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Sample records for archaean methanosarcina acetivorans

  1. Structure of the surface layer of the methanogenic archaean Methanosarcina acetivorans

    OpenAIRE

    Arbing, Mark A.; Chan, Sum; Shin, Annie; Phan, Tung; Ahn, Christine J.; Rohlin, Lars; Gunsalus, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Archaea have a self-assembling proteinaceous surface (S-) layer as the primary and outermost boundary of their cell envelopes. The S-layer maintains structural rigidity, protects the organism from adverse environmental elements, and yet provides access to all essential nutrients. We have determined the crystal structure of one of the two “homologous” tandem polypeptide repeats that comprise the Methanosarcina acetivorans S-layer protein and propose a high-resolution model for a microbial S-la...

  2. Structure of the surface layer of the methanogenic archaean Methanosarcina acetivorans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbing, Mark A.; Chan, Sum; Shin, Annie; Phan, Tung; Ahn, Christine J.; Rohlin, Lars; Gunsalus, Robert P. (UCLA)

    2012-09-05

    Archaea have a self-assembling proteinaceous surface (S-) layer as the primary and outermost boundary of their cell envelopes. The S-layer maintains structural rigidity, protects the organism from adverse environmental elements, and yet provides access to all essential nutrients. We have determined the crystal structure of one of the two 'homologous' tandem polypeptide repeats that comprise the Methanosarcina acetivorans S-layer protein and propose a high-resolution model for a microbial S-layer. The molecular features of our hexameric S-layer model recapitulate those visualized by medium resolution electron microscopy studies of microbial S-layers and greatly expand our molecular view of S-layer dimensions, porosity, and symmetry. The S-layer model reveals a negatively charged molecular sieve that presents both a charge and size barrier to restrict access to the cell periplasmic-like space. The {beta}-sandwich folds of the S-layer protein are structurally homologous to eukaryotic virus envelope proteins, suggesting that Archaea and viruses have arrived at a common solution for protective envelope structures. These results provide insight into the evolutionary origins of primitive cell envelope structures, of which the S-layer is considered to be among the most primitive: it also provides a platform for the development of self-assembling nanomaterials with diverse functional and structural properties.

  3. Structure of the surface layer of the methanogenic archaean Methanosarcina acetivorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbing, Mark A; Chan, Sum; Shin, Annie; Phan, Tung; Ahn, Christine J; Rohlin, Lars; Gunsalus, Robert P

    2012-07-17

    Archaea have a self-assembling proteinaceous surface (S-) layer as the primary and outermost boundary of their cell envelopes. The S-layer maintains structural rigidity, protects the organism from adverse environmental elements, and yet provides access to all essential nutrients. We have determined the crystal structure of one of the two "homologous" tandem polypeptide repeats that comprise the Methanosarcina acetivorans S-layer protein and propose a high-resolution model for a microbial S-layer. The molecular features of our hexameric S-layer model recapitulate those visualized by medium resolution electron microscopy studies of microbial S-layers and greatly expand our molecular view of S-layer dimensions, porosity, and symmetry. The S-layer model reveals a negatively charged molecular sieve that presents both a charge and size barrier to restrict access to the cell periplasmic-like space. The β-sandwich folds of the S-layer protein are structurally homologous to eukaryotic virus envelope proteins, suggesting that Archaea and viruses have arrived at a common solution for protective envelope structures. These results provide insight into the evolutionary origins of primitive cell envelope structures, of which the S-layer is considered to be among the most primitive: it also provides a platform for the development of self-assembling nanomaterials with diverse functional and structural properties.

  4. Reductive nitrosylation of Methanosarcina acetivorans protoglobin: A comparative study

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    Ascenzi, Paolo, E-mail: ascenzi@uniroma3.it [Laboratorio Interdipartimentale di Microscopia Elettronica, Università Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 79, I-00146 Roma (Italy); Istituto di Biochimica delle Proteine, CNR, Via Pietro Castellino 111, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Pesce, Alessandra [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Genova, I-16146 Genova (Italy); Nardini, Marco; Bolognesi, Martino [Dipartimento di Bioscienze, Università di Milano, Via Celoria 26, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Ciaccio, Chiara; Coletta, Massimo [Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche e Medicina Traslazionale, Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario di Ricerca in Chimica dei Metalli nei Sistemi Biologici, Piazza Umberto I 1, I-70121 Bari (Italy); Dewilde, Sylvia [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ► Methanosarcina acetivorans is a strictly anaerobic non-motile methane-producing Archaea. ► M. acetivorans protoglobin binds preferentially O{sub 2} rather than CO. ► Reductive nitrosylation of ferric M. acetivorans protoglobin. ► Nitrosylation of ferrious M. acetivorans protoglobin. ► M. acetivorans protoglobin is a scavenger of RNS and ROS. -- Abstract: Methanosarcina acetivorans is a strictly anaerobic non-motile methane-producing Archaea expressing protoglobin (Pgb) which might either facilitate O{sub 2} detoxification or act as a CO sensor/supplier in methanogenesis. Unusually, M. acetivorans Pgb (MaPgb) binds preferentially O{sub 2} rather than CO and displays anticooperativity in ligand binding. Here, kinetics and/or thermodynamics of ferric and ferrous MaPgb (MaPgb(III) and MaPgb(II), respectively) nitrosylation are reported. Data were obtained between pH 7.2 and 9.5, at 22.0 °C. Addition of NO to MaPgb(III) leads to the transient formation of MaPgb(III)–NO in equilibrium with MaPgb(II)–NO{sup +}. In turn, MaPgb(II)–NO{sup +} is converted to MaPgb(II) by OH{sup −}-based catalysis. Then, MaPgb(II) binds NO very rapidly leading to MaPgb(II)–NO. The rate-limiting step for reductive nitrosylation of MaPgb(III) is represented by the OH{sup −}-mediated reduction of MaPgb(II)–NO{sup +} to MaPgb(II). Present results highlight the potential role of MaPgb in scavenging of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species.

  5. The Methanosarcina barkeri genome: comparative analysis withMethanosarcina acetivorans and Methanosarcina mazei reveals extensiverearrangement within methanosarcinal genomes

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    Maeder, Dennis L.; Anderson, Iain; Brettin, Thomas S.; Bruce,David C.; Gilna, Paul; Han, Cliff S.; Lapidus, Alla; Metcalf, William W.; Saunders, Elizabeth; Tapia, Roxanne; Sowers, Kevin R.

    2006-05-19

    We report here a comparative analysis of the genome sequence of Methanosarcina barkeri with those of Methanosarcina acetivorans and Methanosarcina mazei. All three genomes share a conserved double origin of replication and many gene clusters. M. barkeri is distinguished by having an organization that is well conserved with respect to the other Methanosarcinae in the region proximal to the origin of replication with interspecies gene similarities as high as 95%. However it is disordered and marked by increased transposase frequency and decreased gene synteny and gene density in the proximal semi-genome. Of the 3680 open reading frames in M. barkeri, 678 had paralogs with better than 80% similarity to both M. acetivorans and M. mazei while 128 nonhypothetical orfs were unique (non-paralogous) amongst these species including a complete formate dehydrogenase operon, two genes required for N-acetylmuramic acid synthesis, a 14 gene gas vesicle cluster and a bacterial P450-specific ferredoxin reductase cluster not previously observed or characterized in this genus. A cryptic 36 kbp plasmid sequence was detected in M. barkeri that contains an orc1 gene flanked by a presumptive origin of replication consisting of 38 tandem repeats of a 143 nt motif. Three-way comparison of these genomes reveals differing mechanisms for the accrual of changes. Elongation of the large M. acetivorans is the result of multiple gene-scale insertions and duplications uniformly distributed in that genome, while M. barkeri is characterized by localized inversions associated with the loss of gene content. In contrast, the relatively short M. mazei most closely approximates the ancestral organizational state.

  6. Air-adapted Methanosarcina acetivorans shows high methane production and develops resistance against oxygen stress.

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    Ricardo Jasso-Chávez

    Full Text Available Methanosarcina acetivorans, considered a strict anaerobic archaeon, was cultured in the presence of 0.4-1% O2 (atmospheric for at least 6 months to generate air-adapted cells; further, the biochemical mechanisms developed to deal with O2 were characterized. Methane production and protein content, as indicators of cell growth, did not change in air-adapted cells respect to cells cultured under anoxia (control cells. In contrast, growth and methane production significantly decreased in control cells exposed for the first time to O2. Production of reactive oxygen species was 50 times lower in air-adapted cells versus control cells, suggesting enhanced anti-oxidant mechanisms that attenuated the O2 toxicity. In this regard, (i the transcripts and activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase significantly increased; and (ii the thiol-molecules (cysteine + coenzyme M-SH + sulfide and polyphosphate contents were respectively 2 and 5 times higher in air-adapted cells versus anaerobic-control cells. Long-term cultures (18 days of air-adapted cells exposed to 2% O2 exhibited the ability to form biofilms. These data indicate that M. acetivorans develops multiple mechanisms to contend with O2 and the associated oxidative stress, as also suggested by genome analyses for some methanogens.

  7. Activation of methanogenesis by cadmium in the marine archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans.

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    Elizabeth Lira-Silva

    Full Text Available Methanosarcina acetivorans was cultured in the presence of CdCl(2 to determine the metal effect on cell growth and biogas production. With methanol as substrate, cell growth and methane synthesis were not altered by cadmium, whereas with acetate, cadmium slightly increased both, growth and methane rate synthesis. In cultures metabolically active, incubations for short-term (minutes with 10 µM total cadmium increased the methanogenesis rate by 6 and 9 folds in methanol- and acetate-grown cells, respectively. Cobalt and zinc but not copper or iron also activated the methane production rate. Methanogenic carbonic anhydrase and acetate kinase were directly activated by cadmium. Indeed, cells cultured in 100 µM total cadmium removed 41-69% of the heavy metal from the culture and accumulated 231-539 nmol Cd/mg cell protein. This is the first report showing that (i Cd(2+ has an activating effect on methanogenesis, a biotechnological relevant process in the bio-fuels field; and (ii a methanogenic archaea is able to remove a heavy metal from aquatic environments.

  8. Structural Bases for the Regulation of CO Binding in the Archaeal Protoglobin from Methanosarcina acetivorans.

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    Lesley Tilleman

    Full Text Available Studies of CO ligand binding revealed that two protein states with different ligand affinities exist in the protoglobin from Methanosarcina acetivorans (in MaPgb*, residue Cys(E20101 was mutated to Ser. The switch between the two states occurs upon the ligation of MaPgb*. In this work, site-directed mutagenesis was used to explore the role of selected amino acids in ligand sensing and stabilization and in affecting the equilibrium between the "more reactive" and "less reactive" conformational states of MaPgb*. A combination of experimental data obtained from electronic and resonance Raman absorption spectra, CO ligand-binding kinetics, and X-ray crystallography was employed. Three amino acids were assigned a critical role: Trp(60B9, Tyr(61B10, and Phe(93E11. Trp(60B9 and Tyr(61B10 are involved in ligand stabilization in the distal heme pocket; the strength of their interaction was reflected by the spectra of the CO-ligated MaPgb* and by the CO dissociation rate constants. In contrast, Phe(93E11 is a key player in sensing the heme-bound ligand and promotes the rotation of the Trp(60B9 side chain, thus favoring ligand stabilization. Although the structural bases of the fast CO binding rate constant of MaPgb* are still unclear, Trp(60B9, Tyr(61B10, and Phe(93E11 play a role in regulating heme/ligand affinity.

  9. Apo and ligand-bound structures of ModA from the archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans.

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    Chan, Sum; Giuroiu, Iulia; Chernishof, Irina; Sawaya, Michael R; Chiang, Janet; Gunsalus, Robert P; Arbing, Mark A; Perry, L Jeanne

    2010-03-01

    The trace-element oxyanion molybdate, which is required for the growth of many bacterial and archaeal species, is transported into the cell by an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily uptake system called ModABC. ModABC consists of the ModA periplasmic solute-binding protein, the integral membrane-transport protein ModB and the ATP-binding and hydrolysis cassette protein ModC. In this study, X-ray crystal structures of ModA from the archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans (MaModA) have been determined in the apoprotein conformation at 1.95 and 1.69 A resolution and in the molybdate-bound conformation at 2.25 and 2.45 A resolution. The overall domain structure of MaModA is similar to other ModA proteins in that it has a bilobal structure in which two mixed alpha/beta domains are linked by a hinge region. The apo MaModA is the first unliganded archaeal ModA structure to be determined: it exhibits a deep cleft between the two domains and confirms that upon binding ligand one domain is rotated towards the other by a hinge-bending motion, which is consistent with the 'Venus flytrap' model seen for bacterial-type periplasmic binding proteins. In contrast to the bacterial ModA structures, which have tetrahedral coordination of their metal substrates, molybdate-bound MaModA employs octahedral coordination of its substrate like other archaeal ModA proteins.

