WorldWideScience

Sample records for argonne wakefield accelerator

  1. Drive linac for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chojnacki, E.; Konecny, R.; Rosing, M.; Simpson, J.

    1993-08-01

    The drive linac in Phase I of the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) will be used to accelerate short duration (10 ps), high charge (100 nC) electron bunches from 2 MV to 20 MV for use in a variety of wakefield acceleration and measurement studies. The high charge is required since this drive bunch will generate the wakefields of interest in various test sections and their amplitudes are proportional to bunch charge. The short bunch duration is required to drive high-frequency wakefields without intra-bunch cancellation effects. The drive linac design was a balance between having a small wake function to maintain a drive bunch energy spread of {le}10% and obtaining an adequate accelerating gradient of {ge}10 MV/m. This yielded a large aperture, low shunt impedance, high group velocity, L-band, standing-wave linac. Details of the design, fabrication, and testing are presented in the following.

  2. The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility Status and Recent Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Conde, Manoel; Gai, Wei; Jing, Chunguang; Konecny, Richard; Liu Wan Ming; Power, John G; Wang, Haitao; Yusof, Zikri

    2005-01-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility (AWA) is dedicated to the study of electron beam physics and the development of accelerating structures based on electron beam driven wakefields. In order to carry out these studies, the facility employs a photocathode RF gun capable of generating electron beams with high bunch charges (up to 100 nC) and short bunch lengths. This high intensity beam is used to excite wakefields in the structures under investigation. The wakefield structures presently under development are dielectric loaded cylindrical waveguides with operating frequencies of 7.8 or 15.6 GHz. The facility is also used to investigate the generation and propagation of high brightness electron beams. Presently under investigation, is the use of photons with energies lower than the work function of the cathode surface (Schottky-enabled photoemission), aimed at generating electron beams with low thermal emittance. Novel electron beam diagnostics are also developed and tested at the facility. The AWA electr...

  3. Planned Enhanced Wakefield Transformer Ratio Experiment at Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kanareykin, Alex; Gai, Wei; Jing, Chunguang; Konecny, Richard; Power, John G

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a preliminary experimental study of a wakefield accelerating scheme that uses a carefully spaced and current ramped electron pulse train to produce wakefields that increases the transformer ratio much higher than 2. A dielectric structure was designed and fabricated to operate at 13.625 GHz with dielectric constant of 15.7. The structure will be initially excited by two beams with first and second beam charge ratio of 1:3. The expected transformer ratio is 3 and the setup can be easily extend to 4 pulses which leads to a transformer ratio of more than 6. The dielectric structure cold test results show the tube is within the specification. A set of laser splitters was also tested to produce ramped bunch train of 2 - 4 pulses. Overall design of the experiment and initial results will be presented.

  4. Performance of the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator facility and initial experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility has begun its experimental program. This unique facility is designed to address advanced acceleration research which requires very short, intense electron bunches. The facility incorporates two photo-cathode based electron sources. One produces up to 100 nC, multi-kiloamp 'drive' bunches which are used to excite wakefields in dielectric loaded structures and in plasma. The second source produces much lower intensity 'witness' pulses which are used to probe the fields produced by the drive. The drive and witness pulses can be precisely timed as well as laterally positioned with respect to each other. We discuss commissioning, initial experiments, and outline plans for a proposed 1 GeV demonstration accelerator. (author)

  5. Generation of annular, high-charge electron beams at the Argonne wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, E. E.; Li, C.; Gai, W.; Power, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present and discuss the results from the experimental generation of high-charge annular(ring-shaped)electron beams at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). These beams were produced by using laser masks to project annular laser profiles of various inner and outer diameters onto the photocathode of an RF gun. The ring beam is accelerated to 15 MeV, then it is imaged by means of solenoid lenses. Transverse profiles are compared for different solenoid settings. Discussion includes a comparison with Parmela simulations, some applications of high-charge ring beams,and an outline of a planned extension of this study.

  6. Control, timing, and data acquisition for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoessow, P.; Ho, C.; Power, J.; Chojnacki, E.

    1993-08-01

    The AWA is a new facility primarily designed for wakefield acceleration experiments at the 100 MV/m scale, which incorporates a high current linac and rf photocathode electron source, a low emittance rf electron gun for witness beam generation, and associated beamlines and diagnostics. The control system is based on VME and CA-MAC electronics interfaced to a high performance work-station and provides some distributed processing capability. In addition to the control of linac rf, laser optics, and beamlines, the system is also used for acquisition of video data both from luminescent beam position monitors and from streak camera pulse length diagnostics. Online image feature extraction will permit wakefields to be computed during the course of data taking. The linac timing electronics and its interface to the control system is described.

  7. Control, timing, and data acquisition for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AWA is a new facility primarily designed for wakefield acceleration experiments at the 100 MV/m scale, which incorporates a high current linac and rf photocathode electron source, a low emittance rf electron gun for witness beam generation, and associated beamlines and diagnostics. The control system is based on VME and CA-MAC electronics interfaced to a high performance work-station and provides some distributed processing capability. In addition to the control of linac rf, laser optics, and beamlines, the system is also used for acquisition of video data both from luminescent beam position monitors and from streak camera pulse length diagnostics. Online image feature extraction will permit wakefields to be computed during the course of data taking. The linac timing electronics and its interface to the control system is described

  8. Direct Laser Acceleration in Laser Wakefield Accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    In this dissertation, the direct laser acceleration (DLA) of ionization-injected electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) operating in the quasi-blowout regime has been investigated through experiment and simulation. In the blowout regime of LWFA, the radiation pressure of an intense laser pulse can push a majority of the plasma electrons out and around the main body of the pulse. The expelled plasma electrons feel the electrostatic field of the relatively-stationary ions and are t...

  9. Longitudinal Laser Shaping in Laser Wakefield Accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Chen, Pisin

    2000-01-01

    We study the energetics of wake excitation during the laser-plasma interaction in application to laser wakefield accelerators. We find that both the wake amplitude and the accelerating efficiency (transformer ratio) can be maximized by properly shaping the longitudinal profile of the driving laser pulse. The corresponding family of laser pulse shapes is derived in the nonlinear regime of laser-plasma interaction. Such shapes provide theoretical upper limit on the magnitude of the wakefield an...

  10. Pulse propagation in the laser wakefield accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-density regime of the laser wakefield accelerator is reviewed in which enhanced acceleration is achieved via resonant self-modulation of the laser pulse. This requires laser power in excess of the critical power for optical guiding and a plasma wavelength short compared to the laser pulse-length. The evolution of the laser pulse is described, including a discussion of self-modulation and laser-hose instabilities. Examples of self-modulated laser wakefield accelerators are presented. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  11. Giga-electronvolt electrons due to a transition from laser wakefield acceleration to plasma wakefield acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show through experiments that a transition from laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) regime to a plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) regime can drive electrons up to energies close to the GeV level. Initially, the acceleration mechanism is dominated by the bubble created by the laser in the nonlinear regime of LWFA, leading to an injection of a large number of electrons. After propagation beyond the depletion length, leading to a depletion of the laser pulse, whose transverse ponderomotive force is not able to sustain the bubble anymore, the high energy dense bunch of electrons propagating inside bubble will drive its own wakefield by a PWFA regime. This wakefield will be able to trap and accelerate a population of electrons up to the GeV level during this second stage. Three dimensional particle-in-cell simulations support this analysis and confirm the scenario

  12. Giga-electronvolt electrons due to a transition from laser wakefield acceleration to plasma wakefield acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Mo, M. Z.; Ali, A.; Fourmaux, S.; Lassonde, P.; Kieffer, J. C.; Rozmus, W.; Teychenné, D.; Fedosejevs, R.

    2014-12-01

    We show through experiments that a transition from laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) regime to a plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) regime can drive electrons up to energies close to the GeV level. Initially, the acceleration mechanism is dominated by the bubble created by the laser in the nonlinear regime of LWFA, leading to an injection of a large number of electrons. After propagation beyond the depletion length, leading to a depletion of the laser pulse, whose transverse ponderomotive force is not able to sustain the bubble anymore, the high energy dense bunch of electrons propagating inside bubble will drive its own wakefield by a PWFA regime. This wakefield will be able to trap and accelerate a population of electrons up to the GeV level during this second stage. Three dimensional particle-in-cell simulations support this analysis and confirm the scenario.

  13. Observation of Laser Wakefield Acceleration of Electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Amiranoff, F; Bernard, D; Cros, B; Descamps, D; Dorchies, F; Jacquet, F; Malka, V; Marqués, J R; Matthieussent, G; Miné, P; Modena, A; Mora, P; Morillo, J; Najmudin, Z

    1998-01-01

    The acceleration of electrons injected in a plasma wave generated by the laser wakefield mechanism has been observed. A maximum energy gain of 1.6~MeV has been measured and the maximum longitudinal electric field is estimated to 1.5~GV/m. The experimental data agree with theoretical predictions when 3D effects are taken into account. The duration of the plasma wave inferred from the number of accelerated electrons is of the order of 1~ps.

  14. Suppressing Parasitic Effects in a Long Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shchegolkov, Dmitry [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jing, Chunguang [Euclid Techlabs LLC., Cleveland, OH (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Li, Chen [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Zholents, Alexander A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Power, John G. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-08-27

    Dielectric wakefield acceleration is a promising concept for increasing the accelerating gradient above the limits of conventional accelerators. Although superior gradients are reported in short dielectric wakefield accelerator tubes, problems arise when it comes to efficiency and multi-meter long interaction lengths. Here we discuss possible issues and provide some solutions backed by simulations.

  15. Wakefields and Instabilities in Linear Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrario, M; Palumbo, L

    2014-01-01

    When a charged particle travels across the vacuum chamber of an accelerator, it induces electromagnetic fields, which are left mainly behind the generating particle. These electromagnetic fields act back on the beam and influence its motion. Such an interaction of the beam with its surro undings results in beam energy losses, alters the shape of the bunches, and shifts the betatron and synchrotron frequencies. At high beam current the fields can even lead to instabilities, thus limiting the performance of the accelerator in terms of beam quality and current intensity. We discuss in this lecture the general features of the electromagnetic fields, introducing the concepts of wakefields and giving a few simple examples in cylindrical geometry. We then show the effect of the wakefields on the dynamics of a beam in a linac, dealing in particular with the beam breakup instability and how to cure it.

  16. Axionic suppression of plasma wakefield acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, D. A.; Noble, A.; Walton, T. J.

    2016-09-01

    Contemporary attempts to explain the existence of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using plasma-based wakefield acceleration deliberately avoid non-standard model particle physics. However, such proposals exploit some of the most extreme environments in the Universe and it is conceivable that hypothetical particles outside the standard model have significant implications for the effectiveness of the acceleration process. Axions solve the strong CP problem and provide one of the most important candidates for cold dark matter, and their potential significance in the present context should not be overlooked. Our analysis of the field equations describing a plasma augmented with axions uncovers a dramatic axion-induced suppression of the energy gained by a test particle in the wakefield driven by a particle bunch, or an intense pulse of electromagnetic radiation, propagating at ultra-relativistic speeds within the strongest magnetic fields in the Universe.

  17. Stern Gerlach surfing in laser wakefield accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flood, Stephen P. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute of Accelerator Science and Technology, Daresbury (United Kingdom); Burton, David A., E-mail: d.burton@lancaster.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute of Accelerator Science and Technology, Daresbury (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-25

    We investigate the effects of a Stern–Gerlach-type addition to the Lorentz force on electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator. The Stern–Gerlach-type terms are found to generate a family of trajectories describing electrons that ‘surf’ along the plasma density wave driven by a laser pulse. Such trajectories could lead to an increase in the size of an electron bunch, which may have implications for attempts to exploit such bunches in future free electron lasers.

  18. Investigations of the concept of a multibunch dielectric wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishchenko, I. N.; Kiselev, V. A.; Linnik, A. F.; Pristupa, V. I.; Sotnikov, G. V.

    2016-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations of the physical principles of multibunch dielectric wakefield accelerator concept based on the wakefield excitation in the dielectric structure by a sequence of relativistic electron bunches are presented. The purpose of the concept is to enhance the wakefield intensity by means of the multibunch coherent excitation and wakefield accumulation in a resonator. The acceleration of bunches is achieved at detuning of bunch repetition frequency relative to the frequency of the excited wakefield. In such a way the sequence of bunches is divided into exciting and accelerated parts due to displacing bunches into accelerating phases of wakefield excited by a previous part of bunches of the same sequence. Besides the change of the permittivity and loss tangent of dielectrics under the irradiation by 100 MeV electron beam is studied.

  19. Electron Rephasing in a Laser-Wakefield Accelerator

    OpenAIRE

    Guillaume, Emilien; Döpp, Andreas; Thaury, Cédric; Lifschitz, Agustin; Grittani, G.; Goddet, J.-P.; A. Tafzi; Chou, S W; Veisz, L.; Malka, Victor

    2015-01-01

    An important limit for energy gain in laser-plasma wakefield accelerators is the dephasing length, after which the electron beam reaches the decelerating region of the wakefield and starts to decelerate. Here, we propose to manipulate the phase of the electron beam in the wakefield, in order to bring the beam back into the accelerating region, hence increasing the final beam energy. This rephasing is operated by placing an upward density step in the beam path. In a first experiment, we demons...

  20. Plasma wakefield acceleration at CLARA facility in Daresbury Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, G.; Nie, Y.; Mete, O.; Hanahoe, K.; Dover, M.; Wigram, M.; Wright, J.; Zhang, J.; Smith, J.; Pacey, T.; Li, Y.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C.

    2016-09-01

    A plasma accelerator research station (PARS) has been proposed to study the key issues in electron driven plasma wakefield acceleration at CLARA facility in Daresbury Laboratory. In this paper, the quasi-nonlinear regime of beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration is analysed. The wakefield excited by various CLARA beam settings are simulated by using a 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) code. For a single drive beam, an accelerating gradient up to 3 GV/m can be achieved. For a two bunch acceleration scenario, simulation shows that a witness bunch can achieve a significant energy gain in a 10-50 cm long plasma cell.

  1. Computational studies and optimization of wakefield accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser- and particle beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators produce accelerating fields thousands of times higher than radio-frequency accelerators, offering compactness and ultrafast bunches to extend the frontiers of high energy physics and to enable laboratory-scale radiation sources. Large-scale kinetic simulations provide essential understanding of accelerator physics to advance beam performance and stability and show and predict the physics behind recent demonstration of narrow energy spread bunches. Benchmarking between codes is establishing validity of the models used and, by testing new reduced models, is extending the reach of simulations to cover upcoming meter-scale multi-GeV experiments. This includes new models that exploit Lorentz boosted simulation frames to speed calculations. Simulations of experiments showed that recently demonstrated plasma gradient injection of electrons can be used as an injector to increase beam quality by orders of magnitude. Simulations are now also modeling accelerator stages of tens of GeV, staging of modules, and new positron sources to design next-generation experiments and to use in applications in high energy physics and light sources

  2. Radial equilibrium of relativistic particle bunches in plasma wakefield accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Lotov, K V

    2016-01-01

    Drive particle beams in linear or weakly nonlinear regimes of the plasma wakefield accelerator quickly reach a radial equilibrium with the wakefield, which is described in detail for the first time. The equilibrium beam state and self-consistent wakefields are obtained by combining analytical relationships, numerical integration, and first-principle simulations. In the equilibrium state, the beam density is strongly peaked near the axis, the beam radius is constant along the beam, and longitudinal variation of the focusing strength is balanced by varying beam emittance. The transverse momentum distribution of beam particles depends on the observation radius and is neither separable, nor Gaussian.

  3. Synchrotron radiation from a curved plasma channel laser wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Palastro, J P; Hafizi, B; Chen, Y -H; Johnson, L A; Penano, J R; Helle, M H; Mamonau, A A

    2016-01-01

    A laser pulse guided in a curved plasma channel can excite wakefields that steer electrons along an arched trajectory. As the electrons are accelerated along the curved channel, they emit synchrotron radiation. We present simple analytical models and simulations examining laser pulse guiding, wakefield generation, electron steering, and synchrotron emission in curved plasma channels. For experimentally realizable parameters, a ~2 GeV electron emits 0.1 photons per cm with an average photon energy of multiple keV.

  4. Plasma channel guided laser wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    2005-11-01

    High quality electron beams (several 109 electrons above 80 MeV energy with percent energy spread and low divergence) have been produced for the first time in a compact, high gradient, all-optical laser accelerator by extending the interaction distance using a pre-formed plasma density channel to guide the drive laser pulse. Laser-driven accelerators, in which particles are accelerated by the electric field of a plasma wave (wake) driven by the radiation pressure of an intense laser, have over the past decade demonstrated accelerating fields thousands of times greater than those achievable in conventional radio-frequency accelerators. This has spurred interest in them as compact next-generation sources of energetic electrons and radiation. To date, however, acceleration distances have been severely limited by the lack of a controllable method for extending the propagation distance of the focused laser pulse. The ensuing short acceleration distance resulted in low-energy beams with 100 percent electron energy spread, which has limited potential applications. Optical guiding of relativistically intense (>1018 W/cm 2) laser pulses over distances greater than 10 diffraction lengths is demonstrated herein using plasma channels, which have a density minimum on the axis of propagation, formed by hydrodynamic shock. Laser modes with peak powers of up to 4 TW---twice the self-guiding threshold---were guided without aberration by tuning the plasma density profile. The transmitted optical spectrum showed that the pulse remained in the channel over the entire length, and no accelerated electrons were observed at these powers. Simulations indicated that a large plasma wave was driven by the 4 TW pulse, indicating a possible dark current free structure for a laser wakefield accelerator using controlled injection. The presence of a large plasma wave was verified by increasing laser power and observing electron acceleration. At a guided drive pulse power of 9 TW (500 mJ in 50 fs

  5. Laser wakefield accelerator based light sources: potential applications and requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). NIF and Photon Sciences; Thomas, A. G. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences; Mangles, S. P.D. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Blackett Lab.; Banerjee, S. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Corde, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Flacco, A. [ENSTA, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Litos, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Neely, D. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Oxford (United Kingdom). Rutherford Appleton Lab. (RAL). Central Laser Facility; Viera, J. [Univ. of Lisbon (Portugal). GoLP-Inst. de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear-Lab. Associado; Najmudin, Z. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Blackett Lab.; Bingham, R. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Oxford (United Kingdom). Rutherford Appleton Lab. (RAL). Central Laser Facility; Joshi, C. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Katsouleas, T. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Platt School of Engineering

    2015-01-15

    In this article we review the prospects of laser wakefield accelerators as next generation light sources for applications. This work arose as a result of discussions held at the 2013 Laser Plasma Accelerators Workshop. X-ray phase contrast imaging, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and nuclear resonance fluorescence are highlighted as potential applications for laser-plasma based light sources. We discuss ongoing and future efforts to improve the properties of radiation from plasma betatron emission and Compton scattering using laser wakefield accelerators for these specific applications.

  6. Laser-driven wakefield electron acceleration and associated radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of this research thesis introduces the basic concepts needed for the understanding of the laser-driven wakefield acceleration. It describes the properties of the used laser beams and plasmas, presents some notions about laser-plasma interactions for a better understanding of the physics of laser-driven acceleration. The second part deals with the numerical modelling and the presentation of simulation tools needed for the investigation of laser-induced wakefield acceleration. The last part deals with the optical control of the injection, a technique analogous to the impulsion collision scheme

  7. Theoretical investigation of external injection schemes for laser wakefield acceleration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhof, Mark Jan Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    This thesis reports on laser wakefield acceleration, a radically new approach for particle acceleration that builds on the huge electric fields that a plasma wave can provide. In this approach, an ultra-short laser pulse of high intensity is sent through a plasma. At sufficient intensity, the radiat

  8. Nonlinear Laser Driven Donut Wakefields for Positron and Electron Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, J.; Mendonça, J. T.

    2014-05-01

    We show analytically and through three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that nonlinear wakefields driven by Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulses can lead to hollow electron self-injection and positron acceleration. We find that higher order lasers can drive donut shaped blowout wakefields with strong positron accelerating gradients comparable to those of a spherical bubble. Corresponding positron focusing forces can be more than an order of magnitude stronger than electron focusing forces in a spherical bubble. Required laser intensities and energies to reach the nonlinear donut shaped blowout are within state-of-the-art experimental conditions.

  9. AWAKE: Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E

    2014-01-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is a promising alternative reaching accelerating fields a magnitude of up to 3 higher (GV/m) when compared to conventional RF acceleration. AWAKE, world’s first proton-driven plasma wakefield experiment, was launched at CERN to verify this concept. In this experiment proton bunches at 400 GeV/c will be extracted from the CERN SPS and sent to the plasma cell, where the proton beam drives the plasma wakefields and creates a large accelerating field. This large gradient of ~GV/m can be achieved by relying on the self-modulation instability (SMI) of the proton beam; when seeded by ionization through a short laser pulse, a train of micro-bunches with a period on the order of the plasma wavelength (~mm) develops, which can drive such a large amplitude wake from a long proton bunch (~12 cm). An electron beam will be injected into the plasma to probe the accelerating wakefield. The AWAKE experiment is being installed at CERN in the former CNGS facility, which must be modified to mat...

  10. Observation of acceleration and deceleration in gigaelectron-volt-per-metre gradient dielectric wakefield accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, B D; Andonian, G; Barber, S K; Fitzmorris, K L; Hakimi, S; Harrison, J; Hoang, P D; Hogan, M J; Naranjo, B; Williams, O B; Yakimenko, V; Rosenzweig, J B

    2016-01-01

    There is urgent need to develop new acceleration techniques capable of exceeding gigaelectron-volt-per-metre (GeV m(-1)) gradients in order to enable future generations of both light sources and high-energy physics experiments. To address this need, short wavelength accelerators based on wakefields, where an intense relativistic electron beam radiates the demanded fields directly into the accelerator structure or medium, are currently under intense investigation. One such wakefield based accelerator, the dielectric wakefield accelerator, uses a dielectric lined-waveguide to support a wakefield used for acceleration. Here we show gradients of 1.347±0.020 GeV m(-1) using a dielectric wakefield accelerator of 15 cm length, with sub-millimetre transverse aperture, by measuring changes of the kinetic state of relativistic electron beams. We follow this measurement by demonstrating accelerating gradients of 320±17 MeV m(-1). Both measurements improve on previous measurements by and order of magnitude and show promise for dielectric wakefield accelerators as sources of high-energy electrons. PMID:27624348

  11. Laser Wakefield Acceleration of Electrons at Ecole Polytechnique

    CERN Document Server

    Amiranoff, F; Bernard, D; Cros, B; Descamps, D; Dorchies, F; Jacquet, F; Malka, V; Marquès, J; Matthieussent, G; Miné, P; Modena, A; Mora, P; Morillo, J; Najmudin, Z

    1999-01-01

    The acceleration of electrons injected in a plasma wave generated by the laser wakefield mechanism has been observed. A maximum energy gain of 1.6 eV has been measured and the maximum longitudinal electric field is estimated to 1.5~GV/m. The experimental data agree with theoretical predictions when 3D effects are taken into account. The duration of the plasma wave inferred from the number of accelerated electrons is of the order of 1 ps.

  12. Supersonic jets of hydrogen and helium for laser wakefield acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Svensson, K.; Wojda, F.; Senje, L.; Burza, M.; Aurand, B.; Genoud, G.; Persson, A.; Wahlström, C.-G.; Lundh, O.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of laser wakefield accelerated electrons in supersonic gas flows of hydrogen and helium are investigated. At identical backing pressure, we find that electron beams emerging from helium show large variations in their spectral and spatial distributions, whereas electron beams accelerated in hydrogen plasmas show a higher degree of reproducibility. In an experimental investigation of the relation between neutral gas density and backing pressure, it is found that the resulting number density for helium is ∼30% higher than for hydrogen at the same backing pressure. The observed differences in electron beam properties between the two gases can thus be explained by differences in plasma electron density. This interpretation is verified by repeating the laser wakefield acceleration experiment using similar plasma electron densities for the two gases, which then yielded electron beams with similar properties.

  13. A preliminary design of the collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zholents, A.; Gai, W.; Doran, S.; Lindberg, R.; Power, J. G.; Strelnikov, N.; Sun, Y.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Vasserman, I.; Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Li, Y.; Gao, Q.; Shchegolkov, D. Y.; Simakov, E. I.

    2016-09-01

    A preliminary design of the multi-meter long collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator that achieves a highly efficient transfer of the drive bunch energy to the wakefields and to the witness bunch is considered. It is made from ~0.5 m long accelerator modules containing a vacuum chamber with dielectric-lined walls, a quadrupole wiggler, an rf coupler, and BPM assembly. The single bunch breakup instability is a major limiting factor for accelerator efficiency, and the BNS damping is applied to obtain the stable multi-meter long propagation of a drive bunch. Numerical simulations using a 6D particle tracking computer code are performed and tolerances to various errors are defined.

  14. Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator to drive the future FEL Light Source.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, C.; Power, J.; Zholents, A. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS)); ( HEP); (LLC)

    2011-04-20

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are expensive instruments and a large part of the cost of the entire facility is driven by the accelerator. Using a high-energy gain dielectric wake-field accelerator (DWA) instead of the conventional accelerator may provide a significant cost saving and reduction of the facility size. In this article, we investigate using a collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator to provide a high repetition rate, high current, high energy beam to drive a future FEL x-ray light source. As an initial case study, a {approx}100 MV/m loaded gradient, 850 GHz quartz dielectric based 2-stage, wakefield accelerator is proposed to generate a main electron beam of 8 GeV, 50 pC/bunch, {approx}1.2 kA of peak current, 10 x 10 kHz (10 beamlines) in just 100 meters with the fill factor and beam loading considered. This scheme provides 10 parallel main beams with one 100 kHz drive beam. A drive-to-main beam efficiency {approx}38.5% can be achieved with an advanced transformer ratio enhancement technique. rf power dissipation in the structure is only 5 W/cm{sup 2} in the high repetition rate, high gradient operation mode, which is in the range of advanced water cooling capability. Details of study presented in the article include the overall layout, the transform ratio enhancement scheme used to increase the drive to main beam efficiency, main wakefield linac design, cooling of the structure, etc.

  15. Stern-Gerlach surfing in laser wakefield accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Flood, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effects of a Stern-Gerlach-type addition to the Lorentz force on electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator. The Stern-Gerlach-type terms are found to generate a family of trajectories describing electrons that surf along the plasma density wave driven by a laser pulse. Such trajectories could lead to an increase in the size of an electron bunch, which may have implications for attempts to exploit such bunches in future free electron lasers.

  16. Stern-Gerlach surfing in laser wakefield accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Stephen P.; Burton, David A.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the effects of a Stern-Gerlach-type addition to the Lorentz force on electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator. The Stern-Gerlach-type terms are found to generate a family of trajectories describing electrons that 'surf' along the plasma density wave driven by a laser pulse. Such trajectories could lead to an increase in the size of an electron bunch, which may have implications for attempts to exploit such bunches in future free electron lasers.

  17. Staging optics considerations for a plasma wakefield acceleration linear collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrøm, C. A.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; Delahaye, J. P.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Muggli, P.; Raubenheimer, T. O.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-09-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration offers acceleration gradients of several GeV/m, ideal for a next-generation linear collider. The beam optics requirements between plasma cells include injection and extraction of drive beams, matching the main beam beta functions into the next cell, canceling dispersion as well as constraining bunch lengthening and chromaticity. To maintain a high effective acceleration gradient, this must be accomplished in the shortest distance possible. A working example is presented, using novel methods to correct chromaticity, as well as scaling laws for a high energy regime.

  18. Quasi-stable injection channels in a wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Wiltshire-Turkay, Mara; Pukhov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Particle-driven plasma-wakefield acceleration is a promising alternative to conventional electron acceleration techniques, potentially allowing electron acceleration to energies orders of magnitude higher than can currently be achieved. In this work we investigate the dependence of the energy gain on the position at which electrons are injected into the wake. Test particle simulations show previously unobserved complex structure in the parameter space, with quasi-stable injection channels forming for particles injected in narrow regions away from the centre of the wake. The result is relevant to the planning and tuning of experiments making use of external injection.

  19. Positron acceleration in doughnut wakefields in the blowout regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Jorge; Mendonca, Jose; Fonseca, Ricardo; Silva, Luis

    2014-10-01

    Most important plasma acceleration results were reached in the so called bubble or blowout regime. Although ideally suited for electron acceleration, it has been recognized that non-linear regimes are not adequate to accelerate positrons. New configurations enabling positron acceleration in non-linear regimes would therefore open new research paths for future plasma based collider configurations. In this work, we explore, analytically and through 3D OSIRIS simulations, a novel configuration for positron acceleration in strongly non-linear laser wakefield excitation regimes using Laguerre-Gaussian laser drivers to drive doughnut shaped wakefields with positron focusing and accelerating fields. We demonstrate that positron focusing-fields can be up to an order of magnitude larger than electron focusing in the spherical blowout regime. The amplitude of the accelerating fields is similar to the spherical blowout. Simulations demonstrate laser self-guiding and stable positron acceleration until the laser energy has been exhausted to the plasma. Other realisations of the scheme, using two Gaussian laser pulses, will also be explored. FCT Grant No EXPL/FIS-PLA/0834/2012 and European Research Council ERC-2010-AdG Grant No. 267841.

  20. On some theoretical problems of laser wake-field accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Hayashi, Y.; Kiriyama, H.; Koga, J. K.; Kotaki, H.; Mori, M.; Kando, M.

    2016-06-01

    Enhancement of the quality of laser wake-field accelerated (LWFA) electron beams implies the improvement and controllability of the properties of the wake waves generated by ultra-short pulse lasers in underdense plasmas. In this work we present a compendium of useful formulas giving relations between the laser and plasma target parameters allowing one to obtain basic dependences, e.g. the energy scaling of the electrons accelerated by the wake field excited in inhomogeneous media including multi-stage LWFA accelerators. Consideration of the effects of using the chirped laser pulse driver allows us to find the regimes where the chirp enhances the wake field amplitude. We present an analysis of the three-dimensional effects on the electron beam loading and on the unlimited LWFA acceleration in inhomogeneous plasmas. Using the conditions of electron trapping to the wake-field acceleration phase we analyse the multi-equal stage and multiuneven stage LWFA configurations. In the first configuration the energy of fast electrons is a linear function of the number of stages, and in the second case, the accelerated electron energy grows exponentially with the number of stages. The results of the two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations presented here show the high quality electron acceleration in the triple stage injection-acceleration configuration.

  1. Plasma Channel Guided Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, C G

    2005-01-01

    High quality electron beams (several 109 electrons above 80 MeV energy with percent energy spread and low divergence) have been produced for the first time in a compact, high gradient, all-optical laser accelerator by extending the interaction distance using a pre-formed plasma density channel to guide the drive laser pulse. Laser-driven accelerators, in which particles are accelerated by the electric field of a plasma wave (wake) driven by the radiation pressure of an intense laser, have over the past decade demonstrated accelerating fields thousands of times greater than those achievable in conventional radio-frequency accelerators. This has spurred interest in them as compact next- generation sources of energetic electrons and radiation. To date, however, acceleration distances have been severely limited by the lack of a controllable method for extending the propagation distance of the focused laser pulse. The ensuing short acceleration distance resulted in low-energy beams with 100 percent electron energy...

  2. A Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration experiment at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    The AWAKE Collaboration has been formed in order to demonstrate protondriven plasma wakefield acceleration for the first time. This technology could lead to future colliders of high energy but of a much reduced length compared to proposed linear accelerators. The SPS proton beam in the CNGS facility will be injected into a 10m plasma cell where the long proton bunches will be modulated into significantly shorter micro-bunches. These micro-bunches will then initiate a strong wakefield in the plasma with peak fields above 1 GV/m that will be harnessed to accelerate a bunch of electrons from about 20MeV to the GeV scale within a few meters. The experimental program is based on detailed numerical simulations of beam and plasma interactions. The main accelerator components, the experimental area and infrastructure required as well as the plasma cell and the diagnostic equipment are discussed in detail. First protons to the experiment are expected at the end of 2016 and this will be followed by an initial 3–4 yea...

  3. Beyond injection: Trojan horse underdense photocathode plasma wakefield acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidding, B.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Xi, Y.; O' Shea, B.; Andonian, G.; Schiller, D.; Barber, S.; Williams, O.; Pretzler, G.; Koenigstein, T.; Kleeschulte, F.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M.; Corde, S.; White, W. W.; Muggli, P.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Lotov, K. [Institut fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany) and Particle Beam Physics Laboratory, Department for Physics and Astronomy, UCLA (United States); Particle Beam Physics Laboratory, Department for Physics and Astronomy, UCLA (United States); Institut fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (United States); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, Colorado (United States) and 1348 Redwood Ave., Boulder, Colorado 80304 (United States); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation) and Novosibirsk State University, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-21

    An overview on the underlying principles of the hybrid plasma wakefield acceleration scheme dubbed 'Trojan Horse' acceleration is given. The concept is based on laser-controlled release of electrons directly into a particle-beam-driven plasma blowout, paving the way for controlled, shapeable electron bunches with ultralow emittance and ultrahigh brightness. Combining the virtues of a low-ionization-threshold underdense photocathode with the GV/m-scale electric fields of a practically dephasing-free beam-driven plasma blowout, this constitutes a 4th generation electron acceleration scheme. It is applicable as a beam brightness transformer for electron bunches from LWFA and PWFA systems alike. At FACET, the proof-of-concept experiment 'E-210: Trojan Horse Plasma Wakefield Acceleration' has recently been approved and is in preparation. At the same time, various LWFA facilities are currently considered to host experiments aiming at stabilizing and boosting the electron bunch output quality via a trojan horse afterburner stage. Since normalized emittance and brightness can be improved by many orders of magnitude, the scheme is an ideal candidate for light sources such as free-electron-lasers and those based on Thomson scattering and betatron radiation alike.

  4. Hollow plasma channel for positron plasma wakefield acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, W. D.; Milchberg, H. M.; Muggli, P.; Li, X.; Mori, W. B.

    2011-04-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) has demonstrated the ability to produce very high gradients to accelerate electrons and positrons. In PWFA, a drive bunch of charged particles passes through a uniform plasma, thereby generating a wakefield that accelerates a witness bunch traveling behind the drive bunch. This process works well for electrons, but much less so for positrons due to the positive charge attracting rather than repealing the plasma electrons, which leads to reduced acceleration gradient, halo formation, and emittance growth. This problem can be alleviated by having the positron beam travel through a hollow plasma channel. Presented are modeling results for producing 10-100 cm long hollow plasma channels suitable for positron PWFA. These channels are created utilizing laser-induced gas breakdown in hydrogen gas. The results show that hollow channels with plasma densities of order 1016cm-3 and inner channel radii of order 20μm are possible using currently available terawatt-level lasers. At these densities and radii, preliminary positron PWFA modeling indicates that longitudinal electric fields on axis can exceed 3GV/m.

  5. Applications of laser wakefield accelerator-based light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Félicie; Thomas, Alec G. R.

    2016-11-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) were proposed more than three decades ago, and while they promise to deliver compact, high energy particle accelerators, they will also provide the scientific community with novel light sources. In a LWFA, where an intense laser pulse focused onto a plasma forms an electromagnetic wave in its wake, electrons can be trapped and are now routinely accelerated to GeV energies. From terahertz radiation to gamma-rays, this article reviews light sources from relativistic electrons produced by LWFAs, and discusses their potential applications. Betatron motion, Compton scattering and undulators respectively produce x-rays or gamma-rays by oscillating relativistic electrons in the wakefield behind the laser pulse, a counter-propagating laser field, or a magnetic undulator. Other LWFA-based light sources include bremsstrahlung and terahertz radiation. We first evaluate the performance of each of these light sources, and compare them with more conventional approaches, including radio frequency accelerators or other laser-driven sources. We have then identified applications, which we discuss in details, in a broad range of fields: medical and biological applications, military, defense and industrial applications, and condensed matter and high energy density science.

  6. Laser Wakefield Acceleration Using Wire Produced Double Density Ramps

    CERN Document Server

    Burza, M; Svensson, K; Wojda, F; Persson, A; Hansson, M; Genoud, G; Marklund, M; Wahlström, C -G; Lundh, O

    2012-01-01

    A novel approach to implement and control electron injection into the accelerating phase of a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) is presented. It utilizes a wire, which is introduced into the flow of a supersonic gas jet creating shock waves and three regions of differing plasma electron density. If tailored appropriately, the laser plasma interaction takes place in three stages: Laser self-compression, electron injection and acceleration in the second plasma wave period. Compared to self-injection by wavebreaking of a nonlinear plasma wave in a constant density plasma, this scheme increases beam charge by up to one order of magnitude in the quasi-monoenergetic regime. Electron acceleration in the second plasma wave period reduces electron beam divergence by approximately 25 %, and the localized injection at the density downramps results in spectra with less than a few percent relative spread.

  7. First results of the plasma wakefield acceleration experiment at PITZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishilin, O.; Gross, M.; Brinkmann, R.; Engel, J.; Grüner, F.; Koss, G.; Krasilnikov, M.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Mehrling, T.; Osterhoff, J.; Pathak, G.; Philipp, S.; Renier, Y.; Richter, D.; Schroeder, C.; Schütze, R.; Stephan, F.

    2016-09-01

    The self-modulation instability of long particle beams was proposed as a new mechanism to produce driver beams for proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). The PWFA experiment at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ) was launched to experimentally demonstrate and study the self-modulation of long electron beams in plasma. Key aspects for the experiment are the very flexible photocathode laser system, a plasma cell and well-developed beam diagnostics. In this contribution we report about the plasma cell design, preparatory experiments and the results of the first PWFA experiment at PITZ.

  8. Transformer ratio saturation in a beam-driven wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J. P.; Martorelli, R.; Pukhov, A. [Institut für Theoretische Physik I, Heinrich Heine Universität, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    We show that for beam-driven wakefield acceleration, the linearly ramped, equally spaced train of bunches typically considered to optimise the transformer ratio only works for flat-top bunches. Through theory and simulation, we explain that this behaviour is due to the unique properties of the plasma response to a flat-top density profile. Calculations of the optimal scaling for a train of Gaussian bunches show diminishing returns with increasing bunch number, tending towards saturation. For a periodic bunch train, a transformer ratio of 23 was achieved for 50 bunches, rising to 40 for a fully optimised beam.

  9. Transformer ratio studies for single bunch plasma wakefield acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Plasma Wakefield Acceleration (PWFA) plasma oscillations are driven by ultra relativistic electron beams. The ratio of the maximum accelerating field behind the driving beam (bunch) and the maximum decelerating field inside the driving beam (bunch) is defined as Transformer Ratio, a key parameter that determines the energy gain in particle acceleration. We investigate the transformer ratio for different shapes of a single driving bunch. One dimensional, fluid, relativistic, cold plasma equations have been numerically solved. A complete map of the transformer ratio is obtained by varying: bunch shape, bunch length and density ratio. It is found that the transformer ratio critically depends on the bunch shape and on the density ratio. Moreover both in the linear as well as in the non-linear regime the theoretical limit of 2 for the transformer ratio of a single symmetric bunch can be exceeded using asymmetric bunches in the linear regime as well as symmetric bunches in nonlinear regime

  10. Control and optimization of a staged laser-wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Chen, S.; Powers, N.; Liu, C.; Yan, W.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, P.; Zhao, B.; Umstadter, D.

    2016-09-01

    We report results of an experimental study of laser-wakefield acceleration of electrons, using a staged device based on a double-jet gas target that enables independent injection and acceleration stages. This novel scheme is shown to produce stable, quasi-monoenergetic, and tunable electron beams. We show that optimal accelerator performance is achieved by systematic variation of five critical parameters. For the injection stage, we show that the amount of trapped charge is controlled by the gas density, composition, and laser power. For the acceleration stage, the gas density and the length of the jet are found to determine the final electron energy. This independent control over both the injection and acceleration processes enabled independent control over the charge and energy of the accelerated electron beam while preserving the quasi-monoenergetic character of the beam. We show that the charge and energy can be varied in the ranges of 2-45 pC, and 50-450 MeV, respectively. This robust and versatile electron accelerator will find application in the generation of high-brightness and controllable x-rays, and as the injector stage for more conventional devices.

  11. Synergistic Laser Wakefield/Direct Laser Acceleration in the Plasma Bubble Regime

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xi; Khudik, Vladimir N.; Shvets, Gennady

    2014-01-01

    The concept of a hybrid laser wakefield/direct laser plasma accelerator is proposed. Relativistic electrons undergoing resonant betatron oscillations inside the plasma bubble created by a laser pulse are accelerated by gaining energy directly from the laser pulse and from its plasma wake. The resulting bifurcated phase space of self-injected plasma electrons contains a population that experiences wakefield acceleration beyond the standard one-dimensional limit because of the multi-dimensional...

  12. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, E.; Adli, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V. K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P. N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschön, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A. A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Hüther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K. V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V. A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Öz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z. M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Spitsyn, R. I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P. V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C. P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected into the sample wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  13. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Olsen, V.K. Berglyd; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P.N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschon, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A.A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Huther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K.V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V.A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Oz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z.M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A.P.; Spitsyn, R.I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P.V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C.P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected to sample the wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  14. Ultrashort high quality electron beam from laser wakefield accelerator using two-step plasma density profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we first use the rf linac injector mechanism to generate ultrashort high quality electron beam from laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) with two-step plasma density profile successfully. We incorporate the physics principle in the conventional rf linac injector into the LWFA by using two-step plasma density to decrease the wavelength of the wakefield in plasma. Using this mechanism, we observe a ultrashort high quality electron beam (the rms energy spread is 1.9%, and the rms bunch length is 2 fs) in the simulation. The ultrashort intense terahertz coherent radiation (200 MW, 2 fs) can be generated with the proposed laser wakefield accelerator.

  15. Magnetically Controlled Plasma Waveguide For Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; Davis, P; Palastro, J; Michel, P; Leurent, V; Glenzer, S H; Pollock, B; Tynan, G

    2008-05-14

    An external magnetic field applied to a laser plasma is shown produce a plasma channel at densities relevant to creating GeV monoenergetic electrons through laser wakefield acceleration. Furthermore, the magnetic field also provides a pressure to help shape the channel to match the guiding conditions of an incident laser beam. Measured density channels suitable for guiding relativistic short-pulse laser beams are presented with a minimum density of 5 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} which corresponds to a linear dephasing length of several centimeters suitable for multi-GeV electron acceleration. The experimental setup at the Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where a 1-ns, 150 J 1054 nm laser will produce a magnetically controlled channel to guide a < 75 fs, 10 J short-pulse laser beam through 5-cm of 5 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} plasma is presented. Calculations presented show that electrons can be accelerated to 3 GeV with this system. Three-dimensional resistive magneto-hydrodynamic simulations are used to design the laser and plasma parameters and quasi-static kinetic simulations indicate that the channel will guide a 200 TW laser beam over 5-cm.

  16. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Wu, Kesheng; Prabhat,; Weber, Gunther H.; Ushizima, Daniela M.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

    2009-10-19

    Numerical simulations of laser wakefield particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process and in the design of expensive experimental facilities. As the size and complexity of simulation output grows, an increasingly acute challenge is the practical need for computational techniques that aid in scientific knowledge discovery. To that end, we present a set of data-understanding algorithms that work in concert in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration in very large simulation datasets. These techniques work cooperatively by first identifying features of interest in individual timesteps, then integrating features across timesteps, and based on the information derived perform analysis of temporally dynamic features. This combination of techniques supports accurate detection of particle beams enabling a deeper level of scientific understanding of physical phenomena than hasbeen possible before. By combining efficient data analysis algorithms and state-of-the-art data management we enable high-performance analysis of extremely large particle datasets in 3D. We demonstrate the usefulness of our methods for a variety of 2D and 3D datasets and discuss the performance of our analysis pipeline.

  17. Automatic beam path analysis of laser wakefield particle acceleration data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruebel, Oliver; Wu, Kesheng; Prabhat; Weber, Gunther H; Ushizima, Daniela M; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, Wes [Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Geddes, Cameron G R; Cormier-Michel, Estelle [LOASIS program of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Messmer, Peter [Tech-X Corporation, 5621 Arapahoe Avenue Suite A, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Hagen, Hans [International Research Training Group ' Visualization of Large and Unstructured Data Sets-Applications in Geospatial Planning, Modeling, and Engineering' , Technische Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67653 Kaiserslautern (Germany)], E-mail: oruebel@lbl.gov

    2009-01-01

    Numerical simulations of laser wakefield particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process and in the design of expensive experimental facilities. As the size and complexity of simulation output grows, an increasingly acute challenge is the practical need for computational techniques that aid in scientific knowledge discovery. To that end, we present a set of data-understanding algorithms that work in concert in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high-energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration in very large simulation datasets. These techniques work cooperatively by first identifying features of interest in individual timesteps, then integrating features across timesteps, and based on the information-derived perform analysis of temporally dynamic features. This combination of techniques supports accurate detection of particle beams enabling a deeper level of scientific understanding of physical phenomena than has been possible before. By combining efficient data analysis algorithms and state-of-the-art data management we enable high-performance analysis of extremely large particle datasets in 3D. We demonstrate the usefulness of our methods for a variety of 2D and 3D datasets and discuss the performance of our analysis pipeline.

  18. Estimation of direct laser acceleration in laser wakefield accelerators using particle-in-cell simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J L; Marsh, K A; Tsung, F S; Mori, W B; Joshi, C

    2015-01-01

    Many current laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) experiments are carried out in a regime where the laser pulse length is on the order of or longer than the wake wavelength and where ionization injection is employed to inject electrons into the wake. In these experiments, the trapped electrons will co-propagate with the longitudinal wakefield and the transverse laser field. In this scenario, the electrons can gain a significant amount of energy from both the direct laser acceleration (DLA) mechanism as well as the usual LWFA mechanism. Particle-in-cell (PIC) codes are frequently used to discern the relative contribution of these two mechanisms. However, if the longitudinal resolution used in the PIC simulations is inadequate, it can produce numerical heating that can overestimate the transverse motion, which is important in determining the energy gain due to DLA. We have therefore carried out a systematic study of this LWFA regime by varying the longitudinal resolution of PIC simulations from the standard, bes...

  19. Laser-PlasmaWakefield Acceleration with Higher Order Laser Modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Mullowney, P.; Paul, K.; Cary, J.R.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    Laser-plasma collider designs point to staging of multiple accelerator stages at the 10 GeV level, which are to be developed on the upcoming BELLA laser, while Thomson Gamma source designs use GeV stages, both requiring efficiency and low emittance. Design and scaling of stages operating in the quasi-linear regime to address these needs are presented using simulations in the VORPAL framework. In addition to allowing symmetric acceleration of electrons and positrons, which is important for colliders, this regime has the property that the plasma wakefield is proportional to the transverse gradient of the laser intensity profile. We demonstrate use of higher order laser modes to tailor the laser pulse and hence the transverse focusing forces in the plasma. In particular, we show that by using higher order laser modes, we can reduce the focusing fields and hence increase the matched electron beam radius, which is important to increased charge and efficiency, while keeping the low bunch emittance required for applications.

  20. Properties of Trapped Electron Bunches in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, Neil; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    Plasma-based accelerators use the propagation of a drive bunch through plasma to create large electric fields. Recent plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) experiments, carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), successfully doubled the energy for some of the 42 GeV drive bunch electrons in less than a meter; this feat would have required 3 km in the SLAC linac. This dissertation covers one phenomenon associated with the PWFA, electron trapping. Recently it was shown that PWFAs, operated in the nonlinear bubble regime, can trap electrons that are released by ionization inside the plasma wake and accelerate them to high energies. These trapped electrons occupy and can degrade the accelerating portion of the plasma wake, so it is important to understand their origins and how to remove them. Here, the onset of electron trapping is connected to the drive bunch properties. Additionally, the trapped electron bunches are observed with normalized transverse emittance divided by peak current, {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t}, below the level of 0.2 {micro}m/kA. A theoretical model of the trapped electron emittance, developed here, indicates that the emittance scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density in the non-linear 'bubble' regime of the PWFA. This model and simulations indicate that the observed values of {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t} result from multi-GeV trapped electron bunches with emittances of a few {micro}m and multi-kA peak currents. These properties make the trapped electrons a possible particle source for next generation light sources. This dissertation is organized as follows. The first chapter is an overview of the PWFA, which includes a review of the accelerating and focusing fields and a survey of the remaining issues for a plasma-based particle collider. Then, the second chapter examines the physics of electron trapping in the PWFA. The third chapter uses theory and simulations to analyze the properties of the trapped

  1. Laser triggered injection of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator with the colliding pulse method

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, K; Fubiani, G; Geddes, C. G. R.; Michel, P.; van Tilborg, J.; Toth, C; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Leemans, W. P.

    2004-01-01

    An injection scheme for a laser wakefield accelerator that employs a counterpropagating laser (colliding with the drive laser pulse, used to generate a plasma wake) is discussed. The threshold laser intensity for electron injection into the wakefield was analyzed using a heuristic model based on phase-space island overlap. Analysis shows that the injection can be performed using modest counterpropagating laser intensity a_1 < 0.5 for a drive laser intensity of a_0 = 1.0. Preliminary expe...

  2. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M.; An, Weiming; Clarke, Christine I.; Clayton, Chris E.; Corde, Sebastien; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, Joel; Green, Selina Z.; Hast, Carsten; Hogan, Mark J.; Joshi, Chan; Lindstrøm, Carl A.; Lipkowitz, Nate; Litos, Michael; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Mori, Warren B.; O'Shea, Brendan; Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Walz, Dieter; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yocky, Gerald

    2016-06-01

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. Here we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel is created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m-1 is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations.

  3. Modeling laser wakefield accelerators in a Lorentz boosted frame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Grote, D.P.

    2010-09-15

    Modeling of laser-plasma wakefield accelerators in an optimal frame of reference [1] is shown to produce orders of magnitude speed-up of calculations from first principles. Obtaining these speedups requires mitigation of a high frequency instability that otherwise limits effectiveness in addition to solutions for handling data input and output in a relativistically boosted frame of reference. The observed high-frequency instability is mitigated using methods including an electromagnetic solver with tunable coefficients, its extension to accomodate Perfectly Matched Layers and Friedman's damping algorithms, as well as an efficient large bandwidth digital filter. It is shown that choosing theframe of the wake as the frame of reference allows for higher levels of filtering and damping than is possible in other frames for the same accuracy. Detailed testing also revealed serendipitously the existence of a singular time step at which the instability level is minimized, independently of numerical dispersion, thus indicating that the observed instability may not be due primarily to Numerical Cerenkov as has been conjectured. The techniques developed for Cerenkov mitigation prove nonetheless to be very efficient at controlling the instability. Using these techniques, agreement at the percentage level is demonstrated between simulations using different frames of reference, with speedups reaching two orders of magnitude for a 0.1 GeV class stages. The method then allows direct and efficient full-scale modeling of deeply depleted laser-plasma stages of 10 GeV-1 TeV for the first time, verifying the scaling of plasma accelerators to very high energies. Over 4, 5 and 6 orders of magnitude speedup is achieved for the modeling of 10 GeV, 100 GeV and 1 TeV class stages, respectively.

  4. Modeling laser wakefield accelerators in a Lorentz boosted frame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Grotec, D. P.

    2010-06-15

    Modeling of laser-plasma wakefield accelerators in an optimal frame of reference is shown to produce orders of magnitude speed-up of calculations from first principles. Obtaining these speedups requires mitigation of a high-frequency instability that otherwise limits effectiveness in addition to solutions for handling data input and output in a relativistically boosted frame of reference. The observed high-frequency instability is mitigated using methods including an electromagnetic solver with tunable coefficients, its extension to accomodate Perfectly Matched Layers and Friedman's damping algorithms, as well as an efficient large bandwidth digital filter. It is shown that choosing the frame of the wake as the frame of reference allows for higher levels of filtering and damping than is possible in other frames for the same accuracy. Detailed testing also revealed serendipitously the existence of a singular time step at which the instability level is minimized, independently of numerical dispersion, thus indicating that the observed instability may not be due primarily to Numerical Cerenkov as has been conjectured. The techniques developed for Cerenkov mitigation prove nonetheless to be very efficient at controlling the instability. Using these techniques, agreement at the percentage level is demonstrated between simulations using different frames of reference, with speedups reaching two orders of magnitude for a 0.1 GeV class stages. The method then allows direct and efficient full-scale modeling of deeply depleted laser-plasma stages of 10 GeV-1 TeV for the first time, verifying the scaling of plasma accelerators to very high energies. Over 4, 5 and 6 orders of magnitude speedup is achieved for the modeling of 10 GeV, 100 GeV and 1 TeV class stages, respectively.

  5. The self-injection threshold in self-guided laser wakefield accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Mangles, Stuart P D; Bloom, Michael S; Burza, Matthias; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Persson, Anders; Svensson, Kristoffer; Thomas, Alexander G R; Wahlstrom, Claes-Goran

    2012-01-01

    A laser pulse traveling through a plasma can excite large amplitude plasma waves that can be used to accelerate relativistic electron beams in a very short distance---a technique called laser wakefield acceleration. Many wakefield acceleration experiments rely on the process of wavebreaking, or self-injection, to inject electrons into the wave, while other injection techniques rely on operation without self-injection. We present an experimental study into the parameters, including the pulse energy, focal spot quality and pulse power, that determine whether or not a wakefield accelerator will self-inject. By taking into account the processes of self-focusing and pulse compression we are able to extend a previously described theoretical model, where the minimum bubble size required for trapping is not constant but varies slowly with density and find excellent agreement with this model.

