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Sample records for arginylation-dependent neural crest

  1. Neural crest migration: trailblazing ahead

    OpenAIRE

    Kulesa, Paul M.; McLennan, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic cell migration patterns are amazingly complex in the timing and spatial distribution of cells throughout the vertebrate landscape. However, advances in in vivo visualization, cell interrogation, and computational modeling are extracting critical features that underlie the mechanistic nature of these patterns. The focus of this review highlights recent advances in the study of the highly invasive neural crest cells and their migratory patterns during embryonic development. We discuss...

  2. The neural crest and neural crest cells: discovery and significance for theories of embryonic organization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Brian K Hall

    2008-12-01

    The neural crest has long fascinated developmental biologists, and, increasingly over the past decades, evolutionary and evolutionary developmental biologists. The neural crest is the name given to the fold of ectoderm at the junction between neural and epidermal ectoderm in neurula-stage vertebrate embryos. In this sense, the neural crest is a morphological term akin to head fold or limb bud. This region of the dorsal neural tube consists of neural crest cells, a special population(s) of cell, that give rise to an astonishing number of cell types and to an equally astonishing number of tissues and organs. Neural crest cell contributions may be direct — providing cells — or indirect — providing a necessary, often inductive, environment in which other cells develop. The enormous range of cell types produced provides an important source of evidence of the neural crest as a germ layer, bringing the number of germ layers to four — ectoderm, endoderm, mesoderm, and neural crest. In this paper I provide a brief overview of the major phases of investigation into the neural crest and the major players involved, discuss how the origin of the neural crest relates to the origin of the nervous system in vertebrate embryos, discuss the impact on the germ-layer theory of the discovery of the neural crest and of secondary neurulation, and present evidence of the neural crest as the fourth germ layer. A companion paper (Hall, Evol. Biol. 2008) deals with the evolutionary origins of the neural crest and neural crest cells.

  3. FGF signaling transforms non-neural ectoderm into neural crest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardley, Nathan; García-Castro, Martín I

    2012-12-15

    The neural crest arises at the border between the neural plate and the adjacent non-neural ectoderm. It has been suggested that both neural and non-neural ectoderm can contribute to the neural crest. Several studies have examined the molecular mechanisms that regulate neural crest induction in neuralized tissues or the neural plate border. Here, using the chick as a model system, we address the molecular mechanisms by which non-neural ectoderm generates neural crest. We report that in response to FGF the non-neural ectoderm can ectopically express several early neural crest markers (Pax7, Msx1, Dlx5, Sox9, FoxD3, Snail2, and Sox10). Importantly this response to FGF signaling can occur without inducing ectopic mesodermal tissues. Furthermore, the non-neural ectoderm responds to FGF by expressing the prospective neural marker Sox3, but it does not express definitive markers of neural or anterior neural (Sox2 and Otx2) tissues. These results suggest that the non-neural ectoderm can launch the neural crest program in the absence of mesoderm, without acquiring definitive neural character. Finally, we report that prior to the upregulation of these neural crest markers, the non-neural ectoderm upregulates both BMP and Wnt molecules in response to FGF. Our results provide the first effort to understand the molecular events leading to neural crest development via the non-neural ectoderm in amniotes and present a distinct response to FGF signaling. PMID:23000357

  4. Migrating into Genomics with the Neural Crest

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    Marianne E. Bronner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells are a fascinating embryonic cell type, unique to vertebrates, which arise within the central nervous system but emigrate soon after its formation and migrate to numerous and sometimes distant locations in the periphery. Following their migratory phase, they differentiate into diverse derivatives ranging from peripheral neurons and glia to skin melanocytes and craniofacial cartilage and bone. The molecular underpinnings underlying initial induction of prospective neural crest cells at the neural plate border to their migration and differentiation have been modeled in the form of a putative gene regulatory network. This review describes experiments performed in my laboratory in the past few years aimed to test and elaborate this gene regulatory network from both an embryonic and evolutionary perspective. The rapid advances in genomic technology in the last decade have greatly expanded our knowledge of important transcriptional inputs and epigenetic influences on neural crest development. The results reveal new players and new connections in the neural crest gene regulatory network and suggest that it has an ancient origin at the base of the vertebrate tree.

  5. The origin and evolution of the neural crest

    OpenAIRE

    Donoghue, Philip C. J.; Graham, Anthony; Kelsh, Robert N.

    2008-01-01

    Many of the features that distinguish the vertebrates from other chordates are derived from the neural crest, and it has long been argued that the emergence of this multipotent embryonic population was a key innovation underpinning vertebrate evolution. More recently, however, a number of studies have suggested that the evolution of the neural crest was less sudden than previously believed. This has exposed the fact that neural crest, as evidenced by its repertoire of derivative cell types, h...

  6. Pax7 lineage contributions to the mammalian neural crest.

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    Barbara Murdoch

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells are vertebrate-specific multipotent cells that contribute to a variety of tissues including the peripheral nervous system, melanocytes, and craniofacial bones and cartilage. Abnormal development of the neural crest is associated with several human maladies including cleft/lip palate, aggressive cancers such as melanoma and neuroblastoma, and rare syndromes, like Waardenburg syndrome, a complex disorder involving hearing loss and pigment defects. We previously identified the transcription factor Pax7 as an early marker, and required component for neural crest development in chick embryos. In mammals, Pax7 is also thought to play a role in neural crest development, yet the precise contribution of Pax7 progenitors to the neural crest lineage has not been determined.Here we use Cre/loxP technology in double transgenic mice to fate map the Pax7 lineage in neural crest derivates. We find that Pax7 descendants contribute to multiple tissues including the cranial, cardiac and trunk neural crest, which in the cranial cartilage form a distinct regional pattern. The Pax7 lineage, like the Pax3 lineage, is additionally detected in some non-neural crest tissues, including a subset of the epithelial cells in specific organs.These results demonstrate a previously unappreciated widespread distribution of Pax7 descendants within and beyond the neural crest. They shed light regarding the regionally distinct phenotypes observed in Pax3 and Pax7 mutants, and provide a unique perspective into the potential roles of Pax7 during disease and development.

  7. Metabolic syndromes and neural crest development

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    A. Berio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study is to investigate for the possible connection between abnormal neural crest cell (NCC development and NCC-derived abnormal facial and cerebral structures in 3 children with pyruvate-dehydrogenase (PDH and in 10 cases with oxidative phosphorylation deficiency diagnosed from the Author by standard laboratory assays [i.e. 3 cases of Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS, 2 cases of Leigh syndrome, 1 case of KSS with De Toni-Debrè-Fanconi and rachitis (Berio disease, 1 case of KSS with aortic insuffiency and sub-aortic septum hyperthophy, 3 cases of chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia]. There patients presented with hyperlactacidemia, hyperpyruvicemia and facial abnormalities, similar to those observed in the fetal alcohol syndrome (a typical neurocristopathy due to PDH deficiency, down-regulating NCC genes. The Author hypothesizes that the metabolic defect of scarce energy production is responsible of abnormal NCC proliferation/migration and consequent facial abnormalities.

  8. Current perspectives of the signaling pathways directing neural crest induction

    OpenAIRE

    Stuhlmiller, Timothy J.; García-Castro, Martín I.

    2012-01-01

    The neural crest is a migratory population of embryonic cells with a tremendous potential to differentiate and contribute to nearly every organ system in the adult body. Over the past two decades, an incredible amount of research has given us a reasonable understanding of how these cells are generated. Neural crest induction involves the combinatorial input of multiple signaling pathways and transcription factors, and is thought to occur in two phases from gastrulation to neurulation. In the ...

  9. Negative chemotaxis does not control quail neural crest cell dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, C A; Olivier, K R

    1983-04-01

    Negative chemotaxis has been proposed to direct dispersion of amphibian neural crest cells away from the neural tube (V. C. Twitty, 1949, Growth 13(Suppl. 9), 133-161). We have reexamined this hypothesis using quail neural crest and do not find evidence for it. When pigmented or freshly isolated neural crest cells are covered by glass shards to prevent diffusion of a "putative" chemotactic agent away from the cells and into the medium, we find a decrease in density of cells beneath the coverslip as did Twitty and Niu (1948, J. Exp. Zool. 108, 405-437). Unlike those investigators, however, we find the covered cells move slower than uncovered cells and that the decrease in density can be attributed to cessation of cell division and increased cell death in older cultures, rather than directed migration away from each other. In cell systems where negative chemotaxis has been demonstrated, a "no man's land" forms between two confronted explants (Oldfield, 1963, Exp. Cell Res. 30, 125-138). No such cell-free space forms between confronted neural crest explants, even if the explants are closely covered to prevent diffusion of the negative chemotactic material. If crest cell aggregates are drawn into capillary tubes to allow accumulation of the putative material, the cells disperse farther, the wider the capillary tube bore. This is contrary to what would be expected if dispersion depended on accumulation of this material. Also, no difference in dispersion is noted between cells in the center of the tubes versus cells near the mouth of the tubes where the tube medium is freely exchanging with external fresh medium. Alternative hypotheses for directionality of crest migration in vivo are discussed. PMID:6832483

  10. Current perspectives of the signaling pathways directing neural crest induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhlmiller, Timothy J; García-Castro, Martín I

    2012-11-01

    The neural crest is a migratory population of embryonic cells with a tremendous potential to differentiate and contribute to nearly every organ system in the adult body. Over the past two decades, an incredible amount of research has given us a reasonable understanding of how these cells are generated. Neural crest induction involves the combinatorial input of multiple signaling pathways and transcription factors, and is thought to occur in two phases from gastrulation to neurulation. In the first phase, FGF and Wnt signaling induce NC progenitors at the border of the neural plate, activating the expression of members of the Msx, Pax, and Zic families, among others. In the second phase, BMP, Wnt, and Notch signaling maintain these progenitors and bring about the expression of definitive NC markers including Snail2, FoxD3, and Sox9/10. In recent years, additional signaling molecules and modulators of these pathways have been uncovered, creating an increasingly complex regulatory network. In this work, we provide a comprehensive review of the major signaling pathways that participate in neural crest induction, with a focus on recent developments and current perspectives. We provide a simplified model of early neural crest development and stress similarities and differences between four major model organisms: Xenopus, chick, zebrafish, and mouse. PMID:22547091

  11. Progenitors of the protochordate ocellus as an evolutionary origin of the neural crest

    OpenAIRE

    Ivashkin, Evgeniy; Adameyko, Igor

    2013-01-01

    The neural crest represents a highly multipotent population of embryonic stem cells found only in vertebrate embryos. Acquisition of the neural crest during the evolution of vertebrates was a great advantage, providing Chordata animals with the first cellular cartilage, bone, dentition, advanced nervous system and other innovations. Today not much is known about the evolutionary origin of neural crest cells. Here we propose a novel scenario in which the neural crest originates from neuroectod...

  12. Aebp2 as an epigenetic regulator for neural crest cells.

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    Hana Kim

    Full Text Available Aebp2 is a potential targeting protein for the mammalian Polycomb Repression Complex 2 (PRC2. We generated a mutant mouse line disrupting the transcription of Aebp2 to investigate its in vivo roles. Aebp2-mutant homozygotes were embryonic lethal while heterozygotes survived to adulthood with fertility. In developing mouse embryos, Aebp2 is expressed mainly within cells of neural crest origin. In addition, many heterozygotes display a set of phenotypes, enlarged colon and hypopigmentation, similar to those observed in human patients with Hirschsprung's disease and Waardenburg syndrome. These phenotypes are usually caused by the absence of the neural crest-derived ganglia in hindguts and melanocytes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the majority of the genes involved in the migration and development process of neural crest cells are downstream target genes of AEBP2 and PRC2. Furthermore, expression analyses confirmed that some of these genes are indeed affected in the Aebp2 heterozygotes. Taken together, these results suggest that Aebp2 may regulate the migration and development of the neural crest cells through the PRC2-mediated epigenetic mechanism.

  13. Neural crest induction by paraxial mesoderm in Xenopus embryos requires FGF signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsoro-Burq, Anne-Hélène; Fletcher, Russell B; Harland, Richard M

    2003-07-01

    At the border of the neural plate, the induction of the neural crest can be achieved by interactions with the epidermis, or with the underlying mesoderm. Wnt signals are required for the inducing activity of the epidermis in chick and amphibian embryos. Here, we analyze the molecular mechanisms of neural crest induction by the mesoderm in Xenopus embryos. Using a recombination assay, we show that prospective paraxial mesoderm induces a panel of neural crest markers (Slug, FoxD3, Zic5 and Sox9), whereas the future axial mesoderm only induces a subset of these genes. This induction is blocked by a dominant negative (dn) form of FGFR1. However, neither dnFGFR4a nor inhibition of Wnt signaling prevents neural crest induction in this system. Among the FGFs, FGF8 is strongly expressed by the paraxial mesoderm. FGF8 is sufficient to induce the neural crest markers FoxD3, Sox9 and Zic5 transiently in the animal cap assay. In vivo, FGF8 injections also expand the Slug expression domain. This suggests that FGF8 can initiate neural crest formation and cooperates with other DLMZ-derived factors to maintain and complete neural crest induction. In contrast to Wnts, eFGF or bFGF, FGF8 elicits neural crest induction in the absence of mesoderm induction and without a requirement for BMP antagonists. In vivo, it is difficult to dissociate the roles of FGF and WNT factors in mesoderm induction and neural patterning. We show that, in most cases, effects on neural crest formation were parallel to altered mesoderm or neural development. However, neural and neural crest patterning can be dissociated experimentally using different dominant-negative manipulations: while Nfz8 blocks both posterior neural plate formation and neural crest formation, dnFGFR4a blocks neural patterning without blocking neural crest formation. These results suggest that different signal transduction mechanisms may be used in neural crest induction, and anteroposterior neural patterning. PMID:12783784

  14. Regeneration of neural crest derivatives in the Xenopus tadpole tail

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    Slack Jonathan MW

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After amputation of the Xenopus tadpole tail, a functionally competent new tail is regenerated. It contains spinal cord, notochord and muscle, each of which has previously been shown to derive from the corresponding tissue in the stump. The regeneration of the neural crest derivatives has not previously been examined and is described in this paper. Results Labelling of the spinal cord by electroporation, or by orthotopic grafting of transgenic tissue expressing GFP, shows that no cells emigrate from the spinal cord in the course of regeneration. There is very limited regeneration of the spinal ganglia, but new neurons as well as fibre tracts do appear in the regenerated spinal cord and the regenerated tail also contains abundant peripheral innervation. The regenerated tail contains a normal density of melanophores. Cell labelling experiments show that melanophores do not arise from the spinal cord during regeneration, nor from the mesenchymal tissues of the skin, but they do arise by activation and proliferation of pre-existing melanophore precursors. If tails are prepared lacking melanophores, then the regenerates also lack them. Conclusion On regeneration there is no induction of a new neural crest similar to that seen in embryonic development. However there is some regeneration of neural crest derivatives. Abundant melanophores are regenerated from unpigmented precursors, and, although spinal ganglia are not regenerated, sufficient sensory systems are produced to enable essential functions to continue.

  15. Development of teeth in chick embryos after mouse neural crest transplantations

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsiadis, Thimios A.; Chéraud, Yvonnick; Sharpe, Paul; Fontaine-Pérus, Josiane

    2003-01-01

    Teeth were lost in birds 70–80 million years ago. Current thinking holds that it is the avian cranial neural crest-derived mesenchyme that has lost odontogenic capacity, whereas the oral epithelium retains the signaling properties required to induce odontogenesis. To investigate the odontogenic capacity of ectomesenchyme, we have used neural tube transplantations from mice to chick embryos to replace the chick neural crest cell populations with mouse neural crest cells. The mouse/chick ...

  16. New genes in the evolution of the neural crest differentiation program

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Morales, Juan Ramón; Henrich, Thorsten; Ramialison, Mirana; Wittbrodt, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Development of the vertebrate head depends on the multipotency and migratory behavior of neural crest derivatives. This cell population is considered a vertebrate innovation and, accordingly, chordate ancestors lacked neural crest counterparts. The identification of neural crest specification genes expressed in the neural plate of basal chordates, in addition to the discovery of pigmented migratory cells in ascidians, has challenged this hypothesis. These new findings revive th...

  17. The neural crest stem cells: control of neural crest cell fate and plasticity by endothelin-3

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    ELISABETH DUPIN

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available How the considerable diversity of neural crest (NC-derived cell types arises in the vertebrate embryo has long been a key question in developmental biology. The pluripotency and plasticity of differentiation of the NC cell population has been fully documented and it is well-established that environmental cues play an important role in patterning the NC derivatives throughout the body. Over the past decade, in vivo and in vitro cellular approaches have unravelled the differentiation potentialities of single NC cells and led to the discovery of NC stem cells. Although it is clear that the final fate of individual cells is in agreement with their final position within the embryo, it has to be stressed that the NC cells that reach target sites are pluripotent and further restrictions occur only late in development. It is therefore a heterogenous collection of cells that is submitted to local environmental signals in the various NC-derived structures. Several factors were thus identified which favor the development of subsets of NC-derived cells in vitro. Moreover, the strategy of gene targeting in mouse has led at identifying new molecules able to control one or several aspects of NC cell differentiation in vivo. Endothelin peptides (and endothelin receptors are among those. The conjunction of recent data obtained in mouse and avian embryos and reviewed here contributes to a better understanding of the action of the endothelin signaling pathway in the emergence and stability of NC-derived cell phenotypes.O modo como a diversidade dos tipos celulares derivados da crista neural (CN surge, no embrião de vertebrado, tem sido uma pergunta chave na biologia do desenvolvimento. A pluripotência e a plasticidade na diferenciação da população de células da CN têm sido intensivamente documentadas, ficando deste modo estabelecido que os factores ambientais têm um papel importante na correta diferenciação dos derivados da CN no organismo. Na d

  18. Neural crest and placode contributions to olfactory development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Jun; Osumi, Noriko

    2015-01-01

    Olfaction is the sense of smell that influences many primitive behaviors for survival, e.g., feeding, reproduction, social interaction, and fear response. The olfactory system is an evolutionarily ancient sensory system and composed of the olfactory epithelium (OE), the olfactory bulb (OB), and the olfactory cortex. The OE gives rise to olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), i.e., primary sensory receptor cells whose axons project directly to the OB. The ORNs are unique in the way that they are continuously replaced during physiological turnover or following injury throughout life. In the OE, horizontal basal cells, i.e., flat and quiescent cells attached to the basal lamina, are now thought to be tissue stem cells. Although OE cells, especially ORNs, were hypothesized to be derived from the olfactory placode (OP), recent genetic fate-mapping studies using Cre reporter mice indicate a dual origin, i.e., the OP and neural crest (NC), of the olfactory system. The NC is a transient embryonic tissue that is formed between the dorsal neuroepithelium and epidermis. Neural crest cells (NCCs) are multipotent cells that migrate into various target tissues and differentiate into various cell types, including neurons and glia of the peripheral nervous system, cranial cartilage and bone, and melanocytes. Recent studies have revealed that neural crest-derived cells (NCDCs) are widely distributed in adult tissues, and that a subset of NCDCs still possesses NCC-like multipotency. Here, we review classical and recent studies of the olfactory system, especially focusing on the contribution of the NC and OP to the OE development. PMID:25662265

  19. Adrenergic innervation of the developing chick heart: neural crest ablations to produce sympathetically aneural hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablation of various regions of premigratory trunk neural crest which gives rise to the sympathetic trunks was used to remove sympathetic cardiac innervation. Neuronal uptake of [3H]-norepinephrine was used as an index of neuronal development in the chick atrium. Following ablation of neural crest over somites 10-15 or 15-20, uptake was significantly decreased in the atrium at 16 and 17 days of development. Ablation of neural crest over somites 5-10 and 20-25 caused no decrease in [3H]-norepinephrine uptake. Removal of neural crest over somites 5-25 or 10-20 caused approximately equal depletions of [3H]-norepinephrine uptake in the atrium. Cardiac norepinephrine concentration was significantly depressed following ablation of neural crest over somites 5-25 but not over somites 10-20. Light-microscopic and histofluorescent preparations confirmed the absence of sympathetic trunks in the region of the normal origin of the sympathetic cardiac nerves following neural crest ablation over somites 10-20. The neural tube and dorsal root ganglia were damaged in the area of the neural-crest ablation; however, all of these structures were normal cranial and caudal to the lesioned area. Development of most of the embryos as well as the morphology of all of the hearts was normal following the lesion. These results indicate that it is possible to produce sympathetically aneural hearts by neural-crest ablation; however, sympathetic cardiac nerves account for an insignificant amount of cardiac norepinephrine

  20. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, N. R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development.

  1. Defective ALK5 signaling in the neural crest leads to increased postmigratory neural crest cell apoptosis and severe outflow tract defects

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    Sucov Henry M

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital cardiovascular diseases are the most common form of birth defects in humans. A substantial portion of these defects has been associated with inappropriate induction, migration, differentiation and patterning of pluripotent cardiac neural crest stem cells. While TGF-β-superfamily signaling has been strongly implicated in neural crest cell development, the detailed molecular signaling mechanisms in vivo are still poorly understood. Results We deleted the TGF-β type I receptor Alk5 specifically in the mouse neural crest cell lineage. Failure in signaling via ALK5 leads to severe cardiovascular and pharyngeal defects, including inappropriate remodeling of pharyngeal arch arteries, abnormal aortic sac development, failure in pharyngeal organ migration and persistent truncus arteriosus. While ALK5 is not required for neural crest cell migration, our results demonstrate that it plays an important role in the survival of post-migratory cardiac neural crest cells. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that ALK5-mediated signaling in neural crest cells plays an essential cell-autonomous role in the pharyngeal and cardiac outflow tract development.

  2. Identification and dissection of a key enhancer mediating cranial neural crest specific expression of transcription factor, Ets-1

    OpenAIRE

    Barembaum, Meyer; Bronner, Marianne E.

    2013-01-01

    Neural crest cells form diverse derivatives that vary according to their level of origin along the body axis, with only cranial neural crest cells contributing to facial skeleton. Interestingly, the transcription factor Ets-1 is uniquely expressed in cranial but not trunk neural crest, where it functions as a direct input into neural crest specifier genes, Sox10 and FoxD3. We have isolated and interrogated a cis-regulatory element, conserved between birds and mammals, that drives reporter exp...

  3. File list: NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests hg19 No description Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived... neural crests http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests.bed ...

  4. File list: InP.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests hg19 Input control Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived... neural crests SRX1091573,SRX059369,SRX059361 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests.bed ...

  5. File list: Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests hg19 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived... neural crests SRX059366 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests.bed ...

  6. File list: NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests hg19 No description Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived... neural crests http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests.bed ...

  7. Identification of dividing, determined sensory neuron precursors in the mammalian neural crest

    OpenAIRE

    Greenwood, Amy L.; Turner, Eric E.; Anderson, David J.

    1999-01-01

    Sensory and autonomic neurons of the vertebrate peripheral nervous system are derived from the neural crest. Here we use the expression of lineage-specific transcription factors as a means to identify neuronal subtypes that develop in rat neural crest cultures grown in a defined medium. Sensory neurons, identified by expression of the POU-domain transcription factor Brn-3.0, develop from dividing precursors that differentiate within 2 days following emigration from the neural tube. Most of th...

  8. Tcf7l1 protects the anterior neural fold from adopting the neural crest fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mašek, Jan; Machoň, Ondřej; Kořínek, Vladimír; Taketo, M Mark; Kozmik, Zbyněk

    2016-06-15

    The neural crest (NC) is crucial for the evolutionary diversification of vertebrates. NC cells are induced at the neural plate border by the coordinated action of several signaling pathways, including Wnt/β-catenin. NC cells are normally generated in the posterior neural plate border, whereas the anterior neural fold is devoid of NC cells. Using the mouse model, we show here that active repression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling is required for maintenance of neuroepithelial identity in the anterior neural fold and for inhibition of NC induction. Conditional inactivation of Tcf7l1, a transcriptional repressor of Wnt target genes, leads to aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the anterior neuroectoderm and its conversion into NC. This reduces the developing prosencephalon without affecting the anterior-posterior neural character. Thus, Tcf7l1 defines the border between the NC and the prospective forebrain via restriction of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling gradient. PMID:27302397

  9. Adipose stromal cells contain phenotypically distinct adipogenic progenitors derived from neural crest.

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    Yoshihiro Sowa

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs contain phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous subpopulations of cells, but their developmental origin and their relative differentiation potential remain elusive. In the present study, we aimed at investigating how and to what extent the neural crest contributes to ASCs using Cre-loxP-mediated fate mapping. ASCs harvested from subcutaneous fat depots of either adult P0-Cre/or Wnt1-Cre/Floxed-reporter mice contained a few neural crest-derived ASCs (NCDASCs. This subpopulation of cells was successfully expanded in vitro under standard culture conditions and their growth rate was comparable to non-neural crest derivatives. Although NCDASCs were positive for several mesenchymal stem cell markers as non-neural crest derivatives, they exhibited a unique bipolar or multipolar morphology with higher expression of markers for both neural crest progenitors (p75NTR, Nestin, and Sox2 and preadipocytes (CD24, CD34, S100, Pref-1, GATA2, and C/EBP-delta. NCDASCs were able to differentiate into adipocytes with high efficiency but their osteogenic and chondrogenic potential was markedly attenuated, indicating their commitment to adipogenesis. In vivo, a very small proportion of adipocytes were originated from the neural crest. In addition, p75NTR-positive neural crest-derived cells were identified along the vessels within the subcutaneous adipose tissue, but they were negative for mural and endothelial markers. These results demonstrate that ASCs contain neural crest-derived adipocyte-restricted progenitors whose phenotype is distinct from that of non-neural crest derivatives.

  10. Neural crest does not contribute to the neck and shoulder in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum.

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    Hans-Henning Epperlein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A major step during the evolution of tetrapods was their transition from water to land. This process involved the reduction or complete loss of the dermal bones that made up connections to the skull and a concomitant enlargement of the endochondral shoulder girdle. In the mouse the latter is derived from three separate embryonic sources: lateral plate mesoderm, somites, and neural crest. The neural crest was suggested to sustain the muscle attachments. How this complex composition of the endochondral shoulder girdle arose during evolution and whether it is shared by all tetrapods is unknown. Salamanders that lack dermal bone within their shoulder girdle were of special interest for a possible contribution of the neural crest to the endochondral elements and muscle attachment sites, and we therefore studied them in this context. RESULTS: We grafted neural crest from GFP+ fluorescent transgenic axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum donor embryos into white (d/d axolotl hosts and followed the presence of neural crest cells within the cartilage of the shoulder girdle and the connective tissue of muscle attachment sites of the neck-shoulder region. Strikingly, neural crest cells did not contribute to any part of the endochondral shoulder girdle or to the connective tissue at muscle attachment sites in axolotl. CONCLUSIONS: Our results in axolotl suggest that neural crest does not serve a general function in vertebrate shoulder muscle attachment sites as predicted by the "muscle scaffold theory," and that it is not necessary to maintain connectivity of the endochondral shoulder girdle to the skull. Our data support the possibility that the contribution of the neural crest to the endochondral shoulder girdle, which is observed in the mouse, arose de novo in mammals as a developmental basis for their skeletal synapomorphies. This further supports the hypothesis of an increased neural crest diversification during vertebrate evolution.

  11. Elk3 is essential for the progression from progenitor to definitive neural crest cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Crystal D; Phillips, Jacquelyn L; Bronner, Marianne E

    2013-02-15

    Elk3/Net/Sap2 (here referred to as Elk3) is an Ets ternary complex transcriptional repressor known for its involvement in angiogenesis during embryonic development. Although Elk3 is expressed in various tissues, additional roles for the protein outside of vasculature development have yet to be reported. Here, we characterize the early spatiotemporal expression pattern of Elk3 in the avian embryo using whole mount in situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR and examine the effects of its loss of function on neural crest development. At early stages, Elk3 is expressed in the head folds, head mesenchyme, intersomitic vessels, and migratory cranial neural crest (NC) cells. Loss of the Elk3 protein results in the retention of Pax7+ precursors in the dorsal neural tube that fail to upregulate neural crest specifier genes, FoxD3, Sox10 and Snail2, resulting in embryos with severe migration defects. The results putatively place Elk3 downstream of neural plate border genes, but upstream of neural crest specifier genes in the neural crest gene regulatory network (NC-GRN), suggesting that it is critical for the progression from progenitor to definitive neural crest cell. PMID:23266330

  12. Induction of cranial and posterior trunk neural crest by exogenous retinoic acid in zebrafish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) plays an important role in development of vertebrate embryos. We demonstrate impacts of exogenous RA on the formation of neural crest cells in zebrafish using specific neural crest markers sox9b and crestin. Treatment with all-trans RA at 10?7 mmol/L at 50% epiboly induces sox9b expression in the forebrain and crestin expression in the forebrain and midbrain, resulting in significant increase of pigment cells in the head derived from the cranial neural crest. In addition, RA treatment induces expression of sox9b and crestin in the caudal marginal cells of the neuroectoderm during early segmentation. Earlier commitment of these cells to the neural crest fate in the posterior margins leads to abnormal development of the posterior body, probably by preventing mingling of ventral derived and dorsal-derived cells during the formation of the tailbud.

  13. Dissecting early regulatory relationships in the lamprey neural crest gene network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, Natalya; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2008-12-23

    The neural crest, a multipotent embryonic cell type, originates at the border between neural and nonneural ectoderm. After neural tube closure, these cells undergo an epithelial-mesenchymal transition, migrate to precise, often distant locations, and differentiate into diverse derivatives. Analyses of expression and function of signaling and transcription factors in higher vertebrates has led to the proposal that a neural crest gene regulatory network (NC-GRN) orchestrates neural crest formation. Here, we interrogate the NC-GRN in the lamprey, taking advantage of its slow development and basal phylogenetic position to resolve early inductive events, 1 regulatory step at the time. To establish regulatory relationships at the neural plate border, we assess relative expression of 6 neural crest network genes and effects of individually perturbing each on the remaining 5. The results refine an upstream portion of the NC-GRN and reveal unexpected order and linkages therein; e.g., lamprey AP-2 appears to function early as a neural plate border rather than a neural crest specifier and in a pathway linked to MsxA but independent of ZicA. These findings provide an ancestral framework for performing comparative tests in higher vertebrates in which network linkages may be more difficult to resolve because of their rapid development. PMID:19104059

  14. Isolation and characterization of neural crest-derived stem cells from dental pulp of neonatal mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajohnkiart Janebodin

    Full Text Available Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs are shown to reside within the tooth and play an important role in dentin regeneration. DPSCs were first isolated and characterized from human teeth and most studies have focused on using this adult stem cell for clinical applications. However, mouse DPSCs have not been well characterized and their origin(s have not yet been elucidated. Herein we examined if murine DPSCs are neural crest derived and determined their in vitro and in vivo capacity. DPSCs from neonatal murine tooth pulp expressed embryonic stem cell and neural crest related genes, but lacked expression of mesodermal genes. Cells isolated from the Wnt1-Cre/R26R-LacZ model, a reporter of neural crest-derived tissues, indicated that DPSCs were Wnt1-marked and therefore of neural crest origin. Clonal DPSCs showed multi-differentiation in neural crest lineage for odontoblasts, chondrocytes, adipocytes, neurons, and smooth muscles. Following in vivo subcutaneous transplantation with hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate, based on tissue/cell morphology and specific antibody staining, the clones differentiated into odontoblast-like cells and produced dentin-like structure. Conversely, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs gave rise to osteoblast-like cells and generated bone-like structure. Interestingly, the capillary distribution in the DPSC transplants showed close proximity to odontoblasts whereas in the BMSC transplants bone condensations were distant to capillaries resembling dentinogenesis in the former vs. osteogenesis in the latter. Thus we demonstrate the existence of neural crest-derived DPSCs with differentiation capacity into cranial mesenchymal tissues and other neural crest-derived tissues. In turn, DPSCs hold promise as a source for regenerating cranial mesenchyme and other neural crest derived tissues.

  15. Ets-1 confers cranial features on neural crest delamination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Théveneau

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells (NCC have the particularity to invade the environment where they differentiate after separation from the neuroepithelium. This process, called delamination, is strikingly different between cranial and trunk NCCs. If signalings controlling slow trunk delamination start being deciphered, mechanisms leading to massive and rapid cranial outflow are poorly documented. Here, we show that the chick cranial NCCs delamination is the result of two events: a substantial cell mobilization and an epithelium to mesenchyme transition (EMT. We demonstrate that ets-1, a transcription factor specifically expressed in cranial NCCs, is responsible for the former event by recruiting massively cranial premigratory NCCs independently of the S-phase of the cell cycle and by leading the gathered cells to straddle the basal lamina. However, it does not promote the EMT process alone but can cooperate with snail-2 (previously called slug to this event. Altogether, these data lead us to propose that ets-1 plays a pivotal role in conferring specific cephalic characteristics on NCC delamination.

  16. Conditional expression of Spry1 in neural crest causes craniofacial and cardiac defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spicer Douglas B

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growth factors and their receptors are mediators of organogenesis and must be tightly regulated in a temporal and spatial manner for proper tissue morphogenesis. Intracellular regulators of growth factor signaling pathways provide an additional level of control. Members of the Sprouty family negatively regulate receptor tyrosine kinase pathways in several developmental contexts. To gain insight into the role of Spry1 in neural crest development, we analyzed the developmental effects of conditional expression of Spry1 in neural crest-derived tissues. Results Here we report that conditional expression of Spry1 in neural crest cells causes defects in craniofacial and cardiac development in mice. Spry1;Wnt1-Cre embryos die perinatally and exhibit facial clefting, cleft palate, cardiac and cranial nerve defects. These defects appear to be the result of decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis of neural crest and neural crest-derived cell populations. In addition, the domains of expression of several key transcription factors important to normal craniofacial and cardiac development including AP2, Msx2, Dlx5, and Dlx6 were reduced in Spry1;Wnt1-Cre transgenic embryos. Conclusion Collectively, these data suggest that Spry1 is an important regulator of craniofacial and cardiac morphogenesis and perturbations in Spry1 levels may contribute to congenital disorders involving tissues of neural crest origin.

  17. Substrate-mediated reprogramming of human fibroblasts into neural crest stem-like cells and their applications in neural repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ting-Chen; Hsieh, Fu-Yu; Dai, Niann-Tzyy; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2016-09-01

    Cell- and gene-based therapies have emerged as promising strategies for treating neurological diseases. The sources of neural stem cells are limited while the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have risk of tumor formation. Here, we proposed the generation of self-renewable, multipotent, and neural lineage-related neural crest stem-like cells by chitosan substrate-mediated gene transfer of a single factor forkhead box D3 (FOXD3) for the use in neural repair. A simple, non-toxic, substrate-mediated method was applied to deliver the naked FOXD3 plasmid into human fibroblasts. The transfection of FOXD3 increased cell proliferation and up-regulated the neural crest marker genes (FOXD3, SOX2, and CD271), stemness marker genes (OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2), and neural lineage-related genes (Nestin, β-tubulin and GFAP). The expression levels of stemness marker genes and neural crest maker genes in the FOXD3-transfected fibroblasts were maintained until the fifth passage. The FOXD3 reprogrammed fibroblasts based on the new method significantly rescued the neural function of the impaired zebrafish. The chitosan substrate-mediated delivery of naked plasmid showed feasibility in reprogramming somatic cells. Particularly, the FOXD3 reprogrammed fibroblasts hold promise as an easily accessible cellular source with neural crest stem-like behavior for treating neural diseases in the future. PMID:27341268

  18. Skeletogenic fate of zebrafish cranial and trunk neural crest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Kague

    Full Text Available The neural crest (NC is a major contributor to the vertebrate craniofacial skeleton, detailed in model organisms through embryological and genetic approaches, most notably in chick and mouse. Despite many similarities between these rather distant species, there are also distinct differences in the contribution of the NC, particularly to the calvariae of the skull. Lack of information about other vertebrate groups precludes an understanding of the evolutionary significance of these differences. Study of zebrafish craniofacial development has contributed substantially to understanding of cartilage and bone formation in teleosts, but there is currently little information on NC contribution to the zebrafish skeleton. Here, we employ a two-transgene system based on Cre recombinase to genetically label NC in the zebrafish. We demonstrate NC contribution to cells in the cranial ganglia and peripheral nervous system known to be NC-derived, as well as to a subset of myocardial cells. The indelible labeling also enables us to determine NC contribution to late-forming bones, including the calvariae. We confirm suspected NC origin of cartilage and bones of the viscerocranium, including cartilages such as the hyosymplectic and its replacement bones (hymandibula and symplectic and membranous bones such as the opercle. The cleithrum develops at the border of NC and mesoderm, and as an ancestral component of the pectoral girdle was predicted to be a hybrid bone composed of both NC and mesoderm tissues. However, we find no evidence of a NC contribution to the cleithrum. Similarly, in the vault of the skull, the parietal bones and the caudal portion of the frontal bones show no evidence of NC contribution. We also determine a NC origin for caudal fin lepidotrichia; the presumption is that these are derived from trunk NC, demonstrating that these cells have the ability to form bone during normal vertebrate development.

  19. Local increase level of chondroitin sulfate induces changes in the rhombencephalic neural crest migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro Balbás, J A; Gato, A; Alonso, M; Barbosa, E

    1998-03-01

    Numerous studies suggest that chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) inhibits neural crest cells (NCC) migration at the trunk level. However, its action on the cephalic neural crest is not clear. To determine this action, we have microinjected 0.5 nl of different concentrations of chondroitin sulfate (CS) at the anterior rhombencephalon level in 9 stage chick embryos, as well as subgerminally administering beta-D-xyloside to 8 stage chick embryos. Beta-D-xyloside disrupts CSPG synthesis, producing an increase in CS free chains in several embryonal anlages. Chondroitin sulfate microinjected embryos and beta-D xyloside treated embryos were reincubated until attaining 12 stage. Results obtained for both experimental groups were similar. Immunoreactivity with HNK-1 antibody revealed that NCC did not migrate, remaining near the rhombencephalon dorsal wall; in addition, several NCC did not separate from the neural fold, becoming invaginated towards the rhombencephalon cavity. Our findings indicate that an increase in CS free chains in cephalic neural crest migratory routes not only disrupts their migration, but also impedes delamination and detachment of the rhombencephalic neuroepithelium NCC. These data suggest that the inhibitory action upon the neural crest migration attributed to CSPG may rest on its glycosaminoglycan (GAG). We cannot, however, rule out the possibility that increases in other GAGs apart from CS, may produce similar effects on neural crest migration. PMID:9551866

  20. Signi fi cance of Neural Crest in Tooth Development: The Molecular Signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VP Jayasekharan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The neural crest originates from cells located along the lateral margins of the neural plate. Neural crest cells arise as the result of an inductive action by the non-neural ectoderm adjacent to the neural plate and possibly by nearby mesoderm as well. As the neural tube forms, a group of cells separate from the neuro- ectoderm. These cells have the capacity to migrate and differen- tiate extensively within the developing embryo and they are the basis of structures such as spinal sensory ganglia, sympathetic neurons, Schwann cells, pigment cells and meninges. Speci fi c interactions occur during the development of tooth and recent research has concentrated more on the molecular aspects of these interactions. Thus, it is highly imperative to understand and digress the complex mechanisms involved in these processes

  1. Neural crest stem cell population in craniomaxillofacial development and tissue repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M La Noce

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells, delaminating from the neural tube during migration, undergo an epithelial-mesenchymal transition and differentiate into several cell types strongly reinforcing the mesoderm of the craniofacial body area – giving rise to bone, cartilage and other tissues and cells of this human body area. Recent studies on craniomaxillofacial neural crest-derived cells have provided evidence for the tremendous plasticity of these cells. Actually, neural crest cells can respond and adapt to the environment in which they migrate and the cranial mesoderm plays an important role toward patterning the identity of the migrating neural crest cells. In our experience, neural crest-derived stem cells, such as dental pulp stem cells, can actively proliferate, repair bone and give rise to other tissues and cytotypes, including blood vessels, smooth muscle, adipocytes and melanocytes, highlighting that their use in tissue engineering is successful. In this review, we provide an overview of the main pathways involved in neural crest formation, delamination, migration and differentiation; and, in particular, we concentrate our attention on the translatability of the latest scientific progress. Here we try to suggest new ideas and strategies that are needed to fully develop the clinical use of these cells. This effort should involve both researchers/clinicians and improvements in good manufacturing practice procedures. It is important to address studies towards clinical application or take into consideration that studies must have an effective therapeutic prospect for humans. New approaches and ideas must be concentrated also toward stem cell recruitment and activation within the human body, overcoming the classical grafting.

  2. Williams Syndrome Transcription Factor is critical for neural crest cell function in Xenopus laevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Chris; Yazgan, Oya; Kuo, Hui-Ching; Malakar, Sreepurna; Thomas, Trevor; Fitzgerald, Amanda; Harbour, Billy; Henry, Jonathan J.; Krebs, Jocelyn E.

    2012-01-01

    Williams Syndrome Transcription Factor (WSTF) is one of ~25 haplodeficient genes in patients with the complex developmental disorder Williams Syndrome (WS). WS results in visual/spatial processing defects, cognitive impairment, unique behavioral phenotypes, characteristic “elfin” facial features, low muscle tone and heart defects. WSTF exists in several chromatin remodeling complexes and has roles in transcription, replication, and repair. Chromatin remodeling is essential during embryogenesis, but WSTF’s role in vertebrate development is poorly characterized. To investigate the developmental role of WSTF, we knocked down WSTF in Xenopus laevis embryos using a morpholino that targets WSTF mRNA. BMP4 shows markedly increased and spatially aberrant expression in WSTF-deficient embryos, while SHH, MRF4, PAX2, EPHA4 and SOX2 expression are severely reduced, coupled with defects in a number of developing embryonic structures and organs. WSTF-deficient embryos display defects in anterior neural development. Induction of the neural crest, measured by expression of the neural crest-specific genes SNAIL and SLUG, is unaffected by WSTF depletion. However, at subsequent stages WSTF knockdown results in a severe defect in neural crest migration and/or maintenance. Consistent with a maintenance defect, WSTF knockdowns display a specific pattern of increased apoptosis at the tailbud stage in regions corresponding to the path of cranial neural crest migration. Our work is the first to describe a role for WSTF in proper neural crest function, and suggests that neural crest defects resulting from WSTF haploinsufficiency may be a major contributor to the pathoembryology of WS. PMID:22691402

  3. Characterization of an individual neural crest-like cell lineage in the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis

    OpenAIRE

    Cone, Angela C.

    2008-01-01

    During embryogenesis, all chordate embryos undergo neurulation to form a dorsal, hollow nerve cord. Neural crest cells (NCC), considered a vertebrate innovation, arise during neurulation and later differentiate into a multitude of tissues that account for much of the structural complexity that distinguishes craniates from invertebrate chordates [1, 2]. NCCs are induced and specified at the border of the neural and non-neural ectoderm by a complex network of inductive signals and transcription...

  4. [Progress in the study of syndromic hearing loss resulted from neural crest abnormalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalan, Liu; Hua, Zhang; Yong, Feng

    2014-11-01

    More than 400 types of syndromic hearing loss (SHL) have been reported so far, in which Waardenburg syndrome (WS), congenital microtia syndrome (CMS), and large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS) are the most common ones in clinic. However, it is difficult to study the genetic basis and pathogenesis of SHL in a systematical way because of the strong clinical and genetic heterogeneity of SHL. Dysfunction of neural crest cells (NCC), which are caused by the gene interaction network extended from SOX10 and PAX3, are relevant to the phenotype of WS, CMS and LVAS. Our previous study also confirmed that the gene network was involved in the pathogenesis of WS. In this review, we summarize research progress in the pathogenic mechanisms of SHL resulted from defects in neural crest decelopment, and provide the gene interaction network of neural crest abnormalities resulting in SHL, and hope to provide research ideas and theoretical basis for the systematical study on pathogenesis of common SHL. PMID:25567871

  5. Modeling Cerebrovascular Pathophysiology in Amyloid-β Metabolism using Neural-Crest-Derived Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Cheung

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available There is growing recognition of cerebrovascular contributions to neurodegenerative diseases. In the walls of cerebral arteries, amyloid-beta (Aβ accumulation is evident in a majority of aged people and patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Here, we leverage human pluripotent stem cells to generate vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs from neural crest progenitors, recapitulating brain-vasculature-specific attributes of Aβ metabolism. We confirm that the lipoprotein receptor, LRP1, functions in our neural-crest-derived SMCs to mediate Aβ uptake and intracellular lysosomal degradation. Hypoxia significantly compromises the contribution of SMCs to Aβ clearance by suppressing LRP1 expression. This enabled us to develop an assay of Aβ uptake by using the neural crest-derived SMCs with hypoxia as a stress paradigm. We then tested several vascular protective compounds in a high-throughput format, demonstrating the value of stem-cell-based phenotypic screening for novel therapeutics and drug repurposing, aimed at alleviating amyloid burden.

  6. Neural Crest Stem Cells from Dental Tissues: A New Hope for Dental and Neural Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaskon Ibarretxe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several stem cell sources persist in the adult human body, which opens the doors to both allogeneic and autologous cell therapies. Tooth tissues have proven to be a surprisingly rich and accessible source of neural crest-derived ectomesenchymal stem cells (EMSCs, which may be employed to repair disease-affected oral tissues in advanced regenerative dentistry. Additionally, one area of medicine that demands intensive research on new sources of stem cells is nervous system regeneration, since this constitutes a therapeutic hope for patients affected by highly invalidating conditions such as spinal cord injury, stroke, or neurodegenerative diseases. However, endogenous adult sources of neural stem cells present major drawbacks, such as their scarcity and complicated obtention. In this context, EMSCs from dental tissues emerge as good alternative candidates, since they are preserved in adult human individuals, and retain both high proliferation ability and a neural-like phenotype in vitro. In this paper, we discuss some important aspects of tissue regeneration by cell therapy and point out some advantages that EMSCs provide for dental and neural regeneration. We will finally review some of the latest research featuring experimental approaches and benefits of dental stem cell therapy.

  7. Wnt1 and BMP2: two factors recruiting multipotent neural crest progenitors isolated from adult bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glejzer, A; Laudet, E; Leprince, P; Hennuy, B; Poulet, C; Shakhova, O; Sommer, L; Rogister, B; Wislet-Gendebien, S

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that neural crest-derived progenitor cells can be found in diverse mammalian tissues including tissues that were not previously shown to contain neural crest derivatives, such as bone marrow. The identification of those "new" neural crest-derived progenitor cells opens new strategies for developing autologous cell replacement therapies in regenerative medicine. However, their potential use is still a challenge as only few neural crest-derived progenitor cells were found in those new accessible locations. In this study, we developed a protocol, based on wnt1 and BMP2 effects, to enrich neural crest-derived cells from adult bone marrow. Those two factors are known to maintain and stimulate the proliferation of embryonic neural crest stem cells, however, their effects have never been characterized on neural crest cells isolated from adult tissues. Using multiple strategies from microarray to 2D-DIGE proteomic analyses, we characterized those recruited neural crest-derived cells, defining their identity and their differentiating abilities. PMID:20976520

  8. File list: ALL.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests hg19 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived...X1091539,SRX059364 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests.bed ...

  9. File list: His.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests hg19 Histone Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived...3,SRX1091531,SRX059364,SRX1091530 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests.bed ...

  10. File list: His.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests hg19 Histone Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived...30,SRX059362,SRX1091539,SRX059364 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests.bed ...

  11. Synthesis on accumulation of putative neurotransmitters by cultured neural crest cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The events mediating the differentiation of embryonic neural crest cells into several types of neurons are incompletely understood. In order to probe one aspect of this differentiation, we have examined the capacity of cultured quail trunk neural crest cells to synthesize, from radioactive precursors, and store several putative neurotransmitter compounds. These neural crest cultures develop the capacity to synthesize and accumulate acetylcholine and the catecholamines norepinephrine and dopamine. In contrast, detectable but relatively little synthesis and accumulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine gamma-aminobutyric acid, or octopamine from the appropriate radiolabeled precursors were observed. The capacity for synthesis and accumulation of radiolabeled acetylcholine and catecholamines is very low or absent at 2 days in vitro. Between 3 and 7 days in vitro, there is a marked rise in both catecholamine and acetylcholine accumulation in the cultures. These findings suggest that, under the particular conditions used in these experiments, the development of neurotransmitter biosynthesis in trunk neural crest cells ijs restricted and resembles, at least partially, the pattern observed in vivo. The development of this capacity to synthesize and store radiolabeled acetylcholine and catecholamines from the appropriate radioactive precursors coincides closely with the development of the activities of the synthetic enzymes choline acetyltransferase and dopamine beta-hydroxylase reported by others

  12. Properties of Neural Crest-Like Cells Differentiated from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křivánek, J.; Švandová, Eva; Králik, J.; Hajda, S.; Fedr, Radek; Vinařský, V.; Jaroš, J.; Souček, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 2014 (2014), s. 30-38. ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/1418 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : stem cell differentiation * neural crest * odontogenesis Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; ED - Physiology (UZFG-Y) Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2014

  13. Meis2 is essential for cranial and cardiac neural crest development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machoň, Ondřej; Mašek, Jan; Machoňová, Olga; Krauss, S.; Kozmik, Zbyněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, Nov 6 (2015). ISSN 1471-213X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/2042; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11214 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Meis2 * Persistent truncus arteriosus * Neural crest * Craniofacial skeleton * Cranial nerves Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.667, year: 2014

  14. Gene regulatory evolution and the origin of macroevolutionary novelties: insights from the neural crest

    OpenAIRE

    Van Otterloo, Eric; Robert A Cornell; Medeiros, Daniel Meulemans; Garnett, Aaron T.

    2013-01-01

    The appearance of novel anatomic structures during evolution is driven by changes to the networks of transcription factors, signaling pathways, and downstream effector genes controlling development. The nature of the changes to these developmental gene regulatory networks (GRNs) is poorly understood. A striking test case is the evolution of the GRN controlling development of the neural crest (NC). NC cells emerge from the neural plate border (NPB) and contribute to multiple adult structures. ...

  15. An FGF3-BMP Signaling Axis Regulates Caudal Neural Tube Closure, Neural Crest Specification and Anterior-Posterior Axis Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Matthew J.; Schimmang, Thomas; Lewandoski, Mark

    2016-01-01

    During vertebrate axis extension, adjacent tissue layers undergo profound morphological changes: within the neuroepithelium, neural tube closure and neural crest formation are occurring, while within the paraxial mesoderm somites are segmenting from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Little is known about the signals between these tissues that regulate their coordinated morphogenesis. Here, we analyze the posterior axis truncation of mouse Fgf3 null homozygotes and demonstrate that the earliest role of PSM-derived FGF3 is to regulate BMP signals in the adjacent neuroepithelium. FGF3 loss causes elevated BMP signals leading to increased neuroepithelium proliferation, delay in neural tube closure and premature neural crest specification. We demonstrate that elevated BMP4 depletes PSM progenitors in vitro, phenocopying the Fgf3 mutant, suggesting that excessive BMP signals cause the Fgf3 axis defect. To test this in vivo we increased BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants by removing one copy of Noggin, which encodes a BMP antagonist. In such mutants, all parameters of the Fgf3 phenotype were exacerbated: neural tube closure delay, premature neural crest specification, and premature axis termination. Conversely, genetically decreasing BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants, via loss of BMP receptor activity, alleviates morphological defects. Aberrant apoptosis is observed in the Fgf3 mutant tailbud. However, we demonstrate that cell death does not cause the Fgf3 phenotype: blocking apoptosis via deletion of pro-apoptotic genes surprisingly increases all Fgf3 defects including causing spina bifida. We demonstrate that this counterintuitive consequence of blocking apoptosis is caused by the increased survival of BMP-producing cells in the neuroepithelium. Thus, we show that FGF3 in the caudal vertebrate embryo regulates BMP signaling in the neuroepithelium, which in turn regulates neural tube closure, neural crest specification and axis termination. Uncovering this FGF3-BMP signaling axis is

  16. An FGF3-BMP Signaling Axis Regulates Caudal Neural Tube Closure, Neural Crest Specification and Anterior-Posterior Axis Extension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Anderson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During vertebrate axis extension, adjacent tissue layers undergo profound morphological changes: within the neuroepithelium, neural tube closure and neural crest formation are occurring, while within the paraxial mesoderm somites are segmenting from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM. Little is known about the signals between these tissues that regulate their coordinated morphogenesis. Here, we analyze the posterior axis truncation of mouse Fgf3 null homozygotes and demonstrate that the earliest role of PSM-derived FGF3 is to regulate BMP signals in the adjacent neuroepithelium. FGF3 loss causes elevated BMP signals leading to increased neuroepithelium proliferation, delay in neural tube closure and premature neural crest specification. We demonstrate that elevated BMP4 depletes PSM progenitors in vitro, phenocopying the Fgf3 mutant, suggesting that excessive BMP signals cause the Fgf3 axis defect. To test this in vivo we increased BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants by removing one copy of Noggin, which encodes a BMP antagonist. In such mutants, all parameters of the Fgf3 phenotype were exacerbated: neural tube closure delay, premature neural crest specification, and premature axis termination. Conversely, genetically decreasing BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants, via loss of BMP receptor activity, alleviates morphological defects. Aberrant apoptosis is observed in the Fgf3 mutant tailbud. However, we demonstrate that cell death does not cause the Fgf3 phenotype: blocking apoptosis via deletion of pro-apoptotic genes surprisingly increases all Fgf3 defects including causing spina bifida. We demonstrate that this counterintuitive consequence of blocking apoptosis is caused by the increased survival of BMP-producing cells in the neuroepithelium. Thus, we show that FGF3 in the caudal vertebrate embryo regulates BMP signaling in the neuroepithelium, which in turn regulates neural tube closure, neural crest specification and axis termination. Uncovering this FGF3

  17. miR-21 promotes the differentiation of hair follicle-derived neural crest stem cells into Schwann cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuxin Ni; Kaizhi Zhang; Xuejuan Liu; Tingting Yang; Baixiang Wang; Li Fu; Lan A; Yanmin Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Hair follicle-derived neural crest stem cells can be induced to differentiate into Schwann cells in vivo and in vitro. However, the underlying regulatory mechanism during cell differentiation remains poorly understood. This study isolated neural crest stem cells from human hair folli-cles and induced them to differentiate into Schwann cells. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that microRNA (miR)-21 expression was gradually increased during the differentiation of neural crest stem cells into Schwann cells. After transfection with the miR-21 agonist (agomir-21), the differentiation capacity of neural crest stem cells was enhanced. By contrast, after transfection with the miR-21 antagonist (antagomir-21), the differentiation capacity was attenuated. Further study results showed that SOX-2 was an effective target of miR-21. Without compromising SOX2 mRNA expression, miR-21 can down-regulate SOX protein expression by binding to the 3′-UTR of miR-21 mRNA. Knocking out the SOX2 gene from the neural crest stem cells significantly reversed the antagomir-21 inhibition of neural crest stem cells differentiating into Schwann cells. The results suggest that miR-21 expression was increased during the differentiation of neural crest stem cells into Schwann cells and miR-21 promoted the differentiation through down-regu-lating SOX protein expression by binding to the 3′-UTR of SOX2 mRNA.

  18. CHD7, the gene mutated in CHARGE syndrome, regulates genes involved in neural crest cell guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Yvonne; Wehner, Peter; Opitz, Lennart; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Bongers, Ernie M H F; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A; Wincent, Josephine; Schoumans, Jacqueline; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Borchers, Annette; Pauli, Silke

    2014-08-01

    Heterozygous loss of function mutations in CHD7 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7) lead to CHARGE syndrome, a complex developmental disorder affecting craniofacial structures, cranial nerves and several organ systems. Recently, it was demonstrated that CHD7 is essential for the formation of multipotent migratory neural crest cells, which migrate from the neural tube to many regions of the embryo, where they differentiate into various tissues including craniofacial and heart structures. So far, only few CHD7 target genes involved in neural crest cell development have been identified and the role of CHD7 in neural crest cell guidance and the regulation of mesenchymal-epithelial transition are unknown. Therefore, we undertook a genome-wide microarray expression analysis on wild-type and CHD7 deficient (Chd7 (Whi/+) and Chd7 (Whi/Whi)) mouse embryos at day 9.5, a time point of neural crest cell migration. We identified 98 differentially expressed genes between wild-type and Chd7 (Whi/Whi) embryos. Interestingly, many misregulated genes are involved in neural crest cell and axon guidance such as semaphorins and ephrin receptors. By performing knockdown experiments for Chd7 in Xenopus laevis embryos, we found abnormalities in the expression pattern of Sema3a, a protein involved in the pathogenesis of Kallmann syndrome, in vivo. In addition, we detected non-synonymous SEMA3A variations in 3 out of 45 CHD7-negative CHARGE patients. In summary, we discovered for the first time that Chd7 regulates genes involved in neural crest cell guidance, demonstrating a new aspect in the pathogenesis of CHARGE syndrome. Furthermore, we showed for Sema3a a conserved regulatory mechanism across different species, highlighting its significance during development. Although we postulated that the non-synonymous SEMA3A variants which we found in CHD7-negative CHARGE patients alone are not sufficient to produce the phenotype, we suggest an important modifier role for SEMA3A in the

  19. Applications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Neural Crest Cells in Craniofacial Skeletal Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Morikawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial skeletal tissues are composed of tooth and bone, together with nerves and blood vessels. This composite material is mainly derived from neural crest cells (NCCs. The neural crest is transient embryonic tissue present during neural tube formation whose cells have high potential for migration and differentiation. Thus, NCCs are promising candidates for craniofacial tissue regeneration; however, the clinical application of NCCs is hindered by their limited accessibility. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are easily accessible in adults, have similar potential for self-renewal, and can differentiate into skeletal tissues, including bones and cartilage. Therefore, MSCs may represent good sources of stem cells for clinical use. MSCs are classically identified under adherent culture conditions, leading to contamination with other cell lineages. Previous studies have identified mouse- and human-specific MSC subsets using cell surface markers. Additionally, some studies have shown that a subset of MSCs is closely related to neural crest derivatives and endothelial cells. These MSCs may be promising candidates for regeneration of craniofacial tissues from the perspective of developmental fate. Here, we review the fundamental biology of MSCs in craniofacial research.

