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Sample records for argon calorimater barrel

  1. Installation of the Liquid Argon Calorimater Barrel in the ATLAS Experimental Cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Vandoni, G.

    On the 27th of October, the Liquid Argon Barrel cryostat was transported from Building 180 to point 1. The next day, the Barrel was lowered into the cavern, and was placed on jacks close to its final position inside the completed lower half of the Tile calorimeter. After a day of precise adjustment, it was resting within a few millimetres of its nominal final position, waiting for the upper half of the Tile calorimeter to be installed. Tight requests had been issued by the Liquid Argon collaboration for the whole transport. It was foreseen that the cryostat should not see any acceleration larger than 0.15g along its axis, 0.08g transversally and 0.3g in the vertical direction. In addition, no acceleration higher than 0.03g (or even 0.003g for permanent oscillation) would be allowed at 20Hz, to avoid the risk of damaging the absorbers at this spontaneous vibration frequency. The difficulty would arise when coping these demands with the tortuous route, its slopes and curbs, vibration transmission from the engi...

  2. Liquid Argon Barrel Cryostat Arrived

    CERN Multimedia

    Pailler, P

    Last week the first of three cryostats for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter arrived at CERN. It had travelled for 46 days over several thousand kilometers from Japan to CERN. During three years it has been fabricated by Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. at Harima, close to Kobe, under contract from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the U.S.. This cryostat consists of two concentric cylinders made of aluminium: the outer vacuum vessel with a diameter of 5.5 m and a length of 7 m, and the inner cold vessel which will contain the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter immersed in liquid argon. The total weight will be 270 tons including the detectors and the liquid argon. The cryostat is now located in building 180 where it will be equipped with 64 feed-throughs which serve for the passage of 122,880 electrical lines which will carry the signals of the calorimeter. After integration of the calorimeter, the solenoidal magnet of ATLAS will be integrated in the vacuum vessel. A final cold test of the cryostat inc...

  3. Resource Review Board Celebrates the Magnet and Liquid Argon Barrel Tests in Hall 180

    CERN Multimedia

    Jenni, P.

    2004-01-01

    Address by the Director-General, R. Aymar, in front of the barrel cryostat. On 25th October 2004 many RRB delegates and guests, ATLAS National Contact Physicists, and colleagues from far and from CERN working on the Liquid Argon calorimeter and the magnet system were gathering in Hall 180 to celebrate the major milestones reached during the past months in this hall: the successful cold tests of the first barrel toroid coil, of the solenoid, and of the barrel Liquid Argon calorimeter. About 250 people spent a relaxing evening after the speeches by the Director-General R. Aymar and by the spokesperson who gave the following address: 'It is a great pleasure for me to welcome you all here in Hall 180 in the name of the ATLAS Collaboration! With a few words I would like to recall why we are actually here today to share, what I hope, is a relaxed and joyful moment. To concentrate it all in one sentence I could say: To thank cordially all the main actors for the enormous work accomplished here over many years,...

  4. Last Few Metres for the Barrel Calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Nyman, T.

    On Friday 4th November, the ATLAS Barrel Calorimeter was moved from its assembly point at the side of the ATLAS cavern to the centre of the toroidal magnet system. The detector was finally aligned, to the precision of within a millimetre, on Wednesday 9th November. The ATLAS installation team, led by Tommi Nyman, after having positioned the Barrel Calorimeter in its final location in the ATLAS experimental cavern UX15. The Barrel Calorimeter which will absorb and measure the energy of photons, electrons and hadrons at the core of the ATLAS detector is 8.6 meters in diameter, 6.8 meters long, and weighs over 1600 Tonnes. It consists of two concentric cylindrical detector elements. The innermost comprises aluminium pressure vessels containing the liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter and the solenoid magnet. The outermost is an assembly of 64 hadron tile calorimeter sectors. Assembled 18 meters away from its final position, the Barrel Calorimeter was relocated with the help of a railway, which allows ...

  5. SCT Barrel Assembly Complete

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Batchelor

    As reported in the April 2005 issue of the ATLAS eNews, the first of the four Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) barrels, complete with modules and services, arrived safely at CERN in January of 2005. In the months since January, the other three completed barrels arrived as well, and integration of the four barrels into the entire barrel assembly commenced at CERN, in the SR1 building on the ATLAS experimental site, in July. Assembly was completed on schedule in September, with the addition of the innermost layer to the 4-barrel assembly. Work is now underway to seal the barrel thermal enclosure. This is necessary in order to enclose the silicon tracker in a nitrogen atmosphere and provide it with faraday-cage protection, and is a delicate and complicated task: 352 silicon module powertapes, 352 readout-fibre bundles, and over 400 Detector Control System sensors must be carefully sealed into the thermal enclosure bulkhead. The team is currently verifying the integrity of the low mass cooling system, which must be d...

  6. TRT Barrel milestones passed

    CERN Multimedia

    Ogren, H

    2004-01-01

    The barrel TRT detector passed three significant milestones this spring. The Barrel Support Structure (BSS) was completed and moved to the SR-1 building on February 24th. On March 12th the first module passed the quality assurance testing in Building 154 and was transported to the assembly site in the SR-1 building for barrel assembly. Then on April 21st the final production module that had been scanned at Hampton University was shipped to CERN. TRT Barrel Module Production The production of the full complement of barrel modules (96 plus 9 total spares) is now complete. This has been a five-year effort by Duke University, Hampton University, and Indiana University. Actual construction of the modules in the United States was completed in the first part of 2004. The production crews at each of the sites in the United States have now completed their missions. They are shown in the following pictures. Duke University: Production crew with the final completed module. Indiana University: Module producti...

  7. The MDT Barrel Organ

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira

    Have you ever looked for an interesting use for the spare detector parts once the construction phase was finished? Henk Tiecke, with the help of Oscar van Petten and Marco Kraan, all from NIKHEF, came up with a great idea for leftover MDT tubes. They simply built a pipe organ! See the MDT Barrel Organ in action, as recorded during a party thrown on the occasion of the first shipment of MDT chambers from NIKHEF to CERN. Want to know more about the organ? Please contact Henk Tiecke. Henk Tiecke playing the MDT Barrel Organ.

  8. Barrelled locally convex spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez Carreras, P

    1987-01-01

    This book is a systematic treatment of barrelled spaces, and of structures in which barrelledness conditions are significant. It is a fairly self-contained study of the structural theory of those spaces, concentrating on the basic phenomena in the theory, and presenting a variety of functional-analytic techniques.Beginning with some basic and important results in different branches of Analysis, the volume deals with Baire spaces, presents a variety of techniques, and gives the necessary definitions, exploring conditions on discs to ensure that they are absorbed by the barrels of the sp

  9. A crystal barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The production of crystals for the barrel of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter has been completed. This is an important milestone for the experiment, which received the last of its 62,960 crystals on 9 March. The members of the team responsible for the crystal acceptance testing at CERN display the last crystal for the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter barrel. From left to right: Igor Tarasov, Etiennette Auffray and Hervé Cornet.One of the six machines specially developed to measure 67 different parameters on each crystal. Igor Tarasov is seen inserting the last batch of crystals into the machine. The last of the 62,960 CMS barrel crystals arrived at CERN on 9 March. Once removed from its polystyrene protection, this delicate crystal, like thousands of its predecessors, will be inserted into the last of the 36 supermodules of the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter in a few days' time. This marks the end of an important chapter in an almost 15-year-long journey by the CMS crystals team, some of whose member...

  10. Thin Concrete Barrel Vault

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamerling, M.W.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the structural design of a thin barrel vault constructed with Fusée Ceramique infill elements. The load transfer is analyzed and validated. For the structure composed of Fusée Ceramique elements, steel and concrete the stresses are calculated and compared to the stresses given in

  11. ATLAS TRT barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Productions

    2005-01-01

    On 3 February 2005, members of the US-TRT team proceeded to the installation of the last TRT barrel module for the Transition Radiation Tracker, which will be used for tracking in the Atlas detector. The TRT barrel is made of 96 modules containing around 52 000 4-mm straws, each of them equipped with a 20 microns sense wire. The modules were first designed at CERN, then built in the USA between 1996 and 2003. Duke, Hampton and Indiana Universities, tested in details at CERN between 2003 and 2005 by members of the US-TRT group, and mounted on the support structure in the SR-1 building where this video was taken. During assembly of the last module, one can see Kirill Egorov (PNPI, Gatchina, Russia), Chuck Mahlong (Hampton) as well as John Callahan and Pauline Gagnon (Indiana). (Written by Pauline Gagnon)

  12. Paying by the Barrel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francis L.Sackitey; Ghana

    2012-01-01

    CHINA'S UNIPEC Asia Co. Ltd. will buy up the entire oil share from Ghana's Jubilee field for the next 15 years in a commercial agreement entered into by the government of Ghana. Under the agreement, the West African nation will be supplying China with 13,000 barrels of crude oil daily to pay for a $3 billion loan granted to Ghana by China under a Master Facility Agreement with the China Development Bank.

  13. Weapons barrel life cycle determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebojša Pene Hristov

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the dynamic processes within the gun barrel during the firing process in exploitation. It generally defines the basic principles of constructing tube elements, and shows the distortion of the basic geometry of the tube interior due to wear as well as the impact it causes during exploitation. The article also defines basic empirical models as well as a model based on fracture mechanics for the calculation of a use-life of the barrel, and other elements essential for the safe use of the barrel as the basic weapon element. Erosion causes are analysed in order to control and reduce wear and prolong the lifetime of the gun barrel. It gives directions for the reparation of barrels with wasted resources. In conclusion, the most influential elements of tube wear are given as well as possible modifications of existing systems, primarily propellant charges, with a purpose of prolonging lifetime of gun barrels. The guidelines for a proper determination of the lifetime based on the barrel condition assessment are given as well. INTRODUCTION The barrel as the basic element of each weapon is described as well as the processes occurring during the firing that have impulsive character and are accompanied by large amounts of energy. The basic elements of barrel and itheir constructive characteristics are descibed. The relation between Internal ballistics, ie calculation of the propellant gas pressure in the firing process, and structural elements defined by the barrel material resistance is shown. In general, this part of the study explains the methodology of the gun barrel structural elements calculation, ie. barrel geometry, taking into account the degrees of safety in accordance with Military Standards.   TUBE WEAR AND DEFORMATIONS The weapon barrel gradually wears out during exploitation due to which it no longer satisfies the set requirements. It is considered that the barrel has experienced a lifetime when it fails to fulfill the

  14. Progress of the EM Barrel Presampler Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Hostachy, J.Y.

    The liquid argon barrel presampler is a separate detector which will be placed in front of the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter, in the same cryostat. It is made of 32×2 sectors, each of them being 3.1 m long, about 28 cm large and a few cm thick. Three countries are involved in its construction: France (ISN-Grenoble), Sweden (KTH-Stockholm) and Morocco (Universities: Hassan II Ain Chock-Casablanca and Mohamed V-Rabat, and CNESTEN-Rabat). The design of the presampler started ten years ago and the series production began at the end of the year 2000. Today two-thirds of the sectors are produced and validated. In November 2002, half the detector (i.e. 32 sectors), was inserted on the internal face of the first EM calorimeter wheel (see pictures). Despite the fact that only 0.4 mm was available between sectors, it was possible to insert them all without meeting major difficulties. This operation was led by a team of four people, the sectors being systematically tested after insertion in the wheel. The inserti...

  15. The PANDA Barrel DIRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhygadlo, R.; Schwarz, C.; Belias, A.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Kalicy, G.; Krebs, M.; Lehmann, D.; Nerling, F.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Pfaffinger, M.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Etzelmüller, E.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Schmidt, M.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.

    2016-05-01

    The PANDA detector at the international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR) addresses fundamental questions of hadron physics. Experiments concerning charmonium spectroscopy, the search for hybrids and glueballs and the interaction of hidden and open charm particles with nucleons and nuclei will be performed with antiproton beams impinging on hydrogen or nuclear targets. Cooled beams allow the precision scan of resonances in formation experiments. The momentum range of the antiproton beam between 1.5 GeV/c and 15 GeV/c tests predictions by perturbation theory and will reveal deviations originating from strong QCD . An excellent hadronic particle identification will be accomplished by DIRC (Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light) counters. The design for the barrel region is based on the successful BaBar DIRC with several key improvements, such as fast photon timing and a compact imaging region. DIRC designs based on different radiator geometries with several focusing options were studied in simulation. The performance of each design was characterized in terms of photon yield and single photon Cherenkov angle resolution. Selected design options were implemented in prototypes and tested with hadronic particle beams at GSI and CERN.

  16. End of the EM Barrel Presampler Construction and Insertion

    CERN Multimedia

    Hostachy, J.Y.

    The liquid argon barrel presampler is a thin detector placed in front of the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter, made up of two half barrels also, but with 32 sectors per half barrel instead of 16. Each of these 64 sectors is 3.1 m long, 28 cm large and 2.9 cm thick. Three countries took part in its construction: France (LPSC-Grenoble), Sweden (KTH-Stockholm) and Morocco (Hassan II Ain Chock-Casablanca and Mohamed V-Rabat universities, and CNESTEN-Rabat). The design of the presampler started 11 years ago and the series production began at the end of 2000. Cabling, mechanical and electronic tests of the anodes were achieved in Morocco. Forty-one sectors were assembled and validated at the LPSC-Grenoble and 25 at the KTH-Stockholm. In November 2002, the first half was inserted on the inner face of the first EM calorimeter wheel. The insertion of the other 32 sectors in the second EM calorimeter wheel was achieved in July 2003 (see pictures). The production of two additional sectors will allow us to study the p...

  17. Barrel-shaped supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors argue that the majority of radio supernova remnants have a three-dimensional distribution of emissivity which is barrel shaped, with little emission from the end-caps. They examine some mechanisms which could produce this distribution

  18. STATUS OF THE ATLAS LIQUID ARGON CALORIMETER AND ITS PERFORMANCE

    CERN Document Server

    Berillari, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The liquid argon (LAr) calorimeters are used in ATLAS for all electromagnetic and for hadron calorimetry. The LAr calorimeter system consists of an electromagnetic barrel calorimeter and two endcaps with electromagnetic, hadronic and forward calorimeters. The latest status of the detector as well as problems and solutions addressed during the last years will be presented. Aspects of operation of a large detector over a long time period will be summarized and selected topics showing the performance of the detector will be shown.

  19. First physics pulses in the Barrel Electromagnetic Calorimeter with cosmics

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Serin

    2006-01-01

    The electromagnetic barrel calorimeter has been installed in its final position in October 2005. Since then, the calorimeter is being equipped with front-end electronics. Starting in April 2006, electronics calibration runs are taken a few times per week to debug the electronics and to study the performance in the pit (stability, noise). Today, 10 out of the 32 Front End crates are being read out, amounting to about 35000 channels. cool down, few little typos --> After a 6-week cool down, the barrel cryostat was filled with Liquid Argon in May. The presence of a few shorts (~1MΩ) at the edges of the modules was indicating the possibility of conducting dust having entered into the calorimeter with the flowing liquid. In order to try to improve this situation, the calorimeter was emptied and filled again, but this time by condensating the argon instead of flowing it in liquid phase. The new High Voltage tests are not showing any significant improvement but the situation is statisfactory for ATLAS runn...

  20. The Simulation of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Archambault, J P; Carli, T; Costanzo, D; Dell'Acqua, A; Djama, F; Gallas, M; Fincke-Keeler, M; Khakzad, M; Kiryunin, A; Krieger, P; Leltchouk, M; Loch, P; Ma, H; Menke, S; Monnier, E; Nairz, A; Niess, V; Oakham, G; Oram, C; Pospelov, G; Rajagopalan, S; Rimoldi, A; Rousseau, D; Rutherfoord, J; Seligman, W; Soukharev, A; Strízenec, P; Tóth, J; Tsukerman, I; Tsulaia, V; Unal, G; Grahn, K J

    2008-01-01

    In ATLAS, all of the electromagnetic calorimetry and part of the hadronic calorimetry is performed by a calorimeter system using liquid argon as the active material, together with various types of absorbers. The liquid argon calorimeter consists of four subsystems: the electromagnetic barrel and endcap accordion calorimeters; the hadronic endcap calorimeters, and the forward calorimeters. A very accurate geometrical description of these calorimeters is used as input to the Geant 4-based ATLAS simulation, and a careful modelling of the signal development is applied in the generation of hits. Certain types of Monte Carlo truth information ("Calibration Hits") may, additionally, be recorded for calorimeter cells as well as for dead material. This note is a comprehensive reference describing the simulation of the four liquid argon calorimeteter components.

  1. ID Barrel installed in cryostat

    CERN Multimedia

    Apsimon, R.; Romaniouk, A.

    Wednesday 23rd August was a memorable day for the Inner Detector community as they witnessed the transport and installation of the central part of the inner detector (ID-barrel) into the ATLAS detector. Many members of the collaboration gathered to witness this moment at Point 1. After years of design, construction and commissioning, the outer two detectors (TRT and SCT) of the ID barrel were moved from the SR1 cleanroom to the ATLAS cavern. The barrel was moved across the car park from building 2175 to SX1. Although only a journey of about 100 metres, this required weeks of planning and some degree of luck as far as the weather was concerned. Accelerometers were fitted to the barrel to provide real-time monitoring and no values greater than 0.1 g were recorded, fully satisfying the transport specification for this extremely precise and fragile detector. Muriel, despite her fear of heights, bravely volunteered to keep a close eye on the detector. Swapping cranes to cross the entire parking lot, while Mur...

  2. Depleted Argon from Underground Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argon is a strong scintillator and an ideal target for Dark Matter detection; however 39Ar contamination in atmospheric argon from cosmic ray interactions limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. Argon from deep underground is depleted in 39Ar due to the cosmic ray shielding of the earth. In Cortez, Colorado, a CO2 well has been discovered to contain approximately 600 ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO2. We first concentrate the argon locally to 3% in an Ar, N2, and He mixture, from the CO2 through chromatographic gas separation, and then the N2 and He will be removed by continuous distillation to purify the argon. We have collected 26 kg of argon from the CO2 facility and a cryogenic distillation column is under construction at Fermilab to further purify the argon.

  3. The PANDA Barrel DIRC detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoek, M., E-mail: matthias.hoek@uni-mainz.de [Institut für Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Kalicy, G.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Dodokhov, V. Kh. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Britting, A.; Eyrich, W. [Friedrich Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); and others

    2014-12-01

    The PANDA experiment at the new Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR) at GSI, Darmstadt, will study fundamental questions of hadron physics and QCD using high-intensity cooled antiproton beams with momenta between 1.5 and 15 GeV/c. Efficient Particle Identification for a wide momentum range and the full solid angle is required for reconstructing the various physics channels of the PANDA program. Hadronic Particle Identification in the barrel region of the detector will be provided by a DIRC counter. The design is based on the successful BABAR DIRC with important improvements, such as focusing optics and fast photon timing. Several of these improvements, including different radiator geometries and optics, were tested in particle beams at GSI and at CERN. The evolution of the conceptual design of the PANDA Barrel DIRC and the performance of complex prototypes in test beam campaigns will be discussed.

  4. Completion of the TRT Barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    Gagnon, P

    On February 3, the US-TRT team proudly completed the installation of the 96th barrel TRT module on its support structure in the SR building at CERN. This happy event came after many years of R&D initiated in the nineties by the TA1 team at CERN, followed by the construction of the modules in three American institutes (Duke, Hampton and Indiana Universities) from 1996 to 2003. In total, the 96 barrel modules contain 52544 kapton straws, each 4 mm in diameter and strung with a 30 micron gold-plated tungsten wire. Each wire was manually inserted, a feat in itself! The inner layer modules contain 329 straws, the middle layer modules have 520 straws and the outer layer, 793 straws. Thirty- two modules of each type form a full layer. Their special geometry was designed such as to leave no dead region. On average, a particle will cross 36 straws. Kirill Egorov, Chuck Mahlon and John Callahan inserted the last module in the Barrel Support Structure. After completion in the US, all modules were transferred...

  5. Argon in action

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few days, the SPS has been accelerating argon ions, which have started to be sent to the NA61/SHINE experiment. This operating mode, using a new type of ion, required a number of modifications to the accelerator.   Picture 1: a “super-cycle” of the SPS, featuring a proton cycle for the LHC, followed by an argon ion cycle for the North Area. Today, the accelerators are once again juggling particles and even performing completely new tricks. The SPS is supplying beams of argon ions for the first time, at energies never before achieved for this type of beam. They are destined for the NA61/SHINE experiment (see box) located in the North Area, which began receiving the beams on 11 February. Argon ions have a relatively large mass, as they consist of 40 nucleons, so they can be used in a similar way to lead ions. The main difficulty in accelerating them lies in the SPS, where the variation in acceleration frequency is limited. “The SPS was designed for a...

  6. Thermophysical properties of argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaques, A.

    1988-02-01

    The entire report consists of tables of thermodynamic properties (including sound velocity, thermal conductivity and diffusivity, Prandtl number, density) of argon at 86 to 400/degree/K, in the form of isobars over 0.9 to 100 bars. (DLC)

  7. The OPAL muon barrel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akers, R.J. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Allison, J. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Ashton, P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Bahan, G.A. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Baines, J.T.M. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Banks, J.N. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Barlow, R.J. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Barnett, S. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Beeston, C. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Chrin, J.T.M. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Clowes, S.G. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Davies, O.W. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Duerdoth, I.P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Hinde, P.S. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Hughes-Jones, R.E. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Lafferty, G.D. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Loebinger, F.K. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Macbeth, A.A. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; McGowan, R.F. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Moss, M.W. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Murphy, P.G. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Nijjhar, B. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; O`Dowd, A.J.P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Pawley, S.J. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Phillips, P.D. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Richards, G.E.

    1995-04-21

    The barrel part of the OPAL muon detector consists of 110 drift chambers forming four layers outside the hadron absorber. Each chamber covers an area of 1.2 m by up to 10.4 m and has two cells with wires parallel to the beam and a drift distance of 297 mm. A detailed description of the design, construction, operation and performance of the sub-detector is given. The system has been operating successfully since the start of LEP in 1989. ((orig.)).

  8. Response Uniformity of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Aharrouche, M; Di Ciaccio, L; El Kacimi, M; Gaumer, O; Gouanère, M; Goujdami, D; Lafaye, R; Laplace, S; Le Maner, C; Neukermans, L; Perrodo, P; Poggioli, L; Prieur, D; Przysiezniak, H; Sauvage, G; Wingerter-Seez, I; Zitoun, R; Lanni, F; Lü, L; Ma, H; Rajagopalan, S; Takai, H; Belymam, A; Benchekroun, D; Hakimi, M; Hoummada, A; Gao, Y; Stroynowsk, R; Aleksa, M; Carli, T; Fassnacht, P; Gianotti, F; Hervás, L; Lampl, W; Collot, J; Hostachy, J Y; Ledroit-Guillon, F; Malek, F; Martin, P; Viret, S; Leltchouk, M; Parsons, J A; Simion, S; Barreiro, F; Del Peso, J; Labarga, L; Oliver, C; Rodier, S; Barrillon, P; Benchouk, C; Djama, F; Hubaut, F; Monnier, E; Pralavorio, P; Sauvage, D; Serfon, C; Tisserant, S; Tóth, J; Banfi, D; Carminati, L; Cavalli, D; Costa, G; Delmastro, M; Fanti, M; Mandell, L; Mazzanti, M; Tartarelli, F; Kotov, K; Maslennikov, A; Pospelov, G; Tikhonov, Yu; Bourdarios, C; Fayard, L; Fournier, D; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Kado, M; Parrour, G; Puzo, P; Rousseau, D; Sacco, R; Serin, L; Unal, G; Zerwas, D; Dekhissi, B; Derkaoui, J; EL Kharrim, A; Maaroufi, F; Cleland, W; Lacour, D; Laforge, B; Nikolic-Audit, I; Schwemling, Ph; Ghazlane, H; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R; Idrissi Fakhr-Eddine, A; Boonekamp, M; Kerschen, N; Mansoulié, B; Meyer, P; Schwindlingy, J; Lund-Jensen, B

    2007-01-01

    The construction of the ATLAS electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter modules is completed and all the modules are assembled and inserted in the cryostats. During the production period four barrel and three endcap modules were exposed to test beams in order to assess their performance, ascertain the production quality and reproducibility, and to scrutinize the complete energy reconstruction chain from the readout and calibration electronics to the signal and energy reconstruction. It was also possible to check the full Monte Carlo simulation of the calorimeter. The analysis of the uniformity, resolution and extraction of constant term is presented. Typical non-uniformities of 0.5% and typical global constant terms of 0.6% are measured for the barrel and end-cap modules.

  9. TRT and SCT barrels merge

    CERN Multimedia

    Wells, P S

    2006-01-01

    The SCT barrel was inserted in the TRT on 17 February, just missing Valentine's day. This was a change of emphasis for the two detectors. In the preceeding months there had been a lot of focus on testing their performance. The TRT had been observing cosmic rays through several sectors of the barrel, and all the modules on each of the four layers of the SCT had been characterised prior to integration. In parallel, the engineering teams, lead by Marco Olcese, Andrea Catinaccio, Eric Perrin, Neil Dixon, Iourii Gusakov, Gerard Barbier and Takashi Kohriki, had been preparing for this critical operation. Figure 1: Neil Dixon and Marco Olcese verifying the final alignment The two detectors had to be painstakingly aligned to be concentric to within a millimetre. The SCT was held on a temporary cantilever stand, and the TRT in the ID trolley had to inch over it. Finally the weight of the SCT was transferred to the rails on the inside of the TRT itself. The SCT services actually protruded a little outside the oute...

  10. Mechanical Self-shrinkage of Artillery Barrels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Ciorba

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective of this paper is to define what self-shrink artillery barrel is. She is considered to be a compound barrel like as a thick-walled tube (k>2, in his wall being introduced a state of stress and strain using specific technological proceeds. This type of treatment is aimed to increase the artillery barrel load capacity and wear resistance in operation. The experimental part was realized using an industrial plant at Mechanical Factory of Resita. This part presents a comparative study between mechanical self-shrinkage on artillery head barrel, first using a mandrel and seconds a ball.

  11. Readiness of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter for LHC Collisions

    CERN Document Server

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Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Berg, R; van der Graaf, H; van der Kraaij, E; van der Poel, E; Van Der Ster, D; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; van Kesteren, Z; van Vulpen, I; Vandelli, W; Vandoni, G; Vaniachine, A; Vankov, P; Vannucci, F; Varela Rodriguez, F; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vasilyeva, L; Vassilakopoulos, V I; Vazeille, F; Vegni, G; Veillet, J J; Vellidis, C; Veloso, F; Veness, R; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Ventura, D; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vetterli, M C; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Viehhauser, G H A; Villa, M; Villani, E G; Villaplana Perez, M; Villate, J; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinek, E; Vinogradov, V B; Viret, S; Virzi, J; Vitale, A; Vitells, O V; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaques, F; Vlachos, S; Vlasak, M; Vlasov, N; Vogt, H; Vokac, P; Volpi, M; Volpini, G; von der Schmitt, H; von Loeben, J; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorobiev, A P; Vorwerk, V; Vos, M; Voss, R; Voss, T T; 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Zitoun, R; Zivkovic, L; Zmouchko, V V; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter has been operating continuously since August 2006. At this time, only part of the calorimeter was readout, but since the beginning of 2008, all calorimeter cells have been connected to the ATLAS readout system in preparation for LHC collisions. This paper gives an overview of the liquid argon calorimeter performance measured in situ with random triggers, calibration data, cosmic muons, and LHC beam splash events. Results on the detector operation, timing performance, electronics noise, and gain stability are presented. High energy deposits from radiative cosmic muons and beam splash events allow to check the intrinsic constant term of the energy resolution. The uniformity of the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter response along eta (averaged over phi) is measured at the percent level using minimum ionizing cosmic muons. Finally, studies of electromagnetic showers from radiative muons have been used to cross-check the Monte Carlo simulation. The performance results obtained u...

  12. Simulations of argon accident scenarios in the ATLAS experimental cavern a safety analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Balda, F

    2002-01-01

    Some characteristic accidents in the ATLAS experimental cavern (UX15) are simulated by means of STAR-CD, a code using the "Finite-Volume" method. These accidents involve different liquid argon leaks from the barrel cryostat of the detector, thus causing the dispersion of the argon into the Muon Chamber region and the evaporation of the liquid. The subsequent temperature gradients and distribution of argon concentrations, as well as their evolution in time are simulated and discussed, with the purpose of analysing the dangers related to asphyxiation and to contact with cryogenic fluids for the working personnel. A summary of the theory that stands behind the code is also given. In order to validate the models, an experimental test on a liquid argon spill performed earlier is simulated, showing that the program is able to output reliable results. At the end, some safety-related recommendations are listed.

  13. Recent results from Crystal Barrel

    CERN Document Server

    Doser, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The Crystal Barrel detector has collected data on antiproton annihilation on Hydrogen and Deuterium at rest and at momenta up to 1940 MeV/c, accumulating a total of 600 M events with the goal of studying meson spectroscopy and searching for non-qbarq states. This large amount of data has allowed high statistics studies of exclusive final states produced under various initial conditions. Comparisons between different initial and final states greatly constrain the interpretation of these data sets. In particular, the requirement of consistency between fits of 3-body final state Dalitz plots is a powerful tool in the search for non-standard model resonances [1]. More recently, the study of the same Dalitz plot produced from antiproton annihilation on liquid and gaseous hydrogen, on deuterium or on liquid hydrogen at different center-of-mass energies has extended this approach to higher mass resonances.

  14. Prototyping the PANDA Barrel DIRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, C., E-mail: C.Schwarz@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Kalicy, G.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Dodokhov, V.Kh. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A. [Friedrich Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); and others

    2014-12-01

    The design of the Barrel DIRC detector for the future PANDA experiment at FAIR contains several important improvements compared to the successful BABAR DIRC, such as focusing and fast timing. To test those improvements as well as other design options a prototype was build and successfully tested in 2012 with particle beams at CERN. The prototype comprises a radiator bar, focusing lens, mirror, and a prism shaped expansion volume made of synthetic fused silica. An array of micro-channel plate photomultiplier tubes measures the location and arrival time of the Cherenkov photons with sub-nanosecond resolution. The development of a fast reconstruction algorithm allowed to tune construction details of the detector setup with test beam data and Monte-Carlo simulations.

  15. RESISTANCE OF FIRE-HOSE BARRELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Kachanov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Values of hydraulic resistance of main fire-hose barrels are determined in the paper. Such approach has made it possible to obtain analytical dependencies between main parameters of fire jets with due account of hydraulic losses in fire-hose barrels.

  16. Liquid argon neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Battistoni, G

    2001-01-01

    The liquid argon imaging technique, as proposed for the ICARUS detector, offers the possibility to perform complementary and simultaneous measurements of neutrinos, as those of CERN to Gran Sasso beam (CNGS) and those from cosmic ray events. For the currently allowed values of the Super-Kamiokande results, the combination of both CNGS and atmospheric data will provide a precise determination of the oscillation parameters. Since one can observe and unambiguously identify nu /sub e/, nu /sub mu / and nu /sub tau / components, this technology allows to explore the full (3*3) mixing matrix. The same class of detector can be proposed for high precision measurements at a neutrino factory. (3 refs).

  17. Isentropic compression of argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veeser, L.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Oona, H. [and others

    1997-06-01

    The compression was done in an MC-1 flux compression (explosive) generator, in order to study the transition from an insulator to a conductor. Since conductivity signals were observed in all the experiments (except when the probe is removed), both the Teflon and the argon are becoming conductive. The conductivity could not be determined (Teflon insulation properties unknown), but it could be bounded as being {sigma}=1/{rho}{le}8({Omega}cm){sub -1}, because when the Teflon breaks down, the dielectric constant is reduced. The Teflon insulator problem remains, and other ways to better insulate the probe or to measure the conductivity without a probe is being sought.

  18. Drift Time Measurement in the ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic Calorimeter using Cosmic Muons

    CERN Document Server

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Olcese, M; Olchevski, A G; Oliveira, M; Oliveira Damazio, D; Oliver, J; Oliver Garcia, E; Olivito, D; Olszewski, A; Olszowska, J; Omachi, C; Onofre, A; Onyisi, P U E; Oram, C J; Ordonez, G; Oreglia, M J; Oren, Y; Orestano, D; Orlov, I; Oropeza Barrera, C; Orr, R S; Ortega, E O; Osculati, B; Ospanov, R; Osuna, C; Otec, R; Ottersbach, J P; Ould-Saada, F; Ouraou, A; Ouyang, Q; Owen, M; Owen, S; Oyarzun, A; Ozcan, V E; Ozone, K; Ozturk, N; Pacheco Pages, A; Padhi, S; Padilla Aranda, C; Paganis, E; Pahl, C; Paige, F; Pajchel, K; Palestini, S; Pallin, D; Palma, A; Palmer, J D; Pan, Y B; Panagiotopoulou, E; Panes, B; Panikashvili, N; Panitkin, S; Pantea, D; Panuskova, M; Paolone, V; Papadopoulou, Th D; Park, S J; Park, W; Parker, M A; Parker, S I; Parodi, F; Parsons, J A; Parzefall, U; Pasqualucci, E; Passardi, G; Passeri, A; Pastore, F; Pastore, Fr; Pásztor, G; Pataraia, S; Pater, J R; Patricelli, S; Patwa, A; Pauly, T; Peak, L S; Pecsy, M; Pedraza Morales, M I; Peleganchuk, S V; Peng, H; Penson, A; Penwell, J; Perantoni, M; Perez, K; Perez Codina, E; Pérez García-Estañ, M T; Perez Reale, V; Perini, L; Pernegger, H; Perrino, R; Perrodo, P; Persembe, S; Perus, P; Peshekhonov, V D; Petersen, B A; Petersen, J; Petersen, T C; Petit, E; Petridou, C; Petrolo, E; Petrucci, F; Petschull, D; Petteni, M; Pezoa, R; Pfeifer, B; Phan, A; Phillips, A W; Piacquadio, G; Piccinini, M; Piegaia, R; Pilcher, J E; Pilkington, A D; Pina, J; Pinamonti, M; Pinfold, J L; Ping, J; Pinto, B; Pizio, C; Placakyte, R; Plamondon, M; Plano, W G; Pleier, M A; Poblaguev, A; Poddar, S; Podlyski, F; Poffenberger, P; Poggioli, L; Pohl, M; Polci, F; Polesello, G; Policicchio, A; Polini, A; Poll, J; Polychronakos, V; Pomarede, D M; Pomeroy, D; Pommès, K; Pontecorvo, L; Pope, B G; Popovic, D S; Poppleton, A; Popule, J; Portell Bueso, X; Porter, R; Pospelov, G E; Pospichal, P; Pospisil, S; Potekhin, M; Potrap, I N; Potter, C J; Potter, C T; Potter, K P; Poulard, G; Poveda, J; Prabhu, R; Pralavorio, P; Prasad, S; Pravahan, R; 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Seiden, A; Seifert, F; Seixas, J M; Sekhniaidze, G; Seliverstov, D M; Sellden, B; Seman, M; Semprini-Cesari, N; Serfon, C; Serin, L; Seuster, R; Severini, H; Sevior, M E; Sfyrla, A; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shan, L Y; Shank, J T; Shao, Q T; Shapiro, M; Shatalov, P B; Shaver, L; Shaw, K; Sherman, D; Sherwood, P; Shibata, A; Shimojima, M; Shin, T; Shmeleva, A; Shochet, M J; Shupe, M A; Sicho, P; Sidoti, A; Siebel, A; Siegert, F; Siegrist, J; Sijacki, Dj; Silbert, O; Silva, J; Silver, Y; Silverstein, D; Silverstein, S B; Simak, V; Simic, Lj; Simion, S; Simmons, B; Simonyan, M; Sinervo, P; Sinev, N B; Sipica, V; Siragusa, G; Sisakyan, A N; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sjoelin, J; Sjursen, T B; Skubic, P; Skvorodnev, N; Slater, M; Slavicek, T; Sliwa, K; Sloper, J; Sluka, T; Smakhtin, V; Smirnov, S Yu; Smirnov, Y; Smirnova, L N; Smirnova, O; Smith, B C; Smith, D; Smith, K M; Smizanska, M; Smolek, K; Snesarev, A A; Snow, S W; Snow, J; Snuverink, J; Snyder, S; Soares, M; Sobie, R; Sodomka, J; Soffer, A; Solans, C A; Solar, M; Solc, J; Solfaroli Camillocci, E; Solodkov, A A; Solovyanov, O V; Soluk, R; Sondericker, J; Sopko, V; Sopko, B; Sosebee, M; Sosnovtsev, V V; Sospedra Suay, L; Soukharev, A; Spagnolo, S; Spanó, F; Speckmayer, P; Spencer, E; Spighi, R; Spigo, G; Spila, F; Spiwoks, R; Spousta, M; Spreitzer, T; Spurlock, B; St Denis, R D; Stahl, T; Stahlman, J; Stamen, R; Stancu, S N; Stanecka, E; Stanek, R W; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, S; Starchenko, E A; Stark, J; Staroba, P; Starovoitov, P; Stastny, J; Staude, A; Stavina, P; Stavropoulos, G; Steele, G; Steinbach, P; Steinberg, P; Stekl, I; Stelzer, B; Stelzer, H J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stenzel, H; Stevenson, K; Stewart, G; Stockton, M C; Stoerig, K; Stoicea, G; Stonjek, S; Strachota, P; Stradling, A; Straessner, A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strandlie, A; Strauss, M; Strizenec, P; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D M; Strong, J A; Stroynowski, R; Strube, J; Stugu, B; Stumer, I; Soh, D A; Su, D; Suchkov, S I; Sugaya, Y; Sugimoto, T; Suhr, C; Suk, M; Sulin, V V; Sultansoy, S; Sumida, T; Sun, X; Sundermann, J E; Suruliz, K; Sushkov, S; Susinno, G; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, T; Suzuki, Y; Sviridov, Yu M; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Szymocha, T; Sánchez, J; Ta, D; Tackmann, K; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taga, A; Takahashi, Y; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Talby, M; Talyshev, A; Tamsett, M C; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tanaka, S; Tappern, G P; Tapprogge, S; Tardif, D; Tarem, S; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tassi, E; Tatarkhanov, M; Taylor, C; Taylor, F E; Taylor, G N; Taylor, R P; Taylor, W; Teixeira-Dias, P; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Tennenbaum-Katan, Y D; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Terwort, M; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Tevlin, C M; Thadome, J; Thananuwong, R; Thioye, M; Thoma, S; Thomas, J P; Thomas, T L; Thompson, E N; Thompson, P D; Thompson, P D; Thompson, R J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thun, R P; Tic, T; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Y A; Timmermans, C J W P; Tipton, P; Tique Aires Viegas, F J; Tisserant, S; Tobias, J; Toczek, B; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Toggerson, B; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tomasek, L; Tomasek, M; Tomasz, F; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, D; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Tong, G; Tonoyan, A; Topfel, C; Topilin, N D; Torrence, E; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Tovey, S N; Trefzger, T; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Trinh, T N; Tripiana, M F; Triplett, N; Trischuk, W; Trivedi, A; Trocmé, B; Troncon, C; Trzupek, A; Tsarouchas, C; Tseng, J C L; Tsiafis, I; Tsiakiris, M; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsionou, D; Tsipolitis, G; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsung, J W; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turala, M; Turecek, D; Turk Cakir, I; Turlay, E; Tuts, P M; Twomey, M S; Tylmad, M; Tyndel, M; Tzanakos, G; Uchida, K; Ueda, I; Ugland, M; Uhlenbrock, M; Uhrmacher, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Underwood, D G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Unno, Y; Urbaniec, D; Urkovsky, E; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Usai, G; Uslenghi, M; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Vahsen, S; Valenta, J; Valente, P; Valentinetti, S; Valkar, S; Valladolid Gallego, E; Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Berg, R; van der Graaf, H; van der Kraaij, E; van der Poel, E; Van Der Ster, D; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; van Kesteren, Z; van Vulpen, I; Vandelli, W; Vandoni, G; Vaniachine, A; Vankov, P; Vannucci, F; Varela Rodriguez, F; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vasilyeva, L; Vassilakopoulos, V I; Vazeille, F; Vegni, G; Veillet, J J; Vellidis, C; Veloso, F; Veness, R; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Ventura, D; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vetterli, M C; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Viehhauser, G H A; Villa, M; Villani, E G; Villaplana Perez, M; Villate, J; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinek, E; Vinogradov, V B; Viret, S; Virzi, J; Vitale, A; Vitells, O V; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaques, F; Vlachos, S; Vlasak, M; Vlasov, N; Vogel, A; Vokac, P; Volpi, M; Volpini, G; von der Schmitt, H; von Loeben, J; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorobiev, A P; Vorwerk, V; Vos, M; Voss, R; Voss, T T; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Vudragovic, D; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Wagner, P; Wahlen, H; Walbersloh, J; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wall, R; Wang, C; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J C; Wang, S M; Ward, C P; Warsinsky, M; Wastie, R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, A T; Waugh, B M; Webel, M; Weber, J; Weber, M D; Weber, M; Weber, M S; Weber, P; Weidberg, A R; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Wellenstein, H; Wells, P S; Wen, M; Wenaus, T; Wendler, S; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Werth, M; Werthenbach, U; Wessels, M; Whalen, K; Wheeler-Ellis, S J; Whitaker, S P; White, A; White, M J; White, S; Whiteson, D; Whittington, D; Wicek, F; Wicke, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik, L A M; Wildauer, A; Wildt, M A; Wilhelm, I; Wilkens, H G; Williams, E; Williams, H H; Willis, W; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wilson, M G; Wilson, A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F; Wittgen, M; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wraight, K; Wright, C; Wright, D; Wrona, B; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wulf, E; Xella, S; Xie, S; Xie, Y; Xu, D; Xu, N; Yamada, M; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, S; Yamamura, T; Yamanaka, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamazaki, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, U K; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yao, W M; Yao, Y; Yasu, Y; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yilmaz, M; Yoosoofmiya, R; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Young, C; Youssef, S P; Yu, D; Yu, J; Yu, M; Yu, X; Yuan, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zajacova, Z; Zambrano, V; Zanello, L; Zarzhitsky, P; Zaytsev, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zeller, M; Zema, P F; Zemla, A; Zendler, C; Zenin, O; Zenis, T; Zenonos, Z; Zenz, S; Zerwas, D; Zevi della Porta, G; Zhan, Z; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, Q; Zhang, X; Zhao, L; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, S; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, N; Zhou, Y; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhuravlov, V; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Ziolkowski, M; Zitoun, R; Zivkovic, L; Zmouchko, V V; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V

    2010-01-01

    The ionization signals in the liquid argon of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter are studied in detail using cosmic muons. In particular, the drift time of the ionization electrons is measured and used to assess the intrinsic uniformity of the calorimeter gaps and estimate its impact on the constant term of the energy resolution. The drift times of electrons in the cells of the second layer of the calorimeter are uniform at the level of 1.3% in the barrel and 2.7% in the endcaps. This leads to an estimated contribution to the constant term of 0.29% in the barrel and 0.53% in the endcaps. The same data are used to measure the drift velocity of ionization electrons in liquid argon, which is found to be 4.61 +- 0.07 mm/microsecond at 88.5 K and 1 kV/mm.

  19. Celebrating the Barrel Toroid commissioning

    CERN Multimedia

    Peter Jenni

    ATLAS invited Funding Agency representatives and Laboratory Heads directly related to the funding and construction of the Barrel Toroid for a small ceremony on 13th December 2006 at Point 1, in order to mark the successful first full excitation of the BT (see last eNews). On that date, which was during the December CERN Council week, several of the Funding Agency Heads or their representatives could be present, representing CEA France, INFN Italy, BMBF Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Russia, JINR Dubna and CERN. Speeches were delivered by the ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni thanking the Funding Partners in the name of the Collaboration, by Magnet Project Leader Herman ten Kate tracing the BT construction history, and by the CERN Director-General Robert Aymar congratulating all those who have contributed to the successful project. Herman ten Kate addressing the delegates. The text of the introductory address by Peter Jenni is reproduced here. "It is a great pleasure for me to welcome you all here...

  20. High performance railgun barrels for laboratory use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, David P.; Newman, Duane C.

    1993-01-01

    High performance low-cost, laboratory railgun barrels are now available, comprised of an inherently stiff containment structure which surrounds the bore components machined from 'off the-shelf' materials. The shape of the containment structure was selected to make the barrel inherently stiff. The structure consists of stainless steel laminations which do not compromise the electrical efficiency of the railgun. The modular design enhances the utility of the barrel, as it is easy to service between shots, and can be 're-cored' to produce different configurations and sizes using the same structure. We have produced barrels ranging from 15 mm to 90 mm square bore, a 30 mm round bore, and in lengths varying from 0.25 meters to 10 meters long. Successful tests with both plasma and solid metal armatures have demonstrated the versatility and performance of this design.

  1. Work on the ATLAS semiconductor tracker barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    Precision work is performed on the semiconductor tracker barrel of the ATLAS experiment. All work on these delicate components must be performed in a clean room so that impurities in the air, such as dust, do not contaminate the detector. The semiconductor tracker will be mounted in the barrel close to the heart of the ATLAS experiment to detect the path of particles produced in proton-proton collisions.

  2. First SCT Barrel arrives at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Apsimon, R

    Mid-January saw the arrival at CERN of Barrel #3, the first of four SCT barrels. The barrels are formed as low-mass cylinders of carbon fibre skins on a honeycomb carbon core. They are manufactured in industry and then have all the final precision supports added and the final geometric metrology carried out at Geneva University. Barrel #3, complete with its 384 silicon detector modules, arrived by road from Oxford University in England where the modules were mounted using a purpose-built robot. The modules had been selected from the output of all four barrel module building clusters (in Japan, Scandinavia, USA and the UK). Since Barrel #3 will be exposed to high radiation levels within the tracker volume, these modules, representing over half a million readout channels, have been extensively tested at their operational temperature of around -25 degrees Celcius and at voltages of up to 500V. The dangers of shipping such a fragile component of ATLAS were apparent to all and considerable attention was focused...

  3. The TileCal Barrel Test Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Leitner, R

    On 30th October, the mechanics test assembly of the central barrel of the ATLAS tile hadronic calorimeter was completed in building 185. It started on 23rd June and is the second wheel for the Tilecal completely assembled this year. The ATLAS engineers and technicians are quick: instead of the 27 weeks initially foreseen for assembling the central barrel of the tile hadronic calorimeter (Tilecal) in building 185, they inserted the last of the 64 modules on 30th October after only 19 weeks. In part, this was due to the experience gained in the dry run assembly of the first extended barrel, produced in Spain, in spring this year (see Bulletin 23/2003); however, the central barrel is twice as long - and twice as heavy. With a length of 6.4 metres, an outer diameter of 8.5 metres and an inner diameter of 4.5 metres, the object weight is 1300 tonnes. The whole barrel cylinder is supported by the stainless steel support structure weighing only 27 tons. The barrel also has to have the right shape: over the whole 8...

  4. Depleted argon from underground sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, H.O.; /Princeton U.; Alton, A.; /Augustana U. Coll.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; /Princeton U.; Kendziora, C.; /Fermilab; Loer, B.; /Princeton U.; Montanari, D.; /Fermilab; Mosteiro, P.; /Princeton U.; Pordes, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Argon is a powerful scintillator and an excellent medium for detection of ionization. Its high discrimination power against minimum ionization tracks, in favor of selection of nuclear recoils, makes it an attractive medium for direct detection of WIMP dark matter. However, cosmogenic {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. The cosmic ray shielding by the earth means that Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar. In Cortez Colorado a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 500ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. In order to produce argon for dark matter detectors we first concentrate the argon locally to 3-5% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation. The N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous cryogenic distillation in the Cryogenic Distillation Column recently built at Fermilab. In this talk we will discuss the entire extraction and purification process; with emphasis on the recent commissioning and initial performance of the cryogenic distillation column purification.

  5. Liquid Argon Calorimeter - Barrel Cryostat Construction and Testing May-June 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    US, ATLAS

    1999-01-01

    Photo 1 - Outer Cold Cryostat showing 'Y' support. Photo 2 - Outer Cold Vessel half showing 'X' and 'Z' stops and 'Y' supports. Photo 3 - Cold Vessel Bulkhead, End 'C'. Photo 4 - Outer Cold Vessel half, showing EM Calorimeter support rail. Photo 5 - End of Outer Cold Vessel showing EM Calorimeter support rail. Photo 6 - Al/SST Transitions for Signal and High Voltage feedthroughs. Test weld blocks shown in background. Photo 7 - Welding of Al/SST Transitions onto Outer Cold Vessel. Photo 8 - Al/SST Transitions, including test pumpouts. Photo 9 - Machining of Inner Cold vessel. Photo 10 - Warm Vessel being assembled for leak testing Photo 11 - Setting up Warm Vessel on test stand. Photo 12 - Warm Vessel assembly for testing complete. Photo 13 - Dial indicators mounted against the Warm Vessel Bulkhead during testing. Photo 14 - Pumping on Warm Vessel. Photo 15 - Pumping on the Warm Vessel. Photo 16 - Checking the Solenoid Chimney. Photo 17 - Leak checking the Inner Warm Vessel/Bulkhead flange in the area of ID co...

  6. The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Adamowski, M; Dvorak, E; Hahn, A; Jaskierny, W; Johnson, C; Jostlein, H; Kendziora, C; Lockwitz, S; Pahlka, B; Plunkett, R; Pordes, S; Rebel, B; Schmitt, R; Stancari, M; Tope, T; Voirin, E; Yang, T

    2014-01-01

    The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator was an R&D test stand designed to determine if electron drift lifetimes adequate for large neutrino detectors could be achieved without first evacuating the cryostat. We describe here the cryogenic system, its operations, and the apparatus used to determine the contaminant levels in the argon and to measure the electron drift lifetime. The liquid purity obtained by this system was facilitated by a gaseous argon purge. Additionally, gaseous impurities from the ullage were prevented from entering the liquid at the gas-liquid interface by condensing the gas and filtering the resulting liquid before returning to the cryostat. The measured electron drift lifetime in this test was greater than 6 ms, sustained over several periods of many weeks. Measurements of the temperature profile in the argon, to assess convective flow and boiling, were also made and are compared to simulation.

  7. The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamowski, M.; Carls, B.; Dvorak, E.; Hahn, A.; Jaskierny, W.; Johnson, C.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Lockwitz, S.; Pahlka, B.; Plunkett, R.; Pordes, S.; Rebel, B.; Schmitt, R.; Stancari, M.; Tope, T.; Voirin, E.; Yang, T.

    2014-07-01

    The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator was an R&D test stand designed to determine if electron drift lifetimes adequate for large neutrino detectors could be achieved without first evacuating the cryostat. We describe here the cryogenic system, its operations, and the apparatus used to determine the contaminant levels in the argon and to measure the electron drift lifetime. The liquid purity obtained by this system was facilitated by a gaseous argon purge. Additionally, gaseous impurities from the ullage were prevented from entering the liquid at the gas-liquid interface by condensing the gas and filtering the resulting liquid before returning to the cryostat. The measured electron drift lifetime in this test was greater than 6 ms, sustained over several periods of many weeks. Measurements of the temperature profile in the argon, to assess convective flow and boiling, were also made and are compared to simulation.

  8. Iron Blocks of CMS Magnet Barrel Yoke.

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    On the occasion of presenting the CMS Award 2000 to Deggendorfer Werft und Eisenbau GmbH the delivered blocks were inspected at CERN Point 5. From left to right: H. Gerwig (CERN, CMS Magnet Barrel Yoke Coordinator), G. Waurick (CERN), F. Leher (DWE, Project Engineer) and W. Schuster (DWE, Project Manager).

  9. Celebration for the ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Representatives from Funding Agencies and Barrel Toroid Magnet Laboratories during the ceremony. From left to right: Jean Zinn-Justin (Head of DAPNIA/CEA/Saclay), CERN Director-General Robert Aymar, and Roberto Petronzio (President INFN).Allan Clark (DPNC University Geneva) and Enrique Fernandez (IFAE Barcelona) were among the guests visiting the ATLAS cavern. The barrel toroid is visible in the background. A celebration took place at Point 1 on 13 December to toast the recent powering-up of the ATLAS barrel toroid magnet to full field (Bulletin No. 47-48/06). About 70 guests were invited to attend, mainly composed of representatives from funding partners and key members of the laboratory management teams of the barrel toroid magnet, representing CEA France, INFN Italy, BMBF Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Russia, JINR Dubna and CERN. An introductory speech by ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni the scene for evening. This was followed by the ATLAS magnet system project leader Herman Ten Kate's account of the...

  10. ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet reached nominal field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

     On 9 November the barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas, with an electrical current of 21 000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils as shown on this graph

  11. ATLAS semiconductor tracker installed into its barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS silicon tracker is installed in the silicon tracker barrel. Absolute precision was required in this operation to ensure that the tracker was inserted without damage through minimal clearance. The installation was performed in a clean room on the CERN site so that no impurities in the air would contaminate the tracker's systems.

  12. Fano factor in pure argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fano factor for 5.3 MeV alpha particles in pure argon has been measured with a gridded ionization chamber and estimated to be 0.20 (+0.01-0.02). The obtained value is consistent with the theoretical value if the contribution of elastic nuclear collisions to the Fano factor is taken into the consideration. There is no appreciable difference between the values for pure argon and for a gas mixture of Ar (10%)CH4 obtained in the previous measurement. (orig.)

  13. Barrel calorimeter of the CMD-3 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shebalin, V. E., E-mail: V.E.Shebalin@inp.nsk.su; Anisenkov, A. V.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Bashtovoy, N. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Epifanov, D. A. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Epshteyn, L. B.; Grebenuk, A. A.; Ignatov, F. V.; Erofeev, A. L.; Kovalenko, O. A.; Kozyrev, A. N.; Kuzmin, A. S.; Logashenko, I. B.; Mikhailov, K. Yu.; Razuvaev, G. P.; Ruban, A. A.; Shwartz, B. A.; Talyshev, A. A.; Titov, V. M.; Yudin, Yu. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The structure of the barrel calorimeter of the CMD-3 detector is presented in this work. The procedure of energy calibration of the calorimeter and the method of photon energy restoration are described. The distinctive feature of this barrel calorimeter is its combined structure; it is composed of two coaxial subsystems: a liquid xenon calorimeter and a crystalline CsI calorimeter. The calorimeter spatial resolution of the photon conversion point is about 2 mm, which corresponds to an angular resolution of ∼6 mrad. The energy resolution of the calorimeter is about 8% for photons with energy of 200 MeV and 4% for photons with energy of 1 GeV.

  14. Attainable superheat of argon-helium, argon-neon solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidakov, Vladimir G; Kaverin, Aleksey M; Andbaeva, Valentina N

    2008-10-16

    The method of lifetime measurement has been used to investigate the kinetics of spontaneous boiling-up of superheated argon-helium and argon-neon solutions. Experiments were made at a pressure of p = 1.5 MPa and concentrations up to 0.33 mol% in the range of nucleation rates from 10 (4) to 10 (8) s (-1) m (-3). The homogeneous nucleation regime has been distinguished. With good agreement between experimental data and homogeneous nucleation theory in temperature and concentration dependences of the nucleation rate, a systematic underestimation by 0.25-0.34 K has been revealed in superheat temperatures over the saturated line attained by experiment as compared with theoretical values calculated in a macroscopic approximation. The revealed disagreement between theory and experiment is connected with the dependence of the properties of new-phase nuclei on their size.

  15. Technical Diagnostics of Tank Cannon Smooth Barrel Bore and Ramming Device

    OpenAIRE

    Jiri Balla; Stanislav Prochazka; Robert Jankovych; Stanislav Beer; Zbynek Krist; Michal Kovarik

    2015-01-01

    The technical diagnostics of 125 mm tank cannon 2A46 smooth barrel and ramming devices are discussed respectively. Focuses on barrel diagnostics and suggests new procedures based on reconstructed BG20 Gun Barrel Bore Gauge System, measuring internal diameter of the barrel bore. The new system measures throughout the whole barrel bore the inner diameter not only at the beginning of barrel bore as it was usually measured before. Different nature of barrel wear was revealed between barrels firin...

  16. Binocular indirect argon laser photocoagulator.

    OpenAIRE

    Mizuno, K

    1981-01-01

    The binocular indirect argon laser photocoagulator was newly designed to enable visualisation of the entire fundus during panretinal laser photocoagulation and to treat retinal tears immediately after buckling procedures of the sclera. The lamp housing of the binocular ophthalmoscope was remodelled and adjusted so that the laser beam and illuminating light are coaxial after leaving the ophthalmoscope. The blocking filter was permanently fixed in the eye-pieces to lighten the weight of the oph...

  17. Radiation hard micro-coaxial cables for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Bonivento, W; Imbert, P; de La Taille, C

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has chosen for the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter and for all the end-cap calorimeters a sampling technique, with liquid argon as the active medium. The read-out electronics and the calibration pulsers are located in boxes outside the cryostats housing the detectors. Signals are transmitted between the detectors and the electronic boxes through custom-designed micro- coaxial cables, which are the subject of this paper. These cables have to satisfy very stringent tolerances in terms of signal transmission, dimensions and radiation hardness. Following a successful pre-series production, these cables have been selected for equipping the ATLAS calorimeter. (16 refs).

  18. 3D Printing the ATLAS' barrel toroid

    CERN Document Server

    Goncalves, Tiago Barreiro

    2016-01-01

    The present report summarizes my work as part of the Summer Student Programme 2016 in the CERN IR-ECO-TSP department (International Relations – Education, Communication & Outreach – Teacher and Student Programmes). Particularly, I worked closely with the S’Cool LAB team on a science education project. This project included the 3D designing, 3D printing, and assembling of a model of the ATLAS’ barrel toroid. A detailed description of the project' development is presented and a short manual on how to use 3D printing software and hardware is attached.

  19. The crystal barrel spectrometer at LEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Crystal Barrel spectrometer used at LEAR, CERN to study the products of anti pp and anti pd annihilations is described. A 1380 element array of CsI crystals measures photons from the decay of π0, η, η' and ω mesons. A segmented drift chamber in a 1.5 T magnetic field is used to identify and measure charged particles. A fast on-line trigger on charged and neutral multiplicities and on the invariant mass of secondary particles is available. The performance of the detector is discussed. (orig.)

  20. Composing Experimental Environment of PRIDE Argon cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Seonho; Jang, Yongkuk; Cho, Il Je [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In PRIDE depleted Uranium feed material and a depleted Uranium mixed with some surrogate material are used for performing engineering scale Pyroprocessing. PRIDE has to maintain inert atmosphere because of the characteristic of Electrolytic Reduction technology, Electro refining technology, Electrowinning technology. The impurity concentration of the Argon cell has to be under 50 ppm(Oxygen, moisture). Atmospheric pressure changes and temperature changes can affect the Argon cell's impurity concentration. In this paper, how to compose the Argon cell impurity concentration under 50 ppm to make the exact optimal experimental environment(Oxygen, moisture) will be introduced. Composing the exact optimal experimental environment by supplying Argon gas have been introduced in this paper. Continuously supplying Argon gas which is heavier than the Oxygen through the bottom of the Argon cell the oxygen eventually discharged through the high vent fan and lower the impurity concentration of Oxygen.

  1. Insertion of the first half-barrel of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter into its cryostat

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The first cylinder of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter barrel and the presampler have been inserted in the cryostat.The ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter is intended to detect electrons, positrons and photons by measuring the energy they deposit on being absorbed. The cylinder of the calorimeter is in two halves, that will be sunk in a liquid-argon bath cooled to 90 kelvin (-180°C). Each half-barrel is 3.2 metres long, 53 cm thick and formed by assembling 16 modules. Each module is made up of alternate lead absorbers and electrodes pressed into 64 layers folded accordion-fashion. The presampler, set up inside the cylinder, is an integral part of the calorimeter system: It measures the energy lost by a particle before it reaches the calorimeter. To ensure an ultra-clean environment, a tent (visible here) was erected round the calorimeter and entry point to the cryostat. The detector and presampler, fitted together, could then be slid gradually into the cryostat like a drawer. To do so, the insertion team...