  6. Whittaker functions in beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration for a plasma with a parabolic density profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model for the interaction of charged particle beams and plasma for a linear wakefield generation in a parabolic plasma channel is presented. The density profile has the maximum on the axis. A Gaussian proton beam is employed to excite the plasma wakefield in the channel. We have built a thorough analytical model and solved the governing equations for the wakefield acceleration of a charged particle beam. The longitudinal and radial wakefields are expressed by Whittaker functions, and for certain parameters of plasma and the beam, their behaviours in longitudinal and radial directions are investigated. It is observed that the radial electric field generated by the bunch increases with the distance behind the bunch

  7. Whittaker functions in beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration for a plasma with a parabolic density profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golian, Y.; Dorranian, D., E-mail: d.dorranian@gmail.com [Laser Laboratory, Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aslaninejad, M., E-mail: m.aslaninejad@ipm.ir [Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Particles and Accelerators, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    A model for the interaction of charged particle beams and plasma for a linear wakefield generation in a parabolic plasma channel is presented. The density profile has the maximum on the axis. A Gaussian proton beam is employed to excite the plasma wakefield in the channel. We have built a thorough analytical model and solved the governing equations for the wakefield acceleration of a charged particle beam. The longitudinal and radial wakefields are expressed by Whittaker functions, and for certain parameters of plasma and the beam, their behaviours in longitudinal and radial directions are investigated. It is observed that the radial electric field generated by the bunch increases with the distance behind the bunch.

  8. Down-ramp injection and independently controlled acceleration of electrons in a tailored laser wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, M.; Davoine, X.; Ekerfelt, H.; Svensson, K.; Persson, A.; Wahlström, C.-G.; Lundh, O.; 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.18.071303

    2015-01-01

    We report on a study on controlled injection of electrons into the accelerating phase of a plasma wakefield accelerator by tailoring the target density distribution using two independent sources of gas. The tailored density distribution is achieved experimentally by inserting a narrow nozzle, with an orifice diameter of only 400  μm , into a jet of gas supplied from a 2 mm diameter nozzle. The combination of these two nozzles is used to create two regions of different density connected by a density gradient. Using this setup we show independent control of the charge and energy distribution of the bunches of accelerated electron as well as decreased shot-to-shot fluctuations in these quantities compared to self-injection in a single gas jet. Although the energy spectra are broad after injection, simulations show that further acceleration acts to compress the energy distribution and to yield peaked energy spectra.

  9. Magnetowave Induced Plasma Wakefield Acceleration for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Feng-Yin; /Taiwan, Natl. Chiao Tung U. /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; Chen, Pisin; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Lin, Guey-Lin; /Taiwan, Natl. Chiao Tung U. /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; Noble, Robert; /SLAC; Sydora, Richard; /Alberta U.

    2009-10-17

    Magnetowave induced plasma wakefield acceleration (MPWA) in a relativistic astrophysical outflow has been proposed as a viable mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic particles to ultrahigh energies. Here we present simulation results that clearly demonstrate the viability of this mechanism for the first time. We invoke the high frequency and high speed whistler mode for the driving pulse. The plasma wakefield obtained in the simulations compares favorably with our newly developed relativistic theory of the MPWA. We show that, under appropriate conditions, the plasma wakefield maintains very high coherence and can sustain high-gradient acceleration over hundreds of plasma skin depths. Invoking active galactic nuclei as the site, we show that MPWA production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays beyond ZeV (10{sup 21} eV) is possible.

  10. Magnetowave Induced Plasma Wakefield Acceleration for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Feng-Yin; Lin, Guey-Lin; Reil, Kevin; Sydora, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Magnetowave induced plasma wakefield acceleration (MPWA) in a relativistic astrophysical outflow has been proposed as a viable mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic particles to ultra high energies. Here we present simulation results that clearly demonstrate the viability of this mechanism for the first time. We invoke the high frequency and high speed whistler mode for the driving pulse. The plasma wakefield so induced validates precisely the theoretical prediction. We show that under appropriate conditions, the plasma wakefield maintains very high coherence and can sustain high-gradient acceleration over a macroscopic distance. Invoking gamma ray burst (GRB) as the source, we show that MPWA production of ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) beyond ZeV 10^21 eV is possible.

  11. Capturing Structural Dynamics in Crystalline Silicon Using Chirped Electrons from a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    He, Z -H; Nees, J A; Gallé, G; Scott, S A; Pérez, J R Sanchez; Lagally, M G; Krushelnick, K; Thomas, A G R; Faure, J

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in laser wakefield acceleration has led to the emergence of a new generation of electron and X-ray sources that may have enormous benefits for ultrafast science. These novel sources promise to become indispensable tools for the investigation of structural dynamics on the femtosecond time scale, with spatial resolution on the atomic scale. Here, we demonstrate the use of laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches for time-resolved electron diffraction measurements of the structural dynamics of single-crystal silicon nano-membranes pumped by an ultrafast laser pulse. In our proof-of-concept study, we resolve the silicon lattice dynamics on a picosecond time scale by deflecting the momentum-time correlated electrons in the diffraction peaks with a static magnetic field to obtain the time-dependent diffraction efficiency. Further improvements may lead to femtosecond temporal resolution, with negligible pump-probe jitter being possible with future laser-wakefield-accelerator ultrafast-electron-di...

  12. Measuring the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shaw, J. L. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Marsh, K. A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ralph, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chen, Y. -H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Alessi, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Clayton, C. E. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Joshi, C. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-07-22

    This paper presents a new technique to measure the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator. Measurements are performed with a stacked image plates spectrometer, capable of detecting broadband x-ray radiation up to 1 MeV. It can provide measurements of the betatron x-ray spectrum at any angle of observation (within a 40 mrad cone) and of the beam profile. A detailed description of our data analysis is given, along with comparison for several shots. As a result, these measurements provide useful information on the dynamics of the electrons are they are accelerated and wiggled by the wakefield.

  13. Compton Scattering X-Ray Sources Driven by Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartemann, F V; Gibson, D J; Brown, W J; Rousse, A; Phuoc, K T; Pukhov, A

    2005-10-19

    Recent laser wakefield acceleration experiments have demonstrated the generation of femtosecond, nano-Coulomb, low emittance, nearly monokinetic relativistic electron bunches of sufficient quality to produce bright, tunable, ultrafast x-rays via Compton scattering. Design parameters for a proof-of-concept experiment are presented using a three-dimensional Compton scattering code and a laser-plasma interaction particle-in-cell code modeling the wakefield acceleration process; x-ray fluxes exceeding 10{sup 22} s{sup -1} are predicted, with a peak brightness > 10{sup 20} photons/(mm{sup 2} x mrad{sup 2} x s x 0.1% bandwidth).

  14. Dynamics of electron acceleration in laser-driven wakefields. Acceleration limits and asymmetric plasma waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popp, Antonia

    2011-12-16

    The experiments presented in this thesis study several aspects of electron acceleration in a laser-driven plasma wave. High-intensity lasers can efficiently drive a plasma wave that sustains electric fields on the order of 100 GV/m. Electrons that are trapped in this plasma wave can be accelerated to GeV-scale energies. As the accelerating fields in this scheme are 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than in conventional radio-frequency accelerators, the necessary acceleration distance can be reduced by the same factor, turning laser-wakefield acceleration (LWFA) into a promising compact, and potentially cheaper, alternative. However, laser-accelerated electron bunches have not yet reached the parameter standards of conventional accelerators. This work will help to gain better insight into the acceleration process and to optimize the electron bunch properties. The 25 fs, 1.8 J-pulses of the ATLAS laser at the Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics were focused into a steady-state flow gas cell. This very reproducible and turbulence-free gas target allows for stable acceleration of electron bunches. Thus the sensitivity of electron parameters to subtle changes of the experimental setup could be determined with meaningful statistics. At optimized experimental parameters, electron bunches of {approx}50 pC total charge were accelerated to energies up to 450 MeV with a divergence of {approx}2 mrad FWHM. As, in a new design of the gas cell, its length can be varied from 2 to 14 mm, the electron bunch energy could be evaluated after different acceleration distances, at two different electron densities. From this evolution important acceleration parameters could be extracted. At an electron density of 6.43. 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} the maximum electric field strength in the plasma wave was determined to be {approx}160 GV/m. The length after which the relativistic electrons outrun the accelerating phase of the electric field and are decelerated again, the so-called dephasing length

  15. Dynamics of electron acceleration in laser-driven wakefields. Acceleration limits and asymmetric plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiments presented in this thesis study several aspects of electron acceleration in a laser-driven plasma wave. High-intensity lasers can efficiently drive a plasma wave that sustains electric fields on the order of 100 GV/m. Electrons that are trapped in this plasma wave can be accelerated to GeV-scale energies. As the accelerating fields in this scheme are 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than in conventional radio-frequency accelerators, the necessary acceleration distance can be reduced by the same factor, turning laser-wakefield acceleration (LWFA) into a promising compact, and potentially cheaper, alternative. However, laser-accelerated electron bunches have not yet reached the parameter standards of conventional accelerators. This work will help to gain better insight into the acceleration process and to optimize the electron bunch properties. The 25 fs, 1.8 J-pulses of the ATLAS laser at the Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics were focused into a steady-state flow gas cell. This very reproducible and turbulence-free gas target allows for stable acceleration of electron bunches. Thus the sensitivity of electron parameters to subtle changes of the experimental setup could be determined with meaningful statistics. At optimized experimental parameters, electron bunches of ∼50 pC total charge were accelerated to energies up to 450 MeV with a divergence of ∼2 mrad FWHM. As, in a new design of the gas cell, its length can be varied from 2 to 14 mm, the electron bunch energy could be evaluated after different acceleration distances, at two different electron densities. From this evolution important acceleration parameters could be extracted. At an electron density of 6.43. 1018 cm-3 the maximum electric field strength in the plasma wave was determined to be ∼160 GV/m. The length after which the relativistic electrons outrun the accelerating phase of the electric field and are decelerated again, the so-called dephasing length, was found to be 4.9 mm

  16. The influence of plasma density decreasement by pre-pulse on the laser wakefield acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Gong Dong

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the laser wakefield acceleration, the generation of electron beam is very sensitive to the plasma density. Not only the laser-wakefield interaction, but also the electron trapping and acceleration would be effected by the plasma density. However, the plasma density could be changed in the experiment by different reasons, which will result in the mismatch of parameters arranged initially. Forward Raman scattering spectrum demonstrated that the interaction density was decreased obviously in the experiment, which was verified by the pre-pulse conditions and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It was demonstrated that the plasma density was very important on the self-evolutions and energy coupling of laser pulse and wakefield, and eventually the energy spectrum of electron beam.

  17. Modeling beam-driven and laser-driven plasma Wakefield accelerators with XOOPIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2000-06-01

    We present 2-D particle-in-cell simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approximately} 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approximately} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications to XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  18. A table-top x-ray FEL based on a laser wakefield accelerator-undulator system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, K.; Kawakubo, T.; Nakanishi, H. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Ultrahigh-gradient electron acceleration has been confirmed owing to the laser wakefield acceleration mechanism driven by an intense short laser wakefield acceleration mechanism driven by an intense short laser pulse in an underdense plasma. The laser wakefield acceleration makes it possible to build a compact electron linac capable of producing an ultra-short bunched electron beam. While the accelerator is attributed to longitudinal wakefields, transverse wakefields simultaneously generated by a short laser pulse can serve as a plasma undulator with a very short wavelength equal to a half of the plasma wavelength. We propose a new FEL concept for X-rays based on a laser wakefield accelerator-undulator system driven by intense short laser pulses delivered from table-top terawatt lasers. The system is composed of the accelerator stage and the undulator stage in a table-top size. A low energy electron beam is accelerated an bunched into microbunches due to laser wakefields in the accelerator stage. A micro-bunched beam travelling to the opposite direction of driving laser pulses produces coherent X-ray radiation in the undulator stage. A practical configuration and its analyses are presented.

  19. Beam dynamics in resonant plasma wakefield acceleration at SPARC_LAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, S.; Anania, M. P.; Chiadroni, E.; Croia, M.; Ferrario, M.; Marocchino, A.; Pompili, R.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2016-09-01

    Strategies to mitigate the increase of witness emittance and energy spread in beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration are investigated. Starting from the proposed resonant wakefield acceleration scheme in quasi-non-linear regime that is going to be carried out at SPARC_LAB, we performed systematic scans of the parameters to be used for drivers. The analysis will show that one of the main requirements to preserve witness quality during the acceleration is to have accelerating and focusing fields that are very stable during all the accelerating length. The difference between the dynamics of the leading bunch and the trailing bunch is pointed out. The classical condition on bunch length kpσz =√{ 2 } seems to be an ideal condition for the first driver within long accelerating lengths. The other drivers show to follow different longitudinal matching conditions. In the end a new method for the investigation of the matching for the first driver is introduced.

  20. Downramp-assisted underdense photocathode electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Knetsch, Alexander; Wittig, Georg; Groth, Henning; Xi, Yunfeng; Deng, Aihua; Rosenzweig, James Benjamin; Bruhwiler, David Leslie; Smith, Johnathan; Jaroszynski, Dino Anthony; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Manahan, Grace Gloria; Xia, Guoxing; Jamison, Steven; Hidding, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that the requirements for high quality electron bunch generation and trapping from an underdense photocathode in plasma wakefield accelerators can be substantially relaxed through localizing it on a plasma density downramp. This depresses the phase velocity of the accelerating electric field until the generated electrons are in phase, allowing for trapping in shallow trapping potentials. As a consequence the underdense photocathode technique is applicable by a much larger number of accelerator facilities. Furthermore, dark current generation is effectively suppressed.

  1. Single-shot betatron source size measurement from a laser-wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Köhler, A.; Zarini, O.; Jochmann, A.; Irman, A.; Schramm, U.; 10.1016/j.nima.2016.02.031

    2016-01-01

    Betatron radiation emitted by accelerated electrons in laser-wakefield accelerators can be used as a diagnostic tool to investigate electron dynamics during the acceleration process. We analyze the spectral characteristics of the emitted Betatron pattern utilizing a 2D x-ray imaging spectroscopy technique. Together with simultaneously recorded electron spectra and x-ray images, the betatron source size, thus the electron beam radius, can be deduced at every shot.

  2. Laser triggered injection of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator with the colliding pulse method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An injection scheme for a laser wakefield accelerator that employs a counter propagating laser (colliding with the drive laser pulse, used to generate a plasma wake) is discussed. The threshold laser intensity for electron injection into the wakefield was analyzed using a heuristic model based on phase-space island overlap. Analysis shows that the injection can be performed using modest counter propagating laser intensity a1 0 = 1.0. Preliminary experiments were preformed using a drive beam and colliding beam. Charge enhancement by the colliding pulse was observed. Increasing the signal-to-noise ratio by means of a preformed plasma channel is discussed

  3. Possibility for ultra-bright electron beam acceleration in dielectric wakefield accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    We describe a conceptual proposal to combine the Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator (DWA) with the Emittance Exchanger (EEX) to demonstrate a high-brightness DWA with a gradient of above 100 MV/m and less than 0.1% induced energy spread in the accelerated beam. We currently evaluate the DWA concept as a performance upgrade for the future LANL signature facility MaRIE with the goal of significantly reducing the electron beam energy spread. The preconceptual design for MaRIE is underway at LANL, with the design of the electron linear accelerator being one of the main research goals. Although generally the baseline design needs to be conservative and rely on existing technology, any future upgrade would immediately call for looking into the advanced accelerator concepts capable of boosting the electron beam energy up by a few GeV in a very short distance without degrading the beam's quality. Scoping studies have identified large induced energy spreads as the major cause of beam quality degradation in high-gradient advanced accelerators for free-electron lasers. We describe simulations demonstrating that trapezoidal bunch shapes can be used in a DWA to greatly reduce the induced beam energy spread, and, in doing so, also preserve the beam brightness at levels never previously achieved. This concept has the potential to advance DWA technology to a level that would make it suitable for the upgrades of the proposed Los Alamos MaRIE signature facility.

  4. Numerical Verification of the Power Transfer and Wakefield Coupling in the Clic Two-Beam Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, Arno; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Rawat, V.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Syratchev, I.; Grudiev, A.; Wuensch, W.; /CERN

    2011-08-19

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its two-beam accelerator (TBA) concept envisions complex 3D structures, which must be modeled to high accuracy so that simulation results can be directly used to prepare CAD drawings for machining. The required simulations include not only the fundamental mode properties of the accelerating structures but also the Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS), as well as the coupling between the two systems. Time-domain simulations will be performed to understand pulse formation, wakefield damping, fundamental power transfer and wakefield coupling in these structures. Applying SLAC's parallel finite element code suite, these large-scale problems will be solved on some of the largest supercomputers available. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel two-beam accelerator scheme.

  5. Electron beam manipulation, injection and acceleration in plasma wakefield accelerators by optically generated plasma density spikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig, Georg; Karger, Oliver S.; Knetsch, Alexander; Xi, Yunfeng; Deng, Aihua; Rosenzweig, James B.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Smith, Jonathan; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, Dino A.; Manahan, Grace G.; Hidding, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    We discuss considerations regarding a novel and robust scheme for optically triggered electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators [1]. In this technique, a transversely propagating focused laser pulse ignites a quasi-stationary plasma column before the arrival of the plasma wake. This localized plasma density enhancement or optical "plasma torch" distorts the blowout during the arrival of the electron drive bunch and modifies the electron trajectories, resulting in controlled injection. By changing the gas density, and the laser pulse parameters such as beam waist and intensity, and by moving the focal point of the laser pulse, the shape of the plasma torch, and therefore the generated trailing beam, can be tuned easily. The proposed method is much more flexible and faster in generating gas density transitions when compared to hydrodynamics-based methods, and it accommodates experimentalists needs as it is a purely optical process and straightforward to implement.

  6. Downramp-assisted underdense photocathode electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Knetsch, Alexander; Karger, Oliver; Wittig, Georg; Groth, Henning; Xi, Yunfeng; Deng, Aihua; Rosenzweig, James Benjamin; Bruhwiler, David Leslie; Smith, Johnathan; Jaroszynski, Dino Anthony; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Manahan, Grace Gloria; Xia, Guoxing; Jamison, Steven; Hidding, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that the requirements for high quality electron bunch generation and trapping from an underdense photocathode in plasma wakefield accelerators can be substantially relaxed through localizing it on a plasma density downramp. This depresses the phase velocity of the accelerating electric field until the generated electrons are in phase, allowing for trapping in shallow trapping potentials. As a consequence the underdense photocathode technique is applicable by a much larger number o...

  7. Studies of a hybrid Trojan Horse wakefield accelerator with high transformer ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Nathan; Bruhwiler, David; Hidding, Bernhard; Vay, Jean-Luc; Webb, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration uses relativistic high-charge electron bunches to generate a plasma blowout supporting intense electric fields for trapping and acceleration. Dramatic improvements in emittance, peak current and brightness are achievable through laser-controlled ionization in the plasma blowout, which is the premise of the Trojan Horse approach. The hybrid Trojan Horse concept extends this approach to use the output beam from a laser plasma accelerator to drive a Trojan Horse, resulting in a compact system that can produce higher brightness bunches with order-of-magnitude lower energy spread. We are exploring the use of multiple, shaped laser pulses to resonantly inject a shaped electron drive bunch. The resulting output bunch could generate wakes in PWFA or beam-driven dielectric structures with transformer ratios of 5 to 10 or larger. Hence, a hybrid Trojan Horse accelerator with bunch shaping may provide a compact source of nC bunches that can drive a variety of systems for studying high-gradient wakefields and lepton acceleration. Initial work will use previously simulated electron bunches from a laser plasma accelerator to drive the plasma wakefield stage. We present preliminary results from simulations using the parallel, particle-in-cell framework Warp. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of High Energy Physics, under Award Number DE-SC0013855.

  8. Positron acceleration in plasma bubble wakefield driven by an ultraintense laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Ya-Juan; Wan, Feng; Sang, Hai-Bo, E-mail: sanghb@bnu.edu.cn; Xie, Bai-Song [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, and College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The dynamics of positrons accelerating in electron-positron-ion plasma bubble fields driven by an ultraintense laser is investigated. The bubble wakefield is obtained theoretically when laser pulses are propagating in the electron-positron-ion plasma. To restrict the positrons transversely, an electron beam is injected. Acceleration regions and non-acceleration ones of positrons are obtained by the numerical simulation. It is found that the ponderomotive force causes the fluctuation of the positrons momenta, which results in the trapping of them at a lower ion density. The energy gaining of the accelerated positrons is demonstrated, which is helpful for practical applications.

  9. Letter of Intent for a Demonstration Experiment in Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Assmann, R; Bingham, R; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Delerue, N; Dias, F M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Elsen, E; Fartoukh, S; Ferreira, C M; Fonseca, R A; Geschonke, G; Goddard, B; Gruelke, O; Hessler, C; Hillenbrand, S; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jarozinsky, D; Jolly, S; Joshi, C; Kumar, N; Lu, W; Lopes, N; Kaur, M; Lotov, K; Malka, V; Meddahi, M; Mete, O; Mori, W B; Mueller, A; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Norreys, P; Osterhoff, J; Pozimski, J; Pukhov, A; Reimann, O; Roesler, S; Ruhl, H; Schlarb, H; Schmidt, B; Schmitt, H v d; Schoening, A; Seryi, A; Simon, F; Silva, L O; Tajima, T; Trines, R; Tueckmantel, T; Upadhyay, A; Vieira, J; Willi, O; Wing, M; Xia, G; Yakimenko, V; Yan, X; Zimmermann, F; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2011-01-01

    We propose an experiment on proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PDPWA) which could lead to a future TeV-scale e+- collider of much reduced length compared to conventional designs. Proton bunches are ideal drivers for high energy lepton accelerators, with the potential of reducing drastically the number of required driver stages. By using a plasma to modulate a long proton bunch, a strong plasma wave can be generated by a series of ‘micro-bunches’, so that an experimental program can start today with the existing proton beams. In this letter of intent, we propose a demonstration experiment using the existing CERN SPS beam. This project would be the first beam-driven wakefield acceleration experiment in Europe, and the first proton-driven plasma-wakefield acceleration experiment worldwide. We have set as an initial goal the demonstration of 1 GeV energy gain for electrons in 10 m of plasma. A proposal for reaching 100 GeV within 100 m of plasma will be developed using results from the initial roun...

  10. Direct observation of the injection dynamics of a laser wakefield accelerator using few-femtosecond shadowgraphy

    OpenAIRE

    Sävert, A; Mangles, S. P. D.; Schnell, M.; Siminos, E; Cole, Jason,; Leier, M; M. Reuter; Schwab, Matthew,; M. Möller; Poder, K.; Jäckel, O.; Paulus, Gerhard,; Spielmann, C; Skupin, Stefan; Najmudin, Z.

    2014-01-01

    We present few-femtosecond shadowgraphic snapshots taken during the non-linear evolution of the plasma wave in a laser wakefield accelerator with transverse synchronized few-cycle probe pulses. These snapshots can be directly associated with the electron density distribution within the plasma wave and give quantitative information about its size and shape. Our results show that self-injection of electrons into the first plasma wave period is induced by a lengthening of the first plasma period...

  11. Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration: a path to the future of high-energy particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R; Bohl, T; Bracco, C; Buttenschon, B; Butterworth, A; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Cipiccia, S; Feldbaumer, E; Fonseca, R A; Goddard, B; Gross, M; Grulke, O; Gschwendtner, E; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jaroszynski, D; Jolly, S; Kempkes, P; Lopes, N; Lotov, K; Machacek, J; Mandry, S R; McKenzie, J W; Meddahi, M; Militsyn, B L; Moschuering, N; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Noakes, T C Q; Norreys, P A; Oz, E; Pardons, A; Petrenko, A; Pukhov, A; Rieger, K; Reimann, O; Ruhl, H; Shaposhnikova, E; Silva, L O; Sosedkin, A; Tarkeshian, R; Trines, R M G N; Tuckmantel, T; Vieira, J; Vincke, H; Wing, M; Xia, G

    2014-01-01

    New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future elucidation of fundamental particles and their interactions. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. Past research has focused on creating large-amplitude plasma waves by injecting an intense laser pulse or an electron bunch into the plasma. However, the maximum energy gain of electrons accelerated in a single plasma stage is limited by the energy of the driver. Proton bunches are the most promising drivers of wakefields to accelerate electrons to the TeV energy scale in a single stage. An experimental program at CERN -- the AWAKE experiment -- has been launched to study in detail the important physical processes and to demonstrate the power of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. Here we review the physical principles and some experimental considerations for a future proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator.

  12. Simulation studies of laser wakefield acceleration based on typical 100 TW laser facilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Da-Zhang; GAO Jie; ZHU Xiong-Wei; HE An

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,2-D Particle-In-Cell simulations are made for Laser Wakefield Accelerations(LWFA).As in a real experiment,we perform plasma density scanning for typical 100 TW laser facilities.Several basic laws for self-injected acceleration in a bubble regime are presented.According to these laws,we choose a proper plasma density and then obtain a high quality quasi-monoenergetic electron bunch with arms energy of more than 650 MeV and a bunch length of less than 1.5 μn.

  13. Laser Wakefield Acceleration Driven by a CO2 Laser (STELLA-LW) - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Wayne D

    2008-06-27

    The original goals of the Staged Electron Laser Acceleration – Laser Wakefield (STELLA-LW) program were to investigate two new methods for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). In pseudo-resonant LWFA (PR-LWFA), a laser pulse experiences nonlinear pulse steepening while traveling through the plasma. This steepening allows the laser pulse to generate wakefields even though the laser pulse length is too long for resonant LWFA to occur. For the conditions of this program, PR-LWFA requires a minimum laser peak power of 3 TW and a low plasma density (10^16 cm^-3). Seeded self-modulated LWFA (seeded SM-LWFA) combines LWFA with plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). An ultrashort (~100 fs) electron beam bunch acts as a seed in a plasma to form a wakefield via PWFA. This wakefield is subsequently amplified by the laser pulse through a self-modulated LWFA process. At least 1 TW laser power and, for a ~100-fs bunch, a plasma density ~10^17 cm^-3 are required. STELLA-LW was located on Beamline #1 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The ATF TW CO2 laser served as the driving laser beam for both methods. For PR-LWFA, a single bunch was to probe the wakefield produced by the laser beam. For seeded SM-LWFA, the ATF linac would produce two bunches, where the first would be the seed and the second would be the witness. A chicane would compress the first bunch to enable it to generate wakefields via PWFA. The plasma source was a short-length, gas-filled capillary discharge with the laser beam tightly focused in the center of the capillary, i.e., no laser guiding was used, in order to obtain the needed laser intensity. During the course of the program, several major changes had to be made. First, the ATF could not complete the upgrade of the CO2 laser to the 3 TW peak power needed for the PR-LWFA experiment. Therefore, the PR-LWFA experiment had to be abandoned leaving only the seeded SM-LWFA experiment. Second, the ATF discovered that the

  14. Multi-gigaelectronvolt acceleration of positrons in a self-loaded plasma wakefield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corde, Sebastien [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Adli, E. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Univ. of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Allen, J. M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); An, W. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Clarke, C. I. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Delahaye, J. P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Frederico, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gessner, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Green, S. Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hogan, M. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Joshi, C. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Lipkowitz, N. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Litos, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lu, W. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Marsh, K. A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Mori, W. B. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Schmeltz, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Vafaei-Najafabadi, N. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Walz, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Yakimenko, V. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Yocky, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Clayton, C. E. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-08-26

    New accelerator concepts must be developed to make future particle colliders more compact and affordable. The Plasma Wakefield Accelerator (PWFA) is one such concept, where the electric field of a plasma wake excited by a charged-particle bunch is used to accelerate a trailing bunch of particles. To apply plasma acceleration to particle colliders, it is imperative that both the electrons and their antimatter counterpart, the positrons, are efficiently accelerated at high fields using plasmas1. While substantial progress has recently been reported on high-field, high-efficiency acceleration of electrons in a PWFA powered by an electron bunch 2, such an electron-driven wake is unsuitable for the acceleration and focusing of a positron bunch. Here we demonstrate a new regime of PWFA where particles in the front of a single positron bunch transfer their energy to a substantial number of those in the rear of the same bunch by exciting a wakefield in the plasma. In the process, the accelerating field is altered – self-loaded – so that about a billion positrons gain five gigaelectronvolts (GeV) of energy with a narrow energy spread in a distance of just 1.3 meters. They extract about 30% of the wake’s energy and form a spectrally distinct bunch with as low as a 1.8% r.m.s. energy spread. This demonstrated ability of positron-driven plasma wakes to efficiently accelerate a significant number of positrons with a small energy spread may overcome the long-standing challenge of positron acceleration in plasma-based accelerators.

  15. Experimental validation of a radio frequency photogun as external electron injector for a laser wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stragier, X. F. D.; Luiten, O. J.; van der Geer, S. B.; van der Wiel, M. J.; Brussaard, G. J. H.

    2011-07-01

    A purpose-built RF-photogun as external electron injector for a laser wakefield accelerator has been thoroughly tested. Different properties of the RF-photogun have been measured such as energy, energy spread and transverse emittance. The focus of this study is the investigation of the smallest possible focus spot and focus stability at the entrance of the plasma channel. For an electron bunch with 10 pC charge and 3.7 MeV kinetic energy, the energy spread was 0.5% with a shot-to-shot stability of 0.05%. After focusing the bunch by a pulsed solenoid lens at 140 mm from the middle of the lens, the focal spot was 40 μm with a shot-to-shot stability of 5 μm. Higher charge leads to higher energy spread and to a larger spot size, due to space charge effects. All properties were found to be close to design values. Given the limited energy of 3.7 MeV, the properties are sufficient for this gun to serve as injector for one particular version of laser wakefield acceleration, i.e., injection ahead of the laser pulse. These measured electron bunch properties were then used as input parameters for simulations of electron bunch injection in a laser wakefield accelerator. The arrival time jitter was deduced from measurements of the energy fluctuation, in combination with earlier measurements using THz coherent transition radiation, and is around 150 fs in the present setup. The bunch length in the focus, simulated using particle tracking, depends on the accelerated charge and goes from 100 fs at 0.1 pC to 1 ps at 50 pC. When simulating the injection of the 3.7 MeV electron bunch of 10 pC in front of a 25 TW laser pulse with a waist of 30 μm in a plasma with a density of 0.7 × 1024 m-3, the maximum accelerated charge was found to be 1.2 pC with a kinetic energy of ˜900 MeV and an energy spread of ˜5%. The experiments combined with the simulations show the feasibility of external injection and give a prediction of the output parameters that can be expected from a laser

  16. Sub-femtosecond electron bunches created by direct laser acceleration in a laser wakefield accelerator with ionization injection

    CERN Document Server

    Lemos, N; Marsh, K A; Joshi, C

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we will show through three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that direct laser acceleration in laser a wakefield accelerator can generate sub-femtosecond electron bunches. Two simulations were done with two laser pulse durations, such that the shortest laser pulse occupies only a fraction of the first bubble, whereas the longer pulse fills the entire first bubble. In the latter case, as the trapped electrons moved forward and interacted with the high intensity region of the laser pulse, micro-bunching occurred naturally, producing 0.5 fs electron bunches. This is not observed in the short pulse simulation.

  17. Multi-gigaelectronvolt acceleration of positrons in a self-loaded plasma wakefield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corde, S; Adli, E; Allen, J M; An, W; Clarke, C I; Clayton, C E; Delahaye, J P; Frederico, J; Gessner, S; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Lipkowitz, N; Litos, M; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Schmeltz, M; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Walz, D; Yakimenko, V; Yocky, G

    2015-08-27

    Electrical breakdown sets a limit on the kinetic energy that particles in a conventional radio-frequency accelerator can reach. New accelerator concepts must be developed to achieve higher energies and to make future particle colliders more compact and affordable. The plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) embodies one such concept, in which the electric field of a plasma wake excited by a bunch of charged particles (such as electrons) is used to accelerate a trailing bunch of particles. To apply plasma acceleration to electron-positron colliders, it is imperative that both the electrons and their antimatter counterpart, the positrons, are efficiently accelerated at high fields using plasmas. Although substantial progress has recently been reported on high-field, high-efficiency acceleration of electrons in a PWFA powered by an electron bunch, such an electron-driven wake is unsuitable for the acceleration and focusing of a positron bunch. Here we demonstrate a new regime of PWFAs where particles in the front of a single positron bunch transfer their energy to a substantial number of those in the rear of the same bunch by exciting a wakefield in the plasma. In the process, the accelerating field is altered--'self-loaded'--so that about a billion positrons gain five gigaelectronvolts of energy with a narrow energy spread over a distance of just 1.3 metres. They extract about 30 per cent of the wake's energy and form a spectrally distinct bunch with a root-mean-square energy spread as low as 1.8 per cent. This ability to transfer energy efficiently from the front to the rear within a single positron bunch makes the PWFA scheme very attractive as an energy booster to an electron-positron collider.

  18. Optimisation of the pointing stability of laser-wakefield accelerated electron beams

    CERN Document Server

    Garland, R J; Cole, J; Schumaker, W; Doria, D; Gizzi, L A; Grittani, G; Krushelnick, K; Kuschel, S; Mangles, S P D; Najmudin, Z; Symes, D; Thomas, A G R; Vargas, M; Zepf, M; Sarri, G

    2014-01-01

    Laser-wakefield acceleration is a promising technique for the next generation of ultra-compact, high-energy particle accelerators. However, for a meaningful use of laser-driven particle beams it is necessary that they present a high degree of pointing stability in order to be injected into transport lines and further acceleration stages. Here we show a comprehensive experimental study of the main factors limiting the pointing stability of laser-wakefield accelerated electron beams. It is shown that gas-cells provide a much more stable electron generation axis, if compared to gas-jet targets, virtually regardless of the gas density used. A sub-mrad shot-to-shot fluctuation in pointing is measured and a consistent non-zero offset of the electron axis in respect to the laser propagation axis is found to be solely related to a residual angular dispersion introduced by the laser compression system and can be used as a precise diagnostic tool for compression oprtimisation in chirped pulse amplified lasers.

  19. Effect of self-injection on ultraintense laser wake-field acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhidkov, A; Koga, J; Kinoshita, K; Uesaka, M

    2004-03-01

    The self-injection of plasma electrons which have been accelerated to relativistic energies by a laser pulse moving with a group velocity less than the speed of light with I lambda(2)>5 x 10(19) W microm(2)/cm(2) is found via particle-in-cell simulation to be efficient for laser wake-field acceleration. When the matching condition a(0)> or =(2(1/4)omega/omega(pl))(2/3) is met, the self-injection, along with wave breaking, dominates monoenergetic electron acceleration yielding up to 100 MeV energies by a 100 TW, 20 fs laser pulse. In contrast to the injection due to wave-breaking processes, self-injection allows suppression of production of a Maxwell distribution of accelerated particles and the extraction of a beam-quality bunch of energetic electrons.

  20. Role of direct laser acceleration in energy gained by electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator with ionization injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the role that the transverse electric field of the laser plays in the acceleration of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator operating in the quasi-blowout regime through particle-in-cell code simulations. In order to ensure that longitudinal compression and/or transverse focusing of the laser pulse is not needed before the wake can self-trap the plasma electrons, we have employed the ionization injection technique. Furthermore, the plasma density is varied such that at the lowest densities, the laser pulse occupies only a fraction of the first wavelength of the wake oscillation (the accelerating bucket), whereas at the highest density, the same duration laser pulse fills the entire first bucket. Although the trapped electrons execute betatron oscillations due to the ion column in all cases, at the lowest plasma density they do not interact with the laser field and the energy gain is all due to the longitudinal wakefield. However, as the density is increased, there can be a significant contribution to the maximum energy due to direct laser acceleration (DLA) of those electrons that undergo betatron motion in the plane of the polarization of the laser pulse. Eventually, DLA can be the dominant energy gain mechanism over acceleration due to the longitudinal field at the highest densities. (paper)

  1. Numerical growth of emittance in simulations of laser-wakefield acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transverse emittance is a crucial feature of laser-wakefield accelerators, yet accurately reproducing its value in numerical simulations remains challenging. It is shown here that, when the charge of the bunch exceeds a few tens of pico-coulombs, particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations erroneously overestimate the emittance. This is mostly due the interaction of spurious Cherenkov radiation with the bunch, which leads to a steady growth of emittance during the simulation. A new computational scheme is proposed, which is free of spurious Cherenkov radiation. It can be easily implemented in existing PIC codes and leads to a substantial reduction of the emittance growth. (authors)

  2. Direct Observation of the Injection Dynamics of a Laser Wakefield Accelerator Using Few-Femtosecond Shadowgraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sävert, A; Mangles, S P D; Schnell, M; Siminos, E; Cole, J M; Leier, M; Reuter, M; Schwab, M B; Möller, M; Poder, K; Jäckel, O; Paulus, G G; Spielmann, C; Skupin, S; Najmudin, Z; Kaluza, M C

    2015-07-31

    We present few-femtosecond shadowgraphic snapshots taken during the nonlinear evolution of the plasma wave in a laser wakefield accelerator with transverse synchronized few-cycle probe pulses. These snapshots can be directly associated with the electron density distribution within the plasma wave and give quantitative information about its size and shape. Our results show that self-injection of electrons into the first plasma-wave period is induced by a lengthening of the first plasma period. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations support our observations. PMID:26274425

  3. Electron beam characteristics of a laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Assamagan, Ketevi A; Chen, S Y; Ent, R; Green, R N; Gueye, P; Keppel, C; Mourou, G; Umstadter, D; Wagner, R

    1999-01-01

    The properties of an electron beam trapped and accelerated in a laser wakefield have been investigated. Plastic scintillating fibers were employed together with position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and a series of dipole electro-magnets to study the beam. The measured momentum spectrum peaks around 7 MeV/c with an exponential fall-off at high momenta up to (70.3+- 19.9) MeV/c. The number of electrons detected per bunch is determined to be (2.6+-0.3)x10 sup 1 sup 1.

  4. An ultrashort pulse ultra-violet radiation undulator source driven by a laser plasma wakefield accelerator

    OpenAIRE

    Anania, M.P.; Brunetti, E; Wiggins, S M; Grant, D W; Welsh, G. H.; Issac, R.C.; Cipiccia, S.; Shanks, R. P.; Manahan, G. G.; Aniculaesei, C.; van der Geer, S. B.; De Loos, M.J.; Poole, M.W.; Shepherd, B. J. A.; Clarke, J A

    2014-01-01

    Narrow band undulator radiation tuneable over the wavelength range of 150–260 nm has been produced by short electron bunches from a 2 mm long laser plasma wakefield accelerator based on a 20 TW femtosecond laser system. The number of photons measured is up to 9 × 106 per shot for a 100 period undulator, with a mean peak brilliance of 1 × 1018 photons/s/mrad2/mm2/0.1% bandwidth. Simulations estimate that the driving electron bunch r.m.s. duration is as short as 3 fs when the electron beam has ...

  5. Design of 10 GeV laser wakefield accelerator stages with shaped laser modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Leemans, W.P.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Cowan, B.; Paul, K.

    2009-09-25

    We present particle-in-cell simulations, using the VORPAL framework, of 10 GeV laser plasma wakefield accelerator stages. Scaling of the physical parameters with the plasma density allows us to perform these simulations at reasonable cost and to design high performance stages. In particular we show that, by choosing to operate in the quasi-linear regime, we can use higher order laser modes to tailor the focusing forces. This makes it possible to increase the matched electron beam radius and hence the total charge in the bunch while preserving the low bunch emittance required for applications.

  6. Argonne lectures on particles accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devred, A

    1999-09-01

    The quest for elementary particles has promoted the development of particle accelerators producing beams of increasingly higher energies. In a synchrotron, the particle energy is directly proportional to the product of the machine's radius times the bending magnets' field strength. Present proton experiments at the TeV scale require facilities with circumferences ranging from a few to tens of kilometers and relying on a large number (several hundred to several thousand) high field dipole magnets and high field gradient quadrupole magnets. These electro-magnets use high-current-density, low-critical-temperature superconducting cables and are cooled down at liquid helium temperature. They are among the most costly and the most challenging components of the machine. After explaining what are the various types of accelerator magnets and why they are needed (lecture 1), we briefly recall the origins of superconductivity and we review the parameters of existing superconducting particle accelerators (lecture 2). Then, we review the superconducting materials that are available at industrial scale (chiefly, NbTi and Nb{sub 3}Sn) and we explain in details the manufacturing of NbTi wires and cables (lecture 3). We also present the difficulties of processing and insulating Nb{sub 3}Sn conductors, which so far have limited the use of this material in spite of its superior performances. We continue by discussing the two dimensional current distributions which are the most appropriate for generating pure dipole and quadrupole fields and we explain how these ideal distributions can be approximated by so called cos{theta} and cos 2{theta} coil designs (lecture 4). We also present a few alternative designs which are being investigated and we describe the difficulties of realizing coil ends. Next, we present the mechanical design concepts that are used in existing accelerator magnets (lecture 5) and we describe how the magnets are assembled (lecture 6). Some of the toughest

  7. Argonne lectures on particles accelerator magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quest for elementary particles has promoted the development of particle accelerators producing beams of increasingly higher energies. In a synchrotron, the particle energy is directly proportional to the product of the machine's radius times the bending magnets' field strength. Present proton experiments at the TeV scale require facilities with circumferences ranging from a few to tens of kilometers and relying on a large number (several hundred to several thousand) high field dipole magnets and high field gradient quadrupole magnets. These electro-magnets use high-current-density, low-critical-temperature superconducting cables and are cooled down at liquid helium temperature. They are among the most costly and the most challenging components of the machine. After explaining what are the various types of accelerator magnets and why they are needed (lecture 1), we briefly recall the origins of superconductivity and we review the parameters of existing superconducting particle accelerators (lecture 2). Then, we review the superconducting materials that are available at industrial scale (chiefly, NbTi and Nb3Sn) and we explain in details the manufacturing of NbTi wires and cables (lecture 3). We also present the difficulties of processing and insulating Nb3Sn conductors, which so far have limited the use of this material in spite of its superior performances. We continue by discussing the two dimensional current distributions which are the most appropriate for generating pure dipole and quadrupole fields and we explain how these ideal distributions can be approximated by so called cosθ and cos 2θ coil designs (lecture 4). We also present a few alternative designs which are being investigated and we describe the difficulties of realizing coil ends. Next, we present the mechanical design concepts that are used in existing accelerator magnets (lecture 5) and we describe how the magnets are assembled (lecture 6). Some of the toughest requirements on the performance

  8. Status of a cylindrical superconducting undulator for the laser wakefield accelerator in Jena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afonso Rodriguez, Veronica; Bernhard, Axel; Grau, Andreas; Haerer, Bastian; Peiffer, Peter; Rossmanith, Robert; Weber, Marc; Widmann, Christina [KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Kaluza, Malte; Nicolai, Maria; Rinck, Thorsten; Saevert, Alexander [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena (Germany); Jaeckel, Oliver; Reuter, Maria [Helmholtz Institute Jena, Jena (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Laser-Wakefield accelerators (LWFA) produce electron bunches with several 100 MeV energy within a few millimeters acceleration length, however, with a relatively large energy spread (a few percent). Undulators provide monochromatic radiation with high brilliance. The working principle of undulators requires a small energy spread of the electron beam in the order of 0.1 %. To produce monochromatic undulator radiation with LWF accelerated electrons, a novel iron-free cylindrical superconducting undulator (SCU) is under development at the KIT. This talk gives an overview about the design and the optimisation of the SCU tailored to the particular beam properties of the JETI-LWFA at the University of Jena. In addition a short model test and the construction status of the full scale undulator are shown.

  9. Nonlinear laser-seeded modulation instability in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemon, Carl; Khudik, Vladimir; Yi, S. Austin; Pukhov, Alexander; Shvets, Gennady

    2013-10-01

    A new method for seeding the modulation instability (MI) in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator (PDPWA) using a CO2 laser pulse is presented. The proton beam's envelope equation is used to analytically compare the laser seed with previously suggested seeding methods. Simulations demonstrate that a laser pulse placed ahead of a proton beam with a realistic longitudinal density profile leads to peak accelerating gradients that are comparable to those produced by other seeding methods. The nonlinear BNS damping of the MI is analytically shown to lead to instability saturation. The envelope equation is Fourier expanded into a set of coupled, nonlinear equations that describe the evolution of the beam's Fourier components. Peak beam density and peak accelerating gradient during the beam's evolution are estimated.

  10. Enhanced electron yield from laser-driven wakefield acceleration in high-Z gas jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Hafz, Nasr A. M., E-mail: nasr@sjtu.edu.cn; Li, Song; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Jie [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MOE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); He, Fei; Cheng, Ya [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-10-15

    An investigation of the electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, and neon gas jet plasmas in a typical laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment is carried out. The charge measurement is made by imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a charge coupled device which was cross-calibrated with an integrated current transformer. The dependence of electron beam charge on the laser and plasma conditions for the aforementioned gases are studied. We found that laser-driven wakefield acceleration in low Z-gas jet targets usually generates high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with modest yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which are observed from high-Z gases at higher densities reached much higher yields. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in the nitrogen gas jet target, where we received the highest electron beam charge of ∼1.7 nC. Those intense electron beams will be beneficial for the applications on the generation of bright X-rays, gamma rays radiations, and energetic positrons via the bremsstrahlung or inverse-scattering processes.

  11. High Frequency, High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration Experiments at SLAC and BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenzweig, James; /UCLA; Travish, Gil; /UCLA; Hogan, Mark; /SLAC; Muggli, Patric; /Southern California U.

    2012-07-05

    Given the recent success of >GV/m dielectric wakefield accelerator (DWA) breakdown experiments at SLAC, and follow-on coherent Cerenkov radiation production at the UCLA Neptune, a UCLA-USC-SLAC collaboration is now implementing a new set of experiments that explore various DWA scenarios. These experiments are motivated by the opportunities presented by the approval of FACET facility at SLAC, as well as unique pulse-train wakefield drivers at BNL. The SLAC experiments permit further exploration of the multi-GeV/m envelope in DWAs, and will entail investigations of novel materials (e.g. CVD diamond) and geometries (Bragg cylindrical structures, slab-symmetric DWAs), and have an over-riding goal of demonstrating >GeV acceleration in {approx}33 cm DWA tubes. In the nearer term before FACET's commissioning, we are planning measurements at the BNL ATF, in which we drive {approx}50-200 MV/m fields with single pulses or pulse trains. These experiments are of high relevance to enhancing linear collider DWA designs, as they will demonstrate potential for efficient operation with pulse trains.

  12. Longitudinal gas-density profilometry for plasma-wakefield acceleration targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaper, Lucas, E-mail: lschaper01@qub.ac.uk [Universität Hamburg, FB Physik, Institut für Experimentalphysik, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Goldberg, Lars; Kleinwächter, Tobias; Schwinkendorf, Jan-Patrick; Osterhoff, Jens [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-03-11

    Precise tailoring of plasma-density profiles has been identified as one of the critical points in achieving stable and reproducible conditions in plasma wakefield accelerators. Here, the strict requirements of next generation plasma-wakefield concepts, such as hybrid-accelerators, with densities around 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} pose challenges to target fabrication as well as to their reliable diagnosis. To mitigate these issues we combine target simulation with fabrication and characterization. The resulting density profiles in capillaries with gas jet and multiple in- and outlets are simulated with the fluid code OpenFOAM. Satisfactory simulation results then are followed by fabrication of the desired target shapes with structures down to the 10 µm level. The detection of Raman scattered photons using lenses with large collection solid angle allows to measure the corresponding longitudinal density profiles at different number densities and allows a detection sensitivity down to the low 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} density range at high spatial resolution. This offers the possibility to gain insight into steep density gradients as for example in gas jets and at the plasma-to-vacuum transition.

  13. Wakefield-Induced Ionization injection in beam-driven plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    de la Ossa, A Martinez; Streeter, M J V; Osterhoff, J

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the features and capabilities of Wakefield-Induced Ionization (WII) injection in the blowout regime of beam driven plasma accelerators. This mechanism exploits the electric wakefields to ionize electrons from a dopant gas and trap them in a well-defined region of the accelerating and focusing wake phase, leading to the formation of high-quality witness-bunches. The electron-beam drivers must feature high-peak currents ($I_b^0\\gtrsim 8.5~\\mathrm{kA}$) and a duration comparable to the plasma wavelength to excite plasma waves in the blowout regime and enable WII injection. In this regime, the disparity of the magnitude of the electric field in the driver region and the electric field in the rear of the ion cavity allows for the selective ionization and subsequent trapping from a narrow phase interval. The witness bunches generated in this manner feature a short duration and small values of the normalized transverse emittance ($k_p\\sigma_z \\sim k_p\\epsilon_n \\sim 0.1$). In additi...

  14. Low energy spread electron beams from ionization injection in a weakly relativistic laser wakefield accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show via two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that low energy spread, relativistic electron beams (>120 MeV, <15%) can be produced in the weakly non-linear regime of a plasma wakefield, driven by a moderate power laser pulse (initial a0 < 1). Higher ionization states of a high-Z trace species, mixed in a background H plasma, provide the source of injected electrons. Injection occurs even though the laser intensity is initially well below the trapping threshold, as it is found that the laser pulse evolves until it fulfils the trapping requirements through self-compression. By careful control of intensity and density, the amount of evolution and hence of trapping can be controlled. Acceleration is terminated by depletion due to the extended evolution time, leading to narrow energy spread features even for long interaction lengths. Particle tracking shows that electrons ‘born’ at the periphery of the laser pulse are more likely to follow smoother trajectories inside the wakefield and subsequently to be trapped and accelerated. (paper)

  15. Self-Injection and Acceleration of Monoenergetic Electron Beams from Laser Wakefield Accelerators in a Highly Relativistic Regime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Yoshitama; WEN Xian-Lun; WEN Tian-Shu; WU Yu-Chi; ZHANG Bao-San; ZHU Qi-Hua; HUANG Xiao-Jun; AN Wei-Min; HUNG Wen-Hui; TANG Chuan-Xiang; LIN Yu-Zheng; T. Kameshima; WANG Xiao-Dong; CHEN Li-Ming; H. Kotaki; M. Kando; K. Nakajima; GU Yu-Qiu; GUO Yi; JIAO Chun-Ye; LIU Hong-Jie; PENG Han-Sheng; TANG Chuan-Ming; WANG Xiao-Dong

    2008-01-01

    @@ Self-injection and acceleration of monoenergetic electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators are first in-vestigated in the highly relativistic regime, using 100 TW class, 27 fs laser pulses. Quasi-monoenergetic multi-bunched beams with energies as high as multi-hundredMeV are observed with simultaneous measurements of side-scattering emissions that indicate the formation of self-channelling and self-injection of electrons into a plasma wake, referred to as a 'bubble'. The three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations confirmed multiple self-injection of electron bunches into the bubble and their beam acceleration with gradient of 1.5 GeV/cm.

  16. Application of High-performance Visual Analysis Methods to Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our work combines and extends techniques from high-performance scientific data management and visualization to enable scientific researchers to gain insight from extremely large, complex, time-varying laser wakefield particle accelerator simulation data. We extend histogram-based parallel coordinates for use in visual information display as well as an interface for guiding and performing data mining operations, which are based upon multi-dimensional and temporal thresholding and data subsetting operations. To achieve very high performance on parallel computing platforms, we leverage FastBit, a state-of-the-art index/query technology, to accelerate data mining and multi-dimensional histogram computation. We show how these techniques are used in practice by scientific researchers to identify, visualize and analyze a particle beam in a large, time-varying dataset

  17. Femtosecond electron and x-ray source based on laser wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Oulianov, D A; Gosztola, D J; Korovyanko, O J; Li, Y; Rey de Castro, R C; Shkrob, I A; Crowell, Robert A.; Gosztola, David J.; Korovyanko, Oleg J.; Li, Yuelin; Oulianov, Dmitri A.; Rey-de-Castro, Roberto C.; Shkrob, Ilya A.

    2006-01-01

    A terawatt tabletop laser wakefield acceleration source of relativistic electrons has been developed in our Terawatt Ultrafast High Field Facility (TUHFF). The preliminary results for ultrafast radiolysis of liquid water using this femtosecond electron source are presented. A TUHFF based femtosecond x-ray source is proposed. Thomson scattering of the accelerated electrons off a counterpropagating terawatt laser beam will be used to generate keV x-ray photons. The expected parameters of this x-ray source have been estimated. The short pulse duration, high flux, and good collimation of the resulting x-ray beam would be conducive for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption studies of short-lived transient species in gases, liquids, and solids. It is argued that the solvation dynamics of Br atoms generated in photoinduced electron detachment from aqueous bromide would make a convenient choice for the first pump-probe experiment using this x-ray source.

  18. Generation of laser pulse trains for tests of multi-pulse laser wakefield acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalloo, R. J.; Corner, L.; Arran, C.; Cowley, J.; Cheung, G.; Thornton, C.; Walczak, R.; Hooker, S. M.

    2016-09-01

    In multi-pulse laser wakefield acceleration (MP-LWFA) a plasma wave is driven by a train of low-energy laser pulses separated by the plasma period, an approach which offers a route to driving plasma accelerators with high efficiency and at high pulse repetition rates using emerging technologies such as fibre and thin-disk lasers. Whilst these laser technologies are in development, proof-of-principle tests of MP-LWFA require a pulse train to be generated from a single, high-energy ultrafast pulse. Here we demonstrate the generation of trains of up to 7 pulses with pulse separations in the range 150-170 fs from single 40 fs pulses produced by a Ti:sapphire laser.

  19. Exploiting multi-scale parallelism for large scale numerical modelling of laser wakefield accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Fonseca, Ricardo A; Fiúza, Frederico; Davidson, Asher; Tsung, Frank S; Mori, Warren B; Silva, Luís O

    2013-01-01

    A new generation of laser wakefield accelerators, supported by the extreme accelerating fields generated in the interaction of PW-Class lasers and underdense targets, promises the production of high quality electron beams in short distances for multiple applications. Achieving this goal will rely heavily on numerical modeling for further understanding of the underlying physics and identification of optimal regimes, but large scale modeling of these scenarios is computationally heavy and requires efficient use of state-of-the-art Petascale supercomputing systems. We discuss the main difficulties involved in running these simulations and the new developments implemented in the OSIRIS framework to address these issues, ranging from multi-dimensional dynamic load balancing and hybrid distributed / shared memory parallelism to the vectorization of the PIC algorithm. We present the results of the OASCR Joule Metric program on the issue of large scale modeling of LWFA, demonstrating speedups of over 1 order of magni...