  20. The positive transcriptional elongation factor (P-TEFb) is required for neural crest specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Victoria L; Marin-Barba, Marta; Moxon, Simon; Ford, Christopher T; Ward, Nicole J; Tomlinson, Matthew L; Desanlis, Ines; Hendry, Adam E; Hontelez, Saartje; van Kruijsbergen, Ila; Veenstra, Gert Jan C; Münsterberg, Andrea E; Wheeler, Grant N

    2016-08-15

    Regulation of gene expression at the level of transcriptional elongation has been shown to be important in stem cells and tumour cells, but its role in the whole animal is only now being fully explored. Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a multipotent population of cells that migrate during early development from the dorsal neural tube throughout the embryo where they differentiate into a variety of cell types including pigment cells, cranio-facial skeleton and sensory neurons. Specification of NCCs is both spatially and temporally regulated during embryonic development. Here we show that components of the transcriptional elongation regulatory machinery, CDK9 and CYCLINT1 of the P-TEFb complex, are required to regulate neural crest specification. In particular, we show that expression of the proto-oncogene c-Myc and c-Myc responsive genes are affected. Our data suggest that P-TEFb is crucial to drive expression of c-Myc, which acts as a 'gate-keeper' for the correct temporal and spatial development of the neural crest. PMID:27343897

  1. Neural crest-mediated bone resorption is a determinant of species-specific jaw length

    OpenAIRE

    Ealba, Erin L.; Jheon, Andrew H.; Hall, Jane; Curantz, Camille; Butcher, Kristin D.; Schneider, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Precise control of jaw length during development is crucial for proper form and function. Previously we have shown that in birds, neural crest mesenchyme (NCM) confers species-specific size and shape to the beak by regulating molecular and histological programs for the induction and deposition of cartilage and bone. Here we reveal that a hitherto unrecognized but similarly essential mechanism for establishing jaw length is the ability of NCM to mediate bone resorption. Osteoclasts are conside...

  2. Culture bag systems for clinical applications of adult human neural crest-derived stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Greiner, Johannes F. W.; Grunwald, Lena-Marie; Müller, Janine; Sudhoff, Holger; Widera, Darius; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Kaltschmidt, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Facing the challenging treatment of neurodegenerative diseases as well as complex craniofacial injuries such as those common after cancer therapy, the field of regenerative medicine increasingly relies on stem cell transplantation strategies. Here, neural crest-derived stem cells (NCSCs) offer many promising applications, although scale up of clinical-grade processes prior to potential transplantations is currently limiting. In this study, we aimed to establish a clinical-grad...

  3. Feeder-free Derivation of Neural Crest Progenitor Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zeltner, Nadja; Lafaille, Fabien G.; Fattahi, Faranak; Studer, Lorenz

    2014-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have great potential for studying human embryonic development, for modeling human diseases in the dish and as a source of transplantable cells for regenerative applications after disease or accidents. Neural crest (NC) cells are the precursors for a large variety of adult somatic cells, such as cells from the peripheral nervous system and glia, melanocytes and mesenchymal cells. They are a valuable source of cells to study aspects of human embryonic develo...

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Neural Crest-Derived Stem Cells from Dental Pulp of Neonatal Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Janebodin, Kajohnkiart; Horst, Orapin V; Ieronimakis, Nicholas; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Reesukumal, Kanit; Pratumvinit, Busadee; Reyes, Morayma

    2011-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are shown to reside within the tooth and play an important role in dentin regeneration. DPSCs were first isolated and characterized from human teeth and most studies have focused on using this adult stem cell for clinical applications. However, mouse DPSCs have not been well characterized and their origin(s) have not yet been elucidated. Herein we examined if murine DPSCs are neural crest derived and determined their in vitro and in vivo capacity. DPSCs from neo...

  5. Adipose Stromal Cells Contain Phenotypically Distinct Adipogenic Progenitors Derived from Neural Crest

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshihiro Sowa; Tetsuya Imura; Toshiaki Numajiri; Kosuke Takeda; Yo Mabuchi; Yumi Matsuzaki; Kenichi Nishino

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs) contain phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous subpopulations of cells, but their developmental origin and their relative differentiation potential remain elusive. In the present study, we aimed at investigating how and to what extent the neural crest contributes to ASCs using Cre-loxP-mediated fate mapping. ASCs harvested from subcutaneous fat depots of either adult P0-Cre/or Wnt1-Cre/Floxed-reporter mice contain...

  6. Analysis of neural crest-derived clones reveals novel aspects of facial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaucka, Marketa; Ivashkin, Evgeny; Gyllborg, Daniel; Zikmund, Tomas; Tesarova, Marketa; Kaiser, Jozef; Xie, Meng; Petersen, Julian; Pachnis, Vassilis; Nicolis, Silvia K; Yu, Tian; Sharpe, Paul; Arenas, Ernest; Brismar, Hjalmar; Blom, Hans; Clevers, Hans; Suter, Ueli; Chagin, Andrei S; Fried, Kaj; Hellander, Andreas; Adameyko, Igor

    2016-08-01

    Cranial neural crest cells populate the future facial region and produce ectomesenchyme-derived tissues, such as cartilage, bone, dermis, smooth muscle, adipocytes, and many others. However, the contribution of individual neural crest cells to certain facial locations and the general spatial clonal organization of the ectomesenchyme have not been determined. We investigated how neural crest cells give rise to clonally organized ectomesenchyme and how this early ectomesenchyme behaves during the developmental processes that shape the face. Using a combination of mouse and zebrafish models, we analyzed individual migration, cell crowd movement, oriented cell division, clonal spatial overlapping, and multilineage differentiation. The early face appears to be built from multiple spatially defined overlapping ectomesenchymal clones. During early face development, these clones remain oligopotent and generate various tissues in a given location. By combining clonal analysis, computer simulations, mouse mutants, and live imaging, we show that facial shaping results from an array of local cellular activities in the ectomesenchyme. These activities mostly involve oriented divisions and crowd movements of cells during morphogenetic events. Cellular behavior that can be recognized as individual cell migration is very limited and short-ranged and likely results from cellular mixing due to the proliferation activity of the tissue. These cellular mechanisms resemble the strategy behind limb bud morphogenesis, suggesting the possibility of common principles and deep homology between facial and limb outgrowth. PMID:27493992

  7. Induction of neural crest in Xenopus by transcription factor AP2α

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Ting; Lee, Young-Hoon; Saint-Jeannet, Jean-Pierre; Sargent, Thomas D.

    2003-01-01

    We report experiments with Xenopus laevis, using both intact embryos and ectodermal explants, showing that the transcription factor AP2α is positively regulated by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Wnt signaling, and that this activation is an essential step in the induction of neural crest (NC). Ectopic expression of AP2α is sufficient to activate high-level expression of NC-specific genes such as Slug and Sox9, which can occur as isolated domains within the neural plate as well as by exp...

  8. Lack of beta1 integrins in enteric neural crest cells leads to a Hirschsprung-like phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breau, Marie A; Pietri, Thomas; Eder, Olivier;

    2006-01-01

    The enteric nervous system arises mainly from vagal and sacral neural crest cells that colonise the gut between 9.5 and 14 days of development in mice. Using the Cre-LoxP system, we removed beta1 integrins in the neural crest cells when they emerge from the neural tube. beta1-null enteric neural...... integrins are required for the villi innervation in the small intestine. Our findings highlight the crucial roles played by beta1 integrins at various steps of enteric nervous system development....

  9. Gene array analysis of neural crest cells identifies transcription factors necessary for direct conversion of embryonic fibroblasts into neural crest cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Motohashi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells (NC cells are multipotent cells that emerge from the edge of the neural folds and migrate throughout the developing embryo. Although the gene regulatory network for generation of NC cells has been elucidated in detail, it has not been revealed which of the factors in the network are pivotal to directing NC identity. In this study we analyzed the gene expression profile of a pure NC subpopulation isolated from Sox10-IRES-Venus mice and investigated whether these genes played a key role in the direct conversion of Sox10-IRES-Venus mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs into NC cells. The comparative molecular profiles of NC cells and neural tube cells in 9.5-day embryos revealed genes including transcription factors selectively expressed in developing trunk NC cells. Among 25 NC cell-specific transcription factor genes tested, SOX10 and SOX9 were capable of converting MEFs into SOX10-positive (SOX10+ cells. The SOX10+ cells were then shown to differentiate into neurons, glial cells, smooth muscle cells, adipocytes and osteoblasts. These SOX10+ cells also showed limited self-renewal ability, suggesting that SOX10 and SOX9 directly converted MEFs into NC cells. Conversely, the remaining transcription factors, including well-known NC cell specifiers, were unable to convert MEFs into SOX10+ NC cells. These results suggest that SOX10 and SOX9 are the key factors necessary for the direct conversion of MEFs into NC cells.

  10. The F-box protein Cdc4/Fbxw7 is a novel regulator of neural crest development in Xenopus laevis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartley Rebecca S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The neural crest is a unique population of cells that arise in the vertebrate ectoderm at the neural plate border after which they migrate extensively throughout the embryo, giving rise to a wide range of derivatives. A number of proteins involved in neural crest development have dynamic expression patterns, and it is becoming clear that ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is partly responsible for this. Results Here we demonstrate a novel role for the F-box protein Cdc4/Fbxw7 in neural crest development. Two isoforms of Xenopus laevis Cdc4 were identified, and designated xCdc4α and xCdc4β. These are highly conserved with vertebrate Cdc4 orthologs, and the Xenopus proteins are functionally equivalent in terms of their ability to degrade Cyclin E, an established vertebrate Cdc4 target. Blocking xCdc4 function specifically inhibited neural crest development at an early stage, prior to expression of c-Myc, Snail2 and Snail. Conclusions We demonstrate that Cdc4, an ubiquitin E3 ligase subunit previously identified as targeting primarily cell cycle regulators for proteolysis, has additional roles in control of formation of the neural crest. Hence, we identify Cdc4 as a protein with separable but complementary functions in control of cell proliferation and differentiation.

  11. Canonical Wnt activity regulates trunk neural crest delamination linking BMP/noggin signaling with G1/S transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstyn-Cohen, Tal; Stanleigh, Jonathan; Sela-Donenfeld, Dalit; Kalcheim, Chaya

    2004-11-01

    Delamination of premigratory neural crest cells depends on a balance between BMP/noggin and on successful G1/S transition. Here, we report that BMP regulates G1/S transition and consequent crest delamination through canonical Wnt signaling. Noggin overexpression inhibits G1/S transition and blocking G1/S abrogates BMP-induced delamination; moreover, transcription of Wnt1 is stimulated by BMP and by the developing somites, which concomitantly inhibit noggin production. Interfering with beta-catenin and LEF/TCF inhibits G1/S transition, neural crest delamination and transcription of various BMP-dependent genes, which include Cad6B, Pax3 and Msx1, but not that of Slug, Sox9 or FoxD3. Hence, we propose that developing somites inhibit noggin transcription in the dorsal tube, resulting in activation of BMP and consequent Wnt1 production. Canonical Wnt signaling in turn stimulates G1/S transition and generation of neural crest cell motility independently of its proposed role in earlier neural crest specification. PMID:15456730

  12. High glucose environment inhibits cranial neural crest survival by activating excessive autophagy in the chick embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yu; Li, Shuai; Wang, Guang; Ma, Zheng-Lai; Chuai, Manli; Cao, Liu; Yang, Xuesong

    2015-01-01

    High glucose levels induced by maternal diabetes could lead to defects in neural crest development during embryogenesis, but the cellular mechanism is still not understood. In this study, we observed a defect in chick cranial skeleton, especially parietal bone development in the presence of high glucose levels, which is derived from cranial neural crest cells (CNCC). In early chick embryo, we found that inducing high glucose levels could inhibit the development of CNCC, however, cell proliferation was not significantly involved. Nevertheless, apoptotic CNCC increased in the presence of high levels of glucose. In addition, the expression of apoptosis and autophagy relevant genes were elevated by high glucose treatment. Next, the application of beads soaked in either an autophagy stimulator (Tunicamycin) or inhibitor (Hydroxychloroquine) functionally proved that autophagy was involved in regulating the production of CNCC in the presence of high glucose levels. Our observations suggest that the ERK pathway, rather than the mTOR pathway, most likely participates in mediating the autophagy induced by high glucose. Taken together, our observations indicated that exposure to high levels of glucose could inhibit the survival of CNCC by affecting cell apoptosis, which might result from the dysregulation of the autophagic process. PMID:26671447

  13. ADAM10 is essential for cranial neural crest-derived maxillofacial bone development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yu; Fu, Runqing; Liu, Jiaqiang; Wu, Yong; Wang, Bo; Jiang, Ning; Nie, Ping; Cao, Haifeng; Yang, Zhi; Fang, Bing

    2016-07-01

    Growth disorders of the craniofacial bones may lead to craniofacial deformities. The majority of maxillofacial bones are derived from cranial neural crest cells via intramembranous bone formation. Any interruption of the craniofacial skeleton development process might lead to craniofacial malformation. A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)10 plays an essential role in organ development and tissue integrity in different organs. However, little is known about its function in craniofacial bone formation. Therefore, we investigated the role of ADAM10 in the developing craniofacial skeleton, particularly during typical mandibular bone development. First, we showed that ADAM10 was expressed in a specific area of the craniofacial bone and that the expression pattern dynamically changed during normal mouse craniofacial development. Then, we crossed wnt1-cre transgenic mice with adam10-flox mice to generate ADAM10 conditional knockout mice. The stereomicroscopic, radiographic, and von Kossa staining results showed that conditional knockout of ADAM10 in cranial neural crest cells led to embryonic death, craniofacial dysmorphia and bone defects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that impaired mineralization could be triggered by decreased osteoblast differentiation, increased cell death. Overall, these findings show that ADAM10 plays an essential role in craniofacial bone development. PMID:27221046

  14. Expression of the capacity to release [3H]norepinephrine by neural crest cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cultures of trunk neural crest cells from quail embryos were tested for their ability to release [3H]norepinephrine [(3H]NE) in response to depolarization. After 7 days in vitro, exposure of the cultures to either the alkaloid veratridine or 40 mM K+ results in the evoked release of [3H]NE. The release evoked by veratridine is blocked in the presence of tetrodotoxin. The release evoked by increased K+ is blocked by the calcium antagonist cobalt. Release in response to the nicotinic cholinergic agonist 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazine was also observed. The amount of evoked release is highly correlated with the number of histochemically demonstrable catecholamine-containing cells in a given culture. Autoradiography reveals that the radioactivity taken up by these cultures is located in a subpopulation of cells whose morphology resembles that of the histochemically detectable catecholamine-containing cell population. Whereas capacity for the release of [3H] NE is readily detectable after 7 days in vitro, it is detectable only with difficulty after 4 days in vitro. There is a greater than 6-fold increase in uptake capacity over the period of 4 to 7 days in vitro. These results demonstrate that neural crest cultures grown without their normal synaptic inputs or targets can exhibit the capacity for stimulus secretion coupling characteristic of synaptic neurotransmitter release

  15. IKAP/Elp1 is required in vivo for neurogenesis and neuronal survival, but not for neural crest migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara J Hunnicutt

    Full Text Available Familial Dysautonomia (FD; Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy; HSAN III manifests from a failure in development of the peripheral sensory and autonomic nervous systems. The disease results from a point mutation in the IKBKAP gene, which encodes the IKAP protein, whose function is still unresolved in the developing nervous system. Since the neurons most severely depleted in the disease derive from the neural crest, and in light of data identifying a role for IKAP in cell motility and migration, it has been suggested that FD results from a disruption in neural crest migration. To determine the function of IKAP during development of the nervous system, we (1 first determined the spatial-temporal pattern of IKAP expression in the developing peripheral nervous system, from the onset of neural crest migration through the period of programmed cell death in the dorsal root ganglia, and (2 using RNAi, reduced expression of IKBKAP mRNA in the neural crest lineage throughout the process of dorsal root ganglia (DRG development in chick embryos in ovo. Here we demonstrate that IKAP is not expressed by neural crest cells and instead is expressed as neurons differentiate both in the CNS and PNS, thus the devastation of the PNS in FD could not be due to disruptions in neural crest motility or migration. In addition, we show that alterations in the levels of IKAP, through both gain and loss of function studies, perturbs neuronal polarity, neuronal differentiation and survival. Thus IKAP plays pleiotropic roles in both the peripheral and central nervous systems.

  16. In vivo tumorigenesis was observed after injection of in vitro expanded neural crest stem cells isolated from adult bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Wislet-Gendebien

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cells are adult multipotent cells that represent an attractive tool in cellular therapy strategies. Several studies have reported that in vitro passaging of mesenchymal stem cells alters the functional and biological properties of those cells, leading to the accumulation of genetic aberrations. Recent studies described bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC as mixed populations of cells including mesenchymal (MSC and neural crest stem cells (NCSC. Here, we report the transformation of NCSC into tumorigenic cells, after in vitro long-term passaging. Indeed, the characterization of 6 neural crest-derived clones revealed the presence of one tumorigenic clone. Transcriptomic analyses of this clone highlighted, among others, numerous cell cycle checkpoint modifications and chromosome 11q down-regulation (suggesting a deletion of chromosome 11q compared with the other clones. Moreover, unsupervised analysis such as a dendrogram generated after agglomerative hierarchical clustering comparing several transcriptomic data showed important similarities between the tumorigenic neural crest-derived clone and mammary tumor cell lines. Altogether, it appeared that NCSC isolated from adult bone marrow represents a potential danger for cellular therapy, and consequently, we recommend that phenotypic, functional and genetic assays should be performed on bone marrow mesenchymal and neural crest stem cells before in vivo use, to demonstrate whether their biological properties, after ex vivo expansion, remain suitable for clinical application.

  17. In vivo tumorigenesis was observed after injection of in vitro expanded neural crest stem cells isolated from adult bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine; Poulet, Christophe; Neirinckx, Virginie; Hennuy, Benoit; Swingland, James T; Laudet, Emerence; Sommer, Lukas; Shakova, Olga; Bours, Vincent; Rogister, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells are adult multipotent cells that represent an attractive tool in cellular therapy strategies. Several studies have reported that in vitro passaging of mesenchymal stem cells alters the functional and biological properties of those cells, leading to the accumulation of genetic aberrations. Recent studies described bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) as mixed populations of cells including mesenchymal (MSC) and neural crest stem cells (NCSC). Here, we report the transformation of NCSC into tumorigenic cells, after in vitro long-term passaging. Indeed, the characterization of 6 neural crest-derived clones revealed the presence of one tumorigenic clone. Transcriptomic analyses of this clone highlighted, among others, numerous cell cycle checkpoint modifications and chromosome 11q down-regulation (suggesting a deletion of chromosome 11q) compared with the other clones. Moreover, unsupervised analysis such as a dendrogram generated after agglomerative hierarchical clustering comparing several transcriptomic data showed important similarities between the tumorigenic neural crest-derived clone and mammary tumor cell lines. Altogether, it appeared that NCSC isolated from adult bone marrow represents a potential danger for cellular therapy, and consequently, we recommend that phenotypic, functional and genetic assays should be performed on bone marrow mesenchymal and neural crest stem cells before in vivo use, to demonstrate whether their biological properties, after ex vivo expansion, remain suitable for clinical application. PMID:23071568

  18. Phosphorylation of Sox9 is required for neural crest delamination and is regulated downstream of BMP and canonical Wnt signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jessica A. J.; Wu, Ming-Hoi; Yan, Carol H.; Chau, Bolton K H; So,Henry; Ng, Alvis; CHAN, Alan; Cheah, Kathryn S.E.; Briscoe, James; Cheung, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Coordination of neural crest cell (NCC) induction and delamination is orchestrated by several transcription factors. Among these, Sry-related HMG box-9 (Sox9) and Snail2 have been implicated in both the induction of NCC identity and, together with phoshorylation, NCC delamination. How phosphorylation effects this function has not been clear. Here we show, in the developing chick neural tube, that phosphorylation of Sox9 on S64 and S181 facilitates its SUMOylation, and the phosphorylated forms...

  19. Cranial neural crest cells on the move: their roles in craniofacial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Dwight R; Brugmann, Samantha; Chu, Yvonne; Bajpai, Ruchi; Jame, Maryam; Helms, Jill A

    2011-02-01

    The craniofacial region is assembled through the active migration of cells and the rearrangement and sculpting of facial prominences and pharyngeal arches, which consequently make it particularly susceptible to a large number of birth defects. Genetic, molecular, and cellular processes must be temporally and spatially regulated to culminate in the three-dimension structures of the face. The starting constituent for the majority of skeletal and connective tissues in the face is a pluripotent population of cells, the cranial neural crest cells (NCCs). In this review we discuss the newest scientific findings in the development of the craniofacial complex as related to NCCs. Furthermore, we present recent findings on NCC diseases called neurocristopathies and, in doing so, provide clinicians with new tools for understanding a growing number of craniofacial genetic disorders. PMID:21271641

  20. Molecular control of the neural crest and peripheral nervous system development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbern, Jason M

    2015-01-01

    A transient and unique population of multipotent stem cells, known as neural crest cells (NCCs), generate a bewildering array of cell types during vertebrate development. An attractive model among developmental biologists, the study of NCC biology has provided a wealth of knowledge regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms important for embryogenesis. Studies in numerous species have defined how distinct phases of NCC specification, proliferation, migration, and survival contribute to the formation of multiple functionally distinct organ systems. NCC contributions to the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are well known. Critical developmental processes have been defined that provide outstanding models for understanding how extracellular stimuli, cell-cell interactions, and transcriptional networks cooperate to direct cellular diversification and PNS morphogenesis. Dissecting the complex extracellular and intracellular mechanisms that mediate the formation of the PNS from NCCs may have important therapeutic implications for neurocristopathies, neuropathies, and certain forms of cancer. PMID:25662262

  1. Leader Cells Define Directionality of Trunk, but Not Cranial, Neural Crest Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jo; Gauert, Anton; Briones Montecinos, Luis; Fanlo, Lucía; Alhashem, Zainalabdeen Mohmammed; Assar, Rodrigo; Marti, Elisa; Kabla, Alexandre; Härtel, Steffen; Linker, Claudia

    2016-05-31

    Collective cell migration is fundamental for life and a hallmark of cancer. Neural crest (NC) cells migrate collectively, but the mechanisms governing this process remain controversial. Previous analyses in Xenopus indicate that cranial NC (CNC) cells are a homogeneous population relying on cell-cell interactions for directional migration, while chick embryo analyses suggest a heterogeneous population with leader cells instructing directionality. Our data in chick and zebrafish embryos show that CNC cells do not require leader cells for migration and all cells present similar migratory capacities. In contrast, laser ablation of trunk NC (TNC) cells shows that leader cells direct movement and cell-cell contacts are required for migration. Moreover, leader and follower identities are acquired before the initiation of migration and remain fixed thereafter. Thus, two distinct mechanisms establish the directionality of CNC cells and TNC cells. This implies the existence of multiple molecular mechanisms for collective cell migration. PMID:27210753

  2. Generation and characterization of a novel neural crest marker allele, Inka1-LacZ, reveals a role for Inka1 in mouse neural tube closure

    OpenAIRE

    Reid, Bethany S.; Sargent, Thomas D.; Williams, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies identified Inka1 as a gene regulated by AP-2α in the neural crest required for craniofacial morphogenesis in fish and frog. Here, we extend the analysis of Inka1 function and regulation to the mouse by generating a LacZ knock-in allele. Inka1-LacZ allele expression occurs in the cephalic mesenchyme, heart, and paraxial mesoderm prior to E8.5. Subsequently, expression is observed in the migratory neural crest cells and their derivatives. Consistent with expression of Inka1 in ...

  3. [Transplanted epidermal neural crest stem cell in a peripheral nerve gap].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Jieyuan; Li, Bingcang; Liu, Zheng; Liu, Bin

    2014-04-01

    Neural crest stem cells originated from hair follicle (epidermal neural crest stem cell, EPI-NCSC) are easy to obtain and have potentials to differentiate into various tissues, which make them eminent seed cells for tissue engineering. EPI-NCSC is now used to repair nerve injury, especially, the spinal cord injury. To investigate their effects on repairing peripheral nerve injury, EPI-NCSC from a GFP-SD rat were primarily cultured on coated dishes and on a poly lactic acid coglycolic acid copolymer (PLGA) membrane. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay showed that the initial adhesion rate of EPI-NCSC was 89.7% on PLGA membrane, and the relative growth rates were 89.3%, 87.6%, 85.6%, and 96.6% on the 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th day respectively. Cell cycles and DNA ploidy analysis demonstrated that cell cycles and proliferation indexes of cultured EPI-NCSC had the same variation pattern on coated dishes and PLGA membrane. Then cultured EPI-NCSC were mixed with equal amount of extracellular matrix and injected into a PLGA conduit to connect a 10 mm surgery excision gap of rat sciatic nerve, Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) was used to substitute EPI-NCSC in the control group. After four weeks of transplantation, the defected sciatic nerve achieved a histological restoration, the sensory function of rat hind limb was partly recovered and the sciatic nerve index was also improved. The above results showed that a PLGA conduit filled with EPI-NCSC has a good repair effect on the peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25195250

  4. Grouping of histone deacetylase inhibitors and other toxicants disturbing neural crest migration by transcriptional profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreser, Nadine; Zimmer, Bastian; Dietz, Christian; Sügis, Elena; Pallocca, Giorgia; Nyffeler, Johanna; Meisig, Johannes; Blüthgen, Nils; Berthold, Michael R; Waldmann, Tanja; Leist, Marcel

    2015-09-01

    Functional assays, such as the "migration inhibition of neural crest cells" (MINC) developmental toxicity test, can identify toxicants without requiring knowledge on their mode of action (MoA). Here, we were interested, whether (i) inhibition of migration by structurally diverse toxicants resulted in a unified signature of transcriptional changes; (ii) whether statistically-identified transcript patterns would inform on compound grouping even though individual genes were little regulated, and (iii) whether analysis of a small group of biologically-relevant transcripts would allow the grouping of compounds according to their MoA. We analyzed transcripts of 35 'migration genes' after treatment with 16 migration-inhibiting toxicants. Clustering, principal component analysis and correlation analyses of the data showed that mechanistically related compounds (e.g. histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), PCBs) triggered similar transcriptional changes, but groups of structurally diverse toxicants largely differed in their transcriptional effects. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) confirmed the specific clustering of HDACi across multiple separate experiments. Similarity of the signatures of the HDACi trichostatin A and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid to the one of valproic acid (VPA), suggested that the latter compound acts as HDACi when impairing neural crest migration. In conclusion, the data suggest that (i) a given functional effect (e.g. inhibition of migration) can be associated with highly diverse signatures of transcript changes; (ii) statistically significant grouping of mechanistically-related compounds can be achieved on the basis of few genes with small regulations. Thus, incorporation of mechanistic markers in functional in vitro tests may support read-across procedures, also for structurally un-related compounds. PMID:26238599

  5. Genomic factors that shape craniofacial outcome and neural crest vulnerability in FASD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Smith

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE causes distinctive facial characteristics in some pregnancies and not others; genetic factors may contribute to this differential vulnerability. Ethanol disrupts multiple events of neural crest development including induction, survival, migration, and differentiation. Animal models and genomic approaches have substantially advanced our understanding of the mechanisms underlying these facial changes. PAE during gastrulation produces craniofacial changes corresponding with human fetal alcohol syndrome. These result because PAE reduces prechordal plate extension and suppresses sonic hedgehog, leading to holoprosencephaly and malpositioned facial primordia. Haploinsufficiency in sonic hedgehog signaling increases vulnerability to facial deficits and may influence some PAE pregnancies. In contrast, PAE during early neurogenesis produces facial hypoplasia, preceded by neural crest reductions due to significant apoptosis. Factors mediating this apoptosis include intracellular calcium mobilization, elevated reactive oxygen species, and loss of trophic support from β-catenin/calcium, sonic hedgehog, and mTOR signaling. Genomewide SNP analysis links PDGF receptor genes with facial outcomes in human PAE. Multiple genomic-level comparisons of ethanol-sensitive and –resistant early embryos, in both mouse and chick, independently identify common candidate genes that may potentially modify craniofacial vulnerability, including ribosomal proteins, proteosome, RNA splicing, and focal adhesion. In summary, research using animal models with genome-level differences in ethanol vulnerability, as well as targeted loss- and gain-of-function mutants, has clarified the mechanisms mediating craniofacial change in PAE. The findings additionally suggest that craniofacial deficits may represent a gene-ethanol interaction for some affected individuals. Genetic-level changes may prime individuals toward greater sensitivity or resistance to

  6. In vivo time-lapse imaging reveals extensive neural crest and endothelial cell interactions during neural crest migration and formation of the dorsal root and sympathetic ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Lynn; Dunkel, Haley; Hunnicutt, Barbara J; Filla, Michael; Little, Charles; Lansford, Rusty; Lefcort, Frances

    2016-05-01

    During amniote embryogenesis the nervous and vascular systems interact in a process that significantly affects the respective morphogenesis of each network by forming a "neurovascular" link. The importance of neurovascular cross-talk in the central nervous system has recently come into focus with the growing awareness that these two systems interact extensively both during development, in the stem-cell niche, and in neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's Disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. With respect to the peripheral nervous system, however, there have been no live, real-time investigations of the potential relationship between these two developing systems. To address this deficit, we used multispectral 4D time-lapse imaging in a transgenic quail model in which endothelial cells (ECs) express a yellow fluorescent marker, while neural crest cells (NCCs) express an electroporated red fluorescent marker. We monitored EC and NCC migration in real-time during formation of the peripheral nervous system. Our time-lapse recordings indicate that NCCs and ECs are physically juxtaposed and dynamically interact at multiple locations along their trajectories. These interactions are stereotypical and occur at precise anatomical locations along the NCC migratory pathway. NCCs migrate alongside the posterior surface of developing intersomitic vessels, but fail to cross these continuous streams of motile ECs. NCCs change their morphology and migration trajectory when they encounter gaps in the developing vasculature. Within the nascent dorsal root ganglion, proximity to ECs causes filopodial retraction which curtails forward persistence of NCC motility. Overall, our time-lapse recordings support the conclusion that primary vascular networks substantially influence the distribution and migratory behavior of NCCs and the patterned formation of dorsal root and sympathetic ganglia. PMID:26988118

  7. Changes in cholinergic parameters associated with failure of conotruncal septation in embryonic chick hearts after neural crest ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells from the neural crest over occipital somites migrate to the heart, where they give rise to parasympathetic postganglionic neurons as well as ectomesenchymal elements which contribute to conotruncal septation. With a microcautery needle, the neural crest over occipital somites was ablated bilaterally in chicken embryos at an early stage of development. Histological examination on incubation day 15 revealed conotruncal malformations, involving malformation or absence of the conotruncal septum in all embryos. Two peaks of embryo mortality were observed. One peak (incubation days 6-8) occurred at the same time as conotruncal septal closure; the second peak (incubation days 11-13) was concurrent with the onset of functional parasympathetic innervation. A disruption of parasympathetic innervation was indicated by: (1) a decrease in acetylcholinesterase staining, (2) a decrease (27%) in the number of ganglion cells in the conotruncus, (3) decreases in the acetylcholine content of atrium (31%) and ventricle (39%), and (4) a decrease (21%) in muscarinic acetylcholine receptor density on incubation day 15. Radiolabeled ligand-binding studies revealed no change in the affinity of cardiac muscarinic receptors for [3H]methylscopolamine (K/sub D/ . 0.17-0.21 nM). Agonist-binding affinity and sensitivity to guanine nucleotides were similarly unaffected. The reasons for the limited extent of the parasympathetic lesion are unclear, but may involve recruitment of precursor cells from other regions of the neural crest, partial regeneration of the neural crest following surgical removal, or an alteration in the contribution of incoming sympathetic or preganglionic parasympathetic elements. No such plasticity was associated with neural crest contributions to the structural development of the conotruncus. Malformations were observed in all lesioned embryos

  8. Phosphorylation of Sox9 is required for neural crest delamination and is regulated downstream of BMP and canonical Wnt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jessica A J; Wu, Ming-Hoi; Yan, Carol H; Chau, Bolton K H; So, Henry; Ng, Alvis; Chan, Alan; Cheah, Kathryn S E; Briscoe, James; Cheung, Martin

    2013-02-19

    Coordination of neural crest cell (NCC) induction and delamination is orchestrated by several transcription factors. Among these, Sry-related HMG box-9 (Sox9) and Snail2 have been implicated in both the induction of NCC identity and, together with phoshorylation, NCC delamination. How phosphorylation effects this function has not been clear. Here we show, in the developing chick neural tube, that phosphorylation of Sox9 on S64 and S181 facilitates its SUMOylation, and the phosphorylated forms of Sox9 are essential for trunk neural crest delamination. Both phosphorylation and to a lesser extent SUMOylation, of Sox9 are required to cooperate with Snail2 to promote delamination. Moreover, bone morphogenetic protein and canonical Wnt signaling induce phosphorylation of Sox9, thereby connecting extracellular signals with the delamination of NCCs. Together the data suggest a model in which extracellular signals initiate phosphorylation of Sox9 and its cooperation with Snail2 to induce NCC delamination. PMID:23382206

  9. Induction of neural crest in Xenopus by transcription factor AP2alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ting; Lee, Young-Hoon; Saint-Jeannet, Jean-Pierre; Sargent, Thomas D

    2003-01-21

    We report experiments with Xenopus laevis, using both intact embryos and ectodermal explants, showing that the transcription factor AP2alpha is positively regulated by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Wnt signaling, and that this activation is an essential step in the induction of neural crest (NC). Ectopic expression of AP2alpha is sufficient to activate high-level expression of NC-specific genes such as Slug and Sox9, which can occur as isolated domains within the neural plate as well as by expansion of endogenous NC territories. AP2alpha also has the property of inducing NC in isolated ectoderm in which Wnt signaling is provided but BMP signaling is minimized by overexpression of chordin. Like other NC regulatory factors, activation of AP2alpha requires some attenuation of endogenous BMP signaling; however, this process occurs at a lower threshold for AP2alpha. Furthermore, AP2alpha expression domains are larger than for other NC factors. Loss-of-function experiments with antisense AP2alpha morpholino oligonucleotides result in severe reduction in the NC territory. These results support a central role for AP2alpha in NC induction. We propose a model in which AP2alpha expression, along with inactivation of NC inhibitory factors such as Dlx3, establish a feedback loop comprising AP2alpha, Sox9, and Slug, leading to and maintaining NC specification. PMID:12511599

  10. Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting of EGFP-Labeled Neural Crest Cells From Murine Embryonic Craniofacial Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Singh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available During the early stages of embryogenesis, pluripotent neural crest cells (NCC are known to migrate from the neural folds to populate multiple target sites in the embryo where they differentiate into various derivatives, including cartilage, bone, connective tissue, melanocytes, glia, and neurons of the peripheral nervous system. The ability to obtain pure NCC populations is essential to enable molecular analyses of neural crest induction, migration, and/or differentiation. Crossing Wnt1-Cre and Z/EG transgenic mouse lines resulted in offspring in which the Wnt1-Cre transgene activated permanent EGFP expression only in NCC. The present report demonstrates a flow cytometric method to sort and isolate populations of EGFP-labeled NCC. The identity of the sorted neural crest cells was confirmed by assaying expression of known marker genes by TaqMan Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (QRT-PCR. The molecular strategy described in this report provides a means to extract intact RNA from a pure population of NCC thus enabling analysis of gene expression in a defined population of embryonic precursor cells critical to development.

  11. Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous Tooth Exhibit Stromal-Derived Inducing Activity and Lead to Generation of Neural Crest Cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

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    Khadijeh Karbalaie

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The neural crest is a transient structure of early vertebrate embryos that generates neural crest cells (NCCs. These cells can migrate throughout the body and produce a diverse array of mature tissue types. Due to the ethical and technical problems surrounding the isolation of these early human embryo cells, researchers have focused on in vitro studies to produce NCCs and increase their knowledge of neural crest development. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, we cultured human embryonic stem cells (hESCs on stromal stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED for a two-week period. We used different approaches to characterize these differentiated cells as neural precursor cells (NPCs and NCCs. Results: In the first co-culture week, hESCs appeared as crater-like structures with marginal rosettes. NPCs derived from these structures expressed the early neural crest marker p75 in addition to numerous other genes associated with neural crest induction such as SNAIL, SLUG, PTX3 and SOX9. Flow cytometry analysis showed 70% of the cells were AP2/P75 positive. Moreover, the cells were able to self-renew, sustain multipotent differentiation potential, and readily form neurospheres in suspension culture. Conclusion: SHED, as an adult stem cell with a neural crest origin, has stromal-derived inducing activity (SDIA and can be used as an NCC inducer from hESCs. These cells provide an invaluable resource to study neural crest differentiation in both normal and disordered human neural crest development.

  12. IN VITRO PROPERTIES OF NEURAL CREST-DERIVED MULTIPOTENT STEM CELLS FROM A BULGE REGION OF WHISKER FOLLICLE

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    R. G. Vasyliev

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A culture method for multipotent neural crest-derived stem cell isolated from the bulge region of the hair follicle of whisker pad of adult mice has been described and their biological properties have been studied. It was shown that the cells possess a fibroblast-like morphology, they are nestin-positive and cytokeratin-negative, and also express the following surface markers: CD44, CD73, CD90 and Sca-1. This cell type shows the functional properties of stem cells in culture: clonogenicity, self-renewal, sphere-forming capacity and the ability to the directed multilineage differentiation. Due to these properties, neural crest-derived multipotent stem cells are promising for application in the regenerative medicine

  13. Evaluation of Developmental Toxicants and Signaling Pathways in a Functional Test Based on the Migration of Human Neural Crest Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmer, Bastian; Lee, Gabsang; Balmer, Nina V.; Meganathan, Kesavan; Sachinidis, Agapios; Studer, Lorenz; Leist, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    Background: Information on the potential developmental toxicity (DT) of the majority of chemicals is scarce, and test capacities for further animal-based testing are limited. Therefore, new approaches with higher throughput are required. A screening strategy based on the use of relevant human cell types has been proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and others. Because impaired neural crest (NC) function is one of the known causes for teratologic effects, testing of toxicant ef...

  14. Efficient genome editing of genes involved in neural crest development using the CRISPR/Cas9 system in Xenopus embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhongzhen; Cheng, Tina Tsz Kwan; Shi, Zhaoying; Liu, Ziran; Lei, Yong; Wang, Chengdong; Shi, Weili; Chen, Xiongfeng; Qi, Xufeng; Cai, Dongqing; Feng, Bo; Deng, Yi; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background The RNA guided CRISPR/Cas9 nucleases have been proven to be effective for gene disruption in various animal models including Xenopus tropicalis. The neural crest (NC) is a transient cell population during embryonic development and contributes to a large variety of tissues. Currently, loss-of-function studies on NC development in X. tropicalis are largely based on morpholino antisense oligonucleotide. It is worthwhile establishing targeted gene knockout X. tropicails line using CRIS...

  15. Deletion of integrin-linked kinase from neural crest cells in mice results in aortic aneurysms and embryonic lethality

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Thomas D.; Keling Zang; Ainara Vallejo-Illarramendi

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Neural crest cells (NCCs) participate in the remodeling of the cardiac outflow tract and pharyngeal arch arteries during cardiovascular development. Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a serine/threonine kinase and a major regulator of integrin signaling. It links integrins to the actin cytoskeleton and recruits other adaptor molecules into a large complex to regulate actin dynamics and integrin function. Using the Cre-lox system, we deleted Ilk from NCCs of mice to investigate its rol...

  16. In vivo tumorigenesis was observed after injection of in vitro expanded neural crest stem cells isolated from adult bone marrow

    OpenAIRE

    Sabine Wislet-Gendebien; Christophe Poulet; Virginie Neirinckx; Benoit Hennuy; Swingland, James T.; Emerence Laudet; Lukas Sommer; Olga Shakova; Vincent Bours; Bernard Rogister

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells are adult multipotent cells that represent an attractive tool in cellular therapy strategies. Several studies have reported that in vitro passaging of mesenchymal stem cells alters the functional and biological properties of those cells, leading to the accumulation of genetic aberrations. Recent studies described bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) as mixed populations of cells including mesenchymal (MSC) and neural crest stem cells (NCSC). Here, we report the ...

  17. Conditional beta1-integrin gene deletion in neural crest cells causes severe developmental alterations of the peripheral nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pietri, Thomas; Eder, Olivier; Breau, Marie Anne;

    2004-01-01

    Integrins are transmembrane receptors that are known to interact with the extracellular matrix and to be required for migration, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. We have generated mice with a neural crest cell-specific deletion of the beta1-integrin gene to analyse the role of beta1-...... almost complete absence of Schwann cells and sensory axon segregation and defective maturation in neuromuscular synaptogenesis. Thus, beta1-integrins are important for the control of embryonic and postnatal peripheral nervous system development....

  18. The EJC component Magoh regulates proliferation and expansion of neural crest-derived melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Debra L; Leeds, Karen E; Hwang, Hun-Way; Miller, Emily E; Pavan, William J

    2013-03-15

    Melanoblasts are a population of neural crest-derived cells that generate the pigment-producing cells of our body. Defective melanoblast development and function underlies many disorders including Waardenburg syndrome and melanoma. Understanding the genetic regulation of melanoblast development will help elucidate the etiology of these and other neurocristopathies. Here we demonstrate that Magoh, a component of the exon junction complex, is required for normal melanoblast development. Magoh haploinsufficient mice are hypopigmented and exhibit robust genetic interactions with the transcription factor, Sox10. These phenotypes are caused by a marked reduction in melanoblast number beginning at mid-embryogenesis. Strikingly, while Magoh haploinsufficiency severely reduces epidermal melanoblasts, it does not significantly affect the number of dermal melanoblasts. These data indicate Magoh impacts melanoblast development by disproportionately affecting expansion of epidermal melanoblast populations. We probed the cellular basis for melanoblast reduction and discovered that Magoh mutant melanoblasts do not undergo increased apoptosis, but instead are arrested in mitosis. Mitotic arrest is evident in both Magoh haploinsufficient embryos and in Magoh siRNA treated melanoma cell lines. Together our findings indicate that Magoh-regulated proliferation of melanoblasts in the dermis may be critical for production of epidermally-bound melanoblasts. Our results point to a central role for Magoh in melanocyte development. PMID:23333945

  19. Fibronectin promotes differentiation of neural crest progenitors endowed with smooth muscle cell potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neural crest (NC) is a model system used to investigate multipotency during vertebrate development. Environmental factors control NC cell fate decisions. Despite the well-known influence of extracellular matrix molecules in NC cell migration, the issue of whether they also influence NC cell differentiation has not been addressed at the single cell level. By analyzing mass and clonal cultures of mouse cephalic and quail trunk NC cells, we show for the first time that fibronectin (FN) promotes differentiation into the smooth muscle cell phenotype without affecting differentiation into glia, neurons, and melanocytes. Time course analysis indicated that the FN-induced effect was not related to massive cell death or proliferation of smooth muscle cells. Finally, by comparing clonal cultures of quail trunk NC cells grown on FN and collagen type IV (CLIV), we found that FN strongly increased both NC cell survival and the proportion of unipotent and oligopotent NC progenitors endowed with smooth muscle potential. In contrast, melanocytic progenitors were prominent in clonogenic NC cells grown on CLIV. Taken together, these results show that FN promotes NC cell differentiation along the smooth muscle lineage, and therefore plays an important role in fate decisions of NC progenitor cells

  20. Involvement of seven in absentia homolog-1 in ethanol-induced apoptosis in neural crest cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haijing; Chen, Xiaopan; Yuan, Fuqiang; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Yingming; Chen, Shao-yu

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol-induced apoptosis in selected cell populations is a major component of pathogenesis underlying ethanol-induced teratogenesis. However, there is a fundamental gap in understanding how ethanol leads to apoptosis in embryos. In this study, we investigate the role of seven in absentia homolog-1 (Siah1) protein, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, in ethanol-induced apoptosis. Using an in vitro model of neural crest cell (NCC), JoMa1.3 cells, we found that exposure to 100 mM ethanol resulted in a significant increase in Siah1 mRNA expression in NCCs, an ethanol-sensitive cell population implicated in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). Treatment with 100 mM ethanol for 24 hours also significantly increased the protein expression of Siah1 in JoMa1.3 cells. The nuclear translocation and accumulation of Siah1 was evidenced in the cells exposed to ethanol. In addition, we have found that the inhibition of Siah1 function with siRNA prevents ethanol-induced increase in Siah1 protein expression and nuclear translocation in NCCs. Down-regulation of Siah1 by siRNA also greatly diminished ethanol-induced cell death and caspase-3 activation, indicating that inhibition of Siah1 can attenuate ethanol-induced apoptosis. These results strongly suggest that Siah1 plays an important role in ethanol-induced apoptosis in NCCs. PMID:25193017

  1. Are neural crest stem cells the missing link between hematopoietic and neurogenic niches?

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    Virginie Neirinckx

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic niches are defined as cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. Many different cell types have been characterized as contributors to the formation of HSC niches, such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and mesenchymal progenitors. These mesenchymal progenitors have themselves been classified as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR cells, stem cell factor expressing cells, or nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, which have been recently identified as neural crest-derived cells (NCSCs. Together, these cells are spatially associated with HSCs and believed to provide appropriate microenvironments for HSC self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization and hibernation both by cell-to-cell contact and soluble factors. Interestingly, it appears that regulatory pathways governing the hematopoietic niche homeostasis are operating in the neurogenic niche as well. Therefore, this review paper aims to compare both the regulation of hematopoietic and neurogenic niches, in order to highlight the role of NCSCs and nervous system components in the development and the regulation of the hematopoietic system.

  2. Are neural crest stem cells the missing link between hematopoietic and neurogenic niches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coste, Cécile; Neirinckx, Virginie; Gothot, André; Wislet, Sabine; Rogister, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic niches are defined as cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. Many different cell types have been characterized as contributors to the formation of HSC niches, such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and mesenchymal progenitors. These mesenchymal progenitors have themselves been classified as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL) 12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells, stem cell factor expressing cells, or nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have been recently identified as neural crest-derived cells (NCSCs). Together, these cells are spatially associated with HSCs and believed to provide appropriate microenvironments for HSC self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization and hibernation both by cell-cell contact and soluble factors. Interestingly, it appears that regulatory pathways governing the hematopoietic niche homeostasis are operating in the neurogenic niche as well. Therefore, this review paper aims to compare both the regulation of hematopoietic and neurogenic niches, in order to highlight the role of NCSCs and nervous system components in the development and the regulation of the hematopoietic system. PMID:26136659

  3. Controlled levels of canonical Wnt signaling are required for neural crest migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Ewa; Künneke, Lutz; Loresch, Elisabeth; Grund, Anita; Melchert, Juliane; Pieler, Tomas; Aspelmeier, Timo; Borchers, Annette

    2016-09-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling plays a dominant role in the development of the neural crest (NC), a highly migratory cell population that generates a vast array of cell types. Canonical Wnt signaling is required for NC induction as well as differentiation, however its role in NC migration remains largely unknown. Analyzing nuclear localization of β-catenin as readout for canonical Wnt activity, we detect nuclear β-catenin in premigratory but not migratory Xenopus NC cells suggesting that canonical Wnt activity has to decrease to basal levels to enable NC migration. To define a possible function of canonical Wnt signaling in Xenopus NC migration, canonical Wnt signaling was modulated at different time points after NC induction. This was accomplished using either chemical modulators affecting β-catenin stability or inducible glucocorticoid fusion constructs of Lef/Tcf transcription factors. In vivo analysis of NC migration by whole mount in situ hybridization demonstrates that ectopic activation of canonical Wnt signaling inhibits cranial NC migration. Further, NC transplantation experiments confirm that this effect is tissue-autonomous. In addition, live-cell imaging in combination with biophysical data analysis of explanted NC cells confirms the in vivo findings and demonstrates that modulation of canonical Wnt signaling affects the ability of NC cells to perform single cell migration. Thus, our data support the hypothesis that canonical Wnt signaling needs to be tightly controlled to enable migration of NC cells. PMID:27341758

  4. Regulators of gene expression in Enteric Neural Crest Cells are putative Hirschsprung disease genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriemer, Duco; Sribudiani, Yunia; IJpma, Arne; Natarajan, Dipa; MacKenzie, Katherine C; Metzger, Marco; Binder, Ellen; Burns, Alan J; Thapar, Nikhil; Hofstra, Robert M W; Eggen, Bart J L

    2016-08-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) is required for peristalsis of the gut and is derived from Enteric Neural Crest Cells (ENCCs). During ENS development, the RET receptor tyrosine kinase plays a critical role in the proliferation and survival of ENCCs, their migration along the developing gut, and differentiation into enteric neurons. Mutations in RET and its ligand GDNF cause Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), a complex genetic disorder in which ENCCs fail to colonize variable lengths of the distal bowel. To identify key regulators of ENCCs and the pathways underlying RET signaling, gene expression profiles of untreated and GDNF-treated ENCCs from E14.5 mouse embryos were generated. ENCCs express genes that are involved in both early and late neuronal development, whereas GDNF treatment induced neuronal maturation. Predicted regulators of gene expression in ENCCs include the known HSCR genes Ret and Sox10, as well as Bdnf, App and Mapk10. The regulatory overlap and functional interactions between these genes were used to construct a regulatory network that is underlying ENS development and connects to known HSCR genes. In addition, the adenosine receptor A2a (Adora2a) and neuropeptide Y receptor Y2 (Npy2r) were identified as possible regulators of terminal neuronal differentiation in GDNF-treated ENCCs. The human orthologue of Npy2r maps to the HSCR susceptibility locus 4q31.3-q32.3, suggesting a role for NPY2R both in ENS development and in HSCR. PMID:27266404

  5. The SWI/SNF BAF-A complex is essential for neural crest development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Ronald L; Magnuson, Terry

    2016-03-01

    Growing evidence indicates that chromatin remodeler mutations underlie the pathogenesis of human neurocristopathies or disorders that affect neural crest cells (NCCs). However, causal relationships among chromatin remodeler subunit mutations and NCC defects remain poorly understood. Here we show that homozygous loss of ARID1A-containing, SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes (BAF-A) in NCCs results in embryonic lethality in mice, with mutant embryos succumbing to heart defects. Strikingly, monoallelic loss of ARID1A in NCCs led to craniofacial defects in adult mice, including shortened snouts and low set ears, and these defects were more pronounced following homozygous loss of ARID1A, with the ventral cranial bones being greatly reduced in size. Early NCC specification and expression of the BRG1 NCC target gene, PLEXINA2, occurred normally in the absence of ARID1A. Nonetheless, mutant embryos displayed incomplete conotruncal septation of the cardiac outflow tract and defects in the posterior pharyngeal arteries, culminating in persistent truncus arteriosus and agenesis of the ductus arteriosus. Consistent with this, migrating cardiac NCCs underwent apoptosis within the circumpharyngeal ridge. Our data support the notion that multiple, distinct chromatin remodeling complexes govern genetically separable events in NCC development and highlight a potential pathogenic role for NCCs in the human BAF complex disorder, Coffin-Siris Syndrome. PMID:26806701

  6. MycN Is Critical for the Maintenance of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Crest Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie Ting; Weng, Zhi Hui; Tsang, Kam Sze; Tsang, Lai Ling; Chan, Hsiao Chang; Jiang, Xiao Hua

    2016-01-01

    The biologic studies of human neural crest stem cells (hNCSCs) are extremely challenging due to the limited source of hNCSCs as well as ethical and technical issues surrounding isolation of early human embryonic tissues. On the other hand, vast majority of studies on MycN have been conducted in human tumor cells, thus, the role of MycN in normal human neural crest development is completely unknown. In the present study, we determined the role of MycN in hNCSCs isolated from in vitro-differentiating human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). For the first time, we show that suppression of MycN in hNCSCs inhibits cell growth and cell cycle progression. Knockdown of MycN in hNCSCs increases the expression of Cdkn1a, Cdkn2a and Cdkn2b, which encodes the cyclin-dependent kinases p21CIP1, p16 INK4a and p15INK4b. In addition, MycN is involved in the regulation of human sympathetic neurogenesis, as knockdown of MycN enhances the expression of key transcription factors involved in sympathetic neuron differentiation, including Phox2a, Phox2b, Mash1, Hand2 and Gata3. We propose that unlimited source of hNCSCs provides an invaluable platform for the studies of human neural crest development and diseases. PMID:26815535

  7. MycN Is Critical for the Maintenance of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Crest Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Ting Zhang

    Full Text Available The biologic studies of human neural crest stem cells (hNCSCs are extremely challenging due to the limited source of hNCSCs as well as ethical and technical issues surrounding isolation of early human embryonic tissues. On the other hand, vast majority of studies on MycN have been conducted in human tumor cells, thus, the role of MycN in normal human neural crest development is completely unknown. In the present study, we determined the role of MycN in hNCSCs isolated from in vitro-differentiating human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. For the first time, we show that suppression of MycN in hNCSCs inhibits cell growth and cell cycle progression. Knockdown of MycN in hNCSCs increases the expression of Cdkn1a, Cdkn2a and Cdkn2b, which encodes the cyclin-dependent kinases p21CIP1, p16 INK4a and p15INK4b. In addition, MycN is involved in the regulation of human sympathetic neurogenesis, as knockdown of MycN enhances the expression of key transcription factors involved in sympathetic neuron differentiation, including Phox2a, Phox2b, Mash1, Hand2 and Gata3. We propose that unlimited source of hNCSCs provides an invaluable platform for the studies of human neural crest development and diseases.

