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Sample records for arginine catabolic mobile

  1. An unexpected location of the arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) in a USA300-related MRSA strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Mette Damkjær; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Boye, Kit;

    2011-01-01

    In methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) was initially described in USA300 (t008-ST8) where it is located downstream of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). A common health-care associated MRSA in Copenhagen, Denmark (t024......-ST8) is clonally related to USA300 and is frequently PCR positive for the ACME specific arcA-gene. This study is the first to describe an ACME element upstream of the SCCmec in MRSA. By traditional SCCmec typing schemes, the SCCmec of t024-ST8 strain M1 carries SCCmec IVa, but full sequencing of the...

  2. Arginine transport in catabolic disease states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ming; Choudry, Haroon A; Epler, Mark J; Meng, Qinghe; Karinch, Anne; Lin, Chengmao; Souba, Wiley

    2004-10-01

    Arginine appears to be a semiessential amino acid in humans during critical illness. Catabolic disease states such as sepsis, injury, and cancer cause an increase in arginine utilization, which exceeds body production, leading to arginine depletion. This is aggravated by the reduced nutrient intake that is associated with critical illness. Arginine depletion may have negative consequences on tissue function under these circumstances. Nutritional regimens containing arginine have been shown to improve nitrogen balance and lymphocyte function, and stimulate arginine transport in the liver. We have studied the effects of stress mediators on arginine transport in vascular endothelium, liver, and gut epithelium. In vascular endothelium, endotoxin stimulates arginine uptake, an effect that is mediated by the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and by the cyclo-oxygenase pathway. This TNF-alpha stimulation involves the activation of intracellular protein kinase C (PKC). A significant increase in hepatic arginine transport activity also occurs following burn injury and in rats with progressive malignant disease. Surgical removal of the growing tumor results in a normalization of the accelerated hepatic arginine transport within days. Chronic metabolic acidosis and sepsis individually augment intestinal arginine transport in rats and Caco-2 cell culture. PKC and mitogen-activated protein kinases are involved in mediating the sepsis/acidosis stimulation of arginine transport. Understanding the regulation of plasma membrane arginine transport will enhance our knowledge of nutrition and metabolism in seriously ill patients and may lead to the design of improved nutritional support formulas. PMID:15465794

  3. Catabolism and safety of supplemental L-arginine in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenlong; Hou, Yongqing; Hu, Shengdi; Bazer, Fuller W; Meininger, Cynthia J; McNeal, Catherine J; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-07-01

    L-arginine (Arg) is utilized via multiple pathways to synthesize protein and low-molecular-weight bioactive substances (e.g., nitric oxide, creatine, and polyamines) with enormous physiological importance. Furthermore, Arg regulates cell signaling pathways and gene expression to improve cardiovascular function, augment insulin sensitivity, enhance lean tissue mass, and reduce obesity in humans. Despite its versatile roles, the use of Arg as a dietary supplement is limited due to the lack of data to address concerns over its safety in humans. Data from animal studies are reviewed to assess arginine catabolism and the safety of long-term Arg supplementation. The arginase pathway was responsible for catabolism of 76-85 and 81-96 % Arg in extraintestinal tissues of pigs and rats, respectively. Dietary supplementation with Arg-HCl or the Arg base [315- and 630-mg Arg/(kg BW d) for 91 d] had no adverse effects on male or female pigs. Similarly, no safety issues were observed for male or female rats receiving supplementation with 1.8- and 3.6-g Arg/(kg BW d) for at least 91 d. Intravenous administration of Arg-HCl to gestating sheep at 81 and 180 mg Arg/(kg BW d) is safe for at least 82 and 40 d, respectively. Animals fed conventional diets can well tolerate large amounts of supplemental Arg [up to 630-mg Arg/(kg BW d) in pigs or 3.6-g Arg/(kg BW d) in rats] for 91 d, which are equivalent to 573-mg Arg/(kg BW d) for humans. Collectively, these results can help guide studies to determine the safety of long-term oral administration of Arg in humans. PMID:27156062

  4. Characterization of a Novel Arginine Catabolic Mobile Element (ACME) and Staphylococcal Chromosomal Cassette mec Composite Island with Significant Homology to Staphylococcus epidermidis ACME type II in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Genotype ST22-MRSA-IV.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shore, Anna C

    2011-02-22

    The arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) is prevalent among ST8-MRSA-IVa (USA300) isolates and evidence suggests that ACME enhances the ability of ST8-MRSA-IVa to grow and survive on its host. ACME has been identified in a small number of isolates belonging to other MRSA clones but is widespread among coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). This study reports the first description of ACME in two distinct strains of the pandemic ST22-MRSA-IV clone. A total of 238 MRSA isolates recovered in Ireland between 1971 and 2008 were investigated for ACME using a DNA microarray. Twenty-three isolates (9.7%) were ACME-positive, all were either MRSA genotype ST8-MRSA-IVa (7\\/23, 30%) or ST22-MRSA-IV (16\\/23, 70%). Whole-genome sequencing and comprehensive molecular characterization revealed the presence of a novel 46-kb ACME and SCCmec composite island (ACME\\/SCCmec-CI) in ST22-MRSA-IVh isolates (n = 15). This ACME\\/SCCmec-CI consists of a 12-kb DNA region previously identified in ACME type II in S. epidermidis ATCC 12228, a truncated copy of the J1 region of SCCmec I and a complete SCCmec IVh element. The composite island has a novel genetic organization with ACME located within orfX and SCCmec located downstream of ACME. One pvl-positive ST22-MRSA-IVa isolate carried ACME located downstream of SCCmec IVa as previously described in ST8-MRSA-IVa. These results suggest that ACME has been acquired by ST22-MRSA-IV on two independent occasions. At least one of these instances may have involved horizontal transfer and recombination events between MRSA and CoNS. The presence of ACME may enhance dissemination of ST22-MRSA-IV, an already successful MRSA clone.

  5. Characterization of a novel arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) and staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec composite island with significant homology to Staphylococcus epidermidis ACME type II in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus genotype ST22-MRSA-IV.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shore, Anna C

    2011-05-01

    The arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) is prevalent among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates of sequence type 8 (ST8) and staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) type IVa (USA300) (ST8-MRSA-IVa isolates), and evidence suggests that ACME enhances the ability of ST8-MRSA-IVa to grow and survive on its host. ACME has been identified in a small number of isolates belonging to other MRSA clones but is widespread among coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). This study reports the first description of ACME in two distinct strains of the pandemic ST22-MRSA-IV clone. A total of 238 MRSA isolates recovered in Ireland between 1971 and 2008 were investigated for ACME using a DNA microarray. Twenty-three isolates (9.7%) were ACME positive, and all were either MRSA genotype ST8-MRSA-IVa (7\\/23, 30%) or MRSA genotype ST22-MRSA-IV (16\\/23, 70%). Whole-genome sequencing and comprehensive molecular characterization revealed the presence of a novel 46-kb ACME and staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) composite island (ACME\\/SCCmec-CI) in ST22-MRSA-IVh isolates (n=15). This ACME\\/SCCmec-CI consists of a 12-kb DNA region previously identified in ACME type II in S. epidermidis ATCC 12228, a truncated copy of the J1 region of SCCmec type I, and a complete SCCmec type IVh element. The composite island has a novel genetic organization, with ACME located within orfX and SCCmec located downstream of ACME. One PVL locus-positive ST22-MRSA-IVa isolate carried ACME located downstream of SCCmec type IVa, as previously described in ST8-MRSA-IVa. These results suggest that ACME has been acquired by ST22-MRSA-IV on two independent occasions. At least one of these instances may have involved horizontal transfer and recombination events between MRSA and CoNS. The presence of ACME may enhance dissemination of ST22-MRSA-IV, an already successful MRSA clone.

  6. Bioinformatic evaluation of L-arginine catabolic pathways in 24 cyanobacteria and transcriptional analysis of genes encoding enzymes of L-arginine catabolism in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pistorius Elfriede K

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background So far very limited knowledge exists on L-arginine catabolism in cyanobacteria, although six major L-arginine-degrading pathways have been described for prokaryotes. Thus, we have performed a bioinformatic analysis of possible L-arginine-degrading pathways in cyanobacteria. Further, we chose Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 for a more detailed bioinformatic analysis and for validation of the bioinformatic predictions on L-arginine catabolism with a transcript analysis. Results We have evaluated 24 cyanobacterial genomes of freshwater or marine strains for the presence of putative L-arginine-degrading enzymes. We identified an L-arginine decarboxylase pathway in all 24 strains. In addition, cyanobacteria have one or two further pathways representing either an arginase pathway or L-arginine deiminase pathway or an L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase pathway. An L-arginine amidinotransferase pathway as a major L-arginine-degrading pathway is not likely but can not be entirely excluded. A rather unusual finding was that the cyanobacterial L-arginine deiminases are substantially larger than the enzymes in non-photosynthetic bacteria and that they are membrane-bound. A more detailed bioinformatic analysis of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 revealed that three different L-arginine-degrading pathways may in principle be functional in this cyanobacterium. These are (i an L-arginine decarboxylase pathway, (ii an L-arginine deiminase pathway, and (iii an L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase pathway. A transcript analysis of cells grown either with nitrate or L-arginine as sole N-source and with an illumination of 50 μmol photons m-2 s-1 showed that the transcripts for the first enzyme(s of all three pathways were present, but that the transcript levels for the L-arginine deiminase and the L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase were substantially higher than that of the three isoenzymes of L-arginine decarboxylase. Conclusion The evaluation of 24

  7. Ornithine-δ-aminotransferase is essential for Arginine Catabolism but not for Proline Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadelhofer Bettina

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Like many other plant species, Arabidopsis uses arginine (Arg as a storage and transport form of nitrogen, and proline (Pro as a compatible solute in the defence against abiotic stresses causing water deprivation. Arg catabolism produces ornithine (Orn inside mitochondria, which was discussed controversially as a precursor for Pro biosynthesis, alternative to glutamate (Glu. Results We show here that ornithine-δ-aminotransferase (δOAT, At5g46180, the enzyme converting Orn to pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C, is localised in mitochondria and is essential for Arg catabolism. Wildtype plants could readily catabolise supplied Arg and Orn and were able to use these amino acids as the only nitrogen source. Deletion mutants of δOAT, however, accumulated urea cycle intermediates when fed with Arg or Orn and were not able to utilize nitrogen provided as Arg or Orn. Utilisation of urea and stress induced Pro accumulation were not affected in T-DNA insertion mutants with a complete loss of δOAT expression. Conclusion Our findings indicate that δOAT feeds P5C exclusively into the catabolic branch of Pro metabolism, which yields Glu as an end product. Conversion of Orn to Glu is an essential route for recovery of nitrogen stored or transported as Arg. Pro biosynthesis occurs predominantly or exclusively via the Glu pathway in Arabidopsis and does not depend on Glu produced by Arg and Orn catabolism.

  8. Ornithine-δ-aminotransferase is essential for Arginine Catabolism but not for Proline Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funck, Dietmar; Stadelhofer, Bettina; Koch, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Background Like many other plant species, Arabidopsis uses arginine (Arg) as a storage and transport form of nitrogen, and proline (Pro) as a compatible solute in the defence against abiotic stresses causing water deprivation. Arg catabolism produces ornithine (Orn) inside mitochondria, which was discussed controversially as a precursor for Pro biosynthesis, alternative to glutamate (Glu). Results We show here that ornithine-δ-aminotransferase (δOAT, At5g46180), the enzyme converting Orn to pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C), is localised in mitochondria and is essential for Arg catabolism. Wildtype plants could readily catabolise supplied Arg and Orn and were able to use these amino acids as the only nitrogen source. Deletion mutants of δOAT, however, accumulated urea cycle intermediates when fed with Arg or Orn and were not able to utilize nitrogen provided as Arg or Orn. Utilisation of urea and stress induced Pro accumulation were not affected in T-DNA insertion mutants with a complete loss of δOAT expression. Conclusion Our findings indicate that δOAT feeds P5C exclusively into the catabolic branch of Pro metabolism, which yields Glu as an end product. Conversion of Orn to Glu is an essential route for recovery of nitrogen stored or transported as Arg. Pro biosynthesis occurs predominantly or exclusively via the Glu pathway in Arabidopsis and does not depend on Glu produced by Arg and Orn catabolism. PMID:18419821

  9. Lysozyme affects the microbial catabolism of free arginine in raw-milk hard cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Incecco, P; Gatti, M; Hogenboom, J A; Bottari, B; Rosi, V; Neviani, E; Pellegrino, L

    2016-08-01

    Lysozyme (LZ) is used in several cheese varieties to prevent late blowing which results from fermentation of lactate by Clostridium tyrobutyricum. Side effects of LZ on lactic acid bacteria population and free amino acid pattern were studied in 16 raw-milk hard cheeses produced in eight parallel cheese makings conducted at four different dairies using the same milk with (LZ+) or without (LZ-) addition of LZ. The LZ-cheeses were characterized by higher numbers of cultivable microbial population and lower amount of DNA arising from lysed bacterial cells with respect to LZ + cheeses. At both 9 and 16 months of ripening, Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Lactobacillus fermentum proved to be the species mostly affected by LZ. The total content of free amino acids indicated the proteolysis extent to be characteristic of the dairy, regardless to the presence of LZ. In contrast, the relative patterns showed the microbial degradation of arginine to be promoted in LZ + cheeses. The data demonstrated that the arginine-deiminase pathway was only partially adopted since citrulline represented the main product and only trace levels of ornithine were found. Differences in arginine degradation were considered for starter and non-starter lactic acid bacteria, at different cheese ripening stages. PMID:27052697

  10. Functional characterization and expression analysis of rice δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase provide new insight into the regulation of proline and arginine catabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; Funck, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    While intracellular proline accumulation in response to various stress conditions has been investigated in great detail, the biochemistry and physiological relevance of proline degradation in plants is much less understood. Moreover, the second and last step in proline catabolism, the oxidation of δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid (P5C) to glutamate, is shared with arginine catabolism. Little information is available to date concerning the regulatory mechanisms coordinating these two pathways. Expression of the gene coding for P5C dehydrogenase was analyzed in rice by real-time PCR either following the exogenous supply of amino acids of the glutamate family, or under hyperosmotic stress conditions. The rice enzyme was heterologously expressed in E. coli, and the affinity-purified protein was thoroughly characterized with respect to structural and functional properties. A tetrameric oligomerization state was observed in size exclusion chromatography, which suggests a structure of the plant enzyme different from that shown for the bacterial P5C dehydrogenases structurally characterized to date. Kinetic analysis accounted for a preferential use of NAD+ as the electron acceptor. Cations were found to modulate enzyme activity, whereas anion effects were negligible. Several metal ions were inhibitory in the micromolar range. Interestingly, arginine also inhibited the enzyme at higher concentrations, with a mechanism of uncompetitive type with respect to P5C. This implies that millimolar levels of arginine would increase the affinity of P5C dehydrogenase toward its specific substrate. Results are discussed in view of the involvement of the enzyme in either proline or arginine catabolism. PMID:26300893

  11. Functional characterization and expression analysis of rice δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase provide new insight into the regulation of proline and arginine catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; Funck, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    While intracellular proline accumulation in response to various stress conditions has been investigated in great detail, the biochemistry and physiological relevance of proline degradation in plants is much less understood. Moreover, the second and last step in proline catabolism, the oxidation of δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid (P5C) to glutamate, is shared with arginine catabolism. Little information is available to date concerning the regulatory mechanisms coordinating these two pathways. Expression of the gene coding for P5C dehydrogenase was analyzed in rice by real-time PCR either following the exogenous supply of amino acids of the glutamate family, or under hyperosmotic stress conditions. The rice enzyme was heterologously expressed in E. coli, and the affinity-purified protein was thoroughly characterized with respect to structural and functional properties. A tetrameric oligomerization state was observed in size exclusion chromatography, which suggests a structure of the plant enzyme different from that shown for the bacterial P5C dehydrogenases structurally characterized to date. Kinetic analysis accounted for a preferential use of NAD(+) as the electron acceptor. Cations were found to modulate enzyme activity, whereas anion effects were negligible. Several metal ions were inhibitory in the micromolar range. Interestingly, arginine also inhibited the enzyme at higher concentrations, with a mechanism of uncompetitive type with respect to P5C. This implies that millimolar levels of arginine would increase the affinity of P5C dehydrogenase toward its specific substrate. Results are discussed in view of the involvement of the enzyme in either proline or arginine catabolism. PMID:26300893

  12. Arginine Catabolism by Sourdough Lactic Acid Bacteria: Purification and Characterization of the Arginine Deiminase Pathway Enzymes from Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis CB1

    OpenAIRE

    De Angelis, Maria; Mariotti, Liberato; Rossi, Jone; Servili, Maurizio; Fox, Patrick F.; Rollán, Graciela; Gobbetti, Marco

    2002-01-01

    The cytoplasmic extracts of 70 strains of the most frequently isolated sourdough lactic acid bacteria were screened initially for arginine deiminase (ADI), ornithine transcarbamoylase (OTC), and carbamate kinase (CK) activities, which comprise the ADI (or arginine dihydrolase) pathway. Only obligately heterofermentative strains such as Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis CB1; Lactobacillus brevis AM1, AM8, and 10A; Lactobacillus hilgardii 51B; and Lactobacillus fructivorans DD3 and DA106 showed al...

  13. The human neonatal small intestine has the potential for arginine synthesis; developmental changes in the expression of arginine-synthesizing and -catabolizing enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruijter Jan M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Milk contains too little arginine for normal growth, but its precursors proline and glutamine are abundant; the small intestine of rodents and piglets produces arginine from proline during the suckling period; and parenterally fed premature human neonates frequently suffer from hypoargininemia. These findings raise the question whether the neonatal human small intestine also expresses the enzymes that enable the synthesis of arginine from proline and/or glutamine. Carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CPS, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT, argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS, arginase-1 (ARG1, arginase-2 (ARG2, and nitric-oxide synthase (NOS were visualized by semiquantitative immunohistochemistry in 89 small-intestinal specimens. Results Between 23 weeks of gestation and 3 years after birth, CPS- and ASS-protein content in enterocytes was high and then declined to reach adult levels at 5 years. OAT levels declined more gradually, whereas ARG-1 was not expressed. ARG-2 expression increased neonatally to adult levels. Neurons in the enteric plexus strongly expressed ASS, OAT, NOS1 and ARG2, while varicose nerve fibers in the circular layer of the muscularis propria stained for ASS and NOS1 only. The endothelium of small arterioles expressed ASS and NOS3, while their smooth-muscle layer expressed OAT and ARG2. Conclusion The human small intestine acquires the potential to produce arginine well before fetuses become viable outside the uterus. The perinatal human intestine therefore resembles that of rodents and pigs. Enteral ASS behaves as a typical suckling enzyme because its expression all but disappears in the putative weaning period of human infants.

  14. Physiological implications of arginine metabolism in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Gudrun; Todd, Christopher D; Trovato, Maurizio; Forlani, Giuseppe; Funck, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen is a limiting resource for plant growth in most terrestrial habitats since large amounts of nitrogen are needed to synthesize nucleic acids and proteins. Among the 21 proteinogenic amino acids, arginine has the highest nitrogen to carbon ratio, which makes it especially suitable as a storage form of organic nitrogen. Synthesis in chloroplasts via ornithine is apparently the only operational pathway to provide arginine in plants, and the rate of arginine synthesis is tightly regulated by various feedback mechanisms in accordance with the overall nutritional status. While several steps of arginine biosynthesis still remain poorly characterized in plants, much wider attention has been paid to inter- and intracellular arginine transport as well as arginine-derived metabolites. A role of arginine as alternative source besides glutamate for proline biosynthesis is still discussed controversially and may be prevented by differential subcellular localization of enzymes. Apparently, arginine is a precursor for nitric oxide (NO), although the molecular mechanism of NO production from arginine remains unclear in higher plants. In contrast, conversion of arginine to polyamines is well documented, and in several plant species also ornithine can serve as a precursor for polyamines. Both NO and polyamines play crucial roles in regulating developmental processes as well as responses to biotic and abiotic stress. It is thus conceivable that arginine catabolism serves on the one hand to mobilize nitrogen storages, while on the other hand it may be used to fine-tune development and defense mechanisms against stress. This review summarizes the recent advances in our knowledge about arginine metabolism, with a special focus on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and pinpoints still unresolved critical questions. PMID:26284079

  15. Calcium-dependent phospholipid catabolism and arachidonic acid mobilization in cerebral minces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral minces were used to investigate the role of calcium influx on trauma-induced alterations of brain lipid metabolism. Cerebral phospholipids, nonpolar lipids, and free fatty acids were radiolabeled in vivo with [3H]arachidonic acid. Tissue incubation stimulated the time-dependent catabolism of choline and inositol glycerophospholipids, and resulted in the accumulation of [3H]free fatty acids. These effects were attenuated in Ca2+-free incubations, and when EGTA or verapamil were present. The inhibition of calcium influx also reduced the labeling of diglycerides, whereas ethanolamine and serine glycerophospholipids were not affected by incubation or treatments. Replacing Ca2+ with other cations also attenuated the incubation-dependent alterations in lipid metabolism. However, only cadmium was able to compete with calcium and reduce the accumulation of [3H]free fatty acids. It appeared that about half of the observed phospholipid catabolism was dependent on Ca2+ influx and that at least 80% of the [3H]free fatty acid accumulation required calcium

  16. The Ergogenic Potential of Arginine

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    La Bounty Paul M

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Arginine is a conditionally essential amino acid that is involved in protein synthesis, the detoxification of ammonia, and its conversion to glucose as well as being catabolized to produce energy. In addition to these physiological functions, arginine has been purported to have ergogenic potential. Athletes have taken arginine for three main reasons: 1 its role in the secretion of endogenous growth hormone; 2 its involvement in the synthesis of creatine; 3 its role in augmenting nitric oxide. These aspects of arginine supplementation will be discussed as well as a review of clinical investigations involving exercise performance and arginine ingestion.

  17. Interaction with the Redox Cofactor MYW and Functional Role of a Mobile Arginine in Eukaryotic Catalase-Peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Graf, Michael M H; Jakopitsch, Christa; Zamocky, Marcel; Nicolussi, Andrea; Furtmüller, Paul G; Oostenbrink, Chris; Carpena, Xavi; Obinger, Christian

    2016-06-28

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) are unique bifunctional heme peroxidases with an additional posttranslationally formed redox-active Met-Tyr-Trp cofactor that is essential for catalase activity. On the basis of studies of bacterial KatGs, controversial mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide oxidation were proposed. The recent discovery of eukaryotic KatGs with differing pH optima of catalase activity now allows us to scrutinize those postulated reaction mechanisms. In our study, secreted KatG from the fungus Magnaporthe grisea (MagKatG2) was used to analyze the role of a remote KatG-typical mobile arginine that was shown to interact with the Met-Tyr-Trp adduct in a pH-dependent manner in bacterial KatGs. Here we present crystal structures of MagKatG2 at pH 3.0, 5.5, and 7.0 and investigate the mobility of Arg461 by molecular dynamics simulation. Data suggest that at pH ≥4.5 Arg461 mostly interacts with the deprotonated adduct Tyr. Elimination of Arg461 by mutation to Ala slightly increases the thermal stability but does not alter the active site architecture or the kinetics of cyanide binding. However, the variant Arg461Ala lost the wild-type-typical optimum of catalase activity at pH 5.25 (kcat = 6450 s(-1)) but exhibits a broad plateau between pH 4.5 and 7.5 (kcat = 270 s(-1) at pH 5.5). Moreover, significant differences in the kinetics of interconversion of redox intermediates of wild-type and mutant protein mixed with either peroxyacetic acid or hydrogen peroxide are observed. These findings together with published data from bacterial KatGs allow us to propose a role of Arg461 in the H2O2 oxidation reaction of KatG. PMID:27293030

  18. The use of nucleosides and arginine as alternative energy sources by coagulase-negative staphylococci in view of meat fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, M; Van der Mijnsbrugge, A; Sánchez Mainar, M; Balzarini, T; De Vuyst, L; Leroy, F

    2014-05-01

    The ability of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) to use alternative energy sources in meat may partially explain their occurrence in fermented meats. Of 61 CNS strains tested, all metabolized adenosine and inosine in a meat simulation medium (MSM). The ability to catabolize arginine via the arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway varied between strains. All tested strains of Staphylococcus carnosus and Staphylococcus epidermidis possessed an arcA gene and showed ADI activity, whereas other species, such as Staphylococcus equorum and Staphylococcus succinus, did not. Arginine catabolic mobile elements (ACME), as in the positive control S. epidermidis ATCC 12228, were uncommon and only found in Staphylococcus xylosus 3PA6 (sausage isolate) and Staphylococcus chromogenes G222 (teat apex isolate). Monoculture experiments were performed in MSM with S. carnosus 833 and SS3-4, S. xylosus G211, and S. epidermidis ATCC 12228 and 2S7-4. At all pH values tested (5.3, 5.8, and 6.5), the strains of S. carnosus catabolized arginine faster than the strains of S. xylosus and S. epidermidis. Only at pH 6.5 could a low ADI activity be found for S. xylosus G211. Increased ADI activity occurred in the case of the ACME-positive S. epidermidis ATCC 12228, when compared to the ACME-negative S. epidermidis 2S7-4. PMID:24387852

  19. Expression pattern of a nuclear encoded mitochondrial arginine-ornithine translocator gene from Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Anja

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arginine and citrulline serve as nitrogen storage forms, but are also involved in biosynthetic and catabolic pathways. Metabolism of arginine, citrulline and ornithine is distributed between mitochondria and cytosol. For the shuttle of intermediates between cytosol and mitochondria transporters present on the inner mitochondrial membrane are required. Yeast contains a mitochondrial translocator for ornithine and arginine, Ort1p/Arg11p. Ort1p/Arg11p is a member of the mitochondrial carrier family (MCF essential for ornithine export from mitochondria. The yeast arg11 mutant, which is deficient in Ort1p/Arg11p grows poorly on media lacking arginine. Results High-level expression of a nuclear encoded Arabidopsis thaliana homolog (AtmBAC2 of Ort1p/Arg11p was able to suppress the growth deficiency of arg11. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated expression of AtmBAC2 in all tissues with highest levels in flowers. Promoter-GUS fusions showed preferential expression in flowers, i.e. pollen, in the vasculature of siliques and in aborted seeds. Variable expression was observed in leaf vasculature. Induction of the promoter was not observed during the first two weeks in seedlings grown on media containing NH4NO3, arginine or ornithine as sole nitrogen sources. Conclusion AtmBAC2 was isolated as a mitochondrial transporter for arginine in Arabidopsis. The absence of expression in developing seeds and in cotyledons of seedlings indicates that other transporters are responsible for storage and mobilization of arginine in seeds.

  20. Expression pattern of a nuclear encoded mitochondrial arginine-ornithine translocator gene from Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider Anja; Kunze Reinhard; Wipf Daniel; Hilpert Melanie; Desimone Marcelo; Catoni Elisabetta; Flügge Ulf-Ingo; Schumacher Karin; Frommer Wolf B

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background Arginine and citrulline serve as nitrogen storage forms, but are also involved in biosynthetic and catabolic pathways. Metabolism of arginine, citrulline and ornithine is distributed between mitochondria and cytosol. For the shuttle of intermediates between cytosol and mitochondria transporters present on the inner mitochondrial membrane are required. Yeast contains a mitochondrial translocator for ornithine and arginine, Ort1p/Arg11p. Ort1p/Arg11p is a member of the mitoc...

  1. Arginine does not exacerbate markers of inflammation in cocultures of human enterocytes and leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Negrier, I.; Neveux, N.;

    2007-01-01

    Enteral arginine supplementation in the critically ill has become a matter of controversy. In this study, we investigated effects of the addition of 0.4 and 1.2 mmol/L arginine in a coculture model on markers of inflammation, enterocyte layer integrity, and amino acid transport. In this model, a...... transepithelial flux of 22 amino acids, their catabolism, and the integrity of the enterocyte layer assessed as permeability of fluorescein dextran (M(r) 4400). Bacterial stimulation of intestinal epithelial cells enhanced the basolateral concentration of nitric oxide and all cytokines measured. Supplementation...... the catabolism of serine, asparagine, and lysine, and reduced glutamine catabolism. Addition of arginine increased ornithine formation and moderately reduced transepithelial transport of methionine and other amino acids. Hence, arginine supplementation does not interfere with inflammation...

  2. Methionine catabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perpète, Philippe; Duthoit, Olivier; De Maeyer, Simon; Imray, Louise; Lawton, Andrew I; Stavropoulos, Konstantinos E; Gitonga, Virginia W; Hewlins, Michael J E; Dickinson, J Richard

    2006-01-01

    The catabolism of methionine to methionol and methanethiol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied using (13)C NMR spectroscopy, GC-MS, enzyme assays and a number of mutants. Methionine is first transaminated to alpha-keto-gamma-(methylthio)butyrate. Methionol is formed by a decarboxylation reaction, which yields methional, followed by reduction. The decarboxylation is effected specifically by Ydr380wp. Methanethiol is formed from both methionine and alpha-keto-gamma-(methylthio)butyrate by a demethiolase activity. In all except one strain examined, demethiolase was induced by the presence of methionine in the growth medium. This pathway results in the production of alpha-ketobutyrate, a carbon skeleton, which can be re-utilized. Hence, methionine catabolism is more complex and economical than the other amino acid catabolic pathways in yeast, which use the Ehrlich pathway and result solely in the formation of a fusel alcohol. PMID:16423070

  3. L-arginine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your health provider.Medications for high blood pressure (ACE inhibitors)L-arginine seems to decrease blood pressure. Taking ... with certain medications for high blood pressure, called ACE inhibitors might cause your blood pressure to go too ...

  4. Protein catabolism and requirements in severe illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genton, L; Pichard, C

    2011-03-01

    Reduced total body protein mass is a marker of protein-energy malnutrition and has been associated with numerous complications. Severe illness is characterized by a loss of total body protein mass, mainly from the skeletal muscle. Studies on protein turnover describe an increased protein breakdown and, to a lesser extent, an increased whole-body protein synthesis, as well as an increased flux of amino acids from the periphery to the liver. Appropriate nutrition could limit protein catabolism. Nutritional support limits but does not stop the loss of total body protein mass occurring in acute severe illness. Its impact on protein kinetics is so far controversial, probably due to the various methodologies and characteristics of nutritional support used in the studies. Maintaining calorie balance alone the days after an insult does not clearly lead to an improved clinical outcome. In contrast, protein intakes between 1.2 and 1.5 g/kg body weight/day with neutral energy balance minimize total body protein mass loss. Glutamine and possibly leucine may improve clinical outcome, but it is unclear whether these benefits occur through an impact on total body protein mass and its turnover, or through other mechanisms. Present recommendations suggest providing 20 - 25 kcal/kg/day over the first 72 - 96 hours and increasing energy intake to target thereafter. Simultaneously, protein intake should be between 1.2 and 1.5 g/kg/day. Enteral immunonutrition enriched with arginine, nucleotides, and omega-3 fatty acids is indicated in patients with trauma, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and mild sepsis. Glutamine (0.2 - 0.4 g/kg/day of L-glutamine) should be added to enteral nutrition in burn and trauma patients (ESPEN guidelines 2006) and to parenteral nutrition, in the form of dipeptides, in intensive care unit (ICU) patients in general (ESPEN guidelines 2009). PMID:22139565

  5. Carbohydrate Catabolism in Azospirillum amazonense

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Drets, G.; Fabiano, E.; Cardona, A

    1985-01-01

    The nitrogen fixer Azospirillum amazonense grew on the various disaccharides, hexoses, and pentoses tested in this study but not on polyols and on some tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. An active transport system was detected for sucrose and glucose but not for mannitol and 2-ketoglutarate. Six A. amazonense strains were examined for 16 carbon-metabolizing enzymes, and the results indicate that these strains employ the Entner-Doudoroff pathway to catabolize sucrose, fructose, and glucos...

  6. The arginine-ornithine antiporter ArcD contributes to biological fitness of Streptococcus suis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus eFulde

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The arginine-ornithine antiporter (ArcD is part of the Arginine Deiminase System (ADS, a catabolic, energy-providing pathway found in a variety of different bacterial species, including the porcine zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus suis. The ADS has recently been shown to play a role in the pathogenicity of S. suis, in particular in its survival in host cells. The contribution of arginine and arginine transport mediated by ArcD, however, has yet to be clarified. In the present study, we showed by experiments using [U-13C6]arginine as a tracer molecule that S. suis is auxotrophic for arginine and that bacterial growth depends on the uptake of extracellular arginine. To further study the role of ArcD in arginine metabolism, we generated an arcD-specific mutant strain and characterized its growth compared to the wild-type (WT strain, a virulent serotype 2 strain. The mutant strain showed a markedly reduced growth rate in chemically defined media supplemented with arginine when compared to the WT strain, indicating that ArcD promotes arginine uptake. To further evaluate the in vivo relevance of ArcD, we studied the intracellular bacterial survival of the arcD mutant strain in an epithelial cell culture infection model. The mutant strain was substantially attenuated, and its reduced intracellular survival rate correlated with a lower ability to neutralize the acidified environment. Based on these results, we propose that ArcD, by its function as an arginine-ornithine antiporter, is important for supplying arginine as substrate of the ADS and, thereby, contributes to biological fitness and virulence of S. suis in the host.

  7. Arginine and nitrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llácer, José L; Fita, Ignacio; Rubio, Vicente

    2008-12-01

    When nitrogen is abundant, prokaryotic and eukaryotic oxygen-producing photosynthetic organisms store nitrogen as arginine, by relieving feedback inhibition of the arginine biosynthesis controlling enzyme, N-acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK). The signalling protein PII, an ancient and widely distributed nitrogen/carbon/ADP/ATP sensor, mediates feedback inhibition relief of NAGK by binding to this enzyme. PII phosphorylation or PII binding of ADP or 2-oxoglutarate prevents PII-NAGK complex formation. Crystal structures of NAGK, cyanobacterial and plant PII and corresponding PII-NAGK complexes have been recently determined. In these complexes, two polar PII trimers sandwich one ring-like NAGK hexamer. Each PII subunit contacts one NAGK subunit, triggering a symmetry-restricted narrowing of the NAGK ring, with concomitant adoption by the arginine sites of a low-affinity conformation. PMID:19013524

  8. Arginine metabolism in wounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arginine metabolism in wounds was investigated in the rat in 1) lambda-carrageenan-wounded skeletal muscle, 2) Schilling chambers, and 3) subcutaneous polyvinyl alcohol sponges. All showed decreased arginine and elevated ornithine contents and high arginase activity. Arginase could be brought to the wound by macrophages, which were found to contain arginase activity. However, arginase was expressed by macrophages only after cell lysis and no arginase was released by viable macrophages in vitro. Thus the extracellular arginase of wounds may derive from dead macrophages within the injured tissue. Wound and peritoneal macrophages exhibited arginase deiminase activity as demonstrated by the conversion of [guanido-14C]arginine to radiolabeled citrulline during culture, the inhibition of this reaction by formamidinium acetate, and the lack of prokaryotic contamination of the cultures. These findings and the known metabolic fates of the products of arginase and arginine deiminase in the cellular populations of the wound suggest the possibility of cooperativity among cells for the production of substrates for collagen synthesis

  9. L-arginine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain (angina pectoris). Leg pain associated with poor blood flow (peripheral arterial disease). Research suggests that taking L-arginine by mouth ... by IV) for up to 8 weeks increases blood flow in people with peripheral arterial disease. However, long-term use (up to 6 months) ...

  10. Dysregulated expression of arginine metabolic enzymes in human intestinal tissues of necrotizing enterocolitis and response of CaCO2 cells to bacterial components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kam Tong; Chan, Kathy Yuen Yee; Ma, Terence Ping Yuen; Yu, Jasmine Wai Sum; Tong, Joanna Hung Man; Tam, Yuk Him; Cheung, Hon Ming; To, Ka Fai; Lam, Hugh Simon; Lee, Kim Hung; Li, Karen; Ng, Pak Cheung

    2016-03-01

    The small intestine is the exclusive site of arginine synthesis in neonates. Low levels of circulating arginine have been associated with the occurrence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) but the mechanism of arginine dysregulation has not been fully elucidated. We aimed to investigate (i) expressional changes of arginine synthesizing and catabolic enzymes in human intestinal tissues of NEC, spontaneous intestinal perforation (SIP) and noninflammatory surgical conditions (Surg-CTL) and to investigate the (ii) mechanisms of arginine dysregulation and enterocyte proliferation upon stimulation by bacterial components, arginine depletion, ARG1 overexpression and nitric oxide (NO) supplementation. Our results showed that expressions of arginine synthesizing enzymes ALDH18A1, ASL, ASS1, CPS1, GLS, OAT and PRODH were significantly decreased in NEC compared with Surg-CTL or SIP tissues. Catabolic enzyme ARG1 was increased (>100-fold) in NEC tissues and histologically demonstrated to be expressed by infiltrating neutrophils. No change in arginine metabolic enzymes was observed between SIP and Surg-CTL tissues. In CaCO2 cells, arginine metabolic enzymes were differentially dysregulated by lipopolysaccharide or lipoteichoic acid. Depletion of arginine reduced cell proliferation and this phenomenon could be partially rescued by NO. Overexpression of ARG1 also reduced enterocyte proliferation. We provided the first expressional profile of arginine metabolic enzymes at the tissue level of NEC. Our findings suggested that arginine homeostasis was severely disturbed and could be triggered by inflammatory responses of enterocytes and infiltrating neutrophils as well as bacterial components. Such reactions could reduce arginine and NO, resulting in mucosal damage. The benefit of arginine supplementation for NEC prophylaxis merits further clinical evaluation. PMID:26895666

  11. Deletion of Genes Encoding Arginase Improves Use of "Heavy" Isotope-Labeled Arginine for Mass Spectrometry in Fission Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weronika E Borek

    Full Text Available The use of "heavy" isotope-labeled arginine for stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC mass spectrometry in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is hindered by the fact that under normal conditions, arginine is extensively catabolized in vivo, resulting in the appearance of "heavy"-isotope label in several other amino acids, most notably proline, but also glutamate, glutamine and lysine. This "arginine conversion problem" significantly impairs quantification of mass spectra. Previously, we developed a method to prevent arginine conversion in fission yeast SILAC, based on deletion of genes involved in arginine catabolism. Here we show that although this method is indeed successful when (13C6-arginine (Arg-6 is used for labeling, it is less successful when (13C6(15N4-arginine (Arg-10, a theoretically preferable label, is used. In particular, we find that with this method, "heavy"-isotope label derived from Arg-10 is observed in amino acids other than arginine, indicating metabolic conversion of Arg-10. Arg-10 conversion, which severely complicates both MS and MS/MS analysis, is further confirmed by the presence of (13C5(15N2-arginine (Arg-7 in arginine-containing peptides from Arg-10-labeled cells. We describe how all of the problems associated with the use of Arg-10 can be overcome by a simple modification of our original method. We show that simultaneous deletion of the fission yeast arginase genes car1+ and aru1+ prevents virtually all of the arginine conversion that would otherwise result from the use of Arg-10. This solution should enable a wider use of heavy isotope-labeled amino acids in fission yeast SILAC.

  12. Smoking accelerates biotin catabolism in women123

    OpenAIRE

    Sealey, Wendy M.; April M. Teague; Stratton, Shawna L.; Mock, Donald M.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Smoking accelerates the degradation of many nutrients, including lipids, antioxidants, and certain B vitamins. Accelerated biotin catabolism is of concern in women because marginal biotin deficiency is teratogenic in mammals.

  13. Arginine side chain interactions and the role of arginine as a gating charge carrier in voltage sensitive ion channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Craig T.; Mason, Philip E.; Anderson, J. L. Ross; Dempsey, Christopher E.

    2016-02-01

    Gating charges in voltage-sensing domains (VSD) of voltage-sensitive ion channels and enzymes are carried on arginine side chains rather than lysine. This arginine preference may result from the unique hydration properties of the side chain guanidinium group which facilitates its movement through a hydrophobic plug that seals the center of the VSD, as suggested by molecular dynamics simulations. To test for side chain interactions implicit in this model we inspected interactions of the side chains of arginine and lysine with each of the 19 non-glycine amino acids in proteins in the protein data bank. The arginine guanidinium interacts with non-polar aromatic and aliphatic side chains above and below the guanidinium plane while hydrogen bonding with polar side chains is restricted to in-plane positions. In contrast, non-polar side chains interact largely with the aliphatic part of the lysine side chain. The hydration properties of arginine and lysine are strongly reflected in their respective interactions with non-polar and polar side chains as observed in protein structures and in molecular dynamics simulations, and likely underlie the preference for arginine as a mobile charge carrier in VSD.

  14. Dietary arginine and linear growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Vught, Anneke J A H; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Arts, Ilja C W;

    2013-01-01

    The amino acid arginine is a well-known growth hormone (GH) stimulator and GH is an important modulator of linear growth. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of dietary arginine on growth velocity in children between 7 and 13 years of age. Data from the Copenhagen School...

  15. The regulatory PII protein controls arginine biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario-Méry, Sylvie; Besin, Evelyne; Pichon, Olivier; Meyer, Christian; Hodges, Michael

    2006-04-01

    In higher plants, PII is a nuclear-encoded plastid protein which is homologous to bacterial PII signalling proteins known to be involved in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism. A reduced ornithine, citrulline and arginine accumulation was observed in two Arabidopsis PII knock-out mutants in response to NH4+ resupply after N starvation. This difference could be explained by the regulation of a key enzyme of the arginine biosynthesis pathway, N-acetyl glutamate kinase (NAGK) by PII. In vitro assays using purified recombinant proteins showed the catalytic activation of Arabidopsis NAGK by PII giving the first evidence of a physiological role of the PII protein in higher plants. Using Arabidopsis transcriptome microarray (CATMA) and RT-PCR analyses, it was found that none of the genes involved in the arginine biosynthetic or catabolic pathways were differentially expressed in a PII knock-out mutant background. In conclusion, the observed changes in metabolite levels can be explained by the reduced activation of NAGK by PII. PMID:16545809

  16. Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    . The selection will cover diverse topics such as theories, concepts, methods, and approaches as well as it will explore various modes of mobilities and the relationship to everyday life practices. The selection also covers the ‘politics of mobilities’ from local urban planning schemes to geopolitical...... issues of refugees and environmental degradation. The spaces and territories marked by mobilities as well as the sites marked by the bypassing of such are explored. Moreover, the architectural and technological dimensions to infrastructures and sites of mobilities will be included as well as the issues...... of power, social exclusion, consumption, surveillance and mobilities history to mention some of the many themes covered by this reference work. This new title will focus on the academic contributions to this understanding by primarily focusing on works and publications in the aftermath of the seminal...

  17. Basis of Arginine Sensitivity of Microbial N-Acetyl-l-Glutamate Kinases: Mutagenesis and Protein Engineering Study with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Enzymes▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Murga, M. Leonor; Rubio, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    N-Acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK) catalyzes the second step of arginine biosynthesis. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but not in Escherichia coli, this step is rate limiting and feedback and sigmoidally inhibited by arginine. Crystal structures revealed that arginine-insensitive E. coli NAGK (EcNAGK) is homodimeric, whereas arginine-inhibitable NAGKs, including P. aeruginosa NAGK (PaNAGK), are hexamers in which an extra N-terminal kinked helix (N-helix) interlinks three dimers. By introducing single amino acid replacements in PaNAGK, we prove the functionality of the structurally identified arginine site, as arginine site mutations selectively decreased the apparent affinity for arginine. N-helix mutations affecting R24 and E17 increased and decreased, respectively, the apparent affinity of PaNAGK for arginine, as predicted from enzyme structures that revealed the respective formation by these residues of bonds favoring inaccessible and accessible arginine site conformations. N-helix N-terminal deletions spanning ≥16 residues dissociated PaNAGK to active dimers, those of ≤20 residues decreased the apparent affinity for arginine, and complete N-helix deletion (26 residues) abolished arginine inhibition. Upon attachment of the PaNAGK N-terminal extension to the EcNAGK N terminus, EcNAGK remained dimeric and arginine insensitive. We concluded that the N-helix and its C-terminal portion after the kink are essential but not sufficient for hexamer formation and arginine inhibition, respectively; that the N-helix modulates NAGK affinity for arginine and mediates signal transmission between arginine sites, thus establishing sigmoidal arginine inhibition kinetics; that the mobile αH-β16 loop of the arginine site is the modulatory signal receiver; and that the hexameric architecture is not essential for arginine inhibition but is functionally essential for physiologically relevant arginine control of NAGK. PMID:18263723

  18. Basis of arginine sensitivity of microbial N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinases: mutagenesis and protein engineering study with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Murga, M Leonor; Rubio, Vicente

    2008-04-01

    N-acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK) catalyzes the second step of arginine biosynthesis. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but not in Escherichia coli, this step is rate limiting and feedback and sigmoidally inhibited by arginine. Crystal structures revealed that arginine-insensitive E. coli NAGK (EcNAGK) is homodimeric, whereas arginine-inhibitable NAGKs, including P. aeruginosa NAGK (PaNAGK), are hexamers in which an extra N-terminal kinked helix (N-helix) interlinks three dimers. By introducing single amino acid replacements in PaNAGK, we prove the functionality of the structurally identified arginine site, as arginine site mutations selectively decreased the apparent affinity for arginine. N-helix mutations affecting R24 and E17 increased and decreased, respectively, the apparent affinity of PaNAGK for arginine, as predicted from enzyme structures that revealed the respective formation by these residues of bonds favoring inaccessible and accessible arginine site conformations. N-helix N-terminal deletions spanning > or = 16 residues dissociated PaNAGK to active dimers, those of arginine, and complete N-helix deletion (26 residues) abolished arginine inhibition. Upon attachment of the PaNAGK N-terminal extension to the EcNAGK N terminus, EcNAGK remained dimeric and arginine insensitive. We concluded that the N-helix and its C-terminal portion after the kink are essential but not sufficient for hexamer formation and arginine inhibition, respectively; that the N-helix modulates NAGK affinity for arginine and mediates signal transmission between arginine sites, thus establishing sigmoidal arginine inhibition kinetics; that the mobile alphaH-beta16 loop of the arginine site is the modulatory signal receiver; and that the hexameric architecture is not essential for arginine inhibition but is functionally essential for physiologically relevant arginine control of NAGK. PMID:18263723

  19. Expression and Characterization of ArgR, An Arginine Regulatory Protein in Corynebacterium crenatum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xue Lan; ZHANG Bin; TANG Li; JIAO Hai Tao; XU Heng Yi; XU Feng; XU Hong; WEI Hua; XIONG Yong Hua

    2014-01-01

    Objective Corynebacterium crenatum MT, a mutant from C. crenatum AS 1.542 with a lethal argR gene, exhibits high arginine production. To confirm the effect of ArgR on arginine biosynthesis in C. crenatum, an intact argR gene from wild-type AS 1.542 was introduced into C. crenatum MT, resulting in C. crenatum MT. sp, and the changes of transcriptional levels of the arginine biosynthetic genes and arginine production were compared between the mutant strain and the recombinant strain. Methods Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was employed to analyze the changes of the related genes at the transcriptional level, electrophoretic mobility shift assays were used to determine ArgR binding with the argCJBDF, argGH, and carAB promoter regions, and arginine production was determined with an automated amino acid analyzer. Results Arginine production assays showed a 69.9%reduction in arginine from 9.01±0.22 mg/mL in C. crenatum MT to 2.71±0.13 mg/mL (P Conclusion The arginine biosynthetic genes in C. crenatum are clearly controlled by the negative regulator ArgR, and intact ArgR in C. crenatum MT results in a significant descrease in arginine production.

  20. Inhibition of lytic infection of pseudorabies virus by arginine depletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is a member of Alphahepesviruses; it is an enveloped virus with a double-stranded DNA genome. Polyamines (such as spermine and spermidine) are ubiquitous in animal cells and participate in cellular proliferation and differentiation. Previous results of our laboratory showed that the PRV can accomplish lytic infection either in the presence of exogenous spermine (or spermidine) or depletion of cellular polyamines. The amino acid arginine is a precursor of polyamine biosynthesis. In this work, we investigated the role of arginine in PRV infection. It was found that the plaque formation of PRV was inhibited by arginase (enzyme catalyzing the conversion of arginine into ornithine and urea) treatment whereas this inhibition can be reversed by exogenous arginine, suggesting that arginine is essential for PRV proliferation. Western blotting was conducted to study the effect of arginine depletion on the levels of structural proteins of PRV in virus-infected cells. Four PRV structural proteins (gB, gE, UL47, and UL48) were chosen for examination, and results revealed that the levels of viral proteins were obviously reduced in long time arginase treatment. However, the overall protein synthesis machinery was apparently not influenced by arginase treatment either in mock or PRV-infected cells. Analyzing with native gel, we found that arginase treatment affected the mobility of PRV structural proteins, suggesting the conformational change of viral proteins by arginine depletion. Heat shock proteins, acting as molecular chaperons, participate in protein folding and translocation. Our results demonstrated that long time arginase treatment could reduce the expression of cellular heat shock proteins 70 (hsc70 and hsp70), and transcriptional suppression of heat shock protein 70 gene promoter was one of the mechanisms involved in this reduced expression

  1. L-Arginine Intake Effect on Adenine Nucleotide Metabolism in Rat Parenchymal and Reproductive Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kocic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available L-arginine is conditionally essetcial amino acid, required for normal cell growth, protein synthesis, ammonia detoxification, tissue growth and general performance, proposed in the treatment of men sterility and prevention of male impotence. The aim of the present paper was to estimate the activity of the enzymes of adenine nucleotide metabolism: 5′-nucleotidase (5′-NU, adenosine deaminase (ADA, AMP deaminase, and xanthine oxidase (XO, during dietary intake of L-arginine for a period of four weeks of male Wistar rats. Adenosine concentration in tissues is maintained by the relative activities of the adenosine-producing enzyme, 5′-NU and the adenosine-degrading enzyme-ADA adenosine deaminase. Dietary L-arginine intake directed adenine nucleotide metabolism in liver, kidney, and testis tissue toward the activation of adenosine production, by increased 5′-NU activity and decreased ADA activity. Stimulation of adenosine accumulation could be of importance in mediating arginine antiatherosclerotic, vasoactive, immunomodulatory, and antioxidant effects. Assuming that the XO activity reflects the rate of purine catabolism in the cell, while the activity of AMP deaminase is of importance in ATP regeneration, reduced activity of XO, together with the increased AMP-deaminase activity, may suggest that adenine nucleotides are presumably directed to the ATP regenerating process during dietary L-arginine intake.

  2. Renal catabolism of 125I-glicentin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The renal catabolism of 125I-glicentin has been studied in vivo by the disappearance of this peptide from the plasma of bilaterally nephrectomized, ureteral-ligated, or normal rats and by using tubular microinfusion techniques. In addition the catabolism of glicentin by the isolated, perfused kidney has been studied. Results from in vivo studies demonstrated that half-disappearance time was lower in control (59.5 +/- 1.8 min) than in bilaterally nephrectomized rats (97.2 +/- 2.6 min), and this value was significantly higher than that of ureteral-ligated animals (83.2 +/- 1.1 min, P less than 0.005). Microinfusion experiments revealed that when 125I-glicentin was injected into the proximal tubule, no trichloroacetic-precipitable radioactivity was recovered in the urine, whereas most of inulin injected was recovered. By contrast most of the 125I-glicentin injected into the distal tubule was recovered in the urine. In isolated kidney experiments, organ clearance rate of 125I-glicentin averaged 0.88 +/- 0.10 ml/min, a value significantly higher than that of glomerular filtration rate (0.72 +/- 0.06 ml/min, P less than 0.005, paired data), and both parameters showed a close linear relationship (r = 0.90). Urinary clearance of glicentin was negligible. These results demonstrate that the kidney plays a major role in the catabolism of glicentin, mainly by glomerular filtration and tubular catabolism. The site of tubular catabolism appears to be the proximal tubule. Peritubular uptake was minimal

  3. Effect of dietary lysine restriction and arginine supplementation in two patients with pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzyuk, Tatiana; Thomas, Amanda; Viau, Krista; Liu, Aiping; De Biase, Irene; Botto, Lorenzo D; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    Pyridoxine-Dependent Epilepsy (PDE) is a recessive disorder caused by deficiency of α-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase in the catabolic pathway of lysine. It is characterized by intractable seizures controlled by the administration of pharmacological doses of vitamin B6. Despite seizure control with pyridoxine, intellectual disability and developmental delays are still observed in some patients with PDE, likely due to the accumulation of toxic intermediates in the lysine catabolic pathway: alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde (AASA), delta-1-piperideine-6-carboxylate (P6C), and pipecolic acid. Here we evaluate biochemical and clinical parameters in two PDE patients treated with a lysine-restricted diet and arginine supplementation (100-150mg/kg), aimed at reducing the levels of PDE biomarkers. Lysine restriction resulted in decreased accumulation of PDE biomarkers and improved development. Plasma lysine but not plasma arginine, directly correlated with plasma levels of AASA-P6C (p<0.001, r(2)=0.640) and pipecolic acid (p<0.01, r(2)=0.484). In addition, plasma threonine strongly correlated with the levels of AASA-P6C (p<0.0001, r(2)=0.732) and pipecolic acid (p<0.005, r(2)=0.527), suggesting extreme sensitivity of threonine catabolism to pyridoxine availability. Our results further support the use of dietary therapies in combination with pyridoxine for the treatment of PDE. PMID:27324284

  4. Metabolic control analysis of xylose catabolism in Aspergillus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prathumpai, W.; Gabelgaard, J.B.; Wanchanthuek, P.; Vondervoort, van de P.J.I.; Groot, de M.J.L.; McIntyre, M.; Nielsen, J.

    2003-01-01

    A kinetic model for xylose catabolism in Aspergillus is proposed. From a thermodynamic analysis it was found that the intermediate xylitol will accumulate during xylose catabolism. Use of the kinetic model allowed metabolic control analysis (MCA) of the xylose catabolic pathway to be carried out, an

  5. Glycosidases: inborn errors of glycosphingolipid catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Hisashi; Li, Yu-Teh

    2014-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are information-rich glycoconjugates that occur in nature mainly as constituents of biomembranes. Each GSL contains a complex carbohydrate chain linked to a ceramide moiety that anchors the molecule to biomembranes. In higher animals, catabolism of GSLs takes place in lysosomes where sugar chains in GSLs are hydrolyzed by exo-glycosidases to cleave a sugar residue from the non-reducing end of a sugar chain. Inborn errors of GSL-catabolism, collectively called sphingolipidoses or GSL-storage diseases, are caused by the deficiency of exo-glycosidases responsible for the degradation of the specific sugar residues at the non-reducing termini in GSLs. This chapter briefly discusses glycone, anomeric, linkage, and aglycone specificities of exo-glycosidases and some of the historical landmarks on their associations with the chemical pathology of the five best known sphingolipidoses: GM1 gangliosidosis, GM2 gangliosidosis (Tay-Sachs disease), Fabry disease, Gaucher disease, and Krabbe disease. PMID:25151392

  6. Catabolism of hyaluronan: involvement of transition metals

    OpenAIRE

    Šoltés, Ladislav; Kogan, Grigorij

    2009-01-01

    One of the very complex structures in the vertebrates is the joint. The main component of the joint is the synovial fluid with its high-molar-mass glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, which turnover is approximately twelve hours. Since the synovial fluid does not contain any hyaluronidases, the fast hyaluronan catabolism is caused primarily by reductive-oxidative processes. Eight transition metals – V23, Mn25, Fe26, Co27, Ni28, Cu29, Zn30, and Mo42 – naturally occurring in living organism are essent...

  7. Arginase activities and global arginine bioavailability in wild-type and ApoE-deficient mice: responses to high fat and high cholesterol diets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Erdely

    Full Text Available Increased catabolism of arginine by arginase is increasingly viewed as an important pathophysiological factor in cardiovascular disease, including atherosclerosis induced by high cholesterol diets. Whereas previous studies have focused primarily on effects of high cholesterol diets on arginase expression and arginine metabolism in specific blood vessels, there is no information regarding the impact of lipid diets on arginase activity or arginine bioavailability at a systemic level. We, therefore, evaluated the effects of high fat (HF and high fat-high cholesterol (HC diets on arginase activity in plasma and tissues and on global arginine bioavailability (defined as the ratio of plasma arginine to ornithine + citrulline in apoE(-/- and wild-type C57BL/6J mice. HC and HF diets led to reduced global arginine bioavailability in both strains. The HC diet resulted in significantly elevated plasma arginase in both strains, but the HF diet increased plasma arginase only in apoE(-/- mice. Elevated plasma arginase activity correlated closely with increased alanine aminotransferase levels, indicating that liver damage was primarily responsible for elevated plasma arginase. The HC diet, which promotes atherogenesis, also resulted in increased arginase activity and expression of the type II isozyme of arginase in multiple tissues of apoE(-/- mice only. These results raise the possibility that systemic changes in arginase activity and global arginine bioavailability may be contributing factors in the initiation and/or progression of cardiovascular disease.

  8. Arginase and Arginine Dysregulation in Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Renée C. Benson; Hardy, Karen A.; Morris, Claudia R.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, evidence has accumulated indicating that the enzyme arginase, which converts L-arginine into L-ornithine and urea, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders such as asthma through dysregulation of L-arginine metabolism and modulation of nitric oxide (NO) homeostasis. Allergic asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling. Through substrate competition, arginase decreases bioavailability of L-arginine for nitric oxide syn...

  9. Whole-body synthesis of L-homoarginine in pigs and rats supplemented with L-arginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yongqing; Hu, Shengdi; Jia, Sichao; Nawaratna, Gayan; Che, Dongsheng; Wang, Fenglai; Bazer, Fuller W; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies suggest an important role for L-homoarginine in cardiovascular, hepatic and neurological functions, as well as the regulation of glucose metabolism. However, little is known about whole-body L-homoarginine synthesis or its response to dietary L-arginine intake in animals. Four series of experiments were conducted to determine L-homoarginine synthesis and catabolism in pigs and rats. In Experiment 1, male and female pigs were fed a corn- and soybean meal-based diet supplemented with 0.0-2.42 % L-arginine-HCl. In Experiment 2, male and female rats were fed a casein-based diet, while receiving drinking water containing supplemental L-arginine-HCl to provide 0.0-3.6 g L-arginine/kg body-weight/day. In both experiments, urine collected from the animals for 24 h was analyzed for L-homoarginine and related metabolites. In Experiment 3, pigs and rats received a single oral dose of 1 or 10 mg L-homoarginine/kg body-weight, respectively, and their urine was collected for 24 h for analyses of L-homoarginine and related substances. In Experiment 4, slices of pig and rat tissues (including liver, brain, kidney, heart, and skeletal-muscle) were incubated for 1 h in Krebs-bicarbonate buffer containing 5 or 50 µM L-homoarginine. Our results indicated that: (a) animal tissues did not degrade L-homoarginine in the presence of physiological concentrations of other amino-acids; (b) 95-96 % of orally administered L-homoarginine was recovered in urine; (c) L-homoarginine was quantitatively a minor product of L-arginineg catabolism in the body; and (d) dietary L-arginine supplementation dose-dependently increased whole-body L-homoarginine synthesis. These novel findings provide a new framework for future studies of L-homoarginine metabolism and physiology in animals and humans. PMID:26676627

  10. Pharmacological PPARα activation markedly alters plasma turnover of the amino acids glycine, serine and arginine in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette Ericsson

    Full Text Available The current study extends previously reported PPARα agonist WY 14,643 (30 µmol/kg/day for 4 weeks effects on circulating amino acid concentrations in rats fed a 48% saturated fat diet. Steady-state tracer experiments were used to examine in vivo kinetic mechanisms underlying altered plasma serine, glycine and arginine levels. Urinary urea and creatinine excretion were measured to assess whole-body amino acid catabolism. WY 14,643 treated animals demonstrated reduced efficiency to convert food consumed to body weight gain while liver weight was increased compared to controls. WY 14,643 raised total amino acid concentration (38%, largely explained by glycine, serine and threonine increases. 3H-glycine, 14C-serine and 14C-arginine tracer studies revealed elevated rates of appearance (Ra for glycine (45.5 ± 5.8 versus 17.4 ± 2.7 µmol/kg/min and serine (21.0 ± 1.4 versus 12.0 ± 1.0 in WY 14,643 versus control. Arginine was substantially decreased (-62% in plasma with estimated Ra reduced from 3.1 ± 0.3 to 1.2 ± 0.2 µmol/kg/min in control versus WY 14,643. Nitrogen excretion over 24 hours was unaltered. Hepatic arginase activity was substantially decreased by WY 14,643 treatment. In conclusion, PPARα agonism potently alters metabolism of several specific amino acids in the rat. The changes in circulating levels of serine, glycine and arginine reflected altered fluxes into the plasma rather than changes in clearance or catabolism. This suggests that PPARα has an important role in modulating serine, glycine and arginine de novo synthesis.

