts on Salmon Ecosystems of Bristol Bay, AK AGENCY... of Potential Mining Impacts on Salmon Ecosystems of Bristol Bay, Alaska'' (EPA-910-R-12-004a-d). The... draft ``An Assessment of Potential Mining Impacts on Salmon Ecosystems of Bristol Bay, Alaska''...

  4. Evaluation of the SAFRAN-ISBA-RAPID hydrometeorological chain on a mountainous catchment in a semi-arid region. Case of the Rheraya (Marrakech, Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczypta, Camille; Gascoin, Simon; Habets, Florence; Saaidi, Amina; Berjamy, Brahim; Marchane, Ahmed; Boulet, Gilles; Hanich, Lahoucine; Jarlan, Lionel

    2015-04-01

    The water content of snow pack is an important resource for many watershed in semi-arid areas where downstream plains are dominated by irrigated agriculture. As part of the ANR Amethyst, this work is to develop, adapt and evaluate a hydro-meteorological forecasting chain for quantifying streamflows at the outlet of a mountainous watershed (Rheraya wadi, Marrakech region, Morocco), a pilot basin instrumented since 2003 as part of SudMed project. Two sets of atmospheric forcing were used: (1) The first was generated by spatializing meteorological data observed on 6 stations (Asni, Aremdt, Tachedert, Oukaimeden, Imskerbour and Neltner) using the semi-physical module Micromet (Liston and Elder, 2006) on the hydrological period September 2003 - August 2012; (2) the second is provided by the SAFRAN re-analysis, implemented by the Metoffice of Morocco (Casablanca, Morocco), during the period August 2004 - July 2008. These two sets were then used as inputs for the ISBA surface model, within the modeling platform SURFEX. Finally, runoff and drainage simulations derived from ISBA were forced into the hydrological model RAPID to predict streamflows. The flows predictions and the snow covered area (SCA) were compared respectively to the observations available for the 2003-2009 period and to the daily MODIS products of SCA. Despite time unsystematic lags and low biases on flow values, the initial results are encouraging due to topographical and hydro-complexity of the studied area. Despite a slight tendency to underestimate the SCA for the "Micromet" run and to over-estimate for the "Safran" run, SCA is well reproduced with a determination coefficient of r²=0.76 and r²=0.79, respectively. Given the complex topography of the basin, a sensitivity analysis to the size of the grid point (from 8 km to 250 m) was conducted. If the different simulated series of SCA are close from a resolution to another, streamflows simulations are, by contrast, highly sensitive to the resolution

  5. Coevolution of volcanic catchments in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takeo; Troch, Peter A.

    2016-03-01

    Present-day landscapes have evolved over time through interactions between the prevailing climates and geological settings. Understanding the linkage between spatial patterns of landforms, soils, and vegetation in landscapes and their hydrological response is critical to make quantitative predictions in ungaged basins. Catchment coevolution is a theoretical framework that seeks to formulate hypotheses about the mechanisms and conditions that determine the historical development of catchments and how such evolution affects their hydrological response. In this study, we selected 14 volcanic catchments of different ages (from 0.225 to 82.2 Ma) in Japan. We derived indices of landscape properties (drainage density and slope-area relationship) as well as hydrological response (annual water balance, baseflow index, and flow-duration curves) and examined their relation with catchment age and climate (through the aridity index). We found a significant correlation between drainage density and baseflow index with age, but not with climate. The intra-annual flow variability was also significantly related to catchments age. Younger catchments tended to have lower peak flows and higher low flows, while older catchments exhibited more flashy runoff. The decrease in baseflow with catchment age is consistent with the existing hypothesis that in volcanic landscapes the major flow pathways change over time from deep groundwater flow to shallow subsurface flow. The drainage density of our catchments decreased with age, contrary to previous findings in a set of similar, but younger volcanic catchments in the Oregon Cascades, in which drainage density increased with age. In that case, older catchments were thought to show more landscape incision due to increasing near-surface lateral flow paths. Our results suggests two competing hypotheses on the evolution of drainage density in mature catchments. One is that as catchments continue to age, the hydrologically active channels retreat

  6. Role of glaciers in watershed hydrology: a preliminary study of a "Himalayan catchment"

    OpenAIRE

    R. J. Thayyen; J. T. Gergan

    2010-01-01

    A large number of Himalayan glacier catchments are under the influence of humid climate with snowfall in winter (November–April) and south-west monsoon in summer (June–September) dominating the regional hydrology. Such catchments are defined as "Himalayan catchment", where the glacier meltwater contributes to the river flow during the period of annual high flows produced by the monsoon. The winter snow dominated Alpine catchments of the Kashmir and Karakoram region and cold-arid regions of th...

  7. Rainwater harvesting in arid and semi-arid zones (repr. 1997)

    OpenAIRE

    Boers, Th.M.

    1994-01-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions, the scarcity of water can be alleviated by rainwater harvesting, which is defined as a method of inducing, collecting, storing, and conserving local surface runoff for agriculture. Rainwater harvesting can be applied with different systems, and this dissertation deals with the system of micro-catchments. A microcatchment consists of a runoff area and a basin area in which a tree is planted. The purpose of this study was to develop a design procedure for micro-ca...

  8. Understanding Hydrological Processes in an Ungauged Catchment in sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mul, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Ungauged catchments can be found in many parts of the world, but particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Information collected in a gauged catchment and its regionalisation to ungauged areas is crucial for water resources assessment. Especially farmers in semi-arid areas are in need of such information.

  9. Understanding Hydrological Processes in an Ungauged Catchment in sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mul, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Ungauged catchments can be found in many parts of the world, but particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Information collected in a gauged catchment and its regionalisation to ungauged areas is crucial for water resources assessment. Especially farmers in semi-arid are in need of such information. Inter

  10. Assessment of arsenic speciation and bioaccessibility in mine-impacted materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mine-impacted materials were collected from Victoria, Australia and categorized into three source materials; tailings (n = 35), calcinated (n = 10) and grey slimes (n = 5). Arsenic (As) concentrations in these materials varied over several orders of magnitude (30-47,000 mg kg

  11. Hydrological impact of water and soil conservation works in the Merguellil catchment of central Tunisia

    OpenAIRE

    Lacombe, Guillaume; Cappelaere, Bernard; Leduc, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The Merguellil catchment (1183 km(2)), whose runoff is a major water resource for the Kairouan area in semi-arid Tunisia, was equipped with water and soil conservation works (WSCW) during the 1990s, mainly to reduce soil erosion and sitting of the downstream El Haouareb dam. The spatial configuration of the hydro-meteorological station network makes it possible to characterize the catchment-scale hydrological impact of the WSCW. The catchment is subdivided into two parts, the upper subcatchme...

  12. Co-evolution of volcanic catchments in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, T.; Troch, P. A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Present day landscapes have evolved over time through interactions between the prevailing climates and geological settings. Understanding the linkage between spatial patterns of landforms, soils, and vegetation in landscapes and their hydrological response is critical to make quantitative predictions in ungaged basins. Catchment co-evolution is a theoretical framework that seeks to formulate hypotheses about the mechanisms and conditions that determine the historical development of catchments and how such evolution affects their hydrological response. In this study, we selected 14 volcanic catchments of different ages (from 0.22 to 82Ma) in Japan. We derived indices of landscape properties (drainage density) as well as hydrological response (annual water balance, baseow index, and flow duration curves) and examined their relation with catchment age and climate (through the aridity index). We found signicant correlation between drainage density and baseow index with age, but not with climate. The age of the catchments was also signicantly related to intra-annual flow variability. Younger catchments tend to have lower peak flows and higher low flows, while older catchments exhibit more flashy runoff. The decrease of baseflow with catchment age confirms previous studies that hypothesized that in volcanic landscapes the major flow pathways have changed over time, from deep groundwater flow to shallow subsurface flow. The drainage density of our catchments decreased with age, contrary to previous findings in similar volcanic catchments but of signicant younger age than the ones explored here. In these younger catchments, an increase in drainage density with age was observed, and it was hypothesized that this was because of more landscape incision due to increasing near-surface lateral flow paths in more mature catchments. Our results suggest that as catchments further evolve, hydrologically active channels retreat as less recharge leads to lower average aquifer levels

  13. Mechanisms Controlling Arsenic Uptake in Rice Grown in Mining Impacted Regions in South China

    OpenAIRE

    Junhui Li; Fei Dong; Ying Lu; Qiuyan Yan; Hojae Shim

    2014-01-01

    Foods produced on soils impacted by Pb-Zn mining activities are a potential health risk due to plant uptake of the arsenic (As) associated with such mining. A field survey was undertaken in two Pb-Zn mining-impacted paddy fields in Guangdong Province, China to assess As accumulation and translocation, as well as other factors influencing As in twelve commonly grown rice cultivars. The results showed that grain As concentrations in all the surveyed rice failed national food standards, irrespec...

  14. GIS-Based KW-GIUH hydrological model of semiarid catchments: The case of Faria Catchment, Palestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the most basic challenges of hydrology are the quantitative understanding of the processes of runoff generation and prediction of flow hydrographs. Traditional techniques have been widely applied for the estimation of runoff hydrographs of gauged catchments using historical rainfall-runoff data and unit hydrographs. Such procedures are questioned as to their reliability and their application to ungauged, arid and semiarid catchments. To overcome such difficulties, the use of physically based rainfall-runoff process of Faria Catchment using the lately developed KW-GIUH. Faria catchment, located in the northeastern part of the West Bank, Palestine, is characterized as a semiarid region with annual rainfall depths ranging on average from 150 to 640 mm at both ends of the catchment. The Geographical Information System (GIS) techniques were used to shape the geomorphological features of the catchment. A GIS based KW-GIUH hydrological model was used to stimulate the rainfall-runoff process in the three sub-catchments of Faria, namely: Al-Badan, Al-Faria and Al-Malaqi. The simulated runoff hydrographs proved that the GIS-based KW-GIUH model is applicable to semiarid regions and can be used to estimate the unit hydrographs in the West Bank catchments. (author)

  15. Co-evolution of volcanic catchments in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yoshida

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Present day landscapes have evolved over time through interactions between the prevailing climates and geological settings. Understanding the linkage between spatial patterns of landforms, soils, and vegetation in landscapes and their hydrological response is critical to make quantitative predictions in ungaged basins. Catchment co-evolution is a theoretical framework that seeks to formulate hypotheses about the mechanisms and conditions that determine the historical development of catchments and how such evolution affects their hydrological response. In this study, we selected 14 volcanic catchments of different ages (from 0.225 to 82.2 Ma in Japan. We derived indices of landscape properties (drainage density as well as hydrological response (annual water balance, baseflow index, and flow duration curves and examined their relation with catchment age and climate (through the aridity index. We found significant correlation between drainage density and baseflow index with age, but not with climate. The age of the catchments was also significantly related to intra-annual flow variability. Younger catchments tend to have lower peak flows and higher low flows, while older catchments exhibit more flashy runoff. The decrease of baseflow with catchment age confirms previous studies that hypothesized that in volcanic landscapes the major flow pathways have changed over time, from deep groundwater flow to shallow subsurface flow. The drainage density of our catchments decreased with age, contrary to previous findings in similar volcanic catchments but of significant younger age than the ones explored here. In these younger catchments, an increase in drainage density with age was observed, and it was hypothesized that this was because of more landscape incision due to increasing near-surface lateral flow paths in more mature catchments. Our results suggests two hypotheses on the evolution of drainage density in matured catchments. One is that as

  16. Risk assessment test for lead bioaccessibility to waterfowl in mine-impacted soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, O.; Strawn, D.G.; Heinz, G.H.; Williams, B.

    2006-01-01

    Due to variations in soil physicochemical properties, species physiology, and contaminant speciation, Pb toxicity is difficult to evaluate without conducting in vivo dose-response studies. Such tests, however, are expensive and time consuming, making them impractical to use in assessment and management of contaminated environments. One possible alternative is to develop a physiologically based extraction test (PBET) that can be used to measure relative bioaccessibility. We developed and correlated a PBET designed to measure the bioaccessibility of Pb to waterfowl (W-PBET) in mine-impacted soils located in the Coeur d'Alene River Basin, Idaho. The W-PBET was also used to evaluate the impact of P amendments on Pb bioavailability. The W-PBET results were correlated to waterfowl-tissue Pb levels from a mallard duck [Anas platyrhynchos (L.)] feeding study. The W-PBET Pb concentrations were significantly less in the P-amended soils than in the unamended soils. Results from this study show that the W-PBET can be used to assess relative changes in Pb bioaccessibility to waterfowl in these mine-impacted soils, and therefore will be a valuable test to help manage and remediate contaminated soils.

  17. Metagenomic signatures of a tropical mining-impacted stream reveal complex microbial and metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Mariana P; Dias, Marcela F; Costa, Patrícia S; Ávila, Marcelo P; Leite, Laura R; de Araújo, Flávio M G; Salim, Anna C M; Bucciarelli-Rodriguez, Mônica; Oliveira, Guilherme; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Nascimento, Andréa M A

    2016-10-01

    Bacteria from aquatic ecosystems significantly contribute to biogeochemical cycles, but details of their community structure in tropical mining-impacted environments remain unexplored. In this study, we analyzed a bacterial community from circumneutral-pH tropical stream sediment by 16S rRNA and shotgun deep sequencing. Carrapatos stream sediment, which has been exposed to metal stress due to gold and iron mining (21 [g Fe]/kg), revealed a diverse community, with predominance of Proteobacteria (39.4%), Bacteroidetes (12.2%), and Parcubacteria (11.4%). Among Proteobacteria, the most abundant reads were assigned to neutrophilic iron-oxidizing taxa, such as Gallionella, Sideroxydans, and Mariprofundus, which are involved in Fe cycling and harbor several metal resistance genes. Functional analysis revealed a large number of genes participating in nitrogen and methane metabolic pathways despite the low concentrations of inorganic nitrogen in the Carrapatos stream. Our findings provide important insights into bacterial community interactions in a mining-impacted environment. PMID:27441985

  18. Groundwater resources in the Kouris catchment (Cyprus) : data analysis and numerical modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Boronina, Anastasia; Renard, Philippe; Balderer, Werner; Christodoulides, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    The Kouris catchment in Cyprus is currently experiencing a scarcity of water resources due to the semi-arid climate across the southern part of the region, a series of dry years, and recent surface/subsurface water over-extraction. The catchment consists of the upper part of an ophiolitic complex in the North, which is considered a very significant aquifer for Cyprus, and an overlying sedimentary complex in the South, which has low water storage capacity. Water balance calculations are condu...

  19. Lessons learned from integrated hydrological modeling of ephemeral catchments with different land uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporese, Matteo; Dean, Joshua; Daly, Edoardo

    2016-04-01

    Land use, in particular tree cover, has a strong influence on evapotranspiration (ET) and thus a large effect on the water budget of ephemeral catchments in arid and semi-arid climates. Unfortunately, the dearth of medium to long-term experimental observations in such areas limits the understanding of the interplay between catchment geology, land use, and climate in driving catchment water balance. Here we use four years (2011-2014) of rainfall, streamflow, and groundwater level measurements to estimate the water balance components in two small, adjacent, ephemeral catchments in a semi-arid region of south-eastern Australia; one catchment was predominantly covered with a eucalypt plantation established in July 2008 and the other was dedicated to grazing pasture. The integrated hydrological model CATHY (CATchment HYdrology) was calibrated against the data in the two catchments using streamflow and groundwater level observations in 2011; the data in the following years (2012-2014) were used for the model validation. The model was able to adequately reproduce the periods of flow in both catchments in all years, although streamflow and groundwater levels were better reproduced in the pasture than in the plantation. This can partly be attributed to the root growth of the trees, which is difficult to estimate; the declining water storage in the eucalypt catchment could only be obtained when including a simple model of root growth dynamics. Other sources of uncertainty could be due to an imperfect description of the surface topography and bedrock geology, which prevent us from accurately reproducing the effects of the tree furrows and subsurface wetness connectivity. The water balances estimated from both data and model showed a significant increase in ET in the eucalypt plantation catchment at the expense of groundwater storage: ET accounted for 95-104% of rainfall in the pasture catchment and 104-119% in the eucalypt catchment across the four years studied. However, the

  20. Salinity shapes food webs in shallow lakes: implications for increasing aridity with climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Nicolas; Yu, Jinlei; Gutierrez, Maria Florencia;

    2015-01-01

    A reduction in runoff and higher evaporation rates are expected to occur towards 2050 in arid and semiarid regions of the world, resulting in a reduction of water level and salinization of inland waters. Besides the natural process of catchment erosion, human activities such as irrigation of crop...

  1. Waste biorefinery in arid/semi-arid regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan-Rodrigo; Fang, Chuanji; Almardeai, Saleha; Javid, Usama; Yousuf, Ahasa; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2016-09-01

    The utilization of waste biorefineries in arid/semi-arid regions is advisable due to the reduced sustainable resources in arid/semi-arid regions, e.g. fresh water and biomass. This review focuses on biomass residues available in arid/semi-arid regions, palm trees residues, seawater biomass based residues (coastal arid/semi-arid regions), and the organic fraction of municipal solid waste. The present review aims to describe and discuss the availability of these waste biomasses, their conversion to value chemicals by waste biorefinery processes. For the case of seawater biomass based residues it was reviewed and advise the use of seawater in the biorefinery processes, in order to decrease the use of fresh water. PMID:27072789

  2. Mechanisms controlling arsenic uptake in rice grown in mining impacted regions in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junhui; Dong, Fei; Lu, Ying; Yan, Qiuyan; Shim, Hojae

    2014-01-01

    Foods produced on soils impacted by Pb-Zn mining activities are a potential health risk due to plant uptake of the arsenic (As) associated with such mining. A field survey was undertaken in two Pb-Zn mining-impacted paddy fields in Guangdong Province, China to assess As accumulation and translocation, as well as other factors influencing As in twelve commonly grown rice cultivars. The results showed that grain As concentrations in all the surveyed rice failed national food standards, irrespective of As speciation. Among the 12 rice cultivars, "SY-89" and "DY-162" had the least As in rice grain. No significant difference for As concentration in grain was observed between the rice grown in the two areas that differed significantly for soil As levels, suggesting that the amount of As contamination in the soil is not necessarily the overriding factor controlling the As content in the rice grain. The iron and manganese plaque on the root surface curtailed As accumulation in rice roots. Based on our results, the accumulation of As within rice plants was strongly associated with such soil properties such as silicon, phosphorus, organic matter, pH, and clay content. Understanding the factors and mechanisms controlling As uptake is important to develop mitigation measures that can reduce the amount of As accumulated in rice grains produced on contaminated soils. PMID:25251438

  3. Mechanisms controlling arsenic uptake in rice grown in mining impacted regions in South China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhui Li

    Full Text Available Foods produced on soils impacted by Pb-Zn mining activities are a potential health risk due to plant uptake of the arsenic (As associated with such mining. A field survey was undertaken in two Pb-Zn mining-impacted paddy fields in Guangdong Province, China to assess As accumulation and translocation, as well as other factors influencing As in twelve commonly grown rice cultivars. The results showed that grain As concentrations in all the surveyed rice failed national food standards, irrespective of As speciation. Among the 12 rice cultivars, "SY-89" and "DY-162" had the least As in rice grain. No significant difference for As concentration in grain was observed between the rice grown in the two areas that differed significantly for soil As levels, suggesting that the amount of As contamination in the soil is not necessarily the overriding factor controlling the As content in the rice grain. The iron and manganese plaque on the root surface curtailed As accumulation in rice roots. Based on our results, the accumulation of As within rice plants was strongly associated with such soil properties such as silicon, phosphorus, organic matter, pH, and clay content. Understanding the factors and mechanisms controlling As uptake is important to develop mitigation measures that can reduce the amount of As accumulated in rice grains produced on contaminated soils.

  4. Acidophilic algae isolated from mine-impacted environments and their roles in sustaining heterotrophic acidophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Barrie Johnson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Two acidophilic algae, identified as strains of Chlorella protothecoides var. acidicola and Euglena mutabilis, were isolated in pure culture from abandoned copper mines in Spain and Wales and grown in pH- and temperature-controlled bioreactors. The Chlorella isolate grew optimally at pH 2.5 and 30 ˚C, with a corresponding culture doubling time of 9 hours. The isolates displayed similar tolerance (10-50 mM to four transition metals tested. Growth of the algae in liquid media was paralleled with increasing concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC. Glycolic acid was identified as a significant component (12- 14% of total DOC. Protracted incubation resulted in concentrations of glycolic acid declining in both cases, and glycolic acid added to a culture of Chlorella incubated in the dark was taken up by the alga (~100% within three days. Two monosaccharides were identified in cell-free liquors of each algal isolate: fructose and glucose (Chlorella, and mannitol and glucose (Euglena. These were rapidly metabolised by acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria (Acidiphilium and Acidobacterium spp. though only fructose was utilised by the more fastidious heterotroph Acidocella aromatica. The significance of algae in promoting the growth of iron- (and sulfate- reducing heterotrophic acidophiles that are important in remediating mine-impacted waters is discussed.

  5. Is aridity a high-order control on the hydro-geomorphic response of burned landscapes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Gary; Van der Sant, Rene; Nyman, Petter; Lane, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Fire results in hydro-geomorphic changes that are spatially variable and difficult to predict. In this study we compile 294 infiltration measurements, ten other soil, catchment runoff and erosion datasets, and a year of new data from 15 natural runoff plots across an aridity gradient from the eastern Victorian uplands in SE Australia. The results show that aridity (a function of the long term mean precipitation and net radiation) is associated with low post-fire infiltration capacities, increasing the chance of surface runoff, and strongly increasing the chance of debris flows. Runoff plots from the wettest site (aridity = 1.1) had an average runoff ratio of 0.3% compared with 33.6% for the most arid sites (aridity = 2.4). Post-fire debris flows were only observed in the more arid locations within the Victorian uplands, and resulted in erosion rates more than two orders of magnitude greater than non-debris flow processes. We therefore argue that in south eastern Australia aridity is a high-order control on the magnitude of post-wildfire hydro-geomorphic processes. The results from this Australian study may also help to provide insight into the landscape controls on post fire debris flows elsewhere. Aridity is a landscape-scale parameter that is mappable at a high resolution and therefore is a useful predictor of the spatial variability of the magnitude of post-fire hydro-geomorphic responses.

  6. Catchment conceptualisation for examining applicability of chloride mass balance method in an area of historical forest clearance

    OpenAIRE

    H. Guan; Love, A.; C. T. Simmons; Ding, Z; Hutson, J

    2009-01-01

    Among various approaches for estimating groundwater recharge, chloride mass balance (CMB) method is one of the most frequently used, in particular, for arid and semiarid regions. Widespread native vegetation clearance, common history in many areas globally, has changed land surface boundary condition, posing a question whether the current system has reached new chloride equilibrium for CMB application. To examine CMB applicability for catchments, conceptual catchment types of various chloride...

  7. Hydrological Impacts of Urbanization of Two Catchments in Harare, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster Gumindoga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available By increased rural-urban migration in many African countries, the assessment of changes in catchment hydrologic responses due to urbanization is critical for water resource planning and management. This paper assesses hydrological impacts of urbanization on two medium-sized Zimbabwean catchments (Mukuvisi and Marimba for which changes in land cover by urbanization were determined through Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM images for the years 1986, 1994 and 2008. Impact assessments were done through hydrological modeling by a topographically driven rainfall-runoff model (TOPMODEL. A satellite remote sensing based ASTER 30 metre Digital Elevation Model (DEM was used to compute the Topographic Index distribution, which is a key input to the model. Results of land cover classification indicated that urban areas increased by more than 600 % in the Mukuvisi catchment and by more than 200 % in the Marimba catchment between 1986 and 2008. Woodlands decreased by more than 40% with a greater decrease in Marimba than Mukuvisi catchment. Simulations using TOPMODEL in Marimba and Mukuvisi catchments indicated streamflow increases of 84.8 % and 73.6 %, respectively, from 1980 to 2010. These increases coincided with decreases in woodlands and increases in urban areas for the same period. The use of satellite remote sensing data to observe urbanization trends in semi-arid catchments and to represent catchment land surface characteristics proved to be effective for rainfall-runoff modeling. Findings of this study are of relevance for many African cities, which are experiencing rapid urbanization but often lack planning and design.

  8. An innovative carbonate coprecipitation process for the removal of zinc and manganese from mining impacted waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibrell, P.L.; Chambers, M.A.; Deaguero, A.L.; Wildeman, T.R.; Reisman, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    Although mine drainage is usually thought of as acidic, there are many cases where the water is of neutral pH, but still contains metal species that can be harmful to human or aquatic animal health, such as manganese (Mn) and zinc (Zn). Typical treatment of mine drainage waters involves pH adjustment, but this often results in excessive sludge formation and removal of nontoxic species such as magnesium and calcium. Theoretical consideration of the stability of metal carbonate species suggests that the target metals could be removed from solution by coprecipitation with calcium carbonate. The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a limestone-based process for remediation of acid mine drainage that increases calcium carbonate saturation. This treatment could then be coupled with carbonate coprecipitation as an innovative method for removal of toxic metals from circumneutral mine drainage waters. The new process was termed the carbonate coprecipitation (CCP) process. The CCP process was tested at the laboratory scale using a synthetic mine water containing 50 mg/L each of Mn and Zn. Best results showed over 95% removal of both Mn and Zn in less than 2 h of contact in a limestone channel. The process was then tested on a sample of water from the Palmerton zinc superfund site, near Palmerton, Pennsylvania, containing over 300 mg/L Zn and 60 mg/L Mn. Treatment of this water resulted in removal of over 95% of the Zn and 40% of the Mn in the limestone channel configuration. Because of the potential economic advantages of the CCP process, further research is recommended for refinement of the process for the Palmerton water and for application to other mining impacted waters as well. ?? Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  9. Geochemical control processes and potential sediment toxicity in a mine-impacted lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeleke, Solomon Babatunde; Svensson, Bo H; Yekta, Sepehr Shakeri; Adeleye, Michael Mayowa

    2016-03-01

    Geochemical parameters and major ion concentrations from sediments of a freshwater lake in the town of Åtvidaberg, southeastern, Sweden, were used to identify the geochemical processes that control the water chemistry. The lake sediments are anoxic, characterized by reduced sulfur and sulfidic minerals. The hypothesis tested is that in sulfidic-anaerobic contaminated sediments, the presence of redox potential changes creates a favorable condition for sulfide oxidation, resulting in the release of potentially toxic metals. The acid volatile sulfide (AVS) contents ranged from 5.5 μmol/g to 16 μmol/g of dry sediment. Comparison of total mine tailing metals (∑mine tailing metals) with simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) in sediments indicates that up to 20% of the ∑mine tailing metals are bound to the solid phase as AVS. Consequently, the AVS and SEM analysis classified all sediment samples as potentially toxic in terms of heavy metal concentrations (i.e., SEM to AVS ratio distribution > 1). Evaluation of hydrogeochemical data suggests that calcite dissolution, iron (III) oxyhydroxysulfate mineral jarosite (H-jarosite) precipitation, hematite precipitation, and siderite precipitation are the most prevailing geochemical processes that control the geochemical interactions between the water column and sediment in a mine-impacted lake. The geochemical processes were verified and quantified using a chemical equilibrium modeling program, Visual MINTEQ, Ver 3.1, beta. The identified geochemical processes create an environment in which the characteristics of sulfate-rich waters and acidic-iron produce the geochemical conditions for acid mine drainage and mobilization of toxic metals. PMID:26313659

  10. Rainwater harvesting to alleviate water scarcity in dry conditions: A case study in Faria Catchment, Palestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer SHADEED

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In arid and semi-arid regions, the availability of adequate water of appropriate quality has become a limiting factor for development. This paper aims to evaluate the potential for rainwater harvesting in the arid to semi-arid Faria Catchment, in the West Bank, Palestine. Under current conditions, the supply-demand gap is increasing due to the increasing water demands of a growing population with hydrologically limited and uncertain supplies. By 2015, the gap is estimated to reach 4.5 × 106 m3. This study used the process-oriented and physically-based TRAIN-ZIN model to evaluate two different rainwater harvesting techniques during two rainfall events. The analysis shows that there is a theoretical potential for harvesting an additional 4 × 106 m3 of surface water over the entire catchment. Thus, it is essential to manage the potential available surface water supplies in the catchment to save water for dry periods when the supply-demand gap is comparatively high. Then a valuable contribution to bridging the supply-demand gap can be made.

  11. Rainwater harvesting to alleviate water scarcity in dry conditions: A case study in Faria Catchment, Palestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sameer SHADEED; Jens LANGE

    2010-01-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions, the availability of adequate water of appropriate quality has become a limiting factor for development.This paper aims to evaluate the potential for rainwater harvesting in the arid to semi-arid Faria Catchment, in the West Bank, Palestine.Under current conditions, the supply-demand gap is increasing due to the increasing water demands of a growing population with hydrologically limited and uncertain supplies.By 2015, the gap is estimated to reach 4.5×106 m3.This study used the process-oriented and physically-based TRAIN-ZIN model to evaluate two different rainwater harvesting techniques during two rainfall events.The analysis shows that there is a theoretical potential for harvesting an additional 4 × 106 m3 of surface water over the entire catchment.Thus, it is essential to manage the potential available surface water supplies in the catchment to save water for dry periods when the supply-demand gap is comparatively high.Then a valuable contribution to bridging the supply-demand gap can be made.

  12. Interaction of water components in the semi-arid Huasco and Limarí river basins, North Central Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Strauch

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available For sustainable water resource management in semi-arid regions, sound information is required about interactions between the different components of the water system: rain/snow precipitation, surface/subsurface run-off, groundwater recharge. Exemplarily, the Huasco and Limarí river basins as water stressed river catchments have been studied by isotope and hydrochemical methods for (i the origin of water, (ii water quality, (iii relations of surface and groundwater.

    Applying the complex multi-isotopic and hydrochemical methodology to the water components of the Huasco and Limarí basins, a differentiation of water components concerning subsurface flow and river water along the catchment area and by anthropogenic impacts are detected. Sulphate and nitrate concentrations indicate remarkable input from mining and agricultural activities along the river catchment.

    The 2H-18O relations of river water and groundwater of both catchments point to the behaviour of river waters originated in an arid to semi-arid environment.

    Consequently, the groundwater from several production wells in the lower parts of the catchments is related to the rivers where the wells located, however, it can be distinguished from the river water. Using the hydrological water balance and the isotope mixing model, the interaction between surface and subsurface flows and river flow is estimated.

  13. A methodological comparison of catchment storages in mountainous catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Markus; Staudinger, Maria; Stölzle, Michael; Seeger, Stefan; Seibert, Jan; Stahl, Kerstin

    2015-04-01

    One of the most important functions of catchments is the temporary storage of water, which directly influences runoff dynamics, rainfall-runoff transformation, partitioning of evaporation and runoff fluxes, and accessibility of water to plants. Generally, a large catchment storage is considered beneficial and in particular increases the transit times and hence the buffer functioning related to water quality. Many different methods have been developed to assess catchment storage, however, there are hardly any direct comparisons of several of these methods. One challenge is the definition of water storage, while some methods allow estimation of the entire water storage in a catchment, other methods quantify only the dynamic storage. In addition, most studies focused more on lowland catchments with rain-dominated runoff regimes and observed groundwater fluctuations. Furthermore, these studies often focus on one or two catchments, but do not consider the influence of different climates on the relevance of water storage in the catchment. We applied a range of different methods to assess catchment storage characteristics in 18 catchments in the Swiss Alps, ranging from 500 to 2000m of mean elevation and hence from rainfall- to snowmelt dominated runoff regimes. The first method use only discharge information during recession periods and with varying approaches to extract discharge and storage changes between high flow and low flow, the dynamic catchment storage can be derived. In the next methods the conceptual hydrological model HBV is calibrated to the runoff dynamics and the dynamic and total catchment storages of the different compartments are being evaluated. The last methods are based on stable water isotope data analysis. We use the model TRANSEP to derive the dynamic storage as well as the total water storage of the catchment based on the transit times using several years of fortnightly isotope data in streamflow. The results show that the derived catchment

  14. Catchments Classification: Multivariate Statistical Analysis for Physiographic Similarity in the Niger Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaibou Begou, Jamilatou; Jomaa, Seifeddine; Benabdallah, Sihem; Bazie, Pibgnina; Afouda, Abel; Rode, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine physiographic similarity, as indicator of hydrologic similarity between catchments located in the Bani basin, and to derive the dominant factors controlling each group singularity. We utilized a dataset of 28 catchments described by 16 physical and climatic properties distributed across a wide region with strong environmental gradients. Catchments attributes were first standardized before they underwent an integrated exploratory data analysis composed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) followed by Hierarchical Clustering. Results showed a clear distribution into 3 major clusters. Two of them were well separated and partitioned into northerly flat and semi-arid catchments, and southerly hilly and humid catchments. This nomenclature came from the interpretation of the main factors, topography, precipitation and latitude, which seem to control the most important variability inside these clusters. Moreover, the group of northerly catchments was designated to be dominated by agricultural land use and ferric luvisols soil type, two additional drivers of similarity. The third cluster was located in the center of the study basin, inside which, none of the descriptors seems to exert a strong control on the similarity. The outcome of this study can help understanding catchment functioning and provide a support for a regionalization of hydrological information.

  15. Mechanisms affecting stormflow generation and solute behaviour in a Sahelian headwater catchment

    OpenAIRE

    Ribolzi, Olivier; Karambiri, H.; Bariac, T.; Benedetti, M; Caquineau, Sandrine; Descloitres, Marc; Aventurier, A. (préf.)

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse stormflow processes and the behaviour of solutes therein (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+, alkalinity, NO3-, So(4)(2-), Cl-, Si), during flood events in tropical semi-arid conditions. The study site was a small Sahelian catchment (1.4 ha) located in northern Burkina Faso. Runoff and rain water was sampled over a 2-year period (1999 and 2000). In addition to dissolved load, suspended load was measured in the stream water collected at the outlet of the catchment. Isotop...

  16. Climate change and catchment hydrology

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Conor

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is expected to alter catchment hydrology through changes in extremes of flooding and drought. River catchments are complex, dynamic systems and it is important to develop our understanding of how these systems are likely to respond to changes in climate. Work is ongoing in using EC-Earth simulations to further our understanding of how climate change will affect catchment hydrology and flood risk. In Ireland, the importance of this task is emphasised ...

  17. Understanding runoff processes in a semi-arid environment through isotope and hydrochemical hydrograph separations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Camacho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of runoff generation mechanisms is crucial for the sustainable management of river basins such as the allocation of water resources or the prediction of floods and droughts. However, identifying the mechanisms of runoff generation has been a challenging task, even more so in arid and semi-arid areas where high rainfall and streamflow variability, high evaporation rates, and deep groundwater reservoirs increase the complexity of hydrological process dynamics. Isotope and hydrochemical tracers have proven to be useful in identifying runoff components and their characteristics. Moreover, although widely used in humid-temperate regions, isotope hydrograph separations have not been studied in detail in arid and semi-arid areas. Thus the purpose of this study is to determine if isotope hydrograph separations are suitable for the quantification and characterization of runoff components in a semi-arid catchment considering the hydrological complexities of these regions. Through a hydrochemical characterization of the surface water and groundwater sources of the catchment and two and three component hydrograph separations, runoff components of the Kaap Catchment in South Africa were quantified using both, isotope and hydrochemical tracers. No major disadvantages while using isotope tracers over hydrochemical tracers were found. Hydrograph separation results showed that runoff in the Kaap catchment is mainly generated by groundwater sources. Two-component hydrograph separations revealed groundwater contributions between 64 and 98% of total runoff. By means of three-component hydrograph separations, runoff components were further separated into direct runoff, shallow and deep groundwater components. Direct runoff, defined as the direct precipitation on the stream channel and overland flow, contributed up to 41% of total runoff during wet catchment conditions. Shallow groundwater defined as the soil water and near-surface water component

  18. Catchment-scale environmental controls of sediment-associated contaminant dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macklin, Mark

    2010-05-01

    Globally river sediment associated contaminants, most notably heavy metals, radionuclides, Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs), Organochlorine pesticides (OCs) and phosphorous, constitute one the most significant long-term risks to ecosystems and human health. These can impact both urban and rural areas and, because of their prolonged environmental residence times, are major sources of secondary pollution if contaminated soil and sediment are disturbed by human activity or by natural processes such as water or wind erosion. River catchments are also the primary source of sediment-associated contaminants to the coastal zone, and to the ocean, and an understanding of the factors that control contaminated sediment fluxes and delivery in river systems is essential for effective environmental management and protection. In this paper the catchment-scale controls of sediment-associated contaminant dispersal are reviewed, including climate-related variations in flooding regime, land-use change, channel engineering, restoration and flood defence. Drawing on case studies from metal mining impacted catchments in Bolivia (Río Pilcomayo), Spain (Río Guadiamar), Romania (River Tisa) and the UK (River Swale) some improved methodologies for identifying, tracing, modelling and managing contaminated river sediments are proposed that could have more general application in similarly affected river systems worldwide.

  19. Geochemical Processes Controlling the Generation and Environmental Impacts of Acid Mine Drainage in Semi Arid Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Magombedze, Chris

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluates the geochemical processes that control the geochemistry of acid mine drainage in semi arid conditions. The central objective is to characterise and understand the evolution of acid mine drainage and its potential environmental impacts on the Mazowe River sub-catchment, in north east Zimbabwe. The work is based on a case study at three neighbouring metal sulphide mines, namely Trojan Nickel Mine, Mazowe Gold Mine and Iron Duke Pyrites.The methodology used in this research ...

  20. Runoff from soils on marls under semi-arid mediterranean conditions

    OpenAIRE

    D. Garnet; Blum, W. E. H.

    1996-01-01

    In semi-arid Mediterranean regions the pressure on natural resources such as water and soil is increasing. In the Maghreb, soil degradation and reservoir sedimentation are serious problems, particularly in catchment areas with a high proportion of marls. As part of an Algerian-German project of scientific-technical cooperation, the runoff from soils on marls was studied, using modern rain simulators. A description of the rainfall experiments is followed by the presentation of a simple and app...

  1. Water balance complexities in ephemeral catchments with different land uses: Insights from monitoring and distributed hydrologic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, J. F.; Camporese, M.; Webb, J. A.; Grover, S. P.; Dresel, P. E.; Daly, E.

    2016-06-01

    Although ephemeral catchments are widespread in arid and semiarid climates, the relationship of their water balance with climate, geology, topography, and land cover is poorly known. Here we use 4 years (2011-2014) of rainfall, streamflow, and groundwater level measurements to estimate the water balance components in two adjacent ephemeral catchments in south-eastern Australia, with one catchment planted with young eucalypts and the other dedicated to grazing pasture. To corroborate the interpretation of the observations, the physically based hydrological model CATHY was calibrated and validated against the data in the two catchments. The estimated water balances showed that despite a significant decline in groundwater level and greater evapotranspiration in the eucalypt catchment (104-119% of rainfall) compared with the pasture catchment (95-104% of rainfall), streamflow consistently accounted for 1-4% of rainfall in both catchments for the entire study period. Streamflow in the two catchments was mostly driven by the rainfall regime, particularly rainfall frequency (i.e., the number of rain days per year), while the downslope orientation of the plantation furrows also promoted runoff. With minimum calibration, the model was able to adequately reproduce the periods of flow in both catchments in all years. Although streamflow and groundwater levels were better reproduced in the pasture than in the plantation, model-computed water balance terms confirmed the estimates from the observations in both catchments. Overall, the interplay of climate, topography, and geology seems to overshadow the effect of land use in the study catchments, indicating that the management of ephemeral catchments remains highly challenging.

  2. A Synoptic Climatology of Heavy Rain Events in the Lake Eyre and Lake Frome Catchments

    OpenAIRE

    Michael John Pook; James eRisbey; Caroline eUmmenhofer; Timothy eCohen; Peter eBriggs

    2014-01-01

    The rare occasions when Lake Eyre in central, southern Australia fills with water excite great interest and produce major ecological responses. The filling of other smaller lakes such as Lake Frome, have less impact but can contribute important information about the current and past climates of these arid regions. Here, the dominant synoptic systems responsible for heavy rainfall over the catchments of Lake Eyre and Lake Frome since 1950 are identified and compared. Heavy rain events are defi...

  3. A synoptic climatology of heavy rain events in the Lake Eyre and Lake Frome catchments

    OpenAIRE

    Pook, Michael J.; Risbey, James S.; Ummenhofer, Caroline C.; BRIGGS Peter R.; Cohen, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    The rare occasions when Lake Eyre in central, southern Australia fills with water excite great interest and produce major ecological responses. The filling of other smaller lakes such as Lake Frome have less impact but can contribute important information about the current and past climates of these arid regions. Here, the dominant synoptic systems responsible for heavy rainfall over the catchments of Lake Eyre and Lake Frome since 1950 are identified and compared. Heavy rain events are defin...

  4. The role of climatic and terrain attributes in estimating baseflow recession in tropical catchments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Peña-Arancibia

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of low flows in rivers is paramount more than ever as demand for water increases on a global scale. At the same time, limited streamflow data to investigate this phenomenon, particularly in the tropics, makes the provision of accurate estimations in ungauged areas an ongoing research need. This paper analysed the potential of climatic and terrain attributes of 167 tropical and sub-tropical unregulated catchments to predict baseflow recession rates. Climatic attributes included annual and seasonal indicators of rainfall and potential evapotranspiration. Terrain attributes included indicators of catchment shape, morphology, land cover, soils and geology. Stepwise regression was used to identify the best predictors for baseflow recession coefficients (kbf. Mean annual rainfall (MAR and aridity index (AI were found to explain 49% of the spatial variation of kbf. The rest of climatic indices plus average catchment slope (SLO and tree cover were also good predictors, but co-correlated with MAR. Catchment elongation (CE, a measure of catchment shape, was also found to be statistically significant, although weakly correlated. An analysis of clusters of catchments of smaller size, showed that in these areas, presumably with some similarity of soils and geology due to proximity, residuals of the regression could be explained by SLO and CE. The approach used provides a~potential alternative for kbf parameterisation in ungauged areas.

  5. Environmental care in agricultural catchments: Toward the communicative catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Peter

    1991-11-01

    Substantial land degradation of agricultural catchments in Australia has resulted from the importation of European farming methods and the large-scale clearing of land. Rural communities are now being encouraged by government to take responsibility for environmental care. The importance of community involvement is supported by the view that environmental problems are a function of interactions between people and their environment. It is suggested that the commonly held view that community groups cannot care for their resources is due to inappropriate social institutions rather that any inherent disability in people. The communicative catchment is developed as a vision for environmental care into the future. This concept emerges from a critique of resource management through the catchment metaphors of the reduced, mechanical, and the complex, evolving catchment, which reflect the development of systemic and people-centered approaches to environmental care. The communicative catchment is one where both community and resource managers participate collaboratively in environmental care. A methodology based on action research and systemic thinking (systemic action research) is proposed as a way of moving towards the communicative catchment of the future. Action research is a way of taking action in organizations and communities that is participative and informed by theory, while systemic thinking takes into account the interconnections and relationships between social and natural worlds. The proposed vision, methodology, and practical operating principles stem from involvement in an action research project looking at extension strategies for the implementation of total catchment management in the Hunter Valley, New South Wales.

  6. Climate and hydrological variability: the catchment filtering role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés-Doménech, I.; García-Bartual, R.; Montanari, A.; Marco, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    Measuring the impact of climate change on flood frequency is a complex and controversial task. Identifying hydrological changes is difficult given the factors, other than climate variability, which lead to significant variations in runoff series. The catchment filtering role is often overlooked and thus may hinder the correct identification of climate variability signatures on hydrological processes. Does climate variability necessarily imply hydrological variability? This research aims to analytically derive the flood frequency distribution based on realistic hypotheses about the rainfall process and the rainfall-runoff transformation. The annual maximum peak flow probability distribution is analytically derived to quantify the filtering effect of the rainfall-runoff process on climate change. A sensitivity analysis is performed according to typical semi-arid Mediterranean climatic and hydrological conditions, assuming a simple but common scheme for the rainfall-runoff transformation in small-size ungauged catchments, i.e. the CN-SCS model. Variability in annual maximum peak flows and its statistical significance are analysed when changes in the climatic input are introduced. Results show that depending on changes in the annual number of rainfall events, the catchment filtering role is particularly significant, especially when the event rainfall volume distribution is not strongly skewed. Results largely depend on the return period: for large return periods, peak flow variability is significantly affected by the climatic input, while for lower return periods, infiltration processes smooth out the impact of climate change.

  7. Climate and hydrological variability: the catchment filtering role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Andrés-Doménech

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the impact of climate change on flood frequency is a complex and controversial task. Identifying hydrological changes is difficult given the factors, other than climate variability, which lead to significant variations in runoff series. The catchment filtering role is often overlooked and in fact, this may hinder the correct identification of climate variability signatures on hydrological processes. Does climate variability necessarily imply hydrological variability? The research herein presented aims to analytically derive the flood frequency distribution basing on realistic hypotheses about the rainfall process and the rainfall–runoff transformation. The peak flow probability distribution is analytically derived to quantify the filtering effect operated by the rainfall–runoff process on climate change. A sensitivity analysis is performed according to typical semi-arid Mediterranean climatic and hydrological conditions, assuming a simple but common scheme for the rainfall–runoff transformation in small-size ungauged catchments, i.e. the CN-SCS model. Variability in peak flows and its statistical significance are analysed when changes in the climatic input are introduced. Results show that in regard to changes in the annual number of rainfall events, the catchment filtering role is particularly significant when the event rainfall volume distribution is not strongly skewed. Results largely depend on the return period: for large return periods, peak flow variability is significantly impacted by the climatic input, while for lower return periods, infiltration processes smooth out the effects of climate change.

  8. Evidence of Historical Mining Impacts on Saltmarshes from east Cornwall, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iurian, Andra-Rada; Taylor, Alex; Millward, Geoff; Blake, William

    2016-04-01

    In landscapes with extensive mining history, saltmarshes can become sinks for contaminants that are vulnerable to release with sea-level rise and increased storminess. Given the prolonged residence time of heavy metals in the environment, data is urgently required to contextualise the impacts of past and present mining and pollution events and provide a baseline against which to assess Water Framework Directive (WFD) (2000/60/EC) compliance within an integrated catchment management framework. The geology of east Cornwall, UK (with intrusions of granite into the surrounding sedimentary rocks) was favourable for a prosperous mining industry, although large scale operations did not start until about 1830. Tin, cooper, lead and tungsten were the most important ores in the region. In order to quantify the spatial and temporal extent of contamination from past mining, sediment cores were collected from three saltmarshes, namely: Antony Marsh and Treluggan Marsh on the Lower Basin of River Lynher, and Port Eliot Marsh on the Lower Basin of River Tiddy. Core sections at 1 cm intervals were analysed by gamma-ray spectrometry for Pb-210, Ra-226, Cs-137 and Am-241, and the well-established Constant Rate of Supply (CRS) model was employed to derive Pb-210 geochronology with bomb-derived Cs-137 and Am-241 as independent chronological markers. The geochronological data provided the sedimentary accumulation and temporal context for the study. In terms of sediment quality with respect to mining pollution, core sections were analysed using Q-ICP-MS techniques and, additionally, WD-XRF instrumentation at Plymouth University. Measurements were performed for target elements that are normally associated with mining and smelting activities (e.g. Pb, Cu, Sn, Zn, Cr, Cd, etc.), and lithogenic elements (e.g. Fe, Al, Ti) that allow enrichment factors for the anthropogenically-derived elements to be determined. The grain size distribution was determined to identify storminess events and to

  9. The role of climatic and terrain attributes in estimating baseflow recession in tropical catchments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Peña-Arancibia

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of low flows in rivers is paramount more than ever as demand for water increases on a global scale. At the same time, limited streamflow data to investigate this phenomenon, particularly in the tropics, makes the provision of accurate estimations in ungauged areas an ongoing research need. This paper analysed the potential of climatic and terrain attributes of 167 tropical and sub-tropical unregulated catchments to predict baseflow recession rates. Daily streamflow data (m3 s–1 from the Global River Discharge Center (GRDC and a linear reservoir model were used to obtain baseflow recession coefficients (kbf for these catchments. Climatic attributes included annual and seasonal indicators of rainfall and potential evapotranspiration. Terrain attributes included indicators of catchment shape, morphology, land cover, soils and geology. Stepwise regression was used to identify the best predictors for baseflow recession coefficients. Mean annual rainfall (MAR and aridity index (AI were found to explain 49% of the spatial variation of kbf. The rest of climatic indices and the terrain indices average catchment slope (SLO and tree cover were also good predictors, but co-correlated with MAR. Catchment elongation (CE, a measure of catchment shape, was also found to be statistically significant, although weakly correlated. An analysis of clusters of catchments of smaller size, showed that in these areas, presumably with some similarity of soils and geology due to proximity, residuals of the regression could be explained by SLO and CE. The approach used provides a potential alternative for kbf parameterisation in ungauged catchments.

  10. Ground water input to a rare flood event in an arid zone ephemeral river identified with isotopes and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various isotope studies in temperate climates have shown that the shallow groundwater component feeding perennial rivers during rainfall events can be more important than surface runoff. We report, here on possibly unique isotopic and chemical evidence of groundwater contributions to a rare Hood event of the ephemeral Auob River during the exceptional rains of 1999/2000 in the arid/semi-arid Kalahari of southeastern Namibia. The recognition of this process was enabled by a detailed knowledge of the isotope hydrology of groundwater in the area and provided insights into aspects of the palaeo-hydrology of the Auob River catchment. (author)

  11. Catchment areas for public transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jonas Lohmann Elkjær; Landex, Alex

    2008-01-01

    the simplest approach. The Service Area approach is based on searches in road networks and represents the actual feeder routes and is thereby a more detailed approach. The Service Area approach can be refined by adding additional resistance to certain points in the road network, e.g. stairways. Differences...... by calculating travel potential along the line. The article shows how the different approaches result in differences in the examined catchment areas. It shows how the Service Area approach prevents inaccessible areas to be included in the catchment area and how it allows for detours in feeder routes to....../from stations. The article also shows how the refinement of the Service Area approach with additional time resistance results in smaller catchment areas when the feeder routes cross stairs. It is concluded that GIS-based catchment area analyses are a multiple decision support tool for planning of public...

  12. Study on the change rule of groundwater level and its impacts on vegetation at arid mining area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Shao-gang; BIAN Zheng-fu; ZHANG Ri-chen; LI Lin

    2007-01-01

    The shallow groundwater in Shendong mining area was broken because of large-scale underground mining activities. Selecting 32201 working-face as research area,analyzed the change rule of groundwater level and aquifer thickness under mining impact with a large number of water level observation data. Then, the impacts of groundwater level change on vegetation were analyzed by the relationship theory of arid area groundwater and vegetation. The results show that the aquifer structure and the water condition of supply flow and drainage are changed by the water proof mining. The groundwater level recovere only a little compared with the original groundwater level in two years. But the great change of groundwater level do not have notable influences on vegetation of this mining area, and further study indicates that there are certain conditions where groundwater level change impacted on vegetation. When the influence of groundwater level change was evaluated, the plant ecological water level, warning water level and spatial distribution character of original groundwater and mining-impacted groundwater-level change should be integrated.

  13. Catchment conceptualisation for examining applicability of chloride mass balance method in an area with historical forest clearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Guan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Of the various approaches for estimating groundwater recharge, the chloride mass balance (CMB method is one of the most frequently used, especially for arid and semiarid regions. Widespread native vegetation clearance, common in many areas globally, has changed the land surface boundary condition, posing the question as to whether the current system has reached new chloride equilibrium, required for a CMB application. Although a one-dimensional CMB can be applied at a point where the water and chloride fluxes are locally in steady state, the CMB method is usually applied at a catchment scale owing to significant lateral flows in mountains. The applicability of the CMB method to several conceptual catchment types of various chloride equilibrium conditions is examined. The conceptualisation, combined with some local climate conditions, is shown to be useful in assessing whether or not a catchment has reached new chloride equilibrium. The six conceptual catchment types are tested with eleven selected catchments in the Mount Lofty Ranges (MLR, a coastal hilly area in South Australia having experienced widespread historical forest clearance. The results show that six of the eleven catchments match a type VI chloride balance condition (chloride non-equilibrium with a gaining stream, with the ratios of stream chloride output (O over atmospheric chloride input (I, or catchment chloride O/I ratios, ranging from 2 to 4. Two catchments match a type V chloride balance condition (chloride non-equilibrium with a losing stream, with catchment chloride O/I ratios about 0.5. For these type V and type VI catchments, the CMB method is not applicable. The results also suggest that neither a chloride O/I ratio less than one nor a low seasonal fluctuation of streamflow chloride concentration (a factor below 4 guarantees a chloride equilibrium condition in the study area. A large chloride O/I value (above one and a large fluctuation of streamflow chloride

  14. Catchment conceptualisation for examining applicability of chloride mass balance method in an area of historical forest clearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Guan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Among various approaches for estimating groundwater recharge, chloride mass balance (CMB method is one of the most frequently used, in particular, for arid and semiarid regions. Widespread native vegetation clearance, common history in many areas globally, has changed land surface boundary condition, posing a question whether the current system has reached new chloride equilibrium for CMB application. To examine CMB applicability for catchments, conceptual catchment types of various chloride equilibrium conditions are defined. The conceptualization, combined with some local climate conditions, is demonstrated to be useful in examining whether a catchment has reached new chloride equilibrium. The six conceptual catchment types are tested with eleven selected catchments in the Mount Lofty Ranges (MLR, a coastal hilly area in South Australia having experienced historical widespread forest clearance. The results show that six of the eleven catchments match type VI chloride balance condition (chloride non-equilibrium with a gaining stream, with the ratio of stream chloride output over atmospheric chloride input (catchment chloride O/I ranging from 2 to 4. Two catchments match type V chloride balance condition (chloride non-equilibrium with a losing stream, with catchment chloride O/I values about 0.5. For these catchments, the CMB method is not appropriate to apply. The results also suggest that neither a below-one chloride O/I value nor a low seasonal fluctuation of streamflow chloride concentration (a factor below 4 guarantees a chloride equilibrium condition in the study area. But a large chloride O/I value (above one and a large fluctuation of streamflow chloride concentration (a factor of 10 and above generally indicates either a chloride disequilibrium, or cross-catchment water transfer, or both, for which CMB is not applicable. Based on the regression between chloride O/I values and annual precipitation for type VI catchments, a catchment with

  15. Comprehensive Management of the Heihe Catchment:A Success in Coupling Water-Ecological Setting with Local Economy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ In the arid regions of northwestern China, water is considered as the "life blood" of all living organisms and economic activities.An oasis will grow greener with ample supply of water, whereas the green will fade if water is in short supply. An inland river catchment constitutes an independent unit of ecological functions in which interactions and transformation occur between mountainous areas and plains, between oases and wastelands, and between ground surface runoffs and underground water. The sustainability of a catchment is deeply rooted in the coordination of hydrological, ecological and economical processes in a drainage basin.

  16. 半干旱雨养农业区集雨补灌对马铃薯田水分运移的影响%Effects of Supplemental Irrigation Using Catchment Rainfall on Water Movement of Potato Field in Semi-arid Rainfed Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦舒浩; 张俊莲; 王蒂; 刘震; 申鹏

    2011-01-01

    采用大田试验方法,研究集雨补灌对旱作马铃薯田水分运移规律和产量的影响。结果表明,对马铃薯有效的土壤水分主要分布在80 cm以上土层,苗期补灌45 mm处理水分利用效率(WUE)最高,且收获后不同土层中滞留的水分较少;在此基础上再增加补灌量,马铃薯产量增加不显著,WUE显著降低。集雨补灌增加了马铃薯棵间蒸发量(E)和植株蒸腾量(T),90 mm高额补灌处理在前、中期棵间蒸发量较高,收获后80 cm以下深层贮水量显著高于45 mm及45 mm以下补灌处理。45 mm与90 mm补灌处理植株蒸腾量差异不显著,马铃薯生长后期,苗期补灌与薯块膨大期补灌植株蒸腾量差异亦不显著;苗期45 mm补灌处理蒸腾量与蒸发量比率(T/E)比较高,其综合用水效率较高。%The effects of supplemental irrigation using catchment rainfall on water movement and production of rain-fed potato were studied by field experiments.The results showed that WUE of potato was higher in the supplemental irrigation treatment of 45 mm than other treatments at the seedling stage,and the storage of water in different soil depth was more least.With the increasing of irrigation amount,the production of potato was not increased significantly and WUE decreased significantly.The soil evaporation and transpiration among plants were increased by supplemental irrigation using catchment rainfall.The soil evaporation at prophase and metaphase state was higher in the supplemental irrigation treatment of 90 mm than 45 mm and under 45 mm treatment,at the same time,after harvest the water storage under 80 cm was higher significantly at the treatment of 90 mm.There was no difference of plant transpiration between 45 mm and 90 mm treatment,the same between the seedling and tuber expanding stage.WUE and IWUE were the highest under the 45 mm of irrigation at the seedling stage,because of the highest transpiration and evaporation rate.

  17. Assessment of Trace Metals in Soil, Vegetation and Rodents in Relation to Metal Mining Activities in an Arid Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Rodríguez, Lia C; Alvarez-Castañeda, Sergio Ticul

    2016-07-01

    Areas where abandoned metal-extraction mines are located contain large quantities of mineral wastes derived from environmentally unsafe mining practices. These wastes contain many pollutants, such as heavy metals, which could be released to the environment through weathering and leaching, hence becoming an important source of environmental metal pollution. This study evaluates differences in the levels of lead, iron, nickel, manganese, copper and cadmium in rodents sharing the same type of diet under different microhabitat use in arid areas with past mining activities. Samples of soil, roots, branches and seeds of Palo Adán (Fouquieria diguetii) and specimens of two rodent species (Chaetodipus arenarius and C. spinatus) were collected in areas with impact from past metal mining activities as well as from areas with no mining impact. Both rodent species mirrored nickel and iron levels in soil and seeds, as well as lead levels in soil; however, C. arenarius accumulated higher levels of manganese, copper and cadmium.

  18. Assessment of Trace Metals in Soil, Vegetation and Rodents in Relation to Metal Mining Activities in an Arid Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Rodríguez, Lia C; Alvarez-Castañeda, Sergio Ticul

    2016-07-01

    Areas where abandoned metal-extraction mines are located contain large quantities of mineral wastes derived from environmentally unsafe mining practices. These wastes contain many pollutants, such as heavy metals, which could be released to the environment through weathering and leaching, hence becoming an important source of environmental metal pollution. This study evaluates differences in the levels of lead, iron, nickel, manganese, copper and cadmium in rodents sharing the same type of diet under different microhabitat use in arid areas with past mining activities. Samples of soil, roots, branches and seeds of Palo Adán (Fouquieria diguetii) and specimens of two rodent species (Chaetodipus arenarius and C. spinatus) were collected in areas with impact from past metal mining activities as well as from areas with no mining impact. Both rodent species mirrored nickel and iron levels in soil and seeds, as well as lead levels in soil; however, C. arenarius accumulated higher levels of manganese, copper and cadmium. PMID:27207229

  19. New crops for arid lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinman, C W

    1984-09-28

    Five plants are described that could be grown commercially under arid conditions. Once the most valuable component has been obtained from each plant (rubber from guayule; seed oil from jojoba, buffalo gourd, and bladderpod; and resin from gumweed), the remaining material holds potential for useful products as well as fuel. It is difficult to realize the full potential of arid land plants, however, because of the complexities of developing the necessary agricultural and industrial infrastructure simultaneously. To do so, multicompany efforts or cooperative efforts between government and the private sector will be required.

  20. Interaction of water components in the semi-arid Huasco and Limarí river basins, North Central Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Strauch, G; R. Oyarzún; F. Reinstorf; J. Oyarzún; M. Schirmer; K. Knöller

    2009-01-01

    For sustainable water resource management in semi-arid regions, sound information is required about interactions between the different components of the water system: rain/snow precipitation, surface/subsurface run-off, groundwater recharge. Exemplarily, the Huasco and Limarí river basins as water stressed river catchments have been studied by isotope and hydrochemical methods for (i) the origin of water, (ii) water quality, (iii) relations of surface and groundwater.

    App...

  1. Technical Note: A comparison of model and empirical measures of catchment-scale effective energy and mass transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rasmussen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent work suggests that a coupled effective energy and mass transfer (EEMT term, which includes the energy associated with effective precipitation and primary production, may serve as a robust prediction parameter of critical zone structure and function. However, the models used to estimate EEMT have been solely based on long-term climatological data with little validation using direct empirical measures of energy, water, and carbon balances. Here we compare catchment-scale EEMT estimates generated using two distinct approaches: (1 EEMT modeled using the established methodology based on estimates of monthly effective precipitation and net primary production derived from climatological data, and (2 empirical catchment-scale EEMT estimated using data from 86 catchments of the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX and MOD17A3 annual net primary production (NPP product derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS. Results indicated positive and significant linear correspondence (R2 = 0.75; P −2 yr−1. Modeled EEMT values were consistently greater than empirical measures of EEMT. Empirical catchment estimates of the energy associated with effective precipitation (EPPT were calculated using a mass balance approach that accounts for water losses to quick surface runoff not accounted for in the climatologically modeled EPPT. Similarly, local controls on primary production such as solar radiation and nutrient limitation were not explicitly included in the climatologically based estimates of energy associated with primary production (EBIO, whereas these were captured in the remotely sensed MODIS NPP data. These differences likely explain the greater estimate of modeled EEMT relative to the empirical measures. There was significant positive correlation between catchment aridity and the fraction of EEMT partitioned into EBIO (FBIO, with an increase in FBIO as a fraction of the total as aridity increases and percentage of

  2. Element mobility during pyrite weathering: implications for acid and heavy metal pollution at mining-impacted sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Long; Wang, Rucheng; Chen, Fanrong; Xue, Jiyue; Zhang, Peihua; Lu, Jianjun

    2005-11-01

    Based on back scattered electron images and electron micro-probe analysis results, four alteration layers, including a transition layer, a reticulated ferric oxide layer, a nubby ferric oxide layer and a cellular ferric oxide layer, were identified in the naturally weathering products of pyrite. These layers represent a progressive alteration sequence of pyrite under weathering conditions. The cellular ferric oxide layer correlates with the strongest weathering phase and results from the dissolution of nubby ferric oxide by acidic porewater. Leaching coefficient was introduced to better express the response of element mobility to the degree of pyrite weathering. Its variation shows that the mobility of S, Co and Bi is stronger than As, Cu and Zn. Sulfur in pyrite is oxidized to sulfuric acid and sulfate that are basically released into to porewater, and heavy metals Co and Bi are evidently released by acid dissolution. As, Cu and Zn are enriched in ferric oxide by adsorption and by co-precipitation, but they would re-release to the environment via desorption or dissolution when porewater pH becomes low enough. Consequently, Co, Bi, As, Cu and Zn may pose a substantial impact on water quality. Considering that metal mobility and its concentration in mine waste are two important factors influencing heavy metal pollution at mining-impacted sites, Bi and Co are more important pollutants in this case.