  8. E-cadherin is required for cranial neural crest migration in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chaolie; Kratzer, Marie-Claire; Wedlich, Doris; Kashef, Jubin

    2016-03-15

    The cranial neural crest (CNC) is a highly motile and multipotent embryonic cell population, which migrates directionally on defined routes throughout the embryo, contributing to facial structures including cartilage, bone and ganglia. Cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion is known to play a crucial role in the directional migration of CNC cells. However, migrating CNC co-express different cadherin subtypes, and their individual roles have yet to be fully explored. In previous studies, the expression of individual cadherin subtypes has been analysed using different methods with varying sensitivities, preventing the direct comparison of expression levels. Here, we provide the first comprehensive and comparative analysis of the expression of six cadherin superfamily members during different phases of CNC cell migration in Xenopus. By applying a quantitative RT-qPCR approach, we can determine the copy number and abundance of each expressed cadherin through different phases of CNC migration. Using this approach, we show for the first time expression of E-cadherin and XB/C-cadherin in CNC cells, adding them as two new members of cadherins co-expressed during CNC migration. Cadherin co-expression during CNC migration in Xenopus, in particular the constant expression of E-cadherin, contradicts the classical epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) model postulating a switch in cadherin expression. Loss-of-function experiments further show that E-cadherin is required for proper CNC cell migration in vivo and also for cell protrusion formation in vitro. Knockdown of E-cadherin is not rescued by co-injection of other classical cadherins, pointing to a specific function of E-cadherin in mediating CNC cell migration. Finally, through reconstitution experiments with different E-cadherin deletion mutants in E-cadherin morphant embryos, we demonstrate that the extracellular domain, but not the cytoplasmic domain, of E-cadherin is sufficient to rescue CNC cell migration in vivo

  9. Sonic hedgehog is a chemotactic neural crest cell guide that is perturbed by ethanol exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosa, Ezequiel J; Fernández-Zapico, Martín E; Battiato, Natalia L; Rovasio, Roberto A

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to understand the involvement of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) morphogen in the oriented distribution of neural crest cells (NCCs) toward the optic vesicle and to look for potential disorders of this guiding mechanism after ethanol exposure. In vitro directional analysis showed the chemotactic response of NCCs up Shh gradients and to notochord co-cultures (Shh source) or to their conditioned medium, a response inhibited by anti-Shh antibody, receptor inhibitor cyclopamine and anti-Smo morpholino (MO). Expression of the Ptch-Smo receptor complex on in vitro NCCs was also shown. In whole embryos, the expression of Shh mRNA and protein was seen in the ocular region, and of Ptch, Smo and Gli/Sufu system on cephalic NCCs. Anti-Smo MO or Ptch-mutated plasmid (Ptch1(Δloop2)) impaired cephalic NCC migration/distribution, with fewer cells invading the optic region and with higher cell density at the homolateral mesencephalic level. Beads embedded with cyclopamine (Smo-blocking) or Shh (ectopic signal) supported the role of Shh as an in vivo guide molecule for cephalic NCCs. Ethanol exposure perturbed in vitro and in vivo NCC migration. Early stage embryos treated with ethanol, in a model reproducing Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, showed later disruptions of craniofacial development associated with abnormal in situ expression of Shh morphogen. The results show the Shh/Ptch/Smo-dependent migration of NCCs toward the optic vesicle, with the support of specific inactivation with genetic and pharmacological tools. They also help to understand mechanisms of accurate distribution of embryonic cells and of their perturbation by a commonly consumed teratogen, and demonstrate, in addition to its other known developmental functions, a new biological activity of cellular guidance for Shh. PMID:26979762

  10. Identification of transcriptome signatures and biomarkers specific for potential developmental toxicants inhibiting human neural crest cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallocca, Giorgia; Grinberg, Marianna; Henry, Margit; Frickey, Tancred; Hengstler, Jan G; Waldmann, Tanja; Sachinidis, Agapios; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Leist, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    The in vitro test battery of the European research consortium ESNATS ('novel stem cell-based test systems') has been used to screen for potential human developmental toxicants. As part of this effort, the migration of neural crest (MINC) assay has been used to evaluate chemical effects on neural crest function. It identified some drug-like compounds in addition to known environmental toxicants. The hits included the HSP90 inhibitor geldanamycin, the chemotherapeutic arsenic trioxide, the flame-retardant PBDE-99, the pesticide triadimefon and the histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid and trichostatin A. Transcriptome changes triggered by these substances in human neural crest cells were recorded and analysed here to answer three questions: (1) can toxicants be individually identified based on their transcript profile; (2) how can the toxicity pattern reflected by transcript changes be compacted/dimensionality-reduced for practical regulatory use; (3) how can a reduced set of biomarkers be selected for large-scale follow-up? Transcript profiling allowed clear separation of different toxicants and the identification of toxicant types in a blinded test study. We also developed a diagrammatic system to visualize and compare toxicity patterns of a group of chemicals by giving a quantitative overview of altered superordinate biological processes (e.g. activation of KEGG pathways or overrepresentation of gene ontology terms). The transcript data were mined for potential markers of toxicity, and 39 transcripts were selected to either indicate general developmental toxicity or distinguish compounds with different modes-of-action in read-across. In summary, we found inclusion of transcriptome data to largely increase the information from the MINC phenotypic test. PMID:26705709

  11. Delivery of Epidermal Neural Crest Stem Cells (EPI-NCSC) to hippocamp in Alzheimer's Disease Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Esmaeilzade, Banafshe; Nobakht, Maliheh; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Rahbar Roshandel, Nahid; Rasouli, Homa; Samadi Kuchaksaraei, Ali; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad; Najafzade, Nowruz; Asalgoo, Sara; Hejazian, Leila Beygom; Ghoroghi, Fatima Moghani

    2012-01-01

    Background: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by progressive neuronal loss in hippocamp. Epidermal neural crest stem cells (EPI-NCSC) can differentiate into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of transplanting EPI-NCSC into AD rat model. Methods: Two weeks after induction of AD by injection of Amyloid-β 1-40 into CA1 area of rat hippocamp, Y-maze and single-trial passive avoidance tests were used to show deficit of learning a...

  12. Calponin 2 Acts As an Effector of Noncanonical Wnt-Mediated Cell Polarization during Neural Crest Cell Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Bärbel Ulmer; Cathrin Hagenlocher; Silke Schmalholz; Sabrina Kurz; Axel Schweickert; Ayelet Kohl; Lee Roth; Dalit Sela-Donenfeld; Martin Blum

    2013-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) migrate throughout the embryo to differentiate into cell types of all germ layers. Initial directed NCC emigration relies on planar cell polarity (PCP), which through the activity of the small GTPases RhoA and Rac governs the actin-driven formation of polarized cell protrusions. We found that the actin binding protein calponin 2 (Cnn2) was expressed in protrusions at the leading edge of migratory NCCs in chicks and frogs. Cnn2 knockdown resulted in NCC migration defe...

  13. Neural crest-mediated bone resorption is a determinant of species-specific jaw length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ealba, Erin L; Jheon, Andrew H; Hall, Jane; Curantz, Camille; Butcher, Kristin D; Schneider, Richard A

    2015-12-01

    Precise control of jaw length during development is crucial for proper form and function. Previously we have shown that in birds, neural crest mesenchyme (NCM) confers species-specific size and shape to the beak by regulating molecular and histological programs for the induction and deposition of cartilage and bone. Here we reveal that a hitherto unrecognized but similarly essential mechanism for establishing jaw length is the ability of NCM to mediate bone resorption. Osteoclasts are considered the predominant cells that resorb bone, although osteocytes have also been shown to participate in this process. In adults, bone resorption is tightly coupled to bone deposition as a means to maintain skeletal homeostasis. Yet, the role and regulation of bone resorption during growth of the embryonic skeleton have remained relatively unexplored. We compare jaw development in short-beaked quail versus long-billed duck and find that quail have substantially higher levels of enzymes expressed by bone-resorbing cells including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), Matrix metalloproteinase 13 (Mmp13), and Mmp9. Then, we transplant NCM destined to form the jaw skeleton from quail to duck and generate chimeras in which osteocytes arise from quail donor NCM and osteoclasts come exclusively from the duck host. Chimeras develop quail-like jaw skeletons coincident with dramatically elevated expression of TRAP, Mmp13, and Mmp9. To test for a link between bone resorption and jaw length, we block resorption using a bisphosphonate, osteoprotegerin protein, or an MMP13 inhibitor, and this significantly lengthens the jaw. Conversely, activating resorption with RANKL protein shortens the jaw. Finally, we find that higher resorption in quail presages their relatively lower adult jaw bone mineral density (BMD) and that BMD is also NCM-mediated. Thus, our experiments suggest that NCM not only controls bone resorption by its own derivatives but also modulates the activity of mesoderm

  14. The taming of the neural crest: a developmental perspective on the origins of morphological covariation in domesticated mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R; Geiger, Madeleine; Schneider, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Studies on domestication are blooming, but the developmental bases for the generation of domestication traits and breed diversity remain largely unexplored. Some phenotypic patterns of human neurocristopathies are suggestive of those reported for domesticated mammals and disrupting neural crest developmental programmes have been argued to be the source of traits deemed the 'domestication syndrome'. These character changes span multiple organ systems and morphological structures. But an in-depth examination within the phylogenetic framework of mammals including domesticated forms reveals that the distribution of such traits is not universal, with canids being the only group showing a large set of predicted features. Modularity of traits tied to phylogeny characterizes domesticated mammals: through selective breeding, individual behavioural and morphological traits can be reordered, truncated, augmented or deleted. Similarly, mammalian evolution on islands has resulted in suites of phenotypic changes like those of some domesticated forms. Many domesticated mammals can serve as valuable models for conducting comparative studies on the evolutionary developmental biology of the neural crest, given that series of their embryos are readily available and that their phylogenetic histories and genomes are well characterized. PMID:27429770

  15. Bmps and id2a act upstream of Twist1 to restrict ectomesenchyme potential of the cranial neural crest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita Das

    Full Text Available Cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs have the remarkable capacity to generate both the non-ectomesenchyme derivatives of the peripheral nervous system and the ectomesenchyme precursors of the vertebrate head skeleton, yet how these divergent lineages are specified is not well understood. Whereas studies in mouse have indicated that the Twist1 transcription factor is important for ectomesenchyme development, its role and regulation during CNCC lineage decisions have remained unclear. Here we show that two Twist1 genes play an essential role in promoting ectomesenchyme at the expense of non-ectomesenchyme gene expression in zebrafish. Twist1 does so by promoting Fgf signaling, as well as potentially directly activating fli1a expression through a conserved ectomesenchyme-specific enhancer. We also show that Id2a restricts Twist1 activity to the ectomesenchyme lineage, with Bmp activity preferentially inducing id2a expression in non-ectomesenchyme precursors. We therefore propose that the ventral migration of CNCCs away from a source of Bmps in the dorsal ectoderm promotes ectomesenchyme development by relieving Id2a-dependent repression of Twist1 function. Together our model shows how the integration of Bmp inhibition at its origin and Fgf activation along its migratory route would confer temporal and spatial specificity to the generation of ectomesenchyme from the neural crest.

  16. Distinct functional and temporal requirements for zebrafish Hdac1 during neural crest-derived craniofacial and peripheral neuron development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myron S Ignatius

    Full Text Available The regulation of gene expression is accomplished by both genetic and epigenetic means and is required for the precise control of the development of the neural crest. In hdac1(b382 mutants, craniofacial cartilage development is defective in two distinct ways. First, fewer hoxb3a, dlx2 and dlx3-expressing posterior branchial arch precursors are specified and many of those that are consequently undergo apoptosis. Second, in contrast, normal numbers of progenitors are present in the anterior mandibular and hyoid arches, but chondrocyte precursors fail to terminally differentiate. In the peripheral nervous system, there is a disruption of enteric, DRG and sympathetic neuron differentiation in hdac1(b382 mutants compared to wildtype embryos. Specifically, enteric and DRG-precursors differentiate into neurons in the anterior gut and trunk respectively, while enteric and DRG neurons are rarely present in the posterior gut and tail. Sympathetic neuron precursors are specified in hdac1(b382 mutants and they undergo generic neuronal differentiation but fail to undergo noradrenergic differentiation. Using the HDAC inhibitor TSA, we isolated enzyme activity and temporal requirements for HDAC function that reproduce hdac1(b382 defects in craniofacial and sympathetic neuron development. Our study reveals distinct functional and temporal requirements for zebrafish hdac1 during neural crest-derived craniofacial and peripheral neuron development.

  17. The zebrafish sf3b1b460 mutant reveals differential requirements for the sf3b1 pre-mRNA processing gene during neural crest development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Min; Henion, Paul D

    2012-01-01

    The functions of gene regulatory networks that control embryonic cell diversification occur on a background of constitutively active molecular machinery necessary for the elaboration of genetic interactions. The essential roles of subsets of such "housekeeping" genes in the regulation of specific aspects of development have become increasingly clear. Pre-mRNA processing is essential for production of functional transcripts by, for example, excision of introns. We have cloned the zebrafish toast(b460) locus and found that it encodes splicing factor 3b, subunit 1 (sf3b1). The sf3b1(b460) mutation causes aberrant splicing of sf3b1 resulting in functional and predicted non-functional transcripts and a 90% reduction in full-length Sf3b1 protein. The sf3b1(b460) mutation was isolated in a mutagenesis screen based on the absence of neural crest-derived melanophores. Further analysis revealed specific earlier defects in neural crest development, whereas the early development of other ectodermal populations appears unaffected. The expression of essential transcriptional regulators of neural crest development are severely disrupted in sf3b1(b460) mutants, due in part to defects in pre-mRNA processing of a subset of these factors, leading to defects in neural crest sublineage specification, survival and migration. Misexpression of a subset of these factors rescues aspects of neural crest development in mutant embryos. Our results indicate that although sf3b1 is a ubiquitously essential gene, the degree to which it is required exhibits tissue-type specificity during early embryogenesis. Further, the developmental defects caused by the sf3b1(b460) mutation provide insights into genetic interactions among members of the gene regulatory network controlling neural crest development. PMID:22562198

  18. Dual labeling of neural crest cells and blood vessels within chicken embryos using Chick(GFP) neural tube grafting and carbocyanine dye DiI injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delalande, Jean-Marie; Thapar, Nikhil; Burns, Alan J

    2015-01-01

    All developing organs need to be connected to both the nervous system (for sensory and motor control) as well as the vascular system (for gas exchange, fluid and nutrient supply). Consequently both the nervous and vascular systems develop alongside each other and share striking similarities in their branching architecture. Here we report embryonic manipulations that allow us to study the simultaneous development of neural crest-derived nervous tissue (in this case the enteric nervous system), and the vascular system. This is achieved by generating chicken chimeras via transplantation of discrete segments of the neural tube, and associated neural crest, combined with vascular DiI injection in the same embryo. Our method uses transgenic chick(GFP) embryos for intraspecies grafting, making the transplant technique more powerful than the classical quail-chick interspecies grafting protocol used with great effect since the 1970s. Chick(GFP)-chick intraspecies grafting facilitates imaging of transplanted cells and their projections in intact tissues, and eliminates any potential bias in cell development linked to species differences. This method takes full advantage of the ease of access of the avian embryo (compared with other vertebrate embryos) to study the co-development of the enteric nervous system and the vascular system. PMID:26065540

  19. Search for the Missing lncs: Gene Regulatory Networks in Neural Crest Development and Long Non-coding RNA Biomarkers of Hirschsprung's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR), a birth defect characterized by variable aganglionosis of the gut, affects about 1 in 5000 births, and is a consequence of abnormal development of neural crest cells, from which enteric ganglia derive. In the companion article in this issue (S...

  20. A novel N-terminal motif is responsible for the evolution of neural crest-specific gene-regulatory activity in vertebrate FoxD3

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ono, H.; Kozmik, Zbyněk; Yu, J.K.; Wada, H.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 385, č. 2 (2014), s. 396-404. ISSN 0012-1606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/10/2141 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : neural crest * FoxD3 * amphioxus Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.547, year: 2014

  1. Dental anomalies in different cleft groups related to neural crest developmental fields contributes to the understanding of cleft aetiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Louise Claudius; Kjær, Inger; Mølsted, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    , radiographs, dental casts, and medical records. PATIENTS: Ninety individuals (30 cleft lip, 30 cleft palate, and 30 combined cleft lip and palate), aged 5-27 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Visual evaluation of tooth number and tooth morphology. RESULTS: Cleft lip: Dental deviations were predominantly observed...... in the frontonasal field. Supernumerary lateral incisors occurred significantly more often in cleft lip compared to other cleft types. Cleft palate: Dental deviations were observed in the maxillary and palatal fields indicating that both fields are involved in the development of cleft palate....... Malformed roots were seen significantly more often in cleft palate. Combined cleft lip and palate: Number and type of dental deviations differed significantly from deviations in other cleft types, e.g. significantly more ageneses. CONCLUSIONS: Cleft lip seems to be caused by a disorder in neural crest...

  2. Portable Dynamic Positioning Control System on A Barge in Short-Crested Waves Using the Neural Network Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Ming-chung; LEE Zi-yi

    2013-01-01

    This paper develops a nonlinear mathematical model to simulate the dynamic motion behavior of the barge equipped with the portable outboard Dynamic Positioning (DP) system in short-crested waves.The self-tuning Proportional-Derivative (PD) controller based on the neural network algorithm is applied to control the thrusters for optimal adjustment of the barge position in waves.In addition to the wave,the current,the wind and the nonlinear drift force are also considered in the calculations.The time domain simulations for the six-degree-of-freedom motions of the barge with the DP system are solved by the 4th order Runge-Kutta method which can compromise the efficiency and the accuracy of the simulations.The technique of the portable alternative DP system developed here can serve as a practical tool to assist those ships without being equipped with the DP facility while the dynamic positioning missions are needed.

  3. Periconceptional folate consumption is associated with neonatal DNA methylation modifications in neural crest regulatory and cancer development genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonseth, Semira; Roy, Ritu; Houseman, E Andres; de Smith, Adam J; Zhou, Mi; Lee, Seung-Tae; Nusslé, Sébastien; Singer, Amanda W; Wrensch, Margaret R; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2015-01-01

    Folate deficiency during early embryonic development constitutes a risk factor for neural tube defects and potentially for childhood leukemia via unknown mechanisms. We tested whether folate consumption during the 12 months prior to conception induced DNA methylation modifications at birth in healthy neonates with a genome-wide and agnostic approach. We hypothesized that DNA methylation in genes involved in neural tube development and/or cancer susceptibility would be affected by folate exposure. We retrospectively assessed folate exposure at the time of conception by food-frequency questionnaires administered to the mothers of 343 healthy newborns. We measured genome-wide DNA methylation from neonatal blood spots. We implemented a method based on bootstrap resampling to decrease false-positive findings. Folate was inversely associated with DNA methylation throughout the genome. Among the top folate-associated genes that were replicated in an independent Gambian study were TFAP2A, a gene critical for neural crest development, STX11, a gene implicated in acute myeloid leukemia, and CYS1, a candidate gene for cystic kidney disease. Reduced periconceptional folate intake was associated with increased methylation and, in turn, decreased gene expression at these 3 loci. The top folate-sensitive genes defined by their associated CpG sites were enriched for numerous transcription factors by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, including those implicated in cancer development (e.g., MYC-associated zinc finger protein). The influence of estimated periconceptional folate intake on neonatal DNA methylation levels provides potential mechanistic insights into the role of this vitamin in the development of neural tube defects and childhood cancers. PMID:26646725

  4. In Vivo Transplantation of Enteric Neural Crest Cells into Mouse Gut; Engraftment, Functional Integration and Long-Term Safety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie E Cooper

    Full Text Available Enteric neuropathies are severe gastrointestinal disorders with unsatisfactory outcomes. We aimed to investigate the potential of enteric neural stem cell therapy approaches for such disorders by transplanting mouse enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs into ganglionic and aganglionic mouse gut in vivo and analysing functional integration and long-term safety.Neurospheres generated from yellow fluorescent protein (YFP expressing ENCCs selected from postnatal Wnt1-cre;R26R-YFP/YFP murine gut were transplanted into ganglionic hindgut of wild-type littermates or aganglionic hindgut of Ednrbtm1Ywa mice (lacking functional endothelin receptor type-B. Intestines were then assessed for ENCC integration and differentiation using immunohistochemistry, cell function using calcium imaging, and long-term safety using PCR to detect off-target YFP expression.YFP+ ENCCs engrafted, proliferated and differentiated into enteric neurons and glia within recipient ganglionic gut. Transplanted cells and their projections spread along the endogenous myenteric plexus to form branching networks. Electrical point stimulation of endogenous nerve fibres resulted in calcium transients (F/F0 = 1.16 ± 0.01;43 cells, n = 6 in YFP+ transplanted ENCCs (abolished with TTX. Long-term follow-up (24 months showed transplanted ENCCs did not give rise to tumours or spread to other organs (PCR negative in extraintestinal sites. In aganglionic gut ENCCs similarly spread and differentiated to form neuronal and glial networks with projections closely associated with endogenous neural networks of the transition zone.Transplanted ENCCs successfully engrafted into recipient ganglionic and aganglionic gut showing appropriate spread, localisation and, importantly, functional integration without any long-term safety issues. This study provides key support for the development and use of enteric neural stem cell therapies.

  5. The Wnt Co-Receptor Lrp5 Is Required for Cranial Neural Crest Cell Migration in Zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Willems

    Full Text Available During vertebrate neurulation, cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT, delaminate from the neural plate border, and migrate as separate streams into different cranial regions. There, they differentiate into distinct parts of the craniofacial skeleton. Canonical Wnt signaling has been shown to be essential for this process at different levels but the involved receptors remained unclear. Here we show that the frizzled co-receptor low-density-lipoprotein (LDL receptor-related protein 5 (Lrp5 plays a crucial role in CNCC migration and morphogenesis of the cranial skeleton. Early during induction and migration of CNCCs, lrp5 is expressed ubiquitously but later gets restricted to CNCC derivatives in the ventral head region besides different regions in the CNS. A knock-down of lrp5 does not interfere with induction of CNCCs but leads to reduced proliferation of premigratory CNCCs. In addition, cell migration is disrupted as CNCCs are found in clusters at ectopic positions in the dorsomedial neuroepithelium after lrp5 knock-down and transient CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. These migratory defects consequently result in malformations of the craniofacial skeleton. To date, Lrp5 has mainly been associated with bone homeostasis in mammals. Here we show that in zebrafish, lrp5 also controls cell migration during early morphogenetic processes and contributes to shaping the craniofacial skeleton.

  6. Neural crest migration: interplay between chemorepellents, chemoattractants, contact inhibition, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and collective cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theveneau, Eric; Mayor, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Neural crest (NC) cells are induced at the border of the neural plate and subsequently leave the neuroepithelium during a delamination phase. This delamination involves either a complete or partial epithelium-to-mesenchyme transition, which is directly followed by an extensive cell migration. During migration, NC cells are exposed to a wide variety of signals controlling their polarity and directionality, allowing them to colonize specific areas or preventing them from invading forbidden zones. For instance, NC cells are restricted to very precise pathways by the presence of inhibitory signals at the borders of each route, such as Semaphorins, Ephrins, and Slit/Robo. Although specific NC chemoattractants have been recently identified, there is evidence that repulsive interactions between the cells, in a process called contact inhibition of locomotion, is one of the major driving forces behind directional migration. Interestingly, in cellular and molecular terms, the invasive behavior of NC is similar to the invasion of cancer cells during metastasis. NC cells eventually settle in various places and make an immense contribution to the vertebrate body. They form the major constituents of the skull, the peripheral nervous system, and the pigment cells among others, which show the remarkable diversity and importance of this embryonic-stem cell like cell population. Consequently, several birth defects and craniofacial disorders, such as Treacher Collins syndrome, are due to improper NC cell migration. PMID:23801492

  7. Effects of 13 developmentally toxic chemicals on the migration of rat cephalic neural crest cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usami, Makoto; Mitsunaga, Katsuyoshi; Miyajima, Atsuko; Takamatu, Mina; Kazama, Shugo; Irie, Tomohiko; Doi, Osamu; Takizawa, Tatsuya

    2016-03-01

    The inhibition of neural crest cell (NCC) migration has been considered as a possible pathogenic mechanism underlying chemical developmental toxicity. In this study, we examined the effects of 13 developmentally toxic chemicals on the migration of rat cephalic NCCs (cNCCs) by using a simple in vitro assay. cNCCs were cultured for 48 h as emigrants from rhombencephalic neural tubes explanted from rat embryos at day 10.5 of gestation. The chemicals were added to the culture medium at 24 h of culture. Migration of cNCCs was measured as the change in the radius (radius ratio) calculated from the circular spread of cNCCs between 24 and 48 h of culture. Of the chemicals examined, 13-cis-retinoic acid, ethanol, ibuprofen, lead acetate, salicylic acid, and selenate inhibited the migration of cNCCs at their embryotoxic concentrations; no effects were observed for acetaminophen, caffeine, indium, phenytoin, selenite, tributyltin, and valproic acid. In a cNCC proliferation assay, ethanol, ibuprofen, salicylic acid, selenate, and tributyltin inhibited cell proliferation, suggesting the contribution of the reduced cell number to the inhibited migration of cNCCs. It was determined that several developmentally toxic chemicals inhibited the migration of cNCCs, the effects of which were manifested as various craniofacial abnormalities. PMID:26175014

  8. Impaired Cellular Immunity in the Murine Neural Crest Conditional Deletion of Endothelin Receptor-B Model of Hirschsprung's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankush Gosain

    Full Text Available Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR is characterized by aganglionosis from failure of neural crest cell (NCC migration to the distal hindgut. Up to 40% of HSCR patients suffer Hirschsprung's-associated enterocolitis (HAEC, with an incidence that is unchanged from the pre-operative to the post-operative state. Recent reports indicate that signaling pathways involved in NCC migration may also be involved in the development of secondary lymphoid organs. We hypothesize that gastrointestinal (GI mucosal immune defects occur in HSCR that may contribute to enterocolitis. EdnrB was deleted from the neural crest (EdnrBNCC-/- resulting in mutants with defective NCC migration, distal colonic aganglionosis and the development of enterocolitis. The mucosal immune apparatus of these mice was interrogated at post-natal day (P 21-24, prior to histological signs of enterocolitis. We found that EdnrBNCC-/- display lymphopenia of their Peyer's Patches, the major inductive site of GI mucosal immunity. EdnrBNCC-/- Peyer's Patches demonstrate decreased B-lymphocytes, specifically IgM+IgDhi (Mature B-lymphocytes, which are normally activated and produce IgA following antigen presentation. EdnrBNCC-/- animals demonstrate decreased small intestinal secretory IgA, but unchanged nasal and bronchial airway secretory IgA, indicating a gut-specific defect in IgA production or secretion. In the spleen, which is the primary source of IgA-producing Mature B-lymphocytes, EdnrBNCC-/- animals display decreased B-lymphocytes, but an increase in Mature B-lymphocytes. EdnrBNCC-/- spleens are also small and show altered architecture, with decreased red pulp and a paucity of B-lymphocytes in the germinal centers and marginal zone. Taken together, these findings suggest impaired GI mucosal immunity in EdnrBNCC-/- animals, with the spleen as a potential site of the defect. These findings build upon the growing body of literature that suggests that intestinal defects in HSCR are not restricted

  9. Multipotent skin-derived precursors: adult neural crest-related precursors with therapeutic potential

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Karl J.L; Toma, Jean G; Miller, Freda D.

    2007-01-01

    We previously made the surprising finding that cultures of multipotent precursors can be grown from the dermis of neonatal and adult mammalian skin. These skin-derived precursors (SKPs) display multi-lineage differentiation potential, producing both neural and mesodermal progeny in vitro, and are an apparently novel precursor cell type that is distinct from other known precursors within the skin. In this review, we begin by placing these findings within the context of the rapidly evolving ste...

  10. Adult bone marrow mesenchymal and neural crest stem cells are chemoattractive and accelerate motor recovery in a mouse model of spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Neirinckx, Virginie; Agirman, Gulistan; Coste, Cécile; Marquet, Alice; Dion, Valérie; Rogister, Bernard; Franzen, Rachelle; Wislet, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Stem cells from adult tissues were considered for a long time as promising tools for regenerative therapy of neurological diseases, including spinal cord injuries (SCI). Indeed, mesenchymal (MSCs) and neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) together constitute the bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) that were used as therapeutic options in various models of experimental SCI. However, as clinical approaches remained disappointing, we thought that reducing BMSC heterogeneity should be a...

  11. Delamination of neural crest cells requires transient and reversible Wnt inhibition mediated by Dact1/2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabadán, M Angeles; Herrera, Antonio; Fanlo, Lucia; Usieto, Susana; Carmona-Fontaine, Carlos; Barriga, Elias H; Mayor, Roberto; Pons, Sebastián; Martí, Elisa

    2016-06-15

    Delamination of neural crest (NC) cells is a bona fide physiological model of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process that is influenced by Wnt/β-catenin signalling. Using two in vivo models, we show that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is transiently inhibited at the time of NC delamination. In attempting to define the mechanism underlying this inhibition, we found that the scaffold proteins Dact1 and Dact2, which are expressed in pre-migratory NC cells, are required for NC delamination in Xenopus and chick embryos, whereas they do not affect the motile properties of migratory NC cells. Dact1/2 inhibit Wnt/β-catenin signalling upstream of the transcriptional activity of T cell factor (TCF), which is required for EMT to proceed. Dact1/2 regulate the subcellular distribution of β-catenin, preventing β-catenin from acting as a transcriptional co-activator to TCF, yet without affecting its stability. Together, these data identify a novel yet important regulatory element that inhibits β-catenin signalling, which then affects NC delamination. PMID:27122165

  12. Disruption of CXCR4 signaling in pharyngeal neural crest cells causes DiGeorge syndrome-like malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escot, Sophie; Blavet, Cédrine; Faure, Emilie; Zaffran, Stéphane; Duband, Jean-Loup; Fournier-Thibault, Claire

    2016-02-15

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a congenital disease causing cardiac outflow tract anomalies, craniofacial dysmorphogenesis, thymus hypoplasia, and mental disorders. It results from defective development of neural crest cells (NCs) that colonize the pharyngeal arches and contribute to lower jaw, neck and heart tissues. Although TBX1 has been identified as the main gene accounting for the defects observed in human patients and mouse models, the molecular mechanisms underlying DGS etiology are poorly identified. The recent demonstrations that the SDF1/CXCR4 axis is implicated in NC chemotactic guidance and impaired in cortical interneurons of mouse DGS models prompted us to search for genetic interactions between Tbx1, Sdf1 (Cxcl12) and Cxcr4 in pharyngeal NCs and to investigate the effect of altering CXCR4 signaling on the ontogeny of their derivatives, which are affected in DGS. Here, we provide evidence that Cxcr4 and Sdf1 are genetically downstream of Tbx1 during pharyngeal NC development and that reduction of CXCR4 signaling causes misrouting of pharyngeal NCs in chick and dramatic morphological alterations in the mandibular skeleton, thymus and cranial sensory ganglia. Our results therefore support the possibility of a pivotal role for the SDF1/CXCR4 axis in DGS etiology. PMID:26755698

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells and neural crest stem cells from adult bone marrow: characterization of their surprising similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine; Laudet, Emerence; Neirinckx, Virginie; Alix, Philippe; Leprince, Pierre; Glejzer, Aneta; Poulet, Christophe; Hennuy, Benoit; Sommer, Lukas; Shakhova, Olga; Rogister, Bernard

    2012-08-01

    The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crest stem cells (NCSC) might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), including their similarities and differences. In this paper, using transcriptomic as well as proteomic technologies, we compared NCSC to MSC and stromal nestin-positive cells, all of them isolated from adult bone marrow. We demonstrated that the nestin-positive cell population, which was the first to be described as able to differentiate into functional neurons, was a mixed population of NCSC and MSC. More interestingly, we demonstrated that MSC shared with NCSC the same ability to truly differentiate into Tuj1-positive cells when co-cultivated with paraformaldehyde-fixed cerebellar granule neurons. Altogether, those results suggest that both NCSC and MSC can be considered as important tools for cellular therapies in order to replace neurons in various neurological diseases. PMID:22349262

  14. Interaction of adult human neural crest-derived stem cells with a nanoporous titanium surface is sufficient to induce their osteogenic differentiation

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    Matthias Schürmann

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenic differentiation of various adult stem cell populations such as neural crest-derived stem cells is of great interest in the context of bone regeneration. Ideally, exogenous differentiation should mimic an endogenous differentiation process, which is partly mediated by topological cues. To elucidate the osteoinductive potential of porous substrates with different pore diameters (30 nm, 100 nm, human neural crest-derived stem cells isolated from the inferior nasal turbinate were cultivated on the surface of nanoporous titanium covered membranes without additional chemical or biological osteoinductive cues. As controls, flat titanium without any topological features and osteogenic medium was used. Cultivation of human neural crest-derived stem cells on 30 nm pores resulted in osteogenic differentiation as demonstrated by alkaline phosphatase activity after seven days as well as by calcium deposition after 3 weeks of cultivation. In contrast, cultivation on flat titanium and on membranes equipped with 100 nm pores was not sufficient to induce osteogenic differentiation. Moreover, we demonstrate an increase of osteogenic transcripts including Osterix, Osteocalcin and up-regulation of Integrin β1 and α2 in the 30 nm pore approach only. Thus, transplantation of stem cells pre-cultivated on nanostructured implants might improve the clinical outcome by support of the graft adherence and acceleration of the regeneration process.

  15. Novel migrating mouse neural crest cell assay system utilizing P0-Cre/EGFP fluorescent time-lapse imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawakami Minoru

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neural crest cells (NCCs are embryonic, multipotent stem cells. Their long-range and precision-guided migration is one of their most striking characteristics. We previously reported that P0-Cre/CAG-CAT-lacZ double-transgenic mice showed significant lacZ expression in tissues derived from NCCs. Results In this study, by embedding a P0-Cre/CAG-CAT-EGFP embryo at E9.5 in collagen gel inside a culture glass slide, we were able to keep the embryo developing ex vivo for more than 24 hours; this development was with enough NCC fluorescent signal intensity to enable single-cell resolution analysis, with the accompanying NCC migration potential intact and with the appropriate NCC response to the extracellular signal maintained. By implantation of beads with absorbed platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA, we demonstrated that PDGF-AA acts as an NCC-attractant in embryos. We also performed assays with NCCs isolated from P0-Cre/CAG-CAT-EGFP embryos on culture plates. The neuromediator 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT has been known to regulate NCC migration. We newly demonstrated that dopamine, in addition to 5-HT, stimulated NCC migration in vitro. Two NCC populations, with different axial levels of origins, showed unique distribution patterns regarding migration velocity and different dose-response patterns to both 5-HT and dopamine. Conclusions Although avian species predominated over the other species in the NCC study, our novel system should enable us to use mice to assay many different aspects of NCCs in embryos or on culture plates, such as migration, division, differentiation, and apoptosis.

  16. In vitro cementoblast-like differentiation of postmigratory neural crest-derived p75{sup +} stem cells with dental follicle cell conditioned medium

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    Wen, Xiujie; Liu, Luchuan; Deng, Manjing; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Li; Nie, Xin, E-mail: dr.xinnie@gmail.com

    2015-09-10

    Cranial neural crest-derived cells (CNCCs) play important role in epithelial–mesenchymal interactions during tooth morphogenesis. However, the heterogeneity of CNCCs and their tendency to spontaneously differentiate along smooth muscle or osteoblast lineages in vitro limit further understanding of their biological properties. We studied the differentiation properties of isolated rat embryonic postmigratory CNCCs, expressing p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). These p75NTR positive (p75{sup +}) CNCCs, isolated using fluorescence activated cell sorter, exhibited fibroblast-like morphology and characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells. Incubation of p75{sup +} CNCCs in dental follicle cell conditioned medium (DFCCM) combined with dentin non-collagenous proteins (dNCPs), altered their morphological features to cementoblast-like appearance. These cells also showed low proliferative activity, high ALP activity and significantly increased calcified nodule formation. Markers related to mineralization or specific to cementoblast lineage were highly expressed in dNCPs/DFCCM-treated p75{sup +} cells, suggesting their differentiation along cementoblast-like lineage. p75{sup +} stem cells selected from postmigratory CNCCs represent a pure stem cell population and could be used as a stem cell model for in vitro studies due to their intrinsic ability to differentiate to neuronal cells and transform from neuroectoderm to ectomesenchyme. They can provide a potential stem cell resource for tooth engineering studies and help to further investigate mechanisms of epithelial–mesenchymal interactions in tooth morphogenesis. - Highlights: • Cranial neural crest-derived cells (CNCCs) take part in tooth morphogenesis. • positive (p75{sup +}) CNCCs are fibroblast-like and resemble mesenchymal stem cells. • p75{sup +} CNCCs in dental follicle cell medium (DFCCM/dNCP) appear like cementoblasts. • DFCCM/dNCP-treated p75{sup +} cells express cementoblast specific mineralization

  17. Derivation of Schwann cell precursors from neural crest cells resident in bone marrow for cell therapy to improve peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haiyan; Gong, Yanpei; Qiang, Liang; Li, Xiaoli; Zhang, Shibo; Gao, Jiawen; Li, Kai; Ji, Ximeng; Tian, Ling; Gu, Xiaosong; Ding, Fei

    2016-05-01

    We have previously successfully enriched post-migratory neural crest cells (NCCs) from postnatal rat bone marrow (BM). These BM-NCCs possess glial and neuronal differentiating potential. Based on the neural crest origin of Schwann cells (SCs), in this study, we aimed at using a straightforward protocol to derive Schwann cell precursors (SCPs) from BM-NCCs. Several clonal subpopulations were isolated from BM-NCCs, displaying long-term proliferative capacity and maintaining the NCC identity. The BM-NCC clones could be induced to differentiate into SCs. In particular, clone N1 gave rise to a large and pure population of SCs. Clone N1-derived SCs demonstrated the myelinating capacity in their co-culture with primary dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The decreased expression of NCC-markers and increased expression of SC-markers were related to the differentiation state of clone N1-derived SCs. To investigate the repair-promoting effects of clone N1 on injured peripheral neurons in vitro and in vivo, on one hand, the oxygen glucose deprivation-injured DRG neurons were treated with clone N1-conditioned medium, improving the cell survival and axon growth of neurons; on the other hand, clone N1 or clone N1-derived SCs were respectively implanted to the crush sciatic nerve of rats, and clone N1 yielded the better outcome of nerve regeneration and function restoration than clone N1-derived SCs. Taken together, all the results collectively showed that clone N1 could be identified as SCPs, which might hold promise for cell therapy to improve peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:26946403

  18. Heterochronic shift between early organogenesis and migration of cephalic neural crest cells in two divergent evolutionary phenotypes of archosaurs: crocodile and ostrich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundrát, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Living archosaurs (crocodiles and birds) represent an intriguing evo-devo model system. Although close in phylogenetic relationship, the two lineages show considerable divergence in trends of phenotypic evolution. The head anatomy of recent crocodilians has changed little in comparison with that of their crocodylomorph ancestors. The head phenotype of the avians (birds), as well as some non-avian theropods, shows numerous evolutionary innovations that differ considerably from the crocodylomorph pattern. Most of the novel head structures, such as features of the craniofacial skeleton, cranial nerves, head muscles, and integument are derived from the same cellular source common to all archosaurs, the cephalic neural crest (CNC). Therefore, other factors must be involved in the developmental disparity of homologous structures in the aforementioned lineages. The present study analyzes the earliest developmental events that are associated with the appearance of the neural crest cells in the two archosaur models: Crocodylus niloticus and Struthio camelus. I found that both models share unique developmental features, the presence of an unpaired, rostrally migrating population of CNC cells, showing that the two are closely related to each other. On the other hand, the crocodile and the ostrich differ substantially in (1) timing, (2) duration, and (3) expression patterns of the CNC. Compared with the crocodile, the CNC cells in the ostrich (1) migrate much later into the embryonic head, (2) but relocate to their terminal positions faster, and (3) take specifically directed migratory routes in the mandibular/oral region and head/trunk-interface regions. I suggest that accelerated relocation of CNC cells combined with delayed head organogenesis may represent important innovative conditions in the developmental evolution of a new archosaur head phenotype. PMID:19754710

  19. In vitro cementoblast-like differentiation of postmigratory neural crest-derived p75+ stem cells with dental follicle cell conditioned medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranial neural crest-derived cells (CNCCs) play important role in epithelial–mesenchymal interactions during tooth morphogenesis. However, the heterogeneity of CNCCs and their tendency to spontaneously differentiate along smooth muscle or osteoblast lineages in vitro limit further understanding of their biological properties. We studied the differentiation properties of isolated rat embryonic postmigratory CNCCs, expressing p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). These p75NTR positive (p75+) CNCCs, isolated using fluorescence activated cell sorter, exhibited fibroblast-like morphology and characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells. Incubation of p75+ CNCCs in dental follicle cell conditioned medium (DFCCM) combined with dentin non-collagenous proteins (dNCPs), altered their morphological features to cementoblast-like appearance. These cells also showed low proliferative activity, high ALP activity and significantly increased calcified nodule formation. Markers related to mineralization or specific to cementoblast lineage were highly expressed in dNCPs/DFCCM-treated p75+ cells, suggesting their differentiation along cementoblast-like lineage. p75+ stem cells selected from postmigratory CNCCs represent a pure stem cell population and could be used as a stem cell model for in vitro studies due to their intrinsic ability to differentiate to neuronal cells and transform from neuroectoderm to ectomesenchyme. They can provide a potential stem cell resource for tooth engineering studies and help to further investigate mechanisms of epithelial–mesenchymal interactions in tooth morphogenesis. - Highlights: • Cranial neural crest-derived cells (CNCCs) take part in tooth morphogenesis. • positive (p75+) CNCCs are fibroblast-like and resemble mesenchymal stem cells. • p75+ CNCCs in dental follicle cell medium (DFCCM/dNCP) appear like cementoblasts. • DFCCM/dNCP-treated p75+ cells express cementoblast specific mineralization markers. • p75+ cells are pure stem cells and

  20. EGF–FGF2 stimulates the proliferation and improves the neuronal commitment of mouse epidermal neural crest stem cells (EPI-NCSCs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidermal neural crest stem cells (EPI-NCSCs), which reside in the bulge of hair follicles, are attractive candidates for several applications in cell therapy, drug screening and tissue engineering. As suggested remnants of the embryonic neural crest (NC) in an adult location, EPI-NCSCs are able to generate a wide variety of cell types and are readily accessible by a minimally invasive procedure. Since the combination of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and fibroblast growth factor type 2 (FGF2) is mitogenic and promotes the neuronal commitment of various stem cell populations, we examined its effects in the proliferation and neuronal potential of mouse EPI-NCSCs. By using a recognized culture protocol of bulge whiskers follicles, we were able to isolate a population of EPI-NCSCs, characterized by the migratory potential, cell morphology and expression of phenotypic markers of NC cells. EPI-NCSCs expressed neuronal, glial and smooth muscle markers and exhibited the NC-like fibroblastic morphology. The treatment with the combination EGF and FGF2, however, increased their proliferation rate and promoted the acquisition of a neuronal-like morphology accompanied by reorganization of neural cytoskeletal proteins βIII-tubulin and nestin, as well as upregulation of the pan neuronal marker βIII-tubulin and down regulation of the undifferentiated NC, glial and smooth muscle cell markers. Moreover, the treatment enhanced the response of EPI-NCSCs to neurogenic stimulation, as evidenced by induction of GAP43, and increased expression of Mash-1 in neuron-like cell, both neuronal-specific proteins. Together, the results suggest that the combination of EGF–FGF2 stimulates the proliferation and improves the neuronal potential of EPI-NCSCs similarly to embryonic NC cells, ES cells and neural progenitor/stem cells of the central nervous system and highlights the advantage of using EGF–FGF2 in neuronal differentiation protocols. - Highlights: • EPI-NCSCs express

  1. EGF–FGF{sub 2} stimulates the proliferation and improves the neuronal commitment of mouse epidermal neural crest stem cells (EPI-NCSCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bressan, Raul Bardini; Melo, Fernanda Rosene; Almeida, Patricia Alves; Bittencourt, Denise Avani; Visoni, Silvia; Jeremias, Talita Silva [Departamento de Biologia Celular, Embriologia e Genética, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário – Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis SC (Brazil); Costa, Ana Paula; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy [Departamento de Bioquímica, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário – Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis SC (Brazil); Trentin, Andrea Gonçalves, E-mail: andrea.trentin@ufsc.br [Departamento de Biologia Celular, Embriologia e Genética, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário – Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis SC (Brazil)

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal neural crest stem cells (EPI-NCSCs), which reside in the bulge of hair follicles, are attractive candidates for several applications in cell therapy, drug screening and tissue engineering. As suggested remnants of the embryonic neural crest (NC) in an adult location, EPI-NCSCs are able to generate a wide variety of cell types and are readily accessible by a minimally invasive procedure. Since the combination of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and fibroblast growth factor type 2 (FGF{sub 2}) is mitogenic and promotes the neuronal commitment of various stem cell populations, we examined its effects in the proliferation and neuronal potential of mouse EPI-NCSCs. By using a recognized culture protocol of bulge whiskers follicles, we were able to isolate a population of EPI-NCSCs, characterized by the migratory potential, cell morphology and expression of phenotypic markers of NC cells. EPI-NCSCs expressed neuronal, glial and smooth muscle markers and exhibited the NC-like fibroblastic morphology. The treatment with the combination EGF and FGF{sub 2}, however, increased their proliferation rate and promoted the acquisition of a neuronal-like morphology accompanied by reorganization of neural cytoskeletal proteins βIII-tubulin and nestin, as well as upregulation of the pan neuronal marker βIII-tubulin and down regulation of the undifferentiated NC, glial and smooth muscle cell markers. Moreover, the treatment enhanced the response of EPI-NCSCs to neurogenic stimulation, as evidenced by induction of GAP43, and increased expression of Mash-1 in neuron-like cell, both neuronal-specific proteins. Together, the results suggest that the combination of EGF–FGF2 stimulates the proliferation and improves the neuronal potential of EPI-NCSCs similarly to embryonic NC cells, ES cells and neural progenitor/stem cells of the central nervous system and highlights the advantage of using EGF–FGF{sub 2} in neuronal differentiation protocols. - Highlights: • EPI

  2. CREST Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğçe Köksüz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of CREST syndrome (calsinosis cutis, Raynaud’s phenomenon, oesophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia with all of the five major symptoms. A 46-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic with the complaint of erythema, rigidity and pain on the plantar surface of the feet. She had had Raynaud’s phenomenon for 20 years and oesophageal reflux for five years. Her face had become masklike and there was prominent telangiectasies on her face and hands. Sclerosis were confined to the fingers (sclerodactyly. Direct X-ray graphy demonstrated calcinosis cutis on the left hand and suprapatellar region. She was treated with nifedipine 30 mg/day, acetylsalicylic acid 100 mg/day for Raynaud’s phenomenon and famotidine 40 mg/day, metoclopramide HCL 30 mg/day for oesophageal dysmotility. Her complaints were partially relieved after the treatment. This case had all of the five major symptoms of CREST syndrome, and we aimed to emphasize the major symptoms and complications of CREST syndrome. (Turk J Dermatol 2012; 6: 48-50

  3. The ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 regulates craniofacial development by promoting cranial neural crest cell survival and stem-cell like properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiszniak, Sophie; Kabbara, Samuela; Lumb, Rachael; Scherer, Michaela; Secker, Genevieve; Harvey, Natasha; Kumar, Sharad; Schwarz, Quenten

    2013-11-15

    The integration of multiple morphogenic signalling pathways and transcription factor networks is essential to mediate neural crest (NC) cell induction, delamination, survival, stem-cell properties, fate choice and differentiation. Although the transcriptional control of NC development is well documented in mammals, the role of post-transcriptional modifications, and in particular ubiquitination, has not been explored. Here we report an essential role for the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 in cranial NC cell development. Our analysis of Nedd4(-/-) embryos identified profound deficiency of cranial NC cells in the absence of structural defects in the neural tube. Nedd4 is expressed in migrating cranial NC cells and was found to positively regulate expression of the NC transcription factors Sox9, Sox10 and FoxD3. We found that in the absence of these factors, a subset of cranial NC cells undergo apoptosis. In accordance with a lack of cranial NC cells, Nedd4(-/-) embryos have deficiency of the trigeminal ganglia, NC derived bone and malformation of the craniofacial skeleton. Our analyses therefore uncover an essential role for Nedd4 in a subset of cranial NC cells and highlight E3 ubiquitin ligases as a likely point of convergence for multiple NC signalling pathways and transcription factor networks. PMID:24080509

  4. CREST Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Tuğçe Köksüz; Zeynep Nurhan Saraçoğlu; Ayşe Esra Koku-Aksu; İlham Sabuncu; Cengiz Korkmaz

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of CREST syndrome (calsinosis cutis, Raynaud’s phenomenon, oesophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia) with all of the five major symptoms. A 46-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic with the complaint of erythema, rigidity and pain on the plantar surface of the feet. She had had Raynaud’s phenomenon for 20 years and oesophageal reflux for five years. Her face had become masklike and there was prominent telangiectasies on her face and hands. Sclerosis were ...

  5. Impaired Cellular Immunity in the Murine Neural Crest Conditional Deletion of Endothelin Receptor-B Model of Hirschsprung’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosain, Ankush; Barlow-Anacker, Amanda J.; Erickson, Chris S.; Pierre, Joseph F.; Heneghan, Aaron F.; Epstein, Miles L.; Kudsk, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR) is characterized by aganglionosis from failure of neural crest cell (NCC) migration to the distal hindgut. Up to 40% of HSCR patients suffer Hirschsprung’s-associated enterocolitis (HAEC), with an incidence that is unchanged from the pre-operative to the post-operative state. Recent reports indicate that signaling pathways involved in NCC migration may also be involved in the development of secondary lymphoid organs. We hypothesize that gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal immune defects occur in HSCR that may contribute to enterocolitis. EdnrB was deleted from the neural crest (EdnrBNCC-/-) resulting in mutants with defective NCC migration, distal colonic aganglionosis and the development of enterocolitis. The mucosal immune apparatus of these mice was interrogated at post-natal day (P) 21–24, prior to histological signs of enterocolitis. We found that EdnrBNCC-/- display lymphopenia of their Peyer’s Patches, the major inductive site of GI mucosal immunity. EdnrBNCC-/- Peyer’s Patches demonstrate decreased B-lymphocytes, specifically IgM+IgDhi (Mature) B-lymphocytes, which are normally activated and produce IgA following antigen presentation. EdnrBNCC-/- animals demonstrate decreased small intestinal secretory IgA, but unchanged nasal and bronchial airway secretory IgA, indicating a gut-specific defect in IgA production or secretion. In the spleen, which is the primary source of IgA-producing Mature B-lymphocytes, EdnrBNCC-/- animals display decreased B-lymphocytes, but an increase in Mature B-lymphocytes. EdnrBNCC-/- spleens are also small and show altered architecture, with decreased red pulp and a paucity of B-lymphocytes in the germinal centers and marginal zone. Taken together, these findings suggest impaired GI mucosal immunity in EdnrBNCC-/- animals, with the spleen as a potential site of the defect. These findings build upon the growing body of literature that suggests that intestinal defects in HSCR are not restricted to

  6. The retinoic acid signaling pathway regulates anterior/posterior patterning in the nerve cord and pharynx of amphioxus, a chordate lacking neural crest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escriva, Hector; Holland, Nicholas D.; Gronemeyer, Hinrich; Laudet, Vincent; Holland, Linda Z.

    2002-01-01

    Amphioxus, the closest living invertebrate relative of the vertebrates, has a notochord, segmental axial musculature, pharyngeal gill slits and dorsal hollow nerve cord, but lacks neural crest. In amphioxus, as in vertebrates, exogenous retinoic acid (RA) posteriorizes the embryo. The mouth and gill slits never form, AmphiPax1, which is normally downregulated where gill slits form, remains upregulated and AmphiHox1 expression shifts anteriorly in the nerve cord. To dissect the role of RA signaling in patterning chordate embryos, we have cloned the single retinoic acid receptor (AmphiRAR), retinoid X receptor (AmphiRXR) and an orphan receptor (AmphiTR2/4) from amphioxus. AmphiTR2/4 inhibits AmphiRAR-AmphiRXR-mediated transactivation in the presence of RA by competing for DR5 or IR7 retinoic acid response elements (RAREs). The 5' untranslated region of AmphiTR2/4 contains an IR7 element, suggesting possible auto- and RA-regulation. The patterns of AmphiTR2/4 and AmphiRAR expression during embryogenesis are largely complementary: AmphiTR2/4 is strongly expressed in the cerebral vesicle (homologous to the diencephalon plus anterior midbrain), while AmphiRAR expression is high in the equivalent of the hindbrain and spinal cord. Similarly, while AmphiTR2/4 is expressed most strongly in the anterior and posterior thirds of the endoderm, the highest AmphiRAR expression is in the middle third. Expression of AmphiRAR is upregulated by exogenous RA and completely downregulated by the RA antagonist BMS009. Moreover, BMS009 expands the pharynx posteriorly; the first three gill slit primordia are elongated and shifted posteriorly, but do not penetrate, and additional, non-penetrating gill slit primordia are induced. Thus, in an organism without neural crest, initiation and penetration of gill slits appear to be separate events mediated by distinct levels of RA signaling in the pharyngeal endoderm. Although these compounds have little effect on levels of AmphiTR2/4 expression, RA

  7. Neural crest migration is driven by a few trailblazer cells with a unique molecular signature narrowly confined to the invasive front.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, Rebecca; Schumacher, Linus J; Morrison, Jason A; Teddy, Jessica M; Ridenour, Dennis A; Box, Andrew C; Semerad, Craig L; Li, Hua; McDowell, William; Kay, David; Maini, Philip K; Baker, Ruth E; Kulesa, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    Neural crest (NC) cell migration is crucial to the formation of peripheral tissues during vertebrate development. However, how NC cells respond to different microenvironments to maintain persistence of direction and cohesion in multicellular streams remains unclear. To address this, we profiled eight subregions of a typical cranial NC cell migratory stream. Hierarchical clustering showed significant differences in the expression profiles of the lead three subregions compared with newly emerged cells. Multiplexed imaging of mRNA expression using fluorescent hybridization chain reaction (HCR) quantitatively confirmed the expression profiles of lead cells. Computational modeling predicted that a small fraction of lead cells that detect directional information is optimal for successful stream migration. Single-cell profiling then revealed a unique molecular signature that is consistent and stable over time in a subset of lead cells within the most advanced portion of the migratory front, which we term trailblazers. Model simulations that forced a lead cell behavior in the trailing subpopulation predicted cell bunching near the migratory domain entrance. Misexpression of the trailblazer molecular signature by perturbation of two upstream transcription factors agreed with the in silico prediction and showed alterations to NC cell migration distance and stream shape. These data are the first to characterize the molecular diversity within an NC cell migratory stream and offer insights into how molecular patterns are transduced into cell behaviors. PMID:25977364

  8. Decreased proliferative, migrative and neuro-differentiative potential of postnatal rat enteric neural crest-derived cells during culture in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui; Pan, Wei-Kang; Zheng, Bai-Jun; Wang, Huai-Jie; Chen, Xin-Lin; Liu, Yong; Gao, Ya

    2016-05-01

    A growing body of evidence supports the potential use of enteric neural crest-derived cells (ENCCs) as a cell replacement therapy for Hirschsprung's disease. Based on previous observations of robust propagation of primary ENCCs, as opposed to their progeny, it is suggested that their therapeutic potential after in vitro expansion may be restricted. We therefore examined the growth and differentiation activities and phenotypic characteristics of continuous ENCC cultures. ENCCs were isolated from the intestines of postnatal rats and were identified using an immunocytochemical approach. During continuous ENCC culture expansion, proliferation, migration, apoptosis, and differentiation potentials were monitored. The Cell Counting Kit-8 was used for assessment of ENCC vitality, Transwell inserts for cell migration, immunocytochemistry for cell counts and identification, and flow cytometry for apoptosis. Over six continuous generations, ENCC proliferation potency was reduced and with prolonged culture, the ratio of migratory ENCCs was decreased. The percentage of apoptosis showed an upward trend with prolonged intragenerational culture, but showed a downward trend with prolonged culture of combined generations. Furthermore, the percentage of peripherin(+) cells decreased whilst the percentage of GFAP(+) cells increased with age. The results demonstrated that alterations in ENCC growth characteristics occur with increased culture time, which may partially account for the poor results of proposed cell therapies. PMID:27068376

  9. FGF8 signaling sustains progenitor status and multipotency of cranial neural crest-derived mesenchymal cells in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Meiying; Liu, Chao; Song, Yingnan; Ye, Wenduo; He, Wei; Yuan, Guohua; Gu, Shuping; Lin, Congxin; Ma, Liang; Zhang, Yanding; Tian, Weidong; Hu, Tao; Chen, YiPing

    2015-10-01

    The cranial neural crest (CNC) cells play a vital role in craniofacial development and regeneration. They are multi-potent progenitors, being able to differentiate into various types of tissues. Both pre-migratory and post-migratory CNC cells are plastic, taking on diverse fates by responding to different inductive signals. However, what sustains the multipotency of CNC cells and derivatives remains largely unknown. In this study, we present evidence that FGF8 signaling is able to sustain progenitor status and multipotency of CNC-derived mesenchymal cells both in vivo and in vitro. We show that augmented FGF8 signaling in pre-migratory CNC cells prevents cell differentiation and organogenesis in the craniofacial region by maintaining their progenitor status. CNC-derived mesenchymal cells with Fgf8 overexpression or control cells in the presence of exogenous FGF8 exhibit prolonged survival, proliferation, and multi-potent differentiation capability in cell cultures. Remarkably, exogenous FGF8 also sustains the capability of CNC-derived mesenchymal cells to participate in organogenesis such as odontogenesis. Furthermore, FGF8-mediated signaling strongly promotes adipogenesis but inhibits osteogenesis of CNC-derived mesenchymal cells in vitro. Our results reveal a specific role for FGF8 in the maintenance of progenitor status and in fate determination of CNC cells, implicating a potential application in expansion and fate manipulation of CNC-derived cells in stem cell-based craniofacial regeneration. PMID:26243590

  10. GMDH-type neural network approach for modeling the discharge coefficient of rectangular sharp-crested side weirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isa Ebtehaj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the discharge coefficient using hydraulic and geometrical specifications is one of the influential factors in predicting the discharge passing over a side weir. Taking into account the fact that existing equations are incapable of estimating the discharge coefficient well, artificial intelligence methods are used to predict it. In this study, Group Method of Data Handling (GMDH was used for the purpose of predicting the discharge coefficient in a side weir. The Froude number (F1, weir dimensionless length (b/B, ratios of weir length to depth of upstream flow (b/y1 and weir height to its length (p/y1 were taken as input parameters to express a new model for predicting the discharge coefficient. Two different sets of laboratory data were used to train the artificial network and test the new model. Different statistical indexes were used to evaluate the performance of the GMDH model presented for two states, training and testing. The results indicate that the proposed model predicts the discharge coefficient precisely (MAPE = 5.263 & RMSE = 0.038 and this model is more accurate in predicting than the feed-forward neural network model and existing nonlinear regression equations.

