WorldWideScience

Sample records for arctic marine sediments

  1. Diversity and novelty of actinobacteria in Arctic marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gaiyun; Cao, Tingfeng; Ying, Jianxi; Yang, Yanliu; Ma, Lingqi

    2014-04-01

    The actinobacterial diversity of Arctic marine sediments was investigated using culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches. A total of 152 strains were isolated from seven different media; 18 isolates were selected for phylogenetic analysis on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences. Results showed that the 18 isolates belonged to a potential novel genus and 10 known genera including Actinotalea, Arthrobacter, Brachybacterium, Brevibacterium, Kocuria, Kytococcus, Microbacterium, Micrococcus, Mycobacterium, and Pseudonocardia. Subsequently, 172 rDNA clones were selected by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis from 692 positive clones within four actinobacteria-specific 16S rDNA libraries of Arctic marine sediments, and then these 172 clones were sequenced. In total, 67 phylotypes were clustered in 11 known genera of actinobacteria including Agrococcus, Cellulomonas, Demequina, Iamia, Ilumatobacter, Janibacter, Kocuria, Microbacterium, Phycicoccus, Propionibacterium, and Pseudonocardia, along with other, unidentified actinobacterial clones. Based on the detection of a substantial number of uncultured phylotypes showing low BLAST identities (<95 %), this study confirms that Arctic marine environments harbour highly diverse actinobacterial communities, many of which appear to be novel, uncultured species. PMID:24519808

  2. Paleomagnetic Studies of Marine Sediments for Evaluation of Sedimentation Rates on the Mendeleev Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkina, D.

    2014-12-01

    Nowadays the Arctic Ocean is an area of higher scientific interest. Investigation of composition, genesis, sources and source areas of marine sediments is necessary for a gain of geological knowledge and geo-engineering development of the region. One should note that the dating issue in the Arctic Ocean is a challenge by itself. However, magnetostratigraphy can offer a powerful stratigraphic tool applying to marine sediments here. The 6-meters length core was retrieved from the Mendeleev Ridge in 2012 and subjected to paleomagnetic studies. The examined core was revealed to dominate by normal polarity up to 123 cm below seafloor (cmbsf) and assigned there to the Brunhes polarity chron of the geomagnetic field (0.78 Ma). Then prevalence of reverse polarity persists up to 394-397 cmbsf, assigned to Matuyama age, and short positive intervals are believed to be subchrons of normal polarity. Change from reverse to normal polarity at 394-397 cmbsf is considered as the Matuyama - Gauss (2.58 Ma) boundary and is traced up to 530-531 cmbsf including one short reversal. After this depth a drop back to reverse polarity is ascribed to the beginning of the Gilbert polarity chron (3.58 Ma). The resultant magnetostratigraphy is presented on Figure 1. The stepwise alternating field demagnetization and demagnetization by heating were performed to remove viscous overprints and then to define component magnetization directions. Spikes of natural remanent magnetization intensity and magnetic susceptibility are discovered near almost all assigned chron boundaries, and it may act as an independent factor for determination of polarity boundaries. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility is also considered in order to find out additional peculiarities of the sedimentation. The relative abundance of shallow inclinations at least implies the existence of secondary processes, which may have altered the paleomagnetic record. The mean sedimentation rates on the Mendeleev Ridge do not exceed 1

  3. Thermophilic anaerobes in arctic marine sediments induced to mineralize complex organic matter at high temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, Casey; Arnosti, Carol; Brüchert, Volker;

    2010-01-01

    well as with the addition of freeze-dried Spirulina or individual high-molecular-weight polysaccharides. During 50°C incubation experiments, Arctic thermophiles catalysed extensive mineralization of the organic matter via extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation and sulfate reduction. This high...... temperature-induced food chain mirrors sediment microbial processes occurring at cold in situ temperatures (near 0°C), yet it is catalysed by a completely different set of microorganisms. Using sulfate reduction rates (SRR) as a proxy for organic matter mineralization showed that differences in organic matter......Marine sediments harbour diverse populations of dormant thermophilic bacterial spores that become active in sediment incubation experiments at much higher than in situ temperature. This response was investigated in the presence of natural complex organic matter in sediments of two Arctic fjords, as...

  4. Diversity and distribution of fungal communities in the marine sediments of Kongsfjorden, Svalbard (High Arctic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Fei Wang, Neng; Qin Zhang, Yu; Yu Liu, Hong; Yan Yu, Li

    2015-10-01

    This study assessed the diversity and distribution of fungal communities in eight marine sediments of Kongsfjorden (Svalbard, High Arctic) using 454 pyrosequencing with fungal-specific primers targeting the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal rRNA gene. Sedimentary fungal communities showed high diversity with 42,219 reads belonging to 113 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Of these OTUs, 62 belonged to the Ascomycota, 26 to Basidiomycota, 2 to Chytridiomycota, 1 to Zygomycota, 1 to Glomeromycota, and 21 to unknown fungi. The major known orders included Hypocreales and Saccharomycetales. The common fungal genera were Pichia, Fusarium, Alternaria, and Malassezia. Interestingly, most fungi occurring in these Arctic sediments may originate from the terrestrial habitats and different basins in Kongsfjorden (i.e., inner basin, central basin, and outer basin) harbor different sedimentary fungal communities. These results suggest the existence of diverse fungal communities in the Arctic marine sediments, which may serve as a useful community model for further ecological and evolutionary study of fungi in the Arctic.

  5. Organic carbon degradation in arctic marine sediments, Svalbard: A comparison of initial and terminal steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnosti, C.; Jørgensen, BB

    2006-01-01

    carbohydrate concentrations were comparable to those measured in more temperate sediments, and likely comprise a considerable fraction of porewater dissolved organic carbon. A comparison of dissolved carbohydrate inventories with hydrolysis and sulfate reduction rates suggests that the turnover of carbon......Degradation of marine organic matter under anoxic conditions involves microbial communities working in concert to remineralize complex substrates to CO2. In order to investigate the coupling between the initial and terminal steps of this sequence in permanently cold sediments, rates of...... extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis and sulfate reduction were measured in parallel cores collected from 5 fjords on the west and northwest coast of Svalbard, in the high Arctic. Inventories of total dissolved carbohydrates were also measured in order to evaluate their potential role in carbon turnover...

  6. Community structure, cellular rRNA content, and activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria in marine Arctic sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravenschlag, K.; Sahm, K.; Knoblauch, C.;

    2000-01-01

    The community structure of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) of a marine Arctic sediment (Smeerenburg-fjorden, Svalbard) a-as characterized by both fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and rRNA slot blot hybridization by using group- and genus-specific 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes......, The SRB community was dominated by members of the Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus group. This group accounted for up to 73% of the SRB detected and up to 70% of the SRB rRNA detected. The predominance was shown to be a common feature for different stations along the coast of Svalbard, In a top......-Desulfococcus group. A group of clone sequences (group SVAL1) most closely related to Desulfosarcina variabilis (91.2% sequence similarity) was dominant and was shown to be most abundant in situ, accounting for up to 54.8% of the total SRB detected. A comparison of the two methods used for quantification showed...

  7. Phylogenetic Diversity and Biological Activity of Actinobacteria Isolated from the Chukchi Shelf Marine Sediments in the Arctic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Yuan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine environments are a rich source of Actinobacteria and have the potential to produce a wide variety of biologically active secondary metabolites. In this study, we used four selective isolation media to culture Actinobacteria from the sediments collected from the Chukchi Shelf in the Arctic Ocean. A total of 73 actinobacterial strains were isolated. Based on repetitive DNA fingerprinting analysis, we selected 30 representatives for partial characterization according to their phylogenetic diversity, antimicrobial activities and secondary-metabolite biosynthesis genes. Results from the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the 30 strains could be sorted into 18 phylotypes belonging to 14 different genera: Agrococcus, Arsenicicoccus, Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Citricoccus, Janibacter, Kocuria, Microbacterium, Microlunatus, Nocardioides, Nocardiopsis, Saccharopolyspora, Salinibacterium and Streptomyces. To our knowledge, this paper is the first report on the isolation of Microlunatus genus members from marine habitats. Of the 30 isolates, 11 strains exhibited antibacterial and/or antifungal activity, seven of which have activities against Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans. All 30 strains have at least two biosynthetic genes, one-third of which possess more than four biosynthetic genes. This study demonstrates the significant diversity of Actinobacteria in the Chukchi Shelf sediment and their potential for producing biologically active compounds and novel material for genetic manipulation or combinatorial biosynthesis.

  8. Phylogenetic diversity and biological activity of actinobacteria isolated from the Chukchi Shelf marine sediments in the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Meng; Yu, Yong; Li, Hui-Rong; Dong, Ning; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2014-03-01

    Marine environments are a rich source of Actinobacteria and have the potential to produce a wide variety of biologically active secondary metabolites. In this study, we used four selective isolation media to culture Actinobacteria from the sediments collected from the Chukchi Shelf in the Arctic Ocean. A total of 73 actinobacterial strains were isolated. Based on repetitive DNA fingerprinting analysis, we selected 30 representatives for partial characterization according to their phylogenetic diversity, antimicrobial activities and secondary-metabolite biosynthesis genes. Results from the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the 30 strains could be sorted into 18 phylotypes belonging to 14 different genera: Agrococcus, Arsenicicoccus, Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Citricoccus, Janibacter, Kocuria, Microbacterium, Microlunatus, Nocardioides, Nocardiopsis, Saccharopolyspora, Salinibacterium and Streptomyces. To our knowledge, this paper is the first report on the isolation of Microlunatus genus members from marine habitats. Of the 30 isolates, 11 strains exhibited antibacterial and/or antifungal activity, seven of which have activities against Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans. All 30 strains have at least two biosynthetic genes, one-third of which possess more than four biosynthetic genes. This study demonstrates the significant diversity of Actinobacteria in the Chukchi Shelf sediment and their potential for producing biologically active compounds and novel material for genetic manipulation or combinatorial biosynthesis. PMID:24663116

  9. Trace elements and cathodoluminescence of detrital quartz in Arctic marine sediments – a new ice-rafted debris provenance proxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Müller

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The records of ice-rafted debris (IRD provenance in the North Atlantic – Barents Sea allow the reconstruction of the spatial and temporal changes of ice-flow drainage patterns during glacial and deglacial periods. In this study a new approach to characterisation of the provenance of detrital quartz grains in the fraction > 500 μm of marine sediments offshore of Spitsbergen is introduced, utilizing scanning electron microscope backscattered electron and cathodoluminescence (CL imaging, combined with laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Based on their micro-inclusions, CL and trace element characteristics the investigated IRD grains can be classified into five distinct populations. Three of the populations are indicative of potential IRD provenance provinces in the Storfjord area including Barentsøya and Egdeøya. The results imply that under modern (interglacial conditions IRD deposition along the western Spitsbergen margin is mainly governed by the East Svalbard Current controlling the ice-drift pattern. The presence of detrital quartz from local provinces, however, indicates that variations in IRD supply from western Spitsbergen may be quantified as well. In this pilot study it is demonstrated that this new approach applied on Arctic continental margin sediments, bears a considerable potential for the definition of the sources of IRD and thus of spatial/temporal changes in ice-flow drainage patterns during glacial/interglacial cycles.

  10. Environmental marine geology of the Arctic Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Arctic Ocean and its ice cover are major regulators of Northern Hemisphere climate, ocean circulation and marine productivity. The Arctic is also very sensitive to changes in the global environment because sea ice magnifies small changes in temperature, and because polar regions are sinks for air pollutants. Marine geology studies are being carried out to determine the nature and rate of these environmental changes by study of modern ice and sea bed environments, and by interpretation of geological records imprinted in the sea floor sediments. Sea ice camps, an ice island, and polar icebreakers have been used to study both western and eastern Arctic Ocean basins. Possible early warning signals of environmental changes in the Canadian Arctic are die-back in Arctic sponge reefs, outbreaks of toxic dinoflagellates, and pesticides in the marine food chain. Eastern Arctic ice and surface waters are contaminated by freon and radioactive fallout from Chernobyl. At present, different sedimentary processes operate in the pack ice-covered Canadian polar margin than in summer open waters off Alaska and Eurasia. The geological records, however, suggest that a temperature increase of 1-4C would result in summer open water throughout the Arctic, with major changes in ocean circulation and productivity of waters off Eastern North America, and more widespread transport of pollutants from eastern to western Arctic basins. More studies of longer sediment cores are needed to confirm these interpretations, but it is now clear that the Arctic Ocean has been the pacemaker of climate change during the past 1 million years

  11. Environmental marine geology of the Arctic Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Arctic Ocean and its ice cover are major regulators of Northern Hemisphere climate, ocean circulation and marine productivity. The Arctic is also very sensitive to changes in the global environment because sea ice magnifies small changes in temperature, and because polar regions are sinks for air pollutants. Marine geology studies are being carried out to determine the nature and rate of these environmental changes by study of modem ice and sea-bed environments, and by interpretation of geological records imprinted in the sea-floor sediments. Sea ice camps, an ice island, and polar icebreakers have been used to study both western and eastern Arctic Ocean basins. Possible early warning signals of environmental changes in the Canadian Arctic are die-back in Arctic sponge reefs, outbreaks of toxic dinoflagellates, and pesticides in the marine food chain. Eastern Arctic ice and surface waters are contaminated by freon and radioactive fallout from Chernobyl. At present, different sedimentary processes operate in the pack ice-covered Canadian polar margin than in summer open waters off Alaska and Eurasia. The geological records, however, suggest that a temperature increase of 1-4 degree C would result in summer open water throughout the Arctic, with major changes in ocean circulation and productivity of waters off Eastern North America, and more widespread transport of pollutants from eastern to western Arctic basins. More studies of longer sediment cores are needed to confirm these interpretations, but is is now clear that the Arctic Ocean has been the pacemaker of climate change during the past 1 million years

  12. An inter-laboratory investigation of the Arctic sea ice biomarker proxy IP25 in marine sediments: key outcomes and recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belt, S. T.; Brown, T. A.; Ampel, L.; Cabedo-Sanz, P.; Fahl, K.; Kocis, J. J.; Massé, G.; Navarro-Rodriguez, A.; Ruan, J.; Xu, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the results of an inter-laboratory investigation into the identification and quantification of the Arctic sea ice biomarker proxy IP25 in marine sediments. Seven laboratories took part in the study, which consisted of the analysis of IP25 in a series of sediment samples from different regions of the Arctic, sub-Arctic and Antarctic, additional sediment extracts and purified standards. The results obtained allowed 4 key outcomes to be determined. First, IP25 was identified by all laboratories in sediments from the Canadian Arctic with inter-laboratory variation in IP25 concentration being substantially larger than within individual laboratories. This greater variation between laboratories was attributed to the difficulty in accurately determining instrumental response factors for IP25, even though laboratories were supplied with appropriate standards. Second, the identification of IP25 by 3 laboratories in sediment from SW Iceland that was believed to represent a blank, was interpreted as representing a better limit of detection or quantification for such laboratories, contamination or mis-identification. These alternatives could not be distinguished conclusively with the data available, although it is noted that the precision of these data was significantly poorer compared with the other IP25 concentration measurements. Third, 3 laboratories reported the occurrence of IP25 in a sediment sample from the Antarctic Peninsula even though this biomarker is believed to be absent from the Southern Ocean. This anomaly is attributed to a combined chromatographic and mass spectrometric interference that results from the presence of a di-unsaturated highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) pseudo-homologue of IP25 that occurs in Antarctic sediments. Finally, data are presented that suggest that extraction of IP25 is consistent between Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE) and sonication methods and that IP25 concentrations based on 7-hexylnonadecane as an internal standard

  13. Marine Transportation Implications of the Last Arctic Sea Ice Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, L. W.

    2010-12-01

    Marine access is increasing throughout the Arctic Ocean and the 'Last Arctic Sea Ice Refuge' may have implications for governance and marine use in the region. Arctic marine transportation is increasing due to natural resource developemnt, increasing Arctic marine tourism, expanded Arctic marine research, and a general linkage of the Arctic to the gloabl economy. The Arctic Council recognized these changes with the release of the Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment of 2009. This key study (AMSA)can be viewed as a baseline assessment (using the 2004 AMSA database), a strategic guide for a host of stakeholders and actors, and as a policy document of the Arctic Council. The outcomes of AMSA of direct relevance to the Ice Refuge are within AMSA's 17 recommendations provided under three themes: Enhancing Arctic Marine Safety, Protecting Arctic People and the Environment, and Building the Arctic Marine Infrastructure. Selected recommendations of importance to the Ice Refuge include: a mandatory polar navigation code; identifying areas of heightened ecological and cultural significance; potential designation of special Arctic marine areas; enhancing the tracking and monitoring of Arctic marine traffic; improving circumpolar environmental response capacity; developing an Arctic search and rescue agreement; and, assessing the effects of marine transportation on marine mammals. A review will be made of the AMSA outcomes and how they can influence the governance, marine use, and future protection of this unique Arctic marine environment.

  14. Land-Based Marine Pollution in Arctic

    OpenAIRE

    Haile, Fitsum Gebreselassie

    2014-01-01

    Land-based pollution represents the single most important cause of marine pollution. The threat of land-based pollution to the marine environment is a serious one since it mainly affects coastal waters, which are sites of high biological productivity. The occurrence of high concentrations of pollutants in the Arctic environment has been a concern for many years.. Regional and international actions over the past two decades attempting to manage pollutants in the Arctic environment from land- b...

  15. Chytrids dominate arctic marine fungal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, B T; Gradinger, R

    2016-06-01

    Climate change is altering Arctic ecosystem structure by changing weather patterns and reducing sea ice coverage. These changes are increasing light penetration into the Arctic Ocean that are forecasted to increase primary production; however, increased light can also induce photoinhibition and cause physiological stress in algae and phytoplankton that can favour disease development. Fungi are voracious parasites in many ecosystems that can modulate the flow of carbon through food webs, yet are poorly characterized in the marine environment. We provide the first data from any marine ecosystem in which fungi in the Chytridiomycota dominate fungal communities and are linked in their occurrence to light intensities and algal stress. Increased light penetration stresses ice algae and elevates disease incidence under reduced snow cover. Our results show that chytrids dominate Arctic marine fungal communities and have the potential to rapidly change primary production patterns with increased light penetration. PMID:26754171

  16. Evolution of the Arctic Calanus complex: an Arctic marine avocado?

    OpenAIRE

    Berge, Jørgen; Gabrielsen, Tove M.; Mark A Moline; Renaud, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Before man hunted the large baleen whales to near extinction by the end of the nineteenth century, Arctic ecosystems were strongly influenced by these large predators. Their main prey were zooplankton, among which the calanoid copepod species of the genus Calanus, long considered key elements of polar marine ecosystems, are particularly abundant. These herbivorous zooplankters display a range of adaptations to the highly seasonal environments of the polar oceans, most notably extensive energy...

  17. Sediment-Laden sea ice in the Arctic Ocean: Implications for climate, environment and sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sediments in sea ice were first described by F. Nansen during his famous Fram expedition (1893-1896). Many researchers observed and recorded sediment-laden or dirty sea ice in the Central Arctic, but the origin and incorporation mechanisms are poorly understood and were never the object of detailed studies. Sea ice-rafted sediments are important factors for the albedo and for the ecology and productivity of marine organisms, because of the absorption of solar radiation and lowered light transmission. Beginning in 1987 in the Eastern Arctic Basin and continuing in 1988, 1989 and 1990 in Fram Strait, Barents Sea and Greenland Sea the authors conducted a multi-disciplinary sea ice project on the role and importance of sea ice-rafted sediments for sedimentation in the Arctic Ocean. During the field work very high sediment accumulations were observed and sampled (up to 560 g sediment/kg ice). Most of the material was concentrated in small patches of 1-10 m in diameter, but in some areas, especially in the Eastern Arctic, they covered up to 80% of the ice surface and formed layers of pure mud, 2-3 cm thick. First estimations of the observed concentrations, the annual ice flow through Fram Strait, and the average sedimentation rate in this area show that the necessary sediment flux can be obtained only by sea ice. Thus, sea ice-rafting seems to be the most important input mechanism of fine grained terrigenous (biogenic and terrigenic) sediment into the ice-covered deep sea regions

  18. Alaska Arctic marine fish ecology catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The marine fishes in waters of the United States north of the Bering Strait have received new and increased scientific attention over the past decade (2005–15) in conjunction with frontier qualities of the region and societal concerns about the effects of Arctic climate change. Commercial fisheries are negligible in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, but many marine species have important traditional and cultural values to Alaska Native residents. Although baseline conditions are rapidly changing, effective decisions about research and monitoring investments must be based on reliable information and plausible future scenarios. For the first time, this synthesis presents a comprehensive evaluation of the marine fish fauna from both seas in a single reference. Although many unknowns and uncertainties remain in the scientific understanding, information presented here is foundational with respect to understanding marine ecosystems and addressing dual missions of the U.S. Department of the Interior for energy development and resource conservation. 

  19. Chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants in arctic marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norstrom, R J; Muir, D C

    1994-09-16

    By 1976, the presence of chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants (CHCs) had been demonstrated in fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus), ringed seal (Phoca hispida), hooded seal (Cystophora cristata), bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus), walrus (Obdobenus rosmarus divergens), beluga (Delphinapterus leucas), porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) and polar bear (Ursus maritimus) in various parts of the Arctic. In spite of this early interest, very little subsequent research on contaminants in Arctic marine mammals was undertaken until the mid-1980s. Since that time, there has been an explosion of interest, resulting in a much expanded data base on contaminants in Arctic marine mammals. Except in the Russian Arctic, data have now been obtained on the temporospatial distribution of PCBs and other contaminants in ringed seal, beluga and polar bear. Contaminants in narwhal (Monodon monoceros) have also now been measured. On a fat weight basis, the sum of DDT-related compounds (S-DDT) and PCB levels are lowest in walrus (< 0.1 microgram/g), followed by ringed seal, (0.1-1 microgram/g range). Levels are an order of magnitude higher in beluga and narwhal (1-10 micrograms/g range). It appears that metabolism and excretion of S-DDT and PCBs may be less efficient in cetaceans, leading to greater biomagnification. Polar bears have similar levels of PCBs as cetaceans (1-10 micrograms/g), but with a much simpler congener pattern. DDE levels are lowest in polar bear, indicating rapid metabolism. Effects of age and sex on residue levels are found for all species where this was measured. Among cetaceans and ringed seal, sexually mature females have lower levels than males due to lactation. Although PCB levels in adult male polar bears are about twice as high as females, there is only a trivial age effect in either sex apart from an initial decrease from birth to sexual maturity (age 0-5). Comparison of levels of S-DDT and PCBs in Arctic beluga and ringed seal with those in beluga in the Gulf of St

  20. The evolution of Arctic marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harington, C R

    2008-03-01

    This review deals only with the evolutionary history of core Arctic marine mammals: polar bear (Ursus maritimus), walrus (Odobenus rosmarus), bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus), harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandica), ringed seal (Phoca hispida), bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus), white whale (Delphinapterus leucas), and narwhal (Monodon monoceras). Sections on the evolutionary background of pinnipeds and whales help to provide a better perspective on these core species. Polar bears stemmed from brown bears about the Early to Middle Pleistocene. Fossils are rare; the earliest records are from approximately Early Weichselian deposits of Kew Bridge, London, and Svalbard. Existing Pacific and Atlantic walruses probably arose from splitting of a former Holarctic range during a Pleistocene glacial phase of extensive sea ice in the Canadian Arctic. The earliest known bearded seal remains are from Early to Middle Pleistocene deposits of Norfolk, England, and Cape Deceit, Alaska. Other Pleistocene fossils of this species are recorded from the North Sea, southwestern Sweden, and the Champlain Sea that existed in eastern North America approximately 12 000-10000 BP. The harp seal is the commonest pinniped in the Weichselian deposits of the southern North Sea. The earliest recorded fossil is from about 2 million years ago (2 Ma), from Ocean Point, Alaska. The earliest known Pleistocene ringed seal fossils are from last interglacial deposits near Teshekpuk Lake, Alaska, and Thule, Greenland, although an earlier (3 Ma?) specimen from Malaspina, Alaska, has been reported. This species seems to have been relatively abundant along the coasts of Prince of Wales Island, Alaska, during the Last Glacial Maximum. The bowhead whale probably originated in the high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. The earliest (mid-Wisconsinan) Canadian remains are from Ellesmere and Devon islands. More than 400 radiocarbon-dated bowhead remains have been used to reconstruct Holocene sea ice history in

  1. Black carbon in marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Nieuwenhuize, J.; Van Breugel, P.

    1999-01-01

    Concentrations of black carbon were determined for a number of marine sediments. A comparison of black carbon based on thermal oxidation and hot concentrated nitric acid pretreatments revealed that the latter significantly overestimates combustion derived carbon phases. Black carbon accounts for abo

  2. Radionuclide interactions with marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A critical review of the literature on the subject of the interactions of radionuclides with marine sediments has been carried out. On the basis of the information available, an attempt has been made to give ranges and 'best estimates' for the distribution ratios between seawater and sediments. These estimates have been based on an understanding of the sediment seawater system and the porewater chemistry and mineralogy. Field measurements, laboratory measurements and estimates based on stable-element geochemical data are all taken into account. Laboratory measurements include distribution-ratio and diffusion-coefficient determinations. The elements reviewed are carbon, chlorine, calcium, nickel, selenium, strontium, zirconium, niobium, technetium, tin, iodine, caesium, lead, radium, actinium, thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium. (author)

  3. A quantitative x-ray diffraction inventory of volcaniclastic inputs into the marine sediment archives off Iceland: a contribution to the Volcanoes in the Arctic System programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis D. Eberl

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper re-evaluates how well quantitative x-ray diffraction (qXRD can be used as an exploratory method of the weight percentage (wt% of volcaniclastic sediment, and to identify tephra events in marine cores. In the widely used RockJock v6 software programme, qXRD tephra and glass standards include the rhyodacite White River tephra (Alaska, a rhyolitic tephra (Hekla-4 and the basaltic Saksunarvatn tephra. Experiments of adding known wt% of tephra to felsic bedrock samples indicated that additions ≥10 wt% are accurately detected, but reliable estimates of lesser amounts are masked by amorphous material produced by milling. Volcaniclastic inputs range between 20 and 50 wt%. Primary tephra events are identified as peaks in residual qXRD glass wt% from fourth-order polynomial fits. In cores where tephras have been identified by shard counts in the >150 µm fraction, there is a positive correlation (validation with peaks in the wt% glass estimated by qXRD. Geochemistry of tephra shards confirms the presence of several Hekla-sourced tephras in cores B997-317PC1 and -319PC2 on the northern Iceland shelf. In core B997-338 (north-west Iceland, there are two rhyolitic tephras separated by ca. 100 cm with uncorrected radiocarbon dates on articulated shells of around 13 000 yr B.P. These tephras may be correlatives of the Borrobol and Penifiler tephras found in Scotland. The number of Holocene tephra events per 1000 yr was estimated from qXRD on 16 cores and showed a bimodal distribution with an increased number of events in both the late and early Holocene.

  4. Archaea in Arctic Thermokarst Lake Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheus Carnevali, P. B.; Rohrssen, M.; Dodsworth, J. A.; Kuhn, E.; Williams, M.; Adams, H. E.; Berisford, D. F.; Hand, K. P.; Priscu, J. C.; Walter Anthony, K.; Love, G. D.; Hedlund, B. P.; Murray, A. E.

    2011-12-01

    , which include, in part, a methanogenic community. These findings suggest that the archaeal community in lake sediments of the Northern Slope of Alaska may be more relevant to estimates of methane release from the Arctic than previously thought. Our work will set the grounds to further the understanding of the effect of temperature increases on microbial activities that directly affect the greenhouse gas inventory, and it will expand the census of psychrophiles that thrive in permafrost environments.

  5. Comparative analysis of marine paleogene sections and biota from West Siberia and the Arctic Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmet'ev, M. A.; Zaporozhets, N. I.; Iakovleva, A. I.; Aleksandrova, G. N.; Beniamovsky, V. N.; Oreshkina, T. V.; Gnibidenko, Z. N.; Dolya, Zh. A.

    2010-12-01

    The analysis of the main biospheric events that took place in West Siberia and the Arctic region during the Early Paleogene revealed the paleogeographic and paleobiogeographic unity of marine sedimentation basins and close biogeographic relations between their separate parts. Most biotic and abiotic events of the first half of the Paleogene in the Arctic region and West Siberia were synchronous, unidirectional, and interrelated. Shelf settings, sedimentation breaks, and microfaunal assemblages characteristic of these basins during the Paleogene are compared. The comparative analysis primarily concerned events of the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) and beds with Azolla (aquatic fern). The formation of the Eocene Azolla Beds in the Arctic region and West Siberia was asynchronous, although it proceeded in line with a common scenario related to the development of a system of estuarine-type currents in a sea basin partly isolated from the World Ocean.

  6. Long distance electron transmission in marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    Geochemical observations in marine sediment have recently shown that electric currents may intimately couple spatially separated biogeochemical processes like oxygen reduction at the sediment surface and hydrogen sul-phide oxidation in anoxic layers centimeters below 1. Further experimental studi...... the system. Long distance electron transmission may flourishes in marine sediments exposed to tran-sient oxygen depletion, leaving distinct signatures of such events in the geological record....

  7. Radioactive cesium, cobalt and plutonium in biota, algae and sediments in the nonrestricted areas of the Russian Arctic Seas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biota, macroalgae and sediment samples were collected during scientific expeditions organized by the Murmansk Marine Biological Institute (MMBI) during 1993 - 1996 in the Barents, Petshora, Kara, Laptev and White seas and in the Kola Bay. The purpose of the expeditions was to study the levels of radioactive pollution in the Russian arctic seas

  8. Bacterial and archaeal community structures in the Arctic deep-sea sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; LIU Qun; LI Chaolun; DONG Yi; ZHANG Wenyan; ZHANG Wuchang; XIAO Tian

    2015-01-01

    Microbial community structures in the Arctic deep-sea sedimentary ecosystem are determined by organic matter input, energy availability, and other environmental factors. However, global warming and earlier ice-cover melting are affecting the microbial diversity. To characterize the Arctic deep-sea sediment microbial diversity and its rela-tionship with environmental factors, we applied Roche 454 sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons from Arctic deep-sea sediment sample. Both bacterial and archaeal communities’ richness, compositions and structures as well as tax-onomic and phylogenetic affiliations of identified clades were characterized. Phylotypes relating to sulfur reduction and chemoorganotrophic lifestyle are major groups in the bacterial groups;while the archaeal community is domi-nated by phylotypes most closely related to the ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota (96.66%) and methanogenic Euryarchaeota (3.21%). This study describes the microbial diversity in the Arctic deep marine sediment (>3 500 m) near the North Pole and would lay foundation for future functional analysis on microbial metabolic processes and pathways predictions in similar environments.

  9. Arctic Marine Transportation Program 1979-1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this program was to collect data relevant to developing year-round transportation capabilities in the Arctic Ocean. The US Maritime Administration...

  10. Isolation of Cellulolytic Actinomycetes from Marine Sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Veiga, Manuel; Esparis, Azucena; Fabregas, Jaime

    1983-01-01

    The cellulolytic activity of 36 actinomycetes strains isolated from marine sediments was investigated by the cellulose-azure method. Approximately 50% of the isolates exhibited various degrees of cellulolytic activity.

  11. Diversity, Persistence and Evolution in Marine Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starnawski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    . No evidence for selection of repair and recombination functions in the deeper sediment was found, and high number of motility and chemotaxis was detected through the sediment column. This work casts new light on marine sediment communities, describes their vertical structure and assembly in detail......72 % of our planet is covered by saline water, which at its bottom gradually forms a layer of deposited material. This layer of marine sediments harbors active and diverse prokaryotic communities, of which we know little more than just the phylogenetical associ- ation with their often distant...... treat the whole community as equal, not knowing who and what are the contributions of hydrolyzers, fermenters and terminal oxidizers. In order to address these unknowns I have focused my work on three main aspects of the marine sediments: (i) systematic, analytical description of the microbial...

  12. Towards Arctic Resource Governance of Marine Invasive Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kourantidou, Melina; Kaiser, Brooks; Fernandez, Linda

    2015-01-01

    available. Through analysis of marine invasions in the Arctic, we work to identify and assess patterns in the knowledge gaps regarding invasive species in the Arctic that affect the ability to generate improved governance outcomes. These patterns are expected to depend on multiple aspects of scientific...... research into invasive species threats in the Arctic, including the ways in which known marine invasions are related to different stakeholder groups and existing disparate national and international experiences with invasive species. Stakeholdergroups include dominant industries (fishing, shipping, tourism...... agreements (regarding introductions and mitigations) and existing prevention programs (regional, national and international). We intend to help focus domestic and international governance and research initiatives regarding introduced species on the most valuable, cost effective options, given the knowledge...

  13. Marine Invasive Species Management: Adapting in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Brooks

    2014-01-01

    as a barrier to their establishment. The same characteristics that have previously made the Arctic less open to the establishment and spread of invasive species are ones that make the potential problem so expansive. At stake are unique species and co-evolved systems that have taken millennia to develop. Small...... perturbations in the fragile Arctic ecosystems are likely to have outsized impacts both ecologically and economically. This paper discusses the optimal management of invasive species threats as a process that begins before the arrival of any species, with prevention, and continues in an integrated fashion......The rapid pace of climate change and increased human disturbance of ecosystems in the Arctic is bringing urgency to concern over non-native species introductions and their potential threats to the marine environment and its economic productivity, where before environmental conditions served...

  14. Arctic River Discharge and Sediment Loads --- an Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvitski, J. P.; Overeem, I.; Brakenridge, G. R.; Hudson, B.; Cohen, S.

    2014-12-01

    Evidence suggests that river discharge has been increasing (+10%) over the last 30 years (1977-2007) for most arctic rivers. The peak melt month occurs earlier in the season in 66% of the studied rivers. Cold season flow is also increasing. Satellite discharge estimates, daily, based on microwave radiometry, are now possible from 1998 onwards. Daily river discharge hindcasts over the last 60 years using the water balance model WBMsed at a 10km spatial resolution are now available. The WBMsed model can be used in forecast mode assuming valid input climatology. The challenge here has been the accuracy of sub-polar precipitation grids. While each of these three methods (gauging, orbital sensing, modeling) has temporal and spatial coverage limitations, the combination of all three methods provides for a realistic way forward for estimating local discharge across the pan arctic. Flood inundation products are routinely produced for the pan-arctic using automated mapping algorithms developed by the Dartmouth Flood Observatory. The determination of artic river sediment loads is less than ideal. Some rivers have only been monitored for a short number of years, and many have not been monitored at all. The WBMsed model is perhaps the best method of estimating the daily sediment flux to the Arctic Ocean, at least for rivers where the mean discharge is greater than 30 m3/s. Additionally there is limited-duration field monitoring by national surveys. New methods are being explored, including back calculating the delivery of sediment to the coastal ocean by plume dimensions observed from space (MODIS, LandSat). These methods have had moderate success when applied to plumes extending in the Greenland fjords. Canada maintains an active circa 7-y satellite program (ArcticNet) to track the Mackenzie discharge during the spring-summer runoff period when turbid river water is apt to flow under and over marginal sea ice in the Beaufort Sea.

  15. Chemical pollution in the Arctic and Sub-Arctic marine ecosystems: an overview of current knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savinova, T.N.; Gabrielsen, G.W.; Falk-Petersen, S.

    1995-02-01

    This report is part of a research project in the framework of the Norwegian-Russian Environmental Cooperation, which was initiated in 1991 to elucidate the present status of environmental contaminants in the highly sensitive Arctic aquatic ecosystem, with special focus on sea birds. Although these ecosystems are the least polluted areas in the world, they are contaminated. The main pathways of contamination into Arctic and sub-Arctic marine ecosystems are atmospheric transport, ocean currents and rivers and in some areas, dumping and ship accidents. A literature survey reveals: (1) there is a lack of data from several trophic levels, (2) previous data are difficult to compare with recent data because of increased quality requirement, (3) not much has been done to investigate the effects of contaminants on the cellular level, at individual or population levels. 389 refs., 7 figs., 32 tabs.

  16. Low viral predation pressure in cold hypersaline Arctic sediments and limits on lytic replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo-Lillis, Jesse; Wing, Boswell A; Whyte, Lyle G

    2016-04-01

    Viruses are ubiquitous drivers of microbial ecology and evolution and contribute to biogeochemical cycling. Attention to these attributes has been more substantial for marine viruses than viruses of other environments. Microscopy-based investigation of the viral communities from two cold, hypersaline Arctic springs was undertaken to explore the effects of these conditions on microbe-viral ecology. Sediments and water samples were collected along transects from each spring, from anoxic spring outlets through oxygenated downstream channels. Viral abundance, virus-microbe ratios and modelled virus-microbe contact rates were lower than comparable aqueous and sedimentary environments and most similar to deep subsurface sediments. No individual cell from either spring was visibly infected. Viruses in these springs appear to play a smaller role in controlling microbial populations through lytic activity than in marine water column or surface sedimentary environments. Relief from viral predation indicates the microbial communities are primarily controlled by nutrient limitation. The similarity of these springs to deep subsurface sediments suggests a biogeographic divide in viral replication strategy in marine sediments. PMID:26743115

  17. FRAM - FRontiers in Arctic marine Monitoring: Permanent Observations in a Gateway to the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltwedel, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Our ability to understand the complex interactions of biological, chemical, physical, and geological processes in the ocean is still limited by the lack of integrative and interdisciplinary observation infrastructures. The main purpose of the open-ocean infrastructure FRAM (FRontiers in Arctic marine Monitoring) is permanent presence at sea, from surface to depth, for the provision of near real-time data on climate variability and ecosystem change in an Arctic marine environment. The Alfred-Wegener-Institut I Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung (AWI), together with partner institutes in Germany and Europe, aims at providing such infrastructure for the polar ocean as a major contribution to international efforts towards comprehensive Global Earth Observation. The FRAM Ocean Observing System targets the gateway between the North Atlantic and the Central Arctic, representing a highly climate-sensitive and rapidly changing region of the Earth system. It will serve national and international tasks towards a better understanding of the effects of change in ocean circulation, water mass properties and sea-ice retreat on Arctic marine ecosystems and their main functions and services. FRAM integrates and develops already existing observatories, i.e. the oceanographic mooring array HAFOS (Hybrid Arctic/Antarctic Float Observing System) and the Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site HAUSGARTEN. It will implement existing and next-generation sensors and observatory platforms, allowing synchronous observation of relevant ocean variables, as well as the study of physical, chemical and biological processes in the water column and at the seafloor. Experimental and event-triggered platforms will complement observational platforms. Products of the infrastructure are continuous long-term data with appropriate resolution in space and time, as well as ground-truthing information for ocean models and remote sensing.

  18. Arctic marine mammals and climate change: impacts and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sue E; Huntington, Henry P

    2008-03-01

    Evolutionary selection has refined the life histories of seven species (three cetacean [narwhal, beluga, and bowhead whales], three pinniped [walrus, ringed, and bearded seals], and the polar bear) to spatial and temporal domains influenced by the seasonal extremes and variability of sea ice, temperature, and day length that define the Arctic. Recent changes in Arctic climate may challenge the adaptive capability of these species. Nine other species (five cetacean [fin, humpback, minke, gray, and killer whales] and four pinniped [harp, hooded, ribbon, and spotted seals]) seasonally occupy Arctic and subarctic habitats and may be poised to encroach into more northern latitudes and to remain there longer, thereby competing with extant Arctic species. A synthesis of the impacts of climate change on all these species hinges on sea ice, in its role as: (1) platform, (2) marine ecosystem foundation, and (3) barrier to non-ice-adapted marine mammals and human commercial activities. Therefore, impacts are categorized for: (1) ice-obligate species that rely on sea ice platforms, (2) ice-associated species that are adapted to sea ice-dominated ecosystems, and (3) seasonally migrant species for which sea ice can act as a barrier. An assessment of resilience is far more speculative, as any number of scenarios can be envisioned, most of them involving potential trophic cascades and anticipated human perturbations. Here we provide resilience scenarios for the three ice-related species categories relative to four regions defined by projections of sea ice reductions by 2050 and extant shelf oceanography. These resilience scenarios suggest that: (1) some populations of ice-obligate marine mammals will survive in two regions with sea ice refugia, while other stocks may adapt to ice-free coastal habitats, (2) ice-associated species may find suitable feeding opportunities within the two regions with sea ice refugia and, if capable of shifting among available prey, may benefit from

  19. Radionuclide sorption by marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the solid/solution ratio on distribution ratios measured using a standard batch technique was investigated. Two different deep-sea sediments and the actinides americium, neptunium and plutonium were studied. It is shown that the apparent drop in distribution ratio with increasing sediment concentration can frequently be explained by the presence of a small amount of non-separable or 'low-Rsub(d)' species and that by measuring the Rsub(d) at different solid/solution ratios it is possible to estimate the proportion of low-Rsub(d) species present. These may be colloids or stable complexes. Plutonium exhibited anomalous behaviour with the high-carbonate sediment and the distribution ratio dropped from > 104 to 102 as the solid/soln ratio increased from 2g/l to 20g/l. At high sediment concentrations the plutonium in solution was mainly in the oxidised Pu(V + VI) form and it is postulated that Pu-VI carbonates were the main species present. (author)

  20. Properties of bricks produced from Greenlandic marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Ida Maria Gieysztor; Belmonte, Louise Josefine; Chen, Wan;

    2015-01-01

    ). Miniature bricks werethen prepared according to the optimal conditions and formed at a pressure of 20 MPa, fired at 1020 Cfor 3:5 days at the brickwork Wienerberger Tegl in Helsinge, Denmark. The durability properties suchas porosity, water absorption, bulk density, linear shrinkage, and compressive...... submersion in cold water to fulfilthe requirements for severe weathering according to ASTM-C62 (2013). It was concluded that the firingtemperature needed to be increased in order to obtain a more durable brick-type, suitable for the Arcticclimate.......This study investigated the possibility of a local brick production from fine grained marine sediments (MS) near Sisimiut, Greenland. The assessment is based on the physical and mechanical properties of clay bricks concerning the resistance to the harsh, Arctic weather conditions, together with an...

  1. Eolian sediments in arctic Alaska as sources of paleoenvironmental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eolian sand, silt, and associated fluvial and lacustrine sediments are widespread in Alaska north of the Brooks Range. These sediments and intercalated paleosols record late Quaternary episodes of widespread eolian sediment transport separated by periods of relative landscape stability and the growth of organic soils. The eolian sediments represent paleoenvironments much different from the modem one, in which eolian sediment transport is principally limited to areas adjacent to sediment sources, such as flood plains. Information about these paleoenvironments and their contemporary climates can be obtained by studying the morphology, distribution, and sedimentology of the sediments, and the fossil fauna and flora they contain. Fossils such as beetles and ostracods contained in the fluvial and lacustrine sediments can yield information regarding summer temperature and changes in evaporation/precipitation ratios. Furthermore, the sediments and paleosols can be dated by thermoluminescence and radiocarbon to provide a chronology of paleoclimatic and pale-environmental change. Present data suggest three major episodes of widespread eolian sediment movement during the latest glacial/inter-glacial cycle: (1) a long period coincident with the Wisconsin glaciation during which climate was cooler and drier than today and much of the North Slope was a polar desert; (2) an interval during the latest Pleistocene and early Holocene in which climate was warmer and surface moisture conditions were drier than today; and; (3) one or more brief late Holocene intervals during which climate was probably cooler and drier than today. These eolian sediments and intercalated paleosols are being studied in detail as part of the USGS Climate Change Program in order to understand how past environments in arctic Alaska have responded to climatic change

  2. AMOP (Arctic Marine Oil Spill Program) studies reviewed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-05

    A discussion of the Arctic Marine Oil Spill Program organized in 1976 by the Canadian Federal Government includes: an Arctic Atlas compiled by Fenco Consultants Ltd. to give background information necessary for developing marine oil spill countermeasures for the Arctic north of 60/sup 0/ including the west Greenland coast and the Labrador shelf (geology, meteorology and oceanography, ice conditions, biology, and social factors); program in emergency transport of spill-combatting equipment; and the factors which influence the choice of conveyance, i.e., accessibility of the site, urgency for response, and quantity of material required; laboratory studies involving the release of oil under artificial sea ice in simulated ice formation and decay purposes to determine the interaction of crude oil and first-year sea ice; inability of companies and government to control a major spill in the Labrador Sea because of poor and inadequate transport facilities, communications, and navigational aids, severe environmental conditions, and logistics problems; and studies on the effects of oil-well blowouts in deep water, including formation of oil and gas hydrates, design of oil skimmers, the use of hovercraft, and specifications for an airborne multisensor system for oil detection in ice-infested waters.

  3. Carboniferous non-marine source rocks from Spitsbergen and Bjoernoeya: comparison with the Western Arctic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Koeverden, J.H.; Karlsen, D.A.; Backer-Owe, K. [University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Geoscience

    2011-01-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate that Carboniferous coaly and lacustrine strata have significant liquid hydrocarbon potential in an area extending from the Norwegian Barents Sea in the east to the Canadian Arctic in the west. Organic geochemical analyses were conducted on seven coals and coaly shales from the islands of Spitsbergen (Svalbard archipelago) and Bjpernoeya (Norwegian Barents Sea). The results were interpreted in the context of published data from the two areas, and of time-equivalent non-marine successions on the Finnmark Platform (Norwegian Barents Sea), East Greenland, and the Sverdrup Basin (Canadian Arctic). In each of these areas, a warm and humid climate, together with the onset of rifting on the northern Pangea margin, facilitated the deposition and preservation of organic-rich non-marine sediments on a regional scale. All of the sediments have an elevated content of liptinitic macerals, dominated by alginite or sporinite. In the studied areas, the prolific younger source rocks which may be common in adjacent regions are often immature or absent. The identification of Carboniferous terrestrial strata with source rock potential may therefore enhance the petroleum potential of the studied regions.

  4. Uranium and plutonium in marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The marine sediments contain uranium concentrations that are considered normal, since the seawater contains dissolved natural uranium that is deposited in the bed sea in form of sediments by physical-chemistry and bio-genetics processes. Since the natural uranium is constituted of several isotopes, the analysis of the isotopic relationship 234U/238U are an indicator of the oceanic activity that goes accumulating slowly leaving a historical registration of the marine events through the profile of the marine soil. But the uranium is not the only radioelement present in the marine sediments. In the most superficial strata the presence of the 239+140Pu has been detected that it is an alpha emitter and that recently it has been detected with more frequency in some coasts of the world. The Mexican coast has not been the exception to this phenomenon and in this work the presence of 239-140Pu is shown in the more superficial layers of an exploring coming from the Gulf of Tehuantepec. (Author)

  5. Mercury in dated Greenland marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmund, G.; Nielsen, S.P.

    2000-01-01

    Twenty marine sediment cores from Greenland were analysed for mercury, and dated by the lead-210 method. In general the cores exhibit a mercury profile with higher mercury concentrations in the upper centimetres of the core. The cores were studied by linear regression of In Hg vs, age of the...... sediment for the youngest 100 years. As a rule the mercury decreased with depth in the sediment with various degrees of significance. The increase of the mercury flux during the last 100 years is roughly a doubling. The increase may be of anthropogenic origin as it is restricted to the last 100 years. In...... four cores the concentration of manganese was found also to increase in the top layers indicating diagenesis. In the other cases the higher concentrations were not accompanied by higher manganese concentrations. The mercury flux to the sediment surface was generally proportional to the Pb-210 flux...

  6. HEAVY METAL ACCUMULATION IN SEDIMENT AND FRESHWATER FISH IN U.S. ARCTIC LAKES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metal concentrations in sediment and two species of freshwater fish (lake trout [Salvelinus namaycush], and grayling [Thymallus arcticus]} were examined in four Arctic lakes in Alaska. Concentrations of several metals were naturally high in the sediment relative to uncontaminated...

  7. Modeling sediment deposition from marine outfall jets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terfous, Abdelali; Chiban, Samia; Ghenaim, Abdellah

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional model to study the sediment deposition from marine outfall jets. The introduced unidirectional coupling (fluid-sediment) is an appropriate choice in the case of low-concentrated particle-laden jets such as municipal wastewater discharge, where the concentration of particles is small enough and does not affect the hydrodynamic development of the jet in the nearfield. The sedimentation model takes advantage of the preferential concentration phenomenon. The deposition criterion states that the deposition of sediments begins when the vertical component of the entrainment velocity becomes smaller than the settling velocity. Once the deposition process begins, it is controlled by the settling velocity, entrainment velocity, volume flux, and sediment concentration. The deposition along the jet trajectory is expressed by an ordinary differential equation coupled with the liquid phase equations. Experiments of Lane-Serff and Moran [Sedimentation from Buoyant jets. J Hyd Eng. 2005;131(3):166-174], Cuthbertson and Davies [Deposition from particle-laden, round, turbulent, horizontal, buoyant jets in stationary and coflowing receiving fluids. J Hydr Eng. 2008;134(4):390-402], and Lee [Mixing of horizontal sediment laden jets [dissertation]. Hong Kong: University of Hong Kong; 2010], chosen from bibliography, are used to validate the model. These experiments cover the cases of horizontal and inclined buoyant jets in stationary ambient, horizontal buoyant jets in co-flow current and nonbuoyant horizontal jets in stationary ambient. Good agreement between the experiments and the obtained simulations is revealed. PMID:26732467

  8. Spatial issues in Arctic marine resource governance workshop summary and comment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Brooks A.; Bakanev, Sergey; Bertelsen, Rasmus Gjedssø; Carson, Marcus; Eide, Arne; Fernandez, Linda; Halpin, Patrick; Izmalkov, Sergei; Kyhn, Line A.; Österblom, Henrik; Punt, Maarten; Ravn-Jonsen, Lars; Sanchirico, James; Sokolov, Konstantin; Sundet, Jan H; Thorarinsdóttir, Gudrun G.; Vestergaard, Niels

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly changing Arctic marine ecosystems face new challenges and opportunities that are increasing and shifting governance needs in the region. A group of economists, ecologists, biologists, political scientists and resource managers met in Stockholm, SE, Sept 4–6, 2014 to discuss the...... governance of Arctic marine resources in a spatial context. We report on the findings here....

  9. Quantification of sediment budgets at an arctic delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, A.; Bendixen, M.; Sigsgaard, C.

    2012-12-01

    The impact of ice and snow and freezing temperatures make arctic polar coastal environments quite unique and different from other coastal environments for instance in temperate zones or in tropic areas. The coastal processes and the morphologic evolution of landforms in these areas are strongly influenced by common factors such as cold temperatures, (dis)continuous or sporadic permafrost, and the presence of sea ice cover. Most of these factors have a strong seasonality and the impact of classic coastal processes by waves and tides are often limited to the summer and early fall. Global climate changes induce a lot of changes along the arctic coasts. Sea-levels are rising due to an increased fresh water flux from the glaciers and land ice masses. At the same time, the ice coverage of the coastal waters decreases and the open water periods in summer extend. This might cause extra wave activity with higher erosion rates along many of the shorelines. Many fjords and open coastal stretches in North-East Greenland have deltas. The sources for the sediments for these deltas are located in the drainage basins of rivers that are fed by melting glaciers. These rivers drain pro-glacial and fluvial valleys and may also deliver additional sediment by eroding glacial and peri-glacial deposits in the present coastal plain. Minor sources of sediment transport towards the delta come from reworking of sediments on the delta slope, through lateral transport from the adjacent shores, and through stranded sediment-loaded ice out of the fjord. Losses of sediments occur through further fluvial sediment transport over the delta towards the fjord, or by reworking of delta fringes by coastal processes due to ice, waves and tides. Sandy spits and small barriers often fringe the shoreline of a delta. These features are typically formed and active in the ice-free periods when coastal processes by waves and drifting ice rework the delta front and adjacent coastal cliffs. In this presentation

  10. Polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) in sub-Arctic and Arctic marine mammals, 1986–2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A selection of PCN congeners was analyzed in pooled blubber samples of pilot whale (Globicephala melas), ringed seal (Phoca hispida), minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata), fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus), harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena), hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) and Atlantic white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus acutus), covering a time period of more than 20 years (1986–2009). A large geographical area of the North Atlantic and Arctic areas was covered. PCN congeners 48, 52, 53, 66 and 69 were found in the blubber samples between 0.03 and 5.9 ng/g lw. Also PCBs were analyzed in minke whales and fin whales from Iceland and the total PCN content accounted for 0.2% or less of the total non-planar PCB content. No statistically significant trend in contaminant levels could be established for the studied areas. However, in all species except minke whales caught off Norway the lowest ∑PCN concentrations were found in samples from the latest sampling period. - Highlights: ► PCN concentrations are described in a wide variety of marine mammal species. ► A large geographical area of the North Atlantic and Arctic areas is covered. ► Pooled blubber samples covering a time period of 23 years are evaluated. ► Species- and geographic-dependent PCN congener distribution is seen. ► A decrease in the PCN load is indicated in the studied areas in recent years. - Analysis of PCNs in seven marine mammal species sampled over a 23 year period indicates a decline in the PCN load in sub-Arctic and Arctic areas in recent years.

  11. Modeling nonlinear compressional waves in marine sediments

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, B E

    2009-01-01

    A computational model is presented which will help guide and interpret an upcoming series of experiments on nonlinear compressional waves in marine sediments. The model includes propagation physics of nonlinear acoustics augmented with granular Hertzian stress of order 3/2 in the strain rate. The model is a variant of the time domain NPE (McDonald and Kuperman, 1987) supplemented with a causal algorithm for frequency-linear attenuation. When attenuation is absent, the model ...

  12. Modeling nonlinear compressional waves in marine sediments

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, B E

    2009-01-01

    A computational model is presented which will help guide and interpret an upcoming series of experiments on nonlinear compressional waves in marine sediments. The model includes propagation physics of nonlinear acoustics augmented with granular Hertzian stress of order 3/2 in the strain rate. The model is a variant of the time domain NPE (McDonald and Kuperman, 1987) supplemented with a causal algorithm for frequency-linear attenuation. When attenuation is absent, the model equations are used...

  13. Biodegradation of crude oil in different types of marine sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An active oil-oxidizing bacterium, named Nap C was isolated from the sediment sample of Port Dickson coastal area for this study. Nap C is a gram negative, rod shape marine bacterium. It forms spore when the condition is not favorable. Three different types of treated marine sediment; sand, silt and clay were used in this study. The degradation of Malaysian Tapis A crude oil in the different types of marine sediment were assessed. Silt type of marine sediment was found to sustain highest biodegradation compared to clay type and sand type. 8.6.67% of the Malaysian Tapis A crude oil was degraded in silt type of marine sediment within 10 days of incubation. Where as there were only 60% and 73% of the Malaysian Tapis A crude oil was degraded in sand and clay type of marine sediment respectively. Microbial biomass estimation in the sediment was estimated by indirect phospholipid enumeration technique. (author)

  14. Freshwater and its role in the Arctic Marine System: Sources, disposition, storage, export, and physical and biogeochemical consequences in the Arctic and global oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmack, E. C.; Yamamoto-Kawai, M.; Haine, T. W. N.; Bacon, S.; Bluhm, B. A.; Lique, C.; Melling, H.; Polyakov, I. V.; Straneo, F.; Timmermans, M.-L.; Williams, W. J.

    2016-03-01

    The Arctic Ocean is a fundamental node in the global hydrological cycle and the ocean's thermohaline circulation. We here assess the system's key functions and processes: (1) the delivery of fresh and low-salinity waters to the Arctic Ocean by river inflow, net precipitation, distillation during the freeze/thaw cycle, and Pacific Ocean inflows; (2) the disposition (e.g., sources, pathways, and storage) of freshwater components within the Arctic Ocean; and (3) the release and export of freshwater components into the bordering convective domains of the North Atlantic. We then examine physical, chemical, or biological processes which are influenced or constrained by the local quantities and geochemical qualities of freshwater; these include stratification and vertical mixing, ocean heat flux, nutrient supply, primary production, ocean acidification, and biogeochemical cycling. Internal to the Arctic the joint effects of sea ice decline and hydrological cycle intensification have strengthened coupling between the ocean and the atmosphere (e.g., wind and ice drift stresses, solar radiation, and heat and moisture exchange), the bordering drainage basins (e.g., river discharge, sediment transport, and erosion), and terrestrial ecosystems (e.g., Arctic greening, dissolved and particulate carbon loading, and altered phenology of biotic components). External to the Arctic freshwater export acts as both a constraint to and a necessary ingredient for deep convection in the bordering subarctic gyres and thus affects the global thermohaline circulation. Geochemical fingerprints attained within the Arctic Ocean are likewise exported into the neighboring subarctic systems and beyond. Finally, we discuss observed and modeled functions and changes in this system on seasonal, annual, and decadal time scales and discuss mechanisms that link the marine system to atmospheric, terrestrial, and cryospheric systems.

  15. Microbial diversity in oiled and un-oiled shoreline sediments in the Norwegian Arctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field trials were conducted at an oiled shoreline on the island of Spitsbergen to examine the effect of nutrient addition on the metabolic status, potential for aromatic hydrocarbon degradation, and the phylogenetic diversity of the microbial community in oiled Arctic shoreline sediments. IF-30 intermediate fuel grade oil was applied to the shoreline which was then divided into four plots. One was left untreated and two were tilled. Four applications of fertilizer were applied over a two-month period. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), gene probe and 16S microbial community analysis suggested that bioremediation stimulated the metabolic activity, increased microbial biomass and genetic potential for aromatic hydrocarbon degradation, and increased the population of hydrocarbon degradation of an oiled Arctic shoreline microbial community. The results of this study are in agreement with the results from stimulation of oil biodegradation in temperate marine environments. It was concluded that biodegradation and fertilizer addition are feasible treatment methods for oil spills in Arctic regions. 31 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs

  16. Fluorinated organic compounds in an eastern Arctic marine food web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomy, Gregg T; Budakowski, Wes; Halldorson, Thor; Helm, Paul A; Stern, Gary A; Friesen, Ken; Pepper, Karen; Tittlemier, Sheryl A; Fisk, Aaron T

    2004-12-15

    An eastern Arctic marine food web was analyzed for perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS, C8F17SO3-), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA, C7F15COO-), perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA, C8F17SO2NH2), and N-ethylperfluorooctane sulfonamide (N-EtPFOSA, C8F17SO2NHCH2CH3) to examine the extent of bioaccumulation. PFOS was detected in all species analyzed, and mean concentrations ranged from 0.28 +/- 0.09 ng/g (arithmetic mean +/- 1 standard error, wet wt, whole body) in clams (Mya truncata) to 20.2 +/- 3.9 ng/g (wet wt, liver) in glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus). PFOA was detected in approximately 40% of the samples analyzed at concentrations generally smaller than those found for PFOS; the greatest concentrations were observed in zooplankton (2.6 +/- 0.3 ng/g, wet wt). N-EtPFOSA was detected in all species except redfish with mean concentrations ranging from 0.39 +/- 0.07 ng/g (wet wt) in mixed zooplankton to 92.8 +/- 41.9 ng/g (wet wt) in Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida). This is the first report of N-EtPFOSA in Arctic biota. PFOSA was only detected in livers of beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) (20.9 +/- 7.9 ng/g, wet wt) and narwhal (Monodon monoceros) (6.2 +/- 2.3 ng/g, wet wt), suggesting that N-EtPFOSA and other PFOSA-type precursors are likely present but are being biotransformed to PFOSA. A positive linear relationship was found between PFOS concentrations (wet wt) and trophic level (TL), based on delta15N values, (r2 = 0.51, p 1, suggesting potential for these compounds to biomagnify. The presence of perfluorinated compounds in seabirds and mammals provides evidence that trophic transfer is an important exposure route of these chemicals to Arctic biota. PMID:15669302

  17. On the potential for climate change impacts on marine anthropogenic radioactivity in the Arctic regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current predictions as to the impacts of climate change in general and Arctic climate change in particular are such that a wide range of processes relevant to Arctic contaminants are potentially vulnerable. Of these, radioactive contaminants and the processes that govern their transport and fate may be particularly susceptible to the effects of a changing Arctic climate. This paper explores the potential changes in the physical system of the Arctic climate system as they are deducible from present day knowledge and model projections. As a contribution to a better preparedness regarding Arctic marine contamination with radioactivity we present and discuss how a changing marine physical environment may play a role in altering the current understanding pertaining to behavior of contaminant radionuclides in the marine environment of the Arctic region.

  18. Influence of Sea Ice on Arctic Marine Sulfur Biogeochemistry in the Community Climate System Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deal, Clara [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AL (United States); Jin, Meibing [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AL (United States)

    2013-06-30

    Global climate models (GCMs) have not effectively considered how responses of arctic marine ecosystems to a warming climate will influence the global climate system. A key response of arctic marine ecosystems that may substantially influence energy exchange in the Arctic is a change in dimethylsulfide (DMS) emissions, because DMS emissions influence cloud albedo. This response is closely tied to sea ice through its impacts on marine ecosystem carbon and sulfur cycling, and the ice-albedo feedback implicated in accelerated arctic warming. To reduce the uncertainty in predictions from coupled climate simulations, important model components of the climate system, such as feedbacks between arctic marine biogeochemistry and climate, need to be reasonably and realistically modeled. This research first involved model development to improve the representation of marine sulfur biogeochemistry simulations to understand/diagnose the control of sea-ice-related processes on the variability of DMS dynamics. This study will help build GCM predictions that quantify the relative current and possible future influences of arctic marine ecosystems on the global climate system. Our overall research objective was to improve arctic marine biogeochemistry in the Community Climate System Model (CCSM, now CESM). Working closely with the Climate Ocean Sea Ice Model (COSIM) team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), we added 1 sea-ice algae and arctic DMS production and related biogeochemistry to the global Parallel Ocean Program model (POP) coupled to the LANL sea ice model (CICE). Both CICE and POP are core components of CESM. Our specific research objectives were: 1) Develop a state-of-the-art ice-ocean DMS model for application in climate models, using observations to constrain the most crucial parameters; 2) Improve the global marine sulfur model used in CESM by including DMS biogeochemistry in the Arctic; and 3) Assess how sea ice influences DMS dynamics in the arctic marine

  19. Characterization of marine sediments using analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study deals with the characterization of a marine sediments profile from the Gulf of Tehuantepec, Mexico. Ten sediment samples obtained from a core of 18.3 m of length were analysed. Although there have been numerous marine sediments studies carried out in Mexico, more are needed to better understand the sea floor formation. Crystallographic, morphologic, physical, chemical and gamma ray activity analysis were carried out on the samples. The analysis results showed a decrease in organic matter content as a function of sea depth; this value is related to the specific surface area. Some hazardous materials as Cr, Mn, Ni, Sr and Hg were also identified by PIXE in some samples, probably due to anthropogenic activity. The presence of uranium a naturally occurring element was found in all the samples, suggesting a migration through all materials of strata, radioactive elements such as 226Ra, 235U, 212Pb, 214Pb, 228Ac, 208Ti, 214Bi, 228Ac and 40K were detected. (author)

  20. Diagenetic regimes in Arctic Ocean sediments: Implications for sediment geochemistry and core correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhardt, A.-K.; März, C.; Schuth, S.; Lettmann, K. A.; Schnetger, B.; Wolff, J.-O.; Brumsack, H.-J.

    2016-09-01

    Dark brown sediment layers are a potential stratigraphic tool in Quaternary Arctic Ocean sediments. They are rich in Mn, Fe, and trace metals scavenged from the water column and were most likely deposited during interglacial intervals. In this study, we combine sediment and pore water data from sediment cores taken in different parts of the Arctic Ocean to investigate the influence of early diagenetic processes on sediment geochemistry. In most studied cores, Mn, Co, and Mo are released into the pore waters from Mn oxide dissolution in deeper (>1.5 m) sediment layers. The relationship between sedimentary Mn, Co, and Mo contents in excess of the lithogenic background (elementxs) shows that Coxs/Moxs values are a diagnostic tool to distinguish between layers with diagenetic metal addition from the pore waters (Coxs/Moxs 10), and unaffected layers (Coxs/Moxs from 1 to 10). Steady-state calculations based on current pore water profiles reveal that in the studied cores, the diagenetic addition of these metals from the pore water pool alone is not sufficient to produce the sedimentary metal enrichments. However, it seems evident that dissolution of Mn oxides in the Mn reduction zone can permanently alter the primary geochemical signature of the dark brown layers. Therefore, pore water data and Coxs/Moxs values should be considered before core correlation when this correlation is solely based on Mn contents and dark sediment color. In contrast to the mostly non-lithogenic origin of Mn in the dark brown layers, sedimentary Fe consists of a large lithogenic (80%) and a small non-lithogenic fraction (20%). Our pore water data show that diagenetic Fe remobilization is not currently occurring in the sediment. The dominant Fe sources are coastal erosion and river input. Budget calculations show that Fe seems to be trapped in the modern Arctic Ocean and accumulates in shelf and basin sediments. The Fe isotopic signal δ56Fe of the solid phase is positive (∼0.2-0.3‰) in

  1. Biogeochemistry of pyrite and iron sulfide oxidation in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schippers, A.; Jørgensen, BB

    2002-01-01

    Pyrite (FeS2) and iron monosulfide (FeS) play a central role in the sulfur and iron cycles of marine sediments, They may be buried in the sediment or oxidized by O-2 after transport by bioturbation to the sediment surface. FeS2 and FeS may also be oxidized within the anoxic sediment in which NO3-...

  2. Coastal marine sediment sampling for radionuclide analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    January 1968, a B52 plane carrying 4 nuclear weapons crashed on the sea ice ∼12 km from the Thule Air Base, Northwest Greenland. The benthic marine environment in the 180-230 m deep Bylot Sound was then contaminated with ∼1.4 TBq 239,240Pu (∼0.5 kg). The site was revisited August 1997. Due to the single plutonium injection well defined in time the site is an interesting test case for sediment dating. The present data support an earlier quantification of the sedimentation rate as 3-4 mm per year, i.e. 8-12 cm during the 29 years since the accident. Biological activity has mixed accident plutonium much deeper, down to 20-30 cm, and the 8-12 cm new sediment have been efficiently mixed into the contaminated layer. In addition to the classical bioturbation mixing the upper ∼ 5 cm, the plutonium data indicates the existence of a deeper mixing, probably also caused by bioturbation. This could have implications for the use of excess 210Pb as a sedimentation rate chronometer in coastal environments with rich biological activity. (author)

  3. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrick, Vicki J; Hutchison, Zoë L; Last, Kim S

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura), the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis) and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis) were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris) and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus), showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa). With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally, and perhaps

  4. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki J Hendrick

    Full Text Available The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura, the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus, showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa. With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally

  5. Nonlinear acoustics of water-saturated marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1976-01-01

    Interest in the acoustic qualities of water-saturated marine sediments has increased considerably during recent years. The use of sources of high-intensity sound in oil propsecting, in geophysical and geological studies of bottom and subbottom materials and profiles and recently in marine...... archaeology has emphasized the need of information about the nonlinear acoustic qualities of water-saturated marine sediments. While the acoustic experiments and theoretical investigations hitherto performed have concentrated on a determination of the linear acoustic qualities of water-saturated marine...... sediments, their parameters of nonlinear acoustics are still unexplored. The strong absorption, increasing about linearly with frequency, found in most marine sediments and the occurrence of velocity dispersion by some marine sediments restrict the number of nonlinear acoustic test methods traditionally...

  6. Plutonium in the Arctic Marine Environment — A Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindis Skipperud

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic plutonium has been introduced into the environment over the past 50 years as the result of the detonation of nuclear weapons and operational releases from the nuclear industry. In the Arctic environment, the main source of plutonium is from atmospheric weapons testing, which has resulted in a relatively uniform, underlying global distribution of plutonium. Previous studies of plutonium in the Kara Sea have shown that, at certain sites, other releases have given rise to enhanced local concentrations. Since different plutonium sources are characterised by distinctive plutonium-isotope ratios, evidence of a localised influence can be supported by clear perturbations in the plutonium-isotope ratio fingerprints as compared to the known ratio in global fallout. In Kara Sea sites, such perturbations have been observed as a result of underwater weapons tests at Chernaya Bay, dumped radioactive waste in Novaya Zemlya, and terrestrial runoff from the Ob and Yenisey Rivers. Measurement of the plutonium-isotope ratios offers both a means of identifying the origin of radionuclide contamination and the influence of the various nuclear installations on inputs to the Arctic, as well as a potential method for following the movement of water and sediment loads in the rivers.

  7. Distribution of uranium in marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The marine sediments obtained by means of a sampling nucleus in the Gulf of Tehuantepec, Mexico, they have been object of crystallographic and morphological characterization. The PIXE analysis of some samples in study is shown. The normal methodology to carry out the alpha spectroscopy indicates that the sample should be dissolved, but due to the nature of the marine sediments, it thinks about the necessity to make a fractional separation of the sample components. In each stratum of the profile it separates the organic part and the mineral to recover the uranium. It was observed that in the organic phase, the uranium is in two oxidation states (IV and Vl), being necessary the radiochemical separation with a liquid/liquid column chromatographic that uses the di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid as stationary phase. The uranium compounds extracts are electrodeposited in fine layers on stainless steel disks to carry out the analysis by alpha spectroscopy. The spectroscopic analysis of the uranium indicates us that for each stratum one has a difference marked in the quotient of activities of 234U/238U that depends on the nature of the studied fraction. These results give us a clear idea about how it is presented the effect of the uranium migration and other radioelements in the biosphere, with what we can determine which are the conditions in that these have their maximum mobility and to know their diffusion patterns in the different media studied. (Author)

  8. Biogeographic patterns of bacterial microdiversity in Arctic deep-sea sediments (Hausgarten, Fram Strait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Luigi eButtigieg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine bacteria colonising deep-sea sediments beneath the Arctic ocean, a rapidly changing ecosystem, have been shown to exhibit significant biogeographic patterns along transects spanning tens of kilometres and across water depths reaching several thousands of metres (Jacob et al., 2013. Jacob et al. adopted what has become a classical view of microbial diversity based on operational taxonomic units clustered at the 97% sequence identity level of the 16S rRNA gene and observed a very large microbial community replacement at the Hausgarten Long-Term Ecological Research station (Eastern Fram Strait. Here, we revisited these data using the oligotyping approach with the aims of obtaining new insights into ecological and biogeographic patterns associated with bacterial microdiversity in marine sediments and of assessing the level of concordance of these insights with previously obtained results. Variation in oligotype dispersal range, relative abundance, co-occurrence, and taxonomic identity were related to environmental parameters such as water depth, biomass, and sedimentary pigment concentration. This study assesses ecological implications of the new microdiversity-based technique using a well-characterised dataset of high relevance for global change biology.