  2. Insertion of the first half-barrel of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter into its cryostat

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The first cylinder of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter barrel and the presampler have been inserted in the cryostat. The ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter is intended to detect electrons, positrons and photons by measuring the energy they deposit on being absorbed. The cylinder of the calorimeter is in two halves, that will be sunk in a liquid-argon bath cooled to 90 kelvin (-180°C). Each half-barrel is 3.2 metres long, 53 cm thick and formed by assembling 16 modules. Each module is made up of alternate lead absorbers and electrodes pressed into 64 layers folded accordion-fashion. The presampler, set up inside the cylinder, is an integral part of the calorimeter system: It measures the energy lost by a particle before it reaches the calorimeter. To ensure an ultra-clean environment, a tent was erected round the calorimeter and entry point to the cryostat. The detector and presampler, fitted together, could then be slid gradually into the cryostat like a drawer. To do so, the insertion team had to fine-t...

  3. ATLAS TRT Barrel in Test Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    Luehring, F

    In July, the TRT group made a highly successful test of 6 Barrel TRT modules in the ATLAS H8 testbeam. Over 3000 TRT straw tubes (4 mm diameter gas drift tubes) were instrumented and found to operate well. The prototype represents 1/16 of the ATLAS TRT barrel and was assembled from TRT modules produced as spares. This was the largest scale test of the TRT to this date and the measured detector performance was as good as or better than what was expected in all cases. The 2004 TRT testbeam setup before final cabling was attached. The readout chain and central DAQ system used in the TRT testbeam is a final prototype for the ATLAS experiment. The TRT electronics used to read out the data were: The Amplifier/Shaper/Discriminator with Baseline Restoration (ASDBLR) chip is the front-end analog chip that shapes and discriminates the electronic pulses generated by the TRT straws. The Digital Time Measurement Read Out Chip (DTMROC) measures the time of the pulse relative to the beam crossing time. The TRT-ROD ...

  4. Cosmic Ray Data in TRT Barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Hance

    "I had a great day in August when I went into SR1," said Daniel Froidevaux, former project leader of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker, "not only had all SCT barrels arrived at CERN, but there were cosmic ray tracks seen in the TRT!" Daniel's excitement was mirrored by the rest of the TRT collaboration when, on July 29, the first cosmic ray tracks were seen in the barrel. Along with many others in the community, Daniel was quick to point out that this is the cumulative result of years of R&D, test beam work, and an intense installation and integration schedule. Indeed, the cosmic ray readout is only possible through the coordination of many efforts, from detector mechanics to module assembly, power and high voltage control, cooling, gas systems, electronics and cabling, data acquisition, and monitoring. "Many people have worked very hard on the the TRT, some of them for more than 10 years," said Brig Williams, the leader of the UPenn group responsible for much of the TRT front end electronics. He ...

  5. Quantitative Testing of Defect for Gun Barrels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chang-long; JI Feng-zhu; WANG Jin; CHEN Zheng-ge

    2007-01-01

    The magnetic flux leakage (MFL) method is commonly used in the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of gun barrels. The key point of MFL testing is to estimate the crack geometry parameters based on the measured signal. The analysis of magnetic leakage fields can be obtained by solving Maxwell's equations using finite element method (FEM).The radial component of magnetic flux density is measured in MFL testing. The peak-peak value, the separation distance between positive and negative peaks of signal and the lift-off value of Hall-sensor are used as the main features of every sample. This paper establishes the multi-regression equations related to the width (the depth) of crack and the main characteristic values. The regression model is tested by use of the magnetic leakage data. The experimental results indicate that the regression equations can accurately predict the 2-D defect geometry parameters and the MFL quantitative testing can be achieved.

  6. 27 CFR 25.141 - Barrels and kegs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Marks, Brands, and Labels § 25.141 Barrels and kegs. (a) General requirements. The brewer's name or trade name and the place of production (city and, if necessary for identification, State) shall be permanently marked on each barrel or keg. If the place of production is...

  7. A Finite Element Solution for Barrel Dynamic Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Zhi-yin; NING Bian-fang; WANG Zai-sen

    2007-01-01

    With the APDL language of ANSYS finite element analysis software, the solution program for barrel dynamic stress is developed. The paper describes the pivotal problems of dynamic strength design and provides a foundation for realizing the engineering and programming of barrel dynamic strength design.

  8. Analysis of Heat Transfer in Actively Cooled Compound Gun Barrel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Bin; XIA Wei

    2005-01-01

    when a gun fires, a large amount of heat is brought in the barrel. Erosion/wear and security problems(self ignition of the propellant) associated with this high thermal energy have to be solved owing to the use of higher combustion gas temperature for improved cannon performance and firing at the sustained high rates. Barrel cooling technologies are the effective measures for addressing this issue. In view of the importance of having knowledge of the heat flux, an approach to calculate heat flux based on measurements was presented and validated. The calculated heat flux is used as the inner boundary condition for modeling heat transfer in a 155 mm mid-wall cooled compound gun barrel. Theoretical analysis and simulated results show that natural air cooling is dramatically slower than the forced liquid mid-wall cooling, accordingly wear life of actively cooled barrel is increased and barrel overheating is prevented.

  9. Transition probabilities for argon I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transition probabilities for ArI lines have been calculated on the basis of the (j,k)-coupling scheme for more than 16000 spectral lines belonging to the transition arrays 4s-np (n=4 to n=9), 5s-np (n=5 to n=9), 6s-np (n=6 to n=9), 7s-np (n=8 to n=9), 4p-ns (n=5 to n=10), 5p-ns (n=6 to n=9), 6p-ns (n=7 to n=8), 4p-nd (n=3 to n=9), 5p-nd (n=4 to n=9), 3d-np (n=5 to n=9), 4d-np (n=6 to n=9), 5d-np (n=7 to n=9), 3d-nf (n=4 to n=9), 4d-nf (n=4 to n=9), 5d-nf (n=5 to n=9), 4f-nd (n=5 to n=9) 5f-nd (n=6 to n=9), 4f-ng (n=5 to n=9), 5f-ng (n=6 to n=9). Inso far as values by other authors exist, comparison is made with these values. It turns out that the results obtained in (j,k)-coupling are close to those obtained in intermediate coupling except for intercombination lines. For high principal and/or orbital quantum numbers the transition probabilities for a multiplet approach those of the corresponding transitions in atomic hydrogen. The calculated values are applied to construct a simplified argon-atom model, which reflects the real transition properties and which allows simplified but realistic non-equilibrium calculations for argon plasmas which deviate from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE)

  10. The barrel EM is cold and full

    CERN Multimedia

    Fournier, D

    After insertion of the two EM wheels in the cryostat in 2003, the cold vessel was finally closed in December (Omega seals and welds). This was then followed by the installation of the solenoid in February, and the closing of the warm vessel in March (see eNews of December 2003). During these few months the LAr cryogenic system was thoroughly tested, and its control system commissioned, each of the ~1000 control points at a time. Finally, in April the cool-down could start. Rather unusual for liquid argon detectors, the cool-down was made in its first part (above 140K) by circulating cold nitrogen gas (instead of liquid nitrogen) in the heat exchangers. The reason was to limit as much as possible temperature gradients in the calorimeter body. With the accordion structure, each of the EM wheel behaves as a single piece, which could be damaged if the supporting rings at its outside would contract faster than the active part inside. Also with improperly controlled gradients, the two wheels - 4 meters in diamete...

  11. Opacity of Shock-Generated Argon Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王藩侯; 陈敬平; 周显明; 李西军; 经福谦; 孟续军; 孙永盛

    2001-01-01

    Argon plasmas with uniform density and temperature are generated by a planar shock wave through argon gas. The opacities of argon plasma, covering the thermodynamic states at temperatures of 1.4-2.2eV and in densities of 0.0083- 0.015 g/cm3, are investigated by measuring the emitted radiance versus time at several visible wavelengths. Comparison of the measured opacities with those calculated demonstrates that the average atom model can be used well to describe the essential transport behaviour of photons in argon plasma under the abovementioned thermodynamic condition. A simplified and self-consistent method to deduce the reflectivity R(λ) at the baseplate surface is applied. It demonstrates that the values of R(λ) are all around 0.4 in the experiments, which are basically in agreement with those given by Erskine previously (1994 J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat.Transfer 51 97).

  12. Status and perspecitves of liquid argon calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of liquid argon calorimeters is reviewed, and experience obtained with these devices is described. Future perspectives of the liquid ionization chamber technique in calorimetry are also discussed. (orig.)

  13. Clinical periodontics with the argon laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkbeiner, R. L.

    1995-04-01

    The argon laser has proven to be a valuable tool for the thermodynamic debridement of the periodontal lesion, incisions and tissue fusion. Illustrations of clinical applications and discussion of laser parameters will be provided.

  14. Argon plasma irradiation of polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slepicka, P., E-mail: petr.slepicka@vscht.c [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 16628 Prague (Czech Republic); Vasina, A. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 16628 Prague (Czech Republic); Kolska, Z. [J.E. Purkyne University, Department of Chemistry, 40096 Usti Nad Labem (Czech Republic); Luxbacher, T. [Anton Paar GmbH, 8054 Graz (Austria); Malinsky, P.; Mackova, A. [Nuclear Physics Institute of Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic); Svorcik, V. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 16628 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-06-15

    Polypropylene samples were exposed to argon plasma discharge and the changes of the PP surface properties were studied by different methods. Surface wettability was derived from contact angle measured by standard goniometry and chemical structure of the plasma modified PP was studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), surface morphology and roughness of samples using AFM. Zeta potential of pristine and modified PP was determined with the SurPASS. The presence of incorporated oxygen in the PP surface layer, about 60 nm thick, was observed in RBS spectra. Oxygen concentration is a decreasing function of the depth. With progressing aging time the oxygen concentration on the PP surface decreases. Plasma treatment results in a rapid decrease of the contact angle, which increases again with increasing aging time. In XPS measurement the oxygen containing structures, created by the plasma treatment, were found on the very surface of the modified PP and the zeta potential being changed too. The significant difference in zeta potential between pristine and plasma treated PP clearly indicates that the plasma treatment leads to a more hydrophilic PP surface.

  15. Negative corona current pulses in argon and in mixture argon with SF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waveforms of the first negative current pulses in a short negative point-to plane gap in pure argon and argon with SF6 admixture have been investigated with a nanosecond time resolution at a gas pressure 50 kPa as a function of applied gap voltage and content of SF6 in the mixture. We have made an attempt to explain the differences in the discharge development in pure argon and in argon with admixture of SF6 based on the observed changes of the pulse shape. The experimental results obtained will be discussed in context with existing computer simulation models (Authors)

  16. Performance of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter After Three Years of LHC Operation and Plans for a Future Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Ilic, N; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is a multi-purpose detector built for analyzing LHC collision data. In July 2012, ATLAS announced the discovery of the Higgs boson, the last undiscovered particle in the Standard Model of particle physics. The ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeter played a crucial role in the discovery by providing accurate measurements of Higgs final states such as photons, electrons and jets. The LAr detector is a sampling calorimeter consisting of four subsystems: an electromagnetic barrel (EMB), electromagnetic end-caps (EMEC), hadronic end-caps (HEC), and forward calorimeters (FCAL). The liquid argon purity, temperature and time stability remained well above the required levels throughout the data-taking period. Overall the calorimeter performed very well, with over 99% of data it collected in 2012 proton-proton collisions being suitable for physics analysis. In order to maintain good LAr detector performance, several upgrades are currently being implemented and planned.

  17. Measurements on scintillation light from liquid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that an argon calorimeter can operate as a scintillation detector, provided that xenon is added. With the addition of 170 ppm xenon a light yield of 70% has been obtained. In addition the light yield is determined under influence of an electric field, from differently ionising particles and by the use of aluminium mirrors acting as light guides. Finally first measurements with a photomultiplier working at liquid argon temperatures are reported. (orig.)

  18. Argon Laser Photoablation for Postburn Conjunctival Pigmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Joon Ahn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an ocular burn injury from boiling water which resulted in conjunctival pigmentation, 1 week following injury. For cosmetic purposes, 2 sessions of argon laser photoablation were performed. One month after laser treatment, conjunctival pigmentation had been successfully removed and the patient was very satisfied with the results. Argon laser photoablation may be an effective way to remove postburn conjunctival pigmentation.

  19. Argon clusters embedded in helium nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Filipe Ferreira; Bartl, Peter; Denifl, Stephan; Echt, Olof; Märk, Tilmann D; Scheier, Paul

    2009-11-14

    Electron impact ionization of argon clusters embedded in helium droplets is investigated. Superior mass resolution makes it possible to distinguish between nominally isobaric cluster ions. An abundance maximum for ArHe(12)(+) is unambiguously confirmed; the spectra also prove the formation of Ar(2)He(n)(+) complexes that had been claimed to fragment into pure Ar(2)(+). Distributions of larger argon cluster ions containing up to 60 atoms closely resemble distributions observed upon electron impact or photoionization of bare argon clusters; caging and evaporative cooling provided by the helium matrix do not suffice to quench fragmentation of the nascent argon cluster ions. Intriguing abundance anomalies are observed in distributions of argon cluster ions that contain water, nitrogen or oxygen impurities. The strong abundance of Ar(55)H(2)O(+), Ar(54)O(2)(+) and Ar(54)N(2)(+) contrasts with the virtual absence of slightly larger cluster ions containing the corresponding impurities. The features are probably related to enhanced cluster ion stability upon closure of the second icosahedral shell but the difference in magic numbers (54 versus 55) and the well-known reactivity of charged argon-nitrogen complexes suggest structural differences. PMID:19851558

  20. Performance of a Rain Barrel Sharing Network under Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    Seong Jin Noh; Eun-Sung Chung; Yongwon Seo

    2015-01-01

    Rain barrels can be technically shared through social practices or mutual agreement between individual households. This study proposes the evaluation system for a rain barrel sharing network (RBSN) considering three performance criteria of reliability, resiliency, and vulnerability, under plausible climate change scenarios. First, this study shows how the system can be improved in terms of the performance criteria using historical daily rainfall data based on the storage-reliability-yield rel...

  1. Potassium-argon/argon-40-argon-39 geochronology of Cenozoic alkali basalts from the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Quanshu; SHI Xuefa; YANG Yaomin; WANG Kunshan

    2008-01-01

    Based on the isotopic chronologic results of Cenozoic alkali basalts from the South China Sea,the characteristics of volcanic activi-ty of the South China Sea after spreading were studied.The potassium - argon ages of eight alkali basalt samples from the South China Sea,and the argon - argon ages of two samples among them are reported.Apparent ages of the whole rock are 3.80 to 7.91 Ma with an average value of 5.43 Ma (potassium- argon,whole rock),and there is little difference among samples at the same location,e.g.,4.76~5.78 Ma for location S04-12.The argon - argon ages for the two samples are 6.06 and 4.71 Ma,which lie within the age scope of potassium - argon method.The dating results indicate that rock-forming age is from late Miocene to Pli-ocene,which is consistent with erupting event for alkali basalts from adjacent regions of the South China Sea.Volcanic activities occur after the cessation of spreading of the South China Sea,which are controlled by lithospheric fault and the spreading center formed during the spreading period of the South China Sea.These dating results,combined with geochemical characteristics of these basalts,the published chronological data for the South China Sea and its adjacent regions,and the updated geophysical data near Hainan Island,suggest that after the cessation of spreading of the South China Sea,there occur widely distributing magmatic activities which primarily is alkali basalt,and the volcanic activity continues to Quaternary.The activity may be relative to Hainan mantle plume originated from core/mantle boundary.

  2. Photon reconstruction in the ATLAS Inner Detector and Liquid Argon Barrel Calorimeter at the 2004 Combined Test Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Abat, E; Addy, T N; Adragna, P; Aharrouche, M; Ahmad, A; Akesson, T.P A; Aleksa, M; Alexa, C; Anderson, K; Andreazza, A; Anghinolfi, F; Antonaki, A; Arabidze, G; Arik, E; Atkinson, T; Baines, J; Baker, O K; Banfi, D; Baron, S; Barr, A J; Beccherle, R; Beck, H P; Belhorma, B; Bell, P J; Benchekroun, D; Benjamin, D P; Benslama, K; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Bernabeu, J; Bertelsen, H; Binet, S; Biscarat, C; Boldea, V; Bondarenko, V G; Boonekamp, M; Bosman, M; Bourdarios, C; Broklova, Z; Burckhart-Chromek, D; Bychkov, V; Callahan, J; Calvet, D; Canneri, M; Capeans Garrido, M; Caprini, M; Cardiel Sas, L; Carli, T; Carminati, L; Carvalho, J; Cascella, M; Castillo, M V; Catinaccio, A; Cauz, D; Cavalli, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Cetin, S A; Chen, H; Cherkaoui, R; Chevalier, L; Chevallier, F; Chouridou, S; Ciobotaru, M; Citterio, M; Clark, A; Cleland, B; Cobal, M; Cogneras, E; Conde Muino, P; Consonni, M; Constantinescu, S; Cornelissen, T; Correard, S; Corso-Radu, A; Costa, G; Costa, M J; Costanzo, D; Cuneo, S; Cwetanski, P; Da Silva, D; Dam, M; Dameri, M; Danielsson, H O; Dannheim, D; Darbo, G; Davidek, T; De, K; Defay, P O; Dekhissi, B; Del Peso, J; Del Prete, T; Delmastro, M; Derue, F; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Girolamo, B; Dita, S; Dittus, F; Djama, F; Djobava, T; Dobos, D; Dobson, M; Dolgoshein, B A; Dotti, A; Drake, G; Drasal, Z; Dressnandt, N; Driouchi, C; Drohan, J; Ebenstein, W L; Eerola, P; Efthymiopoulos, I; Egorov, K; Eifert, T F; Einsweiler, K; El Kacimi, M; Elsing, M; Emelyanov, D; Escobar, C; Etienvre, A I; Fabich, A; Facius, K; Idrissi Fakhr-Eddine, A; Fanti, M; Farbin, A; Farthouat, P; Fassouliotis, D; Fayard, L; Febbraro, R; Fedin, O L; Fenyuk, A; Fergusson, D; Ferrari, P; Ferrari, R; Ferreira, B C; Ferrer, A; Ferrere, D; Filippini, G; Flick, T; Fournier, D; Francavilla, P; Francis, D; Froeschl, R; Froidevaux, D; Fullana, E; Gadomski, S; Gagliardi, G; Gagnon, P; Gallas, M; Gallop, B J; Gameiro, S; Gan, K K; Garcia, R; Garcia, C; Gavrilenko, I L; Gemme, C; Gerlach, P; Ghodbane, N; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giangiobbe, V; Giokaris, N; Glonti, G; Gottfert, T.; Golling, T; Gollub, N; Gomes, A; Gomez, M D; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Goodrick, M J; Gorfine, G; Gorini, B; Goujdami, D; Grahn, K J; Grenier, P; Grigalashvili, N; Grishkevich, Y; Grosse-Knetter, J; Gruwe, M; Guicheney, C; Gupta, A; Haeberli, C; Hartel, R.; Hajduk, Z; Hakobyan, H; Hance, M; Hansen, J D; Hansen, P H; Hara, K; Harvey, A., Jr; Hawkings, R J; Heinemann, F.E W; Henriques Correia, A; Henss, T; Hervas, L; Higon, E; Hill, J C; Hoffman, J; Hostachy, J Y; Hruska, I; Hubaut, F; Huegging, F; Hulsbergen, W; Hurwitz, M; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Jansen, E; Jen-La Plante, I; Johansson, P.D C; Jon-And, K; Joos, M; Jorgensen, S; Joseph, J; Kaczmarska, A; Kado, M; Karyukhin, A; Kataoka, M; Kayumov, F; Kazarov, A; Keener, P T; Kekelidze, G D; Kerschen, N; Kersten, S; Khomich, A; Khoriauli, G; Khramov, E; Khristachev, A; Khubua, J; Kittelmann, T H; Klingenberg, R; Klinkby, E B; Kodys, P; Koffas, T; Kolos, S; Konovalov, S P; Konstantinidis, N; Kopikov, S; Korolkov, I; Kostyukhin, V; Kovalenko, S; Kowalski, T Z; Kruger, K.; Kramarenko, V; Kudin, L G; Kulchitsky, Y; Lacasta, C; Lafaye, R; Laforge, B; Lampl, W; Lanni, F; Laplace, S; Lari, T; Le Bihan, A C; Lechowski, M; Ledroit-Guillon, F; Lehmann, G; Leitner, R; Lelas, D; Lester, C G; Liang, Z; Lichard, P; Liebig, W; Lipniacka, A; Lokajicek, M; Louchard, L; Loureiro, K F; Lucotte, A; Luehring, F; Lund-Jensen, B; Lundberg, B; Ma, H; Mackeprang, R; Maio, A; Maleev, V P; Malek, F; Mandelli, L; Maneira, J; Mangin-Brinet, M; Manousakis, A; Mapelli, L; Marques, C; Marti i Garcia, S; Martin, F; Mathes, M; Mazzanti, M; McFarlane, K W; McPherson, R; Mchedlidze, G; Mehlhase, S; Meirosu, C; Meng, Z; Meroni, C; Mialkovski, V; Mikulec, B; Milstead, D; Minashvili, I; Mindur, B; Mitsou, V A; Moed, S; Monnier, E; Moorhead, G; Morettini, P; Morozov, S V; Mosidze, M; Mouraviev, S V; Moyse, E.W J; Munar, A; Myagkov, A; Nadtochi, A V; Nakamura, K; Nechaeva, P; Negri, A; Nemecek, S; Nessi, M; Nesterov, S Y; Newcomer, F M; Nikitine, I; Nikolaev, K; Nikolic-Audit, I; Ogren, H; Oh, S H; Oleshko, S B; Olszowska, J; Onofre, A; Padilla Aranda, C; Paganis, S; Pallin, D; Pantea, D; Paolone, V; Parodi, F; Parsons, J; Parzhitski, S; Pasqualucci, E; Passmore, S M; Pater, J; Patrichev, S; Peez, M; Perez Reale, V; Perini, L; Peshekhonov, V D; Petersen, J; Petersen, T C; Petti, R; Phillips, P W; Pilcher, J; Pina, J; Pinto, B; Podlyski, F; Poggioli, L; Poppleton, A; Poveda, J; Pralavorio, P; Pribyl, L; Price, M J; Prieur, D; Puigdengoles, C; Puzo, P; Ragusa, F; Rajagopalan, S; Reeves, K; Reisinger, I; Rembser, C; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Reznicek, P; Ridel, M; Risso, P; Riu, I; Robinson, D; Roda, C; Roe, S; Rohne, O.; Romaniouk, A; Rousseau, D; Rozanov, A; Ruiz, A; Rusakovich, N; Rust, D; Ryabov, Y F; Ryjov, V; Salto, O; Salvachua, B; Salzburger, A; Sandaker, H; Santamarina Rios, C.Santamarina; Santi, L; Santoni, C; Saraiva, J G; Sarri, F; Sauvage, G; Says, L P; Schaefer, M; Schegelsky, V A; Schiavi, C; Schieck, J; Schlager, G; Schlereth, J; Schmitt, C; Schultes, J; Schwemling, P; Schwindling, J; Seixas, J M; Seliverstov, D M; Serin, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalanda, N; Shaw, C; Shin, T; Shmeleva, A; Silva, J; Simion, S; Simonyan, M; Sloper, J E; Smirnov, S.Yu; Smirnova, L; Solans, C; Solodkov, A; Solovianov, O; Soloviev, I; Sosnovtsev, V V; Spano, F; Speckmayer, P; Stancu, S; Stanek, R; Starchenko, E; Straessner, A; Suchkov, S I; Suk, M; Szczygiel, R; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, F; Tas, P; Tayalati, Y; Tegenfeldt, F; Teuscher, R; Thioye, M; Tikhomirov, V O; Timmermans, C.J.W P; Tisserant, S; Toczek, B; Tremblet, L; Troncon, C; Tsiareshka, P; Tyndel, M; Karagoz Unel, M.; Unal, G; Unel, G; Usai, G; Van Berg, R; Valero, A; Valkar, S; Valls, J A; Vandelli, W; Vannucci, F; Vartapetian, A; Vassilakopoulos, V I; Vasilyeva, L; Vazeille, F; Vernocchi, F; Vetter-Cole, Y; Vichou, I; Vinogradov, V; Virzi, J; Vivarelli, I; de Vivie, J B; Volpi, M; Vu Anh, T; Wang, C; Warren, M; Weber, J; Weber, M; Weidberg, A R; Weingarten, J; Wells, P S; Werner, P; Wheeler, S; Wiesmann, M; Wilkens, H; Williams, H H; Wingerter-Seez, I; Yasu, Y; Zaitsev, A; Zenin, A; Zenis, T; Zenonos, Z; Zhang, H; Zhelezko, A; Zhou, N

    2011-01-01

    The reconstruction of photons in the ATLAS detector is studied with data taken during the 2004 Combined Test Beam, where a full slice of the ATLAS detector was exposed to beams of particles of known energy at the CERN SPS. The results presented show significant differences in the longitudinal development of the electromagnetic shower between converted and unconverted photons as well as in the total measured energy. The potential to use the reconstructed converted photons as a means to precisely map the material of the tracker in front of the electromagnetic calorimeter is also considered. All results obtained are compared with a detailed Monte-Carlo simulation of the test-beam setup which is based on the same simulation and reconstruction tools as those used for the ATLAS detector itself.

  3. Installation of CMS EB (ECAL Barrel) Supermodules 5 and 13 inside HB+ (HCAL Barrel) on 26/27 April 2006

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The first two barrel "supermodules" of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) have been inserted into the barrel hadron calorimeter (HCAL) in the CMS experimental hall (called SX5) in Cessy in preparation for the forthcoming magnet test and cosmic challenge (MTCC). Each of the two supermodules contains 1700 lead tungstate crystals in glass-fibre alveolar support structures, with associated avalanche photodiodes (APDs, for scintillation light detection), electronics and cooling system.

  4. A barrel-related interneuron in layer 4 of rat somatosensory cortex with a high intra-barrel connectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Koelbl, C.; Helmstaedter, Moritz; Lübke, Joachim; Feldmeyer, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic connections between identified fast-spiking (FS), parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons, and excitatory spiny neurons in layer 4 (L4) of the barrel cortex were investigated using patch-clamp recordings and simultaneous biocytin fillings. Three distinct clusters of FS L4 interneurons were identified based on their axonal morphology relative to the barrel column suggesting that these neurons do not constitute a homogeneous interneuron population. One L4 FS interneuron type had an axon...

  5. Application of Cu-polyimide flex circuit and Al-on-glass pitch adapter for the ATLAS SCT barrel hybrid

    CERN Document Server

    Unno, Y; Ikegami, Y; Iwata, Y; Kohriki, T; Kondo, T; Nakano, I; Ohsugi, T; Takashima, R; Tanaka, R; Terada, S; Ujiie, N

    2005-01-01

    We applied the surface build-up Cu-polyimide flex-circuit technology with laser vias to the ATLAS SCT barrel hybrid to be made in one piece from the connector to the electronics sections including cables. The hybrids, reinforced with carbon-carbon substrates, provide mechanical strength, thermal conductivity, low-radiation length, and stability in application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) operation. By following the design rules, we experienced little trouble in breaking the traces. The pitch adapter between the sensor and the ASICs was made of aluminum traces on glass substrate. We identified that the generation of whiskers around the wire-bonding feet was correlated with the hardness of metallized aluminum. The appropriate hardness has been achieved by keeping the temperature of the glasses as low as room temperature during the metallization. The argon plasma cleaning procedure cleaned the contamination on the gold pads of the hybrids for successful wire bonding, although it was unsuccessful in the alu...

  6. Argon Collection And Purification For Proliferation Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achey, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hunter, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-09

    In order to determine whether a seismic event was a declared/undeclared underground nuclear weapon test, environmental samples must be taken and analyzed for signatures that are unique to a nuclear explosion. These signatures are either particles or gases. Particle samples are routinely taken and analyzed under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) verification regime as well as by individual countries. Gas samples are analyzed for signature gases, especially radioactive xenon. Underground nuclear tests also produce radioactive argon, but that signature is not well monitored. A radioactive argon signature, along with other signatures, can more conclusively determine whether an event was a nuclear test. This project has developed capabilities for collecting and purifying argon samples for ultra-low-background proportional counting. SRNL has developed a continuous gas enrichment system that produces an output stream containing 97% argon from whole air using adsorbent separation technology (the flow diagram for the system is shown in the figure). The vacuum swing adsorption (VSA) enrichment system is easily scalable to produce ten liters or more of 97% argon within twelve hours. A gas chromatographic separation using a column of modified hydrogen mordenite molecular sieve has been developed that can further purify the sample to better than 99% purity after separation from the helium carrier gas. The combination of these concentration and purification systems has the capability of being used for a field-deployable system for collecting argon samples suitable for ultra-low-background proportional counting for detecting nuclear detonations under the On-Site Inspection program of the CTBTO verification regime. The technology also has applications for the bulk argon separation from air for industrial purposes such as the semi-conductor industry.

  7. Attenuation of vacuum ultraviolet light in liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Neumeier, A; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Schönert, S; Dandl, T; Heindl, T; Ulrich, A; Wieser, J

    2015-01-01

    The transmission of liquid argon has been measured, wavelength resolved, for a wavelength interval from 118 to 250 nm. The wavelength dependent attenuation length is presented for pure argon. It is shown that no universal wavelength independent attenuation length can be assigned to liquid argon for its own fluorescence light due to the interplay between the wavelength dependent emission and absorption. A decreasing transmission is observed below 130 nm in both chemically cleaned and distilled liquid argon and assigned to absorption by the analogue of the first argon excimer continuum. For not perfectly cleaned argon a strong influence of impurities on the transmission is observed. Two strong absorption bands at 126.5 and 141.0 nm with approximately 2 and 4 nm width, respectively, are assigned to traces of xenon in argon. A broad absorption region below 180 nm is found for unpurified argon and tentatively attributed to the presence of water in the argon sample.

  8. The status of the construction and the performance of the ATLAS liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Lund-Jensen, B

    2004-01-01

    The construction of the ATLAS liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeters is about to be completed The barrel calorimeter and the first end cap are inserted in their cryostats. The quality control performed during the production has resulted in only a very small fraction of malfunctioning channels, ~0.1 %o., and a low constant term in the energy resolution. Several modules of the calorimeter and their corresponding presampler sectors have been tested in electron beams and their energy resolution has been shown to be within the ATLAS requirements. The local constant term is better than 0.4% for all measured cells and the global constant term which includes the cell to cell response variation is less than 0.7%. (3 refs).

  9. The impact of acceleration on barrel/launch package design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the impact of launch acceleration on the design of electromagnetic launcher barrels and on the design of associated launch packages. This is of particular interest because launch package size and mass directly affect the overall armament system size and mass. A common design approach is to use as the peak launch acceleration, the maximum acceleration which the projectile can be designed to withstand. While this approach will minimize barrel length, it may also yield an excessively large overall system size and mass, especially for the long, slender projectile configurations which are desired for high aero-thermal and terminal ballistics performance. An alternate design approach is described which balances the goals of reducing barrel length with reducing launch package mass. Results illustrate the benefits of this balanced design approach on overall armament system size and mass

  10. Cholinergic signals in mouse barrel cortex during active whisker sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggermann, Emmanuel; Kremer, Yves; Crochet, Sylvain; Petersen, Carl C H

    2014-12-11

    Internal brain states affect sensory perception, cognition, and learning. Many neocortical areas exhibit changes in the pattern and synchrony of neuronal activity during quiet versus active behaviors. Active behaviors are typically associated with desynchronized cortical dynamics. Increased thalamic firing contributes importantly to desynchronize mouse barrel cortex during active whisker sensing. However, a whisking-related cortical state change persists after thalamic inactivation, which is mediated at least in part by acetylcholine, as we show here by using whole-cell recordings, local pharmacology, axonal calcium imaging, and optogenetic stimulation. During whisking, we find prominent cholinergic signals in the barrel cortex, which suppress spontaneous cortical activity. The desynchronized state of barrel cortex during whisking is therefore driven by at least two distinct signals with opposing functions: increased thalamic activity driving glutamatergic excitation of the cortex and increased cholinergic input suppressing spontaneous cortical activity.

  11. Cholinergic Signals in Mouse Barrel Cortex during Active Whisker Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Eggermann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Internal brain states affect sensory perception, cognition, and learning. Many neocortical areas exhibit changes in the pattern and synchrony of neuronal activity during quiet versus active behaviors. Active behaviors are typically associated with desynchronized cortical dynamics. Increased thalamic firing contributes importantly to desynchronize mouse barrel cortex during active whisker sensing. However, a whisking-related cortical state change persists after thalamic inactivation, which is mediated at least in part by acetylcholine, as we show here by using whole-cell recordings, local pharmacology, axonal calcium imaging, and optogenetic stimulation. During whisking, we find prominent cholinergic signals in the barrel cortex, which suppress spontaneous cortical activity. The desynchronized state of barrel cortex during whisking is therefore driven by at least two distinct signals with opposing functions: increased thalamic activity driving glutamatergic excitation of the cortex and increased cholinergic input suppressing spontaneous cortical activity.

  12. Correcting the Chromatic Aberration in Barrel Distortion of Endoscopic Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Harry Ng

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Modern endoscopes offer physicians a wide-angle field of view (FOV for minimally invasive therapies. However, the high level of barrel distortion may prevent accurate perception of image. Fortunately, this kind of distortion may be corrected by digital image processing. In this paper we investigate the chromatic aberrations in the barrel distortion of endoscopic images. In the past, chromatic aberration in endoscopes is corrected by achromatic lenses or active lens control. In contrast, we take a computational approach by modifying the concept of image warping and the existing barrel distortion correction algorithm to tackle the chromatic aberration problem. In addition, an error function for the determination of the level of centroid coincidence is proposed. Simulation and experimental results confirm the effectiveness of our method.

  13. First two barrel ECAL supermodules inserted in CMS HCAL

    CERN Multimedia

    K.Bell

    2006-01-01

    The first two barrel "supermodules" for the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) have been inserted into the barrel hadron calorimeter (HCAL) in the experimental hall (called SX5) in Cessy in preparation for the forthcoming magnet test and cosmic challenge (MTCC). Each of the two supermodules contains 1700 lead tungstate crystals in glass-fibre alveolar support structures, with associated avalanche photodiodes (APDs, for scintillation light detection), electronics and cooling system. The barrel ECAL will consist of 36 supermodules, many of which have already been produced (see CERN Bulletin 17-18, 2006). Team from CMS ECAL, CMS Integration and CEA-DAPNIA were involved in the insertion, with the production/integration of the supermodules themselves involving many technicians, engineers and physicists from many institutes. From left to right: Olivier Teller, Maf Alidra and Lucien Veillet.

  14. Simulation and reconstruction of the PANDA Barrel DIRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhygadlo, R., E-mail: r.dzhygadlo@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Kalicy, G.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Dodokhov, V.Kh. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A. [Friedrich Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); and others

    2014-12-01

    Hadronic particle identification (PID) in the barrel region of the PANDA experiment at the new Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR) at GSI, Darmstadt will be provided by a DIRC (Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light) counter. To optimize the performance and reduce the detector cost, detailed simulations of different design elements, such as the width of the radiators, the shape of the expansion volume, and the type of focusing system, were performed using Geant. Custom reconstruction algorithms were developed to match the detector geometry. We will discuss the single photon resolution and photon yield as well as the PID performance for the Barrel DIRC baseline design and several detector design options. - Highlights: • Simulation of the PANDA Barrel DIRC with different design options has been performed. • A design with narrow bars and focusing system meets the PANDA PID goals. • Two reconstruction approaches were developed. • A time-based imaging reconstruction method shows promising results.

  15. Scintillation efficiency of liquid argon in low energy neutron-argon scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments searching for weak interacting massive particles with noble gases such as liquid argon require very low detection thresholds for nuclear recoils. A determination of the scintillation efficiency is crucial to quantify the response of the detector at low energy. We report the results obtained with a small liquid argon cell using a monoenergetic neutron beam produced by a deuterium-deuterium fusion source. The light yield relative to electrons was measured for six argon recoil energies between 11 and 120 keV at zero electric drift field

  16. Scintillation efficiency of liquid argon in low energy neutron-argon scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Creus, W; Amsler, C; Ferella, A D; Rochet, J; Scotto-Lavina, L; Walter, M

    2015-01-01

    Experiments searching for weak interacting massive particles with noble gases such as liquid argon require very low detection thresholds for nuclear recoils. A determination of the scintillation efficiency is crucial to quantify the response of the detector at low energy. We report the results obtained with a small liquid argon cell using a monoenergetic neutron beam produced by a deuterium-deuterium fusion source. The light yield relative to electrons was measured for six argon recoil energies between 11 and 120 keV at zero electric drift field.

  17. Small arms mini-fire control system: fiber-optic barrel deflection sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajic, Slobodan [ORNL; Datskos, Panos G [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally the methods to increase firearms accuracy, particularly at distance, have concentrated on barrel isolation (free floating) and substantial barrel wall thickening to gain rigidity. This barrel stiffening technique did not completely eliminate barrel movement but the problem was significantly reduced to allow a noticeable accuracy enhancement. This process, although highly successful, came at a very high weight penalty. Obviously the goal would be to lighten the barrel (firearm), yet achieve even greater accuracy. Thus, if lightweight barrels could ultimately be compensated for both their static and dynamic mechanical perturbations, the result would be very accurate, yet significantly lighter weight, weapons. We discuss our development of a barrel reference sensor system that is designed to accomplish this ambitious goal. Our optical fiber-based sensor monitors the barrel muzzle position and autonomously compensates for any induced perturbations. The reticle is electronically adjusted in position to compensate for the induced barrel deviation in real time.

  18. Contraction ionization waves in the argon contracted discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation of ionization waves in the argon contracted discharge and a definition of their arising propagation mechanism accounting for the specificity of elementary pocesses characteristic of argon are presented. (author)

  19. Thermal decomposition of barium valerate in argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres, P.; Norby, Poul; Grivel, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of barium valerate (Ba(C4H9CO2)(2)/Ba-pentanoate) was studied in argon by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and hot-stage optical microscopy. Melting takes place in two different steps, at 200 degrees C and 280...

  20. Antiapoptotic activity of argon and xenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaggiari, Sabrina; Kepp, Oliver; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Chaba, Kariman; Adjemian, Sandy; Pype, Jan; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Lemaire, Marc; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-08-15

    Although chemically non-reactive, inert noble gases may influence multiple physiological and pathological processes via hitherto uncharacterized physical effects. Here we report a cell-based detection system for assessing the effects of pre-defined gas mixtures on the induction of apoptotic cell death. In this setting, the conventional atmosphere for cell culture was substituted with gas combinations, including the same amount of oxygen (20%) and carbon dioxide (5%) but 75% helium, neon, argon, krypton, or xenon instead of nitrogen. The replacement of nitrogen with noble gases per se had no effects on the viability of cultured human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Conversely, argon and xenon (but not helium, neon, and krypton) significantly limited cell loss induced by the broad-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor staurosporine, the DNA-damaging agent mitoxantrone and several mitochondrial toxins. Such cytoprotective effects were coupled to the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity, as demonstrated by means of a mitochondrial transmembrane potential-sensitive dye and by assessing the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. In line with this notion, argon and xenon inhibited the apoptotic activation of caspase-3, as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy coupled to automated image analysis. The antiapoptotic activity of argon and xenon may explain their clinically relevant cytoprotective effects. PMID:23907115

  1. The ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic EndCap Calorimeter Construction and tests

    CERN Document Server

    Rodier, S; Del Peso, J

    2003-01-01

    This thesis has been carried out within the ATLAS collaboration. ATLAS is one of the two multipurpose experiments approved for data taking at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The main goals of this experiment are, to find the Higgs boson, the missing piece in the otherwise so succesful Standard Model of Particle Physics, and to look for physics beyond the Standard Model up to a scale of 1TeV. For this purpose, electromagnetic (EM) calorimetry play a key role. The ATLAS Collaboration has chosen a Liquid Argon (LAr) option with lead as passive material. The liquid Argon Calorimeter is divided into two main subdetectors, the barrel and the end caps (EC). The design and construction of the LAr EM EC calorimeter is the responsability of the groups at Centre de Physique de Marseille (CPPM) and the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (UAM)following the guideline developed by the research and development working, group 3 for LHC detectors (RD3). The sharing of responsabilities is such that CPPM provides spacers an...

  2. Keeping argon under a graphene lid-Argon intercalation between graphene and nickel(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Späth, Florian; Gotterbarm, Karin; Amende, Max; Bauer, Udo; Gleichweit, Christoph; Höfert, Oliver; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Papp, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We report on the intercalation of graphene grown on a Ni(111) crystal with argon. Argon is implanted in the Ni(111) crystal by ion bombardment before graphene growth, and diffuses to the surface during the growth of graphene at elevated temperatures. Graphene acts as an atomically thin barrier and keeps the argon underneath. We investigated this system with high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. From our experiments we determined the mean quantities of argon under graphene. From our analysis, a simple model to determine the pressure under the graphene layer is presented. In our measurements, we find an increased thermal stability of the intercalated graphene as compared to non-intercalated graphene on Ni(111).

  3. A Methodology for Characterizing Gun Barrel Flexure due to Vehicle Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Bundy

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Barrel centerline curvature is known to influence the location of projectile shot impacts. Superimposed on the unique manufactured barrel centerline is the flexed barrel shape that can occur prior to firing while the vehicle is on the move. In order to understand and quantify the effects of barrel flexure on gun accuracy, it is necessary to determine what combination of fundamental mode shapes is most likely to occur. A method to accomplish this task is described in this paper. The method is demonstrated by enumerating the 10 most likely flexed barrel shapes that were found to occur in a tank-mounted gun barrel while it traversed a bump course.

  4. Argon Laser Treatment of Strawberry Hemangioma in Infancy

    OpenAIRE

    Achauer, Bruce M.; Vander Kam, Victoria M.

    1985-01-01

    Argon laser therapy is effective for removing port-wine stains and for reducing cutaneous vascular and pigmented lesions. Strawberry hemangiomas, being much thicker lesions than port-wine stains, were considered not appropriate for argon laser treatment. Using argon laser therapy in 13 cases of strawberry hemangioma, we achieved poor to dramatic results.

  5. Argon laser treatment of strawberry hemangioma in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achauer, B M; Vander Kam, V M

    1985-11-01

    Argon laser therapy is effective for removing port-wine stains and for reducing cutaneous vascular and pigmented lesions. Strawberry hemangiomas, being much thicker lesions than port-wine stains, were considered not appropriate for argon laser treatment. Using argon laser therapy in 13 cases of strawberry hemangioma, we achieved poor to dramatic results. PMID:4082569

  6. CMS detects the first muons crossing two barrel sectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Franco Gonella

    2006-01-01

    These are some snapshots from the first cosmic muons crossing sectors 11 and 10 of the CMS barrel wheel YB+2. Five chambers were powered up using the final HV system. With a trigger rate of about 1 Hz, over 26000 events were collected in about 6 hours.

  7. ATLAS-Lowering the first Barrel Toroid coil

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Cranes lowered the first of ATLAS's eight Barrel Toroid coils into the cavern. The part is 25 metres long and the cranes had to hold the 100 tonne coil at a sharp angle while it passed through the 18-metre diameter vertical shaft into the cavern. Then they laid the magnet to a horisontal robust platform. Images from Camera 1

  8. ATLAS-Lowering the first Barrel Toroid coil

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Unit

    2004-01-01

    Cranes lowered the first of ATLAS's eight Barrel Toroid coils into the cavern. The part is 25 meters long and the cranes had to hold the 100 tonne coil at a sharp angle while it passed through the 18-meter diameter vertical shaft into the cavern. Then they laid the magnet to a horizontal robust platform. Images from Camera 2

  9. Barrelettes without barrels in the American water shrew.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth C Catania

    Full Text Available Water shrews (Sorex palustris depend heavily on their elaborate whiskers to navigate their environment and locate prey. They have small eyes and ears with correspondingly small optic and auditory nerves. Previous investigations have shown that water shrew neocortex is dominated by large representations of the whiskers in primary and secondary somatosensory cortex (S1 and S2. Flattened sections of juvenile cortex processed for cytochrome oxidase revealed clear borders of the whisker pad representation in S1, but no cortical barrels. We were therefore surprised to discover prominent barrelettes in brainstem of juvenile water shrews in the present investigation. These distinctive modules were found in the principal trigeminal nucleus (PrV, and in two of the three spinal trigeminal subnuclei (interpolaris--SpVi and caudalis--SpVc. Analysis of the shrew's whisker pad revealed the likely relationship between whiskers and barrelettes. Barrelettes persisted in adult water shrew PrV, but barrels were also absent from adult cortex. Thus in contrast to mice and rats, which have obvious barrels in primary somatosensory cortex and less clear barrelettes in the principal nucleus, water shrews have clear barrelettes in the brainstem and no barrels in the neocortex. These results highlight the diverse ways that similar mechanoreceptors can be represented in the central nervous systems of different species.

  10. Measurement Technology on 200 Liters Barrels of Radioactive Waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI; Lei; SHAO; Jie-wen; LIU; Da-ming; LIU; Hong-bin; CHENG; Yi-mei; HE; Li-xia; ZHU; Li-qun

    2012-01-01

    <正>The measurement device on 200 liters barrel of radioactive waste is designed following the rule of orderly measurement automatically, by using the technology of non-destructive to measure the mass of radioactive waste produced from fuel cycle. Device objects as shown in Fig. 1, which consists of the

  11. Increasing the load bearing capacity of barrel vaults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamerling, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    Just after World War II many barrel vaults and domes were built with a structural system, known as Fusée Ceramique. This paper analyses the load bearing capacity of these vaults. Schemes, theories, idealizations and assumptions are analysed, validated and discussed. Methods to increase the load bear

  12. New results in meson spectroscopy from the crystal barrel experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, C.A. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Recent observations by the Crystal Barrel experiment of two scalar resonances, f{sub o}(1365) and a{sub o}(1450) have allowed the authors to clarify the members of the scalar nonet. In addition, a third scalar, f{sub o}(1500), appears to be supernumerary, and is a candidate for the scalar glueball expected near 1500 MeV.

  13. Design of Radioactive Reference Barrels and Simulation Verification of Linear Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Shell source method was used to prepare radioactive reference barrel for the calibration of gamma scan device because filling method in normal ways produces "hot" points easily and decrease the safety in transportation of the barrel.

  14. Flow Parameters of Argon plasma Discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owing to the viscosity, the plasma will be adhering to the inner surface of the outer electrode and outer surface of the inner one. As result that the discharge will be eroding the walls of coaxial system. The thickness of the boundary layer near the walls has been estimated at different positions from the breech of coaxial plasma gun. It is found that the thickness of layer 0.008 cm at the end of inner electrode (17 cm). A coaxial plasma gun device is operated in argon gas at ambient pressure 0.6 Torr and discharge voltage about 10 KV. The electron temperature of argon discharge has been determined by using spectroscopic technique. It is found that kTe=3.4 eV. By knowing the thickness of the boundary layer, the density can be determined. The Reynolds number R=105 and Mach number M=5 i.e. the flow is compressible and hypersonic

  15. Argon laser irradiation of the otolithic organ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, T.; Nomura, Y.; Young, Y.H.; Hara, M. (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-12-01

    An argon laser was used to irradiate the otolithic organs of guinea pigs and cynomolgus monkeys. After stapedectomy, the argon laser (1.5 W x 0.5 sec/shot) irradiated the utricle or saccule without touching the sensory organs. The stapes was replaced over the oval window after irradiation. The animals used for acute observation were killed immediately for morphologic studies; those used for long-term observation were kept alive for 2, 4, or 10 weeks. Acute observation revealed that sensory and supporting cells were elevated from the basement membrane only in the irradiated area. No rupture of the membranous labyrinth was observed. Long-term observation revealed that the otolith of the macula utriculi had disappeared in 2-week specimens. The entire macula utricili had disappeared in 10-week specimens. No morphologic changes were observed in cochlea, semicircular canals, or membranous labyrinth. The saccule showed similar changes.

  16. Abnormal epidermal changes after argon laser treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, R.A.; Knobler, R.M.; Aberer, E.; Klein, W.; Kocsis, F.; Ott, E. (Univ. of Vienna (Austria))

    1991-02-01

    A 26-year-old woman with a congenital port-wine stain on the forehead was treated three times at 2-month intervals with an argon laser. Six months after the last treatment, moderate blanching and mild scaling confined to the treated area was observed. A biopsy specimen of the treated area revealed a significant decrease in ectatic vessels. However, epidermal changes similar to those of actinic keratosis with disorganized cell layers and marked cytologic abnormalities were seen. Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes for a defect in DNA repair was negative. Multiple, argon laser-induced photothermal effects may be responsible for the changes observed in our case and may lead to premalignant epidermal transformation.

  17. Explanation of the memory effect in argon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Vidosav

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Memory effect - the long time variation of the electrical breakdown time delay on the relaxation time td (τ was observed in argon 24 hours after relaxation times and explained by the long-lived metastable states remaining from the preceding glow. However, the quenching processes reducing the effective lifetime of metastable states several orders of magnitude below that relevant for the time scale of observation were neglected. By applying approximate gas phase models it was found that the early afterglow kinetics up to hundreds of milliseconds is dominated by the decay of molecular argon ions Ar2+ and the approximate value of their ambipolar diffusion coefficient is determined. After that, nitrogen atoms present as impurities and recombined on the cathode surface and/or field emission determine the breakdown time delay down to the cosmic rays and natural radioactivity level.

  18. Anatomy of an Inversion - Argon Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamick, L.; Sharon, Y. Y.; Robinson, S. J. Q.

    2012-02-01

    Two different interactions give similar results for excitation energies and g factors of 2+1 states for most even-even argon isotopes except 46Ar. This is explained in terms of an inversion in J = ½+ and levels in 47K which is successfully obtained by one of the interactions but not the other. This example shows the possible dangers of nuclear astrophysics extrapolations.

  19. Simulation and reconstruction of the PANDA Barrel DIRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Go¨tzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Kalicy, G.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Fo¨hl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kro¨ck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Montgomery, R.; Rosner, G.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Bühler, P.; Gruber, L.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-12-01

    Hadronic particle identification (PID) in the barrel region of the PANDA experiment at the new Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR) at GSI, Darmstadt will be provided by a DIRC (Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light) counter. To optimize the performance and reduce the detector cost, detailed simulations of different design elements, such as the width of the radiators, the shape of the expansion volume, and the type of focusing system, were performed using Geant. Custom reconstruction algorithms were developed to match the detector geometry. We will discuss the single photon resolution and photon yield as well as the PID performance for the Barrel DIRC baseline design and several detector design options.

  20. ATLAS barrel toroid integration and test area in building 180

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two 'double-pancake' windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. The barrel toroid is being assembled in building 180 on the Meyrin site. In the first phase of assembly, the coils are packed into their aluminium-alloy casing. These photos show the double-pancake coils from ANSALDO and the coil casings from ALSTOM. In the foreground is the tooling from COSMI used to turn over the coil casings during this first phase. In the right background is the yellow lifting gantry manufactured at JINR-Dubna, Russia which will transport the coil casings to a heating table for prestressing. Two test benches with magnetic mirror are also visible.

  1. Experiences developing socially acceptable interactions for a robotic trash barrel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Stephen; Mok, Brian Ka Jun; Sirkin, David;

    2015-01-01

    Service robots in public places need to both understand environmental cues and move in ways that people can understand and predict. We developed and tested interactions with a trash barrel robot to better understand the implicit protocols for public interaction. In eight lunch-time sessions spread...... across two crowded campus dining destinations, we experimented with piloting our robot in Wizard of Oz fashion, initiating and responding to requests for impromptu interactions centered on collecting people's trash. Our studies progressed from open-ended experimentation to testing specific interaction...... strategies that seemed to evoke clear engagement and responses, both positive and negative. Observations and interviews show that a) people most welcome the robot's presence when they need its services and it actively advertises its intent through movement; b) people create mental models of the trash barrel...

  2. Technical Diagnostics of Tank Cannon Smooth Barrel Bore and Ramming Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Balla

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The technical diagnostics of 125 mm tank cannon 2A46 smooth barrel and ramming devices are discussed respectively. Focuses on barrel diagnostics and suggests new procedures based on reconstructed BG20 Gun Barrel Bore Gauge System, measuring internal diameter of the barrel bore. The new system measures throughout the whole barrel bore the inner diameter not only at the beginning of barrel bore as it was usually measured before. Different nature of barrel wear was revealed between barrels firing sub-calibre and high explosive projectiles. A method for ramming device diagnostics is presented. An accurate method was proposed, determining projectile extraction force from barrel, as one of the main ramming device parameters for weapons that are used in all areas of armed forces. Results are based on experimental methods assessing the extraction forces from barrel after projectile loading. These tests were performed as a series of tests with consequent technical diagnostics according to the new Czech Defence Standards (derived from NATO standards. The results are presented as the new methodologies for diagnostics of 125 mm barrel 2A46 and ramming devices of tank T-72 for use by technical logistic units in the Czech Republic Armed Forces.

  3. Energy metrics for driving competitiveness of countries: Energy weakness magnitude, GDP per barrel and barrels per capita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coccia, Mario, E-mail: m.coccia@ceris.cnr.i [National Research Council of Italy, CERIS-CNR, Institute for Economic Research on Firm and Growth, Collegio Carlo Alberto-via Real Collegio, n. 30, 10024 Moncalieri (Torino) (Italy)

    2010-03-15

    Energy metrics is the development of a whole new theoretical framework for the conception and measurement of energy and economic system performances, energy efficiency and productivity improvements with important political economy implications consistent with the best use of all natural and economic resources. The purpose of this research is to present some vital energy indicators based on magnitude and scale of energy weakness, GDP per barrel of oil that is an indicator of energy productivity and barrels (of oil) per capita that is an indicator of energy efficiency. Energy metrics can support the monitoring of energy and economic system performances in order to design effective energy strategy and political economy interventions focused on the 'competitive advantage' increase of countries in modern economies.

  4. Energy metrics for driving competitiveness of countries. Energy weakness magnitude, GDP per barrel and barrels per capita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coccia, Mario [National Research Council of Italy, CERIS-CNR, Institute for Economic Research on Firm and Growth, Collegio Carlo Alberto - via Real Collegio, n. 30, 10024 Moncalieri (Torino) (Italy)

    2010-03-15

    Energy metrics is the development of a whole new theoretical framework for the conception and measurement of energy and economic system performances, energy efficiency and productivity improvements with important political economy implications consistent with the best use of all natural and economic resources. The purpose of this research is to present some vital energy indicators based on magnitude and scale of energy weakness, GDP per barrel of oil that is an indicator of energy productivity and barrels (of oil) per capita that is an indicator of energy efficiency. Energy metrics can support the monitoring of energy and economic system performances in order to design effective energy strategy and political economy interventions focused on the 'competitive advantage' increase of countries in modern economies. (author)

  5. Energy metrics for driving competitiveness of countries: Energy weakness magnitude, GDP per barrel and barrels per capita

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy metrics is the development of a whole new theoretical framework for the conception and measurement of energy and economic system performances, energy efficiency and productivity improvements with important political economy implications consistent with the best use of all natural and economic resources. The purpose of this research is to present some vital energy indicators based on magnitude and scale of energy weakness, GDP per barrel of oil that is an indicator of energy productivity and barrels (of oil) per capita that is an indicator of energy efficiency. Energy metrics can support the monitoring of energy and economic system performances in order to design effective energy strategy and political economy interventions focused on the 'competitive advantage' increase of countries in modern economies.

  6. Development of a low-cost inductively coupled argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this investigation is to drastically reduce running costs of an inductively coupled plasma. This is done by reducing the argon consumption from 20 l/min to about 1 l/min. First, a sample introduction system operating on 0.1 l/min of carrier argon is described. This system ensures a high ratio of plasma argon and carrier argon even at the low total argon consumptions intended. Next, the developed low consumption plasma is presented. In the proposed design, air is blown perpendicularly against the outside of the torch. A different coil has been developed to make air-cooling efficient. Preliminary data on coupling efficiency for the air-cooled plasma are presented. A similarly low argon consumption has been achieved with water as an external coolant medium. It is concluded that a cheaper alternative to the current ICP has become available. (Auth.)

  7. Effects of Nitrogen contamination in liquid Argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciarri, R.; Antonello, M.; Baibussinov, B.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Benetti, P.; Calaprice, F.; Calligarich, E.; Cambiaghi, M.; Canci, N.; Carbonara, F.; Cavanna, F.; Centro, S.; Cocco, A. G.; Di Pompeo, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Gallo, V.; Grandi, L.; Meng, G.; Modena, I.; Montanari, C.; Palamara, O.; Pandola, L.; Piano Mortari, G. B.; Pietropaolo, F.; Raselli, G. L.; Roncadelli, M.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, C.; Segreto, E.; Szelc, A. M.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.

    2010-06-01

    A dedicated test of the effects of Nitrogen contamination in liquid Argon has been performed at the INFN-Gran Sasso Laboratory (LNGS, Italy) within the WArP R&D program. A detector has been designed and assembled for this specific task and connected to a system for the injection of controlled amounts of gaseous Nitrogen into the liquid Argon. The purpose of the test is to detect the reduction of the Ar scintillation light emission as a function of the amount of the Nitrogen contaminant injected in the Argon volume. A wide concentration range, spanning from ~ 10-1 ppm up to ~ 103 ppm, has been explored. Measurements have been done with electrons in the energy range of minimum ionizing particles (γ-conversion from radioactive sources). Source spectra at different Nitrogen contaminations are analyzed, showing sensitive reduction of the scintillation yield at increasing concentrations. Direct PMT signal acquisition exploiting high time resolution by fast waveform recording allowed high precision extraction of the main characteristics of the scintillation light emission in contaminated LAr. In particular, the decreasing behavior in lifetime and relative amplitude of the slow component is found to be appreciable starting from Script O(1 ppm) of Nitrogen concentrations. The rate constant of the quenching process induced by Nitrogen in liquid Ar has been found to be kQ(N2) = 0.11 ± 0.01 μs-1ppm-1, consistent with a previous measurement of this quantity but with significant improvement in precision. On the other hand, no evidence for absorption by N2 impurities has been found up to the higher concentrations here explored.

  8. Argon diffusion from biotite at high temperature and pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈道公; 贾命命; 李彬贤; 陆全明; 谢鸿森; 侯渭

    1995-01-01

    t The experiments of argon diffusion dynamics for biotite were carried out at 700 -1000℃ and 0.5 - 2,0 GPa and the diffusion coefficient and activation energy using different models have been calculated. The results indicate that the pressure does affect the argon diffusion and its effect is opposite to that of temperature. When p increases, the activation energy increases and diffusion coefficient decreases. The relation between pressure, closure temperature and cooling rate has been obtained. It is postulated that in low T and high p conditions, the argon diffusion from the environment to the system could occur and incur the appearance of the external argon in minerals.

  9. Near-infrared scintillation of liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, T. [Fermilab; Escobar, C. O. [Campinas State U.; Lippincott, W. H. [Fermilab; Rubinov, P. [Fermilab

    2016-03-03

    Since the 1970s it has been known that noble gases scintillate in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (0.7 $\\mu$m < $\\lambda$; < 1.5$\\mu$m). More controversial has been the question of the NIR light yield for condensed noble gases. We first present the motivation for using the NIR scintillation in liquid argon detectors, then briefly review early as well as more recent efforts and finally show encouraging preliminary results of a test performed at Fermilab.

  10. Near-infrared scintillation of liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, T; Lippincott, W H; Rubinov, P

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1970s it has been known that noble gases scintillate in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (0.7 $\\mu$m < $\\lambda$; < 1.5$\\mu$m). More controversial has been the question of the NIR light yield for condensed noble gases. We first present the motivation for using the NIR scintillation in liquid argon detectors, then briefly review early as well as more recent efforts and finally show encouraging preliminary results of a test performed at Fermilab.