  11. Mechanism of arginine regulation of acetylglutamate synthase, the first enzyme of arginine synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho-Vaello, Enea; Fernández-Murga, María L; Rubio, Vicente

    2009-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase (NAGS), the first enzyme of arginine biosynthesis in bacteria/plants and an essential urea cycle activator in animals, is, respectively, arginine-inhibited and activated. Arginine binds to the hexameric ring-forming amino acid kinase (AAK) domain of NAGS. We show that arginine inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa NAGS by altering the functions of the distant, substrate binding/catalytic GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) domain, increasing K(m)(Glu), decreasing V(max) and triggering substrate inhibition by AcCoA. These effects involve centrally the interdomain linker, since we show that linker elongation or two-residue linker shortening hampers and mimics, respectively, arginine inhibition. We propose a regulatory mechanism in which arginine triggers the expansion of the hexameric NAGS ring, altering AAK-GNAT domain interactions, and the modulation by these interactions of GNAT domain functions, explaining arginine regulation. PMID:19084009

  12. Effects of lipopolysaccharide on the catabolic activity of macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of macrophages to degrade and catabolize antigens is of relevance both as a means to process complex antigens prior to presentation to T cells, as well as a way to down regulate immune responses by destroying the antigenicity of polypeptides. With these considerations, the authors have investigated the regulation of macrophage catabolic activity by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Catabolic activity was quantitated by following the distribution and molecular form of 125-I labelled surface components of heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKLM) subsequent to their uptake by macrophages. They have compared the catabolic activity of macrophages from peritoneal exudates of mice injected i.p. with saline or LPS and have found that LPS-elicited macrophages display a greatly enhanced (3 fold) rate of catabolism. This increase in catabolic activity peaks 3 days after LPS injection and steadily declines thereafter, approaching a baseline level after 3 weeks. The enhancement of catabolic activity is under LPS gene control. LPS-elicited macrophages rapidly destroy the antigenicity of bacterial antigens and function poorly as antigen presenting cells in vitro. These results suggest that LPS elicits a macrophage population specialized for antigen degradation functions with negative regulatory effects on the induction of specific immune responses

  13. The Use of Anabolic Agents in Catabolic States

    OpenAIRE

    Demling, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Objective: We plan to review the current problem of lean mass erosion in catabolic states, caused by injury and critical illness. This protein loss is driven by the hormonal imbalance and excess inflammation referred to as the “stress response to injury.” We then plan to provide the current concepts on the use of available anabolic agents to attenuate the excess catabolism. Data Source: The available published literature on the pathogenesis of acute catabolic states and the use of anabolic an...

  14. Fructose catabolism in Azospirillum brasilense and Azospirillum lipoferum.

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    The pathways for catabolism of fructose were investigated in the type strains of Azospirillum lipoferum and Azospirillum brasilense grown aerobically with (NH4)2SO4 as the nitrogen source. When grown on fructose, the former species possessed a complete Entner-Doudoroff pathway, whereas the latter species lacked activity for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Both species possessed a complete catabolic Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway. Neither species possessed the key enzyme of the hexose monop...

  15. Glutamate, Ornithine, Arginine, Proline, and Polyamine Metabolic Interactions: The Pathway Is Regulated at the Post-Transcriptional Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Rajtilak; Barchi, Boubker; Turlapati, Swathi A.; Gagne, Maegan; Minocha, Rakesh; Long, Stephanie; Minocha, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of glutamate into ornithine, arginine, proline, and polyamines is a major network of nitrogen-metabolizing pathways in plants, which also produces intermediates like nitric oxide, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) that play critical roles in plant development and stress. While the accumulations of intermediates and the products of this network depend primarily on nitrogen assimilation, the overall regulation of the interacting sub-pathways is not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that diversion of ornithine into polyamine biosynthesis (by transgenic approach) not only plays a role in regulating its own biosynthesis from glutamate but also affects arginine and proline biosynthesis. Using two high putrescine producing lines of Arabidopsis thaliana (containing a transgenic mouse ornithine decarboxylase gene), we studied the: (1) effects of exogenous supply of carbon and nitrogen on polyamines and pools of soluble amino acids; and, (2) expression of genes encoding key enzymes in the interactive pathways of arginine, proline and GABA biosynthesis as well as the catabolism of polyamines. Our findings suggest that: (1) the overall conversion of glutamate to arginine and polyamines is enhanced by increased utilization of ornithine for polyamine biosynthesis by the transgene product; (2) proline and arginine biosynthesis are regulated independently of polyamines and GABA biosynthesis; (3) the expression of most genes (28 that were studied) that encode enzymes of the interacting sub-pathways of arginine and GABA biosynthesis does not change even though overall biosynthesis of Orn from glutamate is increased several fold; and (4) increased polyamine biosynthesis results in increased assimilation of both nitrogen and carbon by the cells. PMID:26909083

  16. Membrane lipids regulate ganglioside GM2 catabolism and GM2 activator protein activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anheuser, Susi; Breiden, Bernadette; Schwarzmann, Günter; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2015-09-01

    Ganglioside GM2 is the major lysosomal storage compound of Tay-Sachs disease. It also accumulates in Niemann-Pick disease types A and B with primary storage of SM and with cholesterol in type C. Reconstitution of GM2 catabolism with β-hexosaminidase A and GM2 activator protein (GM2AP) at uncharged liposomal surfaces carrying GM2 as substrate generated only a physiologically irrelevant catabolic rate, even at pH 4.2. However, incorporation of anionic phospholipids into the GM2 carrying liposomes stimulated GM2 hydrolysis more than 10-fold, while the incorporation of plasma membrane stabilizing lipids (SM and cholesterol) generated a strong inhibition of GM2 hydrolysis, even in the presence of anionic phospholipids. Mobilization of membrane lipids by GM2AP was also inhibited in the presence of cholesterol or SM, as revealed by surface plasmon resonance studies. These lipids also reduced the interliposomal transfer rate of 2-NBD-GM1 by GM2AP, as observed in assays using Förster resonance energy transfer. Our data raise major concerns about the usage of recombinant His-tagged GM2AP compared with untagged protein. The former binds more strongly to anionic GM2-carrying liposomal surfaces, increases GM2 hydrolysis, and accelerates intermembrane transfer of 2-NBD-GM1, but does not mobilize membrane lipids. PMID:26175473

  17. A forward genetic approach in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a strategy for exploring starch catabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hande Tunçay

    Full Text Available A screen was recently developed to study the mobilization of starch in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This screen relies on starch synthesis accumulation during nitrogen starvation followed by the supply of nitrogen and the switch to darkness. Hence multiple regulatory networks including those of nutrient starvation, cell cycle control and light to dark transitions are likely to impact the recovery of mutant candidates. In this paper we monitor the specificity of this mutant screen by characterizing the nature of the genes disrupted in the selected mutants. We show that one third of the mutants consisted of strains mutated in genes previously reported to be of paramount importance in starch catabolism such as those encoding β-amylases, the maltose export protein, and branching enzyme I. The other mutants were defective for previously uncharacterized functions some of which are likely to define novel proteins affecting starch mobilization in green algae.

  18. Mobilities Mobilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Pompeyo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Urry, John (2007 Mobilities.Oxford: Polity Press.Urry, John (2007 Mobilities.Oxford: Polity Press.John Urry (1946-, profesor en la Universidad de Lancaster, es un sociólogo de sobra conocido y altamente reputado en el panorama internacional de las ciencias sociales. Su dilatada carrera, aparentemente dispersa y diversificada, ha seguido senderos bastante bien definidos dejando tras de sí un catálogo extenso de obras sociológicas de primer nivel. Sus primeros trabajos se centraban en el campo de la teoría social y la filosofía de las ciencias sociales o de la sociología del poder [...

  19. Arginine regulation of gramicidin S biosynthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Poirier, A.; Demain, A L

    1981-01-01

    Several amino acids are known to affect the gramicidin S producer Bacillus brevis ATCC 9999 with respect ot growth, soluble gramicidin S synthetase formation, antibiotic production, or a combination of these. Our studies confirmed that arginine has paradoxical effects on the B. brevis fermentation; it markedly increased growth and antibiotic production, yet decreased the soluble heavy gramicidin S synthetase activity. We found that arginine did not repress heavy gramicidin S synthetase. The a...

  20. Metabolic control analysis of xylose catabolism in Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prathumpai, Wai; Gabelgaard, J.B.; Wanchanthuek, P.; van de Vondervoort, P.J.I.; de Groot, M.J.L.; Mcintyre, Mhairi; Nielsen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    A kinetic model for xylose catabolism in Aspergillus is proposed. From a thermodynamic analysis it was found that the intermediate xylitol will accumulate during xylose catabolism. Use of the kinetic model allowed metabolic control analysis (MCA) of the xylose catabolic pathway to be carried out......, and flux control was shown to be dependent on the metabolite levels. Due to thermodynamic constraints, flux control may reside at the first step in the pathway, i.e., at the xylose reductase, even when the intracellular xylitol concentration is high. On the basis of the kinetic analysis, the general...... dogma specifying that flux control often resides at the step following an intermediate present at high concentrations was, therefore, shown not to hold. The intracellular xylitol concentration was measured in batch cultivations of two different strains of Aspergillus niger and two different strains of...

  1. Arginine Adjunctive Therapy in Active Tuberculosis

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    Aliasghar Farazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dietary supplementation has been used as a mechanism to augment the immune system. Adjunctive therapy with L-arginine has the potential to improve outcomes in active tuberculosis. Methods. In a randomized clinical trial 63 participants with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in Markazi Province of Iran were given arginine or placebo for 4 weeks in addition to conventional chemotherapy. The final treatment success, sputum conversion, weight gain, and clinical symptoms after one and two months were considered as primary outcomes and secondary outcomes were ESR, CRP, and Hg. Data were collected and analyzed with SPSS software (ver. 18. Results. Arginine supplementation reduced constitutional symptoms (P=0.032 in patients with smear-positive TB at the end of the first month of treatment. Arginine treated patients had significantly increased BMI at the end of the first and second months of treatment (P=0.032 and P=0.04 and a reduced CRP at the end of the first month of treatment (P=0.03 versus placebo group. Conclusion. Arginine is useful as an adjunctive therapy in patients with active tuberculosis, in which the effects are more likely mediated by the increased production of nitric oxide and improved constitutional symptoms and weight gain. This trial is registered with Clinical Trials Registry of Iran: IRCT201211179855N2.

  2. Arginase and Arginine Dysregulation in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renée C. Benson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, evidence has accumulated indicating that the enzyme arginase, which converts L-arginine into L-ornithine and urea, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders such as asthma through dysregulation of L-arginine metabolism and modulation of nitric oxide (NO homeostasis. Allergic asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling. Through substrate competition, arginase decreases bioavailability of L-arginine for nitric oxide synthase (NOS, thereby limiting NO production with subsequent effects on airway tone and inflammation. By decreasing L-arginine bioavailability, arginase may also contribute to the uncoupling of NOS and the formation of the proinflammatory oxidant peroxynitrite in the airways. Finally, arginase may play a role in the development of chronic airway remodeling through formation of L-ornithine with downstream production of polyamines and L-proline, which are involved in processes of cellular proliferation and collagen deposition. Further research on modulation of arginase activity and L-arginine bioavailability may reveal promising novel therapeutic strategies for asthma.

  3. Arginine, scurvy and Cartier's "tree of life"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durzan Don J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several conifers have been considered as candidates for "Annedda", which was the source for a miraculous cure for scurvy in Jacques Cartier's critically ill crew in 1536. Vitamin C was responsible for the cure of scurvy and was obtained as an Iroquois decoction from the bark and leaves from this "tree of life", now commonly referred to as arborvitae. Based on seasonal and diurnal amino acid analyses of candidate "trees of life", high levels of arginine, proline, and guanidino compounds were also probably present in decoctions prepared in the severe winter. The semi-essential arginine, proline and all the essential amino acids, would have provided additional nutritional benefits for the rapid recovery from scurvy by vitamin C when food supply was limited. The value of arginine, especially in the recovery of the critically ill sailors, is postulated as a source of nitric oxide, and the arginine-derived guanidino compounds as controlling factors for the activities of different nitric oxide synthases. This review provides further insights into the use of the candidate "trees of life" by indigenous peoples in eastern Canada. It raises hypotheses on the nutritional and synergistic roles of arginine, its metabolites, and other biofactors complementing the role of vitamin C especially in treating Cartier's critically ill sailors.

  4. Arginine: Its pKa value revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Carolyn A; Platzer, Gerald; Okon, Mark; Garcia-Moreno E, Bertrand; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2015-01-01

    Using complementary approaches of potentiometry and NMR spectroscopy, we have determined that the equilibrium acid dissociation constant (pKa value) of the arginine guanidinium group is 13.8 ± 0.1. This is substantially higher than that of ∼12 often used in structure-based electrostatics calculations and cited in biochemistry textbooks. The revised intrinsic pKa value helps explains why arginine side chains in proteins are always predominantly charged, even at pH values as great as 10. The high pKa value also reinforces the observation that arginine side chains are invariably protonated under physiological conditions of near neutral pH. This occurs even when the guanidinium moiety is buried in a hydrophobic micro-environment, such as that inside a protein or a lipid membrane, thought to be incompatible with the presence of a charged group. PMID:25808204

  5. Structural bases of feed-back control of arginine biosynthesis, revealed by the structures of two hexameric N-acetylglutamate kinases, from Thermotoga maritima and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramón-Maiques, Santiago; Fernández-Murga, María Leonor; Gil-Ortiz, Fernando; Vagin, Alexei; Fita, Ignacio; Rubio, Vicente

    2006-02-24

    N-Acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK) catalyses the second step in the route of arginine biosynthesis. In many organisms this enzyme is inhibited by the final product of the route, arginine, and thus plays a central regulatory role. In addition, in photosynthetic organisms NAGK is the target of the nitrogen-signalling protein PII. The 3-D structure of homodimeric, arginine-insensitive, Escherichia coli NAGK, clarified substrate binding and catalysis but shed no light on arginine inhibition of NAGK. We now shed light on arginine inhibition by determining the crystal structures, at 2.75 A and 2.95 A resolution, of arginine-complexed Thermotoga maritima and arginine-free Pseudomonas aeruginosa NAGKs, respectively. Both enzymes are highly similar ring-like hexamers having a central orifice of approximately 30 A diameter. They are formed by linking three E.coli NAGK-like homodimers through the interlacing of an N-terminal mobile kinked alpha-helix, which is absent from E.coli NAGK. Arginine is bound in each subunit of T.maritima NAGK, flanking the interdimeric junction, in a site formed between the N helix and the C lobe of the subunit. This site is also present, in variable conformations, in P.aeruginosa NAGK, but is missing from E.coli NAGK. Arginine, by gluing the C lobe of each subunit to the inter-dimeric junction, may stabilize an enlarged active centre conformation, hampering catalysis. Acetylglutamate counters arginine inhibition by promoting active centre closure. The hexameric architecture justifies the observed sigmoidal arginine inhibition kinetics with a high Hill coefficient (N approximately 4), and appears essential for arginine inhibition and for NAGK-PII complex formation, since this complex may involve binding of NAGK and PII with their 3-fold axes aligned. The NAGK structures allow identification of diagnostic sequence signatures for arginine inhibition. These signatures are found also in the homologous arginine-inhibited enzyme NAG synthase. The findings

  6. Arginine: Its pKa value revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Fitch, Carolyn A.; Platzer, Gerald; Okon, Mark; Garcia-Moreno E, Bertrand; McIntosh, Lawrence P.

    2015-01-01

    Using complementary approaches of potentiometry and NMR spectroscopy, we have determined that the equilibrium acid dissociation constant (pKa value) of the arginine guanidinium group is 13.8 ± 0.1. This is substantially higher than that of ∼12 often used in structure-based electrostatics calculations and cited in biochemistry textbooks. The revised intrinsic pKa value helps explains why arginine side chains in proteins are always predominantly charged, even at pH values as great as 10. The hi...

  7. Metabolic control analysis of Aspergillus niger L-arabinose catabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Groot, M.J.L.; Prathumpai, Wai; Visser, J.; Ruijter, G.J.G.

    2005-01-01

    A mathematical model of the L-arabinose/D-xylose catabolic pathway of Aspergillus niger was constructed based on the kinetic properties of the enzymes. For this purpose L-arabinose reductase, L-arabitol dehydrogenase and D-xylose reductase were purified using dye-affinity chromatography, and their...

  8. The D-galacturonic acid catabolic pathway in Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lisha; Thiewes, Harry; van Kan, Jan A L

    2011-10-01

    D-galacturonic acid is the most abundant component of pectin, one of the major polysaccharide constituents of plant cell walls. Galacturonic acid potentially is an important carbon source for microorganisms living on (decaying) plant material. A catabolic pathway was proposed in filamentous fungi, comprising three enzymatic steps, involving D-galacturonate reductase, L-galactonate dehydratase, and 2-keto-3-deoxy-L-galactonate aldolase. We describe the functional, biochemical and genetic characterization of the entire D-galacturonate-specific catabolic pathway in the plant pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea. The B. cinerea genome contains two non-homologous galacturonate reductase genes (Bcgar1 and Bcgar2), a galactonate dehydratase gene (Bclgd1), and a 2-keto-3-deoxy-L-galactonate aldolase gene (Bclga1). Their expression levels were highly induced in cultures containing GalA, pectate, or pectin as the sole carbon source. The four proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and their enzymatic activity was characterized. Targeted gene replacement of all four genes in B. cinerea, either separately or in combinations, yielded mutants that were affected in growth on D-galacturonic acid, pectate, or pectin as the sole carbon source. In Aspergillus nidulans and A. niger, the first catabolic conversion only involves the Bcgar2 ortholog, while in Hypocrea jecorina, it only involves the Bcgar1 ortholog. In B. cinerea, however, BcGAR1 and BcGAR2 jointly contribute to the first step of the catabolic pathway, albeit to different extent. The virulence of all B. cinerea mutants in the D-galacturonic acid catabolic pathway on tomato leaves, apple fruit and bell peppers was unaltered. PMID:21683149

  9. Variable carbon catabolism among Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lay Ching Chai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi is strictly a human intracellular pathogen. It causes acute systemic (typhoid fever and chronic infections that result in long-term asymptomatic human carriage. S. Typhi displays diverse disease manifestations in human infection and exhibits high clonality. The principal factors underlying the unique lifestyle of S. Typhi in its human host during acute and chronic infections remain largely unknown and are therefore the main objective of this study. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To obtain insight into the intracellular lifestyle of S. Typhi, a high-throughput phenotypic microarray was employed to characterise the catabolic capacity of 190 carbon sources in S. Typhi strains. The success of this study lies in the carefully selected library of S. Typhi strains, including strains from two geographically distinct areas of typhoid endemicity, an asymptomatic human carrier, clinical stools and blood samples and sewage-contaminated rivers. An extremely low carbon catabolic capacity (27% of 190 carbon substrates was observed among the strains. The carbon catabolic profiles appeared to suggest that S. Typhi strains survived well on carbon subtrates that are found abundantly in the human body but not in others. The strains could not utilise plant-associated carbon substrates. In addition, α-glycerolphosphate, glycerol, L-serine, pyruvate and lactate served as better carbon sources to monosaccharides in the S. Typhi strains tested. CONCLUSION: The carbon catabolic profiles suggest that S. Typhi could survive and persist well in the nutrient depleted metabolic niches in the human host but not in the environment outside of the host. These findings serve as caveats for future studies to understand how carbon catabolism relates to the pathogenesis and transmission of this pathogen.

  10. Low plasma arginine:asymmetric dimethyl arginine ratios predict mortality after intracranial aneurysm rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsø, Jonatan Myrup; Bergström, Anita; Edsen, Troels; Weikop, Pia; Romner, Bertil; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthases, predicts mortality in cardiovascular disease and has been linked to cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In this prospective study, we assessed whether circulating ADMA, arginine...

  11. Modulators of arginine metabolism support cancer immunosurveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freschi Massimo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor-associated accrual of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC in the blood, lymphoid organs and tumor tissues may lead to perturbation of the arginine metabolism and impairment of the endogenous antitumor immunity. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether accumulation of MDSC occurred in Th2 prone BALB/c and Th1 biased C57BL/6 mice bearing the C26GM colon carcinoma and RMA T lymphoma, respectively, and to investigate whether N(G nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME and sildenafil, both modulators of the arginine metabolism, restored antitumor immunity. Results We report here that MDSC accumulate in the spleen and blood of mice irrespective of the mouse and tumor model used. Treatment of tumor-bearing mice with either the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor sildenafil or the nitric-oxide synthase (NOS inhibitor L-NAME significantly restrained tumor growth and expanded the tumor-specific immune response. Conclusion Our data emphasize the role of MDSC in modulating the endogenous tumor-specific immune response and underline the anti-neoplastic therapeutic potential of arginine metabolism modulators.

  12. Lysine and arginine requirements of Salminus brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jony Koji Dairiki

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the dietary lysine (DL and dietary arginine (DA requirements of dourado (Salminus brasiliensis, through dose-response trials using the amino acid profiles of whole carcasses as a reference. Two experiments were carried out in a completely randomized design (n=4. In the first experiment, groups of 12 feed-conditioned dourado juveniles (11.4±0.2 g were stocked in 60 L cages placed in 300 L plastic indoor tanks in a closed circulation system. Fish were fed for 60 days on diets containing 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, or 3.5 % dietary lysine. In the second experiment, dourado juveniles (27.0±0.8 g were fed for 60 days on semipurified diets containing arginine at 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 or 3.0%, in similar conditions to those of the first experiment. Optimal DL requirements, as determined by broken-line analysis method for final weight, weight gain and specific growth rate, were 2.15% DL or 5% lysine in dietary protein, and 1.48% DA or 3.43% arginine in dietary protein. The best feed conversion ratio is attained with 2.5% DL or 5.8% lysine in dietary protein and 1.4% DA or 3.25% arginine in dietary protein.

  13. Dual role of arginine metabolism in establishing pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Mayuri; Datey, Akshay; Wilson, Keith T; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2016-02-01

    Arginine is an integral part of host defense when invading pathogens are encountered. The arginine metabolite nitric oxide (NO) confers antimicrobial properties, whereas the metabolite ornithine is utilized for polyamine synthesis. Polyamines are crucial to tissue repair and anti-inflammatory responses. iNOS/arginase balance can determine Th1/Th2 response. Furthermore, the host arginine pool and its metabolites are utilized as energy sources by various pathogens. Apart from its role as an immune modulator, recent studies have also highlighted the therapeutic effects of arginine. This article sheds light upon the roles of arginine metabolism during pathological conditions and its therapeutic potential. PMID:26610300

  14. Chemical modification of arginine residues in the lactose repressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lactose repressor protein was chemically modified with 2,3-butanedione and phenylglyoxal. Arginine reaction was quantitated by either amino aced analysis or incorporation of 14C-labeled phenylglyoxal. Inducer binding activity was unaffected by the modification of arginine residues, while both operator and nonspecific DNA binding activities were diminished, although to differing degrees. The correlation of the decrease in DNA binding activities with the modification of ∼ 1-2 equiv of arginine per monomer suggests increased reactivity of a functionally essential residue(s). For both reagents, operator DNA binding activity was protected by the presence of calf thymus DNA, and the extent of reaction with phenylglyoxal was simultaneously diminished. This protection presumably results from steric restriction of reagent access to an arginine(s) that is (are) essential for DNA binding interactions. These experiments suggest that there is (are) an essential reactive arginine(s) critical for repressor binding to DNA

  15. Catabolism of 3-Nitrophenol by Ralstonia eutropha JMP 134

    OpenAIRE

    Schenzle, A.; Lenke, H; Fischer, P.; Williams, P A; Knackmuss, H.

    1997-01-01

    Ralstonia eutropha JMP 134 utilizes 3-nitrophenol as the sole source of nitrogen, carbon, and energy. The entire catabolic pathway of 3-nitrophenol is chromosomally encoded. An initial NADPH-dependent reduction of 3-nitrophenol was found in cell extracts of strain JMP 134. By use of a partially purified 3-nitrophenol nitroreductase from 3-nitrophenol-grown cells, 3-hydroxylaminophenol was identified as the initial reduction product. Resting cells of R. eutropha JMP 134 metabolized 3-nitrophen...

  16. A new mechanism for the aerobic catabolism of dimethyl sulfide.

    OpenAIRE

    Visscher, P T; Taylor, B F

    1993-01-01

    Aerobic degradation of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), previously described for thiobacilli and hyphomicrobia, involves catabolism to sulfide via methanethiol (CH3SH). Methyl groups are sequentially eliminated as HCHO by incorporation of O2 catalyzed by DMS monooxygenase and methanethiol oxidase. H2O2 formed during CH3SH oxidation is destroyed by catalase. We recently isolated Thiobacillus strain ASN-1, which grows either aerobically or anaerobically with denitrification on DMS. Comparative experimen...

  17. Increase in sphingolipid catabolic enzyme activity during aging

    OpenAIRE

    Sacket, Santosh J; Chung, Hae-young; Okajima, Fumikazu; Im, Dong-Soon

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To understand the contribution of sphingolipid metabolism and its metabolites to development and aging. Methods: A systemic analysis on the changes in activity of sphingolipid metabolic enzymes in kidney, liver and brain tissues during development and aging was conducted. The study was conducted using tissues from 1-day-old to 720-day-old rats. Results: Catabolic enzyme activities as well as the level of sphingomyelinase (SMase) and ceramidase (CDase) were higher than that of anabolic en...

  18. Identification of genes required for Pseudomonas aeruginosa carnitine catabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Wargo, Matthew J.; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2009-01-01

    Carnitine is a quaternary amine compound prevalent in animal tissues, and a potential carbon, nitrogen and energy source for pathogens during infection. Characterization of activities in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cell lysates has previously shown that carnitine is converted to 3-dehydrocarnitine (3-dhc) which is in turn metabolized to glycine betaine (GB), an intermediate metabolite in the catabolism of carnitine to glycine. However, the identities of the enzymes required for carnitine catabolis...

  19. Mediated Electrochemical Measurements of Intracellular Catabolic Activities of Yeast Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Sheng ZHAO; Zhen Yu YANG; Yao LU; Zheng Yu YANG

    2005-01-01

    Coupling with the dual mediator system menadione/ferricyanide, microelectrode voltammetric measurements were undertaken to detect the ferrocyanide accumulations arising from the mediated reduction of ferricyanide by yeast cells. The results indicate that the dual mediator system menadione/ferricyanide could be used as a probe to detect cellular catabolic activities in yeast cells and the electrochemical response has a positive relationship with the specific growth rate of yeast cells.

  20. Arginine methylation regulates the p53 response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, Martin; Durant, Stephen T; Cho, Er-Chieh;

    2008-01-01

    Activation of the p53 tumour suppressor protein in response to DNA damage leads to apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. Enzymatic modifications are widely believed to affect and regulate p53 activity. We describe here a level of post-translational control that has an important functional consequence on...... of p53. Furthermore, PRMT5 depletion triggers p53-dependent apoptosis. Thus, methylation on arginine residues is an underlying mechanism of control during the p53 response....

  1. Arginine, scurvy and Cartier's "tree of life"

    OpenAIRE

    Durzan Don J

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Several conifers have been considered as candidates for "Annedda", which was the source for a miraculous cure for scurvy in Jacques Cartier's critically ill crew in 1536. Vitamin C was responsible for the cure of scurvy and was obtained as an Iroquois decoction from the bark and leaves from this "tree of life", now commonly referred to as arborvitae. Based on seasonal and diurnal amino acid analyses of candidate "trees of life", high levels of arginine, proline, and guanidino compoun...

  2. Protective Effects of Arginine on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Against Ethanol Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yanfei; Du, Zhaoli; Zhu, Hui; Guo, Xuena; He, Xiuping

    2016-01-01

    Yeast cells are challenged by various environmental stresses in the process of industrial fermentation. As the currently main organism for bio-ethanol production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae suffers from ethanol stress. Some amino acids have been reported to be related to yeast tolerance to stresses. Here the relationship between arginine and yeast response to ethanol stress was investigated. Marked inhibitions of ethanol on cell growth, expression of genes involved in arginine biosynthesis and intracellular accumulation of arginine were observed. Furthermore, extracellular addition of arginine can abate the ethanol damage largely. To further confirm the protective effects of arginine on yeast cells, yeast strains with different levels of arginine content were constructed by overexpression of ARG4 involved in arginine biosynthesis or CAR1 encoding arginase. Intracellular arginine was increased by 18.9% or 13.1% respectively by overexpression of ARG4 or disruption of CAR1, which enhanced yeast tolerance to ethanol stress. Moreover, a 41.1% decrease of intracellular arginine was observed in CAR1 overexpressing strain, which made yeast cells keenly sensitive to ethanol. Further investigations indicated that arginine protected yeast cells from ethanol damage by maintaining the integrity of cell wall and cytoplasma membrane, stabilizing the morphology and function of organellae due to low ROS generation. PMID:27507154

  3. Arginine biosynthesis in Thermotoga maritima: characterization of the arginine-sensitive N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Murga, M Leonor; Gil-Ortiz, Fernando; Llácer, José L; Rubio, Vicente

    2004-09-01

    To help clarify the control of arginine synthesis in Thermotoga maritima, the putative gene (argB) for N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK) from this microorganism was cloned and overexpressed, and the resulting protein was purified and shown to be a highly thermostable and specific NAGK that is potently and selectively inhibited by arginine. Therefore, NAGK is in T. maritima the feedback control point of arginine synthesis, a process that in this organism involves acetyl group recycling and appears not to involve classical acetylglutamate synthase. The inhibition of NAGK by arginine was found to be pH independent and to depend sigmoidally on the concentration of arginine, with a Hill coefficient (N) of approximately 4, and the 50% inhibitory arginine concentration (I0.5) was shown to increase with temperature, approaching above 65 degrees C the I0.50 observed at 37 degrees C with the mesophilic NAGK of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (the best-studied arginine-inhibitable NAGK). At 75 degrees C, the inhibition by arginine of T. maritima NAGK was due to a large increase in the Km for acetylglutamate triggered by the inhibitor, but at 37 degrees C arginine also substantially decreased the Vmax of the enzyme. The NAGKs of T. maritima and P. aeruginosa behaved in gel filtration as hexamers, justifying the sigmoidicity and high Hill coefficient of arginine inhibition, and arginine or the substrates failed to disaggregate these enzymes. In contrast, Escherichia coli NAGK is not inhibited by arginine and is dimeric, and thus the hexameric architecture may be an important determinant of arginine sensitivity. Potential thermostability determinants of T. maritima NAGK are also discussed. PMID:15342584

  4. Spectrophotometric Determination of Arginine in Grape Juice Using 8-Hydroquinoline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hua; LIANG Xin-hong; ZHAO Rui-xiang; FENG Li-dan; LI Hua

    2008-01-01

    Arginine in grape juice can be metabolized by wine yeasts and malolactic bacteria to precursors of ethyl carbamate, known as carcinogen. The aim of this study was to develop a simple, fast, and accurate method for determining arginine in grape juice with Sakaguchi reaction by separating arginine with strong cation-exchange resins. Parameters were optimized including the concentrations of 8-hydroquinoline and sodium hydrobromite. The color stability lasted for 4 min, which is sufficient to finish the measurement. The method is simple, reproducible and accurate, and can be applied for quick measurement of arginine in grape juice to take necessary measures for controlling the level of ethyl carbamate.

  5. Characterization of arginine decarboxylase from Dianthus caryophyllus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Byung Hak; Cho, Ki Joon; Choi, Yu Jin; Park, Ky Young; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2004-04-01

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC, EC 4.1.1.9) is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of polyamines in higher plants, whereas ornithine decarboxylase represents the sole pathway of polyamine biosynthesis in animals. Previously, we characterized a genomic clone from Dianthus caryophyllus, in which the deduced polypeptide of ADC was 725 amino acids with a molecular mass of 78 kDa. In the present study, the ADC gene was subcloned into the pGEX4T1 expression vector in combination with glutathione S-transferase (GST). The fusion protein GST-ADC was water-soluble and thus was purified by sequential GSTrap-arginine affinity chromatography. A thrombin-mediated on-column cleavage reaction was employed to release free ADC from GST. Hiload superdex gel filtration FPLC was then used to obtain a highly purified ADC. The identity of the ADC was confirmed by immunoblot analysis, and its specific activity with respect to (14)C-arginine decarboxylation reaction was determined to be 0.9 CO(2) pkat mg(-1) protein. K(m) and V(max) of the reaction between ADC and the substrate were 0.077 +/- 0.001 mM and 6.0 +/- 0.6 pkat mg(-1) protein, respectively. ADC activity was reduced by 70% in the presence of 0.1 mM Cu(2+) or CO(2+), but was only marginally affected by Mg(2+), or Ca(2+) at the same concentration. Moreover, spermine at 1 mM significantly reduced its activity by 30%. PMID:15120115

  6. Arginine Biosynthesis in Thermotoga maritima: Characterization of the Arginine-Sensitive N-Acetyl-l-Glutamate Kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Murga, M. Leonor; Gil-Ortiz, Fernando; Llácer, José L.; Rubio, Vicente

    2004-01-01

    To help clarify the control of arginine synthesis in Thermotoga maritima, the putative gene (argB) for N-acetyl-l-glutamate kinase (NAGK) from this microorganism was cloned and overexpressed, and the resulting protein was purified and shown to be a highly thermostable and specific NAGK that is potently and selectively inhibited by arginine. Therefore, NAGK is in T. maritima the feedback control point of arginine synthesis, a process that in this organism involves acetyl group recycling and ap...

  7. Directed evolution of a second xylitol catabolic pathway in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    OpenAIRE

    Doten, R C; Mortlock, R P

    1984-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae PRL-R3 has inducible catabolic pathways for the degradation of ribitol and D-arabitol but cannot utilize xylitol as a growth substrate. A mutation in the rbtB regulatory gene of the ribitol operon permits the constitutive synthesis of the ribitol catabolic enzymes and allows growth on xylitol. The evolved xylitol catabolic pathway consists of an induced D-arabitol permease system that also transports xylitol, a constitutively synthesized ribitol dehydrogenase that oxidiz...

  8. Phosphonate biosynthesis and catabolism: a treasure trove of unusual enzymology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Spencer C; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2013-08-01

    Natural product biosynthesis has proven a fertile ground for the discovery of novel chemistry. Herein we review the progress made in elucidating the biosynthetic pathways of phosphonate and phosphinate natural products such as the antibacterial compounds dehydrophos and fosfomycin, the herbicidal phosphinothricin-containing peptides, and the antimalarial compound FR-900098. In each case, investigation of the pathway has yielded unusual, and often unprecedented, biochemistry. Likewise, recent investigations have uncovered novel ways to cleave the CP bond to yield phosphate under phosphorus starvation conditions. These include the discovery of novel oxidative cleavage of the CP bond catalyzed by PhnY and PhnZ as well as phosphonohydrolases that liberate phosphate from phosphonoacetate. Perhaps the crown jewel of phosphonate catabolism has been the recent resolution of the longstanding problem of the C-P lyase responsible for reductively cleaving the CP bond of a number of different phosphonates to release phosphate. Taken together, the strides made on both metabolic and catabolic fronts illustrate an array of fascinating biochemistry. PMID:23870698

  9. Lysosomes from rabbit type II cells catabolize surfactant lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, E D; Ikegami, M; Pinkerton, K E; Peake, J L; Jobe, A H

    2000-01-01

    The role of a lysosome fraction from rabbit type II cells in surfactant dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) catabolism was investigated in vivo using radiolabeled DPPC and dihexadecylphosphatidylcholine (1, 2-dihexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine; DEPC), a phospholipase A(1)- and A(2)-resistant analog of DPPC. Freshly isolated type II cells were gently disrupted by shearing, and lysosomes were isolated with Percoll density gradients (density range 1.0591-1.1457 g/ml). The lysosome fractions were relatively free of contaminating organelles as determined by electron microscopy and organelle marker enzymes. After intratracheal injection of rabbits with [(3)H]DPPC and [(14)C]DEPC associated with a trace amount of natural rabbit surfactant, the degradation-resistant DEPC accumulated 16-fold compared with DPPC in lysosome fractions at 15 h. Lysosomes can be isolated from freshly isolated type II cells, and lysosomes from type II cells are the primary catabolic organelle for alveolar surfactant DPPC following reuptake by type II cells in vivo. PMID:10645892

  10. Possible involvement of a plasmid in arginine auxotrophic mutation of Streptomyces kasugaensis.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakano, M M; Ozawa, K; Ogawara, H

    1980-01-01

    Streptomyces kasugaensis gave arginine auxotrophic mutants at high frequency, The coupled loss and reappearance of plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid with arginine auxotrophy suggested that the insertion of the plasmid into chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid caused the arginine auxotrophy.

  11. Staging Mobilities / Designing Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2015-01-01

    people are ‘staging themselves’ (from below). Staging mobilities is a dynamic process between ‘being staged’ (for example, being stopped at traffic lights) and the ‘mobile staging’ of interacting individuals (negotiating a passage on the pavement). Staging mobilities is about the fact that mobility is...

  12. Structures of Bacterial Biosynthetic Arginine Decarboxylases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F Forouhar; S Lew; J Seetharaman; R Xiao; T Acton; G Montelione; L Tong

    2011-12-31

    Biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase (ADC; also known as SpeA) plays an important role in the biosynthesis of polyamines from arginine in bacteria and plants. SpeA is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme and shares weak sequence homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases. Here, the crystal structure of PLP-bound SpeA from Campylobacter jejuni is reported at 3.0 {angstrom} resolution and that of Escherichia coli SpeA in complex with a sulfate ion is reported at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure of the SpeA monomer contains two large domains, an N-terminal TIM-barrel domain followed by a {beta}-sandwich domain, as well as two smaller helical domains. The TIM-barrel and {beta}-sandwich domains share structural homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases, even though the sequence conservation among these enzymes is less than 25%. A similar tetramer is observed for both C. jejuni and E. coli SpeA, composed of two dimers of tightly associated monomers. The active site of SpeA is located at the interface of this dimer and is formed by residues from the TIM-barrel domain of one monomer and a highly conserved loop in the {beta}-sandwich domain of the other monomer. The PLP cofactor is recognized by hydrogen-bonding, {pi}-stacking and van der Waals interactions.

  13. Arginine specific aminopeptidase from Lactobacillus brevis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya Nandan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The proteolytic system of lactic acid bacteria contribute to the development of flavor during the ripening of cheese through the generation of short peptides and free amino acids, which directly or indirectly act as flavor precursors. Newly isolated lactic acid bacteria (LAB as well as those procured from culture collection centers were screened for the production of various substrate specific aminopeptidases. Among all the strains screened, L. brevis (NRRL B-1836 was found to produce quantifiable amount of intracellular arginine specific aminopeptidase (EC 3.4.11.6. The productivity of arginine aminopeptidase in 5 L fermentor was 36 IU/L/h. The Luedeking and Piret model was tested for intracellular production of aminopeptidase and the data seemed to fit well, as the correlation coefficient was 0.9964 for MRS. The αAP and βAP was 0.4865 and 0.0046, respectively in MRS medium indicating that the yield was predominantly depended on growth. The culture produced lactic acid and also tolerated pH 2.0-3.0 and 0.3-0.5% bile salts, the most important probiotic features.

  14. Arginine Deiminase Resistance in Melanoma Cells Is Associated with Metabolic Reprogramming, Glucose Dependence and Glutamine Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Yan; Tsai, Wen-Bin; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Savaraj, Niramol; Feun, Lynn G.; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2013-01-01

    Many malignant human tumors, including melanomas are auxotrophic for arginine due to reduced expression of argininosuccinate synthetase1 (ASS1), the rate-limiting enzyme for arginine biosynthesis. Pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20), which degrades extracellular arginine resulting in arginine deprivation, has shown favorable results in clinical trials for treating arginine-auxotrophic tumors. Drug resistance is the major obstacle for effective ADI-PEG20 usage. To elucidate mechanisms of ...

  15. Arginine Depletion by Arginine Deiminase Does Not Affect Whole Protein Metabolism or Muscle Fractional Protein Synthesis Rate in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Juan C.; Didelija, Inka Cajo

    2015-01-01

    Due to the absolute need for arginine that certain cancer cells have, arginine depletion is a therapy in clinical trials to treat several types of cancers. Arginine is an amino acids utilized not only as a precursor for other important molecules, but also for protein synthesis. Because arginine depletion can potentially exacerbate the progressive loss of body weight, and especially lean body mass, in cancer patients we determined the effect of arginine depletion by pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) on whole body protein synthesis and fractional protein synthesis rate in multiple tissues of mice. ADI-PEG 20 successfully depleted circulating arginine (<1 μmol/L), and increased citrulline concentration more than tenfold. Body weight and body composition, however, were not affected by ADI-PEG 20. Despite the depletion of arginine, whole body protein synthesis and breakdown were maintained in the ADI-PEG 20 treated mice. The fractional protein synthesis rate of muscle was also not affected by arginine depletion. Most tissues (liver, kidney, spleen, heart, lungs, stomach, small and large intestine, pancreas) were able to maintain their fractional protein synthesis rate; however, the fractional protein synthesis rate of brain, thymus and testicles was reduced due to the ADI-PEG 20 treatment. Furthermore, these results were confirmed by the incorporation of ureido [14C]citrulline, which indicate the local conversion into arginine, into protein. In conclusion, the intracellular recycling pathway of citrulline is able to provide enough arginine to maintain protein synthesis rate and prevent the loss of lean body mass and body weight. PMID:25775142

  16. Arginine, citrulline and nitric oxide metabolism in sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arginine has vasodilatory effects, via its conversion by nitric oxide (NO) synthase into NO, and immunomodulatory actions that play important roles in sepsis. Protein breakdown affects arginine availability, and the release of asymmetric dimethylarginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase, may therefore a...

  17. On the mechanism of arginine requirement for adenovirus synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of arginine deprivation on the synthesis and processing of viral proteins and the assembly of incomplete and complete virions were studied during infection with human adenovirus type 2. Arginine deprivation greatly reduced the synthesis of all viral proteins, particularly the precursor to core protein VII. The inhibition was completely reversible by the addition of arginine to the medium. Arginine deprivation between 7 and 20 hours post-infection inhibited the processing of PVII to VII, suggesting that PVII is not cleaved autocatalytically. The assembly of incomplete virions was sensitive to arginine deprivation only prior to 20 hours, while the assembly of complete virions was dependent on the continuous presence of arginine. This observation supports the hypothesis that incomplete virions are precursors of complete virions. The experiments on the PVII-specific endoprotease activity showed that arginine deprivation caused only slight reduction in the in vitro activity, although no activity was observed in vivo. The present results lead to the hypothesis that arginine deficiency inhibits the synthesis of a functional protein essential for virion maturation, other than the synthesis of processing of PVII. (author)

  18. Effects of dietary salt intake on plasma arginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitiyakara, C; Chabrashvili, T; Jose, P; Welch, W J; Wilcox, C S

    2001-04-01

    Because L-arginine is degraded by hepatic arginase to ornithine and urea and is transported by the regulated 2A cationic amino acid y(+) transporter (CAT2A), hepatic transport may regulate plasma arginine concentration. Groups of rats (n = 6) were fed a diet of either low salt (LS) or high salt (HS) for 7 days to test the hypothesis that dietary salt intake regulates plasma arginine concentration and renal nitric oxide (NO) generation by measuring plasma arginine and ornithine concentrations, renal NO excretion, and expression of hepatic CAT2A, and arginase. LS rats had lower excretion of NO metabolites and cGMP, lower plasma arginine concentration (LS: 83 +/- 7 vs. HS: 165 +/- 10 micromol/l, P plasma ornithine concentration (LS: 82 +/- 6 vs. HS: 66 +/- 4 micromol/l, P plasma arginine concentration with increased plasma ornithine concentration and urea excretion during LS indicates increased arginine metabolism by arginase. This cannot be ascribed to changes in hepatic arginase expression but may be a consequence of increased hepatic arginine uptake via CAT2A. PMID:11247829

  19. Anti-aging effects of l-arginine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Z. Gad

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available l-Arginine is one of the most metabolically versatile amino acids. In addition to its role in the synthesis of nitric oxide, l-arginine serves as a precursor for the synthesis of polyamines, proline, glutamate, creatine, agmatine and urea. Several human and experimental animal studies have indicated that exogenous l-arginine intake has multiple beneficial pharmacological effects when taken in doses larger than normal dietary consumption. Such effects include reduction in the risk of vascular and heart diseases, reduction in erectile dysfunction, improvement in immune response and inhibition of gastric hyperacidity. This review summarises several positive studies and personal experiences of l-arginine. The demonstrated anti-aging benefits of l-arginine show greater potential than any pharmaceutical or nutraceutical agent ever previously discovered.

  20. Life on arginine for Mycoplasma hominis: clues from its minimal genome and comparison with other human urogenital mycoplasmas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Pereyre

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma hominis is an opportunistic human mycoplasma. Two other pathogenic human species, M. genitalium and Ureaplasma parvum, reside within the same natural niche as M. hominis: the urogenital tract. These three species have overlapping, but distinct, pathogenic roles. They have minimal genomes and, thus, reduced metabolic capabilities characterized by distinct energy-generating pathways. Analysis of the M. hominis PG21 genome sequence revealed that it is the second smallest genome among self-replicating free living organisms (665,445 bp, 537 coding sequences (CDSs. Five clusters of genes were predicted to have undergone horizontal gene transfer (HGT between M. hominis and the phylogenetically distant U. parvum species. We reconstructed M. hominis metabolic pathways from the predicted genes, with particular emphasis on energy-generating pathways. The Embden-Meyerhoff-Parnas pathway was incomplete, with a single enzyme absent. We identified the three proteins constituting the arginine dihydrolase pathway. This pathway was found essential to promote growth in vivo. The predicted presence of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase suggested that arginine catabolism is more complex than initially described. This enzyme may have been acquired by HGT from non-mollicute bacteria. Comparison of the three minimal mollicute genomes showed that 247 CDSs were common to all three genomes, whereas 220 CDSs were specific to M. hominis, 172 CDSs were specific to M. genitalium, and 280 CDSs were specific to U. parvum. Within these species-specific genes, two major sets of genes could be identified: one including genes involved in various energy-generating pathways, depending on the energy source used (glucose, urea, or arginine and another involved in cytadherence and virulence. Therefore, a minimal mycoplasma cell, not including cytadherence and virulence-related genes, could be envisaged containing a core genome (247 genes, plus a set of genes required for

  1. Functional genomics by NMR spectroscopy. Phenylacetate catabolism in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Wael; El-Said Mohamed, Magdy; Wanner, Barry L; Datsenko, Kirill A; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Rohdich, Felix; Bacher, Adelbert; Fuchs, Georg

    2003-07-01

    Aerobic metabolism of phenylalanine in most bacteria proceeds via oxidation to phenylacetate. Surprisingly, the further metabolism of phenylacetate has not been elucidated, even in well studied bacteria such as Escherichia coli. The only committed step is the conversion of phenylacetate into phenylacetyl-CoA. The paa operon of E. coli encodes 14 polypeptides involved in the catabolism of phenylacetate. We have found that E. coli K12 mutants with a deletion of the paaF, paaG, paaH, paaJ or paaZ gene are unable to grow with phenylacetate as carbon source. Incubation of a paaG mutant with [U-13C8]phenylacetate yielded ring-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydrophenylacetyl lactone as shown by NMR spectroscopy. Incubation of the paaF and paaH mutants with phenylacetate yielded delta3-dehydroadipate and 3-hydroxyadipate, respectively. The origin of the carbon atoms of these C6 compounds from the aromatic ring was shown using [ring-13C6]phenylacetate. The paaG and paaZ mutants also converted phenylacetate into ortho-hydroxyphenylacetate, which was previously identified as a dead end product of phenylacetate catabolism. These data, in conjunction with protein sequence data, suggest a novel catabolic pathway via CoA thioesters. According to this, phenylacetyl-CoA is attacked by a ring-oxygenase/reductase (PaaABCDE proteins), generating a hydroxylated and reduced derivative of phenylacetyl-CoA, which is not re-oxidized to a dihydroxylated aromatic intermediate, as in other known aromatic pathways. Rather, it is proposed that this nonaromatic intermediate CoA ester is further metabolized in a complex reaction sequence comprising enoyl-CoA isomerization/hydration, nonoxygenolytic ring opening, and dehydrogenation catalyzed by the PaaG and PaaZ proteins. The subsequent beta-oxidation-type degradation of the resulting CoA dicarboxylate via beta-ketoadipyl-CoA to succinyl-CoA and acetyl-CoA appears to be catalyzed by the PaaJ, PaaF and PaaH proteins. PMID:12846838

  2. Arginine acts as an inhibitor of the biosynthesis of several mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touhami, Najim; Buhl, Katharina; Schmidt-Heydt, Markus; Geisen, Rolf

    2016-10-17

    It is well known that the type and the availability of nitrogen have a great influence on the biosynthesis of certain mycotoxins. Here it is shown that some amino acids have no influence, some others strongly support and a third group inhibits the biosynthesis of ochratoxin (OTA) by Penicillium nordicum even in a complex medium, such as PDA. Arginine (Arg) is one of the strong OTA inhibiting amino acids. It was shown that Arg not only inhibits OTA in Penicillium but also citrinin (CIT) biosynthesis in Penicillium verrucosum, Penicillium expansum and Penicillium citrinum and alternariol (AOH), alternariol monomethylether (AME) and tenuazonic acid (TeA) biosynthesis in Alternaria alternata. The minimal inhibitory concentration of Arg differs depending on the mycotoxin and the species analysed. However, the OTA biosynthesis by P. verrucosum and P. nordicum was most sensitive. Growth, on the other hand, was much less affected by Arg. Urea, a metabolite of Arg catabolism, shows a similar inhibitory activity. In wheat medium containing 50mM Arg almost no OTA was produced by Penicillium, in contrast to plain wheat medium. PMID:27400452

  3. Intrinsic and induced isoproturon catabolic activity in dissimilar soils and soils under dissimilar land use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The catabolic activity with respect to the systemic herbicide isoproturon was determined in soil samples by 14C-radiorespirometry. The first experiment assessed levels of intrinsic catabolic activity in soil samples that represented three dissimilar soil series under arable cultivation. Results showed average extents of isoproturon mineralisation (after 240 h assay time) in the three soil series to be low. A second experiment assessed the impact of addition of isoproturon (0.05 μg kg-1) into these soils on the levels of catabolic activity following 28 days of incubation. Increased catabolic activity was observed in all three soils. A third experiment assessed levels of intrinsic catabolic activity in soil samples representing a single soil series managed under either conventional agricultural practice (including the use of isoproturon) or organic farming practice (with no use of isoproturon). Results showed higher (and more consistent) levels of isoproturon mineralisation in the soil samples collected from conventional land use. The final experiment assessed the impact of isoproturon addition on the levels of inducible catabolic activity in these soils. The results showed no significant difference in the case of the conventional farm soil samples while the induction of catabolic activity in the organic farm soil samples was significant. - Dissimilar levels of isoproturon catabolic activity in dissimilar soils and soils under dissimilar land use influence inferred risk

  4. Catabolic effects of muramyl dipeptide on rabbit chondrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramyl dipeptide, an essential structure for the diverse biologic activities of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan, inhibited the synthesis of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan in cultured rabbit costal chondrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Muramyl dipeptide, as well as lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1 alpha, also enhanced the release of 35S-sulfate-prelabeled glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan from the cell layer, which seems to reflect, at least partially, the increasing degradation of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan. Five synthetic analogs of muramyl dipeptide known to be adjuvant active or adjuvant inactive were tested for their potential to inhibit synthesis of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan and to enhance the release of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan in chondrocytes. The structural dependence of these synthetic analogs on chondrocytes was found to parallel that of immunoadjuvant activity. These results suggest that muramyl dipeptide is a potent mediator of catabolism in chondrocytes

  5. Toxoplasma gondii lacks the enzymes required for de novo arginine biosynthesis and arginine starvation triggers cyst formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Barbara A; Gigley, Jason P; Bzik, David J

    2004-03-01

    Two separate carbamoyl phosphate synthetase activities are required for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidines and arginine in most eukaryotes. Toxoplasma gondii is novel in possessing a single carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II gene that corresponds to a glutamine-dependent form required for pyrimidine biosynthesis. We therefore examined arginine acquisition in T. gondii to determine whether the single carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II activity could provide both pyrimidine and arginine biosynthesis. We found that arginine deprivation efficiently blocks the replication of intracellular T. gondii, yet has little effect on long-term parasite viability. Addition of citrulline, but not ornithine, rescues the growth defect observed in the absence of exogenous arginine. This rescue with citrulline is ablated when parasites are cultured in a human citrullinemia fibroblast cell line that is deficient in argininosuccinate synthetase activity. These results reveal the absence of genes and activities of the arginine biosynthetic pathway and demonstrate that T. gondii is an arginine auxotroph. Arginine starvation was also found to efficiently trigger differentiation of replicative tachyzoites into bradyzoites contained within stable cyst-like structures. These same parasites expressing bradyzoite antigens can be efficiently switched back to rapidly proliferating tachyzoites several weeks after arginine starvation. We hypothesise that the absence of gene activities that are essential for the biosynthesis of arginine from carbamoyl phosphate confers a selective advantage by increasing bradyzoite switching during the host response to T. gondii infection. These findings are consistent with a model of host-parasite evolution that allowed host control of bradyzoite induction by trading off virulence for increased transmission. PMID:15003493

  6. Asymmetric Dimethyl Arginine in Hypothyroid Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid diseases may lead to endothelial dysfunction, however, the mechanism underlying the endothelial dysfunction in thyroid disease is still not clear. Asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA), a novel inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthetase (eNOS), was reported to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) synthesis from L-arginine. The present study was carried out to investigate ADMA levels together with effects of dislipidemia in sub-clinical and overt hypothyroid females. There were significant increase in the levels of total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and ADMA in hypothyroid females as compared to controls while the levels of NO and free T4 were significantly decreased than controls. Sub-clinical hypothyroid females had significant high TSH, LDL-c and non-significantly high ADMA levels and total cholesterol as compared to controls while they had significant decrease in NO, HDL-c and non-significant decrease in free T4 as compared to controls. There were significant negative correlations between NO and both ADMA (r2 = 0.84) and free T4 (r2 = 0.95) in overt hypothyroid group while significant positive correlation (r2 = 0.85) was detected between TSH and HDL-c in the same group. These results are highly suggestive that the decrease of nitric oxide secondary to accumulation of ADMA represent an important pathogenic factor together with dyslipidemia in endothelial dysfunction and increased cardiovascular risk especially in hypothyroid females

  7. Arginine affects appetite via nitric oxide in ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Hou, S S; Huang, W; Xu, T S; Rong, G H; Xie, M

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the mechanism by which arginine regulates feed intake in Pekin ducks. In experiment 1, one hundred forty-four 1-d-old male Pekin ducks were randomly allotted to 3 dietary treatments with 6 replicate pens of 8 birds per pen. Birds in each group were fed a corn-corn gluten meal diet containing 0.65, 0.95, and 1.45% arginine. Ducks fed the diet containing 0.65% arginine had lower feed intake and plasma nitric oxide level (P Pekin ducks. PMID:24902706

  8. Arginine-aromatic interactions and their effects on arginine-induced solubilization of aromatic solutes and suppression of protein aggregation

    KAUST Repository

    Shah, Dhawal

    2011-09-21

    We examine the interaction of aromatic residues of proteins with arginine, an additive commonly used to suppress protein aggregation, using experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. An aromatic-rich peptide, FFYTP (a segment of insulin), and lysozyme and insulin are used as model systems. Mass spectrometry shows that arginine increases the solubility of FFYTP by binding to the peptide, with the simulations revealing the predominant association of arginine to be with the aromatic residues. The calculations further show a positive preferential interaction coefficient, Γ XP, contrary to conventional thinking that positive Γ XP\\'s indicate aggregation rather than suppression of aggregation. Simulations with lysozyme and insulin also show arginine\\'s preference for aromatic residues, in addition to acidic residues. We use these observations and earlier results reported by us and others to discuss the possible implications of arginine\\'s interactions with aromatic residues on the solubilization of aromatic moieties and proteins. Our results also highlight the fact that explanations based purely on Γ XP, which measures average affinity of an additive to a protein, could obscure or misinterpret the underlying molecular mechanisms behind additive-induced suppression of protein aggregation. © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  9. Measurement of arginine metabolites: regulators of nitric oxide metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Molly S; Rogers, Lynette K

    2013-01-01

    Arginine is the substrate for nitric oxide synthases (NOS), and arginine availability regulates the production of nitric oxide. Through the activity of methyltransferases, arginine can be methylated to form monomethylarginine (NMMA), asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA), and symmetrical dimethylarginine (SDMA). NMMA and ADMA directly inhibit NOS, whereas SDMA inhibits the cellular import of arginine through the cationic amino acid transporter. Increased levels of methylarginine compounds have been associated with many diseases including atherosclerosis, renal failure, pulmonary hypertension, and preeclampsia. Previous HPLC methods to measure these molecules rely on derivatization with ortho-phthalaldehyde, which is unstable and requires immediate pre- or post-column reactions. We have identified a new fluorometric agent that is stable for at least 1 week and provides chromatographic properties that facilitate separation of these chemically similar compounds by reverse phase chromatography. PMID:24510541

  10. Development and Validation of a New Rp-Hplc Method For Simultaneous Estimation of N-Acetylcysteine And L – Arginine In Combined Dosage form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalluri Naga Jyothi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An isocratic, reversed phase-liquid chromatographic method was developed for quantitative determination of N-acetylcysteine and L-Arginine in combined dosage form. A Waters Xterra Rp8, (150*4.6*5µm column with a mobile phase containing a Phosphate Buffer (pH 4.5 and Methanol (90: 10 v/v was used. The flow rate was maintained at 0.8 ml/min, column temperature at 30°C and effluents were monitored at 248 nm. The retention times of N-acetylcysteine and L-Arginine were found to be 2.697 min and 3.156 min, respectively. The correlation co-efficient for N-acetylcysteine and L-Arginine was found to be 0.99 and 0.99, respectively. The proposed method was validated with respect to linearity, accuracy, precision, specificity, and robustness. Recovery of N-acetylcysteine and L-Arginine in formulations was found to be in the range of 97-103% and 97-103% respectively confirms the non-interferences of the excipients in formulation. Due to its simplicity, rapidness and high precision, this method can be successfully applied for estimation of N-acetylcysteine and L-Arginine in combined pharmaceutical dosage forms.

  11. Cellular Mechanisms of L-arginine Induced Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Masood, Omar

    2013-01-01

    AbstractThe University Of ManchesterOmar MasoodMD Thesis 2013Cellular Mechanisms of L-arginine Induced Experimental Acute Pancreatitis. IntroductionImpairment of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) signaling and in particular calcium overload has emerged as a possible unifying mechanism for precipitating acute pancreatitis (AP.)In the L-arginine (L-arg) experimental model of AP, nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated however the disease progression is largely unaffected by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) ...

  12. L-Arginine Pathway in COPD Patients with Acute Exacerbation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzsics, Istvan; Nagy, Lajos; Keki, Sandor; Sarosi, Veronika; Illes, Balazs; Illes, Zsolt; Horvath, Ildiko; Bogar, Lajos; Molnar, Tihamer

    BACKGROUND: Acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) remains a major cause of mortality. Clinical criteria of AECOPD are subjective. Biomarkers for AECOPD may aid in the initiation of early treatment. Increased production of asymmetric and symmetric dimethylarginine (A......-arginine, ADMA and SDMA serum levels. In patients with AECOPD, production of ADMA and SDMA are more pronounced presumably due to more severe hypoxic insult. Methylated arginine derivatives in the sera may help early recognition of AECOPD....

  13. Acellular matrix of bovine pericardium bound with L-arginine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyo Joo [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jin Woo [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chun Ho [Laboratory of Tissue Engineering, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul 139-240 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Woo [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jung Woog [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Inje University, Gimhae 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ki Dong [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    Surface immobilization of bioactive molecules onto natural tissues has been interestingly studied for the development of new functional matrices for the replacement of lost or malfunctioning tissues. In this study, an acellular matrix of bovine pericardium (ABP) was chemically modified by the direct coupling of L-arginine after glutaraldehyde (GA) cross-linking. The effects of L-arginine coupling on durability and calcification were investigated and the biocompatibility was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. A four-step detergent and enzymatic extraction process has been utilized to remove cellular components from fresh bovine pericardium (BP). Microscopic observation confirmed that nearly all cellular constituents are removed. Thermal and mechanical properties showed that the durability of L-arginine-treated matrices increased as compared with control ABP and GA-treated ABP. Resistance to collagenase digestion revealed that modified matrices have greater resistance to enzyme digestion than control ABP and GA-treated ABP. The in vivo calcification study demonstrated much less calcium deposition on L-arginine-treated ABP than GA-treated one. In vitro cell viability results showed that ABP modified with L-arginine leads to a significant increase in attachment of human dermal fibroblasts. The obtained results attest to the usefulness of L-arginine-treated ABP matrices for cardiovascular bioprostheses.

  14. Inactivity amplifies the catabolic response of skeletal muscle to cortisol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, A. A.; Stuart, C. A.; Sheffield-Moore, M.; Wolfe, R. R.

    1999-01-01

    Severe injury or trauma is accompanied by both hypercortisolemia and prolonged inactivity or bed rest (BR). Trauma and BR alone each result in a loss of muscle nitrogen, albeit through different metabolic alterations. Although BR alone can result in a 2-3% loss of lean body mass, the effects of severe trauma can be 2- to 3-fold greater. We investigated the combined effects of hypercortisolemia and prolonged inactivity on muscle protein metabolism in healthy volunteers. Six males were studied before and after 14 days of strict BR using a model based on arteriovenous sampling and muscle biopsy. Fractional synthesis and breakdown rates of skeletal muscle protein were also directly calculated. Each assessment of protein metabolism was conducted during a 12-h infusion of hydrocortisone sodium succinate (120 microg/kg x h), resulting in blood cortisol concentrations that mimic severe injury (approximately 31 microg/dL). After 14 days of strict BR, hypercortisolemia increased phenylalanine efflux from muscle by 3-fold (P muscle protein breakdown (P muscle protein synthesis. Muscle efflux of glutamine and alanine increased significantly after bed rest due to a significant increase in de novo synthesis (P skeletal muscle to the catabolic effects of hypercortisolemia. Furthermore, these effects on healthy volunteers are analogous to those seen after severe injury.

  15. Tryptophan and tyrosine catabolic pattern in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikumar A

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Catabolism of tryptophan and tyrosine in relation to the isoprenoid pathway was studied in neurological and psychiatric disorders. The concentration of trytophan, quinolinic acid, kynurenic acid, serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid was found to be higher in the plasma of patients with all these disorders; while that of tyrosine, dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine was lower. There was increase in free fatty acids and decrease in albumin (factors modulating tryptophan transport in the plasma of these patients. Concentration of digoxin, a modulator of amino acid transport, and the activity of HMG CoA reductase, which synthesizes digoxin, were higher in these patients; while RBC membrane Na+-K+ ATPase activity showed a decrease. Concentration of plasma ubiquinone (part of which is synthesised from tyrosine and magnesium was also lower in these patients. No morphine could be detected in the plasma of these patients except in MS. On the other hand, strychnine and nicotine were detectable. These results indicate hypercatabolism of tryptophan and hypocatabolism of tyrosine in these disorders, which could be a consequence of the modulating effect of hypothalamic digoxin on amino acid transport.

