WorldWideScience

Sample records for area neurons gaba

  1. Ventral tegmental area glutamate neurons co-release GABA and promote positive reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Ji Hoon; Zell, Vivien; Gutierrez-Reed, Navarre; Wu, Johnathan; Ressler, Reed; Shenasa, Mohammad Ali; Johnson, Alexander B; Fife, Kathryn H; Faget, Lauren; Hnasko, Thomas S

    2016-12-15

    In addition to dopamine neurons, the ventral tegmental area (VTA) contains GABA-, glutamate- and co-releasing neurons, and recent reports suggest a complex role for the glutamate neurons in behavioural reinforcement. We report that optogenetic stimulation of VTA glutamate neurons or terminals serves as a positive reinforcer on operant behavioural assays. Mice display marked preference for brief over sustained VTA glutamate neuron stimulation resulting in behavioural responses that are notably distinct from dopamine neuron stimulation and resistant to dopamine receptor antagonists. Whole-cell recordings reveal EPSCs following stimulation of VTA glutamate terminals in the nucleus accumbens or local VTA collaterals; but reveal both excitatory and monosynaptic inhibitory currents in the ventral pallidum and lateral habenula, though the net effects on postsynaptic firing in each region are consistent with the observed rewarding behavioural effects. These data indicate that VTA glutamate neurons co-release GABA in a projection-target-dependent manner and that their transient activation drives positive reinforcement.

  2. Cocaine disinhibits dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area via use-dependent blockade of GABA neuron voltage-sensitive sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensen, Scott C; Taylor, Seth R; Horton, Malia L; Barber, Elise N; Lyle, Laura T; Stobbs, Sarah H; Allison, David W

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of cocaine on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Utilizing single-unit recordings in vivo, microelectrophoretic administration of DA enhanced the firing rate of VTA GABA neurons via D2/D3 DA receptor activation. Lower doses of intravenous cocaine (0.25-0.5 mg/kg), or the DA transporter (DAT) blocker methamphetamine, enhanced VTA GABA neuron firing rate via D2/D3 receptor activation. Higher doses of cocaine (1.0-2.0 mg/kg) inhibited their firing rate, which was not sensitive to the D2/D3 antagonist eticlopride. The voltage-sensitive sodium channel (VSSC) blocker lidocaine inhibited the firing rate of VTA GABA neurons at all doses tested (0.25-2.0 mg/kg). Cocaine or lidocaine reduced VTA GABA neuron spike discharges induced by stimulation of the internal capsule (ICPSDs) at dose levels 0.25-2 mg/kg (IC(50) 1.2 mg/kg). There was no effect of DA or methamphetamine on ICPSDs, or of DA antagonists on cocaine inhibition of ICPSDs. In VTA GABA neurons in vitro, cocaine reduced (IC(50) 13 microm) current-evoked spikes and TTX-sensitive sodium currents in a use-dependent manner. In VTA DA neurons, cocaine reduced IPSCs (IC(50) 13 microm), increased IPSC paired-pulse facilitation and decreased spontaneous IPSC frequency, without affecting miniature IPSC frequency or amplitude. These findings suggest that cocaine acts on GABA neurons to reduce activity-dependent GABA release on DA neurons in the VTA, and that cocaine's use-dependent blockade of VTA GABA neuron VSSCs may synergize with its DAT inhibiting properties to enhance mesolimbic DA transmission implicated in cocaine reinforcement.

  3. Acupuncture reduces relapse to cocaine-seeking behavior via activation of GABA neurons in the ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wyju; Kim, Min Sun; Jang, Eun Young; Lee, Jun Yeon; Lee, Jin Gyeom; Kim, Hong Yu; Yoon, Seong Shoon; Lee, Bong Hyo; Chang, Suchan; Kim, Jae Hyo; Choi, Kwang H; Koo, Ho; Gwak, Young Seob; Steffensen, Scott C; Ryu, Yeon-Hee; Kim, Hee Young; Yang, Chae Ha

    2017-03-07

    There is growing public interest in alternative approaches to addiction treatment and scientific interest in elucidating the neurobiological underpinnings of acupuncture. Our previous studies showed that acupuncture at a specific Shenmen (HT7) points reduced dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) induced by drugs of abuse. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effects of HT7 acupuncture on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neuronal activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. Using microdialysis and in vivo single-unit electrophysiology, we evaluated the effects of HT7 acupuncture on VTA GABA and NAc DA release and VTA GABA neuronal activity in rats. Using a within-session reinstatement paradigm in rats self-administering cocaine, we evaluated the effects of HT7 stimulation on cocaine-primed reinstatement. Acupuncture at HT7 significantly reduced cocaine suppression of GABA release and GABA neuron firing rates in the VTA. HT7 acupuncture attenuated cocaine-primed reinstatement, which was blocked by VTA infusions of the selective GABAB receptor antagonist 2-hydroxysaclofen. HT7 stimulation significantly decreased acute cocaine-induced DA release in the NAc, which was also blocked by 2-hydroxysaclofen. HT7 acupuncture also attenuated cocaine-induced sensitization of extracellular DA levels in the NAc. Moreover, HT7 acupuncture reduced both locomotor activity and neuronal activation in the NAc induced by acute cocaine in a needle-penetration depth-dependent fashion. These results suggest that acupuncture may suppress cocaine-induced DA release in the NAc and cocaine-seeking behavior through activation of VTA GABA neurons. Acupuncture may be an effective therapy to reduce cocaine relapse by enhancing GABAergic inhibition in the VTA.

  4. Ventral tegmental area dopamine and GABA neurons: Physiological properties and expression of mRNA for endocannabinoid biosynthetic elements

    OpenAIRE

    Merrill, Collin B.; Friend, Lindsey N.; Newton, Scott T.; Hopkins, Zachary H.; Edwards, Jeffrey G.

    2015-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) is involved in adaptive reward and motivation processing and is composed of dopamine (DA) and GABA neurons. Defining the elements regulating activity and synaptic plasticity of these cells is critical to understanding mechanisms of reward and addiction. While endocannabinoids (eCBs) that potentially contribute to addiction are known to be involved in synaptic plasticity mechanisms in the VTA, where they are produced is poorly understood. In this study, DA and ...

  5. Functional properties of GABA synaptic inputs onto GABA neurons in monkey prefrontal cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. Rotaru (Diana C.); C. Olezene (Cameron); T. Miyamae (Takeaki); N.V. Povysheva (Nadezhda V.); A.V. Zaitsev (Aleksey V.); D.A. Lewis (David A.); G. Gonzalez-Burgos (Guillermo)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIn rodent cortex GABAA receptor (GABAAR)-mediated synapses are a significant source of input onto GABA neurons, and the properties of these inputs vary among GABA neuron subtypes that differ in molecular markers and firing patterns. Some features of cortical interne

  6. Amygdala-kindling induces a lasting reduction of GABA-immunoreactive neurons in a discrete area of the ipsilateral piriform cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, H; Ebert, U; Löscher, W

    1998-08-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate a critical role of the piriform cortex (PC) in the kindling model of temporal lobe epilepsy, suggesting that the PC is part of an epileptic network that is pivotal in the genesis of kindling, facilitating, and intensifying the spread of seizures from a focus in amygdala, hippocampus, or other limbic brain regions to cortical and subcortical regions. Kindling of the amygdala has been shown to induce long-lasting changes in synaptic efficacy in the ipsilateral PC comparable to abnormalities seen in epileptic foci, but the neurochemical alterations possibly underlying these functional changes are not known. The possibility that the enhanced excitability of the PC in response to kindling is related to a reduction of GABAergic neurotransmission prompted us to examine if a lasting reduction in GABA-immunoreactive PC neurons is detectable after kindling of the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in rats. Furthermore, GABA immunoreactivity was determined in the BLA in order to investigate whether GABAergic neurons decrease in focal tissue, as previously suggested by neurochemical and immunocytochemical studies in amygdala-kindled rats. Three groups of age-matched rats were used: (1) a group of rats that was kindled via electrical stimulation by a bipolar electrode implanted in the right BLA, (2) a group of BLA-implanted but nonstimulated rats, and (3) a group of non-implanted, naive control rats. The kindled rats were sacrificed 40 days after the last fully kindled seizure. The two other groups of rats were sacrificed together with the kindled rats on the same days, and tissues from kindled and control rats were treated concurrently throughout the immunohistochemical analysis. GABA neurons were stained by a monoclonal antibody to GABA. Kindling of the BLA led to a pronounced decrease in the number of GABA immunoreactive neurons in the ipsi- and contralateral BLA at all section levels examined. In the PC, no significant differences between groups

  7. A noncanonical release of GABA and glutamate modulates neuronal migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manent, Jean-Bernard; Demarque, Michaël; Jorquera, Isabel; Pellegrino, Christophe; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Aniksztejn, Laurent; Represa, Alfonso

    2005-05-11

    Immature neurons express GABA and glutamate receptors before synapse formation, and both transmitters are released at an early developmental stage. We have now tested the hypothesis that the ongoing release of GABA and glutamate modulates neuronal migration. Using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine labeling and cocultures of hippocampal slices obtained from naive and green fluorescent protein-transgenic mice, we report that migration is severely affected by GABA(A) or NMDA receptor antagonist treatments. These effects were also present in munc18-1 knock-out slices in which soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE)-dependent vesicular secretion of transmitters has been deleted. GABA(A) antagonists were more efficient than NMDA antagonists to reduce cell migration, in keeping with the earlier maturation of GABAergic mechanisms. We conclude that GABA and, to a lesser degree, glutamate released in a SNARE-independent mechanism exert a paracrine action on neuronal migration.

  8. Control of cortical neuronal migration by glutamate and GABA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko J Luhmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal migration in the cortex is controlled by the paracrine action of the classical neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Glutamate controls radial migration of pyramidal neurons by acting primarily on NMDA receptors and regulates tangential migration of inhibitory interneurons by activating non-NMDA and NMDA receptors. GABA, acting on ionotropic GABAA-rho and GABAA receptors, has a dichotomic action on radially migrating neurons by acting as a GO signal in lower layers and as a STOP signal in upper cortical plate (CP, respectively. Metabotropic GABAB receptors promote radial migration into the CP and tangential migration of interneurons. Besides GABA, the endogenous GABAergic agonist taurine is a relevant agonist controlling radial migration. To a smaller extent glycine receptor activation can also influence radial and tangential migration. Activation of glutamate and GABA receptors causes increases in intracellular Ca2+ transients, which promote neuronal migration by acting on the cytoskeleton. Pharmacological or genetic manipulation of glutamate or GABA receptors during early corticogenesis induce heterotopic cell clusters in upper layers and loss of cortical lamination, i.e. neuronal migration disorders which can be associated with neurological or neuropsychiatric diseases. The pivotal role of NMDA and ionotropic GABA receptors in cortical neuronal migration is of major clinical relevance, since a number of drugs acting on these receptors (e.g. anti-epileptics, anesthetics, alcohol may disturb the normal migration pattern when present during early corticogenesis.

  9. VTA GABA neurons modulate specific learning behaviours through the control of dopamine and cholinergic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meaghan C Creed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mesolimbic reward system is primarily comprised of the ventral tegmental area (VTA and the nucleus accumbens (NAc as well as their afferent and efferent connections. This circuitry is essential for learning about stimuli associated with motivationally-relevant outcomes. Moreover, addictive drugs affect and remodel this system, which may underlie their addictive properties. In addition to DA neurons, the VTA also contains approximately 30% ɣ-aminobutyric acid (GABA neurons. The task of signalling both rewarding and aversive events from the VTA to the NAc has mostly been ascribed to DA neurons and the role of GABA neurons has been largely neglected until recently. GABA neurons provide local inhibition of DA neurons and also long-range inhibition of projection regions, including the NAc. Here we review studies using a combination of in vivo and ex vivo electrophysiology, pharmacogenetic and optogenetic manipulations that have characterized the functional neuroanatomy of inhibitory circuits in the mesolimbic system, and describe how GABA neurons of the VTA regulate reward and aversion-related learning. We also discuss pharmacogenetic manipulation of this system with benzodiazepines (BDZs, a class of addictive drugs, which act directly on GABAA receptors located on GABA neurons of the VTA. The results gathered with each of these approaches suggest that VTA GABA neurons bi-directionally modulate activity of local DA neurons, underlying reward or aversion at the behavioural level. Conversely, long-range GABA projections from the VTA to the NAc selectively target cholinergic interneurons (CINs to pause their firing and temporarily reduce cholinergic tone in the NAc, which modulates associative learning. Further characterization of inhibitory circuit function within and beyond the VTA is needed in order to fully understand the function of the mesolimbic system under normal and pathological conditions.

  10. GABA concentration and GABAergic neuron populations in limbic areas are differentially altered by brain serotonin deficiency in Tph2 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waider, Jonas; Proft, Florian; Langlhofer, Georg; Asan, Esther; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Gutknecht, Lise

    2013-02-01

    While tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2) null mutant (Tph2(-/-)) mice are completely deficient in brain serotonin (5-HT) synthesis, the formation of serotonergic neurons and pathfinding of their projections are not impaired. However, 5-HT deficiency, during development and in the adult, might affect morphological and functional parameters of other neural systems. To assess the influence of 5-HT deficiency on γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) systems, we carried out measurements of GABA concentrations in limbic brain regions of adult male wildtype (wt), heterozygous (Tph2(+/-)) and Tph2(-/-) mice. In addition, unbiased stereological estimation of GABAergic interneuron numbers and density was performed in subregions of amygdala and hippocampus. Amygdala and prefrontal cortex displayed significantly increased and decreased GABA concentrations, respectively, exclusively in Tph2(+/-) mice while no changes were detected between Tph2(-/-) and wt mice. In contrast, in the hippocampus, increased GABA concentrations were found in Tph2(-/-) mice. While total cell density in the anterior basolateral amygdala did not differ between genotypes, the number and density of the GABAergic interneurons were significantly decreased in Tph2(-/-) mice, with the group of parvalbumin (PV)-immunoreactive (ir) interneurons contributing somewhat less to the decrease than that of non-PV-ir GABAergic interneurons. Major morphological changes were also absent in the dorsal hippocampus, and only a trend toward reduced density of PV-ir cells was observed in the CA3 region of Tph2(-/-) mice. Our findings are the first to document that life-long reduction or complete lack of brain 5-HT transmission causes differential changes of GABA systems in limbic regions which are key players in emotional learning and memory processes. The changes likely reflect a combination of developmental alterations and functional adaptations of emotion circuits to balance the lack of 5-HT, and may underlie altered emotional

  11. Benzodiazepines do not potentiate GABA responses in neonatal hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, C; Ben-Ari, Y

    1991-09-16

    Benzodiazepines (midazolam; flunitrazepam) and pentobarbital increase the response to exogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in adult hippocampal cells. We report in this paper that in contrast pentobarbital but not benzodiazepine potentiate the effects of exogenous (GABA) in neurons recorded from slices of less than two weeks old. This finding suggests that the functional association of benzodiazepine and GABAA receptors is changed during early postnatal life.

  12. Trophic actions of GABA on neuronal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Represa, Alfonso; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2005-06-01

    During brain development, transmitter-gated receptors are operative before synapse formation, suggesting that their action is not restricted to synaptic transmission. GABA, which is the principal excitatory transmitter in the developing brain, acts as an epigenetic factor to control processes including cell proliferation, neuroblast migration and dendritic maturation. These effects appear to be mediated through a paracrine, diffuse, non-synaptic mode of action that precedes the more focused, rapid mode of operation characteristic of synaptic connections. This sequential operation implies that GABA is used as an informative agent but in a unique context at an early developmental stage. This sequence also implies that by altering these effects, drugs acting on the GABA system could be pathogenic during pregnancy.

  13. GnRH neuron firing and response to GABA in vitro depend on acute brain slice thickness and orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Stephanie; Piet, Richard; Iremonger, Karl; Hwa Yeo, Shel; Clarkson, Jenny; Porteous, Robert; Herbison, Allan E

    2012-08-01

    The GnRH neurons exhibit long dendrites and project to the median eminence. The aim of the present study was to generate an acute brain slice preparation that enabled recordings to be undertaken from GnRH neurons maintaining the full extent of their dendrites or axons. A thick, horizontal brain slice was developed, in which it was possible to record from the horizontally oriented GnRH neurons located in the anterior hypothalamic area (AHA). In vivo studies showed that the majority of AHA GnRH neurons projected outside the blood-brain barrier and expressed c-Fos at the time of the GnRH surge. On-cell recordings compared AHA GnRH neurons in the horizontal slice (AHAh) with AHA and preoptic area (POA) GnRH neurons in coronal slices [POA coronal (POAc) and AHA coronal (AHAc), respectively]. AHAh GnRH neurons exhibited tighter burst firing compared with other slice orientations. Although α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) excited GnRH neurons in all preparations, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was excitatory in AHAc and POAc but inhibitory in AHAh slices. GABA(A) receptor postsynaptic currents were the same in AHAh and AHAc slices. Intriguingly, direct activation of GABA(A) or GABA(B) receptors respectively stimulated and inhibited GnRH neurons regardless of slice orientation. Subsequent experiments indicated that net GABA effects were determined by differences in the ratio of GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor-mediated effects in "long" and "short" dendrites of GnRH neurons in the different slice orientations. These studies document a new brain slice preparation for recording from GnRH neurons with their extensive dendrites/axons and highlight the importance of GnRH neuron orientation relative to the angle of brain slicing in studying these neurons in vitro.

  14. Double Labeling Immunoelectron Microscopic Study on the Synaptic Connections between Glutamic Acid Neurons and GABA Neurons in the Hippocampus of Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Changgeng; CAI Qiuyun; LIU Qingying; WEI Ying

    2000-01-01

    In order to explore the roles of different neurotransmitters in epileptic pathogenesis,the synaptic connections between glutamic acid (Glu) neurons and GABA neurons in normal rat hippocampus were studied by pre-embedding double labeling immunoelectron microscopy. The GABA immunoreaction was first demonstrated by chromogen DAB, then the Glu immunoreaction was demonstrated by molybdic acid-TMB method. After being stabilized by DAB-cobalt chloride,the sections were processed for electron microscopic embedding. Under electron microscope, there were many Glu immunoreaction-positive neurons in the pyramidal layer of hippocampal CA1 area and some GABA immunoreaction-positive neurons with pyramidal or polygonal perikarya in the pyramidal, polymorphic and radiant layer of CA1 area. There were also symmetric dendro-axonic synapses formed by GABA-positive dendrites and Glu-positive axons in the polymorphic layer and symmetric axo-dendritic synapses formed by GABA-positive axons and Glu-positive dendrites in the radiant layer. In addition, there were symmetric autoregulatory axo-dendritic synapses between Glu-positive axons and dendrites and autoregulatory axo-axonic synapses (both symmetric and asymmetric) between GABA-positive axons. Above mentioned results, for the first time,showed that there were complex synaptic regulatory relationships between excitatory Glu neurons and inhibitory GABA neurons in the hippocampal CA1 area, thereby, providing ultrastructural evidence for different neurotransmitters participating in epileptic pathogenesis.

  15. Glutamate and GABA in Vestibulo-Sympathetic Pathway Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, Gay R; Friedrich, Victor L; Martinelli, Giorgio P

    2016-01-01

    The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex (VSR) actively modulates blood pressure during changes in posture. This reflex allows humans to stand up and quadrupeds to rear or climb without a precipitous decline in cerebral perfusion. The VSR pathway conveys signals from the vestibular end organs to the caudal vestibular nuclei. These cells, in turn, project to pre-sympathetic neurons in the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and CVLM, respectively). The present study assessed glutamate- and GABA-related immunofluorescence associated with central vestibular neurons of the VSR pathway in rats. Retrograde FluoroGold tract tracing was used to label vestibular neurons with projections to RVLM or CVLM, and sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was employed to activate these pathways. Central vestibular neurons of the VSR were identified by co-localization of FluoroGold and cFos protein, which accumulates in some vestibular neurons following galvanic stimulation. Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to co-localize glutamate- or GABA- labeling in the identified VSR pathway neurons. Most activated projection neurons displayed intense glutamate immunofluorescence, suggestive of glutamatergic neurotransmission. To support this, anterograde tracer was injected into the caudal vestibular nuclei. Vestibular axons and terminals in RVLM and CVLM co-localized the anterograde tracer and vesicular glutamate transporter-2 signals. Other retrogradely-labeled cFos-positive neurons displayed intense GABA immunofluorescence. VSR pathway neurons of both phenotypes were present in the caudal medial and spinal vestibular nuclei, and projected to both RVLM and CVLM. As a group, however, triple-labeled vestibular cells with intense glutamate immunofluorescence were located more rostrally in the vestibular nuclei than the GABAergic neurons. Only the GABAergic VSR pathway neurons showed a target preference, projecting predominantly to CVLM. These data provide the first

  16. Glutamate and GABA in vestibulo-sympathetic pathway neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gay R Holstein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex actively modulates blood pressure during changes in posture. This reflex allows humans to stand up and quadrupeds to rear or climb without a precipitous decline in cerebral perfusion. The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway conveys signals from the vestibular end organs to the caudal vestibular nuclei. These cells, in turn, project to pre-sympathetic neurons in the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and CVLM, respectively. The present study assessed glutamate- and GABA-related immunofluorescence associated with central vestibular neurons of the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway in rats. Retrograde FluoroGold tract tracing was used to label vestibular neurons with projections to RVLM or CVLM, and sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation was employed to activate these pathways. Central vestibular neurons of the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex were identified by co-localization of FluoroGold and cFos protein, which accumulates in some vestibular neurons following galvanic stimulation. Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to co-localize glutamate- or GABA- labeling in the identified vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway neurons. Most activated projection neurons displayed intense glutamate immunofluorescence, suggestive of glutamatergic neurotransmission. To support this, anterograde tracer was injected into the caudal vestibular nuclei. Vestibular axons and terminals in RVLM and CVLM co-localized the anterograde tracer and vesicular glutamate transporter-2 signals. Other retrogradely-labeled cFos-positive neurons displayed intense GABA immunofluorescence. Vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway neurons of both phenotypes were present in the caudal medial and spinal vestibular nuclei, and projected to both RVLM and CVLM. As a group, however, triple-labeled vestibular cells with intense glutamate immunofluorescence were located more rostrally in the vestibular nuclei than the GABAergic neurons. Only the

  17. The role of GABA in the regulation of GnRH neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho eWatanabe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons form the final common pathway for the central regulation of reproduction. Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA has long been implicated as one of the major players in the regulation of GnRH neurons. Although GABA is typically an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mature adult central nervous system, most mature GnRH neurons show the unusual characteristic of being excited by GABA. While many reports have provided much insight into the contribution of GABA to the activity of GnRH neurons, the precise physiological role of the excitatory action of GABA on GnRH neurons remains elusive. This brief review presents the current knowledge of the role of GABA signaling in GnRH neuronal activity. We also discuss the modulation of GABA signaling by neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and the functional consequence of GABAergic inputs to GnRH neurons in both the physiology and pathology of reproduction.

  18. Investigating GABA and its function in platelets as compared to neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneez, Fatima Shad; Saeed, Sheikh Arshad

    2009-08-01

    We have recently suggested that platelets could be used as a model for neuronal receptors. In this paper we have investigated gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism and GABA receptors in platelets and in cultured neurons to see whether platelets' GABA mimics neuronal GABA receptor activities. We used the ELISA technique for detecting the GABA concentration in platelet rich plasma and cultured neurons. The functional effects of GABA and its receptor ligands on platelets were determined using an aggregometer. We found that the GABA concentration is 30% lower in platelets than in neurons and in both preparations GABA was metabolized by GABA transaminase (GABA-T). GABA potentiated calcium dependent platelet aggregation with a higher value in washed platelets suspension (WPS) then in platelet rich plasma (PRP). This effect was inhibited by benzodiazepines, calcium channel blockers and the selective phosphoinositide 3-kinase antagonist Wortmannin. GABA neurotransmission is involved in most aspects of normal brain function and can be perturbed in many neuropathologic conditions. We concluded that platelets could be further developed to be used as a peripheral model to study neuronal GABAergic function and its abnormality in diseases such as epilepsy and schizophrenia. Furthermore our results indicated that PI3-kinase is involved in calcium dependent GABA induced platelet aggregation as this synergistic effect is inhibited by Wortmannin in dose dependent manner.

  19. GABA mediated excitation in immature rat CA3 hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubini, E; Rovira, C; Gaiarsa, J L; Corradetti, R; Ben Ari, Y

    1990-01-01

    Intracellular recordings from rat hippocampal neurons in vitro during the first postnatal week revealed the presence of spontaneous giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs). These were generated by the synchronous discharge of a population of neurons. GDPs reversed polarity at -27 and -51 mV when recorded with KCl or K-methylsulphate filled electrodes, respectively. GDPs were blocked by the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (10 microM). Iontophoretic or bath applications of GABA (10-300 microM) in the presence of tetrodotoxin (1 microM), induced a membrane depolarization or in voltage clamp experiments an inward current which reversed polarity at the same potential as GDPs. The response to GABA was blocked in a non-competitive manner by bicuculline (10 microM) and did not desensitize. GABA mediated GDPs were presynaptically modulated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors. Their frequency was reduced or blocked by NMDA receptor antagonists and by the rather specific non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). The frequency of GDPs was enhanced by glycine and D-serine (10-30 microM) in a strychnine insensitive manner. This effect was blocked by AP-5, suggesting that it was mediated by the allosteric modulatory site of the NMDA receptor. These observations suggest that most of the 'excitatory' drive in immature neurons is mediated by GABA acting on GABAA receptors; furthermore excitatory amino acids modulate the release of GABA by a presynaptic action on GABAergic interneurons.

  20. VTA Projection Neurons Releasing GABA and Glutamate in the Dentate Gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Both dopamine and nondopamine neurons from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) project to a variety of brain regions. Here we examine nondopaminergic neurons in the mouse VTA that send long-range projections to the hippocampus. Using a combination of retrograde tracers, optogenetic tools, and electrophysiological recordings, we show that VTA GABAergic axons make synaptic contacts in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus, where we can elicit small postsynaptic currents. Surprisingly, the currents displayed a partial sensitivity to both bicuculline and NBQX, suggesting that these mesohippocampal neurons corelease both GABA and glutamate. Finally, we show that this projection is functional in vivo and its stimulation reduces granule cell-firing rates under anesthesia. Altogether, the present results describe a novel connection between GABA and glutamate coreleasing of cells of the VTA and the dentate gyrus. This connection could be relevant for a variety of functions, including reward-related memory and neurogenesis. PMID:27648470

  1. Glutamate and GABA as rapid effectors of hypothalamic peptidergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia eSchöne

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Vital hypothalamic neurons regulating hunger, wakefulness, reward-seeking, and body weight are often defined by unique expression of hypothalamus-specific neuropeptides. Gene-ablation studies show that some of these peptides, notably orexin/hypocretin (hcrt/orx, are themselves critical for stable states of consciousness and metabolic health. However, neuron-ablation studies often reveal more severe phenotypes, suggesting key roles for co-expressed transmitters. Indeed, most hypothalamic neurons, including hcrt/orx cells, contain fast transmitters glutamate and GABA, as well as several neuropeptides. What are the roles and relations between different transmitters expressed by the same neuron? Here, we consider signaling codes for releasing different transmitters in relation to transmitter and receptor diversity in behaviorally-defined, widely-projecting peptidergic neurons, such as hcrt/orx cells. We then discuss latest optogenetic studies of endogenous transmitter release from defined sets of axons in situ, which suggest that recently-characterized vital peptidergic neurons (e.g. hcrt/orx, proopiomelanocortin , and agouti-related peptide cells, as well as classical modulatory neurons (e.g. dopamine and acetylcholine cells, all use fast transmitters to control their postsynaptic targets. These optogenetic insights are complemented by recent observations of behavioral deficiencies caused by genetic ablation of fast transmission from specific neuropeptidergic and aminergic neurons. Powerful and fast (millisecond-scale GABAergic and glutamatergic signaling from neurons previously considered to be primarily modulatory raises new questions about the roles of slower co-transmitters they co-express.

  2. Glutamatergic neurons are present in the rat ventral tegmental area

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Sheen, Whitney; Morales, Marisela

    2007-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) is thought to play an important role in reward function. Two populations of neurons, containing either dopamine (DA) or γ-amino butyric acid (GABA), have been extensively characterized in this area. However, recent electrophysiological studies are consistent with the notion that neurons that utilize neurotransmitters other than DA or GABA are likely to be present in the VTA. Given the pronounced phenotypic diversity of neurons in this region, we have proposed ...

  3. Ventral tegmental area GABA projections pause accumbal cholinergic interneurons to enhance associative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Matthew T C; Tan, Kelly R; O'Connor, Eoin C; Nikonenko, Irina; Muller, Dominique; Lüscher, Christian

    2012-12-20

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) are essential for learning about environmental stimuli associated with motivationally relevant outcomes. The task of signalling such events, both rewarding and aversive, from the VTA to the NAc has largely been ascribed to dopamine neurons. The VTA also contains GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-releasing neurons, which provide local inhibition and also project to the NAc. However, the cellular targets and functional importance of this long-range inhibitory projection have not been ascertained. Here we show that GABA-releasing neurons of the VTA that project to the NAc (VTA GABA projection neurons) inhibit accumbal cholinergic interneurons (CINs) to enhance stimulus-outcome learning. Combining optogenetics with structural imaging and electrophysiology, we found that VTA GABA projection neurons selectively target NAc CINs, forming multiple symmetrical synaptic contacts that generated inhibitory postsynaptic currents. This is remarkable considering that CINs represent a very small population of all accumbal neurons, and provide the primary source of cholinergic tone in the NAc. Brief activation of this projection was sufficient to halt the spontaneous activity of NAc CINs, resembling the pause recorded in animals learning stimulus-outcome associations. Indeed, we found that forcing CINs to pause in behaving mice enhanced discrimination of a motivationally important stimulus that had been associated with an aversive outcome. Our results demonstrate that VTA GABA projection neurons, through their selective targeting of accumbal CINs, provide a novel route through which the VTA communicates saliency to the NAc. VTA GABA projection neurons thus emerge as orchestrators of dopaminergic and cholinergic modulation in the NAc.

  4. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1a1 mediates a GABA synthesis pathway in midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Ick; Ganesan, Subhashree; Luo, Sarah X; Wu, Yu-Wei; Park, Esther; Huang, Eric J; Chen, Lu; Ding, Jun B

    2015-10-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons are an essential component of the basal ganglia circuitry, playing key roles in the control of fine movement and reward. Recently, it has been demonstrated that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the chief inhibitory neurotransmitter, is co-released by dopamine neurons. Here, we show that GABA co-release in dopamine neurons does not use the conventional GABA-synthesizing enzymes, glutamate decarboxylases GAD65 and GAD67. Our experiments reveal an evolutionarily conserved GABA synthesis pathway mediated by aldehyde dehydrogenase 1a1 (ALDH1a1). Moreover, GABA co-release is modulated by ethanol (EtOH) at concentrations seen in blood alcohol after binge drinking, and diminished ALDH1a1 leads to enhanced alcohol consumption and preference. These findings provide insights into the functional role of GABA co-release in midbrain dopamine neurons, which may be essential for reward-based behavior and addiction.

  5. GABA(A) receptors on calbindin-immunoreactive myenteric neurons of guinea pig intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X; Galligan, J J

    2000-01-14

    These studies were carried out to characterize the properties of gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABA(A)) receptors on guinea pig intestinal myenteric neurons maintained in primary culture. In addition, the type of neuron expressing GABA(A) receptors was identified using immunohistochemical methods. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of currents elicited by GABA and acetylcholine (ACh) were obtained using pipettes containing Neurobiotin. After electrophysiological studies, neurons were processed for localization of calbindin-D28K-immunoreactivity (calbindin-ir). GABA (1 mM) and ACh (3 mM) caused inward currents in most cells tested. GABA currents were mimicked by muscimol (1-300 microM) and were blocked by bicuculline (10 microM) indicating that GABA was acting at GABA(A) receptors. GABA currents were associated with a conductance increase and a linear current/voltage relationship with a reversal potential of 1 +/- 1 mV (n = 5). Pentobarbital (PB, 3-1000 microM) and diazepam (DZP, 0.01-10 microM) potentiated GABA-induced currents. A maximum concentration of DZP (1 microM) increased GABA-induced currents 3.1 +/- 0.3 times while PB (1000 microM) increased GABA currents by 11 +/- 2 times. In outside-out patches, the amplitude of GABA-activated single-channel currents was linearly related to membrane potential with a single-channel conductance of 28.5 + 0.5 pS (n = 10). PB and DZP increased the open probability of GABA-induced single-channel currents. Neurons containing calbindin-ir were large, were isolated from other neurons and had GABA current amplitudes of -3.4 +/- 0.3 nA (n = 48). Neurons with weak or absent calbindin-ir were smaller, were localized in clusters of cells and had GABA-induced current amplitudes of -0.6 +/- 0.1 nA (n = 20). ACh-induced currents were smaller in calbindin-ir neurons (-0.7 +/- 0.1 nA) compared to weakly calbindin-ir neurons (-1.4 +/- 0.1 nA). These results indicate that myenteric calbindin-ir neurons express a high density of GABA

  6. GABA depolarizes immature neurons and inhibits network activity in the neonatal neocortex in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmse, Knut; Kummer, Michael; Kovalchuk, Yury; Witte, Otto W; Garaschuk, Olga; Holthoff, Knut

    2015-07-16

    A large body of evidence from in vitro studies suggests that GABA is depolarizing during early postnatal development. However, the mode of GABA action in the intact developing brain is unknown. Here we examine the in vivo effects of GABA in cells of the upper cortical plate using a combination of electrophysiological and Ca(2+)-imaging techniques. We report that at postnatal days (P) 3-4, GABA depolarizes the majority of immature neurons in the occipital cortex of anaesthetized mice. At the same time, GABA does not efficiently activate voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels and fails to induce action potential firing. Blocking GABA(A) receptors disinhibits spontaneous network activity, whereas allosteric activation of GABA(A) receptors has the opposite effect. In summary, our data provide evidence that in vivo GABA acts as a depolarizing neurotransmitter imposing an inhibitory control on network activity in the neonatal (P3-4) neocortex.

  7. [The distribution of GABA-ergic neurons in rat neocortex in the postnatal period after the perinatal hypoxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozhaĭ, L I; Otelin, V A

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of GABA-ergic neurons in different areas of the neocortex (frontal, sensorimotor, visual cortex) was studied in Wistar rats at different time periods of postnatal development after their exposure to perinatal hypoxia. To identify these neurons, the antibodies against GAD-67, the marker of GABA-ergic neurons, were used. It was found that the exposure to perinatal hypoxia caused a significant reduction in the number of GAD-67-expressing neurons in both upper and deep layers of the cortex in juvenile age (day 20 of postnatal period), that persisted until the prepubertal period (day 40). In experimental animals at postnatal day 40, the numbers of neurons that synthesized GAD-67, were two times lower in each of the layers of the neocortex than those in control animals. It is suggested that a drastic reduction in the number of GABA-ergic neurons in the neocortex could be a result of the damaging effects of acute perinatal hypoxia on the processes of progenitor cell migration from the subventricular zone, or on the synthesis of the factors controlling these migration processes as well as on GABA-ergic neuron maturation, leading to a delay of GAD-67 expression.

  8. Co-activation of VTA DA and GABA neurons mediates nicotine reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolu, S; Eddine, R; Marti, F; David, V; Graupner, M; Pons, S; Baudonnat, M; Husson, M; Besson, M; Reperant, C; Zemdegs, J; Pagès, C; Hay, Y A H; Lambolez, B; Caboche, J; Gutkin, B; Gardier, A M; Changeux, J-P; Faure, P; Maskos, U

    2013-03-01

    Smoking is the most important preventable cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. This nicotine addiction is mediated through the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), expressed on most neurons, and also many other organs in the body. Even within the ventral tegmental area (VTA), the key brain area responsible for the reinforcing properties of all drugs of abuse, nicotine acts on several different cell types and afferents. Identifying the precise action of nicotine on this microcircuit, in vivo, is important to understand reinforcement, and finally to develop efficient smoking cessation treatments. We used a novel lentiviral system to re-express exclusively high-affinity nAChRs on either dopaminergic (DAergic) or γ-aminobutyric acid-releasing (GABAergic) neurons, or both, in the VTA. Using in vivo electrophysiology, we show that, contrary to widely accepted models, the activation of GABA neurons in the VTA plays a crucial role in the control of nicotine-elicited DAergic activity. Our results demonstrate that both positive and negative motivational values are transmitted through the dopamine (DA) neuron, but that the concerted activity of DA and GABA systems is necessary for the reinforcing actions of nicotine through burst firing of DA neurons. This work identifies the GABAergic interneuron as a potential target for smoking cessation drug development.

  9. GABA-ERGIC NEURONS IN THE RAT STRIATUM UNDER NORMAL AND ISCHEMIC INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.S. Petrova

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD-67 is a marker of GABA-ergic neurons. The purpose of this study is to examine the distribution of GAD-67-immunopositive neurons in the striatum of rats under experimental conditions, reproducing brief focal cerebral ischemia. Endovascular occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery in rats was performed. Duration of circulatory disorders was 30 min, the time of reperfusion was 48 hours. With counting GAD-67-immunopositive neurons in the striatum was found that the number of GABA-ergic neurons in the striatum ipsilateral hemisphere is reduced by 40%. In the contralateral hemisphere, the distribution and structure of the neurons is not different from controls. It is shown that GABA-ergic neurons are less susceptible to damage, as compared to other neurons phenotypes.

  10. A possible role of the non-GAT1 GABA transporters in transfer of GABA from GABAergic to glutamatergic neurons in mouse cerebellar neuronal cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suñol, C; Babot, Z; Cristòfol, R

    2010-01-01

    . The distribution of GAD, GABA and the vesicular glutamate transporter VGlut-1 was assessed using specific antibodies combined with immunofluorescence microscopy. Additionally, tiagabine, SKF 89976-A, betaine, beta-alanine, nipecotic acid and guvacine were used to inhibit the GAT1, betaine/GABA (BGT1), GAT2 and GAT...... neurons constituting the majority of the cells. GABA uptake exhibited the kinetics of high affinity transport and could be partly (20%) inhibited by betaine (IC(50) 142 microM), beta-alanine (30%) and almost fully (90%) inhibited by SKF 89976-A (IC(50) 0.8 microM) or nipecotic acid and guvacine at 1 m...... no effect on the overall GABA content. The inhibitory action of beta-alanine and high concentrations of nipecotic acid and guvacine on GABA transport strongly suggests that also GAT2 or GAT3 (HUGO nomenclature) could play a role....

  11. GABA regulates synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shaoyu; Goh, Eyleen L. K.; Sailor, Kurt A.; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Ming, Guo-Li; Song, Hongjun

    2006-02-01

    Adult neurogenesis, the birth and integration of new neurons from adult neural stem cells, is a striking form of structural plasticity and highlights the regenerative capacity of the adult mammalian brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal activity regulates adult neurogenesis and that new neurons contribute to specific brain functions. The mechanism that regulates the integration of newly generated neurons into the pre-existing functional circuitry in the adult brain is unknown. Here we show that newborn granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus are tonically activated by ambient GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) before being sequentially innervated by GABA- and glutamate-mediated synaptic inputs. GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, initially exerts an excitatory action on newborn neurons owing to their high cytoplasmic chloride ion content. Conversion of GABA-induced depolarization (excitation) into hyperpolarization (inhibition) in newborn neurons leads to marked defects in their synapse formation and dendritic development in vivo. Our study identifies an essential role for GABA in the synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain, and suggests an unexpected mechanism for activity-dependent regulation of adult neurogenesis, in which newborn neurons may sense neuronal network activity through tonic and phasic GABA activation.

  12. Prenatal cocaine exposure decreases parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons and GABA-to-projection neuron ratio in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Deirdre M; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine abuse during pregnancy produces harmful effects not only on the mother but also on the unborn child. The neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin are known as the principal targets of the action of cocaine in the fetal and postnatal brain. However, recent evidence suggests that cocaine can impair cerebral cortical GABA neuron development and function. We sought to analyze the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on the number and distribution of GABA and projection neurons (inhibitory interneurons and excitatory output neurons, respectively) in the mouse cerebral cortex. We found that the prenatal cocaine exposure decreased GABA neuron numbers and GABA-to-projection neuron ratio in the medial prefrontal cortex of 60-day-old mice. The neighboring prefrontal cortex did not show significant changes in either of these measures. However, there was a significant increase in projection neuron numbers in the prefrontal cortex but not in the medial prefrontal cortex. Thus, the effects of cocaine on GABA and projection neurons appear to be cortical region specific. The population of parvalbumin-immunoreactive GABA neurons was decreased in the medial prefrontal cortex following the prenatal cocaine exposure. The cocaine exposure also delayed the developmental decline in the volume of the medial prefrontal cortex. Thus, prenatal cocaine exposure produced persisting and region-specific effects on cortical cytoarchitecture and impaired the physiological balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. These structural changes may underlie the electrophysiological and behavioral effects of prenatal cocaine exposure observed in animal models and human subjects.

  13. Positive modulation of delta-subunit containing GABAA receptors in mouse neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vardya, Irina; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Nieto-Gonzalez, Jose Luis;

    2012-01-01

    δ-subunit containing extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors are potential targets for modifying neuronal activity in a range of brain disorders. With the aim of gaining more insight in synaptic and extrasynaptic inhibition, we used a new positive modulator, AA29504, of δ-subunit containing GABA(A) recep...

  14. A possible role of the non-GAT1 GABA transporters in transfer of GABA from GABAergic to glutamatergic neurons in mouse cerebellar neuronal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suñol, C; Babot, Z; Cristòfol, R; Sonnewald, U; Waagepetersen, H S; Schousboe, A

    2010-09-01

    Cultures of dissociated cerebellum from 7-day-old mice were used to investigate the mechanism involved in synthesis and cellular redistribution of GABA in these cultures consisting primarily of glutamatergic granule neurons and a smaller population of GABAergic Golgi and stellate neurons. The distribution of GAD, GABA and the vesicular glutamate transporter VGlut-1 was assessed using specific antibodies combined with immunofluorescence microscopy. Additionally, tiagabine, SKF 89976-A, betaine, beta-alanine, nipecotic acid and guvacine were used to inhibit the GAT1, betaine/GABA (BGT1), GAT2 and GAT3 transporters. Only a small population of cells were immuno-stained for GAD while many cells exhibited VGlut-1 like immuno-reactivity which, however, never co-localized with GAD positive neurons. This likely reflects the small number of GABAergic neurons compared to the glutamatergic granule neurons constituting the majority of the cells. GABA uptake exhibited the kinetics of high affinity transport and could be partly (20%) inhibited by betaine (IC(50) 142 microM), beta-alanine (30%) and almost fully (90%) inhibited by SKF 89976-A (IC(50) 0.8 microM) or nipecotic acid and guvacine at 1 mM concentrations (95%). Essentially all neurons showed GABA like immunostaining albeit with differences in intensity. The results indicate that GABA which is synthesized in a small population of GAD-positive neurons is redistributed to essentially all neurons including the glutamatergic granule cells. GAT1 is not likely involved in this redistribution since addition of 15 microM tiagabine (GAT1 inhibitor) to the culture medium had no effect on the overall GABA content of the cells. Likewise the BGT1 transporter cannot alone account for the redistribution since inclusion of 3 mM betaine in the culture medium had no effect on the overall GABA content. The inhibitory action of beta-alanine and high concentrations of nipecotic acid and guvacine on GABA transport strongly suggests that also

  15. GABA agonist induced changes in ultrastructure and GABA receptor expression in cerebellar granule cells is linked to hyperpolarization of the neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, G H; Schousboe, A

    1990-01-01

    GABA has been shown to exert a neurotrophic like activity by enhancing the morphological and functional maturation of neurons. Mechanisms involved in this effect of GABA are largely unknown but since GABA has been shown to mediate a hyperpolarizing action on neurons it can be assumed...... that this action might be important. In order to investigate this possibility, the ability to mimic the trophic actions of GABA of different agents known to influence the membrane potential or the GABA gated chloride channels was studied. Hence, GABA receptor expression as well as the ultrastructure of cerebellar...... granule cells were monitored after exposure of the cells in culture to either bromide, valinomycin or picrotoxin. It was found that cells which at early developmental stages (4 days in culture) were exposed to bromide or valinomycin expressed low affinity GABA receptors similar to cells treated...

  16. Imbalance between Glutamate and GABA in Fmr1 Knockout Astrocytes Influences Neuronal Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS is a form of inherited mental retardation that results from the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP, the product of the Fmr1 gene. Numerous studies have shown that FMRP expression in astrocytes is important in the development of FXS. Although astrocytes affect neuronal dendrite development in Fmr1 knockout (KO mice, the factors released by astrocytes are still unclear. We cultured wild type (WT cortical neurons in astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM from WT or Fmr1 KO mice. Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting were performed to detect the dendritic growth of both WT and KO neurons. We determined glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA levels using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The total neuronal dendritic length was reduced when cultured in the Fmr1 KO ACM. This neurotoxicity was triggered by an imbalanced release of glutamate and GABA from Fmr1 KO astrocytes. We found increased glutaminase and GABA transaminase (GABA-T expression and decreased monoamine oxidase B expression in Fmr1 KO astrocytes. The elevated levels of glutamate contributed to oxidative stress in the cultured neurons. Vigabatrin (VGB, a GABA-T inhibitor, reversed the changes caused by glutamate and GABA release in Fmr1 KO astrocytes and the abnormal behaviors in Fmr1 KO mice. Our results indicate that the imbalance in the astrocytic glutamate and GABA release may be involved in the neuropathology and the underlying symptoms of FXS, and provides a therapeutic target for treatment.

  17. Imbalance between Glutamate and GABA in Fmr1 Knockout Astrocytes Influences Neuronal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Shimeng; Yang, Liukun; Shi, Qixin; Li, Yujiao; Zhang, Kun; Yang, Le; Zhao, Minggao; Yang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a form of inherited mental retardation that results from the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), the product of the Fmr1 gene. Numerous studies have shown that FMRP expression in astrocytes is important in the development of FXS. Although astrocytes affect neuronal dendrite development in Fmr1 knockout (KO) mice, the factors released by astrocytes are still unclear. We cultured wild type (WT) cortical neurons in astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM) from WT or Fmr1 KO mice. Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting were performed to detect the dendritic growth of both WT and KO neurons. We determined glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The total neuronal dendritic length was reduced when cultured in the Fmr1 KO ACM. This neurotoxicity was triggered by an imbalanced release of glutamate and GABA from Fmr1 KO astrocytes. We found increased glutaminase and GABA transaminase (GABA-T) expression and decreased monoamine oxidase B expression in Fmr1 KO astrocytes. The elevated levels of glutamate contributed to oxidative stress in the cultured neurons. Vigabatrin (VGB), a GABA-T inhibitor, reversed the changes caused by glutamate and GABA release in Fmr1 KO astrocytes and the abnormal behaviors in Fmr1 KO mice. Our results indicate that the imbalance in the astrocytic glutamate and GABA release may be involved in the neuropathology and the underlying symptoms of FXS, and provides a therapeutic target for treatment. PMID:27517961

  18. Identification of rat ventral tegmental area GABAergic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elyssa B Margolis

    Full Text Available The canonical two neuron model of opioid reward posits that mu opioid receptor (MOR activation produces reward by disinhibiting midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA dopamine neurons through inhibition of local GABAergic interneurons. Although indirect evidence supports the neural circuit postulated by this model, its validity has been called into question by growing evidence for VTA neuronal heterogeneity and the recent demonstration that MOR agonists inhibit GABAergic terminals in the VTA arising from extrinsic neurons. In addition, VTA MOR reward can be dopamine-independent. To directly test the assumption that MOR activation directly inhibits local GABAergic neurons, we investigated the properties of rat VTA GABA neurons directly identified with either immunocytochemistry for GABA or GAD65/67, or in situ hybridization for GAD65/67 mRNA. Utilizing co-labeling with an antibody for the neural marker NeuN and in situ hybridization against GAD65/67, we found that 23±3% of VTA neurons are GAD65/67(+. In contrast to the assumptions of the two neuron model, VTA GABAergic neurons are heterogeneous, both physiologically and pharmacologically. Importantly, only 7/13 confirmed VTA GABA neurons were inhibited by the MOR selective agonist DAMGO. Interestingly, all confirmed VTA GABA neurons were insensitive to the GABA(B receptor agonist baclofen (0/6 inhibited, while all confirmed dopamine neurons were inhibited (19/19. The heterogeneity of opioid responses we found in VTA GABAergic neurons, and the fact that GABA terminals arising from neurons outside the VTA are inhibited by MOR agonists, make further studies essential to determine the local circuit mechanisms underlying VTA MOR reward.

  19. Cell-attached recordings of responses evoked by photorelease of GABA in the immature cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marat eMinlebaev

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel non-invasive technique to measure the polarity of GABAergic responses based on cell-attached recordings of currents activated by laser-uncaging of GABA. For these recordings, a patch pipette was filled with a solution containing RuBi-GABA, and GABA was released from this complex by a laser beam conducted to the tip of the patch pipette via an optic fiber. In cell-attached recordings from neocortical and hippocampal neurons in postnatal days P2-5 rat brain slices in vitro, we found that laser-uncaging of GABA activates integral cell-attached currents mediated by tens of GABA(A channels. The initial response was inwardly directed, indicating a depolarizing response to GABA. The direction of the initial response was dependent on the pipette potential and analysis of its slope-voltage relationships revealed a depolarizing driving force of +11 mV for the currents through GABA channels. Initial depolarizing responses to GABA uncaging were inverted to hyperpolarizing in the presence of the NKCC1 blocker bumetanide. Current-voltage relationships of the currents evoked by Rubi-GABA uncaging using voltage-ramps at the peak of responses not only revealed a bumetanide-sensitive depolarizing reversal potential of the GABA(A receptor mediated responses, but also showed a strong voltage-dependent hysteresis. Upon desensitization of the uncaged-GABA response, current-voltage relationships of the currents through single GABA(A channels revealed depolarizing responses with the driving force values similar to those obtained for the initial response. Thus, cell-attached recordings of the responses evoked by local intrapipette GABA uncaging are suitable to assess the polarity of the GABA(A-Rs mediated signals in small cell compartments.

  20. [Local GABA-ergic modulation of serotonergic neuron activity in the nucleus raphe magnus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniushkin, A N; Merkulova, N A; Orlova, A O; Iniushkina, E M

    2009-07-01

    In voltage-clamp experimental on slices of the rat brainstem the effects of 5-HT and GABA on serotonergic neurons of nucleus raphe magnus were investigated. Local applications of 5-HT induced an increase in IPCSs frequency and amplitude in 45% of serotonergic cells. The effect suppressed by the blocker of fast sodium channels tetradotoxin. Antagonist of GABA receptor gabazine blocked IPSCs in neurons both sensitive and non-sensitive to 5-HT action. Applications of GABA induced a membrane current (I(GABA)), which was completely blocked by gabazine. The data suggest self-control of the activity of serotonergic neurons in nucleus raphe magnus by negative feedback loop via local GABAergic interneurons.

  1. GABA: a pioneer transmitter that excites immature neurons and generates primitive oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Tyzio, Roman; Khazipov, Rustem

    2007-10-01

    Developing networks follow common rules to shift from silent cells to coactive networks that operate via thousands of synapses. This review deals with some of these rules and in particular those concerning the crucial role of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobuytric acid (GABA), which operates primarily via chloride-permeable GABA(A) receptor channels. In all developing animal species and brain structures investigated, neurons have a higher intracellular chloride concentration at an early stage leading to an efflux of chloride and excitatory actions of GABA in immature neurons. This triggers sodium spikes, activates voltage-gated calcium channels, and acts in synergy with NMDA channels by removing the voltage-dependent magnesium block. GABA signaling is also established before glutamatergic transmission, suggesting that GABA is the principal excitatory transmitter during early development. In fact, even before synapse formation, GABA signaling can modulate the cell cycle and migration. The consequence of these rules is that developing networks generate primitive patterns of network activity, notably the giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs), largely through the excitatory actions of GABA and its synergistic interactions with glutamate signaling. These early types of network activity are likely required for neurons to fire together and thus to "wire together" so that functional units within cortical networks are formed. In addition, depolarizing GABA has a strong impact on synaptic plasticity and pathological insults, notably seizures of the immature brain. In conclusion, it is suggested that an evolutionary preserved role for excitatory GABA in immature cells provides an important mechanism in the formation of synapses and activity in neuronal networks.

  2. GABA receptor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Doo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABA{sub A}-receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABA{sub B}-receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABA{sub A}-receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABA{sub A}-receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with {sup 11}C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, {sup 18}F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome {sup 11}C's short half-life. {sup 18}F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '1{sup 1}C-FMZ PET instead of {sup 18}F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABA{sub A} receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas.

  3. Concentration-dependent activation of dopamine receptors differentially modulates GABA release onto orexin neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, Victoria; Trask, Robert B.; Briggs, Chantalle; Rowe, Todd M.; Hirasawa, Michiru

    2017-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) and orexin neurons play important roles in reward and food intake. There are anatomical and functional connections between these two cell groups, where orexin peptides stimulate DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area and DA inhibits orexin neurons in the hypothalamus. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying DA action on orexin neurons remain incompletely understood. Therefore, the effect of DA on inhibitory transmission to orexin neurons was investigated in rat brain slices using whole cell patch clamp technique. We found that DA modulated the frequency of spontaneous and miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) in a concentration dependent, bidirectional manner. Low (1 μM) and high concentrations (100 μM) of DA decreased and increased IPSC frequency, respectively. These effects did not accompany a change in mIPSC amplitude and persisted in the presence of G protein signaling inhibitor GDPβS in the pipette, suggesting that DA acts presynaptically. The decrease in mIPSC frequency was mediated by D2 receptors, whereas the increase required co-activation of D1 and D2 receptors and subsequent activation of phospholipase C. In summary, our results suggest that DA has complex effects on GABAergic transmission to orexin neurons, involving cooperation of multiple receptor subtypes. The direction of dopaminergic influence on orexin neurons is dependent on the level of DA in the hypothalamus. At low levels DA disinhibits orexin neurons whereas at high levels it facilitates GABA release, which may act as negative feedback to curb the excitatory orexinergic output to DA neurons. These mechanisms may have implications for consummatory and motivated behaviours. PMID:26036709

  4. Concentration-dependent activation of dopamine receptors differentially modulates GABA release onto orexin neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, Victoria; Trask, Robert B; Briggs, Chantalle; Rowe, Todd M; Hirasawa, Michiru

    2015-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) and orexin neurons play important roles in reward and food intake. There are anatomical and functional connections between these two cell groups: orexin peptides stimulate DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area and DA inhibits orexin neurons in the hypothalamus. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying the action of DA on orexin neurons remain incompletely understood. Therefore, the effect of DA on inhibitory transmission to orexin neurons was investigated in rat brain slices using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. We found that DA modulated the frequency of spontaneous and miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) in a concentration-dependent bidirectional manner. Low (1 μM) and high (100 μM) concentrations of DA decreased and increased IPSC frequency, respectively. These effects did not accompany a change in mIPSC amplitude and persisted in the presence of G-protein signaling inhibitor GDPβS in the pipette, suggesting that DA acts presynaptically. The decrease in mIPSC frequency was mediated by D2 receptors whereas the increase required co-activation of D1 and D2 receptors and subsequent activation of phospholipase C. In summary, our results suggest that DA has complex effects on GABAergic transmission to orexin neurons, involving cooperation of multiple receptor subtypes. The direction of dopaminergic influence on orexin neurons is dependent on the level of DA in the hypothalamus. At low levels DA disinhibits orexin neurons whereas at high levels it facilitates GABA release, which may act as negative feedback to curb the excitatory orexinergic output to DA neurons. These mechanisms may have implications for consummatory and motivated behaviours.

  5. GABA: a pioneer transmitter that excites immature neurons and generates primitive oscillations.

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Tyzio, Roman; Khazipov, Rustem

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Developing networks follow common rules to shift from silent cells to coactive networks that operate via thousands of synapses. This review deals with some of these rules and in particular those concerning the crucial role of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobuytric acid (GABA), which operates primarily via chloride-permeable GABA(A) receptor channels. In all developing animal species and brain structures investigated, neurons have a higher intracellular chloride concen...

  6. Membrane voltage modulates the GABA(A) receptor gating in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Maria; Mercik, Katarzyna; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2006-02-01

    The kinetics of GABAergic currents in neurons is known to be modulated by the membrane voltage but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully explored. In particular, the impact of membrane potential on the GABA(A) receptor gating has not been elucidated. In the present study, the effect of membrane voltage on current responses elicited by ultrafast GABA applications was studied in cultured hippocampal neurons. The current to voltage relationship (I-V) for responses to saturating [GABA] (10 mM) showed an inward rectification (slope conductance at positive voltages was 0.62 +/- 0.05 of that at negative potentials). On the contrary, I-V for currents evoked by low [GABA] (1 microM) showed an outward rectification. The onset of currents elicited by saturating [GABA] was significantly accelerated at positive potentials. Analysis of currents evoked by prolonged applications of saturating [GABA] revealed that positive voltages significantly increased the rate and extent of desensitization. The onsets of current responses to non-saturating [GABA] were significantly accelerated at positive voltages indicating an enhancement of the binding rate. However, at low [GABA] at which the onset rate is expected to approach an asymptote set by opening/closing and unbinding rates, no significant modification of current onset by voltage was observed. Quantitative analysis based on model simulations indicated that the major effect of membrane depolarization was to increase the rates of binding, desensitization and of opening as well as to slightly reduce the rate of exit from desensitization. In conclusion, we provide evidence that membrane voltage affects the GABA(A) receptor microscopic gating.

  7. Computational modeling reveals dendritic origins of GABA(A-mediated excitation in CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Lewin

    Full Text Available GABA is the key inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult central nervous system, but in some circumstances can lead to a paradoxical excitation that has been causally implicated in diverse pathologies from endocrine stress responses to diseases of excitability including neuropathic pain and temporal lobe epilepsy. We undertook a computational modeling approach to determine plausible ionic mechanisms of GABA(A-dependent excitation in isolated post-synaptic CA1 hippocampal neurons because it may constitute a trigger for pathological synchronous epileptiform discharge. In particular, the interplay intracellular chloride accumulation via the GABA(A receptor and extracellular potassium accumulation via the K/Cl co-transporter KCC2 in promoting GABA(A-mediated excitation is complex. Experimentally it is difficult to determine the ionic mechanisms of depolarizing current since potassium transients are challenging to isolate pharmacologically and much GABA signaling occurs in small, difficult to measure, dendritic compartments. To address this problem and determine plausible ionic mechanisms of GABA(A-mediated excitation, we built a detailed biophysically realistic model of the CA1 pyramidal neuron that includes processes critical for ion homeostasis. Our results suggest that in dendritic compartments, but not in the somatic compartments, chloride buildup is sufficient to cause dramatic depolarization of the GABA(A reversal potential and dominating bicarbonate currents that provide a substantial current source to drive whole-cell depolarization. The model simulations predict that extracellular K(+ transients can augment GABA(A-mediated excitation, but not cause it. Our model also suggests the potential for GABA(A-mediated excitation to promote network synchrony depending on interneuron synapse location - excitatory positive-feedback can occur when interneurons synapse onto distal dendritic compartments, while interneurons projecting to the perisomatic

  8. Depolarizing actions of GABA in immature neurons depend neither on ketone bodies nor on pyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyzio, Roman; Allene, Camille; Nardou, Romain; Picardo, Michel A; Yamamoto, Sumii; Sivakumaran, Sudhir; Caiati, Maddalena D; Rheims, Sylvain; Minlebaev, Marat; Milh, Mathieu; Ferré, Pascal; Khazipov, Rustem; Romette, Jean-Louis; Lorquin, Jean; Cossart, Rosa; Khalilov, Ilgam; Nehlig, Astrid; Cherubini, Enrico; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2011-01-05

    GABA depolarizes immature neurons because of a high [Cl(-)](i) and orchestrates giant depolarizing potential (GDP) generation. Zilberter and coworkers (Rheims et al., 2009; Holmgren et al., 2010) showed recently that the ketone body metabolite DL-3-hydroxybutyrate (DL-BHB) (4 mM), lactate (4 mM), or pyruvate (5 mM) shifted GABA actions to hyperpolarizing, suggesting that the depolarizing effects of GABA are attributable to inadequate energy supply when glucose is the sole energy source. We now report that, in rat pups (postnatal days 4-7), plasma D-BHB, lactate, and pyruvate levels are 0.9, 1.5, and 0.12 mM, respectively. Then, we show that DL-BHB (4 mM) and pyruvate (200 μM) do not affect (i) the driving force for GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents (DF(GABA)) in cell-attached single-channel recordings, (2) the resting membrane potential and reversal potential of synaptic GABA(A) receptor-mediated responses in perforated patch recordings, (3) the action potentials triggered by focal GABA applications, or (4) the GDPs determined with electrophysiological recordings and dynamic two-photon calcium imaging. Only very high nonphysiological concentrations of pyruvate (5 mM) reduced DF(GABA) and blocked GDPs. Therefore, DL-BHB does not alter GABA signals even at the high concentrations used by Zilberter and colleagues, whereas pyruvate requires exceedingly high nonphysiological concentrations to exert an effect. There is no need to alter conventional glucose enriched artificial CSF to investigate GABA signals in the developing brain.

  9. Spatial distributions of GABA receptors and local inhibition of Ca2+ transients studied with GABA uncaging in the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Kanemoto

    Full Text Available GABA (γ-amino-butylic acid-mediated inhibition in the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons was characterized by two-photon uncaging of a caged-GABA compound, BCMACM-GABA, and one-photon uncaging of RuBi-GABA in rat hippocampal slice preparations. Although we found that GABA(A-mediated currents were diffusely distributed along the dendrites, currents elicited at the branch points of the apical dendritic trunk were approximately two times larger than those elsewhere in the dendrite. We examined the inhibitory action of the GABA-induced currents on Ca(2+ transients evoked with a single back-propagating action potential (bAP in oblique dendrites. We found that GABA uncaging selectively inhibited the Ca(2+ transients in the region adjacent (20 µm. Our data indicate that GABA inhibition results in spatially confined inhibition of Ca(2+ transients shortly after bAP, and suggest that this effect is particularly potent at the dendritic branch points where GABA receptors cluster.

  10. Glutamate and GABA activate different receptors and Cl(-) conductances in crab peptide-secretory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, S; Cooke, I M

    2000-01-01

    Responses to rapid application of glutamic acid (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), 0.01-3 mM, were recorded by whole-cell patch clamp of cultured crab (Cardisoma carnifex) X-organ neurons. Responses peaked within 200 ms. Both Glu and GABA currents had reversal potentials that followed the Nernst Cl(-) potential when [Cl(-)](i) was varied. A Boltzmann fit to the normalized, averaged dose-response curve for Glu indicated an EC(50) of 0.15 mM and a Hill coefficient of 1.05. Rapid (t(1/2) approximately 1 s) desensitization occurred during Glu but not GABA application that required >2 min for recovery. Desensitization was unaffected by concanavalin A or cyclothiazide. N-methyl-D-aspartate, alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, quisqualate, and kainate (to 1 mM) were ineffective, nor were Glu responses influenced by glycine (1 microM) or Mg(2+) (0-26 mM). Glu effects were imitated by ibotenic acid (0.1 mM). The following support the conclusion that Glu and GABA act on different receptors: 1) responses sum; 2) desensitization to Glu or ibotenic acid did not diminish GABA responses; 3) the Cl(-)-channel blockers picrotoxin and niflumic acid (0.5 mM) inhibited Glu responses by approximately 90 and 80% but GABA responses by approximately 50 and 20%; and 4) polyvinylpyrrolydone-25 (2 mM in normal crab saline) eliminated Glu responses but left GABA responses unaltered. Thus crab secretory neurons have separate receptors responsive to Glu and to GABA, both probably ionotropic, and mediating Cl(-) conductance increases. In its responses and pharmacology, this crustacean Glu receptor resembles Cl(-)-permeable Glu receptors previously described in invertebrates and differs from cation-permeable Glu receptors of vertebrates and invertebrates.

  11. Interaction between cyclodextrin and neuronal membrane results in modulation of GABA(A) receptor conformational transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Maria; Mercik, Katarzyna; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2006-06-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are nanostructures widely applied in biotechnology and chemistry. Owing to partially hydrophobic character, CDs interact with biological membranes. While the mechanisms of CDs interactions with lipids were widely studied, their effects on proteins are less understood. In the present study we investigated the effects of beta cyclodextrin (betaCD) on GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R) gating. To reliably resolve the kinetics of conformational transitions, currents were elicited by ultrafast gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) applications to outside-out patches from rat cultured hippocampal neurons. betaCD increased the amplitude of responses to saturating GABA concentration ([GABA]) in a dose-dependent manner and this effect was accompanied by profound alterations in the current kinetics. Current deactivation was slowed down by betaCD but this effect was biphasic with a maximum at around 0.5 mM betaCD. While the fast deactivation time constant was monotonically slowed down within considered betaCD concentration range, the slow component first increased and then, at millimolar betaCD concentration, decreased. The rate and extent of desensitization was decreased by betaCD in a dose-dependent manner. The analysis of current responses to nonsaturating [GABA] indicated that betaCD affected the GABA(A)R agonist binding site by slowing down the unbinding rate. Modulation of GABA(A)R desensitization and binding showed different concentration-dependence suggesting different modualtory sites with higher affinity of the latter one. All the betaCD effects were fully reversible indicating that cholesterol uptake into betaCD was not the primary mechanism. We conclude that betaCD is a strong modulator of GABA(A)R conformational transitions.

  12. Glutamatergic and Dopaminergic Neurons in the Mouse Ventral Tegmental Area

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Qi, Jia; Wang, Hui-Ling; Zhang, Shiliang; Morales, Marisela

    2015-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) comprises dopamine (DA), GABA and glutamate (Glu) neurons. Some rat VTA Glu neurons, expressing vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2), co-express tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). While transgenic mice are now being used in attempts to determine the role of VGluT2/TH neurons in reward and neuronal signaling, such neurons have not been characterized in mouse tissue. By cellular detection of VGluT2-mRNA and TH-immunoreactivity (TH-IR), we determined the cellular e...

  13. Compartmentalization of GABA synthesis by GAD67 differs between pancreatic beta cells and neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanaani, Jamil; Cianciaruso, Chiara; Phelps, Edward A;

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA is synthesized by the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in neurons and in pancreatic β-cells in islets of Langerhans where it functions as a paracrine and autocrine signaling molecule regulating the function of islet endocrine cells. The localization of...

  14. gamma-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) induces GABA(B) receptor independent intracellular Ca2+ transients in astrocytes, but has no effect on GHB or GABA(B) receptors of medium spiny neurons in the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, T; Antal, K; Nyitrai, G; Emri, Z

    2009-08-18

    We report on cellular actions of the illicit recreational drug gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) in the brain reward area nucleus accumbens. First, we compared the effects of GHB and the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen. Neither of them affected the membrane currents of medium spiny neurons in rat nucleus accumbens slices. GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic potentials of medium spiny neurons, however, were reduced by baclofen but not GHB. These results indicate the lack of GHB as well as postsynaptic GABA(B) receptors, and the presence of GHB insensitive presynaptic GABA(B) receptors in medium spiny neurons. In astrocytes GHB induced intracellular Ca(2+) transients, preserved in slices from GABA(B) receptor type 1 subunit knockout mice. The effects of tetrodotoxin, zero added Ca(2+) with/without intracellular Ca(2+) store depletor cyclopiazonic acid or vacuolar H-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 indicate that GHB-evoked Ca(2+) transients depend on external Ca(2+) and intracellular Ca(2+) stores, but not on vesicular transmitter release. GHB-induced astrocytic Ca(2+) transients were not affected by the GHB receptor-specific antagonist NCS-382, suggesting the presence of a novel NCS-382-insensitive target for GHB in astrocytes. The activation of astrocytes by GHB implies their involvement in physiological actions of GHB. Our findings disclose a novel profile of GHB action in the nucleus accumbens. Here, unlike in other brain areas, GHB does not act on GABA(B) receptors, but activates an NCS-382 insensitive GHB-specific target in a subpopulation of astrocytes. The lack of either post- or presynaptic effects on medium spiny neurons in the nucleus accumbens distinguishes GHB from many drugs and natural rewards with addictive properties and might explain why GHB has only a weak reinforcing capacity.

  15. Retrograde release of endocannabinoids inhibits presynaptic GABA release to second-order baroreceptive neurons in NTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-Yin; Bonham, Ann C; Dean, Caron; Hopp, Francis A; Hillard, Cecilia J; Seagard, Jeanne L

    2010-12-01

    In prior studies, we found that activation of cannabinoid-1 receptors in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) prolonged baroreflex-induced sympathoinhibition in rats. In many regions of the central nervous system, activation of cannabinoid-1 receptors presynaptically inhibits γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release, disinhibiting postsynaptic neurons. To determine if cannabinoid-1 receptor-mediated presynaptic inhibition of GABA release occurs in the NTS, we recorded miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in anatomically identified second-order baroreceptive NTS neurons in the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists and tetrodotoxin. The cannabinoid-1 receptor agonists, WIN 55212-2 (0.3-30 μM) and methanandamide (3 μM) decreased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in a concentration-dependent manner, an effect that was blocked by the cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonist, N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM 251, 5 μM). Importantly, depolarization of second-order baroreceptive neurons decreased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents; an effect which was blocked by the cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonist. The data indicate that depolarization of second-order baroreceptive NTS neurons induces endocannabinoid release from the neurons, leading to activation of presynaptic cannabinoid-1 receptors, inhibition of GABA release and subsequent enhanced baroreflex signaling in the NTS. The data suggest that endocannabinoid signaling in the NTS regulates short-term synaptic plasticity and provide a mechanism for endocannabinoid modulation of central baroreflex control.

  16. Low doses of alcohol potentiate GABA sub B inhibition of spontaneous activity of hippocampal CA1 neurons in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criado, J.R.; Thies, R. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City (United States))

    1991-03-11

    Low doses of alcohol facilitate firing of hippocampal neurons. Such doses also enhance the inhibitory actions of GABA. Alcohol is known to potentiate inhibition via GABA{sub A} receptors. However, the effects of alcohol on GABA{sub B} receptor function are not understood. Spontaneous activity of single units was recorded from CA1 neurons of male rats anesthetized with 1.0% halothane. Electrical recordings and local application of drugs were done with multi-barrel pipettes. CA1 pyramidal neurons fired spontaneous bursts of action potentials. Acute alcohol decreased the interval between bursts, a mild excitatory action. Alcohol also more than doubled the period of complete inhibition produced by local application of both GABA and baclofen. These data suggest that GABA{sub B}-mediated inhibition is also potentiated by low doses of alcohol.