  10. Identification of the major expressed S-layer and cell surface-layer-related proteins in the model methanogenic archaea: Methanosarcina barkeri Fusaro and Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A.

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    Rohlin, Lars; Leon, Deborah R; Kim, Unmi; Loo, Joseph A; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R; Gunsalus, Robert P

    2012-01-01

    Many archaeal cell envelopes contain a protein coat or sheath composed of one or more surface exposed proteins. These surface layer (S-layer) proteins contribute structural integrity and protect the lipid membrane from environmental challenges. To explore the species diversity of these layers in the Methanosarcinaceae, the major S-layer protein in Methanosarcina barkeri strain Fusaro was identified using proteomics. The Mbar_A1758 gene product was present in multiple forms with apparent sizes of 130, 120, and 100 kDa, consistent with post-translational modifications including signal peptide excision and protein glycosylation. A protein with features related to the surface layer proteins found in Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A and Methanosarcina mazei Goel was identified in the M. barkeri genome. These data reveal a distinct conserved protein signature with features and implied cell surface architecture in the Methanosarcinaceae that is absent in other archaea. Paralogous gene expression patterns in two Methanosarcina species revealed abundant expression of a single S-layer paralog in each strain. Respective promoter elements were identified and shown to be conserved in mRNA coding and upstream untranslated regions. Prior M. acetivorans genome annotations assigned S-layer or surface layer associated roles of eighty genes: however, of 68 examined none was significantly expressed relative to the experimentally determined S-layer gene.

  11. Development of β-Lactamase as a Tool for Monitoring Conditional Gene Expression by a Tetracycline-Riboswitch in Methanosarcina acetivorans

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    Shemsi Demolli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of reporter gene fusions to assess cellular processes such as protein targeting and regulation of transcription or translation is established technology in archaeal, bacterial, and eukaryal genetics. Fluorescent proteins or enzymes resulting in chromogenic substrate turnover, like β-galactosidase, have been particularly useful for microscopic and screening purposes. However, application of such methodology is of limited use for strictly anaerobic organisms due to the requirement of molecular oxygen for chromophore formation or color development. We have developed β-lactamase from Escherichia coli (encoded by bla in conjunction with the chromogenic substrate nitrocefin into a reporter system usable under anaerobic conditions for the methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans. By using a signal peptide of a putative flagellin from M. acetivorans and different catabolic promoters, we could demonstrate growth substrate-dependent secretion of β-lactamase, facilitating its use in colony screening on agar plates. Furthermore, a series of fusions comprised of a constitutive promoter and sequences encoding variants of the synthetic tetracycline-responsive riboswitch (tc-RS was created to characterize its influence on translation initiation in M. acetivorans. One tc-RS variant resulted in more than 11-fold tetracycline-dependent regulation of bla expression, which is in the range of regulation by naturally occurring riboswitches. Thus, tc-RS fusions represent the first solely cis-active, that is, factor-independent system for controlled gene expression in Archaea.

  12. Analysis of the MT1/MT2 Systems Involved in the Metabolism of One-Carbon Compounds in "Methanosarcina acetivorans" C2A

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    Opulencia, Rina Bagsic

    2009-01-01

    Methanogens are strictly anaerobic Archaea that derive their energy for growth by reducing a limited number of substrates to methane. "Methanosarcina" spp. utilize the methylotrophic pathway to grow on methanol, methylamines and methylsulfides. These compounds enter the methylotrophic pathway as methyl-coenzyme M, the synthesis of which is…

  13. Mining Proteomic Data to Expose Protein Modifications in Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1

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    Deborah eLeon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Proteomic tools identify constituents of complex mixtures, often delivering long lists of identified proteins. The high-throughput methods excel at matching tandem mass spectrometry data to spectra predicted from sequence databases. Unassigned mass spectra are ignored, but could, in principle, provide valuable information on unanticipated modifications and improve protein annotations while consuming limited quantities of material. Strategies to mine information from these discards are presented, along with discussion of features that, when present, provide strong support for modifications. In this study we mined LC-MS/MS datasets of proteolytically-digested concanavalin A pull down fractions from Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 cell lysates. Analyses identified 154 proteins. Many of the observed proteins displayed post-translationally modified forms, including O-formylated and methyl-esterified segments that appear biologically relevant (i.e., not artifacts of sample handling. Interesting cleavages and modifications (e.g., S-cyanylation and trimethylation were observed near catalytic sites of methanogenesis enzymes. Of 31 Methanosarcina protein N-termini recovered by concanavalin A binding or from a previous study, only M. mazei S-layer protein MM1976 and its M. acetivorans C2A orthologue, MA0829, underwent signal peptide excision. Experimental results contrast with predictions from algorithms SignalP 3.0 and Exprot, which were found to over-predict the presence of signal peptides. Proteins MM0002, MM0716, MM1364, and MM1976 were found to be glycosylated, and employing chromatography tailored specifically for glycopeptides will likely reveal more.This study supplements limited, existing experimental datasets of mature archaeal N-termini, including presence or absence of signal peptides, translation initiation sites, and other processing. Methanosarcina surface and membrane proteins are richly modified.

  14. Aerobic respiration in the Archaean?

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    Towe, K M

    1990-11-01

    The Earth's atmosphere during the Archaean era (3,800-2,500 Myr ago) is generally thought to have been anoxic, with the partial pressure of atmospheric oxygen about 10(-12) times the present value. In the absence of aerobic consumption of oxygen produced by photosynthesis in the ocean, the major sink for this oxygen would have been oxidation of dissolved Fe(II). Atmospheric oxygen would also be removed by the oxidation of biogenic methane. But even very low estimates of global primary productivity, obtained from the amounts of organic carbon preserved in Archaean rocks, seem to require the sedimentation of an unrealistically large amount of iron and the oxidation of too much methane if global anoxia was to be maintained. I therefore suggest that aerobic respiration must have developed early in the Archaean to prevent a build-up of atmospheric oxygen before the Proterozoic. An atmosphere that contained a low (0.2-0.4%) but stable proportion of oxygen is required.

  15. Genetic manipulation of Methanosarcina spp.

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    Petra Regine Adelheid Kohler

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the third domain of life, the Archaea, is one of the most exciting findings of the last century. These remarkable prokaryotes are well known for their adaptations to extreme environments; however, Archaea have also conquered moderate environments. Many of the archaeal biochemical processes, such as methane production, are unique in nature and therefore of great scientific interest. Although formerly restricted to biochemical and physiological studies, sophisticated systems for genetic manipulation have been developed during the last two decades for methanogenic archaea, halophilic archaea and thermophilic, sulfur-metabolizing archaea. The availability of these tools has allowed for more complete studies of archaeal physiology and metabolism and most importantly provides the basis for the investigation of gene expression, regulation and function. In this review we provide an overview of methods for genetic manipulation of Methanosarcina spp., a group of methanogenic archaea that are key players in the global carbon cycle and which can be found in a variety of anaerobic environments.

  16. The Hadean-Archaean environment.

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    Sleep, Norman H

    2010-06-01

    A sparse geological record combined with physics and molecular phylogeny constrains the environmental conditions on the early Earth. The Earth began hot after the moon-forming impact and cooled to the point where liquid water was present in approximately 10 million years. Subsequently, a few asteroid impacts may have briefly heated surface environments, leaving only thermophile survivors in kilometer-deep rocks. A warm 500 K, 100 bar CO(2) greenhouse persisted until subducted oceanic crust sequestered CO(2) into the mantle. It is not known whether the Earth's surface lingered in a approximately 70 degrees C thermophile environment well into the Archaean or cooled to clement or freezing conditions in the Hadean. Recently discovered approximately 4.3 Ga rocks near Hudson Bay may have formed during the warm greenhouse. Alkalic rocks in India indicate carbonate subduction by 4.26 Ga. The presence of 3.8 Ga black shales in Greenland indicates that S-based photosynthesis had evolved in the oceans and likely Fe-based photosynthesis and efficient chemical weathering on land. Overall, mantle derived rocks, especially kimberlites and similar CO(2)-rich magmas, preserve evidence of subducted upper oceanic crust, ancient surface environments, and biosignatures of photosynthesis.

  17. A multienzyme complex channels substrates and electrons through acetyl-CoA and methane biosynthesis pathways in Methanosarcina.

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    Dillon J Lieber

    Full Text Available Multienzyme complexes catalyze important metabolic reactions in many organisms, but little is known about the complexes involved in biological methane production (methanogenesis. A crosslinking-mass spectrometry (XL-MS strategy was employed to identify proteins associated with coenzyme M-coenzyme B heterodisulfide reductase (Hdr, an essential enzyme in all methane-producing archaea (methanogens. In Methanosarcina acetivorans, Hdr forms a multienzyme complex with acetyl-CoA decarbonylase synthase (ACDS, and F420-dependent methylene-H4MPT reductase (Mer. ACDS is essential for production of acetyl-CoA during growth on methanol, or for methanogenesis from acetate, whereas Mer is essential for methanogenesis from all substrates. Existence of a Hdr:ACDS:Mer complex is consistent with growth phenotypes of ACDS and Mer mutant strains in which the complex samples the redox status of electron carriers and directs carbon flux to acetyl-CoA or methanogenesis. We propose the Hdr:ACDS:Mer complex comprises a special class of multienzyme redox complex which functions as a "biological router" that physically links methanogenesis and acetyl-CoA biosynthesis pathways.

  18. Mixotrophic growth of two thermophilic Methanosarcina strains, Methanosarcina thermophila TM-1 and Methanosarcina sp. SO-2P, on methanol and hydrogen/carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mladenovska, Zuzana; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1997-01-01

    Two thermophilic strains, Methanosarcina thermophila TM-1 and Methanosarcina sp. SO-2P, were capable of mixotrophic growth on methanol and H-2/CO2. Activated carbon was, however, found to be necessary to support good growth. Both strains used hydrogen and methanol simultaneously. When methanol wa...... was depleted, hydrogen utilization continued and methane was further produced with concurrent cell growth. UV epifluorescence microscopy revealed that aggregates of both strains exhibited a bright red fluorescence besides the usual blue-green fluorescence....

  19. Adakitic magmas: modern analogues of Archaean granitoids

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    Martin, Hervé

    1999-03-01

    Both geochemical and experimental petrological research indicate that Archaean continental crust was generated by partial melting of an Archaean tholeiite transformed into a garnet-bearing amphibolite or eclogite. The geodynamic context of tholeiite melting is the subject of controversy. It is assumed to be either (1) subduction (melting of a hot subducting slab), or (2) hot spot (melting of underplated basalts). These hypotheses are considered in the light of modern adakite genesis. Adakites are intermediate to felsic volcanic rocks, andesitic to rhyolitic in composition (basaltic members are lacking). They have trondhjemitic affinities (high-Na 2O contents and K 2O/Na 2O˜0.5) and their Mg no. (0.5), Ni (20-40 ppm) and Cr (30-50 ppm) contents are higher than in typical calc-alkaline magmas. Sr contents are high (>300 ppm, until 2000 ppm) and REE show strongly fractionated patterns with very low heavy REE (HREE) contents (Yb≤1.8 ppm, Y≤18 ppm). Consequently, high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios are typical and discriminating features of adakitic magmas, indicative of melting of a mafic source where garnet and/or hornblende are residual phases. Adakitic magmas are only found in subduction zone environments, exclusively where the subduction and/or the subducted slab are young (situation is well-exemplified in Southern Chile where the Chile ridge is subducted and where the adakitic character of the lavas correlates well with the young age of the subducting oceanic lithosphere. In typical subduction zones, the subducted lithosphere is older than 20 Ma, it is cool and the geothermal gradient along the Benioff plane is low such that the oceanic crust dehydrates before it reaches the solidus temperature of hydrated tholeiite. Consequently, the basaltic slab cannot melt. The released large ion lithophile element (LILE)-rich fluids rise up into the mantle wedge, inducing both its metasomatism and partial melting. Afterwards, the residue is made up of olivine

  20. Direct interspecies electron transfer between Geobacter metallireducens and Methanosarcina barkeri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Liu, Fanghua;

    2014-01-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is potentially an effective form of syntrophy in methanogenic communities, but little is known about the diversity of methanogens capable of DIET. The ability of Methanosarcina barkeri, to participate in DIET was evaluated in co-culture with Geobacter...

  1. Microbial succession during thermophilic digestion: the potential of Methanosarcina sp.

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    Paul Illmer

    Full Text Available A distinct succession from a hydrolytic to a hydrogeno- and acetotrophic community was well documented by DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and dHPLC (denaturing high performance liquid chromatography, and confirmed by qPCR (quantitative PCR measurements and DNA sequence analyses. We could prove that Methanosarcina thermophila has been the most important key player during the investigated anaerobic digestion process. This organism was able to terminate a stagnation phase, most probable caused by a decreased pH and accumulated acetic acid following an initial hydrolytic stage. The lack in Methanosarcina sp. could not be compensated by high numbers of Methanothermobacter sp. or Methanoculleus sp., which were predominant during the initial or during the stagnation phase of the fermentation, respectively.

