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Sample records for area groups 1-7

  1. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory waste area groups 1--7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Technology Logic Diagram was developed to provide technical alternatives for environmental restoration projects at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The diagram (three volumes) documents suggested solutions to the characterization, retrieval, and treatment phases of cleanup activities at contaminated sites within 8 of the laboratory's 10 waste area groups. Contaminated sites at the laboratory's Naval Reactor Facility and Argonne National Laboratory-West are not included in this diagram

  2. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II (this volume) describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Specific INEL problem areas/contaminants are identified along with technology solutions, the status of the technologies, precise science and technology needs, and implementation requirements. Volume III provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are referenced by a TEDS codenumber in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II

  3. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Volume III (this volume) provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are reference by a TEDS code number in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II. Data sheets are arranged alphanumerically by the TEDS code number in the upper right corner of each sheet

  4. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II (this volume) describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Specific INEL problem areas/contaminants are identified along with technology solutions, the status of the technologies, precise science and technology needs, and implementation requirements. Volume III provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are referenced by a TEDS codenumber in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II.

  5. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Volume III (this volume) provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are reference by a TEDS code number in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II. Data sheets are arranged alphanumerically by the TEDS code number in the upper right corner of each sheet.

  6. Revitalization Areas By Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Single Family Revitalization areas are HUD-designated neighborhoods in need of economic and community development and where there is already a strong commitment by...

  7. Experimental area design working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackmore, E.W.; Louis, W.

    1989-05-01

    The charge to this working group on experimental areas concerned a number of topics related to optimum layout of the experimental areas, the design of secondary channels and spectrometers, the floor space required for experiments and the impact of remote handling requirements on site layout. Recommendations included: 1) Plan for a second proton beamline even if not installed initially; 2) Carry out a detailed engineering design of the components for the beamlines and target cell for a configuration in which two or more secondary channel front-ends are combined; 3) Keep the experimental area floor close to grade level to minimize the cost and simplify future extensions to the building as new beamlines or facilities are required; and 4) Plan to have the extraction region accessible from above for remote servicing

  8. Waste site grouping for 200 Areas soil investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify logical waste site groups for characterization based on criteria established in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy (DOE-RL 1996a). Specific objectives of the document include the following: finalize waste site groups based on the approach and preliminary groupings identified in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; prioritize the waste site groups based on criteria developed in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; select representative site(s) that best represents typical and worse-case conditions for each waste group; develop conceptual models for each waste group. This document will serve as a technical baseline for implementing the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy. The intent of the document is to provide a framework, based on waste site groups, for organizing soil characterization efforts in the 200 Areas and to present initial conceptual models

  9. Waste site grouping for 200 Areas soil investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify logical waste site groups for characterization based on criteria established in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy (DOE-RL 1996a). Specific objectives of the document include the following: finalize waste site groups based on the approach and preliminary groupings identified in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; prioritize the waste site groups based on criteria developed in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; select representative site(s) that best represents typical and worse-case conditions for each waste group; develop conceptual models for each waste group. This document will serve as a technical baseline for implementing the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy. The intent of the document is to provide a framework, based on waste site groups, for organizing soil characterization efforts in the 200 Areas and to present initial conceptual models.

  10. Splitting of 9-iodo-1,7-carborane by potassium hydroxide in butanol with butoxy group substitution for iodine atom when formation of anions of 1-butoxy- and 5-butoxy-nido-7,9-dicarbaundecaborate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharkin, L.I.; Ol'shevskaya, V.A.; Guseva, V.V.; Panfilova, S.Yu.

    2000-01-01

    The 9-iodo-1,7-carborane by heating in the potassium hydroxide butanol solution is splitted into the stereoisomeric anions of the nido-7,9-dicarbaundecaborate substituting under the reaction conditions the butoxy-group for iodine atom with formation of anions of the 1-butoxy- and -butoxy-nido-7,9-dicarbaundecaborate [ru

  11. 1 - 7_Abubakar

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    S/No. Determined design parameters. Calculated values. 1. Tilt angle of the solar collector, (N). 17. 2. Area of the solar collector, Ac (m2). 3.15. 3. Weight of moisture to be removed from the rice, Mw (kg). 7.7. 4. Thickness of the bottom insulator, X (mm). 9.2. 5. Thickness of the absorber plate, (. ) 1. 6. Drying period of a batch ...

  12. N-1: Safeguards Science and Technology Group, Tour Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geist, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Group N-1 develops and provides training on nondestructive assay (NDA) technologies intended for nuclear material accounting and control to fulfill both international and domestic obligations. The N-1 group is located at Technical Area (TA)-35 in Buildings 2 and 27. Visitors to the area can observe developed and fielded NDA technologies, as well as the latest research efforts to develop the next generation of NDA technologies. Several areas are used for NDA training. The N-1 School House area typically is used for basic training on neutron- and gamma-ray-based NDA techniques. This area contains an assortment of gamma-ray detector systems, including sodium iodide and high-purity germanium and the associated measurement components. Many types of neutron assay systems are located here, including both standard coincidence and multiplicity counters. The N-1 School House area is also used for holdup training; located here are the mock holdup assemblies and associated holdup measurement tools. Other laboratory areas in the N-1 space are used for specialized training, such as waste NDA, calorimetry, and advanced gamma-ray NDA. Also, many research laboratories in the N-1 space are used to develop new NDA technologies. The calorimetry laboratory is used to develop and evaluate new technologies and techniques that measure the heat signature from nuclear material to determine mass. The micro calorimetry laboratory is being used to develop advanced technologies that can measure gamma rays with extremely high resolution. This technique has been proven in the laboratory setting, and the team is now working to cultivate a field-capable system. The N-1 group also develops remote and unattended systems for the tracking and control of nuclear material. A demonstration of this technology is located within one of the laboratory spaces. The source tracker software was developed by N-1 to monitor the locations and quantities of nuclear materials. This software is currently used to track

  13. Assessing emergency situations and their aftermath in urban areas: The EMRAS II Urban Areas Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiessen, K.M.; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Berkovskyy, V.

    2011-01-01

    The Urban Areas Working Group is part of the International Atomic Energy Agency’s EMRAS II (Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety) Programme. The goal of this Working Group is to test and improve the capabilities of models used in assessment of radioactive contamination in urban settings, ...

  14. Functional groups in areas with fire history in a savanna area in Brazilian Federal District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Naves da Silva Rios

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the formation of functional groups, in 1994 and 2012, in two areas of savanna with different fire history in Planaltina, Federal District, Brazil. In the Area 1 biennial burnings were applied in August 1988, 1990 and 1992; there was fire protection until July 1994 in the Area 2, the control area. Accidental fire occurred in both areas in August 1994, but from September 1994 to 2012 they were protected. These analysis included individuals with abundance ≥ 5 using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA. The groups were defined according to the following attributes: dispersal and pollination syndromes, leaf phenology, life form, type of bark and ability to sprouting after fire. Both areas presented differences in the formation of functional groups in 1994 and 2012. Species functionally similar and with lower diversity of attributes were observed in Area 1, in 1994. The exclusion of fire favored the recruitment of other species and greater diversity of functional attributes in 2012.

  15. Ecological assessment plan for Waste Area Grouping 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashwood, T.L.

    1992-04-01

    Waste Area Grouping (WAG)5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory contains 13 solid waste management units (SWMUs) covering a surface area of {approx}20 ha in Melton Valley south of the main plant area. The largest SWMUs are Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 5 and SWSA 5 North. These two SWMUs also contain most of the radioactive contamination. WAG 5 contains two surface impoundments and two intermittent streams; runoff from WAG 5 enters White Oak Creek and Melton Branch. Principal contaminants include fission-product radionuclides and transuranic elements, but trace metals and some organics may also be present. This document describes the ecological assessment that will perform to determine the ecological effects of contamination from WAG 5. This document also supports the baseline risk assessment and subsequent alternatives evaluations for WAG 5. Three specific tasks are incorporated in the WAG 5 ecological assessment: (1) threatened and endangered species surveys, (2) ambient toxicity tests of seeps, stream reaches, and soil that are identified as being contaminant sources, and (3) sampling of wildlife (specifically wild turkeys) that could potentially transfer contaminants from WAG 5 to humans.

  16. Assessing emergency situations and their aftermath in urban areas: The EMRAS II Urban Areas Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiessen, K.M.; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Berkovskyy, V.

    2011-01-01

    The Urban Areas Working Group is part of the International Atomic Energy Agency’s EMRAS II (Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety) Programme. The goal of this Working Group is to test and improve the capabilities of models used in assessment of radioactive contamination in urban settings......, models, and parameter values used by different assessors. Preliminary conclusions emphasize the value of explaining individual approaches and the importance of understanding the effects of different assumptions and parameter values on the modeling results....

  17. Sodium channel Nav1.7 immunoreactivity in painful human dental pulp and burning mouth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiangou Yiangos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voltage gated sodium channels Nav1.7 are involved in nociceptor nerve action potentials and are known to affect pain sensitivity in clinical genetic disorders. Aims and Objectives To study Nav1.7 levels in dental pulpitis pain, an inflammatory condition, and burning mouth syndrome (BMS, considered a neuropathic orofacial pain disorder. Methods Two groups of patients were recruited for this study. One group consisted of patients with dental pulpitis pain (n = 5 and controls (n = 12, and the other patients with BMS (n = 7 and controls (n = 10. BMS patients were diagnosed according to the International Association for the Study of Pain criteria; a pain history was collected, including the visual analogue scale (VAS. Immunohistochemistry with visual intensity and computer image analysis were used to evaluate levels of Nav1.7 in dental pulp tissue samples from the dental pulpitis group, and tongue biopsies from the BMS group. Results There was a significantly increased visual intensity score for Nav1.7 in nerve fibres in the painful dental pulp specimens, compared to controls. Image analysis showed a trend for an increase of the Nav1.7 immunoreactive % area in the painful pulp group, but this was not statistically significant. When expressed as a ratio of the neurofilament % area, there was a strong trend for an increase of Nav1.7 in the painful pulp group. Nav1.7 immunoreactive fibres were seen in abundance in the sub-mucosal layer of tongue biopsies, with no significant difference between BMS and controls. Conclusion Nav1.7 sodium channel may play a significant role in inflammatory dental pain. Clinical trials with selective Nav1.7 channel blockers should prioritise dental pulp pain rather than BMS.

  18. Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas, Cotton Valley group and Travis Peak-Hosston formations, East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces of the northern Gulf Coast region. Chapters 1-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment is to develop geologically based hypotheses regarding the potential for additions to oil and gas reserves in priority areas of the United States. The USGS recently completed an assessment of undiscovered oil and gas potential of the Cotton Valley Group and Travis Peak and Hosston Formations in the East Texas Basin and Louisiana-Mississippi Salt Basins Provinces in the Gulf Coast Region (USGS Provinces 5048 and 5049). The Cotton Valley Group and Travis Peak and Hosston Formations are important because of their potential for natural gas resources. This assessment is based on geologic principles and uses the total petroleum system concept. The geologic elements of a total petroleum system include hydrocarbon source rocks (source rock maturation, hydrocarbon generation and migration), reservoir rocks (sequence stratigraphy and petrophysical properties), and hydrocarbon traps (trap formation and timing). The USGS used this geologic framework to define one total petroleum system and eight assessment units. Seven assessment units were quantitatively assessed for undiscovered oil and gas resources.

  19. Improving the performance of indicator groups for the identification of important areas for species conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Frank Wugt; Bladt, Jesper; Rahbek, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    Indicator groups may be important tools with which to guide the selection of networks of areas for conservation. Nevertheless, the literature provides little guidance as to what makes some groups of species more suitable than others to guide area selection. Using distributional data on all sub...... diversity by systematically varying the number of distinct genera and families within the indicator groups. We selected area networks based on the indicator groups and tested their ability to represent a set of species, which, in terms of species composition, is independent of the indicator group....... Increasing the proportion of threatened, endemic, and range-restricted species in the indicator groups improved effectiveness of the selected area networks; in particular it improved the effectiveness in representing other threatened and range-restricted species. In contrast increasing the proportion...

  20. Organic petrography:An approach for identification of maceral groups in Gheshlagh coal area, Eastern Alborz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Rabani

    2016-07-01

    , collotelinite, and corpogelinite macerals. Collodetrinite maceral (20 to 65.6 vol.% is the most abundant maceral in the vitrinite group and is associated with inertodetrinite and microspornite macerals. Callotelinite (8.4 to 46.7 wt% occurs as a structureless, homogeneous mass in the Gheshlagh coal seams. The inertinite group (4.9 to 23.3 vol% includes fusinite, semifusinite, macrinite, secretinite, funginite and inertodetrinite macerals. Fusinite (1.7 to12.7 vol.% is present in all coal seams in the Gheshlagh area. Cell cavities of fusinite are filled mostly by corpogelinite and clay minerals. Semifusinite occurs in appreciable concentrations (2.1to 14.3vol.% and Cell lumens of this maceral are filled with mineral matter, pyrite and clay. The liptinite group (nil to 3.5 vol% includes sporinite, cutinite and resinite macerals. Sporinite is the dominant maceral in the liptinite group (nil to 2.3 vol.% and occurs as elongated thread-like or spindle-shaped bodies and occurs as microspores and megaspores. Resinite (nil to 0.1 vol.% occurs as round to oval bodies and as fillings of the cell cavities of fusinite, semifusinite and funginite. The mineral matter content of most of the Gheshlagh coal seams varies between 3.1 and 24.9 vol.%. Mineral matter occurs in primary ground mass or secondary cavity filling form and includes clay minerals, carbonate and sulphide. Conclusion Based on organic petrographic studies carried out on four active coal mines in the Gheshlagh area, the presence of three maceral groups were determined. The vitrinite group (66.2 to 87.2 vol% is the dominant maceral group, and callodetrinite maceral (20 to 65.6 vol% is also abundant. The inertinite group contenthas a range of 4.9 to 23.3 vol% while the fusinite and semifusinite macerals are the most abundant of this group. The lowest volume percentage of macerals belongs to the liptinite group (0 to 3.5 vol% with 2.3 vol% espornitebeing the most abundant Maceral of this group. The presence of espornite maceral at

  1. Cardiovascular actions of angiotensin-(1-7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira A.J.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin-(1-7 (Ang-(1-7 is now considered to be a biologically active member of the renin-angiotensin system. The functions of Ang-(1-7 are often opposite to those attributed to the main effector component of the renin-angiotensin system, Ang II. Chronic administration of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI increases 10- to 25-fold the plasma levels of this peptide, suggesting that part of the beneficial effects of ACEI could be mediated by Ang-(1-7. Ang-(1-7 can be formed from Ang II or directly from Ang I. Other enzymatic pathways for Ang-(1-7 generation have been recently described involving the novel ACE homologue ACE2. This enzyme can form Ang-(1-7 from Ang II or less efficiently by the hydrolysis of Ang I to Ang-(1-9 with subsequent Ang-(1-7 formation. The biological relevance of Ang-(1-7 has been recently reinforced by the identification of its receptor, the G-protein-coupled receptor Mas. Heart and blood vessels are important targets for the formation and actions of Ang-(1-7. In this review we will discuss recent findings concerning the biological role of Ang-(1-7 in the heart and blood vessels, taking into account aspects related to its formation and effects on these tissues. In addition, we will discuss the potential of Ang-(1-7 and its receptor as a target for the development of new cardiovascular drugs.

  2. Uncertainty analysis of an interfacial area reconstruction algorithm and its application to two group interfacial area transport equation validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dave, A.J., E-mail: akshayjd@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Rad. Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48105 (United States); Manera, A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Rad. Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48105 (United States); Beyer, M.; Lucas, D. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Prasser, H.-M. [Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-12-15

    Wire mesh sensors (WMS) are state of the art devices that allow high resolution (in space and time) measurement of 2D void fraction distribution over a wide range of two-phase flow regimes, from bubbly to annular. Data using WMS have been recorded at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) (Lucas et al., 2010; Beyer et al., 2008; Prasser et al., 2003) for a wide combination of superficial gas and liquid velocities, providing an excellent database for advances in two-phase flow modeling. In two-phase flow, the interfacial area plays an integral role in coupling the mass, momentum and energy transport equations of the liquid and gas phase. While current models used in best-estimate thermal-hydraulic codes (e.g. RELAP5, TRACE, TRACG, etc.) are still based on algebraic correlations for the estimation of the interfacial area in different flow regimes, interfacial area transport equations (IATE) have been proposed to predict the dynamic propagation in space and time of interfacial area (Ishii and Hibiki, 2010). IATE models are still under development and the HZDR WMS experimental data provide an excellent basis for the validation and further advance of these models. The current paper is focused on the uncertainty analysis of algorithms used to reconstruct interfacial area densities from the void-fraction voxel data measured using WMS and their application towards validation efforts of two-group IATE models. In previous research efforts, a surface triangularization algorithm has been developed in order to estimate the surface area of individual bubbles recorded with the WMS, and estimate the interfacial area in the given flow condition. In the present paper, synthetically generated bubbles are used to assess the algorithm’s accuracy. As the interfacial area of the synthetic bubbles are defined by user inputs, the error introduced by the algorithm can be quantitatively obtained. The accuracy of interfacial area measurements is characterized for different bubbles

  3. Uncertainty analysis of an interfacial area reconstruction algorithm and its application to two group interfacial area transport equation validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, A.J.; Manera, A.; Beyer, M.; Lucas, D.; Prasser, H.-M.

    2016-01-01

    Wire mesh sensors (WMS) are state of the art devices that allow high resolution (in space and time) measurement of 2D void fraction distribution over a wide range of two-phase flow regimes, from bubbly to annular. Data using WMS have been recorded at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) (Lucas et al., 2010; Beyer et al., 2008; Prasser et al., 2003) for a wide combination of superficial gas and liquid velocities, providing an excellent database for advances in two-phase flow modeling. In two-phase flow, the interfacial area plays an integral role in coupling the mass, momentum and energy transport equations of the liquid and gas phase. While current models used in best-estimate thermal-hydraulic codes (e.g. RELAP5, TRACE, TRACG, etc.) are still based on algebraic correlations for the estimation of the interfacial area in different flow regimes, interfacial area transport equations (IATE) have been proposed to predict the dynamic propagation in space and time of interfacial area (Ishii and Hibiki, 2010). IATE models are still under development and the HZDR WMS experimental data provide an excellent basis for the validation and further advance of these models. The current paper is focused on the uncertainty analysis of algorithms used to reconstruct interfacial area densities from the void-fraction voxel data measured using WMS and their application towards validation efforts of two-group IATE models. In previous research efforts, a surface triangularization algorithm has been developed in order to estimate the surface area of individual bubbles recorded with the WMS, and estimate the interfacial area in the given flow condition. In the present paper, synthetically generated bubbles are used to assess the algorithm’s accuracy. As the interfacial area of the synthetic bubbles are defined by user inputs, the error introduced by the algorithm can be quantitatively obtained. The accuracy of interfacial area measurements is characterized for different bubbles

  4. Waste area Grouping 2 Phase I remedial investigation: Sediment and Cesium-137 transport modeling report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapp, R.B.; Bao, Y.S.; Moore, T.D.; Brenkert, A.L.; Purucker, S.T.; Reece, D.K.; Burgoa, B.B.

    1996-06-01

    This report is one of five reports issued in 1996 that provide follow-up information to the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The five reports address areas of concern that may present immediate risk to public health at the Clinch River and ecological risk within WAG 2 at ORNL. A sixth report, on groundwater, in the series documenting WAG 2 RI Phase I results were part of project activities conducted in FY 1996. The five reports that complete activities conducted as part of Phase I of the Remedial Investigation (RI) for WAG 2 are as follows: (1) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Seep Data Assessment, (2) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Tributaries Data Assessment, (3) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Ecological Risk Assessment, (4) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Human Health Risk Assessment, (5) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Sediment and 137 Cs Transport Modeling In December 1990, the Remedial Investigation Plan for Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was issued (ORNL 1990). The WAG 2 RI Plan was structured with a short-term component to be conducted while upgradient WAGs are investigated and remediated, and a long-term component that will complete the RI process for WAG 2 following remediation of upgradient WAGs. RI activities for the short-term component were initiated with the approval of the Environmental Protection Agency, Region IV (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). This report presents the results of an investigation of the risk associated with possible future releases of 137 Cs due to an extreme flood. The results are based on field measurements made during storms and computer model simulations

  5. Does taxonomic diversity in indicator groups influence their effectiveness in identifying priority areas for species conservation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladt, Jesper Stentoft; Larsen, Frank Wugt; Rahbek, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    the taxonomic diversity in species indicator groups influence their effectiveness in the identification of priority areas for species conservation. We tested whether indicator groups comprising a higher taxonomic diversity (i.e. indicator groups consisting of species from many different taxonomic groups...... not consistently increase the coverage of target species than when using less taxonomically diverse indicator groups. However, indicator groups chosen solely from one taxon were outperformed by taxonomically diverse groups. Second, we found that taxonomic diversity of the indicator did not influence the taxonomic...... diversity of the covered target species (in terms of number of represented families, orders, etc.) Thus, taxonomic diversity per se only had a marginal influence on the performance of indicator groups. Distributional characteristics, such as the proportion of species with narrow range sizes, had a larger...

  6. Development of two-group interfacial area transport equation for confined flow-2. Model evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xiaodong; Kim, Seungjin; Ishii, Mamoru; Beus, Stephen G.

    2003-01-01

    The bubble interaction mechanisms have been analytically modeled in the first paper of this series to provide mechanistic constitutive relations for the two-group interfacial area transport equation (IATE), which was proposed to dynamically solve the interfacial area concentration in the two-fluid model. This paper presents the evaluation approach and results of the two-group IATE based on available experimental data obtained in confined flow, namely, 11 data sets in or near bubbly flow and 13 sets in cap-turbulent and churn-turbulent flow. The two-group IATE is evaluated in steady state, one-dimensional form. Also, since the experiments were performed under adiabatic, air-water two-phase flow conditions, the phase change effect is omitted in the evaluation. To account for the inter-group bubble transport, the void fraction transport equation for Group-2 bubbles is also used to predict the void fraction for Group-2 bubbles. Agreement between the data and the model predictions is reasonably good and the average relative difference for the total interfacial area concentration between the 24 data sets and predictions is within 7%. The model evaluation demonstrates the capability of the two-group IATE focused on the current confined flow to predict the interfacial area concentration over a wide range of flow regimes. (author)

  7. Enhanced expression of Ang-(1-7 during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brosnihan K.B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy is a physiological condition characterized by a progressive increase of the different components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS. The physiological consequences of the stimulated RAS in normal pregnancy are incompletely understood, and even less understood is the question of how this system may be altered and contribute to the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Findings from our group have provided novel insights into how the RAS may contribute to the physiological condition of pregnancy by showing that pregnancy increases the expression of both the vasodilator heptapeptide of the RAS, angiotensin-(1-7 [Ang-(1-7], and of a newly cloned angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE homolog, ACE2, that shows high catalytic efficiency for Ang II metabolism to Ang-(1-7. The discovery of ACE2 adds a new dimension to the complexity of the RAS by providing a new arm that may counter-regulate the activity of the vasoconstrictor component, while amplifying the vasodilator component. The studies reviewed in this article demonstrate that Ang-(1-7 increases in plasma and urine of normal pregnant women. In preeclamptic subjects we showed that plasma Ang-(1-7 was suppressed as compared to the levels found in normal pregnancy. In addition, kidney and urinary levels of Ang-(1-7 were increased in pregnant rats coinciding with the enhanced detection and expression of ACE2. These findings support the concept that in normal pregnancy enhanced ACE2 may counteract the elevation in tissue and circulating Ang II by increasing the rate of conversion to Ang-(1-7. These findings provide a basis for the physiological role of Ang-(1-7 and ACE2 during pregnancy.

  8. A comparative study between met & unmet need groups of contraception in rural area of Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsha M Solanki

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To compare met & unmet need groups of contraception with socio-economic, demographic, accessibility & family Planning (FP related factors. Methods Community based cross-sectional, comparative study was conducted among 363 married women of reproductive age groups in rural area selected by stratified simple random technique. After collecting preliminary information, the study population then divided into two groups based on their contraceptive use i.e. MET Group & UNMET NEED Groups. Then the role of socio-economic, demographic, accessibility & family Planning (FP related factors were studies to determine contraceptive use between these groups. Results Mean age of study subjects was 24.12 ± 4.45 years & average number of children per women was 2.02. Males were more literate than females (69.1% Vs 47.2%. 51.8% women were belonging to lower socio-economic status. Early marriages were still prevalent in this study (53.7%. Prevalence of met group of contraception was 59.2% & that of unmet need for contraception was 44.1%. Met groups were mainly from 20-29 years age group (46.6%; most of them (46.8% were literate & were from high socio-economic group (30.9% compared to unmet need groups. On comparison to unmet groups, most of the met group (33.9% got married after 18 years of age, residing within 5km area (26.4%, had visited to FP centre (49.0% & ever visited by FP staff (43.3%. Conclusion Education, income, marriage age, accessibility, FP staff related factors definitely has role among met & unmet need groups in their contraceptive use.

  9. Two-group interfacial area concentration correlations of two-phase flows in large diameter pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Xiuzhong; Hibiki, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The reliable empirical correlations and models are one of the important ways to predict the interfacial area concentration (IAC) in two-phase flows. However, up to now, no correlation or model is available for the prediction of the IAC in the two-phase flows in large diameter pipes. This study collected an IAC experimental database of two-phase flows taken under various flow conditions in large diameter pipes and presented a systematic way to predict the IAC for two-phase flows from bubbly, cap-bubbly to churn flow in large diameter pipes by categorizing bubbles into two groups (group-1: spherical and distorted bubble, group-2: cap bubble). Correlations were developed to predict the group-1 void fraction from the void fraction of all bubble. The IAC contribution from group-1 bubbles was modeled by using the dominant parameters of group-1 bubble void fraction and Reynolds number based on the parameter-dependent analysis of Hibiki and Ishii (2001, 2002) using one-dimensional bubble number density and interfacial area transport equations. A new drift velocity correlation for two-phase flow with large cap bubbles in large diameter pipes was derived in this study. By comparing the newly-derived drift velocity correlation with the existing drift velocity correlation of Kataoka and Ishii (1987) for large diameter pipes and using the characteristics of the representative bubbles among the group 2 bubbles, we developed the model of IAC and bubble size for group 2 cap bubbles. The developed models for estimating the IAC are compared with the entire collected database. A reasonable agreement was obtained with average relative errors of ±28.1%, ±54.4% and ±29.6% for group 1, group 2 and all bubbles respectively. (author)

  10. Distributed Group-Based Mobility Management Scheme in Wireless Body Area Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moneeb Gohar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For group-based mobility management in 6LoWPAN-based wireless body area networks (WBAN, some schemes using the Proxy Mobile IPv6 (PMIP have been proposed. However, the existing PMIP-based mobility schemes tend to induce large registration delay and handover delay. To overcome such limitations, we propose a new distributed group-based mobility management scheme, in which the Local Mobility Anchor (LMA function is implemented by each Mobile Access Gateway (MAG and the handover operation is performed between two neighboring MAGs without the help of LMA. Besides, each MAG maintains the information of the group of mobile sensors and aggregates the Authentication-Authorization-Accounting (AAA query messages for a group of mobile sensors as a “single” message to decrease the control overhead. By numerical analysis, it is shown that the proposed scheme can reduce the registration and handover delays, compared to the existing PMIP-based mobility schemes.

  11. Comparison of the Variations of Sunspot Number, Number of Sunspot Groups, and Sunspot Area, 1875 -2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Examined are the yearly variations and ratios of sunspot number, the number of sunspot groups, and the total corrected sunspot area for the interval 1875-2013. While yearly sunspot number independently correlates strongly (r = 0.98) with the yearly number of sunspot groups (y = -2 + 11.99x) and the total corrected sunspot area (y = 5 + 0.059x), the strongest correlation (Ry12 = 0.99) is the one based on the bivariate fit of sunspot number against the combined variations of the number of sunspot groups and sunspot area (y = 1 + 5.88x1 + 0.031x2, where y refers to sunspot number, x1 refers to the number of sunspot groups, and x2 refers to the sunspot area). While all cycle minima based on the bivariate fit are concurrent with the observed minimum in sunspot number, cycle maxima are sometimes found to differ. For sunspot cycles 12, 19, 20, and 23, cycle maximum is inferred to have occurred in 1884, 1958, 1970, and 2002, respectively, rather than in 1883, 1957, 1968, and 2000, based on the observed sunspot number. Also, cycle 19's maximum amplitude based on observed sunspot number seems too high in comparison to that found using the bivariate fit. During the 139-year interval 1875-2013, the difference between the observed and predicted sunspot number based on the bivariate fit is sunspot cycle 24, the difference between observed and predicted values has been only -0.7 and 3.2 (=0.5 se).

  12. Screening of contaminants in Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; Hook, L.A.; Suter, G.W.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of a health risk and ecological risk screening analysis for Waste Area Grouping 2 (WAG 2) using available data to identify contaminants and environmental pathways that will require either further investigation or immediate consideration for remediation based on the screening indices. The screening analysis will also identify contaminants that can be assigned a low priority for further investigation and those that require additional data.

  13. Dorsiflexor muscle-group thickness in children with cerebral palsy: Relation to cross-sectional area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Magnusson, Peter; Jensen, Bente Rona

    2009-01-01

    If the thickness and cross-sectional area of the dorsiflexor muscle group are related in children with cerebral palsy, measurements of muscle thickness may be used to monitor changes in muscle size due to training or immobilisation in these patients. We assessed the validity and reliability.......001), and the reliability of the muscle-thickness measurements was high in the healthy subjects (ICC_{2.1} = 0.94, standard error of measurement = 0.04 cm). The dorsiflexor muscle-thickness was 22% less in the affected compared to the non-affected leg in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (P ..., the dorsiflexor cross-sectional area was 32% less in the affected compared to the non-affected leg (P = 0.002). Measurements of dorsiflexor muscle-thickness can be reliably obtained, and they reflect dorsiflexor cross-sectional area in children with cerebral palsy....

  14. Quality assurance plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) is concerned with design and construction (Sect. 2) and characterization and monitoring (Sect. 3). The basis for Sect. 2 is the Quality Assurance Plan for the Design and Construction of Waste Area Grouping 6 Closure at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the basis for Sect. 3 is the Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan. Combining the two areas into one plan gives a single, overall document that explains the requirements and from which the individual QAPs and quality assurance project plans can be written. The Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 QAP establishes the procedures and requirements to be implemented for control of quality-related activities for the WAG 6 project. Quality Assurance (QA) activities are subject to requirements detailed in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), QA Program and the Environmental Restoration (ER) QA Program, as well as to other quality requirements. These activities may be performed by Energy Systems organizations, subcontractors to Energy Systems, and architect-engineer (A-E) under prime contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE), or a construction manager under prime contract to DOE. This plan specifies the overall Energy Systems quality requirements for the project. The WAG 6 QAP will be supplemented by subproject QAPs that will identify additional requirements pertaining to each subproject

  15. Exposure To Violence And Occupational Satisfaction Of Health Personnal In A Health Group Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcin Balci

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this study, it evaluted that exposure to violence and effect of this exposure to occupational satisfaction of health personel in Melikgazi Health Group Area. Materials And Methods: This cross sectional and descriptive study was performed in April-May 2006. Sampling not planned, it assumed to reach all of health personel. Data were analysed using computer and chi square test were used for statistical analyses. Lesser than 0,05 values were accepted as statistically significant. Results: Of the research group 66,7 % were female and 33,3 % were male. Mean age was 34,48 ± 5,73 years. Of the study participants were working in health center, 80,4 % day time and 19,6 % in night time and mean duration of working was 11,99 ± 5,3 years. Of the study group 57,1 % were chosen profession willingly and 65,5 % of them didn’t want to their children chose same profession. Of the study group 68,2 % were thought their fare were not enough. Of the study group, 50,3 % were experinced verbal and/or physical violence with different degrees. Of the violence victims 63,6 % were working in night shift of health centers and most of them doctors. Conclusion: Exposure to violence during work effects the satisfaction negativeley. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(1.000: 13-18

  16. Domestic violence among ever married women of reproductive age group in a slum area of Kolkata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Abhik; Mallik, Sarmila; Sanyal, Debasish; Dasgupta, Samir; Pal, Dipak; Mukherjee, Anindya

    2012-01-01

    Domestic violence has serious impact on women's health and well-being. A nationwide survey conducted in India observed that 37.2% of women experienced violence after marriage. To assess the prevalence of domestic violence among the ever married women in reproductive age group and to find out the types of domestic violence and factors associated with it. The study was a community based cross-sectional study, conducted in a slum area of Kolkata. Overall prevalence of domestic violence was 54%, of which 41.9% suffered from both current and lifetime physical and psychological violence. Presence of property, higher per capita income and social support were protective factors against domestic violence, whereas alcohol addiction and multiple sex partners were the important contributory factors for it. The study recommended more social support, awareness and income generation for women in the slum areas.

  17. Spatial associations between social groups and ozone air pollution exposure in the Beijing urban area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinyi; Cheng, Hongguang; He, Siyuan; Cui, Xiangfen; Pu, Xiao; Lu, Lu

    2018-02-27

    Few studies have linked social factors to air pollution exposure in China. Unlike the race or minority concepts in western countries, the Hukou system (residential registration system) is a fundamental reason for the existence of social deprivation in China. To assess the differences in ozone (O 3 ) exposure among social groups, especially groups divided by Hukou status, we assigned estimates of O 3 exposure to the latest census data of the Beijing urban area using a kriging interpolation model. We developed simultaneous autoregressive (SAR) models that account for spatial autocorrelation to identify the associations between O 3 exposure and social factors. Principal component regression was used to control the multicollinearity bias as well as explore the spatial structure of the social data. The census tracts (CTs) with higher proportions of persons living alone and migrants with non-local Hukou were characterized by greater exposure to ambient O 3 . The areas with greater proportions of seniors had lower O 3 exposure. The spatial distribution patterns were similar among variables including migrants, agricultural population and household separation (population status with separation between Hukou and actual residences), which fit the demographic characteristics of the majority of migrants. Migrants bore a double burden of social deprivation and O 3 pollution exposure due to city development planning and the Hukou system. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. OBJECTS GROUPING FOR SEGMENTATION OF ROADS NETWORK IN HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGES OF URBAN AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Maboudi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Updated road databases are required for many purposes such as urban planning, disaster management, car navigation, route planning, traffic management and emergency handling. In the last decade, the improvement in spatial resolution of VHR civilian satellite sensors – as the main source of large scale mapping applications – was so considerable that GSD has become finer than size of common urban objects of interest such as building, trees and road parts. This technological advancement pushed the development of “Object-based Image Analysis (OBIA” as an alternative to pixel-based image analysis methods. Segmentation as one of the main stages of OBIA provides the image objects on which most of the following processes will be applied. Therefore, the success of an OBIA approach is strongly affected by the segmentation quality. In this paper, we propose a purpose-dependent refinement strategy in order to group road segments in urban areas using maximal similarity based region merging. For investigations with the proposed method, we use high resolution images of some urban sites. The promising results suggest that the proposed approach is applicable in grouping of road segments in urban areas.

  19. Small Marine Protected Areas in Fiji Provide Refuge for Reef Fish Assemblages, Feeding Groups, and Corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaldo, Roberta M; Pires, Mathias M; Guimarães, Paulo Roberto; Hoey, Andrew S; Hay, Mark E

    2017-01-01

    The establishment of no-take marine protected areas (MPAs) on coral reefs is a common management strategy for conserving the diversity, abundance, and biomass of reef organisms. Generally, well-managed and enforced MPAs can increase or maintain the diversity and function of the enclosed coral reef, with some of the benefits extending to adjacent non-protected reefs. A fundamental question in coral reef conservation is whether these benefits arise within small MPAs (reef organisms is largely decoupled from local adult reproduction. We examined the structure of fish assemblages, composition of fish feeding groups, benthic cover, and key ecosystem processes (grazing, macroalgal browsing, and coral replenishment) in three small (0.5-0.8 km2) no-take MPAs and adjacent areas where fisheries are allowed (non-MPAs) on coral reefs in Fiji. The MPAs exhibited greater species richness, density, and biomass of fishes than non-MPAs. Furthermore, MPAs contained a greater abundance and biomass of grazing herbivores and piscivores as well as a greater abundance of cleaners than fished areas. We also found differences in fish associations when foraging, with feeding groups being generally more diverse and having greater biomass within MPAs than adjacent non-MPAs. Grazing by parrotfishes was 3-6 times greater, and macroalgal browsing was 3-5 times greater in MPAs than in non-MPAs. On average, MPAs had 260-280% as much coral cover and only 5-25% as much macroalgal cover as their paired non-MPA sites. Finally, two of the three MPAs had three-fold more coral recruits than adjacent non-MPAs. The results of this study indicate that small MPAs benefit not only populations of reef fishes, but also enhance ecosystem processes that are critical to reef resilience within the MPAs.

  20. Small Marine Protected Areas in Fiji Provide Refuge for Reef Fish Assemblages, Feeding Groups, and Corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Mathias M.; Guimarães, Paulo Roberto; Hoey, Andrew S.; Hay, Mark E.

    2017-01-01

    The establishment of no-take marine protected areas (MPAs) on coral reefs is a common management strategy for conserving the diversity, abundance, and biomass of reef organisms. Generally, well-managed and enforced MPAs can increase or maintain the diversity and function of the enclosed coral reef, with some of the benefits extending to adjacent non-protected reefs. A fundamental question in coral reef conservation is whether these benefits arise within small MPAs (reef organisms is largely decoupled from local adult reproduction. We examined the structure of fish assemblages, composition of fish feeding groups, benthic cover, and key ecosystem processes (grazing, macroalgal browsing, and coral replenishment) in three small (0.5–0.8 km2) no-take MPAs and adjacent areas where fisheries are allowed (non-MPAs) on coral reefs in Fiji. The MPAs exhibited greater species richness, density, and biomass of fishes than non-MPAs. Furthermore, MPAs contained a greater abundance and biomass of grazing herbivores and piscivores as well as a greater abundance of cleaners than fished areas. We also found differences in fish associations when foraging, with feeding groups being generally more diverse and having greater biomass within MPAs than adjacent non-MPAs. Grazing by parrotfishes was 3–6 times greater, and macroalgal browsing was 3–5 times greater in MPAs than in non-MPAs. On average, MPAs had 260–280% as much coral cover and only 5–25% as much macroalgal cover as their paired non-MPA sites. Finally, two of the three MPAs had three-fold more coral recruits than adjacent non-MPAs. The results of this study indicate that small MPAs benefit not only populations of reef fishes, but also enhance ecosystem processes that are critical to reef resilience within the MPAs. PMID:28122006

  1. Source document for waste area groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, P.L.; Kuhaida, A.J., Jr.

    1996-09-01

    This document serves as a source document for Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and other types of documents developed for and pertaining to Environmental Restoration (ER) Program activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It contains descriptions of the (1) regulatory requirements for the ORR ER Program, (2) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) ER Program, (3) ORNL site history and characterization, and (4) history and characterization of Waste Area Groupings (WAGS) 1-20. This document was created to save time, effort, and money for persons and organizations drafting documents for the ER Program and to improve consistency in the documents prepared for the program. By eliminating the repetitious use of selected information about the program, this document will help reduce the time and costs associated with producing program documents. By serving as a benchmark for selected information about the ER Program, this reference will help ensure that information presented in future documents is accurate and complete.

  2. Source document for waste area groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, P.L.; Kuhaida, A.J., Jr.

    1996-09-01

    This document serves as a source document for Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and other types of documents developed for and pertaining to Environmental Restoration (ER) Program activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It contains descriptions of the (1) regulatory requirements for the ORR ER Program, (2) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) ER Program, (3) ORNL site history and characterization, and (4) history and characterization of Waste Area Groupings (WAGS) 1-20. This document was created to save time, effort, and money for persons and organizations drafting documents for the ER Program and to improve consistency in the documents prepared for the program. By eliminating the repetitious use of selected information about the program, this document will help reduce the time and costs associated with producing program documents. By serving as a benchmark for selected information about the ER Program, this reference will help ensure that information presented in future documents is accurate and complete

  3. Effect of angiotensin 1-7 on endothelial cell injury caused by oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Jian Wu1

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effects of angiotensin 1-7 (Ang1-7 on endothelial cell injury caused by oxidative stress. Methods: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs were cultured and divided into blank control group, hydrogen peroxide and different Ang1-7 dose groups (1, 2 and 4 μmol/L Ang1-7 groups. The cell proliferation activity, the contents of antioxidant enzymes in cell culture medium, and the contents of endoplasmic reticulum stress molecules in cells were determined. Results: After 6, 12, 18 and 24 h of treatment, CCK-8 proliferation activity values of hydrogen peroxide group were significantly lower than those of blank control group, CCK-8 proliferation activity values of 1, 2 and 4 μmol/L Ang1-7 groups were significantly higher than those of hydrogen peroxide group, and the larger the Ang1-7 dose, the higher the CCK-8 proliferation activity values; after 24 h of treatment, SOD, GSH-Px, HO-1 and CAT contents in cell culture medium of hydrogen peroxide group were significantly lower than those of control group, and GRP78, XBP1 and CHOP contents in cells were significantly higher than those of control group; SOD, GSH-Px, HO-1 and CAT contents in cell culture medium of 1, 2 and 4 μmol/L Ang1-7 groups were significantly higher than those of hydrogen peroxide group, GRP78, XBP1 and CHOP contents in cells were significantly lower than those of hydrogen peroxide group, and the larger the Ang1-7 dose, the more significant the changes of above molecules in cell culture medium and cells. Conclusion: Angiotensin 1-7 has protective effect on the endothelial cell injury caused by oxidative stress.

  4. "Taalkundige" eksegese van romeine 13 :1 - 7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Botha

    1988-03-01

    Full Text Available As in most scientific disciplines, theoretical and methodological developments in recent times are constantly changing and greatly influencing New Testament studies. The aim of this article is to illustrate, with the use of modern exegetical methods, a possible approach to the "linguistic" phase of the exegetical process. The approach encompasses seven steps, namely, (1 demarcation of the periscope for investigation, (2 a literal translation, (3 grammatical and syntactical commentary, (4 a text -critical check of important variant readings, (5 discourse analysis, (6 a visual representation of the place of the periscope within its broader textual context and (7 word study. Romans 13 :1-7 (which deals with obedience to the authorities is used for the illustration of all seven these methodological steps. As conclusion it is stated that although this approach does not solve all the exegetical and hermeneutical problems of the periscope (which, however, it also does not pretend to do , these seven things will always remain an essential pa r t of the basic exegetical work in a scientific interpretation of New Testament texts .

  5. Screening of contaminants in Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; Hook, L.A.; Suter, G.W.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-07-01

    Waste Area Grouping 2 (WAG 2) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is located in the White Oak Creek Watershed and is composed of White Oak Creek Embayment, White Oak Lake and associated floodplain, and portions of White Oak Creek (WOC) and Melton Branch downstream of ORNL facilities. Contaminants leaving other ORNL WAGs in the WOC watershed pass through WAG 2 before entering the Clinch River. Health and ecological risk screening analyses were conducted on contaminants in WAG 2 to determine which contaminants were of concern and would require immediate consideration for remedial action and which contaminants could be assigned a low priority or further study. For screening purposes, WAG 2 was divided into four geographic reaches: Reach 1, a portion of WOC; Reach 2, Melton Branch; Reach 3, White Oak Lake and the floodplain area to the weirs on WOC and Melton Branch; and Reach 4, the White Oak Creek Embayment, for which an independent screening analysis has been completed. Screening analyses were conducted using data bases compiled from existing data on carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic contaminants, which included organics, inorganics, and radionuclides. Contaminants for which at least one ample had a concentration above the level of detection were placed in a detectable contaminants data base. Those contaminants for which all samples were below the level of detection were placed in a nondetectable contaminants data base

  6. Waste area Grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Human health risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purucker, S.T.; Douthat, D.M.

    1996-06-01

    This report is one of five reports issued in 1996 that provide follow- up information to the Phase 1 Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The five reports address areas of concern that could cause potential human health risk and ecological risk within WAG2 at ORNL. The purpose of this report is to present a summary of the human health risk assessment results based on the data collected for the WAG 2 Phase 1 RI. Estimates of risk are provided based on measured concentrations in the surface water, floodplain soil, and sediment of White Oak Creek, Melton Branch, and their tributaries. The human health risk assessment methodology used in this risk assessment is based on Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund (RAGS). First, the data for the different media are elevated to determine usability for risk assessment. Second, through the process of selecting chemicals of potential concern (COPCs), contaminants to be considered in the risk assessment are identified for each assessment of exposure potential is performed, and exposure pathways are identified. Subsequently, exposure is estimated quantitatively, and the toxicity of each of the COPCs is determined. The results of these analyses are combined and summarized in a risk characterization

  7. Mixed Waste Focus Area Mercury Working Group: An integrated approach to mercury waste treatment and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, T.B.; Morris, M.I.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.

    1998-03-01

    In May 1996, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) initiated the Mercury Working Group (HgWG). The HgWG was established to address and resolve the issues associated with mercury contaminated mixed wastes. During the MWFA's initial technical baseline development process, three of the top four technology deficiencies identified were related to the need for amalgamation, stabilization, and separation removal technologies for the treatment of mercury and mercury contaminated mixed waste. The HgWG is assisting the MWFA in soliciting, identifying, initiating, and managing efforts to address these areas. The focus of the HgWG is to better establish the mercury related treatment technologies at the DOE sites, refine the MWFA technical baseline as it relates to mercury treatment, and make recommendations to the MWFA on how to most effectively address these needs. Based on the scope and magnitude of the mercury mixed waste problem, as defined by HgWG, solicitations and contract awards have been made to the private sector to demonstrate both the amalgamation and stabilization processes using actual mixed wastes. Development efforts are currently being funded that will address DOE's needs for separation removal processes. This paper discusses the technology selection process, development activities, and the accomplishments of the HgWG to date through these various activities

  8. Screening of contaminants in Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; Hook, L.A.; Suter, G.W.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-07-01

    Waste Area Grouping 2 (WAG 2) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is located in the White Oak Creek Watershed and is composed of White Oak Creek Embayment, White Oak Lake and associated floodplain, and portions of White Oak Creek (WOC) and Melton Branch downstream of ORNL facilities. Contaminants leaving other ORNL WAGs in the WOC watershed pass through WAG 2 before entering the Clinch River. Health and ecological risk screening analyses were conducted on contaminants in WAG 2 to determine which contaminants were of concern and would require immediate consideration for remedial action and which contaminants could be assigned a low priority or further study. For screening purposes, WAG 2 was divided into four geographic reaches: Reach 1, a portion of WOC; Reach 2, Melton Branch; Reach 3, White Oak Lake and the floodplain area to the weirs on WOC and Melton Branch; and Reach 4, the White Oak Creek Embayment, for which an independent screening analysis has been completed. Screening analyses were conducted using data bases compiled from existing data on carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic contaminants, which included organics, inorganics, and radionuclides. Contaminants for which at least one ample had a concentration above the level of detection were placed in a detectable contaminants data base. Those contaminants for which all samples were below the level of detection were placed in a nondetectable contaminants data base.

  9. 36 CFR 1280.94 - When do Presidential libraries allow other groups to use their public areas for events?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... libraries allow other groups to use their public areas for events? 1280.94 Section 1280.94 Parks, Forests... Presidential libraries allow other groups to use their public areas for events? (a) Although Presidential... be consistent with the public perception of the library as a research and cultural institution. (c...

  10. Development of a cumulative risk assessment for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's waste area group 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    In 1989, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was added to the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Priorities List of Superfund sites. A Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFA/CO) for the INEL was signed by the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), EPA, and the State of Idaho in December 1991. The goal of this agreement is to ensure that potential or actual INEL releases of hazardous substances to the environment are thoroughly investigated in accordance with the National Contingency Plan (NCP) and that appropriate response actions are taken as necessary to protect human health and the environment. The Test Reactor Area (TRA) is included as Waste Area Group (WAG) 2 of ten INEL WAGs identified in the FFA/CO. WAG 2 consists of 13 operable units (OUs) which include pits, tanks, rubble piles, ponds, cooling towers, wells, french drains, perched water and spill areas. OU 2-13 is the Comprehensive Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) for WAG 2. The study presented here is a preliminary evaluation of the comprehensive risk for WAG-2. This investigation will be used as the basis of the WAG-2 comprehensive baseline risk assessment (BRA), and it will serve as a model for other INEL comprehensive risk assessments. The WAG-2 preliminary risk evaluation consisted of two broad phases. These phases were (1) a site and contaminant screening that was intended to support the identification of COPCs and risk assessment data gaps, and (2) an exposure pathway analysis that evaluated the comprehensive human health risks associated with WAG-2. The primary purposes of the investigation were to screen WAG-2 release sites and contaminants, and to identify risk assessment data gaps, so the investigation will be referred to as the WAG-2 Screening and Data Gap Analysis (SDGA) for the remainder of this report

  11. The mixed waste focus area mercury working group: an integrated approach for mercury treatment and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, T.B.; Morris, M.I.; Holmes-Burns, H.; Petersell, J.; Schwendiman, L.

    1997-01-01

    In May 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) initiated the Mercury Work Group (HgWG), which was established to address and resolve the issues associated with mercury- contaminated mixed wastes. Three of the first four technology deficiencies identified during the MWFA technical baseline development process were related to mercury amalgamation, stabilization, and separation/removal. The HgWG will assist the MWFA in soliciting, identifying, initiating, and managing all the efforts required to address these deficiencies. The focus of the HgWG is to better establish the mercury-related treatment needs at the DOE sites, refine the MWFA technical baseline as it relates to mercury treatment, and make recommendations to the MWFA on how to most effectively address these needs. The team will initially focus on the sites with the most mercury-contaminated mixed wastes, whose representatives comprise the HgWG. However, the group will also work with the sites with less inventory to maximize the effectiveness of these efforts in addressing the mercury- related needs throughout the entire complex

  12. The mixed waste focus area mercury working group: an integrated approach for mercury treatment and disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conley, T.B.; Morris, M.I. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Holmes-Burns, H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Petersell, J. [AIMS, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Schwendiman, L. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-02-01

    In May 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) initiated the Mercury Work Group (HgWG), which was established to address and resolve the issues associated with mercury- contaminated mixed wastes. Three of the first four technology deficiencies identified during the MWFA technical baseline development process were related to mercury amalgamation, stabilization, and separation/removal. The HgWG will assist the MWFA in soliciting, identifying, initiating, and managing all the efforts required to address these deficiencies. The focus of the HgWG is to better establish the mercury-related treatment needs at the DOE sites, refine the MWFA technical baseline as it relates to mercury treatment, and make recommendations to the MWFA on how to most effectively address these needs. The team will initially focus on the sites with the most mercury-contaminated mixed wastes, whose representatives comprise the HgWG. However, the group will also work with the sites with less inventory to maximize the effectiveness of these efforts in addressing the mercury- related needs throughout the entire complex.

  13. Immersion francaise precoce: Mathematique 1-7 (Early French Immersion: Mathematics 1-7).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Andy; And Others

    This mathematics curriculum guide is intended for use in grades 1-7 in the early French immersion program. After an initial listing of textbooks in French for teachers and students, it presents: (1) a general overview of the theory of modern mathematics and a suggested sequence of activities; (2) some notes on the application of the theory and a…

  14. Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This document presents the Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Based on the results of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) and on subsequent discussions with regulators, a decision was made to defer implementing source control remedial measures at the WAG. The alternative selected to address the risks associated with WAG 6 involves maintenance of site access controls prevent public exposure to on-site contaminants, continued monitoring of contaminant releases determine if source control measures are required, and development of technologies that could support the final remediation of WAG 6. Although active source control measures are not being implemented at WAG 6, environmental monitoring is necessary to ensure that any potential changes in contaminant release from the WAG are identified early enough to take appropriate action. Two types of environmental monitoring will be conducted: baseline monitoring and annual routine monitoring. The baseline monitoring will be conducted to establish the baseline contaminant release conditions at the WAG, confirm the site-related chemicals of concern (COCs), and gather data to confirm the site hydrologic model. The baseline monitoring is expected to begin in 1994 and last for 12--18 months. The annual routine monitoring will consist of continued sampling and analyses of COCs to determine off-WAG contaminant flux and risk, identify mills in releases, and confirm the primary contributors to risk. The annual routine monitoring will continue for ∼ 4 years after completion of the baseline monitoring

  15. [Pollution characteristics of platinum group elements in road dust in central urban area of Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ling-Ling; Gao, Bo; Lu, Jin; Zhou, Huai-Dong; Hao, Hong; Wang, Xiao-Jun

    2011-03-01

    In order to survey platinum group elements (PGEs) contamination in central urban area of Beijing, dust samples were collected from the second ring road in December 2009. The road samples were digested with aqua regia and separated and purified with cation exchange resin, and the resulting solutions were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results showed that the concentrations of Pd, Pt and Rh in road dust ranged from 17.40-458.75 ng x g(-1) (126.66 ng x g(-1)), 10.04-182.89 ng x g(-1) (65.25 ng x g(-1)), 4.00-68.04 ng x g(-1) (22.67 ng x g(-1)) respectively. In comparison with international cities, Pd and Rh concentrations in Beijing road dust were middle level and Pt concentration was lower. Pd concentration was rapidly increased in recent years. The concentrations of PGEs in four locations of the second ring road were arranged in the following order: West approximately East > North > South, which were controlled with the traffic intensity. Size partitioning indicated that the 0.125-0.25 mm fraction had the higher PGEs concentrations than other fractions and the fine grain size fraction (< 0.063 mm) is analyzed.

  16. Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This document presents the Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Based on the results of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) and on subsequent discussions with regulators, a decision was made to defer implementing source control remedial measures at the WAG. The alternative selected to address the risks associated with WAG 6 involves maintenance of site access controls prevent public exposure to on-site contaminants, continued monitoring of contaminant releases determine if source control measures are required, and development of technologies that could support the final remediation of WAG 6. Although active source control measures are not being implemented at WAG 6, environmental monitoring is necessary to ensure that any potential changes in contaminant release from the WAG are identified early enough to take appropriate action. Two types of environmental monitoring will be conducted: baseline monitoring and annual routine monitoring. The baseline monitoring will be conducted to establish the baseline contaminant release conditions at the WAG, confirm the site-related chemicals of concern (COCs), and gather data to confirm the site hydrologic model. The baseline monitoring is expected to begin in 1994 and last for 12--18 months. The annual routine monitoring will consist of continued sampling and analyses of COCs to determine off-WAG contaminant flux and risk, identify mills in releases, and confirm the primary contributors to risk. The annual routine monitoring will continue for {approximately} 4 years after completion of the baseline monitoring.

  17. Environmental monitoring plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document presents an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG 6) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This document updates a draft monitoring plan developed in 1993. The draft plan was never finalized awaiting resolution of the mechanisms for addressing RCRA concerns at a site where the CERCLA process resulted in a decision to defer action, i.e., postpone closure indefinitely. Over the past two years the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), US Department of Energy (DOE), and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, have agreed that RCRA authority at the site will be maintained through a post- closure permit; ''closure'' in this case referring to deferred action. Both a Revised Closure Plan (DOE 1995a) and a Post-Closure Permit Application (DOE 1995b) have been developed to document this agreement; relevant portions of the EMP will be included in the RCRA Post-Closure Permit Application. As the RCRA issues were being negotiated, DOE initiated monitoring at WAG 6. The purpose of the monitoring activities was to (1) continue to comply with RCRA groundwater quality assessment requirements, (2) install new monitoring equipment, and (3) establish the baseline conditions at WAG 6 against which changes in contaminant releases could be measured. Baseline monitoring is scheduled to end September 30, 1995. Activities that have taken place over the past two years are summarized in this document

  18. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3 -- Appendix B: Technical findings and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of investigations performed at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5. It includes information on risk assessments that have evaluated long-term impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in this document forms the basis for decisions regarding the need for subsequent remediation work at WAG 5. Sections B1.1 through B1.4 present an overview of the environmental setting of WAG 5, including location, population, land uses, ecology, and climate, and Sects. B1.5 through B1.7 give site-specific details (e.g., topography, soils, geology, and hydrology). The remediation investigation (RI) of WAG 5 did not entail en exhaustive characterization of all physical attributes of the site; the information presented here focuses on those most relevant to the development and verification of the WAG 5 conceptual model. Most of the information presented in this appendix was derived from the RI field investigation, which was designed to complement the existing data base from earlier, site-specific studies of Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 5 and related areas.

  19. An integrated solution for secure group communication in wide-area networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Deborah A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chevassut, Olivier [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Thompson, Mary [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tsudik, Gene [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2001-04-01

    Many distributed applications require a secure reliable group communication system to provide coordination among the application components. This paper describes a secure group layer (SGL) which bundles a reliable group communication system, a group authorization and access control mechanism, and a group key agreement protocol to provide a comprehensive and practical secure group communication platform. SGL also encapsulates the standard message security services (i.e, confidentiality, authenticity and integrity). A number of challenging issues encountered in the design of SGL are brought to light and experimental results obtained with a prototype implementation are discussed.

  20. Addiction treatment in deprived urban areas in EU countries: Accessibility of care for people from socially marginalized groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welbel, Marta; Matanov, Aleksandra; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Barros, Henrique; Canavan, Reamonn; Gabor, Edina; Gaddini, Andrea; Greacen, Tim; Kluge, Ulrike; Lorant, Vincent; Esteban Pena, Mercedes; Schene, Aart H.; Soares, Joaquim J. F.; Strassmayr, Christa; Vondrackova, Petra; Priebe, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This study examines the accessibility of addiction treatment within services providing mental health care and support for people from socially marginalized groups in deprived urban areas across EU countries. Methods: Services providing mental health care and support in deprived areas of 14 EU

  1. Quality of care for anxiety and depression in different ethnic groups by family practitioners in urban areas in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fassaert, T.; Nielen, M.; Verheij, R.; Verhoeff, A.; Dekker, J.; Beekman, A.; Wit, M. de

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is widespread concern about access to good quality health care for ethnic minority groups. This study investigates differences between ethnic groups regarding prevalence of anxiety and depression, and adherence to treatment guidelines by family practitioners in urban areas in the

  2. Quality of care for anxiety and depression in different ethnic groups by family practitioners in urban areas in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fassaert, T.; Nielen, M.M.A.; Verheij, R.; Verhoeff, A.; Dekker, J.; Beekman, A.T.F.; de Wit, M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: There is widespread concern about access to good quality health care for ethnic minority groups. This study investigates differences between ethnic groups regarding prevalence of anxiety and depression, and adherence to treatment guidelines by family practitioners in urban areas in the

  3. Traffic represents the main source of pollution in small Mediterranean urban areas as seen by lichen functional groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llop, Esteve; Pinho, Pedro; Ribeiro, Manuel C; Pereira, Maria João; Branquinho, Cristina

    2017-05-01

    The land-use type (residential, green areas, and traffic) within relatively small Mediterranean urban areas determines significant changes on lichen diversity, considering species richness and functional groups related to different ecological factors. Those areas with larger volume of traffic hold lower species diversity, in terms of species richness and lichen diversity value (LDV). Traffic areas also affect the composition of the lichen community, which is evidenced by sensitive species. The abundance of species of lichens tolerant to low levels of eutrophication diminishes in traffic areas; oppositely, those areas show a higher abundance of species of lichens tolerating high levels of eutrophication. On the other hand, residential and green areas have an opposite pattern, mainly with species highly tolerant to eutrophication being less abundant than low or moderate ones. The characteristics of tree bark do not seem to affect excessively on lichen composition; however, tree species shows some effect that should be considered in further studies.

  4. GIS-based identification of areas with mineral resource potential for six selected deposit groups, Bureau of Land Management Central Yukon Planning Area, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, James V.; Karl, Susan M.; Labay, Keith A.; Shew, Nora B.; Granitto, Matthew; Hayes, Timothy S.; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; Schmidt, Jeanine M.; Todd, Erin; Wang, Bronwen; Werdon, Melanie B.; Yager, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    This study, covering the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Central Yukon Planning Area (CYPA), Alaska, was prepared to aid BLM mineral resource management planning. Estimated mineral resource potential and certainty are mapped for six selected mineral deposit groups: (1) rare earth element (REE) deposits associated with peralkaline to carbonatitic intrusive igneous rocks, (2) placer and paleoplacer gold, (3) platinum group element (PGE) deposits associated with mafic and ultramafic intrusive igneous rocks, (4) carbonate-hosted copper deposits, (5) sandstone uranium deposits, and (6) tin-tungsten-molybdenum-fluorspar deposits associated with specialized granites. These six deposit groups include most of the strategic and critical elements of greatest interest in current exploration.

  5. Traveler information services in rural tourism areas : appendix B, qualitative interviews and focus groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-30

    This report documents results from surveys which were conducted for qualitatively assessing the use of traveler information services in rural areas. The focus of the surveys was to identify those factors which influence travel planning and thus impro...

  6. An epidemiological study of diabetes mellitus amongst high risk age group population in urban and Rural areas of kanpur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem Ahmad

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Research Question : - What is the magnitude of Diabetes mellitus in the urban and rural areas of Kanpur.Objectives:To study the prevalence of diabetes mellitus amongst high risk age group population in urban and rural areas of Kanpur.To compare the magnitude of problem of diabetes mellitus between urban and rural areas of Kanpur.To study the possible associates and socio-demographic variables related to diabetes mellitus.Study Design : Cross sectional study.Setting : The study was performed on three thousand population each in urban and rural areas of Kanpur.Participants : High risk age group population i.e. 45 years and above.Study variables : Age, Sex. impaired glucose tolerance. Body mass index, Education, Working status. Social class, family history of diabetes.Statistical analysis : Chi-square lest, percentagesResults From a total of 676 persons of high risk age group i.e. 45 years and above, the overall prevalence of diabetes mellitus in the study areas was observed lobe 7. l%with 9.94% in urban and 3.61% in rural areas, the maximum percetage of diabetes cases (41.66% was in the age group of 56-60 years. Higher prevalence of diabetes was observed in the obese (56.25% and sedentary (87.5% persons. The family history' of diabetes mellitus was present in (35.41% of diabetes mellitus cases.

  7. Angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas axis integrity is required for the expression of object recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaroni, Thiago L N; Raslan, Ana Cláudia S; Fontes, Walkiria R P; de Oliveira, Marilene L; Bader, Michael; Alenina, Natalia; Moraes, Márcio F D; Dos Santos, Robson A; Pereira, Grace S

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the brain has its own intrinsic renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) is particularly interesting, because it appears to counterbalance most of the Ang II effects. Ang-(1-7) exerts its biological function through activation of the G-protein-coupled receptor Mas. Interestingly, hippocampus is one of the regions with higher expression of Mas. However, the role of Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in hippocampus-dependent memories is still poorly understood. Here we demonstrated that Mas ablation, as well as the blockade of Mas in the CA1-hippocampus, impaired object recognition memory (ORM). We also demonstrated that the blockade of Ang II receptors AT1, but not AT2, recovers ORM impairment of Mas-deficient mice. Considering that high concentrations of Ang-(1-7) may activate AT1 receptors, nonspecifically, we evaluate the levels of Ang-(1-7) and its main precursors Ang I and Ang II in the hippocampus of Mas-deficient mice. The Ang I and Ang II levels are unaltered in the whole hipocampus of MasKo. However, Ang-(1-7) concentration is increased in the whole hippocampus of MasKo mice, as well as in the CA1 area. Taken together, our findings suggest that the functionality of the Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis is essential for normal ORM processing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Captopril intake decreases body weight gain via angiotensin-(1-7).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Young-Bin; Kim, Jong Hun; Park, Byung Mun; Park, Byung Hyun; Kim, Suhn Hee

    2012-09-01

    Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] plays a beneficial role in cardiovascular physiology by providing a counterbalance to the function of angiotensin II (Ang II). Although Ang II has been shown to be an adipokine secreted by adipocyte and affect lipid metabolism, the role of Ang-(1-7) in adipose tissue remains to be clarified. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether Ang-(1-7) affects lipid metabolism in adipose tissue. Ang-(1-7) increased glycerol release from primary adipocytes in a dose-dependent manner. A lipolytic effect of Ang-(1-7) was attenuated by pretreatment with A-779, a Mas receptor blocker and with an inhibitor of phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), or eNOS. However, losartan and PD123319 did not cause any change in Ang-(1-7)-induced lipolysis. Ang-(1-7)-induced lipolysis had an addictive effect with isoproterenol. In normal rats, chronic intake of captopril for 4 wks decreased body weight gain and the amount of adipose tissue and increased plasma Ang-(1-7) level. These effects were attenuated by administration of A-779. The levels of Mas receptor and phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (p-HSL) were significantly increased by treatment with captopril and these captopril-mediated effects were attenuated by the administration of A-779. There was no difference in diameter of adipocytes among sham, captopril- and captopril+A-779-treated groups. The similar effects of captopril on body weight, expression of Mas receptor, and p-HSL were observed in Ang-(1-7)-treated rats. These results suggest that captopril intake decreased body weight gain partly through Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor/PI3K pathway. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. LOCAL ACTION GROUPS - THE EUROPEAN INTEGRATION CATALYST FOR THE ROMANIAN RURAL AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosora Liviu - Cosmin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Romania has the highest share of European Union rural areas (44.9% in 2009, which generates and maintains a long series of regional disparities. Because of these disparities, the economy faces a number of elements that undermine the quality of human and social capital and reduces the potential for growth: precarious social and economic infrastructure, reduced access to markets and thus to goods, a low level of both economic cohesion and living standards, and a difficult access to education and training (leading to the underutilization of labor in rural areas, while major shortages in the labor market and increased migration phenomenon manifests.\\r\

  10. Study of Spatial Pattern of Indicator Plant Species in Ecological Species Groups (Case Study: Manesht Protected Area, Ilam Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Heydari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The key factor in understanding the forest ecosystems is forest structure. Spatial arrangement and location of trees are both one of the main components of forest stand structure. This study was carried out in Manesht protected area, Ilam province. In order to determine the ecological groups and spatial patterns of indicator species, we used fixed-area plots method. For data collection, 125 square sampling plots with an area of 400 m2 were selected based on a systematically random method. The plants were classified using TWINSPAN analysis and then spatial pattern was analyzed by indices of ratio of average to variance, Morisata and standardized Morisata. Four ecological groups were specified and all dispersion indices showed clumped pattern for indicator species of the ecological groups. The results of this study could provide useful information to describe the sustainability of this valuable ecosystem and monitoring protective and rehabilitative practices.