  16. A product of heme catabolism modulates bacterial function and survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Nobles

    Full Text Available Bilirubin is the terminal metabolite in heme catabolism in mammals. After deposition into bile, bilirubin is released in large quantities into the mammalian gastrointestinal (GI tract. We hypothesized that intestinal bilirubin may modulate the function of enteric bacteria. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of bilirubin on two enteric pathogens; enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC, a Gram-negative that causes life-threatening intestinal infections, and E. faecalis, a Gram-positive human commensal bacterium known to be an opportunistic pathogen with broad-spectrum antibiotic resistance. We demonstrate that bilirubin can protect EHEC from exogenous and host-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS through the absorption of free radicals. In contrast, E. faecalis was highly susceptible to bilirubin, which causes significant membrane disruption and uncoupling of respiratory metabolism in this bacterium. Interestingly, similar results were observed for other Gram-positive bacteria, including B. cereus and S. aureus. A model is proposed whereby bilirubin places distinct selective pressure on enteric bacteria, with Gram-negative bacteria being protected from ROS (positive outcome and Gram-positive bacteria being susceptible to membrane disruption (negative outcome. This work suggests bilirubin has differential but biologically relevant effects on bacteria and justifies additional efforts to determine the role of this neglected waste catabolite in disease processes, including animal models.

  17. Increase in sphingolipid catabolic enzyme activity during aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santosh J SACKET; Hae-young CHUNG; Fumikazu OKAJIMA; Dong-soon IM

    2009-01-01

    Aim:To understand the contribution of sphingolipid metabolism and its metabolites to development and aging.Methods: A systemic analysis on the changes in activity of sphingolipid metabolic enzymes in kidney, liver and brain tissues during development and aging was conducted. The study was conducted using tissues from 1-day-old to 720-day-old rats.Results: Catabolic enzyme activities as well as the level of sphingomyelinase (SMase) and ceramidase (CDase) were higher than that of anabolic enzyme activities, sphingomyelin synthase and ceramide synthase. This suggested an accumulation of ceramide and sphingosine during development and aging. The liver showed the highest neutral-SMase activity among the tested enzymes while the kidney and brain exhibited higher neutral-SMase and ceramidase activities, indicating a high production of ceramide in liver and ceramide/sphingosine in the kidney and brain. The activities of sphingolipid metabolic enzymes were significantly elevated in all tested tissues during development and aging, although the onset of significant increase in activity varied on the tissue and enzyme type. During aging, 18 out of 21 enzyme activities were further increased on day 720 compared to day 180.Conclusion: Differential increases in sphingolipid metabolic enzyme activities suggest that sphingolipids including ceramide and sphingosine might play important and dynamic roles in proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis during development and aging.

  18. Hyaluronan Synthesis, Catabolism, and Signaling in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry S. Sherman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA, a component of the extracellular matrix, has been implicated in regulating neural differentiation, survival, proliferation, migration, and cell signaling in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS. HA is found throughout the CNS as a constituent of proteoglycans, especially within perineuronal nets that have been implicated in regulating neuronal activity. HA is also found in the white matter where it is diffusely distributed around astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Insults to the CNS lead to long-term elevation of HA within damaged tissues, which is linked at least in part to increased transcription of HA synthases. HA accumulation is often accompanied by elevated expression of at least some transmembrane HA receptors including CD44. Hyaluronidases that digest high molecular weight HA into smaller fragments are also elevated following CNS insults and can generate HA digestion products that have unique biological activities. A number of studies, for example, suggest that both the removal of high molecular weight HA and the accumulation of hyaluronidase-generated HA digestion products can impact CNS injuries through mechanisms that include the regulation of progenitor cell differentiation and proliferation. These studies, reviewed here, suggest that targeting HA synthesis, catabolism, and signaling are all potential strategies to promote CNS repair.

  19. Aerobic bacterial catabolism of persistent organic pollutants - potential impact of biotic and abiotic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jong-Rok; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Baldrian, Petr; Schmidt, Stefan; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2016-04-01

    Several aerobic bacteria possess unique catabolic pathways enabling them to degrade persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs), polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The catabolic activity of aerobic bacteria employed for removal of POPs in the environment may be modulated by several biotic (i.e. fungi, plants, algae, earthworms, and other bacteria) and abiotic (i.e. zero-valent iron, advanced oxidation, and electricity) agents. This review describes the basic biochemistry of the aerobic bacterial catabolism of selected POPs and discusses how biotic and abiotic agents enhance or inhibit the process. Solutions allowing biotic and abiotic agents to exert physical and chemical assistance to aerobic bacterial catabolism of POPs are also discussed. PMID:26851837

  20. Irritability rather than depression during interferon treatment is linked to increased tryptophan catabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, S; Kema, IP; Haagsma, EB; Boon, JC; Willemse, PHB; Den Boer, JA; De Vries, EGE; Korf, J

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Treatment with recombinant interferon is associated with high rates of psychiatric comorbidity. We investigated the relation between catabolism of the essential amino acid tryptophan, being rate-limiting of peripheral and cerebral serotonin formation, and psychiatric symptoms in patients

  1. L-Arginine Supplementation and Metabolism in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Linderholm

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available L-Arginine, the amino acid substrate for nitric oxide synthase, has been tested as a therapeutic intervention in a variety of chronic diseases and is commonly used as a nutritional supplement. In this study, we hypothesized that a subset of moderate to severe persistent asthma patients would benefit from supplementation with L-arginine by transiently increasing nitric oxide levels, resulting in bronchodilation and a reduction in inflammation. The pilot study consisted of a 3 month randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of L-arginine (0.05 g/kg twice daily in patients with moderate to severe asthma. We measured spirometry, exhaled breath nitric oxide, serum arginine metabolites, questionnaire scores, daily medication use and PEFR with the primary endpoint being the number of minor exacerbations at three months. Interim analysis of the 20 subjects showed no difference in the number of exacerbations, exhaled nitric oxide levels or lung function between groups, though participants in the L-arginine group had higher serum L-arginine at day 60 (2.0 ± 0.6 × 10−3 vs. 1.1 ± 0.2 × 10−3 µmol/L, p < 0.05, ornithine at day 30 (2.4 ± 0.9 vs. 1.2 ± 0.3 µmol/L serum, p < 0.05 and ADMA at day 30 (6.0 ± 1.5 × 10−1 vs. 2.6 ± 0.6 × 10−1 µmol/L serum, p < 0.05 on average compared to the placebo group. The study was terminated prematurely. Supplementing asthma subjects with L-arginine increases plasma levels; whether subgroups might benefit from such supplementation requires further study.

  2. Morphine enhances purine nucleotide catabolism in rive and in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang LIU; Jian-kai LIU; Mu-jie KAN; Lin GAO; Hai-ying FU; Hang ZHOU; Min HONG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect and mechanism of morphine on purine nucleotide catabolism. Methods: The rat model of morphine dependence and withdrawal and rat C6 glioma cells in culture were used. Concentrations of uric acid in the plasma were measured by the uricase-rap method, adenosine deaminase (ADA) and xan- thine oxidase (XO) in the plasma and tissues were measured by the ADA and XO test kit. RT-PCR and RT-PCR-Southern blotting were used to examine the relative amount of ADA and XO gene transcripts in tissues and C6 cells. Results: (i) the concentration of plasma uric acid in the morphine-administered group was signifi-cantly higher (P<0.05) than the control group; (ii) during morphine administration and withdrawal periods, the ADA and XO concentrations in the plasma increased significantly (P<0.05); (iii) the amount of ADA and XO in the parietal lobe, liver, small intestine, and skeletal muscles of the morphine-administered groups increased, while the level of ADA and XO in those tissues of the withdrawal groups decreased; (iv) the transcripts of the ADA and XO genes in the parietal lobe, liver, small intestine, and skeletal muscles were higher in the morphine-administered group. The expression of the ADA and XO genes in those tissues returned to the control level during morphine withdrawal, with the exception of the skeletal muscles; and (v) the upregulation of the expression of the ADA and XO genes induced by morphine treatment could be reversed by naloxone. Conclusion: The effects of morphine on purine nucleotide metabolism might be an important, new biochemical pharmacological mechanism of morphine action.

  3. Arginine Decarboxylase expression, polyamines biosynthesis and reactive oxygen species during organogenic nodule formation in hop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, Ana M; Costa, Joana; Santos, Filipa; Seguí-Simarro, José M; Palme, Klaus; Altabella, Teresa; Tiburcio, Antonio F; Pais, Maria S

    2011-02-01

    Hop (Humulus lupulus L.) is an economically important plant species used in beer production and as a health-promoting medicine. Hop internodes develop upon stress treatments organogenic nodules which can be used for genetic transformation and micropropagation. Polyamines are involved in plant development and stress responses. Arginine decarboxylase (ADC; EC 4·1.1·19) is a key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of putrescine in plants. Here we show that ADC protein was increasingly expressed at early stages of hop internode culture (12h). Protein continued accumulating until organogenic nodule formation after 28 days, decreasing thereafter. The same profile was observed for ADC transcript suggesting transcriptional regulation of ADC gene expression during morphogenesis. The highest transcript and protein levels observed after 28 days of culture were accompanied by a peak in putrescine levels. Reactive oxygen species accumulate in nodular tissues probably due to stress inherent to in vitro conditions and enhanced polyamine catabolism. Conjugated polyamines increased during plantlet regeneration from nodules suggesting their involvement in plantlet formation and/or in the control of free polyamine levels. Immunogold labeling revealed that ADC is located in plastids, nucleus and cytoplasm of nodular cells. In vacuolated cells, ADC immunolabelling in plastids doubled the signal of proplastids in meristematic cells. Location of ADC in different subcellular compartments may indicate its role in metabolic pathways taking place in these compartments. Altogether these data suggest that polyamines play an important role in organogenic nodule formation and represent a progress towards understanding the role played by these growth regulators in plant morphogenesis. PMID:21415599

  4. Imbalanced protein expression patterns of anabolic, catabolic, anti-catabolic and inflammatory cytokines in degenerative cervical disc cells: new indications for gene therapeutic treatments of cervical disc diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demissew S Mern

    Full Text Available Degenerative disc disease (DDD of the cervical spine is common after middle age and can cause loss of disc height with painful nerve impingement, bone and joint inflammation. Despite the clinical importance of these problems, in current publications the pathology of cervical disc degeneration has been studied merely from a morphologic view point using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, without addressing the issue of biological treatment approaches. So far a wide range of endogenously expressed bioactive factors in degenerative cervical disc cells has not yet been investigated, despite its importance for gene therapeutic approaches. Although degenerative lumbar disc cells have been targeted by different biological treatment approaches, the quantities of disc cells and the concentrations of gene therapeutic factors used in animal models differ extremely. These indicate lack of experimentally acquired data regarding disc cell proliferation and levels of target proteins. Therefore, we analysed proliferation and endogenous expression levels of anabolic, catabolic, ant-catabolic, inflammatory cytokines and matrix proteins of degenerative cervical disc cells in three-dimensional cultures. Preoperative MRI grading of cervical discs was used, then grade III and IV nucleus pulposus (NP tissues were isolated from 15 patients, operated due to cervical disc herniation. NP cells were cultured for four weeks with low-glucose in collagen I scaffold. Their proliferation rates were analysed using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide. Their protein expression levels of 28 therapeutic targets were analysed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. During progressive grades of degeneration NP cell proliferation rates were similar. Significantly decreased aggrecan and collagen II expressions (P<0.0001 were accompanied by accumulations of selective catabolic and inflammatory cytokines (disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 4

  5. Arginine protection against ammonia toxicity in exhausted rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Mohan, P; Indira, K; Rajendra, W

    1987-01-01

    Arginine administration (5 m moles/kg/day) to albino rats for 7 days, revealed that this vital basic amino acid possesses latent potentiality for the accentuation of urea cycle or at least for arginase activity. The mitigation of ammonia toxicity was observed to be more effective in the case of gastrocnemius and red vastus as compared to white vastus. Further, ammonia and lactate levels were also decreased by arginine in blood and thereby delaying the onset of fatigue by preventing ammonotoxemia and lactic acidemia. PMID:3666875

  6. The Arginine/ADMA Ratio Is Related to the Prevention of Atherosclerotic Plaques in Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits When Giving a Combined Therapy with Atorvastatine and Arginine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia J. H. Brinkmann

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Supplementation with arginine in combination with atorvastatin is more efficient in reducing the size of an atherosclerotic plaque than treatment with a statin or arginine alone in homozygous Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL rabbits. We evaluated the mechanism behind this feature by exploring the role of the arginine/asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA ratio, which is the substrate and inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS and thereby nitric oxide (NO, respectively. Methods: Rabbits were fed either an arginine diet (group A, n = 9, standard rabbit chow plus atorvastatin (group S, n = 8, standard rabbit chow plus an arginine diet with atorvastatin (group SA, n = 8 or standard rabbit chow (group C, n = 9 as control. Blood was sampled and the aorta was harvested for topographic and histological analysis. Plasma levels of arginine, ADMA, cholesterol and nitric oxide were determined and the arginine/ADMA ratio was calculated. Results: The decrease in ADMA levels over time was significantly correlated to fewer aortic lesions in the distal aorta and total aorta. The arginine/ADMA ratio was correlated to cholesterol levels and decrease in cholesterol levels over time in the SA group. A lower arginine/ADMA ratio was significantly correlated to lower NO levels in the S and C group. Discussion: A balance between arginine and ADMA is an important indicator in the prevention of the development of atherosclerotic plaques.

  7. Mobile Learning Using Mobile Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The participation in mobile learning programs is conditioned by having/using mobile communication technology. Those who do not have or use such technology cannot participate in mobile learning programs. This study evaluates who are the most likely participants of mobile learning programs by examining the demographic profile and mobile phone usage…

  8. Activation of lipid catabolism by the water-soluble fraction of petroleum in the crustacean Macrobrachium borellii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavarías, S; Pollero, R J; Heras, H

    2006-05-01

    Little is known about the effect of the water-soluble fraction of crude oil (WSF) on lipid metabolism in invertebrates. The effect of the WSF on the triacylglycerol (TAG) mobilization, fatty acid activation and degradation was evaluated in the decapod Macrobrachium borellii, exposing adult and eggs at different stages of development for 7 days to a sublethal concentration of WSF. Using radioactive tracers, mitochondrial palmitoyl-CoA synthetase (ACS), triacylglycerol lipase (TAG-lipase) and fatty acid beta-oxidation system activities were assayed. Before studying the effect of WSF, the kinetic parameters of ACS were determined in purified mitochondria. Its optimal temperature and pH were 32 degrees C and 8.0, respectively, the apparent K(m) 2.48 micromol l(-1), and its V(max) of 1.93 nmol min(-1) mg protein(-1). These kinetic parameters differed significantly from this shrimp's microsomal isoform. After 7 days exposure to a sublethal concentration of WSF (0.6 mg/l), changes were observed in the enzymatic activity of all enzymes or enzymatic system assayed in adult midgut gland as well as in stage 5 eggs, a period of active organogenesis. An increase in the mobilization of energy stores was detected as early as stage 4, where TAG-lipase activity increased by 27% in exposed eggs. The increase was even more marked in exposed eggs at stage 5 where a three-fold rise (154%) was determined. Exposed adult shrimp also showed an augmented lipase activity by 38%. Fatty acid beta-oxidation increased by 51.0 and 35.5% in midgut gland and eggs at stage 5, respectively, but no changes were observed at less-developed stages. Mitochondrial fatty acid activation by ACS also increased in adults and stage 5 eggs by 7.4 and 52.0%, respectively. A similar response of the lipid catabolic pathways to WSF contamination in both adult and eggs, suggests that the exposure to this pollutant causes an increase in the energy needs of this shrimp. When validated by field studies, these catabolic

  9. Activation of lipid catabolism by the water-soluble fraction of petroleum in the crustacean Macrobrachium borellii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little is known about the effect of the water-soluble fraction of crude oil (WSF) on lipid metabolism in invertebrates. The effect of the WSF on the triacylglycerol (TAG) mobilization, fatty acid activation and degradation was evaluated in the decapod Macrobrachium borellii, exposing adult and eggs at different stages of development for 7 days to a sublethal concentration of WSF. Using radioactive tracers, mitochondrial palmitoyl-CoA synthetase (ACS), triacylglycerol lipase (TAG-lipase) and fatty acid β-oxidation system activities were assayed. Before studying the effect of WSF, the kinetic parameters of ACS were determined in purified mitochondria. Its optimal temperature and pH were 32 oC and 8.0, respectively, the apparent K m 2.48 μmol l-1, and its V max of 1.93 nmol min-1 mg protein-1. These kinetic parameters differed significantly from this shrimp's microsomal isoform. After 7 days exposure to a sublethal concentration of WSF (0.6 mg/l), changes were observed in the enzymatic activity of all enzymes or enzymatic system assayed in adult midgut gland as well as in stage 5 eggs, a period of active organogenesis. An increase in the mobilization of energy stores was detected as early as stage 4, where TAG-lipase activity increased by 27% in exposed eggs. The increase was even more marked in exposed eggs at stage 5 where a three-fold rise (154%) was determined. Exposed adult shrimp also showed an augmented lipase activity by 38%. Fatty acid β-oxidation increased by 51.0 and 35.5% in midgut gland and eggs at stage 5, respectively, but no changes were observed at less-developed stages. Mitochondrial fatty acid activation by ACS also increased in adults and stage 5 eggs by 7.4 and 52.0%, respectively. A similar response of the lipid catabolic pathways to WSF contamination in both adult and eggs, suggests that the exposure to this pollutant causes an increase in the energy needs of this shrimp. When validated by field studies, these catabolic enzymes could be

  10. Effect of oral L-arginine administration on exhaled nitric oxide (no) concentration in healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Ogata, Hiroshi; Yatabe, Midori; Misaka, Shingen; Shikama, Yayoi; Sato, Suguru; Munakata, Mitsuru; Kimura, Junko

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported a case of pulmonary hypertension, where the symptoms were improved by oral L-arginine (arginine) administration. Arginine may increase nitric oxide (NO) production in the pulmonary artery. Exhaled NO may reflect pulmonary artery NO production. It has been demonstrated that exhaled NO concentration is higher in patients with allergic diseases, but whether oral arginine administration alters exhaled NO is unknown. Therefore, in this study, we investigated whether oral arg...

  11. Mobile Lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler Simonsen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phones are ubiquitous and have completely transformed the way we live, work, learn and conduct our everyday activities. Mobile phones have also changed the way users access lexicographic data. In fact, it can be argued that mobile phones and lexicography are not yet compatible. Modern users...... are already mobile – but lexicography is not yet fully ready for the mobile challenge, mobile users and mobile user situations. The article is based on empirical data from two surveys comprising 10 medical doctors, who were asked to look up five medical substances with the medical dictionary app...... mobile lexicography....

  12. In vivo arginine production and intravascular nitric oxide synthesis in hypotensive sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arginine is important in the response to infections and is a precursor for the synthesis of the vasodilator nitric oxide (NO). Low plasma arginine is correlated with a worse prognosis in patients with sepsis, and increased NO has been implicated in the hypotension of sepsis. Data on in vivo arginine...

  13. Theoretical insights into catalytic mechanism of protein arginine methyltransferase 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruihan Zhang

    Full Text Available Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1, the major arginine asymmetric dimethylation enzyme in mammals, is emerging as a potential drug target for cancer and cardiovascular disease. Understanding the catalytic mechanism of PRMT1 will facilitate inhibitor design. However, detailed mechanisms of the methyl transfer process and substrate deprotonation of PRMT1 remain unclear. In this study, we present a theoretical study on PRMT1 catalyzed arginine dimethylation by employing molecular dynamics (MD simulation and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM calculation. Ternary complex models, composed of PRMT1, peptide substrate, and S-adenosyl-methionine (AdoMet as cofactor, were constructed and verified by 30-ns MD simulation. The snapshots selected from the MD trajectory were applied for the QM/MM calculation. The typical SN2-favored transition states of the first and second methyl transfers were identified from the potential energy profile. Deprotonation of substrate arginine occurs immediately after methyl transfer, and the carboxylate group of E144 acts as proton acceptor. Furthermore, natural bond orbital analysis and electrostatic potential calculation showed that E144 facilitates the charge redistribution during the reaction and reduces the energy barrier. In this study, we propose the detailed mechanism of PRMT1-catalyzed asymmetric dimethylation, which increases insight on the small-molecule effectors design, and enables further investigations into the physiological function of this family.

  14. Effect of iron, taurine and arginine on rat hepatic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The promotion role of iron on pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis and the protective role of taurine and L-arginine against hepatic fibrosis were studied. Method: The model of rat radiation hepatic fibrosis was used. Experimental rats were divided into 0 Gy, 30 Gy, 30 Gy + iron, 30 Gy + taurine and 30 Gy + L-arginine groups. Serum iron, liver tissue hydroxyproline (Hyp) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured one and three months respectively after irradiation of hepatic tissue, production and distribution characteristics of hepatic tissue type I and III collagen were observed with a polarizing microscope. Results: Administration of iron agent could significantly increase hepatic tissue MDA content and serum iron concentration, one month after irradiation, hepatic tissue Hyp in 30 Gy + iron group began to increase, and collagen in hepatic tissue obviously increased. Taurine and L-arginine could reduce serum iron concentration and decrease production of hepatic fissure Hyp. Conclusion: Exogenous iron agent could promote early development of radiation hepatic fibrosis; taurine and arginine could diminish pathologic alteration of hepatic fibrosis to a certain extent

  15. The catabolism of glucose, glutamate, pyruvate and acetate in neisseria elongata subsp. glycolytica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities corresponding to the enzymes glucokinase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, pyridine nucleotide independent malate dehydrogenase, and glutamate dehydrogenase were found in cell free extracts from Neisseria elongata subsp. glycolytica. Activities corresponding to 6-phosphogluconate dehydrase and 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate aldolase were not found. Glucose was catabolized only via the pentose phosphate pathway. The radiorespirometric findings suggest an extensive recycling of the triose and fructose phosphates. There was no evidence for formation of pyruvate from glucose. Glutamate was oxidized via the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Pyruvate and acetate were obviously catabolized by the glyoxylic and tricarboxylic acid cycle, as in N. elongata. (author)

  16. Oxygen-dependent catabolism of indole-3-acetic acid in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egebo, L A; Nielsen, S V; Jochimsen, B U

    1991-01-01

    Some strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum have the ability to catabolize indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Examination of this catabolism in strain 110 by in vivo experiments has revealed an enzymatic activity catalyzing the degradation of IAA and 5-hydroxy-indole-3-acetic acid. The activity requires...... oxygen-consuming opening of the indole ring analogous to the one catalyzed by tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase. The pattern of metabolite usage by known tryptophan-auxotrophic mutants and studies of metabolites by high-performance liquid chromatography indicate that anthranilic acid is a terminal degradation...

  17. Catabolism of pyrimidines in yeast: A tool to understand degradation of anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Gorm; Merico, A.; Bjornberg, O.; Andersen, Birgit; Schnackerz, K.D.; Dobritzsch, D.; Piskur, Jure; Compagno, C.

    The pyrimidine catabolic pathway is of crucial importance in cancer patients because it is involved in degradation of several chemotherapeutic drugs, such as 5-fluorouracil; it also is important in plants, unicellular eukaryotes, and bacteria for the degradation of pyrimidine-based biocides....../antibiotics. During the last decade we have developed a yeast species, Saccharomyces kluyveri, as a model and tool to study the genes and enzymes of the pyrimidine catabolic pathway. In this report, we studied degradation of uracil and its putative degradation products in 38 yeasts and showed that this pathway was...

  18. Isolation of a mutation resulting in constitutive synthesis of L-fucose catabolic enzymes.

    OpenAIRE

    Bartkus, J M; Mortlock, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    A ribitol-positive transductant of Escherichia coli K-12, JM2112, was used to facilitate the isolation and identification of mutations affecting the L-fucose catabolic pathway. Analysis of L-fucose-negative mutants of JM2112 enabled us to confirm that L-fucose-1-phosphate is the apparent inducer of the fucose catabolic enzymes. Plating of an L-fuculokinase-negative mutant of JM2112 on D-arabinose yielded an isolate containing a second fucose mutation which resulted in the constitutive synthes...

  19. Analysis of an Alanine/Arginine Mixture by Using TLC/FTIR Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We applied TLC/FTIR coupled with mapping technique to analyze an alanine/arginine mixture. Narrow band TLC plates prepared by using AgI as a stationary phase were used to separate alanine and arginine. The distribution of alanine and arginine spots was manifested by a 3D chromatogram. Alanine and arginine can be successfully separated by the narrow band TLC plate. In addition, the FTIR spectra of the separated alanine and arginine spots on the narrow band TLC plate are roughly the same as the corresponding reference IR spectra.

  20. Expression of arg genes of Escherichia coli during arginine limitation dependent upon stringent control of translation.

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, M.G.; Rogers, P

    1987-01-01

    The transcription and translation of operons for arginine biosynthetic enzymes after arginine removal (arginine down shift) were studied in relA and relA+ strains of Escherichia coli. After arginine down shift, derepression of synthesis of the arginine biosynthetic enzymes ornithine carbamoyltransferase (argF) and argininosuccinate lyase (argH) began at about 15 min in relA+ cells but was delayed in relA cells for more than 2 h. However, both relA+ and relA cells accumulated high levels of ar...

  1. Enthalpy-driven interactions with sulfated glycosaminoglycans promote cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takechi-Haraya, Yuki; Nadai, Ryo; Kimura, Hitoshi; Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Uchimura, Kenji; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Kawakami, Kohsaku; Shigenaga, Akira; Kawakami, Toru; Otaka, Akira; Hojo, Hironobu; Sakashita, Naomi; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The first step of cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides is thought to occur via electrostatic interactions between positive charges of arginine residues and negative charges of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on the cell surface. However, the molecular interaction of arginine peptides with GAG still remains unclear. Here, we compared the interactions of several arginine peptides of Tat, R8, and Rev and their analogues with heparin in relation to the cell membrane penetration efficiency. The high-affinity binding of arginine peptides to heparin was shown to be driven by large favorable enthalpy contributions, possibly reflecting multidentate hydrogen bondings of arginine residues with sulfate groups of heparin. Interestingly, the lysine peptides in which all arginine residues are substituted with lysine residues exhibited negligible binding enthalpy despite of their considerable binding to heparin. In CHO-K1 cells, arginine peptides exhibited a great cell-penetrating ability whereas their corresponding lysine peptides did not penetrate into cells. The degree of cell penetration of arginine peptides markedly decreased by the chlorate treatment of cells which prevents the sulfation of GAG chains. Significantly, the cell penetration efficiency of arginine peptides was found to be correlated with the favorable enthalpy of binding to heparin. These results suggest that the enthalpy-driven strong interaction with sulfated GAGs such as heparan sulfate plays a critical role in the efficient cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides. PMID:27003128

  2. Proteome-wide analysis of arginine monomethylation reveals widespread occurrence in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sara C; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Mund, Andreas; Lyon, David; Mullari, Meeli; Madsen, Maria V; Daniel, Jeremy A; Jensen, Lars J; Nielsen, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    The posttranslational modification of proteins by arginine methylation is functionally important, yet the breadth of this modification is not well characterized. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified 8030 arginine methylation sites within 3300 human proteins in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, indicating that the occurrence of this modification is comparable to phosphorylation and ubiquitylation. A site-level conservation analysis revealed that arginine methylation sites are less evolutionarily conserved compared to arginines that were not identified as modified by methylation. Through quantitative proteomics and RNA interference to examine arginine methylation stoichiometry, we unexpectedly found that the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) family of arginine methyltransferases catalyzed methylation independently of arginine sequence context. In contrast to the frequency of somatic mutations at arginine methylation sites throughout the proteome, we observed that somatic mutations were common at arginine methylation sites in proteins involved in mRNA splicing. Furthermore, in HeLa and U2OS cells, we found that distinct arginine methyltransferases differentially regulated the functions of the pre-mRNA splicing factor SRSF2 (serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2) and the RNA transport ribonucleoprotein HNRNPUL1 (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U-like 1). Knocking down PRMT5 impaired the RNA binding function of SRSF2, whereas knocking down PRMT4 [also known as coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1)] or PRMT1 increased the RNA binding function of HNRNPUL1. High-content single-cell imaging additionally revealed that knocking down CARM1 promoted the nuclear accumulation of SRSF2, independent of cell cycle phase. Collectively, the presented human arginine methylome provides a missing piece in the global and integrative view of cellular physiology and protein regulation. PMID:27577262

  3. Phytochemicals that modulate amino acid and peptide catabolism by caprine rumen microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Microbe-derived ionophores and macrolide antibiotics are often added to ruminant diets, and growth promotion and feed efficiency are among the benefits. One mechanism is inhibition of microbes that catabolize amino acids or peptides and produce ammonia. Plants also produce antimicrobial ...

  4. Comparing how land use change impacts soil microbial catabolic respiration in Southwestern Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetto, Andre Mancebo; Feigl, Brigitte Josefine; Cerri, Carlos Eduardo Pellegrino; Cerri, Carlos Clemente

    2016-01-01

    Land use changes strongly impact soil functions, particularly microbial biomass diversity and activity. We hypothesized that the catabolic respiration response of the microbial biomass would differ depending on land use and that these differences would be consistent at the landscape scale. In the present study, we analyzed the catabolic response profile of the soil microbial biomass through substrate-induced respiration in different land uses over a wide geographical range in Mato Grosso and Rondônia state (Southwest Amazon region). We analyzed the differences among native areas, pastures and crop areas and within each land use and examined only native areas (Forest, Dense Cerrado and Cerrado), pastures (Nominal, Degraded and Improved) and crop areas (Perennial, No-Tillage, Conventional Tillage). The metabolic profile of the microbial biomass was accessed using substrate-induced respiration. Pasture soils showed significant responses to amino acids and carboxylic acids, whereas native areas showed higher responses to malonic acid, malic acid and succinic acid. Within each land use category, the catabolic responses showed similar patterns in both large general comparisons (native area, pasture and crop areas) and more specific comparisons (biomes, pastures and crop types). The results showed that the catabolic responses of the microbial biomass are highly correlated with land use, independent of soil type or climate. The substrate induced respiration approach is useful to discriminate microbial communities, even on a large scale. PMID:26887228

  5. Experimental studies on porcine protein catabolism after thermic traumas using 15N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within studies on protein metabolism extensive third-degree burns were produced in pigs. During burn disease protein catabolism was determined by means of parenterally applied 15N-glycine and the improvement of the negative total N balance as well as modes of application of amino acids and proteins especially albumins are discussed

  6. Transcriptional Analysis of Prebiotic Uptake and Catabolism by Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM.

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Joakim Mark; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Abou Hachem, Maher; Lahtinen, Sampo J.; Goh, Yong-Jun; Svensson, Birte; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    2012-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract can be positively modulated by dietary supplementation of probiotic bacteria in combination with prebiotic carbohydrates. Here differential transcriptomics and functional genomics were used to identify genes in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM involved in the uptake and catabolism of 11 potential prebiotic compounds consisting of α- and β- linked galactosides and glucosides. These oligosaccharides induced genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar phosph...

  7. Comparing how land use change impacts soil microbial catabolic respiration in Southwestern Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Mancebo Mazzetto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Land use changes strongly impact soil functions, particularly microbial biomass diversity and activity. We hypothesized that the catabolic respiration response of the microbial biomass would differ depending on land use and that these differences would be consistent at the landscape scale. In the present study, we analyzed the catabolic response profile of the soil microbial biomass through substrate-induced respiration in different land uses over a wide geographical range in Mato Grosso and Rondônia state (Southwest Amazon region. We analyzed the differences among native areas, pastures and crop areas and within each land use and examined only native areas (Forest, Dense Cerrado and Cerrado, pastures (Nominal, Degraded and Improved and crop areas (Perennial, No-Tillage, Conventional Tillage. The metabolic profile of the microbial biomass was accessed using substrate-induced respiration. Pasture soils showed significant responses to amino acids and carboxylic acids, whereas native areas showed higher responses to malonic acid, malic acid and succinic acid. Within each land use category, the catabolic responses showed similar patterns in both large general comparisons (native area, pasture and crop areas and more specific comparisons (biomes, pastures and crop types. The results showed that the catabolic responses of the microbial biomass are highly correlated with land use, independent of soil type or climate. The substrate induced respiration approach is useful to discriminate microbial communities, even on a large scale.

  8. Regulation and control of L-arabinose catabolism in Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de M.J.L.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes studies on the biochemical properties and regulation of L-arabinose metabolism and arabinan degrading enzymes of Aspergillus niger. We focused on the investigation of the catabolic pathway, firstly by isolating pathway specific regulatory mutants using a newly developed selecti

  9. Comparing how land use change impacts soil microbial catabolic respiration in Southwestern Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetto, Andre Mancebo; Feigl, Brigitte Josefine; Cerri, Carlos Eduardo Pellegrino; Cerri, Carlos Clemente

    2016-01-01

    Land use changes strongly impact soil functions, particularly microbial biomass diversity and activity. We hypothesized that the catabolic respiration response of the microbial biomass would differ depending on land use and that these differences would be consistent at the landscape scale. In the present study, we analyzed the catabolic response profile of the soil microbial biomass through substrate-induced respiration in different land uses over a wide geographical range in Mato Grosso and Rondônia state (Southwest Amazon region). We analyzed the differences among native areas, pastures and crop areas and within each land use and examined only native areas (Forest, Dense Cerrado and Cerrado), pastures (Nominal, Degraded and Improved) and crop areas (Perennial, No-Tillage, Conventional Tillage). The metabolic profile of the microbial biomass was accessed using substrate-induced respiration. Pasture soils showed significant responses to amino acids and carboxylic acids, whereas native areas showed higher responses to malonic acid, malic acid and succinic acid. Within each land use category, the catabolic responses showed similar patterns in both large general comparisons (native area, pasture and crop areas) and more specific comparisons (biomes, pastures and crop types). The results showed that the catabolic responses of the microbial biomass are highly correlated with land use, independent of soil type or climate. The substrate induced respiration approach is useful to discriminate microbial communities, even on a large scale. PMID:26887228

  10. Mechanical ventilation induces myokine expression and catabolism in peripheral skeletal muscle in pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endotoxin (LPS)-induced sepsis increases circulating cytokines which have been associated with skeletal muscle catabolism. During critical illness, it has been postulated that muscle wasting associated with mechanical ventilation (MV) occurs due to inactivity. We hypothesize that MV and sepsis promo...

  11. Branched-chain amino acid catabolism fuels adipocyte differentiation and lipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Courtney R; Wallace, Martina; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Phillips, Susan A; Murphy, Anne N; Ciaraldi, Theodore P; Metallo, Christian M

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue plays important roles in regulating carbohydrate and lipid homeostasis, but less is known about the regulation of amino acid metabolism in adipocytes. Here we applied isotope tracing to pre-adipocytes and differentiated adipocytes to quantify the contributions of different substrates to tricarboxylic acid (TCA) metabolism and lipogenesis. In contrast to proliferating cells, which use glucose and glutamine for acetyl-coenzyme A (AcCoA) generation, differentiated adipocytes showed increased branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolic flux such that leucine and isoleucine from medium and/or from protein catabolism accounted for as much as 30% of lipogenic AcCoA pools. Medium cobalamin deficiency caused methylmalonic acid accumulation and odd-chain fatty acid synthesis. Vitamin B12 supplementation reduced these metabolites and altered the balance of substrates entering mitochondria. Finally, inhibition of BCAA catabolism compromised adipogenesis. These results quantitatively highlight the contribution of BCAAs to adipocyte metabolism and suggest that BCAA catabolism has a functional role in adipocyte differentiation. PMID:26571352

  12. Mobile Probes in Mobile Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Blomhøj, Ulla; Duvaa, Uffe

    2011-01-01

    In this paper experiences from using mobile probes in educational design of a mobile learning application is presented. The probing process stems from the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. In the project, the mobile phone was not only acting as an agent for acquiring empirical data (as the situation in hitherto mobile probe settings) but was also the technological medium for which data should say something about (mobile learning). Conse...

  13. Gliclazide directly inhibits arginine-induced glucagon release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cejvan, Kenan; Coy, David H; Holst, Jens Juul;

    2002-01-01

    Arginine-stimulated insulin and somatostatin release is enhanced by the sulfonylurea gliclazide. In contrast, gliclazide inhibits the glucagon response. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this inhibition of glucagon release was mediated by a direct suppressive effect of...... specific antagonist of type 2 somatostatin receptor, DC-41-33 (2 micro mol/l), which fully antagonizes the suppressive somatostatin effect on rat A cells. Gliclazide (30 micro mol/l) inhibited glucagon release by 54% in the perfusion experiments, whereas the somatostatin response was nearly abolished. In...... islet perifusions with DC-41-33, arginine-induced glucagon release was inhibited by 66%. We therefore concluded that gliclazide inhibits glucagon release by a direct action on the pancreatic A cell....

  14. A role for TNFα in intervertebral disc degeneration: A non-recoverable catabolic shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► TNFα induced catabolic changes similar to human intervertebral disc degeneration. ► The metabolic shift induced by TNFα was sustained following removal. ► TNFα induced changes suggestive of cell senescence without affecting cell viability. ► Interventions are required to stimulate anabolism and increase cell proliferation. -- Abstract: This study examines the effect of TNFα on whole bovine intervertebral discs in organ culture and its association with changes characteristic of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) in order to inform future treatments to mitigate the chronic inflammatory state commonly found with painful IDD. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFα contribute to disc pathology and are implicated in the catabolic phenotype associated with painful IDD. Whole bovine discs were cultured to examine cellular (anabolic/catabolic gene expression, cell viability and senescence using β-galactosidase) and structural (histology and aggrecan degradation) changes in response to TNFα treatment. Control or TNFα cultures were assessed at 7 and 21 days; the 21 day group also included a recovery group with 7 days TNFα followed by 14 days in basal media. TNFα induced catabolic and anti-anabolic shifts in the nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF) at 7 days and this persisted until 21 days however cell viability was not affected. Data indicates that TNFα increased aggrecan degradation products and suggests increased β-galactosidase staining at 21 days without any recovery. TNFα treatment of whole bovine discs for 7 days induced changes similar to the degeneration processes that occur in human IDD: aggrecan degradation, increased catabolism, pro-inflammatory cytokines and nerve growth factor expression. TNFα significantly reduced anabolism in cultured IVDs and a possible mechanism may be associated with cell senescence. Results therefore suggest that successful treatments must promote anabolism and cell proliferation in

  15. Detection of catabolic genes in indigenous microbial consortia isolated from a diesel-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioremediation is often used for in situ remediation of petroleum-contaminated sites. The primary focus of this study was on understanding the indigenous microbial community which can survive in contaminated environment and is responsible for the degradation. Diesel, toluene and naphthalene-degrading microbial consortia were isolated from diesel-contaminated soil by growing on selective hydrocarbon substrates. The presence and frequency of the catabolic genes responsible for aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation (xylE, ndoB) within the isolated consortia were screened using polymerase chain reaction PCR and DNA-DNA colony hybridization. The diesel DNA-extract possessed both the xylE catabolic gene for toluene, and the nah catabolic gene for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon degradation. The toluene DNA-extract possessed only the xylE catabolic gene, while the naphthalene DNA-extract only the ndoB gene. Restriction enzyme analysis with HaeIII indicated similar restriction patterns for the xylE gene fragment between toluene DNA-extract and a type strain, Pseudomonas putida ATCC 23973. A substantial proportion (74%) of the colonies from the diesel-consortium possessed the xylE gene, and the ndoB gene (78%), while a minority (29%) of the toluene-consortium harbored the xylE gene. 59% of the colonies from the naphthalene-consortium had the ndoB gene, and did not have the xylE gene. These results indicate that the microbial population has been naturally enriched in organisms carrying genes for aromatic hydrocarbon degradation and that significant aromatic biodegradative potential exists at the site. Characterization of the population genotype constitutes a molecular diagnosis which permits the determination of the catabolic potential of the site to degrade the contaminant present. (author)

  16. Arginine vasopressin in septic shock: supplement or substitute for norepinephrine?

    OpenAIRE

    Rehberg, Sebastian; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Traber, Daniel L

    2009-01-01

    In the current issue of Critical Care, Simon and coworkers investigated the effects of first-line arginine vasopressin (AVP) on organ function and systemic metabolism compared with norepinephrine in a pig model of fecal peritonitis. AVP was titrated according to the mean arterial pressure suggesting a vasopressor rather than a hormone replacement therapy. The study provides some evidence for the safety of this therapeutic approach. It needs to be determined whether AVP is most beneficial as a...

  17. Characterization of casein and Poly-L-arginine Multilayer Films

    OpenAIRE

    Warszynska, Lilianna Szyk; Kilan, Katarzyna; Socha, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Thin films containing casein appear to be a promising material for coatings used in the medical area to promote biomineralization. alfa- and beta-casein and poly-L-arginine multilayer films were formed by the layer-by layer technique and their thickness and mass were analyzed by ellipsometry and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). We investigated the effect of the type of casein used for the film formation and of the polyethyleneimine anchoring layer on the thickn...

  18. PRMT1-mediated arginine methylation controls ATXN2L localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arginine methylation is a posttranslational modification that is of importance in diverse cellular processes. Recent proteomic mass spectrometry studies reported arginine methylation of ataxin-2-like (ATXN2L), the paralog of ataxin-2, a protein that is implicated in the neurodegenerative disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. Here, we investigated the methylation state of ATXN2L and its significance for ATXN2L localization. We first confirmed that ATXN2L is asymmetrically dimethylated in vivo, and observed that the nuclear localization of ATXN2L is altered under methylation inhibition. We further discovered that ATXN2L associates with the protein arginine-N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1). Finally, we showed that neither mutation of the arginine–glycine-rich motifs of ATXN2L nor methylation inhibition alters ATXN2L localization to stress granules, suggesting that methylation of ATXN2L is probably not mandatory. - Highlights: • ATXN2L is asymmetrically dimethylated in vivo. • ATXN2L interacts with PRMT1 under normal and stress conditions. • PRMT1-mediated dimethylation of ATXN2L controls its nuclear localization. • ATXN2L localization to stress granules appears independent of its methylation state

  19. PRMT1-mediated arginine methylation controls ATXN2L localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaehler, Christian; Guenther, Anika; Uhlich, Anja; Krobitsch, Sylvia, E-mail: krobitsc@molgen.mpg.de

    2015-05-15

    Arginine methylation is a posttranslational modification that is of importance in diverse cellular processes. Recent proteomic mass spectrometry studies reported arginine methylation of ataxin-2-like (ATXN2L), the paralog of ataxin-2, a protein that is implicated in the neurodegenerative disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. Here, we investigated the methylation state of ATXN2L and its significance for ATXN2L localization. We first confirmed that ATXN2L is asymmetrically dimethylated in vivo, and observed that the nuclear localization of ATXN2L is altered under methylation inhibition. We further discovered that ATXN2L associates with the protein arginine-N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1). Finally, we showed that neither mutation of the arginine–glycine-rich motifs of ATXN2L nor methylation inhibition alters ATXN2L localization to stress granules, suggesting that methylation of ATXN2L is probably not mandatory. - Highlights: • ATXN2L is asymmetrically dimethylated in vivo. • ATXN2L interacts with PRMT1 under normal and stress conditions. • PRMT1-mediated dimethylation of ATXN2L controls its nuclear localization. • ATXN2L localization to stress granules appears independent of its methylation state.

  20. Systems pathway engineering of Corynebacterium crenatum for improved L-arginine production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Zaiwei; Xu, Meijuan; Rao, Zhiming; Guo, Jing; Yang, Taowei; Zhang, Xian; Xu, Zhenghong

    2016-01-01

    L-arginine is an important amino acid in food and pharmaceutical industries. Until now, the main production method of L-arginine in China is the highly polluting keratin acid hydrolysis. The industrial level L-arginine production by microbial fermentation has become an important task. In previous work, we obtained a new L-arginine producing Corynebacterium crenatum (subspecies of Corynebacterium glutamicum) through screening and mutation breeding. In this work, we performed systems pathway engineering of C. crenatum for improved L-arginine production, involving amplification of L-arginine biosynthetic pathway flux by removal of feedback inhibition and overexpression of arginine operon; optimization of NADPH supply by modulation of metabolic flux distribution between glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway; increasing glucose consumption by strengthening the preexisting glucose transporter and exploitation of new glucose uptake system; channeling excess carbon flux from glycolysis into tricarboxylic acid cycle to alleviate the glucose overflow metabolism; redistribution of carbon flux at α-ketoglutarate metabolic node to channel more flux into L-arginine biosynthetic pathway; minimization of carbon and cofactor loss by attenuation of byproducts formation. The final strain could produce 87.3 g L−1 L-arginine with yield up to 0.431 g L-arginine g−1 glucose in fed-batch fermentation. PMID:27338253

  1. Systems pathway engineering of Corynebacterium crenatum for improved L-arginine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Zaiwei; Xu, Meijuan; Rao, Zhiming; Guo, Jing; Yang, Taowei; Zhang, Xian; Xu, Zhenghong

    2016-01-01

    L-arginine is an important amino acid in food and pharmaceutical industries. Until now, the main production method of L-arginine in China is the highly polluting keratin acid hydrolysis. The industrial level L-arginine production by microbial fermentation has become an important task. In previous work, we obtained a new L-arginine producing Corynebacterium crenatum (subspecies of Corynebacterium glutamicum) through screening and mutation breeding. In this work, we performed systems pathway engineering of C. crenatum for improved L-arginine production, involving amplification of L-arginine biosynthetic pathway flux by removal of feedback inhibition and overexpression of arginine operon; optimization of NADPH supply by modulation of metabolic flux distribution between glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway; increasing glucose consumption by strengthening the preexisting glucose transporter and exploitation of new glucose uptake system; channeling excess carbon flux from glycolysis into tricarboxylic acid cycle to alleviate the glucose overflow metabolism; redistribution of carbon flux at α-ketoglutarate metabolic node to channel more flux into L-arginine biosynthetic pathway; minimization of carbon and cofactor loss by attenuation of byproducts formation. The final strain could produce 87.3 g L(-1) L-arginine with yield up to 0.431 g L-arginine g(-1) glucose in fed-batch fermentation. PMID:27338253

  2. Solubilization of aromatic and hydrophobic moieties by arginine in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianguo; Garg, Manju; Shah, Dhawal; Rajagopalan, Raj

    2010-08-01

    Experiments hold intriguing, circumstantial clues to the mechanisms behind arginine-mediated solubilization of small organic drugs and suppression of protein aggregation driven by hydrophobic or aromatic associations, but how exactly arginine's molecular structure and interactions contribute to its function remains unclear since attention has focused so far on the thermodynamics of the preferential exclusion or binding of arginine. Here, we examine, through molecular dynamics simulations, how arginine solubilizes nanoscale particles with hydrophobic surfaces or aromatic-ring-type surface interactions. We show that preferential, hydrophobic, and dispersion interactions of arginine's guanidinium group with the particles lead to a surfactant-like behavior of arginine around the particles and to a solvation layer with a protective polar mask creating a hydrophilic shell. Additionally, arginine-arginine association around the solvation layer further prevents aggregative contacts. The results shed some light on the mechanistic basis of arginine's function as a suppressant of protein aggregation, although the complex energy landscapes and kinetic pathways of aggregation are protein-dependent and pose formidable challenges to developing comprehensive mechanistic pictures. Our results suggest arginine's mode of interaction with hydrophobic patches and aromatic residues could reduce aggregation-prone intermediate states of proteins and shield protein-protein aggregative contacts. The approach used here offers a systematic way of exploring implications of other amino acid/excipient interactions by studying interactions of the excipient with particles grafted with amino acids.

  3. Mobile payment

    CERN Document Server

    Lerner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Paying with mobile devices such as mobile phones or smart phones will expand worldwide in the coming years. This development provides opportunities for various industries (banking, telecommunications, credit card business, manufacturers, suppliers, retail) and for consumers.

  4. Mobile marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Švarc, Ondřej

    2010-01-01

    The goal of bachelor's thesis on the theme "Mobile marketing" is to outline its development and why is this new phenomen so important for all modern companies around the world. The work is not about simple description of mobile marketing media but it vividly informs about the latest trends and news from the world of mobile apps and games. It presents the most successful mobile apps which registered more than billion downloads and from their unique characteristics it unveils great potential of...

  5. Mobile marketing

    OpenAIRE

    KLEČKOVÁ, Zuzana

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this thesis was to provide a comprehensive overview of the mobile marketing and analyze selected campaigns of Czech mobile marketing in comparison to world successful campaigns. The research contained studying of available literature about the theme to gain general knowledge about the issue. The theoretical part of the thesis contains predominantly various definitions of mobile marketing and its tools, advantages of these tools and some information about Mobile Marketing Assoc...

  6. Staging Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    lived as people are “staging themselves” (from below). Staging mobilities is a dynamic process between “being staged” (for example, being stopped at traffic lights) and the “mobile staging” of interacting individuals (negotiating a passage on the pavement). Staging Mobilities is about the fact that...

  7. Coupling microbial catabolic actions with abiotic redox processes: a new recipe for persistent organic pollutant (POP) removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jong-Rok; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Nam, In-Hyun; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2013-01-01

    The continuous release of toxic persistent organic pollutants (POPs) into the environment has raised a need for effective cleanup methods. The tremendous natural diversity of microbial catabolic mechanisms suggests that catabolic routes may be applied to the remediation of POP-contaminated fields. A large number of the recalcitrant xenobiotics have been shown to be removable via the natural catabolic mechanisms of microbes, and detailed biochemical studies of the catabolic methods, together with the development of sophisticated genetic engineering, have led to the use of synthetic microbes for the bioremediation of POPs. However, the steric effects of substituted halogen moieties, microbe toxicity, and the low bioavailability of POPs still deteriorate the efficiency of removal strategies based on natural and synthetic catabolic mechanisms. Recently, abiotic redox processes that induce rapid reductive dehalogenation, hydroxyl radical-based oxidation, or electron shuttling have been reasonably coupled with microbial catabolic actions, thereby compensating for the drawbacks of biotic processes in POP removal. In this review, we first compare the pros and cons of individual methodologies (i.e., the natural and synthetic catabolism of microbes and the abiotic processes involving zero-valent irons, advanced oxidation processes, and small organic stimulants) for POP removal. We then highlight recent trends in coupling the biotic-abiotic methodologies and discuss how the processes are both feasible and superior to individual methodologies for POP cleanup. Cost-effective and environmentally sustainable abiotic redox actions could enhance the microbial bioremediation potential for POPs. PMID:23153459

  8. Mobile Probes in Mobile Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Blomhøj, Ulla; Duvaa, Uffe

    In this paper experiences from using mobile probes in educational design of a mobile learning application is presented. The probing process stems from the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. In the project, the mobile phone was not only acting...... as an agent for acquiring empirical data (as the situation in hitherto mobile probe settings) but was also the technological medium for which data should say something about (mobile learning). Consequently, not only the content of the data but also the ways in which data was delivered and handled......, provided a valuable dimension for investigating mobile use. The data was collected at the same time as design activities took place and the collective data was analysed based on user experience goals and cognitive processes from interaction design and mobile learning. The mobile probe increased the...

  9. An Arginine Deprivation Response Pathway Is Induced in Leishmania during Macrophage Invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele Goldman-Pinkovich

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Amino acid sensing is an intracellular function that supports nutrient homeostasis, largely through controlled release of amino acids from lysosomal pools. The intracellular pathogen Leishmania resides and proliferates within human macrophage phagolysosomes. Here we describe a new pathway in Leishmania that specifically senses the extracellular levels of arginine, an amino acid that is essential for the parasite. During infection, the macrophage arginine pool is depleted due to its use to produce metabolites (NO and polyamines that constitute part of the host defense response and its suppression, respectively. We found that parasites respond to this shortage of arginine by up-regulating expression and activity of the Leishmania arginine transporter (LdAAP3, as well as several other transporters. Our analysis indicates the parasite monitors arginine levels in the environment rather than the intracellular pools. Phosphoproteomics and genetic analysis indicates that the arginine-deprivation response is mediated through a mitogen-activated protein kinase-2-dependent signaling cascade.

  10. An Arginine Deprivation Response Pathway Is Induced in Leishmania during Macrophage Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman-Pinkovich, Adele; Balno, Caitlin; Strasser, Rona; Zeituni-Molad, Michal; Bendelak, Keren; Rentsch, Doris; Ephros, Moshe; Wiese, Martin; Jardim, Armando; Myler, Peter J; Zilberstein, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Amino acid sensing is an intracellular function that supports nutrient homeostasis, largely through controlled release of amino acids from lysosomal pools. The intracellular pathogen Leishmania resides and proliferates within human macrophage phagolysosomes. Here we describe a new pathway in Leishmania that specifically senses the extracellular levels of arginine, an amino acid that is essential for the parasite. During infection, the macrophage arginine pool is depleted due to its use to produce metabolites (NO and polyamines) that constitute part of the host defense response and its suppression, respectively. We found that parasites respond to this shortage of arginine by up-regulating expression and activity of the Leishmania arginine transporter (LdAAP3), as well as several other transporters. Our analysis indicates the parasite monitors arginine levels in the environment rather than the intracellular pools. Phosphoproteomics and genetic analysis indicates that the arginine-deprivation response is mediated through a mitogen-activated protein kinase-2-dependent signaling cascade. PMID:27043018

  11. Risk and risk reduction involving arginine intake and meat consumption in colorectal tumorigenesis and survival

    OpenAIRE

    Zell, Jason A.; Ignatenko, Natalia A.; Yerushalmi, Hagit F; Ziogas, Argyrios; Besselsen, David G; Gerner, Eugene W.; Anton-Culver, Hoda

    2007-01-01

    Elevated polyamine and nitric oxide levels (both derived from arginine) promote tumorigenesis, whereas non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence in experimental and epidemiologic studies. We investigated dietary arginine-induced intestinal tumorigenesis and NSAID-inhibitory effects in Apc(Min/+) mice differentially expressing nitric oxide synthase-2 (Nos2). We also studied effects of estimated arginine exposures through meat consumption on tumor ...

  12. Remission of diabetes mellitus in cats cannot be predicted by the arginine stimulation test

    OpenAIRE

    Tschuor, F

    2011-01-01

    Background: Responsiveness of β-cells to arginine persists the longest during diabetes progression, making the intravenous arginine stimulation test (IVAST) a useful tool to assess residual insulin and glucagon secretion. Hypothesis: Diabetic cats with and without remission will have different arginine-induced insulin or glucagon response. Animals: 17 cats with diabetes, 7 healthy cats. Methods: Response to IVAST was assessed by calculating insulin and glucagon area under the c...

  13. Hyponatraemia in the first week of life in preterm infants. Part I. Arginine vasopressin secretion.

    OpenAIRE

    Rees, L; Brook, C G; Shaw, J C; Forsling, M L

    1984-01-01

    Continuous sequential urinary arginine vasopressin measurements in 14 preterm, ventilated infants suggest that both osmoreceptor and volume receptor systems are able to stimulate the prolonged secretion of arginine vasopressin from 26 weeks' gestation. The kidney is able to respond to arginine vasopressin stimulation from the first day of life and from 26 weeks' gestation. A maximum urine osmolality not exceeding 550 mOsm/kg was reached which varied with hydration of the infant. Excretion of ...

  14. Protective Effect of Arginine on Oxidative Stress in Transgenic Sickle Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Dasgupta, Trisha; Hebbel, Robert P.; Kaul, Dhananjay K.

    2006-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by reperfusion injury and chronic oxidative stress. Oxidative stress and hemolysis in SCD result in inactivation of nitric oxide (NO) and depleted arginine levels. We hypothesized that augmenting NO production by arginine supplementation will reduce oxidative stress in SCD. To this end, we measured the effect of arginine (5% in mouse chow) on NO metabolites (NOx), lipid peroxidation (LPO) and selected antioxidants in transgenic sickle mouse models. U...

  15. Arginine Consumption by the Intestinal Parasite Giardia intestinalis Reduces Proliferation of Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Stadelmann, Britta; Merino, Maria C.; Persson, Lo; Svard, Staffan G.

    2012-01-01

    In the field of infectious diseases the multifaceted amino acid arginine has reached special attention as substrate for the host´s production of the antimicrobial agent nitric oxide (NO). A variety of infectious organisms interfere with this part of the host immune response by reducing the availability of arginine. This prompted us to further investigate additional roles of arginine during pathogen infections. As a model we used the intestinal parasite Giardia intestinalis that actively consu...

  16. Oral Arginine Metabolism May Decrease the Risk for Dental Caries in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Nascimento, M. M.; Liu, Y.; Kalra, R.; Perry, S.; Adewumi, A.; Xu, X.; Primosch, R.E.; Burne, R A

    2013-01-01

    Arginine metabolism by oral bacteria via the arginine deiminase system (ADS) increases the local pH, which can neutralize the effects of acidification from sugar metabolism and reduce the cariogenicity of oral biofilms. To explore the relationship between oral arginine metabolism and dental caries experience in children, we measured ADS activity in oral samples from 100 children and correlated it with their caries status and type of dentition. Supragingival dental plaque was collected from to...

  17. Amino acid catabolism by Lactobacillus helveticus in cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kananen, Soila Kaarina

    Amino acid catabolism is the final step in the conversion of caseins to flavour compounds and a part of a complex combination of biochemical pathways in cheese flavour formation. Lactobacillus helveticus is a thermophilic lactic acid bacterium that is used in cheese manufacture as a primary starter...... culture or as an adjunct culture. It has shown high proteolytic activities in conversion of caseins to peptides and further to amino acids and flavour compounds. Better understanding of the enzyme activity properties and the influence of different properties on final cheese flavour is favourable for...... developing new cheese products with enhanced flavour. The aim of this Ph.D. study was to investigate the importance of strain variation of Lb. helveticus in relation flavour formation in cheese related to amino acid catabolism. Aspects of using Lb. helveticus as starter as well as adjunct culture in cheese...

  18. Invasive Acacia longifolia induce changes in the microbial catabolic diversity of sand dunes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchante, Elizabete; Kjøller, Annelise; Struwe, Sten;

    2008-01-01

    Acacia longifolia is one of the main plant species invading Portuguese dune ecosystems. Areas invaded by this exotic tree have reduced plant diversity and altered soil microbial processes and nutrient pools, but the impacts on microbial functional diversity in the soil have been little explored...... of invasion, carbon (C) content, nitrogen (N) content, C/N ratio, pH, and litter quantity explained 39.6% of the variance of catabolic responses. It is concluded that invasion by A. longifolia has substantial effects on the catabolic diversity of the soil microbial communities. These effects may have wider...... implications for nutrient cycling and ecosystem-level processes and for the invasibility of the system....

  19. Transcriptional Analysis of Prebiotic Uptake and Catabolism by Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Joakim Mark; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Abou Hachem, Maher;

    2012-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract can be positively modulated by dietary supplementation of probiotic bacteria in combination with prebiotic carbohydrates. Here differential transcriptomics and functional genomics were used to identify genes in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM involved in the uptake...... and catabolism of 11 potential prebiotic compounds consisting of α- and β- linked galactosides and glucosides. These oligosaccharides induced genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar phosphotransferase systems (PTS), galactoside pentose hexuronide (GPH) permease, and ATP-binding cassette......1 6-phospho-β-glucosidases implicated in the catabolism of gentiobiose and cellobiose. These findings highlight the broad oligosaccharide metabolic repertoire of L. acidophilus NCFM and establish a platform for selection and screening of both probiotic bacteria and prebiotic compounds that may...

  20. Evaluation of chemical labeling methods for identifying functional arginine residues of proteins by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanigasekara, Maheshika S K; Chowdhury, Saiful M

    2016-09-01

    Arginine residues undergo several kinds of post-translational modifications (PTMs). These PTMs are associated with several inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and diabetes. Mass spectrometric studies of arginine modified proteins and peptides are very important, not only to identify the reactive arginine residues but also to understand the tandem mass spectrometry behavior of these peptides for assigning the sequences unambiguously. Herein, we utilize tandem mass spectrometry to report the performance of two widely used arginine labeling reagents, 1,2-cyclohexanedione (CHD) and phenylglyoxal (PG) with several arginine containing peptides and proteins. Time course labeling studies were performed to demonstrate the selectivity of the reagents in proteins or protein digests. Structural studies on the proteins were also explored to better understand the reaction sites and position of arginine residues. We found CHD showed better labeling efficiencies compared to phenylglyoxal. Reactive arginine profiling on a purified albumin protein clearly pointed out the cellular glycation modification site for this protein with high confidence. We believe these detailed mass-spectrometric studies will provide significant input to profile reactive arginine residues in large-scale studies; therefore, targeted proteomics can be performed to the short listed reactive sites for cellular arginine modifications. PMID:27543028

  1. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 regulates herpes simplex virus replication through ICP27 RGG-box methylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein arginine methylation is involved in viral infection and replication through the modulation of diverse cellular processes including RNA metabolism, cytokine signaling, and subcellular localization. It has been suggested previously that the protein arginine methylation of the RGG-box of ICP27 is required for herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) viral replication and gene expression in vivo. However, a cellular mediator for this process has not yet been identified. In our current study, we show that the protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is a cellular mediator of the arginine methylation of ICP27 RGG-box. We generated arginine substitution mutants in this domain and examined which arginine residues are required for methylation by PRMT1. R138, R148 and R150 were found to be the major sites of this methylation but additional arginine residues serving as minor methylation sites are still required to sustain the fully methylated form of ICP27 RGG. We also demonstrate that the nuclear foci-like structure formation, SRPK interactions, and RNA-binding activity of ICP27 are modulated by the arginine methylation of the ICP27 RGG-box. Furthermore, HSV-1 replication is inhibited by hypomethylation of this domain resulting from the use of general PRMT inhibitors or arginine mutations. Our data thus suggest that the PRMT1 plays a key role as a cellular regulator of HSV-1 replication through ICP27 RGG-box methylation.