  3. Mycorrhiza and PGPB modulate maize biomass, nutrient uptake and metabolic pathways in maize grown in mining-impacted soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawi, Faten; Datta, Rupali; Ramakrishna, Wusirika

    2015-12-01

    Abiotic stress factors including poor nutrient content and heavy metal contamination in soil, can limit plant growth and productivity. The main goal of our study was to evaluate element uptake, biomass and metabolic responses in maize roots growing in mining-impacted soil with the combination of arbuscular mycorrhiza (My) and plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB/B). Maize plants subjected to PGPB, My and combined treatments showed a significant increase in biomass and uptake of some elements in shoot and root. Metabolite analysis identified 110 compounds that were affected ≥2-fold compared to control, with 69 metabolites upregulated in the My group, 53 metabolites in the My+B group and 47 metabolites in B group. Pathway analysis showed that impact on glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism was common between My and My+B groups, whereas PGPB group showed a unique effect on fatty acid biosynthesis with significant increase in palmitic acid and stearic acid. Differential regulation of some metabolites by mycorrhizal treatment correlated with root biomass while PGPB regulated metabolites correlated with biomass increase in shoot. Overall, the combination of rhizospheric microorganisms used in our study significantly increased maize nutrient uptake and growth relative to control. The changes in metabolic pathways identified during the symbiotic interaction will improve our understanding of mechanisms involved in rhizospheric interactions that are responsible for increased growth and nutrient uptake in crop plants.

  4. Phylogenetic Diversity of Archaea and the Archaeal Ammonia Monooxygenase Gene in Uranium Mining-Impacted Locations in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Radeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Uranium mining and milling activities adversely affect the microbial populations of impacted sites. The negative effects of uranium on soil bacteria and fungi are well studied, but little is known about the effects of radionuclides and heavy metals on archaea. The composition and diversity of archaeal communities inhabiting the waste pile of the Sliven uranium mine and the soil of the Buhovo uranium mine were investigated using 16S rRNA gene retrieval. A total of 355 archaeal clones were selected, and their 16S rDNA inserts were analysed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP discriminating 14 different RFLP types. All evaluated archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences belong to the 1.1b/Nitrososphaera cluster of Crenarchaeota. The composition of the archaeal community is distinct for each site of interest and dependent on environmental characteristics, including pollution levels. Since the members of 1.1b/Nitrososphaera cluster have been implicated in the nitrogen cycle, the archaeal communities from these sites were probed for the presence of the ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA. Our data indicate that amoA gene sequences are distributed in a similar manner as in Crenarchaeota, suggesting that archaeal nitrification processes in uranium mining-impacted locations are under the control of the same key factors controlling archaeal diversity.

  5. A Synoptic Climatology of Heavy Rain Events in the Lake Eyre and Lake Frome Catchments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael John Pook

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The rare occasions when Lake Eyre in central, southern Australia fills with water excite great interest and produce major ecological responses. The filling of other smaller lakes such as Lake Frome, have less impact but can contribute important information about the current and past climates of these arid regions. Here, the dominant synoptic systems responsible for heavy rainfall over the catchments of Lake Eyre and Lake Frome since 1950 are identified and compared. Heavy rain events are defined as those where the mean catchment rainfall for 24 hours reaches a prescribed threshold. There were 25 such daily events at Lake Eyre and 28 in the Lake Frome catchment. The combination of a monsoon trough at mean sea level and a geopotential trough in the mid-troposphere was found to be the synoptic system responsible for the majority of the heavy rain events affecting Lake Eyre and one in five of the events at Lake Frome. Complex fronts where subtropical interactions occurred with Southern Ocean fronts also contributed over 20% of the heavy rainfall events in the Frome catchment. Surface troughs without upper air support were found to be associated with 10% or fewer of events in each catchment, indicating that mean sea level pressure analyses alone do not adequately capture the complexity of the heavy rainfall events. At least 80% of the heavy rain events across both catchments occurred when the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI was in its positive phase, and for Lake Frome, the SOI exceeded +10 on 60% of occasions, suggesting that the background atmospheric state in the Pacific Ocean was tilted towards La Niña. Hydrological modeling of the catchments suggests that the 12-month running mean of the soil moisture in a sub-surface layer provides a low frequency filter of the precipitation and matches measured lake levels relatively well.

  6. Stability measures in arid ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosshi, M. I.; Brunsell, N. A.; Koerner, S.

    2015-12-01

    Stability, the capacity of ecosystems to persist in the face of change, has proven its relevance as a fundamental component of ecological theory. Here, we would like to explore meaningful and quantifiable metrics to define stability, with a focus on highly variable arid and semi-arid savanna ecosystems. Recognizing the importance of a characteristic timescale to any definition of stability, our metrics will be focused scales from annual to multi-annual, capturing different aspects of stability. Our three measures of stability, in increasing order of temporal scale, are: (1) Ecosystem resistance, quantified as the degree to which the system maintains its mean state in response to a perturbation (drought), based on inter-annual variability in Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). (2) An optimization approach, relevant to arid systems with pulse dynamics, that models vegetation structure and function based on a trade off between the ability to respond to resource availability and avoid stress. (3) Community resilience, measured as species turnover rate (β diversity). Understanding the nature of stability in structurally-diverse arid ecosystems, which are highly variable, yields theoretical insight which has practical implications.

  7. Water balance modeling of Upper Blue Nile catchments using a top-down approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tekleab

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The water balances of twenty catchments in the Upper Blue Nile basin have been analyzed using a top-down modeling approach based on Budyko's hypotheses. The objective of this study is to obtain better understanding of water balance dynamics of upper Blue Nile catchments on annual and monthly time scales and on a spatial scale of meso scale to large scale. The water balance analysis using a Budyko-type curve at annual scale reveals that the aridity index does not exert a first order control in most of the catchments. This implies the need to increase model complexity to monthly time scale to include the effects of seasonal soil moisture dynamics. The dynamic water balance model used in this study predicts the direct runoff and other processes based on the limit concept; i.e. for dry environments since rainfall amount is small, the aridity index approaches to infinity or equivalently evaporation approaches rainfall and for wet environments where the rainfall amount is large, the aridity index approaches to zero and actual evaporation approaches the potential evaporation. The uncertainty of model parameters has been assessed using the GLUE (Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation methodology. The results show that the majority of the parameters are reasonably well identifiable. However, the baseflow recession constant was poorly identifiable. Parameter uncertainty and model structural errors could be the reason for the poorly identifiable parameter. Moreover, a multi-objective model calibration strategy has been employed to emphasize the different aspects of the hydrographs on low and high flows.

    The model has been calibrated and validated against observed streamflow time series and it shows good performance for the twenty study catchments in the upper Blue Nile. During the calibration period (1995–2000 the Nash and Sutcliffe efficiency (E NS for monthly flow prediction varied between 0.52 to 0.93 (dominated by

  8. Annual plants in arid and semi-arid desert regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuehua LI; Xiaolan LI; Deming JIANG; Zhimin LIU; Qinghe YU

    2008-01-01

    Annual plants are the main vegetation in arid and semi-arid desert regions.Because of their unique traits,they are the optimal experimental subjects for eco-logical studies.In this article,we summarize annual plants' seed germination strategies,seedling adaptability mechanism to environments,seed dispersal,and soil seed banks.We also discuss the biotic and abiotic factors affecting the composition and dynamics of annual plant populations and communities.Because annual plants have important ecological functions in desert vegetation systems,this study on annual plants will be of great bene-fit to the conservation and restoration of desert ecosys-tems,the rational utilization of resources,and the sustainable development of desert regions.

  9. Estimating Catchment-Scale Snowpack Variability in Complex Forested Terrain, Valles Caldera National Preserve, NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpold, A. A.; Brooks, P. D.; Biederman, J. A.; Swetnam, T.

    2011-12-01

    Difficulty estimating snowpack variability across complex forested terrain currently hinders the prediction of water resources in the semi-arid Southwestern U.S. Catchment-scale estimates of snowpack variability are necessary for addressing ecological, hydrological, and water resources issues, but are often interpolated from a small number of point-scale observations. In this study, we used LiDAR-derived distributed datasets to investigate how elevation, aspect, topography, and vegetation interact to control catchment-scale snowpack variability. The study area is the Redondo massif in the Valles Caldera National Preserve, NM, a resurgent dome that varies from 2500 to 3430 m and drains from all aspects. Mean LiDAR-derived snow depths from four catchments (2.2 to 3.4 km^2) draining different aspects of the Redondo massif varied by 30%, despite similar mean elevations and mixed conifer forest cover. To better quantify this variability in snow depths we performed a multiple linear regression (MLR) at a 7.3 by 7.3 km study area (5 x 106 snow depth measurements) comprising the four catchments. The MLR showed that elevation explained 45% of the variability in snow depths across the study area, aspect explained 18% (dominated by N-S aspect), and vegetation 2% (canopy density and height). This linear relationship was not transferable to the catchment-scale however, where additional MLR analyses showed the influence of aspect and elevation differed between the catchments. The strong influence of North-South aspect in most catchments indicated that the solar radiation is an important control on snow depth variability. To explore the role of solar radiation, a model was used to generate winter solar forcing index (SFI) values based on the local and remote topography. The SFI was able to explain a large amount of snow depth variability in areas with similar elevation and aspect. Finally, the SFI was modified to include the effects of shading from vegetation (in and out of

  10. The recharge process in alluvial strip aquifers in arid Namibia and implication for artificial recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Diganta; Xu, Yongxin

    2016-10-01

    Alluvial strip aquifers associated with ephemeral rivers are important groundwater supply sources that sustain numerous settlements and ecological systems in arid Namibia. More than 70 % of the population in the nation's western and southern regions depend on alluvial aquifers associated with ephemeral rivers. Under natural conditions, recharge occurs through infiltration during flood events. Due to the characteristic spatial and temporal variability of rainfall in arid regions, recharge is irregular making the aquifers challenging to manage sustainably and they are often overexploited. This condition is likely to become more acute with increasing water demand and climate change, and artificial recharge has been projected as the apparent means of increasing reliability of supply. The article explores, through a case study and numerical simulation, the processes controlling infiltration, significance of surface water and groundwater losses, and possible artificial recharge options. It is concluded that recharge processes in arid alluvial aquifers differ significantly from those processes in subhumid systems and viability of artificial recharge requires assessment through an understanding of the natural recharge process and losses from the aquifer. It is also established that in arid-region catchments, infiltration through the streambed occurs at rates dependent on factors such as antecedent conditions, flow rate, flow duration, channel morphology, and sediment texture and composition. The study provides an important reference for sustainable management of alluvial aquifer systems in similar regions.

  11. Mitigating Climate Change in the Arid Lands of Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Martin B.; Sorensen, Marten

    2014-05-01

    Mitigating Climate Change in the Arid Lands of Namibia Namibia is the most arid country south of the Sahara, with scarce rainfall and perennial rivers only at its borders, > 80% of the area relies solely on groundwater. This has had devastating economic effects limiting opportunities for sustainable rural livelihoods that keep the population majority living below the World Bank poverty line (IFAD, 2013). A primary example of climatic variability which affects agrarian productivity is increased bush encroachment of Namibia's arid grazing land. The result has been a severe biodiversity loss, increased desertification and diminished water-use efficiency and underground water tables. Given these factors, Namibia's arid lands provide a unique opportunity to assess and test innovative / appropriate adaptation and mitigation strategies. Working toward sustainable management, restoration, and maintenance of balanced, resilient arid ecosystems in Namibia will also be a means to support and expand economic sectors incl. opportunities for job creation and potentially provide a model for similar arid regions. Main vegetation zones are: desert (46%), savannah (37%), and dry woodlands and forests (17%), i.e. human capacities are already in place. However, overall climate variability appears significantly higher than current plans and policies take into account. To improve livelihoods, reduce poverty, and food insecurity for rural Namibians in marginal/hyper-arid lands through sustainable climate change adaptation these objectives will be implemented: 1. Identify, assess and evaluate indigenous management strategies currently used by rural communities. 2. Capture and assess cultural and gender dimensions of management strategies within stakeholder groups using participatory approaches. 3. Determine science-based alternatives for adaptive land management strategies and test their acceptability to local communities and within the current policy framework. 4. Integrate identified

  12. Downscaled TRMM Rainfall Time-Series for Catchment Hydrology Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnavsky, E.; Mulligan, M.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrology in semi-arid regions is controlled, to a large extent, by the spatial and temporal distribution of rainfall defined in terms of rainfall depth and intensity. Thus, appropriate representation of the space-time variability of rainfall is essential for catchment-scale hydrological models applied in semi-arid regions. While spaceborne platforms equipped with remote sensing instruments provide information on a range of variables for hydrological modelling, including rainfall, the necessary spatial and temporal detail is rarely obtained from a single dataset. This paper presents a new dynamic model of dryland hydrology, DryMOD, which makes best use of free, public-domain remote sensing data for representation of key variables with a particular focus on (a) simulation of spatial rainfall fields and (b) the hydrological response to rainfall, particularly in terms of rainfall-runoff partitioning. In DryMOD, rainfall is simulated using a novel approach combining 1-km spatial detail from a climatology derived from the TRMM 2B31 dataset (mean monthly rainfall) and 3-hourly temporal detail from time-series derived from the 0.25-degree gridded TRMM 3B42 dataset (rainfall intensity). This allows for rainfall simulation at the hourly time step, as well as accumulation of infiltration, recharge, and runoff at the monthly time step. In combination with temperature, topography, and soil data, rainfall-runoff and soil moisture dynamics are simulated over large dryland regions. In order to investigate the hydrological response to rainfall and variable catchment characteristics, the model is applied to two very different catchments in the drylands of North and West Africa. The results of the study demonstrate the use of remote sensing-based estimates of precipitation intensity and volume for the simulation of critical hydrological parameters. The model allows for better spatial planning of water harvesting activities, as well as for optimisation of agricultural activities

  13. Water balance modeling of Upper Blue Nile catchments using a top-down approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tekleab

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The hydrological behavior and functioning of twenty catchments in the Upper Blue Nile basin have been analyzed using a top-down modeling approach that is based on Budyko's hypotheses. The objective is to obtain better understanding of catchment response for prediction in ungauged catchments. The water balance analysis using Budyko-type curve at annual scale reveals that the aridity index does not exert a first order control in most of the catchments. This implies the need to increase model complexity to a monthly time scale to include the effects of seasonal soil moisture dynamics. The dynamic water balance model used in this study predicts the direct runoff and other processes based on limit concept. The uncertainty of model parameters has been assessed using the GLUE (Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation. The results show that the majority of the parameters are reasonably well identifiable. Moreover, a multi-objective model calibration strategy has been employed within the GLUE framework to emphasize the different aspects of the hydrographs on low and high flows. The model has been calibrated and validated against observed streamflow time series and it shows good performance for the twenty catchments of the upper Blue Nile. During the calibration period (1995–2000 the Nash and Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency for monthly flow prediction varied between 0.52 to 0.93 during high flows, while it varied between 0.32 to 0.90 during low flows (logarithms of flow series. The model is parsimonious and it is suggested that the resulting parameters can be used to predict monthly stream flows in the ungauged catchments of the Upper Blue Nile basin, which accounts about 60% of total Nile basin flow.

  14. Role of glaciers in watershed hydrology: a preliminary study of a "Himalayan catchment"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Thayyen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A large number of Himalayan glacier catchments are under the influence of humid climate with snowfall in winter (November–April and south-west monsoon in summer (June–September dominating the regional hydrology. Such catchments are defined as "Himalayan catchment", where the glacier meltwater contributes to the river flow during the period of annual high flows produced by the monsoon. The winter snow dominated Alpine catchments of the Kashmir and Karakoram region and cold-arid regions of the Ladakh mountain range are the other major glacio-hydrological regimes identified in the region. Factors influencing the river flow variations in a "Himalayan catchment" were studied in a micro-scale glacier catchment in the Garhwal Himalaya, covering an area of 77.8 km2. Three hydrometric stations were established at different altitudes along the Din Gad stream and discharge was monitored during the summer ablation period from 1998 to 2004, with an exception in 2002. These data have been analysed along with winter/summer precipitation, temperature and mass balance data of the Dokriani glacier to study the role of glacier and precipitation in determining runoff variations along the stream continuum from the glacier snout to 2360 m a.s.l. The study shows that the inter-annual runoff variation in a "Himalayan catchment" is linked with precipitation rather than mass balance changes of the glacier. This study also indicates that the warming induced an initial increase of glacier runoff and subsequent decline as suggested by the IPCC (2007 is restricted to the glacier degradation-derived component in a precipitation dominant Himalayan catchment and cannot be translated as river flow response. The preliminary assessment suggests that the "Himalayan catchment" could experience higher river flows and positive glacier mass balance regime together in association with strong monsoon. The important role of glaciers in this precipitation dominant system is

  15. Role of glaciers in watershed hydrology: ''Himalayan catchment'' perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Thayyen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A large number of Himalayan glacier catchments are under the influence of humid climate with snowfall in winter (November–April and South-West monsoon in summer (June–September dominating the regional hydrology. Such catchments are defined as ''Himalayan catchment'', where the glacier melt water contributes to the river flow during the period of annual high flows produced by the monsoon. Other two major glacio-hydrological regimes of the Himalaya are winter snow dominated Alpine catchments of the Kashmir and Karakoram region and cold-arid regions of the Ladakh mountain range. Factors influencing the river flow variations in a ''Himalayan catchment'' were studied in a micro scale glacier catchment in the Garhwal Himalaya, covering an area of 77.8 km2. Discharge data generated from three hydrometric stations established at different altitudes of the Din Gad stream during the summer ablation period of 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003 and 2004. These data has been analysed along with winter/summer precipitation, temperature and mass balance data of the Dokriani glacier to study the role of the glacier and precipitation in determining the runoff variations along the stream continuum from the glacier snout to 2360 m a.s.l. Study shows that the inter-annual runoff variations in a ''Himalayan glacier catchment'' is directly linked with the precipitation rather than mass balance changes of the glacier. Study suggest that warming induced initial increase of glacier degraded runoff and subsequent decline is a glaciers mass balance response and cannot be translated as river flow response in a ''Himalayan catchment'' as suggested by the IPCC, 2007. Study also suggest that the glacier runoff critically influence the headwater river flows during the years of low summer discharge and proposes that the Himalayan catchment could experience higher river flows and positive

  16. CHARACTERISTICS OF ARIDITY CONDITIONS IN SOUTH DOBRUDJA

    OpenAIRE

    A. TISCOVSCHI; GABRIELA MANEA; O. COCOS; IULIANA VIJULIE; ROXANA CUCULICI

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics of Aridity Conditions in South Dobrudja. For most people, the arid and semi-arid lands are those where precipitation is low (less than 200 mm per year), and yet enough for supplying streams capable of temporarily carrying the debris resulted from weathering, but insufficient for encouraging the development of a vegetal cover meant to protect the soil blanket against eroding agents. The drought is a major and permanent climatic risk for the Dobrudja territory as a whole and for...

  17. Mitigating Climate Change in the Arid Lands of Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Martin B.; Sorensen, Marten

    2014-05-01

    Mitigating Climate Change in the Arid Lands of Namibia Namibia is the most arid country south of the Sahara, with scarce rainfall and perennial rivers only at its borders, > 80% of the area relies solely on groundwater. This has had devastating economic effects limiting opportunities for sustainable rural livelihoods that keep the population majority living below the World Bank poverty line (IFAD, 2013). A primary example of climatic variability which affects agrarian productivity is increased bush encroachment of Namibia's arid grazing land. The result has been a severe biodiversity loss, increased desertification and diminished water-use efficiency and underground water tables. Given these factors, Namibia's arid lands provide a unique opportunity to assess and test innovative / appropriate adaptation and mitigation strategies. Working toward sustainable management, restoration, and maintenance of balanced, resilient arid ecosystems in Namibia will also be a means to support and expand economic sectors incl. opportunities for job creation and potentially provide a model for similar arid regions. Main vegetation zones are: desert (46%), savannah (37%), and dry woodlands and forests (17%), i.e. management strategies currently used by rural communities. 2. Capture and assess cultural and gender dimensions of management strategies within stakeholder groups using participatory approaches. 3. Determine science-based alternatives for adaptive land management strategies and test their acceptability to local communities and within the current policy framework. 4. Integrate identified indigenous knowledge with appropriate science and new emerging technologies to develop a training toolkit of effective strategies relevant to all stakeholders. 5. Utilize training sessions, education workshops, curriculum revisions, and appropriate information and communication technologies (ICTs) including social media outlets to disseminate the toolkit strategies. 6. Apply a modified logic

  18. Effects of aridity in controlling the magnitude of runoff and erosion after wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noske, Philip J.; Nyman, Petter; Lane, Patrick N. J.; Sheridan, Gary J.

    2016-06-01

    This study represents a uniquely high-resolution observation of postwildfire runoff and erosion from dry forested uplands of SE Australia. We monitored runoff and sediment load, and temporal changes in soil surface properties from two (0.2-0.3 ha) dry forested catchments burned during the 2009 Black Saturday wildfire. Event-based surface runoff to rainfall ratios approached 0.45 during the first year postwildfire, compared to reported values runoff ratios in these dry forests were attributed to wildfire-induced soil water repellency and inherently low hydraulic conductivity. Mean ponded hydraulic conductivity ranged from 3 to 29 mm h-1, much lower than values commonly reported for wetter forest. Annual sediment yields peaked at 10 t ha-1 during the first year before declining dramatically to background levels, suggesting high-magnitude erosion processes may become limited by sediment availability on hillslopes. Small differences in aridity between equatorial and polar-facing catchments produced substantial differences in surface runoff and erosion, most likely due to higher infiltration and surface roughness on polar-facing slopes. In summary, the results show that postwildfire erosion processes in Eucalypt forests in south-east Australia are highly variable and that distinctive response domains within the region exist between different forest types, therefore regional generalizations are problematic. The large differences in erosion processes with relatively small changes in aridity have large implications for predicting hydrologic-driven geomorphic changes, land degradation, and water contamination through erosion after wildfire across the landscape.

  19. Modeling the distributed effects of forest thinning on the long-term water balance and streamflow extremes for a semi-arid basin in the southwestern US

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno, Hernan A.; Gupta, Hoshin V.; Dave D. White; Sampson, David A.

    2016-01-01

    To achieve water resource sustainability in the water-limited southwestern US, it is critical to understand the potential effects of proposed forest thinning on the hydrology of semi-arid basins, where disturbances to headwater catchments can cause significant changes in the local water balance components and basinwise streamflows. In Arizona, the Four Forest Restoration Initiative (4FRI) is being developed with the goal of restoring 2.4 million acres of ponderosa pine along...

  20. Associations between metals in residential environmental media and exposure biomarkers over time in infants living near a mining-impacted site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zota, Ami R; Riederer, Anne M; Ettinger, Adrienne S; Schaider, Laurel A; Shine, James P; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra J; Wright, Robert O; Spengler, John D

    2016-09-01

    Infant exposures to metals are a concern for mining-impacted communities, although limited information is available to assess residential exposures over the first year of life. We measured lead (Pb), manganese, arsenic, and cadmium in indoor air, house dust, yard soil, and tap water from 53 infants' homes near the Tar Creek Superfund Site (Oklahoma, USA) at two time points representing developmental stages before and during initial ambulation (age 0-6 and 6-12 months). We measured infant metal biomarkers in: umbilical cord blood (n=53); 12- (n=43) and 24- (n=22) month blood; and hair at age 12 months (n=39). We evaluated cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between infant residential and biomarker concentrations. A doubling of mean dust Pb concentration was consistently associated with 36-49% higher 12-month blood Pb adjusting for cord blood Pb (P⩽0.05). Adjusted dust concentration explained 29-35% of blood Pb variance, and consistent associations with other media were not observed. Although concentrations in dust and blood were generally low, strong and consistent associations between dust and body burden suggest that house dust in mining-impacted communities may impact children's health. These relationships were observed at a young age, typically before blood Pb levels peak and when children's development may be particularly vulnerable to toxic insult. PMID:26648247

  1. Climatic and Catchment-Scale Predictors of Chinese Stream Insect Richness Differ between Taxonomic Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin, Jonathan D; Shah, Deep Narayan; Kuemmerlen, Mathias; Li, Fengqing; Cai, Qinghua; Haase, Peter; Jähnig, Sonja C

    2015-01-01

    Little work has been done on large-scale patterns of stream insect richness in China. We explored the influence of climatic and catchment-scale factors on stream insect (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera; EPT) richness across mid-latitude China. We assessed the predictive ability of climatic, catchment land cover and physical structure variables on genus richness of EPT, both individually and combined, in 80 mid-latitude Chinese streams, spanning a 3899-m altitudinal gradient. We performed analyses using boosted regression trees and explored the nature of their influence on richness patterns. The relative importance of climate, land cover, and physical factors on stream insect richness varied considerably between the three orders, and while important for Ephemeroptera and Plecoptera, latitude did not improve model fit for any of the groups. EPT richness was linked with areas comprising high forest cover, elevation and slope, large catchments and low temperatures. Ephemeroptera favoured areas with high forest cover, medium-to-large catchment sizes, high temperature seasonality, and low potential evapotranspiration. Plecoptera richness was linked with low temperature seasonality and annual mean, and high slope, elevation and warm-season rainfall. Finally, Trichoptera favoured high elevation areas, with high forest cover, and low mean annual temperature, seasonality and aridity. Our findings highlight the variable role that catchment land cover, physical properties and climatic influences have on stream insect richness. This is one of the first studies of its kind in Chinese streams, thus we set the scene for more in-depth assessments of stream insect richness across broader spatial scales in China, but stress the importance of improving data availability and consistency through time.

  2. On predicting debris flows in arid mountain belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolle, Amelie; Langer, Maria; Blöthe, Jan Henrik; Korup, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    The use of topographic metrics for estimating the susceptibility to, and reconstructing the characteristics of, debris flows has a long research tradition, although largely devoted to humid mountainous terrain. The exceptional 2010 monsoonal rainstorms in the high-altitude mountain desert of Ladakh and Zanskar, NW India, were a painful reminder of how susceptible arid regions are to rainfall-triggered flash floods, landslides, and debris flows. The rainstorms of August 4-6 triggered numerous debris flows, killing 182 people, devastating 607 houses, and more than 10 bridges around Ladakh's capital of Leh. The lessons from this disaster motivated us to revisit methods of predicting (a) flow parameters such as peak discharge and maximum velocity from field and remote sensing data, and (b) the susceptibility to debris flows from catchment morphometry. We focus on quantifying uncertainties tied to these approaches. Comparison of high-resolution satellite images pre- and post-dating the 2010 rainstorm reveals the extent of damage and catastrophic channel widening. Computations based on these geomorphic markers indicate maximum flow velocities of 1.6-6.7 m s- 1 with runout of up to ~ 10 km on several alluvial fans that sustain most of the region's settlements. We estimate median peak discharges of 310-610 m3 s- 1, which are largely consistent with previous estimates. Monte Carlo-based error propagation for a single given flow-reconstruction method returns a variance in discharge similar to one derived from juxtaposing several different flow reconstruction methods. We further compare discriminant analysis, classification tree modelling, and Bayesian logistic regression to predict debris-flow susceptibility from morphometric variables of 171 catchments in the Ladakh Range. These methods distinguish between fluvial and debris flow-prone catchments at similar success rates, but Bayesian logistic regression allows quantifying uncertainties and relationships between potential

  3. A Methodology to Assess and Evaluate Rainwater Harvesting Techniques in (Semi-)Arid Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ammar; Riksen, Michel; Ouessar, Mohamed; Ritsema, Coen

    2015-04-01

    Arid and semi-arid regions around the world are generally facing water scarcity problems due to lack of precipitation and unpredictable rainfall patterns. For thousands of years rainwater harvesting (RWH) techniques have been applied to cope with water scarcity. Many researchers have presented and applied different methodologies for determining suitable sites and techniques for RWH. However, there is still little attention given to evaluation of the performance of RWH structures. The aim of this research was to design a scientifically-based and generally applicable methodology to evaluate and assess the performance of existing RWH techniques in (semi-) arid regions. The methodology takes engineering, biophysical, and socio-economic criteria into account to assess the performance of RWH using the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) supported by Geographic Information System (GIS). The Oum Zessar watershed in south-eastern Tunisia is used as a case study site to test this evaluation tool. The performance of 58 RWH locations (14 jessour and 44 tabias) in three main sub-catchments of Oum Zessar watershed were assessed and evaluated. Based on the criteria selected, 60performance, 36received good performance scores. The results very accurately represent the real performance of each site. This integrated methodology, which is highly flexible, saves time and costs, and is easy to adapt in different regions, provides a scientifically based analytical tool to support designers and decision makers aiming to improve the performance of existing and new RWH sites.

  4. Thresholds for runoff and sediment transport in Semi-arid areas; implications for connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, L. J.; Kirkby, M. J.

    2007-05-01

    The concept of connectivity is increasingly being applied within a range of disciplines in the Earth and Environmental sciences as researchers recognize the need to move beyond the traditional view that runoff is generated by either Hortonian infiltration excess or by the variable source area model. In studies which focus on connectivity two key assumptions tend to be made. Firstly, that runoff thresholds must be exceeded for runoff to be produced and secondly, that all factors that influence runoff thresholds are important for hydrological connectivity. It follows that hillslope hydrological connectivity can be initiated by shorter duration, or lower intensity events, whereas catchment-scale hydrological connectivity and flooding, requires prolonged, high intensity storms. Each catchment thus has a base spatial pattern in terms of connectivity, depending on key runoff generating areas, and a response curve as the catchments wets up. In this paper we explore how this base spatial pattern changes according to thresholds in the landscape for runoff generation and sediment transport. By examining a range of events at different spatial scales it is hoped that an understanding can be developed of key thresholds in semi-arid landscapes which will assist in understanding long term landscape development.

  5. Hydropedological insights when considering catchment classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bouma

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil classification systems are analysed to explore the potential of developing classification systems for catchments. Soil classifications are useful to create systematic order in the overwhelming quantity of different soils in the world and to extrapolate data available for a given soil type to soils elsewhere with identical classifications. This principle also applies to catchments. However, to be useful, soil classifications have to be based on permanent characteristics as formed by the soil forming factors over often very long periods of time. When defining permanent catchment characteristics, discharge data would therefore appear to be less suitable. But permanent soil characteristics do not necessarily match with characteristics and parameters needed for functional soil characterization focusing, for example, on catchment hydrology. Hydropedology has made contributions towards the required functional characterization of soils as is illustrated for three recent hydrological catchment studies. However, much still needs to be learned about the physical behaviour of anisotropic, heterogeneous soils with varying soil structures during the year and about spatial and temporal variability. The suggestion is made therefore to first focus on improving simulation of catchment hydrology, possibly incorporating hydropedological expertise, before embarking on a catchment classification effort which involves major input of time and involves the risk of distraction. In doing so, we suggest to also define other characteristics for catchment performance than the traditionally measured discharge rates. Such characteristics may well be derived from societal issues being studied, as is illustrated for the Green Water Credits program.

  6. Collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Christopher Kit

    2015-04-01

    There is a need to improve the production, sharing and use of collaborative knowledge of catchment systems through networks of researchers, policy makers and practitioners. This requires greater levels of systems based integrative research. In parallel to the growing realization that greater levels of collaborative knowledge in scientific research networks are required, a digital revolution has been taking place. This has been driven primarily by the emergence of distributed networks of computers and standards-based interoperability. The objective of this paper is to present the status and research needs for greater levels of systems based integrative research for the production, sharing and use of collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks. To enable increased levels of integrative research depends on development and application of digital technologies to improve collection, use and sharing of data and devise new knowledge infrastructures. This paper focuses on the requirements for catchment observatories that integrate existing and novel physical, social and digital networks of knowledge infrastructures. To support this focus, I present three leading international examples of collaborative networks of catchment researchers and their development of catchment observatories. In particular, the digital infrastructures they have developed to support collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks. These examples are from North America (NSF funded CUAHSI HIS) and from Europe (UK NERC funded EVOp and the German Helmholtz Association Centers funded TERENO/TEODOOR). These exemplars all supported advancing collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks through the development of catchment observatories. I will conclude by discussing the future research directions required for greater levels of production, sharing and use of collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks based on catchment systems science.

  7. Shift of annual water balance in the Budyko space for catchments with groundwater-dependent evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu-Sheng; Zhou, Yangxiao

    2016-09-01

    The Budyko framework represents the general relationship between the evapotranspiration ratio (F) and the aridity index (φ) for the mean annual steady-state water balance at the catchment scale. It is interesting to investigate whether this standard F - φ space can also be applied to capture the shift of annual water balance in catchments with varying dryness. Previous studies have made significant progress in incorporating the storage effect into the Budyko framework for the non-steady conditions, whereas the role of groundwater-dependent evapotranspiration was not investigated. This study investigates how groundwater-dependent evapotranspiration causes the shift of the annual water balance in the standard Budyko space. A widely used monthly hydrological model, the ABCD model, is modified to incorporate groundwater-dependent evapotranspiration into the zone with a shallow water table and delayed groundwater recharge into the zone with a deep water table. This model is applied in six catchments in the Erdos Plateau, China, to estimate the actual annual evapotranspiration. Results show that the variations in the annual F value with the aridity index do not satisfy the standard Budyko formulas. The shift of the annual water balance in the standard Budyko space is a combination of the Budyko-type response in the deep groundwater zone and the quasi-energy limited condition in the shallow groundwater zone. Excess evapotranspiration (F > 1) could occur in dry years, which is contributed by the significant supply of groundwater for evapotranspiration. Use of groundwater for irrigation can increase the frequency of the F > 1 cases.

  8. Biodegradation of biphenyl and removal of 2-chlorobiphenyl by Pseudomonas sp. KM-04 isolated from PCBs-contaminated mine impacted soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, I.; Chon, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to remediate the PCBs contaminated mine soil using microcosm study. For that, the naturally occurring microorganisms are stimulated and enriched in soil itself by supplementing biphenyl as well as benzoic acid. As a result the biphenyl degrading organisms are induced to degrade the PCBs contamination. From the stimulated soil, the biphenyl degrading organisms are isolated and degraded metabolites are elucidated. Pseudomonas sp. strain KM-04 was isolated from PCBs-contaminated soil in a coal mine-impacted area, and identification of bacteria was done by sequencing the 16S rRNA gene analysis. The growth of Pseudomonas sp. strain KM-04 using biphenyl as the sole carbon source was investigated by culturing in 100-mL Erlenmeyer flasks containing 10 ml sterilized MSM and 10 μg/ml biphenyl, and the ability of KM-04 to remove biphenyl and 2-chlorobiphenyl from mine soil was investigated. Metabolite formation was confirmed by liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometric analysis. Pseudomonas sp. strain KM-04 uses biphenyl as a sole carbon and energy source, and resting cells convert biphenyl to its metabolic intermediates, including dihydroxybiphenyl, 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-6-phenylhexa-2,4-dienoic acid, and benzoic acid. Incubation of real soil collected from abandoned mine areas with resting cells of Pseudomonas sp. strain KM-04 for 10 days resulted in the 98.5 % of biphenyl and 82.3 % of 2-chlorobiphenyl in a slurry system. The ability of the Pseudomonas sp. strain KM-04 to bioremediate biphenyl and 2-chlorobiphenyl from abandoned mine soil was examined using soil microcosm studies under laboratory conditions. Treatment of mine soil with the Pseudomonas sp. strain KM-04 for 15 days resulted in 87.1 % reduction in biphenyl and 68.7 % in 2-chlorobiphenyl contents. The results suggest that Pseudomonas sp. strain KM-04 is a potential candidate for the biological removal of biphenyl and chlorinated derivatives

  9. Excess erosion and deposition in the catchments of Kamenichka and Radanjska river, Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milevski Ivica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the greatest environmental problems in the Republic of Macedonia is accelerated soil erosion caused by high human impact during last centuries on to the susceptible landscape. Natural factors itself are very suitable for development of such erosion: from mostly erodible rocks and soils on the mountainous slopes around the depressions, to the generally continental, semi-arid climate and slight vegetation cover. Because of that, there are sites with severe erosion and deposition like those in the catchments of Kamenichka River and Radanjska River, two torrential tributaries of Bregalnica. In these catchments there are varieties of erosion-related landforms: rills, gullies, badlands, landslides, as well as valley-type alluvial fans and huge alluvial plains. Such devastating accelerated erosion and deposition largely transformed original landscape, and represent significant environmental, social, and economic problem in local areas. Because of that, some measures of protection and conservation were taken from 1950-ties in both catchments. But it is obvious that the final effect of these measures is far of enough, so new efforts must be implemented to revitalizing these abandoned lands.

  10. SCIENCES IN COLD AND ARID REGIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Aims and Scope Sciences in Cold and Arid Regions, an international Engiish-language journal, is devoted to publishing the latest research achievements on the process and the pattern of Earth surface system in cold and arid regions. Researches in cold regions 1) emphasize particularly on the cold-region-characterized physical, chemical and biological processes and their interactions, and on the response of Cryosphere to Global change and Human activities as well as its effect to environment and the acclimatizable

  11. Using high resolution aridity and drainage position data to better predict rainfall-runoff relationships in complex upland topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzen, D.; Sheridan, G. J.; Benyon, R. G.; Lane, P. N. J.

    2015-12-01

    In topographically complex terrain, the interaction of aspect-dependent solar exposure and drainage-position-dependent flow accumulation results in energy and water partitioning that is highly spatially variable. Catchment scale rainfall-runoff relationships are dependent on these smaller scale spatial patterns. However, there remains considerable uncertainty as to how to represent this smaller scale variability within lumped parameter, catchment scale rainfall-runoff models. In this study we aim to measure and represent the key interactions between aridity and drainage position in complex terrain to inform the development of simple catchment-scale hydrologic model parameters. Six measurement plots were setup on opposing slopes in an east-west facing eucalypt forest headwater catchment. The field sites are spanning three drainage positions with two contrasting aridity indices each, while minimizing variations in other factors, e.g. geology and weather patterns. Sapflow, soil water content (SWC) and throughfall were continuously monitored on two convergent hillslopes with similar size (1.3 and 1.6ha) but contrasting aspects (north and south). Soil depth varied from 0.6m at the topslope to >2m at the bottomslope positions. Maximum tree heights ranged from 16.2m to 36.9m on the equator-facing slope and from 30.1m to 45.5m on the pole-facing slope, with height decreasing upslope on both aspects. Two evapotranspiration (ET) patterns emerged in relation to aridity and drainage position. On the equator-facing slope (AI~ 2.1), seasonal understorey and overstorey ET patterns were in sync, whereas on the pole-facing slope (AI~1.5) understorey ET showed larger seasonal fluctuations than overstorey ET. Seasonal ET patterns and competition between soil evaporation and root water uptake lead to distinct differences in profile SWC across the sites, likely caused by depletion from different depths. Topsoil water content on equator-facing slopes was generally lower and responded

  12. Ground water input to a rare flood event in an arid zone ephemeral river identified with isotopes and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various isotope studies in temperate climates have shown that the shallow groundwater component feeding perennial rivers during rainfall events can be more important than surface runoff, We report here on possibly unique isotopic and chemical evidence of groundwater contributions to a rare flood event of the ephemeral Auob River during the exceptional rains of 1999/2000 in the arid/semiarid Kalahari of south-eastern Namibia. The recognition of this process was enabled by a detailed knowledge of the isotope hydrology of groundwater in the area and provided insights into aspects of the palaeo-hydrology of the Auob River catchment. (author)

  13. Doing hydrology backwards in tropical humid catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real Rangel, R.; Brena-Naranjo, J. A.; Pedrozo-Acuña, A.

    2015-12-01

    Top-down approaches in hydrology offer the possibility to predict water fluxes at the catchment scale based on the interpretation of the observed hydrological response at the catchment itself. Doing hydrology backwards (inferring precipitation and evapotranspiration rates at the catchment scale from streamflow measurements, see Kirchner (2009)) can be a useful methodology for estimating water fluxes at the catchment and regional scales. Previous studies using this inverse modeling approach have been performed in regions (UK, Switzerland, France, Eastern US) where energy-limited (in winter and early spring) and water-limited conditions (in summer) prevail during a large period of the year. However, such approach has not been tested in regions characterized by a quasi-constant supply of water and energy (e.g. humid tropics). The objective of this work is to infer annual rates of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the last decade in 10 catchments located in Mexico's tropical humid regions. Hourly discharge measurements during recession periods were analyzed and parameters for the nonlinear storage-discharge relationship of each catchment were derived. Results showed large variability in both catchment-scale precipitation and evapotranspiration rates among the selected study sites. Finally, a comparison was done between such estimates and those obtained from remotely-sensed data (TRMM for precipitation and MOD16 for evapotranspiration).

  14. Water Catchment and Storage Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruenig, Michael; Dunbabin, Matt; Moore, Darren

    2010-05-01

    Sensors and Sensor Networks technologies provide the means for comprehensive understanding of natural processes in the environment by radically increasing the availability of empirical data about the natural world. This step change is achieved through a dramatic reduction in the cost of data acquisition and many orders of magnitude increase in the spatial and temporal granularity of measurements. Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) is undertaking a strategic research program developing wireless sensor network technology for environmental monitoring. As part of this research initiative, we are engaging with government agencies to densely monitor water catchments and storages, thereby enhancing understanding of the environmental processes that affect water quality. In the Gold Coast hinterland in Queensland, Australia, we are building sensor networks to monitor restoration of rainforest within the catchment, and to monitor methane flux release and water quality in the water storages. This poster will present our ongoing work in this region of eastern Australia. The Springbrook plateau in the Gold Coast hinterland lies within a World Heritage listed area, has uniquely high rainfall, hosts a wide range of environmental gradients, and forms part of the catchment for Gold Coast's water storages. Parts of the plateau are being restored from agricultural grassland to native rainforest vegetation. Since April 2008, we have had a 10-node, multi-hop sensor network deployed there to monitor microclimate variables. This network will be expanded to 50-nodes in February 2010, and to around 200-nodes and 1000 sensors by mid-2011, spread over an area of approximately 0.8 square kilometers. The extremely dense microclimate sensing will enhance knowledge of the environmental factors that enhance or inhibit the regeneration of native rainforest. The final network will also include nodes with acoustic and image sensing capability for

  15. Exploring the physical controls of regional patterns of flow duration curves - Part 3: A catchment classification system based on regime curve indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopersmith, E.; Yaeger, M. A.; Ye, S.; Cheng, L.; Sivapalan, M.

    2012-11-01

    Predictions of hydrological responses in ungauged catchments can benefit from a classification scheme that can organize and pool together catchments that exhibit a level of hydrologic similarity, especially similarity in some key variable or signature of interest. Since catchments are complex systems with a level of self-organization arising from co-evolution of climate and landscape properties, including vegetation, there is much to be gained from developing a classification system based on a comparative study of a population of catchments across climatic and landscape gradients. The focus of this paper is on climate seasonality and seasonal runoff regime, as characterized by the ensemble mean of within-year variation of climate and runoff. The work on regime behavior is part of an overall study of the physical controls on regional patterns of flow duration curves (FDCs), motivated by the fact that regime behavior leaves a major imprint upon the shape of FDCs, especially the slope of the FDCs. As an exercise in comparative hydrology, the paper seeks to assess the regime behavior of 428 catchments from the MOPEX database simultaneously, classifying and regionalizing them into homogeneous or hydrologically similar groups. A decision tree is developed on the basis of a metric chosen to characterize similarity of regime behavior, using a variant of the Iterative Dichotomiser 3 (ID3) algorithm to form a classification tree and associated catchment classes. In this way, several classes of catchments are distinguished, in which the connection between the five catchments' regime behavior and climate and catchment properties becomes clearer. Only four similarity indices are entered into the algorithm, all of which are obtained from smoothed daily regime curves of climatic variables and runoff. Results demonstrate that climate seasonality plays the most significant role in the classification of US catchments, with rainfall timing and climatic aridity index playing somewhat

  16. Exploring the physical controls of regional patterns of flow duration curves - Part 3: A catchment classification system based on seasonality and runoff regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopersmith, E.; Yaeger, M.; Ye, S.; Cheng, L.; Sivapalan, M.

    2012-06-01

    Predictions of hydrological responses in ungauged catchments can benefit from a classification scheme that can organize and pool together catchments that exhibit a level of hydrologic similarity, especially similarity in some key variable or signature of interest. Since catchments are complex systems with a level of self-organization arising from co-evolution of climate and landscape properties, including vegetation, there is much to be gained from developing a classification system based on a comparative study of a population of catchments across climatic and landscape gradients. The focus of this paper is on climate seasonality and seasonal runoff regime, as characterized by the ensemble mean of within-year variation of climate and runoff. The work on regime behavior is part of an overall study of the physical controls on regional patterns of Flow Duration Curves (FDCs), motivated by the fact that regime behavior leaves a major imprint upon the shape of FDCs, especially the slope of the FDCs. As an exercise in comparative hydrology, the paper seeks to assess the regime behavior of 428 catchments from the MOPEX database simultaneously, classifying and regionalizing them into homogeneous or hydrologically similar groups. A decision tree is developed on the basis of a metric chosen to characterize similarity of regime behavior, using a variant of the Iterative Dichotomiser (ID3) algorithm to form a classification tree and associated catchment classes. In this way, several classes of catchments are distinguished, in which the connection between the catchments' regime behavior and climate and catchment properties becomes self-evident. Only four similarity indices are entered into the algorithm, all of which are obtained from smoothed daily regime curves of climatic variables and runoff. Results demonstrate that climate seasonality plays the most significant role in the classification of US catchments, with rainfall timing and climatic aridity index playing somewhat

  17. Exploring the physical controls of regional patterns of flow duration curves – Part 3: A catchment classification system based on regime curve indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sivapalan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Predictions of hydrological responses in ungauged catchments can benefit from a classification scheme that can organize and pool together catchments that exhibit a level of hydrologic similarity, especially similarity in some key variable or signature of interest. Since catchments are complex systems with a level of self-organization arising from co-evolution of climate and landscape properties, including vegetation, there is much to be gained from developing a classification system based on a comparative study of a population of catchments across climatic and landscape gradients. The focus of this paper is on climate seasonality and seasonal runoff regime, as characterized by the ensemble mean of within-year variation of climate and runoff. The work on regime behavior is part of an overall study of the physical controls on regional patterns of flow duration curves (FDCs, motivated by the fact that regime behavior leaves a major imprint upon the shape of FDCs, especially the slope of the FDCs. As an exercise in comparative hydrology, the paper seeks to assess the regime behavior of 428 catchments from the MOPEX database simultaneously, classifying and regionalizing them into homogeneous or hydrologically similar groups. A decision tree is developed on the basis of a metric chosen to characterize similarity of regime behavior, using a variant of the Iterative Dichotomiser 3 (ID3 algorithm to form a classification tree and associated catchment classes. In this way, several classes of catchments are distinguished, in which the connection between the five catchments' regime behavior and climate and catchment properties becomes clearer. Only four similarity indices are entered into the algorithm, all of which are obtained from smoothed daily regime curves of climatic variables and runoff. Results demonstrate that climate seasonality plays the most significant role in the classification of US catchments, with rainfall timing and climatic aridity index

  18. Exploring the physical controls of regional patterns of flow duration curves – Part 3: A catchment classification system based on seasonality and runoff regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sivapalan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Predictions of hydrological responses in ungauged catchments can benefit from a classification scheme that can organize and pool together catchments that exhibit a level of hydrologic similarity, especially similarity in some key variable or signature of interest. Since catchments are complex systems with a level of self-organization arising from co-evolution of climate and landscape properties, including vegetation, there is much to be gained from developing a classification system based on a comparative study of a population of catchments across climatic and landscape gradients. The focus of this paper is on climate seasonality and seasonal runoff regime, as characterized by the ensemble mean of within-year variation of climate and runoff. The work on regime behavior is part of an overall study of the physical controls on regional patterns of Flow Duration Curves (FDCs, motivated by the fact that regime behavior leaves a major imprint upon the shape of FDCs, especially the slope of the FDCs. As an exercise in comparative hydrology, the paper seeks to assess the regime behavior of 428 catchments from the MOPEX database simultaneously, classifying and regionalizing them into homogeneous or hydrologically similar groups. A decision tree is developed on the basis of a metric chosen to characterize similarity of regime behavior, using a variant of the Iterative Dichotomiser (ID3 algorithm to form a classification tree and associated catchment classes. In this way, several classes of catchments are distinguished, in which the connection between the catchments' regime behavior and climate and catchment properties becomes self-evident. Only four similarity indices are entered into the algorithm, all of which are obtained from smoothed daily regime curves of climatic variables and runoff. Results demonstrate that climate seasonality plays the most significant role in the classification of US catchments, with rainfall timing and climatic aridity index

  19. Rainwater harvesting in arid and semi-arid zones (repr. 1997)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boers, Th.M.

    1994-01-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions, the scarcity of water can be alleviated by rainwater harvesting, which is defined as a method of inducing, collecting, storing, and conserving local surface runoff for agriculture. Rainwater harvesting can be applied with different systems, and this dissertation deals

  20. Spectral Analysis in Catchment Hydrology and Geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, J. W.; Feng, X.; Renshaw, C. E.; Neal, C.

    2001-12-01

    Spectral analysis of chemical tracer time series can be used to probe the internal workings of catchments. It has recently been shown that catchments act as fractal filters for inert chemical tracers like chloride, converting "white noise" rainfall chemistry inputs into fractal "1/f noise" runoff chemistry time series (Kirchner et al., 2000). This implies that catchments have long-tailed travel time distributions, and thus retain soluble contaminants for unexpectedly long timespans. Long-term monitoring data from North America, Britain, and Scandinavia show that this fractal behavior characterizes a wide array of catchments. How can this fractal scaling arise in such diverse settings? One can show that advection and dispersion of spatially distributed rainfall tracer inputs will generate fractal tracer time series, as long as the flow system is highly dispersive (Kirchner et al., in press). This implies that subsurface flow in small catchments is dominated by large conductivity contrasts, such as arise from macropores, fracture networks, and similar large-scale heterogeneities in subsurface conductivity. One can also use spectral methods to analyze long-term time series of water fluxes in rainfall and streamflow. Spectral analysis of hydrologic time series measures the downslope propagation of the hydraulic potential waves that mobilize runoff, whereas spectral analysis of tracer time series clocks the propagation of water itself through the catchment. Water fluxes in streamflow exhibit non-fractal scaling, instead of the fractal 1/f scaling shown by chemical tracers. These observations imply that hydrologic signals are transmitted downslope more rapidly, and with much less dispersion, than chemical tracer signals are. Thus small upland catchments transmit hydraulic potentials (which drive runoff) much less dispersively than they transport water itself. These observations provide important constraints for theoretical models of subsurface flow and transport in

  1. Catchment controls and human disturbances on the geomorphology of small Mediterranean estuarine systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrany, Joan; Grimalt, Miquel

    2014-10-01

    Geographic signatures are physical and human-induced characteristics or processes that identify comparable or unique features of estuaries along latitudinal gradients. In Mediterranean areas, the microtidal regime and the strong seasonal and inter-annual contrasts cause an alternation between relatively high runoff and arid conditions. Furthermore, the long history of human settlement also increases the complexity in the study of these estuarine systems. This study investigates these signatures of the estuaries located within the Mallorcan eastern coast, which are geomorphologically homogeneous because of a similar bedrock geology and Holocene history. A multi-method approach focused on the integration of geomorphometry, hydraulics, historical sources and statistics was used. We explore the role played by catchment morphometric parameters, severe flash flood events and human disturbances in controlling the geomorphology of 10 beach-barrier enclosed, fluvial incised lagoons. Most of the lagoons discharge into 'calas', ranging in size from 1345 to 17,537 m2 and their related catchments are representative of the Mediterranean hydrological systems. Multiple regression models illustrate that the size, slope and drainage network development of the catchments explain the variance in length (r2 = 0.67), volume (r2 = 0.49), area (r2 = 0.64), circularity (r2 = 0.72) and average width (r2 = 0.81) of the lagoons. Depending on these catchment morphometric variables, the shape of the lagoons is also determined by the occurrence of catastrophic flash floods, which cause scouring and dredging, whereas the ordinary flood events and sea storms promote refilling and sedimentation. A historical analysis since 1850 documented 18 flood events, 5 of which were catastrophic with destructive effects along the catchments and large morphological changes in coastal lagoons. High intensity rainfall (up to 200 mm in 2 h), the geomorphometry of the catchments and the massive construction of

  2. Hydrological model parameters identification in a coastal nested catchment in Mersin province (SE Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldırım, Ümit; Jomaa, Seifeddine; Güler, Cüneyt; Rode, Michael

    2016-04-01

    It is known that the coastal Mediterranean region is facing a serious problem of water resources exploitation due to the rapid demographic, socio-economic, land use and climate changes. The hydrological modeling has proven to be an efficient tool for better water resources prediction and management. In this study, the HYdrological Predictions for the Environment (HYPE) model was setup on the nested coastal Sorgun catchment in Turkey (449 km2). This catchment is located in the east part of the Mersin province and is characterized by extremely varied topography, land use, and population density in semi-arid Mediterranean climate conditions. First, the model was calibrated at the catchment outlet (Sarilar) for the period 2003-2006. Second, the model was validated temporally for the period 2009-2013 at daily and monthly time intervals. In addition, the model performance was tested spatially using an internal station (B. Sorgun, 269 km2) located in the headwater region. Results showed that the HYPE model could reproduce the measured daily discharge significantly well (Nash Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) were 0.78 and 0.68 for calibration and validation periods, respectively). For monthly time step, the model performs better compared with daily time interval (NSE were 0.92 and 0.83 for calibration and validation periods, respectively). The model could represent the water balance relatively good at daily and monthly time steps, where the lowest PBIAS (percentage bias) were - 4.19% and - 3.53% for daily and monthly time intervals, respectively (considering the whole period). Results revealed, however, the agreement between the predicted and measured discharge was reduced, when the same best optimized model-parameters at Sarilar gauging station (catchment outlet) were used at B. Sorgun station (internal station). This model transferability less performance at internal station can be explained by the clear changes in terms of land use, soil type and precipitation rate in the

  3. Ecological condition of central Australian arid-zone rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, S C; Thomson, C B; Marshall, J C

    2002-01-01

    Australian arid-zone rivers are known to be ecologically variable and go through "boom and bust" cycles based on highly variable and unpredictable flow regimes. They are facing increasing pressure from land and water resources development and, whilst they are considered to be still in relatively good condition, no studies have yet been carried out to verify this. Such baseline studies are crucial if we are to assess any ecological changes in response to development and management interventions. The ecological condition of four of these endorheic rivers (Georgina, Diamantina, Cooper-Thomson and Bulloo) flowing into the Lake Eyre and Bulloo Basins in central Australia was assessed using several criteria (level of human influence, habitat condition, water chemistry and aquatic macroinvertebrate composition). Using criteria based on the level of human influence, most of the sites were assessed to be relatively unimpacted (reference) condition. The most discernible and widespread impact was riparian and bank damage by stock access. However, the level of this impact was considered to be only moderate. Most aquatic macroinvertebrates found in the area are considered to be opportunistic and tolerant of a wide range of environmental conditions, but with their life histories known to be linked to flow conditions. Their trophic guild was dominated by collectors and predators. The AusRivAS modelled observed to expected values of macroinvertebrate composition indicated that there were differences in ecological condition between sites (e.g. different waterholes) and between times (e.g. seasons and years). Overall, 75% of sites were assessed to be good condition with the remainder being mildly impaired. Water chemistry of the sites was characterised by high spatial and temporal variability with low conductivity and alkaline pH, relatively high turbidity, total nitrogen and total phosphorus, and wide-ranging dissolved oxygen. Given the high variability in water quality and

  4. Identifying Groundwater Recharge in Arid Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, B. F.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Recharge epodicity in arid regions provides a method to estimate annual groundwater recharge given a relationship expressed as the recharge to precipitation ratio. Traditionally, in-situ observations are required to identify aquifer recharge events, while more advanced approaches such as the water-table fluctuation method or the episodic master recession method are necessary to delineate the recharge event. Our study uses the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) observations to estimate monthly changes in groundwater storage which are attributed to the combination of groundwater abstraction and episodic recharge in the arid southwestern United States. Our results illustrate the ability of remote sensing technologies to identify episodic groundwater recharge in arid regions which can be used within sustainable groundwater management frameworks to effectively manage groundwater resources.

  5. Impacts of urbanization on nitrogen cycling and aerosol, surface and groundwater transport in semi-arid regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, K. A.; Gallo, E.; Carlson, M.; Riha, K. M.; Brooks, P. D.; McIntosh, J. C.; Sorooshian, A.; Michalski, G. M.; Meixner, T.

    2011-12-01

    Semi-arid regions are experiencing disproportionate increases in human population and land transformation worldwide, taxing limited water resources and altering nitrogen (N) biogeochemistry. How the redistribution of water and N by urbanization affects semi-arid ecosystems and downstream water quality (e.g. drinking water) is unclear. Understanding these interactions and their feedbacks will be critical for developing science-based management strategies to sustain these limited resources. This is especially true in the US where some of the fastest growing urban areas are in semi-arid ecosystems, where N and water cycles are accelerated, and intimately coupled, and where runoff from urban ecosystems is actively managed to augment a limited water supply to the growing human population. Here we synthesize several ongoing studies from the Tucson Basin in Arizona and examine how increasing urban land cover is altering rainfall-runoff relationships, groundwater recharge, water quality, and long range transport of atmospheric N. Studies across 5 catchments varying in impervious land cover showed that only the least impervious catchment responded to antecedent moisture conditions while hydrologic responses were not statistically related to antecedent rainfall conditions at more impervious sites. Regression models indicated that rainfall depth, imperviousness, and their combined effect control discharge and runoff ratios (p < 0.01, r2 = 0.91 and 0.75, respectively). In contrast, runoff quality was not predictably related to imperviousness or catchment size. Rather, rainfall depth and duration, time since antecedent rainfall, and stream channel characteristics and infrastructure controlled runoff chemistry. Groundwater studies showed nonpoint source contamination of CFCs and associated nitrate in areas of rapid recharge along ephemeral channels. Aerosol measurements indicate that both long-range transport of N and N emissions from Tucson are being transported and deposited

  6. Vertical profiles of soil water content as influenced by environmental factors in a small catchment on the hilly-gully Loess Plateau.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Wang

    Full Text Available Characterization of soil water content (SWC profiles at catchment scale has profound implications for understanding hydrological processes of the terrestrial water cycle, thereby contributing to sustainable water management and ecological restoration in arid and semi-arid regions. This study described the vertical profiles of SWC at the small catchment scale on the hilly and gully Loess Plateau in Northeast China, and evaluated the influences of selected environmental factors (land-use type, topography and landform on average SWC within 300 cm depth. Soils were sampled from 101 points across a small catchment before and after the rainy season. Cluster analysis showed that soil profiles with high-level SWC in a stable trend (from top to bottom were most commonly present in the catchment, especially in the gully related to terrace. Woodland soil profiles had low-level SWC with vertical variations in a descending or stable trend. Most abandoned farmland and grassland soil profiles had medium-level SWC with vertical variations in varying trends. No soil profiles had low-level SWC with vertical variations in an ascending trend. Multi-regression analysis showed that average SWC was significantly affected by land-use type in different soil layers (0-20, 20-160, and 160-300 cm, generally in descending order of terrace, abandoned farmland, grassland, and woodland. There was a significant negative correlation between average SWC and gradient along the whole profile (P<0.05. Landform significantly affected SWC in the surface soil layer (0-20 cm before the rainy season but throughout the whole profile after the rainy season, with lower levels on the ridge than in the gully. Altitude only strongly affected SWC after the rainy season. The results indicated that land-use type, gradient, landform, and altitude should be considered in spatial SWC estimation and sustainable water management in these small catchments on the Loess Plateau as well as in other

  7. Hydropedological insights when considering catchment classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bouma

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil classification systems are analysed in relation to the functioning and characterisation of catchments. Soil classifications are useful to create systematic order in the overwhelming quantity of different soils in the world and to extrapolate data available for a given soil type to soils elsewhere with identical classifications. However, such classifications are based on permanent characteristics as formed by the soil forming factors over often very long periods of time and this does not necessarily match with characteristics and parameters needed for functional soil characterization focusing, for example, on catchment hydrology. Hydropedology has made contributions towards functional characterization of soils as is illustrated for recent hydrological catchment studies. However, much still needs to be learned about the physical behaviour of anisotropic, heterogeneous field soils with varying soil structures during the year and the suggestion is made to first focus on improving simulation of catchment hydrology, incorporating hydropedological expertise, before embarking on a classification effort which involves major input of time and involves the risk of distraction. In doing so, we advise to also define other characteristics for catchment performance than the traditionally measured discharge rates.

  8. Exceptional hydrological phenomena in the Gemenea catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentina LIVARCIUC

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Flash floods, accompanied by high waters and regular floods, represent the most dangerous natural hazards in the Gemenea catchment, inducing other risks such as geomorphologic, environmental, social and economical risks. Flash floods occurred during the 1969 to 2014 monitoring interval are characterized by extremely high discharge values, of 68.9 m3/s in 2006 and 95.3 m3/s in 2008 and a magnitude 2.5 times higher than the average discharge recorded until that timeframe. With an area of 77.7 km2, the Gemenea catchment falls into the category of small catchments, where the peak discharge during exceptional hydrological phenomena is caused by torrential rainfall. Flash floods of particularly high intensities caused serious damages through: total destruction or damage of the torrent correction works, clogging of culverts on catchment forest roads, failure of river banks and deterioration of the bridges that affected roads and homes in Gemenea, Slătioara and Stulpicani villages. These floods have also caused damage to the forest/agriculture fund through deep and lateral erosion, failure of river banks and landslides. Within this study we aim to emphasize the magnitude, frequency, duration and area of manifestation of such phenomena in the Gemenea catchment. Furthermore, we aim to advance our knowledge of the genesis and specific mechanisms of flash flood occurrence for reducing their negative impacts on the local environment and communities

  9. Analyzing catchment behavior through catchment modeling in the Gilgel Abay, Upper Blue Nile River Basin, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Uhlenbrook

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding catchment hydrological processes is essential for water resources management, in particular in data scarce regions. The Gilgel Abay catchment (a major tributary into Lake Tana, source of the Blue Nile is undergoing intensive plans for water management, which is part of larger development plans in the Blue Nile basin in Ethiopia. To obtain a better understanding of the water balance dynamics and runoff generation mechanisms and to evaluate model transferability, catchment modeling has been conducted using the conceptual hydrological model HBV. Accordingly, the catchment of the Gilgel Abay has been divided into two gauged sub-catchments (Upper Gilgel Abay and Koga and the un-gauged part of the catchment. All available data sets were tested for stationarity, consistency and homogeneity and the data limitations (quality and quantity are discussed. Manual calibration of the daily models for three different catchment representations, i.e. (i lumped, (ii lumped with multiple vegetation zones, and (iii semi-distributed with multiple vegetation and elevation zones, showed good to satisfactory model performances with Nash-Sutcliffe efficiencies Reff > 0.75 and > 0.6 for the Upper Gilgel Abay and Koga sub-catchments, respectively. Better model results could not be obtained with manual calibration, very likely due to the limited data quality and model insufficiencies. Increasing the computation time step to 15 and 30 days improved the model performance in both sub-catchments to Reff > 0.8. Model parameter transferability tests have been conducted by interchanging parameters sets between the two gauged sub-catchments. Results showed poor performances for the daily models (0.30 < Reff < 0.67, but better performances for the 15 and 30 days models, Reff > 0.80. The transferability tests together with a sensitivity analysis using Monte Carlo simulations (more than 1 million

  10. Conservation and restoration of degraded ecosystems in arid and semi-arid areas of northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In "West Development" of China, one of the most important activities is the Natural Forest Protection Program, designed to swiftly convert the focus of management and utilization of the natural forests from a timber orientation towards forest conservation, sustainable management and environmental protection. The project covered almost all the arid and semi-arid regions in Northwest region. Accompanying this great campaign this paper studied the conservation and restoration model of degraded ecosystems in arid and semi-arid lands in Northwest China. The past practices have resulted in considerably natural forest degradation and loss through land conversion (primarily for agriculture), over-harvesting, inadequate reforestation and lack of protection. The consequences have been the loss of soil and water resources, diminished timber production capacity on a sustainable basis, and environmental losses. This paper applied Aronson's restoration model and proposed the conservation, restoration, re-allocation and preservation program for the implementation of environmental improvement and natural forest conservation.