  17. Nutritional state-dependent ghrelin activation of vasopressin neurons via retrograde trans-neuronal-glial stimulation of excitatory GABA circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haam, Juhee; Halmos, Katalin C; Di, Shi; Tasker, Jeffrey G

    2014-04-30

    Behavioral and physiological coupling between energy balance and fluid homeostasis is critical for survival. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin has been shown to stimulate the secretion of the osmoregulatory hormone vasopressin (VP), linking nutritional status to the control of blood osmolality, although the mechanism of this systemic crosstalk is unknown. Here, we show using electrophysiological recordings and calcium imaging in rat brain slices that ghrelin stimulates VP neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in a nutritional state-dependent manner by activating an excitatory GABAergic synaptic input via a retrograde neuronal-glial circuit. In slices from fasted rats, ghrelin activation of a postsynaptic ghrelin receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1a (GHS-R1a), in VP neurons caused the dendritic release of VP, which stimulated astrocytes to release the gliotransmitter adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP activation of P2X receptors excited presynaptic GABA neurons to increase GABA release, which was excitatory to the VP neurons. This trans-neuronal-glial retrograde circuit activated by ghrelin provides an alternative means of stimulation of VP release and represents a novel mechanism of neuronal control by local neuronal-glial circuits. It also provides a potential cellular mechanism for the physiological integration of energy and fluid homeostasis.

  18. Neuronal and non-neuronal GABA transporters as targets for antiepileptic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karsten K; White, H Steve; Schousboe, Arne

    2010-01-01

    of such transporters pointing in particular to an interesting role of the transporters located extrasynaptically. It is suggested that the betaine-GABA transporter BGT1 should receive particular interest in this context as the GABA analogue EF 1502 (N-[4,4-bis(3-methyl-2-thienyl)-3-butenyl]-4-(methylamino)-4...

  19. Glutamatergic neurons are present in the rat ventral tegmental area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Sheen, Whitney; Morales, Marisela

    2010-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) is thought to play an important role in reward function. Two populations of neurons, containing either dopamine (DA) or γ-amino butyric acid (GABA), have been extensively characterized in this area. However, recent electrophysiological studies are consistent with the notion that neurons that utilize neurotransmitters other than DA or GABA are likely to be present in the VTA. Given the pronounced phenotypic diversity of neurons in this region, we have proposed that additional cell types, such as those that express the neurotransmitter glutamate may also be present in this area. Thus, by using in situ hybridization histochemistry we investigated whether transcripts encoded by genes for the two vesicular glutamate transporters, VGluT1 or VGluT2, were expressed in the VTA. We found that VGluT2 mRNA but not VGluT1 mRNA is expressed in the VTA. Neurons expressing VGluT2 mRNA were differentially distributed throughout the rostro-caudal and medio-lateral aspects of the VTA, with the highest concentration detected in rostro-medial areas. Phenotypic characterization with double in situ hybridization of these neurons indicated that they rarely co–expressed mRNAs for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, marker for DAergic neurons) or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD, marker for GABAergic neurons). Based on the results described here, we concluded that the VTA contains glutamatergic neurons that in their vast majority are clearly non-DAergic and non-GABAergic. PMID:17241272

  20. [Modulating effect of dopamine on amplitude of GABA-produced chemocontrolled currents in multipolar spinal cord neurons of ammocaete].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukinich, A A

    2010-01-01

    By using the patch-clamp method in the whole cell configuration, modulating effect of dopamine on GABA-activated currents has been studied on isolated multipolar spinal cord neurons of the ammocaete (larva of the lamprey Lampetra planeri). At application of dopamine (5 microM), there was observed in some cases a decrease of the GABA-activated current, on average, by 33.3 +/- 8.7 (n = 8, p multipolar neurons of the ammocaete spinal cord.

  1. Interplay between thyroxin, BDNF and GABA in injured neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulga, A; Rivera, C

    2013-06-03

    Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that groups of neurons in the CNS might react to pathological insults by activating developmental-like programs for survival, regeneration and re-establishment of lost connections. For instance, in cell and animal models it was shown that after trauma mature central neurons become dependent on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) trophic support for survival. This event is preceded by a shift of postsynaptic GABAA receptor-mediated responses from hyperpolarization to developmental-like depolarization. These profound functional changes in GABAA receptor-mediated transmission and the requirement of injured neurons for BDNF trophic support are interdependent. Thyroid hormones (THs) play a crucial role in the development of the nervous system, having significant effects on dendritic branching, synaptogenesis and axonal growth to name a few. In the adult nervous system TH thyroxin has been shown to have a neuroprotective effect and to promote regeneration in experimental trauma models. Interestingly, after trauma there is a qualitative change in the regulatory effect of thyroxin on BDNF expression as well as on GABAergic transmission. In this review we provide an overview of the post-traumatic changes in these signaling systems and discuss the potential significance of their interactions for the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  2. Compartmentalization of GABA synthesis by GAD67 differs between pancreatic beta cells and neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil Kanaani

    Full Text Available The inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA is synthesized by the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD in neurons and in pancreatic β-cells in islets of Langerhans where it functions as a paracrine and autocrine signaling molecule regulating the function of islet endocrine cells. The localization of the two non-allelic isoforms GAD65 and GAD67 to vesicular membranes is important for rapid delivery and accumulation of GABA for regulated secretion. While the membrane anchoring and trafficking of GAD65 are mediated by intrinsic hydrophobic modifications, GAD67 remains hydrophilic, and yet is targeted to vesicular membrane pathways and synaptic clusters in neurons by both a GAD65-dependent and a distinct GAD65-independent mechanism. Herein we have investigated the membrane association and targeting of GAD67 and GAD65 in monolayer cultures of primary rat, human, and mouse islets and in insulinoma cells. GAD65 is primarily detected in Golgi membranes and in peripheral vesicles distinct from insulin vesicles in β-cells. In the absence of GAD65, GAD67 is in contrast primarily cytosolic in β-cells; its co-expression with GAD65 is necessary for targeting to Golgi membranes and vesicular compartments. Thus, the GAD65-independent mechanism for targeting of GAD67 to synaptic vesicles in neurons is not functional in islet β-cells. Therefore, only GAD65:GAD65 homodimers and GAD67:GAD65 heterodimers, but not the GAD67:GAD67 homodimer gain access to vesicular compartments in β-cells to facilitate rapid accumulation of newly synthesized GABA for regulated secretion and fine tuning of GABA-signaling in islets of Langerhans.

  3. Evaluation of GABA Receptors of Ventral Tegmental Area in Cardiovascular Responses in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoo Rasoulpanah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ventral tegmental area (VTA is well known for its role in cardiovascular control. It is demonstrated that about 20-30% of the VTA neurons are GABAergic though their role in cardiovascular control is not yet understood. This study is carried out to find the effects of GABA A and GABA B receptors on cardiovascular response of the VTA. Methods: Experiments were performed on urethane anesthetized male Wistar rats. Drugs were microinjected unilaterally into the VTA. The average changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP and heart rate (HR were compared between the case and the control groups using t test and with the pre-injection values using paired t test. Results: Microinjection of muscimol, a GABAA agonist (500, 1500 and 2500 pmol/100nl into the VTA had no significant effect on MAP and HR compared with the saline group and pre-injection values. Injection of bicuculline methiodide (BMI, 100 and 200 pmol/100 nl, a GABAA antagonist, caused a significant increase in the MAP (11.1±1.95mmHg, P<0.5 and a decrease in HR (-32.07±10.2, P<0.01. Microinjection of baclofen a GABAB receptor agonist (500 or 1000 pmole/100 nl and phaclofen a GABAB receptor antagonist (500 or 1000 pmole/100 nl had no significant effects on MAP and HR. Conclusion: For the first time it was demonstrated that GABA system of the VTA inhibits the cardiovascular system through the activation of GABAA but not the GABAB receptors.

  4. Excitatory action of GABA on immature neurons is not due to absence of ketone bodies metabolites or other energy substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Tyzio, Roman; Nehlig, Astrid

    2011-09-01

    Brain slices incubated with glucose have provided most of our knowledge on cellular, synaptic, and network driven mechanisms. It has been recently suggested that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) excites neonatal neurons in conventional glucose-perfused slices but not when ketone bodies metabolites, pyruvate, and/or lactate are added, suggesting that the excitatory actions of GABA are due to energy deprivation when glucose is the sole energy source. In this article, we review the vast number of studies that show that slices are not energy deprived in glucose-containing medium, and that addition of other energy substrates at physiologic concentrations does not alter the excitatory actions of GABA on neonatal neurons. In contrast, lactate, like other weak acids, can produce an intracellular acidification that will cause a reduction of intracellular chloride and a shift of GABA actions. The effects of high concentrations of lactate, and particularly of pyruvate (4-5 mm), as used are relevant primarily to pathologic conditions; these concentrations not being found in the brain in normal "control" conditions. Slices in glucose-containing medium may not be ideal, but additional energy substrates neither correspond to physiologic conditions nor alter GABA actions. In keeping with extensive observations in a wide range of animal species and brain structures, GABA depolarizes immature neurons and the reduction of the intracellular concentration of chloride ([Cl(-)](i)) is a basic property of brain maturation that has been preserved throughout evolution. In addition, this developmental sequence has important clinical implications, notably concerning the higher incidence of seizures early in life and their long-lasting deleterious sequels. Immature neurons have difficulties exporting chloride that accumulates during seizures, leading to permanent increase of [Cl(-)](i) that converts the inhibitory actions of GABA to excitatory and hampers the efficacy of GABA-acting antiepileptic

  5. Dysbindin Deficiency Modifies the Expression of GABA Neuron and Ion Permeation Transcripts in the Developing Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimore, Jennifer; Zlatic, Stephanie A.; Arnold, Miranda; Singleton, Kaela S.; Cross, Rebecca; Rudolph, Hannah; Bruegge, Martha V.; Sweetman, Andrea; Garza, Cecilia; Whisnant, Eli; Faundez, Victor

    2017-01-01

    The neurodevelopmental factor dysbindin is required for synapse function and GABA interneuron development. Dysbindin protein levels are reduced in the hippocampus of schizophrenia patients. Mouse dysbindin genetic defects and other mouse models of neurodevelopmental disorders share defective GABAergic neurotransmission and, in several instances, a loss of parvalbumin-positive interneuron phenotypes. This suggests that mechanisms downstream of dysbindin deficiency, such as those affecting GABA interneurons, could inform pathways contributing to or ameliorating diverse neurodevelopmental disorders. Here we define the transcriptome of developing wild type and dysbindin null Bloc1s8sdy/sdy mouse hippocampus in order to identify mechanisms downstream dysbindin defects. The dysbindin mutant transcriptome revealed previously reported GABA parvalbumin interneuron defects. However, the Bloc1s8sdy/sdy transcriptome additionally uncovered changes in the expression of molecules controlling cellular excitability such as the cation-chloride cotransporters NKCC1, KCC2, and NCKX2 as well as the potassium channel subunits Kcne2 and Kcnj13. Our results suggest that dysbindin deficiency phenotypes, such as GABAergic defects, are modulated by the expression of molecules controlling the magnitude and cadence of neuronal excitability.

  6. Comparative immunohistochemical localisation of GABA(B1a), GABA(B1b) and GABA(B2) subunits in rat brain, spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, K J; Evans, M L; Robbins, M J; Calver, A R; Leslie, R A; Pangalos, M N

    2001-01-01

    GABA(B) receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors mediating the slow onset and prolonged synaptic actions of GABA in the CNS. The recent cloning of two genes, GABA(B1) and GABA(B2), has revealed a novel requirement for GABA(B) receptor signalling. Studies have demonstrated that the two receptor subunits associate as a GABA(B1)/GABA(B2) heterodimer to form a functional GABA(B) receptor. In this study we have developed polyclonal antisera specific to two splice variants of the GABA(B1) subunit, GABA(B1a) and GABA(B1b), as well as an antiserum to the GABA(B2) subunit. Using affinity-purified antibodies derived from these antisera we have mapped out the distribution profile of each subunit in rat brain, spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion. In brain the highest areas of GABA(B1a), GABA(B1b) and GABA(B2) subunit expression were found in neocortex, hippocampus, thalamus, cerebellum and habenula. In spinal cord, GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits were expressed in the superficial layers of the dorsal horn, as well as in motor neurones in the deeper layers of the ventral horn. GABA(B) receptor subunit immunoreactivity in dorsal root ganglion suggested that expression of GABA(B1b) was restricted to the large diameter neurones, in contrast to GABA(B1a) and GABA(B2) subunits which were expressed in both large and small diameter neurones. Although expression levels of GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits varied we found no areas in which GABA(B1) was expressed in the absence of GABA(B2). This suggests that most, if not all, GABA(B1) immunoreactivity may represent functional GABA(B) receptors. Although our data are in general agreement with functional studies, some discrepancies in GABA(B1) subunit expression occurred with respect to other immunohistochemical studies. Overall our data suggest that GABA(B) receptors are widely expressed throughout the brain and spinal cord, and that GABA(B1a) and GABA(B1b) subunits can associate with GABA(B2) to form both pre- and post-synaptic receptors.

  7. Corticotropin-releasing factor increases GABA synaptic activity and induces inward current in 5-hydroxytryptamine dorsal raphe neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Lynn G; Freeman-Daniels, Emily; Lemos, Julia C; Nunan, John D; Lamy, Christophe; Akanwa, Adaure; Beck, Sheryl G

    2008-11-26

    Stress-related psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression involve dysfunction of the serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] system. Previous studies have found that the stress neurohormone corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) inhibits 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in vivo. The goals of the present study were to characterize the CRF receptor subtypes (CRF-R1 and -R2) and cellular mechanisms underlying CRF-5-HT interactions. Visualized whole-cell patch-clamp recording techniques in brain slices were used to measure spontaneous or evoked GABA synaptic activity in DRN neurons of rats and CRF effects on these measures. CRF-R1 and -R2-selective agonists were bath applied alone or in combination with receptor-selective antagonists. CRF increased presynaptic GABA release selectively onto 5-HT neurons, an effect mediated by the CRF-R1 receptor. CRF increased postsynaptic GABA receptor sensitivity selectively in 5-HT neurons, an effect to which both receptor subtypes contributed. CRF also had direct effects on DRN neurons, eliciting an inward current in 5-HT neurons mediated by the CRF-R2 receptor and in non-5-HT neurons mediated by the CRF-R1 receptor. These results indicate that CRF has direct membrane effects on 5-HT DRN neurons as well as indirect effects on GABAergic synaptic transmission that are mediated by distinct receptor subtypes. The inhibition of 5-HT DRN neurons by CRF in vivo may therefore be primarily an indirect effect via stimulation of inhibitory GABA synaptic transmission. These results regarding the cellular mechanisms underlying the complex interaction between CRF, 5-HT, and GABA systems could contribute to the development of novel treatments for stress-related psychiatric disorders.

  8. Distribution and ultrastructure of neurons in opossum piriform cortex displaying immunoreactivity to GABA and GAD and high-affinity tritiated GABA uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberly, L.B.; Hansen, D.J.; Feig, S.L.; Presto, S.

    1987-12-08

    GABAergic neurons have been identified in the piriform cortex of the opossum at light and electron microscopic levels by immunocytochemical localization of GABA and the GABA-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase and by autoradiographic visualization of high-affinity /sup 3/H-GABA uptake. Four major neuron populations have been distinguished on the basis of soma size, shape, and segregation at specific depths and locations: large horizontal cells in layer Ia of the anterior piriform cortex, small globular cells with thin dendrites concentrated in layers Ib and II of the posterior piriform cortex, and multipolar and fusiform cells concentrated in the deep part of layer III in anterior and posterior parts of the piriform cortex and the subjacent endopiriform nucleus. All four populations were well visualized with both antisera, but the large layer Ia horizontal cells displayed only very light /sup 3/H-GABA uptake, thus suggesting a lack of local axon collaterals or lack of high-affinity GABA uptake sites. The large, ultrastructurally distinctive somata of layer Ia horizontal cells receive a very small number of symmetrical synapses; the thin, axonlike dendrites of small globular cells are exclusively postsynaptic and receive large numbers of both symmetrical and asymmetrical synapses, in contrast to somata which receive a small number of both types; and the deep multipolar and fusiform cells receive a highly variable number of symmetrical and asymmetrical synapses on somata and proximal dendrites. Labeled puncta of axon terminal dimensions were found in large numbers in the neuropil surrounding pyramidal cell somata in layer II and in the endopiriform nucleus. Moderately large numbers of labeled puncta were found in layer I at the depth of pyramidal cell apical dendrites with greater numbers in layer Ia at the depth of distal apical segments than in layer Ib.

  9. Regulation of GABA Equilibrium Potential by mGluRs in Rat Hippocampal CA1 Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Rajput, Padmesh S; Kumar, Ujendra; Sastry, Bhagavatula R

    2015-01-01

    The equilibrium potential for GABA-A receptor mediated currents (EGABA) in neonatal central neurons is set at a relatively depolarized level, which is suggested to be caused by a low expression of K+/Cl- co-transporter (KCC2) but a relatively high expression of Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1). Theta-burst stimulation (TBS) in stratum radiatum induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the current study, the effects of TBS on EGABA in neonatal and juvenile hippocampal CA1 neurons and the underlying mechanisms were examined. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are suggested to modulate KCC2 and NKCC1 levels in cortical neurons. Therefore, the involvement of mGluRs in the regulation of KCC2 or NKCC1 activity, and thus EGABA, following TBS was also investigated. Whole-cell patch recordings were made from Wistar rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, in a slice preparation. In neonates, TBS induces a positive shift in EGABA, which was prevented by NKCC1 antisense but not NKCC1 sense mRNA. (RS)-a-Methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG), a group I and II mGluR antagonist, blocked TBS-induced shifts in both juvenile and neonatal hippocampal neurons. While blockade of mGluR1 or mGluR5 alone could interfere with TBS-induced shifts in EGABA in neonates, only a combined blockade could do the same in juveniles. These results indicate that TBS induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal neurons but a positive shift in neonatal hippocampal neurons via corresponding changes in KCC2 and NKCC1 expressions, respectively. mGluR activation seems to be necessary for both shifts to occur while the specific receptor subtype involved seems to vary.

  10. Regulation of GABA Equilibrium Potential by mGluRs in Rat Hippocampal CA1 Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yang

    Full Text Available The equilibrium potential for GABA-A receptor mediated currents (EGABA in neonatal central neurons is set at a relatively depolarized level, which is suggested to be caused by a low expression of K+/Cl- co-transporter (KCC2 but a relatively high expression of Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1. Theta-burst stimulation (TBS in stratum radiatum induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the current study, the effects of TBS on EGABA in neonatal and juvenile hippocampal CA1 neurons and the underlying mechanisms were examined. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs are suggested to modulate KCC2 and NKCC1 levels in cortical neurons. Therefore, the involvement of mGluRs in the regulation of KCC2 or NKCC1 activity, and thus EGABA, following TBS was also investigated. Whole-cell patch recordings were made from Wistar rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, in a slice preparation. In neonates, TBS induces a positive shift in EGABA, which was prevented by NKCC1 antisense but not NKCC1 sense mRNA. (RS-a-Methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG, a group I and II mGluR antagonist, blocked TBS-induced shifts in both juvenile and neonatal hippocampal neurons. While blockade of mGluR1 or mGluR5 alone could interfere with TBS-induced shifts in EGABA in neonates, only a combined blockade could do the same in juveniles. These results indicate that TBS induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal neurons but a positive shift in neonatal hippocampal neurons via corresponding changes in KCC2 and NKCC1 expressions, respectively. mGluR activation seems to be necessary for both shifts to occur while the specific receptor subtype involved seems to vary.

  11. Selective reduction of cerebral cortex GABA neurons in a late gestation model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, John F; Saito, Mariko; Bleiwas, Cynthia; Masiello, Kurt; Ardekani, Babak; Guilfoyle, David N; Gerum, Scott; Wilson, Donald A; Vadasz, Csaba

    2015-09-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) are associated with cognitive and behavioral deficits, and decreased volume of the whole brain and cerebral cortex. Rodent models have shown that early postnatal treatments, which mimic ethanol toxicity in the third trimester of human pregnancy, acutely induce widespread apoptotic neuronal degeneration and permanent behavioral deficits. However, the lasting cellular and anatomical effects of early ethanol treatments are still incompletely understood. This study examined changes in neocortex volume, thickness, and cellular organization that persist in adult mice after postnatal day 7 (P7) ethanol treatment. Post mortem brain volumes, measured by both MRI within the skull and by fluid displacement of isolated brains, were reduced 10-13% by ethanol treatment. The cerebral cortex showed a similar reduction (12%) caused mainly by lower surface area (9%). In spite of these large changes, several features of cortical organization showed little evidence of change, including cortical thickness, overall neuron size, and laminar organization. Estimates of total neuron number showed a trend level reduction of about 8%, due mainly to reduced cortical volume but unchanged neuron density. However, counts of calretinin (CR) and parvalbumin (PV) subtypes of GABAergic neurons showed a striking >30% reduction of neuron number. Similar ethanol effects were found in male and female mice, and in C57BL/6By and BALB/cJ mouse strains. Our findings indicate that the cortex has substantial capacity to develop normal cytoarchitectonic organization after early postnatal ethanol toxicity, but there is a selective and persistent reduction of GABA cells that may contribute to the lasting cognitive and behavioral deficits in FASD.

  12. GABA(B) receptor activation in the ventral tegmental area inhibits the acquisition and expression of opiate-induced motor sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite-Morris, Kimberly A; Fukudome, Eugene Y; Shoeb, Marwa H; Kaplan, Gary B

    2004-02-01

    Opiate-induced motor sensitization refers to the progressive and enduring motor response that develops after intermittent drug administration, and results from neuroadaptive changes in ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) neurons. Repeated activation of mu-opioid receptors localized on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons in the VTA enhances dopaminergic cell activity and stimulates dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. We hypothesize that GABA(B) receptor agonist treatment in the VTA blocks morphine-induced motor stimulation, motor sensitization, and accumbal Fos immunoreactivity by inhibiting the activation of dopaminergic neurons. First, C57BL/6 mice were coadministered a single subcutaneous injection of morphine with intra-VTA baclofen, a GABA(B) receptor agonist. Baclofen produced a dose-dependent inhibition of opiate-induced motor stimulation that was attenuated by 2-hydroxysaclofen, a GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Next, morphine was administered on days 1, 3, 5, and 9 and mice demonstrated sensitization to its motor stimulant effects and concomitant induction of Fos immunoreactivity in the NAc shell (NAcS) but not NAc core. Intra-VTA baclofen administered during morphine pretreatment blocked the acquisition of morphine-induced motor sensitization and Fos activation in the NAcS. Intra-VTA baclofen administered only on day 9 blocked the expression of morphine-induced motor sensitization and Fos activation in the NAcS. A linear relationship was found between morphine-induced motor activity and accumbal Fos in single- and repeated-dose treatment groups. In conclusion, GABA(B) receptor stimulation in the VTA blocked opiate-induced motor stimulation and motor sensitization by inhibiting the activation of NAcS neurons. GABA(B) receptor agonists may be useful pharmacological treatments in altering the behavioral effects of opiates.

  13. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and GABA_A receptors are involved in directional selectivity of pretectal neurons in pigeons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖泉; 付煜西; 胡婧; 高洪峰; 王书荣

    2000-01-01

    The present study describes the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and its antagonists, bicuculline and 2-hydroxysaclofen, on visual responses of neurons in the pigeon nucleus lentiformis mesencephali (nLM). The results indicate that GABA significantly reduces both spontaneous activity and visual responsiveness, and GABAA antagonist bicuculline but not GABAB antagonist 2-hydroxysaclofen enhances visual responses of nLM cells examined. Furthermore, inhibition produced by motion in the null-direction of pretectal neurons is diminished by bicuculline but not by 2-hydroxysaclofen. It is therefore concluded that the null-direction inhibition of directional cells in the pigeon nLM is predominantly mediated by GABA and GABAA receptors. This inhibition may at least in part underlie directional asymmetry of optokinetic responses.

  14. Increased GABA(A receptor ε-subunit expression on ventral respiratory column neurons protects breathing during pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith B Hengen

    Full Text Available GABAergic signaling is essential for proper respiratory function. Potentiation of this signaling with allosteric modulators such as anesthetics, barbiturates, and neurosteroids can lead to respiratory arrest. Paradoxically, pregnant animals continue to breathe normally despite nearly 100-fold increases in circulating neurosteroids. ε subunit-containing GABA(ARs are insensitive to positive allosteric modulation, thus we hypothesized that pregnant rats increase ε subunit-containing GABA(AR expression on brainstem neurons of the ventral respiratory column (VRC. In vivo, pregnancy rendered respiratory motor output insensitive to otherwise lethal doses of pentobarbital, a barbiturate previously used to categorize the ε subunit. Using electrode array recordings in vitro, we demonstrated that putative respiratory neurons of the preBötzinger Complex (preBötC were also rendered insensitive to the effects of pentobarbital during pregnancy, but unit activity in the VRC was rapidly inhibited by the GABA(AR agonist, muscimol. VRC unit activity from virgin and post-partum females was potently inhibited by both pentobarbital and muscimol. Brainstem ε subunit mRNA and protein levels were increased in pregnant rats, and GABA(AR ε subunit expression co-localized with a marker of rhythm generating neurons (neurokinin 1 receptors in the preBötC. These data support the hypothesis that pregnancy renders respiratory motor output and respiratory neuron activity insensitive to barbiturates, most likely via increased ε subunit-containing GABA(AR expression on respiratory rhythm-generating neurons. Increased ε subunit expression may be critical to preserve respiratory function (and life despite increased neurosteroid levels during pregnancy.

  15. The projection and synaptic organisation of NTS afferent connections with presympathetic neurons, GABA and nNOS neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affleck, V S; Coote, J H; Pyner, S

    2012-09-01

    Elevated sympathetic nerve activity, strongly associated with cardiovascular disease, is partly generated from the presympathetic neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). The PVN-presympathetic neurons regulating cardiac and vasomotor sympathetic activity receive information about cardiovascular status from receptors in the heart and circulation. These receptors signal changes via afferent neurons terminating in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), some of which may result in excitation or inhibition of PVN-presympathetic neurons. Understanding the anatomy and neurochemistry of NTS afferent connections within the PVN could provide important clues to the impairment in homeostasis cardiovascular control associated with disease. Transynaptic labelling has shown the presence of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-containing neurons and GABA interneurons that terminate on presympathetic PVN neurons any of which may be the target for NTS afferents. So far NTS connections to these diverse neuronal pools have not been demonstrated and were investigated in this study. Anterograde (biotin dextran amine - BDA) labelling of the ascending projection from the NTS and retrograde (fluorogold - FG or cholera toxin B subunit - CTB) labelling of PVN presympathetic neurons combined with immunohistochemistry for GABA and nNOS was used to identify the terminal neuronal targets of the ascending projection from the NTS. It was shown that NTS afferent terminals are apposed to either PVN-GABA interneurons or to nitric oxide producing neurons or even directly to presympathetic neurons. Furthermore, there was evidence that some NTS axons were positive for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGLUT2). The data provide an anatomical basis for the different functions of cardiovascular receptors that mediate their actions via the NTS-PVN pathways.

  16. Postsynaptic Depolarization Enhances GABA Drive to Dorsomedial Hypothalamic Neurons through Somatodendritic Cholecystokinin Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Karen M; Baimoukhametova, Dinara V; Bains, Jaideep S; Pittman, Quentin J

    2015-09-23

    Somatodendritically released peptides alter synaptic function through a variety of mechanisms, including autocrine actions that liberate retrograde transmitters. Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a neuropeptide expressed in neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH), a region implicated in satiety and stress. There are clear demonstrations that exogenous CCK modulates food intake and neuropeptide expression in the DMH, but there is no information on how endogenous CCK alters synaptic properties. Here, we provide the first report of somatodendritic release of CCK in the brain in male Sprague Dawley rats. CCK is released from DMH neurons in response to repeated postsynaptic depolarizations, and acts in an autocrine fashion on CCK2 receptors to enhance postsynaptic NMDA receptor function and liberate the retrograde transmitter, nitric oxide (NO). NO subsequently acts presynaptically to enhance GABA release through a soluble guanylate cyclase-mediated pathway. These data provide the first demonstration of synaptic actions of somatodendritically released CCK in the hypothalamus and reveal a new form of retrograde plasticity, depolarization-induced potentiation of inhibition. Significance statement: Somatodendritic signaling using endocannabinoids or nitric oxide to alter the efficacy of afferent transmission is well established. Despite early convincing evidence for somatodendritic release of neurohypophysial peptides in the hypothalamus, there is only limited evidence for this mode of release for other peptides. Here, we provide the first evidence for somatodendritic release of the satiety peptide cholecystokinin (CCK) in the brain. We also reveal a new form of synaptic plasticity in which postsynaptic depolarization results in enhancement of inhibition through the somatodendritic release of CCK.

  17. Substance P receptor expression by inhibitory interneurons of the rat hippocampus: enhanced detection using improved immunocytochemical methods for the preservation and colocalization of GABA and other neuronal markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloviter, R S; Ali-Akbarian, L; Horvath, K D; Menkens, K A

    2001-02-12

    Two unresolved issues regarding the identification and characterization of hippocampal interneurons were addressed in this study. One issue was the longstanding inability to detect gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the somata of several hippocampal interneuron subpopulations, which has prevented the unequivocal identification of all hippocampal interneurons as GABA neurons. The second issue was related to the identification of the hippocampal interneurons that constitutively express substance P (neurokinin-1) receptors (SPRs). The recent development of neurotoxins that specifically target SPR-expressing cells suggests that it may be possible to destroy hippocampal inhibitory interneurons selectively for experimental purposes. Although SPRs are apparently expressed in the hippocampus only by interneurons, colocalization studies have found that most interneurons of several subtypes and hippocampal subregions appear SPR-negative. Thus, the identities and locations of the inhibitory interneurons that are potential targets of an SPR-directed neurotoxin remain in doubt. Using newly developed methods designed to copreserve and colocalize GABA and polypeptide immunoreactivities with increased sensitivity, the authors report that virtually all hippocampal interneuron somata that are immunoreactive for parvalbumin (PV), calbindin, calretinin, somatostatin (SS), neuropeptide Y, cholecystokinin, and vasoactive intestinal peptide exhibited clearly detectable, somal, GABA-like immunoreactivity (LI). Hippocampal SPR-LI was detected only on the somata and dendrites of GABA-immunopositive interneurons. All glutamate receptor subunit 2-immunoreactive principal cells, including dentate granule cells, hilar mossy cells, and hippocampal pyramidal cells, were devoid of detectable SPR-LI, even after prolonged electrical stimulation of the perforant pathway that induced the expression of other neuronal proteins in principal cells. Thus, hippocampal interneurons of all subtypes and

  18. Connections between EM2-containing terminals and GABA/μ-opioid receptor co-expressing neurons in the rat spinal trigeminal caudal nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng-Ying; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Lu, Ya-Cheng; Yin, Jun-Bin; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Ting; Dong, Yu-Lin; Wang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Endomorphin-2 (EM2) demonstrates a potent antinociceptive effect via the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). To provide morphological evidence for the pain control effect of EM2, the synaptic connections between EM2-immunoreactive (IR) axonal terminals and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA)/MOR co-expressing neurons in lamina II of the spinal trigeminal caudal nucleus (Vc) were investigated in the rat. Dense EM2-, MOR- and GABA-IR fibers and terminals were mainly observed in lamina II of the Vc. Within lamina II, GABA- and MOR-neuronal cell bodies were also encountered. The results of immunofluorescent histochemical triple-staining showed that approximately 14.2 or 18.9% of GABA-IR or MOR-IR neurons also showed MOR- or GABA-immunopositive staining in lamina II; approximately 45.2 and 36.1% of the GABA-IR and MOR-IR neurons, respectively, expressed FOS protein in their nuclei induced by injecting formalin into the left lower lip of the mouth. Most of the GABA/MOR, GABA/FOS, and MOR/FOS double-labeled neurons made close contacts with EM2-IR fibers and terminals. Immuno-electron microscopy confirmed that the EM2-IR terminals formed synapses with GABA-IR or MOR-IR dendritic processes and neuronal cell bodies in lamina II of the Vc. These results suggest that EM2 might participate in pain transmission and modulation by binding to MOR-IR and GABAergic inhibitory interneuron in lamina II of the Vc to exert inhibitory effect on the excitatory interneuron in lamina II and projection neurons in laminae I and III. PMID:25386121

  19. Sex differences in diazepam effects and parvalbumin-positive GABA neurons in trait anxiety Long Evans rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravenelle, Rebecca; Neugebauer, Nichole M; Niedzielak, Timothy; Donaldson, S Tiffany

    2014-08-15

    In clinical populations, prevalence rates for a number of anxiety disorders differ between males and females and gonadal hormones are thought to contribute to these differences. While these hormones have been shown to modulate the anxiolytic effects of the benzodiazepine agonist diazepam in some models, findings are inconsistent. Here, we tested for sex differences in response to anxiogenic stimuli following a 30-min diazepam (1.0mg/kg) pre-treatment in male and female rats showing high (HAn) and low (LAn) anxiety-like behavior on the elevated plus maze. Acute diazepam administration resulted in decreased anxiety-like behavior only in HAn males as demonstrated by a significant increase in percent open arm time in the elevated plus maze (EPM). Immunohistochemical analysis for parvalbumin (PV; a calcium-binding protein that selectively stains GABAergic neurons) in central amygdala (CeA), caudate putamen (CPu) and the hippocampus indicated the number of GABAergic interneurons in these areas differed across sex and anxiety trait. In the CPu, females had significantly more PV-immunoreactive (IR) cells than males, and LAn females had greater PV-IR neurons than HAn females. In the CeA, males displayed an increased number of PV-IR neurons compared to females, with no differences found between LAn and HAn. Further, trait differences were evident in the CA2 region of the hippocampus, regardless of sex. Taken together, these data suggest that gonadal hormones and trait anxiety may influence the sensitivity to the anti-anxiety effects of diazepam and these differences may be due in part to the distribution of GABA-containing interneurons.

  20. The canonical Notch pathway effector RBP-J regulates neuronal plasticity and expression of GABA transporters in hippocampal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuxi; Wang, Yue; Worley, Paul F; Mattson, Mark P; Gaiano, Nicholas

    2015-05-01

    Activation of the Notch pathway in neurons is essential for learning and memory in various species from invertebrates to mammals. However, it remains unclear how Notch signaling regulates neuronal plasticity, and whether the transcriptional regulator and canonical pathway effector RBP-J plays a role. Here, we report that conditional disruption of RBP-J in the postnatal hippocampus leads to defects in long-term potentiation, long-term depression, and in learning and memory. Using gene expression profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we identified two GABA transporters, GAT2 and BGT1, as putative Notch/RBP-J pathway targets, which may function downstream of RBP-J to limit the accumulation of GABA in the Schaffer collateral pathway. Our results reveal an essential role for canonical Notch/RBP-J signaling in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and suggest that role, at least in part, is mediated by the regulation of GABAergic signaling.

  1. Fluorescent indication that nitric oxide formation in NTS neurons is modulated by glutamate and GABA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajolla, Gisela P; Accorsi-Mendonça, Daniela; Rodrigues, Gerson J; Bendhack, Lusiane M; Machado, Benedito H; Lunardi, Claure N

    2009-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) in NTS plays an important role in regulating autonomic function to the cardiovascular system. Using the fluorescent dye DAF-2 DA, we evaluated the NO concentration in NTS. Brainstem slices of rats were loaded with DAF-2 DA, washed, fixed in paraformaldehyde and examined under fluorescent light. In different experimental groups, NTS slices were pre-incubated with 1 mM l-NAME (a non-selective NOS inhibitor), 1 mM d-NAME (an inactive enantiomere of l-NAME), 1 mM kynurenic acid (a non-selective ionotropic receptors antagonist) or 20 microM bicuculline (a selective GABAA receptors antagonist) before and during DAF-2 DA loading. Images were acquired using a confocal microscope and the intensity of fluorescence was quantified in three antero-posterior NTS regions. In addition, slices previously loaded with DAF-2 DA were incubated with NeuN or GFAP antibody. A semi-quantitative analysis of the fluorescence intensity showed that the basal NO concentration was similar in all antero-posterior aspects of the NTS (rostral intermediate, 15.5 +/- 0.8 AU; caudal intermediate, 13.2 +/- 1.4 AU; caudal commissural, 13.8 +/- 1.4 AU, n = 10). In addition, the inhibition of NOS and the antagonism of glutamatergic receptors decreased the NO fluorescence in the NTS. On the other hand, d-NAME did not affect the NO fluorescence and the antagonism of GABAA receptors increased the NO fluorescence in the NTS. It is important to note that the fluorescence for NO was detected mainly in neurons. These data show that the fluorescence observed after NTS loading with DAF-2 DA is a result of NO present in the NTS and support the concept that NTS neurons have basal NO production which is modulated by l-glutamate and GABA.

  2. Synthesis of neurotransmitter GABA via the neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle is elevated in rats with liver cirrhosis consistent with a high GABAergic tone in chronic hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leke, Renata; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Iversen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    J. Neurochem. (2011) 117, 824-832. ABSTRACT: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric complication to liver disease. It is known that ammonia plays a role in the pathogenesis of HE and disturbances in the GABAergic system have been related to HE. Synthesis of GABA occurs by decarboxylation...... the neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle, an energy-generating pathway, prior to being employed for GABA synthesis (the indirect pathway). We have previously shown that ammonia induces an elevation of the neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle activity. Thus, the aims of the present study were to determine...... if increased levels of ammonia increase GABA synthesis via the indirect pathway in a rat model of HE induced by bile-duct ligation and in co-cultures of neurons and astrocytes exposed to ammonia. Employing (13) C-labeled precursors and subsequent analysis by mass spectrometry, we demonstrated that more GABA...

  3. Dopamine D1-D2 receptor heteromer in dual phenotype GABA/glutamate-coexpressing striatal medium spiny neurons: regulation of BDNF, GAD67 and VGLUT1/2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa L Perreault

    Full Text Available In basal ganglia a significant subset of GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs coexpress D1 and D2 receptors (D1R and D2R along with the neuropeptides dynorphin (DYN and enkephalin (ENK. These coexpressing neurons have been recently shown to have a region-specific distribution throughout the mesolimbic and basal ganglia circuits. While the functional relevance of these MSNs remains relatively unexplored, they have been shown to exhibit the unique property of expressing the dopamine D1-D2 receptor heteromer, a novel receptor complex with distinct pharmacology and cell signaling properties. Here we showed that MSNs coexpressing the D1R and D2R also exhibited a dual GABA/glutamate phenotype. Activation of the D1R-D2R heteromer in these neurons resulted in the simultaneous, but differential regulation of proteins involved in GABA and glutamate production or vesicular uptake in the nucleus accumbens (NAc, ventral tegmental area (VTA, caudate putamen and substantia nigra (SN. Additionally, activation of the D1R-D2R heteromer in NAc shell, but not NAc core, differentially altered protein expression in VTA and SN, regions rich in dopamine cell bodies. The identification of a MSN with dual inhibitory and excitatory intrinsic functions provides new insights into the neuroanatomy of the basal ganglia and demonstrates a novel source of glutamate in this circuit. Furthermore, the demonstration of a dopamine receptor complex with the potential to differentially regulate the expression of proteins directly involved in GABAergic inhibitory or glutamatergic excitatory activation in VTA and SN may potentially provide new insights into the regulation of dopamine neuron activity. This could have broad implications in understanding how dysregulation of neurotransmission within basal ganglia contributes to dopamine neuronal dysfunction.

  4. Removal of GABA(A receptor γ2 subunits from parvalbumin neurons causes wide-ranging behavioral alterations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elli Leppä

    Full Text Available We investigated the behavioral significance of fast synaptic inhibition by αβγ2-type GABA(A receptors on parvalbumin (Pv cells. The GABA(A receptor γ2 subunit gene was selectively inactivated in Pv-positive neurons by Cre/loxP recombination. The resulting Pv-Δγ2 mice were relatively healthy in the first postnatal weeks; but then as Cre started to be expressed, the mice progressively developed wide-ranging phenotypic alterations including low body weight, motor deficits and tremor, decreased anxiety levels, decreased pain sensitivity and deficient prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex and impaired spatial learning. Nevertheless, the deletion was not lethal, and mice did not show increased mortality even after one year. Autoradiography with t-butylbicyclophosphoro[(35S]thionate suggested an increased amount of GABA(A receptors with only α and β subunits in central nervous system regions that contained high levels of parvalbumin neurons. Using BAC-transgenesis, we reduced some of the Pv-Δγ2 phenotype by selectively re-expressing the wild-type γ2 subunit back into some Pv cells (reticular thalamic neurons and cerebellar Pv-positive neurons. This produced less severe impairments of motor skills and spatial learning compared with Pv-Δγ2 mice, but all other deficits remained. Our results reveal the widespread significance of fast GABAergic inhibition onto Pv-positive neurons for diverse behavioral modalities, such as motor coordination, sensorimotor integration, emotional behavior and nociception.

  5. Metabotropic glutamate and GABA receptors modulate cellular excitability and glutamatergic transmission in chicken cochlear nucleus angularis neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Lu, Yong

    2017-03-01

    Neurons in the avian cochlear nucleus angularis (NA) receive glutamatergic input from the auditory nerve, and GABAergic input from the superior olivary nucleus. Physiologically heterogeneous, NA neurons perform multiple functions including encoding sound intensity information. Using in vitro whole-cell patch recordings from acute brain slices and immunohistochemistry staining, we investigated neuromodulation mediated by metabotropic glutamate and GABA receptors (mGluRs and GABABRs) in NA neurons. Based on their intrinsic firing patterns in response to somatic current injections, NA neurons were classified into onset, damped, and tonic cells. Pharmacological activation of group II mGluRs, group III mGluRs, and GABABRs, by their respective agonists, suppressed the cellular excitability of non-onset firing NA neurons. Each of these agonists inhibited the glutamatergic transmission in NA neurons, in a cell type-independent manner. The frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous release of glutamate was reduced by each of these agonists, suggesting that the modulation of the glutamatergic transmission was via presynaptic actions. Interestingly, activation of group I mGluRs increased cellular excitability and suppressed glutamatergic transmission in non-onset neurons. These results elaborate that auditory processing in NA neurons is subject to neuromodulation mediated by metabotropic receptors activated by native neurotransmitters released at NA.

  6. Alleviation of glutamate mediated neuronal insult by piroxicam in rodent model of focal cerebral ischemia: a possible mechanism of GABA agonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Pallab; Pandey, Anand Kumar; Paul, Sudip; Patnaik, Ranjana

    2014-12-01

    Neurotransmitter imbalance is an inevitable outcome in cerebral ischemia that leads to neuronal death. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of piroxicam, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), on extracellular brain glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release, survival time, and neuronal cell death. Transient focal cerebral ischemia in male Charles Foster rat led to neuronal infarction and compromised intrinsic antioxidant status. Thirty-minute preadministration of piroxicam (10 mg/kg b.w.) showed a significant (P piroxicam administration in stroke rat significantly reduced (P piroxicam attenuates extracellular glutamate release and also reduces neuronal cell death due to reduction in oxidative stress in cerebral ischemia. Our results also indicate a consequent increase of extracellular GABA in brain regions administered with piroxicam, which hints that piroxicam alleviates glutamate excitotoxicity possibly by GABA agonism.

  7. Multiple facets of GABAergic neurons and synapses: multiple fates of GABA signalling in epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossart, Rosa; Bernard, Christophe; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2005-02-01

    Because blocking GABAergic neurotransmission in control tissue generates seizures and because GABA boosters control epilepsy in many patients, studies on epilepsies have been dominated by the axiom that seizures are generated by a failure of GABA-mediated inhibition. However, GABAergic interneurons and synapses are heterogeneous and have many roles that go beyond the straightforward concept of "inhibition of the target". Operation of such a diversified system cannot be ascribed to a single mechanism. In epileptic tissue, GABAergic networks undergo complex rewiring at the anatomical, physiological and functional levels; GABAergic synapses are still operative but show unique features, including excitatory effects. Therefore, inhibition is not a uniform notion and the concept of "failure" of inhibition in epilepsies must be reassessed. Seizures are not generated in a normal circuit in which GABA-mediated inhibition is simply impaired, but in a profoundly rewired network in which several properties of GABA function are altered. This review is part of the TINS Interneuron Diversity series.

  8. Posttraumatic GABA(A)-mediated [Ca2+]i increase is essential for the induction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-dependent survival of mature central neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulga, Anastasia; Thomas-Crusells, Judith; Sigl, Thomas; Blaesse, Anne; Mestres, Pedro; Meyer, Michael; Yan, Qiao; Kaila, Kai; Saarma, Mart; Rivera, Claudio; Giehl, Klaus M

    2008-07-02

    A shift of GABA(A)-mediated responses from hyperpolarizing to depolarizing after neuronal injury leads to GABA(A)-mediated increase in [Ca2+](i). In addition, central neurons become dependent on BDNF for survival. Whether these two mechanisms are causally interrelated is an open question. Here, we show in lesioned CA3 hippocampal neurons in vitro and in axotomized corticospinal neurons in vivo that posttraumatic downregulation of the neuron-specific K-Cl cotransporter KCC2 leads to intracellular chloride accumulation by the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter NKCC1, resulting in GABA-induced [Ca2+](i) transients. This mechanism is required by a population of neurons to survive in a BDNF-dependent manner after injury, because blocking GABA(A)-depolarization with the NKCC1 inhibitor bumetanide prevents the loss of neurons on BDNF withdrawal. The resurgence of KCC2 expression during recovery coincides with loss of BDNF dependency for survival. This is likely mediated through BDNF itself, because injured neurons reverse their response to this neurotrophin by switching the BDNF-induced downregulation of KCC2 to upregulation.

  9. Mathematical Identification of a Neuronal Network Consisting of GABA and DA in Striatal Slices of the Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ramrath

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available High frequency stimulation (HFS has been used to treat various neurological and psychiatric diseases. Although further disorders are under investigation to extend the clinical application of HFS, the complex effect of HFS within a neuronal network is still unknown. Thus, it would be desirable to find a theoretical model that allows an estimation of the expected effect of applied HFS. Based on the neurochemical analysis of effects of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline, the D2-like receptor antagonist sulpiride and the D1-like receptor antagonist SCH-23390 on HFS evoked GABA and dopamine (DA release from striatal slices of the rat brain, a mathematical network model is proposed including the neurotransmitters GABA, DA and glutamate (GLU. The model reflects inhibitory and excitatory interactions of the neurotransmitters outflow in the presence of HFS. Under the assumption of linear interactions and static measurements, the model is expressed analytically. Numerical identification of inhibition and excitation is performed on a basis of real outflow levels of GABA and DA in the rat striatum. Results validate the nature of the proposed model. Therefore, this leads to an analytical model of the interactions within distinct neural network components of the rat striatum.

  10. Energy substrate availability as a determinant of neuronal resting potential, GABA signaling and spontaneous network activity in the neonatal cortex in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Carl D; Mukhtarov, Marat; Malkov, Anton E; Popova, Irina Y; Bregestovski, Piotr; Zilberter, Yuri

    2010-02-01

    While the ultimate dependence of brain function on its energy supply is evident, how basic neuronal parameters and network activity respond to energy metabolism deviations is unresolved. The resting membrane potential (E(m)) and reversal potential of GABA-induced anionic currents (E(GABA)) are among the most fundamental parameters controlling neuronal excitability. However, alterations of E(m) and E(GABA) under conditions of metabolic stress are not sufficiently documented, although it is well known that metabolic crisis may lead to neuronal hyper-excitability and aberrant neuronal network activities. In this work, we show that in slices, availability of energy substrates determines whether GABA signaling displays an inhibitory or excitatory mode, both in neonatal neocortex and hippocampus. We demonstrate that in the neonatal brain, E(m) and E(GABA) strongly depend on composition of the energy substrate pool. Complementing glucose with ketone bodies, pyruvate or lactate resulted in a significant hyperpolarization of both E(m) and E(GABA), and induced a radical shift in the mode of GABAergic synaptic transmission towards network inhibition. Generation of giant depolarizing potentials, currently regarded as the hallmark of spontaneous neonatal network activity in vitro, was strongly inhibited both in neocortex and hippocampus in the energy substrate enriched solution. Based on these results we suggest the composition of the artificial cerebrospinal fluid, which bears a closer resemblance to the in vivo energy substrate pool. Our results suggest that energy deficits induce unfavorable changes in E(m) and E(GABA), leading to neuronal hyperactivity that may initiate a cascade of pathological events.

  11. In Vivo Effect of a 5-HT7 Receptor Agonist on 5-HT Neurons and GABA Interneurons in the Dorsal Raphe Nuclei of Sham and PD Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Zhao, Yan; Gao, Jie; Guo, Yufang; Wang, Xiang; Huo, Jian; Wei, Ping; Cao, Jian

    2017-03-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) neurotransmission is severely affected by the degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Here, we report the effects of the systemic administration of the 5-HT7 receptor agonist AS-19. In sham rats, the mean response of the 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) to systemic AS-19 was excitatory and the mean response of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) interneurons was inhibitory. In Parkinson disease (PD) rats, the same dose did not affect the 5-HT neurons and only high doses (640 μg/kg intravenous) were able to the increase GABA interneuron activity. These results indicate that DRN 5-HT neurons and GABA interneurons are regulated by the activation of 5-HT7 receptors and that the degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway leads to decreased responses of these neurons to AS-19, which in turn suggests that the 5-HT7 receptors on 5-HT neurons and GABA interneurons in PD rats are dysfunctional and downregulated.

  12. Cell-type specific deletion of GABA(A)α1 in corticotropin-releasing factor-containing neurons enhances anxiety and disrupts fear extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafford, Georgette M; Guo, Ji-Dong; Flandreau, Elizabeth I; Hazra, Rimi; Rainnie, Donald G; Ressler, Kerry J

    2012-10-02

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is critical for the endocrine, autonomic, and behavioral responses to stressors, and it has been shown to modulate fear and anxiety. The CRF receptor is widely expressed across a variety of cell types, impeding progress toward understanding the contribution of specific CRF-containing neurons to fear dysregulation. We used a unique CRF-Cre driver transgenic mouse line to remove floxed GABA(A)α1 subunits specifically from CRF neurons [CRF-GABA(A)α1 KO]. This process resulted in mice with decreased GABA(A)α1 expression only in CRF neurons and increased CRF mRNA within the amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. These mice show normal locomotor and pain responses and no difference in depressive-like behavior or Pavlovian fear conditioning. However, CRF-GABA(A)α1 KO increased anxiety-like behavior and impaired extinction of conditioned fear, coincident with an increase in plasma corticosterone concentration. These behavioral impairments were rescued with systemic or BNST infusion of the CRF antagonist R121919. Infusion of Zolpidem, a GABA(A)α1-preferring benzodiazepine-site agonist, into the BNST of the CRF-GABA(A)α1 KO was ineffective at decreasing anxiety. Electrophysiological findings suggest a disruption in inhibitory current may play a role in these changes. These data indicate that disturbance of CRF containing GABA(A)α1 neurons causes increased anxiety and impaired fear extinction, both of which are symptoms diagnostic for anxiety disorders, such as posttraumatic stress disorder.

  13. Immunoreactivity for GABA, GAD65, GAD67 and Bestrophin-1 in the meninges and the choroid plexus: implications for non-neuronal sources for GABA in the developing mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiro Tochitani

    Full Text Available Neural progenitors in the developing neocortex, neuroepithelial cells and radial glial cells, have a bipolar shape with a basal process contacting the basal membrane of the meninge and an apical plasma membrane facing the lateral ventricle, which the cerebrospinal fluid is filled with. Recent studies revealed that the meninges and the cerebrospinal fluid have certain roles to regulate brain development. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA is a neurotransmitter which appears first during development and works as a diffusible factor to regulate the properties of neural progenitors. In this study, we examined whether GABA can be released from the meninges and the choroid plexus in the developing mouse brain. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and 67 (GAD65 and GAD67, both of which are GABA-synthesizing enzymes, are expressed in the meninges. The epithelial cells in the choroid plexus express GAD65. GABA immunoreactivity could be observed beneath the basal membrane of the meninge and in the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus. Expression analyses on Bestrophin-1, which is known as a GABA-permeable channel in differentiated glial cells, suggested that the cells in the meninges and the epithelial cells in the choroid plexus have the channels able to permeate non-synaptic GABA into the extracellular space. Further studies showed that GAD65/67-expressing meningeal cells appear in a manner with rostral to caudal and lateral to dorsal gradient to cover the entire neocortex by E14.5 during development, while the cells in the choroid plexus in the lateral ventricle start to express GAD65 on E11-E12, the time when the choroid plexus starts to develop in the developing brain. These results totally suggest that the meninges and the choroid plexus can work as non-neuronal sources for ambient GABA which can modulate the properties of neural progenitors during neocortical development.

  14. Immunoreactivity for GABA, GAD65, GAD67 and Bestrophin-1 in the meninges and the choroid plexus: implications for non-neuronal sources for GABA in the developing mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochitani, Shiro; Kondo, Shigeaki

    2013-01-01

    Neural progenitors in the developing neocortex, neuroepithelial cells and radial glial cells, have a bipolar shape with a basal process contacting the basal membrane of the meninge and an apical plasma membrane facing the lateral ventricle, which the cerebrospinal fluid is filled with. Recent studies revealed that the meninges and the cerebrospinal fluid have certain roles to regulate brain development. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a neurotransmitter which appears first during development and works as a diffusible factor to regulate the properties of neural progenitors. In this study, we examined whether GABA can be released from the meninges and the choroid plexus in the developing mouse brain. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and 67 (GAD65 and GAD67), both of which are GABA-synthesizing enzymes, are expressed in the meninges. The epithelial cells in the choroid plexus express GAD65. GABA immunoreactivity could be observed beneath the basal membrane of the meninge and in the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus. Expression analyses on Bestrophin-1, which is known as a GABA-permeable channel in differentiated glial cells, suggested that the cells in the meninges and the epithelial cells in the choroid plexus have the channels able to permeate non-synaptic GABA into the extracellular space. Further studies showed that GAD65/67-expressing meningeal cells appear in a manner with rostral to caudal and lateral to dorsal gradient to cover the entire neocortex by E14.5 during development, while the cells in the choroid plexus in the lateral ventricle start to express GAD65 on E11-E12, the time when the choroid plexus starts to develop in the developing brain. These results totally suggest that the meninges and the choroid plexus can work as non-neuronal sources for ambient GABA which can modulate the properties of neural progenitors during neocortical development.

  15. Distribution of GABA-ergic Neurons in the Rhesus Monkey Substantia Nigra%猕猴黑质GABA能神经元的分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董大翠; 蔡秋云; 姚大卫; 陈活彝

    2000-01-01

    The higher evolutive rhesus monkeys were used as experimental materials. GABA-ergic neurons were observed under a light microscope. The GABA-ergic neurons in the pars reticulata of substantion nigra were numerous, dominant in the shape of polygonal or shuttle. The GABA neurons in the pars compacta of substantia nigra were less than in the pars reticulata, with the shape dominant in polygonal, round or shuttle.Many GABA-like positive fibres were observed at the inferior colliculus level of substantia nigra.%采用进化程度较高的灵长类动物猕猴作为实验材料,在光镜下观察黑质的GABA能神经元。在黑质网状部GABA能神经元数量多,以多角形和梭形为主,致密部的GABA能神经元较网状部略稀少,胞体形态以多角形、圆形和梭形为主;在下丘平面还可见到许多GABA样阳性神经纤维。

  16. Selective expression of KCNS3 potassium channel α-subunit in parvalbumin-containing GABA neurons in the human prefrontal cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danko Georgiev

    Full Text Available The cognitive deficits of schizophrenia appear to be associated with altered cortical GABA neurotransmission in the subsets of inhibitory neurons that express either parvalbumin (PV or somatostatin (SST. Identification of molecular mechanisms that operate selectively in these neurons is essential for developing targeted therapeutic strategies that do not influence other cell types. Consequently, we sought to identify, in the human cortex, gene products that are expressed selectively by PV and/or SST neurons, and that might contribute to their distinctive functional properties. Based on previously reported expression patterns in the cortex of mice and humans, we selected four genes: KCNS3, LHX6, KCNAB1, and PPP1R2, encoding K(+ channel Kv9.3 modulatory α-subunit, LIM homeobox protein 6, K(+ channel Kvβ1 subunit, and protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 2, respectively, and examined their colocalization with PV or SST mRNAs in the human prefrontal cortex using dual-label in situ hybridization with (35S- and digoxigenin-labeled antisense riboprobes. KCNS3 mRNA was detected in almost all PV neurons, but not in SST neurons, and PV mRNA was detected in >90% of KCNS3 mRNA-expressing neurons. LHX6 mRNA was detected in almost all PV and >90% of SST neurons, while among all LHX6 mRNA-expressing neurons 50% expressed PV mRNA and >44% expressed SST mRNA. KCNAB1 and PPP1R2 mRNAs were detected in much larger populations of cortical neurons than PV or SST neurons. These findings indicate that KCNS3 is a selective marker of PV neurons, whereas LHX6 is expressed by both PV and SST neurons. KCNS3 and LHX6 might be useful for characterizing cell-type specific molecular alterations of cortical GABA neurotransmission and for the development of novel treatments targeting PV and/or SST neurons in schizophrenia.

  17. Selective expression of KCNS3 potassium channel α-subunit in parvalbumin-containing GABA neurons in the human prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Danko; González-Burgos, Guillermo; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Minabe, Yoshio; Lewis, David A; Hashimoto, Takanori

    2012-01-01

    The cognitive deficits of schizophrenia appear to be associated with altered cortical GABA neurotransmission in the subsets of inhibitory neurons that express either parvalbumin (PV) or somatostatin (SST). Identification of molecular mechanisms that operate selectively in these neurons is essential for developing targeted therapeutic strategies that do not influence other cell types. Consequently, we sought to identify, in the human cortex, gene products that are expressed selectively by PV and/or SST neurons, and that might contribute to their distinctive functional properties. Based on previously reported expression patterns in the cortex of mice and humans, we selected four genes: KCNS3, LHX6, KCNAB1, and PPP1R2, encoding K(+) channel Kv9.3 modulatory α-subunit, LIM homeobox protein 6, K(+) channel Kvβ1 subunit, and protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 2, respectively, and examined their colocalization with PV or SST mRNAs in the human prefrontal cortex using dual-label in situ hybridization with (35)S- and digoxigenin-labeled antisense riboprobes. KCNS3 mRNA was detected in almost all PV neurons, but not in SST neurons, and PV mRNA was detected in >90% of KCNS3 mRNA-expressing neurons. LHX6 mRNA was detected in almost all PV and >90% of SST neurons, while among all LHX6 mRNA-expressing neurons 50% expressed PV mRNA and >44% expressed SST mRNA. KCNAB1 and PPP1R2 mRNAs were detected in much larger populations of cortical neurons than PV or SST neurons. These findings indicate that KCNS3 is a selective marker of PV neurons, whereas LHX6 is expressed by both PV and SST neurons. KCNS3 and LHX6 might be useful for characterizing cell-type specific molecular alterations of cortical GABA neurotransmission and for the development of novel treatments targeting PV and/or SST neurons in schizophrenia.

  18. Studying cerebellar circuits by remote control of selected neuronal types with GABA-A receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Wisden

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Although GABA-A receptor-mediated inhibition of cerebellar Purkinje cells by molecular layer interneurons (MLIs has been studied intensely on the cellular level, it has remained unclear how this inhibition regulates cerebellum-dependent behaviour. We have implemented two complementary approaches to investigate the function of the MLI-Purkinje cell synapse on the behavioral level. In the first approach we permanently disrupted inhibitory fast synaptic transmission at the synapse by genetically removing the postsynaptic GABA-A receptors from Purkinje cells (PC-Δγ2 mice. We found that chronic disruption of the MLI-Purkinje cell synapse strongly impaired cerebellar learning of the vestibular occular reflex (VOR, presumably by disrupting the temporal patterns of Purkinje cell activity. However, in PC-Δγ2 mice the baseline VOR reflex was only mildly affected; indeed PC-Δγ2 mice showed no ataxia or gait abnormalities suggesting that MLI control of Purkinje cell activity is either not involved in ongoing motor tasks or that the system has found a way to compensate for its loss. To investigate the latter possibility we have developed an alternative genetic technique; we made the MLI-Purkinje cell synapse selectively sensitive to rapid manipulation with the GABAA receptor modulator zolpidem (PC-γ2-swap mice. Minutes after intraperitoneal zolpidem injection, these PC-γ2-swap mice developed severe motor abnormalities, revealing a substantial contribution of the MLI-Purkinje cell synapse to real time motor control. The cell-type selective permanent knockout of synaptic GABAergic input, and the fast reversible modulation of GABAergic input at the same synapse illustrate how pursuing both strategies gives a fuller view.

  19. GABA agonist induced changes in ultrastructure and GABA receptor expression in cerebellar granule cells is linked to hyperpolarization of the neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Schousboe, A

    1990-01-01

    treatment did not lead to formation of low affinity GABA receptors. Studies of the ultrastructure of the cells (4-day-old cultures) showed that exposure to bromide or valinomycin mimicked the ability of THIP to enhance the cytoplasmic density of rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, vesicles...

  20. Axonal sorting of Kir3.3 defines a GABA-containing neuron in the CA3 region of rodent hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Gisela; Eulitz, Dirk; Thiele, Theodor; Pahner, Ingrid; Schröter, Sascha; Takamori, Shigeo; Grosse, Johannes; Wickman, Kevin; Tapp, Rosemarie; Veh, Rüdiger W; Ottersen, Ole Petter; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun

    2003-11-01

    Hippocampal interneurons comprise a heterogeneous group of locally acting GABAergic neurons. In addition to their variability in cotransmitter content and receptor profile, they express a variety of potassium channels that specify their individual properties. Here we describe a new type of large GABA-containing neuron in rodent hippocampus that is characterized by an axonal sorting of the potassium channel Kir3.3. The parent cell bodies of the Kir3.3-positive axons are located in CA3, as assessed by primary cultures derived from hippocampal subareas. At postnatal day 14 these neurons appear at the border between stratum oriens and stratum pyramidale of CA3, from where their axons pass through stratum pyramidale to join the mossy fiber tract. In adult hippocampus, high levels of Kir3.3 channel protein exist in axons that run with the mossy fiber tract. Kir3.3 and the vesicular GABA transporter could be identified in subpopulations of large synaptic terminals that probably derive from Kir3.3 neurons. Axonal sorting of Kir3.3 appears to be typical of a group of large inhibitory neurons, including Purkinje cells and a novel type of interneuron in CA3. Kir3.3 neurons might modulate the activity of CA3 circuitries and consequently memory processing in the hippocampus.

  1. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA): a fast excitatory transmitter which may regulate the development of hippocampal neurones in early postnatal life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Y; Tseeb, V; Raggozzino, D; Khazipov, R; Gaiarsa, J L

    1994-01-01

    The properties of neonatal GABAergic synapses were investigated in neurones of the hippocampal CA3 region. GABA, acting on GABAA receptors, provides most of the excitatory drive on immature CA3 pyramidal neurones at an early stage of development, whereas glutamatergic synapses (in particular, those mediated by AMPA receptors) are mostly quiescent. Thus, during the first postnatal week of life, bicuculline fully blocked spontaneous and evoked depolarising potentials, and GABAA receptor agonists depolarised CA3 pyramidal neurones. GABAA mediated currents also had a reduced sensitivity to benzodiazepines. In the presence of bicuculline, between P0 and P4, increasing the stimulus strength reveals an excitatory postsynaptic potential which is mostly mediated by NMDA receptors. During the same developmental period, pre- (but not post) synaptic GABAB inhibition is present. Intracellular injections of biocytin showed that the axonal network of the GABAergic interneurones is well developed at birth, whereas the pyramidal recurrent collaterals are only beginning to develop. Finally, chronic bicuculline treatment of hippocampal neurones in culture reduced the extent of neuritic arborisation, suggesting that GABA acts as a trophic factor in that period. In conclusion, it is suggested that during the first postnatal week of life, when excitatory inputs are still poorly developed, GABAA receptors provide the excitatory drive necessary for pyramidal cell outgrowth. Starting from the end of the first postnatal week of life, when excitatory inputs are well developed, GABA (acting on both GABAA and GABAB receptors) will hyperpolarise the CA3 pyramidal neurones and, as in the adult, will prevent excessive neuronal discharges. Our electrophysiological and morphological studies have shown that hippocampal GABAergic interneurones are in a unique position to modulate the development of CA3 pyramidal neurones. Developing neurones require a certain degree of membrane depolarisation, and a

  2. The Memory-Impairing Effects of Septal GABA Receptor Activation Involve GABAergic Septo-Hippocampal Projection Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs-Kraft, Desiree L.; Wheeler, Marina G.; Parent, Marise B.

    2007-01-01

    Septal infusions of the [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA)[subscript A] agonist muscimol impair memory, and the effect likely involves the hippocampus. GABA[subscript A] receptors are present on the perikarya of cholinergic and GABAergic septo-hippocampal (SH) projections. The current experiments determined whether GABAergic SH projections are…

  3. Comparative density of CCK- and PV-GABA cells within the cortex and hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul David Whissell

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cholecystokinin (CCK- and parvalbumin (PV-expressing neurons constitute the two major populations of perisomatic GABAergic neurons in the cortex and the hippocampus. As CCK- and PV-GABA neurons differ in an array of morphological, biochemical and electrophysiological features, it has been proposed that they form distinct inhibitory ensembles which differentially contribute to network oscillations and behaviour. However, the relationship and balance between CCK- and PV-GABA neurons in the inhibitory networks of the brain is currently unclear as the distribution of these cells has never been compared on a large scale. Here, we systemically investigated the distribution of CCK- and PV-GABA cells across a wide number of discrete forebrain regions using an intersectional genetic approach. Our analysis revealed several novel trends in the distribution of these cells. While PV-GABA cells were more abundant overall, CCK-GABA cells outnumbered PV-GABA cells in several subregions of the hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex and ventrolateral temporal cortex. Interestingly, CCK-GABA cells were relatively more abundant in secondary/association areas of the cortex (V2, S2, M2, and AudD/AudV than they were in corresponding primary areas (V1, S1, M1 and Aud1. The reverse trend was observed for PV-GABA cells. Our findings suggest that the balance between CCK- and PV-GABA cells in a given cortical region is related to the type of processing that area performs; inhibitory networks in the secondary cortex tend to favour the inclusion of CCK-GABA cells more than networks in the primary cortex. The intersectional genetic labelling approach employed in the current study expands upon the ability to study molecularly defined subsets of GABAergic neurons. This technique can be applied to the investigation of neuropathologies which involve disruptions to the GABAergic system, including schizophrenia, stress, maternal immune activation and autism.

  4. Acetylcholine, GABA and neuronal networks: a working hypothesis for compensations in the dystrophic brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Erez James; Quarta, Eros; Fulgenzi, Gianluca; Minciacchi, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a genetic disease arising from a mutation in the dystrophin gene, is characterized by muscle failure and is often associated with cognitive deficits. Studies of the dystrophic brain on the murine mdx model of DMD provide evidence of morphological and functional alterations in the central nervous system (CNS) possibly compatible with the cognitive impairment seen in DMD. However, while some of the alterations reported are a direct consequence of the absence of dystrophin, others seem to be associated only indirectly. In this review we reevaluate the literature in order to formulate a possible explanation for the cognitive impairments associated with DMD. We present a working hypothesis, demonstrated as an integrated neuronal network model, according to which within the cascade of events leading to cognitive impairments there are compensatory mechanisms aimed to maintain functional stability via perpetual adjustments of excitatory and inhibitory components. Such ongoing compensatory response creates continuous perturbations that disrupt neuronal functionality in terms of network efficiency. We have theorized that in this process acetylcholine and network oscillations play a central role. A better understating of these mechanisms could provide a useful diagnostic index of the disease's progression and, perhaps, the correct counterbalance of this process might help to prevent deterioration of the CNS in DMD. Furthermore, the involvement of compensatory mechanisms in the CNS could be extended beyond DMD and possibly help to clarify other physio-pathological processes of the CNS.

