WorldWideScience

Sample records for area consortium research

  1. COAL ASH RESOURCES RESEARCH CONSORTIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium (CARRC, pronounced �cars�) is the core coal combustion by-product (CCB) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCBs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCB utilization and ensuring its successful application. CARRC continued the partnership of industry partners, university researchers, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) addressing needs in the CCB industry through technical research and development projects. Technology transfer also continued through distribution and presentation of the results of research activities to appropriate audiences, with emphasis on reaching government agency representatives and end users of CCBs. CARRC partners have evolved technically and have jointly developed an understanding of the layers of social, regulatory, legal, and competition issues that impact the success of CCB utilization as applies to the CCB industry in general and to individual companies. Many CARRC tasks are designed to provide information on CCB performance including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC activities from 1993�1998 included a variety of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCBs. The tasks summarized in this report are 1) The Demonstration of CCB Use in Small Construction Projects, 2) Application of CCSEM (computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy) for Coal Combustion By-Product Characterization, 3) Development of a Procedure to Determine Heat of Hydration for Coal Combustion By-Products, 4) Investigation of the Behavior of High

  2. Building a local research consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P A

    1994-05-01

    Although state, regional, and national networking often are critical to the nurse researchers, local support that is broader than what is found in any single agency may be the foundation needed by clinicians who want "more" research than that prescribed by their current role. More formal consortiums have successfully implemented a variety of research projects and are another possibility to explore (Beaman & Strader, 1990; Bolton, 1991; Chenitz et al., 1990; Keefe et al., 1988; Thiele, 1989). Another option is some state nurses' associations that have formal research assemblies (eg., Ohio Nurses Association, Assembly of Nurse Researchers). However, forming a local, less formal group with a few expert advisors may supply the energy and momentum necessary for both using and conducting research at a grassroots level. The expert advisors should be research-trained nurses (almost always with a PhD or DNS) who are active group members. Although Fitzpatrick encouraged collaborative research and writing early in the history of Applied Nursing Research (Fitzpatrick, 1989), in 1993 approximately two thirds of the articles in Applied Nursing Research still were single authored. Nurses are not using collaboration to its fullest extent. An informal group in one community has been one way to release the scholarship that was latent in many nurses. PMID:8031105

  3. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators

  4. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

  5. Academically Ambitious and Relevant Higher Education Research: The Legacy of the Consortium of Higher Education Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichler, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    The Consortium of Higher Education Researchers (CHER) was founded in 1988 to stimulate international communication and collaboration of higher education researchers. A need was felt to offset the isolation of the small numbers of scholars in this area of expertise in many countries, as well as the isolation of individual disciplines addressing…

  6. JV Task 120 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Loreal Heebink; David Hassett; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher

    2009-03-28

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') is the core coal combustion product (CCP) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCPs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCP utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program, which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCP performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 2007 to 2009 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCPs. The tasks were included in four categories: (1) Environmental Evaluations of CCPs; (2) Evaluation of Impacts on CCPs from Emission Controls; (3) Construction and Product-Related Activities; and (4) Technology Transfer and Maintenance Tasks. All tasks are designed to work toward achieving the CARRC overall goal and supporting objectives. The various tasks are coordinated in order to provide broad and useful technical data for CARRC members

  7. JV Task 6 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Erick Zacher

    2008-04-01

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCB utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP), which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCB performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 1998 to 2007 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCBs. CARRC topical reports were prepared on several completed tasks. Specific CARRC 1998B2007 accomplishments included: (1) Development of several ASTM International Standard Guides for CCB utilization applications. (2) Organization and presentation of training courses for CCB professionals and teachers. (3) Development of online resources including the Coal Ash Resource Center, Ash from Biomass in Coal (ABC) of cocombustion ash characteristics, and the Buyer's Guide to Coal-Ash Containing Products. In addition

  8. The Research Consortium, 1977-2010: Contributions, Milestones, and Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Bradley J.; Claman, Gayle

    2010-01-01

    Research and innovation are a cornerstone of any progressive organization. The Research Consortium (RC) has served as the principal organization fulfilling this function on behalf of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD) throughout much of its history. The RC is an organization of approximately 5,000…

  9. Experience of the Paris Research Consortium Climate-Environment-Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joussaume, Sylvie; Pacteau, Chantal; Vanderlinden, Jean Paul

    2016-04-01

    It is now widely recognized that the complexity of climate change issues translates itself into a need for interdisciplinary approaches to science. This allows to first achieve a more comprehensive vision of climate change and, second, to better inform the decision-making processes. However, it seems that willingness alone is rarely enough to implement interdisciplinarity. The purpose of this presentation is to mobilize reflexivity to revisit and analyze the experience of the Paris Consortium for Climate-Environment-Society. The French Consortium Climate-Environment-Society aims to develop, fund and coordinate interdisciplinary research into climate change and its impacts on society and environment. Launched in 2007, the consortium relies on the research expertise of 17 laboratories and federation in the Paris area working mainly in the fields of climatology, hydrology, ecology, health sciences, and the humanities and social sciences. As examples, economists and climatologists have studied greenhouse gas emission scenarios compatible with climate stabilization goals. Historical records have provided both knowledge about past climate change and vulnerability of societies. Some regions, as the Mediterranean and the Sahel, are particularly vulnerable and already have to cope with water availability, agricultural production and even health issues. A project showed that millet production in West Africa is expected to decline due to warming in a higher proportion than observed in recent decades. Climate change also raises many questions concerning health: combined effects of warming and air quality, impacts on the production of pollens and allergies, impacts on infectious diseases. All these issues lead to a need for approaches integrating different disciplines. Furthermore, climate change impacts many ecosystems which, in turn, affect its evolution. Our experience shows that interdisciplinarity supposes, in order to take shape, the conjunction between programming

  10. Highly migratory shark fisheries research by the National Shark Research Consortium (NSRC), 2002-2007

    OpenAIRE

    Robert E Hueter; Cailliet, Gregor M.; Ebert, David A.; Musick, John A.; Burgess, George H.

    2007-01-01

    The National Shark Research Consortium (NSRC) includes the Center for Shark Research at Mote Marine Laboratory, the Pacific Shark Research Center at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, the Shark Research Program at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, and the Florida Program for Shark Research at the University of Florida. The consortium objectives include shark-related research in the Gulf of Mexico and along the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the U.S., education and scientific cooperation.

  11. The Launch of the Philadelphia Education Research Consortium: Lessons Learned from the First Year of Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Kate

    2016-01-01

    The Philadelphia Education Research Consortium (PERC) was launched in July 2014 as an innovative place-based consortium of educational research partners from multiple sectors. Its primary objective is to provide research and analyses on some of the city's most pressing education issues. As such, PERC's research agenda is driven by both traditional…

  12. Ohio Coal Research Consortium fifth year final reports summary, September 1, 1994--February 29, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    As part of its efforts to improve the use of high-sulfur Ohio coal within environmental limits, the Ohio Coal Development Office, an entity within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO/ODOD), in late 1988 established a consortium of four Ohio universities. The purpose of the Ohio Coal Research Consortium is to conduct a multi-year fundamental research programs focused on: (1) the enhancement or development of dry sorption processes for the economical removal of high levels of SO{sub 2} and other pollutants, and (2) an increased understanding of methods for reduction in air toxics emissions from combustion gases produced by burning high-sulfur Ohio coal. This report contains summaries of eleven studies in these areas.

  13. Ohio Coal Research Consortium fourth year final summary report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    As a part of its efforts to improve the use of high-sulfur Ohio coal within environmental limits, the Ohio Coal Development Office, an entity within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO/ODOD), in late 1988 established a consortium of four Ohio universities. The purpose of the Ohio Coal Research Consortium is to conduct a multi-year fundamental research program focused on (1) the enhancement or development of dry sorption processes for the economical removal of high levels of SO{sub 2} and other pollutants and (2) an increased understanding of methods for reduction in air toxics emissions from combustion gases produced by burning high-sulfur Ohio coal. This report contains summaries of twelve studies in these areas.

  14. Consortium for Offshore Aviation Research : description of current projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The five projects which are currently underway or being evaluated through the Consortium for Offshore Aviation Research (COAR) were described. The projects are: (1) the use of narrow-beam, high intensity searchlights as approach aids for helicopter landings on helidecks in low visibility conditions, (2) establishment of a precipitation and fog characterization facility forecasting, (3) use of ice-phobic materials for airframe anti-icing, (4) use of differential global positioning satellite systems for offshore operations, and (5) the development of a virtual reality head-up-display for the approach to the Hibernia helideck (or any other helideck) to facilitate low visibility landings. Seed funding for these projects has been provided by the European Space Agency. Additional support is being provided by Hibernia, Petro-Canada, Husky Oil and Chevron Oil Canada. Initiatives to increase the number of partners are underway. 1 fig

  15. 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NIH Pain Consortium will convene the 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research, featuring keynote speakers and expert panel sessions on Innovative Models and Methods. The first keynote address will be delivered by David J. Clark, MD, PhD, Stanford University entitled “Challenges of Translational Pain Research: What Makes a Good Model?” |

  16. Dedicated Beamline Facilities for Catalytic Research. Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingguang [Columbia Univ., New York, NY; Frenkel, Anatoly [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Rodriguez, Jose [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Adzic, Radoslav [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bare, Simon R. [UOP LLC, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Hulbert, Steve L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Karim, Ayman [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mullins, David R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Overbury, Steve [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-03-04

    Synchrotron spectroscopies offer unique advantages over conventional techniques, including higher detection sensitivity and molecular specificity, faster detection rate, and more in-depth information regarding the structural, electronic and catalytic properties under in-situ reaction conditions. Despite these advantages, synchrotron techniques are often underutilized or unexplored by the catalysis community due to various perceived and real barriers, which will be addressed in the current proposal. Since its establishment in 2005, the Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC) has coordinated significant efforts to promote the utilization of cutting-edge catalytic research under in-situ conditions. The purpose of the current renewal proposal is aimed to provide assistance, and to develop new sciences/techniques, for the catalysis community through the following concerted efforts: Coordinating the implementation of a suite of beamlines for catalysis studies at the new NSLS-II synchrotron source; Providing assistance and coordination for catalysis users at an SSRL catalysis beamline during the initial period of NSLS to NSLS II transition; Designing in-situ reactors for a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic studies; Assisting experimental set-up and data analysis by a dedicated research scientist; Offering training courses and help sessions by the PIs and co-PIs.

  17. The Diamond university research consortium: nuclear waste characterisation, immobilisation and storage - 16374

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legacy waste treatment, storage and disposal, as well as decommissioning and site remediation, from the UK's civil nuclear programme are estimated at a cost of Pounds 70 B. Within the UK, the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) directs the strategy for all civil nuclear decommissioning and demanding timescales have been set for remediation of all nuclear sites. Additionally, the Committee on Radioactive Waste Management (CoRWM) recently delivered a recommendation, accepted by Government, that geological disposal in a mined repository presents the 'best available approach' for long term management of the waste legacy. There is therefore a requirement to decommission all power generation and experimental reactors, and fuel reprocessing plants, to decontaminate land, and to return nuclear licensed sites to brown or green field status. The engineering and scientific challenges that lie ahead in meeting these targets are significant, and many of the ideas required to deliver the final end state have not yet been researched. In recognition of this the UK Research Council's Energy Programme released a call for research proposals in the area of nuclear waste management and decommissioning valued at Pounds 4 M. A grant was subsequently awarded in 2008 to a consortium led by the University of Leeds, with member universities from Manchester, Imperial College, Sheffield, Loughborough and University College London. The DIAMOND (Decommissioning, Immobilisation And Management Of Nuclear Wastes For Disposal) consortium will undertake research aligned with the strategic priorities of the NDA and the CoRWM recommendations. Its primary purpose is to be adventurous and to deliver innovation. However, research is also being performed that will be of more immediate benefit to industrial stakeholders, with near-term impact achieved through the adoption of off-the-shelf technology currently implemented by other industries. Currently more than 20 industrial organisations are linked

  18. The FaceBase Consortium: A comprehensive program to facilitate craniofacial research

    OpenAIRE

    Hochheiser, Harry; Aronow, Bruce J.; Artinger, Kristin; Beaty, Terri H.; Brinkley, James F.; Chai, Yang; Clouthier, David; Cunningham, Michael L.; Dixon, Michael; Donahue, Leah Rae; Fraser, Scott E.; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Iwata, Junichi; Klein, Ophir; Marazita, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    The FaceBase Consortium consists of ten interlinked research and technology projects whose goal is to generate craniofacial research data and technology for use by the research community through a central data management and integrated bioinformatics hub. Funded by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) and currently focused on studying the development of the middle region of the face, the Consortium will produce comprehensive datasets of global gene expression pat...

  19. Clinical-histological associations in gastroparesis : results from the Gastroparesis Clinical Research Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grover, M.; Bernard, C. E.; Pasricha, P. J.; Lurken, M. S.; Faussone-Pellegrini, M. S.; Smyrk, T. C.; Parkman, H. P.; Abell, T. L.; Snape, W. J.; Hasler, W. L.; Mccallum, R. W.; Nguyen, L.; Koch, K. L.; Calles, J.; Lee, L.; Tonascia, J.; Uenalp-Arida, A.; Hamilton, F. A.; Farrugia, G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cellular changes associated with diabetic (DG) and idiopathic gastroparesis (IG) have recently been described from patients enrolled in the Gastroparesis Clinical Research Consortium. The association of these cellular changes with gastroparesis symptoms and gastric emptying is unknown. Th

  20. Growing Research Among Osteopathic Residents and Medical Students: A Consortium-Based Research Education Continuum Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannan, Grace D

    2016-05-01

    In general, physicians' interest in research continues to be a challenge. The lack of research culture is more pronounced in the osteopathic medical profession, which is historically not research oriented. With increasing focus on evidence-based medicine and with the single accreditation system for graduate medical education in motion, growing research and scholarly activities among osteopathic physicians and students and residents becomes imperative. This article illustrates how an educational consortium, such as an osteopathic postdoctoral training institution, can play a pivotal role in creating a culture of research through broad-based training of medical students and residents. PMID:27111784

  1. A University Consortium on Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assanis, Dennis; Atreya, Arvind; Bowman, Craig; Chen, Jyh-Yuan; Cheng, Wai; Davidson, David; Dibble, Robert; Edwards, Chris; Filipi, Zoran; Golden, David; Green, William; Hanson, Ronald; Hedrick, J Karl; Heywood, John; Im, Hong; Lavoie, George; Sick, Volker; Wooldridge, Margaret

    2007-03-31

    Over the course of this four year project, the consortium team members from UM, MIT, Stanford, and Berkeley along with contributors from Sandia National Labs and LLNL, have produced a wide range of results on gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The work spanned a wide range of activities including engine experiments, fundamental chemical kinetics experiments, and an array of analytical modeling techniques and simulations. Throughout the project a collaborative approach has produced a many significant new insights into HCCI engines and their behavior while at the same time we achieved our key consortium goal: to develop workable strategies for gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The major accomplishments in each task are summarized, followed by detailed discussion.

  2. Consortium for research in elder self-neglect of Texas research: advancing the field for practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosqueda, Laura; Brandl, Bonnie; Otto, Joanne; Stiegel, Lori; Thomas, Randolph; Heisler, Candace

    2008-11-01

    An external advisory board consisting of members from the fields of geriatric internal medicine, family practice geriatrics, criminal prosecution, civil law, police force, adult protective services, and victims advocacy was created to advise and guide the research conducted by the Consortium for Research in Elder Self-neglect of Texas (CREST). This panel of experts performed site visits and facilitated the research through responses to every-other-week fact sheets and quarterly conference calls. This paper provides the perspective of five of the board members regarding the research findings that were presented at the CREST National Conference in 2006. The discussions outline the successes of the CREST research, describe obstacles and the necessary next steps for continuance of the scientific exploration of this syndrome, and highlight the practice implications of the current and proposed research. PMID:19016972

  3. NSF Antarctic and Arctic Data Consortium; Scientific Research Support & Data Services for the Polar Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, P. J.; Pundsack, J. W.; Carbotte, S. M.; Tweedie, C. E.; Grunow, A.; Lazzara, M. A.; Carpenter, P.; Sjunneskog, C. M.; Yarmey, L.; Bauer, R.; Adrian, B. M.; Pettit, J.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. National Science Foundation Antarctic & Arctic Data Consortium (a2dc) is a collaboration of research centers and support organizations that provide polar scientists with data and tools to complete their research objectives. From searching historical weather observations to submitting geologic samples, polar researchers utilize the a2dc to search andcontribute to the wealth of polar scientific and geospatial data.The goals of the Antarctic & Arctic Data Consortium are to increase visibility in the research community of the services provided by resource and support facilities. Closer integration of individual facilities into a "one stop shop" will make it easier for researchers to take advantage of services and products provided by consortium members. The a2dc provides a common web portal where investigators can go to access data and samples needed to build research projects, develop student projects, or to do virtual field reconnaissance without having to utilize expensive logistics to go into the field.Participation by the international community is crucial for the success of a2dc. There are 48 nations that are signatories of the Antarctic Treaty, and 8 sovereign nations in the Arctic. Many of these organizations have unique capabilities and data that would benefit US ­funded polar science and vice versa.We'll present an overview of the Antarctic & Arctic Data Consortium, current participating organizations, challenges & opportunities, and plans to better coordinate data through a geospatial strategy and infrastructure.

  4. Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium: Accelerating Evidence-Based Practice of Genomic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert C; Goddard, Katrina A B; Jarvik, Gail P; Amendola, Laura M; Appelbaum, Paul S; Berg, Jonathan S; Bernhardt, Barbara A; Biesecker, Leslie G; Biswas, Sawona; Blout, Carrie L; Bowling, Kevin M; Brothers, Kyle B; Burke, Wylie; Caga-Anan, Charlisse F; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Chung, Wendy K; Clayton, Ellen W; Cooper, Gregory M; East, Kelly; Evans, James P; Fullerton, Stephanie M; Garraway, Levi A; Garrett, Jeremy R; Gray, Stacy W; Henderson, Gail E; Hindorff, Lucia A; Holm, Ingrid A; Lewis, Michelle Huckaby; Hutter, Carolyn M; Janne, Pasi A; Joffe, Steven; Kaufman, David; Knoppers, Bartha M; Koenig, Barbara A; Krantz, Ian D; Manolio, Teri A; McCullough, Laurence; McEwen, Jean; McGuire, Amy; Muzny, Donna; Myers, Richard M; Nickerson, Deborah A; Ou, Jeffrey; Parsons, Donald W; Petersen, Gloria M; Plon, Sharon E; Rehm, Heidi L; Roberts, J Scott; Robinson, Dan; Salama, Joseph S; Scollon, Sarah; Sharp, Richard R; Shirts, Brian; Spinner, Nancy B; Tabor, Holly K; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Veenstra, David L; Wagle, Nikhil; Weck, Karen; Wilfond, Benjamin S; Wilhelmsen, Kirk; Wolf, Susan M; Wynn, Julia; Yu, Joon-Ho

    2016-06-01

    Despite rapid technical progress and demonstrable effectiveness for some types of diagnosis and therapy, much remains to be learned about clinical genome and exome sequencing (CGES) and its role within the practice of medicine. The Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) consortium includes 18 extramural research projects, one National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) intramural project, and a coordinating center funded by the NHGRI and National Cancer Institute. The consortium is exploring analytic and clinical validity and utility, as well as the ethical, legal, and social implications of sequencing via multidisciplinary approaches; it has thus far recruited 5,577 participants across a spectrum of symptomatic and healthy children and adults by utilizing both germline and cancer sequencing. The CSER consortium is analyzing data and creating publically available procedures and tools related to participant preferences and consent, variant classification, disclosure and management of primary and secondary findings, health outcomes, and integration with electronic health records. Future research directions will refine measures of clinical utility of CGES in both germline and somatic testing, evaluate the use of CGES for screening in healthy individuals, explore the penetrance of pathogenic variants through extensive phenotyping, reduce discordances in public databases of genes and variants, examine social and ethnic disparities in the provision of genomics services, explore regulatory issues, and estimate the value and downstream costs of sequencing. The CSER consortium has established a shared community of research sites by using diverse approaches to pursue the evidence-based development of best practices in genomic medicine. PMID:27181682

  5. The VUELCO project consortium: new interdisciplinary research for improved risk mitigation and management during volcanic unrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottsmann, J.

    2012-04-01

    -term probabilistic hazard forecasting tools the scientific knowledge base will provide the crucial parameters for a comprehensive and best-practice approach to 1) risk mitigation, 2) communication, 3) decision-making and 4) crisis management during unrest periods. The VUELCO project consortium efforts will generate guidance in the definition and implementation of strategic options for effective risk mitigation, management and governance during unrest episodes. Such a mechanistic platform of understanding, impacting on the synergy of scientists, policy-makers, civil protection authorities, decision-makers, and the public, will place volcanic unrest management on a new basis, with European expertise at its peak. The project is financed by the European Commission under the 7th Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development, Area "Environment".

  6. A consortium approach for disaster relief and technology research and development: Fire station earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Douglas C.

    1992-06-01

    A new paradigm is proposed for alleviating the chronic problem of inadequate response to natural and man-made disasters. Fundamental flaws and weaknesses in the current disaster mitigation system point to the need for an international consortium involving governments, academia, industry, and businesses. Recent changes in social and political framework offer a unique opportunity of rethink and reform the existing disaster response mechanism. Benefits of a collaborative consortium approach may include commercial incentives, improved cost effectiveness, coherence in research and development efforts, conduciveness for long-term planning, and improved deployment of technology for disaster mitigation.

  7. Clinical practice of image-guided spine radiosurgery - results from an international research consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinal radiosurgery is a quickly evolving technique in the radiotherapy and neurosurgical communities. However, the methods of spine radiosurgery have not been standardized. This article describes the results of a survey about the methods of spine radiosurgery at five international institutions. All institutions are members of the Elekta Spine Radiosurgery Research Consortium and have a dedicated research and clinical focus on image-guided radiosurgery. The questionnaire consisted of 75 items covering all major steps of spine radiosurgery. Strong agreement in the methods of spine radiosurgery was observed. In particular, similarities were observed with safety and quality assurance playing an important role in the methods of all institutions, cooperation between neurosurgeons and radiation oncologists in case selection, dedicated imaging for target- and organ-at-risk delineation, application of proper safety margins for the target volume and organs-at-risk, conformal planning and precise image-guided treatment delivery, and close clinical and radiological follow-up. In contrast, three major areas of uncertainty and disagreement were identified: 1) Indications and contra-indications for spine radiosurgery; 2) treatment dose and fractionation and 3) tolerance dose of the spinal cord. Results of this study reflect the current practice of spine radiosurgery in large academic centers. Despite close agreement was observed in many steps of spine radiosurgery, further research in form of retrospective and especially prospective studies is required to refine the details of spinal radiosurgery in terms of safety and efficacy

  8. Clinical practice of image-guided spine radiosurgery - results from an international research consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guckenberger Matthias

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal radiosurgery is a quickly evolving technique in the radiotherapy and neurosurgical communities. However, the methods of spine radiosurgery have not been standardized. This article describes the results of a survey about the methods of spine radiosurgery at five international institutions. Methods All institutions are members of the Elekta Spine Radiosurgery Research Consortium and have a dedicated research and clinical focus on image-guided radiosurgery. The questionnaire consisted of 75 items covering all major steps of spine radiosurgery. Results Strong agreement in the methods of spine radiosurgery was observed. In particular, similarities were observed with safety and quality assurance playing an important role in the methods of all institutions, cooperation between neurosurgeons and radiation oncologists in case selection, dedicated imaging for target- and organ-at-risk delineation, application of proper safety margins for the target volume and organs-at-risk, conformal planning and precise image-guided treatment delivery, and close clinical and radiological follow-up. In contrast, three major areas of uncertainty and disagreement were identified: 1 Indications and contra-indications for spine radiosurgery; 2 treatment dose and fractionation and 3 tolerance dose of the spinal cord. Conclusions Results of this study reflect the current practice of spine radiosurgery in large academic centers. Despite close agreement was observed in many steps of spine radiosurgery, further research in form of retrospective and especially prospective studies is required to refine the details of spinal radiosurgery in terms of safety and efficacy.

  9. The KNOO research consortium: work package 3 - an integrated approach to waste immobilisation and management - 16375

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Keeping the Nuclear Option Open (KNOO) research consortium is a four-year research council funded initiative addressing the challenges related to increasing the safety, reliability and sustainability of nuclear power in the UK. Through collaboration between key industrial and governmental stakeholders, and with international partners, KNOO was established to maintain and develop skills relevant to nuclear power generation. Funded by a research grant of Pounds 6.1 M from the 'Towards a Sustainable Energy Economy Programme' of the UK Research Councils, it represents the single largest university-based nuclear research programme in the UK for more than 30 years. The programme is led by Imperial College London, in collaboration with the universities of Manchester, Sheffield, Leeds, Bristol, Cardiff and the Open University. These universities are working with the UK nuclear industry, who contributed a further Pounds 0.4 M in funding. The industry/government stakeholders include AWE, British Energy, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, the Environment Agency, the Health and Safety Executive, Doosan Babcock, the Ministry of Defence, Nirex, AMEC NNC, Rolls-Royce PLC and the UK Atomic Energy Authority. Work Package 3 of this consortium, led by the University of Leeds, concerns 'An Integrated Approach to Waste Immobilisation and Management', and involves Imperial College London, and the Universities of Manchester and Sheffield. The aims of this work package are: to study the re-mobilisation, transport, solid-liquid separation and immobilisation of particulate wastes; to develop predictive models for particle behaviour based on atomic scale, thermodynamic and process scale simulations; to develop a fundamental understanding of selective adsorption of nuclides onto filter systems and their immobilisation; and to consider mechanisms of nuclide leaving and transport. The paper describes highlights from this work in the key areas of multi-scale modeling

  10. SARC: Development and Support of a Sarcoma Research Consortium Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkison, Jim

    2007-10-29

    SARC is a non-for-profit organization whose mission and vision is to advocate for the collaboration on the design of clinical trials on sarcoma, to further the knowledge regarding the diagnosis and treatment of sarcoma and provide accurate and up to date information to physicians, patients and families. The objectives are to assist in the development of the infrastructure for the continued growth and spectrum of clinical research, to facilitate biannual meeting of investigators, and to develop a preclinical research base that would design and conduct research that would improve the process of drug treatments selected for clinical research trials.

  11. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — ICPSR maintains a data archive of more than 500,000 files of research in the social sciences. It hosts 16 specialized collections of data in education, aging,...

  12. A DOE University-national laboratory waste-management education and research consortium (WERC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results and current status of a consortium of three universities and two national laboratories working closely with industry for an Education and Research program on waste-management and environmental restoration. The program sponsored by the US Department of Energy has been in effect for 18 months and has achieved significant progress towards establishing: undergraduate, graduate and associate degree programs involving environmental management, interactive TV courses from the consortium members transmitted throughout the United States, Mexico ampersand Canada, a satellite TV network, a professional development teleconference series, research programs at the leading edge of technology training multi-disciplinary students, research laboratories for analyses, testing, and student training, technology transfer programs, including a TV series on research applications, outreach programs, including pre-college and minority education, community monitoring

  13. Research Areas in Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. S. T. Waghmode

    2012-01-01

    Research is the most distinguished activity that enhances the quality of higher-education. A person obsessed with research has to face many problems. Apart from having an appropriate guide, the real problem begins with the selection of the research topic. The vast and gleaming research area is always changing its dimensions. Some well-set, readymade and stereotyped topics do not attract the attention of a competent researcher, because he or she is always looking for what is new and qualitativ...

  14. The Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS): Connecting Arctic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, R. H.; Wiggins, H. V.; Creek, K. R.; Sheffield Guy, L.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation will highlight the recent activities of the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS) to connect Arctic research. ARCUS is a nonprofit membership organization of universities and institutions that have a substantial commitment to research in the Arctic. ARCUS was formed in 1988 to serve as a forum for planning, facilitating, coordinating, and implementing interdisciplinary studies of the Arctic; to act as a synthesizer and disseminator of scientific information on arctic research; and to educate scientists and the general public about the needs and opportunities for research in the Arctic. ARCUS, in collaboration with the broader science community, relevant agencies and organizations, and other stakeholders, coordinates science planning and educational activities across disciplinary and organizational boundaries. Examples of ARCUS projects include: Arctic Sea Ice Outlook - an international effort that provides monthly summer reports synthesizing community estimates of the expected sea ice minimum. Sea Ice for Walrus Outlook - a resource for Alaska Native subsistence hunters, coastal communities, and others that provides weekly reports with information on sea ice conditions relevant to walrus in Alaska waters. PolarTREC (Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating) - a program whereby K-12 educators and researchers work together in hands-on field experiences in the Arctic and Antarctic to advance polar science education. ArcticInfo mailing list, Witness the Arctic newsletter, and the Arctic Calendar - communication tools for the arctic science community to keep apprised of relevant news, meetings, and announcements. Coordination for the Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) program, which aims to provide scientific understanding of arctic environmental change to help society understand and respond to a rapidly changing Arctic. More information about these and other ARCUS activities can be found at the ARCUS website at

  15. CERTS: Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions - Research Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, Joseph

    2003-07-30

    Historically, the U.S. electric power industry was vertically integrated, and utilities were responsible for system planning, operations, and reliability management. As the nation moves to a competitive market structure, these functions have been disaggregated, and no single entity is responsible for reliability management. As a result, new tools, technologies, systems, and management processes are needed to manage the reliability of the electricity grid. However, a number of simultaneous trends prevent electricity market participants from pursuing development of these reliability tools: utilities are preoccupied with restructuring their businesses, research funding has declined, and the formation of Independent System Operators (ISOs) and Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs) to operate the grid means that control of transmission assets is separate from ownership of these assets; at the same time, business uncertainty, and changing regulatory policies have created a climate in which needed investment for transmission infrastructure and tools for reliability management has dried up. To address the resulting emerging gaps in reliability R&D, CERTS has undertaken much-needed public interest research on reliability technologies for the electricity grid. CERTS' vision is to: (1) Transform the electricity grid into an intelligent network that can sense and respond automatically to changing flows of power and emerging problems; (2) Enhance reliability management through market mechanisms, including transparency of real-time information on the status of the grid; (3) Empower customers to manage their energy use and reliability needs in response to real-time market price signals; and (4) Seamlessly integrate distributed technologies--including those for generation, storage, controls, and communications--to support the reliability needs of both the grid and individual customers.

  16. The Cardiac Safety Research Consortium enters its second decade: An invitation to participate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, J Rick; Kowey, Peter R; Rodriguez, Ignacio; Cabell, Christopher H; Gintant, Gary; Green, Cynthia L; Kunz, Barbara Lopez; Mortara, Justin; Sager, Philip T; Stockbridge, Norman; Wright, Theressa J; Finkle, John; Krucoff, Mitchell W

    2016-07-01

    The Cardiac Safety Research Consortium (CSRC), a transparent, public-private partnership established in 2005 as a Critical Path Program and formalized in 2006 under a Memorandum of Understanding between the United States Food and Drug Administration and Duke University, is entering its second decade. Our continuing goal is to advance paradigms for more efficient regulatory science related to the cardiovascular safety of new therapeutics, both in the United States and globally, particularly where such safety questions add burden to innovative research and development. Operationally, CSRC brings together a broad base of stakeholders from academia, industry, and government agencies in a collaborative forum focused on identifying barriers and then creating novel solutions through shared data, expertise, and collaborative research. This white paper provides a brief overview of the Consortium's activities in its first decade and a context for some of our current activities and future directions. The growth and success of the CSRC have been primarily driven by members' active participation and the development of goodwill and trust throughout our membership, which have facilitated novel collaborations across traditionally competitive or contentious stakeholder boundaries. The continued expansion of our base of participating academicians, industry experts, and regulators will define the Consortium's success in our second decade. It is our hope that sharing our endeavors to date will stimulate additional participation in the CSRC and also provide a model for other groups starting to develop similar collaborative forums. PMID:27297854

  17. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  18. StemBANCC: Governing Access to Material and Data in a Large Stem Cell Research Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Michael; Klein, Christine; Clemann, Nicole; Collier, David A; Hardy, John; Heisserer, Barbara; Cader, M Zameel; Graf, Martin; Kaye, Jane

    2015-10-01

    This paper makes the case for implementing an internal governance framework for sharing materials and data in stem cell research consortia. A governance framework can facilitate a transparent and accountable system while building trust among partner institutions. However, avoiding excessive bureaucracy is essential. The development and implementation of a governance framework for materials and data access in the Stem cells for Biological Assays of Novel drugs and prediCtive toxiCology (StemBANCC) consortium is presented as a practical example. The StemBANCC project is a multi-partner European research consortium, which aims to build a resource of 1,500 well characterised induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines for in vitro disease modelling and toxicology studies. The project governance framework was developed in two stages. A small working group identified key components of a framework and translated the project legal agreements into a draft policy document. The second phase allowed input from all consortium partners to shape the iterative development of a final policy document that could be agreed by all parties. Careful time management strategies were needed to manage the duration of this component. This part of the process also served as an exploratory space where different options could be proposed, potential gaps in planning identified, and project co-ordination activities specified. PMID:26024842

  19. STRUCTURE OF CONSORTIUM DESTRUCTIVE COMPONENTS IN THE INDUSTRIAL AREA OF KRIVYI RIG BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kachinskaya V.V.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Тhe structural organization and a biological variety of ground mesofauna on consortium level of the organization of ecosystems are considered. The analysis of indicators of the structural organization and a biodiversity of ground mesofauna in consortium Ulmus and Populus in the conditions of territories of industrial mining – metallurgical complex of Krivyi Rig Basin is carried out. It is established that taxonomical structure of ground mesofauna is characterized by insignificant number and quantity of taxonomical groups. Prevalence in morfo-ecological structure of hortobiontes and herpetobiontes testifies about faunae considerable attachment to consortium determinants and influences of a steppe climate on its structure. Prevalence of phytophages and polyphages in trophic structure is caused by combination of determinants specificity of consortium and zone source of fauna formations. The structural organization of ground mesofauna in consortium Ulmus and Populus in the conditions of industrial sites is characterized simplified taxonomical structure with a low biodiversity at all levels. It was suggested that structural and functional organization of destructive components of the block consortium of Ulmus and Populus in the conditions of industrial sites are simplified and determined by biogeochemical patterns of pedogenic and leaf litter layer of consortium and type of anthropogenic impact. Management and sustainable use of consortium under technogenic pressure should be based on the effects of extreme and critical components in the evolution of consortium. These critical points are the type of leading man-made factors and pedogenic and leaf litter biogeochemical conditions of consortium determinants, which results in inhibition of development and simplification of the structural and functional organization of destructive components of the block. The elaboration of measures to restore and maintain that structural and functional organization

  20. Student Research Projects in Geophysics Through a Consortium of Undergraduate Geology Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, G. C.

    2003-12-01

    Beginning in 1987, and continuing to the present, the Keck Geology Consortium, a group of 12 undergraduate institutions, has sponsored a series of summer research projects. These projects typically involve from 9 to 12 students and 3 to 4 faculty members and consist of a 4 to 5 week summer research program followed by continuation of the research at the students' home institutions, often as a senior thesis. Many of these projects have included extensive field and laboratory geophysical components. In order for students to carry out successful research projects in geophysics, several hurdles have to be cleared. Frequently these students have not had a formal course in geophysics, so although they may have strong geologic and quantitative skills, there is usually the need for a concentrated classroom immersion in the geophysical theory and methods related to the project. Field geophysics projects are labor intensive, so it is common for a group of three or more students to produce only one or two complete data sets in the course of the summer program. Generating individualized projects so that students feel ownership of their thesis research can be challenging. Most of the departments do not have a geophysicist on the faculty, so follow-up support for the student research involves continued long-distance collaboration between project directors, students and sponsoring faculty. The impact of the internet on this collaboration cannot be overstated. Finally, diverse computing environments at the participating institutions were a significant problem in the early years. Migration of geophysical software to Windows from Unix, and the widespread availability of Linux has mitigated these problems in recent years. The geophysical components of these projects have been largely successful. A series of vignettes is presented showing the range and nature of geophysical projects that have been carried out. In addition to anecdotal evidence of student satisfaction, there is

  1. TTA school-based research consortium initiative, the evaluation, final report

    OpenAIRE

    Kushner, S.; Simons, H.; James, D; Jones, K; Yee, W C

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report of the evaluation of th School-Based Research Consortium Initiative which ran in England from 1998 to 2001. The initiative was sponsored via a public/private partnership between the Teacher Training Agency (TTA), a UK Government agency, and the Centre for British Teachers (CfBT), a private not-for-profit company. The aim of the initiative was to create local infrastructures of support and action for teachers to engage ‘in and with’ research. Those infrastructures wer...

  2. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2006-06-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel

  3. Innovations and Enhancements for a Consortium of Big-10 University Research and Training Reactors. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Consortium of Big-10 University Research and Training Reactors was by design a strategic partnership of seven leading institutions. We received the support of both our industry and DOE laboratory partners. Investments in reactor, laboratory and program infrastructure, allowed us to lead the national effort to expand and improve the education of engineers in nuclear science and engineering, to provide outreach and education to pre-college educators and students and to become a key resource of ideas and trained personnel for our U.S. industrial and DOE laboratory collaborators.

  4. The Solar Energy Consortium of New York Photovoltaic Research and Development Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Petra M.

    2012-10-15

    Project Objective: To lead New York State to increase its usage of solar electric systems. The expected outcome is that appropriate technologies will be made available which in turn will help to eliminate barriers to solar energy usage in New York State. Background: The Solar Energy Consortium has been created to lead New York State research on solar systems specifically directed at doubling the efficiency, halving the cost and reducing the cost of installation as well as developing unique form factors for the New York City urban environment.

  5. The Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1990--1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In February, 1990, the Secretary of Energy, James Watkins approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) . This program known by the acronym, ''WERC'' includes NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT), the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Sandia National Laboratories. The program is designed to provide an integrated approach to the national need via the following: (1) Education in waste management by the Consortium universities resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. The term waste management is used in a broad sense throughout this paper and includes all aspects of environmental management and environmental restoration. (2) Research programs at the leading edge, providing training to faculty and students and feeding into the education programs. (3) Education and research at the campuses, as well as from three field sites. (4) Ties with other multi-disciplinary university facilities. (5) Ties with two National Laboratories located in New Mexico. (6) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a proposed satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (7) An outreach program to interest others in environmental management, especially precollege students, minority students and practitioners in the field. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the first year

  6. The Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1990--1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-02-25

    In February, 1990, the Secretary of Energy, James Watkins approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) . This program known by the acronym, WERC'' includes NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT), the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Sandia National Laboratories. The program is designed to provide an integrated approach to the national need via the following: (1) Education in waste management by the Consortium universities resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. The term waste management is used in a broad sense throughout this paper and includes all aspects of environmental management and environmental restoration. (2) Research programs at the leading edge, providing training to faculty and students and feeding into the education programs. (3) Education and research at the campuses, as well as from three field sites. (4) Ties with other multi-disciplinary university facilities. (5) Ties with two National Laboratories located in New Mexico. (6) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a proposed satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (7) An outreach program to interest others in environmental management, especially precollege students, minority students and practitioners in the field. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the first year.

  7. The Hobbs Oil and Water Experimental Facility of the Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hobbs Oil and Water Experimental (HOWE) Facility came on-line as a research component of the Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) when funding for the Consortium became official in late February 1990. As a support facility for WERC, which was established to expand the ability of this nation to manage hazardous, radioactive, and solid wastes through a multidisciplinary approach, HOWE can tap into the expertise that resides at three major New Mexico universities, on Native American community college, and two national laboratories. The intention of the HOWE is to provide education, as well as research and development programs, that reflect concerns of the petroleum industry in the United States. Personnel work to solve environmental problems and assess the impact to the industry of regulatory actions pertaining to those problems. Leadership for the program is provided from the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology at Socorro, NM, by Technical Leaders F.D. Martin, Director of the Petroleum Recovery Research Center, and Dr. R.E. Bretz of the petroleum engineering faculty. The HOWE site is administered by Mike DeMarco, Director of the Petroleum Technology Program at the New Mexico Junior College in Hobbs, NM. Currently, the HOWE laboratory is being provided with state-of-the-art equipment to support research projects or field demonstration activities. Programs include research pertaining to groundwater pollution transport processes, slurry-phase bioremediation of oilfield production pit sludges, and treatment of produced brines or contaminated waters. This paper introduces the HOWE and discusses the research programs relevant to the petroleum industry that are presently underway or planned. Future collaborative efforts with industry that are presently underway or planned. Future collaborative efforts with industry groups are being encouraged

  8. [Autonomy despite multimorbidity in old age--the Berlin-based AMA research consortium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüz, B; Dräger, D; Richter, S; Kummer, K; Kuhlmey, A; Tesch-Römer, C

    2011-12-01

    The proportion of the population with multiple illnesses increases with age and growing numbers of people are now living to a very old age. Despite medical progress and improved living conditions, many old people have to deal with physical, psychological, and social impairments. It is a crucial challenge for health and social policy to support the elderly with health-related impairments in their desire to lead as independent a life as possible. Against this background the research consortium Autonomy Despite Multimorbidity in Old Age (AMA I) examined the extent to which the self-determined life style of multimorbid old and very old persons can be supported and maintained. In order to reflect the diversity of life worlds of the elderly, the study sample included participants who were not notably impaired in their everyday functioning, participants in need of nursing care and participants with cognitive impairments. Moreover, the sample comprised both older persons who were still living in their own homes and nursing home residents. The studies conducted within the AMA framework focused on the resources available to old persons living in different situations and on how these resources can be strengthened. This article presents findings from the first phase of funding of the AMA research consortium. In a second phase of funding (2011-2013, AMA II), sustainable practice-based interventions are being developed to mobilize resources which can help multimorbid older persons to maintain their autonomy and the practical viability of these interventions will be tested. PMID:22270971

  9. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carol Lutken

    2006-09-30

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The CMRET has conducted several research cruises during this reporting period

  10. 77 FR 38831 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-3D PDF Consortium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... Section 6(b) of the Act on April 20, 2012 (77 FR 23754). Patricia A. Brink, Director of Civil Enforcement... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--3D PDF... Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), 3D PDF Consortium,...

  11. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities of Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas McGee; Carol Lutken

    2008-05-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research that shared the need for a way to conduct investigations of gas hydrates and their stability zone in the Gulf of Mexico in situ on a more-or-less continuous basis. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor and to discover the configuration and composition of the subsurface pathways or 'plumbing' through which fluids migrate into and out of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the sediment-water interface. Monitoring changes in this zone and linking them to coincident and perhaps consequent events at the seafloor and within the water column is the eventual goal of the Consortium. This mission includes investigations of the physical, chemical and biological components of the gas hydrate stability zone - the sea-floor/sediment-water interface, the near-sea-floor water column, and the shallow subsurface sediments. The eventual goal is to monitor changes in the hydrate stability zone over time. Establishment of the Consortium succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among those involved in gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Following extensive investigation into candidate sites, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) was chosen by consensus of the Consortium at their fall, 2004, meeting as the site most likely to satisfy all criteria established by the group. Much of the preliminary work preceding the establishment of the site - sensor development and testing, geophysical surveys, and laboratory studies - has been reported in

  12. Research Areas: Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 900 drugs and supplements.​​ Recent discoveries from NIDDK research include: New medication shows promise against liver fibrosis ... linked to biliary atresia in newborn animals Support Research NIDDK invests in basic, clinical and translational research ...

  13. Research Areas: Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 900 drugs and supplements.​​ Recent discoveries from NIDDK research include: Allergy drug inhibits hepatitis C in mice ... Liver Regeneration Breakthrough Using Mature Human Cells Support Research NIDDK invests in basic, clinical and translational research ...

  14. An Industry/Academe Consortium for Achieving 20% wind by 2030 through Cutting-Edge Research and Workforce Training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Marr, Jeffrey D.G. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Milliren, Christopher [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Kaveh, Mos [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Mohan, Ned [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Stolarski, Henryk [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Glauser, Mark [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Arndt, Roger [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2013-12-01

    In January 2010, the University of Minnesota, along with academic and industry project partners, began work on a four year project to establish new facilities and research in strategic areas of wind energy necessary to move the nation towards a goal of 20% wind energy by 2030. The project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy with funds made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. $7.9M of funds were provided by DOE and $3.1M was provided through matching funds. The project was organized into three Project Areas. Project Area 1 focused on design and development of a utility scale wind energy research facility to support research and innovation. The project commissioned the Eolos Wind Research Field Station in November of 2011. The site, located 20 miles from St. Paul, MN operates a 2.5MW Clipper Liberty C-96 wind turbine, a 130-ft tall sensored meteorological tower and a robust sensor and data acquisition network. The site is operational and will continue to serve as a site for innovation in wind energy for the next 15 years. Project Areas 2 involved research on six distinct research projects critical to the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 goals. The research collaborations involved faculty from two universities, over nine industry partners and two national laboratories. Research outcomes include new knowledge, patents, journal articles, technology advancements, new computational models and establishment of new collaborative relationships between university and industry. Project Area 3 focused on developing educational opportunities in wind energy for engineering and science students. The primary outcome is establishment of a new graduate level course at the University of Minnesota called Wind Engineering Essentials. The seminar style course provides a comprehensive analysis of wind energy technology, economics, and operation. The course is highly successful and will continue to be offered at the University. The vision of U.S. DOE to

  15. Overview of the consortium of hospitals advancing research on tobacco (chart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riley William T

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Consortium of Hospitals Advancing Research on Tobacco (CHART is a network of six projects and a research coordinating unit funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research. The CHART projects will assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions initiated during hospitalization and continued post-discharge. Methods/design Along with a seventh project funded previously under the NIH Challenge grants, the CHART projects will assess smoking cessation strategies delivered to approximately 10,000 hospitalized smokers across a geographically diverse group of nearly 20 private, public, academic, and community hospitals. The CHART research coordinating unit at Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research provides organizational and data coordination support, facilitating the development of common measures for combining data from multiple CHART projects. Discussion The targeted enrollment in CHART, if achieved, will represent the largest, most diverse pooled dataset of hospitalized smokers receiving smoking cessation assistance, and is designed to contribute to the dissemination and implementation of smoking cessation interventions provided by hospital systems.

  16. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1991--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-07

    In February, 1990, the Secretary of Energy, James Watkins approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, WERC'' includes NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT), Navajo Community College, the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Sandia National Laboratories. The program is designed to provide an integrated approach to the national need via the following: (1) Education in waste management to reach thousands of students by the three Consortium universities and the affiliate college resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (The term waste or environmental management is used in a broad sense throughout this paper and includes all aspects of environmental management and environmental restoration.) (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing training to students and information to faculty feeding into the education programs. (4) Education and technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos Sandia) located in New Mexico, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach program of special interest to pre-college students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the second year.

  17. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1991--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-07

    In February, 1990, the Secretary of Energy, James Watkins approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, ``WERC`` includes NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT), Navajo Community College, the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Sandia National Laboratories. The program is designed to provide an integrated approach to the national need via the following: (1) Education in waste management to reach thousands of students by the three Consortium universities and the affiliate college resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (The term waste or environmental management is used in a broad sense throughout this paper and includes all aspects of environmental management and environmental restoration.) (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing training to students and information to faculty feeding into the education programs. (4) Education and technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos & Sandia) located in New Mexico, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach program of special interest to pre-college students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the second year.

  18. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1991--1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In February, 1990, the Secretary of Energy, James Watkins approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, ''WERC'' includes NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT), Navajo Community College, the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Sandia National Laboratories. The program is designed to provide an integrated approach to the national need via the following: (1) Education in waste management to reach thousands of students by the three Consortium universities and the affiliate college resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (The term waste or environmental management is used in a broad sense throughout this paper and includes all aspects of environmental management and environmental restoration.) (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing training to students and information to faculty feeding into the education programs. (4) Education and technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos ampersand Sandia) located in New Mexico, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach program of special interest to pre-college students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the second year

  19. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The group is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently received increased attention and the group of researchers working on the station has expanded to include several microbial biologists. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments are planned for fall 2005 and center about the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles. The subs will be used to effect bottom surveys, emplace sensors and sea floor experiments and make connections between sensor data loggers and the integrated data power unit (IDP). Station/observatory completion is anticipated for 2007 following the

  20. Filling the Void: The Roles of a Local Applied Research Center and a Statewide Workforce Training Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perniciaro, Richard C.; Nespoli, Lawrence A.; Anbarasan, Sivaraman

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the development of an applied research center at Atlantic Cape Community College and a statewide workforce training consortium run by the community college sector in New Jersey. Their contributions to the economic development mission of the colleges as well as their impact on the perception of community colleges by…

  1. 77 FR 23754 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-3D PDF Consortium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--3D PDF Consortium, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on March 27, 2012, pursuant to Section 6(a) of the National...) Host committees that develop materials in support of 3D PDF's mission; (b) operate a branding...

  2. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Carol Blanton Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2007-03-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. These delays caused scheduling and deployments difficulties but many

  3. The National Astronomy Consortium Summer Student Research Program at NRAO-Socorro: Year 2 structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Elisabeth A.; Sheth, Kartik; Giles, Faye; Perez, Laura M.; Arancibia, Demian; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    I will present a summary of the program structure used for the second year of hosting a summer student research cohort of the National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, NM. The NAC is a program partnering physics and astronomy departments in majority and minority-serving institutions across the country. The primary aim of this program is to support traditionally underrepresented students interested in pursuing a career in STEM through a 9-10 week summer astronomy research project and a year of additional mentoring after they return to their home institution. I will describe the research, professional development, and inclusivity goals of the program, and show how these were used to create a weekly syllabus for the summer. I will also highlight several unique aspects of this program, including the recruitment of remote mentors for students to better balance the gender and racial diversity of available role models for the students, as well as the hosting of a contemporaneous series of visiting diversity speakers. Finally, I will discuss structures for continuing to engage, interact with, and mentor students in the academic year following the summer program. A goal of this work going forward is to be able to make instructional and organizational materials from this program available to other sites interested in joining the NAC or hosting similar programs at their own institution.

  4. Research Areas: Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI's prevention research has a broad focus—from identifying environmental and lifestyle factors that influence cancer risk to studying the biology of how cancer develops and testing ways to disseminate prevention interventions.

  5. Research Areas - Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  6. Research Areas: Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate information derived from diagnostic tools is crucial for making decisions at all stages of cancer care. NCI supports research on the development of tests and imaging technologies that can provide specific information about an individual’s cancer.