  11. Finding Risk Groups by Optimizing Artificial Neural Networks on the Area under the Survival Curve Using Genetic Algorithms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Kalderstam

    Full Text Available We investigate a new method to place patients into risk groups in censored survival data. Properties such as median survival time, and end survival rate, are implicitly improved by optimizing the area under the survival curve. Artificial neural networks (ANN are trained to either maximize or minimize this area using a genetic algorithm, and combined into an ensemble to predict one of low, intermediate, or high risk groups. Estimated patient risk can influence treatment choices, and is important for study stratification. A common approach is to sort the patients according to a prognostic index and then group them along the quartile limits. The Cox proportional hazards model (Cox is one example of this approach. Another method of doing risk grouping is recursive partitioning (Rpart, which constructs a decision tree where each branch point maximizes the statistical separation between the groups. ANN, Cox, and Rpart are compared on five publicly available data sets with varying properties. Cross-validation, as well as separate test sets, are used to validate the models. Results on the test sets show comparable performance, except for the smallest data set where Rpart's predicted risk groups turn out to be inverted, an example of crossing survival curves. Cross-validation shows that all three models exhibit crossing of some survival curves on this small data set but that the ANN model manages the best separation of groups in terms of median survival time before such crossings. The conclusion is that optimizing the area under the survival curve is a viable approach to identify risk groups. Training ANNs to optimize this area combines two key strengths from both prognostic indices and Rpart. First, a desired minimum group size can be specified, as for a prognostic index. Second, the ability to utilize non-linear effects among the covariates, which Rpart is also able to do.

  12. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU's) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment and baseline human health evaluation including a toxicity assessment, and a baseline environmental evaluation

  13. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU'S) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment from doses to humans and animals and associated cancer risks, exposure via food chains, and historical data

  14. Human genetic studies in areas of high natural radiation VI. Genetical load and ethnic group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire-Maia, A.

    1974-01-01

    The load of mutations disclosed by inbreeding, according to the ethnic group of the parents, has been analyzed in our data. Besides the total of the population, a sample with no alien ancestrals has also been analyzed. Genetic load has been studied for absortions, still births, pos-natal mortality, total mortality, anomalies, total mortality + anomalies, and abnormalities in general [pt

  15. Penetrating Ocular Injuries in Pediatric Age Group in a Rural Area of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ocular injuries comprise a group of disorders with a wide variation in clinical presentation, causes, and visual outcome. Penetrating injury is defined as a single full thickness laceration of the eyeball usually caused by a sharp object.[1] Most penetrating injuries encountered are occupational, therefore, seen in adults.

  16. The Exponential Map of the Group of Area-Preserving Diffeomorphisms of a Surface with Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, James; Misiołek, Gerard; Preston, Stephen C.

    2018-03-01

    We prove that the Riemannian exponential map of the right-invariant L 2 metric on the group of volume-preserving diffeomorphisms of a two-dimensional manifold with a nonempty boundary is a nonlinear Fredholm map of index zero.

  17. Computational analysis of a subcooled boiling flow with a one-group interfacial area transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Byoung-Uhn; Park, Goon-Cherl; Yoon, Han-Young; Euh, Dong-Jin; Song, Chul-Hwa

    2008-01-01

    For a multidimensional analysis of a two-phase flow, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code was developed with the implementation of an interfacial area transport equation that is beneficial for dynamically estimating the interfacial area concentration (IAC). The code structure was based on the two-fluid model and the Simplified Marker and Cell (SMAC) algorithm. The SAMC algorithm was extended to a two-phase flow simulation with a phase change. Various well-known constitutive models regarding boiling, condensation, and nondrag forces have been implemented into the code. To verify the robustness of the code to predict wall boiling and void propagation phenomena, a subcooled boiling test in a vertical annulus channel was analyzed as a benchmark problem. As the analysis results, a model for bubble departure diameter on the heated wall was identified as the principal factor for subcooled boiling phenomena, and the limitation of the current departure diameter models under a low-pressure condition resulted in a deviation of the void fraction and IAC when compared with the results of the experiment. It is necessary that the research on the interfacial area transport equation focuses on modeling reliable source terms for the boiling mechanism as a future work. (author)

  18. Site investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 2, Appendixes: Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This report documents the UltraSonic Ranging and Data Systems (USRADS) survey conducted for radiological characterization of approximately 5 acres located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4. The survey was conducted by Chemrad Tennessee Corporation under subcontract No. 7908-RS-00902 to CDM Federal Programs Corporation. The field survey began June 23, 1994 (Chemrad survey team was unable to actually enter field until June 24 awaiting sign-off of CDM plans by MMES) and was terminated on June 29, 1994. The designated survey area is located on the DOE X-10 facility and South of the main X-10 building complex. The entire north boundary of the site is adjacent to SWSA 4, with the Bath Tubbing Trench Seep Area (BTT) actually being a part of that SWSA (See Figure 1). Approximately one-third of the designated area was actually surveyed. The BTT area slopes moderately eastward toward a small stream in the WAG 4 area. The area is open and had recently been trimmed for the survey. The balance of the designated survey area lies along the small stream within WAG 4 and is densely wooded with heavy underbrush. The area had not been cleared or brushed. Survey reference points for the BTT area mere directly tied into the X-10 coordinate system while the t bale,ice of the designated survey area mere tied into an existing relative metric grid system. The designated area was surveyed for radiological characterization using near-surface gamma and beta detectors as well as an energy independent dosimeter. This report describes the survey method and presents the survey findings.

  19. Site investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 2, Appendixes: Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This report documents the UltraSonic Ranging and Data Systems (USRADS) survey conducted for radiological characterization of approximately 5 acres located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4. The survey was conducted by Chemrad Tennessee Corporation under subcontract No. 7908-RS-00902 to CDM Federal Programs Corporation. The field survey began June 23, 1994 (Chemrad survey team was unable to actually enter field until June 24 awaiting sign-off of CDM plans by MMES) and was terminated on June 29, 1994. The designated survey area is located on the DOE X-10 facility and South of the main X-10 building complex. The entire north boundary of the site is adjacent to SWSA 4, with the Bath Tubbing Trench Seep Area (BTT) actually being a part of that SWSA (See Figure 1). Approximately one-third of the designated area was actually surveyed. The BTT area slopes moderately eastward toward a small stream in the WAG 4 area. The area is open and had recently been trimmed for the survey. The balance of the designated survey area lies along the small stream within WAG 4 and is densely wooded with heavy underbrush. The area had not been cleared or brushed. Survey reference points for the BTT area mere directly tied into the X-10 coordinate system while the t bale,ice of the designated survey area mere tied into an existing relative metric grid system. The designated area was surveyed for radiological characterization using near-surface gamma and beta detectors as well as an energy independent dosimeter. This report describes the survey method and presents the survey findings

  20. Food groups consumed by infants and toddlers in urban areas of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Yu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Food consumption patterns of young children in China are not well known. Objective: Characterised food groups consumed by infants and young children in urban China using data from the Maternal Infant Nutrition Growth (MING study. Design: One 24-h dietary recall was completed for 1,350 infants and young children (436 infants aged 6–11 months and 914 young children aged 12–35 months, who were recruited from maternal and child care centres in eight cities via face-to-face interviews with the primary caregiver. All foods, beverages and supplements reported were assigned to one of 64 food groups categorised into the following: milk and milk products, grains, vegetables, fruits, protein foods and desserts/sweets. The percentage of infants and young children consuming foods from specific food groups was calculated, regardless of the amount consumed. Results: Less than half of infants consumed breast milk (47%, whereas 59% of infants consumed infant formula and 53–75% of young children consumed growing-up (fortified milk. Rice was the number one grain food consumed after 6 months (up to 88% and the consumption of infant cereal was low. About 50% of infants did not consume any fruits or vegetables, and 38% of young children did not consume any fruits on the day of the recall. Only 40% of all children consumed dark green leafy vegetables and even fewer consumed deep yellow vegetables. Eggs and pork were the most commonly consumed protein foods. Conclusions: The data provide important insight for developing detailed food consumption guidelines for this population group. Mothers of infants should be encouraged to continue breastfeeding after the first 6 months. Parents should be advised to offer a wide variety of vegetables and fruits daily, particularly dark green leafy and deep yellow vegetables and colourful fruits. The consumption of fortified infant cereal should be advocated to improve the iron intake of Chinese infants.

  1. Features of soil microbial groups in the area Kilmezsky landfill dumping of toxic chemicals ( Kirov Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berezin Grigory Ivanovich

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Under the influence of pesticides a transformation of soil microbial complexes occurs. In the area of Kilmezsky dumping of toxic chemicals (Kirov Region the species composition of soil phototrophes and quantitative characteristics of soil algo-cyano-mycological complexes change as a result of chronic exposure to pesticides . The content of cyanobacteria in the structure of phototrophic systems and the degree of mikromycets populations melanization can be used as bioindicators of soil contamination complementing the set of indicators based on certified laboratory methods of biotesting.

  2. Best management practices plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    This Best Management Practices (BMP) Plan has been developed as part of the environmental monitoring program at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The BMP Plan describes the requirements for personnel training, spill prevention and control, environmental compliance, and sediment/erosion control as they relate to environmental monitoring activities and installation of Monitoring Station 4 at WAG 6

  3. Towards an improved lithostratigraphic subdivision of the chalk group in the Netherlands North Sea area - A seismic stratigraphic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molen, A.S. van der; Wong, Th.E.

    2007-01-01

    In the Netherlands North Sea area, the Chalk Group has thus far been subdivided into the Cenomanian Texel Formation, the Turonian to Maastrichtian Ommelanden Formation and the Danian Ekofisk Formation. This paper describes the attempt to arrive at a more detailed lithostratigraphic subdivision for

  4. Towards an improved lithostratigraphic subdivision of the Chalk Group in the Netherlands North Sea area – A seismic stratigraphic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molen, A.S. van der; Wong, Th.E.

    In the Netherlands North Sea area, the Chalk Group has thus far been subdivided into the Cenomanian Texel Formation, the Turonian to MaastrichtianOmmelanden Formation and the Danian Ekofisk Formation. This paper describes the attempt to arrive at a more detailed lithostratigraphicsubdivision for

  5. Evaluation of Countermeasures Effectiveness in a Radioactively Contaminated Urban Area Using METRO-K : The Implementation of Scenarios Designed by the EMRAS II Urban Areas Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Won Tae; Jeong, Hae Sun; Jeong, Hyo Joon; Kim, Eun Han; Han, Moon Hee

    2012-01-01

    The Urban Areas Working Group within the EMRAS-2 (Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety, Phase 2), which has been supported by the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency), has designed some types of accidental scenarios to test and improve the capabilities of models used for evaluation of radioactive contamination in urban areas. For the comparison of the results predicted from the different models, the absorbed doses in air were analyzed as a function of time following the accident with consideration of countermeasures to be taken. Two kinds of considerations were performed to find the dependency of the predicted results. One is the 'accidental season', i.e. summer and winter, in which an event of radioactive contamination takes place in a specified urban area. Likewise, the 'rainfall intensity' on the day of an event was also considered with the option of 1) no rain, 2) light rain, and 3) heavy rain. The results predicted using a domestic model of METRO-K have been submitted to the Urban Areas Working Group for the intercomparison with those of other models. In this study, as a part of these results using METRO-K, the countermeasures effectiveness in terms of dose reduction was analyzed and presented for the ground floor of a 24-story business building in a specified urban area. As a result, it was found that the countermeasures effectiveness is distinctly dependent on the rainfall intensity on the day of an event, and season when an event takes place. It is related to the different deposition amount of the radionuclides to the surfaces and different behavior on the surfaces following a deposition, and different effectiveness from countermeasures. In conclusion, a selection of appropriate countermeasures with consideration of various environmental conditions may be important to minimize and optimize the socio-economic costs as well as radiation-induced health detriments.

  6. 24 CFR 1.7 - Conduct of investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conduct of investigations. 1.7... DEVELOPMENT-EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 § 1.7 Conduct of investigations. (a... conduct of any investigation, hearing, or judicial proceeding arising thereunder. ...

  7. 48 CFR 970.1504-1-7 - Fee base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fee base. 970.1504-1-7... REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Contracting by Negotiation 970.1504-1-7 Fee base. (a) The fee base is an estimate of necessary allowable costs, with some exclusions. It is used in the fee...

  8. Tsunami risk assessment for facility group over a wide area using inundation assessment method considering energy conservation law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukutani, Yo; Imamura, Fumihiko; Tokunaga, Takeshi; Sato, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    We propose a quantitative evaluation method of overall tsunami risk that the entire facility group over a wide area holds. We considerably reduced the calculation cost for tsunami inundation depth by adopting the evaluation method using energy conservation law as compared with the evaluation method using non-linear long wave equation. For financial institutions such as banks and insurance companies with contractors over a wide area and business companies with multiple their assets and facilities in various places, the proposed evaluation method in this study could be a useful approach to implement their risk-based management decisions for tsunami risk. (author)

  9. Communication of geohazard risks by focus group discussions in the Mount Cameroon area, Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Marmol, M.-A.; Suh Atanga, M. Bi; Njome, S.; Mafany Teke, G.; Jacobs, P.; Suh, C. E.

    2012-04-01

    The inappropriate translation of scientific information of geohazard (volcanic, landslide and crater lake outgassing) risks to any local population leaves people with incongruent views of the real dangers. Initial workshops organized under the supervision of the VLIR-OI (Flemish Interuniversity Council - Own Initiatives) members have led to the deployment of billboards as requested and drawn up by the locals. The VLIR-OI project has also organized focus group discussions (FGD) with the local stakeholders to find out in various cities, the state of preparedness, the response to emergency situations, the recovery from the emergency and the mitigation. Researchers have preferred open discussion with the local population and its representatives in order to elicit information that otherwise might not be found on a structured questionnaire. FGD provide a meaningful interactive opportunity to collect information and reflection on a wide range of input. The method provides an insight into problems that require a solution through a process of discovering the meaning attributed to certain events or issues. In this research four cardinal points as preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation (Fothergill, 1996) guided the FGD. The population (i.e. local town councils) were constituted by a mix of chiefs, engineers, technicians and civil servants and government officials. In all the three city councils concerned, the engineers in charge complained about the lack of strategic planning, and about the missing of an elaborated strategy for disasters. They are aware of the existence of an organigram in the "Département de l'Action Civile" in Yaounde but never received any "strategic" document. Therefore inappropriate actions might be taken by the municipalities themselves. Fortunately all people interrogated at the FDG always mentioned solidarity in any event. Fothergill, 1996, Gender, Risk, and Disasters, Intern. Jour. of Mass Emergencies and Disasters, vol.14, n°1, 33-56

  10. Linking Dichotomous Segregation with Multi-group Segregation: Weighted Segregation Ratios in Selected U. S. Metropolitan Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Lingxin; Fong, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The U. S. residential landscape is increasingly multi-racial and multi-ethnic, giving rise to the question of how to compare dichotomous segregation among multiple groups living in the same area. To address the problem in the existing dichotomous approach, which offers no common basis for comparing dichotomous segregation among multiple groups, this paper develops a weighted segregation ratio approach based on Theil's segregation index and its additive decomposability. This approach can be used to bridge information obtained from dichotomous segregation between specific groups (such as black-white and black-Hispanic), and dichotomous segregation between group and non-group (such as white-non-white and black-non-black) in previous studies. We apply both dichotomous and weighted segregation ratio approaches to 1990 and 2000 U. S. census data. Results are interpreted for five selected metropolitan areas as well as for the weighted national average. This new approach yields distinctive findings that portray the complicated process of residential segregation, including the increasing significance of Hispanic segregation and Asian segregation in the decade from 1990 to 2000. PMID:25580036

  11. Screening of contaminants in Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; Hook, L.A.; Suter, G.W.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of a health risk and ecological risk screening analysis for Waste Area Grouping 2 (WAG 2) using available data to identify contaminants and environmental pathways that will require either further investigation or immediate consideration for remediation based on the screening indices. The screening analysis will also identify contaminants that can be assigned a low priority for further investigation and those that require additional data.

  12. Site characterization plan for groundwater in Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.R.; Curtis, A.H.; Houlberg, L.M.; Purucker, S.T.; Singer, M.L.; Tardiff, M.F.; Wolf, D.A.

    1994-07-01

    The Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is undergoing a site characterization to identify environmental contamination that may be present. This document, Site Characterization Report for Groundwater in Waste Area Grouping I at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, identifies areas of concern with respect to WAG 1 groundwater and presents the rationale, justification, and objectives for conducting this continuing site characterization. This report summarizes the operations that have taken place at each of the areas of concern in WAG 1, summarizes previous characterization studies that have been performed, presents interpretations of previously collected data and information, identifies contaminants of concern, and presents an action plan for further site investigations and early actions that will lead to identification of contaminant sources, their major groundwater pathways, and reduced off-site migration of contaminated groundwater to surface water. Site characterization Activities performed to date at WAG I have indicated that groundwater contamination, principally radiological contamination, is widespread. An extensive network of underground pipelines and utilities have contributed to the dispersal of contaminants to an unknown extent. The general absence of radiological contamination in surface water at the perimeter of WAG 1 is attributed to the presence of pipelines and underground waste storage tank sumps and dry wells distributed throughout WAG 1 which remove more than about 40 million gal of contaminated groundwater per year

  13. Site characterization plan for groundwater in Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, R.R.; Curtis, A.H.; Houlberg, L.M.; Purucker, S.T.; Singer, M.L.; Tardiff, M.F.; Wolf, D.A.

    1994-07-01

    The Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is undergoing a site characterization to identify environmental contamination that may be present. This document, Site Characterization Report for Groundwater in Waste Area Grouping I at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, identifies areas of concern with respect to WAG 1 groundwater and presents the rationale, justification, and objectives for conducting this continuing site characterization. This report summarizes the operations that have taken place at each of the areas of concern in WAG 1, summarizes previous characterization studies that have been performed, presents interpretations of previously collected data and information, identifies contaminants of concern, and presents an action plan for further site investigations and early actions that will lead to identification of contaminant sources, their major groundwater pathways, and reduced off-site migration of contaminated groundwater to surface water. Site characterization Activities performed to date at WAG I have indicated that groundwater contamination, principally radiological contamination, is widespread. An extensive network of underground pipelines and utilities have contributed to the dispersal of contaminants to an unknown extent. The general absence of radiological contamination in surface water at the perimeter of WAG 1 is attributed to the presence of pipelines and underground waste storage tank sumps and dry wells distributed throughout WAG 1 which remove more than about 40 million gal of contaminated groundwater per year.

  14. Behaviors Related to Mosquito-Borne Diseases among Different Ethnic Minority Groups along the China-Laos Border Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In China, mosquito-borne diseases are most common in the sub-tropical area of Yunnan province. The objective of this study was to examine behaviors related to mosquito-borne diseases in different ethnic minority groups and different socioeconomic groups of people living in this region. Methods: A stratified two-stage cluster sampling technique with probability proportional to size was used in Mengla County, Xishuangbanna Prefecture, Yunnan. Twelve villages were used to recruit adult (≥18 years old and eight schools were used for children (<18 years old. A questionnaire on behaviors and environment variables related to mosquito-borne diseases was devised. Results: Multiple correspondence analysis (MCA grouped 20 behaviors into three domains, namely, environmental condition, bed net use behaviors, and repellent use behaviors, respectively. The Han ethnicity had the lowest odds of rearing pigs, their odds being significantly lower than those of Yi and Yao. For bed net use, Dai and other ethnic minority groups were less likely to use bed nets compared to Yi and Yao. The odds of repellent use in the Han ethnicity was lower than in Yi, but higher than in Dai. The Dai group was the most likely ethnicity to use repellents. Farmers were at a higher risk for pig rearing and not using repellents. Education of less than primary school held the lowest odds of pig rearing. Those with low income were at a higher risk for not using bed nets and repellent except in pig rearing. Those with a small family size were at a lower risk for pig rearing. Conclusion: Different ethnic and socioeconomic groups in the study areas require different specific emphases for the prevention of mosquito-borne diseases.

  15. Behaviors Related to Mosquito-Borne Diseases among Different Ethnic Minority Groups along the China-Laos Border Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chao; Guo, Xiaofang; Zhao, Jun; Lv, Quan; Li, Hongbin; McNeil, Edward B; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Zhou, Hongning

    2017-10-15

    Background : In China, mosquito-borne diseases are most common in the sub-tropical area of Yunnan province. The objective of this study was to examine behaviors related to mosquito-borne diseases in different ethnic minority groups and different socioeconomic groups of people living in this region. Methods : A stratified two-stage cluster sampling technique with probability proportional to size was used in Mengla County, Xishuangbanna Prefecture, Yunnan. Twelve villages were used to recruit adult (≥18 years old) and eight schools were used for children (<18 years old). A questionnaire on behaviors and environment variables related to mosquito-borne diseases was devised. Results : Multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) grouped 20 behaviors into three domains, namely, environmental condition, bed net use behaviors, and repellent use behaviors, respectively. The Han ethnicity had the lowest odds of rearing pigs, their odds being significantly lower than those of Yi and Yao. For bed net use, Dai and other ethnic minority groups were less likely to use bed nets compared to Yi and Yao. The odds of repellent use in the Han ethnicity was lower than in Yi, but higher than in Dai. The Dai group was the most likely ethnicity to use repellents. Farmers were at a higher risk for pig rearing and not using repellents. Education of less than primary school held the lowest odds of pig rearing. Those with low income were at a higher risk for not using bed nets and repellent except in pig rearing. Those with a small family size were at a lower risk for pig rearing. Conclusion : Different ethnic and socioeconomic groups in the study areas require different specific emphases for the prevention of mosquito-borne diseases.

  16. Environmental Modelling of Remediation of Urban Contaminated Areas. Report of the Urban Remediation Working Group of EMRAS Theme 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The Urban Remediation Working Group of the International Atomic Energy Agency's EMRAS (Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety) programme was concerned with remediation assessment for urban areas contaminated with dispersed radionuclides. Types of events that could result in dispersal or deposition of radionuclides in an urban situation include both intentional and unintentional events, and releases could range from major events involving a nuclear facility to small events such as a transportation accident. The primary objective of the Urban Remediation Working Group was (1) to test and improve the prediction of dose rates and cumulative doses to humans for urban areas contaminated with dispersed radionuclides, including prediction of changes in radionuclide concentrations or dose rates as a function of location and time; (2) to identify the most important pathways for human exposure; and (3) to predict the reduction in radionuclide concentrations, dose rates, or doses expected to result from various countermeasures or remediation efforts. Specific objectives of the Working Group have included (1) the identification of realistic scenarios for a wide variety of situations, (2) comparison and testing of approaches and models for assessing the significance of a given contamination event and for guiding decisions about countermeasures or remediation measures implemented to reduce doses to humans or to clean up the contaminated area, and (3) improving the understanding of processes and situations that affect the spread of contamination to aid in the development of appropriate models and parameter values for use in assessment of these situations. The major activities of the Working Group have included three areas. The first of these was a review of the available modelling approaches and computer models for use in assessing urban contamination and potential countermeasures or remediation activities. The second area of work was a modelling exercise based on data

  17. [Spanish paediatric research in ANALES DE PEDIATRÍA: research groups and research areas (2003-2009)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Alcaide, G; Valderrama Zurián, J C; Aleixandre Benavent, R; González de Dios, J

    2011-04-01

    Authorships of scientific papers are a significant milestone for researchers. Quantification of authors' contribution in research papers makes it possible to investigate patterns of research collaboration and interactions in scientific community. The objective of this paper is to analyse scientific collaboration and to identify research groups and research areas of ANALES DE PEDIATRÍA. Papers published in ANALES DE PEDIATRÍA between 2003 and 2009 period were selected from Medline. An author name normalization process was carried out. Productivity and scientific collaboration indexes have been determined. Research groups have been identified through co-authorships networks analysis. Thematic areas of research and major domains of research groups have been characterised by means of quantification of Medical Subject Headings terms assigned to documents. An analysis was made of 1,828 documents published by 4,695 authors. The collaboration index (articles) was 5.3 ± 2.3. A total of 97 research groups consisting of between 2 and 80 researchers, which add up 415 researchers have been identified. The main diseases and medical signs studied were asthma (n = 35), multiple abnormalities (n = 28), premature diseases (n = 25), sepsis (n = 24), congenital heart defects (n = 23), respiratory insufficiency (n = 22), HIV infections (n = 21), streptococcal infections (n = 20) and gastroenteritis (n = 20). ANALES DE PEDIATRÍA is one of the most productive Spanish medical journals. Author's collaboration was similar to those observed in other Spanish clinical journals included in Journal Citation Reports. A remarkable number of paediatric research groups publishing on many topics have been identified. Copyright © 2010 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Number of Heat Wave Deaths by Diagnosis, Sex, Age Groups, and Area, in Slovenia, 2015 vs. 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perčič, Simona; Kukec, Andreja; Cegnar, Tanja; Hojs, Ana

    2018-01-01

    Background: Number of deaths increases during periods of elevated heat. Objectives: To examine whether differences in heat-related deaths between 2003 and 2015 occurred in Slovenia. Materials and Methods: We estimated relative risks for deaths for the observed diagnoses, sex, age, and area, as well as 95% confidence intervals and excess deaths associated with heat waves occurring in 2015 and 2003. For comparison between 2015 and 2003, we calculated relative risks ratio and 95% confidence intervals. Results: Statistically significant in 2015 were the following: age group 75+, all causes of deaths (RR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.00–1.22); all population, circulatory system diseases (RR = 1.14, 95% CI 1.01–1.30) and age group 75+, diseases of circulatory system (RR = 1.17, 95% CI 1.01–1.34). Statistically significant in 2003 were the following: female, age group 5–74, circulatory system diseases (RR = 1.69, 95% CI 1.08–2.62). Discussion: Comparison between 2015 and 2003, all, circulatory system diseases (RRR = 1.25, 95% CI 1.01–1.55); male, circulatory system diseases (RRR = 1.85, 95% CI 1.41–2.43); all, age group 75+ circulatory system diseases (RRR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.07–1.69); male, age group 75+, circulatory system diseases (RRR = 1.52, 95% CI 1.03–2.25) and female, age group 75+, circulatory system diseases (RRR = 1.43, 95% CI 1.08–1.89). Conclusions: Public health efforts are urgent and should address circulatory system causes and old age groups. PMID:29361792

  19. Groundwater quality monitoring well installation for Waste Area Grouping 17 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortimore, J.A.; Ebers, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    This report documents the drilling and installation of groundwater quality monitoring (GQM) wells on the perimeter of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 17. WAG 17 is composed of approximately 23 acres and is located in Bethel Valley about 3,100 ft east of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) main plant area. The facilities in WAG 17 constitute the ORNL Services Area and include the shipping and receiving departments, machine shops, carpenter shops, paint shops, lead burning facilities, tritium facility, and the materials storage area. The wells at WAG 17 were drilled and developed between November 1989 and April 1990. These wells were installed to characterize and assess the WAG in accordance with applicable Department of Energy, state, and Environmental Protection Agency regulatory requirements. The purpose of the well installation program was to install GQM wells for groundwater characterization at WAG 17. Data packages produced during installation activities by the ERCE hydrogeologists are an important product of the program. These packages document the well drilling, installation, and development activities and provide valuable data for well sampling and WAG 17 characterization. The forms contained in the packages include predrilling and postdrilling checklists, drilling and construction logs, development and hydraulic conductivity records, and quality control-related documents

  20. Surface radiological investigation of Trench 5 in Waste Area Grouping 7 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, D.D.

    1991-08-01

    A surface radiological investigation of areas encompassing Trench 5 on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was conducted from May 1990 through November 1990. This survey was led by the author, assisted by various members of the Measurement Applications and Development (MAD) group of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the presence, nature, and extent of surface radiological contamination at Trench 5, the Homogeneous Reactor Experiment fuel wells, and surrounding areas. Based on the data obtained in the field, interim corrective measures were recommended to limit human exposure to radioactivity and to minimize insult to the environment. It should be stressed that this project was not intended to be a complete site characterization but rather to be a preliminary investigation into the potential contamination problem that might exist as a result of past operations at Trench 5

  1. Surface radiological investigation of Trench 5 in Waste Area Grouping 7 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, D.D.

    1991-08-01

    A surface radiological investigation of areas encompassing Trench 5 on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was conducted from May 1990 through November 1990. This survey was led by the author, assisted by various members of the Measurement Applications and Development (MAD) group of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the presence, nature, and extent of surface radiological contamination at Trench 5, the Homogeneous Reactor Experiment fuel wells, and surrounding areas. Based on the data obtained in the field, interim corrective measures were recommended to limit human exposure to radioactivity and to minimize insult to the environment. It should be stressed that this project was not intended to be a complete site characterization but rather to be a preliminary investigation into the potential contamination problem that might exist as a result of past operations at Trench 5.

  2. Post-glacial faulting in the Lansjaerv area, Northern Sweden. Comments from the expert group on a field visit at the Molberget post-glacial fault area, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanfors, R.; Ericsson, L.O.

    1993-05-01

    Post-glacial faults have been recognized in the northern Baltic shield for several decades. It is important to evaluate whether such neotectonic movements can lead to new fracturing or decisively alter the geohydrological or geohydrochemical situation around a final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The post-glacial Lansjaerv fault was chosen for an interdisciplinary study because of its relative accessibility. The goals of the study were to assess the mechanisms that caused present day scraps, to clarify the extent of any recent fracturing and to clarify the extent of any ongoing movements. All these objectives were reasonably met through a series of studies, which have been performed by SKB during 1986-1992 in two phases. This report gives a summary of the first phase of the Lansjaerv study (1986-1989) and describes achievements that have been gained during the second phase of the study. As a final of the field-work in the Lansjaerv area a meeting combined with a field excursion was arranged by SKB in June 1991 for a group of international experts. Comments from the expert group on the excursion and the overall Lansjaerv project are presented. One of the major conclusions is that the Lansjaerv post-glacial fault reactivated pre-existing old structures and that the causes of the post-glacial movements is a combination of plate tectonics and deglaciation

  3. Mixed Waste Focus Area Working Group: An Integrated Approach to Mercury Waste Treatment and Disposal. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, M.I.; Conley, T.B.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.

    1997-09-08

    May 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) initiated the Mercury Work Group (HgWG). The HgWG was established to address and resolve the issues associated with Mercury- contaminated mixed wastes (MWs). During the initial technical baseline development process of the MWFA, three of the top four technology deficiencies identified were related to (1) amalgamation, (2) stabilization, and (3) separation and removal for the treatment of mercury and mercury-contaminated mixed waste (MW). The HgWG is assisting the MWFA in soliciting, identifying, initiating, and managing efforts to address these needs.

  4. Mixed Waste Focus Area Working Group: An Integrated Approach to Mercury Waste Treatment and Disposal. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, M.I.; Conley, T.B.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.

    1997-01-01

    May 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) initiated the Mercury Work Group (HgWG). The HgWG was established to address and resolve the issues associated with Mercury- contaminated mixed wastes (MWs). During the initial technical baseline development process of the MWFA, three of the top four technology deficiencies identified were related to (1) amalgamation, (2) stabilization, and (3) separation and removal for the treatment of mercury and mercury-contaminated mixed waste (MW). The HgWG is assisting the MWFA in soliciting, identifying, initiating, and managing efforts to address these needs

  5. Social Enterprise Development-oriented Poverty Alleviation and Sustainable Development of Relative Poverty Groups in Rural Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianye Xing

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The relative poverty groups in rural areas have become main target of China’s poverty alleviation andto explore a long-term effective alleviation mechanismis now a significant topic for research. After thorough research, this paper examines the status and role of this new social organization in rural development-oriented poverty alleviation with the example of the self-service agencies in Xiapu County and Fu’an City founded by the China Foundation for Poverty Alleviation. These social enterprises could improve production and living conditions of relative poverty groups and plays an irreplaceable role in the new rural construction; therefore the government should support the development of social enterprises with proper policies and financial support.

  6. [Micro-area characteristics of laminated chert in the volcanic rocks of Xionger Group of Ruyang area and its geological significances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, An; Li, Hong-zhong; Zhao, Ming-zhen; Yang, Zhi-jun; Liang, Jin; He, Jun-guo

    2014-12-01

    The Xionger Group was originated from the volcanic eruption and sedimentation in Precambrian, whose sedimentary strata at the top were named Majiahe Formation. In the Majiahe Formation, there were hydrothermal chert widely distributed, which were exhibited to be interlayers in the volcanic rocks. The polarized microscope, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman and electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) were conducted to study the characteristics in micro area of the jasperite samples, which were from the sedimentary interlayers in the volcanic rocks of Majiahe Formation in Xionger Group. As shown in the microphotographs and EBSD images, the quartz in the chert had small grain size, low degree of crystallinity and close packed structure, which quite agreed with the characteristics of hydrothermal sedimentary chert. In the chert of Xionger Group, there were clear banded (or lamellar) structures which were contributed by the diversities of the grain size and mineral composition. The different bands (or lamellars) had alternative appearance repeatedly, and denoted the diversities and periodic changes in the substance supply during the precipitation. According to the results of the XRD analysis, the majority minerals of the chert was low temperature quartz, whose lattice parameters were a=b=0.4913 nm, c=0.5405 nm and Z=3. As denoted in the EBSD image and result of Raman analysis, several impurity minerals were formed in the chert in different stages, whose geneses and formation time were quite different. The clay minerals and pyrite were scattered in distribution, and should be contributed by the original sedimentation. On contrary, the felsic minerals and mafic silicate minerals were originated from the sedimentation of tuffaceous substance during the volcanic eruption. The minerals of volcanic genesis had relatively larger grain size, and they deposited together with the hydrothermal sediments to form the bands (or lamellars) of coarse minerals. However, the hydrothermal

  7. Angiotensin-(1-7): Beyond the Cardio-Renal Actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Passos-Silva, Danielle G; Verano-Braga, Thiago; Santos, Robson AS

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a key role in the modulation of many functions in the body. Angiotensin (Ang) II acting on AT1R has a central role in mediating most of the actions of the RAS. However, over the past 10 years, several studies presented evidence...... and tissues which goes beyond its initially described cardiovascular and renal actions. Those effects are mediated by Mas and can counterregulate most of the deleterious effects of Ang II. The interaction Ang-(1-7)/Mas regulates different signaling pathways such as PI3K/AKT and ERK pathways and involves...... and lipolysis while decreasing insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Ang-(1-7) is also able to improve cerebroprotection against ischemic stroke, besides its effects on learning and memory. The reproductive system can also be affected by Ang-(1-7) treatment, with enhanced ovulation, spermatogenesis and sexual...

  8. Angiotensin 1-7 significantly reduces diabetes-induced leukocyte recruitment both in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossi, Fleur; Bernardi, Stella; De Nardo, Daniele; Bramante, Alessandra; Candido, Riccardo; Carretta, Renzo; Fischetti, Fabio; Fabris, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that Ang1-7 has anti-inflammatory effects. Since the formation of Ang1-7 is significantly altered in the setting of diabetes, here we aimed to evaluate whether Ang1-7 infusion could ameliorate diabetes-induced leukocyte recruitment. Wild-type male Wistar rats were randomly allocated to the following groups: control + saline, control + Ang1-7, diabetes + saline, diabetes + Ang1-7. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin. Saline and Ang1-7 (576 μg/kg/day) were injected intraperitoneally daily. After 4 weeks leukocyte trafficking was studied in vivo by intravital microscopy in the mesenteric bed, where the expression of pro-oxidative, proinflammatory, and profibrotic molecules was also assessed. In parallel in vitro studies, HUVEC were grown in 5 mM, 22 mM, 30 mM, 40 mM, 50 mM, and 75 mM glucose media for 48 h, 72 h and 6 days and were treated either with placebo, or with Ang1-7, or with Ang1-7 and its inhibitor A779 in order to evaluate the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. We further studied leukocytes recruitment in vitro by evaluating PMN-HUVEC adhesion. Ang1-7 prevented in vivo diabetes-induced leukocyte adhesion and extravasation, and it significantly reduced vascular hypertrophy and the other molecular changes due to diabetes. Ang 1-7 prevented also in vitro the hyperglycemia-induced increase of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 as well as the hyperglycemia-induced PMN adhesion. A779 inhibited Ang 1-7 effects. Ang1-7 significantly reduced diabetes-induced leukocyte recruitment both in vivo and in vitro. These findings emphasize the potential utility of ACE2/Ang1-7/Mas repletion as a strategy to reduce diabetes-induced atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Annual Monitoring Status Report for Fiscal Year 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard Forsythe

    2010-02-04

    This report documents the status of Fiscal Year 2009 groundwater monitoring performed in Waste Area Group 10 at the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho National Laboratory Site, as identified in the Groundwater Monitoring and Field Sampling Plan for Operable Unit 10-08. Twelve of the fourteen required wells were sampled, and all ten required intervals from the Westbay wells were sampled. Two wells were not sampled because they were in the process of being converted into multiple-sample-interval Westbay wells by the U.S. Geological Survey. Groundwater samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds identified on the Contract Laboratory Program target analyte list as well as metals (filtered), anions, and radionuclides (i.e., I-129, tritium, Tc-99, gross alpha, gross beta, and Sr-90). No contaminant exceeded maximum contaminant levels in wells along the southern boundary of the Idaho National Laboratory Site or in guard wells. Iron was above its secondary maximum contaminant level of 300 ug/L in one well. The cause of the elevated iron concentration is uncertain. Lead was detected just below its action level. However, the zinc concentration was also elevated in these wells, and the source of the lead is probably galvanized riser pipe in the wells. Once the galvanized pipe is replaced, both lead and zinc concentrations should decline, as has been observed at other Waste Area Group 10 wells.

  10. Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Annual Monitoring Status Report for Fiscal Year 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsythe, Howard

    2010-01-01

    This report documents the status of Fiscal Year 2009 groundwater monitoring performed in Waste Area Group 10 at the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho National Laboratory Site, as identified in the Groundwater Monitoring and Field Sampling Plan for Operable Unit 10-08. Twelve of the fourteen required wells were sampled, and all ten required intervals from the Westbay wells were sampled. Two wells were not sampled because they were in the process of being converted into multiple-sample-interval Westbay wells by the U.S. Geological Survey. Groundwater samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds identified on the Contract Laboratory Program target analyte list as well as metals (filtered), anions, and radionuclides (i.e., I-129, tritium, Tc-99, gross alpha, gross beta, and Sr-90). No contaminant exceeded maximum contaminant levels in wells along the southern boundary of the Idaho National Laboratory Site or in guard wells. Iron was above its secondary maximum contaminant level of 300 ug/L in one well. The cause of the elevated iron concentration is uncertain. Lead was detected just below its action level. However, the zinc concentration was also elevated in these wells, and the source of the lead is probably galvanized riser pipe in the wells. Once the galvanized pipe is replaced, both lead and zinc concentrations should decline, as has been observed at other Waste Area Group 10 wells.

  11. Remedial investigation plan for Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Responses to regulator comments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-05-01

    This document, ES/ER-6 D2, is a companion document to ORNL/RAP/Sub-87/99053/4 R1, Remedial Investigation Plan for ORNL Waste Area Grouping 1, dated August 1989. This document lists comments received from the Environmental Protection Agency, Region 4 (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) and responses to each of these comments. As requested by EPA, a revised Remedial Investigation (RI) Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 will not be submitted. The document is divided into two Sections and Appendix. Section I contains responses to comments issued on May 22, 1990, by EPA's Region 4 program office responsible for implementing the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Section 2 contains responses to comments issued on April 7, 1989, by EPA's program office responsible for implementing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); these comments include issues raised by the TDHE. The Appendix contains the attachments referenced in a number of the responses. 35 refs.

  12. Remedial investigation plan for Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Responses to regulator comments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    This document, ES/ER-6 ampersand D2, is a companion document to ORNL/RAP/Sub-87/99053/4 ampersand R1, Remedial Investigation Plan for ORNL Waste Area Grouping 1, dated August 1989. This document lists comments received from the Environmental Protection Agency, Region 4 (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) and responses to each of these comments. As requested by EPA, a revised Remedial Investigation (RI) Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 will not be submitted. The document is divided into two Sections and Appendix. Section I contains responses to comments issued on May 22, 1990, by EPA's Region 4 program office responsible for implementing the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Section 2 contains responses to comments issued on April 7, 1989, by EPA's program office responsible for implementing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); these comments include issues raised by the TDHE. The Appendix contains the attachments referenced in a number of the responses. 35 refs

  13. Groundwater quality monitoring well installation for Waste Area Grouping 3 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortimore, J.A.; Ebers, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    This report documents the drilling and installation of 15 groundwater quality monitoring (GQM) wells on the perimeter of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 3. WAG 3 is located in Melton Valley, approximately 3,000 ft west of the west gate of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and consists of an estimated 22 acres. The subject site contains three solid waste management units: the Contractors' Landfill, the Closed Scrap Metal Area, and Solid Waste Storage Area 3. The wells at WAG 3 were drilled and developed between September 1987 and August 1990. These wells were installed to characterize and assess the WAG in accordance with applicable Department of Energy, state, and Environmental Protection Agency regulatory requirements. The wells at WAG 3 were drilled with auger or air rotary rigs. Depending upon the hydrogeologic conditions present at each proposed well location, one of four basic installation methods was utilized. The purpose of the well installation program was to install GQM wells for groundwater characterization at WAG 3. Data packages produced during installation activities by the ERCE hydrogeologists are an important product of the program. These packages document the well drilling, installation, and development activities and provide valuable data for well sampling and WAG characterization. The forms contained in the packages include predrilling and postdrilling checklists, drilling and construction logs, development and hydraulic conductivity records, and quality control-related documents

  14. Assessment of sediment contamination at Great Lakes Areas of Concern: the ARCS Program Toxicity-Chemistry Work Group strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, P.E.; Burton, G.A.; Crecelius, E.A.; Filkins, J. C.; Giesy, J.P.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Landrum, P.F.; Mac, M.J.; Murphy, T.J.; Rathbun, J. E.; Smith, V. E.; Tatem, H. E.; Taylor, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    In response to a mandate in Section 118(c)(3) of the Water Quality Act of 1987, a program called Assessment and Remediation of Contaminated Sediments (ARCS) was established. Four technical work groups were formed. This paper details the research strategy of the Toxicity-Chemistry Work Group.The Work Group's general objectives are to develop survey methods and to map the degree of contamination and toxicity in bottom sediments at three study areas, which will serve as guidance for future surveys at other locations. A related objective is to use the data base that will be generated to calculate sediment quality concentrations by several methods. The information needed to achieve these goals will be collected in a series of field surveys at three areas: Saginaw Bay (MI), Grand Calumet River (IN), and Buffalo River (NY). Assessments of the extent of contamination and potential adverse effects of contaminants in sediment at each of these locations will be conducted by collecting samples for physical characterization, toxicity testing, mutagenicity testing, chemical analyses, and fish bioaccumulation assays. Fish populations will be assessed for tumors and external abnormalities, and benthic community structure will be analyzed. A mapping approach will use low-cost indicator parameters at a large number of stations, and will extrapolate by correlation from traditional chemical and biological studies at a smaller number of locations. Sediment toxicity testing includes elutriate, pore water and whole sediment bioassays in a three-tiered framework. In addition to the regular series of toxicity tests at primary mater stations, some stations are selected for a more extensive suite of tests.

  15. Translocation 1;7 in hematologic disorders: a brief review of 22 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheres, J.M.; Hustinx, T.W.; Geraedts, J.P.; Leeksma, C.H.; Meltzer, P.S.

    1985-01-01

    A translocation t(1;7)(p11;p11), previously reported in patients with myelodysplasia or leukemia has been found in seven new cases. The present report briefly reviews the cytogenetic and clinical features of 22 patients with this translocation. The majority of these patients had a history of occupational or therapeutic exposure to toxic substances or radiation. Trisomy 8 or 21 were the most common additional abnormalities, especially in leukemic patients. The t(1;7) should be added to the group of specific cytogenetic abnormalities observed frequently in secondary myelodysplasia and leukemia

  16. Phase I remedial investigation report of Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.E. [ed.

    1995-07-01

    This report presents the activities and findings of the first phase of a three-phase remedial investigation (RI) of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and updates the scope and strategy for WAG-2-related efforts. WAG 2 contains White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the ORNL main plant area, White Oak Lake, White Oak Creek Embayment on the Clinch River, and the associated floodplain and subsurface environment. Water, sediment, soil, and biota in WAG 2 are contaminated and continue to receive contaminants from upgradient WAGs. This report includes field activities completed through October 1992. The remediation of WAG 2 is scheduled to follow the cessation of contaminant input from hydrologically upgradient WAGs. While upgradient areas are being remediated, the strategy for WAG 2 is to conduct a long-term monitoring and investigation program that takes full advantage of WAG 2`s role as an integrator of contaminant fluxes from other ORNL WAGs and focuses on four key goals: (1) Implement, in concert with other programs, long-term, multimedia environmental monitoring and tracking of contaminants leaving other WAGs, entering WAG 2, and being transported off-site. (2) Provide a conceptual framework to integrate and develop information at the watershed-level for pathways and processes that are key to contaminant movement, and so support remedial efforts at ORNL. (3) Provide periodic updates of estimates of potential risk (both human health and ecological) associated with contaminants accumulating in and moving through WAG 2 to off-site areas. (4) Support the ORNL Environmental Restoration Program efforts to prioritize, remediate, and verify remedial effectiveness for contaminated sites at ORNL, through long-term monitoring and continually updated risk assessments.

  17. Phase I remedial investigation report of Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.E.

    1995-07-01

    This report presents the activities and findings of the first phase of a three-phase remedial investigation (RI) of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and updates the scope and strategy for WAG-2-related efforts. WAG 2 contains White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the ORNL main plant area, White Oak Lake, White Oak Creek Embayment on the Clinch River, and the associated floodplain and subsurface environment. Water, sediment, soil, and biota in WAG 2 are contaminated and continue to receive contaminants from upgradient WAGs. This report includes field activities completed through October 1992. The remediation of WAG 2 is scheduled to follow the cessation of contaminant input from hydrologically upgradient WAGs. While upgradient areas are being remediated, the strategy for WAG 2 is to conduct a long-term monitoring and investigation program that takes full advantage of WAG 2's role as an integrator of contaminant fluxes from other ORNL WAGs and focuses on four key goals: (1) Implement, in concert with other programs, long-term, multimedia environmental monitoring and tracking of contaminants leaving other WAGs, entering WAG 2, and being transported off-site. (2) Provide a conceptual framework to integrate and develop information at the watershed-level for pathways and processes that are key to contaminant movement, and so support remedial efforts at ORNL. (3) Provide periodic updates of estimates of potential risk (both human health and ecological) associated with contaminants accumulating in and moving through WAG 2 to off-site areas. (4) Support the ORNL Environmental Restoration Program efforts to prioritize, remediate, and verify remedial effectiveness for contaminated sites at ORNL, through long-term monitoring and continually updated risk assessments

  18. Angiotensin-(1-7) : Pharmacological properties and pharmacotherapeutic perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iusuf, Dilek; Henning, Robert H.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Roks, Anton J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic modulation of the renin-angiotensin system is not complete without taking into consideration the beneficial effects of angiotensin-(1-7) in cardiovascular pathology. Various pharmacological pathways are already exploited to involve this heptapeptide in therapy as both inhibitors of

  19. Seasonal variation of the main zooplanktonic groups of the protected natural area estuary El Salado, Jalisco, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navarro-Rodríguez, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Estuarine systems are the most important aquatic natural resources of the nation from various perspectives; fisheries use them mainly through studies that allow the detection and evaluation of the areas of concentration of adults on reproduction phase and potentially exploitable species. This present paper analyzes the spatial and temporal variation of the abundance of zooplankton groups in the Estuary El Salado, Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco. Eight zooplanktonic trawls were conducted during diurnal periods from spring to winter 2001, trawls were superficial, lasting ten minutes, by using a standard “Zeppelin” net with a mesh size of 505 μm with a length of 1.50 m mouth width of 0.60 m which was equipped with a digital flow meter to calculate the volume of filtered water, abundance data were normalized to a volume of 1000 m3. The total catch was 101,968.4 organisms, represented in eleven groups, the brachyurans were the most important group in the order of abundance accounting for 44.5 %, followed by 24.1 % in chaetognaths, decapod with 6.78 %, euphausiids with 11.84 %, and less abundant copepods with 6.18 %, 3.37 % siphonophores small jellyfish, stomatopods 2.83 %, 0.22 % amphipods, cladocerans with 0.33 %, 0.08 % gastropods and finally rare organisms with 0.02 % (appendicular, polychaetes and cumaceans. Variations in both spatial and temporal abundance were influenced by tidal conditions as well as variations in temperature and salinity. All registered major zooplankton groups abundances were homogeneous in the four seasonal periods, however spring was characterized by low abundance, while for summer and winter, the highest values recorded were represented mainly by the Brachyura order, and those abundances were associated with two reproductive periods in both seasons.

  20. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Group 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Technical summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    A remedial investigation (RI) was performed to support environmental restoration activities for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The WAG 5 RI made use of the observational approach, which concentrates on collecting only information needed to assess site risks and support future cleanup work. This information was interpreted and is presented using the framework of the site conceptual model, which relates contaminant sources and release mechanisms to migration pathways and exposure points that are keyed to current and future environmental risks for both human and ecological receptors. The site conceptual model forms the basis of the WAG 5 remedial action strategy and remedial action objectives. The RI provided the data necessary to verify this model and allows recommendations to be made to accomplish those objectives

  1. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Technical summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    A remedial investigation (RI) was performed to support environmental restoration activities for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The WAG 5 RI made use of the observational approach, which concentrates on collecting only information needed to assess site risks and support future cleanup work. This information was interpreted and is presented using the framework of the site conceptual model, which relates contaminant sources and release mechanisms to migration pathways and exposure points that are keyed to current and future environmental risks for both human and ecological receptors. The site conceptual model forms the basis of the WAG 5 remedial action strategy and remedial action objectives. The RI provided the data necessary to verify this model and allows recommendations to be made to accomplish those objectives.

  2. Health and Safety Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Hoesen, S.D.; Clark, C. Jr.; Burman, S.N.; Manis, L.W.; Barre, W.L.

    1993-12-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S ampersand H) issues. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to air, soil, or surface water This plan explains additional site-specific health and safety requirements such as Site Specific Hazards Evaluation Addendums (SSHEAs) to the Site Safety and Health Plan which should be used in concert with this plan and existing established procedures

  3. Removal action report on Waste Area Grouping 4 seeps 4 and 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    This report documents removal action activities for a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) non-time-critical removal action as described in the Action Memorandum prepared in 1996. The technical objective of this removal action was to reduce the release of strontium 90 ( 90 Sr) into an ephemeral tributary to White Oak Creek from Waste Area Grouping 4 (WAG 4) seeps, as measured at Monitoring Station (MS) 1 at ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN. Design was initiated in early January 1996 and grouting activities were completed in late October 9996. Portions of four waste disposal trenches were injected using low-temperature permeation grouting technology with multiple formulations of grouts to reduce the in situ hydraulic conductivity of the waste materials and ultimately reduce the off-site transport of 90 Sr

  4. The results of an ecological risk assessment screening at the Idaho National Engineering`s waste area group 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanHorn, R.

    1995-11-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in southeastern Idaho and occupies approximately 890 square miles on the northwestern portion of the eastern Snake River Plain. INEL has been devoted to nuclear energy research and related activities since its establishment in 1949. In the process of fulfilling this mission, wastes were generated, including radioactive and hazardous materials. Most materials were effectively stored or disposed of, however, some release of contaminants to the environment has occurred. For this reason, the INEL was listed by the US environmental Protection Agency on the National Priorities List (NPL), in November, 1989. This report describes the results of an ecological risk assessment performed for the Waste Area Groups 2 (WAG 2) at the INEL. It also summarizes the performance of screening level ecological risk assessments (SLERA).

  5. Field Operations Procedures Manual for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses meteorological monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Meteorological monitoring of various climatological parameters (e.g., temperature, wind speed, humidity) will be collected by instruments installed at WAG 6. Data will be recorded electronically at frequencies varying from 5-min intervals to 1-h intervals, dependent upon parameter. The data will be downloaded every 2 weeks, evaluated, compressed, and uploaded into a WAG 6 data base for subsequent use. The meteorological data will be used in water balance calculations in support of the WAG 6 hydrogeological model

  6. The results of an ecological risk assessment screening at the Idaho National Engineering's waste area group 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanHorn, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in southeastern Idaho and occupies approximately 890 square miles on the northwestern portion of the eastern Snake River Plain. INEL has been devoted to nuclear energy research and related activities since its establishment in 1949. In the process of fulfilling this mission, wastes were generated, including radioactive and hazardous materials. Most materials were effectively stored or disposed of, however, some release of contaminants to the environment has occurred. For this reason, the INEL was listed by the US environmental Protection Agency on the National Priorities List (NPL), in November, 1989. This report describes the results of an ecological risk assessment performed for the Waste Area Groups 2 (WAG 2) at the INEL. It also summarizes the performance of screening level ecological risk assessments (SLERA)

  7. Waste management plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, L.A.

    1994-10-01

    This Project Waste Management Plan defines the criteria and methods to be used for managing waste generated during activities associated with Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The waste management strategy is based on the generation and management of waste on a systematic basis using the most appropriate combination of waste reduction, segregation, treatment, storage, and disposal practices while protecting the environment and human health, maintaining as low as reasonably achievable limits. This plan contains provisions for safely and effectively managing soils and sediments, sampling water, decontamination fluids, and disposable personal protective equipment consistent with the US Environmental Protection Agency guidance. This plan will be used in conjunction with the ORNL ER Program Waste Management Plan

  8. Spotted fever group Rickettsia in Amblyomma dubitatum tick from the urban area of Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Jaqueline; Garcia, Marcos Valério; Cunha, Rodrigo Casquero; Aguirre, André de Abreu Rangel; Barros, Jacqueline Cavalvante; Csordas, Bárbara Guimarães; Andreotti, Renato

    2015-03-01

    Rickettsia infection of each tick was evaluated by the hemolymph test and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting gltA and ompA genes. All hemolymph tests were negative and PCR of one A. dubitatum detected both Rickettsia genes. Sequence of ompA exhibited a 99% identity with Rickettsia parkeri and R. africae and a 98% identity with R. sibirica. Rickettsia of the spotted fever group in A. dubitatum is described for the first time in an urban area within the municipality of Campo Grande in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul (MS), Brazil. This finding reinforces the importance of more detailed studies to determine the role of A. dubitatum in the transmission of spotted fever agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Health and Safety Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoesen, S.D.; Clark, C. Jr.; Burman, S.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Manis, L.W.; Barre, W.L. [Analysas Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S&H) issues. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to air, soil, or surface water This plan explains additional site-specific health and safety requirements such as Site Specific Hazards Evaluation Addendums (SSHEAs) to the Site Safety and Health Plan which should be used in concert with this plan and existing established procedures.

  10. Public Participation Plan for Waste Area Group 7 Operable Unit 7-13/14 at the Idaho National Laboratory Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B. G. Meagher

    2007-01-01

    This Public Participation Plan outlines activities being planned to: (1) brief the public on results of the remedial investigation and feasibility study, (2) discuss the proposed plan for remediation of Operable Unit 7-13/14 with the public, and (3) encourage public participation in the decision-making process. Operable Unit 7-13/14 is the Comprehensive Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for Waste Area Group 7. Analysis focuses on the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory (Site). This plan, a supplement to the Idaho National Laboratory Community Relations Plan (DOE-ID 2004), will be updated as necessary. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will participate in the public involvement activities outlined in this plan. Collectively, DOE, DEQ, and EPA are referred to as the Agencies. Because history has shown that implementing the minimum required public involvement activities is not sufficient for high-visibility cleanup projects, this plan outlines additional opportunities the Agencies are providing to ensure that the public's information needs are met and that the Agencies can use the public's input for decisions regarding remediation activities

  11. Groundwater quality monitoring well installation for Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortimore, J.A.; Ebers, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    This report documents the drilling and installation of 22 groundwater quality monitoring (GQM) wells on the perimeter of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5. WAG 5 is located south of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory main plant area in Melton Valley and includes 33 solid waste management units. The wells at WAG 5 were drilled and developed between July 1987 and March 1990. These wells were installed to characterize and assess the WAG in accordance with applicable Department of Energy, state, and Environmental Protection Agency regulatory requirements. The purpose of the well installation program was to install GQM wells for groundwater characterization at WAG 5. Data packages produced during installation activities by the ERCE hydrogeologists are an important product of the program. These packages document the well drilling, installation, and development activities and provide valuable data for well sampling and WAG characterization. The forms contained in the packages include predrilling and postdrilling checklists, drilling and construction logs, development and hydraulic conductivity records, and quality control-related documents

  12. Groundwater quality monitoring well installation for Waste Area Grouping 4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortimore, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    This report documents the drilling and installation of 15 groundwater quality monitoring (GQM) wells on the perimeter of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4. WAG 4 is comprised of about 27 acres located in Melton Valley approximately 2700 ft southwest of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory main plant. It contains three inactive solid waste management units: (1) the abandoned intermediate level liquid waste transfer line located along the WAG's northwestern boundary, (2) the experimental pilot pit area, and (3) SWSA 4, the largest unit in the WAG. The wells at WAG 4 were drilled and developed between September 1987 and October 1990. These wells were installed to characterize and assess the WAG in accordance with applicable Department of Energy (DOE), state, and Environmental Protection Agency regulatory requirements. The wells at WAG 4 were drilled with auger or air rotary rigs. Depending on the hydrogeologic conditions present at each proposed well location, one of four basic installation methods was utilized. The purpose of the well installation program was to install GQM wells for groundwater characterization at WAG 4. Data packages produced during installation activities by the ERCE hydrogeologists are an important product of the program. These packages document the well drilling, installation, and development activities and provide valuable data for well sampling and WAG characterization. The forms contained in the packages include predrilling and postdrilling checklists, drilling and construction logs, development and hydraulic conductivity records, and quality control-related documents

  13. Screening of contaminants in Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; Hook, L.A.; Suter, G.W.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-07-01

    Waste Area Grouping 2 (WAG 2) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is located in the White Oak Creek Watershed and is composed of White Oak Creek Embayment, White Oak Lake and associated floodplain, and portions of White Oak Creek (WOC) and Melton Branch downstream of ORNL facilities. Contaminants leaving other ORNL WAGs in the WOC watershed pass through WAG 2 before entering the Clinch River. Health and ecological risk screening analyses were conducted on contaminants in WAG 2 to determine which contaminants were of concern and would require immediate consideration for remedial action and which contaminants could be assigned a low priority or further study. For screening purposes, WAG 2 was divided into four geographic reaches: Reach 1, a portion of WOC; Reach 2, Melton Branch; Reach 3, White Oak Lake and the floodplain area to the weirs on WOC and Melton Branch; and Reach 4, the White Oak Creek Embayment, for which an independent screening analysis has been completed. Screening analyses were conducted using data bases compiled from existing data on carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic contaminants, which included organics, inorganics, and radionuclides. Contaminants for which at least one ample had a concentration above the level of detection were placed in a detectable contaminants data base. Those contaminants for which all samples were below the level of detection were placed in a nondetectable contaminants data base.

  14. Preliminary report on the ecological assessment of Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashwood, T.L.; Suter, G.W. II; Stewart, A.J.

    1992-09-01

    In support of the remedial investigation for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5, staff of the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory have conducted preliminary ecological assessment activities. A screening level ecological risk assessment has been completed, ambient toxicity tests have been conducted on streams and seeps within WAG 5, WAG 5 has been surveyed for rare and endangered species and wetlands, and wild turkeys that may feed on contaminated vegetation and insects in WAG 5 have been screened for beta-emitting isotopes and [sup 137]Cs. The screening-level ecological risk assessment identified some data gaps that were addressed in the ecological assessment plan. These include gaps in data on the toxicity of surface water and soil within WAG 5 and on the status of rare and endangered species. In addition, the screening-level risk assessment identified the need for data on the level of contaminants in wild turkeys that may be consumed by predatory wildlife and humans. Three rounds of ambient toxicity tests on six streams and seeps, using the microcrustacean Ceriodaphnia, have identified potential toxicity in three of the sample sites. Further tests are required to identify the toxicant. No rare or endangered animal species have been identified in the WAG 5 area.

  15. FY 1995 remedial investigation work plan for Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, D.R.; Herbes, S.E.

    1994-09-01

    Field activities to support the remedial investigation (RI) of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) include characterization of the nature and extent of contamination in WAG 2, specifically to support risk-based remediation decisions. WAG 2 is the major drainage system downgradient of other WAGs containing significant sources of contamination at ORNL. The RI of WAG 2 is developed in three phases: Phase 1, initial scoping characterization to determine the need for early action; Phase 2, interim activities during remediation of upgradient WAGs to evaluate potential changes in the contamination status of WAG 2 that would necessitate reevaluation of the need for early action; and Phase 3, completion of the RI process following remediation of upslope WAGs. Specifically, Phase 2 activities are required to track key areas to determine if changes have occurred in WAG 2 that would require (1) interim remedial action to protect human health and the environment or (2) changes in remedial action plans and schedules for WAG2 because of changing contaminant release patterns in upslope WAGs or because of the effects of interim remedial or removal actions in other WAGs. This report defines activities to be conducted in FY 1995 for completion of the Phase 1 RI and initiation of limited Phase 2 field work

  16. Development and validation of bubble breakup and coalescence constitutive models for the one-group interfacial area transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellacani, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    A local mechanistic model for bubble coalescence and breakup for the one-group interfacial area transport equation has been developed, in agreement and within the limits of the current understanding, based on an exhaustive survey of the theory and of the state of the art models for bubble dynamics simulation. The new model has been tested using the commercial 3D CFD code ANSYS CFX. Upward adiabatic turbulent air-water bubbly flow has been simulated and the results have been compared with the data obtained in the experimental facility PUMA. The range of the experimental data available spans between 0.5 to 2 m/s liquid velocity and 5 to 15 % volume fraction. For the implementation of the models, both the monodispersed and the interfacial area transport equation approaches have been used. The first one to perform a detailed analysis of the forces and models to reproduce the dynamic of the dispersed phase adequately and to be used in the next phases of the work. Also two different bubble induced turbulence models have been tested to consider the effect of the presence of the gas phase on the turbulence of the liquid phase. The interfacial area transport equation has been successfully implemented into the CFD code and the state of the art breakup and coalescence models have been used for simulation. The limitations of the actual theory have been shown and a new bubble interactions model has been developed. The simulations showed that a considerable improvement is achieved if compared to the state of the art closure models. Limits in the implementation derive from the actual understanding and formulation of the bubbly dynamics. A strong dependency on the interfacial non-drag force models and coefficients have been shown. More experimental and theory work needs to be done in this field to increase the prediction capability of the simulation tools regarding the distribution of the phases along the pipe radius.

  17. Groundwater quality monitoring well installation for Waste Area Groupings 8 and 9 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortimore, J.A.; Ebers, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    This report documents the drilling and installation of nine groundwater quality monitoring (GQM) wells on the perimeter of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 8 and two GQM wells on the perimeter of WAG 9. WAG 8 encompasses approximately 34 acres, most of which are located in Melton Valley. Irregular in shape, the site has two sinuous extensions from its northern end that contain the low-level radioactive waste (LLW) transfer lines. WAG 8 contains 22 solid waste management units (SWMUs) that can be divided into 4 groups. These groups include the High Flux Isotope Reactor/Transuranium Processing Facility waste collection basins, the LLW line leak sites, and the active LLW tanks. WAG 9 encompasses about 3 acres and is located west of the main portion of WAG 8 and south of Melton Valley Drive. WAG 9 contains four SWMUs. The wells in WAGs 8 and 9 were drilled and developed from June 1989 to March 1990. Monitoring wells were installed to characterize and assess the WAGs in accordance with applicable Department of Energy, state, and Environmental Protection Agency regulatory requirements. The purpose of the well installation program was to install GQM wells for groundwater characterization at WAGs 8 and 9. Data packages produced during installation activities by the ERCE hydrogeologists are an important product of the program. These packages document the well drilling, installation, and development activities and provide valuable data for well sampling and WAG characterization. The forms contained in the packages include predrilling and postdrilling checklists, drilling and construction logs, development and hydraulic conductivity records, and quality control-related documents

  18. Data analysis of a high-density polyethylene geomembrane located in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martino, M.R.