  2. Dietary Arginine Requirements for Growth Are Dependent on the Rate of Citrulline Production in Mice123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Juan C; Agarwal, Umang; Didelija, Inka C

    2015-01-01

    Background: In many species, including humans, arginine is considered a semiessential amino acid because under certain conditions endogenous synthesis cannot meet its demand. The requirements of arginine for growth in mice are ill defined and seem to vary depending on the genetic background of the mice. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the metabolic and molecular basis for the requirement of arginine in 2 mouse strains. Methods: Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) and C57BL/6 (BL6) male mice were fed arginine-free or arginine-sufficient diets (Expt. 1) or 1 of 7 diets with increasing arginine concentration (from 0- to 8-g/kg diet, Expt. 2) between day 24 and 42 of life to determine the arginine requirements for growth. Citrulline production and “de novo” arginine synthesis were measured with use of stable isotopes, and arginine requirements were determined by breakpoint analysis and enzyme expression by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results: In Expt. 1, ICR mice grew at the same rate regardless of the arginine concentration of the diet (mean ± SE: 0.66 ± 0.04 g/d, P = 0.80), but BL6 mice had a reduced growth rate when fed the arginine-free diet (0.25 ± 0.02 g/d, P < 0.001) compared to the 8-g arginine/kg diet (0.46 ± 0.03 g/d). ICR mice showed at least a 2-fold greater expression (P < 0.001) of ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) than BL6 mice, which translated into a greater rate of citrulline (25%) and arginine synthesis (49%, P < 0.002). In Expt. 2, breakpoint analysis showed that the requirement for growth of BL6 mice was met with 2.32 ± 0.39 g arginine/kg diet; for ICR mice, however, no breakpoint was found. Conclusion: Our data indicate that a reduced expression of OTC in BL6 mice translates into a reduced production of citrulline and arginine compared with ICR mice, which results in a dietary arginine requirement for growth in BL6 mice, but not in ICR mice. PMID:25855119

  3. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 regulates herpes simplex virus replication through ICP27 RGG-box methylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jungeun; Shin, Bongjin; Park, Eui-Soon; Yang, Sujeong; Choi, Seunga [Department of Microbiology, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); BK21 Bio Brain Center, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Misun [Department of Microbiology, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Rho, Jaerang, E-mail: jrrho@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Microbiology, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); BK21 Bio Brain Center, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); GRAST, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-01

    Protein arginine methylation is involved in viral infection and replication through the modulation of diverse cellular processes including RNA metabolism, cytokine signaling, and subcellular localization. It has been suggested previously that the protein arginine methylation of the RGG-box of ICP27 is required for herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) viral replication and gene expression in vivo. However, a cellular mediator for this process has not yet been identified. In our current study, we show that the protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is a cellular mediator of the arginine methylation of ICP27 RGG-box. We generated arginine substitution mutants in this domain and examined which arginine residues are required for methylation by PRMT1. R138, R148 and R150 were found to be the major sites of this methylation but additional arginine residues serving as minor methylation sites are still required to sustain the fully methylated form of ICP27 RGG. We also demonstrate that the nuclear foci-like structure formation, SRPK interactions, and RNA-binding activity of ICP27 are modulated by the arginine methylation of the ICP27 RGG-box. Furthermore, HSV-1 replication is inhibited by hypomethylation of this domain resulting from the use of general PRMT inhibitors or arginine mutations. Our data thus suggest that the PRMT1 plays a key role as a cellular regulator of HSV-1 replication through ICP27 RGG-box methylation.

  4. Amino acid catabolism and generation of volatiles by lactic acid bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Tavaria, F. K.; Dahl, S.; Carballo, F. J.; Malcata, F. X.

    2002-01-01

    Twelve isolates of lactic acid bacteria, belonging to the Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, and Enterococcus genera, were previously isolated from 180- d-old Serra da Estrela cheese, a traditional Portuguese cheese manufactured from raw milk and coagulated with a plant rennet. These isolates were subsequently tested for their ability to catabolize free amino acids, when incubated independently with each amino acid in free form or with a mixture thereof. Attempts...

  5. Elevated serine catabolism is associated with the heat shock response in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Matthews, R G; Neidhardt, F C

    1989-01-01

    The biochemical events associated with the heat shock response are not well understood in any organism, nor have the signals that initiate the induction of heat shock protein synthesis been identified. In this work, we demonstrate that the rate of serine catabolism of Escherichia coli cells grown in glucose minimal medium supplemented with serine is elevated three- to sevenfold when the growth temperature is shifted from 37 to 44 degrees C. Elevations in growth temperature and mutations or tr...

  6. Microbial catabolic activities are naturally selected by metabolic energy harvest rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cabaleiro, Rebeca; Ofiţeru, Irina D; Lema, Juan M; Rodríguez, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    The fundamental trade-off between yield and rate of energy harvest per unit of substrate has been largely discussed as a main characteristic for microbial established cooperation or competition. In this study, this point is addressed by developing a generalized model that simulates competition between existing and not experimentally reported microbial catabolic activities defined only based on well-known biochemical pathways. No specific microbial physiological adaptations are considered, growth yield is calculated coupled to catabolism energetics and a common maximum biomass-specific catabolism rate (expressed as electron transfer rate) is assumed for all microbial groups. Under this approach, successful microbial metabolisms are predicted in line with experimental observations under the hypothesis of maximum energy harvest rate. Two microbial ecosystems, typically found in wastewater treatment plants, are simulated, namely: (i) the anaerobic fermentation of glucose and (ii) the oxidation and reduction of nitrogen under aerobic autotrophic (nitrification) and anoxic heterotrophic and autotrophic (denitrification) conditions. The experimentally observed cross feeding in glucose fermentation, through multiple intermediate fermentation pathways, towards ultimately methane and carbon dioxide is predicted. Analogously, two-stage nitrification (by ammonium and nitrite oxidizers) is predicted as prevailing over nitrification in one stage. Conversely, denitrification is predicted in one stage (by denitrifiers) as well as anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation). The model results suggest that these observations are a direct consequence of the different energy yields per electron transferred at the different steps of the pathways. Overall, our results theoretically support the hypothesis that successful microbial catabolic activities are selected by an overall maximum energy harvest rate. PMID:26161636

  7. Formaldehyde catabolism is essential in cells deficient for the Fanconi anemia DNA-repair pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Ivan V; Langevin, Frédéric; Crossan, Gerry P; Takata, Minoru; Patel, Ketan J

    2011-12-01

    Metabolism is predicted to generate formaldehyde, a toxic, simple, reactive aldehyde that can damage DNA. Here we report a synthetic lethal interaction in avian cells between ADH5, encoding the main formaldehyde-detoxifying enzyme, and the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA-repair pathway. These results define a fundamental role for the combined action of formaldehyde catabolism and DNA cross-link repair in vertebrate cell survival. PMID:22081012

  8. Naphthalene and Donor Cell Density Influence Field Conjugation of Naphthalene Catabolism Plasmids

    OpenAIRE

    Hohnstock, A. M.; Stuart-Keil, K G; Kull, E. E.; Madsen, E. L.

    2000-01-01

    We examined transfer of naphthalene-catabolic genes from donor microorganisms native to a contaminated site to site-derived, rifampin-resistant recipient bacteria unable to grow on naphthalene. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) was demonstrated in filter matings using groundwater microorganisms as donors. Two distinct but similar plasmid types, closely related to pDTG1, were retrieved. In laboratory-incubated sediment matings, the addition of naphthalene stimulated HGT. However, recipient bacter...

  9. Diversifying and Stabilizing Selection of Sialidase and N-Acetylneuraminate Catabolism in Mycoplasma synoviae▿ §

    OpenAIRE

    May, Meghan; Brown, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Sialidase activity varies widely among strains and tends to correlate with strain virulence in the avian pathogen Mycoplasma synoviae. To characterize the forms of selection acting on enzymes required for sialic acid scavenging and catabolism, the ratios of nonsynonymous (Ka) to synonymous (Ks) mutation frequency were calculated for codons in the sialidase gene of 16 strains of M. synoviae and for its nearly identical homolog in four strains of Mycoplasma gallisepticum. The Ka/Ks (ω) values f...

  10. Genetic Variation in Sialidase and Linkage to N-acetylneuraminate Catabolism in Mycoplasma synoviae

    OpenAIRE

    May, Meghan; Brown, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    We explored the genetic basis for intraspecific variation in mycoplasmal sialidase activity that correlates with virulence, and its potentially advantageous linkage to nutrient catabolism. Polymorphism in N-acetylneuraminate scavenging and degradation genes (sialidase, N-acetylneuraminate lyase, N-acetylmannosamine kinase, N-acetylmannosamine-6-phosphate epimerase, N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate deacetylase, and glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase) was evident among eight strains of the avian ...

  11. Functional metagenomics to mine the human gut microbiome for dietary fiber catabolic enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Tasse, Lena; Bercovici, Juliette; Pizzut-Serin, Sandra; Robe, Patrick; Tap, Julien; Klopp, Christophe; Cantarel, Brandi L; Coutinho, Pedro M; Henrissat, Bernard; Leclerc, Marion; Doré, Joël; Monsan, Pierre; Remaud-Simeon, Magali; Potocki-Veronese, Gabrielle

    2010-01-01

    The human gut microbiome is a complex ecosystem composed mainly of uncultured bacteria. It plays an essential role in the catabolism of dietary fibers, the part of plant material in our diet that is not metabolized in the upper digestive tract, because the human genome does not encode adequate carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes). We describe a multi-step functionally based approach to guide the in-depth pyrosequencing of specific regions of the human gut metagenome encoding the CAZymes invo...

  12. Intravenous Selenium Modulates L-Arginine-Induced Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Hardman

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Oxidative stress is understood to have a critical role in the development of acinar injury in experimental acute pancreatitis. We have previously demonstrated that compound multiple antioxidant therapy ameliorates end-organ damage in the intra-peritoneal L-arginine rat model. As the principal co-factor for glutathione, selenium is a key constituent of multiple antioxidant preparations. Objective The intention of this study was to investigate the effect of selenium on pancreatic and remote organ injury in a wellvalidated experimental model of acute pancreatitis. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to one of 3 groups (n=5/group and sacrificed at 72 hours. Acute pancreatitis was induced by 250 mg per 100 g body weight of 20% L-arginine hydrochloride in 0.15 mol/L sodium chloride. Group allocations were: Group 1, control; Group 2, acute pancreatitis; Group 3, selenium. Main outcome measures Serum amylase, anti-oxidant levels, bronchoalveolar lavage protein, lung myeloperoxidase activity, and histological assessment of pancreatic injury. Results L-arginine induced acute pancreatitis characterised by oedema, neutrophil infiltration, acinar cell degranulation and elevated serum amylase. Selenium treatment was associated with reduced pancreatic oedema and inflammatory cell infiltration. Acinar degranulation and dilatation were completely absent. A reduction in bronchoalveolar lavage protein content was also demonstrated. Conclusion Intravenous selenium given 24 hours after induction of experimental acute pancreatitis was associated with a reduction in the histological stigmata of pancreatic injury and a dramatic reduction in broncho-alveolar lavage protein content. Serum selenium fell during the course of experimental acute pancreatitis and this effect was not reversed by exogenous selenium supplementation.

  13. Transcriptional analysis of prebiotic uptake and catabolism by Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Joakim Mark; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Hachem, Maher Abou; Lahtinen, Sampo J; Goh, Yong-Jun; Svensson, Birte; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2012-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract can be positively modulated by dietary supplementation of probiotic bacteria in combination with prebiotic carbohydrates. Here differential transcriptomics and functional genomics were used to identify genes in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM involved in the uptake and catabolism of 11 potential prebiotic compounds consisting of α- and β-linked galactosides and glucosides. These oligosaccharides induced genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar phosphotransferase systems (PTS), galactoside pentose hexuronide (GPH) permease, and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. PTS systems were upregulated primarily by di- and tri-saccharides such as cellobiose, isomaltose, isomaltulose, panose and gentiobiose, while ABC transporters were upregulated by raffinose, Polydextrose, and stachyose. A single GPH transporter was induced by lactitol and galactooligosaccharides (GOS). The various transporters were associated with a number of glycoside hydrolases from families 1, 2, 4, 13, 32, 36, 42, and 65, involved in the catabolism of various α- and β-linked glucosides and galactosides. Further subfamily specialization was also observed for different PTS-associated GH1 6-phospho-β-glucosidases implicated in the catabolism of gentiobiose and cellobiose. These findings highlight the broad oligosaccharide metabolic repertoire of L. acidophilus NCFM and establish a platform for selection and screening of both probiotic bacteria and prebiotic compounds that may positively influence the gastrointestinal microbiota. PMID:23028535

  14. Effects of Zinc Magnesium Aspartate (ZMA Supplementation on Training Adaptations and Markers of Anabolism and Catabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almada Anthony

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study examined whether supplementing the diet with a commercial supplement containing zinc magnesium aspartate (ZMA during training affects zinc and magnesium status, anabolic and catabolic hormone profiles, and/or training adaptations. Forty-two resistance trained males (27 ± 9 yrs; 178 ± 8 cm, 85 ± 15 kg, 18.6 ± 6% body fat were matched according to fat free mass and randomly assigned to ingest in a double blind manner either a dextrose placebo (P or ZMA 30–60 minutes prior to going to sleep during 8-weeks of standardized resistance-training. Subjects completed testing sessions at 0, 4, and 8 weeks that included body composition assessment as determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, 1-RM and muscular endurance tests on the bench and leg press, a Wingate anaerobic power test, and blood analysis to assess anabolic/catabolic status as well as markers of health. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Results indicated that ZMA supplementation non-significantly increased serum zinc levels by 11 – 17% (p = 0.12. However, no significant differences were observed between groups in anabolic or catabolic hormone status, body composition, 1-RM bench press and leg press, upper or lower body muscular endurance, or cycling anaerobic capacity. Results indicate that ZMA supplementation during training does not appear to enhance training adaptations in resistance trained populations.

  15. The control of chlorophyll catabolism and the status of yellowing as a biomarker of leaf senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ougham, H; Hörtensteiner, S; Armstead, I; Donnison, I; King, I; Thomas, H; Mur, L

    2008-09-01

    The pathway of chlorophyll catabolism during leaf senescence is known in a fair amount of biochemical and cell biological detail. In the last few years, genes encoding a number of the catabolic enzymes have been characterized, including the key ring-opening activities, phaeophorbide a oxygenase (PaO) and red chlorophyll catabolite reductase (RCCR). Recently, a gene that modulates disassembly of chlorophyll-protein complexes and activation of pigment ring-opening has been isolated by comparative mapping in monocot species, positional cloning exploiting rice genomics resources and functional testing in Arabidopsis. The corresponding gene in pea has been identified as Mendel's I locus (green/yellow cotyledons). Mutations in this and other chlorophyll catabolic genes have significant consequences, both for the course of leaf senescence and senescence-like stress responses, notably hypersensitivity to pathogen challenge. Loss of chlorophyll can occur via routes other than the PaO/RCCR pathway, resulting in changes that superficially resemble senescence. Such 'pseudosenescence' responses tend to be pathological rather than physiological and may differ from senescence in fundamental aspects of biochemistry and regulation. PMID:18721307

  16. Detection of a novel arginine vasopression defect by dideoxy fingerprinting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamani, M.R.S.; Phillips, J.A. III; Copeland, K.C. (Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States) Univ. of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus is a familial form of diabetes insipidus. This disorder is associated with variable levels of arginine vasopressin (AVP) and diabetes insipidus of varying severity, which responds to exogenous AVP. To determine the molecular basis of autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus, the AVP genes of members of a large kindred were analyzed. A new method, called dideoxy fingerprinting, was used to detect an AVP mutation that was characterized by DNA sequencing. The novel defect found changes the last codon of the AVP signal peptide from alanine to threonine, which should perturb cleavage of mature AVP from its precursor protein and inhibit its secretion or action. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Mobility Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Bossen, Claus

    2005-01-01

    coordination necessary in cooperative work, but focuses, we argue, mainly on the temporal aspects of cooperative work. As a supplement, the concept of mobility work focuses on the spatial aspects of cooperative work. Whereas actors seek to diminish the amount of articulation work needed in collaboration by......We posit the concept of Mobility Work to describe efforts of moving about people and things as part of accomplishing tasks. Mobility work can be seen as a spatial parallel to the concept of articulation work proposed by the sociologist Anselm Strauss. Articulation work describes efforts of...... constructing Standard Operation Procedures (SOPs), actors minimise mobility work by constructing Standard Operation Configurations (SOCs). We apply the concept of mobility work to the ethnography of hospital work, and argue that mobility arises because of the need to get access to people, places, knowledge and...

  18. Expression of the Escherichia coli Catabolic Threonine Dehydratase in Corynebacterium glutamicum and Its Effect on Isoleucine Production

    OpenAIRE

    Guillouet, S.; Rodal, A. A.; An, G.-H.; Lessard, P. A.; Sinskey, A J

    1999-01-01

    The catabolic or biodegradative threonine dehydratase (E.C. 4.2.1.16) of Escherichia coli is an isoleucine feedback-resistant enzyme that catalyzes the degradation of threonine to α-ketobutyrate, the first reaction of the isoleucine pathway. We cloned and expressed this enzyme in Corynebacterium glutamicum. We found that while the native threonine dehydratase of C. glutamicum was totally inhibited by 15 mM isoleucine, the heterologous catabolic threonine dehydratase expressed in the same stra...

  19. Mobile Semiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter aims to understand the mobile condition of contemporary life with a particular view to the signifying dimension of the environment and its ‘readability’. The chapter explores the potentials of semiotics and its relationship to the new mobilities literature. What takes place is a...... ‘mobile sense making’ where signs and materially situated meanings connect to the moving human body and thus create particular challenges and complexities of making sense of the world. The chapter includes notions of mobility systems and socio-technical networks in order to show how a ‘semiotic layer’ may...

  20. Mobil marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Engelová, Kateřina

    2006-01-01

    Mobil marketing - reklama a podpora prodeje prostřednictvím mobilních telefonů. Technologické a kulturní předpoklady vzniku tohoto odvětví. Mobil marketing a marketingový mix, možnosti synergie. Nástroje mobil marketingu - reklamní SMS a MMS, lokační služby, soutěže, ankety a hlasování, věrnostní systémy, mobilní obsah. Subjekty mobil marketingu. M-komerce. Využití pro podnikové aplikace.

  1. Mobile Clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitzek, Frank; Katz, Marcos

    A mobile cloud is a cooperative arrangement of dynamically connected communication nodes sharing opportunistic resources. In this book, authors provide a comprehensive and motivating overview of this rapidly emerging technology. The book explores how distributed resources can be shared by mobile...... examples of mobile clouds applications, based on both existing commercial initiatives as well as proof-of-concept test-beds. Visions and prospects are also discussed, paving the way for further development. As mobile networks and social networks become more and more reliant on each other, the concept of...

  2. Insulin resistance is a two-sided mechanism acting under opposite catabolic and anabolic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartsburd, Polina

    2016-04-01

    The survival of multi-cellular organisms depends on the organism ability to maintain glucose homeostasis for time of low/high nutrient availability or high energy needs, and the ability to fight infections or stress. These effects are realized through the insulin controlled transport of blood glucose into the insulin-responsive cells such as muscle, fat and liver cells. Reduction in the ability of these cells to take glucose from the blood in response to normal circulating levels of insulin is known as insulin resistance (IR). Chronic IR is a key pathological feature of obesity, type 2 diabetes, sepsis and cancer cachexia, however temporal IR are widely met in fasting/ hibernation, pregnancy, anti-bacterial immunity, exercise and stress. Paradoxically, a certain part of the IR-cases is associated with catabolic metabolism, whereas the other is related to anabolic pathways. How can this paradoxical IR-response be explained? What is the metabolic basis of this IR variability and its physiological and pathological impacts? An answer to these questions might be achieved through the hypothesis in which IR is considered as a two-sided mechanism acting under opposite metabolic conditions (catabolism and anabolism) but with the common aim to sustain glucose homeostasis in a wide metabolic range. To test this hypothesis, I examined the main metabolic distinctions between the varied IR-cases and their dependence on the blood glucose concentration, level of the IR-threshold, and catabolic/anabolic activation. On the basis of the established interrelations, a simple model of IR-distribution has been developed. The model revealed the «U-type distribution» form with separation into two main IR-groups, each determined in the catabolic or anabolic conditions with one exception - type 2 diabetes and its paradoxical catabolic activation in anabolic conditions. The dual opposing (or complementary) role for the IR opens a new possibility for better understanding the cause and

  3. Stability and resilience of oral microcosms toward acidification and Candida outgrowth by arginine supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Jessica E; Röling, Wilfred F M; Buijs, Mark J; Sissons, Christopher H; ten Cate, Jacob M; Keijser, Bart J F; Crielaard, Wim; Zaura, Egija

    2015-02-01

    Dysbiosis induced by low pH in the oral ecosystem can lead to caries, a prevalent bacterial disease in humans. The amino acid arginine is one of the pH-elevating agents in the oral cavity. To obtain insights into the effect of arginine on oral microbial ecology, a multi-plaque "artificial mouth" (MAM) biofilm model was inoculated with saliva from a healthy volunteer and microcosms were grown for 4 weeks with 1.6 % (w/v) arginine supplement (Arginine) or without (Control), samples were taken at several time-points. A cariogenic environment was mimicked by sucrose pulsing. The bacterial composition was determined by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, the presence and amount of Candida and arginine deiminase system genes arcA and sagP by qPCR. Additionally, ammonium and short-chain fatty acid concentrations were determined. The Arginine microcosms were dominated by Streptococcus, Veillonella, and Neisseria and remained stable in time, while the composition of the Control microcosms diverged significantly in time, partially due to the presence of Megasphaera. The percentage of Candida increased 100-fold in the Control microcosms compared to the Arginine microcosms. The pH-raising effect of arginine was confirmed by the pH and ammonium results. The abundances of sagP and arcA were highest in the Arginine microcosms, while the concentration of butyrate was higher in the Control microcosms. We demonstrate that supplementation with arginine serves a health-promoting function; it enhances microcosm resilience toward acidification and suppresses outgrowth of the opportunistic pathogen Candida. Arginine facilitates stability of oral microbial communities and prevents them from becoming cariogenic. PMID:25433583

  4. The subcellular compartmentalization of arginine metabolizing enzymes and their role in endothelial dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng eChen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO mediates endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and restrains vascular inflammation, smooth muscle proliferation and platelet aggregation. Impaired production of NO is a hallmark of endothelial dysfunction and promotes the development of cardiovascular disease. In endothelial cells, NO is generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS through the conversion of its substrate, L-arginine to L-citrulline. Reduced access to L-arginine has been proposed as a major mechanism underlying reduced eNOS activity and NO production in cardiovascular disease. The arginases (Arg1 and Arg2 metabolize L-arginine to generate L-ornithine and urea and increased expression of arginase has been proposed as a mechanism of reduced eNOS activity secondary to the depletion of L-arginine. Indeed, supplemental L-arginine and suppression of arginase activity has been shown to improve endothelium-dependent relaxation and ameliorate cardiovascular disease. However, L-arginine concentrations in endothelial cells remain sufficiently high to support NO synthesis suggesting additional mechanisms. The compartmentalization of intracellular L-arginine into poorly interchangeable pools has been proposed to allow for the local depletion of L-arginine. Indeed the subcellular location of L-arginine metabolizing enzymes plays important functional roles. In endothelial cells, eNOS is found in discrete intracellular locations and the capacity to generate NO is heavily influenced by its localtion. Arg1 and Arg2 also reside in different subcellular environments and are thought to differentially influence endothelial function. The plasma membrane solute transporter, CAT-1 and the arginine recycling enzyme, ASL, co-localize with eNOS and facilitate NO release. This review highlights the importance of the subcellular location of eNOS and arginine transporting and metabolizing enzymes to NO release and cardiovascular disease.

  5. Oral L-arginine supplementation impacts several reproductive parameters during the postpartum period in mares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Dale E; Warren, Lori K; Mortensen, Christopher J

    2013-05-01

    L-arginine is an amino acid which can alter pituitary function and increase blood flow to the reproductive tract. The objective was to determine the effect of supplementing 100g of L-arginine on plasma arginine concentrations, follicular dynamics and ovarian and uterine artery blood flow during the estrus that occurs subsequent to foaling. In Experiment 1, mares were fed 100g L-arginine for 1 day during the last 3 weeks of pregnancy and plasma samples taken for every hour for the first 4h and every other hour until 12h.L-arginine supplementation elevated plasma arginine concentrations from 1 to 8h post feeding; arginine peaked at 6h (arginine: 515±33μmol/L; control: 80±33μmol/L). In Experiment 2, mares received either 100g L-arginine or control diets beginning 21 d before the expected foaling date and continued for 30 d postpartum. The reproductive tract was evaluated by transrectal Doppler ultrasonography from Day 1 postpartum through Day 30. There were no differences in ovarian follicular dynamics, ovarian or uterine resistance indices between groups. Vascular perfusion of the F1 follicular wall was greater in L-arginine supplemented mares (37.3±2.6%) than controls (25.4±2.7%; Pmares had a smaller uterine body and horns and accumulated less uterine fluid than controls (Pfollicular development, raises the possible use of L-arginine supplementation as a breeding management tool during the postpartum period to increase reproductive success. PMID:23523236

  6. Dietary arginine and linear growth: the Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vught, Anneke J A H; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Arts, Ilja C W; Froberg, Karsten; Andersen, Lars B; El-Naaman, Bianca; Bugge, Anna; Nielsen, Birgit M; Heitman, Berit L

    2013-03-28

    The amino acid arginine is a well-known growth hormone (GH) stimulator and GH is an important modulator of linear growth. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of dietary arginine on growth velocity in children between 7 and 13 years of age. Data from the Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study during 2001-2 (baseline), and at 3-year and 7-year follow-up, were used. Arginine intake was estimated via a 7 d precoded food diary at baseline and 3-year follow-up. Data were analysed in a multilevel structure in which children were embedded within schools. Random intercept and slopes were defined to estimate the association between arginine intake and growth velocity, including the following covariates: sex; age; baseline height; energy intake; puberty stage at 7-year follow-up and intervention/control group. The association between arginine intake and growth velocity was significant for the third and fourth quintile of arginine intake (2.5-2.8 and 2.8-3.2 g/d, respectively) compared with the first quintile ( < 2.2 g/d) (P for trend = 0.04). Protein intake (excluding arginine) was significantly associated with growth velocity; however, the association was weaker than the association between arginine intake and growth velocity (P for trend = 0.14). The results of the present study suggest a dose-dependent physiological role of habitual protein intake, and specifically arginine intake, on linear growth in normally growing children. However, since the study was designed in healthy children, we cannot firmly conclude whether arginine supplementation represents a relevant clinical strategy. Further research is needed to investigate whether dietary arginine may represent a nutritional strategy potentially advantageous for the prevention and treatment of short stature. PMID:23046689

  7. Role of AMP catabolism enzymes in the energetic status of erythrocytes under conditions of glucose depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Dotsenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The adenylate metabolism determines the value of energy charge, adenylate pool and ATP concentration, with its level strongly differing in various cell types. The reasons of such differences are still not clear, moreover, role of adenylate metabolism in the regulation of intracellular ATP concentration is not fully known. Hypotheses about mechanisms of adenylate pool stabilization are based on results of mathematical modeling and require the experimental verification. It is known that AMP catabolism enzymes such as AMP-desaminase and 5’-nucleotidase are directly involved in the processes of adenylate charge and pool regulation and their activity depends on the concentration of this metabolite. It is considered that switching from AMP-desaminase pathway of AMP catabolism to 5’-nucleotidase pathway and vice versa may contribute to stabilization of adenylate charge and pool under increased energy load that leads to the reduction of ATP content. The objective of this study consisted in the experimental investigation of mechanisms of adenylate metabolism regulation in human erythrocytes as well as principles of adenylate and energy metabolism interaction in erythrocytes with varied energy charge. Сhanges in activities of catabolism enzymes such as AMP-membrane-bound (eN and cytosolic (cN-IA 5’-nucleotidase, AMP-desaminase (AMPDA of erythrocytes under conditions of glucose depletion and under vibration effect on cells in the range of frequencies of 8–32 Hz, step of 4 Hz, and the amplitude of 0,5 ±0,04 mmhave been studied. Antiphase change of cN-IA and AMPDA activities in erythrocytes incubated in the medium without glucose was shown. Processes of switching of two ways of AMP catabolism create the conditions for the stabilization of energy charge and the ATP concentration stabilization though at a level below the initial one. In the erythrocytes in the medium without glucose and under vibration the antiphase change of enzyme activity was

  8. Adverse effects associated with arginine alpha-ketoglutarate containing supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, J M; Majlesi, N; Chan, G M; Olsen, D; Hoffman, R S; Nelson, L S

    2009-05-01

    The athletic performance supplement industry is a multibillion-dollar business and one popular category claims to increase nitric oxide (NO) production. We report three patients presenting to the emergency department with adverse effects. A 33-year-old man presented with palpitations, dizziness, vomiting, and syncope, after the use of NO(2) platinum. His examination and electrocardiogram (ECG) were normal. The dizziness persisted, requiring admission overnight. A 21-year-old man with palpitations and near syncope had used a "nitric oxide" supplement. He was tachycardic to 115 bpm with otherwise normal examination. Laboratory values including methemoglobin, and ECG were unremarkable. He was treated with 1 L of saline with no change in heart rate. He was admitted for observation. A 24-year-old man presented after taking NO-Xplode with palpitations and a headache. His examination, laboratory values, and ECG were normal. He was discharged. The purported active ingredient in these products is arginine alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG), which is claimed to increase NO production by supplying the precursor L-arginine. The symptoms could be due to vasodilation from increased levels of NO, though other etiologies cannot be excluded. AAKG containing supplements may be associated with adverse effects requiring hospital admission. PMID:19755457

  9. Mobile Semiotics - signs and mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    This paper is about how to comprehend the mobile condition of contemporary life with a particular view to the signifying dimension of the environment and its ‘readability’. The paper explores the potentials of semiotics and its relationship to the new mobilities literature. The theoretical scope is...... therefore an attempt to mobilize semiotics by drawing on a central body of theory within and adjacent to the discipline. For instance the founding works of C. S. Peirce will be related to the contemporary notions of ‘geosemiotics’ by Scollon & Scollon. The paper’s theoretical claim is that semiotics hold a...... potential for mobilities studies if the awareness of seeing the environment as a semiotic layer and system can be sensitized to the insights of the ‘mobilities turn’. Empirically the paper tentatively explores the usefulness of a mobile semiotics approach to cases such as street signage, airport design, and...

  10. Mobile phones and mobile communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ling, Richard; Donner, Jonathan

    With staggering swiftness, the mobile phone has become a fixture of daily life in almost every society on earth. In 2007, the world had over 3 billion mobile subscriptions. Prosperous nations boast of having more subscriptions than people. In the developing world, hundreds of millions of people who...... could never afford a landline telephone now have a mobile number of their own. With a mobile in our hand many of us feel safer, more productive, and more connected to loved ones, but perhaps also more distracted and less involved with things happening immediately around us. Written by two leading...... researchers in the field, this volume presents an overview of the mobile telephone as a social and cultural phenomenon. Research is summarized and made accessible though detailed descriptions of ten mobile users from around the world. These illustrate popular debates, as well as deeper social forces at work...

  11. Mobile phone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almost the entire Norwegian population has cell phone. The usefulness of the cell phone is great, but can use a mobile phone to health or discomfort? How can exposure be reduced? NRPA follows research and provides advice on mobile phone use. (AG)

  12. Synthesis, characterization and behaviour of trans-bis (argininate) copper (II) to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis, the characterization and the behaviour to gamma radiation of trans-bis (argininate) copper (II) are presented. The synthesis is made from copper sulfate, sodium hydroxide and hydrochloride of L (+) arginine, in aqueous medium, and the characterization by infrared spectroscopy, visible and ultraviolet spectroscopy and elementary analysis. (C.G.C.)

  13. Acute hypothalamic administration of L-arginine increases feed intake in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Ricardo Maneck Malfatti; Luiz Augusto da Silva; Ricardo Aparecido Pereira; Renan Garcia Michel; André Luiz Snak; Fabio Seidel dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the chronic (oral) and acute (hypothalamic infusion) effects of L-arginine supplementation on feed intake, body composition, and behavioral changes in rats. Methods: Twenty rats were divided into two groups treated orally for 60 days; one group received L-arginine (1 g/kg body weight) and one group received saline (1 mL/NaCl ...

  14. Facilitation of peptide fibre formation by arginine-phosphate/carboxylate interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Krishna Prasad; Sandeep Verma

    2008-01-01

    This study describes peptide fibre formation in a hexapeptide, derived from the V3 loop of HIV-1, mediated by the interactions between arginine residues and phosphate/carboxylate anions. This charge neutralization approach was further confirmed when the deletion of arginine residue from the hexapeptide sequence resulted in fibre formation, which was studied by a combination of microscopic techniques.

  15. Antibacterial action of a novel functionalized chitosan-arginine against Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hong; Zhang, Peng; Kieft, Thomas L; Ryan, Shannon J; Baker, Shenda M; Wiesmann, William P; Rogelj, Snezna

    2010-07-01

    The antimicrobial activity of chitosan and chitosan derivatives has been well established. However, although several mechanisms have been proposed, the exact mode of action is still unclear. Here we report on the investigation of antibacterial activity and the antibacterial mode of action of a novel water-soluble chitosan derivative, arginine-functionalized chitosan, on the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens and Escherichia coli. Two different arginine-functionalized chitosans (6% arginine-substituted and 30% arginine-substituted) each strongly inhibited P. fluorescens and E. coli growth. Time-dependent killing efficacy experiments showed that 5000 mg l(-1) of 6%- and 30%-substituted chitosan-arginine killed 2.7 logs and 4.5 logs of P. fluorescens, and 4.8 logs and 4.6 logs of E. coli in 4h, respectively. At low concentrations, the 6%-substituted chitosan-arginine was more effective in inhibiting cell growth even though the 30%-substituted chitosan-arginine appeared to be more effective in permeabilizing the cell membranes of both P. fluorescens and E. coli. Studies using fluorescent probes, 1-N-phenyl-naphthylamine (NPN), nile red (NR) and propidium iodide (PI), and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) suggest that chitosan-arginine's antibacterial activity is, at least in part, due to its interaction with the cell membrane, in which it increases membrane permeability. PMID:20060936

  16. Endothelial arginine resynthesis contributes to the maintenance of vasomotor function in male diabetic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chennupati, Ramesh; Meens, Merlijn J P M T; Marion, Vincent;

    2014-01-01

    : Absence of endothelial citrulline recycling to arginine did not affect blood pressure and systemic arterial vasomotor responses in healthy mice. EDNO-mediated vasodilatation was significantly more impaired in diabetic Ass-KOTie2 than in control mice demonstrating that endothelial arginine recycling...

  17. Restricted Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette; Lassen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    exclusion and stratification mechanisms. In conclusion the article therefore suggests that future urban research and planning also needs a mobile understanding of spaces in the cities and how different mobility systems play an important role to sustain the exclusiveness that often characterises the private......Privatisation of public spaces in the contemporary city has increased during the last decades but only few studies have approached this field from a mobility perspective. Therefore the article seeks to rectify this by exploring two Australian examples of private spaces in the city; gated...... communities and shopping centres through mobility lenses. The article shows how different mobility systems enable and restrict the public access to private-public spaces, and it points out that proprietary communities create an unequal potential for human movement and access in the city. The main argument in...

  18. Mobilities Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Lanng, Ditte Bendix; Wind, Simon

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we identify the nexus between design (architecture, urban design, service design, etc.) and mobilities as a new and emerging research field. In this paper, we apply a “situational mobilities” perspective and take point of departure in the pragmatist question: “What design decisions...... and interventions affords this particular mobile situation?” The paper presents the contours of an emerging research agenda within mobilities research. The advent of “mobilities design” as an emerging research field points towards a critical interest in the material as well as practical consequences...... well as policy-making. The paper proposes that increased understanding of the material affordances facilitated through design provides important insight to planning and policymaking that at times might be in risk of becoming too detached from the everyday life of the mobile subject within contemporary...

  19. Intensive mobilities:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannini, Phillip; Bissell, David; Jensen, Ole B.

    This paper explores the intensities of long distance commuting journeys as a way of exploring how bodily sensibilities are being changed by the mobilities that they undertake. The context of this paper is that many people are travelling further to work than ever before owing to a variety of factors...... which relate to transport, housing and employment. Yet we argue that the experiential dimensions of long distance mobilities have not received the attention that they deserve within geographical research on mobilities. This paper combines ideas from mobilities research and contemporary social theory...... with fieldwork conducted in Canada, Denmark and Australia to develop our understanding of the experiential politics of long distance workers. Rather than focusing on the extensive dimensions of mobilities that are implicated in patterns and trends, our paper turns to the intensive dimensions of this...

  20. Designing Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    How is the width of the pavement shaping the urban experience? How is the material design of transport infrastructure and mobile technology affording social interaction in everyday life spaces? How do people inhabit these spaces with their bodies and in accordance to social and cultural norms......? These are some of the questions that this book raises in order to explore how the design of mobile sites and situations affect people's everyday life. The book takes point of departure in the author's book 'Staging Mobilities' (Routledge, 2013) in which it is argued that mobility is much more than...... mundane acts of moving in the city. 'Designing Mobilities' is based on more than a decade of academic research by Professor of Urban Theory, Ole B. Jensen and a must-read for students and scholars with an interest in urban studies, urban design, architecture, urban planning, transport planning and...

  1. The role of the arginine metabolome in pain: implications for sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakshi N

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitya Bakshi,1–2 Claudia R Morris3–6 1Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 4Department of Emergency Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 5Emory-Children’s Center for Cystic Fibrosis and Airways Disease Research, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 6Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Sickle cell disease (SCD is the most common hemoglobinopathy in the US, affecting approximately 100,000 individuals in the US and millions worldwide. Pain is the hallmark of SCD, and a subset of patients experience pain virtually all of the time. Of interest, the arginine metabolome is associated with several pain mechanisms highlighted in this review. Since SCD is an arginine deficiency syndrome, the contribution of the arginine metabolome to acute and chronic pain in SCD is a topic in need of further attention. Normal arginine metabolism is impaired in SCD through various mechanisms that contribute to endothelial dysfunction, vaso-occlusion, pulmonary complications, risk of leg ulcers, and early mortality. Arginine is a semiessential amino acid that serves as a substrate for protein synthesis and is the precursor to nitric oxide (NO, polyamines, proline, glutamate, creatine, and agmatine. Since arginine is involved in multiple metabolic processes, a deficiency of this amino acid has the potential to disrupt many cellular and organ functions. NO is a potent vasodilator that is depleted in SCD and may contribute to vaso-occlusive pain. As the obligate substrate for NO production, arginine also plays a mechanistic role in SCD-related pain, although its

  2. Supplementation with l-arginine stabilizes plasma arginine and nitric oxide metabolites, suppresses elevated liver enzymes and peroxidation in sickle cell anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaja, S I; Ogungbemi, S O; Kehinde, M O; Anigbogu, C N

    2016-06-01

    The effect of l-arginine on liver function in SCD has received little or no attention. The effect of a chronic, oral, low-dose supplementation with l-arginine (1gm/day for 6 weeks) on some liver enzymes, lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide metabolites was studied in 20 normal (non-sickle cell anaemia; NSCA) subjects and 20 sickle cell anaemia (SCA) subjects. Ten milliliters of blood was withdrawn from an ante-cubital vein for the estimation of plasma arginine concentration ([R]), alanine aminotransaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), plasma total bilirubin concentration [TB], malondialdehyde concentration [MDA] and nitric oxide metabolites concentration [NOx]. Before supplementation, ALT, AST, ALP (pNOx] were higher in NSCA subjects (pNOX] in SCA than in NSCA subjects (plow-dose supplementation with l-arginine improved liver function, oxidative stress, plasma arginine concentration and nitric oxide metabolites levels in NSCA and SCA subjects. Responses in SCA subjects to l-arginine were more sensitive than in NSCA subjects. PMID:27156372

  3. Potentiality of application of the conductometric L-arginine biosensors for the real sample analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaffrezic-Renault N.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine an influence of serum components on the L-arginine biosensor sensitivity and to formulate practical recommendations for its reliable analysis. Methods. The L-arginine biosensor comprised arginase and urease co-immobilized by cross-linking. Results. The biosensor specificity was investigated based on a series of representative studies (namely, through urea determination in the serum; inhibitory effect studies of mercury ions; high temperature treatment of sensors; studying the biosensor sensitivity to the serum treated by enzymes, and selectivity studies. It was found that the response of the biosensor to the serum injections was determined by high sensitivity of the L-arginine biosensor toward not only to L-arginine but also toward two other basic amino acids (L-lysine and L-histidine. Conclusions. A detailed procedure of optimization of the conductometric biosensor for L-arginine determination in blood serum has been proposed.

  4. Sequestration and metabolism of host cell arginine by the intraerythrocytic malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbold, Simon A; Llinás, Manuel; Kirk, Kiaran

    2016-06-01

    Human erythrocytes have an active nitric oxide synthase, which converts arginine into citrulline and nitric oxide (NO). NO serves several important functions, including the maintenance of normal erythrocyte deformability, thereby ensuring efficient passage of the red blood cell through narrow microcapillaries. Here, we show that following invasion by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum the arginine pool in the host erythrocyte compartment is sequestered and metabolized by the parasite. Arginine from the extracellular medium enters the infected cell via endogenous host cell transporters and is taken up by the intracellular parasite by a high-affinity cationic amino acid transporter at the parasite surface. Within the parasite arginine is metabolized into citrulline and ornithine. The uptake and metabolism of arginine by the parasite deprive the erythrocyte of the substrate required for NO production and may contribute to the decreased deformability of infected erythrocytes. PMID:26633083

  5. Differential effects of cranial radiation on growth hormone response to arginine and insulin infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth hormone responses to arginine infusion and to insulin-induced hypoglycemia were studied in 13 patients with neoplastic disease after treatment with radiation and chemotherapy. Patients who received intensive cranial radiation (greater than 2,400 rads) had no response to either arginine or insulin; those who received moderate cranial radiation (greater than or equal to 2,400 rads) had GH response to arginine but not to insulin; patients receiving no cranial radiation responded to both arginine and insulin. These data support the hypothesis that GH secretion in response to arginine infusion has a different mechanism in contrast to the response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia and that the latter is more vulnerable to cranial radiation

  6. Dietary arginine affects energy metabolism through polyamine turnover in juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Synne M; Holen, Elisabeth; Aksnes, Anders; Rønnestad, Ivar; Zerrahn, Jens-Erik; Espe, Marit

    2013-12-14

    In the present study, quadruplicate groups of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) were fed plant protein-based diets with increasing arginine inclusions (range 28·8-37·4 g/kg DM) to investigate whether arginine supplementation affects growth and lipid accumulation through an elevated polyamine turnover. Dietary lysine was held at a constant concentration, just below the requirement. All other amino acids were balanced and equal in the diets. Arginine supplementation increased protein and fat accretion, without affecting the hepatosomatic or visceralsomatic indices. Dietary arginine correlated with putrescine in the liver (R 0·78, P= 0·01) and with ornithine in the muscle, liver and plasma (P= 0·0002, 0·003 and 0·0002, respectively). The mRNA of ornithine decarboxylase, the enzyme producing putrescine, was up-regulated in the white adipose tissue of fish fed the high-arginine inclusion compared with those fed the low-arginine diet. Concomitantly, spermidine/spermine-(N1)-acetyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme for polyamine turnover that consumes acetyl-CoA, showed an increased activity in the liver of fish fed the arginine-supplemented diets. In addition, lower acetyl-CoA concentrations were observed in the liver of fish fed the high-arginine diet, while ATP, which is used in the process of synthesising spermidine and spermine, did not show a similar trend. Gene expression of the rate-limiting enzyme for β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1, was up-regulated in the liver of fish fed the high-arginine diet. Taken together, the data support that increased dietary arginine activates polyamine turnover and β-oxidation in the liver of juvenile Atlantic salmon and may act to improve the metabolic status of the fish. PMID:23656796

  7. Effect of oral take L-arginine on [Ca2+]i of human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the effect of oral take L-arginine on [Ca2+]i of human platelet, ten male volunteers were selected to take L-arginine for 4 days (20g/three times/a day, the 4th day took about 7g). They are neither smokers nor drinkers and no drugs were taken by them during 2 weeks before study. Tests were performed before and after taking L-arginine. Before and after taking L-arginine, platelet intracellular cGMP were 1.91 ± 0.20 vs 2.14 ± 0.34pmol/109 platelets, P 2+]i (A/B value: 0.45 ± 0.14 vs 0.32 ± 0.09) were inhibited. The results has showed that oral take L-arginine could inhibit platelet activation. This inhibition should be ascribed to such two points: (1) The amount of NO released by endothelial cells has increased. A basal release of NO has been found to regulate the blood vessel intensity and inhibit platelet adhesion. After taking L-arginine, the endothelial cells released more NO and the plasma NO3- level also increased. (2) The platelet has synthesized more NO. There is an L-arginine/NO pathway in platelet and platelet could synthesize NO from L-arginine to inhibit its activation. Taking L-arginine has enhanced the negative effect of this pathway by producing more NO. The study will be helpful to further study on the possibility of oral take L-arginine to avoid thrombotic and hemorrhagic diseases

  8. Detection of the proteins with different arginine methylation status induced by low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: The objective of this study is to detect the noble proteins that were functionally regulated by change of arginine methylation through irradiation of the low dose. The increase of the arginine methylation which is induced by low dose gamma-ray will have meaningful Introduction: Exposure of cells to low doses of radiation has well documented biological effect, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms are still poorly understood. Arginine methylation is a post translational modification that results in the formation of asymmetrical and symmetrical dimethylated arginines. Post-translational methylation of arginine residues of proteins involved in a growing number of cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, cell signaling, RNA processing and DNA repair, biological influence. Methods: Human normal cell line Chang-liver was irradiation by gamma-ray of 0.02Gy, 0.2Gy. After irradiation, cells were incubated for 4h, 8h, 24h, and then harvested to prepare protein extracts. ASYM24(anti-dimethyl-Arginine, asymmetric) antibody was used to Western blot and immunoprecipitation. Proteins that show different degrees of intensity between the two samples were analyzed by Mass spectrometry. Results: We detected increased asymmetric arginine methylation of two proteins at 24h after a dose of 0.2Gy irradiation. The mass spectrometry identified that it is 27kDa and 73kDa proteins. The 27kDa is hypothetical protein that function does not know. The 73kDa protein is Mortalin, a member of the Heat shock 70 protein family, which correlate with the radioresistance response, control of cell proliferation and act as a chaperone. Conclusion: Low dose radiation induces the change of asymmetric arginine methylation modification of arginine residues of hypothetical protein and mortalin. We expect that increase of arginine methylation in mortarin and hypothetical protein correlates with the radioresistance, the functional study for

  9. Altered Nitrogen Balance and Decreased Urea Excretion in Male Rats Fed Cafeteria Diet Are Related to Arginine Availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sabater

    2014-01-01

    rats, but low arginine levels point to a block in the urea cycle between ornithine and arginine, thereby preventing the elimination of excess nitrogen as urea. The ultimate consequence of this paradoxical block in the urea cycle seems to be the limitation of arginine production and/or availability.

  10. Resistance training minimizes catabolic effects induced by sleep deprivation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mônico-Neto, Marcos; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Lee, Kil Sun; Phillips, Stuart M; Giampá, Sara Quaglia de Campos; Souza, Helton de Sá; Dáttilo, Murilo; Medeiros, Alessandra; de Moraes, Wilson Max; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Túlio

    2015-11-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) can induce muscle atrophy. We aimed to investigate the changes underpinning SD-induced muscle atrophy and the impact of this condition on rats that were previously submitted to resistance training (RT). Adult male Wistar EPM-1 rats were randomly allocated into 1 of 5 groups: control, sham, SD (for 96 h), RT, and RT+SD. The major outcomes of this study were muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA), anabolic and catabolic hormone profiles, and the abundance of select proteins involved in muscle protein synthesis and degradation pathways. SD resulted in muscle atrophy; however, when SD was combined with RT, the reduction in muscle fiber CSA was attenuated. The levels of IGF-1 and testosterone were reduced in SD animals, and the RT+SD group had higher levels of these hormones than the SD group. Corticosterone was increased in the SD group compared with the control group, and this increase was minimized in the RT+SD group. The increases in corticosterone concentrations paralleled changes in the abundance of ubiquitinated proteins and the autophagic proteins LC3 and p62/SQSTM1, suggesting that corticosterone may trigger these changes. SD induced weight loss, but this loss was minimized in the RT+SD group. We conclude that SD induced muscle atrophy, probably because of the increased corticosterone and catabolic signal. High-intensity RT performed before SD was beneficial in containing muscle loss induced by SD. It also minimized the catabolic signal and increased synthetic activity, thereby minimizing the body's weight loss. PMID:26513007

  11. Endocannabinoid Catabolic Enzymes Play Differential Roles in Thermal Homeostasis in Response to Environmental or Immune Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nass, Sara R; Long, Jonathan Z; Schlosburg, Joel E; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Lichtman, Aron H; Kinsey, Steven G

    2015-06-01

    Cannabinoid receptor agonists, such as Δ(9)-THC, the primary active constituent of Cannabis sativa, have anti-pyrogenic effects in a variety of assays. Recently, attention has turned to the endogenous cannabinoid system and how endocannabinoids, including 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and anandamide, regulate multiple homeostatic processes, including thermoregulation. Inhibiting endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes, monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) or fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), elevates levels of 2-AG or anandamide in vivo, respectively. The purpose of this experiment was to test the hypothesis that endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes function to maintain thermal homeostasis in response to hypothermic challenge. In separate experiments, male C57BL/6J mice were administered a MAGL or FAAH inhibitor, and then challenged with the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 2 mg/kg ip) or a cold (4 °C) ambient environment. Systemic LPS administration caused a significant decrease in core body temperature after 6 h, and this hypothermia persisted for at least 12 h. Similarly, cold environment induced mild hypothermia that resolved within 30 min. JZL184 exacerbated hypothermia induced by either LPS or cold challenge, both of which effects were blocked by rimonabant, but not SR144528, indicating a CB1 cannabinoid receptor mechanism of action. In contrast, the FAAH inhibitor, PF-3845, had no effect on either LPS-induced or cold-induced hypothermia. These data indicate that unlike direct acting cannabinoid receptor agonists, which elicit profound hypothermic responses on their own, neither MAGL nor FAAH inhibitors affect normal body temperature. However, these endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes play distinct roles in thermoregulation following hypothermic challenges. PMID:25715681

  12. Going Mobile?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tallon, Loic; Froes, Isabel Cristina G.

    2011-01-01

    If the future is mobile, how is the museum community developing within that future? What are the challenges museums face within it? In which directions should we be seeking to evolve our collective knowledge share? It was to gain observations on questions such as these that the 2011 Museums & Mob...... & Mobile survey was developed: 660 museum professionals responded. In this paper the authors highlight nine survey observations that they believe are important to the museum community’s increased understanding of and continued progress within mobile interpretation....

  13. Mobile museology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Rikke Haller

    selection of blog posts from the research project blog with three research articles: ‘Museum metamorphosis à la mode’, proposing a fashion perspective on ongoing museum developments; ‘Augmenting the agora: media and civic engagement in museums’, questioning the idea of social media holding a vital potential...... fashionable, the ephemeral, and towards an (ideal) state of change and changeability. This orientation is characterised with the triplet concepts of mobile, mobility, and mobilisation, as related to mobile media and movability; to ‘trans - museal’ mediation; and to the mobilisation of collections, audiences...

  14. Mobile Lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler Simonsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Users are already mobile, but the question is to which extent knowledge-based dictionary apps are designed for the mobile user situation. The objective of this article is to analyse the characteristics of the mobile user situation and to look further into the stationary user situation and the...... looked up the same five medical terms while walking around a hospital bed. The data collected during the two tests include external and internal recordings, think-aloud data and interview data. The data were analysed by means of the information scientific star model, cf. (Simonsen 2011:565), and it was...

  15. Regulation of fructose uptake and catabolism by succinate in Azospirillum brasilense.

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, A; S. Ghosh

    1987-01-01

    Fructose uptake and catabolism in Azospirillum brasilense is dependent on three fructose-inducible enzymes (fru-enzymes): (i) enzyme I and (ii) enzyme II of the phosphoenolpyruvate:fructose phosphotransferase system and (iii) 1-phosphofructokinase. In minimal medium containing 3.7 mM succinate and 22 mM fructose as sources of carbon, growth of A. brasilense was diauxic, succinate being utilized in the first phase of growth and fructose in the second phase with a lag period between the two gro...

  16. Developmental and hormonal regulation of gibberellin biosynthesis and catabolism in pea fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozga, Jocelyn A; Reinecke, Dennis M; Ayele, Belay T; Ngo, Phuong; Nadeau, Courtney; Wickramarathna, Aruna D

    2009-05-01

    In pea (Pisum sativum), normal fruit growth requires the presence of the seeds. The coordination of growth between the seed and ovary tissues involves phytohormones; however, the specific mechanisms remain speculative. This study further explores the roles of the gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis and catabolism genes during pollination and fruit development and in seed and auxin regulation of pericarp growth. Pollination and fertilization events not only increase pericarp PsGA3ox1 message levels (codes for GA 3-oxidase that converts GA(20) to bioactive GA(1)) but also reduce pericarp PsGA2ox1 mRNA levels (codes for GA 2-oxidase that mainly catabolizes GA(20) to GA(29)), suggesting a concerted regulation to increase levels of bioactive GA(1) following these events. 4-Chloroindole-3-acetic acid (4-Cl-IAA) was found to mimic the seeds in the stimulation of PsGA3ox1 and the repression of PsGA2ox1 mRNA levels as well as the stimulation of PsGA2ox2 mRNA levels (codes for GA 2-oxidase that mainly catabolizes GA(1) to GA(8)) in pericarp at 2 to 3 d after anthesis, while the other endogenous pea auxin, IAA, did not. This GA gene expression profile suggests that both seeds and 4-Cl-IAA can stimulate the production, as well as modulate the half-life, of bioactive GA(1), leading to initial fruit set and subsequent growth and development of the ovary. Consistent with these gene expression profiles, deseeded pericarps converted [(14)C]GA(12) to [(14)C]GA(1) only if treated with 4-Cl-IAA. These data further support the hypothesis that 4-Cl-IAA produced in the seeds is transported to the pericarp, where it differentially regulates the expression of pericarp GA biosynthesis and catabolism genes to modulate the level of bioactive GA(1) required for initial fruit set and growth. PMID:19297588

  17. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of a Ureidoglycine Aminotransferase in the Klebsiella pneumoniae Uric Acid Catabolic Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E. (Cornell)

    2010-09-03

    Many plants, fungi, and bacteria catabolize allantoin as a mechanism for nitrogen assimilation. Recent reports have shown that in plants and some bacteria the product of hydrolysis of allantoin by allantoinase is the unstable intermediate ureidoglycine. While this molecule can spontaneously decay, genetic analysis of some bacterial genomes indicates that an aminotransferase may be present in the pathway. Here we present evidence that Klebsiella pneumoniae HpxJ is an aminotransferase that preferentially converts ureidoglycine and an {alpha}-keto acid into oxalurate and the corresponding amino acid. We determined the crystal structure of HpxJ, allowing us to present an explanation for substrate specificity.

  18. Microwave heating of arginine yields highly fluorescent nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippidis, Aggelos [Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (Greece); Stefanakis, Dimitrios [University of Crete, Department of Chemistry (Greece); Anglos, Demetrios, E-mail: anglos@iesl.forth.gr [Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (Greece); Ghanotakis, Demetrios, E-mail: ghanotakis@chemistry.uoc.gr [University of Crete, Department of Chemistry (Greece)

    2013-01-15

    Brightly fluorescent nanoparticles were produced via a single-step, single-precursor procedure based on microwave heating of an aqueous solution of the amino acid arginine. Key structural and optical properties of the resulting Arg nanoparticles, Arg-dots, are reported and discussed with emphasis on the pH dependence of their fluorescence emission. The surface of the Arg-dots was functionalised through coupling to folic acid, opening up ways for connecting fluorescent nanoparticles to cancer cells. The generality and versatility of the microwave heating procedure was further demonstrated by the synthesis of different types of carbon nanoparticles, such as CE-dots, that were produced by use of citric acid and ethanolamine as precursors and compared to the Arg-dots.

  19. Microwave heating of arginine yields highly fluorescent nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brightly fluorescent nanoparticles were produced via a single-step, single-precursor procedure based on microwave heating of an aqueous solution of the amino acid arginine. Key structural and optical properties of the resulting Arg nanoparticles, Arg-dots, are reported and discussed with emphasis on the pH dependence of their fluorescence emission. The surface of the Arg-dots was functionalised through coupling to folic acid, opening up ways for connecting fluorescent nanoparticles to cancer cells. The generality and versatility of the microwave heating procedure was further demonstrated by the synthesis of different types of carbon nanoparticles, such as CE-dots, that were produced by use of citric acid and ethanolamine as precursors and compared to the Arg-dots.

  20. Polymerization on the rocks: beta-amino acids and arginine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have studied the accumulation of long oligomers of beta-amino acids on the surface of minerals using the 'polymerization on the rocks' protocol. We find that long oligopeptides of beta-glutamic acid which cannot be formed in homogeneous aqueous solution are accumulated efficiently on the surface of hydroxylapatite using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as condensing agent. The EDAC-induced oligomerization of aspartic acid on hydroxylapatite proceeds even more efficiently. Hydroxylapatite can also facilitate the ligation of the tripeptide (glu)3. The 'polymerization on the rocks' scenario is not restricted to negatively-charged amino acids. Oligoarginines are accumulated on the surface of illite using carbonyldiimidizole (CDI) as condensing agent. We find that FeS2 catalyzes the CDI-induced oligomerization of arginine, although it does not adsorb oligoarginines. These results are relevant to the formation of polypeptides on the primitive earth.

  1. Haloarchaeal Protein Translocation via the Twin Arginine Translocation Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohlschroder Mechthild

    2009-02-03

    Protein transport across hydrophobic membranes that partition cellular compartments is essential in all cells. The twin arginine translocation (Tat) pathway transports proteins across the prokaryotic cytoplasmic membranes. Distinct from the universally conserved Sec pathway, which secretes unfolded proteins, the Tat machinery is unique in that it secretes proteins in a folded conformation, making it an attractive pathway for the transport and secretion of heterologously expressed proteins that are Sec-incompatible. During the past 7 years, the DOE-supported project has focused on the characterization of the diversity of bacterial and archaeal Tat substrates as well as on the characterization of the Tat pathway of a model archaeon, Haloferax volcanii, a member of the haloarchaea. We have demonstrated that H. volcanii uses this pathway to transport most of its secretome.

  2. Mobile Commerce

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Cristina Enache

    2016-01-01

    Mobile commerce, or m-commerce, refers to the use of wireless digital devices to enable transactions on the Web. Described more fully in Chapter 3, m-commerce involves the use of wireless networks to connect cell phones, handheld devices such Blackberries, and personal computers to the Web. Once connected, mobile consumers can conduct transactions, including stock trades, in-store price comparisons, banking, travel reservations, and more.

  3. The genomes of the South American opossum (Monodelphis domestica) and platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) encode a more complete purine catabolic pathway than placental mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Keebaugh, Alaine C.; Thomas, James W.

    2009-01-01

    The end product of purine catabolism varies amongst vertebrates and is a consequence of independent gene inactivation events that have truncated the purine catabolic pathway. Mammals have traditionally been grouped into two classes based on their end product of purine catabolism: most mammals, whose end product is allantoin due to an ancient loss of allantoinase (ALLN), and the hominoids, whose end product is uric acid due to recent inactivations of urate oxidase (UOX). However little is know...