  2. Stable isotope composition and volume of Early Archaean oceans

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    Pope, Emily Catherine; Rosing, Minik Thorleif; Bird, Dennis K.

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of seawater are controlled by volatile fluxes between mantle, lithospheric (oceanic and continental crust) and atmospheric reservoirs. Throughout geologic time oxygen was likely conserved within these Earth system reservoirs, but hydrogen was not, as it can...... escape to space [1]. Hydrogen isotope ratios of serpentinites from the ~3.8Ga Isua Supracrustal Belt in West Greenland are between -53 and -99‰; the highest values are in antigorite ± lizardite serpentinites from a low-strain lithologic domain where hydrothermal reaction of Archaean seawater with oceanic...... of continents present at that time), and the mass of Early Archaean oceans to ~109 to 126% of present day oceans. Oxygen isotope analyses from these Isua serpentinites (δ18O = +0.1 to 5.6‰ relative to VSMOW) indicate that early Archaean δ18OSEAWATER similar to modern oceans. Our observations suggest...

  3. Rapid evolutionary innovation during an Archaean genetic expansion.

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    David, Lawrence A; Alm, Eric J

    2011-01-01

    The natural history of Precambrian life is still unknown because of the rarity of microbial fossils and biomarkers. However, the composition of modern-day genomes may bear imprints of ancient biogeochemical events. Here we use an explicit model of macroevolution including gene birth, transfer, duplication and loss events to map the evolutionary history of 3,983 gene families across the three domains of life onto a geological timeline. Surprisingly, we find that a brief period of genetic innovation during the Archaean eon, which coincides with a rapid diversification of bacterial lineages, gave rise to 27% of major modern gene families. A functional analysis of genes born during this Archaean expansion reveals that they are likely to be involved in electron-transport and respiratory pathways. Genes arising after this expansion show increasing use of molecular oxygen (P = 3.4 × 10(-8)) and redox-sensitive transition metals and compounds, which is consistent with an increasingly oxygenating biosphere.

  4. Contributions to late Archaean sulphur cycling by life on land

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    Stüeken, Eva E.; Catling, David C.; Buick, Roger

    2012-10-01

    Evidence in palaeosols suggests that life on land dates back to at least 2.76Gyr ago. However, the biogeochemical effects of Archaean terrestrial life are thought to have been limited, owing to the lack of a protective ozone shield from ultraviolet radiation for terrestrial organisms before the rise of atmospheric oxygen levels several hundred million years later. Records of chromium delivery from the continents suggest that microbial mineral oxidation began at least 2.48Gyr ago but do not indicate when the terrestrial biosphere began to dominate important biogeochemical cycles. Here we combine marine sulphur abundance data with a mass balance model of the sulphur cycle to estimate the effects of the Archaean and early Proterozoic terrestrial biosphere on sulphur cycling. We find that terrestrial oxidation of pyrite by microbes using oxygen has contributed a substantial fraction of the total sulphur weathering flux since at least 2.5Gyr ago, with probable evidence of such activity 2.7-2.8Gyr ago. The late Archaean onset of terrestrial sulphur cycling is supported by marine molybdenum abundance data and coincides with a shift to more sulphidic ocean conditions. We infer that significant microbial land colonization began by 2.7-2.8Gyr ago. Our identification of pyrite oxidation at this time provides further support for the appearance of molecular oxygen several hundred million years before the Great Oxidation Event.

  5. Growth kinetics and competition between Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta in mesophilic anaerobic digestion.

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    Conklin, Anne; Stensel, H David; Ferguson, John

    2006-05-01

    Methanosarcina species with a high maximum specific growth rate (mumax) and high half-saturation coefficient (KS) and Methanosaeta species with a low mumax and low KS are the only known aceticlastic methanogens. Because of Methanosaeta's low KS, the low acetate concentrations in conventional, mesophilic anaerobic digestion yield Methanosaeta dominance. However, Methanosarcina absorbs increases in acetate more efficiently and thus promotes more stable digestion. This paper tests the hypothesis that decreasing digester feeding frequencies can increase Methanosarcina predominance. Two acetate-fed reactors were established at a 17-day solids retention time. One reactor was fed hourly, and one was fed once daily. Microscopic and molecular methods were used to verify that the hourly fed reactor enriched for Methanosaeta, while the daily fed reactor enriched for Methanosarcina. Growth and substrate-use kinetics were measured for each reactor. A digester overload condition was simulated, and the Methanosarcina-enriched reactor was found to perform better than the Methanosaeta-enriched reactor. These findings indicate that Methanosarcina dominance can be achieved with infrequent feedings, leading to more stable digestion.

  6. Fractional Crystallisation of Archaean Trondhjemite Magma at 12-7 Kbar: Constraints on Rheology of Archaean Continental Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Saheli; Saha, Lopamudra; Satyanarayan, Manavalan; Pati, Jayanta

    2015-04-01

    Fractional Crystallisation of Archaean Trondhjemite Magma at 12-7 Kbar: Constraints on Rheology of Archaean Continental Crust Sarkar, S.1, Saha, L.1, Satyanarayan, M2. and Pati, J.K.3 1. Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee-247667, Haridwar, India, 2. HR-ICPMS Lab, Geochemistry Group, CSIR-National Geophysical Research Institute, Hyderabad-50007, India. 3. Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Nehru Science Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002, India. Tonalite-Trondhjemite-Granodiorite (TTGs) group of rocks, that mostly constitute the Archaean continental crusts, evolved through a time period of ~3.8 Ga-2.7 Ga with major episodes of juvenile magma generations at ~3.6 Ga and ~2.7 Ga. Geochemical signatures, especially HREE depletions of most TTGs conform to formation of this type of magma by partial melting of amphibolites or eclogites at 15-20 kbar pressure. While TTGs (mostly sodic in compositions) dominates the Eoarchaean (~3.8-3.6 Ga) to Mesoarchaean (~3.2-3.0 Ga) domains, granitic rocks (with significantly high potassium contents) became more dominant in the Neoarchaean period. The most commonly accepted model proposed for the formation of the potassic granite in the Neoarchaean time is by partial melting of TTGs along subduction zones. However Archaean granite intrusive into the gabbro-ultramafic complex from Scourie, NW Scotland has been interpreted to have formed by fractional crystallization of hornblende and plagioclase from co-existing trondhjemitic gneiss. In this study we have studied fractional crystallization paths from a Mesoarchaean trondhjemite from the central Bundelkhand craton, India using MELTS algorithm. Fractional crystallization modeling has been performed at pressure ranges of 20 kbar to 7 kbar. Calculations have shown crystallization of garnet-clinopyroxene bearing assemblages with progressive cooling of the magma at 20 kbar. At pressure ranges 19-16 kbar, solid phases

  7. Direct interspecies electron transfer between Geobacter metallireducens and Methanosarcina barkeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Liu, Fanghua; Markovaite, Beatrice; Chen, Shanshan; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-08-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is potentially an effective form of syntrophy in methanogenic communities, but little is known about the diversity of methanogens capable of DIET. The ability of Methanosarcina barkeri to participate in DIET was evaluated in coculture with Geobacter metallireducens. Cocultures formed aggregates that shared electrons via DIET during the stoichiometric conversion of ethanol to methane. Cocultures could not be initiated with a pilin-deficient G. metallireducens strain, suggesting that long-range electron transfer along pili was important for DIET. Amendments of granular activated carbon permitted the pilin-deficient G. metallireducens isolates to share electrons with M. barkeri, demonstrating that this conductive material could substitute for pili in promoting DIET. When M. barkeri was grown in coculture with the H2-producing Pelobacter carbinolicus, incapable of DIET, M. barkeri utilized H2 as an electron donor but metabolized little of the acetate that P.carbinolicus produced. This suggested that H2, but not electrons derived from DIET, inhibited acetate metabolism. P. carbinolicus-M. barkeri cocultures did not aggregate, demonstrating that, unlike DIET, close physical contact was not necessary for interspecies H2 transfer. M. barkeri is the second methanogen found to accept electrons via DIET and the first methanogen known to be capable of using either H2 or electrons derived from DIET for CO2 reduction. Furthermore, M. barkeri is genetically tractable,making it a model organism for elucidating mechanisms by which methanogens make biological electrical connections with other cells.

  8. Mineral transformations associated with goethite reduction by Methanosarcina barkeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Wang, Hongfang; Dong, H.; Qiu, X.; Dong, X.; Cravotta, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the interaction between methanogens and iron-containing minerals in anoxic environments, we conducted batch culture experiments with Methanosarcina barkeri in a phosphate-buffered basal medium (PBBM) to bioreduce structural Fe(III) in goethite with hydrogen as the sole substrate. Fe(II) and methane concentrations were monitored over the course of the bioreduction experiments with wet chemistry and gas chromatography, respectively. Subsequent mineralogical changes were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In the presence of an electron shuttle anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), 30% Fe(III) in goethite (weight basis) was reduced to Fe(II). In contrast, only 2% Fe(III) (weight basis) was bioreduced in the absence of AQDS. Most of the bioproduced Fe(II) was incorporated into secondary minerals including dufr??nite and vivianite. Our data implied a dufr??nite-vivianite transformation mechanism where a metastable dufr??nite transformed to a more stable vivianite over extended time in anaerobic conditions. Methanogenesis was greatly inhibited by bioreduction of goethite Fe(III). These results have important implications for the methane flux associated with Fe(III) bioreduction and ferrous iron mineral precipitation in anaerobic soils and sediments. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Mantle hydrous-fluid interaction with Archaean granite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słaby, E.; Martin, H.; Hamada, M.; Śmigielski, M.; Domonik, A.; Götze, J.; Hoefs, J.; Hałas, S.; Simon, K.; Devidal, J.-L.; Moyen, J.-F.; Jayananda, M.

    2012-04-01

    Water content/species in alkali feldspars from late Archaean Closepet igneous bodies as well as growth and re-growth textures, trace element and oxygen isotope composition have been studied (Słaby et al., 2011). Both processes growth and re-growth are deterministic, however they differ showing increasing persistency in element behaviour during interaction with fluids. The re-growth process fertilized domains and didn't change their oxygen-isotope signature. Water speciation showed persistent behaviour during heating at least up to 600oC. Carbonate crystals with mantle isotope signature are associated with the recrystallized feldspar domains. Fluid-affected domains in apatite provide evidence of halide exchange. The data testify that the observed recrystallization was a high-temperature reaction with fertilized, halide-rich H2O-CO2 mantle-derived fluids of high water activity. A wet mantle being able to generate hydrous plumes, which appear to be hotter during the Archean in comparison to the present time is supposed by Shimizu et al. (2001). Usually hot fluids, which can be strongly carbonic, precede asthenospheric mantle upwelling. They are supposed to be parental to most recognized compositions, which can be derived by their immiscible separation into saline aqueous-silicic and carbonatitic members (Klein-BenDavid et al., 2007). The aqueous fractions are halogen-rich with a significant proportion of CO2. Both admixed fractions are supposed to be fertile. The Closepet granite emplaced in a major shear zone that delimitates two different terrains. Generally such shear zones, at many places, are supposed to be rooted deep into the mantle. The drain, that favoured and controlled magma ascent and emplacement, seemed to remain efficient after granite crystallization. In the southern part of the Closepet batholiths an evidence of intensive interaction of a lower crust fluid (of high CO2 activity) is provided by the extensive charnockitization of amphibolite facies (St

  10. Optimization of RNA Isolation from the Archaebacterium Methanosarcina Barkeri and Validation for Oligonucleotide Microarray Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culley, David E.; Kovacik, William P.; Brockman, Fred J.; Zhang, Weiwen

    2006-10-01

    ABSTRACT-The recent completion of a draft genome sequence for Methanosarcina barkeri has allowed the application of various high throughput post-genomics technologies, such as nucleic acid microarrays and mass spectrometry of proteins to detect global changes in transcription and translation that occur in response to experimental treatments...