  20. Self-modulated wakefield acceleration in a centimetre self-guiding channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamperidis, C.; Bellei, C.; Bourgeois, N.; Kaluza, M. C.; Krushelnick, K.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Marques, J. R.; Nagel, S. R.; Najmudin, Z.; Najmudin

    2012-08-01

    Self-modulated wakefield acceleration was investigated at densities down to ~4 × 1018 cm-3 by propagating the 50 TW 300 fs LULI laser in helium gas jets at lengths up to 1 cm. Long interaction lengths were achieved by closer matching of the initial focal spot size to the matched spot size for these densities. Electrons with energies extending to 180 MeV were observed in broad energy spectra which show some evidence for non-Maxwellian features at high energy. Two-dimensional PIC simulations indicate that the intial laser pulse breaks up into small pulselets that are eventually compressed and focused inside the first few plasma periods, leading to a `bubble-like' acceleration of electron bunches.

  1. Application of High-performance Visual Analysis Methods to Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, Oliver; Prabhat, Mr.; Wu, Kesheng; Childs, Hank; Meredith, Jeremy; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Ahern, Sean; Weber, Gunther H.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

    2008-08-28

    Our work combines and extends techniques from high-performance scientific data management and visualization to enable scientific researchers to gain insight from extremely large, complex, time-varying laser wakefield particle accelerator simulation data. We extend histogram-based parallel coordinates for use in visual information display as well as an interface for guiding and performing data mining operations, which are based upon multi-dimensional and temporal thresholding and data subsetting operations. To achieve very high performance on parallel computing platforms, we leverage FastBit, a state-of-the-art index/query technology, to accelerate data mining and multi-dimensional histogram computation. We show how these techniques are used in practice by scientific researchers to identify, visualize and analyze a particle beam in a large, time-varying dataset.

  2. High quality electron beam generation in a proton-driven hollow plasma wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yangmei; Lotov, Konstantin V; Sosedkin, Alexander P; Hanahoe, Kieran; Mete-Apsimon, Oznur

    2016-01-01

    Proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerators have numerically demonstrated substantially higher accelerating gradients compared to conventional accelerators and the viability of accelerating electrons to energy frontier in a single plasma stage. However, due to the intrinsic strong and radially varying transverse fields, the beam quality is still far from suitable for practical application in future colliders. Here we propose a new accelerating region which is free from both plasma electrons and ions in the proton-driven hollow plasma channel. The high quality electron beam is therefore generated with this scheme without transverse plasma fields. The results show that a 1 TeV proton driver can propagate and accelerate an electron beam to 0.62 TeV with correlated energy spread of 4.6% and well-preserved normalized emittance below 2.4 mm mrad in a single hollow plasma channel of 700 m. More importantly, the beam loading tolerance is significantly improved compared to the uniform plasma case. This high quality an...

  3. 9 GeV Energy Gain in a Beam-Driven Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Litos, M; Allen, J M; An, W; Clarke, C I; Corde, S; Clayton, C E; Frederico, J; Gessner, S J; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Schmeltz, M; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Yakimenko, V

    2015-01-01

    An electron beam has gained a maximum energy of 9 GeV per particle in a 1.3 m-long electron beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator. The amount of charge accelerated in the spectral peak was 28.3 pC, and the root-mean-square energy spread was 5.0%. The mean accelerated charge and energy gain per particle of the 215 shot data set was 115 pC and 5.3 GeV, respectively, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 4.0 GeV/m at the spectral peak. The mean energy spread of the data set was 5.1%. These results are consistent with the extrapolation of the previously reported energy gain results using a shorter, 36 cm-long plasma source to within 10%, evincing a non-evolving wake structure that can propagate distances of over a meter in length. Wake-loading effects were evident in the data through strong dependencies observed between various spectral properties and the amount of accelerated charge.

  4. Injection of electrons by colliding laser pulses in a laser wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, M.; Aurand, B.; Ekerfelt, H.; Persson, A.; Lundh, O.

    2016-09-01

    To improve the stability and reproducibility of laser wakefield accelerators and to allow for future applications, controlling the injection of electrons is of great importance. This allows us to control the amount of charge in the beams of accelerated electrons and final energy of the electrons. Results are presented from a recent experiment on controlled injection using the scheme of colliding pulses and performed using the Lund multi-terawatt laser. Each laser pulse is split into two parts close to the interaction point. The main pulse is focused on a 2 mm diameter gas jet to drive a nonlinear plasma wave below threshold for self-trapping. The second pulse, containing only a fraction of the total laser energy, is focused to collide with the main pulse in the gas jet under an angle of 150°. Beams of accelerated electrons with low divergence and small energy spread are produced using this set-up. Control over the amount of accelerated charge is achieved by rotating the plane of polarization of the second pulse in relation to the main pulse. Furthermore, the peak energy of the electrons in the beams is controlled by moving the collision point along the optical axis of the main pulse, and thereby changing the acceleration length in the plasma.

  5. ACE3P Computations of Wakefield Coupling in the CLIC Two-Beam Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, Arno; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Rawat, V.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Syratchev, I.; Grudiev, A.; Wuensch, W.; /CERN

    2010-10-27

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its novel two-beam accelerator concept envisions rf power transfer to the accelerating structures from a separate high-current decelerator beam line consisting of power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). It is critical to numerically verify the fundamental and higher-order mode properties in and between the two beam lines with high accuracy and confidence. To solve these large-scale problems, SLAC's parallel finite element electromagnetic code suite ACE3P is employed. Using curvilinear conformal meshes and higher-order finite element vector basis functions, unprecedented accuracy and computational efficiency are achieved, enabling high-fidelity modeling of complex detuned structures such as the CLIC TD24 accelerating structure. In this paper, time-domain simulations of wakefield coupling effects in the combined system of PETS and the TD24 structures are presented. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel CLIC two-beam accelerator scheme.

  6. Temporal characterization of ultrashort ionization-injected electron bunches generated from a laser wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, C J; Wan, Y; Guo, B; Pai, C -H; Wu, Y P; Li, F; Chu, H -H; Gu, Y Q; Mori, W B; Joshi, C; Wang, J; Lu, W

    2016-01-01

    A new concept to diagnose the temporal characteristics of ultrashort electron bunches generated from a laser wakefield accelerator is described. When the ionization-injected bunch interacts with the back of the drive laser it is deflected and stretched along the direction of the electric field of the laser. Upon exiting the plasma if the bunch goes through a narrow slit in front of the dipole magnet that disperses the electrons in the plane of the laser polarization, it can form a series of bunchlets that have different energies but separated by half a laser wavelength. By analyzing the modulated energy spectrum, the beam current profile and the longitudinal (energy versus time) phase space are recovered. This concept is demonstrated through particle-in-cell simulations and experiment.

  7. Multiple quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from laser-wakefield acceleration with spatially structured laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Y.; Li, M. H.; Li, Y. F.; Wang, J. G.; Tao, M. Z.; Han, Y. J.; Zhao, J. R.; Huang, K.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Li, Y. T. [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China); Chen, L. M., E-mail: lmchen@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, D. Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Z. Y. [Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621999 (China); Sheng, Z. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Department of Physics, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Zhang, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-08-15

    By adjusting the focus geometry of a spatially structured laser pulse, single, double, and treble quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were generated, respectively, in laser-wakefield acceleration. Single electron beam was produced as focusing the laser pulse to a single spot. While focusing the laser pulse to two spots that are approximately equal in energy and size and intense enough to form their own filaments, two electron beams were produced. Moreover, with a proper distance between those two focal spots, three electron beams emerged with a certain probability owing to the superposition of the diffractions of those two spots. The energy spectra of the multiple electron beams are quasi-monoenergetic, which are different from that of the large energy spread beams produced due to the longitudinal multiple-injection in the single bubble.

  8. Compton X-rays from Self-Generated Backscattered Radiation in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Antonio; Kaganovich, Dmitri; Helle, Michael; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Palastro, John; Hafizi, Bahman; Gordon, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    A unique Compton scattering configuration for generating monochromatic, short pulse, and potentially coherent x-rays in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) is being studied at the Naval Research Laboratory. Reflection mechanisms such as stimulated Raman scattering and shock-created density gradients in a plasma can generate the required backward-travelling laser pulse directly from the same laser pulse used in the LWFA, i.e., the high energy electron beam and the counter-propagating photon beam are both self-generated by an ultrashort laser pulse in plasma. Extended interaction distance and automatic alignment of electron beam and backscattered radiation could be beneficial to the amplification of the Doppler upshifted Compton X-rays. Preliminary experiments are ongoing with measurement of Raman backscattering and reflection off a plasma density gradient. Energy resolved X-ray results are also anticipated. This work is supported by NRL Base Program and DOE.

  9. Bubble shape and electromagnetic field in the nonlinear regime for laser wakefield acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Huang, S.; Kong, Q., E-mail: qkong@fudan.edu.cn [Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Gu, Y. J. [Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Institute of Physics of the ASCR, ELI-Beamlines Project, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); Kawata, S. [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yohtoh, Utsunomiya 321-8585 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    The electromagnetic field in the electron “bubble” regime for ultra-intense laser wakefield acceleration was solved using the d'Alembert equations. Ignoring the residual electrons, we assume an ellipsoidal bubble forms under ideal conditions, with bubble velocity equal to the speed of light in vacuum. The general solution for bubble shape and electromagnetic field were obtained. The results were confirmed in 2.5D PIC (particle-in-cell) simulations. Moreover, slopes for the longitudinal electric field of larger than 0.5 were found in these simulations. With spherical bubbles, this slope is always smaller than or equal to 0.5. This behavior validates the ellipsoid assumption.

  10. Measurements of the Critical Power for Self-Injection of Electrons in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froula, D. H.; Clayton, C. E.; Döppner, T.; Marsh, K. A.; Barty, C. P. J.; Divol, L.; Fonseca, R. A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Martins, S. F.; Michel, P.; Mori, W. B.; Palastro, J. P.; Pollock, B. B.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J. E.; Ross, J. S.; Siders, C. W.; Silva, L. O.; Wang, T.

    2009-11-01

    A laser wakefield acceleration study has been performed in the matched, self-guided, blowout regime producing 720±50MeV quasimonoenergetic electrons with a divergence ΔθFWHM of 2.85±0.15mrad using a 10 J, 60 fs 0.8μm laser. While maintaining a nearly constant plasma density (3×1018cm-3), the energy gain increased from 75 to 720 MeV when the plasma length was increased from 3 to 8 mm. Absolute charge measurements indicate that self-injection of electrons occurs when the laser power P exceeds 3 times the critical power Pcr for relativistic self-focusing and saturates around 100 pC for P/Pcr>5. The results are compared with both analytical scalings and full 3D particle-in-cell simulations.

  11. Laser Wakefield Acceleration at Reduced Density in the Self-Guided Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralph, J E; Albert, F; Glenzer, S H; Palastro, J P; Pollock, B B; Shaw, J L; Till, A; Froula, D H; Clayton, C E; Lu, W; Mori, W B; Pak, A E; Joshi, C; Martin, S; Silva, L O

    2009-11-18

    Experiments conducted using a 200TW 60 fs laser have demonstrated up to 720 MeV electrons in the self-guided laser wakefield regime using pure Helium gas jet targets. Charge and energy of the accelerated electrons was measured using an electron spectrometer with a 0.5T magnet and charge callibrated image plates. The self-trapped charge in a helium plasma was shown to fall off with decreasing electron density with a threshold at 2.5 x 10{sup 18} (cm{sup -3}) below which no charge is trapped. Self-guiding however is shown to continue below this density limitation over distances of 14 mm with an exit spot size of 25{micro}m. Simulations show that injection of electrons at these densities can be assisted through ionization induced trapping in a mix of Helium with 3% Oxygen.

  12. Colliding pulse injection experiments in non-collinear geometryfor controlled laser plasma wakefield acceleration of electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toth, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric H.; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Leemans,Wim P.; Nakamura, Kei; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Schroeder, Carl B.; Bruhwiler,D.; Cary, J.R.

    2007-06-25

    An optical injection scheme for a laser-plasma basedaccelerator which employs a non-collinear counter-propagating laser beamto push background electrons in the focusing and acceleration phase viaponderomotive beat with the trailing part of the wakefield driver pulseis discussed. Preliminary experiments were performed using a drive beamof a_0 = 2.6 and colliding beam of a_1 = 0.8 both focused on the middleof a 200 mu m slit jet backed with 20 bar, which provided ~; 260 mu mlong gas plume. The enhancement in the total charge by the collidingpulse was observed with sharp dependence on the delay time of thecolliding beam. Enhancement of the neutron yield was also measured, whichsuggests a generation of electrons above 10 MeV.

  13. LCODE: a parallel quasistatic code for computationally heavy problems of plasma wakefield acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Sosedkin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    LCODE is a freely-distributed quasistatic 2D3V code for simulating plasma wakefield acceleration, mainly specialized at resource-efficient studies of long-term propagation of ultrarelativistic particle beams in plasmas. The beam is modeled with fully relativistic macro-particles in a simulation window copropagating with the light velocity; the plasma can be simulated with either kinetic or fluid model. Several techniques are used to obtain exceptional numerical stability and precision while maintaining high resource efficiency, enabling LCODE to simulate the evolution of long particle beams over long propagation distances even on a laptop. A recent upgrade enabled LCODE to perform the calculations in parallel. A pipeline of several LCODE processes communicating via MPI (Message-Passing Interface) is capable of executing multiple consecutive time steps of the simulation in a single pass. This approach can speed up the calculations by hundreds of times.

  14. LCODE: A parallel quasistatic code for computationally heavy problems of plasma wakefield acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosedkin, A. P.; Lotov, K. V.

    2016-09-01

    LCODE is a freely distributed quasistatic 2D3V code for simulating plasma wakefield acceleration, mainly specialized at resource-efficient studies of long-term propagation of ultrarelativistic particle beams in plasmas. The beam is modeled with fully relativistic macro-particles in a simulation window copropagating with the light velocity; the plasma can be simulated with either kinetic or fluid model. Several techniques are used to obtain exceptional numerical stability and precision while maintaining high resource efficiency, enabling LCODE to simulate the evolution of long particle beams over long propagation distances even on a laptop. A recent upgrade enabled LCODE to perform the calculations in parallel. A pipeline of several LCODE processes communicating via MPI (Message-Passing Interface) is capable of executing multiple consecutive time steps of the simulation in a single pass. This approach can speed up the calculations by hundreds of times.

  15. Self-truncated ionization injection and consequent monoenergetic electron bunches in laser wakefield acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ionization-induced injection in laser wakefield acceleration has been recently demonstrated to be a promising injection scheme. However, the energy spread controlling in this mechanism remains a challenge because continuous injection in a mixed gas target is usually inevitable. Here, we propose that by use of certain initially unmatched laser pulses, the electron injection can be constrained to the very front region of the mixed gas target, typically in a length of a few hundreds micrometers determined by the laser self-focusing and the wake deformation. As a result, the produced electron beam has narrow energy spread and meanwhile contains tens of pC in charge. Both multidimensional simulations and theoretical analysis illustrate the effectiveness of this scheme

  16. Photon acceleration versus frequency-domain interferometry for laser wakefield diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, J.M.; Oliveira e Silva, L.; Mendonca, J.T. [GoLP/Centro de Fisica de Plasmas, Inst. Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal)

    1998-03-01

    A detailed comparison between the photon acceleration diagnostic technique and the frequency-domain interferometric technique for laser wakefield diagnostics, by using ray-tracing equations is presented here. The dispersion effects on the probe beam and the implications of an arbitrary phase velocity of the plasma wave are discussed for both diagnostic techniques. In the presence of large amplitude plasma wave and long interaction distances significant frequency shifts can be observed. The importance of this effect on the determination of the phase and frequency shifts measurements given by each of the two diagnostic techniques, is also analyzed. The accuracy of both diagnostic techniques is discussed and some of their technical problems are reviewed. (author)

  17. Beam Transfer Line Design for a Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, C; Brethoux, D; Clerc, V; Goddard, B; Gschwendtner, E; Jensen, L K; Kosmicki, A; Le Godec, G; Meddahi, M; Muggli, P; Mutin, C; Osborne, O; Papastergiou, K; Pardons, A; Velotti, F M; Vincke, H

    2013-01-01

    The world’s first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment (AWAKE) is presently being studied at CERN. The experimentwill use a high energy proton beam extracted from the SPS as driver. Two possible locations for installing the AWAKE facility were considered: the West Area and the CNGS beam line. The previous transfer line from the SPS to the West Area was completely dismantled in 2005 and would need to be fully re-designed and re-built. For this option, geometric constraints for radiation protection reasons would limit the maximum proton beam energy to 300 GeV. The existing CNGS line could be used by applying only minor changes to the lattice for the final focusing and the interface between the proton beam and the laser, required for plasma ionisation and bunch-modulation seeding. The beam line design studies performed for the two options are presented.

  18. Measurements of the critical power for self-injection of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froula, D H; Clayton, C E; Doppner, T; Fonseca, R A; Marsh, K A; Barty, C J; Divol, L; Glenzer, S H; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Martins, S F; Michel, P; Mori, W; Palastro, J P; Pollock, B B; Pak, A; Ralph, J E; Ross, J S; Siders, C; Silva, L O; Wang, T

    2009-06-02

    A laser wakefield acceleration study has been performed in the matched, self-guided, blow-out regime where a 10 J, 60 fs laser produced 720 {+-} 50 MeV quasi-monoenergetic electrons with a divergence of {Delta}{theta} = 2.85 {+-} 0.15 mRad. While maintaining a nearly constant plasma density (3 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}), a linear electron energy gain was measured from 100 MeV to 700 MeV when the plasma length was scaled from 3 mm to 8 mm. Absolute charge measurements indicate that self-injection occurs when P/P{sub cr} > 4 and saturates around 100 pC for P/P{sub cr} > 12. The results are compared with both analytical scalings and full 3D particle-in-cell simulations.

  19. Sapphire capillaries for laser-driven wakefield acceleration in plasma. Fs-laser micromachining and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwinkendorf, Jan-Patrick

    2012-08-15

    Plasma wakefields are a promising approach for the acceleration of electrons with ultrahigh (10 to 100 GV/m) electric fields. Nowadays, high-intensity laser pulses are routinely utilized to excite these large-amplitude plasma waves. However, several detrimental effects such as laser diffraction, electron-wake dephasing and laser depletion may terminate the acceleration process. Two of these phenomena can be mitigated or avoided by the application of capillary waveguides, e.g. fabricated out of sapphire for longevity. Capillaries may compensate for laser diffraction like a fiber and allow for the creation of tapered gas-density profiles working against the dephasing between the accelerating wave and the particles. Additionally, they offer the possibility of controlled particle injection. This thesis is reporting on the set up of a laser for fs-micromachining of capillaries of almost arbitrary shapes and a test stand for density-profile characterization. These devices will permit the creation of tailored gas-density profiles for controlled electron injection and acceleration inside plasma.

  20. Laser-wakefield accelerators as hard x-ray sources for 3D medical imaging of human bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J M; Wood, J C; Lopes, N C; Poder, K; Abel, R L; Alatabi, S; Bryant, J S J; Jin, A; Kneip, S; Mecseki, K; Symes, D R; Mangles, S P D; Najmudin, Z

    2015-01-01

    A bright μm-sized source of hard synchrotron x-rays (critical energy Ecrit > 30 keV) based on the betatron oscillations of laser wakefield accelerated electrons has been developed. The potential of this source for medical imaging was demonstrated by performing micro-computed tomography of a human femoral trabecular bone sample, allowing full 3D reconstruction to a resolution below 50 μm. The use of a 1 cm long wakefield accelerator means that the length of the beamline (excluding the laser) is dominated by the x-ray imaging distances rather than the electron acceleration distances. The source possesses high peak brightness, which allows each image to be recorded with a single exposure and reduces the time required for a full tomographic scan. These properties make this an interesting laboratory source for many tomographic imaging applications. PMID:26283308

  1. Localization of ionization-induced trapping in a laser wakefield accelerator using a density down-ramp

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, M.; Ekerfelt, H.; Aurand, B.; Gallardo Ganzalez, I.; Desforges, F. G.; Davoine, X.; Maitrallain, A.; Reymond, S.; Monot, P.; Persson, A.; Dobosz Dufrénoy S.; Wahlström C-G.; Cros, B.; Lundh, O.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a study on controlled trapping of electrons, by field ionization of nitrogen ions, in laser wakefield accelerators in variable length gas cells. In addition to ionization-induced trapping in the density plateau inside the cells, which results in wide, but stable, electron energy spectra, a regime of ionization-induced trapping localized in the density down-ramp at the exit of the gas cells, is found. The resulting electron energy spectra are peaked, with 10% shot-to-shot fluctuations in peak energy. Ionization-induced trapping of electrons in the density down-ramp is a way to trap and accelerate a large number of electrons, thus improving the efficiency of the laser-driven wakefield acceleration.

  2. Efficient modeling of plasma wakefield acceleration in quasi-non-linear-regimes with the hybrid code Architect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marocchino, A.; Massimo, F.; Rossi, A. R.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present a hybrid approach aiming to assess feasible plasma wakefield acceleration working points with reduced computation resources. The growing interest for plasma wakefield acceleration and especially the need to control with increasing precision the quality of the accelerated bunch demands for more accurate and faster simulations. Particle in cell codes are the state of the art technique to simulate the underlying physics, however the run-time represents the major drawback. Architect is a hybrid code that treats the bunch kinetically and the background electron plasma as a fluid, initialising bunches in vacuum so to take into account for the transition from vacuum to plasma. Architect solves directly the Maxwell's equations on a Yee lattice. Such an approach allows us to drastically reduce run time without loss of generality or accuracy up to the weakly non linear regime.

  3. Tomographic characterisation of gas-jet targets for laser wakefield acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couperus, J. P.; Köhler, A.; Wolterink, T. A. W.; Jochmann, A.; Zarini, O.; Bastiaens, H. M. J.; Boller, K. J.; Irman, A.; Schramm, U.

    2016-09-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has emerged as a promising concept for the next generation of high energy electron accelerators. The acceleration medium is provided by a target that creates a local well-defined gas-density profile inside a vacuum vessel. Target development and analysis of the resulting gas-density profiles is an important aspect in the further development of LWFA. Gas-jet targets are widely used in regimes where relatively high electron densities over short interaction lengths are required (up to several millimetres interaction length, plasma densities down to ~1018cm-3). In this paper we report a precise characterisation of such gas-jet targets by a laser interferometry technique. We show that phase shifts down to 4 mrad can be resolved. Tomographic phase reconstruction enables detection of non-axisymmetrical gas-density profiles which indicates defects in cylindrical nozzles, analysis of slit-nozzles and nozzles with an induced shock-wave density step. In a direct comparison between argon and helium jets we show that it cannot automatically be assumed, as is often done, that a nozzle measured with argon will provide the same gas density with helium.

  4. Tomographic characterisation of gas-jet targets for laser wakefield acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Couperus, J.P.; Wolterink, T.A.W.; Jochmann, A.; Zarini, O..; Bastiaens, H.M.J.; Boller, K.J.; Irman, A.; Schramm, U..

    2016-01-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration(LWFA) has emerged as a promising concept for the next generation of high energy electron accelerators. The acceleration medium is provided by a target that creates a local well-defined gas-density profile inside a vacuum vessel. Target development and analysis of the resulting gas-density profiles is an important aspect in the further development of LWFA. Gas-jet targets are widely used in regimes where relatively high electron densities over short interaction lengths are required (up to several millimetres interaction length, plasma densities down to 1018 cm3). In this paper we report a precise characterization of such gas-jet targets by a laser interferometry technique. We show that phase shifts down to 4 mrad can be resolved. Tomographic phase reconstruction enables detection of non-axisymmetrical gas-density profiles which indicates defects in cylindrical nozzles, analysis of slit-nozzles and nozzles with an induced shock-wave density step. In a direct comparison between argon...

  5. Development of High Gradient Laser Wakefield Accelerators Towards Nuclear Detection Applications at LBNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compact high-energy linacs are important to applications including monochromatic gamma sources for nuclear material security applications. Recent laser wakefield accelerator experiments at LBNL demonstrated narrow energy spread beams, now with energies of up to 1 GeV in 3 cm using a plasma channel at low density. This demonstrates the production of GeV beams from devices much smaller than conventional linacs, and confirms the anticipated scaling of laser driven accelerators to GeV energies. Stable performance at 0.5 GeV was demonstrated. Experiments and simulations are in progress to control injection of particles into the wake and hence to improve beam quality and stability. Using plasma density gradients to control injection, stable beams at 1 MeV over days of operation, and with an order of magnitude lower absolute momentum spread than previously observed, have been demonstrated. New experiments are post-accelerating the beams from controlled injection experiments to increase beam quality and stability. Thomson scattering from such beams is being developed to provide collimated multi-MeV monoenergetic gamma sources for security applications from compact devices. Such sources can reduce dose to target and increase accuracy for applications including photofission and nuclear resonance fluorescence.

  6. Self-modulated laser wakefield accelerators as x-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Lemos, N; Tsung, F S; Shaw, J L; Marsh, K A; Albert, F; Pollock, B B; Joshi, C

    2015-01-01

    The development of a directional, small-divergence, and short-duration picosecond x-ray probe beam with an energy greater than 50 keV is desirable for high energy density science experiments. We therefore explore through particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulations the possibility of using x-rays radiated by betatron-like motion of electrons from a self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator as a possible candidate to meet this need. Two OSIRIS 2D PIC simulations with mobile ions are presented, one with a normalized vector potential a0 = 1.5 and the other with an a0 = 3. We find that in both cases direct laser acceleration (DLA) is an important additional acceleration mechanism in addition to the longitudinal electric field of the plasma wave. Together these mechanisms produce electrons with a continuous energy spectrum with a maximum energy of 300 MeV for a0 = 3 case and 180 MeV in the a0 = 1.5 case. Forward-directed x-ray radiation with a photon energy up to 100 keV was calculated for the a0 = 3 case and up t...

  7. Development of high gradient laser wakefield accelerators towards nuclear detection applications at LBNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, Cameron GR; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Esarey, Eric H.; Gonsalves, Anthony J.; Lin, Chen; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Matlis, Nicholas H.; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Mike; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Plateau, Guillaume R.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim P.

    2008-09-08

    Compact high-energy linacs are important to applications including monochromatic gamma sources for nuclear material security applications. Recent laser wakefield accelerator experiments at LBNL demonstrated narrow energy spread beams, now with energies of up to 1 GeV in 3 cm using a plasma channel at low density. This demonstrates the production of GeV beams from devices much smaller than conventional linacs, and confirms the anticipated scaling of laser driven accelerators to GeV energies. Stable performance at 0.5 GeV was demonstrated. Experiments and simulations are in progress to control injection of particles into the wake and hence to improve beam quality and stability. Using plasma density gradients to control injection, stable beams at 1 MeV over days of operation, and with an order of magnitude lower absolute momentum spread than previously observed, have been demonstrated. New experiments are post-accelerating the beams from controlled injection experiments to increase beam quality and stability. Thomson scattering from such beams is being developed to provide collimated multi-MeV monoenergetic gamma sources for security applications from compact devices. Such sources can reduce dose to target and increase accuracy for applications including photofission and nuclear resonance fluorescence.

  8. Low energy spread 100 MeV-1 GeV electron bunches from laser wakefield acceleration at LOASIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments at the LOASIS laboratory of LBNL recently demonstrated production of 100 MeV electron beams with low energy spread and low divergence from laser wakefield acceleration. The radiation pressure of a 10 TW laser pulse guided over 10 diffraction ranges by a plasma density channel was used to drive an intense plasma wave (wakefield), producing acceleration gradients on the order of 100 GV/m in a mm-scale channel. Beam energy has now been increased from 100 to 1000 MeV by using a cm-scale guiding channel at lower density, driven by a 40TW laser, demonstrating the anticipated scaling to higher beam energies. Particle simulations indicate that the low energy spread beams were produced from self trapped electrons through the interplay of trapping, loading, and dephasing. Other experiments and simulations are also underway to control injection of particles into the wake, and hence improve beam quality and stability further

  9. Plasma wakefield excitation by incoherent laser pulses: a path towards high-average power laser-plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetti, C; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2014-01-01

    In a laser plasma accelerator (LPA), a short and intense laser pulse propagating in a plasma drives a wakefield (a plasma wave with a relativistic phase velocity) that can sustain extremely large electric fields, enabling compact accelerating structures. Potential LPA applications include compact radiation sources and high energy linear colliders. We propose and study plasma wave excitation by an incoherent combination of a large number of low energy laser pulses (i.e., without constraining the pulse phases). We show that, in spite of the incoherent nature of electromagnetic fields within the volume occupied by the pulses, the excited wakefield is regular and its amplitude is comparable or equal to that obtained using a single, coherent pulse with the same energy. These results provide a path to the next generation of LPA-based applications, where incoherently combined multiple pulses may enable high repetition rate, high average power LPAs.

  10. High quality electron beam acceleration by ionization injection in laser wakefields with mid-infrared dual-color lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ming; Luo, Ji; Chen, Min; Mori, Warren B.; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Hidding, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    For the laser wakefield acceleration, suppression of beam energy spread while keeping sufficient charge is one of the key challenges. In order to achieve this, we propose bichromatic laser ionization injection with combined laser wavelengths of 2.4 μ m and 0.8 μ m for wakefield excitation and triggering electron injection via field ionization, respectively. A laser pulse at 2.4 μ m wavelength enables one to drive an intense acceleration structure with a relatively low laser power. To further reduce the requirement of laser power, we also propose to use carbon dioxide as the working gas medium, where carbon acts as the injection element. Our three dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that electron beams at the GeV energy level with both low energy spreads (around 1%) and high charges (several tens of picocoulomb) can be obtained by the use of this scheme with laser peak power totaling sub-100 TW.

  11. High quality electron beam acceleration by ionization injection in laser wakefields with mid-infrared dual-color lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Ming; Chen, Min; Mori, Warren B; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Hidding, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    For the laser wakefield acceleration, suppression of beam energy spread while keeping sufficient charge is one of the key challenges. In order to achieve this, we propose bichromatic laser ionization injection with combined laser wavelengths of $2.4\\rm \\mu m$ and $0.8\\rm \\mu m$ for wakefield excitation and for triggering electron injection via field ionization, respectively. A laser pulse at $2.4\\rm \\mu m$ wavelength enables one to drive an intense acceleration structure with relatively low laser power. To further reduce the requirement of laser power, we also propose to use carbon dioxide as the working gas medium, where carbon acts as the injection element. Our full three dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that electron beams at the GeV energy level with both low energy spreads (around one percent) and high charges (several tens of picocoulomb) can be obtained by this scheme with laser parameters achievable in the near future.

  12. Observation of Betatron radiation in the self-modulated regime of laser wakefield acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Felicie; Pollock, Bradley; Goyon, Clement; Pak, Arthur; Moody, John; Shaw, Jessica; Lemos, Nuno; Marsh, Ken; Clayton, Christopher; Schumaker, William; Glenzer, Siegfried; Saunders, Alison; Falcone, Roger; Fiuza, Frederico; Joshi, Chan

    2015-11-01

    We observed multi keV Betatron x-rays from a self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator. The experiment was performed at the Jupiter Laser Facility, LLNL, by focusing the Titan short pulse beam (4-150 J, 1 ps) onto the edge of a Helium gas jet at electronic densities around 1019 cm-3. For the first time on this laser system, we used a long focal length optic, which produced a laser normalized potential a0 in the range 1-3. Under these conditions, electrons are accelerated by the plasma wave created in the wake of the light pulse. As a result, intense Raman satellites, which measured shifts depend on the electron plasma density, were observed on the laser spectrum transmitted through the target. Electrons with energies up to 200 MeV, as well as Betatron x-rays with critical energies around 20 keV, were measured. OSIRIS 2D PIC simulations confirm that the electrons gain energy both from the plasma wave and from their interaction with the laser field. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC52- 07NA27344, and supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program under tracking code 13-LW-076.

  13. Betatron radiation based diagnostics for plasma wakefield accelerated electron beams at the SPARC_LAB test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpakov, V.; Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Dabagov, S.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Marocchino, A.; Paroli, B.; Pompili, R.; Rossi, A. R.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress with wake-field acceleration has shown a great potential in providing high gradient acceleration fields, while the quality of the beams remains relatively poor. Precise knowledge of the beam size at the exit from the plasma and matching conditions for the externally injected beams are the key for improvement of beam quality. Betatron radiation emitted by the beam during acceleration in the plasma is a powerful tool for the transverse beam size measurement, being also non-intercepting. In this work we report on the technical solutions chosen at SPARC_LAB for such diagnostics tool, along with expected parameters of betatron radiation.

  14. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser wakefield accelerator and plasma mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hai-En; Wang, Xiaoming; Shaw, Joseph; Li, Zhengyan; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Arefiev, Alex; Downer, Mike; InstituteFusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin Team

    2014-10-01

    Compton backscatter (CBS) x-rays have been generated from laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) electron beams by retro-reflecting the LWFA drive pulse with a plasma mirror (PM) and by backscattering a secondary pulse split from the driver pulse. However, tunable quasi-monoenergetic CBS x-rays have been produced only by the latter method, which requires challenging alignment. Here we demonstrate quasi-monoenergetic (~50% FWHM), bright (5 × 106 photon per shot) CBS x-rays with central energy tunability from 75 KeV to 200 KeV by combining a PM with a tunable LWFA. 30 TW, 30-fs (FWHM), laser pulses from the UT3 laser system were focused (f/12) to spot diameter 11 micron, intensity ~6 × 1018 W/cm2 (a = 1.5) at a 1-mm long Helium gas jet, yielding quasi-monoenergetic relativistic electrons. A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit efficiently retro-reflected the LWFA driving pulse into oncoming electrons to produce CBS x-rays without detecting bremsstrahlung background. By changing gas jet backing pressure, electron energy was tuned from 60 to 90 MeV, thereby tuning the CBS x-ray energy, which was determined by measuring transmission through a metal filter pack. The x-ray beam profiles recorded on an image plate had 5-10-mrad divergence.

  15. Compton Backscattered X-rays from Self-Generated Laser Wiggler in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Antonio; Kaganovich, Dmitri; Hafizi, Bahman; Palastro, John; Helle, Michael; Gordon, Daniel; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Seely, John

    2014-10-01

    A unique Compton backscattering configuration for generating monochromatic, short pulse, and potentially coherent x-rays in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) is being studied at the Naval Research Laboratory. Reflection mechanisms such as stimulated Raman scattering and shock-created density gradients in a plasma can generate the required backward-travelling laser pulse directly from the same laser pulse used in the LWFA, i.e., the high energy electron beam and the counter-propagating photon beam are both self-generated by an ultrashort laser pulse in plasma. The automatic alignment of the counter-propagating electrons and photons together with the extended interaction distance and tightly guided beam sizes in a LWFA can lead to a high-gain situation for the Doppler upshifted forward propagating x-rays. Possibilities for exponential gain to achieve coherent generation of the x-rays are under investigation. Theoretical, numerical, and preliminary experimental results will be presented. This work is supported by DOE and NRL 6.1 funding.

  16. Lorentz boosted frame simulation of Laser wakefield acceleration in quasi-3D geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Peicheng; Davidson, Asher; Tableman, Adam; Dalichaouch, Thamine; Meyers, Michael D; Tsung, Frank S; Decyk, Viktor K; Fiuza, Frederico; Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Ricardo A; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis O; Mori, Warren B

    2015-01-01

    When modeling laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) using the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm in a Lorentz boosted frame, the plasma is drifting relativistically at $\\beta_b c$ towards the laser, which can lead to a computational speedup of $\\sim \\gamma_b^2=(1-\\beta_b^2)^{-1}$. Meanwhile, when LWFA is modeled in the quasi-3D geometry in which the electromagnetic fields and current are decomposed into a limited number of azimuthal harmonics, speedups are achieved by modeling three dimensional problems with the computation load on the order of two dimensional $r-z$ simulations. Here, we describe how to combine the speed ups from the Lorentz boosted frame and quasi-3D algorithms. The key to the combination is the use of a hybrid Yee-FFT solver in the quasi-3D geometry that can be used to effectively eliminate the Numerical Cerenkov Instability (NCI) that inevitably arises in a Lorentz boosted frame due to the unphysical coupling of Langmuir modes and EM modes of the relativistically drifting plasma in these simul...

  17. Density profile of a line plasma generated by laser ablation for laser wakefield acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An elongated line plasma generated by a laser ablation of an aluminum target was investigated, which can be used in the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) by employing ultra-intense laser pulse through the longitudinal direction of the plasma. To generate a uniform and long plasma channel along the propagation of ultra-intense laser pulse (main pulse), a cylindrical lens combined with a biprism was used to shape the intensity of a ns Nd:YAG laser (pre-pulse) on the Al target. A uniformity of laser intensity can be manipulated by changing the distance between the biprism and the target. The density profile of the plasma generated by laser ablation was measured using two interferometers, indicating that a 3-mm long uniform line plasma with a density of 6 × 1017 cm−3 could be generated. The density with main pulse was also measured and the results indicated that the density would increase further due to additional ionization of the plasma by the main ultra-intense laser pulse. The resulting plasma density, which is a crucial parameter for the LWFA, can be controlled by the intensity of the pre-pulse, the time delay between the pre- and main pulse, and the distance of the main pulse from the target surface

  18. Modeling Self-Ionized Plasma Wakefield Acceleration for Afterburner Parameters Using QuickPIC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Miaomiao; Decker, Franz Josef; Decyk, Viktor K; Deng, Suzhi; Huang Cheng Kun; Iverson, Richard; Johnson, Devon K; Joshi, Chandrashekhar; Katsouleas, Thomas C; Lu, Wei; Mori, Warren; Muggli, Patric; Oz, Erdem; Shih Yu Tsung, Frank; Walz, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    A plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) has been proposed as a way to double the energy of a future linear collider. This afterburner concept will require meter long uniform plasmas. For the parameters envisaged in possible afterburner stages, the self-fields of the particle beam are intense enough to tunnel ionize some neutral gases such as lithium. Tunnel ionization has been investigated as a way for the beam itself to create the plasma.* Furthermore, tunnel ionization in a neutral or partially pre-ionized gas may create new plasma electrons and alter the plasma wake.*,** Unfortunately, it is not possible to model a PWFA with afterburner parameters using the models described in Bruhwiler et al. and Deng et al. Here we describe the addition of a tunnel ionization package using the ADK model into QuickPIC, a highly efficient quasi-static particle in cell (PIC) code which can model a PWFA with afterburner parameters. There is excellent agreement between QuickPIC and OSIRIS(a full PIC code) for pre-ionized plasma...

  19. Temporal characterization of ultrashort linearly chirped electron bunches generated from a laser wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C. J.; Hua, J. F.; Wan, Y.; Guo, B.; Pai, C.-H.; Wu, Y. P.; Li, F.; Chu, H.-H.; Gu, Y. Q.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.; Wang, J.; Lu, W.

    2016-06-01

    A new method for diagnosing the temporal characteristics of ultrashort electron bunches with linear energy chirp generated from a laser wakefield accelerator is described. When the ionization-injected bunch interacts with the back of the drive laser, it is deflected and stretched along the direction of the electric field of the laser. Upon exiting the plasma, if the bunch goes through a narrow slit in front of the dipole magnet that disperses the electrons in the plane of the laser polarization, it can form a series of bunchlets that have different energies but are separated by half a laser wavelength. Since only the electrons that are undeflected by the laser go through the slit, the energy spectrum of the bunch is modulated. By analyzing the modulated energy spectrum, the shots where the bunch has a linear energy chirp can be recognized. Consequently, the energy chirp and beam current profile of those bunches can be reconstructed. This method is demonstrated through particle-in-cell simulations and experiment.

  20. Dynamics of ionization-induced electron injection in the high density regime of laser wakefield acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamics of ionization-induced electron injection in high density (∼1.2 × 1019 cm−3) regime of laser wakefield acceleration is investigated by analyzing the betatron X-ray emission. In such high density operation, the laser normalized vector potential exceeds the injection-thresholds of both ionization-injection and self-injection due to self-focusing. In this regime, direct experimental evidence of early on-set of ionization-induced injection into the plasma wave is given by mapping the X-ray emission zone inside the plasma. Particle-In-Cell simulations show that this early on-set of ionization-induced injection, due to its lower trapping threshold, suppresses the trapping of self-injected electrons. A comparative study of the electron and X-ray properties is performed for both self-injection and ionization-induced injection. An increase of X-ray fluence by at least a factor of two is observed in the case of ionization-induced injection due to increased trapped charge compared to self-injection mechanism

  1. Electron diffraction using ultrafast electron bunches from a laser-wakefield accelerator at kHz repetition rate

    OpenAIRE

    He, Z.-H; Thomas, A. G. R.; Beaurepaire, B; Nees, J. A.; Hou, B.; Malka, Victor; Krushelnick, K; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    We show that electron bunches in the 50-100 keV range can be produced from a laser wake-field accelerator using 10 mJ, 35 fs laser pulses operating at 0.5 kHz. It is shown that using a solenoid magnetic lens, the electron bunch distribution can be shaped. The resulting transverse and longitudinal coherence is suitable for producing diffraction images from a polycrystalline 10 nm aluminum foil. The high repetition rate, the stability of the electron source and the fact that its uncorrelated bu...

  2. Electron diffraction using ultrafast electron bunches from a laser-wakefield accelerator at kHz repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Z.-H.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Beaurepaire, B.; Nees, J. A.; Hou, B.; Malka, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Faure, J.

    2013-02-01

    We show that electron bunches in the 50-100 keV range can be produced from a laser wakefield accelerator using 10 mJ, 35 fs laser pulses operating at 0.5 kHz. It is shown that using a solenoid magnetic lens, the electron bunch distribution can be shaped. The resulting transverse and longitudinal coherence is suitable for producing diffraction images from a polycrystalline 10 nm aluminum foil. The high repetition rate, the stability of the electron source, and the fact that its uncorrelated bunch duration is below 100 fs make this approach promising for the development of sub-100 fs ultrafast electron diffraction experiments.

  3. Electron diffraction using ultrafast electron bunches from a laser-wakefield accelerator at kHz repetition rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that electron bunches in the 50–100 keV range can be produced from a laser wakefield accelerator using 10 mJ, 35 fs laser pulses operating at 0.5 kHz. It is shown that using a solenoid magnetic lens, the electron bunch distribution can be shaped. The resulting transverse and longitudinal coherence is suitable for producing diffraction images from a polycrystalline 10 nm aluminum foil. The high repetition rate, the stability of the electron source, and the fact that its uncorrelated bunch duration is below 100 fs make this approach promising for the development of sub-100 fs ultrafast electron diffraction experiments.

  4. Efficient numerical modelling of the emittance evolution of beams with finite energy spread in plasma wakefield accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrling, T. J.; Robson, R. E.; Erbe, J.-H.; Osterhoff, J.

    2016-09-01

    This paper introduces a semi-analytic numerical approach (SANA) for the rapid computation of the transverse emittance of beams with finite energy spread in plasma wakefield accelerators in the blowout regime. The SANA method is used to model the beam emittance evolution when injected into and extracted from realistic plasma profiles. Results are compared to particle-in-cell simulations, establishing the accuracy and efficiency of the procedure. In addition, it is demonstrated that the tapering of vacuum-to-plasma and plasma-to-vacuum transitions is a viable method for the mitigation of emittance growth of beams during their injection and extraction from and into plasma cells.

  5. A bremsstrahlung gamma-ray source based on stable ionization injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döpp, A.; Guillaume, E.; Thaury, C.; Lifschitz, A.; Sylla, F.; Goddet, J.-P.; Tafzi, A.; Iaquanello, G.; Lefrou, T.; Rousseau, P.; Conejero, E.; Ruiz, C.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Malka, V.

    2016-09-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration permits the generation of ultra-short, high-brightness relativistic electron beams on a millimeter scale. While those features are of interest for many applications, the source remains constraint by the poor stability of the electron injection process. Here we present results on injection and acceleration of electrons in pure nitrogen and argon. We observe stable, continuous ionization-induced injection of electrons into the wakefield for laser powers exceeding a threshold of 7 TW. The beam charge scales approximately with the laser energy and is limited by beam loading. For 40 TW laser pulses we measure a maximum charge of almost 1 nC per shot, originating mostly from electrons of less than 10 MeV energy. The relatively low energy, the high charge and its stability make this source well-suited for applications such as non-destructive testing. Hence, we demonstrate the production of energetic radiation via bremsstrahlung conversion at 1 Hz repetition rate. In accordance with GEANT4 Monte-Carlo simulations, we measure a γ-ray source size of less than 100 μm for a 0.5 mm tantalum converter placed at 2 mm from the accelerator exit. Furthermore we present radiographs of image quality indicators.

  6. Planned High-gradient Flat-beam-driven Dielectric Wakefield Experiments at the Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemery, Francois [NICADD, DeKalb; Mihalcea, Daniel [NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, Philippe [Fermilab; Zhu, Jun [Mianyang CAEP

    2014-07-01

    In beam driven dielectric wakefield acceleration (DWA), high-gradient short-wavelength accelerating fields are generally achieved by employing dielectric-lined waveguides (DLWs)  with small aperture which constraints the beam sizes. In this paper we investigate the possibility of using a low-energy (50-MeV) flat beams to induce high-gradient wakes in a slab-symmetric DLW. We demonstrate via numerical simulations the possibility to produce axial electric field with peak amplitude close to 0.5 GV/m. Our studies are carried out using the Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) photoinjector beamline. We finally discuss a possible experiment that could be performed in the ASTA photoinjector and eventually at higher energies.  

  7. High-Flux Femtosecond X-Ray Emission from Controlled Generation of Annular Electron Beams in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T Z; Behm, K; Dong, C F; Davoine, X; Kalmykov, S Y; Petrov, V; Chvykov, V; Cummings, P; Hou, B; Maksimchuk, A; Nees, J A; Yanovsky, V; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K

    2016-08-26

    Annular quasimonoenergetic electron beams with a mean energy in the range 200-400 MeV and charge on the order of several picocoulombs were generated in a laser wakefield accelerator and subsequently accelerated using a plasma afterburner in a two-stage gas cell. Generation of these beams is associated with injection occurring on the density down ramp between the stages. This well-localized injection produces a bunch of electrons performing coherent betatron oscillations in the wakefield, resulting in a significant increase in the x-ray yield. Annular electron distributions are detected in 40% of shots under optimal conditions. Simultaneous control of the pulse duration and frequency chirp enables optimization of both the energy and the energy spread of the annular beam and boosts the radiant energy per unit charge by almost an order of magnitude. These well-defined annular distributions of electrons are a promising source of high-brightness laser plasma-based x rays. PMID:27610860

  8. A bremsstrahlung gamma-ray source based on stable ionization injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Döpp, A; Thaury, C; Lifschitz, A; Sylla, F; Goddet, J-P; Tafzi, A; Iaquanello, G; Lefrou, T; Rousseau, P; Conejero, E; Ruiz, C; Phuoc, K Ta; Malka, V

    2016-01-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration permits the generation of ultra-short, high-brightness relativistic electron beams on a millimeter scale. While those features are of interest for many applications, the source remains constraint by the poor stability of the electron injection process. Here we present results on injection and acceleration of electrons in pure nitrogen and argon. We observe stable, continuous ionization-induced injection of electrons into the wakefield for laser powers exceeding a threshold of 7 TW. The beam charge scales approximately linear with the laser energy and is limited by beam loading. For 40 TW laser pulses we measure a maximum charge of almost 1 nC per shot, originating mostly from electrons of less than 10 MeV energy. The relatively low energy, the high charge and its stability make this source well-suited for applications such as non-destructive testing. Hence, we demonstrate the production of energetic radiation via bremsstrahlung conversion at 1 Hz repetition rate. In accordance wit...

  9. Characterization of electrons and x-rays produced using chirped laser pulses in a laser wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T. Z.; Behm, K.; He, Z.-H.; Maksimchuk, A.; Nees, J. A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.

    2016-11-01

    The electron injection process into a plasma-based laser wakefield accelerator can be influenced by modifying the parameters of the driver pulse. We present an experimental study on the combined effect of the laser pulse duration, pulse shape, and frequency chirp on the electron injection and acceleration process and the associated radiation emission for two different gas types—a 97.5% He and 2.5% N2 mixture and pure He. In general, the shortest pulse duration with minimal frequency chirp produced the highest energy electrons and the most charge. Pulses on the positive chirp side sustained electron injection and produced higher charge, but lower peak energy electrons, compared with negatively chirped pulses. A similar trend was observed for the radiant energy. The relationship between the radiant energy and the electron charge remained linear over a threefold change in the electron density and was independent of the drive pulse characteristics. X-ray spectra showed that ionization injection of electrons into the wakefield generally produced more photons than self-injection for all pulse durations/frequency chirp and had less of a spread in the number of photons around the peak x-ray energy.

  10. Multi-chromatic narrow-energy-spread electron bunches from laser wakefield acceleration with dual color lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Ming; Yu, Lu-Le; Mori, Warren B; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Hidding, Bernhard; Jaroszynski, Dino; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    A method based on laser wakefield acceleration is proposed that can generate electron bunches with an energy spectrum containing multiple spikes each with very narrow energy spread. The method is demonstrated through multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The beating of bichromatic short pulse laser fields allows controlled ionization injection of electrons into an accelerating bucket. Due to the different dispersion of the two color pulses co-propagating in the background plasma, the peak amplitude of the combined laser field oscillates during the propagation. Ionization injection occurs when the peak amplitude exceeds an ionization threshold. The threshold is exceeded for limited durations at different propagation distances. Electrons from each injection duration produce separate electron bunches. This combined with an oscillating bubble in multi-dimensions produces an energy spectrum with multi-chromatic spikes, where each spike has an energy spread less than 1%. Such electron bunches could be use...

  11. Heavy ion de-acceleration with the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator system has been used to produce beams of 0.375 MeV/A 16O 8+ and 0.386 MeV/A 28Si 13+ and 28Si 14+ as a test of using the superconducting linac de-acceleration mode to provide highly stripped high charge state heavy-ion beams for use in atomic physics experimental programs. Such beams have been developed in the past at installations containing dual tandem electrostatic accelerators and the U. of Heidelberg tandem-linac facility. The beams in the tests reported in this communication were transmitted through the linac with an efficiency of 30 to 50% and can be delivered to a target location with a transmission efficiency of approximately 7%. These tests required the use of only 50 to 75% of the present linac. Energies down to 0.135 MeV/A should be possible using the entire linac but these lower energies will be accompanied by significant additional losses in transmission efficiency due to longitudinal and transverse emittance growth

  12. Petawatt laser-driven wakefield accelerator: All-optical electron injection via collision of laser pulses and radiation cooling of accelerated electron bunches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmykov, Serguei; Avitzour, Yoav; Yi, S. Austin; Shvets, Gennady

    2007-11-01

    We explore an electron injection into the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) using nearly head-on collision of the petawatt ultrashort (˜30 fs) laser pulse (driver) with a low- amplitude laser (seed) beam of the same duration and polarization. To eliminate the threat to the main laser amplifier we consider two options: (i) a frequency-shifted seed and (ii) a seed pulse propagating at a small angle to the axis. We show that the emission of synchrotron radiation due to betatron oscillations of trapped and accelerated electrons results in significant transverse cooling of quasi- monoenergetic accelerated electrons (with energies above 1 GeV). At the same time, the energy losses due to the synchrotron emission preserve the final energy spread of the electron beam. The ``dark current'' due to the electron trapping in multiple wake buckets and the effect of beam loading (wake destruction at the instant of beams collision) are discussed.

  13. Electron-beam manipulation techniques in the SINBAD Linac for external injection in plasma wake-field acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, B.; Assmann, R.; Behrens, C.; Brinkmann, R.; Dorda, U.; Floettmann, K.; Hartl, I.; Huening, M.; Nie, Y.; Schlarb, H.; Zhu, J.

    2016-09-01

    The SINBAD facility (Short and INnovative Bunches and Accelerators at Desy) is foreseen to host various experiments in the field of production of ultra-short electron bunches and novel high gradient acceleration techniques. Besides studying novel acceleration techniques aiming to produce high brightness short electron bunches, the ARD group at DESY is working on the design of a conventional RF accelerator that will allow the production of low charge (0.5 pC - few pC) ultra-short electron bunches (having full width half maximum, FWHM, length ≤ 1 fs - few fs). The setup will allow the direct experimental comparison of the performance achievable by using different compression techniques (velocity bunching, magnetic compression, hybrid compression schemes). At a later stage the SINBAD linac will be used to inject such electron bunches into a laser driven Plasma Wakefield Accelerator, which imposes strong requirements on parameters such as the arrival time jitter and the pointing stability of the beam. In this paper we review the compression techniques that are foreseen at SINBAD and we underline the differences in terms of peak current, beam quality and arrival time stability.

  14. Improvements to laser wakefield accelerated electron beam stability, divergence, and energy spread using three-dimensional printed two-stage gas cell targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, M.; Schumaker, W.; He, Z.-H.; Zhao, Z.; Behm, K.; Chvykov, V.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R., E-mail: agrt@umich.edu [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-04-28

    High intensity, short pulse lasers can be used to accelerate electrons to ultra-relativistic energies via laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) [T. Tajima and J. M. Dawson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 267 (1979)]. Recently, it was shown that separating the injection and acceleration processes into two distinct stages could prove beneficial in obtaining stable, high energy electron beams [Gonsalves et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 862 (2011); Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 035001 (2011); Pollock et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 045001 (2011)]. Here, we use a stereolithography based 3D printer to produce two-stage gas targets for LWFA experiments on the HERCULES laser system at the University of Michigan. We demonstrate substantial improvements to the divergence, pointing stability, and energy spread of a laser wakefield accelerated electron beam compared with a single-stage gas cell or gas jet target.

  15. Generating multi-GeV electron bunches using single stage laser wakefield acceleration in a 3D nonlinear regime

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, W; Joshi, C; Mori, W B; Silva, L O; Tsung, F S; Tzoufras, M; Vieira, J

    2006-01-01

    The extraordinary ability of space-charge waves in plasmas to accelerate charged particles at gradients that are orders of magnitude greater than in current accelerators has been well documented. We develop a phenomenological framework for Laser WakeField Acceleration (LWFA) in the 3D nonlinear regime, in which the plasma electrons are expelled by the radiation pressure of a short pulse laser, leading to nearly complete blowout. Our theory provides a recipe for designing a LWFA for given laser and plasma parameters and estimates the number and the energy of the accelerated electrons whether self-injected or externally injected. These formulas apply for self-guided as well as externally guided pulses (e.g. by plasma channels). We demonstrate our results by presenting a sample Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation of a 30f sec, 200T W laser interacting with a 0.75cm long plasma with density 1.5*10^18 cm^-3 to produce an ultra-short (10f s) mono-energetic bunch of self-injected electrons at 1.5 GeV with 0.3nC of cha...