  4. Arginine becomes an essential amino acid after massive resection of rat small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Y; Yamada, E; Yoshida, T; Takahashi, H

    1994-12-23

    We compared effects of feeding arginine- and/or proline- deficient diets (-Arg, -Pro, and -Arg, Pro) with those of a complete diet (Complete) in rats whose small intestine had been massively resected. After 4 weeks, the rats fed -Arg and -Arg, Pro lost weight (a mean of 28 and 32 g, respectively), whereas those fed Complete and -Pro gained 80 and 58 g, respectively. The average nitrogen balance was about 117,100, -20 and -14 mg/day for Complete, -Pro, -Arg, and -Arg, Pro diets, respectively. The concentration of arginine in skeletal muscle was about 310, 330, 91, and 65 nmol/g for Complete, -Pro, -Arg, and -Arg, Pro, respectively; while plasma arginine concentration averaged 95, 107, 56, and 46 microM, respectively. The weight loss, the negative nitrogen balance, and the markedly reduced arginine concentration in the muscle observed in rats fed -Arg and -Arg, Pro clearly indicate that arginine becomes a strictly essential amino acid in the rats with massive resection of the small intestine. However, sufficient proline can be synthesized from arginine in tissues such as the liver and kidney in the absence of the small intestine. Plasma glutamine, citrulline in the muscle and plasma, urinary excretion of orotic acid and nitrate (to assess nitric oxide formation from arginine) were also measured, and the changes in these metabolites are discussed. PMID:7798273

  5. One-pot green synthesis of biocompatible arginine-stabilized magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Zhongjun; Zhu Hui; Wang Xiaolei; Yang Fan; Yang Xiurong, E-mail: xryang@ciac.jl.c [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin, 130022 (China)

    2009-11-18

    A green one-step approach has been developed for the synthesis of amino-functionalized magnetite nanoparticles. The synthesis was accomplished by simply mixing FeCl{sub 2} with arginine under ambient conditions. It was found that the Fe{sup 2+}/arginine molar ratio, reaction duration and temperature greatly influence the size, morphology and composition of magnetic nanoparticles. The arginine-stabilized magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The results show that the prepared nanoparticles are spherically shaped with a nearly uniform size distribution and pure magnetite phase. The presence of arginine on the magnetic nanoparticle surface has been confirmed and the amount of surface arginine varies with the Fe{sup 2+}/arginine molar ratio. The surface amine densities are calculated to be 5.60 and 7.84 {mu}mol mg{sup -1} for magnetic nanoparticles prepared at 1:1 and 1:2 Fe{sup 2+}/arginine molar ratio, respectively. The as-synthesized nanoparticles show superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature and good solubility in water. In addition, using a similar synthesis procedure, we have been able to synthesize superparamagnetic manganese and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  6. One-pot green synthesis of biocompatible arginine-stabilized magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A green one-step approach has been developed for the synthesis of amino-functionalized magnetite nanoparticles. The synthesis was accomplished by simply mixing FeCl2 with arginine under ambient conditions. It was found that the Fe2+/arginine molar ratio, reaction duration and temperature greatly influence the size, morphology and composition of magnetic nanoparticles. The arginine-stabilized magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The results show that the prepared nanoparticles are spherically shaped with a nearly uniform size distribution and pure magnetite phase. The presence of arginine on the magnetic nanoparticle surface has been confirmed and the amount of surface arginine varies with the Fe2+/arginine molar ratio. The surface amine densities are calculated to be 5.60 and 7.84 μmol mg-1 for magnetic nanoparticles prepared at 1:1 and 1:2 Fe2+/arginine molar ratio, respectively. The as-synthesized nanoparticles show superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature and good solubility in water. In addition, using a similar synthesis procedure, we have been able to synthesize superparamagnetic manganese and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  7. The effect of L-arginine on guinea-pig and rabbit airway smooth muscle function in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Perez A.C.; Paul W.; Harrison S.; Page C.P.; Spina D.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of L-arginine, D-arginine and L-lysine on airway smooth muscle responsiveness to spasmogens in vitro. Both L-arginine and D-arginine (100 mM) significantly reduced the contractile potency and maximal contractile response to histamine but not to methacholine or potassium chloride in guinea-pig epithelium-denuded isolated trachea. Similarly, the contractile response to histamine was significantly reduced by L-arginine (100 mM) in rabbit epithelium-denuded isolat...

  8. The genomes of the South American opossum (Monodelphis domestica) and platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) encode a more complete purine catabolic pathway than placental mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keebaugh, Alaine C; Thomas, James W

    2009-09-01

    The end product of purine catabolism varies amongst vertebrates and is a consequence of independent gene inactivation events that have truncated the purine catabolic pathway. Mammals have traditionally been grouped into two classes based on their end product of purine catabolism: most mammals, whose end product is allantoin due to an ancient loss of allantoinase (ALLN), and the hominoids, whose end product is uric acid due to recent inactivations of urate oxidase (UOX). However little is known about purine catabolism in marsupials and monotremes. Here we report the results of a comparative genomics study designed to characterize the purine catabolic pathway in a marsupial, the South American opossum (Monodelphis domestica), and a monotreme, the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus). We found that both genomes encode a more complete set of genes for purine catabolism than do eutherians and conclude that a near complete purine catabolic pathway was present in the common ancestor of all mammals, and that the loss of ALLN is specific to placental mammals. Our results therefore provide a revised history for gene loss in the purine catabolic pathway and suggest that marsupials and monotremes represent a third class of mammals with respect to their end products of purine catabolism. PMID:20161190

  9. Hepatic adaptation compensates inactivation of intestinal arginine biosynthesis in suckling mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Marion

    Full Text Available Suckling mammals, including mice, differ from adults in the abundant expression of enzymes that synthesize arginine from citrulline in their enterocytes. To investigate the importance of the small-intestinal arginine synthesis for whole-body arginine production in suckling mice, we floxed exon 13 of the argininosuccinate synthetase (Ass gene, which codes for a key enzyme in arginine biosynthesis, and specifically and completely ablated Ass in enterocytes by crossing Ass (fl and Villin-Cre mice. Unexpectedly, Ass (fl/fl /VilCre (tg/- mice showed no developmental impairments. Amino-acid fluxes across the intestine, liver, and kidneys were calculated after determining the blood flow in the portal vein, and hepatic and renal arteries (86%, 14%, and 33%, respectively, of the transhepatic blood flow in 14-day-old mice. Relative to control mice, citrulline production in the splanchnic region of Ass (fl/fl /VilCre (tg/- mice doubled, while arginine production was abolished. Furthermore, the net production of arginine and most other amino acids in the liver of suckling control mice declined to naught or even changed to consumption in Ass (fl/fl /VilCre (tg/- mice, and had, thus, become remarkably similar to that of post-weaning wild-type mice, which no longer express arginine-biosynthesizing enzymes in their small intestine. The adaptive changes in liver function were accompanied by an increased expression of genes involved in arginine metabolism (Asl, Got1, Gpt2, Glud1, Arg1, and Arg2 and transport (Slc25a13, Slc25a15, and Slc3a2, whereas no such changes were found in the intestine. Our findings suggest that the genetic premature deletion of arginine synthesis in enterocytes causes a premature induction of the post-weaning pattern of amino-acid metabolism in the liver.

  10. Genetic analysis of phenylacetic acid catabolism in Arthrobacter oxydans CECT386.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Llorens, Juana María; Drzyzga, Oliver; Perera, Julián

    2008-07-01

    Arthrobacter oxydans CECT386 is a Gram-positive bacterium able to use either phenylacetic acid or phenylacetaldehyde as the sole carbon and energy source for aerobic growth. Genes responsible for the catabolism of these compounds have been located at two chromosomal regions and were organized in one isolated paaN gene and two putative paa operons, one consisting of the paaD, paaF, tetR and prot genes, and one consisting of the paaG, paaH, paaI, paaJ, paaK and paaB genes. The identity of the paaF and paaN genes was supported by functional complementation experiments. A comparison with the paa catabolic genes and/or gene clusters of other bacteria that degrade these aromatic compounds is presented. The results of this study broaden the knowledge regarding the range of metabolic potential of this strain and eventually make it attractive for environmental applications. PMID:18437357

  11. Empagliflozin, via Switching Metabolism Toward Lipid Utilization, Moderately Increases LDL Cholesterol Levels Through Reduced LDL Catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briand, François; Mayoux, Eric; Brousseau, Emmanuel; Burr, Noémie; Urbain, Isabelle; Costard, Clément; Mark, Michael; Sulpice, Thierry

    2016-07-01

    In clinical trials, a small increase in LDL cholesterol has been reported with sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. The mechanisms by which the SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin increases LDL cholesterol levels were investigated in hamsters with diet-induced dyslipidemia. Compared with vehicle, empagliflozin 30 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks significantly reduced fasting blood glucose by 18%, with significant increase in fasting plasma LDL cholesterol, free fatty acids, and total ketone bodies by 25, 49, and 116%, respectively. In fasting conditions, glycogen hepatic levels were further reduced by 84% with empagliflozin, while 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity and total cholesterol hepatic levels were 31 and 10% higher, respectively (both P empagliflozin. Importantly, none of these parameters were changed by empagliflozin in fed conditions. Empagliflozin significantly reduced the catabolism of (3)H-cholesteryl oleate-labeled LDL injected intravenously by 20%, indicating that empagliflozin raises LDL levels through reduced catabolism. Unexpectedly, empagliflozin also reduced intestinal cholesterol absorption in vivo, which led to a significant increase in LDL- and macrophage-derived cholesterol fecal excretion (both P empagliflozin, by switching energy metabolism from carbohydrate to lipid utilization, moderately increases ketone production and LDL cholesterol levels. Interestingly, empagliflozin also reduces intestinal cholesterol absorption, which in turn promotes LDL- and macrophage-derived cholesterol fecal excretion. PMID:27207551

  12. Acetone formation in the Vibrio family: a new pathway for bacterial leucine catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemecek-Marshall, M; Wojciechowski, C; Wagner, W P; Fall, R

    1999-12-01

    There is current interest in biological sources of acetone, a volatile organic compound that impacts atmospheric chemistry. Here, we determined that leucine-dependent acetone formation is widespread in the Vibrionaceae. Sixteen Vibrio isolates, two Listonella species, and two Photobacterium angustum isolates produced acetone in the presence of L-leucine. Shewanella isolates produced much less acetone. Growth of Vibrio splendidus and P. angustum in a fermentor with controlled aeration revealed that acetone was produced after a lag in late logarithmic or stationary phase of growth, depending on the medium, and was not derived from acetoacetate by nonenzymatic decarboxylation in the medium. L-Leucine, but not D-leucine, was converted to acetone with a stoichiometry of approximately 0.61 mol of acetone per mol of L-leucine. Testing various potential leucine catabolites as precursors of acetone showed that only alpha-ketoisocaproate was efficiently converted by whole cells to acetone. Acetone production was blocked by a nitrogen atmosphere but not by electron transport inhibitors, suggesting that an oxygen-dependent reaction is required for leucine catabolism. Metabolic labeling with deuterated (isopropyl-d(7))-L-leucine revealed that the isopropyl carbons give rise to acetone with full retention of deuterium in each methyl group. These results suggest the operation of a new catabolic pathway for leucine in vibrios that is distinct from the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A pathway seen in pseudomonads. PMID:10601206

  13. The ygeW encoded protein from Escherichia coli is a knotted ancestral catabolic transcarbamylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yongdong; Jin, Zhongmin; Yu, Xiaolin; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang (Maryland); (GWU); (Georgia)

    2012-06-28

    Purine degradation plays an essential role in nitrogen metabolism in most organisms. Uric acid is the final product of purine catabolism in humans, anthropoid apes, birds, uricotelic reptiles, and almost all insects. Elevated levels of uric acid in blood (hyperuricemia) cause human diseases such as gout, kidney stones, and renal failure. Although no enzyme has been identified that further degrades uric acid in humans, it can be oxidized to produce allantoin by free-radical attack. Indeed, elevated levels of allantoin are found in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, chronic lung disease, bacterial meningitis, and noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In other mammals, some insects and gastropods, uric acid is enzymatically degraded to the more soluble allantoin through the sequential action of three enzymes: urate oxidase, 5-hydroxyisourate (HIU) hydrolase and 2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline (OHCU) decarboxylase. Therefore, an elective treatment for acute hyperuricemia is the administration of urate oxidase. Many organisms, including plants, some fungi and several bacteria, are able to catabolize allantoin to release nitrogen, carbon, and energy. In Arabidopsis thaliana and Eschrichia coli, S-allantoin has recently been shown to be degraded to glycolate and urea by four enzymes: allantoinase, allantoate amidohydrolase, ureidoglycine aminohydrolase, and ureidoglycolate amidohydrolase.

  14. Induced superficial chondrocyte death reduces catabolic cartilage damage in murine posttraumatic osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minjie; Mani, Sriniwasan B; He, Yao; Hall, Amber M; Xu, Lin; Li, Yefu; Zurakowski, David; Jay, Gregory D; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    Joints that have degenerated as a result of aging or injury contain dead chondrocytes and damaged cartilage. Some studies have suggested that chondrocyte death precedes cartilage damage, but how the loss of chondrocytes affects cartilage integrity is not clear. In this study, we examined whether chondrocyte death undermines cartilage integrity in aging and injury using a rapid 3D confocal cartilage imaging technique coupled with standard histology. We induced autonomous expression of diphtheria toxin to kill articular surface chondrocytes in mice and determined that chondrocyte death did not lead to cartilage damage. Moreover, cartilage damage after surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus of the knee was increased in mice with intact chondrocytes compared with animals whose chondrocytes had been killed, suggesting that chondrocyte death does not drive cartilage damage in response to injury. These data imply that chondrocyte catabolism, not death, contributes to articular cartilage damage following injury. Therefore, therapies targeted at reducing the catabolic phenotype may protect against degenerative joint disease. PMID:27427985

  15. Argininosuccinate synthetase regulates hepatic AMPK linking protein catabolism and ureagenesis to hepatic lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madiraju, Anila K; Alves, Tiago; Zhao, Xiaojian; Cline, Gary W; Zhang, Dongyan; Bhanot, Sanjay; Samuel, Varman T; Kibbey, Richard G; Shulman, Gerald I

    2016-06-14

    A key sensor of cellular energy status, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), interacts allosterically with AMP to maintain an active state. When active, AMPK triggers a metabolic switch, decreasing the activity of anabolic pathways and enhancing catabolic processes such as lipid oxidation to restore the energy balance. Unlike oxidative tissues, in which AMP is generated from adenylate kinase during states of high energy demand, the ornithine cycle enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) is a principle site of AMP generation in the liver. Here we show that ASS regulates hepatic AMPK, revealing a central role for ureagenesis flux in the regulation of metabolism via AMPK. Treatment of primary rat hepatocytes with amino acids increased gluconeogenesis and ureagenesis and, despite nutrient excess, induced both AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation. Antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of hepatic ASS1 expression in vivo decreased liver AMPK activation, phosphorylation of ACC, and plasma β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. Taken together these studies demonstrate that increased amino acid flux can activate AMPK through increased AMP generated by ASS, thus providing a novel link between protein catabolism, ureagenesis, and hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:27247419

  16. Characterization of a Unique Pathway for 4-Cresol Catabolism Initiated by Phosphorylation in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lei; Ma, Li; Qi, Feifei; Zheng, Xianliang; Jiang, Chengying; Li, Ailei; Wan, Xiaobo; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Li, Shengying

    2016-03-18

    4-Cresol is not only a significant synthetic intermediate for production of many aromatic chemicals, but also a priority environmental pollutant because of its toxicity to higher organisms. In our previous studies, a gene cluster implicated to be involved in 4-cresol catabolism, creCDEFGHIR, was identified in Corynebacterium glutamicum and partially characterized in vivo. In this work, we report on the discovery of a novel 4-cresol biodegradation pathway that employs phosphorylated intermediates. This unique pathway initiates with the phosphorylation of the hydroxyl group of 4-cresol, which is catalyzed by a novel 4-methylbenzyl phosphate synthase, CreHI. Next, a unique class I P450 system, CreJEF, specifically recognizes phosphorylated intermediates and successively oxidizes the aromatic methyl group into carboxylic acid functionality via alcohol and aldehyde intermediates. Moreover, CreD (phosphohydrolase), CreC (alcohol dehydrogenase), and CreG (aldehyde dehydrogenase) were also found to be required for efficient oxidative transformations in this pathway. Steady-state kinetic parameters (Km and kcat) for each catabolic step were determined, and these results suggest that kinetic controls serve a key role in directing the metabolic flux to the most energy effective route. PMID:26817843

  17. Extracellular nucleotide catabolism in human B and T lymphocytes. The source of adenosine production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extracellular nucleotide degradation was studied in intact human B and T lymphocyte subpopulations and in lymphoblastoid cell lines. Cells of B lymphocyte lineage showed high nucleotide degrading activity, whereas T lymphocytes were unable to degrade extracellular nucleotides. The external surface of B cells contained active sites of ecto-triphosphonucleotidase (ecto-ATPase), ecto-diphosphonucleotidase (ecto-ADPase), and ecto-monophosphonucleotidase (ecto-AMPase). The expression of all three ectoenzyme activities seemed closely associated with B cell development. ATPase and ADPase activities increase continuously during B cell maturation, ecto-AMPase activity, on the other hand, reaches maximal activity in late pre-B cells. These results combined with our previous studies of intracellular ATP catabolism provide evidence that extracellular ATP catabolism may represent exclusive source for adenosine in lymphocytes. It is suggested that adenosine may serve as a means of communication between B and T cells in lymphoid organs, B lymphocytes being the sole producers of adenosine and T lymphocytes being the recipients of this signal

  18. Mechanism of Allosteric Inhibition of N-Acetyl-L-glutamate Synthase by L-Arginine*

    OpenAIRE

    Min, Li; Jin, Zhongmin; Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2009-01-01

    N-Acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the first committed step in l-arginine biosynthesis in plants and micro-organisms and is subject to feedback inhibition by l-arginine. This study compares the crystal structures of NAGS from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (ngNAGS) in the inactive T-state with l-arginine bound and in the active R-state complexed with CoA and l-glutamate. Under all of the conditions examined, the enzyme consists of two stacked ...

  19. Use of tritiated prostaglandins in metabolism studies. II: Kinetic isotope effect: an useful tool to investigate catabolizing sequence of prostaglandins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well established that prostaglandin catabolism involves sequential actions of a 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase, a 15-keto-prostaglandin delta 13-reductase and a 15-ketoprostaglandin reductase. This pathway must be confirmed in never investigated tissues before any enzyme assay is carried out. We have developed a new, simple, rapid and reliable method to investigate catabolizing sequence of prostaglandins based on the tritium kinetic isotope effect which occurs during the oxidation of the 15-hydroxyl group of the prostaglandin into a 15-keto group

  20. Designing Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    practices. Everyday life mobilities take place in complex socio-technical systems where the over-layering of hard infrastructures, with design codes and protocols shapes the ‘mobile biotopes’ of the everyday life. By exploring the very tangible and concrete designs of for example everyday life transit...... spaces, mobilitiy technologies or urban sites of movement we get much closer to understanding the meaning of mobilities to social interaction and culture. The cases are still representing work-in-progress but will be reported in the book ‘Designing Mobilites’ (Jensen 2013b) and will cover the four cases...... of: motorway ecologies, bicycle systems design, urban shopping malls and a train transit hub....

  1. Mobile Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Monika Březinová; Michael Rost

    2009-01-01

    This article deals with one of the modern trends in marketing communication, which is mobile marketing. Towards the end of 2008, several projects which use mobile phones for target marketing communication were launched. Commercial SMS´s are sent on the base of agreement or registration of the consumers on special websites, for example hellomobil.cz. The benefit for the consumers is the bonus which can have more forms - not only sending money to the account, free SMS´s/MMS´s and minutes but al...

  2. Mobile Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Semerád, David

    2011-01-01

    The mobile app market is one of the fastest growing in the world. The Apple company has become the most valuated company in the world, mainly due to its App Store. Considering the fact, that nearly all the trends from abroad are soon or later adapted in the Czech Republic, there is quite a big potential value for all the projects on mobile apps including the local market specifics. The subject of this thesis is to consider whether such an app could be successful in such an old school environm...

  3. Synthesis, characterization and properties of L-arginine-passivated silver nanocolloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunatkari, A. L.; Talwatkar, S. S.; Tamgadge, Y. S.; Muley, G. G.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the effect of L-arginine-surface passivation on localised surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), size and stability of colloidal Silver Nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized by chemical reduction method. The surface Plasmon resonance absorption peak of AgNPs shows blue shift with the increase in L-arginine concentration. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis confirmed that the average size of AgNPs reduces from 10 nm to 6 nm as the concentration of L-Arginine increased from 1 to 5 mM. The X-ray diffraction study (XRD) confirmed the formation face-centred cubic (fcc) structured AgNPs. FT-IR studies revealed strong bonding between L-arginine functional groups and AgNPs.

  4. Streptococcus pneumoniae arginine synthesis genes promote growth and virulence in pneumococcal meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.R. Piet; M. Geldhoff; B.D.C. van Schaik; M.C. Brouwer; M. Valls Seron; M.E. Jakobs; K. Schipper; Y. Pannekoek; A.H. Zwinderman; T. van der Poll; A.H.C. van Kampen; F. Baas; A van der Ende; D. van de Beek

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a major human pathogen causing pneumonia, sepsis and bacterial meningitis. Using a clinical phenotype based approach with bacterial whole-genome sequencing we identified pneumococcal arginine biosynthesis genes to be associated with outcome in patients with

  5. L-Arginine and L-Glutamine as Immunonutrients and Modulating Agents for Erysipelothrix rusiopathiae Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijun Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available L-arginine and L-glutamine were not only building blocks of proteins and polypeptides but also important regulators of key metabolic pathways that were necessary for maintenance, growth, reproduction and immunity in organisms. These compelling findings convinced us that L-arginine and L-glutamine play a vital role in virus and bacterium infection. However, scientific literature about its role on Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae (E. rhusiopathiae infection was unavailable. Thus, this study was conduct to research the effect of dietary L-arginine and L-glutamine supplementation on E. rhusiopathiae infection. According to the exciting results, researchers concluded that dietary L-arginine and L-glutamine supplementation ameliorated the cytokines profile and blood parameters and delayed the development process of E. rhusiopathiae infection in mouse model.

  6. Thermal, FT–IR and SHG efficiency studies of L-arginine doped KDP crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K D Parikh; D J Dave; B B Parekh; M J Joshi

    2007-04-01

    Potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) is a well known nonlinear optical (NLO) material with different applications. Since most of the amino acids exhibit NLO property, it is of interest to dope them in KDP. In the present study, amino acid L-arginine was doped in KDP. The doping of L-arginine was confirmed by FT–IR and paper chromatography. Thermogravimetry suggested that as the amount of doping increases the thermal stability decreases as well as the value of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters decreases. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of L-arginine doped KDP crystals was found to be increasing with doping concentration of L-arginine. The results are discussed here.

  7. Resveratrol inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi arginine kinase and exerts a trypanocidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera Vera, Edward A; Sayé, Melisa; Reigada, Chantal; Damasceno, Flávia S; Silber, Ariel M; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2016-06-01

    Arginine kinase catalyzes the reversible transphosphorylation between ADP and phosphoarginine which plays a critical role in the maintenance of cellular energy homeostasis. Arginine kinase from the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, meets the requirements to be considered as a potential therapeutic target for rational drug design including being absent in its mammalian hosts. In this study a group of polyphenolic compounds was evaluated as potential inhibitors of arginine kinase using molecular docking techniques. Among the analyzed compounds with the lowest free binding energy to the arginine kinase active site (market price; and (3) has as a well-defined target enzyme which is absent in the mammalian host, it is a promising compound as a trypanocidal drug for Chagas disease. PMID:26976067

  8. Inhibition of corrosion of carbon steel in well water by arginine-Zn2+ system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANTHONY SAMY SAHAYA RAJA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The environmental friendly inhibitor system arginine-Zn2+, has been investigated by weight-loss method. A synergistic effect exists between arginine and Zn2+ system. The formulation consisting of 250 ppm of arginine and 5 ppm of Zn2+ offers good inhibition efficiency of 98 %. Polarization study reveals that this formulation functions as an anodic inhibitor. AC impedance spectra reveal that a protective film is formed on the metal sur­face. The FTIR spectral study leads to the conclusion that the Fe2+- DL-arginine complex, formed on anodic sites of the metal surface, controls the anodic reaction. Zn(OH2 formed on the cathodic sites of the metal surface controls the cathodic reaction. The surface morphology and the roughness of the metal surface were analyzed with Atomic Force Microscope. A suitable mechanism of corrosion inhibition is proposed based on the results obtained from weight loss study and surface analysis technique.

  9. Large-Scale Identification of the Arginine Methylome by Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Nielsen, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    The attachment of one or more methylation groups to the side chain of arginine residues is a regulatory mechanism for cellular proteins. Recent advances in mass spectrometry-based characterization allow comprehensive identification of arginine methylation sites by peptide-level enrichment...... strategies. Described in this unit is a 4-day protocol for enrichment of arginine-methylated peptides and subsequent identification of thousands of distinct sites by mass spectrometry. Specifically, the protocol explains step-by-step sample preparation, enrichment using commercially available antibodies......, prefractionation using strong cation exchange, and identification using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. A strategy for relative quantification is described using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). Approaches for analysis of arginine methylation site occupancy...

  10. Metabolomic analysis of plasma and liver from surplus arginine fed Atlantic salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Synne M.; Assaad, Houssein I.; Lin, Gang; Wang, Junjun; Aksnes, Anders; Wu, Guoyao; Espe, Marit

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the metabolic effect of surplus arginine (36.1 g/kg dry matter) compared to a control diet with required arginine (21.1 g/kg dry matter) in adult Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). Although the feeding trial had no significant effect on growth, there were significant differences in the metabolite profile in both plasma and liver in experimental group as compared to the control group. There was increased concentrations of biliverdin, PGF-2 alpha, oxidized glutathione, selenocysteine, two monoacylglycerols and a tripeptide in the liver as well as decreased concentrations of valine and a vitamin D3 metabolite in plasma of arginine supplemented fish. These results indicate that while surplus arginine does not affect growth or body weight, it induces metabolic changes in Atlantic salmon. PMID:25553364

  11. A mass spectrometric method to determine activities of enzymes involved in polyamine catabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriya, Shunsuke; Iwasaki, Kaori [Department of Molecular Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, 2-1-6 Kami-kitazawa, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Samejima, Keijiro, E-mail: samejima-kj@igakuken.or.jp [Department of Molecular Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, 2-1-6 Kami-kitazawa, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Takao, Koichi [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Josai University, 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado, Saitama 350-0295 (Japan); Kohda, Kohfuku [Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Musashino University, 1-1-20 Shinmachi, Nishitokyo, Tokyo 202-8585 (Japan); Hiramatsu, Kyoko; Kawakita, Masao [Department of Molecular Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, 2-1-6 Kami-kitazawa, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan)

    2012-10-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds in polyamine catabolic pathway were determined by a column-free ESI-TOF MS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N{sup 1}- and N{sup 8}-acetylspermidine were determined by a column-free ESI-MS/MS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method was applied to determine activities of APAO, SMO, and SSAT in the pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The assay method contained stable isotope-labeled natural substrates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is applicable to biological samples containing natural substrate and product. - Abstract: An analytical method for the determination of three polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) and five acetylpolyamines [N{sup 1}-acetylspermidine (N{sup 1}AcSpd), N{sup 8}-acetylspermidine (N{sup 8}AcSpd), N{sup 1}-acetylspermine, N{sup 1},N{sup 8}-diacetylspermidine, and N{sup 1},N{sup 12}-diacetylspermine] involved in the polyamine catabolic pathway has been developed using a hybrid tandem mass spectrometer. Heptafluorobutyryl (HFB) derivatives of these compounds and respective internal standards labeled with stable isotopes were analyzed simultaneously by TOF MS, based on peak areas appearing at appropriate m/z values. The isomers, N{sup 1}AcSpd and N{sup 8}AcSpd were determined from their fragment ions, the acetylamidopropyl and acetylamidobutyl groups, respectively, using MS/MS with {sup 13}C{sub 2}-N{sup 1}AcSpd and {sup 13}C{sub 2}-N{sup 8}AcSpd which have the {sup 13}C{sub 2}-acetyl group as an internal standard. The TOF MS method was successfully applied to measure the activity of enzymes involved in polyamine catabolic pathways, namely N{sup 1}-acetylpolyamine oxidase (APAO), spermine oxidase (SMO), and spermidine/spermine N{sup 1}-acetyltransferase (SSAT). The following natural substrates and products labeled with stable isotopes considering the application to biological samples were identified; for APAO, [4,9,12-{sup 15}N{sub 3}]-N{sup 1}-acetylspermine and [1,4,8-{sup 15}N{sub 3

  12. Arginine metabolism by macrophages promotes cardiac and muscle fibrosis in mdx muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Wehling-Henricks

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common, lethal disease of childhood. One of 3500 new-born males suffers from this universally-lethal disease. Other than the use of corticosteroids, little is available to affect the relentless progress of the disease, leading many families to use dietary supplements in hopes of reducing the progression or severity of muscle wasting. Arginine is commonly used as a dietary supplement and its use has been reported to have beneficial effects following short-term administration to mdx mice, a genetic model of DMD. However, the long-term effects of arginine supplementation are unknown. This lack of knowledge about the long-term effects of increased arginine metabolism is important because elevated arginine metabolism can increase tissue fibrosis, and increased fibrosis of skeletal muscles and the heart is an important and potentially life-threatening feature of DMD. METHODOLOGY: We use both genetic and nutritional manipulations to test whether changes in arginase metabolism promote fibrosis and increase pathology in mdx mice. Our findings show that fibrotic lesions in mdx muscle are enriched with arginase-2-expressing macrophages and that muscle macrophages stimulated with cytokines that activate the M2 phenotype show elevated arginase activity and expression. We generated a line of arginase-2-null mutant mdx mice and found that the mutation reduced fibrosis in muscles of 18-month-old mdx mice, and reduced kyphosis that is attributable to muscle fibrosis. We also observed that dietary supplementation with arginine for 17-months increased mdx muscle fibrosis. In contrast, arginine-2 mutation did not reduce cardiac fibrosis or affect cardiac function assessed by echocardiography, although 17-months of dietary supplementation with arginine increased cardiac fibrosis. Long-term arginine treatments did not decrease matrix metalloproteinase-2 or -9 or increase the expression of utrophin, which have

  13. Tailored second line therapy in asthmatic children with the arginine-16 genotype

    OpenAIRE

    Lipworth, Brian J; Basu, Kaninika; Donald, Helen P; Tavendale, Roger; Macgregor, Donald F; Ogston, Simon A; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Mukhopadhyay, Somnath

    2012-01-01

    The arginine-16 beta-2 receptor genotype confers increased susceptibility to exacerbations in asthmatic children taking regular long acting beta-2 agonists. We therefore evaluated using montelukast as an alternative to salmeterol as tailored second line asthma controller therapy in children expressing this susceptible genotype. 62 persistent asthmatic children with the homozygous arginine-16 genotype were randomized to receive salmeterol 50ug bid or montelukast 5/10mg od as add on to inhaled ...

  14. Influence of in ovo injection of L-arginine on productive and physiological performance of quail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. K. Al–Hayani,

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of inoculation of different levels of L–arginine into eggs of 0-day-old quail embryos. On 0 day of incubation, 480 eggs (120 for each treatment group were injected with 0% arginine (C group; 1% arginine (T1; 2% arginine (T2; or 3% arginine (T3. After hatching, 336 quail chicks (84 chicks produced from each in ovo injection treatment were placed in an experimental quail house and distributed into 4 treatment groups of 3 replicates each with 16 quail chicks for each replicate. Traits determined in this study were hatchability rate, initial body weight (7 days of age, final body weight (42 days old, feed intake, weight gain, feed conversion ratio, proportional weights of carcass, breast, legs, back bone, wings, neck, abdominal fat, liver, heart, and gizzard, blood serum glucose, protein, cholesterol, total lipids, triglycerides, calcium and phosphorus and Results revealed that in ovo injection with different levels of L–arginine on 0 day of incubation resulted in significant increase (P≤0.05 in hatchability rate, initial body weight, final body weight, feed conversion ratio and serum glucose, protein, total protein, calcium, phosphorus and proportional weights of carcass, breast, legs, liver, heart, and gizzard and significant decrease (P≤0.05 in serum cholesterol, total lipids, triglycerides and proportional weight of back bone, wings and abdominal fat. In conclusion, the inoculation of different levels of L–arginine into eggs of 0–day–old quail embryos especially at the levels of 2% and 3% resulted in significant improvement in productive and physiological performance of quail. Hence in ovo injection with L–arginine could be used as a beneficial tool for enhance productive performance of quail.

  15. Arginine and pyrimidine biosynthetic defects in Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains isolated from patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Shinners, E N; Catlin, B W

    1982-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains with nutritional requirements that include arginine (Arg-), uracil (Ura-), and hypoxanthine have attracted attention because of their tendency to cause disseminated infections, as a basis for genetic studies of arginine and pyrimidine biosynthesis, we examined the activities of four enzymes of these pathways in cell-free extracts of both prototrophic and Arg- Ura- strains. Activities of glutamate acetyltransferase, aspartate transcarbamylase, and orotate phosphor...

  16. Genetic and biochemical characterization of arginine biosynthesis in Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Victor M; Girard, Lourdes; Hernández-Lucas, Ismael; Vázquez, Alejandra; Ortíz-Ortíz, Catalina; Díaz, Rafael; Dunn, Michael F

    2015-08-01

    L-Ornithine production in the alfalfa microsymbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti occurs as an intermediate step in arginine biosynthesis. Ornithine is required for effective symbiosis but its synthesis in S. meliloti has been little studied. Unlike most bacteria, S. meliloti 1021 is annotated as encoding two enzymes producing ornithine: N-acetylornithine (NAO) deacetylase (ArgE) hydrolyses NAO to acetate and ornithine, and glutamate N-acetyltransferase (ArgJ) transacetylates l-glutamate with the acetyl group from NAO, forming ornithine and N-acetylglutamate (NAG). NAG is the substrate for the second step of arginine biosynthesis catalysed by NAG kinase (ArgB). Inactivation of argB in strain 1021 resulted in arginine auxotrophy. The activity of purified ArgB was significantly inhibited by arginine but not by ornithine. The purified ArgJ was highly active in NAO deacetylation/glutamate transacetylation and was significantly inhibited by ornithine but not by arginine. The purified ArgE protein (with a 6His-Sumo affinity tag) was also active in deacetylating NAO. argE and argJ single mutants, and an argEJ double mutant, are arginine prototrophs. Extracts of the double mutant contained aminoacylase (Ama) activity that deacetylated NAO to form ornithine. The purified products of three candidate ama genes (smc00682 (hipO1), smc02256 (hipO2) and smb21279) all possessed NAO deacetylase activity. hipO1 and hipO2, but not smb21279, expressed in trans functionally complemented an Escherichia coli ΔargE : : Km mutant. We conclude that Ama activity accounts for the arginine prototrophy of the argEJ mutant. Transcriptional assays of argB, argE and argJ, fused to a promoterless gusA gene, showed that their expression was not significantly affected by exogenous arginine or ornithine. PMID:26271664

  17. Chiral pharmacokinetics and inversion of NG-nitro-arginine in the rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-feiXIN; RuiTONG; YangFANG; Xiang-junZHOU; Yong-xiangWANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore pharmacokinetics of NG-nitro-D-arginine (D-NNA) and NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) in conscious rats.METHODS: The plasma concentration of D-NNA and L-NNA were determined by chiral ligand exchange method with capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using non-compartment model and were fitted using a computer program DAS. Chiral inversion rate of D-NNA to L-

  18. Arginine intake and risk of coronary heart disease mortality in elderly men

    OpenAIRE

    Oomen, C.M.; Erk, van, M.J.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kromhout, D.

    2000-01-01

    From experimental studies, the hypothesis is derived that the amino acid arginine, the precursor of NO, could restore the impaired endothelial function and increased platelet activation observed in atherosclerosis. We investigated whether dietary intake of arginine is associated with reduced coronary heart disease risk in elderly persons. The study population consisted of 806 men aged 64 to 84 years at baseline who participated in the Zutphen Elderly Study, a population-based cohort followed ...

  19. L-Arginine but not L-glutamine likely increases exogenous carbohydrate oxidation during endurance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, David S; Clarke, Jim; Green, Jackson G; Shi, Xiaocai

    2012-07-01

    The addition of L-arginine or L-glutamine to glucose-electrolyte solutions can increase intestinal water, glucose, and sodium absorption in rats and humans. We evaluated the utility of L-arginine and L-glutamine in energy-rehydration beverages through assessment of exogenous glucose oxidation and perceptions of exertion and gastrointestinal distress during endurance exercise. Eight cyclists rode 150 min at 50% of peak power on four occasions while ingesting solutions at a rate of 150 mL 15 min(-1) that contained (13)C-enriched glucose (266 mmol L(-1)) and sodium citrate ([Na(+)] 60 mmol L(-1)), and either: 4.25 mmol L(-1) L-arginine or 45 mmol L(-1) L-glutamine, and as controls glucose only or no glucose. Relative to glucose only, L-arginine invoked a likely 12% increase in exogenous glucose oxidation (90% confidence limits: ± 8%); however, the effect of L-glutamine was possibly trivial (4.5 ± 7.3%). L-Arginine also led to very likely small reductions in endogenous fat oxidation rate relative to glucose (12 ± 4%) and L-glutamine (14 ± 4%), and relative to no glucose, likely reductions in exercise oxygen consumption (2.6 ± 1.5%) and plasma lactate concentration (0.20 ± 0.16 mmol L(-1)). Effects on endogenous and total carbohydrate oxidation were inconsequential. Compared with glucose only, L-arginine and L-glutamine caused likely small-moderate effect size increases in perceptions of stomach fullness, abdominal cramp, exertion, and muscle tiredness during exercise. Addition of L-arginine to a glucose and electrolyte solution increases the oxidation of exogenous glucose and decreases the oxygen cost of exercise, although the mechanisms responsible and impact on endurance performance require further investigation. However, L-arginine also increases subjective feelings of gastrointestinal distress, which may attenuate its other benefits. PMID:22048324

  20. Structural organization of the rat gene for the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin precursor

    OpenAIRE

    Schmale, H.; Heinsohn, S; Richter, D

    1983-01-01

    The rat arginine vasopressin-neurophysin precursor gene has been isolated from a genomic library cloned in lambda phage Charon 4A. Restriction mapping and nucleotide sequence analysis demonstrated that the gene is 1.85 kilobase pairs long and contains two intervening sequences located in the protein coding region. Exon A encodes a putative signal peptide, the hormone arginine vasopressin and the variable N terminus of the carrier protein neurophysin, exon B encodes the highly conserved middle...

  1. PRE-EXERCISE ARGININE SUPPLEMENTATION INCREASES TIME TO EXHAUSTION IN ELITE MALE WRESTLERS

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Dietary supplements containing arginine are among the most popular ergogenics intended to enhance strength, power and muscle recovery associated with both anaerobic and aerobic exercise. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible effect of pre-exercise acute intake of arginine on performance and exercise metabolism during incremental exhaustive exercise in elite male wrestlers. Nine volunteer elite male wrestlers (24.7±3.8 years) participated in this study. The test-retest prot...

  2. Nonspecific blockade of vascular free radical signals by methylated arginine analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Methylated arginine analogues are often used as probes of the effect of nitric oxide; however, their specificity is unclear and seems to be frequently overestimated. This study analyzed the effects of NG-methyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA on the endothelium-dependent release of vascular superoxide radicals triggered by increased flow. Plasma ascorbyl radical signals measured by direct electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in 25 rabbits increased by 3.8 ± 0.7 nmol/l vs baseline (28.7 ± 1.4 nmol/l, P<0.001 in response to papaverine-induced flow increases of 121 ± 12%. In contrast, after similar papaverine-induced flow increases simultaneously with L-NMMA infusions, ascorbyl levels were not significantly changed compared to baseline. Similar results were obtained in isolated rabbit aortas perfused ex vivo with the spin trap a-phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (N = 22. However, in both preparations, this complete blockade was not reversed by co-infusion of excess L-arginine and was also obtained by N-methyl-D-arginine, thus indicating that it is not related to nitric oxide synthase. L-arginine alone was ineffective, as previously demonstrated for NG-methyl-L-arginine ester (L-NAME. In vitro, neither L-arginine nor its analogues scavenged superoxide radicals. This nonspecific activity of methylated arginine analogues underscores the need for careful controls in order to assess nitric oxide effects, particularly those related to interactions with active oxygen species.

  3. Abnormal mitochondrial L-arginine transport contributes to the pathogenesis of heart failure and rexoygenation injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Williams

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Impaired mitochondrial function is fundamental feature of heart failure (HF and myocardial ischemia. In addition to the effects of heightened oxidative stress, altered nitric oxide (NO metabolism, generated by a mitochondrial NO synthase, has also been proposed to impact upon mitochondrial function. However, the mechanism responsible for arginine transport into mitochondria and the effect of HF on such a process is unknown. We therefore aimed to characterize mitochondrial L-arginine transport and to investigate the hypothesis that impaired mitochondrial L-arginine transport plays a key role in the pathogenesis of heart failure and myocardial injury. METHODS AND RESULTS: In mitochondria isolated from failing hearts (sheep rapid pacing model and mouse Mst1 transgenic model we demonstrated a marked reduction in L-arginine uptake (p<0.05 and p<0.01 respectively and expression of the principal L-arginine transporter, CAT-1 (p<0.001, p<0.01 compared to controls. This was accompanied by significantly lower NO production and higher 3-nitrotyrosine levels (both p<0.05. The role of mitochondrial L-arginine transport in modulating cardiac stress responses was examined in cardiomyocytes with mitochondrial specific overexpression of CAT-1 (mtCAT1 exposed to hypoxia-reoxygenation stress. mtCAT1 cardiomyocytes had significantly improved mitochondrial membrane potential, respiration and ATP turnover together with significantly decreased reactive oxygen species production and cell death following mitochondrial stress. CONCLUSION: These data provide new insights into the role of L-arginine transport in mitochondrial biology and cardiovascular disease. Augmentation of mitochondrial L-arginine availability may be a novel therapeutic strategy for myocardial disorders involving mitochondrial stress such as heart failure and reperfusion injury.

  4. Relationships between PSII-independent hydrogen bioproduction and starch metabolism as evidenced from isolation of starch catabolism mutants in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochois, Vincent; Constans, Laure; Beyly, Audrey; Soliveres, Melanie; Peltier, Gilles; Cournac, Laurent [CEA, DSV, IBEB, Laboratoire de Bioenergetique et Biotechnologie des Bacteries and Microalgues, Saint Paul Lez Durance, F-13108 (France); CNRS, UMR Biologie Vegetale and Microbiologie Environnementales, Saint Paul lez Durance, F-13108 (France); Aix-Marseille Universite, Saint Paul lez Durance, F-13108 (France); Dauvillee, David; Ball, Steven [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); USTL, UGSF, F-59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); CNRS, UMR 8576, F-59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2010-10-15

    Sulfur deprivation, which is considered as an efficient way to trigger long-term hydrogen photoproduction in unicellular green algae has two major effects: a decrease in PSII which allows anaerobiosis to be reached and carbohydrate (starch) storage. Starch metabolism has been proposed as one of the major factors of hydrogen production, particularly during the PSII-independent (or indirect) pathway. While starch biosynthesis has been characterized in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, little remains known concerning starch degradation. In order to gain a better understanding of starch catabolism pathways and identify those steps likely to limit the starch-dependent hydrogen production, we have designed a genetic screening procedure aimed at isolating mutants of the green alga C. reinhardtii affected in starch mobilization. Using two different screening protocols, the first one based on aerobic starch degradation in the dark and the second one on anaerobic starch degradation in the light, eighteen mutants were isolated among a library of 15,000 insertion mutants, eight (std1-8) with the first screen and ten (sda1-10) with the second. Most of the mutant strains isolated in this study showed a reduction or a delay in the PSII-independent hydrogen production. Further characterization of these mutants should allow the identification of molecular determinants of starch-dependent hydrogen production and supply targets for future biotechnological improvements. (author)

  5. Cysteine and arginine-rich peptides as molecular carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Amir Nasrolahi; El-Sayed, Naglaa Salem; Mandal, Dindayal; Tiwari, Rakesh K; Tavakoli, Kathy; Etesham, Matthew; Parang, Keykavous

    2016-01-15

    A number of linear and cyclic peptides containing alternative arginine and cysteine residues, namely linear (CR)3, linear (CR)4, linear (CR)5, cyclic [CR]4, and cyclic [CR]5, were synthesized. The peptides were evaluated for their ability to deliver two molecular cargos, fluorescence-labeled cell-impermeable negatively charged phosphopeptide (F'-GpYEEI) and fluorescence-labeled lamivudine (F'-3TC), intracellularly in human leukemia cancer (CCRF-CEM) cells. We investigated the role of cyclization and the number of amino acids in improving the transporting ability of the peptides. The flow cytometry studies suggested that the synthesized peptides were able to work efficiently as transporters for both cargos. Among all compounds, cyclic [CR]4 was found to be the most efficient peptide in transporting the cargo into cells. For instance, the cellular uptake of F'-3TC (5μM) and F'-GpYEEI (5μM) was enhanced by 16- and 20-fold, respectively, in the presence of cyclic [CR]4 compared to that of the parent compound alone. The mechanism of F'-GpYEEI uptake by cells was found to be energy-independent. The results showed that the number of amino acids and their cyclic nature can impact the efficiency of the peptide in transporting the molecular cargos. PMID:26631317

  6. Urinary and metabolic clearances of arginine vasopressin in normal subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthetic arginine vasopressin (AVP) was infused into 11 hydrated normal subjects at five different infusion rates ranging from 10 to 350 μU kg-1 min-1. Each infusion rate was continued for 1 h, and urinary determinations were made on the 30- to 60-min specimens during which time there was no further rise in plasma AVP. Urinary AVP concentrations (μU/ml) and excretion rates (μU/min) increased linearly with increasing infusion rates, and the concentration of AVP in urine increased 120 times more rapid than plasma. Urinary and metabolic clearances of AVP also increased linearly with the maximum urinary clearance being 60.6% of the creatinine clearance. The total metabolic clearance of AVP (including urinary clearance) was 17.8 times that of the urinary clearance of AVP alone. These data clarify the relationships between plasma and urinary AVP in normal hydrated subjects during AVP infusion under steady-state conditions and emphasize the potential advantage of measuring urinary AVP as a monitor of endogenous AVP secretion. AVP was measured by radioimmunoassay

  7. tlpA gene expression is required for arginine and bicarbonate chemotaxis in Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar A Cerda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available About half of the human population is infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium causing gastritis, peptic ulcer and progression to gastric cancer. Chemotaxis and flagellar motility are required for colonization and persistence of H. pylori in the gastric mucus layer. It is not completely clear which chemical gradients are used by H. pylori to maintain its position. TlpA, a chemotaxis receptor for arginine/ bicarbonate, has been identified. This study aimed to find out whether tlpA gene expression is required for the chemotactic response to arginine/bicarbonate. Wild-type motile H. pylori ATCC 700392 and H. pylori ATCC 43504, a strain having an interrupted tlpA gene, were used. Also, a tlpA-knockout mutant of H. pylori 700392 (H. pylori 700-tlpA::cat was produced by homologous recombination. Expression of tlpA was assessed by a Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR assay. Chemotaxis was measured as a Relative Chemotaxis Response (RCR by a modified capillary assay. H. pylori 700392 presented chemotaxis to arginine and sodium bicarbonate. H. pylori 700-tlpA::cat showed neither tlpA gene expression nor chemotaxis towards arginine and bicarbonate. Besides confirming that TlpA is a chemotactic receptor for arginine/bicarbonate in H. pylori, this study showed that tlpA gene expression is required for arginine/bicarbonate chemotaxis.

  8. Relationship of arginine with lysine in diets for laying Japanese quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata de Souza Reis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the relationship of arginine with lysine for Japanese quails during the period of production, an experiment was conducted using 360 subspecies of Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica with 162 days of age, distributed in a completely randomized design. Diets were formulated with corn, soybean meal, sorghum and wheat bran containing 20.0% crude protein and 2,800 kcal ME/kg. The basal diet contained suboptimal level of lysine equal to 1% and was supplemented with five levels of L-arginine 99% (0.032; 0.083; 0.134; 0.185 and 0.236% to replace the glutamic acid, corresponding to the relationship of arginine with digestible lysine of 1.16, 1.21, 1.26, 1.31 and 1.36. The parameters studied were: feed intake, egg production per hen/day, egg production per hen housed, commercial egg production, egg weight, egg mass, feed conversion by egg mass, feed conversion per dozen eggs, weight and percentage of components of the eggs (yolk, albumen and shell and specific gravity. There was no significant effect on the relationship of arginine with digestible lysine in the diet of Japanese quails for any of the parameters examined. The arginine/lysine ratio of 1.16, which corresponds to a daily intake of 288.84 mg of arginine, provides satisfactory performance and egg quality of Japanese quails.

  9. Hypothalamic protein profiles associated with inhibited feed intake of ducks fed with insufficient dietary arginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Zheng, A J; Xie, M; Huang, W; Xie, J J; Hou, S S

    2014-07-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of arginine on feed intake regulation. One hundred and twenty six 1-day-old male White Pekin ducks (Anas platyrhynchos domestica) were randomly were allotted to one of two dietary treatments. The birds were fed diets containing 0.71% (deficient) or 1.27% (sufficient) arginine for 3 weeks. At 21 days of age, feed intake was determined and hypothalamic protein profiles were analyzed using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification technique. The birds fed with arginine-deficient diet had a lower final live BW and cumulative feed intake (P1.5-fold expressional changes between arginine-deficient and -sufficient dietary treatments. Nine of these proteins were upregulated and seven of them were downregulated. The identified proteins could be regrouped into six categories: protein processing, carbohydrate metabolism and energy production, transporter, cytoskeleton, immunity and neuronal development. Dietary arginine deficiency decreased expression of proteins involved in energy production (glycine amidinotransferase, aldolase B fructose-bisphosphate, aconitase, transaldolase, 6-phosphofructokinase type C-like) and oxygen transportation (haemoglobin subunit α expression). The proteomic alterations described here provides valuable insights into the interactions of arginine with appetite. PMID:24804691

  10. Mobility Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Lassen, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This article takes point of departure in the challenges to understand the importance of contemporary mobility. The approach advocated is a cross-disciplinary one drawing on sociology, geography, urban planning and design, and cultural studies. As such the perspective is to be seen as a part of th...

  11. Sustainable Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærulff, Aslak Aamot

    This paper combines strands of mobilities theory and planning theory, and develops a qualitative approach to look across emerging planning practices. By actively following 8 Danish urban and transport planners, over the course of 2 years, we learn how their practices have changed, inspired by mob...

  12. Mobil nationalisme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Lasse Martin

    2006-01-01

    , varer, mennesker og kapital men derimod en integreret del af disse tendenser. Gennem begrebet mobil nationalisme argumenteres der for en analytisk optik, hvor nationalisme forstås som en proces hvorigennem skiftende relationer og bevægelser mellem forskellige socio-rumlige skalaer som kroppen...

  13. Bioaugmentation of DDT-contaminated soil by dissemination of the catabolic plasmid pDOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunming Gao; Xiangxiang Jin; Jingbei Ren; Hua Fang; Yunlong Yu

    2015-01-01

    A plasmid transfer-mediated bioaugmentation method for the enhancement of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) degradation in soil was developed using the catabolic plasmid pDOD from Sphingobacterium sp.D-6.The pDOD plasmid could be transferred to soil bacteria,such as members of Cellulomonas,to form DDT degraders and thus accelerate DDT degradation.The transfer efficiency of pDOD was affected by the donor,temperature,moisture,and soil type.Approximately 50.7% of the DDT in the contaminated field was removed 210 days after the application of Escherichia coli TG Ⅰ (pDOD-gfp).The results suggested that seeding pDOD into soil is an effective bioaugmentation method for enhancing the degradation of DDT.

  14. Role of Myofibrillar Protein Catabolism in Development of Glucocorticoid Myopathy: Aging and Functional Activity Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seene, Teet; Kaasik, Priit

    2016-01-01

    Muscle weakness in corticosteroid myopathy is mainly the result of the destruction and atrophy of the myofibrillar compartment of fast-twitch muscle fibers. Decrease of titin and myosin, and the ratio of nebulin and MyHC in myopathic muscle, shows that these changes of contractile and elastic proteins are the result of increased catabolism of the abovementioned proteins in skeletal muscle. Slow regeneration of skeletal muscle is in good correlation with a decreased number of satellite cells under the basal lamina of muscle fibers. Aging causes a reduction of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity as the result of the reduced function of the mitochondrial compartment. AMPK activity increases as a result of increased functional activity. Resistance exercise causes anabolic and anticatabolic effects in skeletal muscle: muscle fibers experience hypertrophy while higher myofibrillar proteins turn over. These changes are leading to the qualitative remodeling of muscle fibers. As a result of these changes, possible maximal muscle strength is increasing. Endurance exercise improves capillary blood supply, increases mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle oxidative capacity, and causes a faster turnover rate of sarcoplasmic proteins as well as qualitative remodeling of type I and IIA muscle fibers. The combination of resistance and endurance exercise may be the fastest way to prevent or decelerate muscle atrophy due to the anabolic and anticatabolic effects of exercise combined with an increase in oxidative capacity. The aim of the present short review is to assess the role of myofibrillar protein catabolism in the development of glucocorticoid-caused myopathy from aging and physical activity aspects. PMID:27187487

  15. Role of Myofibrillar Protein Catabolism in Development of Glucocorticoid Myopathy: Aging and Functional Activity Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teet Seene

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Muscle weakness in corticosteroid myopathy is mainly the result of the destruction and atrophy of the myofibrillar compartment of fast-twitch muscle fibers. Decrease of titin and myosin, and the ratio of nebulin and MyHC in myopathic muscle, shows that these changes of contractile and elastic proteins are the result of increased catabolism of the abovementioned proteins in skeletal muscle. Slow regeneration of skeletal muscle is in good correlation with a decreased number of satellite cells under the basal lamina of muscle fibers. Aging causes a reduction of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activity as the result of the reduced function of the mitochondrial compartment. AMPK activity increases as a result of increased functional activity. Resistance exercise causes anabolic and anticatabolic effects in skeletal muscle: muscle fibers experience hypertrophy while higher myofibrillar proteins turn over. These changes are leading to the qualitative remodeling of muscle fibers. As a result of these changes, possible maximal muscle strength is increasing. Endurance exercise improves capillary blood supply, increases mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle oxidative capacity, and causes a faster turnover rate of sarcoplasmic proteins as well as qualitative remodeling of type I and IIA muscle fibers. The combination of resistance and endurance exercise may be the fastest way to prevent or decelerate muscle atrophy due to the anabolic and anticatabolic effects of exercise combined with an increase in oxidative capacity. The aim of the present short review is to assess the role of myofibrillar protein catabolism in the development of glucocorticoid-caused myopathy from aging and physical activity aspects.

  16. Designed Inhibitors of Insulin-Degrading Enzyme Regulate the Catabolism and Activity of Insulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leissring, Malcolm A.; Malito, Enrico; Hedouin, Sabrine; Reinstatler, Lael; Sahara, Tomoko; Abdul-Hay, Samer O.; Choudhry, Shakeel; Maharvi, Ghulam M.; Fauq, Abdul H.; Huzarska, Malwina; May, Philip S.; Choi, Sungwoon; Logan, Todd P.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tang, Wei-Jen; Stein, Ross L.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Selkoe, Dennis J. (Harvard-Med); (BWH); (Yale-MED); (Scripps); (UC); (Mayo)

    2010-09-20

    Insulin is a vital peptide hormone that is a central regulator of glucose homeostasis, and impairments in insulin signaling cause diabetes mellitus. In principle, it should be possible to enhance the activity of insulin by inhibiting its catabolism, which is mediated primarily by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a structurally and evolutionarily distinctive zinc-metalloprotease. Despite interest in pharmacological inhibition of IDE as an attractive anti-diabetic approach dating to the 1950s, potent and selective inhibitors of IDE have not yet emerged. We used a rational design approach based on analysis of combinatorial peptide mixtures and focused compound libraries to develop novel peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors of IDE. The resulting compounds are {approx} 10{sup 6} times more potent than existing inhibitors, non-toxic, and surprisingly selective for IDE vis-a-vis conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Crystallographic analysis of an IDE-inhibitor complex reveals a novel mode of inhibition based on stabilization of IDE's 'closed,' inactive conformation. We show further that pharmacological inhibition of IDE potentiates insulin signaling by a mechanism involving reduced catabolism of internalized insulin. Conclusions/Significance: The inhibitors we describe are the first to potently and selectively inhibit IDE or indeed any member of this atypical zinc-metalloprotease superfamily. The distinctive structure of IDE's active site, and the mode of action of our inhibitors, suggests that it may be possible to develop inhibitors that cross-react minimally with conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Significantly, our results reveal that insulin signaling is normally regulated by IDE activity not only extracellularly but also within cells, supporting the longstanding view that IDE inhibitors could hold therapeutic value for the treatment of diabetes.

  17. The coupling of the plant and microbial catabolisms of phenanthrene in the rhizosphere of Medicago sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratova, Anna; Dubrovskaya, Ekaterina; Golubev, Sergey; Grinev, Vyacheslav; Chernyshova, Marina; Turkovskaya, Olga

    2015-09-01

    We studied the catabolism of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon phenanthrene by four rhizobacterial strains and the possibility of enzymatic oxidation of this compound and its microbial metabolites by the root exudates of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in order to detect the possible coupling of the plant and microbial metabolisms under the rhizospheric degradation of the organic pollutant. A comparative study of phenanthrene degradation pathways in the PAH-degrading rhizobacteria Ensifer meliloti, Pseudomonas kunmingensis, Rhizobium petrolearium, and Stenotrophomonas sp. allowed us to identify the key metabolites from the microbial transformation of phenanthrene, including 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, 2-carboxybenzaldehyde, and 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic, salicylic, and o-phthalic acids. Sterile alfalfa plants were grown in the presence and absence of phenanthrene (0.03 g kg(-1)) in quartz sand under controlled environmental conditions to obtain plant root exudates. The root exudates were collected, concentrated by ultrafiltration, and the activity of oxidoreductases was detected spectrophotometrically by the oxidation rate for various substrates. The most marked activity was that of peroxidase, whereas the presence of oxidase and tyrosinase was detected on the verge of the assay sensitivity. Using alfalfa root exudates as a crude enzyme preparation, we found that in the presence of the synthetic mediator, the plant peroxidase could oxidize phenanthrene and its microbial metabolites. The results indicate the possibility of active participation of plants in the rhizospheric degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their microbial metabolites, which makes it possible to speak about the coupling of the plant and microbial catabolisms of these contaminants in the rhizosphere. PMID:26398627

  18. Volatile sulphur compounds and pathways of L-methionine catabolism in Williopsis yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Amelia W J; Lee, Pin-Rou; Seow, Yi-Xin; Ong, Peter K C; Liu, Shao-Quan

    2012-08-01

    Volatile sulphur compounds (VSCs) are important to the food industry due to their high potency and presence in many foods. This study assessed for the first time VSC production and pathways of L: -methionine catabolism in yeasts from the genus Williopsis with a view to understanding VSC formation and their potential flavour impact. Five strains of Williopsis saturnus (var. saturnus, var. subsufficiens, var. suavolens, var. sargentensis and var. mrakii) were screened for VSC production in a synthetic medium supplemented with L: -methionine. A diverse range of VSCs were produced including dimethyl disulphide, dimethyl trisulphide, 3-(methylthio)-1-propanal (methional), 3-(methylthio)-1-propanol (methionol), 3-(methylthio)-1-propene, 3-(methylthio)-1-propyl acetate, 3-(methylthio)-1-propanoic acid (methionic acid) and ethyl 3-(methylthio)-1-propanoate, though the production of these VSCs varied between yeast strains. W. saturnus var. saturnus NCYC22 was selected for further studies due to its relatively high VSC production. VSC production was characterised step-wise with yeast strain NCYC22 in coconut cream at different L: -methionine concentrations (0.00-0.20%) and under various inorganic sulphate (0.00-0.20%) and nitrogen (ammonia) supplementation (0.00-0.20%), respectively. Optimal VSC production was obtained with 0.1% of L: -methionine, while supplementation of sulphate had no significant effect. Nitrogen supplementation showed a dramatic inhibitory effect on VSC production. Based on the production of VSCs, the study suggests that the Ehrlich pathway of L: -methionine catabolism is operative in W. saturnus yeasts and can be manipulated by adjusting certain nutrient parameters to control VSC production. PMID:22370952

  19. White-to-brite conversion in human adipocytes promotes metabolic reprogramming towards fatty acid anabolic and catabolic pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Barquissau

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions: Conversion of human white fat cells into brite adipocytes results in a major metabolic reprogramming inducing fatty acid anabolic and catabolic pathways. PDK4 redirects glucose from oxidation towards triglyceride synthesis and favors the use of fatty acids as energy source for uncoupling mitochondria.

  20. Oxidised low density lipoprotein causes human macrophage cell death through oxidant generation and inhibition of key catabolic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katouah, Hanadi; Chen, Alpha; Othman, Izani; Gieseg, Steven P

    2015-10-01

    Oxidised low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is thought to be a significant contributor to the death of macrophage cells observed in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Using human-derived U937 cells we have examined the effect of cytotoxic oxLDL on oxidative stress and cellular catabolism. Within 3h of the addition of oxLDL, there was a rapid, concentration dependent rise in cellular reactive oxygen species followed by the loss of cellular GSH, and the enzyme activity of both glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and aconitase. The loss of these catabolic enzymes was accompanied by the loss of cellular ATP and lower lactate generation. Addition of the macrophage antioxidant 7,8-dihydroneopterin inhibited the ROS generation, glutathione loss and catabolic inactivation. NOX was shown to be activated by oxLDL addition while apocynin inhibited the loss of GSH and cell viability. The data suggests that oxLDL triggers an excess of ROS production through NOX activation, and catabolic failure through thiol oxidation resulting in cell death. PMID:26255116

  1. Catabolism of Phenol and Its Derivatives in Bacteria: Genes, Their Regulation, and Use in the Biodegradation of Toxic Pollutants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nešvera, Jan; Rucká, Lenka; Pátek, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 2015 (2015), s. 107-160. ISSN 0065-2164 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA04021212 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Biodegradation * Bioremediation * Phenol catabolism Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.737, year: 2014

  2. Repression of nitrogen catabolic genes by ammonia and glutamine in nitrogen-limited continuous cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Vermeulen, E E; Kalhorn, J W; Verkleij, A J; Boonstra, J; Verrips, C T

    1998-01-01

    Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on ammonia and glutamine decreases the expression of many nitrogen catabolic genes to low levels. To discriminate between ammonia- and glutamine-driven repression of GAP1, PUT4, GDH1 and GLN1, a gln1-37 mutant was used. This mutant is not able to convert ammonia in

  3. CATABOLISM OF AROMATIC BIOGENIC AMINES BY 'PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA' PA01 VIA META CLEAVAGE OF HOMOPROTOCATECHUIC ACID (JOURNAL VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas aruginosa PA01 catabolized the aromatic amines tyramine and octopamine through 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (HPA). Meta ring cleavage was mediated by 3-4-dihydroxyphenylacetate 2,3-dioxygenase (HPADO), producing 2-hydroxy-5-carboxymeth...