  9. Chemical composition of sediments from White Sea, Russian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamza, Olga; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Novigatsky, Aleksandr

    2010-05-01

    The White Sea, the only Russian inland sea, is located on the north of outlying districts of the European part of Russia, belongs to Arctic Ocean. Area of water of sea occupies about 90 tousend square kilometers. The sea can be divided into some general parts: neck, funnel, basin and 4 Bays: Dvina Bay, Kandalaksha Bay, Mezen Bay and Onega Bay. The purpose of this work was geochemical mapping of the surface sediments of this area. The main tasks were: compilation data base of element composition of the surface sediments, geochemical mapping of each element, research of the anormal concentration of elements on the surface. To detect the content of chemical elements several methods were used: atomic absorption spectrometry (P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology); neutron activation analysis (Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry), total and organic carbon analysis, photometric method to detection Si, Al, P (P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology). Bulk composition is one of the fundamental characteristics of sediments and bottom deposites of modern basins. Coarse-grained sediments with portion of pelitic component 80%). Character of elements distribution correlates with facial distribution of sediments from White Sea. According to litologic description, bottom surface of Dvina Bay is practically everywhere covered by layer of fine-grained sand. In the border area between Dvina Bay and White Sea basin on terraced subwater slope aleurite politic silts are abundant. They tend to exhange down the slope to clay silts. In Onega Bay fractions of non-deposition are observed. They are characterized by wide spread of thin blanket poorgraded sediments, which are likely to be relic. Relief of Kandalakscha Bay bottom is presented as alternation of abyssal fosses (near 300 m) with silles and elevations (depressions and in central part of the sea, which is quite wide from both places of original sedimentation and run off sources [2]. Thus, the interrelation

  10. Shifts in Identity and Activity of Methanotrophs in Arctic Lake Sediments in Response to Temperature Changes

    OpenAIRE

    He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J; Pohlman, John W.; Quensen, John; Tiedje, James M.; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH4) flux to the atmosphere is mitigated via microbial CH4 oxidation in sediments and water. As arctic temperatures increase, understanding the effects of temperature on the activity and identity of methanotrophs in arctic lake sediments is important to predicting future CH4 emissions. We used DNA-based stable-isotope probing (SIP), quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), and pyrosequencing analyses to identify and characterize methanotrophic communities active at a range of temperatures (4°C, 10°...

  11. Characterization of marine near-surface sediments by electromagnetic profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates the theory, develops the technology and demonstrates the applicabilities for synchronous in-situ mapping of the magnetic and electric signatures of marine near-surface sediments. A marine electromagnetic profiler has been developed for coastal and shelf operations in 5 to 500 m water depths. The system was designed to resolve subtle and gradual variations in silt and clay content, porosity and diagenesis state of marine sediments at a sub-meter scale. An electromagnet...

  12. Desulfuromonas svalbardensis sp nov and Desulfuromusa ferrireducens sp nov., psychrophilic, Fe(III)-reducing bacteria isolated from Arctic sediments, Svalbard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandieken, V.; Mussmann, M.; Niemann, Hans Henrik;

    2006-01-01

    Two psychrophilic, Gram-negative, rod-shaped, motile bacteria (strains 112(T) and 102(T)) that conserved energy from dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction concomitant with acetate oxidation were isolated from permanently cold Arctic marine sediments. Both strains grew at temperatures down to -2 degrees C...... substrate. As alternatives to Fe(III), they reduced fumarate, S-0 and Mn(IV). Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain 112(T) was most closely related to Desulfuromonas acetoxidans (97.0%) and Desulfuromonas thiophila NZ27(T) (95.5 %), and strain 102(T) to Malonomonas rubra Gra Mal 1(T) (96...

  13. High activity and low temperature optima of extracellular enzymes in Arctic sediments: implications for carbon cycling by heterotrophic microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnosti, C.; Jørgensen, BB

    2003-01-01

    The rate of the initial step in microbial remineralization of organic carbon, extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis, was investigated as a function of temperature in permanently cold sediments from 2 fjords on the west coast of Svalbard (Arctic Ocean). We used 4 structurally distinct polysaccharides...... hydrolysis in order to determine the relative temperature responses of the initial and terminal steps in microbial remineralization of carbon. The temperature optimum of sulfate reduction, 21degreesC, was considerably lower than previous reports of sulfate reduction in marine sediments, but is consistent...... with recent studies of psychrophilic sulfate reducers isolated from Svalbard sediments. A calculation of potential carbon flow into the microbial food chain demonstrated that the activity of just one type of polysaccharide-hydrolyzing enzyme could in theory supply 21 to 100% of the carbon consumed via...

  14. Formate, acetate, and propionate as substrates for sulfate reduction in sub-arctic sediments of Southwest Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glombitza, Clemens; Jaussi, Marion; Røy, Hans;

    2015-01-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are key intermediates in the anaerobic mineralization of organic matter in marine sediments. We studied the role of VFAs in the carbon and energy turnover in the sulfate reduction zone of sediments from the sub-arctic Godthåbsfjord (SW Greenland) and the adjacent...... turnover times increased from several hours at the sediment surface to several years at the bottom of the sulfate reduction zone. Thus, diffusion was not limiting the VFA turnover. Despite constant VFA concentrations, the Gibbs energies (ΔGr) of VFA-dependent sulfate reduction decreased downcore, from −28...... energetic limit at ~ −30 kJ (mol acetate)−1. It is not clear what controls VFA concentrations in the porewater but cell physiological constraints such as energetic costs of VFA activation or uptake could be important. We suggest that such constraints control the substrate turnover and result in a minimum...

  15. Modeling nonlinear compressional waves in marine sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. E. McDonald

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A computational model is presented which will help guide and interpret an upcoming series of experiments on nonlinear compressional waves in marine sediments. The model includes propagation physics of nonlinear acoustics augmented with granular Hertzian stress of order 3/2 in the strain rate. The model is a variant of the time domain NPE (McDonald and Kuperman, 1987 supplemented with a causal algorithm for frequency-linear attenuation. When attenuation is absent, the model equations are used to construct analytic solutions for nonlinear plane waves. The results imply that Hertzian stress causes a unique nonlinear behavior near zero stress. A fluid, in contrast, exhibits nonlinear behavior under high stress. A numerical experiment with nominal values for attenuation coefficient implies that in a water saturated Hertzian chain, the nonlinearity near zero stress may be experimentally observable.

  16. Marine meiofauna, carbon and nitrogen mineralization in sandy and soft sediments of Disko Bay, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rysgaard, S.; Christensen, P.B.; Sørensen, Martin Vinther; Funch, P.; Berg, P.

    2000-01-01

    Organic carbon mineralization was studied in a shallow-water (4 m), sandy sediment and 2 comparatively deep-water (150 and 300 m), soft sediments in Disko Bay, West Greenland. Benthic microalgae inhabiting the shallow-water locality significantly affected diurnal O-2 conditions within the surface...... and was, together with organotrophic O-2 respiration, the most important pathway for carbon mineralization within these sediments. The obtained process rates were comparable to mineralization rates from much warmer localities, suggesting that benthic mineralization in arctic marine environments is...... belonging to Platyhelminthes, Rotifera, Gastrotricha, and Protodriloidae (Polychaeta) occurred only at the sandy locality, whereas Kinorhyncha, Foraminifera, and Cumacea (Crustacea) occurred only at the muddy stations. The larger number of meiofauna individuals at the sandy locality may in part be explained...

  17. Arctic marine climate of the early nineteenth century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Brohan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The climate of the early nineteenth century is likely to have been significantly cooler than that of today, as it was a period of low solar activity (the Dalton minimum and followed a series of large volcanic eruptions. Proxy reconstructions of the temperature of the period do not agree well on the size of the temperature change, so other observational records from the period are particularly valuable. Weather observations have been extracted from the reports of the noted whaling captain William Scoresby Jr., and from the records of a series of Royal Navy expeditions to the Arctic, preserved in the UK National Archives. They demonstrate that marine climate in 1810–25 was marked by consistently cold summers, with abundant sea-ice. But although the period was significantly colder than the modern average, there was a lot of variability: in the Greenland Sea the summers following the Tambora eruption (1816 and 1817 were noticeably warmer, and had lower sea-ice coverage, than the years immediately preceding them; and the sea-ice coverage in Lancaster Sound in 1819 and 1820 was low even by modern standards.

  18. Arctic marine climate of the early nineteenth century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Brohan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The climate of the early nineteenth century is likely to have been significantly cooler than that of today, as it was a period of low solar activity (the Dalton minimum and followed a series of large volcanic eruptions. Proxy reconstructions of the temperature of the period do not agree well on the size of the temperature change, so other observational records from the period are particularly valuable. Weather observations have been extracted from the reports of the noted whaling captain William Scoresby Jr., and from the records of a series of Royal Navy expeditions to the Arctic, preserved in the UK National Archives. They demonstrate that marine climate in 1810–1825 was marked by consistently cold summers, with abundant sea-ice. But although the period was significantly colder than the modern average, there was considerable variability: in the Greenland Sea the summers following the Tambora eruption (1816 and 1817 were noticeably warmer, and had less sea-ice coverage, than the years immediately preceding them; and the sea-ice coverage in Lancaster Sound in 1819 and 1820 was low even by modern standards.

  19. The 'EPIC' exposure assessment methodology - A case study for Arctic marine systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A framework for assessing the impacts of ionising radiation in Arctic areas has been developed in the project EPIC. The initial stage of the assessment requires the selection of a set of reference organisms that could act as representatives of the larger ecosystem. This is achieved through an analysis of transfer pathways and the application of selection criteria. Following this step, the exposure assessment is conducted. Methods for deriving the transfer and fate of radionuclides in Arctic ecosystems are necessary during this procedure as are methods for deriving (weighted or unweighted) dose-rates. Once exposures for reference biota have been derived, they need to be interpreted in terms of biological effects. A case study was performed, in order to demonstrate the exposure assessment part of the EPIC framework for marine systems: A 'worst case' release scenario at the Kola Nuclear Power Plant as described by was selected for the study. The activities of 137Cs, 134Cs, and 90Sr released to the atmosphere were 14.0, 18.7, and 1.7 PBq, respectively. It was assumed that all of the released radioactivity was deposited in the Barents Sea. The NRPA marine box model was employed to simulate sea water and sediment activity concentrations in the study area during the first 20 years after the hypothetical accident. Based on time-dependent sea water activity concentrations derived from the box-model, activity concentrations in marine reference organisms were calculated using equilibrium concentration factors (CFs) were given. Nuclide specific internal Dose Conversion Factors (DCFint) were used to convert activity concentrations in reference organisms to internal dose rates. External dose-rates were calculated from water and (when applicable) sediment activity concentrations using external Dose Conversion Factors (DCFext) and occupancy factors. The latter defines the time spent by biota in various surroundings (e.g. water surface, water column, sediment-water interface

  20. Arctic marine gravity and bathymetry from 3 years of Cryosat-2 SAR altimetry (DTU13 Gravity)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Stenseng, Lars; Knudsen, Per; Jain, Maulik

    The accuracy of the Arctic marine gravity field has for many been severely limited by the availability and accuracy of altimeter data in the Arctic Ocean. Until recently only ERS-1 provided non-repeat (0.9 year) geodetic mission altimetry in the Arctic Ocean and only up to 82N. With the launch of...... Cryosat-2 three years ago a new source of high quality altimetric data has become available. The Cryosat-2 delay Doppler altimeter offers a factor of 20 improvements in along track resolution, an along-track footprint length that does not vary with wave height (sea state) and at least a factor of two in......1 SAR altimetry in the Arctic Ocean for gravity field determination. Extensive testing, interpretation and improvement of methods to handles the new class of data has been investigated and the first result from a new Arctic Ocean wide gravity field will be presented as well as initial test of...

  1. Accelerated delivery of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in recent sediments near a large seabird colony in Arctic Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were measured in sediment cores from ponds located near a large seabird colony at Cape Vera, Devon Island, Arctic Canada. Surface sediment PCB concentrations were ∼5x greater in seabird-affected sites relative to a nearby control pond and were correlated with independent indicators of seabird activity including, sedimentary δ15N and lakewater chlorophyll a and cadmium concentrations. PCB fluxes were amongst the highest recorded from the High Arctic, ranging from 290 to 2400 ng m-2 yr-1. Despite a widespread ban of PCBs in the mid-1970s, PCB accumulation rates in our cores increased, with the highest values recorded in the most recent sediments. Possible mechanisms for the recent PCB increases include a vertical flux step driven by seabird-delivered nutrients and/or delayed loading of PCBs from the catchment into the ponds. The high PCB levels recorded in the seabird-affected sites suggest that seabird colonies are exposing coastal ecosystems to elevated levels of contaminants. - Seabird activity accelerates the delivery of PCBs from marine to terrestrial ecosystems.

  2. Accelerated delivery of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in recent sediments near a large seabird colony in Arctic Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelutti, Neal, E-mail: nm37@queensu.c [Paleoecological Environmental Assessment and Research Laboratory (PEARL), Department of Biology, Queen' s University, 116 Barrie St., Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Liu, Huijun [Department of Environmental Science, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou (China); Smol, John P. [Paleoecological Environmental Assessment and Research Laboratory (PEARL), Department of Biology, Queen' s University, 116 Barrie St., Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Kimpe, Lynda E. [Program for Chemical and Environmental Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Keatley, Bronwyn E. [Paleoecological Environmental Assessment and Research Laboratory (PEARL), Department of Biology, Queen' s University, 116 Barrie St., Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Mallory, Mark [Environment Canada, Iqaluit, NU (Canada); Macdonald, Robie W. [Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Sidney, BC V8L 4B2 (Canada); Douglas, Marianne S.V. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E3 (Canada); Blais, Jules M. [Program for Chemical and Environmental Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2009-10-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were measured in sediment cores from ponds located near a large seabird colony at Cape Vera, Devon Island, Arctic Canada. Surface sediment PCB concentrations were approx5x greater in seabird-affected sites relative to a nearby control pond and were correlated with independent indicators of seabird activity including, sedimentary delta{sup 15}N and lakewater chlorophyll a and cadmium concentrations. PCB fluxes were amongst the highest recorded from the High Arctic, ranging from 290 to 2400 ng m{sup -2} yr{sup -1}. Despite a widespread ban of PCBs in the mid-1970s, PCB accumulation rates in our cores increased, with the highest values recorded in the most recent sediments. Possible mechanisms for the recent PCB increases include a vertical flux step driven by seabird-delivered nutrients and/or delayed loading of PCBs from the catchment into the ponds. The high PCB levels recorded in the seabird-affected sites suggest that seabird colonies are exposing coastal ecosystems to elevated levels of contaminants. - Seabird activity accelerates the delivery of PCBs from marine to terrestrial ecosystems.

  3. Inter- and intraclutch variation in egg mercury levels in marine bird species from the Canadian Arctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal that has been of increasing concern in the Canadian Arctic. We measured total Hg in eggs of three marine birds (Arctic terns Sterna paradisaea, common eiders Somateria mollissima borealis, long-tailed ducks Clangula hyemalis) that breed in the Canadian Arctic, to compare Hg laying order effects from the same clutch and to examine Hg among species. Early-laid eggs of all three species had 24-48% higher Hg concentrations than late laid eggs. Arctic terns had approximately twice the concentration of Hg in their eggs as the two duck species, and Hg in eider eggs from the High Arctic was higher than Hg in eggs from the Low Arctic. Higher Hg in tern eggs was consistent with this species occupying a higher trophic position in marine food webs, as indicated by stable nitrogen isotope (δ15N) values. The egg-laying sequence may need to be considered for Hg biomonitoring studies where small samples sizes are planned, and early eggs may be preferable for such studies since early eggs may be more representative of potential maximum levels of Hg in the marine food webs.

  4. Mineralogical study of surface sediments in the western Arctic Ocean and their implications for material sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Linsen; SHI Xuefa; LIU Yanguang; FANG Xisheng; CHEN Zhihua; WANG Chunjuan; ZOU Jianjun; HUANG Yuanhui

    2014-01-01

    Mineralogical analysis was performed on bulk sediments of 79 surface samples using X-ray diffraction. The analytical results, combined with data on ocean currents and the regional geological background, were used to investigate the mineral sources. Mineral assemblages in sediments and their distribution in the study area indicate that the material sources are complex. (1) Feldspar is abundant in the sediments of the middle Chukchi Sea near the Bering Strait, originating from sediments in the Anadyr River carried by the Anadyr Current. Sediments deposited on the western side of the Chukchi Sea are rich in feldspar. Compared with other areas, sediments in this region are rich in hornblende transported from volcanic and sedimentary rocks in Siberia by the Anadyr Stream and the Siberian Coastal Current. Sediments in the eastern Chukchi Sea are rich in quartz sourced from sediments of the Yukon and Kuskokwim rivers carried by the Alaska Coastal Current. Sediments in the northern Chukchi Sea are rich in quartz and carbonates from the Mackenzie River sediments. (2) Sediments of the southern and central Canada Basin contain little calcite and dolomite, mainly due to the small impact of the Beaufort Gyre carrying carbonates from the Canadian Arctic Islands. Compared with other areas, the mica content in the region is high, implying that the Laptev Sea is the main sediment source for the southern and central Canada Basin. In the other deep sea areas, calcite and dolomite levels are high caused by the input of large amounts of sediment carried by the Beaufort Gyre from the Canadian Arctic Islands (Banks and Victoria). The Siberian Laptev Sea also provides small amounts of sediment for this region. Furthermore, the Atlantic mid-water contributes some fine-grained material to the entire deep western Arctic Ocean.

  5. Bioavailability of sediment-bound contaminants to marine organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, B. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)]|[Colby Coll., Waterville, ME (United States); Neff, J. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)]|[Battelle Ocean Sciences, Duxbury, MA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    The bioavailability of sediment-bound contaminants to marine organisms indicates that there exists a potential for transfer of these contaminants through marine food webs to commercial fisheries products consumed by humans. However, there has been relatively little effort to combine and synthesize data on chemical/biological interactions between benthic animals and seagrasses and the sediments in which they reside on the one hand, and on the chemistry of bioaccumulation on the other. This report provides a conceptual basis for an approach to bioavailability and biomagnification of sediment-bound contaminants that reviews biological and chemical approaches.

  6. Impact of CryoSat-2 for marine gravity field - globally and in the Arctic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Stenseng, Lars; Knudsen, Per; Jain, Maulik

    days repeat offered by CryoSat-2 provides denser coverage than older geodetic mission data set like ERS-1. Thirdly, the 92 degree inclination of CryoSat-2 is designed to map more of the Arctic Ocean than previous altimetric satellites. Finally, CryoSat-2 is able to operate in two new modes (SAR and SAR......Sat-2 in comparison with conventional satellite altimetry have been studied and quantified both globally but particularly for the Arctic Ocean using a large number of marine and airborne surveys providing “ground truth” marine gravity....

  7. Factors Effecting Adsorption of 137 Cs in Marine Sediment Samples in Marine Sediment Samples from the Upper Gulf of Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contamination of 137Cs in sediment is a far more serious problem than in water because sediment is a main transport factor of 137Cs to the aquatic environmental. Most of 137Cs in water could be accumulated in sediment which has direct effect to benthos. This study focused on factors effecting the adsorption of 137Cs in marine sediment samples collected from four different estuary sites to assess the transfer direction of 137Cs from water to sediment that the study method by treat 137Cs into seawater and mixed with different sediment samples for 4 days. The result indicated that properties of marine sediment (cation exchange capacity (CEC), organic matter, clay content, texture, type of clay mineral and size of soil particle) had effects on 137Cs adsorption. CEC and clay content correlated positively with the accumulation of 137Cs in the marine sediment samples. On the other hand, organic matter in sediment correlated negatively with the accumulation of 137Cs in samples. The study of environmental effects (pH and potassium) found that the 137Cs adsorption decreased when concentration of potassium increased. The pH effect is still unclear in this study because the differentiation of pH levels (6, 7, 8.3) did not have effects on 137Cs adsorption in the samples.

  8. PCBs and PCDD/Fs distribution in tissues and organs of marine animals in Russian Arctic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amirova, Z.; Kruglov, E.; Loshkina, E.; Khalilov, R. [Environmental Research and Protection Centre, Ufa (Russian Federation); Melnikov, S.; Vlasov, S. [Regional Centre Monitoring of the Arctic, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2004-09-15

    Studies of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the Russian Arctic were conducted recently by a Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP) project. This project developed new data on the POPs pollution levels in the environment and biosphere, including PCBs and PCDD/Fs, in arctic regions of Russia. Transboundary transport and biomagnification within food chains in arctic regions result in POPs accumulation in tissues of fish and marine animals. The aim of this study was to determine the concentration of indicator PCBs, co-planar PCBs and PCDD/Fs in different tissues and organs of seals, walruses and whales caught near the seashore of Chukotski Peninsula (settlement of Lavrenty), Russia, to determine the background level of arctic biota pollution and to study distribution of toxicants in organisms of marine animals. Sampling was made in the course of the 1{sup st} and the 2{sup nd} stages of the 4{sup th} phase of Raipon/AMAP/GEF project ''Persistent Toxic Substances (PTS), Food Security and Indigenous Peoples of the Russian North'' in 2002 by researchers of the Regional Center for Monitoring of the Arctic (RCMA), St. Petersburg, Russia.

  9. Foreword to the thematic cluster: the Arctic in Rapid Transition—marine ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Kędra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic is warming and losing sea ice. Happening at a much faster rate than previously expected, these changes are causing multiple ecosystem feedbacks in the Arctic Ocean. The Arctic in Rapid Transition (ART initiative was developed by early-career scientists as an integrative, international, multidisciplinary, long-term pan-Arctic network to study changes and feedbacks among the physical and biogeochemical components of the Arctic Ocean and their ultimate impacts on biological productivity on different timescales. In 2012, ART jointly organized with the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists their second science workshop—Overcoming Challenges of Observation to Model Integration in Marine Ecosystem Response to Sea Ice Transitions—at the Institute of Oceanology, Polish Academy of Sciences, in Sopot. This workshop aimed to identify linkages and feedbacks between atmosphere–ice–ocean forcing and biogeochemical processes, which are critical for ecosystem function, land–ocean interactions and productive capacity of the Arctic Ocean. This special thematic cluster of Polar Research brings together seven papers that grew out of workgroup discussions. Papers examine the climate change impacts on various ecosystem elements, providing important insights on the marine ecological and biogeochemical processes on various timescales. They also highlight priority areas for future research.

  10. Marine carbonate system evolution during the EPOCA Arctic pelagic ecosystem experiment in the context of simulated Arctic ocean acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. J. Bellerby

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A major, potential stressor of marine systems is the changing water chemistry following increasing seawater carbon dioxide concentration (CO2, commonly termed ocean acidification. In order to understand how an Arctic pelagic ecosystem may respond to future CO2, a deliberate ocean acidification and nutrient perturbation study was undertaken in an Arctic fjord. The initial setting and evolution of seawater carbonate chemistry were investigated. Additions of carbon dioxide resulted in a wide range of ocean acidification scenarios. This study documents the changes to the CO2 system throughout the study following net biological consumption and gas exchange with the atmosphere. In light of the common practice of extrapolating results to cover regions away from experimental conditions, a modelling study was also performed to assess the representativeness, in the context of the simulated present and future carbonate system, of the experimental study region to both the near and wider Arctic region. The mesocosm experiment represented the range of simulated marine carbonate system for the coming century and beyond (pCO2 to 1420 μatm and thus extrapolations may be appropriate to ecosystems exhibiting similar levels of CO2 system drivers. However, as the regional ocean acidification was very heterogenous and did not follow changes in atmospheric CO2, care should be taken in extrapolating the mesocosm response to other regions based on atmospheric CO2 scenarios.

  11. Methane-derived carbon flow through microbial communities in arctic lake sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J; Pohlman, John W; Tiedje, James M; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2015-09-01

    Aerobic methane (CH4 ) oxidation mitigates CH4 release and is a significant pathway for carbon and energy flow into aquatic food webs. Arctic lakes are responsible for an increasing proportion of global CH4 emissions, but CH4 assimilation into the aquatic food web in arctic lakes is poorly understood. Using stable isotope probing (SIP) based on phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA-SIP) and DNA (DNA-SIP), we tracked carbon flow quantitatively from CH4 into sediment microorganisms from an arctic lake with an active CH4 seepage. When 0.025 mmol CH4 g(-1) wet sediment was oxidized, approximately 15.8-32.8% of the CH4 -derived carbon had been incorporated into microorganisms. This CH4 -derived carbon equated to up to 5.7% of total primary production estimates for Alaskan arctic lakes. Type I methanotrophs, including Methylomonas, Methylobacter and unclassified Methylococcaceae, were most active at CH4 oxidation in this arctic lake. With increasing distance from the active CH4 seepage, a greater diversity of bacteria incorporated CH4 -derived carbon. Actinomycetes were the most quantitatively important microorganisms involved in secondary feeding on CH4 -derived carbon. These results showed that CH4 flows through methanotrophs into the broader microbial community and that type I methanotrophs, methylotrophs and actinomycetes are important organisms involved in using CH4 -derived carbon in arctic freshwater ecosystems. PMID:25581131

  12. Biodegradation of petroleum in marine seep sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Sonakshi

    2016-01-01

    This study presented for the first time the use of intact sediment cores in a continuous sediment-oil-flow-through (SOFT) system for investigating the degradation of petroleum under a simulated petroleum seepage.The biogeochemical response of sediments from hydrocarbon adapted sites like the Caspian Sea, North Alex Mud Volcano in the Eastern Mediterranean, the Santa Barbara Channel and non-adapted site like the Eckernfoerde Bay in the Baltic Sea to petroleum seepage was investigated and compa...

  13. Sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R. S.; Taylor, B. F.

    1978-01-01

    Methanogenesis and sulfate-reduction were followed in laboratory incubations of sediments taken from tropical seagrass beds. Methanogenesis and sulfate-reduction occurred simultaneously in sediments incubated under N2, thereby indicating that the two processes are not mutually exclusive. Sediments incubated under an atmosphere of H2 developed negative pressures due to the oxidation of H2 by sulfate-respiring bacteria. H2 also stimulated methanogenesis, but methanogenic bacteria could not compete for H2 with the sulfate-respiring bacteria.

  14. Marine Mammals and Climate Change in the Pacific Arctic: Impacts & Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme reductions in Arctic sea ice extent and thickness have become a hallmark of climate change, but impacts to the marine ecosystem are poorly understood. As top predators, marine mammals must adapt to biological responses to physical forcing and thereby become sentinels to ecosystem variability and reorganization. Recent sea ice retreats have influenced the ecology of marine mammals in the Pacific Arctic sector. Walruses now often haul out by the thousands along the NW Alaska coast in late summer, and reports of harbor porpoise, humpback, fin and minke whales in the Chukchi Sea demonstrate that these temperate species routinely occur there. In 2010, satellite tagged bowhead whales from Atlantic and Pacific populations met in the Northwest Passage, an overlap thought precluded by sea ice since the Holocene. To forage effectively, baleen whales must target dense patches of zooplankton and small fishes. In the Pacific Arctic, bowhead and gray whales appear to be responding to enhanced prey availability delivered both by new production and advection pathways. Two programs, the Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO) and the Synthesis of Arctic Research (SOAR), include tracking of marine mammal and prey species' responses to ecosystem shifts associated with sea ice loss. Both programs provide an integrated-ecosystem baseline in support of the development of a web-based Marine Mammal Health Map, envisioned as a component of the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS). An overarching goal is to identify ecological patterns for marine mammals in the 'new' Arctic, as a foundation for integrative research, local response and adaptive management.

  15. Biochemical Characterization of a Family 15 Carbohydrate Esterase from a Bacterial Marine Arctic Metagenome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santi, Concetta; Willassen, Nils Peder

    2016-01-01

    Background The glucuronoyl esterase enzymes of wood-degrading fungi (Carbohydrate Esterase family 15; CE15) form part of the hemicellulolytic and cellulolytic enzyme systems that break down plant biomass, and have possible applications in biotechnology. Homologous enzymes are predicted in the genomes of several bacteria, however these have been much less studied than their fungal counterparts. Here we describe the recombinant production and biochemical characterization of a bacterial CE15 enzyme denoted MZ0003, which was identified by in silico screening of a prokaryotic metagenome library derived from marine Arctic sediment. MZ0003 has high similarity to several uncharacterized gene products of polysaccharide-degrading bacterial species, and phylogenetic analysis indicates a deep evolutionary split between these CE15s and fungal homologs. Results MZ0003 appears to differ from previously-studied CE15s in some aspects. Some glucuronoyl esterase activity could be measured by qualitative thin-layer chromatography which confirms its assignment as a CE15, however MZ0003 can also hydrolyze a range of other esters, including p-nitrophenyl acetate, which is not acted upon by some fungal homologs. The structure of MZ0003 also appears to differ as it is predicted to have several large loop regions that are absent in previously studied CE15s, and a combination of homology-based modelling and site-directed mutagenesis indicate its catalytic residues deviate from the conserved Ser-His-Glu triad of many fungal CE15s. Taken together, these results indicate that potentially unexplored diversity exists among bacterial CE15s, and this may be accessed by investigation of the microbial metagenome. The combination of low activity on typical glucuronoyl esterase substrates, and the lack of glucuronic acid esters in the marine environment suggest that the physiological substrate of MZ0003 and its homologs is likely to be different from that of related fungal enzymes. PMID:27433797

  16. Biochemical Characterization of a Family 15 Carbohydrate Esterase from a Bacterial Marine Arctic Metagenome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta De Santi

    Full Text Available The glucuronoyl esterase enzymes of wood-degrading fungi (Carbohydrate Esterase family 15; CE15 form part of the hemicellulolytic and cellulolytic enzyme systems that break down plant biomass, and have possible applications in biotechnology. Homologous enzymes are predicted in the genomes of several bacteria, however these have been much less studied than their fungal counterparts. Here we describe the recombinant production and biochemical characterization of a bacterial CE15 enzyme denoted MZ0003, which was identified by in silico screening of a prokaryotic metagenome library derived from marine Arctic sediment. MZ0003 has high similarity to several uncharacterized gene products of polysaccharide-degrading bacterial species, and phylogenetic analysis indicates a deep evolutionary split between these CE15s and fungal homologs.MZ0003 appears to differ from previously-studied CE15s in some aspects. Some glucuronoyl esterase activity could be measured by qualitative thin-layer chromatography which confirms its assignment as a CE15, however MZ0003 can also hydrolyze a range of other esters, including p-nitrophenyl acetate, which is not acted upon by some fungal homologs. The structure of MZ0003 also appears to differ as it is predicted to have several large loop regions that are absent in previously studied CE15s, and a combination of homology-based modelling and site-directed mutagenesis indicate its catalytic residues deviate from the conserved Ser-His-Glu triad of many fungal CE15s. Taken together, these results indicate that potentially unexplored diversity exists among bacterial CE15s, and this may be accessed by investigation of the microbial metagenome. The combination of low activity on typical glucuronoyl esterase substrates, and the lack of glucuronic acid esters in the marine environment suggest that the physiological substrate of MZ0003 and its homologs is likely to be different from that of related fungal enzymes.

  17. Spatial issues in Arctic marine resource governance workshop summary and comment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Brooks; Bakanev, Sergey; Bertelsen, Rasmus Gjedssø; Carson, Marcus; Eide, Arne; Fernandez, Linda; Halpin, Patrick N.; Izmalkov, Sergei; Kyhn, Line Anker; Österblom, Henrik; Punt, Maarten; Ravn-Jonsen, Lars; Sanchirico, James; Sokolov, Konstantin; Sundet, Jan; Thorarinsdóttir, Gudrun; Vestergaard, Niels

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly changing Arctic marine ecosystems face new challenges and opportunities that are increasing and shifting governance needs in the region. A group of economists, ecologists, biologists, political scientists and resource managers met in Stockholm, SE, Sept 4–6, 2014 to discuss the govern...

  18. Proceedings of the sixteenth Arctic and Marine Oil Spill Program (AMOP) technical seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At a conference on marine and Arctic oil spills, papers were presented on the behavior and fate of spilled oil, spill contingency planning, biological effects and bioremediation, oil spill countermeasures, spill modelling, in-situ burning of spilled oil, oil spill treatment agents, remote sensing, and shoreline protection and cleanup. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 66 papers from this conference

  19. Measuring biogenic silica in marine sediments and suspended matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMaster, David J.

    Measuring the biogenic silica content of marine sediments and suspended matter is essential for a variety of geochemical, biological, and sedimentological studies. Biota forming siliceous skeletal material account for as much as one third of the primary productivity in the ocean [Lisitzin, 1972] and a significant portion (2 to 70% by weight) of open-ocean sediments. Biogenic silica measurements reveal important information concerning the bulk chemistry of suspended material or sediment and are essential in any type of silica flux study in the water column or seabed. Analyses of this biogenic phase in marine plankton are useful in characterizing the basic types of biota present and in comparing the distributions of particulate and dissolved silicate when evaluating nutrient dynamics [Nelson and Smith, 1986]. In the marine environment, diatoms, radiolaria, sponges, and silicoflagellates are the common types of siliceous biota.

  20. Identification of functionally active aerobic methanotrophs in sediments from an arctic lake using stable isotope probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J.; Pohlman, John W.; Catranis, Catharine; Quensen, John; Tiedje, James M.; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Arctic lakes are a significant source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4), but the role that methane oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) play in limiting the overall CH4 flux is poorly understood. Here, we used stable isotope probing (SIP) techniques to identify the metabolically active aerobic methanotrophs in upper sediments (0–1 cm) from an arctic lake in northern Alaska sampled during ice-free summer conditions. The highest CH4 oxidation potential was observed in the upper sediment (0–1 cm depth) with 1.59 μmol g wet weight-1 day-1 compared with the deeper sediment samples (1–3 cm, 3–5 cm and 5–10 cm), which exhibited CH4 oxidation potentials below 0.4 μmol g wet weight-1 day-1. Both type I and type II methanotrophs were directly detected in the upper sediment total communities using targeted primer sets based on 16S rRNA genes. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and functional genes (pmoA and mxaF) in the 13C-DNA from the upper sediment indicated that type I methanotrophs, mainly Methylobacter, Methylosoma, Methylomonas and Methylovulum miyakonense, dominated the assimilation of CH4. Methylotrophs, including the genera Methylophilus and/or Methylotenera, were also abundant in the 13CDNA. Our results show that a diverse microbial consortium acquired carbon from CH4 in the sediments of this arctic lake.

  1. Reburial of fossil organic carbon in marine sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Dickens, Angela F.; Gélinas, Yves; Masiello, Caroline A.; Wakeham, Stuart; Hedges, John I.

    2004-01-01

    Marine sediments act as the ultimate sink for organic carbon, sequestering otherwise rapidly cycling carbon for geologic timescales. Sedimentary organic carbon burial appears to be controlled by oxygen exposure time in situ, and much research has focused on understanding the mechanisms of preservation of organic carbon. In this context, combustion-derived black carbon has received attention as a form of refractory organic carbon that may be preferentially preserved in soils and sediments. How...

  2. Biodiversity of Arctic marine ecosystems and responses to climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, C.; Bluhm, B.; Gallucci, V.;

    2012-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean is undergoing major changes in many of its fundamental physical constituents, from a shift from multi- to first-year ice, shorter ice-covered periods, increasing freshwater runoff and surface stratification, to warming and alteration in the distribution of water masses. These cha...

  3. Future Arctic marine access: analysis and evaluation of observations, models, and projections of sea ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Rogers

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available There is an emerging need for regional applications of sea ice projections to provide more accuracy and greater detail to scientists, national, state and local planners, and other stakeholders. The present study offers a prototype for a comprehensive, interdisciplinary study to bridge observational data, climate model simulations, and user needs. The study's first component is an observationally based evaluation of Arctic sea ice trends during 1980–2008, with an emphasis on seasonal and regional differences relative to the overall pan-Arctic trend. Regional sea ice loss has varied, with a significantly larger decline of winter maximum (January–March extent in the Atlantic region than in other sectors. A lead–lag regression analysis of Atlantic sea ice extent and ocean temperatures indicates that reduced sea ice extent is associated with increased Atlantic Ocean temperatures. Correlations between the two variables are greater when ocean temperatures lag rather than lead sea ice. The performance of 13 global climate models is evaluated using three metrics to compare sea ice simulations with the observed record. We rank models over the pan-Arctic domain and regional quadrants and synthesize model performance across several different studies. The best performing models project reduced ice cover across key access routes in the Arctic through 2100, with a lengthening of seasons for marine operations by 1–3 months. This assessment suggests that the Northwest and Northeast Passages hold potential for enhanced marine access to the Arctic in the future, including shipping and resource development opportunities.

  4. Remnants of marine bacterial communities can be retrieved from deep sediments in lakes of marine origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenheder, Silke; Comte, Jérôme; Zha, Yinghua; Samad, Md Sainur; Sinclair, Lucas; Eiler, Alexander; Lindström, Eva S

    2016-08-01

    Some bacteria can be preserved over time in deep sediments where they persist either in dormant or slow-growing vegetative stages. Here, we hypothesized that such cells can be revived when exposed to environmental conditions similar to those before they were buried in the sediments. To test this hypothesis, we collected bacteria from sediment samples of different ages (140-8500 calibrated years before present, cal BP) from three lakes that differed in the timing of their physical isolation from the Baltic Sea following postglacial uplift. After these bacterial communities were grown in sterile water from the Baltic Sea, we determined the proportion of 16S rRNA sequence reads associated with marine habitats by extracting the environment descriptive terms of homologous sequences retrieved from public databases. We found that the proportion of reads associated with marine descriptive term was significantly higher in cultures inoculated with sediment layers formed under Baltic conditions and where salinities were expected to be similar to current levels. Moreover, a similar pattern was found in the original sediment layers. Our study, therefore, suggests that remnants of marine bacterial communities can be preserved in sediments over thousands of years and can be revived from deep sediments in lakes of marine origin. PMID:26929161

  5. Radionuclides in marine sediments - Distribution and processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NO-1 part of EKO-1 involved both laboratory and field studies. The laboratory studies have been discribed earlier in this report. The following is a summary of the field studies. At station 26 (Norwegian Sea) the sediments seem to be influenced by radiocesium from the Chernobyl accident. This may be due to direct fallout deposition to the sea surface and followed by a rapid sinking and sedimentation. At station 16 (North Sea) some influence from Sellafield plutonium is suggested, as the plutonium ratio is significantly higher (0.07-0.09) than would be expected from global fallout (0.03). Sedimentation rates based on analysis of 210Pb or 210Po varied between 0.03 cm/year - 0.25 cm/year. A surprisingly low sedimentation rate was found in the tenisey Bay (0.05 cm/year). It is possible that the dating method is less suited in this area, due to the long winter ice cover. In general, the rough estimates on Kd values for 137Cs obtained empirically are highter than Kd values obtained from the alboratory studies. This may be due to the fact that the 2 cm surface sediment in most cases has accumulated over many years, carrying contamination from the early eighties when levels of 137Cs in the sea water were higher. The 137Cs in the sediments it now fixed, or being remobilized only very slowly. Burial of the contamination by sedimentation may also make it unavailable for exchange with free water masses. (EHS)

  6. Oceanographic Survey. 3. Radiological survey of marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A part of the outcomes of radiological survey of marine sediments were reported and countermeasures for some problems in the survey were discussed. A modified Smith-McIntyre's collector in a column shape was used for sampling of marine sediments and its structure was outlined in this report. The survey was made at inner sides of bay, shallow areas of coast up to the depth of 200 m, offshore areas of sea and open sea areas. There were two problems for analysis of radionuclides in marine sediments. The first was the age of marine sediment layer to analyze. In the survey points at which amounts of sedimentation were comparatively large, analysis was made based on the vertical distribution of Pb-210. The second was the factor(s) affecting the concentration of radionuclides in marine sediments. The accumulation amounts of Pb-210 and Cs-137 were determined for the samples collected in the Sagami Bay and a close correlation was found between the two accumulations, suggesting that the accumulation of Pb-210 is available for the factor to assess the pollution due to artificial radionuclides. The accumulations of Cs-137 and Bi-207 were compared among five points; a north-east (A), a center (B) and a south-west (C) region of Pacific, the Japan Sea (D) and the Uraga Channel - the Sagami Bay (E). The amount of accumulation for Cs-137 was the largest at (E) followed by (D) and the accumulation of Bi-207 was also greatest at (E). However, the reason of those high levels at (E) has not been elucidated. (M.N.)

  7. Measurement of uranium and thorium in marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakes, oceans and seas accumulate sediments. These sediments constitute a file of the last environmental conditions going up in some cases to thousands of years. In our study, we consulted this file by analyzing radioisotopes of Uranium and Thorium that are included in a carrot of marine sediment taken from the south of Mediterranean Sea. When we applied the technique developed by the maritime environment's laboratory of Monaco, we found spectra with bad resolutions. For this reason, the optimization of this protocol appeared necessary. (Author).

  8. Algal and archaeal polyisoprenoids in a recent marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bian, Liangqiao; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Xie, Tianmin;

    2001-01-01

    Analyses of C-13 contents of individual organic molecules in a marine sediment show that crocetane, 2,6,11,15-tetramethylhexadecane, an isomer of phytane, is produced by microorganisms that use methane as their main source of carbon. The sediments lie at a water depth of 68 m in the Kattegat, the...... strait between Denmark and Sweden. Crocetane appears first 185 cm below the sediment-water interface, in the zone marking the transition from sulfate reduction to methanogenesis. Its delta C-13 value is -90 +/- 10 parts per thousand versus Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite (VPDB). Its structure, which includes...

  9. Climate change alters the structure of arctic marine food webs due to poleward shifts of boreal generalists

    OpenAIRE

    Kortsch, Susanne; Primicerio, Raul; Fossheim, Maria; Dolgov, Andrey V.; Aschan, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Climate-driven poleward shifts, leading to changes in species composition and relative abundances, have been recently documented in the Arctic. Among the fastest moving species are boreal generalist fish which are expected to affect arctic marine food web structure and ecosystem functioning substantially. Here, we address structural changes at the food web level induced by poleward shifts via topological network analysis of highly resolved boreal and arctic food webs of the ...

  10. Sediment Nitrification, Denitrification, and Nitrous Oxide Production in a Deep Arctic Lake †

    OpenAIRE

    Klingensmith, K. M.; Alexander, V.

    1983-01-01

    We used a combination of 15N tracer methods and a C2H2 blockage technique to determine the role of sediment nitrification and denitrification in a deep oligotrophic arctic lake. Inorganic nitrogen concentrations ranged between 40 and 600 nmol · cm−3, increasing with depth below the sediment-water interface. Nitrate concentrations were at least 10 times lower, and nitrate was only detectable within the top 0 to 6 cm of sediment. Eh and pH profiles showed an oxidized surface zone underlain by m...

  11. Meiofauna increases bacterial denitrification in marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaglia, S; Nascimento, F J A; Bartoli, M; Klawonn, I; Brüchert, V

    2014-01-01

    Denitrification is a critical process that can alleviate the effects of excessive nitrogen availability in aquatic ecosystems subject to eutrophication. An important part of denitrification occurs in benthic systems where bioturbation by meiofauna (invertebrates macrofauna, on nitrate reduction, carbon mineralization and methane fluxes. In sediments with abundant and diverse meiofauna, denitrification is double that in sediments with low meiofauna, suggesting that meiofauna bioturbation has a stimulating effect on nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria. However, high meiofauna densities in the presence of bivalves do not stimulate denitrification, while dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium rate and methane efflux are significantly enhanced. We demonstrate that the ecological interactions between meio-, macrofauna and bacteria are important in regulating nitrogen cycling in soft-sediment ecosystems. PMID:25318852

  12. Extending Hydrologic Information Systems to accommodate Arctic marine observations data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Eric S.; Maidment, David R.

    2014-04-01

    The Chukchi Sea Offshore Monitoring in Drilling Area - Chemical and Benthos (COMIDA CAB) project characterizes the biota and chemistry of the continental shelf ecosystem of a region of the Chukchi Sea to form a baseline survey of environmental conditions before drilling for oil commences. This paper describes the COMIDA CAB project data and processing methods, which provide a novel approach to data tracking and archiving from marine sampling cruises. This approach features an adaptation of the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science. Observations Data Model for application with physical, chemical, and biological oceanographic data - a new extension of the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System - thus bringing hydroinformatics into the oceanographic realm. Environmental sampling has been carried out by five separate scientific teams who characterize particular classes of physical, chemical and biological variables, and who each have their own methods of processing samples in their laboratories following the two sampling cruises made to the Chukchi Sea in the summers of 2009 and 2010. The results of their observations and analyses are stored in data files, mostly in Excel format, whose structure is defined differently by each scientific team. In all, the 2009 and 2010 COMIDA CAB field efforts yielded a database of 510,405 data values. Of these, 474,129 were derived from continuous in-situ data sonde profiles and 36,276 were derived from non-sonde extracted samples of the sediment, epibenthos, and water column. These data values represent 301 variables measured at 65 sites and originated from 26 different source files. The biological observations represented 519 distinct taxa. The data from these files are transformed and synthesized into a comprehensive project database in which a set of standardized descriptors of each observed data value are specified and each data value is linked to the data file from which it was created to establish a

  13. Hotspots in cold seas: The composition, distribution, and abundance of marine birds in the North American Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sarah N. P.; Gjerdrum, Carina; Morgan, Ken H.; Mallory, Mark L.

    2014-03-01

    The distribution and thickness of sea ice in the Arctic is changing rapidly, resulting in changes to Arctic marine ecosystems. Seabirds are widely regarded as indicators of marine environmental change, and understanding their distribution patterns can serve as a tool to monitor and elucidate biological changes in the Arctic seas. We examined the at-sea distribution of seabirds in the North American Arctic in July and August, 2007-2012, and marine areas of high density were identified based on bird densities for four foraging guilds. Short-tailed shearwaters (Puffinus tenuirostris) were the most abundant species observed. Northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis), thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia), and dovekies (Alle alle) were also sighted in large numbers. Few birds were sighted between Dolphin and Union Strait and King William Island. Areas of high density over multiple years were found throughout the entire western portion of the study area (Bering Sea, Bering Strait, and Chukchi Sea), Lancaster Sound, Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, and the low Arctic waters off Newfoundland. These waters are characterized by high primary productivity. This study is the first to document the marine distribution of seabirds across the entire North American Arctic within the same time period, providing a critical baseline for monitoring the distribution and abundance of Arctic seabirds in a changing Arctic seascape.

  14. Shifts in identity and activity of methanotrophs in arctic lake sediments in response to temperature changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J.; Pohlman, John W.; Quensen, John; Tiedje, James M.; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH4) flux to the atmosphere is mitigated via microbial CH4 oxidation in sediments and water. As arctic temperaturesincrease, understanding the effects of temperature on the activity and identity of methanotrophs in arctic lake sediments is importantto predicting future CH4 emissions. We used DNA-based stable-isotope probing (SIP), quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), andpyrosequencing analyses to identify and characterize methanotrophic communities active at a range of temperatures (4°C, 10°C,and 21°C) in sediments (to a depth of 25 cm) sampled from Lake Qalluuraq on the North Slope of Alaska. CH4 oxidation activitywas measured in microcosm incubations containing sediments at all temperatures, with the highest CH4 oxidation potential of37.5 mol g1 day1 in the uppermost (depth, 0 to 1 cm) sediment at 21°C after 2 to 5 days of incubation. Q-PCR of pmoA and ofthe 16S rRNA genes of type I and type II methanotrophs, and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes in 13C-labeled DNA obtained bySIP demonstrated that the type I methanotrophs Methylobacter, Methylomonas, and Methylosoma dominated carbon acquisitionfrom CH4 in the sediments. The identity and relative abundance of active methanotrophs differed with the incubation temperature.Methylotrophs were also abundant in the microbial community that derived carbon from CH4, especially in the deeper sediments(depth, 15 to 20 cm) at low temperatures (4°C and 10°C), and showed a good linear relationship (R0.82) with the relativeabundances of methanotrophs in pyrosequencing reads. This study describes for the first time how methanotrophiccommunities in arctic lake sediments respond to temperature variations.

  15. The Coast Guard Federal Security Service of Russia and protection of marine economic activities in the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudinov N. N.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aims and purposes outlined in the Strategy and the state programme on the Arctic for provision of safety of marine activities and communications in the region have been considered. Based on historical analysis the security problems of marine activities occurring in the course of social and economic development of the Arctic zone, their solutions, the role and tasks of the Coast Guard Federal Security Service in this process have been described

  16. Influence of biochar amendments on marine sediment trace metal bioavailability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, G. E.; Hsu-Kim, H.

    2014-12-01

    Biochar has become a desirable material for use in agricultural application to enhance soil quality and in-situ soil and sediment remediation to immobilize organic contaminants. We investigated the effects of biochar sediment amendments on the bioavailability of a suite of inorganic trace metals (Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb) in contaminated sediments from multiple sites in Elizabeth River, VA. We incubated sediments in microcosms with a variety of water column redox and salinity conditions and compared sediments amended with two types of woody biochar to sediments amended with charcoal activated carbon and unamended sediments. We leached sediments in artificial gut fluid mimic of the benthic invertebrate Arenicola marina as a measure of bioavailability of the trace metals analyzed. In unamended anaerobic sediments, the gut fluid mimic leachable fraction of each trace metal is 1-4% of the total sediment concentration for each metal. Initial results indicate that in anaerobic microcosms, woody biochar sediment amendments (added to 5% dry wt) decrease the gut fluid mimic leachable fraction by 30-90% for all trace metals analyzed, and have comparable performance to charcoal activated carbon amendments. However, in microcosms without controlled redox conditions, woody biochar amendments increase the bioavailable fraction of Ni and Cu by up to 80%, while decreasing the bioavailable fraction of Co, Zn, and Pb by approximately 50%; charcoal activated carbon amendments decreased the bioavailability of all trace metals analyzed by approximately 20%. In microcosms without an overlying water column, biochar and activated carbon amendments had no significant effects on trace metal bioavailability. This research demonstrates that biochar can effectively decrease the bioavailability of trace metals in marine sediments, but its efficiency is metal-specific, and environmental conditions impact biochar performance.

  17. Evaluating Sediment Stability at Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. A.; Magalen, J.; Roberts, J.; Chang, G.

    2014-12-01

    Development of offshore alternative energy production methods through the deployment of Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) devices (e.g. wave, tidal, and wind generators) in the United States continues at a rapid pace, with significant public and private investment in recent years. The installation of offshore MHK systems includes cabling to the shoreline and some combination of bottom foundation (e.g., piles, gravity bases, suction buckets) or anchored floating structure. Installation of any of this infrastructure at the seabed may affect coastal sediment dynamics. It is, therefore, necessary to evaluate the interrelationships between hydrodynamics and seabed dynamics and the effects of MHK foundations and cables on sediment transport. If sufficient information is known about the physical processes and sediment characteristics of a region, hydrodynamic and sediment transport models may be developed to evaluate near and far-field sediment transport. The ultimate goal of these models and methods is to quantitatively evaluate changes to the baseline seabed stability due to the installation of MHK farms in the water. The objective of the present study is to evaluate and validate wave, current, and sediment transport models (i.e., a site analysis) that may be used to estimate risk of sediment mobilization and transport. While the methodology and examples have been presented in a draft guidance document (Roberts et al., 2013), the current report presents an overall strategy for model validation, specifically for a case study in the Santa Cruz Bight, Monterey Bay, CA. Innovative techniques to quantify the risk of sediment mobility has been developed to support these investigations. Public domain numerical models are utilized to estimate the near-shore wave climate (SWAN: Simulating Waves Near-shore) and circulation and sediment transport (EFDC: Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code) regimes. The models were validated with field hydrodynamic data. Sediment size information was

  18. Sorption behavior of nonylphenol on marine sediments: Effect of temperature, medium, sediment organic carbon and surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → NP sorption kinetics accorded with non-linear Ho-McKay pseudo-second-order model. → Kd values showed positive correlation with sediment OC contents. → Medium salinity showed positive correlation with Kd and negative with DOC. → CTAB enhanced NP sorption amount the most while SDBS enhanced the lest. → NP sorption was an exothermic physical and spontaneous entropy-decreasing reaction. - Abstract: The sorption behavior of nonylphenol (NP, a toxic endocrine disruptor) on marine sediments was studied in detail through a series of kinetic and thermodynamic sorption experiments. The results showed that the sorption reaction of NP on marine sediments reached equilibrium in 1.5 h and that it accorded well with the non-linear Ho-McKay pseudo-second-order model. The sorption isotherms of NP on H2O-treated sediments could be well described by the Linear isotherm model, while the sorption isotherm on H2O2-treated sediments could be well fitted with the Freundlich isotherm model. A positive correlation was found between the distribution coefficient (Kd) and the sediment organic carbon contents. The medium salinity showed a positive relation with the Kd and a negative relation with the dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) enhanced the sorption amount of NP the most, while sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS) enhanced it the least. The sorption reaction of NP on marine sediments was a spontaneous, physical, exothermic and entropy-decreasing process.

  19. Dating methods about bulk sediments in marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the development of science and technology progress, the studies about dating methods of sediments become more and more precise. Widely used of so many dating methods have offered reliable scientific evidence for the foundation of accurate chronostratigraphic framework in different region. Considering the difference of sedimentary environment as well as sediment types between inland and submarine, the dating method should be secerned. However, there are few articles which specially introduce the dating methods about bulk sediments in submarine environment. Based on the conclusion and summarized about many dating methods, especially focus on the sediment types and dating range,the conformable isotope dating methods (210Pb, 14C), OSL dating and comparatively dating methods (ie., Oxygen isotope curve, Paleomagnetic) which suitable for the bulk sediments in marine environment are suggested. Dating have an very important function in marine geological studies. In order to enhance the veracity and reliability of the dating data, the proper methods based on sediment types and estimated age range are selected. On the other hand,the progress cross-comparison during different dating methods are given. (authors)

  20. Trophodynamics of some PFCs and BFRs in a western Canadian Arctic marine food web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomy, Gregg T; Pleskach, Kerri; Ferguson, Steve H; Hare, Jonathon; Stern, Gary; Macinnis, Gordia; Marvin, Chris H; Loseto, Lisa

    2009-06-01

    The trophodynamics of per- and polyfluorinated compounds and bromine-based flame retardants were examined in components of a marine food web from the western Canadian Arctic. The animals studied and their relative trophic status in the food web, established using stable isotopes of nitrogen (delta15N), were beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) > ringed seal (Phoca hispida) > Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida) > Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) approximately equal to Arctic cisco (Coregonus autumnalis) > pelagic amphipod (Themisto libellula) > Arctic copepod (Calanus hyperboreus). For the brominated diphenyl ethers, the lipid adjusted concentrations of the seven congeners analyzed (Sigma7BDEs: -47, -85, -99, -100, -153, -154, and -209) ranged from 205.4 +/- 52.7 ng/g in Arctic cod to 2.6 +/- 0.4 ng/g in ringed seals. Mean Sigma7BDEs concentrations in Arctic copepods, 16.4 ng/g (n = 2, composite sample), were greater than those in the top trophic level (TL) marine mammals and suggests that (i) Arctic copepods are an important dietary component that delivers BDEs to the food web and (ii) because these compounds are bioaccumulative, metabolism and depletion of BDE congeners in top TL mammals is an important biological process. There were differences in the concentration profiles of the isomers of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) in the food web. The most notable difference was observed for beluga, where the alpha-isomer was enriched (accounting for approximately 90% of the SigmaHBCD body burden), relative to its primary prey species, Arctic cod, where the alpha-isomer accounted for only 20% of the SigmaHBCD body burden (beta: 4% and gamma: 78%). For the C8-C11 perfluorinated carboxylic acids, the trophic magnification factors (TMFs) were all greater than unity and increased with increasing carbon chain length. PFOS and its neutral precursor, PFOSA, also had TMF values greater than one. There were also pronounced differences in the PFOSA to PFOS ratio in ringed seal (0.04) and in

  1. Desulfuromonas svalbardensis sp. nov. and Desulfuromusa ferrireducens sp. nov., psychrophilic, Fe(III)-reducing bacteria isolated from Arctic sediments, Svalbard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandieken, Verona; Mussmann, Marc; Niemann, Helge;

    2006-01-01

    Two psychrophilic, Gram-negative, rod-shaped, motile bacteria (strains 112T and 102T) that conserved energy from dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction concomitant with acetate oxidation were isolated from permanently cold Arctic marine sediments. Both strains grew at temperatures down to -2 degrees C....... As alternatives to Fe(III), they reduced fumarate, S0 and Mn(IV). Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain 112T was most closely related to Desulfuromonas acetoxidans (97.0 %) and Desulfuromonas thiophila NZ27T (95.5 %), and strain 102T to Malonomonas rubra Gra Mal 1T (96.3 %) and...

  2. Pollution of the Marine Environment by Dumping: Legal Framework Applicable to Dumped Chemical Weapons and Nuclear Waste in the Arctic Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Lott, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The Arctic seas are the world’s biggest dumping ground for sea-disposed nuclear waste and have served among the primary disposal sites for chemical warfare agents. Despite of scientific uncertainty, the Arctic Council has noted that this hazardous waste still affects adversely the Arctic marine environment and may have implications to the health of the Arctic people. The purpose of this manuscript is to establish the rights and obligations of the Arctic States in c...

  3. In Situ burning of Arctic marine oil spills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne

    Oil spills in ice filled and Arctic waters pose other challenges for oil spill response compared to open and temperate waters. In situ burning has been proven to be an effective oil spill response method for oil spills in ice filled waters. This thesis presents results from laboratory and field...... experiments where the ignitability of oil spill as a function of oil type and weathering conditions (time/ice) was tested. The results show that the composition of the oil and the ice cover is important for the in situ burning time-window. The results were used to develop an algorithm that was implemented in...

  4. The geochemistry and mobility of the lanthanides in marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been made to evaluate lanthanide mobility in sediments directly by measuring concentrations of 10 lanthanide elements in sediments and pore waters. Due to the very low concentrations of the lanthanides in sea water relative to marine sediments, evidence of lanthanide mobilization is usually difficult to detect from studies of solid-phase geochemistry. Results show that the lanthanides can be extremely mobile. Concentrations in pore waters up to 100 times sea water concentrations have been measured. The conclusions are tentative but the present data suggest that the lanthanides are mobilized during oxidation of organic-rich sediments and are relocated in part in association with secondary Fe-rich phases. The behaviour of Ce is, predictably, somewhat different from the other lanthanides and may be more mobile as a consequence of its redox chemistry. (author)

  5. Mycodiversity in marine sediments contaminated by heavy metals: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotti, Mirca; Carbone, Cristina; Cecchi, Grazia; Consani, Sirio; Cutroneo, Laura; Di Piazza, Simone; Gabutto, Giacomo; Greco, Giuseppe; Vagge, Greta; Capello, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Fungi represent the main decomposers of woody and herbaceous substrates in the marine ecosystems. To date there is a gap in the knowledge about the global diversity and distribution of fungi in marine habitats. On the basis of their biological diversity and their role in ecosystem processes, marine fungi may be considered one of the most attractive groups of organisms in modern biotechnology, e.g. ecotoxic metal bioaccumulation. Here we report the data about the first mycological survey in the metal contaminated coastal sediments of the Gromolo Bay. The latter is located in Ligurian Sea (Eastern Liguria, Italy) and is characterized by an enrichment of heavy metals due to pollution of Gromolo Torrent by acidic processes that interest Fe-Cu sulphide mine. 24 samples of marine sediments were collected along a linear plot in front of the shoreline in July 2015. Each sample was separated into three aliquot for mineralogical, chemical analyses and fungal characterization. The sediment samples are characterised by clay fractions (illite and chlorite), minerals of ophiolitic rocks (mainly serpentine, pyroxene and plagioclase) and quartz and are enriched some chemical elements of environmental importance (such as Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, As). For fungal characterisation the sediment samples were inoculated in Petri dishes on different culture media (Malt Extract Agar and Rose Bengal) prepared with sea water and added with antibiotics. The inoculated dishes were incubated at 20°C in the dark for 28 days. Every week fungal growth was monitored counting the number of colonies. Later, the colonies were isolated in axenic culture for further molecular analysis. The mycodiversity evaluate on the basis of Colony Forming Units (CFU) and microfungal-morphotype characterised by macro-and micro-morphology. Until now on the 72 Petri dishes inoculated 112 CFU of filamentous fungi were counted, among these about 50 morphotypes were characterized. The quantitative results show a mean value of 4

  6. NOAA Atmospheric, Marine and Arctic Monitoring Using UASs (including Rapid Response)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, J. J.; Jacobs, T.

    2015-12-01

    Unmanned systems have the potential to efficiently, effectively, economically, and safely bridge critical observation requirements in an environmentally friendly manner. As the United States' Atmospheric, Marine and Arctic areas of interest expand and include hard-to-reach regions of the Earth (such as the Arctic and remote oceanic areas) optimizing unmanned capabilities will be needed to advance the United States' science, technology and security efforts. Through increased multi-mission and multi-agency operations using improved inter-operable and autonomous unmanned systems, the research and operations communities will better collect environmental intelligence and better protect our Country against hazardous weather, environmental, marine and polar hazards. This presentation will examine NOAA's Atmospheric, Marine and Arctic Monitoring Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) strategies which includes developing a coordinated effort to maximize the efficiency and capabilities of unmanned systems across the federal government and research partners. Numerous intra- and inter-agency operational demonstrations and assessments have been made to verify and validated these strategies. This includes the introduction of the Targeted Autonomous Insitu Sensing and Rapid Response (TAISRR) with UAS concept of operations. The presentation will also discuss the requisite UAS capabilities and our experience in using them.

  7. Diversity and physiology of marine lignicolous fungi in Arctic waters: a preliminary account

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka-Lai Pang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Information on the diversity of marine fungi in polar environments is lacking, especially marine fungi colonizing wood. During visits to Tromsø and Longyearbyen, Norway, drift and trapped wood was collected to provide a preliminary account of lignicolous marine fungi in Arctic waters. Six marine fungi were recorded from 24 and 27 samples of wood from Tromsø and Longyearbyen, respectively. Among these, four marine fungi new to science were identified from wood collected at Longyearbyen. To shed light on the ecological role of this group of fungi in the Arctic, a physiological study of one of the collected fungi, Havispora longyearbyenensis, was conducted. H. longyearbyenensis grew at 4 °C, 10 °C, 15 °C and 20 °C in all salinities tested (0 0/00, 17 0/00, 34 0/00. However, growth was significantly reduced at 4 °C and 0 0/00 salinity. The optimal condition for growth of H. longyearbyenensis was at 20 °C in all salinities tested.

  8. Remobilization of Iodine in Marine Sediments During Early Diagenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程先豪

    1993-01-01

    Based on the sedimentary geochemical studies of the Antarctic Ocean and the various geochemical parameters available,this paper deals with the process of emobilization of iodine in marine sediments during early diagenesis.The results showed that the process is not always controlled completely by organic matter as was expected previously.On average the adsorption and oxide phases of iodine account respectively for 23% and 32% of the total in continental-shelf and hemipelagic surficial sediments.Chemical analysis has revealed that the upward diffusion flux and redox conditions would play an important role in the concentration of iodine in the surface sediments.And the species of iodine in the surfial sediments characteristic of high I/Corg ratios would bepredominated by the oxide and adsorption phases.As experimentally evidenced,it is the early diagenetic remoibilization of iodine associated with the oxide and adsorption phases that led to the decrease of I/Corg with increasing depth.Calculations suggested that the diffusion flux of iodine from the deep parts of te sedimentary columum upwards is on the same order of magnitude as the deposition flux of it from sea water.This may be one of the important factors leading to the depletion of iodine in sedimentary rocks.On the basis of the above discussion and calculations the author has proposed a model for the remobilization of iodine in marine sediments during early diagenesis.

  9. Gamma activation analysis of marine sediments at Havana Bay, Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty six elements was studied preliminary in the superficial sediments of Havana Bay using gamma activation analysis by the electron accelerator microtron MT-25 at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR. Samples from five zones of Havana Bay including the three coves were analyzed. The obtained results show a close relation between the concentration levels of the studied elements and the pollution sources. Some elements (As, Ba, Ni, Pb, Cu, Zn, Fe, Cr, Mn) have high concentration levels compared to the values for other environmental marine sediments reported in the literature. (author)

  10. In situ tensile fracture toughness of surficial cohesive marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bruce D.; Barry, Mark A.; Boudreau, Bernard P.; Jumars, Peter A.; Dorgan, Kelly M.

    2012-02-01

    This study reports the first in situ measurements of tensile fracture toughness, K IC, of soft, surficial, cohesive marine sediments. A newly developed probe continuously measures the stress required to cause tensile failure in sediments to depths of up to 1 m. Probe measurements are in agreement with standard laboratory methods of K IC measurements in both potter's clay and natural sediments. The data comprise in situ depth profiles from three field sites in Nova Scotia, Canada. Measured K IC at two muddy sites (median grain size of 23-50 μm) range from near zero at the sediment surface to >1,800 Pa m1/2 at 0.2 m depth. These profiles also appear to identify the bioturbated/mixed depth. K IC for a sandy site (>90% sand) is an order of magnitude lower than for the muddy sediments, and reflects the lack of cohesion/adhesion. A comparison of K IC, median grain size, and porosity in muddy sediments indicates that consolidation increases fracture strength, whereas inclusion of sand causes weakening; thus, sand-bearing layers can be easily identified in K IC profiles. K IC and vane-measured shear strength correlate strongly, which suggests that the vane measurements should perhaps be interpreted as shear fracture toughness, rather than shear strength. Comparison of in situ probe-measured values with K IC of soils and gelatin shows that sediments have a K IC range intermediate between denser compacted soils and softer, elastic gelatin.

  11. Influence of macrobenthos on chemical diagenesis of marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aller, R.C.

    1977-05-01

    Diagenetic reactions involving the decomposition of organic matter and the dissolution, mobilization, and reprecipitation of metals sensitive to oxidation-reduction reactions, are most intense and rapid in the upper 1 m and especially the upper 10 cm of marine sediment. It is in this upper zone where most benthic organisms live and interact with sediments and where exchange rates of dissolved and particulate material between sediment and overlying water are largely determined. In Long Island Sound, U.S.A., both spatial and temporal trends in sediment chemistry and the flux of material out of the bottom demonstrate the control of diagenesis by bottom fauna. /sup 234/Th//sup 238/U disequilibrium studies demonstrate that particle reworking rates near the sediment-water interface vary both temporally and spatially in the Sound. The most rapid reworking occurs in protobranch-inhabited bottom areas as do the highest /sup 234/Th inventories. Excess /sup 234/Th profiles in the sediment allow determination of the rates of selected diagenetic reactions, such as Mn/sup + +/ production, near the sediment surface. Both the /sup 234/Th disequilibrium and flux measurements indicate that intra-estuarine redistribution of metals continually takes place.

  12. Diversity and Composition of Bacterial Community in Soils and Lake Sediments from an Arctic Lake Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Neng Fei; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Xiao; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Yong; Dong, Long Long; Guo, Yu Dong; Ma, Yong Xing; Zang, Jia Ye

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the diversity and composition of bacterial communities within soils and lake sediments from an Arctic lake area (London Island, Svalbard). A total of 2,987 operational taxonomic units were identified by high-throughput sequencing, targeting bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The samples from four sites (three samples in each site) were significantly different in geochemical properties and bacterial community composition. Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria were abundant phyla in the nine soil samples, whereas Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were abundant phyla in the three sediment samples. Furthermore, Actinobacteria, Chlorobi, Chloroflexi, Elusimicrobia, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospirae, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria significantly varied in their abundance among the four sampling sites. Additionally, members of the dominant genera, such as Clostridium, Luteolibacter, Methylibium, Rhodococcus, and Rhodoplanes, were significantly different in their abundance among the four sampling sites. Besides, distance-based redundancy analysis revealed that pH (p soils and sediments from a lake area in the Arctic harbor a high diversity of bacterial communities, which are influenced by many geochemical factors of Arctic environments.

  13. Oceanographic Survey. 3. Radiological survey of marine environment in Ibaraki Prefecture: marine sediment survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactivity in marine environment of Ibaraki Prefecture has been monitored since 1965. This report briefly describes the radiological survey data of marine sediments. The concentrations of radionuclides in marine water were determined yearly 4 times for 3H and twice for 54Mn, 60Co, 90Sr, 95Zr, 95Nb, 106Ru, 137Cs and 144Ce. The concentrations of 90Sr, 137Cs and 239+240Pu were hardly changed and those of 90Sr and 137Cs were near the limit of identification. The annual excretion of radionuclides from major nuclear plants in Ibaraki Prefecture including JAERI (Tokai and Oarai), Japan Atomic Power Co., etc. were determined for 3H, 14C, 90Sr, 137Cs, 60Co, 129I and 239+240Pu. Based on the results, dose equivalent for the intake of marine animals and algae was estimated to be as low as 0-4.4 μSv. This level was extremely lower than the limit of annual dose equivalent; 1000 μSv and it was kept nearly constant if the operators of those facilities were not discontinued for a long. To elucidate the factors related to the transfer of radionuclides into marine sediments, the depth dose distribution in marine sediments were investigated as well as the relation between radionuclide level and granular size. An elevation of 137Cs level was found for the sediments composed of fine granules, which were rich in the sediments of offshore region. The 239+240Pu level was positively correlated to the content of organic compounds in the sea. (M.N.)