  11. Argon isotope fractionation induced by stepwise heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieloff, Mario; Falter, Martina; Buikin, Alexei I.; Korochantseva, Ekaterina V.; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Altherr, Rainer

    2005-03-01

    Noble gas isotopes are widely used to elucidate the history of the rocks in which they have been trapped, either from distinct reservoirs or by accumulation following radioactive decay. To extract noble gases from their host rocks, stepwise heating is the most commonly used technique to deconvolve isotopically different components, e.g., atmospheric, in situ radiogenic, or excess radiogenic from mantle or crustal reservoirs. The accurate determination of the isotopic composition of these different components is of crucial importance, e.g., for ages obtained by 40Ar- 39Ar stepheating plateaus. However, diffusion theory-based model calculations predict that the stepwise thermal extraction process from mineral phases induces isotope fractionation and, hence, adulterates the original composition. Such effects are largely unconsidered, as they are small and a compelling experimental observation is lacking. We report the first unequivocal evidence for significant mass fractionation of argon isotopes during thermal extraction, observed on shungite, a carbon-rich Precambrian sedimentary rock. The degree of fractionation, as monitored by 38Ar/ 36Ar and 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios, very well agrees with theoretical predictions assuming an inverse square root dependence of diffusion coefficient and atomic mass, resulting in easier extraction of lighter isotopes. Hence, subatmospheric 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios obtained for argon extracted at low temperatures may not represent paleoatmospheric argon. Shungite argon resembles modern atmospheric composition, but constraints on the timing of trapping appear difficult to obtain, as shungites are multicomponent systems. In 40Ar- 39Ar stepwise heating, the isotope fractionation effect could cause systematic underestimations of plateau ages, between 0.15 and 0.4% depending on age, or considerably higher if samples contain appreciable atmospheric Ar. The magnitude of this effect is similar to the presently achieved uncertainties of this increasingly

  12. Argon Purification Studies and a Novel Liquid Argon Re-circulation System

    CERN Document Server

    Mavrokoridis, K; Coleman, J; Lightfoot, P K; McCauley, N; McCormick, K J; Touramanis, C

    2011-01-01

    Future giant liquid argon (LAr) time projection chambers (TPCs) require a purity of better than 0.1 parts per billion (ppb) to allow the ionised electrons to drift without significant capture by any electronegative impurities. We present a comprehensive study of the effects of electronegative impurity on gaseous and liquid argon scintillation light, an analysis of the efficacy of various purification chemicals, as well as the Liverpool LAr setup, which utilises a novel re-circulation purification system. Of the impurities tested - Air, O_2, H_2O, N_2 and CO_2 in the range of between 0.01 ppm to 1000 ppm - H_2O was found to have the most profound effect on gaseous argon scintillation light, and N_2 was found to have the least. Additionally, a correlation between the slow component decay time and the total energy deposited with 0.01 ppm - 100 ppm O_2 contamination levels in liquid argon has been established. The superiority of molecular sieves over anhydrous complexes at absorbing Ar gas, N_2 gas and H_2O vapou...

  13. The barrel muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector has acquired its first cosmic event in a magnetic field produced by the barrel toroid magnet.

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    A 3-D event display of a cosmic muon event, showing the path of a muon travelling through three layers of the barrel muon spectrometer. Three of the eight coils of the barrel toroid magnet can be seen in the top half of the drawing.

  14. Results from a new combined test of an electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter with a hadronic scintillating-tile calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new combined test of an electromagnetic liquid argon accordion calorimeter and a hadronic scintillating-tile calorimeter was carried out at the CERN SPS. These devices are prototypes of the barrel calorimeter of the future ATLAS experiment at the LHC. The energy resolution of pions in the energy range from 10 to 300 GeV at an incident angle θ of about 12 deg. is well described by the expression σ/E=((41.9±1.6)%/√E+(1.8±0.1)%)+(1.8±0.1)/E, where E is in GeV. The response to electrons and muons was evaluated. Shower profiles, shower leakage and the angular resolution of hadronic showers were also studied. Results are compared with those from the previous beam test

  15. Results from a new combined test of an electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter with a hadronic scintillating-tile calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Akhmadaliev, S Z; Amaral, P; Ambrosini, G; Amorim, A; Anderson, K; Andrieux, M L; Aubert, Bernard; Augé, E; Badaud, F; Baisin, L; Barreiro, F; Battistoni, G; Bazan, A; Bazizi, K; Bee, C P; Belorgey, J; Belymam, A; Benchekroun, D; Berglund, S R; Berset, J C; Blanchot, G; Bogush, A A; Bohm, C; Boldea, V; Bonivento, W; Borgeaud, P; Borisov, O N; Bosman, M; Bouhemaid, N; Breton, D; Brette, P; Bromberg, C; Budagov, Yu A; Burdin, S V; Calôba, L P; Camarena, F; Camin, D V; Canton, B; Caprini, M; Carvalho, J; Casado, M P; Cases, R; Castillo, M V; Cavalli, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Chadelas, R; Chalifour, M; Chekhtman, A; Chevalley, J L; Chirikov-Zorin, I E; Chlachidze, G; Chollet, J C; Citterio, M; Cleland, W E; Clément, C; Cobal, M; Cogswell, F; Colas, Jacques; Collot, J; Cologna, S; Constantinescu, S; Costa, G; Costanzo, D; Coulon, J P; Crouau, M; Dargent, P; Daudon, F; David, M; Davidek, T; Dawson, J; De, K; Delagnes, E; de La Taille, C; Del Peso, J; Del Prete, T; de Saintignon, P; Di Girolamo, B; Dinkespiler, B; Dita, S; Djama, F; Dodd, J; Dolejsi, J; Dolezal, Z; Downing, R; Dugne, J J; Duval, P Y; Dzahini, D; Efthymiopoulos, I; Errede, D; Errede, S; Etienne, F; Evans, H; Eynard, G; Farida, F; Fassnacht, P; Fedyakin, N N; Fernández de Troconiz, J; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, A; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Fournier, D; Fumagalli, G; Gallas, E J; García, G; Gaspar, M; Gianotti, F; Gildemeister, O; Glagolev, V; Glebov, V Yu; Gómez, A; González, V; González de la Hoz, S; Gordeev, A; Gordon, H A; Grabskii, V; Graugès-Pous, E; Grenier, P; Hakopian, H H; Haney, M; Hébrard, C; Henriques, A; Henry-Coüannier, F; Hervás, L; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Hostachy, J Y; Hoummada, A; Huet, M; Huston, J; Imbault, D; Ivanyushenkov, Yu M; Jacquier, Y; Jézéquel, S; Johansson, E K; Jon-And, K; Jones, R; Juste, A; Kakurin, S; Karst, P; Karyukhin, A N; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khubua, J I; Klioukhine, V I; Kolachev, G M; Kolomoets, V; Kopikov, S V; Kostrikov, M E; Kovtun, V E; Kozlov, V; Krivkova, P; Kukhtin, V V; Kulagin, M; Kulchitskii, Yu A; Kuzmin, M V; Labarga, L; Laborie, G; Lacour, D; Lami, S; Lapin, V; Le Dortz, O; Lefebvre, M; Le Flour, T; Leitner, R; Leltchouk, M; Le Van-Suu, A; Li, J; Liapis, C; Linossier, O; Lissauer, D; Lobkowicz, F; Lokajícek, M; Lomakin, Yu F; Lomakina, O V; López-Amengual, J M; Lottin, J P; Lund-Jensen, B; Lundqvist, J M; Maio, A; Makowiecki, D S; Malyukov, S N; Mandelli, L; Mansoulié, B; Mapelli, Livio P; Marin, C P; Marrocchesi, P S; Marroquin, F; Martin, L; Martin, O; Martin, P; Maslennikov, A M; Massol, N; Mazzanti, M; Mazzoni, E; Merritt, F S; Michel, B; Miller, R; Minashvili, I A; Miralles, L; Mirea, A; Mnatzakanian, E A; Monnier, E; Montarou, G; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Mosidze, M D; Moynot, M; Muanza, G S; Nagy, E; Nayman, P; Némécek, S; Nessi, Marzio; Nicod, D; Nicoleau, S; Niculescu, M; Noppe, J M; Onofre, A; Pallin, D; Pantea, D; Paoletti, R; Park, I C; Parrour, G; Parsons, J; Pascual, J I; Pereira, A; Perini, L; Perlas, J A; Perrodo, P; Petroff, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinhão, J; Plothow-Besch, Hartmute; Poggioli, Luc; Poirot, S; Price, L; Protopopov, Yu; Proudfoot, J; Pukhov, O; Puzo, P; Radeka, V; Rahm, David Charles; Reinmuth, G; Renardy, J F; Renzoni, G; Rescia, S; Resconi, S; Richards, R; Richer, J P; Riu, I; Roda, C; Roldán, J; Romance, J B; Romanov, V; Romero, P; Rusakovitch, N A; Sala, P R; Sanchis, E; Sanders, H; Santoni, C; Santos, J; Sauvage, D; Sauvage, G; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Sawyer, L; Says, L P; Schaffer, A C; Schwemling, P; Schwindling, J; Seguin-Moreau, N; Seidl, W; Seixas, J M; Selldén, B; Seman, M; Semenov, A A; Senchyshyn, V G; Serin, L; Shaldaev, E; Shchelchkov, A S; Shochet, M J; Sidorov, V; Silva, J; Simaitis, V J; Simion, S; Sissakian, A N; Soloviev, I V; Snopkov, R; Söderqvist, J; Solodkov, A A; Sonderegger, P; Soustruznik, K; Spanó, F; Spiwoks, R; Stanek, R; Starchenko, E A; Stavina, P; Stephens, R; Studenov, S; Suk, M; Surkov, A; Sykora, I; Taguet, J P; Takai, H; Tang, F; Tardell, S; Tas, P; Teiger, J; Teubert, F; Thaler, J J; Thion, J; Tikhonov, Yu A; Tisserand, V; Tisserant, S; Tokar, S; Topilin, N D; Trka, Z; Turcotte, M; Valkár, S; Varanda, M J; Vartapetian, A H; Vazeille, F; Vichou, I; Vincent, P; Vinogradov, V; Vorozhtsov, S B; Vuillemin, V; Walter, C; White, A; Wielers, M; Wingerter-Seez, I; Wolters, H; Yamdagni, N; Yarygin, G; Yosef, C; Zaitsev, A; Zitoun, R; Zolnierowski, Y

    2000-01-01

    A new combined test of an electromagnetic liquid argon accordion calorimeter and a hadronic scintillating-tile calorimeter was carried out at the CERN SPS. These devices are prototypes of the barrel calorimeter of the future ATLAS experiment at the LHC. The energy resolution of pions in the energy range from 10 to 300 GeV at an incident angle theta of about 12 degrees is well described by the expression sigma /E=((41.9+or-1.6)%/ square root E+(1.8+or-0.1)%)(+) (1.8+or-0.1)/E, where E is in GeV. The response to electrons and muons was evaluated. Shower profiles, shower leakage and the angular resolution of hadronic showers were also studied. Results are compared with those from the previous beam test. (22 refs).

  16. Results from a combined test of an electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter with a hadronic scintillating-tile calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Alifanov, A; Amaral, P; Ambrosini, G; Amorim, A; Anderson, K J; Astvatsaturov, A R; Aubert, Bernard; Augé, E; Autiero, D; Azuelos, Georges; Badaud, F; Baisin, L; Battistoni, G; Bazan, A; Bee, C P; Bellettini, Giorgio; Berglund, S R; Berset, J C; Blaj, C; Blanchot, G; Blucher, E; Bogush, A A; Bohm, C; Boldea, V; Borisov, O N; Bosman, M; Bouhemaid, N; Brette, P; Bromberg, C; Brossard, M; Budagov, Yu A; Buono, S; Calôba, L P; Camin, D V; Canton, B; Casado, M P; Cavalli, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Chadelas, R; Chase, Robert L; Chekhtman, A; Chevaleyre, J C; Chevalley, J L; Chirikov-Zorin, I E; Chlachidze, G; Chollet, J C; Cobal, M; Cogswell, F; Colas, Jacques; Collot, J; Cologna, S; Constantinescu, S; Costa, G; Costanzo, D; Cozzi, L; Crouau, M; Dargent, P; Daudon, F; David, M; Davidek, T; Dawson, J; De, K; de La Taille, C; Del Prete, T; Depommier, P; de Saintignon, P; De Santo, A; Dinkespiler, B; Di Girolamo, B; Dita, S; Dolejsi, J; Dolezal, Z; Downing, R; Dugne, J J; Duval, P Y; Dzahini, D; Efthymiopoulos, I; Errede, D; Errede, S; Etienne, F; Evans, H; Fassnacht, P; Fedyakin, N N; Ferrari, A; Ferreira, P; Ferrer, A; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Fouchez, D; Fournier, D; Fumagalli, G; Gallas, E J; Gaspar, M; Gianotti, F; Gildemeister, O; Gingrich, D M; Glagolev, V V; Golubev, V B; Gómez, A; González, J; Gordon, H A; Grabskii, V; Hakopian, H H; Haney, M; Hellman, S; Henriques, A; Holmgren, S O; Honoré, P F; Hostachy, J Y; Huston, J; Ivanyushenkov, Yu M; Jézéquel, S; Johansson, E K; Jon-And, K; Jones, R; Juste, A; Kakurin, S; Karapetian, G V; Karyukhin, A N; Khokhlov, Yu A; Klioukhine, V I; Kolomoets, V; Kopikov, S V; Kostrikov, M E; Kovtun, V E; Kukhtin, V V; Kulagin, M; Kulchitskii, Yu A; Laborie, G; Lami, S; Lapin, V; Lebedev, A; Lefebvre, M; Le Flour, T; Leitner, R; León-Florián, E; Leroy, C; Le Van-Suu, A; Li, J; Liba, I; Linossier, O; Lokajícek, M; Lomakin, Yu F; Lomakina, O V; Lund-Jensen, B; Mahout, G; Maio, A; Malyukov, S N; Mandelli, L; Mansoulié, B; Mapelli, Livio P; Marin, C P; Marroquin, F; Martin, L; Mazzanti, M; Mazzoni, E; Merritt, F S; Michel, B; Miller, R; Minashvili, I A; Miotto, A; Miralles, L; Mnatzakanian, E A; Monnier, E; Montarou, G; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Muanza, G S; Nagy, E; Némécek, S; Nessi, Marzio; Nicoleau, S; Noppe, J M; Olivetto, C; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Pallin, D; Pantea, D; Parrour, G; Pereira, A; Perini, L; Perlas, J A; Pétroff, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Poggioli, Luc; Poirot, S; Polesello, G; Price, L; Protopopov, Yu; Proudfoot, J; Pukhov, O; Radeka, V; Rahm, David Charles; Reinmuth, G; Renardy, J F; Renzoni, G; Resconi, S; Richards, R; Riu, I; Romanov, V; Ronceux, B; Rumyantsev, V; Rusakovitch, N A; Sala, P R; Sanders, H; Sauvage, G; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Sawyer, L; Says, L P; Schaffer, A C; Scheel, C V; Schwemling, P; Schindling, J; Seguin-Moreau, N; Seixas, J M; Selldén, B; Seman, M; Semenov, A A; Senchyshyn, V G; Serin, L; Shchelchkov, A S; Shevtsov, V P; Shochet, M J; Sidorov, V; Simaitis, V J; Simion, S; Sissakian, A N; Solodkov, A A; Sonderegger, P; Soustruznik, K; Stanek, R; Starchenko, E A; Stephani, D; Stephens, R; Studenov, S; Suk, M; Surkov, A; Tang, F; Tardell, S; Tas, P; Teiger, J; Teubert, F; Thaler, J J; Tisserant, S; Tokár, S; Topilin, N D; Trka, Z; Turcot, A S; Turcotte, M; Valkár, S; Vartapetian, A H; Vazeille, F; Vichou, I; Vinogradov, V; Vorozhtsov, S B; Vuillemin, V; Wagner, D; White, Alan R; Wingerter-Seez, I; Yamdagni, N; Yarygin, G; Yosef, C; Zaitsev, A; Zdrazil, M; Zitoun, R; Zolnierowski, Y

    1996-01-01

    The first combined test of an electromagnetic liquid argon accordion calorimeter and a hadronic scintillating-tile calorimeter was carried out at the CERN SPS. These devices are prototypes of the barrel calorimeter of the future ATLAS experiment at the LHC. The energy resolution of pions in the energy range from 20 to 300~GeV at an incident angle $\\theta$ of about 11$^\\circ$ is well-described by the expression $\\sigma/E = ((46.5 \\pm 6.0)\\%/\\sqrt{E} +(1.2 \\pm 0.3)\\%) \\oplus (3.2 \\pm 0.4)~\\mbox{GeV}/E$. Shower profiles, shower leakage, and the angular resolution of hadronic showers were also studied.

  17. Ion-beam excitation of liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann, M; Heindl, T; Neumeier, A; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Roth, S; Schönert, S; Wieser, J; Ulrich, A

    2015-01-01

    The scintillation light of liquid argon has been recorded wavelength and time resolved with very good statistics in a wavelength interval ranging from 118 nm through 970 nm. Three different ion beams, protons, sulfur ions and gold ions, were used to excite liquid argon. Only minor differences were observed in the wavelength-spectra obtained with the different incident particles. Light emission in the wavelength range of the third excimer continuum was found to be strongly suppressed in the liquid phase. In time-resolved measurements, the time structure of the scintillation light can be directly attributed to wavelength in our studies, as no wavelength shifter has been used. These measurements confirm that the singlet-to-triplet intensity ratio in the second excimer continuum range is a useful parameter for particle discrimination, which can also be employed in wavelength-integrated measurements as long as the sensitivity of the detector system does not rise steeply for wavelengths longer than 190 nm. Using ou...

  18. Argon laser-welded arteriovenous anastomoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R A; Kopchok, G; Donayre, C; White, G; Lyons, R; Fujitani, R; Klein, S R; Uitto, J

    1987-11-01

    This study compared the healing of laser-welded and sutured canine femoral arteriovenous anastomoses. Arteriovenous fistulas 2 cm in length were created bilaterally in the femoral vessels of 10 dogs and were studied at 1 (n = 2), 2 (n = 2), 4 (n = 3), and 8 (n = 3) weeks. In each animal, one anastomosis (control) was closed with running 6-0 polypropylene sutures, and the contralateral anastomosis (experimental) was sealed with an argon laser (0.5 watt, 4 minutes of exposure, 1830 J/cm2/1 cm length of anastomosis). At removal all experimental anastomoses were patent without hematomas, aneurysms, or luminal narrowing. Histologic examination at 4 weeks revealed that laser-welded anastomoses had less inflammatory response and almost normal collagen and elastin reorientation. At 8 weeks sutured anastomoses had significant intimal hyperplasia whereas laser repairs had normal luminal architecture. Tensile strength and collagen production, measured by the synthesis of hydroxyproline and the steady-state levels of type I and type III procollagen messenger ribonucleic acids, at the anastomoses and in adjacent vein and artery specimens were similar in sutured and laser-welded repairs at 2, 4, and 8 weeks. We conclude that argon laser welding of anastomoses is an acceptable alternative to suture techniques, with the advantage of improved healing without foreign body response and possible diminished intimal hyperplasia at the anastomotic line. PMID:3312648

  19. Electron scattering and transport in liquid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transport of excess electrons in liquid argon driven out of equilibrium by an applied electric field is revisited using a multi-term solution of Boltzmann’s equation together with ab initio liquid phase cross-sections calculated using the Dirac-Fock scattering equations. The calculation of liquid phase cross-sections extends previous treatments to consider multipole polarisabilities and a non-local treatment of exchange, while the accuracy of the electron-argon potential is validated through comparison of the calculated gas phase cross-sections with experiment. The results presented highlight the inadequacy of local treatments of exchange that are commonly used in liquid and cluster phase cross-section calculations. The multi-term Boltzmann equation framework accounting for coherent scattering enables the inclusion of the full anisotropy in the differential cross-section arising from the interaction and the structure factor, without an a priori assumption of quasi-isotropy in the velocity distribution function. The model, which contains no free parameters and accounts for both coherent scattering and liquid phase screening effects, was found to reproduce well the experimental drift velocities and characteristic energies

  20. Pollution of liquid argon after neutron irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Andrieux, M L; Collot, J; de Saintignon, P; Ferrari, A; Hostachy, J Y; Hoummada, A; Martin, P; Merkel, B; Puzo, P; Sauvage, D; Wielers, M

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the neutron facility installed at SARA is to investigate the behavior of various materials to be used in the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter, when submitted to fast neutron radiation. The samples are placed in a liquid argon cryostat a few cm away from the neutron source. Various pieces of the electromagnetic calorimeter have been tested in order to evaluate the rate of pollution of the liquid and consequently the possible signal loss in energy measurements. The average fluence was equivalent to the maximum expected in the calorimeter in about 10 years. The most striking feature of the results is that the pollution is not due to oxygen, at least for most of it. Using a particular value of the absorption length derived from these data, a simulation was carried out and the energy signal loss in the calorimeter could be predicted. Within the limits of our present knowledge, the conclusion is that damages due to this pollution will not be a problem. (17 refs).

  1. Pollution of liquid argon after neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the neutron facility installed at SARA is to investigate the behavior of various materials to be used in the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter, when submitted to fast neutron radiation. The samples are placed in a liquid argon cryostat a few cm away from the neutron source. Various pieces of the electromagnetic calorimeter have been tested in order to evaluate the rate of pollution of the liquid and consequently the possible signal loss in energy measurements. The average fluence was equivalent to the maximum expected in the calorimeter in about 10 years. The most striking feature of the results is that the pollution is not due to oxygen, at least for most of it. Using a particular value of the absorption length derived from these data, a simulation was carried out and the energy signal loss in the calorimeter could be predicted. Within the limits of our present knowledge, the conclusion is that damages due to this pollution will not be a problem

  2. WARP: a double phase argon programme for dark matter detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WARP (Wimp ARgon Programme) is a double phase Argon detector for Dark Matter search under construction at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. We present recent results obtained operating a prototype with a sensitive mass of 2.3 litres deep underground

  3. Stopping Power of Solid Argon for Helium Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besenbacher, F.; Bøttiger, Jørgen; Grauersen, O.;

    1981-01-01

    By means of the Rutherford-backscattering method, the stopping cross section of solid argon has been measured for 0.5–3 MeV helium ions to an accuracy of not, vert, similar3%. The results agree within the experimental accuracies with our earlier measurements for gaseous argon over the energy region...

  4. Nitrogen Removal from Molten Steel under Argon DC Glow Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ming-shan; DING Wei-zhong; LU Xiong-gang

    2005-01-01

    Under argon DC glow plasma, the nitrogen removal from molten steel was studied. The experimental result showed that nitrogen mass percent could be reduced to 0.000 8%. The change of polarity had no impact on nitrogen removal when the nitrogen mass percent was low. The mechanism of denitrogenation of molten steel under argon DC glow plasma was discussed.

  5. Comparison of Diode and Argon Laser Lesions in Rabbit Retina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Zhang; Xiaoxin Li; Bin Li; Jiping Da

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the histological alteration of retina with various spot intensities between diode and argon lasers in order to instruct the clinical use of 810 nm diode laser.Methods: Transpupillary retinal photocoagulations were performed on 42 eyes of 27pigmented rabbits. Histopathologic alteration of lesions in different intensities and different time intervals after irradiation produced by diode and argon laser was observed and compared using light microscopy. Areas of various lesions measured by image analysis system (CMIAS) were compared quantitatively.Results: Histopathologically, two-week-old grade 2 lesions produced by diode laser induced the disappearance of outer nuclear cells. More than a half of all showed reduction in number of outer nuclear layer cells in argon. Fibroblasts appeared in the diode grade 3lesions 5 days after irradiation. CMIAS data showed that all the areas of diode lesions immediately after photocoagulation were to be larger than those of argon laser lesions in the same spot intensity (P < 0.05). However, twenty-four hours after photocoagulation, the area of the diode lesions increased less than that of the argon laser lesions (8%vs.23%).Conclusion: The acute histological effect caused by 810 nm diode laser and argon green laser is similar,while the expansion of lesion area 24 hours after photocoagulation was less with the diode laser compared to the argon. This may be the first report in the literature regarding quantitative analysis of the delayed reaction of argon green lasers.

  6. Performance of a Rain Barrel Sharing Network under Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Jin Noh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rain barrels can be technically shared through social practices or mutual agreement between individual households. This study proposes the evaluation system for a rain barrel sharing network (RBSN considering three performance criteria of reliability, resiliency, and vulnerability, under plausible climate change scenarios. First, this study shows how the system can be improved in terms of the performance criteria using historical daily rainfall data based on the storage-reliability-yield relationship. This study then examined how the benefits from RBSN are affected by climate change after 100 years. Three climate change scenarios (A1B, A2 and B2 and three global circulation models were used for this purpose. The results showed that the reliability and vulnerability are improved due to sharing and their improvements become larger under climate change conditions. In contrast, the resiliency reduces slightly due to sharing and its reduction is attenuated under climate change conditions. In particular, vulnerability will be reduced significantly under climate change. These results suggest that the sharing of various water resources systems can be an effective climate change adaptation strategy that reduces vulnerability and increases the reliability of the system.

  7. Merging of high speed argon plasma jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, A.; Messer, S.; Brockington, S.; Wu, L.; Witherspoon, F. D. [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, Virginia 22180 (United States); Elton, R. [University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Formation of an imploding plasma liner for the plasma liner experiment (PLX) requires individual plasma jets to merge into a quasi-spherical shell of plasma converging on the origin. Understanding dynamics of the merging process requires knowledge of the plasma phenomena involved. We present results from the study of the merging of three plasma jets in three dimensional geometry. The experiments were performed using HyperV Technologies Corp. 1 cm Minirailguns with a preionized argon plasma armature. The vacuum chamber partially reproduces the port geometry of the PLX chamber. Diagnostics include fast imaging, spectroscopy, interferometry, fast pressure probes, B-dot probes, and high speed spatially resolved photodiodes, permitting measurements of plasma density, temperature, velocity, stagnation pressure, magnetic field, and density gradients. These experimental results are compared with simulation results from the LSP 3D hybrid PIC code.

  8. Large vessel sealing with the argon laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R A; Kopchok, G; Donayre, C; Lyons, R; White, G; Klein, S R; Pizzurro, D; Abergel, R P; Dwyer, R M; Uitto, J

    1987-01-01

    This study compared the histology, biochemistry, and tensile strength of laser-welded and sutured canine venotomies, arteriotomies, and arteriovenous fistulas. Twelve animals had bilateral femoral vessels studied, with one repair (control) closed with interrupted 6-0 polypropylene sutures, and the contralateral repair (experimental) welded with the argon laser. Specimens were examined at weekly intervals from 1 to 4 weeks (four animals for each type of repair), and were evaluated histologically by hematoxylin and eosin, elastin, and trichrome stains; biochemically by the formation of [3H]hydroxyproline as an index of collagen synthesis; and mechanically by tensile strength determinations. At removal, all experimental closures were patent without hematomas, aneurysms, or luminal dilatation. Histologic and biochemical examination and tensile strength determinations suggest that laser welding may be an alternative to sutures for repair of large-diameter venotomies, arteriotomies, and arteriovenous fistulas, as healing is comparable to that seen with suture repairs up to 4 weeks postoperatively. PMID:3306233

  9. Vascular Welding Using The Argon Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Rodney A.; Donayre, Carlos; Kopchok, George; White, Geoffrey; Abergel, R. Patrick; Lyons, Richard; Klein, Stanley; Dwyer, Richard; Uitto, Jouni

    1987-03-01

    This study compared the histology, biochemistry, and tensile strength of laser welded and sutured canine venotomies, arteriotomies and arteriovenous fistulas. Bilateral femoral, carotid or jugular vessels were studied with one repair (control) closed with interrupted 6-0 polypropylene sutures, and the contralatral repair (experimental) welded with the argon laser. Specimens were examined at weekly intervals from 1 to 4 weeks for each type of repair and evaluated histologically by hematoxylineosin, elastin and trichrome stains, biochemically by the formation of [3H] hyaroxyproline as an index of collagen synthesis, ana mechanically by tensile strength determinations. At removal, all experimental closures were patent without hematomas, aneurysms or luminal dilatation. Histologic and biochemical examination and tensile strength determinations suggest that laser welaing may be an alternative to sutures for repair of large diameter venotomies, arteriotomies and arteriovenous fistulas, as they heal comparable to suture repairs up to 4 weeks postoperatively.

  10. Commissioning of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Rezaie, Erfan

    ATLAS, a multi-purpose detector built at the LHC at CERN, requires an extensive commissioning campaign to be ready for proton-proton collisions. In this work, we focus on the commissioning of the liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters, with emphasis on commissioning with cosmic rays. First we outline one phase of the commissioning work, which involves testing of the front-end electronics of the two endcap calorimeters. We then describe two cosmic ray generators as input to a Monte-Carlo simulation of cosmic rays in ATLAS, and compare their results. Finally, we explain a technique developed for this work which uses information from the Tile calorimeters to predict the timing of cosmic rays within the LAr calorimeters, because cosmic rays occur randomly in time whereas the electronics are clocked at [Special characters omitted.] . The results from this analysis tool are compared to default tools, using both simulated and real cosmic ray data in the calorimeters.

  11. An analysis of increasing the size of the strategic petroleum reserve to one billion barrels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Energy Emergency Policy and Evaluation requested that the Energy Information Administration complete an analysis of the proposed expansion in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) from its currently planned size of 750 million barrels to 1000 million barrels. Because the SPR contains only 580 million barrels at this point in time, the benefits and costs of increasing the SPR from 600 to 750 million barrels were also estimated. This report documents the assumptions, methodology, and results of the analysis. 17 figs., 15 tabs.

  12. Installation of CMS EB (ECAL Barrel) Supermodules 5 and 13 inside HB+ (HCAL Barrel) on 26/27 April 2006

    CERN Document Server

    Ken Bell, RAL

    2006-01-01

    The first two barrel "supermodules" of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) have been inserted into the barrel hadron calorimeter (HCAL) in the CMS experimental hall (called SX5) in Cessy in preparation for the forthcoming magnet test and cosmic challenge (MTCC). Each of the two supermodules contains 1700 lead tungstate crystals in glass-fibre alveolar support structures, with associated avalanche photodiodes (APDs, for scintillation light detection), electronics and cooling system. See also the document CMS-PHO-OREACH-2006-019. The first two pictures show the two supermodules in their final position. Fig. 3: the "enfourneur" in position on the HB Cradle. Fig. 4: supermodule n. 5 and extension rails being lifted to the enforneur. Figs. 5-6: supermodule approaching the enforneur. Fig. 7: rotating the Enfourneur to the correct phi direction Figs. 8-9: aligning the extension rails with the rails inside HB and view from inside HB, once the rails are aligned. Figs. 10-12: insertion of supermodule n. 5. Fig. ...

  13. Argon laser induced changes to the carbonate content of enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argon laser irradiation can be used to cure orthodontic brackets onto teeth in significantly less time than conventional curing lights. In addition, it has been shown that the argon laser seems to impart a demineralization resistance to the enamel. The purpose of this study was to use surface science techniques to ascertain if this demineralization resistance is possibly a result of a decrease in the carbonate content of enamel. Eleven mandibular third molars previously scheduled for extraction were collected and used in the present study. The teeth were sectioned in two and randomly assigned to either the argon laser (457-502 nm; 250 mW cm-2) or the control (no treatment) group. The sections assigned to the argon laser group were cured for 10 s and analyzed. To exaggerate any potential changes the experimental sections were then exposed to a further 110 s of argon laser irradiation. Surface analysis was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The results showed no statistically significant change in the carbonate content of enamel after argon laser irradiation (p > 0.05). Thus, it is suggested that any demineralization resistance imparted to the enamel surface by argon laser irradiation is not due to alterations in carbonate content.

  14. Performance of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter barrel module 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction and performance of the barrel pre-series module 0 of the future ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter at the LHC is described. The signal reconstruction and performance of ATLAS-like electronics has been studied. The signal to noise ratio for muons has been found to be 7.11±0.07. An energy resolution of better than 9.5% GeV1/2/√E (sampling term) has been obtained with electron beams of up to 245 GeV. The uniformity of the response to electrons in an area of ΔηxΔphi=1.2x0.075 has been measured to be better than 0.8%

  15. Alcohol dehydrogenase polymorphism in barrel cactus populations of Drosophila mojavensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, S; Hocutt, G D; Breitmeyer, C M; Markow, T A; Pfeiler, E

    1996-07-01

    Starch gel electrophoresis revealed that the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-2) locus was polymorphic in two populations (from Agua Caliente, California and the Grand Canyon, Arizona) of cactophilic Drosophila mojavensis that utilize barrel cactus (Ferocactus acanthodes) as a host plant. Electromorphs representing products of a slow (S) and a fast (F) allele were found in adult flies. The frequency of the slow allele was 0.448 in flies from Agua Caliente and 0.659 in flies from the Grand Canyon. These frequencies were intermediate to those of the low (Baja California peninsula, Mexico) and high (Sonora, Mexico and southern Arizona) frequency Adh-2S populations of D. mojavensis that utilize different species of host cacti. PMID:8765684

  16. Charged Pion Energy Reconstruction in the ATLAS Barrel Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Bosman, M; Nessi, Marzio

    2000-01-01

    The intrinsic performance of the ATLAS barrel and extended barrelcalorimeters for the measurement of charged pions is presented. Pion energyscans (E = 20, 50, 200, 400 and 1000 GeV) at two pseudo-rapidity points ($\\eta$= 0.3 and 1.3) and pseudorapidity scans ($-0.2 < \\eta < 1.8$) with pions ofconstant transverse energy ($E_T = 20$ and 50 GeV) are analysed. A simpleapproach, that accounts in first order for non-compensation and dead materialeffects, is used for the pion energy reconstruction. The intrinsic performancesof the calorimeter are studied: resolution, linearity, effect of dead material,tails in the energy distribution. The effect of electronic noise, cell energycuts and restricted cone size are investigated.

  17. Performance of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter barrel module 0

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, Bernard; Alexa, C; Astesan, F; Augé, E; Aulchenko, V M; Ballansat, J; Barreiro, F; Barrillon, P; Battistoni, G; Bazan, A; Beaugiraud, B; Beck-Hansen, J; Belhorma, B; Belorgey, J; Belymam, A; Ben-Mansour, A; Benchekroun, D; Benchouk, C; Bernard, R; Bertoli, W; Boniface, J; Bonivento, W; Bourdarios, C; Bremer, J; Breton, D; Bán, J; Camard, A; Canton, B; Carminati, L; Cartiglia, N; Cavalli, D; Chalifour, M; Chekhtman, A; Chen, H; Cherkaoui, R; Chevalley, J L; Chollet, F; Citterio, M; Clark, A; Cleland, W; Clément, C; Colas, Jacques; Collot, J; Costa, G; Cros, P; Cunitz, H; de Saintignon, P; Del Peso, J; Delebecque, P; Delmastro, M; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Dinkespiler, B; Djama, F; Dodd, J; Driouichi, C; Dumont-Dayot, N; Duval, P Y; Dzahini, D; Efthymiopoulos, I; Egdemir, J; El-Kacimi, M; El-Mouahhidi, Y; Engelmann, R; Ernwein, J; Falleau, I; Fanti, M; Farrell, J; Fassnacht, P; Ferrari, A; Fichet, S; Fournier, D; Gallin-Martel, M L; Gara, A; García, G; Gaumer, O; Ghazlane, H; Ghez, P; Gianotti, F; Girard, C; Gordon, H; Gouanère, M; Guilhem, G; Hackenburg, B; Hakimi, M; Hassani, S; Henry-Coüannier, F; Hervás, L; Hinz, L; Hoffman, A; Hoffman, J; Hostachy, J Y; Hoummada, A; Hubaut, F; Idrissi, A; Imbault, D; Jacquier, Y; Jérémie, A; Jevaud, M; Jézéquel, S; Kambara, H; Karst, P; Kazanin, V; Kierstead, J A; Kolachev, G M; Kordas, K; de La Taille, C; Labarga, L; Lacour, D; Lafaye, R; Laforge, B; Lanni, F; Le Coroller, A; Le Dortz, O; Le Maner, C; Le Van-Suu, A; Le Flour, T; Leite, M; Leltchouk, M; Lesueur, J; Lissauer, D; Lund-Jensen, B; Lundqvist, J M; Ma, H; Macé, G; Makowiecki, D S; Malychev, V; Mandelli, L; Mansoulié, B; Marin, C P; Martin, D; Martin, L; Martin, O; Martin, P; Maslennikov, A L; Massol, N; Mazzanti, M; McCarthy, R; McDonald, J; Megner, L; Merkel, B; Mirea, A; Moneta, L; Monnier, E; Moynot, M; Muraz, J F; Nagy, E; Negroni, S; Neukermans, L; Nicod, D; Nikolic-Audit, I; Noppe, J M; Ohlsson-Malek, F; Olivier, C; Orsini, F; Pailler, P; Parrour, G; Parsons, J A; Pearce, M; Perini, L; Perrodo, P; Perrot, G; Pétroff, P; Poggioli, Luc; Pospelov, G E; Pralavorio, Pascal; Prast, J; Przysiezniak, H; Puzo, P; Radeka, V; Rahm, David Charles; Rajagopalan, S; Raymond, M; Renardy, J F; Repetti, B; Rescia, S; Resconi, S; Riccadona, X; Richer, J P; Rijssenbeek, M; Rodier, S; Rossel, F; Rousseau, D; Rydström, S; Saboumazrag, S; Sauvage, D; Sauvage, G; Schilly, P; Schwemling, P; Schwindling, J; Seguin-Moreau, N; Seidl, W; Seman, M; Serin, L; Shousharo, A; Simion, S; Sippach, W; Snopkov, R; Steffens, J; Stroynowski, R; Stumer, I; Taguet, J P; Takai, H; Talyshev, A A; Tartarelli, F; Teiger, J; Thion, J; Tikhonov, Yu A; Tisserant, S; Tocut, V; Tóth, J; Veillet, J J; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Vuillemin, V; Wielers, M; Willis, W J; Wingerter-Seez, I; Ye, J; Yip, K; Zerwas, D; Zitoun, R; Zolnierowski, Y

    2003-01-01

    The construction and performance of the barrel pre-series module 0 of the future ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter at the LHC is described. The signal reconstruction and performance of ATLAS-like electronics has been studied. The signal to noise ratio for muons has been found to be 7.11+-0.07. An energy resolution of better than 9.5% GeV^1/2/sqrt{E} (sampling term) has been obtained with electron beams of up to 245GeV. The uniformity of the response to electrons in an area of Delta_eta x Delta_phi = 1.2 x 0.075 has been measured to be better than 0.8%.

  18. A hybrid magnetostrictive-piezoelectric barrel-stave projector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAI Yong; MO Xiping; LIU Yongping; CUI Zheng

    2006-01-01

    A hybrid magnetostrictive-piezoelectric barrel-stave projector is designed and developed. The new type transducer is driven by the union of rare-earth giant magnetostrictive material Terfenol-D and PZT piezoelectric ceramic. Combining the advantages of low frequency performance within a compact size, it proves that the hybrid projector has a much broader band and higher sound power than that with single magnetostrictive or piezoelectric driver by the simulated and measured results. The prototype of the hybrid projector has a size of 88 mm in outside diameter and 316 mm in length, with an underwater resonant frequency of 1.30 kHz,Q factor of 1.43 for -3 dB bandwidth, and transmitting voltage response level of 135.1 dB at the resonant frequency.

  19. Modeling of gun barrel surface erosion: Historic perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckingham, A.C.

    1996-08-01

    Results and interpretations of numerical simulations of some dominant processes influencing gun barrel propellant combustion and flow-induced erosion are presented. Results include modeled influences of erosion reduction techniques such as solid additives, vapor phase chemical modifications, and alteration of surface solid composition through use of thin coatings. Precedents and historical perspective are provided with predictions from traditional interior ballistics compared to computer simulations. Accelerating reactive combustion flow, multiphase and multicomponent transport, flow-to-surface thermal/momentum/phase change/gas-surface chemical exchanges, surface and micro-depth subsurface heating/stress/composition evolution and their roles in inducing surface cracking, spall, ablation, melting, and vaporization are considered. Recognition is given to cyclic effects of previous firing history on material preconditioning. Current perspective and outlook for future are based on results of a US Army-LLNL erosion research program covering 7 y in late 1970s. This is supplemented by more recent research on hypervelocity electromagnetic projectile launchers.

  20. The CMS Level-1 Trigger Barrel Track Finder

    CERN Document Server

    Ero, Janos; Ioannis Flouris; Fountas, Konstantinos; Guiducci, Luigi; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Triossi, Andrea; Wulz, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The design and performance of the upgraded CMS Level-1 Trigger Barrel Muon Track Finder (BMTF) is presented. Monte Carlo simulation data as well as cosmic ray and pp data from a CMS muon detector slice test have been used to study in detail the performance of the new track finder. The design architecture is based on twelve MP7 cards which use a Xilinx Virtex-7 FPGA and can receive and transmit data at 10 Gbps from 72 input and 72 output fibers. According to the CMS Trigger Upgrade TDR the BMTF receives trigger primitive data which are computed using both RPC and DT data and transmits data from a number of muon candidates to the upgraded Global Muon Trigger. Results from detailed studies of comparisons between the BMTF algorithm results and the results of a C++ emulator are also presented. The new BMTF will be commissioned for data taking in 2016.

  1. LArGe - A liquid argon scintillation veto for GERDA

    OpenAIRE

    Heisel, M.(Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Heidelberg, Germany)

    2011-01-01

    LArGe is a Gerda low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for possible applications in the Gerda experiment. Gerda searches for the neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge, by operating naked germanium detectors submersed into 65 m3 of liquid argon. Similarly, LArGe runs Ge-detectors in 1 m3 (1.4 tons) of liquid argon, which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The light is used...

  2. Practical reactor production of {sup 41}Ar from argon clathrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercer, J.R. E-mail: jmercer@pharmacy.ualberta.ca; Duke, M.J.M.; McQuarrie, S.A

    2000-06-01

    The radionuclide {sup 41}Ar has many ideal properties as a gas flow tracer. However, the modest cross-section of {sup 40}Ar for thermal neutron activation makes preparation of suitable activities of {sup 41}Ar technically difficult particularly for low flux reactors. Argon can however be trapped in a molecular complex called a clathrate that can then be irradiated. We prepared argon clathrate and explored its irradiation and stability characteristics. Argon clathrate can be used to provide gigabecquerel quantities of {sup 41}Ar even with low power reactors.

  3. Grafting PNIPAAm from β-barrel shaped transmembrane nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charan, Himanshu; Kinzel, Julia; Glebe, Ulrich; Anand, Deepak; Garakani, Tayebeh Mirzaei; Zhu, Leilei; Bocola, Marco; Schwaneberg, Ulrich; Böker, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    The research on protein-polymer conjugates by grafting from the surface of proteins has gained significant interest in the last decade. While there are many studies with globular proteins, membrane proteins have remained untouched to the best of our knowledge. In this study, we established the conjugate formation with a class of transmembrane proteins and grow polymer chains from the ferric hydroxamate uptake protein component A (FhuA; a β-barrel transmembrane protein of Escherichia coli). As the lysine residues of naturally occurring FhuA are distributed over the whole protein, FhuA was reengineered to have up to 11 lysines, distributed symmetrically in a rim on the membrane exposed side (outside) of the protein channel and exclusively above the hydrophobic region. Reengineering of FhuA ensures a polymer growth only on the outside of the β-barrel and prevents blockage of the channel as a result of the polymerization. A water-soluble initiator for controlled radical polymerization (CRP) was consecutively linked to the lysine residues of FhuA and N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) polymerized under copper-mediated CRP conditions. The conjugate formation was analyzed by using MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry, SDS-PAGE, circular dichroism spectroscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and size exclusion chromatography. Such conjugates combine the specific functions of the transmembrane proteins, like maintaining membrane potential gradients or translocation of substrates with the unique properties of synthetic polymers such as temperature and pH stimuli handles. FhuA-PNIPAAm conjugates will serve as functional nanosized building blocks for applications in targeted drug delivery, self-assembly systems, functional membranes and transmembrane protein gated nanoreactors. PMID:27614163

  4. Design and development of a work robot to place ATLAS SCT modules onto barrel cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Terada, S; Honma, F; Ikegami, Y; Iwata, Y; Kato, Y; Kobayashi, H; Kohriki, T; Kondo, T; Nakano, I; Sengoku, H; Takashima, R; Tanaka, R; Ujiie, N; Unno, Y; Yasuda, S

    2005-01-01

    More than 2000 silicon modules need to be placed and fastened on the ATLAS SCT barrel tracker. A semi-automatic pick-and-place work robot was designed and developed to cope with the module placement for the SCT barrel assembly. We found that this robot could place modules to a mechanical precision of better than 25 mum.

  5. The Effects of Dissolved Methane upon Liquid Argon Scintillation Light

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, B J P; Back, H O; Collin, G; Conrad, J M; Greene, A; Katori, T; Pordes, S; Toups, M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we report on measurements of the effects of dissolved methane upon argon scintillation light. We monitor the light yield from an alpha source held 20 cm from a cryogenic photomultiplier tube (PMT) assembly as methane is injected into a high-purity liquid argon volume. We observe significant suppression of the scintillation light yield by dissolved methane at the 10 part per billion (ppb) level. By examining the late scintillation light time constant, we determine that this loss is caused by an absorption process and also see some evidence of methane-induced scintillation quenching at higher concentrations (50-100 ppb). Using a second PMT assembly we look for visible re-emission features from the dissolved methane which have been reported in gas-phase argon methane mixtures, and we find no evidence of visible re-emission from liquid-phase argon methane mixtures at concentrations between 10 ppb and 0.1%.

  6. Evidence of electric breakdown induced by bubbles in liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Bay, F; Murphy, S; Resnati, F; Rubbia, A; Sergiampietri, F; Wu, S

    2014-01-01

    We report on the results of a high voltage test in liquid argon in order to measure its dielectric rigidity. Under stable conditions and below the boiling point, liquid argon was found to sustain a uniform electric field of 100 kV/cm, applied in a region of 20 cm$^2$ area across 1 cm thick gap. When the liquid is boiling, breakdowns may occur at electric fields as low as 40 kV/cm. This test is one of the R&D efforts towards the Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging ExpeRiment (GLACIER) as proposed Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) for the LBNO observatory for neutrino physics, astrophysics and nucleon decay searches.

  7. A purity monitoring system for liquid argon calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For liquid argon calorimeters electronegative impurities dissolved in the medium degrade the detector response and deteriorate the energy resolution, especially at high energies. A concept for a purity monitoring system for liquid argon calorimeters has been developed and is presented here. Special combined monitors of 241Am- and 207Bi-cells are used to monitor the concentration of impurities. The working principle as well as results from test measurements are discussed

  8. Size Determination of Argon Clusters from a Rayleigh Scattering Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI An-Le; ZHAI Hua-Jin; LIU Bing-Chen; LI Zhong; NI Guo-Yuan; XU Zhi-Zhan

    2000-01-01

    Argon clusters are produced in the process of adiabatic expansion of a high backing pressure gas into vacuum through a nozzle. The cluster size is determined by a Rayleigh scattering measurement. The scattered signal measured is proportional to the 2.78th power of gas stagnation pressure. The average cluster sizes vary from 100 to more than 12000 atoms/cluster with the argon gas backing pressures ranging between 3 to 45 atm.

  9. Pulse shape discrimination studies in a liquid Argon scintillation detector

    OpenAIRE

    Pollmann, T.

    2007-01-01

    Liquid rare gases have been gaining popularity as detector media in rare event searches, especially dark matter experiments, and one factor driving their adoption is the possibility to recognise different types of ionizing radiation by the pulse shapes they evoke. This work on pulse shape discrimination in a liquid argon scintillation detector was done in the framework of the GERDA experiment, where liquid argon scintillation signals may be used for background suppression purposes. Liquid arg...

  10. Power Consideration for Pulsed Discharges in Potassium Seeded Argon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Sheng-Guo; HE Jun-Jia; LIU Ke-Fu

    2007-01-01

    Minimization of energy consumed in plasma generation is critical for applications, in which a large volume of plasmas is needed. We suggest that a high electron density atmospheric pressure plasmas can be generated by pulsed discharges in potassium seeded argon at an elevated temperature with a very small power input. The ionization efficiency and power budget of pulsed discharges in such plasmas are analytically studied. The results show that ionization efficiency of argon, especially at small reduced electric field E/N (the ratio of the electric field to the gas number density), is improved effectively in the presence of small amount of potassium additives. Power input of pulsed discharge to sustain a prescribed average level of ionization in potassium seeded argon is three orders of magnitude lower than that in pure argon. Further, unlike in pure argon, it is found that very short high-voltage pulses with very high repetition rates are unnecessary in potassium seeded argon. A pulse with 100ns of pulse duration, 5kHz of repetition rate, and 2Td (1 Td = 1 ×10-21 Vm2) of E/N is enough to sustain an electron density of 10l9m-3 in 1 atm 1500 K Ar+0.1% K mixture, with a very small power input of about 0.08 × 104 W/m3.

  11. Energy resolution for α-particles in doped liquid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes experiments on the effect of allene doped in liquid argon. In the case of doped argon, a large amount of charge is obtained even at low electric fields and the measured charge increases with the field gradually. This can be explained as follows; part of deposited energy which does not form charge in pure argon contributes to charge signal in doped argon through scintillation photons which ionize allene molecules. The main factors determining the energy resolution for α-particles are considered to be (1) fluctuation in the number of produced ion-electron pairs as expressed by the Fano factor, (2) fluctuation in recombination process, (3) fluctuation in photoionization, (4) fluctuation due to the condition of radioactive source and surface of electrodes, (5) fluctuation in geometrical efficiency due to the range and emission angle of α-particles in liquid argon, and (6) electronic noise of amplifier. The factors (1) and (3) can be neglected because of a large number of associated electrons or photons. In pure liquid argon, the factor (2) may be a cause of bad resolution since the fraction of the produced ion-electron paris which do not recombine is small and the photoionization process never occurs for photons emitted through recombination. (N.K.)

  12. Dynamics of inner ear pressure release, measured with a double-barreled micropipette in the guinea pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, HP; Thalen, EO; Albers, FWJ

    1999-01-01

    The inner ear, fluid pressure was measured in scala media of the guinea pig through one barrel of a double-barreled micropipette after a sudden volume increase or decrease, caused by injection or withdrawal of artificial endolymph through the other barrel. During injection or withdrawal, the inner e

  13. New argon-argon (40Ar/39Ar) radiometric age dates from selected subsurface basalt flows at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Mary K.; Turrin, Brent D.; Champion, Duane E.; Swisher, Carl C.

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, collected samples for 12 new argon-argon radiometric ages from eastern Snake River Plain olivine tholeiite basalt flows in the subsurface at the Idaho National Laboratory. The core samples were collected from flows that had previously published paleomagnetic data. Samples were sent to Rutgers University for argon-argon radiometric dating analyses.

  14. Structural insight into the biogenesis of β-barrel membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Kuszak, Adam J; Gumbart, James C; Lukacik, Petra; Chang, Hoshing; Easley, Nicole C; Lithgow, Trevor; Buchanan, Susan K

    2013-09-19

    β-barrel membrane proteins are essential for nutrient import, signalling, motility and survival. In Gram-negative bacteria, the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) complex is responsible for the biogenesis of β-barrel membrane proteins, with homologous complexes found in mitochondria and chloroplasts. Here we describe the structure of BamA, the central and essential component of the BAM complex, from two species of bacteria: Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus ducreyi. BamA consists of a large periplasmic domain attached to a 16-strand transmembrane β-barrel domain. Three structural features shed light on the mechanism by which BamA catalyses β-barrel assembly. First, the interior cavity is accessible in one BamA structure and conformationally closed in the other. Second, an exterior rim of the β-barrel has a distinctly narrowed hydrophobic surface, locally destabilizing the outer membrane. And third, the β-barrel can undergo lateral opening, suggesting a route from the interior cavity in BamA into the outer membrane. PMID:23995689

  15. Charged Pion Energy Reconstruction in the ATLAS Barrel Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Bosman, Martine; Nessi, Marzio

    1999-01-01

    Intrinsic performance of the ATLAS calorimeters in the barrel region with respect to charged pions was studied. For this the following simulated data were used: pion energy scans ($E = 20, 50, 200, 400$ and $1000$ GeV) at two pseudo-rapidity points ($eta = 0.3$ and $1.3$) and pseudo-rapidity scans ($-0.2 < eta < 1.8$) with pions of constant transverse energy ($E_T = 20$ and $50$ GeV). For pion energy reconstruction the benchmark approach was used. Performance was estimated for cases, when energy and rapidity dependent and independent calibration parameters were applied. The best results were obtained with energy and rapidity dependent parameters. Studies done for pions enabled optimization of the cone size and of the cut to obtain the best energy resolution. Energy dependence of the resolution can be parameterized as: $(50pm4)%/sqrt{E} oplus (3.4pm0.3)% oplus 1.0/E$ at $eta = 0.3$ and $(68pm8)%/sqrt{E} oplus (3.0pm0.7)% oplus 1.5/E$ at $eta = 1.3$. Larger constant term at $eta=0.3$ can be explained by l...

  16. Double Barreled Wet Colostomy: Initial Experience and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Salgado-Cruz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pelvic exenteration and multivisceral resection in colorectal have been described as a curative and palliative intervention. Urinary tract reconstruction in a pelvic exenteration is achieved in most cases with an ileal conduit of Bricker, although different urinary reservoirs have been described. Methods. A retrospective and observational study of six patients who underwent a pelvic exenteration and urinary tract reconstruction with a double barreled wet colostomy (DBWC was done, describing the preoperative diagnosis, the indication for the pelvic exenteration, the complications associated with the procedure, and the followup in a period of 5 years. A literature review of the case series reported of the technique was performed. Results. Six patients had a urinary tract reconstruction with the DBWC technique, 5 male patients and one female patient. Age range was from 20 to 77 years, with a medium age 53.6 years. The most frequent complication presented was a pelvic abscess in 3 patients (42.85%; all complications could be resolved with a conservative treatment. Conclusion. In the group of our patients with pelvic exenteration and urinary tract reconstruction with a DBWC, it is a safe procedure and well tolerated by the patients, and most of the complications can be resolved with conservative treatment.

  17. Erosion measurement techniques for plasma-driven railgun barrels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamison, K.A.; Niiler, A.

    1987-04-01

    Plasma-driven railguns are now in operation at several locations throughout the world. All share common problems in barrel erosion arising from the fact that the bore surface must contain a high temperature plasma armature which transmits the acceleration force to a projectile. The plasma temperature at the core of the armature is estimated to be 30 000 K or higher. Such conditions are erosive to most materials even when the exposure time is 100 s or less. We have adapted two accelerator based techniques to aid in the study of this erosion. The first technique involves the collection and analysis of material ablated and left behind by the plasma. This analysis is baded on the unfolding of the Rutherford backscattered (RBS) spectra of 1 MeV deuterons incident on residue collected from a railgun bore. The second technique is an erosion measurement involving thin layer activation (TLA) of surfaces. In this process, the copper rail surface is activated by 2.4 MeV protons creating a relatively thin (3 m) layer sparsely seeded with a long lived zinc isotope. Monitoring the decay of the activated sample before and after a firing can detect surface wear of about 0.1 m. Results from the RBS and TLA experiments on the BRL plasma driven railgun are described.

  18. Erosion measurement techniques for plasma-driven railgun barrels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamison, K.A.; Niiler, A.

    1987-04-01

    Plasma-driven railguns are now in operation at several locations throughout the world. All share common problems in barrel erosion arising from the fact that the bore surface must contain a high temperature plasma armature which transmits the acceleration force to a projectile. The plasma temperature at the core of the armature is estimated to be 30 000 K or higher. Such conditions are erosive to most materials even when the exposure time is 100 ..mu..s or less. We have adapted two accelerator based techniques to aid in the study of this erosion. The first technique involves the collection and analysis of material ablated and left behind by the plasma. This analysis is baded on the unfolding of the Rutherford backscattered (RBS) spectra of 1 MeV deuterons incident on residue collected from a railgun bore. The second technique is an erosion measurement involving thin layer activation (TLA) of surfaces. In this process, the copper rail surface is activated by 2.4 MeV protons creating a relatively thin (3 ..mu..m) layer sparsely seeded with a long lived zinc isotope. Monitoring the decay of the activated sample before and after a firing can detect surface wear of about 0.1 ..mu..m. Results from the RBS and TLA experiments on the BRL plasma driven railgun are described.

  19. First ATLAS Barrel Toroid coil casing arrives at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The first of eight 25-metre long coil casings for the ATLAS experiment's barrel toroid magnet system arrived at CERN on Saturday 2 March by road from Heidelberg. This structure will be part of the largest superconducting toroid magnet ever made.   The first coil casing for the toroidal magnets of Atlas arrives at Building 180. This is the start of an enormous three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle. Each of the eight sets of double pancake coils will be housed inside aluminium coil casings, which in turn will be held inside a stainless steel vacuum vessel. A huge construction, the casing that arrived at CERN measures 25 metres in length and 5 metres in width. It weighs 20 tones. And this is just the beginning of the toroid jigsaw: by early April a batch of four double pancake coils, which altogether weighs 65 tones, will arrive from Ansaldo in Italy. The first vacuum vessel will also be arriving from Felguera in Spain this month. It will take about two years for all these 25 m long structures of casings, coils a...

  20. Cryogenic Characteristics of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid Superconducting Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Pengo, R; Delruelle, N; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Passardi, Giorgio; Dudarev, A; ten Kate, H

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS, one of the experiments of the LHC accelerator under commissioning at CERN, is equipped with a large superconducting magnet the Barrel Toroid (BT) that has been tested at nominal current (20500 A). The BT is composed of eight race-track superconducting coils (each one weights about 45 tons) forming the biggest air core toroidal magnet ever built. By means of a large throughput centrifugal pump, a forced flow (about 10 liter/second at 4.5 K) provides the indirect cooling of the coils in parallel. The paper describes the results of the measurements carried out on the complete cryogenic system assembled in the ATLAS cavern situated 100 m below the ground level. The measurements include, among other ones, the static heat loads, i.e., with no or constant current in the magnet, and the dynamic ones, since additional heat losses are produced, during the current ramp-up or slow dump, by eddy currents induced on the coil casing.

  1. Performance of prototypes for the PANDA barrel EMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, D. A.; Eissner, T.; Drexler, P.; Moritz, M.; Novotny, R. W.; PANDA Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The PANDA experiment will be part of the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) and aims for the study of strong interaction within the charm sector via antiproton proton collisions up to antiproton momenta of 15 GeV/c. Reflecting the variety of the physics program the PANDA detector is designed as a multi-purpose detector able to perform tracking, calorimetry and particle identification with nearly complete coverage of the solid angle. The Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMC) contained inside its Target Spectrometer is based on cooled PbWO4 scintillator crystals. In order to ensure an excellent performance throughout the large dynamic range of photon/electron energies ranging from a few MeV up to 15 GeV an extensive prototyping phase is mandatory. This contribution describes the measured response of the EMC barrel part prototype PROTO60 at the largest design energy to secondary beams provided by the SPS at CERN. In addition to PROTO60 a tracking station was deployed, providing precise position information of the 15 GeV/c positrons. For calibration purposes a 150 GeV/c muon beam and cosmic radiation, in combination with estimations from GEANT4 simulations were used. The obtained performance concerning energy, position and time information is presented.

  2. Study of the EM Barrel Module 0 with muons

    CERN Document Server

    Camard, A; Laforge, B; Schwemling, P

    2001-01-01

    Muons contaminating the high energy electron beam have been used to study the EM barrel module~0 response to ''minimum ionising'' particles. The ratio between the muon signal and the noise reaches 7.11$\\pm$0.07 when only the middle sampling information are used and reconstructed with an optimal filtering method. The latter increases this ratio by a factor 1.8 with respect to a raw conversion between ADC counts and GeV. From an absolute energy measurement, a $\\left( \\frac{\\mathrm{e}}{\\mathrm{\\mu}} \\right)$ ratio of $0.75\\pm0.02$ is derived. As muons deposit their energy in a smaller cluster than the electrons, they can provide cleaner or complementary information on the calorimeter. For example, the modulation of a cell response with~$\\Phi$ is larger than with electrons, the modulation in the latter case being smoothed out by the transverse size of the electromagnetic showers. Unlike electrons, muons provide also a mean to test the crosstalk measurements done with calibration runs. A good agreement is found. A...

  3. Barrel Toroid fully charged to nominal field, and it works!

    CERN Multimedia

    Herman ten Kate

    After a few weeks of testing up to intermediate currents, finally, on Thursday evening November 9, the current in the Barrel Toroid was pushed up to its nominal value of 20500 A and even 500 A beyond this value to prove that we have some margin. It went surprisingly well. Of course, the 8 coils forming the toroid were already tested individually at the surface but still, some surprise may have come from those parts added to the toroid in the cavern for the first time like the 8 cryoring sections linking the coils as well as the valve box at the bottom in sector 13 regulating the helium flow or the current lead cryostat on the top in sector 5. No training quenches, nothing to worry about, and the test was concluded with a fast dump triggered at 00:40 in the very early morning of November 10. (left) The toroid current during the evening and night of November 9. (right) The test crew oscillated between fear and hope while looking at the control panels as the current approached 21kA. Big relief was in the...