  7. Research Areas: Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  8. Coordinating centers in cancer epidemiology research: the Asia Cohort Consortium coordinating center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Betsy; Smith, Briana R; Potter, John D

    2011-10-01

    Although it is tacitly recognized that a good coordinating center (CC) is essential to the success of any multisite collaborative project, very little study has been done on what makes a CC successful, why some CCs fail, or how to build a CC that meets the needs of a given project. Moreover, very little published guidance is available, as few CCs outside the clinical trial realm write about their work. The Asia Cohort Consortium (ACC) is a collaborative cancer epidemiology research project that has made strong scientific and organizational progress over the past 3 years by focusing its CC on the following activities: collaboration development; operations management; statistical and data management; and communications infrastructure and tool development. Our hope is that, by sharing our experience building the ACC CC, we can begin a conversation about what it means to run a CC for multi-institutional collaboration in cancer epidemiology, help other collaborative projects solve some of the issues associated with collaborative research, and learn from others. PMID:21803842

  9. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2004-03-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has already succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. As funding for this project, scheduled to commence December 1, 2002, had only been in place for less than half of the reporting period, project progress has been less than for other reporting periods. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made and several cruises are planned for the summer/fall of 2003 to test equipment, techniques and compatibility of systems. En route to reaching the primary goal of the Consortium, the establishment of a monitoring station on the sea floor, the following achievements have been made: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning

  10. Impact in Vocational Education and Training Research: The Case of the Australian VET Research Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Roger; Clayton, Berwyn

    2010-01-01

    "Impact" is a notion that is not very well understood in research. Within Australian higher education, it has been bandied about within such frameworks as the "Research Quality Framework" ("RQF") and Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA). Vocational education and training (VET) research is not immune from these movements, and increasingly,…

  11. [Memorandum prevention research - research areas and methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, U; Nöcker, G; Plaumann, M; Linden, S; Pott, E; Koch, U; Pawils, S; Altgeld, T; Dierks, M L; Frahsa, A; Jahn, I; Krauth, C; Pomp, M; Rehaag, R; Robra, B P; Süß, W; Töppich, J; Trojan, A; von Unger, H; Wildner, M; Wright, M

    2012-10-01

    From 2004 to 2012, the German Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) established its first funding programme for the promotion of prevention research. 60 projects on primary prevention and health promotion and the meta-project entitled "Cooperation for Sustainable Prevention Research" (KNP) received BMBF grants under this programme during this period. The experience and knowledge gained and recommendations arising from the research funded under this programme are compiled in memorandum format. The "Memorandum on Prevention Research - Research Areas and Methods" highlights 5 research areas that are considered to be especially relevant from the perspective of the involved scientists and practice partners.The promotion of structural development and sustainability enhancement in disease prevention and health promotion are central areas that should branch out from existing nuclei of crystallization. Improving the health competence of the population and of specific subpopulations is another major area. Research in these areas should contribute to the development of theoretical concepts and to the empirical testing of these concepts. The transfer of knowledge for effective use of developed disease prevention and health promotion programmes and measures is still a scarcely researched area. Among other things, studies of the transfer of programmes from one context to another, analyses of the coop-eration between politics and science, and the continued theoretical and conceptual development of transfer research are needed. Long-term data on the effects of intervention studies are also needed for proper evaluation of sustainability. The latter dem-onstrates the importance of method development in disease prevention and health promotion research as an area that should receive separate funding and support. This research should include, in particular, studies of the efficacy of complex interventions, health economic analyses, and participative health research. PMID:23165608

  12. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-05-18

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The primary objective of the group has been to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently achieved reality via the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology's (NIUST) solicitation for proposals for research to be conducted at the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, have had to be postponed and the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles sacrificed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort is

  13. THE CONSORTIUM FOR PLANT BIOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH, INC., ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    CPBR's ERTT mission is to support basic biotechnology research and the development of new, commercially valuable technologies supportive of the long-term strategic goals of EPA. The research projects selected will address these goals. It is anticipated that the pro...

  14. The Research Consortium on Religious Healthcare Institutions: studying the impact of religious restrictions on women's reproductive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Lori R; Stulberg, Debra B

    2016-07-01

    Catholic hospitals and other religious institutions are a large and growing part of the US health care system. They have specific policies restricting reproductive health care. Despite increased public attention in the media to women denied necessary pregnancy-related care at Catholic hospitals, research on the effects of religious restrictions remains limited. This article summarizes research priorities as generated by 80 attendees at the inaugural meeting of the Research Consortium on Religious Healthcare Institutions. Such research is need to understand the impact of religious health system ownership on women's health. PMID:27036301

  15. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1992--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-15

    In February, 1990, The Secretary of Energy, James Watkins, approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program proposed by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, WERC'' includes as its founding members NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the Sandia National Laboratories. The Navajo Community College joined the program later in 1991. The program has the mission of expanding the nation's capability to address the issues related to management of all types of waste. The program is unique and innovative in many aspects. It provides an integrated approach to this national need, and includes: (1) Education in waste management at the educational institutions resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing hands-on training at the leading edge to students and information feeding into the education programs. (4) Education by technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos Sandia) located in New Mexico and with the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach programs of special interest to precollege students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the third year.

  16. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1992--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-15

    In February, 1990, The Secretary of Energy, James Watkins, approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program proposed by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, ``WERC`` includes as its founding members NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the Sandia National Laboratories. The Navajo Community College joined the program later in 1991. The program has the mission of expanding the nation`s capability to address the issues related to management of all types of waste. The program is unique and innovative in many aspects. It provides an integrated approach to this national need, and includes: (1) Education in waste management at the educational institutions resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing hands-on training at the leading edge to students and information feeding into the education programs. (4) Education by technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos & Sandia) located in New Mexico and with the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach programs of special interest to precollege students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the third year.

  17. Final Technical Report. DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. January 15, 2010 - March 31, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagher, Habib [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Viselli, Anthony [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Goupee, Andrew [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Thaler, Jeffrey [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Brady, Damian [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Browne, Peter [HDR, Inc., Omaha, NE (United States); Browning, James [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Chung, Jade [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Coulling, Alexander [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Deese, Heather [Island Institute, Rockland, ME (United States); Fowler, Matthew [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Holberton, Rebecca [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Anant, Jain [Intertek, Duluth, GA (United States); Jalbert, Dustin [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Johnson, Theresa [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Jonkman, Jason [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Karlson, Benjamin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kimball, Richard [Maine Maritime Academy, Castine, ME (United States); Koo, Bonjun [Technip, Paris (France); Lackner, Matthew [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Lambrakos, Kostas [Technip, Paris (France); Lankowski, Matthew [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Leopold, Adrienne [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Lim, Ho-Joon [Technip, Paris (France); Mangum, Linda [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Martin, Heather [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Masciola, Marco [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Maynard, Melissa [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); McCleave, James [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Mizrahi, Robert [New Jersey Audubon Society, Bernardsville, NJ (United States); Molta, Paul [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Pershing, Andrew [Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME (United States); Pettigrew, Neal [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Prowell, Ian [MMI Engineering, Oakland, CA (United States); Qua, Andrew [Kleinschmidt Associates, Pittsfield, ME (United States); Sherwood, Graham [Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME (United States); Snape, Thomas [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Steneck, Robert [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Stewart, Gordon [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Stockwell, Jason [Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME (United States); Swift, Andrew H. P. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Thomas, Dale [Maine Maritime Academy, Castine, ME (United States); Viselli, Elizabeth [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Zydlewski, Gayle [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States)

    2013-06-11

    This is the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy-funded program, DE-0002981: DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. The project objective was the partial validation of coupled models and optimization of materials for offshore wind structures. The United States has a great opportunity to harness an indigenous abundant renewable energy resource: offshore wind. In 2010, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) estimated there to be over 4,000 GW of potential offshore wind energy found within 50 nautical miles of the US coastlines (Musial and Ram, 2010). The US Energy Information Administration reported the total annual US electric energy generation in 2010 was 4,120 billion kilowatt-hours (equivalent to 470 GW) (US EIA, 2011), slightly more than 10% of the potential offshore wind resource. In addition, deep water offshore wind is the dominant US ocean energy resource available comprising 75% of the total assessed ocean energy resource as compared to wave and tidal resources (Musial, 2008). Through these assessments it is clear offshore wind can be a major contributor to US energy supplies. The caveat to capturing offshore wind along many parts of the US coast is deep water. Nearly 60%, or 2,450 GW, of the estimated US offshore wind resource is located in water depths of 60 m or more (Musial and Ram, 2010). At water depths over 60 m building fixed offshore wind turbine foundations, such as those found in Europe, is likely economically infeasible (Musial et al., 2006). Therefore floating wind turbine technology is seen as the best option for extracting a majority of the US offshore wind energy resource. Volume 1 - Test Site; Volume 2 - Coupled Models; and Volume 3 - Composite Materials

  18. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1992--1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In February, 1990, The Secretary of Energy, James Watkins, approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program proposed by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, ''WERC'' includes as its founding members NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the Sandia National Laboratories. The Navajo Community College joined the program later in 1991. The program has the mission of expanding the nation's capability to address the issues related to management of all types of waste. The program is unique and innovative in many aspects. It provides an integrated approach to this national need, and includes: (1) Education in waste management at the educational institutions resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing hands-on training at the leading edge to students and information feeding into the education programs. (4) Education by technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos ampersand Sandia) located in New Mexico and with the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach programs of special interest to precollege students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the third year

  19. Improving Undergraduate Research Experiences With An Intentional Mentoring Program: Lessons Learned Through Assessment of Keck Geology Consortium Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, K. R.; Garver, J. I.; Greer, L.; Pollock, M.; Varga, R. J.; Davidson, C. M.; Frey, H. M.; Hubbard, D. K.; Peck, W. H.; Wobus, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Keck Geology Consortium, with support from the National Science Foundation (REU Program) and ExxonMobil, is a collaborative effort by 18 colleges to improve geoscience education through high-quality research experiences. Since its inception in 1987 more than 1350 undergraduate students and 145 faculty have been involved in 189 yearlong research projects. This non-traditional REU model offers exceptional opportunities for students to address research questions at a deep level, to learn and utilize sophisticated analytical methods, and to engage in authentic collaborative research that culminates in an undergraduate research symposium and published abstracts volume. The large numbers of student and faculty participants in Keck projects also affords a unique opportunity to study the impacts of program design on undergraduate research experiences in the geosciences. Students who participate in Keck projects generally report significant gains in personal and professional dimensions, as well as in clarification of educational and career goals. Survey data from student participants, project directors, and campus advisors identify mentoring as one of the most critical and challenging elements of successful undergraduate research experiences. Additional challenges arise from the distributed nature of Keck projects (i.e., participants, project directors, advisors, and other collaborators are at different institutions) and across the span of yearlong projects. In an endeavor to improve student learning about the nature and process of science, and to make mentoring practices more intentional, the Consortium has developed workshops and materials to support both project directors and campus research advisors (e.g., best practices for mentoring, teaching ethical professional conduct, benchmarks for progress, activities to support students during research process). The Consortium continues to evolve its practices to better support students from underrepresented groups.

  20. The Mississippi University Research Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass: Production of Alternative Fuels from Waste Biomass Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drs. Mark E. Zapp; Todd French; Lewis Brown; Clifford George; Rafael Hernandez; Marvin Salin (from Mississippie State University); Drs. Huey-Min Hwang, Ken Lee, Yi Zhang; Maria Begonia (from Jackson State University); Drs. Clint Williford; Al Mikell (from the University of Mississippi); Drs. Robert Moore; Roger Hester (from the University of Southern Mississippi).

    2009-03-31

    The Mississippi Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass was formed via funding from the US Department of Energy's EPSCoR Program, which is administered by the Office of Basic Science. Funding was approved in July of 1999 and received by participating Mississippi institutions by 2000. The project was funded via two 3-year phases of operation (the second phase was awarded based on the high merits observed from the first 3-year phase), with funding ending in 2007. The mission of the Consortium was to promote the utilization of biomass, both cultured and waste derived, for the production of commodity and specialty chemicals. These scientific efforts, although generally basic in nature, are key to the development of future industries within the Southeastern United States. In this proposal, the majority of the efforts performed under the DOE EPSCoR funding were focused primarily toward the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks and biogas from waste products. However, some of the individual projects within this program investigated the production of other products from biomass feeds (i.e. acetic acid and biogas) along with materials to facilitate the more efficient production of chemicals from biomass. Mississippi is a leading state in terms of raw biomass production. Its top industries are timber, poultry production, and row crop agriculture. However, for all of its vast amounts of biomass produced on an annual basis, only a small percentage of the biomass is actually industrially produced into products, with the bulk of the biomass being wasted. This situation is actually quite representative of many Southeastern US states. The research and development efforts performed attempted to further develop promising chemical production techniques that use Mississippi biomass feedstocks. The three processes that were the primary areas of interest for ethanol production were syngas fermentation, acid hydrolysis followed by hydrolyzate fermentation, and

  1. Korean Consortium's preliminary research for enhancing a probabilistic fracture mechanics code, PRO-LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Battelle developed a probabilistic fracture mechanics code called PRO-LOCA, which can be used as a tool for evaluating the pipe break frequency. It is being further developed through the international co-operative research program, PARTRIDGE. KINS, KHNP-CRI, and KEPCO-E&C are participating in the PARTIRDGE program by composing a Korean Consortium. The members of Korean Consortium performed benchmark analyses using the beta version of PRO-LOCA 4.0 to evaluate the effect of variables such as simulation methods, crack features, loading conditions, and inspection models on the failure probabilities. The benchmark analyses showed that the PRO-LOCA can provide a trend consistent with the expected crack growth and pipe failure behavior. Especially, the availability of the stress intensity factor and crack opening displacement for non-idealized through-wall cracks was proven from this study. This new solution for non-idealized through-wall cracks had been developed by the Korean Consortium and it was newly included in PRO-LOCA 4.0. However, further improvement is needed to address the problems such as the instability of adaptive sampling method and the unexpected trend of failure probabilities at the early stage of crack growth

  2. Processing of CT images for analysis of diffuse lung disease in the lung tissue research consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwoski, Ronald A.; Bartholmai, Brian; Zavaletta, Vanessa A.; Holmes, David; Robb, Richard A.

    2008-03-01

    The goal of Lung Tissue Resource Consortium (LTRC) is to improve the management of diffuse lung diseases through a better understanding of the biology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and fibrotic interstitial lung disease (ILD) including Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF). Participants are subjected to a battery of tests including tissue biopsies, physiologic testing, clinical history reporting, and CT scanning of the chest. The LTRC is a repository from which investigators can request tissue specimens and test results as well as semi-quantitative radiology reports, pathology reports, and automated quantitative image analysis results from the CT scan data performed by the LTRC core laboratories. The LTRC Radiology Core Laboratory (RCL), in conjunction with the Biomedical Imaging Resource (BIR), has developed novel processing methods for comprehensive characterization of pulmonary processes on volumetric high-resolution CT scans to quantify how these diseases manifest in radiographic images. Specifically, the RCL has implemented a semi-automated method for segmenting the anatomical regions of the lungs and airways. In these anatomic regions, automated quantification of pathologic features of disease including emphysema volumes and tissue classification are performed using both threshold techniques and advanced texture measures to determine the extent and location of emphysema, ground glass opacities, "honeycombing" (HC) and "irregular linear" or "reticular" pulmonary infiltrates and normal lung. Wall thickness measurements of the trachea, and its branches to the 3 rd and limited 4 th order are also computed. The methods for processing, segmentation and quantification are described. The results are reviewed and verified by an expert radiologist following processing and stored in the public LTRC database for use by pulmonary researchers. To date, over 1200 CT scans have been processed by the RCL and the LTRC project is on target for recruitment of the

  3. The AGTSR consortium: An update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fant, D.B.; Golan, L.P. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program is a collaborative University-Industry R&D Consortium that is managed and administered by the South Carolina Energy R&D Center. AGTSR is a nationwide consortium dedicated to advancing land-based gas turbine systems for improving future power generation capability. It directly supports the technology-research arm of the ATS program and targets industry-defined research needs in the areas of combustion, heat transfer, materials, aerodynamics, controls, alternative fuels, and advanced cycles. The consortium is organized to enhance U.S. competitiveness through close collaboration with universities, government, and industry at the R&D level. AGTSR is just finishing its third year of operation and is sponsored by the U.S. DOE - Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The program is scheduled to continue past the year 2000. At present, there are 78 performing member universities representing 36 states, and six cost-sharing U.S. gas turbine corporations. Three RFP`s have been announced and the fourth RFP is expected to be released in December, 1995. There are 31 research subcontracts underway at performing member universities. AGTSR has also organized three workshops, two in combustion and one in heat transfer. A materials workshop is in planning and is scheduled for February, 1996. An industrial internship program was initiated this past summer, with one intern positioned at each of the sponsoring companies. The AGTSR consortium nurtures close industry-university-government collaboration to enhance synergism and the transition of research results, accelerate and promote evolutionary-revolutionary R&D, and strives to keep a prominent U.S. industry strong and on top well into the 21st century. This paper will present the objectives and benefits of the AGTSR program, progress achieved to date, and future planned activity in fiscal year 1996.

  4. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-11-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements one year into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (1a) Repair attempts of the VLA cable damaged in the October >1000m water depth deployment failed; a new design has been tested successfully. (1b) The acoustic modem damaged in the October deployment was repaired successfully. (1c) Additional acoustic modems with greater depth rating and the appropriate surface communications units have been purchased. (1d) The VLA computer system is being modified for real time communications to the surface vessel using radio telemetry and fiber optic cable. (1e) Positioning sensors--including compass and tilt sensors--were completed and tested. (1f) One of the VLAs has been redesigned to collect near sea floor geochemical data. (2

  5. UNIVERSITY CONSORTIUM

    OpenAIRE

    RALUCA-OLGUTA PACURARU

    2011-01-01

    Human resource is considered to be the most valuable resource in the knowledge society. Therefore the whole education system acquires an increased importance because of its task of forming this kind of resource. On the other hand, a characteristic of these times is globalization. A possible response of universities around the world to this requirement may be found in the form of university consortiums.

  6. Biodegradation of crude oil by individual bacterial strains and a mixed bacterial consortium isolated from hydrocarbon contaminated areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj Binupriya, Arthur [Research and Development Division, Regent Ecotech Private Limited, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu (India); Baik, Sang-Ho [Radiation Application Research Division, ARTI, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea); Yun, Sei-Eok [Department of Food Science and Technology, Institute of Agricultural Science and Technology, Research Institute of Bioindustry, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea); Sathishkumar, Muthuswamy

    2008-01-15

    A preliminary study was undertaken to determine the optimal conditions for the biodegradation of a crude oil. Among 57 oil-degrading bacterial cultures isolated from oil-contaminated soil samples, Bacillus sp. IOS1-7, Corynebacterium sp. BPS2-6, Pseudomonas sp. HPS2-5, and Pseudomonas sp. BPS1-8 were selected for the study based on the efficiency of crude oil utilization. Along with the selected individual strains, a mixed bacterial consortium prepared using the above strains was also used for degradation studies. The mixed bacterial consortium showed more growth and degradation than did individual strains. At 1% crude oil concentration, the mixed bacterial consortium degraded a maximum of 77% of the crude oil. This was followed by 69% by Pseudomonas sp. BPS1-8, 64% by Bacillus sp. IOS1-7, 45% by Pseudomonas sp. HPS2-5, and 41% by Corynebacterium sp. BPS2-6. The percentage of degradation by the mixed bacterial consortium decreased from 77 to 45% as the concentration of crude oil was increased from 1 to 12%. Temperature of 35 C and pH 7 were found to be optimum for maximum degradation. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-09-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements six months into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Analysis and repair attempts of the VLA used in the deep water deployment during October 2003 have been completed; Definition of an interface protocol for the VLA DATS to the SFO has been established; Design modifications to allow integration of the VLA to the SFO have been made; Experience gained in the deployments of the first VLA is being applied to the design of the next VLAs; One of the two planned new VLAs being modified to serve as an Oceanographic Line Array (OLA). (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: The decision to replace the Sea Floor Probe technology with the borehole emplacement of a geophysical array was reversed due to the 1300m water depth at the

  8. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-08-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. A year into the life of this cooperative agreement, we note the following achievements: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (A) Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, (B) Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, (C) Adaptation of SDI's Angulate program to use acoustic slant ranges and DGPS data to compute and map the bottom location of the vertical array, (D) Progress in T''0'' delay and timing issues for improved control in data recording, (E) Successful deployment and recovery of the VLA twice during an October, 2003 cruise, once in 830m water, once in 1305m water, (F) Data collection and recovery from the DATS

  9. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report, 1991--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    The member institutions of the Consortium continue to play a significant role in increasing the number of African Americans who enter the environmental professions through the implementation of the Consortium`s RETT Plan for Research, Education, and Technology Transfer. The four major program areas identified in the RETT Plan are as follows: (1) minority outreach and precollege education; (2) undergraduate education and postsecondary training; (3) graduate and postgraduate education and research; and (4) technology transfer.

  10. NOAC monitoring, reversal agents, and post-approval safety and effectiveness evaluation: A cardiac safety research consortium think tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiffel, James A; Weitz, Jeffrey I; Reilly, Paul; Kaminskas, Edvardas; Sarich, Troy; Sager, Philip; Seltzer, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    Four non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban) have been approved in the United States for treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) and venous thromboembolic disease. They have been as or more effective than the prior standards of care, with less fatal or intracranial bleeding, fewer drug and dietary interactions, and greater patient convenience. Nonetheless, the absence of the ability for clinicians to assess compliance or washout with a simple laboratory test (or to adjust dosing with a similar assessment) and the absence of an antidote to rapidly stop major hemorrhage or to enhance safety in the setting of emergent or urgent surgery/procedures have been limitations to greater non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant usage and better thromboembolic prevention. Accordingly, a Cardiac Research Safety Consortium "think tank" meeting was held in February 2015 to address these concerns. This manuscript reports on the discussions held and the conclusions reached at that meeting. PMID:27297852

  11. The nation's first consortium to address waste management issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On July 26, 1989, the secretary of the Department of Energy (DOE), Admiral James Watkins, announced approval of the Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC). The consortium is composed of New Mexico State University (NMSU), the University of New Mexico, the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. This pilot program is expected to form a model for other regional and national programs. The WERC mission is to expand the national capability to address issues associated with the management of hazardous, radioactive, and solid waste. Research, technology transfer, and education/training are the three areas that have been identified to accomplish the objectives set by the consortium. The members of the consortium will reach out to the DOE facilities, other government agencies and facilities, and private institutions across the country. Their goal is to provide resources for solutions to waste management problems

  12. Origins of Sinuous and Braided Channels on Ascraeus Mons, Mars - A Keck Geology Consortium Undergraduate Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wet, A. P.; Bleacher, J. E.; Garry, W. B.

    2012-01-01

    Water has clearly played an important part in the geological evolution of Mars. There are many features on Mars that were almost certainly formed by fluvial processes -- for example, the channels Kasei Valles and Ares Vallis in the Chryse Planitia area of Mars are almost certainly fluvial features. On the other hand, there are many channel features that are much more difficult to interpret -- and have been variously attributed to volcanic and fluvial processes. Clearly unraveling the details of the role of water on Mars is extremely important, especially in the context of the search of extinct or extant life. In this project we built on our recent work in determining the origin of one channel on the southwest rift apron of Ascraeus Mons. This project, funded by the Keck Geology Consortium and involving 4 undergraduate geology majors took advantage of the recently available datasets to map and analyze similar features on Ascraeus Mons and some other areas of Mars. A clearer understanding of how these particular channel features formed might lead to the development of better criteria to distinguish how other Martian channel features formed. Ultimately this might provide us with a better understanding of the role of volcanic and fluvial processes in the geological evolution of Mars.

  13. Optimization of CT image reconstruction algorithms for the lung tissue research consortium (LTRC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollough, Cynthia; Zhang, Jie; Bruesewitz, Michael; Bartholmai, Brian

    2006-03-01

    To create a repository of clinical data, CT images and tissue samples and to more clearly understand the pathogenetic features of pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) launched a cooperative effort known as the Lung Tissue Resource Consortium (LTRC). The CT images for the LTRC effort must contain accurate CT numbers in order to characterize tissues, and must have high-spatial resolution to show fine anatomic structures. This study was performed to optimize the CT image reconstruction algorithms to achieve these criteria. Quantitative analyses of phantom and clinical images were conducted. The ACR CT accreditation phantom containing five regions of distinct CT attenuations (CT numbers of approximately -1000 HU, -80 HU, 0 HU, 130 HU and 900 HU), and a high-contrast spatial resolution test pattern, was scanned using CT systems from two manufacturers (General Electric (GE) Healthcare and Siemens Medical Solutions). Phantom images were reconstructed using all relevant reconstruction algorithms. Mean CT numbers and image noise (standard deviation) were measured and compared for the five materials. Clinical high-resolution chest CT images acquired on a GE CT system for a patient with diffuse lung disease were reconstructed using BONE and STANDARD algorithms and evaluated by a thoracic radiologist in terms of image quality and disease extent. The clinical BONE images were processed with a 3 x 3 x 3 median filter to simulate a thicker slice reconstructed in smoother algorithms, which have traditionally been proven to provide an accurate estimation of emphysema extent in the lungs. Using a threshold technique, the volume of emphysema (defined as the percentage of lung voxels having a CT number lower than -950 HU) was computed for the STANDARD, BONE, and BONE filtered. The CT numbers measured in the ACR CT Phantom images were accurate for all reconstruction kernels for both manufacturers. As expected, visual evaluation of the

  14. The Cambridge Infectious Diseases Consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, James

    2010-01-01

    The Cambridge Infectious Diseases Consortium (CIDC) was established to provide a multi-institutional, world class quality environment for infectious disease research addressing important questions and for the recruitment and training of high quality veterinarians into careers in infectious disease research. The programme has been a demonstrable success in achieving these overall aims. The institutions that have played a key role in the consortium include the Department of Veterinary Medic...

  15. IPD-Work consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Virtanen, Marianna;

    2015-01-01

    of countries. The aim of the consortium is to estimate reliably the associations of work-related psychosocial factors with chronic diseases, disability, and mortality. Our findings are highly cited by the occupational health, epidemiology, and clinical medicine research community. However, some of......Established in 2008 and comprising over 60 researchers, the IPD-Work (individual-participant data meta-analysis in working populations) consortium is a collaborative research project that uses pre-defined meta-analyses of individual-participant data from multiple cohort studies representing a range...... the IPD-Work's findings have also generated disagreement as they challenge the importance of job strain as a major target for coronary heart disease (CHD) prevention, this is reflected in the critical discussion paper by Choi et al (1). In this invited reply to Choi et al, we aim to (i) describe how...

  16. Bastyr/UW Oncomycology Translational Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory ConsortiumResearch Area: Fungi Program: Partnerships for CAM Clinical Translational Research Description: Trametes versicolor is an immunologically active medicinal mushroom...

  17. Research and development project of regional consortiums in fiscal 1998. Research and development of regional consortium energy (development of measuring technology to aid energy conservation in electronic device manufacturing processes (design and trial production of IMI) (Report on the result in the first year)); 1998 nendo chiiki consortium energy kenkyu kaihatsu. Denshi kikirui seizo process no sho energy shien keisoku seigyo gijutsu no kaihatsu (IMI no sekkei to shisaku) (dai 1 nendo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This paper summarizes the development of intelligent micro instruments (IMI) inaugurated in fiscal 1998 as the wide-area consortium project for the Tama area. Research and development will be carried out on the following items: IMI substrate elements utilizing micro machining technology, applicable to micro sensors and micro probes, semiconductor process sensors, electronic device measuring probes, signal processing and communication circuits for wireless sensing. This paper describes the achievements during fiscal 1998. Technologies were transferred from the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory of the Agency of Industrial Science and Technology on silicon micro machining and PZT piezoelectric thin film formation. An IMI research laboratory was installed at the Tokyo Metropolitan University. In developing the IMI substrate elements, different beams applicable to sensors and probes were fabricated on a trial basis, and their mechanical properties were measured. For the semiconductor process sensors, discussions were given on micronization on a chlorine ion analyzer. In developing the electronic device measuring probes, the target was placed on measurement of in-situ characteristics of IC chips on a wafer. A prototype transmitting and receiving circuit board was fabricated for developing the wireless sensing. (NEDO)

  18. Accelerators for Society - TIARA 2012 Test Infrastructure and Accelerator Research Area (in Polish)

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01

    TIARA (Test Infrastructure and Accelerator Research Area - Preparatory Phae) is an European Collaboration of Accelerator Technology, which by running research projects, technical, networks and infrastructural has a duty to integrate the research and technical communities and infrastructures in the global scale of Europe. The Collaboration gathers all research centers with large accelerator infrastructures. Other ones, like universities, are affiliated as associate members. TIARA-PP (preparatory phase) is an European infrastructural project run by this Consortium and realized inside EU-FP7. The paper presents a general overview of TIARA activities, with an introduction containing a portrait of contemporary accelerator technology and a digest of its applications in modern society.

  19. Recent Advances from the DoD Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative Consortium on Innovative Vacuum Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MURI Innovative Vacuum Electronics Program is administered by Dr. Robert Barker of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and consists of a collaboration between six premier universities actively engaged in all aspects of multidisciplinary basic research and graduate instruction in innovative microwave vacuum electronics (MIT, Stanford, University of California, Davis, University of Maryland -- College Park, University of Michigan, and University of Wisconsin). The dual goals are to address basic research issues of critical importance to the DoD as well as to train the next generation. A wide range of fast wave amplifier concepts is under investigation at frequencies ranging from 15 GHz to 1 THz. Two representative examples are a TE01 100 kW W-Band gyro-TWT under investigation at UC Davis and a 140 GHz confocal waveguide based gyro-TWT concept developed at MIT. Novel, lightweight 100 kW, W-Band klystrinos suitable for configuration in arrays are under investigation at Stanford using advanced microfabrication techniques. Extensive analytic and numerical analyses are underway at Wisconsin augmented by experimental measurements using a custom-modified well diagnosed test TWT are aimed at an understanding of the complicated physics of multi-toned ultra-wideband traveling wave tubes including details of the beam-wave interaction and the nonlinear time and space evolution of the carrier(s) and inter-modulation products. A significant emphasis of the Maryland activity is on theoretical and experimental studies of various frequency-multiplying gyroamplifier concepts which are both of fundamental interest as well as practical importance because of the relaxation on driver requirements. Finally, the Michigan team is devoting much of its attention to fundamental theoretical and experimental issues associated with crossed-field devices. The latest results from these as well as other activities will be presented

  20. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1991--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maji, A. K.; Thomson, Bruce M.; Samani, Zohrab A.; Hanson, Adrian; Cadena, Fernando; Gopalan, Aravamudan; Barton, Larry L.; Sillerud, Laurel O.; Fekete, Frank A.; Rogers, Terry; Lindermann, William C.; Pigg, C. Joanne; Blake, Robert; Kieft, Thomas L.; Ross, Timothy J.; LaPointe, Joe L.; Khandan, Nirmala; Bedell, Glenn W.; Rayson, Gary D.; Leslie, Ian H.; Ondrias, Mark R.; Sarr, Gregory P.; Colbaugh, Richard; Angel, Edward; Niemczyk, Thomas M.; Bein, Thomas; Campbell, Andrew; Phillips, Fred; Wilson, John L.; Gutjahr, Allan; Sammis, T. W.; Steinberg, Stanly; Nuttall, H. E.; Genin, Joseph; Conley, Edgar; Aimone-Martin, Catherine T.; Wang, Ming L.; Chua, Koon Meng; Smith, Phillip; Leslie, Ian; Skowlund, Chris T.; McGuckin, Tom; Jenkins-Smith, Hank C.

    1992-04-07

    This report contains the following appendices: Appendix A - Requirements for Undergraduate Level; Appendix B - Requirements for Graduate Level; Appendix C - Graduate Degree In Environmental Engineering; Appendix D - Non-degree Certificate Program; Appendix E - Curriculum for Associate Degree Program; Appendix F - Curriculum for NCC Program; Appendix G - Information 1991 Teleconference Series; Appendix H - Information on 1992 Teleconference Series; Appendix I - WERC interactive Television Courses; Appendix J - WERC Research Seminar Series; Appendix K - Sites for Hazardous/Radioactive Waste Management Series; Appendix L- Summary of Technology Development of the Second Year; Appendix M - List of Major Publications Resulting from WERC; Appendix N - Types of Equipment at WERC Laboratories.

  1. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1991--1992. Appendixes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-07

    This report contains the following appendices: Appendix A - Requirements for Undergraduate Level; Appendix B - Requirements for Graduate Level; Appendix C - Graduate Degree In Environmental Engineering; Appendix D - Non-degree Certificate Program; Appendix E - Curriculum for Associate Degree Program; Appendix F - Curriculum for NCC Program; Appendix G - Information 1991 Teleconference Series; Appendix H - Information on 1992 Teleconference Series; Appendix I - WERC interactive Television Courses; Appendix J - WERC Research Seminar Series; Appendix K - Sites for Hazardous/Radioactive Waste Management Series; Appendix L- Summary of Technology Development of the Second Year; Appendix M - List of Major Publications Resulting from WERC; Appendix N - Types of Equipment at WERC Laboratories.

  2. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1991--1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the following appendices: Appendix A - Requirements for Undergraduate Level; Appendix B - Requirements for Graduate Level; Appendix C - Graduate Degree In Environmental Engineering; Appendix D - Non-degree Certificate Program; Appendix E - Curriculum for Associate Degree Program; Appendix F - Curriculum for NCC Program; Appendix G - Information 1991 Teleconference Series; Appendix H - Information on 1992 Teleconference Series; Appendix I - WERC interactive Television Courses; Appendix J - WERC Research Seminar Series; Appendix K - Sites for Hazardous/Radioactive Waste Management Series; Appendix L- Summary of Technology Development of the Second Year; Appendix M - List of Major Publications Resulting from WERC; Appendix N - Types of Equipment at WERC Laboratories

  3. Kansas Wind Energy Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenbacher, Don [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    2015-12-31

    This project addresses both fundamental and applied research problems that will help with problems defined by the DOE “20% Wind by 2030 Report”. In particular, this work focuses on increasing the capacity of small or community wind generation capabilities that would be operated in a distributed generation approach. A consortium (KWEC – Kansas Wind Energy Consortium) of researchers from Kansas State University and Wichita State University aims to dramatically increase the penetration of wind energy via distributed wind power generation. We believe distributed generation through wind power will play a critical role in the ability to reach and extend the renewable energy production targets set by the Department of Energy. KWEC aims to find technical and economic solutions to enable widespread implementation of distributed renewable energy resources that would apply to wind.

  4. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1992--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eiceman, Gary A.; King, J. Phillip; Smith, Geoffrey B.; Park, Su-Moon; Munson-McGee, Stuart H.; Rajtar, Jerzy; Chen, Z.; Johnson, James E.; Heger, A. Sharif; Martin, David W.; Wilks, Maureen E.; Schreyer, H. L.; Thomson, Bruce M.; Samani, Zohrab A.; Hanson, Adrian; Cadena, Fernando; Gopalan, Aravamudan; Barton, Larry L.; Sillerud, Laurel O.; Fekete, Frank A.; Rogers, Terry; Lindemann, William C.; Pigg, C. Joanne; Blake, Robert; Kieft, Thomas L.; Ross, Timothy J.; LaPointe, Joe L.; Khandan, Nirmala; Bedell, Glenn W.; Rayson, Gary D.; Leslie, Ian H.; Ondrias, Mark R.; Starr, Gregory P.; Colbaugh, Richard; Niemczyk, Thomas M.; Campbell, Andrew; Phillips, Fred; Wilson, John L.; Gutjahr, Allan; Sammis, T. W.; Steinberg, Stanly; Nuttall, H. E.; Genin, Joseph; Conley, Edgar; Aimone-Martin, Catherine T.; Wang, Ming L.; Chua, Koon Meng; Smith, Phillip; Skowland, Chris T.; McGuckin, Tom; Harrison, Glenn; Jenkins-Smith, Hank C.; Kelsey, Charles A.

    1993-02-15

    This report contains the following appendices: Appendix A - Requirements for Undergraduate Level; Appendix B - Requirements for Graduate Level; Appendix C - Graduate Degree In Environmental Engineeringat New Mexico State University; Appendix D - Non-degree Certificate program; Appendix E - Curriculum for Associate Degree Program in Radioactive Hazardous Waste Materials; Appendix F - Curriculum for NCC Program in Earth Environmental Sciences; Appendix G - Brochure of 1992 Teleconference Series; Appendix H - Sites for Hazardous/Radioactive Waste Management Series; Appendix I - WERC Interactive Television Courses; Appendix J - WERC Research Seminar Series Brochures; Appendix K - Summary of Technology Development of the Third Year; Appendix L - List of Major Publications Resulting From WERC; Appendix M - Types of Equipment at WERC Laboratories; and Appendix N - WERC Newsletter Examples.

  5. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1992--1993. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-15

    This report contains the following appendices: Appendix A - Requirements for Undergraduate Level; Appendix B - Requirements for Graduate Level; Appendix C - Graduate Degree In Environmental Engineeringat New Mexico State University; Appendix D - Non-degree Certificate program; Appendix E - Curriculum for Associate Degree Program in Radioactive & Hazardous Waste Materials; Appendix F - Curriculum for NCC Program in Earth & Environmental Sciences; Appendix G - Brochure of 1992 Teleconference Series; Appendix H - Sites for Hazardous/Radioactive Waste Management Series; Appendix I - WERC Interactive Television Courses; Appendix J - WERC Research Seminar Series Brochures; Appendix K - Summary of Technology Development of the Third Year; Appendix L - List of Major Publications Resulting From WERC; Appendix M - Types of Equipment at WERC Laboratories; and Appendix N - WERC Newsletter Examples.

  6. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1992--1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the following appendices: Appendix A - Requirements for Undergraduate Level; Appendix B - Requirements for Graduate Level; Appendix C - Graduate Degree In Environmental Engineeringat New Mexico State University; Appendix D - Non-degree Certificate program; Appendix E - Curriculum for Associate Degree Program in Radioactive ampersand Hazardous Waste Materials; Appendix F - Curriculum for NCC Program in Earth ampersand Environmental Sciences; Appendix G - Brochure of 1992 Teleconference Series; Appendix H - Sites for Hazardous/Radioactive Waste Management Series; Appendix I - WERC Interactive Television Courses; Appendix J - WERC Research Seminar Series Brochures; Appendix K - Summary of Technology Development of the Third Year; Appendix L - List of Major Publications Resulting From WERC; Appendix M - Types of Equipment at WERC Laboratories; and Appendix N - WERC Newsletter Examples

  7. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium - Final Progress Report October 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bement, Arden L.

    2001-10-23

    The basic mission of the Consortium was to advance the science and understanding of high-T{sub c} superconductivity and to promote the development of new materials and improved processing technology. Focused group efforts were the key element of the research program. One program area is the understanding of the layered structures involved in candidate materials and the factors that control their formation, stability and relationship superconductor properties. The other program area had a focus upon factors that limit or control the transport properties such as weak links, flux lattice behavior, and interfaces. Interactions among Consortium d with industrial armiates were an integral part of the program.

  8. Performance of ACMG-AMP Variant-Interpretation Guidelines among Nine Laboratories in the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendola, Laura M; Jarvik, Gail P; Leo, Michael C; McLaughlin, Heather M; Akkari, Yassmine; Amaral, Michelle D; Berg, Jonathan S; Biswas, Sawona; Bowling, Kevin M; Conlin, Laura K; Cooper, Greg M; Dorschner, Michael O; Dulik, Matthew C; Ghazani, Arezou A; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Green, Robert C; Hart, Ragan; Horton, Carrie; Johnston, Jennifer J; Lebo, Matthew S; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Ou, Jeffrey; Pak, Christine M; Patel, Ronak Y; Punj, Sumit; Richards, Carolyn Sue; Salama, Joseph; Strande, Natasha T; Yang, Yaping; Plon, Sharon E; Biesecker, Leslie G; Rehm, Heidi L

    2016-06-01

    Evaluating the pathogenicity of a variant is challenging given the plethora of types of genetic evidence that laboratories consider. Deciding how to weigh each type of evidence is difficult, and standards have been needed. In 2015, the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) and the Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP) published guidelines for the assessment of variants in genes associated with Mendelian diseases. Nine molecular diagnostic laboratories involved in the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) consortium piloted these guidelines on 99 variants spanning all categories (pathogenic, likely pathogenic, uncertain significance, likely benign, and benign). Nine variants were distributed to all laboratories, and the remaining 90 were evaluated by three laboratories. The laboratories classified each variant by using both the laboratory's own method and the ACMG-AMP criteria. The agreement between the two methods used within laboratories was high (K-alpha = 0.91) with 79% concordance. However, there was only 34% concordance for either classification system across laboratories. After consensus discussions and detailed review of the ACMG-AMP criteria, concordance increased to 71%. Causes of initial discordance in ACMG-AMP classifications were identified, and recommendations on clarification and increased specification of the ACMG-AMP criteria were made. In summary, although an initial pilot of the ACMG-AMP guidelines did not lead to increased concordance in variant interpretation, comparing variant interpretations to identify differences and having a common framework to facilitate resolution of those differences were beneficial for improving agreement, allowing iterative movement toward increased reporting consistency for variants in genes associated with monogenic disease. PMID:27181684

  9. Library History Revisited: Research Areas and Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byberg, Lis

    This paper discusses research areas and methods related to library history. The first section outlines research areas, including activities such as services to children in public libraries, mobile libraries, cataloging rules and practice, classification rules and practices, development of bibliographies, organization models, literature offered to…

  10. Does research help to safeguard protected areas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurance, William F

    2013-05-01

    Although many protected areas are foci for scientific research, they also face growing threats from illegal encroachment and overharvesting. Does the presence of field researchers help to limit such threats? Although evidence is largely anecdotal, researchers do appear to provide some protective effects, both actively (such as by deterring poachers) and passively (such as by benefiting local communities economically and thereby generating support for protected areas). However, much remains unknown about the generality and impacts of such benefits. A key priority is to develop a better understanding of the advantages and limitations of field research for aiding protected areas and their biodiversity. PMID:23462294

  11. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Domain: Areas of Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Alpaslan Demir

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs domain has seen rapid developments in recent years. As the number of UAVs increases and as the missions involving UAVs vary, new research issues surface. An overview of the existing research areas in the UAV domain has been presented including the nature of the work categorised under different groups. These research areas are divided into two main streams: Technological and operational research areas. The research areas in technology are divided into onboard and ground technologies. The research areas in operations are divided into organization level, brigade level, user level, standards and certifications, regulations and legal, moral, and ethical issues. This overview is intended to serve as a starting point for fellow researchers new to the domain, to help researchers in positioning their research, identifying related research areas, and focusing on the right issues.Defence Science Journal, Vol. 65, No. 4, July 2015, pp. 319-329, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.65.8631

  12. Enhancing the Decolorizing and Degradation Ability of Bacterial Consortium Isolated from Textile Effluent Affected Area and Its Application on Seed Germination

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A bacterial consortium BMP1/SDSC/01 consisting of six isolates was isolated from textile effected soil, sludge, and textile effluent from Hudiara drain near Nishat Mills Limited, Ferozepur Road, Lahore, Pakistan. It was selected because of being capable of degrading and detoxifying red, green, black, and yellow textile dyes. The pH and supplements were optimized to enhance the decolorization ability of the selected consortium. The results indicated that decolorizing ability of consortium for ...

  13. Midwest superconductivity consortium. 1993 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, in the fourth year of operations further strengthened its mission to advance the science and understanding of high T{sub c} superconductivity. The goals of the organization and the individual projects continue to reflect the current needs for new knowledge in the field and the unique capabilities of the institutions involved. Group efforts and cooperative laboratory interactions to achieve the greatest possible synergy under the Consortium continue to be emphasized. Industrial affiliations coupled with technology transfer initiatives were expanded. Activities of the participants during the past year achieved an interactive and high level of performance. The number of notable achievements in the field contributed by Consortium investigators increased. The programmatic research continues to focus upon key materials-related problems in two areas. The first area has a focus upon {open_quotes}Synthesis and Processing{close_quotes} while the second is centered around {open_quotes}Limiting Features in Transport Properties of High T{sub c} Materials{close_quotes}.

  14. Introduction to Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction The Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium is an alliance of neuroscience journals that have agreed to accept manuscript reviews from other members of the Consortium.Its goals are to support efficient and thorough peer review of original research in neuroscience, speed the publication of research reports, and reduce the burden on peer reviewers.

  15. Cancer Patient and Survivor Research from the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium: A Preview of Three Large Randomized Trials and Initial Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    MARCUS, ALFRED C.; DIEFENBACH, MICHAEL A.; STANTON, ANNETTE L.; MILLER-HALEGOUA, SUZANNE N.; FLEISHER, LINDA; RAICH, PETER C.; MORRA, MARION E.; PEROCCHIA, ROSEMARIE SLEVIN; TRAN, ZUNG VU; BRIGHT, MARY ANNE

    2014-01-01

    Three large randomized trials are described from the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium (CISRC). Three web-based multimedia programs are being tested to help newly diagnosed prostate (Project 1) and breast cancer patients (Project 2) make informed treatment decisions and breast cancer patients prepare for life after treatment (Project 3). Project 3 is also testing a telephone callback intervention delivered by a cancer information specialist. All participants receive standard print material specific to each project. Preliminary results from the two-month follow-up interviews are reported for the initial wave of enrolled participants, most of whom were recruited from the Cancer Information Service (1-800-4-CANCER) telephone information program (Project 1 = 208, Project 2 = 340, Project 3 = 792). Self-reported use of the multimedia program was 51%, 52% and 67% for Projects 1–3, respectively. Self-reported use of the print materials (read all, most or some) was 90%, 85% and 83% for Projects 1–3, respectively. The callback intervention was completed by 92% of Project 3 participants. Among those using the CISRC interventions, perceived utility and benefit was high, and more than 90% would recommend them to other cancer patients. Five initial lessons learned are presented that may help inform future cancer communications research. PMID:23448232

  16. The innovative use of a large-scale industry biomedical consortium to research the genetic basis of drug induced serious adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Arthur L

    2007-01-01

    The International Serious Adverse Event Consortium (SAEC) is a pharmaceutical industry and FDA led international (501 c3 non-profit) consortium, focused on identifying and validating DNA-variants useful in predicting the risk of drug induced, rare serious adverse events (SAEs). As such, it functions with the explicit purpose of enhancing the 'public good'. Its members are (i) organizations engaged principally in the business of discovering, developing and marketing pharmaceutical products, or (ii) a charitable, governmental, or other non-profit organization with an interest in researching the molecular basis of drug response.Drug-induced, rare SAEs present significant health issues for patients; and pose challenges for the safe use of approved drugs and the development of new drugs. Examples of drug-induced, rare SAEs include hepatotoxicity, QT prolongation, rhabdomyolosis, serious skin rashes (e.g. SJS), edema, acute renal failure, acute hypersensitivity, anemias/neutropenias, excessive weigh gain, retinopathy, vasculitis, among others. The rarity of such drug induced SAEs and the absence of effective government surveillance/research networks, makes it extremely difficult for any one company or research entity to accrue enough SAE cases and controls to conduct effective whole genome studies. Central to the notion of the SAEC is industry, government and health care providers can join forces to make use of a variety of sample and data resources in researching the genetic basis of these events.The purpose of the SAEC is threefold:•To carry out research directed toward the discovery of DNA-variants clinically useful in understanding and predicting the risk of drug induced serious adverse events and similar scientific research.•To ensure the widespread availability of the results of such research to the scientific research community and the public at large for no charge through publication and web-based methods; and•To educate the scientific research and medical

  17. 2012 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Chehalis River Watershed Area, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Chehalis River Watershed study area on January 28th, February 2nd-7th,...

  18. REL Pacific Research Alliances and Priority Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Educational Laboratory Pacific, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The mission of the Regional Educational Laboratories (RELs) is to help states, districts, and territories use data and research to improve student outcomes. RELs build capacity to do three things: (1) Use data to identify target areas for improvement; (2) Select the best approaches for improvement, drawing on credible and up-to-date research; and…

  19. Sharing perspectives and experiences of doctoral fellows in the first cohort of Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa: 2011–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babatunde Adedokun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resolution of public health problems in Africa remains a challenge because of insufficient skilled human resource capacity. The Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa (CARTA was established to enhance capacity in multi-disciplinary health research that will make a positive impact on population health in Africa. Objective: The first cohort of the CARTA program describes their perspectives and experiences during the 4 years of fellowship and puts forward suggestions for future progress and direction of research in Africa. Conclusions: The model of training as shown by the CARTA program is an effective model of research capacity building in African academic institutions. An expansion of the program is therefore warranted to reach out to more African academics in search of advanced research training.

  20. Enhancing the decolorizing and degradation ability of bacterial consortium isolated from textile effluent affected area and its application on seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Rashid; Sharif, Faiza; Ali, Sikander; Hayyat, Muhammad Umar

    2015-01-01

    A bacterial consortium BMP1/SDSC/01 consisting of six isolates was isolated from textile effected soil, sludge, and textile effluent from Hudiara drain near Nishat Mills Limited, Ferozepur Road, Lahore, Pakistan. It was selected because of being capable of degrading and detoxifying red, green, black, and yellow textile dyes. The pH and supplements were optimized to enhance the decolorization ability of the selected consortium. The results indicated that decolorizing ability of consortium for the red, green, black, and yellow dyes was higher as compared to individual strains. The consortium was able to decolorize 84%, 84%, 85%, 85%, and 82% of 200 ppm of red, green, black, yellow, and mixed dyes within 24 h while individual strain required 72 h. On supplementing urea, the consortium decolorized 87, 86, 89, 86, and 83%, respectively, while on supplementing sodium chloride the consortium decolorized 93, 94, 93, 94, and 89% of red, green, black, yellow, and mixed dyes, respectively, which was maximum while in the presence of ascorbic acid and ammonium chloride it showed intermediate results. The effect of untreated and treated dyes was investigated on Zea mays L. (maize) and Sorghum vulgare Pers. (sorghum). This study will help to promote an efficient biotreatment of textile effluents. PMID:25654132

  1. Enhancing the Decolorizing and Degradation Ability of Bacterial Consortium Isolated from Textile Effluent Affected Area and Its Application on Seed Germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A bacterial consortium BMP1/SDSC/01 consisting of six isolates was isolated from textile effected soil, sludge, and textile effluent from Hudiara drain near Nishat Mills Limited, Ferozepur Road, Lahore, Pakistan. It was selected because of being capable of degrading and detoxifying red, green, black, and yellow textile dyes. The pH and supplements were optimized to enhance the decolorization ability of the selected consortium. The results indicated that decolorizing ability of consortium for the red, green, black, and yellow dyes was higher as compared to individual strains. The consortium was able to decolorize 84%, 84%, 85%, 85%, and 82% of 200 ppm of red, green, black, yellow, and mixed dyes within 24 h while individual strain required 72 h. On supplementing urea, the consortium decolorized 87, 86, 89, 86, and 83%, respectively, while on supplementing sodium chloride the consortium decolorized 93, 94, 93, 94, and 89% of red, green, black, yellow, and mixed dyes, respectively, which was maximum while in the presence of ascorbic acid and ammonium chloride it showed intermediate results. The effect of untreated and treated dyes was investigated on Zea mays L. (maize and Sorghum vulgare Pers. (sorghum. This study will help to promote an efficient biotreatment of textile effluents.

  2. Advanced Lab Consortium ``Conspiracy''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Jonathan F.

    2006-03-01

    Advanced Laboratory instruction is a time-honored and essential element of an undergraduate physics education. But, from my vantage point, it has been neglected by the two major professional societies, APS and AAPT. At some schools, it has been replaced by ``research experiences,'' but I contend that very few of these experiences in the research lab, particularly in the junior year, deliver what they promise. It is time to focus the attention of APS, AAPT, and the NSF on the advanced lab. We need to create an Advanced Lab Consortium (ALC) of faculty and staff to share experiments, suppliers, materials, pedagogy, ideas, in short to build a professional network for those committed to advanced lab instruction. The AAPT is currently in serious discussions on this topic and my company stands ready with both financial and personnel resources to support the effort. This talk is a plea for co-conspirators.