  4. Simple generic model for dynamic experiments with Saccharomyces cerevisiae in continuous culture. Decoupling between anabolism and catabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duboc, Philippe Jean; von Stockar, U.; Villadsen, John

    1998-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a continuous culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae subjected to a sudden increase in the dilution rate has been successfully modelled for anaerobic growth on glucose, and for aerobic growth on acetate, on ethanol, and on glucose. The catabolism responded by an immediate jump...

  5. Catabolic and anabolic energy for chemolithoautotrophs in deep-sea hydrothermal systems hosted in different rock types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, Jan P.; McCollom, Thomas M.; Hentscher, Michael; Bach, Wolfgang

    2011-10-01

    Active deep-sea hydrothermal vents are hosted by a range of different rock types, including basalt, peridotite, and felsic rocks. The associated hydrothermal fluids exhibit substantial chemical variability, which is largely attributable to compositional differences among the underlying host rocks. Numerical models were used to evaluate the energetics of seven inorganic redox reactions (potential catabolisms of chemolithoautotrophs) and numerous biomolecule synthesis reactions (anabolism) in a representative sampling of these systems, where chemical gradients are established by mixing hydrothermal fluid with seawater. The wide ranging fluid compositions dictate demonstrable differences in Gibbs energies (Δ G r) of these catabolic and anabolic reactions in three peridotite-hosted, six basalt-hosted, one troctolite-basalt hybrid, and two felsic rock-hosted systems. In peridotite-hosted systems at low to moderate temperatures (10), hydrogen oxidation yields the most catabolic energy, but the oxidation of methane, ferrous iron, and sulfide can also be moderately exergonic. At higher temperatures, and consequent SW:HF mixing ratios biomass synthesis yielded up to ˜900 J per g dry cell mass. The energetics of anabolism in basalt- and felsic rock-hosted systems were far less favorable. The results suggest that in peridotite-hosted (and troctolite-basalt hybrid) systems, compared with their basalt (and felsic rock) counterparts, microbial catabolic strategies—and consequently variations in microbial phylotypes—may be far more diverse and some biomass synthesis may yield energy rather than imposing a high energetic cost.

  6. Wounding of potato tubers induces increases in ABA biosynthesis and catabolism and alters expression of ABA metabolic genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of physical wounding on ABA biosynthesis and catabolism and expression of genes encoding key ABA metabolic enzymes were determined in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers. An increase in ABA and ABA metabolite content was observed 48 h after wounding and remained elevated through 96 h. ...

  7. Mobile-to-mobile wireless channels

    CERN Document Server

    Zajic, Alenka

    2013-01-01

    Present-day mobile communications systems can be classified as fixed-to-mobile because they allow mobility on only one end (e.g. the mobile phone to a fixed mobile operator's cell tower). In answer to the consumer demand for better coverage and quality of service, emerging mobile-to-mobile (M-to-M) communications systems allow mobile users or vehicles to directly communicate with each other. This practical book provides a detailed introduction to state-of-the-art M-to-M wireless propagation. Moreover, the book offers professionals guidance for rapid implementation of these communications syste

  8. Mobile Customer Relationship Management and Mobile Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanayei, Ali; Mirzaei, Abas

    The purpose of this study is twofold. First, in order to guarantee a coherent discussion about mobile customer relationship management (mCRM), this paper presents a conceptualization of mCRM delineating its unique characteristics because of Among the variety of mobile services, considerable attention has been devoted to mobile marketing and in particular to mobile customer relationship management services. Second, the authors discusses the security risks in mobile computing in different level(user, mobile device, wireless network,...) and finally we focus on enterprise mobile security and it's subgroups with a series of suggestion and solution for improve mobile computing security.

  9. Sialic acid transport and catabolism are cooperatively regulated by SiaR and CRP in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston Jason W

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transport and catabolism of sialic acid, a critical virulence factor for nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, is regulated by two transcription factors, SiaR and CRP. Results Using a mutagenesis approach, glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN-6P was identified as a co-activator for SiaR. Evidence for the cooperative regulation of both the sialic acid catabolic and transport operons suggested that cooperativity between SiaR and CRP is required for regulation. cAMP was unable to influence the expression of the catabolic operon in the absence of SiaR but was able to induce catabolic operon expression when both SiaR and GlcN-6P were present. Alteration of helical phasing supported this observation by uncoupling SiaR and CRP regulation. The insertion of one half-turn of DNA between the SiaR and CRP operators resulted in the loss of SiaR-mediated repression of the transport operon while eliminating cAMP-dependent induction of the catabolic operon when GlcN-6P was present. SiaR and CRP were found to bind to their respective operators simultaneously and GlcN-6P altered the interaction of SiaR with its operator. Conclusions These results suggest multiple novel features for the regulation of these two adjacent operons. SiaR functions as both a repressor and an activator and SiaR and CRP interact to regulate both operons from a single set of operators.

  10. Ghrelin improves body weight loss and skeletal muscle catabolism associated with angiotensin II-induced cachexia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Masako; Yamaki, Akira; Furuya, Mayumi; Inomata, Norio; Minamitake, Yoshiharu; Ohsuye, Kazuhiro; Kangawa, Kenji

    2012-10-10

    Ghrelin is a gastric peptide that regulates energy homeostasis. Angiotensin II (Ang II) is known to induce body weight loss and skeletal muscle catabolism through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In this study, we investigated the effects of ghrelin on body weight and muscle catabolism in mice treated with Ang II. The continuous subcutaneous administration of Ang II to mice for 6 days resulted in cardiac hypertrophy and significant decreases in body weight gain, food intake, food efficiency, lean mass, and fat mass. In the gastrocnemius muscles of Ang II-treated mice, the levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) were decreased, and the levels of mRNA expression of catabolic factors were increased. Although the repeated subcutaneous injections of ghrelin (1.0mg/kg, twice daily for 5 days) did not affect cardiac hypertrophy, they resulted in significant body weight gains and improved food efficiencies and tended to increase both lean and fat mass in Ang II-treated mice. Ghrelin also ameliorated the decreased IGF-1 levels and the increased mRNA expression levels of catabolic factors in the skeletal muscle. IGF-1 mRNA levels in the skeletal muscle significantly decreased 24h after Ang II infusion, and this was reversed by two subcutaneous injections of ghrelin. In C2C12-derived myocytes, the dexamethasone-induced mRNA expression of atrogin-1 was decreased by IGF-1 but not by ghrelin. In conclusion, we demonstrated that ghrelin improved body weight loss and skeletal muscle catabolism in mice treated with Ang II, possibly through the early restoration of IGF-1 mRNA in the skeletal muscle and the amelioration of nutritional status. PMID:22750276

  11. Mobile Usability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aryana, Bijan; Clemmensen, Torkil

    2013-01-01

    In this article, a country specific comparative mobile usability study is presented, using Iran and Turkey as the two chosen emerging/emergent nation exemplars of smartphone usage and adoption. In a focus group study, three mobile applications were selected by first-time users of smartphones....... In both countries, the music player application was tested, wherein common patterns of accessing and sorting songs emerged. Whereas the Iranian users appeared to be more interested in social networking via use of an SMS service, the Turkish users tended to prefer to apply hierarchies to their own daily...... personal contacts. The results and analysis establish the existence of country specific issues and concerns, as well as reveal generic usability issues. The article concludes that the source of these issues is most likely due to a combination of certain contextual features endemic to both Iran and Turkey...

  12. Intracellular L-arginine concentration does not determine NO production in endothelial cells: Implications on the “L-arginine paradox”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Our findings provide a possible solution to the “L-arginine paradox”. ► Extracellular L-arginine concentration is the major determinant of NO production. ► Cellular L-arginine action is limited by cellular ARG transport, not the Km of NOS. ► We explain how L-arginine supplementation can work to increase endothelial function. -- Abstract: We examined the relative contributory roles of extracellular vs. intracellular L-arginine (ARG) toward cellular activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human endothelial cells. EA.hy926 human endothelial cells were incubated with different concentrations of 15N4-ARG, ARG, or L-arginine ethyl ester (ARG-EE) for 2 h. To modulate ARG transport, siRNA for ARG transporter (CAT-1) vs. sham siRNA were transfected into cells. ARG transport activity was assessed by cellular fluxes of ARG, 15N4-ARG, dimethylarginines, and L-citrulline by an LC–MS/MS assay. eNOS activity was determined by nitrite/nitrate accumulation, either via a fluorometric assay or by15N-nitrite or estimated 15N3-citrulline concentrations when 15N4-ARG was used to challenge the cells. We found that ARG-EE incubation increased cellular ARG concentration but no increase in nitrite/nitrate was observed, while ARG incubation increased both cellular ARG concentration and nitrite accumulation. Cellular nitrite/nitrate production did not correlate with cellular total ARG concentration. Reduced 15N4-ARG cellular uptake in CAT-1 siRNA transfected cells vs. control was accompanied by reduced eNOS activity, as determined by 15N-nitrite, total nitrite and 15N3-citrulline formation. Our data suggest that extracellular ARG, not intracellular ARG, is the major determinant of NO production in endothelial cells. It is likely that once transported inside the cell, ARG can no longer gain access to the membrane-bound eNOS. These observations indicate that the “L-arginine paradox” should not consider intracellular ARG concentration as a

  13. Mobile Misfortune

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigh, Henrik Erdman

    2015-01-01

    termination of the mobility it enables. This article, thus, looks at the motives and manners in which young men in Bissau become caught up in transnational flows of cocaine. It shows how motion is emotively anchored and affectively bound: tied to and directed toward a feeling of worth and realisation of being......, and how migration from the global South often has negative potentiality as an end-point via the ascription of illegality and condition of deportability that shade it....

  14. The African Mobile Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book identifies the factors that has enabled the growth of mobile telephony in Africa. The book covers the regulatory factors, the development and usage of mobile application, mobile security and sustainable power source for mobile networks......This book identifies the factors that has enabled the growth of mobile telephony in Africa. The book covers the regulatory factors, the development and usage of mobile application, mobile security and sustainable power source for mobile networks...

  15. Effects of Arginine Vasopressin on musical short-term memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roni Y. Granot

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous genetic studies showed an association between variations in the gene coding for the 1a receptor of the neuro-hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP and musical working memory (WM. The current study set out to test the influence of intranasal administration (INA of AVP on musical as compared to verbal WM using a double blind crossover (AVP – placebo design. Two groups of 25 males were exposed to 20 IU of AVP in one session, and 20 IU of saline water (placebo in a second session, one week apart. In each session subjects completed the tonal subtest from Gordon's Musical Aptitude Profile, the interval subtest from the Montreal Battery for Evaluation of Amusias (MBEA, and the forward and backward digit span tests. Scores in the digit span tests were not influenced by AVP. In contrast, in the music tests there was an AVP effect. In the MBEA test, scores for the group receiving placebo in the first session (PV were higher than for the group receiving vasopressin in the first session (VP (p < .05 with no main Session effect nor Group * Session interaction. In the Gordon test there was a main Session effect (p < .05 with scores higher in the second as compared to the first session, a marginal main Group effect (p = .093 and a marginal Group X Session interaction (p = 0.88. In addition we found that the group that received AVP in the first session scored higher on scales indicative of happiness, and alertness on the Positive and Negative Affect Scale, (PANAS. Only in this group and only in the music test these scores were significantly correlated with memory scores. Together the results reflect a complex interaction between AVP, musical memory, arousal, and contextual effects such as session, and base levels of memory. The results are interpreted in light of music's universal use as a means to modulate arousal on the one hand, and AVP's influence on mood, arousal, and social interactions on the other.

  16. Transsulfuration pathway thiols and methylated arginines: the Hunter Community Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arduino A Mangoni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Serum homocysteine, when studied singly, has been reported to be positively associated both with the endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine [ADMA, via inhibition of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH activity] and with symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA. We investigated combined associations between transsulfuration pathway thiols, including homocysteine, and serum ADMA and SDMA concentrations at population level. METHODS: Data on clinical and demographic characteristics, medication exposure, C-reactive protein, serum ADMA and SDMA (LC-MS/MS, and thiols (homocysteine, cysteine, taurine, glutamylcysteine, total glutathione, and cysteinylglycine; capillary electrophoresis were collected from a sample of the Hunter Community Study on human ageing [n = 498, median age (IQR = 64 (60-70 years]. RESULTS: REGRESSION ANALYSIS SHOWED THAT: a age (P = 0.001, gender (P = 0.03, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, P = 0.08, body mass index (P = 0.008, treatment with beta-blockers (P = 0.03, homocysteine (P = 0.02, and glutamylcysteine (P = 0.003 were independently associated with higher ADMA concentrations; and b age (P = 0.001, absence of diabetes (P = 0.001, lower body mass index (P = 0.01, lower eGFR (P<0.001, cysteine (P = 0.007, and glutamylcysteine (P < 0.001 were independently associated with higher SDMA concentrations. No significant associations were observed between methylated arginines and either glutathione or taurine concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: After adjusting for clinical, demographic, biochemical, and pharmacological confounders the combined assessment of transsulfuration pathway thiols shows that glutamylcysteine has the strongest and positive independent associations with ADMA and SDMA. Whether this reflects a direct effect of glutamylcysteine on DDAH activity (for ADMA and/or cationic amino acid transport requires further investigations.

  17. Genes, enzymes and regulation of arginine biosynthesis in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, Robert D

    2005-08-01

    Arabidopsis genes encoding enzymes for each of the eight steps in L-arginine (Arg) synthesis were identified, based upon sequence homologies with orthologs from other organisms. Except for N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS; EC 2.3.1.1), which is encoded by two genes, all remaining enzymes are encoded by single genes. Targeting predictions for these enzymes, based upon their deduced sequences, and subcellular fractionation studies, suggest that most enzymes of Arg synthesis reside within the plastid. Synthesis of the L-ornthine (Orn) intermediate in this pathway from L-glutamate occurs as a series of acetylated intermediates, as in most other organisms. An N-acetylornithine:glutamate acetyltransferase (NAOGAcT; EC 2.3.1.35) facilitates recycling of the acetyl moiety during Orn formation (cyclic pathway). A putative N-acetylornithine deacetylase (NAOD; EC 3.5.1.16), which participates in the "linear" pathway for Orn synthesis in some organisms, was also identified. Previous biochemical studies have indicated that allosteric regulation of the first and, especially, the second steps in Orn synthesis (NAGS; N-acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK), EC 2.7.2.8) by the Arg end-product are the major sites of metabolic control of the pathway in organisms using the cyclic pathway. Gene expression profiling for pathway enzymes further suggests that NAGS, NAGK, NAOGAcT and NAOD are coordinately regulated in response to changes in Arg demand during plant growth and development. Synthesis of Arg from Orn is further coordinated with pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis, at the level of allocation of the common carbamoyl-P intermediate. PMID:16122935

  18. Effects of arginine vasopressin on musical working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Roni Y; Uzefovsky, Florina; Bogopolsky, Helena; Ebstein, Richard P

    2013-01-01

    Previous genetic studies showed an association between variations in the gene coding for the 1a receptor of the neuro-hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP) and musical working memory (WM). The current study set out to test the influence of intranasal administration (INA) of AVP on musical as compared to verbal WM using a double blind crossover (AVP-placebo) design. Two groups of 25 males were exposed to 20 IU of AVP in one session, and 20 IU of saline water (placebo) in a second session, 1 week apart. In each session subjects completed the tonal subtest from Gordon's "Musical Aptitude Profile," the interval subtest from the "Montreal Battery for Evaluation of Amusias (MBEA)," and the forward and backward digit span tests. Scores in the digit span tests were not influenced by AVP. In contrast, in the music tests there was an AVP effect. In the MBEA test, scores for the group receiving placebo in the first session (PV) were higher than for the group receiving vasopressin in the first session (VP) (p effect nor Group × Session interaction. In the Gordon test there was a main Session effect (p effect (p = 0.093) and a marginal Group × Session interaction (p = 0.88). In addition we found that the group that received AVP in the first session scored higher on scales indicative of happiness, and alertness on the positive and negative affect scale, (PANAS). Only in this group and only in the music test these scores were significantly correlated with memory scores. Together the results reflect a complex interaction between AVP, musical memory, arousal, and contextual effects such as session, and base levels of memory. The results are interpreted in light of music's universal use as a means to modulate arousal on the one hand, and AVP's influence on mood, arousal, and social interactions on the other. PMID:24151474

  19. Differential role of arginine mutations on the structure and functions of α-crystallin☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Alok Kumar; Nandi, Sandip Kumar; Chakraborty, Ayon; Nagaraj, Ram H.; Biswas, Ashis

    2016-01-01

    Background α-Crystallin is a major protein of the eye lens in vertebrates. It is composed of two subunits, αA- and αB-crystallin. α-Crystallin is an oligomeric protein having these two subunits in 3:1 ratio. It belongs to small heat shock protein family and exhibits molecular chaperone function, which plays an important role in maintaining the lens transparency. Apart from chaperone function, both subunits also exhibit anti-apoptotic property. Comparison of their primary sequences reveals that αA- and αB-crystallin posses 13 and 14 arginine residues, respectively. Several of them undergo mutations which eventually lead to various eye diseases such as congenital cataract, juvenile cataract, and retinal degeneration. Interestingly, many arginine residues of these subunits are modified during glycation and even some are truncated during aging. All these facts indicate the importance of arginine residues in α-crystallin. Scope of review In this review, we will emphasize the recent in vitro and in vivo findings related to congenital cataract causing arginine mutations in α-crystallin. Major conclusions Congenital cataract causing arginine mutations alters the structure and decreases the chaperone function of α-crystallin. These mutations also affect the lens morphology and phenotypes. Interestingly, non-natural arginine mutations (generated for mimicking the glycation and truncation environment) improve the chaperone function of α-crystallin which may play an important role in maintaining the eye lens transparency during aging. General significance The neutralization of positive charge on the guanidino group of arginine residues is not always detrimental to the functionality of α-crystallin. PMID:26080000

  20. Arginine deiminase resistance in melanoma cells is associated with metabolic reprogramming, glucose dependence, and glutamine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yan; Tsai, Wen-Bin; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Savaraj, Niramol; Feun, Lynn G; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2013-11-01

    Many malignant human tumors, including melanomas, are auxotrophic for arginine due to reduced expression of argininosuccinate synthetase-1 (ASS1), the rate-limiting enzyme for arginine biosynthesis. Pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20), which degrades extracellular arginine, resulting in arginine deprivation, has shown favorable results in clinical trials for treating arginine-auxotrophic tumors. Drug resistance is the major obstacle for effective ADI-PEG20 usage. To elucidate mechanisms of resistance, we established several ADI-PEG20-resistant (ADI(R)) variants from A2058 and SK-Mel-2 melanoma cells. Compared with the parental lines, these ADI(R) variants showed the following characteristics: (i) all ADI(R) cell lines showed elevated ASS1 expression, resulting from the constitutive binding of the transcription factor c-Myc on the ASS1 promoter, suggesting that elevated ASS1 is the major mechanism of resistance; (ii) the ADI(R) cell lines exhibited enhanced AKT signaling and were preferentially sensitive to PI3K/AKT inhibitors, but reduced mTOR signaling, and were preferentially resistant to mTOR inhibitor; (iii) these variants showed enhanced expression of glucose transporter-1 and lactate dehydrogenase-A, reduced expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase, and elevated sensitivity to the glycolytic inhibitors 2-deoxy-glucose and 3-bromopyruvate, consistent with the enhanced glycolytic pathway (the Warburg effect); (iv) the resistant cells showed higher glutamine dehydrogenase and glutaminase expression and were preferentially vulnerable to glutamine inhibitors. We showed that c-Myc, not elevated ASS1 expression, is involved in upregulation of many of these enzymes because knockdown of c-Myc reduced their expression, whereas overexpressed ASS1 by transfection reduced their expression. This study identified multiple targets for overcoming ADI-PEG resistance in cancer chemotherapy using recombinant arginine-degrading enzymes. PMID:23979920

  1. Deprivation of L-Arginine Induces Oxidative Stress Mediated Apoptosis in Leishmania donovani Promastigotes: Contribution of the Polyamine Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Abhishek; Das, Sushmita; Roy, Saptarshi; Ghosh, Ayan Kumar; Sardar, Abul Hasan; Verma, Sudha; Saini, Savita; Singh, Ruby; Abhishek, Kumar; Kumar, Ajay; Mandal, Chitra; Das, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    The growth and survival of intracellular parasites depends on the availability of extracellular nutrients. Deprivation of nutrients viz glucose or amino acid alters redox balance in mammalian cells as well as some lower organisms. To further understand the relationship, the mechanistic role of L-arginine in regulation of redox mediated survival of Leishmania donovani promastigotes was investigated. L-arginine deprivation from the culture medium was found to inhibit cell growth, reduce proliferation and increase L-arginine uptake. Relative expression of enzymes, involved in L-arginine metabolism, which leads to polyamine and trypanothione biosynthesis, were downregulated causing decreased production of polyamines in L-arginine deprived parasites and cell death. The resultant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), due to L-arginine deprivation, correlated with increased NADP+/NADPH ratio, decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD) level, increased lipid peroxidation and reduced thiol content. A deficiency of L-arginine triggered phosphatidyl serine externalization, a change in mitochondrial membrane potential, release of intracellular calcium and cytochrome-c. This finally led to DNA damage in Leishmania promastigotes. In summary, the growth and survival of Leishmania depends on the availability of extracellular L-arginine. In its absence the parasite undergoes ROS mediated, caspase-independent apoptosis-like cell death. Therefore, L-arginine metabolism pathway could be a probable target for controlling the growth of Leishmania parasites and disease pathogenesis. PMID:26808657

  2. Effect of counter ions of arginine as an additive for the solubilization of protein and aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Shunsuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2016-10-01

    Arginine is widely used in biotechnological application, but mostly with chloride counter ion. Here, we examined the effects of various anions on solubilization of aromatic compounds and reduced lysozyme and on refolding of the lysozyme. All arginine salts tested increased the solubility of propyl gallate with acetate much more effectively than chloride. The effects of arginine salts were compared with those of sodium or guanidine salts, indicating that the ability of anions to modulate the propyl gallate solubility is independent of the cation. Comparison of transfer free energy of propyl gallate between sodium and arginine salts indicates that the interaction of propyl gallate is more favorable with arginine than sodium. On the contrary, the solubility of aromatic amino acids is only slightly modulated by anions, implying that there is specific interaction between acetic acid and propyl gallate. Unlike their effects on the solubility of small aromatic compounds, the solubility of reduced lysozyme was much higher in arginine chloride than in arginine acetate or sulfate. Consistent with high solubility, refolding of reduced lysozyme was most effective in arginine chloride. These results suggest potential broader applications of arginine modulated by different anions. PMID:27234496

  3. Reduced arginine availability and nitric oxide synthesis in cancer is related to impaired endogenous arginine synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, Mariëlle P K J; Safar, Ahmed M; Bartter, Thaddeus; Koeman, Fari; Deutz, Nicolaas E P

    2016-07-01

    Reduced plasma arginine (ARG) concentrations are found in various types of cancer. ARG and its product nitric oxide (NO) are important mediators in the immune function and the defense against tumour cells. It remains unclear whether the diminished systemic ARG availability in cancer is related to insufficient endogenous ARG synthesis, negatively affecting NO synthesis, and whether a dietary amino acid mixture is able to restore this. In 13 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 11 healthy controls, whole body ARG and CIT (citrulline) rates of appearance were measured by stable isotope methodology before and after intake of a mixture of amino acids as present in whey protein. The conversions of CIT to ARG (indicator of de novo ARG synthesis) and ARG to CIT (marker of NO synthesis), and ARG clearance (reflecting ARG disposal capacity) were calculated. Plasma isotopic enrichments and amino acid concentrations were measured by LC-MS/MS. Conversions of CIT to ARG and ARG to CIT (P<0.05), and CIT rate of appearance (P=0.07) were lower in NSCLC. ARG rate of appearance and clearance were comparable suggesting no enhanced systemic ARG production and disposal capacity in NSCLC. After intake of the mixture, ARG rate of appearance and concentration increased (P<0.001), and ARG to CIT conversion was restored in NSCLC. In conclusion, an impaired endogenous ARG synthesis plays a role in the reduced systemic ARG availability and NO synthesis in advanced NSCLC. Nutritional approaches may restore systemic ARG availability and NO synthesis in cancer, but the clinical implication remains unclear. PMID:27129191

  4. Mobile Payments : Comparison of Mobile Wallet Concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Narayan, Srikant

    2013-01-01

    Mobile payments are an emerging trend and an alternative to traditional payment methods. Mobile payments involve the usage of the mobile phone to handle credit transfers during purchase of goods and peer to peer money transfers referred to as mobile wallet service, instead of depending on bank cards and cash. In this scenario, while the mobile wallet industry still being in its infancy there exist a few drivers of mobile wallet solutions aiming to create a de-facto standard in the mobile mark...

  5. Effect of levo-dopa, arginine and exercise on pituitary growth hormone (GH) secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the stimulation effect on GH secretion with different agents (levo-dopa, arginine, exercise) in dwarf subjects. Methods: Growth hormone provocative tests were performed with levo-dopa (42 times), arginine (33) and standardized exercise (35) in 78 subjects classified as dwarfs. Serum GH levels were determined with RIA before the test and several times (at 30 min, intervals) afterwards with the peak value noted. The test results were divided into 3 categories: 1) peak value 10 ng/ml, test positive (no GH deficiency). Results: Peak values of serum GH after stimulation test with respective agents were: levo-dopa 14.09 ± 9.62 ng/ml, arginine 13.77 ± 6.83 ng/ml and exercise 12.68 ± 7.81 ng/ml with no significant differences among them. Positive rate after drug stimulation was significantly higher than that after exercise: levo-dopa 35.71% (15/42), arginine 36.36% (12/33) vs exercise 14.20% (5/35) P0.05). Conclusion: Diagnosis of GH deficiency (stimulation test negative) is best established after two negative provocative tests with different stimulant each time. Levo-dopa and arginine may be the drug of choice. (authors)

  6. Mechanism of Allosteric Inhibition of N-Acetyl-L-glutamate Synthase by L-Arginine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Li; Jin, Zhongmin; Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang (GUW); (Maryland); (GWU); (Georgia)

    2010-01-07

    N-Acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the first committed step in L-arginine biosynthesis in plants and micro-organisms and is subject to feedback inhibition by L-arginine. This study compares the crystal structures of NAGS from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (ngNAGS) in the inactive T-state with L-arginine bound and in the active R-state complexed with CoA and L-glutamate. Under all of the conditions examined, the enzyme consists of two stacked trimers. Each monomer has two domains: an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain with an AAK-like fold but lacking kinase activity and an N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain homologous to other GCN5-related transferases. Binding of L-arginine to the AAK domain induces a global conformational change that increases the diameter of the hexamer by {approx}10 {angstrom} and decreases its height by {approx}20{angstrom}. AAK dimers move 5{angstrom} outward along their 2-fold axes, and their tilt relative to the plane of the hexamer decreases by {approx}4{sup o}. The NAT domains rotate {approx}109{sup o} relative to AAK domains enabling new interdomain interactions. Interactions between AAK and NAT domains on different subunits also change. Local motions of several loops at the L-arginine-binding site enable the protein to close around the bound ligand, whereas several loops at the NAT active site become disordered, markedly reducing enzymatic specific activity.

  7. L-arginine in combination with sildenafil potentiates the attenuation of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hiti, H; Chovanec, M; Melenovský, V; Vajnerová, O; Baňasová, A; Kautzner, J; Herget, J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia induces an increased production of nitric oxide (NO) in pulmonary prealveolar arterioles. Bioavailability of the NO in the pulmonary vessels correlates with concentration of L-arginine as well as activity of phosphodiesterase-5 enzyme (PDE-5). We tested a hypothesis whether a combination of L-arginine and PDE-5 inhibitor sildenafil has an additive effect in reduction of the hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) in rats. Animals were exposed to chronic normobaric hypoxia for 3 weeks. In the AH group, rats were administered L-arginine during chronic hypoxic exposure. In the SH group, rats were administered sildenafil during chronic hypoxic exposure. In the SAH group, rats were treated by the combination of L-arginine as well as sildenafil during exposure to chronic hypoxia. Mean PAP, structural remodeling of peripheral pulmonary arterioles (%DL) and RV/LV+S ratio was significantly decreased in the SAH group compared to hypoxic controls even decreased compared to the AH and the SH groups in first two measured parameters. Plasmatic concentration of cGMP and NOx were significantly lower in the SAH group compared to hypoxic controls. We demonstrate that NO synthase substrate L-arginine and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor sildenafil administered in combination are more potent in attenuation of the HPH compared to a treatment by substances given alone. PMID:23869884

  8. The impact of arginine-modified chitosan-DNA nanoparticles on the function of macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been demonstrated that incorporation of arginine moieties into chitosan significantly elevates the transgenic efficacy of the chitosan. However, little is known about the impact of arginine-modified chitosan on the function of macrophages, which play a vitally important role in the inflammatory response of the body to foreign substances, especially particulate substances. This study was designed to investigate the impact of arginine-modified chitosan/DNA nanoparticles on the function of the murine macrophage through observation of phagocytic activity and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and TNF-α). Results showed that both chitosan/DNA nanoparticles and arginine-modified chitosan/DNA nanoparticles, containing 20 μg/mL DNA, were internalized by almost all the macrophages in contact. This led to no significant changes, compared to the non-exposure group, in production of cytokines and phagocytic activity of the macrophages 24 h post co-incubation, whereas exposure to LPS induced obviously elevated cytokine production and phagocytic activity, suggesting that incorporation of arginine moieties into chitosan does not have a negative impact on the function of the macrophages.

  9. Mechanism of allosteric inhibition of N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase by L-arginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Li; Jin, Zhongmin; Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Allewell, Norma M; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2009-02-20

    N-Acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the first committed step in l-arginine biosynthesis in plants and micro-organisms and is subject to feedback inhibition by l-arginine. This study compares the crystal structures of NAGS from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (ngNAGS) in the inactive T-state with l-arginine bound and in the active R-state complexed with CoA and l-glutamate. Under all of the conditions examined, the enzyme consists of two stacked trimers. Each monomer has two domains: an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain with an AAK-like fold but lacking kinase activity and an N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain homologous to other GCN5-related transferases. Binding of l-arginine to the AAK domain induces a global conformational change that increases the diameter of the hexamer by approximately 10 A and decreases its height by approximately 20A(.) AAK dimers move 5A outward along their 2-fold axes, and their tilt relative to the plane of the hexamer decreases by approximately 4 degrees . The NAT domains rotate approximately 109 degrees relative to AAK domains enabling new interdomain interactions. Interactions between AAK and NAT domains on different subunits also change. Local motions of several loops at the l-arginine-binding site enable the protein to close around the bound ligand, whereas several loops at the NAT active site become disordered, markedly reducing enzymatic specific activity. PMID:19095660

  10. Arginine: A Potent Prey Attractant to Predatory Newts in Mountain Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, R. P.; Zimmer, R. K.

    2005-05-01

    Chemoreception of aquatic organisms has been well-studied in the laboratory, but rarely in the field. The California newt, Taricha torosa, in natural stream habitats is an excellent animal for exploring behavioral responses to prey odors. Here, we selected 13 amino acids for field bioassays based on their concentrations in prey tissue extracts. Bioassays were calibrated for stimulus dilution by means of fluorescent dye releases and flow-through spectrofluorometry. Moreover, hydrodynamic properties of stream flows were determined using an electromagnetic current meter. Of all amino acids tested, only arginine, alanine and glycine were significantly attractive (relative to stream water controls). These three substances caused free-ranging newts to turn upstream and swim towards the odor sources. Additional experiments showed that arginine was the most effective attractant, evoking plume-tracking behavior at concentrations as low as 10 nM. In subsequent trials, nine arginine analogs were tested, but each compound failed to elicit a significant response. Even subtle changes to arginine, such as the addition of a single carbon to the side chain, destroyed all bioactivity. Within its natural habitat, the California newt thus exhibits keen sensitivity and narrow tuning to the free amino acid, arginine, a chemical signal of its prey.

  11. Mobile Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Luengo Cascudo, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    El principal objetivo de este proyecto es explicar y entender la importancia del Mobile Marketing como nueva herramienta de negocio en el Marketing empresarial. Para ello, el primer objetivo es entender los dos factores que para mí son la clave de su importancia: la evolución del entorno tecnológico y el cambio en los hábitos del consumidor. Debido a la novedad de esta nueva forma de Marketing y al hecho de que está en constante definición, es básico exponer de la forma más cla...

  12. Robotique Mobile

    OpenAIRE

    Filliat, David

    2011-01-01

    1 Introduction I Les bases de la navigation 2 Les différents types de navigation 3 Les sources d'information 4 Matériels courants en robotique mobile II Navigation réactive 5 Navigation vers un but 6 Évitement d'obstacles 7 Apprentissage par renforcement III Navigation utilisant une carte 8 Localisation, Cartographie et Planification 9 Les représentations de l'environne 10 Localisation 11 Cartographie 12 Planification École d'ingénieur

  13. Mobility Impact on Performance of Mobile Grids

    OpenAIRE

    A. S. Nandeppanavar,; M. N. Birje,; S. S. Manvi,; Shridhar

    2010-01-01

    Wireless mobile grids are one of the emerging grid types, which help to pool the resources of several willing and cooperative mobile devices to resolve a computationally intensive task. The mobile grids exhibit stronger challenges like mobility management of devices, providing transparent access to grid resources, task management and handling of limited resources so that resources are shared efficiently. Task execution on these devices should not be affected by their mobility. The proposed wo...

  14. Optimum Mobility Performance with Mobile IP & SIP

    OpenAIRE

    B. Naresh Kumar; DR. R. V. KRISHNAIAH

    2013-01-01

    Mobility will place an efficient role in now days in the wireless communications. Mobile IP andSIP provide the mobility service to the handset users. The problems in Mobile IP and SIP s are triangular,handoff, Intra domain problems. These problems create signal lose and improper signalling to the user. Toovercome these we provide add of service to the Mobile IP and SIP with the integration of the two services.This service provides optimum performance of the system.

  15. Mobilization of mercury from lean tissues during simulated migratory fasting in a model songbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seewagen, Chad L; Cristol, Daniel A; Gerson, Alexander R

    2016-01-01

    The pollutant methylmercury accumulates within lean tissues of birds and other animals. Migrating birds catabolize substantial amounts of lean tissue during flight which may mobilize methylmercury and increase circulating levels of this neurotoxin. As a model for a migrating songbird, we fasted zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) that had been dosed with 0.0, 0.1, and 0.6 parts per million (ppm) dietary methylmercury and measured changes in blood total mercury concentrations (THg) in relation to reductions in lean mass. Birds lost 6-16% of their lean mass during the fast, and THg increased an average of 12% and 11% in the 0.1 and 0.6 ppm treatments, respectively. Trace amounts of THg in the 0.0 ppm control group also increased as a result of fasting, but remained extremely low. THg increased 0.4 ppm for each gram of lean mass catabolized in the higher dose birds. Our findings indicate that methylmercury is mobilized from lean tissues during protein catabolism and results in acute increases in circulating concentrations. This is a previously undocumented potential threat to wild migratory birds, which may experience greater surges in circulating methylmercury than demonstrated here as a result of their greater reductions in lean mass. PMID:27173605

  16. Mobilization of mercury from lean tissues during simulated migratory fasting in a model songbird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seewagen, Chad L.; Cristol, Daniel A.; Gerson, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    The pollutant methylmercury accumulates within lean tissues of birds and other animals. Migrating birds catabolize substantial amounts of lean tissue during flight which may mobilize methylmercury and increase circulating levels of this neurotoxin. As a model for a migrating songbird, we fasted zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) that had been dosed with 0.0, 0.1, and 0.6 parts per million (ppm) dietary methylmercury and measured changes in blood total mercury concentrations (THg) in relation to reductions in lean mass. Birds lost 6–16% of their lean mass during the fast, and THg increased an average of 12% and 11% in the 0.1 and 0.6 ppm treatments, respectively. Trace amounts of THg in the 0.0 ppm control group also increased as a result of fasting, but remained extremely low. THg increased 0.4 ppm for each gram of lean mass catabolized in the higher dose birds. Our findings indicate that methylmercury is mobilized from lean tissues during protein catabolism and results in acute increases in circulating concentrations. This is a previously undocumented potential threat to wild migratory birds, which may experience greater surges in circulating methylmercury than demonstrated here as a result of their greater reductions in lean mass. PMID:27173605

  17. Mobile Security with Smartcards

    OpenAIRE

    Kilian-Kehr, Roger

    2002-01-01

    Mobility in conjunction with communication facilities in the form of mobile telephony seems to be one of the major technology trends observed throughout the last decade. Many experts and analysts expect that the arrival of mobile services such as mobile commerce, location-based services, multi-media messaging, and mobile gaming in the third generation of mobile networks will be the next step in this success story. However, protecting service providers from fraud and mobile users from new thre...

  18. Application of DNA-DNA colony hybridization to the detection of catabolic genotypes in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of preexisting DNA hybridization techniques was investigated for potential in determining populations of specific gene sequences in environmental samples. Cross-hybridizations among two degradative plasmids, TOL and NAH, and two cloning vehicles, pLAFR1 and RSF1010, were determined. The detection limits for the TOL plasmid against a nonhomologous plasmid-bearing bacterial background was ascertained. The colony hybridization technique allowed detection of one colony containing TOL plasmid among 10(6) Escherichia coli colonies of nonhomologous DNA. Comparisons between population estimates derived from growth on selective substrates and from hybridizations were examined. Findings indicated that standard sole carbon source enumeration procedures for degradative populations lead to overestimations due to nonspecific growth of other bacteria on the microcontaminant carbon sources present in the media. Population estimates based on the selective growth of a microcosm population on two aromatic substrates (toluene and naphthalene) and estimates derived from DNA-DNA colony hybridizations, using the TOL or NAH plasmid as a probe, corresponded with estimates of substrate mineralization rates and past exposure to environmental contaminants. The applications of such techniques are hoped to eventually allow enumeration of any specific gene sequences in the environment, including both anabolic and catabolic genes. In addition, this procedure should prove useful in monitoring recombinant DNA clones released into environmental situations

  19. FGF21 Lowers Plasma Triglycerides by Accelerating Lipoprotein Catabolism in White and Brown Adipose Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlein, Christian; Talukdar, Saswata; Heine, Markus; Fischer, Alexander W; Krott, Lucia M; Nilsson, Stefan K; Brenner, Martin B; Heeren, Joerg; Scheja, Ludger

    2016-03-01

    FGF21 decreases plasma triglycerides (TGs) in rodents and humans; however, the underlying mechanism or mechanisms are unclear. In the present study, we examined the role of FGF21 in production and disposal of TG-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) in mice. Treatment with pharmacological doses of FGF21 acutely reduced plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs), liver TG content, and VLDL-TG secretion. In addition, metabolic turnover studies revealed that FGF21 facilitated the catabolism of TRL in white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT). FGF21-dependent TRL processing was strongly attenuated in CD36-deficient mice and transgenic mice lacking lipoprotein lipase in adipose tissues. Insulin resistance in diet-induced obese and ob/ob mice shifted FGF21 responses from WAT toward energy-combusting BAT. In conclusion, FGF21 lowers plasma TGs through a dual mechanism: first, by reducing NEFA plasma levels and consequently hepatic VLDL lipidation and, second, by increasing CD36 and LPL-dependent TRL disposal in WAT and BAT. PMID:26853749

  20. Catabolism of Branched Chain Amino Acids Supports Respiration but Not Volatile Synthesis in Tomato Fruits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrej Kochevenko; Wagner L.Araújo; Gregory S.Maloney; Denise M.Tieman; Phuc Thi Do; Mark G.Taylor; Harry J.Klee; Alisdair R.Fernie

    2012-01-01

    The branched-chain amino acid transaminases (BCATs) have a crucial role in metabolism of the branched-chain amino acids leucine,isoleucine,and valine.These enzymes catalyze the last step of synthesis and the initial step of degradation of these amino acids.Although the biosynthetic pathways of branched chain amino acids in plants have been extensively investigated and a number of genes have been characterized,their catabolism in plants is not yet completely understood.We previously characterized the branched chain amino acid transaminase gene family in tomato,revealing both the subcellular localization and kinetic properties of the enzymes encoded by six genes.Here,we examined possible functions of the enzymes during fruit development.We further characterized transgenic plants differing in the expression of branched chain amino acid transaminases 1 and 3,evaluating the rates of respiration in fruits deficient in BCAT1 and the levels of volatiles in lines overexpressing either BCAT1 or BCAT3.We quantitatively tested,via precursor and isotope feeding experiments,the importance of the branched chain amino acids and their corresponding keto acids in the formation of fruit volatiles.Our results not only demonstrate for the first time the importance of branched chain amino acids in fruit respiration,but also reveal that keto acids,rather than amino acids,are the likely precursors for the branched chain flavor volatiles.

  1. Characterization of the Erwinia chrysanthemi Gan locus, involved in galactan catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delangle, Aurélie; Prouvost, Anne-France; Cogez, Virginie; Bohin, Jean-Pierre; Lacroix, Jean-Marie; Cotte-Pattat, Nicole Hugouvieux

    2007-10-01

    beta-1,4-Galactan is a major component of the ramified regions of pectin. Analysis of the genome of the plant pathogenic bacteria Erwinia chrysanthemi revealed the presence of a cluster of eight genes encoding proteins potentially involved in galactan utilization. The predicted transport system would comprise a specific porin GanL and an ABC transporter made of four proteins, GanFGK(2). Degradation of galactans would be catalyzed by the periplasmic 1,4-beta-endogalactanase GanA, which released oligogalactans from trimer to hexamer. After their transport through the inner membrane, oligogalactans would be degraded into galactose by the cytoplasmic 1,4-beta-exogalactanase GanB. Mutants affected for the porin or endogalactanase were unable to grow on galactans, but they grew on galactose and on a mixture of galactotriose, galactotetraose, galactopentaose, and galactohexaose. Mutants affected for the periplasmic galactan binding protein, the transporter ATPase, or the exogalactanase were only able to grow on galactose. Thus, the phenotypes of these mutants confirmed the functionality of the gan locus in transport and catabolism of galactans. These mutations did not affect the virulence of E. chrysanthemi on chicory leaves, potato tubers, or Saintpaulia ionantha, suggesting an accessory role of galactan utilization in the bacterial pathogeny. PMID:17644603

  2. Novel Insights into the Diversity of Catabolic Metabolism from Ten Haloarchaeal Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain; Scheuner, Carmen; Goker, Markus; Mavromatis, Kostas; Hooper, Sean D.; Porat, Iris; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2011-05-03

    The extremely halophilic archaea are present worldwide in saline environments and have important biotechnological applications. Ten complete genomes of haloarchaea are now available, providing an opportunity for comparative analysis. We report here the comparative analysis of five newly sequenced haloarchaeal genomes with five previously published ones. Whole genome trees based on protein sequences provide strong support for deep relationships between the ten organisms. Using a soft clustering approach, we identified 887 protein clusters present in all halophiles. Of these core clusters, 112 are not found in any other archaea and therefore constitute the haloarchaeal signature. Four of the halophiles were isolated from water, and four were isolated from soil or sediment. Although there are few habitat-specific clusters, the soil/sediment halophiles tend to have greater capacity for polysaccharide degradation, siderophore synthesis, and cell wall modification. Halorhabdus utahensis and Haloterrigena turkmenica encode over forty glycosyl hydrolases each, and may be capable of breaking down naturally occurring complex carbohydrates. H. utahensis is specialized for growth on carbohydrates and has few amino acid degradation pathways. It uses the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway instead of the oxidative pathway, giving it more flexibility in the metabolism of pentoses. These new genomes expand our understanding of haloarchaeal catabolic pathways, providing a basis for further experimental analysis, especially with regard to carbohydrate metabolism. Halophilic glycosyl hydrolases for use in biofuel production are more likely to be found in halophiles isolated from soil or sediment.

  3. Serum and urinary lipoproteins in the human nephrotic syndrome: evidence for renal catabolism of lipoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shore, V.G.; Forte, T.; Licht, H.; Lewis, S.B.

    1982-03-01

    The urinary excretion of lipoproteins and the possibility of catabolic alterations on glomerular filtration were investigated in four nephrotic subjects difering in etiology, serum lipoprotein profile, and 24 hr urinary output of protein and lipids. The apolipoproteins and lipoproteins of urine were compared with those of serum with respect to distribution profile, physical properties, and composition. As expected from molecular sieving effects during glomerular filtration, the urinary HDL were more abundant than the lower density lipoproteins even when the plasma LDL was elevated markedly. Intact apolipoproteins were not found in the concentrated urinary fraction isolated by ultrafiltration between the limits of 10/sup 4/ and 5 x 10/sup 4/ daltons. On the basis of immunoreactivity, gel electrophoresis, and amino acid composition, apolipoproteins B and AI are the major and minor proteins, respectively, of urinary LDL, and apo B is the major protein of the urinary IDL and VLDL. Apolipoproteins AI, AII, CI, CIII, and possibly AIV were isolated from the urinary HDL. As much as 20% of the protein moiety of the urinary HDL appeared to be large apolipoprotien fragments with molecular weights and isoelectric points similar to those of apo CII and apo CIII. The lower density classes of urinary lipoproteins also appeared to have lost apo E and apo C's and to have undergone partial proteolysis.

  4. Aflatoxin B1 induced upregulation of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 in human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghufran, Md Sajid; Ghosh, Krishna; Kanade, Santosh R

    2016-09-01

    The exposure of naturally occurring mycotoxins affects human health and play a vital role in cancer initiation and progression. Aflatoxin B1 is a difuranocoumarin mycotoxin, classified as a group I carcinogen. The present study was conducted to assess the effect of aflatoxin B1 on epigenetic regulatory proteins. The protein arginine methyltransferase 5 expression was induced upon aflatoxin B1 treatment in a dose and time dependent manner. Further global arginine methylation was also increased in the same manner. This is the first report showing the induction of epigenetic regulatory protein, protein arginine methyltransferase 5 upon aflatoxin B1 treatment. Further study is required to establish the detailed pathway of PRMT5 induction. PMID:27242039

  5. Proteomic analysis of arginine methylation sites in human cells reveals dynamic regulation during transcriptional arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Horn, Heiko; Jungmichel, Stephanie;

    2014-01-01

    contain regulated functions on their own. Collectively, we present a site-specific MMA dataset in human cells and demonstrate for the first time that MMA is a dynamic post-translational modification regulated during transcriptional arrest by a hitherto uncharacterized arginine demethylase....... mono-methylation (MMA) sites. We thereby identify 1,027 site-specific MMA sites on 494 human proteins, discovering numerous novel mono-methylation targets and confirming the majority of currently known MMA substrates. Nuclear RNA-binding proteins involved in RNA processing, RNA localization......, transcription, and chromatin remodeling are predominantly found modified with MMA. Despite this, MMA sites prominently are located outside RNA-binding domains as compared to the proteome-wide distribution of arginine residues. Quantification of arginine methylation in cells treated with Actinomycin D uncovers...

  6. GABA Production in Lactococcus lactis Is Enhanced by Arginine and Co-addition of Malate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroute, Valérie; Yasaro, Chonthicha; Narin, Waranya; Mazzoli, Roberto; Pessione, Enrica; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel; Loubière, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis NCDO 2118 was previously selected for its ability to decarboxylate glutamate to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an interesting nutritional supplement able to improve mood and relaxation. Amino acid decarboxylation is generally considered as among the biochemical systems allowing lactic acid bacteria to counteracting acidic stress and obtaining metabolic energy. These strategies also include arginine deiminase pathway and malolactic fermentation but little is known about their possible interactions of with GABA production. In the present study, the effects of glutamate, arginine, and malate (i.e., the substrates of these acid-resistance pathways) on L. lactis NCDO 2118 growth and GABA production performances were analyzed. Both malate and arginine supplementation resulted in an efficient reduction of acidity and improvement of bacterial biomass compared to glutamate supplementation. Glutamate decarboxylation was limited to narrow environmental conditions (pH < 5.1) and physiological state (stationary phase). However, some conditions were able to improve GABA production or activate glutamate decarboxylation system even outside of this compass. Arginine clearly stimulated glutamate decarboxylation: the highest GABA production (8.6 mM) was observed in cultures supplemented with both arginine and glutamate. The simultaneous addition of arginine, malate, and glutamate enabled earlier GABA production (i.e., during exponential growth) at relatively high pH (6.5). As far as we know, no previous study has reported GABA production in such conditions. Although further studies are needed to understand the molecular basis of these phenomena, these results represent important keys suitable of application in GABA production processes. PMID:27458444

  7. Arginine-containing desensitizing toothpaste for the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zheng-yan; Wang, Fei; Lu, Keke; Li, Yue-heng; Zhou, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the effect of arginine-containing desensitizing toothpaste on dentin hypersensitivity (DH). Methods Databases including China National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals, China Biology Medicine disc, Wangfang Data, PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane Trials Register were searched, and Google was used as a supplementary tool to search for information through February 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of the treatment of DH with arginine-containing toothpaste were included. Relevant information was extracted, and a quality evaluation was performed. Meta-analyses were performed using RevMan 5.2 software. Results Eighteen RCTs with 1,423 patients were included. The results of the meta-analyses demonstrated that at days 0 and 3; weeks 2, 4, and 8; and more than 12 weeks, arginine-containing toothpaste led to significantly improved results on the tactile sensitivity test (standardized mean difference [SMD] =1.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.14, 2.76]) and the air-blast test (SMD =−1.60, 95% CI [−2.14, −1.05]) at 4 weeks and the tactile sensitivity test (SMD =2.01, 95% CI [1.41, 2.61]) and the air-blast test (SMD =−1.41, 95% CI [−1.83, −0.98]) at 8 weeks compared to toothpastes containing other desensitizing components, thus indicating a superior therapeutic effect of arginine-containing desensitizing toothpaste. However, no significant differences between arginine-containing toothpaste and toothpastes containing other desensitizing components were observed in the air-blast test at days 0 and 3 and week 2 and in the tactile sensitivity and air-blast tests at more than 12 weeks. Conclusion The current evidence indicates that arginine-containing toothpaste is effective for DH. However, further high-quality, large-sample RCTs are needed. PMID:26793006

  8. Potential protective effect of arginine against 4-nitrophenol-induced ovarian damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei-Feng; Li, Yan-Sen; Dai, Peng-Yuan; Li, Chun-Mei

    2016-01-01

    4-nitrophenol (PNP) is generally regarded as a diesel exhaust particle (DEP). Arginine plays an important role as a new feed additive, possessing highly efficient antioxidant activities. Here we investigated the effects of dietary supplementation with arginine against ovarian damage induced by PNP in rats. A total of thirty-two female rats postnatal day 28 (PND 28) were randomly divided into four groups. Two groups were fed with basal diet or 13 g/kg arginine in diet for 4 weeks, respectively; the other two groups were given PNP (100 mg/kg b.w.) daily by subcutaneous injection for 2 weeks following pretreatment with either basal diet or arginine diet for 2 weeks. The values of body weight gain (BWG), average daily gain (ADG) and percentage weight gain (PWG) upon PNP treatment were significantly reduced than those in other groups. The relative liver weight in the PNP group was significantly decreased compared with the control group. Treatment with PNP significant reduced the number of corpora lutea, although serum 17β-estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) concentrations were unchanged. The morphology of the ovaries in PNP-treated rats displayed necrosis, follicular deformation and granulosa cells irregular arrangement. Moreover, exposure to PNP enhanced production of malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and decreased the activities of total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) and catalase (CAT), and the co-administration of arginine can attenuate the oxidative stress caused by PNP. These results suggest that arginine may have a protective effect against ovarian damage induced by PNP owing to its antioxidant capacity effect. PMID:27193729

  9. Linear short histidine and cysteine modified arginine peptides constitute a potential class of DNA delivery agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Anita; Shukla, Vasundhara; Khanduri, Richa; Dabral, Spoorti; Singh, Harpal; Ganguli, Munia

    2014-03-01

    The success of gene therapy relies on the development of safe and efficient multifunctional carriers of nucleic acids that can overcome extra- and intracellular barriers, protect the nucleic acid and mediate its release at the desired site allowing gene expression. Peptides bear unique properties that are indispensable for any carrier, e.g., they can mediate DNA condensation, cellular targeting, membrane translocation, endosomal escape and nuclear localization. In an effort to design a multifunctional peptide, we have modified an arginine homopeptide R16 by replacement of seven arginines with histidines and addition of one cysteine at each end respectively to impart endosomal escape property while maintaining the DNA condensation and release balance. Addition of histidines imparts endosomal escape property to arginine homopeptide, but their arrangement with respect to arginines is more critical in controlling DNA condensation, release and transfection efficiency. Intriguingly, R5H7R4 peptide where charge/arginine is distributed in blocks is preferred for strong condensation while more efficient transfection is seen in the variants R9H7 and H4R9H3, which exhibit weak condensation and strong release. Addition of cysteine to each of these peptides further fine-tuned the condensation-release balance without application of any oxidative procedure unlike other similar systems reported in the literature. This resulted in a large increase in the transfection efficiency in all of the histidine modified peptides irrespective of the arginine and histidine positions. This series of multifunctional peptides shows comparable transfection efficiency to commercially available transfection reagent Lipofectamine 2000 at low charge ratios, with simple preparative procedure and exhibits much less toxicity. PMID:24476132

  10. The Metabolic Conversion of Arginine in the Rumen Wall and its Importance in Ruminant Nitrogen Metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The functions of arginase and urease of the rumen wall were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Surviving ruminal mucosae of cattle were incubated for four hours. 14C-arginine-HCl, uniformly labelled, was added to the serosal side at a concentration of 10 pmol/mi. About 25% of the added arginine was used during the incubation by the ruminal tissue. In comparison with controls an increased amount of 14C-omithine, urea, and ammonia were formed in the mucosa and appeared on both sides. The increase was due to arginase and urease functions. It was estimated that about 50% of the urea formed by arginine breakdown were present at the mucosa side, mainly in the form of ammonia. Of the omithine simultaneously formed, 85% remained on the serosa side. Remarkable individual variations of omithine and urea formation were found from animal to animal. The in-vivo experiments were performed using goats with catheters placed in the right ruminal artery and vein. We injected 90 μCi of 14C-arginine into the ruminal artery. When 80 g of soluble starch were added to the rumen the activity and concentration of ornithine increased in the ruminal venous blood showing an arterial-venous difference. The radioactivity of urea in blood taken from the ruminal vein and the carotid artery did not show any difference. When starch was omitted from the rumen a comparable difference of omithine concentration was not found. It is assumed that the enzymes arginase and urease of the rumen wall are involved in nitrogen recycling processes. Blood arginine may be hydrolysed in the rumen wall forming urea and ornithine. Urea formed by arginine breakdown may be split to CO2 and ammonia. The experiments produced evidence that the ammonia formed preferably enters the rumen content. The nitrogen transfer through the rumen wall may be affected by varying activities of arginase. (author)

  11. Experimental evidence of a xylose-catabolic pathway on the pAO1 megaplasmid of Arthrobacter nicotinovorans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Mihasan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The pAO1 megaplasmid of A. nicotinovorans consists of 165 ORF's related mainly to nicotine degradation, uptake and utilization of carbohydrates, amino acids and sarcosine. A putative sugar catabolic pathway consisting of 11 ORF's organized as a single operon were previously described. The current work brings experimental data supporting the existence of a D-Xylose catabolic pathway on the pAO1 megaplasmid. When grown on D-xylose containing media, the cells harboring the pAO1 megaplasmid grow to higher cell densities and also express the OxRe protein coded by the megaplasmid. A putative pathway similar to Weimberg pentose pathway is postulated, in which D-xylose is transported in the cell by the ABC-type transport system and then transformed using the putative sugar-dehidrogenase OxRe to D-xylonate, which is further degrated to 2-ketoglutarate and integrated into the general metabolism of the cell

  12. Effects of chronic oral L-arginine administration on the L-arginine/NO pathway in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease or coronary artery disease: L-Arginine prevents renal loss of nitrite, the major NO reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jessica Y; Rothmann, Sabine; Schröder, Frank; Langen, Jennifer; Lücke, Thomas; Mariotti, François; Huneau, Jean François; Frölich, Jürgen C; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2015-09-01

    Despite saturation of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) by its substrate L-arginine (Arg), oral and intravenous supplementation of Arg may enhance NO synthesis, a phenomenon known as "The L-arginine paradox". Yet, Arg is not only a source of NO, but is also a source for guanidine-methylated (N (G)) arginine derivatives which are all inhibitors of NOS activity. Therefore, Arg supplementation may not always result in enhanced NO synthesis. Concomitant synthesis of N (G)-monomethyl arginine (MMA), N (G),N (G)-dimethylarginine (asymmetric dimethylarginine, ADMA) and N (G),N (G´)-dimethylarginine (symmetric dimethylarginine, SDMA) from supplemented Arg may outweigh and even outbalance the positive effects of Arg on NO. Another possible, yet little investigated effect of Arg supplementation may be alteration of renal function, notably the influence on the excretion of nitrite in the urine. Nitrite is the autoxidation product of NO and the major reservoir of NO in the circulation. Nitrite and Arg are reabsorbed in the proximal tubule of the nephron and this reabsorption is coupled, at least in part, to the renal carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity. In the present placebo-controlled studies, we investigated the effect of chronic oral Arg supplementation of 10 g/day for 3 or 6 months in patients suffering from peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) or coronary artery disease (CAD) on the urinary excretion of nitrite relative to nitrate. We determined the urinary nitrate-to-nitrite molar ratio (UNOxR), which is a measure of nitrite-dependent renal CA activity before and after oral intake of Arg or placebo by the patients. The UNOxR was also determined in 6 children who underwent the Arg test, i.e., intravenous infusion of Arg (0.5 g Arg/kg bodyweight) for 30 min. Arg was well tolerated by the patients of the three studies. Oral Arg supplementation increased Arg (plasma and urine) and ADMA (urine) concentrations. No appreciable changes were seen in NO (in PAOD and CAD) and

  13. Separation and partial characterization of the enzymes of the toluene-4-monooxygenase catabolic pathway in Pseudomonas mendocina KR1.

    OpenAIRE

    Whited, G M; Gibson, D T

    1991-01-01

    The route of toluene degradation by Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 was studied by separating or purifying from toluene-grown cells the catabolic enzymes responsible for oxidation of p-cresol through the ring cleavage step. Enzymatic transformations corresponding to each of the metabolic steps in the proposed degradative pathway were conducted with cell-free preparations. p-Cresol was metabolized by the enzyme p-cresol methylhydroxylase to p-hydroxybenzaldehyde. p-Hydroxybenzaldehyde was further ox...

  14. Cytosolic re-localization and optimization of valine synthesis and catabolism enables inseased isobutanol production with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Brat Dawid; Weber Christian; Lorenzen Wolfram; Bode Helge B; Boles Eckhard

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The branched chain alcohol isobutanol exhibits superior physicochemical properties as an alternative biofuel. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae naturally produces low amounts of isobutanol as a by-product during fermentations, resulting from the catabolism of valine. As S. cerevisiae is widely used in industrial applications and can easily be modified by genetic engineering, this microorganism is a promising host for the fermentative production of higher amounts of isobut...

  15. Cytosolic re-localization and optimization of valine synthesis and catabolism enables increased isobutanol production with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Brat, Dawid; Weber, Christian; Lorenzen, Wolfram; Bode, Helge Björn; Boles, Eckhard

    2012-01-01

    Background: The branched chain alcohol isobutanol exhibits superior physicochemical properties as an alternative biofuel. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae naturally produces low amounts of isobutanol as a by-product during fermentations, resulting from the catabolism of valine. As S. cerevisiae is widely used in industrial applications and can easily be modified by genetic engineering, this microorganism is a promising host for the fermentative production of higher amounts of isobutanol. ...

  16. Untersuchungen zur Bedeutung von Arginin für die induzierte NO-Synthese im ZNS

    OpenAIRE

    Fischmann, Boris

    2005-01-01

    Die induzierbare NO-Synthase (iNOS) wird bei verschiedenen neurodegenerativen Erkrankungen verstärkt exprimiert und steht im Verdacht, an der Pathogenese dieser Erkrankungen beteiligt zu sein. Da Arginin der iNOS als Substrat dient, steht die induzierte NO-Produktion in engem Zusammenhang mit dem Argininstoffwechsel. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurden in Modellsystemen für Microgliazellen (N11-Zellen) und für Astrocyten (C6-BU-1-Zellen) Aspekte der induzierten Produktion von NO und des Arginin...

  17. Effect of L-arginine on neuromuscular transmission of the chick biventer cervicis muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Esfandiar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available biventer cervicis muscleD. Effect of L-arginine on neuromuscular transmission of the chick EsfandiarAbstractBackground and Purpose: NO is a short-lived gas molecule generated by degradation of L-arg to citrulline and by the activation of enzyme NOS Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent. There are multiple NOS isoforms that strongly are expressed in skeletal muscle, suggesting the crucial role of NO in regulating muscular metabolism and function. In this study, the effect of L-arginine was examined at the neuromuscular junction of the chick biventer cervicis muscle.Materials and Methods: Biventer cervicis muscle preparations from chick’s age of 3 weeks were set up in the organ bath. The organ bath had a vessel with volume of about 70 ml; it contained Tyrode solution aerated with oxygen and was kept at 37º C. NO levels was also measured in the chick biventer cervicis muscle homogenates, using spectrophotometer method for the direct detection of NO, nitrite and nitrate. Total nitrite (nitrite+nitrate was measured by a spectrophotometer at 540 nm after the conversion of nitrate to nitrite by copperized cadmium granules.Results: L-Arginine at 500 µg/ml, decreased twitch response to electrical stimulation, and produced rightward shift of the dose-response curve for acetylcholine or carbachol. L-arginine at 1000 µg/ml produced a strong shift to the right of the dose-response curve for acetylcholine or carbachol with a reduction in efficacy. The inhibitory effect of L-arginine on the twitch response was blocked by caffeine (200 µg/ml. NO levels were found to be significantly increased in concentrations 500 and 1000 µg/ml of L-arginine in comparison with the control group (p < 0.001.Conclusion: These findings indicate a possible role of increased NO levels in the suppressive action of L-arginie on the twitch response. In addition, the results indicate that the post-junctional antagonistic action of L-arginine is probably the result of impaired sarcoplasmic

  18. Performance and nitrogen balance of laying hens fed increasing levels of digestible lysine and arginine

    OpenAIRE

    Fabyola Barros de Carvalho; José Henrique Stringhini; Maíra Silva Matos; Roberto Moraes Jardim Filho; Marcos Barcellos Café; Nadja Susana Mogyca Leandro; Maria Auxiliadora Andrade

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effect of two digestible lysine levels and four digestible arginine levels on laying hens from 24 to 48 weeks of age. Three hundred and twenty Lohmann LSL laying hens were allotted in a completely randomized design in a 2 × 4 factorial arrangement, with two levels of digestible lysine (700 and 900 mg/kg of diet) and four digestible arginine levels (700, 800, 900 and 1000 mg/kg of diet). Results indicated requirement of 884 and 830 mg of dig...