  11. Geodynamic evolution of the West and Central Pilbara Craton in Western Australia : a mid-Archaean active continental margin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beintema, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    The Archaean era lasted for about one third of the Earth's history, from ca 4.0 until 2.5 billion years ago. Because the Archaean spans such a long time, knowledge about this era is for understanding the evolution of the Earth until the present day, especially because it is the time offormation of m

  12. The Geoglobus acetivorans genome: Fe(III) reduction, acetate utilization, autotrophic growth, and degradation of aromatic compounds in a hyperthermophilic archaeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardanov, Andrey V; Slododkina, Galina B; Slobodkin, Alexander I; Beletsky, Alexey V; Gavrilov, Sergey N; Kublanov, Ilya V; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Skryabin, Konstantin G; Ravin, Nikolai V

    2015-02-01

    Geoglobus acetivorans is a hyperthermophilic anaerobic euryarchaeon of the order Archaeoglobales isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. A unique physiological feature of the members of the genus Geoglobus is their obligate dependence on Fe(III) reduction, which plays an important role in the geochemistry of hydrothermal systems. The features of this organism and its complete 1,860,815-bp genome sequence are described in this report. Genome analysis revealed pathways enabling oxidation of molecular hydrogen, proteinaceous substrates, fatty acids, aromatic compounds, n-alkanes, and organic acids, including acetate, through anaerobic respiration linked to Fe(III) reduction. Consistent with the inability of G. acetivorans to grow on carbohydrates, the modified Embden-Meyerhof pathway encoded by the genome is incomplete. Autotrophic CO2 fixation is enabled by the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. Reduction of insoluble poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide depends on the transfer of electrons from the quinone pool to multiheme c-type cytochromes exposed on the cell surface. Direct contact of the cells and Fe(III) oxide particles could be facilitated by pilus-like appendages. Genome analysis indicated the presence of metabolic pathways for anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds and n-alkanes, although an ability of G. acetivorans to grow on these substrates was not observed in laboratory experiments. Overall, our results suggest that Geoglobus species could play an important role in microbial communities of deep-sea hydrothermal vents as lithoautotrophic producers. An additional role as decomposers would close the biogeochemical cycle of carbon through complete mineralization of various organic compounds via Fe(III) respiration.

  13. Archaean Greenstone Belt Architecture and Stratigraphy: are Comparisons With Ophiolites and Oceanic Plateaux Valid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, J. H.; Bleeker, W.; Leclerc, F.

    2005-12-01

    Archaean greenstone belts and coeval plutonic belts (dominated by TTGs, tonalite-tronhjemite-granodiorite), are commonly interpreted to represent assembled fragments of oceanic crust, oceanic plateaux or juvenile arc terranes, variably reworked by Archaean orogenic processes related to the operation of plate tectonics. However, many of the lava successions that have been interpreted to represent accreted oceanic plateaux are demonstrably ensialic, can be correlated over long distances along-strike, have depositional contacts onto older continental crustal rocks, show tholeiitic to calc-alkaline cyclicity, and have isotopic signatures indicating assimilation of older felsic crust. Inferred Archaean ophiolites do not have sheeted dyke complexes or associated mantle rocks, and cannot be proven to be oceanic terranes formed by seafloor-spreading. Archaean supracrustal sequences are typically dominated by tholeiitic to komatiitic lavas, typically interpreted to represent the products of decompression melting of mantle plumes. Subordinate proportions of andesites, dacites and rhyolites also occur, and these, together with the coeval TTGs, are generally interpreted to represent arc magmas. In the context of uniformitarian interpretations, the coeval emplacement of putative arc- and plume-related magmas requires extremely complex geodynamic scenarios. However, the relative rarity of the archetypal convergent margin magma type (andesite) in Archaean sequences, and the absence of Archaean blueschists, ultra-high-pressure terranes, thrust and fold belts, core complexes and ophiolites, along with theoretical arguments against Archaean subduction, together imply that Archaean cratonic crust was not formed through uniformitarian plate-tectonic processes. A simpler interpretation involves soft intraoceanic collisions of thick (30-50km), plume-related, basaltic-komatiitic oceanic plateaux, with ongoing mafic magmatism leading to anatexis of the hydrated plateau base to generate

  14. Manganiferous minerals of the epidote group from the Archaean basement of West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katerinopoulou, Anna; Balic Zunic, Tonci; Kolb, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    The chemical compositions and crystal structures of Mn3+-containing minerals from the epidote group in Greenland rocks are investigated and described in detail. They occur in hydrothermally altered Archaean mafic sequences within the gneissic complex of the North Atlantic craton of West Greenland...

  15. Co-occurrence of Methanosarcina mazei and Geobacteraceae in an iron(III-reducing enrichment culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiling eZheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Methanosaeta harundinacea and Methanosarcina barkeri, known as classic acetoclastic methanogens, are capable of directly accepting electrons from Geobacter metallireducens for the reduction of carbon dioxide to methane, having been revealed as direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET in the laboratory co-cultures. However, whether their co-occurrences are ubiquitous in the iron (III-reducing environments and the other species of acetoclastic methanogens such as Methanosarcina mazei are capable of DIET are still unknown. Instead of initiating the co-cultures with pure cultures, two-step cultivation was employed to selectively enrich iron (III-reducing microorganisms in a coastal gold mining river, Jiehe River, with rich iron content in the sediments. First, iron (III reducers including Geobacteraceae were successfully enriched by 3-months successive culture on amorphous Fe(III oxides as electron acceptor and acetate as electron donor. High-throughput Illumina sequencing, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP and clone library analysis based on 16S rRNA genes revealed that the enrichment cultures actively contained the bacteria belong to Geobacteraceae and Bacilli, exclusively dominated by the archaea belong to Methanosarcinaceae. Second, the enrichment cultures including methanogens and Geobacteraceae were transferred with ethanol as alternative electron donor. Remarkably, aggregates were successively formed in the enrichments after three transfers. The results revealed by RNA-based analysis demonstrate that the co-occurrence of Methanosarcina mazei and Geobacteraceae in an iron (III-reducing enrichment culture. Furthermore, the aggregates, as close physical contact, formed in the enrichment culture, indicate that DIET could be a possible option for interspecies electron transfer in the aggregates.

  16. Record of mid-Archaean subduction from metamorphism in the Barberton terrain, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyen, Jean-François; Stevens, Gary; Kisters, Alexander

    2006-08-03

    Although plate tectonics is the central geological process of the modern Earth, its form and existence during the Archaean era (4.0-2.5 Gyr ago) are disputed. The existence of subduction during this time is particularly controversial because characteristic subduction-related mineral assemblages, typically documenting apparent geothermal gradients of 15 degrees C km(-1) or less, have not yet been recorded from in situ Archaean rocks (the lowest recorded apparent geothermal gradients are greater than 25 degrees C km(-1)). Despite this absence from the rock record, low Archaean geothermal gradients are suggested by eclogitic nodules in kimberlites and circumstantial evidence for subduction processes, including possible accretion-related structures, has been reported in Archaean terrains. The lack of spatially and temporally well-constrained high-pressure, low-temperature metamorphism continues, however, to cast doubt on the relevance of subduction-driven tectonics during the first 1.5 Gyr of the Earth's history. Here we report garnet-albite-bearing mineral assemblages that record pressures of 1.2-1.5 GPa at temperatures of 600-650 degrees C from supracrustal amphibolites from the mid-Archaean Barberton granitoid-greenstone terrain. These conditions point to apparent geothermal gradients of 12-15 degrees C-similar to those found in recent subduction zones-that coincided with the main phase of terrane accretion in the structurally overlying Barberton greenstone belt. These high-pressure, low-temperature conditions represent metamorphic evidence for cold and strong lithosphere, as well as subduction-driven tectonic processes, during the evolution of the early Earth.

  17. Synthesis of acetyl coenzyme A by carbon monoxide dehydrogenase complex from acetate-grown Methanosarcina thermophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Abbanat, D R; Ferry, J G

    1990-01-01

    The carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) complex from Methanosarcina thermophila catalyzed the synthesis of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) from CH3I, CO, and coenzyme A (CoA) at a rate of 65 nmol/min/mg at 55 degrees C. The reaction ended after 5 min with the synthesis of 52 nmol of acetyl-CoA per nmol of CODH complex. The optimum temperature for acetyl-CoA synthesis in the assay was between 55 and 60 degrees C; the rate of synthesis at 55 degrees C was not significantly different between pHs...

  18. Functional organization of a single nif cluster in the mesophilic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Claudia; Veit, Katharina; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2002-09-01

    The mesophilic methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1 is able to utilize molecular nitrogen (N2) as its sole nitrogen source. We have identified and characterized a single nitrogen fixation (nif) gene cluster in M. mazei Gö1 with an approximate length of 9 kbp. Sequence analysis revealed seven genes with sequence similarities to nifH, nifI1, nifI2, nifD, nifK, nifE and nifN, similar to other diazotrophic methanogens and certain bacteria such as Clostridium acetobutylicum, with the two glnB-like genes (nifI1 and nifI2) located between nifH and nifD. Phylogenetic analysis of deduced amino acid sequences for the nitrogenase structural genes of M. mazei Gö1 showed that they are most closely related to Methanosarcina barkeri nif2 genes, and also closely resemble those for the corresponding nif products of the gram-positive bacterium C. acetobutylicum. Northern blot analysis and reverse transcription PCR analysis demonstrated that the M. mazei nif genes constitute an operon transcribed only under nitrogen starvation as a single 8 kb transcript. Sequence analysis revealed a palindromic sequence at the transcriptional start site in front of the M. mazei nifH gene, which may have a function in transcriptional regulation of the nif operon.

  19. Functional organization of a single nif cluster in the mesophilic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Ehlers

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The mesophilic methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1 is able to utilize molecular nitrogen (N2 as its sole nitrogen source. We have identified and characterized a single nitrogen fixation (nif gene cluster in M. mazei Gö1 with an approximate length of 9 kbp. Sequence analysis revealed seven genes with sequence similarities to nifH, nifI1, nifI2, nifD, nifK, nifE and nifN, similar to other diazotrophic methanogens and certain bacteria such as Clostridium acetobutylicum, with the two glnB-like genes (nifI1 and nifI2 located between nifH and nifD. Phylogenetic analysis of deduced amino acid sequences for the nitrogenase structural genes of M. mazei Gö1 showed that they are most closely related to Methanosarcina barkeri nif2 genes, and also closely resemble those for the corresponding nif products of the gram-positive bacterium C. acetobutylicum. Northern blot analysis and reverse transcription PCR analysis demonstrated that the M. mazei nif genes constitute an operon transcribed only under nitrogen starvation as a single 8 kb transcript. Sequence analysis revealed a palindromic sequence at the transcriptional start site in front of the M. mazei nifH gene, which may have a function in transcriptional regulation of the nif operon.

  20. Ancient micrometeorites suggestive of an oxygen-rich Archaean upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkins, Andrew G.; Bowlt, Lara; Genge, Matthew; Wilson, Siobhan A.; Brand, Helen E. A.; Wykes, Jeremy L.

    2016-05-01

    It is widely accepted that Earth’s early atmosphere contained less than 0.001 per cent of the present-day atmospheric oxygen (O2) level, until the Great Oxidation Event resulted in a major rise in O2 concentration about 2.4 billion years ago. There are multiple lines of evidence for low O2 concentrations on early Earth, but all previous observations relate to the composition of the lower atmosphere in the Archaean era; to date no method has been developed to sample the Archaean upper atmosphere. We have extracted fossil micrometeorites from limestone sedimentary rock that had accumulated slowly 2.7 billion years ago before being preserved in Australia’s Pilbara region. We propose that these micrometeorites formed when sand-sized particles entered Earth’s atmosphere and melted at altitudes of about 75 to 90 kilometres (given an atmospheric density similar to that of today). Here we show that the FeNi metal in the resulting cosmic spherules was oxidized while molten, and quench-crystallized to form spheres of interlocking dendritic crystals primarily of magnetite (Fe3O4), with wüstite (FeO)+metal preserved in a few particles. Our model of atmospheric micrometeorite oxidation suggests that Archaean upper-atmosphere oxygen concentrations may have been close to those of the present-day Earth, and that the ratio of oxygen to carbon monoxide was sufficiently high to prevent noticeable inhibition of oxidation by carbon monoxide. The anomalous sulfur isotope (Δ33S) signature of pyrite (FeS2) in seafloor sediments from this period, which requires an anoxic surface environment, implies that there may have been minimal mixing between the upper and lower atmosphere during the Archaean.

  1. Implications of a reducing and warm (not hot) Archaean ambient mantle for ancient element cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulbach, Sonja

    2016-04-01

    There is considerable uncertainty regarding the oxygen partial pressure (fO2) and potential temperature (TP) of the ambient convecting mantle throughout Earth's history. Rare Archaean eclogite suites have elemental and isotopic compositions indicative of formation of crustal protoliths in oceanic spreading ridges, hence unaffected by continental sources. These include some eclogite xenoliths derived from cratonic mantle lithosphere and orogenic eclogites marking the exhumation of oceanic crust at Pacific-type margins. Their compositions may retain a memory of the thermal and redox state of the Archaean convecting mantle sources that gave rise to their low-pressure protoliths. Archaean eclogites have TiO2-REE relationships consistent with fractional crystallisation of olivine±plagioclase and cpx during formation of picritic protoliths from a melt that separated from a garnet-free peridotite source, implying intersection of the solidus at ≤2.5 to 3.0 GPa [1]. Low melt fractions (oceanic spreading ridges [7] in the Archaean, with implications for the composition and oxygenation of the palaeo-atmosphere. Subsequent subduction of such reducing oceanic crust must have also affected the cycling of volatile elements (soluble instead of molecular species [9]) and of redox-sensitive ore-forming metals [10] during metamorphic dehydration and melting reactions. [1] Aulbach&Viljoen (2015) Earth Planet Sci Lett 431; [2] Herzberg et al. (2010) Earth Planet Sci Lett 292; [3] Sizova et al. (2010) Lithos 116; [4] Rey&Coltice (2008) Geology 36; [5] Dasgupta (2013) RIMG 75; [6] Magni et al. (2014) G3 15; [7] Li&Lee (2004) EPSL 228; [8] Stagno et al. (2013) Nature 493; [9] Sverjensky et al. (2014) Nat Geosci 7; [10] Evans & Tomkins (2011) Earth Planet Sci Lett 308.