  14. Simulated and observed trends in key variables of the Arctic marine carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goris, Nadine; Heinze, Christoph; Lauvset, Siv; Petrenko, Dmitry; Pozdnyakov, Dmitry; Schwinger, Jörg

    2013-04-01

    For the Arctic region, a thorough monitoring of the marine carbon cycle is important, as the general "polar amplification" of climate change also translates into the biogeochemical realm. As compared to the global ocean, the sink for human-produced CO2 is fairly small in the Arctic Ocean itself. Nevertheless, it is important to follow up this Arctic sink as a further control of the regional carbon budget and to record changes in the marine carbon cycle on the way towards a "blue Arctic". Since observations on the Arctic are rare, the EU FP7 MONARCH-A project tries to enable adequate descriptions of the status and evolution of the Arctic region Earth system components by generating time series of observation datasets and model hindcasts. In terms of the marine carbon cycle, this analysis focuses mainly on the key variables pCO2 and primary productivity. For oceanic pCO2, the comprehensive data-sets SOCAT and LDEO were combined, while measurements of atmospheric CO2 were collected from the GLOBALVIEW-CO2 data integration project. Monthly Primary Production fields were retrieved from the sensors MODIS and SeaWiFs. In order to get an overall picture of the behavior and trends of those key variables, in addition the physical-biogeochemical model MICOM-HAMOCC-M was employed. The investigation showed that both oceanic and atmospheric pCO2 are consistent variables which have a regular annual cycle and a similar behaviour all over the Arctic for both model and data. In contrast, primary production shows an irregular annual cycle in both range and form, varying over the Arctic. While a few well distributed measurement stations with continuous observations are sufficient to get a comprehensive picture for consistent variables like pCO2, it is relatively difficult and costly to get a comprehensive record of non-consistent variables. Since the provided data-set for primary production covers a relatively short time-scale, it was neither possible to confidently validate the model

  15. Marine sediments in Disko Trough reveal meltwater-influenced sedimentation during ice-stream retreat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Kelly A.; Cofaigh, Colm Ó.; Jennings, Anne E.; Dowdeswell, Julian A.

    2015-04-01

    Marine geophysical data from middle and outer Disko Trough, West Greenland reveal thick (more than ten metres) acoustically-laminated, fine-grained sediments between subglacial tills at their base and post-glacial marine sediments at the seafloor. These sediments are interpreted as a transitional facies deposited as ice retreated from the trough during deglaciation. New sediment-core records indicate that these units were likely deposited by meltwater plumes emanating from a nearby grounded-ice margin, probably during stillstands in ice retreat. The retreat of ice in the trough may have been stabilised at a narrowing in DiskoTrough on the mid-shelf, as well as at the basalt escarpment south of Disko Island. Such thicknesses of deglacial or "transitional" glacimarine sediments are relatively unusual on high-latitude continental shelves and indicate a significant meltwater production in central West Greenland during deglaciation. This is consistent with the seafloor landforms in the inner and middle parts of the trough that include channels and moats around bedrock protrusions that look to have been eroded by water. IRD counts from the cores indicate that iceberg rafting also occurred during this transitional phase but that this signal was diluted by the fine-grained transitional sediments. Once ice had withdrawn from the area and sedimentation was hemipelagic in nature the IRD signal was less diluted.

  16. Biogenic methane potential of marine sediments. Application of chemical thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arning, E.T.; Schulz, H.M. [Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ, Potsdam (Germany); Berk, W. van [Technical Univ. of Clausthal (Germany). Dept. of Hydrogeology

    2013-08-01

    Accumulations of biogenic methane-dominated gas are widespread and occur in a variety of depositional settings and rock types. However, the potential of biogenic methane remains underexplored. This is mainly due to the fact that quantitative assessments applying numerical modeling techniques for exploration purposes are generally lacking to date. Biogenic methane formation starts in relatively shallow marine sediments below the sulfate reduction zone. When sulfate is exhausted, methanogenesis via the CO{sub 2} reduction pathway is often the dominant biogenic methane formation process in marine sediments (Claypool and Kaplan, 1974). The process can be simplified by the reaction: 2CH{sub 2}O + Ca{sup 2+} + H{sub 2}O {yields} CH{sub 4} + CaCO{sub 3} + 2H{sup +}. The products of early diagenetic reactions initiate coupled equilibrium reactions that induce a new state of chemical equilibrium among minerals, pore water and gas. The driving force of the complex biogeochemical reactions in sedimentary environments during early diagenesis is the irreversible redox-conversion of organic matter. Early diagenetic formation of biogenic methane shortly after deposition ('early diagenesis') was retraced using PHREEQC computer code that is applied to calculate homogenous and heterogeneous mass-action equations in combination with one-dimensional diffusion driven transport (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999). Our modeling approach incorporates interdependent diagenetic reactions evolving into a diffusive multi-component and multiphase system by means of thermodynamic equilibrium calculations of species distribution (Arning et al., 2011, 2012, 2013). Reaction kinetics of organic carbon conversion is integrated into the set of equilibrium reactions by defining type and amount of converted organic matter in a certain time step. It is the aim (1) to calculate quantitatively thermodynamic equilibrium conditions (composition of pore water, mineral phase and gas phase assemblage) in

  17. Distribution of actinomycetes in near-shore tropical marine sediments.

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, P R; Dwight, R; Fenical, W.

    1991-01-01

    Actinomycetes were isolated from near-shore marine sediments collected at 15 island locations throughout the Bahamas. A total of 289 actinomycete colonies were observed, and all but 6 could be assigned to the suprageneric groups actinoplanetes and streptomycetes. A bimodal distribution in the actinomycete population in relation to depth was recorded, with the maximum numbers occurring in the shallow and deep sampling sites. This distribution can be accounted for by a rapid decrease in strepto...

  18. Methylotrophic methanogenesis and potential methylated substrates in marine sediment

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuang, Guangchao

    2014-01-01

    Methane is the simplest hydrocarbon and a potent greenhouse gas that plays important roles in atmospheric chemistry, the global carbon cycle, and the formation of gas hydrates in marine sediment. Microbial production of methane is the terminal step during the degradation of organic matter. It is generally thought that methane is predominantly produced from hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis, while methylotrophic methanogenesis and its relative importance for methane production i...

  19. The bioremediation potential of marine sandy sediment microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Răzvan POPOVICIU

    2012-01-01

    The natural microbiota from marine sandy sediments on the Romanian sea coast was tested for resilience in case of hydrocarbon contamination, for estimating the number of (culturable) hydrocarbon and lipid oil-degrading microorganisms and for determining the influence of inorganic nitrate and phosphate nutrients on hydrocarbon spill bioremediation process, by microcosm experiments.Results show that hydrocarbon contamination affects the bacteriobenthos both in terms of cell numbers and composit...

  20. Analysis of sea ice and phytoplankton biomarkers in marine sediments from the Nordic Seas - a calibration study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Rodriguez, A.; Cabedo Sanz, P.; Belt, S.; Brown, T.; Knies, J.; Husum, K.; Giraudeau, J.

    2012-04-01

    The work presented here is part of the Changing Arctic and SubArctic Environment program (EU CASE) which is an Initial Training Network (ITN) on climate change and marine environment and is an interdisciplinary project focussing on biological proxies. One of these proxies is the sea ice diatom biomarker IP25 which is a highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) alkene synthesised by some Arctic sea-ice diatoms and has been shown to be a specific, stable and sensitive proxy measure of Arctic sea ice when detected in underlying sediments (Belt et al., 2007). The current study focuses on two key elements: (1) An analytical calibration of IP25 isolated from marine sediments and purified using a range of chromatographic methods was conducted in order to improve the quantification of this biomarker in sediment extracts. (2) Analysis of >30 near-surface sediments from the Nordic Seas was carried out to quantify biomarkers previously suggested as indicators of open-water phytoplankton (brassicasterol) (Müller et al., 2011) and sea-ice (IP25) conditions (Belt et al., 2010). The outcomes of the biomarker analyses were used to make comparisons between proxy data and known sea ice conditions in the study area derived from satellite record over the last 20 years. The results of this study should inform longer timescale reconstructions of sea ice conditions in the Nordic sea in the future. Belt, S.T., Massé, G., Rowland. S.J., Poulin. M., Michel. C., LeBlanc. B., (2007). A novel chemical fossil of palaeo sea ice : IP25 . Organic Geochemistry 38 (16-27). Belt, S. T., Vare, L. L., Massé, G., Manners, H. R., Price, J. C., MacLachlan, S. E., Andrews, J. T. & Schmidt, S. (2010) 'Striking similarities in temporal changes to spring sea ice occurrence across the central Canadian Arctic Archipelago over the last 7000 years', Quaternary Science Reviews, 29 (25-26), pp. 3489-3504. Müller, J., Wagner, A., Fahl, K., Stein, R., Prange, M., & Lohmann, G. (2011). Towards quantitative sea ice

  1. Monitoring of biofilm growth in marine sediment by metal electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristiani, P.; Guandalini, R.; Del Negro, P.; Cataletto, B.

    2009-04-01

    Electrochemical monitoring of biofilm growing in marine sediments is evaluating in laboratory experiments, still in progress. The interesting preliminary results obtained during six month experiments are presented in this paper. A concept of electrochemically active bacteria has recently pointed out by several studies, showing that bacteria forming biofilms on conductive materials can achieve a direct electrochemical connection with the substrate using it as electron exchanger, also without the aid of additional mediators [1]. The electric current generated by bacteria is more than enough as signal for bio-sensors. Thanks to the developing of bio-sensors based on electrochemical probes and able to monitoring the biofilm growth on metal surfaces, this "bio-electricity" has been already exploited with success for the biofilm monitoring in industrial equipment exposed to natural waters [2]. The same, very simple, electrochemical biofilm probes, in which electrical signal is proportional to biofilm growth, already successfully used for aerobic environments, have been here tested in the anaerobic environment of marine sediments. A laboratory microcosm has been prepared by filling a large polycarbonate cylinder about one-third full with organic-rich coastal marine sediment collected in the Gulf of Trieste (Northern Adriatic Sea). The sediment was packed tightly in the container to avoid entrapping air and then covered with O2 depleted seawater. Three identical electrochemical sensors were buried in the sediment of microcosm. The cylinder was placed in the dark under controlled temperature and anaerobic conditions. During the six months of monitoring, bacterial communities developing at the water-sediment interface were periodically sampled by inserting a long thin pipette into the column and removing some coloured mud or water. The microrganisms were used to inoculate enriched media and to extract bulk DNA. The results pointed out the possibility of set up simple device

  2. Metatranscriptomic insights into polyphosphate metabolism in marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel S; Flood, Beverly E; Bailey, Jake V

    2016-04-01

    Microorganisms can influence inorganic phosphate (Pi) in pore waters, and thus the saturation state of phosphatic minerals, by accumulating and hydrolyzing intracellular polyphosphate (poly-P). Here we used comparative metatranscriptomics to explore microbial poly-P utilization in marine sediments. Sulfidic marine sediments from methane seeps near Barbados and from the Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) oxygen minimum zone were incubated under oxic and anoxic sulfidic conditions. Pi was sequestered under oxic conditions and liberated under anoxic conditions. Transcripts homologous to poly-P kinase type 2 (ppk2) were 6-22 × more abundant in metatranscriptomes from the anoxic incubations, suggesting that reversible poly-P degradation by Ppk2 may be an important metabolic response to anoxia by marine microorganisms. Overall, diverse taxa differentially expressed homologues of genes for poly-P degradation (ppk2 and exopolyphosphatase) under different incubation conditions. Sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms appeared to preferentially express genes for poly-P degradation under anoxic conditions, which may impact phosphorus cycling in a wide range of oxygen-depleted marine settings. PMID:26381585

  3. Biomarkers of Canadian High Arctic Litoral Sediments for Assessment of Organic Matter Sources and Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pautler, B. G.; Austin, J.; Otto, A.; Stewart, K.; Lamoureux, S. F.; Simpson, M. J.

    2009-05-01

    Carbon stocks in the High Arctic are particularly sensitive to global climate change, and investigation of variations in organic matter (OM) composition is beneficial for the understanding of the alteration of organic carbon under anticipated future elevated temperatures. Molecular-level characterization of solvent extractable compounds and CuO oxidation products of litoral sedimentary OM at the Cape Bounty Arctic Watershed Observatory in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago was conducted to determine the OM sources and decomposition patterns. The solvent extracts contained a series of aliphatic lipids, steroids and one triterpenoid primarily of higher plant origin and new biomarkers, iso- and anteiso-alkanes originating from cerastium arcticum (Arctic mouse-ear chickweed, a native angiosperm) were discovered. Carbon preference index (CPI) values for the n-alkanes, n-alkanols and n-alkanoic acids suggests that the OM biomarkers result from fresh material input in early stage of degradation. The CuO oxidation products were comprised of benzyls, lignin phenols and short-chain diacids and hydroxyacids. High abundance of terrestrial OM biomarkers observed at sites close to the river inlet suggests fluvial inputs as an important pathway to deliver OM into the lake. The lignin phenol vegetation index (LPVI) also suggests that the OM origin is mostly from non-woody angiosperms. A relatively high degree of lignin alteration in the litoral sediments is evident from the abundant ratio of acids and aldehydes of the vanillyl and syringyl monomers. This suggests that the lignin contents have been diagenetically altered as the result of a long residence time in this ecosystem. The molecular-level characterization of litoral sedimentary OM in Canadian High Arctic region provides insight into current OM composition,potential responses to future disturbances and the biogeochemical cycling of carbon in the Arctic.

  4. The distribution of radiocesium and plutonium in sea ice-entrained arctic sediments in relation to potential sources and sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma counting of a range of grain size fractions of sediments entrained in Arctic Ocean sea ice indicate that the wide range of radiocesium activities that are observed in bulk samples are primarily a function of the geographical origin of the sediment, rather than mineral composition, or physical processes that increase the content of fine clays in sediments. Plutonium isotope ratios (240Pu:239Pu) of sea ice sediments are consistent with an ultimate origin of the plutonium from bomb fallout (240Pu:239Pu=similar0·18), and these sediment ratios differ significantly in plutonium isotope ratios from deep sea sediments of the Arctic Ocean. Much lower plutonium activities were observed in deep sea sediments relative to the sea ice entrained sediments. These differences in isotopic ratios indicate that on decadal scales, sedimentation of bomb fallout plutonium is not the sole source of plutonium to deep Arctic Ocean sediments. The large differences in total plutonium activity between some of the sea ice entrained sediments and all of the deep Arctic Ocean sediments also suggest that the total flux of plutonium from sea ice entrained sediments to the deep sea may be relatively small. Radiocesium activity in the sea ice entrained sediments is well correlated with total plutonium abundance, but the best-fit regression line does not pass through the origin, indicating that a small secondary source of cesium (3 to 9 Bq kg-1 dry weight) that is free of plutonium may contribute to the radiocesium activity observed in sediments entrained in Arctic Ocean sea ice. Based upon observations of carbon:nitrogen weight/weight ratios in excess of 20 in the organic carbon fraction, together with δ13C values less than -23%, several of the sea ice entrained sediments show indications of estuarine origin. However, these specific samples typically have low radionuclide burdens. Consideration of the low smectite content (sediments and prevailing

  5. Demethylation and cleavage of dimethylsulfoniopropionate in marine intertidal sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, P.T.; Kiene, R.P.; Taylor, B.F.

    1994-01-01

    Demethylation and cleavage of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) was measured in three different types of,intertidal marine sediments: a cyanobacterial mat, a diatom-covered tidal flat and a carbonate sediment. Consumption rates of added DMSP were highest in cyanobacterial mat slurries (59 ?? mol DMSP l-1 slurry h-1) and lower in slurries from a diatom mat and a carbonate tidal sediment (24 and 9 ??mol DMSP l-1 h-1, respectively). Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and 3-mercaptopropionate (MPA) were produced simultaneously during DMSP consumption, indicating that cleavage and demethylation occurred at the same time. Viable counts of DMSP-utilizing bacteria revealed a population of 2 x 107 cells cm-3 sediment (90% of these cleaved DMSP to DMS, 10% demethylated DMSP to MPA) in the cyanobacterial mat, 7 x 105 cells cm-3 in the diatom mat (23% cleavers, 77% demethylators), and 9 x 104 cells cm-3 (20% cleavers and 80% demethylators) in the carbonate sediment. In slurries of the diatom mat, the rate of MPA production from added 3-methiolpropionate (MMPA) was 50% of the rate of MPA formation from DMSP. The presence of a large population of demethylating bacteria and the production of MPA from DMSP suggest that the demethylation pathway, in addition to cleavage, contributes significantly to DMSP consumption in coastal sediments.

  6. Recovery of oil spills by dispersants in marine arctic regions

    OpenAIRE

    Shata, Asmaa Ali Mahmoud

    2010-01-01

    The initial appearance of dispersants was 1960s and 1970s; oil spill dispersants have been the topic of significant research, testing, and debate. In spite of published reports about dispersant toxicity and effectiveness vary greatly, most spill response experts agree that oil spill dispersants are a valuable tool for responding to marine oil spills. Dispersants are oil spill response chemicals that are used to disperse floating oil into the water column. Dispersant cause a temporary incre...

  7. The chromium isotope composition of reducing and oxic marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueguen, Bleuenn; Reinhard, Christopher T.; Algeo, Thomas J.; Peterson, Larry C.; Nielsen, Sune G.; Wang, Xiangli; Rowe, Harry; Planavsky, Noah J.

    2016-07-01

    The chromium (Cr) isotope composition of marine sediments has the potential to provide new insights into the evolution of Earth-surface redox conditions. There are significant but poorly constrained isotope fractionations associated with oxidative subaerial weathering and riverine transport, the major source of seawater Cr, and with partial Cr reduction during burial in marine sediments, the major sink for seawater Cr. A more comprehensive understanding of these processes is needed to establish global Cr isotope mass balance and to gauge the utility of Cr isotopes as a paleoredox proxy. For these purposes, we investigated the Cr isotope composition of reducing sediments from the upwelling zone of the Peru Margin and the deep Cariaco Basin. Chromium is present in marine sediments in both detrital and authigenic phases, and to estimate the isotopic composition of the authigenic fraction, we measured δ53Cr on a weakly acid-leached fraction in addition to the bulk sediment. In an effort to examine potential variability in the Cr isotope composition of the detrital fraction, we also measured δ53Cr on a variety of oxic marine sediments that contain minimal authigenic Cr. The average δ53Cr value of the oxic sediments examined here is -0.05 ± 0.10‰ (2σ, n = 25), which is within the range of δ53Cr values characteristic of the bulk silicate Earth. This implies that uncertainty in estimates of authigenic δ53Cr values based on bulk sediment analyses is mainly linked to estimation of the ratio of Cr in detrital versus authigenic phases, rather than to the Cr-isotopic composition of the detrital pool. Leaches of Cariaco Basin sediments have an average δ53Cr value of +0.38 ± 0.10‰ (2σ, n = 7), which shows no dependency on sample location within the basin and is close to that of Atlantic deepwater Cr (∼+0.5‰). This suggests that authigenic Cr in anoxic sediments may reliably reflect the first-order Cr isotope composition of deepwaters. For Peru Margin samples

  8. Distribution of PAHs and the PAH-degrading bacteria in the deep-sea sediments of the high-latitude Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, C.; Bai, X.; Sheng, H.; Jiao, L.; Zhou, H.; Shao, Z.

    2015-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are common organic pollutants that can be transferred long distances and tend to accumulate in marine sediments. However, less is known regarding the distribution of PAHs and their natural bioattenuation in the open sea, especially the Arctic Ocean. In this report, sediment samples were collected at four sites from the Chukchi Plateau to the Makarov Basin in the summer of 2010. PAH compositions and total concentrations were examined with GC-MS. The concentrations of 16 EPA-priority PAHs varied from 2.0 to 41.6 ng g-1 dry weight and decreased with sediment depth and movement from the southern to the northern sites. Among the targeted PAHs, phenanthrene was relatively abundant in all sediments. The 16S rRNA gene of the total environmental DNA was analyzed with Illumina high-throughput sequencing (IHTS) to determine the diversity of bacteria involved in PAH degradation in situ. The potential degraders including Cycloclasticus, Pseudomonas, Halomonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Marinomonas, Bacillus, Dietzia, Colwellia, Acinetobacter, Alcanivorax, Salinisphaera and Shewanella, with Dietzia as the most abundant, occurred in all sediment samples. Meanwhile, enrichment with PAHs was initiated onboard and transferred to the laboratory for further enrichment and to obtain the degrading consortia. Most of the abovementioned bacteria in addition to Hahella, Oleispira, Oceanobacter and Hyphomonas occurred alternately as predominant members in the enrichment cultures from different sediments based on IHTS and PCR-DGGE analysis. To reconfirm their role in PAH degradation, 40 different bacteria were isolated and characterized, among which Cycloclasticus Pseudomonas showed the best degradation capability under low temperatures. Taken together, PAHs and PAH-degrading bacteria were widespread in the deep-sea sediments of the Arctic Ocean. We propose that bacteria of Cycloclasticus, Pseudomonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Halomonas, Marinomonas and Dietzia may

  9. Distribution of PAHs and the PAH-degrading bacteria in the deep-sea sediments of the high-latitude Arctic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Dong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are persistent organic pollutants, which can be transferred to a long distance and tend to accumulation in marine sediment. However, PAHs distribution and natural bioattenuation is less known in open sea, especially in the Arctic Ocean. In this report, sediment samples were collected at four sites from the Chukchi Plateau to Makarov Basin in the summer of 2010. PAH composition and total concentrations were examined with GC-MS, we found that the concentrations of 16 EPA-priority PAHs varied from 2.0 to 41.6 ng g−1 dry weight in total and decreased with sediment depths and as well as from the southern to northern sites. Among the targeted PAHs, phenanthrene was relatively abundant in all sediments. To learn the diversity of bacteria involved in PAHs degradation in situ, the 16S rRNA gene of the total environmental DNA was analyzed with Illumina high throughput sequencing (IHTS. In all the sediments, occurred the potential degraders including Cycloclasticus, Pseudomonas, Halomonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Marinomonas, Bacillus, Dietzia, Colwellia, Acinetobacter, Alcanivorax, Salinisphaera and Shewanella, with Dietzia as the most abundant. Meanwhile on board, enrichment with PAHs was initiated and repeated transfer in laboratory to obtain the degrading consortia. Most above mentioned bacteria in addition to Hahella, Oleispira, Oceanobacter and Hyphomonas, occurred alternately as a predominant member in enrichment cultures from different sediments, as revealed with IHTS and PCR-DGGE. To reconfirm their role in PAH degradation, 40 different bacteria were isolated and characterized, among which Cycloclasticus and Pseudomonas showed the best degradation capability under low temperature. Taken together, PAHs and PAH-degrading bacteria were widespread in the deep-sea sediments of the Arctic Ocean. We propose that bacteria of Cycloclasticus, Pseudomonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Halomonas, Marinomonas and Dietzia may play the

  10. Distribution of PAHs and the PAH-degrading bacteria in the deep-sea sediments of the high-latitude Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, C.; Bai, X.; Sheng, H.; Jiao, L.; Zhou, H.; Shao, Z.

    2014-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are persistent organic pollutants, which can be transferred to a long distance and tend to accumulation in marine sediment. However, PAHs distribution and natural bioattenuation is less known in open sea, especially in the Arctic Ocean. In this report, sediment samples were collected at four sites from the Chukchi Plateau to Makarov Basin in the summer of 2010. PAH composition and total concentrations were examined with GC-MS, we found that the concentrations of 16 EPA-priority PAHs varied from 2.0 to 41.6 ng g-1 dry weight in total and decreased with sediment depths and as well as from the southern to northern sites. Among the targeted PAHs, phenanthrene was relatively abundant in all sediments. To learn the diversity of bacteria involved in PAHs degradation in situ, the 16S rRNA gene of the total environmental DNA was analyzed with Illumina high throughput sequencing (IHTS). In all the sediments, occurred the potential degraders including Cycloclasticus, Pseudomonas, Halomonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Marinomonas, Bacillus, Dietzia, Colwellia, Acinetobacter, Alcanivorax, Salinisphaera and Shewanella, with Dietzia as the most abundant. Meanwhile on board, enrichment with PAHs was initiated and repeated transfer in laboratory to obtain the degrading consortia. Most above mentioned bacteria in addition to Hahella, Oleispira, Oceanobacter and Hyphomonas, occurred alternately as a predominant member in enrichment cultures from different sediments, as revealed with IHTS and PCR-DGGE. To reconfirm their role in PAH degradation, 40 different bacteria were isolated and characterized, among which Cycloclasticus and Pseudomonas showed the best degradation capability under low temperature. Taken together, PAHs and PAH-degrading bacteria were widespread in the deep-sea sediments of the Arctic Ocean. We propose that bacteria of Cycloclasticus, Pseudomonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Halomonas, Marinomonas and Dietzia may play the most important role

  11. Marine biodegradation of crude oil in temperate and Arctic water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Mette; Johnsen, Anders R; Christensen, Jan H

    2015-12-30

    Despite increased interest in marine oil exploration in the Arctic, little is known about the fate of Arctic offshore oil pollution. Therefore, in the present study, we examine the oil degradation potential for an Arctic site (Disko Bay, Greenland) and discuss this in relation to a temperate site (North Sea, Denmark). Biodegradation was assessed following exposure to Oseberg Blend crude oil (100 mg L(-1)) in microcosms. Changes in oil hydrocarbon fingerprints of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkyl-substituted PAHs, dibenzothiophenes, n-alkanes and alkyltoluenes were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In the Disko Bay sample, the degradation order was n-alkanes>alkyltoluenes (para->meta->ortho-isomers)>PAHs and dibenzothiophenes, whereas, the degradation order in the North Sea samples was PAHs and dibenzothiophenes>alkyltoluenes>n-alkanes. These differences in degradation patterns significantly affect the environmental risk of oil spills and emphasise the need to consider the specific environmental conditions when conducting risk assessments of Arctic oil pollution. PMID:26159801

  12. Importance of Marine-Derived Nutrients Supplied by Planktivorous Seabirds to High Arctic Tundra Plant Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolicki, Adrian; Zmudczyńska-Skarbek, Katarzyna; Richard, Pierre; Stempniewicz, Lech

    2016-01-01

    We studied the relative importance of several environmental factors for tundra plant communities in five locations across Svalbard (High Arctic) that differed in geographical location, oceanographic and climatic influence, and soil characteristics. The amount of marine-derived nitrogen in the soil supplied by seabirds was locally the most important of the studied environmental factors influencing the tundra plant community. We found a strong positive correlation between δ15N isotopic values and total N content in the soil, confirming the fundamental role of marine-derived matter to the generally nutrient-poor Arctic tundra ecosystem. We also recorded a strong correlation between the δ15N values of soil and of the tissues of vascular plants and mosses, but not of lichens. The relationship between soil δ15N values and vascular plant cover was linear. In the case of mosses, the percentage ground cover reached maximum around a soil δ 15N value of 8‰, as did plant community diversity. This soil δ15N value clearly separated the occurrence of plants with low nitrogen tolerance (e.g. Salix polaris) from those predominating on high N content soils (e.g. Cerastium arcticum, Poa alpina). Large colonies of planktivorous little auks have a great influence on Arctic tundra vegetation, either through enhancing plant abundance or in shaping plant community composition at a local scale. PMID:27149113

  13. Trophic transfer of contaminants in a changing arctic marine food web: Cumberland Sound, Nunavut, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Melissa A; McMeans, Bailey C; Tomy, Gregg T; Rosenberg, Bruno; Ferguson, Steven H; Morris, Adam; Muir, Derek C G; Fisk, Aaron T

    2012-09-18

    Contaminant dynamics in arctic marine food webs may be impacted by current climate-induced food web changes including increases in transient/subarctic species. We quantified food web organochlorine transfer in the Cumberland Sound (Nunavut, Canada) arctic marine food web in the presence of transient species using species-specific biomagnification factors (BMFs), trophic magnification factors (TMFs), and a multifactor model that included δ(15)N-derived trophic position and species habitat range (transient versus resident), and also considered δ(13)C-derived carbon source, thermoregulatory group, and season. Transient/subarctic species relative to residents had higher prey-to-predator BMFs of biomagnifying contaminants (1.4 to 62 for harp seal, Greenland shark, and narwhal versus 1.1 to 20 for ringed seal, arctic skate, and beluga whale, respectively). For contaminants that biomagnified in a transient-and-resident food web and a resident-only food web scenario, TMFs were higher in the former (2.3 to 10.1) versus the latter (1.7 to 4.0). Transient/subarctic species have higher tissue contaminant levels and greater BMFs likely due to higher energetic requirements associated with long-distance movements or consumption of more contaminated prey in regions outside of Cumberland Sound. These results demonstrate that, in addition to climate change-related long-range transport/deposition/revolatilization changes, increasing numbers of transient/subarctic animals may alter food web contaminant dynamics. PMID:22957980

  14. Sedimentary processes in High Arctic lakes (Cape Bounty, Melville Island, Canada): What do sediments really record?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normandeau, Alexandre; Lamoureux, Scott; Lajeunesse, Patrick; Francus, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Lacustrine sedimentary sequences can hold a substantial amount of information regarding paleoenvironments, hydroclimate variability and extreme events, providing critical insights into past climate change. The study of lacustrine sediments is often limited to the analysis of sediment cores from which past changes are inferred. However, studies have provided evidence that the accumulation of sediments in lacustrine basins and their distribution can be affected by a wide range of internal and external forcing mechanisms. It is therefore crucial to have a good knowledge of the factors controlling the transport and distribution of sediments in lakes prior to investigating paleoenvironmental archives. To address this knowledge gap, the Cape Bounty Arctic Watershed Observatory (CBAWO), located on southern Melville Island in the Canadian High Arctic, was initiated in 2003 as a long term monitoring site with the aim of understanding the controls over sediment transport within similar paired watersheds and lakes. The East and West lakes have been monitored each year since 2003 to document the role of hydro-climate variability on water column processes and sediment deposition. Moorings recording water electrical conductivity, temperature, density, dissolved oxygen and turbidity, as well as sediment traps were deployed during the active hydrological period (generally May-July). These data were analyzed in combination with hydrological and climatic data from the watersheds. Additionally, a high-resolution bathymetric and sub-bottom survey was completed in 2015 and allowed imaging the lake floor and sub-surface in great detail. This combination of process and lake morphological data are unique in the Arctic. The morphostratigraphic analysis reveals two highly disturbed lake floors, being widely affected by subaqueous mass movements that were triggered during the last 2000 years. Backscatter intensity maps and the presence of bedforms on each delta foresets indicate that

  15. Chemometric Analysis for Pollution Source Assessment of Harbour Sediments in Arctic Locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kristine B.; Lejon, Tore; Jensen, Pernille Erland;

    2015-01-01

    Pollution levels, pollutant distribution and potential source assessments based on multivariate analysis (chemometrics) were made for harbour sediments from two Arctic locations; Hammerfest in Norway and Sisimiut in Greenland. High levels of heavy metals were detected in addition to organic...... pollutants. Preliminary assessments based on principal component analysis (PCA) revealed different sources and pollutant distribution in the sediments of the two harbours. Tributyltin (TBT) was, however, found to originate from point source(s), and the highest concentrations of TBT in both harbours were...... indicated relation primarily to German, Russian and American mixtures in Hammerfest; and American, Russian and Japanese mixtures in Sisimiut. PCA was shown to be an important tool for identifying pollutant sources and differences in pollutant composition in relation to sediment characteristics....

  16. Detrital zircons (U-Pb and Lu-Hf) and host hemipelagic sediments (Pb-Sr-Nd-Os) from the Polar Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitonov, Igor; Belyatsky, Boris; Petrov, Eugeny; Sergeev, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    . However, a direct resemblance to the Permo-Triassic and Jurassic sandstones of coastal areas of the Arctic, we also do not see. Another factor in the formation of deep marine sediments is fluvial transference. The total input of the Arctic rivers reaches about 1x106 tonnes per year. When comparing the characteristics of detrital zircons of different river systems, we see that the similar is the distribution of zircon ages from the deposits of the Lena, Yenisei and Yana-Indigirka. Given that the Laptev Sea is the main source of «dirty» sea ice, carried by Transpolar Drift in the central part of the Arctic Ocean, detrital zircons from sediments of Lena river, which is characterized by the highest among Arctic rivers discharge, apparently, ensure the formation of the heavy fraction of hemipelagic mud in a large deep-water area of the Arctic Ocean, including the polar region. The observed variations in local distribution of zircon ages in the studied sampling points do not exclude the presence of local material, but to determine its share and establish with certainty the composition further research is required.

  17. Defining ecospace of Arctic marine food webs using a novel quantitative approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, M.; Loseto, L. L.

    2011-12-01

    The Arctic is currently facing unprecedented change with developmental, physical and climatological changes. Food webs within the marine Arctic environment are highly susceptible to anthropogenic stressors and have thus far been understudied. Stable isotopes, in conjunction with a novel set of metrics, may provide a framework that allows us to understand which areas of the Arctic are most vulnerable to change. The objective of this study was to use linear distance metrics applied to stable isotopes to a) define and quantify four Arctic marine food webs in ecospace; b) enable quantifiable comparisons among the four food webs and with other ecosystems; and, c) evaluate vulnerability of the four food webs to anthropogenic stressors such as climate change. The areas studied were Hudson Bay, Beaufort Sea, Lancaster Sound and North Water Polynya. Each region was selected based on the abundance of previous research and published and available stable isotope data in peer-review literature. We selected species to cover trophic levels ranging from particulate matter to polar bears with consideration of pelagic, benthic and ice-associated energy pathways. We interpret higher diversity in baseline carbon energy as signifying higher stability in food web structure. Based on this, the Beaufort Sea food web had the highest stability; the Beaufort Sea food web occupied the largest isotopic niche space and was supported by multiple carbon sources. Areas with top-down control system, such as Lancaster Sound and North Water Polynya, would be the first to experience an increase in trophic redundancy and possible hardships from external stressors, as they have fewer basal carbon sources and greater numbers of mid-high level consumers. We conclude that a diverse carbon energy based ecosystem such as the Beaufort Sea and Hudson Bay regions are more resilient to change than a top down control system.

  18. Bacterial activities driving arsenic speciation and solubility in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia-Brunet, F.; Seby, F.; Crouzet, C.; Joulian, C.; Mamindy-Pajany, Y.; Guezennec, A. G.; Hurel, C.; Marmier, N.; Bataillard, P.

    2012-04-01

    Harbour and marina sediments represent particular environments, with high concentrations in organic carbon and pollutants. Over 50 million m3 of marine sediments are dredged every year in French maritime and commercial ports, to maintain the water depth suitable for navigation, and the most part of them is discharged in deeper sea zones. The present study aimed to elucidate, using a range of complementary approaches, the influence of bacterial activity on arsenic speciation and mobility in marina sediments. Two sites were considered: L'Estaque, impacted by metallurgical activities and by the commercial port of Marseille, and St-Mandrier, less polluted, affected by classical chemical pollutants associated to professional and recreational boating. Arsenic concentration was noticeably higher in l'Estaque sediment (200-350 mg/kg) than in St-Mandrier sediment (15-50 mg/kg). In the solid phases, As(III) was the dominant species in L'Estaque sediment, whereas As(V) was the main form in St Mandrier sediment. At both sites, arsenic was the major trace element detected in interstitial water. Free sulfide and thio-arsenic complexes were detected in the interstitial water of l'Estaque sediment, suggesting a role of sulfate-reduction bacterial activity on arsenic solubility. Anaerobic microcosm experiments confirmed this hypothesis, as stimulation of sulfate-reduction induced a dramatic increase of arsenic concentration in the liquid phase, linked to the formation of soluble thio-arsenic complexes. Nevertheless, microcosms performed in aerobic conditions showed that bacterial activity globally decreased the transfer of arsenic from the sediment toward the overlying water. A red-brown fine layer developed at the sediment-water interface. Altogether, these results suggest that the sediment-water interface zone and the close transition area between aerobic and anaerobic conditions host intense biogeochemical reactions involving As, Fe and S species. These reactions most probably

  19. Marine fungi isolated from Chilean fjord sediments can degrade oxytetracycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahumada-Rudolph, R; Novoa, V; Sáez, K; Martínez, M; Rudolph, A; Torres-Diaz, C; Becerra, J

    2016-08-01

    Salmon farming is the main economic activity in the fjords area of Southern Chile. This activity requires the use of antibiotics, such as oxytetracycline, for the control and prevention of diseases, which have a negative impact on the environment. We analyzed the abilities of endemic marine fungi to biodegrade oxytetracycline, an antibiotic used extensively in fish farming. We isolated marine fungi strains from sediment samples obtained from an area of fish farming activity. The five isolated strains showed an activity on oxytetracycline and were identified as Trichoderma harzianum, Trichoderma deliquescens, Penicillium crustosum, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, and Talaromyces atroroseus by a scanning electron microscopy and characterized by molecular techniques. Results showed significant degradation in the concentration of oxytetracycline at the first 2 days of treatment for all strains analyzed. At 21 days of treatment, the concentration of oxytetracycline was decreased 92 % by T. harzianum, 85 % by T. deliquescens, 83 % by P. crustosum, 73 % by R. mucilaginosa, and 72 % by T. atroroseus, all of which were significantly higher than the controls. Given these results, we propose that fungal strains isolated from marine sediments may be useful tools for biodegradation of antibiotics, such as oxytetracycline, in the salmon industry. PMID:27418075

  20. The Arctic Ocean marine carbon cycle: evaluation of air-sea CO2 exchanges, ocean acidification impacts and potential feedbacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. Mathis

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available At present, although seasonal sea-ice cover mitigates atmosphere-ocean gas exchange, the Arctic Ocean takes up carbon dioxide (CO2 on the order of −65 to −175 Tg C year−1, contributing 5–14% to the global balance of CO2 sinks and sources. Because of this, the Arctic Ocean is an important influence on the global carbon cycle, with the marine carbon cycle and atmosphere-ocean CO2 exchanges sensitive to Arctic Ocean and global climate change feedbacks. In the near-term, further sea-ice loss and increases in phytoplankton growth rates are expected to increase the uptake of CO2 by Arctic surface waters, although mitigated somewhat by surface warming in the Arctic. Thus, the capacity of the Arctic Ocean to uptake CO2 is expected to alter in response to environmental changes driven largely by climate. These changes are likely to continue to modify the physics, biogeochemistry, and ecology of the Arctic Ocean in ways that are not yet fully understood. In surface waters, sea-ice melt, river runoff, cooling and uptake of CO2 through air-sea gas exchange combine to decrease the calcium carbonate (CaCO3 mineral saturation states (Ω of seawater that is counteracted by seasonal phytoplankton primary production (PP. Biological processes drive divergent trajectories for Ω in surface and subsurface waters of Arctic shelves with subsurface water experiencing undersaturation with respect to aragonite and calcite. Thus, in response to increased sea-ice loss, warming and enhanced phytoplankton PP, the benthic ecosystem of the Arctic shelves are expected to be negatively impacted by the biological amplification of ocean acidification. This in turn reduces the ability of many species to produce CaCO3 shells or tests with profound implications for Arctic marine ecosystems.

  1. Serologic evidence of influenza A infection in marine mammals of arctic Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, O; Clavijo, A; Boughen, J A

    2001-10-01

    A serologic survey of influenza A antibodies was undertaken on 1,611 blood samples from five species of marine mammals collected from Arctic Canada from 1984-98. Sampling was done in 24 locations throughout the Canadian Arctic encompassing Sachs Harbor (72 degrees N, 125 degrees W), Northwest Territories in the west to Loks Land (63 degrees N, 64 degrees W), Nunavut in the east, to Eureka (80 degrees N, 86 degrees W), Nunavut in the north to Sanikiluaq (56 degrees N, 79 degrees W), Nunavut in the south. A competitive ELISA using a monoclonal antibody (Mab) against influenza A nucleoprotein (NP) was used. Five of 418 (1.2%) belugas (Delphinapterus leucas) and 23 of 903 (2.5%) ringed seals (Phoca hispida) were serologically positive. None of the 210 walruses (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus), 76 narwhals (Monodon monoceros) and four bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus) had detectable antibodies to influenza A. Positive belugas were identified from communities on southeast Baffin Island while positive ringed seals came from communities in the eastern, western and high Arctic. Virus isolation attempts on lung tissue from a seropositive beluga were unsuccessful. We believe that influenza A infection in marine mammals is sporadic, the infection is probably self-limiting, and it may not be able to be maintained in these animals. Although the predominant hemagglutinin (H) type was not determined and therefore the pathogenicity of the strains to humans is unknown, the hunting and consumption of marine mammals by the Inuit, may put them at risk for influenza A infection. PMID:11763748

  2. Mercury and other trace elements in a pelagic Arctic marine food web (Northwater Polynya, Baffin Bay)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total mercury (THg), methylmercury (MeHg) and 22 other trace elements were measured in ice algae, three species of zooplankton, mixed zooplankton samples, Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida), ringed seals (Phoca hispida) and eight species of seabirds to examine the trophodynamics of these metals in an Arctic marine food web. All samples were collected in 1998 in the Northwater Polynya (NOW) located between Ellesmere Island and Greenland in Baffin Bay. THg and MeHg were found to biomagnify through the NOW food web, based on significant positive relationships between log THg and log MeHg concentrations vs. δ 15N muscle and liver . The slope of these relationships for muscle THg and MeHg concentrations (slope = 0.197 and 0.223, respectively) were similar to those reported for other aquatic food webs. The food web behavior of THg and δ 15N appears constant, regardless of trophic state (eutrophic vs. oligotrophic), latitude (Arctic vs. tropical) or salinity (marine vs. freshwater) of the ecosystem. Rb in both liver and muscle tissue and Zn in muscle tissue were also found to biomagnify through this food web, although at a rate that is approximately 25% of that of THg. A number of elements (Cd, Pb and Ni in muscle tissue and Cd and Li in seabird liver tissue) were found to decrease trophically through the food web, as indicated by significantly negative relationships with tissue-specific δ 15N. A diverse group of metals (Ag, Ba, La, Li, Sb, Sr, U and V) were found to have higher concentrations in zooplankton than seabirds or marine mammals due to bioconcentration from seawater. The remaining metals (As, Co, Cu, Ga, Mn, Mo and Se in muscle tissue) showed no relationship with trophic position, as indicated by δ 15N values, although As in liver tissue showed significant biomagnification in the seabird portion of the food web

  3. Quantitative and phylogenetic study of the Deep Sea Archaeal Group in sediments of the arctic mid-ocean spreading ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen LethJørgensen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In marine sediments archaea often constitute a considerable part of the microbial community, of which the Deep Sea Archaeal Group (DSAG is one of the most predominant. Despite their high abundance no members from this archaeal group have so far been characterized and thus their metabolism is unknown. Here we show that the relative abundance of DSAG marker genes can be correlated with geochemical parameters, allowing prediction of both the potential electron donors and acceptors of these organisms. We estimated the abundance of 16S rRNA genes from Archaea, Bacteria and DSAG in 52 sediment horizons from two cores collected at the slow-spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge, using qPCR. The results indicate that members of the DSAG make up the entire archaeal population in certain horizons and constitute up to ~ 50% of the total microbial community. The quantitative data were correlated to 30 different geophysical and geochemical parameters obtained from the same sediment horizons. We observed a significant correlation between the relative abundance of DSAG 16S rRNA genes and the content of organic carbon (p < 0.0001. Further, significant co-variation with iron oxide, and dissolved iron and manganese (all p < 0.0000, indicated a direct or indirect link to iron and manganese cycling. Neither of these parameters correlated with the relative abundance of archaeal or bacterial 16S rRNA genes, nor did any other major electron donor or acceptor measured. Phylogenetic analysis of DSAG 16S rRNA gene sequences reveals three monophyletic lineages with no apparent habitat-specific distribution. In this study we support the hypothesis that members of the DSAG are tightly linked to the content of organic carbon and directly or indirectly involved in the cycling of iron and/or manganese compounds. Further, we provide a molecular tool to assess their abundance in environmental samples and enrichment cultures.

  4. Impact of CryoSat-2 for marine gravity field - globally and in the Arctic Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Stenseng, Lars; Knudsen, Per; Jain, Maulik

    2012-01-01

    CryoSat-2 offers at least four important improvements compared with conventional altimetry which should benefit marine gravity in general but particularly at high latitude. Firstly the ESA CryoSat-2 signal to noise ratio should be a factor of two better than conventional altimetry. Secondly the 369 days repeat offered by CryoSat-2 provides denser coverage than older geodetic mission data set like ERS-1. Thirdly, the 92 degree inclination of CryoSat-2 is designed to map more of the Arctic Ocea...

  5. Psychrotrophic lipase producers from Arctic soil and sediment samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasol, R; Rashidah, A R; Nazuha, R Siti Nur; Smykla, J; Maznah, W O Wan; Alias, S A

    2014-01-01

    Culturable microorganisms were successfully isolated from soil and sediment samples collected in 2011 on the northern coast of Hornsund, West Spitsbergen. A total of 63 single colony isolates from three sampling sites obtained were subjected to temperature dependence study to assess whether they are obligate psychrophilic or psychrotrophic strains. From initial temperature screening, only 53 psychrotrophic isolates were selected that are capable of growing between 4-28 degrees C. The rest that were capable of tolerating higher temperatures up to 37 degrees C were not included in this study. These isolates were chosen for lipase enzyme screening confirmation with the standard plate assay of olive oil and fluorescent dye Rhodamine B. Six lipase positive isolates were also subjected for subsequent lipase enzyme plate screening on tributyrin, triolein, olive oil and palm oil agar. Lipase production by these six isolates was further assayed by using colorimetric method with palm oil and olive oil as the substrate. These isolates with promising lipase activity ranging from 20 U/ml up to 160 U/ml on palm oil and olive oil substrate were successfully identified. Molecular identification by using 16S rRNA revealed that five out of six isolates were Gram-negative Proteobacteria and the other one was a Gram-positive Actinobacteria. PMID:25033666

  6. Late Holocene Climate Change Inferred From Varved Proglacial Lake Sediments on Northeastern Baffin Island, Arctic Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, E. K.; Briner, J. P.; Axford, Y.

    2007-12-01

    The Arctic has a disproportionately large response to changes in radiative forcing of climate, and glaciers and arctic lacustrine ecosystems respond sensitively to these changes. Lacustrine ecosystems throughout the Arctic are undergoing rapid regime shifts, including dramatically increased primary productivity and changing aquatic floral and faunal assemblages. Our work on organic lake sediments from northeast Baffin Island shows a large increase in primary productivity, changes in insect (Chironomidae) assemblages including the disappearance of cold stenotherms, and a rise in chironomid-inferred summer water temperatures of at least 1.5°C over the past 50 years, reaching temperatures that were unprecedented in the past 5000 years. Here, we pursue the use of varve thickness, an abiotic temperature proxy, to expand our understanding of late Holocene temperature changes on northeast Baffin Island. We obtained a 14C- and 239+240Pu-dated surface core/percussion core pair from a proglacial lake. Together these cores span > 8000 years and the sediments are varved, as verified by the 239+240Pu analysis, for at least the past 700 years. Magnetic susceptibility was high during the early Holocene, decreased to near-zero values during the mid-Holocene and increased during the past 2500 years to reach the highest values seen in the record around 1000 years ago. Loss-on- ignition had an opposite trend, with the highest values in the mid-Holocene. Sedimentation rate was constant during most of the Holocene (0.03 cm yr -1) and increased during the past 1000 years to 0.05 cm yr -1. These parameters indicate that following the absence of an active glacier during the middle Holocene, glacier activity initiated ~2500 years ago and reached peak activity over the last 1000 years. Our ongoing work to obtain a varve-thickness record for at least the last 700 years, and its calibration to a nearby weather station, will be presented.

  7. Neutron activation analysis studies of marine biological species and related marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the effects, if any, of elemental pollution of the Pacific Ocean from the major Southern California sewage outfalls, samples of ocean sediments were obtained and specimens of Dover Sole were caught in a number of locations. Liver tissue samples from Dover Sole specimens were analyzed for 12 elements and sediment samples for 4 elements. Although a number of the elements were highly concentrated in the surface sediments in the heavily-polluted areas, the Dover Sole showed no evidence of picking up any of the 12 elements from these polluted sediments. Sediment profiles, versus depth, (0-34 cm) were also determined for As, Sb, Se, and Hg. Stemming partly from the results of the NSF Baseline Study, the Southern California Coastal Water Research Project (SCCWRP) became interested in a more intensive multi-element study of marine biological species and ocean sediments off the coast of Southern California. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects, if any, of a number of selected elements of interest being discharged into the Pacific Ocean from the principal sewage outfalls in the Southern California (Los Angeles) area upon marine biological species. The 12 elements selected for study were Cr, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sb, and Hg. Since a number of these elements were not amenable to purely instrumental NAA measurements, a suitable post-irradiation radiochemical separation procedure was devised, thoroughly tested, and then applied to 39 samples of liver tissue from specimens of Dover Sole caught in non-polluted, slightly-polluted, fairly-polluted, and heavily-polluted areas along the coast. A number of surface sediment samples from these same locations were also analyzed, by both instrumental and radiochemical NAA. In the following sections, the samples analyzed are cited, the procedures developed and employed are described, the results obtained are presented, and the conclusions reached are discussed

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of the bacterial communities in marine sediments.

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, J P; Herwig, R P

    1996-01-01

    For the phylogenetic analysis of microbial communities present in environmental samples microbial DNA can be extracted from the sample, 16S rDNA can be amplified with suitable primers and the PCR, and clonal libraries can be constructed. We report a protocol that can be used for efficient cell lysis and recovery of DNA from marine sediments. Key steps in this procedure include the use of a bead mill homogenizer for matrix disruption and uniform cell lysis and then purification of the released...

  9. Methodical problems of thermoluminescence dating of holocene eolian and marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methodological problems of thermoluminescence dating of eolian and marine sediments are described. On the basis of studies performed it is shown that K-feldspars are perspective paleodosemeters for TL-dating of sediments of the above-mentioned genesis. TL-dating results of the Holocene eolian sediments from Estonia and the Middle Pleistocene marine, sediments from Arkhangelsk region with reconstructed residual lightsum are presented. The results are in good agreement with those obtained by other dating methods and geological models

  10. [PATTERNS IN CIRCULATION AND TRANSMISSION OF MARINE BIRD PARASITES IN HIGH ARCTIC: A CASE OF ACANTHOCEPHALAN POLYMORPHUS PHIPPSI (PALAEACANTHOCEPHALA, POLYMORPHIDAE)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaktionov, K V; Atrashkevich, G I

    2015-01-01

    This study, based on the materials on parasitic infection of marine birds and invertebrates in Frantz Josef Land (FJL) collected in 1991-1993, focussed on the acanthocephalan Polymorphus phippsi. We identified this parasite, confirmed its species status and analysed its circulation and transmission patterns in high Arctic. The causes of its erroneous identification as P. minutus in several studies were also examined. In contrast to P. minutus, the transmission of P. phippsi is realized in marine coastal ecosystems. Its' main intermediate host in the Arctic is the amphipod Gammarus (Lagunogammarus) setosus, commonin coastal. areas of the shelf zone throughout the Arctic basin. P. phippsi population in FJL and the entire European Arctic is on the whole maintained by a single obligate final host, the common eider Somateria mollissima. Prevalence (P) of P. phippsi in this bird reached 100 %, with the maximal infection intensity (IImax) of 1188 and the mean abundance (MA) of 492.1. Other species of birds found to be infected with P. phippsi (Arctic turn, black guillemot, purple sandpiper and several gulls) are facultative and/or eliminative hosts. The most heavily infected birds were Arctic terns (P = 72.7%, IImax = 227, MA = = 47.1), which contained single mature acanthocephalans. For one of the FJL regions, infections flows of P. phippsi through various host categories were calculated. Involvement of birds unrelated to the common eider into the circulation of P. phippsi is facilitated by their feeding character in the Arctic. While coastal crustaceans are abundant, fish food is relatively scarce (polar cod, snailfishes), and so amphipods make up a considerable part of the diet of marine birds in FJL, if not most of it, as for instance in case of Arctic tern. This promotes an easy entry of the larvae of crustaceans-parasitizing helminthes (cestodes and acanthocephalans, including cystacanths P. phippsi) into non-specific hosts and opens broad colonization possibilities

  11. Effects of sample mass and macrofossil type on radiocarbon dating of arctic and boreal lake sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oswald, W W; Anderson, P M; Brown, T A; Brubaker, L B; Hu, F S; Lozhkin, A V; Tinner, W; Kaltenrieder, P

    2006-05-29

    Dating lake sediments by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) {sup 14}C analysis of plant macrofossils overcomes one of the main problems associated with dating bulk sediment samples, the presence of old organic matter. Even so, many AMS dates from arctic and boreal sites appear to misrepresent the age of the sediment. To understand the nature of these apparent dating anomalies better, we conducted a series of {sup 14}C dating experiments using samples from Alaskan and Siberian lake-sediment cores. First, to test whether our analytical procedures introduced a sample-mass bias, we obtained {sup 14}C dates for different-sized pieces of single woody macrofossils. In these sample-mass experiments, sized statistically equivalent ages were found for samples as small as 0.05 mg C. Second, to assess whether macrofossil type influenced dating results, we conducted sample-type experiments in which {sup 14}C dates were obtained for different macrofossil types sieved from the same depth in the sediment. We dated materials from multiple levels in sediment cores from Upper Capsule Lake (North Slope, northern Alaska) and Grizzly Lake (Copper River Basin, southern Alaska), and from single depths in other records from northern Alaska. In several of the experiments there were significant discrepancies between dates for different plant tissues, and in most cases wood and charcoal were older than other macrofossil types, usually by several hundred years. This pattern suggests that {sup 14}C dates for woody macrofossils may misrepresent the age of the sediment by centuries, perhaps due to their longer terrestrial residence time and the potential in-built age of long-lived plants. This study identifies why some {sup 14}C dates appear to be inconsistent with the overall age-depth trend of a lake-sediment record, and it may guide the selection of {sup 14}C samples in future studies.

  12. A biomarker record of Lake El'gygytgyn, Far East Russian Arctic: investigating sources of organic matter and carbon cycling during marine isotope stages 1–3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Holland

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Arctic paleoenvironmental archives serve as sensitive recorders of past climate change. Lake El'gygytgyn (Far East Russian Arctic is a high-latitude crater impact lake that contains a continuous sediment record influenced by neither glaciation nor glacial erosion since the time of impact 3.58 Ma ago. Prior research on sediments collected from Lake El'gygytgyn suggest times of permanent ice cover and anoxia corresponding to global glacial intervals, during which the sediments are laminated and are characterized by the co-occurrence of high total organic carbon, microscopic magnetite grains that show etching and dissolution, and negative excursions in bulk sediment organic matter carbon isotope (δ13C values. Here we investigate the abundance and carbon isotopic composition of lipid biomarkers recovered from Lake El'gygytgyn sediments spanning marine isotope stages 1–3 to identify key sources of organic matter (OM to lake sediments, to establish which OM sources drive the negative δ13C excursion exhibited by bulk sediment OM, and to explore if there are molecular and isotopic signatures of anoxia in the lake during glaciation. We find that during marine isotope stages 1–3, direct evidence for water column anoxia is lacking. A ~4‰ negative excursion in bulk sediment δ13C values during the Local Last Glacial Maximum (LLGM is accompanied by more protracted, higher magnitude negative excursions in n-alkanoic acid and n-alkanol δ13C values that begin 20 kyr in advance of the LLGM. In contrast, n-alkanes and the C30 n-alkanoic acid do not exhibit a negative δ13C excursion at this time. Our results indicate that the C24, C26 and C28 n-alkanoic acids do not derive entirely from terrestrial OM sources, while the C30 n-alkanoic acid at Lake El'gygytgyn is a robust indicator of terrestrial OM contributions. Overall, our results strongly support the presence of a nutrient-poor water column, which is mostly isolated from atmospheric carbon dioxide

  13. Identifying nitrogen limitations to organic sediments accumulation in various vegetation types of arctic tundra (Hornsund, Svalbard)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypek, G.; Wojtuń, B.; Hua, Q.; Richter, D.; Jakubas, D.; Wojczulanis-Jakubas, K.; Samecka-Cymerman, A.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic and subarctic regions play important roles in the global carbon balance. However, nitrogen (N) deficiency is a major constraint for organic carbon sequestration in the High Arctic. Hence, the identification of the relative contributions from different N-sources is critical for understanding the constraints that limit tundra growth. The stable nitrogen composition of the three main N-sources and numerous plants were analyzed in ten tundra types in the Fuglebekken catchment (Hornsund Fjord, Svalbard, 77°N 15°E). The percentage of the total tundra N-pool provided by seabirds' feces (colonially breeding, planktivorous Alle alle), ranged from 0-21% in Patterned-ground tundra to 100% in Ornithocoprophilous tundra. The total N-pool utilized by tundra plants in the studied catchment was built in 36% by birds, 38% by atmospheric deposition, and 26% by N2-fixation. The results clearly show that N-pool in the tundra is significantly supplemented by nesting seabirds. Thus, if they experienced substantial negative environmental pressure associated with climate change, it would adversely influence the tundra N-budget [1]. The growth rates and the sediment thickness (climatic conditions but also by birds' contribution to the tundra N-pool. [1] Skrzypek G, Wojtuń B, Richter D, Jakubas D, Wojczulanis-Jakubas K, Samecka-Cymerman A, 2015. Diversification of nitrogen sources in various tundra vegetation types in the high Arctic. PLoS ONE (in review).

  14. Comparison between summertime and wintertime Arctic Ocean primary marine aerosol properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zábori

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Primary marine aerosols (PMAs are an important source of cloud condensation nuclei, and one of the key elements of the remote marine radiative budget. Changes occurring in the rapidly warming Arctic, most importantly the decreasing sea ice extent, will alter PMA production and hence the Arctic climate through a set of feedback processes. In light of this, laboratory experiments with Arctic Ocean water during both Arctic winter and summer were conducted and focused on PMA emissions as a function of season and water properties. Total particle number concentrations and particle number size distributions were used to characterize the PMA population. A comprehensive data set from the Arctic summer and winter showed a decrease in PMA concentrations for the covered water temperature (Tw range between −1°C and 15°C. A sharp decrease in PMA emissions for a Tw increase from −1°C to 4°C was followed by a lower rate of change in PMA emissions for Tw up to about 6°C. Near constant number concentrations for water temperatures between 6°C to 10°C and higher were recorded. Even though the total particle number concentration changes for overlapping Tw ranges were consistent between the summer and winter measurements, the distribution of particle number concentrations among the different sizes varied between the seasons. Median particle number concentrations for a dry diameter (DpDp > 0.125μm, the particle number concentrations during winter were mostly higher than in summer (up to 50%. The normalized particle number size distribution as a function of water temperature was examined for both winter and summer measurements. An increase in Tw from −1°C to 10°C during winter measurements showed a decrease in the peak of relative particle number concentration at about a Dp of 0.180μm, while an increase was observed for particles with Dp > 1μm. Summer measurements exhibited a relative shift to smaller particle sizes for an increase of Tw in the range

  15. Bacterial corrosion in marine sediments: influence of cathodic protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to protect offshore structures from marine corrosion, cathodic protection is widely applied via sacrificial anodes (for example zinc or aluminium) or impressed current. In aerated seawater, steel is considered to be protected when a potential of -8050 mV/Cu.CuSO4 is achieved. In many cases, however this potential must be lowered, due to the activity of microorganisms and more specially sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). SRB are obligate anaerobes using sulphate as electron acceptor with resultant production of sulphide. Some of them are also able to use hydrogen as energy source, causing cathodic depolarization of steel surfaces. An experiment was performed to analyze the relation between SRB activity and use of different cathodic potentials applied to mild steel samples in marine sediments. Analytical techniques employed included lipid bio-markers and electrochemical methods. Results indicated an evolution of the bacterial community structure both on the steel and in the sediment, as a function of time and potential. The results also show that cathodically produced hydrogen promotes the growth of SRB (author)

  16. Concentration of 60Co by marine organisms through sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uptake of 60Co absorbed on sea sands by benthic marine organisms was observed in laboratory experiments, since the radioactive cobalt released from nuclear power plants or other establishments into coastal seawater trends to be absorbed on sea sediments and also various kinds of marine organisms live in bottom sediments. Few kinds of flatfishes (Limanda spp.) and shrimp (Trachypenaeus curvirostris) were reared in aquariums contained seawater and sea sands which were highly contaminated with 60Co previously, and whole body retention and distribution of radioactivity were measured on the organisms taken up from the aquariums occasionally by a scintillation counter. Uptake of 60Co from ingested sea sands was also observed on the flatfishes administrating the contaminated sands orally. Concentration of 60Co by the flatfishes reared in the sands was not significant while the shrimp showed high retention of the radioactivity. The food habit of shrimp which usually feeds on organic detritus with other small benthic organisms is different from that of flatfishes, one of the carnivorous, and considered to bring the difference on the pathway of radionuclides concentration. Assimilation of 60Co via the digestive tract of flatfishes through the sands was estimated as about 10 per cent of the administrated radioactivity. (auth.)

  17. The bioremediation potential of marine sandy sediment microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Răzvan POPOVICIU

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The natural microbiota from marine sandy sediments on the Romanian sea coast was tested for resilience in case of hydrocarbon contamination, for estimating the number of (culturable hydrocarbon and lipid oil-degrading microorganisms and for determining the influence of inorganic nitrate and phosphate nutrients on hydrocarbon spill bioremediation process, by microcosm experiments.Results show that hydrocarbon contamination affects the bacteriobenthos both in terms of cell numbers and composition. Bacterial numbers showed a rapid decrease (28% in four days, followed by a relatively fast recovery (two weeks. The pollution favoured the increase of Gram-positive bacterial proportion (from around 25% to 33%Sandy sediment microbiota in both sites studied contained microorganisms able to use mineral or lipid oils as sole carbon sources, usually around 103-104/cm3, with variations according to the sediment grain size and substrate used.The biostimulation experiments showed that, in absence of water dynamism (and, implicitly, an efficient oxygenation, the addition of nitrogen and phosphorus can be ineffective and even inhibit the remediation process, probably due to eutrophication.

  18. A method of harvesting gas hydrates from marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H.Q.; Brill, J.P.; Sarica, C. [Tulsa Univ., Tulsa, OK (United States). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Methane is known to exist in gas hydrates, but low productivity is expected for gas production from gas hydrates in marine sediments because of the shallow depths, low hydrate concentration, low permeability of the gas hydrate stability zone, lack of driving pressure and the slow melting process. This paper presented a newly developed methane harvesting method which aims to overcome technical barriers, maintain cost and energy efficiencies and minimize safety and environmental concerns. The method is based on the concept of capturing the gas released from hydrate dissociation in the sediments. The captured gases can reform hydrates inside and overhead receiver, which once full, can be lifted to shallow warm water for gas collection. This simple and open production system does not require high pressure and does not involve any flow assurance issues. As such, technical difficulties, safety issues and environmental concerns are minimized. The proposed gas harvesting method makes the best use of the nature of hydrates and the subsea pressure and temperature profiles. It combines many new concepts, including electrically adding heat inside the hydrate rich sediments to release gas, using an overhead receiver to capture the gas, allowing the gas to reform hydrates again in the overhead receiver, and lifting produced hydrates to warm water where it can be released and collected. It was concluded that this newly proposed production system enables the development of massive hydrate production fields on the sea bed with high production rates that are economically viable. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Trophic transfer of persistent organochlorine contaminants (OCs) within an Arctic marine food web from the southern Beaufort-Chukchi Seas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoekstra, P.F.; O' Hara, T.M.; Fisk, A.T.; Borgaa, K.; Solomon, K.R.; Muir, D.C.G

    2003-08-01

    The trophic status and biomagnification of persistent OCs within the near-shore Beaufort-Chukchi Seas food web from Barrow, AK is discussed. - Stable isotope values ({delta}{sup 13}C, {delta}{sup 15}N) and concentrations of persistent organochlorine contaminants (OCs) were determined to evaluate the near-shore marine trophic status of biota and biomagnification of OCs from the southern Beaufort-Chukchi Seas (1999-2000) near Barrow, AK. The biota examined included zooplankton (Calanus spp.), fish species such as arctic cod (Boreogadus saida), arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus), pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha), and fourhorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus quadricornis), along with marine mammals, including bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus), beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas), ringed seals (Phoca hispida) and bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus). The isotopically derived trophic position of biota from the Beaufort-Chukchi Seas marine food web, avian fauna excluded, is similar to other coastal food webs in the Arctic. Concentrations of OCs in marine mammals were significantly greater than in fish and corresponded with determined trophic level. In general, OCs with the greatest food web magnification factors (FWMFs) were those either formed due to biotransformation (e.g. p,p'-DDE, oxychlordane) or considered recalcitrant (e.g. {beta}-HCH, 2,4,5-Cl substituted PCBs) in most biota, whereas concentrations of OCs that are considered to be readily eliminated (e.g. {gamma}-HCH) did not correlate with trophic level. Differences in physical-chemical properties of OCs, feeding strategy and possible biotransformation were reflected in the variable biomagnification between fish and marine mammals. The FWMFs in the Beaufort-Chukchi Seas region were consistent with reported values in the Canadian Arctic and temperate food webs, but were statistically different than FWMFs from the Barents and White Seas, indicating that the spatial variability of OC contamination in top

  20. Trophic transfer of persistent organochlorine contaminants (OCs) within an Arctic marine food web from the southern Beaufort-Chukchi Seas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trophic status and biomagnification of persistent OCs within the near-shore Beaufort-Chukchi Seas food web from Barrow, AK is discussed. - Stable isotope values (δ13C, δ15N) and concentrations of persistent organochlorine contaminants (OCs) were determined to evaluate the near-shore marine trophic status of biota and biomagnification of OCs from the southern Beaufort-Chukchi Seas (1999-2000) near Barrow, AK. The biota examined included zooplankton (Calanus spp.), fish species such as arctic cod (Boreogadus saida), arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus), pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha), and fourhorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus quadricornis), along with marine mammals, including bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus), beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas), ringed seals (Phoca hispida) and bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus). The isotopically derived trophic position of biota from the Beaufort-Chukchi Seas marine food web, avian fauna excluded, is similar to other coastal food webs in the Arctic. Concentrations of OCs in marine mammals were significantly greater than in fish and corresponded with determined trophic level. In general, OCs with the greatest food web magnification factors (FWMFs) were those either formed due to biotransformation (e.g. p,p'-DDE, oxychlordane) or considered recalcitrant (e.g. β-HCH, 2,4,5-Cl substituted PCBs) in most biota, whereas concentrations of OCs that are considered to be readily eliminated (e.g. γ-HCH) did not correlate with trophic level. Differences in physical-chemical properties of OCs, feeding strategy and possible biotransformation were reflected in the variable biomagnification between fish and marine mammals. The FWMFs in the Beaufort-Chukchi Seas region were consistent with reported values in the Canadian Arctic and temperate food webs, but were statistically different than FWMFs from the Barents and White Seas, indicating that the spatial variability of OC contamination in top-level marine Arctic predators is attributed to

  1. Phytoremediation of dredged marine sediment: monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes contributing to sediment reclamation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masciandaro, G; Di Biase, A; Macci, C; Peruzzi, E; Iannelli, R; Doni, S

    2014-02-15

    In this study, a pilot phytoremediation experiment was performed to treat about 80 m(3) of silty saline sediments contaminated by heavy metals and organic compounds. After preliminary mixing with a sandy soil and green compost application, three different plant treatments [Paspalum vaginatum (P); P. vaginatum + Spartium junceum (P + S); P. vaginatum + Tamarix gallica (P + T)] were compared to each other and to an unplanted control (C) in order to evaluate the plant efficiency in remediating and ameliorating agronomical and functional sediment properties. The experiment was monitored for one year after planting by taking sediment samples at two depths and performing several chemical and biochemical analyses. After one year, the increase in hydrolytic enzyme and dehydrogenase activities indicated the stimulation of sediment functionality. Additionally, the availability of energy sources derived from organic matter application and plant-root activity promoted the formation of a stable organic matter fraction. Finally, P + S and P + T were also effective in decontaminating polluted marine sediments from both organic (total petroleum hydrocarbons, TPH) and inorganic (heavy metal) pollutants. PMID:24486533

  2. Oxidation of pyrite and iron sulfide by manganese dioxide in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schippers, A.; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    Oxidation of pyrite (FeS2) under anaerobic conditions in marine sediments is experimentally shown for the first time. In slurry experiments with (FeS2)-Fe-55 and a MnO2 rich marine sediment an oxidation of (FeS2)-Fe-55 was detected which decreased with depth and decreasing concentration of MnO2 i...