    1994-08-01

    The Environmental Restoration Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is monitoring the material properties of the High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) cap at Waste Area Grouping 6 for degradation due to exposure to the environment. The material properties of tear resistance, uniaxial yield and break stress, density and carbon black content were within an acceptable range of the minimum average values recommended. The latter three properties did not deteriorate over time when compared to the manufacturer's certificate of analysis. The results of the bent strip test showed failure of all specimens within 170 hours, compared to the recommended time of 1,500 hours without brittle failure recommended by NSF. The Notched Constant Tensile Load test reported transition times of 7 and 8 hours for a passive and active sample of the exposed HDPE liner. The percent crystallinity was found to be within the typical range of 40--60% for 80-mil HDPE; however, samples with high crystallinity, greater than 50%, tend to have poor stress crack performance. This was reinforced by the geomembrane's poor performance in the stress crack resistance tests. As a result of these data, the continued monitoring of the HDPE cap is recommended. Quality control measures must be enacted immediately if a definitive, scientific study is to be conducted that will be beneficial to manufacturers, installers, and users

  19. FY 1995 Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, D.R.; Herbes, S.E.

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide key information needed by decision makers to expedite the process of environmental restoration and to provide the data base required by the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). WAG 2 is the major drainage system downgradient of other WAGs that contain significant sources of contamination at ORNL. Field activities to support the remedial investigation for the RI portion include characterization of the nature and extent of contamination in WAG 2 [consisting of White Oak Creek (WOC) and associated tributaries and floodplain, White Oak Lake (WOL), and White Oak Creek Embayment (WOCE)], specifically to support risk-based remediation decisions. The project consists of three phases: Phase 1, initial scoping characterization to determine the need for early action; Phase 2, interim activities during remediation of upslope WAGs to evaluate potential changes in the contamination status of WAG 2 that would necessitate revaluation of the need for early action; and Phase 3, completion of the RI process following remediation of upslope WAGs. Overall RI objectives, consistent with ORNL Environmental Restoration (ER) Program strategic objectives to reduce risks and comply with environmental regulations, are discussed in the WAG 2 Remedial Investigation Plan

  20. Groundwater quality monitoring well installation for Upper Waste Areas Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortimore, J.A.; Lee, T.A.

    1994-09-01

    This report documents the drilling and installation of seven groundwater quality monitoring (GQM) wells on the perimeter of Upper Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2. Upper WAG 2 is composed of portions of White Oak Creek (WOC), Melton Branch, two of Melton Branch's tributaries, and the floodplains surrounding these water bodies. The WOC section of the subject site begins at the confluence of WOC and Melton Branch and extends 0.62 mile upstream to the 7,500 bridge. The Melton Branch portion of the site also begins at the confluence of WOC and Melton Branch and extends eastward 0.88 mile upstream. The wells at Upper WAG 2 were drilled and developed between December 1989 and October 1990. These wells were installed to characterize and assess the WAG in accordance with applicable Department of Energy, state, and Environmental Protection Agency regulatory requirements. The purpose of the well installation program was to install GQM wells for groundwater characterization at Upper WAG-2. Data packages produced during installation activities by the ERCE hydrogeologists are an important product of the program. These packages document the well drilling, installation, and development activities and provide valuable data for well sampling and WAG characterization. The forms contained in the packages include predrilling and postdrilling checklists, drilling and construction logs, development and hydraulic conductivity records, and quality control-related documents

  1. Groundwater quality monitoring well installation for Waste Area Grouping at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortimore, J.A.; Lee, T.A.

    1994-09-01

    This report documents the drilling and installation of 18 groundwater quality monitoring (GQM) wells on the perimeter of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 11. WAG 11 (White Wing Scrap Yard) is located on the west end of East Fork Ridge between White Wing Road and the Oak Ridge Turnpike. The scrap yard is approximately 25 acres in size. The wells at WAG 11 were drilled and developed between January 1990 and October 1990. These wells were installed to characterize and assess the WAG in accordance with applicable Department of Energy, state, and Environmental Protection Agency regulatory requirements. The wells at WAG 11 were drilled with auger or air rotary rigs. Depending on the hydrogeologic conditions present at each proposed well location, one of four basic installation methods was utilized. Detailed procedures for well construction were specified by the Engineering Division to ensure that the wells would provide water samples representative of the aquifer. To ensure conformance with the specifications, Energy Systems Construction Engineering and ERCE provided continuous oversight of field activities. The purpose of the well installation program was to install GQM wells for groundwater characterization at WAG 11. Data packages produced during installation activities by the ERCE hydrogeologists are an important product of the program. These packages document the well drilling, installation, and development activities and provide valuable data for well sampling and WAG characterization. The forms contained in the packages include predrilling and postdrilling checklists, drilling and construction logs, development and hydraulic conductivity records, and quality control-related documents

  2. RCRA Facility investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This report provides a detailed summary of the activities carried out to sample groundwater at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The analytical results for samples collected during Phase 1, Activity 2 of the WAG 6 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation (RFI) are also presented. In addition, analytical results for Phase 1, activity sampling events for which data were not previously reported are included in this TM. A summary of the groundwater sampling activities of WAG 6, to date, are given in the Introduction. The Methodology section describes the sampling procedures and analytical parameters. Six attachments are included. Attachments 1 and 2 provide analytical results for selected RFI groundwater samples and ORNL sampling event. Attachment 3 provides a summary of the contaminants detected in each well sampled for all sampling events conducted at WAG 6. Bechtel National Inc. (BNI)/IT Corporation Contract Laboratory (IT) RFI analytical methods and detection limits are given in Attachment 4. Attachment 5 provides the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)/Analytical Chemistry Division (ACD) analytical methods and detection limits and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) quarterly compliance monitoring (1988--1989). Attachment 6 provides ORNL/ACD groundwater analytical methods and detection limits (for the 1990 RCRA semi-annual compliance monitoring)

  3. Dynamics of the health status of children in an area with atmospheric pollution, as compared with a control group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antal, A.; Coasan, A.; Vicas, T.; Balasoiu, I.; Horvath, V.; Sabau, S.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of air pollution on children was studied in two areas of Romania. Development, psychometric aspects, and morphological aspects were studied. Vital capacity, maximum expiratory volume, and muscular strength were examined. Adaptability and learning performance were studied in children from 7 to 14 years old. In polluted areas containing high concentrations of nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, lead, and carbon black, the health of the children was impaired. Respiratory diseases were frequent, and pleurobronchopulmonary diseases, anemia, and rachitis also occurred. Scholarly performance was poorer in polluted areas than in control areas. Children in polluted areas were also shorted than in control areas.

  4. ASSESSMENT OF SOCIAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL CONSEQUENCES OF RADIATION DANGER EXPERIENCE AMONG DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS OF THE POPULATION FROM CONTAMINATED AREAS OF RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Marchenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of evaluation of social-psychological consequences of radiation danger experience among different age groups of the population from contaminated areas of Russia (Oryol, Kaluga, Bryansk, Tula areas among whom the unfavorable emotional and personal changes were registered due to subjective features of perception of radiation threat have been represented (“risk” group. Experimental sample of the research consisted of 1 544 people from Russia. One of the main results of this research is establishment of the fact that adverse emotional and personal changes in connection with subjective features of perception of radiation threat were revealed for 53,9% of respondents of advanced age and more than 20% of respondents of middle and young age from contaminated areas of Russia. Among the respondents from contaminated areas of Belarus, about a third surveyed from each age group get to “risk” group.

  5. Angiotensin-(1-7) in human follicular fluid correlates with oocyte maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Ines K; Dela Cruz, Cynthia; Oliveira, Marilene L; Del Puerto, Helen L; Dias, Júlia A; Lobach, Veronica N; Casalechi, Maíra; Camargos, Maria G; Reis, Adelina M; Santos, Robson A; Reis, Fernando M

    2017-06-01

    Do angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7) levels in human ovarian follicular fluid (FF) correlate with the number and proportion of mature oocytes obtained for IVF? The present study shows for the first time that Ang-(1-7) levels in human FF correlate with the proportion of mature oocytes collected upon ovarian stimulation for IVF. Ang-(1-7) is an active peptide of the renin-angiotensin system that stimulates oocyte maturation in isolated rabbit and rat ovaries. However, its role in human ovulation remains unexplored. This was a prospective cohort study including 64 participants from a single IVF center. Sample size was calculated to achieve a statistical power of 80% in detecting 20% differences in the proportion of mature oocytes between groups. The participants were enrolled in the study during six consecutive months. Plasma samples were obtained from all subjects at Day 21 of the last menstrual cycle before starting pituitary blockade and controlled ovarian stimulation (COS). Plasma and FF samples were quickly mixed with a protease inhibitor cocktail and stored at -80°C. Ang-(1-7) was quantified in plasma and FF samples by a highly sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay, which was preceded by solid phase extraction, speed vacuum concentration and sample reconstitution in assay buffer. FF Ang-(1-7) levels were stratified into tertiles and the patients of each tertile were compared for COS/IVF outcomes using Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA. Multiple regression analysis was used to adjust correlations for potential confounders. The mRNA encoding for Mas, a receptor for Ang-(1-7), was investigated by real-time PCR in luteinized granulosa cells purified from the FF. There was a four-fold increase in plasma Ang-(1-7) after ovulation induction (median 160.9 vs 41.4 pg/ml, P Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de Minas Gerais (FAPEMIG). The authors have nothing to disclose. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology

  6. Area G Perimeter Surface-Soil Sampling Environmental Surveillance for Fiscal Year 1998 Hazardous and Solid Waste Group (ESH-19)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquis Childs

    1999-09-01

    Material Disposal Area G (Area G) is at Technical Area 54 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Area G has been the principal facility for the disposal of low-level, solid-mixed, and transuranic waste since 1957. It is currently LANL's primary facility for radioactive solid waste burial and storage. As part of the annual environmental surveillance effort at Area G, surface soil samples are collected around the facility's perimeter to characterize possible radionuclide movement off the site through surface water runoff During 1998, 39 soil samples were collected and analyzed for percent moisture, tritium, plutonium-238 and 239, cesium-137 and americium-241. To assess radionuclide concentrations, the results from these samples are compared with baseline or background soil samples collected in an undisturbed area west of the active portion Area G. The 1998 results are also compared to the results from analogous samples collected during 1996 and 1997 to assess changes over this time in radionuclide activity concentrations in surface soils around the perimeter of Area G. The results indicate elevated levels of all the radionuclides assessed (except cesium-137) exist in Area G perimeter surface soils vs the baseline soils. The comparison of 1998 soil data to previous years (1996 and 1997) indicates no significant increase or decrease in radionuclide concentrations; an upward or downward trend in concentrations is not detectable at this time. These results are consistent with data comparisons done in previous years. Continued annual soil sampling will be necessary to realize a trend if one exists. The radionuclide levels found in the perimeter surface soils are above background but still considered relatively low. This perimeter surface soil data will be used for planning purposes at Area G, techniques to prevent sediment tm.nsport off-site are implemented in the areas where the highest radionuclide concentrations are indicated.

  7. Radiological conditions in areas of Kuwait with residues of depleted uranium. Report by an international group of experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    radiological assessment of compliance with international radiation protection criteria and standards for areas with residues of DU munitions that has been carried out under the auspices of the IAEA. The IAEA assembled an international team of senior experts, including a representative of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). The team was led by R.H. Clarke, Chairman of the International Commission on Radiological Protection.The experts visited Kuwait in September 2001 to assess the sites identified by the Government of Kuwait and to evaluate the available information. The 11 locations selected for the investigation included sites of military action during the Gulf War in which DU munitions were used, sites where DU residues still exist and areas where concern has been expressed about the possible contamination of water and foodstuffs with DU. In February 2002 a mission was conducted to collect samples at the identified sites.The sampling team included scientists from the IAEA Secretariat and from the Spiez Laboratory in Switzerland, representing the UNEP, together with experts from the laboratory of the Radiation Protection Department of the Ministry of Health of Kuwait. Around 200 environmental samples, including soil, water and vegetation, were collected during the campaign and subsequently analysed. The international team of experts prepared a report describing the findings of the measurement programme and the subsequent assessment performed by the team. This report provides a detailed description of the IAEA's investigation of the radiological conditions in Kuwait in relation to residues of DU, the results of the radiological assessment, the overall and site specific findings and conclusions of the assessment, and the recommendations of the expert group. On the basis of the measurements carried out at the sites investigated in the IAEA's study and summarized in this report, DU does not pose a radiological hazard to the population of Kuwait. No persons who might

  8. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This report presents data and information related to remedial investigation studies for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Information is included on a soil gas survey, surface radiological investigations of waste areas, and well installation for ground water monitoring

  9. The Formalization of the Problem area, Implementation and Maintenance of Business process by a group of unmanned vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Kuandykov A.A; Kassenkhan A.M; Mukazhanov N.K; Kozhamzharova D.K; Kalpeeva Zh.B; Sholpanbaev A.T

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the formalization of the problem domain in which there is a business process that is similar in structure.For research and formalization selected a specific type of subject area in which at random time occurs the business processes that are close on the abstract structure.

  10. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3. Appendixes 1 through 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU'S) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment from doses to humans and animals and associated cancer risks, exposure via food chains, and historical data. (CBS)

  11. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2. Sections 4 through 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU's) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment and baseline human health evaluation including a toxicity assessment, and a baseline environmental evaluation.

  12. Antenatal betamethasone attenuates the angiotensin-(1-7)-Mas receptor-nitric oxide axis in isolated proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yixin; Bi, Jianli; Pulgar, Victor M; Chappell, Mark C; Rose, James C

    2017-06-01

    We previously reported a sex-specific effect of antenatal treatment with betamethasone (Beta) on sodium (Na + ) excretion in adult sheep whereby treated males but not females had an attenuated natriuretic response to angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]. The present study determined the Na + uptake and nitric oxide (NO) response to low-dose Ang-(1-7) (1 pM) in renal proximal tubule cells (RPTC) from adult male and female sheep antenatally exposed to Beta or vehicle. Data were expressed as percentage of basal uptake or area under the curve for Na + or percentage of control for NO. Male Beta RPTC exhibited greater Na + uptake than male vehicle cells (433 ± 28 vs. 330 ± 26%; P 0.05). Ang-(1-7) significantly inhibited Na + uptake in RPTC from vehicle male (214 ± 11%) and from both vehicle (190 ± 14%) and Beta (209 ± 11%) females but failed to attenuate Na + uptake in Beta male cells. Beta exposure also abolished stimulation of NO by Ang-(1-7) in male but not female RPTC. Both the Na + and NO responses to Ang-(1-7) were blocked by Mas receptor antagonist d-Ala 7 -Ang-(1-7). We conclude that the tubular Ang-(1-7)-Mas-NO pathway is attenuated in males and not females by antenatal Beta exposure. Moreover, since primary cultures of RPTC retain both the sex and Beta-induced phenotype of the adult kidney in vivo they appear to be an appropriate cell model to examine the effects of fetal programming on Na + handling by the renal tubules. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Development of agricultural producers‘ groups in the Czech Republic with focus on commodity area fruit and vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Vavřina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Groups of agricultural producers had been established in the former Czechoslovakia already in 1930s and with the transition to a market economy it is again relevant to think about the renewal of some type of economic partnership among agricultural producers. The need to establish a group of agricultural producers may occur in the broader context of increasing dynamics within current competitive forces’ models with regard to even relatively less dynamic sector of agriculture. Further development of this kind of economic partnership among agricultural producers in the Czech Republic is eligible for support via public subsidies, namely by Common Agricultural Policy. Nevertheless many agricultural producers are still facing tougher foreign direct competitors after EU accession as single economic units instead of establishing new or joining existing producer groups, namely in production of fruit and vegetables. Authors identify and describe subsidies currently available for further establishment of economic cooperation within structures of agri-food complex and agricultural producers. This is followed by a framework economic analysis of the whole fruit and vegetables production sector within year period 2004–2009 using Farm Accountancy Data Network with the focus on established producer groups using financial statements issued in Business Register of the Czech Republic.

  14. Prevalence of Internet addiction and risk of developing addiction as exemplified by a group of Polish adolescents from urban and rural areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Pawłowska

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available [b]Objective. [/b]The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of Internet addiction and the risk of developing this addiction in Polish adolescents attending junior high schools and high school in Lublin Province, to indicate the differences regarding the intensity of Internet addiction symptoms, and the types of online activity of adolescents residing in urban and rural areas. [b]Material and Methods[/b]. The examined group comprised 1,860 participants (1,320 girls and 540 boys with an average age of 17 years. 760 students lived in urban areas and 1,100 lived in rural areas. The following were used in the study: the Socio-demographic Questionnaire designed by the authors, the Internet Addiction Questionnaire designed by Potembska, the Internet Addiction Test by Young and the Internet Addiction Questionnaire (Kwestionariusz do Badania Uzależnienia od Internetu – KBUI designed by Pawłowska and Potembska. [b]Results[/b]. The adolescents living in urban areas showed a significantly greater intensity of Internet and computer addiction symptoms measured by the KBUI Questionnaire, compared to those living in rural areas. [b]Conclusions.[/b] The Internet addiction criteria were fulfilled by 0.45% of adolescents living in urban areas and 2.9% of those living in rural areas, whereas 35.55% of urban dwelling students and 30.18% of students living in rural areas showed a risk of developing this addiction. More adolescents living in urban areas, compared to those living in rural areas, use Internet pornography, play computer games, disclose their personal data to unknown individuals encountered on the Internet, use Instant Messaging (IM services, electronic mail and Facebook social networking service. Compared to their peers from urban areas, significantly more adolescents from rural areas use ‘Nasza Klasa’ (Our Classmates online social networking service.

  15. Prevalence of Internet addiction and risk of developing addiction as exemplified by a group of Polish adolescents from urban and rural areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowska, Beata; Zygo, Maciej; Potembska, Emilia; Kapka-Skrzypczak, Lucyna; Dreher, Piotr; Kędzierski, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of Internet addiction and the risk of developing this addiction in Polish adolescents attending junior high schools and high school in Lublin Province, to indicate the differences regarding the intensity of Internet addiction symptoms, and the types of online activity of adolescents residing in urban and rural areas. The examined group comprised 1,860 participants (1,320 girls and 540 boys) with an average age of 17 years. 760 students lived in urban areas and 1,100 lived in rural areas. The following were used in the study: the Socio-demographic Questionnaire designed by the authors, the Internet Addiction Questionnaire designed by Potembska, the Internet Addiction Test by Young and the Internet Addiction Questionnaire (Kwestionariusz do Badania Uzależnienia od Internetu - KBUI) designed by Pawłowska and Potembska. The adolescents living in urban areas showed a significantly greater intensity of Internet and computer addiction symptoms measured by the KBUI Questionnaire, compared to those living in rural areas. The Internet addiction criteria were fulfilled by 0.45% of adolescents living in urban areas and 2.9% of those living in rural areas, whereas 35.55% of urban dwelling students and 30.18% of students living in rural areas showed a risk of developing this addiction. More adolescents living in urban areas, compared to those living in rural areas, use Internet pornography, play computer games, disclose their personal data to unknown individuals encountered on the Internet, use Instant Messaging (IM) services, electronic mail and Facebook social networking service. Compared to their peers from urban areas, significantly more adolescents from rural areas use 'Nasza Klasa' (Our Classmates) online social networking service.

  16. Wolfcampian brachiopods from the Bird Spring Group, Wamp Spring area, Las Vegas Range, Clark County, Nevada ( USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, P.C.; Langenheim, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Wamp Spring section of the Bird Spring Group is subdivided into a basal platy limestone member, lower cliff-forming member, and upper cliff-forming member. Triticites, Schwagerina, and Schubertella kingi in the platy limestone member indicate an early Wolfcampian age. Schwagerina, Schubertella kingi, and a distinctive assemblage of brachiopods, similar to the West Texas fauna, indicate that the upper cliff-forming member is late Wolfcampian. The lower cliff-forming member is tentatively assigned to the middle Wolfcampian. The Wamp Spring sequence correlates temporally with the BSe 'formation' of the Bird Spring Group. The fossil-rich upper cliff-forming limestone member includes the new species Pontisia boodi, Crurithyris wampensis, and Calliprotonia(?) n. sp. A, as well as Hustedia culcitula, Crenispirifer(?) sp., Cenorhynchia(?) sp., Kutorginella(?) sp., marginiferids, lyssacine hexactinellid sponges, pleurotomarid and bellerophontid gastropods, cidaroid echinoids, rugose corals, cylindrical cryptostome bryozoans, and nuculids. -from Authors

  17. Natural resources as an area of protection in LCA - outcomes of the discussion by the working group on resources within the UNEP-SETAC Life Cycle Initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonderegger, T.; Fantke, Peter; Dewulf, J.

    2016-01-01

    The topic of resources as an area of protection (AoP) in life cycle assessment (LCA) is being discussed within an expert group under the umbrella of the Life Cycle Initiative by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the Society for Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC...

  18. Role of IUCN WCPA Geoheritage Specialist Group for geoheritage conservation and recognition of World Heritage Sites, Global Geoparks and other protected areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Kyung Sik

    2017-04-01

    Geoheritage comprises those elements of the Earth's geodiversity that are considered to have significant scientific, educational, cultural/aesthetic, ecological or ecosystem service values. IUCN Resolutions at Barcelona (2008), at Jeju (2012) and at Hawaii (2016) clearly recognised that geodiversity is part of nature and geoheritage is part of natural heritage. Formal recognition of the geodiversity component of protected areas was made in 2008 in the revised 'IUCN Guidelines for Applying Protected Area Management Categories'. All 6 of the IUCN Protected Area Management Categories are applicable to the protection of geosites and the wider landscape values of geodiversity. Recognising the wider values of geodiversity therefore provides opportunities to integrate geoheritage much more closely in protected area networks, as the approach advocated by the Geoheritage Specialist Group (GSG) of the IUCN World Commission on Protected Areas. Although geoparks are not a protected area category as such and only includes some parts of protected areas as geosites, the UNESCO Global Geoparks Network also provides an international framework to conserve and enhance geoheritage values as UNESCO World Heritage sites has provided. GSG will pursue significant roles for geoheritage recognition and conservation as follows: 1) Establish the Best Practice Guideline of geoheritage sites for protected areas in the world, 2) Revise the Thematic Study on volcanic sites of Outstanding Universal Values and International Significance, 3) Revise Criterion (viii) for WH recognition, and 4) Initiate 'Key Geoheritage Site' concept in the future.

  19. Nutritional Status among the Children of Age Group 5-14 Years in Selected Arsenic Exposed and Non-Exposed Areas of Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rezaul Karim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To assess and compare the nutritional status of children aged 5-14 years in arsenic exposed and non- exposed areas.It was a cross sectional study conducted on 600 children of age 5-14 years from arsenic exposed and non-exposed areas in Bangladesh. Designed questionnaire and check list were used for collection of data. To estimate BMI necessary anthropometric measurements of the studied children were done. Dietary intakes of the study children were assessed using 24-hours recall method.The difference of socio-economic conditions between the children of exposed area and non-exposed area was not significant. On an average the body mass index was found to be significantly (p < 0.01 lower among the children of arsenic exposed area (49% in comparison to that of children in non-exposed area (38%. Stunting (p < 0.01, wasting (p < 0.05 and underweight (p < 0.05 were significantly higher in exposed group in comparison to non-exposed group. No significant difference of nutrition intake was found between exposed and non-exposed children as well as thin and normal children.In this study children exposed to arsenic contaminated water were found to be suffered from lower nutritional status.

  20. Waste management plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study of Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    This plan defines the criteria and methods to be used for managing waste generated during activities associated with Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). WAG 5 is located in Melton Valley, south of the main ORNL plant area. It contains 17 solid waste management units (SWMUs) to be evaluated during the remedial investigation. The SWMUs include three burial areas, two hydrofracture facilities, two settling ponds, eight tanks, and two low-level liquid waste leak sites. These locations are all considered to be within the WAG 5 area of contamination (AOC). The plan contains provisions for safely and effectively managing soils, rock cuttings, development and sampling water, decontamination fluids, and disposable personal protective equipment (PPE) consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance of May 1991 (EPA 1991). Consistent with EPA guidance, this plan is designed to protect the environment and the health and safety of workers and the public

  1. Multi-Level Scenario Module 1: 7th Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    2076 km), and Brazos River (2060 km). Populated areas in Attica are well supplied with useable water and have several water treatment and...DOC# D786-11183-1 30 MARCH 2006 REV A Range: 70 km Loiter time: 30 min FCS Armed Robotic Vehicle – Assault Variant (ARV-A) PAM MK 44 30 mm...Range LOS: 0-2 km Range BLOS: 2-12 km Speed: 78 kph road 44 kph cross country Armed Robotic Vehicle – Assault Variant, Light (ARV-A (L

  2. LANL Virtual Center for Chemical Hydrogen Storage: Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Ultra-high Surface Area Main Group Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Kauzlarich; Phillip P. Power; Doinita Neiner; Alex Pickering; Eric Rivard; Bobby Ellis, T. M.; Atkins, A. Merrill; R. Wolf; Julia Wang

    2010-09-05

    The focus of the project was to design and synthesize light element compounds and nanomaterials that will reversibly store molecular hydrogen for hydrogen storage materials. The primary targets investigated during the last year were amine and hydrogen terminated silicon (Si) nanoparticles, Si alloyed with lighter elements (carbon (C) and boron (B)) and boron nanoparticles. The large surface area of nanoparticles should facilitate a favorable weight to volume ratio, while the low molecular weight elements such as B, nitrogen (N), and Si exist in a variety of inexpensive and readily available precursors. Furthermore, small NPs of Si are nontoxic and non-corrosive. Insights gained from these studies will be applied toward the design and synthesis of hydrogen storage materials that meet the DOE 2010 hydrogen storage targets: cost, hydrogen capacity and reversibility. Two primary routes were explored for the production of nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm in diameter. The first was the reduction of the elemental halides to achieve nanomaterials with chloride surface termination that could subsequently be replaced with amine or hydrogen. The second was the reaction of alkali metal Si or Si alloys with ammonium halides to produce hydrogen capped nanomaterials. These materials were characterized via X-ray powder diffraction, TEM, FTIR, TG/DSC, and NMR spectroscopy.

  3. Study on mobility-disadvantage group' risk perception and coping behaviors of abrupt geological hazards in coastal rural area of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Anping

    2016-07-01

    China is a country highly vulnerable to abrupt geological hazards. The present study aims to investigate disaster preparedness and perception of abrupt geological disasters (such as rock avalanches, landslide, mud-rock flows etc) in mobility-disadvantage group living in coastal rural area of China. This research is to take into account all factors regarding disasters and to design the questionnaires accordingly. Two debris flow vulnerable townships are selected as study areas including Hedi Township in Qinyuan County and Xianxi Township in Yueqing City which are located in East China's Zhejiang Province. SPSS was applied to conduct descriptive analysis, which results in an effective empirical model for evacuation behavior of the disable groups. The result of this study shows mobility-disadvantage groups' awareness on disaster prevention and mitigation is poor and their knowledge about basic theory and emergency response is limited. Errors and distortions in public consciousness on disaster prevention and mitigation stimulate the development of areas with frequent disasters, which will expose more life and property to danger and aggravate the vulnerability of hazard bearing body. In conclusion, before drafting emergency planning, the government should consider more the disable group's expectations and actual evacuation behavior than the request of the situation to ensure the planning is good to work. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Fission-track ages of the Tokai Group and associate formations in the east coast areas of Ise Bay and their significance in geohistory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makinouchi, Takeshi; Danhara, Toru; Isoda, Kunitoshi.

    1983-01-01

    Fission-track ages of volcanic ash layers within the Tokai Group and associate formations in the east coast areas of Ise Bay are obtained by grain-by-grain method with which individual ages for the respective zircon grains are measured. They are as follows; 1) a volcanic ash layer in the Karayama Formation (tentative age: 1.9 +- 0.4 Ma). Among the zircon grains in this layer, essential ones occupy only 1 per cent, and the others are accidental. 2) Ohtani volcanic ash layer (4.3 +- 0.6 Ma). 3) Kosugaya volcanic ash layer (4.0 +- 0.5 Ma). 4) Kaminoma volcanic ash layer (5.3 +- 0.4 Ma). 5) A volcanic ash layer in the Toyoura Formation seems to be older than 10 Ma. 6) Zircon grains in the Kofu volcanic ash layer (Tokai Group) include two types of spontaneous namely track, clear and vague ones. The latter vague tracks are shorter and thiner, and seem to suffer thermal annealing. The ages obtained have clarified the following Points; a) The tentative age, 1.9 Ma, of the ''Karayama'' volcanic ash layer suggests the existence of unknown Plio-Pleistocene sediment in the Nagoya area. b) The sedimentary basin of Lake Tokai was formed in the latest Miocene, about 6.5 Ma. Generation of the basin coincides approximately with the stage of synchronous and abrupt change in sedimentation rate in sedimentary basins on the Pacific side of central and southern Japan. c) The Tokai Group in Chita (Tokoname Group) intercalates the Gilbert/Epoch 5 boundary in the paleomagnetic chronology in the middle horizon of the group. d) Average rate of sedimentation is about 1 m/10 4 yrs in the marginal areas of the basin, and 3-5 m/10 4 yrs in the central areas. (author)

  5. Benefits of agricultural technology innovation capacity to peasant farmers in rural poor areas: The case of DBN-Group, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Agri Eneji

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available DaBeiNong (DBN Technology Group Co Ltd is a private enterprise, at the cutting edge of the agricultural high-tech industry in China. It has developed its innovative capabilities through Research and Development (R&D activities, skilled R&D personnel, new products, services, processes and markets. This study contributes to knowledge by identifying and constructing a model of the enterprise innovation capacity; the inputs and outputs of innovation in DBN and 9 other agricultural high-tech enterprises in China. We analyzed the enterprise technology innovation capacity and offered recommendations. Two sets of questionnaires were used; for the peasant farmers, and for the agricultural enterprises. We used the rank factors on an ordinal scale and simple percentages. We used econometric model to analyze seven factors of agricultural enterprise innovation capacity. The results show that R&D is strategic to Agricultural Enterprise Innovation Capacity (AETIC. However, the benefits to the peasant farmers need to be further intensified, and stepped up from its present average level. We found that enterprises with higher capital and larger sales have more R&D investment than those with smaller sales. Promoting agricultural research and rural development is crucial to pro-poor growth, given the potential for smallholder agriculture to rapidly absorb and adopt innovations.

  6. Estimation of individual doses from external exposures and dose-group classification of cohort members in high background radiation area in Yangjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Yongling; Shen Hong; Sun Quanfu; Wei Luxin

    1999-01-01

    Objective: In order to estimate annual effective doses from external exposures in the high background radiation area (HBRA) and in the control area (CA) , the authors measured absorbed dose rates in air from terrestrial gamma radiation with different dosimeters. A dose group classification was an important step for analyzing the dose effects relationship among the cohort members in the investigated areas. The authors used the hamlet specific average annual effective doses of all the 526 hamlets in the investigated areas. A classification of four dose groups was made for the cohort members (high, moderate, low and control) . Methods: For the purpose of studying the dose effect relationships among the cohort members in HBRA and CA, it would be ideal that each subject has his own record of individual accumulated doses received before the evaluation. However, rt is difficult to realize it in practice (each of 106517 persons should wear TLD for a long time) . Thus the authors planned two sets of measurements. Firstly, to measure the environmental dose rates (outdoor, indoor, over the bed) in every hamlet of the investigated area (526 hamlets) , considering the occupancy factors for males and females of different age groups to convert to the annual effective dose from the data of dose rates. Secondly, to measure the individual cumulative dose with TLD for part of the subjects in the investigated areas. Results: Based on the two sets of measurements, the estimates of average annual effective doses in HBRA were 211.86 and 206.75 x 10 -5 Sv/a, respectively, 68.60 and 67.11 x 10 -5 Sv/a, respectively(gamma radiation only) . The intercomparison between these two sets of measurement showed that they were in good correlation. Thus the authors are able to yield the equations of linear regression: Y = 0.9937 + 6.0444, r = 0.9949. Conclusions: The authors took the value obtained from direct measurement as 'standard' , and 15 % for uncertainty of measurement. Since the estimates of

  7. Expression, purification and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the chicken MHC class I molecule YF1*7.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hee, Chee Seng; Gao, Song; Miller, Marcia M.; Goto, Ronald M.; Ziegler, Andreas; Daumke, Oliver; Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The chicken classical MHC class I antigen YF1*7.1 was crystallized together with β 2 -microglobulin but without a peptide ligand. Crystals diffracted synchrotron radiation to 1.32 Å and belonged to the monoclinic space group P2 1 . YF1*7.1 is an allele of a polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-like locus within the chicken Y gene complex. With the aim of understanding the possible role of the YF1*7.1 molecule in antigen presentation, the complex of YF1*7.1 heavy chain and β 2 -microglobulin was reconstituted and purified without a peptide. Crystals diffracted synchrotron radiation to 1.32 Å resolution and belonged to the monoclinic space group P2 1 . The phase problem was solved by molecular replacement. A detailed examination of the structure may provide insight into the type of ligand that could be bound by the YF1*7.1 molecule

  8. Readiness review plan for the in situ vitrification demonstration of Seepage Pit 1 in Waste Area Grouping 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    A treatability study is planned that encompasses the application of in situ vitrification (ISV) to at least two segments of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Seepage Pit I during the third quarter of fiscal year 1995. Before the treatability study can be initiated, the proposed activity must be subjected to an Operational Readiness Review (ORR). ORR is a structured methodology of determining readiness to proceed as outlined in Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), Environmental Restoration Waste Management Procedure ER/C-P1610, which provides Energy Systems organizations assurance that the work to be performed is consistent with management's expectations and that the subject activity is ready to proceed safely. The readiness review plan provides details of the review plan overview and the scope of work to be performed. The plan also identifies individuals and position responsibilities for implementing the activity. The management appointed Readiness Review Board (RRB) has been identified. A Field Readiness Review Team (FRT), a management appointed multidisciplinary group, has been established (1) to evaluate the ISV treatability study, (2) to identify and assemble supporting objective evidences of the readiness to proceed, and (3) to assist the team leader in presenting the evidences to the RRB. A major component of RRB is the formulation of readiness review criteria months before the operation. A comprehensive readiness review tree (a positive logic tree) is included, which identifies the activities required for the development of the readiness criteria. The readiness review tree serves as a tool to prevent the omission of an item that could affect system performance. All deficiencies identified in the review will be determined as prestart findings and must be resolved before the project is permitted to proceed. The final approval of the readiness to proceed will be the decision of RRB

  9. Data Management Plan and Functional System Design for the Information Management System of the Clinch River Remedial Investigation and Waste Area Grouping 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, T.; Brandt, C.; Calfee, J.; Garland, M.; Holladay, S.; Nickle, B.; Schmoyer, D.; Serbin, C.; Ward, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The Data Management Plan and Functional System Design supports the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) and Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 Environmental Monitoring Program. The objective of the Data Management Plan and Functional System Design is to provide organization, integrity, security, traceability, and consistency of the data generated during the CRRI and WAG 6 projects. Proper organization will ensure that the data are consistent with the procedures and requirements of the projects. The Information Management Groups (IMGs) for these two programs face similar challenges and share many common objectives. By teaming together, the IMGs have expedited the development and implementation of a common information management strategy that benefits each program.

  10. Measuring unemployment persistence of different labor force groups in the Greater São Paulo Metropolitan Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleomar Gomes da Silva

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article makes use of ARFIMA models and unit root tests with structural breaks to examine the unemployment persistence of different labor forces in the Greater Metropolitan Area of São Paulo. To this purpose, not only is the region's open unemployment rate analyzed but it is also disaggregated by gender, age, color and position within the household. The period ranges from January 1985 to November 2008 and, despite using a range of estimation methods, the presence of a unit root cannot be rejected in general. The exceptions are the series related to Age 15-17 and over 40. But even in these cases the parameter "d" lies above 0.5. This is an indication that the unemployment rates in São Paulo can be defined as non stationary and the majority of the series are not mean-reverting. Therefore, the disinflation policies implemented by the Brazilian policymakers in the last two decades, as well as changes in real variables, have had long-lasting effects on the unemployment rates in São Paulo.Este artigo usa modelos ARFIMA e testes de raiz unitária com quebra estrutural para examinar o grau de persistência do desemprego de diferentes estratos da força de trabalho na Região Metropolitana de São Paulo. Para tanto, a taxa agregada desta região é examinada, como também sua desagregação por gênero, idade, raça e posição dentro da família. O período de análise vai de janeiro de 1985 a novembro 2008 e, apesar do uso de diferentes métodos de estimação, a hipótese de raiz unitária não é rejeitada em geral. As duas exceções são as séries relacionadas aos trabalhadores entre 15 e 17 anos e acima dos 40 anos. Mas, mesmo nestes dois casos, o parâmetro "d" fica acima de 0,5. Isso indica que não há estacionariedade e também não há reversão a uma média de longo prazo para a maioria das séries analisadas. Portanto, as políticas econômicas de combate à inflação das últimas duas décadas, assim como mudanças em vari

  11. DETERMINANTS OF WOMEN’S PARTICIPATION IN SELF HELP GROUP LED MICRO-FINANCING OF FARMS IN ISUIKWUATO LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA OF ABIA STATE, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chidozie Onyedikachi ANYIRO

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This research analyzed determinants of women’s participation in self help group-led micro-financing of farms in Isuikwuato Local Government Area of Abia State, Nigeria. The specific objectives were to; determine the level of women’s participation in self help group led micro financing of farms; determine the factors that influence women’s participation in self help group micro financing of farms; identify constraints of women participation in self help group micro financing of farms in the study area. Multistage random sampling technique was employed in collecting data from one hundred and twenty (120 members of women self help group using structured questionnaire. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, likert scale type and probit regression analysis. The research revealed that the women (respondents actively participated in self help group meetings ( = 3.07, financial and material contributions (= 3.33, self help group project (= 3.36 and recruitment of fresh members (= 3.16, because their calculated means were greater than the critical midpoint mean score (3.0. The study also showed that the women did not participate in committee membership ( = 2.54 and holding of official executive position (= 2.53 in self help group since the midpoint score (3.0 was greater than their calculated mean values. The result of probit regression analysis showed that women’s participation in self help group led micro financing of farms was influenced by household size, years of membership experience, access to credit, primary occupation, mode of entry and annual contribution. The model predicted 94.69 per cent of the sample correctly and posted a log likelihood value of -33.54958, a pseudo R2value of 0.3013 and a goodness of fit chi-square value of 32.10 which is statistically significant at 1.0% level. Meanwhile irregular monthly contribution and loan default were the major constraints of women’s participation in self help group led micro

  12. ABO and Rhesus blood groups and risk of endometriosis in a French Caucasian population of 633 patients living in the same geographic area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghese, Bruno; Chartier, Mélanie; Souza, Carlos; Santulli, Pietro; Lafay-Pillet, Marie-Christine; de Ziegler, Dominique; Chapron, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The identification of epidemiological factors increasing the risk of endometriosis could shorten the time to diagnosis. Specific blood groups may be more common in patients with endometriosis. We designed a cross-sectional study of 633 Caucasian women living in the same geographic area. Study group included 311 patients with histologically proven endometriosis. Control group included 322 patients without endometriosis as checked during surgery. Frequencies of ABO and Rhesus groups in the study and control groups were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. We observed a higher proportion of Rh-negative women in the study group, as compared to healthy controls. Multivariate analysis showed that Rh-negative women are twice as likely to develop endometriosis (aOR = 1.90; 95% CI: 1.20-2.90). There was no significant difference in ABO group distribution between patients and controls. There was no difference when taking into account either the clinical forms (superficial endometriosis, endometrioma, and deep infiltration endometriosis) or the rAFS stages. Rh-negative women are twice as likely to develop endometriosis. Chromosome 1p, which contains the genes coding for the Rhesus, could also harbor endometriosis susceptibility genes.

  13. Data Base Management Plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 10, Operable Unit 3, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This Data Base Management Plan describes the gathering, verifying, analyzing, reporting, and archiving of data generated during the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 10, Operable Unit 3. This investigation will produce data documenting wellhead surveys, well headspace gas pressure measurements, geophysical surveys, water level measurements, and borehole geophysical logs. Close Support Laboratory analyses will be performed on well headspace gas and well water samples

  14. Final report on the waste area grouping perimeter groundwater quality monitoring well installation program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    A groundwater quality monitoring well installation program was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to meet the requirements of environmental regulations, including the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). A total of 173 wells were installed and developed at 11 different waste area groupings (WAGs) between June 1986 and November 1990. A location map of the wells is included

  15. Readiness Review Plan for the Interim Remedial Action on Surface Debris in Waste Area Grouping 11 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This Readiness Review Plan was prepared by the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 11 Site Project Readiness Review Team as an overview of the Interim Remedial Action on Surface Debris in WAG 11 project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, including major readiness milestones, criteria development methodology, and a list of events to occur as part of the review process for determining readiness for each project phase

  16. Preliminary digital model of ground-water flow in the Madison Group, Powder River Basin and adjacent areas, Wyoming, Montana, South Dakota, North Dakota, and Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konikow, Leonard F.

    1976-01-01

    A digital simulation model was used to analyze regional ground-water flow in the Madison Group aquifer in the Powder River Basin in Montana and Wyoming and adjacent areas. Most recharge to the aquifer originates in or near the outcrop areas of the Madison in the Bighorn Mountains and Black Hills, and most discharge occurs through springs and wells. Flow through the aquifer in the modeled areas was approximately 200 cubic feet per second. The aquifer can probably sustain increased ground-water withdrawals of up to several tens of cubic feet per second, but these withdrawals probably would significantly lower the potentiometric surface in the Madison aquifer in a large part of the basin. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Interim remedial action work plan for the cesium plots at Waste Area Grouping 13 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This remedial action work plan (RAWP) is issued under the Federal Facility Agreement to provide a basic approach for implementing the interim remedial action (IRA) described in Interim Record of Decision for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Area Grouping 13 Cesium Plots, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This RAWP summarizes the interim record of decision (IROD) requirements and establishes the strategy for the implementation of the field activities. As documented in the IROD document, the primary goal of this action is to reduce the risk to human health and the environment resulting from current elevated levels of gamma radiation on the site and at areas accessible to the public adjacent to the site. The major steps of this IRA are to: Excavate cesium-contaminated soil; place the excavated soils in containers and transport to Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6; and backfill excavated plots with clean fill materials. The actual remedial action will be performed by Department of Energy prime contractor, MK-Ferguson of Oak Ridge Company. Remediation of the cesium plots will require approximately 60 days to complete. During this time, all activities will be performed according to this RAWP and the applicable specifications, plans, and procedures referred to in this document. The IRA on WAG 13 will prevent a known source of cesium-contaminated soil from producing elevated levels of gamma radiation in areas accessible to the public, eliminate sources of contamination to the environment, and reduce the risks associated with surveillance and maintenance of the WAG 13 site

  18. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (c) 1/7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheikhrouhou, Abdelwaheb

    2004-05-01

    The Third International Conference on Magnetic and Superconducting Materials (MSM03) belongs to a series of conferences, held biannually, aiming at providing a forum to the scientists in the magnetic and superconducting materials areas over the world.The first conference of the series (MSM99) was held in Iran with the proceedings published by World Scientific in 2000, and the second conference (MSM01) was held in Jordan with the proceedings published in Physica B 321 (2002).MSM03 was organized by the Materials Physics Laboratory, Sfax University (Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux de la Faculté des Sciences de Sfax), with many domestic and international supporting institutions. It was held in Monastir (Tunisia), 1-4 September 2003, with over 150 participants and keynote lecturers attending from the following countries: Algeria, Austria, China, Czech Republic, Egypt, France, Germany, Hungary, Iran, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Morocco, Netherlands, Pakistan, Poland, Russia, Spain, Sudan, Sultanate of Oman, Taiwan, Tunisia, United Kingdom and United States of America.Altogether, about 170 papers on a variety of subjects relevant to the topic of the conference were presented, out of which 42 were keynote lectures. The submissions were peer-reviewed, and ultimately 115 articles were selected for publication in this journal. However, it must be noted that 13 of 39 keynote speakers did not submit their manuscripts for publication. Invited and other speakers were distinguished members of the international scientific community who are interested in pure sciences and materials research, and involved in the fabrication, characterization and investigation of the physical properties of magnetic and superconducting materials. High-caliber scientists attended the conference contributing to its success and the event resulted in new international relationships in research and cooperation. The Chairman of the Organizing Committee was Professor Abdelwaheb Cheikhrouhou, Materials

  19. Flight Model Development of Tokyo Tech Nano-Satellite Cute-1.7 + APD II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Hiroki; Nishida, Junichi; Omagari, Kuniyuki; Fujiwara, Ken; Konda, Yasumi; Yamanaka, Tomio; Tanaka, Yohei; Maeno, Masaki; Fujihashi, Kota; Inagawa, Shinichi; Miura, Yoshiyuki; Matunaga, Saburo

    The Laboratory for Space Systems at the Tokyo Institute of Technology has developed the nano-satellite Cute-1.7+APD. The satellite was launched by JAXA M-V-8 rocket on February 22, 2006 and operated for about a month. A successor to the Cute-1.7+APD was developed and is named Cute-1.7+APD II. This new satellite is based on its predecessor but has some modifications. In this paper an overview of the Cute-1.7 series and flight model development of Cute-1.7+APD II are introduced.

  20. Malnutrition and its risk factors among children 1-7 years old in rural Malaysian communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norhayati, M; Noorhayati, M I; Mohammod, C G; Oothuman, P; Azizi, O; Fatimah, A; Fatmah, M S

    1997-12-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the nutritional status of children aged 1-7 years in Malaysian rural communities and to identify its risk factors. In all, 221 children were assessed using anthropometric measurements, dietary questionnaires and other tools. Weight-for-age, height-for-age, weight-for-height were analysed. Based on the NCHS standards, the overall prevalence of underweight, stunting and wasting was 46.2%, 18.1% and 30.3% respectively. Almost one-third of the 1-2 years old groups were malnourished. Univariate analysis identified household income £ MR750.00 as a significant risk factor of stunting and wasting.

  1. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 4: Appendix C, Risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 is part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and is located on the United States Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE-ORR). The site lies southeast of Haw Ridge in Melton Valley and comprises approximately 32 ha (80 ac) [12 ha (30 ac) of forested area and the balance in grassed fields]. The western and southern boundaries of WAG are contiguous with the WAG 2 area which includes White Oak Creek and Melton Branch and associated floodplains. Waste Area Grouping 5 consists of several contaminant source areas for the disposal of low-level radioactive, transuranic (TRU), and fissile wastes (1959 to 1973) as well as inorganic and organic chemical wastes. Wastes were buried in trenches and auger holes. Radionuclides from buried wastes are being transported by shallow groundwater to Melton Branch and White Oak Creek. Different chemicals of potential concern (COPCS) were identified (e.g., cesium-137, strontium-90, radium-226, thorium-228, etc.); other constituents and chemicals, such as vinyl chloride, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, trichloroethene, were also identified as COPCS. Based on the results of this assessment contaminants of concern (COCS) were subsequently identified. The human health risk assessment methodology used in this risk assessment is based on Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund (RAGS) (EPA 1989). First, the data for the different media are evaluated to determine usability for risk assessment. Second, through the process of selecting COPCS, contaminants to be considered in the BHHRA are identified for each media, and the representative concentrations for these contaminants are determined. Third, an assessment of exposure potential is performed, and exposure pathways are identified. Subsequently, exposure is estimated quantitatively, and the toxicity of each of the COPCs is determined. The results of the exposure and toxicity assessments are combined and summarized in the risk characterization section

  2. Regulation of insulin sensitivity, insulin production, and pancreatic β cell survival by angiotensin-(1-7) in a rat model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Junhua; Yang, Zhiming; Yang, Huiyu; Wang, Li; Wu, Huilu; Fan, Yunjuan; Wang, Wei; Fan, Xin; Li, Xing

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the antidiabetic activity of Ang-(1-7), an important component of the renin-angiotensin system, in a rat model of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). A total of 36 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: control group fed standard laboratory diet, DM group fed high-fat diet and injected with STZ, and Ang-(1-7) group receiving injection of STZ followed by Ang-(1-7) treatment. Body weight, blood glucose levels, fasting serum Ang II and insulin levels, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were measured. The pancreas was collected for histological examination and gene expression analysis. Notably, the Ang-(1-7) group showed a significant decrease in fasting blood glucose and serum Ang II levels and HOMA-IR values and increase in fasting serum insulin levels. Pancreatic β cells in the control and Ang-(1-7) groups were normally distributed in the center of pancreatic islets with large clear nuclei. In contrast, pancreatic β cells in the DM group had a marked shrinkage of the cytoplasm and condensation of nuclear chromatin. Ang-(1-7) treatment significantly facilitated insulin production by β cells in diabetic rats. The DM-associated elevation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), caspase-3, caspase-9, caspase-8, and Bax and reduction of Bcl-2 was significantly reversed by Ang-(1-7) treatment. Taken together, Ang-(1-7) protects against STZ-induced DM through improvement of insulin resistance, insulin secretion, and pancreatic β cell survival, which is associated with reduction of iNOS expression and alteration of the Bcl-2 family. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Araxa Group in the type-area: A fragment of Neoproterozoic oceanic crust in the Brasilia Fold Belt; Grupo Araxa em sua area tipo: um fragmento de crosta oceanica Neoproterozoica na faixa de dobramentos Brasilia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seer, Hildor Jose [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Araxa, (CEFET), MG (Brazil); Brod, Jose Affonso; Fuck, Reinhardt Adolfo; Pimentel, Marcio Martins; Boaventura, Geraldo Resende; Dardenne, Marcel Auguste [Brasilia Univ., DF (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias

    2001-09-01

    This study reviews the geological characteristics and puts forward a new evolution model for the Araxa Group in its type-area, the southern segment of the Neo proterozoic Brasilia Belt, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The Araxa Group is confined within a thrust sheet belonging to a syn formal regional fold, the Araxa Syn form, overlying two other thrust sheets made of the Ibia and Canastra Groups. The Araxa Group is described as a tectono stratigraphic terrane in the sense of Howell (1993). It comprises an igneous mafic sequence, with fine and coarse grained amphibolites, associated with pelitic meta sedimentary rocks, and subordinate psanmites. All rocks were metamorphosed to amphibolite facies at ca. 630 Ma ago and were intruded by collisional granites. The amphibolites represent original basaltic and gabbroic rocks, with minor ultramafic (serpentinite/ amphibole-talc schist). The basalts are similar to high Fe O tholeiites, with REE signatures that resemble E-MORB and {epsilon}{sub Nd(T)} =+ 1.1. The meta sedimentary rocks are interpreted as the result of a marine deep-water sedimentation. They have Sm-Nd model ages of 1,9 Ga, and {epsilon}{sub Nd(T)} = -10.21. The amphibolites and metasediments could represent a fragment of back-arc oceanic crust. The data presented here differ significantly from the original definition of Barbosa et al. (1970) who describe the Araxa Group as a pelitic/psanmitic sequence and the collisional granites as a basement complex. (author)

  4. Groundwater level monitoring sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater level monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Groundwater level monitoring will be conducted at 129 sites within the WAG. All of the sites will be manually monitored on a semiannual basis. Forty-five of the 128 wells, plus one site in White Oak Lake, will also be equipped with automatic water level monitoring equipment. The 46 sites are divided into three groups. One group will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level, conductivity, and temperature. The other two groups will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level only. The equipment will be rotated between the two groups. The data collected from the water level monitoring will be used to support determination of the contaminant flux at WAG 6.

  5. Groundwater level monitoring sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater level monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Groundwater level monitoring will be conducted at 129 sites within the WAG. All of the sites will be manually monitored on a semiannual basis. Forty-five of the 128 wells, plus one site in White Oak Lake, will also be equipped with automatic water level monitoring equipment. The 46 sites are divided into three groups. One group will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level, conductivity, and temperature. The other two groups will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level only. The equipment will be rotated between the two groups. The data collected from the water level monitoring will be used to support determination of the contaminant flux at WAG 6

  6. Knowledge and Attitude of Married Women in the Reproductive Age Group Regarding Emergency Contraception in Selected Rural Areas of Udupi District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preethi Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unwanted pregnancy is still a major problem in the modern world despite the widely available contraception services. This study was conducted to determine the knowledge and attitude of married women in the reproductive age group regarding emergency contraception in selected rural areas of Udupi district, India. Material and Methods: The study group comprised of 350 married women in the reproductive age group residing in rural areas of Udupi district, India. A structured questionnaire and an attitude scale were used to assess the knowledge and the attitude. Results: Majority, 69.1% of the married women belonged to Hindu religion, 46.9% had an educational qualification of 10th standard and below. About 13.1% of the married women had undergone abortion. Nearly 96.9% of the married women had heard about emergency contraceptives and only 2% of the married women had used emergency contraceptive pills. About 63.7% out of 339 married women had got information about emergency contraceptive pills from health personnel and about 77.7% from television. Majority 84% had poor knowledge on emergency contraception. About 99.7% had favourable attitude on the use of emergency contraceptives. There was a significant association between knowledge scores and selected variable like education, knowledge and the attitude scores had a correlation. Conclusion: The study identifies the knowledge and attitude of the rural married women regarding emergency contraception, hence to help them to plan future pregnancies and prevent any unwanted or unintended pregnancies.

  7. Data and records management plan for the White Wing Scrap Yard (Waste Area Grouping 11) geophysical survey at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    A geophysical survey is being conducted across the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 11 site to locate buried nonindigenous materials. The survey team will collect data manually in field logbooks and on field forms using two types of instrumentation. This Data and Records Management Plan will describe the process necessary to record and track the geophysical data in a manner that will comply with the data quality objectives (DQOs) described in the WAG 11 Geophysical Survey Work Plan and with Environmental Restoration (ER) regulations concerning project records. This plan provides guidance on handling documentation within CDM Federal Programs Corporation (CDM Federal) and by the survey team in the field. An initial (Phase 1) survey will be performed in established areas (referred to as known target areas) using both 10-ft and 20-ft grid spacing. The results of the Phase 1 survey will be evaluated to determine the appropriate grid spacing to be used for the subsequent survey phase. The second phase (Phase 2) will then cover the remainder of the WAG 11 area using the grid spacing determined in Phase 1. The objective of the Phase 2 survey will be to estimate the horizontal and vertical extent of nonindigenous materials in the subsurface that are man-made, ferrous, highly resistive, and/or possess conductivity above background, based on the survey grid established in Phase 1

  8. Surface radiological investigation of Trench 5 in Waste Area Grouping 7 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, D.D.

    1991-08-01

    A surface radiological investigation of areas encompassing Trench 5 on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was conducted from May 1990 through November 1990. This survey was led by the author, assisted by various members of the Measurement Applications and Development (MAD) group of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the presence, nature, and extent of surface radiological contamination at Trench 5, the Homogeneous Reactor Experiment fuel wells, and surrounding areas. Based on the data obtained in the field, interim corrective measures were recommended to limit human exposure to radioactivity and to minimize insult to the environment. It should be stressed that this project was not intended to be a complete site characterization but rather to be a preliminary investigation into the potential contamination problem that might exist as a result of past operations at Trench 5.

  9. Sampling and analysis plan for the site characterization of the waste area Grouping 1 groundwater operable unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) includes all of the former ORNL radioisotope research, production, and maintenance facilities; former waste management areas; and some former administrative buildings. Site operations have contaminated groundwater, principally with radiological contamination. An extensive network of underground pipelines and utilities have contributed to the dispersal of contaminants to a known extent. In addition, karst geology, numerous spills, and pipeline leaks, together with the long and varied history of activities at specific facilities at ORNL, complicate contaminant migration-pathway analysis and source identification. To evaluate the extent of contamination, site characterization activity will include semiannual and annual groundwater sampling, as well as monthly water level measurements (both manual and continuous) at WAG 1. This sampling and analysis plan provides the methods and procedures to conduct site characterization for the Phase 1 Remedial Investigation of the WAG 1 Groundwater Operable Unit

  10. Sampling and analysis plan for the site characterization of the waste area Grouping 1 groundwater operable unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) includes all of the former ORNL radioisotope research, production, and maintenance facilities; former waste management areas; and some former administrative buildings. Site operations have contaminated groundwater, principally with radiological contamination. An extensive network of underground pipelines and utilities have contributed to the dispersal of contaminants to a known extent. In addition, karst geology, numerous spills, and pipeline leaks, together with the long and varied history of activities at specific facilities at ORNL, complicate contaminant migration-pathway analysis and source identification. To evaluate the extent of contamination, site characterization activity will include semiannual and annual groundwater sampling, as well as monthly water level measurements (both manual and continuous) at WAG 1. This sampling and analysis plan provides the methods and procedures to conduct site characterization for the Phase 1 Remedial Investigation of the WAG 1 Groundwater Operable Unit.

  11. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Environmental Monitoring Program in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 is a hazardous and low-level radioactive waste disposal site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Extensive site investigations have revealed contaminated surface water, sediments, groundwater, and soils. Based on the results of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) conducted from 1989--1991 and on recent interactions with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), a decision was made to defer implementing source control remedial measures at the WAG. The information shows WAG 6 contributes < 2% of the total off-site contaminant risk released over White Oak Dam (WOD). The alternative selected to address hazards at WAG 6 involves maintenance of site access controls to prevent public exposure to on-site contaminants, continued monitoring of contaminant releases to determine if source control measures will be required in the future, and development of technologies to support final remediation of WAG 6. This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) has been developed as part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-1192 ampersand D1). Environmental monitoring will be conducted in two phases: the baseline monitoring phase and the routine annual monitoring phase. The baseline monitoring phase will be conducted to establish the baseline contaminant release conditions at the Waste Area Grouping (WAG), to confirm the site-related chemicals of concern (COC), and to gather data to confirm the site hydrologic model. The baseline monitoring phase is expected to begin in 1994 and continue for 12-18 months. The routine annual monitoring phase will consist of continued sampling and analyses of COC to determine off-WAG contaminant flux, to identify trends in releases, and to confirm the COC. The routine annual monitoring phase will continue for ∼4 years

  12. Fescues of the Intravaginal group of Festuca L. section Festuca in the lowland and montane areas of the northeastern Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyke, S.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fescues of the Intravaginal group of Festuca L. section Festuca in the lowland and montane areas of the northeastern Iberian Peninsula.— Morphologically similar fescues occur across the study area (Mediterranean area of the northeastern Iberian Peninsula at low and middle elevations. With the exception of the high mountain or alpine species, these populations are reviewed here, with particular attention being paid to the Festuca inops (F. gracilior group, as well as to some other species, in particular F. lemanii, which are not easily understood and can complicate identification, especially where the taxa occur sympatrically. The application of the binomen F. inops De Not. to some of the Iberian populations constituting the F. inops group is discussed. New records for F. tarraconensis, F. occitanica, F. michaelis and F. heteroidea amplify the distribution range of these little-known taxa within the Iberian Peninsula.Diferentes especies de Festuca morfológicamente afines crecen en gran parte del territorio objeto de esta reseña (tierras mediterráneas del nordeste de la Península Ibérica, a baja y mediana altitud. Excluyendo las especies de alta montaña, estas poblaciones se han estudiado aquí haciendo hincapié en Festuca grupo inops (F. gracilior, y se han tratado otras especies (F. lemanii en especial que a veces complican la identificación de los miembros de dicho grupo, sobre todo cuando solapan sus distribuciones. Se comenta la aplicación del binomen F. inops De Not. a algunas poblaciones ibéricas del grupo F. inops. Nuevas citas de F. tarraconensis, F. occitanica, F. michaelis y F. heteroidea amplían la distribución de estos taxones dentro de la Península Ibérica.

  13. Implementation of a one-group interfacial area transport equation in a CFD code for the simulation of upward adiabatic bubbly flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellacani, F.; Macian, R.; Chiva, S.; Pena, C.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper upward, isothermal and turbulent bubbly flow in tubes is numerically modeled by using ANSYS CFX 12.1 with the aim of creating a basis for the reliable simulation of the flow along a vertical channel in a nuclear reactor as long term goal. Two approaches based on the mono-dispersed model and on the one-group Interfacial Area Transport Equation (IATE) model are used in order to maintain the computational effort as low as possible. This work represents the necessary step to implement a two-group interfacial area transport equation that will be able to dynamically represent the changes in interfacial structure in the transition region from bubbly to slug flow. The drag coefficient is calculated using the Grace model and the interfacial non-drag forces are also included. The Antal model is used for the calculation of the wall lubrication force coefficient. The lift force coefficient is obtained from the Tomiyama model. The turbulent dispersion force is taken into account and is modeled using the FAD (Favre averaged drag) approach, while the turbulence transfer is simulated with the Sato's model. The liquid velocity is in the range between 0.5 and 2 m/s and the average void fraction varies between 5 and 15%.The source and sink terms for break-up and coalescence needed for the calculation of the implemented Interfacial Area Density are those proposed by Yao and Morel. The model has been checked using experimental results by Mendez. Radial profile distributions of void fraction, interfacial area density and bubble mean diameter are shown at the axial position equivalent to z/D=56. The results obtained by the simulations have a good agreement with the experimental data but show also the need of a better study of the coalescence and breakup phenomena to develop more accurate interaction models. (author)

  14. Project management plan for Waste Area Grouping 5 Old Hydrofracture Facility tanks content removal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) tanks content removal project is to transfer inventory from the five OHF tanks located in Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) liquid low-level (radioactive) waste (LLLW) storage facility, and remediate the remaining OHF tank shells. The major activities involved are identified in this document along with the organizations that will perform the required actions and their roles and responsibilities for managing the project

  15. Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Annual Status Report for Fiscal Year 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. P. Wells

    2007-05-09

    This report provides a status of the progress made in Fiscal Year 2006 on tasks identified in the Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan. Major accomplishments include: (1) groundwater sampling and review of the groundwater monitoring data, (2) installation of a Sitewide groundwater-level monitoring network, (3) update of the Groundwater Monitoring and Field Sampling Plan of Operable Unit 10-08, (4) re-evaluation of the risk at Site TSF-08, (5) progress on the Operable Unit 10-08 Sitewide Groundwater Model.

  16. Risk Factors for Obesity in Adolescents of Ethnic Groups in Rural Areas of the Republic of Buryatia: a Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ljubov V. Rychkova; Z. G. Ajurova; A. V. Pogodina; A. S. Kosovtseva

    2017-01-01

    Background. Obesity develops as a result of interaction of genetic and environmental factors. The impact of environmental factors on the risk of obesity in children can be determined by socially conditioned causes.Objective. Our aim was to identify the risk factors associated with  overweight/obesity in children of different ethnic groups living in  rural areas of the Republic of Buryatia.Methods. The cross-sectional study included adolescents aged 11– 17 years. Overweight was considered to b...

  17. Prevalence of Internet addiction and risk of developing addiction as exemplified by a group of Polish adolescents from urban and rural areas

    OpenAIRE

    Beata Pawłowska; Maciej Zygo; Emilia Potembska; Lucyna Kapka-Skrzypczak; Piotr Dreher; Zbigniew Kędzierski

    2015-01-01

    [b]Objective. [/b]The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of Internet addiction and the risk of developing this addiction in Polish adolescents attending junior high schools and high school in Lublin Province, to indicate the differences regarding the intensity of Internet addiction symptoms, and the types of online activity of adolescents residing in urban and rural areas. [b]Material and Methods[/b]. The examined group comprised 1,860 participants (1,320 girls and 5...

  18. Surveillance and maintenance plan for Waste Area Groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for FY 1993--2002. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, M.K.; Holder, L. Jr.; Jones, R.G.

    1992-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Area Grouping (WAG) Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) program was designed for the management of sites contaminated with radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from the end of their operating life until final facility disposition or site stabilization in accordance with environmental regulations and good management practices. Program objectives include (1) S&M of sites/facilities awaiting final disposition; (2) planning for safe and orderly final closure at each site/facility; and (3) implementing a program to accomplish final disposition in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner.

  19. Surveillance and maintenance plan for Waste Area Groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for FY 1993--2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, M.K.; Holder, L. Jr.; Jones, R.G.

    1992-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Area Grouping (WAG) Surveillance and Maintenance (S M) program was designed for the management of sites contaminated with radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from the end of their operating life until final facility disposition or site stabilization in accordance with environmental regulations and good management practices. Program objectives include (1) S M of sites/facilities awaiting final disposition; (2) planning for safe and orderly final closure at each site/facility; and (3) implementing a program to accomplish final disposition in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner.

  20. Surveillance and maintenance plan for Waste Area Groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for FY 1993--2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, M.K.; Holder, L. Jr.; Jones, R.G.

    1992-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Area Grouping (WAG) Surveillance and Maintenance (S ampersand M) program was designed for the management of sites contaminated with radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from the end of their operating life until final facility disposition or site stabilization in accordance with environmental regulations and good management practices. Program objectives include (1) S ampersand M of sites/facilities awaiting final disposition; (2) planning for safe and orderly final closure at each site/facility; and (3) implementing a program to accomplish final disposition in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner

  1. Functional requirements for the Liquid Waste Transfer and Distribution Station at Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tulay, M.P.

    1991-08-01

    A new facility will be constructed near the Bethel Valley storage tanks to receive process waste liquids generated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory during closure activities at Waste Area Grouping 6. The facility will unload trucks and distribute the liquid waste to other treatment facilities. It will be able to handle eight 5000-gal transfers per 8-h shift. No waste categorized as Resource Conservation and Recovery Act or liquid low-level is expected, but is such waste is encountered, it will cause transfer rate restrictions.

  2. GIS-based identification of areas that have resource potential for critical minerals in six selected groups of deposit types in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Susan M.; Jones, James V.; Hayes, Timothy S.