  3. A Novel Cross-Disciplinary Multi-Institute Approach to Translational Cancer Research: Lessons Learned from Pennsylvania Cancer Alliance Bioinformatics Consortium (PCABC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashokkumar A. Patel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Pennsylvania Cancer Alliance Bioinformatics Consortium (PCABC, http://www.pcabc.upmc.edu is one of the first major project-based initiatives stemming from the Pennsylvania Cancer Alliance that was funded for four years by the Department of Health of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The objective of this was to initiate a prototype biorepository and bioinformatics infrastructure with a robust data warehouse by developing a statewide data model (1 for bioinformatics and a repository of serum and tissue samples; (2 a data model for biomarker data storage; and (3 a public access website for disseminating research results and bioinformatics tools. The members of the Consortium cooperate closely, exploring the opportunity for sharing clinical, genomic and other bioinformatics data on patient samples in oncology, for the purpose of developing collaborative research programs across cancer research institutions in Pennsylvania. The Consortium’s intention was to establish a virtual repository of many clinical specimens residing in various centers across the state, in order to make them available for research. One of our primary goals was to facilitate the identification of cancer specific biomarkers and encourage collaborative research efforts among the participating centers.Methods: The PCABC has developed unique partnerships so that every region of the state can effectively contribute and participate. It includes over 80 individuals from 14 organizations, and plans to expand to partners outside the State. This has created a network of researchers, clinicians, bioinformaticians, cancer registrars, program directors, and executives from academic and community health systems, as well as external corporate partners - all working together to accomplish a common mission. The various sub-committees have developed a common IRB protocol template, common data elements for standardizing data collections for three organ sites, intellectual

  4. Brazil research in selected scientific areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Peter

    2009-01-01

    applies publication growth as well as Citedness and Field Crown Indicators (FCI). Results show that across all research fields, including the Social Sciences, from 1996 the absolute citation impact of Brazil and Mexico are alike, steadily increasing, and just below that of RSA. Publication growth patterns......  The paper analyses the general development of research in Brazil, 1981-2005 and compares to Mexico, Republic of South Africa (RSA) and the world. Publications from 15 research areas and their citations are analyzed for the three countries covering two five-year periods 1996-2005. The paper...... for Brazil and Mexico are identical, with a vast increase since 1991. In contrast, RSA follows the global growth rate. From 1996 to 2005 both Latin American countries almost doubles their research publications in English, probably influencing the growth in relative citation impact, as measured by FCI...

  5. ESMN / European Solar Physics Research Area

    OpenAIRE

    Rutten, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    I briefly present the European Solar Magnetometry Network as a contemporary example of solar physics collaboration across European borders,and I place it in larger-scale context by discussing the past and future of Europe-wide solar physics organization.Solar physics from space is inherently transnational but overall solar physics needs more European cohesion to gain most from EC policy trends towards 'European research areas".

  6. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F

  7. The Cometa Consortium and the PI2S2 project .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becciani, U.

    The new grid e-Infrastructure in Sicily is offering new perspectives and important resources and starts to give new great opportunity for research using the HPC resources. We will show the infrastructure of the Cometa Consortium, the main activities of the PI2S2 project and the new challenges, mainly in the HPC area, that the project is carrying out. A simple but useful procedure for running HPC is also described.

  8. Education and Outreach Programs Offered by the Center for High Pressure Research and the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, G. A.

    2003-12-01

    Major research facilities and organizations provide an effective venue for developing partnerships with educational organizations in order to offer a wide variety of educational programs, because they constitute a base where the culture of scientific investigation can flourish. The Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES) conducts education and outreach programs through the Earth Science Educational Resource Center (ESERC), in partnership with other groups that offer research and education programs. ESERC initiated its development of education programs in 1994 under the administration of the Center for High Pressure Research (CHiPR), which was funded as a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center from 1991 to 2002. Programs developed during ESERC's association with CHiPR and COMPRES have targeted a wide range of audiences, including pre-K, K-12 students and teachers, undergraduates, and graduate students. Since 1995, ESERC has offered inquiry-based programs to Project WISE (Women in Science and Engineering) students at a high school and undergraduate level. Activities have included projects that investigated earthquakes, high pressure mineral physics, and local geology. Through a practicum known as Project Java, undergraduate computer science students have developed interactive instructional tools for several of these activities. For K-12 teachers, a course on Long Island geology is offered each fall, which includes an examination of the role that processes in the Earth's interior have played in the geologic history of the region. ESERC has worked with Stony Brook's Department of Geosciences faculty to offer courses on natural hazards, computer modeling, and field geology to undergraduate students, and on computer programming for graduate students. Each summer, a four-week residential college-level environmental geology course is offered to rising tenth graders from the Brentwood, New York schools in partnership with

  9. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-06-30

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

  10. Final Report to the National Energy Technology Laboratory on FY09-FY13 Cooperative Research with the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittal, Vijay [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-11-04

    The Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) was formed in 1999 in response to a call from U.S. Congress to restart a federal transmission reliability R&D program to address concerns about the reliability of the U.S. electric power grid. CERTS is a partnership between industry, universities, national laboratories, and government agencies. It researches, develops, and disseminates new methods, tools, and technologies to protect and enhance the reliability of the U.S. electric power system and the efficiency of competitive electricity markets. It is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE). This report provides an overview of PSERC and CERTS, of the overall objectives and scope of the research, a summary of the major research accomplishments, highlights of the work done under the various elements of the NETL cooperative agreement, and brief reports written by the PSERC researchers on their accomplishments, including research results, publications, and software tools.

  11. Consortium for coal log pipeline research and development. Final technical progress report, August 10, 1993--August 9, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrero, T.R.

    1996-10-01

    The main objective of this project was to conduct intensive research and development of the Coal Log Pipeline (CLP). Specifically, the R & D was to concentrate on previously neglected and insufficiently studied aspects of CLP which were deemed significant. With improvements in these areas, CLP could be implemented for commercial use within five years. CLP technology is capable of transporting coal logs for long distances. The many potential advantages of CLP over truck and railroad transportation include: lower freight costs, less energy consumption, less air pollution, decreased environmental problems, increased safety, and improved reliability. Previous studies have shown that CLP is advantageous over slurry pipeline technology. First, CLP uses one-third the water required by a coal slurry pipeline. Second, CLP provides easier coal dewatering. Third, the CLP conveying capacity of coal is twice as much as a slurry transport line of equal diameter. In many situations, the cost for transporting each ton of coal is expected to be less expensive by CLP as compared to other competing modes of transportation such as: truck, unit train and slurry pipeline.

  12. International Radical Cystectomy Consortium: A way forward

    OpenAIRE

    Raza, Syed Johar; Field, Erinn; Kibel, Adam S.; Mottrie, Alex; Weizer, Alon Z; Wagner, Andrew; Hemal, Ashok K.; Scherr, Douglas S.; Schanne, Francis; Gaboardi, Franco; Wu, Guan; Peabody, James O.; Koauk, Jihad; Redorta, Joan Palou; Pattaras, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) is an emerging operative alternative to open surgery for the management of invasive bladder cancer. Studies from single institutions provide limited data due to the small number of patients. In order to better understand the related outcomes, a world-wide consortium was established in 2006 of patients undergoing RARC, called the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium (IRCC). Thus far, the IRCC has reported its findings on various areas of operativ...

  13. Prenatal pharmacogenomics: a promising area for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, E H; Cheng, E Y; Hebert, M F; Thummel, K E; Burke, W

    2016-08-01

    Clinical applications of prenatal genetic screening currently focus on detection of aneuploidy and other genetic diseases in the developing fetus. Growing evidence suggests that the fetal genome may also be informative about fetal exposures through contributions to placental transport as well as placental and fetal metabolism. Possible clinical applications of prenatal pharmacogenomic screening include prospective optimization of medication selection and dosage, as well as retrospective assessment of whether a fetus was previously exposed to significant risk. Newly available noninvasive methods of prenatal genetic screening mean that relevant fetal genotypes could be made available to obstetricians for use in management of a current pregnancy. This promising area for research merits more attention than it has thus far received.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 10 May 2016; doi:10.1038/tpj.2016.33. PMID:27168097

  14. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to

  15. The Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research, Inc. Semi-Annual Technical Report for April 1, 2000 - September 30, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-10-02

    Scientific progress reports submitted by university researchers conducting projects funded through CPBR and metrics reports submitted by industry sponsors that provided matching funds to the projects.

  16. Corn in consortium with forages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Maria de Paula Garcia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The basic premises for sustainable agricultural development with focus on rural producers are reducing the costs of production and aggregation of values through the use crop-livestock system (CLS throughout the year. The CLS is based on the consortium of grain crops, especially corn with tropical forages, mainly of the genus Panicum and Urochloa. The study aimed to evaluate the grain yield of irrigated corn crop intercropped with forage of the genus Panicum and Urochloa. The experiment was conducted at the Fazenda de Ensino, Pesquisa e Extensão – FEPE  of the Faculdade de Engenharia - UNESP, Ilha Solteira in an Oxisol in savannah conditions and in the autumn winter of 2009. The experimental area was irrigated by a center pivot and had a history of no-tillage system for 8 years. The corn hybrid used was simple DKB 390 YG at distances of 0.90 m. The seeds of grasses were sown in 0.34 m spacing in the amount of 5 kg ha-1, they were mixed with fertilizer minutes before sowing  and placed in a compartment fertilizer seeder and fertilizers were mechanically deposited in the soil at a depth of 0.03 m. The experimental design used was a randomized block with four replications and five treatments: Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania sown during the nitrogen fertilization (CTD of the corn; Panicum maximum cv. Mombaça sown during the nitrogen fertilization (CMD of the corn; Urochloa brizantha cv. Xaraés sown during the occasion of nitrogen fertilization (CBD of the corn; Urochloa ruziziensis cv. Comumsown during the nitrogen fertilization (CRD of the corn and single corn (control. The production components of corn: plant population per hectare (PlPo, number of ears per hectare (NE ha-1, number of rows per ear (NRE, number of kernels per row on the cob (NKR, number of grain in the ear (NGE and mass of 100 grains (M100G were not influenced by consortium with forage. Comparing grain yield (GY single corn and maize intercropped with forage of the genus Panicum

  17. NCI Cohort Consortium Membership

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Cohort Consortium membership is international and includes investigators responsible for more than 40 high-quality cohorts who are studying large and diverse populations in more than 15 different countries.

  18. Appalachian clean coal technology consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutz, K.; Yoon, Roe-Hoan [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. The research activities will be conducted in cooperation with coal companies, equipment manufacturers, and A&E firms working in the Appalachian coal fields. This approach is consistent with President Clinton`s initiative in establishing Regional Technology Alliances to meet regional needs through technology development in cooperation with industry. The consortium activities are complementary to the High-Efficiency Preparation program of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, but are broader in scope as they are inclusive of technology developments for both near-term and long-term applications, technology transfer, and training a highly-skilled work force.

  19. Hazardous Waste Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A full-service research and evaluation center equipped with safety equipment, a high-bay pilot studies area, and a large-scale pilot studies facility The U.S. Army...

  20. Thermohydrogeological modelling of the Whiteshell research area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents details of the modelling that was done to support the development of the simplified geosphere model (GEONET), which was used in the assessment that was presented in the Environmental Impact Statement on the proposed concept for the disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. Detailed modelling of groundwater flow, heat transport and contaminant transport through the geosphere was performed using the MOTIF finite-element computer code and the particle-tracking code TRACK3D. The GEONET model was developed using data from the Whiteshell Research Area, with a hypothetical disposal vault located at a depth of 500 m. This report first briefly describes the conceptual model and summarises the two-dimensional (2-D) simulations that were used initially to define an adequate 3-D representation of the system. The analysis showed that the configuration of major fracture zones could have a large influence on the groundwater flow patterns. These major fracture zones can have high velocities and large flows. The proximity of the radionuclide source to a major fracture zone may strongly influence the time for a radionuclide to be transported from the disposal vault to the surface. Groundwater flow was then simulated and advective/convective particle tracking was conducted in the selected 3-D representation of the system, to aid in selecting a suitable form for the simplified model to be used in the overall systems assessment with the SYVAC3-CC3 computer code. Sensitivity analyses were performed on the effects of (a) different natural geometries of part of the model domain, (b) different hydraulic properties, (c) construction, operation and closure of the vault, (d) the presence of a water supply well and (e) the presence of an open borehole. These analyses indicated that the shape of the topography and the presence of a major low-dipping fracture zone focuses groundwater passing through the vault into a discharge area that is much smaller than the area of the

  1. Standardized endpoint definitions for transcatheter aortic valve implantation clinical trials: a consensus report from the Valve Academic Research Consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Leon, Martin B; Piazza, Nicolo; Nikolsky, Eugenia; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Cutlip, Donald E.; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Krucoff, Mitchell W.; Mack, Michael; Mehran, Roxana; Miller, Craig; Morel, Marie-Angèle; Petersen, John; Popma, Jeffrey J; Takkenberg, Johanna J.M.; Vahanian, Alec

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To propose standardized consensus definitions for important clinical endpoints in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), investigations in an effort to improve the quality of clinical research and to enable meaningful comparisons between clinical trials. To make these consensus definitions accessible to all stakeholders in TAVI clinical research through a peer reviewed publication, on behalf of the public health. Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation may provi...

  2. A National Consortium for Open Academic Books in Sweden : An investigation funded by National Library of Sweden, Swedish Research Council and Riksbankens Jubileumsfond

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence, David; Bernhardsson, Katarina; Eriksson, Jörgen; Henning, Karin; Hertil Lindelöw, Camilla; Neidenmark, Thomas; Pelling, Maja; Svensson, Aina

    2013-01-01

    2. Concluding recommendations 2.1 Overall Academic books, particularly those published in Sweden and publically funded, should be made available via an open access version; Academic books should undergo an independent peer-review process; A national consortium should be set up that organizes a peer-review process for academic books and provides guidance on open access publishing; A consortium must work closely with existing publishing channels such as commercial publishers, Acta series and un...

  3. Reengineering the national clinical and translational research enterprise: the strategic plan of the National Clinical and Translational Science Awards Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Steven E; Berglund, Lars; Bernard, Gordon R; Califf, Robert M; Fitzgerald, Garret A; Johnson, Peter C

    2010-03-01

    Advances in human health require the efficient and rapid translation of scientific discoveries into effective clinical treatments; this process, in turn, depends on observational data gathered from patients, communities, and public health research that can be used to guide basic scientific investigation. Such bidirectional translational science, however, faces unprecedented challenges due to the rapid pace of scientific and technological development, as well as the difficulties of negotiating increasingly complex regulatory and commercial environments that overlap the research domain. Further, numerous barriers to translational science have emerged among the nation's academic research centers, including basic structural and cultural impediments to innovation and collaboration, shortages of trained investigators, and inadequate funding.To address these serious and systemic problems, in 2006 the National Institutes of Health created the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) program, which aims to catalyze the transformation of biomedical research at a national level, speeding the discovery and development of therapies, fostering collaboration, engaging communities, and training succeeding generations of clinical and translational researchers. The authors report in detail on the planning process, begun in 2008, that was used to engage stakeholders and to identify, refine, and ultimately implement the CTSA program's overarching strategic goals. They also discuss the implications and likely impact of this strategic planning process as it is applied among the nation's academic health centers. PMID:20182119

  4. Interdisciplinary Environmental Summer Study Abroad in Southern Africa as a Mechanism for the Development of an International Research and Education Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swap, R. J.; Sabea, H.; Annegarn, H.; Ford, C.; Netshandama-Funyufunyu, V.; Omara-Ojungu, P.; Vaz, K.; Ribeiro, N.; Twine, W.; Terni, C.; Estes, L.

    2005-12-01

    We describe an interdisciplinary course for non-specialist undergraduates in which the students experience firsthand issues of regional environmental complexity and have the unique opportunity to gain insight into the role the environment plays in shaping the people and culture of southern Africa. Undergraduates receive 3 hours of credit both in Environmental Science and Anthropology for the ``People, Culture and Environment of Southern Africa" study abroad program. The program is an intensive introduction to the physical geography, history and culture of the region and involves an intensive blend of in-class lectures and field trips with daily debriefing discussions. Over the duration of the 30 day program, students are exposed to elements of geology, ecology, hydrology and atmospheric science and how the interconnectedness of these different aspects of the physical environment help shape the history of the people and their culture in the region. Information about logistics and course development as well as to how this summer study abroad program has contributed to the development and expansion of the Southern Africa Virginia Networks and Associations (SAVANA) consortium will be detailed. The program builds upon more than 12 years of relationships between UVA faculty and their southern African colleagues developed during the course of several regional scale research programs with the most recent being the Southern African Regional Science Initiative - SAFARI 2000. Students enrolled with the UVA program are joined by their counterparts and interact with faculty from institutional partners both in the classroom and in the field. Participants operate out of four major locations: Johannesburg, RSA (Univ. of the Witwatersrand); Thohoyondou, RSA (Univ. of Venda); Maputo, MOZ (Univ. of Eduardo Mondlane); and Acornhoek, RSA (Univ. of the Witwatersrand - Rural Facility). Class size is limited to 15 students from UVA and about 6 SAVANA consortium students. This pairing with

  5. 77 FR 71831 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-3D PDF Consortium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... a notice in the Federal Register pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on April 20, 2012 (77 FR 23754... Federal Register pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on September 14, 2012 (77 FR 56861). Patricia A... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--3D...

  6. 78 FR 72713 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-3D PDF Consortium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ... published a notice in the Federal Register pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on April 20, 2012 (77 FR... the Federal Register pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on May 10, 2013 (78 FR 27431). Patricia A... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--3D...

  7. 77 FR 56861 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-3d PDF Consortium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    ... a notice in the Federal Register pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on April 20, 2012 (77 FR 23754... Federal Register pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on June 29, 2012 (77 FR 38831). Patricia A. Brink... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--3d...

  8. 78 FR 27431 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-3D PDF Consortium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... published a notice in the Federal Register pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on April 20, 2012 (77 FR... in the Federal Register pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on December 4, 2012 (77 FR 71831... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--3D...

  9. Center for Herbal Research on Colorectal Cancer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory ConsortiumResearch Area: Herbs Program:Centers of Excellence for Research on CAM Description:Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of...

  10. Standardizing data exchange for clinical research protocols and case report forms: An assessment of the suitability of the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model (ODM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huser, Vojtech; Sastry, Chandan; Breymaier, Matthew; Idriss, Asma; Cimino, James J

    2015-10-01

    Efficient communication of a clinical study protocol and case report forms during all stages of a human clinical study is important for many stakeholders. An electronic and structured study representation format that can be used throughout the whole study life-span can improve such communication and potentially lower total study costs. The most relevant standard for representing clinical study data, applicable to unregulated as well as regulated studies, is the Operational Data Model (ODM) in development since 1999 by the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC). ODM's initial objective was exchange of case report forms data but it is increasingly utilized in other contexts. An ODM extension called Study Design Model, introduced in 2011, provides additional protocol representation elements. Using a case study approach, we evaluated ODM's ability to capture all necessary protocol elements during a complete clinical study lifecycle in the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health. ODM offers the advantage of a single format for institutions that deal with hundreds or thousands of concurrent clinical studies and maintain a data warehouse for these studies. For each study stage, we present a list of gaps in the ODM standard and identify necessary vendor or institutional extensions that can compensate for such gaps. The current version of ODM (1.3.2) has only partial support for study protocol and study registration data mainly because it is outside the original development goal. ODM provides comprehensive support for representation of case report forms (in both the design stage and with patient level data). Inclusion of requirements of observational, non-regulated or investigator-initiated studies (outside Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation) can further improve future revisions of the standard. PMID:26188274

  11. NCI Cohort Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Cohort Consortium is an extramural-intramural partnership formed by the National Cancer Institute to address the need for large-scale collaborations to pool the large quantity of data and biospecimens necessary to conduct a wide range of cancer studies.

  12. Recommendations From the International Consortium on Professional Nursing Practice in Long-Term Care Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilton, Katherine S; Bowers, Barbara J; Heath, Hazel; Shannon, Kay; Dellefield, Mary Ellen; Prentice, Dawn; Siegel, Elena O; Meyer, Julienne; Chu, Charlene H; Ploeg, Jenny; Boscart, Veronique M; Corazzini, Kirsten N; Anderson, Ruth A; Mueller, Christine A

    2016-02-01

    In response to the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics' global agenda for clinical research and quality of care in long-term care homes (LTCHs), the International Consortium on Professional Nursing Practice in Long Term Care Homes (the Consortium) was formed to develop nursing leadership capacity and address the concerns regarding the current state of professional nursing practice in LTCHs. At its invitational, 2-day inaugural meeting, the Consortium brought together international nurse experts to explore the potential of registered nurses (RNs) who work as supervisors or charge nurses within the LTCHs and the value of their contribution in nursing homes, consider what RN competencies might be needed, discuss effective educational (curriculum and practice) experiences, health care policy, and human resources planning requirements, and to identify what sustainable nurse leadership strategies and models might enhance the effectiveness of RNs in improving resident, family, and staff outcomes. The Consortium made recommendations about the following priority issues for action: (1) define the competencies of RNs required to care for older adults in LTCHs; (2) create an LTCH environment in which the RN role is differentiated from other team members and RNs can practice to their full scope; and (3) prepare RN leaders to operate effectively in person-centered care LTCH environments. In addition to clear recommendations for practice, the Consortium identified several areas in which further research is needed. The Consortium advocated for a research agenda that emphasizes an international coordination of research efforts to explore similar issues, the pursuit of examining the impact of nursing and organizational models, and the showcasing of excellence in nursing practice in care homes, so that others might learn from what works. Several studies already under way are also described. PMID:26712302

  13. Coconut Program Area Research Planning and Prioritization

    OpenAIRE

    Aragon, Corazon

    2000-01-01

    The coconut industry is one of the country's major pillars in employment generation and foreign exchange earnings. However, local production problems, the expansion in coconut hectarage of neighboring countries, and recent developments in biotechnology research on other competing crops that have high lauric oil content might affect its long-term sustainability and viability. In a highly liberalized global trade environment, innovation and creativity in the country's coconut industry are neede...

  14. Research Notes ~ Selecting Research Areas and Research Design Approaches in Distance Education: Process Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarshan Mishra

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the process used for selecting research areas and methodological approaches in distance education in India. Experts from the field of distance education in India were interviewed at length, with the aim of collecting qualitative data on opinions on process-issues for selecting areas for research, research design, and appropriate methodological approaches in distance education. Data collected from these interviews were subjected to content analysis; triangulation and peer consultation techniques were used for cross-checking and data verification. While the findings and recommendations of this study have limited application in that they can only be used in the specific context outlined in this paper, respondents in this study nonetheless revealed the pressing need for more process-oriented research in examining media and technology, learners and learning, and distance learning evaluation processes. Our research, which yielded interesting empirical findings, also determined that a mixed approach – one that involves both quantitative and qualitative methods – is more appropriate for conducting research in distance education in India. Qualitative evidence from our research also indicates that respondents interviewed felt that emphasis should be placed on interdisciplinary and systemic research, over that of traditional disciplinary research. Research methods such as student self-reporting, extensive and highly targeted interviews, conversation and discourse analysis, were determined to as useful for data collection for this study.

  15. The 13th Annual Meeting of the Translational Research Cancer Centers Consortium (TrC3); Immune Suppression and the Tumor Microenvironment, Columbus, Ohio; March 1–2, 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Lesinski, Gregory B.; Carson, William E.; Repasky, Elizabeth A.; Wei, Weizen; Kalinski, Pawel; Lotze, Michael T; June, Carl H.; Petros, William; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Olencki, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The Translational Research Cancer Centers Consortium (TrC3) is a cancer immunotherapy network, established to promote biologic therapeutics in the Midwestern and Northeastern regions of The United States. The 13th Annual Meeting of the TrC3 was hosted by The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center—Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute and took place at The Blackwell Hotel and Conference Center in Columbus, OH on March 1–2, 2010 (http://www.osuccc.o...

  16. The virtual atomic and molecular data centre (VAMDC) consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubernet, M. L.; Antony, B. K.; Ba, Y. A.; Babikov, Yu L.; Bartschat, K.; Boudon, V.; Braams, B. J.; Chung, H.-K.; Daniel, F.; Delahaye, F.; Del Zanna, G.; de Urquijo, J.; Dimitrijević, M. S.; Domaracka, A.; Doronin, M.; Drouin, B. J.; Endres, C. P.; Fazliev, A. Z.; Gagarin, S. V.; Gordon, I. E.; Gratier, P.; Heiter, U.; Hill, C.; Jevremović, D.; Joblin, C.; Kasprzak, A.; Krishnakumar, E.; Leto, G.; Loboda, P. A.; Louge, T.; Maclot, S.; Marinković, B. P.; Markwick, A.; Marquart, T.; Mason, H. E.; Mason, N. J.; Mendoza, C.; Mihajlov, A. A.; Millar, T. J.; Moreau, N.; Mulas, G.; Pakhomov, Yu; Palmeri, P.; Pancheshnyi, S.; Perevalov, V. I.; Piskunov, N.; Postler, J.; Quinet, P.; Quintas-Sánchez, E.; Ralchenko, Yu; Rhee, Y.-J.; Rixon, G.; Rothman, L. S.; Roueff, E.; Ryabchikova, T.; Sahal-Bréchot, S.; Scheier, P.; Schlemmer, S.; Schmitt, B.; Stempels, E.; Tashkun, S.; Tennyson, J.; Tyuterev, Vl G.; Vujčić, V.; Wakelam, V.; Walton, N. A.; Zatsarinny, O.; Zeippen, C. J.; Zwölf, C. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) Consortium is a worldwide consortium which federates atomic and molecular databases through an e-science infrastructure and an organisation to support this activity. About 90% of the inter-connected databases handle data that are used for the interpretation of astronomical spectra and for modelling in many fields of astrophysics. Recently the VAMDC Consortium has connected databases from the radiation damage and the plasma communities, as well as promoting the publication of data from Indian institutes. This paper describes how the VAMDC Consortium is organised for the optimal distribution of atomic and molecular data for scientific research. It is noted that the VAMDC Consortium strongly advocates that authors of research papers using data cite the original experimental and theoretical papers as well as the relevant databases. .

  17. Nuclear Technology Education Consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To reinforce the government efforts toward the restoration of nuclear education health, a new concept in post-graduate level training for the nuclear sector has been developed by a strong consortium of UK universities and HE institutions under the title Nuclear Technology Education Consortium (NTEC). The basis of this consortium were designed to meet the UK projected nuclear skills requirements in decommissioning and cleanup, reactor technology, fusion and nuclear medicine. The structure and content of the programme, which leads to qualifications up to master's level in nuclear science and technology, was established following extensive consultations with the UK nuclear sector, including industry, regulators, MoD, NDA, Government Departments and the Cogent Sector Skills Council. The programme is coordinated by the Dalton Nuclear Institute at The University of Manchester. This programme has been approved by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Following are the key features of this consortium: - It was only designed to fulfil the needs nuclear sector; - It offers subjects in broad spectrum, from reactor theory through decommissioning to waste disposal and storage, the subject matter being presented by leading specialists in their field; - Each topic is presented in short course format which is ideal for employees within the industry; - It offers part-time basis over a period of three years as well as full-time in one year post-graduate courses in nuclear science and technology; - This programme also covers the Post-graduate Diploma or Post-graduate Certificate opportunity for students; - Individual subjects are presented in 'short course' modular format, providing excellent access to the programme for engineers and managers in full-time employment who wish to advance their skill and knowledge base; - The core of each module is one week of direct teaching at the relevant institution, minimizing the time away from the workplace for an employee whilst maximizing

  18. Market Research: An Area in Need of Nurse Researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froberg, Debra G.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The application of marketing principles to nursing education and the need for research into the applicant market are discussed for nursing education programs, effective recruiting techniques, prediction of student success in nursing education, program quality, and the current and future nursing market. (Author/MSE)

  19. National Consortium Supports Cities in Evaluating LED Streetlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-09-30

    Fact sheet that introduces Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium, a group of municipalities, utilities, and energy efficiency organizations who are interested in making investments in LED street and area lighting.

  20. 36 CFR 251.23 - Experimental areas and research natural areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Experimental areas and research natural areas. 251.23 Section 251.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LAND USES Miscellaneous Land Uses Designation of Areas § 251.23 Experimental...

  1. Supplier Development Literature Review and Key Future Research Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muddassir Ahmed

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to develop a Supplier Development (SD literature framework and identify the main focus areas in SD research. To this end, a comprehensive review of the existing SD academic literature has been undertaken, which includes 62 research papers. These papers are classified according to their research content and the research methodology employed. A comprehensive list of future research areas is also presented. Thus, this paper will also briefly explore proposed future research. The review of the SD literature presented here identifies the following main areas of focus: Supplier Development Activities, Practices and Success Factors; Direct or Indirect Supplier Development; Supplier Development as a Reactive or Strategic Process; Supplier Development in a Lean Six Sigma & SME context.

  2. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Task 6 Report Promoting a Southeast Hydrogen Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this project task was to establish a technical consortium to promote the deployment of hydrogen technologies and infrastructure in the Southeast. The goal was to partner with fuel cell manufacturers, hydrogen fuel infrastructure providers, electric utilities, energy service companies, research institutions, and user groups to improve education and awareness of hydrogen technologies in an area that is lagging behind other parts of the country in terms of vehicle and infrastructure demonstrations and deployments. This report documents that effort.

  3. The Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maunsell John HR

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As the Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium (NPRC ends its first year, it is worth looking back to see how the experiment has worked. In order to encourage dissemination of the details outlined in this Editorial, it will also be published in other journals in the Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium.

  4. The Consortium for Evidence Based Research in Rural Educational Settings (CEBRRES): Applying Collaborative Action Research as a Means of Enhancing the Development of Rural Middle School Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, A. H.

    2006-05-01

    Kentucky ranks third in the U.S. in need of rural education attention. Rural schools in Kentucky serve nearly 40% of the total student population, and graduation rates and NAEP scores are low. A two-year pilot study is being completed addressing psychological, social, and content knowledge based constructs, as they apply to science and mathematics achievement in rural environments. The goals are to identify the key aspects of rural teachers knowledge and skills, use a framework to describe how knowledge and skills develop in the rural classroom, apply a useful model of intervention to promote teacher development and increased student learning. If proven successful the knowledge can be incorporated into the practice of current teaching and preservice pedagogical methods. The problem that was identified and addressed by CEBRRES is the high level of student disengagement and the shortage of rigorous stimulating curriculum models. The action taken was the development and implementation of model eliciting activities. Teachers at the target school were expected to utilize action research methodology to execute model-eliciting activities in the classroom, and then communicate results in forms that are useful for other teachers. Benefits to teachers included stipends, increased science content depth and breadth, support to achieve "highly qualified teacher status", extensive professional development, and technology, equipment, and supplies for their school. Survey instruments were devised to address school perceptions (61% worry that they are not doing well enough in school), future plans (80% expect to attend college vs. the current 47.5%), various self concepts, academic self concepts (23% feel that learning is difficult for them), and family self concepts. Science was identified by the students as the subject that interests them the most, followed by math, yet Kentucky ranks near the bottom of the U.S. in math and science training in the workplace. Geology

  5. Fruits Program Area Research Planning and Prioritization: Background Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pabuayon, Isabelita

    2000-01-01

    This study addresses the Fruits Program Area research allocation concerns. It provides a background analysis focusing on the fruits industry profile, domestic and export potentials, supply constraints, role of public and private sector R&D, review of past agricultural research, technologies generated by the R&D program, constraints to and consequences of technology adoption, and the strengths and weaknesses in the institutional structure of research and extension linkage. Additionally, it pro...

  6. PRIORITY RESEARCH DIRECTIONS IN THE AREA OF QUALITATIVE METHODOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Melnikova, Olga; Khoroshilov, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    The basic directions of modern theoretical and practical research in the area of qualitative methodology in Russia are discussed in the article. The complexity of research is considered from three points of view: the development of methodology of qualitative analysis, qualitative methods, and verbal and nonverbal projective techniques. The authors present an integrative model of the qualitative analysis, the research on specificity of the use of discourse-analysis method and projective techni...

  7. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesque, Stephen [EWI, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-04-05

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

  8. Research results from the Advanced Lead-Acid Battery Consortium point the way to longer life and higher specific energy for lead/acid electric-vehicle batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, P. T.

    Amidst the welter of publicity devoted to the newer battery chemistries, the remarkable progress made by lead/acid battery technologists in response to the needs of the emerging electric-vehicle market has tended to be overlooked. The flooded design of battery, launched by Gaston Planté around 1860, has given way to a valve-regulated variant which has a history dating only from the 1970s. The key parameters of this `maintenance free' battery have been improved markedly during the course of the development programme of the Advanced Lead-Acid Battery Consortium (ALABC), and it is likely that lead/acid will continue to feature strongly in motive-power applications as a result of its cost advantage and of its enhanced effectiveness.

  9. Engineering research, development and technology: Thrust area report FY 91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence, Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff and the technology needed to support current and future LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) to identify key technologies and (2) conduct high quality work to enhance our capabilities in these key technologies. To help focus our efforts, we identify technology thrust areas and select technical leaders for each area. The thrust areas are integrated engineering activities and, rather than being based on individual disciplines, they are staffed by personnel from Electronics Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and other LLNL organizations, as appropriate. The thrust area leaders are expected to establish strong links to LLNL program leaders and to industry; to use outside and inside experts to review the quality and direction of the work; to use university contacts to supplement and complement their efforts; and to be certain that we are not duplicating the work of others. The thrust area leader is also responsible for carrying out the work that follows from the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program so that the results can be applied as early as possible to the needs of LLNL programs. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes activities conducted within the Program for the fiscal year, 1991. Its intent is to provide timely summaries of objectives, theories, methods, and results

  10. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on area consortium research and development business, 2nd year. Area consortium research and development (research and development of process-compatible flexible robot technology); 1998 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu. Kotei tekiogata flexible robot gijutsu ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu (dai 2 nendo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    To increase international competitiveness, the construction of highly productive systems capable of autonomously accommodating changes in manufacturing processes is indispensable. Robot technologies for flexible, robotized manufacturing lines will be established, and robotization will be promoted in industries related with transportation equipment and semiconductor in and near Kumamoto City. Optimization is to be achieved in such processes as IC chip insertion so that piston insertion into a cylinder with but an extremely little gap between them will be performed without scratches on the cylinder walls and that no plastic deformation will occur in the initial lack of positional correspondence. The technological tasks to be carried out include position detection based on visual information and skill making up, micro-force sensor of great precision and flexible force control, coordinated control of different types of robots, flexible handling mechanism, and integration of different techniques based on an information management system. The control of force now being exercised by humans will be reviewed from a new point of view and harmonization will be established between the human endeavor and sensing devices. Conceptual designs will be completed by the fiscal year end, with efforts concentrated on two prototypes, one for assembly lines and the other for IC inspection. (NEDO)

  11. AWARENESS AND USE OF NATIONAL KNOWLEDGE RESOURCE CONSORTIUM OF NISCAIR: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAKSHI

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper explains about National Knowledge Resource Consortium and examined awareness and use of the consortium by the users of NISCAIR. 70 questionnaires were distributed to the users and 63questionnaires were received back for analysis the data. The results of the survey reveal that majority of the respondents were aware of the consortium whereas only 4.76% were not aware of the consortium. 52.38% respondents were moderately satisfied with the consortium and 23.80% were using for writing research articles. Some problems were highlighted while accessing the consortium. Providing training to its users will make maximum use of the consortium and reduce the problems faced by the users.

  12. Water Research Consortium U.S. Department of Energy Grant Award Number DE-FG02-05ER64132 Final Technical Report For Period Beginning: 15 September 2005 And Ending: 31 December 2009 Report Date: 16 March 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven R. Billingsley

    2010-03-18

    This report summarizes the activities of the INRA Water Research Consortium (IWRC) for the period beginning September 15, 2005 and ending December 16, 2010. This report compares accomplishments to project objectives, documents the activities associated with this project, and lists products developed during the course of the project. The Water Resources Research Needs Assessment team received funding from the Inland Northwest Research Alliance Water Resources Steering Committee to facilitate a structured needs assessment process that could provide a basis for future targeted research efforts to improve regional water resources management in the Inland Northwest region. The original INRA proposal specifically mentions the need to conduct a detailed assessment of the information and research needs of policy makers and water user groups during a period of increasing competition for scarce water supplies. A particular focus of this assessment would be to understand what types of research might facilitate water resource management during periods of drought. The specific goals of the Needs Assessment project were to: (1) Quickly ascertain the perceptions of diverse stakeholders in this region; (2) Condense this complex information into a format that can be shared with the INRA scientific panel, and (3) Develop of a realistic set of research needs & priorities that can shape future INRA-funded research activities.

  13. 03-DPACS: an open source solution for critical PACS systems integratedin the 03 Consortium project.

    OpenAIRE

    Beltrame, Marco

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT The student started his work towards the PhD. in 2005, joining the Bioengineering and ICT group of the University of Trieste, whose core research was in the e-health area. The personal research project conducted by the PhD student was inserted in the O3 Consortium research project, which had the aim to propose a complete solution for the adoption of open technology in the healthcare environment. The solution should become a whole new model for e-health application and include n...

  14. Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium (MNSEC) is to enhance the scope, quality and integration of educational and research capabilities of nuclear sciences and engineering (NS/E) programs at partner schools in support of the U.S. nuclear industry (including DOE laboratories). With INIE support, MNSEC had a productive seven years and made impressive progress in achieving these goals. Since the past three years have been no-cost-extension periods, limited -- but notable -- progress has been made in FY10. Existing programs continue to be strengthened and broadened at Consortium partner institutions. The enthusiasm generated by the academic, state, federal, and industrial communities for the MNSEC activities is reflected in the significant leveraging that has occurred for our programs.

  15. Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Wynn Volkert; Dr. Arvind Kumar; Dr. Bryan Becker; Dr. Victor Schwinke; Dr. Angel Gonzalez; Dr. DOuglas McGregor

    2010-12-08

    The objective of the Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium (MNSEC) is to enhance the scope, quality and integration of educational and research capabilities of nuclear sciences and engineering (NS/E) programs at partner schools in support of the U.S. nuclear industry (including DOE laboratories). With INIE support, MNSEC had a productive seven years and made impressive progress in achieving these goals. Since the past three years have been no-cost-extension periods, limited -- but notable -- progress has been made in FY10. Existing programs continue to be strengthened and broadened at Consortium partner institutions. The enthusiasm generated by the academic, state, federal, and industrial communities for the MNSEC activities is reflected in the significant leveraging that has occurred for our programs.

  16. COnsortium of METabolomics Studies (COMETS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The COnsortium of METabolomics Studies (COMETS) is an extramural-intramural partnership that promotes collaboration among prospective cohort studies that follow participants for a range of outcomes and perform metabolomic profiling of individuals.

  17. Engineering Research, Development and Technology, FY95: Thrust area report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through their collaboration with US industry in pursuit of the most cost-effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where they can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance their capabilities and establish themselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts, technology thrust areas are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1995. The report provides timely summaries of objectives methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: computational electronics and electromagnetics; computational mechanics; microtechnology; manufacturing technology; materials science and engineering; power conversion technologies; nondestructive evaluation; and information engineering.

  18. [Achievement of Qimin Yaoshu in area of herbalogical textual research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hai-Liang; Zhang, Rui-Xian

    2015-11-01

    The achievement of Qimin Yaoshu in the area of herbalogical textual research was illustrated in this paper. Qimin Yaoshu quoted and keeped many contents from ancient agriculture books related in herbalogical literature. It also recorded the information of lots of tropical and subtropical plants. The author bringed forwarded many experiences indistinguishing plants and clarified some long last confused or wrong opinions. The studying philosophy and methods of the authors gave us much enlightenment in our herbalogical textual research. It should be taken into account when the herbalogical textual research was carried out. PMID:27071275

  19. Research on Fish Consumer Profile Evaluation in Romanian Plain Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvius STANCIU

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Research aimed at shaping a fish consumer profile in the Romanian Plain area. 150 people were interviewed. Preferences evaluation was conducted by means of a questionnaire with 27 questions. Favorite fish species, purchasing place and manner, favorite preparation choices, consumption frequency and place have been identified.

  20. Main academic institutions conducting research in the public transport area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, B.E. [Lund Inst. of Tech. (Sweden). Dept. of Traffic Planning and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    The international exchange of knowledge is becoming increasingly important for all activities. Within Europe, the need for simple reviews of institutions within one and the same subject area has become more tangible since the European Union started its public transport research program. The survey has been carried out in two stages. First a questionnaire was sent to those institutions, public transport authorities, public transport associations and individuals within the subject area that were known to the Department. In this questionnaire we asked for the names and addresses of institutions at colleges and universities where significant research on public transport is carried out. In a second stage, a list was compiled of the 48 institutions that were named in the results of the first questionnaire. This list was sent to these institutions with the request for a brief presentation of their research within the public transport sector and information on any institution they felt were missing in the list. We found further interesting institutions on the Internet. The final list contains more than 60 institutions outside the Nordic area. Within the Nordic countries we have exclusively followed our own address list of institutions with long-term research work within the subject area

  1. REALIZATION OF CONSORTIUM PROJECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Łukasik, Jolanta

    2010-01-01

    В статье описаны институционные проблемы и взаимоотношения внутри консорциум во время реализации проектов. Представлены избранные конфликтные ситуации, которые могут появиться в проектных коллективах, также описан фактор риска, который может появляться во время работы с проектом.The article describes the institutional problems and relationships within the consortium during the realization of projects. Selected conflict situations that may arise in project teams and risk factor that may appear...

  2. Thrust Area Report, Engineering Research, Development and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langland, R. T.

    1997-02-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through our collaboration with U.S. industry in pursuit of the most cost- effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where we can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance our capabilities and establish ourselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts technology {ital thrust areas} are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1996. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Microtechnology; Manufacturing Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Information Engineering. Readers desiring more information are encouraged to contact the individual thrust area leaders or authors. 198 refs., 206 figs., 16 tabs.

  3. Review of Multimodal Biometrics: Applications, challenges and Research Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Vijay M. Mane

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Biometric systems for today’s high security applications must meet stringent performance requirements. The fusion of multiple biometrics helps to minimize the system error rates. Fusion methods include processing biometric modalities sequentially until an acceptable match is obtained. More sophisticated methods combine scores from separate classifiers for each modality. This paper is an overview of multimodal biometrics, challenges in the progress of multimodal biometrics, the main research areas and its applications to develop the security system for high security areas

  4. Quality of Online Chat Reference Answers Differ between Local and Consortium Library Staff: Providing Consortium Staff with More Local Information Can Mitigate these Differences. A Review of: Meert, D.L., & Given, L.M. (2009. Measuring quality in chat reference consortia: A comparative analysis of responses to users’ queries.” College & Research Libraries, 70(1, 71‐84.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Newton Miller

    2010-03-01

    standards 82% of the time. The groups showed the most significant differences when separated into the question categories. Local library staff met the standards for “Library User Information” questions 97% of the time, while consortia staff met the standards only 76% of the time. “Request for Instruction” questions were answered with 97% success by local library staff and with 84% success by consortia. Local library staff met the “Request for Academic Information” standards 90% of the time while consortia staff met these standards 87% of the time. For “Miscellaneous Non‐Library Information” questions, 93% of local and 83% of consortia staff met the reference transaction standards. For the second part of the study, 89% of local library staff answered the questions in real time, as opposed to only 69% of non‐local staff. The three most common reasons for not answering in real time (known as deferment categories included not knowing the answer (48% local; 40% consortia, technical difficulty (26% local; 16% consortia, and information not being available (15% local; 31% consortia.Conclusion – The results of this research reveal that there are differences in the quality of answers between local and non‐local staff when taking part in an online chat reference consortium, although these discrepancies vary depending on the type of question. Providing non‐local librarians with the information they need to answer questions accurately and in real time can mitigate these differences.

  5. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1994 Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. During the past year, 27 projects produced over 123 talks and 139 publications. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in August and January); with the second MISCON Workshop held in August; 13 external speakers; 79 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 48 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors

  6. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1994 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high {Tc} superconductivity. During the past year, 27 projects produced over 123 talks and 139 publications. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in August and January); with the second MISCON Workshop held in August; 13 external speakers; 79 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 48 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors.

  7. A systematic literature review of resilience engineering: Research areas and a research agenda proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resilience engineering (RE) has been advocated as a new safety management paradigm, compatible with the nature of complex socio-technical systems. This study aims to identify the research areas and to propose a research agenda for RE, based on a systematic literature review that encompasses 237 studies from 2006 to 2014. Six research areas are identified: theory of RE; identification and classification of resilience; safety management tools; analysis of accidents; risk assessment; and training. The area “theory of RE” accounted for 52% of the studies, and it indicates that research has emphasized the description of how resilient performance occurs. The proposal for a research agenda is focused on: refining key constructs; positioning RE in relation to other theories; exploring other research strategies in addition to case-based studies; investigating barriers for implementing RE; and balancing the importance on describing and understanding resilience with the emphasis on the design of resilient systems, and the evaluation of these designs. - Highlights: • Six research areas on RE are identified. • A research agenda for RE is proposed. • RE research is mostly descriptive and based on case studies. • Design science is suggested as a research strategy for RE. • Five domains account for 75% of the reviewed studies

  8. Engineering research, development and technology. Thrust area report, FY93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff, tools, and facilities needed to support current and future LLNL programs. The efforts are guided by a dual-benefit research and development strategy that supports Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence and economic competitiveness through partnerships with U.S. industry. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes the activities for the fiscal year 1993. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and results from nine thrust areas for this fiscal year: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; Remote Sensing, Imaging, and Signal Engineering; and Emerging Technologies. Separate abstracts were prepared for 47 papers in this report.

  9. NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium 1995-1999 Self Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, Michaela M.; Bowen, Brent D.; Schaffart, Mary M.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium receives funds from NASA to allow Nebraska colleges and universities to implement balanced programs of research, education and public service related to aeronautics, space science and technology. Nebraska is a capability enhancement state which directs efforts and resources toward developing research infrastructure and enhancing the quality of aerospace research and education for all Nebraskans. Furthermore, the Nebraska Space Grant strives to provide national leadership in applied aspects of aeronautics. Nebraska has met, meets and will continue to meet all requirements set forth by NASA. Nebraska is a top-tier consortium and will continue to be a model program.

  10. Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium. Final report, October 10, 1994--March 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, R.H.; Parekh, B.K.; Meloy, T.

    1997-12-31

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium is a group comprised of representatives from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, West Virginia University, and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, that was formed to pursue research in areas related to the treatment and processing of fine coal. Each member performed research in their respective areas of expertise and the report contained herein encompasses the results that were obtained for the three major tasks that the Consortium undertook from October, 1994 through March, 1997. In the first task, conducted by Virginia Polytechnic Institute, novel methods (both mechanical and chemical) for dewatering fine coal were examined. In the second task, the Center for Applied Energy Research examined novel approaches for destabilization of [highly stable] flotation froths. And in the third task, West Virginia University developed physical and mathematical models for fine coal spirals. The Final Report is written in three distinctive chapters, each reflecting the individual member`s task report. Recommendations for further research in those areas investigated, as well as new lines of pursuit, are suggested.

  11. The ocean sampling day consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo;

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate...... the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our...

  12. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Ashlines: To promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing.

  13. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on area consortium research and development business, 1st year. Area consortium energy research and development (biofuel production by advanced function bioreactor); 1998 nendo chiiki consortium energy bun'ya. Kokino bio reactor ni yoru bio nenryo seisan ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Studies were made to produce ethanol directly from starch and cellulose and to collect biodiesel fuels from waste oil by an enzymatic method. For an increase in the yield of biodiesel fuel production, lipase enzymes were explored and optimum reaction conditions were sought for. Starch decomposition was quick for conversion into the target material in a system with the co-expression of amylase and glucoamylase present on the yeast cell surface layer. There was dramatically rapid progress in the increase of enzymatic activity in the cell, although dependent on cell membrane surface treatment conditions. In the generation of acetaminophen by recombinant cohesive yeasts, highly active and expressive yeasts were automatically fixed in the porous support (intelligent bioreactor) while those deactivated or dead were automatically removed. For the construction of a fuzzy control system for this reaction, basic models were investigated, built on the basis of the enzymatic model of reaction and substance balance. A high-precision structural analysis was conducted for the exploration of secondary structure stabilizing factors in protein and peptide and for the elucidation of correlations between structure and function. (NEDO)

  14. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on area consortium research and development business, 1st year. Area consortium energy research and development (molding material processing eco-system using powder lubricant); 1998 nendo chiiki consortium energy kenkyu kaihatsu bun'ya. Funtai rikei junkatsuzai wo mochiita sokeizai kako eko system no kenkyu kaihatsu (dai 1 nendo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    A material processing technology demanding but low energy and cost and causing low environmental impact was developed using a powder lubricant in a closed metal die system. An inorganic powder excellent in adhesiveness as lubricant was discovered. Powder lubricants for die casting and new carbon lubricants for metal die forging were also developed. In a test in an eco-die casting system, it was found that power was better than water solution in terms of finish and energy efficiency. In the development of a metal forging system using a powder lubricant, existing graphite lubricants and new powder lubricants containing fullerene were subjected to evaluation (ring tests). Two types of graphite solutions now in use and two powder lubricants were evaluated by the ring tests, and this enabled the comprehension of powder lubricant characteristics. For the development of a die casting system requiring no lubricant, a metal die surface treatment method was found that produces a surface excellent in resisting erosion by the application of the aluminizing ion nitriding composite treatment method. In addition, wettability was compared between a PVD (physical vapor deposition)-formed nitride film and the powder lubricant constituents. The report also refers to surveys conducted for commercialization. (NEDO)

  15. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on research and development project for regional consortiums. Regional consortium field (Development of super devices for medical treatment devices using three-dimensional micro processing technology (the second year)); 1998 nendo chiiki consortium bun'ya. Maikuro sanjigen kako gijutsu ni yoru iryo kikiyo super device no kaihatsu (dai 2 nendo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    It is intended to develop super devices for medical treatment devices using a three-dimensional micro processing technology by developing and combining precision processing technologies accumulated in the Suwa area. Main targets were placed on device size reduction, and a high reliability portable chemical liquid sustaining injector. This paper describes achievements made in fiscal 1998. Micromotors currently used have as low output torque as 1/4 of the target. Enhancement of reduction gear mechanism efficiency and durability is the problem to be solved. Microtubes with an inner diameter of 0.1 mm were produced on a trial basis by using four kinds of materials. The delivery mechanism assured the targeted flow rate successfully by using the direct cum screw system, but reduction in driving torque is desired. Completion of the cartridge system is also in the realm of aim. Joints will be moved closer to commercialization by selecting materials taking into account the chemical resistance and disposition. Micro connectors and cables still have problems for development. The bubble sensor was virtually decided to be of optical type from the points of detection performance requirements. Detectors and peripheral devices will be reduced in dimensions, and their reliability will be enhanced. The flow rate sensor has a problem to be solved in responsiveness to intermittent flows. (NEDO)

  16. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on research and development project for regional consortiums. Regional consortium field (Development of a three-dimensional high-speed bio-micromanipulation system (the second year)); 1998 nendo chiiki consortium bun'ya. Sanjigen kosoku bio micro manipuration system no kaihatsu (dai 2 nendo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Research and development are made on a bio-micromanipulation system that can substitute human being to perform three-dimensionally selective, large-quantity, repeated, high-speed and high-accuracy processing in micro and nano zones in bio-technologies. Fiscal 1998 has incorporated different component technologies into the common platform structured in last year to structure a high-speed laser manipulator separating device and a three-dimensional micromanipulation device and to perform basic experiments. The structure can sort out arbitrarily only the selected species from a large quantity of microorganisms dispersed in aqueous solution, and separate them at a high speed. Intended objects are trapped by laser beam, and substances other than those intended are removed from the electric field. Then, the trapped objects are moved by laser beam and recovered. This operation can be performed even at DNA level. A positioning and fixing device for cell anatomy was manufactured on a trial basis. In addition, a three-dimensional micromanipulation device was structured, and basic experiments were carried out on force measurement and control. A micro flow path forming technology was established by using a micro processing technology. This paper also describes a commercialization survey. (NEDO)

  17. Desertification or Resilience and Sustainability Research for the Vesuvius area?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobran, F.