  3. Late Paleocene Arctic Ocean shallow-marine temperatures from mollusc stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bice, Karen L.; Arthur, Michael A.; Marincovich, Louie, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Late Paleocene high-latitude (80°N) Arctic Ocean shallow-marine temperatures are estimated from molluscan δ18O time series. Sampling of individual growth increments of two specimens of the bivalve Camptochlamys alaskensis provides a high-resolution record of shell stable isotope composition. The heavy carbon isotopic values of the specimens support a late Paleocene age for the youngest marine beds of the Prince Creek Formation exposed near Ocean Point, Alaska. The oxygen isotopic composition of regional freshwater runoff is estimated from the mean δ18O value of two freshwater bivalves collected from approximately coeval fluviatile beds. Over a 30 – 34‰ range of salinity, values assumed to represent the tolerance of C. alaskensis, the mean annual shallow-marine temperature recorded by these individuals is between 11° and 22°C. These values could represent maximum estimates of the mean annual temperature because of a possible warm-month bias imposed on the average δ18O value by slowing or cessation of growth in winter months. The amplitude of the molluscan δ18O time series probably records most of the seasonality in shallow-marine temperature. The annual temperature range indicated is approximately 6°C, suggesting very moderate high-latitude marine temperature seasonality during the late Paleocene. On the basis of analogy with modern Chlamys species, C. alaskensis probably inhabited water depths of 30–50 m. The seasonal temperature range derived from δ18O is therefore likely to be damped relative to the full range of annual sea surface temperatures. High-resolution sampling of molluscan shell material across inferred growth bands represents an important proxy record of seasonality of marine and freshwater conditions applicable at any latitude. If applied to other regions and time periods, the approach used here would contribute substantially to the paleoclimate record of seasonality.

  4. The freshwater fern Azolla (Azollaceae) from Eocene Arctic and Nordic Sea sediments: New species and their stratigraphic distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Burgh, J.; Collinson, M.E.; van Konijnenburg-van Cittert, J.H.A.; Barke, J.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2013-01-01

    Three new species of the freshwater fern Azolla are described from Eocene marine deposits of the Arctic and Nordic seas, bringing the total number of species now documented from these areas to five. Azolla arctica Collinson et al., Azolla jutlandica Collinson et al., Azolla nova sp. nov. and Azolla

  5. Review: Potential catastrophic reduction of sea ice in the western Arctic Ocean: Its impact on biogeochemical cycles and marine ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    The reduction of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean, which has progressed more rapidly than previously predicted, has the potential to cause multiple environmental stresses, including warming, acidification, and strengthened stratification of the ocean. Observational studies have been undertaken to detect the impacts on biogeochemical cycles and marine ecosystems of these environmental stresses in the Arctic Ocean. Satellite analyses show that the reduction of sea ice has been especially great in the western Arctic Ocean. Observations and model simulations have both helped to clarify the impact of sea-ice reductions on the dynamics of ecosystem processes and biogeochemical cycles. In this review, I focus on the western Arctic Ocean, which has experienced the most rapid retreat of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean and, very importantly, has a higher rate of primary production than any other area of the Arctic Ocean owing to the supply of nutrient-rich Pacific water. I report the impact of the current reduction of sea ice on marine biogeochemical cycles in the western Arctic Ocean, including lower-trophic-level organisms, and identify the key mechanism of changes in the biogeochemical cycles, based on published observations and model simulations. The retreat of sea ice has enhanced primary production and has increased the frequency of appearance of mesoscale anticyclonic eddies. These eddies enhance the light environment and replenish nutrients, and they also represent a mechanism that can increase the rate of the biological pump in the Arctic Ocean. Various unresolved issues that require further investigation, such as biological responses to environmental stressors such as ocean acidification, are also discussed.

  6. The Arctic Ocean marine carbon cycle: evaluation of air-sea CO2 exchanges, ocean acidification impacts and potential feedbacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Bates

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available At present, although seasonal sea-ice cover mitigates atmosphere-ocean gas exchange, the Arctic Ocean takes up carbon dioxide (CO2 on the order of −66 to −199 Tg C year−1 (1012 g C, contributing 5–14% to the global balance of CO2 sinks and sources. Because of this, the Arctic Ocean has an important influence on the global carbon cycle, with the marine carbon cycle and atmosphere-ocean CO2 exchanges sensitive to Arctic Ocean and global climate change feedbacks. In the near-term, further sea-ice loss and increases in phytoplankton growth rates are expected to increase the uptake of CO2 by Arctic Ocean surface waters, although mitigated somewhat by surface warming in the Arctic. Thus, the capacity of the Arctic Ocean to uptake CO2 is expected to alter in response to environmental changes driven largely by climate. These changes are likely to continue to modify the physics, biogeochemistry, and ecology of the Arctic Ocean in ways that are not yet fully understood. In surface waters, sea-ice melt, river runoff, cooling and uptake of CO2 through air-sea gas exchange combine to decrease the calcium carbonate (CaCO3 mineral saturation states (Ω of seawater while seasonal phytoplankton primary production (PP mitigates this effect. Biological amplification of ocean acidification effects in subsurface waters, due to the remineralization of organic matter, is likely to reduce the ability of many species to produce CaCO3 shells or tests with profound implications for Arctic marine ecosystems

  7. Proceedings of the 26. Arctic and Marine Oilspill Program (AMOP) Technical Seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers presented at this Arctic and Marine Oilspill Program (AMOP) technical seminar reviewed the latest technologies that can be applied to the recovery and mitigation of marine oil spills. The very first seminar was held back in 1976 in response to public concerns regarding the potential for oil spills associated with offshore drilling in the Beaufort Sea in the Canadian Arctic. This twenty-sixth issue includes an appendix listing more than 1,200 AMOP papers from the first 25 years of the conference. Today, the AMOP conference has become international in nature and is the only surviving technical conference on oil spill science and technology in the world. While technical presentations about oil spills are the primary focus of the conference, many presentations also deal with other topics of interest, including contingency planning and legislation. In recent years, the conference has attracted about 200 people each year from 20 countries. The different sessions at this conference were entitled: (1) physical and chemical properties and behaviour of spilled oil, (2) activity updates and contingency planning, (3) detection, tracking and remote sensing, (4) biological effects of oil and hydrocarbons and oil biodegradation, (5) technical seminar on chemical spills with a special session on counter-terrorism, (6) technical seminar on chemical spills, (7) containment and recovery, (8) BIOSS, (9) in-situ burning and shoreline protection and cleanup, (10) oil spill treating agents, (11) spill modelling, and, (12) recent spill experiences. Several presentations described the process of oil in water interactions and were aimed at optimizing response functions, strategy development for marine oil spill response, equipment deployment, containment, recovery, and shoreline assessment. Several studies also presented new treatments for oil spills. Relevant papers and/or presentations were indexed separately for inclusion in the database

  8. Alternative procedure to determine radionuclide concentrations for marine sediment dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of an alternative method to prepare and to measure marine sediment samples for dating purpose using high resolution gamma spectrometry is given. To calculate the 137 Cs and the supported and unsupported 210 Pb concentrations, cylindrical tablets subjected to different pressures were analyzed. Mass attenuation coefficients (MAC) were determined by our variant of the transmission method, the Bragg law (using MACs provided by the web program XCOM) and the method of average composition of the analyzed sediment samples. The differences between obtained results are smaller than the experimental error (10%). The influence of pressure and sediment mass on the MAC, mechanical stability of the sample, and self-absorption corrections for different gamma energies is studied. Optimal dimensions of the tablets were determined from considerations on the infinite thickness, minimum detectable activity, precision of results, radiation self-absorption and geometric efficiency. Based on the differential peak absorption analysis, through a relative efficiency curve, a new method to evaluate the existence of radioactive equilibrium between 226 Ra, 222 Rn and its progeny is given. Experimental error of the proposed methodology is evaluated, as well as accuracy, precision and detection limit. With the use of developed methodology, the 210 Pb, 226 Ra and 137 Cs activities in recent sediment samples from near shore of the Orinoco River Delta were determined. The results were comparable with the obtained by two of the most used methods, while precision is improved and radiation self-absorption in sample container is avoided since sample encapsulation is not required. (Full Text)

  9. Recent Advances on Lipid Biomarkers in Marine Sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-lin

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent advances of marine biomarker. Biomarkers of marine microorganisms are also included. It is important to the origin of marine biological and the monitor and evaluation of marine environment.

  10. Late quaternary palaeo-oceanography and palaeo-climatology from sediment cores of the eastern Arctic Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Box cores recovered along a N-S transect in the Eurasian Basin allow the establishment of a time scale for the Late Quaternary history of the Arctic Ocean, based on stable oxygen isotope stratigraphy and AMS 14C dating of planktonic foraminifers (N. pachyderma I.c.). This high resolution stratigraphy, in combination with sedimentological investigations (e.g. coarse fraction analysis, carbonate content, productivity of foraminifers), was carried out to reconstruct the glacial and inter-glacial Arctic Ocean palaeo-environment The sediment cores, which can be correlated throughout the sampling area in the Eastern Arctic Ocean, were dated as representing oxygen isotope stages 1 to 4/5. The sedimentation rates varied between a few mm/ka in glacials and approximately one cm/ka during the Holocene. The sediments allow a detailed sedimentological description of the depositional regime and the palaeo-oceanography of the Eastern Arctic Ocean. Changing ratios of biogenic and lithogenic components in the sediments reflect variations in the oceanographic circulation pattern in the Eurasian Basin during the Late Quaternary. Carbonate content (1-9wt.%), productivity of foraminifers (high in interglacial, low in glacial stages) and the terrigenous components are in good correlation with glacial and inter-glacial climatic fluctuations

  11. Sorption kinetics of TNT and RDX in anaerobic freshwater and marine sediments: Batch studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyarathna, Thivanka; Vlahos, Penny; Tobias, Craig; Smith, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Examination of the partitioning of explosives onto sediment in marine environments is critical to predict the toxicological impacts of worldwide explosive-contaminated sites adjacent to estuaries, wetlands, and the coastal ocean. Marine sediments have been identified as sites of enhanced munitions removal, yet most studies addressing these interactions focus on soils and freshwater sediments. The present study measured the kinetics of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) sorption onto 2 marine sediments of varying grain sizes (silt vs sand) and organic carbon (OC) content. Abiotic sediment sorption tests were performed at 23 °C, 15 °C, and 4 °C by spiking TNT and RDX solutions directly into anaerobic sediment slurries. Marine sediments showed significantly higher compound uptake rates (0.30-0.80 h(-1) ) than freshwater silt (0.0046-0.0065 h(-1) ) for both compounds, probably because of lower compound solubilities and a higher pH in marine systems. Equilibrium partition constants are on the same order of magnitude for marine silt (1.1-2.0 L kg(-1) sediment) and freshwater silt (1.4-3.1 L kg(-1) sediment) but lower for marine sand (0.72-0.92 L kg(-1) sediment). Total organic carbon content in marine sediments varied linearly with equilibrium partition constants for TNT and was moderately linear for RDX. Uptake rates and equilibrium constants of explosives are inversely correlated to temperature regardless of sediment type because of kinetic barriers associated with low temperatures. PMID:26178383

  12. Intercomparison of radionuclide measurements in marine sediment sample IAEA-135

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of an intercomparison exercise on a marine sediment from Irish Sea, IAEA-135, designed for the determination of artificial and natural radionuclides levels, are reported. The data from 151 laboratories representing 51 countries have been evaluated. The following are the recommended values, with confidence intervals, for 40K, 60Co, 134Cs, 137Cs, 154Eu, 155Eu, 226Ra, 228Ra, 232Th,238Pu, 239+240Pu (Reference date: 1 January 1992). Information values for 57Co, 90Sr, 106Ru, 125Sb, 210Pb, 210Po, 228Th, 230Th, 234U, 235U, 238U and 241Am are also reported. All values are expressed in Bq kg-1 dry weight. (author)

  13. Radioactivity in Norwegian Waters: Distribution in seawater and sediments, and uptake in marine organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heldal, Hilde Elise

    2001-07-01

    Prior to the detonation of the first thermonuclear bomb, small amounts of radioactivity, for example in mineral water, were considered to be health enriching. Negative experiences related to thermonuclear bombs and several nuclear accidents have, however, changed people's attitude towards radioactivity during the past 40-50 years. Today, there is a common concern for regular and potential accidental releases of radioactivity from sources such as Sellafield. Although this is important, incorrect assessments of the effects of these releases (e.g. created by uncritical journalism) have the potential to harm the country's fisheries and economy. Therefore, it is of major importance to document up-to-date levels of radioactive contamination of the marine environment, and be able to place these into the proper perspectives. The main topics of the thesis may be summarised as follows: (1) Distribution of Caesium-137, Plutonium-238, Plutonium-239,240 and Americium-241 in sediments with emphasis on the Spitsbergen-Bear Island area, (2) Uptake of Caesium-137 in phytoplankton representative for the Barents and Norwegian Seas phytoplankton communities (laboratory experiments), (3) Bioaccumulation of Caesium-137 in food webs in the Barents and Norwegian Seas, (4) Geographical variations of Caesium-137 in harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) along the Norwegian coast, (5) Transport times for Technetium-99 from Sellafield to various locations along the Norwegian coast and the Arctic Ocean.

  14. Radioactivity in Norwegian Waters: Distribution in seawater and sediments, and uptake in marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to the detonation of the first thermonuclear bomb, small amounts of radioactivity, for example in mineral water, were considered to be health enriching. Negative experiences related to thermonuclear bombs and several nuclear accidents have, however, changed people's attitude towards radioactivity during the past 40-50 years. Today, there is a common concern for regular and potential accidental releases of radioactivity from sources such as Sellafield. Although this is important, incorrect assessments of the effects of these releases (e.g. created by uncritical journalism) have the potential to harm the country's fisheries and economy. Therefore, it is of major importance to document up-to-date levels of radioactive contamination of the marine environment, and be able to place these into the proper perspectives. The main topics of the thesis may be summarised as follows: (1) Distribution of Caesium-137, Plutonium-238, Plutonium-239,240 and Americium-241 in sediments with emphasis on the Spitsbergen-Bear Island area, (2) Uptake of Caesium-137 in phytoplankton representative for the Barents and Norwegian Seas phytoplankton communities (laboratory experiments), (3) Bioaccumulation of Caesium-137 in food webs in the Barents and Norwegian Seas, (4) Geographical variations of Caesium-137 in harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) along the Norwegian coast, (5) Transport times for Technetium-99 from Sellafield to various locations along the Norwegian coast and the Arctic Ocean

  15. Marine sediments as a radioactive pollution repository in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a time period little longer than 60 years, it has been created a radioactive pollution background over the natural one, which started in 1945 and it has been growing up since then, due to several nuclear tests, minor nuclear reactors failure and four major accidents: Wind Scale, Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima. This radioactive polluting background can be easily detected through 137Cs fission product, which by the effect of wind, river currents and rain has been accumulated in marine sediments, mainly because sea represents about 80 % of earth's surface. Since energy demand has been growing up with no interruption during last two centuries, and nuclear energy seems to be the largest available source, it is very likely a great expansion of nuclear energy during twenty-first century. So, this paper presents results obtained in strategic points of the two large littorals in Mexico: Gulf and Pacific Ocean, as an attempt to establish there some figure to evaluate the present radioactive pollution. An adequate figure to do it, seems to be the quotient of activity per gram of 137Cs in marine sediments (Bq137Cs/g), divided by activity per gram of 40K natural radioactivity (Bq40K/g). When this result is multiplied by 100 the percentage of polluting radioactivity (137Cs) related to natural radioactivity (40K) is obtained. This percentage seems to be useful to evaluate the importance of radioactive pollution from 4 points of view: a) calculate the extent of already radioactive pollution present in the seas of world; b) avoid the panic in case of nuclear accidents, c) what will be the growing up rate in the future; d) if it is possible to keep one decreasing rate at same decaying rate of 137Cs (t1/2 = 30.07 years), since from 1945, starting time of radioactive pollution, it has decayed only about 2.2 half lives. (author)

  16. Fine scale remobilisation of Fe, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu and Cd in contaminated marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tankere-Muller, Sophie; Zhang, Hao; Davison, William;

    2007-01-01

    Contaminated sediment from a marine harbour was maintained for 16 months in two flumes that continuously re-circulated the overlying water, sustaining a smooth flow at the sediment surface. The sediment was placed in one flume intact, while for the other it was pre-homogenised. The concentrations...

  17. Proceedings of the 27. Arctic and Marine Oilspill Program (AMOP) Technical Seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers presented at this Arctic and Marine Oilspill Program (AMOP) conference reviewed the latest technologies that can be applied to the recovery and mitigation of marine oil spills. The AMOP conference is international in nature and is the only technical conference on oil spill science and technology in the world. While technical presentations about oil spills are the primary focus of the conference, many presentations also deal with other topics of interest, including contingency planning and legislation. In recent years, the conference has attracted approximately 200 people from around the world. The different sessions at this conference were entitled: (1) physical and chemical properties and behaviour of spilled oil, (2) containment and recovery, (3) in-situ burning, (4) activity updates and contingency planning, (5) detection, tracking and remote sensing, (6) spill modelling, (7) shoreline protection and cleanup, and (8) biological effects of oil and oil biodegradation. The conference also featured a technical seminar on chemical spills with a special session on counter-terrorism. Several presentations described the process of oil in water interactions and were aimed at optimizing response functions, strategy development for marine oil spill response, equipment deployment, containment, recovery, and shoreline assessment. Several studies also presented new treatments for oil spills. All 59 presentations were indexed separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  18. Proceedings of the 28. Arctic and Marine Oilspill Program (AMOP) Technical Seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leading-edge technologies used in marine oil spill response operations were described at this international conference, along with other topics of interest such as contingency planning and legislation. The different sessions at this conference were entitled: (1) physical and chemical properties and behaviour of spilled oil, (2) oil spill fingerprinting, (3) activity updates and contingency planning, (4) oil spill risk assessment, (5) in-situ burning and oil spill treating agents, (6) containment and recovery, (7) shoreline protection and cleanup, (8) detection, tracking and remote sensing, (9) spill modelling, (10) biological effects of oil and oil biodegradation, and (11) recent spill experiences. The conference also featured a technical seminar on chemical spills with a special session on counter-terrorism. Several presentations described the process of oil in water interactions and were aimed at optimizing response functions in harsh Arctic marine waters and strategy development for marine oil spill response and shoreline assessment. Several studies also presented new mechanical, chemical and biological treatments for oil spills. All 68 presentations were indexed separately for inclusion in this database. (author)

  19. Zinc Isotope Ratios as Indicators of Diet and Trophic Level in Arctic Marine Mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klervia Jaouen

    Full Text Available Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of bone collagen are an established method for dietary reconstruction, but this method is limited by the protein preservation. Zinc (Zn is found in bioapatite and the isotopic compositions of this element constitute a very promising dietary indicator. The extent of fractionation of Zn isotopes in marine environments, however, remains unknown. We report here on the measurement of zinc, carbon and nitrogen isotopes in 47 marine mammals from the archaeological site of Arvik in the Canadian Arctic. We undertook this study to test and demonstrate the utility of Zn isotopes in recent mammal bone minerals as a dietary indicator by comparing them to other isotopic dietary tracers. We found a correlation between δ66Zn values and trophic level for most species, with the exception of walruses, which may be caused by their large seasonal movements. δ6Zn values can therefore be used as a dietary indicator in marine ecosystems for both modern and recent mammals.

  20. Zinc Isotope Ratios as Indicators of Diet and Trophic Level in Arctic Marine Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaouen, Klervia; Szpak, Paul; Richards, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of bone collagen are an established method for dietary reconstruction, but this method is limited by the protein preservation. Zinc (Zn) is found in bioapatite and the isotopic compositions of this element constitute a very promising dietary indicator. The extent of fractionation of Zn isotopes in marine environments, however, remains unknown. We report here on the measurement of zinc, carbon and nitrogen isotopes in 47 marine mammals from the archaeological site of Arvik in the Canadian Arctic. We undertook this study to test and demonstrate the utility of Zn isotopes in recent mammal bone minerals as a dietary indicator by comparing them to other isotopic dietary tracers. We found a correlation between δ66Zn values and trophic level for most species, with the exception of walruses, which may be caused by their large seasonal movements. δ6Zn values can therefore be used as a dietary indicator in marine ecosystems for both modern and recent mammals. PMID:27010907

  1. Proceedings of the 29. Arctic and Marine Oilspill Program (AMOP) Technical Seminar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This conference was a venue to exchange information on leading-edge technologies used in marine oil spill response operations. The different sessions at this conference were entitled: (1) physical and chemical properties and behaviour of spilled oil, (2) containment and recovery, (3) activity updates and contingency planning, (4) phytoremediation of inorganic and radionuclides, (5) biosolutions to site remediation, restoration and rehabilitation, (6) phytoremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons, (7) oil spill treating agents, (8) spill modelling, (9) detection, tracking and remote sensing, (10) special session on hurricanes, and (11) recent spill experiences. In addition to a poster session with papers, the conference also featured a technical seminar on chemical spills with a special session on counter-terrorism. Many presentations addressed the issue of optimizing response functions in harsh Arctic marine waters as well as strategy development for marine oil spill response and shoreline assessment. Several studies focused on oil-in-water interactions to find new mechanical, chemical and biological treatments for oil spills. All 65 presentations were indexed separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  2. Proceedings of the 29. Arctic and Marine Oilspill Program (AMOP) Technical Seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conference was a venue to exchange information on leading-edge technologies used in marine oil spill response operations. The different sessions at this conference were entitled: (1) physical and chemical properties and behaviour of spilled oil, (2) containment and recovery, (3) activity updates and contingency planning, (4) phytoremediation of inorganic and radionuclides, (5) biosolutions to site remediation, restoration and rehabilitation, (6) phytoremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons, (7) oil spill treating agents, (8) spill modelling, (9) detection, tracking and remote sensing, (10) special session on hurricanes, and (11) recent spill experiences. In addition to a poster session with papers, the conference also featured a technical seminar on chemical spills with a special session on counter-terrorism. Many presentations addressed the issue of optimizing response functions in harsh Arctic marine waters as well as strategy development for marine oil spill response and shoreline assessment. Several studies focused on oil-in-water interactions to find new mechanical, chemical and biological treatments for oil spills. All 65 presentations were indexed separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  3. Bacterial diversity in oil-polluted marine coastal sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-González, Alejandro; Marqués, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    Marine environments harbour a persistent microbial seed which can be shaped by changes of the environmental conditions such as contamination by petroleum components. Oil spills, together with small but continuous discharges of oil from transportation and recreational activities, are important sources of hydrocarbon pollution within the marine realm. Consequently, prokaryotic communities have become well pre-adapted toward oil pollution, and many microorganisms that are exposed to its presence develop an active degradative response. The natural attenuation of oil pollutants, as has been demonstrated in many sites, is modulated according to the intrinsic environmental properties such as the availability of terminal electron acceptors and elemental nutrients, together with the degree of pollution and the type of hydrocarbon fractions present. Whilst dynamics in the bacterial communities in the aerobic zones of coastal sediments are well characterized and the key players in hydrocarbon biodegradation have been identified, the subtidal ecology of the anaerobic community is still not well understood. However, current data suggest common patterns of response in these ecosystems. PMID:26773654

  4. SOLID RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TECHNOLOGIES: PERFORMANCE OF A POLYMER SEALANT COATING IN AN ARCTIC MARINE ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COWGILL,M.G.; MOSKOWITZ,P.D.; CHERNAENKO,L.M.; NAZARIAN,A.; GRIFFITH,A.; DIASHEV,A.; ENGOY,T.

    2000-06-14

    This first project, under the auspices of the Arctic Military Environmental Cooperation (AMEC) forum, Project 1.4-1 Solid Radioactive Waste Storage Technologies, successfully demonstrated the feasibility of using a polymer-based coating to seal concrete and steel surfaces from permanent radioactive contamination in an Arctic marine environment. A mobile, self-sufficient spraying device, was developed to specifications provided by the Russian Ministry of Defence Northern Navy and was deployed at the RTP Atomflot site, Murmansk, Russia. Demonstration coatings of Polibrid 705 were applied to concrete surfaces exposed to conditions ranging from indoor pedestrian usage to heavy vehicle passage and container handling in a loading bay. A large steel container was also coated with the polymer, filled with solid radwaste, sealed, and left out of doors and exposed to the full 12 month Arctic weather cycle. The field tests were accompanied by a series of laboratory qualification tests carried out at the research laboratory of ICC Nuclide in St. Petersburg. During the 12-month field tests, the sealant coating showed little sign of degradation except for a few chips and gouge marks on the loading bay surface that were readily repaired. Contamination resulting from radwaste handling was easily removed and the surface was not degraded by contact with the decontamination agents. In the laboratory testing, Polibrid 705 met all the Russian qualification requirements with the exception of flammability. In this last instance, it was decided to restrict application of the coating to land-based facilities. The Russian technical experts from the Ministry of Defence quickly familiarized themselves with the equipment and were able to identify several areas of potential improvement as deployment of the equipment progressed. The prime among these was the desirability of extending the range of the equipment through enlarged gasoline tanks (to permit extended operational times) and longer

  5. SOLID RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TECHNOLOGIES: PERFORMANCE OF A POLYMER SEALANT COATING IN AN ARCTIC MARINE ENVIRONMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This first project, under the auspices of the Arctic Military Environmental Cooperation (AMEC) forum, Project 1.4-1 Solid Radioactive Waste Storage Technologies, successfully demonstrated the feasibility of using a polymer-based coating to seal concrete and steel surfaces from permanent radioactive contamination in an Arctic marine environment. A mobile, self-sufficient spraying device, was developed to specifications provided by the Russian Ministry of Defence Northern Navy and was deployed at the RTP Atomflot site, Murmansk, Russia. Demonstration coatings of Polibrid 705 were applied to concrete surfaces exposed to conditions ranging from indoor pedestrian usage to heavy vehicle passage and container handling in a loading bay. A large steel container was also coated with the polymer, filled with solid radwaste, sealed, and left out of doors and exposed to the full 12 month Arctic weather cycle. The field tests were accompanied by a series of laboratory qualification tests carried out at the research laboratory of ICC Nuclide in St. Petersburg. During the 12-month field tests, the sealant coating showed little sign of degradation except for a few chips and gouge marks on the loading bay surface that were readily repaired. Contamination resulting from radwaste handling was easily removed and the surface was not degraded by contact with the decontamination agents. In the laboratory testing, Polibrid 705 met all the Russian qualification requirements with the exception of flammability. In this last instance, it was decided to restrict application of the coating to land-based facilities. The Russian technical experts from the Ministry of Defence quickly familiarized themselves with the equipment and were able to identify several areas of potential improvement as deployment of the equipment progressed. The prime among these was the desirability of extending the range of the equipment through enlarged gasoline tanks (to permit extended operational times) and longer

  6. The impacts of thermokarst on sediment, organic matter, and macroinvertebrate community dynamics in arctic headwater streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinn, M.; Kampman, J.; Larouche, J. R.; Bowden, W. B.

    2010-12-01

    Recent research has documented changes in arctic climate that influence permafrost degradation and the incidence of thermokarst formation. In 2009 and 2010, we examined several thermokarst failures on headwater streams near Toolik Lake, AK, and the Kelly River area of the Noatak National Preserve, AK, USA. We quantified significant differences between reference (upstream) and impacted stream reaches affected by these thermokarst features. Sediment deposition at Toolik in 2009, measured with sediment traps, showed no differences in the organic fractions; however, the inorganic fraction was ~2x higher (PChironomidae) abundance and biomass doubled in the impacted reaches by late summer, mostly due to Dicrotopus, Psudokiefferiella, and Rheotanytarsus. Nemoura (Plecoptera, Nemouridae), a shredding stonefly, abundance and biomass were over 5x higher in the impacted reaches (PChironomidae) showed a 3-fold decrease in the impacted reaches (P<0.05). Results from several years of research indicate that thermokarst failures result in impacts that respond on different temporal scales. High sediment loading during initiation results in negative impacts on primary production and ecosystem function; however, the duration of these effects on primary consumers may diminish relatively quickly downstream and over time. Further research on these failures will help us to determine the trajectory of recovery.

  7. Organochlorine contaminants in arctic marine food chains: identification, geographical distribution, and temporal trends in polar bears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norstrom, R.J.; Simon, M.; Muir, D.C.G.; Schweinsburg, R.E.

    1988-09-01

    Contamination of Canadian arctic and subarctic marine ecosystems by organochlorine (OC) compounds was measured by analysis of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) tissues collected from 12 zones between 1982 and 1984. PCB congeners (S-PCB), chlordanes, DDT and metabolites, chlorobenzenes (S-CBz), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (S-HC-H), and dieldrin were identified by high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Nonachlor-III, a nonachlor isomer in technical chlordane, was positively identified for the first time as an environmental contaminant. S-PCB and S-CHLOR accounted for >80% of the total organochlorines in adipose tissue. Six PCB congeners constituted approximately 93% of S-PCB in polar bears. Levels of most OCs were lowest in the high Arctic, intermediate in Baffin Bay, and highest in Hudson Bay. Levels of ..cap alpha..-HCH were evaluated in zones influenced by surface runoff. Levels of S-CHLOR were four times higher and levels of the other OCs were two times higher in adipose tissue of bears from Hudson Bay and Baffin Bay in 1984 than in adipose tissue archived since 1969 from these areas; levels of S-DDT did not change.

  8. Performance of a polymer sealant coating in an arctic marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of using a polymer-based coating, Polibrid 705, to seal concrete and steel surfaces from permanent radioactive contamination in an Arctic marine environment has been successfully demonstrated using a combination of field and laboratory testing. A mobile, self-sufficient spraying device was developed to specifications provided by the Russian Northern Navy and deployed at the RTP Atomflot site, Murmansk, Russia. Demonstration coatings were applied to concrete surfaces exposed to conditions ranging from indoor pedestrian usage to heavy vehicle passage and container handling in a loading dock. A large steel container was also coated with the polymer, filled with solid radwaste, sealed, and left out of doors, exposed to the full annual Arctic weather cycle. The 12 months of field testing gave rise to little degradation of the sealant coating, except for a few chips and gouge marks on the loading bay surface that were readily repaired. Contamination resulting from radwaste handling was easily removed and the surface was not degraded by contact with the decontamination agents. The field tests were accompanied by a series of laboratory qualification tests carried out at a research laboratory in St. Petersburg. The laboratory tests examined a variety of properties, including bond strength between the coating and the substrate, thermal cycling resistance, wear resistance, flammability, and ease of decontamination. The Polibrid 705 coating met all the Russian Navy qualification requirements with the exception of flammability. In this last instance, it was decided to restrict application of the coating to land-based facilities

  9. Changing Arctic ecosystems--research to understand and project changes in marine and terrestrial ecosystems of the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiselman, Joy; DeGange, Anthony R.; Oakley, Karen; Derksen, Dirk; Whalen, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Ecosystems and their wildlife communities are not static; they change and evolve over time due to numerous intrinsic and extrinsic factors. A period of rapid change is occurring in the Arctic for which our current understanding of potential ecosystem and wildlife responses is limited. Changes to the physical environment include warming temperatures, diminishing sea ice, increasing coastal erosion, deteriorating permafrost, and changing water regimes. These changes influence biological communities and the ways in which human communities interact with them. Through the new initiative Changing Arctic Ecosystems (CAE) the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) strives to (1) understand the potential suite of wildlife population responses to these physical changes to inform key resource management decisions such as those related to the Endangered Species Act, and (2) provide unique insights into how Arctic ecosystems are responding under new stressors. Our studies examine how and why changes in the ice-dominated ecosystems of the Arctic are affecting wildlife and will provide a better foundation for understanding the degree and manner in which wildlife species respond and adapt to rapid environmental change. Changes to Arctic ecosystems will be felt broadly because the Arctic is a production zone for hundreds of species that migrate south for the winter. The CAE initiative includes three major research themes that span Arctic ice-dominated ecosystems and that are structured to identify and understand the linkages between physical processes, ecosystems, and wildlife populations. The USGS is applying knowledge-based modeling structures such as Bayesian Networks to integrate the work.

  10. Input of Terrestrial Palynomorphs since the Last Deglaciation from Sediments of the Chukchi Sea Shelf, Western Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delusina, I.; Kim, S. Y.; Nam, S. I.; Woo, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    We report the palynology of marine sediment core ARA02B/01A-GC from the Western margin of the shallow shelf of the Chukchi Sea in the Arctic, a site which was synchronously influenced by climatic changes during the last deglaciation with those in the Bering Strait. The core contains a rich concentration of continental palynomorphs, even though the coring location is quite a distance from land. The catchment area for the observed palynomorphs includes the territories of both North America (Alaska and North Canada) and Northern Siberia (Chukotka peninsula and Northern East-Siberian coast). Based on this fact, we can reconstruct a common paleoenvironmental history for this location and the Bering Strait during the postglacial interval. We hypothesize that palynomorphs were carried to the sea during low sea-ice coverage intervals by large rivers (Yukon, Mackenzie and Siberian rivers) and were then transferred by oceanic currents. During intervals of extensive sea-ice coverage the source of the palynomorphs was predominantly eroded shelf sediments. The percentage ratio of tree-herb pollen and spores in the palynomorph assemblages shows that favorable conditions for an increase in forest vegetation took place between ~8 and 4 kyr BP, which coincides with maximum freshwater input to the sea. During a climatic optimum at ~5 kyr BP, as inferred from the total dominance of tree and herb pollen, the Chukchi Sea was apparently warmer than today. This represents the maximum ice-free period for the sea. The low sea-ice interval ended ~3 kyr BP, as suggested by a sharp drop in tree pollen, a reduction in fresh water input, and a drop in the concentration of the algae Pediastrum. Our data correlate well with data from marine core HLY0501-5 from the Bering Strait (Polyak et al., 2009) for the interval of 10-8 kyr BP, but shows a divergence since ~4 kyr BP, which may correspond to the beginning of the differentiation of North American and East-Siberian ecosystem zones.

  11. Distribution and sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments from the Bering Sea and western Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mengwei; Wang, Weiguo; Liu, Yanguang; Dong, Linsen; Jiao, Liping; Hu, Limin; Fan, Dejiang

    2016-03-15

    To analyze the distribution and sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and evaluate their potential ecological risks, the concentrations of 16 PAHs were measured in 43 surface sediment samples from the Bering Sea and western Arctic Ocean. Total PAH (tPAH) concentrations ranged from 36.95 to 150.21 ng/g (dry weight). In descending order, the surface sediment tPAH concentrations were as follows: Canada Basin>northern Chukchi Sea>Chukchi Basin>southern Chukchi Sea>Aleutian Basin>Makarov Basin>Bering Sea shelf. The Bering Sea and western Arctic Ocean mainly received PAHs of pyrogenic origin due to pollution caused by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. The concentrations of PAHs in the sediments of the study areas did not exceed effects range low (ERL) values. PMID:26806662

  12. Temperature induced decoupling of enzymatic hydrolysis and carbon remineralization in long-term incubations of Arctic and temperate sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robador, Alberto; Brüchert, Volker; Steen, Andrew;

    2010-01-01

    , and 20 ºC. The short-term temperature response of the active microbial community was tested in temperature gradient block incubations. The temperature optimum of extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis, as measured with a polysaccharide (chondroitin sulfate), differed between Arctic and temperate habitats......Extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis of high-molecular weight organic matter is the initial step in sedimentary organic carbon degradation and is often regarded as the rate-limiting step. Temperature effects on enzyme activities may therefore exert an indirect control on carbon mineralization. We...... by about 8–13 C in fresh sediments and in sediments incubated for 24 months. In both Arctic and temperate sediments, the temperature response of chondroitin sulfate hydrolysis was initially similar to that of sulfate reduction. After 24 months, however, hydrolysis outpaced sulfate reduction rates, as...

  13. Western Arctic Vulnerability to Warming over the past 3.6 Myr: Lessons from sediments drilled at Lake El'gygytgyn, Western Beringia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham-Grette, J.; Melles, M.; Minyuk, P.; Lake El'gygytgyn Science Team

    2011-12-01

    International Continental Deep drilling (ICDP) at Lake El'gygytgyn (67_30' N, 172_05' E; "Lake E"), recovered lacustrine sediments dating back to 3.6 Ma that provides the first time-continuous Pliocene-Pleistocene paleoclimate record of different interglacials from the terrestrial Arctic. While discontinuous, spatially diverse Pliocene and Pleistocene marine interglacial records are known from the arctic borderlands at the outcrop scale, the Lake El'gygytgyn record is critically important understanding the western Arctic landscape response to different forcing factors operating across the Arctic since the mid-Pliocene warm period. The record is important for evaluating the sensitivity of the Arctic region and to provide a template of Arctic climate variability that can be compared to other regions. Lake E modeling is framed around suites of sensitivity tests of Beringian climate response to the full range of forcing experienced over the last ~3.5 million years using a nested Global-Regional Climate Model (GCM-RCM). The Pliocene portion of the lake record (~3.6-3.0 Ma; a time when atmospheric CO2 levels may have been like today) has nearly twice the sedimentation rate as later Quaternary intervals, partly as a consequence of basin infilling but also presumably due to more rainfall and more active rivers at that time. Studies of spores and pollen from this portion of the core (samples every ~10k) show that the area was once dominated by trees, providing us with the pace of variability in Pliocene Arctic forests, which included species of pine, larch, spruce, fir, alder, and hemlock. Hemlock and tree pine pollen is exceptional for this latitude but the assemblage implies July temperatures nearly 8 degrees warmer than today with ~3 times the annual precipitation. Modeling suggests sustained forests at Lake E in both cold and warm orbits during this interval. The record includes a strong M2 cooling event to conditions like today at ~3.3 Ma, but not glacial climates as

  14. Summertime aerosol chemical components in the marine boundary layer of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhouqing; Sun, Liguang; Blum, Joel D.; Huang, Yuying; He, Wei

    2006-05-01

    Samples of aerosols from the marine boundary layer of the Arctic Ocean were collected aboard the R/V Xuelong during summer on the Second Chinese Arctic Research Expedition (July-September 2003). Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) was used to determine chemical compositions of aerosol particles. Multivariate analysis of the SR-XRF data resolved a number of components (factors), which, on the basis of their chemical compositions and from their affiliation with specific meteorological flow patterns, were assigned physical meanings. Five factors explaining 94.7% of the total variance were identified. Ship emissions accounted for 35.3% of the variance (factor 1 (F1)) and are loaded significantly with S, Fe, V, and Ni. The total Fe emitted from ships globally was estimated at 8.60 × 106 kg yr-1. Heavy-metal-rich factors included 34.0% of the variance (F2 and F3) and were interpreted to be pollution carried into the Arctic Ocean by long-range transport. Anthropogenic contributions from industrial regions to the Arctic Ocean during the summer vary and depend on the source locations. Air mass backward trajectories indicate that the metals including Hg, Pb, Cu, and Zn come mainly from northern Russia. The third source controlling the chemical compositions of aerosols was sea salt (F4, 12.8%). The role of sea salt decreased from the open sea to areas near pack ice. On the basis of the factor scores of aerosol samples, we infer that chlorine volatilization from sea salt may occur, enhanced by nitrogen and sulfur contamination emitted from ships. Because the global inventories of nitrogen and sulfur for ship exhausts are large, and halogens could have important consequences in possible tropospheric ozone destruction, the role of ships in influencing halogen depression in sea salt should be further investigated. Finally, we also identified a crustal factor (F5, 12.6%) and suggest that crustal elements (e.g., Ca) contaminating sea ice may become reinjected into

  15. Plutonium in an arctic marine environment 29 years after the Thule accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear weapons contaminated benthic marine environment in the 180-230 m deep Bylot Sound of Thule Airbase, NW Greenland, was revisited August 1997. Data on water and on brown algae indicates that plutonium from the contaminated sediments is not transported into the surface waters in significant quantities. Sediment core data only indicate minor translocation of plutonium from the accident to the area outside Bylot sound. The present data support an ealier quantification of the sedimentation rate as 3-4 mm per year, i.e. 8-12 cm during the 29 years since the accident. Biological activity has mixed accident plutonium much deeper, down to 20-30 cm, and the 8-12 cm new sediment have been efficiently mixed into the contaminated layer. In addition to the classical bioturbation efficiently mixing the upper ≅ 5 cm, the plutonium data indicates the existence of a deeper bioturbation gradualy decreasing with depth. Transfer of plutonium to benthic biota is low leading to lower concentrations in biota than in sediments. (au)

  16. Sonobuoy-based velocity functions for sediment thickness calculation in the deep Canada Basin of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva-Ivanova, N. N.; Hart, P. E.; Chian, D.; Shimeld, J.; Lizarralde, D.; Hutchinson, D. R.; Mosher, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    The deep Canada Basin, which occupies much of the western (Amerasian) Arctic Ocean, is one of the most unexplored and difficult areas on Earth for marine seismic acquisition due to permanent sea ice cover. It extends northward from the Alaskan and Canadian margins for ~500 km and is characterized by a remarkably flat sea floor at 3.6-3.8 km below sea level (bsl) and covers ~500,000 km^2. A set of 143 sonobuoy records were collected during 2007-2010 over the Canada Basin by US-Canada collaborative expeditions. The sonobuoys were deployed along short streamer multi-channel seismic (MCS) lines for estimating seismic velocities in the sediments. A spatial coverage of sonobuoys at every ~80 km on MCS lines provides data for robust average empirical time-depth conversion functions.Sediments are nearly sub-horizontal and sub-parallel, mostly undisturbed with maximum two-way travel time (TWTT)thicknesses of ~5 s, but not greater than ~2.5-3.0 s TWTT closer to the Alpha Ridge and the Chukchi Borderland. Semblance velocity analysis has been applied to the sonobuoy records to determine sediment thickness and depth using the Dix equation. Assuming flat-lying sediments, the normal-moveout (NMO) velocity is approximately equal to the root-mean-square (RMS) average velocity from the sea surface to the reflection horizon. A dip of 5 degrees effects velocity less than 0.5%. Semblance velocity analyses were completed for 128 of 143 sonobuoy records in the deep Canada Basin; 25 records were excluded from later analysis due to bad quality or location on the slope. Results were also converted to interval velocities and depths.The RMS velocities were consistently picked from clear high-coherency events to yield only increasing interval velocities.Picking stopped at or above the bright reflection interpreted as basement on the MCS. Velocities were not picked on dipping reflections surfaces, along the margins where the seafloor was dipping, nor for sedimentary horizons characterized by

  17. Integrated approach to the toxicity evaluation of Irish marine sediments: exotoxicological assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Macken, Ailbhe

    2007-01-01

    The quality of sediment in any aquatic ecosystem is vital to the health of that system. Sediments have been recognised as a major repository for persistent toxic substances. If sediments become sufficiently polluted they can lead to the disruption of surrounding natural biological communities. Therefore the monitoring of sediment quality is essential for successful ecosystem functioning in the marine environment. The aim of the present study was to employ an integrated approach of the toxicit...

  18. Comparison between summertime and wintertime Arctic Ocean primary marine aerosol properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zábori

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary marine aerosols (PMA are an important source of cloud condensation nuclei, and one of the key elements of the remote marine radiative budget. Changes occurring in the rapidly warming Arctic, most importantly the decreasing sea ice extent will alter PMA production and hence the Arctic climate through a set of feedback processes. In light of this, laboratory experiments with Arctic Ocean water during both Arctic winter and summer were conducted and focused on PMA emissions as a function of season and water properties. Total particle number concentrations and particle number size distributions were used to characterize the PMA population. A comprehensive data set from the Arctic summer and winter showed a decrease in PMA concentrations for the covered water temperature (Tw range between −1 °C and 15 °C. A sharp decrease in PMA emissions for a Tw increase from −1 °C to 4 °C was followed by a lower rate of change in PMA emissions for Tw up to about 6 °C. Near constant number concentrations for water temperatures between 6 °C to 10 °C and higher were recorded. Even though the total particle number concentrations changes for overlapping Tw ranges were consistent between the summer and winter measurements, the distribution of particle number concentrations among the different sizes varied between the seasons. Median particle number concentrations for Dp < 0.125 μm measured during winter conditions were similar (deviation of up to 3%, or lower (up to 70% than the ones measured during summer conditions (for the same water temperature range. For Dp > 0.125 μm, the particle number concentrations during winter were mostly higher than in summer (up to 50%. The normalized particle number size distribution as a function of water temperature was examined for both winter and summer measurements. An increase in Tw from

  19. Effect of sediment properties on the sorption of C{sub 12}-2-LAS in marine and estuarine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rico-Rico, Angeles [Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 2, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)], E-mail: a.ricorico@uu.nl; Temara, Ali [Procter and Gamble Company, Central Product Safety, Temselaan 100, 1853 Strombeek-Bever (Belgium); Behrends, Thilo [Department of Earth Sciences-Geochemistry, Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Hermens, Joop L.M. [Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 2, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2009-02-15

    Linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) are anionic high production volume surfactants used in the manufacture of cleaning products. Here, we have studied the effect of the characteristics of marine and estuarine sediments on the sorption of LAS. Sorption experiments were performed with single sediment materials (pure clays and sea sand), with sediments treated to reduce their organic carbon content, and with field marine and estuarine sediments. C{sub 12}-2-LAS was used as a model compound. Sorption to the clays montmorillonite and kaolinite resulted in non-linear isotherms very similar for both clays. When reducing the organic content, sorption coefficients decreased proportionally to the fraction removed in fine grain sediments but this was not the case for the sandy sediment. The correlation of the sediment characteristics with the sorption coefficients at different surfactant concentrations showed that at concentrations below 10 {mu}g C{sub 12}-2-LAS/L, the clay content correlated better with sorption, while the organic fraction became more significant at higher concentrations. - Sorption of C{sub 12}-2-LAS to marine sediments mainly depends on both clay and organic carbon content. The importance of each parameter varies with the surfactant concentration.

  20. Proceedings of the 30. Arctic and Marine Oilspill Program (AMOP) Technical Seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conference was a forum for technology transfer among professionals working in the field of Arctic and marine oil spills, spill assessment, cleanup and control. It was attended by researchers developing oil spill countermeasures technology as well as regulators interested in controlling and managing oil spills. The conference included a technical seminar on chemical spills (TSOCS) for those involved in preventing, managing and controlling spills of hazardous materials. Biological solutions for remediating and rehabilitating contaminated sites were also presented. The presentations on leading-edge technologies used in marine oil spill response operations were presented during different sessions of the conference entitled: (1) physical and chemical properties and behaviour of spilled oil, (2) oil spill treating agents, (3) activity updates and contingency planning, (4) biological effects of oil and hydrocarbons and oil biodegradation, (5) containment and recovery, (6) shoreline protection and cleanup/in-situ burning, (7) detection, tracking and remote sensing, and (8) spill modelling. In addition to a poster session with papers, the conference also featured a technical seminar on chemical spills with a special session on DRDC field trials. The conference featured 55 presentations, of which 36 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  1. Biogeography and Photosynthetic Biomass of Arctic Marine Pico-Eukaroytes during Summer of the Record Sea Ice Minimum 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metfies, Katja; von Appen, Wilken-Jon; Kilias, Estelle; Nicolaus, Anja; Nöthig, Eva-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Information on recent photosynthetic biomass distribution and biogeography of Arctic marine pico-eukaryotes (0.2-3 μm) is needed to better understand consequences of environmental change for Arctic marine ecosystems. We analysed pico-eukaryote biomass and community composition in Fram Strait and large parts of the Central Arctic Ocean (Nansen Basin, Amundsen Basin) using chlorophyll a (Chl a) measurements, automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) and 454-pyrosequencing. Samples were collected during summer 2012, the year with the most recent record sea ice minimum. Chl a concentrations were highest in eastern Fram Strait and pico-plankton accounted for 60-90% of Chl a biomass during the observation period. ARISA-patterns and 454-pyrosequencing revealed that pico-eukaryote distribution is closely related to water mass distribution in the euphotic zone of the Arctic Ocean. Phaeocystaceae, Micromonas sp., Dinophyceae and Syndiniales constitute a high proportion of sequence reads, while sequence abundance of autotrophic Phaeocystaceae and mixotrophic Micromonas sp. was inversely correlated. Highest sequence abundances of Phaeocystaceae were observed in the warm Atlantic Waters in Fram Strait, while Micromonas sp. dominated the abundant biosphere in the arctic halocline. Our results are of particular interest considering existing hypotheses that environmental conditions in Nansen Basin might become more similar to the current conditions in Fram Strait. We propose that in response, biodiversity and biomass of pico-eukaryotes in Nansen Basin could resemble those currently observed in Fram Strait in the future. This would significantly alter biogeochemical cycles in a large part of the Central Arctic Ocean. PMID:26895333

  2. Biogeography and Photosynthetic Biomass of Arctic Marine Pico-Eukaroytes during Summer of the Record Sea Ice Minimum 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Metfies

    Full Text Available Information on recent photosynthetic biomass distribution and biogeography of Arctic marine pico-eukaryotes (0.2-3 μm is needed to better understand consequences of environmental change for Arctic marine ecosystems. We analysed pico-eukaryote biomass and community composition in Fram Strait and large parts of the Central Arctic Ocean (Nansen Basin, Amundsen Basin using chlorophyll a (Chl a measurements, automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA and 454-pyrosequencing. Samples were collected during summer 2012, the year with the most recent record sea ice minimum. Chl a concentrations were highest in eastern Fram Strait and pico-plankton accounted for 60-90% of Chl a biomass during the observation period. ARISA-patterns and 454-pyrosequencing revealed that pico-eukaryote distribution is closely related to water mass distribution in the euphotic zone of the Arctic Ocean. Phaeocystaceae, Micromonas sp., Dinophyceae and Syndiniales constitute a high proportion of sequence reads, while sequence abundance of autotrophic Phaeocystaceae and mixotrophic Micromonas sp. was inversely correlated. Highest sequence abundances of Phaeocystaceae were observed in the warm Atlantic Waters in Fram Strait, while Micromonas sp. dominated the abundant biosphere in the arctic halocline. Our results are of particular interest considering existing hypotheses that environmental conditions in Nansen Basin might become more similar to the current conditions in Fram Strait. We propose that in response, biodiversity and biomass of pico-eukaryotes in Nansen Basin could resemble those currently observed in Fram Strait in the future. This would significantly alter biogeochemical cycles in a large part of the Central Arctic Ocean.

  3. Erosion of soil organic carbon at high latitudes and its delivery to Arctic Ocean sediments: New source to sink insight from radiocarbon dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Robert; Galy, Valier; Gaillardet, Jerome; Dellinger, Mathieu; Bryant, Charlotte; O'Regan, Matt; Grocke, Darren; Coxall, Helen

    2016-04-01

    Soils of the northern high latitudes store carbon over thousands of years and contain almost double the carbon stock of the atmosphere. Erosion processes can mobilise this pre-aged soil organic carbon from the landscape and supply it to rivers. If it escapes degradation during river transport and is delivered to the coastal ocean, this carbon may be sequestered for much longer periods of time (>104 yr) as a geological CO2 sink. Despite this recognition, the erosional flux and fate of particulate organic carbon (POC) in large rivers draining the high latitudes remains poorly constrained. Using radiocarbon activity, we quantify POC source, flux and fate in the Mackenzie River, the main sediment supplier to the Arctic Ocean. When combined with stable carbon isotopes and element ratios, the radiocarbon activity of POC allows us to distinguish inputs of POC from sedimentary rocks and quantify the average age of biospheric POC (from vegetation and soil) transported through the river system. We find that the eroded biospheric POC has resided in the basin for millennia, with a mean radiocarbon age of 5800±800 years. This is much older than large tropical rivers where we have equivalent data (Amazon River, Ganges River), and likely reflects the longer residence time of organic matter in cold, wet, high latitude soils. Based on the measured biospheric POC content and annual sediment flux, we calculate a biospheric POC flux of 2.2 (+1.3/-0.9) TgC yr‑1 from the Mackenzie River. This is the largest input of aged organic carbon to the Arctic Ocean, more than the combined POC flux from the Eurasian Rivers. Offshore, we use a marine core to investigate organic carbon burial over the Holocene period. Radiocarbon measurements of bulk organic carbon reveal a significant offset from benthic foraminifera radiocarbon ages throughout the core, which is dependent upon the grain size of the sediments. Organic matter in sediments >63μm are offset from foraminifera by ˜ 6,000 14C years

  4. Diversity of active aerobic methanotrophs along depth profiles of arctic and subarctic lake water column and sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J.; Pohlman, John W.; Quensen, John; Tiedje, James M.; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH4) emitted from high-latitude lakes accounts for 2–6% of the global atmospheric CH4 budget. Methanotrophs in lake sediments and water columns mitigate the amount of CH4 that enters the atmosphere, yet their identity and activity in arctic and subarctic lakes are poorly understood. We used stable isotope probing (SIP), quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), pyrosequencing and enrichment cultures to determine the identity and diversity of active aerobic methanotrophs in the water columns and sediments (0–25 cm) from an arctic tundra lake (Lake Qalluuraq) on the north slope of Alaska and a subarctic taiga lake (Lake Killarney) in Alaska's interior. The water column CH4 oxidation potential for these shallow (~2m deep) lakes was greatest in hypoxic bottom water from the subarctic lake. The type II methanotroph, Methylocystis, was prevalent in enrichment cultures of planktonic methanotrophs from the water columns. In the sediments, type I methanotrophs (Methylobacter, Methylosoma and Methylomonas) at the sediment-water interface (0–1 cm) were most active in assimilating CH4, whereas the type I methanotroph Methylobacter and/or type II methanotroph Methylocystis contributed substantially to carbon acquisition in the deeper (15–20 cm) sediments. In addition to methanotrophs, an unexpectedly high abundance of methylotrophs also actively utilized CH4-derived carbon. This study provides new insight into the identity and activity of methanotrophs in the sediments and water from high-latitude lakes.

  5. ACCUMULATION OF POLYCHLORINATED ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS FROM SEDIMENT BY THREE BENTHIC MARINE SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to measure the accumulation of selected polychlorinated compounds by marine benthos exposed to environmentally contaminated sediment. andworms (Nereis virens), clams (Macoma nasuta), and grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) were exposed to sedim...

  6. Degradation of dead microbial biomass in a marine sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of dead microbial biomass in a marine beach sand to degradation and mineralization was examined. Microbial sand populations were labeled with [14C]glutamic acid, [3H]adenine, or [3H]thymidine and killed with chloroform. Live sand or seawater (or both) was added to the sterile labeled sand, and biochemical components of the populations were monitored for 10 days. Labeled RNA was degraded more quickly than labeled DNA, but both nucleic acids were degraded to approximately the same extent (60 to 70%). 3H2O was a major acid-soluble breakdown product. RNA (and possibly DNA) breakdown products were reincorporated into DNA (and possibly RNA) during the incubation period. In addition to metabolite salvage, 32% of the total macromolecular 14C was respired in the 10-day period regardless of whether sand or seawater was used as the inoculum. Respiration was essentially complete in 3 days, whereas nucleic acid degradation continued throughout the 10-day incubation. The results indicate that dead microbial biomass is a labile component of the sediment ecosystem

  7. Microbes of deep marine sediments as viewed by metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, J.

    2015-12-01

    Ten years after the first deep marine sediment metagenome was produced, questions still exist about the nucleic acid sequences we have retrieved. Current data sets, including the Peru Margin, Costa Rica Margin and Iberian Margin show that consistently, data forms larger assemblies at depth due to the reduced complexity of the microbial community. But are these organisms active or preserved? At SMTZs, a change in the assembly statistics is noted, as well as an increase in cell counts, suggesting that cells are truly active. As depth increases, genome sizes are consistently large, suggesting that much like soil microbes, sedimentary microbes may maintain a larger reportorie of genomic potential. Functional changes are seen with depth, but at many sites are not correlated to specific geochemistries. Individual genomes show changes with depth, which raises interesting questions on how the subsurface is settled and maintained. The subsurface does have a distinct genomic signature, including unusual microbial groups, which we are now able to analyze for total genomic content.

  8. Elemental depth profiles in marine sediments of Singapore coastal waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-eight core sediment samples were recently collected from different locations of the Singapore coastal region. The aim of the project was to trace the history of marine pollution in various coastal regions and to determine the impact of industrial activities. Two nuclear analytical techniques were employed in this study: particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), Rutherford backscattering (RBS) as well as X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Combined together these techniques provide an excellent tool to determine elemental concentrations of more than 30 elements with detection limits as low as few ppm. Our results show that elemental concentrations in most of the regions do not show a significant variation with depth. However, in regions where industrial and shipping activities are high, for example the Port of Singapore area and the northern part of Johore Straits, the concentrations of metals like Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sn and Pb were found to have an obvious decreasing trend with the depth. In these cores, concentrations in the top 10-15 cm were sometimes ten times higher than the corresponding base line concentrations. Elemental depth profiles of Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Sn and Pb and their mean concentrations in various regions are reported and discussed

  9. Reconstruction of a high-resolution late holocene arctic paleoclimate record from Colville River delta sediments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiner, Kathryn Melissa; Lowry, Thomas Stephen

    2013-10-01

    This work was partially supported by the Sandia National Laboratories,Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (LDRD) fellowship program in conjunction with Texas A&M University (TAMU). The research described herein is the work of Kathryn M. Schreiner (Katie') and her advisor, Thomas S. Bianchi and represents a concise description of Katie's dissertation that was submitted to the TAMU Office of Graduate Studies in May 2013 in partial fulfillment of her doctorate of philosophy degree. High Arctic permafrost soils contain a massive amount of organic carbon, accounting for twice as much carbon as what is currently stored as carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. However, with current warming trends this sink is in danger of thawing and potentially releasing large amounts of carbon as both carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere. It is difficult to make predictions about the future of this sink without knowing how it has reacted to past temperature and climate changes. This project investigated long term, fine scale particulate organic carbon (POC) delivery by the high-Arctic Colville River into Simpson's Lagoon in the near-shore Beaufort Sea. Modern POC was determined to be a mixture of three sources (riverine soils, coastal erosion, and marine). Downcore POC measurements were performed in a core close to the Colville River output and a core close to intense coastal erosion. Inputs of the three major sources were found to vary throughout the last two millennia, and in the Colville River core covary significantly with Alaskan temperature reconstructions.

  10. Radiation technology for treatment of PCB-s in marine sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The primary objective of this study is to achieve total dechlorination of marine sediment containing PCBs and to convert those PCBs to the biphenyl molecules into benign low molecular weight compounds by using ionizing radiation. In the current investigation it is examined the radiation-induced degradation of PCBs in various aqueous surfactant combination solutions. The radiolytic decay of PCBs in marine sediment in presence of surfactants is evident in the initial samples examined

  11. Presence of uranium and plutonium in marine sediments from gulf of Tehuantepec, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium and plutonium were determined in the Tehua II-21 sediment core collected from the Gulf of Tehuantepec, Mexico. The analyses were performed using radiochemical separation and alpha spectroscopy. Activity concentrations of alpha emitters in the sediment samples were from 2.56 to 43.1 Bq/kg for 238U, from 3.15 to 43.1 Bq/kg for 234U and from 0.69 to 2.95 Bq/Kg for 239+240Pu. Uranium activity concentration in marine sediment studied is generally high compared with those found in sediments from other marine coastal areas in the world. The presence of relatively high concentrations of anthropogenic plutonium in the sediments from the Gulf of Tehuantepec suggests that anthropogenic radionuclides have been incorporated and dispersed into the global marine environment. (author)

  12. Experimental investigation on consistency limits of cement and lime-stabilized marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, DongXing; Zentar, Rachid; Abriak, Nor Edine; Xu, WeiYa

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the effects of treatments with cement and lime on the consistency limits of marine sediments dredged from Dunkirk port. The Casagrande percussion test and the fall cone test were used to determine the liquid limits of raw sediments and treated marine sediments. For the evaluation of the plastic limits, the results of the fall cone test were compared with those obtained by the rolling test method. The relationship between the water contents and the penetration depths for the determination of the liquid limit and the plastic limit was explored. Liquid limits at 15.5 mm and plastic limits at 1.55 mm seem to be a more appropriate choice for the studied marine sediments compared with the limits determined by other used prediction methods. Finally, the effect of cement treatment and lime treatment on the Casagrande classification of the studied sediments was investigated according to the different prediction results. PMID:22856290

  13. Rising sea surface temperature: towards ice-free Arctic summers and a changing marine food chain Document Actions

    OpenAIRE

    Coppini, Giovanni; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Bologna, Bologna, Italia; Christiansen, Trine; European Environment Agency

    2009-01-01

    Global sea surface temperature is approximately 1 degree C higher now than 140 years ago, and is one of the primary physical impacts of climate change. Sea surface temperature in European seas is increasing more rapidly than in the global oceans. Projections show the temperature increases will persist throughout this century. Ice-free summers are expected in the Arctic by the end of this century, if not earlier. Already, there is evidence that many marine ecosystems in European seas are affec...

  14. FRAM-2012: Norwegians return to the High Arctic with a Hovercraft for Marine Geophysical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J. K.; Kristoffersen, Y.; Brekke, H.; Hope, G.

    2012-12-01

    After four years of testing methods, craft reliability, and innovative equipment, the R/H SABVABAA has embarked on its first FRAM-201x expedition to the highest Arctic. Named after the Inupiaq word for 'flows swiftly over it', the 12m by 6m hovercraft has been home-based in Longyearbyen, Svalbard since June 2008. In this, its fifth summer of work on the ice pack north of 81N, the craft is supported by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) via the Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center (NERSC) in Bergen, and the Norwegian Scientific Academy for Polar Research. FRAM-2012 represents renewed Norwegian interest in returning to the highest Arctic some 116 years after the 1893-96 drift of Fridtjof Nansen's ship FRAM, the first serious scientific investigation of the Arctic. When replenished by air or icebreaker, the hovercraft Sabvabaa offers a hospitable scientific platform with crew of two, capable of marine geophysical, geological and oceanographic observations over long periods with relative mobility on the ice pack. FRAM-2012 is the first step towards this goal, accompanying the Swedish icebreaker ODEN to the Lomonosov Ridge, north of Greenland, as part of the LOMROG III expedition. The science plan called for an initial drive from the ice edge to Gakkel Ridge at 85N where micro-earthquakes would be monitored, and then to continue north to a geological sampling area on the Lomonosov Ridge at about 88N, 65W. The micro-earthquake monitoring is part of Gaute Hope's MSc thesis and entails five hydrophones in a WiFi-connected hydrophone array deployed over the Gakkel Rift Valley, drifting with the ice at up to 0.4 knots. On August 3 the hovercraft was refueled from icebreaker ODEN at 84-21'N and both vessels proceeded north. The progress of the hovercraft was hampered by insufficient visibility for safe driving and time consuming maneuvering in and around larger fields of rubble ice impassable by the hovercraft, but of little concern to the icebreaker. It

  15. Oil spill related contaminant data for Arctic marine mammals - Obtaining baseline oil spill-related contaminant exposure data for Arctic marine mammals

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — With increasing oil exploration and ship traffic in the U.S. Arctic, there is concern about the increased potential for an oil spill event in this region of the...

  16. Ice rafting history and paleoceanographic reconstructions of Core 08P23 from southern Chukchi Plateau, western Arctic Ocean since Marine Isotope Stage 3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Taoliang; WANG Rujian; XIAO Wenshen; CHEN Zhihua; CHEN Jianfang; CHENG Zhenbo; SUN Yechen

    2015-01-01

    Multiproxy investigations have been performed on Core 08P23 collected from the Chukchi Plateau, the western Arctic Ocean, during the Third Chinese National Arctic Expedition. The core was dated back to Ma-rine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 by a combination of Accelerator Mass Spectrometric (AMS) carbon-14 dating and regional core correlation. A total of five prominent ice-rafted detritus (IRD) events were recognized in MIS 2 and MIS 3. The IRD sources in MIS 3 are originated from vast carbonate rock outcrops of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and clastic quartz in MIS 2 may have a Eurasian origin. Mostδ18O andδ13C values of Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sinistral) (Nps) in Core 08P23 are lighter than the average values of surface sediments. The lighterδ18O andδ13C values of Nps in the two brown layers in MIS 1 and MIS 3 were resulted from meltwater events; and those in the gray layers in MIS 3 were caused by the enhanced sea ice formation. Theδ18O values varied inversely withδ13C in MIS 2 indicate that the study area was covered by thick sea ice or ice sheet with low temperature and little meltwater, which prevented the biological productivity and sea-atmosphere exchange, as well as water mass ventilation. The covaried light values ofδ18O andδ13C in MIS 1 and MIS 3 were resulted from meltwater and/or brine injection.

  17. Spatial and seasonal variation in microbial diversity in marine subtidal sediments in relation to sediment geochemistry and heavy metal pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Pede, A.; Gillan, D.; Gao, Y.; Billon, G.; Lesven, L.; Leermakers, M; Baeyens, W.; Vyverman, W.; Sabbe, K

    2009-01-01

    Very little information is available on the diversity and structure of microbial communities in marine subtidal sediments, especially for micro-eukaryotes. In the framework of the Belgian MICROMET project, we investigated spatial and seasonal (February vs July) variation patterns in the molecular diversity of archaeal, bacterial and eukaryotic communities in 9 subtidal stations in the Belgian Continental Plate (BCP) in relation to sediment granulometry, geochemistry and metal contamination. M...

  18. Does temporal variation of mercury levels in Arctic seabirds reflect changes in global environmental contamination, or a modification of Arctic marine food web functioning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Jérôme; Grémillet, David; Traisnel, Gwendoline; Amélineau, Françoise; Bustamante, Paco

    2016-04-01

    Studying long-term trends of contaminants in Arctic biota is essential to better understand impacts of anthropogenic activities and climate change on the exposure of sensitive species and marine ecosystems. We concurrently measured temporal changes (2006-2014) in mercury (Hg) contamination of little auks (Alle alle; the most abundant Arctic seabird) and in their major zooplankton prey species (Calanoid copepods, Themisto libellula, Gammarus spp.). We found an increasing contamination of the food-chain in East Greenland during summer over the last decade. More specifically, bird contamination (determined by body feather analyses) has increased at a rate of 3.4% per year. Conversely, bird exposure to Hg during winter in the northwest Atlantic (determined by head feather analyses) decreased over the study period (at a rate of 1.5% per year), although winter concentrations remained consistently higher than during summer. By combining mercury levels measured in birds and zooplankton to isotopic analyses, our results demonstrate that inter-annual variations of Hg levels in little auks reflect changes in food-chain contamination, rather than a reorganization of the food web and a modification of seabird trophic ecology. They therefore underline the value of little auks, and Arctic seabirds in general, as bio-indicators of long-term changes in environmental contamination. PMID:26798998

  19. Diversity of active aerobic methanotrophs along depth profiles of arctic and subarctic lake water column and sediments

    OpenAIRE

    He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J; Pohlman, John W.; Quensen, John; Tiedje, James M.; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH4) emitted from high-latitude lakes accounts for 2–6% of the global atmospheric CH4 budget. Methanotrophs in lake sediments and water columns mitigate the amount of CH4 that enters the atmosphere, yet their identity and activity in arctic and subarctic lakes are poorly understood. We used stable isotope probing (SIP), quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), pyrosequencing and enrichment cultures to determine the identity and diversity of active aerobic methanotrophs in the water columns and sedi...

  20. Burrowing and avoidance behaviour in marine organisms exposed to pesticide-contaminated sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møhlenberg, Flemming; Kiørboe, Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Behavioural effects of marine sediment contaminated with pesticides (6000 ppm parathion, 200 ppm methyl parathion, 200 ppm malathion) were studied in a number of marine organisms in laboratory tests and in situ. The burrowing behaviour in Macoma baltica, Cerastoderma edule, Abra alba, Nereis dive...

  1. Origin and geochemical behavior of uranium in marine sediments. Utilization of the 234U/238U ratio in marine geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of this thesis presents the current situation of knowledge of uranium in marine environment. The second part describes the methods of analysis as well as the material support of the study, i.e., the sediments and marine deposits investigated. The third part is dedicated to the study of uranium mobility in marine sediments characterized by detrital terrigenous composition (pelagic clays). This approach allowed quantifying the entering and leaving flux of uranium after the sediment settling and, to discuss, on this basis, the consequences on the uranium oceanic balance. In the third part the origin and behavior of uranium in zones of high surface productivity is studied. The uranium enrichments observed in the hemi-pelagic sediments of the EUMELI (J.G.O.F.S.-France) programme will constitute a material of study adequate for measuring the variations in the 234U/238U ratio in solid phase, in response to the oxido-reducing characteristics of the sediment. Thus establishing the origin of the trapped uranium has been possible. Also, the nature of the sedimentary phases related to uranium in bio-genetic sediments in the Austral Ocean was determined. Thus a relationship between the variations in the 234U/238 and the diagenetic transformations was possible to establish. Finally in the fifth part a study of the behavior of uranium in a polymetallic shell characteristic for deposits of hydrogenized origin

  2. Species Richness and Adaptation of Marine Fungi from Deep-Subseafloor Sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Rédou, Vanessa; Navarri, Marion; Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Barbier, Georges; Burgaud, Gaëtan

    2015-01-01

    The fungal kingdom is replete with unique adaptive capacities that allow fungi to colonize a wide variety of habitats, ranging from marine habitats to freshwater and terrestrial habitats. The diversity, importance, and ecological roles of marine fungi have recently been highlighted in deep-subsurface sediments using molecular methods. Fungi in the deep-marine subsurface may be specifically adapted to life in the deep biosphere, but this can be demonstrated only using culture-based analyses. I...

  3. Pathways and Microbiology of Thiosulfate Transformations and Sulfate Reduction in a Marine Sediment (Kattegat, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB; BAK, F.

    1991-01-01

    Reductive and oxidative pathways of the sulfur cycle were studied in a marine sediment by parallel radiotracer experiments with (SO4(2-))-S-35, (H2S)-S-35, and (S2O3(2-))-S-35 injected into undisturbed sediment cores. The distributions of viable populations of sulfate- and thiosulfate-reducing ba...

  4. Chemoautotrophic Carbon Fixation Rates and Active Bacterial Communities in Intertidal Marine Sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschker, H.T.S.; Vasquez-Cardenas, D.; Bolhuis, H.; Moerdijk-Poortvliet, T.C.W.; Moodley, L.

    2014-01-01

    Chemoautotrophy has been little studied in typical coastal marine sediments, but may be an important component ofcarbon recycling as intense anaerobic mineralization processes in these sediments lead to accumulation of high amounts ofreduced compounds, such as sulfides and ammonium. We studied chemo

  5. Relative sea level and coastal environments in arctic Alaska during Marine Isotope Stage 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, L. M.; Mann, D. H.; Jones, B. M.; Rittenour, T. M.; Grosse, G.; Groves, P.