  5. Neuronal chloride accumulation and excitatory GABA underlie aggravation of neonatal epileptiform activities by phenobarbital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardou, Romain; Yamamoto, Sumii; Chazal, Geneviève; Bhar, Asma; Ferrand, Nadine; Dulac, Olivier; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Khalilov, Ilgam

    2011-04-01

    Phenobarbital produces its anti-epileptic actions by increasing the inhibitory drive of γ-aminobutyric acid. However, following recurrent seizures, γ-aminobutyric acid excites neurons because of a persistent increase of chloride raising the important issue of whether phenobarbital could aggravate persistent seizures. Here we compared the actions of phenobarbital on initial and established ictal-like events in an in vitro model of mirror focus. Using the in vitro three-compartment chamber preparation with the two hippocampi and their commissural fibres placed in three different chambers, kainate was applied to one hippocampus and phenobarbital contralaterally, either after one ictal-like event or after many recurrent ictal-like events that produce an epileptogenic mirror focus. Field, perforated patch and single-channel recordings were used to determine the effects of γ-aminobutyric acid and their modulation by phenobarbital, and alterations of the chloride cotransporters were investigated using sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter 1 and potassium chloride cotransporter 2 antagonists, potassium chloride cotransporter 2 immunocytochemistry and sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter 1 knockouts. Phenobarbital reduced initial ictal-like events and prevented the formation of a mirror focus when applied from the start. In contrast, phenobarbital aggravated epileptiform activities when applied after many ictal-like events by enhancing the excitatory actions of γ-aminobutyric acid due to increased chloride. The accumulation of chloride and the excitatory actions of γ-aminobutyric acid in mirror foci neurons are mediated by the sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter 1 chloride importer and by downregulation and internalization of the chloride-exporter potassium-chloride cotransporter 2. Finally, concomitant applications of the sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter 1 antagonist bumetanide and phenobarbital decreased excitatory actions of γ-aminobutyric acid and

  6. Toward dissecting the etiology of schizophrenia: HDAC1 and DAXX regulate GAD67 expression in an in vitro hippocampal GABA neuron model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subburaju, S; Coleman, A J; Ruzicka, W B; Benes, F M

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is associated with GABA neuron dysfunction in the hippocampus, particularly the stratum oriens of sector CA3/2. A gene expression profile analysis of human postmortem hippocampal tissue followed by a network association analysis had shown a number of genes differentially regulated in SZ, including the epigenetic factors HDAC1 and DAXX. To characterize the contribution of these factors to the developmental perturbation hypothesized to underlie SZ, lentiviral vectors carrying short hairpin RNA interference (shRNAi) for HDAC1 and DAXX were used. In the hippocampal GABA neuron culture model, HiB5, transduction with HDAC1 shRNAi showed a 40% inhibition of HDAC1 mRNA and a 60% inhibition of HDAC1 protein. GAD67, a enzyme associated with GABA synthesis, was increased twofold (mRNA); the protein showed a 35% increase. The expression of DAXX, a co-repressor of HDAC1, was not influenced by HDAC1 inhibition. Transduction of HiB5 cells with DAXX shRNAi resulted in a 30% inhibition of DAXX mRNA that translated into a 90% inhibition of DAXX protein. GAD1 mRNA was upregulated fourfold, while its protein increased by ~30%. HDAC1 expression was not altered by inhibition of DAXX. However, a physical interaction between HDAC1 and DAXX was demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation. Inhibition of HDAC1 or DAXX increased expression of egr-1, transcription factor that had previously been shown to regulate the GAD67 promoter. Our in vitro results point to a key role of both HDAC1 and DAXX in the regulation of GAD67 in GABAergic HiB5 cells, strongly suggesting that these epigenetic/transcription factors contribute to mechanisms underlying GABA cell dysfunction in SZ. PMID:26812044

  7. Toward dissecting the etiology of schizophrenia: HDAC1 and DAXX regulate GAD67 expression in an in vitro hippocampal GABA neuron model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subburaju, S; Coleman, A J; Ruzicka, W B; Benes, F M

    2016-01-26

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is associated with GABA neuron dysfunction in the hippocampus, particularly the stratum oriens of sector CA3/2. A gene expression profile analysis of human postmortem hippocampal tissue followed by a network association analysis had shown a number of genes differentially regulated in SZ, including the epigenetic factors HDAC1 and DAXX. To characterize the contribution of these factors to the developmental perturbation hypothesized to underlie SZ, lentiviral vectors carrying short hairpin RNA interference (shRNAi) for HDAC1 and DAXX were used. In the hippocampal GABA neuron culture model, HiB5, transduction with HDAC1 shRNAi showed a 40% inhibition of HDAC1 mRNA and a 60% inhibition of HDAC1 protein. GAD67, a enzyme associated with GABA synthesis, was increased twofold (mRNA); the protein showed a 35% increase. The expression of DAXX, a co-repressor of HDAC1, was not influenced by HDAC1 inhibition. Transduction of HiB5 cells with DAXX shRNAi resulted in a 30% inhibition of DAXX mRNA that translated into a 90% inhibition of DAXX protein. GAD1 mRNA was upregulated fourfold, while its protein increased by ~30%. HDAC1 expression was not altered by inhibition of DAXX. However, a physical interaction between HDAC1 and DAXX was demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation. Inhibition of HDAC1 or DAXX increased expression of egr-1, transcription factor that had previously been shown to regulate the GAD67 promoter. Our in vitro results point to a key role of both HDAC1 and DAXX in the regulation of GAD67 in GABAergic HiB5 cells, strongly suggesting that these epigenetic/transcription factors contribute to mechanisms underlying GABA cell dysfunction in SZ.

  8. Distribution of synapses on two local auditory interneurones, ON1 and ON2, in the prothoracic ganglion of the cricket: relationships with GABA-immunoreactive neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, A H; Hardt, M

    1996-02-01

    In the prothoracic ganglia of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus two local auditory interneurones, ON1 and ON2, were labelled for electron microscopy by intracellular injection of horseradish peroxidase following physiological characterisation. The neurones branch in the median ventral association centre and the root of nerve 5 on both sides of the ganglion. As they are very similar in shape and position they may share a common embryological origin. Differences are found in the details of the fine branching pattern and in their physiology as ON1 is tuned particularly to low sound frequencies of 4-5 kHz whereas ON2 is more sensitive to frequencies above 8 kHz. Although the ON1 neurones inhibit each other and are involved in the inhibition of other auditory neurones they were not labelled by antibodies against the inhibitory transmitter GABA and their vesicles differ significantly from those in neurones that are. The same is true of the ON2 neurones whose vesicles also differ significantly from those in ON1 supporting light-microscope evidence that they may use different transmitters. The distribution of input and output synapses on the ipsilateral and contralateral branches of ON1 and ON2, and the proportion of the synapses made from and onto neuropilar processes immunoreactive for GABA was determined. In ON1 94% of the input synapses were received on the ipsilateral branches and 62% of the outputs made from the contralateral branches. This confirms previous physiological evidence that input is received ipsilaterally and output made contralaterally but the presence of some contralateral input and a significant ipsilateral output was unsuspected. Thirty percent of the input synapses on the ipsilateral side and 75% on the contralateral side were made from GABA-immunoreactive processes but processes postsynaptic to ON1 were rarely immunoreactive. The distribution of input synapses on ON2 was similar with 90% received on ipsilateral branches but a higher proportion of

  9. Regulation of GABA transporter GAT-1 in neuronal cells : role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and adenosine

    OpenAIRE

    Vaz, Sandra Cristina Henriques, 1978-

    2011-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Ciências Biomédicas (Neurociências), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Medicina, 2011 Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the predominant inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Its activity at the synapse is terminated by re-uptake into nerve terminals and astrocytes, through membrane located specific GABA transporters (GATs), which therefore shape GABAergic transmission. There are three main high affinity subtypes of GATs, GAT-1, GAT-2 and GAT-3,...

  10. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and neuropeptides in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damelio, F.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid and the neuropeptides substance P and Met-enkephalin in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMNV), and lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Glutamic acid decarboxylase immunoreactive (GAD-IR) terminals and fibers were observed in the AP and particularly in the ASP. A gradual decrease in the density of terminals was seen towards the solitary complex. The DMNV revealed irregularly scattered GAD-IR terminals within the neuropil or closely surrounding neuronal cell bodies. The LVN, particularly the dorsal division, showed numerous axon terminals which were mostly localize around large neurons and their proximal dendrites. Substance P immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed high density in the solitary complex, in particular within the lateral division. The ASP showed medium to low density of SP-IR fibers and terminals. The AP exhibited a small number of fibers and terminals irregularly distributed. The DMNV revealed a high density of SP-IR terminals and fibers that were mainly concentrated in the periphery. Very few terminals were detected in the LVN. Met-enkephalin immunoreactive (Met-Enk-IR) fibers and terminals showed high density and uniform distribution in the DMNV. Scattered terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, and NTS (particularly the lateral division). The very few fibers were observed in the LVN surrounded the neuronal cell bodies. The present report is part of a study designed to investigate the interaction between neuropeptides and conventional neurotransmitters under conditions producing motion sickness and in the process of sensory-motor adaptation.

  11. Effect of phosphatidylserine on the basal and GABA-activated Cl- permeation across single nerve membranes from rabbit Deiters' neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapallino, M.V.; Cupello, A.; Mainardi, P.; Besio, G.; Loeb, C.W. (Centro di Studio per la Neurofisiologia Cerebrale, C.N.R., Genova (Italy))

    1990-06-01

    The permeation of labeled Cl- ions across single plasma membranes from Deiters' neurons has been studied in the presence of various concentrations of phosphatidylserine (PS) on their extracellular side. PS reduces significantly basal Cl- permeation only at 10(-5) M on the membrane exterior. No effect was found at other concentrations. GABA activable 36Cl- permeation is heavily reduced and almost abolished at 10(-11) - 10(-5) M phosphatidylserine. This exogenous phosphatidylserine effect is difficult to interpret in relation to the function of the endogenous phospholipid. However, it may be involved in the epileptogenic effect in vivo of exogenous phosphatidylserine administration to rats.

  12. Single rodent mesohabenular axons release glutamate and GABA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, David H.; Mejias-Aponte, Carlos; Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Huiling; Hoffman, Alexander F.; Lupica, Carl R.; Morales, Marisela

    2016-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is involved in reward, aversion, addiction, and depression, through descending interactions with several brain structures, including the ventral tegmental area (VTA). VTA provides reciprocal inputs to LHb, but their actions are unclear. Here we show that the majority of rat and mouse VTA neurons innervating LHb co-express markers for both glutamate-signaling (vesicular glutamate transporter 2, VGluT2) and GABA-signaling (glutamate decarboxylase, GAD; and vesicular GABA transporter, VGaT). A single axon from these mesohabenular neurons co-expresses VGluT2-protein and VGaT-protein, and surprisingly establishes symmetric and asymmetric synapses on LHb neurons. In LHb slices, light activation of mesohabenular fibers expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) driven by VGluT2 or VGaT promoters elicits release of both glutamate and GABA onto single LHb neurons. In vivo light-activation of mesohabenular terminals inhibits or excites LHb neurons. Our findings reveal an unanticipated type of VTA neuron that co-transmits glutamate and GABA, and provides the majority of mesohabenular inputs. PMID:25242304

  13. The glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2006-01-01

    Neurons are metabolically handicapped in the sense that they are not able to perform de novo synthesis of neurotransmitter glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from glucose. A metabolite shuttle known as the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle describes the release of neurotransmitter glutamate....... Discussions of stoichiometry, the relative role of glutamate vs. GABA and pathological conditions affecting the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycling are presented. Furthermore, a section is devoted to the accompanying ammonia homeostasis of the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle, examining the possible means...... of intercellular transfer of ammonia produced in neurons (when glutamine is deamidated to glutamate) and utilized in astrocytes (for amidation of glutamate) when the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle is operating. A main objective of this review is to endorse the view that the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle must...

  14. Non-GABA(A)-mediated effects of lindane on neurite development and intracellular free calcium ion concentration in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, C A; Audesirk, G

    1995-04-01

    Changes in transmembrane Ca(2+) fluxes and intracellular free Ca(2+) ion concentrations ([Ca(2+)](in)) regulate many aspects of neurite development in cultured neurons. Lindane has been shown to increase [Ca(2+)](in) in several cell types. It was therefore hypothesized that lindane exposure would increase [Ca(2+)](in) and thereby alter neurite development in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. The study reported here showed that lindane (50-100 muM) increased [Ca(2+)](in) during short-term exposure (up to 4 hr); in contrast, with long-term exposure (24-48 hr) lindane (1-50 mum) decreased [Ca(2+)](in) significantly below control levels. Lindane decreased neurite initiation at high concentrations (25 mum or above). Lindane increased dendrite number at low concentrations (0.5-1 muM), but decreased dendrite number at high concentrations (50 mum or above). Lindane decreased axon and dendrite elongation and branching at 50 mum. Loading neurons with 1 mum 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), a calcium chelator that partially 'clamps' [Ca(2+)](in), eliminated the effects of 50 mum lindane on [Ca(2+)](in) in short-term exposures. BAPTA did not significantly reverse the inhibition of neurite initiation or axonal elongation caused by 50 mum lindane. However, BAPTA partially reversed the inhibition of dendrite elongation and completely reversed the inhibition of axon and dendrite branching caused by 50 mum lindane. Therefore, some, but not all, of lindane's effects on neurite development may be due to changes in [Ca(2+)](in). Picrotoxin, a gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A))-associated chloride channel antagonist, had no effect on [Ca(2+)](in) or any parameters of neurite growth, suggesting that the effects of lindane on neurite development and [Ca(2+)](in) were not mediated through actions on GABA(A)-associated chloride channels.

  15. Relating normalization to neuronal populations across cortical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Douglas A; Alberts, Joshua J; Cohen, Marlene R

    2016-09-01

    Normalization, which divisively scales neuronal responses to multiple stimuli, is thought to underlie many sensory, motor, and cognitive processes. In every study where it has been investigated, neurons measured in the same brain area under identical conditions exhibit a range of normalization, ranging from suppression by nonpreferred stimuli (strong normalization) to additive responses to combinations of stimuli (no normalization). Normalization has been hypothesized to arise from interactions between neuronal populations, either in the same or different brain areas, but current models of normalization are not mechanistic and focus on trial-averaged responses. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying normalization, we examined interactions between neurons that exhibit different degrees of normalization. We recorded from multiple neurons in three cortical areas while rhesus monkeys viewed superimposed drifting gratings. We found that neurons showing strong normalization shared less trial-to-trial variability with other neurons in the same cortical area and more variability with neurons in other cortical areas than did units with weak normalization. Furthermore, the cortical organization of normalization was not random: neurons recorded on nearby electrodes tended to exhibit similar amounts of normalization. Together, our results suggest that normalization reflects a neuron's role in its local network and that modulatory factors like normalization share the topographic organization typical of sensory tuning properties.

  16. Synaptic organization of substance P, glutamate and GABA-immunoreactive boutons on functionally identified neurons in cat spinal deeper dorsal horn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏锋; 赵志奇

    1997-01-01

    In order to determine how nociceptive input conveyed by the C-fibers terminating in superficial lam-inae of the spinal cord reaches the wide dynamic range (WDR) cells in deeper dorsal horn, which functions as ascend-ing projection pathway, the morphological features of some WDR cells in the deeper dorsal horn of the cat lumbar spinal cord were studied by intracellular injection of horseradish peroxidase and physiological characterization. One of the fully stained neurons with somata in lamina V and dendrites that entered lamina Ⅱ were examined by electron mi-croscopy. Immunogold staining of ultrathin sections through the labeled proximal dendrites in lamina Ⅱ revealed that these dendrites received numerous synapses from substance P and glutamate immunoreactive (IR) axons, which were considered originating from C-fibers. In addition, many GABA-IR terminals were found presynaptic to the labeled dendrites. The results, therefore, suggest that the information carried by primary afferent can be sent from t

  17. Modulatory effects of gonadorelin on GABA-induced depolarization and GABA-activated current in rat spinal ganglion neurons%戈那瑞林对大鼠脊神经节细胞GABA引起的去极化及GABA激活电流的调制作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周小萍; 吴晓平; 关兵才; 李之望

    1996-01-01

    目的:探索戈那瑞林对大鼠初级感觉神经元膜GABA引起的去极化和GABA激活电流的调制作用.方法:应用细胞内记录和全细胞膜片钳技术分别在大鼠脊神经节(SG)标本和新鲜分离神经元进行实验.结果:GABA(10μmol·L-1-1mmol·L-1)在大多数神经元引起可为荷包牡丹碱(100 μmol·L-1)所阻断的膜去极化.预加戈那瑞林(50 μmol·L-1)可减少GABA引起的去极化,抑制率为79±22%(n=29),而戈那瑞林本身不产生膜反应或只引起轻微去极化.在11个细胞中有6个细胞GABA激活电流也为戈那瑞林的预处理所抑制,另5个细胞无改变或反应稍有增加.结论:戈那瑞林对初级感觉神经元GABA介导的去极化和GABA激活电流具有抑制作用.%AIM: To explore the modulatory effects of gonadorelin on GABA-induced depolarization and GABA-activated current in membrane of rat primary sensory neurons. METHODS: Intracellular recordings and whole-cell patch clamp techniques were performed on neurons in rat spinal ganglia (SG) preparation and neurons freshly isolated from rat SG, respectively. Drugs were applied by superfusion and/or by bath application.RESULTS: In the majority of neurons GABA (10tion, which was blocked by bicucullin (100 μmol tion by 79±22 % (n=29), while gonadorelin elicited no effect or slight depolarization alone.In 6 of 11 cells, GABA-activated currents were also inhibited by pretreatment with gonadorelin no change or a slight potentiation. CONCLUSION: Gonadorelin exerts an inhibitory effect on GABA-induced depolarization and GABA-activated current in the primary sensory neurons.

  18. GABA localization in the nematode Ascaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guastella, J.

    1988-01-01

    A histochemical approach was used to examine the distribution of GABA-associated neurons in the nematode Ascaris, an organism whose small number of morphologically simple neurons make it an excellent preparation for analyzing neuronal phenotypes. Two GABAergic markers were examined: GABA-like immunoreactivity (GLIR), a marker for endogenous stores of GABA; and ({sup 3}H)-GABA uptake, a marker for GABA uptake sites. Strong GLIR was present in the cell bodies, neurites and commissures of dorsal and ventral inhibitory motorneurons present in this region. Strong GLIR was also present in the cell bodies and processes of the four RME neurons in the nerve ring and in several other ganglionic neurons. Staining was absent in excitatory motorneurons, in ventral cord interneurons and in muscle cells and hypodermis. GABA uptake sites were found in single neural processes in both the ventral and dorsal nerve cords. ({sup 3}H)-GABA labeling was also observed in the other two RME cells and several other cephalic neurons. Four putative cholinergic excitatory motorneurons in the retrovesicular ganglion (RVG) were heavily labeled. Ventral and dorsal nerve cord inhibitory motorneurons did not take up ({sup 3}H)-GABA. Labeling of the ventral cord excitatory motorneuron somata and cell bodies was at or slightly above background. Heavy labeling of muscle cells was also observed.

  19. GABA B receptor subunit expression in glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, K J; Deuchars, J; Davies, C H; Pangalos, M N

    2003-09-01

    GABA(B) receptor subunits are widely expressed on neurons throughout the CNS, at both pre- and postsynaptic sites, where they mediate the late, slow component of the inhibitory response to the major inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. The existence of functional GABA(B) receptors on nonneuronal cells has been reported previously, although the molecular composition of these receptors has not yet been described. Here we demonstrate for the first time, using immunohistochemistry the expression of GABA(B1a), GABA(B1b), and GABA(B2) on nonneuronal cells of the rat CNS. All three principle GABA(B) receptor subunits were expressed on these cells irrespective of whether they had been cultured or found within brain tissue sections. At the ultrastructural level GABA(B) receptor subunits were expressed on astrocytic processes surrounding both symmetrical and assymetrical synapses in the CA1 subregion of the hippocampus. In addition, GABA(B1a), GABA(B1b), and GABA(B2) receptor subunits were expressed on activated microglia in culture but were not found on myelin forming oligodendrocytes in the white matter of rat spinal cord. Together these data demonstrate that the obligate subunits of functional GABA(B) receptors are expressed in astrocytes and microglia in the rat CNS.

  20. MODULATORY EFFECT OF CAFFEINE ON GABA-ACTIVATED CURRENT FROM ACUTELY ISOLATED RAT DORSAL ROOT GANGLION NEURONS%咖啡因对急性分离大鼠DRG神经元GABA-激活电流的调制作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李韶; 孙长凯; 张健; 李爱萍; 朴花; 李之望

    2007-01-01

    应用全细胞膜片钳记录大鼠新鲜分离背根神经节(DRG)神经元GABA-激活电流,观察咖啡因对GABA-激活电流(IGABA)的调制作用.结果显示:大部分受检细胞(97.4%,113/116) 对外加GABA敏感.1-1000 μmol/L GABA引起一剂量依赖性、有明显去敏感作用的内向电流.预加咖啡因(0.01-100 μmol/L)30 s后再加GABA能明显抑制GABA(100 μmol/L )激活电流的幅值.预加咖啡因后GABA量效曲线明显下移;GABA-激活电流的最大值较之对照下降约57%;而Kd值(30 μmol/L)几乎不变.该结果提示此种抑制为非竞争性的.预加氨茶碱(theophylline)亦可明显抑制GABA激活电流,同一浓度(10 μmol/L)下氨茶碱的抑制作用较咖啡因的抑制作用强.预加安定(diazepam, 1 μmol/L)对GABA(10 μmol/L )激活电流有增强作用,而预加咖啡因(10 μmol/L )有拮抗安定增强IGABA的作用.胞内透析H-8后,几乎可以完全消除咖啡因对IGABA的抑制作用.本结果表明咖啡因在初级传入末稍可能产生对抗突触前抑制的效应.%Whole-cell patch clamp technique was performed on acutely isolated rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons to investigate the modulatory effect of caffeine on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-activated currents (IGABA). The results showed that the majority of the neurons examined (97.4%, 113/116) were sensitive to GABA. 1-1000 μmol/L GABA activated a concentration-dependent inward current which manifested obvious desensitization. After the neurons were treated with caffeine (0.01-100 μmol/L) prior to the application of GABA (100 μmol/L) for 30 s, GABA-activated membrane currents were obviously inhibited. Caffeine shifted the GABA dose-response curve downward and decreased the maximum response to 57% without changing Kd value. These results indicate that the inhibitory effect is non-competitive. Theophylline showed a similar and stronger inhibitory effect on IGABA. The pretreatment with caffeine (10 μmol/L) inhibited IGABA, which was

  1. The role of GABA(A) receptors in the development of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoch, Mary-Anne

    2008-07-01

    Alcoholism is a common, heritable, chronic relapsing disorder. GABA(A) receptors undergo allosteric modulation by ethanol, anesthetics, benzodiazepines and neurosteroids and have been implicated in the acute as well as the chronic effects of ethanol including tolerance, dependence and withdrawal. Medications targeting GABA(A) receptors ameliorate the symptoms of acute withdrawal. Ethanol induces plasticity in GABA(A) receptors: tolerance is associated with generally decreased GABA(A) receptor activation and differentially altered subunit expression. The dopamine (DA) mesolimbic reward pathway originating in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and interacting stress circuitry play an important role in the development of addiction. VTA GABAergic interneurons are the primary inhibitory regulators of DA neurons and a subset of VTA GABA(A) receptors may be implicated in the switch from heavy drinking to dependence. GABA(A) receptors modulate anxiety and response to stress; important elements of sustained drinking and relapse. The GABA(A) receptor subunit genes clustered on chromosome 4 are highly expressed in the reward pathway. Several recent studies have provided strong evidence that one of these genes, GABRA2, is implicated in alcoholism in humans. The influence of the interaction between ethanol and GABA(A) receptors in the reward pathway on the development of alcoholism together with genetic and epigenetic vulnerabilities will be explored in this review.

  2. Excitatory GABA in rodent developing neocortex in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheims, Sylvain; Minlebaev, Marat; Ivanov, Anton; Represa, Alfonso; Khazipov, Rustem; Holmes, Gregory L; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Zilberter, Yuri

    2008-08-01

    GABA depolarizes immature cortical neurons. However, whether GABA excites immature neocortical neurons and drives network oscillations as in other brain structures remains controversial. Excitatory actions of GABA depend on three fundamental parameters: the resting membrane potential (Em), reversal potential of GABA (E(GABA)), and threshold of action potential generation (Vthr). We have shown recently that conventional invasive recording techniques provide an erroneous estimation of these parameters in immature neurons. In this study, we used noninvasive single N-methyl-d-aspartate and GABA channel recordings in rodent brain slices to measure both Em and E(GABA) in the same neuron. We show that GABA strongly depolarizes pyramidal neurons and interneurons in both deep and superficial layers of the immature neocortex (P2-P10). However, GABA generates action potentials in layer 5/6 (L5/6) but not L2/3 pyramidal cells, since L5/6 pyramidal cells have more depolarized resting potentials and more hyperpolarized Vthr. The excitatory GABA transiently drives oscillations generated by L5/6 pyramidal cells and interneurons during development (P5-P12). The NKCC1 co-transporter antagonist bumetanide strongly reduces [Cl(-)]i, GABA-induced depolarization, and network oscillations, confirming the importance of GABA signaling. Thus a strong GABA excitatory drive coupled with high intrinsic excitability of L5/6 pyramidal neurons and interneurons provide a powerful mechanism of synapse-driven oscillatory activity in the rodent neocortex in vitro. In the companion paper, we show that the excitatory GABA drives layer-specific seizures in the immature neocortex.

  3. Demonstration of extensive GABA synthesis in the small population of GAD positive neurons in cerebellar cultures by the use of pharmacological tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnewald, Ursula; Kortner, Trond M; Qu, Hong

    2006-01-01

    Cultures of dissociated cerebella from 7-day-old mice were maintained in vitro for 1-13 days. GABA biosynthesis and degradation were studied during development in culture and pharmacological agents were used to identify the enzymes involved. The amount of GABA increased, whereas that of glutamate...

  4. Electrical stimulation of the substantia nigra reticulata : Detection of neuronal extracellular GABA in the ventromedial thalamus and its regulatory mechanism using microdialysis in awake rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, W; Westerink, BHC

    1997-01-01

    A combination of electrical stimulation and microdialysis was used to study the nigrothalamic gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic system and its regulatory mechanisms in awake rats. Extracellular GABA levels in the ventromedial nucleus of the thalamus were detected in S-min fractions collected befor

  5. Hippocampal GABA transporter distribution in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijns, O.; Karaca, U.; Andrade, P.; Nijs, L. de; Kusters, B.; Peeters, A.; Dings, J.; Pannek, H.; Ebner, A.; Rijkers, K.; Hoogland, G.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine hippocampal expression of neuronal GABA-transporter (GAT-1) and glial GABA-transporter (GAT-3) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and hippocampal sclerosis (HS). METHODS: Hippocampal sections were immunohistochemically stained for GABA-transporter 1 and GABA-transpor

  6. Neuroprotection of GluK1 kainate receptor agonist ATPA against ischemic neuronal injury through inhibiting GluK2 kainate receptor-JNK3 pathway via GABA(A) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qian; Liu, Yong; Han, Dong; Xu, Jing; Zong, Yan-Yan; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Guang-Yi

    2012-05-25

    It is well known that GluK2-containing kainate receptors play essential roles in seizure and cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal death, while GluK1-containing kainate receptors could increase tonic inhibition of post-synaptic pyramidal neurons. This research investigated whether GluK1 could inhibit activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3 (JNK3) signaling pathway mediated by the GluK2 in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. The results show that GluK1 activation by (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (ATPA) at 1nmol per rat could inhibit the assembly of GluK2·Postsynaptic density 95·mixed lineage kinase 3 signaling module, activation of JNK3 and its downstream signal molecules. However, the inhibition of ATPA could be prevented by GluK1 antagonist NS3763, GluK1 antisense, and GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline. In addition, ATPA played a neuroprotective role against cerebral ischemia. In sum, the findings indicate that activation of GluK1 by ATPA at specific dosages may promote GABA release, which then suppresses post-synaptic GluK2-JNK3 signaling-mediated cerebral ischemic injury via GABA(A)R.

  7. Action of bicyclic isoxazole GABA analogues on GABA transporters and its relation to anticonvulsant activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolvig, T; Larsson, O M; Pickering, D S;

    1999-01-01

    The inhibitory action of bicyclic isoxazole gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogues and their 4,4-diphenyl-3-butenyl (DPB) substituted derivatives has been investigated in cortical neurones and astrocytes as well as in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells transiently expressing either mouse GABA...... anticonvulsant activity, lack of proconvulsant activity and the ability of THPO to increase extracellular GABA concentration, indicate that these bicyclic isoxazole GABA analogues and their DPB derivatives may be useful lead structures in future search for new antiepileptic drugs....

  8. Age-related Hearing Loss: GABA, Nicotinic Acetylcholine and NMDA Receptor Expression Changes in Spiral Ganglion Neurons of the Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaolan; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Ding, Bo; Walton, Joseph P.; Frisina, Robert D.; Su, Jiping

    2014-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss – presbycusis – is the number one communication disorder and most prevalent neurodegenerative condition of our aged population. Although speech understanding in background noise is quite difficult for those with presbycusis, there are currently no biomedical treatments to prevent, delay or reverse this condition. A better understanding of the cochlear mechanisms underlying presbycusis will help lead to future treatments. Objectives of the present study were to investigate gamma-amino butyric acid A (GABAA) receptor subunit α1, nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor subunit β2, and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit NR1 mRNA and protein expression changes in spiral ganglion neurons of the CBA/CaJ mouse cochlea, that occur in age-related hearing loss, utilizing quantitative immunohistochemistry and semi-quantitative RT-PCR techniques. We found that auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds shifted over 40 dB from 3–48 kHz in old mice compared to young adults. DPOAE thresholds also shifted over 40 dB from 6–49 kHz in old mice, and their amplitudes were significantly decreased or absent in the same frequency range. Spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) density decreased with age in basal, middle and apical turns, and SGN density of the basal turn declined the most. A positive correlation was observed between SGN density and ABR wave 1 amplitude. mRNA and protein expression of GABAAR α1 and AChR β2 decreased with age in SGNs in the old mouse cochlea. mRNA and protein expression of NMDAR NR1 increased with age in SGNs of the old mice. These findings demonstrate that there are functionally-relevant age-related changes of GABAAR, nAChR, NMDAR expression in CBA mouse SGNs reflecting their degeneration, which may be related to functional changes in cochlear synaptic transmission with age, suggesting biological mechanisms for peripheral age-related hearing loss. PMID:24316061

  9. The effect of morphine sensitization on extracellular concentrations of GABA in dorsal hippocampus of male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmandfar, Maryam; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Kadivar, Mehdi; Karimian, Seyed Morteza; Naghdi, Nasser

    2011-11-01

    Repeated, intermittent exposure to drugs of abuse, such as morphine results in response enhancements to subsequent drug treatments, a phenomenon referred to as behavioral sensitization. As persistent neuronal sensitization may contribute to the long-lasting consequences of drug abuse, characterizing the neurochemical mechanisms of sensitization is providing insights into addiction. Although it has been shown that GABAergic systems in the CA1 region of dorsal hippocampus are involved in morphine sensitization, the alteration of extracellular level of GABA in this area in morphine sensitization has not been investigated. In the present study, using the in vivo microdialysis technique, we investigated the effect of morphine sensitization on extracellular GABA concentration in CA1 region of dorsal hippocampus of freely moving rats. Sensitization was induced by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of morphine, once daily for 3 days followed by 5 days free of the opioid treatment. The results showed that extracellular GABA concentration in CA1 was decreased following acute administration of morphine in non-sensitized rats. However, morphine-induced behavioral sensitization significantly increased the extracellular GABA concentration in this area. The enhancement of GABA in morphine sensitized rats was inhibited by administration of naloxone 30 min before each of three daily doses of morphine. These results suggest an adaptation of the GABAergic neuronal transmission in dorsal hippocampus induced by morphine sensitization and it is implied that opioid receptors may play an important role in this effect.

  10. Identification and functional evidence of GABAergic neurons in parts of the brain of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Jung; Nam, Ryoung-Hee; Yoo, Young Mi; Lee, Chang-Joong

    2004-01-23

    The distribution of GABA-containing neurons was studied in the brain of the adult zebrafish by Nissl staining and immunohistochemistry. GABA immunoreactivity (GABA-IR) was demonstrated in parts of the brain such as olfactory bulb (OB), telencephalon, tectum stratum, and in the hypothalamus. GABA-IR appeared in the area where Nissl-stained cell bodies were abundant. The internal cellular layer of the OB was most densely stained by Nissl staining, and also showed a high level of GABA-IR. The telencephalon and the hypothalamus revealed a similar pattern to the OB in terms of Nissl staining and GABA-IR. However, the distribution and shape of stained cells of the tectum stratum were distinct from those in other regions: Nissl-stained neurons were ubiquitously present throughout all cellular layers including the stratum griseum centrale, the stratum album centrale (SAC), and the stratum periventriculare (SP). However, GABA-IR was weakly expressed in a limited number of neurons only in the SAC and SP. Whether GABA serves as an inhibitory neurotransmitter was also tested in the isolated telencephalon preparation by using extracellular field potential recordings. The synaptic activity recorded in the posterior dorsal telencephalon in response to the electrical stimulation of the anterior dorsal telencephalon was increased in the presence of the GABAA receptor antagonist, BMI, suggesting an inhibitory role for GABA-immunoreactive neurons in the adult brain of the zebrafish.

  11. Chronic flumazenil alters GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNA expression, translation product assembly and channel function in neuronal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, T M; Caruncho, H J; Zhu, W J; Vicini, S; Ikonomovic, S; Grayson, D R; Costa, E

    1996-04-01

    Flumazenil competitively blocks the pharmacological effects of both positive and negative allosteric modulators acting at the benzodiazepine binding sites of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A)) receptors. Using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, label-fracture immunocytochemistry and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we determined changes in the contents of selected GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNA(s), in their translation products and in the electrophysiological characteristics of the receptor channels in cultured cerebellar granule cells treated daily with flumazenil (10 microM) for 4 days in vitro. The contents of the alpha1 and alpha6 receptor subunit mRNAs were significantly increased in the flumazenil-treated group as compared with the dimethyl sulfoxide vehicle-treated control group, whereas there were no significant differences in the absolute amounts of the beta2, beta3, gamma2S, gamma2L++ + and delta receptor subunit mRNAs. The gold immunolabeling densities of the alpha1 and delta receptor subunits were significantly increased, whereas those of the alpha6, beta2/beta3 and gamma2 receptor subunits were decreased. Double-immunolabeling experiments using 5- and 10-nm gold particles suggest that after chronic flumazenil treatment, receptor subunit assemblies containing the alpha1/gamma2 and alpha6/delta subunits may be replaced by a receptor assembly containing the alpha1/delta subunits. The GABA potency in eliciting Cl- channel activity decreased significantly, as indicated by the elevated EC50 values, and the positive modulation of GABA action by diazepam also decreased. These results suggest that flumazenil, perhaps by blocking the action of endogenous allosteric modulators of GABA(A) receptors, may trigger a change in the expression and assembly of the subunits of the GABA(A) receptor. This implies that there might be a dynamic state in the regulation of GABA(A) receptor structure.

  12. Morphofunctional alterations in ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons in acute and prolonged opiates withdrawal. A computational perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enrico, P; Migliore, M; Spiga, S; Mulas, G; Caboni, F; Diana, M

    2016-05-13

    Dopamine (DA) neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) play a key role in the neurobiological basis of goal-directed behaviors and addiction. Morphine (MOR) withdrawal induces acute and long-term changes in the morphology and physiology of VTA DA cells, but the mechanisms underlying these modifications are poorly understood. Because of their predictive value, computational models are a powerful tool in neurobiological research, and are often used to gain further insights and deeper understanding on the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying the development of various psychiatric disorders. Here we present a biophysical model of a DA VTA neuron based on 3D morphological reconstruction and electrophysiological data, showing how opiates withdrawal-driven morphological and electrophysiological changes could affect the firing rate and discharge pattern. The model findings suggest how and to what extent a change in the balance of GABA/GLU inputs can take into account the experimentally observed hypofunction of VTA DA neurons during acute and prolonged withdrawal, whereas morphological changes may play a role in the increased excitability of VTA DA cell to opiate administration observed during opiate withdrawal.

  13. [A new role of GABA on synapses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayama, Tatsuya; Kasai, Haruo

    2014-08-01

    Neurons connect and transmit information via synapses. The major excitatory and inhibitory (E-I) neurotransmitters are glutamate and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA), respectively. The E-I balance plays an important role in various brain functions. In this review, we summarize the role of GABA on synaptic integration and synaptic plasticity by introducing our own recent findings. In synaptic integration, GABA is considered to inhibit depolarization induced by glutamate and suppress action potentials. We found that GABA also has a more direct role on the synaptic plasticity of excitatory inputs. GABA effectively promotes the shrinkage and elimination of synapses by suppressing local dendritic Ca(2+) signaling, while keeping the Ca(2+) domain of the NMDA receptors intact. In this manner, GABA promoted the activation of calcineurin, which in turn activated cofilin. Interestingly, shrinkage tended to spread, likely due to the spread of cofilin, and induced competitive selection of synapses via its phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. The selection of synapses is key to the reorganization of the central nervous system during development and in adulthood, and GABA plays key roles in various mental disorders, such as autism and schizophrenia. Our results account well for the in vivo GABA functions on synaptic selection, and may help to develop new therapeutic compounds.

  14. 虎门合剂对成瘾模型及戒断大鼠GABA免疫阳性神经元的影响%Influences from Traditional Chinese HuMen Composition on GABA Immune Positive Neurons of Morphine-Dependence and Withdrawal Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁尤放; 林涵; 李树春

    2016-01-01

    目的:研究吗啡成瘾性和戒断大鼠在虎门合剂给药后GABA阳性神经元数量的变化。方法:通过提升传统建模方法建立大鼠成瘾模型和模型评估系统,同时利用免疫组化法观察虎门合剂给药后吗啡成瘾和戒断大鼠阳性细胞元的变化。结果:吗啡依赖大鼠海马CA1区和齿状回GABA阳性神经元数目明显减少,虎门合剂治疗组海马GABA阳性神经元数量和光密度均显著升高。结论:虎门合剂对吗啡损伤一般记忆的效应具有拮抗作用。%Objective To discuss the changes occurring in GABA positive neurons of morphine-dependence and withdrawal Rats after given HuMen Composition.Methods Rats addiction models and model evaluation system were established in the study through im-proving the traditional methods of building models.At the same time,immunohistochemical method was used to observe the changes occurring in positive neurons of morphine-dependence and withdrawal Rats after given HuMen Composition.Results the number of positive neurons is obviously decreased in hippocampus CA1 and Dentate Gyrus areas of morphine-dependent rats.In the treatment group of HuMen Composition,the number of hippocampus GABA and optical density are all increased respectively.Conclusion Hu-Men Composition may have certain antagonistic effect in curing damaged memory induced by morphine.

  15. Anion transport and GABA signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Andreas Huebner

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Whereas activation of GABAA receptors by GABA usually results in a hyperpolarizing influx of chloride into the neuron, the reversed chloride driving force in the immature nervous system results in a depolarizing efflux of chloride. This GABAergic depolarization is deemed to be important for the maturation of the neuronal network. The concept of a developmental GABA switch has mainly been derived from in vitro experiments and reliable in vivo evidence is still missing. As GABAA receptors are permeable for both chloride and bicarbonate, the net effect of GABA also critically depends on the distribution of bicarbonate. Whereas chloride can either mediate depolarizing or hyperpolarizing currents, bicarbonate invariably mediates a depolarizing current under physiological conditions. Intracellular bicarbonate is quickly replenished by cytosolic carbonic anhydrases. Intracellular bicarbonate levels also depend on different bicarbonate transporters expressed by neurons. The expression of these proteins is not only developmentally regulated but also differs between cell types and even subcellular regions. In this review we will summarize current knowledge about the role of some of these transporters for brain development and brain function.

  16. GABA uptake inhibitors. Design, molecular pharmacology and therapeutic aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard-Larsen, P; Frølund, B; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2000-01-01

    GABAA receptor agonists. The availability of these compounds made it possible to study the pharmacology of the GABA uptake systems and the GABAA receptors separately. Based on extensive cellular and molecular pharmacological studies using 23, 24, and a number of mono- and bicyclic analogues, it has been...... demonstrated that neuronal and glial GABA transport mechanisms have dissimilar substrate specificities. With GABA transport mechanisms as pharmacological targets, strategies for pharmacological interventions with the purpose of stimulating GABA neurotransmission seem to be (1) effective blockade of neuronal...... recently been reported as the most selective glial GABA uptake inhibitor so far known and may be a useful tool for further elucidation of the pharmacology of GABA transporters. In recent years, a variety of lipophilic analogues of the amino acids 23 and 24 have been developed, and one of these compounds...

  17. Glutamate and GABA in appetite regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Cardoso Delgado

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Appetite is regulated by a coordinated interplay between gut, adipose tissue and brain. A primary site for the regulation of appetite is the hypothalamus where interaction between orexigenic neurons, expressing Neuropeptide Y/Agouti-related protein, and anorexigenic neurons, expressing Pro-opiomelanocortin cocaine/Amphetamine-related transcript, controls energy homeostasis. Within the hypothalamus, several peripheral signals have been shown to modulate the activity of these neurons, including the orexigenic peptide ghrelin and the anorexigenic hormones insulin and leptin. In addition to the accumulated knowledge on neuropeptide signaling, presence and function of amino acid neurotransmitters in key hypothalamic neurons brought a new light into appetite regulation. Therefore, the principal aim of this review will be to describe the current knowledge of the role of amino acid neurotransmitters in the mechanism of neuronal activation during appetite regulation and the associated neuronal-astrocytic metabolic coupling mechanisms.Glutamate and GABA dominate synaptic transmission in the hypothalamus and administration of their receptors agonists into hypothalamic nuclei stimulates feeding. By using 13C High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy based analysis, the Cerdán group has shown that increased neuronal firing in mice hypothalamus, as triggered by appetite during the feeding-fasting paradigm, may stimulate the use of lactate as neuronal fuel leading to increased astrocytic glucose consumption and glycolysis. Moreover, fasted mice showed increased hypothalamic [2-13C]GABA content, which may be explained by the existence of GABAergic neurons in key appetite regulation hypothalamic nuclei. Interestingly, increased [2-13C]GABA concentration in the hypothalamus of fasted animals appears to result mainly from reduction in GABA metabolizing pathways, rather than increased GABA synthesis by augmented activity of the

  18. Marlin-1, a novel RNA-binding protein associates with GABA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couve, Andrés; Restituito, Sophie; Brandon, Julia M; Charles, Kelly J; Bawagan, Hinayana; Freeman, Katie B; Pangalos, Menelas N; Calver, Andrew R; Moss, Stephen J

    2004-04-02

    GABA(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. Whereas heterodimerization between GABA(B) receptor GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 subunits is essential for functional expression, how neurons coordinate the assembly of these critical receptors remains to be established. Here we have identified Marlin-1, a novel GABA(B) receptor-binding protein that associates specifically with the GABA(B)R1 subunit in yeast, tissue culture cells, and neurons. Marlin-1 is expressed in the brain and exhibits a granular distribution in cultured hippocampal neurons. Marlin-1 binds different RNA species including the 3'-untranslated regions of both the GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 mRNAs in vitro and also associates with RNA in cultured neurons. Inhibition of Marlin-1 expression via small RNA interference technology results in enhanced intracellular levels of the GABA(B)R2 receptor subunit without affecting the level of GABA(B)R1. Together our results suggest that Marlin-1 functions to regulate the cellular levels of GABA(B) R2 subunits, which may have significant effects on the production of functional GABA(B) receptor heterodimers. Therefore, our observations provide an added level of regulation for the control of GABA(B) receptor expression and for the efficacy of inhibitory synaptic transmission.

  19. General, kappa, delta and mu opioid receptor antagonists mediate feeding elicited by the GABA-B agonist baclofen in the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens shell in rats: reciprocal and regional interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Patricia; Shimonova, Lyudmila; Khaimov, Arthur; Borukhova, Yaffa; Ilyayeva, Ester; Ranaldi, Robert; Bodnar, Richard J

    2012-03-14

    Food intake is significantly increased following administration of agonists of GABA and opioid receptors into the nucleus accumbens shell (NACs) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). GABA-A or GABA-B receptor antagonist pretreatment within the VTA or NACs differentially affects mu-opioid agonist-induced feeding elicited from the same site. Correspondingly, general or selective opioid receptor antagonist pretreatment within the VTA or NACs differentially affects GABA agonist-induced feeding elicited from the same site. Regional interactions have been evaluated in feeding studies by administering antagonists in one site prior to agonist administration in a second site. Thus, opioid antagonist-opioid agonist and GABA antagonist-GABA agonist feeding interactions have been identified between the VTA and NACs. However, pretreatment with GABA-A or GABA-B receptor antagonists in the VTA failed to affect mu opioid agonist-induced feeding elicited from the NACs, and correspondingly, these antagonists administered in the NACs failed to affect mu opioid-induced feeding elicited from the VTA. To evaluate whether regional and reciprocal VTA and NACs feeding interactions occur for opioid receptor modulation of GABA agonist-mediated feeding, the present study examined whether feeding elicited by the GABA-B agonist, baclofen microinjected into the NACs was dose-dependently blocked by pretreatment with general (naltrexone: NTX), mu (beta-funaltrexamine: BFNA), kappa (nor-binaltorphamine: NBNI) or delta (naltrindole: NTI) opioid antagonists in the VTA, and correspondingly, whether VTA baclofen-induced feeding was dose-dependently blocked by NACs pretreatment with NTX, BFNA, NBNI or NTI in rats. Bilateral pairs of cannulae aimed at the VTA and NACs were stereotaxically implanted in rats, and their food intakes were assessed following vehicle and baclofen (200 ng) in each site. Baclofen produced similar magnitudes of increased food intake following VTA and NACs treatment. Baclofen

  20. GABA(A) receptor activation in the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus impairs consolidation of conditioned contextual fear in C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misane, Ilga; Kruis, Ayla; Pieneman, Anton W; Ögren, Sven Ove; Stiedl, Oliver

    2013-02-01

    Local infusion of the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol is used for reversible inactivation of septohippocampal brain structures associated with cognitive functions. However, information on the effective duration, affected processes and site(s) of action of muscimol in the hippocampus is lacking. Therefore, the dose- and time-dependent effects of bilateral dorsohippocampal infusion of muscimol (0.01-2.0 μg/mouse) below the CA1 area were examined on processing of fear memory in male C57BL/6J mice. Infusion of muscimol 15 min-6 h but not 9 h or 24 h before training impaired conditioned context-dependent fear tested 24 h or 48 h after training. Post-training infusion of muscimol also impaired context-dependent fear when applied either 4 h or 6 h after training, although with lower efficacy. Muscimol was ineffective when administered immediately, 1 h or 24 h after training. Infusion of muscimol 15 min before training impaired context-dependent fear 4-6 h after training indicating preserved short-term but impaired long-term memory. Regardless of infusion time and dose, muscimol had no effect on tone-dependent (cued) fear memory. The impairment by the fluorescently-labeled muscimol-bodipy (5.3 μg/mouse) were similar to those of an equimolar dose of muscimol (1 μg/mouse). The distribution profile after local infusion indicated that muscimol-bodipy (5.3 μg/mouse) was confined to the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus. These results demonstrated that GABA(A) receptor activation in the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus causes a long-term memory impairment of conditioned context-dependent fear mediated by a long-lasting (≥6 h) muscimol action most likely affecting consolidation processes.

  1. [Impact of opiates on dopaminergic neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufling, Jennifer; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José; Barrot, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Since the work of Johnson and North, it is known that opiates increase the activity of dopaminergic neurons by a GABA neuron-mediated desinhibition. This model should however be updated based on recent advances. Thus, the neuroanatomical location of the GABA neurons responsible for this desinhibition has been recently detailed: they belong to a brain structure in continuity with the posterior part of the ventral tegmental area and discovered this past decade. Other data also highlighted the critical role played by glutamatergic transmission in the opioid regulation of dopaminergic neuron activity. During protracted opiate withdrawal, the inhibitory/excitatory balance exerted on dopaminergic neurons is altered. These results are now leading to propose an original hypothesis for explaining the impact of protracted opiate withdrawal on mood.

  2. Fast detection of extrasynaptic GABA with a whole-cell sniffer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rasmus K; Petersen, Anders V; Schmitt, Nicole;

    2014-01-01

    . Ambient GABA is essential for adjusting the excitability of neurons. However, due to the lack of suitable methods, little is known about its dynamics. Here we describe a new technique that allows detection of GABA transients and measurement of the steady state GABA concentration with high spatial...

  3. Distribution of neurons in functional areas of the mouse cerebral cortex reveals quantitatively different cortical zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2013-01-01

    How are neurons distributed along the cortical surface and across functional areas? Here we use the isotropic fractionator (Herculano-Houzel and Lent, 2005) to analyze the distribution of neurons across the entire isocortex of the mouse, divided into 18 functional areas defined anatomically. We find that the number of neurons underneath a surface area (the N/A ratio) varies 4.5-fold across functional areas and neuronal density varies 3.2-fold. The face area of S1 contains the most neurons, followed by motor cortex and the primary visual cortex. Remarkably, while the distribution of neurons across functional areas does not accompany the distribution of surface area, it mirrors closely the distribution of cortical volumes-with the exception of the visual areas, which hold more neurons than expected for their volume. Across the non-visual cortex, the volume of individual functional areas is a shared linear function of their number of neurons, while in the visual areas, neuronal densities are much higher than in all other areas. In contrast, the 18 functional areas cluster into three different zones according to the relationship between the N/A ratio and cortical thickness and neuronal density: these three clusters can be called visual, sensory, and, possibly, associative. These findings are remarkably similar to those in the human cerebral cortex (Ribeiro et al., 2013) and suggest that, like the human cerebral cortex, the mouse cerebral cortex comprises two zones that differ in how neurons form the cortical volume, and three zones that differ in how neurons are distributed underneath the cortical surface, possibly in relation to local differences in connectivity through the white matter. Our results suggest that beyond the developmental divide into visual and non-visual cortex, functional areas initially share a common distribution of neurons along the parenchyma that become delimited into functional areas according to the pattern of connectivity established later.

  4. Expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase messenger RNA in rat medial preoptic area neurones during the oestrous cycle and after ovariectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbison, A E; Augood, S J; McGowan, E M

    1992-08-01

    Evidence suggests that medial preoptic area (MPOA) neurones containing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are modulated directly by oestrogen. We have used an alkaline phosphatase-labelled antisense oligonucleotide probe to examine glutamic acid decarboxylase67 (GAD) mRNA expression within individual cells of the MPOA, diagonal band of Broca (DBB) and parietal cortex in rats killed at noon on each day of the oestrous cycle and after ovariectomy (n = 4-5). As a fall in extracellular GABA concentrations occurs in the MPOA on the afternoon of proestrus, the GAD67 mRNA content of cells was also examined in proestrous rats at 15:00h immediately prior to the preovulatory luteinising hormone (LH) surge. The MPOA was found to have an intermediate number of GAD67 mRNA-containing cells compared with the DBB and cortex (P less than 0.01) but expressed the lowest mean hybridisation signal (P less than 0.01). The parietal cortex had significantly fewer (P less than 0.01) GAD mRNA-containing cells than either the MPOA or DBB but these contained higher mean density of signal (P less than 0.01). The hybridisation signal for GAD mRNA was abolished by either ribonuclease pre-treatment or the use of excess non-labelled probe. No significant (P greater than 0.05) differences in GAD67 mRNA were detected in animals killed at noon throughout the oestrous cycle or after ovariectomy. On the afternoon of proestrus (15:00h) there was a significant 40% reduction in mean GAD67 mRNA content within cells of only the MPOA compared with noon (P less than 0.05). The numbers of cells in the MPOA expressing GAD67 mRNA were not significantly different.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Distribution of GABA-like immunoreactivity in the rat amygdaloid complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitecka, L; Ben-Ari, Y

    1987-12-01

    The distribution of GABA-like (GABA-Li) immunoreactivity in the rat amygdaloid complex was studied by using an anti-GABA antibody. GABA-Li positive neurons and processes were present in every nucleus of the complex. Three patterns of immunoreactivity were revealed: (1) the intercalated masses and the lateral olfactory tract nucleus exhibited the most intense staining of the neuropil, and virtually every neuron was labeled, (2) the central and medial nuclei contained intensely labeled neuropil and moderately labeled neurons, and (3) in the remaining nuclei, the neuropil was weakly labeled, and relatively numerous GABA-Li neurons were present. Our results suggest that: (1) the intercalated masses and lateral olfactory tract nucleus consist of large aggregates of GABA-Li immunoreactive neurons, and (2) the lateral, basal dorsal, and the posterior cortical nuclei may constitute a significant source of GABAergic connections to other amygdaloid nuclei, in particular to the medial and central nuclei.

  6. The expression of GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) receptor subunits in the cNS differs from that in peripheral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calver, A R; Medhurst, A D; Robbins, M J; Charles, K J; Evans, M L; Harrison, D C; Stammers, M; Hughes, S A; Hervieu, G; Couve, A; Moss, S J; Middlemiss, D N; Pangalos, M N

    2000-01-01

    GABA(B) receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the slow and prolonged synaptic actions of GABA in the CNS via the modulation of ion channels. Unusually, GABA(B) receptors form functional heterodimers composed of GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits. The GABA(B1) subunit is essential for ligand binding, whereas the GABA(B2) subunit is essential for functional expression of the receptor dimer at the cell surface. We have used real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to analyse expression levels of these subunits, and their associated splice variants, in the CNS and peripheral tissues of human and rat. GABA(B1) subunit splice variants were expressed throughout the CNS and peripheral tissues, whereas surprisingly GABA(B2) subunit splice variants were neural specific. Using novel antisera specific to individual GABA(B) receptor subunits, we have confirmed these findings at the protein level. Analysis by immunoblotting demonstrated the presence of the GABA(B1) subunit, but not the GABA(B2) subunit, in uterus and spleen. Furthermore, we have shown the first immunocytochemical analysis of the GABA(B2) subunit in the brain and spinal cord using a GABA(B2)-specific antibody. We have, therefore, identified areas of non-overlap between GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunit expression in tissues known to contain functional GABA(B) receptors. Such areas are of interest as they may well contain novel GABA(B) receptor subunit isoforms, expression of which would enable the GABA(B1) subunit to reach the cell surface and form functional GABA(B) receptors.

  7. The Glutamine-Glutamate/GABA Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walls, Anne B; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer;

    2015-01-01

    inhibitor methionine sulfoximine and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (aconitase) inhibitors fluoro-acetate and -citrate. Acetate is metabolized exclusively by glial cells, and [(13)C]acetate is thus capable when used in combination with magnetic resonance spectroscopy or mass spectrometry, to provide......The operation of a glutamine-glutamate/GABA cycle in the brain consisting of the transfer of glutamine from astrocytes to neurons and neurotransmitter glutamate or GABA from neurons to astrocytes is a well-known concept. In neurons, glutamine is not only used for energy production and protein...... synthesis, as in other cells, but is also an essential precursor for biosynthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters. An excellent tool for the study of glutamine transfer from astrocytes to neurons is [(14)C]acetate or [(13)C]acetate and the glial specific enzyme inhibitors, i.e. the glutamine synthetase...

  8. Gamma synchrony predicts neuron-neuron correlations and correlations with motor behavior in extrastriate visual area MT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joonyeol; Lisberger, Stephen G

    2013-12-11

    Correlated variability of neuronal responses is an important factor in estimating sensory parameters from a population response. Large correlations among neurons reduce the effective size of a neural population and increase the variation of the estimates. They also allow the activity of one neuron to be informative about impending perceptual decisions or motor actions on single trials. In extrastriate visual area MT of the rhesus macaque, for example, some but not all neurons show nonzero "choice probabilities" for perceptual decisions or non-zero "MT-pursuit" correlations between the trial-by-trial variations in neural activity and smooth pursuit eye movements. To understand the functional implications of zero versus nonzero correlations between neural responses and impending perceptions or actions, we took advantage of prior observations that specific frequencies of local field potentials reflect the correlated activity of neurons. We found that the strength of the spike-field coherence of a neuron in the gamma-band frequency range is related to the size of its MT-pursuit correlations for eye direction, as well as to the size of the neuron-neuron correlations. Spike-field coherence predicts MT-pursuit correlations better for direction than for speed, perhaps because the topographic organization of direction preference in MT is more amenable to creating meaningful local field potentials. We suggest that the relationship between spiking and local-field potentials is stronger for neurons that have larger correlations with their neighbors; larger neuron-neuron correlations create stronger MT-pursuit correlations. Neurons that lack strong correlations with their neighbors also have weaker correlations with pursuit behavior, but still could drive pursuit strongly.

  9. DISTRIBUTION OF GABA-ERGIC NEURONS IN THE MACAQUE SPINAL CORD%猕猴颈髓的GABA能神经元分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡秋云; 董大翠

    2001-01-01

    应用免疫组织化学方法观察猕猴颈髓的γ-氨基丁酸(GABA)能神经元的分布.观察结果:除第Ⅹ层外,在脊髓Rexed Ⅰ-Ⅸ层可见GABA样免疫反应的胞体和纤维,标记的GABA 胞体为卵圆形、三角形和多角形,可分为大、中、小型,在Ⅲ、Ⅳ、Ⅴ、Ⅶ、Ⅸ层GABA阳性胞体较多.GABA阳性纤维以后角处最多.白质内也有GABA免疫反应阳性的胶质细胞和神经纤维.结果提示GABA能神经元不仅调节感觉信息的传导而且也调节运动信息的传导.

  10. GABA and glutamate pathways are spatially and developmentally affected in the brain of Mecp2-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita El-Khoury

    Full Text Available Proper brain functioning requires a fine-tuning between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission, a balance maintained through the regulation and release of glutamate and GABA. Rett syndrome (RTT is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2 gene affecting the postnatal brain development. Dysfunctions in the GABAergic and glutamatergic systems have been implicated in the neuropathology of RTT and a disruption of the balance between excitation and inhibition, together with a perturbation of the electrophysiological properties of GABA and glutamate neurons, were reported in the brain of the Mecp2-deficient mouse. However, to date, the extent and the nature of the GABA/glutamate deficit affecting the Mecp2-deficient mouse brain are unclear. In order to better characterize these deficits, we simultaneously analyzed the GABA and glutamate levels in Mecp2-deficient mice at 2 different ages (P35 and P55 and in several brain areas. We used a multilevel approach including the quantification of GABA and glutamate levels, as well as the quantification of the mRNA and protein expression levels of key genes involved in the GABAergic and glutamatergic pathways. Our results show that Mecp2-deficient mice displayed regional- and age-dependent variations in the GABA pathway and, to a lesser extent, in the glutamate pathway. The implication of the GABA pathway in the RTT neuropathology was further confirmed using an in vivo treatment with a GABA reuptake inhibitor that significantly improved the lifespan of Mecp2-deficient mice. Our results confirm that RTT mouse present a deficit in the GABAergic pathway and suggest that GABAergic modulators could be interesting therapeutic agents for this severe neurological disorder.

  11. Photorelease of GABA with visible light using an inorganic caging group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Rial Verde

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe the selective photorelease of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA with a novel caged-GABA compound that uses a ruthenium complex as photosensor. This compound (“RuBi-GABA” can be excited with visible wavelengths, providing greater tissue penetration, less photo-toxicity, and faster photorelease kinetics than currently used UV light-sensitive caged compounds. Using pyramidal neurons from neocortical brain slices, we show that RuBi-GABA uncaging induces GABA-A receptor-mediated responses, has no detectable side effects on endogenous GABAergic and glutamatergic receptors and generates responses with kinetics and spatial resolution comparable to the best caged GABA compounds presently available. Finally, we illustrate two potential applications of RuBi-GABA uncaging: GABA receptor mapping, and optical silencing of neuronal firing.

  12. Neurochemical correlates of. gamma. -aminobutyrate (GABA) inhibition in cat visual cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcar, V.J.; Dreher, B. (Univ. of Sydney (Australia))

    1990-01-01

    High affinity binding of ({sup 3}H){gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to neuronal membranes from different parts of cat visual cortex was tested for sensitivity to GABA{sub A} agonists isoguvacine and THIP, GABA{sub A} antagonist SR95531 and GABA{sub B} agonist baclofen. Some of the GABA{sub A}-binding sites were found to have a very low affinity for THIP, suggesting the presence and, possibly, uneven distribution of non-synaptic GABA{sub A} receptors in cat visual cortex. There were no differences in K{sub m} and V{sub max} values of high affinity uptake of GABA and in the potency of K{sup +}-stimulated release of GABA, between primary and association cortices. Consequently, the present results indicate that despite the anatomical and physiological differences between the primary and association feline visual cortices the neurochemical characteristics of GABAergic inhibition are very similar in the two regions.

  13. GABA-A receptor antagonists increase firing, bursting and synchrony of spontaneous activity in neuronal networks grown on microelectrode arrays: a step towards chemical "fingerprinting"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assessment of effects on spontaneous network activity in neurons grown on MEAs is a proposed method to screen chemicals for potential neurotoxicity. In addition, differential effects on network activity (chemical "fingerprints") could be used to classify chemical modes of action....

  14. An excitatory GABA loop operating in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe eAstorga

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While it has been proposed that the conventional inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA can be excitatory in the mammalian brain, much remains to be learned concerning the circumstances and the cellular mechanisms governing potential excitatory GABA action. Using a combination of optogenetics and two-photon calcium imaging in vivo, we find that activation of chloride-permeable GABAA receptors in parallel fibers of the cerebellar molecular layer of adult mice causes parallel fiber excitation. Stimulation of parallel fibers at submaximal stimulus intensities leads to GABA release from molecular layer interneurons, thus creating a positive feedback loop that enhances excitation near the center of an activated parallel fiber bundle. Our results imply that elevated chloride concentration can occur in specific intracellular compartments of mature mammalian neurons and suggest an excitatory role for GABAA receptors in the cerebellar cortex of adult mice.

  15. GABA(A) receptor mediated inhibition contributes to corticostriatal frequency filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinek, Devin A; Partridge, L Donald

    2012-11-21

    The striatum plays an important role in the initiation and learning of skilled motor behavior [6] and receives topographic input from most areas of the cortex. Cortical afferents make divergent contact with many striatal medium spiny neurons while individual medium spiny neurons receive tens of thousands of these glutamatergic synapses [13]. Temporal filtering of frequency information within synaptic fields plays an important role in the processing of neuronal signals. We have previously shown differential filtering characteristics within CA1, CA3, and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus [26] and have now extended these studies to the cortical input to the dorsal striatum in order to address the network filtering characteristics in this important synaptic field. We measured field potentials of striatal medium spiny neurons in response to layer V cortical input over a range of stimulus frequencies from 2Hz to 100Hz. The average population spike amplitude in response to these stimulus trains exhibited a non-linear relationship to frequency, with characteristics of a low pass filter. In order to assess potential modulation of these filter properties, we examined the frequency response in the presence of antagonists to CB1, D2, nACh, and GABA(A) receptors, which are all known to be expressed at these synapses [13]. Of these, only GABA(A) receptor antagonists significantly modulated the frequency filtering characteristics over the examined frequency range. High frequency stimulation induces long term plasticity at corticostriatal synapses [4] and this process is strengthened when GABA(A) receptors are blocked [7,20,29]. Our results suggest a model whereby a temporary decrease in GABA level would modulate the filtering parameters of the corticostriatal circuit, allowing a more robust induction of high frequency-dependent plasticity.

  16. Neuron-type-specific signals for reward and punishment in the ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jeremiah Y; Haesler, Sebastian; Vong, Linh; Lowell, Bradford B; Uchida, Naoshige

    2012-01-18

    Dopamine has a central role in motivation and reward. Dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) signal the discrepancy between expected and actual rewards (that is, reward prediction error), but how they compute such signals is unknown. We recorded the activity of VTA neurons while mice associated different odour cues with appetitive and aversive outcomes. We found three types of neuron based on responses to odours and outcomes: approximately half of the neurons (type I, 52%) showed phasic excitation after reward-predicting odours and rewards in a manner consistent with reward prediction error coding; the other half of neurons showed persistent activity during the delay between odour and outcome that was modulated positively (type II, 31%) or negatively (type III, 18%) by the value of outcomes. Whereas the activity of type I neurons was sensitive to actual outcomes (that is, when the reward was delivered as expected compared to when it was unexpectedly omitted), the activity of type II and type III neurons was determined predominantly by reward-predicting odours. We 'tagged' dopaminergic and GABAergic neurons with the light-sensitive protein channelrhodopsin-2 and identified them based on their responses to optical stimulation while recording. All identified dopaminergic neurons were of type I and all GABAergic neurons were of type II. These results show that VTA GABAergic neurons signal expected reward, a key variable for dopaminergic neurons to calculate reward prediction error.

  17. GABA agonist promoted formation of low affinity GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells is restricted to early development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, G H; Schousboe, A;

    1988-01-01

    The ability of the GABA receptor agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP) to promote formation of low affinity GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells was tested using primary cultures of these neurons. Granule cells were exposed to THIP (150 microM) for 6 hr after......, respectively, 4, 7, 10 and 14 days in culture. It was found that THIP treatment of 4- and 7-day-old cultures led to formation of low affinity GABA receptors, whereas such receptors could not be detected after THIP treatment in the older cultures (10 and 14 days) in spite of the fact that these cultured granule...... cells expressed a high density of high affinity GABA receptors. It is concluded that the ability of THIP to promote formation of low affinity GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells is restricted to an early developmental period....

  18. GABA Metabolism and Transport: Effects on Synaptic Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian C. Roth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available GABAergic inhibition is an important regulator of excitability in neuronal networks. In addition, inhibitory synaptic signals contribute crucially to the organization of spatiotemporal patterns of network activity, especially during coherent oscillations. In order to maintain stable network states, the release of GABA by interneurons must be plastic in timing and amount. This homeostatic regulation is achieved by several pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms and is triggered by various activity-dependent local signals such as excitatory input or ambient levels of neurotransmitters. Here, we review findings on the availability of GABA for release at presynaptic terminals of interneurons. Presynaptic GABA content seems to be an important determinant of inhibitory efficacy and can be differentially regulated by changing synthesis, transport, and degradation of GABA or related molecules. We will discuss the functional impact of such regulations on neuronal network patterns and, finally, point towards pharmacological approaches targeting these processes.

  19. Maternal oxytocin triggers a transient inhibitory switch in GABA signaling in the fetal brain during delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyzio, Roman; Cossart, Rosa; Khalilov, Ilgam; Minlebaev, Marat; Hübner, Christian A; Represa, Alfonso; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Khazipov, Rustem

    2006-12-15

    We report a signaling mechanism in rats between mother and fetus aimed at preparing fetal neurons for delivery. In immature neurons, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter. We found that, shortly before delivery, there is a transient reduction in the intracellular chloride concentration and an excitatory-to-inhibitory switch of GABA actions. These events were triggered by oxytocin, an essential maternal hormone for labor. In vivo administration of an oxytocin receptor antagonist before delivery prevented the switch of GABA actions in fetal neurons and aggravated the severity of anoxic episodes. Thus, maternal oxytocin inhibits fetal neurons and increases their resistance to insults during delivery.

  20. THE ROLE OF GABA RECEPTORS IN THE CONTROL OF NIGROSTRIATAL DOPAMINERGIC-NEURONS - DUAL-PROBE MICRODIALYSIS STUDY IN AWAKE RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SANTIAGO, M; WESTERINK, BHC

    1992-01-01

    A microdialysis probe implanted into the substantia nigra was used to infuse gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic (GABAergic) compounds onto cell bodies/dendrites of dopaminergic neurons, while a second microdialysis probe was used to record the extracellular concentrations of dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxy-ph

  1. Segregation of acetylcholine and GABA in the rat superior cervical ganglia: functional correlation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eElinos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sympathetic neurons have the capability to segregate their neurotransmitters (NTs and co-transmitters to separate varicosities of single axons; furthermore, in culture, these neurons can even segregate classical transmitters. In vivo sympathetic neurons employ acetylcholine (ACh and other classical NTs such as gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA. Herein, we explore whether these neurons in vivo segregate these classical NTs in the superior cervical ganglia of the rat. We determined the topographical distribution of GABAergic varicosities, somatic GABAA receptor, as well as the regional distribution of the segregation of ACh and GABA. We evaluated possible regional differences in efficacy of ganglionic synaptic transmission, in the sensitivity of GABAA receptor to GABA and to the competitive antagonist picrotoxin (PTX. We found that sympathetic preganglionic neurons in vivo do segregate ACh and GABA. GABAergic varicosities and GABAA receptor expression showed a rostro-caudal gradient along ganglia; in contrast, segregation exhibited a caudo-rostral gradient. These uneven regional distributions in expression of GABA, GABAA receptors, and level segregation correlate with stronger synaptic transmission found in the caudal region. Accordingly, GABAA receptors of rostral region show larger sensitivity to GABA and PTX. These results suggest the presence of different types of GABAA receptors in each region that result in a different regional levels of endogenous GABA inhibition. Finally, we discuss a possible correlation of these different levels of GABA modulation and the function of the target organs innervated by rostral and caudal ganglionic neurons.

  2. Conjunctive processing of locomotor signals by the ventral tegmental area neuronal population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong V Wang

    Full Text Available The ventral tegmental area (VTA plays an essential role in reward and motivation. How the dopamine (DA and non-DA neurons in the VTA engage in motivation-based locomotor behaviors is not well understood. We recorded activity of putative DA and non-DA neurons simultaneously in the VTA of awake mice engaged in motivated voluntary movements such as wheel running. Our results revealed that VTA non-DA neurons exhibited significant rhythmic activity that was correlated with the animal's running rhythms. Activity of putative DA neurons also correlated with the movement behavior, but to a lesser degree. More importantly, putative DA neurons exhibited significant burst activation at both onset and offset of voluntary movements. These findings suggest that VTA DA and non-DA neurons conjunctively process locomotor-related motivational signals that are associated with movement initiation, maintenance and termination.

  3. Area-specific migration and recruitment of new neurons in the adult songbird brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vellema, Michiel; Van der Linden, Annemie; Gahr, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    Neuron recruitment has been implicated in morphological and functional plasticity in the adult brain. Whereas mammals restrict neuron recruitment specifically to two regions of known plasticity, the hippocampus and olfactory bulb, newborn neurons are found throughout the forebrain of adult...... sensitive to plastic changes, such as nucleus higher vocal center (HVC) and area X, recruited similar numbers of new neurons as their surrounding brain tissues, employing no specific directional mechanisms. The distribution pattern in and around HVC could best be described by a random displacement model...... toward the olfactory bulb showed high specificity, similar to the mammalian rostral migratory stream. Thus, different mechanisms appear to organize area-specific neuron recruitment in different recipients of the adult songbird brain, unrelated to global plasticity of brain regions....

  4. INHIBITORY EFFECT OF GABA ON FIRING ACTIVITY OF ROSTRAL VENTROLATERAL MEDULLARY NEURONS OF RAT IN VITRO%γ-氨基丁酸对离体大鼠延髓头端腹外侧区神经元单位放电的抑制作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    储祥平; 李鹏; 徐宁善

    1998-01-01

    Extracellular single-unit discharges were obtained from 106 spontaneously active neurons in the region of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) by glass microelectrode from 73 brain slices of Sprague-Dawley rats. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, 0.1 ~ 3.0 mmol/L) inhibited the electrical activity of 84 out of 106 RVLM neurons dose-dependently. The inhibitory effect of GABA could be blocked by GABAA with BMI or PTX alone, the firing rates of most of the RVLM neurons were significantly increased. In 41 neurons responding to GABA, baclofen (0.1 ~ 3.0 μmol/L), a GABAB receptor selective agonist, inhibited the discharges of 33 of the neurons dose-dependently. GABAB receptor antagonist CGP35348 ( n = 13) blocked the inhibition due to baclofen ( n = 21). After perfused with CGP35348 alone, the firing rates of most of the RVLM neurons were significantly increased. Taken together, the inhibition of GABA on RVLM neurons is mediated through either GABAA or GABAB receptors and some intrinsic GABA neurons exert tonic inhibition activity.%在73张脑片上观察了γ-氨基丁酸(GABA)对106个延髓头端腹外侧区(RVLM)神经元单位放电的影响.外源性的GABA(0.1~3.0 mmol/L)抑制了106神经元中的84个神经元的电活动,这些抑制效应呈剂量-反应关系.GABA的抑制效应大部分可被GABAA受体选择性拮抗剂荷苞牡丹碱甲基碘化物(BMI)和Cl-通道阻断剂印防己毒素(PTX)所阻断,而单独灌流BMI和PTX对RVLM神经元主要起兴奋作用.在41个对GABA有抑制效应的RVLM神经元上,GABAB受体选择性激动剂苯氯丁氨酸(0.1~3.0 μmoL/L)抑制了其中33个神经元的单位放电,也呈剂量-反应关系.GABAB受体选择性拮抗剂CGP35348(n=13)可阻断苯氯丁氨酸的抑制效应(n=21),而单独灌流CGP35348对RVLM神经元主要起兴奋作用.上述结果提示:GABA对RVLM神经元的抑制效应,不仅可以通过GABAA受体,而且可以通过GABAB受体起作用;内源性的GABA参与了紧张性的抑制作用.