    2015-12-01

    Vesuvius is one the best studied and monitored volcanoes on Earth, but the populations which surround it have not benefited from the research that would produce their habitats resilient and sustainable to future eruptions. There is no official risk management strategy that would accomplish such goals and the best that the government and mass media have been able to do is to promote for the past 20 years an emergency evacuation plan of geologists. Such a plan is practically unreliable and culturally unacceptable. It requires the issuance of an evacuation order three weeks before an eruption and the relocation all over Italy of about one million people surrounding the volcano, without addressing the issues of mass exodus, resettlement of population, protection of the evacuated territory, and reentry. This strategy gives a license to territorial managers to postpone indefinitely any territorial intervention leading to resilience and sustainability and promotes desertification of the Vesuvius area. In 1995 an interdisciplinary research project called VESUVIUS 2000 (www.gvess.org) was submitted to the European Union for a support, but it was rejected on the grounds that it interferes with the evacuation plan. This project aimed at producing by 2000 a feasibility plan of territorial interventions leading to the resilience and sustainability by requiring the accomplishment of five interdisciplinary goals (VESUVIUS PENTALOGUE) that would delineate the exclusion, resilience, and sustainability areas around the volcano. According to this risk reducing strategy, there is no need to produce the destruction of Vesuvius area culture and deal with the unreliability of long-term eruption prediction. It allows the population to prepare for an eruption and aims at producing a resilient and prosperous territory. It is unfortunate for the populations surrounding Vesuvius, and for the natural hazards research in particular, that the path towards resilience and sustainability is being

  18. Nanoinformatics: a new area of research in nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maojo V

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Victor Maojo,1 Martin Fritts,2,3 Diana de la Iglesia,1 Raul E Cachau,4 Miguel Garcia-Remesal,1 Joyce A Mitchell,5 Casimir Kulikowski61Biomedical Informatics Group, Departamento de Inteligencia Artificial, Facultad de Informática, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain; 2SAIC-Frederick Inc, National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, Maryland, 3National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland, 4Advanced Biomedical Computing Center, National Cancer Institute, SAIC-Frederick Inc, Frederick, Maryland, 5Department of Biomedical Informatics, University of Utah, Utah, 6Department of Computer Science, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Jersey, USAAbstract: Over a decade ago, nanotechnologists began research on applications of nanomaterials for medicine. This research has revealed a wide range of different challenges, as well as many opportunities. Some of these challenges are strongly related to informatics issues, dealing, for instance, with the management and integration of heterogeneous information, defining nomenclatures, taxonomies and classifications for various types of nanomaterials, and research on new modeling and simulation techniques for nanoparticles. Nanoinformatics has recently emerged in the USA and Europe to address these issues. In this paper, we present a review of nanoinformatics, describing its origins, the problems it addresses, areas of interest, and examples of current research initiatives and informatics resources. We suggest that nanoinformatics could accelerate research and development in nanomedicine, as has occurred in the past in other fields. For instance, biomedical informatics served as a fundamental catalyst for the Human Genome Project, and other genomic and –omics projects, as well as the translational efforts that link resulting molecular-level research to clinical problems and findings.Keywords: biomedical informatics, nanomedicine, nanotoxicology, ontologies

  19. Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium is an open scientific forum organized to foster the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations that will lead to a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors.

  20. The research project on technical information basis for aging management in Fukui and Kinki area. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Research Project on Technical Information Basis for Aging Management was initiated in FY2006 by the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) of the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) as a five-year program effectively, to promote aging management of domestic nuclear power plants. Its main objective was to improve the technical basis on which aging nuclear power plants are regulated. Upon taking part in the technical strategy map for Aging Management and Safe Long Term Operation, the experiences and achievements of the participating organizations were taken into account and the following four topics were chosen. The regional characteristics of the Fukui and Kinki area where 15 nuclear power plants, mainly PWRs, and many nuclear related research institutes and universities are located, were also considered. 1) The improvement of pipe thinning management in nuclear power plants, 2) The development of inspection techniques to monitor the initiation and propagation of defects, 3) The development of a guideline for evaluating weld repair methods, 4) The development of a guideline for evaluating the degradation of main structures. To promote this research project, INSS has established a regional consortium (called the 'Fukui Regional Cluster' in coordination with universities, research institutes, electric utilities and venders in the Fukui and Kinki area. INSS is acting as a coordinator to make contracts, facilitate execution, and compile annual reports. In FY2010, 11 continuing research subjects were proposed for this project and all were accepted. Of these, 5 subjects were related to the first topic (pipe thinning), 4 subjects to the second topic (inspection technique) and 1 subject to each of the other two topics (weld repair and main structures). All the subjects have been completed, fulfilling the requirements and expectations. (author)

  1. E-learning as a Research Area: An Analytical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Kakoty

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The concept of E-learning is very broad. It was coined in late 90s as the technological enhanced learning mechanism through Internet. Now it captures a broad range of electronic media like Internet, Intranets, Extranets, satellite broadcast, audio/video tape, interactive TV and CD-ROM to make the learning procedure more flexible and user friendly. Because of the flexible nature of E-learning, it has got more demand among the people of our country and the demand is increasing day by day. As the demand is increasing, this is the time to standardize the whole e-learning system in a proper way and the time to increase the quality of existing standards. Though many standards are already there and has accepted by many academia, institutes and organisations, still there are some gaps and works are going on to make them more practicable and more systematic.This paper analyses the current e-learning procedure and showing the new dimension of research work on this area that follows the important and most neglected research areas till today in this domain. It also analyses the importance of e-education system and recent market of e-learning procedure.

  2. An overview of the Nuclear Materials Focus Area research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) is responsible for providing comprehensive needs identification, integration of technology research and development activities, and technology deployment for stabilization, packaging, and interim storage of surplus nuclear materials within the DOE complex. The NMFA was chartered in April 1999 by the Office of Science and Technology (OST), an organizational component of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). OST manages a national program to conduct basic and applied research, and technology development, demonstration, and deployment assistance that is essential to completing a timely and cost-effective cleanup of the DOE nuclear weapons complex. DOE/EM provides environmental research results, as well as cleanup technologies and systems, to meet high-priority end-user needs, reduce EM's major cost centers and technological risks, and accelerate technology deployments. The NMFA represents the segment of EM that focuses on technological solutions for re-using, transforming, and disposing excess nuclear materials and is jointly managed by the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office and the DOE Idaho Operations Office

  3. Human genetics studies in areas of high natural radiation.IV. Research in radioactive areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is made on researches performed in areas with high levels of natural radioactivity. Some considerations are made on the importance and difficulties involved in projects of this kind. Although there is no doubt that natural radioactivity is one of the causes of the so-called spontaneous mutations, the practical demonstration of this assertion is extremely complex. Projects trying to correlate high levels of natural radioactivity with the occurrence of cancer (in general, or specific), leukemia, congenital malformations (in general or specific), neuro-vegetative disturbs, sex ratio, mortality, and physical development, as well as other characteristics. Some researches with animals are also mentioned, and references are given for plant studies. A critical analysis is made of some works relating to human populations

  4. Overview of the carbon products consortium (CPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, C.L. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) is an industry, university, government cooperative research team which has evolved over the past seven years to produce and evaluate coal-derived feedstocks for carbon products. The members of the Carbon Products Consortium are UCAR Carbon Company, Koppers Industries, CONOCO, Aluminum Company of America, AMOCO Polymers, and West Virginia University. The Carbon and Insulation Materials Technology Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Fiber Materials Inc., and BASF Corporation are affiliates of the CPC. The initial work on coal-derived nuclear graphites was supported by a grant to WVU, UCAR Carbon, and ORNL from the U.S. DOE New Production Reactor program. More recently, the CPC program has been supported through the Fossil Energy Materials program and through PETC`s Liquefaction program. The coal processing technologies involve hydrogenation, extraction by solvents such as N-methyl pyrolidone and toluene, material blending, and calcination. The breadth of carbon science expertise and manufacturing capability available in the CPC enables it to address virtually all research and development issues of importance to the carbon products industry.

  5. Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD) for clinical and research applications: recommendations of the international RDC/TMD consortium network and orofacial pain special interest group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Schiffman; R. Ohrbach; E. Truelove; J. Look; G. Anderson; J.P. Goulet; T. List; P. Svensson; Y. Gonzalez; F. Lobbezoo; A. Michelotti; S.L. Brooks; W. Ceusters; M. Drangsholt; D. Ettlin; C. Gaul; L.J. Goldberg; J.A. Haythornthwaite; L. Hollender; R. Jensen; M.T. John; A. De Laat; R. de Leeuw; W. Maixner; M. van der Meulen; G.M. Murray; D.R. Nixdorf; S. Palla; A. Petersson; P. Pionchon; B. Smith; C.M. Visscher; J. Zakrzewska; S.F. Dworkin

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: The original Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) Axis I diagnostic algorithms have been demonstrated to be reliable. However, the Validation Project determined that the RDC/TMD Axis I validity was below the target sensitivity of ≥ 0.70 and specificity of ≥ 0.

  6. Plutonium Focus Area research and development plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) committed to a research and development program to support the technology needs for converting and stabilizing its nuclear materials for safe storage. The R and D Plan addresses five of the six material categories from the 94-1 Implementation Plan: plutonium (Pu) solutions, plutonium metals and oxides, plutonium residues, highly enriched uranium, and special isotopes. R and D efforts related to spent nuclear fuel (SNF) stabilization were specifically excluded from this plan. This updated plan has narrowed the focus to more effectively target specific problem areas by incorporating results form trade studies. Specifically, the trade studies involved salt; ash; sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C); combustibles; and scrub alloy. The plan anticipates possible disposition paths for nuclear materials and identifies resulting research requirements. These requirements may change as disposition paths become more certain. Thus, this plan represents a snapshot of the current progress and will continue to be updated on a regular basis. The paper discusses progress in safeguards and security, plutonium stabilization, special isotopes stabilization, highly-enriched uranium stabilization--MSRE remediation project, storage technologies, engineered systems, core technology, and proposed DOE/Russian technology exchange projects

  7. Advances in Metal Supported Cells in the METSOFC EU Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKenna, B. J.; Christiansen, N.; Schauperl, R.; Prenninger, P.; Nielsen, Jimmi; Blennow Tullmar, Peter; Klemensø, Trine; Ramousse, Severine; Kromp, A.; Weber, A.

    2013-01-01

    The EU‐sponsored project “METSOFC”, completed at the end of 2011, resulted in a number of advancements toward implementing a mechanically robust metal support as the structural element in SOFC. Technical University of Denmark (DTU) Energy Conversion's research into planar metal supported cells (M...... tolerance to thermal cycles and load cycles. These and other key outcomes of the METSOFC consortium are covered, along with associated work supported by the Danish National Advanced Technology Foundation.......The EU‐sponsored project “METSOFC”, completed at the end of 2011, resulted in a number of advancements toward implementing a mechanically robust metal support as the structural element in SOFC. Technical University of Denmark (DTU) Energy Conversion's research into planar metal supported cells...... (MSCs) has produced an advanced cell design with high performance and mechanical robustness. At low operation temperatures (650 °C), these cells have shown low Area‐specific resistances (ASRs): 0.35 Ω cm2 in cell tests (16 cm2 active area) and under 0.3 Ω cm2 in button cells (0.5 cm2 active area...

  8. Corn in consortium with forages

    OpenAIRE

    Cássia Maria de Paula Garcia; Marcelo Andreotti; Marcelo Carvalho Minhoto Teixeira Filho; Keny Samejima Mascarenha Lopes; Ciniro Costa; Erikelly Aline Ribeiro de Santana

    2013-01-01

    The basic premises for sustainable agricultural development with focus on rural producers are reducing the costs of production and aggregation of values through the use crop-livestock system (CLS) throughout the year. The CLS is based on the consortium of grain crops, especially corn with tropical forages, mainly of the genus Panicum and Urochloa. The study aimed to evaluate the grain yield of irrigated corn crop intercropped with forage of the genus Panicum and Urochloa. The experiment was c...

  9. The ocean sampling day consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Siam, Rania

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks...

  10. The ocean sampling day consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Siam, Rania

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks betwe...

  11. The ocean sampling day consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Siam, Rania

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and ne...

  12. Strengthening post-graduate educational capacity for health policy and systems research and analysis: the strategy of the Consortium for Health Policy and Systems Analysis in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Erasmus, E; Lehmann, U.; Agyepong, IA; Alwar, J; de Savigny, D; Kamuzora, P; Mirzoev, T; Nxumalo, N; Tomson, G; Uzochukwu, B; Gilson, L

    2016-01-01

    Background The last 5–10 years have seen significant international momentum build around the field of health policy and systems research and analysis (HPSR + A). Strengthening post-graduate teaching is seen as central to the further development of this field in low- and middle-income countries. However, thus far, there has been little reflection on and documentation of what is taught in this field, how teaching is carried out, educators’ challenges and what future teaching might look like. Me...

  13. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kohn, Donald B; Puck, Jennifer M; Shearer, William T; Burroughs, Lauri M; Torgerson, Troy R; Decaluwe, Hélène; Haddad, Elie

    2016-08-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a collaboration of 41 North American centers studying therapy for rare primary immune deficiency diseases (PIDs), including severe combined immune deficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). An additional 3 European centers have partnered with the PIDTC to study CGD. Natural history protocols of the PIDTC analyze outcomes of treatment for rare PIDs in multicenter longitudinal retrospective, prospective, and cross-sectional studies. Since 2009, participating centers have enrolled more than 800 subjects on PIDTC protocols for SCID, and enrollment in the studies on WAS and CGD is underway. Four pilot projects have been funded, and 12 junior investigators have received fellowship awards. Important publications of the consortium describe the outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplantation for SCID during 2000-2009, diagnostic criteria for SCID, and the pilot project of newborn screening for SCID in the Navajo Nation. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshops provide an opportunity to strengthen collaborations with junior investigators, patient advocacy groups, and international colleagues. Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Office of Rare Diseases Research, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, the PIDTC has recently received renewal for another 5 years. Here we review accomplishments of the group, projects underway, highlights of recent workshops, and challenges for the future. PMID:27262745

  14. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M. Ainsztein

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Extracellular RNA (exRNA Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies, (c identifying exRNA biomarkers of disease, (d demonstrating clinical utility of exRNAs as therapeutic agents and developing scalable technologies required for these studies, and (e developing a community resource, the exRNA Atlas, to provide the scientific community access to exRNA data, standardized exRNA protocols, and other useful tools and technologies generated by funded investigators.

  15. BIODEGRADATION OF MTBE BY A MICROORGANISM CONSORTIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alimohammadi, A. R. Mesdaghinia, M. Mahmoodi, S. Nasseri, A. H. Mahvi and J. Nouri

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE is one of the ether oxygenates which its use has been increased within the last twenty years. This compound is produced from isobutylene and methanol reaction that is used as octane index enhancer and also increases dissolved oxygen in gasoline and decreases carbon monoxide emission in four phased motors because of better combustion of gasoline. High solubility in water (52 g/L, high vapor pressure (0.54 kg/cm3, low absorption to organic carbon of soil and presence of MTBE in the list of potentially-carcinogens of U.S EPA has made its use of great concern. The culture media used in this study was Mineral Salt Medium (MSM. The study lasted for 236 days and in three different concentrations of MTBE of 200, 5 and 0.8 mg/L. A control sample was also used to compare the results. This research studied the isolation methods of microbial consortium in the MTBE polluted soils in Tehran and Abadan petroleum refinery besides MTBE degradation. The results showed the capability of bacteria in consuming MTBE as carbon source. Final microbial isolation was performed with several microbial passages as well as keeping consortium in a certain amount of MTBE as the carbon source.

  16. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1995 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 127 publications. Three Master`s Degrees and 9 Doctor`s of Philosophy Degrees were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in January and July); the third MISCON Summer School held in July; 12 external speakers; 81 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 54 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temp superconductors.

  17. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium. Progress report, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bement, A.L. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. Programmatic research focuses upon key materials-related problems; principally, synthesis and processing and properties limiting transport phenomena. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 113 publications. publications. Two Master`s Degrees and one Ph.D. were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved two MISCON group meetings (held in July and January), twenty external speakers, 36 collaborations, 10 exchanges of samples and/or measurements, and one (1) gift of equipment from industry. Research achievements this past year expanded our understanding of processing phenomena on structure property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors.

  18. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1995 Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 127 publications. Three Master's Degrees and 9 Doctor's of Philosophy Degrees were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in January and July); the third MISCON Summer School held in July; 12 external speakers; 81 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 54 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temp superconductors

  19. Monitoring for global change in Alaska research natural areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prospect of a significant shift in climatic equilibria and changes in atmospheric composition raises concerns about the potential decline of important natural resources and threats to the survival of the complete range of natural diversity. Three elements are needed in any program with a focus on such concerns: (1) a network of sites containing examples of all or most of the diversity; (2) testable hypotheses of mechanisms by which global change effects will occur in real ecosystems; and (3) a monitoring program robust enough to detect the changes at the sites. With such a program, hypotheses of global change effects can be accepted, rejected, or modified. The Alaska Research Natural Area (RNA) network has been selected to encompass natural diversity. It contains sites and some modest data sets that offer insights into possible effects and outcomes of global warming. Geothermally heated soils at Clear Creek Hot Springs and Big Windy Hot Springs RNAs offer a possible model of forest growth under a warmer climate. On the other hand, a warmer climate may allow greater winter survival of forest insects and increase in forest mortality, similar to that which killed 19% of the trees in a forest reference monitoring plot in 1989 in a mature white spruce stand in the Bonanza Creek Long-Term Ecological Research site. Even if global warming proves to be modest, the program of selecting and monitoring natural diversity according to global change hypotheses is justified because it will contribute greatly to an improved understanding of functioning and linkages among earth systems and because widespread, human-caused reductions in biological diversity have already occurred and are accelerating

  20. Is Europe Evolving Toward an Integrated Research Area?

    CERN Document Server

    Chessa, Alessandro; Pammolli, Fabio; Penner, Orion; Petersen, Alexander M; Riccaboni, Massimo; 10.1126/science.1227970

    2013-01-01

    An integrated European Research Area (ERA) is a critical component for a more competitive and open European R&D system. However, the impact of EU-specific integration policies aimed at overcoming innovation barriers associated with national borders is not well understood. Here we analyze 2.4 x 10^6 patent applications filed with the European Patent Office (EPO) over the 25-year period 1986-2010 along with a sample of 2.6 x 10^5 records from the ISI Web of Science to quantitatively measure the role of borders in international R&D collaboration and mobility. From these data we construct five different networks for each year analyzed: (i) the patent co-inventor network, (ii) the publication co-author network, (iii) the co-applicant patent network, (iv) the patent citation network, and (v) the patent mobility network. We use methods from network science and econometrics to perform a comparative analysis across time and between EU and non-EU countries to determine the "treatment effect" resulting from EU i...

  1. 2003 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Yakima County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 77 square miles and covers a...

  2. 2009 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Lewis County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Lewis County survey area for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium. This data...

  3. 2003 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Lewis County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 100 square miles and covers part...

  4. 2000 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Kitsap Peninsula, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 1,146 square miles and covers part...

  5. 2003 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Snohomish County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 167 square miles and covers a...

  6. Improving safety of aircraft engines: a consortium approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasche, Lisa J. H.

    1996-11-01

    With over seven million departures per year, air transportation has become not a luxury, but a standard mode of transportation for the United States. A critical aspect of modern air transport is the jet engine, a complex engineered component that has enabled the rapid travel to which we have all become accustomed. One of the enabling technologies for safe air travel is nondestructive evaluation, or NDE, which includes various inspection techniques used to assess the health or integrity of a structure, component, or material. The Engine Titanium Consortium (ETC) was established in 1993 to respond to recommendations made by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Titanium Rotating Components Review Team (TRCRT) for improvements in inspection of engine titanium. Several recent accomplishments of the ETC are detailed in this paper. The objective of the Engine Titanium Consortium is to provide the FAAand the manufacturers with reliable and costeffective new methods and/or improvements in mature methods for detecting cracks, inclusions, and imperfections in titanium. The consortium consists of a team of researchers from academia and industry-namely, Iowa State University, Allied Signal Propulsion Engines, General Electric Aircraft Engines, and Pratt & Whitney Engines-who work together to develop program priorities, organize a program plan, conduct the research, and implement the solutions. The true advantage of the consortium approach is that it brings together the research talents of academia and the engineering talents of industry to tackle a technology-base problem. In bringing industrial competitors together, the consortium ensures that the research results, which have safety implications and result from FAA funds, are shared and become part of the public domain.

  7. Mitochondrial Disease Sequence Data Resource (MSeqDR): a global grass-roots consortium to facilitate deposition, curation, annotation, and integrated analysis of genomic data for the mitochondrial disease clinical and research communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Marni J; Shen, Lishuang; Gonzalez, Michael; Leipzig, Jeremy; Lott, Marie T; Stassen, Alphons P M; Diroma, Maria Angela; Navarro-Gomez, Daniel; Yeske, Philip; Bai, Renkui; Boles, Richard G; Brilhante, Virginia; Ralph, David; DaRe, Jeana T; Shelton, Robert; Terry, Sharon F; Zhang, Zhe; Copeland, William C; van Oven, Mannis; Prokisch, Holger; Wallace, Douglas C; Attimonelli, Marcella; Krotoski, Danuta; Zuchner, Stephan; Gai, Xiaowu

    2015-03-01

    Success rates for genomic analyses of highly heterogeneous disorders can be greatly improved if a large cohort of patient data is assembled to enhance collective capabilities for accurate sequence variant annotation, analysis, and interpretation. Indeed, molecular diagnostics requires the establishment of robust data resources to enable data sharing that informs accurate understanding of genes, variants, and phenotypes. The "Mitochondrial Disease Sequence Data Resource (MSeqDR) Consortium" is a grass-roots effort facilitated by the United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation to identify and prioritize specific genomic data analysis needs of the global mitochondrial disease clinical and research community. A central Web portal (https://mseqdr.org) facilitates the coherent compilation, organization, annotation, and analysis of sequence data from both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of individuals and families with suspected mitochondrial disease. This Web portal provides users with a flexible and expandable suite of resources to enable variant-, gene-, and exome-level sequence analysis in a secure, Web-based, and user-friendly fashion. Users can also elect to share data with other MSeqDR Consortium members, or even the general public, either by custom annotation tracks or through the use of a convenient distributed annotation system (DAS) mechanism. A range of data visualization and analysis tools are provided to facilitate user interrogation and understanding of genomic, and ultimately phenotypic, data of relevance to mitochondrial biology and disease. Currently available tools for nuclear and mitochondrial gene analyses include an MSeqDR GBrowse instance that hosts optimized mitochondrial disease and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) specific annotation tracks, as well as an MSeqDR locus-specific database (LSDB) that curates variant data on more than 1300 genes that have been implicated in mitochondrial disease and/or encode mitochondria-localized proteins. MSeqDR is

  8. Fundamentos, Orientaciones, Areas Basicas y Procedimientos para la Investigacion Educativa (Bases, Guidelines, Basic Areas, and Procedures for Educational Research).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ministerio de Educacion Nacional, Bogota (Colombia). Instituto Colombiano de Pedagogia.

    This document establishes the bases, general guidelines, basic areas, and procedures for educational research conducted in Colombia. The philosophy underlying research objectives is explained. There is special interest in social research concerning the condition of man and of the social groups that will be the targets of education, and in research…

  9. VAMDC Consortium: A Service to Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    L Dubernet, M.; Moreau, N.; Zwoelf, C. M.; Ba, Y. A.

    2015-12-01

    The VAMDC Consortium is a worldwide consortium which federates Atomic and Molecular databases through an e-science infrastructure and a political organisation. About 90% of the inter-connected databases handle data that are used for the interpretation of spectra and for the modelisation of media of many fields of astrophysics. This paper presents how the VAMDC Consortium is organised in order to provide a ``service'' to the astrophysics community.

  10. PanScan, the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium, and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium consists of more than a dozen prospective epidemiologic cohort studies within the NCI Cohort Consortium, whose leaders work together to investigate the etiology and natural history of pancreatic cancer.

  11. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on area consortium research and development business. Area consortium for venture business development by building base for small business (abuse double protected next generation card system based on steganography); 1998 nendo venture kigyo ikuseigata chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu (chusho kigyo sozo kibangata). Steganography gijutsu wo riyoshita jisedaigata fusei shiyo taju boshi guard system no kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    A card system is developed using BPCS (Business Planning and Control System) steganography, with electronic data imbedded in the card. Under the system, the visual recognition of the user and the mechanical verification of the card are carried out simultaneously, with the card rejecting any abuse. In fiscal 1998, a system was built by way of trial, constituted of technologies of encoding, decoding, and packaging data into an IC (integrated circuit) card. A photograph of the user's face is attached to the card, the card carries an 8KB IC memory device, and the device stores data of the photograph of the user's face etc. A password has to be inputted before any data may be taken out. A customized key is required to display the imbedded personal data and, for the restoration of the key data, the personal key known only to the owner and the company key that is kept by the card managing company need to be collated with each other. Multiple checking is available for the prevention of abuse, which include the collation of face photographs, collation with display by inputting the password, and request for the customized key to confirm the presence of authority to read the imbedded personal data. (NEDO)

  12. Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium (MUSIC) was established in response to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) program. MUSIC was established as a consortium composed of academic members and national laboratory partners. The members of MUSIC are the nuclear engineering programs and research reactors of Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), North Carolina State University (NCSU), University of Maryland (UMD), University of South Carolina (USC), and University of Tennessee (UTK). The University of Florida (UF), and South Carolina State University (SCSU) were added to the MUSIC membership in the second year. In addition, to ensure proper coordination between the academic community and the nation's premier research and development centers in the fields of nuclear science and engineering, MUSIC created strategic partnerships with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) including the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project and the Joint Institute for Neutron Scattering (JINS), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A partnership was also created with the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) with the aim of utilizing their reactor in research if funding becomes available. Consequently, there are three university research reactors (URRs) within MUSIC, which are located at NCSU (1-MW PULSTAR), UMD (0.25-MW TRIGA) and UF (0.10-MW Argonaut), and the AFRRI reactor (1-MW TRIGA MARK F). The overall objectives of MUSIC are: (a) Demonstrate that University Research Reactors (URR) can be used as modern and innovative instruments of research in the basic and applied sciences, which include applications in fundamental physics, materials science and engineering, nondestructive examination, elemental analysis, and contributions to research in the health and medical sciences, (b) Establish a strong technical collaboration between the nuclear engineering faculty and the MUSIC URRs

  13. Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayman Hawari; Nolan Hertel; Mohamed Al-Sheikhly; Laurence Miller; Abdel-Moeze Bayoumi; Ali Haghighat; Kenneth Lewis

    2010-12-29

    2 Project Summary: The Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium (MUSIC) was established in response to the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) program. MUSIC was established as a consortium composed of academic members and national laboratory partners. The members of MUSIC are the nuclear engineering programs and research reactors of Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), North Carolina State University (NCSU), University of Maryland (UMD), University of South Carolina (USC), and University of Tennessee (UTK). The University of Florida (UF), and South Carolina State University (SCSU) were added to the MUSIC membership in the second year. In addition, to ensure proper coordination between the academic community and the nation’s premier research and development centers in the fields of nuclear science and engineering, MUSIC created strategic partnerships with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) including the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project and the Joint Institute for Neutron Scattering (JINS), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A partnership was also created with the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) with the aim of utilizing their reactor in research if funding becomes available. Consequently, there are three university research reactors (URRs) within MUSIC, which are located at NCSU (1-MW PULSTAR), UMD (0.25-MW TRIGA) and UF (0.10-MW Argonaut), and the AFRRI reactor (1-MW TRIGA MARK F). The overall objectives of MUSIC are: a) Demonstrate that University Research Reactors (URR) can be used as modern and innovative instruments of research in the basic and applied sciences, which include applications in fundamental physics, materials science and engineering, nondestructive examination, elemental analysis, and contributions to research in the health and medical sciences, b) Establish a strong technical collaboration between the nuclear engineering

  14. Results From the John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium. A Success Story for NASA and Northeast Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nall, Marsha M.; Barna, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium was established by NASA in 2002 to formulate and implement an integrated, interdisciplinary research program to address risks faced by astronauts during long-duration space missions. The consortium is comprised of a preeminent team of Northeast Ohio institutions that include Case Western Reserve University, the Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, The National Center for Space Exploration Research, and the NASA Glenn Research Center. The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium research is focused on fluid physics and sensor technology that addresses the critical risks to crew health, safety, and performance. Effectively utilizing the unique skills, capabilities and facilities of the consortium members is also of prime importance. Research efforts were initiated with a general call for proposals to the consortium members. The top proposals were selected for funding through a rigorous, peer review process. The review included participation from NASA's Johnson Space Center, which has programmatic responsibility for NASA's Human Research Program. The projects range in scope from delivery of prototype hardware to applied research that enables future development of advanced technology devices. All of the projects selected for funding have been completed and the results are summarized. Because of the success of the consortium, the member institutions have extended the original agreement to continue this highly effective research collaboration through 2011.

  15. Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium: Overview, Progress and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Akers, Amy L.; Ball, Karen L.; Clancy, Marianne; Comi, Anne M.; Faughnan, Marie E.; Gopal-Srivastava, Rashmi; Jacobs, Thomas P.; Kim, Helen; Krischer, Jeffrey; Marchuk, Douglas A.; Charles E McCulloch; Morrison, Leslie; Moses, Marsha; Moy, Claudia S.; Pawlikowska, Ludmilla

    2013-01-01

    Brain vascular malformations are resource-intensive to manage effectively, are associated with serious neurological morbidity, lack specific medical therapies, and have no validated biomarkers for disease severity and progression. Investigators have tended to work in “research silos” with suboptimal cross-communication. We present here a paradigm for interdisciplinary collaboration to facilitate rare disease research. The Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium (BVMC) is a multidisciplinary, i...

  16. Quality of Online Chat Reference Answers Differ between Local and Consortium Library Staff: Providing Consortium Staff with More Local Information Can Mitigate these Differences. A Review of: Meert, D.L., & Given, L.M. (2009). Measuring quality in chat reference consortia: A comparative analysis of responses to users’ queries.” College & Research Libraries, 70(1), 71‐84.

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Newton Miller

    2010-01-01

    Objective – To evaluate the quality of answers from a 24/7 online chat reference service by comparing the responses given by local and consortia library staff using in‐house reference standards, and by assessing whether or not the questions were answered in real time.Design – Comparative analysis of online chat reference transcripts.Setting – Large academic library in Alberta, Canada.Subjects – A total of online chat reference transcripts from the first year of consortium service were analyze...

  17. Potential Bacterial Consortium to Increase the Effectiveness of Beer Wastewater Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Putu Nia Anggraeni; Ida Bagus Wayan Gunam; Retno Kawuri

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to determine the effectiveness of microbial consortia in beer wastewater treatment. The research was initiated with the isolation of soil microbial consortium that has been contaminated by beer waste water, followed by the selection of the best potential microbial beer wastewater treatment. At the end, the selection of the best microbial consortium was tested in beer wastewater treatment based on pollutant parameters namely biochemical oxygen demand (BOD...

  18. Research trends in nanotechnology studies across geo-economic areas

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Coccia; Ugo Finardi; Diego Margon

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current temporal and spatial research trajectories in nanoscience and nanotechnology studies in order to display the worldwide patterns of research fields across main economic players. The results show the leadership of Europe and North America in nanotechnology research, although the role of China has been growing over time. Current nanotechnology studies have been growing in chemistry and medicine because of applications of nanomaterials mainly in...

  19. Tri-District Arts Consortium Summer Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Charlotte O.

    1990-01-01

    The Tri-District Arts Consortium in South Carolina was formed to serve artistically gifted students in grades six-nine. The consortium developed a summer program offering music, dance, theatre, and visual arts instruction through a curriculum of intense training, performing, and hands-on experiences with faculty members and guest artists. (JDD)

  20. Small Engine & Accessory Test Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Small Engine and Accessories Test Area (SEATA) facilitates testaircraft starting and auxiliary power systems, small engines and accessories. The SEATA consists...

  1. Landscaping market in St.-Petersburg area : Export marketing research

    OpenAIRE

    Pyulze, Aarne

    2013-01-01

    The export marketing approach typically used by firms to undergo strategic decisions to enter target markets is a complex process involving a sophisticated market research. Firms have to consider many factors before intervening foreign markets with the pursuit to export desirable goods and services. The market researcher is responsible for providing the client company with an understanding of what and how has to be done to succeed on a new market. The aim of this study was to identify the ...

  2. Research information systems for higher education institutions in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Luglio, Fabrizio; Zaetta, Marta

    2011-01-01

    16 slides.-- Presentation delivered at the Italian Session. U-GOV, developed by the Italian Consortium CINECA, is the most widely implemented current research information system in Italian universities. The presentation describes U-GOV functionality in institutional research information management areas like project management, open access repository or research assessment among others.

  3. 'Energy research in the building area is very successful'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this interview with Tony Kaiser, president of the Swiss Energy Research Commission CORE, the urgent necessity for the reduction of climate-damaging greenhouse gas emissions is stressed. The main requirement placed on energy research is noted as being its orientation toward long-term goals in order to support the development of efficient and sustainable technologies. Topics discussed also include the current situation in Switzerland, experience gained in the course of activities carried out within the framework of the current 2008 - 2011 Master Plan, the concrete goals of the research program, energy use in buildings, the 2000-Watt Society, work already planned for the 2012 -2015 period, international aspects and co-operation with academia

  4. Thirty Years of Innovation in Seismology with the IRIS Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumy, D. F.; Woodward, R.; Aderhold, K.; Ahern, T. K.; Anderson, K. R.; Busby, R.; Detrick, R. S.; Evers, B.; Frassetto, A.; Hafner, K.; Simpson, D. W.; Sweet, J. R.; Taber, J.

    2015-12-01

    The United States academic seismology community, through the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) Consortium, has promoted and encouraged a rich environment of innovation and experimentation in areas such as seismic instrumentation, data processing and analysis, teaching and curriculum development, and academic science. As the science continually evolves, IRIS helps drive the market for new research tools that enable science by establishing a variety of standards and goals. This has often involved working directly with manufacturers to better define the technology required, co-funding key development work or early production prototypes, and purchasing initial production runs. IRIS activities have helped establish de-facto international standards and impacted the commercial sector in areas such as seismic instrumentation, open-access data management, and professional development. Key institutional practices, conducted and refined over IRIS' thirty-year history of operations, have focused on open-access data availability, full retention of maximum-bandwidth, continuous data, and direct community access to state-of-the-art seismological instrumentation and software. These practices have helped to cultivate and support a thriving commercial ecosystem, and have been a key element in the professional development of multiple generations of seismologists who now work in both industry and academia. Looking toward the future, IRIS is increasing its engagement with industry to better enable bi-directional exchange of techniques and technology, and enhancing the development of tomorrow's workforce. In this presentation, we will illustrate how IRIS has promoted innovations grown out of the academic community and spurred technological advances in both academia and industry.

  5. 从共享到共有:学术图书馆云存储联盟研究%From Sharing to Co-owning:Academic Library Cloud Storage Consortium Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘华; 许新巧

    2014-01-01

    This paper attempts to define the structure and framework of academic library cloud storage consortium.The au-thors analyze the opportunities for academic libraries which cloud-computing is bringing basing on some American cloud storage consortium cases and propose that China academic libraries should accelerate the building of academic library cloud storage consorti-um based on cloud-computing.%探讨学术馆藏云存储联盟的结构和操作框架,并以美国学术图书馆云存储联盟为案例,分析研究云存储联盟给学术图书馆带来的机遇,指出云存储联盟将促进云图书馆的建设,中国学术图书馆应利用云技术,加快建设本国的云存储联盟。

  6. Advances in Metal Supported Cells in the METSOFC EU Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKenna, B. J.; Christiansen, N.; Schauperl, R.;

    2013-01-01

    The EU‐sponsored project “METSOFC”, completed at the end of 2011, resulted in a number of advancements toward implementing a mechanically robust metal support as the structural element in SOFC. Technical University of Denmark (DTU) Energy Conversion's research into planar metal supported cells...... tolerance to thermal cycles and load cycles. These and other key outcomes of the METSOFC consortium are covered, along with associated work supported by the Danish National Advanced Technology Foundation....

  7. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report draft, 1995--1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The HBCU/MI ET Consortium was established in January 1990, through a memorandum of Understanding (MOU) among its member institutions. This group of research-oriented Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions (HBCUs/MIs) agreed to work together to initiate or revise educational programs, develop research partnerships with public and private sector organizations, and promote technology development and transfer to address the nation`s critical environmental problems. While the Consortium`s Research, Education and Technology Transfer (RETT) Plan is the cornerstone of its overall program efforts, the initial programmatic activities of the Consortium focused on environmental education at all levels with the objective of addressing the underrepresentation of minorities in the environmental professions. This 1996 Annual Report provides an update on the activities of the Consortium with a focus on environmental curriculum development for the Technical Qualifications Program (TQP) and Education for Sustainability.

  8. The research of controller area network on hybrid electrical vehicle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Hongxing; Song Liwei; Kou Baoquan; Cheng Shukang

    2006-01-01

    It is of increasing importance to design and implement vehicle networks for transferring information between electrical control units on Hybrid Electrical Vehicle (HEV). This paper presents a scheme of using Controller Area Network (CAN) technology to realize communication and datasharing between the electrical units on the HEV. The principle and communication protocol of Electrical Control Units (ECU) CAN node are introduced. By considering different sensitivity of the devices to the latency of data transportation, a new design procedure is proposed for the purpose of simplifying network codes and wiring harness, reducing assembly space and weight, improving assembly efficiency, and enhancing fault-diagnose in auto networks.

  9. Review of Multimodal Biometrics: Applications, challenges and Research Areas

    OpenAIRE

    Prof. Vijay M. Mane; Prof. (Dr.) Dattatray V. Jadhav

    2009-01-01

    Biometric systems for today’s high security applications must meet stringent performance requirements. The fusion of multiple biometrics helps to minimize the system error rates. Fusion methods include processing biometric modalities sequentially until an acceptable match is obtained. More sophisticated methods combine scores from separate classifiers for each modality. This paper is an overview of multimodal biometrics, challenges in the progress of multimodal biometrics, the main research a...

  10. Switzerland in the European Research Area: Integration Without Legislation

    OpenAIRE

    Lavenex, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    From the point of view of modes of governance and constellations of interdependence, EU research policy offers ideal conditions for the flexible inclusion of non-member states: it is based on transgovernmental coordination through policy networks rather than supranational legislation, it follows scientific rather than political imperatives, and cooperation is in the interest of both the EU and of Switzerland. This article analy- ses the degree to which these factors have allowed for Switzerla...

  11. Boolean methods in operations research and related areas

    OpenAIRE

    Crama, Yves

    2011-01-01

    These are the slides of the "IFORS Distinguished Lecture" that I delivered at the INFORMS Annual meeting in November 2011. The title of the lecture is the title of a monograph co-authored by Peter L. Hammer and Sergiu Rudeanu, which appeared in 1968. Their pioneering work has stimulated a large amount of research and has been very frequently cited. Over the last year, the late Peter Hammer and myself have published two distant follow-ups to ...

  12. Research of claystone in Longdong area gansu province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is key point to choose the host rock of disposal high-level radioactive waste, each country which have nuclear operation a systematic reachers about host rock. From the aboard development and internal prereaserch, in China, claystone is one of the important alternative host rock to disposal HLW. The artical is about geological investigation in Longdong area, regional structure and regional geological features of this area are introduced. The characteristics of clay rock indicate that clay rock true density range from 2.37 g/cm3 to 2.65 g/cm3, the density of nature block is from 2.30 to 2.60 g/cm3, natural water content is from 2% to 5%, Porosity rang from 3.60% to 4.80%. the clay rock permeability coefficient almost is 10 to 11 m/s, specific surface range from 12.6 to 21.2 m2/g(avergae is 16.7 m2/g). Referring to the requirements and standards of clay rock disposal repository site selection in foreign developed countries, and according to the requirements of high-level radioactive waste geological repository in our country, we infer that the clay rocks in Longdong region basically meet the requirements of high level radioactive waste geological repository, especially the Porosity and adsorption performance of the clay rocks more suitable for high-level radioactive waste geological repository than other candidate surrounding rock.(authors)

  13. Radioecological research in areas of technical Issyk-Kul region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : Geochemical conditions of the Issyk-Kul basin define it as natural uranium biogeochemical provinces. An additional human impact creates areas with technologically enhanced background radionuclides in areas previously existing mining and processing of uranium ore. Technogenic uranium plot Kaji-Sai is located on the southern shore of Lake Issyk-Kul, in Ton district, 270 km from Bishkek. Coal mined in the local underground mine; previously burned a passing generation of electricity, and then uranium oxide was removed by acid leaching of ash. Scrap and industrial equipment were buried to form the tailings, with a total uranium waste 400 thousand m3. Currently, tailings dyke and under the influence of natural and anthropogenic influences are gradually destroyed. Former mine Kaji-Sai exposed to erosion floods and mudflows, which lead to the removal of radioactive materials on the surface. Biological response of living organisms on the geochemical conditions of the environment is manifested in the high places of the radionuclide content in their environment. Morphological changes of wild plants in the form of a different number of petals, flowers or infertility and sterility of pollen grains. For the representatives of some plant species (Artemisia dracunculus, Peganum harmala), as well as small rodents inhabiting the tailings (Microtus arvalis, Mus musculus), a raised level of cytogenetic abnormalities, which indicates the accumulation of radionuclides by living organisms

  14. IDENTIFICATION OF IMPORTANT AREAS OF RESEARCH IN FIELD OF QUALITY MENAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandar Vujović; Zdravko Krivokapić

    2008-01-01

    The work arised like results of preliminary research which conduct by authors for necessaries of production doctoral dissertation on Mechanical faculty in Podgorica. Work presented research in quality management areas through aspect of category, methods for data collecting, methods for data analyzing and academics disciplines or areas. The target of this work is to point out the most significant and not enough research areas of quality management systems through review and analyzing doctoral ...

  15. Fiscal 1998 achievement report on regional consortium research and development project. Venture business raising type regional consortium research and development - Small business creation base type (Development of high performance thin film manufacturing system for optical elements and electronic devices); 1998 nendo kogaku narabini denshi buhin'yo kosoku usumaku seizo sochi no kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-02-01

    In the development of a thin film manufacturing vacuum device, high-speed evacuation from atmospheric pressure to 7.0 times 10{sup -5}Pa is accomplished in approximately 80 minutes, and a high-efficiency large sputter gun and a 60rpm high-speed high-precision substrate holder rotating mechanism with rotation accuracy of {+-}1rpm are realized. In the development of optical thin films, film formation is accomplished using a rocking magnetron cathode and an effectively usable range of 62% is achieved in film thickness uniformity, which is 2.5 times as high as that by the conventional method. Using this device, the areas where materials fail to hit the target due to rocking are limited to the top and bottom corners. In the development of an ultrafine film resistor, a leakage field is designed by an electromagnetic field simulator, and a magnetron cathode is designed, with the erosion area (effective film formation range) approximately 2 times as large as that with the conventional cathode. The film thickness distribution is within {+-}5%, variation in the thin film resistor temperature coefficient is within {+-}5ppm/degrees C, and the deposition rate is 4nm/sec which is 4 times as high as that under the conventional method. The number of films is 8 times larger when formation is accomplished with the substrate holder kept in rotation. (NEDO)

  16. Establishing an International Soil Modelling Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, Harry; Schnepf, Andrea; Vanderborght, Jan

    2015-04-01

    -change-feedback processes, bridge basic soil science research and management, and facilitate the communication between science and society . To meet these challenges an international community effort is required, similar to initiatives in systems biology, hydrology, and climate and crop research. We therefore propose to establish an international soil modelling consortium with the aims of 1) bringing together leading experts in modelling soil processes within all major soil disciplines, 2) addressing major scientific gaps in describing key processes and their long term impacts with respect to the different functions and ecosystem services provided by soil, 3) intercomparing soil model performance based on standardized and harmonized data sets, 4) identifying interactions with other relevant platforms related to common data formats, protocols and ontologies, 5) developing new approaches to inverse modelling, calibration, and validation of soil models, 6) integrating soil modelling expertise and state of the art knowledge on soil processes in climate, land surface, ecological, crop and contaminant models, and 7) linking process models with new observation, measurement and data evaluation technologies for mapping and characterizing soil properties across scales. Our consortium will bring together modelers and experimental soil scientists at the forefront of new technologies and approaches to characterize soils. By addressing these aims, the consortium will contribute to improve the role of soil modeling as a knowledge dissemination instrument in addressing key global issues and stimulate the development of translational research activities. This presentation will provide a compelling case for this much-needed effort, with a focus on tangible benefits to the scientific and food security communities.

  17. The ENIGMA Consortium: large-scale collaborative analyses of neuroimaging and genetic data

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Paul M.; Stein, Jason L; Medland, Sarah E.; Hibar, Derrek P.; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Renteria, Miguel E; Toro, Roberto; Jahanshad, Neda; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Agartz, Ingrid; Alda, Martin; Alhusaini, Saud

    2014-01-01

    The Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a collaborative network of researchers working together on a range of large-scale studies that integrate data from 70 institutions worldwide. Organized into Working Groups that tackle questions in neuroscience, genetics, and medicine, ENIGMA studies have analyzed neuroimaging data from over 12,826 subjects. In addition, data from 12,171 individuals were provided by the CHARGE consortium for replication of finding...

  18. The ENIGMA Consortium: Large-scale collaborative analyses of neuroimaging and genetic data

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Van P.; Stein, J; Medland, S.; Hibar, D.; Vasquez, A; Renteria, M.; Toro, R.; Jahanshad, N.; Schumann, G; Franke, B.; Wright, M.; N. Martin; Agartz, I; Alda, M; Alhusaini, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a collaborative network of researchers working together on a range of large-scale studies that integrate data from 70 institutions worldwide. Organized into Working Groups that tackle questions in neuroscience, genetics, and medicine, ENIGMA studies have analyzed neuroimaging data from over 12,826 subjects. In addition, data from 12,171 individuals were provided by the CHARGE consortium for replication of finding...

  19. Targeting Research for Enhanced Impact on Poverty in Marginal Areas: The Representative Case of the Dry Areas of Syria

    OpenAIRE

    La Rovere, Roberto; Aw-Hassan, Aden

    2006-01-01

    Agricultural research in marginal dry areas can contribute to reducing poverty through the development of technological, institutional and policy options for poor farmers by addressing diversified opportunities and development pathways. This paper analyzes the diversity of rural livelihood strategies in the Khanasser Valley in northwest Syria, an area representative of marginal drylands. We experimentally define an operational classification of household typologies based on their different li...

  20. Livestock Production - Future Directions and Priority Research Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While specific issues facing ruminant production differ in detail between developed and developing countries, the general constraints and challenges suggest that common research interests will continue to exist. The need to increase outputs of ruminant meat and milk products differ sharply between the developed and developing world, although a need to increase animal productivity is evident in both, albeit primarily to increase product output in the developing world but to decrease environmental impacts of food producing ruminants in the developed world. The largest single limitation to increasing productivity of ruminants in the low digestibility of the structural carbohydrates which comprise a large proportion of their diets. Research on actions of secondary compounds in ruminal metabolism is required to avoid their negative effects and harvest the benefits of their positive effects. Domesticated ruminants have historically provided a substantial portion of the world's supplies. However if that is to continue, ways must be found to increase digestibility of their primary feedstocks, increase the 'healthfulness' of their products to humans, and decrease the environmental impact of their production systems

  1. Research and Development of Large Area Color AC Plasma Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Tsutae

    1998-10-01

    Plasma display is essentially a gas discharge device using discharges in small cavities about 0. 1 m. The color plasma displays utilize the visible light from phosphors excited by the ultra-violet by discharge in contrast to monochrome plasma displays utilizing visible light directly from gas discharges. At the early stage of the color plasma display development, the degradation of the phosphors and unstable operating voltage prevented to realize a practical color plasma display. The introduction of the three-electrode surface-discharge technology opened the way to solve the problems. Two key technologies of a simple panel structure with a stripe rib and phosphor alignment and a full color image driving method with an address-and-display-period-separated sub-field method have realized practically available full color plasma displays. A full color plasma display has been firstly developed in 1992 with a 21-in.-diagonal PDP and then a 42-in.-diagonal PDP in 1995 Currently a 50-in.-diagonal color plasma display has been developed. The large area color plasma displays have already been put into the market and are creating new markets, such as a wall hanging TV and multimedia displays for advertisement, information, etc. This paper will show the history of the surface-discharge color plasma display technologies and current status of the color plasma display.

  2. The LBNL/JSU/AGMUS Science Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report discusses the 11 year of accomplishments of the science consortium of minority graduates from Jackson State University and Ana G. Mendez University at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  3. 24 CFR 943.122 - How is a consortium organized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is a consortium organized? 943.122 Section 943.122 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... consortium organized? (a) PHAs that elect to form a consortium enter into a consortium agreement among...

  4. High Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility in Morgantown, WV, researchers can investigate new high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen turbine combustion...

  5. SEEA SOUTHEAST CONSORTIUM FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, Timothy [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance; Ball, Kia [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance; Fournier, Ashley [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance

    2014-01-21

    -grantee program was designed to address the unique local conditions and population of its community. There was great diversity in programs design, types of financing and incentives, building stock characteristics, climate and partnerships. From 2010 through 2013, SEEA and its sub-grantee programs focused on determining best practices in program administration, workforce development, marketing and consumer education, financing, and utility partnerships. One of the common themes among programs that were most successful in each of these areas was strong partnerships and collaborations with people or organizations in the community. In many instances engaged partners proved to be the key to addressing barriers such as access to financing, workforce development opportunities and access to utility bill data. The most challenging barrier proved to be the act of building a market for energy efficiency where none previously existed. With limited time and resources, educating homeowners of the value in investing in energy efficiency while engaging electric and gas utilities served as a significant barrier for several programs. While there is still much work to be done to continue to transform the energy efficiency market in the Southeast, the programmatic activities led by SEEA and its sub-grantees resulted in 8,180 energy audits and 5,155 energy efficiency retrofits across the Southeast. In total the Southeast Consortium saved an estimated 27,915,655.93 kWh and generated an estimated $ 2,291,965.90 in annual energy cost savings in the region.