    2015-12-01

    Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5 was characterized by marked fluctuations in climate, the warmest being MIS 5e (124-119 ka) when relative sea level (RSL) stood 2-10 m higher than today along many coastlines. In northern Alaska, marine deposits now 5-10 m above modern sea level are assigned to this time period and termed the Pelukian transgression (PT). Complicating this interpretation is the possibility that an intra-Stage 5 ice shelf extended along the Alaskan coast, causing isostatic depression along its grounded margins, which caused RSL highs even during periods of low, global RSL. Here we use optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) to date inferred PT deposits on the Beaufort Sea coastal plain. A transition from what we interpret to be lagoonal mud to sandy tidal flat deposits lying ~ 2.75 m asl dates to 113+/-18 ka. Above this, a 5-m thick gravelly barrier beach dates to 95 +/- 20 ka. This beach contains well-preserved marine molluscs, whale vertebrae, and walrus tusks. Pleistocene-aged ice-rich eolian silt (yedoma) blanket the marine deposits and date to 57.6 +/-10.9 ka. Our interpretation of this chronostratigraphy is that RSL was several meters higher than today during MIS 5e, and lagoons or brackish lakes were prevalent. Gravel barrier beaches moved onshore as local RSL rose further after MIS 5e. The error range of the OSL age of the barrier-beach unit spans the remaining four substages of MIS 5; however, the highstand of RSL on this arctic coastline appears to occurr after the warmest part of the last interglacial and appears not to be coeval with the eustatic maximum reached at lower latitudes during MIS 5. One possibility is that RSL along the Beaufort Sea coast was affected by isostatic depression caused by an ice shelf associated with widespread, intra-Stage 5 glaciation that was out of phase with lower latitude glaciation and whose extent and timing remains enigmatic.

  6. Molecular Approaches to Understanding C & N Dynamics in MArine Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arturo Massol; James Tiedje; Jizhong Zhou; Allan Devol

    2007-05-16

    Continental margin sediments constitute only about 10% of the total sediment surface area in the world’s oceans, nevertheless they are the dominant sites of nitrogen (N) cycling. Recent studies suggest that the oceanic nitrogen budget is unbalanced, primarily due to a higher nitrogen removal rate in contrast to the fixation rate, and it has been suggested that denitrification activity contributes significantly to this imbalance. Although denitrification in marine environments has been studied intensively at the process level, little is known about the species abundance, composition, distribution, and functional differences of the denitrifying population. Understanding the diversity of microbial populations in marine environments, their responses to various environmental factors such as NO3-, and how this impact the rate of denitrification is critical to predict global N dynamics. Environmental Microbiology has the prompt to study the influence of each microbial population on a biogeochemical process within a given ecosystem. Culture-dependent and –independent techniques using nucleic acid probes can access the identity and activity of cultured and uncultured microorganisms. Nucleic acid probes can target distintict genes which set phylogenetic relationships, such as rDNA 16S, DNA gyrase (gyrB) and RNA polymerase sigma 70 factor (rpoD). In the other hand, the genetic capabilities and their expression could be tracked using probes that target several functional genes, such as nirS, nirK, nosZ, and nifH, which are genes involved in denitrification. Selective detection of cells actively expressing functional genes within a community using In Situ Reverse Transcription-PCR (ISRT-PCR) could become a powerful culture-independent technique in microbial ecology. Here we describe an approach to study the expression of nirS genes in denitrifying bacteria. Pure cultures of Pseudomonas stutzeri and Paracoccus denitrificans, as well as co-cultures with non

  7. Comparative study of plutonium and americium bioaccumulation from two marine sediments contaminated in the natural environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium and americium sediment-animal transfer was studied under controlled laboratory conditions by exposure of the benthic polychaete Nereis diversicolor (O. F. Mueller) to marine sediments contaminated by a nuclear bomb accident (near Thule, Greenland) and nuclear weapons testing (Enewetak Atoll). In both sediment regimes, the bioavailability of plutonium and 241Am was low, with specific activity in the tissues 241Am occurred and 241Am uptake from the Thule sediment was enhanced compared to that from lagoon sediments of Enewetak Atoll. Autoradiography studies indicated the presence of hot particles of plutonium in the sediments. The results highlight the importance of purging animals of their gut contents in order to obtain accurate estimates of transuranic transfer from ingested sediments into tissue. It is further suggested that enhanced transuranic uptake by some benthic species could arise from ingestion of highly activity particles and organic-rich detritus present in the sediments. (author)

  8. Migration phenology and seasonal fidelity of an Arctic marine predator in relation to sea ice dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Seth G; Derocher, Andrew E; Thiemann, Gregory W; Lunn, Nicholas J

    2013-07-01

    Understanding how seasonal environmental conditions affect the timing and distribution of synchronized animal movement patterns is a central issue in animal ecology. Migration, a behavioural adaptation to seasonal environmental fluctuations, is a fundamental part of the life history of numerous species. However, global climate change can alter the spatiotemporal distribution of resources and thus affect the seasonal movement patterns of migratory animals. We examined sea ice dynamics relative to migration patterns and seasonal geographical fidelity of an Arctic marine predator, the polar bear (Ursus maritimus). Polar bear movement patterns were quantified using satellite-linked telemetry data collected from collars deployed between 1991-1997 and 2004-2009. We showed that specific sea ice characteristics can predict the timing of seasonal polar bear migration on and off terrestrial refugia. In addition, fidelity to specific onshore regions during the ice-free period was predicted by the spatial pattern of sea ice break-up but not by the timing of break-up. The timing of migration showed a trend towards earlier arrival of polar bears on shore and later departure from land, which has been driven by climate-induced declines in the availability of sea ice. Changes to the timing of migration have resulted in polar bears spending progressively longer periods of time on land without access to sea ice and their marine mammal prey. The links between increased atmospheric temperatures, sea ice dynamics, and the migratory behaviour of an ice-dependent species emphasizes the importance of quantifying and monitoring relationships between migratory wildlife and environmental cues that may be altered by climate change. PMID:23510081

  9. Radiolytic dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls in transformer oil and in marine sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiolytic dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in transformer oil and in marine sediments has been studied. At low PCB concentrations, complete degradation of the PCBs in transformer oil was achieved without degradation of the oil. Addition of an organic base, triethylamine, enhances the radiolytic dechlorination yield. The mechanism of dechlorination has been shown to involve electron transfer to PCBs from various aromatic radical anions formed in the irradiated oil. At high PCB concentrations, large amounts of triethylamine were necessary to achieve complete radiolytic dechlorination. Preliminary results on PCB-contaminated marine sediments demonstrate that addition of 2-propanol to the sediment/water slurry increases the effectiveness of the electron beam treatment

  10. The remedial investigation of marine sediment at the United Heckathorn Superfund site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, P.J.; Kohn, N.P.; Gardiner, W.W.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1994-02-01

    The former United Heckathom site in Richmond, California, was used to process and package chlorinated pesticides from the 1940s to the mid-1960s. These activities resulted in the contamination of upland soils and marine sediment in the adjacent waterways. Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) was requested by USEPA to conduct a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS). of the marine portion of the site. The objectives of this RI are to determine the extent of pesticide contamination in inner Richmond Harbor, estimate the total volume of contaminated sediment, characterize the subsurface geology; characterize the biological effects of contaminated sediment; and characterize the quality of effluent derived from dewatered sediment through treatability testing. Sediment cores were collected from 53 stations. Vertical subsamples from each sediment core were analyzed for chlorinated pesticides. Sediment from selected cores was also analyzed for other contaminants. Younger Bay Mud (YBM) sediment from multiple stations was mixed to form composite samples representing various segments of the study area. These composites were used for solid-phase toxicity and bioaccumulation tests, and the preparation of liquid-phase samples for treatability testing. The probable quality of effluent produced by dewatering sediment was evaluated by chemical and toxicological testing of suspended-particulate-phase (SPP) and elutriate samples.

  11. Geochemistry of marine sediments of the Brazilian Northeastern continental shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Souza do Nascimento

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The marine sediment samples collected from the northeastern Brazilian continental shelf, at water depths between 20 and 80 m, consisted mainly of sands with an almost total absence of gravel and granules. Medium, coarse and very coarse sand grains are mostly composed of halimeda, lithothamnium, rodoliths and bioclastic sands with a carbonate content varying between 77 and 96 %. The chemistry in general shows a decreasing content of Ca (86.1 % >Si (6 % > Cl (3.6 % > Sr (0.8 % > K (0.66 % > S (0.62 % > Al (0.6 % > Na (0.55% > Mg (0.43 % > Fe (0.4 % > P (0.2 % > Br (0.04 % in the samples. There was no correlation between CaCO3 and chemical contents and grain size with depth and bio-components. With the exception of Sr of marine origin, all other elements (P, S, Br, Cl, Fe are of continental origin. The lithothamnium of some offshore samples shows higher CaCO3 content, while Mg and Na are present only in halimedas. Bioclastic sands contain no Br, and silt and clay fractions are rare and characterize samples closer to the coast. These marine bioclastic granulates are of very pure biogenic calcium carbonates and are thus highly to be recommended for economic purposes.Os granulados marinhos, da Plataforma Continental do nordeste brasileiro, coletados de profundidades entre 20 e 80 m, são predominantemente areias cascalhosas constituídas de halimedas, litotames, rodolitos e areias bioclásticas, cujos teores de carbonatos variam de 77 a 96 %. A concentração média geral de elementos químicos na ordem decrescente é Ca (86.1 % > Si (6 % > Cl (3.6 % > Sr (0.8 % > K (0.66 % > S (0.62 % > Al (0.6 % > Na (0.55 % > Mg (0.43 % > Fe (0.4 % > P (0.2 % > Br (0,04 %, independentemente da profundidade e tipo de bio-componente. Com exceção do Sr, que é de origem marinha, os demais elementos (P, S, Br, Cl, Fe são de origem continental. Elementos como Mg e Na foram restritos às halimedas em apenas duas amostras, enquanto Br não foi detectado nas areias

  12. Effect of recent climate change on Arctic Pb pollution: A comparative study of historical records in lake and peat sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historical changes of anthropogenic Pb pollution were reconstructed based on Pb concentrations and isotope ratios in lake and peat sediment profiles from Ny-Ålesund of Arctic. The calculated excess Pb isotope ratios showed that Pb pollution largely came from west Europe and Russia. The peat profile clearly reflected the historical changes of atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic Pb into Ny-Ålesund, and the result showed that anthropogenic Pb peaked at 1960s–1970s, and thereafter a significant recovery was observed by a rapid increase of 206Pb/207Pb ratios and a remarkable decrease in anthropogenic Pb contents. In contrast to the peat record, the longer lake record showed relatively high anthropogenic Pb contents and a persistent decrease of 206Pb/207Pb ratios within the uppermost samples, suggesting that climate-sensitive processes such as catchment erosion and meltwater runoff might have influenced the recent change of Pb pollution record in the High Arctic lake sediments. - Highlights: ► Historical changes of anthropogenic Pb pollution in Ny-Ålesund were reconstructed. ► Anthropogenic Pb in Ny-Ålesund was largely originated from W. European and Russia. ► Anthropogenic Pb recorded in peat sediments peaked at 1960–1970s and then declined. ► High anthropogenic fluxes were found in recent change of Pb record from lake sediments. ► Climate-sensitive processes might have influenced recent Pb accumulation rate in lakes. - This manuscript reports the effects of climate-sensitive processes on historical records of Pb pollution in sediments of Arctic lakes.

  13. Performance of concrete after 10 years of exposure in the Arctic marine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, M.H. [National University of Singapore (Singapore); Bilodeau, A.; Malhotra, V.M. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    A study was conducted to test the service life of concrete that has been exposed to an Arctic marine environment for 10 years. A total of 12 concrete panels were installed at a site at Nanisivik, Baffin Island, Northwest Territories, Canada. Six of the panels were made with normal-weight aggregate concrete, the others with concrete mixed with expanded shale lightweight aggregate. Steel fibres were also in the cement and the portland cement was replaced with fly ash, slag, silica fume or a combination of fly ash and silica fume. The panels were then visually inspected and cores were also taken to determine the chloride content at various depths from the exposure surface. It was shown that after 10 years of exposure, the panel made of normal weight aggregate did not show much loss of mass from ice abrasion. However, panels made with lightweight aggregate showed mass loss, particularly on the surfaces exposed to the tidal zone. Less damage and cracking was observed in the steel fibre-reinforced panels. Mixtures with fly ash, slag or silica fume showed better resistance to chloride penetration. The use of normal weight limestone aggregate or expanded shale lightweight aggregate did not make a difference in the resistance of the concrete to chloride-ion penetration for non-fibre-reinforced portland cement concrete, but a difference was noted for fibre-reinforced portland cement concrete. Those made with lightweight aggregate materials exhibited a lower chloride-ion content. 7 refs., 10 tabs., 19 figs.

  14. Viable Species of Flamella (Amoebozoa: Variosea) Isolated from Ancient Arctic Permafrost Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmakova, Lyubov; Bondarenko, Natalya; Smirnov, Alexey

    2016-02-01

    Six viable strains of amoebae belonging to the genus Flamella (Amoebozoa, Variosea) were isolated from permafrost sediments sampled in the Russian Arctic region. Two of them are from late Pleistocene permafrost in North-East Siberia, and four--from Holocene and late Pleistocene in North-West Siberia. Light- and electron-microscopic study and molecular phylogeny show that these isolates represent two new species belonging to the genus Flamella. Both species are cyst-forming. This is a remarkable case of high resistance of protozoan cysts, allowing them to survive and recover an amoebae population after a very long, geologically significant period of rest; a "snapshot" of evolution in time. This study directly shows for the first time that amoeba cysts can be conserved not only for years and decades but for many thousand years and then recover, contributing to the formation of an active microbial community. We propose to name the new species as Flamella pleistocenica n.sp. and Flamella beringiania n.sp. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the genus Flamella is a robust and potentially species-rich group of Variosea. PMID:26735346

  15. Pollution of the Marine Environment by Dumping: Legal Framework Applicable to Dumped Chemical Weapons and Nuclear Waste in the Arctic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lott, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic seas are the world’s biggest dumping ground for sea-disposed nuclear waste and have served among the primary disposal sites for chemical warfare agents. Despite of scientific uncertainty, the Arctic Council has noted that this hazardous waste still affects adversely the Arctic marine environment and may have implications to the health of the Arctic people. The purpose of this manuscript is to establish the rights and obligations of the Arctic States in connection with sea-dumped chemical weapons and nuclear material under international law of the sea, international environmental law and disarmament law. Such mapping is important for considering options to tackle the pollution to the Arctic ecosystems and because there seems to be yet no such analysis across the legal fields carried out. This paper aims first at identifying the scale and approximate locations of sea-disposed nuclear waste and chemical weapons in the Arctic Ocean. The analysis will further focus on ascertaining the possibilities to minimize their adverse effects on the Arctic marine environment under the applicable legal framework. It will be argued in this manuscript that due to the corrosion of the chemical weapons and nuclear material containers, recovering, rather than confining this hazardous waste might be counterproductive as it might cause a sudden and widespread release of chemical agents or radionuclides when surfacing. In this regard, carrying out an environmental impact assessment prior to each such remediation operation would be necessary to determine the most suitable technique for minimizing or eliminating pollution.

  16. Pollution of the Marine Environment by Dumping: Legal Framework Applicable to Dumped Chemical Weapons and Nuclear Waste in the Arctic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lott, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic seas are the world’s biggest dumping ground for sea-disposed nuclear waste and have served among the primary disposal sites for chemical warfare agents. Despite of scientific uncertainty, the Arctic Council has noted that this hazardous waste still affects adversely the Arctic marine environment and may have implications to the health of the Arctic people. The purpose of this manuscript is to establish the rights and obligations of the Arctic States in connection with sea-dumped chemical weapons and nuclear material under international law of the sea, international environmental law and disarmament law. Such mapping is important for considering options to tackle the pollution to the Arctic ecosystems and because there seems to be yet no such analysis across the legal fields carried out. This paper aims first at identifying the scale and approximate locations of sea-disposed nuclear waste and chemical weapons in the Arctic Ocean. The analysis will further focus on ascertaining the possibilities to minimize their adverse effects on the Arctic marine environment under the applicable legal framework. It will be argued in this manuscript that due to the corrosion of the chemical weapons and nuclear material containers, recovering, rather than confining this hazardous waste might be counterproductive as it might cause a sudden and widespread release of chemical agents or radionuclides when surfacing. In this regard, carrying out an environmental impact assessment prior to each such remediation operation would be necessary to determine the most suitable technique for minimizing or eliminating pollution.

  17. Persistent organic pollutant and mercury concentrations in eggs of ground-nesting marine birds in the Canadian high Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Liam E; Gilchrist, H Grant; Mallory, Conor D; Braune, Birgit M; Mallory, Mark L

    2016-06-15

    We collected eggs of eight marine bird species from several colony sites in the Canadian high Arctic located at approximately 76°N and analyzed them for concentrations of legacy persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and mercury. We provide the first report on concentrations of POPs in eggs of three Arctic species (Thayer's gull Larus thayeri, Sabine's gull Xema sabini, Ross's Gull Rhodostethia rosea), and we found significant differences in each of the POP profiles among the five species with sufficient data for statistical comparisons (Thayer's gull, black guillemot Cepphus grylle, Sabine's gull, Arctic tern Sterna paradisaea and common eider Somateria mollissima borealis). The Ross's Gull had unexpectedly high POP concentrations relative to the other species examined, although this was based on a single egg, while glaucous gull Larus hyperboreus eggs from our sampling location had very low POPs. Sabine's gulls had the lowest Hg of the eggs studied, consistent with their low trophic position, but concentrations of their legacy POPs were higher than expected. We also noted that total hexachlorocyclohexanes were higher than reported elsewhere in the circumpolar Arctic in three species. PMID:26971212

  18. Tracing carbon flow in an arctic marine food web using fatty acid-stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budge, S M; Wooller, M J; Springer, A M; Iverson, S J; McRoy, C P; Divoky, G J

    2008-08-01

    Global warming and the loss of sea ice threaten to alter patterns of productivity in arctic marine ecosystems because of a likely decline in primary productivity by sea ice algae. Estimates of the contribution of ice algae to total primary production range widely, from just 3 to >50%, and the importance of ice algae to higher trophic levels remains unknown. To help answer this question, we investigated a novel approach to food web studies by combining the two established methods of stable isotope analysis and fatty acid (FA) analysis--we determined the C isotopic composition of individual diatom FA and traced these biomarkers in consumers. Samples were collected near Barrow, Alaska and included ice algae, pelagic phytoplankton, zooplankton, fish, seabirds, pinnipeds and cetaceans. Ice algae and pelagic phytoplankton had distinctive overall FA signatures and clear differences in delta(13)C for two specific diatom FA biomarkers: 16:4n-1 (-24.0+/-2.4 and -30.7+/-0.8 per thousand, respectively) and 20:5n-3 (-18.3+/-2.0 and -26.9+/-0.7 per thousand, respectively). Nearly all delta(13)C values of these two FA in consumers fell between the two stable isotopic end members. A mass balance equation indicated that FA material derived from ice algae, compared to pelagic diatoms, averaged 71% (44-107%) in consumers based on delta(13)C values of 16:4n-1, but only 24% (0-61%) based on 20:5n-3. Our estimates derived from 16:4n-1, which is produced only by diatoms, probably best represented the contribution of ice algae relative to pelagic diatoms. However, many types of algae produce 20:5n-3, so the lower value derived from it likely represented a more realistic estimate of the proportion of ice algae material relative to all other types of phytoplankton. These preliminary results demonstrate the potential value of compound-specific isotope analysis of marine lipids to trace C flow through marine food webs and provide a foundation for future work. PMID:18481094

  19. Verrucomicrobia Are Candidates for Polysaccharide-Degrading Bacterioplankton in an Arctic Fjord of Svalbard

    OpenAIRE

    Cardman, Z.; C. Arnosti; Durbin, A.; Ziervogel, K.; Cox, C; A. D. Steen; Teske, A

    2014-01-01

    In Arctic marine bacterial communities, members of the phylum Verrucomicrobia are consistently detected, although not typically abundant, in 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and pyrotag surveys of the marine water column and in sediments. In an Arctic fjord (Smeerenburgfjord) of Svalbard, members of the Verrucomicrobia, together with Flavobacteria and smaller proportions of Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, constituted the most frequently detected bacterioplankton community members in 16S rRNA gen...

  20. The microbial nitrogen cycling potential in marine sediments is impacted by polyaromatic hydrocarbon pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Scott

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During petroleum hydrocarbon exposure the composition and functional dynamics of marine microbial communities are altered, favoring bacteria that can utilize this rich carbon source. Initial exposure of high levels of hydrocarbons in aerobic surface sediments can enrich growth of heterotrophic microorganisms having hydrocarbon degradation capacity. As a result, there can be a localized reduction in oxygen potential, if the sediments are aerobic, within the surface layer of marine sediments resulting in anaerobic zones. We hypothesized that increasing exposure to elevated hydrocarbon concentrations would positively correlate with an increase in denitrification processes and the net accumulation of dinitrogen. This hypothesis was tested by comparing the relative abundance of genes associated with nitrogen metabolism and nitrogen cycling identified in 6 metagenomes from sediments contaminated by polyaromatic hydrocarbons from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and 3 metagenomes from sediments associated with natural oil seeps in the Santa Barbara Channel. An additional 8 metagenomes from uncontaminated sediments from the Gulf of Mexico were analyzed for comparison. We predicted relative changes in metabolite turnover as a function of the differential microbial gene abundances, which showed predicted accumulation of metabolites associated with denitrification processes, including anammox, in the contaminated samples compared to uncontaminated sediments, with the magnitude of this change being positively correlated to the hydrocarbon concentration and exposure duration. These data highlight the potential impact of hydrocarbon inputs on N cycling processes in marine sediments and provide information relevant for system scale models of nitrogen metabolism in affected ecosystems.

  1. Evaluation of the Polyethylene Reverse Sampler as a Dosing System in Marine Phase II Whole Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluations (TIEs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contaminated marine sediments can cause acute and chronic impairments to benthic organisms. Nonionic organic contaminants (NOCs) are often a primary cause of impairment. Toxicity Identification Evaluations (TIEs) are used to identify chemicals causing toxicity in sediments. Ph...

  2. Sediment distribution coefficients and concentration factors for biota in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1985 the IAEA published Technical Reports Series No. 247 (TRS 247), Sediment Kds and Concentration Factors for Radionuclides in the Marine Environment, which provided sediment distribution coefficients (Kds) and concentration factor (CF) data for marine biological material that could be used in models simulating the dispersion of radioactive waste that had been disposed of in the sea. TRS 247 described an approach for calculating sediment or water Kds using stable element geochemical data developed by J.M. Bewers, even though the use of field derived data was emphasized whenever possible. Over the years, TRS 247 has proved to be a valuable reference for radioecologists, marine modellers and other scientists involved in assessing the impact of radionuclides in the marine environment. In 2000 the IAEA initiated a revision of TRS 247 to take account of the new sets of data obtained since 1985.The outcome of this work is this report, which contains revised sediment Kds for the open ocean and ocean margins and CFs for marine biota. CFs for deep ocean ferromanganese nodules. In addition, this report contains CFs for a limited number of elements for marine mammals not included in TRS 247. This revision was carried out at three IAEA Consultants Meetings held in Monaco and Vienna between April 2000 and December 2002

  3. Extent and toxicity of contaminated marine sediments in Southeastern Florida

    OpenAIRE

    Cantillo, A. Y.; Lauenstein, G. G.

    2004-01-01

    Thirty sites were sampled in southern Biscayne Bay and Manatee Bay in December 1999 to determine the extent of toxicity in sediments. Analyses and assays included: pesticides and phenols in seawater; chemical contaminants in sediment; amphipod mortality, HRGS P450, sea urchin sperm fertilization and embryology, MicrotoxTM, MutatoxTM, grass shrimp AChE and juvenile clam mortality assays; sea urchin sperm, amphipod and oyster DNA damage; and benthic community assessment. Sediment sites near the...

  4. Feasibility study of chemical stabilization of dredged marine sediment

    OpenAIRE

    FURLAN, Ana Paola; RAZAKAMANANTSOA, Andry; Liang, Yingjie; Deneele, Dimitri

    2015-01-01

    Chemical stabilization is one of techniques which can improve mechanical and hydraulic properties of dredged sediments. This paper presents an experimental study focused on different techniques of stabilization of dredged sediment from La Baule-Le Pouliguen (France). Dredged sediments are stabilized with lime, Portland cement and fly ash. Three mixes were produced and submitted to uniaxial compression strength (UCS), indirect tensile strength (ITS) and shear tests at different curing ages. In...

  5. Potential Impacts of PCBs on Sediment Microbiomes in a Tropical Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S. Klaus

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Within the tropical marine study site of Guánica Bay, Puerto Rico, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs are subjected to coastal and oceanic currents coupled with marine microbial and geochemical processes. To evaluate these processes a hydrodynamic model was developed to simulate the transport of PCBs within nearshore and offshore marine areas of Guánica Bay. Material transport and circulation information from the model were matched with measurements from samples collected from within the bay. These samples, consisting of both intertidal and submerged sediments, were analyzed for physical characteristics (organic carbon, grain size, and mineralogy, microbial characteristics (target bacteria levels and microbial community analyses, presence of PCBs, and PCB-degrading enzymes. Results show that the bay geometry and bathymetry limit the mixing of the extremely high levels of PCBs observed in the eastern portion of the bay. Bay bottom sediments showed the highest levels of PCBs and these sediments were characterized by high organic carbon content and finer grain size. Detectable levels of PCBs were also observed within sediments found along the shore. Microbes from the bay bottom sediments showed a greater relative abundance of microbes from the Chloroflexi, phylum with close phylogenetic associations with known anaerobic PCB-degrading organisms. Based on quantitative PCR measurement of the biphenyl dioxygenase gene, the intertidal sediments showed the greatest potential for aerobic PCB degradation. These results elucidate particular mechanisms of PCB’s fate and transport in coastal, tropical marine environments.

  6. Occurrence and sorption properties of arsenicals in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fauser, Patrik; Sanderson, Hans; Hedegaard, Rikke Susanne Vingborg;

    2013-01-01

    The content of total arsenic, the inorganic forms: arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)), the methylated forms: monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), trimethylarsenic oxide, tetramethylarsenonium ion and arsenobetaine was measured in 95 sediment samples and 11 pore water samples...... from the Baltic Sea near the island of Bornholm at depths of up to 100 m. As(III+V) and DMA were detected in the sediment and As(III+V) was detected in the sediment pore water. Average total As concentration of 10.6 ± 7.4 mg/kg dry matter (DM) in the sediment corresponds to previously reported values...

  7. A Potential Impact on the Chemical Composition in the Marine Boundary Layer in the Arctic Ocean by Ship Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Z.; Wang, X.; Blum, J. D.; Sun, L.

    2005-12-01

    Samples of aerosols in the marine boundary layer (MBL) of the Arctic Ocean were collected aboard R/V ()Xuelong during the summer on the Second Chinese Arctic Research Expedition (July-September, 2003). Chemical compositions including major and trace elements and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aerosol particles were analyzed. Results showed that significant amounts of S, Fe, V and Ni are emitted from ship diesel engines and contaminate the ambient air. The total amount of Fe, which plays a significant role in the ocean ()biological pump, emitted from ships in the Arctic is estimated at 4.33-A106 kg yr-1. Sulfur emitted into the atmosphere may be transformed to sulfur acid and result in a chlorine depletion in sea-salt. Because the global inventory of sulfur from ship exhausts is large and halogens may have important consequences in possible tropospheric ozone destruction, the role of ships in effecting halogen depression in sea-salt should be evaluated. For organic compounds, 17 PAHs including Fluoranthene, Phenanthrene, Chrysene, Indeno[123-cd]pyrene, Pyrene, Benzo[b]fluoranthene, Benzo[ghi]pyrene, Naphthalene, Benzo[a]anthracene, Benzo[k]fluoranthene, Coronene, Fluorene, Benzo[a]pyrene, Acenaphthene, Anthracene, Dibenzo[a,h]anthracene and Acenaphthylene were detected. The average levels of subspecies of PAHs in ambient air ranged from 0.003 to 0.089 ng/m3. Among the 17 PAHs, fluoranthene had a relative high level, while the level of acenaphthylene was relative low. The aerosols contaminated by the ship, which were commonly excluded in previous investigations, thus provide an opportunity to investigate and understand the role of ship emissions in the atmospheric chemistry of the marine boundary layer, especially in the Arctic Ocean.

  8. Distribution of radionuclides among green alga, marine sediments and sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distributions of radionuclides among green alga (Ulva pertusa), marine sediment and sea water were examined in laboratory experiments with radioisotope tracers to look into the behavior of the radionuclides released into the coastal sea. Marine sands from the five different seashores along the coast of Japan were used. Distributions of 60Co, 95Zr-95Nb and 106Ru-106Rh in these sands were by far the highest of the three components (marine sand, sea water and marine alga). The distributions of the three radionuclides had not so large fluctuations among the five marine sands and were considered to be rather constant. The total amount found in marine sand and green alga was about 90% for the three radionuclides but about 20% for 137Cs on the average in two weeks after the start of the experiments. The activity ratio of marine sediment (radioactivity in 1 g of sediment/radioactivity in 1 ml of sea water) was 4000 for 60co, 30 for 137Cs, 1800 for 95Zr-95Nb and 900 for 106Ru-106Rh. (auth.)

  9. High bacterial biodiversity increases degradation performance of hydrocarbons during bioremediation of contaminated harbor marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated changes of bacterial abundance and biodiversity during bioremediation experiments carried out on oxic and anoxic marine harbor sediments contaminated with hydrocarbons. Oxic sediments, supplied with inorganic nutrients, were incubated in aerobic conditions at 20 °C and 35 °C for 30 days, whereas anoxic sediments, amended with organic substrates, were incubated in anaerobic conditions at the same temperatures for 60 days. Results reported here indicate that temperature exerted the main effect on bacterial abundance, diversity and assemblage composition. At higher temperature bacterial diversity and evenness increased significantly in aerobic conditions, whilst decreased in anaerobic conditions. In both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, biodegradation efficiencies of hydrocarbons were significantly and positively related with bacterial richness and evenness. Overall results presented here suggest that bioremediation strategies, which can sustain high levels of bacterial diversity rather than the selection of specific taxa, may significantly increase the efficiency of hydrocarbon degradation in contaminated marine sediments. - Highlights: ► Bioremediation performance was investigated on hydrocarbon contaminated sediments. ► Major changes in bacterial diversity and assemblage composition were observed. ► Temperature exerted the major effect on bacterial assemblages. ► High bacterial diversity increased significantly biodegradation performance. This should be considered for sediment remediation by bio-treatments. - Bioremediation strategies which can sustain high levels of bacterial diversity may significantly increase the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in contaminated marine sediments.

  10. Environmental process descriptors for TNT, TNT-related compounds and picric acid in marine sediment slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Process descriptors were determined for picric acid, TNT, and the TNT-related compounds 2,4DNT, 2,6DNT, 2ADNT, 4ADNT, 2,4DANT, 2,6DANT, TNB and DNB in marine sediment slurries. Three marine sediments of various physical characteristics (particle size ranging from 15 to >90% fines and total organic carbon ranging from <0.10 to 3.60%) were kept in suspension with 20 ppt saline water. Concentrations of TNT and its related compounds decreased immediately upon contact with the marine sediment slurries, with aqueous concentrations slowly declining throughout the remaining test period. Sediment-water partition coefficients could not be determined for these compounds since solution phase concentrations were unstable. Kinetic rates and half-lives were influenced by the sediment properties, with the finer grained, higher organic carbon sediment being the most reactive. Aqueous concentrations of picric acid were very stable, demonstrating little partitioning to the sediments. Degradation to picramic acid was minimal, exhibiting concentrations at or just above the detection limit

  11. Natural thorium isotopes in marine sediment core off Labuan port

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafidz, B. Y.; Asnor, A. S.; Terence, R. C.; Mohamed, C. A. R. [School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia 43600, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12

    Sediment core was collected from Labuan port and analyzed to determine the radioactivity of thorium (Th) isotopes. The objectives of this study are to determine the possible sources of Th isotopes at Labuan port and estimates the sedimentation rate based on {sup 228}Th/{sup 232}Th model. The results suggest the {sup 230}Th and {sup 232}Th might be originated from terrestrial sedimentary rock while {sup 228}Th originated by authigenic origin. High ratio value of {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th detected at the top surface sediment indicates the increasing of {sup 230}Th at the recent years which might be contributed from the anthropogenic sources. The sedimentation rate of core sediment from Labuan Port was successfully estimated by using {sup 228}Th/{sup 232}Th model. The result show high sedimentation rate with 4.67 cm/year indicates rapid deposition occurred at this study area due to the high physical activity at the Labuan port. By assume the constant sedimentation rate at this area; we estimated the age of 142 cm core sediment obtained from Labuan port is 32 years started from 1981 to 2012. This chronology will be used in forthcoming research to investigate the historical profile of anthropogenic activities affecting the Labuan port.

  12. The situation of marine sediments in the pathway of radionuclides to man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is widely accepted that the marine sediments are the major reservoir of the radionuclides which are discharged into the coastal sea water. The radionuclides sorpted on the sediments would be recycled in the sea water and be accumulated by marine organisms. And some of the sorpted radionuclides would be transfered to the worm (a kind of benthos) habited in the sediments through their surface or digestive tract and then to the fishes which prey upon the benthos. Therefore, it is important to learn whether the sediments as a ''sink'' may not later become a ''source'' of these contaminants. In this paper, the problem is discussed refering to few reports which are published up to this time. Renfro estimated that about one per cent of 65Zn in the sediment would be transfered to Nereis diversicolor which directly contacts with the sediments: On the recycling of 65Zn from the sediments to the sea water, Seymour and Nelson determined the 65Zn level of 8/100 in the sea water after twelve months following shutdown of reactor. Thus they calculated the ecological half-lives which were affected by the radionuclides retention of the sediments. In our laboratory experiment on the interaction of sediments and Nereis diversicolor using 95Zr, 106Ru, 137Cs and 60Co, the similar results were observed except 137Cs which showed rather high rate of remobilization from the sediments to the sea water. Thus, it could be generally considered that the transfer of radionuclides via sediment would be minor to man. However, it should be born in mind that the increased amount of radionuclides by continuous discharge into sea may raise the level of radionuclides in the sediments and then benthos even with one per cent transfer rate from sediment to benthos. (auth.)

  13. Atmospheric mercury over the marine boundary layer observed during the third China Arctic Research Expedition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Kang; Zhouqing Xie

    2011-01-01

    TGM measurements on board ships have proved to provide valuable complementary information to measurements by a ground based monitoring network.During the third China Arctic Research Expedition (from July 11 to September 24,2008),TGM concentrations over the marine boundary layer along the cruise path were in-situ measured using an automatic mercury vapor analyzer.Here we firstly reported the results in Japan Sea,North Western Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea,where there are rare reports.The value ranged between 0.30 and 6.02 ng/m3 with an average of (1.52 ± 0.68) ng/m3,being slightly lower than the background value of Northern Hemisphere (1.7 ng/m3).Notably TGM showed considerably spatial and temporal variation.Geographically,the average value of TGM in Bering Sea was higher than those observed in Japan Sea and North Western Pacific Ocean.In the north of Japan Sea TGM levels were found to be lower than 0.5 ng/m3 during forward cruise and displayed obviously diurnal cycle,indicating potential oxidation of gaseous mercury in the atmosphere.The pronounced episode was recorded as well.Enhanced levels of TGM were observed in the coastal regions of southern Japan Sea during backward cruise due primarily to air masses transported from the adjacent mainland reflecting the contribution from anthropogenic sources.When ship returned back and passed through Kamchatka Peninsula TGM increased by the potential contamination from volcano emissions.

  14. Electric currents couple spatially separated biogeochemical processes in marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Peter; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Fossing, Henrik;

    2010-01-01

    Some bacteria are capable of extracellular electron transfer, thereby enabling them to use electron acceptors and donors without direct cell contact 1, 2, 3, 4 . Beyond the micrometre scale, however, no firm evidence has previously existed that spatially segregated biogeochemical processes can be...... coupled by electric currents in nature. Here we provide evidence that electric currents running through defaunated sediment couple oxygen consumption at the sediment surface to oxidation of hydrogen sulphide and organic carbon deep within the sediment. Altering the oxygen concentration in the sea water...... in the sediment was driven by electrons conducted from the anoxic zone. A distinct pH peak in the oxic zone could be explained by electrochemical oxygen reduction, but not by any conventional sets of aerobic sediment processes. We suggest that the electric current was conducted by bacterial nanowires...

  15. Marine and ice landscapes of the Arctic and Sub-arctic in the course of towering industrial activity: ability of the management with using documentation facilities of satellite ecological criminalistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melentyev, Vladimir; Vladimirovich Melentyev, Konstantin; Petterssen, Lasse Herbert; Andreevna Zakharova, Tatiana

    2013-04-01

    In our studies we are following for the classification of the marine and ice landscapes of the Arctic that was suggested by prof. Ye.S. Korotkevich who had provided summarizing results of the long-term in situ field experiments and airborne studies that was fulfilled by scientists of Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI) under his leadership in Russian Arctic after the 2-nd World War. But satellite multispectral observations show significant temporal and spatial modification of the suggested scheme especially for Arctic ice landscapes that had occurred in nowadays due to the climate change and anthropogenic press. Design main principle and rules of satellite ecological criminalistics - science of crime detection of ecocatastrophe and incidents on sea and fresh waters with using aerospace survey as well for the control, for the management and the preventing of ecological instability of the marine and lakes ecosystems was done by Academician Kirill Kondratiev together with his apprentices and follower in 1970-s. In frame proposed paper we shall present results of our comprehensive satellite-airborne studies of the marine and ice landscapes as well discuss the incidents that happened in Arctic inside the inland and international waters in past and present days and were revealed with using multispectral remote sensing. But for all that we need to mention that our contemporary investigations are based on the all-weather satellite ERS-1/2 - Envisat - RADARSAT SAR survey archived since 1990-s by SUAI and NERSC/NIERSC.

  16. Response of Methanogens in Arctic Sediments to Temperature and Methanogenic Substrate Availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Lynsay I; Tveit, Alexander; Øvreås, Lise; Head, Ian M; Gray, Neil D

    2015-01-01

    Although cold environments are major contributors to global biogeochemical cycles, comparatively little is known about their microbial community function, structure, and limits of activity. In this study a microcosm based approach was used to investigate the effects of temperature, and methanogenic substrate amendment, (acetate, methanol and H2/CO2) on methanogen activity and methanogen community structure in high Arctic wetlands (Solvatnet and Stuphallet, Svalbard). Methane production was not detected in Stuphallet sediment microcosms (over a 150 day period) and occurred within Solvatnet sediments microcosms (within 24 hours) at temperatures from 5 to 40°C, the maximum temperature being at far higher than in situ maximum temperatures (which range from air temperatures of -1.4 to 14.1°C during summer months). Distinct responses were observed in the Solvatnet methanogen community under different short term incubation conditions. Specifically, different communities were selected at higher and lower temperatures. At lower temperatures (5°C) addition of exogenous substrates (acetate, methanol or H2/CO2) had no stimulatory effect on the rate of methanogenesis or on methanogen community structure. The community in these incubations was dominated by members of the Methanoregulaceae/WCHA2-08 family-level group, which were most similar to the psychrotolerant hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanosphaerula palustris strain E1-9c. In contrast, at higher temperatures, substrate amendment enhanced methane production in H2/CO2 amended microcosms, and played a clear role in structuring methanogen communities. Specifically, at 30°C members of the Methanoregulaceae/WCHA2-08 predominated following incubation with H2/CO2, and Methanosarcinaceaeand Methanosaetaceae were enriched in response to acetate addition. These results may indicate that in transiently cold environments, methanogen communities can rapidly respond to moderate short term increases in temperature, but not

  17. Response of Methanogens in Arctic Sediments to Temperature and Methanogenic Substrate Availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynsay I Blake

    Full Text Available Although cold environments are major contributors to global biogeochemical cycles, comparatively little is known about their microbial community function, structure, and limits of activity. In this study a microcosm based approach was used to investigate the effects of temperature, and methanogenic substrate amendment, (acetate, methanol and H2/CO2 on methanogen activity and methanogen community structure in high Arctic wetlands (Solvatnet and Stuphallet, Svalbard. Methane production was not detected in Stuphallet sediment microcosms (over a 150 day period and occurred within Solvatnet sediments microcosms (within 24 hours at temperatures from 5 to 40°C, the maximum temperature being at far higher than in situ maximum temperatures (which range from air temperatures of -1.4 to 14.1°C during summer months. Distinct responses were observed in the Solvatnet methanogen community under different short term incubation conditions. Specifically, different communities were selected at higher and lower temperatures. At lower temperatures (5°C addition of exogenous substrates (acetate, methanol or H2/CO2 had no stimulatory effect on the rate of methanogenesis or on methanogen community structure. The community in these incubations was dominated by members of the Methanoregulaceae/WCHA2-08 family-level group, which were most similar to the psychrotolerant hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanosphaerula palustris strain E1-9c. In contrast, at higher temperatures, substrate amendment enhanced methane production in H2/CO2 amended microcosms, and played a clear role in structuring methanogen communities. Specifically, at 30°C members of the Methanoregulaceae/WCHA2-08 predominated following incubation with H2/CO2, and Methanosarcinaceaeand Methanosaetaceae were enriched in response to acetate addition. These results may indicate that in transiently cold environments, methanogen communities can rapidly respond to moderate short term increases in temperature, but

  18. The Scientific and Societal Need for Accurate Global Remote Sensing of Marine Suspended Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, James G.

    2006-01-01

    Population pressure, commercial development, and climate change are expected to cause continuing alteration of the vital oceanic coastal zone environment. These pressures will influence both the geology and biology of the littoral, nearshore, and continental shelf regions. A pressing need for global observation of coastal change processes is an accurate remotely-sensed data product for marine suspended sediments. The concentration, delivery, transport, and deposition of sediments is strongly relevant to coastal primary production, inland and coastal hydrology, coastal erosion, and loss of fragile wetland and island habitats. Sediment transport and deposition is also related to anthropogenic activities including agriculture, fisheries, aquaculture, harbor and port commerce, and military operations. Because accurate estimation of marine suspended sediment concentrations requires advanced ocean optical analysis, a focused collaborative program of algorithm development and assessment is recommended, following the successful experience of data refinement for remotely-sensed global ocean chlorophyll concentrations.

  19. Development and application of a marine sediment porewater toxicity test using algal spores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooten, R. [Texas A and M Univ., Corpus Christi, TX (United States); Carr, R.S. [National Biological Service, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    An acute pore water toxicity test protocol using germination and growth of marine macroalgae as endpoints was developed to indicate the presence of toxic compounds in marine/estuarine and sediment porewater samples. Zoospores collected from Ulva fasciata and U. lactuca were used as test organisms. Preliminary results with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, a reference toxicant) indicate that zoospores germination and growth of embryonic gametophytes are as sensitive as the sea urchin fertilization and embryological development toxicity tests. Algal germination and growth data for copper, mercury and other metals will be presented. The results of tests utilizing this algal assay with sediment pore water from contaminated sediments will be compared with more traditional sediment toxicity test methods.

  20. Long distance electron transmission couples sulphur, iron, calcium and oxygen cycling in marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    Geochemical observations in marine sediment have recently documented that electric currents may intimately couple spatially separated biogeochemical processes (1). When marine sediment rich in iron sulphide was exposed to oxygen we observed how the electric currents resulted in significant...... geochemical alterations in the upper centimetres of the anoxic sediment: Sulphides were oxidized to sulphate in anoxic sediment layers. Electrons from this half-reaction were passed to the oxic layers cm above. In this way the domain of oxygen was extended far beyond it’s physically presence. Bioelectrical...... from iron sulfides was to a large extend deposited in the oxic zone as iron oxides and Ca2+ eventually precipitates at the surface as due to high pH caused by cathodic oxygen reduction. The result show how long distance electron transmission allows oxygen to drive the allocation of important minerals...

  1. Burrowing and avoidance behaviour in marine organisms exposed to pesticide-contaminated sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohlenberg, F.; Kiorboe, T.

    1983-02-01

    Behavioural effects of marine sediment contaminated with pesticides (6000 ppm parathion, 200 ppm methyl parathion, 200 ppm malathion) were studied in a number of marine organisms in laboratory tests and in situ. The burrowing behaviour in Macoma baltica, Cerastoderma edule, Abra alba, Nereis diversicolor and Scoloplos armiger was impaired in the contaminated sediment compared to control. The impairment was most pronounced in the laboratory tests, where almost no burrowing occured. In a very simple laboratory set-up, highly significant avoidance of the contaminated sediment was demonstrated for Crangon crangon and Solea solea, but not for Carcinus maenas and Pomatoschistus minutus. The validity of both behavioural tests was supported by in situ observations and investigations on the distribution of the species. It is concluded that both tests are useful tools in the assessment of the impact of contaminated sediments.

  2. Amphipods from marine cave sediments of the southern Iberian Peninsula: diversity and ecological distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Navarro-Barranco, Carlos; Guerra-Garc??a, Jos?? Manuel; S??nchez-Tocino, Luis; Garc??a-G??mez, Jos?? Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The present study explores the amphipod assemblages of six marine caves on the Mediterranean coast of southern Spain. Replicate samples were taken both inside and outside each marine cave in order to characterize the amphipod fauna and the physicochemical properties of the sediment. As a result, 44 amphipods species were identified. The high number of species found in a relatively limited area highlighted the richness of the Alboran Sea fauna, which is mainly due to the mixture of species fro...

  3. Rare earth elements distribution in marine sediments of Malaysia coasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rezaee; Ebrahim; Saraee; Khadijeh; Saion; B.Elias; Abdul; Khalik; Wood; Abdi; Mohammad; Reza

    2009-01-01

    In the east coast Peninsular Malaysia region,sediments are transported by several rivers from the east Malaysia into the South China Sea estuary.In the vicinity of the five river estuaries core sediments were collected in order to investigate rare earth elements(REEs) profile.Core sediments were divided into strata of between 2 to 4 cm intervals and prepared for analyzing by ICP-AES.REE concentrations of 54.3 μg/gr at 24-26 cm in EC4 increased to 114.1 μg/gr at 20-22 cm in EC5.The measured concentration of ...

  4. The Effect of Sediment Disturbance on the Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles Within Coastal Marine Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, A. R.; Wilson, S. R.; Jolley, D. F.

    2006-12-01

    A system allowing the ex situ quantification of the nitrogen cycle and various carbonaceous species (Organic Carbon, carbon dioxide, methane) in the air, water and sediment has been developed and used to monitor the effects of sediment disturbance on the nitrogen and carbon cycles. Measurements are made using standard wet chemical techniques for the sediment and water phases, and FTIR spectroscopy for the real-time monitoring of gas concentrations. Sediment collected from two temperate marine lakes on the eastern coast of Australia has been examined. In the laboratory it was found that the methane flux peaked three days after the initial disturbance; nitrous oxide flux peaked after 12 days while carbon dioxide flux varied throughout the experiment. Nitrite and nitrate concentrations in the overlying water peaked at the end of the second and third weeks, respectively. The total quantity of nitrogen within the system increased by ~ 35%. Sediment disturbance led to an initial release of nitrogenous nutrients from the sediment to the overlying water that were rapidly readsorbed to sediment particles and sequestered back into the sediment phase. The same technology was also adapted to allow this research to be undertaken in the field and used to study three new temperate marine sites within Lake Illawarra, New South Wales, Australia.

  5. Vertical distribution of 137Cs activity concentration in marine sediments at Amvrakikos Gulf, western of Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present work is the study of 137Cs migration in sediment column taking into account the sedimentation rate in the Amvrakikos Gulf, at the western part of Greece. Marine core sediments were collected and the measurements were performed using the high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry method. The vertical distribution of 137Cs activity concentration, as part of anthropogenic marine radioactivity, provided averaged sedimentation rate by identifying the depths of activity concentrations due to the Chernobyl accident and the nuclear tests signals. Furthermore, 137Cs measurements were reproduced using the proposed one-dimensional diffusion–advection model which provides mainly as an output, the sedimentation rate and the average diffusivity of 137Cs in the sediment column. The proposed model estimates the temporal variation of 137Cs activity concentration from 1987 (one year after the Chernobyl accident) till today (2014). - Highlights: • Two sediment cores were studied using 137Cs as a tracer. • Two peaks are observed due to nuclear tests and Chernobyl accident. • Diffusivities, as well as 137Cs apparent sedimentation speeds are estimated

  6. Sediment-worm interaction: transfer of 65Zn from marine silt by the polychaete, Nereis diversicolor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marine polychaete worms (Nereis diversicolor) accumulated 65Zn sorbed to silty marine sediment for 5 days and were then transferred to nonradioactive sediment in the laboratory and in the sea. The mean biological half-life (T/sub B//2/) for the laboratory worms did not differ greatly from that for worms in the sea. Worms living in small flowing seawater systems containing 16 cm3 of sediment accumulated 65Zn added to each system in the form of radioactive organic detritus. Higher percentage uptake of 65Zn was from radioactive detritus particles 0.2 to 2 mm in diameter resting on the sediment surface or mixed with sediment than from finely-ground (65Zn coprecipitated from fresh water with Fe(OH)3 was accumulated by N. diversicolor when the precipitate was on the sediment surface than when the precipitate was well mixed with the sediment. These experimental results indicate that benthic organisms may take up limited amounts of heavy metals associated with bottom sediments and recycle them to benthic and pelagic food webs

  7. Prediction of Persistent Organic Pollutants Biodegradation in Contaminated Marine Sediments Using Passive Sampling Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Prokofyev, E.; Frapiccini, E.; Marini, M.; Bondarenko, A.; Ruello, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate a new configuration (new materials) of the commercial passive sampler Chemcatcher as probe for predicting the bioavailability of persistent organic pollutants in marine sediments. To predict the availability of pollutants to biota, it is important to understand both solution- and solid-phase processes in the sediment, including the kinetics of pollutants release from its binding agent (ligand and/or particle). The present study examined the kinetic of deso...

  8. Arsenic in marine sediments from French Mediterranean ports: Geochemical partitioning, bioavailability and ecotoxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Mamindy-Pajany, Yannick; Hurel, Charlotte; Geret, Florence; Galgani, Francois; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne; Marmier, Nicolas; Romeo, Michele

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates arsenic mobility, bioavailability and toxicity in marine port sediments using chemical sequential extraction and laboratory toxicity tests. Sediment samples were collected from two different Mediterranean ports, one highly polluted with arsenic and other inorganic and organic pollutants (Estaque port (EST)), and the other one, less polluted, with a low arsenic content (Saint Mandrier port (SM)). Arsenic distribution in the solid phase was studied using a sequential extr...

  9. Uptake of plutonium from seawater and sediment by a marine polychaete worm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the uptake of plutonium 239 from sediment by a marine polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor is reported in the present paper. A comparison is made of the relative importance of two possible uptake pathways, sediment and seawater by which this worm may obtain its plutonium body-burden. Under the laboratory conditions used for the comparison of those two routes it would appear that Nereis obtained greater than 98% of its body activity from seawater. (auth.)

  10. Application of compositional data analysis to geochemical data of marine sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Burger, H.; Kuhn, T.

    2008-01-01

    In an earlier investigation (Burger et al., 2000) five sediment cores near the Rodrigues Triple Junction in the Indian Ocean were studied applying classical statistical methods (fuzzy c-means clustering, linear mixing model, principal component analysis) for the extraction of endmembers and evaluating the spatial and temporal variation of geochemical signals. Three main factors of sedimentation were expected by the marine geologists: a volcano-genetic, a hydro-hydrothermal and ...

  11. Radiometric dating of sediment records in Kuwait's marine area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six sediment cores collected from the Northwestern Arabian/Persian Gulf have been radiometrically dated by 210Pb. Three cores were collected from stations within the Kuwait Bay, and three others were collected from stations outside the bay. Two models have been used for 210Pb dating of sediment cores, i.e. Constant Flux: Constant Sedimentation (CF:CS) Model and the Constant Rate of Supply (CRS) Model. The average rates were found to vary significantly between 0.16 and 1.00 cm y-1 for stations outside and within the bay respectively. The variability of the sedimentation rate was essentially physiographic characteristics and variable hydrodynamic condition. In this study, 137Cs fallout radiotracer was also used to construct a realistic chronology. It was observed that the 137Cs in the entire vertical profile has been continuously contributed by fluvial and atmospheric deposition. (author)

  12. Evaluation of the toxicity of organic matter in marine sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    . The variation of the inhibition of AChE is attributed to the presence of the residues of various neurotoxic substances in the sediment contaminatEd. by the river runoff as well industrial effluents and sewage...

  13. Evaluation of the toxicity of organic matter in marine sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    . The variation of the inhibition of AChE is attributed to the presence of the residues of various neurotoxic substances in the sediment contaminatEd. by the river runoff as well industrial effluents and sewage....

  14. Additive modelling reveals spatiotemporal PCBs trends in marine sediments

    OpenAIRE

    G. EVERAERT; De Laender, F.; Deneudt, K.; Roose, P.; Mees, J.; Goethals, P.L.M.; Janssen, C.R.

    2014-01-01

    We developed generalised additive mixed models (GAMMs) to infer spatiotemporal trends of environmental PCB concentrations from an extensive dataset (n = 1219) of PCB concentrations measured between 1991 and 2010 in sediments of the Belgian Coastal Zone (BCZ) and the Western Scheldt estuary. A GAMM with time, geographical zone, periodicity and the organic carbon - water partition coefficient as covariates explained 49% of the variability in the log transformed PCB sediment concentrations. The ...

  15. Ecotoxicological sediment evaluations in marine aquaculture areas of Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Anny; Medina, Paulina; Urrutia, Carolina; Ahumada, Ramón

    2009-08-01

    Given its geographic characteristics, the southern Chilean fjord area is subjected to growing environmental pressure from the development of diverse forms of aquaculture (i.e., fish, algae, shellfish). The sediments accumulate substances as a natural sink, and ecotoxicology assays offer a reliable and robust proxy for sediment quality analyses. This study's objective was to establish a mid-range toxicity base line for the sediments in the region by applying a battery of non-specific ecotoxicological assays. Sediment samples (28) were collected in the channels and fjords studied during the CIMAR-Fiordos 11 cruise (July 2005). The sediments were evaluated using different species endemic to the eastern Pacific as targets: Ampelisca araucana, Tisbe longicornis, Arbacia spatuligera, and Dunaliella tertiolecta. The conditions for each assay were reported previously. Of the four species used as ecotoxicological tools, only D. tertiolecta differed significantly from the control group (negative) in terms of its growth. This difference could be attributed to nutrient enrichment. In general, we concluded that, although local changes occurred in the sediments, the mesoscale magnitude of the ecotoxicological alterations was small. Nonetheless, a surveillance program should be implemented that would allow us to follow-up and analyze the changes that are taking place in the systems on broader scales of time and space. PMID:18633720

  16. Magnetic fingerprint in marine sediments: clues from cultivated Magnetovibrio blakemorei and recent cores from Brazilian Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovane, L.; Florindo, F.; Bazylinski, D. A.; Pellizari, V. H.; Brandini, F. P.; de Almeida, L. A.; Carneiro, F. R.; Braga, E. D.; Lins, U.

    2013-12-01

    The magnetic properties (first order reversal curves, ferromagnetic resonance and decomposition of saturation remanent magnetization acquisition) of Magnetovibrio blakemorei strain MV-1, a marine magnetotactic bacterium, differ from those of other magnetotactic species from sediments deposited in lakes and marine habitats previously studied. This finding suggests that magnetite produced by some magnetotactic bacteria retains magnetic properties in relation to the crystallographic structure of the magnetic phase produced and thus might represent a 'magnetic fingerprint' for a specific magnetotactic bacterium. The technique used to determine this fingerprint is a non-destructive, new technology that might allow for the identification and presence of specific species or types of magnetotactic bacteria in certain environments such as sediment. We also show some preliminary results on the biogeochemical factors that control magnetotactic bacterial populations, documenting the environment and the preservation of bacterial magnetite, which dominates the palaeomagnetic signal throughout recent sediments from Brazilian Coast. We searched for magnetotactic bacteria in order to understand the ecosystems and environmental change related to their presence in sediments. We focused on studying the environmental conditions that allow for the presence of magnetotactic bacteria and magnetosomes in sediments including determining magnetotactic bacterial populations in marine settings, measuring crucial nutrient availability in the water column and in sediments, and examining particulate delivery to the seafloor.

  17. Organochlorine contaminants in arctic marine food chains: accumulation of specific polychlorinated biphenyls and chlordane-related compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muir, D.C.G.; Norstrom, R.J.; Simon, M.

    1988-09-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl congeners (S-PCB) and chlordane-related compounds (S-CHLOR) as well as DDT, hexachlorocyclohexane, toxaphene, and chlorobenzenes were determined in pooled arctic cod (Boreogadus saida) muscle and polar bear (Ursus maritimus) fat and in the blubber and liver of 59 ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from the east-central Canadian Arctic. S-PCB concentrations ranged from 0.0037 mg/kg (wet wt) in cod muscle to 0.68 mg/kg in male seal blubber and 4.50 mg/kg in bear fat. Tri- and tetrachloro PCB homologues were the dominant PCBs in fish, while pentachloro/hexachloro and hexachloro/heptachloro congeners predominated in ringed seal blubber and polar bear fat, respectively. Chlordane compounds detected in seal blubber were oxychlordane, cis- and trans-nonachlor, and cis-chlordane as well as nine minor components of technical chlordane, including nonachlor-III (a nonachlor isomer). Toxaphene and HCH isomers were the major organochlorines in cod muscle with mean concentrations of 0.018 and 0.010 mg/kg, respectively. S-CHLOR/S-PCB ratios ranged from 0.6 in fish muscle and bear fat to 0.7-0.9 in seal blubber, much higher than observed in more southerly marine environments, suggesting a proportionally greater input of chlordane into the Arctic.

  18. Marine transgression, shoreline emergence: Evidence in seabed and terrestrial ground temperatures of changing relative sea levels, Arctic Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alan E.

    1991-04-01

    Precise temperatures to depths of several hundred meters have been measured in abandoned petroleum exploration wells in coastal and offshore areas of the Canadian Arctic. In these regions, changes in relative sea level during the Quaternary have left a strong thermal signature on deep ground temperatures. Surface temperature changes of the order of 10-20 K accompanied shoreline emergence due to uplift in some regions and marine transgression due to eustatic changes in sea levels in others. Classical, analytic techniques are used to demonstrate that these anomalous features are a direct consequence of recent changes in sea level. In coastal areas of the Queen Elizabeth Islands, modelling of the large, near-surface temperature-depth gradients and the distinct curvature in the measured profiles yield emergence times in general agreement with dates taken from emergence curves. The analysis suggests that surface temperatures of these coastal areas were 16-19 K higher than at present from the Late Wisconsinan until emergence in the Holocene, suggesting either marine conditions for this period or glacial ice cover with basal temperatures near the pressure melting point. In contrast, at two offshore wells on the Beaufort Shelf, analyses of the negative temperature-depth gradients below the seabed and profile curvature yield times of marine transgression generally consistent with the published sea level curve for the area. The analyses suggest that surface temperatures of some present offshore areas were 10-16 K lower than today's sea bottom temperatures from the Late Wisconsinan until marine transgression in the Holocene. The characteristic ground temperature profiles measured in such arctic areas provide independent evidence for the relative changes in sea level indicated by proxy data. It is especially valuable for these areas, where there is little historical record and from which datable material, such as shells, driftwood, and pumice fragments, may be scarce or

  19. Accumulation of heavy metals in sediments of marine environments along the southwest coast of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to estimate the rate of excessive sediment accumulation that causes navigational problems and the impacts of urban and industrial development on sediment quality, concentrations of Cu, Ni, Zn, Cr, Mn, Fe and Ca, and radioactivity levels of 210Pb and 137 Cs have been measured in nineteen sediment cores from estuarine, lagoonal, marsh, backwater and inner shelf areas along the southwest coast of India. Sediment accumulation rates in estuarine, lagoonal, marshy areas of the Karnataka coast (ELMKC) and Cochin Backwaters (CBw) are three to six times higher than those in the adjacent inner shelf areas, consistent with the deposition of terrigenous sediments in the river-sea interaction zones. Hydrogen sulphide was detected in most of the samples; sediment colour varied from shades of gray to dark green. Sediments have lower elemental concentrations and element enrichment factors (EFs) particularly for redox sensitive elements such as Mn due to prevalence of reducing conditions in the sedimentary column. Sediments of ELMKC and CBw have a predominantly terrigenous source. They contain low Ca contents, characteristic of tropical river sediments. In contrast, a higher Ca content of inner shelf sediments off both Karnataka State (ISKS-1) and Kerala State (ISKS-2) implies the importance of additional sediment (CaCO3) flux from the marine biota. Measured Cu, Ni and Zn concentrations are generally low, perhaps reflecting the pristine nature of sediments. However, higher concentrations of Cr at all stations and of Zn at CBw indicate the input of Cr enriched minerals like amphibole and pyroxene from the catchment as well as Zn from anthropogenic sources. Heavy metal accumulation rates are high in estuarine, lagoonal, marsh and backwater areas along the southwest coast of India. This is not only due to the proximity of sources, but also due to high sediment accumulation rates because of the reduction of river flow in river-sea interaction zones owing to particle

  20. Composite cement mortars based on marine sediments and oyster shell powder

    OpenAIRE

    Ez-zaki, H.; Diouri, A.; Kamali-Bernard, S.; Sassi, O.

    2016-01-01

    Additions of dredged marine sediments and oyster shell powder (OS) as cement substitute materials in mortars are examined by several techniques. The sediments have high water and chloride contents and calcite, quartz, illite and kaolinite as principal minerals. The OS powders are entirely composed of calcium carbonate and traces of other impurities. Four mixtures of treated sediments and OS powders at 650 °C and 850 °C are added to Portland cement at 8%, 16% and 33% by weight. The hydration o...

  1. Organic pollutants in sediment cores of NE-Germany: Comparison of the marine Arkona Basin with freshwater sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a contamination survey in NE-Germany sediment cores were sampled at 5 locations with freeze-coring devices and conventional box-coring systems. In total more than 40 samples were analysed for several organic compounds (136 PCDD/F, 33 PCB, 39 PAH, 10 DDX, 4 HCH, 4 CB), sedimentological parameters (TOC, TC, TIC, LOI), some total trace metals (Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu, Zn) and dated by measurement of the 21Pb and 137Cs activity. The deepest segment of the cores from the Arkona Basin and the freshwater lakes were dated back to the end of the 19th century. A comparison of marine versus freshwater data is presented. The contamination levels of Arkona Basin were often lower than anthropogenically influenced freshwater sediments and more similar to a freshwater sediment core only influenced by deposition, with an additional Oder River inflow. Differences in patterns and contamination levels are discussed

  2. Electrophoretic Extraction and Proteomic Characterization of Proteins Buried in Marine Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli K. Moore

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Proteins are the largest defined molecular component of marine organic nitrogen, and hydrolysable amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, are important components of particulate nitrogen in marine sediments. In oceanic systems, the largest contributors are phytoplankton proteins, which have been tracked from newly produced bloom material through the water column to surface sediments in the Bering Sea, but it is not known if proteins buried deeper in sediment systems can be identified with confidence. Electrophoretic gel protein extraction methods followed by proteomic mass spectrometry and database searching were used as the methodology to identify buried phytoplankton proteins in sediments from the 8–10 cm section of a Bering Sea sediment core. More peptides and proteins were identified using an SDS-PAGE tube gel than a standard 1D flat gel or digesting the sediment directly with trypsin. The majority of proteins identified correlated to the marine diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana, rather than bacterial protein sequences, indicating an algal source not only dominates the input, but also the preserved protein fraction. Abundant RuBisCO and fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c binding proteins were identified, supporting algal sources of these proteins and reinforcing the proposed mechanisms that might protect proteins for long time periods. Some preserved peptides were identified in unexpected gel molecular weight ranges, indicating that some structural changes or charge alteration influenced the mobility of these products during electrophoresis isolation. Identifying buried photosystem proteins suggests that algal particulate matter is a significant fraction of the preserved organic carbon and nitrogen pools in marine sediments.

  3. Competition within the marine microalgae over the polar dark period in the Greenland Sea of high Arctic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Qing; Rolf Gradinger; Zhou Qingsong

    2003-01-01

    With the onset of winter, polar marine microalgae would have faced total darkness for a period of up to 6 months. A natural autumn community of Arctic sea ice microalgae was collected for dark survival experiments from the Greenland Sea during the ARKTIS-XI/2 Expedition of RV Polarstern in October 1995. After a dark period of 161 days, species dominance in the algal assemblage have changed from initially pennate diatoms to small phytoflagellates ( < 20 μm). Over the entire dark period, the mean algal growth rate was - 0.01 d-1. Nearly all diatom species had negative growth rates, while phytoflagellate abundance increased. Resting spore formation during the dark period was observed in less than 4.5% of all cells and only for dinoflagellates and the diatom Chaetoceros spp. We assume that facultative heterotrophy and energy storage are the main processes enabling survival during the dark Arctic winter. After an increase in light intensity, microalgal cells reacted with fast growth within days. Phytoflagellates had the highest growth rate, followed by Nitzschia frigida. Further investigations and experiments should focus on the mechanisms of dark survival (mixotrophy and energy storage) of polar marine microalgae.

  4. Observation of surface ozone in the marine boundary layer along a cruise through the Arctic Ocean: From offshore to remote

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Pengzhen; Bian, Lingen; Zheng, Xiangdong; Yu, Juan; Sun, Chen; Ye, Peipei; Xie, Zhouqing

    2016-03-01

    Ozone is an important reactive gas in the troposphere; it has been frequently used to estimate atmospheric oxidation capacity. However, there are few data of surface ozone over the Arctic Ocean, especially the central Arctic Ocean. Here, surface ozone in the marine boundary layer along the cruise path during the 5th Chinese Arctic Research Expedition (June to September, 2012) was investigated. The latitudes and longitudes covered in the cruise were 31.1°N-87.7°N and 9.3°E-90°E-168.4°W. The 1-h-averaged ozone varied from 9.4 ppbv to 124.5 ppbv along the cruise. The highest mixing ratios appeared in the East China Sea and the Sea of Japan while the lowest in the Chukchi Sea. The relatively high ozone levels over the East China Sea, the Sea of Japan, and offshore Iceland were caused by transport of precursors and/or ozone from the nearby continent. Ozone mixing ratio decreasing by ~ 2 ppbv/° with increasing latitude was observed during 31-45°N covering the East China Sea and the Sea of Japan, and during 62-69°N covering offshore Iceland. Over the entire Arctic Ocean, ozone levels were relatively low, varying from 9.4 ppbv to 36.1 ppbv with an average of 23.8 ± 4.6 (mean ± standard deviation) ppbv, which was not statistically different with data observed at Barrow observatory during the same period. Unlike ozone over contaminated areas, a slight increasing trend of ozone in 69-87°N was observed. This phenomenon may be ascribed to the role of both vertical transport and chemical processes due to solar radiation.

  5. Accumulation of polychlorinated organic contaminants from sediment by three benthic marine species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruell, R.J.; Rubinstein, N.I.; Taplin, B.K.; LiVolsi, J.A.; Bowen, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to measure the accumulation of selected polychlorinated compounds by marine benthos exposed to environmentally contaminated sediment. Sandworms (Nereis virens), clams (Macoma nasuta), and grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) were exposed to sediment collected from the Passaic River, New Jersey. All three species accumulated 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (2,3,7,8-TCDF) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the sediment. In addition, a recently identified sulfur containing analog of tetrachlorinated dibenzofurans. The objectives of the study were to determine the relative bioavailability of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (2,3,7,8-TCDF) and selected PCB congeners from bottom sediments as well as to examine the relationship between contaminant concentrations in sediments and biota.

  6. The use of ecocores to evaluate biodegradation in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Nielsen, Jef;

    1988-01-01

    A laboratory sediment microcosm called the ecocore is described. It has been used to test the biodegradability of substances which predominantly enter the sediment. A new method for introducing hydrophobic test substances such as hydrocarbons to the test system is also described. In a series of...... tests using 14C-labelled hydrocarbons, it has been demonstrated that evolved and trapped 14C02 in all probability reflects the rates of mineralization of the test substance. The fate of the substances within the test system has been described and the total recovery exceeds 80%. The system shows good...

  7. Long distance electron transport in marine sediments: Microbial and geochemical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Larsen, Steffen; Pfeffer, Christian;

    sulfate, and iron sulphides are the major sources for sulfide in the system. Procaryotes with the ability to perform long distance electron transmission may flourishes in marine sediments exposed to transient oxygen depletion, leaving distinct signatures of such events in the geological record....

  8. Thermodynamic and kinetic control on anaerobic oxidation of methane in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knab, Nina J.; Dale, Andrew W.; Lettmann, Karsten;

    2008-01-01

    The free energy yield of microbial respiration reactions in anaerobic marine sediments must be sufficient to be conserved as biologically usable energy in the form of ATP. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction (SRR) has a very low standard free energy yield of ΔG  = -3...