  5. GABA actions in hippocampal area CA3 during postnatal development: differential shift from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing in somatic and dendritic compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-Parra, Héctor; Treviño, Mario; Heinemann, Uwe; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2008-03-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)-R) activation leads to depolarization of pyramidal cells during the first postnatal week and produces hyperpolarization from the second week. However, immunohistochemical evidence has suggested that during the second and third postnatal weeks the NKCC1 cotransporter relocates from the soma to the dendrites of CA3 pyramidal cells. We hypothesized that this leads to depolarizing responses in apical dendrites. Here we show that the activation of GABA(A)-R in the distal dendrites of CA3 pyramidal cells at P15 by restricted application of muscimol or synaptic activation by stimulation of interneurons in stratum radiatum (SR) causes depolarizing postsynaptic potentials (PSPs), which are blocked by NKCC1 cotransporter antagonists. By contrast, activation of proximal GABA(A)-R by muscimol application or by stimulation of interneurons in s. oriens (SO) leads to hyperpolarizing PSPs. Activation of the dentate gyrus (DG) in the presence of glutamatergic blockers evokes hyperpolarizing responses during the second postnatal week; however, the reversal potential of the DG-evoked inhibitory (I)PSPs is more depolarized than that of IPSPs evoked by activation of SO interneurons. Despite the shift of GABA action from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing, DG-evoked field potentials (f-PSPs) recorded in s. lucidum/radiatum (SL/R) do not change in polarity until the third week. Current source density analysis yielded results consistent with depolarizing actions of GABA in the dendritic compartment. Our data suggest that GABAergic input to apical dendrites of pyramidal cells of CA3 evokes depolarizing PSPs long after synaptic inhibition has become hyperpolarizing in the somata, in the axon initial segments and in basal dendrites.

  6. Afferent Inputs to Neurotransmitter-Defined Cell Types in the Ventral Tegmental Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Faget

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ventral tegmental area (VTA plays a central role in the neural circuit control of behavioral reinforcement. Though considered a dopaminergic nucleus, the VTA contains substantial heterogeneity in neurotransmitter type, containing also GABA and glutamate neurons. Here, we used a combinatorial viral approach to transsynaptically label afferents to defined VTA dopamine, GABA, or glutamate neurons. Surprisingly, we find that these populations received qualitatively similar inputs, with dominant and comparable projections from the lateral hypothalamus, raphe, and ventral pallidum. However, notable differences were observed, with striatal regions and globus pallidus providing a greater share of input to VTA dopamine neurons, cortical input preferentially on to glutamate neurons, and GABA neurons receiving proportionally more input from the lateral habenula and laterodorsal tegmental nucleus. By comparing inputs to each of the transmitter-defined VTA cell types, this study sheds important light on the systems-level organization of diverse inputs to VTA.

  7. The relationships between neurons containing dopamine and nitric oxide synthase in the ventral tegmental area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Wójcik

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Ventral tegmental area (VTA is a heterogeneous group of dopaminergic cells which contains interfascicular (IF, parabrachial (PBP and rostral linear (RLi nuclei. Neurons of this area are involved in the regulation of motor and motivational aspects of behavior and reveal high neuronal plasticity. Among many various neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, nitric oxide (NO is localized in this region. In the present study, we investigated morphology and distribution of nitric oxide synthase (NOS-positive neurons in VTA and their colocalization with dopaminergic neurons. The study was performed on six adult Wistar rats. After perfusional fixation, the brains were cut, immunostained for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH and NOS and studied by confocal laser microscopy. In each of the three studied nuclei of VTA we investigated three different neuronal populations. Numerous TH-immunoreactive (TH-ir and NOS-immunoreactive (NOS-ir neurons are present in the studied region. Among them, a considerable number showed coexistence of both neurotransmitters. The populations of TH-ir and NOS-ir neurons interact with each other as manifested by the presence of NOS-ir endings on TH-ir neurons and vice versa. Taking the above into account, it may be suspected that NO is involved in the modulation of dopaminergic transmission.

  8. GIRK2 expression in dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Stefanie; Fu, Yuhong; Double, Kay; Thompson, Lachlan; Kirik, Deniz; Paxinos, George; Halliday, Glenda M

    2012-08-15

    G-protein-regulated inward-rectifier potassium channel 2 (GIRK2) is reported to be expressed only within certain dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra (SN), although very limited data are available in humans. We examined the localization of GIRK2 in the SN and adjacent ventral tegmental area (VTA) of humans and mice by using either neuromelanin pigment or immunolabeling with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) or calbindin. GIRK2 immunoreactivity was found in nearly every human pigmented neuron or mouse TH-immunoreactive neuron in both the SN and VTA, although considerable variability in the intensity of GIRK2 staining was observed. The relative intensity of GIRK2 immunoreactivity in TH-immunoreactive neurons was determined; in both species nearly all SN TH-immunoreactive neurons had strong GIRK2 immunoreactivity compared with only 50-60% of VTA neurons. Most paranigral VTA neurons also contained calbindin immunoreactivity, and approximately 25% of these and nearby VTA neurons also had strong GIRK2 immunoreactivity. These data show that high amounts of GIRK2 protein are found in most SN neurons as well as in a proportion of nearby VTA neurons. The single previous human study may have been compromised by the fixation method used and the postmortem delay of their controls, whereas other studies suggesting that GIRK2 is located only in limited neuronal groups within the SN have erroneously included VTA regions as part of the SN. In particular, the dorsal layer of dopamine neurons directly underneath the red nucleus is considered a VTA region in humans but is commonly considered the dorsal tier of the SN in laboratory species.

  9. Association of GABA(B) receptors and members of the 14-3-3 family of signaling proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couve, A; Kittler, J T; Uren, J M; Calver, A R; Pangalos, M N; Walsh, F S; Moss, S J

    2001-02-01

    Two GABA(B) receptors, GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2, have been cloned recently. Unlike other G protein-coupled receptors, the formation of a heterodimer between GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 is required for functional expression. We have used the yeast two hybrid system to identify proteins that interact with the C-terminus of GABA(B)R1. We report a direct association between GABA(B) receptors and two members of the 14-3-3 protein family, 14-3-3eta and 14-3-3zeta. We demonstrate that the C-terminus of GABA(B)R1 associates with 14-3-3zeta in rat brain preparations and tissue cultured cells, that they codistribute after rat brain fractionation, colocalize in neurons, and that the binding site overlaps partially with the coiled-coil domain of GABA(B)R1. Furthermore we show a reduced interaction between the C-terminal domains of GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 in the presence of 14-3-3. The results strongly suggest that GABA(B)R1 and 14-3-3 associate in the nervous system and begin to reveal the signaling complexities of the GABA(B)R1/GABA(B)R2 receptor heterodimer.

  10. Daily isoflurane exposure increases barbiturate insensitivity in medullary respiratory and cortical neurons via expression of ε-subunit containing GABA ARs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith B Hengen

    Full Text Available The parameters governing GABAA receptor subtype expression patterns are not well understood, although significant shifts in subunit expression may support key physiological events. For example, the respiratory control network in pregnant rats becomes relatively insensitive to barbiturates due to increased expression of ε-subunit-containing GABAARs in the ventral respiratory column. We hypothesized that this plasticity may be a compensatory response to a chronic increase in inhibitory tone caused by increased central neurosteroid levels. Thus, we tested whether increased inhibitory tone was sufficient to induce ε-subunit upregulation on respiratory and cortical neurons in adult rats. Chronic intermittent increases in inhibitory tone in male and female rats was induced via daily 5-min exposures to 3% isoflurane. After 7d of treatment, phrenic burst frequency was less sensitive to barbiturate in isoflurane-treated male and female rats in vivo. Neurons in the ventral respiratory group and cortex were less sensitive to pentobarbital in vitro following 7d and 30d of intermittent isoflurane-exposure in both male and female rats. The pentobarbital insensitivity in 7d isoflurane-treated rats was reversible after another 7d. We hypothesize that increased inhibitory tone in the respiratory control network and cortex causes a compensatory increase in ε-subunit-containing GABAARs.

  11. Morphological changes of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in the rat preoptic area across puberty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haogang Xue; Xiaodong Gai; Weiqi Sun; Chun Li; Quan Liu

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons in the preoptic area may undergo mor-phological changes during the pubertal period when their activities are upregulated. To clarify the regulatory mechanism of puberty onset, this study aimed to investigate the morphological changes of GnRH neurons in the preoptic area of GnRH-enhanced green lfuorescent protein transgenic rats. Under confocal laser microscopy, pubertal GnRH neurons exhibited an inverted Y distribution pattern. Prepubertal GnRH neurons were generally unipolar and bipolar, and were distinguished as smooth type cells with few small processes or irregular type cells with many spine-like processes in the proximal dendrites. The number of GnRH neurons in the preoptic area and spine-like processes were increased during the course of reproductive matu-ration. There was no signiifcant difference between male and female rats. Immunolfuorescence staining revealed synaptophysin punctae close to the distal end of GnRH neurons, indicating that some presynaptic terminals may form a synaptic linkage with these neurons.

  12. Dopamine Neurons in the Ventral Tegmental Area: An Autopsy Case of Disorganized Type of Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Ikemoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The mesolimbic dopamine (DA system has been associated with the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Here, we examined DA-containing neuronal structures of the ventral tegmental area (VTA of an autopsy case of disorganized type of schizophrenia (75-year-old female, using tyrosine hydroxylase (TH immunohistochemistry. A free floating method using 50-μm cryostat sections and three-dimensional imaging analyzer AxioVision were applied to observe the wide range structures of TH-immunoreactive (-ir neurons. TH-ir neuronal cell bodies in the VTA of the present case had irregular shape and various size, and TH-ir neuronal processes had irregular thickness and straightened shape or curved shape having many corners, when compared to a control autopsy case with no detectable neurological and psychiatric diseases (64-year-old male. The mechanisms underlying the morphological characteristics of DA neurons of the brains with schizophrenia should be elucidated epigenetically as well as genetically.

  13. Mechanisms for multiple activity modes of VTA dopamine neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eOster

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Midbrain ventral segmental area (VTA dopaminergic neurons send numerous projections to cortical and sub-cortical areas, and diffusely release dopamine (DA to their targets. DA neurons display a range of activity modes that vary in frequency and degree of burst firing. Importantly, DA neuronal bursting is associated with a significantly greater degree of DA release than an equivalent tonic activity pattern. Here, we introduce a single compartmental, conductance-based computational model for DA cell activity that captures the behavior of DA neuronal dynamics and examine the multiple factors that underlie DA firing modes: the strength of the SK conductance, the amount of drive, and GABA inhibition. Our results suggest that neurons with low SK conductance fire in a fast firing mode, are correlated with burst firing, and require higher levels of applied current before undergoing depolarization block. We go on to consider the role of GABAergic inhibition on an ensemble of dynamical classes of DA neurons and find that strong GABA inhibition suppresses burst firing. Our studies suggest differences in the distribution of the SK conductance and GABA inhibition levels may indicate subclasses of DA neurons within the VTA. We further identify, that by considering alternate potassium dynamics, the dynamics display burst patterns that terminate via depolarization block, akin to those observed in vivo in VTA DA neurons and in substantia nigra pars compacta DA cell preparations under apamin application. In addition, we consider the generation of transient burst firing events that are NMDA-initiated or elicited by a sudden decrease of GABA inhibition, that is, disinhibition.

  14. Repeated intermittent alcohol exposure during the third trimester-equivalent increases expression of the GABA(A) receptor δ subunit in cerebellar granule neurons and delays motor development in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Marvin R; Vollmer, Cyndel C; Zamudio-Bulcock, Paula A; Vollmer, William; Blomquist, Samantha L; Morton, Russell A; Everett, Julie C; Zurek, Agnieszka A; Yu, Jieying; Orser, Beverley A; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2014-04-01

    Exposure to ethanol (EtOH) during fetal development can lead to long-lasting alterations, including deficits in fine motor skills and motor learning. Studies suggest that these are, in part, a consequence of cerebellar damage. Cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) are the gateway of information into the cerebellar cortex. Functionally, CGNs are heavily regulated by phasic and tonic GABAergic inhibition from Golgi cell interneurons; however, the effect of EtOH exposure on the development of GABAergic transmission in immature CGNs has not been investigated. To model EtOH exposure during the 3rd trimester-equivalent of human pregnancy, neonatal pups were exposed intermittently to high levels of vaporized EtOH from postnatal day (P) 2 to P12. This exposure gradually increased pup serum EtOH concentrations (SECs) to ∼60 mM (∼0.28 g/dl) during the 4 h of exposure. EtOH levels gradually decreased to baseline 8 h after the end of exposure. Surprisingly, basal tonic and phasic GABAergic currents in CGNs were not significantly affected by postnatal alcohol exposure (PAE). However, PAE increased δ subunit expression at P28 as detected by immunohistochemical and western blot analyses. Also, electrophysiological studies with an agonist that is highly selective for δ-containing GABA(A) receptors, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridine-3-ol (THIP), showed an increase in THIP-induced tonic current. Behavioral studies of PAE rats did not reveal any deficits in motor coordination, except for a delay in the acquisition of the mid-air righting reflex that was apparent at P15 to P18. These findings demonstrate that repeated intermittent exposure to high levels of EtOH during the equivalent of the last trimester of human pregnancy has significant but relatively subtle effects on motor coordination and GABAergic transmission in CGNs in rats.

  15. Characterization of GABAergic neurons in the mouse lateral septum: a double fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical study using tyramide signal amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjiu Zhao

    Full Text Available Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA neurotransmission in the lateral septum (LS is implicated in modulating various behavioral processes, including emotional reactivity and maternal behavior. However, identifying the phenotype of GABAergic neurons in the CNS has been hampered by the longstanding inability to reliably detect somal immunoreactivity for GABA or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD, the enzyme that produces GABA. In this study, we designed unique probes for both GAD65 (GAD2 and GAD67 (GAD1, and used fluorescence in Situ hybridization (FISH with tyramide signal amplification (TSA to achieve unequivocal detection of cell bodies of GABAergic neurons by GAD mRNAs. We quantitatively characterized the expression and chemical phenotype of GABAergic neurons across each subdivision of LS and in cingulate cortex (Cg and medial preoptic area (MPOA in female mice. Across LS, almost all GAD65 mRNA-expressing neurons were found to contain GAD67 mRNA (approximately 95-98%, while a small proportion of GAD67 mRNA-containing neurons did not express GAD65 mRNA (5-14%. Using the neuronal marker NeuN, almost every neuron in LS (> 90% was also found to be GABA-positive. Interneuron markers using calcium-binding proteins showed that LS GABAergic neurons displayed immunoreactivity for calbindin (CB or calretinin (CR, but not parvalbumin (PV; almost all CB- or CR-immunoreactive neurons (98-100% were GABAergic. The proportion of GABAergic neurons immunoreactive for CB or CR varied depending on the subdivisions examined, with the highest percentage of colocalization in the caudal intermediate LS (LSI (approximately 58% for CB and 35% for CR. These findings suggest that the vast majority of GABAergic neurons within the LS have the potential for synthesizing GABA via the dual enzyme systems GAD65 and GAD67, and each subtype of GABAergic neurons identified by distinct calcium-binding proteins may exert unique roles in the physiological function and neuronal circuitry of

  16. Dual role of GABA in the neonatal rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilov, I; Dzhala, V; Ben-Ari, Y; Khazipov, R

    1999-11-01

    The effects of modulators of GABA-A receptors on neuronal network activity were studied in the neonatal (postnatal days 0-5) rat hippocampus in vitro. Under control conditions, the physiological pattern of activity of the neonatal hippocampal network was characterized by spontaneous network-driven giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs). The GABA-A receptor agonist isoguvacine (1-2 microM) and the allosteric modulator diazepam (2 microM) induced biphasic responses: initially the frequency of GDPs increased 3 to 4 fold followed by blockade of GDPs and desynchronization of the network activity. The GABA-A receptor antagonists bicuculline (10 microM) and picrotoxin (100 microM) blocked GDPs and induced glutamate (AMPA and NMDA)-receptor-mediated interictal- and ictal-like activities in the hippocampal slices and the intact hippocampus. These data suggest that at early postnatal ages GABA can exert a dual - both excitatory and inhibitory - action on the network activity.

  17. [GABA-Receptors in Modulation of Fear Memory Extinction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovina, N I

    2016-01-01

    GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system determining the efficacy of neuronal interaction. GABA-receptors play a key role in different aspects of fear memory--acquisition and consolidation, retention, reconsolidation and extinction. Extinction is an important behavioural phenomenon which allows organism to adapt its behavior to a changing environment. Extinction of fear memory is a form of new inhibitory learning which interferes with expression of the initial acquired fear conditioning. Resistance to extinction is symptom of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. The aim of the present review was to summarize own and literary data about GABAergic modulation of fear extinction and pharmacological correction of extinction impairment at influences on GABA(A)- and GABA(B)- receptors.

  18. GABA transporter subtype 1 and GABA transporter subtype 3 modulate glutamatergic transmission via activation of presynaptic GABA(B) receptors in the rat globus pallidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiao-Tao; Paré, Jean-Francois; Smith, Yoland

    2012-08-01

    The intra-pallidal application of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter subtype 1 (GAT-1) or GABA transporter subtype 3 (GAT-3) transporter blockers [1-(4,4-diphenyl-3-butenyl)-3-piperidinecarboxylic acid hydrochloride (SKF 89976A) or 1-[2-[tris(4-methoxyphenyl)methoxy]ethyl]-(S)-3-piperidinecarboxylic acid (SNAP 5114)] reduces the activity of pallidal neurons in monkey. This effect could be mediated through the activation of presynaptic GABA(B) heteroreceptors in glutamatergic terminals by GABA spillover following GABA transporter (GAT) blockade. To test this hypothesis, we applied the whole-cell recording technique to study the effects of SKF 89976A and SNAP 5114 on evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) in the presence of gabazine, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, in rat globus pallidus slice preparations. Under the condition of postsynaptic GABA(B) receptor blockade by the intra-cellular application of N-(2,6-dimethylphenylcarbamoylmethyl)-triethylammonium bromide (OX314), bath application of SKF 89976A (10 μM) or SNAP 5114 (10 μM) decreased the amplitude of eEPSCs, without a significant effect on its holding current and whole cell input resistance. The inhibitory effect of GAT blockade on eEPSCs was blocked by (2S)-3-[[(1S)-1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]amino-2-hydroxypropyl](phenylmethyl)phosphinic acid, a GABA(B) receptor antagonist. The paired-pulse ratio of eEPSCs was increased, whereas the frequency, but not the amplitude, of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents was reduced in the presence of either GAT blocker, demonstrating a presynaptic effect. These results suggest that synaptically released GABA can inhibit glutamatergic transmission through the activation of presynaptic GABA(B) heteroreceptors following GAT-1 or GAT-3 blockade. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that presynaptic GABA(B) heteroreceptors in putative glutamatergic subthalamic afferents to the globus pallidus are sensitive to increases in extracellular GABA induced

  19. Procedure for recording the simultaneous activity of single neurons distributed across cortical areas during sensory discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Adrián; Nácher, Verónica; Luna, Rogelio; Alvarez, Manuel; Zainos, Antonio; Cordero, Silvia; Camarillo, Liliana; Vázquez, Yuriria; Lemus, Luis; Romo, Ranulfo

    2008-01-01

    We report a procedure for recording the simultaneous activity of single neurons distributed across five cortical areas in behaving monkeys. The procedure consists of a commercially available microdrive adapted to a commercially available neural data collection system. The critical advantage of this procedure is that, in each cortical area, a configuration of seven microelectrodes spaced 250–500 μm can be inserted transdurally and each can be moved independently in the z axis. For each microelectrode, the data collection system can record the activity of up to five neurons together with the local field potential (LFP). With this procedure, we normally monitor the simultaneous activity of 70–100 neurons while trained monkeys discriminate the difference in frequency between two vibrotactile stimuli. Approximately 20–60 of these neurons have response properties previously reported in this task. The neuronal recordings show good signal-to-noise ratio, are remarkably stable along a 1-day session, and allow testing several protocols. Microelectrodes are removed from the brain after a 1-day recording session, but are reinserted again the next day by using the same or different x-y microelectrode array configurations. The fact that microelectrodes can be moved in the z axis during the recording session and that the x-y configuration can be changed from day to day maximizes the probability of studying simultaneous interactions, both local and across distant cortical areas, between neurons associated with the different components of this task. PMID:18946031

  20. Stress and Sucrose Intake Modulate Neuronal Activity in the Anterior Hypothalamic Area in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Arojit; Guèvremont, Geneviève; Timofeeva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The anterior hypothalamic area (AHA) is an important integrative relay structure for a variety of autonomic, endocrine, and behavioral responses including feeding behavior and response to stress. However, changes in the activity of the AHA neurons during stress and feeding in freely moving rats are not clear. The present study investigated the firing rate and burst activity of neurons in the central nucleus of the AHA (cAHA) during sucrose intake in non-stressful conditions and after acute stress in freely behaving rats. Rats were implanted with micro-electrodes into the cAHA, and extracellular multi-unit activity was recorded during 1-h access to 10% sucrose in non-stressful conditions or after acute foot shock stress. Acute stress significantly reduced sucrose intake, total sucrose lick number, and lick frequency in licking clusters, and increased inter-lick intervals. At the cluster start (CS) of sucrose licking, the cAHA neurons increased (CS-excited, 20% of the recorded neurons), decreased (CS-inhibited, 42% of the neurons) or did not change (CS-nonresponsive, 38% of the neurons) their firing rate. Stress resulted in a significant increase in the firing rate of the CS-inhibited neurons by decreasing inter-spike intervals within the burst firing of these neurons. This increase in the stress-induced firing rate of the CS-inhibited neurons was accompanied by a disruption of the correlation between the firing rate of CS-inhibited and CS-nonresponsive neurons that was observed in non-stressful conditions. Stress did not affect the firing rate of the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons. However, stress changed the pattern of burst firing of the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons by decreasing and increasing the burst number in the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons, respectively. These results suggest that the cAHA neurons integrate the signals related to stress and intake of palatable food and play a role in the stress- and eating-related circuitry

  1. GABA level, gamma oscillation, and working memory performance in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Ming A. Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A relationship between working memory impairment, disordered neuronal oscillations, and abnormal prefrontal GABA function has been hypothesized in schizophrenia; however, in vivo GABA measurements and gamma band neural synchrony have not yet been compared in schizophrenia. This case–control pilot study (N = 24 compared baseline and working memory task-induced neuronal oscillations acquired with high-density electroencephalograms (EEGs to GABA levels measured in vivo with magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Working memory performance, baseline GABA level in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, and measures of gamma oscillations from EEGs at baseline and during a working memory task were obtained. A major limitation of this study is a relatively small sample size for several analyses due to the integration of diverse methodologies and participant compliance. Working memory performance was significantly lower for patients than for controls. During the working memory task, patients (n = 7 had significantly lower amplitudes in gamma oscillations than controls (n = 9. However, both at rest and across working memory stages, there were significant correlations between gamma oscillation amplitude and left DLPFC GABA level. Peak gamma frequency during the encoding stage of the working memory task (n = 16 significantly correlated with GABA level and working memory performance. Despite gamma band amplitude deficits in patients across working memory stages, both baseline and working memory-induced gamma oscillations showed strong dependence on baseline GABA levels in patients and controls. These findings suggest a critical role for GABA function in gamma band oscillations, even under conditions of system and cognitive impairments as seen in schizophrenia.

  2. Responses of mirror neurons in area F5 to hand and tool grasping observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochat, Magali J; Caruana, Fausto; Jezzini, Ahmad; Escola, Ludovic; Intskirveli, Irakli; Grammont, Franck; Gallese, Vittorio; Rizzolatti, Giacomo; Umiltà, Maria Alessandra

    2010-08-01

    Mirror neurons are a distinct class of neurons that discharge both during the execution of a motor act and during observation of the same or similar motor act performed by another individual. However, the extent to which mirror neurons coding a motor act with a specific goal (e.g., grasping) might also respond to the observation of a motor act having the same goal, but achieved with artificial effectors, is not yet established. In the present study, we addressed this issue by recording mirror neurons from the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) of two monkeys trained to grasp objects with pliers. Neuron activity was recorded during the observation and execution of grasping performed with the hand, with pliers and during observation of an experimenter spearing food with a stick. The results showed that virtually all neurons responding to the observation of hand grasping also responded to the observation of grasping with pliers and, many of them to the observation of spearing with a stick. However, the intensity and pattern of the response differed among conditions. Hand grasping observation determined the earliest and the strongest discharge, while pliers grasping and spearing observation triggered weaker responses at longer latencies. We conclude that F5 grasping mirror neurons respond to the observation of a family of stimuli leading to the same goal. However, the response pattern depends upon the similarity between the observed motor act and the one executed by the hand, the natural motor template.

  3. Mirror neurons in monkey area F5 do not adapt to the observation of repeated actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caggiano, Vittorio; Pomper, Joern K; Fleischer, Falk; Fogassi, Leonardo; Giese, Martin; Thier, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Repetitive presentation of the same visual stimulus entails a response decrease in the action potential discharge of neurons in various areas of the monkey visual cortex. It is still unclear whether this repetition suppression effect is also present in single neurons in cortical premotor areas responding to visual stimuli, as suggested by the human functional magnetic resonance imaging literature. Here we report the responses of 'mirror neurons' in monkey area F5 to the repeated presentation of action movies. We find that most single neurons and the population at large do not show a significant decrease of the firing rate. On the other hand, simultaneously recorded local field potentials exhibit repetition suppression. As local field potentials are believed to be better linked to the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal exploited by functional magnetic resonance imaging, these findings suggest caution when trying to derive conclusions on the spiking activity of neurons in a given area based on the observation of BOLD repetition suppression.

  4. Pu-Erh tea and GABA attenuates oxidative stress in kainic acid-induced status epilepticus

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Pu-Erh tea is one of the most-consumed beverages due to its taste and the anti-anxiety-producing effect of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) if contains. However the protective effects of Pu-Erh tea and its constituent, GABA to kainic acid (KA)-induced seizure have not been fully investigated. Methods We analyzed the effect of Pu-Erh tea leaf (PETL) and GABA on KA-induced neuronal injury in vivo and in vitro. Results PETL and GABA reduced the maximal seizure classes, pred...

  5. The mirror neuron system and the strange case of Broca's area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerri, Gabriella; Cabinio, Monia; Blasi, Valeria; Borroni, Paola; Iadanza, Antonella; Fava, Enrica; Fornia, Luca; Ferpozzi, Valentina; Riva, Marco; Casarotti, Alessandra; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; Falini, Andrea; Bello, Lorenzo

    2015-03-01

    Mirror neurons, originally described in the monkey premotor area F5, are embedded in a frontoparietal network for action execution and observation. A similar Mirror Neuron System (MNS) exists in humans, including precentral gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, and superior temporal sulcus. Controversial is the inclusion of Broca's area, as homologous to F5, a relevant issue in light of the mirror hypothesis of language evolution, which postulates a key role of Broca's area in action/speech perception/production. We assess "mirror" properties of this area by combining neuroimaging and intraoperative neurophysiological techniques. Our results show that Broca's area is minimally involved in action observation and has no motor output on hand or phonoarticulatory muscles, challenging its inclusion in the MNS. The presence of these functions in premotor BA6 makes this area the likely homologue of F5 suggesting that the MNS may be involved in the representation of articulatory rather than semantic components of speech.

  6. Electrophysiological characterization of male goldfish (Carassius auratus ventral preoptic area neurons receiving olfactory inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wudu E. Lado

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical communication via sex pheromones is critical for successful reproduction but the underlying neural mechanisms are not well-understood. The goldfish is a tractable model because sex pheromones have been well-characterized in this species. We used male goldfish forebrain explants in vitro and performed whole-cell current clamp recordings from single neurons in the ventral preoptic area (vPOA to characterize their membrane properties and synaptic inputs from the olfactory bulbs (OB. Principle component and cluster analyses based on intrinsic membrane properties of vPOA neurons (N = 107 revealed five (I-V distinct cell groups. These cells displayed differences in their input resistance (Rinput: I II = IV > III = V. Evidence from electrical stimulation of the OB and application of receptor antagonists suggests that vPOA neurons receive monosynaptic glutamatergic inputs via the medial olfactory tract, with connectivity varying among neuronal groups [I (24%, II (40%, III (0%, IV (34% and V (2%].

  7. A glutamatergic reward input from the dorsal raphe to ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jia; Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Hui-Ling; Wang, Huikun; de Jesus Aceves Buendia, Jose; Hoffman, Alexander F; Lupica, Carl R; Seal, Rebecca P; Morales, Marisela

    2014-11-12

    Electrical stimulation of the dorsal raphe (DR) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) activates the fibres of the same reward pathway but the phenotype of this pathway and the direction of the reward-relevant fibres have not been determined. Here we report rewarding effects following activation of a DR-originating pathway consisting of vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGluT3) containing neurons that form asymmetric synapses onto VTA dopamine neurons that project to nucleus accumbens. Optogenetic VTA activation of this projection elicits AMPA-mediated synaptic excitatory currents in VTA mesoaccumbens dopaminergic neurons and causes dopamine release in nucleus accumbens. Activation also reinforces instrumental behaviour and establishes conditioned place preferences. These findings indicate that the DR-VGluT3 pathway to VTA utilizes glutamate as a neurotransmitter and is a substrate linking the DR-one of the most sensitive reward sites in the brain--to VTA dopaminergic neurons.

  8. Different subtypes of GABA-A receptors are expressed in human, mouse and rat T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh K Mendu

    Full Text Available γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA is the most prominent neuroinhibitory transmitter in the brain, where it activates neuronal GABA-A receptors (GABA-A channels located at synapses and outside of synapses. The GABA-A receptors are primary targets of many clinically useful drugs. In recent years, GABA has been shown to act as an immunomodulatory molecule. We have examined in human, mouse and rat CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells which subunit isoforms of the GABA-A channels are expressed. The channel physiology and drug specificity is dictated by the GABA-A receptor subtype, which in turn is determined by the subunit isoforms that make the channel. There were 5, 8 and 13 different GABA-A subunit isoforms identified in human, mouse and rat CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells, respectively. Importantly, the γ2 subunit that imposes benzodiazepine sensitivity on the GABA-A receptors, was only detected in the mouse T cells. Immunoblots and immunocytochemistry showed abundant GABA-A channel proteins in the T cells from all three species. GABA-activated whole-cell transient and tonic currents were recorded. The currents were inhibited by picrotoxin, SR95531 and bicuculline, antagonists of GABA-A channels. Clearly, in both humans and rodents T cells, functional GABA-A channels are expressed but the subtypes vary. It is important to bear in mind the interspecies difference when selecting the appropriate animal models to study the physiological role and pharmacological properties of GABA-A channels in CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells and when selecting drugs aimed at modulating the human T cells function.

  9. GABA increases electrical excitability in a subset of human unmyelinated peripheral axons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard W Carr

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A proportion of small diameter primary sensory neurones innervating human skin are chemosensitive. They respond in a receptor dependent manner to chemical mediators of inflammation as well as naturally occurring algogens, thermogens and pruritogens. The neurotransmitter GABA is interesting in this respect because in animal models of neuropathic pain GABA pre-synaptically regulates nociceptive input to the spinal cord. However, the effect of GABA on human peripheral unmyelinated axons has not been established. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Electrical stimulation was used to assess the effect of GABA on the electrical excitability of unmyelinated axons in isolated fascicles of human sural nerve. GABA (0.1-100 microM increased electrical excitability in a subset (ca. 40% of C-fibres in human sural nerve fascicles suggesting that axonal GABA sensitivity is selectively restricted to a sub-population of human unmyelinated axons. The effects of GABA were mediated by GABA(A receptors, being mimicked by bath application of the GABA(A agonist muscimol (0.1-30 microM while the GABA(B agonist baclofen (10-30 microM was without effect. Increases in excitability produced by GABA (10-30 microM were blocked by the GABA(A antagonists gabazine (10-20 microM, bicuculline (10-20 microM and picrotoxin (10-20 microM. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Functional GABA(A receptors are present on a subset of unmyelinated primary afferents in humans and their activation depolarizes these axons, an effect likely due to an elevated intra-axonal chloride concentration. GABA(A receptor modulation may therefore regulate segmental and peripheral components of nociception.

  10. Evidence for a Revised Ion/Substrate Coupling Stoichiometry of GABA Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willford, Samantha L; Anderson, Cynthia M; Spencer, Shelly R; Eskandari, Sepehr

    2015-08-01

    Plasma membrane γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters (GATs) are electrogenic transport proteins that couple the cotranslocation of Na(+), Cl(-), and GABA across the plasma membrane of neurons and glia. A fundamental property of the transporter that determines its ability to concentrate GABA in cells and, hence, regulate synaptic and extra-synaptic GABA concentrations, is the ion/substrate coupling stoichiometry. Here, we scrutinized the currently accepted 2 Na(+):1 Cl(-):1 GABA stoichiometry because it is inconsistent with the measured net charge translocated per co-substrate (Na(+), Cl(-), and GABA). We expressed GAT1 and GAT3 in Xenopus laevis oocytes and utilized thermodynamic and uptake under voltage-clamp measurements to determine the stoichiometry of the GABA transporters. Voltage-clamped GAT1-expressing oocytes were internally loaded with GABA, and the reversal potential (V rev) of the transporter-mediated current was recorded at different external concentrations of Na(+), Cl(-), or GABA. The shifts in V rev for a tenfold change in the external Na(+), Cl(-), and GABA concentration were 84 ± 4, 30 ± 1, and 29 ± 1 mV, respectively. To determine the net charge translocated per Na(+), Cl(-), and GABA, we measured substrate fluxes under voltage clamp in cells expressing GAT1 or GAT3. Charge flux to substrate flux ratios were 0.7 ± 0.1 charge/Na(+), 2.0 ± 0.2 charges/Cl(-), and 2.1 ± 0.1 charges/GABA. Altogether, our results strongly suggest a 3 Na(+):1 Cl(-):1 GABA coupling stoichiometry for the GABA transporters. The revised stoichiometry has important implications for understanding the contribution of GATs to GABAergic signaling in health and disease.

  11. Salsolinol facilitates glutamatergic transmission to dopamine neurons in the posterior ventral tegmental area of rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiqin Xie

    Full Text Available Although in vivo evidence indicates that salsolinol, the condensation product of acetaldehyde and dopamine, has properties that may contribute to alcohol abuse, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. We have reported previously that salsolinol stimulates dopamine neurons in the posterior ventral tegmental area (p-VTA partly by reducing inhibitory GABAergic transmission, and that ethanol increases glutamatergic transmission to VTA-dopamine neurons via the activation of dopamine D(1 receptors (D(1Rs. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that salsolinol stimulates dopamine neurons involving activation of D(1Rs. By using whole-cell recordings on p-VTA-dopamine neurons in acute brain slices of rats, we found that salsolinol-induced increase in spike frequency of dopamine neurons was substantially attenuated by DL-2-amino-5-phosphono-valeric acid and 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2, 3-dione, the antagonists of glutamatergic N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors. Moreover, salsolinol increased the amplitude of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs and the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs. Additionally, SKF83566, a D(1R antagonist attenuated the salsolinol-induced facilitation of EPSCs and of spontaneous firing of dopamine neurons. Our data reveal that salsolinol enhances glutamatergic transmission onto dopamine neurons via activation of D(1Rs at the glutamatergic afferents in dopamine neurons, which contributes to salsolinol's stimulating effect on p-VTA dopamine neurons. This appears to be a novel mechanism which contributes toward rewarding properties of salsolinol.

  12. Salsolinol facilitates glutamatergic transmission to dopamine neurons in the posterior ventral tegmental area of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guiqin; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Although in vivo evidence indicates that salsolinol, the condensation product of acetaldehyde and dopamine, has properties that may contribute to alcohol abuse, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. We have reported previously that salsolinol stimulates dopamine neurons in the posterior ventral tegmental area (p-VTA) partly by reducing inhibitory GABAergic transmission, and that ethanol increases glutamatergic transmission to VTA-dopamine neurons via the activation of dopamine D(1) receptors (D(1)Rs). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that salsolinol stimulates dopamine neurons involving activation of D(1)Rs. By using whole-cell recordings on p-VTA-dopamine neurons in acute brain slices of rats, we found that salsolinol-induced increase in spike frequency of dopamine neurons was substantially attenuated by DL-2-amino-5-phosphono-valeric acid and 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2, 3-dione, the antagonists of glutamatergic N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors. Moreover, salsolinol increased the amplitude of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs. Additionally, SKF83566, a D(1)R antagonist attenuated the salsolinol-induced facilitation of EPSCs and of spontaneous firing of dopamine neurons. Our data reveal that salsolinol enhances glutamatergic transmission onto dopamine neurons via activation of D(1)Rs at the glutamatergic afferents in dopamine neurons, which contributes to salsolinol's stimulating effect on p-VTA dopamine neurons. This appears to be a novel mechanism which contributes toward rewarding properties of salsolinol.

  13. Effect of feature-selective attention on neuronal responses in macaque area MT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Hoffmann, K-P; Albright, T D; Thiele, A

    2012-03-01

    Attention influences visual processing in striate and extrastriate cortex, which has been extensively studied for spatial-, object-, and feature-based attention. Most studies exploring neural signatures of feature-based attention have trained animals to attend to an object identified by a certain feature and ignore objects/displays identified by a different feature. Little is known about the effects of feature-selective attention, where subjects attend to one stimulus feature domain (e.g., color) of an object while features from different domains (e.g., direction of motion) of the same object are ignored. To study this type of feature-selective attention in area MT in the middle temporal sulcus, we trained macaque monkeys to either attend to and report the direction of motion of a moving sine wave grating (a feature for which MT neurons display strong selectivity) or attend to and report its color (a feature for which MT neurons have very limited selectivity). We hypothesized that neurons would upregulate their firing rate during attend-direction conditions compared with attend-color conditions. We found that feature-selective attention significantly affected 22% of MT neurons. Contrary to our hypothesis, these neurons did not necessarily increase firing rate when animals attended to direction of motion but fell into one of two classes. In one class, attention to color increased the gain of stimulus-induced responses compared with attend-direction conditions. The other class displayed the opposite effects. Feature-selective activity modulations occurred earlier in neurons modulated by attention to color compared with neurons modulated by attention to motion direction. Thus feature-selective attention influences neuronal processing in macaque area MT but often exhibited a mismatch between the preferred stimulus dimension (direction of motion) and the preferred attention dimension (attention to color).

  14. The dynamics of GABA signaling: Revelations from the circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, H Elliott; Walton, James C; Gamble, Karen L; McNeill, John K; Hummer, Daniel L

    2017-01-01

    Virtually every neuron within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) communicates via GABAergic signaling. The extracellular levels of GABA within the SCN are determined by a complex interaction of synthesis and transport, as well as synaptic and non-synaptic release. The response to GABA is mediated by GABAA receptors that respond to both phasic and tonic GABA release and that can produce excitatory as well as inhibitory cellular responses. GABA also influences circadian control through the exclusively inhibitory effects of GABAB receptors. Both GABA and neuropeptide signaling occur within the SCN, although the functional consequences of the interactions of these signals are not well understood. This review considers the role of GABA in the circadian pacemaker, in the mechanisms responsible for the generation of circadian rhythms, in the ability of non-photic stimuli to reset the phase of the pacemaker, and in the ability of the day-night cycle to entrain the pacemaker.

  15. GABA not only a neurotransmitter: osmotic regulation by GABAAR signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana eCesetti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In neurons the anionic channel γ-aminobutyric (GABA A receptor (GABAAR plays a central role in mediating both the neurotrophic and neurotransmitter role of GABA. Activation of this receptor by GABA also affects the function of non-neuronal cells in the central nervous system (CNS, as GABAARs are expressed in mature macroglia and in almost all progenitor types, including neural stem cells. The relevance of GABA signalling in non-neuronal cells has been comparatively less investigated than in neurons. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that these cells are direct targets of GABA regulation. In non-neuronal cells GABAAR activation leads to influx or efflux of chloride (Cl- depending on the electrochemical gradient. Ion transport is indissolubly associated to water fluxes across the plasma membrane and plays a key role in brain physiology. Therefore, GABAAR could affect osmotic tension in the brain by modulating ion gradients. In addition, since water movements also occur through specialized water channels and transporters, GABAAR signalling could affect the movement of water also by regulating the function of the channels and transporters involved, thereby affecting not only the direction of the water fluxes but also their dynamics. This regulation has consequences at the cellular level as it modulates cell volume and activates multiple intracellular signalling mechanisms important for cell proliferation, maturation and survival. It may also have consequences at the systemic level. For example, it may indirectly control neuronal excitability, by regulating the extracellular space and interstitial concentration of Cl-, and contribute to brain water homeostasis. Therefore, GABAergic osmotic regulation should be taken into account during the treatment of pathologies requiring the administration of GABAAR modulators and for the development of therapies for diseases causing water unbalance in the brain.

  16. Brain stimulation used as biofeedback in neuronal activation of the temporal lobe area in autistic children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon Furtado da Silva

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study focused upon the functional capacity of mirror neurons in autistic children. 30 individuals, 10 carriers of the autistic syndrome (GCA, 10 with intellectual impairments (GDI, and 10 non-autistics (GCN had registered eletroencephalogram from the brain area theoretically related to mirror neurons. Data collection procedure occurred prior to brain stimulation and after the stimulation session. During the second session, participants had to alternately process figures evoking neutral, happy, and/or sorrowful feelings. Results proved that, for all groups, the stimulation process in fact produced additional activation in the neural area under study. The level of activation was related to the format of emotional stimuli and the likelihood of boosting such stimuli. Since the increase of activation occurred in a model similar to the one observed for the control group, we may suggest that the difficulty people with autism have at expressing emotions is not due to nonexistence of mirror neurons.

  17. To Ingest or Rest? Specialized Roles of Lateral Hypothalamic Area Neurons in Coordinating Energy Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette A. Brown

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Survival depends on an organism’s ability to sense nutrient status and accordingly regulate intake and energy expenditure behaviors. Uncoupling of energy sensing and behavior, however, underlies energy balance disorders such as anorexia or obesity. The hypothalamus regulates energy balance, and in particular the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA is poised to coordinate peripheral cues of energy status and behaviors that impact weight, such as drinking, locomotor behavior, arousal/sleep and autonomic output. There are several populations of LHA neurons that are defined by their neuropeptide content and contribute to energy balance. LHA neurons that express the neuropeptides melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH or orexins/hypocretins (OX are best characterized and these neurons play important roles in regulating ingestion, arousal, locomotor behavior and autonomic function via distinct neuronal circuits. Recently, another population of LHA neurons containing the neuropeptide Neurotensin (Nts has been implicated in coordinating anorectic stimuli and behavior to regulate hydration and energy balance. Understanding the specific roles of MCH, OX and Nts neurons in harmonizing energy sensing and behavior thus has the potential to inform pharmacological strategies to modify behaviors and treat energy balance disorders.

  18. Orexinergic input to dopaminergic neurons of the human ventral tegmental area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Hrabovszky

    Full Text Available The mesolimbic reward pathway arising from dopaminergic (DA neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA has been strongly implicated in reward processing and drug abuse. In rodents, behaviors associated with this projection are profoundly influenced by an orexinergic input from the lateral hypothalamus to the VTA. Because the existence and significance of an analogous orexigenic regulatory mechanism acting in the human VTA have been elusive, here we addressed the possibility that orexinergic neurons provide direct input to DA neurons of the human VTA. Dual-label immunohistochemistry was used and orexinergic projections to the VTA and to DA neurons of the neighboring substantia nigra (SN were analyzed comparatively in adult male humans and rats. Orexin B-immunoreactive (IR axons apposed to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-IR DA and to non-DA neurons were scarce in the VTA and SN of both species. In the VTA, 15.0±2.8% of TH-IR perikarya in humans and 3.2±0.3% in rats received orexin B-IR afferent contacts. On average, 0.24±0.05 and 0.05±0.005 orexinergic appositions per TH-IR perikaryon were detected in humans and rats, respectively. The majority (86-88% of randomly encountered orexinergic contacts targeted the dendritic compartment of DA neurons. Finally, DA neurons of the SN also received orexinergic innervation in both species. Based on the observation of five times heavier orexinergic input to TH-IR neurons of the human, compared with the rat, VTA, we propose that orexinergic mechanism acting in the VTA may play just as important roles in reward processing and drug abuse in humans, as already established well in rodents.

  19. Ultrastructure of junction areas between neurons and astrocytes in rat supraoptic nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Duan; Hua Yuan; Chang-Jun Su; Ying-Ying Liu; Zhi-Ren Rao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the ultrastructure of junction areas between neurons and astrocytes of supraoptic nuclei in rats orally administered 30 g/L NaCl solution for 5 days.METHODS: The anti-connexin (CX) 43 and anti-CX32 double immunoelectromicroscopic labeled method, and anti-Fos or anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunohistochemistry were used to detect changes in the junctional area between neurons and astrocytes in supraoptic nuclei of 5 rats after 30 g/L NaCL solution was given for 5days.RESULTS: A heterotypic connexin32/connexin43 gap junction (HGJ) between neurons and astrocytes (AS) in rat supraoptic nuclei was observed, which was characterized by the thickening and dark staining of cytomembranes with a narrow cleft between them. The number of HGJs and Fos like immunoreactive (-LI) cells was significantly increased following hyperosmotic stimuli, that is, the rats were administered 30 g/L NaCl solution orally or 90 g/L NaCl solution intravenously. HGJs could be blocked with carbenoxolone (CBX), a gap junction blocker, and the number of Fos-LI neurons was significantly decreased compared with that in rats without CBX injection, while Fos-LI ASs were not affected.CONCLUSION: HGJ may be a rapid adaptive signal structure between neurons and ASs in response to stimulation.

  20. Galphimine-B modifies electrical activity of ventral tegmental area neurons in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortoriello, J; Ortega, A; Herrera-Ruíz, M; Trujillo, J; Reyes-Vázquez, C

    1998-05-01

    Galphimine-B (G-B) is a bioactive compound isolated from the plant Galphimia glauca Cav. (Malpighiaceae) with central nervous system depressant properties previously described. In the present study, extracellular spiking activity records in either somatosensorial cortex or ventral tegmental area (VTA) neurons, were performed in rats after i.p. or local administration of G-B. None of the cortical neurons displayed significant changes induced by any of the applied doses. In VTA cells, two patterns of electrical discharge were recorded, bursting (57%) and nonbursting (43%) types. Systemic administration of G-B induced excitatory effects in neurons with a bursting firing pattern and mixed responses on nonbursting units. When this compound was applied locally by microiontophoresis, most of the bursting and nonbursting spiking neurons showed a firing depression and only a few of the nonbursting neurons showed an increment of discharge frequency. These results are important since VTA is a major dopaminergic center responsible for the innervation of the prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens and entorhinal region. These areas are targets for the action of antipsychotic drugs.

  1. Heterogenous GABA(B) receptor-mediated pathways are involved in the local GABAergic system of the rat trigeminal ganglion: possible involvement of KCTD proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayasaki, H; Sohma, Y; Kanbara, K; Otsuki, Y

    2012-08-30

    It is well known that Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) plays an important role in signal transduction in the central nervous system. However, the function of GABA in the peripheral nervous system, including sensory ganglions, is still unclear. In this study we have characterized the expression, cellular distribution, and function of GABA(B) receptor subunits, and the recently discovered GABA(B) auxiliary subunits, K(+) channel tetramerization domain-containing (KCTD) proteins, in rat trigeminal ganglion (TG) neuronal cells, which are devoid of synapses. We found heterogeneous expression of both GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits, and a near-plasma membrane localization of KCTD12. In addition, we found that GABA(B2) subunits correlated with KCTD16. Whole-cell current-clamp recordings showed that responses to the GABA(B) receptor agonist, baclofen, were variable and both increases and decreases in excitability were observed. This correlated with observed differences in voltage-dependent K(+) current responses to baclofen in voltage-clamped TG neuronal cells. The functional diversity of the GABA(B)ergic regulation on the excitability of the TG neuronal cell bodies could be due to the heterogenous expression of KCTD proteins, and subsequent regulation of plasma membrane K(+) channels. Taken together with our previous demonstration of a local GABA(A) receptor-mediated system in rat TG, we provide an updated GABAergic model in the rat TG that incorporates both GABA(A)- and GABA(B)-receptor systems.

  2. The densities of calbindin and parvalbumin, but not calretinin neurons, are sexually dimorphic in the amygdala of the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Równiak, Maciej; Bogus-Nowakowska, Krystyna; Robak, Anna

    2015-04-16

    In the amygdala, the calcium-binding proteins (calbindin, parvalbumin or calretinin) are useful markers of specific subpopulations of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) containing neurons. In the rat and monkey they together mark the vast majority of GABA-containing neurons in this brain region. As GABA involvement in the control of various behaviors in a sex-specific manner and sexual dimorphism of the GABAergic system itself were recently proven, the question is how much dimorphic may be various subpopulations of this system. Thus, the present study investigates for the first time the presence/absence of sexual dimorphism among neurons expressing calbindin (CB), parvalbumin (PV) and calretinin (CR) which form in the amygdala main subsets of GABAergic system. The results show that in the amygdala of the guinea pig the densities of CB and/or PV expressing neurons are sexually dimorphic with the female>male pattern of sex differences in the basolateral amygdala. In the medial and cortical amygdala respectively CB and PV values are also sexually dimorphic, favoring males. The densities of CR expressing neurons are in the amygdala of the guinea pig sexually isomorphic. In conclusion, the results of the present study provide an evidence that in the amygdala of the guinea pig the densities of neurons expressing CB and/or PV are sexually dimorphic what supports the idea that GABA participates in the mediation of sexually dimorphic functions, controlled by this brain area.

  3. Cell surface area regulation in neurons in hippocampal slice cultures is resistant to oxygen-glucose deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Shulyakova

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Natalya Shulyakova1,2, Jamie Fong2, Diana Diec2, Adrian Nahirny1,2, Linda R Mills1,21Department of Physiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, M5T 2S8; 2Toronto Western Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, 11-430, 399 Bathurst St, Toronto, ON, Canada, M5T 2S8Background: Neurons swell in response to a variety of insults. The capacity to recover, ie, to shrink, is critical for neuronal function and survival. Studies on dissociated neurons have shown that during swelling and shrinking, neurons reorganize their plasma membrane; as neurons swell, in response to hypo-osmotic media, the bilayer area increases. Upon restoration of normo-osmotic media, neurons shrink, forming transient invaginations of the plasma membrane known as vacuole-like dilations (VLDs, to accommodate the decrease in the bilayer.Methods: Here we used confocal microscopy to monitor neuronal swelling and shrinking in the three-dimensional (3D environment of post-natal rat hippocampal slice cultures. To label neurons, we used biolistic transfection, to introduce enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP targeted to the cytoplasm; and a membrane targeted GFP (lckGFP, targeted to the plasma membrane.Results: Neurons in slice cultures swelled and shrank in response to hypo-osmotic to normo-osmotic media changes. Oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD caused sustained neuronal swelling; after reperfusion, some neurons recovered but in others, VLD recovery was stalled. OGD did not impair neuronal capacity to recover from a subsequent osmotic challenge.Conclusion: These results suggest cell surface area regulation (SAR is an intrinsic property of neurons, and that neuronal capacity for SAR may play an important role in the brain’s response to ischemic insults.Keywords: neurons, swelling, ischemia, cell surface area, hippocampal slice culture

  4. Ventral tegmental area neurons in learned appetitive behavior and positive reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Howard L; Hjelmstad, Gregory O; Margolis, Elyssa B; Nicola, Saleem M

    2007-01-01

    Ventral tegmental area (VTA) neuron firing precedes behaviors elicited by reward-predictive sensory cues and scales with the magnitude and unpredictability of received rewards. These patterns are consistent with roles in the performance of learned appetitive behaviors and in positive reinforcement, respectively. The VTA includes subpopulations of neurons with different afferent connections, neurotransmitter content, and projection targets. Because the VTA and substantia nigra pars compacta are the sole sources of striatal and limbic forebrain dopamine, measurements of dopamine release and manipulations of dopamine function have provided critical evidence supporting a VTA contribution to these functions. However, the VTA also sends GABAergic and glutamatergic projections to the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex. Furthermore, VTA-mediated but dopamine-independent positive reinforcement has been demonstrated. Consequently, identifying the neurotransmitter content and projection target of VTA neurons recorded in vivo will be critical for determining their contribution to learned appetitive behaviors.

  5. Area-specific development of distinct projection neuron subclasses is regulated by postnatal epigenetic modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb, Kawssar; Magrinelli, Elia; Nicolas, Céline S; Lukianets, Nikita; Frangeul, Laura; Pietri, Mariel; Sun, Tao; Sandoz, Guillaume; Grammont, Franck; Jabaudon, Denis; Studer, Michele; Alfano, Christian

    2016-01-27

    During cortical development, the identity of major classes of long-distance projection neurons is established by the expression of molecular determinants, which become gradually restricted and mutually exclusive. However, the mechanisms by which projection neurons acquire their final properties during postnatal stages are still poorly understood. In this study, we show that the number of neurons co-expressing Ctip2 and Satb2, respectively involved in the early specification of subcerebral and callosal projection neurons, progressively increases after birth in the somatosensory cortex. Ctip2/Satb2 postnatal co-localization defines two distinct neuronal subclasses projecting either to the contralateral cortex or to the brainstem suggesting that Ctip2/Satb2 co-expression may refine their properties rather than determine their identity. Gain- and loss-of-function approaches reveal that the transcriptional adaptor Lmo4 drives this maturation program through modulation of epigenetic mechanisms in a time- and area-specific manner, thereby indicating that a previously unknown genetic program postnatally promotes the acquisition of final subtype-specific features.

  6. (R)-roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, enhances tonic GABA inhibition in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A; Tyzio, R; Zilberter, Y; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2008-10-02

    Pharmacological agents that mediate a persistent GABAergic conductance are of considerable interest for treatment of epilepsy. (R)-roscovitine is a membrane permeable cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, designed to block cell division. It is currently undergoing a phase II clinical trial as an anticancer drug. We show that (R)-roscovitine increases a tonic GABA-mediated current in rat hippocampal neurons. This enhanced tonic current appears independent of synaptic GABA release and requires functional transmembrane GABA transport. The effect of (R)-roscovitine is associated with neither modification of GABAA receptors nor protein kinase activity, but is associated with a significant increase in intracellular GABA concentration in hippocampal GABAergic neurons. (R)-roscovitine-induced tonic inhibition significantly suppresses spontaneous spiking activity of hippocampal pyramidal cells. Therefore, (R)-roscovitine is a potent modulator of neuronal activity in rat hippocampus and may provide a tool for preventing paroxysmal activity.

  7. Epileptogenic actions of GABA and fast oscillations in the developing hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilov, Ilgam; Le Van Quyen, Michel; Gozlan, Henri; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2005-12-08

    GABA excites immature neurons and inhibits adult ones, but whether this contributes to seizures in the developing brain is not known. We now report that in the developing, but not the adult, hippocampus, seizures beget seizures only if GABAergic synapses are functional. In the immature hippocampus, seizures generated with functional GABAergic synapses include fast oscillations that are required to transform a naive network to an epileptic one: blocking GABA receptors prevents the long-lasting sequels of seizures. In contrast, in adult neurons, full blockade of GABA(A) receptors generates epileptogenic high-frequency seizures. Therefore, purely glutamatergic seizures are not epileptogenic in the developing hippocampus. We suggest that the density of glutamatergic synapses is not sufficient for epileptogenesis in immature neurons; excitatory GABAergic synapses are required for that purpose. We suggest that the synergistic actions of GABA and NMDA receptors trigger the cascades involved in epileptogenesis in the developing hippocampus.

  8. [GABA, a key transmitter for fetal brain maturation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2007-01-01

    GABA, the principal inhibitory transmitter excites immature neurons in all animal species studied. This is due to the higher intracellular concentration of chloride at early developmental stages. Excitatory actions of GABA play an important action in brain maturation. Recent observations also suggest an abrupt shift during delivery that exerts a neuro-protective action contributing to reduce the sequels of trauma and anoxic episodes. These observations have important clinical implications in relation to delivery associated insults but also preterm delivery and more generally consumption of agents during gestation.

  9. Zolpidem, a selective GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit agonist, induces comparable Fos expression in oxytocinergic neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular and accessory but not supraoptic nuclei in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiss, Alexander; Søderman, Andreas; Bundzikova, Jana;

    2006-01-01

    Functional activation of oxytocinergic (OXY) cells in the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN), supraoptic (SON), and accessory (ACC) nuclei was investigated in response to acute treatment with Zolpidem (a GABA(A) receptor agonist with selectivity for alpha(1) subunits) utilizing dual Fos/OXY immun...

  10. GABA Receptor Agonists Rescued Cortical Neurons from Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation%GABA受体激动剂对氧-葡萄糖剥夺诱导皮层神经元死亡的保护作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴翠莹; 李树基; 高天明

    2010-01-01

    目的:研究GABA受体激动剂对氧-葡萄糖剥夺诱导皮层神经元死亡的保护作用.方法: 培养12d的皮层神经元更换为Earle's 平衡盐溶液(Earle's balanced salts ,EBSS)后置于37℃三气缺氧(N2:CO2:O2= 94%:5%:1%)培养箱内培养,4h后恢复正常条件培养,同时在培养液内加入GABA A受体和B受体激动剂作用24h,用Hoechst33342/PI的染色方法检测其死亡情况.结果: GABA A受体激动剂(muscimol)和GABA B受体激动剂(baclofen)均分别能显著降低神经细胞死亡率49.9%和35.3%. 结论: GABA A受体激动剂和B受体激动剂对氧-葡萄糖剥夺诱导的皮层神经元死亡均有显著的保护作用.

  11. Embryonic and postnatal development of GABA, calbindin, calretinin, and parvalbumin in the mouse claustral complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila, José Carlos; Real, M Angeles; Olmos, Luis; Legaz, Isabel; Medina, Loreta; Guirado, Salvador

    2005-01-03

    We analyzed the development of immunoreactive expression patterns for the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the calcium-binding proteins calbindin, calretinin, and parvalbumin in the embryonic and postnatal mouse claustral complex. Each calcium-binding protein shows a different temporal and spatial pattern of development. Calbindin-positive cells start to be seen very early during embryogenesis and increase dramatically until birth, thus becoming the most abundant cell type during embryonic development, especially in the ventral pallial part of the claustrum. The distribution of calbindin neurons throughout the claustrum during embryonic development partly parallels that of GABA neurons, suggesting that at least part of the calbindin neurons of the claustral complex are GABAergic and originate in the subpallium. Parvalbumin cells, on the other hand, start to be seen only postnatally, and their number then increases while the density of calbindin neurons decreases. Based on calretinin expression in axons, the core/shell compartments of the dorsal claustrum start to be clearly seen at embryonic day 18.5 and may be related to the development of the thalamoclaustral input. Comparison with the expression of Cadherin 8, a marker of the developing dorsolateral claustrum, indicates that the core includes a central part of the dorsolateral claustrum, whereas the shell includes a peripheral area of the dorsolateral claustrum, plus the adjacent ventromedial claustrum. The present data on the spatiotemporal developmental patterns of several subtypes of GABAergic neurons in the claustral complex may help for future studies on temporal lobe epilepsies, which have been related to an alteration of the GABAergic activity.

  12. At immature mossy fibers-CA3 connections, activation of presynaptic GABA(B) receptors by endogenously released GABA contributes to synapses silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safiulina, Victoria F; Cherubini, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Early in postnatal life correlated GABAergic activity in the hippocampus is thought to play a crucial role in synaptogenesis and in the development of adult neuronal networks. Unlike adulthood, at this developmental stage, mossy fibers (MF) which are the axons of granule cells, release GABA into CA3 principal cells and interneurons. Here, we tested the hypothesis that at MF-CA3 connections, tonic activation of GABA(B) autoreceptors by GABA is responsible for the low probability of release and synapse silencing. Blocking GABA(B) receptors with CGP55845 enhanced the probability of GABA release and switched on silent synapses while the opposite was observed with baclofen. Both these effects were presynaptic and were associated with changes in paired-pulse ratio and coefficient of variation. In addition, enhancing the extracellular GABA concentration by repetitive stimulation of MF or by blocking the GABA transporter GAT-1, switched off active synapses, an effect that was prevented by CGP55845. In the presence of CGP55845, stimulation of MF-induced synaptic potentiation. The shift of E(GABA) from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction with bumetanide, a blocker of the cation-chloride co-transporter NKCC1, prevented synaptic potentiation and caused synaptic depression, suggesting that the depolarizing action of GABA observed in the presence of CGP55845 is responsible for the potentiating effect. It is proposed that, activation of GABA(B) receptors by spillover of GABA from MF terminals reduces the probability of release and contributes to synapses silencing. This would act as a filter to prevent excessive activation of the auto-associative CA3 network and the emergence of seizures.

  13. Acute oral administration of low doses of methylphenidate targets calretinin neurons in the rat septal area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro eGarcía-Aviles

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Methylphenidate (MPD is a commonly administered drug to treat children suffering from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Alterations in septal driven hippocampal theta rhythm may underlie attention deficits observed in these patients. Amongst others, the septo-hippocampal connections have long been acknowledged to be important in preserving hippocampal function. Thus, we wanted to ascertain if methylphenidate administration, which improves attention in patients, could affect septal areas connecting with hippocampus. We used low and orally administered methylphenidate doses (1.3; 2.7 and 5mg/Kg to rats what mimics the dosage range in humans. In our model, we observed no effect when using 1.3mg/Kg methylphenidate; whereas 2.7 and 5 mg/Kg induced a significant increase in c-fos expression specifically in the medial septum, an area intimately connected to the hippocampus. We analyzed dopaminergic areas such as nucleus accumbens and striatum, and found that only 5mg/Kg induced c-fos levels increase. In these areas tyrosine hydroxylase correlated well with c-fos staining, whereas in the medial septum the sparse tyrosine hydroxylase fibres did not overlap with c-fos positive neurons. Double immunofluorescence of c-fos with neuronal markers in the septal area revealed that co-localization with choline acethyl transferase, parvalbumin, and calbindin with c-fos did not change with MPD treatment; whereas, calretinin and c-fos double labeled neurons increased after MPD administration. Altogether, these results suggest that low and acute doses of methylphenidate primary target specific populations of caltretinin medial septal neurons.

  14. [GABA--the basic mediator of excitation in the early stages of hippocampal development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazipov, R N; Zefirov, A L; Ben-Ari, E

    1998-01-01

    GABA is the principal neurotransmitter of inhibition in the adult mammalian brain. However, at early stages of development, including embryonic period and first week of postnatal life, GABA plays the role of main neurotransmitter of excitation. The paradoxical excitatory effect of GABA is due to an inversed chloride gradient and therefore a depolarizing direction of GABA-A receptor mediated responses. In addition, another type of GABAergic inhibition mediated by postsynaptic GABA-B receptors is not functional at early stage of life. In the neonatal rat hippocampus, GABA, acting via GABA-A receptors, activates voltage gated sodium and calcium channels and potentiates the activity of NMDA receptors by reducing their voltage dependent Mg2+ block. The temporal window when GABA exerts excitatory actions coincides with a particular pattern of activity of hippocampal neuronal network that is characterized by periodical giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) reminiscent of interictal-like epileptiform discharges. Recent studies have shown that GDPs result from the synchronous discharge of GABAergic interneurons and principal glutamatergic pyramidal cells and are mediated by the synergistic excitatory actions of GABA-A and glutamate receptors. GDPs provide synchronous intracellular Ca2+ oscillations and may therefore be implicated in hebbian modulation of developing synapses and activity-dependent formation of the hippocampal network.

  15. The effects of stiripentol on GABA(A) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Janet L

    2011-04-01

    The anticonvulsant stiripentol (Diacomittm) has been shown to have a positive impact on control of seizures for many patients with Dravet syndrome. As with most antiepileptic drugs, stiripentol has multiple mechanisms of action. Its direct anticonvulsant activity is likely due to enhancement of inhibitory, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurotransmission. Stiripentol was shown to increase the activity of both neuronal and recombinant GABA(A) receptors at clinically relevant concentrations. At recombinant receptors, stiripentol was found to act through a unique site in a subunit-dependent manner. Positive modulation by stiripentol was most effective at GABA(A) receptors containing an α3 subunit. The expression of the α3 subunit is developmentally regulated, with highest levels in the immature brain. This subunit selectivity may explain the greater clinical efficacy of stiripentol in childhood-onset epilepsies, including Dravet syndrome.

  16. Actions of insecticides on the insect GABA receptor complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermudez, I.; Hawkins, C.A.; Taylor, A.M.; Beadle, D.J. (School of Biological and Molecular Sciences, Oxford Polytechnic, Headington, Oxford (England))

    1991-01-01

    The actions of insecticides on the insect gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor were investigated using (35S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (( 35S)TBPS) binding and voltage-clamp techniques. Specific binding of (35S)TBPS to a membrane homogenate derived from the brain of Locusta migratoria locusts is characterised by a Kd value of 79.3 {plus minus} 2.9 nM and a Bmax value of 1770 {plus minus} 40 fmol/mg protein. (35S)TBPS binding is inhibited by mM concentrations of barbiturates and benzodiazepines. In contrast dieldrin, ivermectin, lindane, picrotoxin and TBPS are inhibitors of (35S)TBPS binding at the nanomolar range. Bicuculline, baclofen and pyrethroid insecticides have no effect on (35S)TBPS binding. These results are similar to those obtained in electrophysiological studies of the current elicited by GABA in both Locusta and Periplaneta americana central neurones. Noise analysis of the effects of lindane, TBPS, dieldrin and picrotoxin on the cockroach GABA responses reveals that these compounds decrease the variance of the GABA-induced current but have no effect on its mean open time. All these compounds, with the exception of dieldrin, significantly decrease the conductance of GABA-evoked single current.

  17. Stereological estimates of dopaminergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra and retrorubral field in the rat

    OpenAIRE

    Nair-Roberts, R.G.; Chatelain-Badie, S.D.; Benson, E.; White-Cooper, H; BOLAM, J. P.; Ungless, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra and retrorubral field play key roles in reward processing, learning and memory, and movement. Within these midbrain regions and admixed with the dopamine neurons, are also substantial populations of GABAergic neurons that regulate dopamine neuron activity and have projection targets similar to those of dopamine neurons. Additionally, there is a small group of putative glutamatergic neurons within the ventral tegmental a...

  18. GABAA receptor drugs and neuronal plasticity in reward and aversion: focus on the ventral tegmental area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eVashchinkina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available GABAA receptors are the main fast inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the mammalian brain, and targets for many clinically important drugs widely used in the treatment of anxiety disorders, insomnia and in anesthesia. Nonetheless, there are significant risks associated with the long-term use of these drugs particularly related to development of tolerance and addiction. Addictive mechanisms of GABAA receptor drugs are poorly known, but recent findings suggest that those drugs may induce aberrant neuroadaptations in the brain reward circuitry. Recently, benzodiazepines, acting on synaptic GABAA receptors, and modulators of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors (THIP and neurosteroids have been found to induce plasticity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA dopamine neurons and their main target projections. Furthermore, depending whether synaptic or extrasynaptic GABAA receptor populations are activated, the behavioral outcome of repeated administration seems to correlate with rewarding or aversive behavioral responses, respectively. The VTA dopamine neurons project to forebrain centers such as the nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex, and receive afferent projections from these brain regions and especially from the extended amygdala and lateral habenula, forming the major part of the reward and aversion circuitry. Both synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA drugs inhibit the VTA GABAergic interneurons, thus activating the VTA DA neurons by disinhibition and this way inducing glutamatergic synaptic plasticity. However, the GABAA drugs failed to alter synaptic spine numbers as studied from Golgi-Cox-stained VTA dendrites. Since the GABAergic drugs are known to depress the brain metabolism and gene expression, their likely way of inducing neuroplasticity in mature neurons is by disinhibiting the principal neurons, which remains to be rigorously tested for a number of clinically important anxiolytics, sedatives and anesthetics in different parts of

  19. Distribution of input and output synapses on the central branches of bushcricket and cricket auditory afferent neurones: immunocytochemical evidence for GABA and glutamate in different populations of presynaptic boutons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardt, M; Watson, A H

    1999-01-18

    In order to investigate the synapses on the terminals of primary auditory afferents in the bushcricket and cricket, these were impaled with microelectrodes and after physiological characterisation, injected intracellularly with horseradish peroxidase. The tissue was prepared for electron microscopy, and immunocytochemistry for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate was carried out on ultrathin sections by using a post-embedding immunogold technique. The afferent terminals received many input synapses. Between 60-65% of these were made by processes immunoreactive for GABA and approximately 25% from processes immunoreactive for glutamate. The relative distribution of the different classes of input were analysed from serial section reconstruction of terminal afferent branches. Inputs from GABA and glutamate-immunoreactive processes appeared to be scattered at random over the terminal arborisation of the afferents both with respect to each other and to the architecture of the terminals. They were, however, always found close to the output synapses. The possible roles of presynaptic inhibition in the auditory afferents is discussed in the context of the auditory responses of the animals.

  20. Refuting the challenges of the developmental shift of polarity of GABA actions: GABA more exciting than ever!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Woodin, Melanie A; Sernagor, Evelyne; Cancedda, Laura; Vinay, Laurent; Rivera, Claudio; Legendre, Pascal; Luhmann, Heiko J; Bordey, Angelique; Wenner, Peter; Fukuda, Atsuo; van den Pol, Anthony N; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Cherubini, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    DURING BRAIN DEVELOPMENT, THERE IS A PROGRESSIVE REDUCTION OF INTRACELLULAR CHLORIDE ASSOCIATED WITH A SHIFT IN GABA POLARITY: GABA depolarizes and occasionally excites immature neurons, subsequently hyperpolarizing them at later stages of development. This sequence, which has been observed in a wide range of animal species, brain structures and preparations, is thought to play an important role in activity-dependent formation and modulation of functional circuits. This sequence has also been considerably reinforced recently with new data pointing to an evolutionary preserved rule. In a recent "Hypothesis and Theory Article," the excitatory action of GABA in early brain development is suggested to be "an experimental artefact" (Bregestovski and Bernard, 2012). The authors suggest that the excitatory action of GABA is due to an inadequate/insufficient energy supply in glucose-perfused slices and/or to the damage produced by the slicing procedure. However, these observations have been repeatedly contradicted by many groups and are inconsistent with a large body of evidence including the fact that the developmental shift is neither restricted to slices nor to rodents. We summarize the overwhelming evidence in support of both excitatory GABA during development, and the implications this has in developmental neurobiology.