  4. Second Barrel Toroid Coil Installed in ATLAS Cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Tappern, G.

    The second barrel toroid coil was lowered into the ATLAS Cavern on Friday, 26 November. The operation takes approximately five hours of precision crane and winch operations. Before lowering, several checks are made to ensure that no loose items have been left on the coil which would fall during the lowering down the shaft. This is a very difficult, but very important check, with the first coil in position, and partly below the shaft. After changing the winch tooling on Wednesday December 1st, the coil was lifted, rotated and placed into the feet. The girders which support the coil and the Z direction stops had all been pre-set before putting the coil in the feet. The angle is controlled by an inclinometer. When the final adjustments of position have been made, which will locate the coils at the plus/minus two mm level, the connection beams (voussoirs and struts) will be put in place; this requires a complex shimming procedure. This will lock together the two coils into the feet and forms the foundation for th...

  5. Centrifugal barrel polishing of 1.3 GHz Nb cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamashevich, Yegor; Foster, Brian [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany); Navitski, Aliaksandr; Steder, Lea; Elsen, Eckhard [DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are the key components of particle accelerators such as the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL, under construction) and the planned future International Linear Collider (ILC). Steady progress in surface treatment techniques of SRF cavities in both the achievable quality factor Q and the accelerating electric field Eacc makes new accelerators and ambitious projects feasible. One of the alternative surface preparation techniques which is actually being explored is centrifugal barrel polishing (CBP) pioneered at KEK in Japan in mid-nineties by T. Hiuchi et al. CBP is a mechanical polishing of cavities and results in around 10 x smaller surface roughness and mirror-like surface as compared to chemistry alone. Q and E{sub acc} are expected to be at least as high as for chemically treated cavities. CBP eliminates the bulk chemistry and has the potential to completely replace the chemistry. The University of Hamburg is installing a CBP machine to study it as a cavity preparation and repair technique for 9-cell 1.3 GHz SRF cavities at the Deutsche Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY). The setup and first commissioning tests will be presented and discussed.

  6. Modal analysis of an ECC duct for APR+ reactor barrel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Power Reactor Plus (APR+) provides four Direct Vessel Injection (DVI) ducts on the reactor barrel to enhance the performance of Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS). Several studies on safety analysis have verified the excellent performance of the DVI duct. In this study, from the viewpoint of mechanical integrity, modal analyses of two full-scaled DVI ducts have been presented; both numerical analysis and modal tests have been performed in air and water. It was found that the numerical simulation and modal test coincide with each other. The DVI duct is a thin shell of 5 mm thickness, so that harmonic responses to RCP blade passing frequencies should be checked. The dominant passing frequencies are known to be 20, 40, 60, 120 and 240 Hz. In addition, an interesting thing in this study is that added mass effect by coolant seems to be so significant that the natural frequency of the ducts under water could be considerably low as compared with those in air; the natural frequency under water is 60 % lower than that in air. (author)

  7. High Stimulus-Related Information in Barrel Cortex Inhibitory Interneurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Reyes-Puerta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The manner in which populations of inhibitory (INH and excitatory (EXC neocortical neurons collectively encode stimulus-related information is a fundamental, yet still unresolved question. Here we address this question by simultaneously recording with large-scale multi-electrode arrays (of up to 128 channels the activity of cell ensembles (of up to 74 neurons distributed along all layers of 3-4 neighboring cortical columns in the anesthetized adult rat somatosensory barrel cortex in vivo. Using two different whisker stimulus modalities (location and frequency we show that individual INH neurons--classified as such according to their distinct extracellular spike waveforms--discriminate better between restricted sets of stimuli (≤6 stimulus classes than EXC neurons in granular and infra-granular layers. We also demonstrate that ensembles of INH cells jointly provide as much information about such stimuli as comparable ensembles containing the ~20% most informative EXC neurons, however presenting less information redundancy - a result which was consistent when applying both theoretical information measurements and linear discriminant analysis classifiers. These results suggest that a consortium of INH neurons dominates the information conveyed to the neocortical network, thereby efficiently processing incoming sensory activity. This conclusion extends our view on the role of the inhibitory system to orchestrate cortical activity.

  8. Evolution of Martian atmospheric argon: Implications for sources of volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Kevin S.; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    We have examined processes affecting isotopes of argon (36Ar, 38Ar, 40Ar) in order to determine important atmospheric sources and sinks. Our simple model for argon evolution incorporates production of radiogenic argon in the mantle, outgassing of all argon species by extrusive and intrusive volcanism, and loss to space by knock-on sputtering above the exobase. Sputtering has been shown previously to be an important loss process for atmospheric species, especially isotopes of noble gases, which have few other mechanisms of escape. The integrated evolution of argon (36Ar, 38Ar, and 40Ar, respectively) is modeled in terms of these variables: (1) the planetary concentration of potassium, (2) the fraction of juvenile argon released catastrophically during the first 600 Myr., (3) potential variation in the time-history of sputtering loss from that suggested by Luhmann et al. [1992], and (4) the volume of total outgassing to the surface as compared to outgassing contributed by volcanic release. Our results indicate that Mars has lost between 85-95% of 36Ar and 70-88% of outgassed 40Ar. Due to this substantial loss, the planet must have outgassed the equivalent of between 10 and 100 times the total volume of gases released by extrusive and intrusive volcanics. This indicates that volcanic outgassing, alone, is insufficient to explain the present-day abundances of 36Ar and 40Ar in the Martian atmosphere. Similar calculations for 20Ne suggest outgassed volumes of between 100 and 1800 times in excess of that due to volcanism. This results in a distinct Ne/Ar elemental fractionation, with a preference for outgassing argon, of the order of 10 to 17. Although the results must be evaluated within the model uncertainties, the results are compelling in that they unequivocally show the existence of additional sources of atmospheric volatiles and helps define a means to identify them.

  9. Analysis and control of welding deformation in nuclear reactor core barrel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Core barrel is an important part in React Vessel Internals(RVI) and the design of tolerance is quite strict. Firstly, the paper analyses the reasons of welding deformation in core barrel and with the reasons, the paper presents control measures to solve welding deformation. Then, combining the severe deformation in the welding of core barrel in Qinshan Nuclear Power Phase II extension Project Reactor no.3 unit, the paper supply control measures to the no.4 unit and the result of weld satisfy the requirements and the result satisfy design requirement. (authors)

  10. Characterisation of GERDA Phase-I detectors in liquid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GERDA will search for neutrinoless double beta decay in 76Ge by submerging bare enriched HPGe detectors in liquid argon. In GERDA Phase-I, reprocessed enriched-Ge detectors, which were previously operated by the Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX collaborations, and reprocessed natural-Ge detectors from Genius-TF, will be redeployed. We have tested the operation and performance of bare HPGe detectors in liquid nitrogen and in liquid argon over more than three years with three non-enriched p-type prototype detectors. The detector handling and mounting procedures have been defined and the Phase-I detector technology, the low-mass assembly and the long-term stability in liquid argon have been tested successfully. The Phase-I detectors were reprocessed by Canberra Semiconductor NV, Olen, according to their standard technology but without the evaporation of a passivation layer. After their reprocessing, the detectors have been mounted in their low-mass holders and their characterisation in liquid argon performed. The leakage current, the counting characteristics and the efficiency of the detectors have been measured. The testing of the detectors was carried out in the liquid argon test stand of the GERDA underground Detector Laboratory (GDL) at LNGS. The detectors are now stored underground under vacuum until their operation in GERDA.

  11. The Spectroscopic Detectability of Argon in the Lunar Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, J W; Gladstone, G R; Shull, J M; Parker, Joel Wm.

    1999-01-01

    Direct measurements of the abundance of argon in the lunar atmosphere were made in 1973 by instruments placed on the Moon during the Apollo 17 mission, but the total daytime abundance is unknown due to instrument saturation effects; thus, until we are able to return to the Moon for improved direct measurements, we must use remote sensing to establish the daytime abundance. In this paper, we present a complete analysis of the potential for measuring argon in the lunar atmosphere via emission-line or absorption-line observations. We come to the surprising conclusion that the lower limit established by the in situ lunar argon measurements implies that any absorption-line measurement of argon in the lower, dayside lunar atmosphere requires analysis in the optically-thick regime. In light of this result, we present the results of our EUVS sounding rocket observations of the lunar occultation of Spica, which provide a new upper limit on the abundance of argon in the daytime lunar atmosphere. We also re-analyze a re...

  12. Effects of Dimethyl Sulfoxide on Neuronal Response Characteristics in Deep Layers of Rat Barrel Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Narjes; Mohammadi, Elham; Allahtavakoli, Mohammad; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Roohbakhsh, Ali; Haghparast, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a chemical often used as a solvent for water-insoluble drugs. In this study, we evaluated the effect of intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of DMSO on neural response characteristics (in 1200–1500 μm depth) of the rat barrel cortex. Methods: DMSO solution was prepared in 10% v/v concentration and injected into the lateral ventricle of rats. Neuronal spontaneous activity and neuronal responses to deflection of the principal whisker (PW) and adjacent whisker (AW) were recorded in barrel cortex. A condition test ratio (CTR) was used to measure inhibitory receptive fields in barrel cortex. Results: The results showed that both PW and AW evoked ON and OFF responses, neuronal spontaneous activity and inhibitory receptive fields did not change following ICV administration of DMSO. Conclusion: Results of this study suggest that acute ICV administration of 10% DMSO did not modulate the electrophysiological characteristics of neurons in the l deep ayers of rat barrel cortex.

  13. Insertion of the CMS coil into the barrel yoke on 14 September 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    Insertion of the CMS coil into the barrel yoke on 14 September 2005. The pictures have been taken in the CMS experimental hall SX5 in Cessy, neighbouring France. The second picture shows the insertion of the Inner Vacuum Tank.

  14. Data Acquisition and Management in the Calibration Processes of the CMS Barrel Muon Alignment System

    CERN Document Server

    Székely, Géza; Bencze, Gy L; Béni, N; Imrek, J; Molnár, J; Novák, D; Raics, P; Szabó, Z

    2007-01-01

    In order to be able to match correctly the track elements produced by a muon in the Tracker and the Muon System of the CMS experiment [1] the mutual alignment precision between the Tracker and the Barrel Muon System must be no worse than 100-400 micrometers depending on the radial distance of the muon chambers from the Tracker. To fulfill this requirement an alignment system had to be designed. This system contains subsystems for determining the positions of the barrel and endcap chambers while a third one connects these two to the Tracker. Since the Barrel muon chambers are embedded into the magnet yoke of the experiment a nonconventional alignment method had to be developed. In this paper we restrict ourselves to the Barrel Alignment System and the calibration methods of its components.

  15. Computer Aided Design and Stress Analysis of Nose Landing Gear Barrel (NLGB)

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjay Kumar Sardiwal; D. Harika Chowdary

    2015-01-01

    During the conceptual design phase of aircraft the integration of undercarriage system is very important and it is often difficult to achieve on the first time. The nose wheel landing gear preferred configurations for light naval trainer aircraft. The main objective of this project is to improve the static strength criteria and fatigue life of Nose Landing Gear Barrel considered. The investigations includes preliminary design layout for Nose Landing Gear Barrel and initial sizing ...

  16. CNOOC to Boost Oil Output to 290 Million Barrels in 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ China National Offshore Oil Company Limited (CNOOC Limited)announced in early February that its targeted net production volume in 2010 is between 275 million and 290 million barrels ofoil equivalent(BOE).In its 2010 business strategy and development plan recently released to the public the offshore oil giant said the production goal was set given a West Texas Intermediate (WTI)oil price of US $75 per barrel in 2010.

  17. Ectopic anus with barrel gun perineum rare type of anorectal anomaly

    OpenAIRE

    Chamaria, Komal; Shetty, Roshan

    2013-01-01

    Perineal ectopic anus in female infants is not a very uncommon congenital anorectal anomaly with opening into the low vaginal or vulvar region. However, ectopic anus with barrel gun perineum is a less common variety. Patients generally present with frequent history of constipation, but may seek medical help for just aesthetic reasons. We present here one such case of an asymptomatic seven years old female with the rare form of anterior ectopic anus with barrel gun perineum without any fistulo...

  18. Modeling two-phase flow in barrels of weapons with combined charges

    OpenAIRE

    Nebojša P. Hristov; Slobodan R. Savić

    2011-01-01

    The processes occurring during the firing within barrels of weapons with combined charges are described aiming at the improvement of fire power of existing weapons and the design of new ones. The firing process simulation enables the optimization of gunpowders. The analysis of the obtained results helps in choosing the best combination of input-output parameters for the highest muzzle velocity possible while keeping powder gas maximum pressures inside the barrel at the lowest possible level.

  19. Modeling two-phase flow in barrels of weapons with combined charges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebojša P. Hristov

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The processes occurring during the firing within barrels of weapons with combined charges are described aiming at the improvement of fire power of existing weapons and the design of new ones. The firing process simulation enables the optimization of gunpowders. The analysis of the obtained results helps in choosing the best combination of input-output parameters for the highest muzzle velocity possible while keeping powder gas maximum pressures inside the barrel at the lowest possible level.

  20. Metastable argon beam source using a surface wave sustained plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new source of metastable argon atoms in the thermal energy range is reported. The source is based on expanding a plasma sustained by electromagnetic surface waves in a quartz tube through a converging nozzle and extracting a beam from the supersonic free-expansion jet. The beam was characterized by time-of-flight measurements which yielded the absolute intensity and velocity distribution of the argon metastables. The source produced a maximum intensity of 6.2x1014 metastables per second per steradian, the highest time-averaged intensity of thermal argon metastables of any source reported to date. A simple picture of an expanding plasma in a recombination regime is used to explain the dependence of the metastable intensity on absorbed power

  1. On the electric breakdown in liquid argon at centimeter scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, M.; Blatter, A.; Ereditato, A.; Goeldi, D.; Janos, S.; Kreslo, I.; Luethi, M.; von Rohr, C. Rudolf; Strauss, T.; Weber, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study on the dependence of electric breakdown discharge properties on electrode geometry and the breakdown field in liquid argon near its boiling point. The measurements were performed with a spherical cathode and a planar anode at distances ranging from 0.1 mm to 10.0 mm. A detailed study of the time evolution of the breakdown volt-ampere characteristics was performed for the first time. It revealed a slow streamer development phase in the discharge. The results of a spectroscopic study of the visible light emission of the breakdowns complement the measurements. The light emission from the initial phase of the discharge is attributed to electro-luminescence of liquid argon following a current of drifting electrons. These results contribute to set benchmarks for breakdown-safe design of ionization detectors, such as Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LAr TPC).

  2. Energy resolution studies of liquid argon ionization detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gridded ionization chamber was used to study the energy resolution in liquid argon with electrons from a 207Bi radioactive source. Argon was purified in the gas phase with a simple and reliable system, capable of reducing the impurity level below 1 ppb O2 equivalent, as inferred by a pulse shape analysis of the ionization signals. The electron spectrum was measured at different drift fields, up to 10.9 KV/cm. At this maximum field, a total energy resolution of 32 keV (fwhm), corresponding to a noise-subtracted energy resolution of 26 keV (fwhm), was obtained for the 976 keV conversion electron line. This value is the best reported so far in liquid argon but is still a factor of seven worse than the theoretical limit set by the Fano factor. The reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Liquid Argon Calorimetry with LHC-Performance Specifications

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD-3 Liquid Argon Calorimetry with LHC-Performance Specifications \\\\ \\\\Good electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry will play a central role in an LHC detector. Among the techniques used so far, or under development, the liquid argon sampling calorimetry offers high radiation resistence, good energy resolution (electromagnetic and hadronic), excellent calibration stability and response uniformity. Its rate capabilities, however, do not yet match the requirements for LHC. \\\\ \\\\The aim of this proposal is to improve the technique in such a way that high granularity, good hermiticity and adequate rate capabilities are obtained, without compromising the above mentioned properties. To reach this goal, we propose to use a novel structure, the $^{\\prime\\prime}$accordion$^{\\prime\\prime}$, coupled to fast preamplifiers working at liquid argon temperature. Converter and readout electrodes are no longer planar and perpendicular to particles, as usual, but instead they are wiggled around a plane containing particles. ...

  4. A therapeutic experience on Port Wine hemangiomas with Argon Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahvash M

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Port wine stains are benign but cosmetically devasting congenital angiomas. The argon laser is a therapeutic device newly applied to this condition. Our program was begun 6 years ago. From the beginning, the study was conceived as a clinical investigation of both the port wine stain and its argon laser therapy. A total of 218 patients with port wine stains have been studied and many aspects of their clinical condition detailed. Employing the Argon laser, test spots have been carried out in patients and the results have been analyzed with clinical aspects of the lesions. Altogether, 501 treatments were performed in 218 patients. Good to excellent results were obtained in 81 patients. Moderate Result was obtained in 31 weak result in 65 patients. Most common complication were hyperpigmentation and depressed scar.

  5. On the Electric Breakdown in Liquid Argon at Centimeter Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Auger, M; Ereditato, A; Goeldi, D; Janos, S; Kreslo, I; Luethi, M; von Rohr, C Rudolf; Strauss, T; Weber, M S

    2015-01-01

    We present a study on the dependence of electric breakdown discharge parameters on electrode geometry and the breakdown field in liquid argon near its boiling point. The measurements were performed with a spherical cathode and a planar anode at distances ranging from 0.1 mm to 10.0 mm. A detailed study of the time evolution of the breakdown volt-ampere characteristics was performed for the first time. It revealed a slow streamer development phase in the discharge. The results of a spectroscopic study of the visible light emission of the breakdowns complement the measurements. The light emission from the initial phase of the discharge is attributed to electro-luminescence of liquid argon following a current of drifting electrons. These results contribute to set benchmarks for breakdown-safe design of ionization detectors, such as Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LAr TPC).

  6. The serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram suppresses activity in the neonatal rat barrel cortex in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmetshina, Dinara; Zakharov, Andrei; Vinokurova, Daria; Nasretdinov, Azat; Valeeva, Guzel; Khazipov, Roustem

    2016-06-01

    Inhibition of serotonin uptake, which causes an increase in extracellular serotonin levels, disrupts the development of thalamocortical barrel maps in neonatal rodents. Previous in vitro studies have suggested that the disruptive effect of excessive serotonin on barrel map formation involves a depression at thalamocortical synapses. However, the effects of serotonin uptake inhibitors on the early thalamocortical activity patterns in the developing barrel cortex in vivo remain largely unknown. Here, using extracellular recordings of the local field potentials and multiple unit activity (MUA) we explored the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram (10-20mg/kg, intraperitoneally) on sensory evoked activity in the barrel cortex of neonatal (postnatal days P2-5) rats in vivo. We show that administration of citalopram suppresses the amplitude and prolongs the delay of the sensory evoked potentials, reduces the power and frequency of the early gamma oscillations, and suppresses sensory evoked and spontaneous neuronal firing. In the adolescent P21-29 animals, citalopram affected neither sensory evoked nor spontaneous activity in barrel cortex. We suggest that suppression of the early thalamocortical activity patterns contributes to the disruption of the barrel map development caused by SSRIs and other conditions elevating extracellular serotonin levels. PMID:27016034

  7. Long-term potentiation in the neonatal rat barrel cortex in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Shuming; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Sun, Haiyan; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2012-07-11

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is important for the activity-dependent formation of early cortical circuits. In the neonatal rodent barrel cortex, LTP has been studied only in vitro. We combined voltage-sensitive dye imaging with extracellular multielectrode recordings to study whisker stimulation-induced LTP in the whisker-to-barrel cortex pathway of the neonatal rat barrel cortex in vivo. Single whisker stimulation at 2 Hz for 10 min induced an age-dependent expression of LTP in postnatal day (P) 0 to P14 rats, with the strongest expression of LTP at P3-P5. The magnitude of LTP was largest in the activated barrel-related column, smaller in the surrounding septal region, and no LTP could be observed in the neighboring barrel. Current source density analyses revealed an LTP-associated increase of synaptic current sinks in layer IV/lower layer II/III at P3-P5 and in the cortical plate/upper layer V at P0-P1. Our study demonstrates for the first time an age-dependent and spatially confined LTP in the barrel cortex of the newborn rat in vivo.

  8. Vaporization kinetics of Sb2S3 in argon fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨勇; 华一新

    2003-01-01

    The vaporization kinetics of antimony trisulfide in argon fluid was studied with thermogravimetry at 873- 1 173 K. A theoretical model was developed to calculate the overall rate constant and the mass transfer coefficient ingas phase. The experimental results show that the vaporization rate is enhanced with increasing temperature and ar-gon flow-rate. The evaporation rate is mainly controlled by mass transport in the gas phase. The apparent activationenergy for the process is found to be 55.54 kJ/mol. It is demonstrated that the mass transfer coefficient in gas phaseis decreased with increasing temperature.

  9. Modelling of a supersonic ICP argon-hydrogen expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An expanding argon-hydrogen plasma is investigated by means of simulations. The model is a hydrodynamical model specific for plasma expansions, taking into account the conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy. The code includes the Rankine-Hugoniot relations to calculate shock jump conditions. Results are shown for the expansion from an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) with a separated Laval nozzle. The expansion discussed here is a 'weakly' under-expanding argon-hydrogen plasma. The results from the ICP expansion are verified with probe measurements

  10. Attosecond-correlated dynamics of two electrons in argon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Sharma; N Camus; B Fischer; M Kremer; A Rudenko; B Bergues; M Kuebel; N G Johnson; M F Kling; T Pfeifer; J Ullrich; R Moshammer

    2014-01-01

    In this work we explored strong field-induced decay of doubly excited transient Coulomb complex Ar** → Ar2++2. We measured the correlated two-electron emission as a function of carrier envelop phase (CEP) of 6 fs pulses in the non-sequential double ionization (NSDI) of argon. Classical model calculations suggest that the intermediate doubly excited Coulomb complex loses memory of its formation dynamics. We estimated the ionization time difference between the two electrons from NSDI of argon and it is 200 ± 100 as (N Camus et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 073003 (2012)).

  11. Uranium-liquid argon calorimetry: preliminary results from the DO tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The motivations for using uranium and liquid argon in sampling calorimetry are reviewed and the pros and cons of the technique are discussed. Preliminary results of the DO uranium-liquid argon test program are presented. 9 refs., 7 figs

  12. Optical emission spectroscopy of argon and hydrogen-containing plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepa, Sarah; Danko, Stephan; Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) on neutral argon is applied to investigate argon, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas. The spectra are analyzed using an extensive collisional-radiative model (CRM), from which the electron density and the electron temperature (or mean energy) can be calculated. The CRM also yields insight into the importance of different excited species and kinetic processes. The OES measurements are performed on pure argon plasmas at intermediate pressure. Besides, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas are investigated using argon as a trace gas. Especially for the gas mixture discharges, CRMs for low and high pressure differ substantially. The commonly used line-ratio technique is found to lose its sensitivity for gas mixture discharges at higher pressure. A solution using absolutely calibrated line intensities is proposed. The effect of radiation trapping and the shape of the electron energy distribution function on the results are discussed in detail, as they have been found to significantly influence the results. This work was supported by the Ruhr University Research School PLUS, funded by Germany's Excellence Initiative [DFG GSC 98/3].

  13. Measurement of the argon plasma temperature by use of pyrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author describes in detail how to use pyrometer to measure the plasma temperature. The temperatures of shock-generated argon plasmas are given in the present work. Measured results of temperature-pressure curve are compared with calculated results using Saha-Debye-Huckel model, which are in good agreement

  14. Turbulence and transport in a magnetized argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental study on turbulence and transport in the highly ionized argon plasma of a hollow cathode discharge is described. In order to determine the plasma parameters three standard diagnostics have been used, whilst two diagnostics have been developed to study the plasma turbulence. (Auth.)

  15. Thermophysical properties of multi-shock compressed dense argon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q F; Zheng, J; Gu, Y J; Chen, Y L; Cai, L C; Shen, Z J

    2014-02-21

    In contrast to the single shock compression state that can be obtained directly via experimental measurements, the multi-shock compression states, however, have to be calculated with the aid of theoretical models. In order to determine experimentally the multiple shock states, a diagnostic approach with the Doppler pins system (DPS) and the pyrometer was used to probe multiple shocks in dense argon plasmas. Plasma was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The shock was produced using the flyer plate impact accelerated up to ∼6.1 km/s by a two-stage light gas gun and introduced into the plenum argon gas sample, which was pre-compressed from the environmental pressure to about 20 MPa. The time-resolved optical radiation histories were determined using a multi-wavelength channel optical transience radiance pyrometer. Simultaneously, the particle velocity profiles of the LiF window was measured with multi-DPS. The states of multi-shock compression argon plasma were determined from the measured shock velocities combining the particle velocity profiles. We performed the experiments on dense argon plasmas to determine the principal Hugonoit up to 21 GPa, the re-shock pressure up to 73 GPa, and the maximum measure pressure of the fourth shock up to 158 GPa. The results are used to validate the existing self-consistent variational theory model in the partial ionization region and create new theoretical models. PMID:24559345

  16. Thermal decomposition of Yttrium(III) isovalerate in argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Yue, Zhao; Tang, Xiao;

    2016-01-01

    The thermal behaviour of yttrium(III) isovalerate (Y(C4H9CO2)3) was studied in argon by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, FTIR-spectroscopy, hot-stage optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction with a laboratory Cu-tube source as well as with a synchrotron radiation source...

  17. Thermal decomposition of yttrium(III) valerate in argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Yue, Zhao; Tang, Xiao;

    2014-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of yttrium(III) valerate (Y(C4H9CO2)3) was studied in argon by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, in-situ synchrotron diffraction and hot-stage microscopy as well as room temperature optical microscopy. Melting...

  18. Thermal decomposition of yttrium(III) hexanoate in argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Suarez Guevara, Maria Josefina; Attique, Fahmida;

    2015-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of yttrium(III) hexanoate (Y(C5H11CO2)3)·xH2O in argon was studied by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction at a laboratory Cu-tube source and in-situ experiments at a synchrotron radiation source as well as hot...

  19. A 2-Dimensional Fluid Model for an Argon Rf Discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passchier, J. D. P.; W. J. Goedheer,

    1993-01-01

    A fluid model for an argon rf discharge in a cylindrical discharge chamber is presented. The model contains the particle balances for electrons and ions and the electron energy balance. A nonzero autobias voltage is obtained by imposing the condition that the time-averaged current toward the powered

  20. Study of Liquid Argon Dopants for LHC Hadron Calorimetry

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Hadron calorimetry based on the Liquid Argon Ionisation Chamber technique is one of the choice techniques for LHC-experimentation. A systematic study of the effect of selected dopants on Liquid Argon (LAr) will be carried out with the aim to achieve an improvement on: \\item (i)~``Fast Liquid Argon'' search and study of dopants to increase the drift velocity. It has been already shown that CH&sub4. added at a fraction of one percent increases the drift velocity by a factor of two or more. \\item (ii)~``Compensated Liquid Argon'' search and study of dopants to increase the response to densely ionising particles, resulting in improved compensation, such as photosensitive dopants. \\end{enumerate}\\\\ \\\\ Monitoring of the parameters involved in understanding the response of a calorimeter is essential. In case of doped LAr, the charge yield, the non-saturated drift velocity and the electron lifetime in the liquid should be precisely and simultaneously monitored as they all vary with the level of dopant concentrati...

  1. LArGe. A liquid argon scintillation veto for GERDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for possible applications in the GERDA experiment. GERDA searches for the neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge, by operating naked germanium detectors submersed into 65 m3 of liquid argon. Similarly, LArGe runs Ge-detectors in 1 m3 (1.4 tons) of liquid argon, which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The light is used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors, to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. This work adresses the design, construction, and commissioning of LArGe. The background suppression efficiency has been studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times 103 have been achieved. First background data of LArGe (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12-4.6).10-2 cts/(keV.kg.y) (90% c.l.), which is at the level of the Gerda phase I design goal. Furthermore, for the first time we measure the natural 42Ar abundance (in parallel to Gerda), and have indication for the 2νββ-decay in natural germanium. (orig.)

  2. LArGe. A liquid argon scintillation veto for GERDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heisel, Mark

    2011-04-13

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for possible applications in the GERDA experiment. GERDA searches for the neutrinoless double-beta decay in {sup 76}Ge, by operating naked germanium detectors submersed into 65 m{sup 3} of liquid argon. Similarly, LArGe runs Ge-detectors in 1 m{sup 3} (1.4 tons) of liquid argon, which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The light is used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors, to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. This work adresses the design, construction, and commissioning of LArGe. The background suppression efficiency has been studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times 10{sup 3} have been achieved. First background data of LArGe (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12-4.6).10{sup -2} cts/(keV.kg.y) (90% c.l.), which is at the level of the Gerda phase I design goal. Furthermore, for the first time we measure the natural {sup 42}Ar abundance (in parallel to Gerda), and have indication for the 2{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay in natural germanium. (orig.)

  3. Design of capsules capable of argon-filling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of the use of polycarbosilane capsules as fuel container in inertial confinement fusion experiments was analyzed in the paper. Primary study indicates that the polycarbosilane capsules can be filled with argon by means of diffusion and possess reasonable retention time for deuterium. (author)

  4. Conversion of an atomic to a molecular argon ion and low pressure argon relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, N. Stankov; A, P. Jovanović; V, Lj Marković; S, N. Stamenković

    2016-01-01

    The dominant process in relaxation of DC glow discharge between two plane parallel electrodes in argon at pressure 200 Pa is analyzed by measuring the breakdown time delay and by analytical and numerical models. By using the approximate analytical model it is found that the relaxation in a range from 20 to 60 ms in afterglow is dominated by ions, produced by atomic-to-molecular conversion of Ar+ ions in the first several milliseconds after the cessation of the discharge. This conversion is confirmed by the presence of double-Gaussian distribution for the formative time delay, as well as conversion maxima in a set of memory curves measured in different conditions. Finally, the numerical one-dimensional (1D) model for determining the number densities of dominant particles in stationary DC glow discharge and two-dimensional (2D) model for the relaxation are used to confirm the previous assumptions and to determine the corresponding collision and transport coefficients of dominant species and processes. Project supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia (Grant No. ON171025).

  5. Observations of acoustic-wave-induced superluminescence in an argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that in an argon discharge plasma it is possible to obtain overpopulation of certain electronic levels of atomic argon under the influence of acoustic waves. When the specified threshold is exceeded, then a superluminescence (in the form of light flashes) from the overpopulated electronic levels of atomic argon is observed

  6. 21 CFR 874.4490 - Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology. 874.4490 Section 874.4490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology. (a) Identification. The argon laser device for...

  7. Argon metastable dynamics and lifetimes in a direct current microdischarge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanović, Ilija; Kuschel, Thomas; Schröter, Sandra; Böke, Marc

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we study the properties of a pulsed dc microdischarge with the continuous flow of argon. Argon metastable lifetimes are measured by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and are compared with calculated values which yield information about excitation and de-excitation processes. By increasing the gas flow-rate about 5 times from 10 to 50 sccm, the Arm lifetime increases from 1 to 5 μs due to the reduction of metastable quenching with gas impurities. Optical emission spectroscopy reveals nitrogen and water molecules as the main gas impurities. The estimated N2 density [N2] = 0.1% is too low to explain the measured metastable lifetimes. Water impurity was found to be the main de-excitation source of argon metastable atoms due to high quenching coefficients. The water impurity level of [H2O] = 0.15% to 1% is sufficient to bring calculated metastable lifetimes in line with experiments. The maximum value of water content in the discharge compared to the argon atoms is estimated to approximately 6%, due to the large surface to volume ratio of the microdischarge. The current pulse releases the water molecules from the electrode surface and they are either re-adsorbed in the time between 0.4 ms for [H2O] = 1% and 2.6 ms for [H2O] = 0.15% or pumped out of the discharge with the speed equal to the gas flow-rate. Depending on its partial pressure, the water impurity re-adsorption time is of the order of magnitude or less then the argon gas residence time.

  8. Thermo-Mechanical Analysis of Water-Cooled Gun Barrel During Burst Firing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Li-xia; HU Zhi-gang; ZHAO Jian-bo

    2006-01-01

    The thermo-mechanical stress and deformation of water-cooled gun barrel during burst firing are studied by finite element analysis (FEA). The problem is modeled in two steps: 1) A transient heat transfer analysis is first carried out in order to determine temperature evolution and to predict the residual temperatures during the burst firing event; 2) The thermo-mecha-nical stresses and deformation caused by both the residual temperature field and the gas pressure are then calculated. The results show that the residual temperature field tends to a steady state with the increasing of rounds. The residual temperature field has much effect on the gun barrel stress and deformation, especially on the assembly area between barrel and water jacket. The gage between the barrel and water jacket is the critical factor to the thermo-mechanical stress and deformation. The results of this analysis will be very useful to develop the new strength design theory of the liquid-cooled gun barrel.

  9. Unusual mode of firearm injury from the recoiled rear end of a gun barrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, A; Malla, G; Joshi, S; Kumar, A; Koirala, S

    2008-09-01

    Atypical gunshot wounds are caused by a diverse set of parameters relating to weapons and ammunition. We report a previously-unreported and atypical mode of gunshot wound produced by a detached rear end of the barrel of a gun following accidental gun fire, and discuss the difficulties in the management. A 36-year-old man presented to the emergency department with an alleged history of injury on the forehead with the rear end of a gun barrel following accidental gunfire while cleaning the nozzle. Since the time of injury, the patient was in an altered sensorium and had weakness on the right side of the body. There was minimal but continuous bleeding from the wound, with extrusion of brain matter. Skull radiograph showed that the rear end of the barrel had entered the left frontal bone, with associated depressed fracture of the frontal bone. The patient underwent a bicoronal, bifrontal craniotomy with a T-shaped extension towards the barrel to facilitate the reflection of the scalp flap and to avoid any movement of the barrel as it might further injure the brain. Necrotic brain, dura and bone pieces were removed. The patient was doing well at follow-up except for mild residual motor deficits. This case illustrates that while working with limited facilities, particularly in underdeveloped countries, a careful clinical assessment, interpretation of available images and a judicious operative approach can help to save the patient. PMID:18830529

  10. Triggering and measuring bent cosmic muon tracks with the Muon Spectrometer barrel for the first time

    CERN Multimedia

    Fabio Cerutti

    During the ATLAS barrel toroid stability test, bent cosmic muon tracks were seen for the first time in the ATLAS cavern by means of the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The barrel toroid has been powered at its nominal current (20.5 thousand Amperes) and kept in steady state for more than one day during the weekend of 18-19 November (see a report on this test in the Magnet section). During this test one large sector and part of a small sector of the barrel muon spectrometer were readout and used to detect the cosmic muons tracks bent by the toroidal magnetic field. Thirteen muon stations in the feet sectors (sectors 13 and 14) have been used in this test. The muon stations are formed of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) that were providing the muon trigger, and Monitored Drift Tubes that were used to measure with high accuracy the muon curvature hence their momentum. The Level-1 Barrel trigger chain was based on the Barrel Middle Large chambers equipped with final production modules on both the on-detector and the o...

  11. EFFECTS OF ARGON ON THE PROPERTIES OF RF SPUTTERED AMORPHOUS SILICON

    OpenAIRE

    Shao-Qi, Peng; Qai, Yu; Xian, Zhang; Jing, Ye

    1981-01-01

    The Effects of argon on the properties of rf sputtered amorphous silicon film have been investigated. As the sputtering argon pressure is increased from 2 to 20 mTorr, the content of argon in the amorphous silicon film increases apparently (Argon/Silicon : from 10-2 to 5 x 10-2). The other properties measured as a function of argon pressure PAr show that as the PAr is increased, the photoconductivity, resistivity (300K), conductivity activation energy and optical gap increase also, while the ...

  12. Design and fabrication of an advanced, lightweight, high stiffness, railgun barrel concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced lightweight and high stiffness railgun barrel design and incorporates several new design features and advanced materials is being developed by SPARTA, Inc. The program is sponsored by the U.S. Army Armament Research, Development, and Engineering Center ARDEC and by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). The railgun is 7 m long and has a 90 mm round bore. It is designed to accommodate both solid and plasma armatures. Muzzle energies are expected in the range of 9 to 15 MJ. Analysis and final design has been completed and the barrel and other railgun subassemblies are in the fabrication stage at SPARTA, Inc. in San Diego, California. Initial testing will be conducted at Maxwell Laboratories Green Farm facility in September 1990 and will subsequently be shipped to the ARDEC Railgun Laboratory in October 1990 for full power operation and testing. This paper discusses the design features and fabrication approaches for this high performance, lightweight railgun barrel system

  13. CHANGES IN VOLATILE COMPOSITION AND SENSORY PROPERTIES OF VUGAVA WINES AGED IN CROATIA OAK BARRELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanka HERJAVEC

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Vugava musts were fermented in medium-toasted Croatian barrique barrels (225 L made from Quercus petrea and Q. robur oak wood. The oak species used in this research infl uenced the specifi c change of the aroma structure of Vugava wines. During the age period the increase in the concentration of cis and trans oaklactons, guaiacol, eugenol, furfural and 5-methylfurfural was noted. Wines fermented and aged in Q. petrea barrels have higher concentrations of most volatile phenols compared to wines from Q. robur oak wood. From the organoleptic point of view this study suggested that fermentation and on the lees ageing production method in Croatian oak barrels positively infl uenced the quality of Vugava wines where best results were achieved by use of Q. petrea oak wood.

  14. Persistence of biological traces in gun barrels--an approach to an experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courts, Cornelius; Madea, Burkhard; Schyma, Christian

    2012-05-01

    Traces of backspatter in gun barrels after homicidal or suicidal contact shots may be a valuable source of forensic evidence. Yet, a systematic investigation of the persistence and durability of DNA from biological traces in gun barrels is lacking. Our aim was to generate a realistic model to emulate blood and tissue spatters in gun barrels generated by contact gunshots at biological targets and to analyse the persistence and typability of DNA recovered from such stains. Herein, we devise and evaluate three different models for the emulation of backspatter from contact shots: a gelatine-based model with embedded blood bags, a model based on a spongious matrix soaked with blood and covered with a thin plastic membrane and a head model consisting of an acrylic half sphere filled with ballistic gelatine and with blood bags attached to the sphere under a 3-mm silicone layer. The sampling procedure for all three models: a first shot was fired with several types of guns at each model construction and subsequently a second shot was fired at a backstop. Blood samples were collected after each shot by probing the inner surface of the front and rear end of the respective gun barrel with a sterile swab. DNA was then extracted and quantified and up to 20 different short tandem repeat (STR) systems were amplified to generate DNA profiles. Although DNA quantity and STR typing results were heterogenous between the models, all models succeeded in delivering full STR profiles even after more than one shot. We conclude that biological traces in gun barrels are robust and accessible to forensic analysis and that systematic examination of the inside of gun barrels may be advisable for forensic casework.

  15. Performance analysis for the CALIFA Barrel calorimeter of the R3B experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Pol, H.; Ashwood, N.; Aumann, T.; Bertini, D.; Cabanelas, P.; Casarejos, E.; Cederkall, J.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Díaz Fernández, P.; Duran, I.; Fiori, E.; Galaviz, D.; Labiche, M.; Nacher, E.; Pietras, B.; Savran, D.; Tengblad, O.; Teubig, P.

    2014-12-01

    The CALIFA calorimeter is an advanced detector for gamma rays and light charged particles, accordingly optimized for the demanding requirements of the physics programme proposed for the R3B facility at FAIR. The multipurpose character of CALIFA is required to fulfil challenging demands in energy resolution (5-6% at 1 MeV for gamma rays) and efficiency. Charged particles, e.g. protons of energies up to 320 MeV in the Barrel section, should also be identified with an energy resolution better to 1%. CALIFA is divided into two well-separated sections: a "Forward EndCap" and a cylindrical "Barrel" covering an angular range from 43.2° to 140.3°. The Barrel section, based on long CsI(Tl) pyramidal frustum crystals coupled to large area avalanche photodiodes (LAAPDs), attains the requested high efficiency for calorimetric purposes. The construction of the CALIFA Demonstrator, comprising 20% of the total detector, has already been initiated, and commissioning experiments are expected for 2014. The assessment of the capabilities and expected performance of the detector elements is a crucial step in their design, along with the prototypes evaluation. For this purpose, the Barrel geometry has been carefully implemented in the simulation package R3BRoot, including easily variable thicknesses of crystal wrapping and carbon fibre supports. A complete characterization of the calorimeter response (including efficiency, resolution, evaluation of energy and reconstruction losses) under different working conditions, with several physics cases selected to probe the detector performance over a wide range of applications, has been undertaken. Prototypes of different sections of the CALIFA Barrel have been modeled and their responses have been evaluated and compared with the experimental results. The present paper summarizes the outcome of the simulation campaign for the entire Barrel section and for the corresponding prototypes tested at different European installations.

  16. ATLAS Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger robustness study at X5 test facility

    CERN Document Server

    Di Mattia, A; Nisati, A; Pastore, F C; Vari, R; Veneziano, Stefano; Aielli, G; Camarri, P; Cardarelli, R; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Simone, A; Liberti, B; Santonico, R

    2004-01-01

    The present paper describes the Level-1 Barrel Muon Trigger performance as expected with the current configuration of the RPC detectors, as designed for the Barrel Muon Spectrometer of ATLAS. Results of a beam test performed at the X5-GIF facility at CERN are presented in order to show the trigger efficiency with different conditions of RPC detection efficiency and several background rates. Small RPC chambers with part of the final trigger electronics are used, while the trigger coincidence logic is applied off-line using a detailed simulation model. copy 2003 Published by Esevier B.V. 3 Refs.

  17. Evaluation of using short barrel DHS in treatment of intertrochanteric fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Tahmasbi M; Sajjadi Saravi M; Alami Harandi B

    2001-01-01

    Cut out or extrusion of the lag screw from the superior aspect of head and neck of the femur is one of the most common and devastating complications of the surgery of the intertrochanteric fractures with DHS. The exact cause of this complications is unknown, but it seems to be related to osteopenia, inappropriate position of lag screw inside head of the femur and inability of DHS to slide inside the barrel, which is the most ignored risk factor. We used short barrel Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS) fo...

  18. Observations of a solar storm from the stratosphere: The BARREL Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, Alexa

    2016-07-01

    During the Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) second campaign, BARREL observed with a single primary instrument, a 3"x3" NaI spectrometer measuring 20 keV - 10 MeV X-rays [Woodger et al 2015 JGR], portions of an entire solar storm. This very small event, in terms of geomagnetic activity, or one of the largest of the current solar cycle, in terms of solar energetic particle events, has given us a very clear set of observations of the response of the day side magnetosphere to the arrival of an interplanetary coronal mass ejection shock. The BARREL mission of opportunity working in tandem with the Van Allen Probes was designed to study the loss of radiation belt electrons to the ionosphere and upper atmosphere. However BARREL is able to see X-rays from a multitude of sources. During the second campaign, the Sun produced, and BARREL observed, an X-class flare [McGregor et al in prep.]. This was followed by BARREL observations of X-rays, gamma-rays, and directly injected protons from the solar energetic particle (SEP) event associated with the eruption from the Sun while simultaneously the Van Allen Probes observed the SEP protons in the inner magnetosphere [Halford et al 2016 submitted JGR]. Two days later the shock generated by the interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME-shock) hit the Earth while BARREL was in conjunction with the Van Allen Probes and GOES [Halford et al 2015 JGR]. Although this was a Mars directed CME and the Earth only received a glancing blow [Möstl et al 2015 Nat. Commun., Mays et al 2015 ApJ], the modest compression led to the formation of ultra low frequency (ULF) waves, electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, and very low frequency (VLF) whistler mode waves [Halford and Mann 2016 submitted to JGR]. The combination of these waves and the enhancement of the local particle population led to precipitation of electrons remotely observed by BARREL. This was not a Halloween, Bastille Day, or one of the now

  19. Narrow spectral width laser diode for metastable argon atoms pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jun; Li, Bin; Wang, Xinbing; Zuo, Duluo

    2016-03-01

    Diode laser pump source with narrow emitting spectrum for optically pumped metastable rare gas laser (OPRGL) of argon was achieved by employing a complex external cavity coupled with volume Bragg grating (VBG). A commercially available c-mount laser diode with rated power of 6 W was used and studied in both the free running mode and VBG external cavity. The maximum output power of 3.9 W with FWHM less than 25 pm and peak wavelength locked around 811.53 nm was obtained from the VBG external cavity laser diode. Precise control of VBG temperature enabled fine tuning of the emission wavelength over a range of 450 pm. Future researches on OPRGL of argon will benefit from it.

  20. Evaporation and condensation at a liquid surface. I. Argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuoka, Kenji; Matsumoto, Mitsuhiro; Kataoka, Yosuke

    1994-11-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations were carried out to investigate the dynamics of evaporation and condensation for argon at the temperature of 80 and 100 K. From the decrease of the survival probability of vapor molecules, the ratio of self reflection to collision is estimated to be 12%-15%, only weakly dependent on the temperature. This suggests that argon vapor molecules are in the condition of almost complete capture, and the condensation is considered to be a barrierless process. The total ratio of reflection which is evaluated with the flux correlation of condensation and evaporation is 20% at both temperature. The difference between these two ratios of reflection is ascribed to a phenomenon that vapor molecules colliding with the surface drive out other liquid molecules. This molecule exchange at the surface is as important as the self-reflection, and the conventional picture of condensation as a unimolecular chemical reaction is not appropriate.

  1. The Erosion of Frozen Argon by Swift Helium Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besenbacher, F.; Bøttiger, Jørgen; Graversen, O.;

    1981-01-01

    The temperature, energy, and thickness dependence of the erosion rates of frozen argon films when irradiated with 0.1–3 MeV helium ions have been measured. The erosion yields Y are much too high to be explained by the concentional collisional cascade-sputtering theory and are furthermore unequivo......The temperature, energy, and thickness dependence of the erosion rates of frozen argon films when irradiated with 0.1–3 MeV helium ions have been measured. The erosion yields Y are much too high to be explained by the concentional collisional cascade-sputtering theory and are furthermore...... unequivocally associated with electronic processes generated by the bombarding particle. In the present energy region, it is found that Y scales approximately as the electronic stopping power squared, depends on the charge state of the incoming helium ions, and perhaps more important, is independent...

  2. Demonstration of a Lightguide Detector for Liquid Argon TPCs

    CERN Document Server

    Bugel, L; Ignarra, C; Jones, B J P; Katori, T; Smidt, T; Tanaka, H -K

    2011-01-01

    We report demonstration of light detection in liquid argon using an acrylic lightguide detector system. This opens the opportunity for development of an inexpensive, large-area light collection system for large liquid argon time projection chambers. The guides are constructed of acrylic, with TPB embedded in a surface coating with a matching index of refraction. We study the response to early scintillation light produced by a 5.3 MeV alpha. We measure coating responses from 7 to 8 PE on average, compared to an ideal expectation of 10 PE on average. We estimate the attenuation length of light along the lightguide bar to be greater than 0.5 m. The coating response and the attenuation length can be improved; we show, however, that these results are already sufficient for triggering in a large detector.

  3. Trimming a Metallic Biliary Stent Using an Argon Plasma Coagulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Distal migration is one of the common complications after insertion of a covered metallic stent. Stent repositioning or removal is not always possible in every patient. Therefore, trimming using an argon plasma coagulator (APC) may be a good alternative method to solve this problem. Methods. Metallic stent trimming by APC was performed in 2 patients with biliary Wallstent migration and in another patient with esophageal Ultraflex stent migration. The power setting was 60-100 watts with an argon flow of 0.8 l/min. Observations. The procedure was successfully performed and all distal parts of the stents were removed. No significant collateral damage to the nearby mucosa was observed. Conclusions. In a patient with a distally migrated metallic stent, trimming of the stent is possible by means of an APC. This new method may be applicable to other sites of metallic stent migration

  4. Breakdown voltage of metal-oxide resistors in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagby, L. F. [Fermilab; Gollapinni, S. [Kansas State U.; James, C. C. [Fermilab; Jones, B. J.P. [MIT; Jostlein, H. [Fermilab; Lockwitz, S. [Fermilab; Naples, D. [Pittsburgh U.; Raaf, J. L. [Fermilab; Rameika, R. [Fermilab; Schukraft, A. [Fermilab; Strauss, T. [Bern U., LHEP; Weber, M. S. [Bern U., LHEP; Wolbers, S. A. [Fermilab

    2014-11-07

    We characterized a sample of metal-oxide resistors and measured their breakdown voltage in liquid argon by applying high voltage (HV) pulses over a 3 second period. This test mimics the situation in a HV-divider chain when a breakdown occurs and the voltage across resistors rapidly rise from the static value to much higher values. All resistors had higher breakdown voltages in liquid argon than their vendor ratings in air at room temperature. Failure modes range from full destruction to coating damage. In cases where breakdown was not catastrophic, subsequent breakdown voltages were lower in subsequent measuring runs. One resistor type withstands 131 kV pulses, the limit of the test setup.

  5. A pressurized argon gas TPC as DUNE near detector

    CERN Document Server

    Martin-Albo, J

    2016-01-01

    DUNE is a new international experiment for neutrino physics and nucleon decay searches. It will consist of two detectors, about 1300 km apart, exposed to a multi-megawatt neutrino beam that will be built at Fermilab. One of the two detectors will be installed several hundred meters downstream of the neutrino production point with the primary role of characterising the energy spectrum and composition of the beam as well as performing precision measurements of neutrino cross sections. For the design of this so-called near detector, the DUNE Collaboration is considering, among other technologies, a pressurized argon gas time projection chamber. Such a detector, thanks to its low density and low detection thresholds, would allow the detailed measurement in argon of nuclear effects at the neutrino interaction vertex, which are considered at present one of the most important sources of systematic uncertainty for neutrino oscillation measurements.

  6. Opacity measurements in shock-generated argon plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erskine, D.

    1993-07-01

    Dense plasmas having uniform and constant density and temperature are generated by passage of a planar shock wave through gas. The opacity of the plasma is accurately measured versus wavelength by recording the risetime of emitted light. This technique is applicable to a wide variety of species and plasma conditions. Initial experiments in argon have produced plasmas with 2 eV temperatures, 0.004--0.04 g/cm{sup 3} densities, and coupling parameters {Gamma} {approximately}0.3--0.7. Measurements in visible light are compared with calculations using the HOPE code. An interesting peak in the capacity at 400 nm is observed for the first time and is identified with the 4s-5p transition in excited neutral argon atoms.

  7. Treatment of facial vascular lesions with an argon laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanczyk, Jacek; Golebiowska, Aleksandra; Michalska, I.

    1996-03-01

    Two-hundred-ninety-six patients with various vascular lesions of the face have been treated with argon laser LAK-1 in the Department of Dermatology Warsaw Medical Academy since April 1992. The diagnosis of the treated lesions was port-wine stains, multiple telangiectasiae and small, most often induced by trauma hemangioma cavernosum of the lip. Best results were achieved in the patients with small hemangiomas cavernosum of the lip and multiple telangiectasiae on the face. Cure rate in this group was 100%. In 112 port-wine stain cases fading of 50 - 75% comparing with the adjacent skin was achieved. With stress, the argon laser therapy is a method of choice for the treatment of hemangioma cavernosum, port-wine stains and multiple teleagiectasiae of the face.

  8. Development of cryogenic installations for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Adamowski, M; Geynisman, M; Hentschel, S; Montanari, D; Nessi, M; Norris, B

    2015-01-01

    A proposal for a very large liquid argon (68,000 kg) based neutrino detector is being studied. To validate the design principles and the detector technology, and to gain experience in the development of the cryostats and the cryogenic systems needed for such large experiments, several smaller scale installations will be developed and implemented, at Fermilab and CERN. The cryogenic systems for these installations will be developed, constructed, installed and commissioned by an international engineering team. These installations shall bring the required cooling power under specific conditions to the experiments for the initial cool-down and the long term operation, and shall also guarantee the correct distribution of the cooling power within the cryostats to ensure a homogeneous temperature distribution within the cryostat itself. The cryogenic systems shall also include gaseous and liquid phase argon purification devices to be used to reach and maintain the very stringent purity requirements needed for these...

  9. Spectroscopy of Argon Excited in an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabert, E

    2005-04-18

    Argon is one of the gases best investigated and most widely used in plasma discharge devices for a multitude of applications that range from wavelength reference standards to controlled fusion experiments. Reviewing atomic physics and spectroscopic problems in various ionization stages of Ar, the past use and future options of employing an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) for better and more complete Ar data in the x-ray, EUV and visible spectral ranges are discussed.

  10. Influence of argon pollution on the weld surface morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Krolczyk, G.M.; Nieslony, P.; Krolczyk, J.B.; I. Samardzic; Legutko, S.; S. Hloch; Barrans, Simon; Maruda, R.W.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the surfaces of butt welded joints in steel tubes were analyzed using an optical 3D measurement system to determine the morphology and topographic parameters. It was established that pollution of the argon shield gas with oxygen did not influence the width of the heat-affected zone. However, the composition of the shield gas significantly influenced the surface asymmetry, Ssk, and its inclination Sku. The measurement of these parameters enabled the selection of a ...

  11. Thermal decomposition of lanthanum(III) butyrate in argon atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Yue, Zhao; Xiao, Tang;

    2013-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of La(C3H7CO2)3·xH2O (x≈0.82) was studied in argon during heating at 5K/min. After the loss of bound H2O, the anhydrous butyrate presents at 135°C a phase transition to a mesophase, which turns to an isotropic liquid at 180°C. The decomposition of the anhydrous butyrate ...

  12. Operational performance of a large liquid argon photon calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the performance of a large (0.9x1.4 m2) liquid argon photon calorimeter in high energy experiments at Fermilab. Resolutions for π0 and electron showers, obtained under data-taking conditions, are compared with electron-beam calibration results. Exceptional spatial and time resolutions have been achieved for isolated showers (sigmasub(x,y)0 data up to 180 GeV are presented. (orig.)

  13. Unified set of atomic transition probabilities for neutral argon

    OpenAIRE

    Wiese, W.; Brault, J.; Danzmann, K.; Helbig, V.; de Kock, M

    1989-01-01

    The atomic transition probabilities and radiative lifetimes of neutral argon have been the subject of numerous experiments and calculations, but the results exhibit many discrepancies and inconsistencies. We present a unified set of atomic transition probabilities, which is consistent with essentially all recent results, albeit sometimes only after critical reanalysis. The data consistency and scale confirmation has been achieved in two ways. (i) We have carried out some lifetime–branching-ra...

  14. Monte Carlo Simulation of Argon in Nano-Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Min; YANG Chun; GUO Zeng-Yuan

    2000-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are performed to investigate the thermodynamic properties of argon confined in nano-scale cubes constructed of graphite walls. A remarkable depression of the system pressures is observed. The simulations reveal that the length-scale of the cube, the magnitude of the interaction between the fluid and the graphite wall and the density of the fluid exhibit reasonable effects on the thermodynamic property shifts of the luid.

  15. Two dimensional condensation of argon adsorbed on lamellar halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamellar halides such as NiCl2, FeCl2, NiBr2, MnBr2, MgBr2, CdBr2, CoI2, FeI2, MnI2, CaI2 and PbI2 were sublimed in a rapid stream of dry nitrogen. The adsorption of argon on such materials shows stepped isotherms which reveal two dimensional condensations. From sets of isotherms the Helmholtz free energy, the internal energy and the entropy of the successive layers are determined. From the entropy of the first layer the role of the potential relief of the adsorbent surface on the structure of the adsorbed layer may be determined while the Helmholtz free energy reveals how the ionic character of the adsorbent governs the attractive force of adsorption. The study of the second third and fourth layers shows that their growth follows quite a different behaviour depending on whether the Van der Waals diameter of argon is greater or smaller than the distance between adjacent anions on the crystal surface. A proposition is made to account for the difference in the critical temperatures of the first and second dense layers in terms of the vibrationnal state of their respective substrate. The occurence for the maximum critical temperature observed of corresponding to a triangular layer 3% more expanded than the (111) plane of solid argon is discussed

  16. A liquid argon scintillation veto for the Gerda experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegmann, Anne [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    Gerda is an experiment to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge. Bare germanium detectors are operated in a cryostat with 65 m{sup 3} of liquid argon (LAr). To reach the aspired background index of ≤10{sup -3} cts/(keV.kg.yr) for Phase II active background-suppression techniques will be applied, including an active liquid argon veto (LAr veto). A light instrumentation of LAr installed in the LArGe test facility has demonstrated that the detection of argon scintillation light can be used to effectively suppress background events in the germanium, which simultaneously deposit energy in LAr. Based on these results, Gerda pursues several options for the light instrumentation, which have to be compatible with the stringent radiopurity requirements of the experiment and should provide a significant suppression of the background in the region of interest around Q{sub ββ} at 2039 keV. This talk gives an account of the competing design options under investigation in the Gerda collaboration. The design options using photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) are discussed, together with their expected performance from Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, the progress of development is reported, along with the design criteria for light instrumentation in Gerda.

  17. A liquid argon scintillation veto for the Gerda experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerda is an experiment to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge. Bare germanium detectors are operated in a cryostat with 65 m3 of liquid argon (LAr). To reach the aspired background index of ≤10-3 cts/(keV.kg.yr) for Phase II active background-suppression techniques will be applied, including an active liquid argon veto (LAr veto). A light instrumentation of LAr installed in the LArGe test facility has demonstrated that the detection of argon scintillation light can be used to effectively suppress background events in the germanium, which simultaneously deposit energy in LAr. Based on these results, Gerda pursues several options for the light instrumentation, which have to be compatible with the stringent radiopurity requirements of the experiment and should provide a significant suppression of the background in the region of interest around Qββ at 2039 keV. This talk gives an account of the competing design options under investigation in the Gerda collaboration. The design options using photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) are discussed, together with their expected performance from Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, the progress of development is reported, along with the design criteria for light instrumentation in Gerda.

  18. Space-charge effects in liquid argon ionization chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherfoord, J. P.; Walker, R. B.

    2015-03-01

    We have uniformly irradiated liquid argon ionization chambers with betas from high-activity 90Sr sources. The radiation environment is similar to that in the liquid argon calorimeters which are part of the ATLAS detector installed at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We measured the resulting ionization current over a wide range of applied potential for two different source activities and for three different chamber gaps. These studies provide operating experience at exceptionally high ionization rates. In particular they indicate a stability at the 0.1% level for these calorimeters over years of operation at the full LHC luminosity when operated in the normal mode at an electric field E = 1.0 kV / mm. We can operate these chambers in the normal mode or in the space-charge limited regime and thereby determine the transition point between the two. This transition point is parameterized by a positive argon ion mobility of μ+ = 0.08 ± 0.02mm2 / V s at a temperature of 88.0±0.5 K and at a pressure of 1.02±0.02 bar. In the space-charge limited regime the ionization currents are degraded and show signs of instability. At the highest electric fields in our study (6.7 kV/mm) the ionization current is still slowly rising with increasing electric field.

  19. ARAPUCA a new device for liquid argon scintillation light detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a totally innovative device for the detection of liquid argon scintillation light, that has been named ARAPUCA (Argon R and D Advanced Program at UniCAmp). It is composed of a passive light collector and of active devices. The latters are standard SiPMs that operate at liquid argon temperature, while the passive collector is based on a new technology, never explored in this field before. It is a photon trap, that allows to collect light with extremely high efficiency. The total detection efficiency of the device can be tuned by modifying the ratio between the area of the active devices (SiPM) and the area of the optical window. For example, it will allow to reach a detection efficiency at the level of 1% on a surface of 50 × 50 cm2 with an active coverage of 2 × 2 cm2 (two/three large area SiPM). It is also a cheap device, since the major part of its cost is represented by the active devices. For these reason this appears to be the ideal device for scintillation light detection in large Time Projection Chambers. With appropriate modifications it can be used also in next generation Dark Matter detectors

  20. Isotopic fractionation of argon during stepwise release from shungite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In previous attempts to determine the 40Ar/36Ar ratio in the ancient atmosphere, the only direct measurement yielding a value below the atmospheric value of today is for argon released at low temperatures from a pre-Cambrian shungite, an amorphous carbon mineral The present work confirms a low value for 40Ar/36Ar in gas released from a type I shungite at low temperatures. But quantitative scrutiny of the accompanying 38AR/36Ar ratios and the enhanced ratio of 40Ar/36Ar for the fractions released at high temperatures shows convincingly that the effect seen here is an artifact of the stepwise heating and the argon diffusion mobilized thereby. The low 40Ar/36Ar previously obtained is very likely from the same cause rather than reflecting the isotopic composition of the pre-Cambrian atmosphere. The vitreous character of and the sharp, conchoidal fractures seen in the specimens of type I shungite suggest that the substance may exhibit simple volume diffusion over macroscopic dimensions as glasses do. If so, the diffusion parameters (D infinitely = 3 x 10-4 cm2/s and E = 11 kcal/mole) obtained from the data imply rapid exchange with the atmosphere for any argon initially trapped in centimenter-thick veins of the material. (orig.)