  19. Arginine vasopressin stimulates phosphoinositide turnover in an enriched rat Leydig cell preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.R.; Hansen, Harald S.; Jensen, B.

    1989-01-01

    An enriched rat Leydig cell preparation was preincubated with [C]arachidonic acid. Stimulation of the cells with arginine vasopressin (AVP) (1 µM) for 2 min caused a significant increase in labelled phosphatidic acid and a significant fall in radioactivity in phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidyl......An enriched rat Leydig cell preparation was preincubated with [C]arachidonic acid. Stimulation of the cells with arginine vasopressin (AVP) (1 µM) for 2 min caused a significant increase in labelled phosphatidic acid and a significant fall in radioactivity in phosphatidylinositol and...

  20. The Role of Arginin and Uric Acid on Portulaca Grandiflora Growth under Saline Conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Yagi

    2014-01-01

    Seeds of Portulaca grandiflora were soaked in distilled water, NaCl or NaCl with uric acid or arginine or in one of the amino acids. Treatment of seeds of Portulaca grandiflora with arginine and uric acid under saline conditions increased the percent of seed germination from 55% to 80%. Incorporation of these amino acids in the nutrient medium also significantly enhanced the dry weights as well as the contents of chlorophyll and ascorbic acid in the seedlings. Levels of both total amino acids...

  1. Radiometric assay for determining the incorporation of L-canavanine or L-arginine into protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procedures for a radiometric assay of L-[guanidinooxy-14C]canavanine were developed which provide a convenient and accurate measure of the incorporation of [14C]canavanine into de novo-synthesized proteins. These methods are also applicable to determining [14C]arginine incorporation into protein. These procedures have been employed to study the synthesis of L-[guanidinooxy-14C]canavanine- and L-[guanidino-14C]arginine-containing proteins from the hemolymph of Manduca sexta and Heliothis virescens, two highly destructive insect pests

  2. Reengineering of a Corynebacterium glutamicum l-Arginine and l-Citrulline Producer▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, Masato; Mitsuhashi, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kenji; Hayashi, Mikiro

    2009-01-01

    Toward the creation of a robust and efficient producer of l-arginine and l-citrulline (arginine/citrulline), we have performed reengineering of a Corynebacterium glutamicum strain by using genetic information of three classical producers. Sequence analysis of their arg operons identified three point mutations (argR123, argG92up, and argG45) in one producer and one point mutation (argB26 or argB31) in each of the other two producers. Reconstitution of the former three mutations or of each argB...

  3. Dietary l-Arginine Supplementation Protects Weanling Pigs from Deoxynivalenol-Induced Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Li Wu; Peng Liao; Liuqin He; Zemeng Feng; Wenkai Ren; Jie Yin; Jielin Duan; Tiejun Li; Yulong Yin

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the positive effects of dietary supplementation with l-arginine (Arg) on piglets fed a deoxynivalenol (DON)-contaminated diet. A total of eighteen, 28-day-old healthy weanling pigs were randomly assigned into one of three groups: uncontaminated basal diet (control group), 6 mg/kg DON-contaminated diet (DON group) and 6 mg/kg DON + 1% l-arginine (DON + ARG group). After 21 days of Arg supplementation, piglets in the DON and DON + ARG groups were challenged...

  4. Nonspecific blockade of vascular free radical signals by methylated arginine analogues

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro M.A.; Augusto O.; Barbeiro H.V.; Carvalho M.H.C.; da-Luz P.L.; Laurindo F.R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Methylated arginine analogues are often used as probes of the effect of nitric oxide; however, their specificity is unclear and seems to be frequently overestimated. This study analyzed the effects of NG-methyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) on the endothelium-dependent release of vascular superoxide radicals triggered by increased flow. Plasma ascorbyl radical signals measured by direct electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in 25 rabbits increased by 3.8 ± 0.7 nmol/l vs baseline (28.7 ± 1.4 nmol...

  5. Efficacy L-Arginine In Patients With Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Associated With Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr Fediv

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Purpose Recent research in the field of hematology indicate that among the many pathogenic mechanisms of development and progression of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis NASH which occurs on the background of the metabolic syndrome an important role is played by endothelial dysfunction and violations of haemocoagulation. The aim of this research was to study the effectiveness of L-arginine as it corrects endothelial dysfunction and disorders of homeostasis haemocoagulation link in patients with NASH associated with the metabolic syndrome. Subjects and Methods 128 patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis associated with metabolic syndrome were examined. Some patients 63 persons received standard treatment according to national guidelines. To another group 65 patients on the background of basic therapy L-arginine hydrochloride followed by transition to oral form of L-arginine aspartate was administered. Blood levels of stable nitrogen monoxide metabolites nitrites nitrates endothelin-1 and plasma recalcification time prothrombin time thrombin time activated partial thromboplastin time fibrinogen plasma level activity of antithrombin III and coagulation factor XIII potential activity of plasminogen plasma fibrinolytic blood activity were studied. Results Originally significantly increased levels of endothelin-1 decreased after the therapy in all studied groups but more noticeable changes in the group with L-arginine appointment were observed p0.05. In the studied groups normalization of stable nitrogen monoxide metabolites after treatment was also noticed. Significant p0.05 increase in all haemocoagulation time characteristics and activities of antithrombin-III and factor XIII was found. The positive effect of L-arginine on blood fibrinolytic activity was noted. Discussion and Conclusion Combined therapy of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis associated with metabolic syndrome with a differentiated degreeal L-arginine assignment by

  6. Mobile shearography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalms, Michael; Jueptner, Werner

    2005-04-01

    By reason of their sensitivity, accuracy and non-contact as well as non-destructive characteristics, modern optical methods such as digital speckle shearography have found an increasing interest for NDT applications on the factory floor. With new carbon filter technologies and other lightweight constructions in aircraft and automotive manufacturing, adapted examination designs and especially developed testing methods are necessary. Shearography as a coherent optical method has been widely accepted as an useful NDT tool. It is a robust interferometric method to determine locations with maximum stress on various material structures. However, limitations of this technique can be found in the bulky equipment components, the interpretation of the complex sherographic result images and at the work with non-cooperative surfaces (dark absorber, bright shining reflectors). We report a mobile shearography system that was especially designed for investigations at aircraft and automotive constructions.

  7. Mobile video with mobile IPv6

    CERN Document Server

    Minoli, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Increased reliance on mobile devices and streaming of video content are two of the most recent changes that have led those in the video distribution industry to be concerned about the shifting or erosion of traditional advertising revenues. Infrastructure providers also need to position themselves to take advantage of these trends. Mobile Video with Mobile IPv6provides an overview of the current mobile landscape, then delves specifically into the capabilities and operational details of IPv6. The book also addresses 3G and 4G services, the application of Mobile IPv6 to streaming and other mobil

  8. Effects of vegetation type on soil microbial community structure and catabolic diversity assessed by polyphasic methods in North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Soil microbes play a major role in ecological processes and are closely associated with the aboveground plant community. In order to understand the effects of vegetation type on the characteristics of soil microbial communities, the soil microbial communities were assessed by plate counts, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and Biolog microplate techniques in five plant communities, i.e., soybean field (SF), artificial turf (AT), artificial shrub (AS), natural shrub (NS), and maize field (MF) in Jinan, Shandong Province, North China. The results showed that plant diversity had little discernible effect on microbial biomass but a positive impact on the evennessof utilized substrates in Biolog microplate. Legumes could significantly enhance the number of cultural microorganisms, microbial biomass, and community catabolic diversity. Except for SF dominated by legumes, the biomass of fungi and the catabolic diversity of microbial community were higher in less disturbed soil beneath NS than in frequently disturbed soils beneath the other vegetation types. These results confirmed that high number of plant species, legumes, and natural vegetation types tend to support soil microbial communities with higher function. The present study also found a significant correlation between the number of cultured bacteria and catabolic diversity of the bacterial community. Different research methods led to varied results in this study. The combination of several approaches is recommended for accurately describing the characteristics of microbial communities in many respects.

  9. The microbiome, intestinal function, and arginine metabolism of healthy Indian women are different from those of American and Jamaican women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indian women have slower arginine flux during pregnancy compared with American and Jamaican women. Arginine is a semi-essential amino acid that becomes essential during periods of rapid lean tissue deposition. It is synthesized only from citrulline, a nondietary amino acid produced mainly in the gut...

  10. Cationic amino acid transporters and Salmonella Typhimurium ArgT collectively regulate arginine availability towards intracellular Salmonella growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Das

    Full Text Available Cationic amino acid transporters (mCAT1 and mCAT2B regulate the arginine availability in macrophages. How in the infected cell a pathogen can alter the arginine metabolism of the host remains to be understood. We reveal here a novel mechanism by which Salmonella exploit mCAT1 and mCAT2B to acquire host arginine towards its own intracellular growth within antigen presenting cells. We demonstrate that Salmonella infected bone marrow derived macrophages and dendritic cells show enhanced arginine uptake and increased expression of mCAT1 and mCAT2B. We show that the mCAT1 transporter is in close proximity to Salmonella containing vacuole (SCV specifically by live intracellular Salmonella in order to access the macrophage cytosolic arginine pool. Further, Lysosome associated membrane protein 1, a marker of SCV, also was found to colocalize with mCAT1 in the Salmonella infected cell. The intra vacuolar Salmonella then acquire the host arginine via its own arginine transporter, ArgT for growth. The argT knockout strain was unable to acquire host arginine and was attenuated in growth in both macrophages and in mice model of infection. Together, these data reveal survival strategies by which virulent Salmonella adapt to the harsh conditions prevailing in the infected host cells.

  11. DNA strand break dependence on Tris and arginine scavenger concentrations under ultra-soft X-ray irradiation: the contribution of secondary arginine radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souici, Mounir; Khalil, Talat Tariq; Boulanouar, Omar; Belafrites, Abdelfettah; Mavon, Christophe; Fromm, Michel

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we used a bench-top cold-cathode ultra-soft X-ray (USX) generator to expose aqueous DNA plasmid solutions to low-LET radiation under various scavenging conditions. Single- and double-strand breaks were assessed using classic gel electrophoresis quantification of linear, circular and supercoiled plasmid DNA topologies. With their very low penetration range in water, USX can only interact with matter up to short distances, of the order of 50 μm. We validated a stirring procedure which makes it possible to expose 100 µL of aqueous samples (2 mm thick). The scavenging of OH radicals by Tris buffer was studied at ambient temperature under aerobic conditions and compared to data gathered in the literature. A very good agreement was found with the rare data dealing with DNA plasmid exposed to Al Kα photons at low temperature (T ≤ 277 K), which therefore validated the experimental procedure. The yields for DNA single-strand breaks determined during this study enabled the ratio of indirect to direct effects to be determined at 96.2 %, in good agreement with the value of 97.7 % stemming from a study based on γ-ray irradiation of frozen solutions of plasmid DNA. Then, arginine was used both to create a "biological-like" chemical environment around the DNA plasmids and as an OH radical scavenger, in vitro. Although arginine has a greater scavenging (protecting) power than Tris, surprisingly, it led to higher rates of strand breakage. Based on the specific binding modes of arginine to DNA, we suggest that the side effects observed are due to the presence of arginine near to, but also inside, the DNA double helix. PMID:26994994

  12. The Homogentisate Pathway: a Central Catabolic Pathway Involved in the Degradation of l-Phenylalanine, l-Tyrosine, and 3-Hydroxyphenylacetate in Pseudomonas putida

    OpenAIRE

    Arias-Barrau, Elsa; Olivera, Elías R.; Luengo, José M.; Fernández, Cristina; Galán, Beatriz; García, José L.; Díaz, Eduardo; Miñambres, Baltasar

    2004-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida metabolizes Phe and Tyr through a peripheral pathway involving hydroxylation of Phe to Tyr (PhhAB), conversion of Tyr into 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate (TyrB), and formation of homogentisate (Hpd) as the central intermediate. Homogentisate is then catabolized by a central catabolic pathway that involves three enzymes, homogentisate dioxygenase (HmgA), fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (HmgB), and maleylacetoacetate isomerase (HmgC), finally yielding fumarate and acetoacetate. Wherea...

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of the d-Amino Acid Catabolism Bacterium Phaeobacter sp. Strain JL2886, Isolated from Deep Seawater of the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yingnan; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Zilian; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2016-01-01

    Phaeobacter sp. strain JL2886, isolated from deep seawater of the South China Sea, can catabolize d-amino acids. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Phaeobacter sp. JL2886. It comprises ~4.06 Mbp, with a G+C content of 61.52%. A total of 3,913 protein-coding genes and 10 genes related to d-amino acid catabolism were obtained. PMID:27587825

  14. Micro Mobility Marketing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosbond, Jens Henrik; Skov, Mikael B.

    2008-01-01

    Mobile marketing refers to marketing of services or goods using mobile technology and mobile marketing holds potentially great economical opportunities. Traditionally, mobile marketing has been viewed as mobility in the large taking place virtually anywhere, anytime. Further, research shows...... similarities and differences between micro mobility marketing and the traditional mobile marketing in the large. Finally, we suggest areas for further study.Journal of Targeting, Measurement and Analysis for Marketing (2007) 16, 68-77. doi:10.1057/palgrave.jt.5750058; published online 24 December 2007...... considerable number of studies on push-based SMS mobile marketing campaigns. This paper explores a related yet different form of mobile marketing namely micro mobility marketing. Micro mobility marketing denotes mobility in the small, meaning that promotion of goods takes place within a circumscribed location...

  15. Mobile OS Comparative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Jyothy; K, Shinto Kurian

    2013-01-01

    In the fast growing mobile revolutionary era, many operating systems are playing vital role in present market. This study is intending to identify the apt and secure mobile based on mobile operating systems capability and user requirements.

  16. Mobile Inquiry Based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Specht, M. (2012, 8 November). Mobile Inquiry Based Learning. Presentation given at the Workshop "Mobile inquiry-based learning" at the Mobile Learning Day 2012 at the Fernuniversität Hagen, Hagen, Germany.

  17. Basis of Arginine Sensitivity of Microbial N-Acetyl-l-Glutamate Kinases: Mutagenesis and Protein Engineering Study with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Enzymes▿

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Murga, M. Leonor; Rubio, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    N-Acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK) catalyzes the second step of arginine biosynthesis. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but not in Escherichia coli, this step is rate limiting and feedback and sigmoidally inhibited by arginine. Crystal structures revealed that arginine-insensitive E. coli NAGK (EcNAGK) is homodimeric, whereas arginine-inhibitable NAGKs, including P. aeruginosa NAGK (PaNAGK), are hexamers in which an extra N-terminal kinked helix (N-helix) interlinks three dimers. By introducing single...

  18. Molecular and population analyses of a recombination event in the catabolic plasmid pJP4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larraín-Linton, Juanita; De la Iglesia, Rodrigo; Melo, Francisco; González, Bernardo

    2006-10-01

    Cupriavidus necator JMP134(pJP4) harbors a catabolic plasmid, pJP4, which confers the ability to grow on chloroaromatic compounds. Repeated growth on 3-chlorobenzoate (3-CB) results in selection of a recombinant strain, which degrades 3-CB better but no longer grows on 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4-D). We have previously proposed that this phenotype is due to a double homologous recombination event between inverted repeats of the multicopies of this plasmid within the cell. One recombinant form of this plasmid (pJP4-F3) explains this phenotype, since it harbors two copies of the chlorocatechol degradation tfd gene clusters, which are essential to grow on 3-CB, but has lost the tfdA gene, encoding the first step in degradation of 2,4-D. The other recombinant plasmid (pJP4-FM) should harbor two copies of the tfdA gene but no copies of the tfd gene clusters. A molecular analysis using a multiplex PCR approach to distinguish the wild-type plasmid pJP4 from its two recombinant forms, was carried out. Expected PCR products confirming this recombination model were found and sequenced. Few recombinant plasmid forms in cultures grown in several carbon sources were detected. Kinetic studies indicated that cells containing the recombinant plasmid pJP4-FM were not selectable by sole carbon source growth pressure, whereas those cells harboring recombinant plasmid pJP4-F3 were selected upon growth on 3-CB. After 12 days of repeated growth on 3-CB, the complete plasmid population in C. necator JMP134 apparently corresponds to this form. However, wild-type plasmid forms could be recovered after growing this culture on 2,4-D, indicating that different plasmid forms can be found in C. necator JMP134 at the population level. PMID:16980481

  19. Functional metagenomics to mine the human gut microbiome for dietary fiber catabolic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasse, Lena; Bercovici, Juliette; Pizzut-Serin, Sandra; Robe, Patrick; Tap, Julien; Klopp, Christophe; Cantarel, Brandi L; Coutinho, Pedro M; Henrissat, Bernard; Leclerc, Marion; Doré, Joël; Monsan, Pierre; Remaud-Simeon, Magali; Potocki-Veronese, Gabrielle

    2010-11-01

    The human gut microbiome is a complex ecosystem composed mainly of uncultured bacteria. It plays an essential role in the catabolism of dietary fibers, the part of plant material in our diet that is not metabolized in the upper digestive tract, because the human genome does not encode adequate carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes). We describe a multi-step functionally based approach to guide the in-depth pyrosequencing of specific regions of the human gut metagenome encoding the CAZymes involved in dietary fiber breakdown. High-throughput functional screens were first applied to a library covering 5.4 × 10(9) bp of metagenomic DNA, allowing the isolation of 310 clones showing beta-glucanase, hemicellulase, galactanase, amylase, or pectinase activities. Based on the results of refined secondary screens, sequencing efforts were reduced to 0.84 Mb of nonredundant metagenomic DNA, corresponding to 26 clones that were particularly efficient for the degradation of raw plant polysaccharides. Seventy-three CAZymes from 35 different families were discovered. This corresponds to a fivefold target-gene enrichment compared to random sequencing of the human gut metagenome. Thirty-three of these CAZy encoding genes are highly homologous to prevalent genes found in the gut microbiome of at least 20 individuals for whose metagenomic data are available. Moreover, 18 multigenic clusters encoding complementary enzyme activities for plant cell wall degradation were also identified. Gene taxonomic assignment is consistent with horizontal gene transfer events in dominant gut species and provides new insights into the human gut functional trophic chain. PMID:20841432

  20. Mobile Search and Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Lovitskii, Vladimir; McCaffery, Colin; Thrasher, Michael; Traynor, David; Wright, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Mobile advertising is a rapidly growing sector providing brands and marketing agencies the opportunity to connect with consumers beyond traditional and digital media and instead communicate directly on their mobile phones. Mobile advertising will be intrinsically linked with mobile search, which has transported from the internet to the mobile and is identified as an area of potential growth. The result of mobile searching show that as a general rule such search result exceed 1...

  1. Trends in Mobile Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Chocholová, Petra

    2010-01-01

    The principal aim of this thesis is to assess the state of the mobile marketing as of the first quarter of 2011 and to discuss various scenarios of the future development. This thesis defines the terms "mobile marketing" and "mobile advertising" and identifies the main players in the industry. It explores the main categories of mobile advertising such as mobile messaging, in-content and mobile internet advertising. Later, it analyzes the latest trends in the industry and describes in detail t...

  2. Mobile Schools for a Mobile World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Overwhelmingly, independent schools are embracing mobile devices--laptops, iPads or other tablets, and smartphones--to enhance teaching and learning. This article describes the results of the "NAIS 2012 Mobile Learning Survey." Among its findings were that 75 percent of NAIS-member schools currently use mobile learning devices in at…

  3. Diurnal changes in polyamine content, arginine and ornithine decarboxylase, and diamine oxidase in tobacco leaves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gemperlová, Lenka; Nováková, Marie; Vaňková, Radomíra; Eder, Josef; Cvikrová, Milena

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 6 (2006), s. 1413-1421. ISSN 0022-0957 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/03/0369 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Arginine decarboxylase * diamine oxidase * ornithine decarboxylase Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.630, year: 2006

  4. Impaired endothelial function after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage correlates with arginine:asymmetric dimethylarginine ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, A; Staalsø, J M; Romner, B; Olsen, N V

    2014-01-01

    and arginine:ADMA ratio (r=0.43, P<0.005), but not with nitrite/nitrate, VMCA, or S-100B. CONCLUSIONS: Peripheral flow-mediated vasodilation is attenuated in the first days after SAH indicating acute systemic endothelial dysfunction. Impairment of endothelial function after SAH correlates with...

  5. [Antioxidant effects of L-arginine in the rat heart in experimental rhabdomyolysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filimonenko, V P; Nikitchenko, I V; Kaliman, P A

    2009-01-01

    The glycerol administration in a dose of 1 ml of 50% water solution/100 g b. w. was found to cause considerable accumulation of the total heme in the rat blood serum that is accompanied by an increase of TBA-reactive products and protein carbonyl derivates contents and by changes of protein level. Heme entering in the heart tissue is observed in the first hours after glycerol injection. The breaches of heart antioxidant-prooxidant balance are noted in twenty-four hours: TBA-reactive products and protein carbonyl derivates accumulation, heme oxygenase and catalase activation, superoxide dismutase activity lowering and reduction of glutathione content elevation. Pretreatment by L-arginine (0.5 h before glycerol administration) almost did not affect the blood serum changes caused by glycerol injection. However in the rat heart L-arginine administration prevents from TBA-reactive products and protein carbonyl derivates accumulation and the breaches of superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. Besides L-arginine causes the ealier heme oxygenase induction. Possible mechanisms of L-arginine protective action in the rat heart under experimental rhabdomyolysis are discussed. PMID:19877424

  6. Glutamine supplementation, citrulline production, and de novo arginine synthesis: Is there a relation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    We would like to comment on the recent publications by Buijs et al. The authors hypothesized that a parenteral supplement of glutamine stimulates citrulline formation and enhances de novo arginine synthesis. To test this hypothesis, they conducted an experiment with stable isotopes in patients under...

  7. Arginine-vasopressin stimulates the formation of phosphatidic acid in rat Leydig cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.R.; Hansen, Harald S.; Jensen, B.

    1987-01-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) stimulated the formation of labelled phosphatidic acid (PA) in [C]arachidonic acid-prelabelled rat Leydig cells. After addition of 10 M AVP [C]arachidonoylphosphatidic acid reached a maximum within 2 min. The increase was dose-dependent (10-10 M). No change in labelling...

  8. Levels of arginine-vasopressin in cerebrospinal fluid during passive avoidance behavior in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloet, E.R. de; Laczi, F.; Gaffori, O.; Fekete, M.; Wied, D. de

    1984-01-01

    The concentration of immunoreactive arginine-vasopressin (IR-AVP) was measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during acquisition and retention of passive avoidance behavior. IR-AVP level in CSF of male Wistar rats immediately after the learning trial was increased; the rate of which was related to

  9. Reduced preabsorptive insulin response in aged rats : differential effects of amphetamine and arginine-vasopressin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buwalda, B.; Strubbe, J.H.; Bohus, B.

    1991-01-01

    The experiments presented here have been designed to investigate whether the age-related attenuation of the vagal reactivity to emotional stressors and its modulation by amphetamine (Amph) or arginine-vasopressin (AVP) can be generalized for other physiological response patterns. We therefore studie

  10. Evidence for a metabolic shift of arginine metabolism in sickle cell disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnog, JJB; Jager, EH; van der Dijs, FPL; Duits, AJ; Moshage, H; Muskiet, FD; Muskiet, FAJ

    2004-01-01

    Over the last few years, a pivotal role has been ascribed to reduced nitric oxide (NO) availability as a contributing factor to the vaso-occlusive process of sickle cell disease. We investigated whether arginine metabolism in sickle cell patients is different from healthy controls. Blood samples wer

  11. Watermelon enhances arginine availability in an animal model of type-II diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watermelon fruit contain lycopene, a red pigment known for its ability to scavenge free hydroxyl radicals. L-Citrulline, an amino acid that acts as a vasodilator and is a precursor of L-arginine, is found in all cucurbits, but is most plentiful in watermelon. In a study with Zucker diabetic fatty ...

  12. Synergistic Protection of L-Arginine and Vitamin E On Lipid Peroxidation of Asthenospermic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Srivastava

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lipid peroxidation is known to cause various impairments to sperm cells and mayplay a major role in the etiology of male infertility. Asthenospermia is the main factor of maleinfertility and has significantly higher level of peroxidation than in normozoospermic males.Materials and Methods: Using thiobarbituric acid (TBA assay procedure, we have determinedthe level of lipid peroxidation as indicated by malondialdehyde (MDA in the spermatozoa obtainedfrom asthenospermic male semen.Results: An inverse correlation of MDA concentration with sperm motility is observed. Treatmentof cells with L-arginine and vitamin E significantly decreases the MDA concentration and improvesthe sperm motility as compared to that in case of control samples. A combination of L-arginine andvitamin E shows synergistic effect on sperm motility and prevention of lipid peroxidation.Conclusion: L-arginine and vitamin E protect the cells against the loss of sperm motility by lipidperoxidation. Therefore, supplementation of both L-arginine and vitamin E may improve spermmotility and increase the possibility of fertilization in asthenospermic subjects.

  13. Guanidinium Cations Pair with Positively Charged Arginine Side Chains in Water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubíčková, A.; Křížek, T.; Coufal, P.; Wernersson, Erik; Heyda, Jan; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 12 (2011), s. 1387-1389. ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0114; GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : guanidinium * cations * arginine * electrophoresis * water Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.213, year: 2011

  14. Effect of arginase inhibition on pulmonary L-arginine metabolism in murine Pseudomonas pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Mehl

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Infection of the lung with Pseudomonas aeruginosa results in upregulation of nitric oxide synthases (NOS and arginase expression, and both enzymes compete for L-arginine as substrate. Nitric oxide (NO production may be regulated by arginase as it controls L-arginine availability for NOS. We here studied the effect of systemic arginase inhibition on pulmonary L-arginine metabolism in Pseudomonas pneumonia in the mouse. METHODS: Mice (C57BL/6, 8-10 weeks old, female underwent direct tracheal instillation of Pseudomonas (PAO-1-coated agar beads and were treated by repeated intra-peritoneal injections of the arginase inhibitor 2(S-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH or PBS until lungs were harvested on day 3 of the infection. L-arginine metabolites were quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, NO metabolites nitrate and nitrite by Griess reagent and cytokines by ELISA. RESULTS: NO metabolite concentrations (48.5±2.9 vs. 10.9±2.3 µM, p<0.0001, as well as L-ornithine (29.6±1.7 vs 2.3±0.4 µM, p<0.0001, the product of arginase activity, were increased in Pseudomonas infected lungs compared to naïve controls. Concentrations of the NOS inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA were also increased (0.44±0.02 vs. 0.16±0.01 µM, p<0.0001. Arginase inhibition in the infected animals resulted in a significant decrease in L-ornithine (14.6±1.6 µM, p<0.0001 but increase in L-arginine concentration (p<0.001, L-arginine/ADMA ratio (p<0.001, L-arginine availability for NOS (p<0.001, and NO metabolite concentrations (67.3±5.7 µM, p<0.05. Arginase inhibitor treatment also resulted in an increase in NO metabolite levels in animals following intratracheal injection of LPS (p = 0.015. Arginase inhibition was not associated with an increase in inflammatory markers (IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, MIP-2, KC or TNF-α in lung. Concentrations of the L-ornithine-dependent polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine were increased

  15. L-arginine inhibits isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy through nitric oxide and polyamine pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Wang, Li-Na; Xi, Yu-Hui; Li, Hong-Zhu; Xiao, Feng-Gang; Zhao, Ya-Jun; Tian, Ye; Yang, Bao-Feng; Xu, Chang-Qing

    2008-08-01

    Polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Nitric oxide exhibits antihypertrophic functions and inhibits cardiac remodelling. However, the metabolism of polyamines and the potential interactions with nitric oxide in cardiac hypertrophy remain unclear. We randomly divided Wistar rats into four treatment groups: controls, isoproterenol (ISO), ISO and L-arginine, and L-arginine. Isoproterenol (5 mg/kg/day, subcutaneously) and/or L-arginine (800 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally) was administered once daily for 7 days. The expression of atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and fibrogenesis of heart was assessed by Van Gieson staining. Polyamines were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography, and plasma nitric oxide content and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity were determined with a spectrophotometer. The expression levels of ornithine decarboxylase, spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were analysed by Western blot. Heart-to-body weight ratio, left ventricle-to-body weight ratio, atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA expression, collagen fibres and LDH activity were elevated, both ornithine decarboxylase and SSAT proteins were up-regulated, and total polyamines were increased in the group treated with ISO. Additionally, the expression of iNOS was up-regulated, eNOS was down-regulated, and nitric oxide levels were low. Notably, cotreatment with L-arginine reversed most of these changes except for SSAT expression,which was further up-regulated. We propose that increased polyamines and decreased nitric oxide are involved in cardiac hypertrophy induced by ISO and suggest that L-arginine pre-treatment can attenuate cardiac hypertrophy through the regulation of key enzymes of the polyamine and nitric oxide pathways. PMID:18816294

  16. The effect of L-Arginine on the brain tissue of stressed rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batoul Ebadi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available   Abstract  Introduction: This study was conducted to determine the possible beneficial results of L-arginine on prefrontal cortex of rats which impressed by immobilization stress to define the synchronous impression of stress and nitric oxide (NO on evolution of prefrontal cortex of rats after birth. Methods: Forty-eight one month, male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: stressed and non-stressed. L-Arginine (200 mg/kg as a NO synthase (NOS inducer and L-NAME (2O mg/kg were injected intraperitonealy (IP and 7- nitroindazde (25 mg/kg as non-specific was injected subcutaneously (S.C. for 4 weeks. The kind of stress was immobilization for 4 weeks, every other day. The brain was removed after this period and each brain divided into two parts in a coronal section manner. Anterior part used for histological studies with H&E staining and posterior part used for measurement of NO production using spectrophotometer at 540 nm wavelengh. Results: Statistical analysis of microscopic and light microscopic finding showed that thickness of prefrontal cortex and NO production were significantly decreased in stressed rats and especially in groups which received 7- nitroindazole and L-NAME and L-arginine could reverse these results. Discussion: According to this research, we could say that L-arginine decreases the cortical damages in stressed rats and 7-nitroindazole and L-NAME increase this damage in non-stressed group. Although in non stressed groups, L-arginine, L-NAME and 7- nitroindazole were all non-protective and damaging.

  17. Supplemental arginine above the requirement during suckling causes obesity and insulin resistance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Lila; Mori, Tomomi; Koyama, Ayaka; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Kato, Hisanori

    2016-06-01

    Nutrition in early life is important in determining susceptibility to adult obesity, and arginine may promote growth acceleration in infants. We hypothesized that maternal arginine supplementation may promote growth in their pups and contribute to obesity and alteration of the metabolic system in later life. Dams and pups of Wistar rats were given a normal diet (15% protein) as a control (CN) or a normal diet with 2% arginine (ARG). Altered profiles of free amino acids in breast milk were observed in that the concentrations of threonine and glycine were lower in the ARG dams compared with the CN dams. The offspring of the CN and ARG dams were further subdivided into normal-diet (CN-CN and ARG-CN) groups and a high fat-diet groups (CN-HF and ARG-HF). In response to the high fat-diet feeding, the visceral fat deposits were significantly increased in the ARG-HF group (although not compared with the CN-HF group); no difference was observed between the CN-CN and ARG-CN groups. The blood glucose and insulin levels after glucose loading were significantly higher in the ARG-HF group compared with the CN-HF group. The results suggest that the offspring of dams supplemented with arginine during lactation acquired increased susceptibility to a high-fat diet, resulting in visceral obesity and insulin resistance. The lower supply of threonine and glycine to pups may be one of the contributing causes to the programming of lifelong obesity risk in offspring. Our findings also indicated that maternal arginine supplementation during suckling causes obesity and insulin resistance in rats. PMID:27188903

  18. Glutamine, glutamate, and arginine-based acid resistance in Lactobacillus reuteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Januana S; Seeras, Arisha; Sanchez-Maldonado, Alma Fernanda; Zhang, Chonggang; Su, Marcia Shu-Wei; Gänzle, Michael G

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to determine whether glutamine deamidation improves acid resistance of Lactobacillus reuteri, and to assess whether arginine, glutamine, and glutamate-mediated acid resistance are redundant or complementary mechanisms of acid resistance. Three putative glutaminase genes, gls1, gls2, and gls3, were identified in L. reuteri 100-23. All three genes were expressed during growth in mMRS and wheat sourdough. L. reuteri consistently over-expressed gls3 and the glutamate decarboxylase gadB. L. reuteri 100-23ΔgadB over-expressed gls3 and the arginine deiminase gene adi. Analysis of the survival of L. reuteri in acidic conditions revealed that arginine conversion is effective at pH of 3.5 while glutamine or glutamate conversion were effective at pH of 2.5. Arginine conversion increased the pHin but not ΔΨ; glutamate decarboxylation had only a minor effect on the pHin but increased the ΔΨ. This study demonstrates that glutamine deamidation increases the acid resistance of L. reuteri independent of glutamate decarboxylase activity. Arginine and glutamine/glutamate conversions confer resistance to lactate at pH of 3.5 and phosphate at pH of 2.5, respectively. Knowledge of L. reuteri's acid resistance improves the understanding of the adaptation of L. reuteri to intestinal ecosystems, and facilitates the selection of probiotic and starter cultures. PMID:24929734

  19. Cross platform Mobile Applications Development: Mobile Apps Mobility

    OpenAIRE

    Redda, Yonathan Aklilu

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the mobile computing sector has been having quite a revolution.Mobile computing devices have shed loads of weight, gone slim, achieved mass popularityand a great market penetration. But one of the challenges that has been part ofmobile computing is technology and device fragmentation leaving application developersfor mobile phones bewildered. Platform developers, device manufacturers comewith so many features and functionalities that it has been dicult to provide developerswi...

  20. Mobile commerce

    OpenAIRE

    Παπαδανιήλ, Βασίλειος

    2014-01-01

    Η συνεχής ανάπτυξη των mobile συσκευών και συστημάτων, η εκτεταμένη χρήση του Διαδικτύου, οι ραγδαίες εξελίξεις στις ασύρματες τεχνολογίες, η αυξημένη ζήτηση για υψηλής ταχύτητας διαδραστικές υπηρεσίες πολυμέσων καθώς και η αυξανόμενη ανάγκη για ασφαλή ασύρματη επικοινωνία, οδήγησε στην ανάπτυξη του mobile commerce και στην καθιέρωση του στον επιχειρηματικό κόσμο. Η συνεχής βελτίωση των ασύρματων τεχνολογιών, ιδιαίτερα ως προς την ευελιξία και την ευχρηστία, οδήγησε στην παροχή διαφόρων υπηρε...

  1. Bioactive products of arginine in sepsis: tissue and plasma composition after LPS and iNOS blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lortie, M J; Ishizuka, S; Schwartz, D; Blantz, R C

    2000-06-01

    Blockade or gene deletion of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) fails to fully abrogate all the sequelae leading to the high morbidity of septicemia. An increase in substrate uptake may be necessary for the increased production of nitric oxide (NO), but arginine is also a precursor for other bioactive products. Herein, we demonstrate an increase in alternate arginine products via arginine and ornithine decarboxylase in rats given lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The expression of iNOS mRNA in renal tissue was evident 60 but not 30 min post-LPS, yet a rapid decrease in blood pressure was obtained within 30 min that was completely inhibited by selective iNOS blockade. Plasma levels of arginine and ornithine decreased by at least 30% within 60 min of LPS administration, an effect not inhibited by the iNOS blocker L-N(6)(1-iminoethyl)lysine (L-NIL). Significant increases in plasma nitrates and citrulline occurred only 3-4 h post-LPS, an effect blocked by L-NIL pretreatment. The intracellular composition of organs harvested 6 h post-LPS reflected tissue-specific profiles of arginine and related metabolites. Tissue arginine concentration, normally an order of magnitude higher than in plasma, did not decrease after LPS. Pretreatment with L-NIL had a significant impact on the disposition of tissue arginine that was organ specific. These data demonstrate changes in arginine metabolism before and after de novo iNOS activity. Selective blockade of iNOS did not prevent uptake and can deregulate the production of other bioactive arginine metabolites. PMID:10837347

  2. Mobile Operating Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipin Kamboj

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobile phones are used by every people in today’s life. We use mobile phones without knowing the different factors that a mobile used including its technology, operating system, CPU ,RAM etc. Many types of operating system are used by different mobile. Every operating system has their advantage

  3. TYPOLOGIES OF MOBILE APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Ion Ivan; Alin Zamfiroiu2; Dragoş Palaghiţă3

    2013-01-01

    Mobile applications and their particularities are analyzed. Mobile application specific characteristics are defined. Types of applications are identified and analyzed. The paper established differences between mobile applications and mobile application categories. For each identified type the specific structures and development model are identified.

  4. Mobile Operating Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Vipin Kamboj; Hitesh Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Mobile phones are used by every people in today’s life. We use mobile phones without knowing the different factors that a mobile used including its technology, operating system, CPU ,RAM etc. Many types of operating system are used by different mobile. Every operating system has their advantage

  5. T cells stimulate catabolic gene expression by the stromal cells from giant cell tumor of bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, Robert W. [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada); Ghert, Michelle [Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada); Department of Surgery, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Singh, Gurmit, E-mail: gurmit.singh@jcc.hhsc.ca [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada)

    2012-03-23

    results suggest that T cells may potentiate the catabolic effect of GCT.

  6. CYP24, the enzyme that catabolizes the antiproliferative agent vitamin D, is increased in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parise, Robert A; Egorin, Merrill J; Kanterewicz, Beatriz; Taimi, Mohammed; Petkovich, Martin; Lew, April M; Chuang, Samuel S; Nichols, Mark; El-Hefnawy, Talal; Hershberger, Pamela A

    2006-10-15

    1Alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) displays potent antiproliferative activity in a variety of tumor model systems and is currently under investigation in clinical trials in cancer. Studies were initiated to explore its potential in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as effective approaches to the treatment of that disease are needed. In evaluating factors that may affect activity in NSCLC, the authors found that CYP24 (25-hydroxyvitamin D3-24-hydroxylase), the enzyme that catabolizes 1,25D3, is frequently expressed in NSCLC cell lines but not in the nontumorigenic bronchial epithelial cell line, Beas2B. CYP24 expression by RT-PCR was also detected in 10/18 primary lung tumors but in only 1/11 normal lung tissue specimens. Tumor-specific CYP24 upregulation was confirmed at the protein level via immunoblot analysis of patient-matched normal lung tissue and lung tumor extracts. Enzymatically active CYP24 is expected to desensitize NSCLC cells to 1,25D3. The authors therefore implemented a high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) assay for 1,25D3 and its CYP24-generated metabolites to determine whether NSCLC cells express active enzyme. Analysis of NSCLC cell cultures revealed time-dependent loss of 1,25D3 coincident with the appearance of CYP24-generated metabolites. MK-24(S)-S(O)(NH)-Ph-1, a specific inhibitor of CYP24, slowed the loss of 1,25D3 and increased 1,25D3 half-life. Furthermore, combination of 1,25D3 with MK-24(S)-S(O)(NH)-Ph-1 resulted in a significant decrease in the concentration of 1,25D3 required to achieve maximum growth inhibition in NSCLC cells. These data suggest that increased CYP24 expression in lung tumors restricts 1,25D3 activity and support the preclinical evaluation of CYP24 inhibitors for lung cancer treatment. PMID:16708384

  7. Targeting Bone Alleviates Osteoarthritis in Osteopenic Mice and Modulates Cartilage Catabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funck-Brentano, Thomas; Lin, Hilène; Hay, Eric; Ah Kioon, Marie-Dominique; Schiltz, Corinne; Hannouche, Didier; Nizard, Rémy; Lioté, Frédéric; Orcel, Philippe; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Cohen-Solal, Martine Esther

    2012-01-01

    Objective Subchondral bone modifications occur early in the development of osteoarthritis (OA). The level of bone resorption might impact cartilage remodeling. We therefore assessed the in vivo and in vitro effects of targeting bone resorption in OA and cartilage metabolism. Methods OA was induced by meniscectomy (MNX) in ovariectomized osteopenic mice (OP) treated with estradiol (E2), pamidronate (PAM), or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for 6 weeks. We assessed the subchondral bone and cartilage structure and the expression of cartilage matrix proteases. To assess the involvement of bone soluble factors in cartilage metabolism, supernatant of human bone explants pre-treated with E2 or PAM were transferred to cartilage explants to assess proteoglycan release and aggrecan cleavage. OPG/RANKL mRNA expression was assessed in bone explants by real-time quantitative PCR. The role of osteoprotegerin (OPG) in the bone-cartilage crosstalk was tested using an OPG neutralizing antibody. Results Bone mineral density of OP mice and osteoclast number were restored by E2 and PAM (p<0.05). In OP mice, E2 and PAM decreased ADAMTS-4 and -5 expression, while only PAM markedly reduced OA compared to PBS (2.0±0.63 vs 5.2±0.95; p<0.05). OPG/RANKL mRNA was increased in human bone explants treated with both drugs (2.2–3.7-fold). Moreover, supernatants from bone explants cultured with E2 or PAM reduced aggrecan cleavage and cartilage proteoglycan release (73±8.0% and 80±22% of control, respectively, p<0.05). This effect was reversed with osteoprotegerin blockade. Conclusion The inhibition of bone resorption by pamidronate in osteopenic mice alleviates the histological OA score with a reduction in the expression of aggrecanases. Bone soluble factors, such as osteoprotegerin, impact the cartilage response to catabolic factors. This study further highlights the importance of subchondral bone in the regulation of joint cartilage damage in OA. PMID:22432033

  8. Improvement of cellulose catabolism in Clostridium cellulolyticum by sporulation abolishment and carbon alleviation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yongchao [ORNL; Xu, Tao [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Graham, David E [ORNL; He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium cellulolyticum can degrade lignocellulosic biomass, and ferment the soluble sugars to produce valuable chemicals such as lactate, acetate, ethanol and hydrogen. However, the cellulose utilization efficiency of C. cellulolyticum still remains very low, impeding its application in consolidated bioprocessing for biofuels production. In this study, two metabolic engineering strategies were exploited to improve cellulose utilization efficiency, including sporulation abolishment and carbon overload alleviation. Results The spo0A gene at locus Ccel_1894, which encodes a master sporulation regulator was inactivated. The spo0A mutant abolished the sporulation ability. In a high concentration of cellulose (50 g/l), the performance of the spo0A mutant increased dramatically in terms of maximum growth, final concentrations of three major metabolic products, and cellulose catabolism. The microarray and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses showed that the valine, leucine and isoleucine biosynthesis pathways were up-regulated in the spo0A mutant. Based on this information, a partial isobutanol producing pathway modified from valine biosynthesis was introduced into C. cellulolyticum strains to further increase cellulose consumption by alleviating excessive carbon load. The introduction of this synthetic pathway to the wild-type strain improved cellulose consumption from 17.6 g/l to 28.7 g/l with a production of 0.42 g/l isobutanol in the 50 g/l cellulose medium. However, the spo0A mutant strain did not appreciably benefit from introduction of this synthetic pathway and the cellulose utilization efficiency did not further increase. A technical highlight in this study was that an in vivo promoter strength evaluation protocol was developed using anaerobic fluorescent protein and flow cytometry for C. cellulolyticum. Conclusions In this study, we inactivated the spo0A gene and introduced a heterologous synthetic pathway to manipulate the stress

  9. Next generation mobile broadcasting

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez-Barquero, David

    2013-01-01

    Next Generation Mobile Broadcasting provides an overview of the past, present, and future of mobile multimedia broadcasting. The first part of the book-Mobile Broadcasting Worldwide-summarizes next-generation mobile broadcasting technologies currently available. This part covers the evolutions of the Japanese mobile broadcasting standard ISDB-T One-Seg, ISDB-Tmm and ISDB-TSB; the evolution of the South Korean T-DMB mobile broadcasting technology AT-DMB; the American mobile broadcasting standard ATSC-M/H; the Chinese broadcasting technologies DTMB and CMMB; second-generation digital terrestrial

  10. A forward genetic approach in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a strategy for exploring starch catabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Hande Tunçay; Justin Findinier; Thierry Duchêne; Virginie Cogez; Charlotte Cousin; Gilles Peltier; Ball, Steven G; David Dauvillée

    2013-01-01

    A screen was recently developed to study the mobilization of starch in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This screen relies on starch synthesis accumulation during nitrogen starvation followed by the supply of nitrogen and the switch to darkness. Hence multiple regulatory networks including those of nutrient starvation, cell cycle control and light to dark transitions are likely to impact the recovery of mutant candidates. In this paper we monitor the specificity of this m...

  11. Inversion of allosteric effect of arginine on N-acetylglutamate synthase, a molecular marker for evolution of tetrapods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabrera-Luque Juan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficient conversion of ammonia, a potent neurotoxin, into non-toxic metabolites was an essential adaptation that allowed animals to move from the aquatic to terrestrial biosphere. The urea cycle converts ammonia into urea in mammals, amphibians, turtles, snails, worms and many aquatic animals and requires N-acetylglutamate (NAG, an essential allosteric activator of carbamylphosphate synthetase I (CPSI in mammals and amphibians, and carbamylphosphate synthetase III (CPSIII in fish and invertebrates. NAG-dependent CPSI and CPSIII catalyze the formation of carbamylphosphate in the first and rate limiting step of ureagenesis. NAG is produced enzymatically by N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS, which is also found in bacteria and plants as the first enzyme of arginine biosynthesis. Arginine is an allosteric inhibitor of microbial and plant NAGS, and allosteric activator of mammalian NAGS. Results Information from mutagenesis studies of E. coli and P. aeruginosa NAGS was combined with structural information from the related bacterial N-acetylglutamate kinases to identify four residues in mammalian NAGS that interact with arginine. Substitutions of these four residues were engineered in mouse NAGS and into the vertebrate-like N-acetylglutamate synthase-kinase (NAGS-K of Xanthomonas campestris, which is inhibited by arginine. All mutations resulted in arginine losing the ability to activate mouse NAGS, and inhibit X. campestris NAGS-K. To examine at what point in evolution inversion of arginine effect on NAGS occur, we cloned NAGS from fish and frogs and examined the arginine response of their corresponding proteins. Fish NAGS were partially inhibited by arginine and frog NAGS were activated by arginine. Conclusion Difference in arginine effect on bacterial and mammalian NAGS most likely stems from the difference in the type of conformational change triggered by arginine binding to these proteins. The change from arginine

  12. The Hydrophobic Region of the DmsA Twin-Arginine Leader Peptide Determines Specificity with Chaperone DmsD

    OpenAIRE

    Winstone, Tara M. L.; Tran, Vy A.; Turner, Raymond J.

    2013-01-01

    The system specific chaperone DmsD plays a role in the maturation of the catalytic subunit of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase, DmsA. Pre-DmsA contains a 45-amino acid twin-arginine leader peptide that is important for targeting and translocation of folded and cofactor-loaded DmsA by the twin-arginine translocase. DmsD has previously been shown to interact with the complete twin-arginine leader peptide of DmsA. In this study, isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the the...

  13. Location and PCR analysis of catabolic genes in a novel Streptomyces sp. DUT_AHX capable of degrading nitrobenzene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Haixin; ZHOU Jiti; LV Hong; WANG Jing; GUO Jianbo; LIU Guangfei; QU Yuanyuan

    2008-01-01

    A novel strain of Streptomyces sp. DUT_AHX was isolated from sludge contaminated with nitrobenzene and identified on the basis of physiological and biochemical tests and 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence analysis. The optimal degradation conditions were as follows: temperature 30℃, pH 7.0-8.0, shaking speed 150-180 r/min and inocula 10% (V/V). The strain, which possessed a partial reductive pathway with the release of ammonia, was also able to grow on mineral salts basal (MSB) medium plates with 2-aminophenol, phenol, or toluene as the sole carbon source. Furthermore, the enzyme activity tests showed crude extracts of nitrobenzene-grown DUT_AHX contained 2-aminophenol 1,6-dioxygenase activity. The 17-kb plasmid was isolated by the modified alkaline lysis method and was further cured by sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) together with 37℃. As a result, the cured derivative strain DUT_AHX-4 lost the 2-aminophenol 1,6-dioxygenase activity. The results suggested that the catabolic genes encoding the nitrobenzene-degrading enzymes were plasmid-associated. Moreover, the plasmid DNA was amplified with degenerate primers by touchdown PCR and an expected size fragment (471 bp) was generated. The Blast results revealed that the gene encoding a 157 amino acid polypeptide was 39% to 76% identical to YHS domain protein. The further examination of the plasmid would demonstrate the molecular basis of nitrobenzene catabolism in Streptomyces, such as regulation and genetic organization of the catabolic genes.

  14. Mobile platform security

    CERN Document Server

    Asokan, N; Dmitrienko, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Recently, mobile security has garnered considerable interest in both the research community and industry due to the popularity of smartphones. The current smartphone platforms are open systems that allow application development, also for malicious parties. To protect the mobile device, its user, and other mobile ecosystem stakeholders such as network operators, application execution is controlled by a platform security architecture. This book explores how such mobile platform security architectures work. We present a generic model for mobile platform security architectures: the model illustrat

  15. Tenured Public Servant Mobility

    OpenAIRE

    Aline Pauron

    2003-01-01

    The mobility of tenured public servants is studied from three points of view: geographic mobility (defined by a change of regional study and planning area (ZEAT) or department within a ZEAT), socio-economic mobility (change of socio-economic group) and structural mobility (change of ministry or service within a ministry). Geographic mobility is the most frequent, concerning an average 4.2% of staff every year. Not including upgrading (from grade D to grade C and from primary school teacher to...

  16. ON MOBILE MESH NETWORKS

    OpenAIRE

    Namiot, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    With the advances in mobile computing technologies and the growth of the Net, mobile mesh networks are going through a set of important evolutionary steps. In this paper, we survey architectural aspects of mobile mesh networks and their use cases and deployment models. Also, we survey challenging areas of mobile mesh networks and describe our vision of promising mobile services. This paper presents a basic introductory material for Masters of Open Information Technologies Lab, interested in m...

  17. MOBILE MARKETING FUTURE TRENDS

    OpenAIRE

    CĂTOIU, Iacob; GÂRDAN, Daniel Adrian; GÂRDAN, Doru Lucian

    2010-01-01

    The present article proposes an introspection into the field of a new marketing specialization – mobile marketing. The concept mainly refers to all marketing activities related to the new communication channel – Short Message Service, Multimedia Messaging Service, and internet access from mobile phone. The article provides, at the same time, a marketing perspective about future trends of mobile marketing and mobile media, and also a technical perspective related to the future mobile communica...

  18. Factors affecting blind mobility

    OpenAIRE

    Clark-Carter, David

    1985-01-01

    This thesis contains a survey of the mobility problems of blind people, experimental analysis and evaluation of these problems and suggestions for ways in which the evaluation of mobility performance and the design of mobility aids may be improved. The survey revealed a low level of mobility among blind people, with no significant improvement since a comparable survey in 1967. A group of self taught cane users were identified and their mobility was shown to be poor or potentially dangero...

  19. Crocin exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic effects on rat intervertebral discs by suppressing the activation of JNK

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Kang; Li, Yan; MA, ZHENJIANG; Zhao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    As intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration has been proven to contribute to low back pain (LBP), drug treatment aiming at attenuating IVD degeneration may prove to be benefiical. Crocin, a bioactive component of saffron, has been found to exert anti-inflammatory effects on cartilage. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic effects of crocin on rat IVDs were analyzed in vitro and ex vivo. Nucleus pulposus (NP) cells were isolated from the lumbar IVDs of Sprague-Dawley rat...

  20. Acute local inflammation alters synthesis, distribution, and catabolism of third component of complement (C3) in rabbits.

    OpenAIRE

    Manthei, U; Strunk, R. C.; Giclas, P. C.

    1984-01-01

    In order to evaluate the basis for changes in plasma concentrations of the third component of complement (C3) during inflammation, we injected purified radiolabeled C3 into normal New Zealand White rabbits and into rabbits with turpentine-induced pleurisy. In the normal animals, C3 was distributed between the intravascular compartment (75%) and the extravascular space (25%), with an exchange rate of 1.8 +/- 0.1% of the plasma pool per hour. The fractional catabolic rate (FCR) was 2.7 +/- 0.3%...

  1. The influence of environmental parameters on the catabolism of branched-chain amino acids by Staphylococcus xylosus and Staphylococcus carnosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Pelle Thonning; Stahnke, Louise Heller

    2004-01-01

    ionization detection (GC/FID). Main volatile catabolic products of leucine, isoleucine and valine were 3-methylbutanoic, 2-methylbutanoic and 2-methylpropanoic acids, respectively. The generation of branched flavour compounds was influenced significantly by most of the investigated environmental parameters....... The environmental conditions studied were temperature (12-28degreesC), NaCl concentration (4.0-12.0% (w/w)) acidity (pH 4.8-5.8) and addition of manganese (0-2.5mg Mn/kg). Flavour compounds were sampled by automatic static headspace collection and separated/quantified using gas chromatography/flame...

  2. Alternative route for biosynthesis of amino sugars in Escherichia coli K-12 mutants by means of a catabolic isomerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Vogler, A P; Trentmann, S.; Lengeler, J W

    1989-01-01

    By inserting a lambda placMu bacteriophage into gene glmS encoding glucosamine 6-phosphate synthetase (GlmS), the key enzyme of amino sugar biosynthesis, a nonreverting mutant of Escherichia coli K-12 that was strictly dependent on exogenous N-acetyl-D-glucosamine or D-glucosamine was generated. Analysis of suppressor mutations rendering the mutant independent of amino sugar supply revealed that the catabolic enzyme D-glucosamine-6-phosphate isomerase (deaminase), encoded by gene nagB of the ...

  3. Genetic Analysis of the Upper Phenylacetate Catabolic Pathway in the Production of Tropodithietic Acid by Phaeobacter gallaeciensis

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Martine; Brock, Nelson L.; Liesegang, Heiko; Dogs, Marco; Preuth, Ines; Simon, Meinhard; Dickschat, Jeroen S.; Brinkhoff, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    Production of the antibiotic tropodithietic acid (TDA) depends on the central phenylacetate catabolic pathway, specifically on the oxygenase PaaABCDE, which catalyzes epoxidation of phenylacetyl-coenzyme A (CoA). Our study was focused on genes of the upper part of this pathway leading to phenylacetyl-CoA as precursor for TDA. Phaeobacter gallaeciensis DSM 17395 encodes two genes with homology to phenylacetyl-CoA ligases (paaK1 and paaK2), which were shown to be essential for phenylacetate cat...

  4. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) and implications in catabolic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Lindgren, Björn

    1997-01-01

    This thesis has studied the regulation of IGFBP-1 (insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1), which is one factor regulating the bioavailability of IGF-I with special interest how IGFBP-1 is regulated in vitro and in humans, especially in diabetes and catabolic conditions. The IGFBP-1 cDNA was cloned and used for studies in human hepatoma cells, HepG2, which showed that both insulin and IGF-I could decrease IGFBP-1 in the cell conditioned medium. IGF-I inhibited also IGF...

  5. Distribution and Biochemical Properties of an M1-family Aminopeptidase in Plasmodium falciparum Indicate a Role in Vacuolar Hemoglobin Catabolism*

    OpenAIRE

    Ragheb, Daniel; Dalal, Seema; Bompiani, Kristin M.; Ray, W. Keith; Klemba, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Aminopeptidases catalyze N-terminal peptide bond hydrolysis and occupy many diverse roles across all domains of life. Here we present evidence that an M1-family aminopeptidase, PfA-M1, has been recruited to specialized roles in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. PfA-M1 is abundant in two subcellular compartments in asexual intraerythrocytic parasites; that is, the food vacuole, where the catabolism of host hemoglobin takes place, and the nucleus. A unique N-terminal extension c...

  6. Arginine-based cationic liposomes for efficient in vitro plasmid DNA delivery with low cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarker SR

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Satya Ranjan Sarker, Yumiko Aoshima, Ryosuke Hokama, Takafumi Inoue, Keitaro Sou, Shinji Takeoka Department of Life Science and Medical Bioscience, Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University (TWIns, Tokyo, Japan Background: Currently available gene delivery vehicles have many limitations such as low gene delivery efficiency and high cytotoxicity. To overcome these drawbacks, we designed and synthesized two cationic lipids comprised of n-tetradecyl alcohol as the hydrophobic moiety, 3-hydrocarbon chain as the spacer, and different counterions (eg, hydrogen chloride [HCl] salt or trifluoroacetic acid [TFA] salt in the arginine head group. Methods: Cationic lipids were hydrated in 4-(2-hydroxyethyl-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES buffer to prepare cationic liposomes and characterized in terms of their size, zeta potential, phase transition temperature, and morphology. Lipoplexes were then prepared and characterized in terms of their size and zeta potential in the absence or presence of serum. The morphology of the lipoplexes was determined using transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The gene delivery efficiency was evaluated in neuronal cells and HeLa cells and compared with that of lysine-based cationic assemblies and Lipofectamine™ 2000. The cytotoxicity level of the cationic lipids was investigated and compared with that of Lipofectamine™ 2000. Results: We synthesized arginine-based cationic lipids having different counterions (ie, HCl-salt or TFA-salt that formed cationic liposomes of around 100 nm in size. In the absence of serum, lipoplexes prepared from the arginine-based cationic liposomes and plasmid (p DNA formed large aggregates and attained a positive zeta potential. However, in the presence of serum, the lipoplexes were smaller in size and negative in zeta potential. The morphology of the lipoplexes was vesicular. Arginine-based cationic liposomes with HCl-salt showed the

  7. Insight on an arginine synthesis metabolon from the tetrameric structure of yeast acetylglutamate kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio de Cima

    Full Text Available N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK catalyzes the second, generally controlling, step of arginine biosynthesis. In yeasts, NAGK exists either alone or forming a metabolon with N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase (NAGS, which catalyzes the first step and exists only within the metabolon. Yeast NAGK (yNAGK has, in addition to the amino acid kinase (AAK domain found in other NAGKs, a ~150-residue C-terminal domain of unclear significance belonging to the DUF619 domain family. We deleted this domain, proving that it stabilizes yNAGK, slows catalysis and modulates feed-back inhibition by arginine. We determined the crystal structures of both the DUF619 domain-lacking yNAGK, ligand-free as well as complexed with acetylglutamate or acetylglutamate and arginine, and of complete mature yNAGK. While all other known arginine-inhibitable NAGKs are doughnut-like hexameric trimers of dimers of AAK domains, yNAGK has as central structure a flat tetramer formed by two dimers of AAK domains. These dimers differ from canonical AAK dimers in the -110° rotation of one subunit with respect to the other. In the hexameric enzymes, an N-terminal extension, found in all arginine-inhibitable NAGKs, forms a protruding helix that interlaces the dimers. In yNAGK, however, it conforms a two-helix platform that mediates interdimeric interactions. Arginine appears to freeze an open inactive AAK domain conformation. In the complete yNAGK structure, two pairs of DUF619 domains flank the AAK domain tetramer, providing a mechanism for the DUF619 domain modulatory functions. The DUF619 domain exhibits the histone acetyltransferase fold, resembling the catalytic domain of bacterial NAGS. However, the putative acetyl CoA site is blocked, explaining the lack of NAGS activity of yNAGK. We conclude that the tetrameric architecture is an adaptation to metabolon formation and propose an organization for this metabolon, suggesting that yNAGK may be a good model also for yeast and human NAGSs.

  8. Insight on an arginine synthesis metabolon from the tetrameric structure of yeast acetylglutamate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cima, Sergio; Gil-Ortiz, Fernando; Crabeel, Marjolaine; Fita, Ignacio; Rubio, Vicente

    2012-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK) catalyzes the second, generally controlling, step of arginine biosynthesis. In yeasts, NAGK exists either alone or forming a metabolon with N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase (NAGS), which catalyzes the first step and exists only within the metabolon. Yeast NAGK (yNAGK) has, in addition to the amino acid kinase (AAK) domain found in other NAGKs, a ~150-residue C-terminal domain of unclear significance belonging to the DUF619 domain family. We deleted this domain, proving that it stabilizes yNAGK, slows catalysis and modulates feed-back inhibition by arginine. We determined the crystal structures of both the DUF619 domain-lacking yNAGK, ligand-free as well as complexed with acetylglutamate or acetylglutamate and arginine, and of complete mature yNAGK. While all other known arginine-inhibitable NAGKs are doughnut-like hexameric trimers of dimers of AAK domains, yNAGK has as central structure a flat tetramer formed by two dimers of AAK domains. These dimers differ from canonical AAK dimers in the -110° rotation of one subunit with respect to the other. In the hexameric enzymes, an N-terminal extension, found in all arginine-inhibitable NAGKs, forms a protruding helix that interlaces the dimers. In yNAGK, however, it conforms a two-helix platform that mediates interdimeric interactions. Arginine appears to freeze an open inactive AAK domain conformation. In the complete yNAGK structure, two pairs of DUF619 domains flank the AAK domain tetramer, providing a mechanism for the DUF619 domain modulatory functions. The DUF619 domain exhibits the histone acetyltransferase fold, resembling the catalytic domain of bacterial NAGS. However, the putative acetyl CoA site is blocked, explaining the lack of NAGS activity of yNAGK. We conclude that the tetrameric architecture is an adaptation to metabolon formation and propose an organization for this metabolon, suggesting that yNAGK may be a good model also for yeast and human NAGSs. PMID:22529931

  9. Mobile Notes: Mobile Devices in Creative Discussions

    OpenAIRE

    Bollen, Lars; Juarez, Guillermo; Hoppe, Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    The trendy notion of "mobile learning" has different connotations: On the one hand, it can be understood as "learning on the move" - often referred to as "learning any time anywhere". Of course this interpretation relies on specific kinds of technological enabling, but the definition aims at the general setting of learning activities. Particularly, it includes informal learning settings (cf. [1]). A second interpretation sees mobile learning somewhat more pragmatically as learning with mobile...