  9. Marine protist diversity in European coastal waters and sediments as revealed by high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massana, Ramon; Gobet, Angélique; Audic, Stéphane; Bass, David; Bittner, Lucie; Boutte, Christophe; Chambouvet, Aurélie; Christen, Richard; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Decelle, Johan; Dolan, John R; Dunthorn, Micah; Edvardsen, Bente; Forn, Irene; Forster, Dominik; Guillou, Laure; Jaillon, Olivier; Kooistra, Wiebe H C F; Logares, Ramiro; Mahé, Frédéric; Not, Fabrice; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Pawlowski, Jan; Pernice, Massimo C; Probert, Ian; Romac, Sarah; Richards, Thomas; Santini, Sébastien; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Siano, Raffaele; Simon, Nathalie; Stoeck, Thorsten; Vaulot, Daniel; Zingone, Adriana; de Vargas, Colomban

    2015-10-01

    Although protists are critical components of marine ecosystems, they are still poorly characterized. Here we analysed the taxonomic diversity of planktonic and benthic protist communities collected in six distant European coastal sites. Environmental deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) from three size fractions (pico-, nano- and micro/mesoplankton), as well as from dissolved DNA and surface sediments were used as templates for tag pyrosequencing of the V4 region of the 18S ribosomal DNA. Beta-diversity analyses split the protist community structure into three main clusters: picoplankton-nanoplankton-dissolved DNA, micro/mesoplankton and sediments. Within each cluster, protist communities from the same site and time clustered together, while communities from the same site but different seasons were unrelated. Both DNA and RNA-based surveys provided similar relative abundances for most class-level taxonomic groups. Yet, particular groups were overrepresented in one of the two templates, such as marine alveolates (MALV)-I and MALV-II that were much more abundant in DNA surveys. Overall, the groups displaying the highest relative contribution were Dinophyceae, Diatomea, Ciliophora and Acantharia. Also, well represented were Mamiellophyceae, Cryptomonadales, marine alveolates and marine stramenopiles in the picoplankton, and Monadofilosa and basal Fungi in sediments. Our extensive and systematic sequencing of geographically separated sites provides the most comprehensive molecular description of coastal marine protist diversity to date. PMID:26119494

  10. usSEABED: Database Efforts in Marine Surficial Sediments of the US EEZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, J. A.; Jenkins, C. J.; Field, M. E.; Gardner, J. V.; Zimmermann, M.; Box, C. E.; Kneeshaw, T. A.

    2001-12-01

    The USGS, in partnership with the University of Sydney, Australia and National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle is constructing a unique marine surficial sediment database, usSEABED, for the United States EEZ. usSEABED maximizes the knowledge of the seafloor by combining sedimentological and biological information, verbal sample and photographic descriptions (through fuzzy set theory), chemical, and acoustic data, along with other seabed geologic characteristics, into a single standardized format. In this way, usSEABED is more than a compilation of known quantitative surficial sediment data but rather provides an integrated view of the seabed. Decades of marine sediment research by federal, state, local, academic, and private institutions has provided temporal and spatial snapshots of the ocean floor, either as focused, tightly gridded sampling efforts, or in the earliest days, more widely scattered efforts. As is, these datasets had disparate purposes with dissimilar sampling parameters, statistics, and data types. usSEABED filters these datasets, providing uniform parameters for quantitative sediment textural data, parsed verbal data (using fuzzy set theory), modeled data, and both geologic and biologic compositional parameters. Access to our efforts is through our website, available in the fall of 2001, which includes an explanation of the processing involved, sample maps, an interactive GIS site, and a data-download site. usSEABED is held in a comma-delimited, field-defined, tree-d structure that can be brought into most COTS relational databases or GIS. Focussed originally on the U.S. Pacific margin, recent work is widening the coverage to areas in Hawaii, Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico, the Great Lakes, and the U.S. Atlantic margin. usSEABED is an ongoing project, with expanding data inclusions and new data-filtering modules available, such as sediment true-color displays and marine mineral locations. We invite the additions of new sedimentological, biological

  11. Bioaccumulation kinetics of polybrominated diphenyl ethers from estuarine sediments to the marine polychaete, Nereis virens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosterhaus, Susan L; Dreis, Erin; Baker, Joel E

    2011-05-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame-retardant chemicals that have become ubiquitous environmental contaminants. Polybrominated diphenyl ether no-uptake rates from estuarine or marine sediments to deposit-feeding organisms have not yet been reported. In the present study, the marine polychaete worm Nereis virens was exposed to field-contaminated and spiked sediments containing the penta- and deca-BDE commercial mixtures in a 28-d experiment to characterize the relative bioavailability of PBDE congeners from estuarine sediments. A time series sampling regimen was conducted to estimate uptake rate constants. In both field-collected and laboratory-spiked sediment exposures, worms selectively accumulated congeners in the penta-BDE mixture over BDE 209 and other components of the deca-BDE mixture, supporting the prevalence of these congeners in higher trophic level species. Brominated diphenyl ether 209 was not bioavailable to N. virens from field sediment and was only minimally detected in worms exposed to spiked sediments in which bioavailability was maximized. Chemical hydrophobicity was not a good predictor of bioavailability for congeners in the penta-BDE mixture. Direct comparison of bioavailability from the spiked and field sediments for the predominant congeners in the penta-BDE mixture was confounded by the considerable difference in exposure concentration between treatments. Biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) for N. virens after 28 d of exposure to the field sediment were lower than the BSAFs for Nereis succinea collected from the field site, indicating that 28-d bioaccumulation tests using N. virens may underestimate the in situ concentration of PBDEs in deposit-feeding species. The bioavailability of PBDEs to N. virens indicates that these chemicals can be remobilized from estuarine sediments and transferred to aquatic food webs. PMID:21337608

  12. Partition of iodine (129I and 127I) isotopes in soils and marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural organic matter, such as humic and fulvic acids and humin, plays a key role in determining the fate and mobility of radioiodine in soil and sediments. The radioisotope 129I is continuously produced and released from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, and as a biophilic element, its environmental mobility is strongly linked to organic matter. Due to its long half-life (15.7 million years), 129I builds up in the environment and can be traced since the beginning of the nuclear era in reservoirs such as soils and marine sediments. Nevertheless, partition of the isotope between the different types of organic matter in soil and sediment is rarely explored. Here we present a sequential extraction of 129I and 127I chemical forms encountered in a Danish soil, a soil reference material (IAEA-375), an anoxic marine sediment from Southern Norway and an oxic sediment from the Barents Sea. The different forms of iodine are related to water soluble, exchangeable, carbonates, oxides as well as iodine bound to humic acid, fulvic acid and to humin and minerals. This is the first study to identify 129I in humic and fulvic acid and humin. The results show that 30-56% of the total 127I and 42-60% of the total 129I are associated with organic matter in soil and sediment samples. At a soil/sediment pH below 5.0-5.5, 127I and 129I in the organic fraction associate primarily with the humic acid while at soil/sediment pH > 6 129I was mostly found to be bound to fulvic acid. Anoxic conditions seem to increase the mobility and availability of iodine compared to oxic, while subaerial conditions (soils) reduces the availability of water soluble fraction compared to subaqueous (marine) conditions. - Highlights: → Chemical speciation of 129I and 127I in soil and sediment. → Association of 129I with humic substances in soil and marine sediments is reported. → Partition of iodine within the organic fraction depends on soil/sediment pH. → Anoxic conditions seem to increase the mobility

  13. Partition of iodine ({sup 129}I and {sup 127}I) isotopes in soils and marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Violeta, E-mail: violeta.hansen@risoe.dk [Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, NUK-202, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, P.O.B. 49, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Roos, Per [Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, NUK-202, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, P.O.B. 49, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Aldahan, Ala [Department of Earth Science, Uppsala University, SE-758 36 Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Geology, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Hou, Xiaolin [Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, NUK-202, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, P.O.B. 49, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Possnert, Goeran [Tandem Laboratory, Uppsala University, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-12-15

    Natural organic matter, such as humic and fulvic acids and humin, plays a key role in determining the fate and mobility of radioiodine in soil and sediments. The radioisotope {sup 129}I is continuously produced and released from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, and as a biophilic element, its environmental mobility is strongly linked to organic matter. Due to its long half-life (15.7 million years), {sup 129}I builds up in the environment and can be traced since the beginning of the nuclear era in reservoirs such as soils and marine sediments. Nevertheless, partition of the isotope between the different types of organic matter in soil and sediment is rarely explored. Here we present a sequential extraction of {sup 129}I and {sup 127}I chemical forms encountered in a Danish soil, a soil reference material (IAEA-375), an anoxic marine sediment from Southern Norway and an oxic sediment from the Barents Sea. The different forms of iodine are related to water soluble, exchangeable, carbonates, oxides as well as iodine bound to humic acid, fulvic acid and to humin and minerals. This is the first study to identify {sup 129}I in humic and fulvic acid and humin. The results show that 30-56% of the total {sup 127}I and 42-60% of the total {sup 129}I are associated with organic matter in soil and sediment samples. At a soil/sediment pH below 5.0-5.5, {sup 127}I and {sup 129}I in the organic fraction associate primarily with the humic acid while at soil/sediment pH > 6 {sup 129}I was mostly found to be bound to fulvic acid. Anoxic conditions seem to increase the mobility and availability of iodine compared to oxic, while subaerial conditions (soils) reduces the availability of water soluble fraction compared to subaqueous (marine) conditions. - Highlights: > Chemical speciation of {sup 129}I and {sup 127}I in soil and sediment. > Association of {sup 129}I with humic substances in soil and marine sediments is reported. > Partition of iodine within the organic fraction depends

  14. Comparative study of plutonium and americium bioaccumulation from two marine sediments contaminated in the natural environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, T.F.; Smith, J.D. (Melbourne Univ., Parkville (Australia). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry); Fowler, S.W.; LaRosa, J.; Holm, E. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Monaco-Ville (Monaco). Lab. of Marine Radioactivity); Aarkrog, A.; Dahlgaard, H. (Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark))

    1991-01-01

    Plutonium and americium sediment-animal transfer was studied under controlled laboratory conditions by exposure of the benthic polychaete Nereis diversicolor (O. F. Mueller) to marine sediments contaminated by a nuclear bomb accident (near Thule, Greenland) and nuclear weapons testing (Enewetak Atoll). In both sediment regimes, the bioavailability of plutonium and {sup 241}Am was low, with specific activity in the tissues <1% (dry wt) than in the sediments. Over the first three months, a slight preference in transfer of plutonium over {sup 241}Am occurred and {sup 241}Am uptake from the Thule sediment was enhanced compared to that from lagoon sediments of Enewetak Atoll. Autoradiography studies indicated the presence of hot particles of plutonium in the sediments. The results highlight the importance of purging animals of their gut contents in order to obtain accurate estimates of transuranic transfer from ingested sediments into tissue. It is further suggested that enhanced transuranic uptake by some benthic species could arise from ingestion of highly activity particles and organic-rich detritus present in the sediments. (author).

  15. Using marine sediment archives to reconstruct past outlet glacier variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Camilla Snowman; Straneo, Fiamma; Ribergaard, Mads;

    2013-01-01

    Ice-rafted debris in fjord sediment cores provides information about outlet glacier activity beyond the instrumental time period. It tells us that the Helheim Glacier, Greenland’s third most productive glacier, responds rapidly to short-term (3 to 10 years) climate changes....

  16. Concretization of high level radioactive source in marine sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described of forming a concretized coating which encapsulates a canister of heat producing materials and provides protection against corrosion by seawater when the canister is placed in an ocean floor-sediment environment. The method comprises: selecting a location on the ocean floor at such a depth that the proximate seawater thereat would be capable of reaching a temperature of at least 1100C. when in contact with the canister of heat producing materials. The seawater within the pores of the ocean floor sediment thereat contains sufficient amounts of calcium and sulfate to form, at the temperature, an anhydrite layer around the canister; placing the canister into the ocean floor sediment at the location; and storing the canister at the location for at least one month thereby allowing heat from the canister to raise the temperature of the seawater in the pores of the sediment proximate to the canister to at least 1100C. wherein anhydrite precipitates from the proximate seawater and forms a concretized layer on the exterior surfaces of the canister

  17. Development and Evaluation of Polychaete Reverse Samplers for Marine Phase II Whole Sediment Toxicitiy Identification Evaluations (TIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine and estuarine sediments accumulate contaminants and act as a sink for a wide range of toxic chemicals. As a result, the sediments themselves can become a source of contamination. At sufficient levels, contaminated sediments can cause benthic impairments and toxicity to m...

  18. Imaging Oxygen Distribution in Marine Sediments. The Importance of Bioturbation and Sediment Heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Pischedda, Laura; Poggiale, Jean-Christophe; Cuny, Philippe; Gilbert, Franck

    2008-01-01

    The influence of sediment oxygen heterogeneity, due to bioturbation, on diffusive oxygen flux was investigated. Laboratory experiments were carried out with 3 macrobenthic species presenting different bioturbation behaviour patterns:the polychaetes Nereis diversicolor and Nereis virens, both constructing ventilated galleries in the sediment column, and the gastropod Cyclope neritea, a burrowing species which does not build any structure. Oxygen two-dimensional distribution in sediments was qu...

  19. Optimization of hard clams, polychaetes, physical disturbance and denitrifying bacteria of removing nutrients in marine sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui; Thrush, Simon F; Wan, Xihe; Li, Hui; Qiao, Yi; Jiang, Ge; Sun, Ruijian; Wang, LiBao; He, Peimin

    2016-09-15

    Marine organisms are known to play important roles in transforming nutrients in sediments, however, guidelines to optimize sediment restoration are not available. We conducted a laboratory mesocosm experiment to investigate the role of hard clams, polychaetes, the degree of physical disturbance and denitrifying bacterial concentrations in removing total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), and total organic carbon (TOC) in marine sediments. Response surface methodology was employed to analyze the results of initial experiments and in a subsequent experiment identified optimal combinations of parameters. Balancing the TN, TP, TOC removal efficiency, our model predicted 39% TN removal, 33% TP removal, and 42% TOC removal for a 14-day laboratory bioremediation trial using hard clams biomass of 1.2kgm(-2), physical disturbance depth of 16.4cm, bacterial density of 0.18Lm(-2), and polychaetes biomass of 0.16kgm(-2), respectively. These results emphasize the value of combining different species in field-based bioremediation. PMID:27371956

  20. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of marine sediment in-house reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reference materials play an important role in demonstrating the quality and reliability of analytical data. The advantage of using in-house reference materials is that they provide a relatively cheap option as compared to using commercially available certified reference material (CRM) and can closely resemble the laboratory routine test sample. A marine sediment sample was designed as an in-house reference material, in the framework of quality assurance and control (QA/QC) program of the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) Laboratory at Nuclear Malaysia. The NAA technique was solely used for the homogeneity test of the marine sediment sample. The CRM of IAEA- Soil 7 and IAEA- SL1 (Lake Sediment) were applied in the analysis as compatible matrix based reference materials for QA purposes. (Author)

  1. Validation of an analytical methodology for the quantitative analysis of petroleum hydrocarbons in marine sediment samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloy Yordad Companioni Damas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a validation of an analytical procedure for the analysis of petroleum hydrocarbons in marine sediment samples. The proposed protocol is able to measure n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH in samples at concentrations as low as 30 ng/g, with a precision better than 15% for most of analytes. The extraction efficiency of fortified sediments varied from 65.1 to 105.6% and 59.7 to 97.8%, for n-alkanes and PAH in the ranges: C16 - C32 and fluoranthene - benzo(apyrene, respectively. The analytical protocol was applied to determine petroleum hydrocarbons in sediments collected from a marine coastal zone.

  2. Fram-2014/2015: A 400 Day Investigation of the Arctic's Oldest Sediments over the Alpha Ridge with a Research Hovercraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J. K.; Kristoffersen, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The thickest multi-year ice in the Arctic covers a secret. Four short cores raised from the Alpha Ridge in the 1970s and 1980s from drift stations T-3 and CESAR showed ages between 45 and 76 my. The reason for these old ages became clear when examination of legacy seismic data from T-3 showed that in some places up to 500 m of sediments had been removed within an area of some 200 by 600 km, presumably by an impact of asteroid fragments. To investigate the impact area, the authors conceived an innovative research platform in 2007. Named the R/H SABVABAA, this 12m by 6m hovercraft has been home-based in Svalbard since June 2008. During the following 6 years the craft and its evolving innovative light-weight equipment have made 18 trips to the summer ice pack, traveling some 4410 km over ice during some six months of scientific investigations. An opportunity to get a lift to this area, some 1500 km from Svalbard, came in a 2011 invitation to join AWI's icebreaker POLARSTERN in its ARK-XXVIII/4 expedition departing Tromsö August 5, 2014. The 400 day drift will be the first wintering over, ever, of a mobile research platform with geophysical, geological, and oceanographic capabilities. The Arctic ice pack continually moves due to winds and currents. While at the main camp, observations will consist of marine geophysics (seismic profiling with four element CHIRP, a 20 in³ airgun with single hydrophone, as well as 12 kHz bathymetry and 200 kHz sounding of the deep scattering layer), marine geology (coring with a hydrostatically-boosted 3 or 6 m corer; bottom photography; and two rock dredges), and oceanography. Deployed away from the camp, four sonobuoys will allow 3-D seismic acquisition. Access to the depths below the ice is via a hydraulic capstan winch, with 6500 m of Kevlar aramid fiber rope with 2.8 ton breaking strength. Ice thickness monitoring of the local 100 km² will be made with the craft's EM-31 probe when away from the camp, moving to choice locations for

  3. Natural self cleaning and enhanced self cleaning of crude oil, crude oil emulsions and diesel from Arctic shoreline sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural removal and enhanced removal by chemical treatment of crude oil, crude oil emulsion, and diesel were studied in field and basin experiments on Spitsbergen. The beach types comprised gravel beaches, sandy beaches, and mud flats. Each shoreline was divided into nine 25-m2 plots. The chemical treatment comprised Corexit 7664 and Finasol OSR12. Oil concentrations were monitored from the time of contamination and until the end of the season. The upper and lower zones of the beach were treated separately. The decrease in oil concentration during an Arctic summer season was found to be considerable in all the experiments except in the mud flat sediments. Partitioning in the sediment depends on the water level in the sediment, thus oil retention is limited in the more or less water-saturated lower beach zone. Although the overall effect of chemical treatment can be questioned, the chemicals have an effect on oil removal from the sediment. The extensive removal of oil from the control plots indicates that a leave-alone option can be viable on these types of beaches unless extreme requirements for immediate cleanliness exist. 4 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Sequential Sediment Budgets in an Ungauged Watershed: Redwood Creek, Marin County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, P. W.; Stallman, J.

    2005-12-01

    Sediment budgets provide an organizing framework in fluvial geomorphology and have enormous potential in environmental management. A sediment budget approach assisted in developing strategies for restoring Big Lagoon, the wetland ecosystem at the terminus of the 22.7 km2 Redwood Creek watershed in Marin County, California. Persistence of a restored lagoon largely depends on the current sediment yield relative to the reference yield prior to European settlement. Process-based, distributed sediment budgets were constructed for several historical time periods to account for accelerated sediment production from contemporary land management practices and legacy factors stemming from past resource exploitation. Sediment production, storage, and transfer were investigated using digital terrain modeling, field reconnaissance to ascertain and validate hillslope processes, mainstem channel surveys and dendrochronology to assess trends in alluvial sediment storage, application of published process rate estimates, use of short-term and prorated stream gauging records, and sediment transport modeling to validate sediment yields into Big Lagoon. Evidence suggests that the Redwood Creek valley bottom aggraded from at least 3,500 B.P., with floodplain wetlands acting as sediment sinks (average annual sediment yield of 34 t km2 yr-1). Channel incision rapidly followed European settlement and intensive hillslope disturbances beginning around 1840 (peak yield 1921-1982 of 324 t km2 yr-1). Mainstem and large tributary valley bottoms became major sediment sources during this time and remain sources despite progressive retirement of most agricultural land use (yield 1981-2000 of 198 t km2 yr-1). Numerous issues related to data availability and resolution limited quantification of some sediment sources and resulted in potential uncertainties in estimates of yield to Big Lagoon. Historical sediment budgets, however, require more than adequate data sources, they require accurate conceptual

  5. Arctic Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, John; Baggeroer, Arthur; Mikhalevsky, Peter; Munk, Walter; Sagen, Hanne; Vernon, Frank; Worcester, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The dramatic reduction of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean will increase human activities in the coming years. This will be driven by increased demand for energy and the marine resources of an Arctic Ocean more accessible to ships. Oil and gas exploration, fisheries, mineral extraction, marine transportation, research and development, tourism and search and rescue will increase the pressure on the vulnerable Arctic environment. Synoptic in-situ year-round observational technologies are needed to monitor and forecast changes in the Arctic atmosphere-ice-ocean system at daily, seasonal, annual and decadal scales to inform and enable sustainable development and enforcement of international Arctic agreements and treaties, while protecting this critical environment. This paper will discuss multipurpose acoustic networks, including subsea cable components, in the Arctic. These networks provide communication, power, underwater and under-ice navigation, passive monitoring of ambient sound (ice, seismic, biologic and anthropogenic), and acoustic remote sensing (tomography and thermometry), supporting and complementing data collection from platforms, moorings and autonomous vehicles. This paper supports the development and implementation of regional to basin-wide acoustic networks as an integral component of a multidisciplinary, in situ Arctic Ocean Observatory.

  6. Sedimentation rates and age modeling of Late Quaternary marine sediments with unsupported 230Th

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    230Th is a radionuclide of the 238U decay series, characterized by natural abundance in sediments and a half-life of 75,380 years, suitable for direct evaluation of sedimentation rates and sediment ages in a time scale of 700,000 years before the present. 230Th cycle creates a contrast between supported and unsupported 230Th in the sedimentary matrix due to the different geochemical behaviors of 230Th and its parent, 234U. This study aimed at establishing and validating a mathematical model that evaluates sedimentation rates and age modeling based on 230Th data retrieved from a sediment core sampled in the southeastern Brazilian continental margin. The validation of the age modeling of this method was made through a statistical comparison between its results and those of benthic foraminifera δ 18O record technique, widely used for sediment dating and determination of sedimentation rates. It was observed that the model of unsupported 230Th was successful in determining Late Quaternary sedimentation rates and ages in a confidence level of 95 %. It was possible to determine several breaking points in unsupported 230Th vertical profile, and it was shown that those divides correspond to some major intervals between glacial and interglacial periods when compared with the benthic foraminifera record. (author)

  7. Partition of iodine (129I and 127I) isotopes in soils and marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Violeta; Roos, Per; Aldahan, Ala;

    2011-01-01

    Natural organic matter, such as humic and fulvic acids and humin, plays a key role in determining the fate and mobility of radioiodine in soil and sediments. The radioisotope 129I is continuously produced and released from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, and as a biophilic element, its environm......Natural organic matter, such as humic and fulvic acids and humin, plays a key role in determining the fate and mobility of radioiodine in soil and sediments. The radioisotope 129I is continuously produced and released from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, and as a biophilic element, its...... environmental mobility is strongly linked to organic matter. Due to its long half-life (15.7 million years), 129I builds up in the environment and can be traced since the beginning of the nuclear era in reservoirs such as soils and marine sediments. Nevertheless, partition of the isotope between the different...... types of organic matter in soil and sediment is rarely explored. Here we present a sequential extraction of 129I and 127I chemical forms encountered in a Danish soil, a soil reference material (IAEA-375), an anoxic marine sediment from Southern Norway and an oxic sediment from the Barents Sea. The...

  8. Study of photocatalytic degradation of tributyltin, dibutylin and monobutyltin in water and marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosillon, Stephan; Bancon-Montigny, Chrystelle; Mendret, Julie

    2014-08-01

    This study reports on the first assessment of the treatment of sediments contaminated by organotin compounds using heterogeneous photocatalysis. Photocatalysis of organotins in water was carried out under realistic concentration conditions (μgL(-1)). Degradation compounds were analyzed by GC-ICP-MS; a quasi-complete degradation of tributyltin (TBT) in water (99.8%) was achieved after 30min of photocatalytic treatment. The degradation by photolysis was about (10%) in the same conditions. For the first time decontamination of highly polluted marine sediments (certified reference material and harbor sediments) by photocatalysis proves that the use of UV and the production of hydroxyl radicals are an efficient way to treat organotins adsorbed onto marine sediment despite the complexity of the matrix. In sediment, TBT degradation yield ranged from 32% to 37% after only 2h of irradiation (TiO2-UV) and the by-products: dibutyltin (DBT) and monobutyltin (MBT) were degraded very rapidly in comparison with TBT. It was shown that during photocatalysis of organotins in sediments, the hydroxyl radical attack and photolysis are the two ways for the degradation of adsorbed TBT. PMID:24613444

  9. Recent surface marine sediments of Cocos Island in Costa Rica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeffrey A. SIBAJA-CORDERO; Jess S. TRONCOSO; Eddy GMEZ-RAMREZ

    2014-01-01

    Subtidal sediments of Isla del Coco (Cocos Island), Costa Rica were described in their grain size, sorting, organic matter, and carbonates from 27 dredge samples (3-75 m), collected in April 2010. The organic matter range between 1.37-3.31% and carbonates presented a mean of 74±17%. The sorting was moderately or poorly. The grain size ranged between 0.1-1.1mm. The pattern is that sediment change from inner to mouth of bays. Carbonates and gravel fractions increased offshore and organic matter have high values inner the bays. Input of vegetal debris and mud was from the rivers of this island covered with rain and cloud forest.

  10. TEX86 paleothermometry : proxy validation and application in marine sediments

    OpenAIRE

    C. Huguet

    2007-01-01

    Determination of past sea surface temperature (SST) is of primary importance for the reconstruction of natural climatic changes, modelling of climate and reconstruction of ocean circulation. Recently, a new SST proxy was introduced, the TetraEther indeX of lipids with 86 carbons (TEX86), which is based on temperature-related changes that occur in the composition of creanarchaeotal membrane lipids. An empirical correlation between TEX86 values of sediment core tops from a wide variety of geogr...

  11. Diagenetic imprints on magnetic mineral assemblages in marine sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Garming, Johanna Fredrika Lukina

    2006-01-01

    Sediments and sedimentary rocks are important sources for paleomagnetic studies of the geomagnetic field behaviour and of environmental changes. These studies are greatly dependent on the reliable extraction of the detrital magnetic signal. Overprinting of this signal by reductive diagenetic processes, where iron-bearing minerals are dissolved and secondary (magnetic) sulphide minerals form, jeopardizes the validity of such investigations. It is therefore necessary to be aware of the possible...

  12. Toxicological effects of short-term resuspension of metal-contaminated freshwater and marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetters, Kyle J; Costello, David M; Hammerschmidt, Chad R; Burton, G Allen

    2016-03-01

    Sediments in navigation-dominated waterways frequently are contaminated with a variety of particle-associated pollutants and are subject to frequent short-term resuspension events. There is little information documenting whether resuspension of metal-contaminated sediments has adverse ecological effects on resident aquatic organisms. Using a novel laboratory approach, the authors examined the mobilization of Zn, Cu, Cd, Pb, Ni, and Cr during resuspension of 1 freshwater and 2 coastal marine sediments and whether resuspension and redeposition resulted in toxicity to model organisms. Sediment flux exposure chambers were used to resuspend metal-contaminated sediments from 1 site in Lake DePue, Illinois (USA), and 2 sites in Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Maine (USA). Short-term (4-h) resuspension of sediment at environmentally relevant suspended particulate matter concentrations (Daphnia magna; survival, growth, and tissue metal concentration of Neanthes arenaceodentata; bioluminescence of Pyrocystis lunula) was observed during 4-h exposure to resuspended sediments and during 4-d to 10-d post-exposure recovery periods in uncontaminated water. Redeposited suspended particles exhibited increased metal bioavailability and toxicity to H. azteca, highlighting the potential for adverse ecological impacts because of changes in metal speciation. It is important to consider interactions between organisms' life histories and sediment disturbance regimes when assessing risks to ecosystems. PMID:26313755

  13. Using marine bioassays to classify the toxicity of Dutch harbor sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stronkhorst, Joost; Schipper, Cor; Brils, Jos; Dubbeldam, Marco; Postma, Jaap; van de Hoeven, Nelly

    2003-07-01

    A procedure was developed to assess contaminated marine sediments from Dutch harbors for possible adverse biological effects using three laboratory bioassays: A 10-d survival test with the amphipod Corophium volutator, a 14-d survival test with the heart urchin Echinocardium cordatum (adults), and the bioluminescence inhibition test with the bacterium Vibrio fischeri (Microtox solid phase test LSP]). Microtox results were mathematically corrected for the modifying influence of fine sediment particles. After a validation procedure on test performance and modifying factors, respectively, 81%, 99%, and 90% of the amphipod, heart urchin, and Microtox results were approved. Lower and upper threshold limits for biological effects were set at respectively 24 and 30% mortality for C. volutator, 27 and 35% mortality for E. cordatum, and 24 and 48 toxic units for the Microtox SP based on significant differences with control sediment and the performance of reference sediments. The bioassays clearly distinguished harbor sediments that give rise to acute effects and those that do not. Threshold limits for the amphipods, heart urchins, and bacteria were exceeded in, respectively, 9 to 17%, 33 to 40%, and 23 to 50% of the sediment samples. Highest effects were observed in sediments from the northerly harbors; there was significantly less response in sediments from the Delta Region and the port of Rotterdam (The Netherlands). The procedure outlined in this paper can be used for routine screening of contaminated dredged material that is proposed for open water disposal. PMID:12836979

  14. Imaging oxygen distribution in marine sediments. The importance of bioturbation and sediment heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pischedda, L; Poggiale, J C; Cuny, P; Gilbert, F

    2008-06-01

    The influence of sediment oxygen heterogeneity, due to bioturbation, on diffusive oxygen flux was investigated. Laboratory experiments were carried out with 3 macrobenthic species presenting different bioturbation behaviour patterns: the polychaetes Nereis diversicolor and Nereis virens, both constructing ventilated galleries in the sediment column, and the gastropod Cyclope neritea, a burrowing species which does not build any structure. Oxygen two-dimensional distribution in sediments was quantified by means of the optical planar optode technique. Diffusive oxygen fluxes (mean and integrated) and a variability index were calculated on the captured oxygen images. All species increased sediment oxygen heterogeneity compared to the controls without animals. This was particularly noticeable with the polychaetes because of the construction of more or less complex burrows. Integrated diffusive oxygen flux increased with oxygen heterogeneity due to the production of interface available for solute exchanges between overlying water and sediments. This work shows that sediment heterogeneity is an important feature of the control of oxygen exchanges at the sediment-water interface. PMID:18247133

  15. Biogeochemical Indicators in High- and Low-Arctic Marine and Terrestrial Avian Community Changes: Comparative Isotopic (13C, 15N, and 34S) Studies in Alaska and Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causey, D.; Bargmann, N. A.; Burnham, K. K.; Burnham, J. L.; Padula, V. M.; Johnson, J. A.; Welker, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the complex dynamics of environmental change in northern latitudes is of paramount importance today, given documented rapid shifts in sea ice, plant phenology, temperatures, deglaciation, and habitat fidelity. This knowledge is particularly critical for Arctic avian communities, which are integral components by which biological teleconnections are maintained between the mid and northern latitudes. Furthermore, Arctic birds are fundamental to Native subsistence lifestyles and a focus for conservation activities. Avian communities of marine and terrestrial Arctic environments represent a broad spectrum of trophic levels, from herbivores (eg., geese Chen spp.), planktivores (eg., auklets Aethia spp.), and insectivores (eg., passerines: Wheatears Oenanthe spp., Longspurs Calcarius spp.), to predators of marine invertebrates (eg., eiders Somateria spp.), nearshore and offshore fish (eg., cormorants Phalacrocorax spp, puffins Fratercula spp.), even other bird species (eg., gulls Larus spp., falcons Peregrinus spp.). This diversity of trophic interconnections is an integral factor in the dynamics of Arctic ecosystem ecology, and they are key indicators for the strength and trajectories of change. We are especially interested in their feeding ecology, using stable isotope-diet relations to examine historical diets and to predict future feeding ecology by this range of species. Since 2009, we have been studying the foodweb ecology using stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N, δ34S) of contemporaneous coastal and marine bird communities in High Arctic (Northwest Greenland) and Low Arctic (western Aleutian Islands, AK). We are quantifying the isotopic values of blood, organ tissues, and feathers, and have carried out comparisons between native and lipid-extracted samples. Although geographically distant, these communities comprise similar taxonomic and ecological congeners, including several species common to both (eg., Common Eider, Black-legged Kittiwake, Northern

  16. Possible impact of decreasing Arctic pack ice on the higher trophic levels: Seabirds and marine mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Joiris, C.R.

    2012-01-01

    Three main aspects of the possible impacts of retreating pack ice and changing ice coverage in the European Arctic on the higher trophic levels are discussed in this chapter: 1. Seabirds are depending on their colonies on land during the breeding season; the main species, e.g. little auk Alle alle, feed in mixed Polar/ Arctic Water in order to bring back food (polar zooplankton) to their chicks on the nest. In case ice coverage is very low, distance between colony and feeding grounds might be...

  17. Uranium and plutonium in marine sediments; Uranio y plutonio en sedimentos marinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez R, E.; Almazan T, M. G. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ruiz F, A. C., E-mail: eduardo.ordonez@inin.gob.mx [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnologia, Unidad Academica Mazatlan, Sinaloa (MX)

    2011-11-15

    The marine sediments contain uranium concentrations that are considered normal, since the seawater contains dissolved natural uranium that is deposited in the bed sea in form of sediments by physical-chemistry and bio-genetics processes. Since the natural uranium is constituted of several isotopes, the analysis of the isotopic relationship {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U are an indicator of the oceanic activity that goes accumulating slowly leaving a historical registration of the marine events through the profile of the marine soil. But the uranium is not the only radioelement present in the marine sediments. In the most superficial strata the presence of the {sup 239+140}Pu has been detected that it is an alpha emitter and that recently it has been detected with more frequency in some coasts of the world. The Mexican coast has not been the exception to this phenomenon and in this work the presence of {sup 239-140}Pu is shown in the more superficial layers of an exploring coming from the Gulf of Tehuantepec. (Author)

  18. Biogeomorphological implications of microscale interactions between sediment geotechnics and marine benthos: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, John M. H.; Meadows, Azra; Meadows, Peter S.

    2002-09-01

    At the foundations of biogeomorphological processes in the sea lie interactions between the activities of marine benthic animals and the geotechnical properties of their sedimentary environments. The potential significance of these interactions, which take place at a microscale level of millimetres to metres, for the large-scale geomorphology of the seabed has rarely been appreciated. In the context of this review, large-scale is defined as greater than 50 m to hundreds of kilometres. The present review addresses this link, drawing examples from a wide range of marine environments, including estuaries, the intertidal zone, continental shelves and slopes, and the deep sea. It firstly considers sediment stabilisation, slope failure, sediment mixing, biodeposition, sediment compaction, and hydrodynamic effects. This is followed by a consideration of two extremes of the ecological pyramid—the effects of marine meiofauna and marine vertebrates. The final section draws attention to the central role of faunal mucus and extracellular polymeric material (ECPM) in many of the microscale interactions that we describe. The implications of these microscale biological processes and features are discussed in terms of their influence on and control of the large-scale geomorphology of the seabed.

  19. Relatively high antibiotic resistance among heterotrophic bacteria from arctic fjord sediments than water - Evidence towards better selection pressure in the fjord sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatha, A. A. Mohamed; Neethu, C. S.; Nikhil, S. M.; Rahiman, K. M. Mujeeb; Krishnan, K. P.; Saramma, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of antibiotic resistance among aerobic heterotrophic bacteria and coliform bacteria from water and sediment of Kongsfjord. The study was based on the assumption that arctic fjord environments are relatively pristine and offer very little selection pressure for drug resistant mutants. In order to test the hypothesis, 200 isolates belonging to aerobic heterotrophic bacteria and 114 isolates belonging to coliforms were tested against 15 antibiotics belonging to 5 different classes such as beta lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones, sulpha drugs and tetracyclines. Resistance to beta lactam and extended spectrum beta lactam (ESBL) antibiotics was considerably high and they found to vary significantly (p antibiotic resistance against ESBL's extent and diversity of antibiotic resistance (as revealed by multiple antibiotic resistance index and resistance patterns), was high in the aerobic heterotrophic bacteria. Most striking observation was that isolates from fjord sediments (both heterotrophic bacteria and coliforms) in general showed relatively high prevalence of antibiotic resistance against most of the antibiotics tested, indicating to better selection pressure for drug resistance mutants in the fjord sediments.

  20. Millimeter-scale alkalinity measurement in marine sediment using DET probes and colorimetric determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, E; Viollier, E; Simonucci, C; Prévot, F; Langlet, D; Jézéquel, D

    2013-10-01

    Constrained DET (Diffusive Equilibration in Thin films) probes equipped with 75 sampling layers of agarose gel (DGT Research(©)) were used to sample bottom and pore waters in marine sediment with a 2 mm vertical resolution. After retrieval, each piece of hydrogel, corresponding to 25 μL, was introduced into 1 mL of colorimetric reagent (CR) solution consisting of formic acid and bromophenol blue. After the elution/reaction time, absorbance of the latter mixture was read at 590 nm and compared to a calibration curve obtained with the same protocol applied to mini DET probes soaked in sodium hydrogen carbonate standard solutions. This method allows rapid alkalinity determinations for the small volumes of anoxic pore water entrapped into the gel. The method was assessed on organic-rich coastal marine sediments from Thau lagoon (France). Alkalinity values in the overlying waters were in agreement with data obtained by classical sampling techniques. Pore water data showed a progressive increase of alkalinity in the sediment from 2 to 10 mmol kg(-1), corresponding to anaerobic respiration in organic-rich sediments. Moreover, replicates of high-resolution DET profiles showed important lateral heterogeneity at a decimeter scale. This underlines the importance of high-resolution spatial methods for alkalinity profiling in coastal marine systems. PMID:23870435

  1. Environmental and biogeochemical process of accumulation of iron-phosphorus in marine sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WENG Huanxin; ZHANG Xingmao; WU Nengyou; CHEN Lihong; CHEN Jingfeng; WANG Ying; QIN Yachao; TIAN Rongxiang

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the environmental and biogeochemical process of accumulation of iron-phosphorus in marine sediments for the north aktian of the South China Sea and analyzes the relationships between the contents of iron, phosphorus and calcium carbonate as well as their existent characteristics. The results show that the variances of phosphorus and calcium carbonate contents with depths are opposite and those of iron and calcium carbonate contents are almost accordant. It is not only related to the biogeochemical process of accumulation of biogenous calcium carbonate in sediments, which resulted from the fact that the marine primary productivity was stimulated by part of terrigenous phosphorus dissolved into seawater due to decline of superficial water temperature and increase of carbon dioxide content in the glacial period, but also related to iron impelled oxidation and accelerated deposit by the dissolved oxygen from the atmosphere and the photosynthesis of hydrophytes in seawater. The variance of soluble iron-phos- phorus species (Fe-P) in sediment columns can sensitively reflect the changes of climate and environment, which suggests that the accumulative characteristics and existent states of iron-phosphorus species (Fe-P) in marine sediments have the significance as an indicator of the changes of paleoclimate and paleoenvironment.

  2. Origin, dynamics, and implications of extracellular DNA pools in marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torti, Andrea; Lever, Mark Alexander; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-12-01

    In marine sediments, DNA occurs both inside and outside living organisms. DNA not enclosed in living cells may account for the largest fraction of total DNA, and include molecules locked within dead cells, organic and inorganic aggregates, adsorbed onto mineral matrices, and viral DNA. This DNA comprises genetic material released in situ from sediment microbial communities, as well as DNA of pelagic and terrestrial origin deposited to the seafloor. DNA not enclosed in living cells undermines the assumption of a direct link between the overall DNA pool and the local, currently living microbial assemblages, in terms of both microbial cell abundance and diversity. At the same time, the extracellular DNA may provide an integrated view of the biodiversity and ecological processes occurring on land, in marine water columns, and sediments themselves, thereby acting as an archive of genetic information which can be used to reconstruct past changes in source environments. In this review, we identify and discuss DNA pools in marine sediments, with special focus on DNA not enclosed in living cells, its origin, dynamics, and ecological and methodological implications. Achievements in deciphering the genetic information held within each DNA pool are presented along with still-standing challenges and major gaps in current knowledge. PMID:26452301

  3. Geochemical analysis of marine sediments using fused glass disc by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Ning; ZHANG Qin; YAO De; LI Guohui

    2008-01-01

    A method was developed for content determination of Na, Mg, Al, Si, P,S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Nb, Zr, Y, Sr, Rb, Ba, La and Ce etc. covering 26 major, minor, and trace elements in marine sediment samples using fused glass disc by X-ray Fluorescence spectrometry. Calibration was made using marine sediment certified reference materials and the synthetic standard samples prepared by mixing several marine sediments with stream sediment and carbonate standard samples in different proportions. The matrix effect was corrected using theoretical alpha coefficients, experience coefficients and the scattered radiation as the internal standard (for the trace elements). The accuracy of the method was evaluated by analysis of certified reference materials GBW07314, GBW07334 and GSMS6. The results are in good agreement with the certified values of the standards with RSD less than 2.60%, except for Y, Cr, Ga, Ce, La, Nb, Rb, and V with RSD less than 9.0% (n=12).

  4. Reactivity and fate of secondary alkane sulfonates (SAS) in marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research is focused on secondary alkane sulfonates (SAS), anionic surfactants widely used in household applications that access aquatic environments mainly via sewage discharges. We studied their sorption capacity and anaerobic degradation in marine sediments, providing the first data available on this topic. SAS partition coefficients increased towards those homologues having longer alkyl chains (from up to 141 L kg−1 for C14 to up to 1753 L kg−1 for C17), which were those less susceptible to undergo biodegradation. Overall, SAS removal percentages reached up to 98% after 166 days of incubation using anoxic sediments. The degradation pathway consisted on the formation of sulfocarboxylic acids after an initial fumarate attack of the alkyl chain and successive β-oxidations. This is the first study showing that SAS can be degraded in absence of oxygen, so this new information should be taken into account for future environmental risk assessments on these chemicals. - Highlights: • Anionic surfactant SAS can be anaerobically degraded in marine sediments. • Degradation is strongly influenced by the sorption capacity of SAS homologues. • Oxidation of SAS alkyl chain takes place by means of fumarate addition. • Carboxylic acids are formed during the anaerobic degradation of SAS. - Anaerobic degradation of SAS in marine sediments and the metabolites involved in this process are reported for the first time

  5. Physical chemical analysis of marine sediment cementation from the Gulf of Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianfeng; Hammad, Tammam; Saiyouri, Nadia; Hattab, Mahdia

    2012-09-01

    This study aims at investigating the cementation of marine sediments from the Gulf of Guinea by using physicochemical analysis. In order to highlight the presence of cementation in the sediments, three conventional consolidation tests were conducted on intact and remoulded samples. Mercury intrusion porosimetry analyses were then carried out on the specimens taken from samples after consolidation tests. Several physicochemical experimental techniques were used to analyze these cementations, such as cation exchange capacity analysis, batch test, scanning electron microscope imaging coupled with EDS chemical analysis, and thermal analysis. The results seem to indicate that the cementation of these sediments is predominated by the presence of smectite gel between clay aggregates (clusters). Finally, a conceptual sediment microstructural model is proposed to describe the cementation.

  6. Radiological assessment of coastal marine sediment and water samples, Karachi coast, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations of selective natural radionuclides (/sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, /sup 40/K) in shallow marine coastal sediments and sea water off Karachi coast, Pakistan, were measured with a hyper pure germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometer. Sediment and water samples were collected from polluted Layari and Malire River downstream (pre-out fall), Gizri Creek, Layari River out fall in Karachi harbor, Karachi Harbor/ Manora Channel Mains, as well as from open sea (South-East Coast and North-West Coast) within the 10m depth contour. No artificial radionuclides (e.g. /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs and /sup 134/Cs were detected in both water and sediment samples at any of these locations. The activity of /sup 226/Ra in coastal river sediments is found below its limit of detection (<18.35 Bqkg/sup -1/). Activity of /sup 228/Ra in sediments off Karachi Coast ranges between 11.80 +- 3.60 to 37.27+- 4.31 Bqkg/sup -1/. The highest activity was found south of Nuclear Power Station (KANUPP) and the lowest activity was found in the vicinity of Oyster Rocks (open sea). The /sup 226/Ra activity ranges from 19.40+- 5.88 to 67.14 +- 10.02 Bqkg/sup -1/. The activity of /sup 228/Ra in sediments of Manora Channel, South-east Coast of Karachi and the North west coast of Karachi are also in agreement with the IAEA marine sediment standard namely: IAEA-135 (/sup 228/Ra = 36.7 +- 3 Bqkg/sup -1/). The activity of /sup 226/Ra for the South East Coast of Karachi and the North west coast of Karachi are also in agreement with the IAEA marine sediment standard namely: IAEA 135(/sup 226/Ra=23.9 +- 1.1 Bqkg/sup -1/) and Pacific Ocean sediment standard namely: IAEA-368 (/sup 226/Ra=21.4+- 1.1 Bqkg/sup -1/). The /sup 40/K activity in sea sediments varies from 197.7+- 44.24 to 941.90 +- 39.00 Bqkg-1). The highest activity is observed in the vicinity of Oyster Rocks (open sea) along the Clifton coast (South-East Cost of Karachi) and the lowest activity is found south of Nuclear Power Station (KANUPP) along the

  7. Cultivation of Autotrophic Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea from Marine Sediments in Coculture with Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Byoung-Joon; Park, Soo-Je; Yoon, Dae-No; Schouten, Stefan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2010-01-01

    The role of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in nitrogen cycling in marine sediments remains poorly characterized. In this study, we enriched and characterized AOA from marine sediments. Group I.1a crenarchaea closely related to those identified in marine sediments and “Candidatus Nitrosopumilus maritimus” (99.1 and 94.9% 16S rRNA and amoA gene sequence identities to the latter, respectively) were substantially enriched by coculture with sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB). The selective enrichmen...

  8. Intercomparison of radionuclide measurements in marine sediment sample IAEA-367

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of an intercomparison exercise on a Pacific Ocean sediment sample, IAEA-367, designed for the determination of artificial and natural radionuclides levels, are reported. The data from 81 laboratories representing 37 countries have been evaluated. The following are the recommended values, with confidence intervals, for 60Co, 90Sr, 137Cs, 239+240Pu (Reference date: 1 January 1990). Information values for 155Eu, 238Pu, 241Am, and 241Pu are reported. Information values for the following natural radionuclides 40K, 226Ra, 228Th, 230Th, 234U, 235U and 238U are also reported. (author)

  9. Intercomparison of radionuclide measurements in marine sediment sample IAEA-368

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of an intercomparison exercise on a Pacific Ocean sediment sample, IAEA-368, designed for the determination of artificial and natural radionuclides levels, are reported. The data from 89 laboratories representing 37 countries have been evaluated. The following are the recommended values, with confidence intervals, for 60Co, 155Eu, 2107Pb, 226Ra, 238U, 238Pu and239+240Pu (Reference date: 1 January 1990). Information values for 40K, 90Sr, 137Cs, 228Th, 230Th, 232Th, 234U, 235U and 241Am are also reported. (author)

  10. OCEANOGRAPHY & MARINE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20110729 Bai Youcheng(Laboratory of Marine Ecosystem and Biogeochemistry,SOA,Second Institute of Oceanography,Hangzhou 310012,China);Chen Jianfang Biomarker Records in Sediment Core of R12a from the Chukchi Sea during the Last 500 Years(Acta Sedimentologica Sinica,ISSN1000-0550,CN62-1038/P,28(4),2010,p.768-775,6 illus.,40 refs.)Key words:biomarkers,marine sediments,paleoproductivity,Arctic region This paper used multi-biomarkers to study the R12a core’s top 40 cm samples’ phytoplankton and community sampled during the Second Chinese Arctic expedition from the Chukchi Sea in summer,2003,and to obtain the information of the phytoplankton production and community change since 500 a.The results indicate the total and individual primary productivity increased over the last 500 a.The phytoplankton community structure mostly shows the contributions of

  11. Airgun inter-pulse noise field during a seismic survey in an Arctic ultra shallow marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Shane; Vignola, Joseph; Judge, John; Turo, Diego

    2015-12-01

    Offshore oil and gas exploration using seismic airguns generates intense underwater pulses that could cause marine mammal hearing impairment and/or behavioral disturbances. However, few studies have investigated the resulting multipath propagation and reverberation from airgun pulses. This research uses continuous acoustic recordings collected in the Arctic during a low-level open-water shallow marine seismic survey, to measure noise levels between airgun pulses. Two methods were used to quantify noise levels during these inter-pulse intervals. The first, based on calculating the root-mean-square sound pressure level in various sub-intervals, is referred to as the increment computation method, and the second, which employs the Hilbert transform to calculate instantaneous acoustic amplitudes, is referred to as the Hilbert transform method. Analyses using both methods yield similar results, showing that the inter-pulse sound field exceeds ambient noise levels by as much as 9 dB during relatively quiet conditions. Inter-pulse noise levels are also related to the source distance, probably due to the higher reverberant conditions of the very shallow water environment. These methods can be used to quantify acoustic environment impacts from anthropogenic transient noises (e.g., seismic pulses, impact pile driving, and sonar pings) and to address potential acoustic masking affecting marine mammals. PMID:26723302

  12. Worldwide Interlaboratory Comparison on the Determination of Trace Elements in the IAEA-457 Marine Sediment Sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary goal of the IAEA Environment Laboratories is to assist Member States in the use of both stable and radioisotope analytical techniques to understand, monitor and protect the environment. In this context, the major impact of large coastal cities on marine ecosystems is an issue of primary concern for the IAEA and the IAEA Environment Laboratories. The marine pollution assessments required to understand such impacts depend on accurate knowledge of contaminant concentrations in various environmental compartments. Through the IAEA Environment Laboratories, the IAEA has been assisting national laboratories and regional laboratory networks since the early 1970s through the provision of a reference material programme for the analysis of radionuclides, trace elements and organic compounds in marine samples. Quality assurance and quality control are two fundamental requirements to ensure the reliability of analytical results. Data that are not based on adequate quality assurance and quality control can be erroneous, and their misuse can lead to poor environmental management decisions. In this regard, the IAEA has a long history of organizing interlaboratory studies, which have evolved to include an increasing array of potential contaminants in the marine environment. Relevant activities comprise global interlaboratory comparison, regional proficiency tests, the production of marine reference materials and the development of reference methods for trace elements and organic pollutants analysis in marine samples. This publication summarizes the results of the IAEA-457 interlaboratory comparison on the determination of trace elements in a marine sediment sample

  13. Two new Beggiatoa species inhabiting marine mangrove sediments in the Caribbean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maïtena R N Jean

    Full Text Available Beggiatoaceae, giant sulphur-oxidizing bacteria, are well known to occur in cold and temperate waters, as well as hydrothermal vents, where they form dense mats on the floor. However, they have never been described in tropical marine mangroves. Here, we describe two new species of benthic Beggiatoaceae colonizing a marine mangrove adjacent to mangrove roots. We combined phylogenetic and lipid analysis with electron microscopy in order to describe these organisms. Furthermore, oxygen and sulphide measurements in and ex situ were performed in a mesocosm to characterize their environment. Based on this, two new species, Candidatus Maribeggiatoa sp. and Candidatus Isobeggiatoa sp. inhabiting tropical marine mangroves in Guadeloupe were identified. The species identified as Candidatus Maribeggiatoa group suggests that this genus could harbour a third cluster with organisms ranging from 60 to 120 μm in diameter. This is also the first description of an Isobeggiatoa species outside of Arctic and temperate waters. The multiphasic approach also gives information about the environment and indications for the metabolism of these bacteria. Our study shows the widespread occurrence of members of Beggiatoaceae family and provides new insight in their potential role in shallow-water marine sulphide-rich environments such as mangroves.

  14. Arctic soil development on a series of marine terraces on central Spitsbergen, Svalbard: a combined geochronology, fieldwork and modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meij, W. Marijn; Temme, Arnaud J. A. M.; de Kleijn, Christian M. F. J. J.; Reimann, Tony; Heuvelink, Gerard B. M.; Zwoliński, Zbigniew; Rachlewicz, Grzegorz; Rymer, Krzysztof; Sommer, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Soils in Arctic regions currently enjoy attention because of their sensitivity to climate change. It is therefore important to understand the natural processes and rates of development of these soils. Specifically, there is a need to quantify the rates and interactions between various landscape- and soil-forming processes. Soil chronosequences are ideal natural experiments for this purpose. In this contribution, we combine field observations, luminescence dating and soil-landscape modelling to improve and test our understanding of Arctic soil formation. The field site is a Holocene chronosequence of gravelly raised marine terraces in central Spitsbergen. Field observations show that soil-landscape development is mainly driven by weathering, silt translocation, aeolian deposition and rill erosion. Spatial soil variation is mainly caused by soil age, morphological position within a terrace and depth under the surface. Luminescence dating confirmed existing radiocarbon dating of the terraces, which are between ˜ 1.5 and ˜ 13.3 ka old. The soil-landscape evolution model LORICA was used to test our hypothesis that the field-observed processes indeed dominate soil-landscape development. Model results additionally indicated the importance of aeolian deposition as a source of fine material in the subsoil for both sheltered and vegetated trough positions and barren ridge positions. Simulated overland erosion was negligible. Consequently, an un-simulated process must be responsible for creating the observed erosion rills. Dissolution and physical weathering both play a major role. However, using present-day soil observations, the relative contribution of physical and chemical weathering could not be disentangled. Discrepancies between field and model results indicate that soil formation is non-linear and driven by spatially and temporally varying boundary conditions which were not included in the model. To conclude, Arctic soil and landscape development appears to be more

  15. Responses in Arctic marine carbon cycle processes: conceptual scenarios and implications for ecosystem function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen S. Findlay

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic Ocean is one of the fastest changing oceans, plays an important role in global carbon cycling and yet is a particularly challenging ocean to study. Hence, observations tend to be relatively sparse in both space and time. How the Arctic functions, geophysically, but also ecologically, can have significant consequences for the internal cycling of carbon, and subsequently influence carbon export, atmospheric CO2 uptake and food chain productivity. Here we assess the major carbon pools and associated processes, specifically summarizing the current knowledge of each of these processes in terms of data availability and ranges of rates and values for four geophysical Arctic Ocean domains originally described by Carmack & Wassmann (2006: inflow shelves, which are Pacific-influenced and Atlantic-influenced; interior, river-influenced shelves; and central basins. We attempt to bring together knowledge of the carbon cycle with the ecosystem within each of these different geophysical settings, in order to provide specialist information in a holistic context. We assess the current state of models and how they can be improved and/or used to provide assessments of the current and future functioning when observational data are limited or sparse. In doing so, we highlight potential links in the physical oceanographic regime, primary production and the flow of carbon within the ecosystem that will change in the future. Finally, we are able to highlight priority areas for research, taking a holistic pan-Arctic approach.

  16. Magnetotactic bacteria in marine sediments: clues from recent cores from Brazilian Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovane, L.; Pellizari, V. H.; Brandini, F. P.; Braga, E. D. S.; Freitas, G. R.; Benites, M.; Rodelli, D.; Giorgioni, M.; Iacoviello, F.; Ruffato, D. G.; Lins, U.

    2014-12-01

    The magnetic properties (first order reversal curves, ferromagnetic resonance and decomposition of saturation remanent magnetization acquisition) of marine magnetotactic bacteria, in conjunction with geophysical, geochemical and oceanographic data from the Brazilian Coast, provide interesting insights regarding the primary productivity distribution in oceans. This finding suggests that magnetite produced by some magnetotactic bacteria retains magnetic properties in relation to the crystallographic structure of the magnetic phase produced and thus might represent a "magnetic fingerprint" for the presence of magnetotactic bacteria. The use of those magnetic properties is a non-destructive, new technology that might allow for the identification and presence of specific species or types of magnetotactic bacteria in certain environments such as sediment. We will also show some preliminary results on the biogeochemical factors that control magnetotactic bacterial populations, documenting the environment and the preservation of bacterial magnetite, which dominates the palaeomagnetic signal throughout recent sediments from Brazilian Coast. We searched for magnetotactic bacteria in order to understand the ecosystems and environmental change related to their presence in sediments. We studied magnetotactic bacterial concentration and geophysical, geochemical and oceanographic results in marine settings measuring crucially nutrients availability in the water column and in sediments, on particulate delivery to the seafloor, to understand the environmental condition that allow the presence of magnetotactic bacteria and magnetosomes in sediments.

  17. Exposure of the marine deposit feeder Hydrobia ulvae to sediment associated LAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauffret, A., E-mail: aourell.mauffret@icman.csic.e [Marine Sciences Institute of Andalusia (CSIC), Puerto Real (Cadiz) (Spain); Rico-Rico, A. [Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University (Netherlands); Temara, A. [The Procter and Gamble Company, Brussels (Belgium); Blasco, J. [Marine Sciences Institute of Andalusia (CSIC), Puerto Real (Cadiz) (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonates (LAS) effects (mortality, egestion rate, behaviour) on the marine deposit feeder Hydrobia ulvae were assessed in whole-sediment and water-only systems. The results were combined with a bioenergetic-based kinetic model of exposure pathways to account for the observed toxicity. The 10-d LC50 value based on the freely dissolved fraction was 9.3 times lower in spiked sediment (0.152 +- 0.001 (95% CI) mg/L) than in water-only (1.390 +- 0.020 (95% CI) mg/L). Consequently, the actual 10-d LC50 value (208 mg/kg) was overestimated by the Equilibrium Partitioning calculation (1629 mg/kg). This suggests that the sediment associated LAS fraction was bioavailable to the snails. It could also be due to modifications in physiological parameters in absence of sediment, the organism natural substrate. - Lethality of the marine gastropod deposit feeder Hydrobia ulvae exposed to LAS in water-only system was inappropriate to predict LAS toxicity in sediment system.

  18. Historical trends in persistent organic pollutants and metals recorded in sediment from Lake Ellasjoen, Bjornoya, Norwegian Arctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellasjoen receives contaminants from both atmospheric and biological transport (seabird guano). Historical trends of selected persistent organic pollutants and metals were determined by interpretation of down-core contaminant profiles in conjunction with sediment layer ages, determined by the 210Pb method. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane and metabolites (DDTs) increased from about 1930 until 1970 (max. sum PCBs 71.8 ng/g dry weight (dw), max sum DDTs 4.0 ng/g dw), declining afterwards to 46.4 ng/g dw and 1.6 ng/g dw, respectively. Polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) concentrations are increasing in Ellasjoen, reaching 0.73 ng/g dw in 2001. Hexabromocyclododekane (HBCD) was measured only in sediment from 1-2 cm depth (0.43 and 3.88 ng/g dw of α- and γ-HBCD, respectively). Most metals (As, Cd, Co, Ni and Zn) showed a similar pattern as PCBs. No clear trends were observed for Cr, Pb or V. Mercury (Hg) has increased gradually since the beginning of the industrial era. - Levels of Polybrominated diphenyl ethers are increasing in sediment from a Norwegian, Arctic lake

  19. Evaluation of radionuclide levels and radiological dose in three populations of marine mammals in the eastern Canadian Arctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide levels were measured in beluga, walrus and ringed seal populations collected in 1992 to assess radiation dose and changes in dose with age and sex. The authors hypothesized that Arctic marine food chains accumulate high levels of naturally-occurring radionuclides such as polonium-210 and that radiation may pose a stress to animals which also accumulate metals such as cadmium. Liver, kidney, muscle and jawbone were analyzed by gamma spectrometry for cesium-137, cesium-134, lead-210, potassium-40 and radium-226 and fission-derived nuclides. Polonium-210 was analyzed by alpha spec after autodeposition onto a silver disk. Cesium-137 concentrations in muscle in all three populations were low, and ranged from below detection limits to 10 Bq/kg ww. There was no evidence of fission-derived radionuclides such as zinc-65 or cobalt-60. Lead-210 levels ranged from below detection limits in muscle of ringed seal and walrus to a mean of 82.3 Bq/kg ww in walrus bone. Polonium-210 in the three population ranged from 10 to 30 Bq/kg ww in bone and kidney. The major contributor to dose in the animals was polonium-210 because it is an alpha emitter and accumulates to moderate levels in liver and kidney. Radiological dose is approximately 20--30 times higher than background in humans, and is considerably lower than the dose observed in terrestrial food chains in the Arctic

  20. Sediment Ksub(d)s and concentration factors for radionuclides in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both the biological and geochemical processes, which are dependent on the chemical form of the element in question, and the radioactive decay of the nuclide are important parameters in the models used for the calculation of dumping limits for radioactive wastes disposed of in the deep sea. The geochemical processes were not adequately represented in earlier models and only rough approximations of parameters were used in the calculations. This report provides an approach for the calculation of deep-sea sediment distribution coefficients and coastal sediment concentration factors for radionuclides in marine biological materials based, whenever possible, on field data

  1. Validation of an analytical methodology for the quantitative analysis of petroleum hydrocarbons in marine sediment samples

    OpenAIRE

    Eloy Yordad Companioni Damas; Miriam Odette Cora Medina; Ana Catalina Núñez Clemente; Miguel Ángel Díaz Díaz; Luis González Bravo; Rolando Marbot Ramada; Rodny Montes de Oca Porto

    2009-01-01

    This work describes a validation of an analytical procedure for the analysis of petroleum hydrocarbons in marine sediment samples. The proposed protocol is able to measure n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in samples at concentrations as low as 30 ng/g, with a precision better than 15% for most of analytes. The extraction efficiency of fortified sediments varied from 65.1 to 105.6% and 59.7 to 97.8%, for n-alkanes and PAH in the ranges: C16 - C32 and fluoranthene - benzo(a)...

  2. Biogeochemical Interactions In The Application Of Biotechnological Strategies To Marine Sediments Contaminated With Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonti Viviana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sediment contamination in coastal areas with high anthropogenic pressure is a widespread environmental problem. Metal contaminants are of particular concern, since they are persistent and cannot be degraded. Microorganisms can influence metal mobility in the sediment by several direct and indirect processes. However, the actual fate of metals in the environment is not easily predictable and several biogeochemical constraints affect their behaviour. In addition, the geochemical characteristics of the sediment play an important role and the general assumptions for soils or freshwater sediments cannot be extended to marine sediments. In this paper we analysed the correlation between metal mobility and main geochemical properties of the sediment. Although the prediction of metal fate in sediment environment, both for ex-situ bioleaching treatments and in-situ biostimulation strategies, appears to require metal-specific and site-specific tools, we found that TOM and pH are likely the main variables in describing and predicting Zn behaviour. Arsenic solubilisation/increase in mobility appears to correlate positively with carbonate content. Cd, Pb and Ni appear to require multivariate and/or non-linear approaches.

  3. Bioavailability of tetra- and hexa-chlorobiphenyls to benthic organisms from marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benthic animals (Nephtys incisa and Voldia limatula) were exposed to marine sediments which had been spiked with C-14 labelled tetra- (TPCB) or hexa-(HPCB) chlorobiphenyl and equilibrated for periods up to one month. The sediments and organisms were collected at various time intervals and analyzed for their PCB content by liquid scintillation counting following extraction with acetonitrile. The organic carbon content of the sediments and the lipid content of the animals was also determined. Changes in the body burdens of TPCB and HPCB were rapid during the first ten to twenty days of accumulation and tended to level off after thirty days. Accumulation rates were more rapid for the TPCB than for HPCB. Both the rate of accumulation and the apparent steady-state concentrations of PCBs were influenced by the organic carbon content of the sediments. Lipid normalized concentrations of both PCBs appeared to reach steady-state more rapidly than the whole-body concentrations. Preference factors (PF animal/sediment ratios) calculated for these sediments suggest that PF may not be independent of sediment organic carbon content

  4. Sediment-worm interactions: transfer of 65Zn, 109Cd and sup(110m)Ag from marine sediment by Nereis diversicolor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotracer experiments to understand the role of benthic worms in transferring 65Zn, 109Cd and sup(110m)Ag from marine sediments to marine food webs are described. Sediments were made radioactive by adding 30 to 50μCi of the appropriate high specific activity isotope to 500 ml of sea water and mixing with 100 cm3 of sediment. The 65Zn and 109Cd were added as chlorides and the sup(110m)Ag was added as nitrate. Relative accumulation from radioactive sediments and the loss rates of the metals from N. diversicolor were determined at different time intervals. Radioactive worms were transferred to fresh sediments and were periodically radioanalysed. It was observed that simple ingestion of subsurface radioactive sediments is a less effective route of Zn transfer to the worm than by deposit feeding at the sediment-water interface. Cadmium appears to be much less tightly bound to marine sediment than zinc. Worms which accumulated sup(110m)Ag from sediment during a 20 day exposure lost it at a faster rate than 65Zn accumulated during a 5 day exposure

  5. Corrosion of carbon steel nuclear waste containers in marine sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes a study of the corrosion of carbon steel nuclear waste containers in deep ocean sediments, which had the objective of estimating the metal allowance needed to ensure that the containers were not breached by corrosion for 1000 years. It was concluded that under such disposal conditions carbon steel would not be subject to localised corrosion or hydrogen embrittlement, and therefore the study concentrated on evaluating the rate of general attack. This was carried out by developing a mechanistically based mathematical model which was formulated on the conservative assumption that the corrosion would be under activation control, and would not be impeded by the formation of corrosion product layers. This model predicted that an allowance of 33 mm would be required for a 1000 year life. (author)

  6. Diagenetic isotope effects in an anoxic marine sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon isotope effects associated with the remineralization of organic matter in the anoxic sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, NC, have been investigated. Total organic carbon δ13C profiles and an isotopic mass balance of the diagenetic products, σCO2 and methane, indicate that the initial step in the breakdown of the organic matter, i.e. the transformation of biopolymeric material to biomonomers, does not express a significant isotope effect. Intramolecular δ13C measurements of the diagenetic intermediate, acetate indicates that large isotope effects (5-10 per-thousand) occur during the biosynthesis of that compound. Downcore δ13C variations in the acetate appear to be related to fractionations associated with methanogenesis. The fractionation factor for the conversion of the acetate methyl group to methane has been estimated to be 1.02 from the porewater profiles

  7. Intercomparison of radionuclide measurements on marine sediment sample IAEA-300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of an intercomparison exercise on a sediment from Baltic Sea, IAEA-300, designed for the determination of artificial and natural radionuclides' levels, are reported. The data from 159 laboratories representing 51 countries have been evaluated. The following are the recommended values, with confidence intervals, 40K, 60Co, 125Sb, 134Cs, 137Cs, 155Eu, 210Pb, 210Po, 228Ra, 234U, 238U, 239+240Pu and 241Am. Information values for 54Mn, 90Sr, 226Ra, 228Th, 230Th, 232Th, 235U and 238Pu are also reported. All values are given on the reference date of 1 January 1993 and expressed in Bq kg-1 dry weight. (author)

  8. Hyoscyamine-producing marine Actinomycetes from Lagos Lagoon sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Davies; Olabisi; Flora; Adeleye; Isaac; Adeyemi; Wang; Peng; George

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To isolate and screen Actinoniycetes from Lagos Lagoon soil sediments for production of bioactive metabolites.Methods:Sediment samples were collected from four different locations of Lagos Lagoon and were dried for 2 weeks after which the Actinoniycetes were isolated by serial dilution using the spread plate method on starch casein and Kuster’s agar supplemented with 80 ug/mL cycloheximide to prevent fungal growth.The plates were incubated at 28 C for 1-2 weeks.Isolates were selected based on their colonial characteristics as well as their Gram’s reaction and subciiltured using the same media for isolation until pure cultures were obtained and incubated at 28 C for 3 d.Thereafter,they were inoculated into starch casein and Kuster’s broth media and incubated for 8 d.The secondary metabolites were screened for antimicrobial activity against the following microorganisms:methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213.Escherichia coli ATCC 29522.Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853.Candida albicans and Enterocolitis faecal is ATCC 29212.Coagulasenegative staphylococci isolated from HIV patients were also used(Staphylococcus warneri.Staphylococcus xylosus and Staphylococcus epidennidis).The antimicrobial metabolites of the Actinoniycetes isolates were identified using gas chromatography(GC).Results:Crude extracts of isolates showed antimicrobial activity against some of the test organisms.The GC data analysis showed the antibiotic profile of these isolates.Conclusions:Analysis of the crude extracts of the isolates using GC method,revealed the presence of antibiotics including an anticholinergic hyoscyamine among other conclusions.

  9. Examination of the bioaccumulation of halogenated dimethyl bipyrroles in an Arctic marine food web using stable nitrogen isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittlemier, Sheryl A; Fisk, Aaron T; Hobson, Keith A; Norstrom, Ross J

    2002-01-01

    Concentrations of four possibly naturally produced organohalogens--1,1'-dimethyl-3,3',4-tribromo-4,5,5'-trichloro-2,2'-bipyrrole (DBP-Br3Cl3), 1,1'-dimethyl-3,3',4,4'-tetrabromo-5,5'-dichloro-2,2'-bipyrrole (DBP-Br4Cl2), 1,1'-dimethyl-3,3',4,4',5-pentabromo-5'-chloro-2,2'-bipyrrole (DBP-Br5Cl) and 1,1'-dimethyl-3,3',4,4',5,5'-hexabromo-2,2'-bipyrrole (DBP-Br6)--were quantitated and the extent of their magnification through an entire Arctic marine food web [measured as integrated trophic magnification factors (TMFs)] were calculated. The food web consisted of three zooplankton species (Calanus hyperboreus, Mysis oculata, and Sagitta sp.), one fish species [Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida)], four seabird species [dovekie (Alle alle), black guillemot (Cepphus grylle), black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla), and glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus)], and one marine mammal species [ringed seal (Phoca hispida)]. Trophic levels in the food web were calculated from ratios of stable isotopes of nitrogen (15N/14N). All halogenated dimethyl bipyrrole (HDBP) congeners were found to significantly (Ptrophic level in the invertebrate--fish--seabird food web. DBP-Br4Cl2 (TMF= 14.6) was found to biomagnify to a greater extent than DBP-Br3Cl3 (TMF = 5.2), DBP-Br5Cl (TMF = 6.9), or DBP-Br6 (TMF = 7.0), even though the Kow of DBP-Br4CI2 was predicted to be lower than those of DBP-Br5Cl and DBP-Br6. None of the four HDBP congeners in ringed seals followed the general trend of increasing concentration with trophic level, which was possibly due to an ability of the seals to metabolize HDBPs. PMID:11808557

  10. Denitrification and Nitrate Reduction to Ammonium in Taihu Lake and Yellow sea Inter—Tidal Marine Sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YINSHIXUE; SHENQIRONG; 等

    1999-01-01

    Denitrification and nitrate reduction to ammonium in Taihu Lake and Yellow Sea inter-tidal marine sediments were studied.The sediment samples were made slurry containing 150g dry matter per liter.Various of glucose-C to nitrate-N.Acetylene inhibition technique was applied to measure denitrification in the slurres,All samples were incubated anaerobically under argon atmosphere,Data showed that Taihu Lake sediment produced more N2O than marine sediment,Denitrification potential was higher in Taihu Lake sediment than in marine one,Glucose added increase denitrification activity but not the denitrification potential of the sediments.Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium seemed to occur in marine sediment,but not in freshwater one.When the marine sediment was treated with 25mmol L-1 glucose,its denitrification potentail,as indicated by maximum N2O production by acetylene blockage,was lower than that treated with no or 2.5mmol L-1 glucose.Acetylene was suspected to have inhibitory effect on dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium.