  2. Isolation and characterization of a new Methanosarcina mazei strain GFJ07 from a mountain forest pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: A new methanogenic strain, named GFJ07, was isolated from a pond of mountain forests in Guangxi, China. Cells grown in liquid culture tended to form aggregates with pseudosarcina-like or irregular shape.Methodology and Results: The optimum temperature, pH and NaCl concentration were 35 ℃, 7.0 and 0.5%, respectively. The isolate used methanol, trimethylamine, acetate and H2-CO2 as substrates. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequences revealed strain GFJ07 showed the highest sequence similarity of 99.9% to Methanosarcina mazei.Conclusion, significance and impact of study: The cells were Gram positive and nonmotile. Most of single cell grew as a sausage-like clinder about 0.5 μm in diameter and 1.0 μm in length.

  3. Palaeoproterozoic prograde metasomatic-metamorphic overprint zones in Archaean tonalitic gneisses, eastern Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajunen, M.

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Several occurrences of coarse-grained kyanite rocks are exposed in the Archaean area of eastern Finland in zones trending predominantly northwest-southeast that crosscut all the Archaean structures and, locally, the Palaeoproterozoic metadiabase dykes, too. Their metamorphic history illustrates vividly Palaeoproterozoic reactivation of the Archaean craton. The early-stage kyanite rocks were formed within the framework of ductile shearing or by penetrative metasomatism in zones of mobile brecciation. Static-state coarse-grained mineral growth during the ongoing fluid activity covered the early foliated fabrics, and metasomatic zoning developed. The early-stage metasomatism was characterized by Si, Ca and alkali leaching. The late-stage structures are dilatational semi-brittle faults and fractures with unstrained, coarse-grained fabrics often formed by metasomatic reactions displaying Mg enrichment along grain boundaries. Metamorphism proceeded from the low-T early-stage Chl-Ms-Qtz, Ky/And-St, eventually leading to the high-T late-stage Crd-Sil assemblages. The thermal peak, at 600-620°C/4-5 kbar, of the process is dated to 1852+2 Ma (U-Pb on xenotime. Al-silicate growth successions in different locations record small variations in the Palaeoproterozoic clockwise P-T paths. Pressure decreased by c. 1 kbar between the early and late stage, i.e. some exhumation had occurred. Fluid composition also changed during the progression, from saline H2O to CO2, rich. Weak retrograde features of high-T phases indicate a rapid cooling stage and termination of fluid activity. The early-stage Ky-St assemblages resemble those described from nearby Palaeoproterozoic metasediments in the Kainuu and North Karelia Schist Belts, where the metamorphic peak was achieved late with respect to Palaeoproterozoic structures. The static Ky-St metamorphism in kyanite rocks was generated by fluid-induced leaching processes at elevated T during the post-orogenic stage after

  4. The effect of thicker oceanic crust in the Archaean on the growth of continental crust through time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    Present crustal evolution models fail to account for the generation of the large volume of continental crust in the required time intervals. All Archaean plate tectonic models, whether invoking faster spreading rates, similar to today's spreading rates, or longer ridge lengths, essentially propose that continental crust has grown by island arc accretion due to the subduction of oceanic crust. The petrological differences that characterize the Archaean from later terrains result from the subduction of hotter oceanic crust into a hotter mantle. If the oceanic crust was appreciably thicker in the Archaean, as geothermal models would indicate, this thicker crust is surely going to have an effect on tectonic processes. A more valid approach is to compare the possible styles of convergence of thick oceanic crust with modern convergence zones. The best modern analog occurs where thick continental crust is colliding with thick continental crust. Oceanic crustal collision on the scale of the present-day Himalayan continental collision zone may have been a frequent occurrence in the Archaean, resulting in extensive partial melting of the hydrous underthrust oceanic crust to produce voluminous tonalite melts, leaving a depleted stabilized basic residuum. Present-day island arc accretion may not have been the dominant mechanism for the growth of the early Archaean crust.

  5. Effects of Nitrogen and Carbon Sources on Transcription of Soluble Methyltransferases in Methanosarcina mazei Strain Gö1†

    OpenAIRE

    Veit, Katharina; Ehlers, Claudia; Schmitz, Ruth A.

    2005-01-01

    The methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1 uses versatile carbon sources and is able to fix molecular nitrogen with methanol as carbon and energy sources. Here, we demonstrate that when growing on trimethylamine (TMA), nitrogen fixation does not occur, indicating that ammonium released during TMA degradation is sufficient to serve as a nitrogen source and represses nif gene induction. We further report on the transcriptional regulation of soluble methyltransferases, which catal...

  6. Biochar alleviates combined stress of ammonium and acids by firstly enriching Methanosaeta and then Methanosarcina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Fan; Luo, Chenghao; Shao, Liming; He, Pinjing

    2016-03-01

    This investigation evaluated the effectiveness of biochar of different particle sizes in alleviating ammonium (NH4(+)) inhibition (up to 7 g-N/L) during anaerobic digestion of 6 g/L glucose. Compared to the control treatment without biochar addition, treatments that included biochar particles 2-5 mm, 0.5-1 mm and 75-150 μm in size reduced the methanization lag phase by 23.9%, 23.8% and 5.9%, respectively, and increased the maximum methane production rate by 47.1%, 23.5% and 44.1%, respectively. These results confirmed that biochar accelerated the initiation of methanization during anaerobic digestion under double inhibition risk from both ammonium and acids. Furthermore, fine biochar significantly promoted the production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs). Comparative analysis on the archaeal and bacterial diversity at the early and later stages of digestion, and in the suspended, biochar loosely bound, and biochar tightly bound fractions suggested that, in suspended fractions, hydrogenotrophic Methanobacterium was actively resistant to ammonium. However, acetoclastic Methanosaeta can survive at VFAs concentrations up to 60-80 mmol-C/L by improved affinity to conductive biochar, resulting in the accelerated initiation of acetate degradation. Improved methanogenesis was followed by the colonization of the biochar tightly bound fractions by Methanosarcina. The selection of appropriate biochar particles sizes was important in facilitating the initial colonization of microbial cells.

  7. A novel inducible protein production system and neomycin resistance as selection marker for Methanosarcina mazei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondorf, Sebastian; Deppenmeier, Uwe; Welte, Cornelia

    2012-01-01

    Methanosarcina mazei is one of the model organisms for the methanogenic order Methanosarcinales whose metabolism has been studied in detail. However, the genetic toolbox is still limited. This study was aimed at widening the scope of utilizable methods in this group of organisms. (i) Proteins specific to methanogens are oftentimes difficult to produce in E. coli. However, a protein production system is not available for methanogens. Here we present an inducible system to produce Strep-tagged proteins in Ms. mazei. The promoter p1687, which directs the transcription of methyl transferases that demethylate methylamines, was cloned into plasmid pWM321 and its activity was determined by monitoring β-glucuronidase production. The promoter was inactive during growth on methanol but was rapidly activated when trimethylamine was added to the medium. The gene encoding the β-glucuronidase from E. coli was fused to a Strep-tag and was cloned downstream of the p1687 promoter. The protein was overproduced in Ms. mazei and was purified in an active form by affinity chromatography. (ii) Puromycin is currently the only antibiotic used as a selectable marker in Ms. mazei and its relatives. We established neomycin resistance as a second selectable marker by designing a plasmid that confers neomycin resistance in Ms. mazei.

  8. A Novel Inducible Protein Production System and Neomycin Resistance as Selection Marker for Methanosarcina mazei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Mondorf

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanosarcina mazei is one of the model organisms for the methanogenic order Methanosarcinales whose metabolism has been studied in detail. However, the genetic toolbox is still limited. This study was aimed at widening the scope of utilizable methods in this group of organisms. (i Proteins specific to methanogens are oftentimes difficult to produce in E. coli. However, a protein production system is not available for methanogens. Here we present an inducible system to produce Strep-tagged proteins in Ms. mazei. The promoter p1687, which directs the transcription of methyl transferases that demethylate methylamines, was cloned into plasmid pWM321 and its activity was determined by monitoring β-glucuronidase production. The promoter was inactive during growth on methanol but was rapidly activated when trimethylamine was added to the medium. The gene encoding the β-glucuronidase from E. coli was fused to a Strep-tag and was cloned downstream of the p1687 promoter. The protein was overproduced in Ms. mazei and was purified in an active form by affinity chromatography. (ii Puromycin is currently the only antibiotic used as a selectable marker in Ms. mazei and its relatives. We established neomycin resistance as a second selectable marker by designing a plasmid that confers neomycin resistance in Ms. mazei.

  9. The Alternative Route to Heme in the Methanogenic Archaeon Methanosarcina barkeri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Kühner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In living organisms heme is formed from the common precursor uroporphyrinogen III by either one of two substantially different pathways. In contrast to eukaryotes and most bacteria which employ the so-called “classical” heme biosynthesis pathway, the archaea use an alternative route. In this pathway, heme is formed from uroporphyrinogen III via the intermediates precorrin-2, sirohydrochlorin, siroheme, 12,18-didecarboxysiroheme, and iron-coproporphyrin III. In this study the heme biosynthesis proteins AhbAB, AhbC, and AhbD from Methanosarcina barkeri were functionally characterized. Using an in vivo enzyme activity assay it was shown that AhbA and AhbB (Mbar_A1459 and Mbar_A1460 together catalyze the conversion of siroheme into 12,18-didecarboxysiroheme. The two proteins form a heterodimeric complex which might be subject to feedback regulation by the pathway end-product heme. Further, AhbC (Mbar_A1793 was shown to catalyze the formation of iron-coproporphyrin III in vivo. Finally, recombinant AhbD (Mbar_A1458 was produced in E. coli and purified indicating that this protein most likely contains two [4Fe-4S] clusters. Using an in vitro enzyme activity assay it was demonstrated that AhbD catalyzes the conversion of iron-coproporphyrin III into heme.

  10. Evidence for recycled Archaean oceanic mantle lithosphere in the Azores plume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Bruce F; Turner, Simon; Parkinson, Ian; Rogers, Nick; Hawkesworth, Chris

    2002-11-21

    The compositional differences between mid-ocean-ridge and ocean-island basalts place important constraints on the form of mantle convection. Also, it is thought that the scale and nature of heterogeneities within plumes and the degree to which heterogeneous material endures within the mantle might be reflected in spatial variations of basalt composition observed at the Earth's surface. Here we report osmium isotope data on lavas from a transect across the Azores archipelago which vary in a symmetrical pattern across what is thought to be a mantle plume. Many of the lavas from the centre of the plume have lower 187Os/188Os ratios than most ocean-island basalts and some extend to subchondritic 187Os/188Os ratios-lower than any yet reported from ocean-island basalts. These low ratios require derivation from a depleted, harzburgitic mantle, consistent with the low-iron signature of the Azores plume. Rhenium-depletion model ages extend to 2.5 Gyr, and we infer that the osmium isotope signature is unlikely to be derived from Iberian subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Instead, we interpret the osmium isotope signature as having a deep origin and infer that it may be recycled, Archaean oceanic mantle lithosphere that has delaminated from its overlying oceanic crust. If correct, our data provide evidence for deep mantle subduction and storage of oceanic mantle lithosphere during the Archaean era.

  11. Structural and Metamorphic Evolution of the Archaean High-pressure Granulite in Datong-Huaian Area, North China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Archaean granulite terrain in the Datong-Huaian area, north China, comprises a basement complex of fe lsic and mafic granulite (TTG gneiss), overlain by a sedimentary sequence dominated by metapelite and metapsammite (khondalite series). Both lithological associations are separated by a tectonic

  12. Geochemical and biologic constraints on the Archaean atmosphere and climate – A possible solution to the faint early Sun paradox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosing, Minik Thorleif; Brid, D. K.; Sleep, N. H.;

    There is ample geological evidence that Earth’s climate resembled the present during the Archaean, despite a much lower solar luminosity. This was cast as a paradox by Sagan and Mullen in 1972. Several solutions to the paradox have been suggested, mostly focusing on adjustments of the radiative p...