  10. MOBILE TELECOMMUNICATIONS SERVICES AND MOBILE HEALTH DEVICES

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghe Meghisan; Georgeta-Madalina Meghisan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research paper is to identify the potential of mobile health devices with a positive impact on the public health care system from Romania. More people monitoring their health situation with the help of mobile health applications could lead to less money spent by the public health sector with treating more advanced diseases. Approach/ methodology. The analysis of the Romanian mobile telecommunications market and health situation of the population from Romania was based on s...

  11. Abrechnung mobiler Dienste im Mobile-Payment-Referenzmodell

    OpenAIRE

    Pousttchi, Key; Wiedemann, Dietmar Georg

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to analyze mobile payments in the mobile commerce scenario. Therefore, we first classify the mobile payment in the mobile commerce scenario by explaining general offer models, charging concepts, and intermediaries. Second, we describe the mobile payment reference model, especially, the mobile payment reference organization model and different mobile payment standard types. Finally, we conclude our findings.

  12. Mobile Scientific Calculator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abdulrahim Hamdi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The mobile and wireless industry is entering an exciting time. Demand for mobile technology is growing at a tremendous rate. Corporations are deploying mobile applications that provide substantial business benefits, and consumers are readily adopting mobile data applications. We present scientific application for mobile phone in steps of software engineering project starting from data gathering, data analysis, designing, coding, packaging, testing and deploying, Mobile Scientific Calculator (MSC enable user to compute any mathematical operation by using this application in mobile phone without needing to use the calculator. Scientific calculator offers three keys the four mathematic operations, the four systems of digits and offering many of functions such as angles functions, power, factorial and other functions. Scientific calculator is suitable for many mobile phones which don t have scientific calculator in its applications, it provide simple design for dealing with its functions for all users. It operated on more than one mobile phone model.

  13. High-performance liquid chromatography method with radiochemical detection for measurement of nitric oxide synthase, arginase, and arginine decarboxylase activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volke, A; Wegener, Gregers; Vasar, E;

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide has been shown to be involved in numerous biological processes, and many studies have aimed to measure nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity. Recently, it has been demonstrated that arginase and arginine decarboxylase (ADC), two enzymes that also employ arginine as a substrate, may...... simple and fast HPLC method with radiochemical detection to separate radiolabeled L-arginine, L-citrulline, L-ornithine, and agmatine. 3H-labeled L-arginine, L-citrulline, agmatine, and 14C-labeled L-citrulline were used as standards. These compounds were separated in the normal phase column (Allure...... Acidix 250 x 4.6 mm i.d.) under isocratic conditions in less than 20 min with good sensitivity. Using the current method, we have shown the formation of L-citrulline and L-ornithine in vitro using brain tissue homogenate of rats and that of agmatine by Escherichia coli ADC. Udgivelsesdato: null-null...

  14. Effects of a food supplement rich in arginine in patients with smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis--a randomised trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schön, T; Idh, J; Westman, A;

    2011-01-01

    In tuberculosis (TB), the production of nitric oxide (NO) is confirmed but its importance in host defense is debated. Our aim was to investigate whether a food supplement rich in arginine could enhance clinical improvement in TB patients by increased NO production. Smear positive TB patients from...... Gondar, Ethiopia (n = 180) were randomized to a food supplementation rich in arginine (peanuts, equivalent to 1 g of arginine/day) or with a low arginine content (wheat crackers, locally called daboqolo) during four weeks. The primary outcome was cure rate according to the WHO classification and...... secondary outcomes. In the subgroup analysis according to HIV status, peanut supplemented HIV+/TB patients showed increased cure rate (83.8% (31/37) vs 53.1% (17/32), p <0.01). A low baseline eNO (...

  15. One-Pot Green Synthesis and Bioapplication of l-Arginine-Capped Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yongchao; Yin, Weiwei; Liu, Jinting; Xi, Rimo; Zhan, Jinhua

    2010-02-01

    Water-soluble l-arginine-capped Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized using a one-pot and green method. Nontoxic, renewable and inexpensive reagents including FeCl3, l-arginine, glycerol and water were chosen as raw materials. Fe3O4 nanoparticles show different dispersive states in acidic and alkaline solutions for the two distinct forms of surface binding l-arginine. Powder X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to identify the structure of Fe3O4 nanocrystals. The products behave like superparamagnetism at room temperature with saturation magnetization of 49.9 emu g-1 and negligible remanence or coercivity. In the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride, the anti-chloramphenicol monoclonal antibodies were connected to the l-arginine-capped magnetite nanoparticles. The as-prepared conjugates could be used in immunomagnetic assay.

  16. Oral L-Arginine Stimulates GLP-1 Secretion to Improve Glucose Tolerance in Male Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Christoffer; Smajilovic, Sanela; Smith, Eric P;

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological and surgical interventions that increase glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) action are effective to improve glucose homeostasis in type 2 diabetes mellitus. In light of this, nutritional strategies to enhance postprandial GLP-1 secretion, particularly in the context of diet-induced o......Pharmacological and surgical interventions that increase glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) action are effective to improve glucose homeostasis in type 2 diabetes mellitus. In light of this, nutritional strategies to enhance postprandial GLP-1 secretion, particularly in the context of diet......-induced obesity, may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. Importantly, recent evidence suggests the amino acid l-arginine, a well-known insulin secretagogue, can also stimulate release of GLP-1 from isolated rat intestine. Here we tested the hypothesis that oral l-arginine acts as a GLP-1 secretagogue in...

  17. Twin-arginine-dependent translocation of SufI in the absence of cytosolic helper proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzapfel, Eva; Moser, Michael; Schiltz, Emile; Ueda, Takuya; Betton, Jean-Michel; Müller, Matthias

    2009-06-16

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) machinery present in bacterial and thylakoidal membranes is able to transport fully folded proteins. Folding of some Tat precursor proteins requires dedicated chaperones that also sequester the signal sequence during the maturation process. Whether or not signal sequence-binding chaperones are a general prerequisite for all Tat substrate proteins is not known. Here, we have studied the propensity of Tat signal sequences of Escherichia coli to interact with general chaperones and peptidyl-prolyl-cis,trans-isomerases. Site-specific photocross-linking revealed a clear specificity for FK506-binding proteins. Nevertheless transport of the Tat substrate SufI into inverted inner membrane vesicles of E. coli was found to occur in the bona fide absence of any cytosolic chaperone. Our results suggest that in E. coli, cytosolic chaperones are not essential for the twin-arginine-dependent export of cofactor-less substrates. PMID:19432418

  18. Atomic-Resolution Structure of an N(5) Flavin Adduct in D-Arginine Dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Guoxing; Yuan, Hongling; Wang, Siming; Gadda, Giovanni; Weber, Irene T. (GSU)

    2011-09-06

    D-Arginine dehydrogenase (DADH) catalyzes the flavin-dependent oxidative deamination of D-arginine and other D-amino acids to the corresponding imino acids. The 1.07 {angstrom} atomic-resolution structure of DADH crystallized with D-leucine unexpectedly revealed a covalent N(5) flavin adduct, instead of the expected iminoleucine product in the active site. This acyl adduct has been successfully reproduced by photoreduction of DADH in the presence of 4-methyl-2-oxopentanoic acid (ketoleucine). The iminoleucine may be released readily because of weak interactions in the binding site, in contrast to iminoarginine, converted to ketoleucine, which reacts with activated FAD to form the covalently linked acyl adduct.

  19. Atomic-resolution structure of an N5 flavin adduct in D-arginine dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guoxing; Yuan, Hongling; Wang, Siming; Gadda, Giovanni; Weber, Irene T

    2011-07-26

    D-Arginine dehydrogenase (DADH) catalyzes the flavin-dependent oxidative deamination of D-arginine and other D-amino acids to the corresponding imino acids. The 1.07 Å atomic-resolution structure of DADH crystallized with D-leucine unexpectedly revealed a covalent N(5) flavin adduct, instead of the expected iminoleucine product in the active site. This acyl adduct has been successfully reproduced by photoreduction of DADH in the presence of 4-methyl-2-oxopentanoic acid (ketoleucine). The iminoleucine may be released readily because of weak interactions in the binding site, in contrast to iminoarginine, converted to ketoleucine, which reacts with activated FAD to form the covalently linked acyl adduct. PMID:21707047

  20. Selection of Arginine-Rich Anti-Gold Antibodies Engineered for Plasmonic Colloid Self-Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Purvi; Narayanan, S Shankara; Sharma, Jadab; Girard, Christian; Dujardin, Erik; Nizak, Clément

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are affinity proteins with a wide spectrum of applications in analytical and therapeutic biology. Proteins showing specific recognition for a chosen molecular target can be isolated and their encoding sequence identified in vitro from a large and diverse library by phage display selection. In this work, we show that this standard biochemical technique rapidly yields a collection of antibody protein binders for an inorganic target of major technological importance: crystalline metallic gold surfaces. 21 distinct anti-gold antibody proteins emerged from a large random library of antibodies and were sequenced. The systematic statistical analysis of all the protein sequences reveals a strong occurrence of arginine in anti-gold antibodies, which corroborates recent molecular dynamics predictions on the crucial role of arginine in protein/gold interactions. Once tethered to small gold nanoparticles using histidine tag chemistry, the selected antibodies could drive the self-assembly of the colloids onto t...

  1. Arginine-assisted synthesis and catalytic properties of single-crystalline palladium tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Geng-Tao; Jiang, Xian; Wu, Rui; Wei, Shao-Hua; Sun, Dong-Mei; Tang, Ya-Wen; Lu, Tian-Hong; Chen, Yu

    2014-12-24

    Noble metallic nanocrystals (NMNCs) with highly branched morphologies are an exciting new class of nanomaterials because of their great potential application in catalysis, sensing, optics, and electronics originating from their unique structures. Herein, we report a facile water-based method to synthesize high-quality palladium (Pd) tetrapods with the assistance of arginine molecule, which is more economical and environmentally friendly than the previous reported carbon monoxide (CO)-assisted synthesis in the organic system. During the synthesis, arginine molecule plays an essential role in controlling the tetrapod-like morphology. The as-synthesized Pd tetrapods have a potential application in the formic acid (HCOOH)-induced reduction of highly toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) owing to their improved catalytic performance for the HCOOH decomposition. PMID:25469763

  2. Solid-state properties and dissolution behaviour of tablets containing co-amorphous indomethacin-arginine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenz, Elisabeth; Jensen, Katrine Birgitte Tarp; Blaabjerg, Lasse Ingerslev;

    2015-01-01

    Co-amorphous drug formulations provide the possibility to stabilize a drug in its amorphous form by interactions with low molecular weight compounds, e.g. amino acids. Recent studies have shown the feasibility of spray drying as a technique to manufacture co-amorphous indomethacin–arginine in a...... larger production scale. In this work, a tablet formulation was developed for a co-amorphous salt, namely spray dried indomethacin–arginine (SD IND–ARG). The effects of compaction pressure on tablet properties, physical stability and dissolution profiles under non-sink conditions were examined....... Dissolution profiles of tablets with SD IND–ARG (TAB SD IND–ARG) were compared to those of tablets containing a physical mixture of crystalline IND and ARG (TAB PM IND–ARG) and to the dissolution of pure spray dried powder. Concerning tableting, the developed formulation allowed for the preparation of tablets...

  3. Biodegradation Ability and Catabolic Genes of Petroleum-Degrading Sphingomonas koreensis Strain ASU-06 Isolated from Egyptian Oily Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd El-Latif Hesham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are serious pollutants and health hazards. In this study, 15 PAHs-degrading bacteria were isolated from Egyptian oily soil. Among them, one Gram-negative strain (ASU-06 was selected and biodegradation ability and initial catabolic genes of petroleum compounds were investigated. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain ASU-06 to published sequences in GenBank database as well as phylogenetic analysis identified ASU-06 as Sphingomonas koreensis. Strain ASU-06 degraded 100, 99, 98, and 92.7% of 100 mg/L naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, and pyrene within 15 days, respectively. When these PAHs present in a mixed form, the enhancement phenomenon appeared, particularly in the degradation of pyrene, whereas the degradation rate was 98.6% within the period. This is the first report showing the degradation of different PAHs by this species. PCR experiments with specific primers for catabolic genes alkB, alkB1, nahAc, C12O, and C23O suggested that ASU-06 might possess genes for aliphatic and PAHs degradation, while PAH-RHDαGP gene was not detected. Production of biosurfactants and increasing cell-surface hydrophobicity were investigated. GC/MS analysis of intermediate metabolites of studied PAHs concluded that this strain utilized these compounds via two main pathways, and phthalate was the major constant product that appeared in each day of the degradation period.

  4. Catabolic and regulatory systems in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 involved in electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eKouzuma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that respires using a variety of inorganic and organic compounds. MR-1 is also capable of utilizing extracellular solid materials, including anodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs, as electron acceptors, thereby enabling electricity generation. As MFCs have the potential to generate electricity from biomass waste and wastewater, MR-1 has been extensively studied to identify the molecular systems that are involved in electricity generation in MFCs. These studies have demonstrated the importance of extracellular electron-transfer pathways that electrically connect the quinone pool in the cytoplasmic membrane to extracellular electron acceptors. Electricity generation is also dependent on intracellular catabolic pathways that oxidize electron donors, such as lactate, and regulatory systems that control the expression of genes encoding the components of catabolic and electron-transfer pathways. In addition, recent findings suggest that cell-surface polymers, e.g., exopolysaccharides, and secreted chemicals, which function as electron shuttles, are also involved in electricity generation. Despite these advances in our knowledge on the extracellular electron-transfer processes in MR-1, further efforts are necessary to fully understand the underlying intra- and extra-cellular molecular systems for electricity generation in MFCs. We suggest that investigating how MR-1 coordinates these systems to efficiently transfer electrons to electrodes and conserve electrochemical energy for cell proliferation is important for establishing the biological bases for MFCs.

  5. Biodegradation ability and catabolic genes of petroleum-degrading Sphingomonas koreensis strain ASU-06 isolated from Egyptian oily soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesham, Abd El-Latif; Mawad, Asmaa M M; Mostafa, Yasser M; Shoreit, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are serious pollutants and health hazards. In this study, 15 PAHs-degrading bacteria were isolated from Egyptian oily soil. Among them, one Gram-negative strain (ASU-06) was selected and biodegradation ability and initial catabolic genes of petroleum compounds were investigated. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain ASU-06 to published sequences in GenBank database as well as phylogenetic analysis identified ASU-06 as Sphingomonas koreensis. Strain ASU-06 degraded 100, 99, 98, and 92.7% of 100 mg/L naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, and pyrene within 15 days, respectively. When these PAHs present in a mixed form, the enhancement phenomenon appeared, particularly in the degradation of pyrene, whereas the degradation rate was 98.6% within the period. This is the first report showing the degradation of different PAHs by this species. PCR experiments with specific primers for catabolic genes alkB, alkB1, nahAc, C12O, and C23O suggested that ASU-06 might possess genes for aliphatic and PAHs degradation, while PAH-RHDαGP gene was not detected. Production of biosurfactants and increasing cell-surface hydrophobicity were investigated. GC/MS analysis of intermediate metabolites of studied PAHs concluded that this strain utilized these compounds via two main pathways, and phthalate was the major constant product that appeared in each day of the degradation period. PMID:25177681

  6. Monotropein exerts protective effects against IL-1β-induced apoptosis and catabolic responses on osteoarthritis chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Wu, Longhuo; Li, Linfu; Chen, Siyi

    2014-12-01

    Osteoarthritis, characterized by a loss of articular cartilage accompanied with inflammation, is the most common age-associated degenerative disease. Monotropein, an iridoids glycoside isolated from the roots of Morinda officinalis How, has been demonstrated to exhibit anti-inflammatory activity. In the present study, monotropein was firstly to exhibit cartilage protective activity by down regulating the pro-inflammatory cytokines in the knee synovial fluid in vivo. The anti-apoptotic and anti-catabolic effects of monotropein on rat OA chondrocytes treated by IL-1β were investigated in vitro. In cultured chondrocytes, monotropein attenuated apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in response to IL-1β stimulation. Moreover, treatment with monotropein, the expressions of MMP-3 and MMP-13 were significantly decreased, the expression of COL2A1 was increased. Taken together, these findings suggested that monotropein exerted anti-apoptosis and anti-catabolic activity in chondrocytes, which might support its possible therapeutic role in OA. PMID:25466264

  7. Acetate catabolism by Methanosarcina barkeri: evidence for involvement of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, methyl coenzyme M, and methylreductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pathway of acetate catabolism in Methanosarcina barkeri strain MS was studied by using a recently developed assay for methanogenesis from acetate by soluble enzymes in cell extracts. Extracts incubated with [2-14C]acetate, hydrogen, and ATP formed 14CH4 and [14C]methyl coenzyme M as products. The apparent Km for acetate conversion to methane was 5 mM. In the presence of excess acetate, both the rate and duration of methane production was dependent on ATP. Acetyl phosphate replaced the cell extract methanogenic requirement for both acetate and ATP (the Km for ATP was 2 mM). Low concentrations of bromoethanesulfonic acid and cyanide, inhibitors of methylreductase and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, respectively, greatly reduced the rate of methanogenesis. Precipitation of CO dehydrogenase in cell extracts by antibodies raised to 95% purified enzyme inhibited both CO dehydrogenase and acetate-to-methane conversion activity. The data are consistent with a model of acetate catabolism in which methylreductase, methyl coenzyme M, CO dehydrogenase, and acetate-activating enzymes are components. These results are discussed in relation to acetate uptake and rate-limiting transformation mechanisms in methane formation

  8. Arginine Vasopressin V1a Receptor Antagonist Impairs Maternal Memory in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Nephew, Benjamin C.; Bridges, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Primiparous female rats rapidly respond to foster pups following an extended separation from pups after an initial maternal experience. This consolidation of maternal behavior has been referred to as maternal memory. The neurochemical regulation of maternal memory is not clearly understood. One neuropeptide that may mediate maternal memory is arginine vasopressin (AVP), a neuropeptide which is modulated around the time of parturition and has an established role in learning and memory processe...

  9. Comparison of L-Arginine and Hydroxyurea Interactractions with Transitional Metal Ions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Parab

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available No* is a free radical with one free electron and as such it is very highly reactive and particularly it interacts with transitional metals. Nitric oxide, gas is an important signaling molecule in the body of mammals, including humans and is an extremely important intermediate in chemical industry In biological systems there are many enzymes, which contain transitional elements like iron, copper and manganese, which are the most probable sites for nitric oxide to react. Such type of interactions results in considerable mod ification of the enzyme functions resulting pathological and even genetic disorders. This needs a critical amount of nitric oxide in the system for proper functioning. To observe the effects of NO*, various NO* donor compounds are used. Hydroxyurea (HU is shown to increase the levels of NO*.L- arginine is one of the non - essential amino acids. In the body L- arginine is used to make nitric oxide, which reduces blood vessel stiffness, increases blood flow and improves blood vessel function. The visible spectra of some transitional metals Cu, Fe(II,Fe(III,Cr, Mn, Ni have been studied individually in presence of hydroxyurea (HU with varying amounts .The spectra are also studied for the effect of varying amounts of metal ion on hydroxyurea. To observe how arginine itself acts on transitional metal ions. Even effect of Hydroxyurea on metal - arginine binding is also studied. The evaluation of these spectra is carried out for its binding parameters with the help of scatchard plots. The work has revealed certain very significant and interesting data which can have a lot of bearing on many chemical, biological and environmental aspects.

  10. Unique Photobleaching Phenomena of the Twin-Arginine Translocase Respiratory Enzyme Chaperone DmsD

    OpenAIRE

    Rivardo, Fabrizio; Leach, Thorin G.H.; Chan, Catherine S.; Winstone, Tara M. L.; Ladner, Carol L.; Sarfo, Kwabena J.; Turner, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    DmsD is a chaperone of the redox enzyme maturation protein family specifically required for biogenesis of DMSO reductase in Escherichia coli. It exists in multiple folding forms, all of which are capable of binding its known substrate, the twin-arginine leader sequence of the DmsA catalytic subunit. It is important for maturation of the reductase and targeting to the cytoplasmic membrane for translocation. Here, we demonstrate that DmsD exhibits an irreversible photobleaching phenomenon upon ...

  11. Effect of L- Arginine On Electrocardiographic Changes Induced By Hypercholesterolemia And Isoproterenol In Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Pradeep; Goyal, Manish; Agarwal, J L

    2009-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia, a well-known cardiovascular risk factor, is associated with prolonged action potential duration, longer QTc intervals (rate controlled QT interval), suggested that Hypercholesterolemia may have a direct effect on ventricular repolarization. Hypercholesterolemia was induced in rabbits and L-arginine was given orally to animals for sixteen weeks. The isoproterenol was injected in all the animals to produce electrocardiographic changes. ECG was recorded in lead II at start ...

  12. Surprising Arginine Biosynthesis: a Reappraisal of the Enzymology and Evolution of the Pathway in Microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Ying; Labedan, Bernard; Glansdorff, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Summary: Major aspects of the pathway of de novo arginine biosynthesis via acetylated intermediates in microorganisms must be revised in light of recent enzymatic and genomic investigations. The enzyme N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS), which used to be considered responsible for the first committed step of the pathway, is present in a limited number of bacterial phyla only and is absent from Archaea. In many Bacteria, shorter proteins related to the Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferase family ap...

  13. Arginine and proline applied as food additives stimulate high freeze tolerance in larvae of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koštál, Vladimír; Korbelová, Jaroslava; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Moos, Martin; Šimek, Petr

    2016-08-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an insect of tropical origin. Its larval stage is evolutionarily adapted for rapid growth and development under warm conditions and shows high sensitivity to cold. In this study, we further developed an optimal acclimation and freezing protocol that significantly improves larval freeze tolerance (an ability to survive at -5°C when most of the freezable fraction of water is converted to ice). Using the optimal protocol, freeze survival to adult stage increased from 0.7% to 12.6% in the larvae fed standard diet (agar, sugar, yeast, cornmeal). Next, we fed the larvae diets augmented with 31 different amino compounds, administered in different concentrations, and observed their effects on larval metabolomic composition, viability, rate of development and freeze tolerance. While some diet additives were toxic, others showed positive effects on freeze tolerance. Statistical correlation revealed tight association between high freeze tolerance and high levels of amino compounds involved in arginine and proline metabolism. Proline- and arginine-augmented diets showed the highest potential, improving freeze survival to 42.1% and 50.6%, respectively. Two plausible mechanisms by which high concentrations of proline and arginine might stimulate high freeze tolerance are discussed: (i) proline, probably in combination with trehalose, could reduce partial unfolding of proteins and prevent membrane fusions in the larvae exposed to thermal stress (prior to freezing) or during freeze dehydration; (ii) both arginine and proline are exceptional among amino compounds in their ability to form supramolecular aggregates which probably bind partially unfolded proteins and inhibit their aggregation under increasing freeze dehydration. PMID:27489218

  14. Arginine vasopressin versus norepinephrine: will the stronger one win the race?

    OpenAIRE

    Ertmer, Christian; Bone, Hans-Georg; Westphal, Martin

    2006-01-01

    In the current issue of Critical Care, Friesenecker and colleagues present a well-designed comparative study on the microvascular effects of arginine vasopressin (AVP) and norepinephrine (NE) in a physiological, unanesthetized hamster model. The authors clearly demonstrate that AVP, but not NE, has marked vasoconstrictive effects on large arterioles, whereas the impact on small arterioles is comparable for both vasopressors. However, it remains unclear if these results, per se, reflect a stro...

  15. Levels of arginine-vasopressin in cerebrospinal fluid during passive avoidance behavior in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kloet, E.R. de; Laczi, F.; Gaffori, O.; Fekete, M.; Wied, D. de

    1984-01-01

    The concentration of immunoreactive arginine-vasopressin (IR-AVP) was measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during acquisition and retention of passive avoidance behavior. IR-AVP level in CSF of male Wistar rats immediately after the learning trial was increased; the rate of which was related to the intensity of the electric footschock during the learning trial and the avoidance latency as measured 1 day after the learning trial. Immediately after the 24 h retention test IR-AVP levels wer...

  16. Arteriolar vasoconstrictive response: comparing the effects of arginine vasopressin and norepinephrine

    OpenAIRE

    Friesenecker, Barbara E; Tsai, Amy G; Martini, Judith; Ulmer, Hanno; Wenzel, Volker; Hasibeder, Walter R; Intaglietta, Marcos; Dünser, Martin W

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study was designed to examine differences in the arteriolar vasoconstrictive response between arginine vasopressin (AVP) and norepinephrine (NE) on the microcirculatory level in the hamster window chamber model in unanesthetized, normotonic hamsters using intravital microscopy. It is known from patients with advanced vasodilatory shock that AVP exerts strong additional vasoconstriction when incremental dosage increases of NE have no further effect on mean arterial blood pre...

  17. Methylation of CenH3 arginine 37 regulates kinetochore integrity and chromosome segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Samel, Anke; Cuomo, Alessandro; Bonaldi, Tiziana; Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann E

    2012-01-01

    Centromeres of eukaryotic chromosomes mark the site for kinetochore formation and microtubule attachment and are essential for accurate chromosome segregation. Although centromere identity is defined by the presence of the histone H3 variant CenH3/centromere protein A (CENP-A), little is known about how epigenetic modifications on CenH3 might regulate kinetochore assembly and centromere function. Here we show that CENP-A from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, termed Cse4, is methylated on arginine 37...

  18. A mutation in the human phospholamban gene, deleting arginine 14, results in lethal, hereditary cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Haghighi, Kobra; Kolokathis, Fotis; Gramolini, Anthony O.; Waggoner, Jason R.; Pater, Luke; Lynch, Roy A.; Fan, Guo-Chang; Tsiapras, Dimitris; Parekh, Rohan R.; Dorn, Gerald W., II; MacLennan, David H.; Kremastinos, Dimitrios Th; Kranias, Evangelia G.

    2006-01-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-cycling proteins are key regulators of cardiac contractility, and alterations in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-cycling properties have been shown to be causal of familial cardiomyopathies. Through genetic screening of dilated cardiomyopathy patients, we identified a previously uncharacterized deletion of arginine 14 (PLN-R14Del) in the coding region of the phospholamban (PLN) gene in a large family with hereditary heart failure. No homozygous individuals were ide...

  19. Degradation of Arginine and Other Amino Acids by Eubacterium nodatum ATCC 33099

    OpenAIRE

    Uematsu, H.; Hoshino, E.

    2011-01-01

    The utilisation of a total of 20 amino acids by Eubacterium nodatum, a predominant asaccharolytic anaerobe isolated from human periodontal pockets, was studied. Washed cells of the microorganism produced substantial amounts of acetate, butyrate and ammonia from lysine, and butyrate and ammonia from arginine as main products under anaerobic conditions. They also produced a small amount of formate from histidine. Metabolic products were not detected from any of the other 17 amino acids. These r...

  20. The development of poly-L-arginine-coated liposomes for gene delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Opanasopit P; Tragulpakseerojn J; Apirakaramwong A; Ngawhirunpat T; Rojanarata T; Ruktanonchai U

    2011-01-01

    Praneet Opanasopit1, Jintana Tragulpakseerojn1, Auayporn Apirakaramwong1, Tanasait Ngawhirunpat1, Theerasak Rojanarata1, Uracha Ruktanonchai21Faculty of Pharmacy, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand; 2National Nanotechnology Center, Thailand Science Park, Pathumthani, Thailand Abstract: In this study, liposomes coated with cationic polymers, poly-L-arginine (PLA), were assessed as a promising gene transfer system in human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells and human h...

  1. Arginine ADP-ribosylation mechanism based on structural snapshots of iota-toxin and actin complex

    OpenAIRE

    Tsurumura, Toshiharu; Tsumori, Yayoi; Qiu, Hao; Oda, Masataka; Sakurai, Jun; Nagahama, Masahiro; Tsuge, Hideaki

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin (Ia) mono-ADP ribosylates Arg177 of actin, leading to cytoskeletal disorganization and cell death. To fully understand the reaction mechanism of arginine-specific mono-ADP ribosyl transferase, the structure of the toxin-substrate protein complex must be characterized. Recently, we solved the crystal structure of Ia in complex with actin and the nonhydrolyzable NAD+ analog βTAD (thiazole-4-carboxamide adenine dinucleotide); however, the structures of the NAD+...

  2. Efficacy L-Arginine In Patients With Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Associated With Metabolic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Oleksandr Fediv; Volodymyr Shevchuk; Oksana Olinyk

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose Recent research in the field of hematology indicate that among the many pathogenic mechanisms of development and progression of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis NASH which occurs on the background of the metabolic syndrome an important role is played by endothelial dysfunction and violations of haemocoagulation. The aim of this research was to study the effectiveness of L-arginine as it corrects endothelial dysfunction and disorders of homeostasis haemocoagulation ...

  3. Arginine-Rich Cationic Polypeptides Amplify Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Monocyte Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Bosshart, Herbert; Heinzelmann, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The human neutrophil-derived cationic protein CAP37, also known as azurocidin or heparin-binding protein, enhances the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in isolated human monocytes. We measured the release of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) in human whole blood and found that in addition to CAP37, other arginine-rich cationic polypeptides, such as the small structurally related protamines, enhance LPS-induced monocyte activation....

  4. A novel virulence strategy for Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated by an autotransporter with arginine-specific aminopeptidase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Luckett, Jeni C. A.; Owen Darch; Chase Watters; Manal Abuoun; Victoria Wright; Esteban Paredes-Osses; Jenny Ward; Hana Goto; Stephan Heeb; Stéphanie Pommier; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.; Miguel Cámara; Hardie, Kim R.

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary We present a new Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factor that promotes chronic skin wound infections. We propose the name AaaA for this cell-surface tethered autotransporter. This arginine-specific aminopeptidase confers a growth advantage upon P. aeruginosa, providing a fitness advantage by creating a supply of arginine in chronic wounds where oxygen availability is limited and biofilm formation is involved. To our knowledge, this is the first mechanistic evidence linking the ...

  5. Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition by NG-Nitro-l-Arginine Methyl Ester Inhibits Tumor-Induced Angiogenesis in Mammary Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Jadeski, Lorraine C.; Lala, Peeyush K.

    1999-01-01

    Using a murine breast cancer model, we earlier found a positive correlation between the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and tumor progression; treatment with inhibitors of NOS, NG-methyl-l-arginine (NMMA) and NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), had antitumor and antimetastatic effects that were partly attributed to reduced tumor cell invasiveness. In the present study, we used a novel in vivo model of tumor angiogenesis using subcutaneous implants of tumor cells suspended in ...

  6. Acute L-arginine alpha ketoglutarate supplementation fails to improve muscular performance in resistance trained and untrained men

    OpenAIRE

    Wax Benjamin; Kavazis Andreas N; Webb Heather E; Brown Stanley P

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Dietary supplements containing L-arginine are marketed to improve exercise performance, but the efficacy of such supplements is not clear. Therefore, this study examined the efficacy of acute ingestion of L-arginine alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG) muscular strength and endurance in resistance trained and untrained men. Methods Eight resistance trained and eight untrained healthy males ingested either 3000mg of AAKG or a placebo 45 minutes prior to a resistance exercise protocol...

  7. Arginine-Rich Peptides Destabilize the Plasma Membrane, Consistent with a Pore Formation Translocation Mechanism of Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Herce, H.D.; Garcia, A. E.; Litt, J.; Kane, R. S.; Martin, P.; Enrique, N.; Rebolledo, A.; Milesi, V.

    2009-01-01

    Recent molecular dynamics simulations (Herce and Garcia, PNAS, 104: 20805 (2007)) have suggested that the arginine-rich HIV Tat peptides might be able to translocate by destabilizing and inducing transient pores in phospholipid bilayers. In this pathway for peptide translocation, arginine residues play a fundamental role not only in the binding of the peptide to the surface of the membrane but also in the destabilization and nucleation of transient pores across the bilayer, despite being char...

  8. Comparison of the effect of topical versus systemic L-arginine on wound healing in acute incisional diabetic rat model

    OpenAIRE

    Alireza Zandifar; Sima Seifabadi; Ehsan Zandifar; Sajedeh Sohrabi Beheshti; Abolfazl Aslani; Shaghayegh Haghjooy Javanmard

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired wound healing. The amino acid L-arginine is the only substrate for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. The purpose of this study was to compare the topical versus systemic L-arginine treatment on total nitrite (NO x ) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations in wound fluid and rate of wound healing in an acute incisional diabetic wound model. Materials and Methods: A total of 56 Sprague-Dawley rats were ...

  9. A Selective V1A Receptor Agonist, Selepressin, Is Superior to Arginine Vasopressin and to Norepinephrine in Ovine Septic Shock*

    OpenAIRE

    He, Xinrong; Su, Fuhong; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Laporte, Régent; Kjølbye, Anne Louise; Zhang, Jing; Xie, Keliang; Moussa, Mouhamed Djahoum; Reinheimer, Torsten Michael; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Selective vasopressin V1A receptor agonists may have advantages over arginine vasopressin in the treatment of septic shock. We compared the effects of selepressin, a selective V1A receptor agonist, arginine vasopressin, and norepinephrine on hemodynamics, organ function, and survival in an ovine septic shock model. Design: Randomized animal study. Setting: University hospital animal research laboratory. Subjects: Forty-six adult female sheep. Interventions: Fecal peritonitis was in...

  10. Effect of L-arginine on renal blood flow in normal subjects and patients with hypoxic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Howes, T. Q.; Keilty, S. E.; Maskrey, V. L.; Deane, C. R.; Baudouin, S. V.; Moxham, J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: L-arginine is the precursor of endothelium derived nitric oxide (NO) and increasing the available substrate may increase the production of NO. This has been shown by local infusion in peripheral vascular beds but there are few studies of the effects during systemic infusion. Renal vasoconstriction is known to be important in the pathogenesis of cor pulmonale in patients with hypoxic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The effects of a systemic infusion of L-arginine on r...

  11. Mobile Portal Implementation Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Ping; Damsgaard, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Mobile portal plays an important role in mobile commerce market. Current literature focuses on static analysis on the value chain of mobile portals. This article provides a dynamic perspective on mobile portal strategy. Drawing upon network economics, we describe mobile portal implementation...... as a fourphase process. In different phase, a portal provider has various challenges to overcome and adopt diverse strategies, and correspondingly the regulator has different foci. The conceptual framework proposed in this article offers a basis for further analyses on the market dynamics of mobile commerce...

  12. Head First Mobile Web

    CERN Document Server

    Gardner, Lyza; Grigsby, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Despite the huge number of mobile devices and apps in use today, your business still needs a website. You just need it to be mobile. Head First Mobile Web walks you through the process of making a conventional website work on a variety smartphones and tablets. Put your JavaScript, CSS media query, and HTML5 skills to work-then optimize your site to perform its best in the demanding mobile market. Along the way, you'll discover how to adapt your business strategy to target specific devices. Navigate the increasingly complex mobile landscapeTake both technical and strategic approaches to mobile

  13. Mobile Router Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Shell, Dan; Leung, Kent

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems and NASA have been performing joint research on mobile routing technology under a NASA Space Act Agreement. Cisco developed mobile router technology and provided that technology to NASA for applications to aeronautic and space-based missions. NASA has performed stringent performance testing of the mobile router, including the interaction of routing and transport-level protocols. This paper describes mobile routing, the mobile router, and some key configuration parameters. In addition, the paper describes the mobile routing test network and test results documenting the performance of transport protocols in dynamic routing environments.

  14. Using FT-NIR spectroscopy technique to determine arginine content in fermented Cordyceps sinensis mycelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chuanqi; Xu, Ning; Shao, Yongni; He, Yong

    2015-10-01

    This research investigated the feasibility of using Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectral technique for determining arginine content in fermented Cordyceps sinensis (C. sinensis) mycelium. Three different models were carried out to predict the arginine content. Wavenumber selection methods such as competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS) and successive projections algorithm (SPA) were used to identify the most important wavenumbers and reduce the high dimensionality of the raw spectral data. Only a few wavenumbers were selected by CARS and CARS-SPA as the optimal wavenumbers, respectively. Among the prediction models, CARS-least squares-support vector machine (CARS-LS-SVM) model performed best with the highest values of the coefficient of determination of prediction (Rp(2)=0.8370) and residual predictive deviation (RPD=2.4741), the lowest value of root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP=0.0841). Moreover, the number of the input variables was forty-five, which only accounts for 2.04% of that of the full wavenumbers. The results showed that FT-NIR spectral technique has the potential to be an objective and non-destructive method to detect arginine content in fermented C. sinensis mycelium. PMID:26010565

  15. Study on mutual interactions and electronic structures of hyaluronan with Lysine, 6-Aminocaproic acid and Arginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chytil, Martin; Trojan, Martin; Kovalenko, Alexander

    2016-05-20

    Interactions between polyelectrolytes and oppositely charged surfactants have been in a great interest for several decades, yet the conventional surfactants may cause a problem in medical applications. Interactivity between polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) and amino acids Lysine, 6-Aminocaproic acid (6-AcA), and Arginine as an alternative system is reported. The interactions were investigated by means of rheology and electric conductance and the electronic structures were explored by the density functional theory (DFT). Lysine exhibits the strongest interaction of all, which was manifested, e.g. by nearly 6-time drop of the initial viscosity comparing with only 1.3-time lower value in the case of 6-AcA. Arginine interaction with HA was surprisingly weaker in terms of viscosity than that of Lysine due to a lower and delocalized charge density on its guanidine group. According to the DFT calculations, the binding of Lysine to HA was found to be more flexible, while Arginine creates more rigid structure with HA. PMID:26917367

  16. Effect of oral arginine supplementation on GH secretion and lipid metabolism in Wistar trained rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Luciano

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Oral Arginine Supplementation (OAS and exercise are able to modify the secretion of the Growth Hormone (GH that stimulates the lipid metabolism. The aim of the study was to verify the effect of the OAS, the aerobic exercise and the combination of the OAS with the aerobic exercise on the GH secretion and lipid metabolism in rats. The sample was composted for 40 male wistar rats, divided in four groups: Sedentary control (SC, sedentary arginine (SA, trained control (TC and trained arginine (TA. The AS and AT received the oral supplementation in alternated days and the groups CT and AT realized swimming exercise for 1hour/day with overload equivalent to 5% of body mass five days per week during 4 weeks. The concentrations of GH were significantly difference between the sedentary groups (SC and AS and (TC and AT and the lipid metabolism did not change throughout all groups. In conclusions, aerobic physical training did not modify the lipid metabolism and diminishes the values of GH concentration and the OAS did not modify the concentration of GH in Wistar rats.

  17. Arginine and antioxidant supplement on performance in elderly male cyclists: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carpenter Catherine L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human exercise capacity declines with advancing age. These changes often result in loss of physical fitness and more rapid senescence. Nitric oxide (NO has been implicated in improvement of exercise capacity through vascular smooth muscle relaxation in both coronary and skeletal muscle arteries, as well as via independent mechanisms. Antioxidants may prevent nitric oxide inactivation by oxygen free radicals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an L-arginine and antioxidant supplement on exercise performance in elderly male cyclists. Methods This was a two-arm prospectively randomized double-blinded and placebo-controlled trial. Sixteen male cyclists were randomized to receive either a proprietary supplement (Niteworks®, Herbalife International Inc., Century City, CA or a placebo powder. Exercise parameters were assessed by maximal incremental exercise testing performed on a stationary cycle ergometer using breath-by-breath analysis at baseline, week one and week three. Results There was no difference between baseline exercise parameters. In the supplemented group, anaerobic threshold increased by 16.7% (2.38 ± 0.18 L/min, p 2 max between control and intervention groups at either week 1 or week 3 by comparison to baseline. Conclusion An arginine and antioxidant-containing supplement increased the anaerobic threshold at both week one and week three in elderly cyclists. No effect on VO2 max was observed. This study indicated a potential role of L-arginine and antioxidant supplementation in improving exercise performance in elderly.

  18. Promoting siRNA delivery via enhanced cellular uptake using an arginine-decorated amphiphilic dendrimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxuan; Liu, Cheng; Zhou, Jiehua; Chen, Chao; Qu, Fanqi; Rossi, John J.; Rocchi, Palma; Peng, Ling

    2015-02-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) with small interfering RNA (siRNA) is expected to offer an attractive means to specifically and efficiently silence disease-associated genes for treating various diseases provided that safe and efficient delivery systems are available. In this study, we have established an arginine-decorated amphiphilic dendrimer composed of a hydrophobic alkyl chain and a hydrophilic PAMAM dendron bearing arginine terminals as nonviral vector for siRNA delivery. Indeed, this dendrimer proved to be very effective at delivering siRNAs in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells and in human hematopoietic CD34+ stem cells, leading to improved gene silencing compared to the corresponding nonarginine decorated dendrimer. Further investigation confirmed that this dendrimer was granted with the capacity to form stable nanoparticles with siRNA and significantly enhance cellular uptake of siRNA. In addition, this dendrimer revealed no discernible cytotoxicity. All these findings demonstrate that decoration of the dendrimer surface with arginine residues is indeed a useful strategy to improve the delivery ability of dendrimers.

  19. Kinetics for Cu(2+) induced Sepia pharaonis arginine kinase inactivation and aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Li-Li; Wu, Feng; Fu, Yang-Yong; Yin, Shang-Jun; Si, Yue-Xiu; Park, Yong-Doo

    2016-10-01

    Arginine kinase plays an important role in cellular energy metabolism and is closely related to the environmental stress response in marine invertebrates. We studied the Cu(2+)-mediated inhibition and aggregation of Sepia pharaonis arginine kinase (SPAK) and found that Cu(2+) markedly inhibited the SPAK activity along with mixed-type inhibition against the arginine substrate and noncompetitive inhibition against the ATP cofactor. Spectrofluorimetry results showed that Cu(2+) induced a tertiary structure change in SPAK, resulting in exposure of the hydrophobic surface and increased aggregation. Cu(2+)-mediated SPAK aggregation followed first-order kinetics consistent with monophasic and a biphasic processes. Addition of osmolytes, including glycine and proline, effectively blocked SPAK aggregation and restored SPAK activity. Our results demonstrated the effects of Cu(2+) on SPAK catalytic function, conformation, and aggregation, as well as the protective effects of osmolytes on SPAK folding. This study provided important insights into the role of Cu(2+) as a negative effector of the S. pharaonis metabolic enzyme AK and the possible responses of cephalopods to unfavorable environmental conditions. PMID:27318110

  20. Mass spectrometry-based identification and characterisation of lysine and arginine methylation in the human proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremang, Michael; Cuomo, Alessandro; Agresta, Anna Maria; Stugiewicz, Magdalena; Spadotto, Valeria; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2013-09-01

    Protein methylation is a post-translational modification (PTM) by which a variable number of methyl groups are transferred to lysine and arginine residues within proteins. Despite increased interest in this modification due to its reversible nature and its emerging role in a diverse set of biological pathways beyond chromatin, global identification of protein methylation has remained an unachieved goal. To characterise sites of lysine and arginine methylation beyond histones, we employed an approach that combines heavy methyl stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (hmSILAC) with high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Through a broad evaluation of immuno-affinity enrichment and the application of two classical protein separation techniques prior to mass spectrometry, to nucleosolic and cytosolic fractions separately, we identified a total of 501 different methylation types, on 397 distinct lysine and arginine sites, present on 139 unique proteins. Our results considerably extend the number of known in vivo methylation sites and indicate their significant presence on several protein complexes involved at all stages of gene expression, from chromatin remodelling and transcription to splicing and translation. In addition, we describe the potential of the hmSILAC approach for accurate relative quantification of methylation levels between distinct functional states. PMID:23748837

  1. Caries-free subjects have high levels of urease and arginine deiminase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn REYES

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study investigated the relationship between urease and arginine deiminase system (ADS activities and dental caries through a cross-sectional study. Material and Methods: Urease and ADS activities were measured in saliva and plaque samples from 10 caries-free subjects and 13 caries-active. Urease activity was obtained from the ammonia produced by incubation of plaque and saliva samples in urea. ADS activity was obtained from the ammonia generated by the arginine-HCl and Tris-maleate buffer. Specific activity was defined as micromoles of ammonia per minute per milligram of protein. Shapiro-Wilk statistical test was used to analyze the distribution of the data, and Mann-Whitney test was used to determine the significance of the data. Results: The specific urease activity in saliva and plaque was significantly higher in individuals with low DMFT scores. ADS activity in saliva (6.050 vs 1.350, p=0.0154 and plaque (8.830 vs 1.210, p=0.025 was also higher in individuals with low DMFT scores. Conclusions: Caries-free subjects had a higher ammonia generation activity by urease and arginine deiminase system for both saliva and plaque samples than low caries-active subjects. High levels of alkali production in oral environment were related to caries-free subjects.

  2. Effects of Arginine Supplementation on Amino Acid Profiles in Blood and Tissues in Fed and Overnight-Fasted Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Holecek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic arginine intake is believed to have favorable effects on the body. However, it might be hypothesized that excessive consumption of an individual amino acid exerts adverse effects on distribution and metabolism of other amino acids. We evaluated the effect of chronic intake of arginine on amino acid concentrations in blood plasma, liver, kidneys, and soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles. Rats were fed a standard diet or a high-arginine diet (HAD for two months. Half of the animals in each group were sacrificed in the fed state, and the other half after fasting overnight. HAD increased blood plasma concentrations of urea, creatinine, arginine, and ornithine and decreased most other amino acids. Arginine and ornithine also increased in muscles and kidneys; an increase of lysine was observed in both muscle types. Methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, asparagine, glycine, serine, and taurine decreased in most tissues of HAD fed animals. Most of the effects of HAD disappeared after overnight fasting. It is concluded that (i enhanced dietary arginine intake alters distribution of almost all amino acids; and (ii to attain a better assessment of the effects of various nutritional interventions, an appropriate number of biochemical measurements must be performed in both postprandial and postabsorptive states.

  3. Effects of Arginine Supplementation on Amino Acid Profiles in Blood and Tissues in Fed and Overnight-Fasted Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holecek, Milan; Sispera, Ludek

    2016-01-01

    Chronic arginine intake is believed to have favorable effects on the body. However, it might be hypothesized that excessive consumption of an individual amino acid exerts adverse effects on distribution and metabolism of other amino acids. We evaluated the effect of chronic intake of arginine on amino acid concentrations in blood plasma, liver, kidneys, and soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles. Rats were fed a standard diet or a high-arginine diet (HAD) for two months. Half of the animals in each group were sacrificed in the fed state, and the other half after fasting overnight. HAD increased blood plasma concentrations of urea, creatinine, arginine, and ornithine and decreased most other amino acids. Arginine and ornithine also increased in muscles and kidneys; an increase of lysine was observed in both muscle types. Methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, asparagine, glycine, serine, and taurine decreased in most tissues of HAD fed animals. Most of the effects of HAD disappeared after overnight fasting. It is concluded that (i) enhanced dietary arginine intake alters distribution of almost all amino acids; and (ii) to attain a better assessment of the effects of various nutritional interventions, an appropriate number of biochemical measurements must be performed in both postprandial and postabsorptive states. PMID:27070638

  4. The Effects Of L-Arginine And L-Name On Coronary Flow And Oxidative Stress In Isolated Rat Hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobot Tanja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this experimental study was to assess the effects of the acute administration of L-arginine alone and in combination with L-NAME (a non-selective NO synthase inhibitor on the coronary flow and oxidative stress markers in isolated rat hearts. The experimental study was performed on hearts isolated from Wistar albino rats (n=12, male, 8 weeks old, body mass of 180-200 g. Retrograde perfusion of the isolated preparations was performed using a modified method according to the Langendorff technique with a gradual increase in the perfusion pressure (40–120 cmH2O. The following values were measured in the collected coronary effluents: coronary flow, released nitrites (NO production marker, superoxide anion radical and the index of lipid peroxidation (measured as thiobarbiturate reactive substances. The experimental protocol was performed under controlled conditions, followed by the administration of L-arginine alone (1 mmol and L-arginine (1 mmol + L-NAME (30 μmol. The results indicated that L-arginine did not significantly increase the coronary flow or the release of NO, TBARS and the superoxide anion radical. These effects were partially blocked by the joint administration of L-arginine + L-NAME, which indicated their competitive effect. Hence, the results of our study do not demonstrate significant effects of L-arginine administration on the coronary flow and oxidative stress markers in isolated rat hearts.

  5. Influence of phenolic compounds on the growth and arginine deiminase system in a wine lactic acid bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María R. Alberto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of seven phenolic compounds, normally present in wine, on the growth and arginine deiminase system (ADI of Lactobacillus hilgardii X1B, a wine lactic acid bacterium, was established. This system provides energy for bacterial growth and produces citrulline that reacts with ethanol forming the carcinogen ethyl carbamate (EC, found in some wines. The influence of phenolic compounds on bacterial growth was compound dependent. Growth and final pH values increased in presence of arginine. Arginine consumption decreased in presence of protocatechuic and gallic acids (31 and 17%, respectively and increased in presence of quercetin, rutin, catechin and the caffeic and vanillic phenolic acids (between 10 and 13%, respectively. ADI enzyme activities varied in presence of phenolic compounds. Rutin, quercetin and caffeic and vanillic acids stimulated the enzyme arginine deiminase about 37-40%. Amounts of 200 mg/L gallic and protocatechuic acids inhibited the arginine deiminase enzyme between 53 and 100%, respectively. Ornithine transcarbamylase activity was not modified at all concentrations of phenolic compounds. As gallic and protocatechuic acids inhibited the arginine deiminase enzyme that produces citrulline, precursor of EC, these results are important considering the formation of toxic compounds.

  6. Noncanonical Myo9b-RhoGAP Accelerates RhoA GTP Hydrolysis by a Dual-Arginine-Finger Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Fengshuang; Kong, Ruirui; Ren, Jinqi; Zhu, Li; Lou, Jizhong; Wu, Jane Y; Feng, Wei

    2016-07-31

    The GTP hydrolysis activities of Rho GTPases are stimulated by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), which contain a RhoGAP domain equipped with a characteristic arginine finger and an auxiliary asparagine for catalysis. However, the auxiliary asparagine is missing in the RhoGAP domain of Myo9b (Myo9b-RhoGAP), a unique motorized RhoGAP that specifically targets RhoA for controlling cell motility. Here, we determined the structure of Myo9b-RhoGAP in complex with GDP-bound RhoA and magnesium fluoride. Unexpectedly, Myo9b-RhoGAP contains two arginine fingers at its catalytic site. The first arginine finger resembles the one within the canonical RhoGAP domains and inserts into the nucleotide-binding pocket of RhoA, whereas the second arginine finger anchors the Switch I loop of RhoA and interacts with the nucleotide, stabilizing the transition state of GTP hydrolysis and compensating for the lack of the asparagine. Mutating either of the two arginine fingers impaired the catalytic activity of Myo9b-RhoGAP and affected the Myo9b-mediated cell migration. Our data indicate that Myo9b-RhoGAP accelerates RhoA GTP hydrolysis by a previously unknown dual-arginine-finger mechanism, which may be shared by other noncanonical RhoGAP domains lacking the auxiliary asparagine. PMID:27363609

  7. Monomeric Corynebacterium glutamicum N-acetyl glutamate kinase maintains sensitivity to L-arginine but has a lower intrinsic catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Li, Cheng; Zhang, Hao; Liang, Shuli; Han, Shuangyan; Lin, Ying; Yang, Xiaorong; Zheng, Suiping

    2016-02-01

    N-acetyl glutamate kinase (NAGK) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of L-arginine, and L-arginine-sensitive NAGK typically has hexameric architecture. Defining the relationship between this architecture and L-arginine inhibition can provide a foundation to identify the key amino acids involved in the allosteric regulation network of L-arginine. In the present study, the key amino acids in the N-terminal helix (N-helix) of Corynebacterium glutamicum (Cg) NAGK required for hexamer formation were determined using structural homology modeling and site-directed mutagenesis. It was also verified that hexameric architecture is required for the positive cooperativity of inhibition by L-arginine and for efficient catalysis, but that it is not the determinant of inhibition by L-arginine. Monomeric mutants retained a similar sensitivity to L-arginine as the hexameric form, indicating that monomers contain an independent, sensitive signal transduction network of L-arginine to mediate allosteric regulation. Mutation studies of CgNAGKs also revealed that amino acid residues 18-23 of the N-helix are required for inhibition by L-arginine, and that E19 may be an essential amino acid influencing the apparent affinity of L-arginine. Collectively, these studies may illuminate the basic mechanism of metabolic homeostasis of C. glutamicum. PMID:26512006

  8. Exploring the Mobility of Mobile Phone Users

    CERN Document Server

    Csáji, Balázs Cs; Traag, V A; Delvenne, Jean-Charles; Huens, Etienne; Van Dooren, Paul; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Blondel, Vincent D

    2013-01-01

    Mobile phone datasets allow for the analysis of human behavior on an unprecedented scale. The social network, temporal dynamics and mobile behavior of mobile phone users have often been analyzed independently from each other using mobile phone datasets. In this article, we explore the connections between various features of human behavior extracted from a large mobile phone dataset. Our observations are based on the analysis of communication data of 100000 anonymized and randomly chosen individuals in a dataset of communications in Portugal. We show that clustering and principal component analysis allow for a significant dimension reduction with limited loss of information. The most important features are related to geographical location. In particular, we observe that most people spend most of their time at only a few locations. With the help of clustering methods, we then robustly identify home and office locations and compare the results with official census data. Finally, we analyze the geographic spread ...

  9. Mobile Phones on Campus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朴春宝

    2007-01-01

    After entering the 21st century, more and more people have mobile phones in China. At the end of 2002, there were 20 million mobile phone users. By the year 2005 the number has reached up to 30 million.

  10. Tandem mobile robot system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttz, James H.; Shirey, David L.; Hayward, David R.

    2003-01-01

    A robotic vehicle system for terrain navigation mobility provides a way to climb stairs, cross crevices, and navigate across difficult terrain by coupling two or more mobile robots with a coupling device and controlling the robots cooperatively in tandem.

  11. Ion mobility sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  12. Mobile Multilayer IPsec protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.Gayathri

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A mobile user moves around and switches between wireless cells, subnets and domains, it needs to maintain the session continuity. At the same time security of signaling and transport media should not be compromised. A multi-layer security framework involving user authentication, packet based encryption and access control mechanism can provide the desired level of security to the mobile users. Supporting streaming traffic in a mobile wireless Internet is faced with several challenges due to continuous handoff experienced by a mobile user. These challenges include dynamic binding, location management, quality of service and end-to-end security for signaling and transport. Mobile users will use heterogeneous radio access networking technologies. Mobile multilayer IPsec protocol (MML IPSec extends ML-IPSec to deal with mobility and make it suitable for wireless networks. MML-IPSec is integration of ML-IPSec and mobile IP.

  13. Mobile Informal Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glahn, Christian; Börner, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Glahn, C., & Börner, D. (2009). Mobile Informal Learning. Presented at Mobile Learning in Context Symposium at the Open University of the Netherlands. September, 11, 2009, Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open University of the Netherlands.

  14. Metabolic and clinical response to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide in layer pullets of different genetic backgrounds supplied with graded dietary L-arginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieboldt, M A; Frahm, J; Halle, I; Görs, S; Schrader, L; Weigend, S; Preisinger, R; Metges, C C; Breves, G; Dänicke, S

    2016-03-01

    L-arginine (Arg) is an essential amino acid in birds that plays a decisive role in avian protein synthesis and immune response. Effects of graded dietary Arg supply on metabolic and clinical response to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were studied over 48 hours after a single intramuscular LPS injection in 18-week-old genetically diverse purebred pullets. LPS induced a genotype-specific fever response within 4 hours post injectionem. Whereas brown genotypes showed an initial hypothermia followed by longer-lasting moderate hyperthermia, white genotypes exhibited a biphasic hyperthermia without initial hypothermia. Furthermore, within 2 hours after LPS injection, sickness behavior characterized by lethargy, anorexia, intensified respiration, and ruffled feathers appeared, persisted for 3 to 5 hours and recovered 12 hours post injectionem. The varying grades of Arg did not alter the examined traits named above, whereas insufficient Arg reduced body growth and increased relative weights of liver and pancreas significantly. At 48 hours post injectionem, increased relative weights of liver and spleen were also found in LPS treated pullets, whereas LPS decreased those of pancreas, bursa, thymus, and cecal tonsils. Moreover, LPS lowered the sum of plasma amino acids and decreased plasma concentrations of Arg, citrulline, glutamate, methionine, ornithine, phenylalanine, proline, tryptophan, and tyrosine, and increased those of aspartate, glutamine, lysine, 1- and 3-methyl-histidine. Elevating concentrations of dietary Arg led to increasing plasma concentrations of Arg, citrulline, ornithine, and 3-methyl-histidine subsequently. As quantitative expression of LPS-induced anorexia, proteolysis, and the following changes in plasma amino acids, pullets showed a significant decrease of feed and nitrogen intake and catabolic metabolism characterized by negative nitrogen balance and body weight loss in the first 24 hours post injectionem. Pullets recovered from the

  15. Concurrent supplementation of arginine, vitamin E, and vitamin C improve cardiopulmonary performance in broilers chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Feria, C A

    2009-03-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of arginine, vitamin E (VE), and vitamin C (VC) on cardiopulmonary performance and ascites parameters of broilers reared under a cold environmental temperature. One-day-old male broilers were fed a basal corn-soybean meal diet (control, 1.2% arginine and 40 IU of VE), or the basal diet supplemented with 1% arginine and either 200 IU vitamin E (AE), 500 mg of vitamin C (AC), or a combination of VE and VC at the same amounts (AEC) per kilogram of feed. Pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) and mean arterial pressure were recorded in clinically healthy, anesthetized birds (28 to 42 d old) before and after an epinephrine (Epi) challenge (0.5 mg/kg of BW, i.v.), an aminoguanidine hemisulfate challenge (100 mg/kg of BW, i.v.), and an N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester challenge (50 mg/kg of BW, i.v.) at 20-min intervals. Data were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA, and the Student Newman-Keuls test was used to separate means within groups. The PAP increased 30 s after the Epi challenge in all birds, but the peak PAP was lower in the AEC group than in all the other groups, whereas birds in the AE and AC groups had lower PAP peaks than did the control group. After 120 s of challenge, the PAP was lower in AEC birds compared with the other birds. The PAP returned to pre-Epi amounts within 300 s in all groups. The PAP was increased (P < 0.05) within 60 s after the aminoguanidine hemisulfate and N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester challenges in all groups, but no differences were found among groups. The mean arterial pressure responses did not differ among groups. Plasma NO was greater in the AEC group than in all the other groups before and after the Epi challenge. These results showed that Epi elicited lower amplitude PAP and less prolonged increases in PAP in birds from the AEC group, and this may have been related to the increased vasodilation attributable to NO production. The AEC may have had complementary effects against

  16. Test for mobility

    OpenAIRE

    Li Kheng

    2014-01-01

    Mobile application testing is a process by which application software developed for mobile devices is tested, in aspects as functionality, usability and consistency. These applications can be pre-installed or installed from distribution platforms for mobile software. Due mobile devices have witnessed of a phenomenal growth in recent years (a study by Yankee Group predicted to generate $ 4.2 billion in revenue for 2013 through 7000 million downloads of applications the U.S.), it is necesary te...

  17. PSiS Mobile

    OpenAIRE

    Anacleto, Ricardo; Luz, Nuno; Figueiredo, Lino

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a state of the art on applications of mobile devices to support decision of a tourist running on a trip. We focus on two types of applications, tourism recommendation and tourism guide, making a brief description of the main characteristics of each one of them. We also refer the main problems encountered on the development of applications for mobile devices, and present PSiS (Personalized Sightseeing Tours Recommendation System) Mobile, our proposal to a mobile recom...

  18. Mobile internet protocol analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Brachfeld, Lawrence J.

    1999-01-01

    Mobile Internet Protocol (IP) is a proposed standard that builds on the current Internet Protocol by making the fact that a user is mobile transparent to applications and higher level protocols such as Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and User Datagram Protocol (UDP). Mobile IP allows mobile computers to send and receive packets addressed with their home network IP address, regardless of the IP address of their current point of attachment on the Internet while maintaining any current conne...

  19. Fixed mobile convergence handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Ahson, Syed A

    2010-01-01

    From basic concepts to future directions, this handbook provides technical information on all aspects of fixed-mobile convergence (FMC). The book examines such topics as integrated management architecture, business trends and strategic implications for service providers, personal area networks, mobile controlled handover methods, SIP-based session mobility, and supervisory and notification aggregator service. Case studies are used to illustrate technical and systematic implementation of unified and rationalized internet access by fixed-mobile network convergence. The text examines the technolo

  20. Mobile social gaming

    OpenAIRE

    Coulton, Paul; Čopič Pucihar, Klen; Bamford, William

    2008-01-01

    After ten years of game design practices routed within traditional PC and console development aimed at hardcore gamers, the mobile games industry has embraced the realization that these have limited value for mobile, and new approaches need to be considered. In particular the greater utilization of social factors within games would embrace the social practices in which mobile phones often engage. Whilst this has led some to propose MMOGs for mobile, the behavior of players of these games sugg...