    2016-11-16

    Alaska has considerable potential for undiscovered mineral resources. This report evaluates potential for undiscovered critical minerals in Alaska. Critical minerals are those for which the United States imports more than half of its total supply and which are largely derived from nations that cannot be considered reliable trading partners. In this report, estimated resource potential and certainty for the state of Alaska are analyzed and mapped for the following six selected mineral deposit groups that may contain one or more critical minerals: (1) rare earth elements-thorium-yttrium-niobium(-uranium-zirconium) [REE-Th-Y-Nb(-U-Zr)] deposits associated with peralkaline to carbonatitic igneous intrusive rocks; (2) placer and paleoplacer gold (Au) deposits that in some places might also produce platinum group elements (PGE), chromium (Cr), tin (Sn), tungsten (W), silver (Ag), or titanium (Ti); (3) platinum group elements(-cobalt-chromium-nickel-titanium-vanadium) [PGE(-Co-Cr-Ni-Ti-V)] deposits associated with mafic to ultramafic intrusive rocks; (4) carbonate-hosted copper(-cobalt-silver-germanium-gallium) [Cu(-Co-Ag-Ge-Ga)] deposits; (5) sandstone-hosted uranium(-vanadium-copper) [U(-V-Cu)] deposits; and (6) tin-tungsten-molybdenum(-tantalum-indium-fluorspar) [Sn-W-Mo(-Ta-In-fluorspar)] deposits associated with specialized granites.This study used a data-driven, geographic information system (GIS)-implemented method to identify areas that have mineral resource potential in Alaska. This method systematically and simultaneously analyzes geoscience data from multiple geospatially referenced datasets and uses individual subwatersheds (12-digit hydrologic units) as the spatial unit of classification. The final map output uses a red, yellow, green, and gray color scheme to portray estimated relative potential (High, Medium, Low, Unknown) for each of the six groups of mineral deposit types, and it indicates the relative certainty (High, Medium, Low) of that estimate for

  3. Spotted Fever Group Rickettsia in Small Rodents from Areas of Low Endemicity for Brazilian Spotted Fever in the Eastern Region of Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milagres, Bruno S.; Padilha, Amanda F.; Montandon, Carlos E.; Freitas, Renata N.; Pacheco, Richard; Walker, David H.; Labruna, Marcelo B.; Mafra, Cláudio L.; Galvão, Márcio A. M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the humoral immune response against different species of Rickettsia in serum samples from small rodents collected in two areas of a silent focus for Brazilian spotted fever in the eastern region of Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Sera samples were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence assay using antigens from Rickettsia species of the spotted fever, ancestral, and transition groups. Titers ≥ 1:64 were considered positive. In Santa Cruz do Escalvado, 94% (30 of 32) of the samples collected from Rattus rattus, 22% (5 of 23) from Nectomys squamipes, and 80% (4 of 5) from Akodon sp., reacted by indirect immunofluorescence assay with Rickettsia antigens of the spotted fever group. In the municipality of Pingo D'Água, 84% (26 of 31) of the samples collected from R. rattus, 86% (6 of 7) of the samples from Oryzomys subflavus, 86% (6 of 7) from N. squamipes, and 100% (1 of 1) from Bolomys sp. contained antibodies that reacted with rickettsial antigens of the spotted fever group. These results demonstrated the previous exposure of small rodents to spotted fever group Rickettsia, suggesting the participation of these animals in the natural history of these rickettsiae in this region. PMID:23509125

  4. Angiotensina-(1-7 durante o processo inicial na cascata da ovulação em bovinos Angiotensin-(1-7 during the initial process of ovulatory cascade in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joabel Tonellotto dos Santos

    2012-10-01

    , cows were challenged with an intramuscular application of GnRH analogue. Ang-(1-7 or the blockade of its receptor MAS had no effect in Ereg mRNA expression in granulosa cells cultured in vitro. Likewise, the intrafollicular injection of MAS receptor inhibitor (10-5M of A-779 did not block ovulation before the expected time of LH peak (100% of the cows ovulated after GnRH challenge in the treatment and control groups, suggesting that Ang-(1-7 has no role in the early ovulatory cascade in cattle.

  5. Angiotensin (1-7) re-establishes heart cell communication previously impaired by cell swelling: implications for myocardial ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mello, Walmor C

    2014-05-01

    The influence of hypertonic solution on dye coupling was investigated in cell pairs isolated from the left ventricle of adult Sprague Dawley rats.The hypertonic solution together with Lucifer Yellow CH, were dialyzed into one cell of the pair using the whole cell clamp tecnique, and the diffusion of dye in the dialyzed as well as in non-dialyzed cell, was followed by measuring the intensity of fluorescence in both cells as a function of time.The results indicated that: (1) Lucifer Yellow CH dialyzed into one cell of the pair diffuses easily into the nondialyzed cell through gap junctions; (2) the intracellular dialysis of an hypertonic solution into one cell of the pair, increases the area of the dialyzed cell and reduced the area of the non-dialyzed cell suggesting intercellular movement of water; (3) the hypertonic solution dialyzed into one cell of the pair abolished the dye coupling; (4) the gap junction permeability (Pj) estimated before and after administration of hypertonic solution showed an appreciably decrease of Pj; (5) angiotensin (1-7) (Ang (1-7) (10-9M) administered to the bath re-established the dye coupling abolished by hypertonic solution and reduced the cell area; (6) the effect of Ang (1-7) was related to the activation of Mas receptor and was dependent on the activation of PKA. the reestablishment of dye coupling elicited by Ang (1-7) seen in cell pairs dialyzed with hypertonic solution, might indicate that under similar conditions like that seen during myocardial ischemia, the peptide might be of benefit preventing the impairment of cell communication and impulse propagation associated with cardiac reentrant arrhytmias. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Data Base Management Plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    The remedial investigation (RI) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 will involve gathering, verifying, analyzing, reporting, and archiving numerous types of field and analytical data. Field investigations will produce data documenting surficial and geophysical surveys, geologic and hydrogeologic logs, aquifer tests, water level measurements, geophysical logs, and stream and seepage flow measurements. Laboratory analyses will be performed on soil, surface water, groundwater, and sediment samples collected during field investigations. All data resulting from these activities will be contained in the Bechtel RI/feasibility study (FS) project data base and will be managed in accordance with the RI/FS Data Base Management Plan and this WAG-specific plan. This Data Base Management Plan describes the gathering, verifying, analyzing, reporting, and archiving of data generated during Bechtel's remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 5. This investigation will produce data documenting surficial surveys, geophysical surveys, geologic and hydrologic logs, aquifer tests, water level measurements, geophysical logs, and stream and seep flow measurements. Also, laboratory analyses will be performed on soil, surface water, groundwater, and sediment samples. The 1500 series of Bechtel project procedures, ''Data Base Management,'' and the project Data Base Management Plan will be used to ensure that data are handled properly

  7. Health and safety plan for the Remedial Investigation and Site Investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cofer, G.H.; Holt, V.L.; Roupe, G.W.

    1993-11-01

    This health and safety plan (HASP) was developed by the members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health Science Research Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This plan was prepared to ensure that health and safety related items for the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 Remedial Investigation (RI)/Feasibility Study and Site Investigation projects conform with the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.120 (April 18, 1992). The RI Plan calls for the characterization, monitoring, risk assessment, and identification of remedial needs and alternatives that have been structured and staged with short-term and long-term objectives. In early FY 1992, the WAG 2 RI was integrated with the ORNL Environmental Restoration (ER) Site Investigations program in order to achieve the complimentary objectives of the projects more effectively by providing an integrated basis of support. The combined effort was named the WAG 2 Remedial Investigation and Site Investigations Program (WAG 2 RI&SI). The Site Investigation activities are a series of monitoring efforts and directed investigations that support other ER activities by providing information about (1) watershed hydrogeology; (2) contaminants, pathways, and fluxes for groundwater at ORNL; (3) shallow subsurface areas that can act as secondary sources of contaminants; and (4) biological populations and contaminants in biota, in addition to other support and coordination activities.

  8. Data management implementation plan for the site characterization of the Waste Area Grouping 1 Groundwater Operable Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, T.S.; Nickle, E.B.

    1994-10-01

    The Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is undergoing a site characterization. This project is not mandated by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); therefore, no formalized meetings for data quality objective (DQO) development were held. Internally, DQOs were generated by the project team based on the end uses of the data to be collected. The 150-acre WAG 1 is contained within the ORNL security area. It includes all of the former ORNL radioisotope research, production, and maintenance facilities; former waste management areas; and some former administrative facilities. The goal of the WAG 1 Groundwater Site Characterization is to provide the necessary data on the nature and extent of groundwater contamination with an acceptable level of uncertainty to support the selection of remedial alternatives and to identify additional data needs for future actions. Primary objectives for the site characterization are: (1) To identify and characterize contaminant migration pathways based on the collection of groundwater data; (2) to identify sources of groundwater contamination and evaluate remedial actions which could be implemented to control or eliminate these sources; and (3) To conduct groundwater monitoring in support of other OUs in WAG 1 and the ORNL Groundwater OU

  9. Waste Management Plan for the Remedial Investigation of Waste Area Grouping 10, Operable Unit 3, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This Waste Management Plan (WMP) supplements the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Project WMP and defines the criteria and methods to be used for managing and characterizing waste generated during activities associated with the RI of 23 wells near the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF). These wells are within the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 area of contamination (AOC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Field activities for the limited RI of Operable Unit (OU) 3 of WAG 10 will involve sampling and measurement of various environmental media (e.g., liquids and gases). Many of these activities will occur in areas known to be contaminated with radioactive materials or hazardous chemical substances, and it is anticipated that contaminated solid and liquid wastes and noncontaminated wastes will be generated as a result of these activities. On a project-wide basis, handling of these waste materials will be accomplished in accordance with the RI/FS Project WMP and the procedures referenced throughout the plan

  10. Waste area grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Ecological risk assessment and White Oak Creek watershed screening ecological risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efroymson, R.A.; Jackson, B.L.; Jones, D.S. [and others

    1996-05-01

    This report presents an ecological risk assessment for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 based on the data collected in the Phase I remedial investigation (RI). It serves as an update to the WAG 2 screening ecological risk assessment that was performed using historic data. In addition to identifying potential ecological risks in WAG 2 that may require additional data collection, this report serves to determine whether there are ecological risks of sufficient magnitude to require a removal action or some other expedited remedial process. WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), the White Oak Creek Embayment of the Clinch River, associated flood plains, and the associated groundwater. The WOC system drains the WOC watershed, an area of approximately 16.8 km{sup 2} that includes ORNL and associated WAGs. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminants released from ORNL and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent WAGs.

  11. Zircon U-Pb Geochronology, Hf Isotopic Composition and Geological Implications of the Neoproterozoic Huashan Group in the Jingshan Area, Northern Yangtze Block, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Yang, K.

    2015-12-01

    In the northern Yangtze Block, a clear angular unconformity between the Mesoproterozoic sequences (e.g. Dagushi Group) and the overlying Neoproterozoic strata (e.g. Huashan Group) marks the the Jinning orogeny. A combined study of Lu-Hf isotopes and U-Pb ages for detrital zircons from Huashan Group can provide information on the crustal evolution of sedimentary provenances and the timing of the Jinning orogeny. Detrital zircons from Huashan Group have two major U-Pb age populations of about 2.0Ga, 2.65Ga, and three subordinate age groups of about 0.82Ga, 2.5Ga, 2.9Ga with minor >3.0Ga ages. The youngest five analyses yield a weighted average age of 816±9Ma, which is consistent with that of interlayered basalt (824±9Ma, Deng et al., 2013) and roughly defines the minimum depositional age of Huashan Group. Detrital zircons of Huashan Group mostly have two stage Hf isotope model ages (TDM2) between 3.0 to 3.3Ga, indicating that the northern Yangtze Block experienced significant continental crustal growth during the Paleo- to Meso-archean. Similar U-Pb ages of detrital zircons have been obtained from Precambrian sedimentary rocks in the northern Yangtze Block from previous studies (Liu et al., 2008; Guo et al., 2014 and references therein). Recently, ca. 2.65Ga A-type granites had been reported from the Kongling and Huji area, which likely record the thermally stable lithosphere (Chen et al., 2013; Zhou et al., 2015). In combination with this study, it documents the widespread 2.6-2.7Ga magmatic rocks in the northern Yangtze Block. Zhao et al. (2013) demonstrated both the ca. 850Ma tonalite and trondhjemite of the Huangling igneous complex were formed in a continental arc setting. This suggests the Miaowan-Huashan oceanic basin proposed by Bader et al. (2013) has not been closed at ca. 850Ma. This evidence, together with the depositional age of the Huashan Group, indicates the Jinning orogeny took place at 850-820 Ma. [1] Bader et al., 2013 Tectonics [2] Deng et al

  12. Angiotensin-(1-7) regulates Angiotensin II-induced VCAM-1 expression on vascular endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Feng [Department of Cardiology, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing (China); William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London (United Kingdom); Ren, Jingyi [Department of Cardiology, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing (China); Chan, Kenneth [William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London (United Kingdom); Chen, Hong, E-mail: chenhongbj@medmail.com.cn [Department of Cardiology, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We for the first time found that Ang-(1-7) inhibits Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inhibitory effect of Ang-(1-7) on VCAM-1 is mediated by MAS receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Ang-(1-7) is due to the suppression of NF-kappaB translocation. -- Abstract: Angiotensin II (Ang II) and Angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) are key effector peptides in the renin-angiotensin system. Increased circulatory Ang II level is associated with the development of hypertension and atherosclerosis, whereas Ang-(1-7) is a counter-regulatory mediator of Ang II which appears to be protective against cardiovascular disease. However, whether Ang-(1-7) regulates the action of Ang II on vascular endothelial cells (EC) remains unclear. We investigated the effects of Ang II and Ang-(1-7) in the context of atherogenesis, specifically endothelial cell VCAM-1 expression that is implicated in early plaque formation. The results show that Ang II increased VCAM-1 mRNA expression and protein displayed on EC surface, while Ang-(1-7) alone exerted no effects. However, Ang-(1-7) significantly suppressed Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression. Ang-(1-7) also inhibited the Ang II-induced VCAM-1 promoter activity driven by transcription factor NF-KappaB. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assay and ELISA showed that Ang II facilitated the nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB in ECs, and this was attenuated by the presence of Ang-(1-7). The inhibitory effects of Ang-(1-7) on Ang II-induced VCAM-1 promoter activity and NF-kappaB nuclear translocation were all reversed by the competitive antagonist of Ang-(1-7) at the Mas receptor. Our results suggest that Ang-(1-7) mediates its affects on ECs through the Mas receptor, and negatively regulates Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression by attenuating nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB.

  13. AVE 0991, a nonpeptide mimic of the effects of angiotensin-(1-7) on the endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemer, Gabriele; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Louka, Febee R; Malinski, Tadeusz; Heitsch, Holger

    2002-12-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that the heptapeptide angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-[1-7]) exhibits a favorable kinetic of nitric oxide (NO) release accompanied by extremely low superoxide (O2-) production. In this report we describe AVE 0991, a novel nonpeptide compound that evoked effects similar to Ang-(1-7) on the endothelium. AVE 0991 and unlabeled Ang-(1-7) competed for high-affinity binding of [125I]-Ang-(1-7) to bovine aortic endothelial cell membranes with IC50 values of 21+/-35 and 220+/-280 nmol/L, respectively. Stimulated NO and O2- release from bovine aortic endothelial cells was directly and simultaneously measured on the cell surface by selective electrochemical nanosensors. Peak concentrations of NO and O2- release by AVE 0991 and Ang-(1-7) (both 10 micromol/L) were not significantly different (NO: 295+/-20 and 270+/-25 nmol/L; O2-: 18+/-2 and 20+/-4 nmol/L). However, the released amount of bioactive NO was approximately 5 times higher for AVE 0991 in comparison to Ang-(1-7). The selective Ang-(1-7) antagonist [D-Ala(7)]-Ang-(1-7) inhibited the AVE 0991-induced NO and O2- production by approximately 50%. A similar inhibition level was observed for the Ang II AT1 receptor antagonist EXP 3174. In contrast, the Ang II AT2 receptor antagonist PD 123,177 inhibited the AVE 0991-stimulated NO production by approximately 90% but without any inhibitory effect on O2- production. Both NO and O2- production were inhibited by NO synthase inhibition ( approximately 70%) and by bradykinin B2 receptor blockade (approximately 80%). AVE 0991 efficiently mimics the effects of Ang-(1-7) on the endothelium, most probably through stimulation of a specific, endothelial Ang-(1-7)-sensitive binding site causing kinin-mediated activation of endothelial NO synthase.

  14. The role of angiotensin(1-7) in renal vasculature of the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wouden, Els A.; Ochodnický, Peter; van Dokkum, Richard Pe; Roks, Anton Jm; Deelman, Leo E.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Henning, Robert H.

    2006-01-01

    Angiotensin(1-7) is an active component of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Its exact role in renal vascular function is unclear. We therefore studied the effects of angiotensin(1-7) on the renal vasculature in vitro and in vivo. Isolated small renal arteries were studied in an arteriograph

  15. The role of angiotensin(1-7) in renal vasculature of the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wouden, Els A.; Ochodnicky, Peter; van Dokkum, Richard P. E.; Roks, Anton J. M.; Deelman, Leo E.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Henning, Robert H.

    2006-01-01

    Objective Angiotensin(1-7) is an active component of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Its exact role in renal vascular function is unclear. We therefore studied the effects of angiotensin(1-7) on the renal vasculature in vitro and in vivo. Methods Isolated small renal arteries were studied

  16. Neuroprotective Mechanisms of the ACE2-Angiotensin-(1-7)-Mas Axis in Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennion, Douglas M; Haltigan, Emily; Regenhardt, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of beneficial neuroprotective effects of the angiotensin converting enzyme 2-angiotensin-(1-7)-Mas axis [ACE2-Ang-(1-7)-Mas] in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke has spurred interest in a more complete characterization of its mechanisms of action. Here, we summarize findings that desc......The discovery of beneficial neuroprotective effects of the angiotensin converting enzyme 2-angiotensin-(1-7)-Mas axis [ACE2-Ang-(1-7)-Mas] in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke has spurred interest in a more complete characterization of its mechanisms of action. Here, we summarize findings...... that describe the protective role of the ACE2-Ang-(1-7)-Mas axis in stroke, along with a focused discussion on the potential mechanisms of neuroprotective effects of Ang-(1-7) in stroke. The latter incorporates evidence describing the actions of Ang-(1-7) to counter the deleterious effects of angiotensin II...... complete understanding of the mechanisms of action of Ang-(1-7) to elicit neuroprotection will serve as an essential step toward research into potential targeted therapeutics in the clinical setting....

  17. Risk Factors for Obesity in Adolescents of Ethnic Groups in Rural Areas of the Republic of Buryatia: a Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubov V. Rychkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obesity develops as a result of interaction of genetic and environmental factors. The impact of environmental factors on the risk of obesity in children can be determined by socially conditioned causes.Objective. Our aim was to identify the risk factors associated with  overweight/obesity in children of different ethnic groups living in  rural areas of the Republic of Buryatia.Methods. The cross-sectional study included adolescents aged 11– 17 years. Overweight was considered to be the body mass index  (BMI values exceeding the 85th percentile of distribution for a given sex and age, obesity was considered to be the BMI the 95th  percentile. We assessed the anthropometric measures of adolescents and their parents, socio-demographic characteristics, features of early history, eating behaviour, and lifestyle.Results. The study included 151 adolescents of the indigenous Asian (girls — 39.7% and 118 Slavic (girls — 42.4% ethnic groups.  Overweight and obesity were detected in 53 (35% and 36 (31%  adolescents, respectively. Independent risk factors for  overweight/obesity in adolescents of both ethnic groups were BMI in  their mothers — odds ratio (OR 1.2 (95% confidence interval [CI]  1.1–1.3 and 1.3 (95% CI 1.1–1.4, respectively; in adolescents of  indigenous Asian ethnic groups, infrequent food intake — OR 4.2  (95% CI 1.1–16.1, living in an incomplete family — OR 4.4 (95% CI 1.3–14.1, and motherhousewife — OR 3.6 (95% CI 1.3–9.7; in  adolescents of the Slavic ethnic groups — eating at night [OR 17.3  (95% CI 1.8–163.0].Conclusion. The risk factors for overweight/obesity in rural adolescents, regardless of their ethnicity, are overweight in mothers and irregular food intake of children. The risk factors for  adolescents of indigenous Asian ethnic groups include social (family- related characteristics such as living in single-parent families and  families with non-working mothers.

  18. Design of Tokyo Tech nano-satellite Cute-1.7+APD II and its operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Hiroki; Fujihashi, Kota; Inagawa, Shinichi; Miura, Yoshiyuki; Omagari, Kuniyuki; Miyashita, Naoki; Matunaga, Saburo; Toizumi, Takahiro; Kataoka, Jun; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2010-05-01

    Cute-1.7+APD II is the 3rd satellite developed by the Laboratory for Space Systems at the Tokyo Institute of Technology. Cute-1.7+APD II is the current successor to Cute-1.7+APD. This new satellite is based on its predecessor but has some modifications to increase its reliability and robustness against radiation effects, electrical power shortage and so on. The satellite was launched by an ISRO PSLV-C9 rocket on April 28, 2008 and has operated for more than 9 months. Throughout its operation, many missions such as attitude determination and control experiments, scientific observations, photographing and communication experiments have been conducted. In this paper an overview of the Cute-1.7 series and configurations, modifications and operation results of Cute-1.7+APD II are introduced.

  19. Groundwater quality sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater quality sampling and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of energy and managed by martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems). Groundwater sampling will be conducted by Energy Systems at 45 wells within WAG 6. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the groundwater quality monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating relative risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and also will fulfill Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim permit monitoring requirements. The sampling steps described in this plan are consistent with the steps that have previously been followed by Energy Systems when conducting RCRA sampling.

  20. Groundwater quality sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater quality sampling and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of energy and managed by martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems). Groundwater sampling will be conducted by Energy Systems at 45 wells within WAG 6. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the groundwater quality monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating relative risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and also will fulfill Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim permit monitoring requirements. The sampling steps described in this plan are consistent with the steps that have previously been followed by Energy Systems when conducting RCRA sampling

  1. Environmental, safety, and health plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 10, Operable Unit 3, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This document outlines the environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) approach to be followed for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 10 at Oak at Ridge National Laboratory. This ES&H Plan addresses hazards associated with upcoming Operable Unit 3 field work activities and provides the program elements required to maintain minimal personnel exposures and to reduce the potential for environmental impacts during field operations. The hazards evaluation for WAG 10 is presented in Sect. 3. This section includes the potential radiological, chemical, and physical hazards that may be encountered. Previous sampling results suggest that the primary contaminants of concern will be radiological (cobalt-60, europium-154, americium-241, strontium-90, plutonium-238, plutonium-239, cesium-134, cesium-137, and curium-244). External and internal exposures to radioactive materials will be minimized through engineering controls (e.g., ventilation, containment, isolation) and administrative controls (e.g., procedures, training, postings, protective clothing).

  2. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3, Appendix B, Technical findings and conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    This Remedial Investigation Report on Waste Area Grouping, (NVAG) 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was prepared in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for reporting, the results of a site chacterization for public review. This work was performed under Work Breakdown Structure 1.4.12.6.1.05.40.02 (Activity Data Sheet 3305, ``WAG 5``). Publication of this document meets a Federal Facility Agreement milestone of March 31, 1995. This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of investigations performed at WAG 5. It includes information on risk assessments that have evaluated long-term impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in this document forms the basis for decisions regarding, the need for subsequent remediation work at WAG 5.

  3. Groundwater Quality Sampling and Analysis Plan for Environmental Monitoring Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater quality sampling and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems). Groundwater sampling will be conducted by Energy Systems at 45 wells within WAG 6. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the groundwater quality monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating relative risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and also will fulfill Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim permit monitoring requirements. The sampling steps described in this plan are consistent with the steps that have previously been followed by Energy Systems when conducting RCRA sampling

  4. Health and Safety Work Plan for Sampling Colloids in Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, J.D.; McCarthy, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    This Work Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan (SSHP) and the attached work plan are for the performance of the colloid project at WAG 5. The work will be conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) and associated ORNL environmental, safety, and health support groups. The purpose of this document is to establish health and safety guidelines to be followed by all personnel involved in conducting work for this project. The levels of protection and the procedures specified in this plan are based on the best information available from historical data and preliminary evaluations of the area. Therefore, these recommendations represent the minimum health and safety requirements to be observed by all personnel engaged in this project

  5. Meteorological Monitoring Sampling and Analysis Plan for Environmental Monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses meteorological monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Meterological monitoring of various climatological parameters (eg., temperature, wind speed, humidity) will be collected by instruments installed at WAG 6. Data will be recorded electronically at frequencies varying from 5-min intervals to 1-h intervals, dependent upon parameter. The data will be downloaded every 2 weeks, evaluated, compressed, and uploaded into a WAG 6 data base for subsequent use. The meteorological data will be used in water balance calculations in support of the WAG 6 hydrogeological model

  6. Meteorological monitoring sampling and analysis plan for the environmental monitoring plan at Waste Area Grouping 6, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses meteorological monitoring activities that wall be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. Meteorological monitoring of various climatological parameters (e.g., temperature, wind speed, humidity) will be collected by instruments installed at WAG 6. Data will be recorded electronically at frequencies varying from 5-min intervals to 1-h intervals, dependent upon parameter. The data will be downloaded every 2 weeks, evaluated, compressed, and uploaded into a WAG 6 data base for subsequent use. The meteorological data will be used in water balance calculations in support of the WAG 6 hydrogeological model

  7. Environmental, safety, and health plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 10, Operable Unit 3, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This document outlines the environmental, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) approach to be followed for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 10 at Oak at Ridge National Laboratory. This ES ampersand H Plan addresses hazards associated with upcoming Operable Unit 3 field work activities and provides the program elements required to maintain minimal personnel exposures and to reduce the potential for environmental impacts during field operations. The hazards evaluation for WAG 10 is presented in Sect. 3. This section includes the potential radiological, chemical, and physical hazards that may be encountered. Previous sampling results suggest that the primary contaminants of concern will be radiological (cobalt-60, europium-154, americium-241, strontium-90, plutonium-238, plutonium-239, cesium-134, cesium-137, and curium-244). External and internal exposures to radioactive materials will be minimized through engineering controls (e.g., ventilation, containment, isolation) and administrative controls (e.g., procedures, training, postings, protective clothing)

  8. Migration of a groundwater contaminant plume by stratabound flow in Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, R.R.

    1992-08-01

    The discovery of radiologically contaminated groundwater in core hole CH-8 in the western portion of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) prompted a detailed investigation to identify the contaminant plume. Utilizing a working hypothesis of stratabound groundwater flow and contaminant transport, investigators analyzed existing subsurface geologic data to predict the contaminant plume discharge location in first Creek and locations of contaminated groundwater seepage into storm drains. The hypothesis states that differential lithologic/fracture conditions lead to the development of preferred flow and transport pathways, of discrete vertical extent, which may not be coincident with the hydraulic gradient. Leakage out of the stratabound pathway is a minor component of the overall plume configuration

  9. Groundwater Quality Sampling and Analysis Plan for Environmental Monitoring Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater quality sampling and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems). Groundwater sampling will be conducted by Energy Systems at 45 wells within WAG 6. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the groundwater quality monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating relative risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and also will fulfill Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim permit monitoring requirements. The sampling steps described in this plan are consistent with the steps that have previously been followed by Energy Systems when conducting RCRA sampling.

  10. Health and Safety Work Plan for Sampling Colloids in Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, J.D.; McCarthy, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    This Work Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan (SSHP) and the attached work plan are for the performance of the colloid project at WAG 5. The work will be conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) and associated ORNL environmental, safety, and health support groups. The purpose of this document is to establish health and safety guidelines to be followed by all personnel involved in conducting work for this project. The levels of protection and the procedures specified in this plan are based on the best information available from historical data and preliminary evaluations of the area. Therefore, these recommendations represent the minimum health and safety requirements to be observed by all personnel engaged in this project.

  11. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3, Appendix B, Technical findings and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This Remedial Investigation Report on Waste Area Grouping, (NVAG) 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was prepared in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for reporting, the results of a site chacterization for public review. This work was performed under Work Breakdown Structure 1.4.12.6.1.05.40.02 (Activity Data Sheet 3305, ''WAG 5''). Publication of this document meets a Federal Facility Agreement milestone of March 31, 1995. This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of investigations performed at WAG 5. It includes information on risk assessments that have evaluated long-term impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in this document forms the basis for decisions regarding, the need for subsequent remediation work at WAG 5

  12. Local intra-uterine Ang-(1-7) infusion attenuates PGE2and 6-keto PGF1αin decidualized uterus of pseudopregnant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnihan, K Bridget; M Pulgar, Victor; Bharadwaj, Manish S; Neves, Liomar A A; Yamaleyeva, Liliya M

    2016-10-18

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived prostanoids (PGE 2, PGI 2 ) are important contributors to the process of decidualization. Previous studies showed the presence of Ang-(1-7) in the primary and secondary decidualized zones of the implantation site at early pregnancy. Decreased concentrations of Ang-(1-7) were found in the decidualized uterus compared to the non-decidualized uterus of pseudopregnant rats, suggesting that low levels of Ang-(1-7) are required for successful decidualization at early pregnancy. To understand the role of Ang-(1-7) in prostaglandin production in a decidualized uterus, induced by a bolus injection of sesame oil, Ang-(1-7) (24 μg/kg/h) or vehicle was then infused directly into the decidualized uterine horn using an osmotic minipump. The right horns were not injected or infused and served as non-decidualized uterine horns in both groups of animals. Decidualization increased PGE 2 concentration in the uterus (0.53 ± 0.05 vs. 12.0 ± 3.2 pmol/mg protein, p uterus of Ang-(1-7)-treated rats. These studies show that increased local uterine Ang-(1-7) alters the uterine prostaglandin environment, possibly leading to disruptions of early events of decidualization.

  13. Angiotensin-(1-7) attenuates hyposmolarity-induced ANP secretion via the Na+-K+ pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Amin; Oh, Young-Bin; Shan, Gao; Song, Chang Ho; Park, Byung-Hyun; Kim, Suhn Hee

    2010-09-01

    The alteration in osmolarity challenges cell volume regulation, a vital element for cell survival. Hyposmolarity causes an increase in cell volume. Recently, it has been reported that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a role in cell volume regulation. We investigated the effect of angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] on hyposmolarity-induced atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) secretion in normal and diabetic (DM) rat atria and modulation of the effect of Ang-(1-7) by the Na(+)-K(+) pump. Using isolated control rat atria, we observed that perfusion of hyposmotic solution into the atria increased ANP secretion. When Ang-(1-7) [0.1 microM or 1 microM] was perfused in a hyposmolar solution, it decreased the hyposmolarity-induced ANP secretion in a dose-dependent manner. This effect of Ang-(1-7) could be mediated by the Na(+)-K(+) pump, since ouabain, an Na(+)-K(+) pump inhibitor, significantly decreased the effect of Ang-(1-7) on hyposmolarity-induced ANP secretion. In contrast, N(omega) Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME) did not modify the effect of Ang-(1-7) on the hyposmolarity-induced ANP secretion. Interestingly, the ANP secretion was increased robustly by the perfusion of the hyposmolar solution in the DM atria, as compared to the control atria. However, the inhibitory effect of Ang-(1-7) on the hyposmolarity-induced ANP secretion was not observed in the DM atria. In the DM atria, atrial contractility was significantly increased. Taken together, we concluded that Ang-(1-7) attenuated hyposmolarity-induced ANP secretion via the Na(+)-K(+) pump and a lack of Ang-(1-7) response in DM atria may partly relate to change in Na(+)-K(+) pump activity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Implications for reconstruction of the relationship between nuclear industry and siting areas in Japan. Lessons learnt from the cases of Site Stakeholder Groups in United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Shin-etsu

    2014-01-01

    After the Fukushima nuclear accident, the Japanese nuclear community began to recognize the need for establishing local stakeholder meetings in nuclear siting areas for information sharing and communication in reference to the experiences in European countries. This report shows the patterns of institutional design and the management style of stakeholder meetings in UK based on the interview survey, including SSGs (Site Stakeholder Groups) around the NDA (Nuclear Decommissioning Authority) sites and LCLCs (Local Community Liaison Councils) around the nuclear power stations in operation. SSGs have developed a local-oriented management style under the leadership of independent chairs elected from local stakeholders, in contrast to LCLCs where the operator of nuclear energy facilities has the initiative of management. SSGs play critical roles in improving quality of decision-making and enhancing its legitimacy through providing forums for local stakeholder engagement in the process of NDA's consultations and BPEO (Best Practicable Environmental Option) implementation. Based on these insights from UK's cases, the author suggests the following remedies for the relationship between the nuclear industry and siting areas in Japan: (1) introducing evaluation systems of stakeholder engagement linked to the insurance rates of nuclear energy liability, and (2) modifying the nuclear safety agreements into risk management principles. (author)

  15. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2 -- Appendix A: Characterization methods and data summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of investigations performed at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5. It includes information on risk assessments that have evaluated long-term impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in this document forms the basis for decisions regarding the need for subsequent remediation work at WAG 5. This appendix presents background regulatory and technical information regarding the solid waste management units (SWMUs) at WAG 5 to address requirements established by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The US Department of Energy (DOE) agreed to conduct remedial investigations (RIs) under the FFA at various sites at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), including SWMUs and other areas of concern on WAG 5. The appendix gives an overview of the regulatory background to provide the context in which the WAG 5 RI was planned and implemented and documents how historical sources of data, many of which are SWMU-specific, were evaluated and used.

  16. Preliminary report on the ecological assessment of Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashwood, T.L.; Suter, G.W. II; Stewart, A.J.

    1992-09-01

    In support of the remedial investigation for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5, staff of the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory have conducted preliminary ecological assessment activities. A screening level ecological risk assessment has been completed, ambient toxicity tests have been conducted on streams and seeps within WAG 5, WAG 5 has been surveyed for rare and endangered species and wetlands, and wild turkeys that may feed on contaminated vegetation and insects in WAG 5 have been screened for beta-emitting isotopes and {sup 137}Cs. The screening-level ecological risk assessment identified some data gaps that were addressed in the ecological assessment plan. These include gaps in data on the toxicity of surface water and soil within WAG 5 and on the status of rare and endangered species. In addition, the screening-level risk assessment identified the need for data on the level of contaminants in wild turkeys that may be consumed by predatory wildlife and humans. Three rounds of ambient toxicity tests on six streams and seeps, using the microcrustacean Ceriodaphnia, have identified potential toxicity in three of the sample sites. Further tests are required to identify the toxicant. No rare or endangered animal species have been identified in the WAG 5 area.

  17. Work plan for the treatability study for PCB dehalogenation by Agent 313 in Waste Area Grouping 11 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This work Plan describes the treatability study for Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) debalogenation by Agent 313 (a registered trademark of the A.L. Sandpiper Corporation of Columbus, ohio) to be conducted at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 11 on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The study will be conducted at WAG 11 as a result of the contamination of several small areas of soil by leaking capacitors. The primary purpose of this treatability study is to demonstrate the effectiveness of Agent 313 in remediating PCB-contaminated soil. However, the WAG 11 soils to be treated may also contain radionuclides and metals. In addition to providing the procedures to be followed during the treatability study, the work plan briefly describes the project background and technology, lists applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements for the project, and delineates project goals and objectives. This document also follows the general suggested outline for treatability study work plans shown in the 1992 report Guide for conducting Treatability Studies Under CERCLA: Final, EPA;540/R-92-071a, published by the US Environmental Protection Agency

  18. Field sampling and analysis plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boston, H.L.; Ashwood, T.L.; Borders, D.M.; Chidambariah, V.; Downing, D.J.; Fontaine, T.A.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, S.Y.; Miller, D.E.; Moore, G.K.; Suter, G.W.; Tardiff, M.F.; Watts, J.A.; Wickliff, D.S.

    1992-02-01

    This field sampling and analysis (S & A) plan has been developed as part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) remedial investigation (RI) of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The S & A plan has been written in support of the remedial investigation (RI) plan for WAG 2 (ORNL 1990). WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the ORNL main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), White Oak Creek embayment (WOCE) on the Clinch River, and the associated floodplain and subsurface environment (Fig. 1.1). The WOC system is the surface drainage for the major ORNL WAGs and has been exposed to a diversity of contaminants from operations and waste disposal activities in the WOC watershed. WAG 2 acts as a conduit through which hydrologic fluxes carry contaminants from upgradient areas to the Clinch River. Water, sediment, soil, and biota in WAG 2 are contaminated and continue to receive contaminants from upgradient WAGs. This document describes the following: an overview of the RI plan, background information for the WAG 2 system, and objectives of the S & A plan; the scope and implementation of the first 2 years of effort of the S & A plan and includes recent information about contaminants of concern, organization of S & A activities, interactions with other programs, and quality assurance specific to the S & A activities; provides details of the field sampling plans for sediment, surface water, groundwater, and biota, respectively; and describes the sample tracking and records management plan.

  19. Field sampling and analysis plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boston, H.L.; Ashwood, T.L.; Borders, D.M.; Chidambariah, V.; Downing, D.J.; Fontaine, T.A.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, S.Y.; Miller, D.E.; Moore, G.K.; Suter, G.W.; Tardiff, M.F.; Watts, J.A.; Wickliff, D.S.

    1992-02-01

    This field sampling and analysis (S ampersand A) plan has been developed as part of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) remedial investigation (RI) of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The S ampersand A plan has been written in support of the remedial investigation (RI) plan for WAG 2 (ORNL 1990). WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the ORNL main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), White Oak Creek embayment (WOCE) on the Clinch River, and the associated floodplain and subsurface environment (Fig. 1.1). The WOC system is the surface drainage for the major ORNL WAGs and has been exposed to a diversity of contaminants from operations and waste disposal activities in the WOC watershed. WAG 2 acts as a conduit through which hydrologic fluxes carry contaminants from upgradient areas to the Clinch River. Water, sediment, soil, and biota in WAG 2 are contaminated and continue to receive contaminants from upgradient WAGs. This document describes the following: an overview of the RI plan, background information for the WAG 2 system, and objectives of the S ampersand A plan; the scope and implementation of the first 2 years of effort of the S ampersand A plan and includes recent information about contaminants of concern, organization of S ampersand A activities, interactions with other programs, and quality assurance specific to the S ampersand A activities; provides details of the field sampling plans for sediment, surface water, groundwater, and biota, respectively; and describes the sample tracking and records management plan

  20. Impact of N-methylation of the substance P 1-7 amide on anti-allodynic effect in mice after peripheral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skogh, Anna; Lesniak, Anna; Gaugaz, Fabienne Z; Svensson, Richard; Lindeberg, Gunnar; Fransson, Rebecca; Nyberg, Fred; Hallberg, Mathias; Sandström, Anja

    2017-11-15

    Substance P 1-7 (SP 1-7 , Arg 1 -Pro 2 -Lys 3 -Pro 4 -Gln 5 -Gln 6 -Phe 7 ) is the major bioactive metabolite formed after proteolytic degradation of the tachykinin substance P (SP). This heptapeptide often opposes the effects of the mother peptide. Hence, SP 1-7 is having anti-inflammatory, anti-nociceptive and anti-hyperalgesic effects in experimental models. Despite all encouraging properties of SP 1-7 its exact mode of action has not yet been elucidated which has hampered further development of this heptapeptide in drug discovery. Contrary to SP that mediates its biological activity via the NK-1 receptor, the N-terminal fragment SP 1-7 acts through an unknown target that is distinct from all known opioid and tachykinin receptors. The SP 1-7 amide 1 (Arg 1 -Pro 2 -Lys 3 -Pro 4 -Gln 5 -Gln 6 -Phe 7 -NH 2 ) was previously shown to be superior to the endogenous SP 1-7 in all experimental pain models where the two compounds were compared. Herein, we report that N-methylation scan of the backbone of the SP 1-7 amide (1) results in peptides that are significantly less prone to undergo proteolysis in plasma from both mouse and human. However, with the two exceptions of the [MeLys 3 ]SP 1-7 amide (3) and the [MeGln 5 ]SP 1-7 amide (4), the peptides with a methyl group attached to the backbone are devoid of significant anti-allodynic effects after peripheral administration in the spared nerve injury (SNI) mouse model of neuropathic pain. It is suggested that the N-methylation does not allow these peptides to form the accurate bioactive conformations or interactions required for efficient binding to the macromolecular target. The importance of intact N-terminal Arg 1 and C-terminal Phe 7 , anticipated to serve as address and message residues, respectively, for achieving the anti-allodynic effect is emphasized. Notably, the three heptapeptides: the SP 1-7 amide (1), the [MeLys 3 ]SP 1-7 amide (3) amide and the [MeGln 5 ]SP 1-7 amide (4) are all considerably more effective

  1. Seasonal occurrence and distribution of a group of ECs in the water resources of Granada city metropolitan areas (South of Spain): Pollution of raw drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Espinar, Juan Antonio; Navas, Natalia; Chica-Olmo, Mario; Cantarero-Malagón, Samuel; Chica-Rivas, Lucía

    2015-12-01

    This piece of research deals with the monitoring of a group of emerging contaminants (ECs) in the metropolitan area of Granada, a city representative of the South of Spain, in order to evaluate the environmental management of the wastewater system. With that aim, the spatial and seasonal occurrence and distribution of a group of ECs in groundwater, surface and irrigation water resources from the aquifer "Vega de Granada" (VG) have been investigated for the first time. A set of the most prescribed drugs in Spain (ibuprofen, loratadine, pantoprazole and paracetamol), a pesticide widely used in agriculture (atrazine) and a typical anthropogenic contaminant (caffeine) were included in the study. Water samples were taken from the metropolitan area of the city of Granada inside of the zone of the aquifer, from the downstream of two waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) and from the two main irrigation channels where surface and wastewater are mixed before distribution for irrigation purposes in the crops of the study area. A total of 153 water samples were analyzed through liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) throughout the study that took place over a period of two years, from July 2011 to July 2013. Results demonstrated the occurrence of four of the six target pollutants. Ibuprofen was detected several times, always in both channels with concentration ranges from 5.3 to 20.8 μg/L. The occurrence of paracetamol was detected in rivers and channels up to 34.3 μg/L. Caffeine was detected in all the water resources up to 39.3 μg/L. Pantoprazole was detected twice in the surface water source near to a WWPT ranging from 0.02 to 0.05 μg/L. The pesticide atrazine and the drug loratadine were not detected in any of the water samples analyzed. These results show evidence of poor environmental management of the wastewater concerning the water quality of the aquifer studied. The groundwater sources seem to receive a very continuous input of wastewater

  2. Effects of health empowerment intervention on resilience of adolescents in a tribal area: A study using the Solomon four-groups design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Kaushik; Dasgupta, Aparajita; Sinha, Multipada; Shahbabu, Bhaskar

    2017-10-01

    Resilience prevents the emergence of stress-related mental health problems among adolescents. Adolescents in tribal areas of India are more prone to develop such problems. The primary objective was to determine the effect of combined life skills-based health empowerment intervention on the resilience of school-going adolescents in a tribal area. The secondary objectives were to determine the effect of the intervention on internal health locus of control and self-determination and to compare the effect of intervention on resilience between non-tribal and tribal adolescents. We conducted this quasi-experimental study using a Solomon four-group design among 742 adolescents in two schools of Purulia, West Bengal, India. Students of the pretested group were examined for resilience using the Child Youth Resilience Measurement scale. A life skills education-based health empowerment intervention was administered among students of the experimental group. Post-test data on resilience, self-determination, internal health locus of control and pathological behaviour was obtained 3 months after the completion of intervention. A multi-level general linear mixed model was constructed to determine the effect of intervention on resilience. Resilience was less among tribal adolescents at baseline. The intervention significantly improved resilience [β Adjusted  = 11.19 (95% CI = 10.55, 11.83], with a greater increase for tribal adolescents [β tribal-nontribal  = 1.53 (95% CI = 0.03, 3.03)]. The intervention also significantly improved internal health locus of control (marginal mean increment 1.38 ± 0.05), self-determination (marginal mean increment 3.71 ± 0.09) and reduced pathological behaviour of the adolescents. Our study informed the current health policy that the existing life skills education-based programme should be reviewed and modified to include generic life skills, and the life skills education-based programme should be coupled with developmental

  3. Enhanced activity of an angiotensin-(1-7) neuropeptidase in glucocorticoid-induced fetal programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Allyson C; Shaltout, Hossam A; Pirro, Nancy T; Rose, James C; Diz, Debra I; Chappell, Mark C

    2014-02-01

    We previously identified angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and an endopeptidase activity that degraded angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] to Ang-(1-5) and Ang-(1-4), respectively, in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 6-month old male sheep. The present study undertook a more comprehensive analysis of the CSF peptidase that converts Ang-(1-7) to Ang-(1-4) in control and in utero betamethasone-exposed sheep (BMX). Characterization of the Ang-(1-7) peptidase revealed that the thiol agents 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate (APMA) and p-chloromercuribenzoic acid (PCMB), as well as the metallo-chelators o-phenanthroline and EDTA essentially abolished the enzyme activity. Additional inhibitors for serine, aspartyl, and cysteine proteases, as well as selective inhibitors against the endopeptidases neprilysin, neurolysin, prolyl and thimet oligopeptidases did not attenuate enzymatic activity. Competition studies against the peptidase revealed similar IC50s for Ang-(1-7) (5μM) and Ang II (3μM), but lower values for Ala(1)-Ang-(1-7) and Ang-(2-7) of 1.8 and 2.0μM, respectively. In contrast, bradykinin exhibited a 6-fold higher IC50 (32μM) than Ang-(1-7) while neurotensin was a poor competitor. Mean arterial pressure (78±1 vs. 94±2mmHg, N=4-5, Pfetal programming. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Synthesis of MOF having hydroxyl functional side groups and optimization of activation process for the maximization of its BET surface area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jongsik; Kim, Dong Ok; Kim, Dong Wook; Sagong, Kil

    2013-01-01

    To accomplish the postsynthetic modification of MOF with organic-metal precursors (OMPs) described in our previous researches more efficiently, synthesis of MOF (HCC-2) possessing relatively larger pore size as well as higher number of hydroxyl functional side groups per its base unit than those of HCC-1 has been successfully conducted via adopting 1,4-di-(4-carboxy-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl)benzene as an organic ligand and Zn(NO 3 ) 2 ·6H 2 O as a metal source, respectively. Also, optimization about the Activation process of HCC-2 was performed to maximize its BET (Brunauer–Emmett–Teller) surface area which was proved to be proportional to the number of exposed active sites on which its postsynthetic modification occurred. However, Activation process having been validated to be so effective with the acquirement of highly-purified HCC-1 (CO 2 supercritical drying step followed by vacuum drying step) was less satisfactory with the case of HCC-2. This might be attributed to relatively higher hydrophilicity and bulkier molecular structure of organic ligand of HCC-2. However, it was readily settled by simple modification of above Activation process. Moreover, indispensable residues composed of both DMF and its thermally degraded derivatives which were chemically attached via coordination bond with hydroxyl functionalities even after Activation process III might enable their H 2 adsorption properties to be seriously debased compared to that of IRMOF-16 having no hydroxyl functionalities. - Graphical abstract: Synthesis of new-structured MOF (HCC-2) simultaneously possessing relatively larger pore size as well as higher number of hydroxyl functional side groups per its base unit at the same time than those of HCC-1 has been performed via adopting 1,4-di-(4-carboxy-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl)benzene as an organic ligand and Zn(NO 3 ) 2 ·6H 2 O as a metal source, respectively. Also, the optimization of activation process for HCC-2 was conducted to maximize its BET surface area

  5. National Ignition Facility, subsystem design requirements beam control and laser diagnostics SSDR 1.7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliss, E.

    1996-01-01

    This Subsystem Design Requirement document is a development specification that establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Alignment subsystem (WBS 1.7.1), Beam Diagnostics (WBS 1.7.2), and the Wavefront Control subsystem (WBS 1.7. 3) of the NIF Laser System (WBS 1.3). These three subsystems are collectively referred to as the Beam Control ampersand Laser Diagnostics Subsystem. The NIF is a multi-pass, 192-beam, high-power, neodymium-glass laser that meets requirements set forth in the NIF SDR 002 (Laser System). 3 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Discovery of morpholine-based aryl sulfonamides as Nav1.7 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong-Jin; Guernon, Jason; McClure, Andrea; Venables, Brian; Rajamani, Ramkumar; Robbins, Kevin J; Knox, Ronald J; Matchett, Michele; Pieschl, Rick L; Herrington, James; Bristow, Linda J; Meanwell, Nicholas A; Olson, Richard; Thompson, Lorin A; Dzierba, Carolyn

    2018-03-01

    Replacement of the piperidine ring in the lead benzenesulfonamide Na v 1.7 inhibitor 1 with a weakly basic morpholine core resulted in a significant reduction in Na v 1.7 inhibitory activity, but the activity was restored by shortening the linkage from methyleneoxy to oxygen. These efforts led to a series of morpholine-based aryl sulfonamides as isoform-selective Na v 1.7 inhibitors. This report describes the synthesis and SAR of these analogs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. ACE-2/Ang1-7/Mas cascade mediates ACE inhibitor, captopril, protective effects in estrogen-deficient osteoporotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuohashish, Hatem M; Ahmed, Mohammed M; Sabry, Dina; Khattab, Mahmoud M; Al-Rejaie, Salim S

    2017-08-01

    The local role of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) was documented recently beside its conventional systemic functions. Studies showed that the effector angiotensin II (AngII) alters bone health, while inhibition of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE-1) preserved these effects. The newly identified Ang1-7 exerts numerous beneficial effects opposing the AngII. Thus, the current study examines the role of Ang1-7 in mediating the osteo-preservative effects of ACEI (captopril) through the G-protein coupled Mas receptor using an ovariectomized (OVX) rat model of osteoporosis. 8 weeks after the surgical procedures, captopril was administered orally (40mgkg -1 d -1 ), while the specific Mas receptor blocker (A-779) was delivered at infusion rate of 400ngkg -1 min -1 for 6 weeks. Bone metabolic markers were measured in serum and urine. Minerals concentrations were quantified in serum, urine and femoral bones by inductive coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Trabecular and cortical morphometry was analyzed in the right distal femurs using micro-CT. Finally, the expressions of RAS peptides, enzymes and receptors along with the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) were determined femurs heads. OVX animals markedly showed altered bone metabolism and mineralization along with disturbed bone micro-structure. Captopril significantly restored the metabolic bone bio-markers and corrected Ca 2+ and P values in urine and bones of estrogen deficient rats. Moreover, the trabecular and cortical morphometric features were repaired by captopril in OVX groups. Captopril also improved the expressions of ACE-2, Ang1-7, Mas and OPG, while abolished OVX-induced up-regulation of ACE-1, AngII, Ang type 1 receptor (AT1R) and RANKL. Inhibition of Ang1-7 cascade by A-779 significantly eradicated captopril protective effects on bone metabolism, mineralization and micro-structure. A-779 also restored OVX effects on RANKL expression and ACE-1/AngII/AT1R

  8. Synthesis Characterization and Antimicrobial Activity of Metal Chelates of 1, 7-Di (2-hydroxyphenyl 1, 7 di (N-methyl aza-1, 3, 5 heptarine-3-ol hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalin P. Patani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Schiff base complexes derived from 2-furancarboxaldehyde and N-methyl-2-amino phenol have been prepared and characterized using several physical techniques, like elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, magnetic moment measurements, infrared and resonance spectra. N-Methyl-2-amino phenol was condensed stoichiometrically with 2-furancarboxaldehyde in presence of methanol. The resulting 1,7-di(2-hydroxyphenyl 1,7 di(N-methyl aza-1,3,5 heptarine-3-ol hydrochloride was characterized by elemental analysis and spectral studies. The transition metal complexes of Cu2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Co2+ and Mn2+ of the synthesized complexes were prepared. Metal ligand (M:L ratio, IR, reflectance spectral studies, magnetic properties and antimicrobial activity of the synthesized complexes and its metal complexes were carried out.

  9. Assessment of nutritional status of selected group of children living in urban and rural areas in Upper Silesia, in the intervening five years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witanowska, Jolanta; Obuchowicz, Anna; Warmuz-Wancisiewicz, Aneta; Szczurek, Urszula

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the paper is to assess changes in nutritional status of a selected group of children from urban and rural environment in Upper Silesia in the intervening 5 years. The study was conducted twice - in 2003 and during the school year 2008/2009, and involved children from the town of Bytom and from the village Boronów. To assess the nutritional status, the following measurements were used - weight, height and thickness of subcutaneous fold. Body Mass Index (BMI) was also calculated. The results obtained were referred to the appropriate percentile charts. Measurement values, which were located below the 10th percentile or above the 90th percentile were treated as incorrect. Statistical analysis included only those children who participated in the I and II survey. The frequency of the anthropometric measurements and BMI exceeding the accepted limits of norms in both studied environments and between them, 5 years after the previous evaluation, were compared. In both environments, the number of pupils whose body mass exceeded the value of the 90th percentile increased. The number of pupils whose body mass was lower than the 10th percentile also increased in the city, but decreased in the country. Considering BMI, the percentage of children located above the norm increased as well in comparison to the first study. In addition, it was also found that the thickness of subcutaneous skin-fold difference between the studied communities was significant in both the first (p = 0.020) and the second survey (p = 0.015), as well as in each environment, after 5 years since the previous evaluation (Bytom: p = 0.001; Boronów: p = 0.32). In 5 years (2003-2008), the incidence of overweight of pupils increased in both groups. The percentage of pupils who weighed less than 10th percentile increased to a greater extent in urban environment than in rural areas.

  10. Community-based study of reproductive tract infections among women of the reproductive age group in the urban health training centre area in Hubli, Karnataka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeetha S Balamurugan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reproductive tract infections (RTIs is a global health problem including both sexually transmitted infections (STIs and non-sexually transmitted infections (non-STIs of the reproductive tract. RTI/STI is an important concern, as it possess risk for human immunodeficiency virus transmission. Hence a community study was done in Hubli, in terms of active search of the cases based on the symptoms, clinical examination, and feasible laboratory tests along with providing treatment, counseling, and follow-up. Objectives: The objective was to know the prevalence of RTIs among the reproductive age group women and the socio-demographic factors influencing the occurrence of the disease. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was done using a simple random sampling technique to select households. A pretested structured pro forma was used to collect data on RTIs from 656 women of 15-45 years, residing in the field practice area. This was followed by clinical examination and collection of samples for laboratory tests in Urban Health Training Centre, attached to Karnataka Institute of Medical Sciences, Hubli. Results: The prevalence of RTIs among the reproductive age group women was 40.4% based on their symptoms, with majority having abnormal vaginal discharge. The prevalence of RTIs based on clinical finding was 37.4% with majority having vaginitis. The laboratory test revealed a prevalence of 34.3% with majority having Candidiasis. The influence of socio-demographic factors like increased parity, poor socio-economic conditions, poor menstrual hygiene, illiteracy has its direct effect on occurrence of RTI in the community. Conclusion: This depicts that whereever possible, clinical and laboratory findings should support self-reported morbidity to know the exact prevalence of any disease in the community.

  11. Impairment of cardiac function and remodeling induced by myocardial infarction in rats are attenuated by the nonpeptide angiotensin-(1-7) analog AVE 0991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wu-tao; Chen, Wei-yan; Leng, Xiu-yu; Tang, Li-long; Sun, Xiu-ting; Li, Cui-ling; Dai, Gang

    2012-06-01

    We evaluated effects of the nonpeptide angiotensin (ANG)-(1-7) analog AVE 0991 (AVE) on cardiac function and remodeling as well as transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1)/tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) expression in myocardial infarction rat models. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent either sham surgery or coronary ligation. They were divided into four groups: sham, control, AVE, and AVE+A-779 [[D-Ala(7) ]-ANG-(1-7), a selective antagonist for the ANG-(1-7)] group. After 4 weeks of treatment, the AVE group displayed a significant elevation in left ventricular fractional shorting (LVFS) (25.5 ± 7.3% vs. 18.4 ± 3.3%, P AVE group when compared to the control group. There were no differences in LVFS, LVEF, myocyte diameter, and infarct size between the control and AVE+A-779 groups. AVE also markedly attenuated the increased mRNA expression of collagen I (P AVE could improve cardiac function and attenuate ventricular remodeling in MI rat models. It may involve the inhibition of inflammatory factors TGF-β1/TNF-α overexpression and the action on the specific receptor Mas of ANG-(1-7). © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Groundwater level monitoring sampling and analysis plan for the environmental monitoring plan at waste area grouping 6, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document is the Groundwater Level Monitoring Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Note that this document is referred to as a SAP even though no sampling and analysis will be conducted. The term SAP is used for consistency. The procedures described herein are part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for WAG 6, which also includes monitoring tasks for seeps and springs, groundwater quality, surface water, and meteorological parameters. Separate SAPs are being issued concurrently to describe each of these monitoring programs. This SAP has been written for the use of the field personnel responsible for implementation of the EMP, with the intent that the field personnel will be able to take these documents to the field and quickly find the appropriate steps required to complete a specific task. In many cases, Field Operations Procedures (FOPs) will define the steps required for an activity. The FOPs for the EMP are referenced and briefly described in the relevant sections of the SAPs, and are contained within the FOP Manual. Both these documents (the SAP and the FOP Manual) will be available to personnel in the field.

  13. Surface water sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Surface water monitoring will be conducted at nine sites within WAG 6. Activities to be conducted will include the installation, inspection, and maintenance of automatic flow-monitoring and sampling equipment and manual collection of various water and sediment samples. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and will be used in calculations to establish relationships between contaminant concentration (C) and flow (Q). The C-Q relationship will be used in calculating the cumulative risk associated with the off-WAG migration of contaminants.

  14. Seeps and springs sampling and analysis plant for the Environmental Monitoring Plan at Waste Area Grouping 6, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses the monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted at seeps and springs and at two french drain outlets in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-land-burial disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Lockheed Martin Energy System, Inc. Initially, sampling will be conducted at as many as 15 locations within WAG 6 (as many as 13 seeps and 2 french drain outlets). After evaluating the results obtained and reviewing the observations made by field personnel during the first round of sampling, several seeps and springs will be chosen as permanent monitoring points, together with the two french drain outlets. Baseline sampling of these points will then be conducted quarterly for 1 year (i.e., four rounds of sampling after the initial round). The samples will be analyzed for various geochemical, organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. Permanent sampling points having suitable flow rates and conditions may be outfitted with automatic flow-monitoring equipment. The results of the sampling and flow-monitoring efforts will help to quantify flux moving across the ungauged perimeter of the site and will help to identify changes in releases from the contaminant sources

  15. Seeps and springs sampling and analysis plan for the environmental monitoring plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses the monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted at seeps and springs and at two french drain outlets in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-land-burial disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Initially, sampling will be conducted at as many as 15 locations within WAG 6 (as many as 13 seeps and 2 french drain outlets). After evaluating the results obtained and reviewing the observations made by field personnel during the first round of sampling, several seeps and springs will be chosen as permanent monitoring points, together with the two french drain outlets. Baseline sampling of these points will then be conducted quarterly for 1 year (i.e., four rounds of sampling after the initial round). The samples will be analyzed for various geochemical, organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. Permanent sampling points having suitable flow rates and conditions may be outfitted with automatic flow-monitoring equipment. The results of the sampling and flow-monitoring efforts will help to quantify flux moving across the ungauged perimeter of the site and will help to identify changes in releases from the contaminant sources.

  16. Seeps and springs sampling and analysis plant for the Environmental Monitoring Plan at Waste Area Grouping 6, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses the monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted at seeps and springs and at two french drain outlets in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-land-burial disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Lockheed Martin Energy System, Inc. Initially, sampling will be conducted at as many as 15 locations within WAG 6 (as many as 13 seeps and 2 french drain outlets). After evaluating the results obtained and reviewing the observations made by field personnel during the first round of sampling, several seeps and springs will be chosen as permanent monitoring points, together with the two french drain outlets. Baseline sampling of these points will then be conducted quarterly for 1 year (i.e., four rounds of sampling after the initial round). The samples will be analyzed for various geochemical, organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. Permanent sampling points having suitable flow rates and conditions may be outfitted with automatic flow-monitoring equipment. The results of the sampling and flow-monitoring efforts will help to quantify flux moving across the ungauged perimeter of the site and will help to identify changes in releases from the contaminant sources.

  17. Groundwater level monitoring sampling and analysis plan for the environmental monitoring plan at waste area grouping 6, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document is the Groundwater Level Monitoring Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Note that this document is referred to as a SAP even though no sampling and analysis will be conducted. The term SAP is used for consistency. The procedures described herein are part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for WAG 6, which also includes monitoring tasks for seeps and springs, groundwater quality, surface water, and meteorological parameters. Separate SAPs are being issued concurrently to describe each of these monitoring programs. This SAP has been written for the use of the field personnel responsible for implementation of the EMP, with the intent that the field personnel will be able to take these documents to the field and quickly find the appropriate steps required to complete a specific task. In many cases, Field Operations Procedures (FOPs) will define the steps required for an activity. The FOPs for the EMP are referenced and briefly described in the relevant sections of the SAPs, and are contained within the FOP Manual. Both these documents (the SAP and the FOP Manual) will be available to personnel in the field

  18. Seeps and springs sampling and analysis plan for the environmental monitoring plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses the monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted at seeps and springs and at two french drain outlets in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-land-burial disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Initially, sampling will be conducted at as many as 15 locations within WAG 6 (as many as 13 seeps and 2 french drain outlets). After evaluating the results obtained and reviewing the observations made by field personnel during the first round of sampling, several seeps and springs will be chosen as permanent monitoring points, together with the two french drain outlets. Baseline sampling of these points will then be conducted quarterly for 1 year (i.e., four rounds of sampling after the initial round). The samples will be analyzed for various geochemical, organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. Permanent sampling points having suitable flow rates and conditions may be outfitted with automatic flow-monitoring equipment. The results of the sampling and flow-monitoring efforts will help to quantify flux moving across the ungauged perimeter of the site and will help to identify changes in releases from the contaminant sources

  19. Surface water sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Surface water monitoring will be conducted at nine sites within WAG 6. Activities to be conducted will include the installation, inspection, and maintenance of automatic flow-monitoring and sampling equipment and manual collection of various water and sediment samples. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and will be used in calculations to establish relationships between contaminant concentration (C) and flow (Q). The C-Q relationship will be used in calculating the cumulative risk associated with the off-WAG migration of contaminants

  20. SMALL-SCALE AND GLOBAL DYNAMOS AND THE AREA AND FLUX DISTRIBUTIONS OF ACTIVE REGIONS, SUNSPOT GROUPS, AND SUNSPOTS: A MULTI-DATABASE STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz-Jaramillo, Andrés; Windmueller, John C.; Amouzou, Ernest C.; Longcope, Dana W. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Senkpeil, Ryan R. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Tlatov, Andrey G. [Kislovodsk Mountain Astronomical Station of the Pulkovo Observatory, Kislovodsk 357700 (Russian Federation); Nagovitsyn, Yury A. [Pulkovo Astronomical Observatory, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 196140 (Russian Federation); Pevtsov, Alexei A. [National Solar Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Chapman, Gary A.; Cookson, Angela M. [San Fernando Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University Northridge, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States); Yeates, Anthony R. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Watson, Fraser T. [National Solar Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Balmaceda, Laura A. [Institute for Astronomical, Terrestrial and Space Sciences (ICATE-CONICET), San Juan (Argentina); DeLuca, Edward E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Martens, Petrus C. H., E-mail: munoz@solar.physics.montana.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)

    2015-02-10

    In this work, we take advantage of 11 different sunspot group, sunspot, and active region databases to characterize the area and flux distributions of photospheric magnetic structures. We find that, when taken separately, different databases are better fitted by different distributions (as has been reported previously in the literature). However, we find that all our databases can be reconciled by the simple application of a proportionality constant, and that, in reality, different databases are sampling different parts of a composite distribution. This composite distribution is made up by linear combination of Weibull and log-normal distributions—where a pure Weibull (log-normal) characterizes the distribution of structures with fluxes below (above) 10{sup 21}Mx (10{sup 22}Mx). Additionally, we demonstrate that the Weibull distribution shows the expected linear behavior of a power-law distribution (when extended to smaller fluxes), making our results compatible with the results of Parnell et al. We propose that this is evidence of two separate mechanisms giving rise to visible structures on the photosphere: one directly connected to the global component of the dynamo (and the generation of bipolar active regions), and the other with the small-scale component of the dynamo (and the fragmentation of magnetic structures due to their interaction with turbulent convection)

  1. Characterization of secondary solid waste anticipated from the treatment of trench water from Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kent, T.E.; Taylor, P.A.

    1992-09-01

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that new liquid waste streams, generated as a consequence of closure activities at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6, can be treated adequately by existing wastewater treatment facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) without producing hazardous secondary solid wastes. Previous bench-scale treatable studies indicated that ORNL treatment operations will adequately remove the contaminants although additional study was required in order to characterize the secondary waste materials produced as a result of the treatment A 0.5-L/min pilot plant was designed and constructed to accurately simulate the treatment capabilities of ORNL fill-scale (490 L/min) treatment facilities-the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) and Nonradiological Wastewater Treatment Plant (NRWTP). This new test system was able to produce secondary wastes in the quantities necessary for US Environmental Protection Agency toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) testing. The test system was operated for a 45-d test period with a minimum of problems and downtime. The pilot plant operating data verified that the WAG 6 trench waters can be treated at the PWTP and NRWTP to meet the discharge limits. The results of TCLP testing indicate that none of the secondary solid wastes will be considered hazardous as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

  2. Maintenance Action Readiness Assessment Plan for Waste Area Grouping 1 inactive Tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    This Readiness Assessment Plan has been prepared to document operational readiness for the maintenance action consisting of remediation of four inactive liquid low-level radioactive tanks in Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The four tanks to be remediated are Tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013. Tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, and T-30 will be removed from the ground. Because of logistical issues associated with excavation and site access, Tank 3013 will be grouted in place and permanently closed. This project is being performed as a maintenance action rather than an action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, because the risk to human health and environment is well below the US Environmental Protection Agency's level of concern. The decision to proceed as a maintenance action was documented by an interim action proposed plan, which is included in the administrative record. A Readiness Assessment Team has been assembled to review the criteria deemed necessary to conduct the remediation tasks. These criteria include approval of all plans, acquisition of needed equipment, completion of personnel training, and coordination with plant health and safety personnel. Once the criteria have been met and documented, the task will begin. The readiness assessment is expected to be completed by late July 1995, and the task will begin thereafter

  3. Groundwater quality monitoring well installation for Lower Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortimore, J.A.; Lee, T.A.