  11. Musculocontractural Ehlers–Danlos syndrome and neurocristopathies: dermatan sulfate is required for Xenopus neural crest cells to migrate and adhere to fibronectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadège Gouignard

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Of all live births with congenital anomalies, approximately one-third exhibit deformities of the head and face. Most craniofacial disorders are associated with defects in a migratory stem and progenitor cell population, which is designated the neural crest (NC. Musculocontractural Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (MCEDS is a heritable connective tissue disorder with distinct craniofacial features; this syndrome comprises multiple congenital malformations that are caused by dysfunction of dermatan sulfate (DS biosynthetic enzymes, including DS epimerase-1 (DS-epi1; also known as DSE. Studies in mice have extended our understanding of DS-epi1 in connective tissue maintenance; however, its role in fetal development is not understood. We demonstrate that DS-epi1 is important for the generation of isolated iduronic acid residues in chondroitin sulfate (CS/DS proteoglycans in early Xenopus embryos. The knockdown of DS-epi1 does not affect the formation of early NC progenitors; however, it impairs the correct activation of transcription factors involved in the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT and reduces the extent of NC cell migration, which leads to a decrease in NC-derived craniofacial skeleton, melanocytes and dorsal fin structures. Transplantation experiments demonstrate a tissue-autonomous role for DS-epi1 in cranial NC cell migration in vivo. Cranial NC explant and single-cell cultures indicate a requirement of DS-epi1 in cell adhesion, spreading and extension of polarized cell processes on fibronectin. Thus, our work indicates a functional link between DS and NC cell migration. We conclude that NC defects in the EMT and cell migration might account for the craniofacial anomalies and other congenital malformations in MCEDS, which might facilitate the diagnosis and development of therapies for this distressing condition. Moreover, the presented correlations between human DS-epi1 expression and gene sets of mesenchymal character, invasion and

  12. Control of the collective migration of enteric neural crest cells by the Complement anaphylatoxin C3a and N-cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broders-Bondon, Florence; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Gazquez, Elodie; Heysch, Julie; Piel, Matthieu; Mayor, Roberto; Lambris, John D; Dufour, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing the adhesive and migratory behavior of enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs) during their collective migration within the developing mouse gut. We aimed to decipher the role of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a during this process, because this well-known immune system attractant has been implicated in cephalic NCC co-attraction, a process controlling directional migration. We used the conditional Ht-PA-cre transgenic mouse model allowing a specific ablation of the N-cadherin gene and the expression of a fluorescent reporter in migratory ENCCs without affecting the central nervous system. We performed time-lapse videomicroscopy of ENCCs from control and N-cadherin mutant gut explants cultured on fibronectin (FN) and micropatterned FN-stripes with C3a or C3aR antagonist, and studied cell migration behavior with the use of triangulation analysis to quantify cell dispersion. We performed ex vivo gut cultures with or without C3aR antagonist to determine the effect on ENCC behavior. Confocal microscopy was used to analyze the cell-matrix adhesion properties. We provide the first demonstration of the localization of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a and its receptor on ENCCs during their migration in the embryonic gut. C3aR receptor inhibition alters ENCC adhesion and migration, perturbing directionality and increasing cell dispersion both in vitro and ex vivo. N-cadherin-null ENCCs do not respond to C3a co-attraction. These findings indicate that C3a regulates cell migration in a N-cadherin-dependent process. Our results shed light on the role of C3a in regulating collective and directional cell migration, and in ganglia network organization during enteric nervous system ontogenesis. The detection of an immune system chemokine in ENCCs during ENS development may also shed light on new mechanisms for gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:27041467

  13. Derivation of mesenchymal stromal cells from pluripotent stem cells through a neural crest lineage using small molecule compounds with defined media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Fukuta

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells (NCCs are an embryonic migratory cell population with the ability to differentiate into a wide variety of cell types that contribute to the craniofacial skeleton, cornea, peripheral nervous system, and skin pigmentation. This ability suggests the promising role of NCCs as a source for cell-based therapy. Although several methods have been used to induce human NCCs (hNCCs from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs, such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, further modifications are required to improve the robustness, efficacy, and simplicity of these methods. Chemically defined medium (CDM was used as the basal medium in the induction and maintenance steps. By optimizing the culture conditions, the combination of the GSK3β inhibitor and TGFβ inhibitor with a minimum growth factor (insulin very efficiently induced hNCCs (70-80% from hPSCs. The induced hNCCs expressed cranial NCC-related genes and stably proliferated in CDM supplemented with EGF and FGF2 up to at least 10 passages without changes being observed in the major gene expression profiles. Differentiation properties were confirmed for peripheral neurons, glia, melanocytes, and corneal endothelial cells. In addition, cells with differentiation characteristics similar to multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs were induced from hNCCs using CDM specific for human MSCs. Our simple and robust induction protocol using small molecule compounds with defined media enabled the generation of hNCCs as an intermediate material producing terminally differentiated cells for cell-based innovative medicine.

  14. Wild-type ALK and activating ALK-R1275Q and ALK-F1174L mutations upregulate Myc and initiate tumor formation in murine neural crest progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montavon, Gisèle; Jauquier, Nicolas; Coulon, Aurélie; Peuchmaur, Michel; Flahaut, Marjorie; Bourloud, Katia Balmas; Yan, Pu; Delattre, Olivier; Sommer, Lukas; Joseph, Jean-Marc; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle; Gross, Nicole; Mühlethaler-Mottet, Annick

    2014-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene is overexpressed, mutated or amplified in most neuroblastoma (NB), a pediatric neural crest-derived embryonal tumor. The two most frequent mutations, ALK-F1174L and ALK-R1275Q, contribute to NB tumorigenesis in mouse models, and cooperate with MYCN in the oncogenic process. However, the precise role of activating ALK mutations or ALK-wt overexpression in NB tumor initiation needs further clarification. Human ALK-wt, ALK-F1174L, or ALK-R1275Q were stably expressed in murine neural crest progenitor cells (NCPC), MONC-1 or JoMa1, immortalized with v-Myc or Tamoxifen-inducible Myc-ERT, respectively. While orthotopic implantations of MONC-1 parental cells in nude mice generated various tumor types, such as NB, osteo/chondrosarcoma, and undifferentiated tumors, due to v-Myc oncogenic activity, MONC-1-ALK-F1174L cells only produced undifferentiated tumors. Furthermore, our data represent the first demonstration of ALK-wt transforming capacity, as ALK-wt expression in JoMa1 cells, likewise ALK-F1174L, or ALK-R1275Q, in absence of exogenous Myc-ERT activity, was sufficient to induce the formation of aggressive and undifferentiated neural crest cell-derived tumors, but not to drive NB development. Interestingly, JoMa1-ALK tumors and their derived cell lines upregulated Myc endogenous expression, resulting from ALK activation, and both ALK and Myc activities were necessary to confer tumorigenic properties on tumor-derived JoMa1 cells in vitro. PMID:24947326

  15. Creative Copper Crests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knab, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to create an art activity that would link the computer-created business cards of fourth-grade students with an upcoming school-wide medieval event. Creating family crests from copper foil would be a great connection, since they, like business cards, are an individual's way to identify themselves to others.…

  16. Co-culture of neural crest stem cells (NCSC and insulin producing beta-TC6 cells results in cadherin junctions and protection against cytokine-induced beta-cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anongnad Ngamjariyawat

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Transplantation of pancreatic islets to Type 1 diabetes patients is hampered by inflammatory reactions at the transplantation site leading to dysfunction and death of insulin producing beta-cells. Recently we have shown that co-transplantation of neural crest stem cells (NCSCs together with the islet cells improves transplantation outcome. The aim of the present investigation was to describe in vitro interactions between NCSCs and insulin producing beta-TC6 cells that may mediate protection against cytokine-induced beta-cell death. PROCEDURES: Beta-TC6 and NCSC cells were cultured either alone or together, and either with or without cell culture inserts. The cultures were then exposed to the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IFN-γ for 48 hours followed by analysis of cell death rates (flow cytometry, nitrite production (Griess reagent, protein localization (immunofluorescence and protein phosphorylation (flow cytometry. RESULTS: We observed that beta-TC6 cells co-cultured with NCSCs were protected against cytokine-induced cell death, but not when separated by cell culture inserts. This occurred in parallel with (i augmented production of nitrite from beta-TC6 cells, indicating that increased cell survival allows a sustained production of nitric oxide; (ii NCSC-derived laminin production; (iii decreased phospho-FAK staining in beta-TC6 cell focal adhesions, and (iv decreased beta-TC6 cell phosphorylation of ERK(T202/Y204, FAK(Y397 and FAK(Y576. Furthermore, co-culture also resulted in cadherin and beta-catenin accumulations at the NCSC/beta-TC6 cell junctions. Finally, the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone did not affect cytokine-induced beta-cell death during co-culture with NCSCs. CONCLUSION: In summary, direct contacts, but not soluble factors, promote improved beta-TC6 viability when co-cultured with NCSCs. We hypothesize that cadherin junctions between NCSC and beta-TC6 cells promote powerful signals that maintain beta

  17. MicroRNA-21 can promote the differentiation of neural crest stem cells from human follicle into Schwann cells%miR-21促进毛囊神经嵴干细胞分化为许旺细胞

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳华; 刘浩; 辛红; 白晓雪; 刘学娟; 倪宇昕

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:MicroRNAs are a class of non-coding single-stranded smal RNA molecules containing 18–25 nucleotides that can bind to the 3’UTR of the mRNA molecules and regulate the protein expression of target genes. Studies have shown that microRNAs could regulate Schwann cel differentiation, myelination maturation and growth of the peripheral nerve. OBJECTIVE: To observe the expression of miR-21 during the differentiation of neural crest stem cels from human folicle into Schwann cels. METHODS: Hair folicle stem cels were cultured and neural crest stem cels were separated from human hair folicles by flow cytometry. Then, the neural crest stem cels were induced to differentiate into Schwann cels. qRT-PCR was used to detect the expression of miR-21 in the process of induction. Neural crest stem cels from hair folicles were divided into control group, agomir-21 group, agomir-NC group, antagomir-21 group and antagomir-NC group. The control group was without intervention. Agomir-21 group was transfected with miR-21 agonist, whereas Antagomir-21 group was transfected with miR-21 antagonist. agomir-NC group and antagomir-NC group were respectively negative controls of agomir-21 group and antagomir-21 group. Finaly, the possible target of miR-21 was searched in database. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Neural crest stem cels were successfuly separated from human hair folicles using flow cytometry and induced to differentiate into Schwann cels. In the process of cel differentiation, miR-21 expression was upregulated gradualy. Transfection of miR-21 agonist could enhance the stem cel differentiation into Schwann cels, whereas transfection of miR-21 antagonist could weaken the differentiation capacity of stem cels. Furthermore, we found via database searching that SOX2 maybe a target of miR-21 and participate in the regulatory role of miR-21. This study suggested that hair folicle neural crest stem cels can be used as an important source of Schwann cels and miR-21 can promote the

  18. Crested Ibis%朱鹮

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁长青

    2010-01-01

    @@ The Crested Ibis(Nipponia nippon,Plates Ⅰ and Ⅱ)(Ciconiiformes: Threskiomithidae)is a mediumsized wading bird,ranging in length from 57.5 to 84.0 cm,with a longish neck and legs,a red featherless face with a crested white head.Its most distinctive morphological character is the long,slender and decurved bill,perfectly adapted for probing in water and mud,or even in cracks on dry ground.The nonbreeding adult is white,with orange cinnamon tones in the tail and flight-feathers.The long bill is black with a red tip.Its red legs do not extend beyond the tail in flight(Hoyo et al.,1992).

  19. Design Guidelines for Low Crested Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Lamberti, Alberto

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of the design guidelines for low crested structures (LCS's) to be applied in coastal protection schemes. The design guidelines are formulated as a part of the research project: Environmental Design of Low Crested Coastal Defence Structures (DELOS) within the EC 5FP...

  20. Whistler wave trapping in a density crest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The linear trapping process of whistler waves in a field-aligned density crest is investigated theoretically and experimentally below ω = ωsub(c)/2 (half gyrofrequency). The conditions of the crest trapping are derived in terms of the frequency ω/ωsub(c), the incident wave-normal angle theta sub(i), and the density ratio n sub(i)/n sub(o), where n sub(i) and n sub(o) denote the density at the incident point and that at the ridge, respectively. The oscillation length of the trapped ray path is calculated for a parabolic density profile. The experiment on antenna-excited whistler wave has been performed in a large magnetized plasma with the density crest. The phase and amplitude profile of the whistler wave is measured along and across the crest. The measurement has verified characteristic behaviors of the crest trapping. (author)

  1. Design Guidelines for Low Crested Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Lamberti, Alberto

    2004-01-01

    The European Union within the Fifth Framework Programme 1998-2002 Energy, Environment andmSustainable Development sponsored the research project: Enviromnental Design of Low Crested Coastal Defence Structures (DELOS), with participation of 18 European organisations.......The European Union within the Fifth Framework Programme 1998-2002 Energy, Environment andmSustainable Development sponsored the research project: Enviromnental Design of Low Crested Coastal Defence Structures (DELOS), with participation of 18 European organisations....

  2. Generalized crested products of Markov chains

    CERN Document Server

    D'Angeli, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    We define a finite Markov chain, called generalized crested product, which naturally appears as a generalization of the first crested product of Markov chains. A complete spectral analysis is developed and the $k$-step transition probability is given. It is important to remark that this Markov chain describes a more general version of the classical Ehrenfest diffusion model. As a particular case, one gets a generalization of the classical Insect Markov chain defined on the ultrametric space. Finally, an interpretation in terms of representation group theory is given, by showing the correspondence between the spectral decomposition of the generalized crested product and the Gelfand pairs associated with the generalized wreath product of permutation groups.

  3. Flow over an Erodible Broad Crested Weir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. K. C.Sahu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The overtopping flow of water over an earthen embankment causes erosion of soil from its surfaces and the eroded surface of the embankment acts as a Broad crest weir. But the longitudinal profile of the weir goes on changing with time of erosion. Hence crest height of the weir goes changing in accelerated flow condition. In this paper, the discharge equation for this type of flow situation is established for different types of soils used in the embankment. Then, the experiments have been carried out as the analogous rigid beds of the captured eroded profiles at any time of erosion of the broad crested weir to compare the discharge equation and to study the energy loss in dislodging the soil from the surface of the weir and transporting them down stream.

  4. Laboratory Experiments on Low-crested Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Zanuttigh, B.; van der Meer, J.W.;

    2005-01-01

    New unique laboratory experiments on low-crested structures (LCSs) have been performed within the DELOS project. The experiments were carried out in three European laboratories aiming at extending and completing existing available information with respect to a wide range of engineering design...

  5. Modified osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flaps transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Song, Dajiang; Li, Jinsong; Xu, Jian; Lv, Hongbin

    2015-04-01

    The paper aims to improve the operative technique of osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flap harvesting, further minimise morbidity of donor site, and improve the effect of recipient site reconstruction. From March 2005 to March 2011, 55 cases of osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flap harvested by different methods were performed to reconstruct the defects of the extremities. Twenty-nine cases were reconstructed with a traditional deep circumflex iliac artery osteomusculocutaneous flap. Twenty-six cases were repaired with modified osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flaps. In 29 cases with a traditional DCIA osteomusculocutaneous flap, two cases showed the injured lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. Flapnecrosis was significant in two cases. Arterial compromise occurred in one case 5 days after operation completion and led to flap failure. Three flaps developed postoperative venous congestion, but only one flap received re-exploration. In the other two cases, some stitches were removed for decompression. All three flaps survived. In two cases, marginal flap necrosis occurred, but no secondary skin grafting was required. In 26 cases with modified flap transplantation, one case showed the injured lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. All flaps survived totally. Osseous integration was achieved in all 55 cases in 3 ∼ 9 months after operation. The modified osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flap technique enhances flap safety, provides the additional advantages of reducing donor-site morbidity, and improves the recipient-site contour. PMID:25001367

  6. Migratory neuronal progenitors arise from the neural plate borders in tunicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolfi, Alberto; Ryan, Kerrianne; Meinertzhagen, Ian A; Christiaen, Lionel

    2015-11-19

    The neural crest is an evolutionary novelty that fostered the emergence of vertebrate anatomical innovations such as the cranium and jaws. During embryonic development, multipotent neural crest cells are specified at the lateral borders of the neural plate before delaminating, migrating and differentiating into various cell types. In invertebrate chordates (cephalochordates and tunicates), neural plate border cells express conserved factors such as Msx, Snail and Pax3/7 and generate melanin-containing pigment cells, a derivative of the neural crest in vertebrates. However, invertebrate neural plate border cells have not been shown to generate homologues of other neural crest derivatives. Thus, proposed models of neural crest evolution postulate vertebrate-specific elaborations on an ancestral neural plate border program, through acquisition of migratory capabilities and the potential to generate several cell types. Here we show that a particular neuronal cell type in the tadpole larva of the tunicate Ciona intestinalis, the bipolar tail neuron, shares a set of features with neural-crest-derived spinal ganglia neurons in vertebrates. Bipolar tail neuron precursors derive from caudal neural plate border cells, delaminate and migrate along the paraxial mesoderm on either side of the neural tube, eventually differentiating into afferent neurons that form synaptic contacts with both epidermal sensory cells and motor neurons. We propose that the neural plate borders of the chordate ancestor already produced migratory peripheral neurons and pigment cells, and that the neural crest evolved through the acquisition of a multipotent progenitor regulatory state upstream of multiple, pre-existing neural plate border cell differentiation programs. PMID:26524532

  7. The Crest Wing Wave Energy Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Antonishen, Michael Patrick

    This report presents the results of a continuation of an experimental study of the wave energy converting abilities of the Crest Wing wave energy converter (WEC), in the following referred to as ‘Phase 2'. The Crest Wing is a WEC that uses its movement in matching the shape of an oncoming wave to...... generate power. Model tests have been performed using scale models (length scale 1:30), provided by WaveEnergyFyn, in regular and irregular wave states that can be found in Assessment of Wave Energy Devices. Best Practice as used in Denmark (Frigaard et al., 2008). The tests were carried out at Dept. of...... Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU) in the 3D deep water wave tank. The displacement and force applied to a power take off system, provided by WaveEnergyFyn, were measured and used to calculate mechanical power available to the power take off....

  8. CREST guide:the cognitive interview

    OpenAIRE

    Milne, Rebecca Jane

    2016-01-01

    This CREST Guide is an overview of an interviewing protocol – the Cognitive Interview – which aims to improve the recall of accurate and reliable information from interviewees. The Cognitive Interview is a theory and evidence-based approach which addresses three primary psychological processes that underlie interviews with cooperative interviewees: 1. the social dynamics between the interviewee and interviewer; 2. the interviewee’s and interviewer’s cognitive processes; and 3. communication b...

  9. Steep sharp-crested gravity waves on deep water

    OpenAIRE

    Lukomsky, Vasyl'; Gandzha, Ivan,; Lukomsky, Dmytro

    2001-01-01

    A new type of steady steep two-dimensional irrotational symmetric periodic gravity waves on inviscid incompressible fluid of infinite depth is revealed. We demonstrate that these waves have sharper crests in comparison with the Stokes waves of the same wavelength and steepness. The speed of a fluid particle at the crest of new waves is greater than their phase speed.

  10. Vesicularity of basalt erupted at Reykjanes Ridge crest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, W.A.

    1978-01-01

    Average vesicularity of basalt drilled at three sites on the west flank of the Reykjanes Ridge increases with decreasing age. This change apparently records concomitant decrease in water depth at the ridge crest where the basalt was erupted and suggests substantial upward growth of the crest during the past 35 Myr. ?? 1978 Nature Publishing Group.

  11. Lessons learned from the EU project T-CREST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoeberl, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A three year EU project, such a T-CREST, with partners from all over Europe and with backgrounds from different domains is a challenging endeavor. Successful execution of such a project depends on more factors than simply performing excellent research. Within the three-year project T-CREST eight...

  12. Stability of Cubipod Armoured Roundheads in Short Crested Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Medina, Josep R.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a comparison of the stability of concrete cube armour and Cubipod armour in a breakwater roundhead with slope 1:1.5, exposed to both 2-D (long-crested) and 3-D (short-crested) waves. The model tests were performed at the Hydraulics and Coastal Engineering Laboratory at Aalborg ...

  13. Crested wheatgrass control and monitoring Benton Lake Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Crested wheatgrass CWG was planted on Benton Lake NWR at least 30 years ago, presumably to stabilize the soil where it had been disturbed in the process of building...

  14. Flow structure in front of the broad-crested weir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachoval Zbyněk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with research focused on description of flow structure in front of broad-crested weir. Based on experimental measurement, the flow structure in front of the weir (the recirculation zone of flow and tornado vortices and flow structure on the weir crest has been described. The determined flow character has been simulated using numerical model and based on comparing results the suitable model of turbulence has been recommended.

  15. Introducing Big Sagebrush into a Crested Wheatgrass Monoculture

    OpenAIRE

    Newhall, Robert L; Rasmussen, V. Philip, Jr.; Kitchen, Boyd M

    2011-01-01

    Crested wheatgrass (Agropyron desertorum or A. cristatum) has been effectively used to stabilize arid and semi-arid range sites for decades. Reestablishing native plant materials into these areas is often desirable to increase wildlife habitat and ecological diversity. Due to its competitive nature, efforts to reestablish native plants into crested wheatgrass monocultures have had limited success. Tillage will control the grass but leaves the soil vulnerable to erosion and weed invasion. This...

  16. CREST: Climate REconstruction SofTware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, M.; Cheddadi, R.; Chase, B. M.

    2014-02-01

    Several methods currently exist to quantitatively reconstruct palaeoclimatic variables from fossil botanical data. Of these, pdf-based (probability density functions) methods have proven valuable as they can be applied to a wide range of plants assemblages. Most commonly applied to fossil pollen data, their performance, however, can be limited by the taxonomic resolution of the pollen data, as many species may belong to a given pollen-type. Consequently, the climate information associated with different species cannot sometimes not be precisely identified, resulting less accurate reconstructions. This can become particularly problematic in regions of high biodiversity. In this paper, we propose a novel pdf-based method that takes into account the different climatic requirements of each species constituting the broader pollen-type. Pdfs are fitted in two successive steps, with parametric pdfs fitted first for each species, and then a combination of those individual species pdfs into a broader single pdf to represent the pollen-type as a unit. A climate value for the pollen assemblage is estimated from the likelihood function obtained after the multiplication of the pollen-type pdfs, with each being weighted according to its pollen percentage. To test the robustness of the method, we have applied the method to southern Africa as a regional case study, and reconstructed a suite of climatic variables based on extensive botanical data derived from herbarium collections. The reconstructions proved to be accurate for both temperature and precipitation. Predictable exceptions were areas that experience conditions at the extremes of the regional climatic spectra. Importantly, the accuracy of the reconstructed values is independent from the vegetation type where the method is applied or the number of species used. The method used in this study is publicly available in a software package entitled CREST (Climate REconstruction SofTware) and will provide the opportunity to

  17. CREST: Climate REconstruction SofTware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chevalier

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Several methods currently exist to quantitatively reconstruct palaeoclimatic variables from fossil botanical data. Of these, pdf-based (probability density functions methods have proven valuable as they can be applied to a wide range of plants assemblages. Most commonly applied to fossil pollen data, their performance, however, can be limited by the taxonomic resolution of the pollen data, as many species may belong to a given pollen-type. Consequently, the climate information associated with different species cannot sometimes not be precisely identified, resulting less accurate reconstructions. This can become particularly problematic in regions of high biodiversity. In this paper, we propose a novel pdf-based method that takes into account the different climatic requirements of each species constituting the broader pollen-type. Pdfs are fitted in two successive steps, with parametric pdfs fitted first for each species, and then a combination of those individual species pdfs into a broader single pdf to represent the pollen-type as a unit. A climate value for the pollen assemblage is estimated from the likelihood function obtained after the multiplication of the pollen-type pdfs, with each being weighted according to its pollen percentage. To test the robustness of the method, we have applied the method to southern Africa as a regional case study, and reconstructed a suite of climatic variables based on extensive botanical data derived from herbarium collections. The reconstructions proved to be accurate for both temperature and precipitation. Predictable exceptions were areas that experience conditions at the extremes of the regional climatic spectra. Importantly, the accuracy of the reconstructed values is independent from the vegetation type where the method is applied or the number of species used. The method used in this study is publicly available in a software package entitled CREST (Climate REconstruction SofTware and will provide the

  18. CREST--classification resources for environmental sequence tags.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Lanzén

    Full Text Available Sequencing of taxonomic or phylogenetic markers is becoming a fast and efficient method for studying environmental microbial communities. This has resulted in a steadily growing collection of marker sequences, most notably of the small-subunit (SSU ribosomal RNA gene, and an increased understanding of microbial phylogeny, diversity and community composition patterns. However, to utilize these large datasets together with new sequencing technologies, a reliable and flexible system for taxonomic classification is critical. We developed CREST (Classification Resources for Environmental Sequence Tags, a set of resources and tools for generating and utilizing custom taxonomies and reference datasets for classification of environmental sequences. CREST uses an alignment-based classification method with the lowest common ancestor algorithm. It also uses explicit rank similarity criteria to reduce false positives and identify novel taxa. We implemented this method in a web server, a command line tool and the graphical user interfaced program MEGAN. Further, we provide the SSU rRNA reference database and taxonomy SilvaMod, derived from the publicly available SILVA SSURef, for classification of sequences from bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. Using cross-validation and environmental datasets, we compared the performance of CREST and SilvaMod to the RDP Classifier. We also utilized Greengenes as a reference database, both with CREST and the RDP Classifier. These analyses indicate that CREST performs better than alignment-free methods with higher recall rate (sensitivity as well as precision, and with the ability to accurately identify most sequences from novel taxa. Classification using SilvaMod performed better than with Greengenes, particularly when applied to environmental sequences. CREST is freely available under a GNU General Public License (v3 from http://apps.cbu.uib.no/crest and http://lcaclassifier.googlecode.com.

  19. Flow characteristics at trapezoidal broad-crested side weir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Říha Jaromír

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Broad-crested side weirs have been the subject of numerous hydraulic studies; however, the flow field at the weir crest and in front of the weir in the approach channel still has not been fully described. Also, the discharge coefficient of broad-crested side weirs, whether slightly inclined towards the stream or lateral, still has yet to be clearly determined. Experimental research was carried out to describe the flow characteristics at low Froude numbers in the approach flow channel for various combinations of in- and overflow discharges. Three side weir types with different oblique angles were studied. Their flow characteristics and discharge coefficients were analyzed and assessed based on the results obtained from extensive measurements performed on a hydraulic model. The empirical relation between the angle of side weir obliqueness, Froude numbers in the up- and downstream channels, and the coefficient of obliqueness was derived.

  20. Observations of highly localized oscillons with multiple crests and troughs

    CERN Document Server

    LI, Xiaochen; Liao, Shijun

    2014-01-01

    Stable, highly localized Faraday's resonant standing waves with multiple crests and troughs were observed in the alcoholic solution partly filled in a Hele-Shaw cell vertically oscillated with a single frequency. Two types of oscillons were observed. The influence of the experimental parameters (such as the concentration of alcoholic solution, the water depth, the frequency and acceleration amplitude of oscillation) on these oscillons were investigated in details. In the same experimental parameters, all of these oscillons have the almost same wave height but rather irregular crest-to-crest distances. Our experiments highly suggest that the complicated oscillons can be regarded as combination of the two elementary oscillons discovered by Rajchenbach et al. (Physical Review Letters, 107, 2011).

  1. CREST - a large and diverse superfamily of putative transmembrane hydrolases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Eric N

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of membrane-spanning proteins possess enzymatic activity and catalyze important reactions involving proteins, lipids or other substrates located within or near lipid bilayers. Alkaline ceramidases are seven-transmembrane proteins that hydrolyze the amide bond in ceramide to form sphingosine. Recently, a group of putative transmembrane receptors called progestin and adipoQ receptors (PAQRs were found to be distantly related to alkaline ceramidases, raising the possibility that they may also function as membrane enzymes. Results Using sensitive similarity search methods, we identified statistically significant sequence similarities among several transmembrane protein families including alkaline ceramidases and PAQRs. They were unified into a large and diverse superfamily of putative membrane-bound hydrolases called CREST (alkaline ceramidase, PAQR receptor, Per1, SID-1 and TMEM8. The CREST superfamily embraces a plethora of cellular functions and biochemical activities, including putative lipid-modifying enzymes such as ceramidases and the Per1 family of putative phospholipases involved in lipid remodeling of GPI-anchored proteins, putative hormone receptors, bacterial hemolysins, the TMEM8 family of putative tumor suppressors, and the SID-1 family of putative double-stranded RNA transporters involved in RNA interference. Extensive similarity searches and clustering analysis also revealed several groups of proteins with unknown function in the CREST superfamily. Members of the CREST superfamily share seven predicted core transmembrane segments with several conserved sequence motifs. Conclusions Universal conservation of a set of histidine and aspartate residues across all groups in the CREST superfamily, coupled with independent discoveries of hydrolase activities in alkaline ceramidases and the Per1 family as well as results from previous mutational studies of Per1, suggests that the majority of CREST members are

  2. The CREST reactive-burn model for explosives

    OpenAIRE

    Maheswaran M-A.; Lambourn B.; James H.; Whitworth N.; Handley C.

    2011-01-01

    CREST is an innovative reactive-burn model that has been developed at AWE for simulating shock initiation and detonation propagation behaviour in explosives. The model has a different basis from other reactive-burn models in that its reaction rate is independent of local flow variables behind the shock wave e.g. pressure and temperature. The foundation for CREST, based on a detailed analysis of data from particle-velocity gauge experiments, is that the reaction rate depends only on the local ...

  3. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Neural Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Aijun; Tang, Zhenyu; Park, In-Hyun; Zhu, Yiqian; Patel, Shyam; Daley, George Q.; Song, Li

    2011-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great promise for cell therapies and tissue engineering. Neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) are multipotent and represent a valuable system to investigate iPSC differentiation and therapeutic potential. Here we derived NCSCs from human iPSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and investigated the potential of NCSCs for neural tissue engineering. The differentiation of iPSCs and the expansion of derived NCSCs varied in different cell lines, but all NCSC l...

  4. The CREST reactive-burn model for explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheswaran M-A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available CREST is an innovative reactive-burn model that has been developed at AWE for simulating shock initiation and detonation propagation behaviour in explosives. The model has a different basis from other reactive-burn models in that its reaction rate is independent of local flow variables behind the shock wave e.g. pressure and temperature. The foundation for CREST, based on a detailed analysis of data from particle-velocity gauge experiments, is that the reaction rate depends only on the local shock strength and the time since the shock passed. Since a measure of shock strength is the entropy of the non-reacted explosive, which remains constant behind a shock, CREST uses an entropy-dependent reaction rate. This paper will provide an overview of the CREST model and its predictive capability. In particular, it will be shown that the model can predict a wide range of experimental phenomena for both shock initiation (e.g. the effects of porosity and initial temperature on sustained-shock and thin-flyer initiation and detonation propagation (e.g. the diameter effect curve and detonation failure cones using a single set of coefficients.

  5. Flexibility of neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EumorphiaRemboutsika

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic cortical neural stem cells are self-renewing progenitors that can differentiate into neurons and glia. We generated neurospheres from the developing cerebral cortex using a mouse genetic model that allows for lineage selection and found that the self-renewing neural stem cells are restricted to Sox2 expressing cells. Under normal conditions, embryonic cortical neurospheres are heterogeneous with regard to Sox2 expression and contain astrocytes, neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells sufficiently plastic to give rise to neural crest cells when transplanted into the hindbrain of E1.5 chick and E8 mouse embryos. However, when neurospheres are maintained under lineage selection, such that all cells express Sox2, neural stem cells maintain their Pax6+ cortical radial glia identity and exhibit a more restricted fate in vitro and after transplantation. These data demonstrate that Sox2 preserves the cortical identity and regulates the plasticity of self-renewing Pax6+ radial glia cells.

  6. Numerical analysis of divertor plasma for demo-CREST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The numerical analysis of the demonstration fusion reactor Demo-CREST has been carried out; this analysis focuses on impurity seeding. Several design activities for DEMO have been carried out; however, its detailed divertor plasma analysis remains to be carried out. Therefore, in this study, we discuss the possibility of neon puffing in demo-CREST to decrease the power load to the divertor plate by using the B2-EIRENE code. It has been shown that the radiation power loss by neon increases with upstream plasma density and that the peak power load to the divertor plate comes close to the allowable level by using the preliminary divertor configuration (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Hydraulic Evaluation of the Crest Wing Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Antonishen, Michael Patrick

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the wave energy converting abilities of the Crest Wing wave energy converter (WEC). The Crest Wing is a WEC that uses its movement in matching the shape of an oncoming wave to generate power. Model tests have been performed using a scale...... model (length scale 1:30), provided by WaveEnergyFyn, in regular and irregular wave states that can be found in Assessment of Wave Energy Devices. Best Practice as used in Denmark (Frigaard et al., 2008). The tests were carried out at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg (Frigaard et al., 2008). The...... tests were carried out at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU) in the 3D deep water wave tank. The displacement and force applied to a power take off system, provided by WaveEnergyFyn, were measured and used to calculate total power take off....

  8. Facial expression recognition in crested macaques (Macaca nigra)

    OpenAIRE

    Micheletta, Jérôme; Whitehouse, Jamie; Parr, Lisa A.; Bridget M Waller

    2015-01-01

    Facial expressions are a main communication channel used by many different species of primate. Despite this, we know relatively little about how primates discriminate between different facial expressions, and most of what we do know comes from a restricted number of well-studied species. In this study, three crested macaques (Macaca nigra) took part in matching-to-sample tasks where they had to discriminate different facial expressions. In a first experiment, the macaques had to match a photo...

  9. Lumbar Incisional Hernia Repair After Iliac Crest Bone Graft

    OpenAIRE

    Do, Michael V.; Richardson, William S.

    2012-01-01

    The iliac crest is a common donor site for autogenous bone grafts. Among the reported complications, lumbar hernias occur infrequently with a reported incidence of 5% to 9%. Surgical repair is advocated secondary to the risk of incarceration or strangulation. Computed tomography is the diagnostic study of choice. Various transabdominal, retroperitoneal, and laparoscopic approaches have been described for the repair of lumbar hernias. We describe a case of successful lumbar incisional hernia r...

  10. MR imaging findings of medial tibial crest friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klontzas, Michail E., E-mail: miklontzas@gmail.com; Akoumianakis, Ioannis D., E-mail: ioannis.akoumianakis@gmail.com; Vagios, Ilias, E-mail: iliasvagios@gmail.com; Karantanas, Apostolos H., E-mail: akarantanas@gmail.com

    2013-11-01

    Objective: Medial tibial condyle bone marrow edema (BME), associated with soft tissue edema (STe) surrounding the medial collateral ligament, was incidentally observed in MRI examinations of young and athletic individuals. The aim of the present study was to 1. Prospectively investigate the association between these findings and coexistence of localized pain, and 2. Explore the possible contribution of the tibial morphology to its pathogenesis. Methods: The medial tibial condyle crest was evaluated in 632 knee MRI examinations. The angle and depth were measured by two separate evaluators. The presence of STe and BME was recorded. A third evaluator blindly assessed the presence of pain at this site. Results: BME associated with STe was found in 24 patients (with no history of previous trauma, osteoarthritis, tumor or pes anserine bursitis). The mean crest angle was 151.3° (95%CI 147.4–155.3°) compared to 159.4° (95%CI 158.8–160°) in controls (Mann–Whitney test, P < 0.0001). MRI findings were highly predictive of localized pain (sensitivity 92% specificity 99%, Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Friction at the medial tibial condyle crest is a painful syndrome. MRI is a highly specific and sensitive imaging modality for its diagnosis.

  11. A rare case of lumbar hernia following iliac crest bone graft

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Harvesting bone graft from iliac crest is routine procedure in orthopaedics practice. Lumbar hernia following this procedure is rare. Lumbar hernia is classified as congenital, primary, post traumatic and incisional. Objective: Reporting herewith a case of right lumbar hernia in 58 years old female occurring 10 years following full thickness iliac crest bone graft. Conclusion: Iliac crest bone harvest needs to be performed meticulously to prevent postoperative hernia. If occurs,...

  12. Tinea Incognita in a Patient with Crest Syndrome: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgievska-Sukarovska, Biljana; Skerlev, Mihael; Žele-Starčević, Lidija

    2015-01-01

    Tinea incognita is a dermatophytic infection that is difficult to diagnose, usually modified by inappropriate topical or systemic corticosteroid therapy. We report an extensive case of tinea incognita caused by the zoophilic dermatophyte Trichophyton mentagrophytes (var. granulosa) in a 49-year-old female patient with CREST (Calcinosis; Raynaud phenomenon; Esophageal involvement; Sclerodactyly; Teleangiectasia) syndrome. Immunocompromised patients, as well as patients with keratinization disorders, seem to be especially susceptible to dermatophytic infections with atypical clinical presentation that is sometimes bizarre and difficult to recognize. Therefore, close monitoring and mycological skin examination is recommended in order to avoid misdiagnosis and to give the patient the best chance of recovery. PMID:26476904

  13. Multielement analysis of iliac crest bone by neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone samples from iliac crest were obtained from apparently healthy female (n = 4) and male (n = 8) subjects with ages between 15-50. Cortical and trabecular parts were separated and soft tissues like fat, muscle and blood were removed. Calcium, Mg, Na, Cl, Fe, Zn, Br, Sr, and Cs were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis and other techniques, and their relations were discussed. Fairly good agreement was obtained with literature data. These values may serve as reference values for subjects from a Turkish population. (author)

  14. Isotopic Discrimination in the Double-Crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth C Craig

    Full Text Available The diet-tissue discrimination factor is the amount by which a consumer's tissue varies isotopically from its diet, and is therefore a key element in models that use stable isotopes to estimate diet composition. In this study we measured discrimination factors in blood (whole blood, red blood cells and plasma, liver, muscle and feathers of Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus for stable isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur. Cormorants exhibited discrimination factors that differed significantly among tissue types (for carbon and nitrogen, and differed substantially (in the context of the isotopic variation among relevant prey species from those observed in congeneric species. The Double-crested Cormorant has undergone rapid population expansion throughout much of its historic range over the past three decades, leading to both real and perceived conflicts with fisheries throughout North America, and this study provides an essential link for the use of stable isotope analysis in researching foraging ecology, diet, and resource use of this widespread and controversial species.

  15. Determinants of immigration strategies in male crested macaques (Macaca nigra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Pascal R; Hodges, Keith; Agil, Muhammad; Engelhardt, Antje

    2016-01-01

    Immigration into a new group can produce substantial costs due to resistance from residents, but also reproductive benefits. Whether or not individuals base their immigration strategy on prospective cost-benefit ratios remains unknown. We investigated individual immigration decisions in crested macaques, a primate species with a high reproductive skew in favour of high-ranking males. We found two different strategies. Males who achieved low rank in the new group usually immigrated after another male had immigrated within the previous 25 days and achieved high rank. They never got injured but also had low prospective reproductive success. We assume that these males benefitted from immigrating into a destabilized male hierarchy. Males who achieved high rank in the new group usually immigrated independent of previous immigrations. They recieved injuries more frequently and therefore bore immigration costs. They, however, also had higher reproductive success prospects. We conclude that male crested macaques base their immigration strategy on relative fighting ability and thus potential rank in the new group i.e. potential reproductive benefits, as well as potential costs of injury. PMID:27535622

  16. Cardiorespiratory effects of isoflurane anesthesia in crested caracaras (Caracara plancus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, André; Thiesen, Roberto; Vitaliano, Sérgio N; Belmonte, Emílio A; Werther, Karin; Valadão, Carlos A A

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the cardiorespiratory changes induced by isoflurane (ISO) anesthesia in the crested caracara (Caracara plancus), eight crested caracaras that weighed 1.0 kg (range 0.9-1.1 kg) were the subjects for the study. The birds were anesthetized by face mask with ISO for brachial artery catheterization. After recovery, anesthesia was re-induced and maintained with ISO with spontaneous ventilation. Electrocardiography, direct systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP), diastolic arterial blood pressure (DAP), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), respiratory rate (RR), end-tidal carbon dioxide (P(ET)CO2), and cloacal temperature (T degrees C) were measured before induction (baseline, under physical restraint) and after 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 min of ISO anesthesia. Arterial blood samples were collected for blood gas analysis at baseline, 10, 25, and 40 min. No cardiac arrhythmias were observed in the present study. RR, SAP, DAP, MAP, T degrees C and pH decreased from baseline values, whereas arterial partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide, bicarbonate concentration, and P(ET)CO2 were significantly higher than baseline. Apnea was not observed in any bird. ISO anesthesia is suitable for use in healthy members of this species despite the moderate cardiovascular and respiratory depression produced. PMID:22946364

  17. CRANIAL NEURAL CREST CELLS ON THE MOVE: THEIR ROLES IN CRANIOFACIAL DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Cordero, Dwight R; Brugmann, Samantha; Chu, Yvonne; Bajpai, Ruchi; Jame, Maryam; Helms, Jill A.

    2011-01-01

    The craniofacial region is assembled through the active migration of cells and the rearrangement and sculpting of facial prominences and pharyngeal arches, which consequently make it particularly susceptible to a large number of birth defects. Genetic, molecular, and cellular processes must be temporally and spatially regulated to culminate in the three-dimension structures of the face. The starting constituent for the majority of skeletal and connective tissues in the face is a pluripotent p...

  18. Fibulin-1 is required for morphogenesis of neural crest-derived structures

    OpenAIRE

    Cooley, Marion A.; Kern, Christine B.; Fresco, Victor M.; Wessels, Andy; Thompson, Robert P.; McQuinn, Tim C.; Twal, Waleed O.; Mjaatvedt, Corey H.; Drake, Christopher J.; Argraves, W Scott

    2008-01-01

    Here we report that mouse embryos homozygous for a gene trap insertion in the fibulin-1 (Fbln1) gene are deficient in Fbln1 and exhibit cardiac ventricular wall thinning and ventricular septal defects with double outlet right ventricle or overriding aorta. Fbln1 nulls also display anomalies of aortic arch arteries, hypoplasia of the thymus and thyroid, underdeveloped skull bones, malformations of cranial nerves and hemorrhagic blood vessels in the head and neck. The spectrum of malformations ...

  19. CHD7, the gene mutated in CHARGE syndrome, regulates genes involved in neural crest cell guidance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulz, Yvonne; Wehner, Peter; Opitz, Lennart; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Bongers, Ernie M. H. F.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.; Wincent, Josephine; Schoumans, Jacqueline; Kohlhase, Juergen; Borchers, Annette; Pauli, Silke

    2014-01-01

    Heterozygous loss of function mutations in CHD7 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7) lead to CHARGE syndrome, a complex developmental disorder affecting craniofacial structures, cranial nerves and several organ systems. Recently, it was demonstrated that CHD7 is essential for the formation

  20. Elk3 is essential for the progression from progenitor to definitive neural crest cell

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Crystal D.; Phillips, Jacquelyn L.; Bronner, Marianne E.

    2013-01-01

    Elk3/Net/Sap2 (here referred to as Elk3) is an Ets ternary complex transcriptional repressor known for its involvement in angiogenesis during embryonic development. Although Elk3 is expressed in various tissues, additional roles for the protein outside of vasculature development have yet to be reported. Here, we characterize the early spatiotemporal expression pattern of Elk3 in the avian embryo using whole mount in situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR and examine the effects of its los...

  1. Noggin can mimic BMPs effects on early neural crest-derived mesenchyme

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buchtová, M.; Celá, Petra; Bálek, L.; Procházková, J.; Richman, J. M.

    Cancun : Intarnational Society of Developmentasl Biologists, 2013. s. 99-99. [International Congress of Developmental Biology /17./. 16.06.2013-20.06.2013, Cancun] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/09/0725 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : bone morphogenetic protein Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry

  2. Cardiac neural crest ablation inhibits compaction and electrical function of conduction system bundles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gurjarpadhye, A.; Hewett, K. W.; Justus, C.; Wen, X.; Stadt, H.; Kirby, M. L.; Sedmera, David; Gourdie, R. G.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 292, - (2007), H1291-H1300. ISSN 0363-6135 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : conduction system Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 3.973, year: 2007

  3. FLOW OVER A BROAD-CRESTED WEIR IN SUBCRITICAL FLOW CONDITIONS, PHYSICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    seyed hooman hoseini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Weirs are a small overflow-type dams commonly used to raise the level of a river or stream and cause a large change of water level behind them. The use of portable instrument like kinds of weirs, flumes, floats, and volumetric tank are common. Discharges measured range from a trickle in ditch to a flood on the Amazon. Many researchers have studied the head discharge relations for flows over sharp-crested weirs and broad-crested weirs with a simple cross section shape, such as rectangular, triangular, trapezoidal, truncated triangular, and others Basic experiments were conducted on rectangular broad-crested weirs with different geometry. It was found that the discharge coefficient of a rectangular broad-crested weir is related to upstream total head above the crest, length of weir and Channel breadth. Multiple regression analysis equations based on the dimensional analysis concept were developed for computing the discharge coefficient of a rectangular broad-crested weirs and discharge coefficient equation was used for computing the discharge over the broad-crested weirs. Good agreements between the measured values and the values computed from the predictive equation are obtained. Therefore, a reliable equation for calculating the discharge coefficient of rectangular broad-crested weirs in subcritical flow conditions is presented.

  4. Conditional Second Order Short-crested Water Waves Applied to Extreme Wave Episodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2005-01-01

    A derivation of the mean second order short-crested wave pattern and associated wave kinematics, conditional on a given magnitude of the wave crest, is presented. The analysis is based on the second order Sharma and Dean finite water wave theory. A comparison with a measured extreme wave profile...

  5. Medical image of the week: CREST plus ILD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliva I

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A 60 year old female with a history of fibromyalgia presented with dyspnea and skin changes, predominantly on the hands. Physical exam and imaging showed classic findings of limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (scleroderma CREST syndrome. Calcinosis cutis (Figure 1A, Raynaud’s (not shown but endorsed by the patient, Esophageal dysmotility (Figure 1B, dilated esophagus, Sclerodactyly (Figure 1C, and Teleganectasias (Figure 1D were all present. Ground glass opacities were seen predominantly in the bilateral lower lung zones, associated with increased reticular markings (Figure 2A, and traction bronchiectasis (Figure 2B. Pulmonary involvement is noted in the majority of scleroderma patients. Interstitial lung disease (ILD is common and often portends a poor prognosis.

  6. Hycrest crested wheatgrass accelerates the degradation of pentachlorophenol in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, A. M.; Sims, R. C.; Bugbee, B.

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the effects of vegetation on the fate of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in soil using a novel high-flow sealed test system. Pentachlorophenol has been widely used as a wood preservative, and this highly toxic biocide contaminates soil and ground water at many sites. Although plants are known to accelerate the rates of degradation of certain soil contaminants, this approach has not been thoroughly investigated for PCP. The fate of [14C]PCP, added to soil at a concentration of 100 mg/kg, was compared in three unplanted and three planted systems. The plant used was Hycrest, a perennial, drought-tolerant cultivar of crested wheatgrass [Agropyron desertorum (Fischer ex Link) Schultes]. The flow-through test system allowed us to maintain a budget for 14C-label as well as monitor mineralization (breakdown to 14CO2) and volatilization of the test compound in a 155-d trial. In the unplanted systems, an average of 88% of the total radiolabel remained in the soil and leachate and only 6% was mineralized. In the planted system, 33% of the radiolabel remained in the soil plus leachate, 22% was mineralized, and 36% was associated with plant tissue (21% with the root fraction and 15% with shoots). Mineralization rates were 23.1 mg PCP mineralized kg-1 soil in 20 wk in the planted system, and for the unplanted system 6.6 mg PCP kg-1 soil for the same time period. Similar amounts of volatile organic material were generated in the two systems (1.5%). Results indicated that establishing crested wheatgrass on PCP-contaminated surface soils may accelerate the removal of the contaminant.

  7. Static histomorphometry of human iliac crest and vertebral trabecular bone: a comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Ebbesen, Ebbe Nils; Mosekilde, Lis

    2002-01-01

    years) had a known vertebral fracture of L-2. The iliac crest biopsies and 9-mm-thick mediolateral slices of half the entire vertebral bodies were embedded in methylmetacrylate, stained with aniline blue, and scanned into a computer with a flatbed image scanner at a high resolution. With a custom......We recently developed a new, rapid method for conducting static histomorphometry on large histologic sections. This method has now been applied on both iliac crest and lumbar vertebral bone to compare the age-related changes at these two skeletal sites and to investigate the correlation between the...... histomorphometric measures at the iliac crest and the vertebral body. The material comprised matched sets of unilateral transiliac crest bone biopsies and lumbar vertebral bodies (L-2) from 24 women (19-96 years) and 24 men (23-95 years) selected from a larger autopsy material. Three female subjects (80, 88, and 90...

  8. Sex-related gene and sex identification of Crested Ibis Nipponia nippon (Ciconiiformes: Threskiornithidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Crested Ibis (Nipponia nippon) is a critical endangeredspecies of the world. At present, a reintroduction program will be conducted to save this species essentially. However, because the Crested Ibise is a sexual alike bird, it is very difficult to identify the sex from the morphological character. In order to identify the sex easily and select the right individuals for captive breeding and reintroduction, the sex related gene on W chromosome was amplified and the sex of three Crested Ibises were also identified in the present study. The 262bp fragment was also sequenced, and we found that there were 13 different nucleotide sites with 2.25 of transition/transversion based on the comparison with that of the Oriental White Stork. The sequence will also provide a theoretic base for further designing specific primer for sex related gene in the Crested Ibis.

  9. 78 FR 26358 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Meeting With...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy...), on the Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project. e. All local, state, and federal...

  10. 76 FR 22393 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Cancellation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy... and Wildlife Service for the proposed Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project....

  11. 77 FR 47628 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project; Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project; Eagle Crest Energy... Management Act and the Federal Power Act), on the Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric...

  12. 2009 update to crested wheatgrass control and monitoring Benton Lake Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Crested wheatgrass CWG was planted on Benton Lake NWR at least 30 years ago, presumably to stabilize the soil where it had been disturbed in the process of building...

  13. 2010 update to crested wheatgrass control and monitoring Benton Lake Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Crested wheatgrass CWG was planted on Benton Lake NWR at least 30 years ago, presumably to stabilize the soil where it had been disturbed in the process of building...

  14. 2011 update to crested wheatgrass control and monitoring Benton Lake Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Crested wheatgrass CWG was planted on Benton Lake NWR at least 30 years ago, presumably to stabilize the soil where it had been disturbed in the process of building...

  15. Biology of nesting crested, least, and whiskered auklets at Buldir Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — During avifaunal investigations at Buldir Island 1974-1976, some aspects of the biology of Crested, Least, and Whiskered Auklets were investigated in a colony where...

  16. Probing dark matter crests with white dwarfs and IMBHs

    CERN Document Server

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Schödel, Rainer; Davidson, Emily; Cuadra, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    White dwarfs (WDs) are the most promising captors of dark matter (DM) particles in the crests that are expected to build up in the cores of dense stellar clusters. The DM particles could reach sufficient densities in WD cores to liberate energy through self-annihilation. The extinction associated with our Galactic Centre, the most promising region where to look for such effects, makes it impossible to detect the potential associated luminosity of the DM-burning WDs. However, in smaller stellar systems which are close enough to us and not heavily extincted, such as $\\omega-$Cen, we may be able to detect DM-burning WDs. We investigate the prospects of detection of DM-burning WDs in a stellar cluster harbouring an IMBH, which leads to higher densities of DM at the centre as compared with clusters without one. We calculate the capture rate of WIMPs by a WD around an IMBH and estimate the luminosity that a WD would emit depending on its distance to the center of the cluster. Direct-summation $N-$body simulations o...

  17. Crest factor optimization of the multisine waveform for bioimpedance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multisine excitation is widely used in impedance measurements to retain the advantages of the sine wave, while reducing the measurement time. Adding up sine waves increases the amplitude of the excitation signal, but, for the linearity assumption to be valid, the overall amplitude of the signal needs to be kept low. Thus, the crest factor (CF) of the excitation signal must be minimized. A novel empirical method for the minimization of the CF is described in this paper. As in the case of other known methods, the computed CF may be guaranteed to be only a local minimum. However, a systematic variation of initial parameters, which is possible due to the sparing algorithm, ensures a CF value very close or equal to the global minimum. The results of CF minimization and comparison with the results from other sources are provided. The direct CF optimization results (set of optimal phases) are not well suited for practical implementation. The influence of phase accuracy on the CF is discussed, and an algorithm for the recalculation of initial phases to the rougher set is described. It is shown that previously obtained optimization results (minimal CF) can be highly preserved, even in the case of rough phase resolutions. The CF of the multisine also depends on the frequency distribution and amplitudes of its components. The CF of multisines with several frequency distributions are compared. (paper)

  18. Maintenance and radiation protection issues of the CREST reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A maintenance approach of the Compact Reversed Shear Tokamak (CREST) for high availability is proposed. Full sector removal through horizontal ports for easy maintenance is adopted in order to increase availability. Cask type sector removal machines are used to transfer the blanket/divertor sectors. Achievable availability is estimated with a maintenance period and its interval. The proposed maintenance approach allows, at least, the similar availability to that of the present nuclear plants. The estimated availability is acceptable from an economical viewpoint. Safety concerns related to the super-heated direct steam cycle are also examined. One of the unique concerns is due to nitrogen-16 production in the coolant. The super-heated steam must flow through the turbines within several 10 s after leaving the blanket. The requirements for shielding on the heat transfer systems are declared. Another concern is the confinement and recovery of tritium in the coolant, because a high temperature blanket may have a large tritium permeation rate. Water detritiation system proposed here would be able to control the tritium concentration in the coolant within an allowable range

  19. Nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver, CREST syndrome and primary biliary cirrhosis: an overlap syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    McMahon, R F; Babbs, C.; Warnes, T W

    1989-01-01

    Nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver (NRHL) has been found in association with collagen vascular diseases, after drug therapy, with autoimmune disease, and with a variety of haematological disorders. The association of NRHL with the syndrome of Calcinosis cutis, Raynaud's phenomenon, oesophageal dysfunction, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia (CREST syndrome) has only been reported on two previous occasions. The liver disease usually associated with CREST syndrome is primary biliary ci...

  20. BASIC CRITERIA OF IRANIAN COMMERCIAL TOOTHPASTES AND AN ADA APPROVED BRAND (CREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N NOUR BAKHSH

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The effectiveness of fluorided toothpastes in reducing dental caries is well-documented, However not all fluorided toothpastes are equally effective. The objective of this study was to compare some essential criteria of six different toothpastes manufactured in Iran with one brand of ADA approved toothpaste (Crest. Methods. Six commercial toothpastes produced in Iran named as Paveh, Puneh, Nasim, Darugar, golpasand and saviz were compared with Crest in three subjects as follows: 1. Amount of fluoride concentration 2. Amount of releasing fluoride 3. Cleaning efficiency. Two first criteria were tested using the potentiometric method with F- Ion specific electrode, and Cleaning efficiency was done by O'Leary index on 60 volunteers (10 for each toothpaste. Results: Fluoride Concentration in Paveh, Puneh, Nasim toothpastes were nearly700PPM,while in three others were much lower. The highest amount of fluoride was seen in Crest (1450 PPM. Cleaning efficiency of Darugar was better than Crest, Paveh, Puneh. Cleaning efficiency of Nasim was the same as Crest and Golpasand and Saviz were weaker than Crest. Discussion: Since at the present time, the most effective, Cost-benefit method for preventive aspects of fluoride, especially in developing countries is obtained by fluoride toothpastes. Manufactures should improve quality of fluoride toothpastes, ensure that all pates maximize Fluoride bioavailability, develop active agents to help better cleaning efficiency and label products clearly with containig fluoride in PPM.