  16. The Argonne ACWL, a potential accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    THE CWDD (Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator) accelerator was designed to accelerate 80 mA cw of D- to 7.5 MeV. Most of the hardware for the first 2 MeV was installed at Argonne and major subsystems had been commissioned when program funding from the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization ended in October 1993. Renamed the Argonne Continuous Wave Linac (ACWL), we are proposing to complete it to accelerate either deuterons to 2 MeV or protons to 3-3.5 MeV. Equipped with a beryllium or other light-element target, it would make a potent source of neutrons (on the order of 1013 n/s) for BNCT and/or neutron radiography. Project status and proposals for turning ACWL into a neutron source are reviewed, including the results of a computational study that was carried out to design a target/moderator to produce an epithermal neutron beam for BNCT. (orig.)

  17. Accelerator structure work for NLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.H.; Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.L.F.; Deruyter, H.; Farkas, Z.D.; Hoag, H.A.; Holtkamp, N.; Lavine, T.; Loew, G.A.; Nelson, E.M.; Palmer, R.B.; Paterson, J.M.; Ruth, R.D.; Thompson, K.A.; Vlieks, A.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gluckstern, R. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States); Ko, K.; Kroll, N. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)]|[California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-07-01

    The NLC design achieves high luminosity with multiple bunches in each RF pulse. Acceleration of a train of bunches without emittance growth requires control of long range dipole wakefields. SLAC is pursuing a structure design which suppresses the effect of wakefields by varying the physical dimensions of successive cells of the disk-loaded traveling wave structure in a manner which spreads the frequencies of the higher mode while retaining the synchronism between the electrons and the accelerating mode. The wakefields of structures incorporating higher mode detuning have been measured at the Accelerator Test Facility at Argonne. Mechanical design and brazing techniques which avoid getting brazing alloy into the interior of the accelerator are being studied. A test facility for high-power testing of these structures is complete and high power testing has begun.

  18. Wakefield spectra in the plasma-dielectric accelerator when changing the plasma density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of the changes in the spectra of a wake field excited in a cylindrical plasma-dielectric waveguide by relativistic electron bunch is carried out. Three variants of structures are considered: the parameters of the dielectric structure and bunches are fixed; inner or outer radius of the dielectric tube is changed, so that the frequency of the first radial mode coincides with the frequency of the plasma wave. The latter two options are necessary in the case of a regular sequence of bunches to increase the amplitude of the wakefield. It is shown that in case of changes in the outer radius an increase in amplitude of the dielectric wave is due to the transformation of the multimode dielectric wave in a monochromatic wave, with the first harmonic, synchronous with the sequence of bunches.

  19. Multi-Pulse Laser Wakefield Acceleration: A New Route to Efficient, High-Repetition-Rate Plasma Accelerators and High Flux Radiation Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Hooker, S M; Mangles, S P D; Tünnermann, A; Corner, L; Limpert, J; Seryi, A; Walczak, R

    2014-01-01

    Laser-driven plasma accelerators can generate accelerating gradients three orders of magnitude larger than radio-frequency accelerators and have achieved beam energies above 1 GeV in centimetre long stages. However, the pulse repetition rate and wall-plug efficiency of plasma accelerators is limited by the driving laser to less than approximately 1 Hz and 0.1% respectively. Here we investigate the prospects for exciting the plasma wave with trains of low-energy laser pulses rather than a single high-energy pulse. Resonantly exciting the wakefield in this way would enable the use of different technologies, such as fibre or thin-disc lasers, which are able to operate at multi-kilohertz pulse repetition rates and with wall-plug efficiencies two orders of magnitude higher than current laser systems. We outline the parameters of efficient, GeV-scale, 10-kHz plasma accelerators and show that they could drive compact X-ray sources with average photon fluxes comparable to those of third-generation light source but wi...

  20. Plasma wakefields driven by an incoherent combination of laser pulses: a path towards high-average power laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2014-05-01

    he wakefield generated in a plasma by incoherently combining a large number of low energy laser pulses (i.e.,without constraining the pulse phases) is studied analytically and by means of fully-self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations. The structure of the wakefield has been characterized and its amplitude compared with the amplitude of the wake generated by a single (coherent) laser pulse. We show that, in spite of the incoherent nature of the wakefield within the volume occupied by the laser pulses, behind this region the structure of the wakefield can be regular with an amplitude comparable or equal to that obtained from a single pulse with the same energy. Wake generation requires that the incoherent structure in the laser energy density produced by the combined pulses exists on a time scale short compared to the plasma period. Incoherent combination of multiple laser pulses may enable a technologically simpler path to high-repetition rate, high-average power laser-plasma accelerators and associated applications.

  1. Evidence for high-energy and low-emittance electron beams using ionization injection of charge in a plasma wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Clayton, C E; Joshi, C; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Welch, E C; Lu, W; Adli, E; Allen, J; Clarke, C I; Corde, S; Frederico, J; Gessner, S J; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Litos, M D; Yakimenko, V

    2015-01-01

    Ionization injection in a plasma wakefield accelerator was investigated experimentally using two lithium plasma sources of different lengths. The ionization of the helium gas, used to confine the lithium, injects electrons in the wake. After acceleration, these injected electrons were observed as a distinct group from the drive beam on the energy spectrometer. They typically have a charge of tens of pC, an energy spread of a few GeV, and a maximum energy of up to 30 GeV. The emittance of this group of electrons can be many times smaller than the initial emittance of the drive beam. The energy scaling for the trapped charge from one plasma length to the other is consistent with the blowout theory of the plasma wakefield.

  2. Note: Real-time monitoring via second-harmonic interferometry of a flow gas cell for laser wakefield acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandi, F; Giammanco, F; Conti, F; Sylla, F; Lambert, G; Gizzi, L A

    2016-08-01

    The use of a gas cell as a target for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) offers the possibility to obtain stable and manageable laser-plasma interaction process, a mandatory condition for practical applications of this emerging technique, especially in multi-stage accelerators. In order to obtain full control of the gas particle number density in the interaction region, thus allowing for a long term stable and manageable LWFA, real-time monitoring is necessary. In fact, the ideal gas law cannot be used to estimate the particle density inside the flow cell based on the preset backing pressure and the room temperature because the gas flow depends on several factors like tubing, regulators, and valves in the gas supply system, as well as vacuum chamber volume and vacuum pump speed/throughput. Here, second-harmonic interferometry is applied to measure the particle number density inside a flow gas cell designed for LWFA. The results demonstrate that real-time monitoring is achieved and that using low backing pressure gas (<1 bar) and different cell orifice diameters (<2 mm) it is possible to finely tune the number density up to the 10(19) cm(-3) range well suited for LWFA. PMID:27587174

  3. Note: Real-time monitoring via second-harmonic interferometry of a flow gas cell for laser wakefield acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandi, F.; Giammanco, F.; Conti, F.; Sylla, F.; Lambert, G.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2016-08-01

    The use of a gas cell as a target for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) offers the possibility to obtain stable and manageable laser-plasma interaction process, a mandatory condition for practical applications of this emerging technique, especially in multi-stage accelerators. In order to obtain full control of the gas particle number density in the interaction region, thus allowing for a long term stable and manageable LWFA, real-time monitoring is necessary. In fact, the ideal gas law cannot be used to estimate the particle density inside the flow cell based on the preset backing pressure and the room temperature because the gas flow depends on several factors like tubing, regulators, and valves in the gas supply system, as well as vacuum chamber volume and vacuum pump speed/throughput. Here, second-harmonic interferometry is applied to measure the particle number density inside a flow gas cell designed for LWFA. The results demonstrate that real-time monitoring is achieved and that using low backing pressure gas (<1 bar) and different cell orifice diameters (<2 mm) it is possible to finely tune the number density up to the 1019 cm-3 range well suited for LWFA.

  4. Pump depletion limited evolution of the relativistic plasma wave-front in a forced laser-wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, F; Clayton, C E; Marsh, K A; Pak, A E; Ralph, J E; Joshi, C [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Lopes, N C [Grupo de Lasers e Plasmas, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal)], E-mail: cclayton@ucla.edu

    2009-02-15

    In a forced laser-wakefield accelerator experiment (Malka et al 2002 Science 298 1596) where the length of the pump laser pulse is a few plasma periods long, the leading edge of the laser pulse undergoes frequency downshifting and head erosion as the laser energy is transferred to the wake. Therefore, after some propagation distance, the group velocity of the leading edge of the pump pulse-and thus of the driven electron plasma wave-will slow down. This can have implications for the dephasing length of the accelerated electrons and therefore needs to be understood experimentally. We have carried out an experimental investigation where we have measured the velocity v{sub f} of the 'wave-front' of the plasma wave driven by a nominally 50 fs (full width half maximum), intense (a{sub 0} {approx_equal} 1), 0.815 {mu}m laser pulse. To determine the speed of the wave front, time- and space-resolved refractometry, interferometry and Thomson scattering were used. Although a laser pulse propagating through a relatively low-density plasma (n{sub e} = 1.3 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}) showed no measurable changes in v{sub f} over 1.3 mm (and no accelerated electrons), a high-density plasma (n{sub e} = 5 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}) generated accelerated electrons and showed a continuous change in v{sub f} as the laser pulse propagated through the plasma. Possible causes and consequences of the observed v{sub f} evolution are discussed.

  5. COAXIAL TWO-CHANNEL DIELECTRIC WAKE FIELD ACCELERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc.

    2013-04-30

    Theory, computations, and experimental apparatus are presented that describe and are intended to confirm novel properties of a coaxial two-channel dielectric wake field accelerator. In this configuration, an annular drive beam in the outer coaxial channel excites multimode wakefields which, in the inner channel, can accelerate a test beam to an energy much higher than the energy of the drive beam. This high transformer ratio is the result of judicious choice of the dielectric structure parameters, and of the phase separation between drive bunches and test bunches. A structure with cm-scale wakefields has been build for tests at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Laboratory, and a structure with mm-scale wakefields has been built for tests at the SLAC FACET facility. Both tests await scheduling by the respective facilities.

  6. VHEeP: A very high energy electron-proton collider based on proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Caldwell, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Based on current CERN infrastructure, an electron-proton collider is proposed at a centre-of-mass energy of about 9 TeV. A 7 TeV LHC bunch is used as the proton driver to create a plasma wakefield which then accelerates electrons to 3 TeV, these then colliding with the other 7 TeV LHC proton beam. The basic parameters of the collider are presented, which although of very high energy, has integrated luminosities of the order of 1 pb$^{-1}$/year. For such a collider, with a centre-of-mass energy 30 times greater than HERA, parton momentum fractions, $x$, down to about $10^{-8}$ are accessible for $Q^2$ of 1 GeV$^2$ and could lead to effects of saturation or some other breakdown of DGLAP being observed. The total photon-proton cross section can be measured up to very high energies and also at different energies as the possibility of varying the electron beam energy is assumed; this could have synergy with cosmic-ray physics. Other physics which can be pursued at such a collider are contact interaction searches, ...

  7. Enabling Lorentz boosted frame particle-in-cell simulations of laser wakefield acceleration in quasi-3D geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peicheng; Xu, Xinlu; Davidson, Asher; Tableman, Adam; Dalichaouch, Thamine; Li, Fei; Meyers, Michael D.; An, Weiming; Tsung, Frank S.; Decyk, Viktor K.; Fiuza, Frederico; Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis O.; Mori, Warren B.

    2016-07-01

    When modeling laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) using the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm in a Lorentz boosted frame, the plasma is drifting relativistically at βb c towards the laser, which can lead to a computational speedup of ∼ γSUB>/bSUB>2 = (1 -space-time distribution of the LWFA data in the lab and boosted frame, we propose to use a moving window to follow the drifting plasma, instead of following the laser driver as is done in the LWFA lab frame simulations, in order to further reduce the computational loads. We describe the details of how the NCI is mitigated for the quasi-3D geometry, the setups for simulations which combine the Lorentz boosted frame, quasi-3D geometry, and the use of a moving window, and compare the results from these simulations against their corresponding lab frame cases. Good agreement is obtained among these sample simulations, particularly when there is no self-trapping, which demonstrates it is possible to combine the Lorentz boosted frame and the quasi-3D algorithms when modeling LWFA. We also discuss the preliminary speedups achieved in these sample simulations.

  8. Modeling of Laser wakefield acceleration in Lorentz boosted frame using EM-PIC code with spectral solver

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Peicheng; Decyk, Viktor K; An, Weiming; Vieira, Jorge; Tsung, Frank S; Fonseca, Ricardo A; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis O; Mori, Warren B

    2013-01-01

    Simulating laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in a Lorentz boosted frame in which the plasma drifts towards the laser with $v_b$ can speedup the simulation by factors of $\\gamma^2_b=(1-v^2_b/c^2)^{-1}$. In these simulations the relativistic drifting plasma inevitably induces a high frequency numerical instability that contaminates the interested physics. Various approaches have been proposed to mitigate this instability. One approach is to solve Maxwell equations in Fourier space (a spectral solver) as this has been shown to suppress the fastest growing modes of this instability in simple test problems using a simple low pass, ring (in two dimensions), or shell (in three dimensions) filter in Fourier space. We describe the development of a fully parallelized, multi-dimensional, particle-in-cell code that uses a spectral solver to solve Maxwell's equations and that includes the ability to launch a laser using a moving antenna. This new EM-PIC code is called UPIC-EMMA and it is based on the components of the U...

  9. Laser Wakefield Acceleration: Structural and Dynamic Studies. Final Technical Report ER40954

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downer, Michael

    2014-12-19

    Particle accelerators enable scientists to study the fundamental structure of the universe, but have become the largest and most expensive of scientific instruments. In this project, we advanced the science and technology of laser-plasma accelerators, which are thousands of times smaller and less expensive than their conventional counterparts. In a laser-plasma accelerator, a powerful laser pulse exerts light pressure on an ionized gas, or plasma, thereby driving an electron density wave, which resembles the wake behind a boat. Electrostatic fields within this plasma wake reach tens of billions of volts per meter, fields far stronger than ordinary non-plasma matter (such as the matter that a conventional accelerator is made of) can withstand. Under the right conditions, stray electrons from the surrounding plasma become trapped within these “wake-fields”, surf them, and acquire energy much faster than is possible in a conventional accelerator. Laser-plasma accelerators thus might herald a new generation of compact, low-cost accelerators for future particle physics, x-ray and medical research. In this project, we made two major advances in the science of laser-plasma accelerators. The first of these was to accelerate electrons beyond 1 gigaelectronvolt (1 GeV) for the first time. In experimental results reported in Nature Communications in 2013, about 1 billion electrons were captured from a tenuous plasma (about 1/100 of atmosphere density) and accelerated to 2 GeV within about one inch, while maintaining less than 5% energy spread, and spreading out less than ½ milliradian (i.e. ½ millimeter per meter of travel). Low energy spread and high beam collimation are important for applications of accelerators as coherent x-ray sources or particle colliders. This advance was made possible by exploiting unique properties of the Texas Petawatt Laser, a powerful laser at the University of Texas at Austin that produces pulses of 150 femtoseconds (1 femtosecond is 10

  10. Hosing Instability of the Drive Electron Beam in the E157 Plasma-Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, Brent Edward; /SLAC /UCLA

    2005-10-10

    In the plasma-wakefield experiment at SLAC, known as E157, an ultra-relativistic electron beam is used to both excite and witness a plasma wave for advanced accelerator applications. If the beam is tilted, then it will undergo transverse oscillations inside of the plasma. These oscillations can grow exponentially via an instability know as the electron hose instability. The linear theory of electron-hose instability in a uniform ion column predicts that for the parameters of the E157 experiment (beam charge, bunch length, and plasma density) a growth of the centroid offset should occur. Analysis of the E157 data has provided four critical results. The first was that the incoming beam did have a tilt. The tilt was much smaller than the radius and was measured to be 5.3 {micro}m/{delta}{sub z} at the entrance of the plasma (IP1.) The second was the beam centroid oscillates in the ion channel at half the frequency of the beam radius (betatron beam oscillations), and these oscillations can be predicted by the envelope equation. Third, up to the maximum operating plasma density of E157 ({approx}2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}), no growth of the centroid offset was measured. Finally, time-resolved data of the beam shows that up to this density, no significant growth of the tail of the beam (up to 8ps from the centroid) occurred even though the beam had an initial tilt.

  11. Addendum to a proposal for ATLAS: a precision heavy-ion accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This revised proposal for the construction of the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) is in all essentials the same as the proposal originally presented to NUSAC in March 1978. The only differences worth mentioning are the plan to expand the experimental area somewhat more than was originally proposed and an increased cost, brought about principally by inflation. The outline presented is the same as in the original document, reproduced for the convenience of the reader. The objective of the proposed Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) is to provide precision beams of heavy ions for nuclear physics research in the region of projectile energies comparable to nuclear binding energies (5 to 25 MeV/A). By using the demonstrated potential of superconducting rf technology, beams of exceptional quality and flexibility can be obtained. The proposed system is designed to provide beams with tandem-like energy resolution and ease of energy variation, and the energy range is comparable to that of a approx. 50 MV tandem. In addition, the beam will be bunched into very short (approx. 50 psec) pulses, permitting fast-timing measurements that can open up major new experimental approaches

  12. Studies of laser wakefield structures and electron acceleration in underdense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on electron acceleration and optical diagnostics of laser wakes were performed on the HERCULES facility in a wide range of laser and plasma parameters. Using frequency domain holography we demonstrated single shot visualization of individual plasma waves, produced by 40 TW, 30 fs laser pulses focused to the intensity of 1019 W/cm2 onto a supersonic He gas jet with plasma densities ne19 cm-3. These holographic 'snapshots' capture the variation in shape of the plasma wave with distance behind the driver, and resolve wave front curvature seen previously only in simulations. High-energy quasimonoenergetic electron beams were generated using plasma density in the range 1.5x1019≤ne≤3.5x1019 cm-3. These experiments demonstrated that the energy, charge, divergence, and pointing stability of the beam can be controlled by changing ne, and that higher electron energies and more stable beams are produced for lower densities. An optimized quasimonoenergetic beam of over 300 MeV and 10 mrad angular divergence is demonstrated at a plasma density of ne≅1.5x1019 cm-3. The resultant relativistic electron beams have been used to perform photo-fission of 238U with a record high reaction yields of ∼3x105/J. The results of initial experiments on electron acceleration at 70 TW are discussed

  13. THz radiation as a bunch diagnostic forlaser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Tilborg, J.; Schroeder, C.B.; Filip, C.V.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes,C.G.R.; Fubiani, G.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2006-02-15

    Experimental results are reported from two measurementtechniques (semiconductor switching and electro-optic sampling) thatallow temporal characterization of electron bunches produced by alaser-driven plasma-based accelerator. As femtosecond electron bunchesexit the plasma-vacuum interface, coherent transition radiation (at THzfrequencies) is emitted. Measuring the properties of this radiationallows characterization of the electron bunches. Theoretical work on theemission mechanism is represented, including a model that calculates theTHz waveform from a given bunch profile. It is found that the spectrum ofthe THz pulse is coherent up to the 200 mu m thick crystal (ZnTe)detection limit of 4 THz, which corresponds to the production of sub-50fs (root-mean-square) electron bunch structure. The measurementsdemonstrate both the shot-to-shot stability of bunch parameters that arecritical to THz emission (such as total charge and bunch length), as wellas femtosecond synchrotron between bunch, THz pulse, and laserbeam.

  14. 2D hydrodynamic simulations of a variable length gas target for density down-ramp injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononenko, O.; Lopes, N. C.; Cole, J. M.; Kamperidis, C.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Osterhoff, J.; Poder, K.; Rusby, D.; Symes, D. R.; Warwick, J.; Wood, J. C.; Palmer, C. A. J.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations of a variable length gas cell were performed using the open source fluid code OpenFOAM. The gas cell was designed to study controlled injection of electrons into a laser-driven wakefield at the Astra Gemini laser facility. The target consists of two compartments: an accelerator and an injector section connected via an aperture. A sharp transition between the peak and plateau density regions in the injector and accelerator compartments, respectively, was observed in simulations with various inlet pressures. The fluid simulations indicate that the length of the down-ramp connecting the sections depends on the aperture diameter, as does the density drop outside the entrance and the exit cones. Further studies showed, that increasing the inlet pressure leads to turbulence and strong fluctuations in density along the axial profile during target filling, and consequently, is expected to negatively impact the accelerator stability.

  15. Beam Matching to a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Using a Ramped Density Profile at the Plasma Boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, K.A.; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Barnes, C.D.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.H.; Krejcik, P.; O' Connell, C.L.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2006-02-17

    An important aspect of plasma wake field accelerators (PWFA) is stable propagation of the drive beam. In the under dense plasma regime, the drive beam creates an ion channel which acts on the beam as a strong thick focusing lens. The ion channel causes the beam to undergo multiple betatron oscillations along the length of the plasma. There are several advantages if the beam size can be matched to a constant radius. First, simulations have shown that instabilities such as hosing are reduced when the beam is matched [1]. Second, synchrotron radiation losses are minimized when the beam is matched. Third, an initially matched beam will propagate with no significant change in beam size in spite of large energy loss or gain. Coupling to the plasma with a matched radius can be difficult in some cases. This paper shows how an appropriate density ramp at the plasma entrance can be useful for achieving a matched beam. Additionally, the density ramp is helpful in bringing a misaligned trailing beam onto the drive beam axis. A plasma source with boundary profiles useful for matching has been created for the E-164X PWFA experiments at SLAC.

  16. Terahertz radiation as a bunch diagnostic for laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Tilborg, Jeroen; Schroeder, Carl; Filip, Catalin; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Fubiani, Gwenael; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-17

    Experimental results are reported from two measurement techniques (semiconductor switching and electro-optic sampling) that allow temporal characterization of electron bunches produced by a laser-driven plasma-based accelerator. As femtosecond electron bunches exit the plasma-vacuum interface, coherent transition radiation (at THz frequencies) is emitted. Measuring the properties of this radiation allows characterization of the electron bunches. Theoretical work on the emission mechanism is presented, including a model that calculates the THz wave form from a given bunch profile. It is found that the spectrum of the THz pulse is coherent up to the 200 {micro}m thick crystal (ZnTe) detection limit of 4 THz, which corresponds to the production of sub-50 fs (rms) electron bunch structure. The measurements demonstrate both the shot-to-shot stability of bunch parameters that are critical to THz emission (such as total charge and bunch length), as well as femtosecond synchronization among bunch, THz pulse, and laser beam.

  17. Effect of experimental laser imperfections on laser wakefield acceleration and betatron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, J.; Davoine, X.; Fourmaux, S.; Kieffer, J. C.; Corde, S.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Lifschitz, A.

    2016-01-01

    Laser pulses in current ultra-short TW systems are far from being ideal Gaussian beams. The influence of the presence of non-Gaussian features of the laser pulse is investigated here from experiments and 3D Particle-in-Cell simulations. Both the experimental intensity distribution and wavefront are used as input in the simulations. It is shown that a quantitative agreement between experimental data and simulations requires to use realistic pulse features. Moreover, some trends found in the experiments, such as the growing of the X-ray signal with the plasma length, can only be retrieved in simulations with realistic pulses. The performances on the electron acceleration and the synchrotron X-ray emission are strongly degraded by these non-Gaussian features, even keeping constant the total laser energy. A drop on the X-ray photon number by one order of magnitude was found. This clearly put forward the limitation of using a Gaussian beam in the simulations. PMID:27324915

  18. Induced chirp in laser wake-field generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle-in-cell simulation is used to illustrate induced chirp in the laser wake-field generation experiment. The evolution of the laser pulse characteristics and the wake-field amplitude is investigated numerically. The local frequency of the laser pulse is influenced during wake-field excitation. The numerical result shows that the negative Gaussian chirp profile is the mainly induced chirp throughout the laser pulse. Hence, the induced negative Gaussian chirp has a significant influence on wake-field generation and consequently on the acceleration gradient in the wake-field acceleration.

  19. An accurate Rb density measurement method for a plasma wakefield accelerator experiment using a novel Rb reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öz, E.; Batsch, F.; Muggli, P.

    2016-09-01

    A method to accurately measure the density of Rb vapor is described. We plan on using this method for the Advanced Wakefield (AWAKE) (Assmann et al., 2014 [1]) project at CERN , which will be the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield experiment. The method is similar to the hook (Marlow, 1967 [2]) method and has been described in great detail in the work by Hill et al. (1986) [3]. In this method a cosine fit is applied to the interferogram to obtain a relative accuracy on the order of 1% for the vapor density-length product. A single-mode, fiber-based, Mach-Zenhder interferometer will be built and used near the ends of the 10 meter-long AWAKE plasma source to be able to make accurate relative density measurement between these two locations. This can then be used to infer the vapor density gradient along the AWAKE plasma source and also change it to the value desired for the plasma wakefield experiment. Here we describe the plan in detail and show preliminary results obtained using a prototype 8 cm long novel Rb vapor cell.

  20. Single-shot radiography using X-rays from Compton-backscattering with laser-wakefield accelerated electron beams

    CERN Document Server

    Döpp, A; Thaury, C; Gautier, J; Andriyash, I; Lifschitz, A; Goddet, J-P; Tafzi, A; Malka, V; Rousse, A; Phuoc, K Ta

    2015-01-01

    We present results from the production of high energy femtosecond X-rays by Compton-backscattering of an intense femtosecond laser pulse with quasi-monoenergetic laser-accelerated electron beams using a plasma mirror. In our parameter regime electrons of $\\sim$ 150 MeV peak energy emit a high energy radiation beam with a broad spectrum extending up to $\\sim$ 500 keV. The photon yield from the source is sufficiently high to illuminate a centimeter-size sample placed 90 centimeters behind the source and record a single-shot radiograph. The small diameter of the laser-accelerated electron beams translates into a micrometer X-ray source size, making it a promising candidate for advanced X-ray imaging techniques as e.g. propagation-based phase contrast imaging.

  1. Wakefield Undulator For Generating X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Opanasenko, A N

    2004-01-01

    Conception of wakefield undulator (WFU) with very short period is presented. In the base of photon generation by the WFU lies a new mechanism of undulator-type radiation emitted by an ultrarelativistic electron bunch that undulates due to non-synchronous spatial harmonics of its wakefields while the bunch moves along a periodic waveguide. The creation of the WFU with sub-millimeter periods due to advanced accelerator technology opens possibilities to generate hard X-rays employing relatively low electron energies without external alternative fields.

  2. Laser Wakefield experiments at LULI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquès, J. R.

    1997-11-01

    In the context of Laser Plasma Particle Acceleration, the Laser Wakefield(T. Tajima and J. M. Dawson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 267 (1979)) is a very promising scheme for the excitation of a high amplitude Electron Plasma Waves (EPW). In this scheme, the electrons of the plasma are pushed by the radiation pressure associated with the spatio-temporal profile of an ultra-short (intense (> 10^16 W/cm^2) laser pulse. In the wake of this pulse, the electrons oscillate (EPW) around their initial positions. The associated electron-ion charge separation generates electric fields that can be over 100 GV/m. These fields can be longitudinal and of relativistic phase velocity, making them very attractive for high energy particle acceleration. We have studied(J. R. Marquès et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79 (18) 3463, 1996; J. R. Marquès et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76 (19) 3566, 1996.) the transverse electron oscillations excited by laser wakefield. The amplitude, the frequency, and the lifetime of the oscillation have been measured. The quasi-resonant behavior of the oscillation amplitude with the electron density and the increase of the plasma frequency for oscillations in the non-linear regime have been observed. A comparison of our results with 2-D simulations has allowed us to identify a new damping mechanism linked to a transverse gradient of the electron density. At the moment, we are experimentally studying the longitudinal electron oscillations excited by laser wakefield. Two kind of experiments are in progress. The first one is centered on the acceleration of electrons injected in an EPW, while the second one will characterize the EPW. We will present the results of these experiments.

  3. Observation and cures of wakefield effects in the SLC Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeman, J.T.

    1991-12-01

    The acceleration and transport of beams with high currents and low emittances are very carefully controlled for the SLC Linac. Both longitudinal and transverse wakefields affect strongly the trajectory and emittance corrections used for operations during collisions. Longitudinal beam loading introduces an internal energy spread. This loading produces the expected doubled peaked energy spectra while reducing the overall available energy for acceleration. Transverse wakefields cause rapid oscillation amplitude growth with injection errors but can be ameliorated with transverse wakefield (BNS) damping. Transverse wakefields cause an apparent change in the lattice strength, affecting the interpretation of lattice diagnostics. Oscillations also produce non-gaussian transverse density distributions, which must be controlled for emittance and background reduction. Finally, the small misalignments of the accelerating structure enlarge the emittances of the beam. They can be controlled through off-axis trajectories and through systematic waveguide movements.

  4. DOE-HEP Final Report for 2013-2016: Studies of plasma wakefields for high repetition-rate plasma collider, and Theoretical study of laser-plasma proton and ion acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsouleas, Thomas C. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Sahai, Aakash A. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    2016-08-08

    There were two goals for this funded project: 1. Studies of plasma wakefields for high repetition-rate plasma collider, and 2. Theoretical study of laser-plasma proton and ion acceleration. For goal 1, an analytical model was developed to determine the ion-motion resulting from the interaction of non-linear “blow-out” wakefields excited by beam-plasma and laser-plasma interactions. This is key to understanding the state of the plasma at timescales of 1 picosecond to a few 10s of picoseconds behind the driver-energy pulse. More information can be found in the document. For goal 2, we analytically and computationally analyzed the longitudinal instabilities of the laser-plasma interactions at the critical layer. Specifically, the process of “Doppler-shifted Ponderomotive bunching” is significant to eliminate the very high-energy spread and understand the importance of chirping the laser pulse frequency. We intend to publish the results of the mixing process in 2-D. We intend to publish Chirp-induced transparency. More information can be found in the document.

  5. Long Term Evolution of Plasma Wakefields

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, Aakash A; Tsung, F S; Mori, W B

    2014-01-01

    We study the long-term evolution (LTE) of plasma wakefields over multiple plasma-electron periods and few plasma-ion periods, much less than a recombination time. The evolution and relaxation of such a wakefield-perturbed plasma over these timescales has important implications for the upper limits of repetition-rates in plasma colliders. Intense fields in relativistic lasers (or intense beams) create plasma wakefields (modes around {\\omega}pe) by transferring energy to the plasma electrons. Charged-particle beams in the right phase may be accelerated with acceleration/focusing gradients of tens of GeV/m. However, wakefields leave behind a plasma not in equilibrium, with a relaxation time of multiple plasma-electron periods. Ion motion over ion timescales, caused by energy transfer from the driven plasma-electrons to the plasma-ions can create interesting plasma states. Eventually during LTE, the dynamics of plasma de-coheres (multiple modes through instability driven mixing), thermalizing into random motion (...

  6. Final Report: Experimental Investigation of Nonlinear Plasma Wake-Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenzweig, J.

    1997-10-31

    We discuss the exploration of the newly proposed blowout regime of the plasma wakefield accelerator and advanced photoinjector technology for linear collider applications. The plasma wakefield experiment at ANL produced several ground-breaking results in the physics of the blowout regime. The photoinjector R and D effort produced breakthroughs in theoretical, computational, and experimental methods in high brightness beam physics. Results have been published.

  7. Long-term evolution of broken wakefields in finite radius plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Lotov, Konstantin; Petrenko, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    A novel effect of fast heating and charging a finite-radius plasma is discovered in the context of plasma wakefield acceleration. As the plasma wave breaks, the most of its energy is transferred to plasma electrons which create strong charge-separation electric field and azimuthal magnetic field around the plasma. The slowly varying field structure is preserved for hundreds of wakefield periods and contains (together with hot electrons) up to 80% of the initial wakefield energy.

  8. Donut wakefields generated by intense laser pulses with orbital angular momentum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonça, J. T.; Vieira, J. [IPFN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-03-15

    We study the wakefields produced in a plasma by intense laser pulses carrying a finite amount of orbital angular momentum. We show that these wakefields have new donut-like shapes, different from those usually considered in the literature, and could be used to accelerate hollow electron beams. Wakefields with a more general angular structure were also considered. The analytical solutions are corroborated by relativistic particle-in-cell simulations using OSIRIS.

  9. Donut wakefields generated by intense laser pulses with orbital angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the wakefields produced in a plasma by intense laser pulses carrying a finite amount of orbital angular momentum. We show that these wakefields have new donut-like shapes, different from those usually considered in the literature, and could be used to accelerate hollow electron beams. Wakefields with a more general angular structure were also considered. The analytical solutions are corroborated by relativistic particle-in-cell simulations using OSIRIS

  10. Electron cloud wakefields in bunch trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, F. B.; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver

    2016-02-01

    Electron cloud is a concern for many modern and future accelerator facilities. There are a number of undesired effects attributed to the presence of electron clouds. Among them are coherent instabilities, emittance growth, cryogenic heat load, synchronous phase shift and pressure rise. In long bunch trains one can observe the emittance growth getting faster along the bunch train. The interaction between the beam and the electron cloud is a two-stream interaction. The prameters of the electron cloud wakefields depend on the beam intensity, beam centroid perturbations, and on the electron density and perturbations. If the electron cloud forgets the bunch centroid perturbation very fast, the buildup itself, via growing density, becomes a way of coupling between the bunches. In the present paper we address how the bunch perturbation shape affects the multi-bunch wakefields under the conditions similar to the CERN LHC and SPS. We study the interplay between the single-bunch and multi-bunch electron cloud wakefields. The effect of the dipole magnetic field on the multi-bunch wakefields is studied.

  11. Do you want to build such a machine? : Designing a high energy proton accelerator for Argonne National Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paris, E.

    2004-04-05

    Argonne National Laboratory's efforts toward researching, proposing and then building a high-energy proton accelerator have been discussed in a handful of studies. In the main, these have concentrated on the intense maneuvering amongst politicians, universities, government agencies, outside corporations, and laboratory officials to obtain (or block) approval and/or funds or to establish who would have control over budgets and research programs. These ''top-down'' studies are very important but they can also serve to divorce such proceedings from the individuals actually involved in the ground-level research which physically served to create theories, designs, machines, and experiments. This can lead to a skewed picture, on the one hand, of a lack of effect that so-called scientific and technological factors exert and, on the other hand, of the apparent separation of the so-called social or political from the concrete practice of doing physics. An exception to this approach can be found in the proceedings of a conference on ''History of the ZGS'' held at Argonne at the time of the Zero Gradient Synchrotron's decommissioning in 1979. These accounts insert the individuals quite literally as they are, for the most part, personal reminiscences of those who took part in these efforts on the ground level. As such, they are invaluable raw material for historical inquiry but generally lack the rigor and perspective expected in a finished historical work. The session on ''Constructing Cold War Physics'' at the 2002 annual History of Science Society Meeting served to highlight new approaches circulating towards history of science and technology in the post-WWII period, especially in the 1950s. There is new attention towards the effects of training large numbers of scientists and engineers as well as the caution not to equate ''national security'' with military preparedness, but rather

  12. A Compact Wakefield Measurement Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, J. G.; Gai, W.

    2015-10-01

    The conceptual design of a compact, photoinjector-based, facility for high precision measurements of wakefields is presented. This work is motivated by the need for a thorough understanding of beam induced wakefield effects for any future linear collider. We propose to use a high brightness photoinjector to generate (approximately) a 2 nC, 2 mm-mrad drive beam at 20 MeV to excite wakefields and a second photoinjector to generate a 5 MeV, variably delayed, trailing witness beam to probe both the longitudinal and transverse wakefields in the structure under test. Initial estimates show that we can detect a minimum measurable dipole transverse wake function of 0.1 V/pC/m/mm and a minimum measurable monopole longitudinal wake function of 2.5 V/pC/m. Simulations results for the high brightness photoinjector, calculations of the facility's wakefield measurement resolution, and the facility layout are presented.

  13. Beam dynamics and wakefield suppression in interleaved damped and detuned structures for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    D'Elia, A; Khan, V F; Jones, R M; Latina, A; Nesmiyan, I; Riddone, G

    2013-01-01

    Acceleration of multiple bunches of charged particles in the main linacs of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) with high accelerating fields provides two major challenges: firstly, to ensure the surface electromagnetic fields do not cause electrical breakdown and subsequent surface damage, and secondly, to ensure the beam-excited wakefields are sufficiently suppressed to avoid appreciable emittance dilution. In the baseline design for CLIC, heavy wakefield suppression is used (Q ~ 10) [1] and this ensures the beam quality is well-preserved [2]. Here we discuss an alternative means to suppress the wakefield which relies on strong detuning of the cell dipole frequencies, together with moderate damping, effected by manifolds which are slot-coupled to each accelerating cell. This damped and detuned wakefield suppression scheme is based on the methodology developed for the Japanese Linear Collider/Next Linear Collider (JLC/NLC) [3]. Here we track the multi-bunch beam down the complete collider, u...

  14. High transformer ratio of multi-channel dielectric wakefield structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchelkunov, Sergey V.; Marshall, Thomas C.; Sotnikov, Gennadij V.; Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2016-09-01

    Dielectric wakefield (DWA) accelerator concepts are receiving attention on account of their promising performance, mechanical simplicity, and anticipated low cost. Interest in DWA physics directed toward an advanced high-gradient accelerator has been enhanced by a finding that some dielectrics can withstand very high fields (>1 GV/m) for the short times during the passage of charged bunches along dielectric-lined channels. In a two-channel structure, a drive bunch train propagates in a first channel, and in the second adjacent channel where a high gradient wakefield develops, a witness bunch is accelerated. Compared with single-channel DWA's, a two-beam accelerator delivers a high transformer ratio, and thereby reduces the number of drive beam sections needed to achieve a given final test beam energy. An overview of multi-channel DWA structures will be given, with an emphasis on two-channel structures, presenting their advantages and drawbacks, and potential impact on the field. Studies aimed to examine charging rate and charge distribution in a thin walled dielectric wakefield accelerator from a passing charge bunch and the physics of conductivity and discharge phenomena in dielectric materials useful for such accelerator applications are presented in a separate paper in the EAAC-2015 conference proceedings.

  15. Optical diagnostics for laser wakefields in plasma channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaul, E. W.; Le Blanc, S. P.; Downer, M. C.

    1998-11-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators can excite large amplitude electrostatic fields (E >= 100 GV/m) which are potentially suitable for compact accelerators and advanced high energy colliders. An accurate diagnostic tool is necessary to test the physical effects in the wakefield predicted by theory and numerical simulations, and to have control over experiments. Frequency domain interferometry (FDI) (C. W. Siders et. al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 3570 (1995) has been developed in previous work. We experimentally demonstrate single-shot FDI as a sensitive diagnostic technique for probing laser wakefields. To generate wakefields longer than the diffraction limit, optical guiding of the laser pulse is necessary. An optical guide is formed by the hydrodynamic expansion of a cylindrical shock wave driven by a laser heated plasma, which is generated by laser pulse focused with an axicon lens (C. G. Durfee and H. M. Milchberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 2409 (1993)) to intensities of ~= 10^13 W/cm^2. These are too low to reach multi-photon ionization or significant collisional ionization in <= 1 atm helium. We preionize Helium gas with an electrical discharge for efficient inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of the laser pulse and formation of a plasma channel. Spatially resolved chirped pulse interferometry is used to measure the radial electron density profile of the channel.

  16. Status of Wakefield Monitor Experiments at the CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Lillestøl, Reidar; Aftab, Namra; Corsini, Roberto; Döbert, Steffen; Farabolini, Wilfrid; Grudiev, Alexej; Javeed, Sumera; Pfingstner, Juergen; Wuensch, Walter

    2016-01-01

    For the very low emittance beams in CLIC, it is vital to mitigate emittance growth which leads to reduced luminosity in the detectors. One factor that leads to emittance growth is transverse wakefields in the accelerating structures. In order to combat this the structures must be aligned with a precision of a few um. For achieving this tolerance, accelerating structures are equipped with wakefield monitors that measure higher-order dipole modes excited by the beam when offset from the structure axis. We report on such measurements, performed using prototype CLIC accelerating structures which are part of the module installed in the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) at CERN. Measurements with and without the drive beam that feeds rf power to the structures are compared. Improvements to the experimental setup are discussed, and finally remaining measurements that should be performed before the completion of the program are summarized.

  17. Introduction to wakefields and wake potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    What are wakefields and wake potentials, and why are these concepts useful in the physics of linear accelerators and storage rings? We approach this question by first reviewing the basic physical concepts which underlie the mathematical formalism. We then present a summary of the various techniques that have been developed to make detailed calculations of wake potentials. Finally, we give some applications to current problems of interest in accelerator physics. No attempt at completeness can be made in an introductory article of modest length. Rather, we try to give a broad overview and to list key references for more detailed study. It will also be apparent that the last chapter on this subject, with all the loose ends neatly tied up, has yet to be written. There are subtle points, there are controversial questions, and active calculations to resolve these questions are continuing at the time of this writing. 61 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  18. Study of ultra-high gradient wakefield excitation by intense ultrashort laser pulses in plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaki, Hideyuki; Kando, Masaki; Oketa, Takatsugu; Masuda, Shinichi; Koga, James K.; Kondo, Shuji; Kanazawa, Shuhei; Yokoyama, Takashi; Matoba, Toru; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2002-10-01

    We investigate a laser wakefield excited by intense laser pulses, and the possibility of generating an intense bright electron source by an intense laser pulse. The coherent wakefield excited by 2 TW, 50 fs laser pulses in a gas-jet plasma around 1018 cm-3 is measured with a time-resolved frequency domain interferometer (FDI). The results show an accelerating wakefield excitation of 20 GeV/m with good coherency. This is the first time-resolved measurement of laser wakefield excitation in a gas-jet plasma. The experimental results agree with the simulation results and linear theory. The pump-probe interferometer system of FDI will be modified to the optical injection system as a relativistic electron beam injector. In 1D particle in cell simulation we obtain results of high quality intense electron beam generation.

  19. Neutrino-driven wakefield plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, L. A.; Serbeto, A.

    2003-08-01

    Processos envolvendo neutrinos são importantes em uma grande variedade de fenômenos astrofísicos, como as explosões de supernovas. Estes objetos, assim como os pulsares e as galáxias starburst, têm sido propostos como aceleradores cósmicos de partículas de altas energias. Neste trabalho, um modelo clássico de fluidos é utilizado para estudar a interação não-linear entre um feixe de neutrinos e um plasma não-colisional relativístico de pósitrons e elétrons na presença de um campo magnético. Durante a interação, uma onda híbrida superior de grande amplitude é excitada. Para parâmetros típicos de supernovas, verificamos que partículas carregadas "capturadas" por essa onda podem ser aceleradas a altas energias. Este resultado pode ser importante no estudo de mecanismos aceleradores de partículas em ambientes astrofísicos.

  20. Effect of pulse profile and chirp on a laser wakefield generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laser wakefield driven by an asymmetric laser pulse with/without chirp is investigated analytically and through two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. For a laser pulse with an appropriate pulse length compared with the plasma wavelength, the wakefield amplitude can be enhanced by using an asymmetric un-chirped laser pulse with a fast rise time; however, the growth is small. On the other hand, the wakefield can be greatly enhanced for both positively chirped laser pulse having a fast rise time and negatively chirped laser pulse having a slow rise time. Simulations show that at the early laser-plasma interaction stage, due to the influence of the fast rise time the wakefield driven by the positively chirped laser pulse is more intense than that driven by the negatively chirped laser pulse, which is in good agreement with analytical results. At a later time, since the laser pulse with positive chirp exhibits opposite evolution to the one with negative chirp when propagating in plasma, the wakefield in the latter case grows more intensely. These effects should be useful in laser wakefield acceleration experiments operating at low plasma densities.

  1. Effects of Linac Wakefield on CSR Microbunching in the Linac Coherent Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) requires two-stage bunch compression for stability against timing and charge jitters. Coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) induced in these bunch compressors can drive a microbunching instability that may degrade the beam brightness. In this paper, we study effects of the longitudinal wakefield in the accelerator on this instability. We show that significant energy modulation can be accumulated in the linac through the geometrical wakefield and can enhance the CSR microbunching in these compressors. Analytical calculations are compared with numerical simulations to evaluate the gain of microbunching for the entire LCLS accelerator system.

  2. Modification of the Argonne tandem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For nuclear structure experiments with heavy ions it is necessary to have ion energies in excess of 5 MeV per nucleon. At the Argonne tandem FN accelerator this was accomplished by the addition of a superconducting linac. Modifications of the FN tandem to improve the performance of the pair is described

  3. Long Term Evolution of Plasma Wakefields

    OpenAIRE

    Sahai, Aakash A.; Katsouleas, T. C.; Tsung, F. S.; Mori, W. B.

    2014-01-01

    We study the long-term evolution (LTE) of plasma wakefields over multiple plasma-electron periods and few plasma-ion periods, much less than a recombination time. The evolution and relaxation of such a wakefield-perturbed plasma over these timescales has important implications for the upper limits of repetition-rates in plasma colliders. Intense fields in relativistic lasers (or intense beams) create plasma wakefields (modes around {\\omega}pe) by transferring energy to the plasma electrons. C...

  4. Quasimonoenergetic GeV electron bunch generation by the wake-field of the chirped laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One-dimensional nonlinear analysis of wake-field generation and electron bunch acceleration by a chirped laser pulse were investigated numerically. It was found that the optimum linear chirp parameter leads to the wake-field amplitude increase by one order of magnitude and accordingly the acceleration gradient. In our external injection scheme, electrons were accelerated using the initial energy of 100 KeV (γin=1.2). When the pulse passes through the electron bunch most part of the electrons trapped in the first cycle of the laser wake-field and accelerate to about 1 GeV in 1.8 mm. We concluded that the expensive electron preacceleration mechanism could be omitted in a laser-aided electron acceleration scheme.

  5. Positron generation using laser-wakefield electron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron generation, using wakefield-accelerated electrons driven into a converter target, was investigated experimentally and through Monte Carlo simulations. Using experimentally measured initial electron distributions from a 60 fs laser system, modeling shows that a collimated wakefield electron beam of moderate energy (50–200 MeV) produces a large number of positrons (∼107), which are emitted from the rear of a mm-scale, high-Z target with divergence angles between 50 and 150 mrad. The large perpendicular momentum of the positrons was found to be dominated by contributions from multiple small angle Coulomb scattering. Positrons were not observed above background noise for a range of targets where simulations indicate a 5–30× increase in the beam charge was necessary to exceed threshold detection. These results provide new understanding to the fundamental limitations of creating narrow-divergence, high-density positron beams from laser-wakefield platforms for use in future laboratory pair plasma experiments

  6. Extremely short relativistic-electron-bunch generation in the laser wakefield via novel bunch injection scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; Goor, van F.A.; Boller, K.-J.; Reitsma, A.J.W.; Jaroszynski, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Recently a new electron-bunch injection scheme for the laser wakefield accelerator has been proposed [JETP Lett. 74, 371 (2001); Phys. Rev. E 65, 046504 (2002)]. In this scheme, a low energy electron bunch, sent in a plasma channel just before a high-intensity laser pulse, is trapped in the laser wa

  7. Wakefield issue and its impact on X-ray photon pulse in the SXFEL test facility

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Minghao; Feng, Chao; Deng, Haixiao; Liu, Bo; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Besides the designed beam acceleration, the energy of electrons changed by the longitudinal wakefields in a real free-electron laser (FEL) facility, which may degrade FEL performances from the theoretical expectation. In this paper, with the help of simulation codes, the wakefields induced beam energy loss in the sophisticated undulator section is calculated for Shanghai soft X-ray FEL, which is a two-stage seeded FEL test facility. While the 1st stage 44 nm FEL output is almost not affected by the wakefields, it is found that a beam energy loss about 0.8 MeV degrades the peak brightness of the 2nd stage 8.8 nm FEL by a factor of 1.6, which however can be compensated by a magnetic field fine tuning of each undulator segment.

  8. High-power radio frequency pulse generation and extration based on wakefield excited by an intense charged particle beam in dielectric-loaded waveguides.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, F.; High Energy Physics; Illinois Inst. of Tech

    2009-07-24

    Power extraction using a dielectric-loaded (DL) waveguide is a way to generate high-power radio frequency (RF) waves for future particle accelerators, especially for two-beam-acceleration. In a two-beam-acceleration scheme, a low-energy, high-current particle beam is passed through a deceleration section of waveguide (decelerator), where the power from the beam is partially transferred to trailing electromagnetic waves (wakefields); then with a properly designed RF output coupler, the power generated in the decelerator is extracted to an output waveguide, where finally the power can be transmitted and used to accelerate another usually high-energy low-current beam. The decelerator, together with the RF output coupler, is called a power extractor. At Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA), we designed a 7.8GHz power extractor with a circular DL waveguide and tested it with single electron bunches and bunch trains. The output RF frequency (7.8GHz) is the sixth harmonic of the operational frequency (1.3GHz) of the electron gun and the linac at AWA. In single bunch excitation, a 1.7ns RF pulse with 30MW of power was generated by a single 66nC electron bunch passing through the decelerator. In subsequent experiments, by employing different splitting-recombining optics for the photoinjector laser, electron bunch trains were generated and thus longer RF pulses could be successfully generated and extracted. In 16-bunch experiments, 10ns and 22ns RF pulses have been generated and extracted; and in 4-bunch experiments, the maximum power generated was 44MW with 40MW extracted. A 26GHz DL power extractor has also been designed to test this technique in the millimeter-wave range. A power level of 148MW is expected to be generated by a bunch train with a bunch spacing of 769ps and bunch charges of 20nC each. The arrangement for the experiment is illustrated in a diagram. Higher-order-mode (HOM) power extraction has also been explored in a dual-frequency design. By using a bunch

  9. Wakefields in Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billinghurst, Brant E.; Bergstrom, J. C.; Baribeau, C.; Batten, T.; Dallin, L.; May, Tim E.; Vogt, J. M.; Wurtz, Ward A.; Warnock, Robert L.; Bizzozero, D. A.; Kramer, S.; Michaelian, K. H.

    2016-06-01

    When the electron bunches in a storage ring are sufficiently short the electrons act coherently producing radiation several orders of magnitude more intense than normal synchrotron radiation. This is referred to as Coherent Syncrotron Radiation (CSR). Due to the potential of CSR to provide a good source of Terahertz radiation for our users, the Canadian Light Source (CLS) has been researching the production and application of CSR. CSR has been produced at the CLS for many years, and has been used for a number of applications. However, resonances that permeate the spectrum at wavenumber intervals of 0.074 cm-1, and are highly stable under changes in the machine setup, have hampered some experiments. Analogous resonances were predicted long ago in an idealized theory. Through experiments and further calculations we elucidate the resonance and wakefield mechanisms in the CLS vacuum chamber. The wakefield is observed directly in the 30-110 GHz range by rf diodes. These results are consistent with observations made by the interferometer in the THz range. Also discussed will be some practical examples of the application of CSR for the study of condensed phase samples using both transmission and Photoacoustic techniques.

  10. Recent developments in the target facilities at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of recent developments in the target facility at Argonne National Laboratory. Highlights include equipment upgrades which enables us to provide enhanced capabilities for support of the Argonne Heavy-Ion ATLAS Accelerator Project. Also future plans and additional equipment acquisitions will be discussed. 3 refs., 3 tabs

  11. Femtosecond probing of light-speed plasma wakefields by using a relativistic electron bunch

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, C J; Wan, Y; Guo, B; Wu, Y P; Pai, C -H; Li, F; Chu, H -H; Gu, Y Q; Xu, X L; Mori, W B; Joshi, C; Wang, J; Lu, W

    2016-01-01

    Relativistic wakes produced by intense laser or particle beams propagating through plasmas are being considered as accelerators for next generation of colliders and coherent light sources. Such wakes have been shown to accelerate electrons and positrons to several gigaelectronvolts (GeV), with a few percent energy spread and a high wake-to-beam energy transfer efficiency. However, complete mapping of electric field structure of the wakes has proven elusive. Here we show that a high-energy electron bunch can be used to probe the fields of such light-speed wakes with femtosecond resolution. The highly transient, microscopic wakefield is reconstructed from the density modulated ultra-short probe bunch after it has traversed the wake. This technique enables visualization of linear wakefields in low-density plasmas that can accelerate electrons and positrons beams. It also allows characterization of wakes in plasma density ramps critical for maintaining the beam emittance, improving the energy transfer efficiency ...

  12. Advanced accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the suitability of four novel particle acceleration technologies for multi-TeV particle physics machines: laser driven linear accelerators (linac), plasma beat-wave devices, plasma wakefield devices, and switched power and cavity wakefield linacs. The report begins with the derivation of beam parameters practical for multi-TeV devices. Electromagnetic field breakdown of materials is reviewed. The two-beam accelerator scheme for using a free electron laser as the driver is discussed. The options recommended and the conclusions reached reflect the importance of cost. We recommend that more effort be invested in achieving a self-consistent range of TeV accelerator design parameters. Beat-wave devices have promise for 1-100 GeV applications and, while not directly scalable to TeV designs, the current generation of ideas are encouraging for the TeV regime. In particular, surfatrons, finite-angle optical mixing devices, plasma grating accelerator, and the Raman forward cascade schemes all deserve more complete analysis. The exploitation of standard linac geometry operated in an unconventional mode is in a phase of rapid evolution. While conceptual projects abound, there are no complete designs. We recommend that a fraction of sponsored research be devoted to this approach. Wakefield devices offer a great deal of potential; trades among their benefits and constraints are derived and discussed herein. The study of field limitation processes has received inadequate attention; this limits experiment designers. The costs of future experiments are such that investment in understanding these processes is prudent. 34 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Observation of high current effects in high energy linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeman, J.T.

    1991-12-01

    The acceleration and transport of electron beams with high currents and low emittances are subjects studied very carefully for many operating accelerators and most future accelerators. For a example, several Free Electron Lasers (FEL) and the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) presently operate with high energy intense beams. The next generation of synchrotron light sources and future linear colliders require a much higher degree of component precision and beam control. In this note the basic concepts governing the effects of high currents in accelerators are explored, including observations of high currents in present accelerators. The effects of longitudinal wakefields on acceleration and energy spreads are studied first. Then, the transverse equations of motion are developed including the technique of BNS damping to control wakefield growth. These wakefield effects are investigated to characterize their influence on the control and observation of beam oscillations. Finally, the reduction of transverse wakefield effects is important for maintaining the emittance of intense beams. 49 refs., 48 figs.