  11. Isotope techniques in water resource investigations in arid and semi-arid regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Use of Isotope Techniques in Water Resources Investigations in Arid and Semi-arid Regions was initiated with the aim od contributing to the assessment of groundwater resources in arid areas through the use of environmental isotope techniques, and thereby to help in better management of these valuable fresh groundwater resources. The main emphases identified were in three key areas: (i) the evaluation of water balance components such as recharge rate estimation and recharge and discharge cycles at different spatial scales, (ii) paleohydrology and hydroclimatic change and, (iii) anthropogenic impacts and the assessment of the vulnerability of arid zone ground waters to salinisation and pollution impacts. This publication presents individual projects carried out within the frameworks of the CRP. Each paper has been indexed separately

  12. Applying animal behavior to arid rangeland mangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livestock production is one of many demands placed on today’s arid rangelands. Therefore, understanding plant and animal biology and their effects on biotic and abiotic landscape components is fundamental if rangelands are to remain ecologically sustainable. One limiting factor to accomplishing posi...

  13. Spatial interactions and resilience in arid ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppel, van de J.; Rietkerk, M.

    2004-01-01

    We present a mathematical analysis of the consequences of spatial interactions between vegetation patches by means of water flow for the functioning of arid systems. Our model results suggest that spatial exchange of water improved the resilience to disturbances and increased the resistance to human

  14. Accumulation of pharmaceuticals in groundwater under arid climate conditions - Results from unsaturated column experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemann, M; Majewsky, M; Wolf, L

    2016-07-01

    Intense reuse of treated wastewater in agriculture is practiced all over the world, especially in arid and water-scarce regions. In doing so, pharmaceutical residues in the water are irrigated to the soil and subsequently can percolate into the local aquifers. Since evaporation rates in these areas are typically high, persistent substances might enrich in the groundwater recharge of closed catchments like the Jordan Valley. Against this background, unsaturated column tests were conducted to investigate the potential for evaporative accumulation of the two pharmaceuticals bezafibrate and carbamazepine under simulated arid climate conditions. Parallel tests were conducted with inhibited microbiological activity where both substances showed an increase in the effluent concentrations proportional to the evaporation loss of the inflow solution. The mean accumulation factors of the pharmaceuticals correspond to the evaporated water loss. The experiments indicate the accumulation potential for pharmaceuticals with high persistence against biodegradation. For the first time, the overall potential for evaporative enrichment could be demonstrated for pharmaceuticals. Under the given experimental conditions, the two investigated pharmaceuticals did not enrich faster than chloride, which might result in soil salting prior to reaching harmful pharmaceutical concentrations in soil water. The findings are relevant to future assessments of environmental impacts of persistent trace substances, which need to take into account that concentrations in the aquatic cycle might increase further due to evaporative enrichment. PMID:27085060

  15. The International Workshop on Environmental Changes and Sustainable Development in Arid and Semi-arid Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoping Yang; Arthur Conacher

    2007-01-01

    @@ Arid regions,dominated by deserts,are characterized by a severe shortage of moisture,and a lack of perennial and integrated systems of drainage.Distributed over a very large range of temperatures,from the very hot to the very cold zones,arid regions cover about one third of the world's land surface and occur in every continent,including Antarctica.

  16. Aridity and decomposition processes in complex landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossola, Alessandro; Nyman, Petter

    2015-04-01

    Decomposition of organic matter is a key biogeochemical process contributing to nutrient cycles, carbon fluxes and soil development. The activity of decomposers depends on microclimate, with temperature and rainfall being major drivers. In complex terrain the fine-scale variation in microclimate (and hence water availability) as a result of slope orientation is caused by differences in incoming radiation and surface temperature. Aridity, measured as the long-term balance between net radiation and rainfall, is a metric that can be used to represent variations in water availability within the landscape. Since aridity metrics can be obtained at fine spatial scales, they could theoretically be used to investigate how decomposition processes vary across complex landscapes. In this study, four research sites were selected in tall open sclerophyll forest along a aridity gradient (Budyko dryness index ranging from 1.56 -2.22) where microclimate, litter moisture and soil moisture were monitored continuously for one year. Litter bags were packed to estimate decomposition rates (k) using leaves of a tree species not present in the study area (Eucalyptus globulus) in order to avoid home-field advantage effects. Litter mass loss was measured to assess the activity of macro-decomposers (6mm litter bag mesh size), meso-decomposers (1 mm mesh), microbes above-ground (0.2 mm mesh) and microbes below-ground (2 cm depth, 0.2 mm mesh). Four replicates for each set of bags were installed at each site and bags were collected at 1, 2, 4, 7 and 12 months since installation. We first tested whether differences in microclimate due to slope orientation have significant effects on decomposition processes. Then the dryness index was related to decomposition rates to evaluate if small-scale variation in decomposition can be predicted using readily available information on rainfall and radiation. Decomposition rates (k), calculated fitting single pool negative exponential models, generally

  17. Organic amendments impact the availability of heavy metal(loid)s in mine-impacted soil and their phytoremediation by Penisitum americanum and Sorghum bicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawab, Javed; Khan, Sardar; Aamir, Muhammad; Shamshad, Isha; Qamar, Zahir; Din, Islamud; Huang, Qing

    2016-02-01

    The amendment of contaminated soil with organic materials is considered to be an environmentally friendly technique to immobilize heavy metal(loid)s and minimize their subsequent bioaccumulation in plants. This study focuses on the effects of different amendment techniques, such as the use of activated carbons (granulated or powder) and farmyard manure at various application rates (2 and 5 %). These techniques were applied on heavy metal(loid)s such as Ni, Cr, Cd, Pb, Mn, Cu, Zn, Fe, Co, and Al that were present in mine-impacted soil and caused bioaccumulation in cultivated plants. The results showed that, compared with the control, almost all the techniques significantly (P ≤ 0.01) reduced the bioavailability of heavy metal(loid)s in the amended soil. The bioaccumulation of heavy metal(loid)s in Penisitum americanum and Sorghum bicolor was significantly (P ≤ 0.01) reduced with all techniques, while Zn and Cd concentrations increased with the use of farmyard manure. Also compared with the control, plant growth was significantly decreased with the use of activated carbons, particularly with powder activated carbons, while farmyard manure (at 5 %) significantly (P ≤ 0.01) increased plant growth. Among the amendment techniques, powdered activated carbons (at 5 %) were best at reducing the bioavailability of heavy metal(loid)s in soil and plant accumulation. However, it negatively affected the growth of selected plant species.

  18. Catchment classification: empirical analysis of hydrologic similarity based on catchment function in the eastern USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sawicz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrologic similarity between catchments, derived from similarity in how catchments respond to precipitation input, is the basis for catchment classification, for transferability of information, for generalization of our hydrologic understanding and also for understanding the potential impacts of environmental change. An important question in this context is, how far can widely available hydrologic information (precipitation-temperature-streamflow data and generally available physical descriptors be used to create a first order grouping of hydrologically similar catchments? We utilize a heterogeneous dataset of 280 catchments located in the Eastern US to understand hydrologic similarity in a 6-dimensional signature space across a region with strong environmental gradients. Signatures are defined as hydrologic response characteristics that provide insight into the hydrologic function of catchments. A Bayesian clustering scheme is used to separate the catchments into 9 homogeneous classes, which enable us to interpret hydrologic similarity with respect to similarity in climatic and landscape attributes across this region. We finally derive several hypotheses regarding controls on individual signatures from the analysis performed here.

  19. Forests and water - Friends or foes?. Hydrological implications of deforestation and land degradation in semi-arid Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the study area in Babati District in Tanzania a multi-component research approach was attempted. Two catchments, one forested and one deforested-degraded, were studied regarding soil properties, runoff and groundwater recharge. This was done both in the field and with the use of two computer models: one simulating groundwater recharge as a function of rainfall variability, and one simulating hydrological implications of massive land cover conversion on the flooding of nearby Lake Babati. Three major findings came out of the study. The first is that most forested catchments (in various hydroclimates and landscapes) will increase the runoff following deforestation (due to less evapotranspiration). This is well-established knowledge, but it also depends on the actual conditions at hand. These conditions are defined as hydroclimate, soil texture and slope. In humid-temperate climates with coarse soils on flat land, the conditions strongly favor increased runoff following deforestation. However, in dry regions with fine textured soils on hilly ground, and where deforestation also implies land degradation, less dry season flow is likely to develop after a considerable adjustment period has been allowed. Secondly, the prevalence of preferential flow in a forest soil, as compared to a compacted and eroded soil, must be a key component in an explanation of why more dry season flow can emerge from a forested as compared to a deforested catchment in the dry tropics. Thirdly, there are several aspects of semi-arid and arid tropical hydrology which make comparisons with humid-temperate regions difficult and require special attention in the management of water resources in the dry tropics. 14 refs, 18 figs, 1 tab

  20. How old is upland catchment water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Harald; Cartwright, Ian; Morgenstern, Uwe; Gilfedder, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the dynamics of water supply catchments is an essential part of water management. Upland catchments provide a continuous, reliable source of high quality water not only for some of the world's biggest cities, but also for agriculture and industry. Headwater streams control river flow in lowland agricultural basins as the majority of river discharge emerges from upland catchments. Many rivers are perennial and flow throughout the year, even during droughts. However, it is still unclear how reliable and continuous upland catchment water resources really are. Despite many efforts in upland catchment research, there is still little known about where the water is stored and how long it takes to travel through upper catchments. Resolving these questions is crucial to ensure that this resource is protected from changing land use and to estimate potential impacts from a changing climate. Previous research in this important area has been limited by existing measurement techniques. Knowledge to date has relied heavily on the use of variation in stable isotope signals to estimate the age and origin of water from upland catchments. The problem with relying on these measures is that as the water residence time increases, the variation in the stable isotope signal decreases. After a maximum period of four years, no variation can be detected This means that to date, the residence time in upland catchments is likely to have been vastly underestimated. Consequently, the proportion of water flow out of upland river catchments to the total river flow is also underestimated. Tritium (3H) combines directly with water molecules and enters the flow paths with the infiltrating water. Its half-life (12.32 years) makes it ideal to describe residence times in upper catchment reservoirs as it can theoretically measure water up to about 150 years old. The bomb pulse peak in the southern hemisphere was several orders of magnitude lower than in the northern hemisphere. Hence the

  1. Catchment scale multi-objective flood management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Steve; Worrall, Peter; Rosolova, Zdenka; Hammond, Gene

    2010-05-01

    Rural land management is known to affect both the generation and propagation of flooding at the local scale, but there is still a general lack of good evidence that this impact is still significant at the larger catchment scale given the complexity of physical interactions and climatic variability taking place at this level. The National Trust, in partnership with the Environment Agency, are managing an innovative project on the Holnicote Estate in south west England to demonstrate the benefits of using good rural land management practices to reduce flood risk at the both the catchment and sub-catchment scales. The Holnicote Estate is owned by the National Trust and comprises about 5,000 hectares of land, from the uplands of Exmoor to the sea, incorporating most of the catchments of the river Horner and Aller Water. There are nearly 100 houses across three villages that are at risk from flooding which could potentially benefit from changes in land management practices in the surrounding catchment providing a more sustainable flood attenuation function. In addition to the contribution being made to flood risk management there are a range of other ecosystems services that will be enhanced through these targeted land management changes. Alterations in land management will create new opportunities for wildlife and habitats and help to improve the local surface water quality. Such improvements will not only create additional wildlife resources locally but also serve the landscape response to climate change effects by creating and enhancing wildlife networks within the region. Land management changes will also restore and sustain landscape heritage resources and provide opportunities for amenity, recreation and tourism. The project delivery team is working with the National Trust from source to sea across the entire Holnicote Estate, to identify and subsequently implement suitable land management techniques to manage local flood risk within the catchments. These

  2. CHARACTERISTICS OF ARIDITY CONDITIONS IN SOUTH DOBRUDJA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. TISCOVSCHI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of Aridity Conditions in South Dobrudja. For most people, the arid and semi-arid lands are those where precipitation is low (less than 200 mm per year, and yet enough for supplying streams capable of temporarily carrying the debris resulted from weathering, but insufficient for encouraging the development of a vegetal cover meant to protect the soil blanket against eroding agents. The drought is a major and permanent climatic risk for the Dobrudja territory as a whole and for South Dobrudja in particular, a territory where hydrographic network is underdeveloped, streams are ephemeral, and semi-endorheic areas are well developed. When the period of moisture deficiency lasts longer, it can bring about a significant water imbalance, which results in crop losses or restrictions in water consumption, thus leading to a number of economic problems. Under the circumstances, the risk of aridity expansion is significant, this being the reason why a better water management system in Romania is urgently needed. In the last decades, the numerous specialty studies undertaken in the area have emphasized an intensification of the process of dryness, because atmospheric and pedological droughts have become more and more serious. Romania is a member of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO. It actively participates within the drought management network and the Drought Management Center for Southeastern Europe, which comprises 11 countries. The scope is to work together and exchange experience with the neighboring countries that have recorded positive results and acquired a rich experience in terms of drought management. The employment of appropriate pluvial indices in identifying the areas prone to aridity may prove to be convenient tool for finding practical solutions meant to mitigate the impact of this phenomenon on the local communities living in South Dobrudja.

  3. Aridity under conditions of increased CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Peter; Roderick, Micheal L.; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2016-04-01

    A string of recent of studies led to the wide-held assumption that aridity will increase under conditions of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and associated global warming. Such results generally build upon analyses of changes in the 'aridity index' (the ratio of potential evaporation to precipitation) and can be described as a direct thermodynamic effect on atmospheric water demand due to increasing temperatures. However, there is widespread evidence that contradicts the 'warmer is more arid' interpretation, leading to the 'global aridity paradox' (Roderick et al. 2015, WRR). Here we provide a comprehensive assessment of modeled changes in a broad set of dryness metrics (primarily based on a range of measures of water availability) over a large range of realistic atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We use an ensemble of simulations from of state-of-the-art climate models to analyse both equilibrium climate experiments and transient historical simulations and future projections. Our results show that dryness is, under conditions of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and related global warming, generally decreasing at global scales. At regional scales we do, however, identify areas that undergo changes towards drier conditions, located primarily in subtropical climate regions and the Amazon Basin. Nonetheless, the majority of regions, especially in tropical and mid- to northern high latitudes areas, display wetting conditions in a warming world. Our results contradict previous findings and highlight the need to comprehensively assess all aspects of changes in hydroclimatological conditions at the land surface. Roderick, M. L., P. Greve, and G. D. Farquhar (2015), On the assessment of aridity with changes in atmospheric CO2, Water Resour. Res., 51, 5450-5463

  4. Competing feedbacks drive state transitions during initial catchment evolution: Examples from post-mining landscape and ecosystems evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Christoph; Wolfgang, Schaaf; Werner, Gerwin

    2014-05-01

    Within the context of severely disturbed landscapes with little or no ecological memory, such as post-mining landscapes, we propose a simple framework that explains the catchment evolution as a result of competing feedbacks influenced by the initial conditions and the atmospheric drivers such as rainfall intermittency and intensity. The first stage of the evolution is dominated by abiotic feedbacks triggered by rainfall and subsequent fluid flow causing particle mobilisation on the surface and in the subsurface leading to flow concentration or in some instances to densification of surface and subsurface substrates. Subsequently, abiotic-biotic feedbacks start to compete in the sense that biological activity generally stabilizes substrate by preventing particle mobilisation and hence contribute to converting the substrate to a habitat. We suggest that these competing feedbacks may generate alternative stable states in particular under semi-arid and arid climatic conditions, while in temperate often energy limited environments biological process "outcompete" abiotic processes leading to a stable state, in particular from the water balance point of view for comparable geomorphic situations. To illustrate this framework, we provide examples from post-mining landscapes, in which soil, water and vegetation was monitored. In case of arid regions in Australia, we provide evidence that the initial conditions of a mine waste disposal "locked" the system into a state that was limited by water and nutrient storage capacity while at the same time it was stable from a geomorphic point of view for the observation period. The cause of the system to be locked in, is the very high hydraulic conductivity of the substrate, that has not undergone any changes during the first years. In contrast to this case study, we illustrate how this framework explains the evolution of an artificial catchment (Hühnerwasser Catchment) in Lusatia (150 km southeast of Berlin, Germany). During the

  5. Picturing and modelling catchments by representative hillslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loritz, Ralf; Hassler, Sibylle; Jackisch, Conrad; Zehe, Erwin

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological modelling studies often start with a qualitative sketch of the hydrological processes of a catchment. These so-called perceptual models are often pictured as hillslopes and are generalizations displaying only the dominant and relevant processes of a catchment or hillslope. The problem with these models is that they are prone to become too much predetermined by the designer's background and experience. Moreover it is difficult to know if that picture is correct and contains enough complexity to represent the system under study. Nevertheless, because of their qualitative form, perceptual models are easy to understand and can be an excellent tool for multidisciplinary exchange between researchers with different backgrounds, helping to identify the dominant structures and processes in a catchment. In our study we explore whether a perceptual model built upon an intensive field campaign may serve as a blueprint for setting up representative hillslopes in a hydrological model to reproduce the functioning of two distinctly different catchments. We use a physically-based 2D hillslope model which has proven capable to be driven by measured soil-hydrological parameters. A key asset of our approach is that the model structure itself remains a picture of the perceptual model, which is benchmarked against a) geo-physical images of the subsurface and b) observed dynamics of discharge, distributed state variables and fluxes (soil moisture, matric potential and sap flow). Within this approach we are able to set up two behavioral model structures which allow the simulation of the most important hydrological fluxes and state variables in good accordance with available observations within the 19.4 km2 large Colpach catchment and the 4.5 km2 large Wollefsbach catchment in Luxembourg without the necessity of calibration. This corroborates, contrary to the widespread opinion, that a) lower mesoscale catchments may be modelled by representative hillslopes and b) physically

  6. Understanding Water and Solute Fluxes in Diverse Catchments

    OpenAIRE

    Godsey, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Catchments integrate incoming hydrological and geochemical fluxes via the mixing and reaction processes occurring within their boundaries. The catchment science community still seeks realistic and internally consistent models which explain integrated catchment behavior. It is known that the amount of streamflow responds quickly to rainfall, that stream water is predominantly "old" water which has been stored for long periods within the catchment, and that streamflow chemistry varies with flow...

  7. Juvenile salmon investigations River Wenning catchment 1981-86

    OpenAIRE

    Ingersent, B.

    1987-01-01

    As part of the River Lune juvenile salmonid investigation, a number of sites on the River Wenning catchment were electrofished annually from 1981 - 1985. Particularly low Salmon parr populations were evident for much of the Wenning catchment which has caused some concern. All the Wenning catchment electrofishing results are reported in this paper and comparisons are made with designated groups of sites on the remainder of the Lune catchment. These groups of sites are: River Lune and t...

  8. Improving Flood Prediction By the Assimilation of Satellite Soil Moisture in Poorly Monitored Catchments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Garreton, C. D.; Ryu, D.; Western, A. W.; Crow, W. T.; Su, C. H.; Robertson, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    Flood prediction in poorly monitored catchments is among the greatest challenges faced by hydrologists. To address this challenge, an increasing number of studies in the last decade have explored methods to integrate various existing observations from ground and satellites. One approach in particular, is the assimilation of satellite soil moisture (SM-DA) into rainfall-runoff models. The rationale is that satellite soil moisture (SSM) can be used to correct model soil water states, enabling more accurate prediction of catchment response to precipitation and thus better streamflow. However, there is still no consensus on the most effective SM-DA scheme and how this might depend on catchment scale, climate characteristics, runoff mechanisms, model and SSM products used, etc. In this work, an operational SM-DA scheme was set up in the poorly monitored, large (>40,000 km2), semi-arid Warrego catchment situated in eastern Australia. We assimilated passive and active SSM products into the probability distributed model (PDM) using an ensemble Kalman filter. We explored factors influencing the SM-DA framework, including relatively new techniques to remove model-observation bias, estimate observation errors and represent model errors. Furthermore, we explored the advantages of accounting for the spatial distribution of forcing and channel routing processes within the catchment by implementing and comparing lumped and semi-distributed model setups. Flood prediction is improved by SM-DA (Figure), with a 30% reduction of the average root-mean-squared difference of the ensemble prediction, a 20% reduction of the false alarm ratio and a 40% increase of the ensemble mean Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency. SM-DA skill does not significantly change with different observation error assumptions, but the skill strongly depends on the observational bias correction technique used, and more importantly, on the performance of the open-loop model before assimilation. Our findings imply that proper

  9. Space-time modeling of catchment scale drought characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tallaksen, L.; Hisdal, H.; Lanen, van H.A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Drought may affect all components of the water cycle and covers commonly a large part of the catchment area. This paper examines drought propagation at the catchment scale using spatially aggregated drought characteristics and illustrates the importance of catchment processes in modifying the drough

  10. Hydrological behaviour of a small catchment in the dehesa landuse system (Extremadura, SW Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, Antonio; Schnabel, Susanne

    1998-09-01

    Investigations of the hydrological processes operating in a small experimental catchment representative of the dehesa ecosystem were carried out. The dehesa constitutes a system of agro-silvo-pastoral landuse, which is characterized by a Mediterranean, semi-arid climate. The study includes an analysis of the relationships between rainfall, soil water content and discharge, as well as the establishment of the annual water budget. The results demonstrate a complex hydrological response. The relationships between the factors involved and the operating processes are difficult to explain because of the decisive role played by the valley bottoms. These areas typically possess a sediment fill, and contrast with the shallow soils developed on the hillslopes. Genesis and quantity of runoff (Hortonian or saturation) measured at the outlet depend on the antecedent moisture conditions of the valley bottoms because of their water-retention capacity. Annual runoff coefficients are similar to those reported from other semi-arid areas. The analysis of the annual water budget shows that rainfall is positively related with both actual evapotranspiration and discharge.

  11. Water Use and Management in Semiarid Regions - A Distributed Modelling Approach in the Verlorenvlei Catchment, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Melanie; Kralisch, Sven; Fink, Manfred; Pfennig, Björn; Butchart-Kuhlmann, Daniel; Meinhardt, Markus; de Clercq, Willem

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological modelling is a useful method to predict water availability and environmental impacts in a range of climate and land use change scenarios. One of the major challenges to accurate predictions using hydrological modelling in semi-arid areas is the high temporal and spatial variability of rainfall events and the associated uncertainty of related process parameters. Limited and often unreliable climate observations can cause additional problems. These particular circumstances are well documented for many catchments in the world, including semi-arid parts of South Africa. An accurate assessment of water quality and quantity is however crucial for sustainable water resource management, which is often difficult under changing environmental conditions such as climate and land use change. This situation can be found in the Verlorenvlei catchment, a part of the Sandveld area located in the Western Cape region of South Africa. Extensive dry periods in combination with an increasing domestic water demand, expanding irrigation agriculture and expected reducing rainfall due to climate change present a challenging setup for water management in this region. The catchment is a highly sensitive area with one of the most important estuary systems in the Western Cape region, containing significant natural wetlands with high biodiversity and numerous endemic species. With very limited surface water resources, most settlements and irrigation systems in the region are mainly dependent on groundwater. As a result of the particular conditions, the use of improved management techniques, such as centre pivot irrigation and contour-bank farming, are necessary. The distributed, process-oriented hydrological modelling system JAMS/J2000 is used and evaluated to assess water availability within the catchment under different climate and land-use change scenarios. The first phase has involved configuring the model to accurately represent the specific natural conditions of the

  12. Hydropedological insights when considering catchment classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, J.; Droogers, P.; Sonneveld, M.P.W.; Ritsema, C.J.; Hunink, J.E.; Immerzeel, W.W.; Kauffman, S.

    2011-01-01

    Soil classification systems are analysed to explore the potential of developing classification systems for catchments. Soil classifications are useful to create systematic order in the overwhelming quantity of different soils in the world and to extrapolate data available for a given soil type to so

  13. Hydropedological insights when considering catchment classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, J.; Droogers, P.; Sonneveld, M.P.W.; Ritsema, C.J.; Hunink, J.E.; Immerzeel, W.W.; Kauffman, S.

    2011-01-01

    Soil classification systems are analysed in relation to the functioning and characterisation of catchments. Soil classifications are useful to create systematic order in the overwhelming quantity of different soils in the world and to extrapolate data available for a given soil type to soils elsewhe

  14. Examination of catchment areas for public transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex; Hansen, Stephen; Andersen, Jonas Lohmann Elkjær

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a method to examine the catchment areas for stops in high quality public transport systems based on the street network in the examined area. This is achieved by implementing the Service Area functions from the ArcGIS extension Network Analyst. The method is compared to a more...

  15. Assessment of water availability in Chindwinn catchment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of water balance over Chindwinn Catchment has been carried out by using three decades of available climatological and hydrological data (i.e. from 1967). The study was based on the monthly, annual and normal values. Actual evapotranspiration (AET) computed by as well as on the using Penman (1963) as well as Hargreaves (1985) methods. Some of the reliable data of evaporation at the stations were also used to estimate actual evaporation with the pancoefficient value 0.7. The values of actual evapotranspiration estimated by Hargreaves method was lower than the values estimated by Penman, but most followed the same significant trend. The soil moisture deficiency generally occurs during November and April. A few cases of soil moisture deficiency do occur in August, September and October. However, on the overall availability of water in the catchment is quite promising. The residual resulted from the water balance estimation may be assumed as soil moisture in the catchment by neglecting some losses from the catchment. (author)

  16. Development of catchment research, with particular attention to Plynlimon and its forerunner, the East African catchments

    OpenAIRE

    J. R. Blackie; Robinson, M.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Dr J.S.G. McCulloch was deeply involved in the establishment of research catchments in East Africa and subsequently in the UK to investigate the hydrological consequences of changes in land use. Comparison of these studies provides an insight into how influential his inputs and direction have been in the progressive development of the philosophy, the instrumentation and the analytical techniques now employed in catchment research. There were great contrasts in the envi...

  17. Boron water quality for the Plynlimon catchments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Neal

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Boron concentrations in rainfall, throughfall and stemflow for Spruce stands, mist, streamwater and groundwater are compared with chloride to assess atmospheric sources and catchment input-output balances for the Plynlimon catchments. In rainfall, boron concentration averages about 4.5 μg-B l-1 and approximately two thirds of this comes from anthropogenic sources. In through-fall and stemflow, boron concentrations are approximately a factor of ten times higher than in rainfall. This increase is associated with enhanced scavenging of mist and dry deposition by the trees. As the sampling sites were close to a forest edge, this degree of scavenging is probably far higher than in the centre of the forest. The throughfall and stemflow concentrations of boron show some evidence of periodic variations with time with peak concentrations occurring during the summer months indicating some vegetational cycling. In mist, boron concentrations are almost twenty times higher than in rainfall and anthropogenic sources account for about 86% of this. Within the Plynlimon streams, boron concentrations are about 1.4 to 1.7 times higher than in rainfall. However, after allowance for mist and dry deposition contributions to atmospheric deposition, it seems that, on average, about 30% of the boron input is retained within the catchment. For the forested catchments, felling results in a disruption of the biological cycle and a small increase in boron leaching from the catchment results in the net retention by the catchment being slightly reduced. Despite the net uptake by the catchment, there is clear evidence of a boron component of weathering from the bedrock. This is shown by an increased boron concentration in a stream influenced by a nearby borehole which increased groundwater inputs. The weathering component for boron is also observed in Plynlimon groundwaters as boron concentrations and boron to chloride ratios are higher than for the streams. For these

  18. Catchment scale afforestation for mitigating flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Mhari; Quinn, Paul; Bathurst, James; Birkinshaw, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    After the 2013-14 floods in the UK there were calls to 'forest the uplands' as a solution to reducing flood risk across the nation. At present, 1 in 6 homes in Britain are at risk of flooding and current EU legislation demands a sustainable, 'nature-based solution'. However, the role of forests as a natural flood management technique remains highly controversial, due to a distinct lack of robust evidence into its effectiveness in reducing flood risk during extreme events. SHETRAN, physically-based spatially-distributed hydrological models of the Irthing catchment and Wark forest sub-catchments (northern England) have been developed in order to test the hypothesis of the effect trees have on flood magnitude. The advanced physically-based models have been designed to model scale-related responses from 1, through 10, to 100km2, a first study of the extent to which afforestation and woody debris runoff attenuation features (RAFs) may help to mitigate floods at the full catchment scale (100-1000 km2) and on a national basis. Furthermore, there is a need to analyse the extent to which land management practices, and the installation of nature-based RAFs, such as woody debris dams, in headwater catchments can attenuate flood-wave movement, and potentially reduce downstream flood risk. The impacts of riparian planting and the benefits of adding large woody debris of several designs and on differing sizes of channels has also been simulated using advanced hydrodynamic (HiPIMS) and hydrological modelling (SHETRAN). With the aim of determining the effect forestry may have on flood frequency, 1000 years of generated rainfall data representative of current conditions has been used to determine the difference between current land-cover, different distributions of forest cover and the defining scenarios - complete forest removal and complete afforestation of the catchment. The simulations show the percentage of forestry required to have a significant impact on mitigating

  19. Water balance modelling in a semi-arid environment with limited in-situ data: remote sensing coupled with satellite gravimetry, Lake Manyara, East African Rift, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    D. Deus; R. Gloaguen; Krause, P.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate and up to date information on the status and trends of water balance is needed to develop strategies for conservation and the sustainable management of water resources. The purpose of this research is to estimate water balance in a semi-arid environment with limited in-situ data by using a remote sensing approach. We focus on the Lake Manyara catchment, located within the East African Rift of northern Tanzania. We use remote sensing and a semi-distributed hydrological model to study ...

  20. Impact of Forest Cover and Aridity on the Interplay between Effective Rooting Depth and Annual Runoff in South-West Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Smettem

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Variants of the Budkyo hydrological model describe the effects of land use change on annual water yield. A recent modification using a simple process-based ecohydrological model provides insight into the partitioning of rainfall between runoff and evapotranspiration. In particular, the ‘effective vegetation rooting depth’ becomes the single free parameter in the model and can be related to land use and climate. We applied this approach to investigate the relations between mean annual runoff from 2000 to 2011, catchment average effective rooting depth and the proportion of forest cover across eleven catchments in South-west Western Australia. The proportion of forested and cleared land was partitioned using MODIS minimum annual average LAI values from 1 km2 pixels over 2000–2011, with forest clearing ranging from 1% to 98% across the 11 catchments. Estimated mean annual runoff using catchment averaged effective rooting depths for forest and cleared (grassland land obtained using an independent physiologically-based model gave better estimates than a widely used ‘default’ Budkyo-based model. If effective rooting depth declines with aridity, as described by the model then runoff decline may be considerably less (about 50% than predicted if the effective root depth remains unchanged (70%–92% decline. This highlights the importance of understanding ecohydrological feedbacks between vegetation and climate in projecting scenarios of water yield response to climate change.

  1. VOCs in Arid soils: Technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Volatile Organic Compounds In Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) focuses on technologies to clean up volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants in soil and groundwater at arid sites. The initial host site is the 200 West Area at DOE's Hanford site in southeastern Washington state. The primary VOC contaminant is carbon tetrachloride, in association with heavy metals and radionuclides. An estimated 580--920 metric tons of carbon tetrachloride were disposed of between 1955 and 1973, resulting in extensive soil and groundwater contamination. The VOC-Arid ID schedule has been divided into three phases of implementation. The phased approach provides for: rapid transfer of technologies to the Environmental Restoration (EM-40) programs once demonstrated; logical progression in the complexity of demonstrations based on improved understanding of the VOC problem; and leveraging of the host site EM-40 activities to reduce the overall cost of the demonstrations. During FY92 and FY93, the primary technology demonstrations within the ID were leveraged with an ongoing expedited response action at the Hanford 200 West Area, which is directed at vapor extraction of VOCs from the vadose (unsaturated) zone. Demonstration efforts are underway in the areas of subsurface characterization including: drilling and access improvements, off-gas and borehole monitoring of vadose zone VOC concentrations to aid in soil vapor extraction performance evaluation, and treatment of VOC-contaminated off-gas. These current demonstration efforts constitute Phase 1 of the ID and, because of the ongoing vadose zone ERA, can result in immediate transfer of successful technologies to EM-40

  2. Biogeochemical redox cycling of arsenic in mine-impacted lake sediments and co-existing pore waters near Giant Mine, Yellowknife Bay, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, C.F. [Queen' s University, Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering, Kingston, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Jamieson, H.E., E-mail: jamieson@geol.queensu.ca [Queen' s University, Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering, Kingston, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Kyser, T.K. [Queen' s University, Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering, Kingston, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Praharaj, T.; Fortin, D. [University of Ottawa, Department of Earth Sciences, Ottawa, K1A 3N5 (Canada)

    2010-02-15

    Lacustrine sediments, submerged tailings, and their pore waters have been collected at several sites in Yellowknife Bay, Great Slave Lake, Canada, in order to investigate the biogeochemical controls on the remobilization of As from mining-impacted materials under different depositional conditions. Radiometric dating confirms that a mid-core enrichment of Pb, Zn, Cu and Sb corresponds to the opening of a large Au mine 60 a ago. This was evident even in a relatively remote site. Arsenic was enriched at mid-core, coincident with mining activity, but clearly exhibited post-depositional mobility, migrating upwards towards the sediment water interface (SWI) as well as down-core. Deep-water (15 m) Yellowknife Bay sediments that contain buried mine waste are suboxic, relatively organic-rich and abundant in microbes with As in pore waters and sediments reaching 585 {mu}g/L and 1310 mg/kg, respectively. Late summer pore waters show equal proportions of As(III) and As(V) (16-415 {mu}g/L) whereas late winter pore waters are dominated by As(III) (284-947 {mu}g/L). This can be explained by As(III) desorption mechanisms associated with the conversion of FeS to FeS{sub 2} and the reduction of As(V) to As(III) through the oxidation of dissolved sulfide, both microbially-mediated processes. Processes affecting As cycling involve the attenuating efficiency of the oxic zone at the SWI, sediment redox heterogeneity and the reductive dissolution of Fe(hydr)oxides by labile organic matter, temporarily and spatially variable.

  3. Development of catchment research, with particular attention to Plynlimon and its forerunner, the East African catchments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Dr J.S.G. McCulloch was deeply involved in the establishment of research catchments in East Africa and subsequently in the UK to investigate the hydrological consequences of changes in land use. Comparison of these studies provides an insight into how influential his inputs and direction have been in the progressive development of the philosophy, the instrumentation and the analytical techniques now employed in catchment research. There were great contrasts in the environments: tropical highland (high radiation, intense rainfall vs. temperate maritime (low radiation and frontal storms, contrasting soils and vegetation types, as well as the differing social and economic pressures in developing and developed nations. Nevertheless, the underlying scientific philosophy was common to both, although techniques had to be modified according to local conditions. As specialised instrumentation and analytical techniques were developed for the UK catchments many were also integrated into the East African studies. Many lessons were learned in the course of these studies and from the experiences of other studies around the world. Overall, a rigorous scientific approach was developed with widespread applicability. Beyond the basics of catchment selection and the quantification of the main components of the catchment water balance, this involved initiating parallel process studies to provide information on specific aspects of catchment behaviour. This information could then form the basis for models capable of extrapolation from the observed time series to other periods/hydrological events and, ultimately, the capability of predicting the consequences of changes in catchment land management to other areas in a range of climates.

  4. Establishing a connection between hydrologic model parameters and physical catchment signatures for improved hierarchical Bayesian modeling in ungauged catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, L. A.; Weber, K.; Smith, T. J.; Greenwood, M. C.; Sharma, A.

    2012-12-01

    In an effort to improve hydrologic analysis in areas with limited data, hydrologists often seek to link catchments where little to no data collection occurs to catchments that are gauged. Various metrics and methods have been proposed to identify such relationships, in the hope that "surrogate" catchments might provide information for those catchments that are hydrologically similar. In this study we present a statistical analysis of over 150 catchments located in southeast Australia to examine the relationship between a hydrological model and certain catchment metrics. A conceptual rainfall-runoff model is optimized for each of the catchments and hierarchical clustering is performed to link catchments based on their calibrated model parameters. Clustering has been used in recent hydrologic studies but catchments are often clustered based on physical characteristics alone. Usually there is little evidence to suggest that such "surrogate" data approaches provide sufficiently similar model predictions. Beginning with model parameters and working backwards, we hope to establish if there is a relationship between the model parameters and physical characteristics for improved model predictions in the ungauged catchment. To analyze relationships, permutational multivariate analysis of variance tests are used that suggest which hydrologic metrics are most appropriate for discriminating between calibrated catchment clusters. Additional analysis is performed to determine which cluster pairs show significant differences for various metrics. We further examine the extent to which these results may be insightful for a hierarchical Bayesian modeling approach that is aimed at generating model predictions at an ungauged site. The method, known as Bayes Empirical Bayes (BEB) works to pool information from similar catchments to generate informed probability distributions for each model parameter at a data-limited catchment of interest. We demonstrate the effect of selecting

  5. Analysis list: ARID1A [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ARID1A Liver + hg19 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/ARID1A.1.tsv http://dbar...chive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/ARID1A.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/AR...ID1A.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/ARID1A.Liver.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/Liver.gml ...

  6. Analysis list: ARID1B [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ARID1B Liver + hg19 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/ARID1B.1.tsv http://dbar...chive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/ARID1B.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/AR...ID1B.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/ARID1B.Liver.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/Liver.gml ...

  7. Analysis list: ARID3B [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ARID3B Others + hg19 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/ARID3B.1.tsv http://dbar...chive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/ARID3B.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/AR...ID3B.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/ARID3B.Others.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/Others.gml ...

  8. Analysis list: ARID2 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ARID2 Liver + hg19 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/ARID2.1.tsv http://dbar...chive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/ARID2.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/AR...ID2.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/ARID2.Liver.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/Liver.gml ...

  9. Coupling stable isotope and satellite to inform a snow accumulation and melt model for data poor, semi-arid watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hublart, Paul; Sproles, Eric; Soulsby, Chris; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Hevía, Andres

    2016-04-01

    At the most basic level watersheds catch, store, and release water. In semi-arid northern central Chile (29°-32°) snow and glacier melt dominate these basic hydrological stages. In this region precipitation is typically limited to three to five events per year that falls as snow in the High Cordillera at elevations above 3000 m a.s.l. The rugged topography and steep gradient makes snowfall rates highly variable in space and time. Despite its critical importance for water supply, high elevation meteorological data and measurements of snowpack are scarce due to limited winter access above 3000 m a.s.l. Due to the critically limited understanding of catch, store, and release processes most conceptual watershed models for this region remain speculative, are prone to over-parameterization, and greatly inhibits hydrological prediction in the region. Focused on two headwater watersheds of the Elqui River basin (1615-6040 m a.s.l., 429-566 km2) this study couples stable isotope and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) data to develop an improved conceptual model of how semi-arid mountain watersheds catch, store, and release water. MODIS snow-cover and land surface temperature data are used to inform an enhanced temperature-index Snow Accumulation and Melt (SAM) model. The use of remotely-sensed temperature data as input to this model is evaluated by comparison with an interpolated dataset derived from a few available meteorological stations. The outputs from the SAM model are used as inputs to a conceptual catchment model including two water stores (one standing for surface/subsurface processes and the other for deeper groundwater storage). The model is calibrated and evaluated from a Bayesian perspective using discharge data measured at the catchment outlets over a 15-year period (2000-2015). Stable isotope data collected during 2015-2016 is applied to better constrain model outputs. The combination of MODIS-based and isotope-based information proves very

  10. Runoff generation mechanism at two distinct headwater catchments - isotopic evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohnal, Michal; Votrubová, Jana; Šanda, Martin; Tesař, Miroslav; Vogel, Tomáš; Dušek, Jaromír

    2016-04-01

    Data from two headwater catchments indicate considerably different runoff formation mechanisms. The contributions of different surface and subsurface runoff mechanisms to the catchment discharge formation at these two small forested headwater catchments are studied with help of the natural isotopic signatures of the observed fluxes. The Uhlirska catchment (1.78 sq. km, Jizera Mts., Czech Republic) is situated in headwater area of Cerna Nisa stream. Deluviofluvial granitic sediments in the valley bottom areas (riparian zones/wetlands) are surrounded by gentle hillslopes with shallow soils developed on crystalline bedrock. The Liz catchment (0.99 sq. km, Bohemian Forest, Czech Republic) belongs to hillslope-type catchments without riparian zones situated in headwater area of Volynka River. The soil at Liz is developed on biotite paragneiss bedrock. Autocorrelation analysis of the measured catchment discharge rates reveals different hydrograph characteristics for each of the two catchments. Estimated autocorrelation lengths differ by an order of magnitude. Variations of oxygen-18 isotope concentrations in precipitation, groundwater and streamflow were analyzed. Several significant rainfall-runoff events at each of the two catchments were analyzed in detail. These events exhibit substantial difference in isotopic compositions of event and pre-event water, which facilitates hydrograph separation. Clockwise and counterclockwise hysteretic relationships between the stream discharge and its isotope concentration were identified. Results were confronted with the previously published concepts of the runoff formation at the catchments under study. The research was funded by the Czech Science Foundation, project No. 14-15201J.

  11. Catchment Engineering: A New Paradigm in Water Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, P. F.; Burke, S.; O'Donnell, G. M.; Wilkinson, M.; Jonczyk, J.; Barber, N.; Nicholson, A.; Proactive Team

    2011-12-01

    Recent catchment initiatives have highlighted the need for new holistic approaches to sustainable water management. Here, a catchment engineering approach seeks to describe catchment 'function' (or role) as the principal driver for evaluating how it should be managed in the future. Catchment engineering does not seek to re-establish a natural system but seeks to work with natural processes in order to engineer landscapes so that multiple benefits accrue. This approach involves quantifying and assessing catchment change and impacts but most importantly suggests an urgent and proactive agenda for future planning. In particular, an interventionist approach to managing hydrological flow pathways across scale is proposed. It is already accepted that future management will require a range of scientific expertise and full engagement with stakeholders, namely the general public and policy makers. This inclusive concept under a catchment engineering agenda forces any consortia to commit to actively changing and perturbing the catchment system and thus learn, in situ, how to manage the environment for collective benefits. The shared cost, the design, the implementation, the evaluation and any subsequent modifications should involve all relevant parties in the consortia. This joint ownership of a 'hands on' interventionist agenda to catchment change is at the core of catchment engineering. In this paper we show a range of catchment engineering projects from the UK that have addressed multi-disciplinary approaches to flooding, pollution and ecosystem management whilst maintaining economic food production. Local scale demonstration activities, led by local champions, have proven to be an effective means of encouraging wider uptake. Catchment engineering is a concept that relies on all relevant parties within a catchment to take responsibility for the water quantity and quality that arises from the catchment. Further, any holistic solution requires a bottom up, problem solving

  12. Design of a Rainwater Catchment System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Cammardella

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Certain dimensions of a rainwater catchment and storage system were optimized using climatological and sociological data. Using only daily demand and average daily rain fall data, the following dimensions were optimized: 1 The horizontal roof area needed to collect the daily demand of water, 2 The tank size needed to store all the water collected during a heavy rain event, 3 When full, how long the tank will be able to provide water without rain, and 4 The diameter of the outlet flow orifice. With these calculations, we can design a rainwater catchment system that can capture the daily demand and store excess water for use during periods of low rain.

  13. Creating a catchment perspective for river restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Benda

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges in river restoration is to identify the natural fluvial landscape in catchments with a long history of river control. Intensive land use on valley floors often predates the earliest remote sensing: levees, dikes, dams, and other structures alter valley-floor morphology, river channels and flow regimes. Consequently, morphological patterns indicative of the fluvial landscape including multiple channels, extensive floodplains, wetlands, and fluvial-riparian and tributary-confluence dynamics can be obscured, and information to develop appropriate and cost effective river restoration strategies can be unavailable. This is the case in the Pas River catchment in northern Spain (650 km2, in which land use and development have obscured the natural fluvial landscape in many parts of the basin. To address this issue we coupled general principles of hydro-geomorphic processes with computer tools to characterize the fluvial landscape. Using a 5-m digital elevation model, valley-floor surfaces were mapped according to elevation above the channel and proximity to key geomorphic processes. The predicted fluvial landscape is patchily distributed according to topography, valley morphology, river network structure, and fan and terrace landforms. The vast majority of the fluvial landscape in the main segments of the Pas River catchment is presently masked by human infrastructure, with only 15% not impacted by river control structures and development. The reconstructed fluvial landscape provides a catchment scale context to support restoration planning, in which areas of potential ecological productivity and diversity could be targeted for in-channel, floodplain and riparian restoration projects.

  14. Creating a catchment perspective for river restoration

    OpenAIRE

    L. Benda; MILLER, D; J. Barquín

    2011-01-01

    One of the major challenges in river restoration is to identify the natural fluvial landscape in catchments with a long history of river control. Intensive land use on valley floors often predates the earliest remote sensing: levees, dikes, dams, and other structures alter valley-floor morphology, river channels and flow regimes. Consequently, morphological patterns indicative of the fluvial landscape including multiple channels, extensive floodplains, wetlands, and fluvial-riparian and tribu...

  15. Groundwater : site scale, catchment scale, basin scale

    OpenAIRE

    Bricker, Stephanie; Bloomfield, John; Gooddy, Daren; MacDonald, David; Ward, Rob

    2011-01-01

    There are significant groundwater resources in the Thames Basin (Figure 1) supporting approximately 40 per cent of public water supply. Additionally many of the rivers in the catchment are supported by groundwater from the underlying aquifers. Effective management of both groundwater resources and groundwater-dependent ecosystems requires a good understanding of how our aquifers behave. We must also consider how these systems will respond to future changes, in particular climat...

  16. Influence of topography and forestry on catchments

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, Rasmus,

    2009-01-01

    The dynamic development of terrestrial and aquatic environments in boreal catchments is controlled by the factors of parent material, climate, topography, biota, time, and anthropogenic activity. This thesis explores two of these factors, topography and the anthropogenic activity of forestry, as well as their control on the redistribution of solutes in the landscape. On a local scale for two undisturbed sites, the calculation of the topographical wetness index, TWI, was varied to better corre...

  17. A PROPOSED NEW VEGETATION INDEX, THE TOTAL RATIO VEGETATION INDEX (TRVI), FOR ARID AND SEMI-ARID REGIONS

    OpenAIRE

    H. Fadaei; Suzuki, R.; Sakai, T; Torii, K.

    2012-01-01

    Vegetation indices that provide important key to predict amount vegetation in forest such as percentage vegetation cover, aboveground biomass, and leaf-area index. Arid and semi-arid areas are not exempt of this rule. Arid and semi-arid areas of northeast Iran cover about 3.4 million ha and are populated by two main tree species, the broadleaf Pistacia vera (pistachio) and the conifer Juniperus excelsa ssp. polycarpos (Persian juniper). Natural stands of pistachio in Iran are not only environ...

  18. Remote Sensing Parameterization of Land Surface Heat Fluxes over Arid and Semi-arid Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马耀明; 王介民; 黄荣辉; 卫国安; MassimoMENENTI; 苏中波; 胡泽勇; 高峰; 文军

    2003-01-01

    Dealing with the regional land surfaces heat fluxes over inhomogeneous land surfaces in arid and semi-arid areas is an important but not an easy issue. In this study, one parameterization method based on satellite remote sensing and field observations is proposed and tested for deriving the regional land surface heat fluxes over inhomogeneous landscapes. As a case study, the method is applied to the Dunhuang experimental area and the HEIFE (Heihe River Field Experiment, 1988-1994) area. The Dunhuang area is selected as a basic experimental area for the Chinese National Key Programme for Developing Basic Sciences: Research on the Formation Mecbanism and Prediction Theory of Severe Climate Disaster in China (G1998040900, 1999-2003). The four scenes of Landsat TM data used in this study are 3 June 2000,22 August 2000, and 29 January 2001 for the Dunhuang area and 9 July 1991 for the HEIFE area. The regional distributions of land surface variables, vegetation variables, and heat fluxes over inhomogeneous landscapes in arid and semi-arid areas are obtained in this study.

  19. Large landslides lie low: Vertical domains of denudation processes in the arid Himalaya-Karakoram orogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöthe, Jan Henrik

    2014-05-01

    Large bedrock landslides (defined here as affecting >0.1 km2 in planform area) are thought to substantially contribute to denuding active mountain belts, and limiting the growth of topographic relief produced by concurrent tectonic uplift and fluvial or glacial incision. While most research on large landslides has focused on tectonically active, humid mountain belts with varying degrees of rainstorm and earthquake activity, lesser attention has been devoted to arid mountain belts. Especially in the Himalaya, where high denudation rates are commonly associated with high landslide activity, previous work has largely ignored landslide processes in the arid compartments of the orogen. This was motivation for us to compile a landslide inventory covering the arid Himalaya-Karakoram of NW India and N Pakistan within the Indus catchment. Our data set contains 493 rock-slope failures that we compiled from published studies and mapping from remote sensing imagery. Using an empirical volume-area scaling approach we estimate the total landslide volume at >250 km3. This is more than thousand times the contemporary annual sediment load in the Indus River. We analyse the distribution of these volumetrically significant landslides with respect to the regional hypsometry, contemporary glacier cover, and the distribution of rock glaciers. We find that large bedrock landslides in the arid Himalaya-Karakoram region preferentially detach near or from below the study area's median elevation, while glaciers and rock glaciers occupy higher elevations almost exclusively. This trend holds true for both the study area and parts thereof. The largest and highest-lying landslides occur in the Karakoram mountains, where local relief exceeds 6 km, and >90% of the landslide areas lie below the region's median elevation. Our analysis reveals a hitherto unrecognized vertical layering of denudation processes, with landslides chiefly operating below the median elevation, whereas mass transport by

  20. Hyporheic flow pattern based on the coupling of regional and stream scales: Case of Krycklan Catchment area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojarrad, Morteza; Wörman, Anders; Riml, Joakim

    2016-04-01

    Water resources intense development within the past century has had an enormous impact on hydrological systems especially on rivers and groundwater resources. A river basin is a flow system involving the interaction between surface water and groundwater. This interaction occurs in terrestrial and coastal zone and even in arid and semi-arid areas, where surface water overlie on a permeable sediment. A key zone for the interaction between surface water and groundwater is the hyporheic zone, which forms by stream water that in- and exfiltrating in the permeable sediments surrounding the river corridor. Groundwater and hyporheic flows arise due to different range of topographical scales and their relative importance is investigated in this study. Krycklan is a well-monitored research catchment in which the data collection for more than 90 years has comprised hydrology, biochemistry, and aquatic ecology. The catchment is located in a boreal area of northern Sweden. The head-water streams begin in mountainous area and fall to the Baltic Sea near the city of Umea. In this paper, COMSOL Multi-physics simulation software has been used to model the subsurface flow of the whole Krycklan catchment in order to reach a comprehensive understanding of large-scale groundwater circulation and its impact of the stream hyporheic flows. The model statement is based on the 3D Laplace equation, which has been applied independently on two ranges of topographical scales to obtain a superimposed solution. Steady state simulation has been done based on the simplified assumption of constant boundary conditions of the groundwater surface and otherwise non-flow boundaries. The hydraulic head of the groundwater surface was taken as the topography, which apply as an approximation in wet climate with shallow soil layers. The results demonstrated how the ratio of the topographical amplitudes on different scales affect the size (depth) and fragmentation of the hyporheic zone. "Fragmentation" was

  1. The dominance of loess weathering on water and sediment chemistry within the Daihai Lake catchment, northeastern Chinese Loess Plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Firstly highlight the importance of loess weathering in a semi-arid lake. • Loess weathering controls sediment compositions in loess-covered area. • Loess weathering results in similar water chemistry of rivers and groundwater. • Water draining loess areas has distinct Mg/Ca and 87Sr/86Sr from global rivers. - Abstract: This study investigated modern loess weathering and its control on the chemistry of surface water and sediment within the Daihai Lake catchment. The mineral types and the abundances of major and trace elements in loess, sediments and bedrocks were determined to ascertain the provenance of river sediment. The major cation compositions and Sr isotopic ratios of surface and subsurface waters were measured to distinguish the contributions of dissolved loads from various parent materials. The data show that mineralogical characteristics and elemental abundances of the river sediments are almost identical with those of the loess, but are different from the bedrocks, indicating that river sediments are predominantly derived from loess. River waters feeding Daihai Lake show a similar range in 87Sr/86Sr ratios as those of HOAc-soluble carbonate minerals in loess from the Chinese Loess Plateau. The slightly lower 87Sr/86Sr of river waters in the southern catchment relative to other rivers reflect potential weathering of large areas of outcropping basalt. These results imply that (1) surface processes are dominated by weathering of loess which only accounts for 18% of the total catchment area, and (2) loess weathering but not basalt controls the river Sr isotopic signature, although the latter covers a larger catchment area. For groundwater, 87Sr/86Sr ratios indicate that subsurface processes might be controlled by interactions with ambient lithology and hydrological flowpaths. Comparing the rivers draining the Chinese Loess Plateau with global rivers, both Mg/Ca and 87Sr/86Sr in the Daihai surprisingly agree well with those in the upper

  2. Acid rain project biosurveys of streams in the Wastwater catchment

    OpenAIRE

    Prigg, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    This is the Acid rain project biosurveys of streams in the Wastwater catchment produced by the North West Water Authority in 1985. This report forms part of a series on component biological investigations, identified by location or topic, within the acid rain project. Reporting of the Wastwater catchment data would not have been given priority ordinarily, but it has been brought forward to coincide with J. Robinson's reporting of his investigations of land use and liming in the catchment. Thi...

  3. A catchment scale water balance model for FIFE

    OpenAIRE

    Famiglietti, J.S.; E. F. Wood; Sivapalan, M.; Thongs, D. J

    1992-01-01

    A catchment scale water balance model is presented and used to predict evaporation from the King's Creek catchment at the First ISLSCP Field Experiment site on the Konza Prairie, Kansas. The model incorporates spatial variability in topography, soils, and precipitation to compute the land surface hydrologie fluxes. A network of 20 rain gages was employed to measure rainfall across the catchment in the summer of 1987. These data were spatially interpolated and used to drive the model during st...

  4. Incorporating flood event analyses and catchment structures into model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppel, Henning; Schumann, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The space-time variability in catchment response results from several hydrological processes which differ in their relevance in an event-specific way. An approach to characterise this variance consists in comparisons between flood events in a catchment and between flood responses of several sub-basins in such an event. In analytical frameworks the impact of space and time variability of rainfall on runoff generation due to rainfall excess can be characterised. Moreover the effect of hillslope and channel network routing on runoff timing can be specified. Hence, a modelling approach is needed to specify the runoff generation and formation. Knowing the space-time variability of rainfall and the (spatial averaged) response of a catchment it seems worthwhile to develop new models based on event and catchment analyses. The consideration of spatial order and the distribution of catchment characteristics in their spatial variability and interaction with the space-time variability of rainfall provides additional knowledge about hydrological processes at the basin scale. For this purpose a new procedure to characterise the spatial heterogeneity of catchments characteristics in their succession along the flow distance (differentiated between river network and hillslopes) was developed. It was applied to study of flood responses at a set of nested catchments in a river basin in eastern Germany. In this study the highest observed rainfall-runoff events were analysed, beginning at the catchment outlet and moving upstream. With regard to the spatial heterogeneities of catchment characteristics, sub-basins were separated by new algorithms to attribute runoff-generation, hillslope and river network processes. With this procedure the cumulative runoff response at the outlet can be decomposed and individual runoff features can be assigned to individual aspects of the catchment. Through comparative analysis between the sub-catchments and the assigned effects on runoff dynamics new

  5. The Effect of Converting Combined Sewer Catchments to Separate Sewer Catchments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaarup-Jensen, Kjeld; Rasmussen, Michael R.; Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke

    2011-01-01

    separate sewer catchments decreases the amounts of storm water and pollutants diverted to the waste water treatment plant (WWTP) or as combined sewer overflows (CSO). But this happens at the expense of an increase in amounts of storm water and pollutants diverted to local receiving waters when detention...... ponds are not built-in the new separate sewer systems. If a total catchment area transformation – instead of only one fourth – is put through, the consequences could be fatal for receiving waters if no retention of pollutants is integrated in such a transformation....

  6. Uses of tree legumes in semi-arid regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felker, P.

    1980-01-01

    Uses of tree legumes in semi-arid and arid regions are reviewed. This review is divided into sections according to the following general use categories: fuels; human food; livestock food; to increase yields of crops grown beneath their canopies;and control of desertification. (MHR)

  7. Exploring the physical controls of regional patterns of flow duration curves – Part 4: A synthesis of empirical analysis, process modeling and catchment classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sivapalan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports on a four-pronged study of the physical controls on regional patterns of the Flow Duration Curve (FDC. This involved a comparative analysis of long-term continuous data from nearly 200 catchments around the US, encompassing a wide range of climates, geology and ecology. The analysis was done from three different perspectives – statistical analysis, process-based modeling, and data-based classification, followed by a synthesis, which is the focus of this paper. Streamflow data was separated into fast and slow flow responses, and associated signatures, and both total flow and its components were analyzed to generate patterns. Regional patterns emerged in all aspects of the study. The mixed gamma distribution described well the shape of the FDC; regression analysis indicated that certain climate and catchment properties were first order controls on the shape of the FDC. In order to understand the spatial patterns revealed by the statistical study, and guided by the hypothesis that the middle portion of the FDC is a function of the regime curve (RC, mean within year variation of flow, we set out to classify these catchments, both empirically and through process-based modeling, in terms of their regime behavior. The classification analysis showed that climate seasonality and aridity, either directly (empirical classes or through phenology (vegetation processes, were the dominant controls on the RC. Quantitative synthesis of these results determined that these classes were indeed related to the FDC through its slope and related statistical parameters. Qualitative synthesis revealed much diversity in the shapes of the FDCs even within each climate-based homogeneous class, especially in the low-flow tails, suggesting that catchment properties may have become the dominant controls. Thus, while the middle portion of the FDC contains the average response of the catchment, and is mainly controlled by climate, the tails of the FDC

  8. Exploring the physical controls of regional patterns of flow duration curves – Part 4: A synthesis of empirical analysis, process modeling and catchment classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sivapalan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports on a four-pronged study of the physical controls on regional patterns of the flow duration curve (FDC. This involved a comparative analysis of long-term continuous data from nearly 200 catchments around the US, encompassing a wide range of climates, geology, and ecology. The analysis was done from three different perspectives – statistical analysis, process-based modeling, and data-based classification – followed by a synthesis, which is the focus of this paper. Streamflow data were separated into fast and slow flow responses, and associated signatures, and both total flow and its components were analyzed to generate patterns. Regional patterns emerged in all aspects of the study. The mixed gamma distribution described well the shape of the FDC; regression analysis indicated that certain climate and catchment properties were first-order controls on the shape of the FDC. In order to understand the spatial patterns revealed by the statistical study, and guided by the hypothesis that the middle portion of the FDC is a function of the regime curve (RC, mean within-year variation of flow, we set out to classify these catchments, both empirically and through process-based modeling, in terms of their regime behavior. The classification analysis showed that climate seasonality and aridity, either directly (empirical classes or through phenology (vegetation processes, were the dominant controls on the RC. Quantitative synthesis of these results determined that these classes were indeed related to the FDC through its slope and related statistical parameters. Qualitative synthesis revealed much diversity in the shapes of the FDCs even within each climate-based homogeneous class, especially in the low-flow tails, suggesting that catchment properties may have become the dominant controls. Thus, while the middle portion of the FDC contains the average response of the catchment, and is mainly controlled by climate, the tails of the FDC

  9. Developing inorganic carbon-based radiocarbon chronologies for Holocene lake sediments in arid NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiawu; Ma, Xueyang; Qiang, Mingrui; Huang, Xiaozhong; Li, Shuang; Guo, Xiaoyan; Henderson, Andrew C. G.; Holmes, Jonathan A.; Chen, Fahu

    2016-07-01

    Inorganic carbonates are often used to establish radiocarbon (14C) chronologies for lake sediments when terrestrial plant remains (TPR) are rare or when bulk organic matter is insufficient for dating, a problem that is common for many lakes in arid regions. However, the reservoir effect (RE), as well as old carbon contributed from the lakes catchment make it difficult to establish reliable chronologies. Here we present a systematic study of inorganic 14C ages of two lake-sediment sequences, one from a small-enclosed saline lake - Lake Gahai in Qaidam Basin, and the other from a large freshwater lake - Lake Bosten in Xinjiang. Modern dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of the lakes, paleo-lake sediments exposed in the catchment, and mollusk shells in core sediments from Lake Gahai were dated to assess the RE and the contribution of pre-aged carbon to the old ages in the cores. We propose a statistical regression to assess more than one RE for the 14C carbonate ages within our sedimentary sequences. Old radiocarbon ages contributed by detrital carbonates were assessed by comparing the ages of mollusk shells with those of carbonates at the same sediment depths. We established the RE of the authigenic component and assessed detrital old carbon contributions to our two sites, and this was used to correct the 14C ages. Based on this approach, we developed age models for both cores, and tested them using 210Pb ages in both cores and TPR-based 14C-ages recovered from Lake Bosten. We further tested our age models by comparing carbonate-based oxygen isotope (δ18O) records from both lakes to an independently-dated regional speleothem δ18O record. Our results suggest if sedimentary sequences are densely dated and the RE and the contribution of old carbon from detrital carbonates can be ascertained, robust chronological frameworks based on carbonate-based 14C determinations can be established.

  10. CHARACTERISTICS AND CONSTRUCTION OF LANDSCAPE???ECOLOGY IN ARID REGIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper analyzes the characteristics of the landscape structures and landacape ecological processes in arid regions of China. Landscape structure is simplicity and homogeneity with the pattern of desert-oasis-river and canal corridor. The spatial distribution of landscape heterogeneity mosaics is relatively dependent on water resources. In arid regions,the landscape changes rapidly and extensively because of the sensitive landscape ecosystems and fragile regional ecosystems.For the sustainable development of arid regions, the theories and methods for the eco-environmental construction and the strategies of ecological construction in the arid regions were proposed in the view of landscape ecology. Keynote subjects of landscape ecology were also discussed. The paper points out that protecting and increasing landscape diversity and heterogeneity are critical to control ecological safety in arid regions.