  1. Isotopic fractionation of argon during stepwise release from shungite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rison, W.

    1980-05-01

    It is noted that in previous attempts to determine the Ar-40/Ar-36 ratio in the ancient atmosphere, the only direct measurement yielding a value below the atmospheric value of today is for argon released at low temperatures from a pre-Cambrian shungite. In the present work, a low value for Ar-40/Ar-36 in gas released from a type I shungite at low temperatures is confirmed. Attention is given to a study of the accompanying Ar-38/Ar-36 ratios and the enhanced ratio of Ar-40/Ar-36 for the fractions released at high temperatures which shows that the effect observed is a result of the stepwise heating and the argon diffusion mobilized thereby. It is suggested that the low Ar-40/Ar-36 obtained in the past is from the same source rather than reflecting the isotropic composition of the pre-Cambrian atmosphere, and that the type I shungite may exhibit simple volume diffusion over macroscopic dimensions as glasses do. It is concluded that if this is so, the diffusion parameters obtained from the data would imply rapid exchange with the atmosphere for any argon initially trapped in the veins of the material.

  2. Tin LPP plasma control in the argon cusp source

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeoch, Malcolm W.

    2016-03-01

    The argon cusp plasma has been introduced [1,2] for 500W class tin LPP exhaust control in view of its high power handling, predicted low tin back-scatter from a beam dump, and avoidance of hydrogen usage. The physics of tin ion control by a plasma is first discussed. Experimentally, cusp stability and exhaust disc geometry have previously been proved at full scale [2], the equivalent of 300W-500W usable EUV. Here we verify operation of the plasma barrier that maintains a high argon density next to the collector, for its protection, and a low density in the long path toward the intermediate focus, for efficiency. A pressure differential of 2Pa has been demonstrated in initial work. Other aspects of tin LPP plasma control by the cusp have now been demonstrated using tin ions from a low Hz 130mJ CO2 laser pulse onto a solid tin surface at the cusp center. Plasma is rejected at the design to match a specified exhaust power is discussed. In view of this work, argon cusp exhaust control appears to be very promising for 500W class tin LPP sources.

  3. Bacteria Inactivation Using DBD Plasma Jet in Atmospheric Pressure Argon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Guimin; ZHANG Guanjun; SHI Xingmin; MA Yue; WANG Ning; LI Yuan

    2009-01-01

    A coaxial dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet Was designed,which can be operated in atmospheric pressure argon under an intermediate frequency sinusoidal resonant power supply,and an atmospheric pressure glow-like discharge Was achieved.Two kinds of typical bacteria,i.e.,the Staphylococcus aureus(S.aurens)and Escherichia coil(E.coil),were employed to study the bacterial inactivation mechanism by means of the non-thermal plasma.The killing log value (KLV)of S.aureus reached up to 5.38 with a treatment time of 90 s and that of E.coil up to 5.36 with 60 s,respectively.According to the argon emission spectra of the plasma jet and the scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the two bacteria before and after the plasma treatment.it is concluded that the reactive species in the argon plasma played a major role in the bacterial inactivation,while the heat,electric field and UV photons had little effect.

  4. Metal clusters on supported argon layers; Metallcluster auf dielektrischen Substraten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faber, Bernhard

    2011-10-21

    The deposition of small sodium clusters on supported Ar(001)-surfaces is simulated. Theoretical description is achieved by a hierarchical model consisting of time-dependent DFT and molecular dynamics. The valence electrons of the sodium atoms are considered by Kohn-Sham-Scheme with self interaction correction. The interaction of argon atoms and sodium ions is described by atom-atom potentials whereas the coupling to the QM electrons is done by local pseudo-potentials. A decisive part of the model is the dynamical polarizability of the rare-gas atoms. The optional metal support is considered by the method of image charges. The influence of the forces caused by image charges and the influence of the number of argon monolayers on structure, optical response and deposition dynamics of Na{sub 6} and Na{sub 8} is investigated. There is very little influence on cluster structure and only a small shift of the cluster perpendicular to the surface. Concerning optical response the position of the Mie plasmon peak stays robust whereas the details of spectral fragmentation react very sensitively to changes. The forces caused by image charges of the metal support play only a little role with the dynamics of deposition while the thickness of the argon surface strongly influences the dissipation. (orig.)

  5. K-Ar age of young volcanic rocks and excess argon--Binary mixing model and quantitative study of excess argon effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A binary mixing model for excess argon is suggested in the note. According to this model and the data of excess argon component obtained in our experiment , a quantitative study of the effect of excess argon on real K-Ar age of young volcanic rocks is done. The result indicates that the effect of 5% excess argon component in samples on K-Ar age of the samples more than 2 Ma is less than 7.36% and can lead K-Ar age of 0.5 Ma samples to increase by 32.4%, while 1% excess argon component leads K-Ar age of 0.5 Ma samples to increase by 6.26%. Therefore, when pre-processed excess argon component is ≤1%, K-Ar age of the samples more than 0.5 Ma should be credible. On this basis we suggest a principal opinion for evaluation of previous K-Ar dating results and propose that the matrix is used to determine K-Ar age of young volcanic rocks. For the samples less than 0.2 Ma, in the case of high excess argon content, even if only 1% excess argon component exists in their matrix, it can also greatly affect their K-A age. Thus it must be careful to treat the dating result.

  6. 27 CFR 25.160 - Tax adjustment for brewers who produce more than 2,000,000 barrels of beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... who produce more than 2,000,000 barrels of beer. 25.160 Section 25.160 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Tax on Beer Determination of Tax § 25.160 Tax adjustment for brewers who produce more than 2,000,000 barrels of beer....

  7. Computer Aided Design and Stress Analysis of Nose Landing Gear Barrel (NLGB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kumar Sardiwal

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available During the conceptual design phase of aircraft the integration of undercarriage system is very important and it is often difficult to achieve on the first time. The nose wheel landing gear preferred configurations for light naval trainer aircraft. The main objective of this project is to improve the static strength criteria and fatigue life of Nose Landing Gear Barrel considered. The investigations includes preliminary design layout for Nose Landing Gear Barrel and initial sizing has been done. It has been designed and evaluated for strength criteria. A method of analysis for the design of Nose Landing Gear Barrel made up of Al-Cu alloy (BS L 168 T6511 with static loads of axial, bending and normal loads are applied. The geometric modeling of the Nose Landing Gear Barrel was carried out using CAD package CATIA V5 R19 and pre and post processing was done through MSC/PATRAN. The stresses and displacements are obtained with the application of MSC/NASTRAN finite element software.

  8. Superior long-term stability of a glucose biosensor based on inserted barrel plating gold electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Cheng-Teng; Hsiao, Hung-Chan; Fang, Mei-Yen; Zen, Jyh-Myng

    2009-10-15

    Disposable one shot usage blood glucose strips are routinely used in the diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitus and their performance can vary greatly. In this paper we critically evaluated the long-term stability of glucose strips made of barrel plating gold electrodes. Compared to other glucose biosensing platforms of vapor deposited palladium and screen printed carbon electrodes, the proposed glucose biosensor was found to show the best stability among the three biosensing platforms in thermal acceleration experiments at 40 degrees C for 6 months with an average bias of 3.4% at glucose concentrations of 5-20 mM. The precision test of this barrel plating gold glucose biosensor also showed the best performance (coefficients of variation in the range of 1.4-2.4%) in thermal acceleration experiments at 40 degrees C, 50 degrees C and 70 degrees C for 27 days. Error grid analysis revealed that all measurements fell in zone A and zone B. Regression analysis showed no significant difference between the proposed biosensor and the reference method at 99% confidence level. The amperometric glucose biosensor fabricated by inserting two barrel plating gold electrodes onto an injection-molding plastic base followed by immobilizing with a bio-reagent layer and membrane was very impressive with a long-term stability up to 2.5 years at 25 degrees C. Overall, these results indicated that the glucose oxidase/barrel plating gold biosensing platform is ideal for long-term accurate glycemic control.

  9. Supramolecular chains of high nuclearity {Mn(III)25} barrel-like single molecule magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannopoulos, Dimosthenis P; Thuijs, Annaliese; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Pilkington, Melanie; Christou, George; Stamatatos, Theocharis C

    2014-01-25

    The first application of 1-methyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde oxime as a ligand for the coordination of paramagnetic transition metal ions has afforded a new {Mn(III)25} barrel-like cluster linked via Na(+) cations into a 1D polymeric topology that exhibits single-molecule magnetic behaviour.

  10. The beta-barrel outer membrane protein assembly complex of Neisseria meningitidis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volokhina, E.B.; Beckers, F.; Tommassen, J.; Bos, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved protein Omp85 is required for outer membrane protein (OMP) assembly in gram-negative bacteria and in mitochondria. Its Escherichia coli homolog, designated BamA, functions with four accessory lipoproteins, BamB, BamC, BamD, and BamE, together forming the beta-barrel asse

  11. Effect of Associative Learning on Memory Spine Formation in Mouse Barrel Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinska, Malgorzata; Siucinska, Ewa; Jasek, Ewa; Litwin, Jan A; Pyza, Elzbieta; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Associative fear learning, in which stimulation of whiskers is paired with mild electric shock to the tail, modifies the barrel cortex, the functional representation of sensory receptors involved in the conditioning, by inducing formation of new inhibitory synapses on single-synapse spines of the cognate barrel hollows and thus producing double-synapse spines. In the barrel cortex of conditioned, pseudoconditioned, and untreated mice, we analyzed the number and morphological features of dendritic spines at various maturation and stability levels: sER-free spines, spines containing smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER), and spines containing spine apparatus. Using stereological analysis of serial sections examined by transmission electron microscopy, we found that the density of double-synapse spines containing spine apparatus was significantly increased in the conditioned mice. Learning also induced enhancement of the postsynaptic density area of inhibitory synapses as well as increase in the number of polyribosomes in such spines. In single-synapse spines, the effects of conditioning were less pronounced and included increase in the number of polyribosomes in sER-free spines. The results suggest that fear learning differentially affects single- and double-synapse spines in the barrel cortex: it promotes maturation and stabilization of double-synapse spines, which might possibly contribute to permanent memory formation, and upregulates protein synthesis in single-synapse spines. PMID:26819780

  12. Construction of the ATLAS semi-conductor tracker (SCT) barrel modules in Japan

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Y; Ikegami, Y; Iwata, Y; Kobayashi, K; Kohriki, T; Kondo, T; Kurita, M; Minagawa, M; Miyamoto, T; Morinaka, S; Nakano, I; Ohsugi, T; Sengoku, H; Shimma, S

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a semi-automated assembly system and constructed 124 silicon microstrip modules so far for the ATLAS SCT barrel. This article describes the assembly procedure, evaluations of precisions and the module survey results. A precision of similar to 2mum is achievable with this assembly system.

  13. Computed tomography manifestation of a triple-barreled aortic dissection: the Mercedes-Benz mark sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, M S; Zorn, G L; Ho, K J

    1988-04-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) findings of a rare case of triple-barreled aortic dissection was described. CT demonstrated the extent of dissection, a communication between two channels, and three lumens separated by the intimal flap and a thin undetached tunica media, resembling a Mercedes-Benz mark. PMID:3168525

  14. PHYSICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF TANTALUM ON GUN BARREL STEEL (SYSTEMS ANLAYSIS BRANCH, SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, NRMRL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project entails the development of an alternative technology for plating gun barrel steel to replace the process electroplating of chrome (Cr-electroplate) with physical vapor deposition of tantalum (Ta-PVD). Developed by Benet Laboratory at Watervliet Arsenal, this project'...

  15. Twenty years of barrel-stave flextensional transducer technology in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dennis F.

    2005-04-01

    The barrel-stave flextensional transducer, a compact underwater sound source, was conceived at DRDC Atlantic in 1986 [G. W. McMahon and D. F. Jones, U.S. Patent No. 4,922,470 (1 May 1990); Canadian Patent No. 1,285,646 (2 July 1991)]. Over the years, five barrel-stave designs belonging to three flextensional classes were built and tested at DRDC Atlantic. Three Class I transducers with operating frequencies ranging from 800 to 1600 Hz were integrated into submarine communications buoys, low frequency active horizontal projector arrays, and a broadband sonar towbody. A high-power Class II and broadband (1-7 kHz) Class III transducer were deployed under the ice in the Lincoln Sea for research related to rapidly deployable surveillance systems. These barrel-stave flextensional transducers have also supported a variety of marine mammal studies including vocal mimicry in long-finned pilot whales, coda dialects in sperm whales, and the R&D of acoustic detection and tracking systems for endangered northern right whales. In August 2004 a barrel-stave transducer was used to lure a trapped juvenile humpback whale to the sluice gates of a tidal generating station on the Annapolis River in Nova Scotia by transmitting humpback whale calls underwater. The acoustic performance parameters for all 5 transducers will be presented.

  16. Late emergence of the vibrissa direction selectivity map in the rat barrel cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Yves; Léger, Jean-François; Goodman, Dan; Brette, Romain; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2011-07-20

    In the neocortex, neuronal selectivities for multiple sensorimotor modalities are often distributed in topographical maps thought to emerge during a restricted period in early postnatal development. Rodent barrel cortex contains a somatotopic map for vibrissa identity, but the existence of maps representing other tactile features has not been clearly demonstrated. We addressed the issue of the existence in the rat cortex of an intrabarrel map for vibrissa movement direction using in vivo two-photon imaging. We discovered that the emergence of a direction map in rat barrel cortex occurs long after all known critical periods in the somatosensory system. This map is remarkably specific, taking a pinwheel-like form centered near the barrel center and aligned to the barrel cortex somatotopy. We suggest that this map may arise from intracortical mechanisms and demonstrate by simulation that the combination of spike-timing-dependent plasticity at synapses between layer 4 and layer 2/3 and realistic pad stimulation is sufficient to produce such a map. Its late emergence long after other classical maps suggests that experience-dependent map formation and refinement continue throughout adult life.

  17. Construction and test of the final CMS Barrel Drift Tube Muon Chamber prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alberdi, J.; Arneodo, M.; Banicz, K.; Benettoni, M.; Benvenuti, A.; Bethke, S.; Cerrada, M. E-mail: cerrada@ciemat.es; Cirio, R.; Colino, N.; Conti, E.; Dallavalle, M.; Daniel, M.; Dattola, D.; Daudo, F.; De Giorgi, M.; Dosselli, U.; Fanfani, A.; Fanin, C.; Fouz, M.C.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giacomelli, P.; Giordano, V.; Gonella, F.; Grandi, C.; Guaita, P.; Guerzoni, M.; Lacaprara, S.; Lippi, I.; Marcellini, S.; Marin, J.; Martinelli, R.; Maselli, S.; Meneguzzo, A.; Migliore, E.; Mocholi, J.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Montanari, C.; Odorici, F.; Oller, J.C.; Paoletti, S.; Passaseo, M.; Pegoraro, M.; Peroni, C.; Puerta, J.; Reithler, H.; Romero, A.; Romero, L.; Ronchese, P.; Rossi, A.M.; Rovelli, T.; Sacchi, R.; Salicio, J.M.; Staiano, A.; Steinbeck, T.; Torassa, E.; Travaglini, R.; Ventura, L.; Ventura, S.; Vitelli, A.; Voetee, F.; Wegner, M.; Willmott, C.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G

    2002-03-21

    A prototype of the CMS Barrel Muon Detector incorporating all the features of the final chambers was built using the mass production assembly procedures and tools. The performance of this prototype was studied in a muon test beam at CERN and the results obtained are presented in this paper.

  18. Construction and test of the final CMS barrel drift tube muon chamber prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar-Benítez, M; Arneodo, M; Banicz, K; Benettoni, M; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bethke, Siegfried; Cerrada, M; Cirio, R; Colino, N; Conti, E; Dallavalle, G M; Daniel, M; Dattola, D; Daudo, F; De Giorgi, M; Dosselli, U; Fanfani, A; Fanin, C; Fouz-Iglesias, M C; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Glacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Gonella, F; Grandi, C; Guaita, P; Guerzoni, M; Lacaprara, S; Lippi, I; Marcellini, S; Marin, J; Martinelli, R; Maselli, S; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Migliore, E; Mocholí-Mocholí, J; Monaco, V; Montanari, A; Montnari, C; Odorici, F; Oller, J C; Paoletti, S; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Peroni, C; Puerta, J; Reithler, H; Romero, A; Romero, L; Ronchese, P; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Sacchi, R; Salicio, J M; Staiano, A; Steinbeck, T M; Torassa, E; Travaglini, R; Ventura, L; Ventura, Sandro; Vitelli, A; Voetee, F; Wegner, M; Willmott, C; Zotto, P L; Zumerle, G

    2002-01-01

    A prototype of the CMS Barrel Muon Detector incorporating all the features of the final chambers was built using the mass production assembly procedures and tools. The performance of this prototype was studied in a muon test beam at CERN and the results obtained are presented in this paper. (12 refs).

  19. A summary of the BARREL campaigns: Technique for studying electron precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodger, L. A.; Halford, A. J.; Millan, R. M.; McCarthy, M. P.; Smith, D. M.; Bowers, G. S.; Sample, J. G.; Anderson, B. R.; Liang, X.

    2015-06-01

    The Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) studies the loss of energetic electrons from Earth's radiation belts. BARREL's array of slowly drifting balloon payloads was designed to capitalize on magnetic conjunctions with NASA's Van Allen Probes. Two campaigns were conducted from Antarctica in 2013 and 2014. During the first campaign in January and February of 2013, there were three moderate geomagnetic storms with SYM-Hmin < -40 nT. Similarly, two minor geomagnetic storms occurred during the second campaign, starting in December of 2013 and continuing on into February of 2014. Throughout the two campaigns, BARREL observed electron precipitation over a wide range of energies and exhibiting temporal structure from hundreds of milliseconds to hours. Relativistic electron precipitation was observed in the dusk to midnight sector, and microburst precipitation was primarily observed near dawn. In this paper we review the two BARREL science campaigns and discuss the data products and analysis techniques as applied to relativistic electron precipitation observed on 19 January 2013.

  20. Learning-Dependent Plasticity of the Barrel Cortex Is Impaired by Restricting GABA-Ergic Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posluszny, Anna; Liguz-Lecznar, Monika; Turzynska, Danuta; Zakrzewska, Renata; Bielecki, Maksymilian; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Experience-induced plastic changes in the cerebral cortex are accompanied by alterations in excitatory and inhibitory transmission. Increased excitatory drive, necessary for plasticity, precedes the occurrence of plastic change, while decreased inhibitory signaling often facilitates plasticity. However, an increase of inhibitory interactions was noted in some instances of experience-dependent changes. We previously reported an increase in the number of inhibitory markers in the barrel cortex of mice after fear conditioning engaging vibrissae, observed concurrently with enlargement of the cortical representational area of the row of vibrissae receiving conditioned stimulus (CS). We also observed that an increase of GABA level accompanied the conditioning. Here, to find whether unaltered GABAergic signaling is necessary for learning-dependent rewiring in the murine barrel cortex, we locally decreased GABA production in the barrel cortex or reduced transmission through GABAA receptors (GABAARs) at the time of the conditioning. Injections of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA), an inhibitor of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), into the barrel cortex prevented learning-induced enlargement of the conditioned vibrissae representation. A similar effect was observed after injection of gabazine, an antagonist of GABAARs. At the behavioral level, consistent conditioned response (cessation of head movements in response to CS) was impaired. These results show that appropriate functioning of the GABAergic system is required for both manifestation of functional cortical representation plasticity and for the development of a conditioned response. PMID:26641862

  1. Evaluation of mRNA Localization Using Double Barrel Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashimoto, Yuji; Takahashi, Yasufumi; Zhou, Yuanshu; Ito, Hidenori; Ida, Hiroki; Ino, Kosuke; Matsue, Tomokazu; Shiku, Hitoshi

    2016-07-26

    Information regarding spatial mRNA localization in single cells is necessary for a better understanding of cellular functions in tissues. Here, we report a method for evaluating localization of mRNA in single cells using double-barrel scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM). Two barrels in a nanopipette were filled with aqueous and organic electrolyte solutions and used for SICM and as an electrochemical syringe, respectively. We confirmed that the organic phase barrel could be used to collect cytosol from living cells, which is a minute but sufficient amount to assess cellular status using qPCR analysis. The water phase barrel could be used for SICM to image topography with subcellular resolution, which could be used to determine positions for analyzing mRNA expression. This system was able to evaluate mRNA localization in single cells. After puncturing the cellular membrane in a minimally invasive manner, using SICM imaging as a guide, we collected a small amount cytosol from different positions within a single cell and showed that mRNA expression depends on cellular position. In this study, we show that SICM imaging can be utilized for the analysis of mRNA localization in single cells. In addition, we fully automated the pipet movement in the XYZ-directions during the puncturing processes, making it applicable as a high-throughput system for collecting cytosol and analyzing mRNA localization. PMID:27399804

  2. Electrostatic design of the barrel CRID (Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector) and associated measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H. (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Physics); Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, G.; Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Pavel, T.; Ratcliff, B.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Simopoulos, C.; Solodov, E.; Toge, N.; Va' Vra, J. Williams, H. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (US

    1990-04-01

    We report on the electrostatic design and related measurements of the barrel Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector for the Stanford Large Detector experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Linear Collider. We include test results of photon feedback in TMAE-laden gas, distortion measurements in the drift boxes and corona measurements. 13 refs., 21 figs.

  3. Effect of Associative Learning on Memory Spine Formation in Mouse Barrel Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Jasinska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Associative fear learning, in which stimulation of whiskers is paired with mild electric shock to the tail, modifies the barrel cortex, the functional representation of sensory receptors involved in the conditioning, by inducing formation of new inhibitory synapses on single-synapse spines of the cognate barrel hollows and thus producing double-synapse spines. In the barrel cortex of conditioned, pseudoconditioned, and untreated mice, we analyzed the number and morphological features of dendritic spines at various maturation and stability levels: sER-free spines, spines containing smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER, and spines containing spine apparatus. Using stereological analysis of serial sections examined by transmission electron microscopy, we found that the density of double-synapse spines containing spine apparatus was significantly increased in the conditioned mice. Learning also induced enhancement of the postsynaptic density area of inhibitory synapses as well as increase in the number of polyribosomes in such spines. In single-synapse spines, the effects of conditioning were less pronounced and included increase in the number of polyribosomes in sER-free spines. The results suggest that fear learning differentially affects single- and double-synapse spines in the barrel cortex: it promotes maturation and stabilization of double-synapse spines, which might possibly contribute to permanent memory formation, and upregulates protein synthesis in single-synapse spines.

  4. Construction and Performance of the ATLAS SCT Barrels and Cosmic Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Demirkoz, Bilge Melahat

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector for the LHC and will detect proton-proton collisions with center of mass energy of $14$TeV. Part of the central inner detector, the Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) barrels, were assembled and tested at Oxford University and later integrated at CERN with the TRT (Transition Radiation Tracker) barrel. The barrel SCT is composed of 4 layers of silicon strip modules with two sensor layers with $80 \\mu$m channel width. The design of the modules and the barrels has been optimized for low radiation length while maintaining mechanical stability, bringing services to the detector, and ensuring a cold and dry environment. The high granularity, high detector efficiency and low noise occupancy ($ < 5 \\times 10^{-4}$) of the SCT will enable ATLAS to have an efficient pattern recognition capability. Due to the binary nature of the SCT read-out, a stable read-out system and the calibration system is of critical importance. SctRodDaq is the online software framework for the calibration and a...

  5. Roles of argon seeding in energy confinement and pedestal structure in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of improving energy confinement with argon seeding at high density has been investigated in JT-60U. Better confinement is sustained at high density by argon seeding accompanied by higher core and pedestal temperatures. The electron density profiles become flatter with increasing density in conventional H-mode plasmas, whereas peaked density profiles are maintained with argon seeding. Density peaking and dilution effects lower the pedestal density at a given averaged density. The pedestal density in the argon seeded plasmas, which is lower than that in plasmas with deuterium puff, enables the pedestal temperature to be higher, whereas the increase in the pedestal pressure with argon seeding is small. High pedestal temperature is a boundary condition for high core temperature through profile stiffness, which leads to better confinement with argon seeding. The density peaking is a key factor of sustaining better confinement in argon seeded H-mode plasmas. The radiative loss power density is predominantly enhanced in the edge region by argon puff. The role of argon seeding in the pedestal characteristics has also been examined. The pedestal width becomes larger continuously with edge collisionality, but is nearly independent of the presence of argon seeding. (paper)

  6. Argon-41 production and evolution at the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, argon-41 concentrations were measured at various locations within the reactor facility to assess the accuracy of models used to predict argon-41 evolution from the reactor tank, and to determine the relationship between argon gas evolution from the tank and subsequent argon-41 concentrations throughout the reactor room. In particular, argon-41 was measured directly above the reactor tank with the reactor tank lids closed, at other accessible locations on the reactor top with the tank lids both closed and open, and at several locations on the first floor of the reactor room. These measured concentrations were then compared to values calculated using a modified argon-41 production and evolution model for TRIGA reactor tanks and ventilation values applicable to the OSTR facility. The modified model was based in part on earlier TRIGA models for argon-41 production and release, but added features which improved the agreement between predicted and measured values. The approximate dose equivalent rate due to the presence of argon-41 in reactor room air was calculated for several different locations inside the OSTR facility. These dose rates were determined using the argon-41 concentration measured at each specific location, and were subsequently converted to a predicted quarterly dose equivalent for each location based on the reactor's operating history. The predicted quarterly dose equivalent values were then compared to quarterly doses measured by film badges deployed as dose-integrating area radiation monitors at the locations of interest. The results indicate that the modified production and evolution model is able to predict argon-41 concentrations to within a factor of ten when compared to the measured data. Quarterly dose equivalents calculated from the measured argon-41 concentrations and the reactor's operating history seemed consistent with results obtained from the integrating area radiation monitors. Given the argon-41 concentrations measured

  7. Performance analysis for the CALIFA Barrel calorimeter of the R{sup 3}B experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Pol, H., E-mail: hector.alvarez@usc.es [Dpt. de Física de Partículas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Ashwood, N. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Aumann, T. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Bertini, D. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Cabanelas, P. [Dpt. de Física de Partículas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Casarejos, E. [Universidade de Vigo, E-36310 Vigo (Spain); Cederkall, J. [Department of Physics, Lund University, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Cortina-Gil, D.; Díaz Fernández, P.; Duran, I. [Dpt. de Física de Partículas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Fiori, E. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Galaviz, D. [Centro de Fsica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Labiche, M. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Nacher, E. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Pietras, B. [Dpt. de Física de Partículas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); and others

    2014-12-11

    The CALIFA calorimeter is an advanced detector for gamma rays and light charged particles, accordingly optimized for the demanding requirements of the physics programme proposed for the R{sup 3}B facility at FAIR. The multipurpose character of CALIFA is required to fulfil challenging demands in energy resolution (5–6% at 1 MeV for gamma rays) and efficiency. Charged particles, e.g. protons of energies up to 320 MeV in the Barrel section, should also be identified with an energy resolution better to 1%. CALIFA is divided into two well-separated sections: a “Forward EndCap” and a cylindrical “Barrel” covering an angular range from 43.2° to 140.3°. The Barrel section, based on long CsI(Tl) pyramidal frustum crystals coupled to large area avalanche photodiodes (LAAPDs), attains the requested high efficiency for calorimetric purposes. The construction of the CALIFA Demonstrator, comprising 20% of the total detector, has already been initiated, and commissioning experiments are expected for 2014. The assessment of the capabilities and expected performance of the detector elements is a crucial step in their design, along with the prototypes evaluation. For this purpose, the Barrel geometry has been carefully implemented in the simulation package R3BRoot, including easily variable thicknesses of crystal wrapping and carbon fibre supports. A complete characterization of the calorimeter response (including efficiency, resolution, evaluation of energy and reconstruction losses) under different working conditions, with several physics cases selected to probe the detector performance over a wide range of applications, has been undertaken. Prototypes of different sections of the CALIFA Barrel have been modeled and their responses have been evaluated and compared with the experimental results. The present paper summarizes the outcome of the simulation campaign for the entire Barrel section and for the corresponding prototypes tested at different European installations.

  8. Reconstruction of large limb bone defects with a double-barrel free vascularized fibular graft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BI Zheng-gang; HAN Xing-guang; FU Chun-jiang; CAO Yang; YANG Cheng-lin

    2008-01-01

    Background The use of a free,vascularized fibular graft is an important technique for the reconstruction of large defects in long bones.The technique has many advantages in strong,tubular bones; a more reliable vascular anatomy with a large vascular diameter and long pedicle is used,minimizing donor-site morbidity.Due to limitations in both fibular anatomy and mechanics,they cannot effectively be used to treat large limb bone defects due to their volume and strength.Methods From 1990 to 2001,16 clinical cases of large bone defects were treated using vascularized double-barrel fibular grafts.Patients were evaluated for an average of 10 months after surgery.Results All the patients achieved bony union; the average bone union took 10 months post surgery,and no stress fractures occurred.Compared with single fibular grafts,the vascularized double-barrel fibular grafts greatly facilitate bony union and are associated with fewer complications,suggesting that the vascularized double-barrel fibular graft is a valuable procedure for the correction of large bone defects in large,long bones in addition to enhancing bone intensity.Conclusions The vascularized double-barrel fibular graft is superior to the single fibular graft in stimulating osteogenous activity and biological mechanics for the correction of very large bone defects in large,long bones.Free vascularized folded double-barrel fibular grafts can not only fill up large bone defects,but also improve the intensity margin.Therefore,this study also widens its application and enlarges the treatment targets.However,in the case of bone deformability,special attention should be paid to bone fixation and protection of donor and recipient sites.

  9. The effects of argon in the bioenergetics of the hamster and the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, G. E.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1974-01-01

    Oxygen consumption was examined in hamsters and rats exposed to normoxic mixtures of argon at 1 atm. In fasted and nonfasted animals, no marked change in O2 utilization was detectable at 22 C. However, at 7 C a significant decrease in oxygen consumption was observed where the animals were exposed in argon. The data are interpreted in terms of the greater thermal conductivity of nitrogen. The study was prompted by conflicting reports on the metabolic effects of argon and helium.

  10. Argon Laser Photoablation for Treating Benign Pigmented Conjunctival Nevi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsharif, Abdulrahman M.; Al-Gehedan, Saeed M.; Alasbali, Tariq; Alkuraya, Hisham S.; Lotfy, Nancy M.; Khandekar, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of argon laser photoablation of benign conjunctival pigmented nevi with different clinical presentations. Patients and Methods: This interventional case series was conducted between July 2014 and January 2015. Patients presenting with benign conjunctival nevi were included. Data were collected on the clinical features at presentation, argon laser photoablation, and follow-up at 8 and 24 weeks. Postoperative photography allowed recording of the success of each case and the overall success rate. Complete removal of conjunctival pigments was considered an absolute success. Partial pigmentation requiring repeat laser treatment was considered a qualified success. Results: There were 14 eyes (four right eyes and ten left eyes) with benign pigmented conjunctival nevi. There were three males and eight females in the study sample. The median age was 36 (25% percentile: 26 years). Three patients had bilateral lesions. The nevi were located temporally in nine eyes, nasally in three eyes, and on the inferior bulbar conjunctiva in two eyes. The mean horizontal and vertical diameters of nevi were 5 ± 2 mm and 4 ± 2.7 mm, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 5 months. Following laser treatment, no eyes had subconjunctival hemorrhage, infection, scarring, neovascularization, recurrence, or corneal damage. The absolute success rate of laser ablation was 79%. Three eyes with elevated nevi had one to three sessions of laser ablation resulting in a qualified success rate of 100%. Conclusions: Argon laser ablation was a safe and effective treatment for the treatment of selective benign pigmented conjunctival nevi in Arab patients. PMID:27555708

  11. The abundances of neon, sulfur, and argon in planetary nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, S. C.; Lacy, J. H.; Townes, C. H.; Aller, L. H.; Geballe, T. R.; Baas, F.

    1981-01-01

    New infrared observations of Ne II, Ar III, and S IV are used in optical observations of other ionization states of the considered elements to evaluate the abundances of neon, argon, and sulfur in 18 planetary nebulae. Attention is also given to one or more of the infrared lines in 18 other nebulae. It is pointed out that S IV was detected in approximately 90% of the observed objects, while Ar III was found in about 80%, and Ne II in roughly one-third. It is noted that optical observations typically include only a limited region of the nebula, while the infrared measurements frequently involve integration over the entire nebular image.

  12. Ionization coefficients for argon in a micro-discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionization coefficients are measured for electrons in a dc micro-discharge in argon from optical emission profiles. The micro-discharge is operated in the Townsend regime between two parallel-plate electrodes. Axial profiles of emission are obtained with sufficient resolution to provide spatial ionization coefficients. The measured coefficients agree very well with the data obtained from other sources, indicating the operation of the discharge in the Townsend regime and also that Townsend mechanisms do not need extension to describe such discharges. (paper)

  13. Kinetic modeling of the Townsend breakdown in argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macheret, S. O.; Shneider, M. N.

    2013-10-01

    Kinetic modeling of the Townsend breakdown in argon was performed in the "forward-back" approximation. The kinetic model was found to adequately describe the left branch of the Paschen curve, and the important role of ionization by fast ions and atoms near the cathode, as well as the increase in secondary emission coefficient in strong electric fields described in the literature, was confirmed. The modeling also showed that the electron energy distribution function develops a beam of high-energy electrons and that the runaway effect, i.e., the monotonic increase of the mean electron energy with the distance from the cathode, occurs at the left branch of the Paschen curve.

  14. Ionization coefficients for argon in a micro-discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschel, Thomas; Stefanović, Ilija; Malović, Gordana; Marić, Dragana; Petrović, Zoran Lj

    2013-08-01

    Ionization coefficients are measured for electrons in a dc micro-discharge in argon from optical emission profiles. The micro-discharge is operated in the Townsend regime between two parallel-plate electrodes. Axial profiles of emission are obtained with sufficient resolution to provide spatial ionization coefficients. The measured coefficients agree very well with the data obtained from other sources, indicating the operation of the discharge in the Townsend regime and also that Townsend mechanisms do not need extension to describe such discharges.

  15. Diffusion coefficient of metal vapours into rare gases. Mercury - argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The source information is present as well as the results of analysis and integration of data on mutual diffusion coefficient (MDC) of mercury - argon mixture at Hg concentration → 0 in 300-2500 K temperature range. Reference data on MDC for metal - inert gas binary mixtures obtained on the base of complex analysis of various information, as it exemplified by Hg-Ar pair, can be used as a part of metrological support at calibration of devices for determination MDC of gas - metal vapors

  16. Electron drift velocity in argon-methane mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Described are the results of a series of measurements of electron drift velocity taken with samples of chemically pure grade gas mixture of Ar-10% CH4 (N2222O<2 ppm). The measured drift velocity is plotted as a function of the ratio of electric field to pressure in the range from 0.05 to 0.8 V/cmxtorr. The measurements are reproducible only to within 4%. The results of numerical calculations employing the well-established argon elastic and methane elastic and inelastic cross sections are also included. The disagreement from the present experimental results, and from those obtained elsewhere, is rather puzzling

  17. High intensity, argon ion laser-jet photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R. Marshall; Schnapp, Karlyn A.; Hannemann, Klaus; Ho, Douglas M.; Memarian, Hamid R.; Azadnia, Ardeshir; Pinhas, Allan R.; Figley, Timothy M.

    A new technique for the study of high intensity solution photochemistry has been developed. With this laser-jet technique, a high velocity microjet is irradiated with the focussed output of an argon ion laser. Under these extremely high intensity conditions, photochemically generated transient species with suitable absorption properties are excited further and produce relatively large amounts of photoproducts which are not observed under low intensity conditions. The application of this laser-jet technique in the study of the photochemistry of radicals, biradicals, photoenols and the higher excited states of carbonyl and polycyclic aromatic compounds is described.

  18. Optical fiber read-out for liquid argon scintillation light

    CERN Document Server

    Csáthy, J Janicskó; Kratz, J; Schönert, S; Wiesinger, Ch

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we describe the performance of a light detector for Ar scintillation light made of wavelength-shifting (WLS) fibers connected to Silicon-Photomultipliers (SiPM). The setup was conceived to be used as anti-Compton veto for high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors operated directly in liquid Argon (LAr). Background suppression efficiencies for different radioactive sources were measured in a test cryostat with about 800 kg LAr. This work was part of the R\\&D effort for the GERDA experiment.

  19. Study of a novel electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter TGT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept and the basic design of a fast, highly granular and compact electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter are described. This novel calorimeter offers uniform energy response and constant energy resolution independent of the production angle of an impinging particle and of its impact position at the calorimeter. An example of a calorimeter with full rapidity coverage in an application in a collider detector is given. An important aspect of the concept is the electronics for fast signal processing matched to the short charge collection time. We report on the experience with the realization of a prototype calorimeter module and on its performance in a test beam exposure. 15 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Activation of copper by nitrogen and argon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetvertkova, Vera [IAP, Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Mustafin, Edil; Strasik, Ivan [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Belousov, Anton [TU Darmstadt (Germany); Latysheva, Ludmila; Sobolevsky, Nikolai [INR RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ratzinger, Ulrich [IAP, Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Monte Carlo transport codes are widely used for various purposes in nuclear physics, radiation protection, medical applications, accelerator design etc. Code verification by experiments is needed to be sure that the codes give accurate results. New data on the activation of copper by a nitrogen beam of 500 MeV/u is presented and compared with FLUKA and SHIELD simulation results. The activation of copper by a nitrogen beam is compared to activation by an argon beam and respective simulations. This gives a chance to see the accuracy of the codes at different projectile masses. Correspondences and discrepancies of calculations and experiments are discussed.

  1. Study of a Novel Concept for a Liquid Argon Calorimeter \

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD33 \\\\ \\\\ The development of a fast, highly granular and compact electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter prototype is proposed as a generic R\\&D project for a novel concept of calorimetry in proton-proton and electron-positron collider detectors: the $^{\\prime$Thin Gap Turbine$^{\\prime}$ (TGT). The TGT calorimeter has a modular construction, is flexible in its longitudinal and transverse granularity, and offers a uniform energy response and resolution, independent of the production angle of incident particles. An important aspect of the project is the development of fast, radiation-hard front-end electronics which is operating in the cold.

  2. Activation of aluminum by argon: Experimental study and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetvertkova, V., E-mail: v.chetvertkova@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); J. W. Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, IAP, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Strasik, I. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); J. W. Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, IAP, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Belousov, A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Iwase, H. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Mokhov, N. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Mustafin, E. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Latysheva, L. [Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Pavlovic, M. [FEI STU, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Ratzinger, U. [J. W. Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, IAP, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Sobolevsky, N. [Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-06-15

    The paper presents the results of irradiation of aluminum targets by 430 and 500 MeV/u argon beams. Gamma-spectra were measured after the end of the irradiation in order to identify the induced nuclides as well as to determine their residual activity depth-profiles. The results of this experiment are compared with Monte Carlo simulations by FLUKA, GEANT4, MARS, PHITS and SHIELD-A codes. In case of a thin target, the agreement between the experiment and simulations is satisfactory, while in case of a thick target, some discrepancies are observed.

  3. Laser-induced vibrational dynamics of ozone in solid argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Amstrup, B.; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1997-01-01

    We consider the vibrational dynamics, induced by an intense infrared laser pulse, in an ozone molecule with isotopic substitution, that is, (OOO)-O-16-O-16-O-18 and compare the dynamics in the gas phase and in solid ar on. not perturbed by argon on a time-scale of a few picoseconds and selective...... bond-breaking in the molecule should be possible following the same laser control scheme as suggested in the gas phase. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V....

  4. Electron transport in argon in crossed electric and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness; Makabe

    2000-09-01

    An investigation of electron transport in argon in the presence of crossed electric and magnetic fields is carried out over a wide range of values of electric and magnetic field strengths. Values of mean energy, ionization rate, drift velocity, and diffusion tensor are reported here. Two unexpected phenomena arise; for certain values of electric and magnetic field we find regions where the swarm mean energy decreases with increasing electric fields for a fixed magnetic field and regions where swarm mean energy increases with increasing magnetic field for a fixed electric field. PMID:11088933

  5. Quantitative/Statistical Approach to Bullet-to-Firearm Identification with Consecutively Manufactured Barrels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Striupaitis; R.E. Gaensslen

    2005-01-30

    Efforts to use objective image comparison and bullet scanning technologies to distinguish bullets from consecutively manufactured handgun barrels from two manufacturers gave mixed results. The ability of a technology to reliably distinguish between matching and non-matching bullets, where the non-matching bullets were as close in pattern to the matching ones as is probably possible, would provide evidence that the distinctions could be made ''objectively'', and independently of human eyes. That evidence is identical or very close to what seems to be needed to satisfy Daubert standards. It is fair to say that the FTI IBIS image comparison technology correctly distinguished between all the Springfield barrel bullets, and between most but not all of the HiPoint barrel bullets. In the HiPoint cases that were not distinguished 100% of the time, they would he distinguished correctly at least 83% of the time. These results, although obviously limited to the materials used in the comparisons, provide strong evidence that barrel-to-bullet matching is objectively reliable. The results with SciClops were less compelling. The results do not mean that bullet-to-barrel matching is not objectively reliable--rather, they mean that this version of the particular technology could not quite distinguish between these extremely similar yet different bullets as well as the image comparison technology did. In a number of cases, the numerical results made the correct distinctions, although they were close to one another. It is hard to say from this data that this technology differs in its ability to make distinctions between the manufacturers, because the results are very similar with both. The human examiner results were as expected. We did not expect any misidentifications, and there were not any. It would have been preferable to have a higher return rate, and thus more comparisons in the overall sample. As noted, the ''consecutively manufactured barrel

  6. Cobalamin-Independent Methionine Synthase (MetE): A Face-to-Face Double Barrel that Evolved by Gene Duplication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejcha, Robert; Ludwig, Martha L. (Michigan)

    2010-03-08

    Cobalamin-independent methionine synthase (MetE) catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to L-homocysteine (Hcy) without using an intermediate methyl carrier. Although MetE displays no detectable sequence homology with cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase (MetH), both enzymes require zinc for activation and binding of Hcy. Crystallographic analyses of MetE from T. maritima reveal an unusual dual-barrel structure in which the active site lies between the tops of the two ({beta}{alpha}){sub 8} barrels. The fold of the N-terminal barrel confirms that it has evolved from the C-terminal polypeptide by gene duplication; comparisons of the barrels provide an intriguing example of homologous domain evolution in which binding sites are obliterated. The C-terminal barrel incorporates the zinc ion that binds and activates Hcy. The zinc-binding site in MetE is distinguished from the (Cys){sub 3}Zn site in the related enzymes, MetH and betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase, by its position in the barrel and by the metal ligands, which are histidine, cysteine, glutamate, and cysteine in the resting form of MetE. Hcy associates at the face of the metal opposite glutamate, which moves away from the zinc in the binary E {center_dot} Hcy complex. The folate substrate is not intimately associated with the N-terminal barrel; instead, elements from both barrels contribute binding determinants in a binary complex in which the folate substrate is incorrectly oriented for methyl transfer. Atypical locations of the Hcy and folate sites in the C-terminal barrel presumably permit direct interaction of the substrates in a ternary complex. Structures of the binary substrate complexes imply that rearrangement of folate, perhaps accompanied by domain rearrangement, must occur before formation of a ternary complex that is competent for methyl transfer.

  7. Synaptic molecular imaging in spared and deprived columns of mouse barrel cortex with array tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Nicholas C; Collman, Forrest; Vogelstein, Joshua T; Burns, Randal; Smith, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    A major question in neuroscience is how diverse subsets of synaptic connections in neural circuits are affected by experience dependent plasticity to form the basis for behavioral learning and memory. Differences in protein expression patterns at individual synapses could constitute a key to understanding both synaptic diversity and the effects of plasticity at different synapse populations. Our approach to this question leverages the immunohistochemical multiplexing capability of array tomography (ATomo) and the columnar organization of mouse barrel cortex to create a dataset comprising high resolution volumetric images of spared and deprived cortical whisker barrels stained for over a dozen synaptic molecules each. These dataset has been made available through the Open Connectome Project for interactive online viewing, and may also be downloaded for offline analysis using web, Matlab, and other interfaces. PMID:25977797

  8. Current Status of the Pixel Phase I Upgrade in CMS: Barrel Module Production

    CERN Document Server

    Bartek, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The silicon pixel detector is the innermost component of the CMS tracking system, providing high precision space point measurements of charged particle trajectories. Before 2018 the instantaneous luminosity of the LHC is expected to reach about 2~x~$10^{34}~\\rm{cm}^{-2}\\rm{s}^{-1}$, which will significantly increase the number of interactions per bunch crossing. To maintain a high tracking efficiency, CMS has planned to replace the current pixel system during phase I by a new lightweight detector, equipped with an additional 4th layer in the barrel, and one additional forward/backward disk. The present status of barrel modules production will be presented, including preliminary results from tests on the first production pixel modules of the new pixel tracker.

  9. The protection system of the superconducting coils in the Barrel Toroid of ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Acerbi, E; Volpini, G; Daël, A; Lesmond, C

    1999-01-01

    An analysis of the discharge of the Barrel Toroid under several operating conditions has been carried out. The main critical parameters of the discharge (i.e. the maximum temperature inside the coils, the maximum temperature $9 gradient, the maximum voltage at the coil ends and the maximum decentering forces acting on the BT and ECT magnets) have been calculated for several operating conditions (heaters on, heaters off, short circuit with heaters on or $9 off). The aim of this analysis is to provide a cross check of the protection design of the Barrel Toroid coils with an independent study. The results validate the choice to use a low value of dump resistance, and give some important $9 warning in the case of heater failure or presence of a short circuit. (5 refs).

  10. LArIAT: Liquid Argon In A Testbeam

    CERN Document Server

    Cavanna, F; Raaf, J; Rebel, B

    2014-01-01

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) are ideal detectors for precision neutrino physics. These detectors, when located deep underground, can also be used for measurements of proton decay, and astrophysical neutrinos. The technology must be completely developed, up to very large mass scales, and fully mastered to construct and operate these detectors for this physics program. As part of an integrated plan of developing these detectors, accurate measurements in LArTPC of known particle species in the relevant energy ranges are now deemed as necessary. The LArIAT program aims to directly achieve these goals by deploying LArTPC detectors in a dedicated calibration test beam line at Fermilab. The set of measurements envisaged here are significant for both the short-baseline (SBN) and long-baseline (LBN) neutrino oscillation programs in the US, starting with MicroBooNE in the near term and with the adjoint near and far liquid argon detectors in the Booster beam line at Fermilab envisioned in the mid-term...

  11. A liquid argon scintillation veto for the GERDA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerda is an experiment to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge. Results of Phase I have been published in summer 2013. Currently Gerda is being upgraded to a second phase. To reach the aspired background index of ≤ 10-3 cts/(keV . kg . yr) for Phase II active background-suppression techniques will be applied, including an active liquid argon veto (LAr veto). It has been demonstrated by the LArGe test facility that the detection of argon scintillation light can be used to effectively suppress background events in the germanium, which simultaneously deposit energy in LAr. This talk focusses on the light instrumentation which is being installed in GERDA. Photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and wavelength-shifting fibers connected to silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) are combined to maximize the photoelectron-yield with respect to various background sources. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to optimize the design for background suppression and low self-induced background. First results of the prototypes and the progress of installation are reported.

  12. A liquid argon scintillation veto for the GERDA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegmann, Anne [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    Gerda is an experiment to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge. Results of Phase I have been published in summer 2013. Currently Gerda is being upgraded to a second phase. To reach the aspired background index of ≤ 10{sup -3} cts/(keV . kg . yr) for Phase II active background-suppression techniques will be applied, including an active liquid argon veto (LAr veto). It has been demonstrated by the LArGe test facility that the detection of argon scintillation light can be used to effectively suppress background events in the germanium, which simultaneously deposit energy in LAr. This talk focusses on the light instrumentation which is being installed in GERDA. Photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and wavelength-shifting fibers connected to silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) are combined to maximize the photoelectron-yield with respect to various background sources. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to optimize the design for background suppression and low self-induced background. First results of the prototypes and the progress of installation are reported.

  13. Some transport properties in plasmas containing argon and fluorine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novaković R.N.V.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper some results of numerical evaluation of transport coefficients in plasmas in the mixtures of argon and fluorine are presented. These transport characteristics are given in the function of the temperature for low pressures ranging from 0,1 kPa to 1,0 kPa and for low temperatures between 500 K and 5 000 K in argon plasmas with 20% and 30% of the fluorine added. It is assumed that the system is kept under constant pressure and that a corresponding state of local thermodynamical equilibrium (LTE is attained in it. The equilibrium plasma composition, necessary for the evaluations, was determined on the ground of the Saha equations for ionization processes and the law of mass action for the thermal dissociation of F2, combined with the charge conservation relation and the assumption that the pressure remained constant in the course of temperature variations. The ionization energy lowering, required in conjunction with the Saha equations, was obtained with the aid of a modified expression for the plasma Debye radius proposed previously. A previously derived expression for the modified Debye radius, offering the possibility to treat the plasmas considered as weakly non-ideal in the whole temperature range, is used. The cut-off at the Landau length rather than of the smallest of ionic radii is introduced. This alteration in the evaluation procedure brings different considerable changes in the final numerical results for the all relevant quantities.

  14. Compilation of electron collision excitation cross sections for neutro argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work presents a compilation and critical analysis of the available data on electron collision excitation cross sections for neutral Argon levels. This study includes: 1.- A detailed description in intermediate coupling for all the levels belonging the 20 configurations 3p''5 ns(n=4 to 12), np(n=4 to 8) and nd(n=3 to 8) of neutral Argon. 2.- Calculation of the electron collision excitation cross sections in Born and Born-Oppenheimer-Ochkur approximations for all the levels in the 14 configurations 3p''5 ns(n=4 to 7), np(n=4 to 7) and nd(n=3 to 8). 3.- Comparison and discussion of the compiled data. These are the experimental and theoretical values available from the literature, and those from this work. 4.- Analysis of the regularities and systematic behaviors in order to determine which values can be considered more reliable. It is show that the concept of one electron cross section results quite useful for this purpose. In some cases it has been possible to obtain in this way approximate analytical expressions interpolating the experimental data. 5.- All the experimental and theoretical values studied are graphically presented and compared. 6.- The last part of the work includes a listing of several general purpose programs for Atomic Physics calculations developed for this work. (Author)

  15. Elastic properties of liquid and solid argon in nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schappert, Klaus; Pelster, Rolf

    2013-10-16

    We have measured sorption isotherms and determined the intrinsic longitudinal elastic modulus β(Ar,ads) of nanoconfined material via ultrasonic measurements combined with a special effective medium analysis. In the liquid regime the adsorbate only contributes to the measured effective properties when the pores are completely filled and the modulus is bulklike. At partial fillings its contribution is cancelled out by the high compressibility of the vapour phase. In contrast, at lower temperatures frozen argon as well as underlying liquid surface layers cause a linear increase of the effective longitudinal modulus upon filling. During sorption the contribution of the liquid surface layers near the pore wall β(Ar,surf) increases with the thickness of the solid layers reaching the bulk value β(Ar,liquid) only in the limit of complete pore filling. We interpret this effect as due to the gradual stiffening of the solid argon membrane. The measurements and their analysis show that longitudinal ultrasonic waves are well suited to the study of the elastic properties and liquid-solid phase transitions in porous systems. This method should also help to detect the influence of nanoconfinement on elastic properties in further research. PMID:24057946

  16. Barrel-stave model or toroidal model? A case study on melittin pores.

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, L; Harroun, T A; Weiss, T M; Ding, L; Huang, H W

    2001-01-01

    Transmembrane pores induced by amphiphilic peptides, including melittin, are often modeled with the barrel-stave model after the alamethicin pore. We examine this assumption on melittin by using two methods, oriented circular dichroism (OCD) for detecting the orientation of melittin helix and neutron scattering for detecting transmembrane pores. OCD spectra of melittin were systematically measured. Melittin can orient either perpendicularly or parallel to a lipid bilayer, depending on the phy...

  17. Test Beam Measurement of the Crosstalk in the EM Barrel Module 0

    CERN Document Server

    Hubaut, F; Lacour, D; Orsini, F

    2000-01-01

    Test beam measurements of the crosstalk in the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter Module 0 tested at CERN in August 99' are reported. The main sources of crosstalk coming either from electronics or from physical effects on the electrodes have been identified and quantified. This has been done for the crosstalks between the different parts of the module, namely middle-middle, middle-back, middle-front, back-back, back-middle, back-front, front-front and front-middle.

  18. Microcircuits of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in layer 2/3 of mouse barrel cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Avermann, Michael; Tomm, Christian; Mateo, Celine; Gerstner, Wulfram; Petersen, Carl C. H.

    2012-01-01

    Avermann M, Tomm C, Mateo C, Gerstner W, Petersen CC. Microcircuits of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in layer 2/3 of mouse barrel cortex. J Neurophysiol 107: 3116-3134, 2012. First published March 7, 2012; doi:10.1152/jn.00917.2011.-Synaptic interactions between nearby excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the neocortex are thought to play fundamental roles in sensory processing. Here, we have combined optogenetic stimulation, whole cell recordings, and computational modeling to define key...

  19. Study of a twisted ATLAS SCT Barrel deformation as revealed by a photogrammetric survey

    CERN Document Server

    Dobson, E; Heinemann, F; Karagoz-Unel, M

    2007-01-01

    A photogrammetry survey on the SCT barrels was performed as an engineering check on the structure of the ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) shortly after construction. Analysis of the data obtained revealed small scale elliptical deformation as well as a twist of the structure. The results of the survey are presented as well as interpolation of the measured targets to the module positions and a comparison with track based alignment measurements.

  20. Structural Plasticity within the Barrel Cortex during Initial Phases of Whisker-Dependent Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhlman, Sandra J.; O'Connor, Daniel H.; Fox, Kevin; Svoboda, Karel

    2014-01-01

    We report learning-related structural plasticity in layer 1 branches of pyramidal neurons in the barrel cortex, a known site of sensorimotor integration. In mice learning an active, whisker-dependent object localization task, layer 2/3 neurons showed enhanced spine growth during initial skill acquisition that both preceded and predicted expert performance. Preexisting spines were stabilized and new persistent spines were formed. These findings suggest rapid changes in connectivity between mot...

  1. A Study of Bernard Malamud’s The Magic Barrel from the Psychological Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田婧

    2014-01-01

    The Magic Barrel tells a story about Leo Finkle who is a rabbinical student and in want of a wife transacts with the marriage broker Pinye Salzman and finally marry his daughter Stella. By using Sigmund Freud’s Psychoanalytical Criti-cism, this paper aims to explore the Leo’s changes in thought and emotions towards love and marriage and his torment during his process of the pursuit of love and happiness.

  2. Morphology and Physiology of Excitatory Neurons in Layer 6b of the Somatosensory Rat Barrel Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    M. Marx; Feldmeyer, D.

    2012-01-01

    Neocortical lamina 6B (L6B) is a largely unexplored layer with a very heterogeneous cellular composition. To date, only little is known about L6B neurons on a systematic and quantitative basis. We investigated the morphological and electrophysiological properties of excitatory L6B neurons in the rat somatosensory barrel cortex using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and simultaneous biocytin fillings. Subsequent histological processing and computer-assisted 3D reconstructions provided the bas...

  3. Adoption, Maintenance and Diffusion of Stormwater Best Management Practices: Rain Barrels

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffa, Cheyenne R; Prokopy, Linda S; Babin, Nicholas, Ph. D; Turner, Allison J

    2014-01-01

    Urbanization increases the volume of stormwater runoff from homes, businesses and other paved areas of the urbanized landscape. Unable to infiltrate into the ground, stormwater is directed to facilities that can easily become overloaded and cause a variety of water quality issues. This study aims to assess urban homeowners’ motivations to adopt and maintain rain barrels, a stormwater best management practice (BMP), and evaluate how this BMP diffuses throughout a community. This research took ...

  4. Nitrobindin: An Ubiquitous Family of All β-Barrel Heme-proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Giovanna; Ascenzi, Paolo; Polticelli, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Rhodnius prolixus nitrophorins (Rp-NPs), Arabidopsis thaliana nitrobindin (At-Nb), and Homo sapiens THAP4 (Hs-THAP4) are the unique known proteins that use a β-barrel fold to bind ferric heme, which is devoted to NO transport and/or catalysis. The eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel Rp-NPs, which represent the only heme-binding lipocalins, are devoted to deliver NO into the blood vessel of the host and to scavenge histamine during blood sucking. Regarding Nbs, crystallographic data suggest the ability of At-Nb and Hs-THAP4 to bind ferric heme; however, no data are available with respect to these functions in the natural host. Here, a bioinformatics investigation based on the amino acid sequences and three-dimensional structures of At-Nb and Hs-THAP4 suggests a conservation of the 10-stranded antiparallel β-barrel Nb structural module in all life kingdoms of the evolutionary ladder. In particular, amino acid residues involved in the heme recognition and in the structure stabilization of the Nb structural module are highly conserved (identity > 29%; homology > 83%). Moreover, molecular models of putative Nbs from different organisms match very well with each other and known three-dimensional structures of Nbs. Furthermore, phylogenetic tree reconstruction indicates that NPs and Nbs group in distinct clades. These data indicate that 10-stranded β-barrel Nbs constitute a new ubiquitous heme protein family spanning from bacteria to Homo sapiens. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(6):423-428, 2016. PMID:27080126

  5. Performance Study of the CMS Barrel Resistive Plate Chambers with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; 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Timciuc, V; Veverka, J; Wilkinson, R; Yang, Y; Zhang, L; Zhu, K; Zhu, R Y; Akgun, B; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Jang, D W; Jun, S Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Terentyev, N; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Dinardo, M E; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Heyburn, B; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K; Wagner, S R; Zang, S L; Agostino, L; Alexander, J; Blekman, F; Cassel, D; Chatterjee, A; Das, S; Gibbons, L K; Heltsley, B; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Kuznetsov, V; Patterson, J R; Puigh, D; Ryd, A; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Vaughan, J; Weng, Y; Wittich, P; Beetz, C P; Cirino, G; Sanzeni, C; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Afaq, M A; Albrow, M; Ananthan, B; Apollinari, G; Atac, M; Badgett, W; Bagby, L; Bakken, J A; Baldin, B; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Biery, K; Binkley, M; Bloch, I; Borcherding, F; Brett, A M; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Churin, I; Cihangir, S; Crawford, M; 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Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    In October and November 2008, the CMS collaboration conducted a programme of cosmic ray data taking, which has recorded about 270 million events. The Resistive Plate Chamber system, which is part of the CMS muon detection system, was successfully operated in the full barrel. More than 98% of the channels were operational during the exercise with typical detection efficiency of 90%. In this paper, the performance of the detector during these dedicated runs is reported.