    1994-09-01

    This report documents the drilling and installation of 11 groundwater quality monitoring (GQM) wells on the perimeter of Lower Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2. Lower WAG 2 consists of White Oak Lake and the embayment below White Oak Dam above the Clinch River. The wells in Lower WAG 2 were drilled and developed between December 1989 and September 1990. These wells were installed to characterize and assess the WAG in accordance with applicable Department of Energy, state, and Environmental Protection Agency regulatory requirements. The wells at Lower WAG 2 were drilled with auger or air rotary rigs. Depending on the hydrogeologic conditions present at each proposed well location, one of three basic installation methods was utilized. Detailed procedures for well construction were specified by the Engineering Division to ensure that the wells would provide water samples representative of the aquifer. To ensure conformance with the specifications, Energy Systems Construction Engineering and ERCE provided continuous oversight of field activities. The purpose of the well installation program was to install GQM wells for groundwater characterization at Lower WAG 2. Data packages produced during installation activities by the ERCE hydrogeologists are an important product of the program. These packages document the well drilling, installation, and development activities and provide valuable data for well sampling and WAG characterization. The forms contained in the packages include predrilling and postdrilling checklists, drilling and construction logs, development and hydraulic conductivity records, and quality control-related documents

  4. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the treatability study of in situ vitrification of Seepage Pit 1 in Waste Area Grouping 7 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) establishes the quality assurance procedures and requirements to be implemented for the control of quality-related activities for Phase 3 of the Treatability Study (TS) of In Situ Vitrification (ISV) of Seepage Pit 1, ORNL Waste Area Grouping 7. This QAPjP supplements the Quality Assurance Plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program by providing information specific to the ISV-TS. Phase 3 of the TS involves the actual ISV melt operations and posttest monitoring of Pit 1 and vicinity. Previously, Phase 1 activities were completed, which involved determining the boundaries of Pit 1, using driven rods and pipes and mapping the distribution of radioactivity using logging tools within the pipes. Phase 2 involved sampling the contents, both liquid and solids, in and around seepage Pit 1 to determine their chemical and radionuclide composition and the spatial distribution of these attributes. A separate QAPjP was developed for each phase of the project. A readiness review of the Phase 3 activities presented QAPjP will be conducted prior to initiating field activities, and an Operational Acceptance, Test (OAT) will also be conducted with no contamination involved. After, the OAT is complete, the ISV process will be restarted, and the melt will be allowed to increase with depth and incorporate the radionuclide contamination at the bottom of Pit 1. Upon completion of melt 1, the equipment will be shut down and mobilized to an adjacent location at which melt 2 will commence

  5. Effects of subcutaneous glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 [7-36 amide]) in patients with NIDDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nauck, M A; Wollschläger, D; Werner, J

    1996-01-01

    ) in fasting patients; after a single, subcutaneous injection 30 min before a liquid test meal (amino acids 8%, and sucrose 50 g in 400 ml), all compared with a placebo. Glucose (glucose oxidase), insulin, C-peptide, GLP-1 and glucagon (specific immunoassays) were measured. Gastric emptying was assessed......Intravenous glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 [7-36 amide] can normalize plasma glucose in non-insulin-dependent diabetic (NIDDM) patients. Since this is no form for routine therapeutic administration, effects of subcutaneous GLP-1 at a high dose (1.5 nmol/kg body weight) were examined. Three groups...

  6. Favorable Vascular Actions of Angiotensin-(1-7) in Human Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinzari, Francesca; Tesauro, Manfredi; Veneziani, Augusto; Mores, Nadia; Di Daniele, Nicola; Cardillo, Carmine

    2018-01-01

    Obese patients have vascular dysfunction related to impaired insulin-stimulated vasodilation and increased endothelin-1-mediated vasoconstriction. In contrast to the harmful vascular actions of angiotensin (Ang) II, the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 product Ang-(1-7) has shown to exert cardiovascular and metabolic benefits in experimental models through stimulation of the Mas receptor. We, therefore, examined the effects of exogenous Ang-(1-7) on vasodilator tone and endothelin-1-dependent vasoconstriction in obese patients. Intra-arterial infusion of Ang-(1-7) (10 nmol/min) resulted in significant increase in unstimulated forearm flow ( P =0.03), an effect that was not affected by the Mas receptor antagonist A779 (10 nmol/min; P >0.05). In the absence of hyperinsulinemia, however, forearm flow responses to graded doses of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were not different during Ang-(1-7) administration compared with saline (both P >0.05). During infusion of regular insulin (0.15 mU/kg per minute), by contrast, endothelium-dependent vasodilator response to acetylcholine was significantly enhanced by Ang-(1-7) ( P =0.04 versus saline), whereas endothelium-independent response to sodium nitroprusside was not modified ( P =0.91). Finally, Ang-(1-7) decreased the vasodilator response to endothelin A receptor blockade (BQ-123; 10 nmol/min) compared with saline (6±1% versus 93±17%; P <0.001); nitric oxide inhibition by l- N -monomethylarginine (4 µmol/min) during concurrent endothelin A antagonism resulted in similar vasoconstriction in the absence or presence of Ang-(1-7 Ang-(1-7) ( P =0.69). Our findings indicate that in obese patients Ang-(1-7) has favorable effects not only to improve insulin-stimulated endothelium-dependent vasodilation but also to blunt endothelin-1-dependent vasoconstrictor tone. These findings provide support for targeting Ang-(1-7) to counteract the hemodynamic abnormalities of human obesity. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Angiotensin-(1-7) counteracts the effects of Ang II on vascular smooth muscle cells, vascular remodeling and hemorrhagic stroke: Role of the NFкB inflammatory pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihl, Ji C; Zhang, Cheng; Zhao, Yuhui; Xiao, Xiang; Ma, Xiaotang; Chen, Yusen; Chen, Shuzhen; Zhao, Bin; Chen, Yanfang

    2015-10-01

    Angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7) is a potential vasoprotective peptide. In the present study, we investigated its counteractive effects to Ang II on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke (ICH) through inflammatory mechanism. In in vitro experiments, human brain VSMCs (HBVSMCs) were treated with vehicle, Ang II, Ang II+Ang-(1-7), Ang II+A-779 or Ang II+Ang-(1-7)+A-779 (Mas receptor antagonist). HBVSMC proliferation, migration and apoptosis were determined by methyl thiazolyltetrazolium, wound healing assay and flow cytometry, respectively. In in vivo experiments, C57BL/6 mice were divided into vehicle, Ang II, Ang II+Ang-(1-7), Ang II+A-779 or Ang II+Ang-(1-7)+A-779 groups before they were subjected to collagenase-induced ICH or sham surgery. Hemorrhage volume and middle cerebral artery (MCA) remodeling were determined by histological analyses. Levels of NFκB, inhibitor of κBα (IκBα), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and interleukin (IL-8) were measured by western blot or ELISA. We found that 1) Ang II increased HBVSMC migration, proliferation and apoptosis, and increased the blood pressure (BP), neurological deficit score, MCA remodeling and hemorrhage volume in ICH mice. 2) Ang-(1-7) counteracted these effects of Ang II, which was independent of BP, with the down-regulation of NFκB, up-regulation of IκBα, and decreased levels of TNF-α, MCP-1 and IL-8. 3) The beneficial effects of Ang-(1-7) could be abolished by A-779. In conclusion, Ang-(1-7) counteracts the effects of Ang II on ICH via modulating NFκB inflammation pathway in HBVSMCs and cerebral microvessels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 28 June 2012 - Members of the European Brain Council led by President Mary Baker visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Technology Department Group Leader L. Bottura and CMS experimental area with Run Coordinator M. Chamizo-Llatas.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    28 June 2012 - Members of the European Brain Council led by President Mary Baker visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Technology Department Group Leader L. Bottura and CMS experimental area with Run Coordinator M. Chamizo-Llatas.

  9. Prevalence of Internet addiction and risk of developing addiction as exemplified by a group of Polish adolescents from urban and rural areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Pawłowska

    2015-02-01

    The Internet addiction criteria were fulfilled by 0.45% of adolescents living in urban areas and 2.9% of those living in rural areas, whereas 35.55% of urban dwelling students and 30.18% of students living in rural areas showed a risk of developing this addiction. More adolescents living in urban areas, compared to those living in rural areas, use Internet pornography, play computer games, disclose their personal data to unknown individuals encountered on the Internet, use Instant Messaging (IM services, electronic mail and Facebook social networking service. Compared to their peers from urban areas, significantly more adolescents from rural areas use ‘Nasza Klasa’ (Our Classmates online social networking service.

  10. Characterization of Secondary Solid Wastes in Trench Water in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.A.; Kent, T.E.

    1994-02-01

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that new liquid waste streams, generated as a consequence of closure activities at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 and other sites, can be treated at the existing wastewater treatment facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to meet discharge requirements without producing hazardous secondary solid wastes. Previous bench and pilot-scale treatability studies have shown that ORNL treatment operations will adequately remove the contaminants and that the secondary solid wastes produced were not hazardous when treating water from two trenches in WAG 6. This study used WAG 6 trench water spiked with the minimum concentration of Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP) constituents (chemicals that can make a waste hazardous) found in any groundwater samples at ORNL. The Wastewater Treatment Test Facility (WTTF), a 0.5 L/min pilot plant that simulates the treatment capabilities of the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWPT) and Nonradiological Wastewater Treatment Plant (NRWTP), was used for this test. This test system, which is able to produce secondary wastes in the quantities necessary for TCLP testing, was operated for a 59-d test period with a minimum of problems and downtime. The pilot plant operating data verified that WAG 6 trench waters, spiked with the minimum concentration of TCLP contaminants measured to date, can be treated at the PWTP and NRWTP to meet current discharge limits. The results of the TCLP analysis indicated that none of the secondary solid wastes produced during the treatment of these wastewaters will be considered hazardous as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

  11. Test-Retest Reliability of Muscle Thickness, Echo-Intensity and Cross Sectional Area of Quadriceps and Hamstrings Muscle Groups Using B-mode Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassio V. Ruas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound muscle images have been extensively used as tools for investigating, diagnosing and monitoring thigh muscles. However, there is a lack of information examining ultrasound reliability of quadriceps and hamstrings images for research and clinical use. Objectives: To determine the reliability of muscle thickness (MT, echo intensity (EI and cross sectional area (CSA of quadriceps and hamstrings muscle groups. Methods: Single transverse images of the rectus femoris (RF, vastus intermedius (VI, vastus medialis (VM, vastus lateralis (VL, biceps femoris long head (BFlh, semitendinosus (ST, and semimembranosus (SM muscles were scanned in the right and left legs of ten healthy collegiate men (age 23.4 ± 2.2 yrs, mass 71.7 ± 11.7 kg, height 1.73 ± 0.06 m between two sessions with one day interval. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs, standard error of measurement (SEM, and minimum difference to be considered “real” (MD were measured for MT, EI, and CSA. Results: A range of 0.97-0.99, 0.83-0.88, and 0.86-0.97 (ICC; 0.72-1.38, 2.73-3.41, and 0.36-1.04 (SEM; and 2.01-3.82, 7.56-9.46, and 0.99-2.89 (MD were found for quadriceps muscles, and 0.93-0.99, 0.74-0.90, and 0.89-0.96 (ICC; 0.73-1.94, 3.29-4.98, and 0.69-1.08 (SEM; and 2.03-5.38, 9.13-13.81, and 1.91-2.98 (MD were found for hamstrings muscles. Conclusions: These results suggest that ultrasound imaging of both quadriceps and hamstrings muscle architecture is a reliable technique for assessing thigh musculoskeletal tissue. The anatomical sites, as well as ultrasound adjustments, images, and results utilized here may assist future researchers and clinicians as reference tools when measuring quadriceps and hamstrings musculature.

  12. Angiotensin-(1-7 attenuates disuse skeletal muscle atrophy in mice via its receptor, Mas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Gabriela Morales

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Immobilization is a form of disuse characterized by a loss of strength and muscle mass. Among the main features are decreased IGF-1/Akt signalling and increased ubiquitin-proteasome pathway signalling, which induce greater myosin heavy chain degradation. Activation of the classical renin-angiotensin system (RAS causes deleterious effects in skeletal muscle, including muscle wasting. In contrast, angiotensin-(1-7 [Ang-(1-7], a peptide of the non-classical RAS, produces beneficial effects in skeletal muscle. However, the role of Ang-(1-7 in skeletal muscle disuse atrophy and independent of classical RAS activation has not been evaluated. Therefore, we assessed the functions of Ang-(1-7 and the Mas receptor in disuse muscle atrophy in vivo using unilateral cast immobilization of the hind limb in male, 12-week-old wild-type (WT and Mas-knockout (Mas KO mice for 1 and 14 days. Additionally, we evaluated the participation of IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt signalling and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway expression on the effects of Ang-(1-7 immobilization-induced muscle atrophy. Our results found that Ang-(1-7 prevented decreased muscle strength and reduced myofiber diameter, myosin heavy chain levels, and the induction of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expressions, all of which normally occur during immobilization. Analyses indicated that Ang-(1-7 increases IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt pathway signalling through IGFR-1 and Akt phosphorylation, and the concomitant activation of two downstream targets of Akt, p70S6K and FoxO3. These anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7 were not observed in Mas KO mice, indicating crucial participation of the Mas receptor. This report is the first to propose anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7 via the Mas receptor and the participation of the IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt/p70S6K/FoxO3 mechanism in disuse skeletal muscle atrophy.

  13. Angiotensin-(1-7) attenuates disuse skeletal muscle atrophy in mice via its receptor, Mas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, María Gabriela; Abrigo, Johanna; Acuña, María José; Santos, Robson A.; Bader, Michael; Brandan, Enrique; Simon, Felipe; Olguin, Hugo; Cabrera, Daniel; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Immobilization is a form of disuse characterized by a loss of strength and muscle mass. Among the main features are decreased IGF-1/Akt signalling and increased ubiquitin-proteasome pathway signalling, which induce greater myosin heavy chain degradation. Activation of the classical renin-angiotensin system (RAS) causes deleterious effects in skeletal muscle, including muscle wasting. In contrast, angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)], a peptide of the non-classical RAS, produces beneficial effects in skeletal muscle. However, the role of Ang-(1-7) in skeletal muscle disuse atrophy and independent of classical RAS activation has not been evaluated. Therefore, we assessed the functions of Ang-(1-7) and the Mas receptor in disuse muscle atrophy in vivo using unilateral cast immobilization of the hind limb in male, 12-week-old wild-type (WT) and Mas-knockout (Mas KO) mice for 1 and 14 days. Additionally, we evaluated the participation of IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt signalling and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway expression on the effects of Ang-(1-7) immobilization-induced muscle atrophy. Our results found that Ang-(1-7) prevented decreased muscle strength and reduced myofiber diameter, myosin heavy chain levels, and the induction of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expressions, all of which normally occur during immobilization. Analyses indicated that Ang-(1-7) increases IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt pathway signalling through IGFR-1 and Akt phosphorylation, and the concomitant activation of two downstream targets of Akt, p70S6K and FoxO3. These anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7) were not observed in Mas KO mice, indicating crucial participation of the Mas receptor. This report is the first to propose anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7) via the Mas receptor and the participation of the IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt/p70S6K/FoxO3 mechanism in disuse skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:26851244

  14. Intrarenal Mas and AT1 receptors play a role in mediating the excretory actions of renal interstitial angiotensin-(1-7) infusion in anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Julie; Healy, Vincent; Johns, Edward J

    2017-12-01

    What is the central question of this study? Dietary sodium manipulation alters the magnitude of angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]-induced natriuresis. The present study sought to determine whether this was related to relative changes in the activity of intrarenal Mas and/or AT 1 receptors. What is the main finding and its importance? Angiotensin-(1-7)-induced diuresis and natriuresis is mediated by intrarenal Mas receptors. However, intrarenal AT 1 receptor blockade also had an inhibitory effect on Ang-(1-7)-induced natriuresis and diuresis. Thus, Ang-(1-7)-induced increases in sodium and water excretion are dependent upon functional Mas and AT 1 receptors. We investigated whether angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]-induced renal haemodynamic and excretory actions were solely dependent upon intrarenal Mas receptor activation or required functional angiotensin II type 1 (AT 1 ) receptors. The renin-angiotensin system was enhanced in anaesthetized rats by prior manipulation of dietary sodium intake. Angiotensin-(1-7) and AT 1 and Mas receptor antagonists were infused into the kidney at the corticomedullary border. Mas receptor expression was measured in the kidney. Mean arterial pressure, urine flow and fractional sodium excretion were 93 ± 4 mmHg, 46.1 ± 15.7 μl min -1  kg -1 and 1.4 ± 0.3%, respectively, in the normal-sodium group and 91 ± 2 mmHg, 19.1 ± 3.3 μl min -1  kg -1 and 0.7 ± 0.2%, respectively, in the low-sodium group. Angiotensin-(1-7) infusion had no effect on mean arterial pressure in rats receiving a normal-sodium diet but decreased it by 4 ± 5% in rats receiving a low-sodium diet (P < 0.05). Interstitial Ang-(1-7) infusion increased urine flow twofold and fractional sodium excretion threefold (P < 0.05) in rats receiving a normal-sodium diet and to a greater extent, approximately three- and fourfold, respectively, in rats receiving the low-sodium diet (both P < 0.05). Angiotensin-(1-7)-induced increases in urine flow and

  15. AVE 0991-angiotensin-(1-7) receptor agonist, inhibits atherogenesis in apoE-knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toton-Zuranska, J; Gajda, M; Pyka-Fosciak, G; Kus, K; Pawlowska, M; Niepsuj, A; Wolkow, P; Olszanecki, R; Jawien, J; Korbut, R

    2010-04-01

    Recent evidence shows that the renin-angiotensin system is a crucial player in atherosclerotic processes. It was also proved that Ang II promotes atherogenesis. Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] opposites Ang II action. Therefore, we would like to find out whether Ang-(1-7) receptor agonist: AVE 0991, could ameliorate atherosclerosis progression in an experimental model of atherosclerosis: apolipoprotein E (apoE) - knockout mice. AVE 0991 inhibited atherogenesis, measured both by "en face" method (7.63+/-1.6% vs. 14.6+/-2.1%) and "cross-section" method (47 235+/-7 546 microm(2) vs. 91 416+/-8 357 microm(2)). This is the first report showing the effect of AVE 0991 on atherogenesis in gene-targeted mice.

  16. Oral administration of angiotensin-(1-7) ameliorates type 2 diabetes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sérgio H S; Giani, Jorge F; Burghi, Valeria; Miquet, Johanna G; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Braga, Janaina F; Todiras, Mihail; Kotnik, Katarina; Alenina, Natalia; Dominici, Fernando P; Santos, Robson A S; Bader, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) is a disease with increasing importance in modern societies and insufficient treatment options. Pharmacological stimulation of insulin signaling, which is blunted in DM2, is a promising approach to treat this disease. It has been shown that activation of the angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7)/Mas axis of the renin-angiotensin system leads to an improved glucose uptake. In this study, we intended to evaluate, whether this effect could be exploited therapeutically. We first confirmed that Ang-(1-7) improves insulin signaling and glucose uptake in vitro in cultured cardiomyocytes. We then evaluated the therapeutic effect of a newly developed hydro-xypropyl-β-cyclodextrin-based Ang-(1-7) nano-formulation in a novel transgenic rat model of inducible insulin resistance and DM2. The chronic administration of this compound prevented the marked elevation in blood glucose levels in these rats at a dose of 30 μg/kg, reversed the established hyperglycemic state at a dose of 100 μg/kg, and resulted in improved insulin sensitivity, reduced plasma insulin and decreased diabetic nephropathy. In conclusion, an oral Ang-(1-7) formulation reverses hyperglycemia and its consequences in an animal model of DM2 and represents a novel therapeutic option for the treatment of DM2 and other cardio-metabolic diseases. A novel rat model with inducible diabetes can be used to evaluate new therapies. Angiotensin-(1-7) is effective in an oral formulation packaged in cyclodextrine. Angiotensin-(1-7) is a promising antidiabetic drug.

  17. Testing of Models for Predicting the Behaviour of Radionuclides in Freshwater Systems and Coastal Areas. Report of the Aquatic Working Group of EMRAS Theme 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    During last decades a number of projects have been launched to validate models for predicting the behaviour of radioactive substances in the environment. Such projects took advantage from the great deal of experimental data gathered, following the accidental introduction of radionuclides into the environment (the accident at the Chernobyl power plant was the most obvious example), to assess the contamination levels of components of the ecosystem and of the human food chain. These projects stimulated intensive efforts for improving the reliability of the models aimed at predicting the migration of 137 Cs in lakes and of 137 Cs and 90 Sr in rivers. However, there are few examples of similar extensive model validation studies for other aquatic systems, such as coastal waters, or for other long lived radionuclides of potential radiological importance for freshwater systems. The validation of models for predicting the behaviour of radionuclides in the freshwater environment and coastal areas was the object of the EMRAS working group on testing of models for predicting the behaviour of radionuclides in freshwater systems and coastal areas. Five scenarios have been considered: (1) Wash-off of 90 Sr and 137 Cs deposits from the Pripyat floodplain (Ukraine). Modellers were asked to predict the time dependent water contamination of Pripyat River following the inundation of the river floodplain heavily contaminated following the Chernobyl accident. Available input data were the deposits of radionuclides in the floodplain, the time dependent contamination of water in the river entering the floodplain, the water fluxes and several other morphological, meteorological and hydrological data. Concentrations of radionuclides in the water of the River Prypiat down-stream of the floodplain were supplied to assess the performances of the models. (2) Radionuclide discharge from the Dnieper River (Ukraine) into its estuary in the Black Sea. Modellers were asked to predict the time

  18. Angiotensin-(1-7) is a modulator of the human renin-angiotensin system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roks, AJM; van Geel, PP; Pinto, YM; Buikema, H; Henning, RH; de Zeeuw, D; van Gilst, WH

    The renin-angiotensin system is important for cardiovascular homeostasis. Currently, therapies for different cardiovascular diseases are based on inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) or angiotensin II receptor blockade. Inhibition of ACE blocks metabolism of angiotensin-(1-7) to

  19. Angiotensin-(1-7) is a modulator of the human renin-angiotensin system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roks, A. J.; van Geel, P. P.; Pinto, Y. M.; Buikema, H.; Henning, R. H.; de Zeeuw, D.; van Gilst, W. H.

    1999-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system is important for cardiovascular homeostasis. Currently, therapies for different cardiovascular diseases are based on inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) or angiotensin II receptor blockade. Inhibition of ACE blocks metabolism of angiotensin-(1-7) to

  20. 12 CFR 1.7 - Securities held in satisfaction of debts previously contracted; holding period; disposal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. (d... previously contracted; holding period; disposal; accounting treatment; non-speculative purpose. 1.7 Section 1...; accounting treatment; non-speculative purpose. (a) Securities held in satisfaction of debts previously...

  1. Salmonella roggeveld 51 :-:1,7 A New Serotype | Brede | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new Salmonella, S. roggeveld 51 : - : 1,7 is described. So far this Salmonella seems to be geographically restricted to the western Cape Province. A total of 18 different isolations, all performed at the Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Stellenbosch, between 1962 and 1969 gives some insight into the ...

  2. Nonpeptide AVE 0991 is an angiotensin-(1-7) receptor Mas agonist in the mouse kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Sérgio Veloso Brant; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Sampaio, Walkyria Oliveira; de Paula, Renata Dutra; Mendes, Elizabeth Pereira; Bontempo, Elizabete Dias; Pesquero, João Bosco; Walther, Thomas; Alenina, Natalia; Bader, Michael; Bleich, Markus; Santos, Robson Augusto Souza

    2004-10-01

    It has been described recently that the nonpeptide AVE 0991 (AVE) mimics the effects of angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] in bovine endothelial cells. In this study, we tested the possibility that AVE is an agonist of the Ang-(1-7) receptor Mas, in vitro and in vivo. In water-loaded C57BL/6 mice, AVE (0.58 nmol/g body weight) produced a significant reduction in urinary volume (0.06+/-0.03 mL/60 min [n=9] versus 0.27+/-0.05 [n=9]; PAVE. As observed previously for Ang-(1-7), the antidiuretic effect of AVE after water load was blunted in Mas-knockout mice (0.37+/-0.10 mL/60 min [n=9] versus 0.27+/-0.03 mL/60 min [n=11] AVE-treated mice). In vitro receptor autoradiography in C57BL/6 mice showed that the specific binding of 125I-Ang-(1-7) to mouse kidney slices was displaced by AVE, whereas no effects were observed in the binding of 125I-angiotensin II or 125I-angiotensin IV. Furthermore, AVE displaced the binding of 125I-Ang-(1-7) in Mas-transfected monkey kidney cells (COS) cells (IC50=4.75x10(-8) mol/L) and of rhodamine-Ang-(1-7) in Mas-transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. It also produced NO release in Mas-transfected CHO cells blocked by A-779 but not by angiotensin II type-1 (AT1) and AT2 antagonists. Contrasting with these data, the antidiuretic effect of AVE was totally blocked by AT2 antagonists and partially blocked (approximately 60%) by AT1 antagonists. The binding data, the results obtained in Mas-knockout mice and in Mas-transfected cells, show that AVE is a Mas receptor agonist. Our data also suggest the involvement of AT2/AT1-related mechanisms, including functional antagonism, oligomerization or cross-talk, in the renal responses to AVE.

  3. High-latitude-area composition of humpback whale competitive groups in Samana Bay : Further evidence for panmixis in the North Atlantic population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clapham, PJ; Mattila, DK; Palsboll, PJ

    Competitive groups of humpback whales, Megaptera novaeangliae, were observed in Samana Bay, Dominican Republic, West Indies. Photographs of ventral fluke patterns were used to identify individuals, and skin biopsies were taken for molecular determination of sex. Nine groups contained two or more

  4. The nonpeptide ANG-(1-7) mimic AVE 0991 attenuates cardiac remodeling and improves baroreflex sensitivity in renovascular hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Thelma Maria Bedeti; Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Souza Santos, Robson Augusto; Campagnole-Santos, Maria José; Alzamora, Andréia Carvalho

    2013-03-12

    The nonpeptide Ang-(1-7) analog, AVE 0991, is recognized as having beneficial cardiovascular effects similar to those induced by Ang-(1-7). In this study, we evaluated the effects of AVE 0991 on cardiovascular functions and on cardiac and renal remodeling in rats with 2K1C renovascular hypertension. Fisher rats underwent surgery to induce 2K1C renovascular hypertension and were then treated with AVE 0991 (1 or 3mg/kg) for 28days. At the end of treatment, the blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and baroreflex sensitivity were evaluated, in conscious animals. The rats were then euthanized and the heart and kidneys removed for subsequent histological analysis. Treatment with AVE 0991 in 2K1C rats restored the baroreflex sensitivity of both bradycardic and tachycardic components to levels comparable to those of normotensive SHAM rats. At a higher dose (3mg/kg), AVE 0991 was also anti-hypertensive in 2K1C rats. Furthermore, AVE 0991 reduced the heart weight, thickness of myocardial fibers, number of inflammatory cells, and area of collagen deposition in the hearts of 2K1C rats compared to SHAM rats. The inflammatory process and tissue area of collagen deposition were decreased in the clipped kidney of AVE 0091-treated 2K1C rats. Our data showed that oral treatment with AVE 0991 reduces blood-pressure cardiac remodeling and improves baroreflex sensitivity in 2K1C renovascular hypertensive rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hemoglobin E Prevalence among Ethnic Groups Residing in Malaria-Endemic Areas of Northern Thailand and Its Lack of Association with Plasmodium falciparum Invasion In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathrapol Lithanatudom

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin E (HbE is one of the most common hemoglobin variants caused by a mutation in the β-globin gene, and found at high frequencies in various Southeast Asian groups. We surveyed HbE prevalence among 8 ethnic groups residing in 5 villages selected for their high period malaria endemicity, and 5 for low endemicity in northern Thailand, in order to uncover factors which may affect genetic persistence of HbE in these groups. We found the overall HbE prevalence 6.7%, with differing frequencies from 0% in the Pwo Karen, the Lawa, and the Skaw Karen to 24% in the Mon. All HbE genes were heterozygous (AE. Differences in HbE prevalence among the studied ethnic groups indirectly documents that ancestries and evolutionary forces, such as drift and admixture, are the important factors in the persistence of HbE distribution in northern Thailand. Furthermore, the presence of HbE in groups of northern Thailand had no effect on the in vitro infectivity and proliferation of Plasmodium falciparum, nor the production of hemozoin, a heme crystal produced by malaria parasites, when compared to normal red-blood-cell controls. Our data may contribute to a better understanding on the persistence of HbE among ethnic groups and its association with malaria.

  6. Synthesis, photophysical, structural and electronic properties of novel regioisomerically pure 1,7-disubstituted perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic monoimide dibutylester derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozser, Mustafa E.; Mohiuddin, Obaidullah

    2018-04-01

    Three new isomerically pure 1,7-disubstituted perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic monoimide dibutylester derivatives namely; N-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]-1,7-dibromoperylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxy monoimide dibutylester (PMD-1), N-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]-1,7-di(4-tert-butylphenoxy)perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxy monoimide dibutylester (PMD-2) and N-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]-1,7-di(pyrrolidinyl)perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxy monoimide dibutylester (PMD-3), have been synthesized and their electronic absorption spectra, and steady-state fluorescence were investigated experimentally as well as by using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. All three compounds show good solubility in toluene and chloroform. Attachment of two tert-butylphenoxy groups at the 1,7-positions in PMD-2 resulted in a red shifted absorption band with an absorption maximum at 518 nm. UV/Vis absorption spectrum of PMD-3 bearing electron donating pyrrolidinyl groups at the 1,7-positions shows a broad absorption band within the visible region, extending to red region. Absorption maximum of lowest energy transition now shifts to 653 nm. In addition to the S0 → S1 absorption bands, bands belonging to S0 → S2 electronic transitions were observed at 378, 386, and 411 nm for PMD-1, PMD-2, and PMD-3 respectively. Compounds PMD-1, PMD-2 and PMD-3 display low fluorescence quantum yields of 0.027, 0.040 and 0.001, respectively in chloroform. DFT calculations revealed that the attachment of electron donating groups at 1,7-positions of perylene core, results in an increase in frontier orbitals energy levels. Observed energy increase in HOMO level is larger in each case, compared to the energy increase in LUMO levels, due to the higher contribution of side groups to HOMO. DFT calculated band gaps for PMD-1, PMD-2 and PMD-3 are 2.68, 2.63 and 2.29 eV respectively.

  7. Relationships of leaf dark respiration to leaf nitrogen, specific leaf area and leaf life-span: a test across biomes and functional groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter B. Reich; Michael B. Walters; David S. Ellsworth; [and others; [Editor’s note: James M.. Vose is the SRS co-author for this publication.

    1998-01-01

    Based on prior evidence of coordinated multiple leaf trait scaling, the authors hypothesized that variation among species in leaf dark respiration rate (Rd) should scale with variation in traits such as leaf nitrogen (N), leaf life-span, specific leaf area (SLA), and net photosynthetic capacity (Amax). However, it is not known whether such scaling, if it exists, is...

  8. Epidemiology and population structure of Staphylococcus aureus in various population groups from a rural and semi urban area in Gabon, Central Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ateba Ngoa, Ulysse; Schaumburg, Frieder; Adegnika, Ayola Akim; Kösters, Katrin; Möller, Tina; Fernandes, Jose Francisco; Alabi, Abraham; Issifou, Saadou; Becker, Karsten; Grobusch, Martin Peter; Kremsner, Peter Gottfried; Lell, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    Little data is available on the epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus in Africa. In the present study we aim at characterizing the population structure of S. aureus in healthy subjects from a rural and a semi-urban area in Lambarene, Gabon as well as in hospital staff and inpatients. In total, 500

  9. Development of a multiplex PCR test for identification of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serovars 1, 7, and 12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angen, Øystein; Ahrens, Peter; Jessing, Stine Graakjær

    2008-01-01

    A PCR assay for simultaneous species identification and separation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serovars 1, 7 and 12 was developed. Primers specific for genes involved in biosynthesis of the capsular polysaccharides (cps genes) of serovars 1, 7,and 12 were combined with a species-specific PCR...... serotyping methods. Among eight serologically cross-reacting strains designated K1:O7, seven isolates produced amplicons of similar sizes as serovar 1 and one isolate produced amplicons of similar sizes as serovar 7. The species specificity of the assay was evaluated using a collection of 126 strains...... produced an amplicon identical to the cps gene of serovar 7, whereas one isolate produced an amplicon identical to the cps gene of serovar 1. In addition, four isolates of Actinobacillus genomospecies 1 tested positive for the omlA gene but negative for the cps genes. The test represents a convenient...

  10. Block of Kv1.7 potassium currents increases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finol-Urdaneta, Rocio K; Remedi, Maria S; Raasch, Walter; Becker, Stefan; Clark, Robert B; Strüver, Nina; Pavlov, Evgeny; Nichols, Colin G; French, Robert J; Terlau, Heinrich

    2012-05-01

    Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) relies on repetitive, electrical spiking activity of the beta cell membrane. Cyclic activation of voltage-gated potassium channels (K(v) ) generates an outward, 'delayed rectifier' potassium current, which drives the repolarizing phase of each spike and modulates insulin release. Although several K(v) channels are expressed in pancreatic islets, their individual contributions to GSIS remain incompletely understood. We take advantage of a naturally occurring cone-snail peptide toxin, Conkunitzin-S1 (Conk-S1), which selectively blocks K(v) 1.7 channels to provide an intrinsically limited, finely graded control of total beta cell delayed rectifier current and hence of GSIS. Conk-S1 increases GSIS in isolated rat islets, likely by reducing K(v) 1.7-mediated delayed rectifier currents in beta cells, which yields increases in action potential firing and cytoplasmic free calcium. In rats, Conk-S1 increases glucose-dependent insulin secretion without decreasing basal glucose. Thus, we conclude that K(v) 1.7 contributes to the membrane-repolarizing current of beta cells during GSIS and that block of this specific component of beta cell K(v) current offers a potential strategy for enhancing GSIS with minimal risk of hypoglycaemia during metabolic disorders such as Type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2012 EMBO Molecular Medicine.

  11. A 'variable' stellar object in a variable blue nebula V-V 1-7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, N.K.; Gilra, D.P.

    1981-01-01

    V-V 1-7 is supposed to be one of the few planetary nebulae with Ao central stars and was included in the planetary-nebula catalogue as PK 235 + 1 0 1. The nebula was seen on the blue Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS) print but not on the red print; as a result it was thought that it might be a reflection nebula. However, the symmetry of the nebula around the central star (HD 62001), and also the ultraviolet photometric variability of this central star led others to suggest that the nebula might be a nova shell. Subsequently it was found that the nebula V-V 1-7 has disappeared. It is not seen on any direct plate known to us except the POSS blue plate. In this paper the disappearance is reported (along with the nebula) of a stellar object, which appears within the 'nebular shell' of V-V 1-7 on the POSS blue plate, but not on the red plate. (author)

  12. The effects of angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-7 in the rostral ventrolateral medulla of rats on stress-induced hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongshu Du

    Full Text Available We have shown that angiotensin II (Ang II and angiotensin-(1-7 [Ang-(1-7] increased arterial blood pressure (BP via glutamate release when microinjected into the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM in normotensive rats (control. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that Ang II and Ang-(1-7 in the RVLM are differentially activated in stress-induced hypertension (SIH by comparing the effects of microinjection of Ang II, Ang-(1-7, and their receptor antagonists on BP and amino acid release in SIH and control rats. We found that Ang II had greater pressor effect, and more excitatory (glutamate and less inhibitory (taurine and γ-aminobutyric acid amino acid release in SIH than in control animals. Losartan, a selective AT₁ receptor (AT₁R antagonist, decreased mean BP in SIH but not in control rats. PD123319, a selective AT₂ receptor (AT₂R antagonist, increased mean BP in control but not in SIH rats. However, Ang-(1-7 and its selective Mas receptor antagonist Ang779 evoked similar effects on BP and amino acid release in both SIH and control rats. Furthermore, we found that in the RVLM, AT₁R, ACE protein expression (western blot and ACE mRNA (real-time PCR were significantly higher, whereas AT₂R protein, ACE2 mRNA and protein expression were significantly lower in SIH than in control rats. Mas receptor expression was similar in the two groups. The results support our hypothesis and demonstrate that upregulation of Ang II by AT₁R, not Ang-(1-7, system in the RVLM causes hypertension in SIH rats by increasing excitatory and suppressing inhibitory amino acid release.

  13. Elderly from lower socioeconomic groups are more vulnerable to mental health problems, but area deprivation does not contribute: A comparison between Slovak and Dutch cities

    OpenAIRE

    Behanova, Martina; Katreniakova, Zuzana; Nagyova, Iveta; van Ameijden, Erik J. C.; van Dijk, Jitse P.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about factors associated with mental health problems (MHP) of the elderly in socioeconomically deprived neighbourhoods, and comparisons between Central European and Western European countries on this topic are lacking. We examined whether MHP occurred more frequently in deprived neighbourhoods and among deprived people. Next, we examined whether the association of MHP with area deprivation differed by country and whether this could be explained by the socioeconomic...

  14. Widening inequalities in MMR vaccine uptake rates among ethnic groups in an urban area of the UK during a period of vaccine controversy (1994-2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawker, Jeremy I; Olowokure, Babatunde; Wood, Annette L; Wilson, Richard C; Johnson, Richard

    2007-10-23

    We examined MMR vaccine uptake among ethnic groups in Birmingham, UK between 1994 and 2000, a period incorporating adverse MMR vaccine publicity. From 1994 to 2000 overall uptake: (1) fell significantly from 91.1% in 1994 to 89.8% (chi(2) for trend pvaccine uptake and differential response to adverse vaccine publicity.

  15. A Comparison of College Performances of AP® and Non-AP Student Groups in 10 Subject Areas. Research Report No. 2008-7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keng, Leslie; Dodd, Barbara G.

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to compare the performance of students in the College Board Advanced Placement Program® (AP®) compared to non-AP students on a number of college outcome measures. Ten individual AP Exams were examined in this study of students in four entering classes (1998-2001) at the University of Texas at Austin. The four main groups of…

  16. The southwestern extension of the Jiao-Liao-Ji belt in the North China Craton: Geochronological and geochemical evidence from the Wuhe Group in the Bengbu area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaohui; Zhao, Guochun; Liu, Fulai; Cai, Jia

    2018-04-01

    The Wuhe complex is located at the southeastern margin of the North China Craton. The complex consists of metamorphosed Paleoproterozoic potassic granitoids and supracrustal rocks, of which the latter include the Fengyang and Wuhe groups. Meta-mafic rocks from the lower Wuhe Group have igneous zircon U-Pb ages of 2126 ± 37 Ma with εHf(t) values of -6.22 to +8.38, and xenocrystic zircons of 2.39-2.36 Ga, 2.55-2.54 Ga and 2.77-2.69 Ga. Geochemically, the meta-mafic rocks can be classified into two groups. Group 1 island arc tholeiites display flat to slightly right declined REE patterns and moderately negative Nb, Ta, Zr, and Ti anomalies. Group 2 mature arc calcalkaline basalts display strongly fractionated chondrite-normalized REE patterns and evidently negative Nb, Ta and Ti anomalies. These meta-mafic rocks formed by partial melting of sub-arc depleted mantle wedge which had been modified by slab-derived melts at an active continental margin. Depositional age of the group can be constrained in the period of 2.16-2.10 Ga based on ages of the youngest detrital zircons and latter intrusions. U-Pb ages of detrital zircons yield major age peaks of 2.69 Ga and 2.52 Ga, with minor peaks at 2.88 Ga, 2.78 Ga, 2.35 Ga and 2.17 Ga, most of which are derived from the late Mesoarchean to early Paleoproterozoic granitoids in the Wuhe complex and the Jiaodong Terrane. Metamorphic zircons in the marbles coexisting with garnet amphibolites or granulites occur as either single grains or overgrowth (or recrystallization) rims surrounding magmatic zircon cores and yield ages of 1882 ± 19 Ma to 1844 ± 15 Ma. The comparable ca. 2.1 Ga potassic granites with A-type granite affinity, the ca. 2.1 Ga meta-mafic rocks with arc-like geochemical features, the 2.1-1.9 Ga meta-sedimentary units and the 1.9-1.8 Ga subduction- and collision-related granulite-facies metamorphism suggest that the Wuhe complex and the Jiao-Liao-Ji Belt share the same late Paleoproterozoic tectonic evolution

  17. INTERACCIONES ENTRE FAMILIAS Y GRUPOS ARMADOS ILEGALES EN LAS zONAS RURALES DE ANTIOQUIA -- INTERACTIONS AMONG FAMILIES AND ILLEGAL ARMED GROUPS IN COUNTRY AREAS FROM ANTIOQUIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAIME ALBERTO CARMONA PARRA

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we explore the point of view of 21 girls disentailed from the guerrilla and paramilitar groups from Antioquia, in relation to the interactions they perceived between their families and these groups, as well as the performed role by these interactions in their decision to bind to them. The theoretical focus used is the symbolic interactionism, according to which, family, seen as version of the generalized “other”, becomes an interactional escenary, basic to the subjective constitution and referent in a definition of the world. Based on this family role, it is identified on the girls, and the people in general, the ability to interpret the contexts and situations, which, at the same time, condition their reactions and decisions.

  18. Incidence of group A rotavirus in urban and rural areas of the city of Londrina-Brazil, from 1995 to 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângelo Cesar Meneghetti

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Rotaviruses are common pathogens and the causal agents of acute diarrhea among children and young animals. The involvement of rotavirus in human diarrheal disease among population of urban and rural areas of the city of Londrina, Parana was evaluated. Nine hundred and five fecal specimens from persons with diarrhea were studied, being 686 and 219 from urban and rural areas, respectively. Thirty-eight samples (4,2% were positive for rotavirus by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of viral RNA and latex agglutination test of which 36 were from urban and two from rural areas. Out of the positive specimens, 17 strains were further characterized by RT-PCR typing assay, resulting in 16 strains of G1 genotype while one sample was found to be a mixture of G1 and G3 genotypes.Os rotavírus são patógenos comuns e causam diarréia aguda em crianças e animais jovens. Neste trabalho avaliamos a participação do vírus na diarréia de populações humanas das áreas urbana e rural da cidade de Londrina, Paraná. Foram analisadas 905 amostras fecais de indivíduos com diarréia aguda, sendo 686 e 219 amostras das zonas urbana e rural, respectivamente. Trinta e oito amostras (4,2% foram consideradas positivas pelas técnicas de eletroforese em gel de poliacrilamida do RNA viral e aglutinação passiva de látex, das quais 36 da área urbana e dois da área rural. Das amostras positivas, 17 foram genotipadas por RT-PCR tendo sido caracterizadas 16 cepas G1 e uma considerada mistura dos genótipos G1 e G3.

  19. HOW THE DEPRECIATION METHOD CONTRIBUTES TO ESTIMATING FUTURE TREASURY FLOWS OUT OF THE ASSETS USE – CASE STUDY IN THE GROUPS OF SOCIETIES FROM THE ROMANIAN AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manea Marinela - Daniela

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The current paper further pursues a previous research which sets out to test the contribution of the amortization method to generating the future cash flows from using tangible fixed assets within the European and Romania area. The process was initiated out of the necessity to identify new working tools available for the Romanian accountant professionals with regard to implementing the provisions of the accounting international standards (IFRS and it came across the difficulty of modeling the sample – 40 societies – and collecting information from financial situations, often incomplete, insufficiently formalized and difficult to process.

  20. Geophysical survey work plan for White Wing Scrap Yard (Waste Area Grouping 11) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The White Wing Scrap Yard, located on the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation, served as an aboveground storage and disposal area for contaminated debris and scrap from the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge National laboratory. The site is believed to have been active from the early 1950s until the mid-1960s. A variety of materials were disposed of at the site, including contaminated steel tanks and vehicles. As an interim corrective action, a surface debris removal effort was initiated in November 1993 to reduce the potential threat to human health and the environment from the radionuclide-contaminated debris. Following this removal effort, a geophysical survey will be conducted across the site to locate and determine the lateral extent of buried nonindigenous materials. This survey will provide the data necessary to prepare a map showing areas of conductivity and magnetic intensity that vary from measured background values. These anomalies represent potential buried materials and therefore can be targeted for further evaluation. This work plan outlines the activities necessary to conduct the geophysical survey

  1. Results from the SPS 1.7 GHz travelling wave schottky monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Castro, M E; Kroyer, T; Jones, R; Koutchouk, Jean-Pierre; Tranquille, G

    2005-01-01

    A 1.7 GHz waveguide Schottky detector system was recently built and installed in the SPS accelerator following the design of the detectors of the Fermilab Tevatron and Recycler accelerators. The waveguide detector is designed to measure the transverse and longitudinal Schottky signals of the accelerator at a frequency high enough to avoid coherent effects. This paper describes the first tests carried out with the Schottky detector using LHC type beams. The principal goal of these tests was to check whether such a detector can be used for transverse Schottky diagnostics in LHC.

  2. The influence of angiotensin-(1-7) peptidomimetic (AVE 0991) and nebivolol on angiotensin I metabolism in aorta of apoE-knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszanecki, R; Suski, M; Gebska, A; Toton-Zuranska, J; Kus, K; Madej, J; Bujak-Gizycka, B; Jawien, J; Korbut, R

    2013-06-01

    The detrimental role of over activation of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in atherogenesis is widely recognized. Recently, we have demonstrated that Ang-(1-7) peptidomimetic - AVE0991, as well as known beta-adrenolytic agent nebivolol, exert anti-atherogenic actions in mouse model of atherosclerosis - apoE-knockout mice. Here, using LC-ESI-MS ex vivo system, we tested whether prolonged treatment of apoE-knockout mice by these drugs can influence RAS in aorta of apoE-knockout mice in regard to generation of most active metabolites of Ang I-Ang II and Ang-(1-7). As compared to wild type animals there was increased generation of Ang II in aorta of apoE-knockout mice, while the formation of Ang-(1-7) did not differ between both groups. Either treatment with AVE0991 or nebivolol resulted in significant attenuation of Ang II production in aorta of apoE-knockout mice. In conclusion, for the first time we directly demonstrated that there is increase in ability of aortic tissue to generate Ang II in mouse model of atherosclerosis of apoE knockout mice, and that such effect could be efficiently attenuated either by treatment of nebivolol or Ang-(1-7) peptidomimetic - AVE0991. The exact mechanism(s) responsible for interference of both drugs with RAS require further investigation.

  3. High similarity of Trypanosoma cruzi kDNA genetic profiles detected by LSSP-PCR within family groups in an endemic area of Chagas disease in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Maria Alkmim-Oliveira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Determining the genetic similarities among Trypanosoma cruzi populations isolated from different hosts and vectors is very important to clarify the epidemiology of Chagas disease. Methods An epidemiological study was conducted in a Brazilian endemic area for Chagas disease, including 76 chronic chagasic individuals (96.1% with an indeterminate form; 46.1% with positive hemoculture. Results T. cruzi I (TcI was isolated from one child and TcII was found in the remaining (97.1% subjects. Low-stringency single-specific-primer-polymerase chain reaction (LSSP-PCR showed high heterogeneity among TcII populations (46% of shared bands; however, high similarities (80-100% among pairs of mothers/children, siblings, or cousins were detected. Conclusions LSSP-PCR showed potential for identifying similar parasite populations among individuals with close kinship in epidemiological studies of Chagas disease.

  4. The "Learning Through Play" project. Importance of interdisciplinary work among children born prematurely and their family groups in an area of high socio-environmental risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobar, Flor L; Lencina, Manuel J

    2017-12-01

    Several socio-environmental risk factors causea large number of children born prematurely, and without neurological disorders, to have low scores in their development, particularly in the cognitive and socio-emotional skills areas, thus evidencing a potential future risk. Strengthening bonds with the family and caregivers is critical for their adequate development. This article reports on the experience of an interdisciplinary team from Hospital Eva Perón de Tucumán, who designed a program called "Learning Through Play"for the promotion of child development and aimed at parents of preterm infants seen at the Follow-up Outpatient Clinic and the Department of Social Services, with the collaboration of the Department of Nutrition. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  5. Health and safety work plan for sampling colloids in Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, J.D.; McCarthy, J.F.

    1994-07-01

    This Work Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan (SSHP) and the attached work plan are for the performance of the colloid sampling project at WAG 5. The work will be conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) and associated ORNL environmental, safety, and health support groups. This activity will fall under the scope of 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER). The purpose of this document is to establish health and safety guidelines to be followed by all personnel involved in conducting work for this project. Work will be conducted in accordance with requirements as stipulated in the ORNL HAZWOPER Program manual, and applicable ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., and US Department of Energy (DOE) policies and procedures

  6. Angiotensin-(1-7) in the basolateral amygdala attenuates the cardiovascular response evoked by acute emotional stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscar, Charles Gonzaga; Müller-Ribeiro, Flávia Camargos de Figueirêdo; de Castro, Lidiane Gonzaga; Martins Lima, Augusto; Campagnole-Santos, Maria José; Santos, Robson Augusto Souza; Xavier, Carlos Henrique; Fontes, Marco Antônio Peliky

    2015-01-12

    The basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays a critical role in mediating physiological responses to emotional stress. Recent data suggest that angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] can act centrally attenuating the cardiovascular response to acute stress. We investigated whether Ang-(1-7) in the BLA plays a role in the cardiovascular response to emotional stress. Under anesthesia, guide cannulas were implanted into the BLA of Wistar rats. Five days later, the femoral artery was cannulated for mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) recordings. Microinjections of Ang-(1-7) (5 or 50 pmol), the Mas receptor antagonist A-779 (100 pmol), Ang-(1-7)+A-779 (50 + 100 pmol, respectively), or vehicle (NaCl 0.9%, control) were performed after 24h and rats were then submitted to stress trials. Injection of Ang-(1-7) into the BLA blocked the tachycardia (ΔHR: vehicle 135 ± 23 vs. Ang-(1-7) 9 ± 12 bpm; Presponse (ΔMAP: vehicle 28 ± 3 mmHg vs. Ang-(1-7) 6 ± 2 mmHg; Presponse evoked by cage-switch stress paradigm. These findings indicate that Ang-(1-7) can act in the BLA through the Mas receptors modulating the cardiovascular response evoked by emotional stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Brain pericyte-derived soluble factors enhance insulin sensitivity in GT1-7 hypothalamic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Takata, Fuyuko; Matsumoto, Junichi; Machida, Takashi; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Dohgu, Shinya; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2015-02-20

    Insulin signaling in the hypothalamus plays an important role in food intake and glucose homeostasis. Hypothalamic neuronal functions are modulated by glial cells; these form an extensive network connecting the neurons and cerebral vasculature, known as the neurovascular unit (NVU). Brain pericytes are periendothelial accessory structures of the blood-brain barrier and integral members of the NVU. However, the interaction between pericytes and neurons is largely unexplored. Here, we investigate whether brain pericytes could affect hypothalamic neuronal insulin signaling. Our immunohistochemical observations demonstrated the existence of pericytes in the mouse hypothalamus, exhibiting immunoreactivity of platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (a pericyte marker), and laminin, a basal lamina marker. We then exposed a murine hypothalamic neuronal cell line, GT1-7, to conditioned medium obtained from primary cultures of rat brain pericytes. Pericyte-conditioned medium (PCM), but not astrocyte- or aortic smooth muscle cell-conditioned medium, increased the insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt in GT1-7 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. PCM also enhanced insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor β without changing its expression or localization in cytosolic or plasma membrane fractions. These results suggest that pericytes, rather than astrocytes, increase insulin sensitivity in hypothalamic neurons by releasing soluble factors under physiological conditions in the NVU. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Subunit profiling and functional characteristics of acetylcholine receptors in GT1-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yuki; Ishii, Hirotaka; Kobayashi, Makito; Ozawa, Hitoshi

    2017-03-01

    GnRH neurons form a final common pathway for the central regulation of reproduction. Although the involvement of acetylcholine in GnRH secretion has been reported, direct effects of acetylcholine and expression profiles of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) still remain to be studied. Using immortalized GnRH neurons (GT1-7 cells), we analyzed molecular expression and functionality of AChRs. Expression of the mRNAs were identified in the order α7 > β2 = β1 ≧ α4 ≧ α5 = β4 = δ > α3 for nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits and m4 > m2 for muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) subtypes. Furthermore, this study revealed that α7 nAChRs contributed to Ca 2+ influx and GnRH release and that m2 and m4 mAChRs inhibited forskolin-induced cAMP production and isobutylmethylxanthine-induced GnRH secretion. These findings demonstrate the molecular profiles of AChRs, which directly contribute to GnRH secretion in GT1-7 cells, and provide one possible regulatory action of acetylcholine in GnRH neurons.

  9. The Impact of Social and Cultural Engagement and Dieting on Well-Being and Resilience in a Group of Residents in the Metropolitan Area of Naples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rapacciuolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Social isolation and exclusion are associated with poor health status and premature death. A number of related isolation factors, inadequate transportation system and restrictions in individuals’ life space, have been associated with malnutrition in older adults. Since eating is a social event, isolation can have a negative effect on nutrition. Cultural involvement and participation in interactive activities are essential tools to fight social isolation, and they can counteract the detrimental effects of social isolation on health. To provide data supporting the hypothesis that encouraging participation might represent an innovative preventive and health promoting strategy for healthy living and aging, we developed an ad hoc questionnaire to investigate the relationship between cultural participation, well-being, and resilience in a sample of residents in the metropolitan area of Naples. The questionnaire includes a question on adherence to diet or to a special nutritional regimen; in addition, the participants are asked to mention their height and weight. We investigated the relationship between BMI, adherence to diet, and perceived well-being (PWB and resilience in a sample of 571 subjects over 60 years of age. Here, we present evidence that engagement into social and cultural activities is associated with higher well-being and resilience, in particular in females over 60 years of age.

  10. Epidemiology and population structure of Staphylococcus aureus in various population groups from a rural and semi urban area in Gabon, Central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateba Ngoa, Ulysse; Schaumburg, Frieder; Adegnika, Ayola Akim; Kösters, Katrin; Möller, Tina; Fernandes, Jose Francisco; Alabi, Abraham; Issifou, Saadou; Becker, Karsten; Grobusch, Martin Peter; Kremsner, Peter Gottfried; Lell, Bertrand

    2012-10-01

    Little data is available on the epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus in Africa. In the present study we aim at characterizing the population structure of S. aureus in healthy subjects from a rural and a semi-urban area in Lambaréné, Gabon as well as in hospital staff and inpatients. In total, 500 subjects were screened for S. aureus colonization of the nares, axillae and inguinal region. Overall, 146 (29%) were positive. We found 46 different spa types. The most frequent spa types were t084 (35%) and the agr II was the most prevalent subtype of the accessory gene regulator (56%, n=82). Five isolates (3%) were methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Carriage rates of S. aureus in Gabon are comparable to developed countries. MRSA is for the first time described and could pose a significant health threat in this region with limited access to microbiological laboratory facilities and to adequate antimicrobial agents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Changes in the first line Helicobacter pylori eradication rates using the triple therapy-a multicenter study in the Tokyo metropolitan area (Tokyo Helicobacter pylori study group).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Takashi; Takahashi, Shin'ichi; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Nagahara, Akihito; Asaoka, Daisuke; Matsuhisa, Takeshi; Masaoaka, Tatsuhiro; Nishizawa, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Masayuki; Ito, Masayoshi; Kurihara, Naoto; Omata, Fumio; Mizuno, Shigeaki; Torii, Akira; Kawakami, Kohei; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Tokunaga, Kengo; Mine, Tetsuya; Sakaki, Nobuhiro

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a strong risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. In 2013, the Japanese government approved H. pylori eradication therapy in patients with chronic gastritis as well as peptic ulcer. However, the continuing decline in eradication rates for first-line H. pylori eradication therapies is an urgent problem. In this study, we investigated changes in the first-line eradication rate from 2001 to 2010. Eradication rates for 7-day triple therapy [proton pump inhibitor (rabeprazole 20 mg, lansoprazole 60 mg, or omeprazole 40 mg)+amoxicillin 1500 mg + clarithromycin (CAM) 400 or 800 mg, daily] were collated from 14 hospitals in the Tokyo metropolitan area. The urea breath test was used for the evaluation of eradication. The cut-off value was less than 2.5%. The yearly eradication rates (intention to treat/per protocol) were 78.5/79.5% (2001, n=242), 71.2%/72.9% (2002, n=208), 67.8%/70.5% (2003, n=183), 75.6%/84.6% (2004, n=131), 56.4%/70.5% (2005, n=114), 70.5%/75.8% (2006, n=271), 67.4%/82.0% (2007, n=135), 64.0%/76.3% (2008, n=261), 60.5%/74.3% (2009, n=329), and 66.5%/78.8% (2010, n=370), respectively. Examination of eradication rates according to CAM dosage revealed an eradication rate of 65.6% (383/584) for CAM 400 mg daily, and 68.5% (1124/1642) for CAM 800 mg daily, with no significant difference seen between dosages. In recent years, eradication rates for first-line triple therapy have obviously decreased, but no noticeable decrease has occurred after 2001. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Preliminary engineering report waste area grouping 5, Old Hydrofracture Facility Tanks content removal project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requires a Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) for federal facilities placed on the National Priorities List. The Oak Ridge Reservation was placed on that list on December 21, 1989, and the agreement was signed in November 1991 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The effective date of the FFA is January 1, 1992. One objective of the FFA is to ensure that liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that are removed from service are evaluated and remediated through the CERCLA process. Five inactive LLLW tanks, designated T-1, T-2, T-3, T-4, and T-9, located at the Old Hydrofracture (OHF) Facility in the Melton Valley area of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been evaluated and are now entering the remediation phase. As a precursor to final remediation, this project will remove the current liquid and sludge contents of each of the five tanks (System Requirements Document, Appendix A). It was concluded in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis [EE/CA] for the Old Hydrofracture Facility Tanks (DOE 1996) that sluicing and pumping the contaminated liquid and sludge from the five OHF tanks was the preferred removal action. Evaluation indicated that this alternative meets the removal action objective and can be effective, implementable, and cost-effective. Sluicing and removing the tank contents was selected because this action uses (1) applicable experience, (2) the latest information about technologies and techniques for removing the wastes from the tanks, and (3) activities that are currently acceptable for storage of transuranic (TRU) mixed waste

  13. Preliminary engineering report waste area grouping 5, Old Hydrofracture Facility Tanks content removal project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requires a Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) for federal facilities placed on the National Priorities List. The Oak Ridge Reservation was placed on that list on December 21, 1989, and the agreement was signed in November 1991 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The effective date of the FFA is January 1, 1992. One objective of the FFA is to ensure that liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that are removed from service are evaluated and remediated through the CERCLA process. Five inactive LLLW tanks, designated T-1, T-2, T-3, T-4, and T-9, located at the Old Hydrofracture (OHF) Facility in the Melton Valley area of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been evaluated and are now entering the remediation phase. As a precursor to final remediation, this project will remove the current liquid and sludge contents of each of the five tanks (System Requirements Document, Appendix A). It was concluded in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis [EE/CA] for the Old Hydrofracture Facility Tanks (DOE 1996) that sluicing and pumping the contaminated liquid and sludge from the five OHF tanks was the preferred removal action. Evaluation indicated that this alternative meets the removal action objective and can be effective, implementable, and cost-effective. Sluicing and removing the tank contents was selected because this action uses (1) applicable experience, (2) the latest information about technologies and techniques for removing the wastes from the tanks, and (3) activities that are currently acceptable for storage of transuranic (TRU) mixed waste.

  14. impact of life style on body Weight in adolescents on the basis of questionnaire findings in selected group of youth from rural and urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Ścibor

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Overweight and primary obesity in children and adolescents is a crucial problem in public health. Obese children and adolescents are especially susceptible to obesity in adulthood and consequently exposed to many obesity related diseases. Objective: Evaluation of overweight and primary obesity in urban and rural youth populations and comparison of life style concerning: physical activity, sedentary behaviors, dietary habits among overweight and obese adolescents and their peers with proper Body Mass Index value. Materials and methods: The study was performed in the group of 136 students from junior high school. The students with BMI value over 85th percentile of sex-specific growth charts were classified as overweight. Research tool was a questionnaire. Results: 15,9% of adolescents were overweight, out of which 4,5% were obese. There was not a significant relation between Body Mass Index and the place of residence. Overweight and obese adolescents revealed lower physical activity and tendency to spend much more time playing computer games. Adolescents with overweight or obesity did not regularly have breakfast at weekends, more often had sweets and sweet drinks and also high energy and very salty snacks instead. Conclusions: Overweight and obesity is a serious problem among students from junior high school population which calls for taking immediate preventive measures to promote healthy lifestyle among children and adolescents.

  15. Advantages of using voiced questionnaire and image capture application for data collection from a minority group in rural areas along the Thailand–Myanmar border

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siriporn Monyarit

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aims To compare the quality of data collection via electronic data capture (EDC with voiced questionnaire (QNN and data image capture features using a tablet versus standard paper-based QNN, to assess the user’s perception of using the EDC tool, and to compare user satisfaction with the two methods.Study design Randomised cross-over study.Study sites This study was conducted in two villages along the Thailand– Myanmar border.Methodology This study included 30 community health volunteers (CHVs and 120 Karen hill tribe villagers. Employing a cross-over study design, the CHVs were allocated randomly to two groups, in which they performed interviews in different sequences using EDC and QNN.Results Data discrepancies were found between the two data-collection methods, when data from the paper-based and image-capture methods were compared, and when conducting skip pattern questions. More than 90% of the CHVs perceived the EDC to be useful and easy to use. Both interviewers and interviewees were more satisfied with the EDC compared with QNN in terms of format, ease of use, and system speed.Conclusion The EDC can effectively be used as an alternative method to paperbased QNNs for data collection. It produces more accurate data that can be considered evidence-based.

  16. Advantages of using voiced questionnaire and image capture application for data collection from a minority group in rural areas along the Thailand-Myanmar border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monyarit, Siriporn; Pan-ngum, Wirichada; Lawpoolsri, Saranath; Yimsamran, Surapon; Pongnumkul, Suporn; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Singhasivanon, Pratap

    2014-01-01

    To compare the quality of data collection via electronic data capture (EDC) with voiced questionnaire (QNN) and data image capture features using a tablet versus standard paper-based QNN, to assess the user's perception of using the EDC tool, and to compare user satisfaction with the two methods. Randomised cross-over study. Study sites: This study was conducted in two villages along the Thailand-Myanmar border. This study included 30 community health volunteers (CHVs) and 120 Karen hill tribe villagers. Employing a cross-over study design, the CHVs were allocated randomly to two groups, in which they performed interviews in different sequences using EDC and QNN. Data discrepancies were found between the two data-collection methods, when data from the paper-based and image-capture methods were compared, and when conducting skip pattern questions. More than 90% of the CHVs perceived the EDC to be useful and easy to use. Both interviewers and interviewees were more satisfied with the EDC compared with QNN in terms of format, ease of use, and system speed. The EDC can effectively be used as an alternative method to paper-based QNNs for data collection. It produces more accurate data that can be considered evidence-based.

  17. Reduced plasma levels of angiotensin-(1-7 and renin activity in preeclamptic patients are associated with the angiotensin I- converting enzyme deletion/deletion genotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.P. Velloso

    Full Text Available The relationship between preeclampsia and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS is poorly understood. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE is a key RAS component and plays an important role in blood pressure homeostasis by generating angiotensin II (Ang II and inactivating the vasodilator angiotensin-(1-7 (Ang-(1-7. ACE (I/D polymorphism is characterized by the insertion (I or deletion (D of a 287-bp fragment, leading to changes in ACE activity. In the present study, ACE (I/D polymorphism was correlated with plasma Ang-(1-7 levels and several RAS components in both preeclamptic (N = 20 and normotensive pregnant women (N = 20. The percentage of the ACE DD genotype (60% in the preeclamptic group was higher than that for the control group (35%; however, this percentage was not statistically significant (Fisher exact test = 2.86, d.f. = 2, P = 0.260. The highest plasma ACE activity was observed in the ACE DD preeclamptic women (58.1 ± 5.06 vs 27.6 ± 3.25 nmol Hip-His Leu-1 min-1 mL-1 in DD control patients; P = 0.0005. Plasma renin activity was markedly reduced in preeclampsia (0.81 ± 0.2 vs 3.43 ± 0.8 ng Ang I mL plasma-1 h-1 in DD normotensive patients; P = 0.0012. A reduced plasma level of Ang-(1-7 was also observed in preeclamptic women (15.6 ± 1.3 vs 22.7 ± 2.5 pg/mL in the DD control group; P = 0.0146. In contrast, plasma Ang II levels were unchanged in preeclamptic patients. The selective changes in the RAS described in the present study suggest that the ACE DD genotype may be used as a marker for susceptibility to preeclampsia.