  6. Geodesy and the UNAVCO Consortium: Three Decades of Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, L. R.; Miller, M. M.; Meertens, C. M.; Mattioli, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    UNAVCO, a non-profit, university consortium that supports geoscience research using geodesy, began with the ingenious recognition that the nascent Global Positioning System constellation (GPS) could be used to investigate earth processes. The consortium purchased one of the first commercially available GPS receivers, Texas Instrument's TI-4100 NAVSTAR Navigator, in 1984 to measure plate deformation. This early work was highlighted in a technology magazine, GPSWorld, in 1990. Over a 30-year period, UNAVCO and the community have helped advance instrument design for mobility, flexibility, efficiency and interoperability, so research could proceed with higher precision and under ever challenging conditions. Other innovations have been made in data collection, processing, analysis, management and archiving. These innovations in tools, methods and data have had broader impacts as they have found greater utility beyond research for timing, precise positioning, safety, communication, navigation, surveying, engineering and recreation. Innovations in research have expanded the utility of geodetic tools beyond the solid earth science through creative analysis of the data and the methods. For example, GPS sounding of the atmosphere is now used for atmospheric and space sciences. GPS reflectrometry, another critical advance, supports soil science, snow science and ecological research. Some research advances have had broader impacts for society by driving innovations in hazards risk reduction, hazards response, resource management, land use planning, surveying, engineering and other uses. Furthermore, the geodetic data is vital for the design of space missions, testing and advancing communications, and testing and dealing with interference and GPS jamming. We will discuss three decades (and counting) of advances by the National Science Foundation's premiere geodetic facility, consortium and some of the many geoscience principal investigators that have driven innovations in

  7. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industry-driven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings

  8. AGRICOH: A Consortium of Agricultural Cohorts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelia H. Zahm

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available AGRICOH is a recently formed consortium of agricultural cohort studies involving 22 cohorts from nine countries in five continents: South Africa (1, Canada (3, Costa Rica (2, USA (6, Republic of Korea (1, New Zealand (2, Denmark (1, France (3 and Norway (3. The aim of AGRICOH, initiated by the US National Cancer Institute (NCI and coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC, is to promote and sustain collaboration and pooling of data to investigate the association between a wide range of agricultural exposures and a wide range of health outcomes, with a particular focus on associations that cannot easily be addressed in individual studies because of rare exposures (e.g., use of infrequently applied chemicals or relatively rare outcomes (e.g., certain types of cancer, neurologic and auto-immune diseases. To facilitate future projects the need for data harmonization of selected variables is required and is underway. Altogether, AGRICOH provides excellent opportunities for studying cancer, respiratory, neurologic, and auto-immune diseases as well as reproductive and allergic disorders, injuries and overall mortality in association with a wide array of exposures, prominent among these the application of pesticides.

  9. Cross-Cultural Communication Training for Students in Multidisciplinary Research Area of Biomedical Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Shigehiro Hashimoto

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical Engineering makes multidisciplinary research area, which includes biology, medicine, engineering and others. Communication training is important for students, who have a potential to develop Biomedical Engineering. Communication is not easy in a multidisciplinary research area, because each area has its own background of thinking. Because each nation has its own background of culture, on the other hand, international communication is not easy, either. A cross-cultural student progr...

  10. A National Research Agenda for Virtual Reality: Report by the National Research Council Committee on VR R&D

    OpenAIRE

    Pausch, Randy; Aviles, Walter; Durlach, Nathaniel; Robinett, Warren; Zyda, Michael

    1995-01-01

    In 1992, at the request of a consortium of federal agencies, the National Research Council established a committee to "recommand a national research and development agenda in the area of virtual reality" to set U.S. government R&D funding priorities for virtual reality (VR) for the next decade....

  11. 2012 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Hoh River Watershed, Washington (Delivery 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on the Hoh River watershed survey area for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium and...

  12. 2012 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Quinault River Watershed, Washington (Delivery 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on the Quinault watershed survey area for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium. This...

  13. 2001-2002 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Clallam County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract with Clallam County. The data covers an area of approximately 524...

  14. 2002 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Unclassified Topographic LiDAR: Puget Sound Lowlands Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 730 square miles and covers the...

  15. Scenario of research and intellectual production in the area of didactics in the southern of Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Orlando Fernández Aquino; Vânia Maria de Oliveira Vieira; Marilene Ribeiro Resende; Maria Célia Borges

    2016-01-01

    The text was drawn from results of research carried out between 2010 and 2012. The objective was to understand the state of research and intellectual production in the area of Didactic in Southern Brazil. The documentary analysis methodology, working with documents available online was applied. The research was carried out with 9 Postgraduate Program in Education, 12 research lines, 115 professors, 244 research projects and 1730 publications. It was concluded that there is a great number of r...

  16. Building the European Research Area in nuclear fission pioneering steps in actinide science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of the European Research Area (ERA) aims at closer development of research policies in Europe and closer networking of research capacities, to reduce fragmentation of research in Europe. The goal is to make European research more effective and competitive. Several approaches are made to create ERA. The European Research Framework Programme is one tool in this context, with the introduction of the new instruments, Integrated Projects, Networks of Excellence and Integrated Infrastructure Initiatives. Actinide science is one area that could benefit from better coordination and more effective use of the research capacities, both human and physical. The European Commission is thus funding a Network of Excellence (ACTINET-6) and an Integrated Project (EUROPART) in this area within the sixth EURATOM Framework Programme. (author)

  17. Bioremoval of Am-241 and Cs-137 from liquid radioactive wasters by bacterial consortiums; Biorremocao de Am-241 e Cs-137 de rejeitos radioativos liquidos por consorcios bacterianos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Rafael Vicente de Padua; Lima, Josenilson B. de; Gomes, Mirella C.; Borba, Tania R.; Bellini, Maria Helena; Marumo, Julio Takehiro; Sakata, Solange Kazumi, E-mail: rpadua@ipen.b, E-mail: sksakata@ipen.b, E-mail: jblima@ipen.b, E-mail: mbmarumo@ipen.b, E-mail: jtmarumo@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper evaluates the capacity of two bacterial consortiums of impacted areas in removing the Am-241 and Cs-137 from liquid radioactive wastes.The experiments indicated that the two study consortiums were able to remove 100% of the Cs-137 and Am-241 presents in the waste from 4 days of contact. These results suggest that the bio removal with the selected consortiums, can be a viable technique for the treatment of radioactive wastes containing Am-241 and Cs-137

  18. Research on the sustainable development of ecotourism in protected areas: a review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Zhenyu

    2009-01-01

    Due to the unique function of protected areas in species and nature resources conservation, sustainability has become the primary consideration in the development of ecotourism in protected areas.This paper focuses on this issue, and reviews the current literatures in this field, tries to give a comprehensive review which can also be organized in logical sense, classifies three major paradigms about the current research:research on the development of ecotourism in protected areas, research on the external indicators which affect the sustainability of ecotourism in protected areas, researches on the assessment of sustainability of ecotourism in protected areas, and finally points out that the further study in this field must be carried out by inter-disciplines, such as cultural economics and ecological economics.

  19. A survey of critical research areas in the energy segment of restructured electric power markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Availability of a large volume of recent literature on deregulated (a.k.a. restructured) electricity markets underscores the importance of the research needs to ensure proper design and functioning of the markets. Researchers have made significant contributions fueling the evolution of the fundamental market design changes that have taken place since the beginning of the restructuring process. Due to the vast scope, existing survey papers are focused on particular facets of deregulated electricity markets. We adopt a similar approach by focusing on the most important research areas related to the energy market. The contributions of the survey paper lie in the novel approach used in classifying the literature based on critical research areas. Some areas of research such as auction based pricing, bidding strategy formulation, market equilibria, and market power are reviewed in a different light than other existing survey papers. We conclude by providing some future research directions for the energy markets. (author)

  20. Accelerators for Society - TIARA 2012 Test Infrastructure and Accelerator Research Area (in Polish)

    OpenAIRE

    Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01

    TIARA (Test Infrastructure and Accelerator Research Area - Preparatory Phae) is an European Collaboration of Accelerator Technology, which by running research projects, technical, networks and infrastructural has a duty to integrate the research and technical communities and infrastructures in the global scale of Europe. The Collaboration gathers all research centers with large accelerator infrastructures. Other ones, like universities, are affiliated as associate members. TIARA-PP (preparato...

  1. Euratom research and training in nuclear reactor safety: Towards European research and the higher education area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this invited lecture, research and training in nuclear fission are looked at from a European perspective with emphasis on the three success factors of any European policy, namely: common needs, vision and instruments, that ought to be strongly shared amongst the stakeholders across the Member States concerned. As a result, the following questions are addressed: What is driving the current EU trend towards more research, more education and more training, in general? Regarding nuclear fission, in particular, who are the end-users of Euratom 'research and training' and what are their expectations from EU programmes? Do all stakeholders share the same vision about European research and training in nuclear fission? What are the instruments proposed by the European Commission (EC) to conduct joint research programmes of common interest for the nuclear fission community? In conclusion, amongst the stakeholders in Europe, there seems to be a wide consensus about common needs and instruments, but not about a common vision regarding nuclear. (author)

  2. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology and Waste Management Consortium annual report, 1990--1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    The HBCU/MI Environmental Technology and Waste Management Consortium was established in January 1990, through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) among the member institutions. This group of research-oriented Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions (HBCU/MI) agreed to work together to initiate research, technology development and education programs to address the nation`s critical environmental problems. As a group the HBCU/MI Consortium is uniquely positioned to reach women and the minority populations of African Americans, Hispanics and American Indians. As part of their initial work, they developed the Research, Education, and Technology Transfer (RETT) Plan to actualize the Consortium`s guiding principles. In addition to developing a comprehensive research agenda, four major programs were begun to meet these goals. This report summarizes the 1990--1991 progress.

  3. CFD analysis of pump consortium impeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gary C.; Chen, Y. S.; Williams, R. W.

    1992-01-01

    Current design of high performance turbopumps for rocket engines requires effective and robust analytical tools to provide design impact in a productive manner. The main goal of this study is to develop a robust and effective computational fluid dynamics (CFD) pump model for general turbopump design and analysis applications. A Navier-Stokes flow solver, FDNS, embedded with the extended k-epsilon turbulence model and with appropriate moving interface boundary conditions, is developed to analyze turbulent flows in the turbomachinery devices. The FDNS code was benchmarked with its numerical predictions of the pump consortium inducer, and provides satisfactory results. In the present study, a CFD analysis of the pump consortium impeller will be conducted with the application of the FDNS code. The pump consortium impeller, with partial blades, is the new design concept of the advanced rocket engine.

  4. Mathematics Anxiety and Attitudes of Secondary School Students in Rural Area: A Correlational Research

    OpenAIRE

    Engin Karadag; Ishak Karadeniz

    2014-01-01

    Correlation between mathematics anxiety and attitude of children who are educated in rural areas were analyzed in this research. Research was premeditated as a correlational design because it was presumed that there was correlation between two main variables. The population of the study was consisted of secondary school students who were educated in a region called rural areas in the central district of Meram/Konya in the school year of 2012-2013. 726 students who were educated in five second...

  5. The Yamato-793605 martian meteorite consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Kojima,Hideyasu/Miyamoto,Masamichi/Warren,Paul H.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the consortium that has been organized to coordinate study of the Yamato-793605 shergottitic peridotite, a 16-g meteorite of presumed martian origin. Y-793605 is similar to two other Antarctic martian meteorites, ALH-77005 and LEW88516. One of the most important goals of the consortium is to determine how the cosmic-ray exposure history of Y-793605 compares with those of ALH-77005 and LEW88516. An aphanitic-glassy shock melted lithology that constitutes, as scattered veins and glo...

  6. Advances in Research on Modern Agricultural Development in Grain Production Core Area of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan; LIU

    2015-01-01

    Grain production core area is key region of modern agricultural development in China. Through summarizing related literature about grain production area and modern agricultural development researches both at home and abroad,it obtained characteristics and existing problems in the modern agricultural development of the grain production core area. It is found that there are many research perspectives in modern agricultural development of the grain production core area. On the basis of analyzing the grain production core area and connotation,mode and evaluation of the modern agricultural development,it is concluded that further study should be carried out for adopting which development mode and how to make evaluation,so as to provide theoretical guidance for balanced development of modern agriculture in grain production core area of different regions.

  7. Cross-Cultural Communication Training for Students in Multidisciplinary Research Area of Biomedical Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiro Hashimoto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical Engineering makes multidisciplinary research area, which includes biology, medicine, engineering and others. Communication training is important for students, who have a potential to develop Biomedical Engineering. Communication is not easy in a multidisciplinary research area, because each area has its own background of thinking. Because each nation has its own background of culture, on the other hand, international communication is not easy, either. A cross-cultural student program has been designed for communication training in the multidisciplinary research area. Students from a variety of backgrounds of research area and culture have joined in the program: mechanical engineering, material science, environmental engineering, science of nursing, dentist, pharmacy, electronics, and so on. The program works well for communication training in the multidisciplinary research area of biomedical engineering. Foreign language and digital data give students chance to study several things: how to make communication precisely, how to quote previous data. The experience in the program helps students not only understand new idea in the laboratory visit, but also make a presentation in the international research conference. The program relates to author's several experiences: the student internship abroad, the cross-cultural student camp, multi PhD theses, various affiliations, and the creation of the interdisciplinary department.

  8. Perspectives for food research and European collaboration in the European Research Area and the new Framework Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, L

    2001-08-01

    Since 1987, successive framework programmes have contributed to strengthen European food research through the establishment of networks between research institutions, universities and companies from various European countries. In the FAIR programme (1994-1998), 118 research projects comprising nearly 1,000 participants from the European Union and Associated States have been supported in the food area with a European funding of about [symbol: see text] 108 million. Within the Quality of Life and Management of Living Resources programme (1998-2002), food research is mostly supported within the key action 'food, nutrition and health' with a budget of [symbol: see text] 290 million. After the first four deadlines, 735 eligible research proposals have already been received. Further to their evaluation by a panel of independent experts, 108 proposals have been funded or selected for funding representing a total contribution of about [symbol: see text] 168 million. Among those, several clusters of projects are now running on important topics such as probiotics, coeliac diseases, mycotoxins, GMO, safety and food for the elderly. In addition, technology stimulation measures are largely benefiting SMEs to foster their innovation potential. In January 2000, the European Commission adopted a Communication entitled "Towards the European Research Area (ERA)" with the objective to contribute to developing better framework conditions for research in Europe. On 21 February 2001, the Commission adopted proposals to be submitted to the European Parliament and Council for the next framework programme for research and innovation (2002-2006). The new framework programme that is becoming one of the financial instruments of the ERA aims at catalysing the integration of European research by: strengthening of links between the Community research effort and national and regional research policies; concentrating on a limited number of priority fields or research to which activities at the

  9. EGI: anOpen e-Infrastructure Ecosystem for the Digital European Research Area

    OpenAIRE

    Andreozzi, Sergio; Holsinger, Sy; Marinovic, Damir; Newhouse, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Bringing the digital European Research Area (ERA) online means modernising Europe’s research infrastructure by promoting open science through the availability, accessibility and reuse of scientific data and results, the use of web- based tools that facilitate scientific collaboration and ensuring public access to research. As the European Grid Infrastructure (EGI) is the largest European distributed computing infrastructure providing 24/7 access to large scale computing, storage and data reso...

  10. THE PLANT ONTOLOGY CONSORTIUM AND PLANT ONTOLOGIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of the Plant OntologyTM Consortium is to produce structured controlled vocabularies, arranged in ontologies, that can be applied to plant-based database information even as knowledge of the biology of the relevant plant taxa (e.g., development, anatomy, morphology, genomics, proteomics) is ...

  11. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Griffith (Linda); M. Cowan (Morton); L.D. Notarangelo (Luigi Daniele); R. Kohn (Robert); J. Puck (Jennifer); S.-Y. Pai (Sung-Yun); B. Ballard (Barbara); S.C. Bauer (Sarah); J. Bleesing (Jack); M. Boyle (Marcia); R.W. Brower (Ronald); R.H. Buckley (Rebecca); M. van der Burg (Mirjam); L.M. Burroughs (Lauri); F. Candotti (Fabio); A. Cant (Andrew); T. Chatila (Talal); C. Cunningham-Rundles (Charlotte); M.C. Dinauer (Mary); J. Dvorak (Jennie); A. Filipovich (Alexandra); L.A. Fleisher (Lee); H.B. Gaspar (Bobby); T. Gungor (Tayfun); E. Haddad (Elie); E. Hovermale (Emily); F. Huang (Faith); A. Hurley (Alan); M. Hurley (Mary); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); E.M. Kang (Elizabeth); B.R. Logan (Brent); J.R. Long-Boyle (Janel); H. Malech (Harry); S.A. McGhee (Sean); S. Modell (Sieglinde); S. Modell (Sieglinde); H.D. Ochs (Hans); R.J. O'Reilly (Richard); R. Parkman (Robertson); D. Rawlings (D.); J.M. Routes (John); P. Shearer (P.); T.N. Small (Trudy); H. Smith (H.); K.E. Sullivan (Kathleen); P. Szabolcs (Paul); A.J. Thrasher (Adrian); D. Torgerson; P. Veys (Paul); K. Weinberg (Kenneth); J.C. Zuniga-Pflucker (Juan Carlos)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency (SC

  12. Research on fiber-based portable large area surface contamination monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large area portable surface contamination monitor is suitable searching the hot point, especially in the situations of large contamination area such as work site radioactive monitoring, nuclear facility decommissioning or nuclear emergency response. This paper focus on beta radioactive surface contamination. Through researching upon the detector which is made of large area plastic scintillation coupled with fibers, the first large area plastic scintillation surface contamination monitor was established. The effective area of detector reaches 1200 cm2. The verifying experiments indicates that the detection efficiency to 90Sr-90Y plate source comes to 7%. The results show this kind of detector is competent for beta radioactive surface contamination. This work laid a foundation for research and development of the relative instrument. (authors)

  13. Mathematics Anxiety and Attitudes of Secondary School Students in Rural Area: A Correlational Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Karadağ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Correlation between mathematics anxiety and attitude of children who are educated in rural areas were analyzed in this research. Research was premeditated as a correlational design because it was presumed that there was correlation between two main variables. The population of the study was consisted of secondary school students who were educated in a region called rural areas in the central district of Meram/Konya in the school year of 2012-2013. 726 students who were educated in five secondary schools comprised of research sample which was designated as stratified sampling method according to educational regions. Research data were collected by the Mathematics Anxiety Scale, and Mathematics Attitude Scale. Correlation and multiple regression analyses were used to examine data. Findings show that correlation between anxiety and attitude of secondary school students from rural area is in negative direction.Key Words:    Rural education, mathematics attitude, mathematics anxiety

  14. The Brazilian research contribution to knowledge of the plant communities from Antarctic ice free areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Antonio B; Putzke, Jair

    2013-09-01

    This work aims to summarize the results of research carried out by Brazilian researchers on the plant communities of Antarctic ice free areas during the last twenty five years. Since 1988 field work has been carried out in Elephant Island, King George Island, Nelson Island and Deception Island. During this period six papers were published on the chemistry of lichens, seven papers on plant taxonomy, five papers on plant biology, two studies on UVB photoprotection, three studies about the relationships between plant communities and bird colonies and eleven papers on plant communities from ice free areas. At the present, Brazilian botanists are researching the plant communities of Antarctic ice free areas in order to understand their relationships to soil microbial communities, the biodiversity, the distribution of the plants populations and their relationship with birds colonies. In addition to these activities, a group of Brazilian researchers are undertaking studies related to Antarctic plant genetic diversity, plant chemistry and their biotechnological applications. PMID:24068084

  15. Navy Fuel Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Performs basic and applied research to understand the underlying chemistry that impacts the use, handling, and storage of current and future Navy mobility...

  16. Geodynamics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This GSL facility has evolved over the last three decades to support survivability and protective structures research. Experimental devices include three gas-driven...

  17. Weapons Neutron Research Facility (WNR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Weapons Neutron Research Facility (WNR) provides neutron and proton beams for basic, applied, and defense-related research. Neutron beams with energies ranging...

  18. A review of fatigue in fishermen: a complicated and underprioritised area of research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Annbjørg; Jensen, Olaf; Holmen, Ingunn; Petursdottir, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fatigue in fishing has been a highly underprioritised area of research, even though fatigue has been found to be the largest single contributing factor in accidents. Aim: The aim of this article/paper is to provide an overview of the research conducted on fatigue in fishermen up to date......, in order to establish a starting point for further research in this area. Materials and methods: The review is mainly based on journal articles from PubMed, Google Scholar, International Maritime Health, Science Direct and some relevant articles links were also followed. Results: The research...... revealed that only 5 articles have been published concerning fatigue in fishermen. The articles all confirmed that fatigue is a serious health and safety issue among fishermen, and that further research therefore is warranted. Conclusions: Only 2 of the 5 studies of fishermen’s fatigue used objective...

  19. Undergraduate Research at a Minority University: Studying the Atmospheric Conditions in Urban vs. Rural Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, P. A.; Green Garcia, A.; Hromis, A.; Vaquiz, E.; Wright, J. M.; Austin, S. A.; Johnson, L. P.; Musselwhite, D.; Walter, D.

    2009-12-01

    A grant from the National Science Foundation (NFS) funded a three year atmospheric science program known as the Minority University Consortium for Earth and Space Science (MUCESS) that supports undergraduate research programs devoted to studying ozone (O3) profiles. MUCESS institutions are represented by the University of Houston-Downtown (UHD), Medgar Evers College of the City University of New York (MEC), and South Carolina State University (SCSU). The primary strength of the program lies in the fact that it provides a venue for students from the participating minority institutions to build bridges of dialogue and strengthen research capabilities. A secondary strength of MUCESS is that the collaborative institutions are widely separated geographically but they have excellent communications and the ability to coordinate launches and support annual workshops. MUCESS supported a series of ozonesonde launches from multiple sites between April and July 2009. Both urban and rural sites were chosen based on their proximity to the three participating minority universities. Balloon and ozone monitoring technology facilitated data acquisition from cost-effective, environmentally friendly, and reproducible experiments. Payloads consisting of an ozonesonde, Vaisala® radiosonde, and GPS receiver provided information on dynamic atmospheric conditions that exist from ground level through altitudes up to one hundred thousand feet. Preparations for the collaborative launch included an initial calibration phase where identical calibration procedures prepared all three payloads. This calibration phase was performed five to seven days in advance of the launch. An additional calibration was performed the day of launch to verify communications between in-flight and ground radio transmitter and receiver, as well as to validate partial pressure and O3 concentration output from the ozonesonde. Each payload was tethered to a 600 gram weather balloon which was then carried up to the

  20. DOE Research Set-Aside Areas of the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, C.E.; Janecek, L.L.

    1997-08-31

    Designated as the first of seven National Environmental Research Parks (NERPs) by the Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy), the Savannah River Site (SRS) is an important ecological component of the Southeastern Mixed Forest Ecoregion located along the Savannah River south of Aiken, South Carolina. Integral to the Savannah River Site NERP are the DOE Research Set-Aside Areas. Scattered across the SRS, these thirty tracts of land have been set aside for ecological research and are protected from public access and most routine Site maintenance and forest management activities. Ranging in size from 8.5 acres (3.44 ha) to 7,364 acres (2,980 ha), the thirty Set-Aside Areas total 14,005 acres (5,668 ha) and comprise approximately 7% of the Site`s total area. This system of Set-Aside Areas originally was established to represent the major plant communities and habitat types indigenous to the SRS (old-fields, sandhills, upland hardwood, mixed pine/hardwood, bottomland forests, swamp forests, Carolina bays, and fresh water streams and impoundments), as well as to preserve habitats for endangered, threatened, or rare plant and animal populations. Many long-term ecological studies are conducted in the Set-Asides, which also serve as control areas in evaluations of the potential impacts of SRS operations on other regions of the Site. The purpose of this document is to give an historical account of the SRS Set-Aside Program and to provide a descriptive profile of each of the Set-Aside Areas. These descriptions include a narrative for each Area, information on the plant communities and soil types found there, lists of sensitive plants and animals documented from each Area, an account of the ecological research conducted in each Area, locator and resource composition maps, and a list of Site-Use permits and publications associated with each Set-Aside.

  1. DOE Research Set-Aside Areas of the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Designated as the first of seven National Environmental Research Parks (NERPs) by the Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy), the Savannah River Site (SRS) is an important ecological component of the Southeastern Mixed Forest Ecoregion located along the Savannah River south of Aiken, South Carolina. Integral to the Savannah River Site NERP are the DOE Research Set-Aside Areas. Scattered across the SRS, these thirty tracts of land have been set aside for ecological research and are protected from public access and most routine Site maintenance and forest management activities. Ranging in size from 8.5 acres (3.44 ha) to 7,364 acres (2,980 ha), the thirty Set-Aside Areas total 14,005 acres (5,668 ha) and comprise approximately 7% of the Site's total area. This system of Set-Aside Areas originally was established to represent the major plant communities and habitat types indigenous to the SRS (old-fields, sandhills, upland hardwood, mixed pine/hardwood, bottomland forests, swamp forests, Carolina bays, and fresh water streams and impoundments), as well as to preserve habitats for endangered, threatened, or rare plant and animal populations. Many long-term ecological studies are conducted in the Set-Asides, which also serve as control areas in evaluations of the potential impacts of SRS operations on other regions of the Site. The purpose of this document is to give an historical account of the SRS Set-Aside Program and to provide a descriptive profile of each of the Set-Aside Areas. These descriptions include a narrative for each Area, information on the plant communities and soil types found there, lists of sensitive plants and animals documented from each Area, an account of the ecological research conducted in each Area, locator and resource composition maps, and a list of Site-Use permits and publications associated with each Set-Aside

  2. Methods for structuring scientific knowledge from many areas related to aging research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Zhavoronkov

    Full Text Available Aging and age-related disease represents a substantial quantity of current natural, social and behavioral science research efforts. Presently, no centralized system exists for tracking aging research projects across numerous research disciplines. The multidisciplinary nature of this research complicates the understanding of underlying project categories, the establishment of project relations, and the development of a unified project classification scheme. We have developed a highly visual database, the International Aging Research Portfolio (IARP, available at AgingPortfolio.org to address this issue. The database integrates information on research grants, peer-reviewed publications, and issued patent applications from multiple sources. Additionally, the database uses flexible project classification mechanisms and tools for analyzing project associations and trends. This system enables scientists to search the centralized project database, to classify and categorize aging projects, and to analyze the funding aspects across multiple research disciplines. The IARP is designed to provide improved allocation and prioritization of scarce research funding, to reduce project overlap and improve scientific collaboration thereby accelerating scientific and medical progress in a rapidly growing area of research. Grant applications often precede publications and some grants do not result in publications, thus, this system provides utility to investigate an earlier and broader view on research activity in many research disciplines. This project is a first attempt to provide a centralized database system for research grants and to categorize aging research projects into multiple subcategories utilizing both advanced machine algorithms and a hierarchical environment for scientific collaboration.

  3. Research on utilization of quantum beam in environment and energy areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current research activities of environment and industrial materials research division were reviewed from the viewpoint of social needs in environment and energy areas. We have investigated the researches on electrolyte membrane for fuel buttery, high-performance adsorbent for metal ions, modification of naturally occurring polymers, decomposition of persistent toxic organic-substrates, ceramic membrane for hydrogen separation, and evaluation of radiation effects of semiconductor devices. These researches are based on a lot of accumulated technical and analytical know-how using quantum beam such as electron beam, γ ray, and ion beam. (author)

  4. 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) Field Site Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freshley, Mark D.

    2008-12-31

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has established the 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (300 Area IFRC) on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the Office of Science. The project is funded by the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD). The purpose of the project is to conduct research at the 300 IFRC to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The management approach for the 300 Area IFRC requires that a Field Site Management Plan be developed. This is an update of the plan to reflect the installation of the well network and other changes.

  5. 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) Field Site Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has established the 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (300 Area IFRC) on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the Office of Science. The project is funded by the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD). The purpose of the project is to conduct research at the 300 IFRC to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The management approach for the 300 Area IFRC requires that a Field Site Management Plan be developed. This is an update of the plan to reflect the installation of the well network and other changes.

  6. Report on the main areas of the materials science and surface engineering own research

    OpenAIRE

    L.A. Dobrzański

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to present the representative examples for the own scientific research in the area of the forming of the structure and properties of engineering materials including biomaterials, their properties testing and microstructure characterisation and modelling, simulation and prediction of the properties and structure of these materials after selected materials processing technologies.Design/methodology/approach: The main areas of the scientific interests reporte...

  7. Characterizing urban areas with good sound quality: Development of a research protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Elise van Kempen; Jeroen Devilee; Wim Swart; Irene van Kamp

    2014-01-01

    Due to rapid urbanization, the spatial variation between wanted and unwanted sounds will decrease or even disappear. Consequently, the characteristics of (urban) areas where people can temporarily withdraw themselves from urban stressors such as noise may change or become increasingly scarce. Hardly any research has been carried out into the positive health effects of spending time in areas with a good sound quality. One of the problems is that an overview of what aspects determines good soun...

  8. Report on the main areas of the materials science and surface engineering own research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Dobrzański

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to present the representative examples for the own scientific research in the area of the forming of the structure and properties of engineering materials including biomaterials, their properties testing and microstructure characterisation and modelling, simulation and prediction of the properties and structure of these materials after selected materials processing technologies.Design/methodology/approach: The main areas of the scientific interests reported in this paper on the basis of the own original research include forming of structure and properties of engineering materials including biomaterials using advanced synthesis and materials processing technologies and nanotechnologies, engineering materials including biomaterials properties testing and microstructure characterisation using very advanced contemporary research methodologies including electron microscopy, modelling, simulation and prediction of properties and structure of engineering materials including biomaterials using advanced methods of computational materials science including artificial intelligence methods.Findings: A general character of the paper concerning many aspects of material science research enabled a detailed description of research methodology and details concerning research results. Detailed information is included in many detailed cited works.Practical implications: Presented research results can be used in practice.Originality/value: The paper presents numerous research results which Has been made during last years generalising the achievements of the research team directed by the author.

  9. Comparing What to What? Intersecting Methodological Issues in Comparative Area Studies and Transitional Justice Research

    OpenAIRE

    Anika Oettler

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses how current methodological debates on the potentials of Comparative Area Studies intersect with current trends in transitional justice research. As the field of transitional justice studies is approximating a status of maturation, academic enterprises tend to focus on empirical as well as theoretical generalization. The challenge of comparative transitional justice research consists less in weighing national impacts of policies than in taking into account a more historiciz...

  10. The Scope and Selectivity of Comparative Area Studies: Transitional Justice Research

    OpenAIRE

    Oettler, Anika

    2014-01-01

    The paper discusses how current methodological debates on the potential of comparative area studies intersect with current trends in transitional justice research. As the field of transitional justice studies is approaching saturation, academic efforts in this field are in-creasingly focused on empirical as well as theoretical generalization. The challenge of comparative transitional justice research is less to weigh the national impacts of policies than to incorporate a more historicized con...

  11. Avian brood parasitism——a growing research area in behavioral ecology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eivin; RSKAFT; Wei; LIANG; Brd; G.STOKKE

    2012-01-01

    正We are pleased to be responsible guest editors for the two special issues of Chinese Birds(Vol.3,No.4,2012 and Vol.4,No.1,2013),entitled "Avian Brood Parasitism — a Growing Research Area in Behavioral Ecology".The goal of the two special issues is to publish accumulated knowledge and some of the recent developments in the fascinating research occurring in avian

  12. Prospective areas in the production technology of scientific equipment for space research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslavets, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    The average labor of individual types of operations in the percentage ratio of the total labor consumption of manufacturing scientific instruments and apparatus for space research is presented. The prospective areas in the production technology of billet, machining, mechanical assembly, installation and assembly, adjustment and regulation and testing and control operations are noted. Basic recommendations are made with respect to further reduction of labor consumption and an increase in the productivity of labor when manufacturing scientific equipment for space research.

  13. Oak woodlands and forests fire consortium: A regional view of fire science sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabner, Keith W.; Stambaugh, Michael C.; Marschall, Joseph M.; Abadir, Erin R.

    2013-01-01

    The Joint Fire Science Program established 14 regional fire science knowledge exchange consortia to improve the delivery of fire science information and communication among fire managers and researchers. Consortia were developed regionally to ensure that fire science information is tailored to meet regional needs. In this paper, emphasis was placed on the Oak Woodlands and Forests Fire Consortium to provide an inside view of how one regional consortium is organized and its experiences in sharing fire science through various social media, conference, and workshop-based fire science events.

  14. Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-03-31

    On September 30, 2008, the US Department of Energy (DoE), issued a cooperative agreement award, DE-FC26-08NT01914, to the Metropolitan Energy Center (MEC), for a project known as “Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty Certification” project. The cooperative agreement was awarded pursuant to H15915 in reference to H. R. 2764 Congressionally Directed Projects. The original agreement provided funding for The Consortium to implement the established project objectives as follows: (1) to understand the current state of the development of a test protocol for PHEV configurations; (2) to work with industry stakeholders to recommend a medium duty vehicle test protocol; (3) to utilize the Phase 1 Eaton PHEV F550 Chassis or other appropriate PHEV configurations to conduct emissions testing; (4) and to make an industry PHEV certification test protocol recommendation for medium duty trucks. Subsequent amendments to the initial agreement were made, the most significant being a revised Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) that did not address actual field data since it was not available as originally expected. This project was mated by DOE with a parallel project award given to the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in California. The SCAQMD project involved designing, building and testing of five medium duty plug-in hybrid electric trucks. SCAQMD had contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to manage the project. EPRI provided the required match to the federal grant funds to both the SCAQMD project and the Kansas Consortium project. The rational for linking the two projects was that the data derived from the SCAQMD project could be used to validate the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium team. At the same time, the consortium team would be a useful resource to SCAQMD in designating their test procedures for emissions and operating parameters and determining vehicle mileage. The years between award of the cooperative

  15. Scenario of research and intellectual production in the area of didactics in the southern of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Fernández Aquino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The text was drawn from results of research carried out between 2010 and 2012. The objective was to understand the state of research and intellectual production in the area of Didactic in Southern Brazil. The documentary analysis methodology, working with documents available online was applied. The research was carried out with 9 Postgraduate Program in Education, 12 research lines, 115 professors, 244 research projects and 1730 publications. It was concluded that there is a great number of research and publication on the investigative field of Didactics and on the dimension of its foundation, but very little on the disciplinary and professional fields and on the conditions and ways of teaching. It is noteworthy that only a transformative practice can help change the reality of the school, the quality of teacher formation, of learning and mental development of the students.

  16. Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-11

    The numbers of individuals with adequate education and training to participate effectively in the highly technical aspects of environmental site cleanup are insufficient to meet the increasing demands of industry and government. Young people are particularly sensitive to these issues and want to become better equipped to solve the problems which will confront them during their lives. Educational institutions, on the other hand, have been slow in offering courses and curricula which will allow students to fulfill these interests. This has been in part due to the lack of federal funding to support new academic programs. This Consortium has been organized to initiate focused educational effort to reach inner-city youth with interesting and useful energy and environmental programs which can lead to well-paying and satisfying careers. Successful Consortium programs can be replicated in other parts of the nation. This report describes a pilot program in Washington, DC, Philadelphia, and Baltimore with the goal to attract and retain inner-city youth to pursue careers in energy-related scientific and technical areas, environmental restoration, and waste management.

  17. The COPD Biomarker Qualification Consortium (CBQC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casaburi, Richard; Celli, Bartolome; Crapo, James;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Knowledge about the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has advanced dramatically over the last 30 years. Unfortunately, this has had little impact in terms of new treatments. Over the same time frame, only one new class of medication for COPD...... interested party has been in a position to undertake such a process. In order to facilitate the development of novel tools to assess new treatments, the Food and Drug Administration, in collaboration with the COPD Foundation, the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute and scientists from the pharmaceutical...... industry and academia conducted a workshop to survey the available information that could contribute to new tools. Based on this, a collaborative project, the COPD Biomarkers Qualification Consortium, was initiated. The Consortium in now actively preparing integrated data sets from existing resources that...

  18. African-Caribbean cancer consortium for the study of viral, genetic and environmental cancer risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odedina Folakemi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This is a short summary of a meeting of the "African-Caribbean Cancer Consortium", jointly organized by the University of Pittsburgh, Department of Epidemiology and the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, held in Montego Bay, Jamaica as a satellite meeting at the Caribbean Health Research Council, 52nd Annual Council and Scientific meeting on May 4, 2007.

  19. The ENIGMA Consortium: Large-scale collaborative analyses of neuroimaging and genetic data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. Thompson (Paul); J.L. Stein; S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); D.P. Hibar (Derrek); A.A. Vásquez (Arias); M.E. Rentería (Miguel); R. Toro (Roberto); N. Jahanshad (Neda); G. Schumann (Gunter); B. Franke (Barbara); M.J. Wright (Margaret); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); I. Agartz (Ingrid); M. Alda (Martin); S. Alhusaini (Saud); L. Almasy (Laura); J. Almeida (Julia); K. Alpert (Kathryn); N.C. Andreasen; O.A. Andreassen (Ole); L.G. Apostolova (Liana); K. Appel (Katja); N.J. Armstrong (Nicola); B. Aribisala (Benjamin); M.E. Bastin (Mark); M. Bauer (Michael); C.E. Bearden (Carrie); Ø. Bergmann (Ørjan); E.B. Binder (Elisabeth); J. Blangero (John); H.J. Bockholt; E. Bøen (Erlend); M. Bois (Monique); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); T. Booth (Tom); I.J. Bowman (Ian); L.B.C. Bralten (Linda); R.M. Brouwer (Rachel); H.G. Brunner; D.G. Brohawn (David); M. Buckner; J.K. Buitelaar (Jan); K. Bulayeva (Kazima); J. Bustillo; V.D. Calhoun (Vince); D.M. Cannon (Dara); R.M. Cantor; M.A. Carless (Melanie); X. Caseras (Xavier); G. Cavalleri (Gianpiero); M.M. Chakravarty (M. Mallar); K.D. Chang (Kiki); C.R.K. Ching (Christopher); A. Christoforou (Andrea); S. Cichon (Sven); V.P. Clark; P. Conrod (Patricia); D. Coppola (Domenico); B. Crespo-Facorro (Benedicto); J.E. Curran (Joanne); M. Czisch (Michael); I.J. Deary (Ian); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); A. den Braber (Anouk); G. Delvecchio (Giuseppe); C. Depondt (Chantal); L. de Haan (Lieuwe); G.I. de Zubicaray (Greig); D. Dima (Danai); R. Dimitrova (Rali); S. Djurovic (Srdjan); H. Dong (Hongwei); D.J. Donohoe (Dennis); A. Duggirala (Aparna); M.D. Dyer (Matthew); G.D. Ehrlich (Garth D.); C.J. Ekman (Carl Johan); T. Elvsåshagen (Torbjørn); L. Emsell (Louise); S. Erk; T. Espeseth (Thomas); J. Fagerness (Jesen); S. Fears (Scott); I. Fedko (Iryna); G. Fernandez (Guillén); S.E. Fisher (Simon); T. Foroud (Tatiana); P.T. Fox (Peter); C. Francks (Clyde); S. Frangou (Sophia); E.M. Frey (Eva Maria); T. Frodl (Thomas); V. Frouin (Vincent); H. Garavan (Hugh); S. Giddaluru (Sudheer); D.C. Glahn (David); B. Godlewska (Beata); R.Z. Goldstein (Rita); R.L. Gollub (Randy); H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); O. Grimm (Oliver); O. Gruber (Oliver); T. Guadalupe (Tulio); R.E. Gur (Raquel); R.C. Gur (Ruben); H.H.H. Göring (Harald); S. Hagenaars (Saskia); T. Hajek (Tomas); G.B. Hall (Garry); J. Hall (Jeremy); J. Hardy (John); C.A. Hartman (Catharina); J. Hass (Johanna); W. Hatton; U.K. Haukvik (Unn); K. Hegenscheid (Katrin); J. Heinz (Judith); I.B. Hickie (Ian); B.C. Ho (Beng ); D. Hoehn (David); P.J. Hoekstra (Pieter); M. Hollinshead (Marisa); A.J. Holmes (Avram); G. Homuth (Georg); M. Hoogman (Martine); L.E. Hong (L.Elliot); N. Hosten (Norbert); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); H.E. Hulshoff Pol (Hilleke); K.S. Hwang (Kristy); C.R. Jack Jr. (Clifford); S. Jenkinson (Sarah); C. Johnston; E.G. Jönsson (Erik); R.S. Kahn (René); D. Kasperaviciute (Dalia); S. Kelly (Steve); S. Kim (Shinseog); P. Kochunov (Peter); L. Koenders (Laura); B. Krämer (Bernd); J.B.J. Kwok (John); J. Lagopoulos (Jim); G. Laje (Gonzalo); M. Landén (Mikael); B.A. Landman (Bennett); J. Lauriello; S. Lawrie (Stephen); P.H. Lee (Phil); S. Le Hellard (Stephanie); H. Lemaître (Herve); C.D. Leonardo (Cassandra); C.-S. Li (Chiang-shan); B. Liberg (Benny); D.C. Liewald (David C.); X. Liu (Xinmin); L.M. Lopez (Lorna); E. Loth (Eva); A. Lourdusamy (Anbarasu); M. Luciano (Michelle); F. MacCiardi (Fabio); M.W.J. Machielsen (Marise); G.M. MacQueen (Glenda); U.F. Malt (Ulrik); R. Mandl (René); D.S. Manoach (Dara); J.-L. Martinot (Jean-Luc); M. Matarin (Mar); R. Mather; M. Mattheisen (Manuel); M. Mattingsdal (Morten); A. Meyer-Lindenberg; C. McDonald (Colm); A.M. McIntosh (Andrew); F.J. Mcmahon (Francis J); K.L. Mcmahon (Katie); E. Meisenzahl (Eva); I. Melle (Ingrid); Y. Milaneschi (Yuri); S. Mohnke (Sebastian); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); D.W. Morris (Derek W); E.K. Moses (Eric); B.A. Mueller (Bryon ); S. Muñoz Maniega (Susana); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); B. Müller-Myhsok (Bertram); B. Mwangi (Benson); M. Nauck (Matthias); K. Nho (Kwangsik); T.E. Nichols (Thomas); L.G. Nilsson; A.C. Nugent (Allison); L. Nyberg (Lisa); R.L. Olvera (Rene); J. Oosterlaan (Jaap); R.A. Ophoff (Roel); M. Pandolfo (Massimo); M. Papalampropoulou-Tsiridou (Melina); M. Papmeyer (Martina); T. Paus (Tomas); Z. Pausova (Zdenka); G. Pearlson (Godfrey); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); C.P. Peterson (Charles); A. Pfennig (Andrea); M. Phillips (Mary); G.B. Pike (G Bruce); J.B. Poline (Jean Baptiste); S.G. Potkin (Steven); B. Pütz (Benno); A. Ramasamy (Adaikalavan); J. Rasmussen (Jerod); M. Rietschel (Marcella); M. Rijpkema (Mark); S.L. Risacher (Shannon); J.L. Roffman (Joshua); R. Roiz-Santiañez (Roberto); N. Romanczuk-Seiferth (Nina); E.J. Rose (Emma); N.A. Royle (Natalie); D. Rujescu (Dan); M. Ryten (Mina); P.S. Sachdev (Perminder); A. Salami (Alireza); T.D. Satterthwaite (Theodore); J. Savitz (Jonathan); A.J. Saykin (Andrew); C. Scanlon (Cathy); L. Schmaal (Lianne); H. Schnack (Hugo); N.J. Schork (Nicholas); S.C. Schulz (S.Charles); R. Schür (Remmelt); L.J. Seidman (Larry); L. Shen (Li); L. Shoemaker (Lawrence); A. Simmons (Andrew); S.M. Sisodiya (Sanjay); C. Smith (Colin); J.W. Smoller; J.C. Soares (Jair); S.R. Sponheim (Scott); R. Sprooten (Roy); J.M. Starr (John); V.M. Steen (Vidar); S. Strakowski (Stephen); V.M. Strike (Vanessa); J. Sussmann (Jessika); P.G. Sämann (Philipp); A. Teumer (Alexander); A.W. Toga (Arthur); D. Tordesillas-Gutierrez (Diana); D. Trabzuni (Danyah); S. Trost (Sarah); J. Turner (Jessica); M. van den Heuvel (Martijn); N.J. van der Wee (Nic); K.R. van Eijk (Kristel); T.G.M. van Erp (Theo G.); N.E.M. van Haren (Neeltje E.); D. van 't Ent (Dennis); M.J.D. van Tol (Marie-José); M.C. Valdés Hernández (Maria); D.J. Veltman (Dick); A. Versace (Amelia); H. Völzke (Henry); R. Walker (Robert); H.J. Walter (Henrik); L. Wang (Lei); J.M. Wardlaw (J.); M.E. Weale (Michael); M.W. Weiner (Michael); W. Wen (Wei); L.T. Westlye (Lars); H.C. Whalley (Heather); C.D. Whelan (Christopher); T.J.H. White (Tonya); A.M. Winkler (Anderson); K. Wittfeld (Katharina); G. Woldehawariat (Girma); A. Björnsson (Asgeir); D. Zilles (David); M.P. Zwiers (Marcel); A. Thalamuthu (Anbupalam); C.J. Schofield (Christopher); N.B. Freimer (Nelson); N.S. Lawrence (Natalia); D.A. Drevets (Douglas)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a collaborative network of researchers working together on a range of large-scale studies that integrate data from 70 institutions worldwide. Organized into Working Groups that tackle questions in neuroscien

  20. The ENIGMA Consortium : large-scale collaborative analyses of neuroimaging and genetic data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, Paul M.; Stein, Jason L.; Medland, Sarah E.; Hibar, Derrek P.; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Renteria, Miguel E.; Toro, Roberto; Jahanshad, Neda; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Agartz, Ingrid; Alda, Martin; Alhusaini, Saud; Almasy, Laura; Almeida, Jorge; Alpert, Kathryn; Andreasen, Nancy C.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Apostolova, Liana G.; Appel, Katja; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Aribisala, Benjamin; Bastin, Mark E.; Bauer, Michael; Bearden, Carrie E.; Bergmann, Orjan; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Blangero, John; Bockholt, Henry J.; Boen, Erlend; Bois, Catherine; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Booth, Tom; Bowman, Ian J.; Bralten, Janita; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Brunner, Han G.; Brohawn, David G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan; Bulayeva, Kazima; Bustillo, Juan R.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cantor, Rita M.; Carless, Melanie A.; Caseras, Xavier; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chang, Kiki D.; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Christoforou, Andrea; Cichon, Sven; Clark, Vincent P.; Conrod, Patricia; Coppola, Giovanni; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; Deary, Ian J.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; den Braber, Anouk; Delvecchio, Giuseppe; Depondt, Chantal; de Haan, Lieuwe; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dima, Danai; Dimitrova, Rali; Djurovic, Srdjan; Dong, Hongwei; Donohoe, Gary; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Dyer, Thomas D.; Ehrlich, Stefan; Ekman, Carl Johan; Elvsashagen, Torbjorn; Emsell, Louise; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Fagerness, Jesen; Fears, Scott; Fedko, Iryna; Fernandez, Guillen; Fisher, Simon E.; Foroud, Tatiana; Fox, Peter T.; Francks, Clyde; Frangou, Sophia; Frey, Eva Maria; Frodl, Thomas; Frouin, Vincent; Garavan, Hugh; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Glahn, David C.; Godlewska, Beata; Goldstein, Rita Z.; Gollub, Randy L.; Grabe, Hans J.; Grimm, Oliver; Gruber, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Gur, Raquel E.; Gur, Ruben C.; Goering, Harald H. H.; Hagenaars, Saskia; Hajek, Tomas; Hall, Geoffrey B.; Hall, Jeremy; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hass, Johanna; Hatton, Sean N.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hickie, Ian B.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoehn, David; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Hollinshead, Marisa; Holmes, Avram J.; Homuth, Georg; Hoogman, Martine; Hong, L. Elliot; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff; Hwang, Kristy S.; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnston, Caroline; Joensson, Erik G.; Kahn, Rene S.; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kelly, Sinead; Kim, Sungeun; Kochunov, Peter; Koenders, Laura; Kraemer, Bernd; Kwok, John B. J.; Lagopoulos, Jim; Laje, Gonzalo; Landen, Mikael; Landman, Bennett A.; Lauriello, John; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Lee, Phil H.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Lemaitre, Herve; Leonardo, Cassandra D.; Li, Chiang-shan; Liberg, Benny; Liewald, David C.; Liu, Xinmin; Lopez, Lorna M.; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Luciano, Michelle; Macciardi, Fabio; Machielsen, Marise W. J.; MacQueen, Glenda M.; Malt, Ulrik F.; Mandl, Rene; Manoach, Dara S.; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; McMahon, Francis J.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morris, Derek W.; Moses, Eric K.; Mueller, Bryon A.; Munoz Maniega, Susana; Muehleisen, Thomas W.; Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram; Mwangi, Benson; Nauck, Matthias; Nho, Kwangsik; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars-Goeran; Nugent, Allison C.; Nyberg, Lars; Olvera, Rene L.; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Ophoff, Roel A.; Pandolfo, Massimo; Papalampropoulou-Tsiridou, Melina; Papmeyer, Martina; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Peterson, Charles P.; Pfennig, Andrea; Phillips, Mary; Pike, G. Bruce; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Potkin, Steven G.; Puetz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Rasmussen, Jerod; Rietschel, Marcella; Rijpkema, Mark; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Roiz-Santianez, Roberto; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rose, Emma J.; Royle, Natalie A.; Rujescu, Dan; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Salami, Alireza; Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Savitz, Jonathan; Saykin, Andrew J.; Scanlon, Cathy; Schmaal, Lianne; Schnack, Hugo G.; Schork, Andrew J.; Schulz, S. Charles; Schuer, Remmelt; Seidman, Larry; Shen, Li; Shoemaker, Jody M.; Simmons, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W.; Soares, Jair C.; Sponheim, Scott R.; Sprooten, Emma; Starr, John M.; Steen, Vidar M.; Strakowski, Stephen; Strike, Lachlan; Sussmann, Jessika; Saemann, Philipp G.; Teumer, Alexander; Toga, Arthur W.; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Trabzuni, Daniah; Trost, Sarah; Turner, Jessica; Van den Heuvel, Martijn; van der Wee, Nic J.; van Eijk, Kristel; van Erp, Theo G. M.; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; van 't Ent, Dennis; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Hernandez, Maria C. Valdes; Veltman, Dick J.; Versace, Amelia; Voelzke, Henry; Walker, Robert; Walter, Henrik; Wang, Lei; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Weale, Michael E.; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; Westlye, Lars T.; Whalley, Heather C.; Whelan, Christopher D.; White, Tonya; Winkler, Anderson M.; Wittfeld, Katharina; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Zilles, David; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Schofield, Peter R.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Lawrence, Natalia S.; Drevets, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    The Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a collaborative network of researchers working together on a range of large-scale studies that integrate data from 70 institutions worldwide. Organized into Working Groups that tackle questions in neuroscience, genetics

  1. Computer Aided Battery Engineering Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, Ahmad

    2016-06-07

    A multi-national lab collaborative team was assembled that includes experts from academia and industry to enhance recently developed Computer-Aided Battery Engineering for Electric Drive Vehicles (CAEBAT)-II battery crush modeling tools and to develop microstructure models for electrode design - both computationally efficient. Task 1. The new Multi-Scale Multi-Domain model framework (GH-MSMD) provides 100x to 1,000x computation speed-up in battery electrochemical/thermal simulation while retaining modularity of particles and electrode-, cell-, and pack-level domains. The increased speed enables direct use of the full model in parameter identification. Task 2. Mechanical-electrochemical-thermal (MECT) models for mechanical abuse simulation were simultaneously coupled, enabling simultaneous modeling of electrochemical reactions during the short circuit, when necessary. The interactions between mechanical failure and battery cell performance were studied, and the flexibility of the model for various batteries structures and loading conditions was improved. Model validation is ongoing to compare with test data from Sandia National Laboratories. The ABDT tool was established in ANSYS. Task 3. Microstructural modeling was conducted to enhance next-generation electrode designs. This 3- year project will validate models for a variety of electrodes, complementing Advanced Battery Research programs. Prototype tools have been developed for electrochemical simulation and geometric reconstruction.