  6. Right and left support feet of the Central Barrel Yoke of the CMS Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Franz Leher, DWE

    2000-01-01

    Fully loaded the Central Barrel will weigh 3000 tonnes. Those feet have tosupport this weight. Therefore they are made of 120 mm thick steel plates.To guarantee a maximum coverage for the muon detctor they will house a muon detector just benaeth the top plate. Weight of 1 foot is 35 tonnes.Its height is 3.5 m and it is 2.5 m large

  7. Local effects of ECRH on argon transport at ASDEX upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future deuterium-tritium magnetically confined fusion power plants will most probably rely an high-Z Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) such as tungsten. This choice is determined by the necessity of low erosion of the first wall materials (to guarantee a long lifetime of the wall components) and by the need to avoid the too high tritium wall retention of typical carbon based PFCs. The experience gathered at the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak has demonstrated the possibility of reliable and high performance plasma operation with a full tungsten-coated first wall. The observed accumulation of tungsten which can lead to excessive radiation losses is mitigated with the use of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH). Although this impurity control method is routinely performed at AUG, the underlying physics principles are still not clear. This thesis aims an providing further knowledge an the effects of ECRH an the transport of impurities inside the core plasma. The transport of argon has been therefore investigated in-depth in purely ECR heated L-mode (low-confinement) discharges. Studies an impurity transport in centrally ECR heated nitrogen-seeded H-mode (high-confinement) discharges have also been performed. To this scope, a new crystal X-ray spectrometer of the Johann type has been installed an AUG for argon concentration and ion temperature measurements. New methods for the experimental determination of the total argon density through the integrated use of this diagnostic and of the Soft X-Ray (SXR) diode arrays have been developed. This gives the possibility of evaluating the full profiles of the argon transport coefficients from the linear flux-gradient dependency of local argon density. In comparison to classical χ2-minimization methods, the approach proposed here delivers transport coefficients intrinsically independent of the modelling of periodic relaxation mechanisms such as those Lied to sawtooth MHD (Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic) activity. Moreover, the good

  8. Functions of phenylalanine residues within the beta-barrel stem of the anthrax toxin pore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A key step of anthrax toxin action involves the formation of a protein-translocating pore within the endosomal membrane by the Protective Antigen (PA moiety. Formation of this transmembrane pore by PA involves interaction of the seven 2beta2-2beta3 loops of the heptameric precursor to generate a 14-strand transmembrane beta barrel. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the effects on pore formation, protein translocation, and cytotoxicity, of mutating two phenylalanines, F313 and F314, that lie at the tip the beta barrel, and a third one, F324, that lies part way up the barrel. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that the function of these phenylalanine residues is to mediate membrane insertion and formation of stable transmembrane channels. Unlike F427, a key luminal residue in the cap of the pore, F313, F314, and F324 do not directly affect protein translocation through the pore. Our findings add to our knowledge of structure-function relationships of a key virulence factor of the anthrax bacillus.

  9. Destiny of a drop on a fiber: from barrel to clamshell and back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eral, Burak; de Ruiter, J.; de Ruiter, R.; Oh, J. M.; Semprebon, C.; Brinkman, M.; Mugele, F.

    2011-11-01

    Drops on cylindrical fibers are a familiar sight, for instance in the form of dew drops on spider webs. They can exist in two competing morphologies, a cylindrically symmetric barrel state completely engulfing the fiber and an asymmetric clamshell state, in which the drop sits on the side of the fiber. Despite their omnipresence and their practical relevance the physical mechanisms governing the stability of the two morphologies remained elusive. Using electrowetting-functionalized fibers we determined of the stability limits of both morphologies as a function of the two relevant control parameters, the contact angle and the liquid volume. While clamshells are found to prevail for large contact angles and small volumes, and barrels prevail for small angles and large volumes, there is also a wide range of intermediate parameter values, for which both morphologies are mechanically stable. Mapping out the energy landscape of the system by numerical minimization of the free energy we find that the barrel state is easily deformed by non-axisymmetric perturbations. From a general perspective, the demonstration of electrowetting-based reversible switching of liquid morphologies on fibers opens up opportunities for designing functional textiles and porous materials. We thank the Chemical Sciences division of the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO-CW) for financial support.

  10. Folding of β-barrel membrane proteins in lipid bilayers - Unassisted and assisted folding and insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschmidt, Jörg H

    2015-09-01

    In cells, β-barrel membrane proteins are transported in unfolded form to an outer membrane into which they fold and insert. Model systems have been established to investigate the mechanisms of insertion and folding of these versatile proteins into detergent micelles, lipid bilayers and even synthetic amphipathic polymers. In these experiments, insertion into lipid membranes is initiated from unfolded forms that do not display residual β-sheet secondary structure. These studies therefore have allowed the investigation of membrane protein folding and insertion in great detail. Folding of β-barrel membrane proteins into lipid bilayers has been monitored from unfolded forms by dilution of chaotropic denaturants that keep the protein unfolded as well as from unfolded forms present in complexes with molecular chaperones from cells. This review is aimed to provide an overview of the principles and mechanisms observed for the folding of β-barrel transmembrane proteins into lipid bilayers, the importance of lipid-protein interactions and the function of molecular chaperones and folding assistants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions.

  11. Evaluation of using short barrel DHS in treatment of intertrochanteric fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahmasbi M

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Cut out or extrusion of the lag screw from the superior aspect of head and neck of the femur is one of the most common and devastating complications of the surgery of the intertrochanteric fractures with DHS. The exact cause of this complications is unknown, but it seems to be related to osteopenia, inappropriate position of lag screw inside head of the femur and inability of DHS to slide inside the barrel, which is the most ignored risk factor. We used short barrel Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS for fixation of the intertrochanteric fractures in Dimon and Hughston procedure in 16 patients with unstable fracture, from may to August 2000. The only patient suffered from cut out is the one with static position of DHS in the center of the head. The other complications were delayed union in one, disingagement of the lag screw and side plate despite using compression screw, and one case of significant limb length discrepancy 6 months after surgery, mild limbing was the rule and the average of harris scores was 76. We think that, it is possible to reduce the rate of cut out with choosing short barrel DHS instead of the standard one, while using short length lag screw.

  12. CREB Regulates Experience-Dependent Spine Formation and Enlargement in Mouse Barrel Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabella Pignataro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Experience modifies synaptic connectivity through processes that involve dendritic spine rearrangements in neuronal circuits. Although cAMP response element binding protein (CREB has a key function in spines changes, its role in activity-dependent rearrangements in brain regions of rodents interacting with the surrounding environment has received little attention so far. Here we studied the effects of vibrissae trimming, a widely used model of sensory deprivation-induced cortical plasticity, on processes associated with dendritic spine rearrangements in the barrel cortex of a transgenic mouse model of CREB downregulation (mCREB mice. We found that sensory deprivation through prolonged whisker trimming leads to an increased number of thin spines in the layer V of related barrel cortex (Contra in wild type but not mCREB mice. In the barrel field controlling spared whiskers (Ipsi, the same trimming protocol results in a CREB-dependent enlargement of dendritic spines. Last, we demonstrated that CREB regulates structural rearrangements of synapses that associate with dynamic changes of dendritic spines. Our findings suggest that CREB plays a key role in dendritic spine dynamics and synaptic circuits rearrangements that account for new brain connectivity in response to changes in the environment.

  13. Upgrade of the CMS muon trigger system in the barrel region

    CERN Document Server

    Rabady, Dinyar Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    To maintain the excellent performance shown during the LHCs Run-1 the Level-1 Trigger of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment underwent a significant upgrade. One part of this upgrade is the re-organization of the muon trigger path from a subsystem-centric view in which hits in the drift tubes (DT), the cathode strip chambers (CSC), and the resistive plate chambers (RPC) were treated separately in dedicated track-finding systems to one in which complementary detector systems for a given region (barrel, overlap, and endcap) are merged at the track-finding level. This fundamental restructuring of the muon trigger system required the development of a system to receive track candidates from the track-finding layer, remove potential duplicate tracks, and forward the best candidates to the global decision layer.An overview will be given of the new track-finder system for the barrel region, the Barrel Muon Track Finder (BMTF) as well as the cancel-out and sorting layer, the upgraded Global Muon Trigger ($\\mu$GMT). B...

  14. Improving the Resistance of a Eukaryotic β-Barrel Protein to Thermal and Chemical Perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, Dennis; Mager, Frauke; Naveed, Hammad; Arnold, Thomas; Weirich, Sara; Linke, Dirk; Liang, Jie; Nussberger, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Beta-barrel membrane proteins have regular structures with extensive hydrogen bonding networks between their transmembrane (TM) β-strands, which stabilize their protein fold. Nevertheless, weakly stable TM regions exist, which are important for the protein function and interaction with other proteins. Here, we report on the apparent stability of human Tom40A, a member of the ‘mitochondrial porin family’ and main constituent of the mitochondrial protein-conducting channel TOM. Using a physical interaction model TmSIP for β-barrel membrane proteins, we have identified three β-strands unfavorable in the TM domain of the protein. Substitution of key residues inside these strands with hydrophobic amino acids results in a decreased sensitivity of the protein to chemical and/or thermal denaturation. The apparent melting temperature observed when denatured at a rate of one degree per minute, is shifted from 73 to 84 °C. Moreover, the sensitivity of the protein to denaturant agents is significantly lowered. Further, we find a reduced tendency for the mutated protein to form dimers. We propose that the identified weakly stable β-strands 1, 2 and 9 of human Tom40A play an important role in quaternary protein-protein interactions within the mammalian TOM machinery. Our results show that the use of empirical energy functions to model the apparent stability of β-barrel membrane proteins may be a useful tool in the field of nanopore bioengineering. PMID:21835183

  15. Improving the resistance of a eukaryotic β-barrel protein to thermal and chemical perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, Dennis; Mager, Frauke; Naveed, Hammad; Arnold, Thomas; Weirich, Sara; Linke, Dirk; Liang, Jie; Nussberger, Stephan

    2011-10-14

    β-Barrel membrane proteins have regular structures with extensive hydrogen-bond networks between their transmembrane (TM) β-strands, which stabilize their protein fold. Nevertheless, weakly stable TM regions, which are important for the protein function and interaction with other proteins, exist. Here, we report on the apparent stability of human Tom40A, a member of the "mitochondrial porin family" and main constituent of the mitochondrial protein-conducting channel TOM (translocase of the outer membrane). Using a physical interaction model, TmSIP, for β-barrel membrane proteins, we have identified three unfavorable β-strands in the TM domain of the protein. Substitution of key residues inside these strands with hydrophobic amino acids results in a decreased sensitivity of the protein to chemical and/or thermal denaturation. The apparent melting temperature observed when denatured at a rate of 1 °C per minute is shifted from 73 to 84 °C. Moreover, the sensitivity of the protein to denaturant agents is significantly lowered. Further, we find a reduced tendency for the mutated protein to form dimers. We propose that the identified weakly stable β-strands 1, 2 and 9 of human Tom40A play an important role in quaternary protein-protein interactions within the mammalian TOM machinery. Our results show that the use of empirical energy functions to model the apparent stability of β-barrel membrane proteins may be a useful tool in the field of nanopore bioengineering.

  16. A Novel Bonding Method of Pure Aluminum and SUS304 Stainless Steel Using Barrel Nitriding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jung Hyun; Okumiya, Masahiro; Tsunekawa, Yoshiki; Yun, Ky Youl; Kim, Sang Gweon; Yoshida, Masashi

    2014-09-01

    A great deal of research is being carried out on welding or bonding methods between iron and aluminum. However, it is not so easy to make Fe-Al bonding materials with both high strength and light weight. Recently, a new nitriding process has been proposed to produce aluminum nitride on an aluminum surface using a barrel. This study proposes a new concept in the production of a multilayer which has an AlN and Fe-Al intermetallic compound layer between the aluminum and steel using a barrel nitriding process. The bonding process was carried out from 893 K to 913 K (620 °C to 640 °C) for 18, 25.2, and 36 ks with Al2O3 powder and Al-Mg alloy powder. After the process, an aluminum nitride (AlN) layer and a Fe-Al intermetallic compound (Fe2Al5.4) layer were formed at the interface between the pure aluminum and SUS304 austenitic stainless steel. The thicknesses of the AlN layer and the intermetallic compound layer increased with increasing treatment temperature and time. The maximum hardnesses of the AlN layer and Fe2Al5.4 layers were found to be 377HV and 910HV, respectively, after barrel nitriding at 893 K (620 °C) for 18 ks.

  17. Plasticity-Related Gene 1 Affects Mouse Barrel Cortex Function via Strengthening of Glutamatergic Thalamocortical Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unichenko, Petr; Kirischuk, Sergei; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Baumgart, Jan; Roskoden, Thomas; Schneider, Patrick; Sommer, Angela; Horta, Guilherme; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-07-01

    Plasticity-related gene-1 (PRG-1) is a brain-specific protein that modulates glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Here we investigated the functional role of PRG-1 in adolescent and adult mouse barrel cortex both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with wild-type (WT) animals, PRG-1-deficient (KO) mice showed specific behavioral deficits in tests assessing sensorimotor integration and whisker-based sensory discrimination as shown in the beam balance/walking test and sandpaper tactile discrimination test, respectively. At P25-31, spontaneous network activity in the barrel cortex in vivo was higher in KO mice compared with WT littermates, but not at P16-19. At P16-19, sensory evoked cortical responses in vivo elicited by single whisker stimulation were comparable in KO and WT mice. In contrast, at P25-31 evoked responses were smaller in amplitude and longer in duration in WT animals, whereas KO mice revealed no such developmental changes. In thalamocortical slices from KO mice, spontaneous activity was increased already at P16-19, and glutamatergic thalamocortical inputs to Layer 4 spiny stellate neurons were potentiated. We conclude that genetic ablation of PRG-1 modulates already at P16-19 spontaneous and evoked excitability of the barrel cortex, including enhancement of thalamocortical glutamatergic inputs to Layer 4, which distorts sensory processing in adulthood.

  18. Ful distil ation argon producing crud argon column on operating experience%全精馏制氩粗氩塔操作经验浅谈

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马光显

    2015-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces the ful distil ation argon recovery process in the crude argon column in air separation system of cooling,heating and put some matters needing attention in use.%简要介绍了全精馏制氩过程中粗氩塔在空分系统降温、升温及投用中的一些注意事项。

  19. De novo backbone and sequence design of an idealized alpha/beta-barrel protein: Evidence of stable tertiary structure

    OpenAIRE

    Offredi, Fabrice; Dubail, Fabien; Kischel, Philippe; Sarinski, K.; Stern, A S; Van de Weerdt, Cécile; Hoch, J. C.; Prosperi, Christelle; François, Jean-Marie; Mayo, S. L.; Martial, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    We have designed, synthesized, and characterized a 216 amino acid residue sequence encoding a putative idealized alpha/beta-barrel protein. The design was elaborated in two steps. First, the idealized backbone was defined with geometric parameters representing our target fold: a central eight parallel-stranded beta-sheet surrounded by eight parallel alpha-helices, connected together with short structural turns on both sides of the barrel. An automated sequence selection algorithm, based on th...

  20. Divergent evolution of a beta/alpha-barrel subclass: detection of numerous phosphate-binding sites by motif search.

    OpenAIRE

    Bork, P.; Gellerich, J.; Groth, H.; Hooft, R.; Martin, F.

    1995-01-01

    Study of the most conserved region in many beta/alpha-barrels, the phosphate-binding site, revealed a sequence motif in a few beta/alpha-barrels with known tertiary structure, namely glycolate oxidase (GOX), cytochrome b2 (Cyb2), tryptophan synthase alpha subunit (TrpA), and the indoleglycerolphosphate synthase (TrpC). Database searches identified this motif in numerous other enzyme families: (1) IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and GMP reductase (GuaC); (2) phosphoribosylformimino-5-aminoimidazol c...

  1. System Research Of Multi-Barrel Machine Guns Installed On Board Of The Helicopter Of Mi-17 Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bęczkowski Grzegorz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents tests of a multi-barreled machine gun system built on board of a helicopter. The described weapon system consists of three 7.62 mm M-134G multi-barreled machine guns built on the designed frames of shooting positions located in the escape hatch window, the side doors and the rear doors of the transport cabin of the Mi-17-1V helicopter.

  2. Characteristics of atmospheric-pressure, radio-frequency glow discharges operated with argon added ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wen-Ting; Li, Guo; Li, He-Ping; Bao, Cheng-Yu; Wang, Hua-Bo; Zeng, Shi; Gao, Xing; Luo, Hui-Ying

    2007-06-01

    Rf, atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasmas with bare metal electrodes have promising prospects in the fields of plasma-aided etching, thin film deposition, disinfection and sterilization, etc. In this paper, the discharge characteristics are presented for the rf APGD plasmas generated with pure argon or argon-ethanol mixture as the plasma-forming gas and using water-cooled, bare copper electrodes. The experimental results show that the breakdown voltage can be reduced significantly when a small amount of ethanol is added into argon, probably due to the fact that the Penning ionization process is involved, and a pure α-mode discharge can be produced more easily with the help of ethanol. The uniformity of the rf APGDs of pure argon or argon-ethanol mixtures using bare metallic electrodes is identified with the aid of the intensified charge coupled device images.

  3. First measurements with ARGONTUBE, a 5 m long drift Liquid Argon TPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) technique is a promising technology for future neutrino detectors. At LHEP of the University of Bern (Switzerland), an R and D program towards large detectors are on-going. The main goal is to show the feasibility of long drift paths over many meters. Therefore, a liquid Argon TPC with 5 m of drift distance was constructed. Many other aspects of the liquid Argon TPC technology are also investigated, such as a new device to generate high voltage in liquid Argon (Greinacher circuit), a recirculation filtering system and the multi-photon ionization of liquid Argon with a UV laser. Two detectors are built: a medium size prototype for specific detector technology studies, and ARGONTUBE, a 5 m long device

  4. Characteristics of atmospheric-pressure, radio-frequency glow discharges operated with argon added ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rf, atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasmas with bare metal electrodes have promising prospects in the fields of plasma-aided etching, thin film deposition, disinfection and sterilization, etc. In this paper, the discharge characteristics are presented for the rf APGD plasmas generated with pure argon or argon-ethanol mixture as the plasma-forming gas and using water-cooled, bare copper electrodes. The experimental results show that the breakdown voltage can be reduced significantly when a small amount of ethanol is added into argon, probably due to the fact that the Penning ionization process is involved, and a pure α-mode discharge can be produced more easily with the help of ethanol. The uniformity of the rf APGDs of pure argon or argon-ethanol mixtures using bare metallic electrodes is identified with the aid of the intensified charge coupled device images

  5. First measurement of the ionization yield of nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sangiorgio, Samuele [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foxe, Michael P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering; Hagmann, Chris [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jovanovic, Igor [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering; Kazkaz, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mozin, Vladimir V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Norman, E. B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pereverzev, S. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rebassoo, Finn O. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sorensen, Peter F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Liquid phase argon has long been used as a target medium for particle detection via scintillation light. Recently there has been considerable interest in direct detection of both hypothetical darkmatter particles and coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering. These as-yet unobserved neutral particle interactions are expected to result in a recoiling argon atom O(keV), generally referred to in the literature as a nuclear recoil. This prompts the question of the available electromagnetic signal in a liquid argon detector. In this Letter we report the first measurement of the ionization yield (Qy), detected electrons per unit energy, resulting from nuclear recoils in liquid argon, measured at 6.7 keV. This is also the lowest energy measurement of nuclear recoils in liquid argon.

  6. Management of Liver Cancer Argon-helium Knife Therapy with Functional Computer Tomography Perfusion Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongbo; Shu, Shengjie; Li, Jinping; Jiang, Huijie

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to observe the change in blood perfusion of liver cancer following argon-helium knife treatment with functional computer tomography perfusion imaging. Twenty-seven patients with primary liver cancer treated with argon-helium knife and were included in this study. Plain computer tomography (CT) and computer tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging were conducted in all patients before and after treatment. Perfusion parameters including blood flows, blood volume, hepatic artery perfusion fraction, hepatic artery perfusion, and hepatic portal venous perfusion were used for evaluating therapeutic effect. All parameters in liver cancer were significantly decreased after argon-helium knife treatment (p liver tissue, but other parameters kept constant. CT perfusion imaging is able to detect decrease in blood perfusion of liver cancer post-argon-helium knife therapy. Therefore, CTP imaging would play an important role for liver cancer management followed argon-helium knife therapy.

  7. Shifts in developmental timing, and not increased levels of experience-dependent neuronal activity, promote barrel expansion in the primary somatosensory cortex of rats enucleated at birth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Fetter-Pruneda

    Full Text Available Birth-enucleated rodents display enlarged representations of whiskers (i.e., barrels of the posteromedial subfield in the primary somatosensory cortex. Although the historical view maintains that barrel expansion is due to incremental increases in neuronal activity along the trigeminal pathway during postnatal development, recent evidence obtained in experimental models of intramodal plasticity challenges this view. Here, we re-evaluate the role of experience-dependent neuronal activity on barrel expansion in birth-enucleated rats by combining various anatomical methods and sensory deprivation paradigms. We show that barrels in birth-enucleated rats were already enlarged by the end of the first week of life and had levels of metabolic activity comparable to those in control rats at different ages. Dewhiskering after the postnatal period of barrel formation did not prevent barrel expansion in adult, birth-enucleated rats. Further, dark rearing and enucleation after barrel formation did not lead to expanded barrels in adult brains. Because incremental increases of somatosensory experience did not promote barrel expansion in birth-enucleated rats, we explored whether shifts of the developmental timing could better explain barrel expansion during the first week of life. Accordingly, birth-enucleated rats show earlier formation of barrels, accelerated growth of somatosensory thalamocortical afferents, and an earlier H4 deacetylation. Interestingly, when H4 deacetylation was prevented with a histone deacetylases inhibitor (valproic acid, barrel specification timing returned to normal and barrel expansion did not occur. Thus, we provide evidence supporting that shifts in developmental timing modulated through epigenetic mechanisms, and not increased levels of experience dependent neuronal activity, promote barrel expansion in the primary somatosensory cortex of rats enucleated at birth.

  8. Volatile compounds in a spanish red wine aged in barrels made of Spanish, French, and American oak wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simón, Brígida Fernández; Cadahía, Estrella; Jalocha, Jerzy

    2003-12-17

    A red Rioja wine was aged in barrels made of Spanish oak wood (Quercus robur, Quercus petraea,Quercus pyrenaica, and Quercus faginea) during 21 months. The concentrations of some volatile compounds [syringaldehyde, vanillin, eugenol, maltol, guaiacol, 4-ethylphenol, cis and trans isomers of beta-methyl-gamma-octalactone, 2-furfuraldehyde, 5-methyl-2-furfuraldehyde, 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furfuraldehyde, and furfuryl alcohol] were studied in these wines and compared with those of the same wine aged in barrels made from French oak of Q. robur (Limousin, France) and Q. petraea (Allier, France) and American oak of Quercus alba (Missouri). Similar concentrations of these compounds were found in wines aged in Spanish and French oak wood barrels, and significantly different concentrations were found with respect to wines aged in barrels made of American oak wood, indicating a different behavior. Thus, wines with different characteristics were obtained, depending on the kind of wood. Also, the kind of wood had an important influence on sensory characteristics of wine during the aging process. Spanish oak wood from Q. robur, Q. petraea, and Q. pyrenaica can be considered to be suitable for barrel production for quality wines, because a wine aged in barrels made of these Spanish oak woods showed similar and intermediate characteristics to those of the same wine aged in French and American oak woods usually used in cooperage.

  9. A barrel-related interneuron in layer 4 of rat somatosensory cortex with a high intrabarrel connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelbl, Christian; Helmstaedter, Moritz; Lübke, Joachim; Feldmeyer, Dirk

    2015-03-01

    Synaptic connections between identified fast-spiking (FS), parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons, and excitatory spiny neurons in layer 4 (L4) of the barrel cortex were investigated using patch-clamp recordings and simultaneous biocytin fillings. Three distinct clusters of FS L4 interneurons were identified based on their axonal morphology relative to the barrel column suggesting that these neurons do not constitute a homogeneous interneuron population. One L4 FS interneuron type had an axonal domain strictly confined to a L4 barrel and was therefore named "barrel-confined inhibitory interneuron" (BIn). BIns established reliable inhibitory synaptic connections with L4 spiny neurons at a high connectivity rate of 67%, of which 69% were reciprocal. Unitary IPSPs at these connections had a mean amplitude of 0.9 ± 0.8 mV with little amplitude variation and weak short-term synaptic depression. We found on average 3.7 ± 1.3 putative inhibitory synaptic contacts that were not restricted to perisomatic areas. In conclusion, we characterized a novel type of barrel cortex interneuron in the major thalamo-recipient layer 4 forming dense synaptic networks with L4 spiny neurons. These networks constitute an efficient and powerful inhibitory feedback system, which may serve to rapidly reset the barrel microcircuitry following sensory activation. PMID:24076498

  10. Development of membrane cryostats for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Montanari, D; Gendotti, A; Geynisman, M; Hentschel, S; Loew, T; Mladenov, D; Montanari, C; Murphy, S; Nessi, M; Norris, B; Noto, F; Rubbia, A; Sharma, R; Smargianaki, D; Stewart, J; Vignoli, C; Wilson, P; Wu, S

    2015-01-01

    A new collaboration is being formed to develop a multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be located at the Surf Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. In the present design, the detector will be located inside cryostats filled with 68,400 ton of ultrapure liquid argon (less than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination). To qualify the membrane technology for future very large-scale and underground implementations, a strong prototyping effort is ongoing: several smaller detectors of growing size with associated cryostats and cryogenic systems will be designed and built at Fermilab and CERN. They will take physics data and test different detector elements, filtration systems, design options and installation procedures. In addition, a 35 ton prototype is already operational at Fermilab and will take data with single-phase detector in early 2016. After the prototyping phase, the multi-kton detector will be constructed. After commissioning, it will detect and study ne...

  11. Fluorescence Spectrum of SiO in an Argon Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scullman, R.; Hormes, J.; Schroeder, W.; Wiggenhauser, H.

    1987-04-01

    Fluorescence from SiO matrix isolated in argon has been investigated in the wavelength region 120-300 nm. Fluorescence emission spectra from the valence states, A1Π, E1Σ+ and G1Π, revealed that nearly all radiation comes from one channel at 305 nm, which was analysed as originating from the b3Π-X1Σ+ transition. Contrary to the A1Π and G1Π states, the E1Σ+ state also decays radiatively, although weakly, through two other channels situated in the vicinity of 305 nm. These two channels were believed to originate from the a3Σ+-X1Σ+ and e3Σ--X1Σ+ transitions.

  12. Electron Neutrino Classification in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Płoński, Piotr; Sulej, Robert; Zaremba, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinos are one of the least known elementary particles. The detection of neutrinos is an extremely difficult task since they are affected only by weak sub-atomic force or gravity. Therefore large detectors are constructed to reveal neutrino's properties. Among them the Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) detectors provide excellent imaging and particle identification ability for studying neutrinos. The computerized methods for automatic reconstruction and identification of particles are needed to fully exploit the potential of the LAr-TPC technique. Herein, the novel method for electron neutrino classification is presented. The method constructs a feature descriptor from images of observed event. It characterizes the signal distribution propagated from vertex of interest, where the particle interacts with the detector medium. The classifier is learned with a constructed feature descriptor to decide whether the images represent the electron neutrino or cascade produced by photons. The proposed ap...

  13. Large area liquid argon detectors for interrogation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary, Charles; Kane, Steve; Firestone, Murray I.; Smith, Gregory [Adelphi Technology LLC, Purdue Technology Center, 5225 Exploration Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46241 (United States); Gozani, Tsahi; Brown, Craig; Kwong, John; King, Michael J. [Rapiscan Laboratories, 520 Almanor Avenue, Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States); Nikkel, James A.; McKinsey, Dan [Physics Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Measurements of the efficiency, pulse shape, and energy and time resolution of liquid argon (LAr) detectors are presented. Liquefied noble gas-based (LNbG) detectors have been developed for the detection of dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay. However, the same qualities that make LNbG detectors ideal for these applications, namely their size, cost, efficiency, pulse shape discrimination and resolution, make them promising for portal screening and the detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). Two 18-liter prototype detectors were designed, fabricated, and tested, one with pure LAr and the other doped with liquid Xe (LArXe). The LArXe detector presented the better time and energy resolution of 3.3 ns and 20% at 662 KeV, respectively. The total efficiency of the detector was measured to be 35% with 4.5% of the total photons detected in the photopeak.

  14. Argon plasma coagulation for treatment of hemorrhagic radiation gastroduodenitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Shu-Ji; Aoyama, Nobuo; Shirasaka, Daisuke; Inoue, Takashi; Kuroda, Kohei; Ebara, Shigeyuki; Tamura, Takao; Miyamoto, Masaki; Kasuga, Masato [Kobe Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine

    2002-01-01

    A 79-year-old man who had received radiotherapy for portal vein thrombosis due to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) 5 months earlier, showed progressive anemia and melena. Endoscopy on admission revealed diffuse bleeding from multiple telangiectasias on the anterior wall of the antrum and bulbus. We treated this patient with a new non-contact hemostatic method: the argon plasma coagulator (APC). The melena stopped after the first session and the hemoglobin level remained stable for 7 months. No delayed complications have been observed. Gastrointestinal bleeding from chronic radiation gastroduodenitis is rarely reported compared with radiation proctitis. This case demonstrates that APC is effective for hemostasis of diffuse bleeding from radiation gastroduodenitis, just as for radiation protitis. (author)

  15. Line ratio diagnostics in helium and helium seeded argon plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boivin, R F [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5311 (United States); Loch, S D [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5311 (United States); Ballance, C P [Physics Department, Rollins College, White Park, FL 32789 (United States); Branscomb, D [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5311 (United States); Pindzola, M S [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5311 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    We investigate the potential use of line ratio diagnostics to evaluate electron temperature in either helium or helium seeded argon plasmas. Plasmas are produced in a helicon plasma source. A rf compensated Langmuir probe is used to measure both the electron temperature and plasma density while a spectrometer is used to measure He I line intensities from the plasma. For all plasma densities where the electron temperature remains at 5 {+-} 1 eV, three He line ratios are measured. Each experimental ratio is compared with the prediction of three different collisional radiative models. One of these models makes uses of recent R-matrix with pseudo-states calculations for collisional rate coefficients. A discussion related to the different observations and model predictions is presented.

  16. Photodegradation Mechanisms of Tetraphenyl Butadiene Coatings for Liquid Argon Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, B J P; Conrad, J M; Pla-Dalmau, A

    2013-01-01

    We report on studies of degradation mechanisms of tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings of the type used in neutrino and dark matter liquid argon experiments. Using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry we have detected the ultraviolet-blocking impurity benzophenone (BP). We monitored the drop in performance and increase of benzophenone concentration in TPB plates with exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, and demonstrate the correlation between these two variables. Based on the presence and initially exponential increase in the concentration of benzophenone observed, we propose that TPB degradation is a free radical-mediated photooxidation reaction, which is subsequently confirmed by displaying delayed degradation using a free radical inhibitor. Finally we show that the performance of wavelength-shifting coatings of the type envisioned for the LBNE experiment can be improved by 10-20%, with significantly delayed UV degradation, by using a 20% admixture of 4-tert-Butylcatechol.

  17. Kinetic modeling of the Townsend breakdown in argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macheret, S. O.; Shneider, M. N. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, D-414 Engineering Quadrangle, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Kinetic modeling of the Townsend breakdown in argon was performed in the “forward-back” approximation. The kinetic model was found to adequately describe the left branch of the Paschen curve, and the important role of ionization by fast ions and atoms near the cathode, as well as the increase in secondary emission coefficient in strong electric fields described in the literature, was confirmed. The modeling also showed that the electron energy distribution function develops a beam of high-energy electrons and that the runaway effect, i.e., the monotonic increase of the mean electron energy with the distance from the cathode, occurs at the left branch of the Paschen curve.

  18. Uranium (III) precipitation in molten chloride by wet argon sparging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigier, Jean-François; Laplace, Annabelle; Renard, Catherine; Miguirditchian, Manuel; Abraham, Francis

    2016-06-01

    In the context of pyrochemical processes for nuclear fuel treatment, the precipitation of uranium (III) in molten salt LiCl-CaCl2 (30-70 mol%) at 705 °C is studied. First, this molten chloride is characterized with the determination of the water dissociation constant. With a value of 10-4.0, the salt has oxoacid properties. Then, the uranium (III) precipitation using wet argon sparging is studied. The salt is prepared using UCl3 precursor. At the end of the precipitation, the salt is totally free of solubilized uranium. The main part is converted into UO2 powder but some uranium is lost during the process due to the volatility of uranium chloride. The main impurity of the resulting powder is calcium. The consequences of oxidative and reductive conditions on precipitation are studied. Finally, coprecipitation of uranium (III) and neodymium (III) is studied, showing a higher sensitivity of uranium (III) than neodymium (III) to precipitation.

  19. The readout driver (ROD) for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthymiopoulos, Ilias

    2001-04-01

    The Readout Driver (ROD) for the Liquid Argon calorimeter of the ATLAS detector is described. Each ROD module receives triggered data from 256 calorimeter cells via two fiber-optics 1.28 Gbit/s links with a 100 kHz event rate (25 kbit/event). Its principal function is to determine the precise energy and timing of the signal from discrete samples of the waveform, taken each period of the LHC clock (25 ns). In addition, it checks, histograms, and formats the digital data stream. A demonstrator system, consisting of a motherboard and several daughter-board processing units (PUs) was constructed and is currently used for tests in the lab. The design of this prototype board is presented here. The board offers maximum modularity and allows the development and testing of different PU designs based on today's leading integer and floating point DSPs.

  20. Characterization of SF6/Argon Plasmas for Microelectronics Applications; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents measurements in inductively driven plasmas containing SF(sub 6)/Argon gas mixtures. The data in this report is presented in a series of appendices with a minimum of interpretation. During the course of this work we investigated: the electron and negative ion density using microwave interferometry and laser photodetachment; the optical emission; plasma species using mass spectrometry, and the ion energy distributions at the surface of the rf biased electrode in several configurations. The goal of this work was to assemble a consistent set of data to understand the important chemical mechanisms in SF(sub 6) based processing of materials and to validate models of the gas and surface processes

  1. Photodegradation mechanisms of tetraphenyl butadiene coatings for liquid argon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. J. P.; VanGemert, J. K.; Conrad, J. M.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report on studies of degradation mechanisms of tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings of the type used in neutrino and dark matter liquid argon experiments. Using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry we have detected the ultraviolet-blocking impurity benzophenone. We monitored the drop in performance and increase of benzophenone concentration in TPB plates with exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, and demonstrate the correlation between these two variables. Based on the presence and initially exponential increase in the concentration of benzophenone observed, we propose that TPB degradation is a free radical-mediated photooxidation reaction, which is subsequently confirmed by displaying delayed degradation using a free radical inhibitor. Finally we show that the performance of wavelength-shifting coatings of the type envisioned for the LBNE experiment can be improved by 10-20%, with significantly delayed UV degradation, by using a 20% admixture of 4-tert-Butylcatechol.

  2. Liquid Argon Cryogenic Detector Calibration by Inelastic Scattering of Neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Polosatkin, Sergey; Dolgov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    A method for calibration of cryogenic liquid argon detector response to recoils with certain energy -8.2 keV - is proposed. The method utilizes a process of inelastic scattering of monoenergetic neutrons produced by fusion DD neutron generator. Features of kinematics of inelastic scattering cause sufficient (forty times) increase in count rate of useful events relative to traditional scheme exploited elastic scattering with the same recoil energy and compatible energy resolution. The benefits of the proposed scheme of calibration most well implemented with the use of tagged neutron generator as a neutron source that allows to eliminate background originated from casual coincidence of signals on cryogenic detector and additional detector of scattered neutrons.

  3. The liquid argon TPC for the ICARUS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Arneodo, F

    1997-01-01

    The ICARUS project aims at the realisation of a large liquid argon TPC to be run at the Underground Laboratories of Gran Sasso in Italy. An intense R&D; activity has put on firm grounds this new detector technology and experimentally confirmed its feasibility on a few ton scale. Based on these solid achievements, the collaboration is now confident of being able to build and safely operate a multi-kton detector. The reseach program of the experiment involves the systematic study of a wide spectrum of physical phenomena covering many orders of magnitude in the energy deposited in the detector: from the few MeV of solar neutrino interactions, to the about one GeV of the proton decay and atmospheric neutrinos, up to the higher energies of neutrinos from accelerators.

  4. A Thermodynamic Model for Argon Plasma Kernel Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Keck

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasma kernel formation of argon is studied experimentally and theoretically. The experiments have been performed in a constant volume cylindrical vessel located in a shadowgraph system. The experiments have been done in constant pressure. The energy of plasma is supplied by an ignition system through two electrodes located in the vessel. The experiments have been done with two different spark energies to study the effect of input energy on kernel growth and its properties. A thermodynamic model employing mass and energy balance was developed to predict the experimental data. The agreement between experiments and model prediction is very good. The effect of various parameters such as initial temperature, initial radius of the kernel, and the radiation energy loss have been investigated and it has been concluded that initial condition is very important on formation and expansion of the kernel.

  5. The readout driver (ROD) for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Efthymiopoulos, I

    2001-01-01

    The Readout Driver (ROD) for the Liquid Argon calorimeter of the ATLAS detector is described. Each ROD module receives triggered data from 256 calorimeter cells via two fiber-optics 1.28 Gbit/s links with a 100 kHz event rate (25 kbit/event). Its principal function is to determine the precise energy and timing of the signal from discrete samples of the waveform, taken each period of the LHC clock (25 ns). In addition, it checks, histograms, and formats the digital data stream. A demonstrator system, consisting of a motherboard and several daughter-board processing units (PUs) was constructed and is currently used for tests in the lab. The design of this prototype board is presented here. The board offers maximum modularity and allows the development and testing of different PU designs based on today's leading integer and floating point DSPs. (3 refs).

  6. Attosecond Coherent Control of Single and Double Photoionization in Argon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogle, C W; Tong, X M; Martin, L; Murnane, M M; Kapteyn, H C; Ranitovic, P

    2015-10-23

    Ultrafast high harmonic beams provide new opportunities for coherently controlling excitation and ionization processes in atoms, molecules, and materials on attosecond time scales by employing multiphoton two-pathway electron-wave-packet quantum interferences. Here we use spectrally tailored and frequency tuned vacuum and extreme ultraviolet harmonic combs, together with two phase-locked infrared laser fields, to show how the total single and double photoionization yields of argon can be coherently modulated by controlling the relative phases of both optical and electronic-wave-packet quantum interferences. This Letter is the first to apply quantum control techniques to double photoionization, which is a fundamental process where a single, high-energy photon ionizes two electrons simultaneously from an atom. PMID:26551112

  7. Dynamic resonances and tunnelling in the multiphoton ionization of argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results of wavepacket simulations for multiphoton ionization in argon. A single active electron model is applied to estimate the single-electron ionization rates and photoelectron energy distributions for λ = 390 nm light with intensities up to I = 2 x 1014 W cm-2. The multiphoton ionization rates are compared with R-matrix Floquet calculations and found to be in very good agreement. The photoelectron energy distribution is used to study the nature of ionization at the higher intensities. Our results are consistent with recent calculations and experiments which show the imprint of the tunnelling process in the multiphoton regime. For few-cycle intense pulses, we find that the strong modulation of intensity and increased bandwidth leads to dynamic mixing of the 3d and 5s resonances.

  8. The ATLAS liquid Argon calorimeters read-out system

    CERN Document Server

    Blondel, A; Fayard, L; La Marra, D; Léger, A; Matricon, P; Perrot, G; Poggioli, L; Prast, J; Riu, I; Simion, S

    2004-01-01

    The calorimetry of the ATLAS experiment takes advantage of different detectors based on the liquid Argon (LAr) technology. Signals from the LAr calorimeters are processed by various stages before being delivered to the Data Acquisition system. The calorimeter cell signals are received by the front-end boards, which digitize a predetermined number of samples of the bipolar waveform and sends them to the Read-Out Driver (ROD) boards. The ROD board receives triggered data from 1028 calorimeter cells, and determines the precise energy and timing of the signals by processing the discrete samplings of the pulse. In addition, it formats the digital stream for the following elements of the DAQ chain, and performs monitoring. The architecture and functionality of the ATLAS LAr ROD board are discussed, along with the final design of the Processing Unit boards housing the Digital Signal Processors (DSP). (9 refs).

  9. Electron-ion recombination study in argon at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study deals with a wall-stabilized arc burning in argon at atmospheric pressure. A transient mode is obtained using a fast thyristor connected to the electrodes, which short-circuits the discharge. By means of two wavelengths laser interferometry and spectroscopy measurements we have determined the temporal changes of the electron density, ground state atom density and excited atom density. We have shown that, when the electric field is suppressed, the electron temperature rapidly decreases to the gas temperature before changing electron and atom densities. This phenomenon is applied to determine the gas temperature and to evaluate the role played by ionization in electron density balance. The coefficients of ambipolar diffusion, ionization and recombination and an apparent recombination coefficient are determined versus electron temperature and compared with theoretical values

  10. Atmospheric dispersion of argon-41 from anuclear research reactor: measurement and modeling of plume geometry and gamma radiation field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Bent; Astrup, Poul; Drews, Martin;

    2003-01-01

    An atmospheric dispersion experiment was conducted using a visible tracer along with the routine release of argon-41 from the BR1 research reactor in Mol, Belgium. Simultaneous measurements of plume geometry and radiation fields for argon-41 decay were performed as well as measurements of the argon...

  11. The design and performance of a twenty barrel hydrogen pellet injector for Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbahn, J.A.

    1994-05-01

    A twenty barrel hydrogen pellet injector has been designed, built and tested both in the laboratory and on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak at MIT. The injector functions by firing pellets of frozen hydrogen or deuterium deep into the plasma discharge for the purpose of fueling the plasma, modifying the density profile and increasing the global energy confinement time. The design goals of the injector are: (1) Operational flexibility, (2) High reliability, (3) Remote operation with minimal maintenance. These requirements have lead to a single stage, pipe gun design with twenty barrels. Pellets are formed by in- situ condensation of the fuel gas, thus avoiding moving parts at cryogenic temperatures. The injector is the first to dispense with the need for cryogenic fluids and instead uses a closed cycle refrigerator to cool the thermal system components. The twenty barrels of the injector produce pellets of four different size groups and allow for a high degree of flexibility in fueling experiments. Operation of the injector is under PLC control allowing for remote operation, interlocked safety features and automated pellet manufacturing. The injector has been extrusively tested and shown to produce pellets reliably with velocities up to 1400 m/sec. During the period from September to November of 1993, the injector was successfully used to fire pellets into over fifty plasma discharges. Experimental results include data on the pellet penetration into the plasma using an advanced pellet tracking diagnostic with improved time and spatial response. Data from the tracker indicates pellet penetrations were between 30 and 86 percent of the plasma minor radius.

  12. Numerical study on structural integrity of inner barrel caused by thermal stratification in upper plenum of Monju

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japanese prototype fast reactor, Monju, an inner cylinder with several flow holes is placed at the upper plenum adjacent to the core outlet. Liquid sodium heated at the core goes into the upper plenum and flows out to the hot leg piping by overflowing at the top of the inner cylinder and passing through the flow holes. When the reactor scram occurs, a cold coolant flows into the bottom of the upper plenum and the thermal stratification takes place at the upper plenum. And thus, the inner barrel may be damaged by a thermal stress due to the temperature difference of the stratification. In this study, a structural integrity of the inner barrel is evaluated numerically based on the cumulative damage rule. First, the upper plenum of fast reactor is numerically investigated to obtain the time history of the temperature at the inner barrel based on a three dimensional thermal-hydraulic CFD tool (FLUENT code) based on the IAEA benchmark analysis (Reactor scram from 40% power operation).Then, a thermal stresses at each location of the inner barrel is calculated using the time history. With regard to the thermal stress calculation, a simplified model is assumed in which temperature decay due to heat convection through the barrel and heat conduction inside the barrel and heat contraction due to temperature difference caused by the stratification are considered. In addition, a model is combined with the effects of transient heat conduction. Then a cumulative damage factor is obtained at each computational cell of the barrel and is summed up through the stratification phenomenon. It is concluded that no significant cumulative damage is found during the IAEA benchmark condition. It is also notified that a practical damage assessment can be examined numerically using the present method. (author)

  13. The Crystal Barrel: Meson Spectroscopy at LEAR with a 4$\\pi$ Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS197 \\\\ \\\\The Crystal Barrel is a 4$\\pi$ spectrometer designed to provide complete and precise information on practically every final state produced in $\\bar{p} p $ and $\\bar{p}d $ annihilations at low energy and to collect high statistics data samples. Selective triggers can be applied when necessary. \\\\ \\\\The physics goal is to identify all light mesons in the mass range from 0.14 to 2.3~GeV/c$^{2}$, to determine their quantum numbers and decay properties and to study the annihilation dynamics. The main interest is to find the glueball and hybrid degrees of freedom predicted in the framework of Quantum Chromodynamics. \\\\ \\\\\

  14. Study of RPC Barrel maximum efficiency in 2012 and 2015 calibration collision runs

    CERN Document Server

    Cassar, Samwel

    2015-01-01

    The maximum efficiency of each of the 1020 Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) rolls in the barrel region of the CMS muon detector is calculated from the best sigmoid fit of efficiency against high voltage (HV). Data from the HV scans, collected during calibration runs in 2012 and 2015, were compared and the rolls exhibiting a change in maximum efficiency were identified. The chi-square value of the sigmoid fit for each roll was considered in determining the significance of the maximum efficiency for the respective roll.

  15. Twenty barrel in situ pipe gun type solid hydrogen pellet injector for the Large Helical Device

    OpenAIRE

    SAKAMOTO, Ryuichi; MOTOJIMA, Gen; Hayashi, Hiromi; Inoue, Tomoyuki; Ito, Yasuhiko; Ogawa, Hideki; Takami, Shigeyuki; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Yamada, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    A 20 barrel solid hydrogen pellet injector, which is able to inject 20 cylindrical pellets with a diameter and length of between 3.0 and 3.8 mm at the velocity of 1200 m/s, has been developed for the purpose of direct core fueling in LHD (Large Helical Device). The in situ pipe gun concept with the use of compact cryo-coolers enables stable operation as a fundamental facility in plasma experiments. The combination of the two types of pellet injection timing control modes, i.e., pre-programing...

  16. Projects to get you off the grid rain barrels, chicken coops, and solar panels

    CERN Document Server

    Instructablescom

    2014-01-01

    Instructables is back with this compact book focused on a series of projects designed to get you thinking creatively about thinking green. Twenty Instructables illustrate just how simple it can be to make your own backyard chicken coop, or turn a wine barrel into a rainwater collector.Illustrated with dozens of full-color photographs per project accompanying easy-to-follow instructions, this Instructables collection utilizes the best that the online community has to offer, turning a far-reaching group of people into a mammoth database churning out ideas to make life better, easier, and in this

  17. The thermal and magnetic stress analyses of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid- B0 coil

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Z; Daël, A; Mayri, C; Pes, C; Reytier, M

    2002-01-01

    The B0 coil is a test-model of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid (BT) coils. It has been installed in the test station at CERN. One important item of the B0 test is the strain/stress measurements. In order to determine the expected stress values at the strain gage locations on the coil casing and the tie rods, detailed thermal and magnetic stress analyses of the B0 coil have been carried out. The analysis results are prepared for a later one-to-one comparison with the measurement results. (6 refs).

  18. Barrel time-of-flight detector for the PANDA experiment at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, L.; Brunner, S. E.; Marton, J.; Orth, H.; Suzuki, K.

    2016-07-01

    The barrel time-of-flight detector for the PANDA experiment at FAIR is foreseen as a Scintillator Tile (SciTil) Hodoscope based on several thousand small plastic scintillator tiles read-out with directly attached Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). The main tasks of the system are an accurate determination of the time origin of particle tracks to avoid event mixing at high collision rates, relative time-of-flight measurements as well as particle identification in the low momentum regime. The main requirements are the use of a minimum material amount and a time resolution of σ Counter from Philips a time resolution of about 30 ps has been reached.

  19. Results and Consequences of Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge of the CMS Barrel Muon Alignment System

    CERN Document Server

    Bencze, Gy L; Imrek, J; Molnàr, J; Novàk, D; Raics, P; Sass, V; Szabò, Zs; Svékely, G; Szillàsi, Z; PH-EP

    2007-01-01

    In the last year - as part of the first test of the CMS experiment at CERN [1] called Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC) - about 25% of the barrel muon position monitoring system was built and operated. The configuration enabled us to test all the elements of the system and its function in real conditions. The correct operation of the system has been demonstrated. About 500 full measurement cycles have been recorded. In the paper the setup –including the read-out and control - is described and the first preliminary results are presented.

  20. Precise Mapping of the Magnetic Field in the CMS Barrel Yoke using Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; 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Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; 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Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The CMS detector is designed around a large 4 T superconducting solenoid, enclosed in a 12000-tonne steel return yoke. A detailed map of the magnetic field is required for the accurate simulation and reconstruction of physics events in the CMS detector, not only in the inner tracking region inside the solenoid but also in the large and complex structure of the steel yoke, which is instrumented with muon chambers. Using a large sample of cosmic muon events collected by CMS in 2008, the field in the steel of the barrel yoke has been determined with a precision of 3 to 8% depending on the location.

  1. "Person in the barrel" syndrome: Unusual heralding presentation of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Verma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS are rare and relatively unusual in day to day clinical practice. Occasionally, PNS may be the heralding manifestation of the malignancy. Paraneoplastic syndromes are most commonly associated with small cell lung carcinoma and are rarely seen with non small cell lung carcinoma. In this case, we report a non-smoker, middle aged lady, who presented with "person in the barrel" syndrome due to myelo radiculoplexopathy as the first clinical manifestation of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung.

  2. Precise mapping of the magnetic field in the CMS barrel yoke using cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, S. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Aremenia); et al.,

    2010-03-01

    The CMS detector is designed around a large 4 T superconducting solenoid, enclosed in a 12000-tonne steel return yoke. A detailed map of the magnetic field is required for the accurate simulation and reconstruction of physics events in the CMS detector, not only in the inner tracking region inside the solenoid but also in the large and complex structure of the steel yoke, which is instrumented with muon chambers. Using a large sample of cosmic muon events collected by CMS in 2008, the field in the steel of the barrel yoke has been determined with a precision of 3 to 8% depending on the location.

  3. Correlations decrease with propagation of spiking activity in the mouse barrel cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayathri Nattar Ranganathan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Propagation of suprathreshold spiking activity through neuronal populations is important for the function of the central nervous system. Neural correlations have an impact on cortical function particularly on the signaling of information and propagation of spiking activity. Therefore we measured the change in correlations as suprathreshold spiking activity propagated between recurrent neuronal networks of the mammalian cerebral cortex. Using optical methods we recorded spiking activity from large samples of neurons from two neural populations simultaneously. The results indicate that correlations decreased as spiking activity propagated from layer 4 to layer 2/3 in the rodent barrel cortex.

  4. Argon Kα measurement on DIII endash D by Ross filters technique (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techniques to reduce the heat flux to the divertor plates in tokamak power plants and the consequent erosion of, and subsequent damage to the divertor target plates include the injection of impurities such as argon, that can dissipate the energy (through radiative or collisional processes) before it reaches the target plates. An important issue with this type of scheme is poisoning of the plasma core by the impurities introduced in the divertor region. Subsequently, there is a desire to measure the profiles of the injected impurities in the core. X-ray Ross filters with an effective narrow band pass centered on the argon Kα line at 3.2 keV, have been installed on two of the existing x-ray arrays on DIII endash D in order to help determine the argon concentration profiles. Emissivity profiles of the Kα lines and the emissivity profiles for the argon enhanced continuum can be inferred from the inverted filtered x-ray brightness signals if Te, ne, and Ar18+ profiles are known. The MIST code is used to couple the filtered x-ray signals to the time dependent measurements of Te and ne. Further, the Ar16+ profiles measured by charge transfer spectroscopy, are used as a constraint on the MIST code runs to calculate Ar18+ profiles and unfold the argon emissivity profiles. A discussion of the Ross filters, the DIII endash D argon data, and the data analysis scheme for inferring argon emissivity profiles will be discussed. Estimates of the total argon concentration in the core determined from this technique in DIII endash D argon puff experiments will be presented. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  5. Wetting and evaporation of argon nanodroplets on smooth and rough substrates: Molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qun; Wang, Baohe; Chen, Yonggang; Zhao, Zongchang

    2016-10-01

    Wetting and evaporation behaviors of argon nanodroplets on smooth and rough substrates are studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Effects of interaction energy between solid and argon atoms on wetting and evaporation and differences between nanodroplets on smooth and rough substrates have been investigated. The results show that for both smooth and rough substrates, as the interaction energy between solid and argon atoms increases, the contact angle and total evaporation increase. For rough substrates, the variations of contact angle and contact radius during evaporation progress are much more complex and the total evaporation is much larger than that of smooth substrates.

  6. A Study of Dielectric Breakdown Along Insulators Surrounding Conductors in Liquid Argon

    CERN Document Server

    Lockwitz, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    High voltage breakdown in liquid argon is an important consideration in the design of liquid argon time projection chambers, which are often used as neutrino and dark matter detectors. We have made systematic measurements of breakdown voltages in liquid argon along insulators surrounding negative rod electrodes. The purpose of these tests is to understand the effects of materials, of breakdown path length, and of surface topology. We have found no material-specific effects other than those due to their permittivity. We have found no dependence on breakdown voltage on the length of the exposed insulator. A model for the breakdown mechanism is presented that can help inform future designs.

  7. Design Principles and Operational Results of the Cryogenic System for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Fabre, C; Chalifour, M; Gonidec, G; Passardi, Giorgio; Petit, P; Pezzetti, M; Wicek, F

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter housed in three independent cryostats containing a total argon volume of about 78 m3 has been installed in the underground cavern. The three detectors have been cooled down following stringent temperature gradient limits and have been filled with liquid argon. The cryostats are now in a stable condition for periods going up to almost two years. The temperature uniformity within each of the three detector volumes is found to be within 70 mK rms, while the temperature stability stays below 5 mK rms.

  8. A new ozone standard - The vapor pressure of ozone at liquid argon temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauersberger, K.; Hanson, D.; Morton, J.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure of ozone has been measured at liquid argon temperatures. At the normal boiling point of argon (-185.9 C) an ozone pressure of 0.0405 torr was obtained with an accuracy of + or - 1.5 percent. Increases and decreases in liquid argon temperatures raised and lowered the ozone vapor pressure, respectively. During the vapor pressure measurements the purity of ozone was monitored with a mass spectrometer. The proposed ozone standard will considerably improve the calibration of experiments for atmospheric research, the determination of absorption cross sections and other laboratory ozone studies.

  9. Surface compositional changes in GaAs subjected to argon plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surdu-Bob, C.C.; Sullivan, J.L.; Saied, S.O.; Layberry, R.; Aflori, M

    2002-12-30

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been employed to study surface compositional changes in GaAs (1 0 0) subjected to argon plasma treatment. The experimental results have been explained in terms of predicted argon ion energies, measured ion densities and etch rates. A model is proposed for the processes taking place at the surface of GaAs in terms of segregation, sputtering and surface relaxation. Stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM) code has also been employedan aid to identification of the mechanisms responsible for the compositional changes. Argon plasma treatment induced surface oxidation at very low energies and sputtering and surface damage with increasing energy.

  10. Changes in a surface of polycrystalline aluminum upon bombardment with argon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkhotov, O. G.; Ashkhotova, I. B.; Bliev, A. P.; Magkoev, T. T.; Krymshokalova, D. A.

    2014-10-01

    The interaction between argon ions and a natural oxide layer of polycrystalline aluminum is studied via Auger electron (AE) and electron energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy. It is found that bombardment with argon ions whose energy is lower than the Al2O3 sputtering threshold results in the accumulation of bombarding ions in interstitial surface voids, thus forming a supersaturated solid solution of target atoms and bombarding ions of argon and nitrogen entrapped by the ion beam from the residual gas of the working chamber of the spectrometer.

  11. The CMS Barrel Calorimeter Response to Particle Beams from 2 to 350 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

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Gamsizkan, Halil; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Geerebaert, Yannick; Genchev, Vladimir; Gentit, François-Xavier; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershtein, Yuri; Ghezzi, Alessio; Ghodgaonkar, Manohar; Gilly, Jean; Givernaud, Alain; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Gninenko, Sergei; Go, Apollo; Gobbo, Benigno; Godinovic, Nikola; Golubev, Nikolai; Golutvin, Igor; Goncharov, Petr; Gong, Datao; Govoni, Pietro; Grant, Nicholas; Gras, Philippe; Grassi, Tullio; Green, Dan; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gribushin, Andrey; Grinev, B; Guevara Riveros, Luz; Guillaud, Jean-Paul; Gurtu, Atul; Murat Guler, A; Gülmez, Erhan; Gümüs, K; Haelen, T; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Haguenauer, Maurice; Halyo, Valerie; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Hansen, Sten; Hashemi, Majid; Hauptman, John M; Hazen, Eric; Heath, Helen F; Heering, Arjan Hendrix; Heister, Arno; Heltsley, Brian; Hill, Jack; Hintz, Wieland; Hirosky, Robert; Hobson, Peter R; Honma, Alan; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Hunt, Adam; Husejko, Michal; Ille, Bernard; Ilyina, N; Imlay, Richard; Ingram, D; Ingram, Quentin; Isiksal, Engin; Jarry, Patrick; Jarvis, Chad; Jeong, Chiyoung; Jessop, Colin; Johnson, Kurtis F; Jones, John; Jovanovic, Dragoslav; Kaadze, Ketino; Kachanov, Vassili; Kaftanova, V; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kalagin, Vladimir; Kalinin, Alexey; Kalmani, Suresh Devendrappa; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kataria, Sushil Kumar; Kaur, Manjit; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Kayis-Topaksu, A; Kellogg, Richard G; Kennedy, Bruce W; Khmelnikov, Alexander; Kim, Heejong; Kisselevich, I; Kloukinas, Kostas; Kodolova, Olga; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Kolberg, Ted; Kolossov, V; Korablev, Andrey; Korneev, Yury; Kosarev, Ivan; Kramer, Laird; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Krinitsyn, Alexander; Krokhotin, Andrey; Krpic, Dragomir; Kryshkin, V; Kubota, Yuichi; Kubrik, A; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kumar, Arun; Kumar, P; Kunori, Shuichi; Kuo, Chen-Cheng; Kurt, Pelin; Kyberd, Paul; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Laasanen, Alvin T; Ladygin, Vladimir; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Laszlo, Andras; Lawlor, C; Lazic, Dragoslav; Lebeau, Michel; Lecomte, Pierre; Lecoq, Paul; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lee, Sang Joon; Leshev, Georgi; Lethuillier, Morgan; Levchuk, Leonid; Lin, Sheng-Wen; Lin, Willis; Linn, Stephan; Lintern, A L; Litvine, Vladimir; Litvintsev, Dmitri; Litov, Leander; Lobolo, L; Locci, Elizabeth; Lodge, Anthony B; Longo, Egidio; Loukas, Demetrios; Los, Serguei; Lubinsky, V; Luckey, Paul David; Lukanin, Vladimir; Lustermann, Werner; Lynch, Clare; Ma, Yousi; Machado, Emanuel; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Malberti, Martina; Malclès, Julie; Maletic, Dimitrije; Mandjavidze, Irakli; Mans, Jeremy; Manthos, Nikolaos; Maravin, Yurii; Marchica, Carmelo; Marinelli, Nancy; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Marlow, Daniel; Markowitz, Pete; Marone, Matteo; Martínez, German; Mathez, Hervé; Matveev, Viktor; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Maurelli, Georges; Mazumdar, Kajari; Meridiani, Paolo; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mescheryakov, G; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Mikhailin, V; Milenovic, Predrag; Miller, Michael; Milleret, Gérard; Miné, Philippe; Möller, A; Mohammadi-Najafabadi, M; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Moissenz, P; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Moortgat, Filip; Mossolov, Vladimir; Mur, Michel; Musella, Pasquale; Musienko, Yuri; Nagaraj, P; Nardulli, Alessandro; Nash, Jordan; Nédélec, Patrick; Negri, Pietro; Newman, Harvey B; Nikitenko, Alexander; Norbeck, Edwin; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Onengüt, G; Organtini, Giovanni; Orimoto, Toyoko; Ozkan, Cigdem; Ozkurt, Halil; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Ozok, Ferhat; Paganoni, Marco; Paganini, Pascal; Paktinat, S; Pal, Andras; Palma, Alessandro; Panev, Bozhidar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Papadakis, Antonakis; Papadakis, Ioannis; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paramatti, Riccardo; Parracho, P; Pastrone, Nadia; Patil, Mandakini Ravindra; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Pauss, Felicitas; Penzo, Aldo; Petrakou, Eleni; Petrushanko, Sergey; Petrosian, A; Phillips II, David; Pikalov, Vladimir; Piperov, Stefan; Piroué, Pierre; Podrasky, V; Polatoz, A; Pompos, Arnold; Popescu, Sorina; Posch, C; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Ptochos, Fotios; Puljak, Ivica; Pullia, Antonino; Punz, Thomas; Puzovic, Jovan; Qian, Weiming; Ragazzi, Stefano; Rahatlou, Shahram; Ralich, Robert; Rande, J; Razis, Panos A; Redaelli, Nicola; Reddy, L; Reidy, Jim; Renker, Dieter; Reucroft, Steve; Reymond, Jean-Marc; Ribeiro, Pedro Quinaz; Röser, Ulf; Rogalev, Evgueni; Rogan, Christopher; Roh, Youn; Rohlf, James; Romanteau, Thierry; Rondeaux, Françoise; Ronquest, Michael; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Rosowsky, André; Rovelli, Chiara; Ruchti, Randy; Rumerio, Paolo; Rusack, Roger; Rusakov, Sergey V; Ryan, Matthew John; Ryazanov, Anton; Safronov, Grigory; Sala, Leonardo; Salerno, Roberto; Sanders, David A; Santanastasio, Francesco; Sanzeni, Christopher; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Satyanarayana, B; Schinzel, Dietrich; Schmidt, Ianos; Seez, Christopher; Sekmen, Sezen; Semenov, Sergey; Senchishin, V; Sergeyev, S; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Sharp, Peter; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Siamitros, Christos; Sillou, Daniel; Singh, Jas Bir; Singovsky, Alexander; Sirois, Yves; Sirunyan, Albert M; Silva, J; Silva, Pedro; Skuja, Andris; Sharma, Seema; Sherwood, Brian; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Shukla, Prashant; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Smith, Brian; Smith, Vincent J; Sogut, Kenan; Sonmez, Nasuf; Sorokin, Pavel; Spezziga, Mario; Sproston, Martin; Stefanovich, R; Stockli, F; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Sudhakar, Katta; Sulak, Lawrence; Suter, Henry; Suzuki, Ichiro; Swain, John; Tabarellide Fatis, T; Talov, Vladimir; Takahashi, Maiko; Tcheremoukhine, Alexandre; Teller, Olivier; Teplov, Konstantin; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Thiebaux, Christophe; Thomas, Ray; Timciuc, Vladlen; Timlin, Claire; Titov, Maksym; Tobias, A; Tonwar, Suresh C; Topakli, Huseyin; Topkar, Anita; Triantis, Frixos A; Troshin, Sergey; Tully, Christopher; Turchanovich, L; Tyurin, Nikolay; Ueno, Koji; Ulyanov, A; Uzunian, Andrey; Vanini, A; Vankov, Ivan; Vardanyan, Irina; Varela, F; Varela, Joao; Vasil ev, A; Velasco, Mayda; Vergili, Mehmet; Verma, Piyush; Verrecchia, Patrice; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Veverka, Jan; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Vidal, Richard; Virdee, Tejinder; Vishnevskiy, Alexander; Vlassov, E; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Volobouev, Igor; Volkov, Alexey; Volodko, Anton; Von Gunten, Hans Peter; Wang, Lei; Wang, Minzu; Wardrope, David; Weber, Markus; Weng, Joanna; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Wetstein, Matthew; Winn, Dave; Wigmans, Richard; Williams, Jennifer C; Whitmore, Juliana; Won, Steven; Wu, Shouxiang; Yang, Yong; Yaselli, Ignacio; Yazgan, Efe; Yetkin, Taylan; Yohay, Rachel; Zabi, Alexandre; Zálán, Peter; Zamiatin, Nikolai; Zarubin, Anatoli; Zelepoukine, Serguei; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Zhang, Jia-Wen; Zhang, Lin; Zhu, Kejun; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2008-01-01

    The response of the CMS barrel calorimeter (electromagnetic plus hadronic) to hadrons, electrons and muons over a wide momentum range from 2 to 350 GeV/c has been measured. To our knowledge, this is the widest range of momenta in which any calorimeter system has been studied. These tests, carried out at the H2 beam-line at CERN, provide a wealth of information, especially at low energies. The analysis of the differences in calorimeter response to charged pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons and a detailed discussion of the underlying phenomena are presented. We also show techniques that apply corrections to the signals from the considerably different electromagnetic (EB) and hadronic (HB) barrel calorimeters in reconstructing the energies of hadrons. Above 5 GeV/c, these corrections improve the energy resolution of the combined system where the stochastic term equals 84.7$\\pm$1.6$\\%$ and the constant term is 7.4$\\pm$0.8$\\%$. The corrected mean response remains constant within 1.3$\\%$ rms.