  1. Convergent Evolution of Head Crests in Two Domesticated Columbids Is Associated with Different Missense Mutations in EphB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickrey, Anna I; Domyan, Eric T; Horvath, Martin P; Shapiro, Michael D

    2015-10-01

    Head crests are important display structures in wild bird species and are also common in domesticated lineages. Many breeds of domestic rock pigeon (Columba livia) have crests of reversed occipital feathers, and this recessive trait is associated with a nonsynonymous coding mutation in the intracellular kinase domain of EphB2 (Ephrin receptor B2). The domestic ringneck dove (Streptopelia risoria) also has a recessive crested morph with reversed occipital feathers, and interspecific crosses between crested doves and pigeons produce crested offspring, suggesting a similar genetic basis for this trait in both species. We therefore investigated EphB2 as a candidate for the head crest phenotype of ringneck doves and identified a nonsynonymous coding mutation in the intracellular kinase domain that is significantly associated with the crested morph. This mutation is over 100 amino acid positions away from the crest mutation found in rock pigeons, yet both mutations are predicted to negatively affect the function of ATP-binding pocket. Furthermore, bacterial toxicity assays suggest that "crest" mutations in both species severely impact kinase activity. We conclude that head crests are associated with different mutations in the same functional domain of the same gene in two different columbid species, thereby representing striking evolutionary convergence in morphology and molecules. PMID:26104009

  2. Facial expression recognition in crested macaques (Macaca nigra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheletta, Jérôme; Whitehouse, Jamie; Parr, Lisa A; Waller, Bridget M

    2015-07-01

    Facial expressions are a main communication channel used by many different species of primate. Despite this, we know relatively little about how primates discriminate between different facial expressions, and most of what we do know comes from a restricted number of well-studied species. In this study, three crested macaques (Macaca nigra) took part in matching-to-sample tasks where they had to discriminate different facial expressions. In a first experiment, the macaques had to match a photograph of a facial expression to another exemplar of the same expression produced by a different individual, against examples of one of three other types of expressions and neutral faces. In a second experiment, they had to match a dynamic video recording of a facial expression to a still photograph of another exemplar of the same facial expression produced by another individual, also against one of four other expressions. The macaques performed above chance in both tasks, identifying expressions as belonging to the same category regardless of individual identity. Using matrix correlations and multidimensional scaling, we analysed the pattern of errors to see whether overall similarity between facial expressions and/or specific morphological features caused the macaques to confuse facial expressions. Overall similarity, measured with the macaque facial action coding system (maqFACS), did not correlate with performances. Instead, functional similarities between facial expressions could be responsible for the observed pattern of error. These results expand previous findings to a novel primate species and highlight the potential of using video stimuli to investigate the perception and categorisation of visual signals in primates. PMID:25821924

  3. Probing dark matter crests with white dwarfs and IMBHs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro-Seoane, P.; Casanellas, J.; Schödel, R.; Davidson, E.; Cuadra, J.

    2016-06-01

    White dwarfs (WDs) are the most promising captors of dark matter (DM) particles in the crests that are expected to build up in the cores of dense stellar clusters. The DM particles could reach sufficient densities in WD cores to liberate energy through self-annihilation. The extinction associated with our Galactic Centre makes it impossible to detect the potential-associated luminosities, contrary to smaller stellar systems which are close enough to us and not heavily extincted, such as -Cen. We investigate the prospects of detection of DM-burning WDs in a stellar cluster harbouring an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH), which leads to higher densities of DM at the centre. We calculate the capture rate and estimate the luminosity that a WD would emit depending on its distance to the centre of the cluster. Direct-summation N-body simulations of -Cen yield a non-negligible number of WDs in the range of radii of interest. We apply our assumption to published Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys observations of stars in the centre of -Cen and, although we are not able to identify any evident candidate, we proof that their bunching up at high luminosities would be unique. We predict that DM burning will lead to a truncation of the cooling sequence at the faint end. The detection of DM burning in future observations of dense stellar clusters could allow us to probe different models of DM distributions and characteristics. On the other hand, if DM-burning WDs really exist, their number and properties could give hints to the existence of IMBHs.

  4. Neural Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physicists use large detectors to measure particles created in high-energy collisions at particle accelerators. These detectors typically produce signals indicating either where ionization occurs along the path of the particle, or where energy is deposited by the particle. The data produced by these signals is fed into pattern recognition programs to try to identify what particles were produced, and to measure the energy and direction of these particles. Ideally, there are many techniques used in this pattern recognition software. One technique, neural networks, is particularly suitable for identifying what type of particle caused by a set of energy deposits. Neural networks can derive meaning from complicated or imprecise data, extract patterns, and detect trends that are too complex to be noticed by either humans or other computer related processes. To assist in the advancement of this technology, Physicists use a tool kit to experiment with several neural network techniques. The goal of this research is interface a neural network tool kit into Java Analysis Studio (JAS3), an application that allows data to be analyzed from any experiment. As the final result, a physicist will have the ability to train, test, and implement a neural network with the desired output while using JAS3 to analyze the results or output. Before an implementation of a neural network can take place, a firm understanding of what a neural network is and how it works is beneficial. A neural network is an artificial representation of the human brain that tries to simulate the learning process [5]. It is also important to think of the word artificial in that definition as computer programs that use calculations during the learning process. In short, a neural network learns by representative examples. Perhaps the easiest way to describe the way neural networks learn is to explain how the human brain functions. The human brain contains billions of neural cells that are responsible for processing

  5. A statistical study of equatorial ionospheric anomaly single crest from SWARM satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathy, Adel; Ghamry, Essam

    2016-07-01

    However the, the Equatorial Ionospheric Anomaly (EIA) is being represented by two crests within ±15 degree in latitudes, a single crest is being observed in the entire ionosphere. A statistical study of 1351 EIA single crest for ionospheric electron density from SWARM-A satellite are investigated within the interval April 2014 to April 2015. Our analysis focused on local time, seasonal and both geographic and geomagnetic latitudinal variations in addition EIA amplitude with respect to solar and geomagnetic activities. Our results showed that the maximum number of EIA single crest events peak mainly in the dayside region around 1000-1200 LT. The electron density amplitude of the EIA single crest events in the dayside region jumps to 3 times its dawn and nightside amplitude. Spring events observed very close to the magnetic equator in comparison to other seasons. Their maximum number occurs within the magnetic equator, while their seasonal distribution showed that the majority of winter events located in the southern hemisphere, while spring events are centered around the magnetic equator. Regardless of local time or longitudinal location of summer events, it always has smaller amplitude in comparison with other seasons. Seasonal distribution showed that the average number of EIA single crests per month is approximately 200 events with relatively large number of events in September than March. Also it showed two maxima at spring and autumn, and two minima at summer and winter. The average magnetic latitude of summer events is +10 degrees in northern hemisphere. The majority of dawnside and nightside summer events is located in northern hemisphere and reverses its location in winter, while dayside and duskside events seem to be centered within the magnetic equator. The EIA solar and magnetic activity dependence showed that almost EIA single crest events occurred at low and moderate activity which is in partial agreement with previous studies and dayside events

  6. The Investigation of EM Scattering from the Time-Varying Overturning Wave Crest Model by the IEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Meng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the electromagnetic (EM scattering of time-varying overturning wave crests is a worthwhile endeavor. Overturning wave crest is one of the reasons of sea spike generation, which increases the probability of false radar alarms and reduces the performance of multitarget detection in the environment. A three-dimensional (3D time-varying overturning wave crest model is presented in this paper; this 3D model is an improvement of the traditional two-dimensional (2D time-varying overturning wave crest model. The integral equation method (IEM was employed to investigate backward scattering radar cross sections (RCS at various incident angles of the 3D overturning wave crest model. The super phenomenon, where the intensity of horizontal polarization scattering is greater than that of vertical polarization scattering, is an important feature of sea spikes. Simulation results demonstrate that super phenomena may occur in some time samples as variations in the overturning wave crest.

  7. Long-term culture and differentiation of CNS precursors derived from anterior human neural rosettes following exposure to ventralizing factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study we demonstrated that neural rosettes derived from human ES cells can give rise either to neural crest precursors, following expansion in presence of bFGF and EGF, or to dopaminergic precursors after exposure to ventralizing factors Shh and FGF8. Both regionalised precursors are capable of extensive proliferation and differentiation towards the corresponding terminally differentiated cell types. In particular, peripheral neurons, cartilage, bone, smooth muscle cells and also pigmented cells were obtained from neural crest precursors while tyrosine hydroxylase and Nurr1 positive dopaminergic neurons were derived from FGF8 and Shh primed rosette cells. Gene expression and immunocytochemistry analyses confirmed the expression of dorsal and neural crest genes such as Sox10, Slug, p75, FoxD3, Pax7 in neural precursors from bFGF-EGF exposed rosettes. By contrast, priming of rosettes with FGF8 and Shh induced the expression of dopaminergic markers Engrailed1, Pax2, Pitx3, floor plate marker FoxA2 and radial glia markers Blbp and Glast, the latter in agreement with the origin of dopaminergic precursors from floor plate radial glia. Moreover, in vivo transplant of proliferating Shh/FGF8 primed precursors in parkinsonian rats demonstrated engraftment and terminal dopaminergic differentiation. In conclusion, we demonstrated the derivation of long-term self-renewing precursors of selected regional identity as potential cell reservoirs for cell therapy applications, such as CNS degenerative diseases, or for the development of toxicological tests.

  8. Long-term culture and differentiation of CNS precursors derived from anterior human neural rosettes following exposure to ventralizing factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colleoni, Silvia, E-mail: silviacolleoni@avantea.it [Laboratorio di Tecnologie della Riproduzione, Avantea, Via Porcellasco 7/f, 26100 Cremona (Italy); Galli, Cesare [Laboratorio di Tecnologie della Riproduzione, Avantea, Via Porcellasco 7/f, 26100 Cremona (Italy); Dipartimento Clinico Veterinario, Universita di Bologna, Via Tolara di Sopra 50, 40064 Ozzano Emilia (Italy); Giannelli, Serena G. [Stem Cells and Neurogenesis Unit, Division of Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 58, 20132 Milan (Italy); Armentero, Marie-Therese; Blandini, Fabio [Laboratory of Functional Neurochemistry, Interdepartmental Research Center for Parkinson' s Disease, Neurological Institute C. Mondino, Via Mondino 2, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Broccoli, Vania, E-mail: broccoli.vania@hsr.it [Stem Cells and Neurogenesis Unit, Division of Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 58, 20132 Milan (Italy); Lazzari, Giovanna, E-mail: giovannalazzari@avantea.it [Laboratorio di Tecnologie della Riproduzione, Avantea, Via Porcellasco 7/f, 26100 Cremona (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    In this study we demonstrated that neural rosettes derived from human ES cells can give rise either to neural crest precursors, following expansion in presence of bFGF and EGF, or to dopaminergic precursors after exposure to ventralizing factors Shh and FGF8. Both regionalised precursors are capable of extensive proliferation and differentiation towards the corresponding terminally differentiated cell types. In particular, peripheral neurons, cartilage, bone, smooth muscle cells and also pigmented cells were obtained from neural crest precursors while tyrosine hydroxylase and Nurr1 positive dopaminergic neurons were derived from FGF8 and Shh primed rosette cells. Gene expression and immunocytochemistry analyses confirmed the expression of dorsal and neural crest genes such as Sox10, Slug, p75, FoxD3, Pax7 in neural precursors from bFGF-EGF exposed rosettes. By contrast, priming of rosettes with FGF8 and Shh induced the expression of dopaminergic markers Engrailed1, Pax2, Pitx3, floor plate marker FoxA2 and radial glia markers Blbp and Glast, the latter in agreement with the origin of dopaminergic precursors from floor plate radial glia. Moreover, in vivo transplant of proliferating Shh/FGF8 primed precursors in parkinsonian rats demonstrated engraftment and terminal dopaminergic differentiation. In conclusion, we demonstrated the derivation of long-term self-renewing precursors of selected regional identity as potential cell reservoirs for cell therapy applications, such as CNS degenerative diseases, or for the development of toxicological tests.

  9. Modified theoretical stage-discharge relation for circular sharp-crested weirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasool GHOBADIAN

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A circular sharp-crested weir is a circular control section used for measuring flow in open channels, reservoirs, and tanks. As flow measuring devices in open channels, these weirs are placed perpendicular to the sides and bottoms of straight-approach channels. Considering the complex patterns of flow passing over circular sharp-crested weirs, an equation having experimental correlation coefficients was used to extract a stage-discharge relation for weirs. Assuming the occurrence of critical flow over the weir crest, a theoretical stage-discharge relation was obtained in this study by solving two extracted non-linear equations. To study the precision of the theoretical stage-discharge relation, 58 experiments were performed on six circular weirs with different diameters and crest heights in a 30 cm-wide flume. The results show that, for each stage above the weirs, the theoretically calculated discharge is less than the measured discharge, and this difference increases with the stage. Finally, the theoretical stage-discharge relation was modified by exerting a correction coefficient which is a function of the ratio of the upstream flow depth to the weir crest height. The results show that the modified stage-discharge relation is in good agreement with the measured results.

  10. Adenocarcinoma of the third portion of the duodenum in a man with CREST syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fragulidis Georgios

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CREST (Calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, Esophageal dysmotility, Sclerodactyly and Telangiectasias syndrome has been rarely associated with other malignancies (lung, esophagus.This is the first report of a primary adenocarcinoma of the third portion of the duodenum in a patient with CREST syndrome. Case presentation A 54-year-old male patient with CREST syndrome presented with colicky postprandial pain of the upper abdomen, diminished food uptake and a 6-Kg-body weight loss during the previous 2 months. An ulcerative lesion in the third portion of the duodenum was revealed during duodenoscopy, with a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma on biopsy specimen histology. The patient underwent a partial pancreatoduodenectomy. No adjuvant therapy was instituted and follow-up is negative for local recurrence or metastases 21 months postoperatively. Conclusion CREST syndrome has been associated with colon cancer, gastric polyps, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP syndrome and Crohn's disease; however, this is the first report of a primary adenocarcinoma of the duodenum in a patient with CREST syndrome. However, any etiologic relationship remains to be further investigated.

  11. Short-crested waves in deep water: a numerical investigation of recent laboratory experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Madsen, Per A.

    2006-01-01

    A numerical study of quasi-steady, doubly-periodic monochromatic short-crested wave patterns in deep water is conducted using a high-order Boussinesq-type model. Simulations using linear wavemaker conditions in the nonlinear model are initially used to approximate conditions from recent laboratory...... experiments. The computed patterns share many features with those observed in wavetanks, including bending (both frontwards and backwards) of the wave crests, dipping at the crest centerlines, and a pronounced long modulation in the direction of propagation. A new and simple explanation for these features is...... provided, involving the release of spurious free first harmonics, due to the neglect of steady third-order components in the three-dimensional wave generation. A comparison with the experimentally observed beat length and amplitude matches the theoretical/numerical predictions well. Additionally, direct...

  12. NEURAL CRYPTOGRAPHY

    OpenAIRE

    PROTIC DANIJELA D.

    2016-01-01

    Neural cryptography based on the tree parity machine (TPM) is presented in this paper. A mutual learning-based synchronization of two networks is studied. The training of the TPM based on the Hebbian, anti-Hebbian and random walk as well as on the secure key generation protocol is described. The most important attacks on the key generation process are shown.

  13. Neurally Derived Tissues in Xenopus laevis Embryos Exhibit a Consistent Bioelectrical Left-Right Asymmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Pai, Vaibhav P.; Vandenberg, Laura N.; Douglas Blackiston; Michael Levin

    2012-01-01

    Consistent left-right asymmetry in organ morphogenesis is a fascinating aspect of bilaterian development. Although embryonic patterning of asymmetric viscera, heart, and brain is beginning to be understood, less is known about possible subtle asymmetries present in anatomically identical paired structures. We investigated two important developmental events: physiological controls of eye development and specification of neural crest derivatives, in Xenopus laevis embryos. We found that the str...

  14. CREST v2.1 Refined by a Distributed Linear Reservoir Routing Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, X.; Hong, Y.; Zhang, K.; Hao, Z.; Wang, D.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrologic modeling is important in water resources management, and flooding disaster warning and management. Routing scheme is among the most important components of a hydrologic model. In this study, we replace the lumped LRR (linear reservoir routing) scheme used in previous versions of the distributed hydrological model, CREST (coupled routing and excess storage) by a newly proposed distributed LRR method, which is theoretically more suitable for distributed hydrological models. Consequently, we have effectively solved the problems of: 1) low values of channel flow in daily simulation, 2) discontinuous flow value along the river network during flood events and 3) irrational model parameters. The CREST model equipped with both the routing schemes have been tested in the Gan River basin. The distributed LRR scheme has been confirmed to outperform the lumped counterpart by two comparisons, hydrograph validation and visual speculation of the continuity of stream flow along the river: 1) The CREST v2.1 (version 2.1) with the implementation of the distributed LRR achieved excellent result of [NSCE(Nash coefficient), CC (correlation coefficient), bias] =[0.897, 0.947 -1.57%] while the original CREST v2.0 produced only negative NSCE, close to zero CC and large bias. 2) CREST v2.1 produced more naturally smooth river flow pattern along the river network while v2.0 simulated bumping and discontinuous discharge along the mainstream. Moreover, we further observe that by using the distributed LRR method, 1) all model parameters fell within their reasonable region after an automatic optimization; 2) CREST forced by satellite-based precipitation and PET products produces a reasonably well result, i.e., (NSCE, CC, bias) = (0.756, 0.871, -0.669%) in the case study, although there is still room to improve regarding their low spatial resolution and underestimation of the heavy rainfall events in the satellite products.

  15. Avulsion fracture of the iliac crest in a child☆☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortati, Rafael Borghi; Borghi Mortati, Lucas; Silva Teixeira, Matheus; Itiro Takano, Marcelo; Armelin Borger, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Avulsion fractures of the apophysis of the iliac crest have rare incidence and are little known. In this article, we report the case of an 11-year-old female patient who presented this injury after indirect trauma. From careful radiographic analysis, an avulsion fracture of the iliac crest was identified. It was decided to use nonsurgical treatment comprising analgesia and load restriction. This case report emphasizes the importance of suspecting avulsion fractures in cases of low-energy trauma, and also guides the treatment, so as to prevent functional deficit and deformities. PMID:26229818

  16. Ethanol regulates calcium channels in clonal neural cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Messing, R. O.; Carpenter, C. L.; Diamond, I.; Greenberg, D A

    1986-01-01

    The acute and long-term effects of ethanol on voltage-dependent Ca channel function were studied in PC12, a clonal cell line of neural crest origin. Acute exposure to ethanol produced a concentration-dependent decrease in depolarization-evoked 45Ca2+ uptake, while prolonged (2-10 days) exposure led to a reciprocal increase in 45Ca2+ uptake and in the number of Ca-channel binding sites labeled by the dihydropyridine Ca-channel antagonist [3H]nitrendipine. Uptake was restored to control levels ...

  17. A Method for Determination of in Run-Up Front Velocities on Dikes in Oblique and Short-Crested Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Nørgaard, Jørgen Harck; Burcharth, Hans F.

    2011-01-01

    flow directions on a dike. A validation of the proposed method is made against existing semiempirical formulae and measurements from a micro-propeller in case of perpendicular long-crested waves. Moreover, the method is applied for long- and short-crested oblique waves where results show that the...

  18. Neural Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin

    About the Series: Bioelectric Engineering presents state-of-the-art discussions on modern biomedical engineering with respect to applications of electrical engineering and information technology in biomedicine. This focus affirms Springer's commitment to publishing important reviews of the broadest interest to biomedical engineers, bioengineers, and their colleagues in affiliated disciplines. Recent volumes have covered modeling and imaging of bioelectric activity, neural engineering, biosignal processing, bionanotechnology, among other topics.

  19. Neural networks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vajda, Igor; Grim, Jiří

    Oxford : Eolss Publishers-UNESCO, 2008 - (Parra-Luna, F.), s. 224-248 ISBN 978-1-84826-654-4. - (Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems. Volume III) R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/07/1594 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : neural networks * probabilistic approach Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2008/SI/vajda-systems science and cybernetics .pdf

  20. CSUB CREST Research on Climate Change and the San Joaquin Valley, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugh, W. C.; Negrini, R. M.; Baron, D.; Gillespie, J.; Horton, R. A.; Montoya, E.; Cruz-Boone, C.; Andrews, G. D.; Guo, J.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the NSF-supported Centers for Excellence in Science and Technology (CREST), student and faculty researchers at California State University, Bakersfield (CSUB) have been investigating the regional impacts of climate change as well as evaluating the potential of local contributions to its abatement. Highlights of this research include; 1) the development of a high-resolution climate record from Tulare Lake sediments that spans the past 20,000 years, 2) the quantitative analysis and prediction of climate change impacts on Sierra Nevada snowpack, 3) the detailed subsurface characterization of San Joaquin Valley oilfields targeted for CO2 sequestration, and 4) the evaluation of proposed host rock suitability under simulated CO2 injection conditions. To date, CSUB CREST supported research has resulted in 26 contributions to peer-reviewed journals (currently published or in-review). A primary goal of CSUB CREST is to improve the recruitment, retention, and success of students from the local community, the majority of whom are from backgrounds under-represented in STEM disciplines. More than 28 students have been directly involved in the basic and applied research projects supported by this program. The majority of these students have received, or are on track to receive, an M.S. degree and have ultimately gained employment in a STEM field or been accepted into a Ph.D. program. This presentation, and others in this session, will focus on the accomplishments, challenges, and strategies for success gleaned from CSUB CREST Phase 1.

  1. Nesting habitat requirements and nestling diet in the Mediterranean populations of Crested Tits Lophophanes cristatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atienzar, F.; Barba, E.; Holleman, L.J.M.; Belda, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Most bird species show specific habitat requirements for breeding and feeding. We studied the pattern of habitat occupation, nestling diet and breeding performance of Crested Tits Lophophanes cristatus in a “typical” (coniferous) and an “atypical” (Holm Oak Quercus ilex) forest in eastern Spain duri

  2. 78 FR 25263 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project; Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Meeting With...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project; Eagle Crest Energy... Power Act), on the Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project. e. All local, state, and...

  3. 76 FR 15971 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project; Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Teleconference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project; Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Teleconference a. Date and Time of Meeting: Friday, April 15, 2011 at 9 a.m. (Pacific Time)....

  4. 76 FR 22699 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Teleconference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Teleconference a. Date and Time of Meeting: Friday, May 6, 2011 at 1 p.m. (Pacific Time)....

  5. 76 FR 69225 - Migratory Bird Permits; Double-Crested Cormorant Management in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ....) and other Federal laws, while enabling management of human-wildlife conflicts related to the expansion.... Double-crested cormorants have been implicated in several human-DCCO conflict issues including... conflicts. Permits are still used to resolve conflicts related to human health and safety and...

  6. Calibration of reaction rates for the CREST reactive-burn model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Caroline

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, the hydrocode-based CREST reactive-burn model has had success in modelling a range of shock initiation and detonation propagation phenomena in polymer bonded explosives. CREST uses empirical reaction rates that depend on a function of the entropy of the non-reacted explosive, allowing the effects of initial temperature, porosity and double-shock desensitisation to be simulated without any modifications to the model. Until now, the sixteen reaction-rate coefficients have been manually calibrated by trial and error, using hydrocode simulations of a subset of sustained-shock initiation gas-gun experiments and the detonation size-effect curve for the explosive. This paper will describe the initial development of an automatic method for calibrating CREST reaction-rate coefficients, using the well-established Particle Swarm Optimisation (PSO) technique. The automatic method submits multiple hydrocode simulations for each ``particle'' and analyses the results to determine the ``misfit'' to gas-gun and size-effect data. Over ~40 ``generations,'' the PSO code finds a best set of reaction-rate coefficients that minimises the misfit. The method will be demonstrated by developing a new CREST model for EDC32, a conventional high explosive.

  7. Management of Vascular Risk Factors in the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy Versus Stenting Trial (CREST)

    OpenAIRE

    Meschia, James F; Voeks, Jenifer H.; Leimgruber, Pierre P.; Mantese, Vito A.; Timaran, Carlos H; Chiu, David; Bart M. Demaerschalk; Howard, Virginia J; Hughes, Susan E.; Longbottom, Mary; Howard, Annie Green; Brott, Thomas G

    2014-01-01

    Background The Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy Versus Stenting Trial (CREST) is a multicenter randomized trial of stenting versus endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid disease. This study assesses management of vascular risk factors. Methods and Results Management was provided by the patient's physician, with biannual monitoring results collected by the local site. Therapeutic targets were low‐density lipoprotein, cholesterol

  8. Novel structural components of the ventral disc and lateral crest in Giardia intestinalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari D Hagen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Giardia intestinalis is a ubiquitous parasitic protist that is the causative agent of giardiasis, one of the most common protozoan diarrheal diseases in the world. Giardia trophozoites attach to the intestinal epithelium using a specialized and elaborate microtubule structure, the ventral disc. Surrounding the ventral disc is a less characterized putatively contractile structure, the lateral crest, which forms a continuous perimeter seal with the substrate. A better understanding of ventral disc and lateral crest structure, conformational dynamics, and biogenesis is critical for understanding the mechanism of giardial attachment to the host. To determine the components comprising the ventral disc and lateral crest, we used shotgun proteomics to identify proteins in a preparation of isolated ventral discs. Candidate disc-associated proteins, or DAPs, were GFP-tagged using a ligation-independent high-throughput cloning method. Based on disc localization, we identified eighteen novel DAPs, which more than doubles the number of known disc-associated proteins. Ten of the novel DAPs are associated with the lateral crest or outer edge of the disc, and are the first confirmed components of this structure. Using Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP with representative novel DAP::GFP strains we found that the newly identified DAPs tested did not recover after photobleaching and are therefore structural components of the ventral disc or lateral crest. Functional analyses of the novel DAPs will be central toward understanding the mechanism of ventral disc-mediated attachment and the mechanism of disc biogenesis during cell division. Since attachment of Giardia to the intestine via the ventral disc is essential for pathogenesis, it is possible that some proteins comprising the disc could be potential drug targets if their loss or disruption interfered with disc biogenesis or function, preventing attachment.

  9. A pilot study investigating the utilization of crest pads for treatment of toe callus and ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Monica; Bernecker, Tricia; McCullough, James; Hong, John; Trumbauer, Jane Scott; Miller, Mary Ellen

    2015-12-01

    Patients with lesser-toe deformities are at increased risk of developing calluses and ulcers on the distal ends of the affected digits because of the increased pressures applied to these areas. The number of diabetic patients in the United States continues to increase, along with associated comorbidities such as peripheral vascular disease and peripheral neuropathy. These conditions predispose patients to developing foot ulcerations, especially if foot deformities are present. Crest pads are a simple-to-make, inexpensive option to treat calluses and ulcerations on the distal ends of digits; however, there is no research available that support their use. Crest pads consist of rolled gauze covered in moleskin, with a large opening that fits over several toes and lies on the dorsal aspect of the foot, with the padded portion resting under the toes. Over several days of use, the pad molds to the plantar aspect of the toes, offloading pressure from the distal end of the affected digit(s). The sample was obtained through a retrospective chart review of patients identified as having had at least one nail care visit and at least one follow-up visit at a vascular surgery practice between August 2011 and December 2014. Potential subjects with toe deformities who presented with callus or ulcer on the distal end of a digit were considered for inclusion, if they received a crest pad as part of their treatment plan. The scholarly project was a preintervention or postintervention design with subjects acting as their own controls. McNemar's test was used to analyze the results which were statistically significant (P < .0001 at first callus follow-up and P = .0002 at second callus follow-up) for callus, hemorrhagic callus, and/or ulcer improvement following the crest pad intervention. The results of this scholarly project support the use of crest pads in patients with lesser-toe deformities to treat distal toe calluses and/or ulcerations. PMID:26567055

  10. CREST Syndrome - a Limited Form of Systemic Scleroderma: a Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paravina Mirjana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic scleroderma (SSc is a multisystem disease with microvascular abnormalities, autoimmune disorders, excessive collagen production and deposition, and fibrosis of the skin and internal organs. According to the simplest, though incomplete classification, there are two forms of SSc: diffuse and limited (formerly acrosclerosis. CREST syndrome is a subtype of limited SSc, characterized by: calcinosis, Raynaud’s phenomenon, esophageal dysfunction, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia. We present a patient with all the features of the CREST syndrome, which appeared at the age of 43 and lasted for 23 years. The patient presented with a gradual development of symptoms during the first ten years, from Raynaud’s phenomenon, skin sclerosis, calcinosis, telangiectasia, and esophageal dysmotility. The diagnosis was based on clinical findings and relevant diagnostic procedures. The article presents a literature review on the epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, various attempts at classification, diagnostic criteria, and therapeutic modalities.

  11. Linear surface capillary-gravity short-crested waves on a current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Hu

    2008-01-01

    One of the forward situations in the study of water waves is the basic three-dimensional surface wave motion of short-crested waves. Capillary waves result in rich effects concerned closely with remote sensing in the open ocean. Ocean currents experience a complete process in surface wave motion. Based on the above ideas, a linear dynamical system of surface capillary-gravity short-crested waves is developed by considering the current effects, thus leading to the following analytical expressions of the kinematic and dynamic variables: the wave height, the wave steepness, the phase velocity, the wave-particle velocities, accelerations and trajectories and the wave pressure. A number of the classi-cal, typical and latest special wave cases can arise from these expressions.

  12. Possible rim crest deposits in cores 12027 and 15008 - Some interpretations and problems for future research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Light colored coarse grained soils in the upper parts of cores 12027 and 15008 have a chaotic fabric and abundant bedrock-derived rock fragments. They overlie dark colored, fine grained soils with horizontal fabric and abundant regolith-derived rock fragments. The light colored soils are interpreted to be rim crest deposits associated with the craters seen in the lunar surface sampling photographs. The coarse size, poor sorting and chaotic fabric are believed to have originated by the violent mixing processes which are expected with ejecta deposition. The increase in bedrock-derived particles within the light colored soil can be explained by ejecta from craters that penetrated through or deep into the regolith. The dark soils are believed to predate the craters. Distribution of rock fragments in the material interpreted as rim crest ejecta does not fit a simple model of overturned stratigraphy.

  13. Implant-Prosthetic Rehabilitation in Bilateral Agenesis of Maxillary Lateral Incisors with a Mini Split Crest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figliuzzi, M. M.; Giudice, A.; Pileggi, S.; Pacifico, D.; Marrelli, M.; Tatullo, M.; Fortunato, L.

    2016-01-01

    The reported clinical case describes the surgical procedure of ridge augmentation by using a “split crest” technique with a partial thickness flap and a subsequent implant-prosthetic rehabilitation aimed at treating a bilateral agenesis of the upper lateral incisors. In such cases with vestibule-palatal and mesial-distal scarce bone thicknesses associated with the need of a proper functional and aesthetic rehabilitation, the split crest technique is particularly suitable. In the case we reported, because of the poor bone thicknesses, we performed a minimally invasive split crest which allowed a correct insertion of the fixtures. This technique allowed us to achieve an optimal functional and aesthetic rehabilitation; moreover, we obtained a good emergency profile, ensuring the vitality of the close teeth and ensuring a good primary stability and the following osseointegration of dental implants. PMID:27190658

  14. Disproportionately severe calcinosis cutis in an 88-year-old patient with CREST syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchowski, J.M.; Ahn, N.U.; Ahn, U.M. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); McCarthy, E.F. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Dept. of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Mehta, M.B. [Clinical Associates, Good Samaritan Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2001-08-01

    An 88-year-old woman with CREST syndrome (calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasias) presented with hyperglycemia, intravascular depletion, and atrial fibrillation. The patient was found to have unusually severe calcinosis cutis in both legs extending from the knees to the ankles bilaterally, as well as Raynaud's phenomenon, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasias. The patient was normocalcemic and normophosphatemic. Although subcutaneous calcification is often seen with CREST syndrome, this case is unusual in that the area of involvement was much larger than previously described. Furthermore, the amount of calcinosis was disproportionately severe and was the major cause of symptoms and disability compared with the other components of the syndrome. (orig.)

  15. Habitat use and food selection of small mammals near a sagebrush/crested wheatgrass interface in southeastern Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research has been conducted on various aspects of the ecology of wildlife residing on and adjacent to the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) and one other low-level radioactive waste disposal site on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho. Habitat use and food selection data were collected for deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), montane voles (Microtus montanus), Ord's kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ordii), and Townsend's ground squirrels (Spermophilus townsendii) near a sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata)/crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum) interface. Significantly more captures occurred in the native sagebrush habitat than in areas planted in crested wheatgrass or in disturbed sites. Crested wheatgrass, a prolific seed producer, still accounted for over 30% of the total captures. Montane voles and Townsend's ground squirrels (during periods of aboveground activity) used the crested wheatgrass habitat throughout the summer, while deer mice and Ord's kangaroo rats exhibited heavy use after seed set

  16. ECOLOGY OF NON-BREEDING AND BREEDING CRESTED CARACARAS (CARACARA CHERIWAY) IN FLORIDA

    OpenAIRE

    Dwyer, James Fitzgerald

    2010-01-01

    Like many species, Floridaâ s population of Northern Crested Caracaras (Caracara cheriway, hereafter â caracaraâ ) is likely declining due to loss of breeding habitat. Consequently, management-oriented restrictions on landscape modification are applied where breeding occurs, but management rarely is extended beyond breeding areas. Focusing management on breeding areas can be effective if all caracaras occupy breeding areas, all breeding areas are detected, and no intermittent breeding oc...

  17. New Results from the NOAA CREST Lidar Network (CLN Observations in the US Eastcoast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshary Fred

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents coordinated ground-based observations by the NOAA-CREST Lidar Network (CLN for profiling of aerosols, cloud, water vapor, and wind along the US east coast including Caribbean region at Puerto Rico. The instrumentation, methodology and observation capability are reviewed. The applications to continental and intercontinental-scale transport of smoke and dust plumes, and their large scale regional impact are discussed.

  18. Effect of X-ray beam vertical angulation on radiographic assessment of alveolar crest level.

    OpenAIRE

    Zulqarnain B; Almas K

    1998-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are diagnosed and monitored by various methods. Probing pocket depth measurements and dental radiographs are two of the most commonly used methods. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of x-ray beam vertical angulation on radiographic assessment of alveolar crest level in five human mandibles. A standardized technique was used to take bitewing radiographs with -10 degrees, 0 degree and +10 degrees angulation of X-Ray beam. The range of the mean difference...

  19. New Results from the NOAA CREST Lidar Network (CLN) Observations in the US Eastcoast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshary, Fred; Han, Zaw; Wu, Yonghua; Gross, Barry; Wesloh, Daniel; Hoff, Raymond M.; Delgado, Ruben; Su, Jia; Lei, Liqiao; Lee, Robert B.; McCormick, M. Pat; Diaz, Jesus; Cruz, Carlos; Parsiani, Hamed

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents coordinated ground-based observations by the NOAA-CREST Lidar Network (CLN) for profiling of aerosols, cloud, water vapor, and wind along the US east coast including Caribbean region at Puerto Rico. The instrumentation, methodology and observation capability are reviewed. The applications to continental and intercontinental-scale transport of smoke and dust plumes, and their large scale regional impact are discussed.

  20. Correlation of Cere Color with Intra- and Interspecific Agonistic Interactions of Crested Caracaras

    OpenAIRE

    Dwyer, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Bright coloration in birds is an important indicator of individual quality often used in social displays. Structural, carotenoid-, and melanin-based colors are long-lasting, widespread, and widely studied. Hemoglobin-based colors are ephemeral, rare, and less studied. Hemoglobin-based displays occur when an individual facultatively enhances or restricts blood flow through caruncles, combs, wattles, or other highly vascularized un-feathered skin patches. In Crested Caracaras (Caracara cheriway...

  1. Perforated sigmoid diverticulitis in a lumbar hernia after iliac crest bone graft - a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Frueh, Florian S; Vuille-Dit-Bille, Raphael N; Raptis, Dimitri A; Notter, Hanspeter; Muff, Brigitte S

    2014-01-01

    Background The combination of perforated diverticulitis in a lumbar hernia constitutes an extremely rare condition. Case presentation We report a case of a 66 year old Caucasian woman presenting with perforated sigmoid diverticulitis localized in a lumbar hernia following iliac crest bone graft performed 18 years ago. Emergency treatment consisted of laparoscopic peritoneal lavage. Elective sigmoid resection was scheduled four months later. At the same time a laparoscopic hernia repair with a...

  2. Perforated sigmoid diverticulitis in a lumbar hernia after iliac crest bone graft - a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Frueh, Florian S; Vuille-Dit-Bille, Raphael N; Raptis, Dimitri A; Notter, Hanspeter; Muff, Brigitte S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The combination of perforated diverticulitis in a lumbar hernia constitutes an extremely rare condition. CASE PRESENTATION We report a case of a 66 year old Caucasian woman presenting with perforated sigmoid diverticulitis localized in a lumbar hernia following iliac crest bone graft performed 18 years ago. Emergency treatment consisted of laparoscopic peritoneal lavage. Elective sigmoid resection was scheduled four months later. At the same time a laparoscopic hernia rep...

  3. Estimation of Overtopping Rates on Slopes in Wave Power Devices and Other Low Crested Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Burcharth, Hans Falk

    Motivated by questions raised by developers of wave energy devices based on wave overtopping concepts, model tests have been performed to study overtopping of structures with limited draught, low crest freeboards and slope geometries designed to increase overtopping and thereby also the captured...... amount of wave energy. The test results have been incorporated in an existing overtopping prediction formula by application of correction factors presented in the paper...

  4. Population status of great crested newts (Triturus cristatus) at sites subjected to development mitigation

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Brett; Griffiths, Richard A.; John W. Wilkinson

    2016-01-01

    Increasing development of natural habitats frequently causes conflict with the conservation of protected species. Consequently, interventions that attempt to mitigate the impact of development are becoming increasingly commonplace. We used four approaches to assess the effectiveness of development mitigation on a species subject to widespread development pressures in Europe – the great crested newt (Triturus cristatus). Firstly, a systematic evidence review revealed eleven published studies o...

  5. A new crested pterosaur from the early cretaceous of Spain: the first European tapejarid (Pterodactyloidea: Azhdarchoidea)

    OpenAIRE

    Vullo, Romain; Marugán-Lobón, Jesús; Buscalioni, Angela D.; Gomez, Bernard; De La Fuente, Montserrat; Moratalla, José J.; Kellner, Alexander W. A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Tapejaridae is a group of unusual toothless pterosaurs characterized by bizarre cranial crests. From a paleoecological point of view, frugivorous feeding habits have often been suggested for one of its included clades, the Tapejarinae. So far, the presence of these intriguing flying reptiles has been unambiguously documented from Early Cretaceous sites in China and Brazil, where pterosaur fossils are less rare and fragmentary than in similarly-aged European strata. Methodology...

  6. The morphology of the sella turcica in velocardiofacial syndrome suggests involvement of a neural crest developmental field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølsted, Kirsten; Boers, Maria; Kjaer, Inger

    2010-01-01

    measure the cranial base angles in individuals with VCFS and, if possible, to discover the developmental field that may be involved in the condition. The study included 33 patients with VCFS from the Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, Denmark. The genotype was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization...... aplasia, hypothyroidism, and posterior brain abnormality), suggest involvement of a specific developmental field....

  7. The lamprey: A jawless vertebrate model system for examining origin of the neural crest and other vertebrate traits

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Stephen A.; Bronner, Marianne E.

    2014-01-01

    Lampreys are a group of jawless fishes that serve as an important point of comparison for studies of vertebrate evolution. Lampreys and hagfishes are agnathan fishes, the cyclostomes, which sit at a crucial phylogenetic position as the only living sister group of the jawed vertebrates. Comparisons between cyclostomes and jawed vertebrates can help identify shared derived (i.e. synapomorphic) traits that might have been inherited from ancestral early vertebrates, if unlikely to have arisen con...

  8. EXTRACTION, QUANTIFICATION, AND MOLAR MASS DETERMINATION OF HYALURONIC ACID EXTRACTED FROM CHICKEN CREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. ROSA

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available

    Hyaluronic acid (HA is part of the connective tissue. The polymer is composed of alternating units of ß-d-glucuronic acid and N-acetyl-ß-d-glucosamine linked, respectively, via 1-3 and 1-4 bonds. The chicken crest is one of the richest tissues in this polysaccharide. Since Brazil is one of the main chicken exporters in the world, the utilization of the crests of abated animals for the HA obtaining is particularly attractive. The present work sought to extract HA from chicken crest and to determine the molar mass of the extracted acid. Extraction was accomplished by proteolytic digestion with papain during 24 h at 60oC, followed by precipitation with cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC. Hexuronic acid content was determined via the carbazole method, the intrinsic viscosity was measured using the ball viscosimeter, and the molar mass was calculated by extrapolating the calibration line to zero. In addition, qualitative infrared spectroscopy was carried out on the sample using the Bomem MB spectrophotometer. The results show that the extraction method was effective: the extracted acid possesses a large molecular mass, and the extract contains a signifi cant amount of HA.

  9. Polyurethane resins derived from castor oil (Ricinus communis) for tibial crest deviation in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medial patellar luxation is one of the most common orthopedic problems in small breeds of dogs and tibial crest deviation is a frequent accompaining anatomical abnormality. For that reason, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the behavior of castor oil derived polyurethane implants when apllied to experimental defects created on the medial side of the proximal tibia of normal puppies. Twelve dogs were randomly divided in 3 groups of 4 animals and were submitted to the same treatment. Histopathological study was performed respectively at 30 (GI), 60 (GII) and 90 (GIII) days post-surgery. Evaluations methods included clinical assessment, radiology, gross and macroscopic study, tomography and statistical analysis. Clinically, there were no signs of implant rejection. Radiology revealed intense periosteal reaction and new bone formation. On gross examination, there was thickening and lateral deviation of the tibial crest and new bone neoformation. On microscopic examination, there was fibrous tissue around the polyurethane, periosteal proliferation on the medial side of the tibia and no bone proliferation towards the implant. Cat scans reveled lateral deviation of the tibial crest in eleven animals, which was statistically significant (p<5; pared T test)

  10. Free iliac crest grafts with periosteum for treatment of old acetabular defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO De-wei; SUN Qiang; WANG Ben-jie; CUI Da-ping

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To inquire into the therapeutic effectiveness of free iliac crest grafts with periosteum on old acetabular defects.Methods: From February 1996 to June 2005, 9 patients were treated with free iliac crest grafts with periosteum to reconstruct old acetabular defects. There were 7 males and 2 females and the average age was 41.3 years. The acetabular defects were caused by traffic accidents in 6 cases and fall injury in 3 cases. The time from injury to treatment was 4-13 months and averaged 8 months. Intraoperatively we firstly removed the acetabular fracture fragments of the posterior wall. The femoral head was then reducted. Bone graft was harvested from the iliac crest with periosteum, which was sculpted with a rongeur to conform to the defect. The concave (iliac fossa) side of the graft was placed toward the femoral head. The graft was securedly fixed by two to three leg screws.Results: Postoperative syndrome was not found in any of the cases. Harris' score system showed that the score raised from 32. 3 points preoperatively to 81 points postoperatively. The hip function was evaluated as excellent in 3 cases, good in 4 cases and fair in 2 cases.Conclusions: Although this procedure could not exactly reproduce the anatomy of the hip joint, it enables to restore the posterior stability, provide bone-stock for the hip joints and prevent dislocation of the femoral head.

  11. Use of the Vascularized Iliac-Crest Flap in Musculoskeletal Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Tonoli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone loss was in the past treated by several methods, such as bone distraction and the use of nonvascularized or tissue-bank bone grafts. With the advent of modern microsurgical techniques, the vascularized bone flap has been used with good results; it resolves local nutritional problems, repairs soft tissue that is often damaged by severe trauma, and treats bone loss due to tumors, pseudarthroses, and osteomyelitis. This paper reports the authors’ experience with the use of vascularized iliac-crest flaps to treat orthopedic pathologies in five patients with traumatic bone loss (<10 cm, three with osteomyelitis, and three with atrophic nonunion. In all cases, the same surgeon obtained a vascularized iliac-crest flap with a pedicle based on the deep iliac circumflex artery. All flaps consolidated within a mean period of 3 months. These findings demonstrate that the use of an iliac-crest flap is a treatment option in cases of bone loss and that it is associated with good functional results and minimal donor-site morbidity.

  12. Experimental infection of crested caracara (Caracara plancus) with Toxoplasma gondii simulating natural conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitaliano, S N; Mineo, T W P; André, M R; Machado, R Z; Mineo, J R; Werther, K

    2010-08-27

    Toxoplasma gondii affects mainly warm-blooded animals, including birds. Even though previous experimental data indicate that raptors are resistant to clinical infection, there is no information regarding the susceptibility of Brazilian birds of prey to T. gondii. The present study aimed to observe how the crested caracara, a common raptor in Brazil, interacts with T. gondii using an experimental model. Seven crested caracaras, seronegative for T. gondii, were separated into infected (n=5) and control groups (n=2). Birds from the infected group were fed T. gondii-infected Calomys callosus, a rodent present in Brazilian savanna and described as highly susceptible to infection by the parasite, for three consecutive days, while control animals were fed non-infected rodents. All infected birds produced T. gondii-specific IgG antibodies that were firstly detected at day 7 post-infection, with peak production detected between 15 and 30dpi. No significant alterations in clinical and hematological parameters were observed throughout the experimental period, and parasites were sparsely found in muscular tissues after the birds were euthanized. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that crested caracaras are resistant to oral infection with T. gondii, suggesting that the host-parasite relationship between both species has reached a remarkable equilibrium. PMID:20451327

  13. A NOVEL 3-D MODEL FOR THE WATER CRESTING IN HORIZONTAL WELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In the presence of bottom water, a drop in the reservoir pressure due to fluid production causes the aquifer water to expand and to flow into the reservoir. Therefore, hydrocarbon production from a well is limited by the critical flow rate. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the breakthrough time and the critical rate by using a novel 3-D horizontal well model. Based on the hypothesis that the horizontal well is located in any position of a circular reservoir with no-flow boundary on the top of the reservoir and constant pressure boundary at the bottom, the horizontal well has been regarded as an infinite conductivity line sink and then a 3-D steady-state flow model of the horizontal well is set up. A point sink pressure solution can be obtained with the Fourier transform. The result of the pressure distribution of the uniform flux horizontal well can be presented by means of the principle of superposition. According to the stable water cresting theory, this study confirms the stable height of water cresting and the critical rate. Meanwhile, it can re-confirm the breakthrough time at a specific rate. The output of a comparison between this 3-D model and the reservoir numerical simulator (Eclipse) shows the method presented here can be applied to investigate the behavior of a water cresting and to predict the breakthrough time at the bottom water driver reservoir.

  14. Cognitive Remediation and Emotion Skills Training (CREST) for anorexia nervosa in individual format: self-reported outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Tchanturia, Kate; Doris, Eli; Mountford, Vicki; Fleming, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate self-reported outcomes after a brief course of skills-based individual therapy for inpatients with anorexia nervosa (AN). Methods In this case series study 37 adults with AN participated in cognitive remediation and emotion skills training (CREST) sessions, and completed social anhedonia, alexithymia and motivational measures before and after the intervention. Results The CREST primary outcome measures were total scores on the Revised Social Anhedonia Scale (RSAS), whic...

  15. Spatial Ecology of the Critically Endangered Fijian Crested Iguana, Brachylophus vitiensis, in an Extremely Dense Population: Implications for Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, Suzanne F.; Biciloa, Pita; Harlow, Peter S.; Keogh, J. Scott

    2013-01-01

    The Critically Endangered Fijian crested iguana, Brachylophus vitiensis, occurs at extreme density at only one location, with estimates of >10,000 iguanas living on the 70 hectare island of Yadua Taba in Fiji. We conducted a mark and recapture study over two wet seasons, investigating the spatial ecology and intraspecific interactions of the strictly arboreal Fijian crested iguana. This species exhibits moderate male-biased sexual size dimorphism, which has been linked in other lizard species...

  16. Yes-associated protein 65 (YAP expands neural progenitors and regulates Pax3 expression in the neural plate border zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T Gee

    Full Text Available Yes-associated protein 65 (YAP contains multiple protein-protein interaction domains and functions as both a transcriptional co-activator and as a scaffolding protein. Mouse embryos lacking YAP did not survive past embryonic day 8.5 and showed signs of defective yolk sac vasculogenesis, chorioallantoic fusion, and anterior-posterior (A-P axis elongation. Given that the YAP knockout mouse defects might be due in part to nutritional deficiencies, we sought to better characterize a role for YAP during early development using embryos that develop externally. YAP morpholino (MO-mediated loss-of-function in both frog and fish resulted in incomplete epiboly at gastrulation and impaired axis formation, similar to the mouse phenotype. In frog, germ layer specific genes were expressed, but they were temporally delayed. YAP MO-mediated partial knockdown in frog allowed a shortened axis to form. YAP gain-of-function in Xenopus expanded the progenitor populations in the neural plate (sox2(+ and neural plate border zone (pax3(+, while inhibiting the expression of later markers of tissues derived from the neural plate border zone (neural crest, pre-placodal ectoderm, hatching gland, as well as epidermis and somitic muscle. YAP directly regulates pax3 expression via association with TEAD1 (N-TEF at a highly conserved, previously undescribed, TEAD-binding site within the 5' regulatory region of pax3. Structure/function analyses revealed that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP contributes to the inhibition of epidermal and somitic muscle differentiation, but a complete, intact YAP protein is required for expansion of the neural plate and neural plate border zone progenitor pools. These results provide a thorough analysis of YAP mediated gene expression changes in loss- and gain-of-function experiments. Furthermore, this is the first report to use YAP structure-function analyzes to determine which portion of YAP is involved in specific gene expression changes and the

  17. REN: a novel, developmentally regulated gene that promotes neural cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Rita; Zazzeroni, Francesca; Alesse, Edoardo; Mincione, Claudia; Borello, Ugo; Buanne, Pasquale; D'Eugenio, Roberta; Mackay, Andrew R; Argenti, Beatrice; Gradini, Roberto; Russo, Matteo A; Maroder, Marella; Cossu, Giulio; Frati, Luigi; Screpanti, Isabella; Gulino, Alberto

    2002-08-19

    Expansion and fate choice of pluripotent stem cells along the neuroectodermal lineage is regulated by a number of signals, including EGF, retinoic acid, and NGF, which also control the proliferation and differentiation of central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) neural progenitor cells. We report here the identification of a novel gene, REN, upregulated by neurogenic signals (retinoic acid, EGF, and NGF) in pluripotent embryonal stem (ES) cells and neural progenitor cell lines in association with neurotypic differentiation. Consistent with a role in neural promotion, REN overexpression induced neuronal differentiation as well as growth arrest and p27Kip1 expression in CNS and PNS neural progenitor cell lines, and its inhibition impaired retinoic acid induction of neurogenin-1 and NeuroD expression. REN expression is developmentally regulated, initially detected in the neural fold epithelium of the mouse embryo during gastrulation, and subsequently throughout the ventral neural tube, the outer layer of the ventricular encephalic neuroepithelium and in neural crest derivatives including dorsal root ganglia. We propose that REN represents a novel component of the neurogenic signaling cascade induced by retinoic acid, EGF, and NGF, and is both a marker and a regulator of neuronal differentiation. PMID:12186855

  18. Population structure and mating system of the Red-crested Korhaan (Lophotis ruficrista) in South Africa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Johann H van Niekerk

    2015-01-01

    Background:The mating system of the korhaans and bustards in southern Africa is either based on polygyny or monogamy. The Red-crested Korhaan (Lophotis ruficrista) has been described as polygynous but otherwise very little is known about its breeding biology. The aims were to describe the population structure and male behavior during breeding. Methods:The data collected for this paper was mainly based on field transect surveys carried out in 2009, 2010 and 2011. The population structure of the Red-crested Korhaan in the temperate Borakalalo Game Reserve (BGR) was compared with that in the arid Molopo Nature Reserve (MNR) (both situated in the North West province of South Africa). The study was mainly conducted in the BGR but additional work was conducted in the MNR for comparison. Results:The difference in mean group sizes between MNR (1.03) and BGR (1.07) was statistically not significant. Group sizes were not affected by climate despite the fact that the BGR received about 650 mm precipitation per annum and the MNR about 200 mm. In both reserves the apparent sex ratios were skewed in favor of males (1:0.29 in the BGR and 1:0.1 in the MNR). The population was dispersed in a clumped manner which is ascribed to the formation of leks. Leks were positioned in open habitat while females invariably concealed themselves under cover. Conclusions:The leks formed the pivot of the mating system of the Red-crested Korhaan and are identifiable social structures that field ecologists can use to monitor population stability.

  19. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the first month ... that she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In spina bifida, ...

  20. An archaic crested plesiosaur in opal from the Lower Cretaceous high-latitude deposits of Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Kear, Benjamin P.; Schroeder, Natalie I; Michael S Y Lee

    2006-01-01

    Umoonasaurus demoscyllus gen. et sp. nov. is a new small-bodied (approx. 2.5 m) pliosauroid plesiosaur from the Lower Cretaceous (Aptian–Albian) of southern Australia. It is represented by several partial skeletons (one with a near complete skull is the most complete opalized vertebrate fossil yet known), and is unique in having large crests on the skull midline and above the orbits. Umoonasaurus is surprisingly archaic despite its relatively late age (approx. 115 Myr ago)—being simultaneousl...

  1. A Priori Estimates for Two-Dimensional Water Waves with Angled Crests

    OpenAIRE

    Kinsey, Rafe H.; Wu, Sijue

    2014-01-01

    We consider the two-dimensional water wave problem in the case where the free interface of the fluid meets a vertical wall at a possibly non-right angle; our problem also covers interfaces with angled crests. We assume that the fluid is inviscid, incompressible, and irrotational, with no surface tension and with air density zero. We construct a low-regularity energy and prove a closed energy estimate for this problem. Our work differs from earlier work in that, in our case, only a degenerate ...

  2. The Crest of the Peacock Non-European Roots of Mathematics (Third Edition)

    CERN Document Server

    Joseph, George Gheverghese

    2011-01-01

    From the Ishango Bone of central Africa and the Inca quipu of South America to the dawn of modern mathematics, The Crest of the Peacock makes it clear that human beings everywhere have been capable of advanced and innovative mathematical thinking. George Gheverghese Joseph takes us on a breathtaking multicultural tour of the roots and shoots of non-European mathematics. He shows us the deep influence that the Egyptians and Babylonians had on the Greeks, the Arabs' major creative contributions, and the astounding range of successes of the great civilizations of India and China. The third editio

  3. T-CREST: Time-predictable multi-core architecture for embedded systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoeberl, Martin; Abbaspourseyedi, Sahar; Jordan, Alexander;

    2015-01-01

    -core architectures that are optimized for the WCET instead of the average-case execution time. The resulting time-predictable resources (processors, interconnect, memory arbiter, and memory controller) and tools (compiler, WCET analysis) are designed to ease WCET analysis and to optimize WCET performance. Compared...... domain shows that the WCET can be reduced for computation-intensive tasks when distributing the tasks on several cores and using the network-on-chip for communication. With three cores the WCET is improved by a factor of 1.8 and with 15 cores by a factor of 5.7.The T-CREST project is the result...

  4. Optical Neural Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Warden, Melissa R.; Cardin, Jessica A.; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Genetically encoded optical actuators and indicators have changed the landscape of neuroscience, enabling targetable control and readout of specific components of intact neural circuits in behaving animals. Here, we review the development of optical neural interfaces, focusing on hardware designed for optical control of neural activity, integrated optical control and electrical readout, and optical readout of population and single-cell neural activity in freely moving mammals.

  5. Reconstruction of iliac crest with rib to prevent donor site complications: A prospective study of 26 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The tricortical bone graft from the iliac crest are used to reconstruct the post corpectomy spinal defects. The donor iliac area defect is large and may give rise to pain at donor site, instability of pelvis, fracture of ilium, donor site muscle herniation or abdominal content herniation. Rib removed during thoracotomy was used by us to reconstruct the iliac crest defect. Materials and Methods: Twenty-six patients who underwent thoracotomy for dorsal spine corpectomy or curettage for various spinal pathologies from June 2002 to May 2004 were included in the study. After adequate decompression the spine was reconstructed by tricortical bone graft from iliac crest and reconstruction of the iliac crest was done with the rib removed for exposure during thoracotomy. Results: The mean follow up was 15 months. All patients had good graft incorporation which was evaluated on the basis of local tenderness and radiographs. One patient had graft displacement. Conclusion: The reconstruction of iliac crest by rib is a simple and effective procedure to prevent donor site complications.

  6. Genetics and evolution of plumage color in Crested Ibis: Analysis of the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J; Liu, X; Zhang, J; Qing, B; Lu, B

    2015-01-01

    The melanocortin-1-recepter gene (MC1R), an important regulator in melanin synthesis, may cause different plumage color patterns in birds: gain-of-function mutations lead to the synthesis of eumelanin, whereas loss-of-function mutations help to generate pheomelanin synthesis. We had chosen MC1R as a candidate gene for the depigmentation of crested ibis, cloned and sequenced the crested ibis MC1R gene the first time. The crested ibis MC1R sequence, highly conserved with other birds during evolution, had seven transmembrane domains which played an indispensable function through evolution. We did not found any substitution on this sequence among all the sample individuals. The phylogenetic tree showed that crested ibis separated early in the evolution of birds. TYR, TYRP1, TYRP2 and MC1R were expressed in blood and the expression of the four genes showed no significant difference (p>0.05) between normal and albinism individuals, and this result demonstrated that melanic pigments are not involved in the production of red pigmentation in birds. Further study of the crested ibis albinism should focus on analyzing carotenoid-based genes. PMID:26314199

  7. Holographic neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Manger, R

    1998-01-01

    Holographic neural networks are a new and promising type of artificial neural networks. This article gives an overview of the holographic neural technology and its possibilities. The theoretical principles of holographic networks are first reviewed. Then, some other papers are presented, where holographic networks have been applied or experimentally evaluated. A case study dealing with currency exchange rate prediction is described in more detail.

  8. Theoretical Investigation of Peak-Delay Force Reduction for Caissons Exposed to Non-breaking Short-Crested Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.