  2. 40 CFR 230.54 - Parks, national and historical monuments, national seashores, wilderness areas, research sites...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Parks, national and historical monuments, national seashores, wilderness areas, research sites, and similar preserves. 230.54 Section 230.54 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING SECTION 404(b)(1) GUIDELINES FOR SPECIFICATION OF...

  3. Radioactive release in the area of the Research Centre Juelich, - model calculations and measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are several plants with a licence for higher releases of radioactive materials into the air in the area of the Research Centre Juelich. The development of the radioactive releases in the last ten years are shown. For their valuation the radiation exposure is determinated by two different methods. Their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. (orig.)

  4. CG-DAR-1: Guide to the declassified areas of nuclear energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guide, which is based on classification of information by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and on subsequent declassification actions by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors, is intended to identify those areas of nuclear research and development that have been removed from the Restricted Data (RD) category and declassified

  5. Interdisciplinarity in Science: A Tentative Typology of Disciplines and Research Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillo, Fernanda; Bordons, Maria; Gomez, Isabel

    2003-01-01

    Presents a bibliometric methodology that provides a general overview of scientific disciplines with special attention to their interrelation. This work aims to establish a tentative typology of disciplines and research areas according to their degree of interdisciplinarity, measured through a series of indicators based on Institute for Scientific…

  6. 76 FR 77670 - Research Area Within Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary; Notice of Effective Date

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... regulations published on October 14, 2011 (76 FR 63824) are effective on December 4, 2011. FOR FURTHER...: Notice of effective date. SUMMARY: NOAA published a final rule for the establishment of a research area within the Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary on October 14, 2011 (76 FR 63824). Pursuant to...

  7. The Latin American Consortium of Studies in Obesity (LASO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, L. E.; Casas, J. P.; Herrera, V. M.; Miranda, J. J.; Perel, P.; Pichardo, R.; González, A.; Sanchez, J. R.; Ferreccio, C.; Aguilera, X.; Silva, E.; Oróstegui, M.; Gómez, L. F.; Chirinos, J. A.; Medina-Lezama, J.; Pérez, C. M.; Suárez, E.; Ortiz, A. P.; Rosero, L.; Schapochnik, N.; Ortiz, Z.; Ferrante, D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Current, high-quality data are needed to evaluate the health impact of the epidemic of obesity in Latin America. The Latin American Consortium of Studies of Obesity (LASO) has been established, with the objectives of (i) Accurately estimating the prevalence of obesity and its distribution by sociodemographic characteristics; (ii) Identifying ethnic, socioeconomic and behavioural determinants of obesity; (iii) Estimating the association between various anthropometric indicators or obesity and major cardiovascular risk factors and (iv) Quantifying the validity of standard definitions of the various indexes of obesity in Latin American population. To achieve these objectives, LASO makes use of individual data from existing studies. To date, the LASO consortium includes data from 11 studies from eight countries (Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Peru, Puerto Rico and Venezuela), including a total of 32 462 subjects. This article describes the overall organization of LASO, the individual studies involved and the overall strategy for data analysis. LASO will foster the development of collaborative obesity research among Latin American investigators. More important, results from LASO will be instrumental to inform health policies aiming to curtail the epidemic of obesity in the region. PMID:19438980

  8. Fiscal 1998 achievement report on regional consortium research and development project. Venture business raising type regional consortium - small business creating base type (Control of gene expression by ligands for nuclear receptors and its application to medicine manufacture - 2nd year); 1998 nendo kakunai juyotai ligand ni yoru iden joho hatsugen no seigyo to iyaku seizo process eno oyo seika hokokusho. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Studies are made about ascochlorin and its derivatives which are expected to be effective in the treatment and prevention of lifestyle diseases such as arteriosclerosis, diabetes, hypertension, etc. The current goal is to definitely prove at the cell culture stage that ascochlorin and its derivatives act as ligands for nuclear receptors. As the result of the effort to prove their activation of nuclear receptors, it is clarified that they activate not only PPARr, which is the initial target of the research, but also PPARa, PXR, and ER. A computer simulation of interaction between ascochlorin derivatives and PPARr is conducted, and now it is predicted that the helix 10 cubic structure is transformed so that co-activators may connect to the structure. It is also found that AS-6 inhibits almost completely the appearance of type II diabetes in the db/db mouse lacking leptin receptors and type I diabetes in the NOD (non-obese diabetes) mouse. (NEDO)

  9. Engineering Research and Development and Technology thrust area report FY92

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff and the technology needed to support current and future LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) to identify key technologies and (2) to conduct high-quality work to enhance our capabilities in these key technologies. To help focus our efforts, we identify technology thrust areas and select technical leaders for each area. The thrust areas are integrated engineering activities and, rather than being based on individual disciplines, they are staffed by personnel from Electronics Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and other LLNL organizations, as appropriate. The thrust area leaders are expected to establish strong links to LLNL program leaders and to industry; to use outside and inside experts to review the quality and direction of the work; to use university contacts to supplement and complement their efforts; and to be certain that we are not duplicating the work of others. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes activities conducted within the Program for the fiscal year 1992. Its intent is to provide timely summaries of objectives, theories, methods, and results. The nine thrust areas for this fiscal year are: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Emerging Technologies; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Microwave and Pulsed Power; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Remote Sensing and Imaging, and Signal Engineering

  10. Awareness Research Concerning the Existence and Implications of the Avrig – Scorei – Fagaras protected Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bratucu G.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is based upon a survey conducted in the protected area of Avrig - Scorei - Făgăraş from Romania. The main purpose of the article is to determine the awareness, attitudes and ways in which the inhabitants of a protected area may act towards the conservation of the area and support the community development. The research was based on a direct interview, using a questionnaire comprising 20 direct questions. The sampling method was probabilistic, with a multistage sampling, as it allows the possibility to extrapolate the results obtained for the entire research population. The systematic error is of +/-4%. The results showed a reduced awareness of the residents about the existence, functioning and support of this protected area, as well as a positive approach of the local public institutions involved in the management of the area. The local institutions have started to enforce the rules and regulations concerning the protection of the environment in this area, still with a long way to run, according to the opinions of the locals, until reaching the EU standards in this field.

  11. Engineering Research and Development and Technology thrust area report FY92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langland, R.T.; Minichino, C. [eds.

    1993-03-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff and the technology needed to support current and future LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) to identify key technologies and (2) to conduct high-quality work to enhance our capabilities in these key technologies. To help focus our efforts, we identify technology thrust areas and select technical leaders for each area. The thrust areas are integrated engineering activities and, rather than being based on individual disciplines, they are staffed by personnel from Electronics Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and other LLNL organizations, as appropriate. The thrust area leaders are expected to establish strong links to LLNL program leaders and to industry; to use outside and inside experts to review the quality and direction of the work; to use university contacts to supplement and complement their efforts; and to be certain that we are not duplicating the work of others. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes activities conducted within the Program for the fiscal year 1992. Its intent is to provide timely summaries of objectives, theories, methods, and results. The nine thrust areas for this fiscal year are: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Emerging Technologies; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Microwave and Pulsed Power; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Remote Sensing and Imaging, and Signal Engineering.

  12. A risk characterization of safety research areas for Integral Fast Reactor program planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper characterizes the areas of Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) safety research in terms of their importance in addressing the risk of core disruption sequences for innovative designs. Such sequences have traditionally been determined to constitute the primary risk to public health and safety. All core disruption sequences are folded into four fault categories: classic unprotected (unscrammed) events; loss of decay heat; local fault propagation; and failure of critical reactor structures. Event trees are used to describe these sequences and the areas in the IFR Safety and related Base Technology research programs are discussed with respect to their relevance in addressing the key issues in preventing or delimiting core disruptive sequences. Thus a measure of potential for risk reduction is obtained for guidance in establishing research priorites

  13. Challenges for EURATOM research and training in the frame of the European 'Higher Education' And 'Research' areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is intended to answer two major questions of the modern society: 1) What are the challenges for EURATOM Research and Training in the frame of the European 'Higher Education' and 'Research' areas? (main stakeholders); 2) What kind of response is offered by the EURATOM RD and DD and E and T programmes in nuclear fission and radiation protection? (scientific and societal impact). The actions of the research policy in the EU are not conducted for the sake of acquiring Knowledge as a goal per se, but as a support to other EU policies, in particular, the Energy policy. In the area of fission and radiation protection, this Community policy implies the co-operation of all stakeholders (most of them participate in the EURATOM programmes), that is: research organisations (public and private, power and medical applications, etc); systems suppliers (e.g. nuclear vendors, engineering companies, etc); energy providers (e.g. electric utilities, heat and/or hydrogen vendors, etc); nuclear regulatory bodies and associated technical safety organizations (TSO); education and training (E and T) institutions, and, in particular, universities; civil society and the international institutional framework (IAEA and OECD/NEA). The emphasis in the paper is on the improvements all along the history of nuclear fission power (Generations I, II and III) as well as on the visionary innovation proposed by the 'Generation IV International Forum' (GIF). International research (in particular, EURATOM), in this area is guided by the four 'GIF Technology Goals for industry and society', namely: sustainability: e.g. enhanced fuel utilisation and optimal waste management; economics: e.g. minimisation of costs of MWe installed and MWh generated; safety and reliability: e.g. robust safety architecture, no need for off-site measures; proliferation resistance and physical protection: e.g. absence of separated Pu. EURATOM research and training is presented in the broader context of the new EU policy

  14. CFD Parametric Study of Consortium Impeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gary C.; Chen, Y. S.; Garcia, Roberto; Williams, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    Current design of high performance turbopumps for rocket engines requires effective and robust analytical tools to provide design impact in a productive manner. The main goal of this study is to develop a robust and effective computational fluid dynamics (CFD) pump model for general turbopump design and analysis applications. A Finite Difference Navier-Stokes flow solver, FDNS, which includes the extended k-epsilon turbulence model and appropriate moving interface boundary conditions, was developed to analyze turbulent flows in turbomachinery devices. A second-order central difference scheme plus adaptive dissipation terms was employed in the FDNS code, along with a predictor plus multi-corrector pressure-based solution procedure. The multi-zone, multi-block capability allows the FDNS code to efficiently solve flow fields with complicated geometry. The FDNS code has been benchmarked by analyzing the pump consortium inducer, and it provided satisfactory results. In the present study, a CFD parametric study of the pump consortium impeller was conducted using the FDNS code. The pump consortium impeller, with partial blades, is a new design concept of the advanced rocket engines. The parametric study was to analyze the baseline design of the consortium impeller and its modification which utilizes TANDEM blades. In the present study, the TANDEM blade configuration of the consortium impeller considers cut full blades for about one quarter chord length from the leading edge and clocks the leading edge portion with an angle of 7.5 or 22.5 degrees. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect and trend of the TANDEM blade modification and provide the result as a design guideline. A 3-D flow analysis, with a 103 x 23 x 30 mesh grid system and with the inlet flow conditions measured by Rocketdyne, was performed for the baseline consortium impeller. The numerical result shows that the mass flow rate splits through various blade passages are relatively uniform

  15. Fiscal 1998 achievement report on regional consortium research and development project. Regional consortium of venture business fostering type--Creation of key industries (Development of technologies for manufacturing and utilizing various biological regulatory substances using Hokkaido-produced biomasses as materials); 1998 nendo Dosan biomass wo genryo to shita kakushu seitai chosetsu kino busshitsu no seisan riyo gijutsu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The efforts aim to meet consumers' needs for products that will prevent lifestyle diseases or the like. For this purpose, substances answering the purpose are extracted from Hokkaido-produced agricultural and aquatic biomasses, and prepared for testing. Researches are conducted on how they behave in the enzyme, cell, and biological systems, and active substances are isolated and identified. In relation to the aquatic biomass, a technology is established of extracting and separating DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid), taurine, etc., which are multivalent unsaturated fatty acids effective in preventing lifestyle diseases, from the unused parts of the squid. In relation to the agricultural biomass, antimicrobial active substances are extracted and separated from small fruit plants such as the chicory. Long-keeping foods are tentatively produced by the addition of dried powder of the chicory root tuber. In the elucidation of various biological regulatory substances contained in the Hokkaido-produced biomasses, they are tested for their abilities to resist microbes and active oxygen. Furthermore, verification tests are conducted by administering the substances to the senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM). (NEDO)

  16. Fiscal 1998 achievement report on regional consortium research and development project. Venture business fostering regional consortium in its 2nd year--Creation of key industries (Development of manufacturing system for multiple applications of biological resources); 1998 nendo yuyo seibutsu shigen no tamokuteki riyo no tame no kako seizo system no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Research and development is conducted to collect intermediate products from Okinawan herbs for the production of antioxidant products usable for various purposes. Substance-producing plants are screened and the substances they offer are assessed for antioxidant activity, extracted, processed, prepared for market, and checked for safety. At the Okinawa Industrial Technology Center, a DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl)/microplate method has been established, which promptly measures the antioxidant activity of the substances. Using this technology, the divisions concerned of industrial, academic, and governmental organizations cooperate with each other over the optimization of herb cultivation technology, development of a herbal ingredient analyzing technology, efficacy of herbs, development of a safety assessment system, development of a technology for the effective extraction, processing, and preparation of herbal ingredients, and the development of a technology of assessing antioxidant intermediate products for their efficacy. As the result, a technology is established of producing intermediate antioxidant products from Guava, Ryukyuyomogi, and Ukonisomatsu. They are unique Okinawan products, and sell at 40,000-50,000 yen. Since the prices are equal to or lower than the prices of other antioxidant intermediate products, probabilities are very high that they will get into markets in Japan proper. (NEDO)

  17. An approach for setting evidence-based and stakeholder-informed research priorities in low- and middle-income countries

    OpenAIRE

    Rehfuess, Eva A; Durão, Solange; Kyamanywa, Patrick; Joerg J Meerpohl; Young, Taryn; Rohwer, Anke; ,

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To derive evidence-based and stakeholder-informed research priorities for implementation in African settings, the international research consortium Collaboration for Evidence-Based Healthcare and Public Health in Africa (CEBHA+) developed and applied a pragmatic approach. First, an online survey and face-to-face consultation between CEBHA+ partners and policy-makers generated priority research areas. Second, evidence maps for these priority research areas identified gaps and related ...

  18. Position paper on main areas of nuclear chemistry research and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear chemistry, with its specialized areas of nuclear chemistry, radiochemistry, and radiation chemistry, mainly covers these fields: basic research in nuclear chemistry; actinide chemistry; radioanalysis; nuclear chemistry in the life sciences, geosciences, and cosmic chemistry; radiotracers in technology; nuclear power technology; nuclear waste management; tritium chemistry in fusion technology, and radiation protection and radioecology. In the more than one hundred years of history of this branch of science and technology, which was opened up by the discovery of radioactivity and of the radioelements, pioneering discoveries and developments have been made in many sectors. Far beyond the confines of this area of work, they have achieved overriding importance in applications in many fields of technology and industry and in the life sciences. Research and application in nuclear chemistry continue to be highly relevant to society, ecology, and the economy, and the potential of science and technology in this field in Germany is acknowledged internationally. In the light of this vast area of activity, and against the need to maintain competence in nuclear chemistry for the use of nuclear power, irrespective of the status of this continued use in Germany, nuclear chemistry is indispensable to the solution of future problems. The Nuclear Chemistry Group of the Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker therefore uses this position paper to draw attention to the urgent need to keep up and further advance nuclear chemistry applications in a variety of areas of science and technology, also as a public duty of thorough education and research. (orig.)

  19. A quarter century of the Pacific Basin Consortium: looking back to move forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, William A

    2016-03-01

    The Pacific Basin Consortium (PBC) was formed 25 years ago to address significant public health challenges to vulnerable populations imposed by environmental threats in the region, including areas surrounding the rim of and in the Pacific Ocean. Originally focused on toxic waste pollution, the PBC has broadened its efforts over the years, embracing a health focus and more of a balance between engineering and public health. This move was informed by the PBC's close relationship with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Superfund Hazardous Substances Basic Research and Training Program (Superfund Research Program, or SRP), which played a dynamic role in the PBC from its early days. In addition, a sub-focus on children's environmental health emerged, which helped set the agenda for children's environmental health research in the region. Progress has also been made in reducing harm from some threats, particularly via extensive interventions to remediate arsenic in drinking water in Bangladesh, western Thailand, and Vietnam. However, many of the environmental health problems in the Pacific Basin region persist, including air pollution, inadequate safe drinking water, undernutrition, and a growing electronic waste problem. In the Pacific Basin and elsewhere, people with the lowest incomes often live in areas with the worst pollution. Although it is difficult to implement, dynamic strategic networking efforts are vital to understanding and correcting the inequities that persist in global environmental health. The PBC can help accomplish this by continuing and expanding its work to foster and enhance collaborations and communications between environmental health and engineering investigators and to integrate investigator-initiated research. As the PBC looks forward, there is also a need to exert increased effort to establish and maintain partnerships, to develop community-based primary-care and health services

  20. 2001-2002 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Island County and Northeast Jefferson County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 525 square miles and covers all of...

  1. 2012-2013 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Hoh River Watershed, Washington (Deliveries 1 and 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on the Hoh River watershed survey area for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium and...

  2. RESEARCH ON ARGES RIVER FISH FAUNA IN BUDEASA-GOLESTI AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina-Mihaela Truţă

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Arges River was subject to periodic ichthyologic, hydrobiological and hydrological research. By its content and approach the present paper shows a series of research on fish fauna in Budeasa-Golesti area of Arges River, Pitesti. By research presented in the study we sought to evaluate the state and evolution of fish fauna in the city reservoirs, Pitesti area, over the last 30 years, trying to highlight the causes that led to the current situation and to propose measures for the conservation of natural fish fauna in the future. Fish fauna in Pitesti area currently consists of 14 species belonging to four families: Cyprinidae (9 species, Cobitidae (1 species, Esocidae (1 species and Percidae (3 species. Most species live naturally in lakes studied except for one species Pseudorasbora parva which was introduced accidentally. The research undertaken to reflect changes in the fish fauna in the last 30 years, indicates an increase in the number of species, either through deliberate stocking for sport fishing purposes or due to changes in biotope favouring the development of certain species which were accidental in the past.

  3. Activities of Nuclear Research Institute Rez in the area of hydrogen technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NRI is a research institution established in 1955. Nowadays, the Institute provides wide range of expertise and services for operators of the nuclear power plants in the Czech Republic and abroad, supports Czech central state institutions in the domains of strategic energy planning and development, management of radioactive waste (for the Ministry of Trade and Industry), provides independent expertise for the State Office of Nuclear Safety, performs activities in the area of exploitation of ionising radiation and irradiation services for basic and applied research, health service and industry, performs research and provides services for radioactive waste disposal, production of radiopharmaceuticals, education and training of experts and scientific specialists and performs many other activities. With the gradual changes in energy policy, hydrogen economy becomes one of the important topics related to nuclear energy. NRI is participating in the research and development in this area and as a member of the Czech Hydrogen Technology Platform is currently the leader in this area in the country. To promote hydrogen economy, NRI prepared and participated in several demonstration projects. Studies on production of hydrogen in current and future nuclear power plants are performed as well. (authors)

  4. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to

  5. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In

  6. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to

  7. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In

  8. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to

  9. On the Need to Establish an International Soil Modeling Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, H.; Vanderborght, J.; Schnepf, A.

    2014-12-01

    Soil is one of the most critical life-supporting compartments of the Biosphere. Soil provides numerous ecosystem services such as a habitat for biodiversity, water and nutrients, as well as producing food, feed, fiber and energy. To feed the rapidly growing world population in 2050, agricultural food production must be doubled using the same land resources footprint. At the same time, soil resources are threatened due to improper management and climate change. Despite the many important functions of soil, many fundamental knowledge gaps remain, regarding the role of soil biota and biodiversity on ecosystem services, the structure and dynamics of soil communities, the interplay between hydrologic and biotic processes, the quantification of soil biogeochemical processes and soil structural processes, the resilience and recovery of soils from stress, as well as the prediction of soil development and the evolution of soils in the landscape, to name a few. Soil models have long played an important role in quantifying and predicting soil processes and related ecosystem services. However, a new generation of soil models based on a whole systems approach comprising all physical, mechanical, chemical and biological processes is now required to address these critical knowledge gaps and thus contribute to the preservation of ecosystem services, improve our understanding of climate-change-feedback processes, bridge basic soil science research and management, and facilitate the communication between science and society. To meet these challenges an international community effort is required, similar to initiatives in systems biology, hydrology, and climate and crop research. Our consortium will bring together modelers and experimental soil scientists at the forefront of new technologies and approaches to characterize soils. By addressing these aims, the consortium will contribute to improve the role of soil modeling as a knowledge dissemination instrument in addressing key

  10. Recent advances in the source term area within the SARNET European severe accident research network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz, L.E., E-mail: luisen.herranz@ciemat.es [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medio Ambientales y Tecnologica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 40, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Haste, T. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, IRSN, BP 3, F-13115 St Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Kärkelä, T. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT Espoo (Finland)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Main achievements of source term research in SARNET are given. • Emphasis on the radiologically important iodine and ruthenium fission products. • Conclusions on FP release, transport in the RCS and containment behaviour. • Significance of large-scale integral experiments to validate the analyses used. • A thorough list of the most recent references on source term research results. - Abstract: Source Term has been one of the main research areas addressed within the SARNET network during the 7th EC Framework Programme of EURATOM. The entire source term domain was split into three major areas: oxidising impact on source term, iodine chemistry in the reactor coolant system and containment and data and code assessment. The present paper synthesises the main technical outcome stemming from the SARNET FWP7 project in the area of source term and includes an extensive list of references in which deeper insights on specific issues may be found. Besides, based on the analysis of the current state of the art, an outlook of future source term research is outlined, where major changes in research environment are discussed (i.e., the end of the Phébus FP project; the end of the SARNET projects; and the launch of HORIZON 2020). Most probably research projects will be streamlined towards: release and transport under oxidising conditions, containment chemistry, existing and innovative filtered venting systems and others. These will be in addition to a number of projects that have been completed or are ongoing under different national and international frameworks, like VERDON, CHIP and EPICUR started under the International Source Term Programme (ISTP), the OECD/CSNI programmes BIP, BIP2, STEM, THAI and THAI2, and the French national programme MIRE. The experimental PASSAM project under the 7th EC Framework programme, focused on source term mitigation systems, is highlighted as a good example of a project addressing potential enhancement of safety systems

  11. Recent advances in the source term area within the SARNET European severe accident research network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Main achievements of source term research in SARNET are given. • Emphasis on the radiologically important iodine and ruthenium fission products. • Conclusions on FP release, transport in the RCS and containment behaviour. • Significance of large-scale integral experiments to validate the analyses used. • A thorough list of the most recent references on source term research results. - Abstract: Source Term has been one of the main research areas addressed within the SARNET network during the 7th EC Framework Programme of EURATOM. The entire source term domain was split into three major areas: oxidising impact on source term, iodine chemistry in the reactor coolant system and containment and data and code assessment. The present paper synthesises the main technical outcome stemming from the SARNET FWP7 project in the area of source term and includes an extensive list of references in which deeper insights on specific issues may be found. Besides, based on the analysis of the current state of the art, an outlook of future source term research is outlined, where major changes in research environment are discussed (i.e., the end of the Phébus FP project; the end of the SARNET projects; and the launch of HORIZON 2020). Most probably research projects will be streamlined towards: release and transport under oxidising conditions, containment chemistry, existing and innovative filtered venting systems and others. These will be in addition to a number of projects that have been completed or are ongoing under different national and international frameworks, like VERDON, CHIP and EPICUR started under the International Source Term Programme (ISTP), the OECD/CSNI programmes BIP, BIP2, STEM, THAI and THAI2, and the French national programme MIRE. The experimental PASSAM project under the 7th EC Framework programme, focused on source term mitigation systems, is highlighted as a good example of a project addressing potential enhancement of safety systems

  12. Future Deltas Utrecht University research focus area: towards sustainable management of sinking deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stouthamer, E.; van Asselen, S.

    2015-11-01

    Deltas are increasingly under pressure from human impact and climate change. To deal with these pressures that threat future delta functioning, we need to understand interactions between physical, biological, chemical and social processes in deltas. This requires an integrated approach, in which knowledge on natural system functioning is combined with knowledge on spatial planning, land and water governance and legislative frameworks. In the research focus area Future Deltas of Utrecht University an interdisciplinary team from different research groups therefore works together. This allows developing integrated sustainable and resilient delta management strategies, which is urgently needed to prevent loss of vital delta services.

  13. Latest Developments of the Isprs Student Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detchev, I.; Kanjir, U.; Reyes, S. R.; Miyazaki, H.; Aktas, A. F.

    2016-06-01

    The International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) Student Consortium (SC) is a network for young professionals studying or working within the fields of photogrammetry, remote sensing, Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and other related geo-spatial sciences. The main goal of the network is to provide means for information exchange for its young members and thus help promote and integrate youth into the ISPRS. Over the past four years the Student Consortium has successfully continued to fulfil its mission in both formal and informal ways. The formal means of communication of the SC are its website, newsletter, e-mail announcements and summer schools, while its informal ones are multiple social media outlets and various social activities during student related events. The newsletter is published every three to four months and provides both technical and experiential content relevant for the young people in the ISPRS. The SC has been in charge or at least has helped with organizing one or more summer schools every year. The organization's e-mail list has over 1,100 subscribers, its website hosts over 1,300 members from 100 countries across the entire globe, and its public Facebook group currently has over 4,500 joined visitors, who connect among one another and share information relevant for their professional careers. These numbers show that the Student Consortium has grown into a significant online-united community. The paper will present the organization's on-going and past activities for the last four years, its current priorities and a strategic plan and aspirations for the future four-year period.

  14. Consanguineous Marriages among Women in Bursa Nilufer Public Health Training and Research Area

    OpenAIRE

    Nilufer Tavukcu; Emel Irgil

    2008-01-01

    AIM/BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate socio-demographic and fertility features, opinions on consanguinity, and the types of congenital disorders encountered in the babies of women in consanguineous marriages in the Nilufer Public Health Training and Research Area in the province of Bursa in northwest Turkey. METHODS: This case-control study was conducted between September 2005 and March 2006. The case group consisted of 393 women in consanguineous marriages in the Nilufer Pub...

  15. Measuring international technology spillovers and progress towards the European research area

    OpenAIRE

    Siedschlag, Iulia

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to contribute to the development of an evidence-based system to monitor progress towards the European Research Area (ERA) and a knowledge-based economy. We start with an overview of existing theory and empirical evidence on the role of international technology spillovers on economic growth. Further, we discuss the transmission channels of international technology spillovers and barriers to international technology diffusion. Next we turn to measuring specialisat...

  16. Technologies and Research Trends in Wireless Body Area Networks for Healthcare: A Systematic Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ilkyu Ha

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the increasing interest in the integration of the medical technology and the information and communications technology, research on wireless body area networks (WBANs), which apply a sensor network to the human body, is being actively conducted. Existing sensor network technology has the potential to be used in a WBAN; however, it has some limitations. In particular, a WBAN has a very different network environment compared to a sensor network that uses free space, because wireless se...

  17. Research on the Identity Construction of the Disabled Elderly in Rural Areas of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Chen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The identity construction is a very important aspect among the problems of the disabled elderly in rural areas of China. Based on the method of case study and theoretical analysis, this research studies the contents and the process of the identity construction of the disabled elderly in rural areas. It suggests that the identity consists of three elements: personal identity, group identity and social identity, and the characteristics of which include the “high recognition on the disability”, the “core construction of the disability”, the “daily expenses orientation” and the “de-certification of the identity construction”. The mechanism of the construction is supported by three different system types: the basic system, the consolidation system and the maintenance system. The results of the construction demonstrate the features of the identity of “triple-weakness” and “muddling along” of the disabled elderly in rural areas.

  18. Electric Propulsion Research Building (EPRB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electric Propulsion Research Building (EPRB) capability centers on its suite of vacuum chambers, which are configured to meet the unique requirements related to...

  19. Energy Materials Research Laboratory (EMRL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energy Materials Research Laboratory at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) creates a cross-disciplinary laboratory facility that lends itself to the...

  20. Materials Engineering Research Facility (MERF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s Materials Engineering Research Facility (MERF) enables engineers to develop manufacturing processes for producing advanced battery materials in sufficient...

  1. Research, development and demonstration in the energy area in Switzerland - List of projects 2000/2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report prepared by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) reviews research, development and demonstration projects in the energy area that were partly or wholly supported by the Swiss Federation in the years 2000/2001. A list of over 1,000 projects is presented, whereby many projects supported by the Swiss Cantons and local authorities are not included in the statistics. The report also contains figures on the efforts made by the private economy in these areas. The classification of the projects in the four main areas 'efficient use of energy', 'renewable energy sources', 'nuclear energy' and 'energy economics' is presented. This allows comparison with other publications such as the Federal Energy-Research Concept or the Overviews of the Energy-Research Programme Managers. The classification system is also compared with that used by the International Energy Agency (IEA). The Network for Information and Technology Transfer (ENET) is also presented, which has a comprehensive data base at its disposal and which maintains a systematic collection of energy-relevant publications. Details on these projects can be obtained from the appropriate heads of programmes and SFOE departmental heads, whose addresses are given in the report

  2. Characterizing urban areas with good sound quality: Development of a research protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise van Kempen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to rapid urbanization, the spatial variation between wanted and unwanted sounds will decrease or even disappear. Consequently, the characteristics of (urban areas where people can temporarily withdraw themselves from urban stressors such as noise may change or become increasingly scarce. Hardly any research has been carried out into the positive health effects of spending time in areas with a good sound quality. One of the problems is that an overview of what aspects determines good sound quality in urban areas and how these are interrelated is lacking. This paper reviews the literature pertaining to the sound quality of urban areas. Aim is to summarize what is known about the influence of social, spatial, and physical aspects other than sounds, on peoples′ perception of urban sound qualities. Literature from both conventional sound research and from the so-called soundscape field, published between 2000 and the beginning of 2013 in English or Dutch, was evaluated. Although a general set of validated indicators that can be directly applied, is not available yet, a set of indicators was derived from the literature. These form the basis of a study protocol that will be applied in "Towards a Sustainable acoustic Environment", a project that aims to describe sound qualities at a low-scale level. Key-elements of this study protocol, including a questionnaire and the systematic audit of neighborhoods, were presented in this paper.

  3. Characterizing urban areas with good sound quality: development of a research protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kempen, Elise; Devilee, Jeroen; Swart, Wim; van Kamp, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Due to rapid urbanization, the spatial variation between wanted and unwanted sounds will decrease or even disappear. Consequently, the characteristics of (urban) areas where people can temporarily withdraw themselves from urban stressors such as noise may change or become increasingly scarce. Hardly any research has been carried out into the positive health effects of spending time in areas with a good sound quality. One of the problems is that an overview of what aspects determines good sound quality in urban areas and how these are interrelated is lacking. This paper reviews the literature pertaining to the sound quality of urban areas. Aim is to summarize what is known about the influence of social, spatial, and physical aspects other than sounds, on peoples' perception of urban sound qualities. Literature from both conventional sound research and from the so-called soundscape field, published between 2000 and the beginning of 2013 in English or Dutch, was evaluated. Although a general set of validated indicators that can be directly applied, is not available yet, a set of indicators was derived from the literature. These form the basis of a study protocol that will be applied in "Towards a Sustainable acoustic Environment", a project that aims to describe sound qualities at a low-scale level. Key-elements of this study protocol, including a questionnaire and the systematic audit of neighborhoods, were presented in this paper. PMID:25387534

  4. The Global Evidence Mapping Initiative: Scoping research in broad topic areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavender Emma

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence mapping describes the quantity, design and characteristics of research in broad topic areas, in contrast to systematic reviews, which usually address narrowly-focused research questions. The breadth of evidence mapping helps to identify evidence gaps, and may guide future research efforts. The Global Evidence Mapping (GEM Initiative was established in 2007 to create evidence maps providing an overview of existing research in Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI and Spinal Cord Injury (SCI. Methods The GEM evidence mapping method involved three core tasks: 1. Setting the boundaries and context of the map: Definitions for the fields of TBI and SCI were clarified, the prehospital, acute inhospital and rehabilitation phases of care were delineated and relevant stakeholders (patients, carers, clinicians, researchers and policymakers who could contribute to the mapping were identified. Researchable clinical questions were developed through consultation with key stakeholders and a broad literature search. 2. Searching for and selection of relevant studies: Evidence search and selection involved development of specific search strategies, development of inclusion and exclusion criteria, searching of relevant databases and independent screening and selection by two researchers. 3. Reporting on yield and study characteristics: Data extraction was performed at two levels - 'interventions and study design' and 'detailed study characteristics'. The evidence map and commentary reflected the depth of data extraction. Results One hundred and twenty-nine researchable clinical questions in TBI and SCI were identified. These questions were then prioritised into high (n = 60 and low (n = 69 importance by the stakeholders involved in question development. Since 2007, 58 263 abstracts have been screened, 3 731 full text articles have been reviewed and 1 644 relevant neurotrauma publications have been mapped, covering fifty-three high priority

  5. Consortium for Algal Biofuel Commercialization (CAB-COMM) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayfield, Stephen P. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-12-04

    The Consortium for Algal Biofuel Commercialization (CAB-Comm) was established in 2010 to conduct research to enable commercial viability of alternative liquid fuels produced from algal biomass. The main objective of CAB-Comm was to dramatically improve the viability of algae as a source of liquid fuels to meet US energy needs, by addressing several significant barriers to economic viability. To achieve this goal, CAB-Comm took a diverse set of approaches on three key aspects of the algal biofuels value chain: crop protection; nutrient utilization and recycling; and the development of genetic tools. These projects have been undertaken as collaboration between six academic institutions and two industrial partners: University of California, San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography; University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Rutgers University; University of California, Davis; Johns Hopkins University; Sapphire Energy; and Life Technologies.

  6. Creating Future Stem Leaders: The National Astronomy Consortium:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Kartik; Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Boyd, Patricia T.; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Benjamin, Robert A.; Brisbin, Drew; Giles, Faye; National Astronomy Consortium

    2016-01-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) is a program led by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and Associated Universities Inc., (AUI) in partnership with the National Society of Black Physicists (NSBP), and a number of minority and majority universities to increase the numbers of students from underrepresented groups and those otherwise overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline into STEM or STEM-related careers. The seed for the NAC was a partnership between NRAO and Howard University which began with an exchange of a few summer students five years ago. Since then the NAC has grown tremendously. Today the NAC aims to host between 4 to 5 cohorts nationally in an innovative model in which the students are mentored throughout the year with multiple mentors and peer mentoring, continued engagement in research and professional development / career training throughout the academic year and throughout their careers. We will summarize the results from this innovative and highly succesful program and provide lessons learned.

  7. Advances in Metal Supported Cells in the METSOFC EU Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKenna, Brandon J.; Christiansen, Niels; Schauperl, Richard;

    2012-01-01

    metal supported cells (MSCs) having low ASR at low temperature, incorporation into small stacks of powers approaching ½kW, and stack tolerance to various operation cycles. DTU Energy Conversion's (formerly Risø DTU) research into planar MSCs has produced an advanced cell design with high performance......Employing a mechanically robust metal support as the structural element in SOFC has been the objective of various development efforts. The EU-sponsored project “METSOFC”, completed at the end of 2011, resulted in a number of advancements towards implementing this strategy. These include robust...... outcomes of the METSOFC consortium are covered, along with associated work supported by the Danish National Advanced Technology Foundation....

  8. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report 1994--1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The HBCU/MI ET Consortium was established in January 1990, through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) among its member institutions. This group of research oriented Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions (HBCU/MIs) agreed to work together to initiate or revise education programs, develop research partnerships with public and private sector organizations, and promote technology development to address the nation`s critical environmental contamination problems. The Consortium`s Research, Education and Technology Transfer (RETT) Plan became the working agenda. The Consortium is a resource for collaboration among the member institutions and with federal an state agencies, national and federal laboratories, industries, (including small businesses), majority universities, and two and four-year technical colleges. As a group of 17 institutions geographically located in the southern US, the Consortium is well positioned to reach a diverse group of women and minority populations of African Americans, Hispanics and American Indians. This Report provides a status update on activities and achievements in environmental curriculum development, outreach at the K--12 level, undergraduate and graduate education, research and development, and technology transfer.

  9. An Evaluation Method of Research on Wearable Wireless Body Area Network in Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwens Gervásio Sene Júnior

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Wearable Wireless Body Area Networks (WWBANs are an emergent technology enabling the gathering ofreal-time data, for instance, towards decision making by healthcare professionals in the case of remotemonitoring of vital signs of patients. Recent research, however, does not describe in a straightforward wayhow hardware, software and wireless communication platforms fit together in order to fully support aWWBAN-based healthcare application. In this paper we propose a maturity analysis method of research onWWBANs in healthcare. The goal is to analyze whether a paper contemplates features that a researchproject on WWBAN in healthcare should have to apply it in a real world scenario. As a result of ourmethod, features not addressed might indicate the lack of maturity of research papers, or even suggest openissues on that field

  10. Critical research needs for managing coral reef marine protected areas: perspectives of academics and managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvitanovic, C; Wilson, S K; Fulton, C J; Almany, G R; Anderson, P; Babcock, R C; Ban, N C; Beeden, R J; Beger, M; Cinner, J; Dobbs, K; Evans, L S; Farnham, A; Friedman, K J; Gale, K; Gladstone, W; Grafton, Q; Graham, N A J; Gudge, S; Harrison, P L; Holmes, T H; Johnstone, N; Jones, G P; Jordan, A; Kendrick, A J; Klein, C J; Little, L R; Malcolm, H A; Morris, D; Possingham, H P; Prescott, J; Pressey, R L; Skilleter, G A; Simpson, C; Waples, K; Wilson, D; Williamson, D H

    2013-01-15

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are a primary policy instrument for managing and protecting coral reefs. Successful MPAs ultimately depend on knowledge-based decision making, where scientific research is integrated into management actions. Fourteen coral reef MPA managers and sixteen academics from eleven research, state and federal government institutions each outlined at least five pertinent research needs for improving the management of MPAs situated in Australian coral reefs. From this list of 173 key questions, we asked members of each group to rank questions in order of urgency, redundancy and importance, which allowed us to explore the extent of perceptional mismatch and overlap among the two groups. Our results suggest the mismatch among MPA managers and academics is small, with no significant difference among the groups in terms of their respective research interests, or the type of questions they pose. However, managers prioritised spatial management and monitoring as research themes, whilst academics identified climate change, resilience, spatial management, fishing and connectivity as the most important topics. Ranking of the posed questions by the two groups was also similar, although managers were less confident about the achievability of the posed research questions and whether questions represented a knowledge gap. We conclude that improved collaboration and knowledge transfer among management and academic groups can be used to achieve similar objectives and enhance the knowledge-based management of MPAs. PMID:23220604

  11. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-12-31

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The SWC represents a partnership between U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the NETL. This document serves as the eleventh quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the Fall SWC Technology Transfer Workshop for the northeastern U.S., in Pittsburgh, PA, on November 9, 2006, and organizing and identifying projects to exhibit during the SWC/Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) joint reception on November 8, 2006; (2) Distributing a paper copy of the Texas Tech 2004 Final Report and a revised, complete compact disc of all 2004 final reports; (3) Invoicing current and potential members for FY2007; (4) Soliciting nominations for the 2007-2008 Executive Council seats; and (5) Communications and outreach.

  12. The NASA Applied Science Program Disasters Area: Disaster Applications Research and Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, J. J.; Lindsay, F. E.; Stough, T.; Jones, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of the Natural Disaster Application Area is to use NASA's capabilities in spaceborne, airborne, surface observations, higher-level derived data products, and modeling and data analysis to improve natural disaster forecasting, mitigation, and response. The Natural Disaster Application Area applies its remote sensing observations, modeling and analysis capabilities to provide hazard and disaster information where and when it is needed. Our application research activities specifically contribute to 1) Understanding the natural processes that produce hazards, 2)Developing hazard mitigation technologies, and 3)Recognizing vulnerability of interdependent critical infrastructure. The Natural Disasters Application area selects research projects through a rigorous, impartial peer-review process that address a broad spectrum of disasters which afflict populations within the United States, regionally and globally. Currently there are 19 active projects in the research portfolio which address the detection, characterization, forecasting and response to a broad range of natural disasters including earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions and ash dispersion, wildfires, hurricanes, floods, tornado damage assessment, oil spills and disaster data mining. The Disasters team works with federal agencies to aid the government in meeting the challenges associated with natural disaster response and to transfer technologies to agencies as they become operational. Internationally, the Disasters Area also supports the Committee on Earth Observations Working Group on Disasters, and the International Charter on Space and Disasters to increase, strengthen, and coordinate contributions of NASA Earth-observing satellites and applications products to disaster risk management. The CEOS group will lead pilot efforts focused on identifying key systems to support flooding, earthquake, and volcanic events.

  13. The 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge Quality Assurance Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, N. J.

    2009-04-29

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a group of expert collaborators are using the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site 300 Area uranium plume within the footprint of the 300-FF-5 groundwater operable unit as a site for an Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC). The IFRC is entitled Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on the Hanford Site 300 Area Uranium Plume Project. The theme is investigation of multi-scale mass transfer processes. A series of forefront science questions on mass transfer are posed for research that relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements/approaches needed to characterize and model a mass transfer-dominated system. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the 300 Area IFRC Project. This plan is designed to be used exclusively by project staff.

  14. The 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge Quality Assurance Project Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a group of expert collaborators are using the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site 300 Area uranium plume within the footprint of the 300-FF-5 groundwater operable unit as a site for an Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC). The IFRC is entitled Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on the Hanford Site 300 Area Uranium Plume Project. The theme is investigation of multi-scale mass transfer processes. A series of forefront science questions on mass transfer are posed for research that relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements/approaches needed to characterize and model a mass transfer-dominated system. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the 300 Area IFRC Project. This plan is designed to be used exclusively by project staff

  15. Discoursive analysis and pragmatic metadiscourse in four sub-areas of Economics research articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción Hernández Guerra

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available English for Specific Purposes (ESP and English for Academic Purposes (EAP are two disciplines whose importance has been growing lately. This is due to the ever-increasing interest in the language that describes the most recent developments in varying disciplines and the need to communicate in and understand that language. One of the means for the spreading of those new developments in the different technologies is through research articles inspecialised journals. These impose certain rules that must be fulfilled by all researchers who want to see their papers published. Much literature has been written about this, covering most linguistic areas (see, for instance, Bazerman, 1988; Bhatia, 1993; Dudley-Evans, 1994; Fortanet, 2002. Many articles contrast different genres but rarely distinguish different sub-areas within a genre (Bridgman & Carlson, 1984; Malcolm, 1987; Hyland, 1988; Neff Van Aertselaer, 2006. In the present case, we will consider texts within the discipline of Economics. The aim of this paper is to show a structural, grammatical and metatextual analysis of ten articles recently published in very prestigious specialised publications, covering the most important areas of study in Economics. We conclude by making a contrastive rhetorical analysis of the four sub-genres analysed here. These are: Applied Economy, Quantitative Economy, Financial Economy, and Management and Business.

  16. Fundamental research in the area of high temperature fuel cells in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyomin, A.K.

    1996-04-01

    Research in the area of molten carbonate and solid oxide fuel cells has been conducted in Russia since the late 60`s. Institute of High Temperature Electrochemistry is the lead organisation in this area. Research in the area of materials used in fuel cells has allowed us to identify compositions of electrolytes, electrodes, current paths and transmitting, sealing and structural materials appropriate for long-term fuel cell applications. Studies of electrode processes resulted in better understanding of basic patterns of electrode reactions and in the development of a foundation for electrode structure optimization. We have developed methods to increase electrode activity levels that allowed us to reach current density levels of up to 1 amper/cm{sup 2}. Development of mathematical models of processes in high temperature fuel cells has allowed us to optimize their structure. The results of fundamental studies have been tested on laboratory mockups. MCFC mockups with up to 100 W capacity and SOFC mockups with up to 1 kW capacity have been manufactured and tested at IHTE. There are three SOFC structural options: tube, plate and modular.

  17. Advanced Offshore Wind Energy - Atlantic Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempton, Willett

    2015-11-04

    This project developed relationships among the lead institution, U of Delaware, wind industry participants from 11 companies, and two other universities in the region. The participating regional universities were University of Maryland and Old Dominion University. Research was carried out in six major areas: Analysis and documentation of extreme oceanic wind events & their impact on design parameters, calibration of corrosivity estimates measured on a coastal turbine, measurment and modeling of tower structures, measurement and modeling of the tribology of major drive components, and gearbox conditioning monitoring using acoustic sensors. The project also had several educational goals, including establishing a course in wind energy and training graduate students. Going beyond these goals, three new courses were developed, a graduate certificate program in wind power was developed and approved, and an exchange program in wind energy was established with Danish Technical University. Related to the installation of a Gamesa G90 turbine on campus and a Gamesa-UD research program established in part due to this award, several additional research projects have been carried out based on mutual industry-university interests, and funded by turbine revenues. This award and the Gamesa partnership have jointly led to seven graduate students receiving full safety and climb training, to become “research climbers” as part of their wind power training, and contributing to on-turbine research. As a result of the educational program, already six graduate students have taken jobs in the US wind industry.

  18. Bioremediation of crude oil waste contaminated soil using petrophilic consortium and Azotobacter sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fauzi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to determine the effect Petrophilic and Azotobacter sp. consortium on the rate of degradation of hydrocarbons, Azotobacter growth, and Petrophilic fungi growth in an Inceptisol contaminated with crude oil waste originating from Balongan refinery, one of Pertamina (Indonesia’s largest state-owned oil and gas company units in Indramayu – West Java. This study was conducted from March to April 2014 in the glasshouse of research station of the Faculty of Agriculture, Padjadjaran University at Ciparanje, Jatinangor District, Sumedang Regency of West Java. This study used a factorial completely randomized design with two treatments. The first treatment factor was Petrophilic microbes (A consisting of four levels (without treatment, 2% Petrophilic fungi, 2% Petrophilic bacteria, and the 2% Petrophilic consortium, and Azotobacter sp. The second treatment factor was Azotobacter sp. (B consisting of four levels (without treatment, 0.5%, Azotobacter sp., 1% Azotobacter sp., and 1.5% Azotobacter sp. The results demonstrated interaction between Petrophilic microbes and Azotobacter sp. towards hydrocarbon degradation rate, but no interaction was found towards the growth rate of Azotobacter sp. and Petrophilic fungi. Treatments of a1b3 (2% consortium of Petrophilic fungi with 1.5% Azotobacter sp. and a3b3 (2% Petrophilic consortium and 1.5% Azotobacter sp. had hydrocarbon degradation rate at 0.22 ppm/day for each treatment, showing the highest hydrocarbon degradation rate.

  19. Soybean after the consortium corn with tropical forages in the savannah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Maria de Paula Garcia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The biggest limitation to sustainable tillage in the Savannah region is the low biomass accumulation during autumn up to spring, due to low water availability and high temperatures characterizing these regions as having a warm and dry winter. The consortium of grains crops with tropical forages mainly of the genus Panicum and Urochloa is an alternative, to this situation. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the straw production of Panicum and Urochloa after consortium with corn in the crop-livestock integration system on the soybean crop irrigated in succession. The experiment was conducted at the Farm for Teaching, Research and Extension, Faculty of Engineering - UNESP, Ilha Solteira in an Oxisol in Savannah conditions, being in no-tillage for 8 years (previous corn crop. The experimental design was a randomized block with four replications and four treatments: Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania sown during the nitrogen fertilization (CTD of the corn; Panicum maximum cv. Mombasa sown during the nitrogen fertilization (CMD of the corn; Urochloa brizantha cv. Xaraés sown during the occasion of nitrogen fertilization (CBD of the corn; Urochloa ruziziensis cv. Comum sown during the nitrogen fertilization (CRD of the corn. After harvesting the corn and forages cuts, soybean was planted with seeds inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum (Turfy with 600,000 viable cells/seed, at distances of 0.45 m with 24 seeds-1 in the no tillage system (NTS. The height of the first pod, plant population and yield components of soybean (number of pods per plant, number of seeds per pod and mass of 100 grains and grain yield of soybean were not significantly influenced by the straws of forages. These results were found, probably because the area already has a history of tillage for 8 years since this system was stabilized in the area. Therefore, in this soil that was managed correctly, the straw production of the forage of genus Panicum and Urochloa does not

  20. Characteristics Research of Immersed and Waterlogged Subterranean River System of Reservoir Areas of Hydroelectric Stations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The karst immersion and waterlogging is one of the typical and the most harmful natural disasters in southern karst areas of China. It is threat to the local production and life for a long time. In recent years, due to the construction of more reservoirs, the disaster became serious. This article takes immersion and waterlogging of Banwer's subterranean rivers in Yantan reservoir area as an example, researches the daily rainfalls reflection to the water level of reservoir depression, discusses characteristics of immersion and waterlogging of the valley, analyzes the disaster index in detail, such as water level process, the highest water level, sensitive rainfall, original waterlogged rainfall and delayed day numbers etc., and provides the reference as a basis to the disaster analysis.

  1. Research on the Placement of the Ecological Shelter Zone in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, N.; Ruan, X.

    2011-12-01

    The Three Gorges Dam is built on the middle reaches of Yangtze River (Changjiang) in south-central China, which is the world's third longest river. The Three Gorges Reservoir Region (TGRR), including the entire inundated area and 19 administrative units (counties and cities) on both sides of the river, is regarded as an environmentally sensitive area. The total area of the TGRR is approximately 58000 km2. As the Three Gorges Dam fully operated, for the flood control, the water level should be kept in the range between 145 m and 175 m and the reservoir surface water area(over 1080 km2)at a water level of 175 m, with a length of 600 km. Many of cities, villages and farms have been submerged. Moreover, as a result of reservoir operation, the water-level alternation of the reservoir is opposite to the nature, which is low water level (145m) in summer and high water level (175m) in winter. The Hydro-Fluctuation Belt, with a height of 30m, will become a new pollution source due to the riparian being flooded and the submerged areas may still contain trace amounts of toxic or radioactive materials. The environmental impacts associated with large scale reservoir area often have significant negative impacts on the environment. It affects forest cover, species in the area, some endangered, water quality, increase the likelihood of earthquakes and mudslides in the area. To solve these problems, it is necessarily to construct the Ecological Shelter Zone (ESZ) along with the edge of the reservoir area. The function of the ESZ is similar to the riparian zone in reducing flood damage, improving water quality, decreasing the levels of the nonpoint source pollution load and soil erosion and rebuilding the migration routes of plant and wildlife. However, the research of the ESZ is mainly focused on rivers at field scale by now, lack of research method on reservoir at the watershed scale. As the special nature of the Three Gorges Reservoir, the construction of the ESZ in the TGRA is

  2. The Financing of the Michigan Library Consortium. Paper No. 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan Library Consortium, Detroit.

    Since the formal organization of the Michigan Library Consortium, its financial support has come through membership fees and a grant from the Michigan State Library from Title III funds. The financing of the consortium is already a complex operation and will become even more complex as new programs are undertaken, since funds have been accepted…

  3. Growth behind the Mirror: The Family Therapy Consortium's Group Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendorf, Donald J.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Charts the development of the Family Therapy Consortium, a group that provides supervision and continuing education in family therapy and explores the peer supervision process at work in the consortium. The focus is on individual and group development, which are seen as complementary aspects of the same growth process. (Author/NRB)

  4. Urban Consortium Energy Task Force - Year 21 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-04-01

    The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF), comprised of representatives of large cities and counties in the United States, is a subgroup of the Urban Consortium, an organization of the nation's largest cities and counties joined together to identify, develop and deploy innovative approaches and technological solutions to pressing urban issues.