  11. Analysis list: ARID3A [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ARID3A Blood,Liver + hg19 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/AR...ID3A.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/ARID3A.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedb...c.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/ARID3A.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/ARID3A.Blood.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosci...encedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/ARID3A.Liver.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/Blood.gml,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/Liver.gml ...

  12. The current bioenergy production potential of semi-arid and arid regions in sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wicke, B.; Smeets, E.M.W.; Watson, H.; Faaij, A.P.C.

    2011-01-01

    This article assesses the current technical and economic potential of three bioenergy production systems (cassava ethanol, jatropha oil and fuelwood) in semi-arid and arid regions of eight sub-Saharan African countries. The results indicate that the availability of land for energy production ranges

  13. Extreme Rainfall Impacts in Fractured Permeable Catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireson, A. M.; Butler, A. P.

    2009-12-01

    Serious groundwater flooding events have occurred on Chalk catchments in both the UK and north west Europe in the last decade, causing substantial amounts of disruption and economic damage. These fractured, permeable catchments are characterized by low surface runoff, high baseflow indices and strongly attenuated streamflow hydrographs. They have a general resilience to drought and pluvial/fluvial flooding. The small pore size of the Chalk matrix (~ 1 µm) exerts a high suction, such that dynamic storage is primarily due to the fractures, and amounts to ~ 1% of the total volume. As a result, under sustained rainfall the water table can rise up to exceptional levels leading to surface water emergence from springs and valleys. Floodwater may slowly drain with the topography, or, in localized depressions, it may simply pond until the groundwater levels decline. In winter 2000/1, a sequence of individually unexceptional rainfall events over several months led to large scale flooding in the Pang catchment, Berkshire, UK. By contrast, an extreme rainfall event on 20th July 2007 in the same catchment caused a very rapid response at the water table, but due to the antecedent conditions did not lead to flooding. The objective of this study is to quantify how the water table in a fractured permeable catchment responds to different types of rainfall, and the implications of this for groundwater flooding. We make use of measurements from the Pang catchment, including: rainfall (tipping bucket gauges); actual evaporation (eddy flux correlation); soil water content (profile probes and neutron probes); near surface matric potential (tensiometers and equitensiometers); deep (>10m) matric potential (deep jacking tensiometers); and water table elevation (piezometers). Conventional treatment of recharge in Chalk aquifers considers a fixed bypass component of rainfall, normally 15%, to account for the role of the fractures. However, interpretation of the field data suggest three modes

  14. Describing Ecosystem Complexity through Integrated Catchment Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shope, C. L.; Tenhunen, J. D.; Peiffer, S.

    2011-12-01

    Land use and climate change have been implicated in reduced ecosystem services (ie: high quality water yield, biodiversity, and agricultural yield. The prediction of ecosystem services expected under future land use decisions and changing climate conditions has become increasingly important. Complex policy and management decisions require the integration of physical, economic, and social data over several scales to assess effects on water resources and ecology. Field-based meteorology, hydrology, soil physics, plant production, solute and sediment transport, economic, and social behavior data were measured in a South Korean catchment. A variety of models are being used to simulate plot and field scale experiments within the catchment. Results from each of the local-scale models provide identification of sensitive, local-scale parameters which are then used as inputs into a large-scale watershed model. We used the spatially distributed SWAT model to synthesize the experimental field data throughout the catchment. The approach of our study was that the range in local-scale model parameter results can be used to define the sensitivity and uncertainty in the large-scale watershed model. Further, this example shows how research can be structured for scientific results describing complex ecosystems and landscapes where cross-disciplinary linkages benefit the end result. The field-based and modeling framework described is being used to develop scenarios to examine spatial and temporal changes in land use practices and climatic effects on water quantity, water quality, and sediment transport. Development of accurate modeling scenarios requires understanding the social relationship between individual and policy driven land management practices and the value of sustainable resources to all shareholders.

  15. Evaluation of TOPLATS on three Mediterranean catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizu, Javier; Álvarez-Mozos, Jesús; Casalí, Javier; Goñi, Mikel

    2016-08-01

    Physically based hydrological models are complex tools that provide a complete description of the different processes occurring on a catchment. The TOPMODEL-based Land-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (TOPLATS) simulates water and energy balances at different time steps, in both lumped and distributed modes. In order to gain insight on the behavior of TOPLATS and its applicability in different conditions a detailed evaluation needs to be carried out. This study aimed to develop a complete evaluation of TOPLATS including: (1) a detailed review of previous research works using this model; (2) a sensitivity analysis (SA) of the model with two contrasted methods (Morris and Sobol) of different complexity; (3) a 4-step calibration strategy based on a multi-start Powell optimization algorithm; and (4) an analysis of the influence of simulation time step (hourly vs. daily). The model was applied on three catchments of varying size (La Tejeria, Cidacos and Arga), located in Navarre (Northern Spain), and characterized by different levels of Mediterranean climate influence. Both Morris and Sobol methods showed very similar results that identified Brooks-Corey Pore Size distribution Index (B), Bubbling pressure (ψc) and Hydraulic conductivity decay (f) as the three overall most influential parameters in TOPLATS. After calibration and validation, adequate streamflow simulations were obtained in the two wettest catchments, but the driest (Cidacos) gave poor results in validation, due to the large climatic variability between calibration and validation periods. To overcome this issue, an alternative random and discontinuous method of cal/val period selection was implemented, improving model results.

  16. Lithogenic and cosmogenic tracers in catchment hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water, which is one of the primary concerns in hydrology. Many groundwater solutes are derived as a result of interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system. These are termed open-quotes lithogenicclose quotes solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both internally and externally to the catchment system. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing open-quotes cosmogenicclose quotes nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing open-quotes thermonuclearclose quotes nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, such as U and Th (producing open-quotes in-situclose quotes lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading open-quotes cosmogenic nuclidesclose quotes, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage, although always clearly indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute compositions in groundwater, and how these compositions can therefore be used in integrative ways to understand the physical history of groundwater within a catchment system

  17. Lithogenic and cosmogenic tracers in catchment hydrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimz, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water, which is one of the primary concerns in hydrology. Many groundwater solutes are derived as a result of interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system. These are termed {open_quotes}lithogenic{close_quotes} solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both internally and externally to the catchment system. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing {open_quotes}cosmogenic{close_quotes} nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing {open_quotes}thermonuclear{close_quotes} nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, such as U and Th (producing {open_quotes}in-situ{close_quotes} lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading {open_quotes}cosmogenic nuclides{close_quotes}, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage, although always clearly indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute compositions in groundwater, and how these compositions can therefore be used in integrative ways to understand the physical history of groundwater within a catchment system.

  18. Equitable water allocation in a heavily committed international catchment area: the case of the Komati Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkomo, Sakhiwe; van der Zaag, Pieter

    This paper investigates water availability and use in the Komati catchment. The Komati catchment is shared by Swaziland and South Africa and forms part of the Incomati basin, with Mozambique as the third riparian country. In 2002 the three countries reached agreement about how the scarce water should be allocated, based on the principle of equitable and sustainable utilization, as stipulated by the SADC Protocol. The Komati catchment has five main water uses: afforestation, irrigation, the environment, urban/industrial/mining (UIM), and interbasin water transfers (for industrial use). In addition, South Africa and Swaziland have committed themselves to satisfy a certain cross border flow to downstream Mozambique. Frequently, debate has arisen between users and riparian countries on the direction that water resources development has taken in the catchment. Downstream farmers have often complained about interbasin transfers taking place in the upstream portions of the catchment. There has also been animosity about effecting environmental flow releases. A relatively simple, spreadsheet-based water resources model (Waflex) was developed to analyse water availability and use under current and future scenarios. The results were then compared to results obtained from another model that was used in a joint study by Mozambique, South Africa and Swaziland. The Waflex model showed a high degree of consistency with the one used for comparison, especially in terms of trends. It was found that the recent completion of two new dams has improved water supply to irrigation in the two countries. Future water demands will result in appreciable shortages for irrigation and domestic use. The agreed maximum development levels will soon outstrip the ability of the catchment’s supply. The paper shows that a combination of measures will be required to ensure equitable and sustainable water utilisation in the Komati catchment. These will have to be agreed by the riparian countries

  19. Nitrate reduction in geologically heterogeneous catchments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Auken, Esben; Bamberg, C.A.;

    2014-01-01

    and for assessing at which spatial scales modelling tools have predictive capabilities. A new instrument has been developed for airborne geophysical measurements, Mini-SkyTEM, dedicated to identifying geological structures and heterogeneities with horizontal and lateral resolutions of 30–50 m and 2 m, respectively...... the entire catchment. However, as distributed models often do not include local scale hydrogeological heterogeneities, they are typically not able to make accurate predictions at scales smaller than they are calibrated. We present a framework for assessing nitrate reduction in the subsurface...

  20. Design of a Rainwater Catchment System

    OpenAIRE

    Neil Cammardella

    2011-01-01

    Certain dimensions of a rainwater catchment and storage system were optimized using climatological and sociological data. Using only daily demand and average daily rain fall data, the following dimensions were optimized: 1) The horizontal roof area needed to collect the daily demand of water, 2) The tank size needed to store all the water collected during a heavy rain event, 3) When full, how long the tank will be able to provide water without rain, and 4) The diameter of the outlet flow orif...

  1. Possible climate change impacts on water resources availability in a large semi-arid catchment in Northeast Brazil.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronstert, Axel; Güntner, Andreas; Araújo, de José Carlos; Jaeger, Annekathrin; Krol, Maarten

    2005-01-01

    The semiarid region of Northeast Brazil is characterized by water scarcity, vulnerability of natural resources, and pronounced climatic variability. An integrated model has been developed to simulate this complex situation with an emphasis on a large-scale representation of hydrological processes an

  2. The role of macropore flow from plot to catchment scale : a study in a semi-arid area

    OpenAIRE

    van Schaik, N.L.M.B.

    2010-01-01

    Desertification and landscape degradation is a worldwide problem, which is expected to grow in time due to unsustainable land use and climate change. In view of these problems, knowledge of the interaction between vegetation, soil moisture and surface runoff, with subsequent erosion risk is essential. This requires mapping of the spatial and temporal variability of infiltration and runoff production. The influence of preferential flow thereupon is nowadays widely recognized. Therefore the rol...

  3. The impacts of assimilating satellite soil moisture into a rainfall-runoff model in a semi-arid catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Garreton, C.; Ryu, D.; Western, A. W.; Crow, W. T.; Robertson, D. E.

    2014-11-01

    Soil moisture plays a key role in runoff generation processes, and the assimilation of soil moisture observations into rainfall-runoff models is regarded as a way to improve their prediction accuracy. Given the scarcity of in situ measurements, satellite soil moisture observations offer a valuable dataset that can be assimilated into models; however, very few studies have used these coarse resolution products to improve rainfall-runoff model prediction. In this work we evaluate the assimilation of satellite soil moisture into the probability distributed model (PDM) for the purpose of reducing flood prediction uncertainty in an operational context. The surface soil moisture (SSM) and the soil wetness index (SWI) derived from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) are assimilated using an ensemble Kalman filter. Two options for the observed data are considered to remove the systematic differences between SSM/SWI and the model soil moisture prediction: linear regression (LR) and anomaly-based cumulative distribution function (aCDF) matching. In addition to a complete period rescaling scheme (CP), an operationally feasible real-time rescaling scheme (RT) is tested. On average, the discharge prediction uncertainty, expressed as the ensemble mean of the root mean squared difference (MRMSD), is reduced by 25% after assimilation and little overall difference is found between the various approaches. However, when specific flood events are analysed, the level of improvement varies. Our results reveal that efficacy of the soil moisture assimilation for flood prediction is robust with respect to different assumptions regarding the observation error variance. The assimilation performs similarly between the operational RT and the CP schemes, which suggests that short-term training is sufficient to effectively remove observation biases. Regarding the different rescaling techniques used, aCDF matching consistently leads to better assimilation results than LR. Differences between the assimilation of SSM and SWI, however, are not significant. Even though there is improvement in streamflow prediction, the assimilation of soil moisture shows limited capability in error correction when there exists a large bias in the peak flow prediction. Findings of this work imply that proper pre-processing of observed soil moisture is critical for the efficacy of the data assimilation and its performance is affected by the quality of model calibration.

  4. [Spatial heterogeneity of soil moisture and its relationships with environmental factors at small catchment level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhi-Hua; Zhu, Hua-De; Chen, Jia; Fang, Nu-Fang; Ai, Lei

    2012-04-01

    Taking the Wulongchi catchment of Danjiangkou in central China as a case, the soil moisture regime in the observation period from April to October, 2008 was divided into different dry-wet time periods by two way indicator species analysis (TWINSPAN), and the environmental factors that had significant effects on the spatial pattern of soil moisture in different dry-wet time periods were selected by forward selection and Monte Carlo tests. The redundancy analysis (RDA) was adopted to identify the relationships between the distribution pattern of soil moisture and the environmental factors in different time periods, and the partial RDA was applied to quantitatively analyze the effects of environmental factors, spatial variables, and their interactions on the variation pattern of the soil moisture. The soil moisture regime in the observation period was divided into 7 types, and grouped into 4 time periods, i. e. , dry, semi-arid, semi-humid, and humid. In dry period, land use type was the dominant factor affecting the spatial pattern of soil moisture, and the soil thickness, relative elevation, profile curvature, soil bulk density, and soil organic matter content also had significant effects. In semi-arid period, soil thickness played dominant role, and land use type, topographic wetness index, soil bulk density, and profile curvature had significant effects. In semi-humid period, topographic wetness index was the most important affecting factor, and the land use type and the sine value of aspect played significant roles. In humid period, the topographic compound index and the sine value of aspect were the dominant factors, whereas the relative elevation and catchment area were the important factors. In the four time periods, there was a better consistency between the spatial distribution pattern of soil moisture and the environmental ecological gradient. From dry period to humid period, the independent effects of environmental factors on soil moisture pattern

  5. Determine the optimum spectral reflectance of juniper and pistachio in arid and semi-arid region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadaei, Hadi; Suzuki, Rikie

    2012-11-01

    Arid and semi-arid areas of northeast Iran cover about 3.4 million ha are populated by two main tree species, the broadleaf Pistacia vera. L (pistachio) and the conifer Juniperus excelsa ssp. polycarpos (Persian juniper). Natural stands of pistachio in Iran are not only environmentally important but genetically essential as seed sources for pistachio production in orchards. In this study, we estimated the optimum spectral reflectance of juniper forests and natural pistachio stands using remote sensing to help in the sustainable management and production of pistachio in Iran. In this research spectral reflectance are able to specify of multispectral from Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) that provided by JAXA. These data included PRISM is a panchromatic radiometer with a 2.5 m spatial resolution at nadir, has one band with a wavelength of 0.52-0.77 μm and AVNIR-2 is a visible and near infrared radiometer for observing land and coastal zones with a 10 m spatial resolution at nadir, has four multispectral bands: blue (0.42-0.50 μm), green (0.52-0.60 μm), red (0.61-0.69 μm), and near infrared (0.76-0.89 μm). Total ratio vegetation index (TRVI) of optimum spectral reflectance of juniper and pistachio have been evaluated. The result of TRVI for Pistachio and juniper were (R2= 0.71 and 0.55). I hope this research can provide decision of managers to helping sustainable management for arid and semi-arid regions in Iran.

  6. Development of an arid site closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the development of a prototype plan for the effective closure and stabilization of an arid low-level waste disposal site. This plan will provide demonstrated closure techniques for a trench in a disposal site at Los Alamos. The accuracy of modeling soil water storage by two hydrologic models, CREAMS and HELP, was tested by comparing simulation results with field measurements of soil moisture in eight experimental landfill cover systems having a range of well-defined soil profiles and vegetative covers. Regression analysis showed that CREAMS generally represented soil moisture more accurately than HELP simulations. Precautions for determining parameter values for model input and for interpreting simulation results are discussed. A specific example is presented showing how the field-validated hydrologic models can be used to develop a final prototype closure plan. 15 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Standardised survey method for identifying catchment risks to water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D L; Ferguson, C M; Chier, P; Warnecke, M; Watkinson, A

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a systematic methodology to identify and quantify risks in drinking water and recreational catchments. The methodology assesses microbial and chemical contaminants from both diffuse and point sources within a catchment using Escherichia coli, protozoan pathogens and chemicals (including fuel and pesticides) as index contaminants. Hazard source information is gathered by a defined sanitary survey process involving use of a software tool which groups hazards into six types: sewage infrastructure, on-site sewage systems, industrial, stormwater, agriculture and recreational sites. The survey estimates the likelihood of the site affecting catchment water quality, and the potential consequences, enabling the calculation of risk for individual sites. These risks are integrated to calculate a cumulative risk for each sub-catchment and the whole catchment. The cumulative risks process accounts for the proportion of potential input sources surveyed and for transfer of contaminants from upstream to downstream sub-catchments. The output risk matrices show the relative risk sources for each of the index contaminants, highlighting those with the greatest impact on water quality at a sub-catchment and catchment level. Verification of the sanitary survey assessments and prioritisation is achieved by comparison with water quality data and microbial source tracking. PMID:27280603

  8. Analysis of groundwater flow in mountainous, headwater catchments with permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Sarah G.; Ge, Shemin; Liang, Sihai

    2015-12-01

    Headwater catchments have a direct impact on the water resources of downstream lowland regions as they supply freshwater in the form of surface runoff and discharging groundwater. Often, these mountainous catchments contain expansive permafrost that may alter the natural topographically controlled groundwater flow system. As permafrost could degrade with climate change, it is imperative to understand the effect of permafrost on groundwater flow in headwater catchments. This study characterizes groundwater flow in mountainous headwater catchments and evaluates the effect of permafrost in the context of climate change on groundwater movement using a three-dimensional, finite element, hydrogeologic model. The model is applied to a representative headwater catchment on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China. Results from the model simulations indicate that groundwater contributes significantly to streams in the form of baseflow and the majority of groundwater flow is from the shallow aquifer above the permafrost, disrupting the typical topographically controlled flow pattern observed in most permafrost-free headwater catchments. Under a warming scenario where mean annual surface temperature is increased by 2°C, reducing the areal extent of permafrost in the catchment, groundwater contribution to streamflow may increase three-fold. These findings suggest that, in headwater catchments, permafrost has a large influence on groundwater flow and stream discharge. Increased annual air temperatures may increase groundwater discharge to streams, which has implications for ecosystem health and the long-term availability of water resources to downstream regions.

  9. Climate change impact on future water resources availability for a semi-arid area (Ferghana Valley, Central Asia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radchenko, Iuliia; Breuer, Lutz; Mannig, Birgit; Frede, Hans-Georg

    2014-05-01

    Considering increasing temperatures and glacier recession during the last decades, it is of high interest to study the climate change impact on water resources availability in semi-arid regions of Central Asia. The Ferghana Valley is surrounded by the Tien-Shan and Pamiro-Alay mountain systems that store big amounts of water in snowpacks and glaciers. In the valley the agricultural activity of local people strongly depends on available water from the Syrdarya River. The river is formed by the confluence of the Naryn and Karadarya Rivers, which are mainly fed by the glacier and snow melt from the Akshiirak and Ferghana ridges of the aforementioned mountain systems. The small upper river basins of the valley also contribute with runoff (~34 %) to the Syrdarya River. These small rivers are mainly fed by precipitation and seasonal snow melt. Thus, because of climate change and glacier decline, it is necessary to investigate the comparative contribution of the small catchments versus two big river basins to the Syrdarya River system, as these small upper catchments could become more important for future water consumption. In this study the conceptual hydrological HBV-light model has been calibrated and validated for the period 1980-1985 over 18 upper catchments that feed the Syrdarya River from the surrounding mountain ridges. Dynamically downscaled climate change scenarios were then applied up to the year 2100 for these basins. The scenarios were generated by means of Global Circulation Model (ECHAM5) and Regional Climate Model (REMO) with a baseline period from 1971 till 2000. We will present modelling results of water resources, the contribution of small rivers to the Syrdarya River and to what extent this contribution is likely to change in the future. Moreover, the results of simulated potential runoff will be used to develop future climate change adaptation strategies regarding socio-economic and environmental sustainable water use.

  10. A detailed study on Catchment delineation for Urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, B.; B M, A.; Lohani, B.; Jain, A.

    2015-12-01

    Urban flood modelling is carried out for predicting, analysing and planning of floods in urban areas. Catchment information is an important input for urban flood modelling. Automatic catchment delineation at gully gratings for urban areas using appropriate software packages/methods along with an appropriate set of input data and parameters is still a research challenge. Considering the above, the aim of this study is to (i) identify the best suitable software for automatic catchment delineation by considering gully grating as outlet (ii) understand the effect of resolution of DEM on catchments delineated (iii) understand whether to consider DEM or DSM for catchment delineation (iv) study the effect of grid based and TIN based DEM. In this study catchment delineation has been investigated considering IIT Kanpur as a study site. LiDAR data are used to generate DEM/DSM of the study area. A comparative study of catchment delineation has been carried out between ArcHydro 10.1, BASINS 4.1, ArcSWAT, WMS 7.1, and HEC-GeoHMS approaches. Catchments have been delineated for different drainage threshold areas using gully grating points as outlets and their effects have been compared for the aforementioned software. In order to understand the effect of resolution of data, DEMs of 1m and 5m resolution have been generated and compared against each other. Effects of building ridge lines and their contribution to catchment delineation has been studied by generating a DSM of 1m resolution, and comparing the results with catchments delineated using 1m DEM. In order to assess the effects of the types of DEM over catchment delineation, a grid based DEM and TIN based DEM are compared against each other using WMS 7.1 software. The results for the catchment delineation using various software illustrate that ArcHydro 10.1 performs better than any other aforementioned software. Also, it is noted that varied drainage threshold area parameters, resolutions of DEM, selection of DEM

  11. Catchment Systems Engineering: A New Paradigm in Water Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, P. F.; Wilkinson, M. E.; Burke, S.; O'Donnell, G. M.; Jonczyk, J.; Barber, N.; Nicholson, A.

    2012-04-01

    Recent catchment initiatives have highlighted the need for new holistic approaches to sustainable water management. Catchment Systems Engineering seeks to describe catchment the function (or role) as the principal driver for evaluating how it should be managed in the future. Catchment Systems Engineering does not seek to re-establish a natural system but rather works with natural processes in order to engineer landscapes to accrue multiple benefits. The approach involves quantifying and assessing catchment change, impacts and most importantly, suggests an urgent and proactive agenda for future planning. In particular, an interventionist approach to managing hydrological flow pathways across scale is proposed. It is already accepted that future management will require a range of scientific expertise and full engagement with stakeholders. This inclusive concept under a Catchment Systems Engineering agenda forces any consortia to commit to actively changing and perturbing the catchment system and thus learn, in situ, how to manage the environment for collective benefits. The shared cost, the design, the implementation, the evaluation and any subsequent modifications should involve all relevant parties in the consortia. This joint ownership of a 'hands on' interventionist agenda to catchment change is at the core of Catchment Systems Engineering. In this paper we show a range of catchment engineering projects from the UK that have addressed multi-disciplinary approaches to flooding, pollution and ecosystem management, whilst maintaining economic food production. Examples using soft engineered features such as wetlands, ponds, woody debris dams and infiltration zones will be shown. Local scale demonstration activities, led by local champions, have proven to be an effective means of encouraging wider uptake. Evidence that impacts can be achieved at local catchment scale will be introduced. Catchment Systems Engineering is a concept that relies on all relevant parties

  12. Oxygen-18 studies of catchment runoff generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding how runnoff is generated in catchments is important for landuse management. The authors used the response of streams to inputs of rainfall and oxygen-18 to give insight into the process of generating runoff. At Maimai, a West Coast pine forest catchment converted from native beech, streams rise to high levels very quickly after rainfall. Oxygen-18 studies have shown that most of the water discharged during a rainfall event is actually from displaced soil water not current rainfall. The authors have identified the size of this large soil water store as well as the amounts of water flowing from the macropores (with rapid release) and micropores (slow release) within the soil. In contrast, at Glendhu in tussock grassland of upland Otago, streams continue to flow strongly even when there is no rain. The authors found that more baseflow is sources from the soil B-horizon (a compact loess layer) of the surrounding hillslopes and less from the extensive headwater wetlands than was previously thought. This suggests there may be adverse effects on the baseflow if the area is forested and B-horizon water is access by trees

  13. Downstream mixing of sediment and tracers in agricultural catchments: Evidence of changing sediment sources and fluvial processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, Timothy; Wethered, Adam; Smith, Hugh; Heijnis, Henk

    2014-05-01

    Land clearance, soil tillage and grazing in agricultural catchments have liberated sediment and altered hydrological connectivity between hillslopes and channels, leading to increased sediment availability, mobilisation and delivery to rivers. The type and amount of sediment supplied to rivers is critical for fluvial geomorphology and aquatic ecosystem health. Contemporary sediment dynamics are routinely investigated using environmental radionuclides such as caesium-137 (Cs-137) and excess lead-210 (Pb-210ex), which can provide information regarding sediment source types and fluvial processes if sediment sources can be distinguished from one another and mixing models applied to representative samples. However, downstream transport, mixing and dilution of radionuclide-labelled sediment (especially from sources with low initial concentrations) can obliterate the tracer signal; sometimes before anything of geomorphological importance happens in the catchment. Can these findings be used as evidence of sediment source variations and fluvial processes when the limits of detection (of Cs-137 in particular) are being exceeded so rapidly downstream? Sediment sources and downstream sediment dynamics were investigated in Coolbaggie Creek, a major supplier of sediment to the Macquarie River in an agricultural catchment with temperate to semi-arid climate in Australia. Radionuclides were used to discriminate between the banks and gullies (Cs-137 1.45 +/- 0.47 Bq/kg; Pb-210ex 4.67 +/- 1.93 Bq/kg). Within the trunk stream, suspended sediment, organic matter and Cs-137 and Pb-210ex concentrations declined downstream. Results from a mixing model suggest that agricultural topsoils account for 95% of fine sediment entering the channel in the upper reach (200 m2) downstream, with channel expansion and gullies contributing fine sediment to the system. A lack of topsoil being supplied to the channel suggests minimal lateral connectivity between the catchment and the trunk stream in all

  14. Geothermal technoecosystems and water cycles in arid lands. Information paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffield, C.

    1976-01-01

    Arid lands resource information paper No. 2, 'Exploration and Exploitation of Geothermal Resources in Arid and Semiarid Lands,' first issued in 1973, is now out-of-print. The intent of the present paper was to revise that earlier literature review with its annotated bibliography, by recognizing the unusual developments in this field in the interim, with new geothermal fields discovered, new demands for geothermal energy as an alternative source to more conventional sources, and a number of new publications reflecting accelerated research. The extensive bibliography accompanying this paper was produced by ALIS, and includes over one hundred references prepared by the Office of Arid Lands Studies.

  15. Long-term aridity changes in the western United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Edward R; Woodhouse, Connie A; Eakin, C Mark; Meko, David M; Stahle, David W

    2004-11-01

    The western United States is experiencing a severe multiyear drought that is unprecedented in some hydroclimatic records. Using gridded drought reconstructions that cover most of the western United States over the past 1200 years, we show that this drought pales in comparison to an earlier period of elevated aridity and epic drought in AD 900 to 1300, an interval broadly consistent with the Medieval Warm Period. If elevated aridity in the western United States is a natural response to climate warming, then any trend toward warmer temperatures in the future could lead to a serious long-term increase in aridity over western North America.

  16. Anatomy of a catchment: the relation of physical attributes of the Plynlimon catchments to variations in hydrology and water status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Brandt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Plynlimon headwater catchments in mid-Wales have been a landmark study of water resources in the UK uplands for over 30 years. The main physical features of the catchments have been digitised as the basis for linking new model developments and process understanding. Examples are given of how the main physical attributes are related to land management, hydrology and water quality. These data are also being used to provide insights into catchment processes that may underpin the development of new research. This work is particularly relevant given the need for the assessment of water status under the Water Framework Directive. The paper presents hypothetical management scenarios for the catchments, to show how ecological status may be improved, for example, by selectively restructuring areas of commercial forest. Keywords: Plynlimon, GIS, catchment study, forestry, hydrology, WFD

  17. Novel biogeochemical fingerprinting approaches to sediment source apportionment in catchments (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungait, J.; Puttock, A.; Beniston, J. W.; Brazier, R. E.; Lal, R.; Collins, A.

    2013-12-01

    Apportioning the source of organic carbon in eroding sediments is important to constrain the scale of transport processes and to assess the impact of anthropogenic activity on environmental quality. Established biogeochemical techniques are used to trace organic inputs typically derived directly or indirectly from plants into soils, sediments and water using lipid biomarkers. Recently, advances in bulk and compound specific stable 13C isotope analyses have provided novel ways of exploring the source and residence times of organic matter in soils using the natural abundance stable 13C isotope signature of C3 and C4 plant end member values. However, the application of biogeochemical source tracing technologies at the molecular level at field to catchment scales has been slow to develop because of perceived problems with dilution of molecular-scale signals. This paper describes the results of recent experiments in natural and agricultural environments in the UK (Collins et al., 2013; Dungait et al., 2013) and United States (Puttock et al., 2012; Beniston et al., submitted) that have successfully applied new biogeochemical fingerprinting techniques using stable 13C isotope approaches and complementary modelling approaches to explore the transport of particulate and sediment-bound organic carbon at a range of scales from the small plot (m2) to field (ha) and small catchment (10's ha). References Beniston et al (submitted) The effects of crop residue removal on soil erosion and macronutrient dynamics on soils under no till for 42 years. Biogeosciences Collins et al (2013) Catchment source contributions to the sediment-bound organic matter degrading salmonid spawning gravels in a lowland river, southern England. Science of the Total Environment 456-457, 181-195. Dungait et al (2013) Microbial responses to the erosional redistribution of soil organic carbon in arable fields. Soil Biology and Biochemistry 60, 195-201. Puttock et al (2012) Stable carbon isotope analysis of

  18. Using Runoff Collectors to Understand Surface Runoff Characteristics in Remote Nevada Catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, K. E.; Saito, L.; Fenstermaker, L.; Devitt, D.; Strachan, S.; Morris, C.; Weltz, M.

    2012-12-01

    Population growth in Nevada and climate change are placing greater demands on water resources in an already arid region. Nevada is considered one of the most endangered ecoregions in the United States and most vulnerable to climate change in the contiguous United States because of its dependence on water resources. Future water demands in the western U.S. will increasingly need to be satisfied by groundwater, yet data to estimate groundwater recharge are extremely limited in most areas of the region. Surface water contributions to groundwater recharge from ephemeral, remote catchments are difficult and expensive to measure, and are often estimated using modeling techniques based on limited or no actual runoff data. Understanding surface runoff is important because if runoff exists, it can move the location of recharge, affect the distribution of plant and wildlife communities, as well as impact the water balance of surface water resources. In this study, 16 runoff collectors were installed on hillslopes in remote catchments across Nevada in the Snake, Sheep and Desatoya mountain ranges. Each runoff collector is composed of a 1-square-meter sheet metal frame that is placed on a hillslope (5-10% slope), with a subsurface 19-liter (5-gallon) bucket beneath it to collect surface flows within the plot. A pressure transducer is suspended from the surface into the bucket to measure runoff volume. Ten collectors were deployed at monitoring transect sites in the Snake Range and four were deployed within the Sheep Range as a part of the Nevada NSF EPSCoR Climate Change Project. Temperature, precipitation, soil moisture, and other data collected by the NV NSF EPSCoR Project in the vicinity of the runoff collectors will be used to assess the relationship between precipitation events and runoff. In addition, nine rainfall simulation experiments were completed at one of the Sheep Range sites to simulate different sizes of storms and their contributions to surface runoff. The

  19. Surface-groundwater interactions in hard rocks in Sardon Catchment of western Spain: An integrated modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, S. M. Tanvir; Lubczynski, Maciek W.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Su, Zhongbo

    2014-09-01

    The structural and hydrological complexity of hard rock systems (HRSs) affects dynamics of surface-groundwater interactions. These complexities are not well described or understood by hydrogeologists because simplified analyses typically are used to study HRSs. A transient, integrated hydrologic model (IHM) GSFLOW (Groundwater and Surface water FLOW) was calibrated and post-audited using 18 years of daily groundwater head and stream discharge data to evaluate the surface-groundwater interactions in semi-arid, ∼80 km2 granitic Sardon hilly catchment in Spain characterized by shallow water table conditions, relatively low storage, dense drainage networks and frequent, high intensity rainfall. The following hydrological observations for the Sardon Catchment, and more generally for HRSs were made: (i) significant bi-directional vertical flows occur between surface water and groundwater throughout the HRSs; (ii) relatively large groundwater recharge represents 16% of precipitation (P, 562 mm.y-1) and large groundwater exfiltration (∼11% of P) results in short groundwater flow paths due to a dense network of streams, low permeability and hilly topographic relief; deep, long groundwater flow paths constitute a smaller component of the water budget (∼1% of P); quite high groundwater evapotranspiration (∼5% of P and ∼7% of total evapotranspiration); low permeability and shallow soils are the main reasons for relatively large components of Hortonian flow and interflow (15% and 11% of P, respectively); (iii) the majority of drainage from the catchment leaves as surface water; (iv) declining 18 years trend (4.44 mm.y-1) of groundwater storage; and (v) large spatio-temporal variability of water fluxes. This IHM study of HRSs provides greater understanding of these relatively unknown hydrologic systems that are widespread throughout the world and are important for water resources in many regions.

  20. Surface-groundwater interactions in hard rocks in Sardon Catchment of western Spain: an integrated modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, S.M. Tanvir; Lubczynski, Maciek W.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Zhongbo, Su

    2014-01-01

    The structural and hydrological complexity of hard rock systems (HRSs) affects dynamics of surface–groundwater interactions. These complexities are not well described or understood by hydrogeologists because simplified analyses typically are used to study HRSs. A transient, integrated hydrologic model (IHM) GSFLOW (Groundwater and Surface water FLOW) was calibrated and post-audited using 18 years of daily groundwater head and stream discharge data to evaluate the surface–groundwater interactions in semi-arid, ∼80 km2 granitic Sardon hilly catchment in Spain characterized by shallow water table conditions, relatively low storage, dense drainage networks and frequent, high intensity rainfall. The following hydrological observations for the Sardon Catchment, and more generally for HRSs were made: (i) significant bi-directional vertical flows occur between surface water and groundwater throughout the HRSs; (ii) relatively large groundwater recharge represents 16% of precipitation (P, 562 mm.y−1) and large groundwater exfiltration (∼11% of P) results in short groundwater flow paths due to a dense network of streams, low permeability and hilly topographic relief; deep, long groundwater flow paths constitute a smaller component of the water budget (∼1% of P); quite high groundwater evapotranspiration (∼5% of P and ∼7% of total evapotranspiration); low permeability and shallow soils are the main reasons for relatively large components of Hortonian flow and interflow (15% and 11% of P, respectively); (iii) the majority of drainage from the catchment leaves as surface water; (iv) declining 18 years trend (4.44 mm.y−1) of groundwater storage; and (v) large spatio-temporal variability of water fluxes. This IHM study of HRSs provides greater understanding of these relatively unknown hydrologic systems that are widespread throughout the world and are important for water resources in many regions.

  1. Biomarker evidence for increasing aridity in south-central India over the Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, S.; Wilkes, H.; Prasad, S.; Brauer, A.; Basavaiah, N.; Strecker, M. R.; Sachse, D.

    2012-12-01

    Summer monsoonal rainfall has played an important role in the development and sustenance of the largely agro-based economy in the Indian subcontinent in the recent past. A better understanding of past variations in monsoonal rainfall can therefore lead to an assessment of its potential impact on early human societies. However, our knowledge of spatiotemporal patterns of past monsoon strength, as inferred from proxy records, is limited due to the lack of high-resolution paleo-hydrological records from continental archives. Here, we reconstruct centennial-scale hydrological variability associated with changes in the intensity of the Indian Summer Monsoon based on a record of lipid biomarker abundances and compound-specific stable isotopic composition of a 10-m-long sediment core from saline-alkaline Lonar Lake, situated in the core 'monsoon zone' of south-central India. We identified three periods of distinct hydrology over the Holocene in south-central India. The period between 10.4 and 6.5 ka BP was characterized by a relatively high abundance of land-plant biomarkers, such as long-chain n-alkanes. The composition of these leaf-wax n-alkanes (weighted average of concentration of different chain-length n-alkanes, expressed as the ACL index) and their negative δ13C (-30‰ to -33 ‰) indicate the dominance of woody C3 vegetation in the catchment, and negative δD (-170‰ to -175‰) values argue for a wet period due to an intensified monsoon. Rapid fluctuations in abundance of both terrestrial and aquatic biomarkers between 6.5 and 4 ka BP indicate an unstable lake ecosystem, culminating in a transition to arid conditions. Higher ACL values and a pronounced shift to more positive δ13C values (up to -22‰) of leaf-wax n-alkanes over this period indicate a change of dominant vegetation to C4 grasses. Along with a 40‰ increase in leaf wax n-alkane δD values, which likely resulted from less rainfall and/or higher plant evapotranspiration, we interpret this period

  2. Arid Lands--A Study in Ecological Disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckholm, Erik

    1977-01-01

    Reports that over-grazing and unsound agricultural practices are increasing the world-wide amount of uninhabitable land. Cites some practices which have been used to successfully reclaim arid land areas. (CP)

  3. Comparison of drought occurrence in selected Slovak and Czech catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendekova, Miriam; Fendek, Marian; Porubska, Diana; Hanel, Martin; Horacek, Stanislav; Martinkova, Marta; Vizina, Adam

    2014-05-01

    The presented study is focused on the analysis and comparison of hydrological drought occurrence, development and duration in six small to middle sized catchments in the Czech Republic (CZ) and Slovakia. The main questions to be answered are: (1) are there correlations between the physical conditions in the catchments and drought occurrence, and (2) does the spatial trend of drought occurrence exist. The Žitava catchment is located in the central western part of Slovakia having runoff dominated by rainfall with the contribution of snow melting during the spring period. The Belá River catchment is located on the contact of Západné and Vysoké Tatry Mts. in the north of Slovakia. The runoff is snow to snow-rain combined type. The Ľupčianka catchment is located on the northern slopes of the Nízke Tatry Mts. in the northern part of the central Slovakia. The runoff regime is snow-rain combined in the upper part of the catchment, and of rain-snow type in the rest of catchment. The Rakovnický potok brook (CZ) has its spring in Rakovnická pahorkatina hilly land. Runoff is dominated by rainfall, quite heavily influenced by water uptakes in the catchment. The Teplá River (CZ) originates in peat meadows in the western part of the Czech Republic. Runoff is dominated by rainfall. The Metuje catchment (CZ) is formed by Adršsbach-Teplické stěny Upland. The headwater part is typical by deeply incest valleys, table mountains and pseudokarst caves. The discharge is fed dominantly by groundwater. The streamflow drought was characterized using discharge data, the groundwater drought using the base flow values. The local minimum method was used for base flow separation. The threshold level method (Q80, BF80) and the sequent peak algorithm were used for calculation of drought duration in discharge and base flow time series. The data of the same three decades of the common period (1971 - 1980, 1981 - 1990 and 1991 - 2000) were used. The resulting base flow values along with

  4. The application of GEOtop for catchment scale hydrology in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, C.; Xu, X.; Albertson, J.; Kiely, G.

    2009-04-01

    GEOtop represents the new generation of distributed hydrological model driven by geospatial data (e.g. topography, soils, vegetation, land cover). It estimates rainfall-runoff, evapotranspiration and provides spatially distributed outputs as well as routing water and sediment flows through stream and river networks. The original version of GEOtop designed in Italy, includes a rigorous treatment of the core hydrological processes (e.g. unsaturated and saturated flow and transport, surface energy balances, and streamflow generation/routing). Recently GEOtop was extended to include treatment of shallow landslides. The GEOtop model is built on an open-source programming framework, which makes it well suited for adaptation and extension. GEOtop has been run very successfully in a number of alpine catchments (such as Brenta) but has not been used on Irish catchments before. The cell size used for the spatially distributed inputs varies from catchment to catchment. In smaller catchments (less than 2000ha) 50 by 50m cells have been used and 200 by 200 for larger catchments. Smaller cell sizes have been found to significantly increase the computational time so a larger cell size is used providing it does not significantly affect the performance of the model. Digital elevation model, drainage direction, landuse and soil type maps are the minimum spatial requirements with precipitation, radiation, temperature, atmospheric pressure and wind speed been the minimum meteorological requirements for a successful run. The soil type maps must also contain information regarding texture and hydraulic conductivity. The first trial of GEOtop in Ireland was on a small 1524 ha catchment in the south of Ireland. The catchment ranges from 50 to just over 200m, the land use is predominately agricultural grassland and it receives on average 1400mm of rain per year. Within this catchment there is a meteorological tower which provides the meteorological inputs, soil moisture is also recorded at

  5. Climate change adaptation via targeted ecosystem service provision: a sustainable land management strategy for the Segura catchment (SE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagaria, Cecilia; de Vente, Joris; Perez-Cutillas, Pedro

    2014-05-01

    Topical research investigating climate, land-use and management scenarios in the Segura catchment (SE Spain), depicts a landscape at high-risk of, quite literally, deserting agriculture. Land degradation in the semi-arid region of SE Spain is characterized by water shortage, high erosion rates and salinization, increasingly exacerbated by climatic changes, scarce vegetation cover and detrimental farming practices. Future climate scenarios predict increases in aridity, variability and intensity of rainfall events, leading to increasing pressure on scarce soil and water resources. This study conceptualized the impending crisis of agro-ecological systems of the Segura basin (18800 km2) as a crisis of ecosystem service deterioration. In light of existing land degradation drivers and future climate scenarios, the potential of Sustainable Land Management (SLM) strategies was evaluated to target three priority ecosystem services (water provision, sediment retention and carbon sequestration) as a means to achieve climate change adaptation and mitigation. A preceding thorough process of stakeholder engagement (as part of the EU funded DESIRE project) indicated five SLM technologies for potential implementation, all with a focus upon reducing soil erosion, increasing soil water holding capacity and soil organic matter content. These technologies have been tested for over four years in local experimental field plots, and have provided results on the local effects upon individual environmental parameters. Despite the growing emphasis witnessed in literature upon the context-specificity which characterizes adaptation solutions, the frequent analysis at the field scale is limited in both scope and utility. There is a need to investigate the effects of adaptive SLM solutions at wider, regional scales. Thus, this study modeled the cumulative effect of each of the five selected SLM technologies with InVEST, a spatial analyst tool designed for ecosystem service quantification and

  6. Aridity changes in the Tibetan Plateau in a warming climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desertification in the Tibetan Plateau (TP) has drawn increasing attention in the recent decades. It has been postulated as a consequence of increasing climate aridity due to the observed warming. This study quantifies the aridity changes in the TP and attributes the changes to different climatic factors. Using the ratio of precipitation to potential evapotranspiration (P/PET) as an aridity index, we used observed meteorological records at 83 stations in the TP to calculate PET using the Penman–Monteith algorithm and the ratio. Spatial and temporal changes of P/PET in 1979–2011 were analyzed. Results show that stations located in the arid and semi-arid northwestern TP are becoming significantly wetter, and half of the stations in the semi-humid eastern TP are becoming drier, though not significantly, in the recent three decades. The aridity change patterns are significantly correlated with the change patterns of precipitation, sunshine duration and diurnal temperature range. Temporal correlations between the annual P/PET ratio and other meteorological variables confirm the significant correlation between aridity and the three variables, with precipitation being the dominant driver of P/PET changes at the interannual time scale. Annual PET are insignificantly but negatively correlated with P/PET in the cold season. In the warm season, however, the correlation between PET and P/PET is significant at the confidence level of 99.9% when the cryosphere near the surface melts. Significant correlation between annual wind speed and aridity occurs in limited locations and months. Consistency in the climatology pattern and linear trends in surface air temperature and precipitation calculated using station data, gridded data, and nearest grid-to-stations for the TP average and across sub-basins indicate the robustness of the trends despite the large spatial heterogeneity in the TP that challenge climate monitoring. (letter)

  7. Flow path and travel time dynamics in a lowland catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velde, Ype; de Rooij, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    The distribution of time it takes water from the moment of precipitation to reach the catchment outlet is widely used as a characteristic for catchment flow path contributions, catchment vulnerability to pollution spreading and pollutant loads from catchments to downstream waters. However, this distribution tends to vary in time driven by variability in precipitation and evapotranspiration. Catchment scale mixing of water controls how dynamics in rainfall and evapotranspiration are translated into dynamics of travel time distributions. In this presentation we use the concept of StorAge selection (SAS) functions, that quantify catchment scale mixing of water, to describe chloride and nitrate flow. We will show how SAS functions relate to the topography and subsurface and how they are effective in describing nitrate and chloride transport. The presented analyses will combine unique datasets of high-frequency discharge and water quality concentrations with conceptual models of water flow and solute transport. Remarkable findings are the large contrasts in travel times between lowland and sloping catchments and the strong relationship between evapotranspiration and stream water nutrient concentration dynamics.

  8. Pesticide uses and transfers in urbanised catchments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchoud, Hélène; Farrugia, Frédéric; Mouchel, Jean Marie

    2004-05-01

    An investigation on herbicide uses in two semi-urban catchments was performed simultaneously with sampling campaigns at six stations inside both watersheds from April to July 1998. Urban uses of herbicides exceeded agricultural uses, and transfer coefficients were also higher in urban areas. Therefore, the most used product in urban areas (diuron) was by far the most contaminating product. Householders accounted for 30% of all uses. The highest measured diuron concentration in water surface was 8.7 microg l(-1) due to its use on impervious surfaces. Compared to EEC standards for drinking water production (0.1 microg l(-1)), it is clear that suburban uses of herbicides may severely endanger drinking water production from river water.

  9. Modeling of matters removal from swampy catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inishev, N. G.; Inisheva, L. I.

    2010-05-01

    This work shows the results of fixed study of geochemical conditions in the system of landscape oligotrophic profile at Vasyugan mire spurs, and also we make an approach to processes modelling of compounds removal from swampy catchment. During investigation of symbolic model of chemical matters removal from the surface of a catchment basin and their movement along the channel network it was taken into account that removal of chemical elements during the period of spring flood and rain high waters occur mainly with overland flow. During calculation of dissolved matters movement the following admissions take place: 1. The problem is solved at one-dimension set-up. Concentration of investigated components is taken as averaged one along the flow cross section or effective area of slope cross-section for overland runoff, i.e. it changes only lengthways and in time. 2. It is considered that dissolved matters spread due to movement of water and together with its particles. 3. Processes of water self-clarification are not considered. The model is calculated on the basis of discharge of the investigated ingredient, i.e. matter mass moving through the given flow cross-section into time unit. This is the peculiarity of the model. Matter removal together with water flow is determined if necessary. Everyday impurity consumptions and its concentration can be estimated at the outlet at the moment of time according to convolution integral. Estimation of overland runoff and water inflow into the channel network is based on the mathematic model of outflow formation from peatland areas which considers basic processes carrying out at catchment and basin channel network. Stored moisture estimation of snow cover is taken according to snow survey data before snow melting. Everyday water supply to the surface of water collection was determined according to the results of snow melt intensity estimation by the methods of temperature coefficient and water yield from snow (A.G. Kovzel). All

  10. Chemical weathering and runoff chemistry in a steep headwater catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Suzanne Prestrud; Dietrich, William E.

    2001-07-01

    We present here deductions about the location, rate, and mechanisms of chemical weathering in a small catchment based on a catchment-scale sprinkling experiment. In this experiment demineralized water was applied at an approximately steady rate in the CB1 catchment in the Oregon Coast Range to reach and maintain a quasi-steady discharge for a period of 4 days. Because of nearly steady flow conditions within the catchment, the contribution to solute fluxes from soil and bedrock could be partitioned. One half of the solute flux from the catchment derived from colluvial soil, and one half from weathering in bedrock. This implies more intense weathering in the thin colluvium mantling the catchment than in the thick underlying weathered bedrock. The annual solute flux from the catchment, scaled to the annual runoff from the catchment, is 32 +/- 10 t km-2 year-1, equivalent to published chemical denudation rates for nearby rivers with drainage areas 106 times greater than the experiment site. Soil waters sampled during the sprinkling experiment had steady compositions following a period of transient water flow conditions, implying steady-state chemical evolution in the soil. The waters leached organic anions from shallow depths in the soil, which solubilized aluminium and iron, indicating that podzolization is occurring in these soils. Carbonate dissolution appears to be an important source of solutes from the bedrock, despite being present as only a minor phase in the rock. Water balance suggests that the residence time of water in the catchment is about 2 months, and that typical 24 h storms displace only a fraction of the stored water. A consequence is that runoff chemistry is dominated by old water, which imposes strong limits on the variability of runoff composition.

  11. Biogeochemical and Hydrological Heterogeneity and Emergent Archetypical Catchment Response Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawitz, J. W.; Gall, H. E.; Rao, P. S.

    2014-12-01

    What can stream hydrologic and biogeochemical signals tell us about interactions among spatially heterogeneous hydrological and biogeochemical processes at the catchment-scale? We seek to understand how the spatial structure of solute sources coupled with both stationary and nonstationary hydroclimatic drivers affect observed archetypes of concentration-discharge (C-Q) patterns. These response patterns are the spatially integrated expressions of the spatiotemporal structure of solutes exported from managed catchments, and can provide insight into likely ecological consequences of receiving water bodies (e.g., wetlands, rivers, lakes, and coastal waters). We investigated the following broad questions: (1) How does the spatial correlation between the structure of flow-generating areas and biogeochemical source areas across a catchment evolve under stochastic hydro-climatic forcing? (2) What are the feasible hydrologic and biogeochemical responses that lead to the emergence of archetypical C-Q patterns? and; (3) What implications do these coupled dynamics have for catchment monitoring and implementation of management practices? We categorize the observed temporal signals into three archetypical C-Q patterns: dilution; accretion, and constant concentration. We applied a parsimonious stochastic model of heterogeneous catchments, which act as hydrologic and biogeochemical filters, to examine the relationship between spatial heterogeneity and temporal history of solute export signals. The core concept of the modeling framework is considering the type and degree of spatial correlation between solute source zones and flow generating zones, and activation of different portions of the catchments during rainfall events. Our overarching hypothesis is that each archetype C-Q pattern can be generated by explicitly linking landscape-scale hydrologic responses and spatial distributions of solute source properties within a catchment. We compared observed multidecadal data to

  12. Characteristics of chemistry and stable isotopes in groundwater of the Chaobai River catchment, Beijing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J. [Key Laboratory of Engineering Geomechanics, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, J.; Wang, X. [Hydrogeology and Engineering Geology Team of Beijing, Beijing 100037 (China); Pang, Z. [Key Laboratory of Engineering Geomechanics, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2013-07-01

    Environmental isotopes and chemical compositions are useful tools for the study of groundwater flow systems. Groundwater of the Chaobai River catchment, Beijing was sampled for chemical and stable isotopes analyses in 2005. Geochemical signatures evolve progressively from CaMg-HCO{sub 3} to NaK-HCO{sub 3}, and then to Na-HCO{sub 3} compositions as groundwater flows from the mountain to discharge areas. Groundwater can be divided into two groups on the basis of stable isotope compositions: ancient groundwater and modern groundwater. Modern groundwater (-9.90/00 to -6.60/00 for δ{sup 18}O) plots along a line with a slope of 4.0 on a δ{sup 2}H versus δ{sup 18}O diagram, reflecting evaporation during the process of recharge, whereas ancient groundwater samples (30 to 12 Ka.) are different in isotopic composition (-11.00/00 and -68.20/00 for δ{sup 18}O and δ{sup 2}H, respectively), reflecting the cold and arid climate in the last glacial period. The results have important implications for groundwater management in Beijing City. (authors)

  13. Modelling catchment areas for secondary care providers: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Simon; Wardlaw, Jessica; Crouch, Susan; Carolan, Michelle

    2011-09-01

    Hospitals need to understand patient flows in an increasingly competitive health economy. New initiatives like Patient Choice and the Darzi Review further increase this demand. Essential to understanding patient flows are demographic and geographic profiles of health care service providers, known as 'catchment areas' and 'catchment populations'. This information helps Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) to review how their populations are accessing services, measure inequalities and commission services; likewise it assists Secondary Care Providers (SCPs) to measure and assess potential gains in market share, redesign services, evaluate admission thresholds and plan financial budgets. Unlike PCTs, SCPs do not operate within fixed geographic boundaries. Traditionally, SCPs have used administrative boundaries or arbitrary drive times to model catchment areas. Neither approach satisfactorily represents current patient flows. Furthermore, these techniques are time-consuming and can be challenging for healthcare managers to exploit. This paper presents three different approaches to define catchment areas, each more detailed than the previous method. The first approach 'First Past the Post' defines catchment areas by allocating a dominant SCP to each Census Output Area (OA). The SCP with the highest proportion of activity within each OA is considered the dominant SCP. The second approach 'Proportional Flow' allocates activity proportionally to each OA. This approach allows for cross-boundary flows to be captured in a catchment area. The third and final approach uses a gravity model to define a catchment area, which incorporates drive or travel time into the analysis. Comparing approaches helps healthcare providers to understand whether using more traditional and simplistic approaches to define catchment areas and populations achieves the same or similar results as complex mathematical modelling. This paper has demonstrated, using a case study of Manchester, that when estimating

  14. Soilwater dynamics related to waterlogging in a sloping catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atputhanathan, C. S.; Gunawardena, E. R. N.; Rushton, K. R.

    1991-03-01

    A study to understand the factors contributing to waterlogging was conducted in a small catchment of 5.4 ha in an irrigation scheme in the Eastern Dry Zone of Sri Lanka. An analysis, based on climatological data, extensive measurements of inflows and outflows, groundwater head fluctuations, soil moisture content variations and soil properties, indicated that a single catchment water balance and the SEW index are of limited value due to the spatial nature of the waterlogging problem in this sloping catchment with surface irregularities. A distributed mathematical model was developed to represent the lateral and vertical components of flow; the agreement between the simulated and field results is satisfactory.

  15. Late glacial aridity in southern Rocky Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, O.K.; Pitblado, B.L. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1995-09-01

    While the slopes of the present-day Colorado Rocky Mountains are characterized by large stands of subalpine and montane conifers, the Rockies of the late glacial looked dramatically different. Specifically, pollen records suggest that during the late glacial, Artemisia and Gramineae predominated throughout the mountains of Colorado. At some point between 11,000 and 10,000 B.P., however, both Artemisia and grasses underwent a dramatic decline, which can be identified in virtually every pollen diagram produced for Colorado mountain sites, including Como Lake (Sangre de Cristo Mountains), Copley Lake and Splains; Gulch (near Crested Butte), Molas Lake (San Juan Mountains), and Redrock Lake (Boulder County). Moreover, the same pattern seems to hold for pollen spectra derived for areas adjacent to Colorado, including at sites in the Chuska Mountains of New Mexico and in eastern Wyoming. The implications of this consistent finding are compelling. The closest modem analogues to the Artemisia- and Gramineae-dominated late-glacial Colorado Rockies are found in the relatively arid northern Great Basin, which suggests that annual precipitation was much lower in the late-glacial southern Rocky Mountains than it was throughout the Holocene.

  16. Salinization mechanisms in semi-arid regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a period of three years the basins of the Pereira de Miranda and Caxitore dams, located in the crystalline rock area of Ceara, Brazil, were studied in order to determine the mechanisms of salinization of their waters. Isotope methods (18O/16O) and hidrochemistry (determination of the of the maior ions) were applied to surface, underground and rain water in this study. An isotope model was designed and applied to the determination of evaporation and percolation of dams in semi-arid zones during the dry season. The results are compared to those from a conventional chemical model. As causes of salinization of the water in the dams, the contributions of the rain itself and the lixiviation of the soil are quantified. An interaction between the dams and the underground water is imperceptible. The salinization of the underground water is attributed to recharge of the aquifer with rain water from the surface runoff followed by evaporation of the water rising, due to capilarity, in a one-directional flow to the surface. (Author)

  17. Entomological studies for surveillance and prevention of dengue in arid and semi-arid districts of Rajasthan, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Purohit

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Rajasthan is one of the dengue endemic states of India. Very few studies have been published on entomological aspects of dengue in this state. Owing to water scarcity, inhabitants in desert areas overstore domestic water which leads to the persistence of dengue vectors within the domestic premises. Area specific knowledge on breeding, key containers and seasonal rhythms of vector population is essential for preparing an effective prevention plan against dengue. Present paper reports results of entomological investigations on dengue vectors in arid and semi-arid districts of Rajasthan. Methods: Longitudinal studies were undertaken during 2004–06 in one arid and two semi-arid dengue endemic districts of Rajasthan. Adult and larval Aedes were collected from the randomly selected houses in representative towns and villages with associated details of container types and water storage practices of inhabitants. Results: In urban areas during all the seasons adult house index (AHI of Aedes aegypti was maximum in desert zone (25 and least in semi-arid area with saline river III (1. The difference of AHI during three seasons was statistically significant (c2 = 16.1, p <0.01 for urban; and c2 = 50.71, p < 0.001 for rural. Breeding of Ae. aegypti among urban settings was maximum in desert zone. During all the seasons cement tanks were the key breeding habitats for Ae. aegypti in desert as well as semi-arid areas. Interpretation & conclusion: Water storage habits during summer season emerged to be the risk factor of vector abundance in urban areas of arid and semi-arid settings. A carefully designed study of key containers targeting cement tanks as the primary habitats of mosquito control may lead to commendable results for dengue prevention.

  18. Keeping Sediment and Nutrients out of Streams in Arid/Semi-Arid Regions: Application of Low Impact Development/Green Infrastructure Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongping, Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Climatic and hydrological characteristics in the arid/semi-arid areas create unique challenges to soil, water and biodiversity conservation. These areas are environmentally sensitive, but very valuable for the ecosystems services they provide to society. Some of these areas are experiencing the fastest urbanization and now face multiple water resource challenges. Low Impact Development (LID)/Green Infrastructure (GI) practices are increasingly popular for reducing stormwater and nonpoint source pollution in many regions around the world. However, streamflow in the arid/semi-arid regions is largely dependent on seasonal, short term, and high intensity rainfall events. LID has not been very common in the arid/semi-arid regions due to a lack of performance evaluation, as well as the perception that LID may not be very useful for regions with little annual precipitation. This study focused on investigating the hydrologic and pollutant removal performance of LID/GI systems in arid/semi-arid climates. Ten types of practices were found in use in the Western/Southwestern U.S.: rainwater harvest systems, detention ponds, retention ponds, bioretention, media filters, porous pavements, vegetated swales/buffer/strips, green roofs, infiltration trenches, and integrated LIDs. This study compared the performance of these practices in terms of their effectiveness at pollutant removal and cost-effectiveness. This analysis provides insight into the future implementation of LID/GI in the arid/semi-arid areas. Key words: LID/GI, arid/semi-arid, effectiveness of pollutant removal, cost-effectiveness analysis

  19. UNESCO's G-WADI Program - Developing and Delivering Tools for Improved Water Management in Semi-arid and Arid Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, G. C.; Imam, B.; Sorooshian, S.

    2007-12-01

    UNESCO's Water and Development Information for Arid Lands - A Global Network (G-WADI) aims to strengthen the capacity to manage the water resources of arid and semi-arid areas around the globe through a network of international and regional cooperation. Six centers, including SAHRA headquartered at the University of Arizona and CHRS at UC-Irvine, are cooperating to improve water resource management by sharing knowledge and tools. Specific objectives include: improved understanding of the special characteristics of hydrological systems and water management needs in arid areas, through shared data and experiences; capacity building of individuals and institutions; raising awareness of advanced technologies for data provision, data assimilation, and system analysis; and promoting integrated basin management and the use of appropriate decision support tools. SAHRA coordinates G-WADI's information dissemination via G-WADI's web site and publications. Web-based resources include Global Water News Watch and the subscription service, Water News Tracker, plus access to remotely sensed precipitation data from HyDIS. Information on use of isotopes and chemical tracers is also featured. Materials and outcomes from various workshops and short courses on modeling, water harvesting, and impacts of climate change also are provided. While the intent is to benefit water resource managers in semi- arid and arid developing countries, the collaboration among international water centers, and perspectives and traditional knowledge gained from users, has benefitted U.S. researchers in many ways.

  20. Use of High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing for Hydro-Geomorphologic Analysis of Medium-sized Arid Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh, Yuval; Blumberg, Dan G.; Cohen, Hai; Morin, Efrat; Maman, Shimrit

    2016-04-01

    Arid environments are often remote, expansive, difficult to access and especially vulnerable to flash flood hazards due to the poor understanding of the phenomenon and the lack of meteorological, geomorphological, and hydrological data. For many years, catchment characteristics have been observed using point-based measurements such as rain gauges and soil sample analysis; on the other hand, use of remote sensing technologies can provide spatially continuous hydrological parameters and variables. The advances in remote sensing technologies can provide new geo-spatial data using high spatial and temporal resolution for basin-scale geomorphological analysis and hydrological models. This study used high spatial resolution remote sensing for hydro-geomorphologic analysis of the arid medium size Rahaf watershed (76 km2), located in the Judean Desert, Israel. During the research a high resolution geomorphological map of Rahaf basin was created using WorldView-2 multispectral satellite imageries; surface roughness was estimated using SIR-C and COSMO-SkyMed Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) spaceborne sensors; and rainstorm characteristics were extracted using ground-based meteorological radar. The geomorphological mapping of Rahaf into 17 classes with good accuracy. The surface roughness extraction using SAR over the basin showed that the correlation between the COSMO-SkyMed backscatter coefficient and the surface roughness was very strong with an R2 of 0.97. This study showed that using x-band spaceborne sensors with high spatial resolution, such as COSMO-SkyMed, are more suitable for surface roughness evaluation in flat arid environments and should be in favor with longer wavelength operating sensors such as the SIR-C. The current study presents an innovative method to evaluate Manning's hydraulic roughness coefficient (n) in arid environments using radar backscattering. The weather radar rainfall data was calibrated using rain gauges located in the watershed. The

  1. Integrated Nitrogen CAtchment model (INCA) applied to a tropical catchment in the Atlantic Forest, São Paulo, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Ranzini, M.; Forti, M. C.; Whitehead, P. G.; Arcova, F. C. S.; De Cicco, V.; Wade, A. J.

    2007-01-01

    Stream-water flows and in-stream nitrate and ammonium concentrations in a small (36.7 ha) Atlantic Forest catchment were simulated using the Integrated Nitrogen in CAtchments (INCA) model version 1.9.4. The catchment, at Cunha, is in the Serra do Mar State Park, SE Brazil and is nearly pristine because the nearest major conurbations, São Paulo and Rio, are some 450 km distant. However, intensive farming may increase nitrogen (N) deposition and there are growing pressures for urbanisation. The...