    In nature coastal structures are exposed to oblique short-crested waves. The effect of wave incident angle on total wave force on a long caisson are twofold. The one is the force reduction due to the reduction of instantaneous point pressure on the caisson, named point-pressure force reduction. The...... other is the force reduction due to the fact that the peak pressures do not occur simultaneously along the caisson, named peak-delay force reduction. These two reduction effects can also be expected with short-crested waves, as the short-crestedness of waves means the spreading of wave energy over a...... on the peak-delay force reduction of caissons exposed to non-breaking short-crested waves. Battjes (1982) has investigated theoretically the peak-delay force reduction of shortcrested waves with only one frequency component. Such a force reduction factor cannot be applied because in nature waves are...

  9. Misexpression of Pknox2 in mouse limb bud mesenchyme perturbs zeugopod development and deltoid crest formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenrong; Zhu, Huang; Zhao, Jianzhi; Li, Hanjun; Wan, Yong; Cao, Jingjing; Zhao, Haixia; Yu, Jian; Zhou, Rujiang; Yao, Yiyun; Zhang, Lingling; Wang, Lifang; He, Lin; Ma, Gang; Yao, Zhengju; Guo, Xizhi

    2013-01-01

    The TALE (Three Amino acid Loop Extension) family consisting of Meis, Pbx and Pknox proteins is a group of transcriptional co-factors with atypical homeodomains that play pivotal roles in limb development. Compared to the in-depth investigations of Meis and Pbx protein functions, the role of Pknox2 in limb development remains unclear. Here, we showed that Pknox2 was mainly expressed in the zeugopod domain of the murine limb at E10.5 and E11.5. Misexpression of Pknox2 in the limb bud mesenchyme of transgenic mice led to deformities in the zeugopod and forelimb stylopod deltoid crest, but left the autopod and other stylopod skeletons largely intact. These malformations in zeugopod skeletons were recapitulated in mice overexpressing Pknox2 in osteochondroprogenitor cells. Molecular and cellular analyses indicated that the misexpression of Pknox2 in limb bud mesenchyme perturbed the Hox10-11 gene expression profiles, decreased Col2 expression and Bmp/Smad signaling activity in the limb. These results indicated that Pknox2 misexpression affected mesenchymal condensation and early chondrogenic differentiation in the zeugopod skeletons of transgenic embryos, suggesting Pknox2 as a potential regulator of zeugopod and deltoid crest formation. PMID:23717575

  10. Misexpression of Pknox2 in mouse limb bud mesenchyme perturbs zeugopod development and deltoid crest formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenrong Zhou

    Full Text Available The TALE (Three Amino acid Loop Extension family consisting of Meis, Pbx and Pknox proteins is a group of transcriptional co-factors with atypical homeodomains that play pivotal roles in limb development. Compared to the in-depth investigations of Meis and Pbx protein functions, the role of Pknox2 in limb development remains unclear. Here, we showed that Pknox2 was mainly expressed in the zeugopod domain of the murine limb at E10.5 and E11.5. Misexpression of Pknox2 in the limb bud mesenchyme of transgenic mice led to deformities in the zeugopod and forelimb stylopod deltoid crest, but left the autopod and other stylopod skeletons largely intact. These malformations in zeugopod skeletons were recapitulated in mice overexpressing Pknox2 in osteochondroprogenitor cells. Molecular and cellular analyses indicated that the misexpression of Pknox2 in limb bud mesenchyme perturbed the Hox10-11 gene expression profiles, decreased Col2 expression and Bmp/Smad signaling activity in the limb. These results indicated that Pknox2 misexpression affected mesenchymal condensation and early chondrogenic differentiation in the zeugopod skeletons of transgenic embryos, suggesting Pknox2 as a potential regulator of zeugopod and deltoid crest formation.

  11. 3D laboratory experiments on a system of low-crested breakwaters under oblique wave attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papacharalampous, Georgia; Karantinos, Michalis; Giantsi, Theodora; Moutzouris, Constantinos

    2016-04-01

    Low-crested breakwaters are being increasingly used for shore protection. Hydrodynamics around coastal structures are complicated and have not been fully understood. A series of large scale (1:40) 3D laboratory experiments were carried out in the Laboratory of Harbour Works, National Technical University of Athens to investigate the wave disturbance around a system of two non-parallel to the shoreline breakwaters. The structures were of the type of low-crested, permeable and attacked by obliquely incident waves. Three different water depths were tested in the basin with a range of various different spectra. The transmission and reflection coefficients were measured in the middle of each breakwater. For this purpose, 1 gauge and 4 gauges (in line) were placed on the landward and seaward side of each breakwater respectively. The effect of diffraction is incorporate at the measured wave heights. The measured coefficients are being compared to their corresponding estimated using existing empirical formulas. Most of those formulas neglect wave obliquity.

  12. Modelling shock to detonation transition in PETN using HERMES and CREST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheswaran, Mary-Ann; Curtis, John; Reaugh, Jack

    2013-06-01

    The High Explosive Response to MEchanical Stimulus (HERMES) model has been developed to address High Explosive Violent Response (HEVR). It is a material model for use in the both the LS-DYNA finite element and ALE3D hydrocodes that enables the modelling of both shock to detonation (SDT) and deflagration to detonation (DDT) transition. As part of its ongoing development and application, model parameters for the explosive PETN were found by using experimental data for PETN at different densities. PETN was selected because of the availability of both SDT and DDT data. To model SDT and DDT, HERMES uses a subset of the CREST reactive burn model with the Mie-Gruneisen equation of state (EOS) for the unreacted explosive and a look-up table for the gas EOS as generated by Cheetah. The unreacted EOS parameters were found first by calculating the principal isentrope of unreacted PETN at TMD from PETN shock Hugoniot data. Then Pop-plot data for PETN was used to fit the CREST parameters at each density. The resulting new PETN HERMES material model provides a platform for further investigations of SDT and DDT in low density PETN powder. JER's activity was performed under the auspices of the US DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and partially funded by the Joint US DoD/DOE Munitions Technology Development Program.

  13. Clinical effectiveness of 99mTc-diphosphonate scintigraphy of revascularized iliac crest flaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical assessment of the perfusion of the musculocutaneous portion of composite iliac crest free flaps was compared to 99mTc-diphosphonate (HDP) uptake in 14 patients who underwent primary oromandibular reconstruction after ablative cancer surgery. Bone scanning was performed on average at the 9-10th postoperative day (range 4-48) 3 h after intravenous injection of 550 MBq 99mTc-HDP. Eleven patients showed complete concordance between 99mTc-HDP uptake and soft-tissue status. Two patients showed uptake and viable muscle in spite of necrotic skin. One patient had a viable musculocutaneous flap but a photopenic defect in the bone graft; 6 months later, a small corresponding part of the bone was sequestrated. In this study, bone scanning and clinical assessment of muscle perfusion were 100% accurate in predicting viability of bone graft. Skin viability was a less reliable parameter. It is concluded that bone scanning is not indicated as routine investigation for revascularized iliac crest flaps and that clinical assessment of muscle perfusion is a reliable monitor of the early function of such flaps. (au) 8 refs

  14. Combination of microvascular medial femoral condyle and iliac crest flap for hemi-midface reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandtner, C; Hachleitner, J; Buerger, H; Gaggl, A

    2015-06-01

    In midface defects including the orbit (Brown class III and IV), no single flap can provide adequate reconstruction. In this technical note, the combination of vascularized iliac crest flap and vascularized medial femoral condyle flap (MFC) is described. The vascularized iliac crest flap is reported to be the gold standard for maxilla reconstruction. There is, however, no consensus on the best method for orbital and nasal wall reconstruction. The MFC flap can be harvested as a thin corticoperiosteal flap or as an osteomyocutaneous flap. Due to the periosteal blood supply, this flap can be customized for an individual defect of the upper hemi-midface. It is therefore of great benefit in orbital and nasal wall reconstruction. By combining the deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) bone flap and the MFC flap, the best standard reconstruction technique of the hemi-maxilla can be combined with a new anatomical precise microvascular reconstruction technique of the orbit. A nearly symmetric midface appearance can be achieved. PMID:25835757

  15. Tibial crest fracture correction after tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA using a modified TTA technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Carmagnani Prada

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Corrective osteotomies are challenging techniques that require specialized training and acquisition of specific materials. Nevertheless, they have been increasingly studied and used in clinical routine in the world. Several variations on the model and the application technique have been developed and refined in search of the improvement of surgical techniques and development of implants more affordable to purchase. The tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA consists on stabilization of tibial plateau perpendicular to the patellar tendon through the tibial tuberosity advancement. Our goal is to report a surgical complication of fracture of the tibial crest after TTA procedure. A dog with a confirmed diagnosis of rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament (CCLR was operated using conventional technique of TTA. After 3 days of surgery, the same animal had a fracture of the proximal tibial crest. The animal was sent back to surgery and was used a variation of TTA technique, with autologous iliac wing and three cortical screws. This variation of the technique was able to replace the original technique successfully.

  16. Chaotic diagonal recurrent neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xing-Yuan; Zhang Yi

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel neural network based on a diagonal recurrent neural network and chaos,and its structure andlearning algorithm are designed.The multilayer feedforward neural network,diagonal recurrent neural network,and chaotic diagonal recurrent neural network are used to approach the cubic symmetry map.The simulation results show that the approximation capability of the chaotic diagonal recurrent neural network is better than the other two neural networks.

  17. Chaotic diagonal recurrent neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a novel neural network based on a diagonal recurrent neural network and chaos, and its structure and learning algorithm are designed. The multilayer feedforward neural network, diagonal recurrent neural network, and chaotic diagonal recurrent neural network are used to approach the cubic symmetry map. The simulation results show that the approximation capability of the chaotic diagonal recurrent neural network is better than the other two neural networks. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  18. Evolvable Neural Software System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolvable Neural Software System (ENSS) is composed of sets of Neural Basis Functions (NBFs), which can be totally autonomously created and removed according to the changing needs and requirements of the software system. The resulting structure is both hierarchical and self-similar in that a given set of NBFs may have a ruler NBF, which in turn communicates with other sets of NBFs. These sets of NBFs may function as nodes to a ruler node, which are also NBF constructs. In this manner, the synthetic neural system can exhibit the complexity, three-dimensional connectivity, and adaptability of biological neural systems. An added advantage of ENSS over a natural neural system is its ability to modify its core genetic code in response to environmental changes as reflected in needs and requirements. The neural system is fully adaptive and evolvable and is trainable before release. It continues to rewire itself while on the job. The NBF is a unique, bilevel intelligence neural system composed of a higher-level heuristic neural system (HNS) and a lower-level, autonomic neural system (ANS). Taken together, the HNS and the ANS give each NBF the complete capabilities of a biological neural system to match sensory inputs to actions. Another feature of the NBF is the Evolvable Neural Interface (ENI), which links the HNS and ANS. The ENI solves the interface problem between these two systems by actively adapting and evolving from a primitive initial state (a Neural Thread) to a complicated, operational ENI and successfully adapting to a training sequence of sensory input. This simulates the adaptation of a biological neural system in a developmental phase. Within the greater multi-NBF and multi-node ENSS, self-similar ENI s provide the basis for inter-NBF and inter-node connectivity.

  19. Slit/Robo1 signaling regulates neural tube development by balancing neuroepithelial cell proliferation and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guang; Li, Yan; Wang, Xiao-yu [Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine of The Ministry of Education, Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Han, Zhe [Institute of Vascular Biological Sciences, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510224 (China); Chuai, Manli [College of Life Sciences Biocentre, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH (United Kingdom); Wang, Li-jing [Institute of Vascular Biological Sciences, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510224 (China); Ho Lee, Kenneth Ka [Stem Cell and Regeneration Thematic Research Programme, School of Biomedical Sciences, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin (Hong Kong); Geng, Jian-guo, E-mail: jgeng@umich.edu [Institute of Vascular Biological Sciences, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510224 (China); Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Yang, Xuesong, E-mail: yang_xuesong@126.com [Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine of The Ministry of Education, Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2013-05-01

    Formation of the neural tube is the morphological hallmark for development of the embryonic central nervous system (CNS). Therefore, neural tube development is a crucial step in the neurulation process. Slit/Robo signaling was initially identified as a chemo-repellent that regulated axon growth cone elongation, but its role in controlling neural tube development is currently unknown. To address this issue, we investigated Slit/Robo1 signaling in the development of chick neCollege of Life Sciences Biocentre, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, UKural tube and transgenic mice over-expressing Slit2. We disrupted Slit/Robo1 signaling by injecting R5 monoclonal antibodies into HH10 neural tubes to block the Robo1 receptor. This inhibited the normal development of the ventral body curvature and caused the spinal cord to curl up into a S-shape. Next, Slit/Robo1 signaling on one half-side of the chick embryo neural tube was disturbed by electroporation in ovo. We found that the morphology of the neural tube was dramatically abnormal after we interfered with Slit/Robo1 signaling. Furthermore, we established that silencing Robo1 inhibited cell proliferation while over-expressing Robo1 enhanced cell proliferation. We also investigated the effects of altering Slit/Robo1 expression on Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and Pax7 expression in the developing neural tube. We demonstrated that over-expressing Robo1 down-regulated Shh expression in the ventral neural tube and resulted in the production of fewer HNK-1{sup +} migrating neural crest cells (NCCs). In addition, Robo1 over-expression enhanced Pax7 expression in the dorsal neural tube and increased the number of Slug{sup +} pre-migratory NCCs. Conversely, silencing Robo1 expression resulted in an enhanced Shh expression and more HNK-1{sup +} migrating NCCs but reduced Pax7 expression and fewer Slug{sup +} pre-migratory NCCs were observed. In conclusion, we propose that Slit/Robo1 signaling is involved in regulating neural tube

  20. Slit/Robo1 signaling regulates neural tube development by balancing neuroepithelial cell proliferation and differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formation of the neural tube is the morphological hallmark for development of the embryonic central nervous system (CNS). Therefore, neural tube development is a crucial step in the neurulation process. Slit/Robo signaling was initially identified as a chemo-repellent that regulated axon growth cone elongation, but its role in controlling neural tube development is currently unknown. To address this issue, we investigated Slit/Robo1 signaling in the development of chick neCollege of Life Sciences Biocentre, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, UKural tube and transgenic mice over-expressing Slit2. We disrupted Slit/Robo1 signaling by injecting R5 monoclonal antibodies into HH10 neural tubes to block the Robo1 receptor. This inhibited the normal development of the ventral body curvature and caused the spinal cord to curl up into a S-shape. Next, Slit/Robo1 signaling on one half-side of the chick embryo neural tube was disturbed by electroporation in ovo. We found that the morphology of the neural tube was dramatically abnormal after we interfered with Slit/Robo1 signaling. Furthermore, we established that silencing Robo1 inhibited cell proliferation while over-expressing Robo1 enhanced cell proliferation. We also investigated the effects of altering Slit/Robo1 expression on Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and Pax7 expression in the developing neural tube. We demonstrated that over-expressing Robo1 down-regulated Shh expression in the ventral neural tube and resulted in the production of fewer HNK-1+ migrating neural crest cells (NCCs). In addition, Robo1 over-expression enhanced Pax7 expression in the dorsal neural tube and increased the number of Slug+ pre-migratory NCCs. Conversely, silencing Robo1 expression resulted in an enhanced Shh expression and more HNK-1+ migrating NCCs but reduced Pax7 expression and fewer Slug+ pre-migratory NCCs were observed. In conclusion, we propose that Slit/Robo1 signaling is involved in regulating neural tube development by tightly

  1. "A taste for the beautiful": latent aesthetic mate preferences for white crests in two species of Australian grassfinches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, N T; Symanski, R

    1998-12-01

    Darwin first hypothesized that bright colors and elaborate ornamentation of male animals evolved in response to the "aesthetic" mate preferences of females. By this reasoning, potentially costly male secondary sexual traits may evolve not in response to selection for demonstration of vigor but, rather, in response to latent, nonfunctional preferences by females. Recent comparative evidence for this phenomenon is equivocal. Here we present experimental evidence that two avian species from a lineage devoid of crested species have mate preferences for opposite sex conspecifics wearing artificial white crests. Other colors of crests that have been studied are not preferred. Preferences for white crests did not diminish over the longest experimental interval (12 wk). These results are additional powerful evidence for highly structured aesthetic mate preferences in estrildine finches. Sex differences in the expression of preferences, and the widespread occurrence of facial ornamentation in birds, suggest that the preference "structure" is influenced by the central nervous system. We hypothesize that aesthetic preferences are a potent force in the early evolution of sexually selected traits, and that "indicator" traits evolve secondarily from traits initially favored by aesthetic preferences. PMID:18811428

  2. Crest Level Optimization of the Multi Level Overtopping based Wave Energy Converter Seawave Slot-Cone Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Osaland, E.

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes the optimization of the crest levels and geometrical layout of the SSG structure, focusing on maximizing the obtained potential energy in the overtopping water. During wave tank testing at AAU average overtopping rates into the individual reservoirs have been measured. The...

  3. Single-blinded prospective randomized study comparing open versus needle technique for obtaining autologous cancellous bone from the iliac crest.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, R.H.M.A.

    2005-01-01

    One of the most frequent complications of cervical anterior discectomy with fusion is pain at the donor site, usually the iliac crest. Despite the advent of new materials, autologous bone is still the "gold standard" for fusion procedures. A prospective, single blinded, randomized study was performe

  4. Cryptic crested newt diversity at the Eurasian transition: the mitochondrial DNA phylogeography of Near Eastern Triturus newts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielstra, B; Themudo, G Espregueira; Güçlü, O; Olgun, K; Poyarkov, N A; Arntzen, J W

    2010-09-01

    Crested newts of the Triturus karelinii group occur in a phylogeographically understudied region: the Near East. Controversy surrounds the systematic position of these newts within the complete crested newt assemblage (the Triturus cristatus superspecies). We explore the situation using mitochondrial sequence data (ND2 and ND4, approximately 1.7kb) and employing different methods of phylogenetic inference (Bayesian inference and Maximum Likelihood using mixed models) and molecular dating (r8s and BEAST). The T. karelinii group is monophyletic and constitutes one of four main lineages in the T. cristatus superspecies. The separation of the T. karelinii group from the remaining crested newts around 9Ma is related to the formation of the Mid-Aegean Trench, which separated the Balkan and Anatolian landmasses. The T. karelinii group comprises three geographically structured clades (eastern, central and western). The genetic divergence shown by these clades is comparable to that among recognized crested newt species. We suggest the uplift of the Armenian Plateau to be responsible for the separation of the eastern clade around 7Ma, and the re-establishment of a marine connection between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean at the end of the Messinian Salinity Crisis to have caused the split between the central and western clade around 5.5Ma. Genetic structuring within the three clades dates to the Quaternary Ice Age (<2.59Ma) and is associated with alternating periods of isolation and reconnection caused by periodic changes in sea level and surface runoff. PMID:20435147

  5. MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES TO MINIMIZE DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS AND OTHER FISH-EATING BIRDS AT AQUACULTURE FACILITIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methods used to minimize double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) and other fish-eating birds at aquaculture facilities have limited success because birds acclimate or adjust to the technique. During 2000-2001, a technique using twine strung at 30 m intervals across 8 catfish ponds was test...

  6. Generation of Branch Coverage Test Data for Simulink/Stateflow Models Using Crest Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangharatna Godboley

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Automated test suite generation is an optimization technique to reduce test effort and duration. Software Testing has traditionally been one of the main techniques contributing to high software quality and dependability. Testing performance consumes about 50% of software development resources, so any methods aiming at reducing software- testing costs are likely to reduce software development costs. So an automated generation of test cases is highly required. Modelling technology has been introduced into the software testing field. Even though how to perform the testing is difficult task, in this approach we are testing using simulation modelling and by using testing methods we are generating MC/DC test cases. In our approach, the first system is modelled in MATLAB using Simulink/Stateflow tool. After that we are generating code from the Simulink/Stateflow models. We use that code to generate the test data using Concolic tester CREST Tool. Concolic testing is used in avionics systems in an efficient way.

  7. Head Discharge Relationship of Thin Plated Rectangular Lab Fabricated Sharp Crested Weirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Tekade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Measuring open channel flows has been a major challenge at the field level. Because of the fact that the measuring devices are to be made from procedures and materials prescribed in standard codes. Weirs over a period of time had been used to measure discharges in open channel systems. But non-availability of standard material at village level proves to be a major bottleneck in implementing weirs as field measurement devices. The present experimental study is an attempt to prove the good hydraulic performance of weirs made of locally available metal sheets. That use of complicated material and machining is not necessary in the fabrication of rectangular weir. A discharge formula for the rectangular weir of different sizes is extensively studied. From the experimental study it is concluded that the Cd value for each weir is nearly same. Also material and slight variation in thickness has no effect on the Cd value in case of rectangular sharp crested weir.

  8. Solar cycle variation of the total electron content around equatorial anomaly crest region in east asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yinn-Nien; Cheng, Kang

    1995-10-01

    The monthly mean hourly values of total electron content data obtained at Lunping Observatory (geographic coordinates 25.00°N, 121.17°E; geomagnetic coordinates 14.3°N, 191.3°E) by using the ETS2 satellite beacon signal during the period from March 1977 to December 1990 have been used to analyze the solar cycle variations of total electron content (TEC) around equatorial anomaly crest region in East Asia. Positive, correlations were found between the 12 month running average of monthly mean TECs and sunspot numbers. By using the linear regression analysis method, the contour charts for real diurnal and seasonal variations of TEC at certain sunspot numbers were constructed and described. The diurnal variation of TEC was represented by the sum of its diurnal mean and first three harmonic components. The solar cycle variations of these components have also been discussed.

  9. Coastal defence through low crested breakwater structures: jumping out of the frying pan into the fire?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munari, Cristina; Corbau, Corinne; Simeoni, Umberto; Mistri, Michele

    2011-08-01

    The Adriatic coast of Punta Marina (Ravenna) is protected by 3-km long low crested breakwater structures (LCSs). Through a 3-years long multidisciplinar study, we assessed the impact of such defensive structures on environmental and biological condition. LCSs create pools where conditions are very different from the surrounding nearshore system. Mechanical disturbance by currents and waves varied greatly in intensity and frequency between seaward and landward sides of the structures. Sedimentary budget was positive at the landward side, but it was due to a gain on the seafloor and not on the emerged beach. The budget at seaward was negative. LCSs determine differences in benthic assemblages, alter the seasonal pattern of communities, and modify seasonal fluctuations of animal assemblages. Landward sheltered areas can be seen as "lagoonal island" surrounded by a "sea of marine habitat". Differences in ecological quality status, obtained through M-AMBI, are due to the sum of these factors. PMID:21722927

  10. Crest Factor Reduction in MC-CDMA Employing Carrier Interferometry Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Balasubramaniam

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses signal compactness issues in MC-CDMA employing carrier interferometry codes using the measure of crest factor (CF. Carrier interferometry codes, applied to N -carrier MC-CDMA systems, enable 2N users to simultaneously share the system bandwidth with minimal degradation in performance (relative to the N -orthogonal-user case. First, for a fully loaded ( K=N and K=2N users MC-CDMA system with practical values of N , it is shown that the CF in downlink transmission demonstrates desirable properties of low mean and low variance. The downlink CF degrades when the number of users in the system decreases. Next, the high CF observed in the uplink is characterized and the poor CF in a partially loaded downlink as well as uplink is effectively combated using Schroeder's analytical CF reduction techniques.

  11. Neural Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — As part of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and The Institute for System Research, the Neural Systems Laboratory studies the functionality of the...

  12. A neural flow estimator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger; Bogason, Gudmundur; Bruun, Erik

    1995-01-01

    This paper proposes a new way to estimate the flow in a micromechanical flow channel. A neural network is used to estimate the delay of random temperature fluctuations induced in a fluid. The design and implementation of a hardware efficient neural flow estimator is described. The system is...... implemented using switched-current technique and is capable of estimating flow in the μl/s range. The neural estimator is built around a multiplierless neural network, containing 96 synaptic weights which are updated using the LMS1-algorithm. An experimental chip has been designed that operates at 5 V with a...

  13. Root Mean Square Acceleration (RMS, Crest Factor and Hand- Arm Vibration Dose Value In Tiller Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PARVIN NASSIRI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess exposure to hand-arm vibration in tiller users, Forty users of tiller in northeastern provinces of Iran were examined to measure hand-arm vibration parameters such as root mean square acceleration (RMS, total equivalent acceleration, Vibration Dose Value (VDV and crest factor in three directions (x, y, and z and various operating modes for comparing them with the relevant permitted standard levels. The hand-arm vibration measurement was done according to the standards ISO 5349-1 and ISO 5349-2. The obtained results indicated that the exposure level in three modes of rota-tilling, transportation and idling were equal to 16.95, 14.16 and 8.65 m/s2, respectively. In all measurement modes, the exposure to vibration in the direction x was greater than that of y and z. Moreover, the average crest factor was calculated less than six. The highest vibration dose values were measured in rota-tilling mode when the tiller was in 2nd  gear (60.76 m/s1.75 and 1st gear (56.83 m/s1.75. The results indicated that the permitted working time was only few seconds and there was a risk of musculoskeletal disorders. The present study emphasizes on the need for interventional and control managerial measures to eliminate or reduce hand-arm vibration transmitted to the tiller users' hands for avoiding major problems such as musculoskeletal disorders, discomfort and  premature fatigue. In this regard, further studies are required to identify vibration sources in different types of tillers.

  14. Comparison of fracture site callus with iliac crest bone marrow as the source of plastic-adherent cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmad Zaki

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Red marrow has been described as the main source of mesenchymal stem cells although its aspiration and isolation from bone marrow was reported to have significant donor site morbidity. Since secondary bone healing occurs through formation of callus as the result of proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, callus may become alternative source for mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, we compared the number of plastic-adherent cells from fracture site callus and bone marrow of iliac crest after two and four weeks of culture.Methods: Sixteen New Zealand rabbits were fracturized at the femoral shaft. Then, these rabbits were taken care. After two weeks of fracturization, 3 mL iliac crest bone marrow aspiration and callus extraction of eight rabbits were cultured (group I. The other eight rabbits were treated equally after four weeks of fracturization (group II. Simultaneously, the cultures were observed after one and two weeks. Four weeks later, they were harvested. Cells were counted using Neubauer hemocytometer. The average number of cells between the sources and groups were statistically analyzed using the unpaired t-test. Results: In group I, there were 2.6 ± 0.1 x 104 cells in the culture of iliac crest bone marrow aspirate and 2.5 ± 0.1 x 104 cells in culture of callus extract from fracture site (p = 0.34. In group II, there were 2.7 ± 0.1 x 104 cells and 2.1 ± 0.1 x 104 cells, respectively (p < 0.001.Conclusion: Fracture site callus at the second week post-fracturization may be potential as source of plastic-adherent cells compared with iliac crest bone marrow. (Med J Indones. 2013;22:70-5Keywords: Bone marrow, fracture site callus, iliac crest, long bone, mesenchymal stem cell, plastic-adherent cells

  15. New technique for feline carbon dioxide laser onychectomy by resection of the redundant epidermis of the ungual crest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, William P.

    2000-05-01

    A new technique for feline carbon dioxide laser onychectomy can further minimize postoperative pain and complications in any age animal. This procedure is accomplished by resection of the redundant epidermis over the ungual crest. Resection of the redundant epidermis allows complete dissection and removal of the claw from a strictly cranio-dorsal approach, thereby minimizing trauma to the surrounding tissues and post- operative complications. The laser setting is preferred at four to six watts continuous power. The epidermis of the ungual crest is resected in a circumferential manner at its most distal edge. This tissue is pushed proximally over the ungual crest. A second circumferential incision is made 3 mm proximal to the first incision. Deeper subcutaneous fascia is also pushed proximally over the ungual crest. An incision of the extensor tendon is made at its insertion on the ungual crest keeping the redundant epidermis proximal to this incision. The incision through the extensor tendon is continued deeper to the synovium of PII and PIII. Gentle traction in a palmar direction will disarticulate the joint space between PII and PIII. Incisions into the lateral and medial collateral ligaments from a cranio-dorsal origin in palmar direction further disarticulate the joint. Care must be exercised to preserve all epidermal tissue lying immediately adjacent to the collateral ligaments. Continual palmar traction will expose the base of PIII and the insertion of the flexor tendon. A dorsal incision is made into the flexor tendon in a palmar direction. Extreme palmar rotation of PIII will allow the dissection of the subcutaneous tissue of the pad from PIII. The redundant epidermal tissue will now cover the majority of the onychectomy site. No sutures or tissue adhesive are advised.

  16. Neural Networks: Implementations and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Vonk, E.; Veelenturf, L.P.J.; Jain, L.C.

    1996-01-01

    Artificial neural networks, also called neural networks, have been used successfully in many fields including engineering, science and business. This paper presents the implementation of several neural network simulators and their applications in character recognition and other engineering areas

  17. Critical Branching Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kello, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    It is now well-established that intrinsic variations in human neural and behavioral activity tend to exhibit scaling laws in their fluctuations and distributions. The meaning of these scaling laws is an ongoing matter of debate between isolable causes versus pervasive causes. A spiking neural network model is presented that self-tunes to critical…

  18. Vocal behavior of Crested Guineafowl (Guttera edouardi) based on visual and sound playback surveys in the Umhlanga Lagoon Nature Reserve, KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Johann H.van Niekerk

    2015-01-01

    Background:General y speaking, playbacks were often ineffective to determine the group sizes of birds since mainly males from leks responded. This limitation has not been tested properly for flocking birds such as Crested Guineafowl (Guttera edouardi) with the view to use it as a counting method. The aims of the study reported in this paper were (1) to describe the cal s of Crested Guineafowl in a social context;(2) to interpret cal s in an evolutionary context;and (3) to demonstrate that playbacks can be used to locate and count Crested Guineafowl in smal isolated forests. Methods:The vocal behavior of Crested Guineafowl was observed during a survey conducted in the Umhlanga Lagoon Nature Reserve (KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa) from November 2010 to June 2012. Transect line observations and sound playback methods were used. Results:The behavioral context and structure of cal s were described. The eight cal s described for Crested Guineafowl were produced mainly to unite flock members in the dense understory, where visibility was poor, and to repel intruders. When not disturbed, Crested Guineafowl were quiet and only made soft contact calls. Conclusions:The high rate of call back and the fact that flocks invariably approach the source of the call en masse, shows that field researchers are able to assess the population size of Crested Guineafowl with sound playbacks along a transect. The value of playbacks as a conservation tool is assessed.

  19. Differentiation of Equine Mesenchymal Stromal Cells into Cells of Neural Lineage: Potential for Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Cruz Villagrán

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are able to differentiate into extramesodermal lineages, including neurons. Positive outcomes were obtained after transplantation of neurally induced MSCs in laboratory animals after nerve injury, but this is unknown in horses. Our objectives were to test the ability of equine MSCs to differentiate into cells of neural lineage in vitro, to assess differences in morphology and lineage-specific protein expression, and to investigate if horse age and cell passage number affected the ability to achieve differentiation. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were obtained from young and adult horses. Following demonstration of stemness, MSCs were neurally induced and microscopically assessed at different time points. Results showed that commercially available nitrogen-coated tissue culture plates supported proliferation and differentiation. Morphological changes were immediate and all the cells displayed a neural crest-like cell phenotype. Expression of neural progenitor proteins, was assessed via western blot or immunofluorescence. In our study, MSCs generated from young and middle-aged horses did not show differences in their ability to undergo differentiation. The effect of cell passage number, however, is inconsistent and further experiments are needed. Ongoing work is aimed at transdifferentiating these cells into Schwann cells for transplantation into a peripheral nerve injury model in horses.

  20. Is neural Darwinism Darwinism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Belle, T

    1997-01-01

    Neural Darwinism is a theory of cognition developed by Gerald Edelman along with George Reeke and Olaf Sporns at Rockefeller University. As its name suggests, neural Darwinism is modeled after biological Darwinism, and its authors assert that the two processes are strongly analogous. both operate on variation in a population, amplifying the more adaptive individuals. However, from a computational perspective, neural Darwinism is quite different from other models of natural selection, such as genetic algorithms. The individuals of neural Darwinism do not replicate, thus robbing the process of the capacity to explore new solutions over time and ultimately reducing it to a random search. Because neural Darwinism does not have the computational power of a truly Darwinian process, it is misleading to label it as such. to illustrate this disparity in adaptive power, one of Edelman's early computer experiments, Darwin I, is revisited, and it is shown that adding replication greatly improves the adaptive power of the system. PMID:9090158

  1. Consciousness and neural plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    consciousness is related to neural processes it seems, at least prima facie, that the ability of the neural structures to change should be reflected in a theory of this relationship "Neural plasticity" refers to the fact that the brain can change due to its own activity. The brain is not static but rather a...... relation between consciousness and brain functions. If consciousness is connected to specific brain structures (as a function or in identity) what happens to consciousness when those specific underlying structures change? It is therefore possible that the understanding and theories of neural plasticity can......, something that is stable over time. Considering neural plasticity, this is not necessarily so. The NCC might change and hence literally change the way a person is conscious. What it is about the NCC that can and might change is, even though it can be relevant for the relation between the brain and...

  2. Dynamics of neural cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchronization of neural networks has been used for public channel protocols in cryptography. In the case of tree parity machines the dynamics of both bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning is driven by attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. Thus it can be described well by a random walk model for the overlap between participating neural networks. For that purpose transition probabilities and scaling laws for the step sizes are derived analytically. Both these calculations as well as numerical simulations show that bidirectional interaction leads to full synchronization on average. In contrast, successful learning is only possible by means of fluctuations. Consequently, synchronization is much faster than learning, which is essential for the security of the neural key-exchange protocol. However, this qualitative difference between bidirectional and unidirectional interaction vanishes if tree parity machines with more than three hidden units are used, so that those neural networks are not suitable for neural cryptography. In addition, the effective number of keys which can be generated by the neural key-exchange protocol is calculated using the entropy of the weight distribution. As this quantity increases exponentially with the system size, brute-force attacks on neural cryptography can easily be made unfeasible

  3. ANT Advanced Neural Tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a practical introduction to the use of Artificial Neural Networks. Artificial Neural Nets are often used as an alternative to the traditional symbolic manipulation and first order logic used in Artificial Intelligence, due the high degree of difficulty to solve problems that can not be handled by programmers using algorithmic strategies. As a particular case of Neural Net a Multilayer Perception developed by programming in C language on OS9 real time operating system is presented. A detailed description about the program structure and practical use are included. Finally, several application examples that have been treated with the tool are presented, and some suggestions about hardware implementations. (Author) 15 refs

  4. ANT Advanced Neural Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labrador, I.; Carrasco, R.; Martinez, L.

    1996-07-01

    This paper describes a practical introduction to the use of Artificial Neural Networks. Artificial Neural Nets are often used as an alternative to the traditional symbolic manipulation and first order logic used in Artificial Intelligence, due the high degree of difficulty to solve problems that can not be handled by programmers using algorithmic strategies. As a particular case of Neural Net a Multilayer Perception developed by programming in C language on OS9 real time operating system is presented. A detailed description about the program structure and practical use are included. Finally, several application examples that have been treated with the tool are presented, and some suggestions about hardware implementations. (Author) 15 refs.

  5. AUV fuzzy neural BDI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The typical BDI (belief desire intention) model of agent is not efficiently computable and the strict logic expression is not easily applicable to the AUV (autonomous underwater vehicle) domain with uncertainties. In this paper, an AUV fuzzy neural BDI model is proposed. The model is a fuzzy neural network composed of five layers: input ( beliefs and desires) , fuzzification, commitment, fuzzy intention, and defuzzification layer. In the model, the fuzzy commitment rules and neural network are combined to form intentions from beliefs and desires. The model is demonstrated by solving PEG (pursuit-evasion game), and the simulation result is satisfactory.

  6. Ticks on crested francolins, Francolinus sephaena, and on the vegetation on a farm in Limpopo Province, South Africa : research communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Uys

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Ticks were collected at approximately bi-monthly intervals between June 1996 and June 1997 from crested francolins, Francolinus sephaena, and from the vegetation on a mixed cattle and wildlife farm in Limpopo Province, South Africa. The birds were infested with the immature stages of 13 tick species, of which Amblyomma hebraeum, Amblyomma marmoreum and Hyalomma marginatumrufipes were the most numerous and prevalent. Ten ixodid tick species were collected from the vegetation, of which the immature stages of Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus decoloratus and Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi were the most numerous. No adult ticks were collected from the birds and only two from the vegetation. The restricted home range of crested francolins implies that they could serve as a source of tick infestation only for other animals within the same habitat as the birds.

  7. Association of Total Electron Content (TEC and foF2 variations with earthquake events at the anomaly crest region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Depueva

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper attempts to identify ionospheric parameters in association with earthquake at anomaly crest station through VHF Radio Beacon data and ground based ionosonde measurements while the Total Electron Content(TEC parameters from RB observations are based mainly on data taken over Guwahati (26.2°N, 91.75° E, foF2 data used in the analysis were collected at Ahmadabad (23.01°N, 72.36°E. The paper describes methods and techniques adopted to examine modifications on these parameters if any, due to earthquake preparatory processes at equatorial anomaly crest stations. The mechanism of inducement of density changes in the ionosphere is sought through the generation of strong fountain effect possibly by the development of electric field during the earthquake preparatory process.

  8. Levee crest elevation profiles derived from airborne lidar-based high resolution digital elevation models in south Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaseanu-Lovejoy, Monica; Thatcher, Cindy A.; Barras, John A.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the feasibility of using airborne lidar surveys to derive high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) and develop an automated procedure to extract levee longitudinal elevation profiles for both federal levees in Atchafalaya Basin and local levees in Lafourche Parish. Generally, the use of traditional manual surveying methods to map levees is a costly and time consuming process that typically produces cross-levee profiles every few hundred meters, at best. The purpose of our paper is to describe and test methods for extracting levee crest elevations in an efficient, comprehensive manner using high resolution lidar generated DEMs. In addition, the vertical uncertainty in the elevation data and its effect on the resultant estimate of levee crest heights is addressed in an assessment of whether the federal levees in our study meet the USACE minimum height design criteria.

  9. A comparative analysis of double-crested cormorant diets from stomachs and pellets from two Lake Ontario colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James H.; Ross, Robert M.; McCullough, Russell D.; Mathers, Alastair

    2010-01-01

    Double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) diets were compared with evidence from the stomachs of shot birds and from regurgitated pellets at High Bluff Island and Little Galloo Island, Lake Ontario. The highest similarity in diets determined by stomach and pellet analyses occurred when both samples were collected on the same day. Diet overlap dropped substantially between the two methods when collection periods were seven to ten days apart, which suggested differences in prey availability between the two periods. Since the average number of fish recovered in pellets was significantly higher than that in stomachs, use of pellets to determine fish consumption of double-crested cormorants may be more valid than stomach analysis because pellet content represent an integrated sampling of food consumed over approximately 24 hours.

  10. Convolutional Neural Network Based Fault Detection for Rotating Machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Olivier; Slavkovikj, Viktor; Vervisch, Bram; Stockman, Kurt; Loccufier, Mia; Verstockt, Steven; Van de Walle, Rik; Van Hoecke, Sofie

    2016-09-01

    Vibration analysis is a well-established technique for condition monitoring of rotating machines as the vibration patterns differ depending on the fault or machine condition. Currently, mainly manually-engineered features, such as the ball pass frequencies of the raceway, RMS, kurtosis an crest, are used for automatic fault detection. Unfortunately, engineering and interpreting such features requires a significant level of human expertise. To enable non-experts in vibration analysis to perform condition monitoring, the overhead of feature engineering for specific faults needs to be reduced as much as possible. Therefore, in this article we propose a feature learning model for condition monitoring based on convolutional neural networks. The goal of this approach is to autonomously learn useful features for bearing fault detection from the data itself. Several types of bearing faults such as outer-raceway faults and lubrication degradation are considered, but also healthy bearings and rotor imbalance are included. For each condition, several bearings are tested to ensure generalization of the fault-detection system. Furthermore, the feature-learning based approach is compared to a feature-engineering based approach using the same data to objectively quantify their performance. The results indicate that the feature-learning system, based on convolutional neural networks, significantly outperforms the classical feature-engineering based approach which uses manually engineered features and a random forest classifier. The former achieves an accuracy of 93.61 percent and the latter an accuracy of 87.25 percent.

  11. An Assessment of Breeding Great Blue Herons and the Impact of Double-Crested Cormorants in the Shad Island Rookery, Swanton Vermont 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Concern about the effects of invading Double-crested Cormorants on Lake Champlain has prompted investigations in the Great Blue Heron rookery on Shad Island,...

  12. Development and Pilot Evaluation of Native CREST – a Cancer Research Experience and Student Training Program for Navajo Undergraduate Students

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Christine A; Bauer, Mark C.; Horazdovsky, Bruce F.; Garrison, Edward R.; Patten, Christi A.; Petersen, Wesley O.; Bowman, Clarissa N.; Vierkant, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center and Diné College received funding for a 4-year collaborative P20 planning grant from the National Cancer Institute in 2006. The goal of the partnership was to increase Navajo undergraduates’ interest in and commitment to biomedical coursework and careers, especially in cancer research. This paper describes the development, pilot testing and evaluation of Native CREST (Cancer Research Experience & Student Training), a 10-week cancer research training program provi...

  13. Unilateral evisceration of an eye following cornea and lens perforation in a sulfur-crested cockatoo (Cacatua galerita)

    OpenAIRE

    CHRISTEN, C.; Richter, M.; Fischer, I.; Eule, C; Spiess, B M; Hatt, J M

    2006-01-01

    A 24-year old male sulfur-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua galerita) was presented with a subacute perforation of the cornea without involvement of the lens.The bird was treated conservatively and the eye remained quiescent up to a second traumatic corneal perforation associated with a lens capsule rupture 15 months later. Due to the second perforating trauma of an already blind eye involving the lens, evisceration of the eye was performed. Two months after surgery the cosmetic result was excellent....

  14. The Numerical Solution of Nekrasov's Equation in the Boundary Layer near the Crest, for Waves near the Maximum Height

    OpenAIRE

    Byatt-Smith, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Nekrasov's integral equation describing water waves of permanent form, determines the angle phi that the wave surface makes with the horizontal. The independent variable s is a suitably scaled velocity potential, evaluated at the free surface, with the origin corresponding to the crest of the wave. For all waves, except for amplitudes near the maximum, phi satisfies the inequality mod(phi) is less than pi/6. It has been shown numerically and analytically, that as the wave amplitude approaches...

  15. Molecular detection of bacteria in the families Rickettsiaceae and Anaplasmataceae in northern crested caracaras (Caracara cheriway).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, John A; Fitak, Robert R; Dwyer, James F; Morrison, Joan L; Culver, Melanie

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial pathogens of the families Anaplasmataceae and Rickettsiaceae are often spread to humans or other animals from bites from infected arthropod hosts. Recently, an increasing number of studies have implicated migratory birds in the circulation of these pathogens through the spread of arthropod vectors. However, few studies have examined the potential for resident bird populations to serve as reservoirs for these zoonoses. In this study, we used nested PCRs of the GroESL and 17kDa genes to screen for Anaplasmataceae and Rickettsiaceae, respectively, in a resident population of the northern crested caracara (Caracara cheriway) from Florida (n=55). Additionally, a small number (n=6) of captive individuals from Texas were included. We identified one individual (1.64%) positive for Rickettsia felis and one (1.64%) positive for Ehrlichia chaffeensis; both these individuals were from Florida. Presence of these pathogens demonstrates that these birds are potential hosts; however, the low prevalence of infections suggests that these populations likely do not function as an ecological reservoir. PMID:26837860

  16. Multi-frequency simultaneous measurement of bioimpedance spectroscopy based on a low crest factor multisine excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) is becoming a powerful diagnostic tool for a wide variety of medical applications, and the multi-frequency simultaneous (MFS) measurement of BIS can greatly reduce measurement time and record the transient physiological status of a living body compared with traditional frequency-sweep measurement technology. This paper adopts the Van der Ouderaa’s multisine, which has 31 equidistant and flat amplitude spectra and a low crest factor of 1.405 as the broadband excitation, and realizes the MFS measurement of BIS by means of spectral analysis using the fast Fourier transform algorithm. The approach to implement the multisine based on a field-programmable gate array and a digital to analog converter is described in detail, and impedance measurement experiments are performed on three resistance-capitance three-element phantoms. Experimental results show a commendable accuracy with a mean relative error of 0.55% for the impedance amplitudes, and a mean absolute error of 0.20° for the impedance phases on the 31 frequencies ranging linearly from 32 to 992 kHz. This paper validates the feasibility of the MFS technology for BIS measurement based on the multisine excitation. (paper)

  17. Multi-frequency simultaneous measurement of bioimpedance spectroscopy based on a low crest factor multisine excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuxiang; Zhang, Fu; Tao, Kun; Wang, Lianhuan; Wen, He; Teng, Zhaosheng

    2015-03-01

    Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) is becoming a powerful diagnostic tool for a wide variety of medical applications, and the multi-frequency simultaneous (MFS) measurement of BIS can greatly reduce measurement time and record the transient physiological status of a living body compared with traditional frequency-sweep measurement technology. This paper adopts the Van der Ouderaa's multisine, which has 31 equidistant and flat amplitude spectra and a low crest factor of 1.405 as the broadband excitation, and realizes the MFS measurement of BIS by means of spectral analysis using the fast Fourier transform algorithm. The approach to implement the multisine based on a field-programmable gate array and a digital to analog converter is described in detail, and impedance measurement experiments are performed on three resistance-capitance three-element phantoms. Experimental results show a commendable accuracy with a mean relative error of 0.55% for the impedance amplitudes, and a mean absolute error of 0.20° for the impedance phases on the 31 frequencies ranging linearly from 32 to 992 kHz. This paper validates the feasibility of the MFS technology for BIS measurement based on the multisine excitation. PMID:25679488

  18. Molecular detection of bacteria in the families Rickettsiaceae and Anaplasmataceae in northern crested caracaras (Caracara cheriway)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, John A.; Fitak, Robert R.; Dwyer, James F.; Morrison, Joan L.; Culver, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens of the families Anaplasmataceae and Rickettsiaceae are often spread to humans or other animals from bites from infected arthropod hosts. Recently, an increasing number of studies have implicated migratory birds in the circulation of these pathogens through the spread of arthropod vectors. However, few studies have examined the potential for resident bird populations to serve as reservoirs for these zoonoses. In this study, we used nested PCRs of the GroESL and 17 kDa genes to screen for Anaplasmataceae and Rickettsiaceae, respectively, in a resident population of the northern crested caracara (Caracara cheriway) from Florida (n = 55). Additionally, a small number (n = 6) of captive individuals from Texas were included. We identified one individual (1.64%) positive for Rickettsia felis and one (1.64%) positive for Ehrlichia chaffeensis; both these individuals were from Florida. Presence of these pathogens demonstrates that these birds are potential hosts; however, the low prevalence of infections suggests that these populations likely do not function as an ecological reservoir.

  19. CREST : a computer program for the calculation of composition dependent self-shielded cross-sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer program CREST for the calculation of the composition and temperature dependent self-shielded cross-sections using the shielding factor approach has been described. The code includes the editing and formation of the data library, calculation of the effective shielding factors and cross-sections, a fundamental mode calculation to generate the neutron spectrum for the system which is further used to calculate the effective elastic removal cross-sections. Studies to explore the sensitivity of reactor parameters to changes in group cross-sections can also be carried out by using the facility available in the code to temporarily change the desired constants. The final self-shielded and transport corrected group cross-sections can be dumped on cards or magnetic tape in a suitable form for their direct use in a transport or diffusion theory code for detailed reactor calculations. The program is written in FORTRAN and can be accommodated in a computer with 32 K work memory. The input preparation details, sample problem and the listing of the program are given. (author)

  20. Immunohistochemical and morphological features of a small bowel leiomyoma in a black crested macaque (Macaca nigra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristizabal-Arbelaez Mónica

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous gastrointestinal neoplasms in non-human primates are commonly seen in aged individuals. Due to genetic similarities between human and non-human primates, scientists have shown increasing interest in terms of comparative oncology studies. Case presentation The present study is related to a case of an intestinal leiomyoma in a black crested macaque (Macaca nigra, kept on captivity by Matecaña Zoo, Pereira City, Colombia. The animal had abdominal distension, anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea and behavioral changes. Clinical examination showed an increased volume in the upper right abdominal quadrant caused by a neoplastic mass. The patient died during the surgical procedure. Necropsy revealed several small nodules in the peritoneum with adhesion to different portions of the small and large intestines, liver, stomach and diaphragm. Tissue samples were collected, routinely processed and stained by H&E. Microscopic examination revealed a mesenchymal tumor limited to tunica muscularis, resembling normal smooth muscle cells. Neoplastic cells were positive for alpha-smooth muscle actin and vimentin, and negative for cytokeratin AE1/AE3 by immunohistochemistry. Those morphological and immunohistochemical findings allowed to diagnose the intestinal leiomyoma referred above. Conclusion Neoplastic diseases in primates have multifaceted causes. Their manifestations are understudied, leading to a greater difficulty in detection and measurement of the real impact provides by this disease.

  1. Fast tool for evaluation of iliac crest tissue elastic properties using the reduced-basis methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taeyong; Garlapati, Revanth Reddy; Lam, Kathy; Lee, Peter Vee Sin; Chung, Yoon-Sok; Choi, Jae Bong; Vincent, Tan Beng Chye; Das De, Shamal

    2010-12-01

    Computationally expensive finite element (FE) methods are generally used for indirect evaluation of tissue mechanical properties of trabecular specimens, which is vital for fracture risk prediction in the elderly. This work presents the application of reduced-basis (RB) methods for rapid evaluation of simulation results. Three cylindrical transiliac crest specimens (diameter: 7.5 mm, length: 10-12 mm) were obtained from healthy subjects (20 year-old, 22 year-old, and 24 year-old females) and scanned using microcomputed tomography imaging. Cubic samples of dimensions 5×5×5 mm(3) were extracted from the core of the cylindrical specimens for FE analysis. Subsequently, a FE solution library (test space) was constructed for each of the specimens by varying the material property parameters: tissue elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio, to develop RB algorithms. The computational speed gain obtained by the RB methods and their accuracy relative to the FE analysis were evaluated. Speed gains greater than 4000 times, were obtained for all three specimens for a loss in accuracy of less than 1% in the maxima of von-Mises stress with respect to the FE-based value. The computational time decreased from more than 6 h to less than 18 s. RB algorithms can be successfully utilized for real-time reliable evaluation of trabecular bone elastic properties. PMID:21142323

  2. Evaluation of sloshing wave crest impact pressure acting on a fixed roof cylindrical tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the applicability of a newly developed computer code SLOSH-3D on estimating of sloshing wave crest impact pressure acting on a fixed roof of cylindrical tank. Based on the computed results, slosh-induced pressure loads and distribution on the tank roof is presented. A large shaking table test conducted on the E-Defense shaking table by a joint study group, composed of some electric companies, has been analyzed. In the shaking table test, partially water-filled cylindrical tank (diameter: 3m, height: 3m, water depth: 2.3m or 1.9m) with a flat fixed roof was subjected to a sinusoidal excitation at the first sloshing resonant frequency. The computer code well simulated the observed waveform with a spiky rising large pressure at the time of liquid impact on the tank wall, including appearance of negative pressures in the post impact period, with sufficient accuracy. As for the liquid impact zone of the tank roof including the water splash phenomena, the numerical computations indicated good agreement with the observed results. Furthermore, the numerical computations provided the total pressure load and pressure distribution on the tank wall at an instant of time when maximum pressure peak occurs. Consequently, the computer code SLOSH-3D was capable of predicting the complex nonlinear sloshing behavior with the collision of the liquid surface against the thank roof with an acceptable level of accuracy. (author)

  3. URANS simulations of ship motion responses in long-crest irregular waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈志荣; 叶海轩; 万德成

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, numerical prediction of ship motion responses in long-crest irregular waves by the URANS-VOF method is presented. A white noise spectrum is applied to generate the incoming waves to evaluate the motion responses. The procedure can replace a decade of simulations in regular wave with one single run to obtain a complete curve of linear motion response, conside-rably reducing computation time. A correction procedure is employed to adjust the wave generation signal based on the wave spe-ctrum and achieves fairly better results in the wave tank. Three ship models with five wave conditions are introduced to validate the method. The computations in this paper are completed by using the solver naoe-FOAM-SJTU, a solver developed for ship and ocean engineering based on the open source code OpenFOAM. The computational motion responses by the irregular wave procedure are compared with the results by regular wave, experiments and strip theory. Transfer functions by irregular wave closely agree with the data obtained in the regular waves, showing negligible difference. The comparison between computational results and experiments also show good agreements. The results better predicted by CFD method than strip theories indicate that this method can compensate for the inaccuracy of the strip theories. The results confirm that the irregular wave procedure is a promising method for the accurate prediction of motion responses with less accuracy loss and higher efficiency compared with the regular wave procedure.

  4. The Future of Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Lakra, Sachin; T. V. Prasad; G. Ramakrishna

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes some recent developments in neural networks and discusses the applicability of neural networks in the development of a machine that mimics the human brain. The paper mentions a new architecture, the pulsed neural network that is being considered as the next generation of neural networks. The paper also explores the use of memristors in the development of a brain-like computer called the MoNETA. A new model, multi/infinite dimensional neural networks, are a recent developme...

  5. Neural networks for aircraft control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linse, Dennis

    1990-01-01

    Current research in Artificial Neural Networks indicates that networks offer some potential advantages in adaptation and fault tolerance. This research is directed at determining the possible applicability of neural networks to aircraft control. The first application will be to aircraft trim. Neural network node characteristics, network topology and operation, neural network learning and example histories using neighboring optimal control with a neural net are discussed.

  6. Neural Networks in Data Mining

    OpenAIRE

    Priyanka Gaur

    2012-01-01

    The application of neural networks in the data mining is very wide. Although neural networks may have complex structure, long training time, and uneasily understandable representation of results, neural networks have high acceptance ability for noisy data and high accuracy and are preferable in data mining. In this paper the data mining based on neural networks is researched in detail, and the key technology and ways to achieve the data mining based on neural networks are also researched.

  7. Neural networks and graph theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许进; 保铮

    2002-01-01

    The relationships between artificial neural networks and graph theory are considered in detail. The applications of artificial neural networks to many difficult problems of graph theory, especially NP-complete problems, and the applications of graph theory to artificial neural networks are discussed. For example graph theory is used to study the pattern classification problem on the discrete type feedforward neural networks, and the stability analysis of feedback artificial neural networks etc.

  8. Neural Oscillators Programming Simplified

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick McDowell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurological mechanism used for generating rhythmic patterns for functions such as swallowing, walking, and chewing has been modeled computationally by the neural oscillator. It has been widely studied by biologists to model various aspects of organisms and by computer scientists and robotics engineers as a method for controlling and coordinating the gaits of walking robots. Although there has been significant study in this area, it is difficult to find basic guidelines for programming neural oscillators. In this paper, the authors approach neural oscillators from a programmer’s point of view, providing background and examples for developing neural oscillators to generate rhythmic patterns that can be used in biological modeling and robotics applications.

  9. Geometric neural computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayro-Corrochano, E J

    2001-01-01

    This paper shows the analysis and design of feedforward neural networks using the coordinate-free system of Clifford or geometric algebra. It is shown that real-, complex-, and quaternion-valued neural networks are simply particular cases of the geometric algebra multidimensional neural networks and that some of them can also be generated using support multivector machines (SMVMs). Particularly, the generation of radial basis function for neurocomputing in geometric algebra is easier using the SMVM, which allows one to find automatically the optimal parameters. The use of support vector machines in the geometric algebra framework expands its sphere of applicability for multidimensional learning. Interesting examples of nonlinear problems show the effect of the use of an adequate Clifford geometric algebra which alleviate the training of neural networks and that of SMVMs. PMID:18249926

  10. Hidden neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Anders Stærmose; Riis, Søren Kamaric

    1999-01-01

    A general framework for hybrids of hidden Markov models (HMMs) and neural networks (NNs) called hidden neural networks (HNNs) is described. The article begins by reviewing standard HMMs and estimation by conditional maximum likelihood, which is used by the HNN. In the HNN, the usual HMM probability...... parameters are replaced by the outputs of state-specific neural networks. As opposed to many other hybrids, the HNN is normalized globally and therefore has a valid probabilistic interpretation. All parameters in the HNN are estimated simultaneously according to the discriminative conditional maximum...... likelihood criterion. The HNN can be viewed as an undirected probabilistic independence network (a graphical model), where the neural networks provide a compact representation of the clique functions. An evaluation of the HNN on the task of recognizing broad phoneme classes in the TIMIT database shows clear...