  5. Borehole television surveys and acoustic televiewer logging at the National Hydrology Research Institute's hydrogeological research area in Chalk River, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of studies of the fracture distribution and fracture orientation encountered in 23 boreholes at the National Hydrology Research Institute's Hydrogeological Research Area in Chalk River. Borehole television camera and acoustic televiewer data were used to determine: the fracture distribution as a function of depth; the aperture distribution as a function of depth; and, the predominant fracture sets. Fracture frameworks of the rock mass were constructed based on these data. The rock mass was found to be moderately to well fractured. Many open fractures were detected in the CR-series boreholes, especially in the upper 70 m. Three interconnecting, highly fractured zones are intersected by the CR-series boreholes between elevations of 96.80 m and 56.56 m, 34.91 m and -22.42 m, and -56.56 m and -61.31 m, while two interconnecting fracture zones are encountered by the FS-series boreholes between elevations 103.89 m and 96.64 m, and 108.20 m and 95.08 m. The predominant fracture sets strike east-west, northwest and indeterminably subhorizontal. The predominant set of veins strikes to the south. The subsurface fracture patterns and vein patterns were found to be similar to those observed on surface outcrops

  6. Botanical reconnaissance of Big Run Bog Candidate Research Natural Area. Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzika, R.M.; Hunsucker, R.; DeMeo, T.

    1996-07-25

    To document the botanical diversity of the Big Run Bog candidate Research Natural Area on the Monongahela National Forest in West Virginia, a botanical survey was conducted in 1993-94. The survey identified 193 species of vascular plants in 118 genera and 52 families. Six species of rare vascular plants were found. Vascular plant families with the most species present were Cyperaceae (24), Asteraceae (23), Poaceae (16), and Ericaceae (14). For each taxon, family, species, habitat and estimated abundance are reported. Nonvascular plants totaled 87 species in 55 genera and 33 families.

  7. Research of vertical migration of radionuclides in the soil at testing 'Red forest' area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Researches of vertical migration of Chernobyl origin radionuclides at testing 'Red forest' rea in 5-km ChNPP-zone were carried out. The γ- and β- spectrometer measurements of soil samples were carried out using the anticompton spectrometer and a beta spectrometer. Presence of 60Co, 134, 137Cs, 154,155Eu, 241Am to depth of 30 cm in all soil cuts was fixed. The sites with sod-low-podzol sandy soils on alluvial sands contain 137Cs, 90Sr and 241Am to depth of 60 cm. The presence 243Am and 243Cm was found in the top layers of soils at territory of testing area.

  8. Research and development programme in the DEBENE-area for fast breeder material development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1964 a joint programme for the development of cladding and core structural materials for Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR) has been underway at the Research Centres in Belgium, Germany and Netherlands and with their industrial partners. Different organizations have contributed to this development in the DEBENE-area [Deutschland (FRG), Belgium, Netherlands], namely the Research Centres: Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe and CEN-SCK, Mol, and the industrial partners and Belgonucleaire, Brussel, and Interatom, Bensberg. At the starting point of this development several concepts for FBR's existed, steam cooled, gas cooled, and liquid sodium cooled versions. This was the reason for a relatively broad testing and development programme which took into account the following: (1) commercial austenitic stainless steels with high mechanical strength, (2) commercial nickel-based alloys especially for the purpose of steam cooled FBR's, (3) the development of a series of vanadium-based alloys, and (4) the introduction of dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys

  9. Functional consortium for denitrifying sulfide removal process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chuan [Harbin Inst. of Technology (CN). State Key Lab. of Water Resource and Environment (SKLWRE); Harbin Inst. of Technology (China). School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie [Harbin Inst. of Technology (CN). State Key Lab. of Water Resource and Environment (SKLWRE); Liu, Lihong [Harbin Inst. of Technology (China). School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering; Lee, Duu-Jong [Harbin Inst. of Technology (CN). State Key Lab. of Water Resource and Environment (SKLWRE); National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2010-03-15

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process simultaneously converts sulfide, nitrate, and chemical oxygen demand from industrial wastewaters to elemental sulfur, nitrogen gas, and carbon dioxide, respectively. This investigation utilizes a dilution-to-extinction approach at 10{sup -2} to 10{sup -6} dilutions to elucidate the correlation between the composition of the microbial community and the DSR performance. In the original suspension and in 10{sup -2} dilution, the strains Stenotrophomonas sp., Thauera sp., and Azoarcus sp. are the heterotrophic denitrifiers and the strains Paracoccus sp. and Pseudomonas sp. are the sulfide-oxidizing denitrifers. The 10{sup -4} dilution is identified as the functional consortium for the present DSR system, which comprises two functional strains, Stenotrophomonas sp. strain Paracoccus sp. At 10{sup -6} dilution, all DSR performance was lost. The functions of the constituent cells in the DSR granules were discussed based on data obtained using the dilution-to-extinction approach. (orig.)

  10. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The SWC represents a partnership between U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the NETL. This document serves as the twelfth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Drafting and releasing the 2007 Request for Proposals; (2) Securing a meeting facility, scheduling and drafting plans for the 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; (3) Conducting elections and announcing representatives for the four 2007-2008 Executive Council seats; (4) 2005 Final Project Reports; (5) Personal Digital Assistant Workshops scheduled; and (6) Communications and outreach.

  11. Results of research in the area of nanotechnologies and nanomaterials. Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KARPOV Alexey Ivanovich

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To popularize scientific achievements in construction the main results of Russian and foreign scientists’ research are published in the form of abstract. Within the investigation «Obtaining and research of physical and chemical properties of nanosized system nickel–copper» experimentally proved model of synthesis of nanosized powders of system nickel–copper based on the method of reduction of metal salts from water solution has been offered; optimal conditions for obtaining radiographic pure powders have been determined. The paper also deals with conditions for obtaining and phase composition of mixed nickel and copper hydroxides including those which are stable when stored in wet conditions. The copper hydroxide stabilization method has been proposed. The practical value of performed investigation «Research of electron structure functionalized carbon nanotubes by spectographic methods with synchronous radiation» is that it developed one of the areas of physical chemistry: complex research of electron structure of carbon nanotubes including functionalized ones was carried out by the method of experimental (spectographic with synchrotron radiation of different energies and theoretical methods; the general methods of the modern applied plasmonics aimed at identification of characteristics of defects formation in carbon nanosystems of low dimension have been developed.

  12. The Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) - A Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb Aldrich; Lois Arena; Dianne Griffiths; Srikanth Puttagunta; David Springer

    2010-12-31

    This final report summarizes the work conducted by the Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) (http://www.carb-swa.com/), one of the 'Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership' Industry Teams, for the period January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. The Building America Program (BAP) is part of the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program (BTP). The long term goal of the BAP is to develop cost effective, production ready systems in five major climate zones that will result in zero energy homes (ZEH) that produce as much energy as they use on an annual basis by 2020. CARB is led by Steven Winter Associates, Inc. with Davis Energy Group, Inc. (DEG), MaGrann Associates, and Johnson Research, LLC as team members. In partnership with our numerous builders and industry partners, work was performed in three primary areas - advanced systems research, prototype home development, and technical support for communities of high performance homes. Our advanced systems research work focuses on developing a better understanding of the installed performance of advanced technology systems when integrated in a whole-house scenario. Technology systems researched included: - High-R Wall Assemblies - Non-Ducted Air-Source Heat Pumps - Low-Load HVAC Systems - Solar Thermal Water Heating - Ventilation Systems - Cold-Climate Ground and Air Source Heat Pumps - Hot/Dry Climate Air-to-Water Heat Pump - Condensing Boilers - Evaporative condensers - Water Heating CARB continued to support several prototype home projects in the design and specification phase. These projects are located in all five program climate regions and most are targeting greater than 50% source energy savings over the Building America Benchmark home. CARB provided technical support and developed builder project case studies to be included in near-term Joule Milestone reports for the following community scale projects: - SBER Overlook at

  13. Community based needs assessment in an urban area; A participatory action research project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahari Saeid

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community assessment is a core function of public health. In such assessments, a commitment to community participation and empowerment is at the heart of the WHO European Healthy Cities Network, reflecting its origins in health for all and the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion. This study employs a participation and empowerment plan in order to conduct community assessment. Methods The method of participatory action research (PAR was used. The study was carried out in an area of high socio-economic deprivation in Ardabil, a city in the northwest of Iran, which is currently served by a branch of the Social Development Center (SDC. The steering committee of the project was formed by some university faculty members, health officials and delegates form Farhikhteh non-governmental organization and representatives from twelve blocks or districts of the community. Then, the representatives were trained and then conducted focus groups in their block. The focus group findings informed the development of the questionnaire. About six hundred households were surveyed and study questionnaires were completed either during face-to-face interviews by the research team (in case of illiteracy or via self-completion. The primary question for the residents was: 'what is the most important health problem in your community? Each health problem identified by the community was weighted based on the frequency it was selected on the survey, and steering committee perception of the problem's seriousness, urgency, solvability, and financial load. Results The main problems of the area appeared to be the asphalt problem, lack of easy access to medical centers, addiction among relatives and unemployment of youth. High participation rates of community members in the steering committee and survey suggest that the PAR approach was greatly appreciated by the community and that problems identified through this research truly reflect community opinion

  14. Research on the hydrogeological and geochemical conditions at the coastal area and submarine formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major concerns for the high-level radioactive waste disposal is the possibility of the radionuclides to reach biosphere by groundwater flow. Recent research results have shown that the fresh groundwater discharge from subsea formations are widespread phenomena, thus, it is necessary to evaluate the submarine groundwater discharge as possible pathways of contaminant discharge towards the biosphere. It is also important to unravel the groundwater flow and associated material transport at the coastal area and subsea formations. To better understand the groundwater flow processes and the submarine groundwater discharge, we have conducted the hydrological, hydrogeological, geochemical, and numerical modeling studies at the Kurobe alluvial fan and its offshore, Toyama Prefecture, Japan. In this report, the results of the following research activities are presented: 1) Development and application of a method to detect the locations of the submarine groundwater discharge. 2) Development and application of a method to collect uncontaminated groundwater samples from subsea formations. 3) Measurements of submarine groundwater discharge fluxes by automated seepage meter. 4) Hydrological and geochemical studies for groundwater flow at the coastal area. 5) Geochemical studies to understand sources of fresh submarine groundwater discharge. 6) Examination of groundwater flow and submarine groundwater discharge using methane concentration and carbon isotope ratio. 7) Numerical modeling studies for coastal groundwater flow system. (author)

  15. Regional groundwater flow in the Atikokan Research Area : simulation of 18O and 3H distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL is investigating a concept for disposing of nuclear fuel waste deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. As part of this investigation, we have performed a model simulation of regional groundwater flow in the Atikokan Research Area, a fractured plutonic rock environment of the Canadian Shield, and used the distribution of oxygen-18 (18O) and tritium (3H) in groundwater to test the model. At the first stage of model calibration, groundwater flow was simulated using a three-dimensional finite-element code, MOTIF, in conjunction with a conceptual framework model derived from field geological, geophysical and hydrogeological data. Hydraulic parameters (permeability and porosity) were systematically varied until simulated recharge rates to the water table compared favourably with estimated recharge rates based on stream flow analysis. At the second stage, vertical average linear groundwater velocities from the first stage of the calibration process were combined with conceptualized one-dimensional models of the system to generate depth concentration profiles of 18O and 3H. Recharge-, midline-and discharge area models of both the fracture zones and the rock mass were employed. The simulated profiles formed 'envelopes' around all field 18O and 3H data, indicating that the calibrated velocities used in the model are reasonable. The models demonstrate that the scatter of δ18O and 3H field data from the Atikokan Research Area is consistent with the groundwater flow model predictions and can be explained by the complexity arising from different hydraulic regimes (recharge, midline, discharge) and hydrogeologic environments (fracture zones, rock mass) of the regional flow system. 50 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Basic Research Firing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Basic Research Firing Facility is an indoor ballistic test facility that has recently transitioned from a customer-based facility to a dedicated basic research...

  17. Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Columbia River and groundwater well water sources are delivered to the Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL), where these resources are used to conduct research on fish...

  18. Mukilteo Research Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory ConsortiumResearch at the Mukilteo Research Station focuses on understanding the life cycle of marine species and the impacts of ecosystem stressors on anadromous and marine...

  19. Is there much variation in variation? Revisiting statistics of small area variation in health services research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibáñez Berta

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of Small Area Variation Analysis for policy-making contrasts with the scarcity of work on the validity of the statistics used in these studies. Our study aims at 1 determining whether variation in utilization rates between health areas is higher than would be expected by chance, 2 estimating the statistical power of the variation statistics; and 3 evaluating the ability of different statistics to compare the variability among different procedures regardless of their rates. Methods Parametric bootstrap techniques were used to derive the empirical distribution for each statistic under the hypothesis of homogeneity across areas. Non-parametric procedures were used to analyze the empirical distribution for the observed statistics and compare the results in six situations (low/medium/high utilization rates and low/high variability. A small scale simulation study was conducted to assess the capacity of each statistic to discriminate between different scenarios with different degrees of variation. Results Bootstrap techniques proved to be good at quantifying the difference between the null hypothesis and the variation observed in each situation, and to construct reliable tests and confidence intervals for each of the variation statistics analyzed. Although the good performance of Systematic Component of Variation (SCV, Empirical Bayes (EB statistic shows better behaviour under the null hypothesis, it is able to detect variability if present, it is not influenced by the procedure rate and it is best able to discriminate between different degrees of heterogeneity. Conclusion The EB statistics seems to be a good alternative to more conventional statistics used in small-area variation analysis in health service research because of its robustness.

  20. SARNET: Integrating Severe Accident Research in Europe - Safety Issues in the Source Term Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SARNET (Severe Accident Research Network) is a Network of Excellence of the EU 6. Framework Programme that integrates in a sustainable manner the research capabilities of about fifty European organisations to resolve important remaining uncertainties and safety issues concerning existing and future nuclear plant, especially water-cooled reactors, under hypothetical severe accident conditions. It emphasises integrating activities, spreading of excellence (including knowledge transfer) and jointly-executed research. This paper summarises the main results obtained at the middle of the current 4-year term, highlighting those concerning radioactive release to the environment. Integration is pursued through different methods: the ASTEC integral computer code for severe accident modelling, development of PSA level 2 methods, a means for definition, updating and resolution of safety issues, and development of a web database for storing experimental results. These activities are helped by an evolving Advanced Communication Tool, easing communication amongst partners. Concerning spreading of excellence, educational courses covering severe accident analysis methodology and level 2 PSA have been organised for early 2006. A text book on Severe Accident Phenomenology is being written. A mobility programme for students and young researchers has started. Results are disseminated mainly through open conference proceedings, with journal publications planned. The 1. European Review Meeting on Severe Accidents in November 2005 covered SARNET activities during its first 18 months. Jointly executed research activities concern key issues grouped in the Corium, Containment and Source Term areas. In Source Term, behaviour of the highly radio-toxic ruthenium under oxidising conditions, including air ingress, is investigated. Models are proposed for fuel and ruthenium oxidation. Experiments on transport of oxide ruthenium species are performed. Reactor scenario studies assist in defining

  1. Securing Canada’s Information-Technology Infrastructure: Context, Principles, and Focus Areas of Cybersecurity Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Craigen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the challenges of cybersecurity and ultimately the provision of a stable and resilient information-technology infrastructure for Canada and, more broadly, the world. We describe the context of current cybersecurity challenges by synthesizing key source material whose importance was informed by our own real-world experiences. Furthermore, we present a checklist of guiding principles to a unified response, complete with a set of action-oriented research topics that are linked to known operational limitations. The focus areas are used to drive the formulation of a unified and relevant research and experimental development program, thereby moving us towards a stable and resilient cyberinfrastructure. When cybersecurity is viewed as an inherently interdisciplinary problem of societal concern, we expect that fundamentally new research perspectives will emerge in direct response to domain-specific protection requirements for information-technology infrastructure. Purely technical responses to cybersecurity challenges will be inadequate because human factors are an inherent aspect of the problem. This article will interest managers and entrepreneurs. Senior management teams can assess new technical developments and product releases to fortify their current security solutions, while entrepreneurs can harness new opportunities to commercialize novel technology to solve a high-impact cybersecurity problem..

  2. Denitrifying microbial consortium in pasture soil is influenced by the intensity of cattle-induced stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čuhel, Jiří; Šimek, Miloslav

    Nijmegen: Radboud University Nijmegen, 2006. s. 38. [COST Action 856, Ecological Aspects of Denitrification, with Emphasis on Agriculture . Management Committee Meeting & Workshop, New developments in the N-cycle reactions in the first decade of the 21st century. 09.03.2006-11.03.2006, Nijmegen] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : denitrifying microbial consortium * pasture soil * intensity of cattle-induced stress Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  3. Effect of whey fermented by Enterococcus faeciumin consortium with Veilonella parvulaon ruminal bacteria in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Higor Fábio Carvalho Bezerra; Juliana Silva de Oliveira; Edson Mauro Santos; Augusto César de Queiroz; Hilário Cuquetto Mantovani; Ricardo Martins Araujo Pinho; Jurandir Queiroz de Oliveira Junior; Elizabete Cristina Batista da Costa

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of whey fermented by Enterococus faecium in consortium with Veilonella parvula in vitro on ruminal microorganisms in different substrates, with or without monensin. The first experiment was carried out in a completely randomized design, in a 6 × 3 factorial arrangement (six substrates × three whey levels) with two replicates. In experiment two, a 2 × 3 × 4 factorial arrangement (with and without monensin, three foods and four levels of...

  4. Determining client need in a multi-state fetal alcohol syndrome consortium: from training to practice

    OpenAIRE

    Haynes George; Dunnagan Tim; Christopher Suzanne; Stiff Lili

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background A multi-state consortium was developed in the US to conduct baseline data collection and intervention research on fetal alcohol syndrome. Each state employed support specialists whose job it was to reduce or eliminate alcohol consumption in women who were at high risk for drinking alcohol during their pregnancy. The purpose of this paper is to report how support specialists in three primarily rural/frontier states were trained to assess client need and how client need was ...

  5. Effect of Probiotic Consortium on the Local Inflammatory Process in Chronic Periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhanagul Khasenbekova; Saule Saduakhasova; Alexandr Gulayev; Almagul Kushugulova; Samat Kozhakhmetov; Gulnara Shakhabayeva; Indira Tynybayeva; Talgat Nurgozhin; Zhaxybay Zhumadilov

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Inflammatory periodontal disease is one of the major concerns of researchers and clinicians, because it can lead to tooth loss and an increased risk of systemic pathologies, even at the age of 35. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of gelatin-based probiotic consortium on the local and general factors of inflammation in rats with chronic periodontitis. Methods: The study object was a complex of probiotic bacteria based in an odourless 6% gelatin plate with ne...

  6. Renewable Generators' Consortium: ensuring a market for green electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project summary focuses on the objectives and key achievements of the Renewable Generators Consortium (RGC) which was established to help renewable energy projects under the Non-Fossil Fuel Obligation (NFFO) to continue to generate in the open liberated post-1998 electricity market. The background to the NFFO is traced, and the development of the Consortium, and the attitudes of generators and suppliers to the Consortium are discussed along with the advantages of collective negotiations through the RGC, the Heads of Terms negotiations, and the success of RGC which has demonstrated the demand for green electricity

  7. Tanks Focus Area Alternative Salt Processing Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, Harry D.

    2000-05-15

    In March 2000, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) requested the Tanks Focus Area (TFA)to assume management responsibility for the Salt Processing Project technology development program at Savannah River Site. The TFA was requested to conduct several activities, including review and revision of the technology development roadmaps, development of down-selection criteria, and preparation of a comprehensive Research and Development (R&D) Program Plan for three candidate cesium removal technologies, as well as the Alpha and strontium removal processes that must also be carried out. The three cesium removal candidate technologies are Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Non-Elutable Ion Exchange, Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX), and Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). This plan describes the technology development needs for each process that must be satisfied in order to reach a down-selection decision, as well as continuing technology development required to support conceptual design activities.

  8. Tanks Focus Area Alternative Salt Processing Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, Harry D.

    2000-11-30

    In March 2000, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) requested the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to assume management responsibility for the Salt Processing Project technology development program at Savannah River Site. The TFA was requested to conduct several activities, including review and revision of the technology development roadmaps, development of down-selection criteria, and preparation of a comprehensive Research and Development (R&D) Program Plan for three candidate cesium removal technologies, as well as the Alpha and strontium removal processes that must also be carried out. The three cesium removal candidate technologies are Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Non-Elutable Ion Exchange, Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX), and Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). This plan describes the technology development needs for each process that must be satisfied in order to reach a down-selection decision, as well as continuing technology development required to support conceptual design activities.

  9. Radiological mapping of the area around two research reactors in Islamabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents survey of gamma radiation exposure around Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH). PINSTECH hosts two research reactors, two isotope production plants and several radiochemistry laboratories. Dose measurement was performed in thirty villages around PINSTECH. The average outdoor absorbed dose rate in air was 59 ± 16 nGy h-1. The average annual outdoor dose rate due to terrestrial gamma-rays was 71.4 ± 20.0 μSv y-1. The annual collective effective dose equivalent was 415 man-Sv and the estimated excess life-time cancer risk was 7.3 × 10-4. The study revealed that inhabitants living in the area surrounding PINSTECH were radiologically safe. (author)

  10. Progress in the research and demonstration of Everglades periphyton-based stormwater treatment areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, J S; Knight, R L; Wenkert, L; Clarke, R; Gong, S

    2001-01-01

    The South Florida Water Management District (District) is conducting research focused on potential advanced treatment technologies to support reduction of phosphorus (P) loads in surface water entering the remaining Everglades. Periphyton-based stormwater treatment areas (PSTA) are one of the advanced treatment technologies being researched by the District. This detailed research and demonstration project is being conducted in two phases. Basic research in field-based mesocosm experiments was conducted during the first phase within the District's Everglades Nutrient Removal Project (ENR). Studies were conducted in 24 portable PSTA mesocosms and three of the south ENR test cells. Phase 1 studies addressed the effects of system substrate (shellrock, organic peat, or sand), water depth, hydraulic loading rate, vegetation presence, depth:width ratio, and inhibition of algal growth on total phosphorus removal performance of the PSTA mesocosms. A second phase of research is currently under way, during which PSTA feasibility will be evaluated further in four field-scale constructed mesocosms totaling about 2 ha, and follow up studies within the ENR test cells and portable mesocosms will be conducted to further investigate the effects of other inorganic substrates, shallow water depth, and velocity on treatment performance. Phase 1 monitoring has determined that periphyton-dominated communities can be established in constructed wetlands within 5 months. The algal component of these periphyton plant communities is characteristic of natural Everglades periphyton. High macrophyte densities resulted from use of peat soils in PSTA mesocosms, while shellrock and sand soils promoted more desirable sparse macrophyte stands. P removal rates under the conditions of this research were relatively high considering the low influent total P concentrations tested (average 23 microg/L). PSTA mesocosms on shellrock soils were able to attain long-term average outflow total P concentrations

  11. Consanguineous Marriages among Women in Bursa Nilufer Public Health Training and Research Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilufer Tavukcu

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM/BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate socio-demographic and fertility features, opinions on consanguinity, and the types of congenital disorders encountered in the babies of women in consanguineous marriages in the Nilufer Public Health Training and Research Area in the province of Bursa in northwest Turkey. METHODS: This case-control study was conducted between September 2005 and March 2006. The case group consisted of 393 women in consanguineous marriages in the Nilufer Public Health Training and Research Area; the control group consisted of 393 women of similar age living in the same neighborhoods but in non-consanguineous marriages. RESULTS: Women involved in a consanguineous marriage were on average younger than women in the control group. The mean numbers of pregnancies, births, stillbirths, and living and deceased babies were all significantly higher among the consanguineous marriages. When the sample and the control groups were compared, it was obtained that the women in the case group were socio-economically in a lower status statistically, by means of their husband’s and their own education and occupational status, than the women in the control group. The women in the case group were more likely to believe that consanguinity is not detrimental to a child’s health, and they approved of consanguineous marriages for their own children. These opinions were held despite there being a significantly higher incidence of congenital disorders among the children of the consanguineous marriages. CONCLUSION: Women there should be offered genetic counseling to help reduce the occurrence of children being born with congenital abnormalities. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(2.000: 107-112

  12. Consanguineous Marriages among Women in Bursa Nilufer Public Health Training and Research Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilufer Tavukcu

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM/BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate socio-demographic and fertility features, opinions on consanguinity, and the types of congenital disorders encountered in the babies of women in consanguineous marriages in the Nilufer Public Health Training and Research Area in the province of Bursa in northwest Turkey. METHODS: This case-control study was conducted between September 2005 and March 2006. The case group consisted of 393 women in consanguineous marriages in the Nilufer Public Health Training and Research Area; the control group consisted of 393 women of similar age living in the same neighborhoods but in non-consanguineous marriages. RESULTS: Women involved in a consanguineous marriage were on average younger than women in the control group. The mean numbers of pregnancies, births, stillbirths, and living and deceased babies were all significantly higher among the consanguineous marriages. When the sample and the control groups were compared, it was obtained that the women in the case group were socio-economically in a lower status statistically, by means of their husband’s and their own education and occupational status, than the women in the control group. The women in the case group were more likely to believe that consanguinity is not detrimental to a child’s health, and they approved of consanguineous marriages for their own children. These opinions were held despite there being a significantly higher incidence of congenital disorders among the children of the consanguineous marriages. CONCLUSION: Women there should be offered genetic counseling to help reduce the occurrence of children being born with congenital abnormalities. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2008; 7(2: 107-112

  13. Characterization of organics in Whiteshell research area groundwater and the implications for radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naturally occurring organics in groundwaters of the Whiteshell Research Area (WRA) of southern Manitoba were investigated to assess their potential role in radionuclide transport within granite fractures of the Canadian Shield. A survey of dissolved organic carbon concentrations, carried out to determine the variability in the organic content of these groundwaters, showed average concentrations of 0.8 ±0.1 mg/L for Fracture Zone 2, 0.8 ± 0.4 mg/L for near-vertical fractures and 2.3 ± 0.8 mg/L for deeper saline groundwater. The dissolved organic carbon consisted mainly of hydrophilic neutral compounds (60 to 75%), and hydrophobic and hydrophilic acids (23 to 39%), along with very small amounts of hydrophobic bases and neutrals, and hydrophilic bases. Significant contamination from drilling operations and plastics, mostly in the form of hydrophobic neutrals, was observed in some samples. These compounds would not contribute to radionuclide migration in a natural system and are not included in the assessment of the organic complexing capacity of these groundwaters. Based on groundwater concentrations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic acids and on the measured carboxylic functional group content of these acids, the average complexing capacity of natural organics in Whiteshell Research Area groundwaters was calculated to be 2.9 x 10(-6) eq/L. The ability of these organics to complex radionuclides was tested using conditional stability constants from the literature for humic complex formation with Am(III), Th(IV), and U(VI). The chemistry of U(VI) was predicted to be dominated by inorganic complexes and not significantly affected by organics. The literature contains a wide range in values of stability constants for Am(III) and Th(TV) complexes with humics. The aqueous chemistry of Am(III) and Th(VI) could be affected by complexation with natural organics if the higher stability constant values are valid for WRA groundwaters. (UK)

  14. Climate change in the Carpathian-Balkan Area. Advancing research and cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel MINDRESCU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Carpathian Mountains are considered to be one of Europe’s last “wilderness” areas, but are nevertheless under heavy pressure from human activities. Examples range from large-scale activities (e.g. metal and coal mining and ecological disasters (e.g. tailing dam failures in the Toroiaga and Baia Mare areas to cross-border pollution (e.g. Chernobyl nuclear accident. The current political thrust for economic development is accelerating the pace of industrial activities, exploitation of natural resources and tourism. Romania has just recently been integrated into the European Union and many community-based projects were initiated to evaluate problems related to climatic and anthropogenic impacts.The diversity of landforms that characterize the Carpathian region encompassing mountain ranges and large spans of adjacent lowlands and the dynamic interplay between North Atlantic, continental, and Mediterranean atmospheric circulation patterns in southeastern Europe, have resulted in extremely fragmented habitats and exceptional biodiversity (Veres and Mindrescu, 2013. However, the Carpathian Mountains remain the least studied mountain environment in Europe, as reflected for example by the low number of well-dated and high-resolution paleorecords (e.g. Buczkó et al. 2009. Rose et al. (2009 published a pollution history study from a lake in the Retezat Mountains at the western extremity of the Southern Carpathians, but no paleoenvironmental studies exist for the rest of the mountain range, despite the abundance of suitable sites (Akinyemi et al., 2013.An interdisciplinary approach to geoscience is particularly important in this vast research field (geosciences, as innovative science is increasingly stimulated by studies that cross disciplinary boundaries and thus benefit from multiple research methods and viewpoints. Grasping this concept has led us to encourage interdisciplinary cooperation by creating “meeting places” where geoscience

  15. SARNET. Severe Accident Research Network - key issues in the area of source term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About fifty European organisations integrate in SARNET (Network of Excellence of the EU 6th Framework Programme) their research capacities in resolve better the most important remaining uncertainties and safety issues concerning existing and future Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) under hypothetical Severe Accident (SA) conditions. Wishing to maintain a long-lasting cooperation, they conduct three types of activities: integrating activities, spreading of excellence and jointly executed research. This paper summarises the main results obtained by the network after the first year, giving more prominence to those from jointly executed research in the Source Term area. Integrating activities have been performed through different means: the ASTEC integral computer code for severe accident transient modelling, through development of PSA2 methodologies, through the setting of a structure for definition of evolving R and D priorities and through the development of a web-network of data bases that hosts experimental data. Such activities have been facilitated by the development of an Advanced Communication Tool. Concerning spreading of excellence, educational courses covering Severe Accident Analysis Methodology and Level 2 PSA have been set up, to be given in early 2006. A detailed text book on Severe Accident Phenomenology has been designed and agreed amongst SARNET members. A mobility programme for students and young researchers is being developed, some detachments are already completed or in progress, and examples are quoted. Jointly executed research activities concern key issues grouped in the Corium, Containment and Source Term areas. In Source Term, behaviour of the highly radio-toxic ruthenium under oxidising conditions (like air ingress) for HBU and MOX fuel has been investigated. First modelling proposals for ASTEC have been made for oxidation of fuel and of ruthenium. Experiments on transport of highly volatile oxide ruthenium species have been performed. Reactor

  16. Problem areas and research needs on radiation protection in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards has been assigned by Congress the responsibility to prepare an annual review of the reactor safety research program of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The first Committee report on this subject was published in December, 1977, and a second is under preparation. Among the many topics considered were the evaluation and control of occupational radiation exposures at commercial nuclear power plants. Areas relative to exposure evaluation that have been identified as needing attention at the present time include improved techniques for monitoring occupational neutron exposures, better data collection and analysis with respect to internally deposited radionuclides, and an up-grading in quality control procedures in the manufacture of radiation monitoring instruments. Areas relative to exposure control that have been identified as needing attention include the development of additional design and manufacturing approaches for preventing the production and buildup of key radionuclides within reactor cooling systems; the development and testing of techniques for removing those radionuclides which do accumulate in the system; the application of risk/benefit assessments to procedures for the maintenance, repair, modification, replacement, and disposal of major nuclear power plant components, such as steam generators; and the development of design features that would facilitate decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Also in need of further development are procedures for conducting cost/benefit assessments of the value of increased inplant inspections and further recycling and reuse of waste effluents. (author)

  17. The Tennessee Mouse Genome Consortium: Identification of ocular mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonski, Monica M. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Wang, Xiaofei [ORNL; Lu, Lu [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Miller, Darla R [ORNL; Rinchik, Eugene M [ORNL; Williams, Robert [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Goldowitz, Daniel [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis

    2005-06-01

    The Tennessee Mouse Genome Consortium (TMGC) is in its fifth year of a ethylnitrosourea (ENU)-based mutagenesis screen to detect recessive mutations that affect the eye and brain. Each pedigree is tested by various phenotyping domains including the eye, neurohistology, behavior, aging, ethanol, drug, social behavior, auditory, and epilepsy domains. The utilization of a highly efficient breeding protocol and coordination of various universities across Tennessee makes it possible for mice with ENU-induced mutations to be evaluated by nine distinct phenotyping domains within this large-scale project known as the TMGC. Our goal is to create mutant lines that model human diseases and disease syndromes and to make the mutant mice available to the scientific research community. Within the eye domain, mice are screened for anterior and posterior segment abnormalities using slit-lamp biomicroscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy, fundus photography, eye weight, histology, and immunohistochemistry. As of January 2005, we have screened 958 pedigrees and 4800 mice, excluding those used in mapping studies. We have thus far identified seven pedigrees with primary ocular abnormalities. Six of the mutant pedigrees have retinal or subretinal aberrations, while the remaining pedigree presents with an abnormal eye size. Continued characterization of these mutant mice should in most cases lead to the identification of the mutated gene, as well as provide insight into the function of each gene. Mice from each of these pedigrees of mutant mice are available for distribution to researchers for independent study.

  18. Turning soil survey data into digital soil maps in the Energy Region Eger Research Model Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pásztor, László; Dobos, Anna; Kürti, Lívia; Takács, Katalin; Laborczi, Annamária

    2015-04-01

    Agria-Innoregion Knowledge Centre of the Eszterházy Károly College has carried out targeted basic researches in the field of renewable energy sources and climate change in the framework of TÁMOP-4.2.2.A-11/1/KONV project. The project has covered certain issues, which require the specific knowledge of the soil cover; for example: (i) investigation of quantitative and qualitative characteristics of natural and landscape resources; (ii) determination of local amount and characteristics of renewable energy sources; (iii) natural/environmental risk analysis by surveying the risk factors. The Energy Region Eger Research Model Area consists of 23 villages and is located in North-Hungary, at the Western part of Bükkalja. Bükkalja is a pediment surface with erosional valleys and dense river network. The diverse morphology of this area results diversity in soil types and soil properties as well. There was large-scale (1:10,000 and 1:25,000 scale) soil mappings in this area in the 1960's and 1970's which provided soil maps, but with reduced spatial coverage and not with fully functional thematics. To achive the recent tasks (like planning suitable/optimal land-use system, estimating biomass production and development of agricultural and ecomonic systems in terms of sustainable regional development) new survey was planned and carried out by the staff of the College. To map the soils in the study area 10 to 22 soil profiles were uncovered per settlement in 2013 and 2014. Field work was carried out according to the FAO Guidelines for Soil Description and WRB soil classification system was used for naming soils. According to the general goal of soil mapping the survey data had to be spatially extended to regionalize the collected thematic local knowledge related to soil cover. Firstly three thematic maps were compiled by digital soil mapping methods: thickness of topsoil, genetic soil type and rate of surface erosion. High resolution digital elevation model, Earth

  19. Astroparticle Physics European Consortium Town Meeting Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The Astroparticle Physics European Consortium (APPEC) invites you to a town meeting at the Grand Amphithéatre de Sorbonne in Paris on the 6th and 7th April 2016 to discuss an update of the 2011 APPEC Astroparticle Physics roadmap, to be published in September 2016. In 2014 APPEC decided to launch an update of the 2011 Roadmap, transforming it to a “resource aware” roadmap. The intention was to gauge the financial impact of the beginnings of operation of the large global scale observatories put forward in the previous roadmap and to examine the possibilities of international coordination of future global initiatives. The APPEC Scientific Advisory Committee examined the field and prepared a set of recommendations. Based on these recommendations, the APPEC General Assembly drafted a set of “considerations” to be published by end of February 2016 and be debated in an open dialogue with the community, through the web page but primarily at the town meeting of 6-7 April. Based on this debate the final re...

  20. Strategy for research, development and demonstration within the area of energy; Strategi for forskning, udvikling og demonstration pae energiomraedet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-04-15

    The Danish Advisory Energy Research Committee advises the Danish Energy Authority on strategies, frames and priorities as regards energy research, technological development and demonstration. This report presents the Danish Advisory Energy Research Committee's suggestion for a strategy for the joint research, development and demonstration effort within the area of energy. The main messages are firstly, that the efforts for demonstration of technologies, energy systems and concepts are targeted and upgraded. Secondly, the Committee focuses on research aimed at consortia of business enterprises and research institutions and on larger co-financed projects with fairly wide scopes. Thirdly, growth and market potentials are discussed. (BA)

  1. Consortium-Based Genetic Studies of Kawasaki Disease in Korea: Korean Kawasaki Disease Genetics Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Keuk; Hong, Young Mi; Jang, Gi Young; Yun, Sin Weon; Yu, Jeong Jin; Yoon, Kyung Lim; Lee, Kyung-Yil; Kil, Hong-Rang

    2015-11-01

    In order to perform large-scale genetic studies of Kawasaki disease (KD) in Korea, the Korean Kawasaki Disease Genetics Consortium (KKDGC) was formed in 2008 with 10 hospitals. Since the establishment of KKDGC, there has been a collection of clinical data from a total of 1198 patients, and approximately 5 mL of blood samples per patient (for genomic deoxyribonucleic acid and plasma isolation), using a standard clinical data collection form and a nation-wide networking system for blood sample pick-up. In the clinical risk factor analysis using the collected clinical data of 478 KD patients, it was found that incomplete KD type, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) non-responsiveness, and long febrile days are major risk factors for coronary artery lesions development, whereas low serum albumin concentration is an independent risk factor for IVIG non-responsiveness. In addition, we identified a KD susceptibility locus at 1p31, a coronary artery aneurysm locus (KCNN2 gene), and the causal variant in the C-reactive protein (CRP) promoter region, as determining the increased CRP levels in KD patients, by means of genome-wide association studies. Currently, this consortium is continually collecting more clinical data and genomic samples to identify the clinical and genetic risk factors via a single nucleotide polymorphism chip and exome sequencing, as well as collaborating with several international KD genetics teams. The consortium-based approach for genetic studies of KD in Korea will be a very effective way to understand the unknown etiology and causal mechanism of KD, which may be affected by multiple genes and environmental factors. PMID:26617644

  2. Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program (IDCRP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Our mission is to conduct infectious disease clinical research of importance to the military through a unique, adaptive, and collaborative network, to inform health...

  3. Accelerator Center for Energy Research (ACER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Accelerator Center for Energy Research (ACER) exploits radiation chemistry techniques to study chemical reactions (and other phenomena) by subjecting samples to...

  4. Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) is dedicated to understanding the problems of global climate change and their potential solutions. The Institute...

  5. Combustion & Laser Diagnostics Research Complex (CLDRC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Combustion and Laser Diagnostics Research Complex (CLRDC) supports the experimental and computational study of fundamental combustion phenomena to...

  6. Building Technologies Research and Integration Center (BTRIC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Building Technologies Research and Integration Center (BTRIC), in the Energy and Transportation Science Division (ETSD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL),...

  7. U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Vision: Leading the world in integrated dairy forage systems research. Mission: Providing dairy industry solutions for food security, environmental sustainability,...

  8. U.S. DAIRY FORAGE RESEARCH CENTER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Vision: Leading the world in integrated dairy forage systems research. Mission: Providing dairy industry solutions for food security, environmental sustainability,...

  9. Consortium NCS/GNS: Disposal of spent nuclear fuel from the DKFZ (Heidelberg, Germany)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Before the decommissioning of the TRIGA HD II reactor of the 'Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum' in Heidelberg (DKFZ) the spent nuclear fuel (126 TRIGA- F/A) had to be discharged from the reactor and shipped in 2001 to the United States. The Consortium NCS/GNS together with the DKFZ carried out this task including the following essential details: Implementation of structural measures inside the reactor building. Development and fabrication of loading units for the FIA. Development and fabrication of a transfer system for the loading units. Obtaining new German and US certifications for the casks. Loading of the casks. Shipment of the casks from DKFZ to the United States by road and sea. The successful completion of this task once again proved the operational experience of the Consortium NCS/GNS which will be useful for further worldwide shipments of spent nuclear fuel from research reactors. e.g. shipments from Europe, South America and Australia to the United States and France. (author)

  10. Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium collaborates on epidemiologic studies to address the high burden of prostate cancer and to understand the causes of etiology and outcomes among men of African ancestry.

  11. Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium (E2C2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium studies the etiology of this common cancer and build on resources from existing studies by combining data across studies in order to advance the understanding of the etiology of this disease.

  12. Kinetics and characteristics of phenanthrene degradation by a microbial consortium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jin; Xu Hongke; An Mingquan; Yan Guiwen

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics and characteristics of phenanthrene degradation by a microbial consortium W4 isolated from Henan Oilfield were investigated. The degradation percentage of solid phenanthrene at 200 mg/L in liquid medium after 6 days of incubation was higher than 95% under the condition of 37 ℃ and 120 r/min by this microbial consortium. The degradation of phenanthrene could be fitted to a first-order kinetic model with the half-life of 1.25 days. The optimum conditions for degradation of phenanthrene by consortium W4 were as follows: temperature about 37 ℃, pH from 6.0 to 7.0 and salinity about 8.0 g/L.It was concluded that microbial consortium W4 might degrade phenanthrene via both salicylic acid and o-phthalic acid pathways by analyzing products with GC-MS.

  13. Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium collaborates with three genomic facilities, epidemiologists, population geneticists, and biostatisticians from multiple institutions to study hormone-related gene variants and environmental factors in breast and prostate cancers.

  14. Nanotechnology for social needs: contributions from Latin American research in the areas of health, energy and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews, based on data from scientific publications and research groups, the state of the art of nanotechnology research applied to the areas of medicine, energy and water in Latin America. Such areas have been considered as particularly relevant in order to meet the social needs of the developing countries. It is shown that the countries in the region have incorporated these areas to their nanotechnology agendas and several countries have increasing research capacities. However, such capacities are concentrated in Brazil and Mexico, while the regional cooperation networks are still weak. Although the research topics tend to align with relevant social issues, there are still a number of challenges so as the results of such investigations may be effectively reflected in quality of life improvements; one of them is that many publications and research topics are on basic science, which makes it difficult to evaluate their potential application field

  15. Nanotechnology for social needs: contributions from Latin American research in the areas of health, energy and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Invernizzi, Noela, E-mail: noela@ufpr.br; Foladori, Guillermo; Robles-Belmont, Eduardo; Záyago Lau, Edgar; Figueroa, Edgar Arteaga; Bagattolli, Carolina; Carrozza, Tomás Javier; Chiancone, Adriana; Urquijo, William [Universidade Federal do Paraná, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Políticas Públicas (Brazil)

    2015-05-15

    This paper reviews, based on data from scientific publications and research groups, the state of the art of nanotechnology research applied to the areas of medicine, energy and water in Latin America. Such areas have been considered as particularly relevant in order to meet the social needs of the developing countries. It is shown that the countries in the region have incorporated these areas to their nanotechnology agendas and several countries have increasing research capacities. However, such capacities are concentrated in Brazil and Mexico, while the regional cooperation networks are still weak. Although the research topics tend to align with relevant social issues, there are still a number of challenges so as the results of such investigations may be effectively reflected in quality of life improvements; one of them is that many publications and research topics are on basic science, which makes it difficult to evaluate their potential application field.

  16. A Research on Efficiency of Sport Areas in Çankırı City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Pekin Timur Ö.B. Timur C. Kuş Şahin C. Dağıstanlıoğlu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study; existed conditions, general features, planning principles and standarts of the sport areas in Çankırı provincial center were examined and physical efficiency of these areas were evaluated in terms of field, facility capacity, facility size, facility type, and facility number, also service areas. Service areas were determined by using Geographical Information System (GIS. The total areas of the sport areas in the provincial center were found as 161 decares, for accessing to planning standarts of sport area, it would be determined that needed 241 decares sport areas which has been 28 new sport facilities in the provincial center. As a result, according to planning criteria of sport areas, the sport areas in Çankırı provincial center were found insufficiently in terms of the facility type and number, facility capacity and size and service area and the number of sport area. In addition, it was determined that most of the existing sport areas were neglected by professional maintance and these areas were planned without any considerations with green areas. According to these result, accurate proposal were presented to be sufficient and successful in existing and future sport areas in the provincial center.

  17. Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium: Overview, Progress and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Amy L; Ball, Karen L; Clancy, Marianne; Comi, Anne M; Faughnan, Marie E; Gopal-Srivastava, Rashmi; Jacobs, Thomas P; Kim, Helen; Krischer, Jeffrey; Marchuk, Douglas A; McCulloch, Charles E; Morrison, Leslie; Moses, Marsha; Moy, Claudia S; Pawlikowska, Ludmilla; Young, William L

    2013-04-01

    Brain vascular malformations are resource-intensive to manage effectively, are associated with serious neurological morbidity, lack specific medical therapies, and have no validated biomarkers for disease severity and progression. Investigators have tended to work in "research silos" with suboptimal cross-communication. We present here a paradigm for interdisciplinary collaboration to facilitate rare disease research. The Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium (BVMC) is a multidisciplinary, inter-institutional group of investigators, one of 17 consortia in the Office of Rare Disease Research Rare Disease Clinical Research Network (RDCRN). The diseases under study are: familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformations type 1, common Hispanic mutation (CCM1-CHM); Sturge-Weber Syndrome (SWS); and brain arteriovenous malformation in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Each project is developing biomarkers for disease progression and severity, and has established scalable, relational databases for observational and longitudinal studies that are stored centrally by the RDCRN Data Management and Coordinating Center. Patient Support Organizations (PSOs) are a key RDCRN component in the recruitment and support of participants. The BVMC PSOs include Angioma Alliance, Sturge Weber Foundation, and HHT Foundation International. Our networks of clinical centers of excellence in SWS and HHT, as well as our PSOs, have enhanced BVMC patient recruitment. The BVMC provides unique and valuable resources to the clinical neurovascular community, and recently reported findings are reviewed. Future planned studies will apply successful approaches and insights across the three projects to leverage the combined resources of the BVMC and RDCRN in advancing new biomarkers and treatment strategies for patients with vascular malformations. PMID:25221778

  18. 2004-2005 International Whaling Commission-Southern Ocean Whale and Ecosystem Research (IWC-SOWER) Cruise, Area III

    OpenAIRE

    Ensor, P.; Findlay, K.; Friedrichsen, G.; Hirose, K.; Komiya, H; Morse, L; Olson, P; Sekiguchi, K.; Van Waerebeek, K.; Yoshimura, I

    2005-01-01

    We conducted the 27th annual IWC-SOWER (formerly IDCR) Cruise in Area III (000°-070°E) aboard the Japanese Research Vessels Shonan Maru and Shonan Maru No.2. The 65-day cruise departed Cape Town, South Africa on 4 January 2005 and returned to Fremantle, Australia on 9 March 2005. After transiting to the study area, we carried out a minke whale survey and several research experiments from 12 January to 25 February. A systematic minke whale survey was conducted in Area IIIW (000°-035°E) from 12...

  19. Enrichment strategy to select functional consortium from mixed cultures: Consortium from rumen liquor for simultaneous cellulose degradation and hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Aijie; Ren, Nanqi [State Key Lab of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Gao, Lingfang; Xu, Jifei; Liu, Chong; Lee, Duu-Jong [School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Strain isolation using conventional roll tube/plating technique is time consuming and is able to culture in vitro only a small fraction of existing microbes in a natural microflora. This paper proposed a simple and rapid method to select the as-simple-as-possible biological consortium by serially diluting the original mixed culture. The diluted which remains, while the one diluted in serial loses the target function, is defined as the functional consortium of the original mixed culture. Since the microbial structure and the reaction pathway incorporated with the functional consortium is much simpler than its original mother liquor, detailed analysis on the strain interaction is possible without the risk of losing key functional strains as often caused from conventional isolation method. The rumen liquor that can degrade cellulose and produce hydrogen is used as a demonstration example. A ''rumen cellulose-degrading bacterial consortium'' (RCBC) was identified using the proposed enrichment strategy. (author)

  20. Research report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SURRC, opened in 1963 in the grounds of the National Engineering Laboratory, East Kilbride, was originally established in order to provide the Scottish Universities with the research and teaching facilities associated with a research reactor. Colleagues from the consortium universities now have access to a range of state-of-the-art equipment suitable for research in the broad areas of nuclear, isotopic and earth sciences. The research activities reported for 1992 fall into eleven categories; environmental radioactivity and nuclear geochemistry including radiocarbon dating, neutron activation analysis and tracer studies, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, body composition studies, stable isotopes in medical and biological science, luminescence dating and dosimetry, radiation effects in electrical insulation gamma ray irradiation processes, radiogenic isotopes in geology, stable isotope geochemistry and laser microprobe mass spectrometry for geology. Details of staffing, teaching activities and reactor operation are also given. (author)

  1. Research highlights : study of the noise generated by heat pumps in residential areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rising energy costs and aggressive marketing played a major role in the substantial increase in the number of domestic heat pumps installed. As a rule, heat pumps are connected to the heating and ventilation systems on the outside of the house. Whether the heat pump is equipped with an integrated compressor or not, it creates noise. The noise is generated by the powerful fan designed to cool all the coils, and also by the compressor itself and the circulation of the refrigerant gas. Some municipalities received so many complaints on this topic that they are considering adopting noise bylaws. The first objective of the research undertaken by Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation on heat pumps in residential areas was to analyze the noise pollution mode of commonly used heat pumps. A study of a simple noise reduction device was performed, and the extent to which it should be used. Finally, there had to be no reduction of the thermal capacities of the pumps. Phase 1 of the study took place between May and August 1990, in the area of Quebec City. A total of 125 heat pumps were identified. The four major manufacturers were Trane, Carrier, York, and Lennox. Initial sound pressure levels measurements were made at one metre from the unit, for 80 such units, respecting the ratio by brands in the sample of 125. A detailed global noise measurement determined the sound power of each pump. A detailed muffler feasibility study was then conducted, using a Trane heat pump. The results of the study indicated that heat pumps were a major source of continuous noise in low and mid-density areas. It was discovered that a noise attenuation device could always be built around heat pumps, which needed to be installed as close as possible to the casing of the heat pump. It is not possible to design a device to fit each and every heat pump, the design is specific to the dimensions and characteristics of each model of heat pump. The thermal performance of the pumps will not be affected by

  2. Lithology, fracture intensity, and fracture filling of drill core from Chalk River research area, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1977, 1978, and 1979, nine inclined cored boreholes, ranging in length from 113 to 704 m, were drilled in the Chalk River Research Area in order to define the geological subsurface characteristics of the rock mass at several selected test areas. A total of 2,458 metres of NQ-3 and HQ-3 core was obtained from the nine boreholes. Orthogneiss was the most predominant rock type intersected by the boreholes. Pyroxenite, amphibolite, metagabbro and dykes of diabase, pegmatite and aplite were also encountered. The crosscutting relationships and textures within the rocks indicate that the relative ages of the rock units, from youngest to oldest, are diabase; aplite and pegmatite dykes with no defined fabric; pyroxenite; meta-ferrogabbro; amphibolite; aplite and pegmatite dykes and pegmatite pods with a defined fabric; and orthogneiss. Textural characteristics and mineral assemblages indicate that the orthogneisses in the Chalk River Area are a product of regional, medium to high-grade metamorphism and belong to the upper amphibilite to granulite facies. A total of 35,597 fractures (an average of 14.5 fractures per metre) was observed in the core. Brecciated zones and open fractures were noted in the core from all of the boreholes, and major faults were identified in four of the nine boreholes. Nearly all of the fractures have a thickness between 0.4 and 1.2 mm and contain one or more types of filling. Chlorite and calcite are the most common types of filling. Epidote, hematite, clays, sulphides, talc, sericite, and rock fragments also occur in the fractures. The crosscutting relationships between fractures and the sequence of filling layers within the fractures indicate that several episodes of fracturing have occurred and that fractures containing more than one filling have probably been reactivated. A comparison of the geological logs from one of the boreholes with natural gamma, neutron-neutron and magnetic susceptibility logs indicates that certain rock types and

  3. Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium: Inventory of existing programs. Appendix 13.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-21

    This is the ``first effort`` to prepare an inventory of existing educational programs, focused primarily on inner-city youth, in operation in Washington, DC, Baltimore, and Philadelphia. The purpose of the inventory is to identify existing programs which could be augmented, adapted, or otherwise strengthened to help fulfil the mission of the Department of Energy-sponsored Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium, the mission of which is to recruit and retain inner-city youth to pursue careers in energy-related scientific and technical areas and in environmental restoration and waste management. The Consortium does not want to ``reinvent the wheel`` and all of its members need to learn what others are doing. Each of the 30 participating academic institutions was invited to submit as many program descriptions as they wished. Due to the summer holidays, or because they did not believe than they were carrying out programs relevant to the mission of the Consortium, some institutions did not submit any program descriptions. In addition, several industries, governmental agencies, and not-for-profit institutions were invited to submit program descriptions.