  2. Aquaculture and mangrove ecosys of temproductivity in arid and semi-arid Balochistan coastal environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of coastal shrimp-pond operations, and the structure and functioning of coastal mangrove forest ecosystems with particular reference to Ecuador, indicates that certain physical parameters may be good predictors of key biological processes. The most important factors are those associated with the regional water balance, tidal and surface water circulation patterns, and the physicochemical properties of the underlying soils. One important conclusion to emerge from the analyses is that at both regional and local levels, well-developed and productive mangrove forest areas often represent the least desirable sites for the construction and operation of commercial shrimp ponds. In certain regards semi-arid and arid coastal environments where mangroves are poorly developed, shrimp ponds that are constructed on barren mud flats and inland salt pans appear to have the potential to produce higher yields of shrimp with fewer management problems and at a relatively lower production cost. The data and research results from coast of Baluchistan and elsewhere are briefly summarized to suggest why productive mangrove ecosystems to not make the best areas in which to obtain maximum shrimp-pond yields. (author)

  3. Predictability and prediction of summer rainfall in the arid and semi-arid regions of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wen; Wang, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Northwest China (NWC) is an arid and semi-arid region where climate variability and environmental changes are sensitive to precipitation. The present study explores sources and limits of predictability of summer precipitation over NWC using the predictable mode analysis (PMA) of percentage of rainfall anomaly data. Two major modes of NWC summer rainfall variability are identified which are tied to Eurasian continental scale precipitation variations. The first mode features wet northern China corresponding to dry central Siberia and wet Mongolia, which is mainly driven by tropical Pacific sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTA). The second mode features wet western China reflecting wet Central Asia and dry Ural-western Siberia, which strongly links to Indian Ocean SSTA. Anomalous land warming over Eurasia also provides important precursors for the two modes. The cross-validated hindcast results demonstrate these modes can be predicted with significant correlation skills, suggesting that they may be considered as predictable modes. The domain averaged temporal correlation coefficient (TCC) skill during 1979 to 2015 using 0-month (1-month) lead models is 0.39 (0.35), which is considerably higher than dynamical models' multi-model ensemble mean skill (-0.02). Maximum potential attainable prediction skills are also estimated and discussed. The result illustrates advantage of PMA in predicting rainfall over dry land areas and large room for dynamical model improvement. However, secular changes of predictors need to be detected continuously in order to make practical useful prediction.

  4. Adaptation to drought in arid and semi-arid environments: Case of the Zambezi Valley, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Mavhura

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale rain-fed agriculture is the main livelihood in arid to semi-arid regions of subSaharan Africa. The area is characterised by erratic rainfall and frequent droughts, making the capacity for coping with temporal water shortages essential for smallholder farmers. Focusing on the Zambezi Valley, Zimbabwe, this study investigates the impact of drought on food security and the strategies used by smallholder farmers to cope with drought. We used meteorological data and interviews to examine the rainfall variability in the study area and the drought-coping mechanisms employed by smallholder famers respectively. The results show that there are various strategies used by smallholder farmers to cope with the impact of drought. These strategies include drought-tolerant crop production, crop variety diversification, purchasing cereals through asset sales, non-governmental organisations’ food aid and gathering wild fruit. However, consecutive droughts have resulted in high food insecurity and depletion of household assets during droughts. Smallholder farmers in the valley have also resorted to a number of measures taken before, during and after the drought. Still, these strategies are not robust enough to cope with this uncertainty

  5. A 500-year history of floods in the semi arid basins of south-eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez García, Carlos; Schulte, Lothar; Peña, Juan Carlos; Carvalho, Filpe; Brembilla, Carla

    2016-04-01

    Floods are one of the natural hazards with higher incidence in the south-eastern Spain, the driest region in Europe, causing fatalities, damage of infrastructure and economic losses. Flash-floods in semi arid environments are related to intensive rainfall which can last from few hours to days. These floods are violent and destructive because of their high discharges, sediment transport and aggradation processes in the flood plain. Also during historical times floods affected the population in the south-eastern Spain causing sever damage or in some cases the complete destruction of towns. Our studies focus on the flood reconstruction from historical sources of the Almanzora, Aguas and Antas river basins, which have a surface between 260-2600 km2. We have also compiled information from the Andarax river and compared the flood series with the Guadalentín and Segura basins from previous studies (Benito et. al., 2010 y Machado et al., 2011). Flood intensities have been classified in four levels according to the type of damage: 1) ordinary floods that only affect agriculture plots; 2) extraordinary floods which produce some damage to buildings and hydraulic infrastructure; 3) catastrophic floods which caused sever damage, fatalities and partial or complete destruction of towns. A higher damage intensity of +1 magnitude was assigned when the event is recorded from more than one major sub-basin (stretches and tributaries such as Huércal-Overa basin) or catchment (e.g. Antas River). In total 102 incidences of damages and 89 floods were reconstructed in the Almanzora (2.611 km2), Aguas (539 km2), Antas (261 km2) and Andarax (2.100 km2) catchments. The Almanzora River was affected by 36 floods (1550-2012). The highest events for the Almanzora River were in 1580, 1879, 1973 and 2012 producing many fatalities and destruction of several towns. In addition, we identified four flood-clusters 1750-1780, 1870-1900, 1960-1977 and 1989-2012 which coincides with the periods of

  6. Transferring global uncertainty estimates from gauged to ungauged catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgin, F.; Andréassian, V.; Perrin, C.; Oudin, L.

    2015-05-01

    Predicting streamflow hydrographs in ungauged catchments is challenging, and accompanying the estimates with realistic uncertainty bounds is an even more complex task. In this paper, we present a method to transfer global uncertainty estimates from gauged to ungauged catchments and we test it over a set of 907 catchments located in France, using two rainfall-runoff models. We evaluate the quality of the uncertainty estimates based on three expected qualities: reliability, sharpness, and overall skill. The robustness of the method to the availability of information on gauged catchments was also evaluated using a hydrometrical desert approach. Our results show that the method presents advantageous perspectives, providing reliable and sharp uncertainty bounds at ungauged locations in a majority of cases.

  7. A catchment scale water balance model for FIFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famiglietti, J. S.; Wood, E. F.; Sivapalan, M.; Thongs, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    A catchment scale water balance model is presented and used to predict evaporation from the King's Creek catchment at the First ISLSCP Field Experiment site on the Konza Prairie, Kansas. The model incorporates spatial variability in topography, soils, and precipitation to compute the land surface hydrologic fluxes. A network of 20 rain gages was employed to measure rainfall across the catchment in the summer of 1987. These data were spatially interpolated and used to drive the model during storm periods. During interstorm periods the model was driven by the estimated potential evaporation, which was calculated using net radiation data collected at site 2. Model-computed evaporation is compared to that observed, both at site 2 (grid location 1916-BRS) and the catchment scale, for the simulation period from June 1 to October 9, 1987.

  8. Quantifying human impacts on catchment sediment yield: A continental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanmaercke, Matthias; Poesen, Jean; Govers, Gerard; Verstraeten, Gert

    2015-07-01

    Both from a scientific and environmental management perspective, there is a large need to assess the magnitude and controlling factors of human impacts on catchment sediment yield. Quantifying this impact is difficult, since it requires knowing both the actual sediment yield (SYa, [t km- 2 y- 1]) as well as the corresponding "pristine" value of a catchment (SYp, [t km- 2 y- 1]; i.e. the sediment yield that can be expected if the catchment was not affected by humans). Here we address this problem by comparing measured SYa values for 165 European catchments that were unaffected by dams or reservoirs with their corresponding SYp, which were predicted using a recently developed regression model. The ratio between these two values is expected to reflect the degree of human impact on catchment sediment yield (HIF). Correlation and partial correlation analyses showed that spatial variability in HIF is mainly explained by differences in land use (i.e. the fraction of arable land) and catchment area. The effect of these two factors was clearly linked in western and central Europe: whereas SYa can be easily 40 times higher than SYp in intensively cultivated small (≤ 1 km2) catchments, the difference is negligible for large (> 1000 km2) catchments with the same land use. While, this concurs with our knowledge that the effects of land use (change) on erosion rates can be buffered at the catchment scale, this study provides a first robust quantification of this effect. Apart from a potential climatic effect (i.e. a correlation between HIF and the average annual air temperature) no other factors could be identified that are significant in explaining observed differences in HIF. This indicates that HIF is mainly controlled by catchment scale and land use, while other factors may be only of secondary importance at an intra-continental scale. Nonetheless, more accurate quantifications of these HIF values and more refined characterizations of the catchments in terms of (historical

  9. Shallow Horizontal GCHP Effectiveness in Arid Climate Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Timothy James

    Ground coupled heat pumps (GCHPs) have been used successfully in many environments to improve the heating and cooling efficiency of both small and large scale buildings. In arid climate regions, such as the Phoenix, Arizona metropolitan area, where the air condi-tioning load is dominated by cooling in the summer, GCHPs are difficult to install and operate. This is because the nature of soils in arid climate regions, in that they are both dry and hot, renders them particularly ineffective at dissipating heat. The first part of this thesis addresses applying the SVHeat finite element modeling soft-ware to create a model of a GCHP system. Using real-world data from a prototype solar-water heating system coupled with a ground-source heat exchanger installed in Menlo Park, California, a relatively accurate model was created to represent a novel GCHP panel system installed in a shallow vertical trench. A sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the accuracy of the calibrated model. The second part of the thesis involved adapting the calibrated model to represent an ap-proximation of soil conditions in arid climate regions, using a range of thermal properties for dry soils. The effectiveness of the GCHP in the arid climate region model was then evaluated by comparing the thermal flux from the panel into the subsurface profile to that of the prototype GCHP. It was shown that soils in arid climate regions are particularly inefficient at heat dissipation, but that it is highly dependent on the thermal conductivity inputted into the model. This demonstrates the importance of proper site characterization in arid climate regions. Finally, several soil improvement methods were researched to evaluate their potential for use in improving the effectiveness of shallow horizontal GCHP systems in arid climate regions.

  10. Rainfall, runoff and sediment transport in a Mediterranean mountainous catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuset, J; Vericat, D; Batalla, R J

    2016-01-01

    The relation between rainfall, runoff, erosion and sediment transport is highly variable in Mediterranean catchments. Their relation can be modified by land use changes and climate oscillations that, ultimately, will control water and sediment yields. This paper analyses rainfall, runoff and sediment transport relations in a meso-scale Mediterranean mountain catchment, the Ribera Salada (NE Iberian Peninsula). A total of 73 floods recorded between November 2005 and November 2008 at the Inglabaga Sediment Transport Station (114.5 km(2)) have been analysed. Suspended sediment transport and flow discharge were measured continuously. Rainfall data was obtained by means of direct rain gauges and daily rainfall reconstructions from radar information. Results indicate that the annual sediment yield (2.3 t km(-1) y(-1) on average) and the flood-based runoff coefficients (4.1% on average) are low. The Ribera Salada presents a low geomorphological and hydrological activity compared with other Mediterranean mountain catchments. Pearson correlations between rainfall, runoff and sediment transport variables were obtained. The hydrological response of the catchment is controlled by the base flows. The magnitude of suspended sediment concentrations is largely correlated with flood magnitude, while sediment load is correlated with the amount of direct runoff. Multivariate analysis shows that total suspended load can be predicted by integrating rainfall and runoff variables. The total direct runoff is the variable with more weight in the equation. Finally, three main hydro-sedimentary phases within the hydrological year are defined in this catchment: (a) Winter, where the catchment produces only water and very little sediment; (b) Spring, where the majority of water and sediment is produced; and (c) Summer-Autumn, when little runoff is produced but significant amount of sediments is exported out of the catchment. Results show as land use and climate change may have an important

  11. Empirical relations between catchment characteristics and discharge patterns in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, G.; Dahné, J.; Arheimer, B.

    2012-04-01

    In hydrological modelling it is often assumed that catchment characteristics, such as soil type, vegetation, land-use, slope, altitude and climate influence both the magnitude and dynamics of the water discharge characteristics. This presentation demonstrates an inter-site comparison on similarities and dissimilarities in hydrological response from Swedish unregulated catchments with an area less than 2000 km2. Observed daily time-series for about 20 years from 198 sites were analysed to search for and quantify statistical relationships between catchment characteristics and flow characteristics. A number of flow characteristics were calculated, such as the mean, mean annual maximum, peakiness, skewness and percentiles. The catchments were grouped dependent on catchment characteristics (for example >80% forest). The differences between the discharges from different catchment types were analysed both graphically and statistically. A T-test was performed to see if the mean value for the flow characteristics was significantly different from the rest of the catchments. Following the t-test, a set of box-whisker diagrams were made for visual inspection of the results. The results showed that lake percentage is the most important catchment characteristic for most of the flow characteristics. The effect of lakes was therefore treated separately. For lake-free basins soil type was in general more important than land-use. For instance, coarse soils exhibit a sustained base flow, whereas thin soils and bare rock are characterised by peak flows with short duration. Finally, the presentation will give some examples on how the retrieved empirical information was included in a national modelling approach to simulate spatial variability in Swedish water discharge patterns.

  12. Rainfall, runoff and sediment transport in a Mediterranean mountainous catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuset, J; Vericat, D; Batalla, R J

    2016-01-01

    The relation between rainfall, runoff, erosion and sediment transport is highly variable in Mediterranean catchments. Their relation can be modified by land use changes and climate oscillations that, ultimately, will control water and sediment yields. This paper analyses rainfall, runoff and sediment transport relations in a meso-scale Mediterranean mountain catchment, the Ribera Salada (NE Iberian Peninsula). A total of 73 floods recorded between November 2005 and November 2008 at the Inglabaga Sediment Transport Station (114.5 km(2)) have been analysed. Suspended sediment transport and flow discharge were measured continuously. Rainfall data was obtained by means of direct rain gauges and daily rainfall reconstructions from radar information. Results indicate that the annual sediment yield (2.3 t km(-1) y(-1) on average) and the flood-based runoff coefficients (4.1% on average) are low. The Ribera Salada presents a low geomorphological and hydrological activity compared with other Mediterranean mountain catchments. Pearson correlations between rainfall, runoff and sediment transport variables were obtained. The hydrological response of the catchment is controlled by the base flows. The magnitude of suspended sediment concentrations is largely correlated with flood magnitude, while sediment load is correlated with the amount of direct runoff. Multivariate analysis shows that total suspended load can be predicted by integrating rainfall and runoff variables. The total direct runoff is the variable with more weight in the equation. Finally, three main hydro-sedimentary phases within the hydrological year are defined in this catchment: (a) Winter, where the catchment produces only water and very little sediment; (b) Spring, where the majority of water and sediment is produced; and (c) Summer-Autumn, when little runoff is produced but significant amount of sediments is exported out of the catchment. Results show as land use and climate change may have an important

  13. Automatic set up of SHETRAN for catchments in Great Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Elizabeth; Kilsby, Chris; Fowler, Hayley

    2014-05-01

    Physically-based spatially-distributed (PBSD) models may provide a robust framework for simulating catchment processes in ungauged catchments and under climatic variability. However, they are often overlooked in catchment studies in favour of their conceptual or lumped counterparts. This is because conceptual models are easy and rapid to set up, and can be finely tuned using historic data to give excellent simulation results. On the other hand PBSD models, such as SHETRAN developed at Newcastle University, require much more input data and take weeks or months to set up. To overcome these problems and to promote the use of SHETRAN, this project has set up an easy-to-use, accessible system of hydrological models across Great Britain to be used for both catchment scale studies and countrywide analysis of river flows under present and future conditions. An interface for this system has been developed to make the usually long and tedious setup of PBSD models quick and easy. A non-expert user can now set up a robust and reliable model for a catchment within Great Britain within 10 seconds, a process which would usually take weeks. The user can select a catchment from one of the 1457 boundaries identified in the National River Flow Archive, or they can upload their own catchment boundary as a shapefile. The system therefore has great flexibility for use in setting up models of gauged and ungauged catchments. PBSD models require a lot of data (DEM, geology, soil, land cover), often available in only an inappropriate format. The data behind this system is freely accessible under an academic licence and downloadable from various publicly funded bodies. These data layers have been converted into the correct format for use with SHETRAN, which is also freely available and is provided with every model set up.

  14. Hydrological response of a small catchment burned by experimental fire

    OpenAIRE

    Stoof, C.R.; R. W. Vervoort; Iwema, J.; Elsen, E.; Ferreira, A. J. D.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Fire can considerably change hydrological processes, increasing the risk of extreme flooding and erosion events. Although hydrological processes are largely affected by scale, catchment-scale studies on the hydrological impact of fire are scarce, and nested approaches are rarely used. Taking a unique approach, we performed a catchment-scale experimental fire to improve insight into the drivers of fire impact on hydrology. In north-central Portugal, rainfall, canopy interception, streamflow an...

  15. Groundwater and surface water interaction for integrated catchment planning

    OpenAIRE

    Aradas, Rodolfo D.

    2005-01-01

    Integrated Catchment Management (ICM), defined as the design of intervention strategies encompassing and integrating the fields of hydrology, environmental, social and economic science, is vital in order to reach sustainable solutions on a catchment basis. Modelling lies at the core of the ICM process as it supports baseline studies and enables analysis of proposed intervention measures both for present day conditions and under future scenarios. Its core role in ICM leads to the need to devel...

  16. Predicting aquifer response time for application in catchment modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Glen R; Gilfedder, Mat; Dawes, Warrick R; Rassam, David W

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that changes in catchment land use can lead to significant impacts on water resources. Where land-use changes increase evapotranspiration there is a resultant decrease in groundwater recharge, which in turn decreases groundwater discharge to streams. The response time of changes in groundwater discharge to a change in recharge is a key aspect of predicting impacts of land-use change on catchment water yield. Predicting these impacts across the large catchments relevant to water resource planning can require the estimation of groundwater response times from hundreds of aquifers. At this scale, detailed site-specific measured data are often absent, and available spatial data are limited. While numerical models can be applied, there is little advantage if there are no detailed data to parameterize them. Simple analytical methods are useful in this situation, as they allow the variability in groundwater response to be incorporated into catchment hydrological models, with minimal modeling overhead. This paper describes an analytical model which has been developed to capture some of the features of real, sloping aquifer systems. The derived groundwater response timescale can be used to parameterize a groundwater discharge function, allowing groundwater response to be predicted in relation to different broad catchment characteristics at a level of complexity which matches the available data. The results from the analytical model are compared to published field data and numerical model results, and provide an approach with broad application to inform water resource planning in other large, data-scarce catchments. PMID:24842053

  17. Localized bedrock aquifer distribution explains discharge from a headwater catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosugi, Ken'ichirou; Fujimoto, Masamitsu; Katsura, Shin'ya; Kato, Hiroyuki; Sando, Yoshiki; Mizuyama, Takahisa

    2011-07-01

    Understanding a discharge hydrograph is one of the leading interests in catchment hydrology. Recent research has provided credible information on the importance of bedrock groundwater on discharge hydrographs from headwater catchments. However, intensive monitoring of bedrock groundwater is rare in mountains with steep topography. Hence, how bedrock groundwater controls discharge from a steep headwater catchment is in dispute. In this study, we conducted long-term hydrological observations using densely located bedrock wells in a headwater catchment underlain by granitic bedrock. The catchment has steep topography affected by diastrophic activities. Results showed a fairly regionalized distribution of bedrock aquifers within a scale of tens of meters, consisting of upper, middle, and lower aquifers, instead of a gradual and continuous decline in water level from ridge to valley bottom. This was presumably attributable to the unique bedrock structure; fault lines developed in the watershed worked to form divides between the bedrock aquifers. Spatial expanse of each aquifer and the interaction among aquifers were key factors to explain gentle and considerable variations in the base flow discharge and triple-peak discharge responses of the observed hydrograph. A simple model was developed to simulate the discharge hydrograph, which computed each of the contributions from the soil mantle groundwater, from the lower aquifer, and from the middle aquifer to the discharge. The modeling results generally succeeded in reproducing the observed hydrograph. Thus, this study demonstrated that understanding regionalized bedrock aquifer distribution is pivotal for explaining discharge hydrograph from headwater catchments that have been affected by diastrophic activities.

  18. Groundwater head controls nitrate export from an agricultural lowland catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musolff, Andreas; Schmidt, Christian; Rode, Michael; Lischeid, Gunnar; Weise, Stephan M.; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2016-10-01

    Solute concentration variability is of fundamental importance for the chemical and ecological state of streams. It is often closely related to discharge variability and can be characterized in terms of a solute export regime. Previous studies, especially in lowland catchments, report that nitrate is often exported with an accretion pattern of increasing concentrations with increasing discharge. Several modeling approaches exist to predict the export regime of solutes from the spatial relationship of discharge generating zones with solute availability in the catchment. For a small agriculturally managed lowland catchment in central Germany, we show that this relationship is controlled by the depth to groundwater table and its temporal dynamics. Principal component analysis of groundwater level time series from wells distributed throughout the catchment allowed derivation of a representative groundwater level time series that explained most of the discharge variability. Groundwater sampling revealed consistently decreasing nitrate concentrations with an increasing thickness of the unsaturated zone. The relationships of depth to groundwater table to discharge and to nitrate concentration were parameterized and integrated to successfully model catchment discharge and nitrate export on the basis of groundwater level variations alone. This study shows that intensive and uniform agricultural land use likely results in a clear and consistent concentration-depth relationship of nitrate, which can be utilized in simple approaches to predict stream nitrate export dynamics at the catchment scale.

  19. Hydrogeophysics and remote sensing for the design of hydrogeological conceptual models in hard rocks - Sardón catchment (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francés, Alain P.; Lubczynski, Maciek W.; Roy, Jean; Santos, Fernando A. M.; Mahmoudzadeh Ardekani, Mohammad R.

    2014-11-01

    Hard rock aquifers are highly heterogeneous and hydrogeologically complex. To contribute to the design of hydrogeological conceptual models of hard rock aquifers, we propose a multi-techniques methodology based on a downward approach that combines remote sensing (RS), non-invasive hydrogeophysics and hydrogeological field data acquisition. The proposed methodology is particularly suitable for data scarce areas. It was applied in the pilot research area of Sardón catchment (80 km2) located west of Salamanca (Spain). The area was selected because of hard-rock hydrogeology, semi-arid climate and scarcity of groundwater resources. The proposed methodology consisted of three main steps. First, we detected the main hydrogeological features at the catchment scale by processing: (i) a high resolution digital terrain model to map lineaments and to outline fault zones; and (ii) high-resolution, multispectral satellite QuickBird and WorldView-2 images to map the outcropping granite. Second, we characterized at the local scale the hydrogeological features identified at step one with: i) ground penetrating radar (GPR) to assess groundwater table depth complementing the available monitoring network data; ii) 2D electric resistivity tomography (ERT) and frequency domain electromagnetic (FDEM) to retrieve the hydrostratigraphy along selected survey transects; iii) magnetic resonance soundings (MRS) to retrieve the hydrostratigraphy and aquifer parameters at the selected survey sites. In the third step, we drilled 5 boreholes (25 to 48 m deep) and performed slug tests to verify the hydrogeophysical interpretation and to calibrate the MRS parameters. Finally, we compiled and integrated all acquired data to define the geometry and parameters of the Sardón aquifer at the catchment scale. In line with a general conceptual model of hard rock aquifers, we identified two main hydrostratigraphic layers: a saprolite layer and a fissured layer. Both layers were intersected and drained by

  20. Temporal and Spatial Patterns of Preferential Flow Occurrence in the Shale Hills Catchment: From the Hillslope to the Catchment Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Lin, H.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding temporal and spatial patterns of preferential flow (PF) occurrence is important in revealing hillslope and catchment hydrologic and biogeochemical processes. Quantitative assessment of the frequency and control of PF occurrence in the field, however, has been limited, especially at the landscape scale of hillslope and catchment. By using 5.5-years' (2007-2012) real-time soil moisture at 10 sites response to 323 precipitation events, we tested the temporal consistency of PF occurrence at the hillslope scale in the forested Shale Hills Catchment; and by using 25 additional sites with at least 1-year data (2011-2012), we evaluated the spatial patterns of PF occurrence across the catchment. To explore the potential effects of PF occurrence on catchment hydrology, wavelet analysis was performed on the recorded time series of hydrological signals (i.e., precipitation, soil moisture, catchment discharge). Considerable temporal consistence was observed in both the frequency and the main controls of PF occurrence at the hillslope scale, which was attributed largely to the statistical stability of precipitation pattern over the monitoring period and the relatively stable subsurface preferential pathways. Preferential flow tended to occur more often in response to intense rainfall events, and favored the conditions at dry hilltop or wet valley floor sites. When upscaling to the entire catchment, topographic control on the PF occurrence was amplified remarkably, leading to the identification of a subsurface PF network in the catchment. Higher frequency of PF occurrence was observed at the valley floor (average 48%), hilltop (average 46%), and swales/hillslopes near the stream (average 40%), while the hillslopes in the eastern part of the catchment were least likely to experience PF (0-20%). No clear relationship, however, was observed between terrain attributes and PF occurrence, because the initiation and persistency of PF in this catchment was controlled

  1. Characterization of catchment behaviour and rainfall selection for flash flood hydrological model calibration: catchments of the eastern Pyrenees

    OpenAIRE

    Garambois, Pierre-André; Roux, Hélène; Larnier, Kévin; Labat, David; Dartus, Denis

    2015-01-01

    International audience Accurate flash flood prediction depends heavily on rainfall data quality and knowledge of catchment behaviour. A methodology based on global sensitivity analysis and hydrological similarity is proposed to analyse flash storm-flood events with a mechanistic model. The behaviour of medium-sized catchments is identified in terms of rainfall-runoff conservation. On the basis of this shared behaviour, rainfall products with questionable quantitative precipitation estimati...

  2. Hypothesis testing in the Maimai Catchments, Westland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven experiments were carried out on the Maimai Catchments, Westland, to test assumptions about the nature of unsaturated zone waters flows in this humid environment. Hypotheses tested were: 1) that the deuterium (D) content of base flow water sources in small streams are constant at any given time, 2) that different soil moisture sampling methods give the same D contents, 3) that throughfall has the same D content as rainfall, 4) that saturation overland flow is mainly composed of current event rainfall, 5) that macropores are not connected into pipe networks, 6) that the underlying substrate (Old Man Gravel conglomerate) does not deliver water to the stream during rainfall events, and 7) that different near-stream water sources have the same D contents at a given time. Over 570 samples were collected of which 300 were analysed for deuterium in 1992-1993. This report gives the background, rationale, methods and brief results of the experiments. The results will be integrated with other measurements and written up in one or more papers for journal publication. (author). 18 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  3. Stream quality in a small urbanised catchment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    River-length patterns in the chemistry and biology of the Charlton Brook, an unclassified watercourse in Sheffield, England, have been examined. Five sampling sites for macroinvertebrates and pollutant analysis were used, in conjunction with Environment Agency's General Quality Assessment (GQA) methodologies and hydraulic analysis of the catchment. Sites were strategically located to account for the tributaries and the brook downstream of their confluence, to assess the potential impact from surface water outfalls (SWOs). Variations in GQA parameters indicate a significant drop in quality downstream of the SWOs that discharge to the study watercourse, with a marked drop in biological diversity noted at the onset of urbanisation. The decline in biological quality however is greater than that suggested by physicochemical analysis alone. There was a significant inverse relationship between impermeable area and biological diversity. Analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and trace metals in sediment from the watercourse showed significant yet irregular variations between sites. The potential toxicity of instream metal concentrations was determined using cumulative criterion unit (CCU) scores, which highlighted cadmium, copper and lead as the major sources of potential chronic instream toxicity. The threshold for likely harm to aquatic life is exceeded at all sites. In the absence of different physical characteristics, comparisons of the chemical and biological data indicate that the benthic macroinvertebrate population of such watercourses are adversely affected by the stormwater inputs

  4. Guiding soil conservation strategy in headwater mediterranean catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Slimane, Abir; Raclot, Damien; Evrard, Olivier; Sanaa, Mustapha; Lefèvre, Irène; Le Bissonnais, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Reservoir siltation due to water erosion is an important environmental issue in Mediterranean countries where storage of clear surface water is crucial for their economic and agricultural development. In order to reduce water erosion, this study aimed to design a methodology for guiding the implementation of efficient conservation strategies by identifying the dominant sediment sources in Mediterranean context. To this end, a fingerprinting method was combined with long-term field monitoring of catchment sediment yield in five headwater catchments (0.1-10 km2) equipped with a small reservoir between 1990 and 1995. The five catchments were chosen to cover the large diversity of environmental conditions found along the Tunisian Ridge and in the Cape Bon region. The fingerprinting techniques based on measurements of cesium-137 and Total Organic Carbon within the catchments and in reservoir sediment deposits successfully identified the contribution of rill/interrill and gully/channel erosion to sediment yield at the outlet of five small headwater catchments during the last 15-20 years. Results showed the very large variability of erosion processes among the selected catchments, with rill/interrill erosion contributions to sediment accumulated in outlet reservoirs ranging from 20 to 80%. Overall, rill/interrill erosion was the dominant process controlling reservoir siltation in three catchments whereas gully/channel erosion dominated in the other two catchments. This demonstrates that the dominant erosion process in the Mediterranean regions highly depends on the local environmental context. The lowest rill/interrill erosion contribution (2.2 Mg ha-1 yr-1) in the five catchments remained significantly higher than the tolerable soil loss indicating the severe levels reached by soil erosion along the Tunisian Ridge and in the Cape Bon region. This study also showed that although the implementation of improved topsoil management measures greatly reduced rill

  5. Comparison of subsurface connectivity in Alpine headwater catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuecco, Giulia; Rinderer, Michael; van Meerveld, Ilja; Penna, Daniele; Borga, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Saturation at the soil-bedrock interface or the rise of shallow groundwater into more permeable soil layers results in subsurface stormflow and can lead to hillslope-stream connectivity. Despite the importance of subsurface connectivity for streamflow and streamwater chemistry, the factors controlling its spatial and temporal variability are still poorly understood. This study takes advantage of networks of spatially-distributed piezometers in five small (piezometers in the 14 and 3.3 ha catchments in the Italian Dolomites, and for four years from spring to fall in 7-8 piezometers in three piezometers (nodes). A node was considered to be connected to the stream when shallow groundwater was observed in the piezometer and it was connected by the edges to the stream. Weights were given to each piezometer based on Thiessen polygons to determine the area of the catchment that was connected to the stream. For the Swiss pre-alpine catchments the duration that nodes were connected to the stream was significantly correlated to the local and upslope site characteristics, such as the topographic wetness index, local slope and curvature. For the dolomitic catchment with the largest riparian zone, the time that nodes were connected to the stream was correlated with downslope site characteristics, such as the vertical distance to the nearest stream. The temporal changes in the area of the catchment that was connected to the stream reflected the streamflow dynamics for all catchments. Subsurface connectivity increased during rainfall events but there was a short delay compared to streamflow, suggesting that other processes (e.g. direct channel precipitation, runoff from near stream saturated areas) contributed to streamflow at the beginning of the event. Groundwater levels declined later and slower than streamflow, resulting in complex but mainly anti-clockwise hysteretic relations between streamflow and the area that was connected to the stream. Threshold-like relations between

  6. Calibration, validation, parameter indentifiability and uncertainty analysis of a 2 - parameter parsimonious monthly rainfall-runoff model in two catchments in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rwasoka, D. T.; Madamombe, C. E.; Gumindoga, W.; Kabobah, A. T.

    Hydrologic modelling lies at the core of hydrology and water resources management. Attempts at gaining a holistic grasp on model robustness, hydrologic theory and processes have inadvertently led to models that are not-well structured or too complex to apply in arid and semi-arid catchments and in Africa, in particular. In view of this, this paper reports on the application of a monthly parsimonious hydrologic model in two catchments in Zimbabwe, the Nyatsime and Upper Save river catchments. The two (2) parameter monthly parsimonious GR2M model was applied. The inputs were rainfall and potential evapotranspiration. Measured discharge was used for calibration and validation. Calibration and uncertainty analysis were done using the Differential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM) algorithm. The performance of the GR2M model was evaluated using ten (10) model performance metrics. Parameter indentifiability was analysed on the basis of the shape of the posterior distribution of parameters. Parameter and total uncertainty were analysed in the context of the formal Bayesian DREAM approach. The 10 performance evaluation metrics showed that the model performed satisfactorily during calibration and validation in terms of the overall fit of observed and simulated stream flows, low flows and the runoff volumes. The Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) was >0.85, the Kling-Gupta Efficiency (KGE) was >80% and Volume Efficiency was >59% during calibration. Slight performance drops were noted during validation except for the NSE in Nyatsime catchment whilst the KGE remained relatively high. The validation NSE was >0.65, the Kling-Gupta Efficiency (KGE) was >71% and Volume Efficiency was >55%. Calibrated parameters values showed good time-stability and were well identifiable with posterior parameter distributions having Gaussian shapes. Parameter uncertainty, in relation to total uncertainty was low. Parameter uncertainty constituted about 7% of the total uncertainty region. It was

  7. On the operationalization of a spatially explicit evaluation of the complexity of land use trajectories in semi-arid Mediterranean agro-ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nainggolan, Doan

    of the interacting effects of various types of drivers. The thesis highlights conceptual and practical challenges in undertaking an integrated evaluation of land use change complexity. Future policy making should consider the various factors that are jointly shaping agricultural land use trajectories.......This thesis aims to unpack the complexity of trajectories of land use change in semi-arid Mediterranean agro-ecosystems – illustrated using findings from the Torrealvilla catchment in south-eastern Spain. The research looks at multiple dimensions of land use change and addresses the past, present...... for further expansion of irrigated farming, the agent-based scenario analysis indicates the opposite. Overall the thesis confirms that land use changes in Mediterranean agro-ecosystems are indeed complex entailing multiple, contrasting, and perhaps competing trajectories and are the manifestation...

  8. Integrated Water Resources Planning and Management in Arid/Semi-arid Regions: Data, Modeling, and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, H.; Liu, Y.; Wagener, T.; Durcik, M.; Duffy, C.; Springer, E.

    2005-12-01

    Water resources in arid and semi-arid regions are highly sensitive to climate variability and change. As the demand for water continues to increase due to economic and population growth, planning and management of available water resources under climate uncertainties becomes increasingly critical in order to achieve basin-scale water sustainability (i.e., to ensure a long-term balance between supply and demand of water).The tremendous complexity of the interactions between the natural hydrologic system and the human environment means that modeling is the only available mechanism for properly integrating new knowledge into the decision-making process. Basin-scale integrated models have the potential to allow us to study the feedback processes between the physical and human systems (including institutional, engineering, and behavioral components); and an integrated assessment of the potential second- and higher-order effects of political and management decisions can aid in the selection of a rational water-resources policy. Data and information, especially hydrological and water-use data, are critical to the integrated modeling and assessment for water resources management of any region. To this end we are in the process of developing a multi-resolution integrated modeling and assessment framework for the south-western USA, which can be used to generate simulations of the probable effects of human actions while taking into account the uncertainties brought about by future climatic variability and change. Data are being collected (including the development of a hydro-geospatial database) and used in support of the modeling and assessment activities. This paper will present a blueprint of the modeling framework, describe achievements so far and discuss the science questions which still require answers with a particular emphasis on issues related to dry regions.

  9. Hydrological drought severity explained by climate and catchment characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Loon, A. F.; Laaha, G.

    2015-07-01

    Impacts of a drought are generally dependent on the severity of the hydrological drought event, which can be expressed by streamflow drought duration or deficit volume. For prediction and the selection of drought sensitive regions, it is crucial to know how streamflow drought severity relates to climate and catchment characteristics. In this study we investigated controls on drought severity based on a comprehensive Austrian dataset consisting of 44 catchments with long time series of hydrometeorological data (on average around 50 year) and information on a large number of physiographic catchment characteristics. Drought analysis was performed with the variable threshold level method and various statistical tools were applied, i.e. bivariate correlation analysis, heatmaps, linear models based on multiple regression, varying slope models, and automatic stepwise regression. Results indicate that streamflow drought duration is primarily controlled by storage, quantified by the Base Flow Index or by a combination of catchment characteristics related to catchment storage and release, e.g. geology and land use. Additionally, the duration of dry spells in precipitation is important for streamflow drought duration. Hydrological drought deficit, however, is governed by average catchment wetness (represented by mean annual precipitation) and elevation (reflecting seasonal storage in the snow pack and glaciers). Our conclusion is that both drought duration and deficit are governed by a combination of climate and catchment control, but not in a similar way. Besides meteorological forcing, storage is important; storage in soils, aquifers, lakes, etc. influences drought duration and seasonal storage in snow and glaciers influences drought deficit. Consequently, the spatial variation of hydrological drought severity is highly dependent on terrestrial hydrological processes.

  10. Actinobacteria from arid and desert habitats: diversity and biological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim eWink

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The lack of new antibiotics in the pharmaceutical pipeline guides more and more researchers to leave the classical isolation procedures and to look in special niches and ecosystems. Bioprospecting of extremophilic Actinobacteria through mining untapped strains and avoiding resiolation of known biomolecules is among the most promising strategies for this purpose. With this approach, members of acidtolerant, alkalitolerant, psychrotolerant, thermotolerant, halotolerant and xerotolerant Actinobacteria have been obtained from respective habitats. Among these, little survey exists on the diversity of Actinobacteria in arid areas, which are often adapted to relatively high temperatures, salt concentrations, and radiation. Therefore, arid and desert habitats are special ecosystems which can be recruited for the isolation of uncommon Actinobacteria with new metabolic capability.At the time of this writing, members of Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Saccharothrix, Streptosporangium, Cellulomonas, Amycolatopsis, Geodermatophilus, Lechevalieria, Nocardia and Actinomadura are reported from arid habitats. However, metagenomic data present dominant members of the communities in desiccating condition of areas with limited water availability that are not yet isolated. Furthermore, significant diverse types of polyketide synthase (PKS and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS genes are detected in xerophilic and xerotolerant Actinobacteria and some bioactive compounds are reported from them. Rather than pharmaceutically active metabolites, molecules with protection activity against drying such as Ectoin and Hydroxyectoin with potential application in industry and agriculture have also been identified from xerophilic Actinobacteria. In addition, numerous biologically active small molecules are expected to be discovered from arid adapted Actinobacteria in the future. In the current survey, the diversity and biotechnological potential of Actinobacteria

  11. Workshop on environmental changes of arid regions convenes in Inner Mongolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Hosted by the CAS Institute of Geology and Geophysics and the local government, the International Workshop on Environmental Changes and Sustainable Development in Arid and Semi-arid Regions was held recently in Alashan Left Banner, Inner Mongolia.

  12. New crops for arid lands. [Jojoba; Buffalo gourd; Bladderpod; Gumweed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinman, C.W.

    1984-09-28

    Five plants are described that could be grown commercially under arid conditions. Once the most valuable component has been obtained from each plant (rubber from guayule; seed oil from jojoba, buffalo gourd, and bladderpod; and resin from gumweed), the remaining material holds potential for useful products as well as fuel. It is difficult to realize the full potential of arid land plants, however, because of the complexities of developing the necessary agricultural and industrial infrastructure simultaneously. To do so, multicompany efforts or cooperative efforts between government and the private sector will be required.

  13. Potential of arid zone vegetation as a source of substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassham, J.A.

    1977-11-01

    Three aspects of the potential of vegetation in arid zones as a source of substrates are discussed. The first includes the limitations on efficiency of conversion of solar energy to the stored chemical energy of biomass in green plants, and the subsequent biochemical pathways of carbon dioxide fixation and biosynthesis. Second is the potential of plants endogenous to arid zones. Finally, the use of covered agriculture or controlled environmental agriculture (CEA) is considered both in its present form and in terms of possible extenion to the large scale production of stable crops. (JGB)

  14. Monitoring small reservoirs in semi-arid region by satellite SAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolina Papa, Maria; Mitidieri, Francesco; Amitrano, Donato; Ruello, Giuseppe; Di Martino, Gerardo; Iodice, Antonio; Riccio, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    The work presents a novel tool for the monitoring of small reservoirs in semi-arid regions. The pilot project was developed in the Yatenga region, a Sahelian area in northern Burkina Faso. In semi-arid regions, small reservoirs are widely employed for facing seasonal variability in water availability due to the alternation of a rainy (3 months) and a dry (9 months) season. Beside their crucial importance, the small reservoirs are not appropriately monitored, they are often built for the initiative of small local communities and even basic data as their location and capacity are not available. Another major problem is linked to soil erosion due to water and consequent reservoirs' sedimentation that reduces the amount of available water and the life span of reservoirs. This lack of data prevents the implementation of strategies for the optimization of water resources management. It is therefore necessary to improve the data availability through the development of cost-effective monitoring techniques and to adapt the hydrological modeling to the limited available data. In this context the use if satellite data can highly contribute to the achievement of crucial information at low costs, high resolution in time and wide areas. In the present work, we used COSMO-SkyMed Stripmap (3m resolution) and Spotligth (1m resolution) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data acquired under the aegis of the 2007 Italian Space Agency Announcement of Opportunity and of the HydroCIDOT project. The shorelines of the reservoirs were extracted from the series of SAR images by employing an innovative change-detection framework. A digital elevation model (DEM) of the study area was obtained via standard interferometry processing of images acquired at the end of the dry season, when small reservoirs are completely empty, and information about the surface usually covered by water can be retrieved. The obtained DEM and shorelines were used for bathymetry extraction of reservoirs. For the

  15. a Proposed New Vegetation Index, the Total Ratio Vegetation Index (trvi), for Arid and Semi-Arid Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadaei, H.; Suzuki, R.; Sakai, T.; Torii, K.

    2012-07-01

    Vegetation indices that provide important key to predict amount vegetation in forest such as percentage vegetation cover, aboveground biomass, and leaf-area index. Arid and semi-arid areas are not exempt of this rule. Arid and semi-arid areas of northeast Iran cover about 3.4 million ha and are populated by two main tree species, the broadleaf Pistacia vera (pistachio) and the conifer Juniperus excelsa ssp. polycarpos (Persian juniper). Natural stands of pistachio in Iran are not only environmentally important but also genetically essential as seed sources for pistachio production in orchards. We investigated the relationships between tree density and vegetation indices in the arid and semi-arid regions in the northeast of Iran by analysing Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) data PRISM is a panchromatic radiometer with a 2.5 m spatial resolution at nadir, and has one band with a wavelength of 0.52-0.77 μm (JAXA EORC). AVNIR-2 is a visible and near infrared radiometer for observing land and coastal zones with a 10 m spatial resolution at nadir, and has four multispectral bands: blue (0.42-0.50 μm), green (0.52-0.60 μm), red (0.61-0.69 μm), and near infrared (0.76-0.89 μm) (JAXA EORC). In this study, we estimated various vegetation indices using maximum filtering algorithm (5×5) and examined. This study carried out of juniper forests and natural pistachio stand using Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) and field inventories. Have been compared linear regression model of vegetation indices and proposed new vegetation index for arid and semi-arid regions. Also, we estimated the densities of juniper forests and natural pistachio stands using remote sensing to help in the sustainable management and production of pistachio in Iran. We present a new vegetation index for arid and semi-arid regions with sparse forest cover, the Total Ratio Vegetation Index (TRVI), and we investigate the relationship of the new index to tree density by analysing data from the

  16. A PROPOSED NEW VEGETATION INDEX, THE TOTAL RATIO VEGETATION INDEX (TRVI, FOR ARID AND SEMI-ARID REGIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fadaei

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation indices that provide important key to predict amount vegetation in forest such as percentage vegetation cover, aboveground biomass, and leaf-area index. Arid and semi-arid areas are not exempt of this rule. Arid and semi-arid areas of northeast Iran cover about 3.4 million ha and are populated by two main tree species, the broadleaf Pistacia vera (pistachio and the conifer Juniperus excelsa ssp. polycarpos (Persian juniper. Natural stands of pistachio in Iran are not only environmentally important but also genetically essential as seed sources for pistachio production in orchards. We investigated the relationships between tree density and vegetation indices in the arid and semi-arid regions in the northeast of Iran by analysing Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS data PRISM is a panchromatic radiometer with a 2.5 m spatial resolution at nadir, and has one band with a wavelength of 0.52–0.77 μm (JAXA EORC. AVNIR-2 is a visible and near infrared radiometer for observing land and coastal zones with a 10 m spatial resolution at nadir, and has four multispectral bands: blue (0.42–0.50 μm, green (0.52–0.60 μm, red (0.61–0.69 μm, and near infrared (0.76–0.89 μm (JAXA EORC. In this study, we estimated various vegetation indices using maximum filtering algorithm (5×5 and examined. This study carried out of juniper forests and natural pistachio stand using Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS and field inventories. Have been compared linear regression model of vegetation indices and proposed new vegetation index for arid and semi-arid regions. Also, we estimated the densities of juniper forests and natural pistachio stands using remote sensing to help in the sustainable management and production of pistachio in Iran. We present a new vegetation index for arid and semi-arid regions with sparse forest cover, the Total Ratio Vegetation Index (TRVI, and we investigate the relationship of the new index to tree density by

  17. Catchment systems science and management: from evidence to resilient landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Paul

    2014-05-01

    There is an urgent need to reassess both the scientific understanding and the policy making approaches taken to manage flooding, water scarcity and pollution in intensively utilised catchments. Many European catchments have been heavily modified and natural systems have largely disappeared. However, working with natural processes must still be at the core of any future management strategy. Many catchments have greatly reduced infiltration rates and buffering capacity and this process needs to be reversed. An interventionist and holistic approach to managing water quantity and quality at the catchment scale is urgently required through the active manipulation of natural flow processes. Both quantitative (field experiments and modelling) and qualitative evidence (local knowledge) is required to demonstrate that catchment have become 'unhealthy'. For example, dense networks of low cost instrumentation could provide this multiscale evidence and, coupled with stakeholder knowledge, build a comprehensive understanding of whole system function. Proactive Catchment System Management is an interventionist approach to altering the catchment scale runoff regime through the manipulation of landscape scale hydrological flow pathways. Many of the changes to hydrological processes cannot be detected at the catchment scale as the primary causes of flooding and pollution. Evidence shows it is the land cover and the soil that are paramount to any change. Local evidence shows us that intense agricultural practices reduce the infiltration capacity through soil degradation. The intrinsic buffering capacity has also been lost across the landscape. The emerging hydrological process is one in which the whole system responds too quickly (driven by near surface and overland flow processes). The bulk of the soil matrix is bypassed during storm events and there is little or no buffering capacity in the riparian areas or in headwater catchments. The prospect of lower intensity farming rates is

  18. Impacts of groundwater extraction on salinization risk in a semi-arid floodplain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaghmand, S.; Beecham, S.; Hassanli, A.

    2013-12-01

    In the lower River Murray in Australia, a combination of a reduction in the frequency, duration and magnitude of natural floods, rising saline water tables in floodplains, and excessive evapotranspiration have led to an irrigation-induced groundwater mound forcing the naturally saline groundwater onto the floodplain. It is during the attenuation phase of floods that these large salt accumulations are likely to be mobilised and discharged into the river. This has been highlighted as the most significant risk in the Murray-Darling Basin and the South Australian Government and catchment management authorities have subsequently developed salt interception schemes (SIS). The aim of these schemes is to reduce the hydraulic gradient that drives the regional saline groundwater towards the River Murray. This paper investigates the interactions between a river (River Murray in South Australia) and a saline semi-arid floodplain (Clark's floodplain) that is significantly influenced by groundwater lowering due to a particular SIS. The results confirm that groundwater extraction maintains a lower water table and a higher amount of fresh river water flux to the saline floodplain aquifer. In terms of salinity, this may lead to less solute stored in the floodplain aquifer. This occurs through three mechanisms, namely extraction of the solute mass from the system, reducing the saline groundwater flux from the highland to the floodplain and changing the floodplain groundwater regime from a losing to a gaining one. It is shown that groundwater extraction is able to remove some of the solute stored in the unsaturated zone and this can mitigate the floodplain salinity risk. A conceptual model of the impact of groundwater extraction on floodplain salinization has been developed.

  19. Modelling streamflow in a large anastomosing river of the arid zone, Diamantina River, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costelloe, J. F.; Grayson, R. B.; McMahon, T. A.

    2006-05-01

    Anastomosing rivers form a subset of the anabranching family of river types and provide considerable challenges to modelling of their streamflow because of complex flow patterns across greatly varying floodplain widths. Estimates of distributed flow data are required for catchment management purposes and ecological studies of these rivers but are hindered by a paucity of measured discharge data. A grid-based, semi-distributed, conceptual model structure is applied to a 330 km reach of the arid zone Diamantina River of central Australia. Model complexity is constrained by data availability with only a single gauging station located at the downstream end of the reach to provide discharge data for model calibration. The model uses a simple conceptual bucket structure and accounts for exceptionally high transmission losses as well as flow patterns and wave speeds that vary with discharge within the reach. The intricate flow patterns across the floodplains widths of up to 50 km are simulated using a grid-based structure that required the following features: (i) cell connections that are explicitly defined using a code that allows for multi-directional flow from a cell; and (ii) each cell having a binary flow pattern, with the second connection pattern being triggered when the surface storage of the cell exceeds a calibrated level for a given land-type. Satellite images were used to define the flow paths, and hence cell connection patterns, utilised by various sized floods. The model was able to provide acceptable simulation of large floods but with decreasing model performance in the simulation of small to medium sized floods. Simulation suggested that incorrectly defined flow paths for the smaller floods were a major factor in this decreased performance. The capability of the model would be improved by further detailed mapping, using satellite imagery, of spatial patterns of inundation as discharge varies.

  20. Coupled modeling approach to assess climate change impacts on groundwater recharge and adaptation in arid areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, H.; Uvo, C. B.; Berndtsson, R.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of future climate scenarios on surface and groundwater resources was simulated using a modeling approach for an artificial recharge area in arid southern Iran. Future climate data for the periods of 2010-2030 and 2030-2050 were acquired from the Canadian Global Coupled Model (CGCM 3.1) for scenarios A1B, A2, and B1. These scenarios were adapted to the studied region using the delta-change method. A conceptual rainfall-runoff model (Qbox) was used to simulate runoff in a flash flood prone catchment. The model was calibrated and validated for the period 2002-2011 using daily discharge data. The projected climate variables were used to simulate future runoff. The rainfall-runoff model was then coupled to a calibrated groundwater flow and recharge model (MODFLOW) to simulate future recharge and groundwater hydraulic heads. As a result of the rainfall-runoff modeling, under the B1 scenario the number of floods is projected to slightly increase in the area. This in turn calls for proper management, as this is the only source of fresh water supply in the studied region. The results of the groundwater recharge modeling showed no significant difference between present and future recharge for all scenarios. Owing to that, four abstraction and recharge scenarios were assumed to simulate the groundwater level and recharge amount in the studied aquifer. The results showed that the abstraction scenarios have the most substantial effect on the groundwater level and the continuation of current pumping rate would lead to a groundwater decline by 18 m up to 2050.

  1. The role of upland wetlands in modulating snowmelt runoff in the semi-arid Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevia, Andres; Sproles, Eric; Soulsby, Chris; Tetzlaff, Doerthe

    2016-04-01

    The wetlands, or bofedales, of semi-arid northern central Chile (29°-32°S) provide a critical store of water that modulate spring snowmelt runoff. Water released from bofedales helps sustain flows throughout the dry portions of the year, providing fresh water to downstream residents and a robust tourist, agricultural, and mining economy. In the Río Claro watershed (30°S, 1515 km2, 800m to 5500 m a.s.l.) a series fourteen bofedales have formed at natural choke points in the valley bottoms of the headwater reaches. The highly erosive dynamic of this watershed provides ample sediment, and some of these bofedales are up to 30 m deep. Annual precipitation in the region is limited to 4-6 events annually that fall primarily as snow at elevations above 3500 m. The subsurface storage of the headwaters is limited by the steep terrain of the headwater catchments that are devoid of soils and primarily underlain by granite bedrock. Downstream, irrigated area has increased by 200% between 1985 and 2005, driven by the cultivation of table grapes for export. For over 70 years local water managers have flooded the bodfedales during spring runoff to augment late season flow when irrigation demand peaks. While this low-tech strategy has worked in the past, a recent 8-year drought has raised concerns over long-term water security. We apply geophysical and geographic measurements, water quality, and stable isotopic tracers to calculate the volume of water storage and residence times in the bofedales of Río Claro. This information will be used to evaluate the reliability of the bofedale system as compared to a proposed reservoir in the headwaters of the Río Claro. Additionally, estimating the storage and residence times of the will help reduce uncertainty for modeling efforts currently underway in Río Claro.

  2. Carbon redistribution by erosion processes in an intensively disturbed catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boix-Fayos, Carolina; Martínez-Mena, María; Pérez Cutillas, Pedro; de Vente, Joris; Barberá, Gonzalo G.; Mosch, Wouter; Navarro Cano, Jose Antonio; Gaspar, Leticia; Navas, Ana

    2016-04-01

    Understanding how organic carbon moves with sediments along the fluvial system is crucial to close catchment scale carbon budgets. Especially challenging is the analysis of organic carbon dynamics during fluvial transport in heterogeneous, fragile and disturbed environments with ephemeral and intense hydrological pulses, typical of Mediterranean conditions. This paper explores the catchment scale organic carbon redistribution by lateral flows in extreme Mediterranean environmental conditions from a geomorphological perspective. The study area is a catchment (Cárcavo) in SE Spain with a semiarid climate, erodible lithologies, shallow soils, and highly disturbed by agricultural terraces, land levelling, reforestations and construction of check-dams. To increase understanding of erosion induced catchment scale organic carbon redistribution, we studied the subcatchments of 8 check-dams distributed along the catchment main channel in detail. We determined 137Cs, physicochemical characteristics and organic carbon pools of soils and sediments deposited behind each check-dam, performed spatial analysis of properties of the catchment and buffer areas around check-dams, and carried out geomorphological analysis of the slope-channel connections. Soils showed very low Total Organic Carbon (TOC) values oscillating between 15.2 and 4.4 g Kg-1 for forest and agricultural soils, respectively. Sediments mobilized by erosion were poor in TOC compared to the eroded (forest) soils (6.6±0.7 g Kg-1), and the redistribution of organic carbon through the catchment, especially of the Mineral Associated Organic Carbon (MAC) pool, showed the same pattern as clay particles and 137Cs. The TOC erosion rates (0.031±0.03 Mg ha-1 y-1) were comparable to others reported for subhumid Mediterranean catchments and to those modelled worldwide for pasture land. Those lateral fluxes were equivalent to 10.4 % of the TOC stock from the topsoil at the moment of the check-dam construction and

  3. Deriving N-year discharges in small catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledvinka, Ondrej; Bohac, Milon

    2016-04-01

    Maximum discharges with the return period of 100 years (Q100) belong to basic hydrological data that are derived and provided for any profile of the river network by the Czech Hydrometeorological Institute (CHMI). However, as regards small catchments, the determination of these characteristics is largely subjective and thus it is rather performed by comparing the results of several methods. The first approach is to extrapolate the three parameters of maximum peak discharges (average Qmax, coefficient of variation Cvmax, Q100) from water-gauging stations to selected unobserved profiles (using regression relationships and regularities at the confluence points). For this purpose, the so-called program Budsez is utilized. During this process, the physical-geographical (PG) features, rainfall data and other information about catchments are considered, based on which the parameters of theoretical distributions of N-year discharges are optimized. For smaller catchments the relationships between the 100-year specific runoff q100 and the catchment area and other PG characteristics are used that are determined in a GIS environment with the extension AGPosudek. In this innovative method, besides many other PG characteristics, especially the average value of CN and N-year maximum daily precipitation are taken into account when computing Q100. In the older methodologies, Q100 is based on the average slope of the stream and the average slope of the catchment. The values of Q100 are then corrected according to the percentage of forested areas and the catchment shape. Hydrologists compare the values of Q100 coming from different approaches in a logarithmic graph (q100 against area) for the particular catchment or its analogon. The final value is determined with respect to experience and previously issued values. The remaining N-year discharges are usually assessed through the ratio QN/Q100 from the nearest water-gauging station or the closest profile where these ratios were

  4. The Influence of temporal sampling regime on the WFD classification of catchments within the Eden Demonstration Test Catchment Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonczyk, Jennine; Haygarth, Phil; Quinn, Paul; Reaney, Sim

    2014-05-01

    A high temporal resolution data set from the Eden Demonstration Test Catchment (DTC) project is used to investigate the processes causing pollution and the influence of temporal sampling regime on the WFD classification of three catchments. This data highlights WFD standards may not be fit for purpose. The Eden DTC project is part of a UK government-funded project designed to provide robust evidence regarding how diffuse pollution can be cost-effectively controlled to improve and maintain water quality in rural river catchments. The impact of multiple water quality parameters on ecosystems and sustainable food production are being studied at the catchment scale. Three focus catchments approximately 10 km2 each, have been selected to represent the different farming practices and geophysical characteristics across the Eden catchment, Northern England. A field experimental programme has been designed to monitor the dynamics of agricultural diffuse pollution at multiple scales using state of the art sensors providing continuous real time data. The data set, which includes Total Phosphorus and Total Reactive Phosphorus, Nitrate, Ammonium, pH, Conductivity, Turbidity and Chlorophyll a reveals the frequency and duration of nutrient concentration target exceedance which arises from the prevalence of storm events of increasing magnitude. This data set is sub-sampled at different time intervals to explore how different sampling regimes affects our understanding of nutrient dynamics and the ramification of the different regimes to WFD chemical status. This presentation seeks to identify an optimum temporal resolution of data for effective catchment management and to question the usefulness of the WFD status metric for determining health of a system. Criteria based on high frequency short duration events needs to be accounted for.

  5. Hydrological drought across the world: impact of climate and physical catchment structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. J. Van Lanen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale hydrological drought studies have demonstrated spatial and temporal patterns in observed trends, and considerable difference exists among global hydrological models in their ability to reproduce these patterns. In this study a controlled modeling experiment has been set up to systematically explore the role of climate and physical catchment structure (soils and groundwater systems to better understand underlying drought-generating mechanisms. Daily climate data (1958–2001 of 1495 grid cells across the world were selected that represent Köppen–Geiger major climate types. These data were fed into a conceptual hydrological model. Nine realizations of physical catchment structure were defined for each grid cell, i.e., three soils with different soil moisture supply capacity and three groundwater systems (quickly, intermediately and slowly responding. Hydrological drought characteristics (number, duration and standardized deficit volume were identified from time series of daily discharge. Summary statistics showed that the equatorial and temperate climate types (A- and C-climates had about twice as many drought events as the arid and polar types (B- and E-climates, and the durations of more extreme droughts were about half the length. Selected soils under permanent grassland were found to have a minor effect on hydrological drought characteristics, whereas groundwater systems had major impact. Groundwater systems strongly controlled the hydrological drought characteristics of all climate types, but particularly those of the wetter A-, C- and D-climates because of higher recharge. The median number of droughts for quickly responding groundwater systems was about three times higher than for slowly responding systems. Groundwater systems substantially affected the duration, particularly of the more extreme drought events. Bivariate probability distributions of drought duration and standardized deficit for combinations of K

  6. Hydrological drought across the world: impact of climate and physical catchment structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. J. Van Lanen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale hydrological drought studies have demonstrated spatial and temporal patterns in observed trends and considerable difference exists among global hydrological models in their ability to reproduce these patterns. A controlled modeling experiment has been set up to systematically explore the role of climate and physical catchment structure (soils and groundwater systems to better understand underlying drought-generating mechanisms. Daily climate data (1958–2001 of 1495 grid cells across the world were selected that represent Köppen-Geiger major climate types. These data were fed into a hydrological model. Nine realizations of physical catchment structure were defined for each grid cell, i.e. three soils with different soil moisture supply capacity and three groundwater systems (quickly-, intermediary- and slowly-responding. Hydrological drought characteristics (number, duration and standardized deficit volume were identified from time series of daily discharge. Summary statistics showed that the equatorial and temperate climate types (A- and C-climates had about twice as many drought events as the arid and polar types (B- and E-climates and the duration of more extreme droughts were about half the length. Soils were found to have a minor effect on hydrological drought characteristics, whereas groundwater systems had major impact. Groundwater systems strongly controlled the hydrological drought characteristics of all climate types, but particularly those of the wetter A-, C- and D-climates because of higher recharge. The median number of drought for quickly-responding groundwater systems was about three times higher than for slowly-responding systems, which substantially affected the duration, particularly of the more extreme drought events. Bivariate probability distributions of drought duration and standardized deficit for combinations of Köppen-Geiger climate, soil and groundwater system showed that responsiveness of groundwater

  7. A comparison of regionalisation methods for catchment model parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Parajka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examine the relative performance of a range of methods for transposing catchment model parameters to ungauged catchments. We calibrate 11 parameters of a semi-distributed conceptual rainfall-runoff model to daily runoff and snow cover data of 320 Austrian catchments in the period 1987-1997 and verify the model for the period 1976-1986. We evaluate the predictive accuracy of the regionalisation methods by jack-knife cross-validation against daily runoff and snow cover data. The results indicate that two methods perform best. The first is a kriging approach where the model parameters are regionalised independently from each other based on their spatial correlation. The second is a similarity approach where the complete set of model parameters is transposed from a donor catchment that is most similar in terms of its physiographic attributes (mean catchment elevation, stream network density, lake index, areal proportion of porous aquifers, land use, soils and geology. For the calibration period, the median Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency ME of daily runoff is 0.67 for both methods as compared to ME=0.72 for the at-site simulations. For the verification period, the corresponding efficiencies are 0.62 and 0.66. All regionalisation methods perform similar in terms of simulating snow cover.

  8. The ethics of socio-ecohydrological catchment management: towards hydrosolidarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Falkenmark

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to clarify key biophysical issues and the problems involved in the ethics of socio-ecohydrological catchment management. The issue in managing complex systems is to live with unavoidable change while securing the capacity of the ecohydrological system of the catchment to sustain vital ecological goods and services, aquatic as well as terrestrial, on which humanity depends ultimately. Catchment management oriented to sustainability has to be based on ethical principles: human rights, international conventions, sustaining crucial ecological goods and services, and protecting ecosystem resilience, all of which have water linkages. Many weaknesses have to be identified, assessed and mitigated to improve the tools by which the ethical issues can be addressed and solved: a heritage of constraining tunnel vision in both science and management; inadequate shortcuts made in modern scientific system analyses (e.g. science addressing sustainability issues; simplistic technical-fix approaches to water and ecosystems in land/water/ecosystem management; conventional tools for evaluation of scientific quality with its focus on “doing the thing right” rather than “doing the right thing”. The new ethics have to incorporate principles that, on a catchment basis, allow for proper attention to the hungry and poor, upstream and downstream, to descendants, and to sites and habitats that need to be protected. Keywords: catchment, hydrosolidarity, ecosystem, water determinants, resilience, green water, blue water, sustainability science

  9. Impact and consequences of evapotranspiration changes on water resources availability in the arid Zhangye Basin, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, X.; Schaepman, M.E.; Clevers, J.G.P.W.; Su, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) plays an important role in the hydrological cycle and it is essential to estimate ET accurately for the evaluation of available water resources. This is most important in arid and semi-arid regions. In this paper, the long-term changes in daily ET in the semi-arid Zhangye Bas

  10. Utilisation Of Micro-Finance Institutions’ Funds By Borrowers In Arid And Semi-Arid Lands In Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Nzioki, Paul M.; Taragon, Geoffrey; Kalio, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite a lot of efforts in terms of resource mobilisation in Arid and Semi-Arid Lands (ASAL) , the poverty levels are still very high and the defaulted loans from the four Micro-Finance Institutions (MFIs) in Maralal town amounts KES 15 million. The study sought to establish whether economic characteristics of entrepreneurs and whether literacy levels affect application and usage of borrowed funds in the ASAL regions of Africa. The study was limited to Maralal Town, one of the main towns in ...