  18. Reduced plasma levels of angiotensin-(1-7 and renin activity in preeclamptic patients are associated with the angiotensin I- converting enzyme deletion/deletion genotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.P. Velloso

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between preeclampsia and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS is poorly understood. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE is a key RAS component and plays an important role in blood pressure homeostasis by generating angiotensin II (Ang II and inactivating the vasodilator angiotensin-(1-7 (Ang-(1-7. ACE (I/D polymorphism is characterized by the insertion (I or deletion (D of a 287-bp fragment, leading to changes in ACE activity. In the present study, ACE (I/D polymorphism was correlated with plasma Ang-(1-7 levels and several RAS components in both preeclamptic (N = 20 and normotensive pregnant women (N = 20. The percentage of the ACE DD genotype (60% in the preeclamptic group was higher than that for the control group (35%; however, this percentage was not statistically significant (Fisher exact test = 2.86, d.f. = 2, P = 0.260. The highest plasma ACE activity was observed in the ACE DD preeclamptic women (58.1 ± 5.06 vs 27.6 ± 3.25 nmol Hip-His Leu-1 min-1 mL-1 in DD control patients; P = 0.0005. Plasma renin activity was markedly reduced in preeclampsia (0.81 ± 0.2 vs 3.43 ± 0.8 ng Ang I mL plasma-1 h-1 in DD normotensive patients; P = 0.0012. A reduced plasma level of Ang-(1-7 was also observed in preeclamptic women (15.6 ± 1.3 vs 22.7 ± 2.5 pg/mL in the DD control group; P = 0.0146. In contrast, plasma Ang II levels were unchanged in preeclamptic patients. The selective changes in the RAS described in the present study suggest that the ACE DD genotype may be used as a marker for susceptibility to preeclampsia.

  19. Report of the task group reviewing national and international activities in the area of ageing of nuclear power plant concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    After a background information on the mandate of the task group and its organisation, the longevity of nuclear power plants is first addressed: the present status of nuclear power plants in the 25 OECD Member Countries is summarised and the importance of ensuring continued safe operation of nuclear power plants described. Safety-related concrete structures (primarily containments) for several reactor concepts are briefly described as well as their materials of construction. Primary mechanisms that can produce adverse ageing of the concrete structures are described (e.g., chemical attack and corrosion of steel reinforcement). The overall performance of nuclear power plant concrete structures is described and age-related degradation incidences that have occurred are noted (e.g., corrosion of steel in water intake structures and corrosion of metal liners). National ageing management programmes of OECD Member Countries are then described with the emphasis placed on nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures. Although the majority of these programmes are addressing components such as the reactor pressure vessel and steam generator, several national programmes have sophisticated activities that address the concrete structures (e.g., Canada, France, Japan, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the United States). International ageing management activities are then summarised, primarily addressed under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (ageing management activities for concrete containment buildings) and the Commission of European Communities (CEC) (assessment of the long-term durability of reinforced and prestressed concrete structures and buildings, and steel containments in nuclear power plants). General conclusions and recommendations are provided at the end of the report

  20. Multiple Reversals of Bill Length over 1.7 Million Years in a Hawaiian Bird Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Leonard A; Medeiros, Matthew C I; Cann, Rebecca L

    2016-03-01

    Evolutionary change has been documented over geological time, but reversals in morphology, from an ancestral state to a derived state and back again, tend to be rare. Multiple reversals along the same lineage are even rarer. We use the chronology of the Hawaiian Islands and an avian example, the Hawaiian honeycreeper 'amakihi (Hemignathus spp.) lineage, which originated on the oldest main island of Kaua'i 1.7 million years ago, to examine the process of sequential reversals in bill length. We document three single and two multiple reversals of bill length on six main islands from oldest to youngest, consistent with the phylogeny of the lineage. Longer bills occur on islands with endemic species, including phylogenetically relevant outgroups, that may compete with or dominate the 'amakihi. On islands without those species, the 'amakihi had shorter bills of similar length. Both types of reversals in morphology in this lineage integrate microevolutionary processes with macroevolution in the adaptive radiation of Hawaiian honeycreepers.

  1. Low sodium diet inhibits the local counter-regulator effect of angiotensin-(1-7) on angiotensin II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roks, Anton J M; Nijholt, Jeroen; van Buiten, Azuwerus; van Gilst, Wiek H; de Zeeuw, Dick; Henning, Robert H

    2004-01-01

    Objective The heptapeptide angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] has been identified as a versatile, endogenous inhibitor of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). As the therapeutic response to exogenous RAS inhibitors, such as AT, receptor antagonists, is altered by changes in salt intake, we investigated

  2. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, Angiotensin-(1-7) and Mas: new players of the Renin Angiotensin System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Robson AS; Ferreira, Anderson J; Verano-Braga, Thiago

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin(Ang)-(1-7) is now recognized as a biologically active component of renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Ang-(1-7) appears to play a central role in the RAS because it exerts a vast array of actions, many of them opposite to those attributed to the main effector peptide of the RAS, Ang II. ...

  3. Oral delivery of ACE2/Ang-(1-7) bioencapsulated in plant cells protects against experimental uveitis and autoimmune uveoretinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shil, Pollob K; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Zhu, Ping; Verma, Amrisha; Daniell, Henry; Li, Qiuhong

    2014-12-01

    Hyperactivity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) resulting in elevated Angiotensin II (Ang II) contributes to all stages of inflammatory responses including ocular inflammation. The discovery of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has established a protective axis of RAS involving ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas that counteracts the proinflammatory and hypertrophic effects of the deleterious ACE/AngII/AT1R axis. Here we investigated the hypothesis that enhancing the systemic and local activity of the protective axis of the RAS by oral delivery of ACE2 and Ang-(1-7) bioencapsulated in plant cells would confer protection against ocular inflammation. Both ACE2 and Ang-(1-7), fused with the non-toxic cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) were expressed in plant chloroplasts. Increased levels of ACE2 and Ang-(1-7) were observed in circulation and retina after oral administration of CTB-ACE2 and Ang-(1-7) expressing plant cells. Oral feeding of mice with bioencapsulated ACE2/Ang-(1-7) significantly reduced endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) in mice. Treatment with bioencapsulated ACE2/Ang-(1-7) also dramatically decreased cellular infiltration, retinal vasculitis, damage and folding in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). Thus, enhancing the protective axis of RAS by oral delivery of ACE2/Ang-(1-7) bioencapsulated in plant cells provide an innovative, highly efficient and cost-effective therapeutic strategy for ocular inflammatory diseases.

  4. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a low incidence European area. A prospective observational analysis from the Head and Neck Study Group of the Italian Society of Radiation Oncology (AIRO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonoli, S.; Bruschieri, L. [Brescia University, Istituto del Radio, Brescia (Italy); Alterio, D. [European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Caspiani, O. [Isola Tiberina Hospital, Rome (Italy); Bacigalupo, A. [IRCCS A.O.U. San Martino IST Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Bunkheila, F. [S. Orsola Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Cianciulli, M. [S. Camillo Hospital, Rome (Italy); Merlotti, A. [Busto Arsizio Hospital, Busto Arsizio (Italy); Podhradska, A. [Milan University - Monza S. Gerardo Hospital, Milan (Italy); Rampino, M. [Turin University, Turin (Italy); Cante, D. [Treviglio Hospital, Treviglio (Italy); Gatta, R. [Brescia University, Istituto del Radio, Brescia (Italy); Prato Hospital, Prato (Italy); Magrini, S.M.

    2016-12-15

    To evaluate the outcomes with respect to long-term survival and toxicity in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated in a European country with low incidence. A prospective observational study carried out by the AIRO Head and Neck group in 12 Italian institutions included 136 consecutive patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) ± chemotherapy (CHT) for NPC (without distant metastasis) between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2010. The disease-specific survival (DSS), overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS) at 5 years were 92 (±2), 91 (±3), and 69 % (±5 %), respectively. Distant failure was the most frequent modality of relapse. The local, regional, and locoregional control at 5 years were 89 (±3), 93 (±3), and 84 % (±4 %), respectively. The incidence of acute and late toxicity and the correlations with different clinical/technical variables were analyzed. Neoadjuvant CHT prolongs radiotherapy overall treatment time (OTT) and decreases treatment adherence during concomitant chemoradiotherapy. An adequate minimum dose coverage to PTV(T) is a predictive variable well related to outcome. Our data do not substantially differ in terms of survival and toxicity outcomes from those reported in larger series of patients treated in countries with higher incidences of NPC. The T stage (TNM 2002 UICC classification) is predictive of DSS and OS. The GTV volume (T ± N) and an adequate minimum PTV(T) coverage dose (D95 %) were also identified as potential predictive variables. Sophisticated technologies of dose delivery (IMRT) with image-guided radiotherapy could help to obtain better minimum PTV(T) coverage dose with increased DFS; distant metastasis after treatment still remains an unresolved issue. (orig.) [German] Bewertung von langfristigem Ueberleben und Toxizitaet bei Patienten mit Nasopharynxkarzinom (NPC), die in einem europaeischen Land mit geringer Inzidenz behandelt wurden. Die prospektive Beobachtungsanalyse, durchgefuehrt von der

  5. Selected data for wells and test holes used in structure-contour maps of the Inyan Kara Group, Minnekahta Limestone, Minnelusa Formation, Madison Limestone, and Deadwood Formation in the Black Hills area, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents selected data on wells and test holes that were used in the construction of structure-contour maps of selected formations that contain major aquifers in the Black Hills area of western South Dakota. Altitudes of the top of the Inyan Kara Group, Minnekahta Limestone, Minnelusa Formation, Madison Limestone, and Deadwood Formation are presented for the wells and test holes presented in this report.

  6. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide that are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS offline and computing operations, hosting dedicated analysis efforts such as during the CMS Heavy Ion lead-lead running. With a majority of CMS sub-detectors now operating in a “shifterless” mode, many monitoring operations are now routinely performed from there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. The CMS Communications Group, CERN IT and the EVO team are providing excellent videoconferencing support for the rapidly-increasing number of CMS meetings. In parallel, CERN IT and ...

  7. The influence of angiotensin-(1-7) Mas receptor agonist (AVE 0991) on mitochondrial proteome in kidneys of apoE knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suski, Maciej; Olszanecki, Rafał; Stachowicz, Aneta; Madej, Józef; Bujak-Giżycka, Beata; Okoń, Krzysztof; Korbut, Ryszard

    2013-12-01

    Excessive action of angiotensin II on mitochondria has been shown to play an important role in mitochondrial dysfunction, a common feature of atherogenesis and kidney injury. Angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis constitutes a countermeasure to the detrimental effects of angiotensin II on AT1 receptors. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of angiotensin-(1-7) peptidomimetic AVE0991 on the kidney mitochondrial proteome in widely used animal model of atherosclerosis (apoE(-/-) mice). Proteins changed in apoE(-/-) mice belonged to the groups of antioxidant enzymes, apoptosis regulators, inflammatory factors and metabolic enzymes. Importantly, AVE0991 partially reversed atherosclerosis-related changes in apoE(-/-) mice. © 2013.

  8. Angiotensin-(1-7 Promotes Resolution of Neutrophilic Inflammation in a Model of Antigen-Induced Arthritis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia C. Barroso

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Defective resolution of inflammation may be crucial for the initiation and development of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as arthritis. Therefore, it has been suggested that therapeutic strategies based on molecules that facilitate inflammation resolution present great potential for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects and role of angiotensin-(1-7 [Ang-(1-7] in driving resolution of neutrophilic inflammation in a model of arthritis. For this purpose, male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to antigen-induced arthritis and treated with Ang-(1-7 at the peak of the inflammatory process. Analysis of the number of inflammatory cells, apoptosis, and immunofluorescence for NF-κB was performed in the exudate collected from the knee cavity. Neutrophil accumulation in periarticular tissue was measured by assaying myeloperoxidase activity. Apoptosis of human neutrophil after treatment with Ang-(1-7 was evaluated morphologically and by flow cytometry, and NF-κB phosphorylation by immunofluorescence. Efferocytosis was evaluated in vivo. Therapeutic treatment with Ang-(1-7 at the peak of inflammation promoted resolution, an effect associated with caspase-dependent neutrophils apoptosis and NF-κB inhibition. Importantly, Ang-(1-7 was also able to induce apoptosis of human neutrophils, an effect associated with NF-κB inhibition. The pro-resolving effects of Ang-(1-7 were inhibited by the Mas receptor antagonist A779. Finally, we showed that Ang-(1-7 increased the efferocytic ability of murine macrophages. Our results clearly demonstrate that Ang-(1-7 resolves neutrophilic inflammation in vivo acting in two key step of resolution: apoptosis of neutrophils and their removal by efferocytosis. Ang-(1-7 is a novel mediator of resolution of inflammation.

  9. Endogenous opioids contribute to insensitivity to pain in humans and mice lacking sodium channel Nav1.7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minett, Michael S; Pereira, Vanessa; Sikandar, Shafaq; Matsuyama, Ayako; Lolignier, Stéphane; Kanellopoulos, Alexandros H; Mancini, Flavia; Iannetti, Gian D; Bogdanov, Yury D; Santana-Varela, Sonia; Millet, Queensta; Baskozos, Giorgios; MacAllister, Raymond; Cox, James J; Zhao, Jing; Wood, John N

    2015-12-04

    Loss-of-function mutations in the SCN9A gene encoding voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 cause congenital insensitivity to pain in humans and mice. Surprisingly, many potent selective antagonists of Nav1.7 are weak analgesics. We investigated whether Nav1.7, as well as contributing to electrical signalling, may have additional functions. Here we report that Nav1.7 deletion has profound effects on gene expression, leading to an upregulation of enkephalin precursor Penk mRNA and met-enkephalin protein in sensory neurons. In contrast, Nav1.8-null mutant sensory neurons show no upregulated Penk mRNA expression. Application of the opioid antagonist naloxone potentiates noxious peripheral input into the spinal cord and dramatically reduces analgesia in both female and male Nav1.7-null mutant mice, as well as in a human Nav1.7-null mutant. These data suggest that Nav1.7 channel blockers alone may not replicate the analgesic phenotype of null mutant humans and mice, but may be potentiated with exogenous opioids.

  10. The quasi-biennial oscillation of 1.7 years in ground level enhancement events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco Herrera, V. M.; Pérez-Peraza, J.; Soon, W.; Márquez-Adame, J. C.

    2018-04-01

    The so-called Ground Level Enhancement events are sporadic relativistic solar particles measured at ground level by a network of cosmic ray detectors worldwide. These sporadic events are typically assumed to occur by random chance. However, we find that by studying the last 56 ground level enhancement events reported from 1966 through 2014, these events occur preferentially in the positive phase of the quasi-biennial oscillation of 1.7 year periodicity. These discrete ground level enhancement events show that there is another type of solar emission (i.e., wavelike packets) that occurs only in a specific phase of a very particular oscillation. We interpret this empirical result to support that ground level enhancement events are not a result of purely stochastic processes. We used the Morlet wavelet to analyze the phase of each of the periodicities found by the wavelet analyses and local variations of power spectral density in these sporadic events. We found quasi-regular periodicities of 10.4, 6.55, 4.12, 2.9, 1.73, 0.86, 0.61, 0.4 and 0.24 years in ground level enhancements. Although some of these quasi-biennial oscillation periodicities (i.e., oscillations operating between 0.6 and 4 years) may be interpreted as simply harmonics and overtones of the fundamental solar cycle from the underlying sun-spot magnetism phenomenon. The sources of these periodicities are still unclear. Also there is no clear mechanism for the variability of the quasi-biennial oscillation periodicities itself. The quasi-biennial oscillation periodicities are broadly considered to be a variation of solar activity, associated with the solar dynamo process. Also, the intensity of these periodicities is more important around the years of maximum solar activity because the quasi-biennial oscillation periodicities are modulated by the solar cycle where the Sun is more energetically enhanced during activity maxima. To identify the relationships among ground level enhancement, solar, and cosmic

  11. Lidocaine reduces the transition to slow inactivation in Nav1.7 voltage-gated sodium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Patrick L; Jarecki, Brian W; Cummins, Theodore R

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The primary use of local anaesthetics is to prevent or relieve pain by reversibly preventing action potential propagation through the inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels. The tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated sodium channel subtype Nav1.7, abundantly expressed in pain-sensing neurons, plays a crucial role in perception and transmission of painful stimuli and in inherited chronic pain syndromes. Understanding the interaction of lidocaine with Nav1.7 channels could provide valuable insight into the drug's action in alleviating pain in distinct patient populations. The aim of this study was to determine how lidocaine interacts with multiple inactivated conformations of Nav1.7 channels. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We investigated the interactions of lidocaine with wild-type Nav1.7 channels and a paroxysmal extreme pain disorder mutation (I1461T) that destabilizes fast inactivation. Whole cell patch clamp recordings were used to examine the activity of channels expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. KEY RESULTS Depolarizing pulses that increased slow inactivation of Nav1.7 channels also reduced lidocaine inhibition. Lidocaine enhanced recovery of Nav1.7 channels from prolonged depolarizing pulses by decreasing slow inactivation. A paroxysmal extreme pain disorder mutation that destabilizes fast inactivation of Nav1.7 channels decreased lidocaine inhibition. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Lidocaine decreased the transition of Nav1.7 channels to the slow inactivated state. The fast inactivation gate (domain III–IV linker) is important for potentiating the interaction of lidocaine with the Nav1.7 channel. PMID:21232038

  12. Oral delivery of Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and Angiotensin-(1-7) bioencapsulated in plant cells attenuates pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Vinayak; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Rathinasabapathy, Anandharajan; Lin, Shina; Jin, Guiying; Song, Chunjuan; Shil, Pollob; Nair, Anand; Qi, Yanfei; Li, Qiuhong; Francis, Joseph; Katovich, Michael J; Daniell, Henry; Raizada, Mohan K

    2014-12-01

    Emerging evidences indicate that diminished activity of the vasoprotective axis of the renin-angiotensin system, constituting angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and its enzymatic product, angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] contribute to the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, long-term repetitive delivery of ACE2 or Ang-(1-7) would require enhanced protein stability and ease of administration to improve patient compliance. Chloroplast expression of therapeutic proteins enables their bioencapsulation within plant cells to protect against gastric enzymatic degradation and facilitates long-term storage at room temperature. Besides, fusion to a transmucosal carrier helps effective systemic absorption from the intestine on oral delivery. We hypothesized that bioencapsulating ACE2 or Ang-(1-7) fused to the cholera nontoxin B subunit would enable development of an oral delivery system that is effective in treating PH. PH was induced in male Sprague Dawley rats by monocrotaline administration. Subset of animals was simultaneously treated with bioencapsulaed ACE2 or Ang-(1-7) (prevention protocol). In a separate set of experiments, drug treatment was initiated after 2 weeks of PH induction (reversal protocol). Oral feeding of rats with bioencapsulated ACE2 or Ang-(1-7) prevented the development of monocrotaline-induced PH and improved associated cardiopulmonary pathophysiology. Furthermore, in the reversal protocol, oral ACE2 or Ang-(1-7) treatment significantly arrested disease progression, along with improvement in right heart function, and decrease in pulmonary vessel wall thickness. In addition, a combination therapy with ACE2 and Ang-(1-7) augmented the beneficial effects against monocrotaline-induced lung injury. Our study provides proof-of-concept for a novel low-cost oral ACE2 or Ang-(1-7) delivery system using transplastomic technology for pulmonary disease therapeutics. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Prostaglandin E2 Upregulated Trigeminal Ganglionic Sodium Channel 1.7 Involving Temporomandibular Joint Inflammatory Pain in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2017-06-01

    Prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) is a key proinflammatory mediator that contributes to inflammatory hyperalgesia. Voltage-gated sodium channel 1.7 (Na v 1.7) plays an important role in inflammatory pain. However, the modulation of Na v 1.7 in inflammatory pain remains poorly understood. We hypothesized that PGE 2 might regulate Na v 1.7 expression in inflammatory pain. We here showed that treatment of rat trigeminal ganglion (TG) explants with PGE 2 significantly upregulated the mRNA and protein expressions of Na v 1.7 through PGE 2 receptor EP2. This finding was confirmed by studies on EP2-selective antagonist PF-04418948. We also demonstrated that Na v 1.7 and COX-2 expressions, as well as PGE 2 levels, were upregulated in the TG after induction of rats' temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation. Correspondingly, hyperalgesia, as indicated by head withdrawal threshold, was observed. Moreover, TMJ inflammation-induced upregulation of Na v 1.7 expression and PGE 2 levels in the TG could be reversed by COX-2-selective inhibitor meloxicam given by oral gavage, and meanwhile, the hyperalgesia of inflamed TMJ was also mitigated. So we concluded that PGE 2 upregulated trigeminal ganglionic Na v 1.7 expression to contribute to TMJ inflammatory pain in rats. Our finding suggests that PGE 2 was an important regulator of Na v 1.7 in TMJ inflammatory pain, which may help increase understanding on the hyperalgesia of peripheral inflammation and develop a new strategy to address inflammatory pain.

  14. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Ti n Mo ( n = 1 - 7) clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ge; Zhai, Zhongyuan; Sheng, Yong

    2017-04-01

    The ground state structures of TinMo and Tin+1 (n = 1 - 7) clusters and their structural, electronic and magnetic properties are investigated with the density functional method at B3LYP/LanL2DZ level. One Mo atom substituted Tin+1 structure is the dominant growth pattern, and the TinMo clusters exhibit enhanced structural stabilities according to the averaged binding energies. The electronic properties are also discussed by investigating chemical hardness and HOMO-LUMO energy gap. The results reveal that Ti3Mo and Ti5Mo keep higher chemical stabilities when compared with the other clusters. For all the studied clusters, the Mo atoms always get electrons from Ti atoms and present negative charges. Moreover, the doping of Mo in the bare titanium clusters can alter the magnetic moments of them. Ti3Mo and Ti5Mo show relatively large total magnetic moments, which may be related to the presence of exchange splitting behavior in their densities of states. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2017-70589-8

  15. Virtual instrument automation of ion channeling setup for 1.7 MV tandetron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh, K.; Sundaravel, B.; Panigrahi, B.K.; Nair, K.G.M.; Viswanathan, B.

    2004-01-01

    A virtual instrument based automated ion channeling experimental setup has been developed and implemented in a 1.7 MV tandetron accelerator. Automation of the PC based setup is done using a windows based virtual instrument software allowing the setup to be easily ported between different computer operating systems. The virtual instrument software has been chosen to achieve quick and easy development of versatile, multi-purpose user friendly graphical interface for carrying out channeling experiments. The software has been modular designed to provide independent control of the stepper motors for fixing the sample at any user defined orientation, running and on-line display of azimuthal and tilt angular scans, auto storage of the angular scan data. Using this automated setup, the crystallographic axis of the sample can be aligned with the incident ion beam rapidly minimizing the beam damages to the sample. A standard single crystalline GaAs(100) has been characterized with this set up using 2 MeV He ++ ion beam. The crystalline quality (χ min ) and channeling half angle (ψ 1sol2 ) are measured to be 3.7% and 0.48 deg., respectively, which are close to the theoretical values. Salient features, working principles and design details of the automated setup are discussed in this paper

  16. INITIATION PROCESSES FOR THE 2013 MAY 13 X1.7 LIMB FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Jinhua [Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory, CAS, 830011, Urumqi (China); Wang, Ya; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng, E-mail: jihs@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing, 210008 (China)

    2017-01-20

    For the X1.7 class flare on 2013 May 13 (SOL2013-05-13T01:53), its initiation process was well observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory and the Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI) on board STEREO-B . The initiation process incorporates the following phenomena: an X-ray precursor that started ∼9 minutes before flare onset, two hot magnetic loops (as seen with AIA hot channels) forming a sigmoidal core magnetic structure (as seen with the EUVI), a rapidly formed magnetic flux rope (MFR) that expands outward, and a flare loop that contracts inward. The two hot magnetic loops were activated after the occurrence of the X-ray precursor. After activation, magnetic reconnection occurred between the two hot magnetic loops (inside the sigmoid structure), which produced the expanding MFR and the contracting flare loop (CFL). The MFR and CFL can only be seen with AIA hot and cool channels, respectively. For this flare, the real initiation time can be regarded as being from the starting time of the precursor, and its impulsive phase started when the MFR began its fast expansion. In addition, the CFL and the growing postflare magnetic loops are different loop systems, and the CFL was the product of magnetic reconnection between sheared magnetic fields that also produced the MFR.

  17. INITIATION PROCESSES FOR THE 2013 MAY 13 X1.7 LIMB FLARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Jinhua; Wang, Ya; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng

    2017-01-01

    For the X1.7 class flare on 2013 May 13 (SOL2013-05-13T01:53), its initiation process was well observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory and the Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI) on board STEREO-B . The initiation process incorporates the following phenomena: an X-ray precursor that started ∼9 minutes before flare onset, two hot magnetic loops (as seen with AIA hot channels) forming a sigmoidal core magnetic structure (as seen with the EUVI), a rapidly formed magnetic flux rope (MFR) that expands outward, and a flare loop that contracts inward. The two hot magnetic loops were activated after the occurrence of the X-ray precursor. After activation, magnetic reconnection occurred between the two hot magnetic loops (inside the sigmoid structure), which produced the expanding MFR and the contracting flare loop (CFL). The MFR and CFL can only be seen with AIA hot and cool channels, respectively. For this flare, the real initiation time can be regarded as being from the starting time of the precursor, and its impulsive phase started when the MFR began its fast expansion. In addition, the CFL and the growing postflare magnetic loops are different loop systems, and the CFL was the product of magnetic reconnection between sheared magnetic fields that also produced the MFR.

  18. Captopril avoids hypertension, the increase in plasma angiotensin II but increases angiotensin 1-7 and angiotensin II-induced perfusion pressure in isolated kidney in SHR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Moreno, P; Pardo, J P; Hernández-Muñoz, R; López-Guerrero, J J; Del Valle-Mondragón, L; Pastelín-Hernández, G; Ibarra-Barajas, M; Villalobos-Molina, R

    2012-10-01

    We investigated captopril effects, an ACE inhibitor, on hypertension development, on Ang II and Ang-(1-7) plasma concentrations, on Ang II-induced contraction in isolated kidneys, and on kidney AT1R from spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. Five weeks-old SHR and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats were treated with captopril at 30 mg/kg/day, in drinking water for 2 or 14 weeks. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured, and isolated kidneys were tested for perfusion pressure and AT1R expression; while Ang II and Ang-(1-7) concentrations were determined in plasma. Captopril did not modify SBP in WKY rats and avoided its increase as SHR aged. Plasma Ang-II concentration was ∼4-5 folds higher in SHR rats, and captopril reduced it (Pcaptopril increased Ang-(1-7) by ∼2 fold in all rat groups. Captopril increased Ang II-induced pressor response in kidneys of WKY and SHR rats, phenomenon not observed in kidneys stimulated with phenylephrine, a α₁-adrenoceptor agonist. Captopril did not modify AT1R in kidney cortex and medulla among rat strains and ages. Data indicate that captopril increased Ang II-induced kidney perfusion pressure but not AT₁R density in kidney of WKY and SHR rats, due to blockade of angiotensin II synthesis; however, ACE inhibitors may have other actions like activating signaling processes that could contribute to their diverse effects. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. The potential of a self-assessment tool to identify healthcare professionals' strengths and areas in need of professional development to aid effective facilitation of group-based, person-centered diabetes education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenov, Vibeke; Wind, Gitte; Skinner, Timothy; Reventlow, Susanne; Hempler, Nana Folmann

    2017-09-18

    Healthcare professionals' person-centered communication skills are pivotal for successful group-based diabetes education. However, healthcare professionals are often insufficiently equipped to facilitate person-centeredness and many have never received post-graduate training. Currently, assessing professionals' skills in conducting group-based, person-centered diabetes education primarily focus on experts measuring and coding skills on various scales. However, learner-centered approaches such as adequate self-reflective tools have been shown to emphasize professional autonomy and promote engagement. The aim of this study was to explore the potential of a self-assessment tool to identify healthcare professionals' strengths and areas in need of professional development to aid effective facilitation of group-based, person-centered diabetes education. The study entails of two components: 1) Field observations of five different educational settings including 49 persons with diabetes and 13 healthcare professionals, followed by interviews with 5 healthcare professionals and 28 persons with type 2 diabetes. 2) One professional development workshop involving 14 healthcare professionals. Healthcare professionals were asked to assess their person-centered communication skills using a self-assessment tool based on challenges and skills related to four educator roles: Embracer, Facilitator, Translator, and Initiator. Data were analyzed by hermeneutic analysis. Theories derived from theoretical model 'The Health Education Juggler' and techniques from 'Motivational Interviewing in Groups' were used as a framework to analyze data. Subsequently, the analysis from the field notes and interview transcript were compared with healthcare professionals' self-assessments of strengths and areas in need to effectively facilitate group-based, person-centered diabetes education. Healthcare professionals self-assessed the Translator and the Embracer to be the two most skilled roles whereas

  20. The potential of a self-assessment tool to identify healthcare professionals' strengths and areas in need of professional development to aid effective facilitation of group-based, person-centered diabetes education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenov, Vibeke; Wind, Gitte; Skinner, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    engagement. The aim of this study was to explore the potential of a self-assessment tool to identify healthcare professionals’ strengths and areas in need of professional development to aid effective facilitation of group-based, person-centered diabetes education. Methods: The study entails of two components....... Healthcare professionals were asked to assess their person-centered communication skills using a self-assessment tool based on challenges and skills related to four educator roles: Embracer, Facilitator, Translator, and Initiator. Data were analyzed by hermeneutic analysis. Theories derived from theoretical...... model ‘The Health Education Juggler’ and techniques from ‘Motivational Interviewing in Groups’ were used as a framework to analyze data. Subsequently, the analysis from the field notes and interview transcript were compared with healthcare professionals’ self-assessments of strengths and areas in need...

  1. Dietary sodium intake modulates renal excretory responses to intrarenal angiotensin (1-7) administration in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Julie; Corbett, Alan; Johns, Edward J

    2013-02-01

    Angiotensin II at the kidney regulates renal hemodynamic and excretory function, but the actions of an alternative metabolite, angiotensin (1-7), are less clear. This study investigated how manipulation of dietary sodium intake influenced the renal hemodynamic and excretory responses to intrarenal administration of angiotensin (1-7). Renal interstitial infusion of angiotensin (1-7) in anesthetized rats fed a normal salt intake had minimal effects on glomerular filtration rate but caused dose-related increases in urine flow and absolute and fractional sodium excretions ranging from 150 to 200%. In rats maintained for 2 wk on a low-sodium diet angiotensin (1-7) increased glomerular filtration rate by some 45%, but the diuretic and natriuretic responses were enhanced compared with those in rats on a normal sodium intake. By contrast, renal interstitial infusion of angiotensin (1-7) in rats maintained on a high-sodium intake had no effect on glomerular filtration rate, whereas the diuresis and natriuresis was markedly attenuated compared with those in rats fed either a normal or low-sodium diet. Plasma renin and angiotensin (1-7) were highest in the rats on the low-sodium diet and depressed in the rats on a high-sodium diet. These findings demonstrate that the renal hemodynamic and excretory responses to locally administered angiotensin (1-7) is dependent on the level of sodium intake and indirectly on the degree of activation of the renin-angiotensin system. The exact way in which angiotensin (1-7) exerts its effects may be dependent on the prevailing levels of angiotensin II and its receptor expression.

  2. Association of plasma angiotensin-(1-7 level and left ventricular function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan-Pan Hao

    Full Text Available We recently found that overexpression of angiotensin (Ang-converting enzyme 2, which metabolizes Ang-II to Ang-(1-7 and Ang-I to Ang-(1-9, may prevent diabetes-induced left ventricular remodeling and dysfunction in rats. Our objective was to evaluate the association of plasma Ang-(1-7 level and left ventricular function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.We measured the left ventricular ejection fraction (EF, ratio of early to late left ventricular filling velocity (E/A and ratio of early diastolic mitral inflow to annular velocity (E/Ea by ultrasonography in 110 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus for more than 5 years. Anthropometric and fasting blood values were obtained from medical records. The plasma Ang-(1-7 level in patients with a poor EF (15 was significantly lower than that in patients with E/Ea ≤15. Ang-(1-7 level was negatively correlated with E/Ea and Log-N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and positively with EF and E/A. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that Ang-(1-7, hemoglobin A1c and Ang-II levels as well as duration of diabetes predicted EF; Ang-(1-7 level, fasting blood glucose, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level and duration of diabetes predicted E/A; and Ang-(1-7 and hemoglobin A1c levels predicted E/Ea.Plasma Ang-(1-7 level is independently associated with left ventricular function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and may be a biomarker for assessing cardiac function in such patients.

  3. Citizens' action group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andritzky, W.

    1978-01-01

    For the first empirical study of citizens' action groups 331 such groups were consulted. Important information was collected on the following aspects of these groups: their self-image, areas and forms of activities, objectives and their extent, how long the group has existed, successes and failures and their forms of organisation. (orig.) [de

  4. AN EXTREME STARBURST IN THE CORE OF A RICH GALAXY CLUSTER AT z = 1.7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Tracy; Bonaventura, Nina; Delahaye, Anna [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montréal, Québec, H3P 1T3 (Canada); Noble, Allison; Yee, H. K. C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H4 (Canada); DeGroot, Andrew; Wilson, Gillian; Foltz, Ryan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Muzzin, Adam; Chapman, Scott [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Cooper, Mike [Centre for Galaxy Evolution, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Lidman, Chris [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Surace, Jason [Spitzer Space Science Centre, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dunne, Loretta [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand); Geach, James [Center for Astrophysics Research, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Hayden, Brian [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hildebrandt, Hendrik [Argelander-Institute fur Astronomie, Auf dem Hugel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Huang, Jiasheng [National Astronomical Observatories of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Pope, Alexandra [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 011003 (United States); Smith, Matthew W. L. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff, Wales CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-08-20

    We have discovered an optically rich galaxy cluster at z = 1.7089 with star formation occurring in close proximity to the central galaxy. The system, SpARCS104922.6+564032.5, was detected within the Spitzer Adaptation of the red-sequence Cluster Survey, and confirmed through Keck-MOSFIRE spectroscopy. The rest-frame optical richness of N{sub gal} (500 kpc) = 30 ± 8 implies a total halo mass, within 500 kpc, of ∼3.8 ± 1.2 × 10{sup 14} M{sub ⊙}, comparable to other clusters at or above this redshift. There is a wealth of ancillary data available, including Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope optical, UKIRT-K, Spitzer-IRAC/MIPS, and Herschel-SPIRE. This work adds submillimeter imaging with the SCUBA2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and near-infrared imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope. The mid/far-infrared (M/FIR) data detect an Ultra-luminous Infrared Galaxy spatially coincident with the central galaxy, with L{sub IR} = 6.2 ± 0.9 × 10{sup 12} L{sub ⊙}. The detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at z = 1.7 in a Spitzer-IRS spectrum of the source implies the FIR luminosity is dominated by star formation (an Active Galactic Nucleus contribution of 20%) with a rate of ∼860 ± 130 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. The optical source corresponding to the IR emission is likely a chain of >10 individual clumps arranged as “beads on a string” over a linear scale of 66 kpc. Its morphology and proximity to the Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) imply a gas-rich interaction at the center of the cluster triggered the star formation. This system indicates that wet mergers may be an important process in forming the stellar mass of BCGs at early times.

  5. Maintenance Action Work Plan for Waste Area Grouping 1 inactive tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    This Maintenance Action Work Plan has been prepared to document the activities and procedures for the remediation of four inactive, low-level radioactive tanks at Waste Area Grouping 1, from the Category D list of tanks in the Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation (EPA et al. 1994). The four tanks to remediated are tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013. Three of the tanks (3001-B, 3004-B, and T-30) will be physically removed from the ground. Because of logistical issues associted with excavation and site access, the fourth tank (3013) will be grouted in place and permanently closed

  6. Maintenance Action Work Plan for Waste Area Grouping 1 inactive tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This Maintenance Action Work Plan has been prepared to document the activities and procedures for the remediation of four inactive, low-level radioactive tanks at Waste Area Grouping 1, from the Category D list of tanks in the Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation (EPA et al. 1994). The four tanks to remediated are tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013. Three of the tanks (3001-B, 3004-B, and T-30) will be physically removed from the ground. Because of logistical issues associted with excavation and site access, the fourth tank (3013) will be grouted in place and permanently closed.

  7. A study of prevalence of Sexually Transmitted Infections & response to syndromic treatment among married women of reproductive age group in rural area of Parol Primary Health Centre under Thane district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibha V. Gosalia

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To study prevalence of Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs - symptomatic, clinical & laboratorial& response to syndromic treatment in among STI groups. Design Community based interventional study Setting Rual area-Parol Primary Health Centre(PHC, District Thane, Maharashtra state. Poulation Women of reproductive age groups 15 -45 years Methods Present Community based interventional study was conducted among representative group of 415 women of reproductive age groups who were selected by simple random sampling technique in Parol PHC, District Thane, Maharashtra state. All symptomatic & asymptomatic women were counseled for examination & investigations & given syndromic treatment. Follow-up done to assess impact of syndromic treatment. Main Outcome Prevalence of STI symptomatically was 39%, clinically 32.3% & Laboratorial 26%. After syndromic treatment, prevalence of STIs was significantly reduced. Statistical Analysis Z test Results Of the surveyed women (415, prevalence of STI symptomatically was 39%, clinically 32.3% & Laboratorial 26%. The most common presenting symptom was vaginal discharge (36.4% followed by Burning Micturition (24.7%, Vulval itching (17.3%, Lower abdominal pain (13% & Genital ulcer (8.6%. Clinically, 55.2% women were diagnosed as cervicitis & 44.8% as PID. Laboratorial diagnosed STIs were - vaginal candidiasis 46.3%, Bacterial vaginosis 25%, Trichmoniasis 19.4 %, Genital Herpes 7.4% & HIV 1.9%. After syndromic treatment, prevalence of STIs has statistically significantly reduced. Conclusion Syndromic Rx & health education can definitely reduce STIs.

  8. A study of prevalence of sexually transmitted infections & response to syndromic treatment among married women of reproductive age group in rural area of Parol Primary Health Centre under Thane district, Mahrashtra , India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmar Mehul Tribhovandas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To study prevalence of Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs - symptomatic, clinical & laboratorial & response to syndromic treatment in among STI groups. Design Community based interventional study Setting Rual area-Parol Primary Health Centre(PHC, District Thane, Maharashtra state. Poulation Women of reproductive age groups 15 -45 years Methods Community based interventional study, conducted among representative group of 415 women of reproductive age groups, by simple random sampling technique in Parol PHC, District Thane, Maharashtra state. All symptomatic & asymptomatic women were counseled for examination & investigations & given syndromic treatment. Follow-up done to assess impact of syndromic treatment. Main Outcome Prevalence of STI symptomatically was 39%, clinically 32.3% & Laboratorial 26%. After syndromic treatment, prevalence of STIs has statistically significantly reduced. Statistical Analysis Z-test Results Of the surveyed women (415, prevalence of STI symptomatically was 39%, clinically 32.3% & Laboratorial 26%. The most common presenting symptom was vaginal discharge (36.4% followed by Burning Micturition (24.7%, Vulval itching (17.3%, Lower abdominal pain (13% & Genital ulcer (8.6%. Clinically, 55.2% women were diagnosed as cervicitis & 44.8% as PID. Laboratorial diagnosed STIs were - vaginal candidiasis 46.3%, Bacterial vaginosis 25%, Trichmoniasis 19.4 %, Genital Herpes 7.4% & HIV 1.9%. After syndromic treatment, prevalence of STIs has statistically significantly reduced. Conclusion: Syndromic Rx & health education can definitely reduce STIs.

  9. Short-chain chlorinated paraffins in soil, paddy seeds (Oryza sativa) and snails (Ampullariidae) in an e-waste dismantling area in China: Homologue group pattern, spatial distribution and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; Fu, Jianjie; Wang, Yawei; Jiang, Guibin

    2017-01-01

    Short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) in multi-environmental matrices are studied in Taizhou, Zhejiang Province, China, which is a notorious e-waste dismantling area. The investigated matrices consist of paddy field soil, paddy seeds (Oryza sativa, separated into hulls and rice unpolished) and apple snails (Ampullariidae, inhabiting the paddy fields). The sampling area covered a 65-km radius around the contamination center. C 10 and C 11 are the two predominant homologue groups in the area, accounting for about 35.7% and 33.0% of total SCCPs, respectively. SCCPs in snails and hulls are generally higher than in soil samples (30.4-530 ng/g dw), and SCCPs in hulls are approximate five times higher than in corresponding rice samples (4.90-55.1 ng/g dw). Homologue pattern analysis indicates that paddy seeds (both hull and rice) tend to accumulate relatively high volatile SCCP homologues, especially the ones with shorter carbon chain length, while snails tend to accumulate relatively high lipophilic homologues, especially the ones with more substituted chlorines. SCCPs in both paddy seeds and snails are linearly related to those in the soil. The e-waste dismantling area, which covers a radius of approximate 20 km, shows higher pollution levels for SCCPs according to their spatial distribution in four matrices. The preliminary assessment indicates that SCCP levels in local soils pose no significant ecological risk for soil dwelling organisms, but higher risks from dietary exposure of SCCPs are suspected for people living in e-waste dismantling area. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS Offline and Computing operations, and a number of subdetector shifts can now take place there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. A new CMS meeting room has been equipped for videoconferencing in building 42, next to building 40. Our building 28 meeting room and the facilities at P5 will be refurbished soon and plans are underway to steadily upgrade the ageing equipment in all 15 CMS meeting rooms at CERN. The CMS evaluation of the Vidyo tool indicates that it is not yet ready to be considered as a potential replacement for EVO. The Communications Group provides the CMS-TV (web) cha...

  11. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been strengthening the activities in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The Communications Group has invested a lot of effort to support the operations needs of CMS. Hence, the CMS Centres where physicists work on remote CMS shifts, Data Quality Monitoring, and Data Analysis are running very smoothly. There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide, up from just 16 at the start of CMS data-taking. The latest to join are Imperial College London, the University of Iowa, and the Università di Napoli. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, which is now full repaired after the major flooding at the beginning of the year, has been at the centre of CMS offline and computing operations, most recently hosting a large fraction of the CMS Heavy Ion community during the lead-lead run. A number of sub-detector shifts can now take pla...

  12. Pain thresholds, supra-threshold pain and lidocaine sensitivity in patients with erythromelalgia, including the I848Tmutation in NaV 1.7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helås, T; Sagafos, D; Kleggetveit, I P; Quiding, H; Jönsson, B; Segerdahl, M; Zhang, Z; Salter, H; Schmelz, M; Jørum, E

    2017-09-01

    Nociceptive thresholds and supra-threshold pain ratings as well as their reduction upon local injection with lidocaine were compared between healthy subjects and patients with erythromelalgia (EM). Lidocaine (0.25, 0.50, 1.0 or 10 mg/mL) or placebo (saline) was injected intradermally in non-painful areas of the lower arm, in a randomized, double-blind manner, to test the effect on dynamic and static mechanical sensitivity, mechanical pain sensitivity, thermal thresholds and supra-threshold heat pain sensitivity. Heat pain thresholds and pain ratings to supra-threshold heat stimulation did not differ between EM-patients (n = 27) and controls (n = 25), neither did the dose-response curves for lidocaine. Only the subgroup of EM-patients with mutations in sodium channel subunits Na V 1.7, 1.8 or 1.9 (n = 8) had increased lidocaine sensitivity for supra-threshold heat stimuli, contrasting lower sensitivity to strong mechanical stimuli. This pattern was particularly clear in the two patients carrying the Na V 1.7 I848T mutations in whom lidocaine's hyperalgesic effect on mechanical pain sensitivity contrasted more effective heat analgesia. Heat pain thresholds are not sensitized in EM patients, even in those with gain-of-function mutations in Na V 1.7. Differential lidocaine sensitivity was overt only for noxious stimuli in the supra-threshold range suggesting that sensitized supra-threshold encoding is important for the clinical pain phenotype in EM in addition to lower activation threshold. Intracutaneous lidocaine dose-dependently blocked nociceptive sensations, but we did not identify EM patients with particular high lidocaine sensitivity that could have provided valuable therapeutic guidance. Acute pain thresholds and supra-threshold heat pain in controls and patients with erythromelalgia do not differ and have the same lidocaine sensitivity. Acute heat pain thresholds even in EM patients with the Na V 1.7 I848T mutation are normal and only nociceptor

  13. The Problematic Practical Application of Section 1(6) and 1(7) of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In recent years many developments have taken place in the field of the law of succession. Du Toit aptly states that "despite the static image that the law of succession often projects, it is a vibrant area of the law that has undergone dramatic changes in recent times and will continue to do so in future". This is indeed the case, ...

  14. Trichoderma sp. PDR1-7 promotes Pinus sylvestris reforestation of lead-contaminated mine tailing sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, A Giridhar; Shea, Patrick J; Oh, Byung-Taek

    2014-04-01

    Vegetation is critical to stabilize and remediate mine tailing sites, but plant growth is often poor due to toxicity from heavy metal(loid)s (HMs). A non-symbiotic endophytic fungus, Trichoderma sp. PDR1-7, isolated from Pb-contaminated mine tailing soil, exhibited both high tolerance to HMs and desirable plant growth-promoting characteristics. PDR1-7 promoted HM solubilization in mine tailing soil and removed significant amounts of Pb and other HMs from liquid media containing single and multiple metals. Pb removal efficiency increased with initial pH from 4 to 6 and with Pb concentration from 100 to 125 mg L(-1). Inoculating soil with PDR1-7 significantly increased nutrient availability and seedling growth, chlorophyll and protein contents, as well as antioxidative enzyme (superoxide dismutase) activity. A decrease in malondialdehyde indicated less oxidative stress. HM concentrations were much higher in Pinus sylvestris roots when PDR1-7 was present. These observations suggest the utility of Trichoderma sp. PDR1-7 for pine reforestation and phytoremediation of Pb-contaminated mine soil. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A study of prevalence of sexually transmitted infections & response to syndromic treatment among married women of reproductive age group in rural area of Parol Primary Health Centre under Thane district, Mahrashtra , India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmar Mehul Tribhovandas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To study prevalence of Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs - symptomatic, clinical & laboratorial & response to syndromic treatment in among STI groups. Design Community based interventional study Setting Rual area-Parol Primary Health Centre(PHC, District Thane, Maharashtra state. Poulation Women of reproductive age groups 15 -45 years Methods Communitybasedinterventionalstudy,conductedamongrepresentativegroupof415womenof reproductive age groups, by simple random sampling technique in Parol PHC, District Thane, Maharashtra state. All symptomatic & asymptomatic women were counseled for examination & investigations & given syndromic treatment. Follow-up done to assess impact of syndromic treatment. Main Outcome Prevalence of STI symptomatically was 39%, clinically 32.3% & Laboratorial 26%. After syndromic treatment, prevalence of STIs has statistically significantly reduced Statistical Analysis Z-test Results Of the surveyed women (415, prevalence of STI symptomatically was 39%, clinically 32.3% & Laboratorial 26%. The most common presenting symptom was vaginal discharge (36.4% followed by Burning Micturition (24.7%, Vulval itching (17.3%, Lower abdominal pain (13% & Genital ulcer (8.6%. Clinically, 55.2% women were diagnosed as cervicitis & 44.8% as PID. Laboratorial diagnosed STIs were - vaginal candidiasis 46.3%, Bacterial vaginosis 25%, Trichmoniasis 19.4 %, Genital Herpes 7.4% & HIV 1.9%. After syndromic treatment, prevalence of STIs has statistically significantly reduced. Conclusion: Syndromic Rx & health education can definitely reduce STIs.

  16. Selective silencing of Na(V)1.7 decreases excitability and conduction in vagal sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroi, Yukiko; Ru, Fei; Kollarik, Marian; Canning, Brendan J; Hughes, Stephen A; Walsh, Stacey; Sigg, Martin; Carr, Michael J; Undem, Bradley J

    2011-12-01

    There has been much information learned in recent years about voltage gated sodium channel (Na(V)) subtypes in somatosensory pain signalling, but much less is known about the role of specific sodium channel subtypes in the vagal sensory system. In this study, we developed a technique using adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) to directly introduce shRNA against Na(V)1.7 subtype gene into the vagal sensory ganglia of guinea pigs in vivo. Na(V)1.7 gene expression in nodose ganglia was effectively and selectively reduced without influencing the expression of other sodium channel subtype genes including Na(V)1.1, 1.2, 1.3 1.6, 1.8, or 1.9. Using a whole cell patch-clamp technique, this effect on Na(V)1.7 gene expression coincided with a reduction in tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current, a requirement for much larger depolarizing stimulus to initiate action potentials, and reduction in repetitive action potential discharge. Extracellular recordings in the isolated vagus nerve revealed that the conduction of action potentials in sensory A- and C-fibres in many neurons was effectively abolished after Na(V)1.7 shRNA introduction. Moreover, bilateral Na(V)1.7 shRNA injected animals survived for several months and the vagal reflex behaviour, exemplified by citric acid-induced coughing, was significantly suppressed. These data indicate that selectively silencing Na(V)1.7 ion channel expression leads to a substantial decrease in neural excitability and conduction block in vagal afferent nerves.

  17. Throttling Characteristics of the RL10 Derivative Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine -- Demo 1.6 and 1.7 Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Matthew K.; Hulka, James; Adamski, Walt; Brown, Corey

    2010-01-01

    The Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE) is a deep throttling cryogenic Lunar Module Descent Engine (LMDE) technology development demonstrator based on the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) RL10 engine. Previous testing on this engine occurred during 2006 as Demo 1.0, then Demo 1.5 in 2007, Demo 1.6 in 2008 and finally Demo 1.7 in 2010. A review of Demo 1.0, 1.5, and preliminary results of 1.6 were reported in previous JANNAF papers. Demo 1.6 was tested at the PWR E-6 test facility in November 2008. The primary goal of this series was to mitigate low frequency combustion instability observed at low power levels. To mitigate the chug, the Demo 1.6 injector was modified from the previous configurations to include an approximately 0.050 inch thick teflon-type spray-on insulation to reduce heat transfer to the LOX manifold, which was believed to be a significant contributor to the low power instability. In addition, gaseous helium injection into the LOX manifold was used as a means to stabilize the system. Also explored in this test series was mitigation for a low power 1 Hz fuel system oscillation caused by sub-critical hydrogen boiling in the chamber cooling jacket. Reduced area gas venturis were utilized to avoid the 1 Hz fuel-size oscillation by keeping the cooling jacket supercritical down to lower engine power levels. Demo 1.7 began testing in March 2010. Its primary objectives were to demonstrate closed loop control capability on mixture ratio and chamber pressure, start to lower power levels and increased throttling ramp rates. Secondary test objectives that are discussed include multiple engine starts, higher mixture ratio excursions and additional time at low power level. While the complete test series and data reduction is not yet complete for Demo 1.7, an overview and up-to-date status is provided.

  18. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The recently established CMS Communications Group, led by Lucas Taylor, has been busy in all three of its main are areas of responsibility: Communications Infrastructure, Information Systems, and Outreach and Education Communications Infrastructure The damage caused by the flooding of the CMS Centre@CERN on 21st December has been completely repaired and all systems are back in operation. Major repairs were made to the roofs, ceilings and one third of the floor had to be completely replaced. Throughout these works, the CMS Centre was kept operating and even hosted a major press event for first 7 TeV collisions, as described below. Incremental work behind the scenes is steadily improving the quality of the CMS communications infrastructure, particularly Webcasting, video conferencing, and meeting rooms at CERN. CERN/IT is also deploying a pilot service of a new videoconference tool called Vidyo, to assess whether it might provide an enhanced service at a lower cost, compared to the EVO tool currently in w...

  19. Handbook of group actions

    CERN Document Server

    Papadopoulos, Athanase; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Groups and group actions are probably the most central objects in mathematics. Comprising volumes 31 and 32 of the ALM series (with further volumes forthcoming), the Handbook of Group Actions presents survey articles on the topic of group actions and how they appear in several mathematical contexts. The general subject matter is organized under the following sections: geometry, mapping class groups, knot groups, topology, representation theory, deformation theory, and discrete groups. The various articles deal with both classical material and modern developments. They are written by specialists in their respective subject areas, and addressed to graduate students who want to learn the theory, as well as to specialists as a reference.

  20. Identification and assessment of products of biodiversity with commercial potential in an organized group of producers in the area of influence of the Eco-Archeological Corridor in the South of Huila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Cecilia Vinasco Guzmán

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In Colombia, despite the wide biodiversity, efforts to find the products that may be involved in bio-activities have been inadequate and communities have not been involved with this proposal for economic and social development. To contribute to the development of these initiatives, an investigation over three groups belonging to the Mashiramo Corporation (Pitalito’s municipalities of San Agustin and Acevedo was carried out since February to September 2010, in seeking of biodiversity products with commercial potential in the south area of Huila, using the methodology of Market Analysis and Development (MA & D. In phase 1, 17 products were selected and classified into 4 groups: forest products and byproducts (species of orchids, native flowers, forest species and seeds, Zoo-breeding (lepidopteron fauna, wild and hydro biological resources, native foods (two legume species and products and services (ecotourism, environmental services and sale of handicrafts. In phase 2 (identification of products, markets and ways of marketing 5 products were analized: ecotourism, incipient handicrafts, black fish farming (Astroblepus chapmani, a nursery of native forest species and Guatin Zoo-breeding (Dasyprocta punctata. In the third phase, the plan was formulated for ecotourism business with emphasis on bird watching. It was concluded that methodological appropriation is needed by the beneficiary community to ensure the development of activities to learn to make decisions based on market data and not for creating false expectations that generate negative experiences in communities.

  1. Angiotensin-(1-7)-Induced Plasticity Changes in the Lateral Amygdala Are Mediated by COX-2 and NO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Doris

    2007-01-01

    It is known from studies outside the brain that upon binding to its receptor, angiotensin-(1-7) elicits the release of prostanoids and nitric oxide (NO). Cyclooxygenase (COX) is a key enzyme that converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandins. Since there are no data available so far on the role of COX-2 in the amygdala, in a first step we…

  2. Sodium status and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition : effects on plasma angiotensin-(1-7) in healthy man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kocks, MJA; Lely, AT; Boomsma, F; de Jong, PE; Navis, G

    Objective Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors provide effective intervention for cardiovascular and renal disease. Changes in angiotensin-(1-7) have been proposed to be involved in the mechanism of action of ACE inhibition (ACEi). In particular, an altered balance between angiotensin II

  3. McStas 1.7 - a new version of the flexible Monte Carlo neutron scattering package

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willendrup, P.; Farhi, E.; Lefmann, K.

    2004-01-01

    in collaboration between Riso and ILL. The new version (1.7) has many improvements, among these added support for the popular Microsoft Windows platform. This presentation will demonstrate a selection of the new features through a simulation of the ILL IN6 beamline. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  4. Captopril improves postresuscitation hemodynamics protective against pulmonary embolism by activating the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hong-Li; Li, Chun-Sheng; Zhao, Lian-Xing; Yang, Jun; Tong, Nan; An, Le; Liu, Qi-Tong

    2016-11-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (APE) has a very high mortality rate, especially at cardiac arrest and even after the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). This study investigated the protective effect of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril on postresuscitation hemodynamics, in a porcine model of cardiac arrest established by APE. Twenty-nine Beijing Landrace pigs were infused with an autologous thrombus leading to cardiac arrest and subjected to standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation and thrombolysis. Ten resuscitated pigs were randomly and equally apportioned to receive either captopril (22.22 mg/kg) infusion or the same volume saline, 30 min after ROSC. Hemodynamic changes and ACE-Ang II-angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis levels were determined. APE was associated with a decline in mean arterial pressure and a dramatic increase in pulmonary artery pressure and mean right ventricular pressure. After ROSC, captopril infusion was associated with significantly lower mean right ventricular pressure and systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance, faster heart rate, and higher Ang-(1-7) levels, ACE2/ACE, and Ang-(1-7)/Ang II, compared with the saline infusion. The ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas pathway correlated negatively with external vascular lung water and pulmonary vascular permeability and positively with the right cardiac index. In conclusion, in a pig model of APE leading to cardiac arrest, captopril infusion was associated with less mean right ventricular pressure overload after resuscitation, compared with saline infusion. The reduction in systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance associated with captopril may be by inhibiting the ACE-Ang II-AT1R axis and activating the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis.

  5. Mutations at opposite ends of the DIII/S4-S5 linker of sodium channel NaV1.7 produce distinct pain disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyrrell Lynda

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two groups of gain-of-function mutations in sodium channel NaV1.7, which are expressed in dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons, produce two clinically-distinct pain syndromes - inherited erythromelalgia (IEM and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder (PEPD. IEM is characterized by intermittent burning pain and skin redness in the feet or hands, triggered by warmth or mild exercise, while PEPD is characterized by episodes of rectal, ocular and mandibular pain accompanied with skin flushing, triggered by bowel movement and perianal stimulation. Most of the IEM mutations are located within channel domains I and II, while most of the PEPD mutations are located within domains III and IV. The structural dichotomy parallels the biophysical effects of the two types of mutations, with IEM mutations shifting voltage-dependence of NaV1.7 activation in a hyperpolarized direction, and PEPD mutations shifting fast-inactivation of NaV1.7 in a depolarized direction. While four IEM and four PEPD mutations are located within cytoplasmic linkers joining segments 4 and 5 (S4-S5 linkers in the different domains (IEM: domains I and II; PEPD: domains III and IV, no S4-S5 linker has been reported to house both IEM and PEPD mutations thus far. Results We have identified a new IEM mutation P1308L within the C-terminus of the DIII/S4-S5 linker of NaV1.7, ten amino acids from a known PEPD mutation V1298F which is located within the N-terminus of this linker. We used voltage-clamp to compare the biophysical properties of the two mutant channels and current-clamp to study their effects on DRG neuron excitability. We confirm that P1308L and V1298F behave as prototypical IEM and PEPD mutations, respectively. We also show that DRG neurons expressing either P1308L or V1298F become hyperexcitable, compared to DRG neurons expressing wild-type channels. Conclusions Our results provide evidence for differential roles of the DIII/S4-S5 linker N- and C-termini in channel

  6. Structure of a putative trans-editing enzyme for prolyl-tRNA synthetase from Aeropyrum pernix K1 at 1.7 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murayama, Kazutaka; Kato-Murayama, Miyuki; Katsura, Kazushige; Uchikubo-Kamo, Tomomi; Yamaguchi-Hirafuji, Machiko; Kawazoe, Masahito; Akasaka, Ryogo; Hanawa-Suetsugu, Kyoko; Hori-Takemoto, Chie [RIKEN Genomic Sciences Center, Yokohama (Japan); Terada, Takaho [RIKEN Genomic Sciences Center, Yokohama (Japan); RIKEN Harima Institute at SPring-8, Hyogo (Japan); Shirouzu, Mikako [RIKEN Harima Institute at SPring-8, Hyogo (Japan); Yokoyama, Shigeyuki, E-mail: yokoyama@biochem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [RIKEN Genomic Sciences Center, Yokohama (Japan); RIKEN Harima Institute at SPring-8, Hyogo (Japan); Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2005-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the APE2540 protein from A. pernix K1 has been determined by the multiple anomalous dispersion method at 1.7 Å resolution. The structure includes two monomers in the asymmetric unit and shares structural similarity with the YbaK protein or cysteinyl-tRNA{sup Pro} deacylase from H. influenzae. The crystal structure of APE2540, the putative trans-editing enzyme ProX from Aeropyrum pernix K1, was determined in a high-throughput manner. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.4, b = 58.9, c = 53.6 Å, β = 106.8°. The structure was solved by the multiwavelength anomalous dispersion method at 1.7 Å and refined to an R factor of 16.8% (R{sub free} = 20.5%). The crystal structure includes two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. Each monomer consists of eight β-strands and seven α-helices. A structure-homology search revealed similarity between the trans-editing enzyme YbaK (or cysteinyl-tRNA{sup Pro} deacylase) from Haemophilus influenzae (HI1434; 22% sequence identity) and putative ProX proteins from Caulobacter crescentus (16%) and Agrobacterium tumefaciens (21%)

  7. Structure of a putative trans-editing enzyme for prolyl-tRNA synthetase from Aeropyrum pernix K1 at 1.7 Å resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Kazutaka; Kato-Murayama, Miyuki; Katsura, Kazushige; Uchikubo-Kamo, Tomomi; Yamaguchi-Hirafuji, Machiko; Kawazoe, Masahito; Akasaka, Ryogo; Hanawa-Suetsugu, Kyoko; Hori-Takemoto, Chie; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2004-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the APE2540 protein from A. pernix K1 has been determined by the multiple anomalous dispersion method at 1.7 Å resolution. The structure includes two monomers in the asymmetric unit and shares structural similarity with the YbaK protein or cysteinyl-tRNA Pro deacylase from H. influenzae. The crystal structure of APE2540, the putative trans-editing enzyme ProX from Aeropyrum pernix K1, was determined in a high-throughput manner. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 47.4, b = 58.9, c = 53.6 Å, β = 106.8°. The structure was solved by the multiwavelength anomalous dispersion method at 1.7 Å and refined to an R factor of 16.8% (R free = 20.5%). The crystal structure includes two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. Each monomer consists of eight β-strands and seven α-helices. A structure-homology search revealed similarity between the trans-editing enzyme YbaK (or cysteinyl-tRNA Pro deacylase) from Haemophilus influenzae (HI1434; 22% sequence identity) and putative ProX proteins from Caulobacter crescentus (16%) and Agrobacterium tumefaciens (21%)

  8. Group X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  9. Group purchasing: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetrich, J G

    1987-07-01

    The various types and operational methods of purchasing groups are described, and evaluation of groups is discussed. Since group purchasing is increasing in popularity as a method of controlling drug costs, community and hospital pharmacy managers may need to evaluate various groups to determine the appropriateness of their services. Groups are categorized as independent, system based, or alliance or association based. Instead of "purchasing," some groups develop contracts for hospitals, which then purchase directly from the vendor. Aside from this basic difference between groups that purchase and groups that contract, comparisons among groups are difficult because of the wide variation in sizes and services. Competition developing from diversification among groups has led to "super groups," formed from local and regional groups. In evaluating groups, advantages and disadvantages germane to accomplishing the member's objectives must be considered. To ensure a group's success, members must be committed and support the group's philosophies; hospital pharmacists must help to establish a strong formulary system. To select vendors, groups should develop formal qualification and selection criteria and should not base a decision solely on price. The method of solicitation (bidding or negotiating), as well as the role of the prime vendor, should be studied. Legal implications of group purchasing, especially in the areas of administrative fees and drug diversion, must also be considered. The most advantageous group for each organization will include members with common missions and will be able to implement strategies for future success.

  10. The independent prokaryotic origins of eukaryotic fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase and sedoheptulose-1, 7-bisphosphatase and the implications of their origins for the evolution of eukaryotic Calvin cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Yong-Hai

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Calvin cycle of eubacteria, the dephosphorylations of both fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate (FBP and sedoheptulose-1, 7-bisphosphate (SBP are catalyzed by the same bifunctional enzyme: fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase/sedoheptulose-1, 7-bisphosphatase (F/SBPase, while in that of eukaryotic chloroplasts by two distinct enzymes: chloroplastic fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase (FBPase and sedoheptulose-1, 7-bisphosphatase (SBPase, respectively. It was proposed that these two eukaryotic enzymes arose from the divergence of a common ancestral eubacterial bifunctional F/SBPase of mitochondrial origin. However, no specific affinity between SBPase and eubacterial FBPase or F/SBPase can be observed in the previous phylogenetic analyses, and it is hard to explain why SBPase and/or F/SBPase are/is absent from most extant nonphotosynthetic eukaryotes according to this scenario. Results Domain analysis indicated that eubacterial F/SBPase of two different resources contain distinct domains: proteobacterial F/SBPases contain typical FBPase domain, while cyanobacterial F/SBPases possess FBPase_glpX domain. Therefore, like prokaryotic FBPase, eubacterial F/SBPase can also be divided into two evolutionarily distant classes (Class I and II. Phylogenetic analysis based on a much larger taxonomic sampling than previous work revealed that all eukaryotic SBPase cluster together and form a close sister group to the clade of epsilon-proteobacterial Class I FBPase which are gluconeogenesis-specific enzymes, while all eukaryotic chloroplast FBPase group together with eukaryotic cytosolic FBPase and form another distinct clade which then groups with the Class I FBPase of diverse eubacteria. Motif analysis of these enzymes also supports these phylogenetic correlations. Conclusions There are two evolutionarily distant classes of eubacterial bifunctional F/SBPase. Eukaryotic FBPase and SBPase do not diverge from either of them but have two independent origins

  11. Group Flow and Group Genius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  12. The theory of groups

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Marshall

    2018-01-01

    This 1959 text offers an unsurpassed resource for learning and reviewing the basics of a fundamental and ever-expanding area. "This remarkable book undoubtedly will become a standard text on group theory." - American Scientist.

  13. Review of the transport of selected radionuclides in the interim risk assessment for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Waste Area Group 7 Operable Unit 7-13/14, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Joseph P.; Landa, Edward R.; Nimmo, John R.; Cecil, L. DeWayne; Knobel, LeRoy L.; Glynn, Pierre D.; Kwicklis, Edward M.; Curtis, Gary P.; Stollenwerk, Kenneth G.; Anderson, Steven R.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Bossong, Clifford R.; Orr, Brennon R.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requested that the U.S. Geological Survey conduct an independent technical review of the Interim Risk Assessment (IRA) and Contaminant Screening for the Waste Area Group 7 (WAG-7) Remedial Investigation, the draft Addendum to the Work Plan for Operable Unit 7-13/14 WAG-7 comprehensive Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS), and supporting documents that were prepared by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, Inc. The purpose of the technical review was to assess the data and geotechnical approaches that were used to estimate future risks associated with the release of the actinides americium, uranium, neptunium, and plutonium to the Snake River Plain aquifer from wastes buried in pits and trenches at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The SDA is located at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex in southeastern Idaho within the boundaries of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Radionuclides have been buried in pits and trenches at the SDA since 1957 and 1952, respectively. Burial of transuranic wastes was discontinued in 1982. The five specific tasks associated with this review were defined in a ?Proposed Scope of Work? prepared by the DOE, and a follow-up workshop held in June 1998. The specific tasks were (1) to review the radionuclide sampling data to determine how reliable and significant are the reported radionuclide detections and how reliable is the ongoing sampling program, (2) to assess the physical and chemical processes that logically can be invoked to explain true detections, (3) to determine if distribution coefficients that were used in the IRA are reliable and if they have been applied properly, (4) to determine if transport model predictions are technically sound, and (5) to identify issues needing resolution to determine technical adequacy of the risk assessment analysis, and what additional work is required to resolve those issues.