  11. Bone thickness of the infrazygomatic crest area in skeletal Class III growing patients: A computed tomographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to investigate the bone thickness of the infrazygomatic crest area by computed tomography (CT) for placement of a miniplate as skeletal anchorage for maxillary protraction in skeletal Class III children. CT images of skeletal Class III children (7 boys, 9 girls, mean age: 11.4 years) were taken parallel to the Frankfurt horizontal plane. The bone thickness of the infrazygomatic crest area was measured at 35 locations on the right and left sides, perpendicular to the bone surface. The bone was thickest (5.0 mm) in the upper zygomatic bone and thinnest (1.1 mm) in the anterior wall of the maxillary sinus. Generally, there was a tendency for the bone to be thicker at the superior and lateral area of the zygomatic process of the maxilla. There was no clinically significant difference in bone thickness between the right and left sides; however, it was thicker in male than in female subjects. In the infrazygomatic crest area, the superior and lateral area of the zygomatic process of the maxilla had the most appropriate thickness for placement of a miniplate in growing skeletal Class III children with a retruded maxilla.

  12. Bone thickness of the infrazygomatic crest area in skeletal Class III growing patients: A computed tomographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyub Soo; Choi, Hang Moon; Choi, Dong Soon; Jang, Insan; Cha, Bong Kuen [College of Dentistry and Research Institute of Oral Science, Gangneung-Wonju National University, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    This study was performed to investigate the bone thickness of the infrazygomatic crest area by computed tomography (CT) for placement of a miniplate as skeletal anchorage for maxillary protraction in skeletal Class III children. CT images of skeletal Class III children (7 boys, 9 girls, mean age: 11.4 years) were taken parallel to the Frankfurt horizontal plane. The bone thickness of the infrazygomatic crest area was measured at 35 locations on the right and left sides, perpendicular to the bone surface. The bone was thickest (5.0 mm) in the upper zygomatic bone and thinnest (1.1 mm) in the anterior wall of the maxillary sinus. Generally, there was a tendency for the bone to be thicker at the superior and lateral area of the zygomatic process of the maxilla. There was no clinically significant difference in bone thickness between the right and left sides; however, it was thicker in male than in female subjects. In the infrazygomatic crest area, the superior and lateral area of the zygomatic process of the maxilla had the most appropriate thickness for placement of a miniplate in growing skeletal Class III children with a retruded maxilla.

  13. Neural cryptography with feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  14. Recurrent Neural Network Regularization

    OpenAIRE

    Zaremba, Wojciech; Sutskever, Ilya; Vinyals, Oriol

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple regularization technique for Recurrent Neural Networks (RNNs) with Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) units. Dropout, the most successful technique for regularizing neural networks, does not work well with RNNs and LSTMs. In this paper, we show how to correctly apply dropout to LSTMs, and show that it substantially reduces overfitting on a variety of tasks. These tasks include language modeling, speech recognition, image caption generation, and machine translation.

  15. Neural Turing Machines

    OpenAIRE

    Graves, Alex; Wayne, Greg; Danihelka, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    We extend the capabilities of neural networks by coupling them to external memory resources, which they can interact with by attentional processes. The combined system is analogous to a Turing Machine or Von Neumann architecture but is differentiable end-to-end, allowing it to be efficiently trained with gradient descent. Preliminary results demonstrate that Neural Turing Machines can infer simple algorithms such as copying, sorting, and associative recall from input and output examples.

  16. Neural Tube Defects

    OpenAIRE

    Greene, Nicholas D. E.; Copp, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs), including spina bifida and anencephaly, are severe birth defects of the central nervous system that originate during embryonic development when the neural tube fails to close completely. Human NTDs are multifactorial, with contributions from both genetic and environmental factors. The genetic basis is not yet well understood, but several nongenetic risk factors have been identified as have possibilities for prevention by maternal folic acid supplementation. Mechani...

  17. Neural Programmer-Interpreters

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Scott; De Freitas, Nando

    2015-01-01

    We propose the neural programmer-interpreter (NPI): a recurrent and compositional neural network that learns to represent and execute programs. NPI has three learnable components: a task-agnostic recurrent core, a persistent key-value program memory, and domain-specific encoders that enable a single NPI to operate in multiple perceptually diverse environments with distinct affordances. By learning to compose lower-level programs to express higher-level programs, NPI reduces sample complexity ...

  18. Evolution of neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Uršič, Aleš

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this work is construction of an artificial life model and simulation of organisms in an environment with food. Organisms survive if they find food successfuly. With evolution and learning organisms develop a neural network which enables that. First neural networks and their history are introduced with the basic concepts like a neuron model, a network, transfer functions, topologies and learning. I describe the backpropagation learning on multilayer feed forward network and dem...

  19. Deep Sequential Neural Network

    OpenAIRE

    Denoyer, Ludovic; Gallinari, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Neural Networks sequentially build high-level features through their successive layers. We propose here a new neural network model where each layer is associated with a set of candidate mappings. When an input is processed, at each layer, one mapping among these candidates is selected according to a sequential decision process. The resulting model is structured according to a DAG like architecture, so that a path from the root to a leaf node defines a sequence of transformations. Instead of c...

  20. Neural crack identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inverse, crack identification problem in elasticity can be formulated as an output error minimization problem which, nevertheless, can not be solved without difficulties by classical numerical optimization. A review of all these previous results, where we used neural networks, filter-driven optimization and genetic algorithms is presented and in a companion lecture during this conference. The use of neural networks for the solution of the inverse problem makes possible the on-line solution of the problem. In fact, one usually approximates the inverse mapping (measurements versus crack quantities). Most of the effort is spent for the learning of this relation, while a sufficiently trained neural network provides predictions with, practically, zero computational cost. Potential applications include on-line, in-flight health monitoring systems with applications in civil and mechanical engineering and production control. In this paper we present new developments in the design of specialized neural networks for the solution of the crack identification problem. Emphasis is posed on the effective use of the learning data, which are produced by the boundary element method. Several technical data will be discussed. They include thoughts about the effective choice of the neural network architecture, the number of training examples and of the learning algorithms will be provided, together with the results of our recent numerical investigation. A detailed application for one or more elliptical cracks using static analysis results with the use of back-propagation trained neural networks will be provided. The general methodology follows our previously published results. By using more refined algorithms for the numerical solution of the neural network learning problem, which are based on the MERLIN optimization system developed in the department of the second author, we are able to solve complicated tasks. First results based on dynamic investigations (wave propagation driven

  1. Modeling the Effects of Climate Change on Whitebark Pine Along the Pacific Crest Trail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. S.; Nguyen, A.; Gill, N.; Kannan, S.; Patadia, N.; Meyer, M.; Schmidt, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Pacific Crest Trail (PCT), one of eight National Scenic Trails, stretches 2,650 miles from Mexico to the Canadian border. At high elevations along this trail, within Inyo and Sierra National Forests, populations of whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) have been diminishing due to infestation of the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) and are threatened due to a changing climate. Understanding the current and future condition of whitebark pine is a primary goal of forest managers due to its high ecological and economic importance, and it is currently a candidate for protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Using satellite imagery, we analyzed the rate and spatial extent of whitebark pine tree mortality from 1984 to 2011 using the Landsat-based Detection of Trends in Disturbance and Recovery (LandTrendr) program. Climate data, soil properties, and biological features of the whitebark pine were incorporated in the Physiological Principles to Predict Growth (3-PG) model to predict future rates of growth and assess its applicability in modeling natural whitebark pine processes. Finally, the Random Forest algorithm was used with topographic data alongside recent and future climate data from the IPCC A2 and B1 climate scenarios for the years 2030, 2060, and 2090 to model the future distribution of whitebark pine. LandTrendr results indicate beetle related mortality covering 14,940 km2 of forest, 2,880 km2 of which are within whitebark pine forest. By 2090, our results show that under the A2 climate scenario, whitebark pine suitable habitat may be reduced by as much as 99.97% by the year 2090 within our study area. Under the B1 climate scenario, which has decreased CO2 emissions, 13.54% more habitat would be preserved in 2090.

  2. Heterogeneity in avian richness-environment relationships along the Pacific Crest Trail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. McGrann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Predictions of the responses of montane bird communities to climate change generally presuppose that species and assemblages hold constant relationships to temperature across large study regions. However, comparative studies of avian communities exploring the factors that currently shape species richness patterns rarely analyze relationships across neighboring ecological regions of the same mountain chain. Evaluations of the intrinsic regional differences in species-environment relationships are needed to better inform expectations of how bird communities may be affected by future climate change. In this study, we evaluated the relative importance of three environmental factors (temperature, precipitation, and net primary productivity in structuring avian richness patterns along a continuous mega-transect. We followed the route of the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT (32.58° N to 42.00° N, ranging in elevation from 365 to 4020 m on the California cordillera and completed avian point counts on 3578 systematically established survey plots. We divided this mega-transect into five sections, which corresponded to distinct ecological regions along the mountain chain. Regions differed both for elevation-richness patterns, exhibiting linear and unimodal trends, and for model-supported environmental drivers of patterns, with some richness-environment correlations changing sign across adjacent regions. These results were robust to sampling bias, regional species availability, and spatial autocorrelation. Although seasonal variation in avian movements may have limited influence on our results, we conclude that intrinsic regional environments affect bird species richness differently in each of these sections on the PCT, thus creating region-specific species-environment relationships. Appreciation of regional environmental heterogeneity will only increase in light of forecasted climate change, where regional predictions often diverge greatly from global trends

  3. A biomimetic growth factor delivery strategy for enhanced regeneration of iliac crest defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of provision of growth factors in the engineering of tissues has long been shown to control the behavior of the cells within the construct and several approaches were applied toward this end. In nature, more than one type of growth factor is known to be effective during the healing of tissue defects and their peak concentrations are not always simultaneous. One of the most recent strategies includes the delivery of a combination of growth factors with the dose and timing to mimic the natural regeneration cascade. The sequential delivery of bone morphogenetic proteins BMP-2 and BMP-7 which are early and late appearing factors during bone regeneration, respectively, was shown in vitro to enhance osteoblastic differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. In the present study, the aim was to study the effectiveness of this delivery strategy in a rabbit iliac crest model. 3D plotted poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds were loaded with BMP carrying nanoparticles to achieve: (a) single BMP-2 or BMP-7 delivery, and (b) their combined delivery in a simultaneous or (c) sequential (biomimetic) fashion. After eight weeks of implantation, computed tomography and biomechanical tests showed better mineralized matrix formation and bone-implant union strength at the defect site in the case of sequential delivery compared to single or simultaneous delivery modes. Bone mineral density (BMD) and push-out stress were: 33.65±2.25 g cm−3 and 14.5±2.28 MPa, respectively, and almost 2.5 fold higher in comparison to those without growth factors (BMD: 14.14±1.21 g cm−3; PS: 6.59±0.65 MPa). This study, therefore, supports those obtained in vitro and emphasizes the importance of mimicking the natural timing of bioavailability of osteogenic factors in improving the regeneration of critical-sized bone defects. (paper)

  4. Rule Extraction:Using Neural Networks or for Neural Networks?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hua Zhou

    2004-01-01

    In the research of rule extraction from neural networks, fidelity describes how well the rules mimic the behavior of a neural network while accuracy describes how well the rules can be generalized. This paper identifies the fidelity-accuracy dilemma. It argues to distinguish rule extraction using neural networks and rule extraction for neural networks according to their different goals, where fidelity and accuracy should be excluded from the rule quality evaluation framework, respectively.

  5. Neural networks: genuine artifical intelligence. Neurale netwerken: echte kunstmatige intelligentie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jongepier, A.G. (KEMA NV, Arnhem (Netherlands))

    Artificial neural networks are a new form of artificial intelligence. At this moment KEMA NV is examining the possibilities of applying artificial neural networks to processes that are related to power systems. A number of applications already gives hopeful results. Artificial neural networks are suited to pattern recognition. If a problem can be formulated in terms of pattern recognition, an artificial neural network may give a valuable contribution to the solution of this problem. 8 figs., 15 refs.

  6. Hyperbolic Hopfield neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, M

    2013-02-01

    In recent years, several neural networks using Clifford algebra have been studied. Clifford algebra is also called geometric algebra. Complex-valued Hopfield neural networks (CHNNs) are the most popular neural networks using Clifford algebra. The aim of this brief is to construct hyperbolic HNNs (HHNNs) as an analog of CHNNs. Hyperbolic algebra is a Clifford algebra based on Lorentzian geometry. In this brief, a hyperbolic neuron is defined in a manner analogous to a phasor neuron, which is a typical complex-valued neuron model. HHNNs share common concepts with CHNNs, such as the angle and energy. However, HHNNs and CHNNs are different in several aspects. The states of hyperbolic neurons do not form a circle, and, therefore, the start and end states are not identical. In the quantized version, unlike complex-valued neurons, hyperbolic neurons have an infinite number of states. PMID:24808287

  7. Introduction to Artificial Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan

    1999-01-01

    The note addresses introduction to signal analysis and classification based on artificial feed-forward neural networks.......The note addresses introduction to signal analysis and classification based on artificial feed-forward neural networks....

  8. Neural tube defects

    OpenAIRE

    M.E. Marshall

    1981-01-01

    Neural tube defects refer to any defect in the morphogenesis of the neural tube, the most common types being spina bifida and anencephaly. Spina bifida has been recognised in skeletons found in north-eastern Morocco and estimated to have an age of almost 12 000 years. It was also known to the ancient Greek and Arabian physicians who thought that the bony defect was due to the tumour. The term spina bifida was first used by Professor Nicolai Tulp of Amsterdam in 1652. Many other terms have bee...

  9. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system multi-objective optimization using the genetic algorithm/singular value decomposition method for modelling the discharge coefficient in rectangular sharp-crested side weirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshbin, Fatemeh; Bonakdari, Hossein; Hamed Ashraf Talesh, Seyed; Ebtehaj, Isa; Zaji, Amir Hossein; Azimi, Hamed

    2016-06-01

    In the present article, the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) is employed to model the discharge coefficient in rectangular sharp-crested side weirs. The genetic algorithm (GA) is used for the optimum selection of membership functions, while the singular value decomposition (SVD) method helps in computing the linear parameters of the ANFIS results section (GA/SVD-ANFIS). The effect of each dimensionless parameter on discharge coefficient prediction is examined in five different models to conduct sensitivity analysis by applying the above-mentioned dimensionless parameters. Two different sets of experimental data are utilized to examine the models and obtain the best model. The study results indicate that the model designed through GA/SVD-ANFIS predicts the discharge coefficient with a good level of accuracy (mean absolute percentage error = 3.362 and root mean square error = 0.027). Moreover, comparing this method with existing equations and the multi-layer perceptron-artificial neural network (MLP-ANN) indicates that the GA/SVD-ANFIS method has superior performance in simulating the discharge coefficient of side weirs.

  10. Spatial ecology of the critically endangered Fijian crested iguana, Brachylophus vitiensis, in an extremely dense population: implications for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Suzanne F; Biciloa, Pita; Harlow, Peter S; Keogh, J Scott

    2013-01-01

    The Critically Endangered Fijian crested iguana, Brachylophus vitiensis, occurs at extreme density at only one location, with estimates of >10,000 iguanas living on the 70 hectare island of Yadua Taba in Fiji. We conducted a mark and recapture study over two wet seasons, investigating the spatial ecology and intraspecific interactions of the strictly arboreal Fijian crested iguana. This species exhibits moderate male-biased sexual size dimorphism, which has been linked in other lizard species to territoriality, aggression and larger male home ranges. We found that male Fijian crested iguanas exhibit high injury levels, indicative of frequent aggressive interactions. We did not find support for larger home range size in adult males relative to adult females, however male and female residents were larger than roaming individuals. Males with established home ranges also had larger femoral pores relative to body size than roaming males. Home range areas were small in comparison to those of other iguana species, and we speculate that the extreme population density impacts considerably on the spatial ecology of this population. There was extensive home range overlap within and between sexes. Intersexual overlap was greater than intrasexual overlap for both sexes, and continuing male-female pairings were observed among residents. Our results suggest that the extreme population density necessitates extensive home range overlap even though the underlying predictors of territoriality, such as male biased sexual size dimorphism and high aggression levels, remain. Our findings should be factored in to conservation management efforts for this species, particularly in captive breeding and translocation programs. PMID:24019902

  11. Spatial ecology of the critically endangered Fijian crested iguana, Brachylophus vitiensis, in an extremely dense population: implications for conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne F Morrison

    Full Text Available The Critically Endangered Fijian crested iguana, Brachylophus vitiensis, occurs at extreme density at only one location, with estimates of >10,000 iguanas living on the 70 hectare island of Yadua Taba in Fiji. We conducted a mark and recapture study over two wet seasons, investigating the spatial ecology and intraspecific interactions of the strictly arboreal Fijian crested iguana. This species exhibits moderate male-biased sexual size dimorphism, which has been linked in other lizard species to territoriality, aggression and larger male home ranges. We found that male Fijian crested iguanas exhibit high injury levels, indicative of frequent aggressive interactions. We did not find support for larger home range size in adult males relative to adult females, however male and female residents were larger than roaming individuals. Males with established home ranges also had larger femoral pores relative to body size than roaming males. Home range areas were small in comparison to those of other iguana species, and we speculate that the extreme population density impacts considerably on the spatial ecology of this population. There was extensive home range overlap within and between sexes. Intersexual overlap was greater than intrasexual overlap for both sexes, and continuing male-female pairings were observed among residents. Our results suggest that the extreme population density necessitates extensive home range overlap even though the underlying predictors of territoriality, such as male biased sexual size dimorphism and high aggression levels, remain. Our findings should be factored in to conservation management efforts for this species, particularly in captive breeding and translocation programs.

  12. Population structure and mating system of the Red-crested Korhaan(Lophotis ruficrista) in South Africa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Johann; H; van; Niekerk

    2015-01-01

    Background: The mating system of the korhaans and bustards in southern Africa is either based on polygyny or monogamy. The Red-crested Korhaan(Lophotis ruficrista) has been described as polygynous but otherwise very little is known about its breeding biology. The aims were to describe the population structure and male behavior during breeding.Methods: The data collected for this paper was mainly based on field transect surveys carried out in 2009, 2010 and 2011. The population structure of the Red-crested Korhaan in the temperate Borakalalo Game Reserve(BGR)was compared with that in the arid Molopo Nature Reserve(MNR)(both situated in the North West province of South Africa). The study was mainly conducted in the BGR but additional work was conducted in the MNR for comparison.Results: The difference in mean group sizes between MNR(1.03) and BGR(1.07) was statistically not significant.Group sizes were not affected by climate despite the fact that the BGR received about 650 mm precipitation per annum and the MNR about 200 mm. In both reserves the apparent sex ratios were skewed in favor of males(1:0.29 in the BGR and 1:0.1 in the MNR). The population was dispersed in a clumped manner which is ascribed to the formation of leks. Leks were positioned in open habitat while females invariably concealed themselves under cover.Conclusions: The leks formed the pivot of the mating system of the Red-crested Korhaan and are identifiable social structures that field ecologists can use to monitor population stability.

  13. Generalized Adaptive Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical model of supervised learning by artificial neural network provides for simultaneous adjustments of both temperatures of neurons and synaptic weights, and includes feedback as well as feedforward synaptic connections. Extension of mathematical model described in "Adaptive Neurons For Artificial Neural Networks" (NPO-17803). Dynamics of neural network represented in new model by less-restrictive continuous formalism.

  14. Characteristics of short-crested waves and currents behind offshore man-made island type power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the diffracted waves with breaking and the nearshore currents caused by short-crested waves, behind a man-made island, on which nuclear power plants are constructed. Firstly, hydraulic model tests with a multi-directional wave maker were performed. Effects of the irregularity and directional spreading of waves, and the effects of cooling water intake flow on diffracted waves and nearshore currents behind a man-made island, were investigated experimentally. Secondly, a numerical model was developed to simulate deformation of multi-directional irregular waves and nearshore currents. The validity of the numerical model was verified through comparison with the experimental results

  15. TEC variations during low solar activity period (2005–2007) near the Equatorial Ionospheric Anomaly Crest region in India

    OpenAIRE

    Bagiya, Mala S.; H. P. Joshi; Iyer, K. N.; Aggarwal, M; Ravindran, S.; B. M. Pathan

    2009-01-01

    The dual frequency signals from the GPS satellites recorded at Rajkot (22.29° N, 70.74° E, Geographic, 14.03° N Geomagnetic) near the Equatorial ionization anomaly crest in India have been analyzed to study the ionospheric variations in terms of Total Electron Content (TEC) for the low solar activity period from April 2005 to December 2007. In this study, we describe the diurnal and seasonal variations of TEC, solar activity dependence of TEC and effects of a space weather related...

  16. Autogenous iliac crest bone graft versus banked allograft bone in scoliosis surgery in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Takaso, Masashi; Imura, Takayuki; Adachi, Kou; Fukushima, Kensuke; Saito, Wataru; Miyajima, Gennyo; Minatani, Atsushi; Shinntani, Ryousuke; Itoman, Moritoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi; Ohtori, Seiji; Sasaki, Atsushi

    2009-01-01

    A total of 36 consecutive nonambulatory DMD patients underwent scoliosis surgery. Patients were divided into two groups: the autogenous iliac crest bone graft group (the ICBG group; 20 patients) and the allogenous bone graft group (the ALBG group; 16 patients). The mean preoperative curves measured 87° and 31° at the last follow-up in the ICBG group and 83° and 28° in the ALBG group. In the ICBG group, three (15%) patients had intraoperative sacroiliac joint penetration, five (25%) had iliac ...

  17. Introduction to neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This lecture is a presentation of today's research in neural computation. Neural computation is inspired by knowledge from neuro-science. It draws its methods in large degree from statistical physics and its potential applications lie mainly in computer science and engineering. Neural networks models are algorithms for cognitive tasks, such as learning and optimization, which are based on concepts derived from research into the nature of the brain. The lecture first gives an historical presentation of neural networks development and interest in performing complex tasks. Then, an exhaustive overview of data management and networks computation methods is given: the supervised learning and the associative memory problem, the capacity of networks, the Perceptron networks, the functional link networks, the Madaline (Multiple Adalines) networks, the back-propagation networks, the reduced coulomb energy (RCE) networks, the unsupervised learning and the competitive learning and vector quantization. An example of application in high energy physics is given with the trigger systems and track recognition system (track parametrization, event selection and particle identification) developed for the CPLEAR experiment detectors from the LEAR at CERN. (J.S.). 56 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab., 1 appendix

  18. Neural Network Ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Salamon, Peter

    1990-01-01

    We propose several means for improving the performance an training of neural networks for classification. We use crossvalidation as a tool for optimizing network parameters and architecture. We show further that the remaining generalization error can be reduced by invoking ensembles of similar...... networks....

  19. Neural Networks and Micromechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kussul, Ernst; Baidyk, Tatiana; Wunsch, Donald C.

    The title of the book, "Neural Networks and Micromechanics," seems artificial. However, the scientific and technological developments in recent decades demonstrate a very close connection between the two different areas of neural networks and micromechanics. The purpose of this book is to demonstrate this connection. Some artificial intelligence (AI) methods, including neural networks, could be used to improve automation system performance in manufacturing processes. However, the implementation of these AI methods within industry is rather slow because of the high cost of conducting experiments using conventional manufacturing and AI systems. To lower the cost, we have developed special micromechanical equipment that is similar to conventional mechanical equipment but of much smaller size and therefore of lower cost. This equipment could be used to evaluate different AI methods in an easy and inexpensive way. The proved methods could be transferred to industry through appropriate scaling. In this book, we describe the prototypes of low cost microequipment for manufacturing processes and the implementation of some AI methods to increase precision, such as computer vision systems based on neural networks for microdevice assembly and genetic algorithms for microequipment characterization and the increase of microequipment precision.

  20. Human harvest, climate change and their synergistic effects drove the Chinese Crested Tern to the brink of extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuihua Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Synergistic effect refers to simultaneous actions of separate factors which have a greater total effect than the sum of the individual factor effects. However, there has been a limited knowledge on how synergistic effects occur and individual roles of different drivers are not often considered. Therefore, it becomes quite challenging to manage multiple threatening processes simultaneously in order to mitigate biodiversity loss. In this regard, our hypothesis is, if the traits actually play different roles in the synergistic interaction, conservation efforts could be made more effectively. To understand the synergistic effect and test our hypothesis, we examined the processes associated with the endangerment of critically endangered Chinese Crested Tern (Thalasseus bernsteini, whose total population number was estimated no more than 50. Through monitoring of breeding colonies and investigations into causative factors, combined with other data on human activities, we found that widespread human harvest of seabird eggs and increasing frequency of typhoons are the major factors that threatened the Chinese Crested Tern. Furthermore, 28 percent of breeding failures were due to the synergistic effects in which egg harvest-induced renestings suffered the higher frequent typhoons. In such combined interactions, the egg harvest has clearly served as a proximal factor for the population decline, and the superimposition of enhanced typhoon activity further accelerated the species toward imminent extinction. Our findings suggest that species endangerment, on one hand, should be treated as a synergistic process, while conservation efforts, on the other hand, should focus principally on combatting the threat that triggers synergistic effects.

  1. Profiling of drugs and environmental chemicals for functional impairment of neural crest migration in a novel stem cell-based test battery

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmer, Bastian; Pallocca, Giorgia; Dreser, Nadine; Foerster, Sunniva; Waldmann, Tanja; Westerhout, Joost; Julien, Sylvie; Krause, Karl-Heinz; van Thriel, Christoph; Hengstler, Jan G.; Sachinidis, Agapios; Bosgra, Sieto; Leist, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Developmental toxicity in vitro assays have hitherto been established as stand-alone systems, based on a limited number of toxicants. Within the embryonic stem cell-based novel alternative tests project, we developed a test battery framework that allows inclusion of any developmental toxicity assay and that explores the responses of such test systems to a wide range of drug-like compounds. We selected 28 compounds, including several biologics (e.g., erythropoietin), classical pharmaceuticals ...

  2. .I.AmphiPax3/7./I., an amphioxus paired box gene: insights into chordate myogenesis, neurogenesis, and the possible evolutionary precursor of definitive vertebrate neural crest

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holland, L. Z.; Schubert, M.; Kozmik, Zbyněk; Holland, N. D.

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 3 (1999), s. 153-165. ISSN 1520-541X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/96/0014; GA MŠk ME 130; GA AV ČR KSK2052601 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  3. The oncoprotein v-Myb activates transcription of Gremlin 2 during in vitro differentiation of the chicken neural crest to melanoblasts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Starostová, Michaela; Čermák, Vladimír; Dvořáková, Marta; Karafiát, Vít; Kosla, Jan; Dvořák, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 540, č. 1 (2014), s. 122-129. ISSN 0378-1119 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200520801 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Melanocyte development * Tamoxifen-inducible v-Myb * v-Myb-dependent genes * PRDC * KRT19 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.138, year: 2014

  4. Profiling of drugs and environmental chemicals for functional impairment of neural crest migration in a novel stem cell-based test battery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmer, B.; Pallocca, G.; Dreser, N.; Foerster, S.; Waldmann, T.; Westerhout, J.; Julien, S.; Krause, K.H.; Van Thriel, C.; Hengstler, J.G.; Sachinidis, A.; Bosgra, S.; Leist, M.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental toxicity in vitro assays have hitherto been established as stand-alone systems, based on a limited number of toxicants. Within the embryonic stem cell-based novel alternative tests project, we developed a test battery framework that allows inclusion of any developmental toxicity assay

  5. In vitro and in vivo effects on neural crest stem cell differentiation by conditional activation of Runx1 short isoform and its effect on neuropathic pain behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanaykina, Nadezda; Abelson, Klas; King, Dale;

    2010-01-01

    originating from NCSCs. In in vivo experiments we applied doxycycline (DOX) to pregnant mice (days 8-11), i.e. when NCSCs actively migrate, and examined the phenotype of offsprings. We also examined whether DOX-induced activation of Runx1a in adult mice affects their sensitivity to mechanical stimulation...

  6. Analysis of neural data

    CERN Document Server

    Kass, Robert E; Brown, Emery N

    2014-01-01

    Continual improvements in data collection and processing have had a huge impact on brain research, producing data sets that are often large and complicated. By emphasizing a few fundamental principles, and a handful of ubiquitous techniques, Analysis of Neural Data provides a unified treatment of analytical methods that have become essential for contemporary researchers. Throughout the book ideas are illustrated with more than 100 examples drawn from the literature, ranging from electrophysiology, to neuroimaging, to behavior. By demonstrating the commonality among various statistical approaches the authors provide the crucial tools for gaining knowledge from diverse types of data. Aimed at experimentalists with only high-school level mathematics, as well as computationally-oriented neuroscientists who have limited familiarity with statistics, Analysis of Neural Data serves as both a self-contained introduction and a reference work.

  7. Neural tube defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Marshall

    1981-09-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects refer to any defect in the morphogenesis of the neural tube, the most common types being spina bifida and anencephaly. Spina bifida has been recognised in skeletons found in north-eastern Morocco and estimated to have an age of almost 12 000 years. It was also known to the ancient Greek and Arabian physicians who thought that the bony defect was due to the tumour. The term spina bifida was first used by Professor Nicolai Tulp of Amsterdam in 1652. Many other terms have been used to describe this defect, but spina bifida remains the most useful general term, as it describes the separation of the vertebral elements in the midline.

  8. Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Nahar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An artificial neural network is an information-processing paradigm that is inspired by the way biological nervous systems, such as the brain, process information. The key element of this paradigm is the novel structure of the information processing system. It is composed of a large number of highly interconnected processing elements (neurons working in unison to solve specific problems. Ann’s, like people, learn by example.

  9. Implementing Neural Networks Efficiently

    OpenAIRE

    Collobert, Ronan; Kavukcuoglu, Koray; Farabet, Clément; Montavon, Grégoire; Orr, Geneviève; Müller, K.-R.

    2012-01-01

    Neural networks and machine learning algorithms in general require a flexible environment where new algorithm prototypes and experiments can be set up as quickly as possible with best possible computational performance. To that end, we provide a new framework called Torch7, that is especially suited to achieve both of these competing goals. Torch7 is a versatile numeric computing framework and machine learning library that extends a very lightweight and powerful programming language Lua. Its ...

  10. Neural Mechanisms of Foraging

    OpenAIRE

    Kolling, Nils; Behrens, Timothy EJ; Mars, Rogier B.; Rushworth, Matthew FS

    2012-01-01

    Behavioural economic studies, involving limited numbers of choices, have provided key insights into neural decision-making mechanisms. By contrast, animals’ foraging choices arise in the context of sequences of encounters with prey/food. On each encounter the animal chooses to engage or whether the environment is sufficiently rich that searching elsewhere is merited. The cost of foraging is also critical. We demonstrate humans can alternate between two modes of choice, comparative decision-ma...

  11. Neural Dataset Generality

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatesan, Ragav; Gattupalli, Vijetha; Li, Baoxin

    2016-01-01

    Often the filters learned by Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) from different datasets appear similar. This is prominent in the first few layers. This similarity of filters is being exploited for the purposes of transfer learning and some studies have been made to analyse such transferability of features. This is also being used as an initialization technique for different tasks in the same dataset or for the same task in similar datasets. Off-the-shelf CNN features have capitalized on thi...

  12. Artificial neural network modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Samarasinghe, Sandhya

    2016-01-01

    This book covers theoretical aspects as well as recent innovative applications of Artificial Neural networks (ANNs) in natural, environmental, biological, social, industrial and automated systems. It presents recent results of ANNs in modelling small, large and complex systems under three categories, namely, 1) Networks, Structure Optimisation, Robustness and Stochasticity 2) Advances in Modelling Biological and Environmental Systems and 3) Advances in Modelling Social and Economic Systems. The book aims at serving undergraduates, postgraduates and researchers in ANN computational modelling. .

  13. Neural networks for triggering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denby, B. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Campbell, M. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (USA)); Bedeschi, F. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy)); Chriss, N.; Bowers, C. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA)); Nesti, F. (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy))

    1990-01-01

    Two types of neural network beauty trigger architectures, based on identification of electrons in jets and recognition of secondary vertices, have been simulated in the environment of the Fermilab CDF experiment. The efficiencies for B's and rejection of background obtained are encouraging. If hardware tests are successful, the electron identification architecture will be tested in the 1991 run of CDF. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Neural networks for triggering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of neural network beauty trigger architectures, based on identification of electrons in jets and recognition of secondary vertices, have been simulated in the environment of the Fermilab CDF experiment. The efficiencies for B's and rejection of background obtained are encouraging. If hardware tests are successful, the electron identification architecture will be tested in the 1991 run of CDF. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  15. Dynamic recurrent neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Pearlmutter, Barak A

    1990-01-01

    We survey learning algorithms for recurrent neural networks with hidden units and attempt to put the various techniques into a common framework. We discuss fixpoint learning algorithms, namely recurrent backpropagation and deterministic Boltzmann Machines, and non-fixpoint algorithms, namely backpropagation through time, Elman's history cutoff nets, and Jordan's output feedback architecture. Forward propagation, an online technique that uses adjoint equations, is also discussed. In many cases...

  16. Bayesian Neural Word Embedding

    OpenAIRE

    Barkan, Oren

    2016-01-01

    Recently, several works in the domain of natural language processing presented successful methods for word embedding. Among them, the Skip-gram (SG) with negative sampling, known also as Word2Vec, advanced the state-of-the-art of various linguistics tasks. In this paper, we propose a scalable Bayesian neural word embedding algorithm that can be beneficial to general item similarity tasks as well. The algorithm relies on a Variational Bayes solution for the SG objective and a detailed step by ...

  17. Progress in neural plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    POO; Mu-Ming

    2010-01-01

    One of the properties of the nervous system is the use-dependent plasticity of neural circuits.The structure and function of neural circuits are susceptible to changes induced by prior neuronal activity,as reflected by short-and long-term modifications of synaptic efficacy and neuronal excitability.Regarded as the most attractive cellular mechanism underlying higher cognitive functions such as learning and memory,activity-dependent synaptic plasticity has been in the spotlight of modern neuroscience since 1973 when activity-induced long-term potentiation(LTP) of hippocampal synapses was first discovered.Over the last 10 years,Chinese neuroscientists have made notable contributions to the study of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity,as well as of the plasticity beyond synapses,including activity-dependent changes in intrinsic neuronal excitability,dendritic integration functions,neuron-glia signaling,and neural network activity.This work highlight some of these significant findings.

  18. Neural logic networks a new class of neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    Heng, Teh Hoon

    1995-01-01

    This book is the first of a series of technical reports of a key research project of the Real-World Computing Program supported by the MITI of Japan.The main goal of the project is to model human intelligence by a special class of mathematical systems called neural logic networks.The book consists of three parts. Part 1 describes the general theory of neural logic networks and their potential applications. Part 2 discusses a new logic called Neural Logic which attempts to emulate more closely the logical thinking process of human. Part 3 studies the special features of neural logic networks wh

  19. Post-fledging dispersal and habitat use of a reintroduced population of the Crested Ibis (Nipponia nippon)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiping; Huo; Junfeng; Guo; Xia; Li; Xiaoping; Yu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of dispersal movement of birds and their habitat preference during the post-fledging period is fundamental to the understanding of their ecological and evolutionary processes. The Crested Ibis is now being reintroduced to protected sites within its historical range, with the goal of establishing a self-sustaining population that may eventually qualify the species for delisting.Methods: We carried out an ecological study of post-fledging dispersal and habitat use of a reintroduced population of the Crested Ibis(Nipponia nippon) from 2008 to 2012 in Ningshan County, China, by using banding and radio-telemetry methods.Results: In about two weeks(an average of 14.3 days) after fledging, the activities of the fledglings were concentrated in a range of about 100 m around their natal sites, such as the oak-pine forest patches at the edge of open habitats.During this period, fledglings were still partially dependent upon parental care and fed typically on a daily basis.Siblings increasingly became independent by mid-August and then gradually moved away from their natal sites to post-fledging dispersal locations. During the period of the post-fledging dispersal process, most juveniles moving southwest were concentrated at the mean direction(μ = 254.6°, ? = 70.5°) with a mean dispersal distance of 5.1 km.It took an average of 56.4 days to disperse from the natal territory to the first wintering area. Also, forging habitats for juvenile ibis varied with time and local conditions. For example, paddy fields were used most frequently among all habitat types, while shallow rivers just from August to October. Masson pine(Pinus massoniana) was often regarded as the roosting tree species preferred by the Crested Ibis, with the highest utilization rate among all the roosting habitat types. The juveniles of the wild population dispersed four times as far as that of the reintroduced population, but the overall pattern of post-fledging dispersal is similar for

  20. Lie Access Neural Turing Machine

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Recently, Neural Turing Machine and Memory Networks have shown that adding an external memory can greatly ameliorate a traditional recurrent neural network's tendency to forget after a long period of time. Here we present a new design of an external memory, wherein memories are stored in an Euclidean key space $\\mathbb R^n$. An LSTM controller performs read and write via specialized structures called read and write heads, following the design of Neural Turing Machine. It can move a head by ei...

  1. Nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Yongchen eWang; Liang eGuo

    2016-01-01

    Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a h...

  2. Nanomaterial-Enabled Neural Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yongchen; Guo, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a h...

  3. Handbook of neural computing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parten, C.; Hartson, C.; Maren, A. (Tennessee Univ., Chattanooga, TN (USA)); Pap, R. (Accurate Automation Corp., Chattanooga, TN (US))

    1990-01-01

    Here is a comprehensive guide to architectures, processes, implementation methods, and applications of neural computing systems. Unlike purely theoretical books, this handbook shows how to apply neural processing systems to problems in neurophysiology, control theories, learning theory, pattern recognition, and similar areas. This book discusses neural network theories, and shows where they came from, how they can be used, and how they can be developed for future applications.

  4. Public acceptance of fusion energy and scientific feasibility of a fusion reactor. Low cost tokamak fusion power reactor based on a reversed shear plasma: CREST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cost down of tokamak fusion reactors is one of the key issues that must be dealt with in order to deploy fusion energy for commercial use. Our previous study of the costs of tokamak power plants has shown that a very high Troyon coefficient βN (up to 5 or 6) is required in order to realize a cost-competitive tokamak reactor. A reversed shear configuration, which has been observed recently in several tokamak experiments, might results in such a low cost tokamak. In this study, we propose a compact commercial reactor based on the shear reversed high beta equilibrium, which is named the Compact REversed Shear Tokamak (CREST). The optimized parameters of CREST are; major radius R = 5.4 m, maximum toroidal field Bmax = 12.5 T (5.6 T at plasma center), and fusion power Pf = 3 GW with 4.5 MW/m2 in the mean neutron wall load. The ideal MHD instabilities are all stable in this equilibrium while the βN value reaches 5.5. The plasma configuration of CREST is close to that of ITER advanced mode plasma. This will encourage an investigation of the feasibility of the CREST concept by ITER. Although many further studies and developments are necessary, such compact tokamak can be cost-competitive as an electric power source in the 21st century and could be a promising tool in the development of a commercial tokamak reactor succeeding the ITER project. (author)

  5. Biomechanical competence of six different bone screws for reconstructive surgery in three different transplants: Fibular, iliac crest, scapular and artificial bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Arnold P; Raith, Stefan; Ode, Jan-Eric; Teichmann, Jan; Lethaus, Bernd; Möhlhenrich, Stephan C; Hölzle, Frank; Duda, Georg N; Steiner, Timm

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to determine a combination of screw and transplantation type that offers optimal primary stability for reconstructive surgery. Fibular, iliac crest, and scapular transplants were tested along with artificial bone substrate. Six different kinds of bone screws (Medartis(©)) were compared, each type utilized with one of six specimens from human transplants (n = 6). Controlled screw-in-tests were performed and the required torque was protocolled. Subsequently, pull-out-tests were executed to determine the retention forces. The artificial bone substitute material showed significantly higher retention forces than real bone samples. The self-drilling screws achieved the significantly highest retention values in the synthetic bone substitute material. Cancellous screws achieved the highest retention in the fibular transplants, while self-drilling and cancellous screws demonstrated better retention than cortical screws in the iliac crest. In the scapular graft, no significant differences were found between the screw types. In comparison to the human transplant types, the cortical screws showed the significantly highest values in the fibula and the lowest values in the iliac crest. The best retention was found in the combination of cancellous screws with fibular graft (514.8 N + -252.3 N). For the flat bones (i.e., scapular and illiac crest) we recommend the cancellous screws. PMID:27107477

  6. Ionospheric Variations in the Region of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly Crest: Comparison Between Observations and IRI-2012 Model Predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyeyemi, E. O.; Bolaji, S.; Adewale, A. O.; Akala, A. O.; Oladipo, O. A.; Olugbon, B.; Olawepo, O. A.; Adeniyi, J. O.; Adimula, I.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this work is to study the variations of the F2-layer critical frequency (foF2) in the region of equatorial ionization anomaly crest and check the accuracy of International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-2012) model predictions using ionosonde measurements from a number of stations in this region. We have used data, based on availability, corresponding to different seasonal and solar activity periods from each station considered to carry out our investigations. Details of the statistical analysis using percentage deviation (PD), upper and lower inter-quartile range (IQR) and relative deviation module mean (RDMM) for the evaluation of the IRI model performance are presented. The results show that, generally, the IRI model predictions have agreement with the observed values in terms of the pattern of variations but there are number of cases where IRI model overestimates and underestimates the observed values. Results from this study will be of help to improving prediction ability of the IRI models.

  7. Genomic signatures of near-extinction and rebirth of the crested ibis and other endangered bird species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shengbin; Li, Bo; Cheng, Cheng;

    2014-01-01

    practices, to facilitate sustainable recovery of endangered species.ConclusionsThese findings demonstrate common genomic signatures of population decline across avian species and pave a way for further effort in saving endangered species and enhancing conservation genomic efforts.......BackgroundNearly a quarter of all avian species is either threatened or nearly threatened. Of these, 73 species are currently being rescued from going extinct in wildlife sanctuaries. One of the previously most critically-endangered is the crested ibis, Nipponia nippon. Once widespread across North...... of near extinction events in association with environmental and behavioral attributes of species. We confirm that both loss of genetic diversity and enrichment of deleterious mutations of protein-coding genes contribute to the major genetic defects of the endangered species. We further identify...

  8. A blow-up criteria and the existence of 2d gravity water waves with angled crests

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Sijue

    2015-01-01

    We consider the two dimensional gravity water wave equation in the regime that includes free surfaces with angled crests. We assume that the fluid is inviscid, incompressible and irrotational, the air density is zero, and we neglect the surface tension. In \\cite{kw} it was shown that in this regime, only a degenerate Taylor inequality $-\\frac{\\partial P}{\\partial\\bold{n}}\\ge 0$ holds, with degeneracy at the singularities; an energy functional $\\frak E$ was constructed and an aprori estimate was proved. In this paper we show that a (generalized) solution of the water wave equation with smooth data will remain smooth so long as $\\frak E(t)$ remains finite; and for any data satisfying $\\frak E(0)<\\infty$, the equation is solvable locally in time, for a period depending only on $\\frak E(0)$.

  9. Progress in the development of SiC/SiC composites for Advanced Energy Systems: CREST-ACE program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the title of 'R and D of Environment Conscious Multi-Functional Structural Materials for Advanced Energy Systems', a new R and D activity to establish high efficiency and environmental conscious energy conversion systems, as one of the programs of Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), has been initiated from October 1997 to September 2002. This program cares for R and D of high performance materials and materials systems for severe environments and production of model components for energy conversion systems is carried out. The emphasis is on R and D of SiC/SiC, W/W with their system studies to establish sound material life cycles. The program outline and preliminary results on SiC/SiC are provided. (author)

  10. Interspecific interactions, habitat use, and management of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) in the Laurentian Great Lakes: An introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapanian, Martin A.

    2002-01-01

    The collection of seven papers in this journal issue represents a subset of the presentations from a special session at the 44th Annual Conference of the International Association for Great Lakes Research. The session, 'Management of the Double-crested Cormorant in the Laurentian Great Lakes Region,' was held on 12 June 2001 and contained 18 presentations. Topics included cormorant-fish interactions, effects of cormorant nesting on colonies of other waterbirds, cormorant population dynamics, habitat use by foraging cormorants, evaluation of management techniques, and policy and conflict assessment on cormorant-related issues. The collection is organized into four basic topics: management of populations, effects of cormorants on other colonial waterbirds, foraging habitats of cormorants, and effects of cormorants on fisheries. A primary objective of this collection is to provide information and useful tools for managing cormorants in the Great Lakes.

  11. Internal Occipital Crest Misalignment with Internal Occipital Protuberance: A Case Report of Posterior Cranial Fossa Anatomic Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Ha Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During gross anatomy head and neck laboratory session, one dissection group observed an abnormal anatomic variation in the posterior cranial fossa of a 94-year-old male cadaver. The internal occipital crest was not aligned with internal occipital protuberance and groove for superior sagittal sinus. It seemed that the internal occipital protuberance was shifted significantly to the right side. As a result the skull was overly stretched in order to connect with the internal occipital ridge. These internal skull variations of occipital bone landmarks can influence the location of adjacent dural venous sinuses and possibly influence cerebrospinal fluid flow. Similar anatomical anomalies have been attributed to presence of hydrocephalus and abnormalities in cisterna magna.

  12. An empirical model of ionospheric total electron content (TEC near the crest of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajra Rajkumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a geomagnetic quiet time (Dst > −50 nT empirical model of ionospheric total electron content (TEC for the northern equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA crest over Calcutta, India. The model is based on the 1980–1990 TEC measurements from the geostationary Engineering Test Satellite-2 (ETS-2 at the Haringhata (University of Calcutta, India: 22.58° N, 88.38° E geographic; 12.09° N, 160.46° E geomagnetic ionospheric field station using the technique of Faraday rotation of plane polarized VHF (136.11 MHz signals. The ground station is situated virtually underneath the northern EIA crest. The monthly mean TEC increases linearly with F10.7 solar ionizing flux, with a significantly high correlation coefficient (r = 0.89–0.99 between the two. For the same solar flux level, the TEC values are found to be significantly different between the descending and ascending phases of the solar cycle. This ionospheric hysteresis effect depends on the local time as well as on the solar flux level. On an annual scale, TEC exhibits semiannual variations with maximum TEC values occurring during the two equinoxes and minimum at summer solstice. The semiannual variation is strongest during local noon with a summer-to-equinox variability of ~50–100 TEC units. The diurnal pattern of TEC is characterized by a pre-sunrise (0400–0500 LT minimum and near-noon (1300–1400 LT maximum. Equatorial electrodynamics is dominated by the equatorial electrojet which in turn controls the daytime TEC variation and its maximum. We combine these long-term analyses to develop an empirical model of monthly mean TEC. The model is validated using both ETS-2 measurements and recent GNSS measurements. It is found that the present model efficiently estimates the TEC values within a 1-σ range from the observed mean values.

  13. Abundance of Harpy and Crested Eagles from a reservoir-impact area in the Low- and Mid-Xingu River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaiotti, T M; Junqueira, T G; Palhares, V; Aguiar-Silva, F H; Henriques, L M P; Oliveira, G; Guimarães, V Y; Castro, V; Mota, D; Trombin, D F; Villar, D N A; Lara, K M; Fernandes, D; Castilho, L; Yosheno, E; Alencar, R M; Cesca, L; Dantas, S M; Laranjeiras, T O; Mathias, P C; Mendonça, C V

    2015-08-01

    In the Brazilian Amazon, two monospecific genera, the Harpy Eagle and Crested Eagle have low densities and are classified by IUCN as Near Threatened due to habitat loss, deforestation, habitat degradation and hunting. In this study, we evaluate occurrence of these large raptors using the environmental surveys database from Belo Monte Hydroelectric Power Plant. Integrating the dataset from two methods, we plotted a distribution map along the Xingu River, including records over a 276-km stretch of river. Terrestrial surveys (RAPELD method) were more efficient for detecting large raptors than standardized aquatic surveys, although the latter were complementary in areas without modules. About 53% of the records were obtained during activities of wildlife rescue/flushing, vegetation suppression or in transit. Between 2012 and 2014, four Harpy Eagles were removed from the wild; two shooting victims, one injured by collision with power lines and one hit by a vehicle. Also, seven nests were mapped. The mean distance between Harpy Eagle records was 15 km along the river channel, with a mean of 20 km between nests near the channel, which allowed us to estimate 20 possible pairs using the alluvial forest, riverine forest and forest fragments. Territories of another ten pairs will probably be affected by inundation of the Volta Grande channel, which is far from the main river. The average distance between Crested Eagle records was 16 km along the river channel. The only nest found was 1.3 km away from a Harpy Eagle nest. The remnant forests are under threat of being replaced by cattle pastures, so we recommend that permanently protected riparian vegetation borders (APP) be guaranteed, and that forest fragments within 5 km of the river be conserved to maintain eagle populations. PMID:26691093

  14. The Tendency of the Crest Factor Helps Detect Nascent Events; Electronic Circuit, Software and Applications to Signals from Diverse Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núñez-Pérez Ricardo Francisco

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the signal analysis techniques in the time domain, the crest factor (CF is undoubtedly one of the most simple and fast to implement using electronic circuits and/or software. That's why it has been used reliably to care for machinery and to evaluate the quality of supply. One of the major manufacturers of instruments for these purposes is Bruel and Kjaer and defines the crest factor of voltage or repetitive current signal as the ratio of the peak level and its rms value during a certain period of time. In this paper, we try to find out experimentally the potential of CF and their tendency to detect the nascent and evolution of events in various fields of knowledge, either by generating it with a developed electronic circuit, or with calculations, through routines that are performed with the programs DADISP and LabVIEW. The results are validated and checked for all the above factors and trends through a comparison between them and the proposed features and specifications. The results were acceptable so that the tools were applied to detect early faults in electrical machines, to identify chaosity differences between the circuits with these dynamics, to detect abnormal respiratory distress or rales in patients and to detect harmful distortions in the electrical current, all this based on simulations and measurements for each of the 4 cases studied. Other CF original applications proposed are: a control of chaos in electronic circuits that stir/ mix industrial processes and b correct the power factor of non-linear and inductive loads. A medium-term study and use a CF that considers the maximum signal peak to peak is contemplated, and it is thought that it can improve event detection

  15. An empirical model of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) near the crest of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajra, Rajkumar; Chakraborty, Shyamal Kumar; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; DasGupta, Ashish; Echer, Ezequiel; Brum, Christiano G. M.; Gonzalez, Walter D.; Sobral, José Humberto Andrade

    2016-07-01

    We present a geomagnetic quiet time (Dst > -50 nT) empirical model of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) for the northern equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) crest over Calcutta, India. The model is based on the 1980-1990 TEC measurements from the geostationary Engineering Test Satellite-2 (ETS-2) at the Haringhata (University of Calcutta, India: 22.58° N, 88.38° E geographic; 12.09° N, 160.46° E geomagnetic) ionospheric field station using the technique of Faraday rotation of plane polarized VHF (136.11 MHz) signals. The ground station is situated virtually underneath the northern EIA crest. The monthly mean TEC increases linearly with F10.7 solar ionizing flux, with a significantly high correlation coefficient (r = 0.89-0.99) between the two. For the same solar flux level, the TEC values are found to be significantly different between the descending and ascending phases of the solar cycle. This ionospheric hysteresis effect depends on the local time as well as on the solar flux level. On an annual scale, TEC exhibits semiannual variations with maximum TEC values occurring during the two equinoxes and minimum at summer solstice. The semiannual variation is strongest during local noon with a summer-to-equinox variability of ~50-100 TEC units. The diurnal pattern of TEC is characterized by a pre-sunrise (0400-0500 LT) minimum and near-noon (1300-1400 LT) maximum. Equatorial electrodynamics is dominated by the equatorial electrojet which in turn controls the daytime TEC variation and its maximum. We combine these long-term analyses to develop an empirical model of monthly mean TEC. The model is validated using both ETS-2 measurements and recent GNSS measurements. It is found that the present model efficiently estimates the TEC values within a 1-σ range from the observed mean values.

  16. Chaotic neural control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, A.; Ali, M. K.

    2001-04-01

    We consider the problem of stabilizing unstable equilibria by discrete controls (the controls take discrete values at discrete moments of time). We prove that discrete control typically creates a chaotic attractor in the vicinity of an equilibrium. Artificial neural networks with reinforcement learning are known to be able to learn such a control scheme. We consider examples of such systems, discuss some details of implementing the reinforcement learning to controlling unstable equilibria, and show that the arising dynamics is characterized by positive Lyapunov exponents, and hence is chaotic. This chaos can be observed both in the controlled system and in the activity patterns of the controller.

  17. Neurally augmented sexual function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloy, S

    2007-01-01

    Neurally Augmented Sexual Function (NASF) is a technique utilizing epidural electrodes to restore and improve sexual function. Orgasmic dysfunction is common in adult women, affecting roughly one quarter of populations studied. Many male patients suffering from erectile dysfunction are not candidates for phosphdiesterase therapy due to concomitant nitrate therapy. Positioning the electrodes at roughly the level of the cauda equina allows for stimulation of somatic efferents and afferents as well as modifying sympathetic and parasympathetic activity. Our series of women treated by NASF is described. Our experience shows that the evaluation of potential candidates for both correctable causes and psychological screening are important considerations. PMID:17691397

  18. Information theoretic neural computation

    CERN Document Server

    Kamimura, Ryotaro

    2002-01-01

    In order to develop new types of information media and technology, it is essential to model complex and flexible information processing in living systems. This book presents a new approach to modeling complex information processing in living systems. Traditional information-theoretic methods in neural networks are unified in one framework, i.e. a-entropy. This new approach will enable information systems such as computers to imitate and simulate human complex behavior and to uncover the deepest secrets of the human mind.

  19. Neural network applications in telecommunications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alspector, Joshua

    1994-01-01

    Neural network capabilities include automatic and organized handling of complex information, quick adaptation to continuously changing environments, nonlinear modeling, and parallel implementation. This viewgraph presentation presents Bellcore work on applications, learning chip computational function, learning system block diagram, neural network equalization, broadband access control, calling-card fraud detection, software reliability prediction, and conclusions.

  20. Neural networks at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes neural network applications at the Fermilab Tevatron, including the first online hardware application in high energy physics (muon tracking): the CDF and DO neural network triggers; offline quark/gluon discrimination at CDF; ND a new tool for top to multijets recognition at CDF

  1. Neural Networks for Optimal Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O.

    1995-01-01

    Two neural networks are trained to act as an observer and a controller, respectively, to control a non-linear, multi-variable process.......Two neural networks are trained to act as an observer and a controller, respectively, to control a non-linear, multi-variable process....

  2. Neural Networks for the Beginner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Robin M.

    Motivated by the brain, neural networks are a right-brained approach to artificial intelligence that is used to recognize patterns based on previous training. In practice, one would not program an expert system to recognize a pattern and one would not train a neural network to make decisions from rules; but one could combine the best features of…

  3. Analysis of neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    Heiden, Uwe

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this work is a unified and general treatment of activity in neural networks from a mathematical pOint of view. Possible applications of the theory presented are indica­ ted throughout the text. However, they are not explored in de­ tail for two reasons : first, the universal character of n- ral activity in nearly all animals requires some type of a general approach~ secondly, the mathematical perspicuity would suffer if too many experimental details and empirical peculiarities were interspersed among the mathematical investigation. A guide to many applications is supplied by the references concerning a variety of specific issues. Of course the theory does not aim at covering all individual problems. Moreover there are other approaches to neural network theory (see e.g. Poggio-Torre, 1978) based on the different lev­ els at which the nervous system may be viewed. The theory is a deterministic one reflecting the average be­ havior of neurons or neuron pools. In this respect the essay is writt...

  4. Artificial neural networks in NDT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artificial neural networks, simply known as neural networks, have attracted considerable interest in recent years largely because of a growing recognition of the potential of these computational paradigms as powerful alternative models to conventional pattern recognition or function approximation techniques. The neural networks approach is having a profound effect on almost all fields, and has been utilised in fields Where experimental inter-disciplinary work is being carried out. Being a multidisciplinary subject with a broad knowledge base, Nondestructive Testing (NDT) or Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) is no exception. This paper explains typical applications of neural networks in NDT/NDE. Three promising types of neural networks are highlighted, namely, back-propagation, binary Hopfield and Kohonen's self-organising maps. (Author)

  5. Neural fields theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Graben, Peter; Potthast, Roland; Wright, James

    2014-01-01

    With this book, the editors present the first comprehensive collection in neural field studies, authored by leading scientists in the field - among them are two of the founding-fathers of neural field theory. Up to now, research results in the field have been disseminated across a number of distinct journals from mathematics, computational neuroscience, biophysics, cognitive science and others. Starting with a tutorial for novices in neural field studies, the book comprises chapters on emergent patterns, their phase transitions and evolution, on stochastic approaches, cortical development, cognition, robotics and computation, large-scale numerical simulations, the coupling of neural fields to the electroencephalogram and phase transitions in anesthesia. The intended readership are students and scientists in applied mathematics, theoretical physics, theoretical biology, and computational neuroscience. Neural field theory and its applications have a long-standing tradition in the mathematical and computational ...