  11. Catchments characterization by means of lumped conceptual models - a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Rita; Casper, Markus C.

    2016-04-01

    Lumped conceptual models are important tools for understanding, predicting and characterizing the hydrologic behavior of meso-scale catchments. An important prerequisite for this is a clear relationship between catchment characteristics and the model structure. The large number of possible model structures complicates the selection of appropriate model structures. We prove the behaviour and suitability of 12 different predefined model structures for 99, often neighbored or nested catchments in western Germany for catchment characterization. The 12 model structures are formulated within the modelling framework SUPERFLEX. They differ in their architecture and complexity. We calibrate all 12 model structures for all 99 catchments. For all models with an acceptable performance, we compare the flow duration curves of observed and simulated runoff by means of signature indices derived from the flow duration curves. The comparison results in three types of catchments: a) For 15 catchments, none of the 12 model structures led to an acceptable model. Either there is no suitable model structure within the 12 tested structures or these catchments are not suitable for modelling. For the other catchments up to eight acceptable models per catchment are recognized. No model structure leads to an acceptable model for every catchment. b) For 35 catchments, all acceptable models show different performance and flow duration curves with a clear best performing model. A relationship between the best performing model structure and catchment characteristics may be possible. Model structure selection is an important issue. c) For 49 catchments, all, or the majority of acceptable models, show similar signature indices indicating similar flow duration curves of simulated runoff. Similar simulation results with different model structures for a catchment refer to model equifinality. A clear relationship between catchment characteristics and model structure, a direct cause- and effect

  12. Local facilitation, bistability and transitions in arid ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kefi, S.; Rietkerk, M.; Baalen, van M.; Loreau, M.

    2007-01-01

    Arid ecosystems are liable to undergo sudden discontinuous transitions from a vegetated to a desert state as a result of human pressure and climate change. A predictive framework about the conditions under which such transitions occur is lacking. Here, we derive and analyze a general model describin

  13. Extreme climatic events shape arid and semiarid ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmgren, M.; Stapp, P.; Dickman, C.; Gracia, C.; Graham, S.

    2006-01-01

    Climatic changes associated with the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) can have a dramatic impact on terrestrial ecosystems worldwide, but especially on arid and semiarid systems, where productivity is strongly limited by precipitation. Nearly two decades of research, including both short-term exp

  14. Evaporation as the transport mechanism of metals in arid regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Ana T; Safar, Zeinab; Loch, J P Gustav

    2014-09-01

    Soils of arid regions are exposed to drought and drastic temperature oscillations throughout the year. Transport mechanisms in these soils are therefore very different from the ones in temperate regions, where rain dictates the fate of most elements in soils. Due to the low rainfall and high evaporation rates in arid regions, groundwater quality is not threatened and all soil contamination issues tend to be overlooked. But if soil contamination happens, where do contaminants go? This study tests the hypothesis of upward metal movement in soils when evaporation is the main transport mechanism. Laboratory evaporation tests were carried out with heavy metal spiked Saudi soil, using circulation of air as the driving force (Fig. 1). Main results show that loamy soil retains heavy metals quite well while evaporation drives heavy metals to the surface of a sandy soil. Evaporation transports heavy metals upward in sandy soils of arid regions, making them accumulate at the soil surface. Sand being the dominating type of soil in arid regions, soils can then be a potential source of contaminated aerosols and atmospheric pollution - a transboundary problem. Some other repercussions for this problem are foreseen, such as the public ingestion or inhalation of dust.

  15. Documentation of Arid Land Soilscapes in Southwestern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Ibáñez, Juan; Pérez-Gómez, Rufino; Oyonarte, Cecilio; Brevik, Eric C.

    2016-04-01

    There have been no studies to date that have proven the existence of soil assemblages typical of arid lands in Europe. This study was carried out in Almería province, a representative territory of the SE part of the Iberian Peninsula which is the driest part of Europe, to determine if soils characteristic of arid lands were present. The study made use of mathematical tools previously developed in biodiversity and pedodiversity analysis, such as richness, entropy indices, abundance distribution models, diversity-area relationships and nested subset analysis to analyse the spatial distribution of soils. The study demonstrated that the soil types or pedotaxa are typical of mountainous arid lands. Shallow and weakly developed soils (e.g. Leptosols, Regosols, Arenosols), Calcisols, Gypsisols and Solonchaks cover most of the study area, and pedodiversity analysis demonstrates that the pedotaxa spatial patterns follow the same regularities as in other areas, environments and scales. In view of the fact that the class of landscapes identified in this study are unique in Europe, the Tarbernas desert and other arid lands sites of the study area merit preservation as part of the European geological, geomorphological, and pedological heritage.

  16. Agave Lechuguilla as a Potential Biomass Source in Arid Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Houri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biomass productivity presents a challenging problem in arid and semi-arid areas.  Despite a large need for energy in the form of solid biomass, liquid fuel or needs for animal feed, these regions remain largely unproductive.  A convenient way to overcome this challenge is to utilize plants with high water-use efficiency.  Agave lechuguilla is an example of a highly productive (3.8 tons ha-1 yr-1 desert plant that holds the potential for producing biomass with minimal water resources.  For this purpose, a global suitability map has been developed showing areas where this plant can be planted, and its productivity was assessed.  A Maxent model was used and was further refined by excluding protected areas and used lands (urban, agriculture, etc...  Productivity assessment provides a good way forward for prioritizing the regional utilization of this plant.   This study provides an initial analysis for the use of arid and semi-arid regions for biomass production.  Results indicate the potential generation of 93.8 million tons per year of dry biomass if the suitable areas were fully utilized.  The analytical method can be readily applied to other potential plant species to optimize the use of certain areas.

  17. Evaporation as the transport mechanism of metals in arid regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lima, A.T.; Safar, Z.; Loch, J.P.G.

    2014-01-01

    Soils of arid regions are exposed to drought and drastic temperature oscillations throughout the year. Transport mechanisms in these soils are therefore very different from the ones in temperate regions, where rain dictates the fate of most elements in soils. Due to the low rainfall and high evapora

  18. Trends and responses to global change of China's arid regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weixi YANG

    2009-01-01

    Ⅰ analyzed and elaborated the trends in and responses to global change in arid regions of China, from the perspective of nine variables, i.e., temperature, precipitation, river runoff, melting glaciers, water level of lakes, wind power and evaporation, vegetation, oases, and desertification. The climate and hydrology data Ⅰ citedrepresent many years of observations. Ⅰ conclude that, since the 1980s, the climate in arid regions of China has clearly changed with rising temperatures and precipitation in most areas. Wind power and the number of galestorm days have continuously decreased, which resulted in an improvement of humid conditions and increases in river discharge and water levels of lakes. Simultaneously, vegetation also has improved and the process of deserti-fication has essentially been arrested. Although there are some unfavorable developments, such as decreased river flows or flow interruptions and downstream oases have suffered from degradation, these incidental cases should not distract our attention from the generally favorable trends during the middle and late 20th century. These discordant phenomena are not consequences of climate change but rather of unsuitable human activities. Despitea substantial increase in precipitation, the level of the original precipitation was so small that any increase in precipitation was still small. As a result, none of the fundamental conditions such as a scarcity of water resources and precipitation nor the landscape of drought-ridden deserts in the arid regions will change. The vulnerability of the eco-environmental system in the arid regions will not change fundamentally either in the near future.

  19. Simulation of water use and herbage growth in arid regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, van H.

    1975-01-01

    The and and semi-arid regions of the world, totalling about 30% of the land surface of the earth, are predominantly used for extensive grazing, as low and erratic rainfall presents too high a risk for arable farming. The population that can be sustained by the animal products -meat, milk or wool- is

  20. Evaporation as the transport mechanism of metals in arid regions

    KAUST Repository

    Lima, Ana T.

    2014-09-01

    Soils of arid regions are exposed to drought and drastic temperature oscillations throughout the year. Transport mechanisms in these soils are therefore very different from the ones in temperate regions, where rain dictates the fate of most elements in soils. Due to the low rainfall and high evaporation rates in arid regions, groundwater quality is not threatened and all soil contamination issues tend to be overlooked. But if soil contamination happens, where do contaminants go? This study tests the hypothesis of upward metal movement in soils when evaporation is the main transport mechanism. Laboratory evaporation tests were carried out with heavy metal spiked Saudi soil, using circulation of air as the driving force (Fig. 1). Main results show that loamy soil retains heavy metals quite well while evaporation drives heavy metals to the surface of a sandy soil. Evaporation transports heavy metals upward in sandy soils of arid regions, making them accumulate at the soil surface. Sand being the dominating type of soil in arid regions, soils can then be a potential source of contaminated aerosols and atmospheric pollution - a transboundary problem. Some other repercussions for this problem are foreseen, such as the public ingestion or inhalation of dust. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Survey on the construction of realization scenario of large-scale revegetation of arid regions; Daikibo ryokuka no jitsugenka scenario sakusei ni kansuru chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    In order to fix carbon dioxide as a measure to mitigate global warming, research of large-scale revegetation of arid regions has been conducted toward the ultimate goals of systematizing revegetation technologies centered on securing and using water resources, evaluating the feasibility of arid revegetation by extending the viewpoint to examine even rainfall increase by artificial means, and establishing a strategic program for large-scale revegetation. A trial revegetation feasibility map was made for a selected target region in Western Australia, and rough revegetation steps were formulated. Selection of proper region, introduction of technology, and planning were conducted by grasping environment of the target revegetation region. As a result, it was found that growth of plants is vigorous at the catchment areas due to the surface water transfer along the topography of surface in spite of poor rainfall. Obstruction of plant growth is partly caused by the corrosion of soil and accumulation of salt, but mainly caused by the shortage of water. Based on these data, ranking of proper regions was evaluated. When the technology is introduced in the region with A-rank, several times of water can be collected. 60 refs., 61 figs., 30 tabs.

  2. Streamflow Characteristics of Two Forested Catchments in the Sopron Hills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GRIBOVSZKI, Zoltán

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the central issues in hydrology is today to establish a relationship between thehydrological and biological processes in ecosystems. One question of this theme is the vegetationimpact on the water budget of the catchment. Water use by vegetation can closely be linked tostreamflow patterns on a variety of time scales. At present many details of these connections arepoorly understood.Investigation on small catchments is the best way of studying hydrological processes in headwater,forested watersheds. In this paper drainage basin morphology and streamflow characteristics (baseflow and quick flow have been analysed under conditions of forest management in two neighbouringsmall forested catchments (the Farkas Valley and Vadkan Valley located in the prealpine hillsbordering to Austria on the basis of streamflow data collected during 2001.

  3. Modelling a river catchment using an electrical circuit analogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. Collier

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available An electrical circuit analogue of a river catchment is described from which is derived an hydrological model of river flow called the River Electrical Water Analogue Research and Development (REWARD model. The model is based upon an analytic solution to the equation governing the flow of electricity in an inductance-capacitance-resistance (LCR circuit. An interpretation of L, C and R in terms of catchment parameters and physical processes is proposed, and tested for the River Irwell catchment in northwest England. Hydrograph characteristics evaluated using the model are compared with observed hydrographs, confirming that the modelling approach does provide a reliable framework within which to investigate the impact of variations in model input data.

  4. Assessment of Runoff Contributing Catchment Areas in Rainfall Runoff Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Johansen, C.; Schaarup-Jensen, Kjeld

    2005-01-01

    In numerical modelling of rainfall caused runoff in urban sewer systems an essential parameter is the hydrological reduction factor which defines the percentage of the impervious area contributing to the surface flow towards the sewer. As the hydrological processes during a rainfall are difficult...... to determine with significant precision the hydrological reduction factor is implemented to account all hydrological losses except the initial loss. This paper presents an inconsistency between calculations of the hydrological reduction factor, based on measurements of rainfall and runoff, and till now...... recommended literary values for residential areas. It is proven by comparing rainfall-runoff measurements from four different residential catchments that the literary values of the hydrological reduction factor are over-estimated for this type of catchments. In addition, different catchment descriptions...

  5. Assessment of runoff contributing catchment areas in rainfall runoff modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren; Johansen, C.; Schaarup-Jensen, Kjeld

    2006-01-01

    In numerical modelling of rainfall caused runoff in urban sewer systems an essential parameter is the hydrological reduction factor which defines the percentage of the impervious area contributing to the surface flow towards the sewer. As the hydrological processes during a rainfall are difficult...... to determine with significant precision the hydrological reduction factor is implemented to account all hydrological losses except the initial loss. This paper presents an inconsistency between calculations of the hydrological reduction factor, based on measurements of rainfall and runoff, and till now...... recommended literature values for residential areas. It is proven by comparing rainfall-runoff measurements from four different residential catchments that the literature values of the hydrological reduction factor are over-estimated for this type of catchment. In addition, different catchment descriptions...

  6. Transit times of water particles in the vadose zone across catchment states and catchments functional units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Matthias; Weiler, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the water movement in the vadose zone and its associated transport of solutes are of major interest to reduce nutrient leaching, pollution transport or other risks to water quality. Soil physical models are widely used to asses such transport processes, while the site specific parameterization of these models remains challenging. Inverse modeling is a common method to adjust the soil physical parameters in a way that the observed water movement or soil water dynamics are reproduced by the simulation. We have shown that the pore water stable isotope concentration can serve as an additional fitting target to simulate the solute transport and water balance in the unsaturated zone. In the presented study, the Mualem- van Genuchten parameters for the Richards equation and diffusivity parameter for the convection-dispersion equation have been parameterized using the inverse model approach with Hydrus-1D for 46 experimental sites of different land use, topography, pedology and geology in the Attert basin in Luxembourg. With the best parameter set we simulated the transport of a conservative solute that was introduced via a pulse input at different points in time. Thus, the transit times in the upper 2 m of the soil for different catchment states could be inferred for each location. It has been shown that the time a particle needs to pass the -2 m depth plane highly varies from the systems state and the systems forcing during and after infiltration of that particle. Differences in transit times among the study sites within the Attert basin were investigated with regards to its governing factors to test the concept of functional units. The study shows the potential of pore water stable isotope concentration for residence times and transport analyses in the unsaturated zone leading to a better understanding of the time variable subsurface processes across the catchment.

  7. Organic carbon efflux from a deciduous forest catchment in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Kim

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Soil infiltration and surface discharge of precipitation are critical processes that affect the efflux of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC and Particulate Organic Carbon (POC in forested catchments. Concentrations of DOC and POC can be very high in the soil surface in most forest ecosystems and their efflux may not be negligible particularly under the monsoon climate. In East Asia, however, there are little data available to evaluate the role of such processes in forest carbon budget. In this paper, we address two basic questions: (1 how does stream discharge respond to storm events in a forest catchment? and (2 how much DOC and POC are exported from the catchment particularly during the summer monsoon period? To answer these questions, we collected hydrological data (e.g., precipitation, soil moisture, runoff discharge, groundwater level and conducted hydrochemical analyses (including DOC, POC, and six tracers in a deciduous forest catchment in Gwangneung National Arboretum in west-central Korea. Based on the end-member mixing analysis of the six storm events during the summer monsoon in 2005, the surface discharge was estimated as 30 to 80% of the total runoff discharge. The stream discharge responded to precipitation within 12 h during these storm events. The annual efflux of DOC and POC from the catchment was estimated as 0.04 and 0.05 t C ha−1 yr−1, respectively. Approximately 70% of the annual organic carbon efflux occurred during the summer monsoon period. Overall, the annual efflux of organic carbon was estimated to be about 10% of the Net Ecosystem carbon Exchange (NEE obtained by eddy covariance measurement at the same site. Considering the current trends of increasing intensity and amount of summer rainfall and the large interannual variability in NEE, ignoring the organic carbon efflux from forest catchments would result in an inaccurate estimation of the carbon sink strength of forest ecosystems in the monsoon

  8. Susceptibility of Shallow Landslide in Fraser Hill Catchment, Pahang Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Nor Azmin Sulaiman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In tropical areas especially during monsoon seasons intense precipitation is the main caused that trigger the natural shallow landslide phenomena. This phenomenon can be disastrous and widespread in occurrence even in undisturbed forested catchment. In this paper, an attempt has been made to evaluate the susceptibility of natural hill slopes to failure for a popular hill resort area, the Fraser Hill Catchment under different rainfall regimes and soil thickness. A Digital Elevation Model (DEM was prepared for the 8.2 km2 catchment. A GIS based deterministic model was then applied to predict the spatial landslide occurrence within catchment. Model input parameters include bulk density, friction angle, cohesion and hydraulic conductivity were gathered through in situ and lab analysis as well as from previous soil analysis records. Landslides locations were recorded using GPS as well as previous air photos and satellite imagery to establish landslide source areas inventory. The landslide susceptibility map was produced under different precipitation event’s simulation to see the effects of precipitation to stability of the hill slopes of the catchment. The results were categorized into naturally unstable (Defended, Upper Threshold, Lower Threshold, marginal instability (Quasi Stable and stable area (Moderately Stable and Stable. Results of the simulation indicated notable change in precipitation effect on Defended area is between 10mm to 40mm range in a single storm event. However, when storm event is exceeded 120mm, the result on Defended area produced by the model tends to be constant further on. For area categorized as naturally unstable (Factor of Safety, SF<1, with 110 mm of precipitation in a single storm event and soil depth at 2 meters and 4 meters could affect 69.51% and 69.88% respectively of the catchment area fall under that class. In addition, the model was able to detect 4% more of the landslide inventory under shallower soil depth of

  9. Field-based study of connectivity in an agricultural catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexartza-Artza, I.; Wainwright, J.

    2009-12-01

    Field-based studies of hydrological connectivity can provide context-specific knowledge that might both help understand dynamic complex systems and contribute to other synthetic or modelling approaches. The importance of such an understanding of catchment processes and also of the knowledge of catchment connections with water bodies and the changes of concentration with scale for Integrated Catchment Management has been increasingly emphasized. To provide a holistic understanding, approaches to the study of connectivity need to include both structural and functional aspects of the system and must consider the processes taking place within and across different temporal and spatial scales. A semi-quantitative nested approach has been used to investigate connectivity and study the interactions and feedbacks between the factors influencing transfer processes in the Ingbirchworth Catchment, in the uplands of the River Don, England. A series of reconnaissance techniques have been combined with monitoring of aspects such as rainfall, runoff, sediment transfer and soil-moisture distribution from plot to catchment scale and with consideration of linkages between land and water bodies. The temporal aspect has also been considered, with a special focus on the temporal distribution of events and the influence of longer term catchment changes such as those in land use and management practices. A variability of responses has been observed in relation to the characteristics of events, land use and scale of observation, with elements traditionally considered as limiting or enhancing connectivity responding differently under changing conditions. Sediment redistribution, reshaping of structure and consequent reinforcing loops can be observed across all land uses and landscape units, but the relevance it terms of effective connectivity of highly connected patches varies as the scale is increased. The knowledge acquired can contribute to recognise emerging processes significant for

  10. Runoff predictions in ungauged catchments in southeast Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fapeng; Zhang, Yongqiang; Xu, Zongxue; Liu, Changming; Zhou, Yanchun; Liu, Wenfeng

    2014-04-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) plays a key role on both hydrology and climate for southern and eastern Asia. Improving runoff predictions in ungauged catchments in the TP is critical for surface water hydrology and water resources management in this region. However, a detailed runoff prediction study in this region has not been reported yet. To fill the gap, this study evaluates two regionalization approaches, spatial proximity and physical similarity, for predicting runoff using two rainfall-runoff models (SIMHYD and GR4J). These models are driven by meteorological inputs from eight large non-nested catchments (4000-50,000 km2) in the Yarlung Tsangpo River basin located in southeast TP. For each catchment, the two models are calibrated using data from the first two-thirds of the observation period and validated over the remaining period. The calibrated and validated Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency of monthly runoff (NSE) varies from 0.73 to 0.93 for the SIMHYD model, and are similar to or slightly better than those obtained for the GR4J model. The incorporation of snowfall-snowmelt processes into the rainfall-runoff models does not noticeably improve the runoff predictions in the study area. The main reason is that monthly runoff is dominated by summer precipitation and snowfall in winter accounts for a small percentage (less than 14%). The results from both models show that the spatial proximity approach marginally outperforms the physical similarity approach and both approaches are better than random selection of a donor catchment. This is consistent with recent regionalization studies carried out in Europe and Australia. The study suggests that conceptual rainfall-runoff models are powerful and simple tools for monthly runoff predictions in large catchments in southeast TP, and incorporation of more catchments into regionalization can further improve prediction skills.

  11. Hydrologic Analysis of Ungauged Catchments For The Supply of Water For Irrigation On Railway Embankment Batters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyasi-Agyei, Y.; Nissen, D.

    Water has been identified as a key component to the success of grass establishment on railway embankment batters (side slope) within Central Queensland, Australia, to control erosion. However, the region under study being semi-arid experiences less than 600 mm average annual rainfall occurring on about 60 days of the year. Culverts and bridges are integral part of railway embankments. They are used to cross water courses, be it an ephemeral creek or just a surface runoff path. Surface runoff through an ungauged railway embankment culvert is diverted to a temporary excavated pond located at the downstream side of the hydraulic structure. The temporary excavated pond water is used to feed an automated drip irrigation system, with solar as a source of energy to drive a pump. Railway embankment batter erosion remediation is timed in the wet season when irrigation is used to supplement natural rainfall. Hydrologic analysis of ungauged catchments for sizing the temporary excavated pond is presented. It is based on scenarios of runoff coefficient and curve number, and mass curve (Rippl diagram). Three years of continuous rainfall data (1997/1998 -1999/2000) were used to design a pond. The performance of the designed pond was evaluated in a field experiment during the next wet season (2000/2001). It supplied adequate water for irrigation as predicted by the hydrologic analysis during the grass establishment. This helped to achieve 100% grass cover on the railway embankment batter within 12 weeks. The proposed irrigation system has been demonstrated t o be feasible and cost effective.

  12. Chemical erosion intensity in the Nišava catchments

    OpenAIRE

    Manojlović Predrag A.

    2002-01-01

    The Nišava catchment comprehends the area of 4068 km2. There are differences in erosion intensity due to different physical-geographical characteristics of that area. Mechanical water erosion in the Nišava catchment is 302,4 m3/km2/yr and chemical erosion is 67,2 t/km2/yr. Space differences are large (47,1-115.5 t/km2/yr) and are mostly determined by hydrological and lithological characteristics of that area.

  13. The implications of geology, soils, and vegetation on landscape morphology: Inferences from semi-arid basins with complex vegetation patterns in Central New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetemen, Omer; Istanbulluoglu, Erkan; Vivoni, Enrique R.

    2010-04-01

    This paper examines the relationship between land surface properties (e.g. soil, vegetation, and lithology) and landscape morphology quantified by the catchment descriptors: the slope-area (S-A) relation, curvature-area (C-A) relation, and the cumulative area distribution (CAD), in two semi-arid basins in central New Mexico. The first site is composed of several basins located in today's desert elevations with mesic north-facing and xeric south-facing hillslopes underlain by different lithological formations. The second site is a mountainous basin exhibiting vegetation gradients from shrublands in the lower elevations to grasslands and forests at higher elevations. All three land surface properties were found to have significant influences on the S-A and C- A relations, while the power-law exponents of the CADs for these properties did not show any significant deviations from the narrow range of universal scaling exponents reported in the literature. Among the three different surface properties we investigated, vegetation had the most profound impact on the catchment descriptors. In the S-A diagrams of the aspect-controlled ecosystems, we found steeper slopes in north-facing aspects than south-facing aspects for a given drainage area. In elevation-controlled ecosystems, forested landscapes exhibited the steepest slopes for the range of drainage areas examined, followed by shrublands and grasslands in all soil textures and lithologies. In the C-A diagrams, steeper slopes led to a higher degree of divergence on hillslopes and a higher degree of convergence in the valleys than shallower slopes. The influence of functional types of vegetation detected on observed topography provided some initial understanding of the potential impacts of life on the organization of topography. This finding also emphasizes the critical role of climate in catchment development. We suggest that climatic fluctuations that are capable of replacing vegetation communities could lead to highly

  14. Hydrological behaviour and water balance analysis for Xitiaoxi catchment of Taihu Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Li-juan XUE; Li-jiao LI; Zhang, Qi

    2008-01-01

    With the rapid social and economic development of the Taihu region, Taihu Lake now faces an increasingly severe eutrophication problem. Pollution from surrounding catchments contributes greatly to the eutrophication of water bodies in the region. Investigation of surface flow and associated mass transport for the Xitiaoxi catchment is of a significant degree of importance as the Xitiaoxi catchment is one of the major catchments within the Taihu region. A SWAT-based distributed hydrological mo...

  15. Arid land plants: promising new tools for economic development and basic research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felker, P.

    1980-01-01

    An overview is presented of arid land plant development stressing products and plant physiological and ecological concepts unique to arid land plants. Integration of new arid land crops into polyculture management systems is suggested utilizing specialized plant functions, e.g., drought resistance, resistance to salinity, ability to fix nitrogen, frost tolerance and capability to produce a cash crop. Impacts on arid land plant productivity on political systems of developing countries are discussed and recommendations are presented for overcoming institutional constraints facing arid land plant development. (MHR)

  16. Management of nutrients and water in rainfed arid and semi-arid areas. Proceedings of a consultants meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sustainable food security is needed for the arid and semi-arid regions of the tropical, subtropical and warm-temperate climatic zones. In these regions the supply of locally grown food is unreliable because much of it is produced in conditions of highly variable rainfall. Even in favourable seasons, these regions re becoming increasingly dependent on imported food. The IAEA's involvement in field studies on soil-water use dates back several years. A five year Co-ordinated Research Project on ''The Use of Nuclear and Related Techniques in Assessment of Irrigation Schedules of Field Crops to Increase Effective Use of Water in Irrigation Projects''. That project, completed in 1995, laid a solid foundation for future research. Because of a scarcity of water in many developing countries and increasing needs for sustainable food security in the face of increasing populations and lack of funds for irrigation schemes of significant dimension, research must focus on improved management of (i) the modest quantities of fertilizers that are available to farmers, (ii) the natural resources that are available to farmers for increasing soil organic matter content, and (iii) rain water. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture held a Consultants Meeting on Management of Nutrients and Water in Rainfed Arid and Semi-Arid Areas for Increasing Crop Production, 26-29 May 1997

  17. Spatial pattern of nitrogen isotopes as an indicator of ecosystem responses to rainfall in semi-arid and arid grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, C.; Bai, E.; Liu, D.; Fang, T. Y.; Jiang, P.; Han, G. X.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential element for plant growth, however, whether it is a limiting factor of plant growth in water-limited areas is still not clear. Here we examined spatial variations of plant and soil stable N isotopes along a 3200 km precipitation gradient and proposed a conceptual model to explain ecosystem responses to increasing precipitation in arid and semi-arid grasslands in China. Soil δ15N increased with increasing MAP in areas with MAP areas with 200 mm 200 mm. In areas with MAP nutrient cycling in arid and semi-arid areas. If future climate change leads to drier climate in dryland, the uncoupled plant and microbial response may cause more N losses and higher ecosystem vulnerability. 3 Soil organic carbon (Soil C, a), total nitrogen (Soil N, b), C/N (c) and δ15N (d) of study sites along a MAP gradient. Relationship between MAP and foliar δ15N (a) and root δ15N (b).

  18. Impacts of climate change on nutrient cycling in semi-arid and arid ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belnap, J. [National Biological Survey, Moab, UT (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Effective precipitation is a major factor in determining nutrient pathways in different ecosystems. Soil flora and fauna play a critical role in nutrient cycles of all ecosystems. Temperature, timing, and amounts of precipitation affect population composition, activity levels, biomass, and recovery rates from disturbance. Changes in these variables can result in very different inputs and outputs for different nutrients. As a result, areas with less effective precipitation have very different nutrient cycles than more mesic zones. Climate change, therefore, can profoundly affect the nutrient cycles of ecosystems. Nitrogen cycles may be especially sensitive to changes in temperature and to timing and amounts of precipitation. Rainfall contains varying amounts of nitrogen compounds. Changes in amounts of rainfall will change amounts of nitrogen available to these systems. Because rainfall is limited in semi-arid and regions, these systems tend to be more dependent on microbial populations for nitrogen input. Consequently, understanding the effects of climate change on these organisms is critical in understanding the overall effect on ecosystems.

  19. Agave: a biofuel feedstock for arid and semi-arid environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, Stephen; Martin, Jeffrey; Simpson, June; Wang, Zhong; Visel, Axel

    2011-05-31

    Efficient production of plant-based, lignocellulosic biofuels relies upon continued improvement of existing biofuel feedstock species, as well as the introduction of newfeedstocks capable of growing on marginal lands to avoid conflicts with existing food production and minimize use of water and nitrogen resources. To this end, specieswithin the plant genus Agave have recently been proposed as new biofuel feedstocks. Many Agave species are adapted to hot and arid environments generally unsuitable forfood production, yet have biomass productivity rates comparable to other second-generation biofuel feedstocks such as switchgrass and Miscanthus. Agavesachieve remarkable heat tolerance and water use efficiency in part through a Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM) mode of photosynthesis, but the genes andregulatory pathways enabling CAM and thermotolerance in agaves remain poorly understood. We seek to accelerate the development of agave as a new biofuelfeedstock through genomic approaches using massively-parallel sequencing technologies. First, we plan to sequence the transcriptome of A. tequilana to provide adatabase of protein-coding genes to the agave research community. Second, we will compare transcriptome-wide gene expression of agaves under different environmentalconditions in order to understand genetic pathways controlling CAM, water use efficiency, and thermotolerance. Finally, we aim to compare the transcriptome of A.tequilana with that of other Agave species to gain further insight into molecular mechanisms underlying traits desirable for biofuel feedstocks. These genomicapproaches will provide sequence and gene expression information critical to the breeding and domestication of Agave species suitable for biofuel production.

  20. Spatial patterns of D/H ratios in meteoric water, leaf waxes from plants, POM and sediments within a large fluvial Himalayan catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachse, D.; Hoffmann, B.; Bookhagen, B.; Feakins, S. J.; Kahmen, A.; Adhikari, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    The Arun Valley in eastern Nepal exhibits one of the steepest climatic gradients in the world with several meters of annual rainfall at the mountain front in the south and arid, cold conditions near the Tibetan Plateau in the north. This provides an excellent natural laboratory to analyse the spatial distribution of hydrogen isotope (D/H) ratio of meteoric waters and of plant leaf waxes in living plants, particulate organic matter (POM) and sediments within a catchment. The D/H ratio of leaf wax in soils and lake sediments has been shown to be a robust proxy of general hydrological conditions. Since substantial heterogeneity is observed between individual plants, long-term archives, such as soils and sediments are spatially and temporally integrating proxy records. In order to extract quantitative information from biological proxies in long-term sedimentary archives, it is important to understand these integrative processes expected with fluvial transport, but so far detailed catchment wide surveys of proxy heterogeneity are lacking. Here we studied the Nepalese part of the catchment of the Arun river, whose southern part is strongly affected by the summer precipitation associated with the Indian monsoon, whereas the upper reaches to the north are glacier-fed. We sampled across a steep altitudinal (73 to 1267m a.s.l.) and environmental gradient with spatially variable precipitation (from 800-4500 mm/year) and five different vegetation zones (from tropical to subtropical evergreen forests and finally alpine vegetation) along the less than 150 km the valley cuts through the Himalaya. We investigated how this gradient is recorded in the D/H ratio of water and/or leaf wax from different natural archives (meteoric water, plants, particulate organic material, soils, river sediments). We compare this dataset with climatological, ecological and remote sensing data from their respective catchments to evaluate sources of the observed heterogeneity. In particular, our aim is

  1. Process-based hydrological modeling using SWAT: The effect of permafrost on water resources in the large-scale river catchment Kharaa / Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülsmann, L.; Geyer, T.; Karthe, D.; Priess, J.; Schweitzer, C.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was applied to obtain a better understanding of hydrological processes in the semi-arid catchment of the Kharaa River in Northern Mongolia. The transient, physical-based model SWAT was set up using spatial datasets on soil, land use, climate, and stream network provided by the project "IWRM-MoMo" to (i.) simulate the water balance components of the basin and (ii.) to identify potential gaps in the input data. We found that the SWAT model satisfactorily reflects the hydrological processes in the catchment and simulates river runoff as a response to strong rainfall events as well as to snow and ice melt. To obtain correct runoff volumes during spring, permafrost has to be considered. Permafrost-influenced soils constrain water flow in the frozen layer, so that percolation out of the active layer is hampered (Woo 2011). This effect is reproduced in SWAT by assigning an impermeable layer in the subsurface to the areas dominated by permafrost. The simulations indicate that in these regions groundwater resources are limited as a consequence of impermeable ground ice. In addition, groundwater recharge rates in the catchment are generally low due to high evaporation rates (80-90 %). Consequently the base flow contribution is small. Further studies on the estimation of groundwater recharge rates should be carried out, since groundwater is an important resource for water supply. Model results indicate that the non-uniformity of the precipitation distribution was not sufficiently covered by the interpolated input data, so that precipitation and runoff volumes are partially over- or underestimated. Since precipitation defines the overall water availability in river catchments (Baumgartner 1982), additional climate records would considerably improve model outputs. As a consequence of large evapotranspiration losses, discharge as well as groundwater recharge estimates were identified to be highly sensitive to

  2. A disaggregating approach to describe overland flow occurrence within a catchment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Vigiak; R. Romanowicz; E.E. van Loon; G. Sterk; K.J. Beven

    2006-01-01

    A parametrically parsimonious, data-based model was built on observations at hillslope and catchment scale to simulate the distribution of overland flow within a small East African Highlands catchment (Kwalei, Tanzania). A rainfall-flow Data Based Mechanistic model identified catchment effective rai

  3. Phosphorus transformations along a large-scale climosequence in arid and semiarid grasslands of northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jiao; Turner, Benjamin L.; Lü, Xiaotao; Chen, Zhenhua; Wei, Kai; Tian, Jihui; Wang, Chao; Luo, Wentao; Chen, Lijun

    2016-09-01

    The Walker and Syers model of phosphorus (P) transformations during long-term soil development has been verified along many chronosequences but has rarely been examined along climosequences, particularly in arid regions. We hypothesized that decreasing aridity would have similar effects on soil P transformations as time by increasing the rate of pedogenesis. To assess this, we examined P fractions in arid and semiarid grassland soils (0-10 cm) along a 3700 km aridity gradient in northern China (aridity between 0.43 and 0.97, calculated as 1 - [mean annual precipitation/potential evapotranspiration]). Primary mineral P declined as aridity decreased, although it still accounted for about 30% of the total P in the wettest sites. In contrast, the proportions of organic and occluded P increased as aridity decreased. These changes in soil P composition occurred in parallel with marked shifts in soil nutrient stoichiometry, with organic carbon:organic P and nitrogen:organic P ratios increasing with decreasing aridity. These results indicate increasing abundance of P relative to carbon or nitrogen along the climosequence. Overall, our results indicate a broad shift from abiotic to biotic control on P cycling at an aridity value of approximately 0.7 (corresponding to about 250 mm mean annual rainfall). We conclude that the Walker and Syers model can be extended to climosequences in arid and semiarid ecosystems and that the apparent decoupling of nutrient cycles in arid soils is a consequence of their pedogenic immaturity.

  4. Modelling Pesticide Leaching At Column, Field and Catchment Scales I. Analysis of Soil Variability At Field and Catchment Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärdenäs, A.; Jarvis, N.; Alavi, G.

    The spatial variability of soil characteristics was studied in a small agricultural catch- ment (Vemmenhög, 9 km2) at the field and catchment scales. This analysis serves as a basis for assumptions concerning upscaling approaches used to model pesticide leaching from the catchment with the MACRO model (Jarvis et al., this meeting). The work focused on the spatial variability of two key soil properties for pesticide fate in soil, organic carbon and clay content. The Vemmenhög catchment (9 km2) is formed in a glacial till deposit in southernmost Sweden. The landscape is undulating (30 - 65 m a.s.l.) and 95 % of the area is used for crop production (winter rape, winter wheat, sugar beet and spring barley). The climate is warm temperate. Soil samples for or- ganic C and texture were taken on a small regular grid at Näsby Farm, (144 m x 144 m, sampling distance: 6-24 m, 77 points) and on an irregular large grid covering the whole catchment (sampling distance: 333 m, 46 points). At the field scale, it could be shown that the organic C content was strongly related to landscape position and height (R2= 73 %, p organic C content of hollows in the landscape is so high that they contribute little to the total loss of pesticides (Jarvis et al., this meeting). Clay content is also related to landscape position, being larger at the hilltop locations resulting in lower near-saturated hydraulic conductivity. Hence, macropore flow can be expected to be more pronounced (see also Roulier & Jarvis, this meeting). The variability in organic C was similar for the field and catchment grids, which made it possible to krige the organic C content of the whole catchment using data from both grids and an uneven lag distance.

  5. Isotope hydrology of catchment basins: lithogenic and cosmogenic isotopic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimz, G. J., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water. Many solutes in natural waters are derived from the interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system - these are termed `lithogenic` solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both within and outside of the catchment - i.e., in addition to being derived from catchment rock and soil, they are solutes that are also transported into the catchment. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing `cosmogenic` nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing `thermonuclear` nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, principally {sup 238}U (producing `in-situ` lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading `cosmogenic nuclides`, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage here, although always indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute concentrations in catchment waters, and how the isotopic compositions of the solutes can be used in integrative ways to identify these processes, thereby revealing the physical history of the water within a catchment system. The concept of a `system` is important in catchment hydrology. A catchment is the smallest landscape unit that can both participate in all of the aspects of the hydrologic cycle and

  6. Modeling the Surface Water-Groundwater Interaction in Arid and Semi-Arid Regions Impacted by Agricultural Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Y.; Wu, B.; Zheng, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In many semi-arid and arid regions, interaction between surface water and groundwater plays an important role in the eco-hydrological system. The interaction is often complicated by agricultural activities such as surface water diversion, groundwater pumping, and irrigation. In existing surface water-groundwater integrated models, simulation of the interaction is often simplified, which could introduce significant simulation uncertainty under certain circumstance. In this study, GSFLOW, a USGS model coupling PRMS and MODFLOW, was improved to better characterize the surface water-groundwater interaction. The practices of water diversion from rivers, groundwater pumping and irrigation are explicitly simulated. In addition, the original kinematic wave routing method was replaced by a dynamic wave routing method. The improved model was then applied in Zhangye Basin (the midstream part of Heihe River Baisn), China, where the famous 'Silk Road' came through. It is a typical semi-arid region of the western China, with extensive agriculture in its oasis. The model was established and calibrated using the data in 2000-2008. A series of numerical experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of those improvements. It has been demonstrated that with the improvements, the observed streamflow and groundwater level were better reproduced by the model. The improvements have a significant impact on the simulation of multiple fluxes associated with the interaction, such as groundwater discharge, riverbed seepage, infiltration, etc. Human activities were proved to be key elements of the water cycle in the study area. The study results have important implications to the water resources modeling and management in semi-arid and arid basins.

  7. Impact of Direct Soil Moisture and Revised Soil Moisture Index Methods on Hydrologic Predictions in an Arid Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milad Jajarmizadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The soil and water assessment tool (SWAT is a physically based model that is used extensively to simulate hydrologic processes in a wide range of climates around the world. SWAT uses spatial hydrometeorological data to simulate runoff through the computation of a retention curve number. The objective of the present study was to compare the performance of two approaches used for the calculation of curve numbers in SWAT, that is, the Revised Soil Moisture Index (SMI, which is based on previous meteorological conditions, and the Soil Moisture Condition II (SMCII, which is based on soil features for the prediction of flow. The results showed that the sensitive parameters for the SMI method are land-use and land-cover features. However, for the SMCII method, the soil and the channel are the sensitive parameters. The performances of the SMI and SMCII methods were analyzed using various indices. We concluded that the fair performance of the SMI method in an arid region may be due to the inherent characteristics of the method since it relies mostly on previous meteorological conditions and does not account for the soil features of the catchment.

  8. Research Note:Determination of soil hydraulic properties using pedotransfer functions in a semi-arid basin, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tombul

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal variations in soil hydraulic properties such as soil moisture q(h and hydraulic conductivity K(q or K(h, may affect the performance of hydrological models. Moreover, the cost of determining soil hydraulic properties by field or laboratory methods makes alternative indirect methods desirable. In this paper, various pedotransfer functions (PTFs are used to estimate soil hydraulic properties for a small semi-arid basin (Kurukavak in the north-west of Turkey. The field measurements were a good fit with the retention curve derived using Rosetta SSC-BD for a loamy soil. To predict parameters to describe soil hydraulic characteristics, continuous PTFs such as Rosetta SSC-BD (Model H3 and SSC-BD-q33q1500 (Model H5 have been applied. Using soil hydraulic properties that vary in time and space, the characteristic curves for three soil types, loam, sandy clay loam and sandy loam have been developed. Spatial and temporal variations in soil moisture have been demonstrated on a plot and catchment scale for loamy soil. It is concluded that accurate site-specific measurements of the soil hydraulic characteristics are the only and probably the most promising method to progress in the future. Keywords: soil hydraulic properties, soil characteristic curves, PTFs

  9. Research Note:Determination of soil hydraulic properties using pedotransfer functions in a semi-arid basin, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombul, M.; Akyürek, Z.; Ünal Sorman, A.

    Spatial and temporal variations in soil hydraulic properties such as soil moisture q(h) and hydraulic conductivity K(q) or K(h), may affect the performance of hydrological models. Moreover, the cost of determining soil hydraulic properties by field or laboratory methods makes alternative indirect methods desirable. In this paper, various pedotransfer functions (PTFs) are used to estimate soil hydraulic properties for a small semi-arid basin (Kurukavak) in the north-west of Turkey. The field measurements were a good fit with the retention curve derived using Rosetta SSC-BD for a loamy soil. To predict parameters to describe soil hydraulic characteristics, continuous PTFs such as Rosetta SSC-BD (Model H3) and SSC-BD-q33q1500 (Model H5) have been applied. Using soil hydraulic properties that vary in time and space, the characteristic curves for three soil types, loam, sandy clay loam and sandy loam have been developed. Spatial and temporal variations in soil moisture have been demonstrated on a plot and catchment scale for loamy soil. It is concluded that accurate site-specific measurements of the soil hydraulic characteristics are the only and probably the most promising method to progress in the future.

  10. Sedimentation in the Lake Victoria catchment and the Winam Gulf.

    OpenAIRE

    Masongo, O.; Mwirigi, P.; Okungu, J.; Osio, J.; Abuodha, J.O.Z.; Hecky, R. E.

    2005-01-01

    The need to carry out sedimentation and sediment characteristics study at the river mouths and the lake was contingent upon the supposition that the rivers in the lake Victoria catchment including surface runoffs convey a great deal of assorted sediments, most of which are deposited in the lake thereby causing the lake to continue filling up and affecting the quality of water.

  11. Discharge Water Quality Models of Storm Runoff in a Catchment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The relationships between the water qualities of nitrogen and phosphorous contents in the discharge water and the discharge of storm runoff of an experimental catchment including terraced paddy field are analyzed based on experiment results of the catchment. By summarizing the currently related research on water quality models, the water quality models of different components of storm runoff of the catchment are presented and verified with the experiment data of water quality analyses and the corresponding discharge of the storm runoffs during 3 storms. Through estimating the specific discharge of storm runoff, the specific load of different components of nitrogen and phosphorus in the discharge water of the catchment can be forecasted by the models. It is found that the mathematical methods of linear regression are very useful for analysis of the relationship between the concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus and the water discharge of storm runoff. It is also found that the most content of the nitrogen (75%) in the discharge water is organic, while half of the content (49%) of phosphorus in the discharge water is inorganic.

  12. Ensemble approach for hydrological forecasting in ungauged catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randrianasolo, Annie; Ramos, Maria-Helena; Andreassian, Vazken

    2013-04-01

    This study focuses on the application of ensemble approaches to forecast flows in ungauged catchments. The aim is to study the best strategy to search for information in gauged "donor" basins and to transfer it to the ungauged site. We investigate what information is needed to set up a rainfall-runoff model and to perform forecast updating in real time. These two components of a flood forecasting system are thus decoupled in our approach. The methodology adopted integrates the scenarios of regional transfer of information and the scenarios of ensemble weather forecasting together in a forecasting system. The approach of ensemble forecasting is thus generalised to the particular case of hydrological forecasting in ungauged basins. The study is based on 211 catchments in France and on an archive of about 4.5 years of ensemble forecasts of rainfall, which are used for hydrological modelling on a daily time step. Flow forecasts are evaluated with special attention paid to the attributes of reliability and accuracy of the forecasts. The results show that forecast reliability in ungauged sites can be improved by using several sets of parameters from neighbour catchments, while forecast accuracy is improved with the transfer of updating information from gauged neighbour catchments.

  13. Examining the Potential Travellers in Catchment Areas for Public Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex; Hansen, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a method to examine the catchment areas for stops in high quality public transport systems based on the actual street network in the examined area. This is achieved by implementing the service area functions from the ArcGIS extension Network Analyst. The method is compared...

  14. Modelling (flash) floods in a Dutch lowland catchment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brauer, C.C.; Teuling, A.J.; Overeem, A.; Velde, Y. van der; Hazenberg, P.; Warmerdam, P.M.M.; Kloosterman, P.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2012-01-01

    On 26 August 2010 the eastern part of The Netherlands and the bordering part of Germany were struck by a series of rainfall events.We investigated the unprecedented flash flood triggered by this exceptionally heavy rainfall event (return period > 1000 years) in the 6.5 km2 Hupsel Brook catchment, wh

  15. First Flush Effects in an Urban Catchment Area in Aalborg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben; Brpch, Kirsten; Andersen, Margit Riis

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes the results of measurements from a 2 year period on a 95 hectare urban catchment in Aalborg, Denmark. The results of the rain/discharge measurements include 160 storm events corresponding to an accumulated rain depth of totally 753 mm. The water quality measurements include 15...

  16. SOLVING A HIDDEN PROBLEM: RAINWATER CATCHMENT TO OFFSET GROUNDWATER DEPLETION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison is developing a rain water catchment system for the newest wing of the UW-Hospital, the IRC. The UW-Hospital currently imports its irrigation water, at a great cost to the hospital and, more severely, Madison’s water table. The city of...

  17. WWF Kikori Catchment Developmental Project, Papua New Guinea orchid survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clements, M.A.; Harris, W.K.

    2002-01-01

    The World Wildlife Fund (Kikori Catchment Developmental Project, Papua New Guinea) has commenced field surveys of the Orchidaceae in the Lake Kutabu and Mt Bosavi areas of Papua New Guinea. The main purpose of the survey is to get a more accurate assessment of the orchids in the region. In a previou

  18. Nutrient loads exported from managed catchments reveal emergent biogeochemical stationarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basu, N.B.; Destouni, G.; Jawitz, J.W.; Thompson, S.E.; Loukinova, N.V.; Darracq, A.; Zanardo, S.; Yaeger, M.; Sivapalan, M.; Rinaldo, A.; Rao, S.P.C.

    2010-01-01

    Complexity of heterogeneous catchments poses challenges in predicting biogeochemical responses to human alterations and stochastic hydro‐climatic drivers. Human interferences and climate change may have contributed to the demise of hydrologic stationarity, but our synthesis of a large body of observ

  19. The ethics of socio-ecohydrological catchment management: towards hydrosolidarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenmark, M.; Folke, Carl

    This paper attempts to clarify key biophysical issues and the problems involved in the ethics of socio-ecohydrological catchment management. The issue in managing complex systems is to live with unavoidable change while securing the capacity of the ecohydrological system of the catchment to sustain vital ecological goods and services, aquatic as well as terrestrial, on which humanity depends ultimately. Catchment management oriented to sustainability has to be based on ethical principles: human rights, international conventions, sustaining crucial ecological goods and services, and protecting ecosystem resilience, all of which have water linkages. Many weaknesses have to be identified, assessed and mitigated to improve the tools by which the ethical issues can be addressed and solved: a heritage of constraining tunnel vision in both science and management; inadequate shortcuts made in modern scientific system analyses (e.g. science addressing sustainability issues); simplistic technical-fix approaches to water and ecosystems in land/water/ecosystem management; conventional tools for evaluation of scientific quality with its focus on "doing the thing right" rather than "doing the right thing". The new ethics have to incorporate principles that, on a catchment basis, allow for proper attention to the hungry and poor, upstream and downstream, to descendants, and to sites and habitats that need to be protected.

  20. Tritium-based age/streamflow relationships and catchment function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, M. K.; Morgenstern, U.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding runoff generation is important for management of freshwater systems. Determining transit time distributions (TTDs) of streamwaters and how they change with flow gives information on the flowpaths and water storages in catchments - fundamental for understanding the responses of streams to stressors such as pollution, land use change and climate change. This work uses tritium measurements on single samples to determine TTDs and how they change with flow. Such use of tritium is only practical so far in the Southern Hemisphere, because of its much-lower input of bomb-tritium in the 1960s. Another advantage of tritium is that it reveals the full spectrum of ages present in streams, whereas oxygen-18 or chloride variations only show younger ages (i.e. truncated TTDs). Case studies are presented for two New Zealand catchments, both with volcanic ash substrates. The first (Toenepi) is a dairy catchment near Hamilton, which shows well-constrained power law relationships between mean transit time (MTT) and flow, and between silica concentration and flow. Baseflow MTTs vary from 2.5 to 157 years. The second (Tutaeuaua) is a pastoral farming catchment near Taupo. Results for nested catchments along the stream also show power law relationships for both MTT and silica with flow. Baseflow MTTs vary from 1 to 11 years. Although the MTT data could be represented approximately by straight lines in log-log plots, hysteresis effects due to catchment wetness variations did disturb the relationships. Having TTDs from individual samples focusses attention on the nature of the water storages supplying the stream at the times of sampling. The flow record contains information on catchment function, which can enhance the value of the age data, provided such information can be satisfactorily interpreted. A new baseflow estimation method is used to determine the slow storage (aka groundwater) fraction in the stream. The age data is showing that slow storages have mean ages of

  1. Seasonal exports of phosphorus from intensively fertilised nested grassland catchments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ciaran Lewis; Rashad Rafique; Nelius Foley; Paul Leahy; Gerard Morgan; John Albertson; Sandeep Kumar

    2013-01-01

    We carried out a one year (2002) study of phosphorus (P) loss from soil to water in three nested grassland catchments with known P input in chemical fertilizer and animal liquid slurry applications.Chemical fertilizer was applied to the grasslands between March and September and animal slurry was applied over the twelve months.The annual chemical P fertilizer applications for the 17 and 211 ha catchments were 16.4 and 23.7 kg P/ha respectively and the annual slurry applications were 10.7 and 14.0 kg P/ha,respectively.The annual total phosphorus (TP) export in stream-flow was 2.61,2.48 and 1.61 kg P/ha for the 17,211 and 1524 ha catchments,respectively,compared with a maximum permissible (by regulation) annual export of ca.0.35 kg P/ha.The export rate (ratio of P export to P in land applications) was 9.6% and 6.6% from the 17 and 211 ha catchments,respectively.On average,70% of stream flow and 85% of the P export occurred during the five wet months (October to February) indicating that when precipitation is much greater than evaporation,the hydrological conditions are most favourable for P export.However the soil quality and land use history may vary the results.Particulate P made up 22%,43% and 37% of the TP export at the 17,211 and 1524 ha catchment areas,respectively.As the chemical fertilizer was spread during the grass growth months (March to September),it has less immediate impact on stream water quality than the slurry applications.We also show that as the catchment scale increases,the P concentrations and P export decrease,confirming dilution due to increasing rural catchment size.In the longer term,the excess P from fertilizer maintains high soil P levels,an antecedent condition favourable to P loss from soil to water.This study confirms the significant negative water quality impact of excess P applications,particularly liquid animal slurry applications in wet winter months.The findings suggest that restricted P application in wet months can

  2. Longterm Measurements of Bedload-Transport in alpine Catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achleitner, Stefan; Kammerlander, Johannes; Eichner, Bernhard; Schöber, Johannes; Chiari, Michael

    2016-04-01

    In recent years the necessity of predicting the long-term behavior of sediment transport has increased. On the one hand, the effects of technical measures (e.g. retaining measures, hydropower, etc.) in the natural system are to be evaluated. On the other hand long term ecological studies that are strongly linked to the sediment budgets and its variation are more and more evolving. The ACRP Project DevoBeta-CC addresses the dynamics of long term sediment transport dynamics and its temporal altering. The focus is put on smaller tributary catchments enabling the model development. In total the data from ten catchments connected to the hydropower station Kaunertal (Tyrol/Austria) and eleven catchments linked to the power plant group Sellrain-Silz (Tyrol/Austria) are available. The considered catchments vary regarding their characteristics such as size (3 km³ to 27 km²), glaciation (0 % to 53 %), mean catchment slope (53 % to 92 %) and mean channel gradient (4 % to 49 %). The main data basis are records from the water intake structures operated (partly since 1965) by the TIWAG (Tiroler Wasserkraft AG). The sedimentation dynamics and operational flushings of the connected settling basins are used to measure the transported sediments. Since 1985 even high resolution data (15min intervals) are available. At selected catchments, the operationally recorded data (flushings, load membrane measurements,...) are verified within measuring campaigns using bed load traps upstream. Further, the sedimentation dynamics and grain size distributions in the settling basins are evaluated. Therefor two water intakes were put temporally out of operation, allowing an improved measurement of settled volumes by means of terrestrial surveying. Uncertainty assessments reveal an overall accuracy of estimated annual bed load volumes lower than a factor of two. Additionally, the data set enables to address sediment transport at a sub-annual basis, hence, the presented data set is unique regarding

  3. Sediment yield and connectivity in a gullied sandy catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucía, Ana; Francisco Martín-Duque, José; Laronne, Jonathan B.; Ángel Sanz-Santos, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    Badland areas are considered to have high connectivity of sediment at the catchment scale; however, little is known about processes occurring in gullies and badlands developed in sands. This type of gullies is quite common in the Central-Eastern Iberian Peninsula and is associated with historic mining. The sandy badlands also appear in both abandoned and traditionally reclaimed mines, generating on- and offsite environmental effects. Our aim is to quantify the rates of the different processes occurring in the sandy gullied catchments, as well as their coupling and connectivity at a catchment scale. This may allow application to improve reclamation practice in mines and quarries located in sandy materials. The study site is a small (1.32 ha) gullied catchment, the Barranca de los Pinos, which is located in the Northern Piedmont of the Guadarrama Mountains (Central Spain). The catchment area has been divided into Homogeneous Response Units (HRUs) attending to the dominant active process . The sediment produced in the different HRUs has been monitored by a variety of methods: repeat Terrestrial Laser Scanning of high gradient slopes, closed microplots in low gradient slopes and automatic (Reid type) slot bedload samplers and siphon samplers to monitor suspended sediment transport in the channel. During the 2010-11 monitoring period the sediment yield due to gravitational movements in high gradient slopes varied from 20 to 200 kg m-2y-1. In the low gradient slopes the splash and non-concentrated runoff generated 0.1 - 6 kg m-2y-1,while the channel yielded 7.44 ± 1.08 kg m-2y-1 with a very high proportion (>70%) of bedload. Despite the difficulties of extrapolating and comparing the results obtained at different spatial and temporal resolutions, annual patterns of erosion and transport of sediments within the sandy gullied catchments have been identified. These confirm that the transport of sediment in this catchment is limited by the capacity of flow events to

  4. Crossing thresholds: Analysis of hazardous tipping points in alpine catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutzmann, Silke; Sass, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Steep mountain channels or torrents in small alpine catchments are characterized by high geomorphic activity with sediment dynamics being inherently nonlinear and threshold-mediated. Localized, high intensity rainstorms can drive torrential systems past a tipping point resulting in a sudden onset of hazardous events like (flash-) flooding, heavy bedload transport or debris flows. Such responses exhibit an abrupt switch in the fluvial system's mode (e.g. transport / supply limited). Changes in functional connectivity may persist beyond the tipping point. Torrential hazards cause costly damage in the densely populated Alpine Region. Thus, there is a rising interest in potential effects of climate change on torrential sediment dynamics. Understanding critical conditions close to tipping points is important to reduce uncertainty in predicting sediment fluxes. In this study we aim at (i) establishing threshold precipitation characteristics for the Eastern Alps of Austria. Precipitation is hypothesized to be the main forcing factor of torrential events. (ii) How do thresholds vary in space and time? (iii) The effect of external triggers is strongly mediated by the internal disposition of catchments to respond. Which internal conditions are critical for susceptibility? (iv) Is there a change in magnitude or frequency in the recent past and what can be expected for the future? The 71 km2 catchment of the river Schöttlbach in the East Alpine Region of Styria (Austria) is monitored since a heavy precipitation event resulted in a catastrophic flood in July 2011. Sediment mobilization from slopes as well as within-channel storage and bedload transport are regularly measured using photogrammetric methods and sediment impact sensors. Thus, detailed knowledge exists on magnitude and spatial propagation of sediment waves through the catchment. The associated hydro-meteorological (pre-) conditions can be inferred from a dense station network. Changing bedload transport rates and

  5. Holocene paleovegetation reconstructed from a fluvial sediment-paleosol sequence along the upper Alazani River (Caucasus region) using leaf-wax biomarkers - local vs. catchment information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliedtner, Marcel; Zech, Roland; von Suchodoletz, Hans

    2015-04-01

    Due to its small-scale pattern of different climatic and ecologic regions and a long-lasting history of human land-use since ca. 8 ka, the Caucasus region is of particular interest with regard to Holocene climatic and paleoenvironmental changes. However, there only exists a limited number of paleoenvironmental reconstructions from that region yet. This study aims at reconstructing Holocene vegetational and paleoenvironmental changes using leaf-wax n-alkanes, n-carboxylic acids and compound specific δ13C and δD isotopes from a fluvial sediment-paleosol sequence along the upper Alazani River in eastern Georgia. Phases of sedimentation and pedogenesis between >8 until ca. 1.7 cal. ka BP reflect alternating periods of geomorphic stability (pedogenesis) with reduced flooding activity due to more arid conditions, and periods of geomorphic activity (sedimentation) with increased flooding and erosion in the humid catchment area due to enhanced precipitation. Thus, biomarkers derived from non-pedogenetic sediments should be mostly derived from the catchment area located in the southern Greater Caucasus Mountains, whereas due to pedogenetic accumulation of organic matter biomarkers derived from the (paleo-)soils should mostly show the local signal of the sampling site located in the piedmont area. Long-chain leaf wax-derived n-alkanes are present in all samples: Paleosols are mostly dominated by high contributions from grass vegetation (C31 and C33), indicating a local dominance of grass vegetation throughout the Holocene. This could be caused by relatively arid conditions and/or by agricultural use that is documented at this site by potsherds from ca. 8 cal. ka BP. Non-pedogenetic sediment layers show a higher abundance of grass-derived n-alkanes during the early Holocene and the Caucasian Holocene climate optimum around 5 cal. ka BP, whereas deciduous trees (C27 and C29) may have dominated after that period. However, it is not clear yet whether this vegetation change

  6. Advancing catchment hydrology to deal with predictions under change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Ehret

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Throughout its historical development, hydrology as an engineering discipline and earth science has relied strongly on the assumption of long-term stationary boundary conditions and system configurations, which allowed for simplified and sectoral descriptions of the dynamics of hydrological systems. However, in the face of rapid and extensive global changes (of climate, land use etc. which affect all parts of the hydrological cycle, the general validity of this assumption appears doubtful. Likewise, so does the application of hydrological concepts based on stationarity to questions of hydrological change. The reason is that transient system behaviours often develop through feedbacks between the system constituents, and with the environment, generating effects that could often be neglected under stationary conditions. In this context, the aim of this paper is to present and discuss paradigms and theories potentially helpful to advancing hydrology towards the goal of understanding and predicting hydrological systems under change. For the sake of brevity we focus on catchment hydrology. We begin with a discussion of the general nature of explanation in hydrology and briefly review the history of catchment hydrology. We then propose and discuss several perspectives on catchments: as complex dynamical systems, self-organizing systems, co-evolving systems and open dissipative thermodynamic systems. We discuss the benefits of comparative hydrology and of taking an information-theoretic view of catchments, including the flow of information from data to models to predictions. In summary, we suggest that the combination of these closely related perspectives can serve as a paradigm for the further development of catchment hydrology to address predictions under change.

  7. Linkwater catchment groundwater residence time, flow pattern, and hydrochemistry trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water demand in the Marlborough Sounds Linkwater catchment is increasing due to pasture irrigation by dairy farmers. Little is known about the geology and the hydrology of the area. Resource management decisions are being made without a sound understanding of sustainable limits. Groundwater is the main potential source for irrigation water at Linkwater. Marlborough District Council requires a baseline hydrological assessment of the flow characteristics of the Linkwater catchment to guide day-to-day allocation practice and advice to Council. While this may be regarded as a baseline study, according to Marlborough District Council consent records, a significant amount of water (around 10,000 m3/day) has already been allocated at Linkwater. It is assumed that Linkwater catchment water is derived predominantly from local rainfall, either directly onto the flats or as surface run-off from the adjacent ranges via Cullens Creek and other smaller creeks. The variation in well depth at Linkwater suggests that there are different water-bearing formations, ranging from shallow flow through the alluvial gravels recharged by seepage from Cullens Creek or recent rainfall, to medium and deep aquifers that may contain older water. The objective of this study is to establish the hydrogeology of the Linkwater area, and groundwater flow patterns from the isotopic and chemical signature of the water, including the sources of catchment recharge and mean residence times of the water in the catchment. Tritium, chloroflurocarbons (CFCs) and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) are used for age dating, and δ18O, N2, Ar, CH4 and a full chemical assessment at all sites (including arsenic, nutrients and heavy metals) are used along with the age data to identify flow characteristics. (author). 26 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs

  8. How Sustainable are Engineered Rivers in Arid Lands?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurgen Schmandt

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Engineered rivers in arid lands play an important role in feeding the world’s growing population. Each continent has rivers that carry water from distant mountain sources to fertile soil downstream where rainfall is scarce. Over the course of the last century most rivers in arid lands have been equipped with large engineering structures that generate electric power and store water for agriculture and cities. This has changed the hydrology of the rivers. In this paper we discuss how climate variation, climate change, reservoir siltation, changes in land use and population growth will challenge the sustainability of engineered river systems over the course of the next few decades. We use the Rio Grande in North America, where we have worked with Mexican and American colleagues, to describe our methodology and results. Similar work is needed to study future water supply and demand in engineered rivers around the world.