  14. Laser wakefield simulation using a speed-of-light frame envelope model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulation of laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) experiments is computationally intensive due to the disparate length scales involved. Current experiments extend hundreds of laser wavelengths transversely and many thousands in the propagation direction, making explicit PIC simulations enormously expensive and requiring massively parallel execution in 3D. We can substantially improve the performance of laser wakefield simulations by modeling the envelope modulation of the laser field rather than the field itself. This allows for much coarser grids, since we need only resolve the plasma wavelength and not the laser wavelength, and therefore larger timesteps. Thus an envelope model can result in savings of several orders of magnitude in computational resources. By propagating the laser envelope in a frame moving at the speed of light, dispersive errors can be avoided and simulations over long distances become possible. Here we describe the model and its implementation, and show simulations and benchmarking of laser wakefield phenomena such as channel propagation, self-focusing, wakefield generation, and downramp injection using the model.

  15. Wakefield issue and its impact on X-ray photon pulse in the SXFEL test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minghao; Li, Kai; Feng, Chao; Deng, Haixiao; Liu, Bo; Wang, Dong

    2016-06-01

    Besides the designed beam acceleration, the energy of electrons is changed by the longitudinal wakefields in a real free-electron laser (FEL) facility, which may degrade FEL performances from the theoretical expectation. In this paper, with the help of simulation codes, the wakefields induced beam energy loss in the sophisticated undulator section is calculated for Shanghai soft X-ray FEL, which is a two-stage seeded FEL test facility. While the 1st stage 44 nm FEL output is almost not affected by the wakefields, it is found that a beam energy loss about 0.8 MeV degrades the peak brightness of the 2nd stage 8.8 nm FEL by a factor of 1.6, which however can be compensated by a magnetic field fine tuning of each undulator segment. And the longitudinal coherence of the 8.8 nm FEL output illustrates a slight degradation, because of the beam energy curvatures induced by the wakefields.

  16. Ponderomotive scattering of an electron-bunch before injection into a laser wakefield

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatrian, A G; Luttikhof, M J H; Van Goor, F A

    2006-01-01

    For the purpose of laser wakefield acceleration, it turned out that also the injection of electron bunches longer than a plasma wavelength can generate accelerated femtosecond bunches with relatively low energy spread. This is of high interest because such injecting bunches can be provided, e.g., by state-of-the-art photo cathode RF guns. Here we point out that when an e-bunch is injected in the wakefield it is important to take into account the ponderomotive scattering of the injecting bunch by the laser pulse in the vacuum region located in front of the plasma. At low energies of the injected bunch this scattering results in a significant drop of the collection efficiency. Larger collection efficiency can by reached with lower intensity laser pulses and relatively high injection energies. We also estimate the minimum trapping energy for the injected electrons and the length of the trapped bunch.

  17. Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention claims equipment for stabilizing the position of the front covers of the accelerator chamber in cyclic accelerators which significantly increases accelerator reliability. For stabilizing, it uses hydraulic cushions placed between the electromagnet pole pieces and the front chamber covers. The top and the bottom cushions are hydraulically connected. The cushions are disconnected and removed from the hydraulic line using valves. (J.P.)

  18. Wakefields studies for the SXFEL user facility

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Minghao; Huang, Dazhang; Deng, Haixiao; Liu, Bo; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Besides the original seeded undulator line, in the Soft X-ray free-electron laser (SXFEL) user facility at Shanghai, a second undulator line based on self-amplified spontaneous emission is proposed to achieve 2 nm laser pulse with extremely high brightness. In this paper, the beam energy deviation induced by the undulator wakefields is numerically obtained, and it is verified to have a good agreement between 3D and 2D simulation results. The beam energy loss along the undulator degrades the expected FEL output performance. Impact of wakefields on pulse energy, radiation power and spectrum is discussed, as well as the benefits of compensation obtained with a taper in the undulator field. And using the planned SXFEL diagnostic, a longitudinal wakefields measurement experiment is proposed and simulated.

  19. Relativistically strong CO{sub 2} laser driver for plasma-channeled particle acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1995-12-31

    Long-wavelength, short-duration laser pulses are desirable for plasma wakefield particle acceleration and plasma waveguiding. The first picosecond terawatt CO{sub 2} laser is under development to test laser-driven electron acceleration schemes.

  20. A Beam Driven Plasma-Wakefield Linear Collider: From Higgs Factory to Multi-TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, Erik; Gessner, Spencer J; Hogan, Mark J; Raubenheimer, Tor; An, Weiming; Joshi, Chan; Mori, Warren

    2013-01-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) holds much promise for advancing the energy frontier because it can potentially provide a 1000-fold or more increase in acceleration gradient with excellent power efficiency in respect with standard technologies. Most of the advances in beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration were obtained by a UCLA/USC/SLAC collaboration working at the SLAC FFTB[ ]. These experiments have shown that plasmas can accelerate and focus both electron and positron high energy beams, and an accelerating gradient in excess of 50 GeV/m can be sustained in an 85 cm-long plasma. The FFTB experiments were essentially proof-of-principle experiments that showed the great potential of plasma accelerators. The FACET[ ] test facility at SLAC will in the period 2012-2016 further study several issues that are directly related to the applicability of PWFA to a high-energy collider, in particular two-beam acceleration where the witness beam experiences high beam loading (required for high efficiency), small...

  1. Review of Beam-Driven Plasma Wakefield Experiments at SLAC

    CERN Document Server

    Hogan, Mark; Clayton, Chris; Decker, Franz Josef; Deng, Suzhi; Emma, Paul; Huang Cheng Kun; Iverson, Richard; Johnson, Devon K; Joshi, Chandrashekhar; Katsouleas, Thomas C; Krejcik, Patrick; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth; Mori, Warren; Muggli, Patric; Oz, Erdem; Siemann, Robert; Walz, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    In the plasma wakefield accelerator, a short relativistic-electron bunch drives a large amplitude plasma wave or wake. In experiment E-164X, we use the 28.5 GeV, ultra-short (?80 femtosecond), high peak-current (?30 kiloamperes) bunch now available at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Final Focus Test Beam facility. The head of this bunch fieldionizes a lithium vapor and excites the wake, and the tail samples the accelerating field. The latter is accomplished by setting the plasma density to match the plasma wavelength to the bunch length. After the plasma, the bunch is dispersed in energy by an imaging magnetic-spectrometer. Preliminary analysis shows that gradients in excess of 15 GeV/m are excited over a plasma length of approximately 10 cm, leading to energy gain on the order of of 1.5 GeV, or about an order of magnitude larger than energy gains reported to date. This gradient is also three orders of magnitude larger than that in the three-kilometer long Stanford linear accelerator that produces the ...

  2. Analysis of the transverse kick to beams in low-frequency photoinjectors due to wakefield effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah, Wa'el; Jones, Roger M.; Coacolo, J.-L.

    2009-04-01

    A time domain analysis of the normal modes in a cavity is used to obtain an analytical expression for the transverse momentum imparted to particles within an accelerated electron beam in a low frequency photoinjector. These analytical expressions form the basis of detailed simulations on the transverse momentum imparted to an accelerated beam. This analysis of the wakefields employs a modified form of the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem in which additional velocity dependent effects are taken into account. Simulations are presented for parameters of the ELSA photocathode.

  3. Automated analysis for detecting beams in laser wakefield simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushizima, Daniela M.; Rubel, Oliver; Prabhat, Mr.; Weber, Gunther H.; Bethel, E. Wes; Aragon, Cecilia R.; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Hamann, Bernd; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans

    2008-07-03

    Laser wakefield particle accelerators have shown the potential to generate electric fields thousands of times higher than those of conventional accelerators. The resulting extremely short particle acceleration distance could yield a potential new compact source of energetic electrons and radiation, with wide applications from medicine to physics. Physicists investigate laser-plasma internal dynamics by running particle-in-cell simulations; however, this generates a large dataset that requires time-consuming, manual inspection by experts in order to detect key features such as beam formation. This paper describes a framework to automate the data analysis and classification of simulation data. First, we propose a new method to identify locations with high density of particles in the space-time domain, based on maximum extremum point detection on the particle distribution. We analyze high density electron regions using a lifetime diagram by organizing and pruning the maximum extrema as nodes in a minimum spanning tree. Second, we partition the multivariate data using fuzzy clustering to detect time steps in a experiment that may contain a high quality electron beam. Finally, we combine results from fuzzy clustering and bunch lifetime analysis to estimate spatially confined beams. We demonstrate our algorithms successfully on four different simulation datasets.

  4. Numerical simulation of betatron X-ray emission from laser-produced wakefield accelerated electrons%空泡机制产生 betatron X 射线辐射的数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨祖华; 钱凤; 赵宗清; 谭放; 曹磊峰; 谷渝秋; 肖沙里; 闫永宏; 余金清; 范伟

    2012-01-01

    针对SILEX钛宝石激光器参数,采用PIC数值模拟程序VORPAL对激光尾波场加速进行了模拟,得到了电子轨迹及能量数据,进而通过理论计算得到了空泡机制下X射线辐射特性.结果表明,空泡机制下高能电子在空泡中做betatron振荡且多数电子被加速到170 MeV左右;加速能量较低的电子(约100MeV),其辐射谱为临界能量约3 keV的类同步辐射谱,发散角约为8 mrad,而能量较高的电子(约170 MeV)对应的光子临界能量约为10 keV.%To find a solution for the high brightness, ultra-short pulse X-ray source, the betatron X-ray mechanism was studied. It is based on the interactions which generate the laser wake field acceleration (LWFA), between the ultra-intense short laser and the plasma. These accelerated electrons make betatron oscillations in the transverse fields of the bubble and emit high brightness and ultra-short X-ray pulses (about fs). Also, this kind of source has the advantages of small size, low cost. The numerical calculations of the emission of the betatron X-rays were carried out with 2D-PIC simulations and the data processing software. Synchrotron spectra with critical energy of 3 keV and 10 keV which are radiated by the lower energy electrons (about 100 MeV) and the higher energy electrons (about 170 MeV) respectively, are reported and the emission is confined to a small angle of about 8 mrad, which has a good agreement with the theoretical results.

  5. RF Cell Modeling and Experiments for Wakefield Minimization in DARHT-II

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, S D; Nelson, Scott D.; Vella, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Electron beams of linear induction accelerators experience deflective forces caused by RF fields building up as a result of accelerating cavities of finite size. These forces can significantly effect the beam when a long linac composed of identical cells is assembled. Recent techniques in computational modeling, simulation, and experiments for 20 MeV DARHT-II (Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test) accelerator cells were found to reduce the wakefield impedance of the cells from 800 ohms/meter to 350 ohms/meter and experimental results confirm the results of the modeling efforts. Increased performance of the cell was obtained through a parametric study of the accelerator structure, materials, material tuning, and geometry. As a result of this effort, it was found that thickness-tuned ferrite produced a 50% deduction in the wakefield impedance in the low frequency band and was easily tunable based on the material thickness. It was also found that shaped metal sections allow for high-Q resonances to be de-tun...

  6. Complete temporal characterisation of asymmetric pulse compression in a laser wakefield

    CERN Document Server

    Schreiber, J; Mangles, S P D; Kamperidis, C; Kneip, S; Nagel, S R; Palmer, C A J; Rajeev, P P; Najmudin, Z

    2010-01-01

    We present complete experimental characterisation of the temporal shape of an intense ultrashort 200-TW laser pulse driving a laser wakefield. The phase of the pulse was uniquely measured using (second order) frequency resolved optical gating (FROG). The pulses are asymmetrically compressed, and exhibit a positive chirp consistent with the expected asymmetric self-phase modulation due to photon acceleration/deceleration in a relativistic plasma wave. The measured pulse duration decreases linearly with increasing length and density of the plasma, in quantitative agreement with the intensity dependent group velocity variation in the plasma wave.

  7. The electron accelerator for the AWAKE experiment at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepitone, K.; Doebert, S.; Burt, G.; Chevallay, E.; Chritin, N.; Delory, C.; Fedosseev, V.; Hessler, Ch.; McMonagle, G.; Mete, O.; Verzilov, V.; Apsimon, R.

    2016-09-01

    The AWAKE collaboration prepares a proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using the SPS beam at CERN. A long proton bunch extracted from the SPS interacts with a high power laser and a 10 m long rubidium vapour plasma cell to create strong wakefields allowing sustained electron acceleration. The electron bunch to probe these wakefields is supplied by a 20 MeV electron accelerator. The electron accelerator consists of an RF-gun and a short booster structure. This electron source should provide beams with intensities between 0.1 and 1 nC, bunch lengths between 0.3 and 3 ps and an emittance of the order of 2 mm mrad. The wide range of parameters should cope with the uncertainties and future prospects of the planned experiments. The layout of the electron accelerator, its instrumentation and beam dynamics simulations are presented.

  8. Ponderomotive Acceleration by Relativistic Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, Calvin; Yeh, Po-Chun; Luk, Onnie; McClenaghan, Joseph; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu; Tajima, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    In the extreme high intensity regime of electromagnetic (EM) waves in plasma, the acceleration process is found to be dominated by the ponderomotive acceleration (PA). While the wakefields driven by the ponderomotive force of the relativistic intensity EM waves are important, they may be overtaken by the PA itself in the extreme high intensity regime when the dimensionless vector potential $a_0$ of the EM waves far exceeds unity. The energy gain by this regime (in 1D) is shown to be (approximately) proportional to $a_0^2$. Before reaching this extreme regime, the coexistence of the PA and the wakefield acceleration (WA) is observed where the wave structures driven by the wakefields show the phenomenon of multiple and folded wave-breakings. Investigated are various signatures of the acceleration processes such as the dependence on the mass ratio for the energy gain as well as the energy spectral features. The relevance to high energy cosmic ray acceleration and to the relativistic laser acceleration is conside...

  9. Laser Wakefield diagnostic using holographic longitudinal interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volfbeyn, P.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    1999-03-26

    We propose a diagnostic technique for wakefield measurement in plasma channels. A new technique for plasma channel creation, the Ignitor Heater scheme was proposed and experimentally tested in hydrogen and nitrogen previously. It makes use of two laser pulses. The Ignitor, an ultrashort (sub 100 fs) laser pulse, is brought to a line focus using a cylindrical lens to ionize the gas. The Heater pulse (160 ps long) is used to heat the existing spark via in-verse Bremsstrahlung. The hydrodynamic shock expansion creates a partially evacuated plasma channel with a density minimum on axis. Such a channel has properties of an optical waveguide. This technique allows creation of plasma channels in low atomic number gases, such as hydrogen, which is of importance for guiding of highly intense laser pulses. Laser pulses injected into such plasma channels produce a plasma wake that has a phase velocity close to the speed of light. A discussion of plasma wake measurements, using a Longitudinal Interferometry Wakefield Diagnostic Based on Time Domain Rayleigh Refractometry with Holographic Inversion, will be presented.

  10. Electromagnetic Emission from Laser Wakefields in Magnetized Underdense Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡志丹; 盛政明; 丁文君; 王伟民; 董全力; 张杰

    2012-01-01

    A wakefield driven by a short intense laser pulse in a perpendicularly magnetized underdense plasma is studied analytically and numerically for both weakly relativistic and highly relativistic situations. Owing to the DC magnetic field, a transverse component of the electric fields associated with the wakefield appears, while the longitudinal wave is not greatly affected by the magnetic field up to 22 Tesla. Moreover, the scaling law of the transverse field versus the longitudinal field is derived. One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation results confirm the analytical results. Wakefield transmission through the plasma-vacuum boundary, where electromagnetic emission into vacuum occurs, is also investigated numerically. These results are useful for the generation of terahertz radiation and the diagnosis of laser wakefields.

  11. Wakefield Damping for the CLIC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambattu, P.K.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A.C.; Carter, R.G.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Khan, V.; Jones, R.M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2011-12-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  12. Wakefield damping for the CLIC crab cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P K; Dexter, A C; Carter, R G; Khan, V; Jones, R M; Dolgashev, V

    2009-01-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  13. WAKEFIELD DAMPING FOR THE CLIC CRAB CAVITY

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P; Dexter, A; Carter, R; Khan, V; Jones, R; Dolgashev, V

    2009-01-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  14. Beam-driven, Plasma-based Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Muggli, P

    2016-01-01

    We briefly give some of the characteristics of the beam-driven, plasma-based particle accelerator known as the plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA). We also mention some of the major results that have been obtained since the birth of the concept. We focus on high-energy particle beams where possible.

  15. Parametric injection for monoenergetic electron acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguchi, A; Takano, K; Hotta, E; Nemoto, K [Department of Energy Sciences Tokyo Institute of Technology 4259 Nagatsuta-cho Midori-ku Yokohama 226-8502 Japan (Japan); Zhidkov, A [Central Research Instistute of Electric Power Industry 2-6-1 Nagasaka Yokosuka Kanagawa 240-0196 Japan (Japan); Nakajima, K [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK 1-1 Oho Tsukuba Ibaraki 305-0801 Japan (Japan)], E-mail: blue-ayu@plasma.es.titech.ac.jp

    2008-05-01

    Electrons are accelerated in the laser wakefield (LWFA). This mechanism has been studied by 2D or 3D Particle In Cell simulation. However, how the electrons are injected in the wakefield is not understood. In this paper, we consider about the process of self -injection and propose new scheme. When plasma electron density modulates, parametric resonance of electron momentum is induced. The parametric resonance depends on laser waist modulation. We carried out 2D PIC simulation with the initial condition decided from resonance condition. Moreover, we analyze experimental result that generated 200-250 MeV monoenergetic electron beam with 400TW intense laser in CAEP in China.

  16. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  17. Tomography of human trabecular bone with a laser-wakefield driven x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J. M.; Wood, J. C.; Lopes, N. C.; Poder, K.; Abel, R. L.; Alatabi, S.; Bryant, J. S. J.; Jin, A.; Kneip, S.; Mecseki, K.; Parker, S.; Symes, D. R.; Sandholzer, M. A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.

    2016-01-01

    A laser-wakefield driven x-ray source is used for the radiography of human bone. The betatron motion of accelerated electrons generates x-rays which are hard (critical energy {{E}\\text{crit}}>30 keV), have small source size (full micro-computed tomography in a reasonable time scale of several hours, limited only by the laser repetition rate. The x-ray imaging beamline length (not including the laser) is shorter than that of a synchrotron source due to the high accelerating fields and small source size. Hence this interesting laboratory-based source may one day bridge the gap between small microfocus x-ray tubes and large synchrotron facilities.

  18. Comparison of energy spreads induced by a wakefield in a cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy spread of a beam bunch induced in a linear accelerator can be reduced to a minimum if the amplitude and the phase of the RF voltage are optimized. The energy spread is induced by the longitudinal wakefield and by the sinusoidal profile of the accelerating voltage acting on the beam. The cavity shape, the bunch profile, and the charge in the bunch determine the wake function. Aiming to have an approximately constant net voltage acting across the beam bunch, we optimize the amplitude and the phase of the RF voltage. The minimum energy spread, the required RF voltage, and the required RF phase are calculated as a function of the net charge and the length of the bunch. To find out the effect of cavity shape on the minimum energy spread, the optimization was performed for several types of cavities. 4 refs., 8 figs

  19. Emission of strong Terahertz pulses from laser wakefields in weakly coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Divya; Malik, Hitendra K.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper discusses the laser plasma interaction for the wakefield excitation and the role of external magnetic field for the emission of Terahertz radiation in a collisional plasma. Flat top lasers are shown to be more appropriate than the conventional Gaussian lasers for the effective excitation of wakefields and hence, the generation of strong Terahertz radiation through the transverse component of wakefield.

  20. MuSiC: a Multibunch and multiparticle Simulation Code with an alternative approach to wakefield effects

    CERN Document Server

    Migliorati, M

    2015-01-01

    The simulation of beam dynamics in presence of collective effects requires a strong computational effort to take into account, in a self consistent way, the wakefield acting on a given charge and produced by all the others. Generally this is done by means of a convolution integral or sum. Moreover, if the electromagnetic fields consist of resonant modes with high quality factors, responsible, for example, of coupled bunch instabilities, a charge is also affected by itself in previous turns, and a very long record of wakefield must be properly taken into account. In this paper we present a new simulation code for the longitudinal beam dynamics in a circular accelerator, which exploits an alternative approach to the currently used convolution sum, reducing the computing time and avoiding the issues related to the length of wakefield for coupled bunch instabilities. With this approach it is possible to simulate, without the need of a large computing power, simultaneously, the single and multi-bunch beam dynamics...

  1. Power Spectrum of Cerenkov Radiation from Laser Wakefield in Magnetized Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Ito, Hiroaki; Nishida, Yasushi

    2000-10-01

    An angle and radiation frequecy distribution of the output power of the electromagnetic wave radiation from the laser wakefield in a magnetized plasma (Cerenkov wakes radiaiton) have been calculated. The magnetic field here is applied for the far field electromagnetic wave radiation = requirement. The radiation frequency is confined from ωp to = ω_h. The electromagnetic wave generation originates from the coupling between the DC perpendicular magnetic field and the plasma electron longitudinal = disturbance caused by the laser ponderomotive force. Under Coulomb gauge condition, the wave equation can be completely partitioned for the scale potential = and the vector field, so it can be easily obtained from the near zone static = field and far zone radiation field. The former has well been studied as the = static wakefield acceleration. Here we wish to present the detailed study on = the feature of the radiated electromagnetic field for the later case. The radiation = power spectrum which depends on the magnetic field, the laser pulse length, = the radiation frequency and the corresponding refraction index have been = given. The analysis shows that at the direction of \\cos θ= c=3D1/β n, where n is the refraction index of the magnetized plasma, the output = power has the maximum which satisfies the Cerenkov radiation angle condition, = so that the output power for the radiation frequency of ωp = is mainly located at the forward direction.

  2. Development of an X-Band Dielectric-Based Wakefield Power Extractor for Potential CLIC Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jing, C -J; Kanareykin, A; Schoessow, P; Conde, M E; Gai, W; Power, J G; Syratchev, I

    2011-01-01

    In the past decade, tremendous efforts have been put into the development of the CLIC Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS), and significant progress has been made. However, one concern remains the manufacturing cost of the PETS, particularly considering the quantities needed for a TeV machine. A dielectric-based wakefield power extractor in principle is much cheaper to build. A low surface electric field to gradient ratio is another big advantage of the dielectric-loaded accelerating/decelerating structure. We are currently investigating the possibility of using a cost-effective dielectric-based wakefield power extractor as an alternative to the CLIC PETS. We designed a 12 GHz dielectric-based power extractor which has a similar performance to CLIC PETS with parameters 23 mm beam channel, 240 ns pulse duration, 135 MW output per structure using the CLIC drive beam. In order to study potential rf breakdown issues, as a first step we are building a 11.424 GHz dielectric-based power extractor scaled fr...

  3. Argonne National Laboratory High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1989--June 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuss the following areas on High Energy Physics at Argonne National Laboratory: experimental program; theory program; experimental facilities research; accelerator research and development; and SSC detector research and development.

  4. Resistive Wall Wakefield in the LCLS Undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Bane, Karl Leopold Freitag

    2005-01-01

    In the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a short, intense bunch (rms length 20 microns, bunch charge 1 nC) will pass through a small, long undulator beam pipe (radius 2.5 mm, length 130 m). The wakefields in the undulator, particularly the resistive wall wake of the beam pipe, will induce an energy variation along the bunch, a variation that needs to be kept to within a few times the Pierce parameter for all beam particles to continue to lase. Earlier calculations included the short-range resistive wall wake, but did not include the frequency dependence of conductivity (ac conductivity) of the beam pipe walls. We show that for copper and for the LCLS bunch structure, including the ac conductivity results in a very large effect. We show that the effect can be ameliorated by choosing aluminum and also by taking a flat, rather than round, beam pipe chamber (if the vertical aperture is fixed). The effect of the (high frequency) anomalous skin effect is also considered.

  5. Electromagnetic radiation from laser wakefields in underdense plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue; Liu; Wei-Min; Wang; Zheng-Ming; Sheng

    2014-01-01

    It is demonstrated by simulations and analysis that a wakefield driven by an ultrashort intense laser pulse in underdense plasma can emit tunable electromagnetic radiation along the laser propagation direction. The profile of such a kind of radiation is closely associated with the structure of the laser wakefield. In general, electromagnetic radiation in the terahertz range with its frequency a few times the electron plasma frequency can be generated in the moderate intensity regime. In the highly nonlinear case, a chain of radiation pulses is formed corresponding to the nonlinear structure of the wake. Study shows that the radiation is associated with the self-modulation process of the laser pulse in the wakefield and resulting transverse electron momenta from modulated asymmetric laser fields.

  6. Laser wakefield excitation and measurement on a femtosecond time scale: Theory and experiment. Progress report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a progress report describing work on laser generated wakefields, which can be applied to particle acceleration. The authors have carried out simulation studies in one and two dimensions, and experimental studies of the generation of such fields. The authors also report on the propagation studies of femtosecond laser pulses in atmospheric density gases, and work on developing such high power laser sources, with well controlled pointing and spectral characteristics. The project has involved collaboration with Japanese and Russian researchers

  7. Recovery of CTF beam signals from a strong wakefield background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beam monitor for the CERN Linear Collider Test Facility (CTF) has to work not only with very short pulses (350 ps FWHM) at a spacing of 330 ps, but also in a strong wakefield background. A cone-shaped button pickup electrode has been designed and constructed for use with CTF beams and tests have been made using a real time analogue Gaussian filter to recover the beam signals from the strong wakefield signals. As a comparison to the analogue filter, a study has been made to process the data off-line and extract the beam signals using digital filtering based on the wavelet concept. (author). 3 refs., 7 figs

  8. High Energy Particle Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    Audio Productions, Inc, New York

    1960-01-01

    Film about the different particle accelerators in the US. Nuclear research in the US has developed into a broad and well-balanced program.Tour of accelerator installations, accelerator development work now in progress and a number of typical experiments with high energy particles. Brookhaven, Cosmotron. Univ. Calif. Berkeley, Bevatron. Anti-proton experiment. Negative k meson experiment. Bubble chambers. A section on an electron accelerator. Projection of new accelerators. Princeton/Penn. build proton synchrotron. Argonne National Lab. Brookhaven, PS construction. Cambridge Electron Accelerator; Harvard/MIT. SLAC studying a linear accelerator. Other research at Madison, Wisconsin, Fixed Field Alternate Gradient Focusing. (FFAG) Oakridge, Tenn., cyclotron. Two-beam machine. Comments : Interesting overview of high energy particle accelerators installations in the US in these early years. .

  9. Present and future radioactive nuclear beam developments at Argonne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decrock, P.

    1996-11-01

    A scheme for building an ISOL-based radioactive nuclear beam facility at the Argonne Physics Division, is currently evaluated. The feasibility and efficiency of the different steps in the proposed production- and acceleration cycles are being tested. At the Dynamitron Facility of the ANL Physics Division, stripping yields of Kr, Xe and Ph beams in a windowless gas cell have been measured and the study of fission of {sup 238}U induced by fast neutrons from the {sup 9}Be(dn) reaction is in progress. Different aspects of the post-acceleration procedure are currently being investigated. In parallel with this work, energetic radioactive beams such as {sup 17}F, {sup 18}F and {sup 56}Ni have recently been developed at Argonne using the present ATLAS facility.

  10. High Gradient Accelerator Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temkin, Richard [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics. Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    2016-07-12

    The goal of the MIT program of research on high gradient acceleration is the development of advanced acceleration concepts that lead to a practical and affordable next generation linear collider at the TeV energy level. Other applications, which are more near-term, include accelerators for materials processing; medicine; defense; mining; security; and inspection. The specific goals of the MIT program are: • Pioneering theoretical research on advanced structures for high gradient acceleration, including photonic structures and metamaterial structures; evaluation of the wakefields in these advanced structures • Experimental research to demonstrate the properties of advanced structures both in low-power microwave cold test and high-power, high-gradient test at megawatt power levels • Experimental research on microwave breakdown at high gradient including studies of breakdown phenomena induced by RF electric fields and RF magnetic fields; development of new diagnostics of the breakdown process • Theoretical research on the physics and engineering features of RF vacuum breakdown • Maintaining and improving the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator, the highest frequency operational accelerator in the world, a unique facility for accelerator research • Providing the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator facility as a facility for outside users • Active participation in the US DOE program of High Gradient Collaboration, including joint work with SLAC and with Los Alamos National Laboratory; participation of MIT students in research at the national laboratories • Training the next generation of Ph. D. students in the field of accelerator physics.

  11. High Gradient Accelerator Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temkin, Richard [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics. Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    2016-07-12

    The goal of the MIT program of research on high gradient acceleration is the development of advanced acceleration concepts that lead to a practical and affordable next generation linear collider at the TeV energy level. Other applications, which are more near-term, include accelerators for materials processing; medicine; defense; mining; security; and inspection. The specific goals of the MIT program are: • Pioneering theoretical research on advanced structures for high gradient acceleration, including photonic structures and metamaterial structures; evaluation of the wakefields in these advanced structures • Experimental research to demonstrate the properties of advanced structures both in low power microwave cold test and high power, high gradient test at megawatt power levels • Experimental research on microwave breakdown at high gradient including studies of breakdown phenomena induced by RF electric fields and RF magnetic fields; development of new diagnostics of the breakdown process • Theoretical research on the physics and engineering features of RF vacuum breakdown • Maintaining and improving the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator, the highest frequency operational accelerator in the world, a unique facility for accelerator research • Providing the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator facility as a facility for outside users • Active participation in the US DOE program of High Gradient Collaboration, including joint work with SLAC and with Los Alamos National Laboratory; participation of MIT students in research at the national laboratories • Training the next generation of Ph. D. students in the field of accelerator physics.

  12. Progress of plasma wakefield self-modulation experiments at FACET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adli, E.; Berglyd Olsen, V. K.; Lindstrøm, C. A.; Muggli, P.; Reimann, O.; Vieira, J. M.; Amorim, L. D.; Clarke, C. I.; Gessner, S. J.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M. D.; O`Shea, B. D.; Yakimenko, V.; Clayton, C.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Williams, O.

    2016-09-01

    Simulations and theory predict that long electron and positron beams may under favorable conditions self-modulate in plasmas. We report on the progress of experiments studying the self-modulation instability in plasma wakefield experiments at FACET. The experimental results obtained so far, while not being fully conclusive, appear to be consistent with the presence of the self-modulation instability.

  13. LTRACK: Beam-transport calculation including wakefield effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LTRACK is a first-order beam-transport code that includes wakefield effects up to quadrupole modes. This paper will introduce the readers to this computer code by describing the history, the method of calculations, and a brief summary of the input/output information. Future plans for the code will also be described

  14. 17 GHz High Gradient Accelerator Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temkin, Richard J. [MIT; Shapiro, Michael A. [MIT

    2013-07-10

    This is a report on the MIT High Gradient Accelerator Research program which has included: Operation of the 17 GHz, 25 MeV MIT/Haimson Research Corp. electron accelerator at MIT, the highest frequency, stand-alone accelerator in the world; collaboration with members of the US High Gradient Collaboration, including the design and test of novel structures at SLAC at 11.4 GHz; the design, construction and testing of photonic bandgap structures, including metallic and dielectric structures; the investigation of the wakefields in novel structures; and the training of the next generation of graduate students and postdoctoral associates in accelerator physics.

  15. Wakefield excitation via metasurface-loaded waveguide

    OpenAIRE

    Sharples, Emmy; Letizia, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    A metallic waveguide loaded with layers of complementary split ring resonator (CSRR) based metasurface is presented for accelerator and coherent source applications. This structure presents left handed behaviour arising from the strong electrical response of CSRRs which form the metasurface and the transverse field confined between the closely positioned metasurface layers. The loaded waveguide structure is known to have a TM-like mode at 5.47GHz suitable for acceleration. In this paper, the ...

  16. A broadband gamma-ray spectrometry using novel unfolding algorithms for characterization of laser wakefield-generated betatron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a high-flux, broadband gamma-ray spectrometry capable of characterizing the betatron radiation spectrum over the photon energy range from 10 keV to 20 MeV with respect to the peak photon energy, spectral bandwidth, and unique discrimination from background radiations, using a differential filtering spectrometer and the unfolding procedure based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. These properties are experimentally verified by measuring betatron radiation from a cm-scale laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) driven by a 1-PW laser, using a differential filtering spectrometer consisting of a 15-filter and image plate stack. The gamma-ray spectra were derived by unfolding the photostimulated luminescence (PSL) values recorded on the image plates, using the spectrometer response matrix modeled with the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The accuracy of unfolded betatron radiation spectra was assessed by unfolding the test PSL data simulated with GEANT4, showing an ambiguity of less than 20% and clear discrimination from the background radiation with less than 10%. The spectral analysis of betatron radiation from laser wakefield-accelerated electron beams with energies up to 3 GeV revealed radiation spectra characterized by synchrotron radiation with the critical photon energy up to 7 MeV. The gamma-ray spectrometer and unfolding method presented here facilitate an in-depth understanding of betatron radiation from LWFA process and a novel radiation source of high-quality photon beams in the MeV regime

  17. A broadband gamma-ray spectrometry using novel unfolding algorithms for characterization of laser wakefield-generated betatron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Jong Ho, E-mail: jhjeon07@ibs.re.kr; Nakajima, Kazuhisa, E-mail: naka115@dia-net.ne.jp; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Yoo, Byung Ju; Shin, Kang Woo [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Taek; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seung Ku; Choi, Il Woo [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Photonics Research Institute, GIST, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Yong Joo [Nuclear Data Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jung Hun; Jo, Sung Ha [Advanced Photonics Research Institute, GIST, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Hojbota, Calin; Cho, Byeoung Ick; Nam, Chang Hee [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Photon Science, GIST, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    We present a high-flux, broadband gamma-ray spectrometry capable of characterizing the betatron radiation spectrum over the photon energy range from 10 keV to 20 MeV with respect to the peak photon energy, spectral bandwidth, and unique discrimination from background radiations, using a differential filtering spectrometer and the unfolding procedure based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. These properties are experimentally verified by measuring betatron radiation from a cm-scale laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) driven by a 1-PW laser, using a differential filtering spectrometer consisting of a 15-filter and image plate stack. The gamma-ray spectra were derived by unfolding the photostimulated luminescence (PSL) values recorded on the image plates, using the spectrometer response matrix modeled with the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The accuracy of unfolded betatron radiation spectra was assessed by unfolding the test PSL data simulated with GEANT4, showing an ambiguity of less than 20% and clear discrimination from the background radiation with less than 10%. The spectral analysis of betatron radiation from laser wakefield-accelerated electron beams with energies up to 3 GeV revealed radiation spectra characterized by synchrotron radiation with the critical photon energy up to 7 MeV. The gamma-ray spectrometer and unfolding method presented here facilitate an in-depth understanding of betatron radiation from LWFA process and a novel radiation source of high-quality photon beams in the MeV regime.

  18. PIC simulation of electron acceleration in an underdense plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Darvish Molla

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the interesting Laser-Plasma phenomena, when the laser power is high and ultra intense, is the generation of large amplitude plasma waves (Wakefield and electron acceleration. An intense electromagnetic laser pulse can create plasma oscillations through the action of the nonlinear pondermotive force. electrons trapped in the wake can be accelerated to high energies, more than 1 TW. Of the wide variety of methods for generating a regular electric field in plasmas with strong laser radiation, the most attractive one at the present time is the scheme of the Laser Wake Field Accelerator (LWFA. In this method, a strong Langmuir wave is excited in the plasma. In such a wave, electrons are trapped and can acquire relativistic energies, accelerated to high energies. In this paper the PIC simulation of wakefield generation and electron acceleration in an underdense plasma with a short ultra intense laser pulse is discussed. 2D electromagnetic PIC code is written by FORTRAN 90, are developed, and the propagation of different electromagnetic waves in vacuum and plasma is shown. Next, the accuracy of implementation of 2D electromagnetic code is verified, making it relativistic and simulating the generating of wakefield and electron acceleration in an underdense plasma. It is shown that when a symmetric electromagnetic pulse passes through the plasma, the longitudinal field generated in plasma, at the back of the pulse, is weaker than the one due to an asymmetric electromagnetic pulse, and thus the electrons acquire less energy. About the asymmetric pulse, when front part of the pulse has smaller time rise than the back part of the pulse, a stronger wakefield generates, in plasma, at the back of the pulse, and consequently the electrons acquire more energy. In an inverse case, when the rise time of the back part of the pulse is bigger in comparison with that of the back part, a weaker wakefield generates and this leads to the fact that the electrons

  19. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes many of the nuclear physics heavy-ion accelerator facilities in the US and the research programs being conducted. The accelerators described are: Argonne National Laboratory--ATLAS; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility; Brookhaven National Laboratory--Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) (Proposed); Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--Bevalac; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory--88-Inch Cyclotron; Los Alamos National Laboratory--Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF); Massachusetts Institute of Technology--Bates Linear Accelerator Center; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory--Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator; Stanford Linear Accelerator Center--Nuclear Physics Injector; Texas AandM University--Texas AandM Cyclotron; Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL); University of Washington--Tandem/Superconducting Booster; and Yale University--Tandem Van de Graaff

  20. Diagnostic and Detectors for Charging and Damage of Dielectrics in High-gradient Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Shchelkunov, S V; Hirshfield, J L

    2015-01-01

    The research is aimed to address issues of analysis and mitigation of high repetition rate effects in Dielectric Wakefield Accelerators, and more specifically, to study charging rate and charge distribution in a thin walled dielectric wakefield accelerator from a passing charge bunch and the physics of conductivity and discharge phenomena in dielectric materials useful for such accelerator applications. The issue is the role played by the beam halo and intense wakefields in charging of the dielectric, possibly leading to undesired deflection of charge bunches and degradation of the dielectric material. The detector that was developed is based on measurement of the complex electrical conductivity, which would appear as a transient phenomenon accompanying the passage of one or more charge bunches, by observing the change of complex admittance of a resonant microwave cavity that is fitted around the dielectric tubing. The detector also can detect permanent damage to the material. During initial stage of developm...

  1. Laser plasma accelerator driven by a super-Gaussian pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermayr, Tobias; Petrovics, Stefan; Iqbal, Khalid; Klier, Constantin; Ruhl, Hartmut; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Deng, Aihua; Zhang, Xiaomei; Shen, Baifei; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan; Tajima, Toshiki; Tajima

    2012-08-01

    A laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) with a weak focusing force is considered to seek improved beam quality in LWFA. We employ super-Gaussian laser pulses to generate the wakefield and study the behavior of the electron beam dynamics and synchrotron radiation arising from the transverse betatron oscillations through analysis and computation. We note that the super-Gaussian wakefields radically reduce the betatron oscillations and make the electron orbits mainly ballistic over a single stage. This feature permits to obtain small emittance and thus high luminosity, while still benefitting from the low-density operation of LWFA (Nakajima et al. 2011 Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 14, 091301), such as the reduced radiation loss, less number of stages, less beam instabilities, and less required wall plug power than in higher density regimes.

  2. Two-color beam generation based on wakefield excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettoni, S.; Prat, E.; Reiche, S.

    2016-05-01

    Several beam manipulation methods have been studied and experimentally tested to generate two-color photon beams in free electron laser facilities to accommodate the user requests. We propose to use the interaction of the beam with an oscillating longitudinal wakefield source to obtain a suitable electron beam structure. The bunch generates two subpulses with different energies and delayed in time passing through a magnetic chicane after its longitudinal phase space has been modulated by the wakefield source. According to this approach the power of the emitted radiation is not degraded compared to the monochromatic beam, and the setup in the machine is quite simple because the bunch is manipulated only in the high energy section, where it is more rigid. We present the design applied to SwissFEL. We identified the parameters and the corresponding range of tunability of the time and energy separation among the two subbunches.

  3. Photon Acceleration Based On Laser-Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    One dimensional electron density perturbation is derived by using the cold fluid equation, Possion's equation and the conti nuity equation. The perturbation is generated by a driving laser pulse propagating through a plasma. The upshifting of the frequency of a trailing pulse induced by density perturbation is studied by using optical metric. The results show that it is possible that the photon will gain energy from the wakefield when assuming photon's number to be conserved, i.e., the photon will be accelerated.

  4. Ionization effects in the generation of wake-fields by ultra-high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in argon gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makito, K.; Shin, J.-H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Zhidkov, A.; Hosokai, T.; Masuda, S. [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-8, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), CREST, 2-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kodama, R. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-8, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), CREST, 2-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-10-15

    Difference in mechanisms of wake-field generation and electron self-injection by high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in an initially neutral Argon gas and in pre-ionized plasma without ionization is studied via 2D particle-in-cell simulations including optical ionization of the media. For shorter laser pulses, 40 fs, ionization results only in an increase of the charge of accelerated electrons by factor of {approx}3 with qualitatively the same energy distribution. For longer pulses, 80 fs, a more stable wake field structure is observed in the neutral gas with the maximal energy of the accelerated electrons exceeding that in the fixed density plasma. In higher density Argon, an ionizing laser pulse converts itself to a complex system of solitons at a self-induced, critical density ramp.

  5. Ionization effects in the generation of wake-fields by ultra-high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in argon gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makito, K.; Zhidkov, A.; Hosokai, T.; Shin, J.-H.; Masuda, S.; Kodama, R.

    2012-10-01

    Difference in mechanisms of wake-field generation and electron self-injection by high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in an initially neutral Argon gas and in pre-ionized plasma without ionization is studied via 2D particle-in-cell simulations including optical ionization of the media. For shorter laser pulses, 40 fs, ionization results only in an increase of the charge of accelerated electrons by factor of ˜3 with qualitatively the same energy distribution. For longer pulses, 80 fs, a more stable wake field structure is observed in the neutral gas with the maximal energy of the accelerated electrons exceeding that in the fixed density plasma. In higher density Argon, an ionizing laser pulse converts itself to a complex system of solitons at a self-induced, critical density ramp.

  6. Observation of Wakefields and Resonances in Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Billinghurst, B E; Baribeau, C; Batten, T; Dallin, L; May, T E; Vogt, J M; Wurtz, W A; Warnock, R; Bizzizero, D A; Kramer, S

    2015-01-01

    We report on high resolution measurements of resonances in the spectrum of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) at the Canadian Light Source (CLS). The resonances permeate the spectrum at wavenumber intervals of $0.074 ~\\textrm{cm}^{-1}$, and are highly stable under changes in the machine setup (energy, bucket filling pattern, CSR in bursting or continuous mode). Analogous resonances were predicted long ago in an idealized theory as eigenmodes of a smooth toroidal vacuum chamber driven by a bunched beam moving on a circular orbit. A corollary of peaks in the spectrum is the presence of pulses in the wakefield of the bunch at well defined spatial intervals. Through experiments and further calculations we elucidate the resonance and wakefield mechanisms in the CLS vacuum chamber, which has a fluted form much different from a smooth torus. The wakefield is observed directly in the 30-110 GHz range by RF diodes, and indirectly by an interferometer in the THz range. The wake pulse sequence found by diodes is less ...

  7. AREAL test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakanov, V. M.; Amatuni, G. A.; Amirkhanyan, Z. G.; Aslyan, L. V.; Avagyan, V. Sh.; Danielyan, V. A.; Davtyan, H. D.; Dekhtiarov, V. S.; Gevorgyan, K. L.; Ghazaryan, N. G.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Hakobyan, L. S.; Haroutiunian, S. G.; Ivanyan, M. I.; Khachatryan, V. G.; Laziev, E. M.; Manukyan, P. S.; Margaryan, I. N.; Markosyan, T. M.; Martirosyan, N. V.; Mehrabyan, Sh. A.; Mkrtchyan, T. H.; Muradyan, L. Kh.; Nikogosyan, G. H.; Petrosyan, V. H.; Sahakyan, V. V.; Sargsyan, A. A.; Simonyan, A. S.; Toneyan, H. A.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Vardanyan, T. L.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Yeremyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.; Zanyan, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced Research Electron Accelerator Laboratory (AREAL) is a 50 MeV electron linear accelerator project with a laser driven RF gun being constructed at the CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute. In addition to applications in life and materials sciences, the project aims as a test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts. In this paper, the AREAL RF photoinjector performance, the facility design considerations and its highlights in the fields of free electron laser, the study of new high frequency accelerating structures, the beam microbunching and wakefield acceleration concepts are presented.

  8. A new awakening for accelerator cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Imagine: an accelerator unbound by length; one that can bring a beam up to the TeV level in just a few hundred metres. Sounds like a dream? Perhaps not for long. At CERN’s Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE), physicists may soon be working to bring this contemporary fairy-tale to life.   The AWAKE experiment in the CNGS facility. Wherever you find a modern linear particle accelerator, you’ll find with it a lengthy series of RF accelerating cavities. Although based on technology first developed over half a century ago, RF cavities have dominated the accelerating world since their inception. However, new developments in plasma accelerator systems may soon be bringing a new player into the game. By harnessing the power of wakefields generated by beams in plasma cells, physicists may be able to produce accelerator gradients of many GV/m –  hundreds of times higher than those achieved in current RF cavities. “Plasma wakef...

  9. Particle-in-cell simulations of plasma accelerators and electron-neutral collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo E.; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2001-10-01

    We present 2-D simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented particle-in-cell code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approx}10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approx}10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory and fluid simulations. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications of XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling relativistic electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  10. Investigation on laser accelerators. Plasma beat wave accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Akihiko; Miyamoto, Yasuaki; Hagiwara, Masayoshi; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Sudo, Osamu [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    1998-04-01

    Laser accelerator technology has characteristics of high energy, compact, short pulse and high luminescence{center_dot}low emittance. This means potential many applications in wide ranges of fields as well as high energy and nuclear physics. High power short laser pulses are injected to a plasma in the typical example of laser accelerators. Large electric fields are induced in the plasma. Electrons in the plasma are accelerated with the ponderomotive force of the electric field. The principles of interaction on beat wave, wakefield accelerators, inverse free electron laser and inverse Cherenkov radiation are briefly introduced. The overview of plasma beat wave accelerator study is briefly described on the programs at Chalk River Laboratories(Canada), UCLA(USA), Osaka Univ. (Japan) and Ecole Polytechnique (France). Issues of the plasma beat wave accelerator are discussed from the viewpoint of application. Existing laser technologies of CO{sub 2}, YAG and YFL are available for the present day accelerator technology. An acceleration length of beat wave interaction is limited due to its phase condition. Ideas on multi-staged acceleration using the phasing plasma fiber are introduced. (Y. Tanaka)

  11. 2015 Annual Report - Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, James R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papka, Michael E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cerny, Beth A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Coffey, Richard M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility provides supercomputing capabilities to the scientific and engineering community to advance fundamental discovery and understanding in a broad range of disciplines.

  12. 2014 Annual Report - Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, James R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papka, Michael E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cerny, Beth A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Coffey, Richard M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility provides supercomputing capabilities to the scientific and engineering community to advance fundamental discovery and understanding in a broad range of disciplines.

  13. Wakefield and impedance studies of a liner using MAFIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, W.; Barts, T.

    1993-03-01

    The liner is a perforated beam tube that is coaxial with an outer bore tube. The 3D code MAFIA (version 3.1) is used to study the wakefields, impedances, and resonances of this structure. The short-range wakes and low-frequency (below the cutoff) impedances are in agreement with the theoretical model. The long-range wakes and high-frequency resonances are associated with the distribution of the holes (or slots). The dependence of the impedance on the size, shape, and pattern of the holes (or slots) is studied. The impact of the liner impedance on the Superconducting Super Collider impedance budget is discussed.

  14. Wakefield and impedance studies of a liner using MAFIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, W.; Barts, T. (SSC Laboratory, Dallas, Texas 75237 (United States))

    1993-12-25

    The liner is a perforated beam tube which is coaxial with an outer bore tube. The 3D code MAFIA version 3.1 is used to study the wakefields, impedances, and resonances of this structure. The short range wakes and low frequency (below the cutoff) impedances are in agreement with the theoretical model. The long range wakes and high frequency resonances are associated with the distribution of the holes (or slots). The dependence of the impedance on the size, shape, and pattern of the holes (or slots) is studied. The impact of the liner impedance on the SSC impedance budget is discussed.

  15. Wakefield and impedance studies of a liner using MAFIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, W.; Barts, T.

    1993-12-01

    The liner is a perforated beam tube which is coaxial with an outer bore tube. The 3D code MAFIA version 3.1 is used to study the wakefields, impedances, and resonances of this structure. The short range wakes and low frequency (below the cutoff) impedances are in agreement with the theoretical model. The long range wakes and high frequency resonances are associated with the distribution of the holes (or slots). The dependence of the impedance on the size, shape, and pattern of the holes (or slots) is studied. The impact of the liner impedance on the SSC impedance budget is discussed.

  16. Laser pulse shaping for high gradient accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, F.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Bisesto, F.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Galletti, M.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Gatti, G.; Moreno, M.; Petrarca, M.; Pompili, R.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2016-09-01

    In many high gradient accelerator schemes, i.e. with plasma or dielectric wakefield induced by particles, many electron pulses are required to drive the acceleration of one of them. Those electron bunches, that generally should have very short duration and low emittance, can be generated in photoinjectors driven by a train of laser pulses coming inside the same RF bucket. We present the system used to shape and characterize the laser pulses used in multibunch operations at Sparc_lab. Our system gives us control over the main parameter useful to produce a train of up to five high brightness bunches with tailored intensity and time distribution.

  17. Argonne National Laboratory institutional plan FY 2002 - FY 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The national laboratory system provides a unique resource for addressing the national needs inherent in the mission of the Department of Energy. Argonne, which grew out of Enrico Fermi's pioneering work on the development of nuclear power, was the first national laboratory and, in many ways, has set the standard for those that followed. As the Laboratory's new director, I am pleased to present the Argonne National Laboratory Institutional Plan for FY 2002 through FY 2007 on behalf of the extraordinary group of scientists, engineers, technicians, administrators, and others who re responsible for the Laboratory's distinguished record of achievement. Like our sister DOE laboratories, Argonne uses a multifaceted approach to advance U.S. R and D priorities. First, we assemble interdisciplinary teams of scientists and engineers to address complex problems. For example, our initiative in Functional Genomics will bring together biologists, computer scientists, environmental scientists, and staff of the Advanced Photon Source to develop complete maps of cellular function. Second, we cultivate specific core competencies in science and technology; this Institutional Plan discusses the many ways in which our core competencies support DOE's four mission areas. Third, we serve the scientific community by designing, building, and operating world-class user facilities, such as the Advanced Photon Source, the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, and the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System. This Plan summarizes the visions, missions, and strategic plans for the Laboratory's existing major user facilities, and it explains our approach to the planned Rare Isotope Accelerator. Fourth, we help develop the next generation of scientists and engineers through educational programs, many of which involve bright young people in research. This Plan summarizes our vision, objectives, and strategies in the education area, and it gives statistics on student and faculty participation. Finally, we

  18. Simulation of Laser Wake Field Acceleration using a 2.5D PIC Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, W. M.; Hua, J. F.; Huang, W. H.; Tang, Ch. X.; Lin, Y. Z.

    2006-11-01

    A 2.5D PIC simulation code is developed to study the LWFA( Laser WakeField Acceleration ). The electron self-injection and the generation of mono-energetic electron beam in LWFA is briefly discussed through the simulation. And the experiment of this year at SILEX-I laser facility is also introduced.

  19. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), conducted June 15 through 26, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with ANL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ANL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). When completed, the S A results will be incorporated into the Argonne National Laboratory Environmental Survey findings for inclusion in the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 75 refs., 24 figs., 60 tabs.

  20. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), conducted June 15 through 26, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with ANL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ANL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S ampersand A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S ampersand A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). When completed, the S ampersand A results will be incorporated into the Argonne National Laboratory Environmental Survey findings for inclusion in the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 75 refs., 24 figs., 60 tabs

  1. Proposed environmental remediation at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment evaluating proposed environmental remediation activity at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E), Argonne, Illinois. The environmental remediation work would (1) reduce, eliminate, or prevent the release of contaminants from a number of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and two radiologically contaminated sites located in areas contiguous with SWMUs, and (2) decrease the potential for exposure of the public, ANL-E employees, and wildlife to such contaminants. The actions proposed for SWMUs are required to comply with the RCRA corrective action process and corrective action requirements of the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency; the actions proposed are also required to reduce the potential for continued contaminant release. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

  2. Proposed environmental remediation at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment evaluating proposed environmental remediation activity at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E), Argonne, Illinois. The environmental remediation work would (1) reduce, eliminate, or prevent the release of contaminants from a number of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and two radiologically contaminated sites located in areas contiguous with SWMUs, and (2) decrease the potential for exposure of the public, ANL-E employees, and wildlife to such contaminants. The actions proposed for SWMUs are required to comply with the RCRA corrective action process and corrective action requirements of the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency; the actions proposed are also required to reduce the potential for continued contaminant release. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required

  3. Argonne National Laboratory 1985 publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopta, J.A. (ED.); Hale, M.R. (comp.)

    1987-08-01

    This report is a bibliography of scientific and technical 1985 publications of Argonne National Laboratory. Some are ANL contributions to outside organizations' reports published in 1985. This compilation, prepared by the Technical Information Services Technical Publications Section (TPB), lists all nonrestricted 1985 publications submitted to TPS by Laboratory's Divisions. The report is divided into seven parts: Journal Articles - Listed by first author, ANL Reports - Listed by report number, ANL and non-ANL Unnumbered Reports - Listed by report number, Non-ANL Numbered Reports - Listed by report number, Books and Book Chapters - Listed by first author, Conference Papers - Listed by first author, Complete Author Index.