  1. Synaptic origin of rhythmic visually evoked activity in kitten area 17 neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringuier, V; Fregnac, Y; Debanne, D; Shulz, D; Baranyi, A

    1992-12-01

    Rhythmic patterns in neuronal activity in response to moving stimuli were observed in 28% of cells recorded extracellularly or intracellularly in area 17 of 4-16 week old anaesthetized and paralysed kittens. In both recording modes, oscillation frequencies ranged between 7 and 71 Hz, and were confined for 88% of cells in the 7-20 Hz band of the spectrum. A comparative study of firing autocorrelograms) and subthreshold activity (autocorrelation functions) indicates that the regularity of discharge stemmed from visually evoked oscillations of membrane potential at the same frequency. These oscillations are shown to result from extrinsic excitatory activity, since their amplitude, but not their frequency, depends on the resting membrane potential. The dependency on stimulus configuration supports the hypothesis that oscillations in neuronal output are dictated by periodic activity in afferent circuits selectively recruited by different attributes of the visual input which are not exclusively processed at the cortical level.

  2. GABAergic actions on cholinergic laterodorsal tegmental neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlmeier, K A; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2010-01-01

    (IRK) mediated this effect. Further, outward currents were never additive with those induced by application of carbachol, suggesting that they were mediated by activation of GABA(B) receptors linked to the same G(IRK) activated in these cells by muscarinic receptor stimulation. Activation of GABA(B) receptors....... Therefore, we studied the actions of GABA agonists and antagonists on cholinergic LDT cells by performing patch clamp recordings in mouse brain slices. Under conditions where detection of Cl(-) -mediated events was optimized, GABA induced gabazine (GZ)-sensitive inward currents in the majority of LDT...... neurons. Post-synaptic location of GABA(A) receptors was demonstrated by persistence of muscimol-induced inward currents in TTX and low Ca(2+) solutions. THIP, a selective GABA(A) receptor agonist with a preference for d-subunit containing GABA(A) receptors, induced inward currents, suggesting...

  3. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on synaptogenesis and synaptic function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Elster, L;

    1998-01-01

    The correct establishment and function of synapses depend on a variety of factors, such as guidance of pre- and postsynaptic neurons as well as receptor development and localization. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) has a pronounced effect on these events and elicits differentiation of neurons; tha...

  4. GABA uptake into astrocytes is not associated with significant metabolic cost: implications for brain imaging of inhibitory transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatton, Jean-Yves; Pellerin, Luc; Magistretti, Pierre J

    2003-10-14

    Synaptically released glutamate has been identified as a signal coupling excitatory neuronal activity to increased glucose utilization. The proposed mechanism of this coupling involves glutamate uptake into astrocytes resulting in increased intracellular Na+ (Nai+) and activation of the Na+/K+-ATPase. Increased metabolic demand linked to disruption of Nai+ homeostasis activates glucose uptake and glycolysis in astrocytes. Here, we have examined whether a similar neurometabolic coupling could operate for the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), also taken up by Na+-dependent transporters into astrocytes. Thus, we have compared the Nai+ response to GABA and glutamate in mouse astrocytes by microspectrofluorimetry. The Nai+ response to GABA consisted of a rapid rise of 4-6 mM followed by a plateau that did not, however, significantly activate the pump. Indeed, the GABA transporter-evoked Na+ influxes are transient in nature, almost totally shutting off within approximately 30 sec of GABA application. The metabolic consequences of the GABA-induced Nai+ response were evaluated by monitoring cellular ATP changes indirectly in single cells and measuring 2-deoxyglucose uptake in astrocyte populations. Both approaches showed that, whereas glutamate induced a robust metabolic response in astrocytes (decreased ATP levels and glucose uptake stimulation), GABA did not cause any measurable metabolic response, consistent with the Nai+ measurements. Results indicate that GABA does not couple inhibitory neuronal activity with glucose utilization, as does glutamate for excitatory neurotransmission, and suggest that GABA-mediated synaptic transmission does not contribute directly to brain imaging signals based on deoxyglucose.

  5. GABA, a natural immunomodulator of T lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjurstöm, Helen; Wang, Junyang; Ericsson, Ida

    2008-01-01

    gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main neuroinhibitory transmitter in the brain. Here we show that GABA in the extracellular space may affect the fate of pathogenic T lymphocytes entering the brain. We examined in encephalitogenic T cells if they expressed functional GABA channels that could......M and higher GABA concentrations decreased T cell proliferation. The results are consistent with GABA being immunomodulatory....

  6. Increased binding of [3H]GABA to striatal membranes following ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, A; Pulsinelli, W

    1983-05-01

    Sodium-independent binding of [3H]gamma-aminobutyric acid ([3H]GABA) to membranes prepared from ischemic-damaged rat striatum was studied by kinetic and time-course analysis. Three days after 40 min of ischemia, [3H]GABA binding increased fourfold over control values. Scatchard analysis of the binding showed that ischemia significantly increased the affinity (KD) and the total number of binding sites (Bmax) for the high-affinity GABA receptor. These results support the conclusion that transient forebrain ischemia damages striatal GABAergic neurons.

  7. [Effect of retroauricular galvanic stimulation on the central vestibular system--immunohistochemical evaluation of GABA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okami, K; Sekitani, T

    1990-03-01

    The changes of the neurotransmitter (GABA) distribution in the brain stem of the rats by retroauricular galvanic stimulation were investigated using immunohistochemical method. Twenty-one rats were divided into two groups: the control group which received no galvanic stimulation, and the galvanically stimulated group which received anodal galvanic stimulation (unipolar monoauricular, 5 mA in intensity, 500 msec of duration, 1 Hz in frequency) for 30 minutes. The specimens obtained as usual strict procedure for histological investigation were stained immunohistochemically using antisera against GABA. The results were as follows: 1. In the control group, GABA-like immunoreactivity was observed in all four main vestibular nuclei. In the superior, medial, and descending vestibular nuclei GABA-like immunoreactivity was found in the small cells and the terminals. Giant cells in the lateral vestibular nucleus were surrounded by GABA immunoreactive terminals. 2. In the galvanically stimulated group GABA-like immunoreactivity showed recognizable laterality in the lateral vestibular nucleus where GABA-like immunoreactivity surrounding giant cells showed more intensive on the side ipsilateral to the stimulation compared with the opposite side. On the other hand GABA-like immunoreactivity showed no laterality in the superior, medial, and descending vestibular nuclei. 3. It can be concluded that the retroauricular galvanic stimulation cause some changes in the inhibitory activity of the lateral vestibulo-spinal tract and of the spinal motor neuron.

  8. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation facilitates GABA(B) receptor-effector coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couve, A; Thomas, P; Calver, A R; Hirst, W D; Pangalos, M N; Walsh, F S; Smart, T G; Moss, S J

    2002-05-01

    GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. Here we show that the functional coupling of GABA(B)R1/GABA(B)R2 receptors to inwardly rectifying K(+) channels rapidly desensitizes. This effect is alleviated after direct phosphorylation of a single serine residue (Ser892) in the cytoplasmic tail of GABA(B)R2 by cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Basal phosphorylation of this residue is evident in rat brain membranes and in cultured neurons. Phosphorylation of Ser892 is modulated positively by pathways that elevate cAMP concentration, such as those involving forskolin and beta-adrenergic receptors. GABA(B) receptor agonists reduce receptor phosphorylation, which is consistent with PKA functioning in the control of GABA(B)-activated currents. Mechanistically, phosphorylation of Ser892 specifically enhances the membrane stability of GABA(B) receptors. We conclude that signaling pathways that activate PKA may have profound effects on GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic inhibition. These results also challenge the accepted view that phosphorylation is a universal negative modulator of G protein-coupled receptors.

  9. 大鼠生后MGBv神经元主动膜特性的变化及GABA受体激动剂的影响%Alteration of membrane properties of MGBv neurons and the effect of GABA receptor agonist on them during postnatal development in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚小红; 万子兵; 熊鹰

    2005-01-01

    Objective To observe membrane properties of ventral partition of the medial geniculate body (MGBv) in Wistar rat and the effect of GABA receptor agonist on them during postnatal development. Methods Whole-cell patch clamp recording was used to record waveform of action potential (AP) and the effect of GABA receptor agonist on them from neurons in the MGBv of rats ( postnatal days 3-30). Results There was a difference in AP firing pattern in rat MGBv neurons of different postnatal day. We only recorded low threshold Ca2+ spikes (LTS) in P3 MGBv neurons, but recorded AP in P6-30 MGBv neurons after depolarizing currents application; AP was recorded at the start phase of pulse and with a long-last after hyperpolarization potential (AHP) in P8, in P20 AP was recorded after a delay and it appeared on depolarizing ramp with a shorter-last AHP compared with P8. The GABAA receptor agonist, muscimol, and the GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, had effects on responses evoked by depolarizing current in the MGBv neurons in P6 and P15 rats. Muscimol and baclofen reduced AP firing rather than AP amplitude in P6 MGBv neurons, however, in P15 MGBv neurons baclofen had little effect on AP firing while muscimol greatly reduced the size of voltage shift produced by positive or negative current injection. Conclusion The AP waveform of MGBv neurons matures rapidly during first two postnatal weeks. A similar rapid maturation also has been observed in rat neocortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons as well as in ferret dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGNd) neurons. These results suggest that in the central nervous system of small mammals, AP waveforms mature rapidly in many types of neurons, thus, coordinated activities in neuronal circuits may occur. In early postnatal development, GABA receptor mainly mediates an excitation effect, depolarizes P6 MGBv neurons and dramatically increases the frequency of AP firing. Inhibition of GABA receptor matures slowly along with increment of

  10. Striatal cholinergic interneurons Drive GABA release from dopamine terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Alexandra B; Hammack, Nora; Yang, Cindy F; Shah, Nirao M; Seal, Rebecca P; Kreitzer, Anatol C

    2014-04-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons are implicated in motor control, associative plasticity, and reward-dependent learning. Synchronous activation of cholinergic interneurons triggers large inhibitory synaptic currents in dorsal striatal projection neurons, providing one potential substrate for control of striatal output, but the mechanism for these GABAergic currents is not fully understood. Using optogenetics and whole-cell recordings in brain slices, we find that a large component of these inhibitory responses derive from action-potential-independent disynaptic neurotransmission mediated by nicotinic receptors. Cholinergically driven IPSCs were not affected by ablation of striatal fast-spiking interneurons but were greatly reduced after acute treatment with vesicular monoamine transport inhibitors or selective destruction of dopamine terminals with 6-hydroxydopamine, indicating that GABA release originated from dopamine terminals. These results delineate a mechanism in which striatal cholinergic interneurons can co-opt dopamine terminals to drive GABA release and rapidly inhibit striatal output neurons.

  11. Neuronal Heterotopias Affect the Activities of Distant Brain Areas and Lead to Behavioral Deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kazuhiro; Kubo, Ken-ichiro; Endo, Toshihiro; Yoshida, Keitaro; Benner, Seico; Ito, Yukiko; Aizawa, Hidenori; Aramaki, Michihiko; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Tanaka, Kohichi; Takata, Norio; Tanaka, Kenji F; Mimura, Masaru; Tohyama, Chiharu; Kakeyama, Masaki; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2015-09-01

    Neuronal heterotopia refers to brain malformations resulting from deficits of neuronal migration. Individuals with heterotopias show a high incidence of neurological deficits, such as epilepsy. More recently, it has come to be recognized that focal heterotopias may also show a range of psychiatric problems, including cognitive and behavioral impairments. However, because focal heterotopias are not always located in the brain areas responsible for the symptoms, the causal relationship between the symptoms and heterotopias remains elusive. In this study, we showed that mice with focal heterotopias in the somatosensory cortex generated by in utero electroporation exhibited spatial working memory deficit and low competitive dominance behavior, which have been shown to be closely associated with the activity of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in rodents. Analysis of the mPFC activity revealed that the immediate-early gene expression was decreased and the local field potentials of the mPFC were altered in the mice with heterotopias compared with the control mice. Moreover, activation of these ectopic and overlying sister neurons using the DREADD (designer receptor exclusively activated by designer drug) system improved the working memory deficits. These findings suggest that cortical regions containing focal heterotopias can affect distant brain regions and give rise to behavioral abnormalities. Significance statement: Recent studies reported that patients with heterotopias have a variety of clinical symptoms, such as cognitive disturbance, psychiatric symptoms, and autistic behavior. However, the causal relationship between the symptoms and heterotopias remains elusive. Here we showed that mice with focal heterotopias in the somatosensory cortex generated by in utero electroporation exhibited behavioral deficits that have been shown to be associated with the mPFC activity in rodents. The existence of heterotopias indeed altered the neural activities of the mPFC, and

  12. Modulation of Specific Sensory Cortical Areas by Segregated Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Demonstrated by Neuronal Tracing and Optogenetic Stimulation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves-Coira, Irene; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Rodrigo-Angulo, Margarita; Núñez, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Neocortical cholinergic activity plays a fundamental role in sensory processing and cognitive functions. Previous results have suggested a refined anatomical and functional topographical organization of basal forebrain (BF) projections that may control cortical sensory processing in a specific manner. We have used retrograde anatomical procedures to demonstrate the existence of specific neuronal groups in the BF involved in the control of specific sensory cortices. Fluoro-Gold (FlGo) and Fast Blue (FB) fluorescent retrograde tracers were deposited into the primary somatosensory (S1) and primary auditory (A1) cortices in mice. Our results revealed that the BF is a heterogeneous area in which neurons projecting to different cortical areas are segregated into different neuronal groups. Most of the neurons located in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) projected to the S1 cortex, indicating that this area is specialized in the sensory processing of tactile stimuli. However, the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (B) nucleus shows a similar number of cells projecting to the S1 as to the A1 cortices. In addition, we analyzed the cholinergic effects on the S1 and A1 cortical sensory responses by optogenetic stimulation of the BF neurons in urethane-anesthetized transgenic mice. We used transgenic mice expressing the light-activated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2, tagged with a fluorescent protein (ChR2-YFP) under the control of the choline-acetyl transferase promoter (ChAT). Cortical evoked potentials were induced by whisker deflections or by auditory clicks. According to the anatomical results, optogenetic HDB stimulation induced more extensive facilitation of tactile evoked potentials in S1 than auditory evoked potentials in A1, while optogenetic stimulation of the B nucleus facilitated either tactile or auditory evoked potentials equally. Consequently, our results suggest that cholinergic projections to the cortex are organized into segregated

  13. Modulation of specific sensory cortical areas by segregated basal forebrain cholinergic neurons demonstrated by neuronal tracing and optogenetic stimulation in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene eChaves-Coira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neocortical cholinergic activity plays a fundamental role in sensory processing and cognitive functions. Previous results have suggested a refined anatomical and functional topographical organization of basal forebrain (BF projections that may control cortical sensory processing in a specific manner. We have used retrograde anatomical procedures to demonstrate the existence of specific neuronal groups in the BF involved in the control of specific sensory cortices. Fluoro-gold and Fast Blue fluorescent retrograde tracers were deposited into the primary somatosensory (S1 and primary auditory (A1 cortices in mice. Our results revealed that the BF is a heterogeneous area in which neurons projecting to different cortical areas are segregated into different neuronal groups. Most of the neurons located in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB projected to the S1 cortex, indicating that this area is specialized in the sensory processing of tactile stimuli. However, the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (B nucleus shows a similar number of cells projecting to the S1 as to the A1 cortices. In addition, we analyzed the cholinergic effects on the S1 and A1 cortical sensory responses by optogenetic stimulation of the BF neurons in urethane-anesthetized transgenic mice. We used transgenic mice expressing the light-activated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2, tagged with a fluorescent protein (ChR2-YFP under the control of the choline-acetyl transferase promoter (ChAT. Cortical evoked potentials were induced by whisker deflections or by auditory clicks. According to the anatomical results, optogenetic HDB stimulation induced more extensive facilitation of tactile evoked potentials in S1 than auditory evoked potentials in A1, while optogenetic stimulation of the B nucleus facilitated either tactile or auditory evoked potentials equally. Consequently, our results suggest that cholinergic projections to the cortex are organized into segregated

  14. Neurochemical, morphologic, and laminar characterization of cortical projection neurons in the cingulate motor areas of the macaque monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimchinsky, E. A.; Hof, P. R.; Young, W. G.; Morrison, J. H.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The primate cingulate gyrus contains multiple cortical areas that can be distinguished by several neurochemical features, including the distribution of neurofilament protein-enriched pyramidal neurons. In addition, connectivity and functional properties indicate that there are multiple motor areas in the cortex lining the cingulate sulcus. These motor areas were targeted for analysis of potential interactions among regional specialization, connectivity, and cellular characteristics such as neurochemical profile and morphology. Specifically, intracortical injections of retrogradely transported dyes and intracellular injection were combined with immunocytochemistry to investigate neurons projecting from the cingulate motor areas to the putative forelimb region of the primary motor cortex, area M1. Two separate groups of neurons projecting to area M1 emanated from the cingulate sulcus, one anterior and one posterior, both of which furnished commissural and ipsilateral connections with area M1. The primary difference between the two populations was laminar origin, with the anterior projection originating largely in deep layers, and the posterior projection taking origin equally in superficial and deep layers. With regard to cellular morphology, the anterior projection exhibited more morphologic diversity than the posterior projection. Commissural projections from both anterior and posterior fields originated largely in layer VI. Neurofilament protein distribution was a reliable tool for localizing the two projections and for discriminating between them. Comparable proportions of the two sets of projection neurons contained neurofilament protein, although the density and distribution of the total population of neurofilament protein-enriched neurons was very different in the two subareas of origin. Within a projection, the participating neurons exhibited a high degree of morphologic heterogeneity, and no correlation was observed between somatodendritic morphology and

  15. 力竭运动前后及恢复期大鼠脑皮质运动区GABA含量及GAD、GABA-T活性的变化%Changes of Gamma-aminobutyric Acid Content and Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase, GABA Transaminase Activity in Motor Area of Rats Cortex after Acute Exhausting Swimming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡江平; 张蕴琨

    2005-01-01

    目的:观察力竭运动前后及恢复期大鼠脑皮质运动区GABA含量及GAD、GABA-T活性的动态变化.方法:成年雄性SD大鼠进行一次性力竭游泳,用荧光法测定其脑皮质运动区GABA含量及GAD、GABA-T活性.结果:力竭运动前后及恢复期大鼠脑皮质运动区GA-BA含量、GAD与GABA-T活性出现明显变化.结论:运动性疲劳时GABA可能是脑的机能抑制状态的主导因素之一.力竭运动后GAD、GABA-T活性明显增高,GABA的代谢加快.中枢机能的恢复具有时间延续性.GABA代谢酶的变化可以用来评定运动过程及恢复期中枢机能状态.

  16. BDNF regulates the KCC2-dependent switch from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing GABA action

    OpenAIRE

    Akyeli, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The depolarising action of the neurotransmitter GABA enables a route for local Ca2+ entry into immature neurons and therefore plays an important role in neuronal maturation. We have characterised neuronal GABAA receptor activity in slices comprising the superficial gray layer of the late embryonic and early postnatal mouse superior colliculus and compared wild type (bdnf+/+) and BDNF-deficient (bdnf-/-) preparations. Whole-cell or gramicidin-perforated patch recordings and Ca2+ imaging exper...

  17. Face inversion decreased information about facial identity and expression in face-responsive neurons in macaque area TE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugase-Miyamoto, Yasuko; Matsumoto, Narihisa; Ohyama, Kaoru; Kawano, Kenji

    2014-09-10

    To investigate the effect of face inversion and thatcherization (eye inversion) on temporal processing stages of facial information, single neuron activities in the temporal cortex (area TE) of two rhesus monkeys were recorded. Test stimuli were colored pictures of monkey faces (four with four different expressions), human faces (three with four different expressions), and geometric shapes. Modifications were made in each face-picture, and its four variations were used as stimuli: upright original, inverted original, upright thatcherized, and inverted thatcherized faces. A total of 119 neurons responded to at least one of the upright original facial stimuli. A majority of the neurons (71%) showed activity modulations depending on upright and inverted presentations, and a lesser number of neurons (13%) showed activity modulations depending on original and thatcherized face conditions. In the case of face inversion, information about the fine category (facial identity and expression) decreased, whereas information about the global category (monkey vs human vs shape) was retained for both the original and thatcherized faces. Principal component analysis on the neuronal population responses revealed that the global categorization occurred regardless of the face inversion and that the inverted faces were represented near the upright faces in the principal component analysis space. By contrast, the face inversion decreased the ability to represent human facial identity and monkey facial expression. Thus, the neuronal population represented inverted faces as faces but failed to represent the identity and expression of the inverted faces, indicating that the neuronal representation in area TE cause the perceptual effect of face inversion.

  18. [Impregnoarchitectonic study of neurons in the caudal hypothalamic area in sheep].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajtová, V

    1985-06-01

    The impregnoarchitectonics of neurons in the regio hypothalamica caudalis was studied by the methods after Ramón-Moliner and Golgi-Cox. Neuron types, morphology of synaptic conjugations and orientation of dendrites and axons are indicated for each nucleus. Small spindle-shaped neurons are the most frequent neuron forms occurring in the regio hypothalamica caudalis. It is only in the nucl. hypothalamicus perifornicalis that neuron processes and the long cell axes are oriented around the columna fornicis. One especially large neuron "occupies" the dorsal part of this nucleus.

  19. Exposure to novelty and forced swimming evoke stressor-dependent changes in extracellular GABA in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groote, L; Linthorst, A C E

    2007-09-07

    In the hippocampus, a brain structure critically important in the stress response, GABA controls neuronal activity not only via synaptic inhibition, but also via tonic inhibition through stimulation of extrasynaptic GABA receptors. The extracellular level of GABA may represent a major determinant for tonic inhibition and, therefore, it is surprising that its responsiveness to stress has hardly been investigated. To clarify whether hippocampal extracellular GABA levels change in response to acute stress, we conducted an in vivo microdialysis study in rats. We found that dialysate GABA levels respond to various neuropharmacological manipulations such as reuptake inhibition, elevated concentrations of K(+), tetrodotoxin and baclofen, indicating that a large proportion of hippocampal extracellular GABA depends on neuronal release and that GABA re-uptake plays a role in determining the extracellular levels of this neurotransmitter. Next, rats were exposed to a novel cage or to forced swimming in 25 degrees C water. Interestingly, these two stressors resulted in opposite effects. Novelty caused a fast increase in GABA (120% of baseline), whereas forced swimming resulted in a profound decrease (70% of baseline). To discriminate between the psychological and physical aspects (i.e. the effects on body temperature) of forced swimming, another group of animals was forced to swim at 35 degrees C. This stressor, like novelty, caused an increase in hippocampal GABA, suggesting a stimulatory effect of psychological stress. The effects of novelty could not be blocked by the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor antagonist D-Phe-CRF(12-41). These results are the first to demonstrate stressor-dependent changes in hippocampal extracellular GABA; an observation which may be of particular significance for GABAergic tonic inhibition of hippocampal neurons.

  20. GABA regulates the multidirectional tangential migration of GABAergic interneurons in living neonatal mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Inada

    Full Text Available Cortical GABAergic interneurons originate from ganglionic eminences and tangentially migrate into the cortical plate at early developmental stages. To elucidate the characteristics of this migration of GABAergic interneurons in living animals, we established an experimental design specialized for in vivo time-lapse imaging of the neocortex of neonate mice with two-photon laser-scanning microscopy. In vesicular GABA/glycine transporter (VGAT-Venus transgenic mice from birth (P0 through P3, we observed multidirectional tangential migration of genetically-defined GABAergic interneurons in the neocortical marginal zone. The properties of this migration, such as the motility rate (distance/hr, the direction moved, and the proportion of migrating neurons to stationary neurons, did not change through P0 to P3, although the density of GABAergic neurons at the marginal zone decreased with age. Thus, the characteristics of the tangential motility of individual GABAergic neurons remained constant in development. Pharmacological block of GABA(A receptors and of the Na⁺-K⁺-Cl⁻ cotransporters, and chelating intracellular Ca²⁺, all significantly reduced the motility rate in vivo. The motility rate and GABA content within the cortex of neonatal VGAT-Venus transgenic mice were significantly greater than those of GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, suggesting that extracellular GABA concentration could facilitate the multidirectional tangential migration. Indeed, diazepam applied to GAD67-GFP mice increased the motility rate substantially. In an in vitro neocortical slice preparation, we confirmed that GABA induced a NKCC sensitive depolarization of GABAergic interneurons in VGAT-Venus mice at P0-P3. Thus, activation of GABA(AR by ambient GABA depolarizes GABAergic interneurons, leading to an acceleration of their multidirectional motility in vivo.

  1. GABA is the principal fast-acting excitatory transmitter in the neonatal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinekugel, X; Khalilov, I; McLean, H; Caillard, O; Gaiarsa, J L; Ben-Ari, Y; Khazipov, R

    1999-01-01

    gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the principal neurotransmitter of inhibition in the adult mammalian brain. However, at early stages of development, including the embryonic period and first week of postnatal life, GABA plays the role of main neurotransmitter of excitation. The paradoxical excitatory effect of GABA is caused by an inverted chloride gradient and, therefore, a depolarizing direction of GABA type A (GABAA) receptor mediated responses. In addition, another type of GABAergic inhibition mediated by postsynaptic GABA type B (GABAB) receptors is not functional at early stage of life. In the neonatal rat hippocampus, GABA, acting via GABAA receptors, activates voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels and potentiates the activity of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors by reducing their voltage-dependent Mg2+ block. The temporal window when GABA exerts excitatory actions coincides with a particular pattern of activity of hippocampal neuronal network that is characterized by periodical giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) reminiscent of interictal-like epileptiform discharges. Recent studies have shown that GDPs result from the synchronous discharge of GABAergic interneurons and principal glutamatergic pyramidal cells, and they are mediated by the synergistic excitatory actions of GABAA and glutamate receptors. GDPs provide synchronous intracellular Ca2+ oscillations and may, therefore, be implicated in hebbian modulation of developing synapses and activity-dependent formation of the hippocampal network.

  2. Gestational changes of GABA levels and GABA binding in the human uterus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdoe, S.L.; Villanyi, P.; Laszlo, A.

    1989-01-01

    The concentrations of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the activities of L-glutamate decarboxylase and GABA-transaminase, and the nature of the sodium-independent binding of GABA were examined in uterine tissue pieces obtained surgically from pregnant and non-pregnant women. GABA concentrations were reduced, while the activity of GABA-transaminase and the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)GABA significantly increased in specimens from pregnant subjects. These findings suggest some gestation-related functional role for the GABA system in the human uterus.

  3. Morphine disinhibits glutamatergic input to VTA dopamine neurons and promotes dopamine neuron excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Zhao, Yanfang; Yang, Hualan; Luan, Wenjie; Song, Jiaojiao; Cui, Dongyang; Dong, Yi; Lai, Bin; Ma, Lan; Zheng, Ping

    2015-07-24

    One reported mechanism for morphine activation of dopamine (DA) neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) is the disinhibition model of VTA-DA neurons. Morphine inhibits GABA inhibitory neurons, which shifts the balance between inhibitory and excitatory input to VTA-DA neurons in favor of excitation and then leads to VTA-DA neuron excitation. However, it is not known whether morphine has an additional strengthening effect on excitatory input. Our results suggest that glutamatergic input to VTA-DA neurons is inhibited by GABAergic interneurons via GABAB receptors and that morphine promotes presynaptic glutamate release by removing this inhibition. We also studied the contribution of the morphine-induced disinhibitory effect on the presynaptic glutamate release to the overall excitatory effect of morphine on VTA-DA neurons and related behavior. Our results suggest that the disinhibitory action of morphine on presynaptic glutamate release might be the main mechanism for morphine-induced increase in VTA-DA neuron firing and related behaviors.

  4. Modulatory effect of substance P on GABA-activated currents from rat dorsal root ganglion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-qiang SI; Zhi-qin ZHANG; Chun-xia LI; Li-feng WANG; Yun-lei YANG; Zhi-wang LI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the modulatory effect of substance P (SP) on GABA-activated current of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in rat. METHODS: The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record SP- and GABAactivated currents in neurons freshly dissociated from rat DRG neurons. Drugs were applied by rapid solution exchange. RESULTS: Application of SP (28/41, 68.5 %) and GABA (36/41, 88.2 %) could induce concentrationdependent inward current in some cells. SP-(10 μmol/L) and GABA (100 μmol/L)-activated inward currents were (244±83) pA (n=9) and (1.8±0.5) nA (n=13), respectively. The majority of GABA-activated current had obvious three processes, the peak value (Ip), the steady state (Iss) and the desensitization (Ia). The desensitization of GABAactivated current was a biphasic process, including fast and slow desensitization. However, pre-application of SP (0.001-1 μmol/L) could inhibit the GABA-activated inward current which was identified to be GABAA receptormediated current. The inhibitory effects were concentration-dependent. The inhibitory effect of SP on the peak value of GABA-activated current was more than the steady state of GABA-activated current. The inhibition of GABA-activated current by SP (0.1 μmol/L) was related to the time after application of SP, the inhibition of GABAactivated currents by SP reached the peak at about 4 min (49.8 %±7.2 %, n=7, P<0.01) and took about 12 min to get a full recovery. The inhibition of GABA-activated currents by SP was almost completely removed after blockade of PKC by H-7 with the re-patch clamp. CONCLUSION: Pre-application of SP exerts a more strong inhibitory effect on the peak value of GABA-activated current than the steady state of GABA-activated current.

  5. Excitatory actions of gaba during development: the nature of the nurture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2002-09-01

    In the immature brain, GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) is excitatory, and GABA-releasing synapses are formed before glutamatergic contacts in a wide range of species and structures. GABA becomes inhibitory by the delayed expression of a chloride exporter, leading to a negative shift in the reversal potential for choride ions. I propose that this mechanism provides a solution to the problem of how to excite developing neurons to promote growth and synapse formation while avoiding the potentially toxic effects of a mismatch between GABA-mediated inhibition and glutamatergic excitation. As key elements of this cascade are activity dependent, the formation of inhibition adds an element of nurture to the construction of cortical networks.

  6. 尼氟灭酸对CCI模型鼠DRG神经元GABA介导膜电流的影响%Effects of Niflumic Acid on GABA-Activated Currents in Isolated Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons in Rats with Chronic Constriction Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈梦洁; 马克涛; 司军强; 李丽

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effects of niflumic acid (NFA) on GABA-activated currents in isolated dorsal root ganglion neurons in rats with neuropathic pain and explore the analgesia mechanism of NFA. (1) CCI mice model and the pseudo-operation model was established and the change of thermal withdrawal latency on operated side was detected by Hot-plate test. (2) Whole-cell patch-clamp technique was employed to record the changes of GABA-activated currents in the CCI model group, the pseudo-operation group and the control group.Results showed that:(1)The thermal withdrawal latency on operated side of the CCI model group was significantly shortened. (2)The GABA (1~1000 μmol/L) made the DRG neurons to produce concentration dependent inward currents (P<0.05,n=6). (3)The GABA-activated currents of injured side in CCI group were significantly decreased compared with the pseudo-operation and control groups (GABA concentration,1~100 μmol/L)(P<0.01).(4) The currents of control groups were decreased significantly compared with the CCI group by the same concentration of NFA (P<0.05,n=5).The attenuation of the effect of inhibition on GABA-activated currents by NFA is due to the increased numbers of the CaCCs on DRG neurons in CCI group.%为观察尼氟灭酸(NFA)对坐骨神经慢性压迫损伤(CCI)所导致的神经病理性痛大鼠的背根神经节(dorsal root ganglion,DRG)神经元上GABAA 受体激活电流的影响,探讨尼氟灭酸在神经病理性疼痛时在脊髓水平的作用及可能机制。采用如下方法:(1)制作CCI模型。(2)运用热板实验检测CCI组、假手术组术侧下肢热缩足反射潜伏期的变化。(3)运用全细胞膜片钳技术记录CCI模型组术侧、假手术组术侧、正常组DRG神经元上GABAA受体激活电流的幅度。(4)记录尼氟灭酸对正常组和CCI组术侧DRG神经元上GABAA受体激活电流的调节作用。结果显示,(1)CCI组术侧下肢热缩足反

  7. Study on cognition disorder and morphologic change of neurons in hippocampus area following traumatic brain injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪军; 崔建忠; 周云涛; 高俊玲

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the correlation between cognition disorder and morphologic change of hippocampal neurons after traumatic brain injury (TBI).   Methods: Wistar rat models with severe TBI were made by Marmarous method. The histopathological change of the neurons in the hippocampus area were studied with hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated X-dUPT nick end labeling (TUNEL), respectively. The cognitive function was evaluated with the Morris water maze test.   Results: The comprehensive neuronal degeneration and necrosis could be observed in CA2-3 regions of hippocampus at 3 days after injury. Apoptotic positive neurons in CA2-4 regions of hippocampus and dentate gyrus increased in the injured group at 24 hours following TBI. They peaked at 7 days and then declined. Significant impairment of spatial learning and memory was observed after injury in the rats.   Conclusions: The rats have obvious disorders in spatial learning and memory after severe TBI. Meanwhile, delayed neuronal necrosis and apoptosis can be observed in the neurons in the hippocampus area. It suggests that delayed hippocampal cell death may contribute to the functional deficit.

  8. Effects of GABA agonists on body temperature regulation in GABA(B(1))-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quéva, Christophe; Bremner-Danielsen, Marianne; Edlund, Anders; Ekstrand, A Jonas; Elg, Susanne; Erickson, Sven; Johansson, Thore; Lehmann, Anders; Mattsson, Jan P

    2003-09-01

    1. Activation of GABA(B) receptors evokes hypothermia in wildtype (GABA(B(1))+/+) but not in GABA(B) receptor knockout (GABA(B(1))-/-) mice. The aim of the present study was to determine the hypothermic and behavioural effects of the putative GABA(B) receptor agonist gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), and of the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol. In addition, basal body temperature was determined in GABA(B(1))+/+, GABA(B(1))+/- and GABA(B(1))-/- mice. 2. GABA(B(1))-/- mice were generated by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. Correct gene targeting was assessed by Southern blotting, PCR and Western blotting. GABA(B) receptor-binding sites were quantified with radioligand binding. Measurement of body temperature was done using subcutaneous temperature-sensitive chips, and behavioural changes after drug administration were scored according to a semiquantitative scale. 3. GABA(B(1))-/- mice had a short lifespan, probably caused by generalised seizure activity. No histopathological or blood chemistry changes were seen, but the expression of GABA(B(2)) receptor protein was below the detection limit in brains from GABA(B(1))-/- mice, in the absence of changes in mRNA levels. 4. GABA(B) receptor-binding sites were absent in brain membranes from GABA(B(1))-/- mice. 5. GABA(B(1))-/- mice were hypothermic by approximately 1 degrees C compared to GABA(B(1))+/+ and GABA(B(1))+/- mice. 6. Injection of baclofen (9.6 mg kg-1) produced a large reduction in body temperature and behavioural effects in GABA(B(1))+/+ and in GABA(B(1))+/- mice, but GABA(B(1))-/- mice were unaffected. The same pattern was seen after administration of GHB (400 mg kg-1). The GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol (2 mg kg-1), on the other hand, produced a more pronounced hypothermia in GABA(B(1))-/-mice. In GABA(B(1))+/+ and GABA(B(1))+/- mice, muscimol induced sedation and reduced locomotor activity. However, when given to GABA(B(1))-/- mice, muscimol triggered periods of intense jumping and wild

  9. Early sequential formation of functional GABA(A) and glutamatergic synapses on CA1 interneurons of the rat foetal hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennou, Sonia; Khalilov, Ilgam; Diabira, Diabé; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Gozlan, Henri

    2002-07-01

    During postnatal development of CA1 pyramidal neurons, GABAergic synapses are excitatory and established prior to glutamatergic synapses. As interneurons are generated before pyramidal cells, we have tested the hypothesis that the GABAergic interneuronal network is operative before glutamate pyramidal neurons and provides the initial patterns of activity. We patch-clamp recorded interneurons in foetal (69 neurons) and neonatal P0 (162 neurons) hippocampal slices and performed a morphofunctional analysis of biocytin-filled neurons. At P0, three types of interneurons were found: (i) non-innervated "silent" interneurons (5%) with no spontaneous or evoked synaptic currents; (ii) G interneurons (17%) with GABA(A) synapses only; and (iii) GG interneurons with GABA and glutamatergic synapses (78%). Relying on the neuronal capacitance, cell body size and arborization of dendrites and axons, the three types of interneurons correspond to three stages of development with non-innervated neurons and interneurons with GABA(A) and glutamatergic synapses being, respectively, the least and the most developed. Recordings from both pyramidal neurons and interneurons in foetuses (E18-20) revealed that the majority of interneurons (65%) had functional synapses whereas nearly 90% of pyramidal neurons were quiescent. Therefore, interneurons follow the same GABA-glutamate sequence of synapse formation but earlier than the principal cells. Interneurons are the source and the target of the first synapses formed in the hippocampus and are thus in a position to modulate the development of the hippocampus in the foetal stage.

  10. Long-lasting novelty-induced neuronal reverberation during slow-wave sleep in multiple forebrain areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidarta Ribeiro

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of experience-dependent brain reactivation during both slow-wave (SW and rapid eye-movement (REM sleep led to the notion that the consolidation of recently acquired memory traces requires neural replay during sleep. To date, however, several observations continue to undermine this hypothesis. To address some of these objections, we investigated the effects of a transient novel experience on the long-term evolution of ongoing neuronal activity in the rat forebrain. We observed that spatiotemporal patterns of neuronal ensemble activity originally produced by the tactile exploration of novel objects recurred for up to 48 h in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, putamen, and thalamus. This novelty-induced recurrence was characterized by low but significant correlations values. Nearly identical results were found for neuronal activity sampled when animals were moving between objects without touching them. In contrast, negligible recurrence was observed for neuronal patterns obtained when animals explored a familiar environment. While the reverberation of past patterns of neuronal activity was strongest during SW sleep, waking was correlated with a decrease of neuronal reverberation. REM sleep showed more variable results across animals. In contrast with data from hippocampal place cells, we found no evidence of time compression or expansion of neuronal reverberation in any of the sampled forebrain areas. Our results indicate that persistent experience-dependent neuronal reverberation is a general property of multiple forebrain structures. It does not consist of an exact replay of previous activity, but instead it defines a mild and consistent bias towards salient neural ensemble firing patterns. These results are compatible with a slow and progressive process of memory consolidation, reflecting novelty-related neuronal ensemble relationships that seem to be context- rather than stimulus-specific. Based on our current and previous results

  11. GABA-A receptor inhibition of local calcium signaling in spines and dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlin, Joseph J; Carter, Adam G

    2014-11-26

    Cortical interneurons activate GABA-A receptors to rapidly control electrical and biochemical signaling at pyramidal neurons. Different populations of interneurons are known to uniquely target the soma and dendrites of pyramidal neurons. However, the ability of these interneurons to inhibit Ca(2+) signaling at spines and dendrites is largely unexplored. Here we use whole-cell recordings, two-photon microscopy, GABA uncaging and optogenetics to study dendritic inhibition at layer 5 (L5) pyramidal neurons in slices of mouse PFC. We first show that GABA-A receptors strongly inhibit action potential (AP)-evoked Ca(2+) signals at both spines and dendrites. We find robust inhibition over tens of milliseconds that spreads along the dendritic branch. However, we observe no difference in the amount of inhibition at neighboring spines and dendrites. We then examine the influence of interneurons expressing parvalbumin (PV), somatostatin (SOM), or 5HT3a receptors. We determine that these populations of interneurons make unique contacts onto the apical and basal dendrites of L5 pyramidal neurons. We also show that SOM and 5HT3a but not PV interneurons potently inhibit AP Ca(2+) signals via GABA-A receptors at both spines and dendrites. These findings reveal how multiple interneurons regulate local Ca(2+) signaling in pyramidal neurons, with implications for cortical function and disease.

  12. 孕烯醇酮和孕烯醇酮硫酸盐对小鼠不同脑区3H-GABA与GABAB受体结合的影响%Effects of Pregnenolone and Pregnenolone Sulfate on 3H-GABA Bound with GABAB Receptor in Different Areas of Mice Brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周雪瑞

    2001-01-01

    By using radioactive ligand-receptor binding assay, this paperreported the effects of pregnenolong (Pe) and pregnenolone sulfate (Pes) on 3H-GABA bound with GABAB receptor in different areas of mice brain. The result showed that Pe decreased the binding of 3H-GABA with GABAB receptor, and it could be blocked and turned over by baclofen. Pes markedly decreased the binding of 3H-GABA with GABAB receptor in cerebral cortex and hippocampus and increased the binding in hypothalamus of mice brain. Baclofen could blocked the inhibition effect, enhance the effects of increase. These results suggested that major effects of Pe and Pes on 3H-GABA bound with GABAB receptor in different areas of mice brain were inhibition effects.%采用放射配体受体结合分析法,研究了孕烯醇酮(Pe)和孕烯醇酮硫酸盐(Pes)对小鼠不同脑区3H-GABA与GABAB受体结合的影响.结果显示,Pe对小鼠下丘脑、大脑皮层、海马、小脑GABAB受体的结合均有抑制效应,且能被GABAB受体激动剂巴氯芬(Bac)所阻断并翻转.Pes对大脑皮层、海马、小脑GABAB受体的结合有抑制作用,而对下丘脑则有促进作用.Bac能阻断Pes的抑制作用(海马除外),加强Pes的促进作用.实验结果提示,Pe,Pes对各脑区GABAB受体的结合具有一定的影响作用,且多为抑制效应.

  13. Neurons of the dentate molecular layer in the rabbit hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Sancho-Bielsa

    Full Text Available The molecular layer of the dentate gyrus appears as the main entrance gate for information into the hippocampus, i.e., where the perforant path axons from the entorhinal cortex synapse onto the spines and dendrites of granule cells. A few dispersed neuronal somata appear intermingled in between and probably control the flow of information in this area. In rabbits, the number of neurons in the molecular layer increases in the first week of postnatal life and then stabilizes to appear permanent and heterogeneous over the individuals' life span, including old animals. By means of Golgi impregnations, NADPH histochemistry, immunocytochemical stainings and intracellular labelings (lucifer yellow and biocytin injections, eight neuronal morphological types have been detected in the molecular layer of developing adult and old rabbits. Six of them appear as interneurons displaying smooth dendrites and GABA immunoreactivity: those here called as globoid, vertical, small horizontal, large horizontal, inverted pyramidal and polymorphic. Additionally there are two GABA negative types: the sarmentous and ectopic granular neurons. The distribution of the somata and dendritic trees of these neurons shows preferences for a definite sublayer of the molecular layer: small horizontal, sarmentous and inverted pyramidal neurons are preferably found in the outer third of the molecular layer; vertical, globoid and polymorph neurons locate the intermediate third, while large horizontal and ectopic granular neurons occupy the inner third or the juxtagranular molecular layer. Our results reveal substantial differences in the morphology and electrophysiological behaviour between each neuronal archetype in the dentate molecular layer, allowing us to propose a new classification for this neural population.

  14. View-based encoding of actions in mirror neurons of area f5 in macaque premotor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caggiano, Vittorio; Fogassi, Leonardo; Rizzolatti, Giacomo; Pomper, Joern K; Thier, Peter; Giese, Martin A; Casile, Antonino

    2011-01-25

    Converging experimental evidence indicates that mirror neurons in the monkey premotor area F5 encode the goals of observed motor acts [1-3]. However, it is unknown whether they also contribute to encoding the perspective from which the motor acts of others are seen. In order to address this issue, we recorded the visual responses of mirror neurons of monkey area F5 by using a novel experimental paradigm based on the presentation of movies showing grasping motor acts from different visual perspectives. We found that the majority of the tested mirror neurons (74%) exhibited view-dependent activity with responses tuned to specific points of view. A minority of the tested mirror neurons (26%) exhibited view-independent responses. We conclude that view-independent mirror neurons encode action goals irrespective of the details of the observed motor acts, whereas the view-dependent ones might either form an intermediate step in the formation of view independence or contribute to a modulation of view-dependent representations in higher-level visual areas, potentially linking the goals of observed motor acts with their pictorial aspects.

  15. Evaluation of the areas of neuronal cell bodies and nuclei in the myenteric plexus of the duodenum of adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIRANDA-NETO MARCILÍO H.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the areas of cell body and nucleus profiles of the myenteric neurons in the antimesenteric and intermediate regions of the duodenum of adult rats. Five male rats were used. The duodenum was removed and dissected to whole-mount preparations, which were stained by the Giemsa technique. The areas of cell body and nucleus profiles of 100 neurons, 50 from each region, of each animal, were assessed with image analyser. Based on the global mean±SD of the areas of cell body profiles, neurons were labelled as small, medium or large. It was observed that the neurons did not differ significantly in size or incidence between the antimesenteric and intermediate regions. However, the nuclei of the small and medium neurons were significantly smaller in the latter region. It is discussed that the smaller nuclear size could be related to the cell bodies being slightly smaller on this region and to a possible smaller biosynthetic activity which would influence nuclear size.

  16. Early loss of interneurons and delayed subunit-specific changes in GABA(A)-receptor expression in a mouse model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouilleret, V; Loup, F; Kiener, T; Marescaux, C; Fritschy, J M

    2000-01-01

    Unilateral injection of kainic acid (KA) into the dorsal hippocampus of adult mice induces spontaneous recurrent partial seizures and replicates histopathological changes observed in human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) (Bouilleret V et al., Neuroscience 1999; 89:717-729). Alterations in pre- and postsynaptic components of GABAergic neurotransmission were investigated immunohistochemically at different time points (1-120 days) in this mouse model of MTLE. Markers of GABAergic interneurons (parvalbumin, calbindin-D28k, and calretinin), the type-1 GABA transporter (GAT1), and major GABA(A)-receptor subunits expressed in the hippocampal formation were analyzed. Acutely, KA injection produced a profound loss of hilar cells but only limited damage to CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells. In addition, parvalbumin and calbindin-D28k staining of interneurons disappeared irreversibly in CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG), whereas calretinin staining was spared. The prominent GABA(A)-receptor alpha1 subunit staining of interneurons also disappeared after KA treatment, suggesting acute degeneration of these cells. Likewise, GAT1 immunoreactivity revealed degenerating terminals at 24 h post-KA in CA1 and DC and subsided almost completely thereafter. Loss of CA1 and, to a lesser extent, CA3 neurons became evident at 7-15 days post-KA. It was more accentuated after 1 month, accompanied by a corresponding reduction of GABA(A)-receptor staining. In contrast, DC granule cells were markedly enlarged and dispersed in the molecular layer and exhibited a prominent increase in GABA(A)-receptor subunit staining. After 4 months, the dorsal CA1 area was lost almost entirely, CA3 was reduced, and the DG represented most of the remaining dorsal hippocampal formation. No significant morphological alterations were detected contralaterally. These results suggest that loss of hilar cells and GABAergic neurons contributes to epileptogenesis in this model of MTLE. In contrast, long-term degeneration of

  17. The alpha2C-adrenoceptor modulates GABA release in mouse striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weilie; Ordway, Gregory A

    2003-04-10

    The alpha(2C)-adrenoceptor occurs in high density in the striatum relative to other brain regions, but its biological role in striatal physiology is perplexing because of the paucity of noradrenergic terminals in this region. In this study, mice with a targeted inactivation of the alpha(2C)-adrenoceptor gene (alpha(2C)-KO mice), and genetically related mice (WT mice), were used to study the potential role of the striatal alpha(2C)-adrenoceptor in modulating GABA release. Perfused brain slices were pre-loaded with [(3)H]GABA and were stimulated electrically. In WT mice, the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist, UK14304 (brimonidine), significantly enhanced [(3)H]GABA release from striatal slices, while the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist, RX821002, alone evoked a significant decrease in [(3)H]GABA release. In alpha(2C)-KO mice, the effect of RX821002 was absent, while UK14304 retained its ability to enhance [(3)H]GABA release. Pharmacological depletion of monoamines in WT mice also abolished the effect of RX821002 on [(3)H]GABA release. In hippocampal slices, RX821002-induced reduction in [(3)H]GABA release was present in WT and alpha(2C)-KO mice. In the presence of tetrodotoxin, RX821002 increased [(3)H]GABA release in striatal slices from both WT and alpha(2C)-KO mice. Together, these data imply that alpha(2A)- and alpha(2C)-adrenoceptors are located on different neurons in the striatum, that alpha(2C)-adrenoceptor-mediated effects on striatal GABA release are mediated by an endogenous catecholamine that could be dopamine, and that the alpha(2C)-adrenoceptor effect of RX821002 does not occur at the GABAergic terminal.

  18. The responses to illusory contours of neurons in cortex areas 17 and 18 of the cats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Responses to illusory contours (ICs) were sampled from neurons incortical areas 17 and 18 of the anesthetized cats. For ICs sensitive cells, the differences of receptive field properties were compared when ICs and real contour stimuli were applied. Two hundred orientation or direction selective cells were studied. We find that about 42 percent of these cells were the ICs sensitive cells. Although their orientation or direction tuning curves to ICs bar and real bars were similar, the response modes (especially latency and time course) were different. The cells' responses to ICs were independent of the spatial phases of sinusoidal gratings, which composed the ICs. The cells' optimal spatial frequency to composing gratings the ICs was much higher than the one to moving gratings. Therefore, these cells really responded to the ICs rather than the line ends of composing gratings. For some kinds of velocity-tuning cells, the optimal velocity to moving ICs bar was much lower than the optimal velocity to moving bars. The present results demonstrate that some cells in areas 17 and 18 of cats have the ability to respond to ICs and have different response properties of the receptive fields to ICs and luminance boundaries via different neural mechanisms.

  19. Electrophysiological and morphological properties of neurons in the prepositus hypoglossi nucleus that express both ChAT and VGAT in a double-transgenic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yasuhiko; Zhang, Yue; Yanagawa, Yuchio

    2015-04-01

    Although it has been proposed that neurons that contain both acetylcholine (ACh) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are present in the prepositus hypoglossi nucleus (PHN), these neurons have not been characterized because of the difficulty in identifying them. In the present study, PHN neurons that express both choline acetyltransferase and the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) were identified using double-transgenic rats, in which the cholinergic and inhibitory neurons express the fluorescent proteins tdTomato and Venus, respectively. To characterize the neurons that express both tdTomato and Venus (D+ neurons), the afterhyperpolarization (AHP) profiles and firing patterns of these neurons were investigated via whole-cell recordings of brainstem slice preparations. Regarding the three AHP profiles and four firing patterns that the D+ neurons exhibited, an AHP with an afterdepolarization and a firing pattern that exhibited a delay in the generation of the first spike were the preferential properties of these neurons. In the three morphological types classified, the multipolar type that exhibited radiating dendrites was predominant among the D+ neurons. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that the VGAT-immunopositive axonal boutons that expressed tdTomato were primarily located in the dorsal cap of inferior olive (IO) and the PHN. Although the PHN receives cholinergic inputs from the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus and laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, D+ neurons were absent from these brain areas. Together, these results suggest that PHN neurons that co-express ACh and GABA exhibit specific electrophysiological and morphological properties, and innervate the dorsal cap of the IO and the PHN.

  20. The Timing of the Excitatory-to-Inhibitory GABA Switch Is Regulated by the Oxytocin Receptor via KCC2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Leonzino

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin and its receptor (Oxtr play a crucial role in the postnatal transition of neuronal GABA neurotransmission from excitatory to inhibitory, a developmental process known as the GABA switch. Using hippocampal neurons from Oxtr-null mice, we show that (1 Oxtr is necessary for the correct timing of the GABA switch by upregulating activity of the chloride cotransporter KCC2, (2 Oxtr, in a very early and narrow time window, directly modulates the functional activity of KCC2 by promoting its phosphorylation and insertion/stabilization at the neuronal surface, and (3 in the absence of Oxtr, electrophysiological alterations are recorded in mature neurons, a finding consistent with a reduced level of KCC2 and increased susceptibility to seizures observed in adult Oxtr-null mice. These data identify KCC2 as a key target of oxytocin in postnatal events that may be linked to pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  1. Serotonin modulation of cortical neurons and networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau eCelada

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The serotonergic pathways originating in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DR and MnR, respectively are critically involved in cortical function. Serotonin (5-HT, acting on postsynaptic and presynaptic receptors, is involved in cognition, mood, impulse control and motor functions by 1 modulating the activity of different neuronal types, and 2 varying the release of other neurotransmitters, such as glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine and dopamine. Also, 5-HT seems to play an important role in cortical development. Of all cortical regions, the frontal lobe is the area most enriched in serotonergic axons and 5-HT receptors. 5-HT and selective receptor agonists modulate the excitability of cortical neurons and their discharge rate through the activation of several receptor subtypes, of which the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 subtypes play a major role. Little is known, however, on the role of other excitatory receptors moderately expressed in cortical areas, such as 5-HT2C, 5-HT4, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors are key players and exert opposite effects on the activity of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC. The activation of 5-HT1A receptors in mPFC hyperpolarizes pyramidal neurons whereas that of 5-HT2A receptors results in neuronal depolarization, reduction of the afterhyperpolarization and increase of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs and of discharge rate. 5-HT can also stimulate excitatory (5-HT2A and 5-HT3 and inhibitory (5-HT1A receptors in GABA interneurons to modulate synaptic GABA inputs onto pyramidal neurons. Likewise, the pharmacological manipulation of various 5-HT receptors alters oscillatory activity in PFC, suggesting that 5-HT is also involved in the control of cortical network activity. A better understanding of the actions of 5-HT in PFC may help to develop treatments for mood and cognitive disorders associated with an abnormal function of the

  2. Phencyclidine affects firing activity of ventral tegmental area neurons that are related to reward and social behaviors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, T; Okamoto, M; Suzuki, Y; Hoshino, K-Y; Jodo, E

    2013-06-14

    Patients with schizophrenia exhibit deficits in motivation and affect, which suggests an impairment in the reward system. The psychotomimetic drug, phencyclidine (PCP), also induces schizophrenia-like negative symptoms, such as reduced motivation, blunted affect, and social withdrawal in both humans and animals. Previous studies have indicated that the dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) play a pivotal role in the development of reward-associated learning and motivation. However, how PCP affects the activity of VTA neurons during performance of a reward-related task and social interaction with others in unanesthetized animals remains unclear. Here, we recorded the unit activity of VTA neurons in freely moving rats before and after systemic administration of PCP in a classical conditioning paradigm, and during social interaction with an unfamiliar partner. In the classical conditioning task, two different tones were sequentially presented, one of which accompanied electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle as an unconditioned stimulus. After identifying the response properties of recorded neurons in the classical conditioning task and social interaction, animals received an intraperitoneal injection of PCP. Our study demonstrated that most VTA neurons responsive to reward-associated stimuli were also activated during social interaction. Such activation of neurons was considerably suppressed by systemic administration of PCP, thus, PCP may affect the firing activity of VTA neurons that are involved in motivation, learning, and social interaction. Disruption of the response of VTA neurons to reward stimuli and socially interactive situations may be involved in PCP-induced impairments similar to the negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

  3. The role of the area postrema in the anorectic effects of amylin and salmon calcitonin: behavioral and neuronal phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braegger, Fiona E; Asarian, Lori; Dahl, Kirsten; Lutz, Thomas A; Boyle, Christina N

    2014-10-01

    Amylin reduces meal size by activating noradrenergic neurons in the area postrema (AP). Neurons in the AP also mediate the eating-inhibitory effects of salmon calcitonin (sCT), a potent amylin agonist, but the phenotypes of the neurons mediating its effect are unknown. Here we investigated whether sCT activates similar neuronal populations to amylin, and if its anorectic properties also depend on AP function. Male rats underwent AP lesion (APX) or sham surgery. Meal patterns were analysed under ad libitum and post-deprivation conditions. The importance of the AP in mediating the anorectic action of sCT was examined in feeding experiments of dose-response effects of sCT in APX vs. sham rats. The effect of sCT to induce Fos expression was compared between surgery groups, and relative to amylin. The phenotype of Fos-expressing neurons in the brainstem was examined by testing for the co-expression of dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH) or tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH). By measuring the apposition of vesicular glutamate transporter-2 (VGLUT2)-positive boutons, potential glutamatergic input to amylin- and sCT-activated AP neurons was compared. Similar to amylin, an intact AP was necessary for sCT to reduce eating. Further, co-expression between Fos activation and DBH after amylin or sCT did not differ markedly, while co-localization of Fos and TPH was minor. Approximately 95% of neurons expressing Fos and DBH after amylin or sCT treatment were closely apposed to VGLUT2-positive boutons. Our study suggests that the hindbrain pathways engaged by amylin and sCT share many similarities, including the mediation by AP neurons.

  4. Endogenous Opioid-Induced Neuroplasticity of Dopaminergic Neurons in the Ventral Tegmental Area Influences Natural and Opiate Reward

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitchers, Kyle K.; Coppens, Caroline M.; Beloate, Lauren N.; Fuller, Jonathan; Van, Sandy; Frohmader, Karla S.; Laviolette, Steven R.; Lehman, Michael N.; Coolen, Lique M.

    2014-01-01

    Natural reward and drugs of abuse converge on the mesolimbic pathway and activate common mechanism of neural plasticity in the nucleus accumbens. Chronic exposure to opiates induces plasticity in dopaminergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA), which regulates morphine reward tolerance. Her

  5. Effects of sustained serotonin reuptake inhibition on the firing of dopamine neurons in the rat ventral tegmental area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dremencov, Eliyahu; El Mansari, Mostafa; Blier, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Background: Selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are efficacious in depression because of their ability to increase 5-HT neurotransmission. However, owing to a purported inhibitory effect of 5- HT on dopamine (DA) neuronal activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), this increase

  6. Activation of ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons produces wakefulness through dopamine D2-like receptors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Yo; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Takahashi, Koji; Yonezawa, Toshiya; Kanda, Takeshi; Takata, Yohko; Cherasse, Yoan; Lazarus, Michael

    2017-01-25

    A growing body of evidence suggests that dopamine plays a role in sleep-wake regulation, but the dopamine-producing brain areas that control sleep-wake states are unclear. In this study, we chemogenetically activated dopamine neurons in the ventral midbrain of mice to examine the role of these neurons in sleep-wake regulation. We found that activation of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), but not in the substantia nigra, strongly induced wakefulness, although both cell populations expressed the neuronal activity marker c-Fos after chemogenetic stimulation. Analysis of the pattern of behavioral states revealed that VTA activation increased the duration of wakefulness and decreased the number of wakefulness episodes, indicating that wakefulness was consolidated by VTA activation. The increased wakefulness evoked by VTA activation was completely abolished by pretreatment with the dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonist raclopride, but not by the D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390. These findings indicate that the activation of VTA dopamine neurons promotes wakefulness via D2/D3 receptors.

  7. Long-Term Effects of Maternal Deprivation on the Neuronal Soma Area in the Rat Neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Aksić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Early separation of rat pups from their mothers (separatio a matrem is considered and accepted as an animal model of perinatal stress. Adult rats, separated early postnatally from their mothers, are developing long-lasting changes in the brain and neuroendocrine system, corresponding to the findings observed in schizophrenia and affective disorders. With the aim to investigate the morphological changes in this animal model we exposed 9-day-old (P9 Wistar rats to a 24 h maternal deprivation (MD. At young adult age rats were sacrificed for morphometric analysis and their brains were compared with the control group bred under the same conditions, but without MD. Rats exposed to MD had a 28% smaller cell soma area in the prefrontal cortex (PFCX, 30% in retrosplenial cortex (RSCX, and 15% in motor cortex (MCX compared to the controls. No difference was observed in the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in the neocortex of MD rats compared to the control group. The results of this study demonstrate that stress in early life has a long-term effect on neuronal soma size in cingulate and retrosplenial cortex and is potentially interesting as these structures play an important role in cognition.

  8. The Subcellular Localization of GABA Transporters and Its Implication for Seizure Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karsten K; Hansen, Gert H; Danielsen, E Michael

    2015-01-01

    anticonvulsant effect in several seizure models in mice. The pharmacological profile of these and similar compounds has been thoroughly investigated in in vitro systems, comparing the GAT subtype selectivity with the ability to inhibit GABA uptake in primary cultures of neurons and astrocytes. However, an exact...

  9. Presynaptically mediated effects of cholecystokinin-8 on the excitability of area postrema neurons in rat brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugeta, Shingo; Hirai, Yoshiyuki; Maezawa, Hitoshi; Inoue, Nobuo; Yamazaki, Yutaka; Funahashi, Makoto

    2015-08-27

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a well-known gut hormone that shows anorexigenic effects via action at peripheral and central receptors. CCK is also widely distributed throughout the mammalian brain and appears to function as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator. The area postrema is one of the circumventricular organs, located on the dorsal surface of the medulla oblongata at the caudal end of the fourth ventricle. Blood vessels in the area postrema lack a blood brain barrier, offering specific central neural elements unique access to circulating substances. Immunohistochemical studies show CCK-A receptors in the area postrema, and we reported CCK-sensitive area postrema neurons. However, the receptive mechanism of CCK in area postrema neurons still remains unexplained. We investigated the responses of area postrema neurons to agonists and antagonists of CCK receptors using whole cell and perforated patch-clamp recordings in rat brain slices. The application of CCK-8 elicited excitatory responses, such as increases in the frequency of mEPSCs (miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents), a shift toward larger amplitude mEPSCs, and increases in the frequency of action potentials. These changes were found mostly in cells not displaying the hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih), except for small excitatory changes in a minority of Ih-positive neurons. Tonic inward currents or an inhibitory response to CCK-8 were never seen. Analysis of the amplitude of mEPSCs before and after the administration of CCK-8 indicated the responses mediated via the presynaptic receptors. The effect of CCK-8 was abolished in the presence of CNQX (AMPA type glutamate receptor antagonist). In the presence of lorglumide (a selective CCK-A receptor antagonist), CCK-8-induced excitatory responses were inhibited. No cells responded to the administration of non-sulfated CCK-8 (CCK-8NS, a selective CCK-B receptor agonist). We conclude that CCK-8 exerts its action via presynaptic CCK-A receptors

  10. Delineation of the Role of Astroglial GABA Transporters in Seizure Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schousboe, Arne; Madsen, Karsten K

    2017-02-11

    Studies of GABA transport in neurons and astrocytes have provided evidence that termination of GABA as neurotransmitter is brought about primarily by active transport into the presynaptic, GABAergic nerve endings. There is, however, a considerable transport capacity in the astrocytes surrounding the synaptic terminals, a transport which may limit the availability of transmitter GABA leading to a higher probability of seizure activity governed by the balance of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. Based on this it was hypothesized that selective inhibition of astrocytic GABA transport might prevent such seizure activity. A series of GABA analogs of restricted conformation were synthesized and in a number of collaborative investigations between Prof. Steve White at the University of Utah and medicinal chemists and pharmacologists at the School of Pharmacy and the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, GABA analogs with exactly this pharmacological property were identified. The most important analogs identified were N-methyl-exo-THPO (N-methyl-3-hydroxy-4-amino-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1,2-benzisoxazole) and its lipophilic analog EF-1502 ((RS)-4-[N-[1,1-bis(3-methyl-2-thienyl)but-1-en-4-yl]-N-methylamino]-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol) both of which turned out to be potent anticonvulsants in animal models of epilepsy.

  11. Effects of Prolactin and Lactation on A15 Dopamine Neurones in the Rostral Preoptic Area of Female Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R S E; Herbison, A E; Grattan, D R

    2015-09-01

    There are several distinct populations of dopamine neurones in the hypothalamus. Some of these, such as the A12 tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurones and the A14 periventricular dopamine neurones, are known to be regulated by the anterior pituitary hormone prolactin, whereas others, such as the A13 zona incerta dopaminergic neurones, are not. The present study aimed to investigate the role of prolactin in the regulation of a fourth population of hypothalamic dopamine neurones: the A15 dopamine population in the rostral hypothalamus. These neurones may play a role in the regulation of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion, and we hypothesised that they might contribute to the suppression of GnRH release and infertility caused by hyperprolactinaemia. Under basal (low prolactin) conditions, only 8% of A15 dopamine neurones in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) of vehicle-treated dioestrous mice expressed phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (pSTAT5), as labelled by immunohistochemistry. We have previously shown that this transcription factor can be used as an index of prolactin-receptor activation. Following acute prolactin administration, 35% of AVPV dopamine neurones co-expressed pSTAT5, whereas, during lactation, when endogenous prolactin levels are chronically elevated, 55% of AVPV dopamine neurones expressed pSTAT5. There was also a significant increase in dopamine turnover in the rostral hypothalamus, both in the diagonal band of Broca at the level of the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis and in the rostral preoptic area during lactation, with the 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid/dopamine ratio increasing from 0.28 ± 0.04 and 0.14 ± 0.01 in dioestrous mice to 0.82 ± 0.06 and 0.38 ± 0.03, respectively, in day 7 lactating mice. It is not yet known whether this change is driven by the hyperprolactinaemia of lactation, or another lactation-specific signal. These data demonstrate that the A15

  12. Phorbol ester reduces ethanol excitation of dopaminergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area: Involvement of protein kinase C theta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarat eNimitvilai

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA play a key role in the rewarding and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse, including alcohol. Ethanol directly increases the firing rate of dopaminergic (DAergic VTA neurons, but modulation of the firing rate of DAergic VTA neurons can be controlled by a number of factors, including some that are under the control of protein kinase C (PKC. Application of phorbol esters activates PKC and the present study assessed the effect of a phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, on ethanol-induced excitation of DA VTA neurons. Ethanol-induced excitation of DAergic VTA neurons was reduced significantly in the presence of PMA. This action of PMA was antagonized by chelerythrine chloride, a non-selective antagonist of PKC, but not by moderate concentrations of antagonists of conventional PKC isoforms (Gö6976 and Gö6983. A PKC δ/θ inhibitor antagonized PMA-induced reduction of ethanol excitation. Since PKCδ antagonist Gö6983 did not antagonize the effect of PMA on ethanol excitation, the PMA reduction of ethanol excitation is most likely to be mediated by PKCθ. Antagonists of intracellular calcium pathways were ineffective in antagonizing PMA action on ethanol excitation, consistent with the lack of calcium dependence of PKCθ. In summary, ethanol-induced excitation of VTA neurons is attenuated in the presence of PMA, and this attenuation appears to be mediated by PKCθ. This novel mechanism for interfering with ethanol activation of reward-related neurons could provide a new target for pharmacotherapy to ameliorate alcoholism.

  13. Visual motion integration by neurons in the middle temporal area of a New World monkey, the marmoset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Selina S; Tailby, Chris; Gharaei, Saba; Camp, Aaron J; Bourne, James A; Solomon, Samuel G

    2011-12-01

    The middle temporal area (MT/V5) is an anatomically distinct region of primate visual cortex that is specialized for the processing of image motion. It is generally thought that some neurons in area MT are capable of signalling the motion of complex patterns, but this has only been established in the macaque monkey. We made extracellular recordings from single units in area MT of anaesthetized marmosets, a New World monkey. We show through quantitative analyses that some neurons (35 of 185; 19%) are capable of signalling pattern motion ('pattern cells'). Across several dimensions, the visual response of pattern cells in marmosets is indistinguishable from that of pattern cells in macaques. Other neurons respond to the motion of oriented contours in a pattern ('component cells') or show intermediate properties. In addition, we encountered a subset of neurons (22 of 185; 12%) insensitive to sinusoidal gratings but very responsive to plaids and other two-dimensional patterns and otherwise indistinguishable from pattern cells. We compared the response of each cell class to drifting gratings and dot fields. In pattern cells, directional selectivity was similar for gratings and dot fields; in component cells, directional selectivity was weaker for dot fields than gratings. Pattern cells were more likely to have stronger suppressive surrounds, prefer lower spatial frequencies and prefer higher speeds than component cells. We conclude that pattern motion sensitivity is a feature of some neurons in area MT of both New and Old World monkeys, suggesting that this functional property is an important stage in motion analysis and is likely to be conserved in humans.

  14. GABA(A) receptor-mediated presynaptic inhibition on glutamatergic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Sokatsu; Yoshimura, Megumu; Shin, Min-Chul; Wakita, Masahito; Nonaka, Kiku; Akaike, Norio

    2011-01-15

    We investigated the functional roles of presynaptic GABA(A) receptors on excitatory nerve terminals in contributing to spontaneous and action potential-evoked glutamatergic transmission to rat hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons. Single CA3 neurons were mechanically isolated with adherent nerve terminals, namely the 'synaptic bouton preparation', and spontaneous glutamatergic excitatory synaptic potentials (sEPSCs) and EPSCs evoked by focal electrical stimuli of a single presynaptic glutamatergic boutons (eEPSCs) were recorded using conventional whole-cell patch recordings. Selective activation of presynaptic GABA(A) receptors on these excitatory nerve terminals by muscimol, markedly facilitated sEPSCs frequency but inhibited eEPSC amplitude. The facilitation of sEPSC frequency was completely occluded by GABA(A) receptor-Cl⁻ channel blockers bicuculline or penicillin (PN). PN itself concentration-dependently inhibited the GABA(A) receptor response induced by bath application of muscimol, but had no effect on the glutamate receptor response. In addition, pretreatment with a blocker of the Na(+), K(+), 2Cl⁻ co-transporter type 1 (NKCC-1), bumetanide, prevented the muscimol-induced inhibition of eEPSCs. The results indicate that activation of presynaptic GABA(A) receptors directly depolarizes glutamatergic excitatory nerve terminals and thereby differentially modulates sEPSCs and eEPSCs.

  15. Induction of the GABA cell phenotype: an in vitro model for studying neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivan Subburaju

    Full Text Available Recent studies of the hippocampus have suggested that a network of genes is associated with the regulation of the GAD₆₇ (GAD1 expression and may play a role in γ-amino butyric acid (GABA dysfunction in schizophrenia (SZ and bipolar disorder (BD. To obtain a more detailed understanding of how GAD₆₇ regulation may result in GABAergic dysfunction, we have developed an in vitro model in which GABA cells are differentiated from the hippocampal precursor cell line, HiB5. Growth factors, such as PDGF, and BDNF, regulate the GABA phenotype by inducing the expression of GAD₆₇ and stimulating the growth of cellular processes, many with growth cones that form appositions with the cell bodies and processes of other GAD₆₇-positive cells. These changes are associated with increased expression of acetylated tubulin, microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2 and the post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD95. The addition of BDNF, together with PDGF, increases the levels of mRNA and protein for GAD₆₇, as well as the high affinity GABA uptake protein, GAT1. These changes are associated with increased concentrations of GABA in the cytoplasm of "differentiated" HiB5 neurons. In the presence of Ca²⁺ and K⁺, newly synthesized GABA is released extracellularly. When the HiB5 cells appear to be fully differentiated, they also express GAD₆₅, parvalbumin and calbindin, and GluR subtypes as well as HDAC1, DAXX, PAX5, Runx2, associated with GAD₆₇ regulation. Overall, these results suggest that the HiB5 cells can differentiate into functionally mature GABA neurons in the presence of gene products that are associated with GAD₆₇ regulation in the adult hippocampus.