  13. Archaean asteroid impacts, banded iron formations and MIF-S anomalies: A discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glikson, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    The origin of mass-independent fractionation (MIF-S) of sulphur isotopes ( δ33S) recorded in sediments older than 2.45 Ga is widely interpreted in terms of UV-triggered reactions under oxygen-poor ozone-depleted atmosphere conditions (Farquhar, J., Bao, H., Thiemens, M. [2000] Science, 289, 756; Farquhar, J., Peters, M., Johnston, D.T., Strauss, H., Masterson, A., Wiechert, U., Kaufman, A.J. [2007] Nature, 449, 706-709; Farquhar, J., Wing, B.A. [2003] Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 213, 1-13; Kaufman, A.J., Johnston, D.T., Farquhar, J., Masterson, A.L., Lyons, T.W., Bates, S., Anbar, A.D., Arnold, G.L., Garvin, J., Buick, R. [2007a] Science, 317, 1900-1903; Kaufman, A.J., Farquhar, J., Johnston, D.T., Lyons, T.W., Arnold, G.L., Anbar, A. [2007b] Deep Time Drilling Project of the NASA Astrobiology Drilling Program). Observed mid-Archaean variability of MIF-S signatures raises questions regarding the extent of atmospheric anoxia (Ohmoto, H., Watanabe, Y., Ikemi, H., Poulson, H.R., Taylor, B. [2006] Nature, 406, 908-991; Farquhar et al., 2007). Late Archaean (˜2.7-2.5 Ga) and mid-Archaean (˜3.2 Ga) sequences in the Pilbara Craton (Western Australia) and Kaapvaal Craton (South Africa), in which MIF-S data were measured, contain asteroid impact ejecta units dated as 2.48, 2.56, 2.63, 3.24, 3.26 and 3.47 Ga old (Lowe, D.R., Byerly, G.R., Kyte, T., Shukolyukov, A., Asaro, F., Krull, A. [2003] Astrobiology, 3, 7-48; Simonson, B.M., Hassler, S.W. [1997] Aust. J. Earth Sci., 44, 37-48; Simonson, B.M., Glass, B.P. [2004] Ann. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci., 32, 329-361; Glikson, A.Y. [2004] Astrobiology, 4, 19-50; Glikson, A.Y. [2006] Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 246, 149-160; Glikson, A.Y. [2008] Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 267, 558-570). Mass balance calculations based on iridium and 53Cr/ 52Cr isotopic anomalies (Byerly, G.R., Lowe, D.R. [1994] Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 58, 3469-3486; Kyte, F.T., Shukloyukov, A., Lugmair, G.W., Lowe, D.R., Byerly, G.R. [2003] Geology, 31, 283-286) and

  14. Effects of various environmental conditions on the transformation of chlorinated solvents by Methanosarcina thermophila cell exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeseman, J L; Novak, P J

    2001-12-20

    Several microbiologically produced biomolecules have been shown to degrade chlorinated contaminants found in groundwater systems. It was discovered that the cell-free exudates of the methanogen Methanosarcina thermophila were capable of carbon tetrachloride (CT) and chloroform (CF) degradation. Characterization of the exudates suggested that the active agents were porphorinogen-type molecules, possibly containing zinc. This research was performed to determine if the exudates from M. thermophila could be used for remediation purposes. The cell exudates were found to be capable of degrading CT, CF, tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. CT degradation was used to gauge exudate activity under a variety of conditions that would be encountered in the environment. The cell exudates were active when incubated in two types of soil matrices and at temperatures ranging from 4 to 23 degrees C. Over a 35-day period approximately 10.2 micromoles of CT were degraded by M. thermophila exudates. To test the hypothesis that the exudates contained either a zinc porphorinogen or a quinone, experiments were performed with zinc 5,10,15,20-tetra (4-pyridyl)-21 H, 23 H-porphine tetrakis, protoporphyrin IX zinc, and juglone. The two zinc porphyrins were capable of mediating CT degradation at rates comparable to those observed with the M. thermophila exudates; however, juglone was only capable of very slow CT transformation. The electron-transfer activity of the M. thermophila cell exudates was therefore more consistent with the activity of porphorinogens rather than quinones. Finally, in two enrichment cultures established from aquifer material and marine sediment, the possibility of excreted agents capable of degrading CT was evident.

  15. Deep origin and hot melting of an Archaean orogenic peridotite massif in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Dirk; van Roermund, Herman L M; Drury, Martyn R; Ottolini, Luisa; Mason, Paul R D; Davies, Gareth R

    2006-04-13

    The buoyancy and strength of sub-continental lithospheric mantle is thought to protect the oldest continental crust (cratons) from destruction by plate tectonic processes. The exact origin of the lithosphere below cratons is controversial, but seems clearly to be a residue remaining after the extraction of large amounts of melt. Models to explain highly melt-depleted but garnet-bearing rock compositions require multi-stage processes with garnet and clinopyroxene possibly of secondary origin. Here we report on orogenic peridotites (fragments of cratonic mantle incorporated into the crust during continent-continent plate collision) from Otrøy, western Norway. We show that the peridotites underwent extensive melting during upwelling from depths of 350 kilometres or more, forming a garnet-bearing cratonic root in a single melting event. These peridotites appear to be the residue after Archaean aluminium depleted komatiite magmatism.

  16. A proposal for formation of Archaean stromatolites before the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Frederick Allen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Stromatolites are solid, laminar structures of biological origin. Living examples are sparsely distributed and formed by cyanobacteria, which are oxygenic phototrophs. However, stromatolites were abundant between 3.4 and 2.4 Gyr, prior to the advent of cyanobacteria and oxygenic photosynthesis. Here I propose that many Archaean stromatolites were seeded at points of efflux of hydrogen sulfide from hydrothermal fields into shallow water, while their laminar composition arose from alternating modes of strictly anoxygenic photosynthetic metabolism. These changes were a redox regulatory response of gene expression to changing hydrogen sulfide concentration, which fluctuated with intermittent dilution by tidal action or by rainfall into surface waters. The proposed redox switch between modes of metabolism deposited sequential microbial mats. These mats gave rise to alternating carbonate sediments predicted to retain evidence of their origin in differing ratios of isotopes of carbon and sulfur. The mats may have arisen either by replacement of microbial populations or by continuous lineages of protocyanobacteria in which a redox genetic switch selected between type I and type II photosynthetic reaction centers, and thus between photolithoautotrophic and photoorganoheterotrophic metabolism. In the latter case, and by 2.4 Gyr at the latest, a mutation had disabled the redox genetic switch to give simultaneous constitutive expression of both type I and type II reaction centers, and thus to the ability to extract electrons from manganese and then water. By this simple step, the first cyanobacterium had the dramatic advantage of emancipation from limiting supplies of inorganic electron donors, produced free molecular oxygen as a waste product, and initiated the Great Oxidation Event in Earth’s history at the transition from the Archaean to the Paleoproterozoic.

  17. Oxygen produced by cyanobacteria in simulated Archaean conditions partly oxidizes ferrous iron but mostly escapes-conclusions about early evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantamäki, Susanne; Meriluoto, Jussi; Spoof, Lisa; Puputti, Eeva-Maija; Tyystjärvi, Taina; Tyystjärvi, Esa

    2016-12-01

    The Earth has had a permanently oxic atmosphere only since the great oxygenation event (GOE) 2.3-2.4 billion years ago but recent geochemical research has revealed short periods of oxygen in the atmosphere up to a billion years earlier before the permanent oxygenation. If these "whiffs" of oxygen truly occurred, then oxygen-evolving (proto)cyanobacteria must have existed throughout the Archaean aeon. Trapping of oxygen by ferrous iron and other reduced substances present in Archaean oceans has often been suggested to explain why the oxygen content of the atmosphere remained negligible before the GOE although cyanobacteria produced oxygen. We tested this hypothesis by growing cyanobacteria in anaerobic high-CO2 atmosphere in a medium with a high concentration of ferrous iron. Microcystins are known to chelate iron, which prompted us also to test the effects of microcystins and nodularins on iron tolerance. The results show that all tested cyanobacteria, especially nitrogen-fixing species grown in the absence of nitrate, and irrespective of the ability to produce cyanotoxins, were iron sensitive in aerobic conditions but tolerated high concentrations of iron in anaerobicity. This result suggests that current cyanobacteria would have tolerated the high-iron content of Archaean oceans. However, only 1 % of the oxygen produced by the cyanobacterial culture was trapped by iron, suggesting that large-scale cyanobacterial photosynthesis would have oxygenated the atmosphere even if cyanobacteria grew in a reducing ocean. Recent genomic analysis suggesting that ability to colonize seawater is a secondary trait in cyanobacteria may offer a partial explanation for the sustained inefficiency of cyanobacterial photosynthesis during the Archaean aeon, as fresh water has always covered a very small fraction of the Earth's surface. If oxygenic photosynthesis originated in fresh water, then the GOE marks the adaptation of cyanobacteria to seawater, and the late-Proterozoic increase

  18. Hydrogen and Oxygen Isotope Composition of Archaean Oceans Preserved in the ~3.8 Ga Isua Supracrustal Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, E. C.; Rosing, M.; Bird, D. K.

    2010-12-01

    The hydrogen isotope composition of Earth’s oceans is dependent on fluxes from the mantle, continental crust, surficial and groundwater reservoirs, and the incoming and outgoing flux of hydrogen from space. δD values of serpentinites from the Isua supracrustal belt in West Greenland range from -53 to -99‰. The upper limit of these values demonstrably preserves a signature of original seawater metasomatism, and gives a lower limit δD value for early Archaean oceans of -26‰ based on equilibrium fractionation. We propose that the progressive increase in δDOCEAN since this time is due to the preferential uptake of hydrogen in continent-forming minerals, and to hydrogen escape via biogenic methanogenesis. At most, 1.4x1022 mol H2 has been lost due to hydrogen escape, depending on the volume of continents already present at ca. 3.8 Ga, and oceans at this time were likely ~109 to 125% the size of modern day oceans. This upper limit suggests that atmospheric methane levels in the Archaean were less than 500ppmv, limiting the extent to which atmospheric greenhouse gases counteracted the faint early Sun. Oxygen isotope compositions from the same serpentinites (+0.1 to 5.6‰) indicate that the δ18O of Early Archaean oceans was ~ 0-4‰; similar to modern values. Based on this, we propose that low δ18O values of Archaean and Paleozoic cherts and carbonates are not a function of changing ocean isotope composition, but rather are due to isotopic exchange with shallow hydrothermal fluids on the ocean floor or during diagenesis.

  19. Pre-biotic organic molecules in hydrothermal quartz veins from the Archaean Yilgarn province, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Christian; Schreiber, Ulrich; Dyker, Gerald; Kirnbauer, Thomas; Mulder, Ines; Sattler, Tobias; Schöler, Heinfried; Tubbesing, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    According to a model recently published by Schreiber et al. (OLEB 2012), pre-biotic organic molecules as earliest markers for a chemical evolution have been formed in tectonic faults of the first Archaean cratons. These faults are often documented by quartz- and other hydrothermal vein mineralization. During the growth of these quartzes, small portions of hydrothermal fluids are enclosed which conserve the chemical composition of the given fluid medium. According to our model, the preconditions for the geochemical formation of organic molecules are a suitable carbon source (e.g. carbon dioxide), varying P/T conditions, and catalysts. This given, rising hydrothermal fluids such as mineral-rich water and supercritical carbon dioxide in deep faults with contacts to the upper earth mantle offer conditions which allow for reactions similar to the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. So far, the inclusions which possibly have conserved the products of these reactions have not been analyzed for possible organic constituents. First analytical results of a Mesozoic hydrothermal quartz vein from central Germany (Taunus) reveal that several organic compounds are found in fluid inclusions. However, the true origin of these compounds is unclear due to possible contamination by adjacent Corg-rich metasediments. Therefore, we have extended the study to hydrothermal quartz veins from the Archaean Yilgarn craton, to impact-generated quartz veins of the Shoemaker-Crater as well as to hydrothermal quartz boulders from a 2.7 to 3 billion years old conglomerate near Murchison (Western Australia). In one of the samples from the conglomerate, a wide spectrum of organic compounds such as bromomethane, butane, isoprene, benzene, and toluene have been detected. The time interval between the quartz formation, its erosion and its sedimentation is unknown. Possibly, the analyzed quartz sample was formed in a hydrothermal vein long before any living cells have existed on earth. In this case, the given

  20. Sink or swim? Geodynamic and petrological model constraints on the fate of Archaean primary crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaus, B.; Johnson, T.; Brown, M.; VanTongeren, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Ambient mantle potential temperatures in the Archaean were significantly higher than 1500 °C, leading to a high percent of melting and generating thick MgO-rich primary crust underlain by highly residual mantle. However, the preserved volume of this crust is low suggesting much of it was recycled. Here we couple calculated phase equilibria for hydrated and anhydrous low to high MgO crust compositions and their complementary mantle residues with 2-D numerical geodynamic models to investigate lithosphere dynamics in the early Earth. We show that, with increasing ambient mantle potential temperature, the density of primary crust increases more dramatically than the density of residual mantle decreases and the base of MgO-rich primary crust becomes gravitationally unstable with respect to the underlying mantle even when fully hydrated. To study this process we use geodynamic models that include the effects of melt extraction, crust formation and depletion of the mantle in combination with laboratory-constrained dislocation and diffusion creep rheologies for the mantle. The models show that the base of the gravitationally unstable lithosphere delaminates through relatively small-scale Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, but only if the viscosity of the mantle lithosphere is sufficiently low. Thickening of the crust above upwelling mantle and heating at the base of the crust are the main mechanisms that trigger the delamination process. Scaling laws were developed that are in good agreement with the numerical simulations and show that the key parameters that control the instability are the density contrast between crust and underlying mantle lithosphere, the thickness of the unstable layer and the effective viscosity of the upper mantle. Depending on uncertainties in the melting relations and rheology (hydrous or anhydrous) of the mantle, this process is shown to efficiently recycle the crust above potential temperatures of 1550-1600 °C. However, below these temperatures