  4. Argonne National Laboratory 1985 publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a bibliography of scientific and technical 1985 publications of Argonne National Laboratory. Some are ANL contributions to outside organizations' reports published in 1985. This compilation, prepared by the Technical Information Services Technical Publications Section (TPB), lists all nonrestricted 1985 publications submitted to TPS by Laboratory's Divisions. The report is divided into seven parts: Journal Articles - Listed by first author, ANL Reports - Listed by report number, ANL and non-ANL Unnumbered Reports - Listed by report number, Non-ANL Numbered Reports - Listed by report number, Books and Book Chapters - Listed by first author, Conference Papers - Listed by first author, Complete Author Index

  5. Linac transport and acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acceleration of intense bunches maintaining high brightness is limited both by single-particle effects, e.g., misalignments, injection errors, and rf-steering, and collective phenomena, where the effects of the longitudinal and transverse wakefield on particles within a single bunch are the most severe. The working group has considered both problems and potentials of linac acceleration from ∼50 MeV to 1 GeV for free electron laser (FEL) applications, as well as from a few Gev to 1 TeV for linear colliders. The outlook for free electron lasers is bright: no fundamental problems seem to arise in the acceleration of peak currents in excess of 100 A with small emittance and low momentum spread. The situation of linear colliders is more complex and more difficult. Two examples, one operating at 11.4 GHz, the other at 30 GHz, are used to illustrate some of the difficulties and the exceedingly tight tolerances required. Both examples are based on round beams, and thus neither benefit from the advantages of flat beams nor address the increased care required in transporting beams of very small emittance in one plane. The working group acknowledges, but did not explore, promising concepts for colliders based on RF superconductivity

  6. Laser driven particle acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation summarizes the last ten years of research at the Laboratory of Applied Optics on laser-plasma based electron acceleration. The main result consists of the development and study of a relativistic electron source with unique properties: high energy (100-300 MeV) in short distances (few millimeters), mono-energetic, ultra-short (few fs), stable and tunable. The manuscript describes the steps that led to understanding the physics, and then mastering it in order to produce this new electron source. Non linear propagation of the laser pulse in the plasma is first presented, with phenomena such as non linear wakefield excitation, relativistic and ponderomotive self-focusing in the short pulse regime, self-compression. Acceleration and injection of electrons are then reviewed from a theoretical perspective. Experimental demonstrations of self-injection in the bubble regime and then colliding pulse injection are then presented. These experiments were among the first to produce monoenergetic, high quality, stable and tunable electron beams from a laser-plasma accelerator. The last two chapters are dedicated to the characterization of the electron beam using transition radiation and to its applications to gamma radiography and radiotherapy. Finally, the perspectives of this research are presented in the conclusion. Scaling laws are used to determine the parameters that the electron beams will reach using peta-watt laser systems currently under construction. (author)

  7. A computational study of dielectric photonic-crystal-based accelerator cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, C. A.

    Future particle accelerator cavities may use dielectric photonic crystals to reduce harmful wakefields and increase the accelerating electric field (or gradient). Reduced wakefields are predicted based on the bandgap property of some photonic crystals (i.e. frequency-selective reflection/transmission). Larger accelerating gradients are predicted based on certain dielectrics' strong resistance to electrical breakdown. Using computation, this thesis investigated a hybrid design of a 2D sapphire photonic crystal and traditional copper conducting cavity. The goals were to test the claim of reduced wakefields and, in general, judge the effectiveness of such structures as practical accelerating cavities. In the process, we discovered the following: (1) resonant cavities in truncated photonic crystals may confine radiation weakly compared to conducting cavities (depending on the level of truncation); however, confinement can be dramatically increased through optimizations that break lattice symmetry (but retain certain rotational symmetries); (2) photonic crystal cavities do not ideally reduce wakefields; using band structure calculations, we found that wakefields are increased by flat portions of the frequency dispersion (where the waves have vanishing group velocities). A complete comparison was drawn between the proposed photonic crystal cavities and the copper cavities for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC); CLIC is one of the candidates for a future high-energy electron-positron collider that will study in greater detail the physics learned at the Large Hadron Collider. We found that the photonic crystal cavity, when compared to the CLIC cavity: (1) can lower maximum surface magnetic fields on conductors (growing evidence suggests this limits accelerating gradients by inducing electrical breakdown); (2) shows increased transverse dipole wakefields but decreased longitudinal monopole wakefields; and (3) exhibits lower accelerating efficiencies (unless a large photonic

  8. Design studies and commissioning plans for plasma acceleration research station experimental program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mete, O.; Xia, G.; Hanahoe, K. [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Warrington, Halton WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Dover, M.; Wigram, M.; Wright, J.; Zhang, J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Smith, J. [Tech-X UK Ltd, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4FS (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Plasma acceleration research station is an electron beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration test stand proposed for CLARA facility in Daresbury Laboratory. In this paper, the interaction between the electron beam and the plasma is numerically characterised via 2D numerical studies by using VSIM code. The wakefields induced by a single bunch travelling through the plasma were found to vary from 200 MV/m to 3 GV/m for a range of bunch length, bunch radius, and plasma densities. Energy gain for the particles populating the bunch tail through the wakefields driven by the head of the bunch was demonstrated. After determining the achievable field for various beams and plasma configurations, a reference setting was determined for further studies. Considering this reference setting, the beam quality studies were performed for a two-bunch acceleration case. The maximum energy gain as well as the energy spread mitigation by benefiting from the beam loading was investigated by positioning the witness and driver bunches with respect to each other. Emittance growth mechanisms were studied considering the beam-plasma and beam-wakefield interactions. Eventually, regarding the findings, the initial commissioning plans and the aims for the later stages were summarised.

  9. Tailored electron bunches with smooth current profiles for enhanced transformer ratios in beam-driven acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Lemery, Francois

    2015-01-01

    Collinear high-gradient ${\\cal O} (GV/m)$ beam-driven wakefield methods for charged-particle acceleration could be critical to the realization of compact, cost-efficient, accelerators, e.g., in support of TeV-scale lepton colliders or multiple-user free-electron laser facilities. To make these options viable, the high accelerating fields need to be complemented with large transformer ratios $>2$, a parameter characterizing the efficiency of the energy transfer between a wakefield-exciting "drive" bunch to an accelerated "witness" bunch. While several potential current distributions have been discussed, their practical realization appears challenging due to their often discontinuous nature. In this paper we propose several alternative current profiles which are smooth which also lead to enhanced transformer ratios. We especially explore a laser-shaping method capable of generating one the suggested distributions directly out of a photoinjector and discuss a linac concept that could possible drive a dielectric ...

  10. Particle-In-Cell Modeling of Plasma-Based Accelerators in Two and Three Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Hemker, Roy G

    2015-01-01

    In this dissertation, a fully object-oriented, fully relativistic, multi-dimensional Particle-In-Cell code was developed and applied to answer key questions in plasma-based accelerator research. The simulations increase the understanding of the processes in laser plasma and beam-plasma interaction, allow for comparison with experiments, and motivate the development of theoretical models. The simulations support the idea that the injection of electrons in a plasma wave by using a transversely propagating laser pulse is possible. The beam parameters of the injected electrons found in the simulations compare reasonably with beams produced by conventional methods and therefore laser injection is an interesting concept for future plasma-based accelerators. Simulations of the optical guiding of a laser wakefield driver in a parabolic plasma channel support the idea that electrons can be accelerated over distances much longer than the Rayleigh length in a channel. Simulations of plasma wakefield acceleration in the ...

  11. Damped and detuned accelerator structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deruyter, H.; Farkas, Z.D; Hoag, H.A.; Ko, K.; Kroll, N.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.; Palmer, R.B.; Paterson, J.M.; Thompson, K.A.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-09-01

    This paper reports continuing work on accelerator structures for future TeV linear colliders. These structures, in addition to having to operate at high gradients, must minimize the effects of wakefield modes which are induced by e{sup {plus minus}} bunch trains. Two types of modified disk-loaded waveguides are under investigation: damped structures in which the wakefield power is coupled out to lossy regions through radial slots in the disks and/or azimuthal rectangular waveguides, whereby the external Q of the undesirable HEM{sub 11} mode is lowered to values below 20, and detuned structures in which the frequencies of these modes are modified from one end to the other of each section by {approximately}10%, thereby scrambling their effects on the beam. Beam dynamics calculations indicate that these two approaches are roughly equivalent. MAFIA, ARGUS and URMEL codes have been used extensively in conjunction with low-power tests on S- and X-band models to identify mode patterns, dispersion curves and Q values, and to demonstrate damping or detuning of the HEM modes. Results of calculations and measurements on the various structures are presented and evaluated.

  12. Push technology at Argonne National Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, R. E.; Woell, Y. N.

    1999-04-06

    Selective dissemination of information (SDI) services, also referred to as current awareness searches, are usually provided by periodically running computer programs (personal profiles) against a cumulative database or databases. This concept of pushing relevant content to users has long been integral to librarianship. Librarians traditionally turned to information companies to implement these searches for their users in business, academia, and the science community. This paper describes how a push technology was implemented on a large scale for scientists and engineers at Argonne National Laboratory, explains some of the challenges to designers/maintainers, and identifies the positive effects that SDI seems to be having on users. Argonne purchases the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Current Contents data (all subject areas except Humanities), and scientists no longer need to turn to outside companies for reliable SDI service. Argonne's database and its customized services are known as ACCESS (Argonne-University of Chicago Current Contents Electronic Search Service).

  13. Argonne's Laboratory computing center - 2007 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R.; Pieper, G. W.

    2008-05-28

    Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) in the spring of 2002 to help meet pressing program needs for computational modeling, simulation, and analysis. The guiding mission is to provide critical computing resources that accelerate the development of high-performance computing expertise, applications, and computations to meet the Laboratory's challenging science and engineering missions. In September 2002 the LCRC deployed a 350-node computing cluster from Linux NetworX to address Laboratory needs for mid-range supercomputing. This cluster, named 'Jazz', achieved over a teraflop of computing power (1012 floating-point calculations per second) on standard tests, making it the Laboratory's first terascale computing system and one of the 50 fastest computers in the world at the time. Jazz was made available to early users in November 2002 while the system was undergoing development and configuration. In April 2003, Jazz was officially made available for production operation. Since then, the Jazz user community has grown steadily. By the end of fiscal year 2007, there were over 60 active projects representing a wide cross-section of Laboratory expertise, including work in biosciences, chemistry, climate, computer science, engineering applications, environmental science, geoscience, information science, materials science, mathematics, nanoscience, nuclear engineering, and physics. Most important, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. The LCRC continues to foster growth in the computational science and engineering capability and quality at the Laboratory. Specific goals include expansion of the use of Jazz to new disciplines and Laboratory initiatives, teaming with Laboratory infrastructure providers to offer more scientific data management capabilities, expanding Argonne staff use of national computing facilities, and improving the scientific

  14. Argonne National Laboratory 1986 publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopta, J.A.; Springer, C.J.

    1987-12-01

    This report is a bibliography of scientific and technical 1986 publications of Argonne National Laboratory. Some are ANL contributions to outside organizations' reports published in 1986. This compilation, prepared by the Technical Information Services Technical Publications Section (TPS), lists all nonrestricted 1986 publications submitted to TPS by the Laboratory's Divisions. Author indexes list ANL authors only. If a first author is not an ANL employee, an asterisk in the bibliographic citation indicates the first ANL author. The report is divided into seven parts: Journal Articles -- Listed by first author; ANL Reports -- Listed by report number; ANL and non-ANL Unnumbered Reports -- Listed by report number; Non-ANL Numbered Reports -- Listed by report number; Books and Book Chapters -- Listed by first author; Conference Papers -- Listed by first author; and Complete Author Index.

  15. Argonne National Laboratory 1986 publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a bibliography of scientific and technical 1986 publications of Argonne National Laboratory. Some are ANL contributions to outside organizations' reports published in 1986. This compilation, prepared by the Technical Information Services Technical Publications Section (TPS), lists all nonrestricted 1986 publications submitted to TPS by the Laboratory's Divisions. Author indexes list ANL authors only. If a first author is not an ANL employee, an asterisk in the bibliographic citation indicates the first ANL author. The report is divided into seven parts: Journal Articles -- Listed by first author; ANL Reports -- Listed by report number; ANL and non-ANL Unnumbered Reports -- Listed by report number; Non-ANL Numbered Reports -- Listed by report number; Books and Book Chapters -- Listed by first author; Conference Papers -- Listed by first author; and Complete Author Index

  16. Report of the HEPAP Subpanel on Advanced Accelerator R and D and the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced accelerator research is reviewed with focus on its possible impact on the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The technical status of high energy electron-positron linear colliders is assessed. Experience is reviewed in the areas of storage ring physics and the technology of superconducting magnets. Areas are identified where progress is required for a high energy linear collider to be feasible, and progress and prospects in these areas are reviewed. The work on linac structures powered by either a microwave tube or a free electron laser are reviewed, and other more advanced concepts are discussed, such as plasma accelerators, wakefield accelerators, switched power accelerators, and inverse Cherenkov accelerators

  17. Laser Guiding for GeV Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemans, Wim; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Csaba

    2005-06-06

    Guiding of relativistically intense laser beams in preformed plasma channels is discussed for development of GeV-class laser accelerators. Experiments using a channel guided laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) at LBNL have demonstrated that near mono-energetic 100 MeV-class electron beams can be produced with a 10 TW laser system. Analysis, aided by particle-in-cell simulations, as well as experiments with various plasma lengths and densities, indicate that tailoring the length of the accelerator, together with loading of the accelerating structure with beam, is the key to production of mono-energetic electron beams. Increasing the energy towards a GeV and beyond will require reducing the plasma density and design criteria are discussed for an optimized accelerator module. The current progress and future directions are summarized through comparison with conventional accelerators, highlighting the unique short term prospects for intense radiation sources based on laser-driven plasma accelerators.

  18. An Update on the DOE Early Career Project on Photonic Band Gap Accelerator Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Evgenya I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Edwards, Randall L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Haynes, William B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Madrid, Michael A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Romero, Frank P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tuzel, Walter M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boulware , Chase H. [Niowave, Inc; Grimm, Terry [Niowave, Inc.

    2012-06-07

    We performed fabrication of two SRF PBG resonators at 2.1 GHz and demonstrated their proof-of-principle operation at high gradients. Measured characteristics of the resonators were in good agreement with theoretical predictions. We demonstrated that SRF PBG cavities can be operated at 15 MV/m accelerating gradients. We completed the design and started fabrication of the 16-cell PBG accelerating structure at 11.7 GHz for wakefield testing at AWA.

  19. Generation of electron beams from a laser-based advanced accelerator at Shanghai Jiao Tong University

    OpenAIRE

    Elsied, Ahmed M. M.; Hafz, Nasr A. M.; Li, Song; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Sokollik, Thomas; Jie ZHANG

    2014-01-01

    At Shanghai Jiao Tong University, we have established a research laboratory for advanced acceleration research based on high-power lasers and plasma technologies. In a primary experiment based on the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) scheme, multi-hundred MeV electron beams having a reasonable quality are generated using 20-40 TW, 30 femtosecond laser pulses interacting independently with helium, neon, nitrogen and argon gas jet targets. The laser-plasma interaction conditions are optimized...

  20. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brief descriptions are given of DOE and Nuclear Physics program operated and sponsored accelerator facilities. Specific facilities covered are the Argonne Tandem/Linac Accelerator System, the Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the proposed Continuous Beam Accelerator at Newport News, Virginia, the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory at Duke University, the Bevalac and the SuperHILAC at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Bates Linear Accelerator Center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Nuclear Physics Injector at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, the Texas A and M Cyclotrons, the Tandem/Superconducting Booster Accelerator at the University of Washington and the Tandem Van de Graaff at the A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory of Yale University. Included are acquisition cost, research programs, program accomplishments, future directions, and operating parameters of each facility

  1. 激光尾场中 Betatron 振荡产生 X 射线的研究进展%Research Progress in X -ray Generated by Betatron Oscillation in Laser Wakefield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佟帅; 杨志; 舒晓芳; 刘世炳

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing the intensity of X -ray generated by betaron oscillation in the laser wakefield has been a hotpot of current resear-ches.Based on the analysis of present research condition of generating X -ray in the laser wakefield electron acceleration (LWFA), this essay explores an approach for enhancing the intensity of betaron X -ray in the laser wakefield,and introduces related research process.%增强激光尾场中 betatron 振荡产生的 X 射线强度的新方法已成为目前研究的热点。在剖析激光尾场电子加速(LWFA)中产生 X 射线的研究现状的基础上,探索了增强 betatron X 射线强度的方法,介绍了激光尾场中 betatron 振荡产生 X 射线的研究进展。

  2. Time domain numerical calculations of the short electron bunch wakefields in resistive structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsakanian, Andranik

    2010-10-15

    The acceleration of electron bunches with very small longitudinal and transverse phase space volume is one of the most actual challenges for the future International Linear Collider and high brightness X-Ray Free Electron Lasers. The exact knowledge on the wake fields generated by the ultra-short electron bunches during its interaction with surrounding structures is a very important issue to prevent the beam quality degradation and to optimize the facility performance. The high accuracy time domain numerical calculations play the decisive role in correct evaluation of the wake fields in advanced accelerators. The thesis is devoted to the development of a new longitudinally dispersion-free 3D hybrid numerical scheme in time domain for wake field calculation of ultra short bunches in structures with walls of finite conductivity. The basic approaches used in the thesis to solve the problem are the following. For materials with high but finite conductivity the model of the plane wave reflection from a conducting half-space is used. It is shown that in the conductive half-space the field components perpendicular to the interface can be neglected. The electric tangential component on the surface contributes to the tangential magnetic field in the lossless area just before the boundary layer. For high conducting media, the task is reduced to 1D electromagnetic problem in metal and the so-called 1D conducting line model can be applied instead of a full 3D space description. Further, a TE/TM (''transverse electric - transverse magnetic'') splitting implicit numerical scheme along with 1D conducting line model is applied to develop a new longitudinally dispersion-free hybrid numerical scheme in the time domain. The stability of the new hybrid numerical scheme in vacuum, conductor and bound cell is studied. The convergence of the new scheme is analyzed by comparison with the well-known analytical solutions. The wakefield calculations for a number of

  3. Awakening the potential of plasma acceleration

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Civil engineering has begun for the new AWAKE experiment, which looks to push the boundaries of particle acceleration. This proof-of-principle experiment will harness the power of wakefields generated by proton beams in plasma cells, producing accelerator gradients hundreds of times higher than those used in current RF cavities.   Civil engineering works are currently ongoing at the AWAKE facility. As one of CERN's accelerator R&D experiments, the AWAKE project is rather unique. Like all of CERN's experiments, AWAKE is a collaborative endeavour with institutes and organisations participating around the world. "But unlike fixed-target experiments, where the users take over once CERN has delivered the facility, in AWAKE, the synchronised proton, electron and laser beams provided by CERN are an integral part of the experiment," explains Edda Gschwendtner, CERN AWAKE project leader. "So, of course, CERN's involvement in the project goes well...

  4. Manifold damping of the NLC detuned accelerating structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate the reappearance of the HOM wakefield of a detuned accelerator structure and relax tolerance requirements, we propose to provide low level damping by coupling all cavities to several identical and symmetrically located waveguides (manifolds) which run parallel to each accelerator structure and are terminated at each end by matched loads. The waveguides are designed such that all modes which couple to the acceleration mode are non-propagating at the acceleration mode frequency. Hence the coupling irises can be designed to provide large coupling to higher frequency modes without damping the acceleration mode. Because the higher order modes are detuned, they are localized and have a broad spectrum of phase velocities of both signs. They are therefore capable of coupling effectively to all propagating modes in the waveguides. Methods of analyzing and results obtained for the very complex system of modes in the accelerating structure and manifolds are presented

  5. Accelerator research studies: Technical progress report for the period June 1, 1986 to May 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported in the study of instabilities and emittance growth in periodic focusing systems for intense beams, collective ion acceleration by intense electron beams and pulse-powered plasma focus, and microwave sources and parameter scaling for high-frequency linacs. Results of a solenoid lens realignment are reported. Theoretical work with particle simulation codes is underway. Laser-controlled collective ion acceleration was demonstrated, a time-resolved Thomson spectrometer was developed, and theoretical studies have led to the development of improved analytical and simulation models describing the equilibrium state and the collective acceleration mechanism in an electron beam with co-moving ions. Progress is reported in the development of a gyroklystron electron gun, and theoretical work on frequency scaling and wakefield effects resulting in codes for quick evaluation of different parameter regimes for electron-positron colliders is discussed. Studies of quadrupole wakefield effects have commenced

  6. Particle-in-cell simulations of tunneling ionization effects in plasma-based accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Bruhwiler, D L; Cary, J R; Esarey, E; Leemans, W; Giacone, R E

    2003-01-01

    Plasma-based accelerators can sustain accelerating gradients on the order of 100 GV/m. If the plasma is not fully ionized, fields of this magnitude will ionize neutral atoms via electron tunneling, which can completely change the dynamics of the plasma wake. Particle-in-cell simulations of a high-field plasma wakefield accelerator, using the OOPIC code, which includes field-induced tunneling ionization of neutral Li gas, show that the presence of even moderate neutral gas density significantly degrades the quality of the wakefield. The tunneling ionization model in OOPIC has been validated via a detailed comparison with experimental data from the l'OASIS laboratory. The properties of a wake generated directly from a neutral gas are studied, showing that one can recover the peak fields of the fully ionized plasma simulations, if the density of the electron drive bunch is increased such that the bunch rapidly ionized the gas.

  7. A fast high-order method to calculate wakefields in an electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report on a high-order fast method to numerically calculate wakefields in an electron beam given a wake function model. This method is based on a Newton–Cotes quadrature rule for integral approximation and an FFT method for discrete summation that results in an O(Nlog(N)) computational cost, where N is the number of grid points. Using the Simpson quadrature rule with an accuracy of O(h4), where h is the grid size, we present numerical calculation of the wakefields from a resonator wake function model and from a one-dimensional coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wake model. Besides the fast speed and high numerical accuracy, the calculation using the direct line density instead of the first derivative of the line density avoids numerical filtering of the electron density function for computing the CSR wakefield.

  8. Enhancement of plasma wakefield generation and self-compression of femtosecond laser pulses by ionization gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As lasers become progressively higher in power, optical damage thresholds will become a limiting factor. Using the non-linear optics of plasma may be a way to circumvent these limits. In this paper, we report on simulations showing an enhancement to plasma wakefield self-compression of femtosecond laser pulses due to an ionization gradient at the leading edge of the pulse. By operating in a regime where wakefield generation is driven by moderately relativistic (∼1018 W cm−2) laser pulses and proper choice of gas species, the ionization front of the pulse can lead to a frequency shift that enhances the ponderomotive force and therefore both the wakefield generation and subsequent pulse compression. (paper)

  9. Analysis and control of wakefields in X-band crab cavities for Compact Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambattu, P.K., E-mail: praveen-kumar.ambattu@stfc.ac.uk [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4 YW (United Kingdom); Burt, G. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4 YW (United Kingdom); Khan, V.F.; Jones, R.M. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dexter, A. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4 YW (United Kingdom); Dolgashev, V. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2011-11-21

    The Compact Linear Collider requires a crab cavity on each beamline prior to the interaction point to rotate the bunches before collision. The cavities are X-band travelling wave type and are located close to the final doublet of the beam delivery system. This makes the beam very sensitive to transverse momentum imparted by wakefields; hence the wakefields must be tightly controlled. Of special concerns are the orthogonal polarisation of the operating mode and the fundamental monopole mode of the crab cavity. The former mode is at the same frequency as the operating mode of a cylindrically symmetric cavity and the latter one is at a lower frequency and hence is difficult to damp using a single means. In this paper major problematic modes of the crab cavity are investigated and damping requirements for them are calculated. Possibility of meeting the required wakefield control using waveguide damping and choke damping is thoroughly investigated. As a comparison, damped-detuning is also investigated.

  10. Analysis and Control of Wakefields in X-Band Crab Cavities for Compact Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambattu, P.K.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Burt, G.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Khan, V.F.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.; Jones, R.M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.; Dexter, A.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2012-04-25

    The Compact Linear Collider requires a crab cavity on each beamline prior to the interaction point to rotate the bunches before collision. The cavities are X-band travelling wave type and are located close to the final doublet of the beam delivery system. This makes the beam very sensitive to transverse momentum imparted by wakefields; hence the wakefields must be tightly controlled. Of special concerns are the orthogonal polarization of the operating mode and the fundamental monopole mode of the crab cavity. The former mode is at the same frequency as the operating mode of a cylindrically symmetric cavity and the latter one is at a lower frequency and hence is difficult to damp using a single means. In this paper major problematic modes of the crab cavity are investigated and damping requirements for them are calculated. Possibility of meeting the required wakefield control using waveguide damping and choke damping is thoroughly investigated. As a comparison, damped-detuning is also investigated.

  11. A fast high-order method to calculate wakefield forces in an electron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Qiang, Ji; Ryne, Robert D

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report on a high-order fast method to numerically calculate wakefield forces in an electron beam given a wake function model. This method is based on a Newton-Cotes quadrature rule for integral approximation and an FFT method for discrete summation that results in an $O(Nlog(N))$ computational cost, where $N$ is the number of grid points. Using the Simpson quadrature rule with an accuracy of $O(h^4)$, where $h$ is the grid size, we present numerical calculation of the wakefields from a resonator wake function model and from a one-dimensional coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wake model. Besides the fast speed and high numerical accuracy, the calculation using the direct line density instead of the first derivative of the line density avoids numerical filtering of the electron density function for computing the CSR wakefield force.

  12. Phase Space Dynamics of Ionization Injection in Plasma Based Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, X L; Li, F; Zhang, C J; Yan, L X; Du, Y C; Huang, W H; Chen, H B; Tang, C X; Lu, W; Yu, P; An, W; Mori, W B; Joshi, C

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of beam phase space in ionization-induced injection into plasma wakefields is studied using theory and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The injection process causes special longitudinal and transverse phase mixing leading initially to a rapid emittance growth followed by oscillation, decay, and eventual slow growth to saturation. An analytic theory for this evolution is presented that includes the effects of injection distance (time), acceleration distance, wakefield structure, and nonlinear space charge forces. Formulas for the emittance in the low and high space charge regimes are presented. The theory is verified through PIC simulations and a good agreement is obtained. This work shows how ultra-low emittance beams can be produced using ionization-induced injection.

  13. Chemical analysis of Argonne premium coal samples. Bulletin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    Contents: The Chemical Analysis of Argonne Premium Coal Samples: An Introduction; Rehydration of Desiccated Argonne Premium Coal Samples; Determination of 62 Elements in 8 Argonne Premium Coal Ash Samples by Automated Semiquantitative Direct-Current Arc Atomic Emission Spectrography; Determination of 18 Elements in 5 Whole Argonne Premium Coal Samples by Quantitative Direct-Current Arc Atomic Emission Spectrography; Determination of Major and Trace Elements in Eight Argonne Premium Coal Samples (Ash and Whole Coal) by X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry; Determination of 29 Elements in 8 Argonne Premium Coal Samples by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis; Determination of Selected Elements in Coal Ash from Eight Argonne Premium Coal Samples by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry and Atomic Emission Spectrometry; Determination of 25 Elements in Coal Ash from 8 Argonne Premium Coal Samples by Inductively Coupled Argon Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry; Determination of 33 Elements in Coal Ash from 8 Argonne Premium Coal Samples by Inductively Coupled Argon Plasma-Mass Spectrometry; Determination of Mercury and Selenium in Eight Argonne Premium Coal Samples by Cold-Vapor and Hydride-Generation Atomic Absorption Spectrometry; Determinaton of Carbon, Hydrogen, and Nitrogen in Eight Argonne Premium Coal Samples by Using a Gas Chromatographic Analyzer with a Thermal Conductivity Detector; and Compilation of Multitechnique Determinations of 51 Elements in 8 Argonne Premium Coal Samples.

  14. A fast method for computing 1-D wakefields due to coherent synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Chad E., E-mail: ChadMitchell@lbl.gov; Qiang, Ji; Ryne, Robert D.

    2013-07-01

    A method for computing the free-space longitudinal wakefield due to coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in a one-dimensional model is developed using a fast integrated Green function approach. This approach accurately captures the short-range behavior of the CSR interaction and does not require the numerical differentiation of a noisy longitudinal charge density. The transient wakefields that occur near bend entry and exit are included. This method can also be generalized to include the effect of upstream radiation that propagates through multiple lattice elements before interacting with the bunch.

  15. Chemical research at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is a research and development laboratory located 25 miles southwest of Chicago, Illinois. It has more than 200 programs in basic and applied sciences and an Industrial Technology Development Center to help move its technologies to the industrial sector. At Argonne, basic energy research is supported by applied research in diverse areas such as biology and biomedicine, energy conservation, fossil and nuclear fuels, environmental science, and parallel computer architectures. These capabilities translate into technological expertise in energy production and use, advanced materials and manufacturing processes, and waste minimization and environmental remediation, which can be shared with the industrial sector. The Laboratory`s technologies can be applied to help companies design products, substitute materials, devise innovative industrial processes, develop advanced quality control systems and instrumentation, and address environmental concerns. The latest techniques and facilities, including those involving modeling, simulation, and high-performance computing, are available to industry and academia. At Argonne, there are opportunities for industry to carry out cooperative research, license inventions, exchange technical personnel, use unique research facilities, and attend conferences and workshops. Technology transfer is one of the Laboratory`s major missions. High priority is given to strengthening U.S. technological competitiveness through research and development partnerships with industry that capitalize on Argonne`s expertise and facilities. The Laboratory is one of three DOE superconductivity technology centers, focusing on manufacturing technology for high-temperature superconducting wires, motors, bearings, and connecting leads. Argonne National Laboratory is operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  16. EDITORIAL: Laser and Plasma Accelerators Workshop, Kardamyli, Greece, 2009 Laser and Plasma Accelerators Workshop, Kardamyli, Greece, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Bob; Muggli, Patric

    2011-01-01

    The Laser and Plasma Accelerators Workshop 2009 was part of a very successful series of international workshops which were conceived at the 1985 Laser Acceleration of Particles Workshop in Malibu, California. Since its inception, the workshop has been held in Asia and in Europe (Kardamyli, Kyoto, Presqu'ile de Giens, Portovenere, Taipei and the Azores). The purpose of the workshops is to bring together the most recent results in laser wakefield acceleration, plasma wakefield acceleration, laser-driven ion acceleration, and radiation generation produced by plasma-based accelerator beams. The 2009 workshop was held on 22-26 June in Kardamyli, Greece, and brought together over 80 participants. (http://cfp.ist.utl.pt/lpaw09/). The workshop involved five main themes: • Laser plasma electron acceleration (experiment/theory/simulation) • Computational methods • Plasma wakefield acceleration (experiment/theory/simulation) • Laser-driven ion acceleration • Radiation generation and application. All of these themes are covered in this special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. The topic and application of plasma accelerators is one of the success stories in plasma physics, with laser wakefield acceleration of mono-energetic electrons to GeV energies, of ions to hundreds of MeV, and electron-beam-driven wakefield acceleration to 85 GeV. The accelerating electric field in the wake is of the order 1 GeV cm-1, or an accelerating gradient 1000 times greater than in conventional accelerators, possibly leading to an accelerator 1000 times smaller (and much more affordable) for the same energy. At the same time, the electron beams generated by laser wakefield accelerators have very good emittance with a correspondingly good energy spread of about a few percent. They also have the unique feature in being ultra-short in the femtosecond scale. This makes them attractive for a variety of applications, ranging from material science to ultra-fast time

  17. Plasma Beat-Wave Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Christopher E.

    2002-04-01

    Among all the advanced accelerator concepts that use lasers as the power source, most of the effort to date has been with the idea of using a laser pulse to excite a accelerating mode in a plasma. Within this area, there are a variety of approaches for creating the accelerating mode, as indicated by the other talks in this session. What is common to these approaches is the physics of how a laser pulse pushes on plasma electrons to organize electron-density perturbations, the sources of the ultra-high (> GeV/M) accelerating gradients. It is the "ponderomotive force", proportional to the local gradient of the of the laser intensity, that pushes plasma electrons forward (on the leading edge of the pulse) and backwards (on the trailing edge) which leads to harmonic motion of the electrons. As the laser pulse moves through the plasma at group velocity Vg c, the oscillating electrons show up macroscopically as a plasma mode or wave with frequency w equal to the plasma frequency and k = w/Vg. For short laser pulses, this is the Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) concept. Closely related is the Plasma Beat-Wave Acceleration (PBWA) concept. Here, the laser pulse that perturbs the plasma is composed of two closely-spaced frequencies that "beat", i.e., periodically constructively and destructively interfere, forming an electromagnetic beat wave. One can visualize this as a train of short pulses. If this beating frequency is set to the plasma frequency, then each pulse in the train will reinforce the density perturbation caused by the previous pulse. The principal advantage of multiple pulses driving up the plasma wave as opposed to a single pulse is in efficiency, allowing for the production of relatively large diameter (more 1-D like) accelerating modes. In this talk I will discuss past, current and planned PBWA experiments which are taking place at UCLA, RAL in England, and LULI in France.

  18. Generation of ultra-short relativistic-electron-bunch by a laser wakefield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; Boller, K.-J.; Goor, van F.A.

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of the generation of an ultra-short (about one micron long) relativistic (up to a few GeVs) electron-bunch in a moderately nonlinear laser wakefield excited in an underdense plasma by an intense laser pulse is investigated. The ultra-short bunch is formed by trapping, effective compr

  19. Wakefield computations for a corrugated pipe as a beam dechirper for FEL applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, C. K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bane, K. L.F. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-06-09

    A beam “dechirper” based on a corrugated, metallic vacuum chamber has been proposed recently to cancel residual energy chirp in a beam before it enters the undulator in a linac-based X-ray FEL. Rather than the round geometry that was originally proposed, we consider a pipe composed of two parallel plates with corrugations. The advantage is that the strength of the wake effect can be tuned by adjusting the separation of the plates. The separation of the plates is on the order of millimeters, and the corrugations are fractions of a millimeter in size. The dechirper needs to be meters long in order to provide sufficient longitudinal wakefield to cancel the beam chirp. Considerable computation resources are required to determine accurately the wakefield for such a long structure with small corrugation gaps. Combining the moving window technique and parallel computing using multiple processors, the time domain module in the parallel finite-element electromagnetic suite ACE3P allows efficient determination of the wakefield through convergence studies. In this paper, we will calculate the longitudinal, dipole and quadrupole wakefields for the dechirper and compare the results with those of analytical and field matching approaches.

  20. Collective effects on the wakefield and stopping power of an ion beam pulse in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell simulation is carried out to study the collective effects on the wakefield and stopping power for a hydrogen ion beam pulse propagation in hydrogen plasmas. The dependence of collective effects on the beam velocity and density is obtained and discussed. For the beam velocity, it is found that the collective effects have the strongest impact on the wakefield as well as the stopping power in the case of the intermediate beam velocities, in which the stopping power is also the largest. For the beam density, it is found that at low beam densities, the collective contribution to the stopping power increase linearly with the increase of the beam density, which corresponds well to the results calculated using the dielectric theory. However, at high beam densities, our results show that after reaching a maximum value, the collective contribution to the stopping power starts to decrease significantly with the increase of the beam density. Besides, at high beam densities, the wakefield loses typical V-shaped cone structures, and the wavelength of the oscillation wakefield increases as the beam density increases

  1. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  2. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base

  3. Beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Baboi, Nicoleta

    2012-01-01

    Higher order modes (HOM) are electromagnetic resonant fields. They can be excited by an electron beam entering an accelerating cavity, and constitute a component of the wakefield. This wakefield has the potential to dilute the beam quality and, in the worst case, result in a beam-break-up instability. It is therefore important to ensure that these fields are well suppressed by extracting energy through special couplers. In addition, the effect of the transverse wakefield can be reduced by aligning the beam on the cavity axis. This is due to their strength depending on the transverse offset of the excitation beam. For suitably small offsets the dominant components of the transverse wakefield are dipole modes, with a linear dependence on the transverse offset of the excitation bunch. This fact enables the transverse beam position inside the cavity to be determined by measuring the dipole modes extracted from the couplers, similar to a cavity beam position monitor (BPM), but requires no additional vacuum instrum...

  4. Nuclear Physics accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Physics program requires the existence and effective operation of large and complex accelerator facilities. These facilities provide the variety of projectile beams upon which virtually all experimental nuclear research depends. Their capability determine which experiments can be performed and which cannot. Seven existing accelerator facilities are operated by the Nuclear Physics program as national facilities. These are made available to all the Nation's scientists on the basis of scientific merit and technical feasibility of proposals. The national facilities are the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory; the Bates Linear Accelerator Center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Bevalac at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; the Tandem/AGS Heavy Ion Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory; the ATLAS facility at Argonne National Laboratory; the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Nuclear Physics Injector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) enables the SLAC facility to provide a limited amount of beam time for nuclear physics research on the same basis as the other national facilities. To complement the national facilities, the Nuclear Physics program supports on-campus accelerators at Duke University, Texas A and M University, the University of Washington, and Yale University. The facility at Duke University, called the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL), is jointly staffed by Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina. These accelerators are operated primarily for the research use of the local university faculty, junior scientists, and graduate students

  5. Beam characterization of a new continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new Continuous Wave (CW) Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) for the ATLAS (Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System) Intensity Upgrade was developed, built and tested at Argonne National Laboratory. We present here a characterization of the RFQ output beam in the longitudinal phase space, as well as a measurement of the transverse beam halo. Measurement results are compared to simulations performed using the beam dynamics code TRACK. -- Highlights: • Beam commissioning of a new CW RFQ has been performed at Argonne National Laboratory. • Energy spread and bunch shape measurements were conducted. • The formation of a beam halo in the transverse phase space was studied

  6. Optimization of the combined proton acceleration regime with a target composition scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, W. P. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Graduate School, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Beijing 100088 (China); Li, B. W., E-mail: li-baiwen@iapcm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Zheng, C. Y.; Liu, Z. J. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Yan, X. Q. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Qiao, B. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Extreme Optics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China)

    2016-01-15

    A target composition scheme to optimize the combined proton acceleration regime is presented and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations by using an ultra-intense circularly polarized (CP) laser pulse irradiating an overdense hydrocarbon (CH) target, instead of a pure hydrogen (H) one. The combined acceleration regime is a two-stage proton acceleration scheme combining the radiation pressure dominated acceleration (RPDA) stage and the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) stage sequentially together. Protons get pre-accelerated in the first stage when an ultra-intense CP laser pulse irradiating an overdense CH target. The wakefield is driven by the laser pulse after penetrating through the overdense CH target and propagating in the underdense tritium plasma gas. With the pre-accelerate stage, protons can now get trapped in the wakefield and accelerated to much higher energy by LWFA. Finally, protons with higher energies (from about 20 GeV up to about 30 GeV) and lower energy spreads (from about 18% down to about 5% in full-width at half-maximum, or FWHM) are generated, as compared to the use of a pure H target. It is because protons can be more stably pre-accelerated in the first RPDA stage when using CH targets. With the increase of the carbon-to-hydrogen density ratio, the energy spread is lower and the maximum proton energy is higher. It also shows that for the same laser intensity around 10{sup 22} W cm{sup −2}, using the CH target will lead to a higher proton energy, as compared to the use of a pure H target. Additionally, proton energy can be further increased by employing a longitudinally negative gradient of a background plasma density.

  7. Summary report of working group 3: High gradient and laser-structure based acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solyak, N.; /Fermilab; Cowan, B.M.; /Tech-X, Boulder

    2010-01-01

    The charge for the working group on high gradient and laser-structure based acceleration was to assess the current challenges involved in developing an advanced accelerator based on electromagnetic structures, and survey state-of-the-art methods to address those challenges. The topics of more than 50 presentations in the working group covered a very broad range of issues, from ideas, theoretical models and simulations, to design and manufacturing of accelerating structures and, finally, experimental results on obtaining extremely high accelerating gradients in structures from conventional microwave frequency range up to THz and laser frequencies. Workshop discussion topics included advances in the understanding of the physics of breakdown and other phenomena, limiting high gradient performance of accelerating structures. New results presented in this workshop demonstrated significant progress in the fields of conventional vacuum structure-based acceleration, dielectric wakefield acceleration, and laser-structure acceleration.

  8. Summary Report of Working Group 3: High Gradient and Laser-Structure Based Acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The charge for the working group on high gradient and laser-structure based acceleration was to assess the current challenges involved in developing an advanced accelerator based on electromagnetic structures, and survey state-of-the-art methods to address those challenges. The topics of more than 50 presentations in the working group covered a very broad range of issues, from ideas, theoretical models and simulations, to design and manufacturing of accelerating structures and, finally, experimental results on obtaining extremely high accelerating gradients in structures from conventional microwave frequency range up to THz and laser frequencies. Workshop discussion topics included advances in the understanding of the physics of breakdown and other phenomena, limiting high gradient performance of accelerating structures. New results presented in this workshop demonstrated significant progress in the fields of conventional vacuum structure-based acceleration, dielectric wakefield acceleration, and laser-structure acceleration.

  9. Accelerator Layout and Physics of X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Decking, W

    2005-01-01

    X-ray Free-Electron Lasers facilities are planned or already under construction around the world. This talk covers the X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers LCLS (SLAC), European XFEL (DESY) and SCSS (Spring8). All aim for self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) FEL radiation of approximately 0.1 nm wavelengths. The required excellent electron beam qualities pose challenges to the accelerator physicists. Space charge forces, coherent synchrotron radiation and wakefields can deteriorate the beam quality. The accelerator physics and technological challenges behind each of the projects will be reviewed, covering the critical components low-emittance electron gun, bunch-compressors, accelerating structures and undulator systems.

  10. Laser Accelerated Ions from a Shock Compressed Gas Foil

    CERN Document Server

    Helle, M H; Kaganovich, D; Chen, Y; Palastro, J P; Ting, A

    2016-01-01

    We present results of energetic laser-ion acceleration from a tailored, near solid density gas target. Colliding hydrodynamic shocks compress a pure hydrogen gas jet into a 70 {\\mu}m thick target prior to the arrival of the ultra-intense laser pulse. A density scan reveals the transition from a regime characterized by a wide angle, low energy beam to one of a more focused beam with a high energy halo. In the latter case, three dimensional simulations show the formation of a Z-pinch driven by the axial current resulting from laser wakefield accelerated electrons. Ions at the rear of the target are then accelerated by a combination of space charge fields from accelerated electrons and Coulombic repulsion as the pinch dissipates.

  11. Characterization of mixed CH-TRU waste at Argonne-West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argonne National Laboratory is participating in the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program by characterizing and repackaging mixed contact-handled transuranic waste. Argonne's initial activities in the Program were described last year at Waste Management '92. Since then, additional waste has been characterized and repackaged, resulting in six bins ready for shipment to WIPP upon the initiation of the bin tests. Lessons learned from these operations are being factored in the design and installation of a new characterization facility, the Enhanced Waste Characterization Facility (EWCF). The objectives of the WIPP Experimental Test Program have also undergone change since last year leading to an accelerated effort to factor sludge sampling capability into the EWCF. Consequently, the initiation of non-sludge operations in the waste characterization chamber has been delayed to Summer 1993 while the sludge sampling modifications are incorporated into the facility. Benefits in operational flexibility, effectiveness, and efficiency and reductions in potential facility and personnel contamination and exposure are expected from the enhanced waste characterization facility within the Hot Fuel Examination Facility at Argonne-West. This paper summarizes results and lessons learned from recent characterization and repackaging efforts and future plans for characterization. It also describes design features and status of the EWCF

  12. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1995-02-25

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R and D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle; assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five-Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory's LDRD Plan for FY 1994. Project summaries of research in the following areas are included: (1) Advanced Accelerator and Detector Technology; (2) X-ray Techniques for Research in Biological and Physical Science; (3) Nuclear Technology; (4) Materials Science and Technology; (5) Computational Science and Technology; (6) Biological Sciences; (7) Environmental Sciences: (8) Environmental Control and Waste Management Technology; and (9) Novel Concepts in Other Areas.

  13. Surviving to tell the tale: Argonne's Intense Pulsed Neutron Source from an ecosystem perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At first glance the story of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), an accelerator-driven neutron source for exploring the structure of materials through neutron scattering, seems to be one of puzzling ups and downs. For example, Argonne management, Department of Energy officials, and materials science reviewers continued to offer, then withdraw, votes of confidence even though the middling-sized IPNS produced high-profile research, including work that made the cover of Nature in 1987. In the midst of this period of shifting opinion and impressive research results, some Argonne materials scientists were unenthusiastic, members of the laboratory's energy physics group were key supporters, and materials scientists at another laboratory provided, almost fortuitously, a new lease on life. What forces shaped the puzzling life cycle of the IPNS? And what role - if any - did the moderate price tag and the development of scientific and technological ideas play in the course it took? To answer these questions this paper looks to an ecosystem metaphor for inspiration, exploring how opinions, ideas, and machinery emerged from the interrelated resource economies of Argonne, the DOE, and the materials science community by way of a tangled web of shifting group interactions. The paper will conclude with reflections about what the resulting focus on relationality explains about the IPNS story as well as the underlying dynamic that animates knowledge production at U.S. national laboratories.

  14. Plasma production for electron acceleration by resonant plasma wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Croia, M.; Curcio, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G. P.; Filippi, F.; Ghigo, A.; Lollo, V.; Pella, S.; Pompili, R.; Romeo, S.; Ferrario, M.

    2016-09-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is the most promising acceleration technique known nowadays, able to provide very high accelerating fields (10-100 GV/m), enabling acceleration of electrons to GeV energy in few centimeter. However, the quality of the electron bunches accelerated with this technique is still not comparable with that of conventional accelerators (large energy spread, low repetition rate, and large emittance); radiofrequency-based accelerators, in fact, are limited in accelerating field (10-100 MV/m) requiring therefore hundred of meters of distances to reach the GeV energies, but can provide very bright electron bunches. To combine high brightness electron bunches from conventional accelerators and high accelerating fields reachable with plasmas could be a good compromise allowing to further accelerate high brightness electron bunches coming from LINAC while preserving electron beam quality. Following the idea of plasma wave resonant excitation driven by a train of short bunches, we have started to study the requirements in terms of plasma for SPARC_LAB (Ferrario et al., 2013 [1]). In particular here we focus on hydrogen plasma discharge, and in particular on the theoretical and numerical estimates of the ionization process which are very useful to design the discharge circuit and to evaluate the current needed to be supplied to the gas in order to have full ionization. Eventually, the current supplied to the gas simulated will be compared to that measured experimentally.

  15. Materials technology at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betten, P.

    1989-01-01

    Argonne is actively involved in the research and development of new materials research and development (R D). Five new materials technologies have been identified for commercial potential and are presented in this paper as follows: (1) nanophase materials, (2) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of ceramics, (3) superconductivity developments and technology transfer mechanisms, and (4) COMMIX computer code modeling for metal castings, and (5) tribology using ion-assisted deposition (IAB). 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Argonne National Laboratory Physics Division annual report, January--December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K.J. [ed.

    1997-08-01

    The past year has seen several of the Physics Division`s new research projects reach major milestones with first successful experiments and results: the atomic physics station in the Basic Energy Sciences Research Center at the Argonne Advanced Photon Source was used in first high-energy, high-brilliance x-ray studies in atomic and molecular physics; the Short Orbit Spectrometer in Hall C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator (TJNAF) Facility that the Argonne medium energy nuclear physics group was responsible for, was used extensively in the first round of experiments at TJNAF; at ATLAS, several new beams of radioactive isotopes were developed and used in studies of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics; the new ECR ion source at ATLAS was completed and first commissioning tests indicate excellent performance characteristics; Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of mass-8 nuclei were performed for the first time with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions using state-of-the-art computers, including Argonne`s massively parallel IBM SP. At the same time other future projects are well under way: preparations for the move of Gammasphere to ATLAS in September 1997 have progressed as planned. These new efforts are imbedded in, or flowing from, the vibrant ongoing research program described in some detail in this report: nuclear structure and reactions with heavy ions; measurements of reactions of astrophysical interest; studies of nucleon and sub-nucleon structures using leptonic probes at intermediate and high energies; atomic and molecular structure with high-energy x-rays. The experimental efforts are being complemented with efforts in theory, from QCD to nucleon-meson systems to structure and reactions of nuclei. Finally, the operation of ATLAS as a national users facility has achieved a new milestone, with 5,800 hours beam on target for experiments during the past fiscal year.

  17. Two-Color Laser High-Harmonic Generation in Cavitated Plasma Wakefields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Carl; Benedetti, Carlo; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2016-10-03

    A method is proposed for producing coherent x-rays via high-harmonic generation using a laser interacting with highly-stripped ions in cavitated plasma wakefields. Two laser pulses of different colors are employed: a long-wavelength pulse for cavitation and a short-wavelength pulse for harmonic generation. This method enables efficient laser harmonic generation in the sub-nm wavelength regime.

  18. Wakefields generated by collisional neutrinos in neutral-electron-positron-ion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinakiche, Nouara [Faculty of Sciences, Department of Physics, University of Boumeredes U.M.B.B., Boumerdes 35000 (Algeria)

    2015-12-15

    A classical fluid description is adopted to investigate nonlinear interaction between an electron-type neutrino beam and a relativistic collisionless unmagnetized neutral-electron-positron-ion plasma. In this work, we consider the collisions of the neutrinos with neutrals in the plasma and study their effect on the generation of wakefields in presence of a fraction of ions in a neutral-electron-positron plasma. The results obtained in the present work are interpreted and compared with previous studies.

  19. Wakefields generated by collisional neutrinos in neutral-electron-positron-ion plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A classical fluid description is adopted to investigate nonlinear interaction between an electron-type neutrino beam and a relativistic collisionless unmagnetized neutral-electron-positron-ion plasma. In this work, we consider the collisions of the neutrinos with neutrals in the plasma and study their effect on the generation of wakefields in presence of a fraction of ions in a neutral-electron-positron plasma. The results obtained in the present work are interpreted and compared with previous studies

  20. Linear Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Vretenar, M

    2014-01-01

    The main features of radio-frequency linear accelerators are introduced, reviewing the different types of accelerating structures and presenting the main characteristics aspects of linac beam dynamics.

  1. Accelerator physics of the Stanford Linear Collider and SLC accelerator experiments towards the Next Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeman, J.T.

    1992-06-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) was built to collide single bunches of electrons and positrons head-on at a single interaction point with single beam energies up to 55 GeV. The small beam sizes and high currents required for high luminosity operation have significantly pushed traditional beam quality limits. The Polarized Electron Source produces about 8 {times} 10{sup 10} electrons in each of two bunches with up to 28% polarization,. The Damping Rings provide coupled invariant emittances of 1.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} r-m with 4.5 {times} 10{sup 10} particles per bunch. The 57 GeV Linac has successfully accelerated over 3 {times} 10{sup 10} particles with design invariant emittances of 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} r-m. Both longitudinal and transverse wakefields affect strongly the trajectory and emittance corrections used for operations. The Arc systems routinely transport decoupled and betatron matched beams. In the Final Focus, the beams are chromatically corrected and demagnified producing spot sizes of 2 to 3 {mu}m at the focal point. Spot sizes below 2 {mu}m have been made during special tests. Instrumentation and feedback systems are well advanced, providing continuous beam monitoring and pulse-by-pulse control. A luminosity of 1.6 {times} 10{sup 29} cm{sup {minus}2}sec{sup {minus}1} has been produced. Several experimental tests for a Next Linear Collider (NLC) are being planned or constructed using the SLC accelerator as a test facility. The Final Focus Test Beam will demagnify a flat 50 GeV electron beam to dimensions near 60 nm vertically and 900 nm horizontally. A potential Emittance Dynamics Test Area has the capability to test the acceleration and transport of very low emittance beams, the compression of bunch lengths to 50 {mu}m, the acceleration and control of multiple bunches, and the properties of wakefields in the very short bunch length regime.

  2. Study of ultra-high gradient wakefield excitation by intense ultrashort laser pulses in plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Kotaki, H

    2002-01-01

    We investigate a mechanism of nonlinear phenomena in laser-plasma interaction, a laser wakefield excited by intense laser pulses, and the possibility of generating an intense bright electron source by an intense laser pulse. We need to understand and further employ some of these phenomena for our purposes. We measure self-focusing, filamentation, and the anomalous blueshift of the laser pulse. The ionization of gas with the self-focusing causes a broad continuous spectrum with blueshift. The normal blueshift depends on the laser intensity and the plasma density. We, however, have found different phenomenon. The laser spectrum shifts to fixed wavelength independent of the laser power and gas pressure above some critical power. We call the phenomenon 'anomalous blueshift'. The results are explained by the formation of filaments. An intense laser pulse can excite a laser wakefield in plasma. The coherent wakefield excited by 2 TW, 50 fs laser pulses in a gas-jet plasma around 10 sup 1 sup 8 cm sup - sup 3 is mea...

  3. Production, Characterization, and Acceleration of Optical Microbunches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, Christopher M.S. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2008-06-20

    Optical microbunches with a spacing of 800 nm have been produced for laser acceleration research. The microbunches are produced using a inverse Free-Electron-Laser (IFEL) followed by a dispersive chicane. The microbunched electron beam is characterized by coherent optical transition radiation (COTR) with good agreement to the analytic theory for bunch formation. In a second experiment the bunches are accelerated in a second stage to achieve for the first time direct net acceleration of electrons traveling in a vacuum with visible light. This dissertation presents the theory of microbunch formation and characterization of the microbunches. It also presents the design of the experimental hardware from magnetostatic and particle tracking simulations, to fabrication and measurement of the undulator and chicane magnets. Finally, the dissertation discusses three experiments aimed at demonstrating the IFEL interaction, microbunch production, and the net acceleration of the microbunched beam. At the close of the dissertation, a separate but related research effort on the tight focusing of electrons for coupling into optical scale, Photonic Bandgap, structures is presented. This includes the design and fabrication of a strong focusing permanent magnet quadrupole triplet and an outline of an initial experiment using the triplet to observe wakefields generated by an electron beam passing through an optical scale accelerator.

  4. Enhanced betatron X-rays from axially modulated plasma wakefields

    CERN Document Server

    Palastro, J P; Gordon, D

    2015-01-01

    In the cavitation regime of plasma-based accelerators, a population of high-energy electrons tailing the driver can undergo betatron motion. The motion results in X-ray emission, but the brilliance and photon energy are limited by the electrons' initial transverse coordinate. To overcome this, we exploit parametrically unstable betatron motion in a cavitated, axially modulated plasma. Theory and simulations are presented showing that the unstable oscillations increase both the total X-ray energy and average photon energy.