  14. Isopermutation group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muktibodh, A. S. [Department of Mathematics, Mohota College of Science, NAGPUR-440009 India E-mail: amukti2000@yahoo.com (India)

    2015-03-10

    The concept of ‘Isotopy’ as formulated by Ruggero Maria Santilli [1, 2, 3] plays a vital role in the development of Iso mathematics. Santilli defined iso-fields of characteristic zero. In this paper we extend this definition to define Iso-Galois fields [4] which are essentially of non-zero characteristic. Isotopically isomorphic realizations of a group define isopermutation group which gives a clear cut distinction between automorphic groups and isotopic groups.

  15. San Francisco Bay Area CHARG: Coastal Hazards Adaptation Resiliency Group, a Multi-Jurisdictional Collaboration to Develop Innovative Regional Solutions to Address Sea Level Rise and Improve Shoreline Resiliency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, R.

    2017-12-01

    For a challenge as complex and far-reaching as sea level rise and improving shoreline resiliency, strong partnerships between scientists, elected officials, decision-makers, and the general public are the only way that effective solutions can be developed. The San Francisco Bay, like many similar sheltered water coastal environments (for example, Galveston Bay, Tampa Bay, or Venetian Lagoon) offers a unique opportunity for multiple jurisdictions to collaborate to address sea level rise on a regional basis. For the San Francisco Bay, significant scientific progress has been made in building a real-time simulation model for riverine and Bay hydrodynamics. Other major scientific initiatives, such as morphology mapping, shoreline mapping, and a sediment budget are also underway. In 2014, leaders from the Bay Area science, engineering, planning, policy, elected, and regulatory communities representing jurisdictions around the Bay joined together to address sea level rise. The group includes people from local, regional, state, and federal agencies and organizations. Together, CHARG (Coastal Hazards Adaptation Resiliency Group) established a collective vision and approach to implementing regional solutions. Decision-makers within many Bay Area jurisdictions are motivated to show demonstrable progress toward addressing sea level rise. However, the cost to implement shoreline resiliency solutions will be very large, and must be founded on strong science.CHARG is now tackling several key technical challenges. One is to develop science-based guidelines for local jurisdictions to determine when a project is local, sub-regional, or regional. Concurrently, several organizations are planning or implementing pilot shoreline resiliency projects and other programs. Many creative regional solutions are possible in a sheltered water environment that simply would not be feasible along the open coast. By definition, these solutions cannot be undertaken by one entity alone. Large

  16. Permutation groups

    CERN Document Server

    Passman, Donald S

    2012-01-01

    This volume by a prominent authority on permutation groups consists of lecture notes that provide a self-contained account of distinct classification theorems. A ready source of frequently quoted but usually inaccessible theorems, it is ideally suited for professional group theorists as well as students with a solid background in modern algebra.The three-part treatment begins with an introductory chapter and advances to an economical development of the tools of basic group theory, including group extensions, transfer theorems, and group representations and characters. The final chapter feature

  17. Sulfonamides as Selective NaV1.7 Inhibitors: Optimizing Potency and Pharmacokinetics While Mitigating Metabolic Liabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Matthew M; Dineen, Thomas A; Marx, Isaac E; Altmann, Steven; Boezio, Alessandro; Bregman, Howard; Chu-Moyer, Margaret; DiMauro, Erin F; Feric Bojic, Elma; Foti, Robert S; Gao, Hua; Graceffa, Russell; Gunaydin, Hakan; Guzman-Perez, Angel; Huang, Hongbing; Huang, Liyue; Jarosh, Michael; Kornecook, Thomas; Kreiman, Charles R; Ligutti, Joseph; La, Daniel S; Lin, Min-Hwa Jasmine; Liu, Dong; Moyer, Bryan D; Nguyen, Hanh N; Peterson, Emily A; Rose, Paul E; Taborn, Kristin; Youngblood, Beth D; Yu, Violeta; Fremeau, Robert T

    2017-07-27

    Several reports have recently emerged regarding the identification of heteroarylsulfonamides as Na V 1.7 inhibitors that demonstrate high levels of selectivity over other Na V isoforms. The optimization of a series of internal Na V 1.7 leads that address a number of metabolic liabilities including bioactivation, PXR activation, as well as CYP3A4 induction and inhibition led to the identification of potent and selective inhibitors that demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetic profiles and were devoid of the aforementioned liabilities. The key to achieving this within a series prone to transporter-mediated clearance was the identification of a small range of optimal cLogD values and the discovery of subtle PXR SAR that was not lipophilicity dependent. This enabled the identification of compound 20, which was advanced into a target engagement pharmacodynamic model where it exhibited robust reversal of histamine-induced scratching bouts in mice.

  18. Benzoxazolinone aryl sulfonamides as potent, selective Nav1.7 inhibitors with in vivo efficacy in a preclinical pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pero, Joseph E; Rossi, Michael A; Lehman, Hannah D G F; Kelly, Michael J; Mulhearn, James J; Wolkenberg, Scott E; Cato, Matthew J; Clements, Michelle K; Daley, Christopher J; Filzen, Tracey; Finger, Eleftheria N; Gregan, Yun; Henze, Darrell A; Jovanovska, Aneta; Klein, Rebecca; Kraus, Richard L; Li, Yuxing; Liang, Annie; Majercak, John M; Panigel, Jacqueline; Urban, Mark O; Wang, Jixin; Wang, Ying-Hong; Houghton, Andrea K; Layton, Mark E

    2017-06-15

    Studies on human genetics have suggested that inhibitors of the Na v 1.7 voltage-gated sodium channel hold considerable promise as therapies for the treatment of chronic pain syndromes. Herein, we report novel, peripherally-restricted benzoxazolinone aryl sulfonamides as potent Na v 1.7 inhibitors with excellent selectivity against the Na v 1.5 isoform, which is expressed in the heart muscle. Elaboration of initial lead compound 3d afforded exemplar 13, which featured attractive physicochemical properties, outstanding lipophilic ligand efficiency and pharmacological selectivity against Na v 1.5 exceeding 1000-fold. Key structure-activity relationships associated with oral bioavailability were leveraged to discover compound 17, which exhibited a comparable potency/selectivity profile as well as full efficacy following oral administration in a preclinical model indicative of antinociceptive behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Efficacy of NS5A Inhibitors Against Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes 1-7 and Escape Variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith M; Pham, Long V; Mikkelsen, Lotte S

    2018-01-01

    NS5A inhibitors against HCV genotype 1-7 prototype isolates and resistant escape variants, and investigated the effects of pre-existing resistance-associated substitutions (RAS) on HCV escape from treatment. METHODS: We measured the efficacy of different concentrations of daclatasvir, ledipasvir......, ombitasvir, elbasvir, ruzasvir, velpatasvir, and pibrentasvir in cultured cells infected with HCV recombinants expressing genotype 1-7 NS5A proteins with or without RAS. We engineered HCV variants that included RAS identified in escape experiments, using recombinants with or without T/Y93H and daclatasvir......, or that contained RAS previously reported from patients. RESULTS: NS5A inhibitors had varying levels of efficacy against original and resistant viruses. Only velpatasvir and pibrentasvir had uniform high activity against all HCV genotypes tested. RAS hotspots in NS5A were found at amino acids 28, 30, 31, and 93...

  20. Treatment of Na(v)1.7-mediated pain in inherited erythromelalgia using a novel sodium channel blocker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Yigal Paul; Price, Nicola; Namdari, Rostam; Cohen, Charles Jay; Lamers, Mieke H; Winters, Conrad; Price, James; Young, Clint E; Verschoof, Henry; Sherrington, Robin; Pimstone, Simon Neil; Hayden, Michael Reuben

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the SCN9A gene leading to deficiency of its protein product, Na(v)1.7, cause congenital indifference to pain (CIP). CIP is characterized by the absence of the ability to sense pain associated with noxious stimuli. In contrast, the opposite phenotype to CIP, inherited erythromelalgia (IEM), is a disorder of spontaneous pain caused by missense mutations resulting in gain-of-function in Na(v)1.7 that promote neuronal hyperexcitability. The primary aim of this study was to demonstrate that Na(v)1.7 antagonism could alleviate the pain of IEM, thereby demonstrating the utility of this opposite phenotype model as a tool for rapid proof-of-concept for novel analgesics. An exploratory, randomized, double-blind, 2-period crossover study was conducted in 4 SCN9A mutation-proven IEM patients. In each treatment period (2days), separated by a 2-day washout period, patients were orally administered XEN402 (400mg twice daily) or matching placebo. In 3 patients, pain was induced by heat or exercise during each treatment arm. A fourth patient, in constant severe pain, required no induction. Patient-reported outcomes of pain intensity and/or relief were recorded, and the time taken to induce pain was measured. The ability to induce pain in IEM patients was significantly attenuated by XEN402 compared with placebo. XEN402 increased the time to maximal pain induction and significantly reduced the amount of pain (42% less) after induction (P=.014). This pilot study showed that XEN402 blocks Na(v)1.7-mediated pain associated with IEM, thereby demonstrating target engagement in humans and underscoring the use of rare genetic disorders with mutant target channels as a novel approach to rapid proof-of-concept. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. High Temperature Creep of an Al-8,5Fe-1,3V-1,7Si Alloy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuchařová, Květa; Zhu, S. J.; Čadek, Josef

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 2 (2002), s. 69-84 ISSN 0023-432X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS2041001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : Al-8,5Fe 1,3V 1,7Si alloy * creep behavior , true threshold stress Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.493, year: 2002

  2. Inhibition of Nav1.7 channels by methyl eugenol as a mechanism underlying its antinociceptive and anesthetic actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ze-Jun; Tabakoff, Boris; Levinson, Simon R; Heinbockel, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Methyl eugenol is a major active component extracted from the Chinese herb Asari Radix et Rhizoma, which has been used to treat toothache and other pain. Previous in vivo studies have shown that methyl eugenol has anesthetic and antinociceptive effects. The aim of this study was to determine the possible mechanism underlying its effect on nervous system disorders. The direct interaction of methyl eugenol with Na(+) channels was explored and characterized using electrophysiological recordings from Nav1.7-transfected CHO cells. In whole-cell patch clamp mode, methyl eugenol tonically inhibited peripheral nerve Nav1.7 currents in a concentration- and voltage-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 295 μmol/L at a -100 mV holding potential. Functionally, methyl eugenol preferentially bound to Nav1.7 channels in the inactivated and/or open state, with weaker binding to channels in the resting state. Thus, in the presence of methyl eugenol, Nav1.7 channels exhibited reduced availability for activation in a steady-state inactivation protocol, strong use-dependent inhibition, enhanced binding kinetics, and slow recovery from inactivation compared to untreated channels. An estimation of the affinity of methyl eugenol for the resting and inactivated states of the channel also demonstrated that methyl eugenol preferentially binds to inactivated channels, with a 6.4 times greater affinity compared to channels in the resting state. The failure of inactivated channels to completely recover to control levels at higher concentrations of methyl eugenol implies that the drug may drive more drug-bound, fast-inactivated channels into drug-bound, slow-inactivated channels. Methyl eugenol is a potential candidate as an effective local anesthetic and analgesic. The antinociceptive and anesthetic effects of methyl eugenol result from the inhibitory action of methyl eugenol on peripheral Na(+) channels.

  3. Calculations for a BWR Lattice with Adjacent Gadolinium Pins Using the Monte Carlo Cell Code Serpent v.1.1.7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Ferraro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo neutron transport codes are usually used to perform criticality calculations and to solve shielding problems due to their capability to model complex systems without major approximations. However, these codes demand high computational resources. The improvement in computer capabilities leads to several new applications of Monte Carlo neutron transport codes. An interesting one is to use this method to perform cell-level fuel assembly calculations in order to obtain few group constants to be used on core calculations. In the present work the VTT recently developed Serpent v.1.1.7 cell-oriented neutronic calculation code is used to perform cell calculations of a theoretical BWR lattice benchmark with burnable poisons, and the main results are compared to reported ones and with calculations performed with Condor v.2.61, the INVAP's neutronic collision probability cell code.

  4. RCRA Facility investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 6, Technical memorandums 06-13, 06-14, and 06-15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannard, J. R.; Wilson, R. C.; Zondlo, T. F.

    1991-09-01

    This report describes the borehole geophysical logging performed at selected monitoring wells at waste area grouping (WAG) 6 of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of the WAG 6 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation (RFI). It identifies the locations and describes the methods, equipment used in the effort, and the results of the activity. The actual logs for each well logged are presented in Attachment 1 through 4 of the TM. Attachment 5 provide logging contractor service literature and Attachment 6 is the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Procedure for Control of a Nuclear Source Utilized in Geophysical logging. The primary objectives of the borehole geophysical logging program were to (1) identify water-bearing fractured bedrock zones to determine the placement of the screen and sealed intervals for subsequent installation, and (2) further characterize local bedrock geology and hydrogeology and gain insight about the deeper component of the shallow bedrock aquifer flow system. A secondary objective was to provide stratigraphic and structural correlations with existing logs for Hydraulic Head Monitoring Station (HHMS) wells, which display evidence of faulting.

  5. RCRA Facility investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 5, Technical Memorandums 06-09A, 06-10A, and 06-12A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-09-01

    This report provides a detailed summary of the activities carried out to sample groundwater at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The analytical results for samples collected during Phase 1, Activity 2 of the WAG 6 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation (RFI) are also presented. In addition, analytical results for Phase 1, activity sampling events for which data were not previously reported are included in this TM. A summary of the groundwater sampling activities of WAG 6, to date, are given in the Introduction. The Methodology section describes the sampling procedures and analytical parameters. Six attachments are included. Attachments 1 and 2 provide analytical results for selected RFI groundwater samples and ORNL sampling event. Attachment 3 provides a summary of the contaminants detected in each well sampled for all sampling events conducted at WAG 6. Bechtel National Inc. (BNI)/IT Corporation Contract Laboratory (IT) RFI analytical methods and detection limits are given in Attachment 4. Attachment 5 provides the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)/Analytical Chemistry Division (ACD) analytical methods and detection limits and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) quarterly compliance monitoring (1988--1989). Attachment 6 provides ORNL/ACD groundwater analytical methods and detection limits (for the 1990 RCRA semi-annual compliance monitoring).

  6. Medida da área do canal vertebral lombar em diferentes faixas etárias Medida de la superficie del canal vertebral lumbar en los diferentes grupos de edad Lumbar spinal canal area in different age groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair Ortiz

    2009-03-01

    rango de edad fue 0,258 y para el sexo de 0,062; en el caso de la L5, el "p-value" para el rango de edad fue 0,279 y el sexo de 0,003. CONCLUSIÓN: no hay diferencia en el ámbito de la canal vertebral lumbar entre los grupos de edad analizados, pero hay diferencias entre los sexos, siendo mayor en los hombres.OBJECTIVE: to measure the lumbar spinal canal area, using computerized tomography, compare different age groups and determine if there are differences between those. METHODS: the lumbar spinal canal area was measured in 78 individuals, divided in eight age groups, with data obtained from computerized tomography scans of the abdomen. The measurements were made at L1, L3 and L5 levels at the transpedicular section. RESULTS: the values for L1 produced a p-value of 0,586 for the age group and a p-value of 0,003 for sex. Therefore, we can say that there is no evidence of differences among age rage groups, but shows evidence of difference for sex being larger in males. For L3, the p-value of age rage was 0,258, and the value for sex was 0,062. For L5, the p-value for the age range was 0279, and the value for sex was 0,003. CONCLUSION: there is no difference of spinal canal area between the age groups, but there is difference for the sex being larger in males.

  7. Reflection groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggermont, G.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, PISA organised proactive meetings of reflection groups on involvement in decision making, expert culture and ethical aspects of radiation protection.All reflection group meetings address particular targeted audiences while the output publication in book form is put forward

  8. Group Theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brian

    The group interpretation approach to theatre production is defined as a method that will lead to production of plays that will appeal to "all the layers of the conscious and unconscious mind." In practice, it means that the group will develop and use resources of the theatre that orthodox companies too often ignore. The first two chapters of this…

  9. Site Safety and Health Plan (Phase 3) for the treatability study for in situ vitrification at Seepage Pit 1 in Waste Area Grouping 7, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, B.P.; Naney, M.T.

    1995-06-01

    This plan is to be implemented for Phase III ISV operations and post operations sampling. Two previous project phases involving site characterization have been completed and required their own site specific health and safety plans. Project activities will take place at Seepage Pit 1 in Waste Area Grouping 7 at ORNL, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Purpose of this document is to establish standard health and safety procedures for ORNL project personnel and contractor employees in performance of this work. Site activities shall be performed in accordance with Energy Systems safety and health policies and procedures, DOE orders, Occupational Safety and Health Administration Standards 29 CFR Part 1910 and 1926; applicable United States Environmental Protection Agency requirements; and consensus standards. Where the word ``shall`` is used, the provisions of this plan are mandatory. Specific requirements of regulations and orders have been incorporated into this plan in accordance with applicability. Included from 29 CFR are 1910.120 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response; 1910.146, Permit Required - Confined Space; 1910.1200, Hazard Communication; DOE Orders requirements of 5480.4, Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Standards; 5480.11, Radiation Protection; and N5480.6, Radiological Control Manual. In addition, guidance and policy will be followed as described in the Environmental Restoration Program Health and Safety Plan. The levels of personal protection and the procedures specified in this plan are based on the best information available from reference documents and site characterization data. Therefore, these recommendations represent the minimum health and safety requirements to be observed by all personnel engaged in this project.

  10. Site Safety and Health Plan (Phase 3) for the treatability study for in situ vitrification at Seepage Pit 1 in Waste Area Grouping 7, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, B.P.; Naney, M.T.

    1995-06-01

    This plan is to be implemented for Phase III ISV operations and post operations sampling. Two previous project phases involving site characterization have been completed and required their own site specific health and safety plans. Project activities will take place at Seepage Pit 1 in Waste Area Grouping 7 at ORNL, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Purpose of this document is to establish standard health and safety procedures for ORNL project personnel and contractor employees in performance of this work. Site activities shall be performed in accordance with Energy Systems safety and health policies and procedures, DOE orders, Occupational Safety and Health Administration Standards 29 CFR Part 1910 and 1926; applicable United States Environmental Protection Agency requirements; and consensus standards. Where the word ''shall'' is used, the provisions of this plan are mandatory. Specific requirements of regulations and orders have been incorporated into this plan in accordance with applicability. Included from 29 CFR are 1910.120 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response; 1910.146, Permit Required - Confined Space; 1910.1200, Hazard Communication; DOE Orders requirements of 5480.4, Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Standards; 5480.11, Radiation Protection; and N5480.6, Radiological Control Manual. In addition, guidance and policy will be followed as described in the Environmental Restoration Program Health and Safety Plan. The levels of personal protection and the procedures specified in this plan are based on the best information available from reference documents and site characterization data. Therefore, these recommendations represent the minimum health and safety requirements to be observed by all personnel engaged in this project

  11. Dynamical Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paldus, Josef

    The well known symmetry (invariance, degeneracy) dynamical groups or algebras of quantum mechanical Hamiltonians provide quantum numbers (conservation laws, integrals of motion) for state labeling and the associated selection rules. In addition, it is often advantageous to employ much larger groups, referred to as the dynamical groups (noninvariance groups, dynamical algebras, spectrum generating algebras), which may or may not be the invariance groups of the studied system [4.1,2,3,4,5,6,7]. In all known cases, they are Lie groups (LGs), or rather corresponding Lie algebras (LAs), and one usually requires that all states of interest of a system be contained in a single irreducible representation (irrep). Likewise, one may require that the Hamiltonian be expressible in terms of the Casimir operators of the corresponding universal enveloping algebra [4.8,9]. In a weaker sense, one regards any group (or corresponding algebra) as a dynamical group if the Hamiltonian can be expressed in terms of its generators [4.10,11,12]. In nuclear physics, one sometimes distinguishes exact (baryon number preserving), almost exact (e.g., total isospin), approximate (e.g., SU(3) of the "eightfold way") and model (e.g., nuclear shell model) dynamical symmetries [4.13]. The dynamical groups of interest in atomic and molecular physics can be conveniently classified by their topological characteristic of compactness. Noncompact LGs (LAs) generally arise in simple problems involving an infinite number of bound states, while those involving a finite number of bound states (e.g., molecular vibrations or ab initio models of electronic structure) exploit compact LG's.

  12. Estrogen modulates potassium currents and expression of the Kv4.2 subunit in GT1-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Imre; Varju, Patricia; Liposits, Zsolt

    2007-03-01

    The proper maintenance of reproduction requires the pulsatile secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), which is ensured by synchronized periodic firing of multiple GnRH neurons. Both hormone secretion and electrophysiological properties of GnRH cells are influenced by estrogen. The impact of 17beta-estradiol treatment on the function of voltage gated A- and K-type potassium channels, known modulators of firing rate, was therefore examined in our experiments using immortalized GnRH-producing GT1-7 neurons. Whole cell patch clamp recordings showed the absence of the A-type current in GT1-7 cells cultured in estrogen-free medium and after 8h 17beta-estradiol treatment. Exposure of the cells to 17beta-estradiol for 24 and 48 h, respectively, resulted in the appearance of the A-type current. The induction of the A-type current by 17beta-estradiol was dose-related (50 pM to 15 nM range). In contrast, the K-type potassium current was apparent in the estrogen-free environment and 17beta-estradiol administration significantly decreased its amplitude. Co-administration of 17beta-estradiol and estrogen receptor blocker, Faslodex (ICI 182,780; 1 microM) abolished the occurrence of the A-type current. Real-time PCR data demonstrated that expression of the Kv4.2 subunit of the A-type channel was low at 0, 0.5, 2 and 8h, peaked at 24h and diminished at 48 h 17beta-estradiol treatment (15 nM). These data indicate that potassium channels of GT1-7 neurons are regulated by estrogen a mechanism that might contribute to modulation of firing rate and hormone secretion in GnRH neurons.

  13. Fetal betamethasone exposure attenuates angiotensin-(1-7)-Mas receptor expression in the dorsal medulla of adult sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Allyson C; Shaltout, Hossam A; Nautiyal, Manisha; Rose, James C; Chappell, Mark C; Diz, Debra I

    2013-06-01

    Glucocorticoids including betamethasone (BM) are routinely administered to women entering into early preterm labor to facilitate fetal lung development and decrease infant mortality; however, fetal steroid exposure may lead to deleterious long term consequences. In a sheep model of fetal programming, BM-exposed (BMX) offspring exhibit elevated mean arterial pressure (MAP) and decreased baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) for control of heart rate by 0.5-years of age associated with changes in the circulating and renal renin-angiotensin systems (RAS). In the brain solitary tract nucleus, angiotensin (Ang) II actions through the AT1 receptor oppose the beneficial actions of Ang-(1-7) at the Mas receptor for BRS regulation. Therefore, we examined Ang peptides, angiotensinogen (Aogen), and receptor expression in this brain region of exposed and control offspring of 0.5- and 1.8-years of age. Mas protein expression was significantly lower (>40%) in the dorsal medulla of BMX animals at both ages; however, AT1 receptor expression was not changed. BMX offspring exhibited a higher ratio of Ang II to Ang-(1-7) (2.30±0.36 versus 0.99±0.28; p<0.01) and Ang II to Ang I at 0.5-years. Although total Aogen was unchanged, Ang I-intact Aogen was lower in 0.5-year BMX animals (0.78±0.06 vs. 1.94±0.41; p<0.05) suggesting a greater degree of enzymatic processing of the precursor protein in exposed animals. We conclude that in utero BM exposure promotes an imbalance in the central RAS pathways of Ang II and Ang-(1-7) that may contribute to the elevated MAP and lower BRS in this model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Synthesis and biological evaluation of dialkylaminoalkylamino benzo[c][1,7] and [1,8]phenanthrolines as antiproliferative agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbetçi, Tuba; Genès, Constance; Depauw, Sabine; Prado, Soizic; Porée, François-Hugues; Hildebrand, Marie-Paule; David-Cordonnier, Marie-Hélène; Michel, Sylvie; Tillequin, François

    2010-06-01

    Benzo[c][1,7] and [1,8]phenanthroline substituted by dialkylaminoalkyl side chains at position C2 and C1, respectively, were synthesized and their biological activity evaluated. These compounds displayed more potent cytotoxicity toward L1210 cells than the parent unsubstituted compounds, associated with strong DNA interaction. The moderate TopoI inhibitory activity induced by the novel compounds suggests that other cellular targets should be responsible for the antiproliferative activity. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Safety and efficacy of a Nav1.7 selective sodium channel blocker in patients with trigeminal neuralgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakrzewska, Joanna M; Palmer, Joanne; Morisset, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    , can be administered at therapeutic doses without titration, and has shown good tolerability in healthy individuals in phase 1 studies. We therefore assessed the safety and efficacy of BIIB074 in patients with trigeminal neuralgia in a phase 2a study. METHODS: We did a double-blind, multicentre......BACKGROUND: Current standard of care for trigeminal neuralgia is treatment with the sodium channel blockers carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine, which although effective are associated with poor tolerability and the need for titration. BIIB074, a Nav1.7-selective, state-dependent sodium-channel blocker...

  16. Revelation 1:7 − A roadmap of God’s τέλοςfor his creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobus de Smidt

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Revelation 1:7 points to an anticipated final appearance of Jesus at the consummation. This κηρύσσω developed from the late Jewish apocalyptic eschatology. This apocalyptic end time dawned with Jesus. The present time is thus simultaneously the end time, though the consummation is still in the future. As Jesus appeared on earth with his resurrection, so will he appear at the consummation − his resurrection appearance is a simile of his appearance at the consummation. He will appear in a corporeal form. The writer encourages the second-generation marginalised Christians. The Roman emperor is not the victor − Jesus is the axis mundi of God’s final purpose for his creation. The final appearance of Jesus will bring redemption for the believers and mourning for the unbelievers. The κηρύσσω of Revelation 1:7 is diametrically the opposite of the chiliasts. The country of Israel and her present inhabitants have no eschatological role to fulfil at the consummation. Openbaring 1:7 dui op ’n geantisipeerde finale verskyning van Jesus met die voleinding. Hierdie κηρύσσω het uit die Joodse laat-apokaliptiese eskatologie ontwikkel. Die apokaliptiese eindtyd het met Jesus se opstanding plaasgevind en die Nuwe-Testamentiese hede is dus alreeds die eindtyd. Die voleinding is egter nog in die toekoms. Jesus se verskyning met sy opstanding is ’n metafoor vir sy koms by die voleinding. Hy sal liggaamlik verskyn. Die skrywer bemoedig die gemarginaliseerde tweede generasie Christene. Die Romeinse keiser is nie die oorwinnaar nie − Jesus is die axis mundi van God se finale plan vir sy skepping. Die finale verskyning van Jesus sal vir die gelowiges ewige verlossing bewerk, maar die ongelowiges sal in rou gedompel word. Die κηρύσσω van Openbaring 1:7 is die teenoorgestelde van die standpunt van die chiliasme. Die land en huidige volk van Israel vervul geen eskatologiese rol by die voleinding nie.

  17. Group Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  18. Computer group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, H.; Black, I.; Heusler, A.; Hoeptner, G.; Krafft, F.; Lang, R.; Moellenkamp, R.; Mueller, W.; Mueller, W.F.; Schati, C.; Schmidt, A.; Schwind, D.; Weber, G.

    1983-01-01

    The computer groups has been reorganized to take charge for the general purpose computers DEC10 and VAX and the computer network (Dataswitch, DECnet, IBM - connections to GSI and IPP, preparation for Datex-P). (orig.)

  19. Groups and Geometries : Siena Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Kantor, William; Lunardon, Guglielmo; Pasini, Antonio; Tamburini, Maria

    1998-01-01

    On September 1-7, 1996 a conference on Groups and Geometries took place in lovely Siena, Italy. It brought together experts and interested mathematicians from numerous countries. The scientific program centered around invited exposi­ tory lectures; there also were shorter research announcements, including talks by younger researchers. The conference concerned a broad range of topics in group theory and geometry, with emphasis on recent results and open problems. Special attention was drawn to the interplay between group-theoretic methods and geometric and combinatorial ones. Expanded versions of many of the talks appear in these Proceedings. This volume is intended to provide a stimulating collection of themes for a broad range of algebraists and geometers. Among those themes, represented within the conference or these Proceedings, are aspects of the following: 1. the classification of finite simple groups, 2. the structure and properties of groups of Lie type over finite and algebraically closed fields of f...

  20. Group technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, C.P.

    1976-01-01

    Group Technology has been conceptually applied to the manufacture of batch-lots of 554 machined electromechanical parts which now require 79 different types of metal-removal tools. The products have been grouped into 7 distinct families which require from 8 to 22 machines in each machine-cell. Throughput time can be significantly reduced and savings can be realized from tooling, direct-labor, and indirect-labor costs

  1. Lie groups and algebraic groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . These fields are interrelated and each of these fields contributes to the other. 2. Examples and classification. We first give some examples of Lie groups. The most frequently occurring ones are the linear classical groups GLn(R), GLn(C), ...

  2. Lie groups and algebraic groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S RAGHUNATHAN and T N VENKATARAMANA. ∗. School of Mathematics, Tata Institute of Fundamental ... linear classical groups GLn(R), GLn(C), SOn(R),. SOn(C), Spn(R) and Spn(C). Let us call a con- nected Lie ..... split groups due respectively to C C Moore and. V Deodhar. B Sury solved the congruence subgroup ...

  3. Abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, László

    2015-01-01

    Written by one of the subject’s foremost experts, this book focuses on the central developments and modern methods of the advanced theory of abelian groups, while remaining accessible, as an introduction and reference, to the non-specialist. It provides a coherent source for results scattered throughout the research literature with lots of new proofs. The presentation highlights major trends that have radically changed the modern character of the subject, in particular, the use of homological methods in the structure theory of various classes of abelian groups, and the use of advanced set-theoretical methods in the study of undecidability problems. The treatment of the latter trend includes Shelah’s seminal work on the undecidability in ZFC of Whitehead’s Problem; while the treatment of the former trend includes an extensive (but non-exhaustive) study of p-groups, torsion-free groups, mixed groups, and important classes of groups arising from ring theory. To prepare the reader to tackle these topics, th...

  4. AVE 0991, a non-peptide mimic of angiotensin-(1-7) effects, attenuates pulmonary remodelling in a model of chronic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Machado, M G; Magalhães, G S; Cardoso, J A; Kangussu, L M; Murari, A; Caliari, M V; Oliveira, M L; Cara, D C; Noviello, M L M; Marques, F D; Pereira, J M; Lautner, R Q; Santos, R A S; Campagnole-Santos, M J

    2013-10-01

    AVE 0991 (AVE) is a non-peptide compound, mimic of the angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7) actions in many tissues and pathophysiological states. Here, we have investigated the effect of AVE on pulmonary remodelling in a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced chronic allergic lung inflammation. We used BALB/c mice (6-8 weeks old) and induced chronic allergic lung inflammation by OVA sensitization (20 μg·mouse(-1) , i.p., four times, 14 days apart) and OVA challenge (1%, nebulised during 30 min, three times per·week, for 4 weeks). Control and AVE groups were given saline i.p and challenged with saline. AVE treatment (1 mg·kg(-1) ·per day, s.c.) or saline (100 μL·kg(-1) ·per day, s.c.) was given during the challenge period. Mice were anaesthetized 72 h after the last challenge and blood and lungs collected. In some animals, primary bronchi were isolated to test contractile responses. Cytokines were evaluated in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung homogenates. Treatment with AVE of OVA sensitised and challenged mice attenuated the altered contractile response to carbachol in bronchial rings and reversed the increased airway wall and pulmonary vasculature thickness and right ventricular hypertrophy. Furthermore, AVE reduced IL-5 and increased IL-10 levels in the BAL, accompanied by decreased Ang II levels in lungs. AVE treatment prevented pulmonary remodelling, inflammation and right ventricular hypertrophy in OVA mice, suggesting that Ang-(1-7) receptor agonists are a new possibility for the treatment of pulmonary remodelling induced by chronic asthma. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. Lectures on Chevalley groups

    CERN Document Server

    Steinberg, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Robert Steinberg's Lectures on Chevalley Groups were delivered and written during the author's sabbatical visit to Yale University in the 1967-1968 academic year. The work presents the status of the theory of Chevalley groups as it was in the mid-1960s. Much of this material was instrumental in many areas of mathematics, in particular in the theory of algebraic groups and in the subsequent classification of finite groups. This posthumous edition incorporates additions and corrections prepared by the author during his retirement, including a new introductory chapter. A bibliography and editorial notes have also been added. This is a great unsurpassed introduction to the subject of Chevalley groups that influenced generations of mathematicians. I would recommend it to anybody whose interests include group theory. -Efim Zelmanov, University of California, San Diego Robert Steinberg's lectures on Chevalley groups were given at Yale University in 1967. The notes for the lectures contain a wonderful exposition of ...

  6. Novel 1-(7-ethoxy-1-benzofuran-2-yl) substituted chalcone derivatives: Synthesis, characterization and anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Demet; Erkisa, Merve; Ulukaya, Engin; Coskun, Mehmet Fatih; Ari, Ferda

    2017-08-18

    Cancer treatment still requires new compounds to be discovered. Chalcone and its derivatives exhibit anticancer potential in different cancer cells. A new series of benzofuran substituted chalcone derivatives was synthesized by the base-catalyzed Claisen-Schmidt reaction of the 1-(7-ethoxy-1-benzofuran-2-yl) ethanone with different aromatic aldehydes to yield 1-(7-ethoxy-1-benzofuran-2-yl) substituted chalcone derivatives 3a-j. The derivatives were characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1 H NMR and 13 C NMR spectroscopy techniques. The anti-growth effect of chalcone compounds was tested in breast cancer (MCF-7), non-small cell lung cancer (A549) and prostate cancer (PC-3) cell lines by the SRB and ATP cell viability assays. Apoptosis was detected by mitochondrial membrane potential, Annexin V staining and caspase 3/7 activity. Formation of reactive oxygen species was determined by DCFDA. The results revealed that chalcone derivatives have anticancer activity with especially chalcone derivative 3a showing cytotoxic effects on cancer cells. In addition, chalcone derivative 3a induced apoptosis through caspase dependent pathways in prostate, lung and breast cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. 1,7-Bis-(N,N-dialkylaminoperylene Bisimides: Facile Synthesis and Characterization as Near-Infrared Fluorescent Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kew-Yu Chen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Three symmetric alkylamino-substituted perylene bisimides with different n-alkyl chain lengths (n = 6, 12, or 18, 1,7-bis-(N,N-dialkylaminoperylene bisimides (1a–1c, were synthesized under mild condition and were characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR and high resolution mass spectroscopy. Their optical and electrochemical properties were measured using UV-Vis and emission spectroscopic techniques as well as cyclic voltammetry (CV. These compounds show deep green color in both solution and solid state, and are highly soluble in dichloromethane and even in nonpolar solvents such as hexane. The shapes of the absorption spectra of 1a–1c in the solution and solid state were found to be almost the same, indicating that the long alkyl chains could efficiently prevent intermolecular contact and aggregation. They show a unique charge transfer emission in the near-infrared region, of which the peak wavelengths exhibit strong solvatochromism. The dipole moments of the molecules have been estimated using the Lippert–Mataga equation, and upon excitation, they show larger dipole moment changes than that of 1,7-diaminoperylene bisimide (2. Moreover, all the dyes exhibit two irreversible one-electron oxidations and two quasi-reversible one-electron reductions in dichloromethane at modest potentials. Complementary density functional theory calculations performed on these chromophores are reported in order to rationalize their electronic structure and optical properties.

  8. Group learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pimentel, Ricardo; Noguira, Eloy Eros da Silva; Elkjær, Bente

    The article presents a study that aims at the apprehension of the group learning in a top management team composed by teachers in a Brazilian Waldorf school whose management is collective. After deciding to extend the school, they had problems recruiting teachers who were already trained based...... with which they coexist. To achieve this, the research adopted phenomenology as a method and ethnography as strategy, using participant observation, in-depth interviews, and interviews-to-the-double. The results show that the collective management practice is a crossroad of other practices......, and they are interrelated to the group learning as the construction, maintenance and reconstruction of the intelligibility of practices. From this perspective, it can be said that learning is a practice and not an exceptional phenomenon. Building, maintaining and rebuilding the intelligibility is the group learning...

  9. [Meek technique skin graft for treating exceptionally large area burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qinglian; Cai, Chen; Yu, Youxin; Tang, Yizhong; Hu, Delin; Liu, Sheng; Qi, Weiwei; Shi, Jie

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the clinical effect of Meek technique skin graft in treating exceptionally large area burns. The clinical data were retrospectively analysed from 10 cases of exceptionally large area burns treated with Meek technique skin graft from April 2009 to February 2010 (Meek group), and were compared with those from 10 cases of exceptionally large area burns treated with the particle skin with large sheet of skin allograft transplantation from January 2002 to December 2006 (particle skin group). In Meek group, there were 8 males and 2 females with an average age of 34.5 years (range, 5-55 years), including 6 cases of flame burns, 2 cases of hot liquid burns, 1 case of electrical burn, and 1 case of high-temperature dust burn. The burn area was 82.6% +/- 3.1% of total body surface area (TBSA). The most were deep II degree to III degree burns. The time from burn to hospitalization was (3.5 +/- 1.3) hours. In particle skin group, there were 8 males and 2 females with an average age of 36.8 years (range, 18-62 years), including 5 cases of flame burns, 2 cases of hot liquid burns, and 3 cases of gunpowder explosion injury. The burn area was 84.1% +/- 7.4% of TBSA. The most were deep II degree to III degree burns. The time from burn to hospitalization was (4.9 +/- 2.2) hours. There was no significant difference in general data between 2 groups (P > 0.05). The skin graft survival rate, the time of skin fusion, the systemic wound healing time, and the treatment cost of 1% of burn area were 91.23% +/- 5.61%, (11.14 +/- 2.12) days, (38.89 +/- 10.36) days, and (5113.28 +/- 552.44) yuan in Meek group, respectively; and were 78.65% +/- 12.29%, (18.37 +/- 4.63) days, (48.73 +/- 16.92) days, and (7386.36 +/- 867.64) yuan in particle skin group; showing significant differences between 2 groups (P Meek technique skin graft has good effect in treating exceptionally large area burns with the advantages of high survival rate of skin graft, short time of skin fusion, and low

  10. Effect of AVE 0991 angiotensin-(1-7) receptor agonist treatment on elemental and biomolecular content and distribution in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE-knockout mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, J.; Gajda, M.; Jawień, J.; Kwiatek, W. M.; Appel, K.; Dumas, P.

    2013-12-01

    Gene-targeted apolipoprotein E-knockout (apoE-KO) mice display early and highly progressive vascular lesions containing lipid deposits and they became a reliable animal model to study atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of AVE 0991 angiotensin-(1-7) receptor agonist on the distribution of selected pro- and anti- inflammatory elements as well as biomolecules in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE-knockout mice. Synchrotron radiation-based X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) and Fourier Transform Infrared (micro-FTIR) microspectroscopies were applied. Two-month-old apoE-KO mice were fed for following four months diet supplemented with AVE 0991 (0.58 μmol/kg b.w. per day). Histological sections of ascending aortas were analyzed spectroscopically. The distribution of P, Ca, Fe and Zn were found to correspond with histological structure of the lesion. Significantly lower contents of P, Ca, Zn and significantly higher content of Fe were observed in animals treated with AVE 0991. Biomolecular analysis showed lower lipids saturation level and lower lipid to protein ratio in AVE 0991 treated group. Protein secondary structure was studied according to the composition of amide I band (1660 cm-1) and it demonstrated higher proportion of β-sheet structure as compared to α-helix in both studied groups.

  11. Dive Distribution and Group Size Parameters for Marine Species Occurring in the U.S. Navy’s Atlantic and Hawaii-Southern California Training and Testing Study Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    Blue whales track the diel vertical migration of their prey and feed almost exclusively on euphausiids, Marine Species Dive Distribution and Group ...Size Information 3.1 Introduction Many marine mammals are known to travel and feed in groups . The NAEMO accounts for this behavior by...Marine Species Dive Distribution and Group Size Parameters Technical Report 9 June 2017 NUWC-NPT Technical Report 12,243 9 June 2017 Dive

  12. Angiotensin (1-7) ameliorates the structural and biochemical alterations of ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis in rats via activation of ACE-2/Mas receptor axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuohashish, Hatem M; Ahmed, Mohammed M; Sabry, Dina; Khattab, Mahmoud M; Al-Rejaie, Salim S

    2017-05-23

    The local and systemic renin angiotensin system (RAS) influences the skeletal system micro-structure and metabolism. Studies suggested angiotensin 1-7 (Ang(1-7)) as the beneficial RAS molecule via Mas receptor activation. This study examines the function of Ang(1-7) in bone micro-architecture and metabolism in an ovariectomized (OVX) rodent model of osteoporosis. OVX rats showed structural and bone metabolic degeneration in parallel with suppressed expressions of the angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2)/Ang(1-7)/Mas components. The infusion of Ang(1-7) markedly alleviated the altered bone metabolism and significantly enhanced both trabecular (metaphyseal) and cortical (metaphyseal-diaphyseal) morphometry. Urinary and bones minerals were also improved in OVX rats by Ang(1-7). The infusion of the heptapeptide enhanced ACE-2/Mas receptor expressions, while down-regulated AngII, ACE, and AngII type-1 receptor (AT1R) in OVX animals. Moreover, Ang(1-7) markedly improved osteoprotegerin (OPG) and lowered receptor activator NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expressions. The defensive properties of Ang(1-7) on bone metabolism, structure and minerals were considerably eradicated after blockage of Mas receptor with A-779. Ang(1-7)-induced up-regulated ACE-2/Ang(1-7)/Mas cascade and OPG expressions were abolished and the expressions of ACE/AngII/AT1R and RANKL were provoked by A-779. These findings shows for the first time the novel valuable therapeutic role of Ang(1-7) on bone health and metabolism through the ACE-2/Mas cascade.

  13. Expression of Nav1.7 in DRG neurons extends from peripheral terminals in the skin to central preterminal branches and terminals in the dorsal horn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Black Joel A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sodium channel Nav1.7 has emerged as a target of considerable interest in pain research, since loss-of-function mutations in SCN9A, the gene that encodes Nav1.7, are associated with a syndrome of congenital insensitivity to pain, gain-of-function mutations are linked to the debiliting chronic pain conditions erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder, and upregulated expression of Nav1.7 accompanies pain in diabetes and inflammation. Since Nav1.7 has been implicated as playing a critical role in pain pathways, we examined by immunocytochemical methods the expression and distribution of Nav1.7 in rat dorsal root ganglia neurons, from peripheral terminals in the skin to central terminals in the spinal cord dorsal horn. Results Nav1.7 is robustly expressed within the somata of peptidergic and non-peptidergic DRG neurons, and along the peripherally- and centrally-directed C-fibers of these cells. Nav1.7 is also expressed at nodes of Ranvier in a subpopulation of Aδ-fibers within sciatic nerve and dorsal root. The peripheral terminals of DRG neurons within skin, intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENF, exhibit robust Nav1.7 immunolabeling. The central projections of DRG neurons in the superficial lamina of spinal cord dorsal horn also display Nav1.7 immunoreactivity which extends to presynaptic terminals. Conclusions The expression of Nav1.7 in DRG neurons extends from peripheral terminals in the skin to preterminal central branches and terminals in the dorsal horn. These data support a major contribution for Nav1.7 in pain pathways, including action potential electrogenesis, conduction along axonal trunks and depolarization/invasion of presynaptic axons. The findings presented here may be important for pharmaceutical development, where target engagement in the right compartment is essential.

  14. Anchorage Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — An anchorage area is a place where boats and ships can safely drop anchor. These areas are created in navigable waterways when ships and vessels require them for...

  15. Selected Data for Wells and Test Holes Used in Structure-Contour Maps of the Inyan Kara Group, Minnekahta Limestone, Minnelusa Formation, Madison Limestone, and Deadwood Formation in the Black Hills Area, South Dakota

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carter, Janet M

    1999-01-01

    This report presents selected data on wells and test holes that were used in the construction of structure-contour maps of selected formations that contain major aquifers in the Black Hills area of western South Dakota...

  16. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 4, Technical memorandums 06-03A, 06-04A, 06-05A, and 06-08A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R. C.; Lewis, K. K.

    1991-09-01

    This report presents data and information related to remedial investigation studies for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Information is included on a soil gas survey, surface radiological investigations of waste areas, and well installation for ground water monitoring. (CBS)

  17. Blood-brain barrier permeation in the rat during exposure to low-power 1.7-GHz microwave radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, T.R.; Ali, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    The permeability of the blood-brain barrier to high-and low-molecular-weight compounds has been measured as a function of continuous-wave (CW) and pulsed-microwave radiation. Adult rats, anesthetized with pentobarbital and injected intravenously with a mixture of [ 14 C] sucrose and [ 3 H] inulin, were exposed for 30 min at a specific absorption rate of 0.1 W/kg to 1.7-GHz CW and pulsed (0.5-microseconds pulse width, 1,000 pps) microwaves. After exposure, the brain was perfused and sectioned into nine regions, and the radioactivity in each region was counted. During identical exposure conditions, temperatures of rats were measured in eight of the brain regions by a thermistor probe that did not perturb the field. No change in uptake of either tracer was found in any of the eight regions as compared with those of sham-exposed animals

  18. Apparently balanced t(1;7)(q21.3;q34) in an infant with Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, E W; Laneri, G; Clemens, M M; Kochmar, S J; Surti, U

    1997-09-05

    Coffin-Siris syndrome is a multiple anomaly/mental retardation syndrome characterized by "coarse" facial appearance, hypoplastic or absent nails on the fifth digits, generalized hirsutism with sparse scalp hair, hypotonia, and developmental delay. Due to several reports of affected sibs with or without a mildly affected parent, both autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant inheritance have been suggested. All previous patients with well-documented Coffin-Siris syndrome are chromosomally normal, and the gene has not been mapped. We report on an infant with typical findings of Coffin-Siris syndrome who also has a de novo apparently balanced translocation of chromosomes 1 and 7, karyotype 46,XY,t(1;7)(q21.3;q34). The parental chromosomes are normal and none of the relatives have signs of Coffin-Siris syndrome. The breakpoints 1q21.3 and 7q34 are suggested as possible locations for a Coffin-Siris gene.

  19. Normalization of fasting glycaemia by intravenous GLP-1 ([7-36 amide] or [7-37]) in type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nauck, M A; Weber, I; Bach, I

    1998-01-01

    Intravenous GLP-1 [7-36 amide] can normalize fasting hyperglycaemia in Type 2 diabetic patients. Whether GLP-1 [7-37] has similar effects and how quickly plasma glucose concentrations revert to hyperglycaemia after stopping GLP-1 is not known. Therefore, 8 patients with Type 2 diabetes (5 female,...

  20. Subtype-Selective Small Molecule Inhibitors Reveal a Fundamental Role for Nav1.7 in Nociceptor Electrogenesis, Axonal Conduction and Presynaptic Release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristos J Alexandrou

    Full Text Available Human genetic studies show that the voltage gated sodium channel 1.7 (Nav1.7 is a key molecular determinant of pain sensation. However, defining the Nav1.7 contribution to nociceptive signalling has been hampered by a lack of selective inhibitors. Here we report two potent and selective arylsulfonamide Nav1.7 inhibitors; PF-05198007 and PF-05089771, which we have used to directly interrogate Nav1.7's role in nociceptor physiology. We report that Nav1.7 is the predominant functional TTX-sensitive Nav in mouse and human nociceptors and contributes to the initiation and the upstroke phase of the nociceptor action potential. Moreover, we confirm a role for Nav1.7 in influencing synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord as well as peripheral neuropeptide release in the skin. These findings demonstrate multiple contributions of Nav1.7 to nociceptor signalling and shed new light on the relative functional contribution of this channel to peripheral and central noxious signal transmission.

  1. Computer group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, I.; Heusler, A.; Hoeptner, G.; Krafft, F.; Lang, R.; Moellenkamp, R.; Mueller, W.; Mueller, W.F.; Schmidt, A.; Schwind, D.; Weber, G.

    1989-01-01

    The VAX-8650 has been running with no idle time during more than 98% of the time. Early in 1988 it became the boot member of a local area VAX cluster. Up to five satellites (mikroVAX II and VAXstation2000) joined the cluster building a pool of 22 disk drives. Experimences with the cluster system have shown a way to expand the capacity: Early in 1989, a second boot member (VAX3000) and several VAXstations (VAXstation2000 and VAXstation3200) will be added with additional disk space. (orig.)

  2. Bi2Ca2Co1.7Ox thermoelectric ceramics textured by laser floating zone method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemonnier, S.

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermoelectric performance on cobaltite ceramics can be increased raising the electrical conductivity. This can be performed by increasing grain size and aligning them along a preferential direction by the Laser Floating Zone (LFZ method. In this work, Bi2Ca2Co1.7Ox ceramics have been directionally grown at three different speeds, 15, 30 and 50 mm/h. It has been found a small influence of the growth conditions on the thermoelectric properties. In all the cases, the microstructure shows alternated cobaltite layers with small CoO inclusions. In despite, the thermopower is higher than usual in misfit cobaltites obtained by conventional solid state routes. This preliminary result originates probably from oxygen vacancies.Las prestaciones termoeléctricas de las cerámicas basadas en óxidos de cobalto pueden ser aumentadas por la disminución de la resistividad eléctrica. Esto puede realizarse aumentando el tamaño de grano y alineándolo en una dirección preferencial, utilizando el método de zona flotante inducida por láser (LFZ. En este trabajo, se han crecido cerámicas termoeléctricas de composición Bi2Ca2Co1.7Ox a tres velocidades diferentes, 15, 30 y 50 mm/h. Se ha encontrado que las condiciones de crecimiento tienen poca influencia en las propiedades termoeléctricas. En todos los casos, la microestructura está formada por capas alternadas de cobaltitas, con pequeñas inclusiones de CoO. A pesar de ello, el poder termoeléctrico medido es mayor de lo habitual para este tipo de materiales preparados por métodos convencionales en estado sólido. Este resultado preliminar está originado, probablemente, por la formación de vacantes de oxígeno.

  3. The Unknown Oldowan: ~1.7-Million-Year-Old Standardized Obsidian Small Tools from Garba IV, Melka Kunture, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallotti, Rosalia; Mussi, Margherita

    2015-01-01

    The Oldowan Industrial Complex has long been thought to have been static, with limited internal variability, embracing techno-complexes essentially focused on small-to-medium flake production. The flakes were rarely modified by retouch to produce small tools, which do not show any standardized pattern. Usually, the manufacture of small standardized tools has been interpreted as a more complex behavior emerging with the Acheulean technology. Here we report on the ~1.7 Ma Oldowan assemblages from Garba IVE-F at Melka Kunture in the Ethiopian highland. This industry is structured by technical criteria shared by the other East African Oldowan assemblages. However, there is also evidence of a specific technical process never recorded before, i.e. the systematic production of standardized small pointed tools strictly linked to the obsidian exploitation. Standardization and raw material selection in the manufacture of small tools disappear at Melka Kunture during the Lower Pleistocene Acheulean. This proves that 1) the emergence of a certain degree of standardization in tool-kits does not reflect in itself a major step in cultural evolution; and that 2) the Oldowan knappers, when driven by functional needs and supported by a highly suitable raw material, were occasionally able to develop specific technical solutions. The small tool production at ~1.7 Ma, at a time when the Acheulean was already emerging elsewhere in East Africa, adds to the growing amount of evidence of Oldowan techno-economic variability and flexibility, further challenging the view that early stone knapping was static over hundreds of thousands of years.

  4. Dysprosium-doped ZBLAN fiber laser tunable from 2.8  μm to 3.4  μm, pumped at 1.7  μm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Matthew R; Woodward, Robert I; Jackson, Stuart D

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate a mid-infrared dysprosium-doped fluoride fiber laser with a continuously tunable output range of 573 nm, pumped by a 1.7 μm Raman fiber laser. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the largest tuning range achieved to date from any rare-earth-doped fiber laser and, critically, spans the 2.8-3.4 μm spectral region, which contains absorption resonances of many important functional groups and is uncovered by other rare-earth ions. Output powers up to 170 mW are achieved, with 21% slope efficiency. We also discuss the relative merits of the 1.7 μm pump scheme, including possible pump excited-state absorption.

  5. Products of Finite Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Ballester-Bolinches, Adolfo; Asaad, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    The study of finite groups factorised as a product of two or more subgroups has become a subject of great interest during the last years with applications not only in group theory, but also in other areas like cryptography and coding theory. It has experienced a big impulse with the introduction of some permutability conditions. The aim of this book is to gather, order, and examine part of this material, including the latest advances made, give some new approach to some topics, and present some new subjects of research in the theory of finite factorised groups.

  6. Group play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tychsen, Anders; Hitchens, Michael; Brolund, Thea

    2008-01-01

    Role-playing games (RPGs) are a well-known game form, existing in a number of formats, including tabletop, live action, and various digital forms. Despite their popularity, empirical studies of these games are relatively rare. In particular there have been few examinations of the effects of the v......Role-playing games (RPGs) are a well-known game form, existing in a number of formats, including tabletop, live action, and various digital forms. Despite their popularity, empirical studies of these games are relatively rare. In particular there have been few examinations of the effects...... of the various formats used by RPGs on the gaming experience. This article presents the results of an empirical study, examining how multi-player tabletop RPGs are affected as they are ported to the digital medium. Issues examined include the use of disposition assessments to predict play experience, the effect...... of group dynamics, the influence of the fictional game characters and the comparative play experience between the two formats. The results indicate that group dynamics and the relationship between the players and their digital characters, are integral to the quality of the gaming experience in multiplayer...

  7. [A retrospective study on HBsAg clearance rate after antiviral therapy in children with HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B aged 1-7 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, S S; Dong, Y; Xu, Z Q; Wang, L M; Chen, D W; Gan, Y; Wang, F C; Yan, J G; Cao, L L; Wang, P; Zhang, H F

    2016-10-20

    Objective: To investigate the HBsAg clearance rate after antiviral therapy in children with HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) aged 1-7 years. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed for the HBsAg clearance rate in 293 children who were hospitalized in 302 Hospital of PLA from June 2006 to December 2013, met the inclusion criteria, received antiviral therapy, and were followed up for at least 6 months after the withdrawal of antiviral therapy. The t-test or the rank sum test was applied according to the distribution of continuous data, and the chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data. Results: The HBsAg positive rate of children's mothers was 91.1%. In the age groups of >1-≤2 years, >2-≤3 years, >3-≤4 years, >4-≤5 years, >5-≤6 years, and >6-≤7 years, the HBsAg clearance rates were 66.1%, 65.5%, 45.7%, 41.3%, 20.6%, and 27.6%, respectively. There were significant differences in HBsAg clearance rate between the age groups of >1-≤3 years and >3-≤5 years, >1-≤3 years and >5-≤7 years, and >3-≤5 years and >5-≤7 years ( P = 0.001, 0.000, and 0.008). Of all children, 64.8% were boys, among whom 41.1% achieved HBsAg clearance, and 35.2% were girls, among whom 61.2% achieved HBsAg clearance; there was a significant difference in HBsAg clearance rate between boys and girls (P = 0.001). The children with pretreatment alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels of ≤80 IU/L, > 80 IU/L, ≤200 IU/L, and > 200 IU/L had HBsAg clearance rates of 40.7%, 51.2%, 47.6%, and 49.4%, respectively; there were no significant differences in HBsAg clearance rate between the ALT ≤80 IU/L and ALT > 80 IU/L groups and the ALT ≤200 IU/L and ALT > 200 IU/L groups ( P = 0.101 and 0.778). There was no significant difference in HBsAg clearance rate between the pretreatment HBV DNA load antiviral therapy alone and had an HBsAg clearance rate of 48.8%, and 41.3% received interferon alone for 6 months followed by lamivudine antiviral therapy and

  8. Cardiovascular group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  9. Angiotensin 1-7 Overexpression Mediated by a Capsid-optimized AAV8 Vector Leads to Significant Growth Inhibition of Hepatocellular Carcinoma In vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yingying; Pei, Nana; Chen, Xinglu; Chen, Huiying; Yan, Renhe; Bai, Na; Li, Andrew; Li, Jinlong; Zhang, Yanling; Du, Hongyan; Chen, Baihong; Sumners, Colin; Wang, Xuejun; Wang, Shengqi; Li, Hongwei

    2018-01-01

    Background: Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] has been identified to inhibit the growth of many types of tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo . However, the rapid degradation of Ang-(1-7) in vivo limits its clinical application. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype-8 is a remarkable vector for long-term in vivo gene delivery. Method: This study was designed to investigate the effects of AAV-mediated Ang-(1-7) overexpression on hepatocellular carcinoma. We first generated three different tyrosine (Y) to phenylalanine (F) mutants of AAV8 (Y447F, Y703F, Y708F) and evaluated their in vivo transduction efficiencies. Results: The data indicated that the Y703F mutant elicited a significant enhancement of liver gene delivery when compared with wild-type AAV8 (wtAAV8). The anti-tumor effect of Ang-(1-7) mediated by this optimized vector was evaluated in H22 hepatoma-bearing mice. Our results demonstrated that AAV-Ang-(1-7) persistently inhibited the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma by significantly downregulating angiogenesis. This was confirmed by observed decreases in the levels of the proangiogenic factors VEGF and PIGF. Conclusion: Collectively, these data suggest that Ang-(1-7) overexpression mediated by the optimized vector may be an effective alternative for hepatocellular carcinoma therapy due to its long-term and significant anti-tumor activity.

  10. Effect of synthetic methods on the thermoelectrical properties of textured Bi2Ca2Co1.7Ox ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diez, J. C.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermoelectric performances on cobaltite ceramics can be changed by grain orientation. This can be performed by directional solidification on samples prepared from different synthetic methods. Three synthetic methods, conventional solid state reaction, sol-gel and polymer solution were used for preparation of Bi2Ca2Co1.7Ox powders. The powders have been directionally grown, at a rate of 30 mm/h, by the laser floating zone method. In all the cases, the microstructure shows alternated layers, of Bi2Ca2Co2Ox and a Bi-Ca-O solid solution, with small CoO inclusions. It has been found an improvement on the power factor at 50 ºC for the solution methods with respect to the conventional solid sate sintered samples.Las prestaciones de las cerámicas basadas en óxidos de cobalto pueden modificarse por medio de la orientación de los granos. Este proceso puede llevarse a cabo mediante solidificación direccional de las muestras, que previamente han podido ser preparadas por diferentes rutas. En este trabajo se han utilizado tres métodos de síntesis, estado sólido, sol-gel y por vía polimérica, para preparar cerámicas con composición Bi2Ca2Co1.7Ox. Estos polvos se han crecido direccionalmente a 30 mm/h, por el método de zona flotante inducida por láser. En todos los casos la microestructura consiste en capas alternas, de Bi2Ca2Co2Ox y una solución sólida Bi-Ca-O, con pequeñas inclusiones de CoO. Se ha encontrado que los métodos de disolución mejoran el factor de potencia a 50 ºC, con respecto a los valores que se obtienen a través de los métodos de sinterizado en estado sólido.

  11. TSUNAMI MENTAWAI 25 OKTOBER 2010 (SIMULASI COMCOT 1.7 DAN DAMPAKNYA KINI TERHADAP PANTAI BARAT MENTAWAI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herdiana Mutmainah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tsunami yang terjadi pada 25 Oktober 2010 di Mentawai disebabkan oleh subduksi lempeng Indo-Australia dan Eurasia. Gempa dengan magnitude 7.7 MW ini terjadi pada pukul 14:42:22 UTC atau 21:42:22 WIB dengan lokasi episenter di 3.484 oLS dan 100.114 oBT, pada kedalaman 20.6 kilometer di Samudera Hindia dan berjarak 280 kilometer dari Padang atau 110 kilometer dari Pagai Utara. Gempa ini tergolong tsunami earthquake karena merupakan gempa dasar laut yang menghasilkan gelombang tsunami cukup besar. Simulasi tsunami dilakukan menggunakan COMCOT 1.7 dengan parameter sesar strike 325o, dip 11,62o , dan slip 101.4625o. Hasil simulasi menunjukkan bahwa tinggi tsunami di enam titik berkisar 3.4 hingga 4.3 meter. Model ini menghitung penjalaran gelombang sampai ke garis pantai menggunakan persamaan linear. Dampak Tsunami tahun 2010 terhadap pantai Barat Mentawai berupa perubahan garis pantai yaitu abrasi parah pada pulau kecil dan hilangnya kawasan serta beberapa jenis mangrove. Kata Kunci : Tsunami earthquake, parameter sesar, dampak Tsunami MentawaiTSUNAMI OF MENTAWAI ON 25 OCTOBER 2010 AND ITS TODAY IMPACT ON THE WEST COAST OF MENTAWAITsunami that occurred on October 25, 2010 in Mentawai caused by the subduction of Indo-Australian plate and the Eurasian. An earthquake with a magnitude of 7.7 MW occurred at 14:42:22 UTC, or 21:42:22 pm with the epicenter at 3.484 locations 0LS and 100.114 0BT, at a depth of 20.6 kilometers in the Indian Ocean and is 280 kilometers from Padang or 110 kilometers of North Pagai. This earthquake was classified as a tsunami earthquake seaquake that generate big enough tsunami waves. Tsunami simulation was performed using 1.7 COMCOT with cesarean parameter strike 325o, dip 11,62o, and slip 101.4625o. The simulation results show that the tsunami height at six points ranging from 3.4 to 4.3 meters. This model calculates wave propagation up to the shoreline using linear equations. 2010 Tsunami impact on the West coast of the

  12. Safety and Biodistribution Evaluation in Cynomolgus Macaques of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a Recombinant AAV Vector for Treatment of Achromatopsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Guo-jie; Budzynski, Ewa; Sonnentag, Peter; Nork, T Michael; Miller, Paul E; Sharma, Alok K; Ver Hoeve, James N; Smith, Leia M; Arndt, Tara; Calcedo, Roberto; Gaskin, Chantelle; Robinson, Paulette M; Knop, David R; Hauswirth, William W; Chulay, Jeffrey D

    2016-03-01

    Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation (AGTC) is developing rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vector expressing the human CNGB3 gene, for treatment of achromatopsia, an inherited retinal disorder characterized by markedly reduced visual acuity, extreme light sensitivity, and absence of color discrimination. We report here results of a study evaluating the safety and biodistribution of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in cynomolgus macaques. Three groups of animals (n = 2 males and 2 females per group) received a subretinal injection in one eye of 300 μl containing either vehicle or rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 at one of two concentrations (4 × 10(11) or 4 × 10(12) vector genomes/ml) and were evaluated over a 3-month period before being euthanized. Administration of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 was associated with a dose-related anterior and posterior segment inflammatory response that was greater than that observed in eyes injected with the vehicle control. Most manifestations of inflammation improved over time except that vitreous cells persisted in vector-treated eyes until the end of the study. One animal in the lower vector dose group was euthanized on study day 5, based on a clinical diagnosis of endophthalmitis. There were no test article-related effects on intraocular pressure, visual evoked potential responses, hematology or clinical chemistry parameters, or gross necropsy observations. Histopathological examination demonstrated minimal mononuclear infiltrates in all vector-injected eyes. Serum anti-AAV antibodies developed in all vector-injected animals. No animals developed antibodies to CNGB3. Biodistribution studies demonstrated high levels of vector DNA in the injected eye but minimal or no vector DNA in any other tissue. These results support the use of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in clinical studies in patients with achromatopsia caused by CNGB3 mutations.

  13. Angiotensin-(1-7 in Paraventricular Nucleus Contributes to the Enhanced Cardiac Sympathetic Afferent Reflex and Sympathetic Activity in Chronic Heart Failure Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingsheng Ren

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex (CSAR enhancement contributes to exaggerated sympathetic activation in chronic heart failure (CHF. The current study aimed to investigate the roles of angiotensin (Ang-(1-7 in CSAR modulation and sympathetic activation and Ang-(1-7 signaling pathway in paraventricular nucleus of CHF rats. Methods: CHF was induced by coronary artery ligation. Responses of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA and mean arterial pressure (MAP to epicardial application of capsaicin were used to evaluate CSAR in rats with anesthesia. Results: Ang-(1-7 increased RSNA, MAP, CSAR activity, cAMP level, NAD(PH oxidase activity and superoxide anion level more significantly in CHF than in sham-operated rats, while Mas receptor antagonist A-779 had the opposite effects. Moreover, Ang-(1-7 augmented effects of Ang II in CHF rats. The effects of Ang-(1-7 were blocked by A-779, adenylyl cyclase inhibitor SQ22536, protein kinase A inhibitor Rp-cAMP, superoxide anion scavenger tempol and NAD(PH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. Mas and AT1 receptor protein expressions, Ang-(1-7 and Ang II levels in CHF increased. Conclusions: These results indicate that Ang-(1-7 in paraventricular nucleus enhances CSAR and sympathetic output not only by exerting its own effects but also by augmenting the effects of Ang II through Mas receptor in CHF. Endogenous Ang-(1-7/Mas receptor activity contributes to CSAR enhancement and sympathetic activation in CHF, and NAD(PH oxidase-derived superoxide anions and the cAMP-PKA signaling pathway are involved in mediating the effects of Ang-(1-7 in CHF.