  9. Uranium isotopes in carbonate aquifers of arid region setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alshamsi, Dalal M.; Murad, Ahmed A.; Aldahan, Ala;

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater in arid and semiarid regions is vital resource for many uses and therefore information about concentrations of uranium isotopes among other chemical parameters are necessary. In the study presented here, distribution of 238U and 235U in groundwater of four selected locations in the so......Groundwater in arid and semiarid regions is vital resource for many uses and therefore information about concentrations of uranium isotopes among other chemical parameters are necessary. In the study presented here, distribution of 238U and 235U in groundwater of four selected locations...... in the southern Arabian peninsula, namely at two locations within the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and two locations in Oman are discussed. The analyses of the uranium isotopes were performed using ICP-MS and the results indicated a range of concentrations for 235U and 238 U at 3–39 ng L-1 (average: 18 ng L-1...

  10. On coordinated development of oasis and environment in arid area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based upon the formation and evolution of oasis and the factors restricting the coordinated development of oasis economy and environment, this paper presents a goal of the development in coordination. It suggests that the sustainable survival and development of oasis could be ensured only if the oasis-desert and water source ecology are managed in a combined way to form a macro system. In light with the above mentioned, the approach to the development of economy and environment of oasis in arid area should depend upon the establishment of an oasis ecological and economic system, which suits the arid environment and promotes the efficiency of resource configuration, stabilizes economic increment and benefits ecological development.

  11. Domesticated proboscidea parviflora: a potential oilseed crop for arid lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, J.; Bretting, P.K.; Nabhan, G.P.; Weber, C.

    1981-01-01

    Wild and domesticated Proboscidea parviflora were evaluated as oilseed crops for arid lands through chemical and biological analyses. Domesticated plants grown in the Sonoran desert bore seed containing 35-40 per cent oil and 23-27 per cent protein. Yield per hectare was estimated at 1000 kg of oil and 675 kg of protein, quantities which compare favourably with other crops. An ephemeral life cycle and certain characteristics of the fruit and seed allow this plant to grow in xeric habitats unsuitable for many other plants. Several Proboscidea species hybridize with P. parviflora and could be used in future crop breeding. Rapid germination and higher oil and protein content of seed make the domesticated P. parviflora superior to the wild form as a crop. Domesticated P. parviflora thus shows promise as an oilseed crop for the Sonoran Desert and possibly for other arid regions. (Refs. 22).

  12. Arid lands plants as feedstocks for fuels and chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the recent research on arid-adapted plants that have potential as producers of fuels or chemicals. The major focus will be on plant species that appear to have commercial value. Research on guayule (Parthenium argentatum) and jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) will be mentioned only briefly, since these plants have been discussed extensively in the literature, and excellent reviews are already in existence. In this review the literature on arid-adapted plants that have potential uses for solid fuels, liquid fuels, and chemical feedstocks is summarized, followed by an overview of the research directions and types of development that are needed in order for bio-energy production systems to reach the commercial stage. 127 references.

  13. Controls on Water Storage, Mixing and Release in a Nested Catchment Set-up with Clean and Mixed Physiographic Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, L.; McDonnell, J.; Hissler, C.; Martínez-Carreras, N.; Klaus, J.

    2015-12-01

    With catchment water storage being only rarely determined, storage dynamics remain largely unknown to date. However, storage bears considerable potential for catchment inter-comparison exercises, as well as it is likely to have an important role in regulating catchment functions. Catchment comparisons across a wide range of environments and scales will help to increase our understanding of relationships between storage dynamics and catchment processes. With respect to the potential of catchment storage for bringing new momentum to catchment classification and catchment processes understanding we currently investigate spatial and temporal variability of dynamic storage in a nested catchment set-up (16 catchments) of the Alzette River basin (Luxembourg, Europe), covering a wide range of geological settings, catchment areas, contrasted landuse, and hydro-meteorological and tracer series. We define catchment storage as the total amount of water stored in a control volume, delimited by the catchment's topographical boundaries and depth of saturated and unsaturated zones. Complementary storage assessments (via input-output dynamics of natural tracers, geographical sounding, groundwater level measurements, soil moisture measurements, hydrometry) are carried out for comparison purposes. In our nested catchment set-up we have (1) assessed dependencies between geology, catchment permeability and winter runoff coefficients, (2) calculated water balance derived catchment storage and mixing potential and quantified how dynamic storage differs between catchments and scales, and (3) examined how stream baseflow dD (as a proxy for baseflow transit time) and integrated flow measures (like the flow duration curve) relate to bedrock geology. Catchments with higher bedrock permeability exhibited larger storage capacities and eventually lower average winter runoff coefficients. Over a time-span of 11 years, all catchments re-produced the same winter runoff coefficients year after year

  14. Impact of Small Hill Farm Ponds on Water Flow and Nitrogen Transfer in Mediterranean Agricultural Catchment (Kamech, Cap Bon, Tunisia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetland ecology and the downstream water quality and quantity depend on water dynamics. In arid/semiarid environments average annual rainfall is seasonal, highly variable and significantly less than evaporation. Groundwater discharge can be a major component of the water balance in these environments. Determination of the wetland water budget is therefore essential part of wetland characterization. Some elements, such as surface inflow, precipitation, evaporation, surface outflow, and variation of lake level, can be measured easily at the site. However, it is difficult to determine the groundwater inflow and outflow. In this paper, the stable isotope mass balance together with the conventional water budget are applied to the water storage of a small hill dam (capacity of 142 460 m3), the Lake Kamech, located in the peninsula of Cap Bon, north eastern Tunisia, in order to assess the interaction between ground and surface waters. The δ18O and δ2H isotopes allowed for assessing water cycle components over the catchment. Results indicated that upstream ground waters are disconnected from the lake even if they contribute to the stream base flow while runoff is the main flow that filled the lake. The water budget indicates that approximately 80 000 m3 had infiltrated into the underlying alluvial aquifer during the 2009-2010 water year while groundwater had supported the lake storage during high releases periods and during dry season by supplying about 10 000 m3 to the lake. (author)

  15. How should a rainfall-runoff model be parameterized in an almost ungauged catchment? A methodology tested on 609 catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Serna, Claudia; Lebecherel, Laure; Perrin, Charles; Andréassian, Vazken; Oudin, Ludovic

    2016-06-01

    This paper examines catchments that are almost ungauged, i.e., catchments for which only a small number of point flow measurements are available. In these catchments, hydrologists may still need to simulate continuous streamflow time series using a rainfall-runoff model, and the methodology presented here allows using few point measurements for model parameterization. The method combines regional information (parameter sets of neighboring gauged stations) and local information (contributed by the point measurements) within a framework where the relative weight of each source of information is made dependent on the number of point measurements available. This approach is tested with two different hydrological models on a set of 609 catchments in France. The results show that on average a few flow measurements can significantly improve the simulation efficiency, and that 10 measurements can reduce the performance gap between the gauged and ungauged situations by more than 50%. The added value of regional information progressively decreases until being almost insignificant when sufficient flow measurements are available. Model parameters tend to come closer to the values obtained by calibration in fully gauged conditions as the number of point flow measurements increases.

  16. Runoff Responses to Forest Thinning at Plot and Catchment Scales in a Headwater Catchment Draining Japanese Cypress Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the effect of forest thinning on runoff generation at plot and catchment scales in headwater basins draining a Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) forest. We removed 58.3% of the stems (corresponding to 43.2% of the basal area) in the treated headwater basin (catc...

  17. Expanding the phenotypic spectrum of ARID1B-mediated disorders and identification of altered cell-cycle dynamics due to ARID1B haploinsufficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sim, J. C. H.; White, S. M.; Fitzpatrick, E.;

    2014-01-01

    patient-derived and ARID1B knockdown fibroblasts after serum starvation demonstrated delayed cell cycle re-entry associated with reduced cell number in the S-1 phase. Based on the patient's distinctive phenotype, we ascertained four additional patients and identified heterozygous de novo ARID1B frameshift...

  18. Evolutionary shifts in habitat aridity predict evaporative water loss across squamate reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christian L; Cox, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    Aridity is an important determinant of species distributions, shaping both ecological and evolutionary diversity. Lizards and snakes are often abundant in deserts, suggesting a high potential for adaptation or acclimation to arid habitats. However, phylogenetic evidence indicates that squamate diversity in deserts may be more strongly tied to speciation within arid habitats than to convergent evolution following repeated colonization from mesic habitats. To assess the frequency of evolutionary transitions in habitat aridity while simultaneously testing for associated changes in water-balance physiology, we analyzed estimates of total evaporative water loss (EWL) for 120 squamate species inhabiting arid, semiarid, or mesic habitats. Phylogenetic reconstructions revealed that evolutionary transitions to and from semiarid habitats were much more common than those between arid and mesic extremes. Species from mesic habitats exhibited significantly higher EWL than those from arid habitats, while species from semiarid habitats had intermediate EWL. Phylogenetic comparative methods confirmed this association between habitat aridity and EWL despite phylogenetic signal in each. Thus, the historical colonization of arid habitats by squamates is repeatedly associated with adaptive changes in EWL. This physiological convergence, which may reflect both phenotypic plasticity and genetic adaptation, has likely contributed to the success of squamates in arid environments.

  19. Wind power variations under humid and arid meteorological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • It indicates the role of weather parameters’ roles in the wind energy calculation. • Meteorological variables are more significant in arid regions for wind power. • It provides opportunity to take into consideration air density variability. • Wind power is presented in terms of the wind speed, temperature and pressure. - Abstract: The classical wind power per rotor area per time is given as the half product of the air density by third power of the wind velocity. This approach adopts the standard air density as constant (1.23 g/cm3), which ignores the density dependence on air temperature and pressure. Weather conditions are not taken into consideration except the variations in wind velocity. In general, increase in pressure and decrease in temperature cause increase in the wind power generation. The rate of increase in the pressure has less effect on the wind power as compared with the temperature rate. This paper provides the wind power formulation based on three meteorological variables as the wind velocity, air temperature and air pressure. Furthermore, from the meteorology point of view any change in the wind power is expressed as a function of partial changes in these meteorological variables. Additionally, weather conditions in humid and arid regions differ from each other, and it is interesting to see possible differences between the two regions. The application of the methodology is presented for two meteorology stations in Istanbul, Turkey, as representative of the humid regions and Al-Madinah Al-Monawwarah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, for arid region, both on daily record bases for 2010. It is found that consideration of air temperature and pressure in the average wind power calculation gives about 1.3% decrease in Istanbul, whereas it is about 13.7% in Al-Madinah Al-Monawwarah. Hence, consideration of meteorological variables in wind power calculations becomes more significant in arid regions

  20. Semi-arid development: competitiveness factors in biodiesel productive chain

    OpenAIRE

    Breno Barros Telles do Carmo; Dmontier Pinheiro Aragão; Heráclito Lopes Jaguaribe Pontes; Bruno Magalhães Ribeiro; Marcos Ronaldo Albertin

    2009-01-01

    The new global market competitiveness considerer the competition between productive chains (PC) or supply chains, not just between enterprises. In this case, it can be observed collaboration and cooperation enterprises that dispute with others productives chain. The PC competitiveness can be impaired if is subject by inhibitors factors, that can impairer the performance. This paper analyses these competitiveness factors inhibitors in biodiesel productive chain (CPB) in semi-arid area: exporte...

  1. A Feasibility Study of Geologic Water Storage in Arid Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairley, J. P.; Preuit, T.

    2001-05-01

    An important control on the carrying capacity of arid and semi-arid regions is the ability to develop and maintain a reliable water supply for domestic and agricultural use. In the semi-arid highlands of southern Peru, the pre-Columbian Incas developed a technique of collecting and storing basin yields by controlling the discharge boundary of an existing aquifer. This water resource management strategy has been dubbed "Geologic Water Storage" (Fairley, in review). Yield from at least one such system near Cuzco, Peru, has provided a reliable source of irrigation water for rural farmers to the present day. The geologic water storage systems of southern Peru suggested the possibility of developing a similar system to water stock in rural Idaho. Annual precipitation in Idaho is about one-third that of southern Peru, and obtaining an adequate stock water supply is often problematic. The application of a simple lumped capacitance model to a selected basin in central Idaho showed that it may be physically and economically feasible to modify the basin characteristics to prolong water availability at the site. A more detailed study of this problem, that includes field characterization of the site, is necessary to substantiate the model results. If further studies and field trials confirm the viability of geologic water storage, this approach may find applications in many rural and developing areas, both nationally and internationally.

  2. Saline dust storms and their ecological impacts in arid regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jilili; Abuduwaili

    2010-01-01

    In many arid and semiarid regions,saline playas represent a significant source of unconsoli-dated sediments available for aeolian transport,and severe saline dust storms occur frequently due to human disturbance.In this study,saline dust storms are reviewed systematically from the aspects of con-cept,general characteristics,conditions of occurrence,distribution and ecological impact.Our researches showed that saline dust storms are a kind of chemical dust storm originating in dry lake beds in arid and semiarid regions;large areas of unconsolidated saline playa sediments and frequent strong winds are the basic factors to saline dust storm occurrence;there are differentiation characteristics in deposition flux and chemical composition with wind-blown distance during saline dust storm diffusion;and saline dust storm diffusion to some extent increases glacier melt and results in soil salinization in arid regions.An under-standing of saline dust storms is important to guide disaster prevention and ecological rehabilitation.

  3. Characteristics of the volatile organic compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Program (VOC-Arid ID) is targeted at demonstration and testing of technologies for the evaluation and cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants at arid DOE sites. The initial demonstration site is an area of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) contamination located near the center of the Hanford Site. The movement of CCl4 and other volatile organic contaminants in the subsurface is very complex. The problem at the Hanford Site is further complicated by the concurrent discharge of other waste constituents including acids, lard oil, organic phosphates, and transuranic radionuclides. In addition, the subsurface environment is very complex, with large spatial variabilities in hydraulic properties. A thorough understanding of the problem is essential to the selection of appropriate containment, retrieval, and/or in situ remedial technologies. The effectiveness of remedial technologies depends on knowing where the contaminants are, how they are held up in a given physical and chemical subsurface environment; and knowing the physical, chemical, and microbiological changes that are induced by the various remedial technologies

  4. Hydrological characterization of twelve water catchments in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afolayan, S.O

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Twelve water catchments (WCs in Ogbomosho, south west of Nigeria were evaluated for their hydrological characterization with respect to domestic and irrigation activities. Both physiochemical and biological parameters (limnological properties were determined which include pH, total alkalinity (TA, CO32-,HCO3 -, NO3-N, SO42-, N, P, K, Na, Ca, Mg, dissolved oxygen (DO, electrical conductivity (ECw, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD, total solids (TS, total dissolved solids (TDS, chlorophyll a,b,c and phaeophytin. Temperature fluctuation of the water catchments was measured in-situ to avoid samples coming into contact with the surrounding air using mercury in glass thermometer. Soil samples collected from the bottom of the water catchments were determined for chemical properties such as N, P, K, Na, Ca, Mg, and SO4-2 following recommended procedures. These parameters were investigated based on the perceived research consent of their efficacy in characterizing water catchments hydrologically along safety and pollution divides. The limnological properties were configured into ranking compared with standards to evaluate the degree of contamination or suitability of the WCs for domestic and irrigation purposes. Results obtained indicated pH values of the catchments ranging from 5.8 to 7.4 with corresponding TA between 0 and 296 mgL-1 suggesting high level of dissolved carbon dioxide (DCO2 and traces of untreated wastewater in most of the catchments. Based on ranking of the limnological properties of the WCs, WC4, WC5, WC6 recorded indices between 65 and 95 signifying that cumulatively these three WCs were more prone to pollution and could affect human health at consumption while WC2, WC3, WC 7 and , WC 10, aligned between 95 and 120 indicating mild to medium pollution and WC1, WC 11, and WC 12 oscillated between 120 to 145 picturing WCs approaching standards (132 while WC8 ranged between 145 and 170 revealing WC 8 as catchment with little or no tendency

  5. Sediment budget for Rediu reservoir catchment, North-Eastern Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todosi, Cristian; Niculita, Mihai

    2016-04-01

    Sediment budgets are a useful tool for geomorphologic analysis, catchment management and environmental assessment, despite the uncertainties related to their assessment. We present the sediment budget construction and validation for a small catchment of 9.5319 kmp (953.19 ha) situated in the North-Eastern part of Romania. The Rediu reservoir was built between 1986 and 1988, on Rediu valley, a left tributary of Bahlui river, north-west from Iasi city. The catchment of the reservoir has 6.5 km in length and 2.5 km in maximum width, the altitudes decreasing from 170 m in the northern part, to 52 m in the southern part. The valley is symmetric, the altitude of the hillslopes going between 200 m to 75 m in one km length, in the transversal section with the maximum width. The floodplain is narrow having between 20 m to 210 m (in the area of confluence with Breazu tributary). The mean slope of the catchment is 6.4 degree, the maximum slope being 24.6 degrees. The length of channels which show banks of up to 2 m is 19.98 km. The land is used predominantly as crops (58.1 %), 16.7 % being covered by pastures (from which over half are eroded), 11.5 % percent of the catchment being covered by planted forests, 9.2 % by rural constructions and roads, 2.9 % by hayfields, 1.5 % by lakes and 0.1 % by orchards. Beside the Rediu reservoir, there are three ponds (15 771, 1761 and 751 sqm) in the catchment. We considered the trap efficiency for the reservoir and the ponds to be 95%. Aerial images from 1963, 1978 , 1984, 2005, 2008, 2010, 2012 and 2014 were used to assess the state of geomorphological processes before and after the reservoir construction. After 1970 a gully system situated in Breazu tributary sub-catchment and several active landslides along the main valley left side were forested. Beside these processes, soil erosion and human impact by constructions are the main processes generating sediment in the study area. The sediment yields were quantified by estimating the

  6. Land use change and carbon cycle in arid and semi-arid lands of East and Central Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Togtohyn; Chuluun; Dennis; Ojima

    2002-01-01

    Dramatic changes in land use have occurred in arid and semi-arid landsof Asia during the 20th century. Grassland conversion into croplands and ecosystem degradation is widespread due to the high growth rate of human population and political reforms of pastoral systems. Rangeland degradation made many parts of this region vulnerable to environmental and political changes. The collapse of the livestock sector in some states of central Asia, expansion of livestock inChina and intensive degradation of grasslands in China are examples of the responses of pastoral systems to these changes over the past decades. Carbon dynamics in this region is highly variable in space and time. Land use/cover changes with widespread reduction of forest and grasslands increased carbon emission from the region.

  7. Soil weathering rates in 21 catchments of the Canadian Shield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Houle

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil mineral weathering represents an essential source of nutrient base cation (Ca, Mg and K for forest growth in addition to provide a buffering power against precipitation acidity for soils and surface waters. Weathering rates of base cations were obtained for 21 catchments located within the temperate and the boreal forest of the Canadian Shield with the geochemical model PROFILE. Weathering rates ranged from 0.58 to 4.46 kmolc ha−1 yr−1 and their spatial variation within the studied area was mostly in agreement with spatial variations in soil mineralogy. Weathering rates of Ca and Mg were significantly correlated (r = 0.80 and 0.64 with their respective lake concentrations. Weathering rates of K and Na did not correlate with lake concentrations of K and Na. The modeled weathering rates for each catchment were also compared with estimations of net catchment exportations. The result show that modeled weathering rates of Ca were not significantly different than the net catchment exportations while modeled weathering rates of Mg were higher by 51%. Larger differences were observed for K and Na weathering rates that were significantly different than net catchment exportations being 6.9 and 2.2 times higher than net exportations, respectively. The results for K were expected given its high reactivity with biotic compartments and suggest that most of the K produced by weathering reactions was retained within soil catchments and/or above ground biomass. This explanation does not apply to Na, however, which is a conservative element in forest ecosystems because of the insignificant needs of Na for soil microorganisms and above ground vegetations. It raises concern about the liability of the PROFILE model to provide reliable values of Na weathering rates. Overall, we concluded that the PROFILE model is powerful enough to reproduce spatial geographical gradients in weathering rates for relatively large areas

  8. Tracer Cycles and Water Ages in Heterogeneous Catchments and Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, J. W.; Jasechko, S.

    2015-12-01

    Estimates of catchment mean transit times are often based on seasonal cycles of stable isotope tracers in precipitation and streamflow. In many cases these transit time estimates are derived directly from sine-wave fitting to the observed seasonal isotope cycles. Broadly similar results are also obtained from time-domain convolutions or explicit tracer modeling, because here too the dominant tracer signal that these techniques seek to match is the seasonal isotopic cycle. Here I use simple benchmark tests to show that estimates of mean transit times based on seasonal tracer cycles will typically be wrong by several hundred percent, when applied to catchments with realistic degrees of spatial heterogeneity. This aggregation bias arises from the strong nonlinearity in the relationship between tracer cycle amplitude and mean travel time. A similar bias arises in estimates of mean transit times in nonstationary catchments. Since typical real-world catchments are both spatially heterogeneous and nonstationary, this analysis poses a fundamental challenge to tracer-based estimates of mean transit times. I propose an alternative storage metric, the fraction of "young water" in streamflow, defined as the fraction of runoff with transit times of less than roughly 0.2 years. I show that young water fractions are virtually free of aggregation bias; that is, they can be accurately estimated from tracer cycles in highly heterogeneous mixtures of subcatchments with strongly contrasting transit time distributions. They can also be reliably estimated in strongly nonstationary catchments. Young water fractions can be estimated separately for individual flow regimes, allowing direct determination of how shifts in hydraulic regime alter the fraction of water reaching the stream by fast flowpaths. One can also estimate the chemical composition of idealized "young water" and "old water" end-members, using relationships between young water fractions and solute concentrations across

  9. Assessing water quality trends in catchments with contrasting hydrological regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherriff, Sophie C.; Shore, Mairead; Mellander, Per-Erik

    2016-04-01

    Environmental resources are under increasing pressure to simultaneously achieve social, economic and ecological aims. Increasing demand for food production, for example, has expanded and intensified agricultural systems globally. In turn, greater risks of diffuse pollutant delivery (suspended sediment (SS) and Phosphorus (P)) from land to water due to higher stocking densities, fertilisation rates and soil erodibility has been attributed to deterioration of chemical and ecological quality of aquatic ecosystems. Development of sustainable and resilient management strategies for agro-ecosystems must detect and consider the impact of land use disturbance on water quality over time. However, assessment of multiple monitoring sites over a region is challenged by hydro-climatic fluctuations and the propagation of events through catchments with contrasting hydrological regimes. Simple water quality metrics, for example, flow-weighted pollutant exports have potential to normalise the impact of catchment hydrology and better identify water quality fluctuations due to land use and short-term climate fluctuations. This paper assesses the utility of flow-weighted water quality metrics to evaluate periods and causes of critical pollutant transfer. Sub-hourly water quality (SS and P) and discharge data were collected from hydrometric monitoring stations at the outlets of five small (~10 km2) agricultural catchments in Ireland. Catchments possess contrasting land uses (predominantly grassland or arable) and soil drainage (poorly, moderately or well drained) characteristics. Flow-weighted water quality metrics were calculated and evaluated according to fluctuations in source pressure and rainfall. Flow-weighted water quality metrics successfully identified fluctuations in pollutant export which could be attributed to land use changes through the agricultural calendar, i.e., groundcover fluctuations. In particular, catchments with predominantly poor or moderate soil drainage

  10. Safeguarding the provision of ecosystem services in catchment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Mark

    2013-04-01

    A narrow technocentric focus on a few favored ecosystem services (generally provisioning services) has led to ecosystem degradation globally, including catchment systems and their capacities to support human well-being. Increasing recognition of the multiple benefits provided by ecosystems is slowly being translated into policy and some areas of practice, although there remains a significant shortfall in the incorporation of a systemic perspective into operation management and decision-making tools. Nevertheless, a range of ecosystem-based solutions to issues as diverse as flooding and green space provision in the urban environment offers hope for improving habitat and optimization of beneficial services. The value of catchment ecosystem processes and their associated services is also being increasingly recognized and internalized by the water industry, improving water quality and quantity through catchment land management rather than at greater expense in the treatment costs of contaminated water abstracted lower in catchments. Parallel recognition of the value of working with natural processes, rather than "defending" built assets when catchment hydrology is adversely affected by unsympathetic upstream development, is being progressively incorporated into flood risk management policy. This focus on wider catchment processes also yields a range of cobenefits for fishery, wildlife, amenity, flood risk, and other interests, which may be optimized if multiple stakeholders and their diverse value systems are included in decision-making processes. Ecosystem services, particularly implemented as a central element of the ecosystem approach, provide an integrated framework for building in these different perspectives and values, many of them formerly excluded, into commercial and resource management decision-making processes, thereby making tractable the integrative aspirations of sustainable development. This can help redress deeply entrenched inherited assumptions

  11. Spatiotemporal analysis and trends of aridity of Iberian Peninsula (1960-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniagua, Luis L.; García, Abelardo; Moral, Francisco J.; Rebollo, Francisco J.

    2016-04-01

    In this study the aridity of the Iberian Peninsula was analysed, taking into account 45 stations in Spain and Portugal from 1960 to 2010. The De Martonne Index was considered. The goal of this study was to explore the spatial distribution and to determine monotonic trends and shift changes in annual aridity by using the Mann-Kendall test and the Seńs estimator. The spatially interpolated maps of the aridity indice were generated using the ordinary kriging algorithm in a geographic information system (GIS) environment. A great variability for Martonne Index was found, gathering from semiarid climates to extremely humid, although the former being the dominant type. 41 temporal series showed decreasing tendencies, 15 of them significant, belonging to all climate types, which indicates a increase in aridity during the research period. A shift in the aridity tendency has been observed around 1979, and a period of greater aridity started since.

  12. VOC-Arid Integrated Demonstration guide to preparation of demonstration documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guide has been prepared by Demonstration Operations of the Volatile Organic Compound-Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID). Its purpose is to describe demonstration documents, designate responsibilities for these documents, and guide the Principal Investigator (PI) and others in their preparation. The main emphasis of this guide is to describe the documentation required of the PI. However, it does cover some of the responsibilities of other members of the VOC-Arid ID team. The VOC-Arid ID is one of several US Department of Energy (DOE) integrated demonstrations designed to support the demonstration of emerging environmental management and restoration technologies. The principal objective of the VOC-Arid ID is to identify, develop, and demonstrate new and innovative technologies for environmental restoration at arid or semiarid sites containing volatile organic compounds with or without associated contamination (e.g., radionuclides and metals)

  13. Outcrop Groundwater Prospecting, Drilling, and Well Construction in Hard Rocks in Semi-arid Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Chambel, António

    2014-01-01

    This chapter presents some recommendations for prospecting, drilling and well construction in hard rocks in semi-arid regions. Considering that these conditions are present in many countries where technology is not always available, the chapter concentrates on the most basic and simple methods to plan where best to drill and maximize success through the direct observation of rock types, weathering and fracturing. The advantage for the geologist and hydrogeologist in an arid or semi-arid envir...

  14. Spatial distribution and comparison of aridity indices in Extremadura, southwestern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moral, Francisco J.; Rebollo, Francisco J.; Paniagua, Luis L.; García-Martín, Abelardo; Honorio, Fulgencio

    2015-09-01

    In semi-arid lands with warm climates, aridity is a real hazard, with the threat of desertification because of greater precipitation variability and prolonged droughts. Aridity indices can be used to identify areas prone to desertification. The present study aimed to analyse the spatial distribution of aridity in Extremadura, southwestern Spain, using three indices: the De Martonne aridity index (I DM), the Pinna combinative index (I P), and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) aridity index (I F). Temperature, precipitation, and evapotranspiration data from 90 weather stations located throughout Extremadura and 27 along boundaries with at least 30-year length (within the 1980-2011 period) were used to compute each index at each station. The statistical properties of each aridity index were assessed, and later, they were mapped by means of an integrated geographic information system (GIS) and a multivariate geostatistical (regression-kriging) algorithm in which exhaustive secondary information on elevation was incorporated. Annual and seasonal I DM and I F, and annual I P-kriged maps were generated. According to annual I DM, the semi-arid and Mediterranean conditions are predominant in the region, covering about 70 % of the territory, while about 94 % of the areas are classified as dry and semi-dry Mediterranean based on annual I P and about 86 % are classified as semi-arid and dry categories based on annual I F. The most vulnerable to aridity are the natural regions located to the west, the south, and the southeast of Extremadura, especially during summer, when arid conditions are found across the region. Although the three aridity indices were highly correlated, displaying similar spatial patterns, I DM was preferred because it can better discriminate different climate conditions in Extremadura.

  15. Analysis and evaluation of tillage on an alfisol ina semi-arid tropical region of India

    OpenAIRE

    Klaij, M C

    1983-01-01

    Tillage field experiments were conducted on Alfisols in a semi-arid tropical environment in India. The research was conducted within the framework of the Farming Systems Research Program of the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT).To put the experiments into perspective, a general review is given in chapter 2 on the environment of the semi-arid tropics, its problems and the research related to agricultural production. Rainfed agriculture has failed to pro...

  16. ARID1A immunohistochemistry improves outcome prediction in invasive urothelial carcinoma of urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraj, Sheila F; Chaux, Alcides; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Munari, Enrico; Ellis, Carla; Driscoll, Tina; Schoenberg, Mark P; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Shih, Ie-Ming; Netto, George J

    2014-11-01

    AT-rich interactive domain 1A (ARID1A) is tumor suppressor gene that interacts with BRG1 adenosine triphosphatase to form a SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling protein complex. Inactivation of ARID1A has been described in several neoplasms, including epithelial ovarian and endometrial carcinomas, and has been correlated with prognosis. In the current study, ARID1A expression in urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder and its association with clinicopathological parameters and outcome are addressed. Five tissue microarrays were constructed from 136 cystectomy specimens performed for UC at our institution. Nuclear ARID1A staining was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. An H-score was calculated as the sum of the products of intensity (0-3) multiplied by extent of expression (0%-100%). Average H-score per case was used for statistical analysis. ARID1A expression was categorized in low and high using Youden index to define the cut point. ARID1A expression significantly increased from normal to noninvasive UC to invasive UC. For both tumor progression and cancer death, Youden index yielded an H-score of 288 as the optimal cut point for ARID1A expression. Low ARID1A expression showed a tendency for lower risk of tumor progression and cancer mortality. Adding ARID1A expression to pathologic features offers a better model for predicting outcome than pathologic features alone. Low ARID1A expression was more frequently seen in earlier stage disease. There was a tendency for low ARID1A expression to predict better outcome. More importantly, the findings indicate that adding ARID1A expression to pathologic features increases the goodness of fit of the predictive model. PMID:25175170

  17. Organic Matter and Water Addition Enhance Soil Respiration in an Arid Region

    OpenAIRE

    Liming Lai; Jianjian Wang; Yuan Tian; Xuechun Zhao; Lianhe Jiang; Xi Chen; Yong Gao; Shaoming Wang; Yuanrun Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is generally predicted to increase net primary production, which could lead to additional C input to soil. In arid central Asia, precipitation has increased and is predicted to increase further. To assess the combined effects of these changes on soil CO2 efflux in arid land, a two factorial manipulation experiment in the shrubland of an arid region in northwest China was conducted. The experiment used a nested design with fresh organic matter and water as the two controlled par...

  18. Assessment of surface water resources availability using catchment modelling and the results of tracer studies in the mesoscale Migina Catchment, Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munyaneza, O.; Mukubwa, A.; Maskey, S.; Uhlenbrook, S.; Wenninger, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we developed a catchment hydrological model which can be used to inform water resources planning and decision making for better management of the Migina Catchment (257.4 km2). The semi-distributed hydrological model HEC-HMS (Hydrologic Engineering Center – the Hydrologic Modell

  19. Internally Drained Supraglacial River Catchments on the Southwest Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, K.; Smith, L. C.; Chu, V. W.; Pitcher, L. H.; Gleason, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Internally drained catchments are the hydrologic units on the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) surface that collect and drain meltwater into moulins or supraglacial lakes without out flows. Understanding the spatial pattern of these internal catchments is critical, which can provide key information about how supraglacial meltwater is transported and released on the ice surface. This study proposed an automatic approach to detect supraglacial hydrologic features (rivers, lakes, moulins, and internal catchments) located at southwest GrIS from Landsat-8 OLI panchromatic imagery. A total of 800 internal catchments are delineated and the average catchment size (river network length) is found to increase with elevations. In addition, moulins are the prime way to drain internal catchments and the average moulin densities decrease with elevations. Adaptive depression area thresholds are calculated to achieve optimal match between DEM-modeled and image-detected internal catchment patterns. The pattern of these image-detected internal catchments also indicates that: 1) not all the DEM-modeled topographic depressions act as meltwater sinks; 2) moulin distribution greatly impacts the internal catchment patterns; and 3) topographic depressions can be connected downstream without being fully filled, changing the fragmentary of the internal catchments.

  20. Estimation of soil moisture-thermal infrared emissivity relation in arid and semi-arid environments using satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazia Blasi, Maria; Masiello, Guido; Serio, Carmine; Venafra, Sara; Liuzzi, Giuliano; Dini, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    The retrieval of surface parameters is very important for various aspects concerning the climatological and meteorological context. At this purpose surface emissivity represents one of the most important parameters useful for di fferent applications such as the estimation of climate changes and land cover features. It is known that thermal infrared (TIR) emissivity is aff ected by soil moisture, but there are very few works in literature on this issue. This study is aimed to analyze and fi nd a relation between satellite soil moisture data and TIR emissivity focusing on arid and semi-arid environments. These two parameters, together with the land surface temperature, are fundamental for a better understanding of the physical phenomena implied in the soil-atmosphere interactions and the surface energy balance. They are also important in several fi elds of study, such as climatology, meteorology, hydrology and agriculture. In particular, there are several studies stating a correlation between soil moisture and the emissivity at 8-9 μ m in desertic soils, which corresponds to the quartz Reststrahlen, a feature which is typical of sandy soils. We investigated several areas characterized by arid or semi-arid environments, focusing our attention on the Dahra desert (Senegal), and on the Negev desert (Israel). For the Dahra desert we considered both in situ, provided by the International Soil Moisture Network, and satellite soil moisture data, from ASCAT and AMSR-E sensors, for the whole year 2011. In the case of the Negev desert soil moisture data are derived from ASCAT observations and we computed a soil moisture index from a temporal series of SAR data acquired by the Cosmo-SkyMed constellation covering a period of six months, from June 2015 to November 2015. For both cases soil moisture data were related to the retrieved TIR emissivity from the geostationary satellite SEVIRI in three di erent spectral channels, at 8.7 μm, 10.8 μ m and 12 μ m. A Kalman lter

  1. A conceptual glacio-hydrological model for high mountainous catchments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Schaefli

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In high mountainous catchments, the spatial precipitation and therefore the overall water balance is generally difficult to estimate. The present paper describes the structure and calibration of a semi-lumped conceptual glacio-hydrological model for the joint simulation of daily discharge and annual glacier mass balance that represents a better integrator of the water balance. The model has been developed for climate change impact studies and has therefore a parsimonious structure; it requires three input times series – precipitation, temperature and potential evapotranspiration – and has 7 parameters to calibrate. A multi-signal approach considering daily discharge and – if available – annual glacier mass balance has been developed for the calibration of these parameters. The model has been calibrated for three different catchments in the Swiss Alps having glaciation rates between 37% and 52%. It simulates well the observed daily discharge, the hydrological regime and some basic glaciological features, such as the annual mass balance.

  2. Review of several problems on the study of eco-hydrological processes in arid zones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Ecosystem degradation is a common and cardinal environmental problem in arid zones. The change in the eco-hydrological processes is the basic cause responsible for such a problem. The study on the eco-hydrological processes in arid zones has become a forefront and focus of the eco-environmental research. Recent studies on eco-hydrological processes in arid zones show that the primary vegetation pattern and its eco-hydrological effect are of the most stable state of the ecosystem in arid zones. Special water absorption ways of plants in arid zones and the hydraulic lift and reverse hydraulic lift functions of some plants are the key mechanisms to maintain the stability of the ecosystem in arid zones. In the case of water shortage, ensuring ecological water requirement and maintaining proper ecological ground- water table are the prerequisite to keep healthful operation of the ecosystem in arid zones. The paper reviews some advances in the study of eco-hydrological processes in arid zones. It puts forward the concepts of critical ecological water requirement, optimal ecological water requirement and saturated ecological water requirement, and discusses their determination methods. It also emphasizes that the studies on natural vegetation pattern and eco-hydrological effect, on plants with hydraulic lift function, on water sources for plant absorption, on ecological water requirement and ecological groundwater table for different plant species should be strengthened to determine the species composition and pattern suitable for the restoration and reestablishment of vegetation in different arid zones in China.

  3. Targeting EZH2 methyltransferase activity in ARID1A mutated cancer cells is synthetic lethal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biter, Benjamin G.; Aird, Katherine M.; Garipov, Azat; Li, Hua; Amatangelo, Michael; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Schultz, David C.; Liu, Qin; Shih, Ie-Ming; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.; Speicher, David W.; Zhang, Rugang

    2015-01-01

    ARID1A, a chromatin remodeler, shows one of the highest mutation rates across many cancer types. Notably, ARID1A is mutated in over 50% of ovarian clear cell carcinomas, which currently has no effective therapy. To date, clinically applicable targeted cancer therapy based on ARID1A mutational status has not been described. Here we show that inhibition of the EZH2 methyltransferase acts in a synthetic lethal manner in ARID1A mutated ovarian cancer cells. ARID1A mutational status correlates with response to the EZH2 inhibitor. We identified PIK3IP1 as a direct ARID1A/EZH2 target, which is upregulated by EZH2 inhibition and contributes to the observed synthetic lethality by inhibiting PI3K/AKT signaling. Significantly, EZH2 inhibition causes regression of ARID1A mutated ovarian tumors in vivo. Together, these data demonstrate for the first time a synthetic lethality between ARID1A mutation and EZH2 inhibition. They indicate that pharmacological inhibition of EZH2 represents a novel treatment strategy for ARID1A mutated cancers. PMID:25686104

  4. Creating a catchment scale perspective for river restoration

    OpenAIRE

    L. Benda; MILLER, D; J. Barquín

    2011-01-01

    One of the major challenges in river restoration is to identify the natural fluvial landscape in catchments with a long history of river control. Intensive land use on valley floors often predates the earliest remote sensing: levees, dikes, dams, and other structures alter valley-floor morphology, river channels and flow regimes. Consequently, morphological patterns indicative of the fluvial landscape including multiple channels, extensive floodplains, wetlands, and fluvial-riparian and tribu...

  5. Estimation of erosion and sediment export from an agricultural catchment

    OpenAIRE

    Evrard, Olivier; Nord, Guillaume; Cerdan, Olivier; Souchère, Véronique; Le Bissonnais, Yves; Bonté, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Soil erosion leads to important environmental problems (e.g. muddy floods, reservoir sedimentation) in cultivated areas of the European loess belt. This study aimed to quantify erosion and to determine the impact of rainfall seasonality and land use change on soil erosion over the last 40 years in a 94-ha cultivated catchment of Normandy (France). To this end, scenarios representative of the different land use conditions were simulated using the STREAM expert-based erosion model. A 13-yrs lon...

  6. Catchment Very-High Frequency Hydrochemistry: the Critex Chemical House

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floury, P.; Gaillardet, J.; Tallec, G.; Blanchouin, A.; Ansart, P.

    2015-12-01

    Exploring the variations of river quality at very high frequency is still a big challenge that has fundamental implications both for understanding catchment ecosystems and for water quality monitoring. Within the French Critical Zone program CRITEX, we have proposed to develop a prototype called "Chemical House", applying the "lab on field" concept to one of the stream of the Orgeval Critical Zone Observatory. The Orgeval catchment (45 km2) is part of the Critical Zone RBV ("Réseau des bassins versants") network. It is a typical temperate agricultural catchment that has been intensively monitored for the last 50 years for hydrology and nutrient chemistry. Agricultural inputs and land use are also finely monitored making Orgeval an ideal basin to test the response of the Critical Zone to agricultural forcing. Geology consists of a typical sedimentary basin of Cenozoic age with horizontal layers of limestones, silcrete and marls, covered by a thin loamy layer. Two main aquifers are present within the catchment: the Brie and the Champigny aquifers. Mean runoff is 780 mm/yr. The Chemical House is a fully automated lab and installed directly along the river, which performs measurement of all major dissolved elements such as Na, Cl, Mg, Ca, NO3, SO4 and K every half hour. It also records all physical parameters (Temperature, pH, conductivity, O2 dissolved, Turbidity) of the water every minute. Orgeval Chemical House started to measure river chemistry on June 12, 2015 and has successfully now recorded several months of data. We will present the architecture of the Chemical House and the first reproducibility and accuracy tests made during the summer drought 2015 period. Preliminary results show that the chemical house is recoding significant nychtemeral (day/night) cycles for each element. We also observe that each element has its own behaviour along a day. First results open great prospects.

  7. Soil Chemistry 1983-86 at the Rain Project Catchments

    OpenAIRE

    Lotse, E.G.; Wright, R.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the rain project is to explain the effects of changed acid deposition on soils and waters. This report presents results from chemical and physical analyses of soil samples collected yearly 1984-1986 at the rain project catchments at Sogndal and Risdalsheia. Estimates of historical weathering rates based on total elemental analysis of soil and bedrock are 295 and 12 meq/m"/yr at Sogndal and Risdalsheia, respectively. Of the key chemical parameters measured only absorbed sulfate show...

  8. Creating a catchment scale perspective for river restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Benda

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges in river restoration is to identify the natural fluvial landscape in catchments with a long history of river control. Intensive land use on valley floors often predates the earliest remote sensing: levees, dikes, dams, and other structures alter valley-floor morphology, river channels and flow regimes. Consequently, morphological patterns indicative of the fluvial landscape including multiple channels, extensive floodplains, wetlands, and fluvial-riparian and tributary-confluence dynamics can be obscured, and information to develop appropriate and cost effective river restoration strategies can be unavailable. This is the case in the Pas River catchment in northern Spain (650 km2, in which land use and development have obscured the natural fluvial landscape in many parts of the basin. To address this issue we used computer tools to examine the spatial patterns of fluvial landscapes that are associated with five domains of hydro-geomorphic processes and landforms. Using a 5-m digital elevation model, valley-floor surfaces were mapped according to elevation above the channel and proximity to key geomorphic processes. The predicted fluvial landscape is patchily distributed according to hillslope and valley topography, river network structure, and channel elevation profiles. The vast majority of the fluvial landscape in the main segments of the Pas River catchment is presently masked by human infrastructure, with only 15% not impacted by river control structures and development. The reconstructed fluvial landscape provides a catchment scale context to support restoration planning, in which areas of potential ecological productivity and diversity could be targeted for in-channel, floodplain and riparian restoration projects.

  9. Characteristics and drivers of baseflow response in 183 Australian catchments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. J. M. van Dijk

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Daily streamflow data for 183 Australian catchments were used to assess the characteristics and main drivers of baseflow and quick flow behaviour, and to find an appropriate balance between simplicity and explanatory performance in modelling. Baseflow separation was performed following the Wittenberg algorithm. A linear reservoir model (one parameter produced baseflow estimates as good as those obtained using a non-linear reservoir (two parameters and was therefore considered the more appropriate. The transition from storm flow dominated to baseflow dominated streamflow generally occurred 7 to 10 d after the storm event. The catchments investigated had baseflow half-times of about 12 d, with 80% of stations having half-times between 7 and 34 d. The shortest half-times occurred in the driest catchments and were attributed to intermittent occurrence of fast-draining (possibly perched groundwater. Median baseflow index (BFI was 0.45 with considerable variation between stations. Catchment humidity explained 27% of the variation in derived baseflow recession coefficients. Another 53% of variance in recession coefficients as well as in BFI showed spatial correlation lengths of 200 to 300 km, corresponding to terrain factors rather than climate or land use. The remaining 16 to 20% of variance remained unexplained. Most (84% of the variation between stations in average baseflow could be explained by monthly precipitation in excess of potential evapotranspiration. Most (70% of the variation in average quick flow could be explained by average rainfall. Another 20% of variation was spatially correlated over spatial scales of 400 km, possibly reflecting a combination of terrain and climate factors; the remaining 10 to 16% remained unexplained.

  10. Suspended sediment apportionment in a South-Korean mountain catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkholz, Axel; Meusburger, Katrin; Park, Ji-Hyung; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Due to the rapid agricultural expansion and intensification during the last decades in South-Korea, large areas of hill slope forests were transformed to paddies and vegetable fields. The intensive agriculture and the easily erodible soils in our catchment are a major reason for the increased erosion causing suspended sediments to infiltrate into the close drinking water reservoir. The drinking water reservoir Lake Soyang provides water supply for over ten million people in Seoul. Landscape managers need to know the exact origin of these sediments before they can create landscape amelioration schemes. We applied a compound-specific stable isotope (CSSI) approach (Alewell et al., 2015) to apportion the sources of the suspended sediments between forest and agricultural soil contribution to the suspended sediments in a different catchment and applied the same approach to identify and quantify the different sources of the suspended sediments in the river(s) contributing to Lake Soyang. We sampled eight soil sites within the catchment considering the different landuse types forest, rice paddies, maize and vegetables. Suspended sediments were sampled at three outlets of the different sub-catchments. Soils and suspended sediments are analysed for bulk carbon and nitrogen isotopes, compound-specific carbon isotopes of plant-wax derived long-chain fatty acids and long-chain n-alkanes. Fatty acid and alkane isotopes are then used in mixing calculations and the mixing model software IsoSource to find out the contribution of the different source soils to the suspended sediments. We present first data of the source soils and the suspended sediments. C. Alewell, A. Birkholz, K. Meusburger, Y. Schindler-Wildhaber, L. Mabit, 2015. Sediment source attribution from multiple land use systems with CSIA. Biogeosciences Discuss. 12: 14245-14269.

  11. SOILS VULNERABILITY OF CATCHMENT ALMAŞ AT GEOMORPHOLOGIC CONTEMPORARY PROCESSES

    OpenAIRE

    MĂDĂLINA-IOANA RUS; I. A. IRIMUȘ

    2015-01-01

    Soils vulnerability of the Catchment Almas geomorphologic processes. Almas Basin, signed lower lithologic Miocene soils deposits, shows six classes: Cernisols, Cambisols, Luvisols, Hydrosols, Pelisols, Protosols (after SRTS, 2003). The largest share is attributed to Luvisols class (60%), followed by undeveloped soil represented by Protosols and Antrisols (15%), followed by the remaining classes with lower weights: Cambisols (13%), Cernisols (7%), Pelisols (4%), Hydrosols (1%). Contemporary ge...

  12. A physically-based Distributed Hydrologic Model for Tropical Catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe, N. A.; Ogden, F. L.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrological models are mathematical formulations intended to represent observed hydrological processes in a watershed. Simulated watersheds in turn vary in their nature based on their geographic location, altitude, climatic variables and geology and soil formation. Due to these variations, available hydrologic models vary in process formulation, spatial and temporal resolution and data demand. Many tropical watersheds are characterized by extensive and persistent biological activity and a large amount of rain. The Agua Salud catchments located within the Panama Canal Watershed, Panama, are such catchments identified by steep rolling topography, deep soils derived from weathered bedrock, and limited exposed bedrock. Tropical soils are highly affected by soil cracks, decayed tree roots and earthworm burrows forming a network of preferential flow paths that drain to a perched water table, which forms at a depth where the vertical hydraulic conductivity is significantly reduced near the bottom of the bioturbation layer. We have developed a physics-based, spatially distributed, multi-layered hydrologic model to simulate the dominant processes in these tropical watersheds. The model incorporates the major flow processes including overland flow, channel flow, matrix and non-Richards film flow infiltration, lateral downslope saturated matrix and non-Darcian pipe flow in the bioturbation layer, and deep saturated groundwater flow. Emphasis is given to the modeling of subsurface unsaturated zone soil moisture dynamics and the saturated preferential lateral flow from the network of macrospores. Preliminary results indicate that the model has the capability to simulate the complex hydrological processes in the catchment and will be a useful tool in the ongoing comprehensive ecohydrological studies in tropical catchments, and help improve our understanding of the hydrological effects of deforestation and aforestation.

  13. Understanding catchment behavior through stepwise model concept improvement

    OpenAIRE

    F. Fenicia; Savenije, H. H. G.; P. Matgen; Pfister, L.

    2008-01-01

    Lack of data is one of the main limitations for hydrological modeling. However, it is often used as a justification for over simplifying, poorly performing models. If we want to enhance our understanding of hydrological systems, it is important to fully exploit the information contained in the available data, and to learn from model deficiencies. In this paper, we propose a methodology where we systematically update the model structure, progressively incorporating new hypotheses of catchment ...

  14. Lowland forest butterflies of the Sankosh River catchment, Bhutan

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides information on butterflies of the lowland forests of Bhutan for the first time. As a part of the biodiversity impact assessment for the proposed Sankosh hydroelectric power project, a survey was carried out along the Sankosh River catchment to study the butterfly diversity. The aim of the study was to identify species of conservation priority, their seasonality and to know the butterfly diversity potential of the area. Surveys were carried out during five different seas...

  15. Parsimonious hydrological modeling of urban sewer and river catchments

    OpenAIRE

    Coutu, Sylvain; Del Giudice, Dario; Rossi, Luca; Barry, David Andrew

    2012-01-01

    A parsimonious model of flow capable of simulating flow in natural/engineered catchments and at WWTP (Wastewater Treatment Plant) inlets was developed. The model considers three interacting, dynamic storages that account for transfer of water within the system. One storage describes the ``flashy'' response of impervious surfaces, another pervious areas and finally one storage describes subsurface flow. The sewerage pipe network is considered as an impervious surface and is thus included in th...

  16. Instability driven flow and runoff formation in a small catchment

    OpenAIRE

    Tesar, M.; Šír, M.; Prazák, J.; Lichner, L.

    2004-01-01

    Two anomalous phenomena were observed in a small catchment: 1) In some situations, the water supplied by rain caused a pronounced decrease in the soil water content. 2) In these periods, the soil water movement could be explained only by assuming an irregularly oscillating outflow of soil water into lower horizons. In these situations a large volume of water flows through the soil; therefore on the hydrological scale, this phenomenon forms a great part of the outflow from a watershed. These p...

  17. Water chemistry of small reservoir catchments in central Tunisia

    OpenAIRE

    Montoroi, Jean-Pierre; GRUNBERGER, OLIVIER; Nasri, S

    1999-01-01

    Numerous small hill reservoirs have been constructed in Tunisia since the early 1990's. The water chemistry of a representative small reservoir catchment was investigated to elucidate water-soil-rock interactions. The groundwater and surface water of the calcareous and marly watershed were characterizes by field chemical investigations and pedological observations. The reservoir water was alkaline, with a low concentration, highly oxygenated and weakly carbonated while the groundwater was neu...

  18. The status of persistent organic pollutants in Lake Victoria catchment

    OpenAIRE

    Madadi, O.V; Wandiga, S.O.; Jumba, I.O.

    2006-01-01

    The use of most organochlorine pesticides has been banned or restricted in the republic of Kenya under the Rotterdam and Stockholm convention due to high levels of persistence in the environment and toxicity to nontarget organisms. Studies conducted in some parts of the country have revealed that residue levels of these compounds are still in the environment. However, the residues of these compounds have not been exhaustively studied in the Lake Victoria catchment area. This study was set to ...

  19. Hydrological response of a small catchment burned by experimental fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Stoof

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Fire can considerably change hydrological processes, increasing the risk of extreme flooding and erosion events. Although hydrological processes are largely affected by scale, catchment-scale studies on the hydrological impact of fire are scarce, and nested approaches are rarely used. Taking a unique approach, we performed a catchment-scale experimental fire to improve insight into the drivers of fire impact on hydrology. In north-central Portugal, rainfall, canopy interception, streamflow and soil moisture were monitored in shrub-covered paired catchments pre- and post-fire. Post-fire runoff coefficients were higher than pre-fire, and fire changed the rainfall-streamflow relationship – although the increase in streamflow was only significant at the subcatchment-scale. Fire also increased the response of topsoil moisture to rainfall, and caused more rapid drying of topsoils after rain events. Since soil physical changes due to fire were not apparent, we suggest that changes resulting from vegetation removal played an important role in increasing streamflow after fire, namely: (1 increased effective rainfall and decreased transpiration – increasing the amount of water available for (subsurface runoff, (2 more rapid development of soil water repellency and decreased surface water storage – increasing overland flow risk, (3 more rapid breakdown of post-fire soil water repellency – increasing infiltration during extended rain events. Results stress that fire impact on hydrology is largely affected by scale, highlight the hydrological impact of fire on small scales, and emphasize the risk of overestimating fire impact when upscaling plot-scale studies to the catchment-scale. Finally, they increase understanding of the processes contributing to post-fire flooding and erosion events.

  20. The Lune catchment abstraction management strategy. Consultation document September 2003

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    This consultation document sets out the proposed future licensing strategy for the Lune Catchment Abstraction Management Strategy (CAMS) area. Following the three month consultation period, the Environment Agency will determine the final licensing strategy and publish it in the CAMS document. The strategy will provide an indication of whether new abstraction licences are likely to be available and the conditions that should be expected on licences. Water plays a vi...

  1. Nutrient Transport in the Lower Seyhan Catchment Area

    OpenAIRE

    Aslan, Gamze

    1999-01-01

    The Lower Seyhan Catchment Area starts at the downstream of the Seyhan Dam on the Seyhan River. This fertile area is exposed to dense agricultural activities. Nutrient loads (nitrogen and phosphorus) from these activities create an important pollution potential for surface and groundwater resources in the area. In addition to the agricultural areas, these nutrient loads also originate from domestic and industrial discharges. In this study, the transport of the estimated nutrient lo...

  2. Geographically Isolated Wetlands and Catchment Hydrology: A Modified Model Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, G.; Golden, H. E.; Lane, C.; D'Amico, E.

    2014-12-01

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs), typically defined as depressional wetlands surrounded by uplands, support an array of hydrological and ecological processes. However, key research questions concerning the hydrological connectivity of GIWs and their impacts on downgradient surface waters remain unanswered. This is particularly important for regulation and management of these systems. For example, in the past decade United States Supreme Court decisions suggest that GIWs can be afforded protection if significant connectivity exists between these waters and traditional navigable waters. Here we developed a simulation procedure to quantify the effects of various spatial distributions of GIWs across the landscape on the downgradient hydrograph using a refined version of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a catchment-scale hydrological simulation model. We modified the SWAT FORTRAN source code and employed an alternative hydrologic response unit (HRU) definition to facilitate an improved representation of GIW hydrologic processes and connectivity relationships to other surface waters, and to quantify their downgradient hydrological effects. We applied the modified SWAT model to an ~ 202 km2 catchment in the Coastal Plain of North Carolina, USA, exhibiting a substantial population of mapped GIWs. Results from our series of GIW distribution scenarios suggest that: (1) Our representation of GIWs within SWAT conforms to field-based characterizations of regional GIWs in most respects; (2) GIWs exhibit substantial seasonally-dependent effects upon downgradient base flow; (3) GIWs mitigate peak flows, particularly following high rainfall events; and (4) The presence of GIWs on the landscape impacts the catchment water balance (e.g., by increasing groundwater outflows). Our outcomes support the hypothesis that GIWs have an important catchment-scale effect on downgradient streamflow.

  3. Sediment sources in the Upper Severn catchment: a fingerprinting approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Collins

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspended sediment sources in the Upper Severn catchment are quantified using a composite fingerprinting technique combining statistically-verified signatures with a multivariate mixing model. Composite fingerprints are developed from a suite of diagnostic properties comprising trace metal (Fe, Mn, AI, heavy metal (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr, Co, Ni, base cation (Na, Mg, Ca, K, organic (C, N, radiometric (137Cs, 210Pb, and other (total P determinands. A numerical mixing model, to compare the fingerprints of contemporary catchment source materials with those of fluvial suspended sediment in transit and those of recent overbank floodplain deposits, provides a means of quantifying present and past sediment sources respectively. Sources are classified in terms of eroding surface soils under different land uses and channel banks. Eroding surface soils are the most important source of the contemporary suspended sediment loads sampled at the Institute of Hydrology flow gauging stations at Plynlimon and at Abermule. The erosion of forest soils, associated with the autumn and winter commercial activities of the Forestry Commission, is particularly evident. Reconstruction of sediment provenance over the recent past using a sediment core from the active river floodpiain at Abermule, in conjunction with a 137Cs chronology, demonstrates the significance of recent phases of afforestation and deforestation for accelerated catchment soil erosion.

  4. Hydrogeochemistry of shallow groundwater in an upland Scottish catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulsby, C.; Chen, M.; Ferrier, R. C.; Helliwell, R. C.; Jenkins, A.; Harriman, R.

    1998-06-01

    The hydrogeochemistry of shallow groundwater has been characterized in the Allt a'Mharcaidh catchment in the Scottish Cairngorms in order to: (i) assess the spatial and temporal variation in groundwater chemistry; (ii) identify the hydrogeochemical processes regulating its evolution; and (iii) examine the influence of groundwater on the quality and quantity of stream flow. Shallow groundwater in superficial drift deposits is circumneutral (pH7·1) and base cation concentrations are enriched compared with precipitation and drainage water from overlying podzolic soils. Modelling with NETPATH suggests that the dominant geochemical processes that account for this are the dissolution of plagioclase, K-feldspar and biotite. Groundwater emerging as springs from weathered granite underlying high altitude (>900 m) alpine soils shows similar characteristics, though weathering rates are lower, probably as a result of reduced residence times and lower temperatures. Chemical hydrograph separation techniques using acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and Si as tracers show that groundwater is the dominant source of baseflow in the catchment and also buffers the chemistry of stream water at high flows: groundwater may account for as much as 50-60% of annual runoff in the catchment. Climate and land use in the Cairngorms are vulnerable to future changes, which may have major implications for hydrogeological processes in the area.

  5. The topographic wetness index as a predictor for hot spots of DOC export from catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musolff, Andreas; Oosterwoud, Marieke; Tittel, Jörg; Selle, Benny; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2015-04-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in the discharge of many catchments in Europe and North America are rising. This increase is of concern for the drinking water supply from reservoirs since high DOC concentrations cause additional costs in water treatment and potentially the formation of harmful disinfection by-products. A prerequisite for understanding this increase is the knowledge on the spatial distribution of dominant soil DOC sources within catchments and on mobilization as well as transfer processes to the surface water. A number of studies identified wetland soils as the dominant source with fast mobilization and short transit times to the receiving surface water. However, most studies have either focussed on smaller, hillslope and single catchment or on larger scale multi-catchment assessments. Moreover, information on the distribution of soil types in catchments is not always readily available. This study brings together both types of assessment in a data-driven top-down approach: (i) a detailed survey on DOC concentration and loads over the course of one year within two paired data-rich catchments discharging into a large drinking water reservoir in central Germany and (ii) a database of hydrochemistry and physio-geographic characteristics of 113 catchments draining into 58 reservoirs across Germany over the course of 16 years. The objective is to define hot spots of DOC export within the catchments for both types of assessments (i, ii) and to test the suitability of the topographic wetness index (TWI) as a proxy for well-connected wetland soils at various spatial scales. In the sub-catchments of assessment (i) the spatial variability of concentrations and loads was much smaller than expected. None of the studied sub-catchments was a predominant producer of the total DOC loads exported from the catchments. We found the mean concentrations and loads to be positively correlated with the share of groundwater-dominated soils in the sub-catchments

  6. Meaningful traits for grouping plant species across arid ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär Lamas, Marlene Ivonne; Carrera, A L; Bertiller, M B

    2016-05-01

    Grouping species may provide some degree of simplification to understand the ecological function of plants on key ecosystem processes. We asked whether groups of plant species based on morpho-chemical traits associated with plant persistence and stress/disturbance resistance reflect dominant plant growth forms in arid ecosystems. We selected twelve sites across an aridity gradient in northern Patagonia. At each site, we identified modal size plants of each dominant species and assessed specific leaf area (SLA), plant height, seed mass, N and soluble phenol concentration in green and senesced leaves at each plant. Plant species were grouped according with plant growth forms (perennial grasses, evergreen shrubs and deciduous shrubs) and plant morphological and/or chemical traits using cluster analysis. We calculated mean values of each plant trait for each species group and plant growth form. Plant growth forms significantly differed among them in most of the morpho-chemical traits. Evergreen shrubs were tall plants with the highest seed mass and soluble phenols in leaves, deciduous shrubs were also tall plants with high SLA and the highest N in leaves, and perennial grasses were short plants with high SLA and low concentration of N and soluble phenols in leaves. Grouping species by the combination of morpho-chemical traits yielded 4 groups in which species from one growth form prevailed. These species groups differed in soluble phenol concentration in senesced leaves and plant height. These traits were highly correlated. We concluded that (1) plant height is a relevant synthetic variable, (2) growth forms adequately summarize ecological strategies of species in arid ecosystems, and (3) the inclusion of plant morphological and chemical traits related to defenses against environmental stresses and herbivory enhanced the potential of species grouping, particularly within shrubby growth forms. PMID:26897637

  7. Sediment transfer in coastal catchments exposed to typhoons: lessons learnt from catchments contaminated with Fukushima radioactive fallout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrard, Olivier; Laceby, J. Patrick; Onda, Yuichi; Lefèvre, Irène

    2016-04-01

    Several coastal catchments located in Northeastern Japan received significant radioactive fallout following the Fukushima nuclear accident in March 2011, with initial 137Cs activities exceeding 100 kBq m-2. Although radiocesium poses a considerable health risk for local populations, it also provides a relatively straightforward tracer to investigate sediment transfers in catchments exposed to spring floods and heavy typhoons in late summer and early fall. This study focused on two catchments (the Niida and Mano Rivers) covering a surface area of 450 km² that drain the main radioactive plume. A database of radiocesium activities measured in potential source samples (n=260) was used to model radiocesium dilution in 342 sediment deposit samples collected at 38 locations during 9 different sampling campaigns conducted every 6 months from Nov. 2011 to Nov. 2015. The dilution of the initial radiocesium contamination in sediment was individually calculated for each of the 342 samples using a distribution model. Results show that the proportion of heavily contaminated sediment increased from 27% to 39% after the occurrence of typhoons in 2013 (with rainfall amount exceeding 100 mm in 48 hours) and from 29% to 45% after the 2015 spring floods, illustrating the occurrence of soil erosion and resuspension of contaminated material stored in the river channel. In contrast, the occurrence of a very strong typhoon in September 2015 (up to 450 mm in 48h) led to the dilution and the flush of the contamination to the Pacific Ocean, with the proportion of heavily contaminated material decreasing from 45 to 21%. This case study in catchments impacted by the Fukushima accident illustrates their high reactivity to both human activities and rainfall. These results will improve our understanding of sediment transfers in similar coastal mountainous environments frequently exposed to heavy rainfall.

  8. Forecasting the impact of global changes on the water resources of a mountainous catchment in the Chilean Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelland, D.; Campéon, C.; Dezetter, A.; Jourde, H.