  11. Flocculation alters the distribution and flux of melt-water supplied sediments and nutrients in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Ernstsen, Verner Brandbyge;

    settling tubes were sampled to enable sub-sampling of different floc size fractions. Flocculation was observed during periods with low turbulent shear and also at the front of the fresh water plume resulting in significant volumes of large sized flocs at depth below the plume. The floc sizes and volumes...... environment but comparatively little is known about the flocculation processes in the Arctic. We investigated flocculation dynamics from a melt-water river in the inner Disko Fjord, West Greenland. A novel, laser-illuminated camera system significantly improved the particle size measurement capabilities and...... were correlated with particulate and dissolved C, Fe and N concentrations. The observed flocculation dynamics highlight the potential for redistributing sediments and nutrients in the water column, which is important for understanding these environments and ecosystems in the past and future....

  12. Validation of a method to measure plutonium levels in marine sediments in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this research was to develop and to validate a method of radiochemical separation of plutonium, suitable from the economic and practical point of view, in Cuba conditions. This method allowed to determine plutonium activity levels in the marine sediments from Cienfuegos Bay. The selected method of radiochemical separation was that of anionic chromatography and the measure technique was the quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The method was applied to a certified reference material, six repetitions were carried out and a good correspondence between the average measured value and the average certified value of plutonium was achieved, so the trueness of the method was demonstrated. It was also proven the precision of the method, since it was obtained a variation coefficient of 11% at 95% confidence level. The obtained results show that the presence of plutonium in the analyzed marine sediment samples is only due to the global radioactive fallout. (author)

  13. A global survey of the distribution of free gas in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Peter; Orsi, Tim; Richardson, Michael

    2003-10-01

    Following the work of Aubrey Anderson in the Gulf of Mexico, we have attempted to quantify the global distribution of free gas in shallow marine sediments, and have identified and indexed over one hundred documented cases in the scientific and engineering literature. Our survey confirms previous assumptions, primarily that gas bubbles are ubiquitous in the organic-rich muds of coastal waters and shallow adjacent seas. Acoustic turbidity as recorded during seismo-acoustic surveys is the most frequently cited evidence used to infer the presence of seafloor gas. Biogenic methane predominates within these shallow subbottom deposits. The survey also reveals significant imbalances in the geographic distribution of studies, which might be addressed in the future by accessing proprietary data or local studies with limited distribution. Because of their global prevalence, growing interest in gassy marine sediments is understandable as their presence has profound scientific, engineering and environmental implications.

  14. {sup 137}Cs in marine sediments of Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Paulo Alves de Lima [Instituto Oceanográfico, Universidade de São Paulo (IO-USP), Pça. do Oceanográfico, 191, Butantã, SP, 05508 900 (Brazil); Ribeiro, Andreza Portella, E-mail: andrezpr@usp.br [Instituto Oceanográfico, Universidade de São Paulo (IO-USP), Pça. do Oceanográfico, 191, Butantã, SP, 05508 900 (Brazil); Mestrado de Gestão Ambiental e Sustentabilidade, Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE), Avenida Francisco Matarazzo, 612, prédio C, andar térreo, Água Branca, São Paulo, SP, 05001 100 (Brazil); Nascimento, Mylene Giseli do; Martins, Cesar de Castro [Centro de Estudos do Mar, Universidade Federal do Paraná (CEM-UFPR), Av. Beira-mar, no number, Balneário Pontal do Sul, Pontal do Paraná, PR, 83255 971 (Brazil); Mahiques, Michel Michaelovitch de; Montone, Rosalinda Carmelo; Figueira, Rubens Cesar Lopes [Instituto Oceanográfico, Universidade de São Paulo (IO-USP), Pça. do Oceanográfico, 191, Butantã, SP, 05508 900 (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    The radionuclide cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is produced exclusively by anthropogenic processes and primarily by nuclear explosions. This study determined the reference inventory that is {sup 137}Cs associated with the element's original input, and utilized the levels of activity of this radionuclide previously measured in five sediment profiles collected from Admiralty Bay, Antarctica, to investigate the mobility of this element in the environment. {sup 137}Cs has a half-life of 30 years. Because of this, it is environmentally persistent and has been shown to accumulate in marine organisms. The mean reference inventory of this radionuclide in Admiralty Bay sediments, determined using high resolution gamma ray spectrometry, was 20.23 ± 8.94 Bq m{sup −2}, and within the ambient {sup 137}Cs activity range. A model of {sup 137}Cs diffusion–convection was applied to data collected from 1 cm intervals in sediment cores with the aim of providing insights with respect to this element's behavior in sediments. Model results showed a significant correlation between measured and modeled values using the concentrations of {sup 137}Cs, and estimated input into the system from the global fallout of past nuclear tests and expected values based on local sedimentation rates. Results highlight the importance of accounting for the vertical diffusion of {sup 137}Cs in marine sediments when used as a tracer for environmental processes and for assessing potential bioavailability. - Highlights: ► Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is produced exclusively by anthropogenic processes. ► A model of diffusion–convection simulated {sup 137}Cs environmental behavior. ► This is important for assessing the bioavailability of this toxic element. ► In Antarctica ice cover influenced the input to the sediments.

  15. 137Cs in marine sediments of Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radionuclide cesium-137 (137Cs) is produced exclusively by anthropogenic processes and primarily by nuclear explosions. This study determined the reference inventory that is 137Cs associated with the element's original input, and utilized the levels of activity of this radionuclide previously measured in five sediment profiles collected from Admiralty Bay, Antarctica, to investigate the mobility of this element in the environment. 137Cs has a half-life of 30 years. Because of this, it is environmentally persistent and has been shown to accumulate in marine organisms. The mean reference inventory of this radionuclide in Admiralty Bay sediments, determined using high resolution gamma ray spectrometry, was 20.23 ± 8.94 Bq m−2, and within the ambient 137Cs activity range. A model of 137Cs diffusion–convection was applied to data collected from 1 cm intervals in sediment cores with the aim of providing insights with respect to this element's behavior in sediments. Model results showed a significant correlation between measured and modeled values using the concentrations of 137Cs, and estimated input into the system from the global fallout of past nuclear tests and expected values based on local sedimentation rates. Results highlight the importance of accounting for the vertical diffusion of 137Cs in marine sediments when used as a tracer for environmental processes and for assessing potential bioavailability. - Highlights: ► Cesium-137 (137Cs) is produced exclusively by anthropogenic processes. ► A model of diffusion–convection simulated 137Cs environmental behavior. ► This is important for assessing the bioavailability of this toxic element. ► In Antarctica ice cover influenced the input to the sediments

  16. Characters of the organic δ13C and its climatic information in sediment cores of the lakes nearby the arctic yellow river station of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arctic is favored by researchers due to its sensitivity and feedback to Global Climate Change, and the organic δ13C record of lake sediment is a key indicator for the environ- mental climate change. The sedimentary rates and δ13C of two sediment cores (No.1 and No.2), collected from two lakes near the Arctic Yellow River Station of China during July to Aug of 2007, were determined in order to investigate the climate change of the Arctic during the past centuries. The sedimentary rates, determined with 210Pb method, of sample No.1 and sample No.2 were 1.05 mm/a and 0.91 mm/a, respectively, and the vertical distribution of organic δ13C of two sediment cores have similar trends during the same period. The results show that the temperature at the Arctic Yellow River Station of China during the last three centuries was unsteady, and was alternating with a 'lower-higher-lower' process. (authors)

  17. Derivation of the nonlinearity parameter B/A of saturated, unconsolidated marine sediments via a statistical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.; Noh, E.; Ohm, W.-S.; Kwon, O.-C.

    2015-10-01

    Marine sediments are known to exhibit the nonlinearity parameter B/A that is much greater than that of homogeneous fluids and solids. The enormous value of B/A is particularly sensitive to the state of grain contacts. Although there exists a large body of literature that deals with the B/A of marine sediments, few studies have addressed how the random nature of grain contacts affects B/A. Here, we develop a model for the B/A of saturated, unconsolidated marine sediments, which accounts for random grain contacts. The number of contacts per grain and the distribution of contact stress between grains are treated statistically. The quadratic nonlinearity of the equivalent suspension of grains and the interstitial fluid is then combined with the nonlinearity arising from the random Hertzian contacts to produce the effective B/A of marine sediments.

  18. Heavy metal burden in coastal marine sediments of north west coast of India in relation to pollution

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rokade, M.A.

    IN COASTAL MARINE SEDIMENTS OF NORTH WEST COAST OF INDIA IN RELATION TO POLLUTION A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MUMBAI FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY SUBMITTED BY M. A. ROKADE UNDER...

  19. Microbial mercury transformations in marine, estuarine and freshwater sediment downstream of the Idrija Mercury Mine, Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idrija Mine, the second largest Hg mine in the world, ceased operation in 1995, but still delivers large quantities of Hg downstream including into the northern Adriatic Sea, 100 km away. Transformation of Hg species in sediment in sites over 60 km from the mine, including marine sites in the Adriatic Sea, was measured to determine the ability of the system to transform and mobilize Hg and to produce methylmercury (MeHg). Cores from a freshwater impoundment, a brackish estuarine site, and three marine sites in the Gulf of Trieste were sectioned anaerobically, and Hg methylation and MeHg demethylation activities determined using radio-techniques (203Hg for methylation and 14C-MeHg for demethylation). Total and dissolved Hg and MeHg were determined as were other geochemical parameters. In addition, rates of SO4 reduction were determined in marine sediment using a 35S technique. Mercury was readily methylated and demethylated at all sites. Marine sediment was investigated in winter and summer with rates of Hg transformation and SO4 reduction corresponding only in winter. Methylation of Hg in summer displayed subsurface peaks that may have been influenced by bioturbation. Total Hg and MeHg were most abundant in the freshwater, estuarine, and near-shore marine sites, but dissolved pore water Hg and MeHg were highest in the estuarine region where S cycling appeared ideal for the mobilization of Hg. The impoundment sediment also seemed to be a 'hotspot' of Hg transformations. MeHg demethylation occurred via the oxidative demethylation pathway (CO2 produced from MeHg), except in surficial sediment offshore in the Gulf during winter, where sediment was more oxidizing and significant amounts of CH4 were liberated during MeHg degradation via reductive demethylation. The CH4 formation was likely due to an increased influence from the expression of MeHg degradative enzymes encoded by the mer detoxification bacterial genetic system. The freshwater site also liberated CH4

  20. Quantitative research for pollution levels in marine sediments of Ha Long Bay by nuclear technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the theme of Quantitative study of pollution levels in marine sediments of Halong bay by nuclear techniques conducted from June 2011 to June 2013, the authors conducted monitoring, sediment samples collected in the bay below the sediment column at 8 locations, in which 7 columns located at the estuary near Tuan Chau Island and 1 column at the area near the harbor of Cam Pha. The column samples were taken to the laboratory, cut slices with a distance of 2 cm in the form of frozen and conduct tests of radioactive Pb-210 to determine the rate of sediment in the survey area. Evaluation results based on the method by determining 210Pb, the sediment rate showed speed in the survey area ranged from 0.3 cm.a-1 to 1.2 cm.a-1 and an average of 1.0 cm.a-1. The slices of sediment samples (110 samples) were analyzed heavy metals (KLN) and As elemental by ICP-MS method. These sediment sample also were analyzed for simultaneous determination of N and P and total organic carbon (TOC). Results showed that heavy metal concentrations and As is smaller than the value specified in the National Technical Regulation on Sediment Quality of Vietnam (QCVN), phosphorus concentration less than that can cause harmful effects, but the concentration of total nitrogen and organic carbon that may exceed be harmful as directed by Canadian standards (Persuad et al. 1992). The concentration data in the Halong bay sediment were processed by statistical software SPSS-18, results showed high correlation between the quality TOC, N, P, K and correlation the majority of KLN, this proves the origin of sediments is part of the natural soil components and parts (TOC, N, P, K) is due to the activity of human activity as well as by agricultural fertilizers. The average content of elements in sediments Halong be compared with other data published works of sediment Quang Ninh area, the results show the correlation figures are also high. However, the results of the analysis of KLN and As in Halong sediment

  1. Seismic peak amplitude as a predictor of TOC content in shallow marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Arthur Ayres; Mota, Bruno Bourguignon; Belem, André Luiz; Albuquerque, Ana Luiza; Capilla, Ramsés

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic remote sensing is a highly effective tool for exploring the seafloor of both deep and shallow marine settings. Indeed, the acoustic response depends on several physicochemical factors such as sediment grain size, bulk density, water content, and mineralogy. The objective of the present study is to assess the suitability of seismic peak amplitude as a predictor of total organic carbon (TOC) content in shallow marine sediments, based on data collected in the Cabo Frio mud belt in an upwelling zone off southeastern Brazil. These comprise records of P-wave velocity (V P) along 680 km of high-resolution single-channel seismic surveys, combined with analyses of grain size, wet bulk density, absolute water content and TOC content for four piston-cores. TOC contents of sediments from 13 box-cores served to validate the methodology. The results show well-defined positive correlations between TOC content and mean grain size (phi scale) as well as absolute water content, and negative correlations with V P, wet bulk density, and acoustic impedance. These relationships yield a regression equation by which TOC content can be satisfactorily predicted on the basis of acoustic impedance for this region: y = - 4.84 ln(x) + 40.04. Indeed, the derived TOC contents differ by only 5% from those determined by geochemical analysis. After appropriate calibration, acoustic impedance can thus be conveniently used as a predictor of large-scale spatial distributions of organic carbon enrichment in marine sediments. This not only contributes to optimizing scientific project objectives, but also enhances the cost-effectiveness of marine surveys by greatly reducing the ship time commonly required for grid sampling.

  2. Modelling the cohesive sediment transport in the marine environment: the case of Thermaikos Gulf

    OpenAIRE

    Y. N. Krestenitis; Kombiadou, K. D.; Savvidis, Y. G.

    2007-01-01

    The transport of fine-grained sediments in the marine environment entails risks of pollutant intrusions from substances absorbed onto the cohesive flocks' surface, gradually released to the aquatic field. These substances include nutrients such as nitrate, phosphate and silicate compounds from drainage from fertilization of adjacent cultivated areas that enter the coastal areas through rivers and streams, or trace metals as remainders from urban and industrial activities. As a consequenc...

  3. Evaluating spatial patterns of dioxins in sediments to aid determination of potential implications for marine reptiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermanussen, S.; Gaus, C. [National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology, Brisbane (Australia); Limpus, C.J. [Queensland Environmental Protection Agency, Brisbane (Australia); Paepke, O. [ERGO Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Hamburg (Germany); Blanshard, W. [Sea World, Gold Coast (Australia); Connell, D. [School of Public Health, Griffith Univ., Brisbane (Australia)

    2004-09-15

    Recent investigations have identified elevated concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (dioxins) in marine sediments and wildlife of Queensland, Australia. While it has been demonstrated that the contamination is widespread and predominantly land-based, limited information exists on the pathways and fate of these compounds within the near-shore marine system. This environment supports unique and threatened species including green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas). Adult green turtles are predominantly herbivorous, feeding on seagrass and algae. Apart from initial migration to feeding grounds (at {proportional_to}10 years of age) and intermittent migrations to breeding grounds (at {proportional_to}30-50 years and thereafter), green turtles remain and feed within relatively small home ranges. Long life-span (50 years or more), near-shore feeding grounds and highly specialized food requirements render green turtles potentially vulnerable to contaminant exposure. Recent studies have shown a relationship between PCDD/F concentrations found in herbivorous marine wildlife and concentrations in sediments of their habitats. Hence, the spatial evaluation of sediment PCDD/F distribution may assist the assessment of green turtle exposure and its potential implications. The present study provides baseline information on green turtle PCDD/F concentrations in Queensland, Australia and investigates exposure pathways. In addition, spatial distribution of PCDD/Fs in sediments from known green turtle feeding regions is assessed using geographic information systems. This represents the first stage of a large scale investigation into the exposure and sensitivity of marine reptiles to dioxins and dioxin-like compounds and to evaluate whether poor health status observed in some populations may be related to contaminant exposure.

  4. Metal release from contaminated estuarine sediment under pH changes in the marine environment

    OpenAIRE

    Martin-Torre, C; PAYAN, C; Verbinnen, B; Coz, A.; Ruiz, G.; Vandecasteele, C; Viguri, R

    2015-01-01

    The contaminant release from estuarine sediment due to pH changes was investigated using a modified CEN/TS 14429 pH-dependence leaching test. The test is performed in the range of pH values of 0–14 using deionised water and seawater as leaching solutions. The experimental conditions mimic different circumstances of the marine environment due to the global acidification, carbon dioxide (CO2) leakages from carbon capture and sequestration technologies, and accidental chemical spills in seawater...

  5. 87Sr/86Sr measurements on marine sediments by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is documented for the study of the strontium isotopic composition (87Sr/86Sr) in geological samples, i.e. in the marine lithic fraction of core sediments. Methods for the determination of the isotopic composition, its accuracy and precision are reported. The results obtained simultaneously on 11 samples by both ICP-MS and thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) reveal a very good correlation (r2 = 0.955). (orig.)

  6. Reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene in marine sediments: Biodiversity and dehalorespiring capabilities of the indigenous microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matturro, B; Presta, E; Rossetti, S

    2016-03-01

    Chlorinated compounds pose environmental concerns due to their toxicity and wide distribution in several matrices. Microorganisms specialized in leading anaerobic reductive dechlorination (RD) processes, including Dehalococcoides mccartyi (Dhc), are able to reduce chlorinated compounds to harmless products or to less toxic forms. Here we report the first detailed study dealing with the RD potential of heavy polluted marine sediment by evaluating the biodegradation kinetics together with the composition, dynamics and activity of indigenous microbial population. A microcosm study was conducted under strictly anaerobic conditions on marine sediment collected near the marine coast of Sarno river mouth, one of the most polluted river in Europe. Tetrachloroethene (PCE), used as model pollutant, was completely converted to ethene within 150 days at reductive dechlorination rate equal to 0.016 meq L(-1) d(-1). Consecutive spikes of PCE allowed increasing the degradation kinetics up to 0.1 meq L(-1)d(-1) within 20 days. Strictly anaerobiosis and repeated spikes of PCE stimulated the growth of indigenous Dhc cells (growth yield of ~7.0 E + 07 Dhc cells per μM Cl(-1) released). Dhc strains carrying the reductive dehalogenase genes tceA and vcrA were detected in the original marine sediment and their number increased during the treatment as demonstrated by the high level of tceA expression at the end of the microcosm study (2.41 E + 05 tceA gene transcripts g(-1)). Notably, the structure of the microbial communities was fully described by Catalysed Reporter Deposition Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (CARD-FISH) as wells as the dynamics of the dechlorinating bacteria during the microcosms operation. Interestingly, a direct role of Dhc cells was ascertained suggesting the existence of strains adapted at salinity conditions. Additionally, non-Dhc Chloroflexi were retrieved in the original sediment and were kept stable over time suggesting their likely flanking role of the RD

  7. A novel approach to the assess biotic oxygen consumption in marine sediment communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, Victor; Queiros, Ana; Widdicombe, Stephen; Stephens, Nick; Lessin, Gennadi; Krause, Stefan; Lewandowski, Joerg

    2016-04-01

    Bioturbation , the mixing of the sediment matrix by burrowing animals impacts sediment metabolism, including respiration through redistribution of particulate organics, changes in bacterial biota diversity and acitivity, as well as via burrowing fauna's own metabolism. Bioturbation, reflecting faunal activity, is also a proxy for the general sedimentary ecosystem health, and can be impacted by many of emerging marine environmental issues such as ocean acidification, warming and the occurrence of heat waves. Sedimentary oxygen consumption is often taken as a proxy for the activity of bioturbating fauna, but determining baselines can be difficult because of the confounding effects of other fauna and microbes present in sediments, as well as irnorganic processes that consume oxygen. Limitations therefore exist in current methodologies, and numerous confounding factors are hampering progress in this area. Here, we present novel method for the assessment of sediment respiration which is expected to be affected only by the biogenic oxygen consumption (namely aerobic respiration). As long as tracer reduction "immune" to inorganic oxygen consumption, so that measurements using this method can be used, alongside traditional methods, to decouple biological respiration from inorganic oxygen consumption reactions. The tracer is easily detectable, non-toxic and can be applied in systems with constant oxygen supply. The latter allow for incubation without the need to to work with unsealed experimental units, bringing procedural advantage over traditional methods. Consequently assessed bioturbating fauna is not exposed to hypoxia and additional stress. Here, we had applied system for the first time to investigate impacts of a common North-Atlantic bioturbator, the brittle star Amphiura filiformis, - on respiration of marine sediments. Two series of experiments were conducted with animals and sediment collected from Cawsand Bay, Plymouth, UK Preliminary results show that tracer

  8. Linking microbial community structure to biogeochemical function in coastal marine sediments: Stable isotope probing combined with magnetic bead capture

    OpenAIRE

    Stal, L.J.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Miyatake, T.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial community structure and its biogeochemical functions in marine sediments can be successfully linked by using the improved Mag-SIP method in combination with other approaches. In this thesis, we were able to provide detailed information on the microorganisms responsible for the utilization of major substrates in marine sediments. It was shown that a number of important groups in the microbial community played a broader role than expected. Some surprising results are that oxygenic pho...

  9. Plio-Pleistocene imprint of natural climate cycles in marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of Earth to natural climate cyclicity is written in marine sediments. The Earth is a complex system, as is climate change determined by various modes, frequency of cycles, forcings, boundary conditions, thresholds, and tipping elements. Oceans act as climate change buffers, and marine sediments provide archives of climate conditions in the Earths history. To read climate records they must be well-dated, well-calibrated and analysed at high-resolution. Reconstructions of past climates are based on climate variables such as atmospheric composition, temperature, salinity, ocean productivity and wind, the nature and quality which are of the utmost importance. Once the palaeoclimate and palaeoceanographic proxy-variables of past events are well documented, the best results of modelling and validation, and future predictions can be obtained from climate models. Neither the mechanisms for abrupt climate changes at orbital, millennial and multi-decadal time scales nor the origin, rhythms and stability of cyclicity are as yet fully understood. Possible sources of cyclicity are either natural in the form of internal ocean-atmosphere-land interactions or external radioactive forcing such as solar irradiance and volcanic activity, or else anthropogenic. Coupling with stochastic resonance is also very probable. I provide here, an overview of the cyclicity affecting the Earth on various time scales focussing upon the Plio-Pleistocene and Holocene epochs, together with a compilation of some of the key questions under debate, and a number of representative works that illustrate cyclicity in marine sediments. (Author)

  10. Plutonium isotopes in marine sediments and some biota from the Sudanese coast of the Red Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of 239+240Pu and 238Pu were carried out on marine biota as well as on sediments from the fringing reefs area extending towards north and south (Flamingo Bay) of Port Sudan harbour. The analyses were performed using radiochemical separation and alpha spectrometry. The range of the activity concentrations in marine sediments, in mBq kg-1 dry weight, was found to be from 5.10 to 82.00 for 239+240Pu and from 0.89 to 8.63 for 238Pu. Corresponding activity concentrations of 239+240Pu and 238Pu in sediments from the harbours at Port Sudan and Sawakin were 53-301 and 8.29-28.6 (Port Sudan) and 163-343 and 4.7 (Sawakin), respectively. The higher values for plutonium in marine algae suggest their suitability as an indicator species for monitoring purposes. The results obtained are generally lower than those found by other studies and show that the Red Sea environment is mildly affected by plutonium contamination. Activity ratios of plutonium isotopes confirm that the existence of plutonium in the Red Sea is mainly due to atmospheric global fallout. (authors)

  11. Marine coastal sediments microbial hydrocarbon degradation processes: contribution of experimental ecology in the omics’era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana eCravo-Laureau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Coastal marine sediments, where important biological processes take place, supply essential ecosystem services. By their location, such ecosystems are particularly exposed to human activities as evidenced by the recent Deepwater Horizon disaster. This catastrophe revealed the importance to better understand the microbial processes involved on hydrocarbon degradation in marine sediments raising strong interests of the scientific community. During the last decade, several studies have shown the key role played by microorganisms in determining the fate of hydrocarbons in oil-polluted sediments but only few have taken into consideration the whole sediment’s complexity. Marine coastal sediment ecosystems are characterized by remarkable heterogeneity, owning high biodiversity and are subjected to fluctuations in environmental conditions, especially to important oxygen oscillations due to tides. Thus, for understanding the fate of hydrocarbons in such environments, it is crucial to study microbial activities, taking into account sediment characteristics, physical-chemical factors (electron acceptors, temperature, nutrients, co-metabolites availability as well as sediment’s reworking due to bioturbation activities. Key information could be collected from in situ studies, which provide an overview of microbial processes, but it is difficult to integrate all parameters involved. Microcosm experiments allow to dissect in-depth some mechanisms involved in hydrocarbon degradation but exclude environmental complexity. To overcome these lacks, strategies have been developed, by creating experiments as close as possible to environmental conditions, for studying natural microbial communities subjected to oil pollution. We present here a review of these approaches, their results and limitation, as well as the promising future of applying ‘omics’ approaches to characterize in-depth microbial communities and metabolic networks involved in hydrocarbon

  12. Assessing regional populations of ground-nesting marine birds in the Canadian High Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Maftei

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Queens Channel region of Nunavut is an ecologically distinct area within the Canadian High Arctic consisting of an extensive archipelago of small, low-lying gravel islands throughout which form several localized but highly productive polynyas. We used aerial survey and colony-monitoring data to assess regional- and colony-level fluctuations in the number of birds in this region between 2002 and 2013. Regional and colony-specific monitoring suggested that common eider (Somateria mollissima numbers are increasing, while numbers of Arctic terns (Sterna paradisaea may be in decline. Based on these data, we suggest that even infrequent comprehensive surveys are more useful than annual monitoring at specific sites in generating an accurate assessment of ground-nesting seabird populations at the regional level, and that dramatic fluctuations at individual colonies probably belie the overall stability of regional populations.

  13. Bacillus cellulasensis sp. nov., isolated from marine sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawlankar, Rahul; Thorat, Meghana N; Krishnamurthi, Srinivasan; Dastager, Syed G

    2016-01-01

    A novel bacterial strain NIO-1130(T) was isolated from sediment sample taken from Chorao Island, Goa Province, India, and subjected to a taxonomic investigation. The strain was Gram-positive, aerobic, and motile. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed the isolate within the genus Bacillus and strain NIO-1130(T) showed highest sequence similarity with Bacillus halosaccharovorans DSM 25387(T) (98.4%) and Bacillus niabensis CIP 109816(T) (98.1%), whereas other Bacillus species showed <97.0% similarity. Tree based on gyrB gene sequence revealed that strain bacillus group. The major menaquinone was MK-7 and the predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C15:0, anteiso-C15:0, iso-C17:0, and anteiso-C17:0. The strain showed a DNA G+C content of 39.9 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization studies revealed that strain NIO-1130(T) exhibits 70% similarity with Bacillus halosaccharovorans DSM 25387(T) and Bacillus niabensis CIP 109816(T). On the basis of physiological, biochemical, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses, we consider the isolate to represent a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus cellulasensis sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is NIO-1130(T) (=NCIM 5461(T)=CCTCC AB 2011126(T)). PMID:26410293

  14. Distribution of molluscan remains in the sediment of the Chukchi Sea and its vicinity, the Arctic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Aiguo; Xu Fengshan; Sun Haiqing; Li Lon

    2003-01-01

    The result of an analysis of mollusca remains collected from the Chukchi Sea, Beaufort Sea and Bering Sea in the First Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition, from July to September,1999 is presented. Seventeen species of mollusca have been identified, which belong to two classes: Bivalvia and Gastropoda. The compositions of the mollusca are very simple. According to the distribution pattern two groups may be distinguished among molluscan species. The Pan-Arctic and circumboreal group comprises Nuculana pernula, N. radiata, Nucula bellotii, Astarte montagui, Seripes groenlandicus, Macoma calcarea, M. moesta alaskana, Liocyma fluctuosa, Mya pseudoarenaria and Turritella polaris. Three species, Cyclocardia crebricos tata, Trichotrois coronata and Argobuccinum oregonense are components of the Pan-Arctic and Pacific boreal group. With regard to feeding habits, detritus feeders dominate. There are 7 species of detritus feeders, i.e. , Nuculana pernula, N. radiata,Nucula bellotii , Macoma calcarea , M. moesta alaskana , Macoma sp. and Trichotropis coronata . Detritus feeders are dominant with regard to the numbers of species as well as to the frequency of occurrence. Macoma calcarea is the most abundant species.

  15. The effect of the global warming on marine ecosystems in the Arctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article discusses various results from studies of development in the ecosystems in the Arctic region and the effect the global warming may have. The warming in these areas is larger than in the central Europe and influence the economic and social development of the region. The focus is on the fisheries, exploitation of oil and gas, transport, diversity in species, acidification of the oceans, meteorological phenomena etc.. Some environmental and energy related aspects are mentioned. (tk)

  16. The geochemistry of uranium and thorium in coastal marine sediments and sediment pore waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pore water profiles of uranium and thorium isotopes in the muddy sediments of Buzzards Bay, MA permit an assessment of the effect of diagenetic redox reactions on the geochemical behaviour of these elements. Uranium shows a pronounced minimum pore water concentration (approx. 1.2dpm/kg) near the sediment water interface (0-3 cm) which coincides with the pore water Fe maximum. U concentrations increase with depth to a broad maximum which is greater than the overlying seawater value, then decrease. The coincidence of the pore water uranium and Fe maximum is consistent with the hypothesis of reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) and removal from solution at about the same depth (or pe) as Fe is reduced. Increases in pore water U with depth appear to be related to release of authigenic (seawater) U(VI) to solution, possibly as alkalinity and pH increase and organic matter with which the U is associated is oxidized. In contrast, pore water profiles of the long-lived Th isotopes 232Th and 230Th show low activities (234Th shows greatest pore water activities in the upper 5 cm and is present at virtually zero activities elsewhere in the sediment column. The upper few centimeters of the sediment generally contain excess 234Th scavenged from the overlying water column and distributed by bioturbation. (author)

  17. Effects of four aromatic organic pollutants on microbial glucose metabolism and thymidine incorporation in marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The metabolism of D-(U-14C)glucose and the incorporation of (methyl-3H)thymidine by aerobic and anaerobic marine sediment microbes exposed to 1 to 1000 ppm anthracene, naphthalene, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, and pentachlorophenol were examined. Cell-specific rates of (14C)glucose metabolism averaged 1.7 x 10-21 and 0.5 x 10-21 mol/min per cell for aerobic and anaerobic sediment slurries, respectively; (3H)thymidine incorporation rates averaged 43 x 10-24 and 9 x 10-24 mol/min per cell for aerobic and anaerobic slurries, respectively. Aerobic sediments exposed to three of the organic pollutants for 2 to 7 days showed recovery of both activities. Anaerobic sediments showed little recovery after 2 days of pre-exposure to the pollutants. The authors conclude that (i) anaerobic sediments are more sensitive than aerobic sediments to pollutant additions; (ii) (3H)thymidine incorporation is more sensitive to pollutant additions than is (14C)glucose metabolism; and (iii) the toxicity of the pollutants increased in the following order: anthracene, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, naphthalene, and pentachlorophenol

  18. Influences of marine sediment on the accumulation of radionuclides by green alga (Ulva pertusa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distribution of radionuclides (60Co, 137Cs, 95Zr-95Nb and 106Ru-106Rh) among green alga (Ulva pertusa), sea water and marine sediment were examined by radioisotope tracer experiment in order to estimate the influence of sediment on the accumulation of radionuclides by the alga. By the application of the compartment model to the experimental results, exponential formulas of distributions were obtained. Through comparison of the transfer coefficients of radionuclides calculated from the exponential formulas, the influence of the sediment on the accumulation of the radionuclides by the green alga was determined to be the largest for 60Co, followed by 95Zr-95Nb, 106Ru-106Rh and 137Cs in this order. The activity ratios of 95Zr-95Nb and 106Ru-106Rh calculated from the transfer coefficients are larger for the alga than for the sediment, inversely those of 60Co and 137Cs show higher values for the sediment than for the alga. Especially, in the case of 60Co, the activity ratio for the sediment is approximately 20 times greater than that for the alga. Biological half lives in green alga estimated from the transfer coefficients were 10 days for 60Co, 7 days for 137Cs, 26 days for 95Zr-95Nb and 24 days for 106Ru-106Rh. (auth.)

  19. Experimental results on bioaccumulation of metals and organic contaminants from marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruus, Anders; Schaanning, Morten; Oxnevad, Sigurd; Hylland, Ketil

    2005-04-30

    A test-system for the assessment of bioavailability and bioaccumulation of metals and organic contaminants in marine benthic organisms is described and results from studies where this system has been applied are assessed. Sediments tested were polluted harbour sediment (from Norway), and clean sediments spikes with metal containing weight materials for drilling muds. Contaminants that may bioaccumulate under relevant conditions are indicated. The test-system uses two species of ecological relevance (Nereis diversicolor and Hinia reticulata). Interspecies differences in bioaccumulation were found for several compounds, which show the importance of using species with different modes of living in such tests. Compared to other PAHs, pyrene was found to bioaccumulate to a high degree (BioAccumulation Ratio, BAR=213.5>sediment concentration ratio, SCR=97.4; bioaccumulation factor, organism dw. conc. to sediment dw. conc., BAF=1.02), which shows that extrapolating bioaccumulation results between different substances is difficult. When assessing bioavailability of specific compounds, it is most adequate to perform direct measurements on exposed organisms, such as the experiments described here. The high bioaccumulation of compounds such as pyrene and nickel may in some cases be attributed to manipulation of the sediments and (for pyrene) lack of subsequent aging, thereby overestimating bioavailability. PMID:15820107

  20. Certification of Trace Element Mass Fractions in IAEA-457 Marine Sediment Sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary goal of the IAEA Environment Laboratories in Monaco (NAEL) is to help Member States understand, monitor and protect the marine environment. The major impact exerted by large coastal cities on marine ecosystems is therefore of great concern to the IAEA and its Environment Laboratories. Given that marine pollution assessments of such impacts depend on accurate knowledge of contaminant concentrations in various environmental compartments, the NAEL has assisted national laboratories and regional laboratory networks through its Reference Products for Environment and Trade programme since the early 1970s. Quality assurance (QA), quality control (QC) and associated good laboratory practice are essential components of all marine environmental monitoring studies. QC procedures are commonly based on the analysis of certified reference materials and reference samples in order to validate analytical methods used in monitoring studies and to assess reliability and comparability of measurement data. QA can be realized by participation in externally organized laboratory performance studies, also known as interlaboratory comparisons, which compare and evaluate analytical performance and measurement capabilities of participating laboratories. Data that are not based on adequate QA/QC can be erroneous and their misuse can lead to incorrect environmental management decisions. A marine sediment sample with certified mass fractions for Ag, Al, As, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe, Hg, Li, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sn, Sr, V and Zn was recently produced by the NAEL in the frame of a project between the IAEA and the Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology. This report describes the sample preparation methodology, the material homogeneity and stability study, the selection of laboratories, the evaluation of results from the certification campaign and the assignment of property values and their associated uncertainty. As a result, reference values for mass fractions and associated expanded

  1. Certification of Trace Elements and Methyl Mercury Mass Fractions in IAEA-456 Marine Sediment Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary goal of the IAEA Environment Laboratories is to assist Member States in the use of both stable and radioisotope analytical techniques to understand, monitor and protect the environment. In this context, the major impact of large coastal cities on marine ecosystems is an issue of prime concern for the IAEA and the IAEA Environment Laboratories. The marine pollution assessments required to understand such impacts depend on accurate knowledge of contaminant concentrations in various environmental compartments. The IAEA Environment Laboratories has been assisting national laboratories and regional laboratory networks since the early 1970s through the provision of a reference material programme for the analysis of radionuclides, trace elements and organic compounds in marine samples. Quality assurance, quality control and associated good laboratory practice are essential components of all marine environmental monitoring studies. Quality control procedures are commonly based on the analysis of certified reference materials and reference samples in order to validate analytical methods used in monitoring studies and to assess t h e reliability and comparability of measurement data. Data that are not based on adequate quality assurance and quality control can be erroneous, and their misuse can lead to poor environmental management decisions. A marine sediment sample with certified mass amount contents for aluminium, arsenic, cadmium chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, mercury, methyl mercury, manganese, nickel, vanadium and zinc was recently produced by the IAEA Environment Laboratories. This publication presents the sample preparation methodology, including material homogeneity and the stability study, the selection of laboratories, the evaluation of results from the certification campaign, and the assignment of property values and their associated uncertainty. As a result, certified values for mass fractions and associated expanded uncertainty were

  2. Kinetic parameters for nutrient enhanced crude oil biodegradation in intertidal marine sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind K Singh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Availability of inorganic nutrients, particularly N and P, is often a primary control on crude oil hydrocarbon degradation in marine systems. Nevertheless, there is a paucity of information on fundamental kinetic parameters for nutrient enhanced crude oil biodegradation that can be used to model the fate of crude oil in bioremediation programmes that use inorganic nutrient addition to stimulate oil biodegradation. Here we report fundamental kinetic parameters (Ks and qmax for nitrate- and phosphate-stimulated crude oil biodegradation under nutrient limited conditions and with respect to crude oil, under conditions where N&P are not limiting. Crude oil degradation was limited by both N&P availability. When N was added alone maximum rates of CO2 production measured were 3.94±0.46 µmol CO2 /g wet sediment/day. However when the same levels of N were added in the presence of 0.5% P w/w of oil (1.6 μmol P/g wet sediment maximum rates of measured CO2 production more than doubled (11.52±0.72 µmol CO2 /g wet sediment/day. Ks and qmax estimates for N (in the form of sodium nitrate when P was not limiting were 1.57±0.56 µmol/g wet sediment and 10.57±0.63 µmol CO2 /g wet sediment/day respectively. The corresponding values for P were 80 nmol/g wet sediment and 8.76±1.15 µmol CO2 /g wet sediment/day. The qmax values with respect to N and P were not significantly different (P< 0.05. Analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes indicated that Alcanivorax spp. were selected in these marine sediments with increasing inorganic nutrient concentration, whereas Cycloclasticus spp. were more prevalent at lower inorganic nutrient concentrations. These data suggest that simple empirical estimates of the proportion of nutrients added relative to crude oil concentrations may not be sufficient to guarantee successful crude oil bioremediation in oxic beach sediments. The data we present also help define the maximum rates and hence timescales required for bioremediation

  3. Assessment and management of contaminated sediments in Italian marine coastal waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Water Framework Directive (WFD) obliges Member State to achieve a good chemical and ecological status of all surface water bodies within a specific deadline; in particular the good chemical status is a condition in which the concentrations of priority substances do not exceed the environmental quality standards (EQS) in order to protect human health and the environment; the WFD states that EQS have to be derived for water, sediment or biota. The good chemical status could be difficult to achieve in the historical marine contaminated water bodies due to the presence of high concentrations of toxic, bio accumulative and persistent substances in the sediments. In these specific highly contaminated sites there is a need to apply an ecosystem approach in which, as a first step, less stringent sediment EQS are defined in order to take the appropriate measures for the protection of aquatic ecosystems and human health; the long-term goal for these sites is the achievement of the good chemical status foreseen by the WFD. The methodology applied in Italy for the sediment quality assessment of marine contaminated sites is explained in this paper

  4. A 35,000 year record of terrigenous and marine lipids in Amazon Fan sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boot, C.S.; Pancost, R.D. [Bristol Univ. (United Kingdom). Organic Geochemistry Unit; Ettwein, V.J.; Maslin, M.A. [University College London (United Kingdom). Environmental Change Research Centre; Weyhenmeyer, C.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    2006-02-15

    Elemental and lipid analyses were carried out on sediments recovered from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 942 to provide a 35 kyr record of organic matter input to Amazon Fan sediments. Total organic carbon (TOC) and higher plant biomarker mass accumulation rates were an order of magnitude greater during the last glacial period compared to the current interglacial due to sea-level controlled variations in Amazon River sediment supply. Large maxima were also seen at {approx} 12 ka, which are most likely due to discharge events. Higher plant n-alkane average chain lengths did not change throughout the record, suggesting consistency in the source vegetation type. The abundance of taraxerol relative to other plant biomarkers increased at {approx} 12 ka, indicating increased mangrove input due to either higher mangrove productivity or increased erosion of mangrove deposits. The mass accumulation rates (MARs) of some bacterial and eustigmatophyte biomarkers varied closely with those of higher plant biomarkers and so seem to have a non-marine source. Long chain alkenones were present in some of the sediments, generally in very low concentration, indicating dilution of the marine signal with terrestrial organic matter. (author)

  5. Micromonospora fluostatini sp. nov., isolated from marine sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phongsopitanun, Wongsakorn; Kudo, Takuji; Mori, Mihoko; Shiomi, Kazuro; Pittayakhajonwut, Pattama; Suwanborirux, Khanit; Tanasupawat, Somboon

    2015-12-01

    The novel actinomycete strain PWB-003T, which produced fluostatins B and C antibiotics, was isolated from nearshore sediment collected from Panwa Cape, Phuket Province, Thailand. Data from the present polyphasic study indicated that strain PWB-003T represented a member of the genus Micromonospora. It produced single spores on substrate mycelia and contained meso-diaminopimelic acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan. Whole-cell hydrolysate contained ribose, xylose, arabinose, mannose and glucose. The predominant menaquinone was MK-10 (H4). Cellular fatty acids comprised C18 : 1ω9c, iso-C16 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0, iso-C15 : 0 and iso-C17 : 0. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity analysis, the novel strain was closely related to Micromonospora eburnea LK2-10T (99.38 %), Micromonospora chaiyaphumensis MC5-1T (99.16 %), Micromonospora yangpuensis FXJ6.011T (98.97 %), Micromonospora echinaurantiaca DSM 43904T (98.97 %), Micromonospora pallida DSM 43817T (98.97 %), Micromonospora sagamiensis DSM 43912T and Micromonospora auratinigra JCM 12357T (both 98.97 %). The G+C content of the DNA was 74.5 mol%. DNA-DNA relatedness values among strain PWB-003T and related type strains ranged from 11.3 ± 1.3 to 38.8 ± 1.1 %. On the basis of these observations, strain PWB-003T could be distinguished from its closely related type strains and is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Micromonospora, for which the name Micromonospora fluostatini sp. nov. (type strain PWB-003T = JCM 30529T = PCU 341T = TISTR 2345T) is proposed. PMID:26358439

  6. Sediment characteristics and benthic ecological status in contrasting marine environments of subtropical Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Alice K Y; Xu, Wen-Zhe; Liu, Xiao-Shou; Cheung, Siu Gin; Shin, Paul K S

    2016-02-15

    Sediment characteristics and benthic communities on a finer sampling scale in four contrasting environments in subtropical Hong Kong were analyzed in summer and winter 2012. In two harbour habitats which suffered from historic sewage pollution or hypoxic events, organic carbon, nutrient and trace metal content in the sediment were significantly higher than that in an offshore area and a marine reserve. The relatively low organic and nutrient content in the offshore habitat could be resulted from enhanced resuspension of such materials from the seabed owing to intense water mixing and disturbance caused by bottom trawling. The biotic indices AMBI and M-AMBI were shown to be useful in assessing the benthic ecological status of these habitats. Such indices can also be more sensitive than sediment physico-chemical parameters in differentiating the response of macrofauna to seasonal changes in the benthic environment. PMID:26749224

  7. Vertical activity distribution of dissimilatory nitrate reduction in coastal marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, A.; de Beer, D.; Stief, P.

    2013-01-01

    The relative importance of two dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathways, denitrification (DEN) and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA), was investigated in intact sediment cores from five different coastal marine field sites (Dorum, Aarhus Bight, Mississippi Delta, Limfjord...... reduction was clearly dominated by DEN (59-131% of the total NO3- reduced) rather than by DNRA, irrespective of the sedimentary inventories of electron donors such as organic carbon, sulfide, and iron. Highest ammonium production via DNRA, accounting for up to 8.9% of the total NO3- reduced, was found...... at a site with very high concentrations of total sulfide and NH4+ within and below the layer in which NO3- reduction occurred. Sediment from two field sites, one with low and one with high DNRA activity in the core incubations, was also used for slurry incubations. Now, in both sediments high DNRA activity...

  8. Assessment of radionuclides and heavy metals in marine sediments along the Upper Gulf of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuntong, S.; Phaophang, C.; Sudprasert, W.

    2015-05-01

    Due to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in 2011 and the development of nuclear power plant in neighboring countries such as Vietnam in the near future, radionuclide assessment in marine sediment during 2010 - 2011 may be useful as background levels for radiation protection in Thailand. Marine sediments (10 samples) were collected approximately 1 km away from the coastline along Chonburi to Pattaya, Chonburi Province. The sediments were ground and sieved through 2-mm test sieve after air drying. Radionuclides were measured with a gamma spectrometer equipped with a well-calibrated HPGe detector. The samples were prepared in the same geometry as the reference material. The optimal counting time was 60,000 - 80,000 s for statistical evaluation and uncertainties. No contamination of 137Cs as an artificial radionuclide was found. Naturally-occurring radionuclides including 238U, 232Th and 40K were found. The mean specific activities of 238U, 232Th and 40K were 44 ± 10, 59 ± 17 and 463 ± 94 Bq/kg in the rainy season (2010); 41 ± 6, 50 ± 9 and 484 ± 83 Bq/kg in the winter (2010), and 39 ± 6, 41 ± 7 and 472 ± 81 Bq/kg in the summer (2011), respectively. The mean specific activities were higher than the values in the UNSCEAR report of 35, 30 and 400 Bq/kg for 238U, 232Th and 40K, respectively. From the measured specific activities, the absorbed dose rate, radium equivalent activity, external hazard index and annual external effective dose rate were calculated in order to assess the health risk. No radiation hazards related to the radioactivity in the sediment were expected. The accumulation of radionuclides varied with the particle size and the organic matter content in the sediment. The accumulation of heavy metals showed similar results to that of the radionuclides in the sediment.

  9. Neutron activation analysis of stream bed and marine sediments for river and coastal resource management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stream bed sediments from four sites in the tributaries Aklan River, and five marine coastal sediments from Batan, Aklan, were analyzed to evaluate an analytical method for the determination of major (Cl, Ti, Ca, Mg, P, Si, Fe, Al, Na, K, Mn) and trace elements (Cu,Ba, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Mo, Ga, Ni, Mb, Th, Sr, Sn, S, Pb, Rb, Zr, Zn, V, Yb, Sc, Se, Br, La, Ce, Au,) using neutron activation analysis, NAA. Samples were prepared by grinding the sediments to fine powders and subjecting the processed samples to either short irradiation (10 s) and/or long irradiation (20 min) in a nuclear reactor. The JRR-3, a domestically designed and constructed 20 MW reactor in Japan provides a max thermal flux of 2 x 1014 [cm-2 s-1] in the core. The samples were bombarded with neutron flux from the JRR-3 reactor, to instigate formation of radioactive isotopes. After complete activation, the samples were analyzed using a high purity germanium, HPGe, detector and the spectra of the emissions of the radioactive samples were used to determine the concentrations of the elements. The short-lived radionuclides were counted after 1 week cooling time. Quantification of elemental composition and analysis of accuracy was done by comparison to certified reference material standards: JMS-1 for marine sediments and JSD-11 for river sediments. Detection limits for trace elements were in the part per billion (ppb) range and are adequate for geochemical, agricultural, and environmental purposes. Application of this validated technique affords reliable determination on new mineral potentiality in the sediments and indicate ambient conditions of macro-and micro-nutrients' availability for agriculture/fisheries coastal resource development. (author)

  10. Nitrogen isotopes in bulk marine sediment: linking seafloor observations with subseafloor records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-E. Tesdal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The stable isotopes of nitrogen offer a unique perspective on changes in the nitrogen cycle, past and present. However, the presence of multiple forms of nitrogen in marine sediments can complicate the interpretation of bulk nitrogen isotope measurements. Although the large-scale global patterns of seafloor δ15N have been shown to match process-based expectations, small-scale heterogeneity on the seafloor, or alterations of isotopic signals during translation into the subseafloor record, could obscure the primary signals. Here, a public database of nitrogen isotope measurements is described, including both seafloor and subseafloor sediment samples ranging in age from modern to the Pliocene, and used to assess these uncertainties. In general, good agreement is observed between neighbouring seafloor sites within a 100 km radius, with 85% showing differences of < 1‰. There is also a good correlation between the δ15N of the shallowest (< 5 ka subseafloor sediments and neighbouring seafloor sites within a 100 km radius (R2 = 0.83, which suggests a reliable translation of sediments into the buried sediment record. Meanwhile, gradual δ15N decreases over multiple glacial–interglacial cycles appear to reflect post-depositional alteration in records from the deep sea (below 2000 m. We suggest a simple conceptual model to explain these 100-kyr-timescale changes in well-oxygenated, slowly accumulating sediments, which calls on differential loss rates for pools of organic N with different δ15N. We conclude that bulk sedimentary nitrogen isotope records are reliable monitors of past changes in the marine nitrogen cycle at most locations, and could be further improved with a better understanding of systematic post-depositional alteration. Furthermore, geochemical or environmental criteria should be developed in order to effectively identify problematic locations and to account for

  11. Fluid composition of the sediment-influenced Loki's Castle vent field at the ultra-slow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumberger, Tamara; Früh-Green, Gretchen L.; Thorseth, Ingunn H.; Lilley, Marvin D.; Hamelin, Cédric; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Okland, Ingeborg E.; Pedersen, Rolf B.

    2016-08-01

    The hydrothermal vent field Loki's Castle is located in the Mohns-Knipovich bend (73°N) of the ultraslow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) close to the Bear Island sediment fan. The hydrothermal field is venting up to 320° C hot black smoker fluids near the summit of an axial volcanic ridge. Even though the active chimneys have grown on a basaltic ridge, geochemical fluid data show a strong sedimentary influence into the hydrothermal circulation at Loki's Castle. Compelling evidence for a sediment input is given by high alkalinity, high concentrations of NH4+, H2, CH4, C2+ hydrocarbons as well as low Mn and Fe contents. The low δ13C values of CO2 and CH4 and the thermogenic isotopic pattern of the C2+ hydrocarbons in the high-temperature vent fluids clearly point to thermal degradation of sedimentary organic matter and illustrate diminution of the natural carbon sequestration in sediments by hydrothermal circulation. Thus, carbon-release to the hydrosphere in Arctic regions is especially relevant in areas where the active Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge system is in contact with the organic matter rich detrital sediment fans.

  12. Viability of microcomputed tomography to study tropical marine worm galleries in humid muddy sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioturbation is an ecological process driven by organisms, which transports nutrients and gases from air/water to sediment through their galleries, by the time they feed, burrow and/or construct galleries. This exchange is vital to the maintenance of micro and macrobenthic organisms, mainly in muddy flat environments. Species with distinct galleries could create levels of bioturbation, affecting the benthic interactions. In this sense, it is fundamental developing a non-destructive method that permits identifying/quantifying the properties of these galleries. The recent advances in micro-computed tomography are allowing the high resolution 3D images generation. However, once muddy sediments are rich in organic matter and interstitial water, these would lead to motion artifacts which could, in turn, decrease the accuracy of galleries identification/quantification. In this context, the aim of this study was to develop a protocol which combines laboratory experiments and microtomography analysis in order to generate accurate 3D images of the small marine worm's galleries within humid muddy sediments. The sediment was collected at both muddy flats of Surui's and Itaipu lagoon's mangroves (RJ-Brazil), sieved (0.5mm mesh) and introduced with one individual of the marine worm Laeonereis acuta (Nereididae, Polychaeta) in each acrylic corer holders (4.4cm of internal diameter). High energy microtomography scanner was used to obtain 3D images and the setup calibration was 130 kV and 61 mA. Each acquisition image time was among 4h and 6h. Several procedures of drying remained water inside the cores were performed aiming obtaining images without movement artifacts due to circulating water, and this issue was one of the main studied parameter. In order to investigate possible chemical effects, 2ml of formalin (35%) with menthol were added to the surface of the cores. The results show that although the drying time was appropriated, the chemicals created bubbles within the

  13. Viability of microcomputed tomography to study tropical marine worm galleries in humid muddy sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennafirme, Simone F., E-mail: sipennafirme@gmail.com [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Biologia Marinha; Machado, Alessandra S.; Lima, Inaya; Suzuki, Katia N.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: machado@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: inaya@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: norisuzuki6@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    Bioturbation is an ecological process driven by organisms, which transports nutrients and gases from air/water to sediment through their galleries, by the time they feed, burrow and/or construct galleries. This exchange is vital to the maintenance of micro and macrobenthic organisms, mainly in muddy flat environments. Species with distinct galleries could create levels of bioturbation, affecting the benthic interactions. In this sense, it is fundamental developing a non-destructive method that permits identifying/quantifying the properties of these galleries. The recent advances in micro-computed tomography are allowing the high resolution 3D images generation. However, once muddy sediments are rich in organic matter and interstitial water, these would lead to motion artifacts which could, in turn, decrease the accuracy of galleries identification/quantification. In this context, the aim of this study was to develop a protocol which combines laboratory experiments and microtomography analysis in order to generate accurate 3D images of the small marine worm's galleries within humid muddy sediments. The sediment was collected at both muddy flats of Surui's and Itaipu lagoon's mangroves (RJ-Brazil), sieved (0.5mm mesh) and introduced with one individual of the marine worm Laeonereis acuta (Nereididae, Polychaeta) in each acrylic corer holders (4.4cm of internal diameter). High energy microtomography scanner was used to obtain 3D images and the setup calibration was 130 kV and 61 mA. Each acquisition image time was among 4h and 6h. Several procedures of drying remained water inside the cores were performed aiming obtaining images without movement artifacts due to circulating water, and this issue was one of the main studied parameter. In order to investigate possible chemical effects, 2ml of formalin (35%) with menthol were added to the surface of the cores. The results show that although the drying time was appropriated, the chemicals created bubbles

  14. Vitamin B1 in marine sediments: pore water concentration gradient drives benthic flux with potential biological implications

    OpenAIRE

    Monteverde, Danielle R.; Gómez-Consarnau, Laura; Cutter, Lynda; Chong, Lauren; Berelson, William; Sañudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio A.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin B1, or thiamin, can limit primary productivity in marine environments, however the major marine environmental sources of this essential coenzyme remain largely unknown. Vitamin B1 can only be produced by organisms that possess its complete synthesis pathway, while other organisms meet their cellular B1 quota by scavenging the coenzyme from exogenous sources. Due to high bacterial cell density and diversity, marine sediments could represent some of the highest concentrations of putativ...

  15. Temperature response of denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation rates and microbial community structure in Arctic fjord sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canion, Andy; Overholt, Will A; Kostka, Joel E; Huettel, Markus; Lavik, Gaute; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2014-10-01

    The temperature dependency of denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) rates from Arctic fjord sediments was investigated in a temperature gradient block incubator for temperatures ranging from -1 to 40°C. Community structure in intact sediments and slurry incubations was determined using Illumina SSU rRNA gene sequencing. The optimal temperature (Topt ) for denitrification was 25-27°C, whereas anammox rates were optimal at 12-17°C. Both denitrification and anammox exhibited temperature responses consistent with a psychrophilic community, but anammox bacteria may be more specialized for psychrophilic activity. Long-term (1-2 months) warming experiments indicated that temperature increases of 5-10°C above in situ had little effect on the microbial community structure or the temperature response of denitrification and anammox. Increases of 25°C shifted denitrification temperature responses to mesophilic with concurrent community shifts, and anammox activity was eliminated above 25°C. Additions of low molecular weight organic substrates (acetate and lactate) caused increases in denitrification rates, corroborating the hypothesis that the supply of organic substrates is a more dominant control of respiration rates than low temperature. These results suggest that climate-related changes in sinking particulate flux will likely alter rates of N removal more rapidly than warming. PMID:25115991

  16. Magnetostratigraphy of sediments from Lake El'gygytgyn ICDP Site 5011-1: paleomagnetic age constraints for the longest paleoclimate record from the continental Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Haltia

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Paleomagnetic measurements were performed on sediments drilled from ICDP Site 5011-1 in Lake El'gygytgyn (67°30' N, 172°05' E located in Far East Russian Arctic. The lake fills partly a crater formed by a meteorite impact 3.58 ± 0.04 Ma ago. Sediments from three parallel cores (5011-1A, 5011-1B and 5011-1C, recovered from the middle part of the lake, yielded a total of 355 m of sediment. Sediments are characterized by variable lithology, where intervals of homogenous and laminated sediments alternate, and mass movement deposits of variable thickness occur frequently along the sediment profile. Mineral magnetic investigation made on sediments enclosed in core catchers suggests that magnetic carrier in these sediments is partly maghemitized Ti-rich pseudo-single domain magnetite. Its detrital origin could be shown by mineral magnetic measurements and SEM-EDS analyses performed on mini-sized cylindrical rock samples, polished rock sections, creek sediments and magnetic extracts prepared from them. The intensity of the natural remanent magnetization (NRM in the sediments is mainly high with a range from about 1 to 1000 mA m−1. Most of the sediments carry a stable magnetization component interpreted as primary depositional remanent magnetization. Characteristic inclination data show alternating intervals of steep positive and negative inclinations that were used to assign magnetic polarity to the lake sediment profile. This was a rather straightforward procedure owing to the mainly high quality of data. The Matuyama/Gauss (2.608 Ma and Brunhes/Matuyama (0.780 Ma reversals were recognized in the sediments. Furthermore, during the Gauss chron the Mammoth and Kaena reversed subchrons, and during the Matuyama, the Olduvai and Jaramillo normal subchrons, as well as the Réunion and Cobb Mountain cryptochrons were identified. Sediment deposition rate is highest at the base of the sequence laid down in the beginning of Gauss chron, when deposition rate

  17. Interaction between Cenozoic fault activity and sediment influx in the Arctic region: new thermochronologic data and seismic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigot-Buschendorf, Maelianna; Mouthereau, Frédéric; Fillon, Charlotte; Loget, Nicolas; Labrousse, Loïc; Werner, Philippe; Bernet, Matthias; Ehlers, Todd

    2015-04-01

    The Alaskan Brooks Range and its canadian counterpart, the British Mountains result from the Meso-Cenozoic collision of the Arctic continental margin with accreted volcanic arcs and adjacent continental terranes. Because of its location and known potential for oil industries, more attention has been brought to this area for the last few years. While the timing of collisional events, duration, and rates of exhumation associated with mountain building is now better understood, the causes of these exhumation events are still largely unknown. Published constraints and our present data are consistent with progressive cooling from 105 to 25 Ma, with rates of exhumation constant across the range until 35-25 Ma. From 35 Ma onwards, exhumation likely slowed in concomitance with underplating/duplexing in the inner part of the belt (Doonerak window) and activation of the northernmost thrust. The earliest cooling stage (from 100 Ma) marking the onset of the Brookian orogeny is recorded by a low order coarsening upward sequence in the foreland. On the contrary, the latest stage of cooling (at 35 Ma) is not linked to the construction of the range but more likely due to a reorganization of the wedge possibly related to changes in the regional climatic or geodynamic boundary conditions. First, we aim at reconstructing the time-temperature evolution of the British Mountains by combining new (U-Th)/He and fission-tracks ages on zircon and apatite ; our first thermochronological data in the British Mountains show ages ranging from 110 to 25 Ma from range to basin. These data will permit to reconstruct the thermal history of the British Mountains and its basin, and to estimate the exhumation rates associated to the main unities. Then, we also examine the role of climate during the Tertiary period. Some markers indicate a climate change at this period which could be registered in the sedimentation. Therefore we determine the part of climate by analyzing seismic lines in the Beaufort

  18. Zinc isotope ratios as indicators of diet and trophic level in Arctic marine mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Klervia Jaouen; Paul Szpak; Richards, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of bone collagen are an established method for dietary reconstruction, but this method is limited by the protein preservation. Zinc (Zn) is found in bioapatite and the isotopic compositions of this element constitute a very promising dietary indicator. The extent of fractionation of Zn isotopes in marine environments, however, remains unknown. We report here on the measurement of zinc, carbon and nitrogen isotopes in 47 marine mammals from the archaeo...

  19. Inversion of marine multifrequency electromagnetic profiling data: a new approach to resolve surficial sediment stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baasch, B.; Müller, H.; Oberle, F. K. J.; von Dobeneck, T.

    2014-01-01

    Electromagnetic induction (EMI) methods are widely used on land to map electric conductivity and/or magnetic susceptibility distributions of surficial sediments. In contrast, the application of these methods in marine environments is relatively novel. Based on the recently developed electromagnetic benthic profiler MARUM-NERIDIS III we investigate the potential of concentric-loop EMI methods to recover conductivity and susceptibility of layered marine sediments. Sensitivity analyses based on a data and model normalized Jacobian matrix were performed to compare the influence of conductivity and susceptibility to in-phase and quadrature components at different frequencies. Both parameters substantially affect the EM response. However, the influence of susceptibility decreases more with depth and offers lower depth resolution than that of conductivity. A 1-D inversion algorithm to reconstruct vertical conductivity distributions was developed from existing non-linear inversion methods using apparent conductivity and apparent susceptibility recovered from simultaneous half-space inversion as a priori information. This algorithm was tested on synthetic and real marine EM data from a commercial multifrequency concentric loop EMI system (GEM-3). The results indicate that our inversion algorithm yields meaningful results down to approximately 3 m depth under typical shallow marine conditions. The comparison of inversion results recovered with 1-D and 2-D constraints showed that combining lateral with vertical constraints substantially improves the resolution of the inversion outputs. Field data from the NW Iberian shelf was calibrated according to a processing flow specifically designed for underwater conditions and analysed. Inversion outputs are in good agreement with ground-truthing stratigraphic investigations and deliver relevant clues on past and present sediment dynamics.

  20. Microbial processes and organic priority substances in marine coastal sediments (Adriatic Sea, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoppini, Annamaria; Ademollo, Nicoletta; Amalfitano, Stefano; Dellisanti, Walter; Lungarini, Silvia; Miserocchi, Stefano; Patrolecco, Luisa; Langone, Leonardo

    2015-04-01

    PERSEUS EU FP7 Project aims to identify the interacting patterns of natural and human-derived pressures to assess their impact on marine ecosystems and, using the objectives and principles of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) as a vehicle, to design an effective and innovative research governance framework based on sound scientific knowledge. In the frame of this Project (subtask 1.3.3 ADREX: Adriatic and Ionian Seas Experiment), monitoring surveys were conducted in the Adriatic Sea (Italy) in order to study the variation of structural and functional characteristics of native bacterial communities and the occurrence of selected classes of organic priority substances in sediments. The study area represents a good natural laboratory sensitive to climate variability and human pressure, owing to the semi-enclosed nature of the Adriatic Sea and to the increasing trend of human activities in the coastal regions. During the cruise ADRI-13 (November 2013) and ADRI-14 (October 2014) we sampled several coastal sites from the mouth of the Po River to the Otranto strait. Surface sediments were collected in all areas, while sediment cores were sampled in selected sites. Microbes associated with marine sediments play an important role in the C-flux being responsible for the transformation of organic detritus (autochthonous and allochthonous) into biomass. The sediment bacterial abundance was determined by epifluorescence microscopy and the rate of bacterial carbon production by measuring the 3H-leucine uptake rates. The community respiration rate was estimated by the measurement of the electron transport system (ETS) activity. The sediment contamination level was determined by measuring the concentration of contaminants included in the list of organic priority substances: PAHs, bisphenol A (BPA), alkylphenols (APs). The extraction/clean-up of PAHs, BPA and APs was performed by ultrasonic bath with the appropriate solvents, followed by analytical determination with

  1. Release and migration of activation products from corrosion-resistant metal specimens in marine sediments. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation of the release of Ni-63, Co-60, and Fe-55 from Inconel 600 and 347 stainless steel specimens implanted in marine sediment for one year is described. Radiochemical analysis of the sediment from overcores of the metal specimens permit estimation of integrated activities, release rates, and diffusion coefficients of the three radionuclides. The redox chemistry of the sediments is characterized by measurement of several naturally occurring oxidizing agents and is correlated with the behavior of the radionuclides

  2. Quantitative analysis of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments: A modeling perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, P.; Dale, A. W.; Arndt, S.; LaRowe, D. E.; Mogollón, J.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2011-05-01

    Recent developments in the quantitative modeling of methane dynamics and anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments are critically reviewed. The first part of the review begins with a comparison of alternative kinetic models for AOM. The roles of bioenergetic limitations, intermediate compounds and biomass growth are highlighted. Next, the key transport mechanisms in multi-phase sedimentary environments affecting AOM and methane fluxes are briefly treated, while attention is also given to additional controls on methane and sulfate turnover, including organic matter mineralization, sulfur cycling and methane phase transitions. In the second part of the review, the structure, forcing functions and parameterization of published models of AOM in sediments are analyzed. The six-orders-of-magnitude range in rate constants reported for the widely used bimolecular rate law for AOM emphasizes the limited transferability of this simple kinetic model and, hence, the need for more comprehensive descriptions of the AOM reaction system. The derivation and implementation of more complete reaction models, however, are limited by the availability of observational data. In this context, we attempt to rank the relative benefits of potential experimental measurements that should help to better constrain AOM models. The last part of the review presents a compilation of reported depth-integrated AOM rates (ΣAOM). These rates reveal the extreme variability of ΣAOM in marine sediments. The model results are further used to derive quantitative relationships between ΣAOM and the magnitude of externally impressed fluid flow, as well as between ΣAOM and the depth of the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ). This review contributes to an improved understanding of the global significance of the AOM process, and helps identify outstanding questions and future directions in the modeling of methane cycling and AOM in marine sediments.

  3. Ammonia in the summertime Arctic marine boundary layer: sources, sinks, and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth, Gregory R.; Murphy, Jennifer G.; Croft, Betty; Martin, Randall V.; Pierce, Jeffrey R.; Côté, Jean-Sébastien; Courchesne, Isabelle; Tremblay, Jean-Éric; Gagnon, Jonathan; Thomas, Jennie L.; Sharma, Sangeeta; Toom-Sauntry, Desiree; Chivulescu, Alina; Levasseur, Maurice; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.

    2016-02-01

    Continuous hourly measurements of gas-phase ammonia (NH3(g)) were taken from 13 July to 7 August 2014 on a research cruise throughout Baffin Bay and the eastern Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Concentrations ranged from 30 to 650 ng m-3 (40-870 pptv) with the highest values recorded in Lancaster Sound (74°13' N, 84°00' W). Simultaneous measurements of total ammonium ([NHx]), pH and temperature in the ocean and in melt ponds were used to compute the compensation point (χ), which is the ambient NH3(g) concentration at which surface-air fluxes change direction. Ambient NH3(g) was usually several orders of magnitude larger than both χocean and χMP (transport model was employed to examine the impact of NH3(g) emissions from seabird guano on boundary-layer composition and nss-SO42- neutralization. A GEOS-Chem simulation without seabird emissions underestimated boundary layer NH3(g) by several orders of magnitude and yielded highly acidic aerosol. A simulation that included seabird NH3 emissions was in better agreement with observations for both NH3(g) concentrations and nss-SO42- neutralization. This is strong evidence that seabird colonies are significant sources of NH3 in the summertime Arctic, and are ubiquitous enough to impact atmospheric composition across the entire Baffin Bay region. Large wildfires in the Northwest Territories were likely an important source of NH3, but their influence was probably limited to the Central Canadian Arctic. Implications of seabird-derived N-deposition to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are also discussed.

  4. Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Sediment Processes in Shallow Waters of the Arctic Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Frédéric Gazeau; Pieter van Rijswijk; Lara Pozzato; Middelburg, Jack J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the important roles of shallow-water sediments in global biogeochemical cycling, the effects of ocean acidification on sedimentary processes have received relatively little attention. As high-latitude cold waters can absorb more CO2 and usually have a lower buffering capacity than warmer waters, acidification rates in these areas are faster than those in sub-tropical regions. The present study investigates the effects of ocean acidification on sediment composition, processes and sedim...