  12. Translocation boost protein-folding efficiency of double-barreled chaperonins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluzza, Ivan; van der Vies, Saskia M; Frenkel, Daan

    2006-05-15

    Incorrect folding of proteins in living cells may lead to malfunctioning of the cell machinery. To prevent such cellular disasters from happening, all cells contain molecular chaperones that assist nonnative proteins in folding into the correct native structure. One of the most studied chaperone complexes is the GroEL-GroES complex. The GroEL part has a "double-barrel" structure, which consists of two cylindrical chambers joined at the bottom in a symmetrical fashion. The hydrophobic rim of one of the GroEL chambers captures nonnative proteins. The GroES part acts as a lid that temporarily closes the filled chamber during the folding process. Several capture-folding-release cycles are required before the nonnative protein reaches its native state. Here we report molecular simulations that suggest that translocation of the nonnative protein through the equatorial plane of the complex boosts the efficiency of the chaperonin action. If the target protein is correctly folded after translocation, it is released. However, if it is still nonnative, it is likely to remain trapped in the second chamber, which then closes to start a reverse translocation process. This shuttling back and forth continues until the protein is correctly folded. Our model provides a natural explanation for the prevalence of double-barreled chaperonins. Moreover, we argue that internal folding is both more efficient and safer than a scenario where partially refolded proteins escape from the complex before being recaptured.

  13. Shifts in coding properties and maintenance of information transmission during adaptation in barrel cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Maravall

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal responses to ongoing stimulation in many systems change over time, or "adapt." Despite the ubiquity of adaptation, its effects on the stimulus information carried by neurons are often unknown. Here we examine how adaptation affects sensory coding in barrel cortex. We used spike-triggered covariance analysis of single-neuron responses to continuous, rapidly varying vibrissa motion stimuli, recorded in anesthetized rats. Changes in stimulus statistics induced spike rate adaptation over hundreds of milliseconds. Vibrissa motion encoding changed with adaptation as follows. In every neuron that showed rate adaptation, the input-output tuning function scaled with the changes in stimulus distribution, allowing the neurons to maintain the quantity of information conveyed about stimulus features. A single neuron that did not show rate adaptation also lacked input-output rescaling and did not maintain information across changes in stimulus statistics. Therefore, in barrel cortex, rate adaptation occurs on a slow timescale relative to the features driving spikes and is associated with gain rescaling matched to the stimulus distribution. Our results suggest that adaptation enhances tactile representations in primary somatosensory cortex, where they could directly influence perceptual decisions.

  14. A New Four-Barrel Pellet Injection System for the TJ-II Stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL; Foust, Charles R [ORNL; McGill, James M [ORNL; Baylor, Larry R [ORNL; Caughman, John B [ORNL; Fehling, Dan T [ORNL; Harris, Jeffrey H [ORNL; Meitner, Steven J [ORNL; Rasmussen, David A [ORNL; McCarthy, K. J. [EURATOM-CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain; Chamorro, M. [Laboratory Nacional de Fusion, Madrid, Spain; Garcia, R. [Laboratory Nacional de Fusion, Madrid, Spain; Hildago, C. [Laboratory Nacional de Fusion, Madrid, Spain; Medrano, M. [Laboratory Nacional de Fusion, Madrid, Spain; Unamuno, R. [Laboratory Nacional de Fusion, Madrid, Spain

    2011-01-01

    A new pellet injection system for the TJ-II stellarator has been developed/constructed as part of a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Centro de Investigaciones Energ ticas, Medioambientales y Tecnol gicas (CIEMAT). ORNL is providing most of the injector hardware and instrumentation, the pellet diagnostics, and the pellet transport tubes; CIEMAT is responsible for the injector stand/interface to the stellarator, cryogenic refrigerator, vacuum pumps/ballast volumes, gas manifolds, remote operations, plasma diagnostics, and data acquisition. The pellet injector design is an upgraded version of that used for the ORNL injector installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST). It is a four-barrel system equipped with a cryogenic refrigerator for in situ hydrogen pellet formation and a combined mechanical punch/propellant valve system for pellet acceleration (speeds ~100 to 1000 m/s). On TJ-II, it will be used as an active diagnostic and for fueling. To accommodate the plasma experiments planned for TJ-II, pellet sizes significantly smaller than those typically used for the MST application are required. The system will initially be equipped with four different pellet sizes, with the gun barrel bores ranging between ~0.5 to 1.0 mm. The new system is almost complete and is described briefly here, highlighting the new features added since the original MST injector was constructed. Also, the future installation on TJ-II is reviewed.

  15. The Common Cryogenic Test Facility for the Atlas Barrel and End-Cap Toroid Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Junker, S; Passardi, Giorgio; Pengo, R; Pirotte, O

    2004-01-01

    The large ATLAS toroidal superconducting magnet made of the Barrel and two End-Caps needs extensive testing at the surface of the individual components prior to their final assembly into the underground cavern of LHC. A cryogenic test facility specifically designed for cooling sequentially the eight coils making the Barrel Toroid (BT) has been fully commissioned and is now ready for final acceptance of these magnets. This facility, originally designed for testing individually the 46 tons BT coils, will be upgraded to allow the acceptance tests of the two End-Caps, each of them having a 160 tons cold mass. The integrated system mainly comprises a 1.2 kW@4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid-nitrogen precooler, two cryostats housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps of respectively 80 g/s and 600 g/s nominal flow and specific instrumentation to measure the thermal performances of the magnets. This paper describes the overall facility with particular emphasis to the cryogenic features adopted to match the specific re...

  16. The common cryogenic test facility for the ATLAS barrel and end-cap toroid magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Junker, S; Passardi, Giorgio; Pengo, R; Pirotte, O

    2004-01-01

    The large ATLAS toroidal superconducting magnet made of the Barrel and two End-Caps needs extensive testing at the surface of the individual components prior to their final assembly into the underground cavern of LHC. A cryogenic test facility specifically designed for cooling sequentially the eight coils making the Barrel Toroid (BT) has been fully commissioned and is now ready for final acceptance of these magnets. This facility, originally designed for testing individually the 46 tons BT coils, will be upgraded to allow the acceptance tests of the two End-Caps, each of them having 160 tons cold mass. The integrated system mainly comprises a 1.2 kW@4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid-nitrogen precooler, two cryostats housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps of respectively 80 g/s and 600 g/s nominal flow and specific instrumentation to measure the thermal performances of the magnets. This paper describes the overall facility with particular emphasis to the cryogenic features adopted to match the specific requ...

  17. Design and Test of the Off-Detector Electronics for the CMS Barrel Muon Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Guiducci, Luigi; Montanari, A; Odorici, F; Pellegrini, G; Torromeo, G; Travaglini, R

    2007-01-01

    Drift Tubes chambers are used in the CMS barrel for tagging the passage of high Pt muons generated in a LHC event and for triggering the CMS data read out. The Sector Collector (SC) system synchronizes the track segments built by trigger modules on the chambers and deliver them to reconstruction processors (Track Finder, TF) that assemble full muon tracks. Then, the Muon Sorter (MS) has to select the best four candidates in the barrel and to filter fake muons generated by the TF system redundancy. The hardware implementations of the Sector Collector and Muon Sorter systems satisfy radiation, I/O and fast timing constraints using several FPGA technologies. The hardware was tested with custom facilities, integrated with other trigger subsystems, and operated in a beam test. A test beam on a 40 MHz bunched beam validated the local trigger electronics and off-detector prototype cards and the synchronization tools. The CMS Magnet Test and Cosmic challenge in 2006 proved stable and reliable operation of the Drift T...

  18. Yucca Mountain, a high-level nuclear waste repository over a billion barrel oil field?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New structural models and source rock data suggest that the proposed Yucca Mountain, Nevada, high-level nuclear waste repository lies in the Central Nevada thrust belt. The Central Nevada thrust belt could contain billion-barrel oil fields. The Central Nevada thrust belt coincides with an organic richness fairway and a maturation fairway of Mississippian source rocks that have already produced more than 25 million barrels of oil. Giant thrust-related structures along the thrust belt have yet to be tested. However, new work in the Tempahute Range, which lies between Yucca Mountain and the prolific Grant Canyon field, confirms the thrust belt concept and sheds light on source and reservoir rock quality and thrust belt geometry. Klippen of overmature Mississippian rocks are distinct on maturation maps such as the Diamond Range klippe in central Nevada. Thrust trends suggest that the Eleana Range near Yucca Mountain may be another klippe of overmature rocks over Mississippian source rocks in the oil window. There is a strong possibility that the subthrust source rocks may have generated large quantities of hydrocarbons that may be trapped in large thrust features beneath Yucca Mountain

  19. The Muon Spectrometer Barrel Level-1 Trigger of the ATLAS Experiment at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Aloisio, A; Conventi, F; De Asmundis, R; Izzo, V; Migliaccio, A; Ciapetti, G; Di Mattia, A; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Nisati, A; Pastore, F; Petrolo, E; Vari, R; Veneziano, Stefano; Salamon, A

    2006-01-01

    The proton-proton beam crossing at the LHC accelerator at CERN will have a rate of 40 MHz at the project luminosity. The ATLAS Trigger System has been designed in three levels in order to select only interesting physics events reducing from that rate of 40 MHz to the foreseen storage rate of about 200 Hz. The First Level reduces the output rate to about 100 kHz. The ATLAS Muon Spectrometer has been designed to perform stand-alone triggering and measurement of muon transverse momentum up to 1 TeV/c with good resolution (from 3% at 10 GeV/c up to 10% at 1 TeV/c). In the Barrel region of the Muon Spectrometer the Level-1 trigger is given by means of three layers of Resistive Plate Chamber detectors (RPC): a gaseous detector working in avalanche mode composed by two plates of high-resistivity bakelite and two orthogonal planes of read-out strips. The logic of the Level-1 barrel muon trigger is based on the search of patterns of RPC hits in the three layers consistent with a high transverse momentum muon track ori...

  20. Design of Variable Width Barrel Shifter for High Speed Processor Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Kumar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Microprocessor is the brain of the computer. It works as the Central Processing Unit of the computer. It contains Arithmetic Logical Unit (ALU that performs the arithmetic operations such as Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication and Division. It also performs the Logical operations such as AND, NAND, OR, NOR, EXOR, EXNOR and NOT. It also contains register file to store the operand in load/store instructions in RISC Processor Architecture. Control Unit genetares the control signals that synchronize the operation of the processor which tells the microarchitecture which operation is done at which time. Now during the multiplication partial product is shifted and added. So shifter is an important part of the processor architecture. Barrel Shifter is an important combinational logic block. It was incorporated in 386 processor and is also used in microcontroller design. Intel has since moved to software implemented shifters in the Pentium 4 Processor Architecture but AMD still uses it. Here the design of the variable width barrel shifter is presented in which we can shift 4bit, 8bit, 16bit, and 32bit and maximum 64bit partial product during multiplication. Functionality is check using Modelsim 6.4a.Now to generate the gate level netlist Xilinx ISE 9.2i is used.

  1. Mechanical assisted electroless barrel-plating Ni-P coatings on magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoxia PING; Juntao YUAN; Yedong HE; Xiaogang LI

    2009-01-01

    A mechanically assisted electroless barrel-plating Ni-P was carried out in a rolling drum containing Mg alloy specimens and ceramic balls, which was submerged in a bath containing electroless plating solution. It is demonstrated that the Ni-P coatings deposited by this novel technique have a crystallized Ni-P solid solution structure,showing fine-grains, higher hardness, and higher corrosion resistance compared with the conventional electroless plated amorphous Ni-P coatings. After heat treatment at 400 ~C for 1 h, the structure of such Ni-P coatings were transformed to a structure with Ni-Ni3P double phases, and cracks in these coatings could not-be observed,whereas cracks appeared seriously in the conventional electroless plated Ni-P coating after same heat treatment. Therefore, both hardness and corrosion resistance of these Ni-P coatings can be improved further by heat treatment. All of these beneficial effects can be attributed to the role of mechanical attrition during the mechanically assisted electroless barrel-plating process.

  2. A case of adenocarcinoma occurred at site of radiated double-barrel sigmoid colostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 60-year-old female developed an adenocarcinoma at the site of double-barrel sigmoid colostomy. She underwent a total hysterectomy and the subsequent radiation therapy due to carcinoma uteri when she was 34 years old. She had rectal stenosis one year later and underwent sigmoid colostomy. She had been healthy thereafter, however, when she was 58 years old, she noticed an elevated lesion at the site of colostomy. Biopsy revealed well-differentiated adenocarcinoma, so surgery was recommended but she refused it. Two years later, the entire stoma became a carcinoma, which directly invaded the abdominal wall on MRI images. A bow-shaped skin incision was made and en bloc resection of the tumor, colostomy and the surrounding tissues was performed. Finally, descending colostomy in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen was reconstructed. Primary adenocarcinoma occurring at a double-barrel colostomy is very rare, and such a case may never have been reported, although there were some reports of carcinoma occurring at an end colostomy. Since the site of the present carcinoma was radiated, the radiation may contribute to this carcinogenesis, suspecting its late effect. Our surgical procedure enabled simultaneously operation of combined resection and intraabdominal manipulation, and the reconstruction site of the stoma was easily selected. (author)

  3. Thalamic network oscillations synchronize ontogenetic columns in the newborn rat barrel cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; An, Shuming; Sun, Jyh-Jang; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kindler, Jennifer; Berger, Thomas; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2013-06-01

    Neocortical areas are organized in columns, which form the basic structural and functional modules of intracortical information processing. Using voltage-sensitive dye imaging and simultaneous multi-channel extracellular recordings in the barrel cortex of newborn rats in vivo, we found that spontaneously occurring and whisker stimulation-induced gamma bursts followed by longer lasting spindle bursts were topographically organized in functional cortical columns already at the day of birth. Gamma bursts synchronized a cortical network of 300-400 µm in diameter and were coherent with gamma activity recorded simultaneously in the thalamic ventral posterior medial (VPM) nucleus. Cortical gamma bursts could be elicited by focal electrical stimulation of the VPM. Whisker stimulation-induced spindle and gamma bursts and the majority of spontaneously occurring events were profoundly reduced by the local inactivation of the VPM, indicating that the thalamus is important to generate these activity patterns. Furthermore, inactivation of the barrel cortex with lidocaine reduced the gamma activity in the thalamus, suggesting that a cortico-thalamic feedback loop modulates this early thalamic network activity.

  4. Self-assembled heterogeneous argon/neon core-shell clusters studied by photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundwall, M; Pokapanich, W; Bergersen, H; Lindblad, A; Rander, T; Ohrwall, G; Tchaplyguine, M; Barth, S; Hergenhahn, U; Svensson, S; Björneholm, O

    2007-06-01

    Clusters formed by a coexpansion process of argon and neon have been studied using synchrotron radiation. Electrons from interatomic Coulombic decay as well as ultraviolet and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to determine the heterogeneous nature of the clusters and the cluster structure. Binary clusters of argon and neon produced by coexpansion are shown to exhibit a core-shell structure placing argon in the core and neon in the outer shells. Furthermore, the authors show that 2 ML of neon on the argon core is sufficient for neon valence band formation resembling the neon solid. For 1 ML of neon the authors observe a bandwidth narrowing to about half of the bulk value.

  5. Surface Chemistry of Polymers Physical Adsorption of Nitrogen, Argon, Sulfur Dioxide and Neopentane on Polyvinylidene Fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Houriet, Jean-Philippe; Ghiste, Patrick; Stoeckli, Fritz

    2007-01-01

    The adsorption of nitrogen, argon, sulfur dioxide and neopentane on polyvinylidene fluoride has been measured by static methods and by gas-solid chromatography. The polymer has a homogeneous surface of low energy, which is not significantly affected by heating.

  6. Surface modification of polypropylene using argon plasma: Statistical optimization of the process variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low pressure plasma treatment using radiofrequency (rf) discharge of argon gas was employed to improve the hydrophilicity of polypropylene. The effects of argon plasma on the wettability, surface chemistry and surface morphology of polypropylene were studied using static contact angle measurements, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Increase in surface energy of polypropylene was observed as a result of argon plasma treatment. SEM and AFM images revealed the increased surface roughness. A set of identified process variables (rf power, pressure, argon flow rate and time) were used in this study and were optimized using central composite design (CCD) of response surface methodology (RSM). A statistical model was developed to represent the surface energy in terms of the process variables mentioned above. Accuracy of the model was verified and found to be high.

  7. Pose Measurement Performance of the Argon Relative Navigation Sensor Suite in Simulated Flight Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galante, Joseph M.; Eepoel, John Van; Strube, Matt; Gill, Nat; Gonzalez, Marcelo; Hyslop, Andrew; Patrick, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Argon is a flight-ready sensor suite with two visual cameras, a flash LIDAR, an on- board flight computer, and associated electronics. Argon was designed to provide sensing capabilities for relative navigation during proximity, rendezvous, and docking operations between spacecraft. A rigorous ground test campaign assessed the performance capability of the Argon navigation suite to measure the relative pose of high-fidelity satellite mock-ups during a variety of simulated rendezvous and proximity maneuvers facilitated by robot manipulators in a variety of lighting conditions representative of the orbital environment. A brief description of the Argon suite and test setup are given as well as an analysis of the performance of the system in simulated proximity and rendezvous operations.

  8. Formation and characterization of magnesium bisozonide and carbonyl complexes in solid argon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanjun; Gong, Yu; Zhang, Qingqing; Zhou, Mingfei

    2010-10-14

    The reactions of magnesium atoms with dioxygen and dioxygen/carbon monoxide mixture have been investigated by matrix isolation infrared absorption spectroscopy. Magnesium atoms react with dioxygen in solid argon to form the inserted MgO(2) molecules under UV excitation, which were previously characterized. Annealing allows the dioxygen molecules to diffuse and to react with MgO(2) and form the magnesium bisozonide complex, Mg(O(3))(2), which is proposed to be coordinated by two argon atoms in solid argon matrix. The Mg(O(3))(2)(Ar)(2) complex is characterized to have two equivalent side-on bonded ozonide ligands with a D(2h) symmetry. The coordinated argon atoms can be replaced by carbon monoxide to give the magnesium bisozonide dicarbonyl complex, Mg(O(3))(2)(CO)(2), a neutral magnesium carbonyl complex with CO binding to the Mg(2+) center. PMID:20857987

  9. Dynamic range compression in a liquid argon calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleland, W.E. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Lissauer, D.; Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Takai, H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Wingerter-Seez, I. [LAPP, Annecy-le-Vieux (France)

    1996-12-31

    The anticipated range of particle energies at the LHC, coupled with the need for precision, low noise calorimetry makes severe demands on the dynamic range of the calorimeter readout. A common approach to this problem is to use shapers with two or more gain scales. In this paper, the authors describe their experience with a new approach in which a preamplifier with dynamic gain compression is used. An unavoidable consequence of dynamic gain adjustment is that the peaking time of the shaper output signal becomes amplitude dependent. The authors have carried out a test of such a readout system in the RD3 calorimeter, a liquid argon device with accordion geometry. The calibration system is used to determine both the gain of the individual channels as well as to map the shape of the waveform as a function of signal amplitude. A new procedure for waveform analysis, in which the fitted parameters describe the impulse response of the system, permits a straightforward translation of the calibration waveform to the waveform generated by a particle crossing the ionization gap. They find that the linearity and resolution of the calorimeter is equivalent to that obtained with linear preamplifiers, up to an energy of 200 GeV.

  10. Coherent set of electron cross sections for argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, L. L.; Ferreira, C. M.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a coherent set of electron impact cross sections for argon (elastic momentum-transfer, inelastic for the excitation of 37 levels Ar(4s,4p,3d,5p,4d,6s) and ionization), which was recently uploaded onto the LXcat IST-Lisbon database. The cross section set was validated by comparing calculated swarm parameters (electron mobility and characteristic energy) and rate coefficients (Townsend ionization coefficient and direct + cascade excitation coefficients to the 4s and 4p states) with available experimental data, for E / N = 10-4 - 100 Td and Tg = 300, 77 K. The validation procedure involves the solution to the homogeneous two-term electron Boltzmann equation, resorting to three different solvers: (i) IST-Lisbon's (ii) BOLSIG+ (v1.2) with LXcat; (iii) BOLSIG+ (v1.23). The results obtained with these solvers are compared to evidence the importance of certain numerical features related with both the energy-grid (number of points, grid-type and maximum energy value) and the interpolation scheme adopted for the cross sections. In particular, the latter can cause a 6% variation on the values of swarm parameters at intermediate E/Ns.

  11. An update of argon inelastic cross sections for plasma discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper proposes a coherent set of electron impact inelastic cross sections for argon, based on recent experimental measurements. The updated set is validated by comparing calculated swarm parameters and rate coefficients (obtained by solving the two-term approximation electron Boltzmann equation) with available experimental data. This validation procedure is usually adopted when the cross section set is to be later used in plasma discharge modelling. Simulation results for the electron drift velocity and characteristic energy are in very good agreement with experimental values of these quantities. Calculations, using cross section sets proposed by different authors, of the total (direct + cascade) excitation coefficients to the 4s and 4p states, and of the Townsend ionization coefficient, show that the present set ensures the best overall agreement with measured values. The agreement is particularly good for the excitation coefficient to metastable 4s'[1/2]0 and the Townsend ionization coefficient, which are probably the most relevant electron macroscopic coefficients in the modelling of discharge plasmas

  12. Argon defect complexes in low energy Ar irradiated molybdenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Veen, A.; Buters, W.T.M.; van der Kolk, G.J.; Caspers, L.M. (Interuniversitair Reactor Instituut, Delft (Netherlands)); Armstrong, T.R. (Victoria Univ., Wellington (New Zealand). Dept. of Physics)

    1982-03-15

    Thermal desorption spectrometry has been used to study the defects created in Mo irradiated along the <110> direction with Ar ions ranging in energy from 0.1 to 2 keV. In addition to monitoring the release of the implanted Ar, additional information has been obtained by decoration of the defects with low energy helium and subsequent monitoring of the helium release. The studies show evidence that the Ar can be trapped in both substitutional sites and in a configuration in which the Ar is associated with vacancies (ArVsub(n), n >= 2). Most of the Ar implanted at high energy is released at approx. equal to 1500 K by thermal vacancy assisted diffusion. Argon trapped closer to the surface is released at lower temperatures via at least three different surface related release mechanisms. Additional results are presented on the interaction of self interstitial atoms (introduced by 100 eV Xe bombardment) with the Ar defects. Substitutional Ar is found to convert to interstitial Ar which seems to be mobile at room temperature. The Ar-vacancy complexes are found to be reduced to substitutional Ar. The results of atomistic calculations of the release mechanisms will also be presented.

  13. Scintillation Light from Cosmic-Ray Muons in Liquid Argon

    CERN Document Server

    Whittington, Denver

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the results of the first experiment to directly measure the properties of the scintillation light generated by minimum ionizing cosmic-ray muons in liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches, as well as for particle identification. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo facility at Fermilab using prototype light guides and electronics developed for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment. Analysis of the time-resolved structure of the scintillation light from cosmic-ray muons gives $\\langle \\tau_{\\text{T}}\\rangle = 1.43 \\pm 0.04~\\text{(stat.)} \\pm 0.007~\\text{(sys.)}~\\mu$s for the triplet light decay time constant. The ratio of singlet to triplet light measured using surface-coated light guides is $R = 0.39 \\pm 0.01~\\text{(stat.)} \\pm 0.008~\\text{(sys.)}$. There is some evidence that this value is not consistent with $R$ for minimum ionizing electrons. However, the value for $...

  14. State-selective radiative recombination cross sections of argon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The n-, (n,l)- and fine-structure level state-selective radiative recombinations (RR) cross sections of argon ions Ar18+,Ar13+,Ar7+ and Ar+ are obtained with the semi-classical Kramer formula, the relativistic self-consistent field (RSCF) method and the relativistic configuration interaction (RCI) method. It is found that for the highly charged ions with few electrons, the cross sections calculated with these three methods are in good agreement with each other. But as the number of electrons increases, the Kramer formula deviates from the RSCF and RCI results. For instance, when the energy of the incident electron is larger than 100 eV, the n-state selective cross sections of Ar7+ calculated from the Kramer formula are underestimated for more than 50%. The RSCF results are in general agreement with the RCI results. However, for the low charged ions, a clear distinction appears due to the strong configuration interaction, especially near the Cooper minimum. The n-resolved (n≤10) and total Maxwellian averaged rate coefficients are calculated, and the analytic fitting parameters are also provided. -- Highlights: ► The RR cross sections of Ar18+, Ar13+, Ar7+ and Ar+ are obtained. ► The Kramer formula, the relativistic self-consistent field and RCI methods are used. ► Results from three methods are compared with each other.

  15. Electronics calibration board for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To calibrate the energy response of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter, an electronics calibration board has been designed; it delivers a signal whose shape is close to the calorimeter ionization current signal with amplitude up to 100 mA in 50 Ω with 16 bit dynamic range. The amplitude of this signal is designed to be uniform over all calorimeters channels, stable in time and with an integral linearity much better that the electronics readout. The various R and D phases and most of the difficulties met are discussed and illustrated by many measurements. The custom design circuits are described and the layout of the ATLAS calibration board presented. The procedure used to qualify the boards is explained and the performance obtained illustrated: a dynamic range up to 3 TeV in three energy scales with an integral linearity better than 0.1% in each of them, a response uniformity better than 0.2% and a stability better than 0.1%. The performance of the board is well within the ATLAS requirements. Finally, in situ measurements done on the ATLAS calorimeter are shown to validate these performances

  16. Methane from benzene in argon dielectric barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Efficient on-line conversion of benzene to methane at room temperature. ► Absence of other H-atom donor suggests new type of chemistry. ► For parent loss > 90%, methane yield was ∼40% of limit due to H-atom availability. ► Surface moisture contributed ·OH radical for trace phenolic products’ formation. ► This method may emerge as an exploitable tactic for pollutants’ usable alterations. -- Abstract: A first-time account of direct, on-line, instantaneous and efficient chemical conversion of gas phase benzene to methane in argon Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) is presented. In the absence of another overt hydrogen-donating source, potency of analogous parents toward methane generation is found to follow the order: benzene > toluene > p-xylene. Simultaneous production of trace amounts of phenolic surface deposits suggest (a) prompt decomposition of the parent molecules, including a large fraction yielding atomic transients (H-atom), (b) continuous and appropriate recombination of such parts, and (c) trace moisture in parent contributing ·OH radicals and additional H-atoms, which suitably react with the unreacted fraction of the parent, and also other intermediates. Results highlight Ar DBD to be a simple and exploitable technology for transforming undesirable hazardous aromatics to usable/useful low molecular weight open-chain products following the principles of green chemistry and engineering

  17. Optically Forbidden Excitations of 3s Electron of Argon by Fast Electron Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱林繁; 成华东; 刘小井; 田鹏; 苑震生; 李文斌; 徐克尊

    2003-01-01

    The electron energy loss spectrum of argon in the energy region of 24.5-30.5eV was measured at 2.5 keV impact energy. The line profile parameters of the optically forbidden excitations of 3s-1ns (n = 4-6) and 3s-1nd (n = 3-7) of argon, I.e.,Eγ,Г,q and p,were determined.

  18. Benchmarking TPB-coated Light Guides for Liquid Argon TPC Light Detection Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Baptista, B.; Bugel, L.; Chiu, C; Conrad, J. M.; Ignarra, C. M.; Jones, B. J. P.; Katori, T.; Mufson, S.

    2012-01-01

    Scintillation light from liquid argon is produced at 128 nm and thus must be shifted to visible wavelengths in light detection systems used for Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs). To date, designs have employed tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings on photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) or plates placed in front of the PMTs. Recently, a new approach using TPB-coated light guides was proposed. In this paper, we show that the response of lightguides coated with TPB in a UV Transmitting (UV...

  19. TPB-coated Light Guides for Liquid Argon TPC Light Detection Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ignarra, C M

    2013-01-01

    Light detection systems in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) require the detection of the 128 nm light produced during argon scintillation. Most detectors use Tetraphenyl Butadiene (TPB) to shift the wavelength of the light into a range visible to Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs). These proceedings summarize characterizations of light-guides coated with a matrix of TPB in UV transmitting acrylic which are more compact than existing LArTPC light collection systems.

  20. TPB-coated light guides for liquid argon TPC light detection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignarra, C. M.

    2013-10-01

    Light detection systems in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) require the detection of the 128 nm light produced during argon scintillation. Most detectors use Tetraphenyl Butadiene (TPB) to shift the wavelength of the light into a range visible to Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs). These proceedings summarize characterizations of light-guides coated with a matrix of TPB in UV transmitting acrylic which are more compact than existing LArTPC light collection systems.

  1. Effect of Ginkgo biloba on the lesions induced by retinal argon laser photocoagulation in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clairambault, P.; Pairault, C.; Droy-Lefaix, M.T.; Magnier, B.; Magnier, M.

    1986-01-09

    In rabbits, retinal argon laser photocoagulation disrupts the arrangement of cell layers and produces interstitial edema. Photochemical and thermal energy is released with production of free oxygenated radicals that are responsible for destruction of cell membranes. Retinal argon laser photocoagulation in rabbits was used as a pharmacologic model to evaluate the protective effect of EGB 761 against membrane lesions and edema. As a strong free radicals scavengers, EGB 761 confirms its protective action on cells membranes and its anti-edema effect.

  2. Configurational Entropy,Diffusivity and Potential Energy Landscape in Liquid Argon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Yong-Ping; MA Cong-Xiao; LI Jia-Yun; LI Cong; WANG Dan; LI Mei-Li; SUN Min-Hua

    2009-01-01

    The configurational entropy, diffusion coefficient, dynamics and thermodynamics fragility indices of liquid argon are calculated using molecular dynamics simulations at two densities. The relationship between dynamics and thermodynamics properties is studied. The diffusion coefficient depends linearly on configurational entropy, which is consistent with the hypothesis of Adam-Gibbs. The consistence of dynamics and thermodynamics fragility indices demonstrates that dynamical behaviour is governed by thermodynamics behaviour in glass transition of liquid argon.

  3. Effect of Ginkgo biloba on the lesions induced by retinal argon laser photocoagulation in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In rabbits, retinal argon laser photocoagulation disrupts the arrangement of cell layers and produces interstitial edema. Photochemical and thermal energy is released with production of free oxygenated radicals that are responsible for destruction of cell membranes. Retinal argon laser photocoagulation in rabbits was used as a pharmacologic model to evaluate the protective effect of EGB 761 against membrane lesions and edema. As a strong free radicals scavengers, EGB 761 confirms its protective action on cells membranes and its anti-edema effect

  4. A correction to Birks' Law in liquid argon ionization chamber simulations for highly ionizing particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a study of the performance of Birks' Law in liquid argon ionization chamber simulations as applied to highly ionizing particles, such as particles with multiple electric charges or with magnetic charge. We used Birks' Law to model recombination effects in a GEANT4 simulation of heavy ions in a liquid argon calorimeter. We then compared the simulation to published heavy-ion data to extract a highly ionizing particle correction to Birks' Law.

  5. LArGe: Background suppression using liquid argon (LAr) scintillation for 0$\

    CERN Document Server

    Marco, M D; Schönert, S

    2007-01-01

    Measurements with a bare p-type high purity germanium diode (HPGe) submerged in a 19 kg liquid argon (LAr) scintillation detector at MPIK Heidelberg are reported. The liquid argon--germanium system (LArGe) is operated as a 4$\\pi$ anti-Compton spectrometer to suppress backgrounds in the HPGe. This R&D is carried out in the framework of the GERDA experiment which searches for 0$\

  6. Discovery of photospheric argon in very hot central stars of planetary nebulae and white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Werner, K; Kruk, J W

    2007-01-01

    We report the first discovery of argon in hot evolved stars and white dwarfs. We have identified the ArVII 1063.55A line in some of the hottest known (Teff=95000-110000 K) central stars of planetary nebulae and (pre-) white dwarfs of various spectral type. We determine the argon abundance and compare it to theoretical predictions from stellar evolution theory as well as from diffusion calculations. We analyze high-resolution spectra taken with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. We use non-LTE line-blanketed model atmospheres and perform line-formation calculations to compute synthetic argon line profiles. We find a solar argon abundance in the H-rich central star NGC1360 and in the H-deficient PG1159 star PG1424+535. This confirms stellar evolution modeling that predicts that the argon abundance remains almost unaffected by nucleosynthesis. For the DAO-type central star NGC7293 and the hot DA white dwarfs PG0948+534 and REJ1738+669 we find argon abundances that are up to three orders of magnitude sma...

  7. Numerical study of breakdown pattern induced by an intense microwave under nitrogen and argon gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2016-07-01

    Filamentary plasma induced by microwave beam irradiation was reproduced in nitrogen and argon by combining fluid or particle plasma models with electromagnetic wave propagation. Transport coefficients used in the fluid model are estimated from particle simulation to maintain consistency of the breakdown structure between the fluid and particle models. A discrete structure was obtained using the one-dimensional (1D) fluid model, because a standing wave is generated in front of the plasma when the incident microwave beam is reflected by the overcritical plasma, which agrees with the breakdown structure obtained using the 1D particle model. A 2D plasma filament was also reproduced using the fluid model in nitrogen and argon. Reflection of the incident microwave in argon becomes stronger than that in nitrogen because of the denser argon plasma. Change in filament shape is induced in argon because the electric field is deformed at the plasma tip owing to stronger wave reflection from the neighboring filament. The propagation speed of the plasma front becomes larger in argon breakdown because of the larger ionization frequency and the larger diffusion coefficient.

  8. Condensed argon isentropic compression with ultrahigh magnetic field pressure: Experimental design. Post-shot report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bykov, A.I.; Boriskov, G.V.; Dolotenko, M.I. [All-Russian Research Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    This report continues the series of work devoted to experimental study of a high-dense condensed argon state. Remember that according to work of Kwon et. al., hexagonal close-packed structure is profitable in terms of energy rather than face-centered argon structure (stable with zero pressure). What is most interesting and intriguing here is the issue of possible argon metallization, when it is compressed up to the densities more than 9.17 g/cm{sup 3}. In the experiment of 1995 (the arrangement and data are described in a cited reference) the authors recorded appearance of conductivity in argon, which is non-conductive in the initial state, when it is compressed more than a factor of four. The peak value of argon specific conductivity recorded in this experiment did not exceed 10 (Ohm x cm){sup {minus}1}. This value of conductivity is characteristic of semiconductors, but not metals, which have 10{sup 4} (Ohm x cm){sup {minus}1}. At this stage of the work the main attention is paid to recording of argon conductive state and studying the possibilities of multiframed radiography of the sample in the compressed state.

  9. Low radioactivity argon dark matter search results from the DarkSide-50 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Agnes, P; Albuquerque, I F M; Alexander, T; Alton, A K; Arisaka, K; Back, H O; Baldin, B; Biery, K; Bonfini, G; Bossa, M; Bottino, B; Brigatti, A; Brodsky, J; Budano, F; Bussino, S; Cadeddu, M; Cadonati, L; Cadoni, M; Calaprice, F; Canci, N; Candela, A; Cao, H; Cariello, M; Carlini, M; Catalanotti, S; Cavalcante, P; Chepurnov, A; Cocco, A G; Covone, G; Crippa, L; D'Angelo, D; D'Incecco, M; Davini, S; De Cecco, S; De Deo, M; De Vincenzi, M; Derbin, A; Devoto, 25 A; Di Eusanio, F; Di Pietro, G; Edkins, E; Empl, A; Fan, A; Fiorillo, G; Fomenko, K; Forster, G; Franco, D; Gabriele, F; Galbiati, C; Giganti, C; Goretti, A M; Granato, F; Grandi, L; Gromov, M; Guan, M; Guardincerri, Y; Hackett, B R; Herner, K; Hungerford, E V; Ianni, Al; Ianni, An; James, I; Jollet, C; Keeter, K; Kendziora, C L; Kobychev, V; Koh, G; Korablev, D; Korga, G; Kubankin, A; Li, X; Lissia, M; Lombardi, P; Luitz, S; Ma, Y; Machulin, I N; Mandarano, A; Mari, S M; Maricic, J; Marini, L; Martoff, C J; Meregaglia, A; Meyers, P D; Miletic, T; Milincic, R; Montanari, D; Monte, A; Montuschi, M; Monzani, M; Mosteiro, P; Mount, B J; Muratova, V N; Musico, P; Napolitano, J; Nelson, A; Odrowski, S; Orsini, M; Ortica, F; Pagani, L; Pallavicini, M; Pantic, E; Parmeggiano, S; Pelczar, K; Pelliccia, N; Perasso, S; Pocar, A; Pordes, S; Pugachev, D A; Qian, H; Randle, K; Ranucci, G; Razeto, A; Reinhold, B; Renshaw, A L; Romani, A; Rossi, B; Rossi, N; Rountree, D; Sablone, D; Saggese, P; Saldanha, R; Sands, W; Sangiorgio, S; Savarese, C; Segreto, E; Semenov, D A; Shields, E; Singh, P N; Skorokhvatov, M D; Smallcomb, M; Smirnov, O; Sotnikov, A; Stanford, C; Suvorov, Y; Tartaglia, R; Tatarowicz, J; Testera, G; Tonazzo, A; Trinchese, P; Unzhakov, E V; Vishneva, A; Vogelaar, B; Wada, M; Walker, S; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Watson, A W; Westerdale, S; Wilhelmi, J; Wojcik, M M; Xiang, X; Xu, J; Yang, C; Yoo, J; Zavatarelli, S; Zec, A; Zhong, W; Zhu, C; Zuzel, G

    2015-01-01

    The DarkSide-50 dark matter search reports the first results obtained using a target of low-radioactivity argon extracted from underground sources. The experiment is located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and uses a two-phase time projection chamber as a detector. A total of 155 kg of low radioactivity argon has been obtained, and we have determined that underground argon is depleted in Ar-39 by a factor (1.4 +- 0.2) x 10^3 relative to atmospheric argon. The underground argon was also found to contain (2.05 +- 0.13) mBq/kg of Kr-85. We found no evidence for dark matter in the form of WIMPs in 70.9 live-days of data with a fiducial mass of (36.9 +- 0.6) kg. When combined with our preceding search with an atmospheric argon target, we set a 90 % C.L. upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section of 2.0 x 10^-44 cm^2 (8.6 x 10^-44 cm^2, 8.0 x 10^-43 cm^2 ) for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c^2 (1 TeV/c^2 , 10 TeV/c^2 ).

  10. Results from the first use of low radioactivity argon in a dark matter search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnes, P. [Universite Paris Diderot (France). et al.

    2016-04-08

    Liquid argon is a bright scintillator with potent particle identification properties, making it an attractive target for direct-detection dark matter searches. The DarkSide-50 dark matter search here reports the first WIMP search results obtained using a target of low-radioactivity argon. DarkSide-50 is a dark matter detector, using two-phase liquid argon time projection chamber, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The underground argon is shown to contain Ar-39 at a level reduced by a factor (1.4 +- 0.2) x 103 relative to atmospheric argon. We report a background-free null result from (2616 +- 43) kg d of data, accumulated over 70.9 live-days. When combined with our previous search using an atmospheric argon, the 90 % C.L. upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section based on zero events found in the WIMP search regions, is 2.0 x 10-44 cm2 (8.6 x 10-44 cm2, 8.0 x 10-43 cm2) for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c2 (1 TeV/c2 , 10 TeV/c2).

  11. The Effects of CO2 Injection and Barrel Temperatures on the Physiochemical and Antioxidant Properties of Extruded Cereals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thin, Thazin; Myat, Lin; Ryu, Gi-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The effects of CO2 injection and barrel temperatures on the physiochemical and antioxidant properties of extruded cereals (sorghum, barley, oats, and millet) were studied. Extrusion was carried out using a twin-screw extruder at different barrel temperatures (80, 110, and 140°C), CO2 injection (0 and 500 mL/min), screw speed of 200 rpm, and moisture content of 25%. Extrusion significantly increased the total flavonoid content (TFC) of extruded oats, and β-glucan and protein digestibility (PD) of extruded barley and oats. In contrast, there were significant reductions in 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, PD of extruded sorghum and millet, as well as resistant starch (RS) of extruded sorghum and barley, and total phenolic content (TPC) of all extrudates, except extruded millet. At a barrel temperature of 140°C, TPC in extruded barley was significantly increased, and there was also an increase in DPPH and PD in extruded millet with or without CO2 injection. In contrast, at a barrel temperature of 140°C, the TPC of extruded sorghum decreased, TFC of extruded oats decreased, and at a barrel temperature of 110°C, PD of extruded sorghum without CO2 decreased. Some physical properties [expansion ratio (ER), specific length, piece density, color, and water absorption index] of the extrudates were significantly affected by the increase in barrel temperature. The CO2 injection significantly affected some physical properties (ER, specific length, piece density, water solubility index, and water absorption index), TPC, DPPH, β-glucan, and PD. In conclusion, extruded barley and millet had higher potential for making value added cereal-based foods than the other cereals. PMID:27752504

  12. Comparative observation of protective effects of earplug and barrel on auditory organs of guinea pigs exposed to experimental blast underpressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chao-jun; ZHU Pei-fang; LIU Zhao-hua; WANG Zheng-guo; YANG Cheng; CHEN Hai-bin; NING Xin; ZHOU Ji-hong; Chen Jian

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the protective effects of earplug and barrel on auditory organs of guinea pigs exposed to experimental blast underpressure (BUP).Methods: The hearing thresholds of the guinea pigs were assessed with auditory brainstem responses (ABR).The traumatic levels of tympanic membrane and ossicular chain were observed under stereo-microscope. The rate of outer hair cells (OHCs) loss was analyzed using a light microscope. The changes of guinea pigs protected with barrel and earplug were compared with those of the control group without any protection.Results: An important ABR threshold shift of the guinea pigs without any protection was detected from 8h to 14d after being exposed to BUP with a peak ranging from -64.5kPa to -69.3kPa (P<0.01). The rate of perforation of tympanic membrane reached 87.5 % and that of total OHCs loss was 19.46% + 5.38% at 14d after exposure. The guinea pigs protected with barrel and earplug had lower ABR threshold and total OHCs loss rate compared with the animals without any protection (P < 0.01 ). All of the tympanic membrane and ossicular chain of the protected animals maintained their integrities.Meanwhile, the guinea pigs protected with the barrel had lower ABR threshold and total OHCs loss rate than those with earplug (P<0.01).Conclusions: The earplug and barrel have protective effects against BUP-induced trauma on auditory organs of the guinea pigs and the protective effects of barrel are better than those of earplug.

  13. Development and test of a prototype for the PANDA barrel DIRC detector at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalicy, Grzegorz

    2014-07-01

    The PANDA experiment at FAIR will perform world class physics studies using high-intensity cooled antiproton beams with momenta between 1.5 and 15 GeV/c. A rich physics program requires very good particle identification (PID). Charged hadron PID for the barrel section of the target spectrometer has to cover the angular range of 22-140 and separate pions from kaons for momenta up to 3.5 GeV/c with a separation power of at least 3 standard deviations. The system that will provide it has to be thin and operate in a strong magnetic field. A ring imaging Cherenkov detector using the DIRC principle meets those requirements. The design of the PANDA Barrel DIRC is based on the successful BABAR DIRC counter with several important changes to improve the performance and optimize the costs. The design options are being studied in detailed Monte Carlo simulation, and implemented in increasingly complex system prototypes and tested in particle beams. Before building the full system prototypes the radiator bars and lenses are measured on the test benches. The performance of the DIRC prototype was quantified in terms of the single photon Cherenkov angle resolution and the photon yield. Results for two full system prototypes will be presented. The prototype in 2011 aimed at investigating the full size expansion volume. It was found that the resolution for this configuration is at the level of in good agreement with ray tracing simulation results. A more complex prototype, tested in 2012, provided the first experience with a compact fused silica prism expansion volume, a wide radiator plate, and several advanced lens options for the focusing system. The performance of the baseline configuration of the prototype with a standard lens and an air gap met the requirements for the PANDA PID for most of the polar angle range but failed at polar angles around 90 due to photon loss at the air gap. Measurements with a prototype high-refractive index compound lens without an air gap at a polar

  14. Inhaled 45–50% argon augments hypothermic brain protection in a piglet model of perinatal asphyxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broad, Kevin D.; Fierens, Igor; Fleiss, Bobbi; Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Ezzati, Mojgan; Hassell, Jane; Alonso-Alconada, Daniel; Bainbridge, Alan; Kawano, Go; Ma, Daqing; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Gressens, Pierre; Golay, Xavier; Sanders, Robert D.; Robertson, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    Cooling to 33.5 °C in babies with neonatal encephalopathy significantly reduces death and disability, however additional therapies are needed to maximize brain protection. Following hypoxia–ischemia we assessed whether inhaled 45–50% Argon from 2–26 h augmented hypothermia neuroprotection in a neonatal piglet model, using MRS and aEEG, which predict outcome in babies with neonatal encephalopathy, and immunohistochemistry. Following cerebral hypoxia–ischemia, 20 Newborn male Large White piglets < 40 h were randomized to: (i) Cooling (33 °C) from 2–26 h (n = 10); or (ii) Cooling and inhaled 45–50% Argon (Cooling + Argon) from 2–26 h (n = 8). Whole-brain phosphorus-31 and regional proton MRS were acquired at baseline, 24 and 48 h after hypoxia–ischemia. EEG was monitored. At 48 h after hypoxia–ischemia, cell death (TUNEL) was evaluated over 7 brain regions. There were no differences in body weight, duration of hypoxia–ischemia or insult severity; throughout the study there were no differences in heart rate, arterial blood pressure, blood biochemistry and inotrope support. Two piglets in the Cooling + Argon group were excluded. Comparing Cooling + Argon with Cooling there was preservation of whole-brain MRS ATP and PCr/Pi at 48 h after hypoxia–ischemia (p < 0.001 for both) and lower 1H MRS lactate/N acetyl aspartate in white (p = 0.03 and 0.04) but not gray matter at 24 and 48 h. EEG background recovery was faster (p < 0.01) with Cooling + Argon. An overall difference between average cell-death of Cooling versus Cooling + Argon was observed (p < 0.01); estimated cells per mm2 were 23.9 points lower (95% C.I. 7.3–40.5) for the Cooling + Argon versus Cooling. Inhaled 45–50% Argon from 2–26 h augmented hypothermic protection at 48 h after hypoxia–ischemia shown by improved brain energy metabolism on MRS, faster EEG recovery and reduced cell death on TUNEL. Argon may provide a cheap and practical therapy

  15. Modelling steel’s homogenization during argon purging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Pieprzyca

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: One of the primary tasks that put the steel producers to the test is to reduce production costs while maintaining high quality. This objective is achieved among others through the optimization of conducted technological processes. Commonly used technology of steel homogenization with inert gases is an important stage in the production of steel in which that objective can be accomplished.Design/methodology/approach: Tests of hydrodynamic processes occurring during the steel blowing with inert gases process directly in industrial conditions is very difficult or impossible. Therefore, as the primary research method physical modelling was used. In order to carry out the tests described in the article a physical model of the station for the argon purging was used that is working at the VSB-TU, Department of Metallurgy and Foundry in Ostrava.Findings: As a result the study provided values for the investigated process and determined the appropriate location of the gas-permeable fittings in steelmaking ladle’s bottom plug. This allows to obtain the required conditions for the steel mixing in the entire volume of ladle’s workspace.Research limitations/implications: Tests presented in the article were carried out in the VSB-TU in Ostrava. Due to this fact some research limitations occurs that applies to localization and physical model’s specific construction. Therefore, as a result of cooperation between VSB-TU in Ostrava and the Silesian University of Technology will be carried out the construction of the new research station in Katowice.Practical implications: The results of the research constitute the basis to make changes that will allow the optimization to so far used purge of steel technology.Originality/value: The results presented in the article are addressed to the steel producers and it allows to optimize on-going steel homogenization process that takes place in the ladle

  16. Scintillation light from cosmic-ray muons in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittington, Denver Wade [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Physics Dept.; Mufson, S. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Astronomy Dept.; Howard, B. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Physics Dept.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the results of an experiment to directly measure the time-resolved scintillation signal from the passage of cosmic-ray muons through liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo dewar facility at Fermilab using prototype light guide detectors and electronics developed for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Two models are presented for the time structure of the scintillation light, a phenomenological model and a physically-motivated model. Both models find tT = 1:52 ms for the decay time constant of the Ar 2 triplet state. These models also show that the identification of the “early” light fraction in the phenomenological model, FE 25% of the signal, with the total light from singlet decays is an underestimate. The total fraction of singlet light is FS 36%, where the increase over FE is from singlet light emitted by the wavelength shifter through processes with long decay constants. The models were further used to compute the experimental particle identification parameter Fprompt, the fraction of light coming in a short time window after the trigger compared with the light in the total recorded waveform. The models reproduce quite well the typical experimental value 0.3 found by dark matter and double b-decay experiments, which suggests this parameter provides a robust metric for discriminating electrons and muons from more heavily ionizing particles.

  17. Scintillation Light from Cosmic-Ray Muons in Liquid Argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittington, Denver Wade [Indiana U.; Mufson, S. [Indiana U., Bloomington, Dept. Astron.; Howard, B. [Indiana U.

    2015-11-13

    This paper reports the results of an experiment to directly measure the time-resolved scintillation signal from the passage of cosmic-ray muons through liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo dewar facility at Fermilab using prototype light guide detectors and electronics developed for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Two models are presented for the time structure of the scintillation light, a phenomenological model and a physically-motivated model. Both models find tT = 1:52 ms for the decay time constant of the Ar 2 triplet state. These models also show that the identification of the “early” light fraction in the phenomenological model, FE 25% of the signal, with the total light from singlet decays is an underestimate. The total fraction of singlet light is FS 36%, where the increase over FE is from singlet light emitted by the wavelength shifter through processes with long decay constants. The models were further used to compute the experimental particle identification parameter Fprompt, the fraction of light coming in a short time window after the trigger compared with the light in the total recorded waveform. The models reproduce quite well the typical experimental value 0.3 found by dark matter and double b-decay experiments, which suggests this parameter provides a robust metric for discriminating electrons and muons from more heavily ionizing particles.

  18. Scintillation light from cosmic-ray muons in liquid argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, D.; Mufson, S.; Howard, B.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the results of an experiment to directly measure the time-resolved scintillation signal from the passage of cosmic-ray muons through liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo dewar facility at Fermilab using prototype light guide detectors and electronics developed for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Two models are presented for the time structure of the scintillation light, a phenomenological model and a composite model. Both models find τT = 1.52 μs for the decay time constant of the Ar2* triplet state. These models also show that the identification of the ``early'' light fraction in the phenomenological model, FE ≈ 25% of the signal, with the total light from singlet decays is an underestimate. The total fraction of singlet light is FS ≈ 36%, where the increase over FE is from singlet light emitted by the wavelength shifter through processes with long decay constants. The models were further used to compute the experimental particle identification parameter Fprompt, the fraction of light coming in a short time window after the trigger compared with the light in the total recorded waveform. The models reproduce quite well the typical experimental value ~0.3 found by dark matter and double β-decay experiments, which suggests this parameter provides a robust metric for discriminating electrons and muons from more heavily ionizing particles.

  19. Comparison of data with Monte Carlo simulations at the ATLAS barrel combined testbeam 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speckmayer, P.

    2009-04-01

    The scheme adopted as baseline by ATLAS for the calibration of hadrons depends strongly on the quality of the description of the data by simulations. In 2004, the calorimeters of the ATLAS barrel region have been exposed to a testbeam in order to evaluate the energy response of pions for the energies ranging from 1 to 350 GeV. For the energy region from 3 to 9 GeV a data analysis with the full systematic uncertainty is available. The data has been compared extensively to GEANT4 simulations. Several combinations of physical models—the so called "physics lists"—are provided by the GEANT4 collaboration and have been evaluated. The best overall description of data is achieved with the physics list QGSP_BERT which describes the energy response of pions within a few percent. QGSP_BERT has been adopted by ATLAS for the simulation of the first data.

  20. Comparison of data with Monte Carlo simulations at the ATLAS barrel combined testbeam 2004

    CERN Document Server

    Speckmayer, P

    2009-01-01

    The scheme adopted as baseline by ATLAS for the calibration of hadrons depends strongly on the quality of the description of the data by simulations. In 2004, the calorimeters of the ATLAS barrel region have been exposed to a testbeam in order to evaluate the energy response of pions for the energies ranging from 1 to 350 GeV. For the energy region from 3 to 9 GeV a data analysis with the full systematic uncertainty is available. The data has been compared extensively to GEANT4 simulations. Several combinations of physical models—the so called "physics lists"—are provided by the GEANT4 collaboration and have been evaluated. The best overall description of data is achieved with the physics list QGSP_BERT which describes the energy response of pions within a few percent. QGSP_BERT has been adopted by ATLAS for the simulation of the first data.

  1. Design, Performance, and Calibration of CMS Hadron-Barrel Calorimeter Wedges

    CERN Document Server

    Baiatian, G; Emeliantchik, Igor; Massolov, V; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Stefanovich, R; Damgov, Jordan; Dimitrov, Lubomir; Genchev, Vladimir; Piperov, Stefan; Vankov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Bencze, Gyorgy; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zálán, Peter; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Kumar, Arun; Singh, Jas Bir; Acharya, Bannaje Sripathi; Banerjee, Sunanda; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Chendvankar, Sanjay; Dugad, Shashikant; Kalmani, Suresh Devendrappa; Katta, S; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Nagaraj, P; Patil, Mandakini Ravindra; Reddy, L; Satyanarayana, B; Sudhakar, Katta; Verma, Piyush; Paktinat, S; Golutvin, Igor; Kalagin, Vladimir; Kosarev, Ivan; Mescheryakov, G; Sergeyev, S; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Gershtein, Yuri; Kaftanov, Vitali; Kisselevich, I; Kolossov, V; Krokhotin, Andrey; Kuleshov, Sergey; Litvintsev, Dmitri; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Ulyanov, A; Demianov, A; Gribushin, Andrey; Kodolova, Olga; Petrushanko, Sergey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Vardanyan, Irina; Yershov, A; Abramov, Victor; Goncharov, Petr; Khmelnikov, Alexander; Korablev, Andrey; Korneev, Yury; Krinitsyn, Alexander; Kryshkin, V; Lukanin, Vladimir; Pikalov, Vladimir; Ryazanov, Anton; Talov, Vladimir; Turchanovich, L; Volkov, Alexey; Camporesi, Tiziano; De Visser, Theo; Vlassov, E; Aydin, Sezgin; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Kayis-Topaksu, A; Kuzucu-Polatoz, A; Onengüt, G; Ozdes-Koca, N; Cankocak, Kerem; Ozok, Ferhat; Serin-Zeyrek, M; Sever, Ramazan; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isiksal, Engin; Kaya, Mithat; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Grinev, B; Lubinsky, V; Senchishin, V; Anderson, E Walter; Hauptman, John M; Elias, John E; Elvira, D; Freeman, Jim; Green, Dan; Lazic, Dragoslav; Los, Serguei; O'Dell, Vivian; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Suzuki, Ichiro; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Antchev, Georgy; Hazen, Eric; Lawlor, C; Machado, Emanuel; Posch, C; Rohlf, James; Wu, Shouxiang; Adams, Mark Raymond; Burchesky, Kyle; Qiang, W; Abdullin, Salavat; Baden, Drew; Bard, Robert; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Grassi, Tullio; Jarvis, Chad; Kellogg, Richard G; Kunori, Shuichi; Skuja, Andris; Podrasky, V; Sanzeni, Christopher; Winn, Dave; Akgun, Ugur; Ayan, S; Duru, Firdevs; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Miller, Michael; Norbeck, Edwin; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Schmidt, Ianos; Akchurin, Nural; Carrell, Kenneth Wayne; Gumu, K; Thomas, Ray; Baarmand, Marc M; Ralich, Robert; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Cushman, Priscilla; Heering, Arjan Hendrix; Sherwood, Brian; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Reidy, Jim; Sanders, David A; Karmgard, Daniel John; Ruchti, Randy; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Mans, Jeremy; Tully, Christopher; De Barbaro, Pawel; Bodek, Arie; Budd, Howard; Chung, Yeon Sei; Haelen, T; Imboden, Matthias; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Barnes, Virgil E; Laasanen, Alvin T; Pompos, Arnold

    2007-01-01

    Extensive measurements have been made with pions, electrons and muons on four production wedges of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) hadron barrel (HB) calorimeter in the H2 beam line at CERN with particle momenta varying from 20 to 300 GeV/c. Data were taken both with and without a prototype electromagnetic lead tungstate crystal calorimeter (EB) in front of the hadron calorimeter. The time structure of the events was measured with the full chain of preproduction front-end electronics running at 34 MHz. Moving-wire radioactive source data were also collected for all scintillator layers in the HB. These measurements set the absolute calibration of the HB prior to first pp collisions to approximately 4%.