    2012-04-01

    This study aims to simulate the complex interrelationships between climate forcing, human pressure and dynamics of groundwater and surface water of the upper Elqui catchment (5 660 km2) in the Chilean Andes. The water resources of this mountainous, semi-arid catchment has been undergoing a growing pressure because of high climate variability and of the economic mutations of various sectors (agriculture, tourism), which have impacted water availability of the area. Due to the agriculture-based development in the region, water scarcity is thus a matter of great concern for this basin. Hydrological simulations were performed with a conceptual model that takes into account a shallow reservoir supplied by precipitation and feeding evapotranspiration, surface/sub-surface runoff and infiltration, and (ii) a deep reservoir fed by infiltration and generating the baseflow. A third reservoir, in which fluxes are controlled by temperature, has been introduced to account for the snowmelt regime of the catchment. A 30-year period (1979-2008) was chosen to capture long-term hydro-climatic variability due to alternating ENSO and LNSO events. Then water uses (dam functioning, agricultural and domestic withdrawals) were integrated into the model. The model was calibrated and validated with streamflow data on the basis of a multi-objective function that aggregates a variety of goodness-of-fit criteria. Prospective climatic and anthropogenic scenarios were finally elaborated and forced into the model in order to propose midterm (2050 horizon) simulations. The model correctly reproduces the observed discharge at the basin outlet. Depending on the modelling complexity, NSE coefficients are about 0.82-0.90 over the calibration period (1979-1990) and 0.78-0.84 over the validation period (1991-2008). The volume error between observation and simulation is lower than 15% over the whole period studied. The dynamics of both the water level in the deep conceptual reservoir and the water table

  9. Influence of geology, regolith and soil on fluid flow pathways in an upland catchment in central NSW, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Tony

    2014-05-01

    Influence of geology, regolith and soil on fluid flow pathways in an upland catchment in central NSW, Australia. Tony Bernardi and Leah Moore Dryland Salinity Hazard Mitigation Program (DSHMP), University of Canberra, ACT 2601, AUSTRALIA The diversity of salt expression in central NSW has defied classification because salt expression, mobilisation and transport is highly variable and is typically site specific. Hydrological models are extensively used to simulate possible outcomes for a range of land use changes to mitigate the mobilisation and transport of salt into the streams or across the land surface. The ability of these models to mimic reality can be variable thereby reducing the confidence in the models outputs and uptake of strategic management changes by the community. This study focuses on a 250 ha semi-arid sub-catchment of Little River catchment in central west NSW in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia. We propose that an understanding the structure of the landforms and configuration of rock, regolith and soil materials at the study site influences fluid flow pathways in the landscape and can be related to observed variations in the chemical composition and salinity of surface and aquifer water. Preliminary geological mapping of the site identified the dominant rock type as a pink and grey dacite and in localised mid-slope areas, a coarsely crystalline biotite-phyric granodiorite. Samples were taken at regular intervals from natural exposures in eroded stream banks and in excavations made during the installation of neutron moisture meter tubes. In order to establish mineral weathering pathways, samples were taken from the relatively unweathered core to the outer weathered 'onion skins' of corestones on both substrates, and then up through the regolith profile, including the soil zone, to the land surface. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) was conducted on the rock and soil/saprock samples. Electromagnetic induction (EMI

  10. High resolution modeling of a small urban catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouri-Plakali, Ilektra; Ichiba, Abdellah; Gires, Auguste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Flooding is one of the most complex issues that urban environments have to deal with. In France, flooding remains the first natural risk with 72% of decrees state of natural disaster issued between October 1982 and mid-November 2014. Flooding is a result of meteorological extremes that are usually aggravated by the hydrological behavior of urban catchments and human factors. The continuing urbanization process is indeed changing the whole urban water cycle by limiting the infiltration and promoting runoff. Urban environments are very complex systems due to their extreme variability, the interference between human activities and natural processes but also the effect of the ongoing urbanization process that changes the landscape and hardly influences their hydrologic behavior. Moreover, many recent works highlight the need to simulate all urban water processes at their specific temporal and spatial scales. However, considering urban catchments heterogeneity still challenging for urban hydrology, even after advances noticed in term of high-resolution data collection and computational resources. This issue is more to be related to the architecture of urban models being used and how far these models are ready to take into account the extreme variability of urban catchments. In this work, high spatio-temporal resolution modeling is performed for a small and well-equipped urban catchment. The aim of this work is to identify urban modeling needs in terms of spatial and temporal resolution especially for a very small urban area (3.7 ha urban catchment located in the Perreux-sur-Marne city at the southeast of Paris) MultiHydro model was selected to carry out this work, it is a physical based and fully distributed model that interacts four existing modules each of them representing a portion of the water cycle in urban environments. MultiHydro was implemented at 10m, 5m and 2m resolution. Simulations were performed at different spatio-temporal resolutions and analyzed with

  11. Storm-driven pesticide dynamics in a catchment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Rebecca; Freer, Jim; Michaelides, Katerina; Hurley, Steven; Howden, Nicholas; Bull, Ian

    2013-04-01

    Loss of pesticides from agricultural land in runoff and subsurface flow during rainfall events poses a significant concern for water quality, with adverse effects on drinking water and aquatic life. Pesticide mobilisation and transport is affected by runoff and erosion processes which leads to different flow pathways and pesticide residence times in a catchment. In the soil and sediment environment pesticides can be a significant component of surface water contamination because of their persistence in soil and sediment and that they have a tendency to desorb back into water over time. A lowland agricultural catchment upstream of a drinking-water supply reservoir in the South West of England is being used to investigate pesticide dynamics at the catchment scale during individual storm events. Pesticide concentration in water and suspended sediments were determined from samples taken at incremental changes in stream flow incorporating both rising and falling river levels. The study aims to determine the relative partitioning of pesticides transported in the dissolved phase or adsorbed to sediment. Analyses of soil, sediment and water from across the catchment aids understanding of the interaction between different media and can be used to determine the importance of dissolved and sediment-bound pesticide dynamics during individual storm events. Initial results imply that processes of transport and desorption are occurring in both soils and river and reservoir sediments which are likely to be an important factor for timing of pesticide movement. This suggests soil and sediment are acting as a sustained source of contamination to surface water. However; interactions between these different media are complex. Investigation of the molluscicide metaldehyde, showed this to be present in stream water at concentrations greater than 0.1 µg µl-1 nine months after application. Storm event analysis shows peak pesticide concentration in the stream to coincide with storm

  12. CAOS: the nested catchment soil-vegetation-atmosphere observation platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Markus; Blume, Theresa

    2016-04-01

    Most catchment based observations linking hydrometeorology, ecohydrology, soil hydrology and hydrogeology are typically not integrated with each other and lack a consistent and appropriate spatial-temporal resolution. Within the research network CAOS (Catchments As Organized Systems), we have initiated and developed a novel and integrated observation platform in several catchments in Luxembourg. In 20 nested catchments covering three distinct geologies the subscale processes at the bedrock-soil-vegetation-atmosphere interface are being monitored at 46 sensor cluster locations. Each sensor cluster is designed to observe a variety of different fluxes and state variables above and below ground, in the saturated and unsaturated zone. The numbers of sensors are chosen to capture the spatial variability as well the average dynamics. At each of these sensor clusters three soil moisture profiles with sensors at different depths, four soil temperature profiles as well as matric potential, air temperature, relative humidity, global radiation, rainfall/throughfall, sapflow and shallow groundwater and stream water levels are measured continuously. In addition, most sensors also measure temperature (water, soil, atmosphere) and electrical conductivity. This setup allows us to determine the local water and energy balance at each of these sites. The discharge gauging sites in the nested catchments are also equipped with automatic water samplers to monitor water quality and water stable isotopes continuously. Furthermore, water temperature and electrical conductivity observations are extended to over 120 locations distributed across the entire stream network to capture the energy exchange between the groundwater, stream water and atmosphere. The measurements at the sensor clusters are complemented by hydrometeorological observations (rain radar, network of distrometers and dense network of precipitation gauges) and linked with high resolution meteorological models. In this

  13. Influence of teleconnection on water quality in agricultural river catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellander, Per-Erik; Jordan, Phil; Shore, Mairead; McDonald, Noeleen; Shortle, Ger

    2015-04-01

    Influences such as weather, flow controls and lag time play an important role in the processes influencing the water quality of agricultural catchments. In particular weather signals need to be clearly considered when interpreting the effectiveness of current measures for reducing nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) losses from agricultural sources to water bodies. In north-western Europe weather patterns and trends are influenced by large-scale systems such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the position of the Gulf Stream, the latter expressed as the Gulf Stream North Wall index (GSNW index). Here we present five years of monthly data of nitrate-N concentration in stream water and groundwater (aggregated from sub-hourly monitoring in the stream outlet and monthly sampling in multilevel monitoring wells) from four agricultural catchments (ca. 10 km2) together with monitored weather parameters, long-term weather data and the GSNW index. The catchments are situated in Ireland on the Atlantic seaboard and are susceptible to sudden and seasonal shifts in oceanic climate patterns. Rain anomalies and soil moisture deficit dynamics were similar to the dynamics of the GSNW index. There were monitored changes in nitrate-N concentration in both groundwater and surface water with no apparent connection to agricultural management; instead such changes also appeared to follow the GSNW index. For example, in catchments with poorly drained soils and a 'flashy hydrology' there were seasonal dynamics in nitrate-N concentration that correlated with the seasonal dynamics of the GSNW index. In a groundwater driven catchment there was a consistent increase in nitrate-N concentration over the monitored period which may be the result of increasingly more recharge in summer and autumn (as indicated by more flux in the GSNW index). The results highlight that the position of the Gulf Stream may influence the nitrate-N concentration in groundwater and stream water and there is a risk

  14. Impact of spatial and temporal resolution of rainfall inputs on urban hydrodynamic outputs: A multi-catchment investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ochoa-Rodriguez, Susana; Wang, Lipen; Gires, Auguste;

    2015-01-01

    Urban catchments are typically characterised by high spatial variability and fast runoff processes resulting in short response times. Hydrological analysis of such catchments requires high resolution precipitation and catchment information to properly represent catchment response. This study...... investigated the impact of rainfall input resolution on the outputs of detailed hydrodynamic models of seven urban catchments in North-West Europe. The aim was to identify critical rainfall resolutions for urban catchments to properly characterise catchment response. Nine storm events measured by a dual...... for standardising model outputs and making results comparable were implemented. Results were analysed in the light of storm and catchment characteristics. Three main features were observed in the results: (1) the impact of rainfall input resolution decreases rapidly as catchment drainage area increases; (2...

  15. Semi-arid development: competitiveness factors in biodiesel productive chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno Barros Telles do Carmo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The new global market competitiveness considerer the competition between productive chains (PC or supply chains, not just between enterprises. In this case, it can be observed collaboration and cooperation enterprises that dispute with others productives chain. The PC competitiveness can be impaired if is subject by inhibitors factors, that can impairer the performance. This paper analyses these competitiveness factors inhibitors in biodiesel productive chain (CPB in semi-arid area: exported product, market knowledge, competitiveness position, opportunities to aggregate value in chain, cooperation between enterprises, enterprises way of thinking and paternalism by government. It was done this analyses to compare CPB with the world.

  16. Robustness and uncertainties in future hydrological regimes of Swiss catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addor, N.; Roessler, O.; Koeplin, N.; Bernhard, L.; Weingartner, R.; Seibert, J.

    2013-12-01

    Projections of discharge under future climate are impaired by uncertainties arising from different sources: the emission scenarios, the climate models and internal climate variability, the post-processing and sampling of the climate projections, and the hydrological models structure and parameterization. This study aims to investigate the contribution of these sources to the final uncertainty of discharge projections. To this end we performed analyses of variance (ANOVA) in six catchments expected to react differently to climate change and representative of the typical Swiss discharge regimes. We used climate projections of the CH2011 dataset obtained from the Center for Climate Systems Modeling (C2SM). This dataset consists of two types of projections, both relying on the delta change technique. The delta coefficients were determined either in a deterministic way by spectral smoothing of 10 GCM-RCM chains or in a probabilistic way by a Bayesian multi-model approach combining 20 runs until 2050, and then 14 runs until 2099. In addition to the climate projections for emission scenario A1B chosen for the ENSEMBLES project, the CH2011 team generated simulations for the scenarios A2 and RCP3PD using pattern scaling. This enabled us to address the influence of the uncertainty in greenhouse gas emissions on discharge projections. We ran hydrological simulations using three conceptual models: HBV, PREVAH and WaSiM. HBV and PREVAH rely on a similar reservoir structure, while WaSiM uses the more process-oriented Richards-equation approach. PREVAH and WaSiM rely on a higher level of spatial discretization than the lumped HBV model. The use of the three different models allowed evaluation of the sensitivity of discharge projections to the hydrological model complexity and structure. Further, we compared two ways to determine PREVAH parameter values: via calibration and via regionalization. Simulations were run for the periods 2020-2049, 2045-2074 and 2070-2099 to assess the

  17. Role of glaciers in watershed hydrology: ''Himalayan catchment'' perspective

    OpenAIRE

    R. J. Thayyen; J. T. Gergan

    2009-01-01

    A large number of Himalayan glacier catchments are under the influence of humid climate with snowfall in winter (November–April) and South-West monsoon in summer (June–September) dominating the regional hydrology. Such catchments are defined as ''Himalayan catchment'', where the glacier melt water contributes to the river flow during the period of annual high flows produced by the monsoon. Other two major glacio-hydrological regimes of the Himalaya are winter snow do...

  18. Determination of catchment area of surface water in gis for suitable land management

    OpenAIRE

    Kovačič, Primož

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this diploma thesis is defining the catchment areas of surface waters for suitable land management, which is also reflected on water quality. Besides basic concepts, legal backgrounds in Slovenia, which are related to water areas and water management, are introduced. The thesis presents the existing models of catchment areas of waters in Slovenia and it especially exposes the subsistent methodology of defining catchment areas of surface waters on the basis of digital eleva...

  19. Factors controlling inter-catchment variation of mean transit time with consideration of temporal variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenchao; Yamanaka, Tsutomu

    2016-03-01

    The catchment transit time, a lumped descriptor reflecting both time scale and spatial structure of catchment hydrology can provide useful insights into chemical/nuclear pollution risks within a catchment. Despite its importance, factors controlling spatial variation of mean transit time (MTT) are not yet well understood. In this study, we estimated time-variant MTTs for about ten years (2003-2012) in five mesoscale sub-catchments of the Fuji River catchment, central Japan, to establish the factors controlling their inter-catchment variation with consideration of temporal variability. For this purpose, we employed a lumped hydrological model that was calibrated and validated by hydrometric and isotopic tracer observations. Temporal variation patterns of estimated MTT were similar in all sub-catchments, but with differing amplitudes. Inter-catchment variation of MTT was greater in dry periods than wet periods, suggesting spatial variation of MTT is controlled by water 'stock' rather than by 'flow'. Although the long-term average MTT (LAMTT) in each catchment was correlated with mean slope, coverage of forest (or conversely, other land use types), coverage of sand-shale conglomerate, and groundwater storage, the multiple linear regression revealed that inter-catchment variation of LAMTT is principally controlled by the amount of groundwater storage. This is smaller in mountainous areas covered mostly by forests and greater in plain areas with less forest coverage and smaller slope. This study highlights the topographic control of MTT via groundwater storage, which might be a more important factor in mesoscale catchments, including both mountains and plains, rather than in smaller catchments dominated by mountainous topography.

  20. The "Teflon basin" myth: Snow-soil interactions in mountain catchments in the western US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M. W.; Cowie, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    In much of western North America, snow and snowmelt provide the primary means for storage of winter precipitation, effectively transferring water from the relatively wet winter season to the typically dry summers. A common assumption is that high-elevation catchments in the western United States behave like "Teflon basins" and that water released from seasonal storage in snow packs flows directly into streams with little or no interaction with underlying soils. Here I present information from a variety of catchments in the Colorado Front Range on snowmelt/soil interactions using isotopic, geochemical, nutrient and hydrometric data in 2- and 3- component hydrograph separations, along with end-member mixing analysis (EMMA). For most catchments we measured these parameters in weekly precipitation, the seasonal snowpack, snowmelt before contact with the ground, discharge, springs, soil solution, and groundwater. We ran EMMA at the catchment scale for catchments that represent the rain-snow transition zone in the montane forest, the seasonally snow covered sub-alpine to alpine transition zone, and a high-elevation alpine zone near the continental divide. In all catchments three end-members were the source waters for about 95% of discharge. Two end-members were the same in all catchments, snow and groundwater. For the alpine catchment talus springs was the third water source, while rain was the third water source in the two lower-elevation catchments. For all three catchments, soil solution plotted with stream waters along or near a line connecting the snow and groundwater end-members. Thus, for seasonally snow-covered catchments from montane to alpine ecosystems, snowmelt infiltrates underlying soils before snowmelt recharges groundwater reservoirs and contributes to surface flows. Seasonally snow-covered catchments are not Teflon basins. Rather, snowmelt infiltrates soils where solute concentrations are changed by biological and geochemical processes.

  1. Watershed scale spatial variability in dissolved and total organic and inorganic carbon in contrasting UK catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumberland, S.; Baker, A.; Hudson, N. J.

    2006-12-01

    Approximately 800 organic and inorganic carbon analyses have been undertaken from watershed scale and regional scale spatial surveys in various British catchments. These include (1) a small (wetlands for all sample sites. (4) In the urbanized Ouseburn catchment, although many sample sites also show this same mixing trend, some tributaries follow a pollutant trend of simultaneous increases in both DOC and DIC. The Ouseburn is part of the larger Tyne catchment: this larger catchment follows the simple groundwater DIC- soil water DOC end member mixing model, with the exception of the urban catchments which exhibit an elevated DIC compared to rural sites. (5) Urbanization is demonstrated to increase DIC compared to equivalent rural catchments; this DIC has potential sources including diffuse source inputs from the dissolution of concrete, point sources such as trade effluents and landfill leachates, and bedrock derived carbonates relocated to the soil dissolution zone by urban development. (6) DIC in rural SW England demonstrates that spatial variability in DIC can be attributed to variations in geology; but that DIC concentrations in the SW England rivers dataset are typically lower than the urbanized Tyne catchments despite the presence of carbonate bedrock in many of the sample catchments in the SW England dataset. (7) Recent investigations into carbon fluxes in British rivers have focused on long term increases in DOC in rural and predominantly upland catchments. Our results suggest that research is needed into understanding long term variations in inorganic carbon concentration, as well as total (organic and inorganic) carbon fluxes from British rivers, to obtain total carbon loads. In particular, we provide evidence that DIC concentrations may be greater in urbanized catchments compared to equivalent non-urban catchments, with the implication that increasing urbanization in the future will see increases in riverine DIC and a decrease in the strength of any DOC

  2. Progress in the identification of catchments with co-existent multiple steady states and finite resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, T. J.; Western, A. W.; Thyer, M. A.; Frost, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrology has implicitly assumed that catchments are infinitely resilient to droughts and floods. No matter the magnitude of the climatic disturbance, almost all hydrological models simulate full recovery and hence assume infinite resilience. Recent research shows that catchments can undergo fundamental change during major droughts and this change in behavior is not captured by rainfall-runoff models. To date, the field of hydrological resilience has relied on theoretical deterministic models or vague resilience concepts, with the identification of catchments with multiple steady states (henceforth, attractors) remaining elusive. This is primarily due to the challenges stochastic forcing introduces into quantifying disturbance and recovery, and because resilience theory does not adequately address stochastic forcing. Drawing from recent hydrological resilience theory on catchment disturbance and recovery, a data-driven hidden Markov model is proposed for identifying recovery to a different hydrological state following major climatic disturbances. Application to selected unregulated catchments within Victoria, Australia, shows that after the Millennium Drought (~1995-2010) some catchments are yet to recover and have persisted within a functionally different hydrological state compared to that prior to the drought. Conversely, some catchments fully recovered at the cessation of the drought. This provides the first known field evidence that some catchments may have multiple attractors. Additionally, catchments are shown to differ in their resistance to the drought, with some catchments switching to a drought state at the commencement of the meteorological drought while other catchments taking ~10 years to switch to a hydrological drought state. In addition to separating hydrological droughts from meteorological droughts, this research provides a pathway for quantifying catchment resilience and resistance to climatic disturbances.

  3. Design for participation in ecologically sound management of South Africa's Mlazi River Catchment

    OpenAIRE

    Auerbach, R

    1999-01-01

    Without local participation, integrated catchment management and Landcare will not become a general reality in South Africa. With support from the South African Water Research Commission, the University of Natal's Farmer Support Group set up the Ntshongweni Catchment Management Programme (NCMP) as a practical participatory action research investigation of ecological farming systems, integrated catchment management and Landcare. Local experience played a crucial role in helping to build credib...

  4. Evaluation of catchment contributing areas and storm runoff in flat terrain subject to urbanisation

    OpenAIRE

    O. V. Barron; D. Pollock; Dawes, W.

    2011-01-01

    Contributing Catchment Area Analysis (CCAA) is a spatial analysis technique developed and used for estimation of the hydrological connectivity of relatively flat catchments. It allows accounting for the effect of relief depressions on the catchment rainfall-runoff relationship which is not commonly considered in hydrological modelling. Analysis of distributed runoff was based on USDA runoff curves numbers (USDA, 1986), which utilised the spatial information on land cover and soil types, while...

  5. Chloride transport in a small catchment of the Norrström basin.

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Mengni

    2014-01-01

    On a catchment scale, chloride (Cl-) leached from forest soil due to dry deposition and interaction between vegetation and soil could attribute to the Cl- mass balance. The availability of Cl- data from monitoring works enables the assessment of net ecosystem budgets of Cl-, which compares Cl- amount from wet deposition to that in stream export. Some studies have shown that Cl- imbalances could occur in some catchments and one of such catchments with negative budget is Kringlan. The Kringlan ...

  6. Aerosol radiative effects over global arid and semi-arid regions based on MODIS Deep Blue satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Papadimas, Christos D.; Gkikas, Antonis; Matsoukas, Christos; Sayer, Andrew M.; Hsu, N. Christina; Vardavas, Ilias

    2014-05-01

    Aerosols are a key parameter for several atmospheric processes related to weather and climate of our planet. Specifically, the aerosol impact on Earth's climate is exerted and quantified through their radiative effects, which are induced by their direct, indirect and semi-direct interactions with radiation, in particular at short wavelengths (solar). It is acknowledged that the uncertainty of present and future climate assessments is mainly associated with aerosols and that a better understanding of their physico-chemical, optical and radiative effects is needed. The contribution of satellites to this aim is important as a complementary tool to climate and radiative transfer models, as well as to surface measurements, since space observations of aerosol properties offer an extended spatial coverage. However, such satellite based aerosol properties and associated model radiation computations have suffered from unavailability over highly reflecting surfaces, namely polar and desert areas. This is also the case for MODIS which, onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites, has been providing high quality aerosol data since 2000 and 2002, respectively. These data, more specifically the aerosol optical depth (AOD) which is the most important optical property used in radiative and climate models, are considered to be of best quality. In order to address this problem, the MODIS Deep Blue (DB) algorithm has been developed which enables the retrieval of AOD above arid and semi-arid areas of the globe, including the major deserts. In the present study we make use of the FORTH detailed spectral radiative transfer model (RTM) with MODIS DB AOD data, supplemented with single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (AP) aerosol data from the Global Aerosol DataSet (GADS) to estimate the aerosol DREs over the arid and semi-arid regions of the globe. The RTM is run using surface and atmospheric data from the ISCCP-D2 dataset and the NCEP global reanalysis project and computes the

  7. Characterizing Runoff and Water Yield from Headwater Catchments in the Southern Sierra Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safeeq, M.; Hunsaker, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    In a mediterranean climate where much of the annual precipitation falls during winter, the snow-capped Sierra Nevada serves as the primary source of dry season runoff that supports agriculture, industries, urban, and other ecosystems. Increased warming has led to significant reductions in mountain snowpack accumulation and earlier snowmelt throughout the western United States where most of the snow accumulates at temperatures near the freezing point. As a result, declines in dry season runoff magnitude, earlier runoff timing, and altered flood risk have been reported across the region. An important question in this context is, how to best manage forested catchments for water and other ecosystem services? We depict the differences in hydrologic response of ten catchments in the Kings River Experimental Watersheds (KREW) research project using continuous precipitation, snow, and runoff data during 2004-2014. The size of these catchments ranges from 50 to 475 ha, and they span a 600-m elevation range in the rain snow transitional zone. In terms of soil, Shaver and Gerle-Cagwin dominate the lower elevation Providence catchments, and Cagwin soils dominate the higher elevation Bull catchments. The majority of these catchments have southwest aspect, moderate average slope (i.e. <25%), and a well-developed drainage network with drainage density ranging from 4.6 to 10.1 km/km2. Bull catchments, on average, have higher runoff than the Providence catchments across all hydrologic signatures extracted from daily hydrographs. Mean annual runoff ranges between 281 to 408 mm in Providence and 436 to 656 mm in Bull catchments despite no significant difference in precipitation among KREW's four meteorological stations. However, high elevation Bull catchments receive significantly more precipitation as snow than the low elevation Providence catchments. The average runoff ratio ranges from 18% to as high as 43% among different catchments, indicating that the catchment

  8. Sediment transport in steep forested catchments: the role of disturbance and scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Greg; Hugo, James; Webb, Ashley

    2016-04-01

    Sediment loads (both bedload and suspended sediment) are difficult to measure due to the time and equipment needed. However such data is needed to understand overall sediment transport rates, landscape evolution, effect of human disturbance as well as patterns and temporal response. There is a dearth of such data sets globally let along for Australia. Here we present the findings from 8 steep slope forested catchments dominated by headwater streams (size range 15-100 hectares) in south-eastern Australia where both bedload and suspended load have been measured over multiple years. The results demonstrate that suspended load is the dominant component. There appears to be no consistent suspended to bedload ratio for the catchments. The suspended sediment to bedload ratio appears to be catchment specific. There was no relationship between total load (or bedload/suspended load) and average catchment slope, stream length, shape or any geomorphic descriptor. Again this appears to be catchment specific. However catchment total load was found to be significantly related to catchment area and demonstrates strong log-log linear behaviour. Comparing these total loads with total load data from a nearby larger catchments (100km2 to 1000km2) demonstrates that there is a significant scaling relationship across all catchment sizes in this region. The scaling relationships found here are similar to those found globally and provide a unique insight into an understudied system. The data also provides the ability to assess sediment transport models and their reliability across different scales.

  9. Detecting non-stationary hydrologic model parameters in a paired catchment system using data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathiraja, S.; Marshall, L.; Sharma, A.; Moradkhani, H.

    2016-08-01

    Non-stationarity represents one of the major challenges facing hydrologists. There exists a need to develop modelling systems that are capable of accounting for potential catchment changes, in order to provide useful predictions for the future. Such changes may be due to climatic temporal variations or human induced changes to land cover. Extensive research has been undertaken on the impacts of land-use change on hydrologic behaviour, however, few studies have examined this issue in a predictive modelling context. In this paper, we investigate whether a time varying model parameter estimation framework that uses the principles of Data Assimilation can improve prediction for two pairs of experimental catchments in Western Australia. All catchments were initially forested, but after three years one catchment was fully cleared whilst another had only 50% of its area cleared. Their adjacent catchments remained unchanged as a control. Temporal variations in parameters were detected for both treated catchments, with no comparable variations for the control catchments. Improved streamflow prediction and representation of soil moisture dynamics were also seen for the time varying parameter case, compared to when a time invariant parameter set from the calibration period was used. While we use the above mentioned catchments to illustrate the usefulness of the approach, the methods are generic and equally applicable in other settings. This study serves as an important validation step to demonstrate the potential for time varying model structures to improve both predictions and modelling of changing catchments.

  10. Land use and land use dynamics in the upper-Ruizi river catchment, Southwestern Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Vanonckelen, Steven; Isabirye, Moses; Deckers, Seppe; Poesen, Jean

    2011-01-01

    In the effort to assess the land uses and land use dynamics in the Lake Victoria basin, a field survey is carried out in the Ruizi river catchment, Southwestern Uganda. The catchment plays a crucial role in the food production of the entire country and it is probably a major contributor of water and sediment to Lake Victoria. A land use map of relevant sub-catchments is constructed by field visits and GPS mapping. The land use dynamics are researched in two micro-catchments by compari...

  11. Hydrological dynamics of a Mediterranean catchment in a global change context. (Romanyac catchment, Cap de Creus, Girona, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latron, J.; Pardini, G.; Gispert, M.; Llorens, P.

    2009-04-01

    Mediterranean regions are characterized by unevenly distributed water resources, and consequently a more precise knowledge of the main hydrological processes and their variability and changes is crucial for a better management of water resources. However, the lack of hydrological information and data in most areas of the Mediterranean basin greatly difficult the analyses of changes in water resources at relevant scales. In this context, the Soil Science Unit GRCT48 from the University of Girona is conducting an integrated study of hydrological response, soil erosion and soil degradation processes in fragile Mediterranean areas undergoing changes in use and management. The study area is located in the Cap de Creus Peninsula (NE Spain), where land abandonment has been the outstanding characteristic over the last decades. The area is covered by terraced soils, most of them abandoned, and stands for a representative Mediterranean environment. Current land cover is a mosaic of areas with different shrubs according to wildfire occurrence. Residual patches of cork and pine trees are also present as well as small extensions of pastures. Finally some localized areas of vineyards and olive trees are still cultivated. The approach is based on the complementary use of plot and catchment scales to assess the effect of land cover and land use change on physical, chemical and biological parameters of soil quality and on rainfall-runoff-erosion relationships. Along the study period, observed rainfall-runoff response at the plot scale was highly variable among sites but also for a given environment, depending on antecedent wetness conditions and rainfall characteristics. Overall, surface runoff responses were low in all environments. Soil loss associated to rainfall-runoff events showed very large variations among sites, and also for a given site, between the different rainfall events. At the catchment scale, preliminary results obtained from the monitoring, of three catchments of

  12. Transferring rainfall runoff model parameters to ungauged catchments: Does the metric by which hydrologic similarity is defined actually matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R.; Archfield, S. A.; Wagener, T.; Vogel, R. M.

    2012-04-01

    Daily streamflow information is critical for solving any number of hydrologic problems. Because most of the world's stream reaches are ungauged, this data is commonly needed for rivers that have no readily available measurements of streamflow. One approach to estimating daily streamflow time series at ungauged catchments transfers a set of model parameters resulting from the calibration of a rainfall-runoff model at a gauged catchment (or set of gauged catchments) to an ungauged site of interest. Central to this approach is the selection of a gauged donor catchment that is considered hydrologically similar to the ungauged catchment. A number of published studies compare various methods to define hydrologic similarity, typically using distance between the catchments or similarity in catchments characteristics; however, no one metric of hydrologic similarity has been demonstrated to provide a consistent approach to select a suitable donor catchment. For 16 unregulated catchments in the mid-Atlantic United States, this study shows that the similarity metric matters little if the catchments are classified as good receivers, which we define as catchments having more than two donor catchments that result in reasonable models of daily streamflow. Rainfall-runoff models were calibrated at each of the 16 study catchments and then the study catchments were treated as ungauged and model parameters from each of the other 15 catchments were transferred to the ungauged catchment. For catchments that are good receivers, combining the model output from several donors - no matter whether the donors were selected using distance or similarity in catchment characteristics - resulted in estimated daily streamflow comparable to the observed streamflow at the ungauged location. However, none of the similarity metrics were useful for selecting a suitable donor catchment when the ungauged catchment is considered to be a poor receiver (defined as a catchment with only one donor catchment

  13. Seasonal contribution of terrestrial organic matter and biological oxygen demand to the Baltic Sea from three contrasting river catchments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reader, H. E.; Stedmon, C. A.; Kritzberg, E. S.

    2014-01-01

    on the same order of magnitude for all three catchments. Biological oxygen demand (BOD) was used as a proxy for the lability of carbon in the system. The range of BOD values was similar for all three catchments, however, the ratio of BOD to DOC (an indication of the labile fraction) in Ume river was four...... times higher than in the southern two catchments. Total annual BOD loading to the Baltic Sea was twice as high in the northern catchment than in the two southern catchments. Lower winter temperatures and preservation of organic matter in the northern catchment combined with an intense spring flood help...

  14. Karst catchments exhibited higher degradation stress from climate change than the non-karst catchments in southwest China: An ecohydrological perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meixian; Xu, Xianli; Wang, Dingbao; Sun, Alexander Y.; Wang, Kelin

    2016-04-01

    Karst landform represents about 10% of the continental area and plays key roles in water supplies for almost a quarter of the global population. Knowledge of ecohydrological responses of karst landform to climate change is critical for both water resources management and ecological protection in these regions. This study investigated the effects of karst landform on the elasticity of actual evapotranspiration (derived by the Budyko equation), estimated the contribution of climate change and evaluated the implications, on the basis of 13 typical catchments that have different karst landform coverages in southwest China. Catchment properties, including the vegetation coverage, portion of karst landform (POK), drainage area, surface roughness, mean topographic wetness index, mean slope, and mean aspect, were selected to test the influencing factors for the elasticity of actual evapotranspiration. Results indicate that POK is the most influencing factor for the elasticity of actual evapotranspiration in this region. Moreover, the actual evapotranspiration in karst catchments is more sensitive to precipitation change and less sensitive to the potential evapotranspiration change than that in the non-karst catchments. On the other hand, the contribution of climate change to actual evapotranspiration was generally negative in this region. Furthermore, relatively large negative contributions mainly occurred in the karst-dominated catchments, suggesting that the karst catchments were exposed to higher degradation stress brought by the climate change than that in non-karst catchments.

  15. A methodology to assess and evaluate rainwater harvesting techniques in (semi-) arid regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adham, Ammar; Riksen, Michel; Ouessar, Mohamed; Ritsema, Coen J.

    2016-01-01

    Arid and semi-arid regions around the world face water scarcity problems due to lack of precipitation and unpredictable rainfall patterns. For thousands of years, rainwater harvesting (RWH) techniques have been applied to cope with water scarcity. Researchers have used many different methodologie

  16. Conservation tillage of rainfed maize in semi-arid Zimbabwe: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyakudya, I.W.; Stroosnijder, L.

    2015-01-01

    Food security in Sub-Saharan Africa, particularly in semi-arid tropics (41% of the region; 6 months of dry season) is threatened by droughts, dry spells and infertile soils. In Zimbabwe, 74% of smallholder farming areas are located in semi-arid areas mostly in areas with soils of low fertility and w

  17. An overview of biodegradation of LNAPLs in coastal (semi)-arid environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yadav, B.K.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Contamination of soil and water due to the release of light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) is a ubiquitous problem. The problem is more severe in arid and semi-arid coastal regions where most of the petroleum production and related refinery industries are located. Biological treatment of these o

  18. Analysis and evaluation of tillage on an alfisol ina semi-arid tropical region of India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaij, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    Tillage field experiments were conducted on Alfisols in a semi-arid tropical environment in India. The research was conducted within the framework of the Farming Systems Research Program of the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT).To put the experiments into per

  19. Impact of grazing on range plant community components under arid Mediterranean climate in northern Syria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niane, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Keywords: Rotational grazing, full protection, continuous grazing species richness, species diversity, soil seed bank, Bayesian methods, Salsola vermiculata, seed longevity, rangeland management, Syria.   Rangelands represent 70% of the semi-arid and arid Mediterranean land mass. It is a n

  20. Differences in the ARID-1 alpha expressions in squamous and adenosquamous carcinomas of uterine cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solakoglu Kahraman, Dudu; Diniz, Gulden; Sayhan, Sevil; Ayaz, Duygu; Uncel, Melek; Karadeniz, Tugba; Akman, Tulay; Ozdemir, Aykut

    2015-10-01

    AT-rich interactive domain 1A (ARID1A) is a tumor suppressor gene involved in chromatin remodeling which encodes ARID1A (BAF250a) protein. Recent studies have shown the loss of ARID1A expression in several types of tumors. This retrospective study was designed to evaluate the differences in tissue expressions of ARID1A in a spectrum of cervical neoplasms. Cervical intraepithelial neoplasms, invasive squamous or adenosquamous carcinomas were identified in 100 patients recently diagnosed as cervical neoplasms based on pathology databases. In this series, there were 29 low- and 29 high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasms, 27 squamous cell carcinomas, and 15 adenosquamous carcinomas. Mean age of the patients was 47.8 ± 13 years (20-80 years). It was determined that the expression of ARID1A was statistically significantly down-regulated in adenosquamous carcinomas when compared with non-invasive or invasive squamous cell carcinomas (p = 0.015). Lower levels of the ARID1A expression were detected in cases with adenosquamous carcinomas (60%), low- or high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL) (31%), and squamous cell carcinomas (18.5%). Our findings have demonstrated the presence of a correlation between ARID1A expression and adenomatous differentiation of uterine squamous cell carcinomas. Therefore, ARID1A gene may suggestively have a role in the pathogenesis of cervical adenosquamous carcinomas.

  1. Expansive Soil Properties in a Semi-Arid Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MuawiaA. Dafalla

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The expansive soils in semi-arid regions are of great concern to design and geotechnical engineers. Range and variations of geotechnical properties of soils are very useful for appropriate design. Saudi Arabia; a semi arid region attracted the attention of researchers and practicing engineers over the last three decades following the rapid urbanizations in different parts of the country. Advanced testing equipments were made available for this study. The research group conducted joint visits with high officials from different municipality authorities to survey the problem and study the extent of damage to various structures. The areas visited included Al Ghatt, Al Zulfi, Al Hofuf, Um Al Sahik, Al Qatif, Tabuk, Tayma and Al Qaleeba. Single and two storey buildings, boundary walls, pavements and asphalt roads suffered significant damage in many parts of the visited locations. This paper presents the outcome of survey and a general review of previous works carried out for swelling clays in Saudi Arabia. Engineering properties for typical soil formation are presented.

  2. Feasibility of groundwater recharge dam projects in arid environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, H. H.

    2014-05-01

    A new method for determining feasibility and prioritizing investments for agricultural and domestic recharge dams in arid regions is developed and presented. The method is based on identifying the factors affecting the decision making process and evaluating these factors, followed by determining the indices in a GIS-aided environment. Evaluated parameters include results from field surveys and site visits, land cover and soils data, precipitation data, runoff data and modeling, number of beneficiaries, domestic irrigation demand, reservoir objectives, demography, reservoirs yield and reliability, dam structures, construction costs, and operation and maintenance costs. Results of a case study on more than eighty proposed dams indicate that assessment of reliability, annualized cost/demand satisfied and yield is crucial prior to investment decision making in arid areas. Irrigation demand is the major influencing parameter on yield and reliability of recharge dams, even when only 3 months of the demand were included. Reliability of the proposed reservoirs as related to their standardized size and net inflow was found to increase with increasing yield. High priority dams were less than 4% of the total, and less priority dams amounted to 23%, with the remaining found to be not feasible. The results of this methodology and its application has proved effective in guiding stakeholders for defining most favorable sites for preliminary and detailed design studies and commissioning.

  3. Aridity, desalination plants and tourism in the eastern Canary Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José-León García-Rodríguez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The islands of Lanzarote and Fuerteventura are the easternmost of the Canary Islands, and are located on the southern edge of the temperate zone, in the subtropical anticyclone belt. With less than 150 mm of rainfall a year, they are classified as an arid zone. Their inhabitants have devised original agricultural systems to combat the aridity, although low yields have historically limited socio-economic development and population growth. These systems were used until the introduction of seawater desalination plants and the arrival of tourism in the last third of the twentieth century, which improved living standards for the local population but also led to a cultural transition. Nevertheless, these farming systems have left behind an important regional heritage, with an environmental and scenic value that has played an integral role in the latest phase of development. The systems have become a tourist attraction and have been central to the two islands being designated biosphere reserves by UNESCO. This article aims to analyse the main socioeconomic and land-use changes that have come about as a result of desalination technology.

  4. Microclimates of the arid lands ecology reserve, 1968--1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorp, J. M.; Hinds, W. T.

    1977-04-01

    The climatology of the Hanford Reservation Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve does not end, of course, with this report. As this goes to press the arid lands of eastern Washington are experiencing the driest winter in 65 years of record. Even without including this winter's (1976-77) data in our summaries here, we have been fortunate to have had a very dry winter (1972-73) and a very wet winter (1973-74) occur within our first 8 years of climatological measurements on the Reserve. Our primary purpose with this report has been to analyze the first 8 years of climatological measurements from the ALE Reserve and to identify persistent spatial variations between stations or groups of stations. From these variations we have been able to recognize several distinct, but related microclimates occurring within the Reserve. Secondly, we have shown that significant correlations exist between each microclimate on the Reserve and that of the Hanford Meteorological Station nearby. These correlations, coupled with the 30-year weather record at the HMS and possibly with the 32-year (1912-1944) record at the Hanford townsite, allow ALE Reserve temperature and precipitation estimates to be made for years prior to the ALE climatology program.

  5. Glacial aridity in central Indonesia coeval with intensified monsoon circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konecky, Bronwen; Russell, James; Bijaksana, Satria

    2016-03-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum was cool and dry over the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool (IPWP), a key region driving global oceanic-atmospheric circulation. Both low- and high-latitude teleconnections with insolation, ice sheets, and sea level have been suggested to explain the pervasive aridity observed in paleoecological and geomorphic data. However, proxies tracking the H- and O-isotopic composition of rainfall (e.g., speleothems, sedimentary biomarkers) suggest muted aridity or even wetter conditions than the present, complicating interpretations of glacial IPWP climate. Here we use multiproxy reconstructions from lake sediments and modern rainfall isotopic measurements from central Indonesia to show that, contrary to the classical "amount effect," intensified Australian-Indonesian monsoon circulation drove lighter H- and O-isotopic composition of IPWP rainfall during the LGM, while at the same time, dry conditions prevailed. Precipitation isotopes are particularly sensitive to the apparent increase in monsoon circulation and perhaps also decreased moisture residence time implied by our data, explaining contrasts among proxy records while illuminating glacial IPWP atmospheric circulation, a key target for climate models.

  6. An Evaluation of Unsaturated Flow Models in an Arid Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, J.

    1999-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of two unsaturated flow models in arid regions. The area selected for the study was the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada. The two models selected for this evaluation were HYDRUS-1D [Simunek et al., 1998] and the SHAW model [Flerchinger and Saxton, 1989]. Approximately 5 years of soil-water and atmospheric data collected from an instrumented weighing lysimeter site near the RWMS were used for building the models with actual initial and boundary conditions representative of the site. Physical processes affecting the site and model performance were explored. Model performance was based on a detailed sensitivity analysis and ultimately on storage comparisons. During the process of developing descriptive model input, procedures for converting hydraulic parameters for each model were explored. In addition, the compilation of atmospheric data collected at the site became a useful tool for developing predictive functions for future studies. The final model results were used to evaluate the capacities of the HYDRUS and SHAW models for predicting soil-moisture movement and variable surface phenomena for bare soil conditions in the arid vadose zone. The development of calibrated models along with the atmospheric and soil data collected at the site provide useful information for predicting future site performance at the RWMS.

  7. Sustainable Small-Scale Agriculture in Semi-Arid Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Ingram

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available For at least the past 8000 years, small-scale farmers in semi-arid environments have had to mitigate shortfalls in crop production due to variation in precipitation and stream flow. To reduce their vulnerability to a shortfall in their food supply, small-scale farmers developed short-term strategies, including storage and community-scale sharing, to mitigate inter-annual variation in crop production, and long-term strategies, such as migration, to mitigate the effects of sustained droughts. We use the archaeological and paleoclimatic records from A.D. 900-1600 in two regions of the American Southwest to explore the nature of variation in the availability of water for crops, and the strategies that enhanced the resilience of prehistoric agricultural production to climatic variation. Drawing on information concerning contemporary small-scale farming in semi-arid environments, we then suggest that the risk coping and mitigation strategies that have endured for millennia are relevant to enhancing the resilience of contemporary farmers' livelihoods to environmental and economic perturbations.

  8. Soil microbial responses to nitrogen addition in arid ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L Sinsabaugh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The N cycle of arid ecosystems is influenced by low soil organic matter, high soil pH and extremes in water potential and temperature that lead to open canopies and development of biological soil crusts (biocrusts. We investigated the effects of N amendment on soil microbial dynamics in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa shrubland site in southern Nevada USA. Sites were fertilized with a NO3-NH4 mix at 0, 7, and 15 kg ha-1 yr-1 from March 2012 to March 2013. In March 2013, biocrust (0-0.5 cm and bulk soils (0-10 cm were collected beneath Ambrosia canopies and in the interspaces between plants. Biomass responses were assessed as bacterial and fungal SSU rRNA gene copy number and chlorophyll a concentration. Metabolic responses were measured by five ecoenzyme activities (EEA and rates of N transformation. By most measures, nutrient availability, microbial biomass and process rates were greater in soils beneath the shrub canopy compared to the interspace between plants, and greater in the surface biocrust horizon compared to the deeper 10 cm soil profile. Most measures responded positively to experimental N addition. Effect sizes were generally greater for bulk soil than biocrust. Results were incorporated into a meta-analysis of arid ecosystem responses to N.

  9. Resistance Status of the Malaria Vector Mosquitoes, Anopheles stephensi and Anopheles subpictus Towards Adulticides and Larvicides in Arid and Semi-Arid Areas of India

    OpenAIRE

    Tikar, S. N.; M J Mendki; Sharma, A K; D. Sukumaran; Veer, Vijay; Prakash, Shri; Parashar, B. D.

    2011-01-01

    Susceptibility studies of malaria vectors Anopheles stephensi Liston (Diptera: Culicidae) and An. subpictus Grassi collected during 2004–2007 from various locations of Arid and Semi-Arid Zone of India were conducted by adulticide bioassay of DDT, malathion, deltamethrin and larvicide bioassay of fenthion, temephos, chlorpyriphos and malathion using diagnostic doses. Both species from all locations exhibited variable resistance to DDT and malathion from majority of location. Adults of both the...

  10. Modeling the distributed effects of forest thinning on the long-term water balance and stream flow extremes for a semi-arid basin in the southwestern US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Moreno

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To achieve water resources sustainability in the water-limited Southwestern US, it is critical to understand the potential effects of proposed forest thinning on the hydrology of semi-arid basins, where disturbances to headwater catchments can cause significant changes in the local water balance components and basin-wise stream flows. In Arizona, the Four Forest Restoration Initiative (4FRI is being developed with the goal of restoring 2.4 million acres of ponderosa pine along the Mogollon Rim. Using the physically based, spatially distributed tRIBS model, we examine the potential impacts of the 4FRI on the hydrology of Tonto Creek, a basin in the Verde–Tonto–Salt (VTS system, which provides much of the water supply for the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. Long-term (20 year simulations indicate that forest removal can trigger significant shifts in the spatio-temporal patterns of various hydrological components, causing increases in net radiation, surface temperature, wind speed, soil evaporation, groundwater recharge, and runoff, at the expense of reductions in interception and shading, transpiration, vadose zone moisture and snow water equivalent, with south facing slopes being more susceptible to enhanced atmospheric losses. The net effect will likely be increases in mean and maximum stream flow, particularly during El Niño events and the winter months, and chiefly for those scenarios in which soil hydraulic conductivity has been significantly reduced due to thinning operations. In this particular climate, forest thinning can lead to net loss of surface water storage by vegetation and snow pack, increasing the vulnerability of ecosystems and populations to larger and more frequent hydrologic extreme conditions on these semi-arid systems.

  11. Modeling the distributed effects of forest thinning on the long-term water balance and streamflow extremes for a semi-arid basin in the southwestern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Hernan A.; Gupta, Hoshin V.; White, Dave D.; Sampson, David A.

    2016-03-01

    To achieve water resource sustainability in the water-limited southwestern US, it is critical to understand the potential effects of proposed forest thinning on the hydrology of semi-arid basins, where disturbances to headwater catchments can cause significant changes in the local water balance components and basinwise streamflows. In Arizona, the Four Forest Restoration Initiative (4FRI) is being developed with the goal of restoring 2.4 million acres of ponderosa pine along the Mogollon Rim. Using the physically based, spatially distributed triangulated irregular network (TIN)-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator (tRIBS) model, we examine the potential impacts of the 4FRI on the hydrology of Tonto Creek, a basin in the Verde-Tonto-Salt (VTS) system, which provides much of the water supply for the Phoenix metropolitan area. Long-term (20-year) simulations indicate that forest removal can trigger significant shifts in the spatiotemporal patterns of various hydrological components, causing increases in net radiation, surface temperature, wind speed, soil evaporation, groundwater recharge and runoff, at the expense of reductions in interception and shading, transpiration, vadose zone moisture and snow water equivalent, with south-facing slopes being more susceptible to enhanced atmospheric losses. The net effect will likely be increases in mean and maximum streamflow, particularly during El Niño events and the winter months, and chiefly for those scenarios in which soil hydraulic conductivity has been significantly reduced due to thinning operations. In this particular climate, forest thinning can lead to net loss of surface water storage by vegetation and snowpack, increasing the vulnerability of ecosystems and populations to larger and more frequent hydrologic extreme conditions on these semi-arid systems.

  12. Project 5322 Mid-Term Report: Key Eco-Hydrological Parameters Retrieval And Land Data Assimilation System Development In A Typical Inland River Basin Of Chinas Arid Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faivre, R.; Colin, J.; Menenti, M.; Lindenbergh, R.; Van Den Bergh, L.; Yu, H.; Jia, L.; Xin, L.

    2010-10-01

    Improving the understanding and the monitoring of high elevation regions hydrology is of major relevance from both societal and environmental points of view for many Asian countries, in particular in terms of flood and drought, but also in terms of food security in a chang- ing environment. Satellite and airborne remote sensing technologies are of utmost for such a challenge. Exist- ing imaging spectro-radiometers, radars, microwave ra- diometers and backscatter LIDAR provide a very com- prehensive suite of measurements over a wide rage of wavelengths, time frequencies and spatial resolu- tions. It is however needed to devise new algorithms to convert these radiometric measurements into useful eco-hydrological quantitative parameters for hydrologi- cal modeling and water management. The DRAGON II project entitled Key Eco-Hydrological Parameters Re- trieval and Land Data Assimilation System Development in a Typical Inland River Basin of Chinas Arid Region (ID 5322) aims at improving the monitoring, understand- ing, and predictability of hydrological and ecological pro- cesses at catchment scale, and promote the applicability of quantitative remote sensing in watershed science. Ex- isting Earth Observation platforms provided by the Euro- pean Space Agency as well as prototype airborne systems developed in China - ENVISAT/AATSR, ALOS/PRISM and PALSAR, Airborne LIDAR - are used and combined to retrieve advanced land surface physical properties over high elevation arid regions of China. The existing syn- ergies between this project, the CEOP-AEGIS project (FP7) and the WATER project (CAS) provide incentives for innovative studies. The investigations presented in the following report focus on the development of advanced and innovative methodologies and algorithms to monitor both the state and the trend of key eco-hydrological vari- ables: 3D vegetation properties, land surface evaporation, glacier mass balance and drought indicators.

  13. Impact of rhizobial populations and their host legumes on microbial activity in soils of arid regions in Tunisia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen fixing legumes and their microsymbionts are a fundamental contributor to soil fertility and prevent their degradation in arid and semi arid ecosystems. In Tunisia, few data are available on the contribution of these legumes in microbial activity in the arid soil. In this objective, a study was undertaken on five leguminous species from different arid regions to evaluate their ability to regenerate microbiological processes of the soil: Genista saharea, Genista microcephala, Acacia tortilis sspr raddiana, Retama raetam and Prosopis stephaniana. (Author)

  14. Impact of rhizobial populations and their host legumes on microbial activity in soils of arid regions in Tunisia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fterich, A.; Mahdhi, M.; Mars, M.

    2009-07-01

    Nitrogen fixing legumes and their microsymbionts are a fundamental contributor to soil fertility and prevent their degradation in arid and semi arid ecosystems. In Tunisia, few data are available on the contribution of these legumes in microbial activity in the arid soil. In this objective, a study was undertaken on five leguminous species from different arid regions to evaluate their ability to regenerate microbiological processes of the soil: Genista saharea, Genista microcephala, Acacia tortilis sspr raddiana, Retama raetam and Prosopis stephaniana. (Author)

  15. Quantifying the contribution of land use and climate change to stream flow alteration in tropical catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marhaento, Hero; Booij, Martijn J.; Hoekstra, Arjen Y.

    2015-04-01

    A new approach is introduced to measure the quantitative contribution of land use and climate change to stream flow alteration based on the changes in the proportion of excess water relative to changes in the proportion of excess energy. The quantitative contribution is estimated based on three measures: (1) the resultant length (R) which indicates the magnitude of the changes in the proportion of excess water and energy with a higher resultant indicating a higher magnitude; (2) the slope of change (θ in arc degree) which indicates the magnitude of the contribution of land use and climate changes with a higher slope reflecting a higher contribution of climate change; and (3) the relative contribution of land use and climate changes to stream flow alteration (C in %). In this study, we applied our approach to five catchments (Pidekso, Keduang, Samin, Madiun and Kening) ranging in size from 234 to 3759 km2 on Java, Indonesia. The hydro-climatic data cover the period 1975 - 2012 and the land use maps acquired from multi-temporal satellite imageries (i.e. for the years 1972, 1994, 2002 and 2013) were used and analyzed. The approach consists of four steps: (1) performing abrupt change detection on annual stream flow using Pettitt's test; (2) calculating the proportion of excess water and the proportion of excess energy for the period before and after the abrupt change of the stream flow; (3) calculating the quantitative contribution of land use and climate change to stream flow changes; (4) comparing the results with the Mann-Kendall trend analysis of variability in precipitation and potential evapotranspiration, and the land use change analysis. The results show that all catchments have a simultaneous increase of the proportion of excess water and energy for the period after the abrupt change compared to the period before the abrupt change. The Samin catchment gives the highest R value with a value of 0.9 followed by Pidekso catchment (0.7), Keduang catchment (0

  16. Controls of catchments` sub-storage contributions to dynamic water quality patterns in the stream network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Tobias; Maike Hegenauer, Anja

    2016-04-01

    Water quality is usually observed either continuously at a few stations within a catchment or with few snapshot sampling campaigns throughout the whole stream network. Although we know that the depletion of catchment sub-storages can vary throughout the stream network according to their actual water content (spatial variability of actual storage conditions can be caused amongst others by unevenly distributed rainfall, storage size or spatial differences in soil characteristics and land use), we know little about the impact of this process on spatial water quality patterns. For summer low flow recession periods, when stream water composition can be crucial for aquatic ecosystem conditions and the exceedance of water quality thresholds, knowledge on the controls of the dynamic interplay of catchment storages and stream water composition might improve water quality management and the implementation of corresponding mitigation measures. We studied this process throughout the stream network of a first-order agricultural headwater catchment in south-western Germany during two summer low flow recession periods. The underlying geology of the study area is a deep layer of aeolian loess, whilst the dominating soil is a silty calcaric regosol with gleizations in the colluvium. The land use in the catchment is dominated by viniculture (63 %) and arable crops (18 %). Due to the dense drainpipe network within the catchment we could identify 12 sub-catchments contributing during summer low flow recession periods to total stream discharge. We continuously observed discharge, electrical conductivity and water temperatures for 8 of the sub-catchments and at the catchment outlet. This data set was accomplished by 10 snapshot campaigns where we sampled for water temperatures, electrical conductivity, major ions, pH and O2 throughout the stream network. Using either discharge concentration relationships or time dependent functions, we derived continuous export rates for all measures in

  17. An extended modeling approach to assess climate change impacts on groundwater recharge and adaptation in arid areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hashemi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The impact of future climate scenarios on surface and groundwater resources was simulated using a modeling approach for an artificial recharge area in arid southern Iran. Future climate data for the periods of 2010–2030 and 2030–2050 were acquired from the Canadian Global Coupled Model (CGCM 3.1 for scenarios A1B, A2, and B1. These scenarios were adapted to the studied region using the delta-change method. The modified version of the HBV model (Qbox was used to simulate runoff in a flash flood prone catchment. The model was calibrated and validated for the period 2002–2011 using daily discharge data. The projected climate variables were used to simulate future runoff. The rainfall–runoff model was then coupled to a calibrated groundwater flow and recharge model (MODFLOW to simulate future recharge and groundwater hydraulic head. The results of the rainfall–runoff modeling showed that under the B1 scenario the number of floods might increase in the area. This in turn calls for a proper management, as this is the only source of fresh water supply in the studied region. The results of the groundwater recharge modeling showed no significant difference between present and future recharge for all scenarios. Owing to that, four abstraction and recharge scenarios were assumed to simulate the groundwater level and recharged water in the studied aquifer. The results showed that the abstraction scenarios have the most substantial effect on the groundwater level and the continuation of current pumping rate would lead to a groundwater decline by 18 m up to 2050.

  18. Multiscale investigations in a mesoscale catchment – hydrological modelling in the Gera catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Krause

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of the hydrological process-oriented model J2000 (J2K is part of a cooperation project between the Thuringian Environmental Agency (Thüringer Landesanstalt für Umwelt und Geologie – TLUG and the Department of Geoinformatics of the Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena focussing on the implementation of the EU water framework directive (WFD. In the first project phase J2K was parametrised and calibrated for a mesoscale catchment to quantify if it can be used as hydrological part of a multi-objective tool-box needed for the implementation of the WFD. The main objectives for that pilot study were: The development and application of a suitable distribution concept which provide the spatial data basis for various tasks and which reflects the specific physiogeographical variability and heterogeneity of river basins adequately. This distribution concept should consider the following constraints: The absolute number of spatial entities, which forms the basis for any distributive modelling should be as small as possible, but the spatial distributed factors, which controls quantitative and qualitative hydrological processes should not be generalised to much. The distribution concept of hydrological response units HRUs (Flügel, 1995 was selected and enhanced by a topological routing scheme (Staudenrausch, 2001 for the simulation of lateral flow processes. J2K should be calibrated for one subbasin of the pilot watershed only. Then the parameter set should be used on the other subbasins (referred as transfer basins to investigate and quantify the transferability of a calibrated model and potential spatial dependencies of its parameter set. In addition, potential structural problems in the process description should be identified by the transfer to basins which show a different process dominance as the one which was used for calibration does. Model calibration and selection of efficiency criteria for the quantification of the model quality

  19. Assessing the drivers of dissolved organic matter export from two contrasting lowland catchments, U.K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Christopher A; Johnes, Penny J; Spencer, Robert G M

    2016-11-01

    Two lowland catchments in the U.K. were sampled throughout 2010-11 to investigate the dominant controls on dissolved organic matter quantity and composition. The catchments had marked differences in terms of nutrient status, land cover and contrasting lithologies resulting in differences in the dominant flow pathways (groundwater vs. surface water dominated). The Upper Wylye is a chalk stream with a baseflow index of 0.98, draining a catchment dominated by intensive agricultural production. Millersford Brook is a lowland peat catchment with a baseflow index of 0.43, draining a semi-natural catchment with heather moorland and coniferous forest. Samples were collected weekly between October 2010 and September 2011 from eleven sampling locations. Samples were analysed to determine dissolved organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus fractions with DOM composition evaluated via the DOC:DON ratio, DOC:DOP ratio, specific UV absorption at 254nm, absorbance ratio (a250:a365) and the spectral slope parameter between 350 and 400nm (S350-400). Significant differences were observed in all determinands between the catchments, over time, and spatially along nutrient enrichment and geoclimatic gradients. Seasonal variation in preferential flow pathways mobilising groundwater-derived DOM were identified as likely controls on the delivery of DOM in the permeable chalk dominated catchment. Steeper S350-400 values and elevated a250:a365 ratios in this catchment suggest material of a lower bulk aromatic C content and molecular weight delivered during the winter months when compared to the summer. DOC:DON ratios were markedly lower in the chalk catchment than the peatland catchment, reflecting the paucity of organic matter within the mineral soils of the chalk landscape, and higher fertiliser application rates. This manuscript highlights that DOM composition varies according to catchment landscape character and hydrological function. PMID:27422728

  20. Fit-for-purpose phosphorus management: do riparian buffers qualify in catchments with sandy soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, David; Summers, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Hillslope runoff and leaching studies, catchment-scale water quality measurements and P retention and release characteristics of stream bank and catchment soils were used to better understand reasons behind the reported ineffectiveness of riparian buffers for phosphorus (P) management in catchments with sandy soils from south-west Western Australia (WA). Catchment-scale water quality measurements of 60 % particulate P (PP) suggest that riparian buffers should improve water quality; however, runoff and leaching studies show 20 times more water and 2 to 3 orders of magnitude more P are transported through leaching than runoff processes. The ratio of filterable reactive P (FRP) to total P (TP) in surface runoff from the plots was 60 %, and when combined with leachate, 96 to 99 % of P lost from hillslopes was FRP, in contrast with 40 % measured as FRP at the large catchment scale. Measurements of the P retention and release characteristics of catchment soils (bank soil (bank soils suggest that catchment soils contain more P, are more P saturated and are significantly more likely to deliver FRP and TP in excess of water quality targets than stream bank soils. Stream bank soils are much more likely to retain P than contribute P to streams, and the in-stream mixing of FRP from the landscape with particulates from stream banks or stream beds is a potential mechanism to explain the change in P form from hillslopes (96 to 99 % FRP) to large catchments (40 % FRP). When considered in the context of previous work reporting that riparian buffers were ineffective for P management in this environment, these studies reinforce the notion that (1) riparian buffers are unlikely to provide fit-for-purpose P management in catchments with sandy soils, (2) most P delivered to streams in sandy soil catchments is FRP and travels via subsurface and leaching pathways and (3) large catchment-scale water quality measurements are not good indicators of hillslope P mobilisation and transport

  1. The scaling method of specific catchment area from DEMs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xin; TANG Guoan; XlAO Chenchao; GAO Yiping; ZHU Shijie

    2011-01-01

    Specific Catchment Area (SCA) is defined as the upstream catchment area of a unit contour.As one of the key terrain parameters,it is widely used in the modeling of hydrology,soil erosion and ecological environment.However,SCA value changes significantly at different DEM resolutions,which inevitably affect terrain analysis results.SCA can be described as the ratio of Catchment Area (CA) and DEM grid length.In this paper,the scale effect of CA is firstly investigated.With Jiuyuangou Gully,a watershed about 70 km2 in northern Shaanxi Province of China,as the test area,it is found that the impacts of DEM scale on CA are different in spatial distribution.CA value in upslope location becomes bigger with the decrease of the DEM resolution.When the location is close to downstream areas the impact of DEM scale on CA is gradually weakening.The scale effect of CA can be concluded as a mathematic trend of exponential decline.Then,a downscaling model of SCA is put forward by introducing the scale factor and the location factor.The scaling model can realize the conversion of SCA value from a coarse DEM resolution to a finer one at pixel level.Experiment results show that the downscaled SCA was well revised,and consistent with SCA at the target resolution with respect to the statistical indexes,histogram and spatial distribution.With the advantages of no empirical parameters,the scaling model could be considered as a simple and objective model for SCA scaling in a rugged drainage area.