  16. Auto-modulation of neuroactive steroids on GABA A receptors: a novel pharmacological effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Florian; Rassler, Cornelia; Allgaier, Clemens; Strecker, Karl; Wohlfarth, Kai

    2007-02-01

    GABA(A) receptor function is modulated by various important drugs including neuroactive steroids that act on allosteric modulatory sites and can directly activate GABA(A) receptor channels at high concentrations. We used whole cell patch-clamp recordings and rapid applications of the neuroactive steroid alphaxalone to investigate repetitive steroid effects. Alphaxalone potentiation of submaximal GABA-evoked currents was enhanced significantly by repetitive coapplications at all investigated recombinant isoforms (alpha1beta3delta, alpha1beta3gamma2L, alpha6beta3delta, alpha6beta3gamma2L) and at GABA(A) receptors of differentiated human NT2 neurons. A similar increase of current amplitudes was induced by repetitive applications of a high steroid concentration without GABA. We refer to these reversible effects as auto-modulation because repeated interactions of steroids enhanced their own pharmacological impact at the receptor sites in a time and concentration dependent manner without affecting GABA controls. Pronounced auto-modulatory actions were also measured using the neurosteroid 5alpha-THDOC in contrast to indiplon, THIP, and pentobarbital indicating a steroid specificity. Protein kinase A inhibition significantly reduced alphaxalone auto-modulation at alpha1beta3gamma2L, alpha6beta3gamma2L, and alpha6beta3delta subtypes while it enhanced potentiation at alpha1beta3delta isoforms suggesting a crucial influence of receptor subunit composition and phosphorylation for steroid actions. Especially at extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptor sites containing the delta subunit steroid auto-modulation may have a critical role in enhancing potentiation of GABA-induced currents.

  17. Prefrontal parvalbumin interneurons shape neuronal activity to drive fear expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtin, Julien; Chaudun, Fabrice; Rozeske, Robert R; Karalis, Nikolaos; Gonzalez-Campo, Cecilia; Wurtz, Hélène; Abdi, Azzedine; Baufreton, Jerome; Bienvenu, Thomas C M; Herry, Cyril

    2014-01-02

    Synchronization of spiking activity in neuronal networks is a fundamental process that enables the precise transmission of information to drive behavioural responses. In cortical areas, synchronization of principal-neuron spiking activity is an effective mechanism for information coding that is regulated by GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-ergic interneurons through the generation of neuronal oscillations. Although neuronal synchrony has been demonstrated to be crucial for sensory, motor and cognitive processing, it has not been investigated at the level of defined circuits involved in the control of emotional behaviour. Converging evidence indicates that fear behaviour is regulated by the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC). This control over fear behaviour relies on the activation of specific prefrontal projections to the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA), a structure that encodes associative fear memories. However, it remains to be established how the precise temporal control of fear behaviour is achieved at the level of prefrontal circuits. Here we use single-unit recordings and optogenetic manipulations in behaving mice to show that fear expression is causally related to the phasic inhibition of prefrontal parvalbumin interneurons (PVINs). Inhibition of PVIN activity disinhibits prefrontal projection neurons and synchronizes their firing by resetting local theta oscillations, leading to fear expression. Our results identify two complementary neuronal mechanisms mediated by PVINs that precisely coordinate and enhance the neuronal activity of prefrontal projection neurons to drive fear expression.

  18. The Uptake of GABA in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez Rojas, Robert L; Ahn, Il-Young; Suárez Mantilla, Brian; Sant'Anna, Celso; Pral, Elizabeth Mieko Furusho; Silber, Ariel Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) is widely known as a neurotransmitter and signal transduction molecule found in vertebrates, plants, and some protozoan organisms. However, the presence of GABA and its role in trypanosomatids is unknown. Here, we report the presence of intracellular GABA and the biochemical characterization of its uptake in Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Kinetic parameters indicated that GABA is taken up by a single transport system in pathogenic and nonpathogenic forms. Temperature dependence assays showed a profile similar to glutamate transport, but the effect of extracellular cations Na(+) , K(+) , and H(+) on GABA uptake differed, suggesting a different uptake mechanism. In contrast to reports for other amino acid transporters in T. cruzi, GABA uptake was Na(+) dependent and increased with pH, with a maximum activity at pH 8.5. The sensitivity to oligomycin showed that GABA uptake is dependent on ATP synthesis. These data point to a secondary active Na(+) /GABA symporter energized by Na(+) -exporting ATPase. Finally, we show that GABA occurs in the parasite's cytoplasm under normal culture conditions, indicating that it is regularly taken up from the culture medium or synthesized through an still undescribed metabolic pathway.

  19. Anorexia and impaired glucose metabolism in mice with hypothalamic ablation of Glut4 neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongxia; Lu, Taylor Y; McGraw, Timothy E; Accili, Domenico

    2015-02-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) uses glucose independent of insulin. Nonetheless, insulin receptors and insulin-responsive glucose transporters (Glut4) often colocalize in neurons (Glut4 neurons) in anatomically and functionally distinct areas of the CNS. The apparent heterogeneity of Glut4 neurons has thus far thwarted attempts to understand their function. To answer this question, we used Cre-dependent, diphtheria toxin-mediated cell ablation to selectively remove basal hypothalamic Glut4 neurons and investigate the resulting phenotypes. After Glut4 neuron ablation, mice demonstrate altered hormone and nutrient signaling in the CNS. Accordingly, they exhibit negative energy balance phenotype characterized by reduced food intake and increased energy expenditure, without locomotor deficits or gross neuronal abnormalities. Glut4 neuron ablation affects orexigenic melanin-concentrating hormone neurons but has limited effect on neuropeptide Y/agouti-related protein and proopiomelanocortin neurons. The food intake phenotype can be partially normalized by GABA administration, suggesting that it arises from defective GABAergic transmission. Glut4 neuron-ablated mice show peripheral metabolic defects, including fasting hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance, decreased insulin levels, and elevated hepatic gluconeogenic genes. We conclude that Glut4 neurons integrate hormonal and nutritional cues and mediate CNS actions of insulin on energy balance and peripheral metabolism.

  20. Knockout of GAD65 has major impact on synaptic GABA synthesized from astrocyte-derived glutamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walls, Anne Byriel; Eyjolfsson, Elvar M.; Smeland, Olav B.

    2011-01-01

    was further investigated in GAD65 knockout and wild-type mice using [1,2-(13)C]acetate and in some cases γ-vinylGABA (GVG, Vigabatrin), an inhibitor of GABA degradation. A detailed metabolic mapping was obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis of tissue extracts of cerebral cortex...... glutamine both via direct synthesis and via a pathway involving mitochondrial metabolism. Furthermore, a severe neuronal hypometabolism, involving glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle activity, was observed in cerebral cortex of GAD65 knockout mice....

  1. Cocaine depresses GABAA current of hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, J H; Liu, P L; Wu, W H; McArdle, J J

    1997-10-01

    Although blockade of dopamine re-uptake and the resulting elevation of excitatory agonists is commonly thought the primary mechanism of cocaine-induced seizures, it is possible that other neurotransmitters such as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are involved. To examine this possibility, the effects of cocaine on the whole cell GABA current (IGABA) of freshly isolated rat hippocampal neurons were investigated with the patch-clamp technique. Preincubation or acute application of cocaine reversibly suppressed IGABA. The IC50 was 127 microM when cocaine was applied before the application of GABA. The concentration-response relations of cocaine in various GABA concentrations revealed that cocaine inhibited IGABA non-competitively. This effect of cocaine appeared to be independent of voltage. The present study suggests that the GABA receptor/channel complex is also a target for cocaine's action. The suppression of IGABA may contribute to cocaine-induced seizures.

  2. GABA(A) receptor subtype selective cognition enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maubach, Karen

    2003-08-01

    Currently the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) is largely unrealised, with no preventive or curative therapies. The marketed acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (eg. donepezil, Aricept) are directed toward temporary symptomatic relief from impaired cognition, but have prominent adverse effects with minimal efficacy. In pursuit of novel cognition enhancers, the observation that classical benzodiazepines (BZ, eg. diazepam) are amnesic, coupled with the preservation of GABA(A) receptors in brain areas most affected by AD, highlighted the GABA(A) receptor as a potential therapeutic target. In contrast to the amnesic BZ agonists, the BZ inverse agonists (eg. DMCM) which attenuate GABA(A) receptor function, have been shown to improve performance in animal models of learning and memory. Unfortunately, such non-selective ligands also induce anxiety and convulsions. More recently, novel ligands have been developed (eg. 6,6-dimethyl-3-(2-hydroxyethyl)thio-1-(thiazol-2-yl)-6,7-dihydro-2-benzothiophen-4(5H)-one) that demonstrate binding selectivity and high inverse agonism for the alpha5 GABA(A) receptor subtype, which is preferentially located in the hippocampus, a region of the brain associated with learning and memory. Pre-clinical results are encouraging, since these alpha5 selective inverse agonists enhance memory in animal models, such as spatial learning in the Morris water-maze, but are devoid of the adverse effects associated with activity at other GABA(A) receptor subtypes in other brain regions. If the efficacy and safety profiles of alpha5 inverse agonists in humans prove to be similar to those seen in pre-clinical studies, these compounds would offer significant benefit to AD and MCI patients.

  3. Functional expression of the GABAA receptor alpha2 and alpha3 subunits at synapses between intercalated medial paracapsular neurons of mouse amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella eGeracitano

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the amygdala, GABAergic neurons in the intercalated medial paracapsular cluster (Imp have been suggested to play a key role in fear learning and extinction. These neurons project to the central amygdaloid nucleus and to other areas within and outside the amygdala. In addition, they give rise to local collaterals that innervate other neurons in the Imp. Several drugs, including benzodiazepines, are allosteric modulators of GABA-A receptors. Benzodiazepines have both anxiolytic and sedative actions, which are mediated through GABA-A receptors containing alpha2/3 and alpha1 subunits, respectively. To establish whether alpha1 or alpha2/3 subunits are expressed at Imp cell synapses, we used paired recordings of anatomically-identified Imp neurons and high resolution immunocytochemistry in the mouse. We observed that a selective alpha3 subunit agonist, TP003 (100 nM, significantly increased the decay time constant of the unitary IPSCs. A similar effect was also induced by zolpidem (10 microM or by diazepam (1 microM. In contrast, lower doses of zolpidem (0.1-1 microM did not significantly alter the kinetics of the unitary IPSCs. Accordingly, immunocytochemical experiments established that the alpha2 and alpha3, but not the alpha1 subunits of the GABA-A receptors, were present at Imp cell synapses of the mouse amygdala. These results define, for the first time, some of the functional GABA-A receptor subunits expressed at synapses of Imp cells. The data also provide an additional rationale to prompt the search of GABA-A receptor alpha3 selective ligands as improved anxiolytic drugs.

  4. Leptin Responsive and GABAergic Projections to the Rostral Preoptic Area in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuure, W A; Quennell, J H; Anderson, G M

    2016-03-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin plays a critical role in the control of reproduction via signalling in hypothalamic neurones. The drivers of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones, do not have the receptors for leptin. Therefore, intermediate leptin responsive neurones must provide leptin-to-GnRH signalling. We investigated the populations of leptin responsive neurones that provide input to the rostral preoptic area (rPOA) where GnRH cell bodies reside. Fluorescent retrograde tracer beads (RetroBeads; Lumafluor Inc., Naples, FL, USA) were injected into the rPOA of transgenic leptin receptor enhanced green fluorescent protein (Lepr-eGFP) reporter mice. Uptake of the RetroBeads by Lepr-eGFP neurones was assessed throughout the hypothalamus. RetroBead uptake was most evident in the medial arcuate nucleus (ARC), the dorsomedial nucleus (DMN) and the ventral premammillary nucleus (PMV) of the hypothalamus. The uptake of RetroBeads specifically by Lepr-eGFP neurones was highest in the medial ARC (18% of tracer-labelled neurones Lepr-eGFP-positive). Because neurones that are both leptin responsive and GABAergic play a critical role in the regulation of fertility by leptin, we next focussed on the location of these populations. To address whether GABAergic neurones in leptin-responsive hypothalamic regions project to the rPOA, the experiment was repeated in GABA neurone reporter mice (Vgat-tdTomato). Between 10% and 45% of RetroBead-labelled neurones in the ARC were GABAergic, whereas uptake of tracer by GABAergic neurones in the DMN and PMV was very low (leptin responsive and GABAergic neurones from the ARC project to the region of the GnRH cell bodies. Our findings suggest that LEPR-expressing GABA neurones from the ARC may be mediators of leptin-to-GnRH signalling.

  5. Co-existence of calcium-binding proteins and γ-aminobutyric acid or glycine in neurons of the rat medullary dorsal horn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文; 武胜昔; 李云庆

    2004-01-01

    Background We investigated the co-expression of calbindin-D28k (CB), calretinin (CR) and parvalbumin (PV, a combination of the three is referred to as CaBPs) with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or glycine in neurons of the rat medullary dorsal horn (MDH).Methods Immunofluorescence histochemical double-staining for CaBPs and GABA or glycine was performed on the sections from rat MDH.Results CB-, CR-, PV-, GABA- and glycine-like immunoreactive (LI) neurons were differentially observed in all layers of the MDH, but particularly in lamina Ⅱ. Neurons that exhibited immunoreactivity for both CaBPs and GABA or glycine were also observed mainly in lamina Ⅱ. A few of them were found in laminae I and III. The percentages of neurons which co-expressed CB/GABA or CB/glycine out of the total numbers of CB- and GABA-LI neurons or CB- and glycine-LI neurons were 5.3% and 12.1% or 4.1% and 10.0%, respectively. The ratios of CR/GABA or CR/glycine co-existing neurons out of the total numbers of CR- and GABA-LI neurons or CR- and glycine-LI neurons were 5.8% and 7.6% or 4.4% and 7.1%, respectively. The rates of PV/GABA or PV/glycine co-localized neurons out of the total numbers of PV- and GABA-LI neurons or PV- and glycine-LI neurons were 11.1% and 5.1% or 9.9% and 5.1%, respectively. Conclusion The results indicate that some neurons in the MDH contain both CaBPs and GABA or glycine.

  6. Effects of social defeat on dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area in male and female California mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Gian D; Steinman, Michael Q; Doig, Ian E; Hao, Rebecca; Trainor, Brian C

    2015-12-01

    Dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) have important functions related to rewards but are also activated in aversive contexts. Electrophysiology studies suggest that the degree to which VTA dopamine neurons respond to noxious stimuli is topographically organized across the dorsal-ventral extent. We used c-fos immunohistochemistry to examine the responses of VTA dopamine neurons in contexts of social defeat and social approach. Studying monogamous California mice (Peromyscus californicus) allowed us to observe the effects of social defeat on both males and females. Females exposed to three episodes of defeat, but not a single episode, had more tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)/c-fos-positive cells in the ventral (but not dorsal) VTA compared with controls. This observation suggests that repeated exposure to aversive contexts is necessary to trigger activation of VTA dopamine neurons. Defeat did not affect TH/c-fos colocalizations in males. We also examined the long-term effects of defeat on c-fos expression in a social interaction test. As previously reported, defeat reduced social interaction in females but not males. Surprisingly, there were no effects of defeat stress on TH/c-fos colocalizations in any subregion of the VTA. However, females had more TH/c-fos-positive cells than males across the entire VTA, and also had greater c-fos-positive cell counts in posterior subregions of the nucleus accumbens shell. Our results show that dopamine neurons in the VTA are more responsive to social contexts in females and that the ventral VTA in particular is sensitive to aversive contexts.

  7. Anorexia and Impaired Glucose Metabolism in Mice With Hypothalamic Ablation of Glut4 Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongxia; Lu, Taylor Y.; McGraw, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) uses glucose independent of insulin. Nonetheless, insulin receptors and insulin-responsive glucose transporters (Glut4) often colocalize in neurons (Glut4 neurons) in anatomically and functionally distinct areas of the CNS. The apparent heterogeneity of Glut4 neurons has thus far thwarted attempts to understand their function. To answer this question, we used Cre-dependent, diphtheria toxin–mediated cell ablation to selectively remove basal hypothalamic Glut4 neurons and investigate the resulting phenotypes. After Glut4 neuron ablation, mice demonstrate altered hormone and nutrient signaling in the CNS. Accordingly, they exhibit negative energy balance phenotype characterized by reduced food intake and increased energy expenditure, without locomotor deficits or gross neuronal abnormalities. Glut4 neuron ablation affects orexigenic melanin-concentrating hormone neurons but has limited effect on neuropeptide Y/agouti-related protein and proopiomelanocortin neurons. The food intake phenotype can be partially normalized by GABA administration, suggesting that it arises from defective GABAergic transmission. Glut4 neuron–ablated mice show peripheral metabolic defects, including fasting hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance, decreased insulin levels, and elevated hepatic gluconeogenic genes. We conclude that Glut4 neurons integrate hormonal and nutritional cues and mediate CNS actions of insulin on energy balance and peripheral metabolism. PMID:25187366

  8. Effect of prenatal loud music and noise on total number of neurons and glia, neuronal nuclear area and volume of chick brainstem auditory nuclei, field L and hippocampus: a stereological investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Tania; Palanisamy, Pradeep; Nag, T C; Roy, T S; Wadhwa, Shashi

    2013-06-01

    The present study explores whether prenatal patterned and unpatterned sound of high sound pressure level (110 dB) has any differential effect on the morphology of brainstem auditory nuclei, field L (auditory cortex analog) and hippocampus in chicks (Gallus domesticus). The total number of neurons and glia, mean neuronal nuclear area and total volume of the brainstem auditory nuclei, field L and hippocampus of post-hatch day 1 chicks were determined in serial, cresyl violet-stained sections, using stereology software. All regions studied showed a significantly increased total volume with increase in total neuron number and mean neuronal nuclear area in the patterned music stimulated group as compared to control. Contrastingly the unpatterned noise stimulated group showed an attenuated volume with reduction in the total neuron number. The mean neuronal nuclear area was significantly reduced in the auditory nuclei and hippocampus but increased in the field L. Glial cell number was significantly increased in both experimental groups, being highest in the noise group. The brainstem auditory nuclei and field L showed an increase in glia to neuron ratio in the experimental groups as compared to control. In the hippocampus the ratio remained unaltered between control and music groups, but was higher in the noise group. It is thus evident that though the sound pressure level in both experimental groups was the same there were differential changes in the morphological parameters of the brain regions studied, indicating that the characteristics of the sound had a role in mediating these effects.

  9. Meroterpenoid Chrodrimanins Are Selective and Potent Blockers of Insect GABA-Gated Chloride Channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xu

    Full Text Available Meroterpenoid chrodrimanins, produced from Talaromyces sp. YO-2, are known to paralyze silkworm (Bombyx mori larvae, but their target is unknown. We have investigated the actions of chrodrimanin B on ligand-gated ion channels of silkworm larval neurons using patch-clamp electrophysiology. Chrodrimanin B had no effect on membrane currents when tested alone at 1 μM. However, it completely blocked the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA-induced current and showed less pronounced actions on acetylcholine- and L-glutamate-induced currents, when delivered at 1 μM for 1 min prior to co-application with transmitter GABA. Thus, chrodrimanins were also tested on a wild-type isoform of the B. mori GABA receptor (GABAR RDL using two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology. Chrodrimanin B attenuated the peak current amplitude of the GABA response of RDL with an IC50 of 1.66 nM. The order of the GABAR-blocking potency of chrodrimanins B > D > A was in accordance with their reported insecticidal potency. Chrodrimanin B had no open channel blocking action when tested at 3 nM on the GABA response of RDL. Co-application with 3 nM chrodrimanin B shifted the GABA concentration response curve to a higher concentration and further increase of chrodrimanin B concentration to 10 nM; it reduced maximum current amplitude of the GABA response, pointing to a high-affinity competitive action and a lower affinity non-competitive action. The A282S;T286V double mutation of RDL, which impairs the actions of fipronil, hardly affected the blocking action of chrodrimanin B, indicating a binding site of chrodrimanin B distinct from that of fipronil. Chrodrimanin B showed approximately 1,000-fold lower blocking action on human α1β2γ2 GABAR compared to RDL and thus is a selective blocker of insect GABARs.

  10. Meroterpenoid Chrodrimanins Are Selective and Potent Blockers of Insect GABA-Gated Chloride Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Furutani, Shogo; Ihara, Makoto; Ling, Yun; Yang, Xinling; Kai, Kenji; Hayashi, Hideo; Matsuda, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Meroterpenoid chrodrimanins, produced from Talaromyces sp. YO-2, are known to paralyze silkworm (Bombyx mori) larvae, but their target is unknown. We have investigated the actions of chrodrimanin B on ligand-gated ion channels of silkworm larval neurons using patch-clamp electrophysiology. Chrodrimanin B had no effect on membrane currents when tested alone at 1 μM. However, it completely blocked the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced current and showed less pronounced actions on acetylcholine- and L-glutamate-induced currents, when delivered at 1 μM for 1 min prior to co-application with transmitter GABA. Thus, chrodrimanins were also tested on a wild-type isoform of the B. mori GABA receptor (GABAR) RDL using two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology. Chrodrimanin B attenuated the peak current amplitude of the GABA response of RDL with an IC50 of 1.66 nM. The order of the GABAR-blocking potency of chrodrimanins B > D > A was in accordance with their reported insecticidal potency. Chrodrimanin B had no open channel blocking action when tested at 3 nM on the GABA response of RDL. Co-application with 3 nM chrodrimanin B shifted the GABA concentration response curve to a higher concentration and further increase of chrodrimanin B concentration to 10 nM; it reduced maximum current amplitude of the GABA response, pointing to a high-affinity competitive action and a lower affinity non-competitive action. The A282S;T286V double mutation of RDL, which impairs the actions of fipronil, hardly affected the blocking action of chrodrimanin B, indicating a binding site of chrodrimanin B distinct from that of fipronil. Chrodrimanin B showed approximately 1,000-fold lower blocking action on human α1β2γ2 GABAR compared to RDL and thus is a selective blocker of insect GABARs.

  11. Effects of glutamate decarboxylase and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter on the bioconversion of GABA in engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vo, Tam Dinh; Kim, Tae Wan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2012-05-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-essential amino acid and a precursor of pyrrolidone, a monomer of nylon 4. GABA can be biosynthesized through the decarboxylation of L: -glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase. In this study, the effects of glutamate decarboxylase (gadA, gadB), glutamate/GABA antiporter (gadC) and GABA aminotransferase (gabT) on GABA production were investigated in Escherichia coli. Glutamate decarboxylase was overexpressed alone or with the glutamate/GABA antiporter to enhance GABA synthesis. GABA aminotransferase, which redirects GABA into the TCA cycle, was knock-out mutated. When gadB and gadC were co-overexpressed in the gabT mutant strain, a final GABA concentration of 5.46 g/l was obtained from 10 g/l of monosodium glutamate (MSG), which corresponded to a GABA yield of 89.5%.

  12. Early expression of KCC2 in rat hippocampal cultures augments expression of functional GABA synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudotvorova, Ilona; Ivanov, Anton; Rama, Sylvain; Hübner, Christian A; Pellegrino, Christophe; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Medina, Igor

    2005-08-01

    The development of GABAergic synapses is associated with an excitatory to inhibitory shift of the actions of GABA because of a reduction of [Cl-]i. This is due to a delayed postnatal expression of the K+ -Cl- cotransporter KCC2, which has low levels at birth and peaks during the first few postnatal weeks. Whether the expression of the cotransporter and the excitatory to inhibitory shift have other consequences on the operation of GABA(A) receptors and synapses is not yet known. We have now expressed KCC2 in immature neurones at an early developmental stage and determined the consequences on the formation of GABA and glutamate synapses. We report that early expression of the cotransporter selectively enhances GABAergic synapses: there is a significant increase of the density of GABA(A) receptors and synapses and an increase of the frequency of GABAergic miniature postsynaptic currents. The density of glutamate synapses and frequency of AMPA miniature postsynaptic currents are not affected. We conclude that the expression of KCC2 and the reduction of [Cl-]i play a critical role in the construction of GABAergic networks that extends beyond the excitatory to inhibitory shift of the actions of GABA.

  13. Characterization of GABA/sub A/ receptor-mediated /sup 36/chloride uptake in rat brain synaptoneurosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luu, M.D.; Morrow, A.L.; Paul, S.M.; Schwartz, R.D.

    1987-09-07

    ..gamma..-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor-mediated /sup 36/chloride (/sup 36/Cl/sup -/) uptake was measured in synaptoneurosomes from rat brain. GABA and GABA agonists stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake in a concentration-dependent manner with the following order of potency: Muscimol>GABA>piperidine-4-sulfonic acid (P4S)>4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo-(5,4-c)pyridin-3-ol (THIP)=3-aminopropanesulfonic acid (3APS)>>taurine. Both P4S and 3APS behaved as partial agonists, while the GABA/sub B/ agonist, baclofen, was ineffective. The response to muscimol was inhibited by bicuculline and picrotoxin in a mixed competitive/non-competitive manner. Other inhibitors of GABA receptor-opened channels or non-neuronal anion channels such as penicillin, picrate, furosemide and disulfonic acid stilbenes also inhibited the response to muscimol. A regional variation in muscimol-stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake was observed; the largest responses were observed in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus, moderate responses were obtained in the striatum and hypothalamus and the smallest response was observed in the pons-medulla. GABA receptor-mediated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake was also dependent on the anion present in the media. The muscinol response varied in media containing the following anions: Br/sup -/>Cl/sup -/greater than or equal toNO/sub 3//sup -/>I/sup -/greater than or equal toSCN/sup -/>>C/sub 3/H/sub 5/OO/sup -/greater than or equal toClO/sub 4//sup -/>F/sup -/, consistent with the relative anion permeability through GABA receptor-gated anion channels and the enhancement of convulsant binding to the GABA receptor-gated Cl/sup -/ channel. 43 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  14. Change in Excitability of Corticospinal Pathway and GABA-Mediated Inhibitory Circuits of Primary Motor Cortex Induced by Contraction of Adjacent Hand Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jono, Yasutomo; Iwata, Yasuyuki; Mizusawa, Hiroki; Hiraoka, Koichi

    2016-11-01

    The present study examined whether the excitability of the corticospinal pathway and the GABA-mediated inhibitory circuits of the primary motor cortex that project onto the corticospinal neurons in the tonically contracting hand muscle are changed by tonic contraction of the adjacent hand muscle. The motor evoked potential (MEP) and cortical silent period (CSP) in the tonically contracting hand muscle were obtained while the adjacent hand muscle was either tonically contracting or at rest. The MEP and CSP of the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle elicited across the scalp sites where the MEP is predominantly elicited in the FDI muscle were decreased by tonic contraction of the abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscle. The centers of the area of the MEP and the duration of the CSP in the FDI muscle elicited across the sites where the MEP is predominantly elicited in the FDI muscle were lateral to those in the FDI muscle elicited across the sites where the MEP is elicited in both the FDI and ADM muscles. They were also lateral to those in the ADM muscle elicited either across the sites where the MEP is predominantly elicited in the ADM muscle, or across the sites where the MEP is elicited in both the FDI and ADM muscles. The decrease in the corticospinal excitability and the excitability of the GABA-mediated inhibitory circuits of the primary motor cortex that project onto the corticospinal neurons in the FDI muscle may be due either to (1) the interaction between the activity of the lateral area of the FDI representation and the descending drive to the ADM muscle, or (2) the decreased susceptibility of the primary motor area that predominantly projects onto the corticospinal neurons in the FDI muscle, which also plays a role in independent finger movement when both the FDI and ADM muscles act together as synergists.

  15. GABA systems, benzodiazepines, and substance dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Robert J

    2003-01-01

    Alterations in the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor complex and GABA neurotransmission influence the reinforcing and intoxicating effects of alcohol and benzodiazepines. Chronic modulation of the GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor complex plays a major role in central nervous system dysregulation during alcohol abstinence. Withdrawal symptoms stem in part from a decreased GABAergic inhibitory function and an increase in glutamatergic excitatory function. GABA(A) receptors play a role in both reward and withdrawal phenomena from alcohol and sedative-hypnotics. Although less well understood, GABA(B) receptor complexes appear to play a role in inhibition of motivation and diminish relapse potential to reinforcing drugs. Evidence suggests that long-term alcohol use and concomitant serial withdrawals permanently alter GABAergic function, down-regulate benzodiazepine binding sites, and in preclinical models lead to cell death. Benzodiazepines have substantial drawbacks in the treatment of substance use-related disorders that include interactions with alcohol, rebound effects, alcohol priming, and the risk of supplanting alcohol dependency with addiction to both alcohol and benzodiazepines. Polysubstance-dependent individuals frequently self-medicate with benzodiazepines. Selective GABA agents with novel mechanisms of action have anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, and reward inhibition profiles that have potential in treating substance use and withdrawal and enhancing relapse prevention with less liability than benzodiazepines. The GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen has promise in relapse prevention in a number of substance dependence disorders. The GABA(A) and GABA(B) pump reuptake inhibitor tiagabine has potential for managing alcohol and sedative-hypnotic withdrawal and also possibly a role in relapse prevention.

  16. Hypocretin/orexin antagonism enhances sleep-related adenosine and GABA neurotransmission in rat basal forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-DeRose, Jacqueline; Schwartz, Michael D; Nguyen, Alexander T; Warrier, Deepti R; Gulati, Srishti; Mathew, Thomas K; Neylan, Thomas C; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2016-03-01

    Hypocretin/orexin (HCRT) neurons provide excitatory input to wake-promoting brain regions including the basal forebrain (BF). The dual HCRT receptor antagonist almorexant (ALM) decreases waking and increases sleep. We hypothesized that HCRT antagonists induce sleep, in part, through disfacilitation of BF neurons; consequently, ALM should have reduced efficacy in BF-lesioned (BFx) animals. To test this hypothesis, rats were given bilateral IgG-192-saporin injections, which predominantly targets cholinergic BF neurons. BFx and intact rats were then given oral ALM, the benzodiazepine agonist zolpidem (ZOL) or vehicle (VEH) at lights-out. ALM was less effective than ZOL at inducing sleep in BFx rats compared to controls. BF adenosine (ADO), γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA), and glutamate levels were then determined via microdialysis from intact, freely behaving rats following oral ALM, ZOL or VEH. ALM increased BF ADO and GABA levels during waking and mixed vigilance states, and preserved sleep-associated increases in GABA under low and high sleep pressure conditions. ALM infusion into the BF also enhanced cortical ADO release, demonstrating that HCRT input is critical for ADO signaling in the BF. In contrast, oral ZOL and BF-infused ZOL had no effect on ADO levels in either BF or cortex. ALM increased BF ADO (an endogenous sleep-promoting substance) and GABA (which is increased during normal sleep), and required an intact BF for maximal efficacy, whereas ZOL blocked sleep-associated BF GABA release, and required no functional contribution from the BF to induce sleep. ALM thus induces sleep by facilitating the neural mechanisms underlying the normal transition to sleep.

  17. Neurobeachin Regulates Glutamate- and GABA-Receptor Targeting to Synapses via Distinct Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzana, F; Zalm, R; Chen, N; Li, K W; Grant, Seth G N; Smit, A B; Toonen, R F; Verhage, M

    2016-05-01

    Neurotransmission and synaptic strength depend on expression of post-synaptic receptors on the cell surface. Post-translational modification of receptors, trafficking to the synapse through the secretory pathway, and subsequent insertion into the synapse involves interaction of the receptor with A-kinase anchor proteins (AKAPs) and scaffolding proteins. Neurobeachin (Nbea), a brain specific AKAP, is required for synaptic surface expression of both glutamate and GABA receptors. Here, we investigated the role of Nbea-dependent targeting of postsynaptic receptors by studying Nbea interaction with synapse-associated protein 102 (SAP102/Dlg3) and protein kinase A subunit II (PKA II). A Nbea mutant lacking the PKA binding domain showed a similar distribution as wild-type Nbea in Nbea null neurons and partially restored GABA receptor surface expression. To understand the relevance of Nbea interaction with SAP102, we analysed SAP102 null mutant mice. Nbea levels were reduced by ~80% in SAP102 null mice, but glutamatergic receptor expression was normal. A single-point mutation in the pleckstrin homology domain of Nbea (E2218R) resulted in loss of binding with SAP102. When expressed in Nbea null neurons, this mutant fully restored GABA receptor surface expression, but not glutamate receptor expression. Our results suggest that the PKA-binding domain is not essential for Nbea's role in receptor targeting and that Nbea targets glutamate and GABA receptors to the synapse via distinct molecular pathways by interacting with specific effector proteins.

  18. Muscimol as an ionotropic GABA receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Graham A R

    2014-10-01

    Muscimol, a psychoactive isoxazole from Amanita muscaria and related mushrooms, has proved to be a remarkably selective agonist at ionotropic receptors for the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. This historic overview highlights the discovery and development of muscimol and related compounds as a GABA agonist by Danish and Australian neurochemists. Muscimol is widely used as a ligand to probe GABA receptors and was the lead compound in the development of a range of GABAergic agents including nipecotic acid, tiagabine, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo(5,4-c)pyridin-3-ol, (Gaboxadol(®)) and 4-PIOL.

  19. Coordinated activity of ventral tegmental neurons adapts to appetitive and aversive learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunbok Kim

    Full Text Available Our understanding of how value-related information is encoded in the ventral tegmental area (VTA is based mainly on the responses of individual putative dopamine neurons. In contrast to cortical areas, the nature of coordinated interactions between groups of VTA neurons during motivated behavior is largely unknown. These interactions can strongly affect information processing, highlighting the importance of investigating network level activity. We recorded the activity of multiple single units and local field potentials (LFP in the VTA during a task in which rats learned to associate novel stimuli with different outcomes. We found that coordinated activity of VTA units with either putative dopamine or GABA waveforms was influenced differently by rewarding versus aversive outcomes. Specifically, after learning, stimuli paired with a rewarding outcome increased the correlation in activity levels between unit pairs whereas stimuli paired with an aversive outcome decreased the correlation. Paired single unit responses also became more redundant after learning. These response patterns flexibly tracked the reversal of contingencies, suggesting that learning is associated with changing correlations and enhanced functional connectivity between VTA neurons. Analysis of LFP recorded simultaneously with unit activity showed an increase in the power of theta oscillations when stimuli predicted reward but not an aversive outcome. With learning, a higher proportion of putative GABA units were phase locked to the theta oscillations than putative dopamine units. These patterns also adapted when task contingencies were changed. Taken together, these data demonstrate that VTA neurons organize flexibly as functional networks to support appetitive and aversive learning.

  20. Paracrine intercellular communication by a Ca2+- and SNARE-independent release of GABA and glutamate prior to synapse formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarque, Michael; Represa, Alfonso; Becq, Hélène; Khalilov, Ilgam; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Aniksztejn, Laurent

    2002-12-19

    GABA and glutamate receptors are expressed in immature "silent" CA1 pyramidal neurons prior to synapse formation, but their function is unknown. We now report the presence of tonic, spontaneous, and evoked currents in embryonic and neonatal CA1 neurons mediated primarily by the activation of GABA(A) receptors. These currents are mediated by a nonconventional release of transmitters, as they persist in the presence of calcium channel blockers or botulinium toxin and are observed in Munc18-1-deficient mice in which vesicular release is abolished. This paracrine communication is modulated by glutamate but not GABA transporters, which do not operate during this period of life. Thus, a Ca(2+)- and SNARE-independent release of transmitters underlies a paracrine mode of communication before synapse formation.

  1. Estradiol-induced modulation of estrogen receptor-beta and GABA within the adult neocortex: a potential transsynaptic mechanism for estrogen modulation of BDNF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blurton-Jones, Mathew; Tuszynski, Mark H

    2006-12-01

    Estrogen influences brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the neocortex. However, BDNF-producing cortical neurons do not express detectable levels of nuclear estrogen receptors; instead, the most abundant cortical nuclear estrogen receptor, ER-beta, is present in GABAergic neurons, prompting us to test the hypothesis that estrogen effects on BDNF are mediated via cortical inhibitory interneurons. Adult female ovariectomized rats were provided acute estrogen replacement and the number of cortical GABA, ER-beta, and ER-beta/GABA double-labeled neurons was examined. Within 48 hours of injection of 17-beta-estradiol, the number of perirhinal neurons double-labeled for ER-beta/GABA was reduced by 28% (PBDNF-expressing cells, brain sections were double- or triple-labeled for ER-beta, GABAergic, and BDNF immunomarkers. The findings indicated that ER-beta-bearing inhibitory neurons project onto other GABAergic neurons that lack nuclear estrogen receptors; these inhibitory neurons in turn innervate BDNF-expressing excitatory cells. High estrogen states reduce cortical GABA levels, presumably releasing inhibition on BDNF-expressing neurons. This identifies a putative two-step transsynaptic mechanism whereby estrogen availability modulates expression of inhibitory transmitters, resulting in increased BDNF expression.

  2. Unravelling the unusual signalling properties of the GABA(B) receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couve, Andrés; Calver, Andrew R; Fairfax, Benjamin; Moss, Stephen J; Pangalos, Menelas N

    2004-10-15

    GABA(B) receptors are the cornerstone receptors in the modulation of inhibitory signalling in the central nervous system and continue to be targets for the amelioration of a number of neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders. Unravelling the molecular identity of this receptor has spurred much research over the past five or so years and generated a renewed interest and excitement in the field. Many questions are being answered and lessons learnt, not only about GABA(B) receptor function but also about general mechanisms of G-protein-coupled receptor signalling. However, as questions are being answered as many new questions are being raised and many GABA(B)-related conundrums continue to remain unanswered. In this report, we review some of the most recent work in the area of GABA(B) receptor research. In particular, we focus our attentions on the emerging mechanisms thought to be important in GABA(B) receptor signalling and the growing complex of associated proteins that we consider to be part of the GABA(B) receptor "signalosome."

  3. Local sensitivity to stimulus orientation and spatial frequency within the receptive fields of neurons in visual area 2 of macaque monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, X; Zhang, B; Smith, E L; Nishimoto, S; Ohzawa, I; Chino, Y M

    2012-02-01

    We used dynamic dense noise stimuli and local spectral reverse correlation methods to reveal the local sensitivities of neurons in visual area 2 (V2) of macaque monkeys to orientation and spatial frequency within their receptive fields. This minimized the potentially confounding assumptions that are inherent in stimulus selections. The majority of neurons exhibited a relatively high degree of homogeneity for the preferred orientations and spatial frequencies in the spatial matrix of facilitatory subfields. However, about 20% of all neurons showed maximum orientation differences between neighboring subfields that were greater than 25 deg. The neurons preferring horizontal or vertical orientations showed less inhomogeneity in space than the neurons preferring oblique orientations. Over 50% of all units also exhibited suppressive profiles, and those were more heterogeneous than facilitatory profiles. The preferred orientation and spatial frequency of suppressive profiles differed substantially from those of facilitatory profiles, and the neurons with suppressive subfields had greater orientation selectivity than those without suppressive subfields. The peak suppression occurred with longer delays than the peak facilitation. These results suggest that the receptive field profiles of the majority of V2 neurons reflect the orderly convergence of V1 inputs over space, but that a subset of V2 neurons exhibit more complex response profiles having both suppressive and facilitatory subfields. These V2 neurons with heterogeneous subfield profiles could play an important role in the initial processing of complex stimulus features.

  4. GABA Australis, some reflections on the history of GABA receptor research in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Graham A R

    2017-02-01

    Research on GABA receptors has a long history in Australia dating from 1958 with David Curtis and his colleagues in Canberra. This review traces many of the advances made in Australia guided by highly cited publications and some obscure ones. It covers the discovery of key chemicals with which to investigate GABA receptor function including bicuculline, muscimol, phaclofen, THIP and (+)-CAMP. Also described are findings relevant to the involvement of mutant GABA receptors in inherited epilepsy. The modulation of GABA receptors by a bewildering range of chemicals, especially by flavonoids and terpenoids, is discussed.

  5. Kinetic studies on the inhibition of GABA-T by gamma-vinyl GABA and taurine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Saba A J; Suliman, Fakhr Eldin O; Barghouthi, Samira

    2003-08-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T, EC 2.6.1.19) is a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) dependent enzyme that catalyzes the degradation of gamma-aminobutyric acid. The kinetics of this reaction are studied in vitro, both in the absence, and in the presence of two inhibitors: gamma-vinyl GABA (4-aminohex-5-enoic acid), and a natural product, taurine (ethylamine-2-sulfonic acid). A kinetic model that describes the transamination process is proposed. GABA-T from Pseudomonas fluorescens is inhibited by gamma-vinyl GABA and taurine at concentrations of 51.0 and 78.5 mM. Both inhibitors show competitive inhibition behavior when GABA is the substrate and the inhibition constant (Ki) values for gamma-vinyl GABA and taurine were found to be 26 +/- 3 mM and 68 +/- 7 mM respectively. The transamination process of alpha-ketoglutarate was not affected by the presence of gamma-vinyl GABA, whereas, taurine was a noncompetitive inhibitor of GABA-T when alpha-ketoglutarate was the substrate. The inhibition dissociation constant (Kii) for this system was found to be 96 +/- 10 mM. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) in the absence of inhibition, was found to be 0.79 +/- 0.11 mM, and 0.47 +/- 0.10 mM for GABA and alpha-ketoglutarate respectively.

  6. Inhibition of GABA release by presynaptic ionotropic GABA receptors in hippocampal CA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axmacher, Nikolai; Draguhn, Andreas

    2004-02-09

    Vesicular transmitter release can be regulated by transmitter-gated ion channels at presynaptic axon terminals. The central inhibitory transmitter GABA acts on such presynaptic ionotropic receptors in various cells, including inhibitory interneurons. Here we report that GABA-mediated postsynaptic inhibitory currents in CA3 pyramidal cells of rat hippocampal slices are suppressed by agonists of GABAA receptors. The effect is present for both stimulus-induced and miniature IPSCs, indicating a reduction in the probability of vesicular release by presynaptic, action-potential-independent mechanisms. We conclude that the release of GABA from hippocampal CA3 interneurons is regulated by a negative feedback via presynaptic ionotropic GABA autoreceptors.

  7. Calretinin in the entorhinal cortex of the rat: distribution, morphology, ultrastructure of neurons, and co-localization with gamma-aminobutyric acid and parvalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouterlood, F G; van Denderen, J C; van Haeften, T; Witter, M P

    2000-09-18

    Calretinin is a marker that differentially labels neurons in the central nervous system. We used this marker to distinguish subtypes of neurons within the general population of neurons in the entorhinal cortex of the rat. The distribution, morphology, and ultrastructure of calretinin-immunopositive neurons in this cortical area were documented. We further analyzed the co-localization of the marker with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and studied whether calretinin-positive neurons project to the hippocampal formation. Methods used included single-label immunocytochemistry at the light and electron microscopic level, retrograde tracing combined with immunocytochemistry, and double-label confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The entorhinal cortex contained calretinin-positive cells in a scattered fashion, in all layers except layer IV (lamina dissecans). Bipolar and multipolar dendritic configurations were present, displaying smooth dendrites. Bipolar cells had a uniform morphology whereas the multipolar calretinin cell population consisted of large neurons, cells with long ascending dendrites, horizontally oriented neurons, and small spherical cells. Retrograde tracing combined with immunocytochemistry showed that calretinin is not present in cells projecting to the hippocampus. Few synapic contacts between calretinin-positive axon terminals and immunopositive cell bodies and dendrites were seen. Most axon terminals of calretinin fibers formed asymmetrical synapses, and immunopositive axons were always unmyelinated. Results obtained in the CLSM indicate that calretinin co-exists in only 18-20% of the GABAergic cell population (mostly small spherical and bipolar cells). Thus, the entorhinal cortex contains two classes of calretinin interneurons: GABA positive and GABA negative. The first class is presumably a classical, GABAergic inhibitory interneuron. The finding of calretinin-immunoreactive axon terminals with asymmetrical synapses suggests that the second

  8. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances GABA transport by modulating the trafficking of GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1) from the plasma membrane of rat cortical astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Sandra H; Jørgensen, Trine N; Cristóvão-Ferreira, Sofia; Duflot, Sylvie; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Gether, Ulrik; Sebastião, Ana M

    2011-11-25

    The γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters (GATs) are located in the plasma membrane of neurons and astrocytes and are responsible for termination of GABAergic transmission. It has previously been shown that brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) modulates GAT-1-mediated GABA transport in nerve terminals and neuronal cultures. We now report that BDNF enhances GAT-1-mediated GABA transport in cultured astrocytes, an effect mostly due to an increase in the V(max) kinetic constant. This action involves the truncated form of the TrkB receptor (TrkB-t) coupled to a non-classic PLC-γ/PKC-δ and ERK/MAPK pathway and requires active adenosine A(2A) receptors. Transport through GAT-3 is not affected by BDNF. To elucidate if BDNF affects trafficking of GAT-1 in astrocytes, we generated and infected astrocytes with a functional mutant of the rat GAT-1 (rGAT-1) in which the hemagglutinin (HA) epitope was incorporated into the second extracellular loop. An increase in plasma membrane of HA-rGAT-1 as well as of rGAT-1 was observed when both HA-GAT-1-transduced astrocytes and rGAT-1-overexpressing astrocytes were treated with BDNF. The effect of BDNF results from inhibition of dynamin/clathrin-dependent constitutive internalization of GAT-1 rather than from facilitation of the monensin-sensitive recycling of GAT-1 molecules back to the plasma membrane. We therefore conclude that BDNF enhances the time span of GAT-1 molecules at the plasma membrane of astrocytes. BDNF may thus play an active role in the clearance of GABA from synaptic and extrasynaptic sites and in this way influence neuronal excitability.

  9. Spontaneous Neuronal Activity in Developing Neocortical Networks: From Single Cells to Large-Scale Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Sinning, Anne; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Stüttgen, Maik C; Kirischuk, Sergei; Kilb, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal activity has been shown to be essential for the proper formation of neuronal circuits, affecting developmental processes like neurogenesis, migration, programmed cell death, cellular differentiation, formation of local and long-range axonal connections, synaptic plasticity or myelination. Accordingly, neocortical areas reveal distinct spontaneous and sensory-driven neuronal activity patterns already at early phases of development. At embryonic stages, when immature neurons start to develop voltage-dependent channels, spontaneous activity is highly synchronized within small neuronal networks and governed by electrical synaptic transmission. Subsequently, spontaneous activity patterns become more complex, involve larger networks and propagate over several neocortical areas. The developmental shift from local to large-scale network activity is accompanied by a gradual shift from electrical to chemical synaptic transmission with an initial excitatory action of chloride-gated channels activated by GABA, glycine and taurine. Transient neuronal populations in the subplate (SP) support temporary circuits that play an important role in tuning early neocortical activity and the formation of mature neuronal networks. Thus, early spontaneous activity patterns control the formation of developing networks in sensory cortices, and disturbances of these activity patterns may lead to long-lasting neuronal deficits.

  10. Treating enhanced GABAergic inhibition in Down syndrome: use of GABA α5-selective inverse agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Cué, Carmen; Delatour, Benoît; Potier, Marie-Claude

    2014-10-01

    Excess inhibition in the brain of individuals carrying an extra copy of chromosome 21 could be responsible for cognitive deficits observed throughout their lives. A change in the excitatory/inhibitory balance in adulthood would alter synaptic plasticity, potentially triggering learning and memory deficits. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mature central nervous system and binds to GABAA receptors, opens a chloride channel, and reduces neuronal excitability. In this review we discuss methods to alleviate neuronal inhibition in a mouse model of Down syndrome, the Ts65Dn mouse, using either an antagonist (pentylenetetrazol) or two different inverse agonists selective for the α5-subunit containing receptor. Both inverse agonists, which reduce inhibitory GABAergic transmission, could rescue learning and memory deficits in Ts65Dn mice. We also discuss safety issues since modulation of the excitatory-inhibitory balance to improve cognition without inducing seizures remains particularly difficult when using GABA antagonists.

  11. Localization of the brainstem GABAergic neurons controlling paradoxical (REM sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Sapin

    Full Text Available Paradoxical sleep (PS is a state characterized by cortical activation, rapid eye movements and muscle atonia. Fifty years after its discovery, the neuronal network responsible for the genesis of PS has been only partially identified. We recently proposed that GABAergic neurons would have a pivotal role in that network. To localize these GABAergic neurons, we combined immunohistochemical detection of Fos with non-radioactive in situ hybridization of GAD67 mRNA (GABA synthesis enzyme in control rats, rats deprived of PS for 72 h and rats allowed to recover after such deprivation. Here we show that GABAergic neurons gating PS (PS-off neurons are principally located in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG and the dorsal part of the deep mesencephalic reticular nucleus immediately ventral to it (dDpMe. Furthermore, iontophoretic application of muscimol for 20 min in this area in head-restrained rats induced a strong and significant increase in PS quantities compared to saline. In addition, we found a large number of GABAergic PS-on neurons in the vlPAG/dDPMe region and the medullary reticular nuclei known to generate muscle atonia during PS. Finally, we showed that PS-on neurons triggering PS localized in the SLD are not GABAergic. Altogether, our results indicate that multiple populations of PS-on GABAergic neurons are distributed in the brainstem while only one population of PS-off GABAergic neurons localized in the vlPAG/dDpMe region exist. From these results, we propose a revised model for PS control in which GABAergic PS-on and PS-off neurons localized in the vlPAG/dDPMe region play leading roles.

  12. Suprachiasmatic nuclei and Circadian rhythms. The role of suprachiasmatic nuclei on rhythmic activity of neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area, ventromedian nuclei and pineal gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, H.

    1977-01-01

    Unit activity of lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) and Ventromedian nuclei (VMN) was recorded in urethane anesthetized male rats. A 5 to 10 sec. a 3-5 min and a circadian rhythmicity were observed. In about 15% of all neurons, spontaneous activity of LHA and VMN showed reciprocal relationships. Subthreshold stimuli applied at a slow rate in the septum and the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) suppressed the rhythms without changing firing rates. On the other hand, stimulation of the optic nerve at a rate of 5 to 10/sec increased firing rates in 1/3 of neurons of SCN. Iontophoretically applied acetylcholine increased 80% of tested neurons of SCN, whereas norepinephrine, dopamine and 5 HT inhibited 64, 60 and 75% of SCN neurons respectively. These inhibitions were much stronger in neurons, the activity of which was increased by optic nerve stimulation. Stimulation of the SCN inhibited the tonic activity in cervical sympathetic nerves.

  13. GABA B receptor modulation of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission onto rat CA3 hippocampal interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Saobo; McBain, Chris J

    2003-01-15

    Hippocampal stratum radiatum inhibitory interneurons receive glutamatergic excitatory innervation via the recurrent collateral fibers of CA3 pyramidal neurons and GABAergic inhibition from other interneurons. We examined both presynaptic- and postsynaptic-GABA(B) receptor-mediated responses at both synapse types. Postsynaptic GABA(B) receptor-mediated responses were absent in recordings from young (P16-18) but present in recordings from older animals (> or =P30) suggesting developmental regulation. In young animals, the GABA(B) receptor agonist, baclofen, inhibited the amplitude of evoked EPSCs and IPSCs, an effect blocked by prior application of the selective antagonist CGP55845. Baclofen enhanced the paired-pulse ratio and coefficient of variation of evoked EPSCs and IPSCs, consistent with a presynaptic mechanism of regulation. In addition, baclofen reduced the frequency of miniature IPSCs but not mEPSCs. However, baclofen reduced the frequency of KCl-induced mEPSCs; an effect blocked by Cd(2+), implicating presynaptic voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels as a target for baclofen modulation. In contrast, although Cd(2+) prevented the KCl-induced increase in mIPSC frequency, it failed to block baclofen's reduction of mIPSC frequency. Whereas N- and P/Q-types of Ca(2+) channels contributed equally to GABA(B) receptor-mediated inhibition of EPSCs, more P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels were involved in GABA(B) receptor-mediated inhibition of IPSCs. Finally, baclofen blocked the frequency-dependent depression of EPSCs and IPSCs, but was less effective at blocking frequency-dependent facilitation of EPSCs. Our results demonstrate that presynaptic GABA(B) receptors are expressed on the terminals of both excitatory and inhibitory synapses onto CA3 interneurons and that their activation modulates essential components of the release process underlying transmission at these two synapse types.

  14. Control of GABA Release at Mossy Fiber-CA3 Connections in the Developing Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safiulina, Victoria F; Caiati, Maddalena D; Sivakumaran, Sudhir; Bisson, Giacomo; Migliore, Michele; Cherubini, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    In this review some of the recent work carried out in our laboratory concerning the functional role of GABAergic signalling at immature mossy fibres (MF)-CA3 principal cell synapses has been highlighted. While in adulthood MF, the axons of dentate gyrus granule cells release onto CA3 principal cells and interneurons glutamate, early in postnatal life they release GABA, which exerts into targeted cells a depolarizing and excitatory action. We found that GABA(A)-mediated postsynaptic currents (MF-GPSCs) exhibited a very low probability of release, were sensitive to L-AP4, a group III metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, and revealed short-term frequency-dependent facilitation. Moreover, MF-GPSCs were down regulated by presynaptic GABA(B) and kainate receptors, activated by spillover of GABA from MF terminals and by glutamate present in the extracellular medium, respectively. Activation of these receptors contributed to the low release probability and in some cases to synapses silencing. By pairing calcium transients, associated with network-driven giant depolarizing potentials or GDPs (a hallmark of developmental networks thought to represent a primordial form of synchrony between neurons), generated by the synergistic action of glutamate and GABA with MF activation increased the probability of GABA release and caused the conversion of silent synapses into conductive ones suggesting that GDPs act as coincident detector signals for enhancing synaptic efficacy. Finally, to compare the relative strength of CA3 pyramidal cell output in relation to their MF glutamatergic or GABAergic inputs in adulthood or in postnatal development, respectively, a realistic model was constructed taking into account different biophysical properties of these synapses.

  15. GABA-agonists induce the formation of low-affinity GABA-receptors on cultured cerebellar granule cells via preexisting high affinity GABA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Meier, E; Schousboe, A

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics of specific GABA-binding to membranes isolated from cerebellar granule cells, cultured for 12 days from dissociated cerebella of 7-day-old rats was studied using [3H]GABA as the ligand. The granule cells were cultured in the presence of the specific GABA receptor agonist 4, 5, 6, 7-t...

  16. Impairment of GABA transporter GAT-1 terminates cortical recurrent network activity via enhanced phasic inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Simon Razik

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the central nervous system, GABA transporters (GATs very efficiently clear synaptically released GABA from the extracellular space, and thus exert a tight control on GABAergic inhibition. In neocortex, GABAergic inhibition is heavily recruited during recurrent phases of spontaneous action potential activity which alternate with neuronally quiet periods. Therefore, such activity should be quite sensitive to minute alterations of GAT function. Here, we explored the effects of a gradual impairment of GAT-1 and GAT-2/3 on spontaneous recurrent network activity – termed network bursts and silent periods – in organotypic slice cultures of rat neocortex. The GAT-1 specific antagonist NO-711 depressed activity already at nanomolar concentrations (IC50 for depression of spontaneous multiunit firing rate of 42 nM, reaching a level of 80% at 500-1000 nM. By contrast, the GAT-2/3 preferring antagonist SNAP-5114 had weaker and less consistent effects. Several lines of evidence pointed towards an enhancement of phasic GABAergic inhibition as the dominant activity-depressing mechanism: network bursts were drastically shortened, phasic GABAergic currents decayed slower, and neuronal excitability during ongoing activity was diminished. In silent periods, NO-711 had little effect on neuronal excitability or membrane resistance, quite in contrast to the effects of muscimol, a GABA mimetic which activates GABAA receptors tonically. Our results suggest that an enhancement of phasic GABAergic inhibition efficiently curtails cortical recurrent activity and may mediate antiepileptic effects of therapeutically relevant concentrations of GAT-1 antagonists.

  17. Altered gamma oscillations during pregnancy through loss of δ subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors on parvalbumin interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferando, Isabella; Mody, Istvan

    2013-01-01

    Gamma (γ) oscillations (30-120 Hz), an emergent property of neuronal networks, correlate with memory, cognition and encoding. In the hippocampal CA3 region, locally generated γ oscillations emerge through feedback between inhibitory parvalbumin-positive basket cells (PV+BCs) and the principal (pyramidal) cells. PV+BCs express δ-subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs (δ-GABA(A)Rs) and NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs) that balance the frequency of γ oscillations. Neuroactive steroids (NS), such as the progesterone-derived (3α,5α)-3-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one (allopregnanolone; ALLO), modulate the expression of δ-GABA(A)Rs and the tonic conductance they mediate. Pregnancy produces large increases in ALLO and brain-region-specific homeostatic changes in δ-GABA(A)Rs expression. Here we show that in CA3, where most PV+ interneurons (INs) express δ-GABA(A)Rs, expression of δ-GABA(A)Rs on INs diminishes during pregnancy, but reverts to control levels within 48 h postpartum. These anatomical findings were corroborated by a pregnancy-related increase in the frequency of kainate-induced CA3 γ oscillations in vitro that could be countered by the NMDA-R antagonists D-AP5 and PPDA. Mimicking the typical hormonal conditions during pregnancy by supplementing 100 nM ALLO lowered the γ frequencies to levels found in virgin or postpartum mice. Our findings show that states of altered NS levels (e.g., pregnancy) may provoke perturbations in γ oscillatory activity through direct effects on the GABAergic system, and underscore the importance of δ-GABA(A)Rs homeostatic plasticity in maintaining constant network output despite large hormonal changes. Inaccurate coupling of NS levels to δ-GABA(A)R expression may facilitate abnormal neurological and psychiatric conditions such as epilepsy, post-partum depression, and post-partum psychosis, thus providing insights into potential new treatments.

  18. Differential effects of phosphonic analogues of GABA on GABA(B) autoreceptors in rat neocortical slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, J; Marino, V; Parker, D A; Kerr, D I

    1998-04-01

    The effects of five phosphonic derivatives of GABA on the release of [3H]-GABA from rat neocortical slices, preloaded with [3H]-GABA, were investigated. Phaclofen and 4-aminobutylphosphonic acid (4-ABPA) increased the overflow of [3H] evoked by electrical stimulation (2 Hz) in a concentration-dependent manner, with similar potencies (phaclofen EC50=0.3 mmol/l, 4-ABPA EC50=0.4 mmol/l). At 3 mmol/l, phaclofen increased the release of [3H]-GABA by 82.6+/-8.6%, and 4-ABPA increased the release by 81.3+/-9.0%. 2-Amino-ethylphosphonic acid (2-AEPA) increased the overflow of [3H] by 46.8+/-10.9% at the highest concentration tested (3 mmol/l). In contrast, the lower phosphonic homologue 3-aminopropylphosphonic acid (3-APPA), and 2-amino-2-(p-chlorophenyl)-ethylphosphonic acid (2-CPEPA), a baclofen analogue, did not modify the stimulated overflow. These results suggest that phaclofen, 4-ABPA and 2-AEPA are antagonists at GABA(B) autoreceptors, the latter being the weakest antagonist, whilst neither 3-APPA nor 2-CPEPA are active at these receptors. Since phaclofen, 4-ABPA and 2-CPEPA are antagonists and 3-APPA a partial agonist/antagonist on GABA(B) heteroreceptors, the lack of effect of 3-APPA and 2-CPEPA on [3H]-GABA release in this study suggests that GABA(B) autoreceptors may be pharmacologically distinct from the heteroreceptors.

  19. GABA(A) receptor- and GABA transporter polymorphisms and risk for essential tremor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thier, S; Kuhlenbäumer, G; Lorenz, D

    2011-01-01

    Background:  Clinical features and animal models of essential tremor (ET) suggest gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor (GABA(A) R) subunits and GABA transporters as putative candidate genes. Methods:  A total of 503 ET cases and 818 controls were investigated for an association between polymorphisms...

  20. Molecular cloning and expression of a GABA receptor subunit from the crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Vázquez, Eric N; Díaz-Velásquez, Clara E; Uribe, R M; Arias, Juan M; García, Ubaldo

    2016-02-01

    Molecular cloning has introduced an unexpected, large diversity of neurotransmitter hetero- oligomeric receptors. Extensive research on the molecular structure of the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAR) has been of great significance for understanding how the nervous system works in both vertebrates and invertebrates. However, only two examples of functional homo-oligomeric GABA-activated Cl(-) channels have been reported. In the vertebrate retina, the GABAρ1 subunit of various species forms homo-oligomeric receptors; in invertebrates, a cDNA encoding a functional GABA-activated Cl(-) channel has been isolated from a Drosophila melanogaster head cDNA library. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, these subunits function efficiently as a homo-oligomeric complex. To investigate the structure-function of GABA channels from the crayfish Procambarus clarkii, we cloned a subunit and expressed it in human embryonic kidney cells. Electrophysiological recordings show that this subunit forms a homo-oligomeric ionotropic GABAR that gates a bicuculline-insensitive Cl(-) current. The order of potency of the agonists was GABA > trans-4-amino-crotonic acid = cis-4-aminocrotonic acid > muscimol. These data support the notion that X-organ sinus gland neurons express at least two GABA subunits responsible for the formation of hetero-oligomeric and homo-oligomeric receptors. In addition, by in situ hybridization studies we demonstrate that most X-organ neurons from crayfish eyestalk express the isolated pcGABAA β subunit. This study increases the knowledge of the genetics of the crayfish, furthers the understanding of this important neurotransmitter receptor family, and provides insight into the evolution of these genes among vertebrates and invertebrates.

  1. Honeybee Kenyon cells are regulated by a tonic GABA receptor conductance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Mary J; Harvey, Jenni

    2014-10-15

    The higher cognitive functions of insects are dependent on their mushroom bodies (MBs), which are particularly large in social insects such as honeybees. MB Kenyon cells (KCs) receive multisensory input and are involved in associative learning and memory. In addition to receiving sensory input via excitatory nicotinic synapses, KCs receive inhibitory GABAergic input from MB feedback neurons. Cultured honeybee KCs exhibit ionotropic GABA receptor currents, but the properties of GABA-mediated inhibition in intact MBs are currently unknown. Here, using whole cell recordings from KCs in acutely isolated honeybee brain, we show that KCs exhibit a tonic current that is inhibited by picrotoxin but not by bicuculline. Bath application of GABA (5 μM) and taurine (1 mM) activate a tonic current in KCs, but l-glutamate (0.1-0.5 mM) has no effect. The tonic current is strongly potentiated by the allosteric GABAA receptor modulator pentobarbital and is reduced by inhibition of Ca(2+) channels with Cd(2+) or nifedipine. Noise analysis of the GABA-evoked current gives a single-channel conductance value for the underlying receptors of 27 ± 3 pS, similar to that of resistant to dieldrin (RDL) receptors. The amount of injected current required to evoke action potential firing in KCs is significantly lower in the presence of picrotoxin. KCs recorded in an intact honeybee head preparation similarly exhibit a tonic GABA receptor conductance that reduces neuronal excitability, a property that is likely to contribute to the sparse coding of sensory information in insect MBs.

  2. Nicotinic receptors and functional regulation of GABA cell microcircuitry in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benes, Francine M

    2012-01-01

    Studies of the hippocampus in postmortem brains from patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have provided evidence for a defect of GABAergic interneurons. Significant decreases in the expression of GAD67, a marker for GABA cell function, have been found repeatedly in several different brain regions that include the hippocampus. In this region, nicotinic receptors are thought to play an important role in modulating the activity of GABAergic interneurons by influences of excitatory cholinergic afferents on their activity. In bipolar disorder, this influence appears to be particularly prominent in the stratum oriens of sectors CA3/2 and CA1, two sites where these cells constitute the exclusive neuronal cell type. In sector CA3/2, this layer receives a robust excitatory projection from the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and this is thought to play a central role in regulating GABA cells at this locus. Using laser microdissection, recent studies have focused selectively on these two layers and their associated GABA cells using microarray technology. The results have provided support for the idea that nicotinic cholinergic receptors play a particularly important role in regulating the activity of GABA neurons at these loci by regulating the progression of cell cycle and the repair of damaged DNA. In bipolar disorder, there is a prominent reduction in the expression of mRNAs for several different nicotinic subunit isoforms. These decreases could reflect a diminished influence of this receptor system on these GABA cells, particularly in sector CA3/2 where a preponderance of abnormalities have been observed in postmortem studies. In patients with bipolar disorder, excitatory nicotinic cholinergic fibers from the medial septum may converge with glutamatergic fibers from the BLA on GABAergic interneurons in the stratum oriens of CA3/2 and result in disturbances of their genomic and functional integrity, ones that may induce disruptions of the integration of

  3. GABA(B2) is essential for g-protein coupling of the GABA(B) receptor heterodimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, M J; Calver, A R; Filippov, A K; Hirst, W D; Russell, R B; Wood, M D; Nasir, S; Couve, A; Brown, D A; Moss, S J; Pangalos, M N

    2001-10-15

    GABA(B) receptors are unique among G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in their requirement for heterodimerization between two homologous subunits, GABA(B1) and GABA(B2), for functional expression. Whereas GABA(B1) is capable of binding receptor agonists and antagonists, the role of each GABA(B) subunit in receptor signaling is unknown. Here we identified amino acid residues within the second intracellular domain of GABA(B2) that are critical for the coupling of GABA(B) receptor heterodimers to their downstream effector systems. Our results provide strong evidence for a functional role of the GABA(B2) subunit in G-protein coupling of the GABA(B) receptor heterodimer. In addition, they provide evidence for a novel "sequential" GPCR signaling mechanism in which ligand binding to one heterodimer subunit can induce signal transduction through the second partner of a heteromeric complex.

  4. GABA through the Ages: Regulation of Cortical Function and Plasticity by Inhibitory Interneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Lehmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory interneurons comprise only about 20% of cortical neurons and thus constitute a clear minority compared to the vast number of excitatory projection neurons. They are, however, an influential minority with important roles in cortical maturation, function, and plasticity. In this paper, we will highlight the functional importance of cortical inhibition throughout brain development, starting with the embryonal formation of the cortex, proceeding by the regulation of sensory cortical plasticity in adulthood, and finishing with the GABA involvement in sensory information processing in old age.

  5. Downregulated GABA and BDNF-TrkB Pathway in Chronic Cyclothiazide Seizure Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuzhen Kong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclothiazide (CTZ has been reported to simultaneously enhance glutamate receptor excitation and inhibit GABAA receptor inhibition, and in turn it evokes epileptiform activities in hippocampal neurons. It has also been shown to acutely induce epileptic seizure behavior in freely moving rats. However, whether CTZ induced seizure rats could develop to have recurrent seizure still remains unknown. In the current study, we demonstrated that 46% of the CTZ induced seizure rats developed to have recurrent seizure behavior as well as epileptic EEG with a starting latency between 2 weeks and several months. In those chronic seizure rats 6 months after the seizure induction by the CTZ, our immunohistochemistry results showed that both GAD and GAT-1 were significantly decreased across CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus area of the hippocampus studied. In addition, both BDNF and its receptor TrkB were also decreased in hippocampus of the chronic CTZ seizure rats. Our results indicate that CTZ induced seizure is capable of developing to have recurrent seizure, and the decreased GABA synthesis and transport as well as the impaired BDNF-TrkB signaling pathway may contribute to the development of the recurrent seizure. Thus, CTZ seizure rats may provide a novel animal model for epilepsy study and anticonvulsant drug testing in the future.

  6. Downregulated GABA and BDNF-TrkB pathway in chronic cyclothiazide seizure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Shuzhen; Cheng, Zhihua; Liu, Jianhui; Wang, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Cyclothiazide (CTZ) has been reported to simultaneously enhance glutamate receptor excitation and inhibit GABAA receptor inhibition, and in turn it evokes epileptiform activities in hippocampal neurons. It has also been shown to acutely induce epileptic seizure behavior in freely moving rats. However, whether CTZ induced seizure rats could develop to have recurrent seizure still remains unknown. In the current study, we demonstrated that 46% of the CTZ induced seizure rats developed to have recurrent seizure behavior as well as epileptic EEG with a starting latency between 2 weeks and several months. In those chronic seizure rats 6 months after the seizure induction by the CTZ, our immunohistochemistry results showed that both GAD and GAT-1 were significantly decreased across CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus area of the hippocampus studied. In addition, both BDNF and its receptor TrkB were also decreased in hippocampus of the chronic CTZ seizure rats. Our results indicate that CTZ induced seizure is capable of developing to have recurrent seizure, and the decreased GABA synthesis and transport as well as the impaired BDNF-TrkB signaling pathway may contribute to the development of the recurrent seizure. Thus, CTZ seizure rats may provide a novel animal model for epilepsy study and anticonvulsant drug testing in the future.

  7. Radial and tangential migration of telencephalic somatostatin neurons originated from the mouse diagonal area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puelles, Luis; Morales-Delgado, N; Merchán, P; Castro-Robles, B; Martínez-de-la-Torre, M; Díaz, C; Ferran, J L

    2016-07-01

    The telencephalic subpallium is the source of various GABAergic interneuron cohorts that invade the pallium via tangential migration. Based on genoarchitectonic studies, the subpallium has been subdivided into four major domains: striatum, pallidum, diagonal area and preoptic area (Puelles et al. 2013; Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas), and a larger set of molecularly distinct progenitor areas (Flames et al. 2007). Fate mapping, genetic lineage-tracing studies, and other approaches have suggested that each subpallial subdivision produces specific sorts of inhibitory interneurons, distinguished by differential peptidic content, which are distributed tangentially to pallial and subpallial target territories (e.g., olfactory bulb, isocortex, hippocampus, pallial and subpallial amygdala, striatum, pallidum, septum). In this report, we map descriptively the early differentiation and apparent migratory dispersion of mouse subpallial somatostatin-expressing (Sst) cells from E10.5 onward, comparing their topography with the expression patterns of the genes Dlx5, Gbx2, Lhx7-8, Nkx2.1, Nkx5.1 (Hmx3), and Shh, which variously label parts of the subpallium. Whereas some experimental results suggest that Sst cells are pallidal, our data reveal that many, if not most, telencephalic Sst cells derive from de diagonal area (Dg). Sst-positive cells initially only present at the embryonic Dg selectively populate radially the medial part of the bed nucleus striae terminalis (from paraseptal to amygdaloid regions) and part of the central amygdala; they also invade tangentially the striatum, while eschewing the globus pallidum and the preoptic area, and integrate within most cortical and nuclear pallial areas between E10.5 and E16.5.

  8. Self-administration of ethanol, cocaine, or nicotine does not decrease the soma size of ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle S Mazei-Robison

    Full Text Available Our previous observations show that chronic opiate administration, including self-administration, decrease the soma size of dopamine (DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA of rodents and humans, a morphological change correlated with increased firing rate and reward tolerance. Given that a general hallmark of drugs of abuse is to increase activity of the mesolimbic DA circuit, we sought to determine whether additional drug classes produced a similar morphological change. Sections containing VTA were obtained from rats that self-administered cocaine or ethanol and from mice that consumed nicotine. In contrast to opiates, we found no change in VTA DA soma size induced by any of these other drugs. These data suggest that VTA morphological changes are induced in a drug-specific manner and reinforce recent findings that some changes in mesolimbic signaling and neuroplasticity are drug-class dependent.