  5. Novel aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase genes from coastal marine sediments of Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrero Marcela A

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, widespread pollutants in the marine environment, can produce adverse effects in marine organisms and can be transferred to humans through seafood. Our knowledge of PAH-degrading bacterial populations in the marine environment is still very limited, and mainly originates from studies of cultured bacteria. In this work, genes coding catabolic enzymes from PAH-biodegradation pathways were characterized in coastal sediments of Patagonia with different levels of PAH contamination. Results Genes encoding for the catalytic alpha subunit of aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases (ARHDs were amplified from intertidal sediment samples using two different primer sets. Products were cloned and screened by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Clones representing each restriction pattern were selected in each library for sequencing. A total of 500 clones were screened in 9 gene libraries, and 193 clones were sequenced. Libraries contained one to five different ARHD gene types, and this number was correlated with the number of PAHs found in the samples above the quantification limit (r = 0.834, p nahAc-like genes, phnAc-like genes as identified in Alcaligenes faecalis AFK2, and phnA1-like genes from marine PAH-degraders from the genus Cycloclasticus. Conclusion These results show the presence of hitherto unidentified ARHD genes in this sub-Antarctic marine environment exposed to anthropogenic contamination. This information can be used to study the geographical distribution and ecological significance of bacterial populations carrying these genes, and to design molecular assays to monitor the progress and effectiveness of remediation technologies.

  6. Bioremediation of oil polluted marine sediments: A bio-engineering treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Simone; Calogero, Rosario; Santisi, Santina; Genovese, Maria; Denaro, Renata; Genovese, Lucrezia; Giuliano, Laura; Mancini, Giuseppe; Yakimov, Michail M

    2015-06-01

    The fate of hydrocarbon pollutants and the development of oil-degrading indigenous marine bacteria in contaminated sediments are strongly influenced by abiotic factors such as temperature, low oxygen levels, and nutrient availability. In this work, the effects of different biodegradation processes (bioremediation) on oil-polluted anoxic sediments were analyzed. In particular, as a potential bioremediation strategy for polluted sediments, we applied a prototype of the "Modular Slurry System" (MSS), allowing containment of the sediments and their physical-chemical treatment (by air insufflations, temperature regulation, and the use of a slow-release fertilizer). Untreated polluted sediments served as the blank in a non-controlled experiment. During the experimental period (30 days), bacterial density and biochemical oxygen demand were measured and functional genes were identified by screening. Quantitative measurements of pollutants and an eco-toxicological analysis (mortality of Corophium orientale) were carried out at the beginning and end of the experiments. The results demonstrated the high biodegradative capability achieved with the proposed technology and its strong reduction of pollutant concentrations and thus toxicity. PMID:26496620

  7. Determination of multi-element in marine sediment samples collected in Angola by the k0-NAA technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The marine sediment samples were designed to collect in Angola for marine environmental pollution study. The k0-standardization method of neutron activation analysis (k0-NAA) on Dalat research reactor has been developed to determine of multi-element in the Angola marine sediment samples. The samples were irradiated in cell 7-1 for short- and middle-lived nuclides and rotary specimen rack for long-lived nuclides. The irradiation facilities were characterized for neutron spectrum parameters and post-activated samples were measured on the calibrated gamma-ray spectrometers using HPGe detectors. The analytical results for 9 marine sediment samples with 27 elements: Al, As, Br, Ca, Ce,Cl, Co, Cs, Dy, Fe, Hf, I, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Th, Ti, U, V and Zn in term of mean concentration, standard deviation and their content range are shown in the report. The analytical quality assurance was done by analysis of a Japan's certified reference material namely marine sediment NMIJ-CRM-7302a. These preliminary results revealed that the k0-NAA technique on the Dalat research reactor is a good analytical technique for determination of multi-element in the marine sediment samples. Some heavy metals and trace elements determined in this work possibly connected to the human activities at the sampling region. (author)

  8. Latitudinal variation in ecological opportunity and intraspecific competition indicates differences in niche variability and diet specialization of Arctic marine predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkowski, David J; Ferguson, Steve; Choy, Emily S; Loseto, Lisa L; Brown, Tanya M; Muir, Derek C G; Semeniuk, Christina A D; Fisk, Aaron T

    2016-03-01

    Individual specialization (IS), where individuals within populations irrespective of age, sex, and body size are either specialized or generalized in terms of resource use, has implications on ecological niches and food web structure. Niche size and degree of IS of near-top trophic-level marine predators have been little studied in polar regions or with latitude. We quantified the large-scale latitudinal variation of population- and individual-level niche size and IS in ringed seals (Pusa hispida) and beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis on 379 paired ringed seal liver and muscle samples and 124 paired beluga skin and muscle samples from eight locations ranging from the low to high Arctic. We characterized both within- and between-individual variation in predator niche size at each location as well as accounting for spatial differences in the isotopic ranges of potential prey. Total isotopic niche width (TINW) for populations of ringed seals and beluga decreased with increasing latitude. Higher TINW values were associated with greater ecological opportunity (i.e., prey diversity) in the prey fish community which mainly consists of Capelin (Mallotus villosus) and Sand lance (Ammodytes sp.) at lower latitudes and Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida) at high latitudes. In beluga, their dietary consistency between tissues also known as the within-individual component (WIC) increased in a near 1:1 ratio with TINW (slope = 0.84), suggesting dietary generalization, whereas the slope (0.18) of WIC relative to TINW in ringed seals indicated a high degree of individual specialization in ringed seal populations with higher TINWs. Our findings highlight the differences in TINW and level of IS for ringed seals and beluga relative to latitude as a likely response to large-scale spatial variation in ecological opportunity, suggesting species-specific variation in dietary plasticity to spatial differences in prey resources and

  9. Triassic deep-marine sedimentation in the western Qinling and Songpan terrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG; QingRen; QU; HongJie; HU; JianMin

    2007-01-01

    Triassic sequences in both the western Qinling and Songpan terrane are composed mostly of deep-marine sediments. A detailed study was carried out on main sedimentary facies of Triassic successions, showing that they resulted from diverse sedimentary processes, such as submarine debris-flows, turbidity currents, bottom-flows, suspension fallout, and fluidized sediment flows. Debris-flows are dividable into two types, gravelly and sandy debris-flows, respectively, and the sandy debris-flow deposits make up considerable portion of the Triassic successions concerned. Turbidite is characterized by occurrence of normal grading, and the whole Bouma sequences, though widely developed, are not totally attributed to true turbidity currents. The non-graded Ta division is thought to originate from sandy debris flows, whereas the rest divisions result from low-density currents or from bottom-current modification if they contain sedimentary structures related to traction currents. Four types of facies associations are distinguished within Triassic deep-marine successions: massive and thick-bedded coarse-grained facies association, medium- and thick-bedded sandstone with interlayered fine-grained facies association, interlayered thin-bedded fine-grained facies association, and syn-sedimentary slump/breccia facies association. Spatial distribution of the different facies associations suggests that Lower Triassic sedimentation occurred primarily in continental slope, submarine channels, and base-of-slope aprons in the Hezuo-Jianzha region of the western Qinling, whereas the Middle Triassic consists mainly of sedimentary facies of base-of-slope aprons and submarine incised valleys. The counterparts in the Dangchang-Diebu region, in contrast, are characterized by platform carbonates. The shallow-marine carbonates evolved into deep-marine facies since the Ladinian, indicative of rapid drowning of the Carnian carbonate platform in Middle Triassic times. Depositional history of Lower

  10. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) anaerobic degradation in marine sediments: microcosm study and role of autochthonous microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matturro, Bruna; Ubaldi, Carla; Grenni, Paola; Caracciolo, Anna Barra; Rossetti, Simona

    2016-07-01

    Polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) biodegradation was followed for 1 year in microcosms containing marine sediments collected from Mar Piccolo (Taranto, Italy) chronically contaminated by this class of hazardous compounds. The microcosms were performed under strictly anaerobic conditions with or without the addition of Dehalococcoides mccartyi, the main microorganism known to degrade PCBs through the anaerobic reductive dechlorination process. Thirty PCB congeners were monitored during the experiments revealing that the biodegradation occurred in all microcosms with a decrease in hepta-, hexa-, and penta-chlorobiphenyls (CBs) and a parallel increase in low chlorinated PCBs (tri-CBs and tetra-CBs). The concentrations of the most representative congeners detected in the original sediment, such as 245-245-CB and 2345-245-CB, and of the mixture 2356-34-CB+234-245-CB, decreased by 32.5, 23.8, and 46.7 %, respectively, after only 70 days of anaerobic incubation without any bioaugmentation treatment. Additionally, the structure and population dynamics of the microbial key players involved in the biodegradative process and of the entire mixed microbial community were accurately defined by Catalyzed Reporter Deposition Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (CARD-FISH) in both the original sediment and during the operation of the microcosm. The reductive dehalogenase genes of D. mccartyi, specifically involved in PCB dechlorination, were also quantified using real-time PCR (qPCR). Our results demonstrated that the autochthonous microbial community living in the marine sediment, including D. mccartyi (6.32E+06 16S rRNA gene copy numbers g(-1) sediment), was able to efficiently sustain the biodegradation of PCBs when controlled anaerobic conditions were imposed. PMID:26162439

  11. In situ lubricant degradation in Antarctic marine sediments. 1. Short-term changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Belinda A W; Davies, Noel W; Goldsworthy, Paul M; Riddle, Martin J; Snape, Ian; Stark, Jonathan S

    2006-02-01

    A large-scale, in situ experiment was set up near the Bailey Peninsula area (Casey Station, East Antarctica) to monitor the natural attenuation of synthetic lubricants in marine sediments over five years. Here, we report the short-term changes after 5 and 56 weeks. The lubricants tested were an unused and used Mobil lubricant (0W/40; Exxon Mobil, Irving, TX, USA) and a biodegradable alternative (0W/20; Fuchs Lubricants, Harvey, IL, USA). Clean sediment was collected, contaminated with the lubricants, and deployed by divers onto the seabed in a randomized block design. The sampled sediments were analyzed by gas chromatography-flame-ionization detector and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with selective ion monitoring. The base fluid of all lubricant treatments did not decrease significantly after 56 weeks in situ. Alkanoate esters of 1,1,1-tris(hydroxymethyl)propane in the biodegradable and unused lubricants were degraded extensively in situ; however, these esters constituted only a minor proportion of the lubricant volume. The additives, alkylated naphthalenes and substituted diphenylamines, were fairly resistant to degradation, which is of environmental concern because of their toxicity. The biodegradable lubricant did not break down to recognized biodegradable thresholds and, as such, should not be classified as biodegradable under Antarctic marine conditions. A separate experiment was conducted to determine the influence of sediment preparation and deployment on compound ratios within the lubricants, and we found that preparation and deployment of the contaminated sediments had only a minor effect on compound recovery. Further monitoring of this in situ experiment will provide much needed information about the long-term natural attenuation of lubricants. PMID:16519295

  12. Development of marine sediment bioassays and toxicity tests for monitoring and regulation in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thain, J.; Matthiessen, P.

    1995-12-31

    There is a need in Europe and elsewhere for a broad suite of whole-sediment bioassays and toxicity tests which can be used for routine monitoring and assessment of the marine environment and for evaluating the toxic effects of chemicals which may find their way into sediments. Until recently, few European species had been incorporated into such tests but the availability of suitable methodologies is now increasing rapidly. Perhaps the most important recent activity in this area consisted of an international ring test of acute sediment toxicity test methods which was organized by the Oslo and Paris Commissions in 1993, using up to 4 offshore chemicals as test materials. It evaluated the performance of 4 acute (5--10 day) tests involving: the sea urchin Echinocardium cordatum, the bivalve mollusc Abra alba, the amphipod crustacean Corophium volutator, and the polychaete worm Arenicola marina. The ring test concluded that the C. volutator test was the most appropriate for evaluating offshore chemicals, but all these methods are now widely used in Europe, both as toxicity tests and as bioassays. For example, the A. marina procedure (which has both lethal and sublethal endpoints), in combination with the C. volutator method, is now routinely used in the UK for monitoring the toxicity of estuarine sediments. Further activities are in progress. Perhaps the most important is the development of chronic marine sediment tests and bioassays which can be used to assess the long-term effects of the many sedimentary contaminants which are able to persist in this type of habitat and possibly cause delayed effects on the growth and reproduction, etc. of benthic fauna.

  13. Arctic soil development on a series of marine terraces on Central Spitsbergen, Svalbard: a combined geochronology, fieldwork and modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meij, W. M.; Temme, A. J. A. M.; de Kleijn, C. M. F. J. J.; Reimann, T.; Heuvelink, G. B. M.; Zwoliński, Z.; Rachlewicz, G.; Rymer, K.; Sommer, M.

    2015-12-01

    Soils in Arctic regions currently enjoy significant attention because of their potentially substantial changes under climate change. It is important to quantify the natural processes and rates of development of these soils, to better define and determine current and future changes. Specifically, there is a need to quantify the interactions between various landscape and soil forming processes that together have resulted in current soil properties. Soil chronosequences are ideal natural experiments for this purpose. In this contribution, we combine field observations, luminescence dating and soil-landscape modelling to test and improve our understanding about Arctic soil formation. Our field site is a Holocene chronosequence of gravelly raised marine terraces in central Spitsbergen. Field observations suggest that soil-landscape development is mainly driven by weathering, silt translocation, aeolian deposition and rill erosion. Spatial soil heterogeneity is mainly caused by soil age, morphological position and depth under the surface. Substantial organic matter accumulation only occurs in few, badly drained positions. Luminescence dating confirmed existing radiocarbon dating of the terraces, which are between ~ 3.6 and ~ 14.4 ka old. Observations and ages were used to parameterize soil landscape evolution model LORICA, which was subsequently used to test the hypothesis that our field-observed processes indeed dominate soil-landscape development. Model results indicate the importance of aeolian deposition as a source of fine material in the subsoil for both sheltered beach trough positions and barren beach ridge positions. Simulated overland erosion was negligible. Therefore, an un-simulated process must be responsible for creating the observed erosion rills. Dissolution and physical weathering both play a major role. However, by using present day soil observations, relative physical and chemical weathering could not be disentangled. Discrepancies between field and

  14. Radionuclide impact on sediments and algae from Black sea marine ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide metals are the major part of anthropogenic fallout pollutants in the Black Sea marine ecosystems. The complex analysis of pollutant concentrations is a major concern for modern ecology in obtaining reliable information about the type and quantities of substances entering the marine environment. Marine macroalgae are important factor for nuclides accumulation in marine ecosystems. The ecological conditions at the Black Sea littoral zone vary depending on the location and depth. The seasonal change in macrophytic species is determined by the season, temperature and light regime. Some algae species are adaptive to contamination but some species react quickly to the environmental changes especially to the chemical contaminants. This paper deals with the problem of transboundary pollution in the Black Sea and the most significant pollution problem has been identified as the eutrophication phenomenon. Oxygen deficiency (hypoxia or anoxia) and mass mortality caused by eutrophication have become a permanent feature in the north-western shelf area where anoxic zones have expanded from covering 3500 km2 in 1973 to 40,000 km2 in 1990. The data for technogenic (mainly 137Cs) and natural radionuclides were determined in the sediment samples collected along the Bulgarian Black Sea coast. The measured levels correspond to those cited in the literature for background levels, showing no additional anthropogenic contamination. In sand and sandy sediments Cs content does not change greatly while the process of 137Cs accumulation is observed in slime and silt sediments. The data show that the 238U and 226Ra values are close at most of the locations. 226Ra /238U activity ratio (mean value) for sand and sandy sediments is in the range 0.55 - 0.85, meaning 226Ra deficit while the values for 226Ra /238U ratios in slime and silt sediments are close to the equilibrium. The obtained data show that radionuclide concentrations strongly depend on the sediment nature. Results for

  15. Disentangling the fossil world from the deep biosphere in marine sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, J. B.; Walsh, E. A.; D'Hondt, S.

    2015-12-01

    DNA in marine sediment contains both detrital sequences and sequences from organisms native to the sediment. The demarcation between these two pools and their rates of respective turnover as sediment ages are generally unknown. Here we address these issues by quantifying the total extractable DNA pool and comparing it to the fraction of sequenced chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) in sediment from two sites in the Bering Sea. Sediment at both of these sites is initially oxic, but transitions to suboxic and anoxic within approximately hundred years. In our samples, cpDNA as a tracer of detrital DNA is dominated by identifiable phylotypes that match specific siliceous microfossil taxa. The fraction of sequences comprised by cpDNA decreases with increasing sediment age over hundreds of thousands of years (kyr) to 1.4 million years (Ma), but does not reach zero at either site. When we take into account the overall shrinkage of the DNA pool, this cpDNA fraction follows a power-law function, suggesting that the residual cpDNA becomes increasingly recalcitrant with age. This increasing recalcitrance can be explained by biological activity decreasing with sediment age and / or by preferential long-term survival of only the most thoroughly protected DNA. In either case, this trend suggests that DNA persisting beyond an initial period (ca. 100 - 200 kyr at our sites) has an increased chance of preservation at depth. The association of sequenced cpDNA reads with specific siliceous microfossil taxa suggests that microfossils may help to preserve DNA; DNA from such taxa may be useful for studies of paleoenvironmental conditions and biological evolution on timescales that approach or exceed one million years.

  16. Ecotoxicological response of marine organisms to inorganic and organic sediment amendments in laboratory exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Gunther; Leather, James; Kan, Jinjun; Arias-Thode, Yolanda Meriah

    2011-10-01

    Experimental materials currently being investigated for use as amendments for the in situ remediation of contaminated sediments were assessed for their potential impacts on marine benthos. Laboratory toxicity tests involving lethal and sublethal endpoints were conducted on sediments amended with apatite, organoclay, chitin, or acetate, with the polychaete Neanthes arenaceodentata, the amphipod Eohaustorius estuarius, and the larval sheepshead minnow Cyprinodon variegatus. Amendments were mixed loosely into uncontaminated or metal-contaminated sediments, and also added inside experimental geotextile mats, at sediment dry weight (dw) concentrations ranging from 0.5% to 10%. The geotextile mats, containing apatite (5 or 10% dw), and/or organoclay (5%) did not result in adverse effects on any of the test organisms. Chitin and acetate, however, repetitively resulted in adverse effects on survival and/or adverse or positive effects on organism growth at concentrations of ≤ 2.5% dw. The adverse effects were attributed to water quality degradation in the exposure vessels (notably ammonia and dissolved oxygen concentration, for chitin and acetate, respectively) as a result of the microbial breakdown of the amendments. For N. arenaceodentata, growth was enhanced in the presence of chitin at concentrations as low as 0.5% sediment dw, which stimulated bacterial growth that may have provided an additional food source for the polychaete. Sediment chitin concentrations of 0.5% resulted in a statistically significant reduction in N. arenaceodentata body burdens of 61%, 29%, and 54%, relative to unamended contaminated sediment, for Cu, Zn, and Cd, respectively. The studies suggest a lack of inherent toxicity of these materials on the experimental organisms, as the adverse or positive responses observed are likely related to artifacts associated with laboratory exposure. Assessments in field settings are needed to verify this conclusion. PMID:21840599

  17. Sediment ages and flux variations from depth profiles of 210Pb: lake and marine examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sediment accumulation rates are redetermined for several freshwater and marine settings to demonstrate the application of a new methodology for interpreting sediment core profiles of radioisotope activity versus depth. Depositional histories were reconstructed using the sediment isotope tomography (SIT) methodology, which abandons the stringent requirement of current methods that sediment accumulation rates and isotopic fluxes may not both vary with time. Using inverse numerical analysis techniques in conjunction with a predictive model, the SIT method is able to separate the effects of sediment accumulation from flux variations to determine age-to-depth relationships. Cumulative probability procedures provide a framework for interpreting the sensitivity and accuracy of the model-determined age-to-depth relationships. Restrictions applied to previous methods on interpreting sediment profiles affected by mixing must also be adhered to when using the SIT method. Previously published data from two Estonian lakes, Kurtna and Nommejaerv, from Rockwell Reservoir in Northeastern Ohio and from Cape Lookout Bight, NC, are examined to demonstrate the broad applicability of the methodology. With the exception of one location, the resultant age-to-depth relationships determined by the model agree with earlier interpretations. In the Estonian Lake Nommejaerv, previous use of the Constant Flux model overestimates sediment ages for two known time horizons, giving ages of 43 yr at 22 cm and 111 yr at 45 cm. The age-to-depth relationship determined by the SIT method reproduces satisfactorily the time horizons of 16±1 yr at 22 cm and 35±2 yr at 45 cm, in agreement with the onset of industrial activities in the region. These examples illustrate the suitability of this new methodology for application in a variety of complex depositional environments

  18. Pan-Arctic concentrations of mercury and stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) in marine zooplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerleau, Corinne; Stern, Gary A; Pućko, Monika; Foster, Karen L; Macdonald, Robie W; Fortier, Louis

    2016-05-01

    Zooplankton play a central role in marine food webs, dictating the quantity and quality of energy available to upper trophic levels. They act as "keystone" species in transfer of mercury (Hg) up through the marine food chain. Here, we present the first Pan-Arctic overview of total and monomethylmercury concentrations (THg and MMHg) and stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) in selected zooplankton species by assembling data collected between 1998 and 2012 from six arctic regions (Laptev Sea, Chukchi Sea, southeastern Beaufort Sea, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, Hudson Bay and northern Baffin Bay). MMHg concentrations in Calanus spp., Themisto spp. and Paraeuchaeta spp. were found to increase with higher δ(15)N and lower δ(13)C. The southern Beaufort Sea exhibited both the highest THg and MMHg concentrations. Biomagnification of MMHg between Calanus spp. and two of its known predators, Themisto spp. and Paraeuchaeta spp., was greatest in the southern Beaufort Sea. Our results show large geographical variations in Hg concentrations and isotopic signatures for individual species related to regional ecosystem features, such as varying water masses and freshwater inputs, and highlight the increased exposure to Hg in the marine food chain of the southern Beaufort Sea. PMID:26874765

  19. Genotoxic and teratogenic potential of marine sediment extracts investigated with comet assay and zebrafish test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic extracts of marine sediments from the North Sea and the Baltic Sea were investigated with two toxicity assays. The comet assay based on the fish cell line Epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) was applied to determine the genotoxic potential; zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio) were used to quantify the teratogenic potential of the samples. EC50 values were calculated from dose-response curves for both test systems. Highest teratogenic and genotoxic effects normalised to total organic carbon (TOC) content were detected in sediment samples of different origins. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are not likely to be the causes of the observed effects, as demonstrated by a two-step fractionation procedure of selected extracts. The toxic potential was more pronounced in fractions having polarity higher than those possessed by PAHs and PCBs. The suitability of the two in vitro test systems for assessing genotoxic and teratogenic effects of marine sediment extracts could be demonstrated. - Capsule: In vitro toxicity assays are used to assess genotoxic and teratogenic effects of environmental extracts

  20. Effect of salinity on methanogenic propionate degradation by acclimated marine sediment-derived culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Toyokazu; Kita, Akihisa; Okamura, Yoshiko; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2015-12-01

    Degradation of propionate under high salinity is needed for biomethane production from salt-containing feedstocks. In this study, marine sediment-derived culture was evaluated to determine the effect of salinity on methanogenic propionate degradation. Microbes in marine sediments were subjected to fed-batch cultivation on propionate for developing acclimatized cultures. The rate of propionate degradation increased eightfold during 10 rounds of cultivation. Microbial community composition was determined through pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons after 10 rounds of cultivation. Taxa analysis was conducted for the reads obtained by pyrosequencing. Known propionate degraders were undetectable in the acclimated culture. Comparison of bacterial taxa in the original sediment with those in the acclimated culture revealed that the populations of four bacterial taxa were significantly increased during acclimation. Methanolobus was the predominant archaea genus in the acclimated culture. The propionate degradation rate of the acclimated culture was not affected by salinity of up to equivalent of 1.9 % NaCl. The rate decreased at higher salinity levels and was more than 50 % of the maximum rate even at equivalent of 4.3 % NaCl. PMID:26364311

  1. Multi-elemental analysis of marine sediments of Manila Bay using x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the marine sediments of Manila Bay was done by employing X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The general trends observed in sediments are increasing (Ca and Sr), decreasing (Zr), or constant (Cl, Na, S, K) with respect to depth, sometimes, no trend can be observed. These trends are further explained by correlations present among these elements, plus all the other elements. The two X RF data analysis methods Auto Quantify and AXIL were also compared on the basis of the correlation plot obtained. AutoQuantify gave clearer correlations; thus, results from this method were used for constructing correlation plots. Correlations using Microsoft Excel and Stat graphics Centurion X V show that there are naturally occurring [lithogenic (Si, Ti, Al, Mg, Rb, Zn and Fe), biogenic (Ca, Mg), and conservative (Na, Cl)] and non-naturally occurring [mostly anthropogenic, brought to the bodies of water by aeolian or fluvial input (heavy metals Pb-Cu-Zn and Ni-Cr)] correlation present in the sediments. Moreover, pairs of elements that may coexist in a source and not coexist in another (Cr and Mg, Cr and Ni) have also been observed. The heavy metal enrichment was attributed to the burning of fossil fuels, iron and steel manufacturing (present in Valenzuela-Bulacan area), ferry and fishing services and other industrialization activities present in Manila Bay. Marine organisms are affected by the presence of these heavy metals by means of bioaccumulations, and may later on affect humans because of trophic transfer and bio magnification. (author)

  2. Ecological and isotopic insights to the origin of archaeal tetraethers in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, A.; Hurley, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Thaumarchaeota, formerly known as Marine Group I Crenarchaeota, are believed to be the primary source of the isoprenoidal glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether lipids (GDGTs) found in the environment. Enrichment mesocosms and empirical correlations for marine sediments (TEX86) show a positive relationship between environmental temperature and the number of cyclopentyl or cyclohexyl rings contained within the GDGT structure. The TEX86 paleotemperature proxy has been applied across a large temporal range of geologic events and to sediments of widely varying depositional and diagenetic history. TEX86 assumes a direct correlation between the preserved GDGT ratios and SST. A number of fundamental assumptions underlie this correlation, including that: (1) GDGTs transported to the sediments reflect biomass of surface origin, (2) GDGTs produced by Archaea deeper in the water column should reflect deep temperatures and are not exported, and (3) community variations - including the potential contribution of GDGTs by Group II Euryarchaeota - do not appreciably affect the overall TEX86-SST relationship. Here we discuss evidence that questions all three of these assumptions and propose strategies for further understanding how GDGTs record paleoenvironments. These new approaches include greater application of physiological and culture studies; concurrent measurements of δ13C, Δ14C and D/H ratios of GDGTs; and cross-correlations with other paleotemperature proxies.

  3. Biomonitoring polluted sediments in Arctic regions - possibilities and challenges using benthic foraminifera. Case studies from northern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirbekk, Kari; Dijkstra, Noortje; Junttila, Juho; Sternal, Beata; Pedersen, Kristine Bondo; Forwick, Matthias; Carroll, JoLynn

    2016-04-01

    Biomonitoring pollution in marine environments using benthic foraminifera assemblages have proven to be a valid method for many regions. Two important reasons for their suitability are their sensitivity to changes in the environment and their rapid response time due to short life cycles. In addition, they are preserved in the sedimentary record, allowing for baseline studies of conditions prior to introduction of contaminants. Species of benthic foraminifera that appear to tolerate polluted sediments are referred to as opportunistic species. This notion is in general used for species able to dominate environments that are too stressful for most species. The high latitude setting of the northern Norwegian coastal zone experience high seasonality and, hence, largely changing conditions throughout a year: variations in water mass domination, freshwater influence, temperature and current velocity. It is possible that an environment like this is inhibited by a higher amount of opportunistic species generally thriving under high stress conditions. This might make the use of benthic foraminifera for biomonitoring more challenging, as the faunal compositions may be a result of a complex set of processes. Consequently, large datasets are necessary in order to make reliable conclusions, which in time may be used as generalized guidelines for biomonitoring in this geographical area. Here, we present preliminary results of benthic foraminiferal assemblages from two sites in Finnmark, northern Norway, which have been exposed to pollution. The main site is Repparfjorden, where the inner parts of the fjord were used as a submarine waste deposal site for mine tailings from a local copper mine during the 1970´s. Results from four marine sediment cores (10-20 cm long) containing sediments classified to be in moderate to very bad state (according to Norwegian sediment quality criteria) are presented. The contamination is seen in intervals of elevated copper content dated to the 1970

  4. Oxygen distribution and bioirrigation in Arctic fjord sediments (Svalbard, Barents Sea)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, BB; Glud, RN; Holby, O.

    2005-01-01

    total oxygen uptake of the sediments as measured in situ by a flux chamber lander. The sediments were densely populated by fauna such as tube-dwelling polychaetes. Inhabited and relict tubes of 1 to 2.5 mm diameter reached densities of up to 1 cm(-2), and about 15 % of all oxygen microprofiles showed...... composite, 2-dimensional images of the oxygen distribution. Oxygen penetrations ranged from 3 to 11 min with a mean depth of 6 to 8 mm. The mean diffusive oxygen uptake rates across the sediment-water interface ranged from 2.8 to 13.4 mmol O-2 m(-2) d(-1). The diffusive flux accounted for 60 to 95% of the...... evidence of advective oxygen flow through the tubes. Based on oxygen microprofiles and data on burrow geometry and density, burrows extending down into the anoxic sediment extended the oxic sediment volume by 2 to 10 % and thereby enhanced the oxygen flux. Anoxic microenvironments were not detected, but...

  5. The Surface of Venus is Saturated With Ancient Impact Structures, and its Plains are Marine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, W. B.

    2009-05-01

    Conventional interpretations of Venus are forced to fit dubious pre-Magellan conjectures that the planet is as active internally as Earth and preserves no ancient surface features. Plate tectonics obviously does not operate, so it is commonly assumed that the surface must record other endogenic processes, mostly unique to Venus. Imaginative systems of hundreds of tiny to huge rising and sinking plumes and diapirs are invoked. That much of the surface in fact is saturated with overlapping large circular depressions with the morphology of impact structures is obscured by postulating plume origins for selected structures and disregarding the rest. Typical structures are rimmed circular depressions, often multiring, with lobate debris aprons; central peaks are common. Marine-sedimentation features are overlooked because dogma deems the plains to be basalt flows despite their lack of source volcanoes and fissures. The unearthly close correlation between geoid and topography at long to moderate wavelengths requires, in conventional terms, dynamic maintenance of topography by up and down plumes of long-sustained precise shapes and buoyancy. A venusian upper mantle much stronger than that of Earth, because it is cooler or poorer in volatiles, is not considered. (The unearthly large so-called volcanoes and tessera plateaus often are related to rimmed circular depressions and likely are products of impact fluidization and melting.) Plains-saturating impact structures (mostly more obvious in altimetry than backscatter) with diameters of hundreds of km are superimposed as cookie-cutter bites, are variably smoothed and smeared by apparent submarine impact and erosion, and are differentially buried by sediments compacted into them. Marine- sedimentation evidence includes this compaction; long sinuous channels and distributaries with turbidite- channel characteristics and turbidite-like lobate flows (Jones and Pickering, JGSL 2003); radar-smooth surfaces and laminated aspect in

  6. Thaumarchaeotal Signature Gene Distribution in Sediments of the Northern South China Sea: an Indicator of the Metabolic Intersection of the Marine Carbon, Nitrogen, and Phosphorus Cycles?

    OpenAIRE

    Dang, Hongyue; ZHOU, Haixia; Yang, Jinying; Ge, Huangmin; Jiao, Nianzhi; Luan, Xiwu; Zhang, Chuanlun; Martin G Klotz

    2013-01-01

    Thaumarchaeota are abundant and active in marine waters, where they contribute to aerobic ammonia oxidation and light-independent carbon fixation. The ecological function of thaumarchaeota in marine sediments, however, has rarely been investigated, even though marine sediments constitute the majority of the Earth's surface. Thaumarchaeota in the upper layer of sediments may contribute significantly to the reservoir of nitrogen oxides in ocean waters and thus to productivity, including the ass...

  7. INFLUENCE OF SOOT CARBON ON THE BIOACCULUMATION OF SEDIMENT-BOUND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS BY MARINE BENTHIC INVERTEBRATES: AN INTERSPECIES COMPARISON

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to soot carbon in marine sediments has been hypothesized to reduce PAH bioavailability. This hypothesis was tested for eight species of marine benthic invertebrates (four polychaete worms, Clymenella torquata, Nereis virens,...

  8. Tsunami induced transportation of the coastal marine sediments to distant onshore regions: Some indications from foraminiferal and microbenthic studies of new Wandoor region (Andaman & Nicobar)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khare, N.; Chaturvedi, S.K.; Ingole, B.S.

    regions near New Wandoor (Andaman and Nicobar) suggested the areal extent of marine transgression due to tsunami waves on December 26, 2004. There is a need to investigate coastal marine sediments with multi-disciplinary approach to understnd impact...

  9. Integrated ecotoxicological assessment of marine sediments affected by land-based marine fish farm effluents: physicochemical, acute toxicity and benthic community analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, C; Yáñez, E; Martín-Díaz, M L; Riba, I; DelValls, T A

    2013-08-01

    An integrated ecotoxicological assessment of marine sediments affected by land-based marine fish farm effluents was developed using physicochemical and benthic community structure analyses and standardised laboratory bioassays with bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), amphipods (Ampelisca brevicornis) and sea urchin larvae (Paracentrotus lividus). Intertidal sediment samples were collected at five sites of the Rio San Pedro (RSP) creek, from the aquaculture effluent to a clean site. The effective concentration (EC50) from bacterial bioluminescence and A. brevicornis survival on whole sediments and P. lividus larval developmental success on sediment elutriates were assessed. Numbers of species, abundance and Shannon diversity were the biodiversity indicators measured in benthic fauna of sediment samples. In parallel, redox potential, pH, organic matter and metal levels (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in the sediment and dissolved oxygen in the interstitial water were measured in situ. Water and sediment physicochemical analysis revealed the exhibition of a spatial gradient in the RSP, evidenced by hypoxia/anoxia, reduced and acidic conditions, high organic enrichment and metal concentrations at the most contaminated sites. Whereas, the benthic fauna biodiversity decreased the bioassays depicted decreases in EC50, A. brevicornis survival, P. lividus larval success at sampling sites closer to the studied fish farms. This study demonstrates that the sediments polluted by fish farm effluents may lead to alterations of the biodiversity of the exposed organisms. PMID:23681739

  10. Bioaccumulation and effect of sediment-associated silver in different forms in two marine deposit feeders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dai, Lina; Banta, Gary Thomas; Syberg, Kristian;

    2014-01-01

    to sediment amended with Ag in various forms (ionic Ag(I), nano-sized Ag and micron-sized Ag), and toxic endpoints were assessed at the whole organism level. After exposure for several weeks, no significant toxic effects were detected (i.e., mortality, growth rate and condition index) at the whole...... limited information at the whole organism level as to whether metallo-nanoparticles differ in toxicity from the same metals added to the environment in ionic or bulk form. In the present study, two organisms (i.e., a marine polychaete, Capitella teleta and a marine bivalve, Macoma balthica) were exposed...... organism level, although all forms of metallic Ag were accumulated in our test organisms. Our results thus did not confirm findings from studies performed at the subcellular level that have found the toxicity of Ag nanoparticles was more toxic than the corresponding metallic Ag in ionic and in bulk forms...

  11. A marine to freshwater sediment succession from Kowhai Beach wetland, Northland : implications for Holocene sea level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An infilled wetland located behind coastal dunes in north-east Northland is used to reconstruct a local history of environmental change spanning early Holocene (c. 7000 yr BP) to modern time. Proxy indicators (sediment texture, diatoms and pollen) provide evidence for a transition from marginal marine- to brackish- to freshwater-conditions in the wetland. Radiocarbon ages constrain the chronology of this succession to 7880-7430 cal. yr BP for the early period of marine conditions, 3570-3210 cal. yr BP for the latter brackish phase and 1060-800 cal. yr BP for the change to freshwater conditions. Within this succession, the diatom record preserves a strong brackish signal at core depths above the limit of the modern tidal range. This is presented as preliminary evidence for a mid-Holocene sea level highstand for northern New Zealand of approximately 1.2 m above present mean sea level. (author). 40 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  12. Wintertime Arctic Ocean sea water properties and primary marine aerosol concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zábori

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Sea spray aerosols are an important part of the climate system through their direct and indirect effects. Due to the diminishing sea ice, the Arctic Ocean is one of the most rapidly changing sea spray aerosol source areas. However, the influence of these changes on primary particle production is not known.

    In laboratory experiments we examined the influence of Arctic Ocean water temperature, salinity, and oxygen saturation on primary particle concentration characteristics. Sea water temperature was identified as the most important of these parameters. A strong decrease in sea spray aerosol production with increasing water temperature was observed for water temperatures between −1°C and 9°C. Aerosol number concentrations decreased from at least 1400 cm−3 to 350 cm−3. In general, the aerosol number size distribution exhibited a robust shape with one mode close to dry diameter Dp 0.2 μm with approximately 45% of particles at smaller sizes. Changes in sea water temperature did not result in pronounced change of the shape of the aerosol size distribution, only in the magnitude of the concentrations. Our experiments indicate that changes in aerosol emissions are most likely linked to changes of the physical properties of sea water at low temperatures. The observed strong dependence of sea spray aerosol concentrations on sea water temperature, with a large fraction of the emitted particles in the typical cloud condensation nuclei size range, provide strong arguments for a more careful consideration of this effect in climate models.

  13. Testaceans (Protozoa: Testacea) in Quaternary Permafrost Sediments of Bykovsky Peninsula, Arctic Yakutia

    OpenAIRE

    Bobrov, Anatoly A.; Siegert, Christine; Andreev, Andrei A.; Schirrmeister, Lutz

    2003-01-01

    The results of the first protozoological study in terms of paleoecology of long-term sediments and buried soils formed in the cryolite zone of northeastern Siberia are discussed. The data on testaceans (Protozoa: Testacea) inhabiting various sites of Bykovsky Peninsula, Laptev Sea coast near estuary of Lena, within the last 53 000 years (Late Pleistocene and Holocene) are presented.

  14. Seismic stratigraphy and sediment thickness of the Nansen Basin, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engen, Øyvind; Gjengedal, Jakob Andreas; Faleide, Jan Inge; Kristoffersen, Yngve; Eldholm, Olav

    2009-03-01

    A Norwegian expedition to the western Nansen Basin, Yermak Plateau and the Hinlopen margin in 2001 acquired about 1100 km of 2-D multichannel seismic profiles and 50 wide-angle sonobuoy record sections. Analysis of these data establishes a regional seismic stratigraphic framework for the western Nansen Basin integrating previously published stratigraphic schemes. P-wave velocities and sediment thickness were derived within 7-8 per cent uncertainty from 2-D seismic ray tracing models of each sonobuoy section. Sediment thickness reaches 2 km in the studied area and increases towards the depocentre of the giant Franz-Victoria fan on the Barents-Kara continental margin. High-relief oceanic crystalline crust with 3.7 km s-1 average near-top velocity is infilled by four seismic sediment units with typical velocities 2.4, 2.2, 2.0 and 1.8 km s-1. A prominent regional seismic horizon between units 2 and 3 is tentatively correlated by basement onlap and sedimentation rates to a Miocene (~10 Ma) palaeoceanographic event, possibly the opening of the Fram Strait. The youngest unit is correlated to prograding sequences on the margin and to the onset of major slope failure caused by intensified glacio-fluvial drainage and ice sheet erosion during Northern Hemisphere glaciations (2.6-0.01 Ma).

  15. Impacts of ocean acidification on sediment processes in shallow waters of the Arctic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazeau, F.; van Rijswijk, P.; Pozzato, L.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the important roles of shallow-water sediments in global biogeochemical cycling, the effects of ocean acidification on sedimentary processes have received relatively little attention. As high-latitude cold waters can absorb more CO2 and usually have a lower buffering capacity than warmer wat

  16. Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Sediment Processes in Shallow Waters of the Arctic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazeau, F.; van Rijswijk, P.; Pozzato, L.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the important roles of shallow-water sediments in global biogeochemical cycling, the effects of ocean acidification on sedimentary processes have received relatively little attention. As high-latitude cold waters can absorb more CO2 and usually have a lower buffering capacity than warmer wat

  17. Increased accumulation of sulfur in lake sediments of the high Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drevnick, Paul E.; Muir, Derek C.G.; Lamborg, Carl H.;

    2010-01-01

    in sulfur accumulation may be due ultimately to a changing climate. Warming-induced lengthening of the ice-free season is resulting in well-documented increases in algal production and sedimentation of the resulting detrital matter. Algal detritus is a rich source of labile carbon, which in these...

  18. Uptake of radioactivity by marine surface sediments collected in Ghazaouet, west coast of Algeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of surface marine sediments of different grain sizes collected in Ghazaouet, a small bay on the western coast of Algeria, have been examined to measure concentrations of natural and artificial gamma-emitting radionuclides. The aim of this study is to determine the level of radioactivity and its repartition in the sedimentary area. The samples analyzed by direct counting gamma spectrometry, showed relatively high activities for natural radioactivity and revealed measurable quantities of 137Cs, ranging from 0.66-8.47 Bq kg-1 dry weight. In addition, some of the samples of different nature were sieved in different grain-sizes, to study the uptake of radioactivity. It is found that the sediments of less than 100 μm grain-size have the highest level of uptake of radioactivity

  19. Persistence of heavy metals in shallow arctic marine sediments contaminated by drilling effluents: Draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Offshore oil exploration activity usually requires the discharge of drilling muds and formation cuttings into adjacent waters or on ice above these waters. Although...

  20. Response of fermentation and sulfate reduction to experimental temperature changes in temperate and Arctic marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finke, Niko; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic degradation of organic material generally proceeds through a sequence of steps, including polymer hydrolysis, fermentation and respiration or methanogenesis. The intermediates, such as volatile fatty acids (VFA) or H(2), are generally maintained at low concentration, showing a close...

  1. Rock physics modeling of shallow marine sediments in the eastern continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dewangan, P.; Sriram, G.; RamPrasad, T.

    that are in a state of suspension, i.e. having no frame stiffness. The EMM model can be extended to estimate the hydrate and free gas concentration in marine sediments from porosity and velocity profiles (Helgerud, 1999). Lee (2006) showed that shear wave... is matrix velocity, V w water velocity and V p Woods velocity. Lee Equation for S-wave prediction: The S-wave velocities can be predicted from the moduli of the dry rock which can be estimated from the P-wave velocity. Dry rock bulk moduli...

  2. Focus on sulfur count rates along marine sediment cores acquired by XRF Core Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Chéron, Sandrine; Etoubleau, Joel; Bayon, Germain; Garziglia, Sebastien; Boissier, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the information provided by sulfur count rates obtained by X-ray fluorescence core scanner (XRF-CS) along sedimentary records. The analysis of two marine sediment cores from the Niger Delta margin shows that XRF-CS sulfur count rates obtained at the surface of split core sections with XRF-CS correlate with both direct quantitative pyrite concentrations, as inferred from X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and sulfur determination by wavelength dispersive X-r...

  3. Decomposition of algal lipids in clay-enriched marine sediment under oxic and anoxic conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕冬伟; 宋茜; 王旭晨

    2010-01-01

    A series of laboratory incubation experiments were conducted to examine the decomposition of algal organic matter in clay-enriched marine sediment under oxic and anoxic conditions.During the 245-day incubation period,changes in the concentrations of TOC,major algal fatty acid components (14:0,16:0,16:1,18:1 and 20:5),and n-alkanes (C16-C23) were quantified in the samples.Our results indicate that the organic matters were degraded more rapidly in oxic than anoxic conditions.Adsorption of fatty acids onto cla...

  4. Spatiotemporal distributions of Fukushima-derived radionuclides in nearby marine surface sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kusakabe

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatiotemporal distributions of anthropogenic radionuclides in marine surface sediments off Miyagi, Fukushima, and Ibaraki Prefectures were analyzed on the basis of data collected during the monitoring program launched by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Sports, Science and Technology in 2011 right after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident began. Concentrations of 137Cs in the surface sediments varied spatially by two orders of magnitude, from 1.7 to 580 Bq kg-dry−1, and there was no obvious correlation between 137Cs concentration and the proximity of the sampling location to the accident site. The total inventory of 137Cs accumulated in the upper 3 cm of surface sediments in the monitoring area was estimated to be 3.78 × 1013 Bq, that is, 0.1–2% of the total 137Cs flux from the plant to the ocean as a result of the accident (the percentage depends on the model used to estimate the total flux. The spatial variations of 137Cs concentration and inventory depended on two main factors: the 137Cs concentration in the overlying water during the first several months after the accident and the physical characteristics of the sediments (water content and bulk density. The temporal variations of the concentrations of other anthropogenic radionuclides (90Sr, 95Nb, 110 mAg, 125Sb, 129Te, and 129 mTe in the sediments were also investigated. Activity ratios of these nuclides to 137Cs suggest that the nuclides themselves were not homogenized before they were removed from seawater to the sediments.

  5. Transformation of PBDE mixtures during sediment transport and resuspension in marine environments (Gulf of Lion, NW Mediterranean Sea)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polybromodiphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in superficial sediments from the Gulf of Lion were studied. They were largely predominated by BDE 209 (98.7% of all PBDEs) indicating that the main source of these pollutants was the commercial mixture deca-BDE. This compound and the less brominated BDE exhibited a southwestward decreasing concentration gradient following the dominant marine currents and bottom relief, e.g. the Mud Belt, the submarine canyons and the Open Continental Slope. All PBDEs exhibited statistically significant correlations confirming the common origin. However, a progressive transformation of the dumped BDE 209 was identified showing a depletion paralleled by increases of the less brominated BDEs (from 8.6% to 22%). These less brominated compounds were accumulated at about 100–140 km away from the Rhone prodelta, e.g. at the end of the submarine canyons, evidencing that these transformation compounds can be accumulated at long distances from the dumping sites in the marine system. Highlights: ► Polybromodiphenyl ethers are associated to organic carbon in marine sediments. ► PBDEs in marine sediments can accumulate further away than 140 km from the spill site. ► BDE-209 in marine sediments generate congeners found in banned commercial mixtures. ► BDE-209 in marine sediments generates new congeners not found in commercial mixtures. ► Submarine canyons channel PBDEs from the continental platform to the deep shelf. - Decomposition of decabromodiphenyl ether in marine sediments generates congeners found in banned mixtures in areas located far away from the discharge sites.

  6. Simulating the modern δ30Si distribution in the oceans and in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, S.; Wolf-Gladrow, D. A.; Völker, C.

    2016-02-01

    The δ30Si of biogenic silica (δ30SiBSi) in marine sediments is a promising proxy for the reconstruction of silicic acid utilization by diatoms in the geological past. The application of this proxy, however, requires an understanding of the modern δ30Si distributions and their controlling mechanisms. Here we present results from a modern climate simulation with a coupled ocean-sediment model that includes a prognostic formulation of biogenic silica production with concurrent silicon isotopic fractionation. In agreement with previous studies, biological fractionation combined with physical transport and mixing determines the oceanic distribution of simulated δ30Si. A new finding is a distinct seasonal cycle of δ30Si in the surface ocean, which is inversely related to that of silicic acid concentration and mixed layer depth. We also provide the first simulation results of sedimentary δ30Si, which reveal that (1) the δ30SiBSi distribution in the surface sediment reflects the exported δ30SiBSi signal from the euphotic zone and (2) the dissolution of biogenic silica in the sediment acts as a source of relatively light δ30Si into the bottom waters of the polar oceans, while it is a source of heavier δ30Si to the subtropical South Atlantic and South Pacific.

  7. Ligand-enhanced electrokinetic remediation of metal-contaminated marine sediments with high acid buffering capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Matteo; Iannelli, Renato; Losito, Gabriella

    2016-06-01

    The suitability of electrokinetic remediation for removing heavy metals from dredged marine sediments with high acid buffering capacity was investigated. Laboratory-scale electrokinetic remediation experiments were carried out by applying two different voltage gradients to the sediment (0.5 and 0.8 V/cm) while circulating water or two different chelating agents at the electrode compartments. Tap water, 0.1 M citric acid and 0.1 M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solutions were used respectively. The investigated metals were Zn, Pb, V, Ni and Cu. In the unenhanced experiment, the acid front could not propagate due to the high acid buffering capacity of the sediments; the production of OH(-) ions at the cathode resulted in a high-pH environment causing the precipitation of CaCO3 and metal hydroxides. The use of citric acid prevented the formation of precipitates, but solubilisation and mobilisation of metal species were not sufficiently achieved. Metal removal was relevant when EDTA was used as the conditioning agent, and the electric potential was raised up to 0.8 V/cm. EDTA led to the formation of negatively charged complexes with metals which migrated towards the anode compartment by electromigration. This result shows that metal removal from sediments with high acid buffering capacity may be achieved by enhancing the electrokinetic process by EDTA addition when the acidification of the medium is not economically and/or environmentally sustainable. PMID:26490900

  8. Characterization of trace organic contaminants in marine sediment from Yeongil Bay, Korea: 1. Instrumental analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine (OC) pesticides (HCB, HCHs, CHLs, and DDTs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylphenols (APs), and bisphenol A (BPA) were measured in 26 marine sediments collected from Yeongil Bay, Korea, in order to characterize their spatial distribution and sources. PCBs (2.85-26.5 ng/g, dry wt.) were detected mainly in the inner bay locations Mean OC pesticide ranged from 1.16 ng/g dry wt. for HCH to 0.05 ng/g dry wt. for HCB). PAH concentrations ranged from <10.0 to 1870 (mean: 309) ng/g dry wt., and were predominated 3- and 4-ring congeners. Concentrations of APs, such as nonylphenol, octylphenol, butylphenol (means 89.1, 4.61, 11.0 ng/g dry wt., respectively), were greater at locations proximal to municipal wastewater discharges. Concentrations of PCBs and PAHs were great near shipyards and industrial complexes. Vertical profiles of PAHs and APs indicated that they have been associated with sediments since the 1950s. - Among various sediment contaminant classes measured, nonylphenol and PAHs are responsible for the variability among sampling sites, suggesting the existence of multiple sources in Yeongil Bay sediment

  9. Numerical simulation of sealing effect of gas hydrate for CO2 leakage in marine sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T.; Yu, T.; Oyama, H.; Yoshida, T.; Nakashima, T.; Kamada, K.

    2015-12-01

    Although carbon dioxide capture and storage in subsea geological structure is regarded as one of the promising mitigation technologies against the global warming, there is a risk of CO2 leakage and it is required to develop numerical models to predict how the CO2 migrate in the marine sediments. It is said that there are CO2-trap mechanisms in the geological formations, such as capillary trap, dissolution trap, and mineral trap. In this study, we focus on another trap mechanism: namely, hydrate trap. If the water is deep in the ocean, say more than 250 m, CO2 hydrate forms near the sea floor, at which temperature and pressure conditions can stabilise CO2 hydrate. To predict the gas productivity, it is important to know permeability damage in hydrate bearing sediments. Although hydrate saturation is the same, the permeability is different depending on its spatial distribution within the pore of sand sediment. Here, to know where hydrate is formed in the pore of porous media, we propose a numerical model for estimating the microscopic distribution of CO2 hydrate in sand sediment using a classical nucleation theory and the phase-field model.

  10. Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e. equivalent to ~ 8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Our results obtained from δ13C analysis of amino sugars in selected marine sediment samples showed that muramic acid had isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities, whereas glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus. The analysis of stable carbon isotopic compositions of amino sugars opens a promising window for the investigation of microbial metabolisms in marine sediments and the deep marine biosphere.

  11. Oil effect in freshly spiked marine sediment on Vibrio fischeri, Corophium volutator, and Echinocardium cordatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brils, Jos M; Huwer, Sherri L; Kater, Belinda J; Schout, Peter G; Harmsen, Joop; Delvigne, Gerard A L; Scholten, Martin C Th

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide data to be used in The Netherlands for development of ecotoxicologically based quality criteria for oil-contaminated sediments and dredged material. In addition, the relation of toxicity to specific oil boiling-point fraction ranges was explored. Natural marine sediment, with a moisture, organic carbon, and silt content of approximately 80, 1.8, and 33% of the dry weight, respectively, was artificially spiked using a spiking method developed in this project. Aliquots of one part of the sediment were spiked to several concentrations of Gulf distillate marine grade A (DMA) gasoil (containing 64% C10-19) and aliquots of the other part to several concentrations of Gulf high viscosity grade 46 (HV46) hydraulic oil (containing 99.2% C19-40). Thus, for each individual oil type, a concentration series was created. Vibrio fischeri (endpoint: bioluminescence inhibition), Corophium volutator (endpoint:mortality), and Echinocardium cordatum (endpoint:mortality) were exposed to these spiked sediments for 10 min, 10 d and 14 d, respectively. Based on the test results, the effective concentration on 50% of the test animals was statistically estimated. For DMA gasoil and HV46 hydraulic oil, respectively, the effective concentrations were 43.7 and 2,682 mg/kg dry weight for V. fischeri, 100 and 9,138 mg/kg dry weight for C. volutator, 190, and 1064 mg/kg dry weight for E. cordatum. This study shows that the toxicity is strongly correlated with the lower boiling-point fractions and especially to those within the C10-C19 range. PMID:12371504

  12. Correction of sound velocity depending on the temperature for unconsolidated marine sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Choul

    2016-04-01

    laboratory sound velocity measurements with systematic temperature change on unconsolidated marine sediment have been performed to establish the precise correction curves between temperature and the sound velocity. Piston and box core samples recovered from the East Sea and the South Sea of Korea were used for the measurement. The core samples were cooled (at temperature of nearly 0℃) and the temperature was gradually increased (from 0℃ to 30℃) to measure sound velocity depending on the changes in temperature. The sediment texture and physical properties (porosity, water content, and bulk density) were measured separately at the same depth. The rate of velocity increase for muddy, silty, and sandy sediment are about 2.63 m/s/℃, 2.74 m/s/℃, and 2.96 m/s/℃, respectively. This is similar to the velocity change rate, 2.97 m/s/℃ presented by Del Grosso (1952). The samples used in this research, however, have relatively higher porosity than those of Del Grosso (1952). Thus, the possibility of discrepancy is differences in water content which affect the sound velocity and measurement system. We used recently developed digital velocity measurement system using PXI based on LabVIEW. We suggest to employ this correction for the accurate in situ geoacoustic property from laboratory data particularly for the deep cold water sample such as the East Sea sediment that has very low bottom water temperature about 0℃. Keywords : in situ geoacoustic property, temperature correction, East Sea Acknowledgements: This research was supported by the Agency for Defense Development (UD14003DD) and by "Marine geological and geophysical mapping of the Korean seas" of the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM).

  13. Stable carbon isotope ratios of intact GDGTs indicate heterogeneous sources to marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Ann; Hurley, Sarah J.; Walter, Sunita R. Shah; Kusch, Stephanie; Lichtin, Samantha; Zhang, Yi Ge

    2016-05-01

    Thaumarchaeota, the major sources of marine glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether lipids (GDGTs), are believed to fix the majority of their carbon directly from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The δ13C values of GDGTs (δ13CGDGT) may be powerful tools for reconstructing variations in the ocean carbon cycle, including paleoproductivity and water mass circulation, if they can be related to values of δ13CDIC. To date, isotope measurements primarily are made on the C40 biphytane skeletons of GDGTs, rather than on complete tetraether structures. This approach erases information revealed by the isotopic heterogeneity of GDGTs within a sample and may impart an isotopic fractionation associated with the ether cleavage. To circumvent these issues, we present δ13C values for GDGTs from twelve recent sediments representing ten continental margin locations. Samples are purified by orthogonal dimensions of HPLC, followed by measurement of δ13C values by Spooling Wire Microcombustion (SWiM)-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) with 1σ precision and accuracy of ±0.25‰. Using this approach, we confirm that GDGTs, generally around -19‰, are isotopically "heavy" compared to other marine lipids. However, measured δ13CGDGT values are inconsistent with predicted values based on the 13C content of DIC in the overlying water column and the previously-published biosynthetic isotope fractionation for a pure culture of an autotrophic marine thaumarchaeon. In some sediments, the isotopic composition of individual GDGTs differs, indicating multiple source inputs. The data appear to confirm that crenarchaeol primarily is a biomarker for Thaumarchaeota, but its δ13C values still cannot be explained solely by autotrophic carbon fixation. Overall the complexity of the results suggests that both organic carbon assimilation (ca. 25% of total carbon) and multiple source(s) of exogenous GDGTs (contributing generally <30% of input to sediments) are necessary to explain the observed

  14. Bioakkumulering av miljøgifter fra marine sediment - etablering av et test-system. (Bioaccumulation of sediment-bound contaminants - establishment of a test-system)

    OpenAIRE

    Hylland, K.

    1996-01-01

    Det har blitt etablert et oppsett for testing av biotilgjengeligheten av miljøgifter i marine sedimenter. Test-systemet kan brukes til testing av sediment innhentet fra felt og sediment innblandet en ønsket miljøgift eller blanding av miljøgifter. Test-organismer i oppsettet er børstemarken Nereis diversicolor og nettsnegl Hinia (Nassarius) reticulata. Dette er sentrale arter i økosystemet, de er lette å samle i store antall og det er mulig å holde begge i akvariesystemer over lengre tid. All...

  15. Zeroing tests of luminescence sediment dating in the Arctic Ocean: Review and new results from Alaska-margin core tops and central-ocean dirty sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Glenn W.

    2009-07-01

    Additional numeric dating techniques are needed for sediments in the Arctic Ocean that span at least the last half million years. Almost all presently suitable geochronometers are relative-dating methods, requiring significant assumptions about sedimentation rates (such as continuous deposition and preservation). An alternative 'absolute' geochronometer, luminescence sediment dating, assumes daylight exposure of siliciclastic grains before burial. Early tests and applications of thermoluminescence (TL) techniques in the western Arctic Ocean showed some promise, but trans-ocean application to core tops of more sensitive photon-stimulated-luminescence (PSL) multi-aliquot procedures revealed large regional variations in accuracy. Recent applications of single-aliquot PSL procedures to core tops and dirty sea ice refine our understanding of the limitations and capabilities of PSL dating in this ocean. Dirty sea ice is the source of most of the bottom sediment. Particular procedures for multi-aliquot and single-aliquot PSL dating produce near-zero ages for silt grains from 4 available dirty sea-ice samples. This suggests that TL and PSL age overestimates obtained previously from core-top samples were due mainly to bottom-current reworking (mixing or stripping) of silt grains in abyssal darkness, rather than due to sedimentation of relict-age grains from sea ice. Single-aliquot PSL dating of silt grains from core tops at two different-depth sites at the Alaskan margin reveals large variations in accuracy. This re-emphasizes the critical sensitivity of fine-silt PSL dating accuracy to the effects of bottom-current processes. These recent applications are beginning to provide a more precise knowledge of just where and how PSL methods are likely to be accurate in the Arctic Ocean.

  16. Contamination of an arctic terrestrial food web with marine-derived persistent organic pollutants transported by breeding seabirds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choy, Emily S., E-mail: echoy087@uottawa.c [Program for Chemical and Environmental Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Kimpe, Linda E., E-mail: linda.kimpe@uottawa.c [Program for Chemical and Environmental Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Mallory, Mark L., E-mail: mark.mallory@ec.gc.c [Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada, Iqaluit, NU, X0A 0H0 (Canada); Smol, John P., E-mail: smolj@queensu.c [Paleoecological Environmental Assessment and Research Lab (PEARL), Department of Biology, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Blais, Jules M., E-mail: jules.blais@uottawa.c [Program for Chemical and Environmental Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2010-11-15

    At Cape Vera, Devon Island (Nunavut, Canada), a colony of northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) concentrates and releases contaminants through their guano to the environment. We determined whether persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from seabirds were transferred to coastal food webs. Snow buntings (Plectrophenax nivalis) were the most contaminated species, with {Sigma}PCB and {Sigma}DDT (mean: 168, 106 ng/g ww) concentrations surpassing environmental guidelines for protecting wildlife. When examined collectively, PCB congeners and DDT in jewel lichen (Xanthoria elegans) were lower in samples taken farther from the seabird colony, and increased with increasing {delta}{sup 15}N values. However, only concentrations of p'p-DDE:{Sigma}DDT and PCB-95 were significantly correlated inversely with distance from the seabird cliffs. Linkages between marine-derived POPs and their concentrations in terrestrial mammals were less clear. Our study provides novel contaminant data for these species and supports biovector transport as a source of organic contaminants to certain components of the terrestrial food web. - This study provides evidence of contaminant transport by seabirds to a coastal Arctic food web.

  17. Contamination of an arctic terrestrial food web with marine-derived persistent organic pollutants transported by breeding seabirds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At Cape Vera, Devon Island (Nunavut, Canada), a colony of northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) concentrates and releases contaminants through their guano to the environment. We determined whether persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from seabirds were transferred to coastal food webs. Snow buntings (Plectrophenax nivalis) were the most contaminated species, with ΣPCB and ΣDDT (mean: 168, 106 ng/g ww) concentrations surpassing environmental guidelines for protecting wildlife. When examined collectively, PCB congeners and DDT in jewel lichen (Xanthoria elegans) were lower in samples taken farther from the seabird colony, and increased with increasing δ15N values. However, only concentrations of p'p-DDE:ΣDDT and PCB-95 were significantly correlated inversely with distance from the seabird cliffs. Linkages between marine-derived POPs and their concentrations in terrestrial mammals were less clear. Our study provides novel contaminant data for these species and supports biovector transport as a source of organic contaminants to certain components of the terrestrial food web. - This study provides evidence of contaminant transport by seabirds to a coastal Arctic food web.

  18. Plutonium behavior during the early diagenesis of marine sediments: applications to two marine environments labelled by radionuclides released from reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plutonium released into the English Channel and the Irish Sea by nuclear fuel reprocessing plants is mainly associated to sediments. Nevertheless, this association is partially reversible. This work combines a field study, carried out on the Cumbrian mud patch and the Esk estuary (Eastern Irish Sea), and laboratory experiments performed on carbonaceous coarse-grained sediments collected in the Central Channel. It presents new data on the plutonium solid partition in sediments and suggests realistic scenarios for describing its release from sediments to the water column. The role of reactive sulphides acting as temporary sink phases is shown in anoxic sediments; those sulphides are liable to release dissolved plutonium upon their oxidation. The plutonium is also bound to carbonates within the carbonaceous matrix and as carbonate surface complexes. Conceptual schemes of the behaviour of the plutonium in marine sediments are proposed; they highlight the strong remobilization potential of plutonium from marine sediments to the interstitial water. Its plutonium content can be injected into the overlying water column. (author)

  19. Anoxic carbon degradation in Arctic sediments: Microbial transformations of complex substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnosti, Carol; Finke, Niko; Larsen, Ole;

    2005-01-01

    Complex substrates are degraded in anoxic sediments by the concerted activities of diverse microbial communities. To explore the effects of substrate complexity on carbon transformations in permanently cold anoxic sediments, four substrates—Spirulina cells, Isochrysis cells, and soluble high...... of carbon degradation diverged, with an additional 43%, 32%, 33%, and 8% of Isochrysis, Iso-Ex, Spirulina, and Spir-Ex carbon respired to CO2 over the next 750 h of incubation. Somewhat surprisingly, the soluble, carbohydrate-rich extracts did not prove to be more labile substrates than the whole...... cells from which they were derived. Although Spirulina and Iso-Ex differed in physical and chemical characteristics (solid/soluble, C/N ratio, lipid and carbohydrate content), nearly identical quantities of carbon were respired to CO2. In contrast, only 15% of Spir-Ex carbon was respired, despite the...

  20. Lignin as an indicator of the sedimentation conditions on the Arctic shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulyantsev, A. S.; Romankevich, E. A.; Peresypkin, V. I.; Belyaev, N. A.; Semiletov, I. P.; Bratskaya, S. Yu.; Vetrov, A. A.; Sergienko, V. I.

    2016-03-01

    It is shown for the first time that the proportion of lignin in shelf deposits may range from 1/3 to the total concentration of organic carbon. The distribution of wood residues and lignin in the studied sedimentary formation is very uneven, which reflects the dynamic flux environment of sedimentation and OM supply. The calculated molecular indexes showed that most of the OM in deposits underwent insignificant diagenetic alterations.

  1. Iron Cycling in Marine Sediments - New Insights from Isotope Analysis on Sequentially Extracted Fe Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, S.; Kasten, S.; Poulton, S.; Hartmann, J.; Staubwasser, M.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive Fe (oxyhydr)oxides preferentially undergo early diagenetic cycling and may cause a diffusive flux of dissolved Fe2+ from sediments towards the sediment-water interface. The partitioning of Fe in sediments has traditionally been studied by applying sequential extractions based on reductive dissolution of Fe minerals. We complemented the sequential leaching method by Poulton and Canfield [1] in order to be able to gain δ56Fe data for specific Fe fractions, as such data are potentially useful to study Fe cycling in marine environments. The specific mineral fractions are Fe-carbonates, ferrihydrite + lepidocrocite, goethite + hematite, and magnetite. Leaching was performed with acetic acid, hydroxylamine-HCl, Na-dithionite and oxalic acid. The processing of leachates for δ56Fe analysis involved boiling the samples in HCl/HNO3/H2O2, Fe precipitation and anion exchange column chromatography. The new method was applied to short sediment cores from the North Sea and a bay of King George Island (South Shetland Islands, Antarctica). Downcore mineral-specific variations in δ56Fe revealed differing contributions of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides to redox cycling. A slight decrease in easily reducible Fe oxides correlating with a slight increase in δ56Fe for this fraction with depth, which is in line with progessive dissimilatory iron reduction [2,3], is visible in the top 10 cm of the North Sea core, but not in the antarctic sediments. Less reactive (dithionite and oxalate leachable) fractions did not reveal isotopic trends. The acetic acid-soluble fraction displayed pronounced δ56Fe trends at both sites that cannot be explained by acid volatile sulfides that are also extracted by acetic acid [1]. We suggest that low δ56Fe values in this fraction relative to the pool of easily reducible Fe oxides result from adsorbed Fe(II) that was open to isotopic exchange with oxide surfaces, affirming the experimental results of Crosby el al. [2]. Hence, δ56Fe analyses on marine

  2. Batch and column studies of the stabilization of toxic heavy metals in dredged marine sediments by hematite after bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamindy-Pajany, Yannick; Geret, Florence; Hurel, Charlotte; Marmier, Nicolas

    2013-08-01

    The management of dredged sediments is an important issue in coastal regions where the marine sediments are highly polluted by metals and organic pollutants. In this paper, mineral-based amendments (hematite, zero-valent iron and zeolite) were used to stabilize metallic pollutants (As, Cd, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in a contaminated marine sediment sample. Mineral-based amendments were tested at three application rates (5 %, 10 %, and 15 %) in batch experiments in order to select the best amendment to perform column experiments. Batch tests have shown that hematite was the most efficient amendment to stabilize inorganic pollutants (As, Cd, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in the studied sediment. Based on batch tests, hematite was used at one application rate equal to 5 % to conduct column experiments. Column tests confirmed that hematite was able to decrease metal concentrations in leachates from stabilized sediment. The stabilization rates were particularly high for Cd (67 %), Mo (80 %), and Pb (90 %). The Microtox solid phase test showed that hematite could decrease significantly the toxicity of stabilized sediment. Based on batch and column experiments, it emerged that hematite could be a suitable adsorbent to stabilize metals in dredged marine sediment. PMID:23370851

  3. Certification of Trace Element Mass Fractions in IAEA-458 Marine Sediment Sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary goal of the IAEA Environment Laboratories (NAEL) is to help Member States understand, monitor and protect the marine environment. The major impact exerted by large coastal cities on marine ecosystems is therefore of great concern to the IAEA and its Environment Laboratories. Given that marine pollution assessments of such impacts depend on accurate knowledge of contaminant concentrations in various environmental compartments, the NAEL has assisted national laboratories and regional laboratory networks through its Reference Products for Environment and Trade programme since the early 1970s. Quality assurance (QA), quality control (QC) and associated good laboratory practice are essential components of all marine environmental monitoring studies. QC procedures are commonly based on the analysis of certified reference materials and reference samples in order to validate analytical methods used in monitoring studies and to assess reliability and comparability of measurement data. QA can be realized by participation in externally organized laboratory performance studies, also known as interlaboratory comparisons, which compare and evaluate the analytical performance and measurement capabilities of participating laboratories. Data that are not based on adequate QA/QC can be erroneous, and their misuse can lead to incorrect environmental management decisions. This report describes the sample preparation methodology, material homogeneity and stability study, selection of laboratories, evaluation of results from the certification campaign and assignment of property values and their associated uncertainty. As a result, reference values for mass fractions and associated expanded uncertainty for 16 trace elements (Al, As, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe, Hg, Li, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, Sn, V and Zn) in marine sediment were established

  4. Use of polyoxyethylene-6-lauryl ether and microwave-assisted extraction for the determination of chlorophenols in marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Cristina Mahugo; Ferrera, Zoraida Sosa; Rodriguez, Jose J. Santana

    2004-10-25

    Microwave-assisted micellar extraction was optimised and applied to the extraction, prior to analysis by liquid chromatography with diode array spectrophotometric detection, of chlorophenols in marine sediment samples. This study was carried out using a non-ionic surfactant polyoxyethylene-6-lauryl ether as extractant. Parameters studied included surfactant concentration, pH of the solution, extraction time and power. Once the method was optimised, it was applied to different spiked marine sediments from coasts of the Canary Islands (Spain). The results obtained indicate that irradiation of 500 W for 2 min achieved the best extraction efficiency (100% recovery) and standard deviation values <10%. Detection limits were obtained in the range 1.2-12.7 {mu}g g{sup -1} for the chlorophenols studied. The proposed method provides a simple, fast and organic solvent-free procedure to analyse for chlorophenols in marine sediment samples.

  5. Isolation and characterization of a marine bacterium producing protease from Chukchi Sea, Arctic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A Gram negative bacterium Ar/W/b/75°25'N/1 producing extracellular alkaline protease was isolated from surface water of latitude 75°25'N, and longitude 162°25'W in