  5. The big and little of fifty years of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the $50 million Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS) and the $30 million Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR) II. Starting in the mid-1990s, Argonne physicists expanded their exploration of the properties of matter by employing a new type of Moessbauer spectroscopy--this time using synchrotron light sources such as Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (APS), which at $1 billion was the most expensive U.S. accelerator project of its time. Traditional Moessbauer spectroscopy looks superficially like prototypical ''Little Science'' and Moessbauer spectroscopy using synchrotrons looks like prototypical ''Big Science''. In addition, the growth from small to larger scale research seems to follow the pattern familiar from high energy physics even though the wide range of science performed using Moessbauer spectroscopy did not include high energy physics. But is the story of Moessbauer spectroscopy really like the tale told by high energy physicists and often echoed by historians? What do U.S. national laboratories, the ''Home'' of Big Science, have to offer small-scale research? And what does the story of the 50-year development of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne tell us about how knowledge is produced at large laboratories? In a recent analysis of the development of relativistic heavy ion science at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory I questioned whether it was wise for historians to speak in terms of ''Big Science'', pointing out at that Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory hosted large-scale projects at three scales, the grand scale of the Bevatron, the modest scale of the HILAC, and the mezzo scale of the combined machine, the Bevalac. I argue that using the term ''Big Science'', which was coined by participants, leads to a misleading preoccupation with the largest projects and the tendency to see the history of physics as the history of high energy physics. My aim here is to provide an additional corrective to such views as well as further information about the web of connections that allows

  6. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1983 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. 19 references, 8 figures, 49 tables

  7. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; Duffy, T. L.; Sedlet, J.

    1981-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1980 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and foodstuffs; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated.

  8. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1984 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, ground water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. 20 refs., 8 figs., 46 tabs

  9. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1980 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and foodstuffs; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated

  10. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1979 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, Argonne effluent water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and foodstuffs; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environemetal penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measuremenets were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated

  11. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program: Argonne facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, S. V. [comp.

    1976-09-01

    The objective of the document is to present in one volume an overview of the Argonne National Laboratory test facilities involved in the conduct of the national LMFBR research and development program. Existing facilities and those under construction or authorized as of September 1976 are described. Each profile presents brief descriptions of the overall facility and its test area and data relating to its experimental and testing capability. The volume is divided into two sections: Argonne-East and Argonne-West. Introductory material for each section includes site and facility maps. The profiles are arranged alphabetically by title according to their respective locations at Argonne-East or Argonne-West. A glossary of acronyms and letter designations in common usage to describe organizations, reactor and test facilities, components, etc., involved in the LMFBR program is appended.

  12. Proceedings of the 18. international linear accelerator conference. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings cover the whole field of linear accelerators, from its original and continuing role in particle physics research to the wide range of applications found today in many other disciplines and technologies. The contributions were deliberately spread among the different conference sessions in order to maintain a broad interest. The topics covered include: the design, construction and control of linear accelerators and the associated technology; dedicated test facilities, injection, wakefields, bunching, halo, dynamics, radio-frequency (RF), electron and ion accelerators, (laser) ion sources; active alignment, beam steering and spot size; simulation, monitoring and diagnostics; a description of the performance and current status of many machines, including proposed ones such as CLIC, the NLC and TESLA; applications to medical diagnosis and radiotherapy; use in the treatment and sterilisation of materials (including food) and in the reprocessing of radioactive waste; use as potential suppliers of energy. (orig.)

  13. Transformer ratio improvement for beam based plasma accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing the transformer ratio of wakefield accelerating systems improves the viability of present novel accelerating schemes. The use of asymmetric bunches to improve the transformer ratio of beam based plasma systems has been proposed for some time[1, 2] but suffered from lack appropriate beam creation systems. Recently these impediments have been overcome [3, 4] and the ability now exists to create bunches with current profiles shaped to overcome the symmetric beam limit of R ≤ 2. We present here work towards experiments designed to measure the transformer ratio of such beams, including theoretical models and simulations using VORPAL (a 3D capable PIC code) [5]. Specifically we discuss projects to be carried out in the quasi-nonlinear regime [6] at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory and the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Lab.

  14. Enhanced betatron X-rays from axially modulated plasma wakefields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palastro, J. P.; Kaganovich, D.; Gordon, D. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC 20375-5346 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    In the cavitation regime of plasma-based accelerators, a population of high-energy electrons trailing the driver can undergo betatron motion. The motion results in X-ray emission, but the brilliance and photon energy are limited by the electrons' initial transverse coordinate. To overcome this, we exploit parametrically unstable betatron motion in a cavitated, axially modulated plasma. Theory and simulations are presented showing that the unstable oscillations increase both the total X-ray energy and average photon energy.

  15. Generation of electron beams from a laser-based advanced accelerator at Shanghai Jiao Tong University

    CERN Document Server

    Elsied, Ahmed M M; Li, Song; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Sokollik, Thomas; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    At Shanghai Jiao Tong University, we have established a research laboratory for advanced acceleration research based on high-power lasers and plasma technologies. In a primary experiment based on the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) scheme, multi-hundred MeV electron beams having a reasonable quality are generated using 20-40 TW, 30 femtosecond laser pulses interacting independently with helium, neon, nitrogen and argon gas jet targets. The laser-plasma interaction conditions are optimized for stabilizing the electron beam generation from each type of gas. The electron beam pointing angle stability and divergence angle as well as the energy spectra from each gas jet are measured and compared.

  16. Far-field constant-gradient laser accelerator of electrons in an ion channel

    CERN Document Server

    Khudik, Vladimir; Shvets, Gennady

    2016-01-01

    We predict that electrons in an ion channel can gain ultra-relativistic energies by simultaneously interacting with a laser pulse and, counter-intuitively, with a decelerating electric field. The crucial role of the decelerating field is to maintain high-amplitude betatron oscillations, thereby enabling constant rate energy flow to the electrons via the direct laser acceleration mechanism. Multiple harmonics of the betatron motion can be employed. Injecting electrons into a decelerating phase of a laser wakefield accelerator is one practical implementation of the scheme.

  17. Program for Plasma-Based Concepts for Future High Energy Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OAK B204 Program for Plasma-Based Concepts for Future High Energy Accelerators. The progress made under this program in the period since November 15, 2002 is reflected in this report. The main activities for this period were to conduct the first run of the E-164 high-gradient wakefield experiment at SLAC, to prepare for run 2 and to continue our collaborative effort with CERN to model electron cloud interactions in circular accelerators. Each of these is described. Also attached to this report are papers that were prepared or appeared during this period

  18. Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterization of the electron density in laser produced plasmas is presented using direct wavefront analysis of a probe laser beam. The performance of a laser-driven plasma-wakefield accelerator depends on the plasma wavelength and hence on the electron density. Density measurements using a conventional folded-wave interferometer and using a commercial wavefront sensor are compared for different regimes of the laser-plasma accelerator. It is shown that direct wavefront measurements agree with interferometric measurements and, because of the robustness of the compact commercial device, offer greater phase sensitivity and straightforward analysis, improving shot-to-shot plasma density diagnostics.

  19. Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plateau, Guillaume; Matlis, Nicholas; Geddes, Cameron; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; van Mourik, Reinier; Leemans, Wim

    2010-02-20

    Characterization of the electron density in laser produced plasmas is presented using direct wavefront analysis of a probe laser beam. The performance of a laser-driven plasma-wakefield accelerator depends on the plasma wavelength, hence on the electron density. Density measurements using a conventional folded-wave interferometer and using a commercial wavefront sensor are compared for different regimes of the laser-plasma accelerator. It is shown that direct wavefront measurements agree with interferometric measurements and, because of the robustness of the compact commercial device, have greater phase sensitivity, straightforward analysis, improving shot-to-shot plasma-density diagnostics.

  20. Development of high intensity source of thermal positrons APosS (Argonne Positron Source)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an update on the positron-facility development at Argonne National Laboratory. We will discuss advantages of using low-energy electron accelerator, present our latest results on slow positron production simulations, and plans for further development of the facility. We have installed a new converter/moderator assembly that is appropriate for our electron energy that allows increasing the yield about an order of magnitude. We have simulated the relative yields of thermalized positrons as a function of incident positron energy on the moderator. We use these data to calculate positron yields that we compare with our experimental data as well as with available literature data. We will discuss the new design of the next generation positron front end utilization of reflection moderator geometry. We also will discuss planned accelerator upgrades and their impact on APosS.

  1. Status report on the Advanced Photon Source Project at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory is designed as a national synchrotron radiation user facility which will provide extremely bright, highly energetic x-rays for multidisciplinary research. When operational, the Advanced Photon Source will accelerate positrons to a nominal energy of 7 GeV. The positrons will be manipulated by insertion devices to produce x-rays 10,000 times brighter than any currently available for research. Accelerator components, insertion devices, optical elements, and optical-element cooling schemes have been and continue to be the subjects of intensive research and development. A call for Letters of Intent from prospective users of the Advanced Photon Source has resulted in a substantial response from industrial, university, and national laboratory researchers

  2. Editorial: Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Chan; Malka, Victor

    2010-04-01

    The ability of short but intense laser pulses to generate high-energy electrons and ions from gaseous and solid targets has been well known since the early days of the laser fusion program. However, during the past decade there has been an explosion of experimental and theoretical activity in this area of laser-matter interaction, driven by the prospect of realizing table-top plasma accelerators for research, medical and industrial uses, and also relatively small and inexpensive plasma accelerators for high-energy physics at the frontier of particle physics. In this focus issue on laser- and beam-driven plasma accelerators, the latest advances in this field are described. Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators Contents Slow wave plasma structures for direct electron acceleration B D Layer, J P Palastro, A G York, T M Antonsen and H M Milchberg Cold injection for electron wakefield acceleration X Davoine, A Beck, A Lifschitz, V Malka and E Lefebvre Enhanced proton flux in the MeV range by defocused laser irradiation J S Green, D C Carroll, C Brenner, B Dromey, P S Foster, S Kar, Y T Li, K Markey, P McKenna, D Neely, A P L Robinson, M J V Streeter, M Tolley, C-G Wahlström, M H Xu and M Zepf Dose-dependent biological damage of tumour cells by laser-accelerated proton beams S D Kraft, C Richter, K Zeil, M Baumann, E Beyreuther, S Bock, M Bussmann, T E Cowan, Y Dammene, W Enghardt, U Helbig, L Karsch, T Kluge, L Laschinsky, E Lessmann, J Metzkes, D Naumburger, R Sauerbrey, M. Scḧrer, M Sobiella, J Woithe, U Schramm and J Pawelke The optimum plasma density for plasma wakefield excitation in the blowout regime W Lu, W An, M Zhou, C Joshi, C Huang and W B Mori Plasma wakefield acceleration experiments at FACET M J Hogan, T O Raubenheimer, A Seryi, P Muggli, T Katsouleas, C Huang, W Lu, W An, K A Marsh, W B Mori, C E Clayton and C Joshi Electron trapping and acceleration on a downward density ramp: a two-stage approach R M G M Trines, R Bingham, Z Najmudin

  3. High-Gradient, Millimeter Wave Accelerating Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzikov, S V; Peskov, N Yu

    2015-01-01

    The millimeter wave all-metallic accelerating structure, aimed to provide more than 100 MeV/m gradient and fed by feeding RF pulses of 20-30 ns duration, is proposed. The structure is based on a waveguide with small helical corrugation. Each section of 10-20 wavelengths long has big circular cross-section aperture comparable with wavelength. Because short wavelength structures are expected to be critical to wakefields excitation and emittance growth, we suggest to combine in one structure properties of a linear accelerator and a cooling damping ring simultaneously. It provides acceleration of straight on-axis beam as well as cooling of this beam due to the synchrotron radiation of particles in strong non-synchronous transverse fields. These properties are provided by specific slow eigen mode which consists of two partial waves, TM01 and TM11. Simulations show that shunt impedance can be as high as 100 MOhm/m. Results of the first low-power tests with 30 GHz accelerating section are analyzed.

  4. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development”.1 The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014.2 A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at three beam power levels, 6, 12 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was observed. This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiations. The previous report1 described an initial analysis performed on a geometry that had not been updated to reflect the as-built solution vessel. Here, the as-built geometry is used. Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations were performed on the updated geometry, and these results were used to define the power deposition profile for the CFD analyses, which were performed using Fluent, Ver. 16.2. CFD analyses were performed for the 12 and 15 kW irradiations, and further improvements to the model were incorporated, including the consideration of power deposition in nearby vessel components, gas mixture composition, and bubble size distribution. The temperature results of the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  5. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development”. The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014. A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at three beam power levels, 6, 12 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was observed. This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiations. The previous report described an initial analysis performed on a geometry that had not been updated to reflect the as-built solution vessel. Here, the as-built geometry is used. Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations were performed on the updated geometry, and these results were used to define the power deposition profile for the CFD analyses, which were performed using Fluent, Ver. 16.2. CFD analyses were performed for the 12 and 15 kW irradiations, and further improvements to the model were incorporated, including the consideration of power deposition in nearby vessel components, gas mixture composition, and bubble size distribution. The temperature results of the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  6. Ultra-High Gradient Channeling Acceleration in Nanostructures: Design/Progress of Proof-of-Concept (POC) Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young min [Fermilab; Green, A. [NICADD, DeKalb; Lumpkin, A. H. [Fermilab; Thurman-Keup, R. M. [Fermilab; Shiltsev, V. [Fermilab; Zhang, X. [Shanghai, Inst. Optics, Fine Mech.; Farinella, D. M. [UC, Irvine; Taborek, P. [UC, Irvine; Tajima, T. [UC, Irvine; Wheeler, J. A. [U. Michigan, Ann Arbor; Mourou, G. [U. Michigan, Ann Arbor

    2016-09-16

    A short bunch of relativistic particles or a short-pulse laser perturbs the density state of conduction electrons in a solid crystal and excites wakefields along atomic lattices in a crystal. Under a coupling condition the wakes, if excited, can accelerate channeling particles with TeV/m acceleration gradients [1] in principle since the density of charge carriers (conduction electrons) in solids n0 = ~ 10 to the power of 20 – 10 to the power of 23 cm-3 is significantly higher than what was considered above in gaseous plasma. Nanostructures have some advantages over crystals for channeling applications of high power beams. The dechanneling rate can be reduced and the beam acceptance increased by the large size of the channels. For beam driven acceleration, a bunch length with a sufficient charge density would need to be in the range of the plasma wavelength to properly excite plasma wakefields, and channeled particle acceleration with the wakefields must occur before the ions in the lattices move beyond the restoring threshold. In the case of the excitation by short laser pulses, the dephasing length is appreciably increased with the larger channel, which enables channeled particles to gain sufficient amounts of energy. This paper describes simulation analyses on beam- and laser (X-ray)-driven accelerations in effective nanotube models obtained from Vsim and EPOCH codes. Experimental setups to detect wakefields are also outlined with accelerator facilities at Fermilab and NIU. In the FAST facility, the electron beamline was successfully commissioned at 50 MeV and it is being upgraded toward higher energies for electron accelerator R&D. The 50 MeV injector beamline of the facility is used for X-ray crystal-channeling radiation with a diamond target. It has been proposed to utilize the same diamond crystal for a channeling acceleration POC test. Another POC experiment is also designed for the NIU accelerator lab with time-resolved electron diffraction. Recently, a

  7. Future accelerators (?)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  8. The evolution of high energy accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant, E.D.

    1994-08-01

    Accelerators have been devised and built for two reasons: In the first place, by physicists who needed high energy particles in order to have a means to explore the interactions between particles that probe the fundamental elementary forces of nature. And conversely, sometimes accelerator builders produce new machines for higher energy than ever before just because it can be done, and then challenge potential users to make new discoveries with the new means at hand. These two approaches or motivations have gone hand in hand. This lecture traces how high energy particle accelerators have grown from tools used for esoteric small-scale experiments to the gigantic projects of today. So far all the really high-energy machines built and planned in the world--except the SLC--have been ring accelerators and storage rings using the strong-focusing method. But this method has not removed the energy limit, it has only pushed it higher. It would seem unlikely that one can go beyond the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)--but in fact a workshop was held in Sicily in November 1991, concerned with the question of extrapolating to 100 TeV. Other acceleration and beam-forming methods are now being discussed--collective fields, laser acceleration, wake-field accelerators etc., all aimed primarily at making linear colliders possible and more attractive than with present radiofrequency methods. So far it is not entirely clear which of these schemes will dominate particle physics in the future--maybe something that has not been thought of as yet.

  9. The evolution of high energy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerators have been devised and built for two reasons: In the first place, by physicists who needed high energy particles in order to have a means to explore the interactions between particles that probe the fundamental elementary forces of nature. And conversely, sometimes accelerator builders produce new machines for higher energy than ever before just because it can be done, and then challenge potential users to make new discoveries with the new means at hand. These two approaches or motivations have gone hand in hand. This lecture traces how high energy particle accelerators have grown from tools used for esoteric small-scale experiments to the gigantic projects of today. So far all the really high-energy machines built and planned in the world--except the SLC--have been ring accelerators and storage rings using the strong-focusing method. But this method has not removed the energy limit, it has only pushed it higher. It would seem unlikely that one can go beyond the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)--but in fact a workshop was held in Sicily in November 1991, concerned with the question of extrapolating to 100 TeV. Other acceleration and beam-forming methods are now being discussed--collective fields, laser acceleration, wake-field accelerators etc., all aimed primarily at making linear colliders possible and more attractive than with present radiofrequency methods. So far it is not entirely clear which of these schemes will dominate particle physics in the future--maybe something that has not been thought of as yet

  10. Environmental assessment related to the operation of Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-08-01

    In order to evaluate the environmental impacts of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) operations, this assessment includes a descriptive section which is intended to provide sufficient detail to allow the various impacts to be viewed in proper perspective. In particular, details are provided on site characteristics, current programs, characterization of the existing site environment, and in-place environmental monitoring programs. In addition, specific facilities and operations that could conceivably impact the environment are described at length. 77 refs., 16 figs., 47 tabs.

  11. Nuclear Accident Dosimetry at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes current planning at Argonne National Laboratory with respect to dose determination following a criticality incident. The discussion relates chiefly to two types of commercially obtained dosimeter packages, and includes the results of independent calibrations performed at the Laboratory. The primary dosimeter system incorporates threshold detectors developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for neutron spectrum measurement. Fission foil decay calibration curves have been determined experimentally for scintillation counting equipment routinely used at Argonne. This equipment also has been calibrated for determination of sodium-24 activity in blood. Dosimeter units of the type designed at Savannah River Laboratory are deployed as secondary stations. Data from the neutron activation components of these units will be used to make corrections to, the neutron spectrum for intermediate as well as thermal energies. The epicadmium copper foil activation, for a given fluence of intermediate energy neutrons, has been shown relatively insensitive to neutron spectrum variations within the region, and a meaningful average of copper cross-section has been determined. Counter calibration factors determined at Argonne are presented for the copper, indium, and sulphur components. The total neutron fluence is computed using the corrected spectrum in conjunction with a capture probability function and the blood sodium result. One or more specifications of neutron dose then may be calculated by applying the spectral information to the appropriate conversion function. The gamma portion of the primary dosimeter package contains fluorescent rods and a thermoluminescent dosimeter in addition to a two-phase chemical dosimeter. The gamma dosimeter in the secondary package is a polyacrylamide solution which is degraded by exposure to gamma radiation. The absorbed dose is derived from a measured change insolution viscosity. Difficulties in evaluation, placement, and

  12. The generation of high fields for particle acceleration to very high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Workshop organised by the CERN Accelerator School, the European Committee for Future Accelerators and the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare was held at the Frascati laboratory of INFN during the last week of September 1984. Its purpose was to bring together an inter-disciplinary group of physicists to review ideas for the acceleration of particles to energies beyond those attainable in machines whose construction is underway, or is currently contemplated. These proceedings contain some of the material presented and discussed at the Workshop, comprising papers on topics such as: the free-electron-laser, the lasertron, wakefield accelerators, the laser excitation of droplet arrays, a switched-power linac, plasma beat-wave accelerators and the choice of basic parameters for linear colliders intended for the TeV energy region. (orig.)

  13. Argonne National Laboratory research offers clues to Alzheimer's plaques

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Researchers from Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago have developed methods to directly observe the structure and growth of microscopic filaments that form the characteristic plaques found in the brains of those with Alzheimer's Disease (1 page).

  14. Argonne National Laboratory Physics Division annual report, January--December 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The past year has seen several of the Physics Division's new research projects reach major milestones with first successful experiments and results: the atomic physics station in the Basic Energy Sciences Research Center at the Argonne Advanced Photon Source was used in first high-energy, high-brilliance x-ray studies in atomic and molecular physics; the Short Orbit Spectrometer in Hall C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator (TJNAF) Facility that the Argonne medium energy nuclear physics group was responsible for, was used extensively in the first round of experiments at TJNAF; at ATLAS, several new beams of radioactive isotopes were developed and used in studies of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics; the new ECR ion source at ATLAS was completed and first commissioning tests indicate excellent performance characteristics; Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of mass-8 nuclei were performed for the first time with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions using state-of-the-art computers, including Argonne's massively parallel IBM SP. At the same time other future projects are well under way: preparations for the move of Gammasphere to ATLAS in September 1997 have progressed as planned. These new efforts are imbedded in, or flowing from, the vibrant ongoing research program described in some detail in this report: nuclear structure and reactions with heavy ions; measurements of reactions of astrophysical interest; studies of nucleon and sub-nucleon structures using leptonic probes at intermediate and high energies; atomic and molecular structure with high-energy x-rays. The experimental efforts are being complemented with efforts in theory, from QCD to nucleon-meson systems to structure and reactions of nuclei. Finally, the operation of ATLAS as a national users facility has achieved a new milestone, with 5,800 hours beam on target for experiments during the past fiscal year

  15. Neutronics Code Development at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program of U.S. DOE, a suite of modern fast reactor simulation tools is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The general goal is to reduce the uncertainties and biases in various areas of reactor design activities by providing enhanced prediction capabilities. Under this fast reactor simulation program, a high-fidelity deterministic neutron transport code named UNIC is being developed. The end goal of this development is to produce an integrated neutronics code that enables the high fidelity description of a nuclear reactor and simplifies the multi-step design process by direct and accurate coupling with thermal-hydraulics and structural mechanics calculations. (author)

  16. Argonne National Lab gets Linux network teraflop cluster

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    "Linux NetworX, Salt Lake City, Utah, has delivered an Evolocity II (E2) Linux cluster to Argonne National Laboratory that is capable of performing more than one trillion calculations per second (1 teraFLOP). The cluster, named "Jazz" by Argonne, is designed to provide optimum performance for multiple disciplines such as chemistry, physics and reactor engineering and will be used by the entire scientific community at the Lab" (1 page).

  17. Argonne National Laboratory's photooxidation organic mixed-waste treatment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the installation and startup testing of the Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) photo-oxidation organic mixed-waste treatment system. This system will treat organic mixed (i.e., radioactive and hazardous) waste by oxidizing the organics to carbon dioxide and inorganic salts in an aqueous media. The residue will be treated in the existing radwaste evaporators. The system is installed in the waste management facility at the ANL-E site in Argonne, Illinois

  18. Accelerating Value Creation with Accelerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Eythor Ivar

    2015-01-01

    accelerator programs. Microsoft runs accelerators in seven different countries. Accelerators have grown out of the infancy stage and are now an accepted approach to develop new ventures based on cutting-edge technology like the internet of things, mobile technology, big data and virtual reality. It is also...... with the traditional audit and legal universes and industries are examples of emerging potentials both from a research and business point of view to exploit and explore further. The accelerator approach may therefore be an Idea Watch to consider, no matter which industry you are in, because in essence accelerators...

  19. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; ESH/QA Oversight

    2007-09-13

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2006. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  20. Argonne National Laboratory Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, T. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gomez, J. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moos, L. P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-09-02

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2013. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with environmental management, sustainability efforts, environmental corrective actions, and habitat restoration. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable standards intended to protect human health and the environment. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) CAP-88 Version 3 computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  1. 1986 annual site environmental report for Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for 1986 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, ground water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; of the environmental penetrating radiation dose; and for a variety of chemical constituents in surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water. Sample collections and measurements were made on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology based on recent International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations is required and used in this report. The radiation dose to off-site population groups is estimated. The average concentrations and total amounts of radioactive and chemical pollutants released by Argonne to the environment were all below appropriate standards. 21 refs., 7 figs., 52 tabs

  2. Argonne National Laboratory Site Environmental report for calendar year 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.

    2010-08-04

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2009. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  3. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.; ESH/QA Oversight

    2008-09-09

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2007. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  4. Argonne National Laboratory site enviromental report for calendar year 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.

    2009-09-02

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2008. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  5. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  6. Experimental Test of 7.8 GHz Power Extractor Using Dielectric Loaded Rectangular Waveguide Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on experimental test of a 7.8 GHz power extractor using a dielectric loaded rectangular waveguide structure. This work is conducted at the Argonne wakefield accelerator (AWA) facility. The wakefield is excited by an electron beam travelling through a dielectric loaded rectangular waveguide, and the generated rf power is then subsequently extracted with a properly designed rf coupler. In the experiment, 30 MW of output power is excited by a 66 nC single electron bunch, and wakefield superposition by a train consisting of four bunches is also demonstrated. Both the results agree well with theoretical predictions

  7. Electron acceleration in long scale laser - plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamperidis, Christos; Mangles, Stuart P. D.; Nagel, Sabrina R.; Bellei, Claudio; Krushelnick, Karl; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Bourgeois, Nicola; Marques, Jean Raphael; Kaluza, Malte C.

    2006-10-01

    Broad energy electron bunches are produced through the Self-Modulated Laser Wakefield Acceleration scheme at the 30J, 300 fsec laser, LULI, France, with long scale underdense plasmas, created in a He filled gas cell and in He gas jet nozzles of various lengths. With c.τlaser>>λplasma, electrons reached Emax ˜ 200MeV. By carefully controlling the dynamics of the interaction and by simultaneous observations of the electron energy spectra and the forward emitted optical spectrum, we found that a plasma density threshold (˜5.10^18 cm-3) exists for quasi-monoenergetic (˜30MeV) features to appear. The overall plasma channel size was inferred from the collected Thomson scattered light. 2D PIC simulations indicate that the main long laser pulse breaks up into small pulselets that eventually get compressed and tightly focused inside the first few plasma periods, leading to a bubble like acceleration of electron bunches.

  8. New Developments in the Simulation of Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, K.; Cary, J.R.; Cowan, B.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Mullowney, P.J.; Messmer, P.; Esarey, E.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Vay, J.-L.

    2008-09-10

    Improved computational methods are essential to the diverse and rapidly developing field of advanced accelerator concepts. We present an overview of some computational algorithms for laser-plasma concepts and high-brightness photocathode electron sources. In particular, we discuss algorithms for reduced laser-plasma models that can be orders of magnitude faster than their higher-fidelity counterparts, as well as important on-going efforts to include relevant additional physics that has been previously neglected. As an example of the former, we present 2D laser wakefield accelerator simulations in an optimal Lorentz frame, demonstrating>10 GeV energy gain of externally injected electrons over a 2 m interaction length, showing good agreement with predictions from scaled simulations and theory, with a speedup factor of ~;;2,000 as compared to standard particle-in-cell.

  9. A laser strain gauge for accelerator targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi megawatt accelerators can deliver sufficient power to a target to destroy it in a few pulses. In order to look at the response of solid and liquid targets under these high power pulses, we are developing optical methods of measuring surface deformations with time resolutions limited by laser pulse lengths. These methods can be used to examine the surfaces of solids and liquids during elastic deformation and unstable hydrodynamic flows. We present preliminary results of a system designed for target tests using the Brookhaven AGS and the Argonne CHM linac

  10. Capturing relativistic wakefield structures in plasmas using ultrashort high-energy electrons as a probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C. J.; Hua, J. F.; Xu, X. L.; Li, F.; Pai, C.-H.; Wan, Y.; Wu, Y. P.; Gu, Y. Q.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.

    2016-07-01

    A new method capable of capturing coherent electric field structures propagating at nearly the speed of light in plasma with a time resolution as small as a few femtoseconds is proposed. This method uses a few femtoseconds long relativistic electron bunch to probe the wake produced in a plasma by an intense laser pulse or an ultra-short relativistic charged particle beam. As the probe bunch traverses the wake, its momentum is modulated by the electric field of the wake, leading to a density variation of the probe after free-space propagation. This variation of probe density produces a snapshot of the wake that can directly give many useful information of the wake structure and its evolution. Furthermore, this snapshot allows detailed mapping of the longitudinal and transverse components of the wakefield. We develop a theoretical model for field reconstruction and verify it using 3-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This model can accurately reconstruct the wakefield structure in the linear regime, and it can also qualitatively map the major features of nonlinear wakes. The capturing of the injection in a nonlinear wake is demonstrated through 3D PIC simulations as an example of the application of this new method.

  11. Capturing relativistic wakefield structures in plasmas using ultrashort high-energy electrons as a probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C J; Hua, J F; Xu, X L; Li, F; Pai, C-H; Wan, Y; Wu, Y P; Gu, Y Q; Mori, W B; Joshi, C; Lu, W

    2016-01-01

    A new method capable of capturing coherent electric field structures propagating at nearly the speed of light in plasma with a time resolution as small as a few femtoseconds is proposed. This method uses a few femtoseconds long relativistic electron bunch to probe the wake produced in a plasma by an intense laser pulse or an ultra-short relativistic charged particle beam. As the probe bunch traverses the wake, its momentum is modulated by the electric field of the wake, leading to a density variation of the probe after free-space propagation. This variation of probe density produces a snapshot of the wake that can directly give many useful information of the wake structure and its evolution. Furthermore, this snapshot allows detailed mapping of the longitudinal and transverse components of the wakefield. We develop a theoretical model for field reconstruction and verify it using 3-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This model can accurately reconstruct the wakefield structure in the linear regime, and it can also qualitatively map the major features of nonlinear wakes. The capturing of the injection in a nonlinear wake is demonstrated through 3D PIC simulations as an example of the application of this new method. PMID:27403561

  12. Capturing relativistic wakefield structures in plasmas using ultrashort high-energy electrons as a probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C. J.; Hua, J. F.; Xu, X. L.; Li, F.; Pai, C.-H.; Wan, Y.; Wu, Y. P.; Gu, Y. Q.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.

    2016-01-01

    A new method capable of capturing coherent electric field structures propagating at nearly the speed of light in plasma with a time resolution as small as a few femtoseconds is proposed. This method uses a few femtoseconds long relativistic electron bunch to probe the wake produced in a plasma by an intense laser pulse or an ultra-short relativistic charged particle beam. As the probe bunch traverses the wake, its momentum is modulated by the electric field of the wake, leading to a density variation of the probe after free-space propagation. This variation of probe density produces a snapshot of the wake that can directly give many useful information of the wake structure and its evolution. Furthermore, this snapshot allows detailed mapping of the longitudinal and transverse components of the wakefield. We develop a theoretical model for field reconstruction and verify it using 3-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This model can accurately reconstruct the wakefield structure in the linear regime, and it can also qualitatively map the major features of nonlinear wakes. The capturing of the injection in a nonlinear wake is demonstrated through 3D PIC simulations as an example of the application of this new method. PMID:27403561

  13. LCLS X-Ray FEL Output Performance in the Presence of HighlyTime-Dependent Undulator Wakefields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bane, Karl L.F.; Emma, Paul; Huang, Heinz-Dieter Nuhn; Stupakov,Gennady; Fawley, William M.; Reiche, Sven

    2005-08-25

    Energy loss due to wakefields within a long undulator, if not compensated by an appropriate tapering of the magnetic field strength, can degrade the FEL process by detuning the resonant FEL frequency. The wakefields arise from the vacuum chamber wall resistivity, its surface roughness, and abrupt changes in its aperture. For LCLS parameters, the resistive-wall component is the most critical and depends upon the chamber material (e.g., Cu) and its radius. Of recent interest[1] is the so-called ''AC'' component of the resistive-wall wake which can lead to strong variations on very short timescales (e.g., {approx} 20 0fs). To study the expected performance of the LCLS in the presence of these wakefields, we have made an extensive series of start-to-end SASE simulations with tracking codes PARMELA and ELEGANT, and time-dependent FEL simulation codes GENESIS1.3 and GINGER. We discuss the impact of the wakefield losses upon output energy, spectral bandwidth, and temporal envelope of the output FEL pulse, as well as the benefits of a partial compensation of the time-dependent wake losses obtained with a slight z-dependent taper in the undulator field. We compare the taper results to those predicted analytically[2].

  14. LCLS X-Ray FEL Output Performance in the Presence of Highly Time-Dependent Undulator Wakefields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fawley, W.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Bane, K.L.F.; Emma, P.; Huang, Z.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC; Reiche, S.; /UCLA

    2005-09-30

    Energy loss due to wakefields within a long undulator, if not compensated by an appropriate tapering of the magnetic field strength, can degrade the FEL process by detuning the resonant FEL frequency. The wakefields arise from the vacuum chamber wall resistivity, its surface roughness, and abrupt changes in its aperture. For LCLS parameters, the resistive-wall component is the most critical and depends upon the chamber material (e.g., Cu) and its radius. Of recent interest[1] is the so-called ''AC'' component of the resistive-wall wake which can lead to strong variations on very short timescales (e.g., {approx} 20 fs). To study the expected performance of the LCLS in the presence of these wakefields, we have made an extensive series of start-to-end SASE simulations with tracking codes PARMELA and ELEGANT, and time-dependent FEL simulation codes GENESIS1.3 and GINGER. We discuss the impact of the wakefield losses upon output energy, spectral bandwidth, and temporal envelope of the output FEL pulse, as well as the benefits of a partial compensation of the time-dependent wake losses obtained with a slight z-dependent taper in the undulator field. We compare the taper results to those predicted analytically[2].

  15. Optimization of the LCLS X-Ray FEL Output Performance in the Presence of Strong Undulator Wakefields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiche, S.; /UCLA; Bane, K.L.F.; Emma, P.; Huang, Z.; Nuhn, H.D.; Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC; Fawley, W.M.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2006-03-17

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Free-Electron Laser will operate in the wavelength range of 1.5 to 15 Angstroms. Energy loss due to wakefields within the long undulator can degrade the FEL process by detuning the resonant FEL frequency. The wakefields arise from the vacuum chamber wall resistivity, its surface roughness, and abrupt changes in its aperture. For LCLS parameters, the resistive component is the most critical and depends upon the chamber material (e.g. Cu) and its radius. To study the expected performance in the presence of these wakefields, we make a series of start-to-end simulations with tracking codes PARMELA and ELEGANT and time-dependent FEL simulation codes Genesis 1.3 and Ginger. We discuss the impact of the wakefield on output energy, spectral bandwidth, and temporal envelope of the output FEL pulse, as well as the benefits of a partial compensation obtained with a slight z dependent taper in the undulator field. We compare these results to those obtained by decreasing the bunch charge or increasing the vacuum chamber radius. We also compare our results to those predicted in concurrent analytical work.

  16. Surviving to tell the tale : Argonne's Intense Pulsed Neutron Source from an ecosystem perspective.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westfall, C.; Office of The Director

    2010-07-01

    At first glance the story of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), an accelerator-driven neutron source for exploring the structure of materials through neutron scattering, seems to be one of puzzling ups and downs. For example, Argonne management, Department of Energy officials, and materials science reviewers continued to offer, then withdraw, votes of confidence even though the middling-sized IPNS produced high-profile research, including work that made the cover of Nature in 1987. In the midst of this period of shifting opinion and impressive research results, some Argonne materials scientists were unenthusiastic, members of the laboratory's energy physics group were key supporters, and materials scientists at another laboratory provided, almost fortuitously, a new lease on life. What forces shaped the puzzling life cycle of the IPNS? And what role - if any - did the moderate price tag and the development of scientific and technological ideas play in the course it took? To answer these questions this paper looks to an ecosystem metaphor for inspiration, exploring how opinions, ideas, and machinery emerged from the interrelated resource economies of Argonne, the DOE, and the materials science community by way of a tangled web of shifting group interactions. The paper will conclude with reflections about what the resulting focus on relationality explains about the IPNS story as well as the underlying dynamic that animates knowledge production at U.S. national laboratories.

  17. Laser accelerator

    OpenAIRE

    Vigil, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited In 1979,W. B. Colson and S. K. Ride proposed a new kind of electron accelerator using a uniform magnetic field in combination with a circularly-polarized laser field. A key concept is to couple the oscillating electric field to the electron’s motion so that acceleration is sustained. This dissertation investigates the performance of the proposed laser accelerator using modern high powered lasers and mag-netic fields that are significan...

  18. Argonne National Laboratory institutional plan FY 2001--FY 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beggs, S.D.

    2000-12-07

    This Institutional Plan describes what Argonne management regards as the optimal future development of Laboratory activities. The document outlines the development of both research programs and support operations in the context of the nation's R and D priorities, the missions of the Department of Energy (DOE) and Argonne, and expected resource constraints. The Draft Institutional Plan is the product of many discussions between DOE and Argonne program managers, and it also reflects programmatic priorities developed during Argonne's summer strategic planning process. That process serves additionally to identify new areas of strategic value to DOE and Argonne, to which Laboratory Directed Research and Development funds may be applied. The Draft Plan is provided to the Department before Argonne's On-Site Review. Issuance of the final Institutional Plan in the fall, after further comment and discussion, marks the culmination of the Laboratory's annual planning cycle. Chapter II of this Institutional Plan describes Argonne's missions and roles within the DOE laboratory system, its underlying core competencies in science and technology, and six broad planning objectives whose achievement is considered critical to the future of the Laboratory. Chapter III presents the Laboratory's ''Science and Technology Strategic Plan,'' which summarizes key features of the external environment, presents Argonne's vision, and describes how Argonne's strategic goals and objectives support DOE's four business lines. The balance of Chapter III comprises strategic plans for 23 areas of science and technology at Argonne, grouped according to the four DOE business lines. The Laboratory's 14 major initiatives, presented in Chapter IV, propose important advances in key areas of fundamental science and technology development. The ''Operations and Infrastructure Strategic Plan'' in Chapter V includes

  19. Electron self-injection for the acceleration in laser-pulse-wakes in the presence of a `strong' external magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Zhidkov, A; Masuda, S; Oishi, Y; Fujii, T; Kodama, R

    2012-01-01

    An external static magnetic field with its strength B~10T may result in the laser wake wave-breaking upon changing the electron motion in the vicinity of maximal density ramp of a wave period. This, as shown by numerical simulations, can change the resonance character of the electron self-injection in the laser wake-field; a total charge loaded in the acceleration phase of laser pulse wake can be controlled by a proper choice of the magnetic field strength.

  20. Resonantly excited betatron hard X-Rays from Ionization Injected Electron Beam in a Laser Plasma Accelerator

    OpenAIRE

    K. Huang; Chen, L. M.; Y. F. Li; D.Z. Li; M. Z. Tao; M. Mirzaie; Y. Ma; J. R. Zhao; M. H. Li; M. Chen; Hafz, N.; Sokollik, T.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2015-01-01

    A new scheme for bright hard x-ray emission from laser wakefield electron accelerator is reported, where pure nitrogen gas is adopted. Intense Betatron x-ray beams are generated from ionization injected K-shell electrons of nitrogen into the accelerating wave bucket. The x-ray radiation shows synchrotron-like spectrum with total photon yield 8$\\times$10$^8$/shot and $10^8$ over 110keV. In particular, the betatron hard x-ray photon yield is 10 times higher compared to the case of helium gas un...

  1. LIBO accelerates

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The prototype module of LIBO, a linear accelerator project designed for cancer therapy, has passed its first proton-beam acceleration test. In parallel a new version - LIBO-30 - is being developed, which promises to open up even more interesting avenues.

  2. Self-mapping the longitudinal field structure of a nonlinear plasma accelerator cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, C. E.; Adli, E.; Allen, J.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Corde, S.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Xu, X.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-08-01

    The preservation of emittance of the accelerating beam is the next challenge for plasma-based accelerators envisioned for future light sources and colliders. The field structure of a highly nonlinear plasma wake is potentially suitable for this purpose but has not been yet measured. Here we show that the longitudinal variation of the fields in a nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator cavity produced by a relativistic electron bunch can be mapped using the bunch itself as a probe. We find that, for much of the cavity that is devoid of plasma electrons, the transverse force is constant longitudinally to within +/-3% (r.m.s.). Moreover, comparison of experimental data and simulations has resulted in mapping of the longitudinal electric field of the unloaded wake up to 83 GV m-1 to a similar degree of accuracy. These results bode well for high-gradient, high-efficiency acceleration of electron bunches while preserving their emittance in such a cavity.

  3. 3D printing of gas jet nozzles for laser-plasma accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döpp, A; Guillaume, E; Thaury, C; Gautier, J; Ta Phuoc, K; Malka, V

    2016-07-01

    Recent results on laser wakefield acceleration in tailored plasma channels have underlined the importance of controlling the density profile of the gas target. In particular, it was reported that the appropriate density tailoring can result in improved injection, acceleration, and collimation of laser-accelerated electron beams. To achieve such profiles, innovative target designs are required. For this purpose, we have reviewed the usage of additive layer manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, in order to produce gas jet nozzles. Notably we have compared the performance of two industry standard techniques, namely, selective laser sintering (SLS) and stereolithography (SLA). Furthermore we have used the common fused deposition modeling to reproduce basic gas jet designs and used SLA and SLS for more sophisticated nozzle designs. The nozzles are characterized interferometrically and used for electron acceleration experiments with the Salle Jaune terawatt laser at Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée. PMID:27475557

  4. 3D printing of gas jet nozzles for laser-plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Döpp, A; Thaury, C; Gautier, J; Phuoc, K Ta; Malka, V

    2016-01-01

    Recent results on laser wakefield acceleration in tailored plasma channels have underlined the importance of controlling the density profile of the gas target. In particular it was reported that appropriate density tailoring can result in improved injection, acceleration and collimation of laser-accelerated electron beams. To achieve such profiles innovative target designs are required. For this purpose we have reviewed the usage of additive layer manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, in order to produce gas jet nozzles. Notably we have compared the performance of two industry standard techniques, namely selective laser sintering (SLS) and stereolithography (SLA). Furthermore we have used the common fused deposition modeling (FDM) to reproduce basic gas jet designs and used SLA and SLS for more sophisticated nozzle designs. The nozzles are characterized interferometrically and used for electron acceleration experiments with the Salle Jaune terawatt laser at Laboratoire d'Optique Appliqu\\'ee.

  5. 3D printing of gas jet nozzles for laser-plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döpp, A.; Guillaume, E.; Thaury, C.; Gautier, J.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Malka, V.

    2016-07-01

    Recent results on laser wakefield acceleration in tailored plasma channels have underlined the importance of controlling the density profile of the gas target. In particular, it was reported that the appropriate density tailoring can result in improved injection, acceleration, and collimation of laser-accelerated electron beams. To achieve such profiles, innovative target designs are required. For this purpose, we have reviewed the usage of additive layer manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, in order to produce gas jet nozzles. Notably we have compared the performance of two industry standard techniques, namely, selective laser sintering (SLS) and stereolithography (SLA). Furthermore we have used the common fused deposition modeling to reproduce basic gas jet designs and used SLA and SLS for more sophisticated nozzle designs. The nozzles are characterized interferometrically and used for electron acceleration experiments with the Salle Jaune terawatt laser at Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée.

  6. Observation of longitudinal and transverse self-injections in laser-plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corde, S.; Thaury, C.; Lifschitz, A.; Lambert, G.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Davoine, X.; Lehe, R.; Douillet, D.; Rousse, A.; Malka, V.

    2013-02-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators can produce high-quality electron beams, up to giga electronvolts in energy, from a centimetre scale device. The properties of the electron beams and the accelerator stability are largely determined by the injection stage of electrons into the accelerator. The simplest mechanism of injection is self-injection, in which the wakefield is strong enough to trap cold plasma electrons into the laser wake. The main drawback of this method is its lack of shot-to-shot stability. Here we present experimental and numerical results that demonstrate the existence of two different self-injection mechanisms. Transverse self-injection is shown to lead to low stability and poor-quality electron beams, because of a strong dependence on the intensity profile of the laser pulse. In contrast, longitudinal injection, which is unambiguously observed for the first time, is shown to lead to much more stable acceleration and higher-quality electron beams.

  7. Observation of longitudinal and transverse self-injections in laser-plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Corde, S; Lifschitz, A; Lambert, G; Phuoc, K Ta; Davoine, X; Lehe, R; Douillet, D; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators can produce high quality electron beams, up to giga-electronvolts in energy, from a centimeter scale device. The properties of the electron beams and the accelerator stability are largely determined by the injection stage of electrons into the accelerator. The simplest mechanism of injection is self-injection, in which the wakefield is strong enough to trap cold plasma electrons into the laser wake. The main drawback of this method is its lack of shot-to-shot stability. Here we present experimental and numerical results that demonstrate the existence of two different self-injection mechanisms. Transverse self-injection is shown to lead to low stability and poor quality electron beams, because of a strong dependence on the intensity profile of the laser pulse. In contrast, longitudinal injection, which is unambiguously observed for the first time, is shown to lead to much more stable acceleration and higher quality electron beams.

  8. The Argonne beamline-B telescope control system: A study of adaptability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A beam-expanding telescope to study high-precision H- particle optics and beam sensing was designed by the Accelerator Technology Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory and will be installed on beamline-B at Argonne National Laboratory. The control system for this telescope was developed in a relatively short period of time using experience gained from building the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) control system. The designers modified hardware and software to take advantage of new technology as well as to meet the requirements of the new system. This paper discusses lessons learned in the process of adapting hardware and software from an existing control system to one with rather different requirements

  9. Tiger team assessment of the Argonne Illinois site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-19

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Tiger Team Assessment of the Argonne Illinois Site (AIS) (including the DOE Chicago Operations Office, DOE Argonne Area Office, Argonne National Laboratory-East, and New Brunswick Laboratory) and Site A and Plot M, Argonne, Illinois, conducted from September 17 through October 19, 1990. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted by a team comprised of professionals from DOE, contractors, consultants. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) Programs at AIS. Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is the principal tenant at AIS. ANL-E is a multiprogram laboratory operated by the University of Chicago for DOE. The mission of ANL-E is to perform basic and applied research that supports the development of energy-related technologies. There are a significant number of ES H findings and concerns identified in the report that require prompt management attention. A significant change in culture is required before ANL-E can attain consistent and verifiable compliance with statutes, regulations and DOE Orders. ES H activities are informal, fragmented, and inconsistently implemented. Communication is seriously lacking, both vertically and horizontally. Management expectations are not known or commondated adequately, support is not consistent, and oversight is not effective.

  10. Tiger team assessment of the Argonne Illinois site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Tiger Team Assessment of the Argonne Illinois Site (AIS) (including the DOE Chicago Operations Office, DOE Argonne Area Office, Argonne National Laboratory-East, and New Brunswick Laboratory) and Site A and Plot M, Argonne, Illinois, conducted from September 17 through October 19, 1990. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted by a team comprised of professionals from DOE, contractors, consultants. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES ampersand H) Programs at AIS. Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is the principal tenant at AIS. ANL-E is a multiprogram laboratory operated by the University of Chicago for DOE. The mission of ANL-E is to perform basic and applied research that supports the development of energy-related technologies. There are a significant number of ES ampersand H findings and concerns identified in the report that require prompt management attention. A significant change in culture is required before ANL-E can attain consistent and verifiable compliance with statutes, regulations and DOE Orders. ES ampersand H activities are informal, fragmented, and inconsistently implemented. Communication is seriously lacking, both vertically and horizontally. Management expectations are not known or commondated adequately, support is not consistent, and oversight is not effective

  11. Preliminary Conceptual Design Report for the FACET-II Project at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Mark [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-04-22

    Plasma wakefield acceleration has the potential to dramatically shrink the size and cost of particle accelerators. Research at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has demonstrated that plasmas can provide 1,000 times the acceleration in a given distance compared with current technologies. Developing revolutionary and more efficient acceleration techniques that allow for an affordable high-energy collider is the focus of FACET, a National User Facility at SLAC. The existing FACET National User Facility uses part of SLAC’s two-mile-long linear accelerator to generate high-density beams of electrons and positrons. FACET-II is a new test facility to develop advanced acceleration and coherent radiation techniques with high-energy electron and positron beams. It is the only facility in the world with high energy positron beams. FACET-II provides a major upgrade over current FACET capabilities and the breadth of the potential research program makes it truly unique. It will synergistically pursue accelerator science that is vital to the future of both advanced acceleration techniques for High Energy Physics, ultra-high brightness beams for Basic Energy Science, and novel radiation sources for a wide variety of applications. The design parameters for FACET-II are set by the requirements of the plasma wakefield experimental program. To drive the plasma wakefield requires a high peak current, in excess of 10kA. To reach this peak current, the electron and positron design bunch size is 10μ by 10μ transversely with a bunch length of 10μ. This is more than 200 times better than what has been achieved at the existing FACET. The beam energy is 10 GeV, set by the Linac length available and the repetition rate is up to 30 Hz. The FACET-II project is scheduled to be constructed in three major stages. Components of the project discussed in detail include the following: electron injector, bunch compressors and linac, the positron system, the Sector 20 sailboat and W chicanes

  12. Physics Division Argonne National Laboratory description of the programs and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ANL Physics Division traces its roots to nuclear physics research at the University of Chicago around the time of the second world war. Following the move from the University of Chicago out to the present Argonne site and the formation of Argonne National Laboratory: the Physics Division has had a tradition of research into fundamental aspects of nuclear and atomic physics. Initially, the emphasis was on areas such as neutron physics, mass spectrometry, and theoretical studies of the nuclear shell model. Maria Goeppert Maier was an employee in the Physics Division during the time she did her Nobel-Prize-winning work on the nuclear shell model. These interests diversified and at the present time the research addresses a wide range of current problems in nuclear and atomic physics. The major emphasis of the current experimental nuclear physics research is in heavy-ion physics, centered around the ATLAS facility (Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System) with its new injector providing intense, energetic ion beams over the fill mass range up to uranium. ATLAS is a designated National User Facility and is based on superconducting radio-frequency technology developed in the Physics Division. A small program continues in accelerator development. In addition, the Division has a strong program in medium-energy nuclear physics carried out at a variety of major national and international facilities. The nuclear theory research in the Division spans a wide range of interests including nuclear dynamics with subnucleonic degrees of freedom, dynamics of many-nucleon systems, nuclear structure, and heavy-ion interactions. This research makes contact with experimental research programs in intermediate-energy and heavy-ion physics, both within the Division and on the national and international scale. The Physics Division traditionally has strong connections with the nation's universities. We have many visiting faculty members and we encourage students to participate in our

  13. Physics Division Argonne National Laboratory description of the programs and facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K.J. [ed.

    1999-05-24

    The ANL Physics Division traces its roots to nuclear physics research at the University of Chicago around the time of the second world war. Following the move from the University of Chicago out to the present Argonne site and the formation of Argonne National Laboratory: the Physics Division has had a tradition of research into fundamental aspects of nuclear and atomic physics. Initially, the emphasis was on areas such as neutron physics, mass spectrometry, and theoretical studies of the nuclear shell model. Maria Goeppert Maier was an employee in the Physics Division during the time she did her Nobel-Prize-winning work on the nuclear shell model. These interests diversified and at the present time the research addresses a wide range of current problems in nuclear and atomic physics. The major emphasis of the current experimental nuclear physics research is in heavy-ion physics, centered around the ATLAS facility (Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System) with its new injector providing intense, energetic ion beams over the fill mass range up to uranium. ATLAS is a designated National User Facility and is based on superconducting radio-frequency technology developed in the Physics Division. A small program continues in accelerator development. In addition, the Division has a strong program in medium-energy nuclear physics carried out at a variety of major national and international facilities. The nuclear theory research in the Division spans a wide range of interests including nuclear dynamics with subnucleonic degrees of freedom, dynamics of many-nucleon systems, nuclear structure, and heavy-ion interactions. This research makes contact with experimental research programs in intermediate-energy and heavy-ion physics, both within the Division and on the national and international scale. The Physics Division traditionally has strong connections with the nation's universities. We have many visiting faculty members and we encourage students to participate in our

  14. Measurement and analysis of the impact of transverse incoherent wakefields in a light source storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelle, P.; Nagaoka, R.; Sreedharan, R.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of incoherent wakefields arising from a high current beam circulating in a ring composed of many flat chambers on the beam is analyzed numerically and experimentally for the SOLEIL storage ring. Three distinct ranges of the excited field are studied: the long multiturn regime in multibunch fillings, the medium regime involving neighboring bunches, and the short intrabunch regime. Two theoretical models, which both take into account the field diffusion across chamber walls of finite thickness, are employed to compare the measurement with theoretical expectations. Specific experimental methods, based respectively upon orbit analysis, bunch-by-bunch transverse feedback and a single particle betatron resonance, are introduced to measure the incoherent focusing effect in the three regimes. It is found that the excited incoherent fields can be large enough to affect the ring performance. The non-negligible contribution of nonevaporable getter coating is shown to improve the agreement between measurements and calculations.

  15. Oscillating two-stream instability of laser wakefield-driven plasma wave

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nafis Ahmad; V K Tripathi; Moiz Ahmad; M Rafat

    2016-01-01

    The laser wakefield-driven plasma wave in a low-density plasma is seen to be susceptible to the oscillating two-stream instability (OTSI). The plasma wave couples to two short wavelength plasma wave sidebands. The pump plasma wave and sidebands exert a ponderomotive force on the electrons driving a low-frequency quasimode. The electron density perturbation associated with this mode couples with the pump-driven electron oscillatory velocity to produce nonlinear currents driving the sidebands. At large pump amplitude, the instability grows faster than the ion plasma frequency and ions do not play a significant role. The growth rate of the quasimode, at large pump amplitude scales faster than linear. The growth rate is maximum for an optimum wave number of the quasimode and also increases with pump amplitude. Nonlocal effects, however reduce the growth rate by about half.