  9. Brainstem projections of neurons located in various subdivisions of the dorsolateral hypothalamic area – an anterograde tract-tracing study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rege Sugárka Papp

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The projections from the dorsolateral hypothalamic area (DLH to the lower brainstem have been investigated by using biotinylated dextran amine (BDA, an anterograde tracer in rats. The DLH can be divided into 3 areas (dorsomedial hypothalamus, perifornical area, lateral hypothalamic area, and further subdivided into 8 subdivisions. After unilateral stereotaxic injections of BDA into individual DLH subdivisions, the correct sites of injections were controlled histologically, and the distribution patterns of BDA-positive fibers were mapped on serial sections between the hypothalamus and spinal cord in 22 rats. BDA-labeled fibers were observable over 100 different brainstem areas, nuclei or subdivisions. Injections into the 8 DLH subdivisions established distinct topographical patterns. In general, the density of labeled fibers was low in the lower brainstem. High density of fibers was seen only 4 of the 116 areas: in the lateral and ventrolateral parts of the periaqueductal gray, the Barrington’s and the pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei. All of the biogenic amine cell groups in the lower brainstem (9 noradrenaline, 3 adrenaline and 9 serotonin cell groups received labeled fibers, some of them from all, or at least 7 DLH subdivisions, mainly from perifornical and ventral lateral hypothalamic neurons. Some of the tegmental nuclei and nuclei of the reticular formation were widely innervated, although the density of the BDA-labeled fibers was generally low. No definitive descending BDA-positive pathway, but long-run solitaire BDA-labeled fibers were seen in the lower brainstem. These descending fibers joined some of the large tracts or fasciculi in the brainstem. The distribution pattern of BDA-positive fibers of DLH origin throughout the lower brainstem was comparable to patterns of previously published orexin- or melanin-concentrating hormone-immunoreactive fibers with somewhat differences.

  10. Loss of microRNA-124 expression in neurons in the peri-lesion area in mice with spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Zhao; Hui Zhang; Dan Zhang; Cai-yong Yu; Xiang-hui Zhao; Fang-fang Liu; Gan-lan Bian; Gong Ju; Jian Wang

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-124 (miR-124) is abundantly expressed in neurons in the mammalian central ner-vous system, and plays critical roles in the regulation of gene expression during embryonic neurogenesis and postnatal neural differentiation. However, the expression proifle of miR-124 after spinal cord injury and the underlying regulatory mechanisms are not well understood. In the present study, we examined the expression of miR-124 in mouse brain and spinal cord after spinal cord injury usingin situ hybridization. Furthermore, the expression of miR-124 was examined with quantitative RT-PCR at 1, 3 and 7 days after spinal cord injury. The miR-124 expression in neurons at the site of injury was evaluated by in situ hybridization combined with NeuN immunohistochemical staining. The miR-124 was mainly expressed in neurons through-out the brain and spinal cord. The expression of miR-124 in neurons significantly decreased within 7 days after spinal cord injury. Some of the neurons in the peri-lesion area were NeuN+/miR-124−. Moreover, the neurons distal to the peri-lesion site were NeuN+/miR-124+. These ifndings indicate that miR-124 expression in neurons is reduced after spinal cord injury, and may relfect the severity of spinal cord injury.

  11. Orexin-A affects gastric distention sensitive neurons in the hippocampus and gastric motility and regulation by the perifornical area in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shu; Xu, Luo; Sun, Xiangrong; Guo, Feifei; Gong, Yanling; Gao, Shengli

    2016-09-01

    Orexin-A is mainly produced in the lateral hypothalamus (LHA) and the perifornical area (PeF). Here, we aim to elucidate the effects of orexin-A in the hippocampus (Hi) on gastric distention (GD)-sensitive neurons and gastric motility, and potential regulation mechanisms by the PeF. Retrograde tracing and fluorescent-immunohistochemical staining were used to determine orexin-A neuronal projections. Single unit discharges in the Hi were recorded extracellularly and gastric motility in conscious rats was monitored during administration of orexin-A to the Hi or electrical stimulation of the PeF. Orexin-A administration to the Hi excited most of the GD-excitatory (GD-E) neurons and GD-inhibitory (GD-I) neurons, and increased gastric motility in a dose-dependent manner. All of effects induced by orexin-A could be partly blocked by pretreatment with orexin-A antagonist, SB-334867. Electrical stimulation of the PeF excited the majority of the orexin-A-responsive GD neurons in the Hi and promoted gastric motility. Additionally, pretreatment with SB-334867 in the Hi increased the firing rate of GDI and GDE neurons following electrical stimulation of the PeF. These findings suggest that orexin-A could regulate activities of GD-sensitive neurons and gastric motility. Furthermore, the PeF may be involved in this regulatory pathway.

  12. In vivo neurochemical evidence that newly synthesised GABA activates GABA(B), but not GABA(A), receptors on dopaminergic nerve endings in the nucleus accumbens of freely moving rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saigusa, T.; Aono, Y.; Sekino, R.; Uchida, T.; Takada, K.; Oi, Y.; Koshikawa, N.; Cools, A.R.

    2012-01-01

    GABA released from accumbal GABAergic interneurons plays an inhibitory role in the regulation of dopamine efflux through GABA(B) and GABA(A) receptors located on accumbal dopaminergic nerve endings. The cytosolic newly synthesised GABA alters vesicular GABA levels and, accordingly, the amount of GAB

  13. Role of gamma-aminobutyricacidB(GABA(B)) receptors in the regulation of kainic acid-induced cell death in mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Kyu; Seo, Young Jun; Choi, Seong Soo; Kwon, Min Soo; Shim, Eon Jeong; Lee, Jin Young; Suh, Hong Won

    2005-12-31

    Kainic acid (KA) is well-known as an excitatory, neurotoxic substance. In mice, KA administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) lead to morphological damage of hippocampus expecially concentrated on the CA3 pyramidal neurons. In the present study, the possible role of gamma-aminobutyric acid B (GABA(B)) receptors in hippocampal cell death induced by KA (0.1 microg) administered i.c.v. was examined. 5-Aminovaleric acid (5-AV; GABA(B) receptors antagonist, 20 mug) reduced KA-induced CA3 pyramidal cell death. KA increased the phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (p-CaMK II) immunoreactivities (IRs) 30 min after KA treatment, and c-Fos, c-Jun IR 2 h, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), complement receptor type 3 (OX-42) IR 1 day in hippocampal area in KA-injected mice. 5-AV attenuated KA-induced p-CaMK II, GFAP and OX-42 IR in the hippocampal CA3 region. These results suggest that p-CaMK II may play as an important regulator on hippocampal cell death induced by KA administered i.c.v. in mice. Activated astrocytes, which was presented by GFAP IR, and activated microglia, which was presented by the OX-42 IR, may be a good indicator for measuring the cell death in hippocampal regions by KA excitotoxicity. Furthermore, it showed that GABA(B) receptors appear to be involved in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cell death induced by KA administered i.c.v. in mice.

  14. Aversive behavior induced by optogenetic inactivation of ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons is mediated by dopamine D2 receptors in the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danjo, Teruko; Yoshimi, Kenji; Funabiki, Kazuo; Yawata, Satoshi; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    2014-04-29

    Dopamine (DA) transmission from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) is critical for controlling both rewarding and aversive behaviors. The transient silencing of DA neurons is one of the responses to aversive stimuli, but its consequences and neural mechanisms regarding aversive responses and learning have largely remained elusive. Here, we report that optogenetic inactivation of VTA DA neurons promptly down-regulated DA levels and induced up-regulation of the neural activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) as evaluated by Fos expression. This optogenetic suppression of DA neuron firing immediately evoked aversive responses to the previously preferred dark room and led to aversive learning toward the optogenetically conditioned place. Importantly, this place aversion was abolished by knockdown of dopamine D2 receptors but not by that of D1 receptors in the NAc. Silencing of DA neurons in the VTA was thus indispensable for inducing aversive responses and learning through dopamine D2 receptors in the NAc.

  15. Proton MRS of the unilateral substantia nigra in the human brain at 4 tesla: detection of high GABA concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, Gülin; Terpstra, Melissa; Tkác, Ivan; Aia, Pratibha; Lowary, Jodi; Tuite, Paul J; Gruetter, Rolf

    2006-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN), the cause of which is unknown. Characterization of early SN pathology could prove beneficial in the treatment and diagnosis of PD. The present study shows that with the use of short-echo (5 ms) Stimulated-Echo Acquisition Mode (STEAM) spectroscopy and LCModel, a neurochemical profile consisting of 10 metabolites, including gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), and glutathione (GSH), can be measured from the unilateral SN at 4 tesla. The neurochemical profile of the SN is unique and characterized by a fourfold higher GABA/Glu ratio compared to the cortex, in excellent agreement with established neurochemistry. The presence of elevated GABA levels in SN was validated with the use of editing, suggesting that partial volume effects were greatly reduced. These findings establish the feasibility of obtaining a neurochemical profile of the unilateral human SN by single-voxel spectroscopy in small volumes.

  16. GABA and glutamate uptake and metabolism in retinal glial (Müller cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eBringmann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Müller cells, the principal glial cells of the retina, support the synaptic activity by the uptake and metabolization of extracellular neurotransmitters. Müller cells express uptake and exchange systems for various neurotransmitters including glutamate and -aminobutyric acid (GABA. Müller cells remove the bulk of extracellular glutamate in the inner retina and contribute to the glutamate clearance around photoreceptor terminals. By the uptake of glutamate, Müller cells are involved in the shaping and termination of the synaptic activity, particularly in the inner retina. Reactive Müller cells are neuroprotective, e.g., by the clearance of excess extracellular glutamate, but may also contribute to neuronal degeneration by a malfunctioning or even reversal of glial glutamate transporters, or by a downregulation of the key enzyme, glutamine synthetase. This review summarizes the present knowledge about the role of Müller cells in the clearance and metabolization of extracellular glutamate and GABA. Some major pathways of GABA and glutamate metabolism in Müller cells are described; these pathways are involved in the glutamate-glutamine cycle of the retina, in the defense against oxidative stress via the production of glutathione, and in the production of substrates for the neuronal energy metabolism.

  17. The GABA excitatory/inhibitory shift in brain maturation and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Khalilov, Ilgam; Kahle, Kristopher T; Cherubini, Enrico

    2012-10-01

    Ionic currents and the network-driven patterns they generate differ in immature and adult neurons: The developing brain is not a "small adult brain." One of the most investigated examples is the developmentally regulated shift of actions of the transmitter GABA that inhibit adult neurons but excite immature ones because of an initially higher intracellular chloride concentration [Cl(-)](i), leading to depolarizing and often excitatory actions of GABA instead of hyperpolarizing and inhibitory actions. The levels of [Cl(-)](i) are also highly labile, being readily altered transiently or persistently by enhanced episodes of activity in relation to synaptic plasticity or a variety of pathological conditions, including seizures and brain insults. Among the plethora of channels, transporters, and other devices involved in controlling [Cl(-)](i), two have emerged as playing a particularly important role: the chloride importer NKCC1 and the chloride exporter KCC2. Here, the authors stress the importance of determining how [Cl(-)](i) is dynamically regulated and how this affects brain operation in health and disease. In a clinical perspective, agents that control [Cl(-)](i) and reinstate inhibitory actions of GABA open novel therapeutic perspectives in many neurological disorders, including infantile epilepsies, autism spectrum disorders, and other developmental disorders.

  18. Eugenol inhibits the GABAA current in trigeminal ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Moon, Jee Youn; Jung, Sung Jun; Kang, Jin Gu; Choi, Seung Pyo; Jang, Jun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Eugenol has sedative, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic effects, but also serves as an irritant through the regulation of a different set of ion channels. Activation of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors on sensory neurons leads to the stabilization of neuronal excitability but contributes to formalin-induced inflammatory pain. In this study, we examined the effect of eugenol on the GABA-induced current in rat trigeminal ganglia (TG) neurons and in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing the GABAA receptor α1β2γ2 subtype using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were used to confirm the expression of GABAA receptor γ2 subunit mRNA and protein in the TG and hippocampus. Eugenol decreased the amplitude ratio of the GABA-induced current to 27.5 ± 3.2% (p eugenol inhibited GABA-induced currents in a dose-dependent manner. Application of eugenol also decreased the GABA response in the presence of a G-protein blocker. Eugenol pretreatment with different concentrations of GABA resulted in similar inhibition of the GABA-induced current in a non-competitive manner. In conclusion, eugenol inhibits the GABA-induced current in TG neurons and HEK 293 cells expressing the GABAA receptor in a reversible, dose-dependent, and non-competitive manner, but not via the G-protein pathway. We suggest that the GABAA receptor could be a molecular target for eugenol in the modulation of nociceptive information.

  19. Dorsal border periaqueductal gray neurons project to the area directly adjacent to the central canal ependyma of the C4-T8 spinal cord in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouton, L J; Kerstens, L; Van der Want, J; Holstege, G

    1996-11-01

    In a previous study horseradish peroxidase (HRP) injections in the upper thoracic and cervical spinal cord revealed some faintly labeled small neurons at the dorsal border of the periaqueductal gray (PAG). The present light microscopic and electronmicroscopic tracing study describes the precise location of these dorsal border PAG-spinal neurons and their terminal organization. Wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated HRP (WGA-HRP) injections into cervical and upper thoracic spinal segments resulted in several hundreds of small retrogradely labeled neurons at the dorsal border of the ipsilateral caudal PAG. These neurons were not found after injections in more caudal segments. WGA-HRP injections in the dorsal border PAG region surprisingly resulted in anterogradely labeled fibers terminating in the area dorsally and laterally adjoining the central canal ependyma of the C4-T8 spinal cord. No anterogradely labeled fibers were found more caudal in the spinal cord. The labeled fibers found in the upper cervical cord were not located in the area immediately adjoining the ependymal layer of the central canal, but in the lateral part of laminae VI, VII and VIII and in area X bilaterally. Electronmicroscopic results of one case show that the dorsal border PAG-spinal neurons terminate in the neuropil of the subependymal area and in the vicinity of the basal membranes of capillaries located laterally to the central canal. The terminal profiles contain electron-lucent and densecored vesicles, suggesting a heterogeneity of possible transmitters. A striking observation was the lack of synaptic contacts, suggesting nonsynaptic release from the profiles. The function of the dorsal border PAG-spinal projection is unknown, but considering the termination pattern of the dorsal border PAG neurons on the capillaries the intriguing similarity between this projection system and the hypothalamohypophysial system is discussed.

  20. GABA A/Bz receptor subtypes as targets for selective drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Settimo, F; Taliani, S; Trincavelli, M L; Montali, M; Martini, C

    2007-01-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors are the major inhibitory neuronal receptors in the mammalian brain. Their activation by GABA opens the intrinsic ion channel, enabling chloride flux into the cell with subsequent hyperpolarization. Several GABA(A) receptor subunit isoforms have been cloned, the major isoform containing alpha, beta, and gamma subunits, and a regional heterogeneity associated with distinct physiological effects has been suggested. As a variety of allosteric ligands can modulate GABA-gated conductance changes through binding to distinct sites, the development of subtype-selective ligands may lead to the selective treatment of GABA system-associated pathology. In particular, the best characterized binding site is the benzodiazepine site (BzR), localized at the alpha/gamma subunit interface, in which the alpha subunit is the main determinant of BzR ligand action selectivity. The alpha1-containing BzR have been proposed to be responsible for the sedative action; the alpha2 and/or the alpha3 subtypes have been suggested to mediate the anxiolytic activity and the myorelaxation effects, and the alpha5 subtype has been associated with cognition processes. The discovery of alpha-selective subtype ligands may help in the specific treatment of anxiety, sleep disorders, convulsions and memory deficits with fewer side effects. Selectivity may be achieved by two approaches: selective affinity or selective efficacy. Selective affinity needs a compound to bind with a higher affinity to one receptor subtype compared with another, whereas subtype-selective efficacy relies on a compound binding to all subtypes, but having different efficacies at various subtypes. The status of BzR ligands, subdivided on the basis of their main chemical structural features, is reviewed in relation to structure-activity relationships which determine their affinity or efficacy selectivity for a certain BzR subtype.

  1. Decreased GABA receptor in the cerebral cortex of epileptic rats: effect of Bacopa monnieri and Bacoside-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Jobin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstact Background Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA, the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the cerebral cortex, maintains the inhibitory tones that counter balances neuronal excitation. When this balance is perturbed, seizures may ensue. Methods In the present study, alterations of the general GABA, GABAA and GABAB receptors in the cerebral cortex of the epileptic rat and the therapeutic application of Bacopa monnieri were investigated. Results Scatchard analysis of [3H]GABA, [3H]bicuculline and [3H]baclofen in the cerebral cortex of the epileptic rat showed significant decrease in Bmax (P Aά1, GABAAγ, GABAAδ, GABAB and GAD where down regulated (P Aά5 subunit and Cyclic AMP responsible element binding protein were up regulated. Confocal imaging study confirmed the decreased GABA receptors in epileptic rats. Epileptic rats have deficit in radial arm and Y maze performance. Conclusions Bacopa monnieri and Bacoside-A treatment reverses epilepsy associated changes to near control suggesting that decreased GABA receptors in the cerebral cortex have an important role in epileptic occurrence; Bacopa monnieri and Bacoside-A have therapeutic application in epilepsy management.

  2. Frontal GABA levels change during working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Lars; Martin, Ernst; Klaver, Peter; Edden, Richard; Zelaya, Fernando; Lythgoe, David J; Lüchinger, Rafael; Brandeis, Daniel; O'Gorman, Ruth L

    2012-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging metrics are thought to reflect changes in neurotransmitter flux, but changes in neurotransmitter levels have not been demonstrated in humans during a cognitive task, and the relationship between neurotransmitter dynamics and hemodynamic activity during cognition has not yet been established. We evaluate the concentration of the major inhibitory (GABA) and excitatory (glutamate + glutamine: Glx) neurotransmitters and the cerebral perfusion at rest and during a prolonged delayed match-to-sample working memory task. Resting GABA levels in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex correlated positively with the resting perfusion and inversely with the change in perfusion during the task. Further, only GABA increased significantly during the first working memory run and then decreased continuously across subsequent task runs. The decrease of GABA over time was paralleled by a trend towards decreased reaction times and higher task accuracy. These results demonstrate a link between neurotransmitter dynamics and hemodynamic activity during working memory, indicating that functional neuroimaging metrics depend on the balance of excitation and inhibition required for cognitive processing.

  3. Frontal GABA levels change during working memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Michels

    Full Text Available Functional neuroimaging metrics are thought to reflect changes in neurotransmitter flux, but changes in neurotransmitter levels have not been demonstrated in humans during a cognitive task, and the relationship between neurotransmitter dynamics and hemodynamic activity during cognition has not yet been established. We evaluate the concentration of the major inhibitory (GABA and excitatory (glutamate + glutamine: Glx neurotransmitters and the cerebral perfusion at rest and during a prolonged delayed match-to-sample working memory task. Resting GABA levels in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex correlated positively with the resting perfusion and inversely with the change in perfusion during the task. Further, only GABA increased significantly during the first working memory run and then decreased continuously across subsequent task runs. The decrease of GABA over time was paralleled by a trend towards decreased reaction times and higher task accuracy. These results demonstrate a link between neurotransmitter dynamics and hemodynamic activity during working memory, indicating that functional neuroimaging metrics depend on the balance of excitation and inhibition required for cognitive processing.

  4. Oxytocin-mediated GABA inhibition during delivery attenuates autism pathogenesis in rodent offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyzio, Roman; Nardou, Romain; Ferrari, Diana C; Tsintsadze, Timur; Shahrokhi, Amene; Eftekhari, Sanaz; Khalilov, Ilgam; Tsintsadze, Vera; Brouchoud, Corinne; Chazal, Genevieve; Lemonnier, Eric; Lozovaya, Natalia; Burnashev, Nail; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2014-02-07

    We report that the oxytocin-mediated neuroprotective γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) excitatory-inhibitory shift during delivery is abolished in the valproate and fragile X rodent models of autism. During delivery and subsequently, hippocampal neurons in these models have elevated intracellular chloride levels, increased excitatory GABA, enhanced glutamatergic activity, and elevated gamma oscillations. Maternal pretreatment with bumetanide restored in offspring control electrophysiological and behavioral phenotypes. Conversely, blocking oxytocin signaling in naïve mothers produced offspring having electrophysiological and behavioral autistic-like features. Our results suggest a chronic deficient chloride regulation in these rodent models of autism and stress the importance of oxytocin-mediated GABAergic inhibition during the delivery process. Our data validate the amelioration observed with bumetanide and oxytocin and point to common pathways in a drug-induced and a genetic rodent model of autism.

  5. Description of morphological changes in neurons and endothelial cells of CA1-area of hippocampus in rats with alloxan-induced hyp erglycemia under application of nootropic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhylyuk V.I.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Using neuromorphometry analysis differences in the effects of nootropic drugs on morphology and function of neurons and endothelial cells of hippocampus, content of RNA, content of apoptotic and destructive neurons were examined in white rats with chronic alloxan-induced hyperglycemia. It ha s been found that diabetes in rats is accompanied by specific morphological and functional changes and activation of apoptosis in neurons of the CA1-area in hi ppocampus, which may be related to disturbance of local blood flow due to endothelial damage. N-carbamoyl-methyl-4-phenyl-2-pyrrolidone (entrop, N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine (noopept, pramiracetam, cerebrocurin and citicoline show protective effects on neurons and endothelial cells, which are much larger in force than effect s of ginkgo biloba extract, piracetam and pentoxifylline. This protective activity is characterized by reducing the number of apoptotic and dest ructive neurons in hippocampal CA1-area, increasing the density of functioning nerve and endothelial cells, activation of RNA biosynthesis in the neurocytes and endo-thelial cells

  6. Ultrastructure and immunocytochemical characteristics of cells in the octopus cell area of the rat cochlear nucleus: comparison with multipolar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2003-01-01

    Cells in the octopus cell area of the rat ventral cochlear nucleus have been connected to the monaural interpretation of spectral patterns of sound such as those derived from speech. This is possible by their fast onset of firing after each octopus cell and its dendrites have been contacted by many auditory fibres carrying different frequencies. The cytological characteristics that make these large cells able to perform such a function have been studied with ultrastructural immunocytochemistry for glycine, GABA and glutamate, and compared to that of other multipolar neurons of other regions of the ventral cochlear nucleus. Cells in the octopus cell area have an ultrastructure similar to large-giant D-multipolar neurons present in other areas of the cochlear nucleus, from which they differ by the presence of a larger excitatory axo-somatic synaptic input and larger mitochondria. Octopus cells are glycine and GABA negative, and glutamate positive with different degree. Large octopus cells receive more axo-somatic boutons than smaller octopus cells. Fusiform octopus cells are found sparsely within the intermediate acoustic striae. These cells are large to giant excitatory neurons (23-35 microm) with 62-85% of their irregular perimeter covered with large axo-somatic synaptic boutons. Most boutons contain round vesicles and are glycine and GABA negative but glutamate positive. The latter excitatory boutons represent about 70% of the input to octopus cells. Glycine positive boutons with flat and pleomorphic vesicles account for 9-10% of the input while GABA-ergic boutons with pleomorphic vesicles represent about 20% of the synaptic input. Other few, multipolar cells within the rat octopus cell area are surrounded by more inhibitory than excitatory terminals which contain flat and pleomorphic vesicles, a feature distinctive from that of true octopus cells. The latter resemble multipolar cells seen outside the octopus cell area that project to the contralateral inferior

  7. 5-HT and GABA modulate intrinsic excitability of type I interneurons in Hermissenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Nan Ge; Tian, Lian-Ming; Crow, Terry

    2009-11-01

    The sensory neurons (photoreceptors) in the visual system of Hermissenda are one site of plasticity produced by Pavlovian conditioning. A second site of plasticity produced by conditioning is the type I interneurons in the cerebropleural ganglia. Both photoreceptors and statocyst hair cells of the graviceptive system form monosynaptic connections with identified type I interneurons. Two proposed neurotransmitters in the graviceptive system, serotonin (5-HT) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), have been shown to modify synaptic strength and intrinsic neuronal excitability in identified photoreceptors. However, the potential role of 5-HT and GABA in plasticity of type I interneurons has not been investigated. Here we show that 5-HT increased the peak amplitude of light-evoked complex excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), enhanced intrinsic excitability, and increased spike activity of identified type I(e(A)) interneurons. In contrast, 5-HT decreased spike activity and intrinsic excitability of type I(e(B)) interneurons. The classification of two categories of type I(e) interneurons was also supported by the observation that 5-HT produced opposite effects on whole cell steady-state outward currents in type I(e) interneurons. Serotonin produced a reduction in the amplitude of light-evoked complex inhibitory PSPs (IPSPs), increased spontaneous spike activity, decreased intrinsic excitability, and depolarized the resting membrane potential of identified type I(i) interneurons. In contrast to the effects of 5-HT, GABA produced inhibition in both types of I(e) interneurons and type I(i) interneurons. These results show that 5-HT and GABA can modulate the intrinsic excitability of type I interneurons independent of the presynaptic effects of the same transmitters on excitability and synaptic efficacy of photoreceptors.

  8. The diversity of GABA(A) receptor subunit distribution in the normal and Huntington's disease human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldvogel, H J; Faull, R L M

    2015-01-01

    GABA(A) receptors are assembled into pentameric receptor complexes from a total of 19 different subunits derived from a variety of different subunit classes (α1-6, β1-3, γ1-3, δ, ɛ, θ, and π) which surround a central chloride ion channel. GABA(A) receptor complexes are distributed heterogeneously throughout the brain and spinal cord and are activated by the extensive GABAergic inhibitory system. In this chapter, we describe the heterogeneous distribution of six of the most widely distributed subunits (α1, α2, α3, β2,3, and γ2) throughout the human basal ganglia. This review describes the studies we have carried out on the normal and Huntington's disease human basal ganglia using autoradiographic labeling and immunohistochemistry in the human basal ganglia. GABA(A) receptors are known to react to changing conditions in the brain in neurological disorders, especially in Huntington's disease and display a high degree of plasticity which is thought to compensate for loss of function caused by disease. In Huntington's disease, the variable loss of GABAergic medium spiny striatopallidal projection neurons is associated with a loss of GABA(A) receptor subunits in the striosome and/or the matrix compartments of the striatum. By contrast in the globus pallidus, a loss of the GABAergic striatal projection neurons results in a dramatic upregulation of subunits on the large postsynaptic pallidal neurons; this is thought to be a compensatory plastic mechanism resulting from the loss of striatal GABAergic input. Most interestingly, our studies have revealed that the subventricular zone overlying the caudate nucleus contains a variety of proliferating progenitor stem cells that possess a heterogeneity of GABA(A) receptor subunits which may play a role in human brain repair mechanisms.

  9. Independent presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms regulate endocannabinoid signaling at multiple synapses in the ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegel, Arthur C; Lupica, Carl R

    2004-12-08

    Dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area have been implicated in psychiatric disorders and drug abuse. Understanding the mechanisms through which their activity is regulated via the modulation of afferent input is imperative to understanding their roles in these conditions. Here we demonstrate that endocannabinoids liberated from DA neurons activate cannabinoid CB1 receptors located on glutamatergic axons and on GABAergic terminals targeting GABA(B) receptors located on these cells. Endocannabinoid release was initiated by inhibiting either presynaptic type-III metabotropic glutamate receptors or postsynaptic calcium-activated potassium channels, two conditions that also promote enhanced DA neuron excitability and bursting. Thus, activity-dependent release of endocannabinoids may act as a regulatory feedback mechanism to inhibit synaptic inputs in response to DA neuron bursting, thereby regulating firing patterns that may fine-tune DA release from afferent terminals.

  10. Phospho-dependent functional modulation of GABA(B) receptors by the metabolic sensor AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Wilkins, Megan E; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Terunuma, Miho; Tamaki, Keisuke; Iemata, Mika; Warren, Noel; Couve, Andrés; Calver, Andrew; Horvath, Zsolt; Freeman, Katie; Carling, David; Huang, Lan; Gonzales, Cathleen; Cooper, Edward; Smart, Trevor G; Pangalos, Menelas N; Moss, Stephen J

    2007-01-18

    GABA(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors composed of R1 and R2 subunits that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the brain by activating inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (GIRKs) and inhibiting Ca(2+) channels. We demonstrate here that GABA(B) receptors are intimately associated with 5'AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK acts as a metabolic sensor that is potently activated by increases in 5'AMP concentration that are caused by enhanced metabolic activity, anoxia, or ischemia. AMPK binds the R1 subunit and directly phosphorylates S783 in the R2 subunit to enhance GABA(B) receptor activation of GIRKs. Phosphorylation of S783 is evident in many brain regions, and is increased dramatically after ischemic injury. Finally, we also reveal that S783 plays a critical role in enhancing neuronal survival after ischemia. Together our results provide evidence of a neuroprotective mechanism, which, under conditions of metabolic stress or after ischemia, increases GABA(B) receptor function to reduce excitotoxicity and thereby promotes neuronal survival.

  11. Temporal development of GABA agonist induced alterations in ultrastructure and GABA receptor expression in cultured cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Belhage, B; Schousboe, A;

    1987-01-01

    The temporal development of the effect of THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) on the ultrastructure composition and GABA receptor expression in cerebellar granule cells was investigated by quantitative electron microscopy (morphometric analysis) and GABA binding assays...... exposed to THIP (150 microM) for 3 hr low affinity GABA receptors were induced. These findings show that the effect of THIP on the ultrastructure composition and GABA receptor expression in cultured cerebellar granule cells may be interrelated and moreover it is likely that the turn-over of GABA receptors...

  12. Characterization of GABAergic neurons in rapid-eye-movement sleep controlling regions of the brainstem reticular formation in GAD67-green fluorescent protein knock-in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ritchie E; McKenna, James T; Winston, Stuart; Basheer, Radhika; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Thakkar, Mahesh M; McCarley, Robert W

    2008-01-01

    Recent experiments suggest that brainstem GABAergic neurons may control rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. However, understanding their pharmacology/physiology has been hindered by difficulty in identification. Here we report that mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the GAD67 promoter (GAD67-GFP knock-in mice) exhibit numerous GFP-positive neurons in the central gray and reticular formation, allowing on-line identification in vitro. Small (10-15 microm) or medium-sized (15-25 microm) GFP-positive perikarya surrounded larger serotonergic, noradrenergic, cholinergic and reticular neurons, and > 96% of neurons were double-labeled for GFP and GABA, confirming that GFP-positive neurons are GABAergic. Whole-cell recordings in brainstem regions important for promoting REM sleep [subcoeruleus (SubC) or pontine nucleus oralis (PnO) regions] revealed that GFP-positive neurons were spontaneously active at 3-12 Hz, fired tonically, and possessed a medium-sized depolarizing sag during hyperpolarizing steps. Many neurons also exhibited a small, low-threshold calcium spike. GFP-positive neurons were tested with pharmacological agents known to promote (carbachol) or inhibit (orexin A) REM sleep. SubC GFP-positive neurons were excited by the cholinergic agonist carbachol, whereas those in the PnO were either inhibited or excited. GFP-positive neurons in both areas were excited by orexins/hypocretins. These data are congruent with the hypothesis that carbachol-inhibited GABAergic PnO neurons project to, and inhibit, REM-on SubC reticular neurons during waking, whereas carbachol-excited SubC and PnO GABAergic neurons are involved in silencing locus coeruleus and dorsal raphe aminergic neurons during REM sleep. Orexinergic suppression of REM during waking is probably mediated in part via excitation of acetylcholine-inhibited GABAergic neurons.

  13. Valerian inhibits rat hepatocarcinogenesis by activating GABA(A receptor-mediated signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kakehashi

    Full Text Available Valerian is widely used as a traditional medicine to improve the quality of sleep due to interaction of several active components with the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA A receptor (GABA(AR system. Recently, activation of GABA signaling in stem cells has been reported to suppress cell cycle progression in vivo. Furthermore, possible inhibitory effects of GABA(AR agonists on hepatocarcinogenesis have been reported. The present study was performed to investigate modulating effects of Valerian on hepatocarcinogenesis using a medium-term rat liver bioassay. Male F344 rats were treated with one of the most powerful Valerian species (Valeriana sitchensis at doses of 0, 50, 500 and 5000 ppm in their drinking water after initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis with diethylnitrosamine (DEN. Formation of glutathione S-transferase placental form positive (GST-P(+ foci was significantly inhibited by Valerian at all applied doses compared with DEN initiation control rats. Generation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in the rat liver was significantly suppressed by all doses of Valerian, likely due to suppression of Nrf2, CYP7A1 and induction of catalase expression. Cell proliferation was significantly inhibited, while apoptosis was induced in areas of GST-P(+ foci of Valerian groups associated with suppression of c-myc, Mafb, cyclin D1 and induction of p21(Waf1/Cip1, p53 and Bax mRNA expression. Interestingly, expression of the GABA(AR alpha 1 subunit was observed in GST-P(+ foci of DEN control rats, with significant elevation associated with Valerian treatment. These results indicate that Valerian exhibits inhibitory effects on rat hepatocarcinogenesis by inhibiting oxidative DNA damage, suppressing cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in GST-P(+ foci by activating GABA(AR-mediated signaling.

  14. Neuronal activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor regulate the density of inhibitory synapses in organotypic slice cultures of postnatal hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, S; Wehrlé, R; Sotelo, C

    2000-11-01

    Hippocampal interneurons inhibit pyramidal neurons through the release of the neurotransmitter GABA. Given the importance of this inhibition for the proper functioning of the hippocampus, the development of inhibitory synapses must be tightly regulated. In this study, the possibility that neuronal activity and neurotrophins regulate the density of GABAergic inhibitory synapses was investigated in organotypic slice cultures taken from postnatal day 7 rats. In hippocampal slices cultured for 13 d in the presence of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline, the density of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65-immunoreactive terminals was increased in the CA1 area when compared with control slices. Treatment with the glutamate receptor antagonist 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione decreased the density of GAD65-immunoreactive terminals in the stratum oriens of CA1. These treatments had parallel effects on the density of GABA-immunoreactive processes. Electron microscopic analysis after postembedding immunogold labeling with antibodies against GABA indicated that bicuculline treatment increased the density of inhibitory but not excitatory synapses. Application of exogenous BDNF partly mimicked the stimulatory effect of bicuculline on GAD65-immunoreactive terminals. Finally, antibodies against BDNF, but not antibodies against nerve growth factor, decrease the density of GAD65-immunoreactive terminals in bicuculline-treated slices. Thus, neuronal activity regulates the density of inhibitory synapses made by postnatal hippocampal interneurons, and BDNF could mediate part of this regulation. This regulation of the density of inhibitory synapses could represent a feedback mechanism aimed at maintaining an appropriate level of activity in the developing hippocampal networks.

  15. Visual Responsiveness of Neurons in the Secondary Somatosensory Area and its Surrounding Parietal Operculum Regions in Awake Macaque Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hihara, Sayaka; Taoka, Miki; Tanaka, Michio; Iriki, Atsushi

    2015-11-01

    Previous neurophysiological studies performed in macaque monkeys have shown that the secondary somatosensory cortex (SII) is essentially engaged in the processing of somatosensory information and no other sensory input has been reported. In contrast, recent human brain-imaging studies have revealed the effects of visual and auditory stimuli on SII activity, which suggest multisensory integration in the human SII. To determine whether multisensory responses of the SII also exist in nonhuman primates, we recorded single-unit activity in response to visual and auditory stimuli from the SII and surrounding regions in 8 hemispheres from 6 awake monkeys. Among 1157 recorded neurons, 306 neurons responded to visual stimuli. These visual neurons usually responded to rather complex stimuli, such as stimulation of the peripersonal space (40.5%), observation of human action (29.1%), and moving-object stimulation outside the monkey's reach (23.9%). We occasionally applied auditory stimuli to visual neurons and found 10 auditory-responsive neurons that exhibited somatosensory responses. The visual neurons were distributed continuously along the lateral sulcus covering the entire SII, along with other somatosensory neurons. These results highlight the need to investigate novel functional roles-other than somesthetic sensory processing-of the SII.

  16. Morphology and distribution of neurons expressing serotonin 5-HT1A receptors in the rat hypothalamus and the surrounding diencephalic and telencephalic areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvin, Eric; Scrogin, Karie; Dudás, Bertalan

    2010-07-01

    Disorders of serotonergic neurotransmission are involved in disturbances of numerous hypothalamic functions including circadian rhythm, mood, neuroendocrine functions, sleep and feeding. Among the serotonin receptors currently recognized, 5-HT(1A) receptors have received considerable attention due to their importance in the etiology of mood disorders. While previous studies have shown the presence of 5-HT(1A) receptors in several regions of the rat brain, there is no detailed map of the cellular distribution of 5-HT(1A) receptors in the rat diencephalon. In order to characterize the distribution and morphology of the neurons containing 5-HT(1A) receptors in the diencephalon and the adjacent telencephalic areas, single label immunohistochemistry was utilized. Large, multipolar, 5-HT(1A)-immunoreactive (IR) neurons were mainly detected in the magnocellular preoptic nucleus and in the nucleus of diagonal band of Broca, while the supraoptic nucleus contained mainly fusiform neurons. Medium-sized 5-HT(1A)-IR neurons with triangular or round-shaped somata were widely distributed in the diencephalon, populating the zona incerta, lateral hypothalamic area, anterior hypothalamic nucleus, substantia innominata, dorsomedial and premamillary nuclei, paraventricular nucleus and bed nucleus of stria terminalis. The present study provides schematic mapping of 5-HT(1A)-IR neurons in the rat diencephalon. In addition, the morphology of the detected 5-HT(1A)-IR neural elements is also described. Since rat is a widely used laboratory animal in pharmacological models of altered serotoninergic neurotransmission, detailed mapping of 5-HT(1A)-IR structures is pivotal for the neurochemical characterization of the neurons containing 5-HT(1A) receptors.

  17. Spatial variability and reproducibility of GABA-edited MEGA-LASER 3D-MRSI in the brain at 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnilicová, Petra; Považan, Michal; Strasser, Bernhard; Andronesi, Ovidiu C; Gajdošík, Martin; Dydak, Ulrike; Ukropec, Jozef; Dobrota, Dušan; Trattnig, Siegfried; Bogner, Wolfgang

    2016-11-01

    The reproducibility of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) quantification results, obtained with MRSI, was determined on a 3 T MR scanner in healthy adults. In this study, a spiral-encoded, GABA-edited, MEGA-LASER MRSI sequence with real-time motion-scanner-instability corrections was applied for robust 3D mapping of neurotransmitters in the brain. In particular, the GABA(+) (i.e. GABA plus macromolecule contamination) and Glx (i.e. glutamate plus glutamine contamination) signal was measured. This sequence enables 3D-MRSI with about 3 cm(3) nominal resolution in about 20 min. Since reliable quantification of GABA is challenging, the spatial distribution of the inter-subject and intra-subject variability of GABA(+) and Glx levels was studied via test-retest assessment in 14 healthy volunteers (seven men-seven women). For both inter-subject and intra-subject repeated measurement sessions a low coefficient of variation (CV) and a high intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were found for GABA(+) and Glx ratios across all evaluated voxels (intra-/inter-subject: GABA(+) ratios, CV ~ 8%-ICC > 0.75; Glx ratios, CV ~ 6%-ICC > 0.70). The same was found in selected brain regions for Glx ratios versus GABA(+) ratios (CV varied from about 5% versus about 8% in occipital and parietal regions, to about 8% versus about 10% in the frontal area, thalamus, and basal ganglia). These results provide evidence that 3D mapping of GABA(+) and Glx using the described methodology provides high reproducibility for application in clinical and neuroscientific studies.

  18. Yellow fluorescent protein-based assay to measure GABA(A channel activation and allosteric modulation in CHO-K1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teres Johansson

    Full Text Available The γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A ion channels are important drug targets for treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Finding GABA(A channel subtype selective allosteric modulators could lead to new improved treatments. However, the progress in this area has been obstructed by the challenging task of developing functional assays to support screening efforts and the generation of cells expressing functional GABA(A ion channels with the desired subtype composition. To address these challenges, we developed a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP-based assay to be able to study allosteric modulation of the GABA(A ion channel using cryopreserved, transiently transfected, assay-ready cells. We show for the first time how the MaxCyte STX electroporation instrument can be used to generate CHO-K1 cells expressing functional GABA(A α2β3γ2 along with a halide sensing YFP-H148Q/I152L (YFP-GABA(A2 cells. As a basis for a cell-based assay capable of detecting allosteric modulators, experiments with antagonist, ion channel blocker and modulators were used to verify GABA(A subunit composition and functionality. We found that the I(- concentration used in the YFP assay affected both basal quench of YFP and potency of GABA. For the first time the assay was used to study modulation of GABA with 7 known modulators where statistical analysis showed that the assay can distinguish modulatory pEC50 differences of 0.15. In conclusion, the YFP assay proved to be a robust, reproducible and inexpensive assay. These data provide evidence that the assay is suitable for high throughput screening (HTS and could be used to discover novel modulators acting on GABA(A ion channels.

  19. Zbtb20-Induced CA1 Pyramidal Neuron Development and Area Enlargement in the Cerebral Midline Cortex of Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob V; Blom, Jonas B; Noraberg, Jens

    2010-01-01

    that are innervated by Schaffer collateral projections in ectopic strata oriens and radiatum. The Zbtb20-transformed neurons express Bcl11B, Satb2, and Calbindin-D28k, which are markers of adult CA1 pyramidal neurons. Downregulation of Zbtb20 expression by RNA interference impairs the normal maturation of CA1...... pyramidal neurons resulting in deficiencies in Calbindin-D28k expression and in reduced apical dendritic arborizations in stratum lacunosum moleculare. Overall, the results show that Zbtb20 is required for various aspects of CA1 pyramidal neuron development such as the postnatal extension of apical...... dendritic arbors in the distal target zone and the subtype differentiation of Calbindin-D28k-positive subsets. They further suggest that Zbtb20 plays a role in arealization of the midline cortex....

  20. A single GABAergic neuron mediates feedback of odor-evoked signals in the mushroom body of larval Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liria Monica Masuda-Nakagawa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition has a central role in defining the selectivity of the responses of higher order neurons to sensory stimuli. However, the circuit mechanisms of regulation of these responses by inhibitory neurons are still unclear. In Drosophila, the mushroom bodies (MBs are necessary for olfactory memory, and by implication for the selectivity of learned responses to specific odors. To understand the circuitry of inhibition in the calyx (the input dendritic region of the MBs, and its relationship with MB excitatory activity, we used the simple anatomy of the Drosophila larval olfactory system to identify any inhibitory inputs that could contribute to the selectivity of MB odor responses. We found that a single neuron accounts for all detectable GABA innervation in the calyx of the MBs, and that this neuron has presynaptic terminals in the calyx and postsynaptic branches in the MB lobes (output axonal area. We call this neuron the larval anterior paired lateral (APL neuron, because of its similarity to the previously described adult APL neuron. Reconstitution of GFP partners (GRASP suggests that the larval APL makes extensive contacts with the MB intrinsic neurons, Kenyon Cells (KCs, but few contacts with incoming projection neurons. Using calcium imaging of neuronal activity in live larvae, we show that the larval APL responds to odors, in a mannner that requires output from KCs. Our data suggest that the larval APL is the sole GABAergic neuron that innervates the MB input region and carries inhibitory feedback from the MB output region, consistent with a role in modulating the olfactory selectivity of MB neurons.

  1. Developmental stability of taurine's activation on glycine receptors in cultured neurons of rat auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zheng-Quan; Lu, Yun-Gang; Chen, Lin

    2008-01-03

    Taurine is an endogenous amino acid that can activate glycine and/or gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors in the central nervous system. During natural development, taurine's receptor target undergoes a shift from glycine receptors to GABA(A) receptors in cortical neurons. Here, we demonstrate that taurine's receptor target in cortical neurons remains stable during in vitro development. With whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we found that taurine always activated glycine receptors, rather than GABA(A) receptors, in neurons of rat auditory cortex cultured for 5-22 days. Our results suggest that the functional sensitivity of glycine and GABA(A) receptors to taurine is critically regulated by their developmental environments.

  2. Transmitters and pathways mediating inhibition of spinal itch-signaling neurons by scratching and other counterstimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasuku Akiyama

    Full Text Available Scratching relieves itch, but the underlying neural mechanisms are poorly understood. We presently investigated a role for the inhibitory neurotransmitters GABA and glycine in scratch-evoked inhibition of spinal itch-signaling neurons in a mouse model of chronic dry skin itch. Superficial dorsal horn neurons ipsilateral to hindpaw dry skin treatment exhibited a high level of spontaneous firing that was significantly attenuated by cutaneous scratching, pinch and noxious heat. Scratch-evoked inhibition was nearly abolished by spinal delivery of the glycine antagonist, strychnine, and was markedly attenuated by respective GABA(A and GABA(B antagonists bicuculline and saclofen. Scratch-evoked inhibition was also significantly attenuated (but not abolished by interruption of the upper cervical spinal cord, indicating the involvement of both segmental and suprasegmental circuits that engage glycine- and GABA-mediated inhibition of spinal itch-signaling neurons by noxious counterstimuli.

  3. Circuit Architecture of VTA Dopamine Neurons Revealed by Systematic Input-Output Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Kevin T; Steinberg, Elizabeth E; DeLoach, Katherine E; Xie, Stanley; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Schwarz, Lindsay; Gao, Xiaojing J; Kremer, Eric J; Malenka, Robert C; Luo, Liqun

    2015-07-30

    Dopamine (DA) neurons in the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA) integrate complex inputs to encode multiple signals that influence motivated behaviors via diverse projections. Here, we combine axon-initiated viral transduction with rabies-mediated trans-synaptic tracing and Cre-based cell-type-specific targeting to systematically map input-output relationships of VTA-DA neurons. We found that VTA-DA (and VTA-GABA) neurons receive excitatory, inhibitory, and modulatory input from diverse sources. VTA-DA neurons projecting to different forebrain regions exhibit specific biases in their input selection. VTA-DA neurons projecting to lateral and medial nucleus accumbens innervate largely non-overlapping striatal targets, with the latter also sending extensive extra-striatal axon collaterals. Using electrophysiology and behavior, we validated new circuits identified in our tracing studies, including a previously unappreciated top-down reinforcing circuit from anterior cortex to lateral nucleus accumbens via VTA-DA neurons. This study highlights the utility of our viral-genetic tracing strategies to elucidate the complex neural substrates that underlie motivated behaviors.

  4. Adaptation in sound localization: from GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic modulation to perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Annette; Myoga, Michael H; Lingner, Andrea; Ford, Marc C; Alexandrova, Olga; Felmy, Felix; Pecka, Michael; Siveke, Ida; Grothe, Benedikt

    2013-12-01

    Across all sensory modalities, the effect of context-dependent neural adaptation can be observed at every level, from receptors to perception. Nonetheless, it has long been assumed that the processing of interaural time differences, which is the primary cue for sound localization, is nonadaptive, as its outputs are mapped directly onto a hard-wired representation of space. Here we present evidence derived from in vitro and in vivo experiments in gerbils indicating that the coincidence-detector neurons in the medial superior olive modulate their sensitivity to interaural time differences through a rapid, GABA(B) receptor-mediated feedback mechanism. We show that this mechanism provides a gain control in the form of output normalization, which influences the neuronal population code of auditory space. Furthermore, psychophysical tests showed that the paradigm used to evoke neuronal GABA(B) receptor-mediated adaptation causes the perceptual shift in sound localization in humans that was expected on the basis of our physiological results in gerbils.

  5. Effects of oxytocin on GABA signalling in the foetal brain during delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazipov, Rustem; Tyzio, Roman; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2008-01-01

    Oxytocin (OXT) exerts multiple effects in the adult central nervous system. However, little is known about the effects of OXT on foetal neurons during delivery, at the time when a surge of OXT occurs. In a recent study, the effects of OXT on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signalling have been reported in foetal and newborn rats. In the immature rat hippocampal and neocortical neurons at birth, endogenous OXT induced a switch in the action of GABA from excitatory to inhibitory. This excitatory-to-inhibitory switch was caused by a switch in the polarity of the GABAergic responses from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing, reflecting a decrease in the intracellular chloride concentration. The effects of OXT were mimicked and occluded by bumetanide, a selective blocker of the chloride co-transporter NKCC1, suggesting that the effects of OXT involve inhibition of NKCC1. Neuronal death caused by anoxic-aglycaemic episodes was substantially delayed in the foetal hippocampus by endogenous OXT. These findings suggest that OXT plays important role in the preparation of the foetal brain to delivery.

  6. GABA and GABA receptors alterations in the primary visual cortex of concave lens-induced myopic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wen; Bi, Ai-Ling; Xu, Chao-Li; Ye, Xiang; Chen, Mei-Qing; Wang, Xin-Ting; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Guo, Jun-Guo; Jiang, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Jin; Bi, Hong-Sheng

    2017-02-02

    Until recently most researches on myopia mechanisms have mainly been focused on the eye ball and few investigations were explored on the upper visual pathway, such as the visual cortex. The roles of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the retinal and in the upper visual pathway are inter-correlated. As the retinal glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), GABA, and the mRNA levels of GABA receptors increased during the concave lens induced myopia formation, however, whether GABA alterations also occurred in the visual cortex during the concave lens induction is still unknown. In the present study, using HPLC, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and Real-Time Quantitative-PCR (RT-PCR) methods, we observed the changing trends of GABA, glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), and GABA receptors in the visual cortex of concave lens-induced myopic guinea pigs. Similar to the changing patterns of retinal GABA, the concentrations of GAD, GABA and the mRNA levels of GABA receptors in the visual cortex also increased. These results indicate that the exploration on myopia mechanisms should possibly be investigated on the whole visual pathway and the detailed significance of cortical GABA alterations needs further investigation.

  7. Co-localization of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid and Glutamate in Neurons of the Spider Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian-Fine, Ruth; Meisner, Shannon; Torkkeli, Päivi H; Meinertzhagen, Ian A

    2015-12-01

    Spider sensory neurons with cell bodies close to various sensory organs are innervated by putative efferent axons from the central nervous system (CNS). Light and electronmicroscopic imaging of immunolabeled neurons has demonstrated that neurotransmitters present at peripheral synapses include γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate and octopamine. Moreover, electrophysiological studies show that these neurotransmitters modulate the sensitivity of peripheral sensory neurons. Here, we undertook immunocytochemical investigations to characterize GABA and glutamate-immunoreactive neurons in three-dimensional reconstructions of the spider CNS. We document that both neurotransmitters are abundant in morphologically distinct neurons throughout the CNS. Labeling for the vesicular transporters, VGAT for GABA and VGLUT for glutamate, showed corresponding patterns, supporting the specificity of antibody binding. Whereas some neurons displayed strong immunolabeling, others were only weakly labeled. Double labeling showed that a subpopulation of weakly labeled neurons present in all ganglia expresses both GABA and glutamate. Double labeled, strongly and weakly labeled GABA and glutamate immunoreactive axons were also observed in the periphery along muscle fibers and peripheral sensory neurons. Electron microscopic investigations showed presynaptic profiles of various diameters with mixed vesicle populations innervating muscle tissue as well as sensory neurons. Our findings provide evidence that: (1) sensory neurons and muscle fibers are innervated by morphologically distinct, centrally located GABA- and glutamate immunoreactive neurons; (2) a subpopulation of these neurons may co-release both neurotransmitters; and (3) sensory neurons and muscles are innervated by all of these neurochemically and morphologically distinct types of neurons. The biochemical diversity of presynaptic innervation may contribute to how spiders filter natural stimuli and coordinate appropriate response

  8. Suppression of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transaminases induces prominent GABA accumulation, dwarfism and infertility in the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Satoshi; Matsukura, Chiaki; Takayama, Mariko; Asamizu, Erika; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2013-05-01

    Tomatoes accumulate γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) at high levels in the immature fruits. GABA is rapidly converted to succinate during fruit ripening through the activities of GABA transaminase (GABA-T) and succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH). Although three genes encoding GABA-T and both pyruvate- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent GABA-T activities have been detected in tomato fruits, the mechanism underlying the GABA-T-mediated conversion of GABA has not been fully understood. In this work, we conducted loss-of-function analyses utilizing RNA interference (RNAi) transgenic plants with suppressed pyruvate- and glyoxylate-dependent GABA-T gene expression to clarify which GABA-T isoforms are essential for its function. The RNAi plants with suppressed SlGABA-T gene expression, particularly SlGABA-T1, showed severe dwarfism and infertility. SlGABA-T1 expression was inversely associated with GABA levels in the fruit at the red ripe stage. The GABA contents in 35S::SlGABA-T1(RNAi) lines were 1.3-2.0 times and 6.8-9.2 times higher in mature green and red ripe fruits, respectively, than the contents in wild-type fruits. In addition, SlGABA-T1 expression was strongly suppressed in the GABA-accumulating lines. These results indicate that pyruvate- and glyoxylate-dependent GABA-T is the essential isoform for GABA metabolism in tomato plants and that GABA-T1 primarily contributes to GABA reduction in the ripening fruits.

  9. Traumatic brain injury and the effects of diazepam, diltiazem, and MK-801 on GABA-A receptor subunit expression in rat hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Rebecca C

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excitatory amino acid release and subsequent biochemical cascades following traumatic brain injury (TBI have been well documented, especially glutamate-related excitotoxicity. The effects of TBI on the essential functions of inhibitory GABA-A receptors, however, are poorly understood. Methods We used Western blot procedures to test whether in vivo TBI in rat altered the protein expression of hippocampal GABA-A receptor subunits α1, α2, α3, α5, β3, and γ2 at 3 h, 6 h, 24 h, and 7 days post-injuy. We then used pre-injury injections of MK-801 to block calcium influx through the NMDA receptor, diltiazem to block L-type voltage-gated calcium influx, or diazepam to enhance chloride conductance, and re-examined the protein expressions of α1, α2, α3, and γ2, all of which were altered by TBI in the first study and all of which are important constituents in benzodiazepine-sensitive GABA-A receptors. Results Western blot analysis revealed no injury-induced alterations in protein expression for GABA-A receptor α2 or α5 subunits at any time point post-injury. Significant time-dependent changes in α1, α3, β3, and γ2 protein expression. The pattern of alterations to GABA-A subunits was nearly identical after diltiazem and diazepam treatment, and MK-801 normalized expression of all subunits 24 hours post-TBI. Conclusions These studies are the first to demonstrate that GABA-A receptor subunit expression is altered by TBI in vivo, and these alterations may be driven by calcium-mediated cascades in hippocampal neurons. Changes in GABA-A receptors in the hippocampus after TBI may have far-reaching consequences considering their essential importance in maintaining inhibitory balance and their extensive impact on neuronal function.

  10. Collateral projections of neurons in laminae I, III, and IV of rat spinal cord to thalamus, periaqueductal gray matter, and lateral parabrachial area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khater, Khulood M; Todd, Andrew J

    2009-08-20

    Projection neurons in lamina I, together with those in laminae III-IV that express the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1r), form a major route through which nociceptive information reaches the brain. Axons of these cells innervate various targets, including thalamus, periaqueductal gray matter (PAG), and lateral parabrachial area (LPb), and many cells project to more than one target. The aims of this study were to quantify projections from cervical enlargement to PAG and LPb, to determine the proportion of spinothalamic neurons at lumbar and cervical levels that were labelled from PAG and LPb, and to investigate morphological differences between projection populations. The C7 segment contained fewer lamina I spinoparabrachial cells than L4, but a similar number of spino-PAG cells. Virtually all spinothalamic lamina I neurons at both levels were labelled from LPb and between one-third and one-half from PAG. This suggests that significant numbers project to all three targets. Spinothalamic lamina I neurons differed from those labelled only from LPb in that they were generally larger, were more often multipolar, and (in cervical enlargement) had stronger NK1r immunoreactivity. Most lamina III/IV NK1r cells at both levels projected to LPb, but few were labelled from PAG. The great majority of these cells in C7 and over one-fourth of those in L4 were spinothalamic, and at each level some projected to both thalamus and LPb. These results confirm that neurons in these laminae have extensive collateral projections and suggest that different neuronal subpopulations in lamina I have characteristic patterns of supraspinal projection.

  11. CXCL12 chemokine and GABA neurotransmitter systems crosstalk and their putative roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guyon eAlice

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Since CXCL12 and its receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7, have been found in the brain, the role of this chemokine has been expanded from chemoattractant in the immune system to neuromodulatory in the brain. Several pieces of evidence suggest that this chemokine system could crosstalk with the GABAergic system, known to be the main inhibitory neurotransmitter system in the brain. Indeed, GABA and CXCL12 as well as their receptors are colocalized in many cell types including neurons and there are several examples in which these two systems interact. Several mechanisms can be proposed to explain how these systems interact, including receptor-receptor interactions, crosstalk at the level of second messenger cascades, or direct pharmacological interactions, as GABA and GABAB receptor agonists/antagonists have been shown to be allosteric modulators of CXCR4.The interplay between CXCL12/CXCR4-CXCR7 and GABA/GABAA-GABAB receptors systems could have many physiological implications in neurotransmission, cancer and inflammation. In addition, the GABAB agonist baclofen is currently used in medicine to treat spasticity in patients with spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis and other disorders. More recently it has also been used in the treatment of alcohol dependence and withdrawal. The allosteric effects of this agent on CXCR4 could contribute to these beneficial effects or at the opposite, to its side effects.

  12. Target-specific suppression of GABA release from parvalbumin interneurons in the basolateral amygdala by dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hong-Yuan; Ito, Wataru; Li, Jiayang; Morozov, Alexei

    2012-10-17

    Dopamine (DA) in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) promotes fear learning by disinhibiting principal neurons (PNs) and enabling synaptic plasticity in their sensory inputs. While BLA interneurons (INs) are heterogeneous, it is unclear which interneuron subtypes decrease GABAergic input to PNs in the presence of DA. Here, using cell type-selective photostimulation by channelrhodopsin 2 in BLA slices from mouse brain, we examined the role of parvalbumin-positive INs (PV-INs), the major interneuronal subpopulation in BLA, in the disinhibitory effect of DA. We found that DA selectively suppressed GABAergic transmission from PV-INs to PNs by acting on presynaptic D(2) receptors, and this effect was mimicked by Rp-cAMP, an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent signaling. In contrast, DA did not alter GABA release from PV-INs to INs. Furthermore, neither suppressing cAMP-dependent signaling by Rp-cAMP nor enhancing it by forskolin altered GABA release from PV-INs to BLA INs. Overall, DA disinhibits BLA, at least in part, by suppressing GABA release from PV-INs in the target cell-specific manner that results from differential control of this release by cAMP-dependent signaling.

  13. SAT1, a glutamine transporter, is preferentially expressed in GABAergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Tallak Solbu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Subsets of GABAergic neurons are able to maintain high frequency discharge patterns, which requires efficient replenishment of the releasable pool of GABA. Although glutamine is considered a preferred precursor of GABA, the identity of transporters involved in glutamine uptake by GABAergic neurons remains elusive. Molecular analyses revealed that SAT1 (Slc38a1 features system A characteristics with a preferential affinity for glutamine, and that SAT1 mRNA expression is associated with GABAergic neurons. By generating specific antibodies against SAT1 we show that this glutamine carrier is particularly enriched in GABAergic neurons. Cellular SAT1 distribution resembles that of GAD67, an essential GABA synthesis enzyme, suggesting that SAT1 can be involved in translocating glutamine into GABAergic neurons to facilitate inhibitory neurotransmitter generation.

  14. The glutamate-glutamine(GABA cycle: importance of late postnatal development and potential reciprocal interactions between biosynthesis and degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif eHertz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The gold standard for studies of glutamate-glutamine(GABA cycling and its connections to brain biosynthesis from glucose of glutamate and GABA and their subsequent metabolism are the elegant in vivo studies by 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR, showing the large fluxes in the cycle. However, simpler experiments in intact brain tissue (e.g. immunohistochemistry, brain slices, cultured brain cells and mitochondria have also made important contributions to the understanding of details, mechanisms and functional consequences of glutamate/GABA biosynthesis and degradation. The purpose of this review is to attempt to integrate evidence from different sources regarding i the enzyme(s responsible for the initial conversion of -ketoglutarate to glutamate; ii the possibility that especially glutamate oxidation is essentially confined to astrocytes; and iii the ontogenetically very late onset and maturation of glutamine-glutamate(GABA cycle function. Pathway models based on the functional importance of aspartate for glutamate synthesis suggest the possibility of interacting pathways for biosynthesis and degradation of glutamate and GABA and the use of transamination as the default mechanism for initiation of glutamate oxidation. The late development and maturation are related to the late cortical gliogenesis and convert brain cortical function from being purely neuronal to becoming neuronal-astrocytic. This conversion is associated with huge increases in energy demand and production, and the character of potentially incurred gains of function are discussed. These may include alterations in learning mechanisms, in mice indicated by lack of pairing of odor learning with aversive stimuli in newborn animals but the development of such an association 10-12 days later. The possibility is suggested that analogous maturational changes may contribute to differences in the way learning is accomplished in the newborn human brain and during later development.

  15. [Autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA in opiate addiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrile, L A; Fomina, V G; Nevidimova, T I; Vetlugina, T P; Batukhtina, E I; Savochkina, D N; Zakharova, I A; Davydova, T V

    2015-01-01

    Blood serum from 129 patients with opium addiction at different stages of the disease and 63 donors (control group) was examined for the presence of autoantibodies to the exciting and inhibitory amino acids glutamate and GABA. It was shown enhanced production of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA. Dependence of the level and frequency of detec- tion of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA on the stage of the disease was revealed.

  16. [Mirror neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2011-01-01

    Mirror neurons were recently discovered in frontal brain areas of the monkey. They are activated when the animal makes a specific movement, but also when the animal observes the same movement in another animal. Some of them also respond to the emotional expression of other animals of the same species. These mirror neurons have also been found in humans. They respond to or "reflect" actions of other individuals in the brain and are thought to represent the basis for imitation and empathy and hence the neurobiological substrate for "theory of mind", the potential origin of language and the so-called moral instinct.

  17. Control of GABA release at single mossy fiber-CA3 connections in the developing hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria F Safiulina

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this review some of the recent work carried out in our laboratory concerning the functional role of GABAergic signalling at immature mossy fibres (MF-CA3 principal cell synapses has been highlighted. While in adulthood MF, the axons of dentate gyrus granule cells release onto CA3 principal cells and interneurons glutamate, early in postnatal life they release GABA, which exerts into targeted cells a depolarizing and excitatory action. We found that GABAA-mediated postsynaptic currents (MF-GPSCs exhibited a very low probability of release, were sensitive to L-AP4, a group III metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, and revealed short-term frequency-dependent facilitation. Moreover, MF-GPSCs were down regulated by presynaptic GABAB and kainate receptors, activated by spillover of GABA from MF terminals and by glutamate present in the extracellular medium, respectively. Activation of these receptors contributed to the low release probability and in some cases to synapses silencing. By pairing calcium transients, associated with network-driven giant depolarizing potentials or GDPs (a hallmark of developmental networks thought to represent a primordial form of synchrony between neurons, generated by the synergistic action of glutamate and GABA with MF activation increased the probability of GABA release and caused the conversion of silent synapses into conductive ones suggesting that GDPs act as coincident detector signals for enhancing synaptic efficacy. Finally, to compare the relative strength of CA3 pyramidal cell output in relation to their MF glutamatergic or GABAergic inputs in adulthood or in postnatal development, respectively, a realistic model was constructed taking into account different biophysical properties of these synapses.

  18. Central and Peripheral GABA(A) Receptor Regulation of the Heart Rate Depends on the Conscious State of the Animal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Bo Hjorth; Grunnet, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Intuitively one might expect that activation of GABAergic inhibitory neurons results in bradycardia. In conscious animals the opposite effect is however observed. GABAergic neurons in nucleus ambiguus hold the ability to control the activity of the parasympathetic vagus nerve that innervates...... the heart. Upon GABA activation the vagus nerve will be inhibited leaving less parasympathetic impact on the heart. The picture is however blurred in the presence of anaesthesia where both the concentration and type of anaesthetics can result in different effects on the cardiovascular system. This paper...

  19. Cloning and functional expression of intracellular loop variants of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) RDL GABA receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Wells, Jennina; Hawkins, Joseph; Colombo, Claudia; Bermudez, Isabel; Jones, Andrew K

    2016-06-08

    The insect GABA receptor, RDL (resistance to dieldrin), plays central roles in neuronal signalling and is the target of several classes of insecticides. To study the GABA receptor from an important pollinator species, we cloned Rdl cDNA from the honey bee, Apis mellifera. Three Rdl variants were identified, arising from differential use of splice acceptor sites in the large intracellular loop between transmembrane regions 3 and 4. These variants were renamed from previously, as Amel_RDLvar1, Amel_RDLvar2 and Amel_RDLvar3. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, the three variants showed no difference in sensitivity to the agonist, GABA, with EC50s of 29μM, 20μM and 29μM respectively. Also, the potencies of the antagonists, fipronil and imidacloprid, were similar on all three variants. Fipronil IC50 values were 0.18μM, 0.31μM and 0.20μM whereas 100μM imidacloprid reduced the GABA response by 17%, 24% and 31%. The possibility that differential splicing of the RDL intracellular loop may represent a species-specific mechanism leading to insensitivity to insecticides is discussed.

  20. Localization of GABA(B) (R1) receptors in the rat hippocampus by immunocytochemistry and high resolution autoradiography, with specific reference to its localization in identified hippocampal interneuron subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloviter, R S; Ali-Akbarian, L; Elliott, R C; Bowery, B J; Bowery, N G

    1999-11-01

    Immunocytochemical and autoradiographic methods were used to localize the GABA(B) receptor in the normal rat hippocampus. GABA(B) receptor 1-like immunoreactivity (GBR1-LI) was most intense in presumed GABAergic interneurons of all hippocampal subregions. It was also present throughout the hippocampal neuropil, where it was most intense in the dendritic strata of the dentate gyrus, which are innervated by the perforant pathway and inhibitory dentate hilar cells, and in strata oriens and radiatum of area CA3. The dendritic regions of area CA1 exhibited less GBR1-LI than area CA3. GBR1-LI was detectable in the somata of CA1 pyramidal cells, but was minimal or undetectable within the somata of dentate granule cells and CA3 pyramidal cells. GBR1-LI was similarly minimal in the dentate hilar neuropil, and in stratum lucidum, the two regions that contain granule cell axons and terminals. Nor was GBR1-LI detectable in the inhibitory basket cell fiber systems that surround hippocampal principal cell somata. Fluorescence co-localization studies indicated that significant proportions of interneurons expressing somatostatin, neuropeptide Y, cholecystokinin, calbindin, or calretinin also expressed GBR1-LI constitutively. Conversely, parvalbumin-positive GABAergic basket cells of the dentate gyrus and hippocampus, which form GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory axo-somatic synapses, rarely contained detectable GBR1-LI. High resolution autoradiography with the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP 62349 revealed a close correspondence between receptor ligand binding and GBR1-LI, with several notable exceptions. Ligand binding closely matched GBR1-LI throughout the hippocampal, cortical, thalamic, and cerebellar neuropil. However, the hippocampal interneuron somata and dendrites that exhibited the most intense GBR1-LI, and the GBR1-positive somata of CA1 pyramidal cells, did not exhibit a similar density of [3H]-CGP 62349 binding. These data clarify the relationship between

  1. Dopamine D2 receptor desensitization by dopamine or corticotropin releasing factor in ventral tegmental area neurons is associated with increased glutamate release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Herman, Melissa; You, Chang; Arora, Devinder S; McElvain, Maureen A; Roberto, Marisa; Brodie, Mark S

    2014-07-01

    Neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are the source of dopaminergic (DAergic) input to important brain regions related to addiction. Prolonged exposure of these VTA neurons to moderate concentrations of dopamine (DA) causes a time-dependent decrease in DA-induced inhibition, a complex desensitization called DA inhibition reversal (DIR). DIR is mediated by conventional protein kinase C (cPKC) through concurrent stimulation of D2 and D1-like DA receptors, or by D2 stimulation concurrent with activation of some Gq-linked receptors. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) acts via Gq, and can modulate glutamater neurotransmission in the VTA. In the present study, we used brain slice electrophysiology to characterize the interaction of DA, glutamate antagonists, and CRF agonists in the induction and maintenance of DIR in the VTA. Glutamate receptor antagonists blocked induction but not maintenance of DIR. Putative blockers of neurotransmitter release and store-operated calcium channels blocked and reversed DIR. CRF and the CRF agonist urocortin reversed inhibition produced by the D2 agonist quinpirole, consistent with our earlier work indicating that Gq activation reverses quinpirole-mediated inhibition. In whole cell recordings, the combination of urocortin and quinpirole, but not either agent alone, increased spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in VTA neurons. Likewise, the combination of a D1-like receptor agonist and quinpirole, but not either agent alone, increased sEPSCs in VTA neurons. In summary, desensitization of D2 receptors induced by dopamine or CRF on DAergic VTA neurons is associated with increased glutamatergic signaling in the VTA.

  2. Brain microdialysis of GABA and glutamate : What does it signify?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, W; Westerink, BHC

    1997-01-01

    Microdialysis has become a frequently used method to study extracellular levels of GABA and glutamate in the central nervous system. However, the fact that the major part of GABA and glutamate as measured by microdialysis does not fulfill the classical criteria for exocytotic release questions the v

  3. GABA shunt enzymes and the relationship with morphine abstinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Th. de Boer (Thijs)

    1977-01-01

    textabstractSelective inhibition of tbe rate-limiting step in tbe degradation of tbe inhibitory neurotransmitter Y·aminobutyric acid (GABA) might be of potential use in the treatment of many neurological or psychiatric disorders since it might correct a central GABA deficiency. Alternatively, as suc

  4. Targeting Neuronal Networks with Combined Drug and Stimulation Paradigms Guided by Neuroimaging to Treat Brain Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faingold, Carl L; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2015-10-01

    Improved therapy of brain disorders can be achieved by focusing on neuronal networks, utilizing combined pharmacological and stimulation paradigms guided by neuroimaging. Neuronal networks that mediate normal brain functions, such as hearing, interact with other networks, which is important but commonly neglected. Network interaction changes often underlie brain disorders, including epilepsy. "Conditional multireceptive" (CMR) brain areas (e.g., brainstem reticular formation and amygdala) are critical in mediating neuroplastic changes that facilitate network interactions. CMR neurons receive multiple inputs but exhibit extensive response variability due to milieu and behavioral state changes and are exquisitely sensitive to agents that increase or inhibit GABA-mediated inhibition. Enhanced CMR neuronal responsiveness leads to expression of emergent properties--nonlinear events--resulting from network self-organization. Determining brain disorder mechanisms requires animals that model behaviors and neuroanatomical substrates of human disorders identified by neuroimaging. However, not all sites activated during network operation are requisite for that operation. Other active sites are ancillary, because their blockade does not alter network function. Requisite network sites exhibit emergent properties that are critical targets for pharmacological and stimulation therapies. Improved treatment of brain disorders should involve combined pharmacological and stimulation therapies, guided by neuroimaging, to correct network malfunctions by targeting specific network neurons.