  14. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2012-01-01

      Outreach and Education We are fortunate that our research has captured the public imagination, even though this inevitably puts us under the global media spotlight, as we saw with the Higgs seminar at CERN in December, which had 110,000 distinct webcast viewers. The media interest was huge with 71 media organisations registering to come to CERN to cover the Higgs seminar, which was followed by a press briefing with the DG and Spokespersons. This event resulted in about 2,000 generally positive stories in the global media. For this seminar, the CMS Communications Group prepared up-to-date news and public material, including links to the CMS results, animations and event displays [http://cern.ch/go/Ch8thttp://cern.ch/go/Ch8t]. There were 44,000 page-views on the CMS public website, with the Higgs news article being by far the most popular item. CMS event displays from iSpy are fast becoming the iconic media images, featuring on numerous major news outlets (BBC, CNN, MSN...) as well as in the sci...

  15. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin is particularly busy at the moment, hosting about 50 physicists taking part in the heavy-ion data-taking and analysis. Three new CMS meeting room will be equipped for videoconferencing in early 2012: 40/5B-08, 42/R-031, and 28/S-029. The CMS-TV service showing LHC Page 1, CMS Page 1, etc. (http://cmsdoc.cern.ch/cmscc/projector/index.jsp) is now also available for mobile devices: http://cern.ch/mcmstv. Figure 12: Screenshots of CMS-TV for mobile devices Information Systems CMS has a new web site: (http://cern.ch/cms) using a modern web Content Management System to ensure content and links are managed and updated easily and coherently. It covers all CMS sub-projects and groups, replacing the iCMS internal pages. It also incorporates the existing CMS public web site (http:/...

  16. The influence of elastic strain on the early stages of decomposition in Cu–1.7at% Fe

    KAUST Repository

    Rademacher, Thomas

    2009-04-01

    The initial stage of decomposition of homogenized Cu-1.7 at% Fe at 722 K was investigated by means of field ion microscopy (FIM), atom probe tomography (APT) and computer-assisted field ion image tomography (cFIIT). The agglomeration of atoms depending on time could be investigated and the growth of precipitates with a diameter of few nanometers was observed during ongoing nucleation. For the cFIIT measurements, an improved reconstruction algorithm was developed. Employing cFIIT in combination with FIM images, alignments of precipitates mainly in < 100 > directions were found. Besides, a general experimental concept to evaluate strain-related effects on the position of the proximate precipitate will be introduced. These analyses of the APT and cFIIT data show tendencies of a preferred < 100 > directed configuration as well. This effect can be associated with the elastic anisotropy of the Cu matrix (f.c.c.) to accommodate the volume misfit of precipitates. In accordance with previous model calculations, a preferred nucleation in < 100 > directions with respect to existing clusters can be concluded. For such cluster arrangements strain energy reduction is largest for precipitates adapting their sizes. Thus, additional stabilization against coarsening can be inferred for < 100 > alignments which result in the observed effects. (C) 2008 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Measurement of 1.7–74 MeV polarised γ rays with the HARPO TPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geerebaert, Y., E-mail: yannick.geerebaert@polytechnique.fr [LLR, École Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Gros, Ph., E-mail: philippe.gros@llr.in2p3.fr [LLR, École Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Amano, S. [LASTI, University of Hyôgo (Japan); Attié, D. [CEA, Irfu, CEA-Saclay (France); Bernard, D.; Bruel, P. [LLR, École Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Calvet, D.; Colas, P. [CEA, Irfu, CEA-Saclay (France); Daté, S. [JASRI/SPring8 (Japan); Delbart, A. [CEA, Irfu, CEA-Saclay (France); Frotin, M.; Giebels, B. [LLR, École Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Götz, D. [AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS – Université Paris Diderot (France); IRFU/Service d' Astrophysique, CEA-Saclay (France); Hashimoto, S. [LASTI, University of Hyôgo (Japan); Horan, D. [LLR, École Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Kotaka, T. [LASTI, University of Hyôgo (Japan); Louzir, M. [LLR, École Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Minamiyama, Y.; Miyamoto, S. [LASTI, University of Hyôgo (Japan); Ohkuma, H. [JASRI/SPring8 (Japan); and others

    2017-02-11

    Current γ-ray telescopes based on photon conversions to electron-positron pairs, such as Fermi, use tungsten converters. They suffer of limited angular resolution at low energies, and their sensitivity drops below 1 GeV. The low multiple scattering in a gaseous detector gives access to higher angular resolution in the MeV–GeV range, and to the linear polarisation of the photons through the azimuthal angle of the electron-positron pair. HARPO is an R&D programme to characterise the operation of a TPC (Time Projection Chamber) as a high angular-resolution and sensitivity telescope and polarimeter for γ rays from cosmic sources. It represents a first step towards a future space instrument. A 30 cm cubic TPC demonstrator was built, and filled with 2 bar argon-based gas. It was put in a polarised γ-ray beam at the NewSUBARU accelerator in Japan in November 2014. Data were taken at different photon energies from 1.7 MeV to 74 MeV, and with different polarisation configurations. The electronics setup is described, with an emphasis on the trigger system. The event reconstruction algorithm is quickly described, and preliminary measurements of the polarisation of 11 MeV photons are shown.

  18. Photobleaching Dynamics in Small Molecule vs. Polymer Organic Photovoltaic Blends with 1,7-Bis-Trifluoromethylfullerene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunecker, Wade A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Garner, Logan E [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Arias, Dylan H [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Christensen, Steven T [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ferguson, Andrew J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kopidakis, Nikos [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Larson, Bryon W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Owczarczyk, Zbyslaw [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pfeilsticker, Jason [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Viswanathan, Vinila Nellissery [Indian Institute of Science; Brook, Colin P. [Colorado State University; Ramamurthy, Praveen C. [Indian Institute of Science; Strauss, Steven H. [Colorado State University; Boltalina, Olga V. [Colorado State University

    2018-02-27

    Two organic photovoltaic (OPV) donor materials (one polymer and one small molecule) are synthesized from the same constituent building blocks, namely thiophene units, cyclopentathiophene dione (CTD), and cyclopentadithiophene (CPDT). Photobleaching dynamics of these donor materials are then studied under white light illumination in air with blends of PC70BM and the bis-trifluoromethylfullerene 1,7-C60(CF3)2. For both the polymer and small molecule blends, C60(CF3)2 stabilizes the initial rate of photobleaching by a factor of 15 relative to PC70BM. However, once the small molecule:C60(CF3)2 blend bleaches to ~80% of its initial optical density, the rate of photobleaching dramatically accelerates, which is not observed in the analogous polymer blend. We probe that phenomenon using time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) to measure PL quenching efficiencies at defined intervals during the photobleaching experiments. The data indicates the small molecule donor and C60(CF3)2 acceptor significantly de-mix with time, after which the blend begins to bleach at approximately the same rate as the neat donor sample. The work suggests that perfluoroalkylfullerenes have great potential to stabilize certain OPV active layers toward photodegradation, provided their morphology is stable.

  19. Temporal profile of estrogen-dependent gene expression in LHRH-producing GT1-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varju, Patricia; Chang, Ken C; Hrabovszky, Erik; Merchenthaler, István; Liposits, Zsolt

    2009-02-01

    The long-term cellular effects of estrogens are mediated by nuclear estrogen receptors which act as transcription factors to regulate gene expression. Hypothalamic targets of estrogen action include luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-secreting neurons controlling reproduction in vertebrates. Microarray analysis and qRT-PCR studies were performed on GT1-7, immortalized LHRH neurons after 17beta-estradiol treatment to reveal the nature of estrogen-regulated genes and the time course of changes in their expression profile. More than 1000 transcripts showed robust responses to estrogen treatment and the majority of responding genes were up-regulated. Early-responding genes showed altered expression 0.5-2h after estrogen exposure, whereas late-responding genes changed after 24-48h treatment. Up-regulated genes encoded transcription factors, molecules involved in cellular movement, cell death, immune response, neurotransmitter and neuropeptide receptors, ion channels and transporters. The 17beta-estradiol modulation of 12 genes - representing characteristic gene clusters - has been confirmed by qRT-PCR. Our studies highlighted diverse gene networks, cell regulatory mechanisms and metabolic pathways through which estrogen may alter gene expression in immortalized LHRH neurons. The findings also support the notion that genomic effects of estrogen targeting in vivo directly the LHRH neuronal network of mammals play an important role in the central feedback regulation of the reproductive axis by estrogen.

  20. Grism Spectroscopy Of The Eclipse Of Corot-2b At 1.1-1.7μM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Ashlee N.; Deming, D.; Madhusudhan, N.; Agol, E.; Burrows, A.; Charbonneau, D.; Clampin, M.; Désert, J.; Gilliland, R.; Knutson, H.; Mandell, A.; Ranjan, S.; Seager, S.; Showman, A.

    2012-01-01

    Here we present HST eclipse spectroscopy spanning 1.1 to 1.7 μm of the CoRoT-2 system using the G141 grism on WFC3. These near-infrared data serve to complement the pre-existing and already-published optical CoRoT data and warm Spitzer infrared observations. CoRoT-2b, the sole planet known in the system, is a member of the Very Hot Jupiter (VHJ) class of exoplanets, and the secondary eclipse was measured with three separate HST visits. We find the albedo of CoRoT-2b upon comparison of optical data, which comprises both thermal and reflected spectral components, and the thermal spectrum as constrained by the Spitzer and WFC3 infrared data. Analysis of the data required characterization of the persistence on the WFC3 detector as it manifests for these observations; it is not insignificant. After compiling results of flux patterns for the majority of the seventeen exoplanets studied in this HST program, we find the extent of the persistence, a linear, additive effect that is strongly dependent upon stimulating flux and time of/since exposure, and subtract it to leave only the true flux received from the CoRoT-2 system in and out of secondary eclipse.

  1. Safety and Biodistribution Evaluation in CNGB3-Deficient Mice of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a Recombinant AAV Vector for Treatment of Achromatopsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Guo-jie; Budzynski, Ewa; Sonnentag, Peter; Nork, T Michael; Miller, Paul E; McPherson, Leslie; Ver Hoeve, James N; Smith, Leia M; Arndt, Tara; Mandapati, Savitri; Robinson, Paulette M; Calcedo, Roberto; Knop, David R; Hauswirth, William W; Chulay, Jeffrey D

    2016-03-01

    Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation (AGTC) is developing rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing the human CNGB3 gene, for treatment of achromatopsia, an inherited retinal disorder characterized by markedly reduced visual acuity, extreme light sensitivity, and absence of color discrimination. We report here results of a study evaluating safety and biodistribution of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in CNGB3-deficient mice. Three groups of animals (n = 35 males and 35 females per group) received a subretinal injection in one eye of 1 μl containing either vehicle or rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 at one of two dose concentrations (1 × 10(12) or 4.2 × 10(12) vg/ml) and were euthanized 4 or 13 weeks later. There were no test-article-related changes in clinical observations, body weights, food consumption, ocular examinations, clinical pathology parameters, organ weights, or macroscopic observations at necropsy. Cone-mediated electroretinography (ERG) responses were detected after vector administration in the treated eyes in 90% of animals in the higher dose group and 31% of animals in the lower dose group. Rod-mediated ERG responses were reduced in the treated eye for all groups, with the greatest reduction in males given the higher dose of vector, but returned to normal by the end of the study. Microscopic pathology results demonstrated minimal mononuclear cell infiltrates in the retina and vitreous of some animals at the interim euthanasia and in the vitreous of some animals at the terminal euthanasia. Serum anti-AAV antibodies developed in most vector-injected animals. No animals developed antibodies to hCNGB3. Biodistribution studies demonstrated high levels of vector DNA in vector-injected eyes but little or no vector DNA in nonocular tissue. These results support the use of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in clinical studies in patients with achromatopsia caused by CNGB3 mutations.

  2. Hábitos alimentares aterogênicos de grupos populacionais em área metropolitana da região sudeste do Brasil Atherogenic alimentary habits of population groups in a metropolitan area of southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignez Salas Martins

    1994-10-01

    . Por outro lado, o consumo de colesterol acima de 300mg/dia situou-se nas faixas de 37 a 50% e de 20 a 32% para os homens e mulheres, respectivamente. A percentagem de dietas com calorias provenientes das gorduras (G% acima de 30% variou de 25 a 40%, para os homens e de 45 a 50% para as mulheres. A participação dos ácidos graxos saturados (AGS% em proporções maiores ou iguais a 10 foi relativamente baixa para ambos os sexos: de 5 a 17% para os homens e menos de 10% para as mulheres. Os percentuais de casos em que a relação ácidos graxos saturados e insaturados (AGS/AGI guardou valores menores ou iguais a 1, também foi baixa para a população em geral; situou-se entre 7 e 22% para os homens e em proporções abaixo de 10%, para as mulheres. Concluiu-se que a dieta se apresenta como provável fator de risco de doenças cardiovasculares, dislipidemias, obesidade e hipertensão, para grande parte da população.This present study is one part of the project "Atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases, lipemic disorders, hypertension, obesity and diabetes mellitus in a population of the metropolitan area of S. Paulo, Brazil" undertaken in Cotia county. An alimentary inquiry based on the alimentary history of the individual was carried out among a sub-sample of the population (568 individuals. The objectives of the inquiry are the following: a- the identification of the atherogenic potential of the diets of different human groups, stratified according to social class and b the analysis of consumption differentials of some nutrients, which confer atherogenicity to the diet, as between social classes. The consumption differentials were analyzed as between men and women, by social class and taking the 50th percentile (P50 of the sample as the standard of reference, with regard to the following dietary constituents: energy, total proteins, proteins of animal origin, percentages of protein calories (P%, fatty acids, fats (F% and carbohydrates (CH%. Also, according to this

  3. Revitalization Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Revitalization areas are HUD-designated neighborhoods in need of economic and community development and where there is already a strong commitment by the local...

  4. 700 Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 700 Area of the Hanford Site is located in downtown Richland.Called the Federal Office Building, the Richland Operations Site Manager and the Richland Operations...

  5. Comparison of Gating Properties and Use-Dependent Block of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 Channels by Anti-Arrhythmics Mexiletine and Lidocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Mi, Jianxun; Lu, Ka; Lu, Yanxin; Wang, KeWei

    2015-01-01

    Mexiletine and lidocaine are widely used class IB anti-arrhythmic drugs that are considered to act by blocking voltage-gated open sodium currents for treatment of ventricular arrhythmias and relief of pain. To gain mechanistic insights into action of anti-arrhythmics, we characterized biophysical properties of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 channels stably expressed in HEK293 cells and compared their use-dependent block in response to mexiletine and lidocaine using whole-cell patch clamp recordings. While the voltage-dependent activation of Nav1.5 or Nav1.7 was not affected by mexiletine and lidocaine, the steady-state fast and slow inactivation of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 were significantly shifted to hyperpolarized direction by either mexiletine or lidocaine in dose-dependent manner. Both mexiletine and lidocaine enhanced the slow component of closed-state inactivation, with mexiletine exerting stronger inhibition on either Nav1.5 or Nav1.7. The recovery from inactivation of Nav1.5 or Nav1.7 was significantly prolonged by mexiletine compared to lidocaine. Furthermore, mexiletine displayed a pronounced and prominent use-dependent inhibition of Nav1.5 than lidocaine, but not Nav1.7 channels. Taken together, our findings demonstrate differential responses to blockade by mexiletine and lidocaine that preferentially affect the gating of Nav1.5, as compared to Nav1.7; and mexiletine exhibits stronger use-dependent block of Nav1.5. The differential gating properties of Nav1.5 and Nav1.7 in response to mexiletine and lidocaine may help explain the drug effectiveness and advance in new designs of safe and specific sodium channel blockers for treatment of cardiac arrhythmia or pain. PMID:26068619

  6. The importance of aquaculture community group (ACG) in social media (Facebook) towards the aquaculture knowledge and financial improvement of small scale fish farmers (SSFF) in rural areas of Central Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfitasari, T.; Nugroho, R. A.; Nugroho, A. P.

    2018-04-01

    Internet is now widely used by people all over the world, including small scale fisheries communities such as fish farmers. Many applications are being created including social media Facebook which are used by small scale fish farmers (SSFF) for its ease and convenience. The objective of this research is to identify the impact of aquaculture community group (ACG) in social media Facebook towards the improvement of aquaculture knowledge and financial condition of small scale fish farmers in Central Java. This research used quantitative approach where questionnaires were distributed into two groups: SSFF who are member of ACG in social media Facebook and who are not. Sampling technique used random sampling, used 60 samples of SSFF in Central Java. Data obtained were tested using the test statistic Independent t-test using SPSS v.20. Result showed a significant effect of group who are member of ACG in social media Facebook and those who are not, towards the aquaculture knowledge (t count -7.424 and sig 0.000) and financial improvement (t -3.775 and sig 0.000). The results of the average value of the SSFF who are ACG member in Facebook are also higher than farmers who are not.

  7. Processing effects on the thermoelectric properties of Bi2Ca2Co1.7Ox ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasekh, Sh.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bi2Ca2Co1.7Ox bulk polycrystalline ceramics were prepared by the solid state method and by directional growth. Moreover, the effect of annealing on the textured materials has been studied. Microstructure has shown randomly oriented grains in the classical sintered materials while in the textured samples those were well oriented with their c-axis nearly perpendicular to the growth direction. Furthermore, the textured-annealed samples showed much lower amount of secondary phases than the as-grown ones. These microstructural changes are reflected on the thermoelectric properties which increase with the grain orientation and with the decrease on the secondary phase content mainly due to the electrical resistivity reduction. As a consequence, a raise on the power factor of about 6 and 9 times, compared with the classically sintered samples, was obtained for the as-grown and textured-annealed ones, respectively. The maximum power factor obtained at 650 ºC in the textured-annealed samples (~ 0.31 mW/K2m is about 50 % higher, at the same temperature, than the obtained in one of the most used methods for texturing this kind of materials, the sinter-forging process.Se han preparado cerámicas policristalinas volumétricas de Bi2Ca2Co1.7Ox por medio del método clásico de estado sólido y por crecimiento direccional. Además, se ha estudiado el efecto del recocido en los materiales texturados. La microestructura ha mostrado granos orientados al azar en las muestras preparadas por sinterizado en estado sólido, mientras que en las muestras texturadas se orientaban con el eje c perpendicular a la dirección de crecimiento. Por otro lado, las muestras texturadas-recocidas mostraban una cantidad mucho menor de fases secundarias que las crecidas. Estos cambios en la microestructura se reflejan en las propiedades termoeléctricas, que aumentan con la orientación de los granos y con la disminución del contenido en fases secundarias, principalmente por la

  8. Differential protein expression profile in the hypothalamic GT1-7 cell line after exposure to anabolic androgenic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Rivera, Freddyson J; Pérez-Laspiur, Juliana; Santiago-Gascot, María E; Alemán-Reyes, Abner G; García-Santiago, Emanuel; Rodríguez-Pérez, Yolanda; Calo-Guadalupe, Cristhian; Otero-Pagán, Inelia; Ayala-Pagán, Roxsana N; Martínez, Magdiel; Cantres-Rosario, Yisel M; Meléndez, Loyda M; Barreto-Estrada, Jennifer L

    2017-01-01

    The abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has been considered a major public health problem during decades. Supraphysiological doses of AAS may lead to a variety of neuroendocrine problems. Precisely, the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is one of the body systems that is mainly influenced by steroidal hormones. Fluctuations of the hormonal milieu result in alterations of reproductive function, which are made through changes in hypothalamic neurons expressing gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). In fact, previous studies have shown that AAS modulate the activity of these neurons through steroid-sensitive afferents. To increase knowledge about the cellular mechanisms induced by AAS in GnRH neurons, we performed proteomic analyses of the murine hypothalamic GT1-7 cell line after exposure to 17α-methyltestosterone (17α-meT; 1 μM). These cells represent a good model for studying regulatory processes because they exhibit the typical characteristics of GnRH neurons, and respond to compounds that modulate GnRH in vivo. Two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry analyses identified a total of 17 different proteins that were significantly affected by supraphysiological levels of AAS. Furthermore, pathway analyses showed that modulated proteins were mainly associated to glucose metabolism, drug detoxification, stress response and cell cycle. Validation of many of these proteins, such as GSTM1, ERH, GAPDH, PEBP1 and PDIA6, were confirmed by western blotting. We further demonstrated that AAS exposure decreased expression of estrogen receptors and GnRH, while two important signaling pathway proteins p-ERK, and p-p38, were modulated. Our results suggest that steroids have the capacity to directly affect the neuroendocrine system by modulating key cellular processes for the control of reproductive function.

  9. Differential protein expression profile in the hypothalamic GT1-7 cell line after exposure to anabolic androgenic steroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddyson J Martínez-Rivera

    Full Text Available The abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS has been considered a major public health problem during decades. Supraphysiological doses of AAS may lead to a variety of neuroendocrine problems. Precisely, the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis is one of the body systems that is mainly influenced by steroidal hormones. Fluctuations of the hormonal milieu result in alterations of reproductive function, which are made through changes in hypothalamic neurons expressing gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH. In fact, previous studies have shown that AAS modulate the activity of these neurons through steroid-sensitive afferents. To increase knowledge about the cellular mechanisms induced by AAS in GnRH neurons, we performed proteomic analyses of the murine hypothalamic GT1-7 cell line after exposure to 17α-methyltestosterone (17α-meT; 1 μM. These cells represent a good model for studying regulatory processes because they exhibit the typical characteristics of GnRH neurons, and respond to compounds that modulate GnRH in vivo. Two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry analyses identified a total of 17 different proteins that were significantly affected by supraphysiological levels of AAS. Furthermore, pathway analyses showed that modulated proteins were mainly associated to glucose metabolism, drug detoxification, stress response and cell cycle. Validation of many of these proteins, such as GSTM1, ERH, GAPDH, PEBP1 and PDIA6, were confirmed by western blotting. We further demonstrated that AAS exposure decreased expression of estrogen receptors and GnRH, while two important signaling pathway proteins p-ERK, and p-p38, were modulated. Our results suggest that steroids have the capacity to directly affect the neuroendocrine system by modulating key cellular processes for the control of reproductive function.

  10. Glutamate increases toxicity of inorganic lead in GT1-7 neurons: partial protection induced by flunarizine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loikkanen, Jarkko; Vaehaekangas, Kirsi H. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Kuopio, PO Box 1627, 70211, Kuopio (Finland); Naarala, Jonne [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Kuopio, PO Box 1627, 70211, Kuopio (Finland); Savolainen, Kai M. [Department of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 aA, 00250, Helsinki (Finland)

    2003-12-01

    Recent studies point to an interaction between the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system and inorganic lead (Pb) neurotoxicity. Pb (1-100 {mu}M) evoked cytotoxicity over the period of 72 h in mouse hypothalamic GT1-7 neurons. Glutamate (0.1 or 1 mM) on its own did not have any effect on cell viability. However, 1 mM glutamate clearly increased Pb-induced cell death at 48 and 72 h. Although flunarizine (0.1-10 {mu}M), an antagonist of L- and T-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCCs), partially protected from the cytotoxicity induced by co-exposure to Pb (10 or 100 {mu}M) and glutamate (1 mM), it had no protective effect on cytotoxicity induced by Pb alone. The flunarizine-induced protection was dependent on time and observed only at 48 h. Neither verapamil, an antagonist of L-type VSCCs, nor DIDS, an inhibitor of anion exchange, at non-toxic concentrations (0.1-10 {mu}M) had any effect on cytotoxicity induced by Pb alone or together with glutamate at any studied time point. Co-exposure to Pb and glutamate also resulted in more prominent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) than either of the compounds alone. Interestingly, we observed an increase in intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels in cells exposed to micromolar concentrations of Pb. Glutamate decreased the levels of intracellular GSH and also partially reduced the Pb-induced increase in GSH levels. These results suggest that the interaction of glutamate and Pb results in increased neuronal cell death via mechanisms that involve an increase in ROS production, a decrease in intracellular GSH defense against oxidative stress and probably T-type VSCCs. (orig.)

  11. Structure of Acostatin, a Dimeric Disintegrin From Southern Copperhead (Agkistrodon Contortrix Contortrix), at 1.7 Angstrom Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moiseeva, N.; Bau, R.; Swenson, S.D.; Marklund, F.S.; Jr.; Choe, J.-Y.; Liu, Z.-J.; Allaire, M.

    2009-05-26

    Disintegrins are a family of small (4-14 kDa) proteins that bind to another class of proteins, integrins. Therefore, as integrin inhibitors, they can be exploited as anticancer and antiplatelet agents. Acostatin, an {alpha}{beta} heterodimeric disintegrin, has been isolated from the venom of Southern copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix). The three-dimensional structure of acostatin has been determined by macromolecular crystallography using the molecular-replacement method. The asymmetric unit of the acostatin crystals consists of two heterodimers. The structure has been refined to an R{sub work} and R{sub free} of 18.6% and 21.5%, respectively, using all data in the 20-1.7 {angstrom} resolution range. The structure of all subunits is similar and is well ordered into N-terminal and C-terminal clusters with four intramolecular disulfide bonds. The overall fold consists of short {beta}-sheets, each of which is formed by a pair of antiparallel {beta}-strands connected by {beta}-turns and flexible loops of different lengths. Conformational flexibility is found in the RGD loops and in the C-terminal segment. The interaction of two N-terminal clusters via two intermolecular disulfide bridges anchors the {alpha}{beta}chains of the acostatin dimers. The C-terminal clusters of the heterodimer project in opposite directions and form a larger angle between them in comparison with other dimeric disintegrins. Extensive interactions are observed between two heterodimers, revealing an {alpha}{beta}{beta}{alpha} acostatin tetramer. Further experiments are required to identify whether the {alpha}{beta}{beta}{alpha} acostatin complex plays a functional role in vivo.

  12. 13th February 2012 - German CEO Barmenia Insurance Group and Chair of the Hochschulrat Board of Governors of the Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal J. Beutelmann visiting ATLAS experimental area and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Advise R. Voss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    13th February 2012 - German CEO Barmenia Insurance Group and Chair of the Hochschulrat Board of Governors of the Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal J. Beutelmann visiting ATLAS experimental area and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Advise R. Voss.

  13. 14 November 2013 - Director of Indian Institute of Technology Indore P. Mathur with members of the Indian community working at CERN; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2, the ALICE experimental area and SM18 with ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson, Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare P. Giubellino and Technology Department, Accelerator Beam Transfer Group Leader V. Mertens

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    14 November 2013 - Director of Indian Institute of Technology Indore P. Mathur with members of the Indian community working at CERN; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2, the ALICE experimental area and SM18 with ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson, Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare P. Giubellino and Technology Department, Accelerator Beam Transfer Group Leader V. Mertens

  14. Statistics of sunspot group clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getko Ryszarda

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Zubrzycki method is utilized to find all sunspot groups which are close to each other during each Carrington rotation. The sunspot group areas and their positions for the years 1874–2008 are used. The descending, the ascending and the maximum phases of solar cycles for each solar hemisphere are considered separately. To establish the size of the region D where the clusters are searched, the correlation function dependent on the distance between two groups is applied. The method estimates the weighted area of each cluster. The weights dependent on the correlation function of distances between sunspot groups created each cluster. For each cluster the weighted position is also evaluated. The weights dependent on the areas of sunspot groups created a given cluster. The number distribution of the sunspot groups created each cluster and the cluster statistics within different phases of the 11-year cycle and within all considered solar cycles are also presented.

  15. Formal groups and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hazewinkel, Michiel

    2012-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive treatment of the theory of formal groups and its numerous applications in several areas of mathematics. The seven chapters of the book present basics and main results of the theory, as well as very important applications in algebraic topology, number theory, and algebraic geometry. Each chapter ends with several pages of historical and bibliographic summary. One prerequisite for reading the book is an introductory graduate algebra course, including certain familiarity with category theory.

  16. Magnetic regimes in amorphous Ni--Fe--P--B alloys. [1. 7 to 300/sup 0/K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, J.

    1976-10-01

    A complete substitution of iron for nickel was obtained by splat-cooling in amorphous alloys of composition (Ni/sub 100-y/Fe/sub y/)/sub 79/P/sub 13/B/sub 8/. Results of high-field magnetization (up to 70 kOe), ac and dc low-field susceptibility, Curie temperature, and resistivity measurements over a temperature range of 1.7 to 300/sup 0/K are reported. The Ni/sub 79/P/sub 13/B/sub 8/ alloy is not ferromagnetic, but the magnetization behavior as a function of field and temperature is typically that of alloys in the critical concentration range for ferromagnetism. The Fe/sub 79/P/sub 13/B/sub 8/ alloy is ferromagnetic with a Curie temperature T/sub c/ of 616/sup 0/K. For y = 1 at. percent, the Fe atoms are magnetic. The variation of the moment per Fe atom as a function of y is discussed. When y is increased, the Ni atoms are likely to be polarized progressively and the moment per Ni atom would be roughly constant for y equal to or greater than 30 at. percent. Various magnetic behaviors were defined as a function of the Fe content. The value of T/sub c/ reaches a maximum for y similarly ordered 90 at. percent and extrapolates to zero for y similarly ordered 7 at. percent. Alloys within the range 1 equal to or less than y equal to or less than 10 at. percent did not exhibit well-defined Curie transition, but sharp maxima in low-field susceptibility measurements were observed at T/sub M/. The value of T/sub M/ is proportional to y for 1 equal to or less than y equal to or less than 4 at. percent, as in classical spin-glass regimes. For 4 less than y equal to or less than 10 at. percent, the variation of T/sub M/ as a function of y implies a more complicated type of magnetic ordering (micromagnetism or superparamagnetism). Homogeneous ferromagnetic ordering emerges only for y greater than 10 at. percent. Results of resistivity measurements are discussed in relation to the magnetic properties of different regimes in the magnetic phase diagram. 6 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Minimum area thresholds for rattlesnakes and colubrid snakes on islands in the Gulf of California, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meik, Jesse M; Makowsky, Robert

    2018-01-01

    We expand a framework for estimating minimum area thresholds to elaborate biogeographic patterns between two groups of snakes (rattlesnakes and colubrid snakes) on islands in the western Gulf of California, Mexico. The minimum area thresholds for supporting single species versus coexistence of two or more species relate to hypotheses of the relative importance of energetic efficiency and competitive interactions within groups, respectively. We used ordinal logistic regression probability functions to estimate minimum area thresholds after evaluating the influence of island area, isolation, and age on rattlesnake and colubrid occupancy patterns across 83 islands. Minimum area thresholds for islands supporting one species were nearly identical for rattlesnakes and colubrids (~1.7 km 2 ), suggesting that selective tradeoffs for distinctive life history traits between rattlesnakes and colubrids did not result in any clear advantage of one life history strategy over the other on islands. However, the minimum area threshold for supporting two or more species of rattlesnakes (37.1 km 2 ) was over five times greater than it was for supporting two or more species of colubrids (6.7 km 2 ). The great differences between rattlesnakes and colubrids in minimum area required to support more than one species imply that for islands in the Gulf of California relative extinction risks are higher for coexistence of multiple species of rattlesnakes and that competition within and between species of rattlesnakes is likely much more intense than it is within and between species of colubrids.

  18. An angiotensin-(1-7) peptidase in the kidney cortex, proximal tubules, and human HK-2 epithelial cells that is distinct from insulin-degrading enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Bryan A; Cruz-Diaz, Nildris; Marshall, Allyson C; Pirro, Nancy T; Su, Yixin; Gwathmey, TanYa M; Rose, James C; Chappell, Mark C

    2015-03-15

    Angiotensin 1-7 [ANG-(1-7)] is expressed within the kidney and exhibits renoprotective actions that antagonize the inflammatory, fibrotic, and pro-oxidant effects of ANG II. We previously identified an peptidase that preferentially metabolized ANG-(1-7) to ANG-(1-4) in the brain medulla and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of sheep (Marshall AC, Pirro NT, Rose JC, Diz DI, Chappell MC. J Neurochem 130: 313-323, 2014); thus the present study established the expression of the peptidase in the kidney. Utilizing a sensitive HPLC-based approach, we demonstrate a peptidase activity that hydrolyzed ANG-(1-7) to ANG-(1-4) in the sheep cortex, isolated tubules, and human HK-2 renal epithelial cells. The peptidase was markedly sensitive to the metallopeptidase inhibitor JMV-390; human HK-2 cells expressed subnanomolar sensitivity (IC50 = 0.5 nM) and the highest specific activity (123 ± 5 fmol·min(-1)·mg(-1)) compared with the tubules (96 ± 12 fmol·min(-1)·mg(-1)) and cortex (107 ± 9 fmol·min(-1)·mg(-1)). The peptidase was purified 41-fold from HK-2 cells; the activity was sensitive to JMV-390, the chelator o-phenanthroline, and the mercury-containing compound p-chloromercuribenzoic acid (PCMB), but not to selective inhibitors against neprilysin, neurolysin and thimet oligopeptidase. Both ANG-(1-7) and its endogenous analog [Ala(1)]-ANG-(1-7) (alamandine) were preferentially hydrolyzed by the peptidase compared with ANG II, [Asp(1)]-ANG II, ANG I, and ANG-(1-12). Although the ANG-(1-7) peptidase and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) share similar inhibitor characteristics of a metallothiolendopeptidase, we demonstrate marked differences in substrate specificity, which suggest these peptidases are distinct. We conclude that an ANG-(1-7) peptidase is expressed within the renal proximal tubule and may play a potential role in the renal renin-angiotensin system to regulate ANG-(1-7) tone. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Angiotensin-(1-7) Blockade Attenuates Captopril- or Hydralazine-Induced Cardiovascular Protection in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats-Treated with L-NAME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benter, Ibrahim F.; Yousif, Mariam H. M.; Al-Saleh, Fatemah M.; Chappell, Raj Raghupathy Mark C.; Diz, Debra I.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the contribution of angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] to captopril-induced cardiovascular protection in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) chronically treated with the nitric oxide synthesis inhibitor L-NAME (SHR-L). L-NAME (80 mg/L) administration for three weeks increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) from 196 ± 6 mmHg to 229 ± 3 mmHg (pcaptopril (300 mg/L in drinking water) or hydralazine (1.5 mg/kg/day ip). In isolated perfused hearts, the recovery of left ventricular function from global ischemia was enhanced by captopril or hydralazine treatment, and was exacerbated with A779. The Ang-(1-7) antagonist attenuated the beneficial effects of captopril and hydralazine on cardiac function. Recovery from global ischemia was also improved in isolated SHR-L hearts acutely perfused with captopril during both the perfusion and reperfusion periods. The acute administration of A779 reduced the beneficial actions of captopril to improve recovery following ischemia. We conclude that during periods of reduced nitric oxide availability, endogenous Ang-(1-7) plays a protective role to effectively buffer the increase in blood pressure and renal injury, as well as the recovery from cardiac ischemia. Moreover, Ang-(1-7) contributes to the blood pressure lowering and tissue protective actions of captopril and hydralazine in a model of severe hypertension and end-organ damage. PMID:21326110

  20. Sulfonamides as Selective NaV1.7 Inhibitors: Optimizing Potency, Pharmacokinetics, and Metabolic Properties to Obtain Atropisomeric Quinolinone (AM-0466) that Affords Robust in Vivo Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graceffa, Russell F; Boezio, Alessandro A; Able, Jessica; Altmann, Steven; Berry, Loren M; Boezio, Christiane; Butler, John R; Chu-Moyer, Margaret; Cooke, Melanie; DiMauro, Erin F; Dineen, Thomas A; Feric Bojic, Elma; Foti, Robert S; Fremeau, Robert T; Guzman-Perez, Angel; Gao, Hua; Gunaydin, Hakan; Huang, Hongbing; Huang, Liyue; Ilch, Christopher; Jarosh, Michael; Kornecook, Thomas; Kreiman, Charles R; La, Daniel S; Ligutti, Joseph; Milgram, Benjamin C; Lin, Min-Hwa Jasmine; Marx, Isaac E; Nguyen, Hanh N; Peterson, Emily A; Rescourio, Gwen; Roberts, John; Schenkel, Laurie; Shimanovich, Roman; Sparling, Brian A; Stellwagen, John; Taborn, Kristin; Vaida, Karina R; Wang, Jean; Yeoman, John; Yu, Violeta; Zhu, Dawn; Moyer, Bryan D; Weiss, Matthew M

    2017-07-27

    Because of its strong genetic validation, Na V 1.7 has attracted significant interest as a target for the treatment of pain. We have previously reported on a number of structurally distinct bicyclic heteroarylsulfonamides as Na V 1.7 inhibitors that demonstrate high levels of selectivity over other Na V isoforms. Herein, we report the discovery and optimization of a series of atropisomeric quinolinone sulfonamide inhibitors [ Bicyclic sulfonamide compounds as sodium channel inhibitors and their preparation . WO 2014201206, 2014 ] of Na V 1.7, which demonstrate nanomolar inhibition of Na V 1.7 and exhibit high levels of selectivity over other sodium channel isoforms. After optimization of metabolic and pharmacokinetic properties, including PXR activation, CYP2C9 inhibition, and CYP3A4 TDI, several compounds were advanced into in vivo target engagement and efficacy models. When tested in mice, compound 39 (AM-0466) demonstrated robust pharmacodynamic activity in a Na V 1.7-dependent model of histamine-induced pruritus (itch) and additionally in a capsaicin-induced nociception model of pain without any confounding effect in open-field activity.

  1. Rapid eye movement (REM sleep deprivation reduces rat frontal cortex acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7 activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camarini R.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid eye movement (REM sleep deprivation induces several behavioral changes. Among these, a decrease in yawning behavior produced by low doses of cholinergic agonists is observed which indicates a change in brain cholinergic neurotransmission after REM sleep deprivation. Acetylcholinesterase (Achase controls acetylcholine (Ach availability in the synaptic cleft. Therefore, altered Achase activity may lead to a change in Ach availability at the receptor level which, in turn, may result in modification of cholinergic neurotransmission. To determine if REM sleep deprivation would change the activity of Achase, male Wistar rats, 3 months old, weighing 250-300 g, were deprived of REM sleep for 96 h by the flower-pot technique (N = 12. Two additional groups, a home-cage control (N = 6 and a large platform control (N = 6, were also used. Achase was measured in the frontal cortex using two different methods to obtain the enzyme activity. One method consisted of the obtention of total (900 g supernatant, membrane-bound (100,000 g pellet and soluble (100,000 g supernatant Achase, and the other method consisted of the obtention of a fraction (40,000 g pellet enriched in synaptic membrane-bound enzyme. In both preparations, REM sleep deprivation induced a significant decrease in rat frontal cortex Achase activity when compared to both home-cage and large platform controls. REM sleep deprivation induced a significant decrease of 16% in the membrane-bound Achase activity (nmol thiocholine formed min-1 mg protein-1 in the 100,000 g pellet enzyme preparation (home-cage group 152.1 ± 5.7, large platform group 152.7 ± 24.9 and REM sleep-deprived group 127.9 ± 13.8. There was no difference in the soluble enzyme activity. REM sleep deprivation also induced a significant decrease of 20% in the enriched synaptic membrane-bound Achase activity (home-cage group 126.4 ± 21.5, large platform group 127.8 ± 20.4, REM sleep-deprived group 102.8 ± 14.2. Our results

  2. Comparative hygienic evaluation of behavior of different pesticides groups in soil, prediction of risk of ground water contamination and its danger for human health in areas with irrigation farming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novohatska, O.; Stavnichenko, P.; Kondratiuk, M.; Antonenko, A.; Vavrinevich, O.; Omelchuk, S.; Bardov, V.

    2017-01-01

    A comparative risk evaluation of contamination of the soil and groundwater with fungicides, insecticides and herbicides, and risk assessment of the adverse effects of these substances on human health while contaminated groundwater consumption. Methodology: Field hygienic experiments with studied pesticides were carried out in different soil and climatic zones. Prediction of pesticides migration possibility in groundwater was carried out by Groundwater ubiquity score (GUS) and Leaching potential index (LEACH). For integrated assessment of the potential hazard of pesticide exposure on the human organism when it enters ground and surface waters we used integral groundwater contamination index (IGCHI). Results: Among fungicides, the most resistant were triazoles, herbicides- oxyacetamide flufenacet and all studied insecticides. There was a significant difference between the maximum and minimum DT50 values, in some cases the difference reaches more than 10 times. The evaluation of GUS index showed that risk of leaching into groundwater of fungicides based on paclobutrazol, herbicides based on metribuzin, insecticides based on thiamethoxam during application in soil and climatic conditions of Ukraine is a high (probably leached). Conclusion: The maximum possible concentration of studied groups pesticides in groundwater was significantly lower than allowable, which is associated primarily with low application rates and indicates the relative safety for human health when consuming water, which could be contaminated with test compounds. (author)

  3. Evidence from Impact Crater Observations for Few Large Impacts on the Moon 0.8-1.7 Ga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchoff, M. R.; Bottke, W. F.; Marchi, S.; Chapman, C. R.; Enke, B.

    2012-12-01

    assumptions about how craters degrade. In addition, when our crater ages are combined with others determined (e.g., Copernicus, Tycho, King; [5-9]), we preliminarily observe a relative lull in lunar impact cratering for ~0.8-1.7 Ga. Intriguingly, this interval appears to roughly coincide with a period on Earth called the "boring billion" [10], when the evolution of life appears to have been stagnant and oceans were euxinic (poorly mixed, largely starved of oxygen). We speculate that absence of major terrestrial impacts may have surprising implications for the history of life and our biosphere. References: [1] Neukum, G., et al. (2001) SSR 96, 55-86. [2] Wilhelms, D.E. (1987) Geologic History of the Moon USGS, Paper 1348. [3] Marchi, S., et al. (2009) AJ 137, 4936-4948. [4] Ryder, G., et al. (1991) Geology 19, 143-146. [5] Neukum, G. and B. König (1976). Lunar Sci. VII. Proc., 2867-2881. [6] Hiesinger, H., et al. (2012) JGR 117, E00H10, doi: 10.1029/2011je003935. [7] van der Bogert, C.H., et al. (2010). LPSC XLI. Abst. #2165. [8] McEwen, A.S., et al. (1993) JGR 98, 17207-17231. [9] Ashley, J.W., et al. (2011). 42nd LPSC, Abst. #2437. [10] Holland, H.D. (2006) Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 361, 903-915.

  4. Tackling obesity in areas of high social deprivation: clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a task-based weight management group programme - a randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRobbie, Hayden; Hajek, Peter; Peerbux, Sarrah; Kahan, Brennan C; Eldridge, Sandra; Trépel, Dominic; Parrott, Steve; Griffiths, Chris; Snuggs, Sarah; Myers Smith, Katie

    2016-10-01

    An increasing number of people require help to manage their weight. The NHS recommends weight loss advice by general practitioners and/or a referral to a practice nurse. Although this is helpful for some, more effective approaches that can be disseminated economically on a large scale are needed. To assess whether or not a task-based weight management programme [Weight Action Programme (WAP)] has better long-term effects than a 'best practice' intervention provided in primary care by practice nurses. Randomised controlled trial with cost-effectiveness analysis. General practices in east London, UK. Three hundred and thirty adults with a body mass index (BMI) of ≥ 30 kg/m 2 or a BMI of ≥ 28 kg/m 2 plus comorbidities were recruited from local general practices and via media publicity. Those who had a BMI of > 45 kg/m 2 , had lost > 5% of their body weight in the previous 6 months, were currently pregnant or taking psychiatric medications were excluded. Participants were randomised (2 : 1) to the WAP or nurse arms. The WAP intervention was delivered in eight weekly group sessions that combined dietary and physical activity, advice and self-monitoring in a group-oriented intervention. The initial course was followed by 10 monthly group maintenance sessions open to all participants in this study arm. The practice nurse intervention (best usual care) consisted of four one-to-one sessions delivered over 8 weeks, and included standard advice on diet and physical activity based on NHS 'Change4Life' materials and motivational support. The primary outcome measure was weight change at 12 months. Secondary outcome measures included change in BMI, waist circumference and blood pressure, and proportion of participants losing at least 5% and 10% of baseline body weight. Staff collecting measurements at the 6- and 12-month follow-ups were blinded to treatment allocation. The primary outcome measure was analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle

  5. A Healthy School Start Plus for prevention of childhood overweight and obesity in disadvantaged areas through parental support in the school setting - study protocol for a parallel group cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elinder, Liselotte Schäfer; Patterson, Emma; Nyberg, Gisela; Norman, Åsa

    2018-04-06

    Systematic reviews conclude that interventions to prevent overweight and obesity in children obtain stronger effects when parents are involved. Parenting practices and parent-child interactions shape children's health-related behaviours. The Healthy School Start Plus intervention aims to promote healthy dietary habits and physical activity and prevent obesity in children through parental support in disadvantaged areas with increased health needs, delivered by teachers and school nurses. This protocol describes the design, outcome and process evaluation of the study. Effectiveness of the intervention is compared to standard care within school health services. The 6-month programme, based on Social Cognitive Theory, consists of four components: 1) Health information to parents regarding the child; 2) Motivational Interviewing with the parents by the school nurse concerning the child; 3) classroom activities for the children by teachers; and 4) a web-based self-test of type-2 diabetes risk by parents. Effects will be studied in a cluster randomised trial including 17 schools and 352 six-year old children. The primary outcome is dietary intake of indicator foods, and secondary outcomes are physical activity, sedentary behaviour and BMI. Outcomes will be measured at baseline, at 6 months directly after the intervention, and at follow-up 18 months post baseline. Statistical analysis will be by mixed-effect regression analysis according to intention to treat and per protocol. Mediation analysis will be performed with parental self-efficacy and parenting practices. Quantitative and qualitative methods will be used to study implementation in terms of dose, fidelity, feasibility and acceptability. The hypothesis is that the programme will be more effective than standard care and feasible to perform in the school context. The programme is in line with the cumulated evidence regarding the prevention of childhood obesity: That schools should be a focal point of prevention

  6. Development of a Rapid Throughput Assay for Identification of hNav1.7 Antagonist Using Unique Efficacious Sodium Channel Agonist, Antillatoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Zhao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs are responsible for the generation of the action potential. Among nine classified VGSC subtypes (Nav1.1–Nav1.9, Nav1.7 is primarily expressed in the sensory neurons, contributing to the nociception transmission. Therefore Nav1.7 becomes a promising target for analgesic drug development. In this study, we compared the influence of an array of VGSC agonists including veratridine, BmK NT1, brevetoxin-2, deltamethrin and antillatoxin (ATX on membrane depolarization which was detected by Fluorescence Imaging Plate Reader (FLIPR membrane potential (FMP blue dye. In HEK-293 cells heterologously expressing hNav1.7 α-subunit, ATX produced a robust membrane depolarization with an EC50 value of 7.8 ± 2.9 nM whereas veratridine, BmK NT1, and deltamethrin produced marginal response. Brevetoxin-2 was without effect on membrane potential change. The ATX response was completely inhibited by tetrodotoxin suggesting that the ATX response was solely derived from hNav1.7 activation, which was consistent with the results where ATX produced a negligible response in null HEK-293 cells. Six VGSC antagonists including lidocaine, lamotrigine, phenytoin, carbamazepine, riluzole, and 2-amino-6-trifluoromethylthiobenzothiazole all concentration-dependently inhibited ATX response with IC50 values comparable to that reported from patch-clamp experiments. Considered together, we demonstrate that ATX is a unique efficacious hNav1.7 activator which offers a useful probe to develop a rapid throughput screening assay to identify hNav1.7 antagonists.

  7. Development of a Rapid Throughput Assay for Identification of hNav1.7 Antagonist Using Unique Efficacious Sodium Channel Agonist, Antillatoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fang; Li, Xichun; Jin, Liang; Zhang, Fan; Inoue, Masayuki; Yu, Boyang; Cao, Zhengyu

    2016-02-16

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are responsible for the generation of the action potential. Among nine classified VGSC subtypes (Nav1.1-Nav1.9), Nav1.7 is primarily expressed in the sensory neurons, contributing to the nociception transmission. Therefore Nav1.7 becomes a promising target for analgesic drug development. In this study, we compared the influence of an array of VGSC agonists including veratridine, BmK NT1, brevetoxin-2, deltamethrin and antillatoxin (ATX) on membrane depolarization which was detected by Fluorescence Imaging Plate Reader (FLIPR) membrane potential (FMP) blue dye. In HEK-293 cells heterologously expressing hNav1.7 α-subunit, ATX produced a robust membrane depolarization with an EC50 value of 7.8 ± 2.9 nM whereas veratridine, BmK NT1, and deltamethrin produced marginal response. Brevetoxin-2 was without effect on membrane potential change. The ATX response was completely inhibited by tetrodotoxin suggesting that the ATX response was solely derived from hNav1.7 activation, which was consistent with the results where ATX produced a negligible response in null HEK-293 cells. Six VGSC antagonists including lidocaine, lamotrigine, phenytoin, carbamazepine, riluzole, and 2-amino-6-trifluoromethylthiobenzothiazole all concentration-dependently inhibited ATX response with IC50 values comparable to that reported from patch-clamp experiments. Considered together, we demonstrate that ATX is a unique efficacious hNav1.7 activator which offers a useful probe to develop a rapid throughput screening assay to identify hNav1.7 antagonists.

  8. The ACE-2/Ang1-7/Mas cascade enhances bone structure and metabolism following angiotensin-II type 1 receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuohashish, Hatem M; Ahmed, Mohammed M; Sabry, Dina; Khattab, Mahmoud M; Al-Rejaie, Salim S

    2017-07-15

    The renin angiotensin system (RAS) regulates numerous systemic functions and is expressed locally in skeletal tissues. Angiotensin1-7 (Ang1-7) is a beneficial member of the RAS, and the therapeutic effects of a large number of angiotensin receptors blockers (ARBs) are mediated by an Ang1-7-dependent cascade. This study examines whether the reported osteo-preservative effects of losartan are mediated through the angiotensin converting enzyme2 (ACE-2)/Ang1-7/Mas pathway in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Sham and OVX animals received losartan (10mg/kg/d p.o.) for 6 weeks. A specific Mas receptor blocker (A-779) was delivered via mini-osmotic pumps during the losartan treatment period. Serum and urine bone metabolism biomarker levels were measured. Bone trabecular and cortical morphometry were quantified in distal femurs, whereas mineral contents were estimated in ashed bones, serum and urine. Finally, the expression of RAS components, the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) was determined. Losartan significantly improved the elevated bone metabolism marker levels and altered trabecular and cortical structures in OVX animals, and restored normal urinary and skeletal mineral levels. Mas receptor inhibition significantly abolished all osteo-protective effects of losartan and enhanced the deleterious effects of OVX. Losartan enhanced OVX-induced up-regulation of ACE-1, AngII, angiotensin type 1 (AT 1 ) receptor and RANKL expression, and increased ACE-2, Ang1-7, Mas and OPG expression in OVX animals. However, A-779 significantly eradicated the effects of losartan on RAS components and RANKL/OPG expression. Thus, Ang1-7 are involved in the osteo-preservative effects of losartan via Mas receptor, which may add therapeutic value to this well-known antihypertensive agent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Summary report: injection group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Brown, B.

    1984-01-01

    The injector group attempted to define and address several problem areas related to the SSC injector as defined in the Reference Design Study (RDS). It also considered the topic of machine utilization, particularly the question of test beam requirements. Details of the work are given in individually contributed papers, but the general concerns and consensus of the group are presented within this note. The group recognized that the injector as outlined in the RDS was developed primarily for costing estimates. As such, it was not necessarily well optimized from the standpoint of insuring the required beam properties for the SSC. On the other hand, considering the extraordinary short time in which the RDS was prepared, it is an impressive document and a good basis from which to work. Because the documented SSC performance goals are ambitious, the group sought an injector solution which would more likely guarantee that SSC performance not be limited by its injectors. As will be seen, this leads to a somewhat different solution than that described in the RDS. Furthermore, it is the consensus of the group that the new, conservative approach represents only a modest cost increase of the overall project well worth the confidence gained and the risks avoided

  10. Discovery of non-zwitterionic aryl sulfonamides as Nav1.7 inhibitors with efficacy in preclinical behavioral models and translational measures of nociceptive neuron activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong-Jin; Guernon, Jason; McClure, Andrea; Luo, Guanglin; Rajamani, Ramkumar; Ng, Alicia; Easton, Amy; Newton, Amy; Bourin, Clotilde; Parker, Dawn; Mosure, Kathleen; Barnaby, Omar; Soars, Matthew G; Knox, Ronald J; Matchett, Michele; Pieschl, Rick; Herrington, James; Chen, Ping; Sivarao, D V; Bristow, Linda J; Meanwell, Nicholas A; Bronson, Joanne; Olson, Richard; Thompson, Lorin A; Dzierba, Carolyn

    2017-10-15

    Since zwitterionic benzenesulfonamide Na v 1.7 inhibitors suffer from poor membrane permeability, we sought to eliminate this characteristic by replacing the basic moiety with non-basic bicyclic acetals and monocyclic ethers. These efforts led to the discovery of the non-zwitterionic aryl sulfonamide 49 as a selective Na v 1.7 inhibitor with improved membrane permeability. Despite its moderate cellular activity, 49 exhibited robust efficacy in mouse models of neuropathic and inflammatory pain and modulated translational electromyogram measures associated with activation of nociceptive neurons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Paleoproterozoic (~1.88Ga felsic volcanism of the Iricoumé Group in the Pitinga Mining District area, Amazonian Craton, Brazil: insights in ancient volcanic processes from field and petrologic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Pierosan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Iricoumé Group correspond to the most expressive Paleoproterozoic volcanism in the Guyana Shield, Amazonian craton. The volcanics are coeval with Mapuera granitoids, and belong to the Uatumã magmatism. They have U-Pb ages around 1880 Ma, and geochemical signatures of α-type magmas. Iricoumé volcanics consist of porphyritic trachyte to rhyolite, associated to crystal-rich ignimbrites and co-ignimbritic fall tuffs and surges. The amount and morphology of phenocrysts can be useful to distinguish lava (flow and dome from hypabyssal units. The morphology of ignimbrite crystals allows the distinction between effusive units and ignimbrite, when pyroclasts are obliterated. Co-ignimbritic tuffs are massive, and some show stratifications that suggest deposition by current traction flow. Zircon and apatite saturation temperatures vary from 799°C to 980°C, are in agreement with most temperatures of α-type melts and can be interpreted as minimum liquidus temperature. The viscosities estimation for rhyolitic and trachytic compositions yield values close to experimentally determined melts, and show a typical exponential decay with water addition. The emplacement of Iricoumé volcanics and part of Mapuera granitoids was controlled by ring-faults in an intracratonic environment. A genesis related to the caldera complex setting can be assumed for the Iricoumé-Mapuera volcano-plutonic association in the Pitinga Mining District.O Grupo Iricoumé corresponde ao mais expressivo vulcanismo Paleoproterozóico do Escudo das Guianas, craton Amazônico. As rochas vulcânicas são coexistentes com os granitóides Mapuera, e pertencem ao magmatismo Uatumã. Possuem idades U-Pb em torno 1888 Ma, e assinaturas geoquímicas de magmas tipo-A. As vulcânicas do Iricoumé consistem de traquitos a riolitos porfiríticos, associados a ignimbritos ricos em cristal e tufos co-ignimbríticos de queda e surge. A quantidade e a morfologia dos fenocristais podem ser

  12. Group theoretical methods in Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmo, M.A. del; Santander, M.; Mateos Guilarte, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The meeting had 102 papers. These was distributed in following areas: -Quantum groups,-Integrable systems,-Physical Applications of Group Theory,-Mathematical Results,-Geometry, Topology and Quantum Field Theory,-Super physics,-Super mathematics,-Atomic, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics. Nuclear and Particle Physics,-Symmetry and Foundations of classical and Quantum mechanics

  13. Angiotensin-(1?7) inhibits inflammation and oxidative stress to relieve lung injury induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, W.; Kang, J.; Hu, K.; Tang, S.; Zhou, X.; Yu, S.; Li, Y.; Xu, L.

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with inflammation and oxidative stress in lung tissues and can lead to metabolic abnormalities. We investigated the effects of angiotensin1–7 [Ang-(1–7)] on lung injury in rats induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH). We randomly assigned 32 male Sprague-Dawley rats (180–200 g) to normoxia control (NC), CIH-untreated (uCIH), Ang-(1–7)-treated normoxia control (N-A), and Ang-(1–7)-treated CIH (CIH-A) groups. Oxidative stress biomarkers were measured ...

  14. Working Group Report: Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  15. Quiet areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rikke Munck

    2016-01-01

    perception as a result of its interrelationships between motion, gaze, and sound. This paper uses four films, one of which is a drone flyover, to launch a discussion concerning a smooth and alluring gaze, a sliding gaze that penetrates landscapes, and site appearance. Films hold the capacity to project both...... a site and near-sensory experience. In so doing, films can achieve an intimate reflection of both outer experience and affection of inner sensations, and the audio-visual and time-space based presentation of this dualism can mimic human experience. This paper discusses how this embedded transference...... and transcendence can facilitate a deeper understanding of intimate sensations, substantiating their role in the future design and planning of urban landscapes. Hence, it addresses the ethics of an intimacy perspective (of drone filming) in the qualification of quiet areas....

  16. Papel de la angiotensina-(1-7 sobre la recaptación neuronal de noradrenalina en la hipertensión

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela M. Gironacci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available RESUMENPreviamente demostramos que la angiotensina (Ang-(1-7, en contraste con la Ang II, disminuyela liberación y la síntesis de noradrenalina (NA en ratas espontáneamentehipertensas (SHR. En el presente trabajo investigamos en ratas SHR el efecto de la Ang-(1-7 sobre la recaptación neuronal y la expresión del transportador de NA (NET, principalresponsable de la eliminación de NA del espacio sináptico. Si bien la Ang-(1-7 no presentaun efecto agudo sobre la recaptación neuronal de noradrenalina, tiene un papel estimuladorsobre el contenido proteico del NET a largo plazo. Esta acción la ejerce a través de laestimulación de la síntesis proteica de novo del transportador por la activación del receptorMas. Esto sugeriría que, a través de la regulación de los niveles de NA en el espacio sináptico,la Ang-(1-7 contribuiría a la regulación de la presión arterial.REV ARGENT CARDIOL 2010;78:151-155.

  17. Altkäemaksu vahendus (KarS § 296) kui vajaliku osavõtuga koosseis. Riigikohtu kriminaalkolleegiumi otsus 3-1-1-7-08 / Jaan Sootak

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Sootak, Jaan, 1948-

    2008-01-01

    Riigikohtu kriminaalkolleegiumi otsusest 3-1-1-7-08. P. P. kaitsja vandeadvokaat Valentina Manjuki kassatsioon Viru Ringkonnakohtu 24. oktoobri 2007. a kohtuotsuse peale kriminaalasjas P. P. süüdistuses KarS § 296 lg 1 järgi

  18. Atum: Scalable Group Communication Using Volatile Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Guerraoui, Rachid; Kermarrec, Anne-Marie; Pavlovic, Matej; Seredinschi, Dragos-Adrian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents Atum, a group communication middleware for a large, dynamic, and hostile environment. At the heart of Atum lies the novel concept of volatile groups: small, dynamic groups of nodes, each executing a state machine replication protocol, organized in a flexible overlay. Using volatile groups, Atum scatters faulty nodes evenly among groups, and then masks each individual fault inside its group. To broadcast messages among volatile groups, Atum runs a gossip protocol across the...

  19. Angiotensin 1-7, but not the thrombin-cleaved osteopontin C-terminal fragment, attenuates osteopontin-mediated macrophage-induced endothelial-cell inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamias, Rachel; Rudich, Assaf; Greenberg, George; Szendro, Gabriel; Wolak, Talya

    2018-03-01

    Evaluating the pro-/anti-inflammatory activity of the C-terminal cleavage product of osteopontin in comparison to angiotensin 1-7. Human coronary endothelial cells (hcEC) treated with conditioned media from human U937 macrophages. Macrophages were (pre)treated with C-terminal, full-length or N-terminal osteopontin (OPN-C, OPN-FL, OPN-N, respectively), angiotensin II, angiotensin 1-7 or TNF-α. OPN-C modulatory capacity was compared to that of Ang1-7 in inhibiting subsequent Ag II, OPN-FL or OPN-N-induced macrophage-mediated endothelial inflammation. Protein expression of NFκB, IκB, vCAM-1 and iCAM-1 was assessed using western blot. Promotor activation by NFκB was also assessed by dual-luciferase reporter assay. Conditioned media of macrophages treated with OPN-C induced hcECs' NfκB activation to a lower degree than OPN-FL or OPN-N. Priming of macrophages with angiotensin 1-7 attenuated the endothelial pro-inflammatory effect induced by subsequent exposure of the macrophages to angiotensin II, OPN-FL or OPN-N. This was evidenced by both NfκB activation and vCAM and iCAM expression. In contrast, priming macrophages with OPN-C did not significantly attenuate the subsequent response to the pro-inflammatory cytokines. OPN-C induces lower macrophage-induced endothelial inflammation compared to OPN-FL or OPN-N, but unlike angiotensin 1-7, fails to prevent endothelial inflammation induced by subsequent pro-inflammatory macrophage stimulation.

  20. SUBTASK 1.7 EVALUATION OF KEY FACTORS AFFECTING SUCCESSFUL OIL PRODUCTION IN THE BAKKEN FORMATION, NORTH DAKOTA PHASE II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darren D. Schmidt; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen; Damion J. Knudsen; John A. Harju; Edward N. Steadman

    2011-10-31

    Production from the Bakken and Three Forks Formations continues to trend upward as forecasts predict significant production of oil from unconventional resources nationwide. As the U.S. Geological Survey reevaluates the 3.65 billion bbl technically recoverable estimate of 2008, technological advancements continue to unlock greater unconventional oil resources, and new discoveries continue within North Dakota. It is expected that the play will continue to expand to the southwest, newly develop in the northeastern and northwestern corners of the basin in North Dakota, and fully develop in between. Although not all wells are economical, the economic success rate has been near 75% with more than 90% of wells finding oil. Currently, only about 15% of the play has been drilled, and recovery rates are less than 5%, providing a significant future of wells to be drilled and untouched hydrocarbons to be pursued through improved stimulation practices or enhanced oil recovery. This study provides the technical characterizations that are necessary to improve knowledge, provide characterization, validate generalizations, and provide insight relative to hydrocarbon recovery in the Bakken and Three Forks Formations. Oil-saturated rock charged from the Bakken shales and prospective Three Forks can be produced given appropriate stimulation treatments. Highly concentrated fracture stimulations with ceramic- and sand-based proppants appear to be providing the best success for areas outside the Parshall and Sanish Fields. Targeting of specific lithologies can influence production from both natural and induced fracture conductivity. Porosity and permeability are low, but various lithofacies units within the formation are highly saturated and, when targeted with appropriate technology, release highly economical quantities of hydrocarbons.

  1. IAC-11.E1-7.-A1.8.5 The Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Charles W.

    2012-12-01

    Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut is an international educational challenge focusing on fitness and nutrition as we encourage students to "train like an astronaut." Teams of students (aged 8-12) learn principles of healthy eating and exercise, compete for points by finishing training modules, and get excited about their future as "fit explorers." The 18 core exercises (targeting strength, endurance, coordination, balance, spatial awareness, and more) involve the same types of skills that astronauts learn in their training and use in spaceflight. This first-of-its-kind cooperative outreach program has allowed 11 space agencies and various partner institutions to work together to address quality health/fitness education, challenge students to be more physically active, increase awareness of the importance of lifelong health and fitness, teach students how fitness plays a vital role in human performance for exploration, and to inspire and motivate students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields. The project was initiated in 2009 in response to a request by the International Space Life Sciences Working Group. USA, Netherlands, Italy, France, Germany, Austria, Colombia, Spain, Belgium, Czech Republic and United Kingdom hosted teams for the pilot in the spring of 2010, and Japan held a modified version of the challenge. Several more agencies provided input into the preparations. Competing in 137 teams, more than 4000 students from over 40 cities worldwide participated in the first round of Mission X.

  2. Potential Environmental Justice Areas - (EJSCREEN) Block Group Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data are from EJSCREEN, an environmental justice (EJ) screening and mapping tool that provides EPA with a nationally consistent dataset and methodology for...

  3. 6.1 Research Areas in the Antenna Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    and support structures using three-dimensional (3-D) printers is an essential part of novel antenna developments. 2.2 Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) for... textile -integrated, and multifunctional antennas realized from emerging nanomaterials (e.g., carbon nanotubes [CNT] and graphene). The application of...platforms and high durability antennas for conformal, textile - integrated, and/or vehicle-integrated antenna applications. Frequencies of interest range

  4. Which finite simple groups are unit groups?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher James; Occhipinti, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    We prove that if G is a finite simple group which is the unit group of a ring, then G is isomorphic to either (a) a cyclic group of order 2; (b) a cyclic group of prime order 2^k −1 for some k; or (c) a projective special linear group PSLn(F2) for some n ≥ 3. Moreover, these groups do all occur...

  5. PCORnet's Collaborative Research Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletcher, Mark J; Forrest, Christopher B; Carton, Thomas W

    2018-01-01

    The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) launched a multi-institutional "network of networks" in 2013 - Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network (PCORnet) - that is designed to conduct clinical research that is faster, less expensive, and more responsive to the information needs of patients and clinicians. To enhance cross-network and cross-institutional collaboration and catalyze the use of PCORnet, PCORI has supported formation of 11 Collaborative Research Groups focusing on specific disease types (e.g., cardiovascular health and cancer) or particular patient populations (e.g., pediatrics and health disparities). PCORnet's Collaborative Research Groups are establishing research priorities within these focus areas, establishing relationships with potential funders, and supporting development of specific research projects that will use PCORnet resources. PCORnet remains a complex, multilevel, and heterogeneous network that is still maturing and building a diverse portfolio of observational and intervention