  16. 激光尾波场中光子加速研究%Photon acceleration in the laser wakefield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王剑; 赵宗清; 谷渝秋; 蔡达峰; 焦春晔; 吴玉迟; 何颖玲; 滕建; 杨向东; 王磊

    2008-01-01

    在SILEX-Ⅰ激光装置上,测量了超短超强激光脉冲与稀薄等离子体相互作用之后的透射谱.实验中发现,激光尾波场产生的密度扰动导致等离子体折射率随时间空间不断变化,导致光子的加速/减速.透射谱上主要表现为激光频率谱峰的劈裂和随密度变化的展宽,没有发现与前向受激拉曼散射或自调制不稳定性相联系的边频波.同时,利用LPIC++无碰撞粒子模拟程序模拟了超短超强激光与稀薄等离子体相互作用后的透射谱,模拟结果也发现了明显的光子加速过程.

  17. On the phase velocity of plasma waves in a self-modulated laser wake-field accelerator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreev, N. E.; Kirsanov, V. I.; Sakharov, A. S.; van Amersfoort, P. W.; Goloviznin, V. V.

    1996-01-01

    The properties of the wake field excited by a flattop laser pulse with a sharp leading edge and a power below the critical one for relativistic self-focusing are studied analytically and numerically with emphasis on the phase velocity of the plasma wave. The paraxial model describing modulation of t

  18. The big and little of fifty years of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westfall, C.

    2005-09-20

    equipment that cost $100,000 by the 1970s alongside work at the $50 million Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS) and the $30 million Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR) II. Starting in the mid-1990s, Argonne physicists expanded their exploration of the properties of matter by employing a new type of Moessbauer spectroscopy--this time using synchrotron light sources such as Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (APS), which at $1 billion was the most expensive U.S. accelerator project of its time. Traditional Moessbauer spectroscopy looks superficially like prototypical ''Little Science'' and Moessbauer spectroscopy using synchrotrons looks like prototypical ''Big Science''. In addition, the growth from small to larger scale research seems to follow the pattern familiar from high energy physics even though the wide range of science performed using Moessbauer spectroscopy did not include high energy physics. But is the story of Moessbauer spectroscopy really like the tale told by high energy physicists and often echoed by historians? What do U.S. national laboratories, the ''Home'' of Big Science, have to offer small-scale research? And what does the story of the 50-year development of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne tell us about how knowledge is produced at large laboratories? In a recent analysis of the development of relativistic heavy ion science at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory I questioned whether it was wise for historians to speak in terms of ''Big Science'', pointing out at that Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory hosted large-scale projects at three scales, the grand scale of the Bevatron, the modest scale of the HILAC, and the mezzo scale of the combined machine, the Bevalac. I argue that using the term ''Big Science'', which was coined by participants, leads to a misleading preoccupation with the largest projects and the tendency to see the history of physics as the history

  19. Experimental evidence of nonthermal acceleration of relativistic electrons by an intensive laser pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramitsu, Y; Nakanii, N; Kondo, K; Sakawa, Y; Mori, Y; Miura, E; Tsuji, K; Kimura, K; Fukumochi, S; Kashihara, M; Tanimoto, T; Nakamura, H; Ishikura, T; Takeda, K; Tampo, M; Kodama, R; Kitagawa, Y; Mima, K; Tanaka, K A; Hoshino, M; Takabe, H

    2011-02-01

    Nonthermal acceleration of relativistic electrons is investigated with an intensive laser pulse. An energy distribution function of energetic particles in the universe or cosmic rays is well represented by a power-law spectrum, therefore, nonthermal acceleration is essential to understand the origin of cosmic rays. A possible candidate for the origin of cosmic rays is wakefield acceleration at relativistic astrophysical perpendicular shocks. The wakefield is considered to be excited by large-amplitude precursor light waves in the upstream of the shocks. Substituting an intensive laser pulse for the large amplitude light waves, we performed a model experiment of the shock environments in a laboratory plasma. An intensive laser pulse was propagated in a plasma tube created by imploding a hollow polystyrene cylinder, as the large amplitude light waves propagated in the upstream plasma at an astrophysical shock. Nonthermal electrons were generated, and the energy distribution functions of the electrons have a power-law component with an index of ~2. We described the detailed procedures to obtain the nonthermal components from data obtained by an electron spectrometer.

  20. Performance model of the Argonne Voyager multimedia server

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Disz, T.; Olson, R.; Stevens, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Mathematics and Computer Science Div.

    1997-07-01

    The Argonne Voyager Multimedia Server is being developed in the Futures Lab of the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. As a network-based service for recording and playing multimedia streams, it is important that the Voyager system be capable of sustaining certain minimal levels of performance in order for it to be a viable system. In this article, the authors examine the performance characteristics of the server. As they examine the architecture of the system, they try to determine where bottlenecks lie, show actual vs potential performance, and recommend areas for improvement through custom architectures and system tuning.

  1. Photographic as-builts for Argonne National Laboratory-West

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, E.K.; Wiegand, C.V.

    1995-04-19

    Located 35 miles West of Idaho Falls, Idaho, Argonne National Laboratory-West operates a number of nuclear facilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) through the University of Chicago. Part of the present mission of Argonne National Laboratory-West includes shutdown of the EBR-II Reactor. In order to accomplish this task the Engineering-Drafting Department is exploring cost effective methods of providing as-building services. A new technology of integrating photographic images and AUTOCAD drawing files is considered one of those methods that shows promise.

  2. Argonne's contribution to regional development : successful examples.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y. I.

    2000-11-14

    Argonne National Laboratory's mission is basic research and technology development to meet national goals in scientific leadership, energy technology, and environmental quality. In addition to its core missions as a national research and development center, Argonne has exerted a positive impact on its regional economic development, has carried out outstanding educational programs not only for college/graduate students but also for pre-college students and teachers, and has fostered partnerships with universities for research collaboration and with industry for shaping the new technological frontiers.

  3. Accelerated Ions from a Laser Driven Z-pinch

    CERN Document Server

    Helle, Michael H; Kaganovich, Dmitri; Chen, Yu-hsin; Palastro, John P; Ting, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Intense laser acceleration of ions is inherently difficult due to the velocity mismatch between laser pulses moving at the speed of light and slowly moving massive ions. Instead of directly accelerating the ions, current approaches rely on TV/m laser fields to ionize and drive out electrons. The ions are then accelerated by the resulting electrostatic fields from charge separation. Here we report experimental and numerical acceleration of ions by means of laser driven Z-pinch exiting a sharp plasma interface. This is achieved by first driving a plasma wakefield in the self-modulated bubble regime. Cold return currents are generated to maintain quasi-neutrality of the plasma. The opposite current repel and form an axial fast current and a cylindrical-shell cold return current with a large (100 MG) azithmuthal field in between. These conditions produce a Z-pinch that compresses the fast electrons and ions on axis. If this process is terminated at a sharp plasma interface, a beam of ions are then accelerated in ...

  4. Argonne Leadership Computing Facility 2011 annual report : Shaping future supercomputing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papka, M.; Messina, P.; Coffey, R.; Drugan, C. (LCF)

    2012-08-16

    The ALCF's Early Science Program aims to prepare key applications for the architecture and scale of Mira and to solidify libraries and infrastructure that will pave the way for other future production applications. Two billion core-hours have been allocated to 16 Early Science projects on Mira. The projects, in addition to promising delivery of exciting new science, are all based on state-of-the-art, petascale, parallel applications. The project teams, in collaboration with ALCF staff and IBM, have undertaken intensive efforts to adapt their software to take advantage of Mira's Blue Gene/Q architecture, which, in a number of ways, is a precursor to future high-performance-computing architecture. The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) enables transformative science that solves some of the most difficult challenges in biology, chemistry, energy, climate, materials, physics, and other scientific realms. Users partnering with ALCF staff have reached research milestones previously unattainable, due to the ALCF's world-class supercomputing resources and expertise in computation science. In 2011, the ALCF's commitment to providing outstanding science and leadership-class resources was honored with several prestigious awards. Research on multiscale brain blood flow simulations was named a Gordon Bell Prize finalist. Intrepid, the ALCF's BG/P system, ranked No. 1 on the Graph 500 list for the second consecutive year. The next-generation BG/Q prototype again topped the Green500 list. Skilled experts at the ALCF enable researchers to conduct breakthrough science on the Blue Gene system in key ways. The Catalyst Team matches project PIs with experienced computational scientists to maximize and accelerate research in their specific scientific domains. The Performance Engineering Team facilitates the effective use of applications on the Blue Gene system by assessing and improving the algorithms used by applications and the techniques used to

  5. Radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches: Coherent terahertz and femtosecond X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron beam based radiation sources provide electromagnetic radiation for countless applications. The properties of the radiation are primarily determined by the properties of the electron beam. Compact laser driven accelerators are being developed that can provide ultra-short electron bunches (femtosecond duration) with relativistic energies reaching towards a GeV. The electron bunches are produced when an intense laser interacts with a dense plasma and excites a large amplitude plasma density modulation (wakefield) that can trap background electrons and accelerate them to high energies. The short pulse nature of the accelerated bunches and high particle energy offer the possibility of generating radiation from one compact source that ranges from coherent terahertz to gamma rays. The intrinsic synchronization to a laser pulse and unique character of the radiation offers a wide range of possibilities for scientific applications. Two particular radiation source regimes are discussed: Coherent terahertz emission and x-ray emission based on betatron oscillations and Thomson scattering

  6. Astrophysical ZeV acceleration in the relativistic jet from an accreting supermassive blackhole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu; Tajima, Toshiki

    2014-04-01

    An accreting supermassive blackhole, the central engine of active galactic nucleus (AGN), is capable of exciting extreme amplitude Alfven waves whose wavelength (wave packet) size is characterized by its clumpiness. The pondermotive force and wakefield are driven by these Alfven waves propagating in the AGN (blazar) jet, and accelerate protons/nuclei to extreme energies beyond Zetta-electron volt (ZeV=1021 eV). Such acceleration is prompt, localized, and does not suffer from the multiple scattering/bending enveloped in the Fermi acceleration that causes excessive synchrotron radiation loss beyond 1019 eV. The production rate of ZeV cosmic rays is found to be consistent with the observed gamma-ray luminosity function of blazars and their time variabilities.

  7. Particle-in-cell Modeling Of Plasma-based Accelerators In Two And Three Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Hemker, R J

    2000-01-01

    In this dissertation, a fully object-oriented, fully relativistic, multidimensional Particle-In-Cell code was developed and applied to answer key questions in plasma- based accelerator research. The simulations increase the understanding of the processes in laser plasma and beam- plasma interaction, allow for comparison with experiments, and motivate the development of theoretical models. The simulations support the idea that the injection of electrons in a plasma wave by using a transversely propagating laser pulse is possible. The beam parameters of the injected electrons found in the simulations compare reasonably with beams produced by conventional methods and therefore laser injection is an interesting concept for future plasma-based accelerators. Simulations of long laser pulses, such as the ones used in self- modulated laser wakefield acceleration, predict the existence of a hosing instability with a wavelength longer than the plasma wavelength. It is found that this effect might increase the emittance...

  8. Proceedings of the 18. international linear accelerator conference (Linac96). V.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These Proceedings cover the whole field of linear accelerators, from its original and continuing role in particle physics research to the wide range of applications found today in many other disciplines and technologies. The contributions were deliberately spread among the different conference sessions in order to maintain a broad interest. The topics covered include: the design, construction and control of linear accelerators and the associated technology; dedicated test facilities, injection, wakefields, bunching, halo, dynamics, radio-frequency (RF), electron and ion accelerators, (laser) ion sources; active alignment, beam steering and spot size; simulation, monitoring and diagnostics; a description of the performance and current status of many machines, including proposed ones such as CLIC, the NLC and TESLA; applications to medical diagnosis and radiotherapy; use in the treatment and sterilisation of materials (including food) and in the reprocessing of radioactive waste; use as potential suppliers of energy. (author)

  9. Radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches: Coherent terahertz and femtosecond X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemans, W.P.; Esarey, E.; van Tilborg, J.; Michel, P.A.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2004-10-01

    Electron beam based radiation sources provide electromagnetic radiation for countless applications. The properties of the radiation are primarily determined by the properties of the electron beam. Compact laser driven accelerators are being developed that can provide ultra-short electron bunches (femtosecond duration) with relativistic energies reaching towards a GeV. The electron bunches are produced when an intense laser interacts with a dense plasma and excites a large amplitude plasma density modulation (wakefield) that can trap background electrons and accelerate them to high energies. The short pulse nature of the accelerated bunches and high particle energy offer the possibility of generating radiation from one compact source that ranges from coherent terahertz to gamma rays. The intrinsic synchronization to a laser pulse and unique character of the radiation offers a wide range of possibilities for scientific applications. Two particular radiation source regimes are discussed: Coherent terahertz emission and x-ray emission based on betatron oscillations and Thomson scattering.

  10. Plasma Dark Current in Self-ionized Plasma Wake Field Accelerators (PWFA)

    CERN Document Server

    Oz, Erdem; Clayton, Chris; Decker, Franz Josef; Deng, Suzhi; Hogan, Mark; Huang Cheng Kun; Iverson, Richard; Johnson, Devon K; Joshi, Chandrashekhar; Katsouleas, Thomas C; Krejcik, Patrick; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth; Mori, Warren; Muggli, Patric; Siemann, Robert; Walz, Dieter; Zhou, Miaomiao

    2005-01-01

    Particle trapping is investigated with experiment, theory and simulations for conditions relevant to beam driven Plasma Wake Field Accelerators. Such trapping produces plasma dark current when the wakefield aplitude is above a threshold values and may place a limit on the maximum acceleration gradient in a PWFA. Trapping and dark current are enhanced when in an ionizing plasma, that is self-ionized by the beam as well as in gradual density gradients. In the E164X conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center by a collaboration of USC, UCLA and SLAC, evidence of trapping has been observed. Here we present experimental results and a simplified analytical model of the particle trapping threshold which is compared to simulations done with an object oriented fully parallel 3-D PIC code OSIRIS.

  11. How Argonne's Intense Pulsed Neutron Source came to life and gained its niche : the view from an ecosystem perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At first glance the story of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) appears to have followed a puzzling course. When researchers first proposed their ideas for an accelerator-driven neutron source for exploring the structure of materials through neutron scattering, the project seemed so promising that both Argonne managers and officials at the laboratory's funding agency, the Department of Energy (DOE), suggested that it be made larger and more expensive. But then, even though prototype building, testing, and initial construction went well a group of prominent DOE reviewers recommended in fall 1980 that it be killed, just months before it had been slated to begin operation, and DOE promptly accepted the recommendation. In response, Argonne's leadership declared the project was the laboratory's top priority and rallied to save it. In late 1982, thanks to another review panel led by the same scientist who had chaired the panel that had delivered the death sentence, the project was granted a reprieve. However, by the late 1980s, the IPNS was no longer top priority within the international materials science community, at Argonne, or within the DOE budget because prospects for another, larger materials science accelerator emerged. At just this point, the facility started to produce exciting scientific results. For the next two decades, the IPNS, its research, and its experts became valued resources at Argonne, within the U.S. national laboratory system, and within the international materials science community. Why did this Argonne project prosper and then almost suffer premature death, even though it promised (and later delivered) good science? How was it saved and how did it go on to have a long, prosperous life for more than a quarter of a century? In particular, what did an expert assessment of the quality of IPNS science have to do with its fate? Getting answers to such questions is important. The U.S. government spends a lot

  12. Magnetically Controlled Optical Plasma Waveguide for Electron Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, B B; Froula, D H; Tynan, G R; Divol, L; Davis, P; Palastro, J P; Price, D; Glenzer, S H

    2008-08-28

    In order to produce multi-Gev electrons from Laser Wakefield Accelerators, we present a technique to guide high power laser beams through underdense plasma. Experimental results from the Jupiter Laser Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that show density channels with minimum plasma densities below 5 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} are presented. These results are obtained using an external magnetic field (<5 T) to limit the radial heat flux from a pre-forming laser beam. The resulting increased plasma pressure gradient produces a parabolic density gradient which is tunable by changing the external magnetic field strength. These results are compared with 1-D hydrodynamic simulations, while quasi-static kinetic simulations show that for these channel conditions 90% of the energy in a 150 TW short pulse beam is guided over 5 cm and predict electron energy gains of 3 GeV.

  13. Three Argonne technologies win R&D 100 awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Three technologies developed or co-developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have been recognized with R&D 100 Awards, which highlight some of the best products and technologies from around the world" (1 page).

  14. Argonne to open new facility for advanced vehicle testing

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory will open it's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility on Friday, Nov. 15. The facility is North America's only public testing facility for engines, fuel cells, electric drives and energy storage. State-of-the-art performance and emissions measurement equipment is available to support model development and technology validation (1 page).

  15. Brookhaven Lab and Argonne Lab scientists invent a plasma valve

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory have received U.S. patent number 6,528,948 for a device that shuts off airflow into a vacuum about one million times faster than mechanical valves or shutters that are currently in use (1 page).

  16. Argonne National Laboratory Publications July 1, 1968 - June 30, 1969.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1969-08-01

    This publication list is a bibliography of scientific and technical accounts originated at Argonne and published during the fiscal year 1969 (July 1, 1968 through June 30, 1969). It includes items published as journal articles, technical reports, books, etc., all of which have been made available to the public.

  17. Argonne Laboratory Computing Resource Center - FY2004 Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R.

    2005-04-14

    In the spring of 2002, Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center, and in April 2003 LCRC began full operations with Argonne's first teraflops computing cluster. The LCRC's driving mission is to enable and promote computational science and engineering across the Laboratory, primarily by operating computing facilities and supporting application use and development. This report describes the scientific activities, computing facilities, and usage in the first eighteen months of LCRC operation. In this short time LCRC has had broad impact on programs across the Laboratory. The LCRC computing facility, Jazz, is available to the entire Laboratory community. In addition, the LCRC staff provides training in high-performance computing and guidance on application usage, code porting, and algorithm development. All Argonne personnel and collaborators are encouraged to take advantage of this computing resource and to provide input into the vision and plans for computing and computational analysis at Argonne. Steering for LCRC comes from the Computational Science Advisory Committee, composed of computing experts from many Laboratory divisions. The CSAC Allocations Committee makes decisions on individual project allocations for Jazz.

  18. Accelerator operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This section is concerned with the operation of both the tandem-linac system and the Dynamitron, two accelerators that are used for entirely different research. Developmental activities associated with the tandem and the Dynamitron are also treated here, but developmental activities associated with the superconducting linac are covered separately because this work is a program of technology development in its own right

  19. Argonne's Laboratory computing resource center : 2006 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R. B.; Kaushik, D. K.; Riley, K. R.; Valdes, J. V.; Drugan, C. D.; Pieper, G. P.

    2007-05-31

    Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) in the spring of 2002 to help meet pressing program needs for computational modeling, simulation, and analysis. The guiding mission is to provide critical computing resources that accelerate the development of high-performance computing expertise, applications, and computations to meet the Laboratory's challenging science and engineering missions. In September 2002 the LCRC deployed a 350-node computing cluster from Linux NetworX to address Laboratory needs for mid-range supercomputing. This cluster, named 'Jazz', achieved over a teraflop of computing power (10{sup 12} floating-point calculations per second) on standard tests, making it the Laboratory's first terascale computing system and one of the 50 fastest computers in the world at the time. Jazz was made available to early users in November 2002 while the system was undergoing development and configuration. In April 2003, Jazz was officially made available for production operation. Since then, the Jazz user community has grown steadily. By the end of fiscal year 2006, there were 76 active projects on Jazz involving over 380 scientists and engineers. These projects represent a wide cross-section of Laboratory expertise, including work in biosciences, chemistry, climate, computer science, engineering applications, environmental science, geoscience, information science, materials science, mathematics, nanoscience, nuclear engineering, and physics. Most important, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. The LCRC continues to foster growth in the computational science and engineering capability and quality at the Laboratory. Specific goals include expansion of the use of Jazz to new disciplines and Laboratory initiatives, teaming with Laboratory infrastructure providers to offer more scientific data management capabilities, expanding Argonne staff

  20. Argonne's Laboratory Computing Resource Center : 2005 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R. B.; Coghlan, S. C; Kaushik, D. K.; Riley, K. R.; Valdes, J. V.; Pieper, G. P.

    2007-06-30

    Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center in the spring of 2002 to help meet pressing program needs for computational modeling, simulation, and analysis. The guiding mission is to provide critical computing resources that accelerate the development of high-performance computing expertise, applications, and computations to meet the Laboratory's challenging science and engineering missions. The first goal of the LCRC was to deploy a mid-range supercomputing facility to support the unmet computational needs of the Laboratory. To this end, in September 2002, the Laboratory purchased a 350-node computing cluster from Linux NetworX. This cluster, named 'Jazz', achieved over a teraflop of computing power (10{sup 12} floating-point calculations per second) on standard tests, making it the Laboratory's first terascale computing system and one of the fifty fastest computers in the world at the time. Jazz was made available to early users in November 2002 while the system was undergoing development and configuration. In April 2003, Jazz was officially made available for production operation. Since then, the Jazz user community has grown steadily. By the end of fiscal year 2005, there were 62 active projects on Jazz involving over 320 scientists and engineers. These projects represent a wide cross-section of Laboratory expertise, including work in biosciences, chemistry, climate, computer science, engineering applications, environmental science, geoscience, information science, materials science, mathematics, nanoscience, nuclear engineering, and physics. Most important, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. The LCRC continues to improve the computational science and engineering capability and quality at the Laboratory. Specific goals include expansion of the use of Jazz to new disciplines and Laboratory initiatives, teaming with Laboratory infrastructure

  1. Multipactor Physics, Acceleration, and Breakdown in Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Richard P. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Gold, Steven H. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this 3-year program is to study the physics issues associated with rf acceleration in dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures, with a focus on the key issue of multipactor loading, which has been found to cause very significant rf power loss in DLA structures whenever the rf pulsewidth exceeds the multipactor risetime (~10 ns). The experiments are carried out in the X-band magnicon laboratory at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Euclid Techlabs LLC, who develop the test structures with support from the DoE SBIR program. There are two main elements in the research program: (1) high-power tests of DLA structures using the magnicon output (20 MW @11.4 GHz), and (2) tests of electron acceleration in DLA structures using relativistic electrons from a compact X-band accelerator. The work during this period has focused on a study of the use of an axial magnetic field to suppress multipactor in DLA structures, with several new high power tests carried out at NRL, and on preparation of the accelerator for the electron acceleration experiments.

  2. Optimizing the configuration of a superconducting photonic band gap accelerator cavity to increase the maximum achievable gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Kurennoy, Sergey S.; O'Hara, James F.; Olivas, Eric R.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.

    2014-02-01

    We present a design of a superconducting rf photonic band gap (SRF PBG) accelerator cell with specially shaped rods in order to reduce peak surface magnetic fields and improve the effectiveness of the PBG structure for suppression of higher order modes (HOMs). The ability of PBG structures to suppress long-range wakefields is especially beneficial for superconducting electron accelerators for high power free-electron lasers (FELs), which are designed to provide high current continuous duty electron beams. Using PBG structures to reduce the prominent beam-breakup phenomena due to HOMs will allow significantly increased beam-breakup thresholds. As a result, there will be possibilities for increasing the operation frequency of SRF accelerators and for the development of novel compact high-current accelerator modules for the FELs.

  3. Controlled Electron Injection into Plasma Accelerators and Space Charge Estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma based accelerators are capable of producing electron sources which are ultra-compact (a few microns) and high energies (up to hundreds of MeVs) in much shorter distances than conventional accelerators. This is due to the large longitudinal electric field that can be excited without the limitation of breakdown as in RF structures.The characteristic scale length of the accelerating field is the plasma wavelength and for typical densities ranging from 1018 - 1019 cm-3, the accelerating fields and scale length can hence be on the order of 10-100GV/m and 10-40 mu m, respectively. The production of quasimonoenergetic beams was recently obtained in a regime relying on self-trapping of background plasma electrons, using a single laser pulse for wakefield generation. In this dissertation, we study the controlled injection via the beating of two lasers (the pump laser pulse creating the plasma wave and a second beam being propagated in opposite direction) which induce a localized injection of background plasma electrons. The aim of this dissertation is to describe in detail the physics of optical injection using two lasers, the characteristics of the electron beams produced (the micrometer scale plasma wavelength can result in femtosecond and even attosecond bunches) as well as a concise estimate of the effects of space charge on the dynamics of an ultra-dense electron bunch with a large energy spread

  4. Investigation of the vertical instability at the Argonne Intense Pulsed Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaoheng; Dooling, J. C.; Harkay, K. C.; Kustom, R. L.; McMichael, G. E.

    2009-10-01

    The rapid cycling synchrotron of the intense pulsed neutron source at Argonne National Laboratory normally operates at an average beam current of 14 to 15μA, accelerating protons from 50 to 450 MeV 30 times per second. The beam current is limited by a single-bunch vertical instability that occurs in the later part of the 14 ms acceleration cycle. By analyzing turn-by-turn beam position monitor data, two cases of vertical beam centroid oscillations were discovered. The oscillations start from the tail of the bunch, build up, and develop toward the head of the bunch. The development stops near the bunch center and oscillations remain localized in the tail for a relatively long time (2-4 ms, 1-2×104 turns). This vertical instability is identified as the cause of the beam loss. We compared this instability with a head-tail instability that was purposely induced by switching off sextupole magnets. It appears that the observed vertical instability is different from the classical head-tail instability.

  5. KEKB accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KEKB, the B-Factory at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) recently achieved the luminosity of 1 x 1034 cm-2s-1. This luminosity is two orders higher than the world's level at 1990 when the design of KEKB started. This unprecedented result was made possible by KEKB's innovative design and technology in three aspects - beam focusing optics, high current storage, and beam - beam interaction. Now KEKB is leading the luminosity frontier of the colliders in the world. (author)

  6. A 50-MeV mm-wave electron linear accelerator system for production of tunable short wavelength synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Wisconsin at Madison is developing a new millimeter wavelength, 50-MeV electron linear accelerator system for production of coherent tunable wavelength synchrotron radiation. Modern micromachining techniques based on deep etch x-ray lithography, LIGA (Lithografie, Galvanoformung, Abformung), capable of producing high-aspect ratio structures are being considered for the fabrication of the accelerating components

  7. Real-time diagnostic for charging and damage of dielectrics in accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchelkunov, S. V.; Marshall, T. C.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the progress made during the initial stage of our research to study charging rate and charge distribution in a thin walled dielectric wakefield accelerator (DWA) from a passing charge bunch and the physics of conductivity and discharge phenomena in dielectric materials useful in accelerator applications. The issue is the role played by the beam halo and intense wakefields in charging the dielectric, possibly leading to undesired deflection of charge bunches and degradation of the dielectric material: the effects that may grow over many pulses, albeit perhaps differently at different repetition rates. During the initial stage of development, a microwave apparatus was built and signal processing was developed to observe time-dependent charging of dielectric surfaces and/or plasmas located on or near the inner surface of a thin-wall hollow dielectric tube. Three frequencies were employed to improve the data handling rate and the signal-to-noise. The test and performance results for a plasma test case are presented; in particular, the performance of the test unit shows capability to detect small changes ~0.1% of a dielectric constant, which would correspond to the scraping-off of only 0.3 nC to the walls of the dielectric liner inside the cavity from the passing charge bunch.

  8. Accelerating networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evolving out-of-equilibrium networks have been under intense scrutiny recently. In many real-world settings the number of links added per new node is not constant but depends on the time at which the node is introduced in the system. This simple idea gives rise to the concept of accelerating networks, for which we review an existing definition and-after finding it somewhat constrictive-offer a new definition. The new definition provided here views network acceleration as a time dependent property of a given system as opposed to being a property of the specific algorithm applied to grow the network. The definition also covers both unweighted and weighted networks. As time-stamped network data becomes increasingly available, the proposed measures may be easily applied to such empirical datasets. As a simple case study we apply the concepts to study the evolution of three different instances of Wikipedia, namely, those in English, German, and Japanese, and find that the networks undergo different acceleration regimes in their evolution

  9. Final report on "Multipactor Physics, Acceleration, and Breakdown in Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating Structures"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Richard P. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Gold, Steven H. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year program (2013-2016) to evaluate the physics issues associated with rf acceleration in dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures, with a focus on the key issue of multipactor loading, which has been found to cause very significant rf power loss in DLA structures whenever the rf pulsewidth exceeds the multipactor risetime (~10 ns). The experiments are carried out in the X-band magnicon laboratory at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Euclid Techlabs LLC, who develop the test structures with support from the DoE SBIR program. There are two main elements in the research program: (1) high-power tests of DLA structures using the magnicon output (20 MW @11.4 GHz), and (2) tests of electron acceleration in DLA structures using relativistic electrons from a compact X-band accelerator. The work during this period has focused on a study of the use of an axial magnetic field to suppress multipactor in DLA structures, with several new high power tests carried out at NRL, and on preparation of the accelerator for the electron acceleration experiments. A new experiment was recently conducted with improved conditions, including a solenoidal magnetic field (up to 1.1 T), a shorter standing wave DLA to ensure uniformity, and a built-in rf probe to monitor the accelerating gradient inside the cavity during high-power testing. Excellent agreement has been obtained between the modeled and measured accelerating gradient signals inside the standing-wave DLA structure, which represents a quantitatively better understanding of multipactor. More importantly, this is the first demonstration of multipactor being fully suppressed in a rf-driven DLA structure. This eliminates one of the most important hurdles towards practical dielectric-based rf linear accelerators, and may lead to wide use of dielectric materials in high-field vacuum electronics.

  10. Fluid simulation of relativistic electron beam driven wakefield in a cold plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excitation of wakefield in a cold homogeneous plasma, driven by an ultra-relativistic electron beam is studied in one dimension using fluid simulation techniques. For a homogeneous rigid beam having density (nb) less than or equal to half the plasma density (n0), simulation results are found to be in good agreement with the analytical work of Rosenzweig [Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 555 (1987)]. Here, Rosenzweig's work has been analytically extended to regimes where the ratio of beam density to plasma density is greater than half and results have been verified using simulation. Further in contrast to Rosenzweig's work, if the beam is allowed to evolve in a self-consistent manner, several interesting features are observed in simulation viz. splitting of the beam into beam-lets (for lb > λp) and compression of the beam (for lb < λp), lb and λp, respectively, being the initial beam length and plasma wavelength

  11. Simplified hydrodynamic models for the analysis of marine propellers in a wake-field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DURANTE D.; DUBBIOSO G.; TESTA C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison among different hydrodynamic models for the analysis of the unsteady loads delivered by a marine propeller working in an axial, non-uniform inflow. Specifically, for a propeller subjected to a wake-field dominated by local high-frequency changes in space, the unsteady hydroloads predicted by the Nakatake formulation are compared with those given by the Theodorsen and Sears theories, respectively. Drawbacks and potentialities of these approaches are highlighted to assess a computationally efficient hydrodynamic solver for the analysis of operating conditions where propeller blades are significantly per- turbed by a multi-harmonic onset-flow. Guidelines coming from this investigation may drive the choice of a fast and reliable un- steady propeller modeling that represents a good trade-off between accuracy of simulation and cost of computation within imple- mentation in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solvers. The hydrodynamic formulations herein proposed are validated through numerical comparisons with the (accurate but computationally expensive) propeller loads predicted by a fully 3-D panel-method Boundary Element Method (BEM) solver, suited for the analysis of propellers operating in a complex hydrodynamic environment.

  12. Some wakefield effects in the superconducting RF cavities of LCLS-II

    CERN Document Server

    Bane, K; Yakovlev, V

    2014-01-01

    For LCLS-II we estimate the power of radiated wakefields generated in the SRF cavities (including the 3rd harmonic cavities) and in the end transitions. Much of this power will pass through and reflect in the strings of cryomodules that comprise linacs L1, L2, or L3. Presumably, some of it will be absorbed by the higher order mode (HOM) couplers, or by the absorbers at warmer temperatures situated between the cryomodules. We investigate where such power gets generated, but not where it ends up. As such the results can serve as a pessimistic calculation of the extra power that needs to be removed by the cryosystem. Finally, we also estimate---under the assumption that all the wake power ends up in the SRF walls---the wall heating and the extent of Cooper pair breaking in L3, where the bunch is most intense. Note that all calculations here are of single bunch effects; thus resonant interactions are not included.

  13. Quasi-monoenergetic Electron Beams from Laser-plasma Acceleration by Ionization-induced Injection in Low- density Pure Nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Mengze; Hafz, Nasr A. M.; Li, Song; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Chen, Liming; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya; Jie ZHANG

    2014-01-01

    We report a laser wakefield acceleration of electron beams up to 130 MeV from laser-driven 4-mm long nitrogen gas jet. By using a moderate laser intensity (3.5*10^18 W.cm^(-2)) and relatively low plasma densities (0.8*10^18 cm^(-3) to 2.7*10^18 cm^(-3)) we have achieved a stable regime for laser propagation and consequently a stable generation of electron beams. We experimentally studied the dependence of the drive laser energy on the laser-plasma channel and electron beam parameters. The qua...

  14. Argonne's Expedited Site Characterization: An integrated approach to cost- and time-effective remedial investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a methodology for remedial site investigation that has proven to be both technically superior to and more cost- and time-effective than traditional methods. This methodology is referred to as the Argonne Expedited Site Characterization (ESC). Quality is the driving force within the process. The Argonne ESC process is abbreviated only in time and cost and never in terms of quality. More usable data are produced with the Argonne ESC process than with traditional site characterization methods that are based on statistical-grid sampling and multiple monitoring wells. This paper given an overview of the Argonne ESC process and compares it with traditional methods for site characterization. Two examples of implementation of the Argonne ESC process are discussed to illustrate the effectiveness of the process in CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act) and RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) programs

  15. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  16. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavitytThere is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  17. Neutron Transport Methods for Accelerator-Driven Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas Tsoulfanidis; Elmer Lewis

    2005-02-09

    The objective of this project has been to develop computational methods that will enable more effective analysis of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS). The work is centered at the University of Missouri at Rolla, with a subcontract at Northwestern University, and close cooperation with the Nuclear Engineering Division at Argonne National Laboratory. The work has fallen into three categories. First, the treatment of the source for neutrons originating from the spallation target which drives the neutronics calculations of the ADS. Second, the generalization of the nodal variational method to treat the R-Z geometry configurations frequently needed for scoping calculations in Accelerator Driven Systems. Third, the treatment of void regions within variational nodal methods as needed to treat the accelerator beam tube.

  18. Heavy-ion acceleration with a superconducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This year, 1988, is the tenth anniversary of the first use of RF superconductivity to accelerate heavy ions. In June 1978, the first two superconducting resonators of the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) were used to boost the energy of a 19F beam from the tandem, and by September 1978 a 5-resonator linac provided an 16O beam for a nuclear-physics experiment. Since then, the superconducting linac has grown steadily in size and capability until now there are 42 accelerating structures and 4 bunchers. Throughout this period, the system was used routinely for physics research, and by now the total time with beam on target is 35,000 hours. Lessons learned from this long running experience and some key technical developments that made it possible are reviewed in this paper. 19 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Laser plasma acceleration of electrons with multi-PW laser beams in the frame of CILEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser plasma acceleration of electrons has progressed along with advances in laser technology. It is thus expected that the development in the near-future of multi-PW-class laser and facilities will enable a vast range of scientific opportunities for laser plasma acceleration research. On one hand, high peak powers can be used to explore the extremely high intensity regime of laser wakefield acceleration, producing for example large amounts of electrons in the GeV range or generating high energy photons. On the other hand, the available laser energy can be used in the quasi-linear regime to create accelerating fields in large volumes of plasma and study controlled acceleration in a plasma stage of externally injected relativistic particles, either electrons or positrons. In the frame of the Centre Interdisciplinaire de la Lumière EXtrême (CILEX), the Apollon-10P laser will deliver two beams at the 1 PW and 10 PW levels, in ultra-short (>15fs) pulses, to a target area dedicated to electron acceleration studies, such as the exploration of the non-linear regimes predicted theoretically, or multi-stage laser plasma acceleration

  20. Laser plasma acceleration of electrons with multi-PW laser beams in the frame of CILEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cros, B., E-mail: brigitte.cros@u-psud.fr [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Paradkar, B.S. [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Davoine, X. [CEA DAM DIF, Arpajon F-91297 (France); Chancé, A. [CEA IRFU-SACM, Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Desforges, F.G. [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Dobosz-Dufrénoy, S. [CEA DSM-IRAMIS-SPAM, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Delerue, N. [LAL, CNRS and Universit Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Ju, J.; Audet, T.L.; Maynard, G. [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Lobet, M.; Gremillet, L. [CEA DAM DIF, Arpajon F-91297 (France); Mora, P. [CPhT, CNRS and Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Schwindling, J.; Delferrière, O. [CEA IRFU-SACM, Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Bruni, C.; Rimbault, C.; Vinatier, T. [LAL, CNRS and Universit Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Di Piazza, A. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Grech, M. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, Palaiseau (France); and others

    2014-03-11

    Laser plasma acceleration of electrons has progressed along with advances in laser technology. It is thus expected that the development in the near-future of multi-PW-class laser and facilities will enable a vast range of scientific opportunities for laser plasma acceleration research. On one hand, high peak powers can be used to explore the extremely high intensity regime of laser wakefield acceleration, producing for example large amounts of electrons in the GeV range or generating high energy photons. On the other hand, the available laser energy can be used in the quasi-linear regime to create accelerating fields in large volumes of plasma and study controlled acceleration in a plasma stage of externally injected relativistic particles, either electrons or positrons. In the frame of the Centre Interdisciplinaire de la Lumière EXtrême (CILEX), the Apollon-10P laser will deliver two beams at the 1 PW and 10 PW levels, in ultra-short (>15fs) pulses, to a target area dedicated to electron acceleration studies, such as the exploration of the non-linear regimes predicted theoretically, or multi-stage laser plasma acceleration.

  1. Engineering Design of a Multipurpose X-band Accelerating Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Gudkov, Dmitry; Samoshkin, Alexander; Zennaro, Riccardo; Dehler, Micha; Raguin, Jean-Yves

    2010-01-01

    Both FEL projects, SwissFEL and Fermi-Elettra each require an X-band RF accelerating structure for optimal bunch compression at the respective injectors. As the CLIC project is pursuing a program for producing and testing the X-band high-gradient RF structures, a collaboration between PSI, Elettra and CERN has been established to build a multipurpose X-band accelerating structure. This paper focuses on its engineering design, which is based on the disked cells jointed together by diffusion bonding. Vacuum brazing and laser beam welding is used for auxiliary components. The accelerating structure consists of two coupler subassemblies, 73 disks and includes a wakefield monitor and diagnostic waveguides. The engineering study includes the external cooling system, consisting of two parallel cooling circuits and an RF tuning system, which allows phase advance tuning of the cell by deforming the outer wall. The engineering solution for the installation and sealing of the wake field monitor feed-through devices that...

  2. Load management strategy for Particle-In-Cell simulations in high energy particle acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Dérouillat, J.

    2016-09-01

    In the wake of the intense effort made for the experimental CILEX project, numerical simulation campaigns have been carried out in order to finalize the design of the facility and to identify optimal laser and plasma parameters. These simulations bring, of course, important insight into the fundamental physics at play. As a by-product, they also characterize the quality of our theoretical and numerical models. In this paper, we compare the results given by different codes and point out algorithmic limitations both in terms of physical accuracy and computational performances. These limitations are illustrated in the context of electron laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). The main limitation we identify in state-of-the-art Particle-In-Cell (PIC) codes is computational load imbalance. We propose an innovative algorithm to deal with this specific issue as well as milestones towards a modern, accurate high-performance PIC code for high energy particle acceleration.

  3. Resonantly excited betatron hard X-Rays from Ionization Injected Electron Beam in a Laser Plasma Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, K; Li, Y F; Li, D Z; Tao, M Z; Mirzaie, M; Ma, Y; Zhao, J R; Li, M H; Chen, M; Hafz, N; Sokollik, T; Sheng, Z M; Zhang, J

    2015-01-01

    A new scheme for bright hard x-ray emission from laser wakefield electron accelerator is reported, where pure nitrogen gas is adopted. Intense Betatron x-ray beams are generated from ionization injected K-shell electrons of nitrogen into the accelerating wave bucket. The x-ray radiation shows synchrotron-like spectrum with total photon yield 8$\\times$10$^8$/shot and $10^8$ over 110keV. In particular, the betatron hard x-ray photon yield is 10 times higher compared to the case of helium gas under the same laser parameters. Particle-in-cell simulation suggests that the enhancement of the x-ray yield results from ionization injection, which enables the electrons to be quickly accelerated to the driving laser region for subsequent betatron resonance. Employing the present scheme,the single stage nitrogen gas target could be used to generate stable high brightness betatron hard x-ray beams.

  4. Shielding effect and wakefield pattern of a moving test charge in a non-Maxwellian dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, S. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Quaid-e-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Khan, S. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Quaid-e-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, Gomal University, Dera Ismail Khan 29050 (Pakistan)

    2013-07-15

    By using the Vlasov-Poisson equations, we calculate an expression for the electrostatic potential caused by a test charge in an unmagnetized non-Maxwellian dusty plasma, whose constituents are the superthermal hot-electrons, the mobile cold-electrons with a neutralizing background of cold ions, and charge fluctuating isolated dust grains. The superthermality effects due to hot electrons not only modify the dielectric constant of the electron-acoustic waves but also significantly affect the electrostatic potential. The latter can be decomposed into the Debye-Hückel and oscillatory wake potentials. Analytical and numerical results reveal that the Debye-Hückel and wakefield potentials converge to the Maxwellian case for large values of superthermality parameter. Furthermore, the plasma parameters play a vital role in the formation of shielding and wakefield pattern in a two-electron temperature plasma. The present results should be important for laboratory and space dusty plasmas, where hot-electrons can be assumed to follow the non-Maxwellian distribution function.

  5. Argonne National Lab deploys Force10 networks' massively dense ethernet switch for supercomputing cluster

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Force10 Networks, Inc. today announced that Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, IL) has successfully deployed Force10 E-Series switch/routers to connect to the TeraGrid, the world's largest supercomputing grid, sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF)" (1/2 page).

  6. Frontiers: Research Highlights 1946-1996 [50th Anniversary Edition. Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This special edition of 'Frontiers' commemorates Argonne National Laboratory's 50th anniversary of service to science and society. America's first national laboratory, Argonne has been in the forefront of U.S. scientific and technological research from its beginning. Past accomplishments, current research, and future plans are highlighted.

  7. Frontiers: Research highlights 1946-1996 [50th Anniversary Edition. Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This special edition of 'Frontiers' commemorates Argonne National Laboratory's 50th anniversary of service to science and society. America's first national laboratory, Argonne has been in the forefront of U.S. scientific and technological research from its beginning. Past accomplishments, current research, and future plans are highlighted.

  8. Ultrafast terawatt laser sources for high-field particle acceleration and short wavelength generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Laser Sources working group concerned itself with recent advances in and future requirements for the development of laser sources relevant to high-energy physics (HEP) colliders, small scale accelerators, and the generation of short wave-length radiation. We heavily emphasized pulsed terawatt peak power laser sources for several reasons. First, their development over the past five years has been rapid and multi-faceted, and has made relativistic light intensity available to the advanced accelerator community, as well as the wider physics community, for the first time. Secondly, they have strongly impacted plasma-based accelerator research over the past two years, producing the first experimental demonstrations of the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) in both its resonantly-driven and self-modulated forms. Thirdly, their average power and wall-plug efficiency currently fall well short of projected requirements for future accelerators and other high average power applications, but show considerable promise for improving substantially over the next few years. A review of this rapidly emerging laser technology in the context of advanced accelerator research is therefore timely

  9. Customizable electron beams from optically controlled laser plasma acceleration for γ-ray sources based on inverse Thomson scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmykov, S. Y.; Davoine, X.; Ghebregziabher, I.; Shadwick, B. A.

    2016-09-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons in the blowout regime can be controlled by tailoring the laser pulse phase and the plasma target. The 100 nm-scale bandwidth and negative frequency chirp of the optical driver compensate for the nonlinear frequency red-shift imparted by wakefield excitation. This mitigates pulse self-steepening and suppresses continuous injection. The plasma channel suppresses diffraction of the pulse leading edge, further reducing self-steepening, making injection even quieter. Besides, the channel destabilizes the pulse tail confined within the accelerator cavity (the electron density "bubble"), causing oscillations in the bubble size. The resulting periodic injection generates background-free comb-like beams - sequences of synchronized, low phase-space volume bunches. Controlling the number of bunches, their energy, and energy spacing by varying the channel radius and the pulse length (as permitted by the large bandwidth) enables the design of a tunable, all-optical source of polychromatic, pulsed γ-rays using the mechanism of inverse Thomson scattering. Such source may radiate ~107 quasi-monochromatic 10 MeV-scale photons per shot into a microsteradian-scale observation angle. The photon energy is distributed among several distinct bands, each having sub-25% energy spread dictated by the mrad-scale divergence of electron beam.

  10. Research in mathematics and computer science at Argonne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieper, G.W.

    1989-08-01

    This report reviews the research activities in the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory for the period January 1988 - August 1989. The body of the report gives a brief look at the MCS staff and the research facilities, and discusses various projects carried out in two major areas of research: analytical and numerical methods and advanced computing concepts. Projects funded by non-DOE sources are also discussed, and new technology transfer activities are described. Further information on division staff, visitors, workshops, and seminars is found in the appendices.

  11. 1985 annual site environmental report for Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is one in a series of annual reports prepared to provide DOE, environmental agencies, and the public with information on the level of radioactive and chemical pollutants in the environment and on the amounts of such substances, if any, added to the environment as a result of Argonne operations. Included in this report are the results of measurements obtained in 1985 for a number of radionuclides in air, surface water, ground water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in surface and subsurface water; and for the external penetrating radiation dose

  12. Argonne National Laboratory monthly progress report, April 1952

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1952-04-01

    This progress report from the Argonne National Laboratory covers the work in Biological and Medical Research, Radiological Physics, and Health services for the quarterly period ending March 31, 1952. Numerous experiments were conducted in an attempt to answer some of the questions arising from exposure to ionizing radiation, especially X radiation. Some of the research involved the radiosensitivity of cells and some involved animals. The effects of radium in humans was also evaluated. Other studies were performed in biology, such as the effect of photoperiodism on plant growth and the biological of beryllium.

  13. Change in argonne national laboratory: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozley, A

    1971-10-01

    Despite traditional opposition to change within an institution and the known reluctance of an "old guard" to accept new managerial policies and techniques, the reactions suggested in this study go well beyond the level of a basic resistance to change. The response, indeed, drawn from a random sampling of Laboratory scientific and engineering personnel, comes close to what Philip Handler has recently described as a run on the scientific bank in a period of depression (1, p. 146). It appears that Argonne's apprehension stems less from the financial cuts that have reduced staff and diminished programs by an annual 10 percent across the last 3 fiscal years than from the administrative and conceptual changes that have stamped the institution since 1966. Administratively, the advent of the AUA has not forged a sense of collaborative effort implicit in the founding negotiations or contributed noticeably to increasing standards of excellence at Argonne. The AUA has, in fact, yet to exercise the constructive powers vested in them by the contract of reviewing and formulating long-term policy on the research and reactor side. Additionally, the University of Chicago, once the single operator, appears to have forfeited some of the trust and understanding that characterized the Laboratory's attitude to it in former years. In a period of complex and sensitive management the present directorate at Argonne is seriously dissociated from a responsible spectrum of opinion within the Laboratory. The crux of discontent among the creative scientific and engineering community appears to lie in a developed sense of being overadministered. In contrast to earlier periods, Argonne's professional staff feels a critical need for a voice in the formulation of Laboratory programs and policy. The Argonne senate could supply this mechanism. Slow to rally, their present concern springs from a firm conviction that the Laboratory is "withering on the vine." By contrast, the Laboratory director Powers

  14. Search for doubly-charged negative ions via accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Argonne FN tandem accelerator in conjunction with an Enge split-pole magnetic spectrograph has been used as a highly sensitive mass spectrometer to search for doubly charged negative ions of 11B, 12C and 16O. No evidence for the formation of these ions in an inverted sputter source and the subsequent acceleration in the tandem has been found. The following limits for the ratio of doubly-charged to singly-charged ions were measured: X--/X- -15, 11B; -15, 12C; -14, 16O. A relatively abundant formation of the short lived, metastable He- ion in the sputter source has been observed

  15. Linear Accelerator (LINAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Linear Accelerator A linear accelerator (LINAC) customizes high energy x-rays to ... ensured? What is this equipment used for? A linear accelerator (LINAC) is the device most commonly used ...

  16. Simulation and characterization of the RF system and global stability analysis at the REGAE linear electron accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayet, Frank

    2012-12-15

    LAOLA (LAboratory for Laser- and beam-driven plasma Acceleration), is a collaboration between groups from DESY and the University of Hamburg. Its mission is to complement basic research in the relatively new field of plasma wakefield acceleration (PWA) by an explicit combination with DESY's conventional, modern accelerators. The linear electron accelerator REGAE is designed to produce sub 10 fs low charge electron bunches with ultra-low emittance at a repetition rate of 50 Hz. The planned experiments include femtosecond electron diffraction (R.J. Dwayne Miller), as well as the probing of laser induced plasma wakefields with well characterized bunches (LAOLA). They all require high bunch time of flight stability down to 10 fs. The REGAE machine consists of two RF cavities, both fed by a single klystron. While the first one - the gun cavity - is used for acceleration of the electrons, the second one - the buncher cavity - can be used to reduce the electron bunch length. This scheme only works for a specific RF phase relation between the two cavities. This thesis is split into two parts. In the first one the implications of the unique two cavity design on day-to-day machine operation are analyzed. To this end an analytical model of the RF system is developed, which is necessary for understanding how to individually adjust the cavity phases. In the second part the influence of the setup on time of flight stability is discussed with an emphasis on phase jitter compensation. RF phase stability measurements reveal that the current machine setup allows for a time of flight stability down to 50 fs right after the gun.

  17. Microscale chemistry technology exchange at Argonne National Laboratory - east.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pausma, R.

    1998-06-04

    The Division of Educational Programs (DEP) at Argonne National Laboratory-East interacts with the education community at all levels to improve science and mathematics education and to provide resources to instructors of science and mathematics. DEP conducts a wide range of educational programs and has established an enormous audience of teachers, both in the Chicago area and nationally. DEP has brought microscale chemistry to the attention of this huge audience. This effort has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy through the Environmental Management Operations organization within Argonne. Microscale chemistry is a teaching methodology wherein laboratory chemistry training is provided to students while utilizing very small amounts of reagents and correspondingly small apparatus. The techniques enable a school to reduce significantly the cost of reagents, the cost of waste disposal and the dangers associated with the manipulation of chemicals. The cost reductions are achieved while still providing the students with the hands-on laboratory experience that is vital to students who might choose to pursue careers in the sciences. Many universities and colleges have already begun to switch from macroscale to microscale chemistry in their educational laboratories. The introduction of these techniques at the secondary education level will lead to freshman being better prepared for the type of experimentation that they will encounter in college.

  18. Draft environmental assessment of Argonne National Laboratory, East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This environmental assessment of the operation of the Argonne National Laboratory is related to continuation of research and development work being conducted at the Laboratory site at Argonne, Illinois. The Laboratory has been monitoring various environmental parameters both offsite and onsite since 1949. Meteorological data have been collected to support development of models for atmospheric dispersion of radioactive and other pollutants. Gaseous and liquid effluents, both radioactive and non-radioactive, have been measured by portable monitors and by continuous monitors at fixed sites. Monitoring of constituents of the terrestrial ecosystem provides a basis for identifying changes should they occur in this regime. The Laboratory has established a position of leadership in monitoring methodologies and their application. Offsite impacts of nonradiological accidents are primarily those associated with the release of chlorine and with sodium fires. Both result in releases that cause no health damage offsite. Radioactive materials released to the environment result in a cumulative dose to persons residing within 50 miles of the site of about 47 man-rem per year, compared to an annual total of about 950,000 man-rem delivered to the same population from natural background radiation. 100 refs., 17 figs., 33 tabs

  19. Draft environmental assessment of Argonne National Laboratory, East

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    This environmental assessment of the operation of the Argonne National Laboratory is related to continuation of research and development work being conducted at the Laboratory site at Argonne, Illinois. The Laboratory has been monitoring various environmental parameters both offsite and onsite since 1949. Meteorological data have been collected to support development of models for atmospheric dispersion of radioactive and other pollutants. Gaseous and liquid effluents, both radioactive and non-radioactive, have been measured by portable monitors and by continuous monitors at fixed sites. Monitoring of constituents of the terrestrial ecosystem provides a basis for identifying changes should they occur in this regime. The Laboratory has established a position of leadership in monitoring methodologies and their application. Offsite impacts of nonradiological accidents are primarily those associated with the release of chlorine and with sodium fires. Both result in releases that cause no health damage offsite. Radioactive materials released to the environment result in a cumulative dose to persons residing within 50 miles of the site of about 47 man-rem per year, compared to an annual total of about 950,000 man-rem delivered to the same population from natural background radiation. 100 refs., 17 figs., 33 tabs.

  20. How Argonne's Intense Pulsed Neutron Source came to life and gained its niche : the view from an ecosystem perspective.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westfall, C.; Office of The Director

    2008-02-25

    At first glance the story of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) appears to have followed a puzzling course. When researchers first proposed their ideas for an accelerator-driven neutron source for exploring the structure of materials through neutron scattering, the project seemed so promising that both Argonne managers and officials at the laboratory's funding agency, the Department of Energy (DOE), suggested that it be made larger and more expensive. But then, even though prototype building, testing, and initial construction went well a group of prominent DOE reviewers recommended in fall 1980 that it be killed, just months before it had been slated to begin operation, and DOE promptly accepted the recommendation. In response, Argonne's leadership declared the project was the laboratory's top priority and rallied to save it. In late 1982, thanks to another review panel led by the same scientist who had chaired the panel that had delivered the death sentence, the project was granted a reprieve. However, by the late 1980s, the IPNS was no longer top priority within the international materials science community, at Argonne, or within the DOE budget because prospects for another, larger materials science accelerator emerged. At just this point, the facility started to produce exciting scientific results. For the next two decades, the IPNS, its research, and its experts became valued resources at Argonne, within the U.S. national laboratory system, and within the international materials science community. Why did this Argonne project prosper and then almost suffer premature death, even though it promised (and later delivered) good science? How was it saved and how did it go on to have a long, prosperous life for more than a quarter of a century? In particular, what did an expert assessment of the quality of IPNS science have to do with its fate? Getting answers to such questions is important. The U.S. government