  6. Medical diagnosis using neural network

    CERN Document Server

    Kamruzzaman, S M; Siddiquee, Abu Bakar; Mazumder, Md Ehsanul Hoque

    2010-01-01

    This research is to search for alternatives to the resolution of complex medical diagnosis where human knowledge should be apprehended in a general fashion. Successful application examples show that human diagnostic capabilities are significantly worse than the neural diagnostic system. This paper describes a modified feedforward neural network constructive algorithm (MFNNCA), a new algorithm for medical diagnosis. The new constructive algorithm with backpropagation; offer an approach for the incremental construction of near-minimal neural network architectures for pattern classification. The algorithm starts with minimal number of hidden units in the single hidden layer; additional units are added to the hidden layer one at a time to improve the accuracy of the network and to get an optimal size of a neural network. The MFNNCA was tested on several benchmarking classification problems including the cancer, heart disease and diabetes. Experimental results show that the MFNNCA can produce optimal neural networ...

  7. An Overview of Protocols for the Neural Induction of Dental and Oral Stem Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Boon Chin; Lim, Lee Wei; Wu, Wutian; Zhang, Chengfei

    2016-06-01

    To date, various adult stem cells have been identified within the oral cavity, including dental pulp stem cells, dental follicle stem cells, stem cells from apical papilla, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth, periodontal ligament stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells from the gingiva. All of these possess neurogenic potential due to their common developmental origin from the embryonic neural crest. Besides the relative ease of isolation of these adult stem cells from readily available biological waste routinely produced during dental treatment, these cells also possess the advantage of immune compatibility in autologous transplantation. In recent years, much interest has been focused on the derivation of neural lineages from these adult stem cells for therapeutic applications in the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerve regeneration. In addition, there are also promising nontherapeutic applications of stem cell-derived neurons in pharmacological and toxicological screening of neuroactive drugs, and for in vitro modeling of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases. Hence, this review will critically examine the diverse array of in vitro neural induction protocols that have been devised for dental and oral-derived stem cells. These protocols are defined not only by the culture milieu comprising the basal medium plus growth factors, small molecules, and other culture supplements but also by the substrata/surface coatings utilized, the presence of multiple culture stages, the total culture duration, the initial seeding density, and whether the spheroid/neurosphere formation is being utilized to recapitulate the three-dimensional neural differentiation microenvironment that is naturally present physiologically in vivo. PMID:26757369

  8. 黑嘴端凤头燕鸥北方群体存在的新证据%Latest evidence of the existence of the northern flock of the Chinese Crested Tern (Sterna bernsteini)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦玉平; 何芬奇

    2011-01-01

    Three Chinese Crested Terns (Sterna bernsteini) were seen stopping at the Golden Coast of Rizhao (city),southern Shandong Province,China,on 6 September 2011.This is the third record of the bird appearing in northern China since 2004 and it contributes the latest evidence of the existence of the northern flock of the Chinese Crested Tern.The photos attached here have well illustrated the plumage,particularly the pattern of its head,of the Chinese Crested Tern in the post-breeding season.

  9. Neural circuitry and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Valentin A; Tracey, Kevin J

    2015-12-01

    Research during the last decade has significantly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms at the interface between the nervous system and the immune system. Insight into bidirectional neuro-immune communication has characterized the nervous system as an important partner of the immune system in the regulation of inflammation. Neuronal pathways, including the vagus nerve-based inflammatory reflex, are physiological regulators of immune function and inflammation. In parallel, neuronal function is altered in conditions characterized by immune dysregulation and inflammation. Here, we review these regulatory mechanisms and describe the neural circuitry modulating immunity. Understanding these mechanisms reveals possibilities to use targeted neuromodulation as a therapeutic approach for inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. These findings and current clinical exploration of neuromodulation in the treatment of inflammatory diseases define the emerging field of Bioelectronic Medicine. PMID:26512000

  10. Interacting neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, R; Kinzel, W; Kanter, I

    2000-08-01

    Several scenarios of interacting neural networks which are trained either in an identical or in a competitive way are solved analytically. In the case of identical training each perceptron receives the output of its neighbor. The symmetry of the stationary state as well as the sensitivity to the used training algorithm are investigated. Two competitive perceptrons trained on mutually exclusive learning aims and a perceptron which is trained on the opposite of its own output are examined analytically. An ensemble of competitive perceptrons is used as decision-making algorithms in a model of a closed market (El Farol Bar problem or the Minority Game. In this game, a set of agents who have to make a binary decision is considered.); each network is trained on the history of minority decisions. This ensemble of perceptrons relaxes to a stationary state whose performance can be better than random. PMID:11088736

  11. Trends in neural network technology. Neural network gijutsu no doko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, K. (Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-12-01

    The present and future of neural network technologies were reviewed. Neural networks simulate the neurons and synapses of human brain, thus permitting the utilization of heuristic knowledge difficult to describe in a logical manner. Such networks can therefore solve optimization problems, difficult to solve by conventional computers, more rapidly while sacrificing a permissible degree of rigor. In light of these advantages, many attempts have been made to apply neural networks to a variety of engineering fields including character recognition, phonetic recognition diagnosis, operation and so on. Now that these attempts have demonstrated the great potential of neural network technology, its application to practical problems will receive increasing attention. The necessity for fundamental studies on learning algorithms, modularization techniques, hardware technologies and so on will grow in conjunction with the above trends in application. 20 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Principles of artificial neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    Graupe, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Artificial neural networks are most suitable for solving problems that are complex, ill-defined, highly nonlinear, of many and different variables, and/or stochastic. Such problems are abundant in medicine, in finance, in security and beyond. This volume covers the basic theory and architecture of the major artificial neural networks. Uniquely, it presents 18 complete case studies of applications of neural networks in various fields, ranging from cell-shape classification to micro-trading in finance and to constellation recognition - all with their respective source codes. These case studies

  13. Creative-Dynamics Approach To Neural Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Michail A.

    1992-01-01

    Paper discusses approach to mathematical modeling of artificial neural networks exhibiting complicated behaviors reminiscent of creativity and intelligence of biological neural networks. Neural network treated as non-Lipschitzian dynamical system - as described in "Non-Lipschitzian Dynamics For Modeling Neural Networks" (NPO-17814). System serves as tool for modeling of temporal-pattern memories and recognition of complicated spatial patterns.

  14. Evaluation of analgesic effect of local administration of morphine after iliac crest bone graft harvesting: A double blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devinder Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Pain is a complex process influenced by both physiological and psychological factors. In spite of an armamentarium of analgesic drugs and techniques available to combat post-operative pain, appropriate selection, and effective management for relief of post-operative pain still poses unique challenges. The discovery of peripheral opioid receptors has led to growing interest in the use of locally applied opioids (intra-articular, intra-pleural, intra-peritoneal, and perineural for managing acute pain. As bone graft harvesting is associated with significant post-operative pain and there is a paucity of literature on the use of peripheral opioids at the iliac crest bone harvesting site, the present study was planned to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of local administration of morphine after iliac crest bone graft harvesting. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients, 20-50 years of age scheduled to undergo elective surgery for delayed and non-union fracture both bone leg with bone grafting under general anaesthesia (GA were randomly assigned to one of the four groups of 15 patients each: group 1: 2.5 ml normal saline (NS +2.5 ml NS infiltrated into the harvest site at 2 sites + 1 ml NS intramuscularly (i/m; Group 2: 2.5 ml NS + 2.5 ml NS infiltrated into the harvest site at 2 sites + 5 mg morphine in 1 ml i/m.; Group 3: 2.5 mg (2.5 ml morphine + 2.5 mg (2.5 ml morphine infiltrated into the harvest site at 2 sites + 1 ml NS i/m; Group 4: 0.5 mg naloxone (2.5 ml +5 mg (2.5 ml morphine infiltrated into the harvest site at 2 sites + 1 ml NS i/m. Pain from the bone graft site and operative site was assessed for 24 h post-operatively. Results: The patients who had received morphine infiltration (Group 3 had significantly less pain scores at the graft site at 4, 6, and 10 post-operative hours. They also had significantly less morphine consumption and overall better pain relief as compared to the other groups. Conclusions

  15. Proximity association in polygynous western black crested gibbons (Nomascus concolor jingdongensis): network structure and seasonality%Proximity association in polygynous western black crested gibbons (Nomascus concolor jingdongensis):network structure and seasonality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Hua GUAN; Bei HUANG; Wen-He NING; Qing-Yong NI; Xue-Long JIANG

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the structure and seasonality of the proximity network in a group of polygynous western black crested gibbons (Nomascus concolor) using social network analysis.The spatial proximity changed seasonally and was affected by temperature and rainfall.Preferred proximity association was not distributed randomly among individuals.Kinship was one explanation for the social structure,as offspring preferred to maintain close proximity with their mothers.The proximity of infants to mothers decreased with age,and independent offspring had lower proximity to mothers than dependent ones.We found that the adult male had different proximity relationships with two different adult females.The frequency of proximity between the male and the infant-carrying female was significantly higher than that between the male and the female who had immigrated carrying one offspring of uncertain paternity into the group.Infanticide avoidance and/or predation protection for dependent infants might explain the proximity relationship differences.Temperature influenced group proximity association,with individual proximity increasing in the cold months and decreasing in the hot months.Group proximity decreased in months with higher anthropogenic disturbance.

  16. Plakophilin-3 is required for late embryonic amphibian development, exhibiting roles in ectodermal and neural tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, William A; Kloc, Malgorzata; Cho, Kyucheol; Lee, Moonsup; Hofmann, Ilse; Sater, Amy; Vleminckx, Kris; McCrea, Pierre D

    2012-01-01

    The p120-catenin family has undergone a significant expansion during the evolution of vertebrates, resulting in varied functions that have yet to be discerned or fully characterized. Likewise, members of the plakophilins, a related catenin subfamily, are found throughout the cell with little known about their functions outside the desmosomal plaque. While the plakophilin-3 (Pkp3) knockout mouse resulted in skin defects, we find larger, including lethal effects following its depletion in Xenopus. Pkp3, unlike some other characterized catenins in amphibians, does not have significant maternal deposits of mRNA. However, during embryogenesis, two Pkp3 protein products whose temporal expression is partially complimentary become expressed. Only the smaller of these products is found in adult Xenopus tissues, with an expression pattern exhibiting distinctions as well as overlaps with those observed in mammalian studies. We determined that Xenopus Pkp3 depletion causes a skin fragility phenotype in keeping with the mouse knockout, but more novel, Xenopus tailbud embryos are hyposensitive to touch even in embryos lacking outward discernable phenotypes, and we additionally resolved disruptions in certain peripheral neural structures, altered establishment and migration of neural crest, and defects in ectodermal multiciliated cells. The use of two distinct morpholinos, as well as rescue approaches, indicated the specificity of these effects. Our results point to the requirement of Pkp3 in amphibian embryogenesis, with functional roles in a number of tissue types. PMID:22496792

  17. Plakophilin-3 is required for late embryonic amphibian development, exhibiting roles in ectodermal and neural tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A Munoz

    Full Text Available The p120-catenin family has undergone a significant expansion during the evolution of vertebrates, resulting in varied functions that have yet to be discerned or fully characterized. Likewise, members of the plakophilins, a related catenin subfamily, are found throughout the cell with little known about their functions outside the desmosomal plaque. While the plakophilin-3 (Pkp3 knockout mouse resulted in skin defects, we find larger, including lethal effects following its depletion in Xenopus. Pkp3, unlike some other characterized catenins in amphibians, does not have significant maternal deposits of mRNA. However, during embryogenesis, two Pkp3 protein products whose temporal expression is partially complimentary become expressed. Only the smaller of these products is found in adult Xenopus tissues, with an expression pattern exhibiting distinctions as well as overlaps with those observed in mammalian studies. We determined that Xenopus Pkp3 depletion causes a skin fragility phenotype in keeping with the mouse knockout, but more novel, Xenopus tailbud embryos are hyposensitive to touch even in embryos lacking outward discernable phenotypes, and we additionally resolved disruptions in certain peripheral neural structures, altered establishment and migration of neural crest, and defects in ectodermal multiciliated cells. The use of two distinct morpholinos, as well as rescue approaches, indicated the specificity of these effects. Our results point to the requirement of Pkp3 in amphibian embryogenesis, with functional roles in a number of tissue types.

  18. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD Associated Neural Defects: Complex Mechanisms and Potential Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Marrs

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD, caused by prenatal alcohol exposure, can result in craniofacial dysmorphism, cognitive impairment, sensory and motor disabilities among other defects. FASD incidences are as high as 2% to 5 % children born in the US, and prevalence is higher in low socioeconomic populations. Despite various mechanisms being proposed to explain the etiology of FASD, the molecular targets of ethanol toxicity during development are unknown. Proposed mechanisms include cell death, cell signaling defects and gene expression changes. More recently, the involvement of several other molecular pathways was explored, including non-coding RNA, epigenetic changes and specific vitamin deficiencies. These various pathways may interact, producing a wide spectrum of consequences. Detailed understanding of these various pathways and their interactions will facilitate the therapeutic target identification, leading to new clinical intervention, which may reduce the incidence and severity of these highly prevalent preventable birth defects. This review discusses manifestations of alcohol exposure on the developing central nervous system, including the neural crest cells and sensory neural placodes, focusing on molecular neurodevelopmental pathways as possible therapeutic targets for prevention or protection.

  19. Modular, Hierarchical Learning By Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Pierre F.; Toomarian, Nikzad

    1996-01-01

    Modular and hierarchical approach to supervised learning by artificial neural networks leads to neural networks more structured than neural networks in which all neurons fully interconnected. These networks utilize general feedforward flow of information and sparse recurrent connections to achieve dynamical effects. The modular organization, sparsity of modular units and connections, and fact that learning is much more circumscribed are all attractive features for designing neural-network hardware. Learning streamlined by imitating some aspects of biological neural networks.

  20. Demultiplexer circuit for neural stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessendorf, Kurt O; Okandan, Murat; Pearson, Sean

    2012-10-09

    A demultiplexer circuit is disclosed which can be used with a conventional neural stimulator to extend the number of electrodes which can be activated. The demultiplexer circuit, which is formed on a semiconductor substrate containing a power supply that provides all the dc electrical power for operation of the circuit, includes digital latches that receive and store addressing information from the neural stimulator one bit at a time. This addressing information is used to program one or more 1:2.sup.N demultiplexers in the demultiplexer circuit which then route neural stimulation signals from the neural stimulator to an electrode array which is connected to the outputs of the 1:2.sup.N demultiplexer. The demultiplexer circuit allows the number of individual electrodes in the electrode array to be increased by a factor of 2.sup.N with N generally being in a range of 2-4.

  1. Complex-Valued Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hirose, Akira

    2012-01-01

    This book is the second enlarged and revised edition of the first successful monograph on complex-valued neural networks (CVNNs) published in 2006, which lends itself to graduate and undergraduate courses in electrical engineering, informatics, control engineering, mechanics, robotics, bioengineering, and other relevant fields. In the second edition the recent trends in CVNNs research are included, resulting in e.g. almost a doubled number of references. The parametron invented in 1954 is also referred to with discussion on analogy and disparity. Also various additional arguments on the advantages of the complex-valued neural networks enhancing the difference to real-valued neural networks are given in various sections. The book is useful for those beginning their studies, for instance, in adaptive signal processing for highly functional sensing and imaging, control in unknown and changing environment, robotics inspired by human neural systems, and brain-like information processing, as well as interdisciplina...

  2. Neural complexity, dissociation, and schizophrenia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bob, P.; Šusta, M.; Chládek, Jan; Glaslová, K.; Fedor-Ferybergh, P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 10 (2007), HY1-5. ISSN 1234-1010 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : neural complexity * dissociation * schizophrenia Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.607, year: 2007

  3. Neural Networks in Control Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O.

    The intention of this report is to make a systematic examination of the possibilities of applying neural networks in those technical areas, which are familiar to a control engineer. In other words, the potential of neural networks in control applications is given higher priority than a detailed...... study of the networks themselves. With this end in view the following restrictions have been made: - Amongst numerous neural network structures, only the Multi Layer Perceptron (a feed-forward network) is applied. - Amongst numerous training algorithms, only four algorithms are examined, all in a...... recursive form (sample updating). The simplest is the Back Probagation Error Algorithm, and the most complex is the recursive Prediction Error Method using a Gauss-Newton search direction. - Over-fitting is often considered to be a serious problem when training neural networks. This problem is specifically...

  4. [The interdisciplinary fixed restoration of an edentulous maxilla with a pronounced resorption of the alveolar crest. A case report. Part I: The immediate reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teubner, Eckart; Rohner, Dennis; Hammer, Beat; Pietrobon, Nic; Lorenzon, Andreas; Marinello, Carlo P

    2009-01-01

    Edentulous patients wearing a conventional complete denture often request a fixed restoration for functional, esthetical and/or psychosocial reasons. For these patients implant-supported fixed dental prostheses are a prosthetic means of choice. However, after years of edentulism often a marked resorption of the alveolar crest has taken place, asking for bone augmentation before implant placement. Thus, fixed implant reconstructions are time and cost intense and stressful for the patient. This case report documents the immediate fixed reconstruction in the edentulous maxilla after ridge augmentation with a cortical cancellous bone graft from the iliac crest and implant placement. A CAD/CAM-system was used for implant planning and the fabrication of a drilling guide. The prosthetic reconstruction was inserted immediately after implant placement. PMID:19485075

  5. Differential Protection of Generator by Using Neural Network, Fuzzy Neural and Fuzzy Neural Petri Net

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Dr. Abduladhem A. Ali

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the applications of Artificial Intelligence techniques for detecting internalfaults in Power generators. Three techniques are used which are Neural Net (NN, FuzzyNeural Net (FNN and Fuzzy Neural Petri Net (FNPN to implement differential protection ofgenerator. MATLAB toolbox has been used for simulations and generation of faults data fortraining the programs for different faults cases and to implement the relays. Results ofdifferent fault cases are presented and these results are compared among the threeimplemented techniques of relays and with the conventional differential relay of generator.

  6. Neural stem cell derived tumourigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Froldi; Milán Szuperák; Cheng, Louise Y.

    2015-01-01

    In the developing Drosophila CNS, two pools of neural stem cells, the symmetrically dividing progenitors in the neuroepithelium (NE) and the asymmetrically dividing neuroblasts (NBs) generate the majority of the neurons that make up the adult central nervous system (CNS). The generation of a correct sized brain depends on maintaining the fine balance between neural stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, which are regulated by cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic cues. In this review, we wil...

  7. Neural Networks Of VLSI Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Silvio P.

    1991-01-01

    Concept for design of electronic neural network calls for assembly of very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits of few standard types. Each VLSI chip, which contains both analog and digital circuitry, used in modular or "building-block" fashion by interconnecting it in any of variety of ways with other chips. Feedforward neural network in typical situation operates under control of host computer and receives inputs from, and sends outputs to, other equipment.

  8. Neural models and physiological reality

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Barry B.

    2008-01-01

    Neural models of retinal processing provide an important tool for analyzing retinal signals and their functional significance. However, it is here argued that in biological reality, retinal connectivity is unlikely to be as specific as ideal neural models might suggest. The retina is thought to provide functionally specific signals, but this specificity is unlikely to be anatomically complete. This is illustrated by examples of cone connectivity to macaque ganglion cells. For example, cells o...

  9. Neural Networks for Fingerprint Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Baldi, Pierre; Chauvin, Yves

    1993-01-01

    After collecting a data base of fingerprint images, we design a neural network algorithm for fingerprint recognition. When presented with a pair of fingerprint images, the algorithm outputs an estimate of the probability that the two images originate from the same finger. In one experiment, the neural network is trained using a few hundred pairs of images and its performance is subsequently tested using several thousand pairs of images originated from a subset of the database corresponding to...

  10. Neural Networks and Photometric Redshifts

    OpenAIRE

    Tagliaferri, Roberto; Longo, Giuseppe; Andreon, Stefano; Capozziello, Salvatore; Donalek, Ciro; Giordano, Gerardo

    2002-01-01

    We present a neural network based approach to the determination of photometric redshift. The method was tested on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Early Data Release (SDSS-EDR) reaching an accuracy comparable and, in some cases, better than SED template fitting techniques. Different neural networks architecture have been tested and the combination of a Multi Layer Perceptron with 1 hidden layer (22 neurons) operated in a Bayesian framework, with a Self Organizing Map used to estimate the accuracy...

  11. What are artificial neural networks?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Artificial neural networks have been applied to problems ranging from speech recognition to prediction of protein secondary structure, classification of cancers and gene prediction. How do they work and what might they be good for? Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Feb......Artificial neural networks have been applied to problems ranging from speech recognition to prediction of protein secondary structure, classification of cancers and gene prediction. How do they work and what might they be good for? Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Feb...

  12. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachloro-p-dioxin Concentrations in Double-crested Cormorant and Black-crowned Night-heron Eggs of Shooters Island and Isle of Meadows, New York

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A total of eight Double-crested Cormorant and 10 Black-crowned Night-Heron eggs from Shooter's Island and the Isle of Meadows, respectively, were submitted for...

  13. TEC variations during low solar activity period (2005-2007) near the Equatorial Ionospheric Anomaly Crest region in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagiya, Mala S.; Joshi, H. P.; Iyer, K. N.; Aggarwal, M.; Ravindran, S.; Pathan, B. M.

    2009-03-01

    The dual frequency signals from the GPS satellites recorded at Rajkot (22.29° N, 70.74° E, Geographic, 14.03° N Geomagnetic) near the Equatorial ionization anomaly crest in India have been analyzed to study the ionospheric variations in terms of Total Electron Content (TEC) for the low solar activity period from April 2005 to December 2007. In this study, we describe the diurnal and seasonal variations of TEC, solar activity dependence of TEC and effects of a space weather related event, a geomagnetic storm on TEC. The diurnal variation of TEC shows pre-dawn minimum for a short period of time, followed by a steep early morning increase and then reaches maximum value between 14:00 LT and 16:00 LT. The mean diurnal variations during different seasons are brought out. It is found that TEC at Rajkot is at its maximum during Equinoctial months (March, April, September, October), and minimum during the Winter months (November, December, January, February), with intermediate values during Summer months (May, June, July, August), showing a semi annual variation. TEC values have been decreasing since 2005, onwards showing positive correlation with solar activity. TEC variations during the geomagnetic storm commencing 24 August 2005 with Dst=-216 nT are analysed. TEC shows a positive ionospheric storm effect on the first day of the storm and negative ionospheric storm effect on the next day. The equatorial Electrojet control on the development of the equatorial anomaly is also demonstrated.

  14. Pulsed vs. CW low level light therapy on osteoarticular signs and symptoms in limited scleroderma (CREST syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barolet, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    Limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (lcSSc) was formerly known as CREST syndrome in reference to the associated clinical features: Calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, Esophageal dysfunction, Sclerodactyly, and Telangiectasias. The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) has been identified has a major player in the pathogenic process, while low level light therapy (LLLT) has been shown to modulate this cytokine superfamily. This case study was conducted to assess the efficacy of 940nm using microsecond domain pulsing and continuous wave mode (CW) on osteoarticular signs and symptoms associated with lcSSc. The patient was treated two to three times a week for 13 weeks, using a sequential pulsing mode on one elbow, and a CW mode on the other. Efficacy assessments included inflammation, symptoms, pain, and health scales, patient satisfaction, clinical global impression, and adverse effects monitoring. Significant functional and morphologic improvements were observed after LLLT, with best results seen with the pulsing mode. No significant adverse effects were noted. Two mechanisms of action may be at play. The 940nm wavelength provides inside-out heating possibly vasodilating capillaries which in turn increases catabolic processes leading to a reduction of in situ calcinosis. LLLT may also improve symptoms by triggering a cascade of cellular reactions, including the modulation of inflammatory mediators.

  15. The neural processing of taste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katz Donald B

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although there have been many recent advances in the field of gustatory neurobiology, our knowledge of how the nervous system is organized to process information about taste is still far from complete. Many studies on this topic have focused on understanding how gustatory neural circuits are spatially organized to represent information about taste quality (e.g., "sweet", "salty", "bitter", etc.. Arguments pertaining to this issue have largely centered on whether taste is carried by dedicated neural channels or a pattern of activity across a neural population. But there is now mounting evidence that the timing of neural events may also importantly contribute to the representation of taste. In this review, we attempt to summarize recent findings in the field that pertain to these issues. Both space and time are variables likely related to the mechanism of the gustatory neural code: information about taste appears to reside in spatial and temporal patterns of activation in gustatory neurons. What is more, the organization of the taste network in the brain would suggest that the parameters of space and time extend to the neural processing of gustatory information on a much grander scale.

  16. Volcanic eruption of the mid-ocean ridge along the East Pacific Rise crest at 9°45-52'N: direct submersible observations of seafloor phenomena associated with an eruption event in April, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haymon, R.M.; Fornari, D.J.; Von Damm, K. L.; Lilley, M.D.; Perfit, M.R.; Edmond, J.M.; Shanks, Wayne C., III; Lutz, R.A.; Grebmeier, J.M.; Carbotte, S.; Wright, D.; McLaughlin, E.; Smith, M.; Beedle, N.; Olson, E.

    1993-01-01

    In April, 1991, we witnessed from the submersible Alvin a suite of previously undocumented seafloor phenomena accompanying an in-progress eruption of the mid-ocean ridge on the East Pacific Rise crest at 9°45′N–52′N. The volume of the eruption could not be precisely determined, although comparison of pre- and post-eruption SeaBeam bathymetry indicate that any changes in ridge crest morphology resulting from the eruption were < 10 m high.

  17. neural control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Automatic power stabilization control is the desired objective for any reactor operation , especially, nuclear power plants. A major problem in this area is inevitable gap between a real plant ant the theory of conventional analysis and the synthesis of linear time invariant systems. in particular, the trajectory tracking control of a nonlinear plant is a class of problems in which the classical linear transfer function methods break down because no transfer function can represent the system over the entire operating region . there is a considerable amount of research on the model-inverse approach using feedback linearization technique. however, this method requires a prices plant model to implement the exact linearizing feedback, for nuclear reactor systems, this approach is not an easy task because of the uncertainty in the plant parameters and un-measurable state variables . therefore, artificial neural network (ANN) is used either in self-tuning control or in improving the conventional rule-based exper system.the main objective of this thesis is to suggest an ANN, based self-learning controller structure . this method is capable of on-line reinforcement learning and control for a nuclear reactor with a totally unknown dynamics model. previously, researches are based on back- propagation algorithm . back -propagation (BP), fast back -propagation (FBP), and levenberg-marquardt (LM), algorithms are discussed and compared for reinforcement learning. it is found that, LM algorithm is quite superior

  18. Correlational Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandar, Sarath; Khapra, Mitesh M; Larochelle, Hugo; Ravindran, Balaraman

    2016-02-01

    Common representation learning (CRL), wherein different descriptions (or views) of the data are embedded in a common subspace, has been receiving a lot of attention recently. Two popular paradigms here are canonical correlation analysis (CCA)-based approaches and autoencoder (AE)-based approaches. CCA-based approaches learn a joint representation by maximizing correlation of the views when projected to the common subspace. AE-based methods learn a common representation by minimizing the error of reconstructing the two views. Each of these approaches has its own advantages and disadvantages. For example, while CCA-based approaches outperform AE-based approaches for the task of transfer learning, they are not as scalable as the latter. In this work, we propose an AE-based approach, correlational neural network (CorrNet), that explicitly maximizes correlation among the views when projected to the common subspace. Through a series of experiments, we demonstrate that the proposed CorrNet is better than AE and CCA with respect to its ability to learn correlated common representations. We employ CorrNet for several cross-language tasks and show that the representations learned using it perform better than the ones learned using other state-of-the-art approaches. PMID:26654210

  19. Monitoring of vibrating machinery using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary source of vibration in complex engineering systems is rotating machinery. Vibration signatures collected from these components render valuable information about the operational state of the system and may be used to perform diagnostics. For example, the low frequency domain contains information about unbalance, misalignment, instability in journal bearing and mechanical looseness; analysis of the medium frequency range can render information about faults in meshing gear teeth; while the high frequency domain will contain information about incipient faults in rolling-element bearings. Trend analysis may be performed by comparing the vibration spectrum for each machine with a reference spectrum and evaluating the vibration magnitude changes at different frequencies. This form of analysis for diagnostics is often performed by maintenance personnel monitoring and recording transducer signals and analyzing the signals to identify the operating condition of the machine. With the advent of portable fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyzers and ''laptop'' computers, it is possible to collect and analyze vibration data an site and detect incipient failures several weeks or months before repair is necessary. It is often possible to estimate the remaining life of certain systems once a fault has been detected. RMS velocity, acceleration, displacements, peak value, and crest factor readings can be collected from vibration sensors. To exploit all the information embedded in these signals, a robust and advanced analysis technique is required. Our goal is to design a diagnostic system using neural network technology, a system such as this would automate the interpretation of vibration data coming from plant-wide machinery and permit efficient on-line monitoring of these components

  20. Ectopic Myf5 or MyoD prevents the neuronal differentiation program in addition to inducing skeletal muscle differentiation, in the chick neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfini, Marie-Claire; Duprez, Delphine

    2004-02-01

    Forced expression of the bHLH myogenic factors, Myf5 and MyoD, in various mammalian cell lines induces the full program of myogenic differentiation. However, this property has not been extensively explored in vivo. We have taken advantage of the chick model to investigate the effect of electroporation of the mouse Myf5 and MyoD genes in the embryonic neural tube. We found that misexpression of either mouse Myf5 or MyoD in the chick neural tube leads to ectopic skeletal muscle differentiation, assayed by the expression of the myosin heavy chains in the neural tube and neural crest derivatives. We also showed that the endogenous neuronal differentiation program is inhibited under the influence of either ectopic mouse Myf5 or MyoD. We used this new system to analyse, in vivo, the transcriptional regulation between the myogenic factors. We found that MyoD and Myogenin expression can be activated by ectopic mouse Myf5 or MyoD, while Myf5 expression cannot be activated either by mouse MyoD or by itself. We also analysed the transcriptional regulation between the myogenic factors and the different genes involved in myogenesis, such as Mef2c, Pax3, Paraxis, Six1, Mox1, Mox2 and FgfR4. We established the existence of an unexpected regulatory loop between MyoD and FgfR4. The consequences for myogenesis are discussed. PMID:14724123

  1. Atividade antioxidante do ácido hialurônico extraído da crista de frango Antioxidant activity of hyaluronic acid extracted from chicken crest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Severo da Rosa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O ácido hialurônico (AH é uma macromolécula com importância na área médica, na área farmacêutica e na indústria de cosméticos. O cordão umbilical e a crista de galo são os tecidos mais ricos neste polissacarídeo. O Brasil é um dos principais exportadores de frango do mundo; assim, o aproveitamento das cristas dos animais abatidos para a obtenção de AH se mostra particularmente atraente. Este trabalho teve como objetivos fazer a extração do AH da crista de frango e determinar a atividade antioxidante in vitro. Cristas de frangos secas e delipidadas foram submetidas à digestão proteolítica e posteriormente à precipitação com cloreto de cetilpiridinio (CPC. A atividade antioxidante foi determinada pelo método de seqüestro do radical 2,2 - difenil 1-picrilhidrazil (DPPH. A concentração de glicosaminoglicanos (GAGs na crista de frango é de 14,9µg de ácido hexurônico /mg de tecido seco e o AH extraído apresentou ótima atividade antioxidante in vitro. Desse modo, o AH pode ser aproveitado como um resíduo das indústrias de processamento de frangos.The hyaluronic acid (HA is an important macromolecule in medical and pharmaceutical areas as well as in the cosmetics industry. The umbilical cord and the chicken crest are two of the richest tissues in this polysaccharide. Since Brazil is one of the main chicken exporters in the world, the utilization of crests from slaughtered animals to obtain HA is particularly attractive. The present research aimed to extract hyaluronic acid (HA from the crest and determine its antioxidant activity in vitro. Dry and delipidated chicken crest underwent proteolytic digestion and subsequent precipitation with cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC. Antioxidant activity was determined by the 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH method. The glycosaminoglycans (GAG concentration in the chicken crest was 14.9µg of hexuronic acid /mg of dry tissue and the extracted HA presented great antioxidant

  2. Neural network regulation driven by autonomous neural firings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myoung Won

    2016-07-01

    Biological neurons naturally fire spontaneously due to the existence of a noisy current. Such autonomous firings may provide a driving force for network formation because synaptic connections can be modified due to neural firings. Here, we study the effect of autonomous firings on network formation. For the temporally asymmetric Hebbian learning, bidirectional connections lose their balance easily and become unidirectional ones. Defining the difference between reciprocal connections as new variables, we could express the learning dynamics as if Ising model spins interact with each other in magnetism. We present a theoretical method to estimate the interaction between the new variables in a neural system. We apply the method to some network systems and find some tendencies of autonomous neural network regulation.

  3. Optical neural stimulation modeling on degenerative neocortical neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zverev, M.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Salas-García, I.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2015-07-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases usually appear at advanced age. Medical advances make people live longer and as a consequence, the number of neurodegenerative diseases continuously grows. There is still no cure for these diseases, but several brain stimulation techniques have been proposed to improve patients' condition. One of them is Optical Neural Stimulation (ONS), which is based on the application of optical radiation over specific brain regions. The outer cerebral zones can be noninvasively stimulated, without the common drawbacks associated to surgical procedures. This work focuses on the analysis of ONS effects in stimulated neurons to determine their influence in neuronal activity. For this purpose a neural network model has been employed. The results show the neural network behavior when the stimulation is provided by means of different optical radiation sources and constitute a first approach to adjust the optical light source parameters to stimulate specific neocortical areas.

  4. Neural Networks for Flight Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    Neural networks are being developed at NASA Ames Research Center to permit real-time adaptive control of time varying nonlinear systems, enhance the fault-tolerance of mission hardware, and permit online system reconfiguration. In general, the problem of controlling time varying nonlinear systems with unknown structures has not been solved. Adaptive neural control techniques show considerable promise and are being applied to technical challenges including automated docking of spacecraft, dynamic balancing of the space station centrifuge, online reconfiguration of damaged aircraft, and reducing cost of new air and spacecraft designs. Our experiences have shown that neural network algorithms solved certain problems that conventional control methods have been unable to effectively address. These include damage mitigation in nonlinear reconfiguration flight control, early performance estimation of new aircraft designs, compensation for damaged planetary mission hardware by using redundant manipulator capability, and space sensor platform stabilization. This presentation explored these developments in the context of neural network control theory. The discussion began with an overview of why neural control has proven attractive for NASA application domains. The more important issues in control system development were then discussed with references to significant technical advances in the literature. Examples of how these methods have been applied were given, followed by projections of emerging application needs and directions.

  5. Evaluation of VIIRS Land Surface Temperature Using CREST-SAFE Air, Snow Surface, and Soil Temperature Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos L. Pérez Díaz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS Land Surface Temperature (LST Environmental Data Record (EDR was evaluated against snow surface (T-skin and near-surface air temperature (T-air ground observations recorded at the Cooperative Remote Sensing Science and Technology Center—Snow Analysis and Field Experiment (CREST-SAFE, located in Caribou, ME, USA during the winters of 2013 and 2014. The satellite LST corroboration of snow-covered areas is imperative because high-latitude regions are often physically inaccessible and there is a need to complement the data from the existing meteorological station networks. T-skin is not a standard meteorological parameter commonly observed at synoptic stations. Common practice is to measure surface infrared emission from the land surface at research stations across the world that allow for estimating ground-observed LST. Accurate T-skin observations are critical for estimating latent and sensible heat fluxes over snow-covered areas because the incoming and outgoing radiation fluxes from the snow mass and T-air make the snow surface temperature different from the average snowpack temperature. Precise characterization of the LST using satellite observations is an important issue because several climate and hydrological models use T-skin as input. Results indicate that T-air correlates better than T-skin with VIIRS LST data and that the accuracy of nighttime LST retrievals is considerably better than that of daytime. Based on these results, empirical relationships to estimate T-air and T-skin for clear-sky conditions from remotely-sensed (RS LST were derived. Additionally, an empirical formula to correct cloud-contaminated RS LST was developed.

  6. TEC variations during low solar activity period (2005–2007 near the Equatorial Ionospheric Anomaly Crest region in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ravindran

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The dual frequency signals from the GPS satellites recorded at Rajkot (22.29° N, 70.74° E, Geographic, 14.03° N Geomagnetic near the Equatorial ionization anomaly crest in India have been analyzed to study the ionospheric variations in terms of Total Electron Content (TEC for the low solar activity period from April 2005 to December 2007. In this study, we describe the diurnal and seasonal variations of TEC, solar activity dependence of TEC and effects of a space weather related event, a geomagnetic storm on TEC. The diurnal variation of TEC shows pre-dawn minimum for a short period of time, followed by a steep early morning increase and then reaches maximum value between 14:00 LT and 16:00 LT. The mean diurnal variations during different seasons are brought out. It is found that TEC at Rajkot is at its maximum during Equinoctial months (March, April, September, October, and minimum during the Winter months (November, December, January, February, with intermediate values during Summer months (May, June, July, August, showing a semi annual variation. TEC values have been decreasing since 2005, onwards showing positive correlation with solar activity. TEC variations during the geomagnetic storm commencing 24 August 2005 with Dst=−216 nT are analysed. TEC shows a positive ionospheric storm effect on the first day of the storm and negative ionospheric storm effect on the next day. The equatorial Electrojet control on the development of the equatorial anomaly is also demonstrated.

  7. Occurrence of Sporadic -E layer during the Low Solar Activity over the Anomaly Crest Region Bhopal, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhawre, Purushottam

    2016-07-01

    Ionospheric anomaly crest regions are most challenging for scientific community to understand its mechanism and investigation, for this purpose we are investigating some inospheric result for this region. The study is based on the ionogram data recorded by IPS-71 Digital Ionosonde installed over anomaly crust region Bhopal (Geo.Lat.23.2° N, Geo. Long77.4° E, Dip latitude18.4°) over a four year period from January 2007 to December 2010, covering the ending phase of 23rd Solar Cycle and starting phase of 24th solar cycle. This particular period is felt to be very suitable for examining the sunspot number and it encompasses periods of low solar activities. Quarterly ionograms are analyzed for 24 hours during these study years and have been carefully examined to note down the presence of sporadic- E. We also note down the space weather activities along with the study. The studies are divided in mainly four parts with space and geomagnetic activities during these periods. The occurrence probability of this layer is highest in summer solstice, moderate during equinox and low during winter solstice. Remarkable occurrence peaks appear from June to July in summer and from December to January in winter. The layer occurrence showed a double peak variation with distinct layer groups, in the morning (0200 LT) and the other during evening (1800 LT).The morning layer descent was associated with layer density increase indicating the strengthening of the layer while it decreased during the evening layer descent. The result indicates the presence of semi-diurnal tide over the location while the higher descent velocities could be due to the modulation of the ionization by gravity waves along with the tides. The irregularities associated with the gradient-drift instability disappear during the counter electrojet and the current flow is reversed in westward.

  8. Comparative characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells derived from reamer-irrigator-aspirator, iliac crest bone marrow, and adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toosi, S; Naderi-Meshkin, H; Kalalinia, F; Peivandi, M T; Hossein Khani, H; Bahrami, A R; Heirani-Tabasi, A; Mirahmadi, M; Behravan, J

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been considered promising tools for new clinical concepts in supporting cellular therapy and regenerative medicine. More recently, Ream/Irrigator/Aspirator (RIA) was introduced as a source of MSCs. In this study we compared MSCs derived from three different sources (iliac crest bone marrow (ICBM), adipose tissue (AT), and (RIA)) regarding the morphology, the success rate of isolating MSCs, colony frequency, expansion potential, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation capacity. MSCs were isolated from three different sources and flow cytometric analyses were performed for cell characterization. Colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) assay and population doubling time (PDT) were evaluated for MSCs derived from three different sources and differentiation potential of RIA, ICBM-, and AT-MSCs were determined by staining. Additionally, gene expression profiles for tissue specific markers corresponding to osteogenesis and chondrogenesis were analyzed using real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Cultured with the appropriate condition, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation could be confirmed in all MSC preparations. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that RIA- and AT-derived MSCs have more homogenous populations than ICBM-MSCs. A comparison of the colonogenic ability in different tissues by CFU-F assay after 10 days showed that more colonies are formed from RIA-MSCs than from ICBM-MSCs, and AT-MSCs. AT-MSCs, were dispersed with no obvious colonies. The RIA-MSCs underwent osteogenesis and chondrogenesis at a faster rate than ICBM and AT-MSCs. Direct comparisons of RIA- to ICBM- and AT-MSCs have shown the RIA-MSCs have higher differentiation toward osteoblast and chondrocytes compared to other sources of MSCs. Hence, RIA-MSCs may be recommended as a more suitable source for treating orthopedic disorders. PMID:27609477

  9. Association of Serum 17β-Estradiol Concentration, Hormone Therapy, and Alveolar Crest Height in Postmenopausal Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youjin; LaMonte, Michael J.; Hovey, Kathleen M.; Mai, Xiaodan; Tezal, Mine; Millen, Amy E.; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M.; Genco, Robert J.; Barnabei, Vanessa M.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Background Declines in endogenous estrogen levels after menopause can lead to systemic bone loss, including loss of oral bone and alveolar crest height (ACH). However, few studies have assessed both serum 17β-estradiol (E2) and exogenous hormone therapy (HT) use in relation to oral bone loss. Methods This study examines the associations among serum E2, HT use, and ACH in 613 postmenopausal women from the Buffalo OsteoPerio study. Baseline ACH levels and 5-year ACH were assessed for groups according to E2 level (undetectable, >5.00 to ≤18.00, >18.00 to ≤46.07, and >46.07 pg/mL) and among HT use (never, ever) using analysis of variance and analysis of covariance. Logistic regression was used to analyze the association of ACH loss with serum E2 and HT use. Results In cross-sectional analyses, no association was found of serum E2 with whole-mouth mean or worst-site ACH. However, history of HT use was associated with ACH. Women who had never used HT had more ACH loss assessed as a whole-mouth mean ACH (P = 0.01) and as worst-site ACH loss (P = 0.03). In logistic regression analyses of baseline ACH loss severity, HT never-users had two-fold higher odds of being in the severe ACH loss category compared to ever-users (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 3.62). No association was observed of 5-year change in ACH with baseline serum E2 or HT use. Conclusion Although this study did not detect an association with current serum E2 level and ACH, HT use was found to be associated with less ACH loss in postmenopausal women. PMID:25594424

  10. Neural networks and statistical learning

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Ke-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Providing a broad but in-depth introduction to neural network and machine learning in a statistical framework, this book provides a single, comprehensive resource for study and further research. All the major popular neural network models and statistical learning approaches are covered with examples and exercises in every chapter to develop a practical working understanding of the content. Each of the twenty-five chapters includes state-of-the-art descriptions and important research results on the respective topics. The broad coverage includes the multilayer perceptron, the Hopfield network, associative memory models, clustering models and algorithms, the radial basis function network, recurrent neural networks, principal component analysis, nonnegative matrix factorization, independent component analysis, discriminant analysis, support vector machines, kernel methods, reinforcement learning, probabilistic and Bayesian networks, data fusion and ensemble learning, fuzzy sets and logic, neurofuzzy models, hardw...

  11. Video Compression Using Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Mishra

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Apart from the existing technology on image compression represented by series of JPEG, MPEG and H.26x standards, new technology such as neural networks and genetic algorithms are being developed to explore the future of image coding. Successful applications of neural networks to basic propagation algorithm have now become well established and other aspects of neural network involvement in this technology. In this paper different algorithms were implemented like gradient descent back propagation, gradient descent with momentum back propagation, gradient descent with adaptive learning back propagation, gradient descent with momentum and adaptive learning back propagation and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The size of original video clip is 25MB and after compression it becomes 21.3MB giving the compression ratio as 85.2% and compression factor of 1.174. It was observed that the size remains same after compression but the difference is in the clarity.

  12. COCOMO Estimates Using Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupama Kaushik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Software cost estimation is an important phase in software development. It predicts the amount of effort and development time required to build a software system. It is one of the most critical tasks and an accurate estimate provides a strong base to the development procedure. In this paper, the most widely used software cost estimation model, the Constructive Cost Model (COCOMO is discussed. The model is implemented with the help of artificial neural networks and trained using the perceptron learning algorithm. The COCOMO dataset is used to train and to test the network. The test results from the trained neural network are compared with that of the COCOMO model. The aim of our research is to enhance the estimation accuracy of the COCOMO model by introducing the artificial neural networks to it.

  13. Neural Networks and Database Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Schikuta, Erich

    2008-01-01

    Object-oriented database systems proved very valuable at handling and administrating complex objects. In the following guidelines for embedding neural networks into such systems are presented. It is our goal to treat networks as normal data in the database system. From the logical point of view, a neural network is a complex data value and can be stored as a normal data object. It is generally accepted that rule-based reasoning will play an important role in future database applications. The knowledge base consists of facts and rules, which are both stored and handled by the underlying database system. Neural networks can be seen as representation of intensional knowledge of intelligent database systems. So they are part of a rule based knowledge pool and can be used like conventional rules. The user has a unified view about his knowledge base regardless of the origin of the unique rules.

  14. Neural networks in signal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Engineering has matured during the last decade. In research and design, control, supervision, maintenance and production, mathematical models and theories are used extensively. In all such applications signal processing is embedded in the process. Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), because of their nonlinear, adaptive nature are well suited to such applications where the classical assumptions of linearity and second order Gaussian noise statistics cannot be made. ANN's can be treated as nonparametric techniques, which can model an underlying process from example data. They can also adopt their model parameters to statistical change with time. Algorithms in the framework of Neural Networks in Signal processing have found new applications potentials in the field of Nuclear Engineering. This paper reviews the fundamentals of Neural Networks in signal processing and their applications in tasks such as recognition/identification and control. The topics covered include dynamic modeling, model based ANN's, statistical learning, eigen structure based processing and generalization structures. (orig.)

  15. Principles of neural information processing

    CERN Document Server

    Seelen, Werner v

    2016-01-01

    In this fundamental book the authors devise a framework that describes the working of the brain as a whole. It presents a comprehensive introduction to the principles of Neural Information Processing as well as recent and authoritative research. The books´ guiding principles are the main purpose of neural activity, namely, to organize behavior to ensure survival, as well as the understanding of the evolutionary genesis of the brain. Among the developed principles and strategies belong self-organization of neural systems, flexibility, the active interpretation of the world by means of construction and prediction as well as their embedding into the world, all of which form the framework of the presented description. Since, in brains, their partial self-organization, the lifelong adaptation and their use of various methods of processing incoming information are all interconnected, the authors have chosen not only neurobiology and evolution theory as a basis for the elaboration of such a framework, but also syst...

  16. Performance sustaining intracortical neural prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuyujukian, Paul; Kao, Jonathan C.; Fan, Joline M.; Stavisky, Sergey D.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Neural prostheses, or brain-machine interfaces, aim to restore efficient communication and movement ability to those suffering from paralysis. A major challenge these systems face is robust performance, particularly with aging signal sources. The aim in this study was to develop a neural prosthesis that could sustain high performance in spite of signal instability while still minimizing retraining time. Approach. We trained two rhesus macaques implanted with intracortical microelectrode arrays 1-4 years prior to this study to acquire targets with a neurally-controlled cursor. We measured their performance via achieved bitrate (bits per second, bps). This task was repeated over contiguous days to evaluate the sustained performance across time. Main results. We found that in the monkey with a younger (i.e., two year old) implant and better signal quality, a fixed decoder could sustain performance for a month at a rate of 4 bps, the highest achieved communication rate reported to date. This fixed decoder was evaluated across 22 months and experienced a performance decline at a rate of 0.24 bps yr-1. In the monkey with the older (i.e., 3.5 year old) implant and poorer signal quality, a fixed decoder could not sustain performance for more than a few days. Nevertheless, performance in this monkey was maintained for two weeks without requiring additional online retraining time by utilizing prior days’ experimental data. Upon analysis of the changes in channel tuning, we found that this stability appeared partially attributable to the cancelling-out of neural tuning fluctuations when projected to two-dimensional cursor movements. Significance. The findings in this study (1) document the highest-performing communication neural prosthesis in monkeys, (2) confirm and extend prior reports of the stability of fixed decoders, and (3) demonstrate a protocol for system stability under conditions where fixed decoders would otherwise fail. These improvements to decoder

  17. Application of neural networks in coastal engineering

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mandal, S.

    the neural network attractive. A neural network is an information processing system modeled on the structure of the dynamic process. It can solve the complex/nonlinear problems quickly once trained by operating on problems using an interconnected number...

  18. Plant Growth Models Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we descrive our motivation and approach to devloping models and the neural network architecture. Initial use of the artificial neural network for modeling the single plant process of transpiration is presented.

  19. Ocean wave forecasting using recurrent neural networks

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mandal, S.; Prabaharan, N.

    , merchant vessel routing, nearshore construction, etc. more efficiently and safely. This paper describes an artificial neural network, namely recurrent neural network with rprop update algorithm and is applied for wave forecasting. Measured ocean waves off...

  20. Neural network exploitation in reliability assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contribution deals with neural network application for the diagnostic system of the three-phase asynchronous electro motor. The case study is done and can be used as a model for the next application of neural network methodology.

  1. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  2. Neural nets and chaotic carriers

    CERN Document Server

    Whittle, Peter

    2010-01-01

    ""Neural Nets and Chaotic Carriers"" develops rational principles for the design of associative memories, with a view to applying these principles to models with irregularly oscillatory operation so evident in biological neural systems, and necessitated by the meaninglessness of absolute signal levels. Design is based on the criterion that an associative memory must be able to cope with 'fading data', i.e., to form an inference from the data even as its memory of that data degrades. The resultant net shows striking biological parallels. When these principles are combined with the Freeman speci

  3. Visual Grouping by Neural Oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Guoshen

    2008-01-01

    Distributed synchronization is known to occur at several scales in the brain, and has been suggested as playing a key functional role in perceptual grouping. State-of-the-art visual grouping algorithms, however, seem to give comparatively little attention to neural synchronization analogies. Based on the framework of concurrent synchronization of dynamic systems, simple networks of neural oscillators coupled with diffusive connections are proposed to solve visual grouping problems. Multi-layer algorithms and feedback mechanisms are also studied. The same algorithm is shown to achieve promising results on several classical visual grouping problems, including point clustering, contour integration and image segmentation.

  4. MEMBRAIN NEURAL NETWORK FOR VISUAL PATTERN RECOGNITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Popko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of visual patterns is one of significant applications of Artificial Neural Networks, which partially emulate human thinking in the domain of artificial intelligence. In the paper, a simplified neural approach to recognition of visual patterns is portrayed and discussed. This paper is dedicated for investigators in visual patterns recognition, Artificial Neural Networking and related disciplines. The document describes also MemBrain application environment as a powerful and easy to use neural networks’ editor and simulator supporting ANN.

  5. Building a Chaotic Proved Neural Network

    CERN Document Server

    Bahi, Jacques M; Salomon, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Chaotic neural networks have received a great deal of attention these last years. In this paper we establish a precise correspondence between the so-called chaotic iterations and a particular class of artificial neural networks: global recurrent multi-layer perceptrons. We show formally that it is possible to make these iterations behave chaotically, as defined by Devaney, and thus we obtain the first neural networks proven chaotic. Several neural networks with different architectures are trained to exhibit a chaotical behavior.

  6. Neural Network Adaptations to Hardware Implementations

    OpenAIRE

    Moerland, Perry,; Fiesler,Emile

    1997-01-01

    In order to take advantage of the massive parallelism offered by artificial neural networks, hardware implementations are essential.However, most standard neural network models are not very suitable for implementation in hardware and adaptations are needed. In this section an overview is given of the various issues that are encountered when mapping an ideal neural network model onto a compact and reliable neural network hardware implementation, like quantization, handling nonuniformities and ...

  7. Neural Network Adaptations to Hardware Implementations

    OpenAIRE

    Moerland, Perry,; Fiesler,Emile; Beale, R

    1997-01-01

    In order to take advantage of the massive parallelism offered by artificial neural networks, hardware implementations are essential. However, most standard neural network models are not very suitable for implementation in hardware and adaptations are needed. In this section an overview is given of the various issues that are encountered when mapping an ideal neural network model onto a compact and reliable neural network hardware implementation, like quantization, handling nonuniformities and...

  8. Model Of Neural Network With Creative Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Michail; Barhen, Jacob

    1993-01-01

    Paper presents analysis of mathematical model of one-neuron/one-synapse neural network featuring coupled activation and learning dynamics and parametrical periodic excitation. Demonstrates self-programming, partly random behavior of suitable designed neural network; believed to be related to spontaneity and creativity of biological neural networks.

  9. Neural mechanisms underlying the evolvability of behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, Paul S.

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of nervous systems alters the evolvability of behaviour. Complex nervous systems are phylogenetically constrained; nevertheless particular species-specific behaviours have repeatedly evolved, suggesting a predisposition towards those behaviours. Independently evolved behaviours in animals that share a common neural architecture are generally produced by homologous neural structures, homologous neural pathways and even in the case of some invertebrates, homologous identified neu...

  10. International joint conference on neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This book contains papers on neural networks. Included are the following topics: A self-training visual inspection system with a neural network classifier; A bifurcation theory approach to vector field programming for periodic attractors; and construction of neural nets using the radon transform.

  11. Simplified LQG Control with Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O.

    1997-01-01

    A new neural network application for non-linear state control is described. One neural network is modelled to form a Kalmann predictor and trained to act as an optimal state observer for a non-linear process. Another neural network is modelled to form a state controller and trained to produce a...

  12. Neural chips, neural computers and application in high and superhigh energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Architecture peculiarity and characteristics of series of neural chips and neural computes used in scientific instruments are considered. Tendency of development and use of them in high energy and superhigh energy physics experiments are described. Comparative data which characterize the efficient use of neural chips for useful event selection, classification elementary particles, reconstruction of tracks of charged particles and for search of hypothesis Higgs particles are given. The characteristics of native neural chips and accelerated neural boards are considered

  13. INAA application in the age dynamics assessment of Ca, Cl, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, and Sr contents in the cortical bone of human iliac crest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senile osteoporosis and osteoporosis among postmenopausal women are an urgent problem. The effect of age and sex on chemical element contents in intact cortical bone of iliac crest of 80 relatively healthy 15-55 year old women (n=36) and men (n=44) was investigated. The IAEA and NIST reference materials (H-5 animal bone and SRM1486 bone meal) were used to estimate the precision and accuracy of results. Contents of Ca, Cl, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, and Sr in intact bone samples were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis using short lived radionuclides. Mean values (M ± S.E.M.) for mass fraction of the investigated elements (on dry weight basis) for female and male all together were: 208 ± 3 g/kg, 1390 ± 55 mg/kg, 746 ± 41 mg/kg, 2070 ± 65 mg/kg, <0.36 ± 0.02 mg/kg, 5590 ± 1200 mg/kg, 95.3 ± 17.0 g/kg, and 308 ± 18 mg/kg respectively. The contents of elements such as Ca, Mg, and P in the cortical iliac crest tend to decrease with age to a certain degree for both women and men. This tendency is more pronounced for men. Sex-related comparison did not show any differences in Ca, Cl, Mg, Mn, Na, and Sr mass fractions. Statistical little significant (p≤0.05, t-test) higher mass fraction of P in the female and K in the male cortical iliac crest was found only. (author)

  14. Binary Factorization by Neural Autoassociators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Húsek, Dušan; Frolov, A. A.; Muraviev, I.; Řezanková, H.; Snášel, V.; Polyakov, P.Y.

    Zürich : ACTA Press, 2003 - (Hamza, M.), s. 649-653 ISBN 0-88986-390-3. ISSN 1482-7913. [IASTED International Conference /3./. Benalmadena (ES), 08.09.2003-10.09.2003] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00B096 Keywords : Boolean factorization * recurrent neural network s * single-step approximation Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information

  15. Artificial neural networks in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, P.E.

    1994-07-01

    This Technology Brief provides an overview of artificial neural networks (ANN). A definition and explanation of an ANN is given and situations in which an ANN is used are described. ANN applications to medicine specifically are then explored and the areas in which it is currently being used are discussed. Included are medical diagnostic aides, biochemical analysis, medical image analysis and drug development.

  16. Nanomaterial-Enabled Neural Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongchen; Guo, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed. PMID:27013938

  17. Nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchen eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed.

  18. Phase Transitions of Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Kinzel, Wolfgang

    1997-01-01

    The cooperative behaviour of interacting neurons and synapses is studied using models and methods from statistical physics. The competition between training error and entropy may lead to discontinuous properties of the neural network. This is demonstrated for a few examples: Perceptron, associative memory, learning from examples, generalization, multilayer networks, structure recognition, Bayesian estimate, on-line training, noise estimation and time series generation.

  19. Medical Imaging with Neural Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to provide an overview of the recent developments in the use of artificial neural networks in medical imaging. The areas of medical imaging that are covered include : ultrasound, magnetic resonance, nuclear medicine and radiological (including computerized tomography). (authors)

  20. Aphasia Classification Using Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axer, H.; Jantzen, Jan; Berks, G.;

    2000-01-01

    A web-based software model (http://fuzzy.iau.dtu.dk/aphasia.nsf) was developed as an example for classification of aphasia using neural networks. Two multilayer perceptrons were used to classify the type of aphasia (Broca, Wernicke, anomic, global) according to the results in some subtests of the...