  2. Twenty barrel in situ pipe gun type solid hydrogen pellet injector for the Large Helical Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Motojima, Gen; Hayashi, Hiromi; Inoue, Tomoyuki; Ito, Yasuhiko; Ogawa, Hideki; Takami, Shigeyuki; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Yamada, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    A 20 barrel solid hydrogen pellet injector, which is able to inject 20 cylindrical pellets with a diameter and length of between 3.0 and 3.8 mm at the velocity of 1200 m/s, has been developed for the purpose of direct core fueling in LHD (Large Helical Device). The in situ pipe gun concept with the use of compact cryo-coolers enables stable operation as a fundamental facility in plasma experiments. The combination of the two types of pellet injection timing control modes, i.e., pre-programing mode and real-time control mode, allows the build-up and sustainment of high density plasma around the density limit. The pellet injector has demonstrated stable operation characteristics during the past three years of LHD experiments. PMID:24007062

  3. 时尚怪人Iris Barrel Apfel登上着装名人榜

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Holly(编译)

    2008-01-01

    近日,《名利场》杂志评出了2008国际最佳着装名人榜,这个榜单里有我们耳熟能详的名流,却也隐藏着极品“异类”。位列第七的Iris Barrel Apfel就是最典型的一位,这位86岁的著名室内设计师用“超级圆形大眼镜+超级大项链+无数手镯+古董衣”的标志性形象,让时尚界牢牢铭记住她的形象,并佩服得五体投地。

  4. Experimental investigation of a cook-off temperature in a hot barrel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amer HAMEED a; Mathew AZAVEDO b; Philip PITCHER b

    2014-01-01

    The experimental investigations of the effect of contact time/temperature on initiating the cook-off using 7.62 mm calibre cartridge cases (CC) were conducted previously. These cartridges were filled with commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) double based (DB) propellant (Bulls Eye) and were loaded in a hot chamber. The thermal explosion temperature is of great significance to both weapon designers and safety inspectors as it provides the operational limit and safe operating temperature. For CC under test, it was found that the cook-off temperatures of this propellant were encountered with the heat transfer profile of the simulated gun barrel between 151.4 ?C and 153.4 ?C, with a reaction occurring in less than 300 s after the round was chambered. Usefully, each experiment was found to be consistent and repeatable.

  5. Detailed Surface Analysis Of Incremental Centrifugal Barrel Polishing (CBP) Of Single-Crystal Niobium Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palczewski, Ari D.; Tian, Hui; Trofimova, Olga; Reece, Charles E.

    2011-07-01

    We performed Centrifugal Barrel Polishing (CBP) on single crystal niobium samples/coupons housed in a stainless steel sample holder following the polishing recipe developed at Fermi Lab (FNAL) in 2011 \\cite{C. A. Cooper 2011}. Post CBP, the sample coupons were analyzed for surface roughness, crystal composition and structure, and particle contamination. Following the initial analysis each coupon was high pressure rinsed (HRP) and analyzed for the effectiveness of contamination removal. We were able to obtain the mirror like surface finish after the final stage of tumbling, although some defects and embedded particles remained. In addition, standard HPR appears to have little effect on removing embedded particles which remain after each tumbling step, although final polishing media removal was partially affected by standard/extended HPR.

  6. 溶盐桶改造%Reform of salt dissolving barrels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘红星

    2015-01-01

    采用井矿盐制烧碱可降低生产成本,为满足使用井矿盐的要求,对一次盐水装置的溶盐桶进行了技术改造:进水管采用5根,增加折流槽和中心筒。%The production cost of caustic soda can be reduced by using mineral salt as raw material. Transformations were carried out on the salt dissolving barrel adopted in primary brine devices, including installing 5 water feeding pipes, adding a baffle tank and a center cylinder, in order to meet the require-ments of using mineral salt.

  7. Applications of the double-barreled data in whole-genome shotgun sequence assembly and analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yujun; WANG Jing; GU Xiaocheng; YU Jun; LI Songgang; NI Peixiang; L(U) Hong; YE Jia; HU Jianfei; CHEN Chen; HUANG Xiangang; CONG Lijuan; LI Guangyuan

    2005-01-01

    Double-barreled (DB) data have been widely used for the assembly of large genomes. Based on the experience of building the whole-genome working draft of Oryza sativa L.ssp. Indica, we present here the prevailing and improved uses of DB data in the assembly procedure and report on novel applications during the following data-mining processes such as acquiring precise insert fragment information of each clone across the genome, and a new kind of Iow-cost whole-genome microarray. With the increasing number of organisms being sequenced,we believe that DB data will play an important role both in other assembly procedures and infuture genomic studies.

  8. Experimental investigation of a cook-off temperature in a hot barrel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer Hameed

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The experimental investigations of the effect of contact time/temperature on initiating the cook-off using 7.62 mm calibre cartridge cases (CC were conducted previously. These cartridges were filled with commercial off-the-shelf (COTS double based (DB propellant (Bulls Eye and were loaded in a hot chamber. The thermal explosion temperature is of great significance to both weapon designers and safety inspectors as it provides the operational limit and safe operating temperature. For CC under test, it was found that the cook-off temperatures of this propellant were encountered with the heat transfer profile of the simulated gun barrel between 151.4 °C and 153.4 °C, with a reaction occurring in less than 300 s after the round was chambered. Usefully, each experiment was found to be consistent and repeatable.

  9. Dosimetry assessments for the reactor pressure vessel and core barrel in UK PWR plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, D.A.; Allen, D.A.; Huggon, A.P.; Picton, D.J.; Robinson, A.T.; Steadman, R.J. [Serco, Rutherford House, Quedgeley, Gloucester, Gl2 4NF (United Kingdom); Seren, T.; Lipponen, M.; Kekki, T. [VTT, Technical Research Centre of Finland, Otakaari 3 K, P.O. BOX 1000, Espoo, FI-02044 (Finland)

    2011-07-01

    Specimens for the Sizewell B reactor pressure vessel (RPV) inservice steels surveillance program are irradiated inside eight capsules located within the reactor pressure vessel and loaded prior to commissioning. The periodic removal of these capsules and testing of their contents provides material properties data at intervals during the lifetime of the plant. Neutron activation measurements and radiation transport calculations play an essential role in assessing the neutron exposure of the specimens and RPV. Following the most recent withdrawal, seven capsules have now been removed covering nine cycles of reactor operation. This paper summarizes the dosimetry results of the Sizewell B surveillance program obtained to date. In addition to an overview of the calculational methodology it includes a review of the measurements. Finally, it describes an extension of the methodology to provide dosimetry recommendations for the core barrel and briefly discusses the results that were obtained. (authors)

  10. Material wear and failure mode analysis of breakfast cereal extruder barrels and screw elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastio, Michael Joseph, Jr.

    2005-11-01

    Nearly seventy-five years ago, the single screw extruder was introduced as a means to produce metal products. Shortly after that, the extruder found its way into the plastics industry. Today much of the world's polymer industry utilizes extruders to produce items such as soda bottles, PVC piping, and toy figurines. Given the significant economical advantages of extruders over conventional batch flow systems, extruders have also migrated into the food industry. Food applications include the meat, pet food, and cereal industries to name just a few. Cereal manufacturers utilize extruders to produce various forms of Ready-to-Eat (RTE) cereals. These cereals are made from grains such as rice, oats, wheat, and corn. The food industry has been incorrectly viewed as an extruder application requiring only minimal energy control and performance capability. This misconception has resulted in very little research in the area of material wear and failure mode analysis of breakfast cereal extruders. Breakfast cereal extruder barrels and individual screw elements are subjected to the extreme pressures and temperatures required to shear and cook the cereal ingredients, resulting in excessive material wear and catastrophic failure of these components. Therefore, this project focuses on the material wear and failure mode analysis of breakfast cereal extruder barrels and screw elements, modeled as a Discrete Time Markov Chain (DTMC) process in which historical data is used to predict future failures. Such predictive analysis will yield cost savings opportunities by providing insight into extruder maintenance scheduling and interchangeability of screw elements. In this DTMC wear analysis, four states of wear are defined and a probability transition matrix is determined based upon 24,041 hours of operational data. This probability transition matrix is used to predict when an extruder component will move to the next state of wear and/or failure. This information can be used to determine

  11. Revisiting the oligomerization mechanism of Vibrio cholerae cytolysin, a beta-barrel pore-forming toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Anand Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2016-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) is a membrane-damaging beta-barrel pore-forming toxin (beta-PFT). VCC causes permeabilization of the target membranes by forming transmembrane oligomeric beta-barrel pores. Oligomerization is a key step in the mode of action of any beta-PFT, including that of VCC. Earlier studies have identified some of the key residues in VCC that are directly involved in the generation of the inter-protomer contacts, thus playing critical roles in the oligomerization of the membrane-bound toxin. Analysis of the VCC oligomeric pore structure reveals a potential hydrogen-bond network that appears to connect the sidechain of an asparagine residue (Asn582; located within an inter-domain linker sequence) from one protomer to the backbone CO- and NH-groups of the neighbouring protomer, indirectly through water molecules at most of the inter-protomer interfaces. In the present study, we show that the mutation of Asn582Ala affects the oligomerization and the pore-forming activity of VCC in the membrane lipid bilayer of the synthetic lipid vesicles, while the replacement of Asn582Gln results into the restoration of the oligomeric pore-forming ability of the toxin. Using a number of truncated variants of VCC, having deletion in the C-terminal region of the toxin starting from the Asn582 residue or beyond, we also show that the presence of Asn582 is critically required for the oligomerization of the truncated form of the protein. PMID:27150630

  12. Developmental switch in neurovascular coupling in the immature rodent barrel cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph M Zehendner

    Full Text Available Neurovascular coupling (NVC in the adult central nervous system (CNS is a mechanism that provides regions of the brain with more oxygen and glucose upon increased levels of neural activation. Hemodynamic changes that go along with neural activation evoke a blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signal in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI that can be used to study brain activity non-invasively. A correct correlation of the BOLD signal to neural activity is pivotal to understand this signal in neuronal development, health and disease. However, the function of NVC during development is largely unknown. The rodent whisker-to-barrel cortex is an experimentally well established model to study neurovascular interdependences. Using extracellular multi-electrode recordings and laser-Doppler-flowmetry (LDF we show in the murine barrel cortex of postnatal day 7 (P7 and P30 mice in vivo that NVC undergoes a physiological shift during the first month of life. In the mature CNS it is well accepted that cortical sensory processing results in a rise in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF. We show in P7 animals that rCBF decreases during prolonged multi-whisker stimulation and goes along with multi unit activity (MUA fatigue. In contrast at P30, MUA remains stable during repetitive stimulation and is associated with an increase in rCBF. Further we characterize in both age groups the responses in NVC to single sensory stimuli. We suggest that the observed shift in NVC is an important process in cortical development that may be of high relevance for the correct interpretation of brain activity e.g. in fMRI studies of the immature central nervous system (CNS.

  13. TP0326, a Treponema pallidum β-barrel assembly machinery A (BamA) orthologue and rare outer membrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosiers, Daniel C; Anand, Arvind; Luthra, Amit; Dunham-Ems, Star M; LeDoyt, Morgan; Cummings, Michael A D; Eshghi, Azad; Cameron, Caroline E; Cruz, Adriana R; Salazar, Juan C; Caimano, Melissa J; Radolf, Justin D

    2011-06-01

    Definitive identification of Treponema pallidum rare outer membrane proteins (OMPs) has long eluded researchers. TP0326, the sole protein in T. pallidum with sequence homology to a Gram-negative OMP, belongs to the BamA family of proteins essential for OM biogenesis. Structural modelling predicted that five polypeptide transport-associated (POTRA) domains comprise the N-terminus of TP0326, while the C-terminus forms an 18-stranded amphipathic β-barrel. Circular dichroism, heat modifiability by SDS-PAGE, Triton X-114 phase partitioning and liposome incorporation supported these topological predictions and confirmed that the β-barrel is responsible for the native protein's amphiphilicity. Expression analyses revealed that native TP0326 is expressed at low abundance, while a protease-surface accessibility assay confirmed surface exposure. Size-exclusion chromatography and blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a modular Bam complex in T. pallidum larger than that of Escherichia coli. Non-orthologous ancillary factors and self-association of TP0326 via its β-barrel may both contribute to the Bam complex. T. pallidum-infected rabbits mount a vigorous antibody response to both POTRA and β-barrel portions of TP0326, whereas humans with secondary syphilis respond predominantly to POTRA. The syphilis spirochaete appears to have devised a stratagem for harnessing the Bam pathway while satisfying its need to limit surface antigenicity. PMID:21488980

  14. Upregulation of excitatory neurons and downregulation of inhibitory neurons in barrel cortex are associated with loss of whisker inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Guanjun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Loss of a sensory input causes the hypersensitivity in other modalities. In addition to cross-modal plasticity, the sensory cortices without receiving inputs undergo the plastic changes. It is not clear how the different types of neurons and synapses in the sensory cortex coordinately change after input deficits in order to prevent loss of their functions and to be used for other modalities. We studied this subject in the barrel cortices from whiskers-trimmed mice vs. controls. After whisker trimming for a week, the intrinsic properties of pyramidal neurons and the transmission of excitatory synapses were upregulated in the barrel cortex, but inhibitory neurons and GABAergic synapses were downregulated. The morphological analyses indicated that the number of processes and spines in pyramidal neurons increased, whereas the processes of GABAergic neurons decreased in the barrel cortex. The upregulation of excitatory neurons and the downregulation of inhibitory neurons boost the activity of network neurons in the barrel cortex to be high levels, which prevent the loss of their functions and enhances their sensitivity to sensory inputs. These changes may prepare for attracting the innervations from sensory cortices and/or peripheral nerves for other modalities during cross-modal plasticity.

  15. Lock, Stock and Two Different Barrels: Comparing the Genetic Composition of Morphotypes of the Indo-Pacific Sponge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swierts, T.; Peijnenburg, K.T.C.A.; de Leeuw, C.; Cleary, D.F.R.; Hörnlein, C.; Setiawan, E.; Wörheide, G.; Erpenbeck, D.; de Voogd, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    The giant barrel sponge Xestospongia testudinaria is an ecologically important species that is widely distributed across the Indo-Pacific. Little is known, however, about the precise biogeographic distribution and the amount of morphological and genetic variation in this species. Here we provide the

  16. Research status of electromagnetic rail gun barrel structure%电磁轨道炮身管结构的研究概况

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕彦; 任泽宁; 钱学梅; 胡俊; 黄建文; 杨忠贤; 赵鸿雁

    2012-01-01

    电磁轨道炮身管工况特殊、结构复杂,开发轻质、高效的身管是电磁轨道炮走向实战应用的关键.从结构力学方面介绍电磁轨道炮管对材料和结构的要求,综述典型的轨道炮身管结构设计概况.归纳实战型轨道炮管结构设计的关键点.%Due to special working conditions and complex structure of electromagnetic rail gun barrel, the exploration of lightweight, efficient barrel becomes the key for actual cnmbal application of electromagnetic rail gun. Material and structural requirements of gun barrel are illustrated from the viewpoints of structural mechanics, typical barrel designs are reviewed, and the key points of actual combat barrel design are summarized.

  17. Argon gas concentration effects on nanostructured molybdenum nitride layer growth using 100 Hz pulsed dc glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikhlaq, U.; Ahmad, R.; Saleem, S.; Shah, M. S.; Umm-i-Kalsoom; Khan, N.; Khalid, N.

    2012-08-01

    The effect of argon concentration (10%-40%) on the surface properties of molybdenum is studied in nitrogen-argon mixture using 100 Hz pulsed dc glow discharge. The analysis is carried out by using X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Vickers microhardness tester to investigate surface properties of the nitrided samples. XRD results exhibit the formation of molybdenum nitrides. Crystallite size analysis and SEM morphology confirm the growth of nanostructured molybdenum nitride layers. Moreover, significant increase in surface hardness (by a factor of about two times) is found when the sample is treated for 30% argon in nitrogen-argon mixed plasma.

  18. Resilience to disturbance despite limited dispersal and self-recruitment in tropical barrel sponges: implications for conservation and management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Bell

    Full Text Available While estimates of connectivity are important for effective management, few such estimates are available for reef invertebrates other than for corals. Barrel sponges are one of the largest and most conspicuous members of the coral reef fauna across the Indo-Pacific and given their large size, longevity and ability to process large volumes of water, they have a major role in reef functioning. Here we used a panel of microsatellite markers to characterise the genetic structure of two barrel sponge species, Xestospongia testudinaria and a currently undescribed Xestospongia species. We sampled across seven populations in the Wakatobi Marine National Park, SE Sulawesi (Indonesia spanning a spatial scale of approximately 2 to 70 km, and present the first estimates of demographic connectivity for coral reef sponges. Genetic analyses showed high levels of genetic differentiation between all populations for both species, but contrasting patterns of genetic structuring for the two species. Autocorrelation analyses showed the likely dispersal distances of both species to be in the order of 60 and 140 m for Xestopongia sp. and Xestospongia testudinaria, respectively, which was supported by assignment tests that showed high levels of self-recruitment (>80%. We also found consistently high inbreeding coefficients across all populations for both species. Our study highlights the potential susceptibility of barrel sponges to environmental perturbations because they are generally long-lived, slow growing, have small population sizes and are likely to be reliant on self-recruitment. Surprisingly, despite these features we actually found the highest abundance of both barrel sponge species (although they were generally smaller at a site that has been severely impacted by humans over the last fifty years. This suggests that barrel sponges exhibit environmental adaptation to declining environmental quality and has important implications for the management and

  19. Improved TPB-coated light guides for liquid argon TPC light detection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scintillation light produced in liquid argon (LAr) must be shifted from 128 nm to visible wavelengths in light detection systems used for liquid argon time-projection chambers (LArTPCs). To date, LArTPC light collection systems have employed tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings on photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) or plates placed in front of the PMTs. Recently, a new approach using TPB-coated light guides was proposed. In this paper, we report on light guides with improved attenuation lengths above 100 cm when measured in air. This is an important step in the development of meter-scale light guides for future LArTPCs. Improvements come from using a new acrylic-based coating, diamond-polished cast UV transmitting acrylic bars, and a hand-dipping technique to coat the bars. We discuss a model for connecting bar response in air to response in liquid argon and compare this to data taken in liquid argon. The good agreement between the prediction of the model and the measured response in liquid argon demonstrates that characterization in air is sufficient for quality control of bar production. This model can be used in simulations of light guides for future experiments

  20. Improved TPB-coated light guides for liquid argon TPC light detection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Z.; Bugel, L.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J. M.; Jones, B. J. P.; Moon, J.; Toups, M.; Wongjirad, T.

    2015-08-01

    Scintillation light produced in liquid argon (LAr) must be shifted from 128 nm to visible wavelengths in light detection systems used for liquid argon time-projection chambers (LArTPCs). To date, LArTPC light collection systems have employed tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings on photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) or plates placed in front of the PMTs. Recently, a new approach using TPB-coated light guides was proposed. In this paper, we report on light guides with improved attenuation lengths above 100 cm when measured in air. This is an important step in the development of meter-scale light guides for future LArTPCs. Improvements come from using a new acrylic-based coating, diamond-polished cast UV transmitting acrylic bars, and a hand-dipping technique to coat the bars. We discuss a model for connecting bar response in air to response in liquid argon and compare this to data taken in liquid argon. The good agreement between the prediction of the model and the measured response in liquid argon demonstrates that characterization in air is sufficient for quality control of bar production. This model can be used in simulations of light guides for future experiments.

  1. Fast-imaging and spectroscopic analysis of atmospheric argon streamers for large gap arc breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachuilo, Michael; Stefani, Francis; Bengtson, Roger; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2014-10-01

    A non-equilibrium plasma source has been developed to assist in the low-voltage arc breakdown of large electrode gaps. The source consists of a dielectric embedded wire helically wound around a confining cylindrical quartz chamber. Annular electrodes cap the ends of the quartz chamber. An argon feed gas is used to provide a uniform environment and exhausts to ambient atmospheric conditions. A negative polarity 50 kV trigger pulse is applied to the embedded trigger wire to initiate the arc breakdown. Application of the trigger pulse produces a localized coronal discharges along the inner surface of the quartz tube. The corona provides seed electrons through which streamers propagate from one of the main discharge electrode along the quartz surface until it reaches the opposite electrode to bridge the gap. Once the gap is bridged a spark over occurs and robust arc discharge is formed in the chamber volume. Fast imaging of the streamer propagation establishes its velocity in the range of ~ 100 km/s. Spectroscopy of the streamer discharge in atmospheric argon has been conducted and electron temperature and number density estimated from a collision radiative model. Argon spectrum is dominated by neutral argon lines in the 650--950 nm range, and singly ionized argon lines are observed in the ultra-violet to near UV (300--400 nm). Research was performed in connection with AFOSR Contract FA9550-11-1-0062.

  2. Prediction of the thermophysical properties of pure neon, pure argon, and the binary mixtures neon-argon and argon-krypton by Monte Carlo simulation using ab initio potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrabad, A E; Laghaei, R; Deiters, U K

    2004-10-01

    Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations were used to test the ability of intermolecular pair potentials derived ab initio from quantum mechanical principles, enhanced by Axilrod-Teller triple-dipole interactions, to predict the vapor-liquid phase equilibria of pure neon, pure argon, and the binary mixtures neon-argon and argon-krypton. The interaction potentials for Ne-Ne, Ar-Ar, Kr-Kr, and Ne-Ar were taken from literature; for Ar-Kr a different potential has been developed. In all cases the quantum mechanical calculations had been carried out with the coupled-cluster approach [CCSD(T) level of theory] and with correlation consistent basis sets; furthermore an extrapolation scheme had been applied to obtain the basis set limit of the interaction energies. The ab initio pair potentials as well as the thermodynamic data based on them are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental data; the only exception is neon. It is shown, however, that in this case the deviations can be quantitatively explained by quantum effects. The interaction potentials that have been developed permit quantitative predictions of high-pressure phase equilibria of noble-gas mixtures.

  3. First measurement of surface nuclear recoil background for argon dark matter searches

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jingke; Westerdale, Shawn; Calaprice, Frank; Wright, Alexander; Shi, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    One major background in direct searches for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) comes from the deposition of radon progeny on detector surfaces. The most dangerous surface background is the $^{206}$Pb recoils produced by $^{210}$Po decays. In this letter, we report the first characterization of this background in liquid argon. The scintillation signal of low energy Pb recoils is measured to be highly quenched in argon, and we estimate that the 103keV $^{206}$Pb recoil background will produce a signal equal to that of a ~5keV (30keV) electron recoil ($^{40}$Ar recoil). In addition, we demonstrate that this dangerous $^{210}$Po surface background can be suppressed by a factor of ~100 or higher using pulse shape discrimination methods, which can make argon dark matter detectors near background-free and enhance their potential for discovery of medium- and high-mass WIMPs. We also discuss the impact on other low background experiments.

  4. The WArP Experiment: A Double-Phase Argon Detector for Dark Matter Searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cryogenic noble liquids emerged in the previous decade as one of the best media to perform WIMP dark matter searches, in particular due to the possibility to scale detector volumes to multiton sizes. The WArP experiment was then developed as one of the first to implement the idea of coupling Argon in liquid and gas phase, in order to discriminate β/γ-interactions from nuclear recoils and then achieve reliable background rejection. Since its construction, other projects spawned, employing Argon and Xenon and following its steps. The WArP 100l detector was assembled in 2008 at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories (LNGS), as the final step of a years-long R&D programme, aimed at characterising the technology of Argon in double phase for dark matter detection. Though it never actually performed a physics run, a technical run was taken in 2011, to characterise the detector response

  5. Operation of a GERDA phase I prototype detector in liquid argon and nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A GERDA phase I prototype detector, consisting of a bare non-enriched high-purity (HP) p-type germanium diode mounted in a low mass holder has been operated both in liquid nitrogen and liquid argon. Because of its high density, liquid argon has been selected as cryogenic liquid and shield for GERDA experiment. The testing of this detector assembly has been carried out in the underground detector laboratory at LNGS, and at the detector manufacturer. The best resolution achieved is 2.2 keV FWHM at 1.332 MeV, which is the same as the resolution measured in a standard test cryostat. The long-term measurements with the prototype detector are performed in liquid argon. Up to now, 38 thermal cycles have been carried out with this detector. The operations, measurements and results of the prototype detector testing are summarized. (orig.)

  6. Lattice gas model for fragmentation from argon on scandium to gold on gold

    CERN Document Server

    Das-Gupta, S; Gupta, Subal Das; Pan, Jicai

    1995-01-01

    The recent fragmentation data for central collisions of Gold on Gold are even qualitatively different from those for central collisions of Argon on Scandium. The latter can be fitted with a lattice gas model calculation. Effort is made to understand why the model fails for Gold on Gold. The calculation suggests that the large Coulomb interaction which is operative for the larger system is responsible for this discrepancy. This is demonstrated by mapping the lattice gas model to a molecular dynamics calculation for disassembly. This mapping is quite faithful for Argon on Scandium but deviates strongly for Gold on Gold. The molecular dynamics calculation for disassembly reproduces the characteristics of the fragmentation data for both Gold on Gold and Argon on Scandium.

  7. Theoretical and experimental comparisons of Gamble 2 argon gas puff experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A one-dimensional radiative MHD analysis of an imploding argon gas puff plasma is performed. The calculations are set up to approximate the conditions of a series of argon gas puff experiments that were carried out on the NRL Gamble II generator. Annular gas puffs (2.5 cm diameter) are imploded with a 1.2-MA peak driving current for different initial argon mass loadings. Comparisons are made with the experimental results for implosion times, K, L-shell x-ray emission, and energy coupled from the generator to the plasma load. The purpose of these calculations is to provide a foundation from which a variety of physical phenomena which influence the power and total energy of the x-ray emission can be analyzed. Comparisons with similar experimental and theoretical results for aluminum plasmas are discussed

  8. Atomistic-Continuum Hybrid Simulation of Heat Transfer between Argon Flow and Copper Plates

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Yijin; Chen, C L

    2016-01-01

    A simulation work aiming to study heat transfer coefficient between argon fluid flow and copper plate is carried out based on atomistic-continuum hybrid method. Navier-Stokes equations for continuum domain are solved through the Pressure Implicit with Splitting of Operators (PISO) algorithm, and the atom evolution in molecular domain is solved through the Verlet algorithm. The solver is validated by solving Couette flow and heat conduction problems. With both momentum and energy coupling method applied, simulations on convection of argon flows between two parallel plates are performed. The top plate is kept as a constant velocity and has higher temperature, while the lower one, which is modeled with FCC copper lattices, is also fixed but has lower temperature. It is found that, heat transfer between argon fluid flow and copper plate in this situation is much higher than that at macroscopic when the flow is fully developed.

  9. Argon: Systematic Review on Neuro- and Organoprotective Properties of an “Inert” Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Höllig

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Argon belongs to the group of noble gases, which are regarded as chemically inert. Astonishingly some of these gases exert biological properties and during the last decades more and more reports demonstrated neuroprotective and organoprotective effects. Recent studies predominately use in vivo or in vitro models for ischemic pathologies to investigate the effect of argon treatment. Promising data has been published concerning pathologies like cerebral ischemia, traumatic brain injury and hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. However, models applied and administration of the therapeutic gas vary. Here we provide a systematic review to summarize the available data on argon’s neuro- and organoprotective effects and discuss its possible mechanism of action. We aim to provide a summary to allow further studies with a more homogeneous setting to investigate possible clinical applications of argon.

  10. Surface modification of poly (vinyl chloride) by long-distance and direct argon RF plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the effects of long- distance and direct argon radio frequency (RF) plasma surface treatment on polyvinyl chloride (PVC) films in terms of changes in surface wettability and surface chemistry. The surface properties are characterized by the water contact angle measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanism is further analyzed and the role of all kinds of active species, e.g. electrons, ions and free radicals involved in plasma surface modification is further evaluated. Results show that the long-distance and direct RF plasma treatments modify the PVC surface in morphology and composition, and both modifications cause surface oxidation of PVC films, in the forming of functional groups enhancing polymer wettability. The effect of the long-distance argon RF plasma is more notable. This suggests that long-distance argon RF plasma could restrain the ion and electron eroding effect and enhance free radical reaction.

  11. The effects of accelerated heavy nuclei of neon and argon on mammalian cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survival of human T-1 kidney cells in high-energy neon (400MeV/nucleon) and argon (500MeV/nucleon) beams has been studied at the Berkeley Bevalac. Cells were plated in monolayers on glass and studied at different residual-range values. The survival curves depend on LET and on particle velocity. The effectiveness of the beams increases as the range decreases, except for argon beams with very low range values, where the effectiveness decreases again. The 'oxygen effect' is high at high particle energies (2.6 for neon and 2.4 for argon); it decreases to values between 1.1 and 1.3 near the Bragg peak. (author)

  12. Synodic and semiannual oscillations of argon-40 in the lunar exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, R. Richard; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    The neutral mass spectrometer on the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft collected a trove of exospheric data, including a set of high-quality measurements of radiogenic 40Ar over a period of 142 days. Data synthesis studies, using well-established exosphere simulation tools, show that the LADEE argon data are consistent with an exosphere-regolith interaction that is dominated by adsorption and that the desorption process generates the Armand distribution of exit velocities. The synthesis work has uncovered an apparent semiannual oscillation of argon that is consistent with temporal sequestration in the seasonal cold traps created at the poles by the obliquity of the Moon. In addition, the LADEE data provide new insight into the pristine nature of lunar regolith, its spatially varying sorption properties, and the influence of sorption processes on the synodic oscillation of the argon exosphere.

  13. Atomistic Simulation of Properties of Ultra-thin Layer of Liquid Argon Compressed Between Diamond Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Khomenko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Using the method of classical molecular dynamics we investigate the properties of ultrathin film of liquid argon, which consists of one or two layers of molecules and is confined by two atomically smooth crystalline diamond surfaces. The aim of the research is validating the use of rigid surfaces and one of the available models of the argon molecule. We study the behavior of the equilibrium and dynamic characteristics of the system. It is shown that at increasing external load the transition of film in the solid-like state occurs, which is indicated by the behavior of the velocity autocorrelation function of argon molecules, reduction of the magnitude of the diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity increase. The organization of molecules in layers and the presence of their in-plane ordering are revealed. The dependences of the kinetic friction force on time and load are obtained. The results are compared with experimental data.

  14. Coherent and incoherent Thomson scattering on an argon/hydrogen microwave plasma torch with transient behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrusník, A.; Synek, P.; Hübner, S.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.; Zajíčková, L.; Nijdam, S.

    2016-10-01

    A new method of processing time-integrated coherent Thomson scattering spectra is presented, which provides not only the electron density and temperature but also information about the transient behaviour of the plasma. Therefore, it is an alternative to single-shot Thomson scattering measurements as long as the scattering is coherent. The method is applied to a microwave plasma torch operating in argon or a mixture of argon with hydrogen at atmospheric pressure. Electron densities up to 8\\cdot {{10}21} m-3 (ionization degree above 10-3) were observed, which is more than two times higher than presented in earlier works on comparable discharges. Additionally, a parametric study with respect to the argon/hydrogen ratio and the input power was carried out and the results are discussed together with earlier Stark broadening measurements on the same plasma.

  15. Ionic Wind Phenomenon and Charge Carrier Mobility in Very High Density Argon Corona Discharge Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, M.; Bonifaci, N.; Denat, A.

    2014-04-01

    Wind ions phenomenon has been observed in the high density argon corona discharge plasma. Corona discharge plasma was produced by point to plane electrodes and high voltage DC. Light emission from the recombination process was observed visually. The light emission proper follow the electric field lines that occur between point and plane electrodes. By using saturation current, the mobilities of non-thermal electrons and ions have been obtained in argon gas and liquid with variation of density from 2,5 1021 to 2 1022 cm-3. In the case of ions, we found that the behaviour of the apparent mobility inversely proportional to the density or follow the Langevin variation law. For non-thermal electron, mobility decreases and approximately follows a variation of Langevin type until the density <= 0,25 the critical density of argon.

  16. Operation of a high purity germanium crystal in liquid argon as a Compton suppressed radiation spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Orrell, J L; Amsbaugh, J F; Doe, P J; Hossbach, T W; Orrell, John L.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Amsbaugh, John F.; Doe, Peter J.; Hossbach, Todd W.

    2007-01-01

    A high purity germanium crystal was operated in liquid argon as a Compton suppressed radiation spectrometer. Spectroscopic quality resolution of less than 1% of the full-width half maximum of full energy deposition peaks was demonstrated. The construction of the small apparatus used to obtain these results is reported. The design concept is to use the liquid argon bath to both cool the germanium crystal to operating temperatures and act as a scintillating veto. The scintillation light from the liquid argon can veto cosmic-rays, external primordial radiation, and gamma radiation that does not fully deposit within the germanium crystal. This technique was investigated for its potential impact on ultra-low background gamma-ray spectroscopy. This work is based on a concept initially developed for future germanium-based neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments.

  17. Lipid bilayer-bound conformation of an integral membrane beta barrel protein by multidimensional MAS NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy, Matthew T. [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States); Su, Yongchao; Silvers, Robert; Andreas, Loren; Clark, Lindsay [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (United States); Wagner, Gerhard [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States); Pintacuda, Guido; Emsley, Lyndon [Université de Lyon, Centre de RMN à Très Hauts Champs, Institut des Sciences Analytiques (CNRS, ENS Lyon, UCB Lyon 1) (France); Griffin, Robert G., E-mail: rgg@mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2015-04-15

    The human voltage dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC) is a 32 kDa β-barrel integral membrane protein that controls the transport of ions across the outer mitochondrial membrane. Despite the determination of VDAC solution and diffraction structures, a structural basis for the mechanism of its function is not yet fully understood. Biophysical studies suggest VDAC requires a lipid bilayer to achieve full function, motivating the need for atomic resolution structural information of VDAC in a membrane environment. Here we report an essential step toward that goal: extensive assignments of backbone and side chain resonances for VDAC in DMPC lipid bilayers via magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR). VDAC reconstituted into DMPC lipid bilayers spontaneously forms two-dimensional lipid crystals, showing remarkable spectral resolution (0.5–0.3 ppm for {sup 13}C line widths and <0.5 ppm {sup 15}N line widths at 750 MHz). In addition to the benefits of working in a lipid bilayer, several distinct advantages are observed with the lipid crystalline preparation. First, the strong signals and sharp line widths facilitated extensive NMR resonance assignments for an integral membrane β-barrel protein in lipid bilayers by MAS NMR. Second, a large number of residues in loop regions were readily observed and assigned, which can be challenging in detergent-solubilized membrane proteins where loop regions are often not detected due to line broadening from conformational exchange. Third, complete backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments could be obtained for the first 25 residues, which comprise the functionally important N-terminus. The reported assignments allow us to compare predicted torsion angles for VDAC prepared in DMPC 2D lipid crystals, DMPC liposomes, and LDAO-solubilized samples to address the possible effects of the membrane mimetic environment on the conformation of the protein. Concluding, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the

  18. Lipid bilayer-bound conformation of an integral membrane beta barrel protein by multidimensional MAS NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human voltage dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC) is a 32 kDa β-barrel integral membrane protein that controls the transport of ions across the outer mitochondrial membrane. Despite the determination of VDAC solution and diffraction structures, a structural basis for the mechanism of its function is not yet fully understood. Biophysical studies suggest VDAC requires a lipid bilayer to achieve full function, motivating the need for atomic resolution structural information of VDAC in a membrane environment. Here we report an essential step toward that goal: extensive assignments of backbone and side chain resonances for VDAC in DMPC lipid bilayers via magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR). VDAC reconstituted into DMPC lipid bilayers spontaneously forms two-dimensional lipid crystals, showing remarkable spectral resolution (0.5–0.3 ppm for 13C line widths and <0.5 ppm 15N line widths at 750 MHz). In addition to the benefits of working in a lipid bilayer, several distinct advantages are observed with the lipid crystalline preparation. First, the strong signals and sharp line widths facilitated extensive NMR resonance assignments for an integral membrane β-barrel protein in lipid bilayers by MAS NMR. Second, a large number of residues in loop regions were readily observed and assigned, which can be challenging in detergent-solubilized membrane proteins where loop regions are often not detected due to line broadening from conformational exchange. Third, complete backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments could be obtained for the first 25 residues, which comprise the functionally important N-terminus. The reported assignments allow us to compare predicted torsion angles for VDAC prepared in DMPC 2D lipid crystals, DMPC liposomes, and LDAO-solubilized samples to address the possible effects of the membrane mimetic environment on the conformation of the protein. Concluding, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the reported

  19. DarkSide-50 WIMP search results with low radioactivity argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xin; DarkSide Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, DarkSide-50 is the first physics detector of the DarkSide dark matter search program. The experiment features a dual-phase Time Projection Chamber as the WIMP detector, surrounded by an organic liquid-scintillator neutron veto and a water-Cherenkov muon detector. We report the results from the first use of low radioactivity argon extracted from underground sources in a dark matter search. We have determined that underground argon is depleted in 39Ar by a factor (1 . 4 +/- 0 . 2) ×103 relative to atmospheric argon whose 39Ar activity is 1 bq/kg. The underground argon is also found to contain (2 . 05 +/- 0 . 13) mBq/kg of 85Kr. We find no evidence for dark matter in the form of WIMPs in 70.9 live-days of data with a fiducial mass of (36 . 9 +/- 0 . 6) kg. When combined with our preceding search with an atmospheric argon target, we set a 90 % C.L. upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section of 2 . 0 ×10-44 cm2 (8 . 6 ×10-44 cm2, 8 . 0 ×10-43 cm2) for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c2 (1 TeV/c2, 10 TeV/c2). DS-50 will continue dark matter search with the underground argon target for a total of 3 years. See also the DS-50 presentations by E. Edkins and G. Koh.

  20. Calculation of ion energy distributions of argon excimer ions generated in helicon plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Tong-Zhen; Jiang Nan; Wang Long

    2005-01-01

    A program is developed to calculate the ion energy distributions (IEDs) of Ar2+ making use of a simplified kinetic model with a combination of Monte Carlo method. Several coefficients are used to realize good match between the calculated and measured results. Some important assumptions are confirmed: argon excimer ions have short lifetime,hence they are formed in a short range before the collecting electrode. The excimer ions that encounter collisions will be discarded because they turn to other ion species after they collide with argon atoms. From the calculated results some plasma parameters such as the cross section or neutral density in discharge could be evaluated.

  1. Transport coefficients of helium-argon mixture based on ab initio potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharipov, Felix; Benites, Victor J

    2015-10-21

    The viscosity, thermal conductivity, diffusion coefficient, and thermal diffusion factor of helium-argon mixtures are calculated for a wide range of temperature and for various mole fractions up to the 12th order of the Sonine polynomial expansion with an ab initio intermolecular potential. The calculated values for these transport coefficients are compared with other data available in the open literature. The comparison shows that the obtained transport coefficients of helium-argon mixture have the best accuracy for the moment. PMID:26493894

  2. Heat Transfer During Evaporation of Cesium From Graphite Surface in an Argon Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bespala Evgeny

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on discussion of problem of graphite radioactive waste formation and accumulation. It is shown that irradiated nuclear graphite being inalienable part of uranium-graphite reactor may contain fission and activation products. Much attention is given to the process of formation of radioactive cesium on the graphite element surface. It is described a process of plasma decontamination of irradiated graphite in inert argon atmosphere. Quasi-one mathematical model is offered, it describes heat transfer process in graphite-cesium-argon system. Article shows results of calculation of temperature field inside the unit cell. Authors determined the factors which influence on temperature change.

  3. Evolution of precipitate in nickel-base alloy 718 irradiated with argon ions at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shuoxue; Luo, Fengfeng; Ma, Shuli; Chen, Jihong; Li, Tiecheng; Tang, Rui; Guo, Liping

    2013-07-01

    Alloy 718 is a nickel-base superalloy whose strength derives from γ'(Ni3(Al,Ti)) and γ″(Ni3Nb) precipitates. The evolution of the precipitates in alloy 718 irradiated with argon ions at elevated temperature were examined via transmission electron microscopy. Selected-area electron diffraction indicated superlattice spots disappeared after argon ion irradiation, which showing that the ordered structure of the γ' and γ″ precipitates became disordered. The size of the precipitates became smaller with the irradiation dose increasing at 290 °C.

  4. A 20-Liter Test Stand with Gas Purification for Liquid Argon Research

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yichen; Tang, Wei; Joshi, Jyoti; Qian, Xin; Diwan, Milind; Kettell, Steve; Morse, William; Rao, Triveni; Stewart, James; Tsang, Thomas; Zhang, Lige

    2016-01-01

    We describe the design of a 20-liter test stand constructed to study fundamental properties of liquid argon (LAr). This system utilizes a simple, cost-effective gas argon (GAr) purification to achieve ultra-high purity, which is necessary to study electron transport properties in LAr. An electron drift stack with up to 25 cm length is constructed to study electron drift, diffusion, and attachment at various electric fields. A gold photocathode and a pulsed laser are used as a bright electron source. The operational performance of this system is reported.

  5. Pulse Compression by Filamentation in Argon with an Acoustic Optical Programmable Dispersive Filter for Predispersion Compensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao-Wei; JIANG Yong-Liang; LENG Yu-Xin; LIU Jun; GE Xiao-Chun; LI Ru-Xin; XU Zhi-Zhan

    2006-01-01

    @@ We have experimentally demonstrated pulses 0.4 mJ in duration smaller than 12 fs with an excellent spatial beam profile by self-guided propagation in argon. The original 52fs pulses from the chirped pulsed amplification laser system are first precompressed to 32 fs by inserting an acoustic optical programmable dispersive filter instrument into the laser system for spectrum reshaping and dispersion compensation, and the pulse spectrum is subsequently broadened by filamentation in an argon cell. By using chirped mirrors for post-dispersion compensation, the pulses are successfully compressed to smaller than 12fs.

  6. The Discovery of Argon in Comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp)

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, S A; Festou, M C; Parker, J W; A'Hearn, M F; Wilkinson, E; Gladstone, G R

    2000-01-01

    On 30.14 March 1997 we observed the EUV spectrum of the bright comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) at the time of its perihelion, using our EUVS sounding rocket telescope/spectrometer. The spectra reveal the presence H Ly beta, O+, and, most notably, Argon. Modelling of the retrieved Ar production rates indicates that comet Hale-Bopp is enriched in Ar relative to cosmogonic expectations. This in turn indicates that Hale-Bopp's deep interior has never been exposed to the 35-40 K temperatures necessary to deplete the comet's primordial argon supply.

  7. Physiological responses of Vigna radiata L. to nitrogen and argon+ laser irradiation - Short Communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of nitrogen laser (337.1 nm) and argon+ laser (514.5 nm) irradiation on physiological responses in the green gram seedlings was studied. The shoot and root lengths and fresh and dry weights of the seedlings increased with 30 min exposure to nitrogen laser and 5 min exposure to Argon+ laser. Protein content was maximum with 20 min exposure to N laser and 5 min exposure to Ar+ laser, while DNA and RNA contents were maximum at 5 min exposure with both the laser treatments

  8. Inner-shell Annihilation of Positrons in Argon, Iron and Copper Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Raouf, M A; El-Bakry, S Y

    2007-01-01

    The annihilation parameters of positrons with electrons in different shells of Argon, Iron and Copper atoms are calculated below the positronium (Ps) formation thresholds. Quite accurate ab initio calculations of the bound state wavefunctions of Argon, Iron and Copper orbitals are obtained from Cowan computer code. A least-squares variational method (LSVM) is used for determining the wavefunction of the positrons. The program is employed for calculating the s-wave partial cross sections of positrons scattered by Iron and Copper atoms. Our results of the effective charge are compared with available experimental and theoretical ones. --

  9. Application of argon laser LAK-1 for therapy in selected blood vessel diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanczyk, Jacek; Golebiowska, Aleksandra; Michalska, I.; Nowakowski, Wlodzimierz

    1995-03-01

    Argon laser was applied in 172 patients with various vascular disorders and epidermal nevi. The best therapeutical results were obtained in facial telangiectasia and in cavernous hemangiomas, in which there was a complete or almost complete regression. In capillary facial hemangiomas in 49 patients (79%) clearing of 50% to 75% was obtained, and in epidermal nevi the full regression was in 4 (44%) of the cases, and 50% regression in 4 (44%). In telangiectasia of the lower limbs the results were not satisfactory. We stress that cavernous, and capillary hemangiomas, as well as facial telangiectasia are an indication for the argon laser therapy.

  10. Performance of the Electronic Readout of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, H; Aleksa, M; Aperio Bella, L; Archambault, JP; Arfaoui, S; Arnaez, O; Auge, E; Aurousseau, M; Bahinipati, S; Ban, J; Banfi, D; Barajas, A; Barillari, T; Bazan, A; Bellachia, F; Beloborodova, O; Benchekroun, D; Benslama, K; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Bernat, P; Bernier, R; Besson, N; Binet, S; Blanchard, JB; Blondel, A; Bobrovnikov, V; Bohner, O; Boonekamp, M; Bordoni, S; Bouchel, M; Bourdarios, C; Bozzone, A; Braun, HM; Breton, D; Brettel, H; Brooijmans, G; Caputo, R; Carli, T; Carminati, L; Caughron, S; Cavalleri, P; Cavalli, D; Chareyre, E; Chase, RL; Chekulaev, SV; Chen, H; Cheplakov, A; Chiche, R; Citterio, M; Cojocaru, C; Colas, J; Collard, C; Collot, J; Consonni, M; Cooke, M; Copic, K; Costa, GC; Courneyea, L; Cuisy, D; Cwienk, WD; Damazio, D; Dannheim, D; De Cecco, S; De La Broise, X; De La Taille, C; de Vivie, JB; Debennerot, B; Delagnes, E; Delmastro, M; Derue, F; Dhaliwal, S; Di Ciaccio, L; Doan, O; Dudziak, F; Duflot, L; Dumont-Dayot, N; Dzahini, D; Elles, S; Ertel, E; Escalier, M; Etienvre, AI; Falleau, I; Fanti, M; Farooque, T; Favre, P; Fayard, Louis; Fent, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, A; Fournier, D; Fournier, L; Fras, M; Froeschl, R; Gadfort, T; Gallin-Martel, ML; Gibson, A; Gillberg, D; Gingrich, DM; Göpfert, T; Goodson, J; Gouighri, M; Goy, C; Grassi, V; Gray, J; Guillemin, T; Guo, B; Habring, J; Handel, C; Heelan, L; Heintz, H; Helary, L; Henrot-Versille, S; Hervas, L; Hobbs, J; Hoffman, J; Hostachy, JY; Hoummada, A; Hrivnac, J; Hrynova, T; Hubaut, F; Huber, J; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Iengo, P; Imbert, P; Ishmukhametov, R; Jantsch, A; Javadov, N; Jezequel, S; Jimenez Belenguer, M; Ju, XY; Kado, M; Kalinowski, A; Kar, D; Karev, A; Katsanos, I; Kazarinov, M; Kerschen, N; Kierstead, J; Kim, MS; Kiryunin, A; Kladiva, E; Knecht, N; Kobel, M; Koletsou, I; König, S; Krieger, P; Kukhtin, V; Kuna, M; Kurchaninov, L; Labbe, J; Lacour, D; Ladygin, E; Lafaye, R; Laforge, B; Lamarra, D; Lampl, W; Lanni, F; Laplace, S; Laskus, H; Le Coguie, A; Le Dortz, O; Le Maner, C; Lechowski, M; Lee, SC; Lefebvre, M; Leonhardt, K; Lethiec, L; Leveque, J; Liang, Z; Liu, C; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Loch, P; Lu, J; Ma, H; Mader, W; Majewski, S; Makovec, N; Makowiecki, D; Mandelli, L; Mangeard, PS; Mansoulie, B; Marchand, JF; Marchiori, G; Martin, D; Martin-Chassard, G; Martin dit Latour, B; Marzin, A; Maslennikov, A; Massol, N; Matricon, P; Maximov, D; Mazzanti, M; McCarthy, T; McPherson, R; Menke, S; Meyer, JP; Ming, Y; Monnier, E; Mooshofer, P; Neganov, A; Niedercorn, F; Nikolic-Audit, I; Nugent, IM; Oakham, G; Oberlack, H; Ocariz, J; Odier, J; Oram, CJ; Orlov, I; Orr, R; Parsons, JA; Peleganchuk, S; Penson, A; Perini, L; Perrodo, P; Perrot, G; Perus, A; Petit, E; Pisarev, I; Plamondon, M; Poffenberger, P; Poggioli, L; Pospelov, G; Pralavorio, P; Prast, J; Prudent, X; Przysiezniak, H; Puzo, P; Quentin, M; Radeka, V; Rajagopalan, S; Rauter, E; Reimann, O; Rescia, S; Resende, B; Richer, JP; Ridel, M; Rios, R; Roos, L; Rosenbaum, G; Rosenzweig, H; Rossetto, O; Roudil, W; Rousseau, D; Ruan, X; Rudert, A; Rusakovich, N; Rusquart, P; Rutherfoord, J; Sauvage, G; Savine, A; Schaarschmidt, J; Schacht, P; Schaffer, A; Schram, M; Schwemling, P; Seguin Moreau, N; Seifert, F; Serin, L; Seuster, R; Shalyugin, A; Shupe, M; Simion, S; Sinervo, P; Sippach, W; Skovpen, K; Sliwa, R; Soukharev, A; Spano, F; Stavina, P; Straessner, A; Strizenec, P; Stroynowski, R; Talyshev, A; Tapprogge, S; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, GF; Teuscher, R; Tikhonov, Yu; Tocut, V; Tompkins, D; Thompson, P; Tisserant, S; Todorov, T; Tomasz, F; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Trinh, Thi N; Trochet, S; Trocme, B; Tschann-Grimm, K; Tsionou, D; Ueno, R; Unal, G; Urbaniec, D; Usov, Y; Voss, K; Veillet, JJ; Vincter, M; Vogt, S; Weng, Z; Whalen, K; Wicek, F; Wilkens, H; Wingerter-Seez, I; Wulf, E; Yang, Z; Ye, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zarzhitsky, P; Zerwas, D; Zhang, H; Zhang, L; Zhou, N; Zimmer, J; Zitoun, R; Zivkovic, L

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS detector has been designed for operation at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. ATLAS includes electromagnetic and hadronic liquid argon calorimeters, with almost 200,000 channels of data that must be sampled at the LHC bunch crossing frequency of 40 MHz. The calorimeter electronics calibration and readout are performed by custom electronics developed specifically for these purposes. This paper describes the system performance of the ATLAS liquid argon calibration and readout electronics, including noise, energy and time resolution, and long term stability, with data taken mainly from full-system calibration runs performed after installation of the system in the ATLAS detector hall at CERN.

  11. Experimental Measurement for Shock Velocity-Mass Velocity Relationship of Liquid Argon Up to 46 GPa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟川民; 施尚春; 董石; 杨向东; 谭华; 经福谦

    2003-01-01

    Shock properties of liquid argon were measured in the shock pressure up to 46 GPa by employing the two-stage light gas gun. Liquid nitrogen was used as coolant liquid. The cryogenic target system has been improved to compare with the previous work. Shock velocities were measured with self-shorting electrical probes. Impactor velocities were measured with an electrical-magnetic induction system. Mass velocities were obtained by mean of shock impedance matching method. The experimental data shows that the slope of experimental Hugoniot curve of liquid argon begins to decrease above 30 GPa.

  12. Intermolecular interaction potentials of methane-argon complex calculated using LDA approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Yu-Lin; Chen Xiang-Rong; Zhou Xiao-Lin; Yang Xiang-Dong; Wang Hai-Yan

    2004-01-01

    The intermolecular interaction potential for methane-argon complex is calculated by local density approximation (LDA) approaches. The calculated potential has a minimum when the intermolecular distance of methane-argon complex is 6.75 a.u.; the corresponding depth of the potential is 0.0163eV which has good agreement with experimental data. We also have made a nonlinear fitting of our results for the Lennard-Jones (12-6) potential function and obtain that V(R) = 143794365.332/R12 - 3032.093/R6 (R in a.u. and V(R) in eV).

  13. Ablation of Barrett’s esophagus using the second-generation argon plasma coagulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy and safety of the second-generation argon plasma coagulation (VIO APC) in ablation of Barrett’s esophagus. Methods Eighteen patients with Barrett’s esophagus (12 males, median age of 55 years, median length of 2.1 cm,1 low-grade dysplasia, 13 cases of short segment Barrett’s esophagus) received VIO APC, which was performed at a power setting of 40W and argon gas flow at 1.5-2.0 L/min, "forced" mode, in 1-3 sessions (mean 1.3). All the patients received treatment with hi...

  14. Research of On-line Analytical Method of Trace Oxygen and Water in Argon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Metal sodium has an active chemical quality. When it is used as a coolant in a fast neutron reactor, it must be protected by a cover gas argon for safety operation of the reactor. But oxygen and water in argon can produce chemical reaction with sodium. Then sodium hydroxide, sodium oxide and hydrogen can be produced. This will be harmful to the safety operation of reactor. The purpose of controlling a level of impurity in the cover gas is for controlling a level of impurity in sodium. The research is to find an on-line determining method and a sampling system to monitor

  15. Design of Portable Barrel-scrubbing Robot%便携式炮管擦洗机器人设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶卫军; 廖凯; 冯虎田; 钱林方

    2011-01-01

    Aiming at the existing problem that the inner barrel is hard to be cleaned, a new portable barrel-scrubbing robot is proposed and designed. For the requirement of scrubbing the inner barrel, the working principle and the scrubbing mode of this robot is determined. The main modules of the robot are designed and the control system is constructed. The robot's mechanical analysis for the course of scrubbing is done by the classical mechanics method, and the driving moment is obtained and calculated through the simulation. A prototype of the portable barrel-scrubbing robot is manufactured and the experiments of the robot's motion function are implemented. The experimental results show that the designed robot can perform the barrel-scrubbing work when the tilt angle of the barrel is up to 22° and the maximum speed of robot reaches 0. 75 m/min, and can meet the utilization requirement in the open country or on the scene of army exercises.%针对炮管内壁清洗难的现状,提出并设计了一种新型便携式炮管内壁擦洗机器人.针对炮管内壁擦洗要求,确定了机器人的工作原理与擦洗方式;对机器人的主要结构模块进行了设计,并搭建了机器人的控制系统;采用经典力学方法对机器人复合擦洗过程中的力学进行了分析,得到了其驱动力矩并进行了仿真计算;制作了便携式炮管内壁擦洗机器人样机,并进行了运动功能实验.实验结果表明,所设计的机器人能在炮管最大倾角为22°时进行擦洗工作,其最大直线运动速度能达到0.75 m/min,能满足在野外或演习现场使用要求.

  16. ArgonCube: a novel, fully-modular approach for the realization of large-mass liquid argon TPC neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Amsler, C; Asaadi, J; Auger, M; Barbato, F; Bay, F; Bishai, M; Bleiner, D; Borgschulte, A; Bremer, J; Cavus, E; Chen, H; De Geronimo, G; Ereditato, A; Fleming, B; Goldi, D; Hanni, R; Kose, U; Kreslo, I; La Mattina, F; Lanni, F; Lissauer, D; Luthi, M; Lutz, P; Marchionni, A; Mladenov, D; Nessi, M; Noto, F; Palamara, O; Raaf, J L; Radeka, V; Rudolph Von Rohr, Ch; Smargianaki, D; Soderberg, M; Strauss, Th; Weber, M; Yu, B; Zeller, G P; Zeyrek, M; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2015-01-01

    The Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber is a prime candidate detector for future neutrino oscillation physics experiments, underground neutrino observatories and proton decay searches. A large international project based on this technology is currently being considered at the future LBNF facility in the United States on the very large mass scale of 40 kton. In this document, following the long standing R&D work conducted over the last years in several laboratories in Europe and in the United States, we intend to propose a novel Liquid Argon TPC approach based on a fully-modular, innovative design, the ArgonCube. The related R&D work will proceed along two main directions; one aimed at on the assessment of the proposed modular detector design, the other on the exploitation of new signal readout methods. Such a strategy will provide high performance while being cost-effective and robust at the same time. According to our plans, we will firstly realize a detector prototype hosted in a cryostat that is a...

  17. SDC muon barrel toroid 1/9.197 scale test model at SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the scale model for the muon barrel toroid (MBT) is to discover any problems in the preliminary design associated with the fabrication, assembly and installation. The information obtained from the model fabrication, assembly, installation, and testing processes will be used to evaluate the MBT preliminary design and to verify the finite element (FE) analysis. The final design of the MBT will take advantage of the experience gained from the test model to improve the design and engineering, fabrication methods, and assembly methods. The goals that are considered relevant to the test model include the following: Verify the in-plane and out-of-plane stiffness of the test model as predicted by the FE analysis. Verify the corner joint stiffness of the test model as predicted by the FE analysis. Verify the fabrication and assembly methods for the blocks, pins and keys on a small scale. Demonstrate the plate flattening scheme on a small scale. Insure that the preliminary design of the MBT can be assembled into the correct shape on a small scale. A magnetic measurement will be performed to record the field density inside an air gap. The main goal is to find out the field distribution for the test model due to geometry variation. The field measurements will also provide the information to verify the magnetic property of the steel material as well as the impact on the field distribution due to material variation

  18. The CERN cryogenic test facility for the ATLAS barrel toroid magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann

    2000-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroidal magnets (ECT) and the barrel toroid magnet (BT) made of eight coils symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. The magnets will be tested individually in a 5000 m/sup 2/ experimental area prior to their final installation at an underground cavern of the LHC Collider. For the BT magnets, a dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed which is currently under the construction and commissioning phase. A liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit and a 1200 W@4.5K refrigerator will allow flexible operating conditions via a rather complex distribution and transfer line system. Flow of two-phase helium for cooling the coils is provided by centrifugal pumps immersed in a saturated liquid helium bath. The integration of the pumps in an existing cryostat required the adoption of novel mechanical solutions. Tests conducted permitted the validation of the technical design of the cryostat and i...

  19. The coincidence matrix ASIC of the level-1 muon barrel trigger of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bocci, V; Salamon, A; Vari, R; Veneziano, Stefano

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel level-1 muon trigger processes hit information from the resistive plate chamber detector, identifying candidate muon tracks and assigning them to a programmable p/sub T/ range and to a unique bunch crossing number. The trigger system uses up to seven detector layers and seeks hit patterns compatible with muon tracks in the bending and nonbending projection. The basic principle of the algorithm is to demand a coincidence of hits in the different chamber layers within a path. The width of the road is related to the p/sub T / threshold to be applied. The system is split into an on-detector and an off-detector part. The on-detector electronics reduces the information from about 350 k channels to about 400 32-bit data words sent via optical fiber to the so-called sector logic (SL). The off- detector SL electronics collects muon candidates and associates them to detector regions-of-interest of Delta eta * Delta Phi of 0.1*0.1. The core of the on-detector electronics is the coincidence matrix ASIC (...

  20. [The guiacum barrels between science and esoterism: Tommaso Campailla genius loci].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscemi, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Tommaso Campailla, as a typical man of his time, had a good humanistic and scientific education. He was born in Modica in 1668 [corrected] from an aristocratic family. When he was sixteen years old he moved to Catania to study law, but in a short time he came back to his native town where he preferred to study as an autodidact. He got married and had children and was elected senator seven times. In spite of his particular look, he was appreciated for his vast culture and his great sensibility. Giovanna Finocchiaro Chimirri noticed his very kind soul and called him: "the christian and Italian Lucretio". In addition, he was a friend of the Arcadian poet Girolama Lorefice Grimaldi. Campailla was a very good medical doctor, although he was an autodidact, and he was very able to inculcate love for medical studies in many students. He fought syphilis rheumatism in a "modern" way, using the "guaiacum barrels" or "vapour stovens" that he had invented. He died in 1740 in Modica. PMID:18450036