  5. Development of GPCR modulation of GABAergic transmission in chicken nucleus laminaris neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Quan Tang

    Full Text Available Neurons in the nucleus laminaris (NL of birds act as coincidence detectors and encode interaural time difference to localize the sound source in the azimuth plane. GABAergic transmission in a number of CNS nuclei including the NL is subject to a dual modulation by presynaptic GABA(B receptors (GABA(BRs and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs. Here, using in vitro whole-cell patch clamp recordings from acute brain slices of the chick, we characterized the following important but unknown properties pertaining to such a dual modulation: (1 emergence of functional GABA synapses in NL neurons; (2 the temporal onset of neuromodulation mediated by GABA(BRs and mGluRs; and (3 the physiological conditions under which GABA(BRs and mGluRs are activated by endogenous transmitters. We found that (1 GABA(AR-mediated synaptic responses were observed in about half of the neurons at embryonic day 11 (E11; (2 GABA(BR-mediated modulation of the GABAergic transmission was detectable at E11, whereas the modulation by mGluRs did not emerge until E15; and (3 endogenous activity of GABA(BRs was induced by both low- (5 or 10 Hz and high-frequency (200 Hz stimulation of the GABAergic pathway, whereas endogenous activity of mGluRs was induced by high- (200 Hz but not low-frequency (5 or 10 Hz stimulation of the glutamatergic pathway. Furthermore, the endogenous activity of mGluRs was mediated by group II but not group III members. Therefore, autoreceptor-mediated modulation of GABAergic transmission emerges at the same time when the GABA synapses become functional. Heteroreceptor-mediated modulation appears at a later time and is receptor type dependent in vitro.

  6. At immature mossy fibers-CA3 connections, activation of presynaptic GABAB receptors by endogenously released GABA contributes to synapses silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria F Safiulina

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Early in postnatal life correlated GABAergic activity in the hippocampus is thought to play a crucial role in synaptogenesis and in the development of adult neuronal networks. Unlike adulthood, at this developmental stage, mossy fibers (MF which are the axons of granule cells, release GABA into CA3 principal cells and interneurons. Here, we tested the hypothesis that at MF-CA3 connections, tonic activation of GABAB autoreceptors by GABA is responsible for the low probability of release and synapse silencing. Blocking GABAB receptors with CGP55845 enhanced the probability of GABA release and switched on silent synapses while the opposite was observed with baclofen. Both these effects were presynaptic and were associated with changes in paired-pulse ratio and coefficient of variation. In addition, enhancing the extracellular GABA concentration by repetitive stimulation of MF or by blocking the GABA transporter GAT-1, switched off active synapses, an effect that was prevented by CGP55845. In the presence of CGP55845, stimulation of MF induced synaptic potentiation. The shift of EGABA from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction with bumetanide, a blocker of the cation-chloride co-transporter NKCC1, prevented synaptic potentiation and caused synaptic depression, suggesting that the depolarizing action of GABA observed in the presence of CGP55845 is responsible for the potentiating effect. It is proposed that, activation of GABAB receptors by spillover of GABA from MF terminals reduces the probability of release and contributes to synapses silencing. This would act as a filter to prevent excessive activation of the auto-associative CA3 network and the emergence of seizures.

  7. Anterior ventral tegmental area dopaminergic neurons are not involved in the motivational effects of bromocriptine, pramipexole and cocaine in drug-free rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouachikh, Omar; Dieb, Wisam; Durif, Franck; Hafidi, Aziz

    2014-04-01

    Dopamine dysregulation syndrome in Parkinson's disease has been attributed to dopamine replacement therapies and/or a lesion of the dopaminergic system. Dopaminergic neuronal loss targets the substantia nigra and the ventral tegmental area (VTA). We hypothesize that dopamine replacement therapy is responsible for the potential reinforcement effect in Parkinson's disease, by acting on the neuronal reward circuitry. We previously demonstrated that the posterior (p) VTA, which projects to the nucleus accumbens (NAc), is implicated in the motivational effect of dopamine receptor agonists in 6-OHDA bilateral pVTA-lesioned drug-free animals. In the present study we investigated the implication of the anterior (a) VTA in the potential reinforcement effect of dopamine receptor agonists. Using the conditioned place preference (CPP) behavioral paradigm, we investigated the motivational effects of dopamine receptor agonists (bromocriptine and pramipexole), and cocaine in rats with a 6-OHDA bilateral lesion of the aVTA. Bromocriptine and pramipexole did not induce a significant CPP at 1mg/kg in both sham and bilateral 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. However bromocriptine induced CPP only at a dose of 3mg/kg in both animal groups. Moreover cocaine, which is known to increase dopamine release, induced reinforcing effects in both 6-OHDA-lesioned and sham rats. Our data show a lack of involvement of aVTA dopamine neurons in the motivational effects of bromocriptine, pramipexole and cocaine.

  8. Interleukin-1α expression precedes IL-1β after ischemic brain injury and is localised to areas of focal neuronal loss and penumbral tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luheshi Nadia M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral ischemia is a devastating condition in which the outcome is heavily influenced by inflammatory processes, which can augment primary injury caused by reduced blood supply. The cytokines interleukin-1α (IL-1α and IL-1β are key contributors to ischemic brain injury. However, there is very little evidence that IL-1 expression occurs at the protein level early enough (within hours to influence brain damage after stroke. In order to determine this we investigated the temporal and spatial profiles of IL-1α and IL-1β expression after cerebral ischemia. Findings We report here that in mice, as early as 4 h after reperfusion following ischemia induced by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, IL-1α, but not IL-1β, is expressed by microglia-like cells in the ischemic hemisphere, which parallels an upregulation of IL-1α mRNA. 24 h after ischemia IL-1α expression is closely associated with areas of focal blood brain barrier breakdown and neuronal death, mostly near the penumbra surrounding the infarct. The sub-cellular distribution of IL-1α in injured areas is not uniform suggesting that it is regulated. Conclusions The early expression of IL-1α in areas of focal neuronal injury suggests that it is the major form of IL-1 contributing to inflammation early after cerebral ischemia. This adds to the growing body of evidence that IL-1α is a key mediator of the sterile inflammatory response.

  9. Lateral hypothalamic area orexin-A influence the firing activity of gastric distension-sensitive neurons and gastric motility in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Heling; Luan, Xiao; Guo, Feifei; Sun, Xiangrong; Gong, Yanling; Xu, Luo

    2016-06-01

    The orexins system consists of two G-protein coupled receptors (the orexin-1 and the orexin-2 receptor) and two neuropeptides, orexin-A and orexin-B. Orexin-A is an excitatory neuropeptide that regulates arousal, wakefulness and appetite. Recent studies have shown that orexin-A may promote gastric motility. We aim to explore the effects of orexin-A on the gastric -distension (GD) sensitive neurons and gastric motility in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), and the possible regulation by the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Extracellular single unit discharges were recorded and the gastric motility was monitored by administration of orexin-A into the LHA and electrical stimulation of the PVN. There were GD neurons in the LHA, and administration of orexin-A to the LHA could increase the firing rate of both GD-excitatory (GD-E) and GD-inhibited (GD-I) neurons. The gastric motility was significantly enhanced by injection of orexin-A into the LHA with a dose dependent manner, which could be completely abolished by pre-treatment with orexin-A receptor antagonist SB334867. Electrical stimulation of the PVN could significantly increase the firing rate of GD neurons responsive to orexin-A in the LHA as well as promote gastric motility of rats. However, those effects could be partly blocked by pre-treatment with SB334867 in the LHA. It is suggested that orexin-A plays an important role in promoting gastric motility via LHA. The PVN may be involved in regulation of LHA on gastric motility.

  10. Electrical stimulation therapies for CNS disorders and pain are mediated by competition between different neuronal networks in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faingold, Carl L

    2008-11-01

    CNS neuronal networks are known to control normal physiological functions, including locomotion and respiration. Neuronal networks also mediate the pathophysiology of many CNS disorders. Stimulation therapies, including localized brain and vagus nerve stimulation, electroshock, and acupuncture, are proposed to activate "therapeutic" neuronal networks. These therapeutic networks are dormant prior to stimulatory treatments, but when the dormant networks are activated they compete with pathophysiological neuronal networks, disrupting their function. This competition diminishes the disease symptoms, providing effective therapy for otherwise intractable CNS disorders, including epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, chronic pain, and depression. Competition between stimulation-activated therapeutic networks and pathophysiological networks is a major mechanism mediating the therapeutic effects of stimulation. This network interaction is hypothesized to involve competition for "control" of brain regions that contain high proportions of conditional multireceptive (CMR) neurons. CMR regions, including brainstem reticular formation, amygdala, and cerebral cortex, have extensive connections to numerous brain areas, allowing these regions to participate potentially in many networks. The participation of CMR regions in any network is often variable, depending on the conditions affecting the organism, including vigilance states, drug treatment, and learning. This response variability of CMR neurons is due to the high incidence of excitatory postsynaptic potentials that are below threshold for triggering action potentials. These subthreshold responses can be brought to threshold by blocking inhibition or enhancing excitation via the paradigms used in stimulation therapies. Participation of CMR regions in a network is also strongly affected by pharmacological treatments (convulsant or anesthetic drugs) and stimulus parameters (strength and repetition rate). Many studies indicate that

  11. Kisspeptin Excitation of GnRH Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Kisspeptin binding to its cognate G protein-coupled receptor (GPR54, aka Kiss1R) in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons stimulates peptide release and activation of the reproductive axis in mammals. Kisspeptin has pronounced pre- and postsynaptic effects, with the latter dominating the excitability of GnRH neurons. Presynaptically, kisspeptin increases the excitatory drive (both GABA-A and glutamate) to GnRH neurons and postsynaptically, kisspeptin inhibits an A-type and inwardly rectifying K + (Kir 6.2 and GIRK) currents and activates nonselective cation (TRPC) currents to cause long-lasting depolarization and increased action potential firing. The signaling cascades and the multiple intracellular targets of kisspeptin actions in native GnRH neurons are continuing to be elucidated. This review summarizes our current state of knowledge about kisspeptin signaling in GnRH neurons. PMID:23550004

  12. Probing the orthosteric binding site of GABAA receptors with heterocyclic GABA carboxylic acid bioisosteres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jette G; Bergmann, Rikke; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Povl;

    2013-01-01

    selective and potent GABAAR agonists. This review investigates the use of heterocyclic carboxylic acid bioisosteres within the GABAAR area. Several heterocycles including 3-hydroxyisoxazole, 3-hydroxyisoxazoline, 3-hydroxyisothiazole, and the 1- and 3-hydroxypyrazole rings have been employed in order to map...... the orthosteric binding site. The physicochemical properties of the heterocyclic moieties making them suitable for bioisosteric replacement of the carboxylic acid in the molecule of GABA are discussed. A variety of synthetic strategies for synthesis of the heterocyclic scaffolds are available. Likewise, methods...... for introduction of substituents into specific positions of the heterocyclic scaffolds facilitate the investigation of different regions in the orthosteric binding pocket in close vicinity of the core scaffolds of muscimol/GABA. The development of structural models, from pharmacophore models to receptor homology...

  13. [Pharmacological influences on the brain level and transport of GABA. II) Effect of various psychoactive drugs on brain level and uptake of GABA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabana, M A; Varotto, M; Saladini, M; Zanchin, G; Battistin, L

    1981-04-30

    The effects of some psychoactive drugs on the level and uptake of GABA in the mouse brain was studied using well standardized procedures, mainely the silica-gel cromatography for determining the GABA content and the brain slices for measuring GABA uptake. It was found that levomepromazine, sulpiride, haloperidol and amytryptiline were without effects on the cerebral level of GABA; it was also found that these drugs do not influence the rates of uptake of GABA by mouse brain slices. Such results do indicate that the psychoactive drugs studied are without effects on the level and uptake of GABA in the brain.

  14. Chronic infusions of GABA into the medial prefrontal cortex induce spatial alternation deficits in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, S; Galicia, O; Brailowsky, S

    1993-10-21

    It has been proposed that functions associated with the prefrontal cortex could change as a consequence of aging. Previous experiments in young rats have demonstrated that anatomical lesions or chronic GABA infusions into this area produce deficits in spatial delayed alternation tasks. The present study examines the effect of chronic (7 days) GABA or saline infusion into the prefrontal cortex on the performance of delayed alternation task in old rats (24 months). The results suggested that aged rats needed more sessions to acquire the delayed alternation task. GABA infusions into the prefrontal cortex produced deficits in spatial alternation tasks similar to those previously observed in young rats. Performance rapidly recovered after the infusion period. Histological analysis showed similar lesion size in both groups. The results suggest that aged prefrontal cortex and/or related areas participating in the acquisition of the delayed alternation task are more sensitive to aging processes. Furthermore, the prefrontal cortex is important for the retention of a previously learned spatial delayed alternation task. The structures involved in functional recovery from these deficits appear to be fully functional in aged rats.

  15. Improved estimates for the role of grey matter volume and GABA in bistable perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Kristian; Blicher, Jakob Udby; Del Pin, Simon Hviid; Andersen, Lau Møller; Rees, Geraint; Kanai, Ryota

    2016-10-01

    Across a century or more, ambiguous stimuli have been studied scientifically because they provide a method for studying the internal mechanisms of the brain while ensuring an unchanging external stimulus. In recent years, several studies have reported correlations between perceptual dynamics during bistable perception and particular brain characteristics such as the grey matter volume of areas in the superior parietal lobule (SPL) and the relative GABA concentration in the occipital lobe. Here, we attempt to replicate previous results using similar paradigms to those used in the studies first reporting the correlations. Using the original findings as priors for Bayesian analyses, we found strong support for the correlation between structure-from-motion percept duration and anterior SPL grey matter volume. Correlations between percept duration and other parietal areas as well as occipital GABA, however, were not directly replicated or appeared less strong than previous studies suggested. Inspection of the posterior distributions (current "best guess" based on new data given old data as prior) revealed that several original findings may reflect true relationships although no direct evidence was found in support of them in the current sample. Additionally, we found that multiple regression models based on grey matter volume at 2-3 parietal locations (but not including GABA) were the best predictors of percept duration, explaining approximately 35% of the inter-individual variance. Taken together, our results provide new estimates of correlation strengths, generally increasing confidence in the role of the aSPL while decreasing confidence in some of the other relationships.

  16. GABA[subscript A] Receptor Downregulation in Brains of Subjects with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels responsible for mediation of fast inhibitory action of GABA in the brain. Preliminary reports have demonstrated altered expression of GABA receptors in the brains of subjects with autism suggesting GABA/glutamate system dysregulation. We investigated the…

  17. How and why does tomato accumulate a large amount of GABA in the fruit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko eTakayama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA has received much attention as a health-promoting functional compound, and several GABA-enriched foods have been commercialized. In higher plants, GABA is primarily metabolized via a short pathway called the GABA shunt. The GABA shunt bypasses two steps (the oxidation of α-ketoglutarate to succinate of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle via reactions catalysed by three enzymes: glutamate decarboxylase (GAD, GABA transaminase (GABA-T and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH. The GABA shunt plays a major role in primary carbon and nitrogen metabolism and is an integral part of the TCA cycle under stress and non-stress conditions. Tomato is one of the major crops that accumulate a relatively high level of GABA in its fruits. The GABA levels in tomato fruits dramatically change during fruit development; the GABA levels increase from flowering to the mature green stage and then rapidly decrease during the ripening stage. Although GABA constitutes up to 50% of the free amino acids at the mature green stage, the molecular mechanism of GABA accumulation and the physiological function of GABA during tomato fruit development remain unclear. In this review, we summarize recent studies of GABA accumulation in tomato fruits and discuss the potential biological roles of GABA in tomato fruit development.

  18. GABAA receptor-expressing neurons promote consumption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Samantha K.

    2017-01-01

    Feeding decisions are highly plastic and bidirectionally regulated by neurons that either promote or inhibit feeding. In Drosophila melanogaster, recent studies have identified four GABAergic interneurons that act as critical brakes to prevent incessant feeding. These GABAergic neurons may inhibit target neurons that drive consumption. Here, we tested this hypothesis by examining GABA receptors and neurons that promote consumption. We find that Resistance to dieldrin (RDL), a GABAA type receptor, is required for proper control of ingestion. Knockdown of Rdl in a subset of neurons causes overconsumption of tastants. Acute activation of these neurons is sufficient to drive consumption of appetitive substances and non-appetitive substances and acute silencing of these neurons decreases consumption. Taken together, these studies identify GABAA receptor-expressing neurons that promote Drosophila ingestive behavior and provide insight into feeding regulation. PMID:28362856

  19. An Electrostatic Funnel in the GABA-Binding Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy S Carpenter

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAA-R is a major inhibitory neuroreceptor that is activated by the binding of GABA. The structure of the GABAA-R is well characterized, and many of the binding site residues have been identified. However, most of these residues are obscured behind the C-loop that acts as a cover to the binding site. Thus, the mechanism by which the GABA molecule recognizes the binding site, and the pathway it takes to enter the binding site are both unclear. Through the completion and detailed analysis of 100 short, unbiased, independent molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated this phenomenon of GABA entering the binding site. In each system, GABA was placed quasi-randomly near the binding site of a GABAA-R homology model, and atomistic simulations were carried out to observe the behavior of the GABA molecules. GABA fully entered the binding site in 19 of the 100 simulations. The pathway taken by these molecules was consistent and non-random; the GABA molecules approach the binding site from below, before passing up behind the C-loop and into the binding site. This binding pathway is driven by long-range electrostatic interactions, whereby the electrostatic field acts as a 'funnel' that sweeps the GABA molecules towards the binding site, at which point more specific atomic interactions take over. These findings define a nuanced mechanism whereby the GABAA-R uses the general zwitterionic features of the GABA molecule to identify a potential ligand some 2 nm away from the binding site.

  20. SPECT imaging of GABA{sub A}/benzodiazepine receptors and cerebral perfusion in mild cognitive impairment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pappata, Sabina; Varrone, Andrea; Vicidomini, Caterina; Sansone, Valeria; Comerci, Marco; Panico, Maria Rosaria; Quarantelli, Mario [CNR, Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, Naples (Italy); Milan, Graziella; De Falco, Caterina; Lore, Elisa; Postiglione, Alfredo [University ' ' Federico II' ' , Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Naples (Italy); Iavarone, Alessandro [Neurologic and Stroke Unit, CTO Hospital, Naples (Italy); Salvatore, Marco [CNR, Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, Naples (Italy); University ' ' Federico II' ' , Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Naples (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    The involvement of neocortical and limbic GABA{sub A}/benzodiazepine (BZD) receptors in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is controversial and mainly reported in advanced stages. The status of these receptors in the very early stages of AD is unclear and has not been explored in vivo. Our aims were to investigate in vivo the integrity of cerebral cortical GABA{sub A}/BZD receptors in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and to compare possible receptor changes to those in cerebral perfusion. [{sup 123}I]Iomazenil and [{sup 99m}Tc]HMPAO SPECT images were acquired in 16 patients with amnestic MCI and in 14 normal elderly control subjects (only [{sup 123}I]iomazenil imaging in 5, only [{sup 99m}Tc]HMPAO imaging in 4, and both [{sup 123}I]iomazenil and [{sup 99m}Tc]HMPAO imaging in 5). Region of interest (ROI) analysis and voxel-based analysis were performed with cerebellar normalization. Neither ROI analysis nor voxel-based analysis showed significant [{sup 123}I]iomazenil binding changes in MCI patients compared to control subjects, either as a whole group or when considering only those patients with MCI that converted to AD within 2 years of clinical follow-up. In contrast, the ROI analysis revealed significant hypoperfusion of the precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex in the whole group of MCI patients and in MCI converters as compared to control subjects. Voxel-based analysis showed similar results. These results indicate that in the very early stages of AD, neocortical and limbic neurons/synapses expressing GABA{sub A}/BZD receptors are essentially preserved. They suggest that in MCI patients functional changes precede neuronal/synaptic loss in neocortical posterior regions and that [{sup 99m}Tc]HMPAO rCBF imaging is more sensitive than [{sup 123}I]iomazenil GABA{sub A}/BZD receptor imaging in detecting prodromal AD. (orig.)

  1. Investigating the Role of Glutamate and GABA in the Modulation of Transthalamic Activity: A Combined fMRI-fMRS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, Nathalie; Sonnay, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    The Excitatory-Inhibitory balance (EIB) between glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons is known to regulate the function of thalamocortical neurocircuits. The thalamus is known as an important relay for glutamatergic and GABAergic signals ascending/descending to/from the somatosensory cortex in rodents. However, new investigations attribute a larger role to thalamic nuclei as modulators of information processing within the cortex. In this study, functional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (fMRS) was used to measure glutamate (Glu) and GABA associations with BOLD responses during activation of the thalamus to barrel cortex (S1BF) pathway at 9.4T. In line with previous studies in humans, resting GABA and Glu correlated negatively and positively respectively with BOLD responses in S1BF. Moreover, a significant negative correlation (R = −0.68, p = 0.0024) between BOLD responses in the thalamus and the barrel cortex was found. Rats with low Glu levels and high resting GABA levels in S1BF demonstrated lower BOLD responses in S1BF and high amplitude BOLD responses in the thalamus themselves linked to the release of high GABA levels during stimulation. In addition, early analysis of resting state functional connectivity suggested EIB controlled thalamocortical neuronal synchrony. We propose that the presented approach may be useful for further characterization of diseases affecting thalamocortical neurotransmission. PMID:28197105

  2. Cloning and sequencing of mouse GABA transporter complementary DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAMANTHONYC.W.; LIHEGUO; 等

    1994-01-01

    A cDNA encoding the mouse GABA transporter has been isolated and sequenced.The results show that the mouse GABA transporter cDNA differs from that of the rat by 60 base pairs at the open reading frame region but the deduced amino acid sequences of the two cDNAs are identical and both composed of 599 amino acids.However,the amino acid sequence is different from the sequence deduced from a recently published mouse GABA transporter cDNA.

  3. Area-specific effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) genetic ablation on various neuronal subtypes of the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Gisela; Djalali, Susann; Deng, Dong Rui; Höltje, Markus; Hinz, Britta; Schwartzkopff, Katharina; Cygon, Marcel; Rothe, Thomas; Stroh, Thomas; Hellweg, Rainer; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun; Hörtnag, Heide

    2005-05-12

    The effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on the development of presynaptic terminals and of neuronal subtypes in various brain areas were studied in BDNF-knockout (BDNF-/-) mice at postnatal days 15-17. Western analysis revealed no changes in the overall amount of a variety of synaptic proteins in BDNF-/- mice as compared to wild type mice. In addition, the complex between the vesicular proteins, synaptophysin and synaptobrevin, as well as their respective homodimers were unaltered. Moreover, no changes in the density of neurons were found in, e.g., the CA3 region of the hippocampus and the nucleus nervi facialis of BDNF-/- mice. However, cholinergic cells were reduced by 20% in the medial septum of BDNF-/- mice associated with a decrease in the activity of choline acetyltransferase and protein levels of nerve growth factor in the hippocampus by 16% and 44%, respectively. In the striatum, however, the total number of cholinergic cells were comparable in both groups, although the activity of choline acetyltransferase was decreased by 46%. In GABAergic interneurons, the expression of neuropeptides in various brain areas was differentially affected by BDNF deletion as revealed by immunohistochemistry. In the hippocampus and cortex of BDNF-/- mice, the density of neuropeptide Y-, somatostatin-, and parvalbumin-immunoreactive cells was drastically reduced, whereas the density of calretinin-positive cells was increased. The extent of these changes in neuropeptide-containing cells varied among hippocampal subregions. In the striatum, only the density of parvalbumin-immunoreactive cells was decreased by approximately 45%. In conclusion, BDNF deficiency is accompanied by a differential dysregulation in the expression of neuropeptides and calcium-binding proteins in otherwise intact GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons in a region-specific manner.

  4. Reciprocal cholinergic and GABAergic modulation of the small ventrolateral pacemaker neurons of Drosophila's circadian clock neuron network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelito, Katherine R; Shafer, Orie T

    2012-04-01

    The relatively simple clock neuron network of Drosophila is a valuable model system for the neuronal basis of circadian timekeeping. Unfortunately, many key neuronal classes of this network are inaccessible to electrophysiological analysis. We have therefore adopted the use of genetically encoded sensors to address the physiology of the fly's circadian clock network. Using genetically encoded Ca(2+) and cAMP sensors, we have investigated the physiological responses of two specific classes of clock neuron, the large and small ventrolateral neurons (l- and s-LN(v)s), to two neurotransmitters implicated in their modulation: acetylcholine (ACh) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Live imaging of l-LN(v) cAMP and Ca(2+) dynamics in response to cholinergic agonist and GABA application were well aligned with published electrophysiological data, indicating that our sensors were capable of faithfully reporting acute physiological responses to these transmitters within single adult clock neuron soma. We extended these live imaging methods to s-LN(v)s, critical neuronal pacemakers whose physiological properties in the adult brain are largely unknown. Our s-LN(v) experiments revealed the predicted excitatory responses to bath-applied cholinergic agonists and the predicted inhibitory effects of GABA and established that the antagonism of ACh and GABA extends to their effects on cAMP signaling. These data support recently published but physiologically untested models of s-LN(v) modulation and lead to the prediction that cholinergic and GABAergic inputs to s-LN(v)s will have opposing effects on the phase and/or period of the molecular clock within these critical pacemaker neurons.

  5. Inhibition of GABA-activated Currents by Cannabinoids in Rat Trigeminal Neurons%大麻素对大鼠三叉神经节神经元γ-氨基丁酸激活电流的抑制作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周莹; 刘长金; 李爱; 胡新武; 陈蕾; 刘烈炬

    2007-01-01

    目的 探讨人工合成大麻素WIN55,212-2对大鼠三叉神经节神经元γ-氨基丁酸(GABA)激活电流(IGABA)的调制作用.方法 采用全细胞膜片钳技术.结果 ①实验中大部分受检细胞(91.84%,99/108)对胞外给予GABA(10~1 000 μmol/L)敏感,可记录到具有浓度依赖性的内向电流,该电流可被GABAA受体特异性拮抗剂荷包牡丹碱(Bicuculline)阻断.②预加WIN55,212-2(0.03~10μmol/L)对IGABA产生抑制作用,该抑制作用呈可逆性、浓度依赖性和非电压依赖性.WIN55,212-2使IGABA的量效曲线明显下移,而两者的阈值基本不变;最大反应浓度时IGABA幅值减少了(48.83±4.78)%;两条曲线的半数有效浓度(EC50)值比较接近(36.85 μmol/L vs 25.76μmol/L).③WIN55,212-2对IGABA的抑制作用可被大麻素CB1受体选择性拮抗剂AM281阻断,不能被大麻素CB2受体选择性拮抗剂AM630阻断.细胞外灌流蛋白激酶C(PKC)的抑制剂BIM可部分逆转WIN55,212-2对IGABA的抑制作用.结论 大麻素WIN55,212-2作用于CB1受体,部分通过激活PKC途径来减少GABAA受体介导的电流,加强突触前抑制作用,这可能是大麻素的外周镇痛机制之一.

  6. Connections between 5-HT-containing terminals and 5-HT2A receptor and γ-aminobutyric acid or glycine co-existed neurons in the rat medullary dorsal horn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui; LI Yun-qing

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the connections between serotonin (5-HT)-containing terminals and 5-HT2A receptor (5-HT2AR)/γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or 5-HT2AR/glycine co-existed neurons in the rat medullary dorsal horn (MDH).Methods: Immunofluorescence histochemical triple-staining for 5-HT, 5-HT2AR, GABA or glycine. Results: 5-HT-immunoreaetive fibers and terminals were chiefly located in the superficial laminae (laminae Ⅰ and Ⅱ) of the MDH. Neurons exhibiting 5-HT2AR-, GABA- or glycine-immunoreactivities were mainly observed in the superficial laminae. Some 5-HT2AR-immunopositive neurons also exhibited GABA- or glycine-immunoreaetivities. 5-HT-containing terminals made close contacts with 5-HT2AR/GABA or 5-HT2AR/glycine co-existed neurons. Conclusion: 5-HT2AR/GABA or 5-HT2AR /glycine co-exist in some of the neurons in the superficial laminae of the MDH. 5-HT-immunoreactive terminals form close connections with 5-HT2AR/GABA or 5-HT2AR/glycine co-existed neurons.

  7. Roles of forebrain GABA receptors in controlling vasopressin secretion and related phenomena under basal and hyperosmotic circumstances in conscious rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Ken'ichi; Yamada, Takaho

    2008-09-05

    Although the anteroventral third ventricular region (AV3V), a forebrain area essential for homeostatic responses, includes receptors for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the roles of these receptors in controlling vasopressin (AVP) secretion and related phenomena have not been clarified as yet. This study aimed to pursue this problem in conscious rats implanted with indwelling catheters. Cerebral injection sites were determined histologically. Applications of bicuculline, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, to the AV3V induced prompt and marked augmentations in plasma AVP, osmolality, glucose, arterial pressure and heart rate, without affecting plasma electrolytes. Such phenomena did not occur when phaclofen, a GABA(B) receptor antagonist, was applied to the AV3V. All of the effects of AV3V-administered bicuculline were abolished by preadministration of the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol. Preadministration of either MK-801 or NBQX, ionotropic glutamatergic receptor antagonists, was also potent to abolish the AVP response to AV3V bicuculline. When hypertonic saline was infused intravenously, plasma AVP increased progressively, in parallel with rises in plasma osmolality, sodium and arterial pressure. AV3V application of muscimol or baclofen, a GABA(B) receptor agonist, was found to abolish the response of plasma AVP, without inhibiting that of the osmolality or sodium. The response of arterial pressure was also blocked by muscimol treatment, but not by baclofen treatment. Based on these results, we concluded that, under basal conditions, GABA receptors in the AV3V or vicinity may tonically operate to attenuate AVP secretion and cardiovascular functions through mechanisms associated with glutamatergic activity, and that plasma hyperosmolality may cause facilitation of AVP release by decreasing forebrain GABAergic activity.

  8. Effect of Testosterone on Neuronal Morphology and Neuritic Growth of Fetal Lamb Hypothalamus-Preoptic Area and Cerebral Cortex in Primary Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika C Reddy

    Full Text Available Testosterone plays an essential role in sexual differentiation of the male sheep brain. The ovine sexually dimorphic nucleus (oSDN, is 2 to 3 times larger in males than in females, and this sex difference is under the control of testosterone. The effect of testosterone on oSDN volume may result from enhanced expansion of soma areas and/or dendritic fields. To test this hypothesis, cells derived from the hypothalamus-preoptic area (HPOA and cerebral cortex (CTX of lamb fetuses were grown in primary culture to examine the direct morphological effects of testosterone on these cellular components. We found that within two days of plating, neurons derived from both the HPOA and CTX extend neuritic processes and express androgen receptors and aromatase immunoreactivity. Both treated and control neurites continue to grow and branch with increasing time in culture. Treatment with testosterone (10 nM for 3 days significantly (P < 0.05 increased both total neurite outgrowth (35% and soma size (8% in the HPOA and outgrowth (21% and number of branch points (33% in the CTX. These findings indicate that testosterone-induced somal enlargement and neurite outgrowth in fetal lamb neurons may contribute to the development of a fully masculine sheep brain.

  9. Reduced parahippocampal and lateral temporal GABA{sub A}-[{sup 11}C]flumazenil binding in major depression: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klumpers, Ursula M.H. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam (Netherlands); GGZ inGeest, partner of VUmc, Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Veltman, Dick J. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Drent, Madeleine L. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Endocrinology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boellaard, Ronald; Lammertsma, Adriaan A. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Research, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Comans, Emile F.I. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Research, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meynen, Gerben [VU University Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hoogendijk, Witte J.G. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-03-15

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) has been related to both a dysfunctional {gamma}-amino butyric acid (GABA) system and to hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA). Although GABA has been suggested to inhibit HPA axis activity, their relationship has never been studied at the level of the central GABA{sub A}-benzodiazepine receptor in depressed patients or in relation to antidepressant treatment. Eleven depressed outpatients were compared, before and after treatment with citalopram, with nine age-matched healthy controls. The subjects were scanned using the positron emission tomography (PET) tracer [{sup 11}C]flumazenil ([{sup 11}C]FMZ). Parametric voxel-by-voxel Logan plots were compared with methods based on regions of interest (ROI), to provide volume of distribution (V{sub T}) and binding potential (BP{sub ND}) values. Plasma GABA levels were determined and a dexamethasone-corticotropin releasing hormone (DEX-CRH) test was performed. In MDD, parametric voxel-by-voxel Logan plots showed bilateral reduced [{sup 11}C]FMZ binding in the parahippocampal gyrus and right lateral superior temporal gyrus (p uncorrected {<=}0.001). In the temporal area, [{sup 11}C]FMZ binding showed a strong inverse correlation with HPA axis activity. Plasma GABA did not discriminate MDD from controls, but correlated inversely with [{sup 11}C]FMZ binding in the right insula. Following treatment with citalopram, voxel-based analysis revealed reduced binding in the right lateral temporal gyrus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. The bilateral reduction in limbic parahippocampal and right temporal [{sup 11}C]FMZ binding found in MDD indicates decreased GABA{sub A}-benzodiazepine receptor complex affinity and/or number. The inverse relationship between GABA{sub A} binding in the temporal lobe and HPA axis activity, suggests that HPA axis hyperactivity is partly due to reduced GABA-ergic inhibition. (orig.)

  10. Low nanomolar GABA effects at extrasynaptic a4ß1/ß3delta GABAA receptor subtypes indicate a different binding mode for GABA at these receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karim, Nasiara; Wellendorph, Petrine; Absalom, Nathan;

    2012-01-01

    Ionotropic GABA(A) receptors are a highly heterogenous population of receptors assembled from a combination of multiple subunits. The aims of this study were to characterize the potency of GABA at human recombinant d-containing extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes using th...

  11. Chemical integrity of ( sup 3 H)GABA used in binding studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcar, V.J. (Univ. of Sydney, N.S.W. (Australia))

    1989-07-01

    A method which is claimed to be able to determine the proportion of true GABA within radiolabeled GABA used in binding studies was tested using (3H)GABA. The method was found to be unsuitable for {sup 3}H-labeled GABA and, furthermore, both theoretical considerations and the present experimental data indicated that it could also produce misleading results with ({sup 14}C)GABA.

  12. Transmedulla Neurons in the Sky Compass Network of the Honeybee (Apis mellifera) Are a Possible Site of Circadian Input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Maximilian; Held, Martina; Bender, Julia; Berz, Annuska; Heinloth, Tanja; Hellfritz, Timm; Pfeiffer, Keram

    2015-01-01

    Honeybees are known for their ability to use the sun's azimuth and the sky's polarization pattern for spatial orientation. Sky compass orientation in bees has been extensively studied at the behavioral level but our knowledge about the underlying neuronal systems and mechanisms is very limited. Electrophysiological studies in other insect species suggest that neurons of the sky compass system integrate information about the polarization pattern of the sky, its chromatic gradient, and the azimuth of the sun. In order to obtain a stable directional signal throughout the day, circadian changes between the sky polarization pattern and the solar azimuth must be compensated. Likewise, the system must be modulated in a context specific way to compensate for changes in intensity, polarization and chromatic properties of light caused by clouds, vegetation and landscape. The goal of this study was to identify neurons of the sky compass pathway in the honeybee brain and to find potential sites of circadian and neuromodulatory input into this pathway. To this end we first traced the sky compass pathway from the polarization-sensitive dorsal rim area of the compound eye via the medulla and the anterior optic tubercle to the lateral complex using dye injections. Neurons forming this pathway strongly resembled neurons of the sky compass pathway in other insect species. Next we combined tracer injections with immunocytochemistry against the circadian neuropeptide pigment dispersing factor and the neuromodulators serotonin, and γ-aminobutyric acid. We identified neurons, connecting the dorsal rim area of the medulla to the anterior optic tubercle, as a possible site of neuromodulation and interaction with the circadian system. These neurons have conspicuous spines in close proximity to pigment dispersing factor-, serotonin-, and GABA-immunoreactive neurons. Our data therefore show for the first time a potential interaction site between the sky compass pathway and the circadian

  13. PROJECTION OF GABA-IMMUNOREACTIVE NEURONS IN ABDUCENS AND VESTIBULAR NUCLEUS TO OCULOMOTOR NUCLEUS IN RATS%大鼠展神经核和前庭神经核内GABA反应神经元向动眼神经核的投射

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严瑛; 迟焕芳; 王守彪; 梅光东; 倪同上; 祝捷

    2007-01-01

    用辣根过氧化物酶(horseradish peroxidase, HRP)逆行标记结合γ-氨基丁酸(γ-amino-butyric acid,GABA)的免疫组织化学双标技术观察大鼠的展神经核和前庭神经核内GABA阳性神经元的分布,以及其向动眼神经核的投射.结果表明:注射HRP于大鼠动眼神经核内直肌亚核后,在对侧展神经核区以及前庭神经核、脑桥旁正中网状结构中发现HRP单标记细胞;在前庭神经核内,可见HRP单标记、GABA阳性和HRP/GABA双标记三类神经元,其中HRP/GABA双标记细胞占HRP标记细胞总数的47.1%.结果表明GABA在前庭神经核向动眼神经核的抑制性投射中起一定作用,而在展神经核向动眼神经核投射的核间通路中,可能不是起主要作用的抑制性神经递质.

  14. Kv3-Like Potassium Channels Are Required for Sustained High-Frequency Firing in Basal Ganglia Output Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Shengyuan; Matta, Shannon G.; Zhou, Fu-Ming

    2010-01-01

    The GABA projection neurons in the substantial nigra pars reticulata (SNr) are key output neurons of the basal ganglia motor control circuit. These neurons fire sustained high-frequency, short-duration spikes that provide a tonic inhibition to their targets and are critical to movement control. We hypothesized that a robust voltage-activated K+ conductance that activates quickly and resists inactivation is essential to the remarkable fast-spiking capability in these neurons. Semi-quantitative...

  15. The language of GABA in pollen tube growth and guidance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanghui YU; Yan CHEN

    2008-01-01

    The achievement of double fertilization in higher plants requires the successful transport of sperm cells to the female gametes, the ovules. Pollen tubes, the tubular structure protruding from pollens, carrying the sperms play an important role in this process. How a pollen tube precisely guides its direction to gain its goal is of mystery. Previous investigation indicated that mul-tiple signal clues from the pistils function as the route signs to regulate the pathway of pollen tube growth. Among the signal clues, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) seems to be universal. Its gradient concentration has been found both in tobacco and Arabidopsis pollen tube guid-ance. In the communication of pollens and pistils, what on earth GABA tells pollen tubes is of great interest. The GABA receptors on the pollen membrane are thought to be the hinge in the language conversation. In this review, the mechanism of GABA gradient formation is investigated. The possible GABA receptor on the pollen membrane is examined and its function is discussed. To decipher the possible language of GABA in pollen tube growth and guidance, multiple methods are needed. The combination of transcriptome and proteomics assay is expected to unveil the secret.

  16. Pharmacological characterization of homobaclofen on wild type and mutant GABA(B)1b receptors coexpressed with the GABA(B)2 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Madsen, Bo E.; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P;

    2001-01-01

    Homobaclofen (5-amino-3-(4-chlorophenyl) pentanoic acid) is a homologue of the classical GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen. In a recent study, the two enantiomers of this compound were tested in a GABA(B) receptor selective [3H]gamma-aminobutyric acid ([3H]GABA) binding assay using rat brain homo...

  17. Co-Localization of GABA Shunt Enzymes for the Efficient Production of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid via GABA Shunt Pathway in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Van Dung; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Park, Si Jae; Lee, Seung Hwan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-04-28

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-protein amino acid, which is an important inhibitor of neurotransmission in the human brain. GABA is also used as the precursor of biopolymer Nylon-4 production. In this study, the carbon flux from the tricarboxylic acid cycle was directed to the GABA shunt pathway for the production of GABA from glucose. The GABA shunt enzymes succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (GabD) and GABA aminotransferase (GabT) were co-localized along with the GABA transporter (GadC) by using a synthetic scaffold complex. The co-localized enzyme scaffold complex produced 0.71 g/l of GABA from 10 g/l of glucose. Inactivation of competing metabolic pathways in mutant E. coli strains XBM1 and XBM6 increased GABA production 13% to reach 0.80 g/l GABA by the enzymes co-localized and expressed in the mutant strains. The recombinant E. coli system developed in this study demonstrated the possibility of the pathway of the GABA shunt as a novel GABA production pathway.

  18. GABA-A Inhibition Shapes the Spatial and Temporal Response Properties of Purkinje Cells in the Macaque Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo M. Blazquez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Data from in vitro and anesthetized preparations indicate that inhibition plays a major role in cerebellar cortex function. We investigated the role of GABA-A inhibition in the macaque cerebellar ventral-paraflocculus while animals performed oculomotor behaviors that are known to engage the circuit. We recorded Purkinje cell responses to these behaviors with and without application of gabazine, a GABA-A receptor antagonist, near the recorded neuron. Gabazine increased the neuronal responsiveness to saccades in all directions and the neuronal gain to VOR cancellation and pursuit, most significantly the eye and head velocity sensitivity. L-glutamate application indicated that these changes were not the consequence of increases in baseline firing rate. Importantly, gabazine did not affect behavior or efference copy, suggesting that only local computations were disrupted. Our data, collected while the cerebellum performs behaviorally relevant computations, indicate that inhibition is a potent regulatory mechanism for the control of input-output gain and spatial tuning in the cerebellar cortex.

  19. Kv3-like potassium channels are required for sustained high-frequency firing in basal ganglia output neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shengyuan; Matta, Shannon G; Zhou, Fu-Ming

    2011-02-01

    The GABA projection neurons in the substantial nigra pars reticulata (SNr) are key output neurons of the basal ganglia motor control circuit. These neurons fire sustained high-frequency, short-duration spikes that provide a tonic inhibition to their targets and are critical to movement control. We hypothesized that a robust voltage-activated K(+) conductance that activates quickly and resists inactivation is essential to the remarkable fast-spiking capability in these neurons. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis on laser capture-microdissected nigral neurons indicated that mRNAs for Kv3.1 and Kv3.4, two key subunits for forming high activation threshold, fast-activating, slow-inactivating, 1 mM tetraethylammonium (TEA)-sensitive, fast delayed rectifier (I(DR-fast)) type Kv channels, are more abundant in fast-spiking SNr GABA neurons than in slow-spiking nigral dopamine neurons. Nucleated patch clamp recordings showed that SNr GABA neurons have a strong Kv3-like I(DR-fast) current sensitive to 1 mM TEA that activates quickly at depolarized membrane potentials and is resistant to inactivation. I(DR-fast) is smaller in nigral dopamine neurons. Pharmacological blockade of I(DR-fast) by 1 mM TEA impaired the high-frequency firing capability in SNr GABA neurons. Taken together, these results indicate that Kv3-like channels mediating fast-activating, inactivation-resistant I(DR-fast) current are critical to the sustained high-frequency firing in SNr GABA projection neurons and hence movement control.

  20. Thalamic posterior ventral neurons with bifurcating axons to the first and second somatosensory areas in the cat, demonstrated by the fluorescent retrograde double labeling technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanagihara,Mamoru

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available The thalamic posterior ventral neurons with bifurcating axons to both the first and second somatosensory cortical areas (SI and SII in the cat were examined by the fluorescent retrograde double labeling technique. After injection of Evans blue (EB into the SI, and of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindol.2HCl (DAPI into the SII of the same hemisphere, EB- and DAPI-labeled cells were observed predominantly in both the posterolateral ventral and the posteromedial ventral nuclei of the thalamus. Although EB single-labeled and DAPI single-labeled cells tended to occupy separate regions within the posterior ventral nuclei, a small number of cells double-labeled with both EB and DAPI were detected in the border zone between two single-labeled cell groups. These observations indicate that some cells in the posteromedial and posterolateral ventral nuclei project both to the SI and SII by bifurcating axons.

  1. Differential distribution of glutamate- and GABA-gated chloride channels in the housefly Musca domestica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Tomo; Ozoe, Fumiyo; Azuma, Masaaki; Ozoe, Yoshihisa

    2013-09-01

    l-Glutamic acid (glutamate) mediates fast inhibitory neurotransmission by affecting glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls) in invertebrates. The molecular function and pharmacological properties of GluCls have been well studied, but not much is known about their physiological role and localization in the insect body. The distribution of GluCls in the housefly (Musca domestica L.) was thus compared with the distribution of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channels (GABACls). Quantitative PCR and ligand-binding experiments indicate that the GluCl and GABACl transcripts and proteins are predominantly expressed in the adult head. Intense GluCl immunostaining was detected in the lamina, leg motor neurons, and legs of adult houseflies. The GABACl (Rdl) immunostaining was more widely distributed, and was found in the medulla, lobula, lobula plate, mushroom body, antennal lobe, and ellipsoid body. The present findings suggest that GluCls have physiological roles in different tissues than GABACls.

  2. The Glutamine Transporters and Their Role in the Glutamate/GABA-Glutamine Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leke, Renata; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine is a key amino acid in the CNS, playing an important role in the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle (GGC). In the GGC, glutamine is transferred from astrocytes to neurons, where it will replenish the inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitter pools. Different transporters participate...... acids and cationic amino acids (y(+)LAT2 isoform) and have been associated with glutamine efflux from astrocytes. ASCT2 is a Na(+)-dependent antiporter, the participation of which in the GGC also remains to be better characterized. All these isoforms are tightly regulated by transcriptional...... and translational mechanisms, which are induced by several determinants such as amino acid deprivation, hormones, pH, and the activity of different signaling pathways. Dysfunctional glutamine transporter activity has been associated with the pathophysiological mechanisms of certain neurologic diseases...

  3. Development of layer 1 neurons in the mouse neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian; Yao, Xing-Hua; Fu, Yinghui; Yu, Yong-Chun

    2014-10-01

    Layer 1 of the neocortex harbors a unique group of neurons that play crucial roles in synaptic integration and information processing. Although extensive studies have characterized the properties of layer 1 neurons in the mature neocortex, it remains unclear how these neurons progressively acquire their distinct morphological, neurochemical, and physiological traits. In this study, we systematically examined the dynamic development of Cajal-Retzius cells and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons in layer 1 during the first 2 postnatal weeks. Cajal-Retzius cells underwent morphological degeneration after birth and gradually disappeared from layer 1. The majority of GABAergic interneurons showed clear expression of at least 1 of the 6 distinct neurochemical markers, including Reelin, GABA-A receptor subunit delta (GABAARδ), neuropeptide Y, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), calretinin, and somatostatin from postnatal day 8. Furthermore, according to firing pattern, layer 1 interneurons can be divided into 2 groups: late-spiking (LS) and burst-spiking (BS) neurons. LS neurons preferentially expressed GABAARδ, whereas BS neurons preferentially expressed VIP. Interestingly, both LS and BS neurons exhibited a rapid electrophysiological and morphological development during the first postnatal week. Our results provide new insights into the molecular, morphological, and functional developments of the neurons in layer 1 of the neocortex.

  4. Seizures beget seizures: the quest for GABA as a key player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2006-01-01

    Synapses mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptors are notoriously altered during periods of enhanced activity. Since a loss of inhibitory tone is a basic cause of seizures and epilepsies, it is important to determine the underlying mechanisms and the way this could be alleviated or at least reduced. Alterations of the intracellular content of chloride are thought to be a major player in the sequence of events that follow episodes of hyperactivity. In this review, I discuss these mechanisms both in the adult and developing brain, relying on studies in which chloride and GABAergic currents were measured by electrophysiological and imaging techniques. The main conclusion is that in adult systems, status epilepticus induces a complete re-organization of the networks, with cell death, axonal growth, and glutamatergic neosynapse formation leading to an increased glutamatergic drive. This, in turn, will decrease the threshold of seizure generation and thus contribute to seizure generation. In contrast, GABAergic synapses are not readily "plastic" as the lost interneurones and synapses are not replaced. Somatostatin-positive 0-LM Interneurons that innervate the dendrites of the principal cells in the hippocampus degenerate selectively, leading to a loss of the inhibitory drive in the dendrites, whereas somatic projecting basket cells and somatic inhibitory drives are relatively spared. This imbalance leads to a reduction of the inhibitory strength that is necessary but not sufficient to generate ongoing seizures. An additional important factor is the persistent increase of the intracellular chloride concentration that leads to a long-lasting shift in the depolarizing direction of the actions of GABA that will also contribute to seizure generation. In the developing brain, a major source of seizure generation is the depolarizing and often excitatory actions of GABA due to a higher intracellular chloride concentration ([Cl-]I) in immature neurons, a property

  5. Parvalbumin and Neuropeptide Y Expressing Hippocampal GABA-ergic Inhibitory Interneuron Numbers Decline in a Model of Gulf War illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarick eMegahed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive dysfunction is amongst the most conspicuous symptoms in Gulf war illness (GWI. Combined exposure to the nerve gas antidote pyridostigmine bromide, pesticides and stress during the Persian Gulf War-1 are presumed to be among the major causes of GWI. Indeed, our recent studies in rat models have shown that exposure to GWI-related (GWIR chemicals and mild stress for four weeks engenders cognitive impairments accompanied with several detrimental changes in the hippocampus. In this study, we tested whether reduced numbers of hippocampal gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA-ergic interneurons are among the pathological changes induced by GWIR-chemicals and stress. Animals were exposed to low doses of GWIR-chemicals and mild stress for four weeks. Three months after this exposure, subpopulations of GABA-ergic interneurons expressing the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (PV, the neuropeptide Y (NPY and somatostatin (SS in the hippocampus were stereologically quantified. Animals exposed to GWIR-chemicals and stress for four weeks displayed reduced numbers of PV-expressing GABA-ergic interneurons in the dentate gyrus and NPY-expressing interneurons in the CA1 and CA3 subfields. However, no changes in SS+ interneuron population were observed in the hippocampus. Furthermore, GABA-ergic interneuron deficiency in these animals was associated with greatly diminished hippocampus neurogenesis. Because PV+ and NPY+ interneurons play roles in maintaining normal cognitive function and neurogenesis, and controlling the activity of excitatory neurons in the hippocampus, reduced numbers of these interneurons may be one of the major causes of cognitive dysfunction and reduced neurogenesis observed in GWI. Hence, strategies that improve inhibitory neurotransmission in the hippocampus may prove beneficial for reversing cognitive dysfunction in GWI.

  6. Parvalbumin and neuropeptide Y expressing hippocampal GABA-ergic inhibitory interneuron numbers decline in a model of Gulf War illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megahed, Tarick; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shuai, Bing; Shetty, Ashok K

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is amongst the most conspicuous symptoms in Gulf War illness (GWI). Combined exposure to the nerve gas antidote pyridostigmine bromide (PB), pesticides and stress during the Persian Gulf War-1 (PGW-1) are presumed to be among the major causes of GWI. Indeed, our recent studies in rat models have shown that exposure to GWI-related (GWIR) chemicals and mild stress for 4 weeks engenders cognitive impairments accompanied with several detrimental changes in the hippocampus. In this study, we tested whether reduced numbers of hippocampal gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons are among the pathological changes induced by GWIR-chemicals and stress. Animals were exposed to low doses of GWIR-chemicals and mild stress for 4 weeks. Three months after this exposure, subpopulations of GABA-ergic interneurons expressing the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (PV), the neuropeptide Y (NPY) and somatostatin (SS) in the hippocampus were stereologically quantified. Animals exposed to GWIR-chemicals and stress for 4 weeks displayed reduced numbers of PV-expressing GABA-ergic interneurons in the dentate gyrus and NPY-expressing interneurons in the CA1 and CA3 subfields. However, no changes in SS+ interneuron population were observed in the hippocampus. Furthermore, GABA-ergic interneuron deficiency in these animals was associated with greatly diminished hippocampus neurogenesis. Because PV+ and NPY+ interneurons play roles in maintaining normal cognitive function and neurogenesis, and controlling the activity of excitatory neurons in the hippocampus, reduced numbers of these interneurons may be one of the major causes of cognitive dysfunction and reduced neurogenesis observed in GWI. Hence, strategies that improve inhibitory neurotransmission in the hippocampus may prove beneficial for reversing cognitive dysfunction in GWI.

  7. Fast micro-iontophoresis of glutamate and GABA: a useful tool to investigate synaptic integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christina; Remy, Stefan

    2013-07-31

    One of the fundamental interests in neuroscience is to understand the integration of excitatory and inhibitory inputs along the very complex structure of the dendritic tree, which eventually leads to neuronal output of action potentials at the axon. The influence of diverse spatial and temporal parameters of specific synaptic input on neuronal output is currently under investigation, e.g. the distance-dependent attenuation of dendritic inputs, the location-dependent interaction of spatially segregated inputs, the influence of GABAergig inhibition on excitatory integration, linear and non-linear integration modes, and many more. With fast micro-iontophoresis of glutamate and GABA it is possible to precisely investigate the spatial and temporal integration of glutamatergic excitation and GABAergic inhibition. Critical technical requirements are either a triggered fluorescent lamp, light-emitting diode (LED), or a two-photon scanning microscope to visualize dendritic branches without introducing significant photo-damage of the tissue. Furthermore, it is very important to have a micro-iontophoresis amplifier that allows for fast capacitance compensation of high resistance pipettes. Another crucial point is that no transmitter is involuntarily released by the pipette during the experiment. Once established, this technique will give reliable and reproducible signals with a high neurotransmitter and location specificity. Compared to glutamate and GABA uncaging, fast iontophoresis allows using both transmitters at the same time but at very distant locations without limitation to the field of view. There are also advantages compared to focal electrical stimulation of axons: with micro-iontophoresis the location of the input site is definitely known and it is sure that only the neurotransmitter of interest is released. However it has to be considered that with micro-iontophoresis only the postsynapse is activated and presynaptic aspects of neurotransmitter release are not

  8. Characteristics of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA receptors in the rat central nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroda,Hiroo

    1983-04-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA were investigated in the rat central nervous system by radioreceptor assay (RRA. Scatchard analysis revealed that the rat brain had two distinct GABA binding sites with an apparent dissociation constant (Kd of 11.7 nM and 34.7 nM. The highest level of specific [3H]-GABA binding was found in the rat cerebellum. Imidazole acetic acid, a potent GABA agonist, was effective in displacing [3H]-GABA binding but beta-alanine was slightly effective in inhibiting [3H]-GABA binding. Muscimol, the most potent GABA agonist, has been used as a ligand to characterize the postsynaptic GABA receptors. However, the maximal binding capacity (Bmax of muscimol-RRA was about 3 times larger than that of GABA-RRA, suggesting that muscimol might label not only GABA receptors but other unknown receptors as well. An endogenous inhibitor of GABA receptor binding was purified from the P2 fraction of rat brain with 0.05% Triton X-100. The endogenous inhibitor was competitive with GABA on GABA binding sites. The inhibition by the endogenous inhibitor of GABA receptor binding was blocked by the allosteric effect of diazepam. In the presence of diazepam, [3H]-GABA binding with the endogenous inhibitor was larger than that with GABA, whereas there was no difference in the absence of diazepam. This indicated that the endogenous inhibitor was not GABA itself. The molecular weight of the endogenous inhibitor was estimate by gel filtration to be less than 3,000 daltons.

  9. Diversity among principal and GABAergic neurons of the anterior olfactory nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel eKay

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the cellular components of neural circuits is an essential step in discerning regional function. The anterior olfactory nucleus (AON is reciprocally connected to both the ipsi- and contralateral olfactory bulb (OB and piriform cortex (PC, and, as a result, can broadly influence the central processing of odor information. While both the AON and PC are simple cortical structures, the regions differ in many ways including their general organization, internal wiring and synaptic connections with other brain areas. The present work used targeted whole-cell patch clamping to investigate the morphological and electrophysiological properties of the AON’s two main neuronal populations: excitatory projection neurons and inhibitory interneurons. Retrograde fluorescent tracers placed into either the OB or PC identified projection neurons. Two classes were observed with different physiological signatures and locations (superficial and deep pyramidal neurons, suggesting the AON contains independent efferent channels. Transgenic mice in which GABA-containing cells expressed green fluorescent protein were used to assess inhibitory neurons. These cells were further identified as containing one or more of seven molecular markers including three calcium-binding proteins (calbindin, calretinin, parvalbumin or four neuropeptides (somatostatin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, neuropeptide Y, cholecystokinin. The proportion of GABAergic cells containing these markers varied across subregions reinforcing notions that the AON has local functional subunits. At least five classes of inhibitory cells were observed: fast-spiking multipolar, regular-spiking multipolar, superficial neurogliaform, deep neurogliaform, and horizontal neurons. While some of these cell types are similar to those reported in the PC and other cortical regions, the AON also has unique populations. These studies provide the first examination of the cellular components of this simple

  10. D4 and D1 dopamine receptors modulate [3H] GABA release in the substantia nigra pars reticulata of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-García, Jacqueline; Hernández-Chan, Nancy; Paz-Bermúdez, Francisco; Sierra, Arturo; Erlij, David; Aceves, Jorge; Florán, Benjamín

    2009-12-01

    Neurons of the globus pallidus express dopamine D4 receptors that can modulate transmitter release by their axon terminals. Indeed, GABA release from pallidal terminals in the subthalamic nucleus and in the reticular nucleus of the thalamus is inhibited by activation of D4 receptors. Here we investigated whether GABA release by pallidal projections to the substantia nigra reticulate (SNr) is also modulated by D4 receptors. Dopamine-stimulated depolarization-induced GABA release in slices of the SNr; however, after selective blockade of D1 receptors, dopamine inhibited release. The selective D4 agonist PD 168,077 (IC(50) = 5.30 nM) mimicked the inhibition of release while the selective D4 antagonist L-745,870 blocked the inhibition. To identify the source of D1 and D4 modulated terminals, we unilaterally injected kainic acid in either the GP or the striatum. After lesions of the pallidum, the D4 induced inhibition of release was blocked while the D1 induced stimulation was still significant. Lesions of the striatum had the converse effects. We conclude that release of dopamine in the SNr enhances GABA release mainly through activation of D1 receptors in striatonigral projections and inhibits release mainly through activation of D4 receptors in pallidonigral projections. Because deficient D4 receptor signaling in globus pallidus terminals will lead to disinhibition of impulse traffic through the thalamus we speculate that the D4 abnormalities observed in ADHD patients may be important in the generation of the syndrome.

  11. The four human ¿-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Trine; Christiansen, Bolette; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn;

    2009-01-01

    , we perform the first elaborate pharmacological characterization of all four human GAT subtypes. We conduct the experiments in parallel in a [3H]GABA uptake assay using 14 standard GAT substrates and inhibitors. This setup enables direct comparison of the absolute values of inhibitory activities......, no subtype selective ligands have been reported for the three remaining GATs. Given the potential therapeutic relevance of the individual GAT subtypes, a search for novel structures displaying selectivities for specific GAT subtypes is important. In this study, we validate our [3H]GABA uptake assay for use...... in high throughput screening. We find that the assay is categorized by high Z'-factors (Z' > 0.5) for all four GAT subtypes, demonstrating that the assay is excellent for a high throughput screen. This [3H]GABA uptake assay therefore enables future high through put screening of compound libraries...

  12. GABA-B receptor activation and conflict behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketelaars, C.E.J.; Bollen, E.L.; Rigter, H.; Bruinvels, J.

    1988-01-01

    Baclofen and oxazepam enhance extinction of conflict behavior in the Geller-Seifter test while baclofen and diazepam release punished behavior in Vogel's conflict test. In order to investigate the possibility that the effect of the selective GABA-B receptor agonist baclofen is mediated indirectly via the GABA-A/benzodiazepine receptor complex, the effect of pretreatment of rats with baclofen on (/sup 3/H)-diazepam binding to washed and unwashed cortical and cerebellar membranes of rats has been studied. Baclofen pretreatment increase Bmax in washed cerebellar membranes when bicuculline was present in the incubation mixture. No effect was seen in cortical membranes. The present results render it unlikely that the effect of baclofen on extinction of conflict behavior and punished drinking is mediated via the GABA-A/benzodiazepine receptor complex. 50 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  13. Epoxy fatty acids and inhibition of the soluble epoxide hydrolase selectively modulate GABA mediated neurotransmission to delay onset of seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Inceoglu

    Full Text Available In the brain, seizures lead to release of large amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids including arachidonic acid (ARA. ARA is a substrate for three major enzymatic routes of metabolism by cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and cytochrome P450 enzymes. These enzymes convert ARA to potent lipid mediators including prostanoids, leukotrienes and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs. The prostanoids and leukotrienes are largely pro-inflammatory molecules that sensitize neurons whereas EETs are anti-inflammatory and reduce the excitability of neurons. Recent evidence suggests a GABA-related mode of action potentially mediated by neurosteroids. Here we tested this hypothesis using models of chemically induced seizures. The level of EETs in the brain was modulated by inhibiting the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH, the major enzyme that metabolizes EETs to inactive molecules, by genetic deletion of sEH and by direct administration of EETs into the brain. All three approaches delayed onset of seizures instigated by GABA antagonists but not seizures through other mechanisms. Inhibition of neurosteroid synthesis by finasteride partially blocked the anticonvulsant effects of sEH inhibitors while the efficacy of an inactive dose of neurosteroid allopregnanolone was enhanced by sEH inhibition. Consistent with earlier findings, levels of prostanoids in the brain were elevated. In contrast, levels of bioactive EpFAs were decreased following seizures. Overall these results demonstrate that EETs are natural molecules which suppress the tonic component of seizure related excitability through modulating the GABA activity and that exploration of the EET mediated signaling in the brain could yield alternative approaches to treat convulsive disorders.

  14. GABAergic neurons in K(o)lliker-Fuse nucleus and B(o)tzinger complex with axons projecting to phrenic nucleus%KF核及B(o)tzinger复合体内GABA能神经元向膈神经核的投射

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋刚; 李勤; 邵凤之

    2000-01-01

    实验在6只成年猫上进行.将WGA-HRP微量注入C5膈神经核内, 通过逆行追踪及GABA免疫组织化学FITC荧光双重标记方法, 研究了脑干内GABA能神经元向膈神经核的投射.结果在脑桥KF核和面神经后核周围区(即B(o)tzinger复合体)观察到GABA-HRP双标神经元.另外, 在中缝大核、旁巨细胞外侧核及前庭神经核也观察到双标神经元.本实验结果表明: 发自上述脑干神经核团, 特别是KF核及B(o)tzinger复合体的GABA能神经元的轴突可投射到膈神经核.%Experiments were made on 6 adult cats. Brainstem neurons that project to the phrenic nucleus were retrogradely labeled by microinjection of WGA-HRP into phrenic nucleus. The brainstem sections were doubly processed for HRP histochemical staining with the TMB-Co-DAB method, and GABA immunohistochemical staining with anti-GABA primary antibody and FITC conjugated immunofluorescent secondary antibody. HRP-FITC double-labeled neurons were observed in the pontine K(o)lliker-Fuse nucleus and areas around the retrofacial nucleus (B(o)tzinger complex). Double-labeled neurons were also observed in the raphe nucleus, the lateral paragigantocellular nucleus, and the vestibular nucleus. The results show that brainstem GABAergic neurons in these structures, especially those in the K(o)lliker-Fuse nucleus and the B(o)t.C, send axonal projections to the phrenic nucleus.

  15. [Induced-division of neurons derived from neural stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiu-Xia; Que, Hai-Ping; Lu, Shuang-Hong; Liu, Shao-Jun

    2004-04-25

    In order to explore if mature neurons derived from neural stem cells have the potentiality to divide, we utilized the chemical digestion method to disperse the adult rat brain tissue into single cells, and culture them in serum-free medium. After being cultured for about eight days in vitro, the neural stem cells were induced to differentiate into neurons. The neurons were further induced to divide. Utilizing the method of serial photograph and NF-160 immunocytochemistry, the processes of division of some neurons were recorded. At the same time, PCNA+NF-160 (or Chat, GABA, GAD) double label were used to investigate if the dividing-neurons were mature ones. After the neural stem cells were induced to differentiate in vitro for eight days, they possessed the shape and character of mature neurons. The differentiated neuron had a big nucleus and one or two distinct nucleolus in the nuclear. Within the perikaryon,there were a large amount of dense and Nissl body-like structure. Several long processes emerged from various locations of the cell body. Then, EGF and bFGF were added into the medium to induce division. After two days of induced-division, neuron-like cells were observed to divide; moreover, the number of neuron-like cells in the region increased continually. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated these cells were NF-160-positive. Serial photographs of dividing-process of neuron-like cells were obtained and their daughter cells were also NF-160-positive. After PCNA+NF-160 (or Chat, GABA, GAD) double label, some cells showed brown cell plasma and black nucleus. The above-mentioned results indicate that neurons, which were previously thought to be end-differentiated, can be re-called into cell cycle under appropriate conditions. Mature neurons still have the potential to divide, proliferate and self-renew.

  16. Experiment K-6-18. Study of muscarinic and gaba (benzodiazepine) receptors in the sensory-motor cortex, hippcampus and spinal code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunton, N.; Damelio, F.; Krasnov, I.

    1990-01-01

    Frontal lobe samples of rat brains flown aboard Cosmos 1887 were processed for the study of muscarinic (cholinergic) and GABA (benzodiazepine) receptors and for immunocytochemical localization of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Although radioactive labeling of both muscarinic cholinergic and GABA (benzodiazepine) receptors proved to be successful with the techniques employed, distinct receptor localization of individual laminae of the frontal neocortex was not possible since the sampling of the area was different in the various groups of animals. In spite of efforts made for proper orientation and regional identification of laminae, it was found that a densitometric (quantitation of autoradiograms) analysis of the tissue did not contribute to the final interpretation of the effects of weightlessness on these receptors. As to the immunocytochemical studies the use of both markers, GFAP and GABA antiserum, confirmed the suitability of the techniques for use in frozen material. However, similar problems to those encountered in the receptor studies prevented an adequate interpretation of the effects of micro-G exposure on the localization and distribution of GABA and GFAP. This study did, however, confirm the feasibility of investigating neurotransmitters and their receptors in future space flight experiments.

  17. Attenuation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transaminase activity contributes to GABA increase in the cerebral cortex of mice exposed to β-cypermethrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y; Cao, D; Li, X; Zhang, R; Yu, F; Ren, Y; An, L

    2014-03-01

    The current study investigated the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels and GABA metabolic enzymes (GABA transaminase (GABA(T)) and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD)) activities at 2 and 4 h after treatment, using a high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detectors and colorimetric assay, in the cerebral cortex of mice treated with 20, 40 or 80 mg/kg β-cypermethrin by a single oral gavage, with corn oil as vehicle control. In addition, GABA protein (4 h after treatment), GABA(T) protein (2 h after treatment) and GABA receptors messenger RNA (mRNA) expression were detected by immunohistochemistry, Western blot and real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, respectively. β-Cypermethrin (80 mg/kg) significantly increased GABA levels in the cerebral cortex of mice, at both 2 and 4 h after treatment, compared with the control. Also, GABA immunohistochemistry results suggested that the number of positive granules was increased in the cerebral cortex of mice 4 h after exposure to 80 mg/kg β-cypermethrin when compared with the control. Furthermore, the results also showed that GABA(T) activity detected was significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex of mice 2 h after β-cypermethrin administration (40 or 80 mg/kg). No significant changes were found in GAD activity, or the expression of GABA(T) protein and GABAB receptors mRNA, in the cerebral cortex of mice, except that 80 mg/kg β-cypermethrin caused a significant decrease, compared with the vehicle control, in GABAA receptors mRNA expression 4 h after administration. These results suggested that attenuated GABA(T) activity induced by β-cypermethrin contributed to increased GABA levels in the mouse brain. The downregulated GABAA receptors mRNA expression is most likely a downstream event.

  18. Selective mGAT2 (BGT-1) GABA Uptake Inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine Byskov; Jørgensen, Lars; Madsen, Karsten Kirkegaard;

    2013-01-01

    β-Amino acids sharing a lipophilic diaromatic side chain were synthesized and characterized pharmacologically on mouse GABA transporter subtypes mGAT1−4. The parent amino acids were also characterized. Compounds 13a, 13b, and 17b displayed more than 6-fold selectivity for mGAT2 over mGAT1. Compound...... 17b displayed anticonvulsive properties inferring a role of mGAT2 in epileptic disorders. These results provide new neuropharmacological tools and a strategy for designing subtype selective GABA transport inhibitors....

  19. Cloning and characterization of a functional human ¿-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter, human GAT-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Bolette; Meinild, Anne-Kristine; Jensen, Anders A.

    2007-01-01

    and dependent on both Na(+) and Cl(-). Pharmacologically the transporter is distinct from the other human GABA transporters and similar to rat GAT-2 and mouse GAT3 with high sensitivity toward GABA and beta-alanine. Furthermore the GABA transport inhibitor (S)-SNAP-5114 displayed some inhibitory activity...

  20. Hypothalamic Non-AgRP, Non-POMC GABAergic Neurons Are Required for Postweaning Feeding and NPY Hyperphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Ran; Wu, Zhaofei; Sun, Hao; Xu, Yuanzhong; Mangieri, Leandra R; Xu, Yong; Tong, Qingchun

    2015-07-22

    The hypothalamus is critical for feeding and body weight regulation. Prevailing studies focus on hypothalamic neurons that are defined by selectively expressing transcription factors or neuropeptides including those expressing proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and agouti-related peptides (AgRP). The Cre expression driven by the pancreas-duodenum homeobox 1 promoter is abundant in several hypothalamic nuclei but not in AgRP or POMC neurons. Using this line, we generated mice with disruption of GABA release from a major subset of non-POMC, non-AgRP GABAergic neurons in the hypothalamus. These mice exhibited a reduction in postweaning feeding and growth, and disrupted hyperphagic responses to NPY. Disruption of GABA release severely diminished GABAergic input to the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH). Furthermore, disruption of GABA-A receptor function in the PVH also reduced postweaning feeding and blunted NPY-induced hyperphagia. Given the limited knowledge on postweaning feeding, our results are significant in identifying GABA release from a major subset of less appreciated hypothalamic neurons as a key mediator for postweaning feeding and NPY hyperphagia, and the PVH as one major downstream site that contributes significantly to the GABA action. Significance statement: Prevalent studies on feeding in the hypothalamus focus on well characterized, selective groups neurons [e.g., proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and ago