  1. Percolation of diagenetic fluids in the Archaean basement of the Franceville basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouélé, Idalina Moubiya; Dudoignon, Patrick; Albani, Abderrazak El; Cuney, Michel; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Gauthier-Lafaye, François

    2014-01-01

    The Palaeoproterozoic Franceville basin, Gabon, is mainly known for its high-grade uranium deposits, which are the only ones known to act as natural nuclear fission reactors. Previous work in the Kiéné region investigated the nature of the fluids responsible for these natural nuclear reactors. The present work focuses on the top of the Archaean granitic basement, specifically, to identify and date the successive alteration events that affected this basement just below the unconformity separating it from the Palaeoproterozoic basin. Core from four drill holes crosscutting the basin-basement unconformity have been studied. Dating is based on U-Pb isotopic analyses performed on monazite. The origin of fluids is discussed from the study of fluid inclusion planes (FIP) in quartz from basement granitoids. From the deepest part of the drill holes to the unconformable boundary with the basin, propylitic alteration assemblages are progressively replaced by illite and locally by a phengite + Fe chlorite ± Fe oxide assemblage. Illitic alteration is particularly strong along the sediment-granitoid contact and is associated with quartz dissolution. It was followed by calcite and anhydrite precipitation as fracture fillings. U-Pb isotopic dating outlines three successive events: a 3.0-2.9-Ga primary magmatic event, a 2.6-Ga propylitic alteration and a late 1.9-Ga diagenetic event. Fluid inclusion microthermometry suggests the circulation of three types of fluids: (1) a Na-Ca-rich diagenetic brine, (2) a moderately saline (diagenetic + meteoric) fluid, and (3) a low-salinity fluid of probable meteoric origin. These fluids are similar to those previously identified within the overlying sedimentary rocks of the Franceville basin. Overall, the data collected in this study show that the Proterozoic-Archaean unconformity has operated as a major flow corridor for fluids circulation, around 1.9 Ga. highly saline diagenetic brines; hydrocarbon-rich fluids derived from organic matter

  2. Genome sequencing of methanogenic Archaea Methanosarcina mazei TUC01 strain isolated from an Amazonian Flooded Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraúna, R. A.; Graças, D. A.; Ramos, R. T.; Carneiro, A. R.; Lopes, T. S.; Lima, A. R.; Zahlouth, R. L.; Pellizari, V. H.; Silva, A.

    2013-05-01

    Methanosarcina mazei is a strictly anaerobic methanogen from the Methanosarcinales order. This species is known for its broad catabolic range among methanogens and is widespread throughout diverse environments. The draft genome of a strain cultivated from the sediment of the Tucuruí hydroelectric power station, the fourth largest hydroelectric dam in the world, is described here. Approximately 80% of methane is produced by biogenic sources, such as methanogenic archaea from M. mazei species. Although the methanogenesis pathway is well known, some aspects of the core genome, genome evolution and shared genes are still unclear. A sediment sample from the Tucuruí hydropower station reservoir was inoculated in mineral media supplemented with acetate and methanol. This media was maintained in an H2:CO2 (80:20) atmosphere to enrich and cultivate M. mazei. The enrichment was conducted at 30°C under standard anaerobic conditions. After several molecular and cellular analyses, total DNA was extracted from a non-pure culture of M. mazei, amplified using phi29 DNA polymerase (BioLabs) and finally used as a source template for genome sequencing. The draft genome was obtained after two rounds of sequencing. First, the genome was sequenced using a SOLiD System V3 with a mate-paired library, which yielded 24,405,103 and 24,399,268 reads (50 bp) for the R3 and F3 tags, respectively. The second round of sequencing was performed using the SOLiD 5500 XL platform with a mate-paired library, resulting in a total of 113,588,848 reads (60 bp) for each tag (F3 and R3). All reads obtained by this procedure were filtered using Quality Assessment software, whereby reads with an average quality score below Phred 20 were removed. Velvet and Edena were used to assemble the reads, and Simplifier was used to remove the redundant sequences. After this, a total of 16,811 contigs were obtained. M. mazei GO1 (AE008384) genome was used to map the contigs and generate the scaffolds. We used the

  3. Archaean zircons in Miocene oceanic hotspot rocks establish ancient continental crust beneath Mauritius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwal, Lewis D; Wiedenbeck, Michael; Torsvik, Trond H

    2017-01-31

    A fragment of continental crust has been postulated to underlie the young plume-related lavas of the Indian Ocean island of Mauritius based on the recovery of Proterozoic zircons from basaltic beach sands. Here we document the first U-Pb zircon ages recovered directly from 5.7 Ma Mauritian trachytic rocks. We identified concordant Archaean xenocrystic zircons ranging in age between 2.5 and 3.0 Ga within a trachyte plug that crosscuts Older Series plume-related basalts of Mauritius. Our results demonstrate the existence of ancient continental crust beneath Mauritius; based on the entire spectrum of U-Pb ages for old Mauritian zircons, we demonstrate that this ancient crust is of central-east Madagascar affinity, which is presently located ∼700 km west of Mauritius. This makes possible a detailed reconstruction of Mauritius and other Mauritian continental fragments, which once formed part of the ancient nucleus of Madagascar and southern India.

  4. A Field Trip to the Archaean in Search of Darwin’s Warm Little Pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Damer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Charles Darwin’s original intuition that life began in a “warm little pond” has for the last three decades been eclipsed by a focus on marine hydrothermal vents as a venue for abiogenesis. However, thermodynamic barriers to polymerization of key molecular building blocks and the difficulty of forming stable membranous compartments in seawater suggest that Darwin’s original insight should be reconsidered. I will introduce the terrestrial origin of life hypothesis, which combines field observations and laboratory results to provide a novel and testable model in which life begins as protocells assembling in inland fresh water hydrothermal fields. Hydrothermal fields are associated with volcanic landmasses resembling Hawaii and Iceland today and could plausibly have existed on similar land masses rising out of Earth’s first oceans. I will report on a field trip to the living and ancient stromatolite fossil localities of Western Australia, which provided key insights into how life may have emerged in Archaean, fluctuating fresh water hydrothermal pools, geological evidence for which has recently been discovered. Laboratory experimentation and fieldwork are providing mounting evidence that such sites have properties that are conducive to polymerization reactions and generation of membrane-bounded protocells. I will build on the previously developed coupled phases scenario, unifying the chemical and geological frameworks and proposing that a hydrogel of stable, communally supported protocells will emerge as a candidate Woese progenote, the distant common ancestor of microbial communities so abundant in the earliest fossil record.

  5. A Field Trip to the Archaean in Search of Darwin's Warm Little Pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damer, Bruce

    2016-05-25

    Charles Darwin's original intuition that life began in a "warm little pond" has for the last three decades been eclipsed by a focus on marine hydrothermal vents as a venue for abiogenesis. However, thermodynamic barriers to polymerization of key molecular building blocks and the difficulty of forming stable membranous compartments in seawater suggest that Darwin's original insight should be reconsidered. I will introduce the terrestrial origin of life hypothesis, which combines field observations and laboratory results to provide a novel and testable model in which life begins as protocells assembling in inland fresh water hydrothermal fields. Hydrothermal fields are associated with volcanic landmasses resembling Hawaii and Iceland today and could plausibly have existed on similar land masses rising out of Earth's first oceans. I will report on a field trip to the living and ancient stromatolite fossil localities of Western Australia, which provided key insights into how life may have emerged in Archaean, fluctuating fresh water hydrothermal pools, geological evidence for which has recently been discovered. Laboratory experimentation and fieldwork are providing mounting evidence that such sites have properties that are conducive to polymerization reactions and generation of membrane-bounded protocells. I will build on the previously developed coupled phases scenario, unifying the chemical and geological frameworks and proposing that a hydrogel of stable, communally supported protocells will emerge as a candidate Woese progenote, the distant common ancestor of microbial communities so abundant in the earliest fossil record.

  6. Iron isotope fractionation during microbial dissimilatory iron oxide reduction in simulated Archaean seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percak-Dennett, E M; Beard, B L; Xu, H; Konishi, H; Johnson, C M; Roden, E E

    2011-05-01

    The largest Fe isotope excursion yet measured in marine sedimentary rocks occurs in shales, carbonates, and banded iron formations of Neoarchaean and Paleoproterozoic age. The results of field and laboratory studies suggest a potential role for microbial dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) in producing this excursion. However, most experimental studies of Fe isotope fractionation during DIR have been conducted in simple geochemical systems, using pure Fe(III) oxide substrates that are not direct analogues to phases likely to have been present in Precambrian marine environments. In this study, Fe isotope fractionation was investigated during microbial reduction of an amorphous Fe(III) oxide-silica coprecipitate in anoxic, high-silica, low-sulphate artificial Archaean seawater at 30 °C to determine if such conditions alter the extent of reduction or isotopic fractionations relative to those observed in simple systems. The Fe(III)-Si coprecipitate was highly reducible (c. 80% reduction) in the presence of excess acetate. The coprecipitate did not undergo phase conversion (e.g. to green rust, magnetite or siderite) during reduction. Iron isotope fractionations suggest that rapid and near-complete isotope exchange took place among all Fe(II) and Fe(III) components, in contrast to previous work on goethite and hematite, where exchange was limited to the outer few atom layers of the substrate. Large quantities of low-δ(56)Fe Fe(II) (aqueous and solid phase) were produced during reduction of the Fe(III)-Si coprecipitate. These findings shed new light on DIR as a mechanism for producing Fe isotope variations observed in Neoarchaean and Paleoproterozoic marine sedimentary rocks.

  7. An Archaean heavy bombardment from a destabilized extension of the asteroid belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottke, William F; Vokrouhlický, David; Minton, David; Nesvorný, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Brasser, Ramon; Simonson, Bruce; Levison, Harold F

    2012-05-03

    The barrage of comets and asteroids that produced many young lunar basins (craters over 300 kilometres in diameter) has frequently been called the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB). Many assume the LHB ended about 3.7 to 3.8 billion years (Gyr) ago with the formation of Orientale basin. Evidence for LHB-sized blasts on Earth, however, extend into the Archaean and early Proterozoic eons, in the form of impact spherule beds: globally distributed ejecta layers created by Chicxulub-sized or larger cratering events4. At least seven spherule beds have been found that formed between 3.23 and 3.47 Gyr ago, four between 2.49 and 2.63 Gyr ago, and one between 1.7 and 2.1 Gyr ago. Here we report that the LHB lasted much longer than previously thought, with most late impactors coming from the E belt, an extended and now largely extinct portion of the asteroid belt between 1.7 and 2.1 astronomical units from Earth. This region was destabilized by late giant planet migration. E-belt survivors now make up the high-inclination Hungaria asteroids. Scaling from the observed Hungaria asteroids, we find that E-belt projectiles made about ten lunar basins between 3.7 and 4.1 Gyr ago. They also produced about 15 terrestrial basins between 2.5 and 3.7 Gyr ago, as well as around 70 and four Chicxulub-sized or larger craters on the Earth and Moon, respectively, between 1.7 and 3.7 Gyr ago. These rates reproduce impact spherule bed and lunar crater constraints.

  8. Gold deposits in the late Archaean Nzega-Igunga greenstone belt, central plateau of tanzania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feiss, P.G.; Siyomana, S.

    1985-01-01

    2.2 m oz of gold have been produced, since 1935, from late Archaean (2480-2740 Ma) greenstone belts of the Central Plateau, Tanzania. North and east of Nzega (4/sup 0/12'S, 3/sup 0/11'E), 18% of the exposed basement, mainly Dodoman schists and granites, consists of metavolcanics and metasediments of the Nyanzian and Kavirondian Series. Four styles of mineralization are observed. 1. Stratabound quartz-gold veins with minor sulfides. Host rocks are quartz porphyry, banded iron formation (BIF), magnetite quartzite, and dense, cherty jasperite at the Sekenke and Canuck mines. The Canuck veins are on strike from BIF's in quartz-eye porphyry of the Igusule Hills. 2. Stratabound, disseminated gold in coarse-grained, crowded feldspar porphyry with lithic fragments and minor pyrite. At Bulangamilwa, the porphyry is conformable with Nyanzian-aged submarine (.) greenstone, volcanic sediment, felsic volcanics, and sericite phyllite. The deposits are on strike with BIF of the Wella Hills, which contains massive sulfide with up to 15% Pb+Zn. 3. Disseminated gold in quartz-albite metasomes in Nyanzian greenstones. At Kirondatal, alteration is associated with alaskites and feldspar porphyry dikes traceable several hundred meters into post-Dodoman diorite porphyry. Gold is with pyrite, arsenopyrite, pyrrhotite, minor chalcopyrite, and sphalerite as well as tourmalinite and silica-cemented breccias. 4. Basal Kavirondian placers in metaconglomerates containing cobbles and boulders of Dodoman and Nyanzian rocks several hundred meters up-section from the stratabound, disseminated mineralization at Bulangamilwa.