  4. The Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast: A NOAA RISA Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast, or CCRUN, was funded in October 2010 under NOAA's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) program to serve stakeholder needs in assessing and managing risks from climate variability and change. It is currently also the only RISA team with a principal focus on climate change adaptation in urban settings. While CCRUN's initial focus is on the major cities of the urban Northeast corridor (Philadelphia, New York and Boston), its work will ultimately expand to cover small and medium-sized cities in the relevant portions of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania as well, so that local needs for targeted climate-risk information can be served in a coordinated way. CCRUN is designed to address the complex challenges that are associated with densely populated, highly interconnected urban areas, including such as urban heat island effects; poor air quality; intense coastal development, and multifunctional settlement along inland waterways; complex overlapping institutional jurisdictions; integrated infrastructure systems; and highly diverse, and in some cases, fragile socio-economic communities. These challenges can best be addressed by the stakeholder-driven interdisciplinary approach taken by the CCRUN RISA team. As an important added benefit, the research accomplishments and lessons learned through stakeholder engagement will provide a foundation for managing climate risks in other urban areas in the United States. CCRUN's initial projects are focused in three broad sectors: Water, Coasts, and Health. Research in each of these sectors is linked through the cross-cutting themes of climate change and community vulnerability, the latter of which is especially important in considerations of environmental justice and equity. CCRUN's stakeholder-driven approach to research can therefore support investigations of the impacts of a changing climate, population growth, and

  5. The National Astronomy Consortium - An Adaptable Model for OAD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Kartik

    2015-08-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) is a program led by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and Associated Universities Inc., (AUI) in partnership with the National Society of Black Physicists (NSBP), and a number of minority and majority universities to increase the numbers of students from underrepresented groups and those otherwise overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline into STEM or STEM-related careers. The seed for the NAC was a partnership between NRAO and Howard University which began with an exchange of a few summer students five years ago. Since then the NAC has grown tremendously. Today the NAC aims to host between 4 to 5 cohorts nationally in an innovative model in which the students are mentored throughout the year with multiple mentors and peer mentoring, continued engagement in research and professional development / career training throughout the academic year and throughout their careers.The NAC model has already shown success and is a very promising and innovative model for increasing participation of young people in STEM and STEM-related careers. I will discuss how this model could be adapted in various countries at all levels of education.

  6. Researches of Optimum Leaf Area Index Dynamicmodels for Rape(brassica Napus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hongxin; Zhang, Chunlei; Li, Guangming; Zhang, Baojun; Zhao, Suolao; Wang, Baoqing; Jin, Zhiqing; Zhu, Dawei; Zhu, Juanjuan; Wei, Xiufang

    The objectives of developing optimum leaf area index dynamic models for rape (OLAIDM) was to develop Rape Cultivation Simulation-Optimization- Decision Making System(Rape-CSODS) , to design its planting , to regulate and control its growth and development, and to fulfill its high yield, good quality, high benefits and standard production eventually. The OLAIDM were developed based on field experiments with 3 cultivars, 6 sowing dates, 2 types of plant pattern and 4 sites from 2002 to 2007 in middle and lower valley of Yangtze river in China and relative data from references of rape researches, employed ideas of R/WCSODS (Rice/Wheat Cultivation Simulation- Optimization-Decision Making System), and in the same time, the OLAIMR and its parameters also were assessed, calibrated and tested. The average absolute deviation(de), correlation coefficients(r) and the standard errors of their absolute deviation(Sde) of between the observed and simulated values for LAI of two cultivars in Wuhan and Nanjing were -0.03~0.1533, 0.9707~0.9997 and0.1332~0.4032, respectively. 1:1 line of them were in Fig. 1 to 4. Multi-factors such as the ramification types, cultivars, and light et al. were taken into account in this study, therefore, the OLAIDM with general adaptability, clear yield aim, mechanism, and dynamic characteristic can simulate optimum LAI dynamic for rape under different sites, cultivars and ramification types, and yielding levels.

  7. A revised conceptual hydrogeologic model of a crystalline rock environment, Whiteshell research area, southeastern Manitoba, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A revised conceptual hydrogeologic model of regional groundwater flow in the crystalline rocks of the Whiteshell Research Area (WRA) has been developed by a team of AECL geoscientists. The revised model updates an earlier model developed in 1985, and has a much broader database. This database was compiled from Landsat and airborne radar images, geophysical surveys and surface mapping, and from analyses of fracture logs, hydraulic tests and water samples collected from a network of deep boreholes drilled across the WRA. The boundaries of the revised conceptual model were selected to coincide with the natural hydraulic boundaries assumed for the regional groundwater flow systems in the WRA. The upper and lower boundaries are the water table and a horizontal plane 4 km below ground surface. For modelling purposes the rocks below 4 km are considered to be impermeable. The rocks of the modelled region were divided on the basis of fracture characteristics into three categories: fractured zones (FZs); moderately fractured rock (MFR); and sparsely fractured rock (SFR). The FZs are regions of intensely fractured rock. Seventy-six FZs were selected to form the fault framework within the revised conceptual model. The physical rock/water properties of the FZs, MFR and SFR were selected by analysis of field data from hydraulic and tracer tests, laboratory test data and water quality data. These properties were used to define a mathematical groundwater flow model of the WRA using AECL's MOTIF finite element code (Ophori et al. 1995, 1996). (author). 29 refs., 4 tabs., 12 figs

  8. Results of prototype borehole instrumentation at the Hydrologic Research Facility, area 25, NTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two 12+ meter (40 feet) deep, dry-augured boreholes, located adjacent to the Hydrologic Research Facility (HRF) calibration laboratory in Area 25, Nevada Test Site (NTS), were instrumented in October, 1991, and a third in February, 1992. Four instrument stations located at depths of 3.0, 6.1, 9.1, and 12.2 meters (m) were established in each borehole in order to evaluate instrumentation that will be used in the deep unsaturated-zone borehole-instrumentation program at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Yucca Mountain is being evaluated as a potential site for the storage of high-level radioactive waste. The Yucca Mountain borehole-instrumentation program is designed to measure and monitor the unsaturated-zone fluid (liquid and gas) flow potential gradients and flow processes in the unsaturated-zone. To date, results of the HRF prototype borehole instrumentation program indicate that the stability and operational reliability of the sensors selected for use at Yucca Mountain will be adequate to sustain a long-term, in-situ monitoring program; one that is expected to last from three to five years. Data from the HRF borehole instrumentation experiment also indicate that sensor accuracy and precision are sufficient to measure the state variables (pneumatic pressure, temperature, vapor pressure and water potential) needed to quantify water, water vapor, gas, and heat flux in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain

  9. Perspective: The Climate-Population-Infrastructure Modeling and Simulation Fertile Area for New Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Melissa R [ORNL; Fernandez, Steven J [ORNL; Walker, Kimberly A [ORNL; Fu, Joshua S [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Managing the risks posed by climate change and extreme weather to energy production and delivery is a challenge to communities worldwide. As climate conditions change, populations will shift, and demand will re-locate; and networked infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers, and, hopefully, minimize vulnerability to natural disaster. Climate effects such as sea level rise, increased frequency and intensity of natural disasters, force populations to move locations. Displaced population creates new demand for built infrastructure that in turn generates new economic activity that attracts new workers and associated households to the new locations. Infrastructures and their interdependencies will change in reaction to climate drivers as the networks expand into new population areas and as portions of the networks are abandoned as people leave. Thus, infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers while some parts of the network are underused, and these changes will create emerging vulnerabilities. Forecasting the location of these vulnerabilities by combining climate predictions and agent based population movement models shows promise for defining these future population distributions and changes in coastal infrastructure configurations. By combining climate and weather data, engineering algorithms and social theory it has been only recently possible to examine electricity demand response to increased climactic temperatures, population relocation in response to extreme cyclonic events, consequent net population changes and new regional patterns in electricity demand. These emerging results suggest a research agenda of coupling these disparate modelling approaches to understand the implications of climate change for protecting the nation s critical infrastructure.

  10. Antioxidant activity of the probiotic consortium in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saule Saduakhasova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Available evidence suggests that probiotics have different biological functions that depend on several mechanisms, such as antioxidant and DNA-protective activities. The probiotic consortium includes bacterial cultures such as Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum, and other bacterial cultures isolated from traditional Kazakh dairy products (ayran, kumys, shubat, and healthy clinical material. The aim of this study was to investigate the total antioxidant activity of the consortium of probiotic bacteria and to determine the activity of superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, and DNA-protective action. Material and methods: In vitro comet assay was used to determine the antigenotoxicity of the probiotic consortium. Total antioxidant activity was determined using a method of analysis with Trolox as the equivalent. The analysis method of superoxide dismutase activity assesses the inhibition rate of the nitroblue tetrazolium reduction to formazan by superoxide dismutase. Determination of glutathione reductase activity is based on the measurement of the NADPH oxidation speed. Results: A significantly high level of the total antioxidant activity of the probiotic consortium intact cells (15.3 mM/ml was observed whereas the activity index of  lysate  was 11.1 mM/ml. The superoxide dismutase activity of probiotic consortium lysate was evaluated, with values that peaked at 0.24 U/mg protein. The superoxide dismutase activity of the consortium was lower in comparison to L.fernentum E-3 and L.fernentum E-18 cultures with values of 0.85 U/mg and 0.76 U/mg protein, respectively. SOD activity of probiotic consortium whole cells was not observed, which is typical for lactic acid bacteria. Glutathione reductase plays an important role in the optimal protection from oxidative stress. Glutathione reductase activity of the studied probiotic consortium was low; moreover, the activity of the lysate was two times

  11. The soundscape of nature areas: assessment and review of research approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    The Environmental Noise Directive requires authorities to delineate (nature) areas where the acoustic quality is good, and to protect these areas. In the Netherlands, since decades provinces have delineated so-called quiet areas cf. the Environmental Protection Act. In line with the noise abatement paradigm acoustic parameters were applied as maximum allowed levels (e.g. 40 dB Lday) and specific activities near or in these nature areas were restricted. Underlying reasons for preserving the (a...

  12. The ENIGMA Consortium: large-scale collaborative analyses of neuroimaging and genetic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Paul M; Stein, Jason L; Medland, Sarah E; Hibar, Derrek P; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Renteria, Miguel E; Toro, Roberto; Jahanshad, Neda; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J; Martin, Nicholas G; Agartz, Ingrid; Alda, Martin; Alhusaini, Saud; Almasy, Laura; Almeida, Jorge; Alpert, Kathryn; Andreasen, Nancy C; Andreassen, Ole A; Apostolova, Liana G; Appel, Katja; Armstrong, Nicola J; Aribisala, Benjamin; Bastin, Mark E; Bauer, Michael; Bearden, Carrie E; Bergmann, Orjan; Binder, Elisabeth B; Blangero, John; Bockholt, Henry J; Bøen, Erlend; Bois, Catherine; Boomsma, Dorret I; Booth, Tom; Bowman, Ian J; Bralten, Janita; Brouwer, Rachel M; Brunner, Han G; Brohawn, David G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan; Bulayeva, Kazima; Bustillo, Juan R; Calhoun, Vince D; Cannon, Dara M; Cantor, Rita M; Carless, Melanie A; Caseras, Xavier; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chang, Kiki D; Ching, Christopher R K; Christoforou, Andrea; Cichon, Sven; Clark, Vincent P; Conrod, Patricia; Coppola, Giovanni; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; Deary, Ian J; de Geus, Eco J C; den Braber, Anouk; Delvecchio, Giuseppe; Depondt, Chantal; de Haan, Lieuwe; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dima, Danai; Dimitrova, Rali; Djurovic, Srdjan; Dong, Hongwei; Donohoe, Gary; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Dyer, Thomas D; Ehrlich, Stefan; Ekman, Carl Johan; Elvsåshagen, Torbjørn; Emsell, Louise; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Fagerness, Jesen; Fears, Scott; Fedko, Iryna; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Foroud, Tatiana; Fox, Peter T; Francks, Clyde; Frangou, Sophia; Frey, Eva Maria; Frodl, Thomas; Frouin, Vincent; Garavan, Hugh; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Glahn, David C; Godlewska, Beata; Goldstein, Rita Z; Gollub, Randy L; Grabe, Hans J; Grimm, Oliver; Gruber, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Gur, Raquel E; Gur, Ruben C; Göring, Harald H H; Hagenaars, Saskia; Hajek, Tomas; Hall, Geoffrey B; Hall, Jeremy; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A; Hass, Johanna; Hatton, Sean N; Haukvik, Unn K; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hickie, Ian B; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoehn, David; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hollinshead, Marisa; Holmes, Avram J; Homuth, Georg; Hoogman, Martine; Hong, L Elliot; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Hwang, Kristy S; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnston, Caroline; Jönsson, Erik G; Kahn, René S; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kelly, Sinead; Kim, Sungeun; Kochunov, Peter; Koenders, Laura; Krämer, Bernd; Kwok, John B J; Lagopoulos, Jim; Laje, Gonzalo; Landen, Mikael; Landman, Bennett A; Lauriello, John; Lawrie, Stephen M; Lee, Phil H; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Lemaître, Herve; Leonardo, Cassandra D; Li, Chiang-Shan; Liberg, Benny; Liewald, David C; Liu, Xinmin; Lopez, Lorna M; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Luciano, Michelle; Macciardi, Fabio; Machielsen, Marise W J; Macqueen, Glenda M; Malt, Ulrik F; Mandl, René; Manoach, Dara S; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Francis J; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Derek W; Moses, Eric K; Mueller, Bryon A; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Mwangi, Benson; Nauck, Matthias; Nho, Kwangsik; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars-Göran; Nugent, Allison C; Nyberg, Lars; Olvera, Rene L; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Ophoff, Roel A; Pandolfo, Massimo; Papalampropoulou-Tsiridou, Melina; Papmeyer, Martina; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Penninx, Brenda W; Peterson, Charles P; Pfennig, Andrea; Phillips, Mary; Pike, G Bruce; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Potkin, Steven G; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Rasmussen, Jerod; Rietschel, Marcella; Rijpkema, Mark; Risacher, Shannon L; Roffman, Joshua L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rose, Emma J; Royle, Natalie A; Rujescu, Dan; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Salami, Alireza; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Savitz, Jonathan; Saykin, Andrew J; Scanlon, Cathy; Schmaal, Lianne; Schnack, Hugo G; Schork, Andrew J; Schulz, S Charles; Schür, Remmelt; Seidman, Larry; Shen, Li; Shoemaker, Jody M; Simmons, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W; Soares, Jair C; Sponheim, Scott R; Sprooten, Emma; Starr, John M; Steen, Vidar M; Strakowski, Stephen; Strike, Lachlan; Sussmann, Jessika; Sämann, Philipp G; Teumer, Alexander; Toga, Arthur W; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Trabzuni, Daniah; Trost, Sarah; Turner, Jessica; Van den Heuvel, Martijn; van der Wee, Nic J; van Eijk, Kristel; van Erp, Theo G M; van Haren, Neeltje E M; van 't Ent, Dennis; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; Veltman, Dick J; Versace, Amelia; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Robert; Walter, Henrik; Wang, Lei; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; Westlye, Lars T; Whalley, Heather C; Whelan, Christopher D; White, Tonya; Winkler, Anderson M; Wittfeld, Katharina; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Zilles, David; Zwiers, Marcel P; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Schofield, Peter R; Freimer, Nelson B; Lawrence, Natalia S; Drevets, Wayne

    2014-06-01

    The Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a collaborative network of researchers working together on a range of large-scale studies that integrate data from 70 institutions worldwide. Organized into Working Groups that tackle questions in neuroscience, genetics, and medicine, ENIGMA studies have analyzed neuroimaging data from over 12,826 subjects. In addition, data from 12,171 individuals were provided by the CHARGE consortium for replication of findings, in a total of 24,997 subjects. By meta-analyzing results from many sites, ENIGMA has detected factors that affect the brain that no individual site could detect on its own, and that require larger numbers of subjects than any individual neuroimaging study has currently collected. ENIGMA's first project was a genome-wide association study identifying common variants in the genome associated with hippocampal volume or intracranial volume. Continuing work is exploring genetic associations with subcortical volumes (ENIGMA2) and white matter microstructure (ENIGMA-DTI). Working groups also focus on understanding how schizophrenia, bipolar illness, major depression and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affect the brain. We review the current progress of the ENIGMA Consortium, along with challenges and unexpected discoveries made on the way. PMID:24399358

  13. Frost Effects Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Full-scale study in controlled conditions The Frost Effects Research Facility (FERF) is the largest refrigerated warehouse in the United States that can be used for...

  14. Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — For more than 30 years The Combustion Research Facility (CRF) has served as a national and international leader in combustion science and technology. The need for a...

  15. The Brazilian Research Consortium on Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders: recruitment, assessment instruments, methods for the development of multicenter collaborative studies and preliminary results Consórcio Brasileiro de Pesquisa em Transtornos do Espectro Obsessivo-Compulsivo: recrutamento, instrumentos de avaliação, métodos para o desenvolvimento de estudos colaborativos multicêntricos e resultados preliminares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euripedes Constantino Miguel

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the recruitment of patients, assessment instruments, implementation, methods and preliminary results of The Brazilian Research Consortium on Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders, which includes seven university sites. METHOD: This cross-sectional study included a comprehensive clinical assessment including semi-structured interviews (sociodemographic data, medical and psychiatric history, disease course and comorbid psychiatric diagnoses, and instruments to assess obsessive-compulsive (Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale and Dimensional Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, depressive (Beck Depression Inventory and anxious (Beck Anxiety Inventory symptoms, sensory phenomena (Universidade de São Paulo Sensory Phenomena Scale, insight (Brown Assessment Beliefs Scale, tics (Yale Global Tics Severity Scale and quality of life (Medical Outcome Quality of Life Scale Short-form-36 and Social Assessment Scale. The raters' training consisted of watching at least five videotaped interviews and interviewing five patients with an expert researcher before interviewing patients alone. The reliability between all leaders for the most important instruments (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, Dimensional Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, Universidade de São Paulo Sensory Phenomena Scale was measured after six complete interviews. RESULTS: Inter-rater reliability was 96%. By March 2008, 630 obsessive-compulsive disorder patients had been systematically evaluated. Mean age (±SE was 34.7 (±0.51, 56.3% were female, and 84.6% Caucasian. The most prevalent obsessive compulsive symptom dimensions were symmetry and contamination. The most common comorbidities were major depression, generalized anxiety and social anxiety disorder. The most common DSM-IV impulsive control disorder was skin picking. CONCLUSION: The sample was composed mainly by Caucasian individuals, unmarried, with some kind of occupational activity, mean age

  16. A review of non-agricultural land-use in peri-urbanization area:research progress and perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Hong; Liu Aili; Xie Ting

    2008-01-01

    The peri-urbanization area as a kind of rural-urban interface is changing rapidly in physical,economic,and social terms.The land use pattern in such area is shiffting away from the assumptionv of mainstream paradigms to new conceotual landscapes,which leads to a series of problems on economic development and social stabilization.There are many,researches on non-agricultural land-use in peri-urbanization area.In this paper both international and domestic research literature is reviewed by dividing six parts.The first part introduces the conception of peri-urbanization area and its driver factors.Then In the second and the third part,the paper expatiates on the progress in the ram-agricultural land-use in peri-urban area on land-use pattern,evolution,characterislics,problems,etc.The forth part focuses on the reasons that cause the land-use problems in the research area,while the fifih part reviews the integrating ways of non-agricultural land-use.Finally recommendations for further study are draw with specific reference to the current and future position of non-agricultural land-use study in peri-urban area.

  17. Creating a Consortium to Increase minority and Low-Income Community Participation in Alternative Energy Development, Production and Management Melinda Downing, United States Department of Energy Geraldine Herring, United States Department of Agriculture John Rosenthall, Environmental Justice Conference, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    in all aspects of the field of alternative energy. The Consortium's primary objectives are to find ways to: - Include minorities in the development and ownership of infrastructure in the alternative energy industry; - Promote research and education programs to inform the public about risks and benefits of various forms of alternative energy; - Build a Mentor/Protege Program between HBCU/MSIs and industry leaders to enhance minority participation in ownership and career success in alternative energy production and distribution. The Consortium will work together to create a process whereby minorities and low income individuals will be recruited, educated, and mentored to maximize alternative energy ownership and job opportunities. Industry specialists and government representatives will work with academicians and others to: 1. research areas and methods where minorities and rural communities can engage in the industry; 2. invest in minorities by serving as mentors to minority serving institutions by offering hands-on experience through apprenticeships; 3. work to identify ownership opportunities for minorities; and 4. work to develop legislation that supports economic development and participation for minorities and rural communities in the industry. To accomplish this goal, the Consortium has set out a three-phase plan. Phase I organized a meeting of professionals to discuss the concept, explore the fundamentals, identify key players, and draft next steps. The group took a critical look at the energy industry: 1) trends, 2) economics, 3) limited number of minorities; and 4) infrastructure. Through that process the group identified four areas that would greatly impact economic development for minorities and rural communities: I Energy; II Broadband Communications; III Education; IV Labor Resources. Phase II presented a roundtable panel discussion that continued to refine the Consortium. The goal of these discussions is to produce a well-balanced Consortium committed to

  18. Implementation of research results to prevent land degradation in viticultural areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marqués Pérez, Maria Jose; Bienes, Ramon; de Benito, Alejandro; Velasco, Ana

    2013-04-01

    This study shows the lack of interest of land users to establish contact with scientific institutions and their reluctance to change their traditional way to manage their soils. It is conducted in Madrid and Castilla La Mancha, Spain, where the production of wine is an important source of income. The basic research was dealing with sustainable land management in sloping vineyards to prevent soil degradation. The usual reduced tillage practice in the area is compared with different cover grasses in the inter-rows of vines. The results demonstrate that these managements are able to increase soil organic matter, improve infiltration, reduce runoff and soil loss and increase soil aggregate stability. Nevertheless a decrease in production is noticed in some permanent cover treatments. A survey to know the feasibility of implementation of this sustainable land management was conducted. Less than 5% of vine growers coming to cellars and cooperatives were willing to be interviewed. Finally 64 vine growers answered a questionnaire regarding different aspects of their environmental concerns, age, land management practices and economic situation. The majority of respondents (82%) are worried about erosion problems in their sloping vineyards. They were informed about the results of the abovementioned project but only 32% of them would change the cultivation by grasses in the inter-rows. The respondents were not old (72% below 50 years old), and the agriculture was not their first activity (69% had other different sources of income). It is remarkable that they have some misunderstandings and lack of knowledge in questions regarding soil conservation. Only 3% of them receive some kind of economic aid from the institutions to avoid land degradation. This could be related to the small or medium size of their lands as 87% of them have plots smaller than 50 ha. The extension services and policy makers have to face this situation to achieve the proper implementation of scientific

  19. Revised model of regional groundwater flow of the Whiteshell Research Area: Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional groundwater flow of the Whiteshell Research Area (WRA) is simulated in order to evaluate alternative locations for a hypothetical nuclear fuel waste disposal vault that maximizes retention of vault contaminants in the geosphere, and to define boundary conditions for a smaller local model around the vault. A revised conceptual model of the hydrogeologic conditions was constructed using all the information obtained from field investigations at the WRA between 1977 and 1994. All the simulations were performed using AECL's three-dimensional finite-element code, MOTIF. Average values of hydraulic parameters obtained from the field data were used for a base-case simulation, in which freshwater was assumed to occur in the entire flow region. The simulated average groundwater recharge rate for this base case did not compare favourably with the recharge rate that was estimated from the field data. Model calibration was ultimately achieved by modifying the hydraulic parameters and total dissolved solids (TDS) distribution of the fluid in a series of consecutive simulations. The simulated recharge rate for the final calibrated model was 4.8 mm/a which compares well with the rate of 5 mm/a, that was estimated from independent field experiments. The simulated freshwater heads also compared reasonably well with measured heads in the network of boreholes at the WRA. Most of the groundwater flow occurred in local systems between the ground surface and the depth of 2000 m. The travel times, pathways and exit locations of particles released from different depth horizons in the groundwater velocity field of the calibrated model were determined using a particle tracking code, TRACK3D. These results were used to select a location for a hypothetical nuclear fuel waste disposal vault that maximizes the retention of vault contaminants in a long, slow groundwater flow pathways. The selected location is about 5 km northeast of the location of Underground Research Laboratory (URL

  20. Research on Bitcoin Cooperative Mining Area%Bitcoin合作式矿区挖矿研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕楠

    2014-01-01

    Bitcoin,a new type of e-currency,has attracted researchers' attention in different fields since its birth. More and more people take part in mining activity. Due to the way of creating Bitcoin,the more people join,the lower efficiency they have. And the majority of new Bitcoins are produced by a small number of pro-mining-organizations. The rate of return of individual participants is much lower. In order to redress the imbalance of mining and raise the low rate,a cooperative mining area model,which is made of groups,is able to gather computing capability and re-assign the interests from mining,which ensures every single miner's rate could be raised.%比特币(Bitcoin)作为一种新型电子货币从创造之初就受到各领域学者的广泛关注,越来越的人投身到挖矿的行列。但是比特币本身的产生机制导致越多人参与,比特币产出的效率就越低。大部分比特币产出都集中在少部分的专业挖矿组织手中,个人参与者回报率极低。为了解决挖矿产出不平衡、回报率低的问题,一种合作式矿区挖矿模型通过有效整合个人参与者的计算能力,按小组形式进行合作挖矿,后将挖矿所得利益在组内重新分配,以提高个人挖矿回报率。

  1. Regional groundwater flow in the Atikokan research area : spatially variable density and viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In modelling the regional groundwater flow at the Atikokan Research Area (ARA), it was anticipated that fluid viscosity might vary significantly as a function of total dissolved solids (TDS) because pore fluids range from fresh through brackish and saline waters to brines. An empirical fluid viscosity-solute concentration equation adopted from Robinson and Stokes was modified and used to estimate viscosity from field-observed TDS. A molecular weight of 53.65 g and a temperature dependent Di coefficient of 0.1223 were estimated from groundwater chemistry data and used in the viscosity calculations. The calculated viscosities fell in the expected range in comparison with experimental values derived for sodium chloride solutions. Results of initial groundwater flow simulations in the ARA using the MOTIF finite-element code were found to be inconsistent with expectations. Employing hypothetical 'unit basin' models and accounting for concentration in the viscosity equation yielded results that are consistent with expected buoyancy effects. The influence of solute concentration must be considered in calculating both fluid density and viscosity for accurate simulation of variable density flow in an environment like the ARA. Simulations of groundwater flow for the ARA suggest that both flow directions and magnitudes should be simultaneously considered during model calibration. Simulations were also performed to assess the effects of varying the vertical boundary conditions, and to test the hypothesis that deep flow in the ARA may be regionally continuous and isolated from shallow -local systems. Hydrostatic-pressure boundary conditions. based on a fluid density distribution, were specified to allow horizontal inflow and outflow at the vertical boundaries which modified the flow pattern only in their proximities, and no continuous regional flow system was produced. Groundwater flow in the ARA may be analyzed with no-flow vertical boundary conditions. (author). 28 refs., 7

  2. Economic Development Mode and Countermeasure Research on the Nansi Lake Drainage Area Based on Circular Economy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Firstly,it is pointed out that circular economy should be vigorously developed in the Nansi Lake Drainage Area,and the connotation of circular economy is expounded.Then,problems in developing circular economy in Nansi Lake Drainage Area are analyzed from the aspects of agriculture,industrial enterprises,and waste utilization.Finally,combining with the four modes of peasant household,enterprise,region and society in the development of circular economy,corresponding countermeasures are put forward for the circular economy in Nansi Lake Drainage Area,such as establishing the government guidance mechanism for big agriculture circular economy in Nansi Lake Drainage Area,constructing incentive systems for industrial enterprises adopting circular economy in Nansi Lake Drainage Area,adjusting the industrial structure of Nansi Lake Drainage Area,and optimizing the energy consumption structure.

  3. Modeling and simulation challenges pursued by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turinsky, Paul J.; Kothe, Douglas B.

    2016-05-01

    The Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the first Energy Innovation Hub of the Department of Energy, was established in 2010 with the goal of providing modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities that support and accelerate the improvement of nuclear energy's economic competitiveness and the reduction of spent nuclear fuel volume per unit energy, and all while assuring nuclear safety. To accomplish this requires advances in M&S capabilities in radiation transport, thermal-hydraulics, fuel performance and corrosion chemistry. To focus CASL's R&D, industry challenge problems have been defined, which equate with long standing issues of the nuclear power industry that M&S can assist in addressing. To date CASL has developed a multi-physics "core simulator" based upon pin-resolved radiation transport and subchannel (within fuel assembly) thermal-hydraulics, capitalizing on the capabilities of high performance computing. CASL's fuel performance M&S capability can also be optionally integrated into the core simulator, yielding a coupled multi-physics capability with untapped predictive potential. Material models have been developed to enhance predictive capabilities of fuel clad creep and growth, along with deeper understanding of zirconium alloy clad oxidation and hydrogen pickup. Understanding of corrosion chemistry (e.g., CRUD formation) has evolved at all scales: micro, meso and macro. CFD R&D has focused on improvement in closure models for subcooled boiling and bubbly flow, and the formulation of robust numerical solution algorithms. For multiphysics integration, several iterative acceleration methods have been assessed, illuminating areas where further research is needed. Finally, uncertainty quantification and data assimilation techniques, based upon sampling approaches, have been made more feasible for practicing nuclear engineers via R&D on dimensional reduction and biased sampling. Industry adoption of CASL's evolving M

  4. A decade of research in Inuit children, youth, and maternal health in Canada: areas of concentrations and scarcities

    OpenAIRE

    Sheppard, Amanda J; Hetherington, Ross

    2012-01-01

    Inuit Canadians are on average about 20 years younger and have a 10-year lower life expectancy than other Canadians. While there have been improvements in Inuit health status over time, significant health disparities still remain. This paper will review the peer-reviewed literature related to Inuit child, youth, and maternal health between 2000 and 2010, investigate which thematic areas were examined, and determine what proportion of the research is related to each group. Establishing areas o...

  5. The Theory and Practice of Culturally Relevant Education: A Synthesis of Research across Content Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Brittany; Laughter, Judson

    2016-01-01

    Many teachers and educational researchers have claimed to adopt tenets of culturally relevant education (CRE). However, recent work describes how standardized curricula and testing have marginalized CRE in educational reform discourses. In this synthesis of research, we sought examples of research connecting CRE to positive student outcomes across…

  6. Zkušenosti s evropskými infrastrukturními projekty (ESFRI) a spolupráce v rámci ERIC (European research infrastructures consortium) a související komunikace (právo na informace) s Evropskou komisí

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolman, Jiří

    Pardubice: University of Pardubice, 2013, s. 36-42. ISBN 978-80-7395-674-5. [International seminar 2013 - The Secret of Successful Projects. Litomyšl (CZ), 16.09.2013-17.09.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : ESFRI * ERIC * consortium agreement * free access to information * European Commission Subject RIV: AG - Legal Sciences

  7. A decade of research in Inuit children, youth, and maternal health in Canada: areas of concentrations and scarcities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J. Sheppard

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Inuit Canadians are on average about 20 years younger and have a 10-year lower life expectancy than other Canadians. While there have been improvements in Inuit health status over time, significant health disparities still remain. This paper will review the peer-reviewed literature related to Inuit child, youth, and maternal health between 2000 and 2010, investigate which thematic areas were examined, and determine what proportion of the research is related to each group. Establishing areas of research concentrations and scarcities may help direct future research where it is needed. We followed a systematic literature review and employed peer-reviewed research literature on child, youth, and maternal health which were selected from 3 sources, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and the Circumpolar Health Bibliographic Database. The resulting references were read, and summarized according to population group and thematic area. The thematic areas that emerged by frequency were: infectious disease; environment/environmental exposures; nutrition; birth outcomes; tobacco; chronic disease; health care; policy, human resources; interventions/programming; social determinants of health; mental health and wellbeing; genetics; injury; and dental health. The 72 papers that met the inclusion criteria were not mutually exclusive with respect to group studied. Fifty-nine papers (82% concerned child health, 24 papers (33% youth health, and 58 papers (81% maternal health. The review documented high incidences of illness and significant public health problems; however, in the context of these issues, opportunities to develop research that could directly enhance health outcomes are explored.

  8. 75 FR 55692 - Proposed Research Area Within the Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... offshore of Sapelo Island, Georgia, on an area of continental shelf stretching from Cape Hatteras, North... as an important sentinel site to monitor and study impacts of climate change, such as ocean.... Sentinel sites are areas well suited to ensure sustained observations of environmental change, to...

  9. Building on Area Studies Expertise – The Arab-European Association for Media and Communication Researchers (AREACORE)

    OpenAIRE

    Jassim M. Jaber; Carola Richter

    2014-01-01

    This short article introduces the new Arab-European Association for Media and Communication Researchers (AREACORE) as the manifestation of the necessity to strengthen area expertise in communication studies. The reasons for founding this association fit into the broader framework of de-westernization attempts, while also allowing for dialogue to take place on an equal footing. The authors invite all interested communication researchers to join the network and build up an Arab-E...

  10. Knowledge base for subject area of knowledge organization: Issues, challenges, and preliminary outcomes of a research project

    OpenAIRE

    Kučerová, Helena; Bratková, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The poster presented a research project of Czech knowledge base for subject area of knowledge organization, conducted on Faculty of Arts of Charles University in Prague and funded by the Czech Ministry of Culture through the Programme of applied R&D in National and Cultural Identity (NAKI). We describe the outline of the project and we demonstrate interim issues and outcomes after first year od research. --- The motivation for the project was the fact that since the 1980s, no monograph coveri...

  11. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  12. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronaldo Szilard; Hongbin Zhang; Doug Kothe; Paul Turinsky

    2011-10-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  13. [Pollution-ecological problems of old industrial and mining areas and future research prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qixing

    2005-06-01

    Environmental pollution and its solicitation in ecological problems of old industrial and mining areas have become a worldwide technological puzzle restricting sustainable economic and social development. But, the definition and category of old industrial and mining areas is still disputed as an important concept. In this paper, the concept of old industrial and mining area was discussed in theory, and, proceeded with analyzing the complexity of current situation and environmental pollution problems of old industrial and mining areas in China, more keystone attention was paid to the secondary pollution problems from old industrial and mining areas as an important frontier of science. On the basis of expounding the complexity and characters of environmental pollution in old industrial and mining areas, it was suggested that as two key scientific problems in environmental sciences and ecology, the formation mechanisms and control technology of secondary pollution in old industrial and mining areas and the responses of new-type diseases to environmental pollution based on molecular ecotoxicology should be systematically studied on the national scale, and be an important component of environmental protection strategy in China in the future. PMID:16180772

  14. Proceedings of the Doctoral Consortium of the Wirtschaftsinformatik 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Eymann, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Seit den frühen neunziger Jahren veröffentlichen junge Wissenschaftler in den Beiträgen zum Doctoral Consortium, das im Rahmen der Konferenz zur "Wirtschaftsinformatik" veranstaltet wird. Dieser Band enthält ausgesuchte Beiträge von 20 Doktoranden des Doctoral Consortium 2011 in Zürich. - Table of Contents: Sören Bergmann, Automatische Generierung adaptiver und lernfähiger Modelle zur Simulation von Produktionssystemen ... 9, Markus Böhm, Besondere Herausforderungen für die IT im Kontext von ...

  15. The sociology in gdańsk. Institutional development and the main research areas

    OpenAIRE

    BACHÓRZ AGATA; MICHAŁOWSKI LESŁAW; OBRACHT-PRONDZYŃSKI CEZARY

    2014-01-01

    Sociology in Gdansk, in its institutional dimension, has existed since 1958. However, its development as a separate university degree in Gdańsk University dates back only to 90s of the 20th century. It still seeks recognition and needs to work on the research profile. Nevertheless, some lines of research and theoretical reflection had time to develop. The most important of them are research on local communities and regional studies, including, recognizable on Polish and European scale, resear...

  16. Research on supplying potential of uranium source from rocks in western provenance area of Hailaer basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using U-Pb isotope composition evolution, this paper expounds the initial uranium content in volcanic rocks of provenance area of Xihulitu basin and in granites of provenance area of Kelulun sag, western Hailaer basin. The initial uranium content (U0) in volcanic rocks of provenance area is higher, the average initial uranium content of volcanic rocks is 10.061 x 10-6, the average uranium variation coefficient (ΔU) is -49.57%; the average initial uranium content of granites is 18.381 x 10-6, the average uranium variation coefficient (ΔU) is -80%. The results indicate that rocks in provenance area could provide the pre-enrichment of uranium in deposited sandstone. U-Ra equilibrium coefficients of rocks indicate that there is obvious U-Ra disequilibrium phenomenon in volcanic rocks, and the time when granites provided uranium source occurred 16000 a ago. (authors)

  17. Biological surveys in the Firth-Mancha Research Natural Area, Alaska, 1979-1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — At Mancha Creek, an area within the forest-tundra ecotone, five major habitat types were identified and studied intensively for aspects of vegetation composition,...

  18. Biological Surveys in the Firth-Mancha Research Natural Area, Alaska, 1979-1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — At Mancha Creek, an area within the foresttundra ecotone, five major habitat types were identified and studied intensively for aspects of vegetation composition,...

  19. Monitoring and Research on Wading Birds in the Water Conservation Areas ofthe Everglades: The 1996 Nesting season

    OpenAIRE

    Peter C Frederick; Salatas, Johanna; Surdick, James

    1996-01-01

    This project was initiated to continue monitoring reproductive responses of wading birds in the central Everglades, and to investigate two areas of research considered key to understanding and managing wading birds: nestling energetics, and factors affecting food availability. This report summarizes the first of two years of work. (101 page document)

  20. The Case of Norway: State-of-the-Art in Ten Selected Areas of Research on Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundem, Bjorg B.

    1987-01-01

    A review of Norwegian research on higher education looks at efforts in the areas of teaching and learning, policy and policy formation, lifelong and nontraditional education, governance and institutional administration, the education-work relationship, resource scarcity, improving statistical information, international cooperation, women's…

  1. Computerized comprehensive data analysis of Lung Imaging Database Consortium (LIDC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) is the largest public CT image database of lung nodules. In this study, the authors present a comprehensive and the most updated analysis of this dynamically growing database under the help of a computerized tool, aiming to assist researchers to optimally use this database for lung cancer related investigations. Methods: The authors developed a computer scheme to automatically match the nodule outlines marked manually by radiologists on CT images. A large variety of characteristics regarding the annotated nodules in the database including volume, spiculation level, elongation, interobserver variability, as well as the intersection of delineated nodule voxels and overlapping ratio between the same nodules marked by different radiologists are automatically calculated and summarized. The scheme was applied to analyze all 157 examinations with complete annotation data currently available in LIDC dataset. Results: The scheme summarizes the statistical distributions of the abovementioned geometric and diagnosis features. Among the 391 nodules, (1) 365 (93.35%) have principal axis length ≤20 mm; (2) 120, 75, 76, and 120 were marked by one, two, three, and four radiologists, respectively; and (3) 122 (32.48%) have the maximum volume overlapping ratios ≥80% for the delineations of two radiologists, while 198 (50.64%) have the maximum volume overlapping ratios <60%. The results also showed that 72.89% of the nodules were assessed with malignancy score between 2 and 4, and only 7.93% of these nodules were considered as severely malignant (malignancy ≥4). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that LIDC contains examinations covering a diverse distribution of nodule characteristics and it can be a useful resource to assess the performance of the nodule detection and/or segmentation schemes.

  2. HISTORICAL MEMORY OF HUNTERS IN THE STEPPE AND FOREST-STEPPE AREAS OF ALTAI KRAI (BASED ON SOCIAL RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitalii Valeriyevich Kulish

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal of research. The article deals with hunters’ characteristics of steppe and forest-steppe areas of Altai Krai as specific subject of preservation and development of historical memory. The scope of the research is peculiarities of historical memory of hunters. The author devotes attention to the process of preservation by hunters’ historical memory in micro-toponymic system of neighbourhoods of localities and offers some recommendations for this preservation.Method and methodology of research. The research based on quantitative and qualitative methods: interviewing and group discussions.Results. Research results give information about specificity of historical memory of hun-ters. Historical memory of hunters of steppe and forest-steppe areas of Altai Krai can be cha-racterized by following peculiarities: it keeps information about out-of-the-way and unknown for main population historical places; it keeps micro-toponymic system of neighbourhoods of locality; it actualizes primary «real» or episodic memory; assures intergenerational continuity; becomes an important addition or explicitation for description, research, reconstruction of main historical events; assures reproduction of traditions as the most stable mental element of historical memory of population. This memory can fulfill its reproduction function for a long time in case when society and government focus attention on hunters.Use of results. Research results can be used in socioforecasting and management of social systems.

  3. Operations research in areas of civil engineering and sustainable development: EURO working group activities

    OpenAIRE

    Zavadskas, Edmundas Kazimieras; Vilutienė EWG-ORSDCE coordinato, Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    The viewpoint presented in this paper promotes the collaboration, partnering and exchange of best practice knowledge as key factors to reap benefits for construction excellence and sustainability. The approach uses the example of EURO Working Group “OR in Sustainable Development and Civil Engineering” activities. EURO is the 'Association of European Operational Research Societies' within IFORS, the 'International Federation of Operational Research Societies'.

  4. Software business models and contexts for software innovation: key areas software business research

    OpenAIRE

    Käkölä, Timo

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines business, design, and product development aspects of software business models. Contexts of small and large companies for creating software innovations are also analysed. Finally, software business research is called for and an agenda for software business research is presented to better understand the dynamics of the software industry and help create and manage successful software-intensive ventures.

  5. RESEARCH AREA -- ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE CONTROL (AIR POLLUTION TECHNOLOGY BRANCH, AIR POLLUTION PREVENTION AND CONTROL DIVISION, NRMRL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Air Pollution Technology Branch (APTB) of NRMRL's Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division in Research Triangle Park, NC, has conducted several research projects for evaluating the use of artificial intelligence (AI) to improve the control of pollution control systems an...

  6. Connecting Genomic Alterations to Cancer Biology with Proteomics: The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Matthew; Gillette, Michael; Carr, Steven A.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Townsend, Reid; Kinsinger, Christopher; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Liebler, Daniel

    2013-10-03

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium is applying the latest generation of proteomic technologies to genomically annotated tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint initiative of the NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute. By providing a fully integrated accounting of DNA, RNA, and protein abnormalities in individual tumors, these datasets will illuminate the complex relationship between genomic abnormalities and cancer phenotypes, thus producing biologic insights as well as a wave of novel candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets amenable to verifi cation using targeted mass spectrometry methods.

  7. Identifying the Role of the International Consortium "MIT/LINC" in Supporting the Integration of ICT in Higher Education in Emerging Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young; Moser, Franziska Zellweger

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this research effort is to provide insights on what core needs and difficulties exist toward the implementation of ICT in higher education in emerging countries and how a consortium like LINC can best support these efforts. An exploratory research design combining a survey, on-site interviews, participant observation and document…

  8. Research on the System of Town Buildingin China’s Ethnic Minority Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Changde

    2015-01-01

    Town building is one of the most important methods for China to promote new-pat-terns of urbanization in ethnic minority areas. This article analyzes the characteristics of the scale, distribution,population and economic development of towns in ethnic areas. The study finds that at present,the population scale of the towns in ethnic areas is relatively small;town construction in eth-nic areas takes place with a low population densi-ty;and the contacts between towns are weak;In the recent decade,the industrial and occupational structure of the population in ethnic regions shows a reversed adjustment trend. Although there are some improvement in infrastructure construction in these towns,the overall infrastructure in the rural area of the towns is backward—cable TV,waste treatment,per capita electricity and highway den-sity lag largely behind other parts of the country, and, if compared with the eastern and central parts,the gap is even greater. Most employees of towns in the ethnic areas still take the primary in-dustry sector as their priority( agriculture,forest-ry,etc);the proportion of non-farm employment is less than 40%. Employment in secondary indus-try is low. The driving function of industrial ag-glomeration in the towns is weak,and it is difficult to drive the economic development of the towns. Although agriculture is still the base and main body of the town economy in the ethnic areas,invest-ment in agriculture is insufficient. The increasing returns and positive externalities from economic ac-tivity on spatial agglomeration is an important moti-vation for the economic development of less devel-oped bodies.

  9. Geografski pristopi k proučevanju kriznih območij = Geographical attempts to research of crisis areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Zupančič

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals on the phenomenon of crisis areas in the world in the light of international relations in transformation of world political map. Analysing the physiognomy, structures and functions the paper is seeking the reasons for the confl icts, describe their genesis, characteristical developmental stages and particulary the spatial and social consequences. Those mostly regenerate their confl ictual potential and are relatively constant geopolitcial neuralgic areas. They are the crossroads of world-power interesses, even they are poor world periphery by their structure. The paper undertake the geographic point of research of crisis areas. The shown cases of North Dalmatia (Croatia and Kosovo (South Serbia the author ilustrate the characteristical development of two different crisis areas.

  10. Microbial Corrosion of API 5L X-70 Carbon Steel by ATCC 7757 and Consortium of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Various cases of accidents involving microbiology influenced corrosion (MIC) were reported by the oil and gas industry. Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) have always been linked to MIC mechanisms as one of the major causes of localized corrosion problems. In this study, SRB colonies were isolated from the soil in suspected areas near the natural gas transmission pipeline in Malaysia. The effects of ATCC 7757 and consortium of isolated SRB upon corrosion on API 5L X-70 carbon steel coupon were i...

  11. University of Washington Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The theme of the University of Washington based Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research (CHC) is understanding the biochemical, molecular and exposure...

  12. Satellite data in aquatic area research - Some ideas for future studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitala, Jouko T.

    1986-01-01

    Attempts to apply aquatic remote sensing to the preparation of parametric map-like presentations, quantitative evaluations and time-related investigations in various water areas in Finland are presented. The potential use of Landsat MSS data in aquatic area studies, including limology, aquatic botany, geomorphology and engineering is evaluated using computer-aided digital remote sensing techniques. MSS data may provide information about depth, Secchi disc values, humus content in water, and productivity. Aquatic vegetation classification using MSS is possible only where vegetation units are large enough in respect to the 0.5 hectares ground resolution. Multitemporal satellite imagery has been used to evaluate alterations in the littoral areas of some Finnish water reservoirs between successive periods of high water. It is concluded that although MSS data can be of use in aquatic studies, it should be used in connection with field data and/or TM and SPOT data.

  13. Research on the accessibility to health and educational services in the rural areas in Extremadura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieto Masot Ana

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available As the competent laws on Health and Education of the Extremaduran Government read, all the Extremaduran people have the right to their benefits, irrespective of their social, economic and cultural characteristics. Nevertheless, in the Region of Extremadura there are still differences between the rural and urban areas, so, studying how the Extremaduran people can access, with the same conditions, to those services considered basic, such as health and education, is very significant. Using techniques as Network Analyst and the interpolation method IDW, we can note that in Extremadura there are still zones with a very-far- from- laws reality, rural areas with a difficult access to the named services and equipment due to the location on low developed in population and economy areas, and very far from the main communication roads

  14. Climate change in the Carpathian-Balkan Area. Advancing research and cooperation

    OpenAIRE

    Mindrescu, Marcel; Daniel VERES; Astrid BJÖRNSEN GURUNG; Kiefer, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    The Carpathian Mountains are considered to be one of Europe’s last “wilderness” areas, but are nevertheless under heavy pressure from human activities. Examples range from large-scale activities (e.g. metal and coal mining) and ecological disasters (e.g. tailing dam failures in the Toroiaga and Baia Mare areas) to cross-border pollution (e.g. Chernobyl nuclear accident). The current political thrust for economic development is accelerating the pace of industrial activities, exploitation of na...

  15. Research on the conversion relationships between the river and groundwater in the Yellow River drainage area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wenke; KONG Jinling; DUAN Lei; WANG Yanlin; MA Xiongde

    2004-01-01

    Conversion relationships between the river and groundwater in the Yellow River drainage area are studied in this paper based on the geologic and physiognomy conditions and the data of the groundwater regime, isotope, groundwater flow field and field survey. Then eight recharge and discharge modes on the relationships are put forward and the hydraulic characteristics of the modes are analysed, which provides a scientific basis for quantitatively simulating and assessing the conversion relationships,maintenance mechanism of the Yellow River and the regeneration ability of the groundwater in the area.

  16. Research on coal structure indices to coal and gas outbursts in Pingdingshan Mine Area, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭德勇; 宋广太; 库明欣

    2002-01-01

    According to the feature that coal and gas outbursts is controlled by coal structure in Pingdingshan mine area, based on the study of the distribution law of disturbed coal in Mine Area and the macroscopic characteristics of coal structure, the characteristics and genesis to micro-pore of disturbed coal, the relationship between the type of coal structure and gas parameter, and the structural feature of coal at outbursts sites are mainly explored in this paper. Further, the steps and methods are put forward that coal structure indices applied to forecast coal and gas outbursts.

  17. Computational Astrophysics Consortium 3 - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, Stan

    2014-08-29

    Final project report for UCSC's participation in the Computational Astrophysics Consortium - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis. As an appendix, the report of the entire Consortium is also appended.

  18. Site pre-selection of underground research laboratory in Beijing area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The background of this study was reported in this paper. The aim of construction of underground research laboratory and its principles for site pre-selection were described. The research work which was performed by the former investigators and authors was also presented. Then the data on both Yangfang and Fenshuiyu granite bodies as candidate sites for underground research laboratory were given as viewed from natural and economic geography, properties of granite body, petrology, structure, hydrogeology, sorption and diffusion of radionuclides on/in granite. Finally, the comparison study on both granite bodies was conducted and it is considered that although there were many abandoned tunnels in Fenshuiling granite body, only the tunnels on B275m level may be used and a few experiments (for example, heater test) can be conducted there, but as a whole, Yangfang granite body is better than Fenshuiling granite body as a candidate site for underground research laboratory. (author)

  19. Report on research in progress in the nuclear spectroscopy area : reactions and structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helene, O.A.M.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Seale, W.A. (Sao Paulo Univ. (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica); Saxena, R.N. (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo (Brazil))

    1982-09-01

    Research on nuclear spectroscopy which are being done by several groups in Brazil are reported. Works, both experimental and theoretical, are divided in particle and gamma spectroscopy and the former has also gamma-gamma angular correlation.

  20. Report on research in progress in the nuclear spectroscopy area : reactions and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on nuclear spectroscopy which are being done by several groups in Brazil are reported. Works, both experimental and theoretical, are divided in particle and gamma spectroscopy and the former has also gamma-gamma angular correlation. (L.C.)