  9. Enhanced methane production in an anaerobic digestion and microbial electrolysis cell coupled system with co-cultivation of Geobacter and Methanosarcina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qi; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Zhan, Guoqiang; Bo, Tao; Yang, Yanfei; Tao, Yong; He, Xiaohong; Li, Daping; Yan, Zhiying

    2016-04-01

    The anaerobic digestion (AD) and microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) coupled system has been proved to be a promising process for biomethane production. In this paper, it was found that by co-cultivating Geobacter with Methanosarcina in an AD-MEC coupled system, methane yield was further increased by 24.1%, achieving to 360.2 mL/g-COD, which was comparable to the theoretical methane yield of an anaerobic digester. With the presence of Geobacter, the maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate (216.8 mg COD/(L·hr)) and current density (304.3A/m(3)) were both increased by 1.3 and 1.8 fold compared to the previous study without Geobacter, resulting in overall energy efficiency reaching up to 74.6%. Community analysis demonstrated that Geobacter and Methanosarcina could coexist together in the biofilm, and the electrochemical activities of both were confirmed by cyclic voltammetry. Our study observed that the carbon dioxide content in total gas generated from the AD reactor with Geobacter was only half of that generated from the same reactor without Geobacter, suggesting that Methanosarcina may obtain the electron transferred from Geobacter for the reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. Taken together, Geobacter not only can improve the performance of the MEC system, but also can enhance methane production.

  10. Audio-magnetotelluric investigation of allochthonous iron formations in the Archaean Reguibat shield (Mauritania): structural and mining implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronner, G.; Fourno, J. P.

    1992-11-01

    The M'Haoudat range, considered as an allochthonous unit amid the strongly metamorphosed Archaean basement (Tiris Group), belongs to the Lower Proterozoic Ijil Group, weakly metamorphosed, constituted mainly by iron quartzites including red jaspers and high grade iron ore. Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) soundings (frequency range 1-7500 HZ) were performed together with the systematic survey of the range (SNIM mining company). The non-linear least squares method was used to perform a smoothness-constrained data model. The obvious AMT resistivity contrasts between the M'Haoudat Unit (150-3500 ohm. m) and the Archaean basement (20 000 ohm. m) allow to state precisely that the two thrust surfaces, on both sides of the range, join together at a depth which increases from North-West to South-East, as the ore bodies. Inside the steeply dipping M'Haoudat Unit, the main beds of iron quartzites (1500-3500 ohm. m), schists (1000-1500 ohm. m) and hematite ores (150-300 ohm. m) were distinguished when their thickness exceeded 30 to 50 m. The existence of an hydrostatic level (1-50 ohm. m) and the steeply dipping architecture, very likely responsible for the lack of resistivity contrast on the upper part of some profiles, complicate the interpretation at high frequencies the thin layers being poorly defined.

  11. Generation of continental crust in the northern part of the Borborema Province, northeastern Brazil, from Archaean to Neoproterozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Zorano Sérgio; Kalsbeek, Feiko; Deng, Xiao-Dong; Frei, Robert; Kokfelt, Thomas Find; Dantas, Elton Luiz; Li, Jian-Wei; Pimentel, Márcio Martins; Galindo, Antonio Carlos

    2016-07-01

    This work deals with the origin and evolution of the magmatic rocks in the area north of the Patos Lineament in the Borborema Province (BP). This northeastern segment of NE Brazil is composed of at least six different tectonic blocks with ages varying from late-Archaean to late-Palaeoproterozoic. Archaean rocks cover ca. 5% of the region. They were emplaced over a period of 700 Ma, with at least seven events of magma generation, at 3.41, 3.36, 3.25, 3.18, 3.12, 3.03, and 2.69 Ga. The rocks are subalkaline to slightly alkaline, with affinity to I- and M-type magmas; they follow trondhjemitic or potassium calc-alkaline differentiation trends. They have epsilon Nd(t) of +1.4 to -4.2 and negative anomalies for Ta-Nb, P and Ti, consistent with a convergent tectonic setting. Both subducted oceanic crust and upper mantle (depleted or metasomatised) served as sources of the magmas. After a time lapse of about 350 m y., large-scale emplacement of Paleoproterozoic units took place. These rocks cover about 50% of the region. Their geochemistry indicates juvenile magmatism with a minor contribution from crustal sources. These rocks also exhibit potassic calc-alkaline differentiation trends, again akin to I- and M-type magmas, and show negative anomalies for Ta-Nb, Ti and P. Depleted and metasomatised mantle, resulting from interaction with adakitic or trondhjemitic melts in a subduction zone setting, is interpreted to be the main source of the magmas, predominanting over crustal recycling. U-Pb ages indicate generation of plutonic rocks at 2.24-2.22 Ga (in some places at about 2.4-2.3 Ga) and 2.13-2.11 Ga, and andesitic volcanism at 2.15 Ga. Isotopic evidence indicates juvenile magmatism (epsilon Nd(t) of +2.9 to -2.9). After a time lapse of about 200 m y. a period of within-plate magmatic activity followed, with acidic volcanism (1.79 Ga) in Orós, granitic plutonism (1.74 Ga) in the Seridó region, anorthosites (1.70 Ga) and A-type granites (1.6 Ga) in the Transverse Zone

  12. Orogenic gold mineralisation hosted by Archaean basement rocks at Sortekap, Kangerlussuaq area, East Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holwell, D. A.; Jenkin, G. R. T.; Butterworth, K. G.; Abraham-James, T.; Boyce, A. J.

    2013-04-01

    A gold-bearing quartz vein system has been identified in Archaean basement rocks at Sortekap in the Kangerlussuaq region of east Greenland, 35 km north-northeast of the Skaergaard Intrusion. This constitutes the first recorded occurrence of Au mineralisation in the metamorphic basement rocks of east Greenland. The mineralisation can be classified as orogenic style, quartz vein-hosted Au mineralisation. Two vein types have been identified based on their alteration styles and the presence of Au mineralisation. Mineralised type 1 veins occur within sheared supracrustal units and are hosted by garnet-bearing amphibolites, with associated felsic and ultramafic intrusions. Gold is present as native Au and Au-rich electrum together with arsenopyrite and minor pyrite and chalcopyrite in thin alteration selvages in the immediate wall rocks. The alteration assemblage of actinolite-clinozoisite-muscovite-titanite-scheelite-arsenopyrite-pyrite is considered to be a greenschist facies assemblage. The timing of mineralisation is therefore interpreted as being later and separate event to the peak amphibolite facies metamorphism of the host rocks. Type 2 quartz veins are barren of mineralisation, lack significant alteration of the wall rocks and are considered to be later stage. Fluid inclusion microthermometry of the quartz reveals three separate fluids, including a high temperature ( T h = 300-350 °C), H2O-CO2-CH4 fluid present only in type 1 veins that in interpreted to be responsible for the main stage of Au deposition and sulphidic wall rock alteration. It is likely that the carbonic fluids were actually trapped at temperatures closer to 400 °C. Two other fluids were identified within both vein types, which comprise low temperature (100-200 °C) brines, with salinities of 13-25 wt% eq. NaCl and at least one generation of low salinity aqueous fluids. The sources and timings of the secondary fluids are currently equivocal but they may be related to the emplacement of

  13. Multifractal spatial organisation in hydrothermal gold systems of the Archaean Yilgarn craton, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Mark; Ord, Alison; Hobbs, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    A range of factors controls the location of hydrothermal alteration and gold mineralisation in the Earth's crust. These include the broad-scale lithospheric architecture, availability of fluid sources, fluid composition and pH, pressure-temperature conditions, microscopic to macroscopic structural development, the distribution of primary lithologies, and the extent of fluid-rock interactions. Consequently, the spatial distribution of alteration and mineralization in hydrothermal systems is complex and often considered highly irregular. However, despite this, do they organize themselves in a configuration that can be documented and quantified? Wavelets, mathematical functions representing wave-like oscillations, are commonly used in digital signals analysis. Wavelet-based multifractal analysis involves incrementally scanning a wavelet across the dataset multiple times (varying its scale) and recording its degree of fit to the signal at each interval. This approach (the wavelet transform modulus maxima method) highlights patterns of self-similarity present in the dataset and addresses the range of scales over which these patterns replicate themselves (expressed by their range in 'fractal dimension'). Focusing on seven gold ore bodies in the Archaean Yilgarn craton of Western Australia, this study investigates whether different aspects of hydrothermal gold systems evolve to organize themselves spatially as multifractals. Four ore bodies were selected from the Sunrise Dam deposit (situated in the Laverton tectonic zone of the Kurnalpi terrane) in addition to the Imperial, Majestic and Salt Creek gold prospects, situated in the Yindarlgooda dome of the Mount Monger goldfield (approximately 40km due east of Kalgoorlie). The Vogue, GQ, Cosmo East and Astro ore bodies at Sunrise Dam were chosen because they exhibit different structural geometries and relationships between gold and associated host-rock alteration styles. Wavelet-based analysis was conducted on 0.5m and 1m

  14. Mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of the Archaean LCT pegmatite deposit Cattlin Creek, Ravensthorpe, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Matthias; Dittrich, Thomas; Seifert, Thomas; Schulz, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    The LCT (lithium-cesium-tantalum) pegmatite Cattlin Creek is located about 550 km ESE of Perth, Western Australia. The complex-type, rare-element pegmatite is hosted in metamorphic rocks of the Archaean Ravensthorpe greenstone belt, which constitutes of the southern edge of the Southern Cross Terranes of the Yilgarn Craton. The deposit is currently mined for both lithium and tantalum by Galaxy Resources Limited since 2010. The pegmatitic melt intruded in a weak structural zone of crossing thrust faults and formed several pegmatite sills, of which the surface nearest mineralized pegmatite body is up to 21 m thick. The Cattlin Creek pegmatite is characterized by an extreme fractionation that resulted in the enrichment of rare elements like Li, Cs, Rb, Sn and Ta, as well as the formation of a vertical zonation expressed by distinct mineral assemblages. The border zone comprises a fine-grained mineral assemblage consisting of albite, quartz, muscovite that merges into a medium-grained wall zone and pegmatitic-textured intermediate zones. Those zones are manifested by the occurrence of megacrystic spodumene crystals with grain sizes ranging from a couple of centimeters up to several metres. The core zone represents the most fractionated part of the pegmatite and consists of lepidolite, cleavelandite, and quartz. It also exhibits the highest concentrations of Cs (0.5 wt.%), Li (0.4 wt.%), Rb (3 wt.%), Ta (0.3 wt.%) and F (4 wt.%). This zone was probably formed in the very last crystallization stage of the pegmatite and its minerals replaced earlier crystallized mineral assemblages. Moreover, the core zone hosts subordinate extremely Cs-enriched (up to 13 wt.% Cs2O) mineral species of beryl. The chemical composition of this beryl resamples that of the extreme rare beryl-variety pezzotaite. Other observed subordinate, minor and accessory minerals comprise tourmaline, garnet, cassiterite, apatite, (mangano-) columbite, tantalite, microlite (Bi-bearing), gahnite, fluorite

  15. Establishing a Markerless Genetic Exchange System for Methanosarcina mazei Strain Gö1 for Constructing Chromosomal Mutants of Small RNA Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Ehlers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A markerless genetic exchange system was successfully established in Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1 using the hpt gene coding for hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase. First, a chromosomal deletion mutant of the hpt gene was generated conferring resistance to the purine analog 8-aza-2,6-diaminopurine (8-ADP. The nonreplicating allelic exchange vector (pRS345 carrying the pac-resistance cassette for direct selection of chromosomal integration, and the hpt gene for counterselection was introduced into this strain. By a pop-in and ultimately pop-out event of the plasmid from the chromosome, allelic exchange is enabled. Using this system, we successfully generated a M. mazei deletion mutant of the gene encoding the regulatory non-coding RNA sRNA154. Characterizing M. mazei Δ154 under nitrogen limiting conditions demonstrated differential expression of at least three cytoplasmic proteins and reduced growth strongly arguing for a prominent role of sRNA154 in regulation of nitrogen fixation by posttranscriptional regulation.

  16. Single-cell analysis reveals gene-expression heterogeneity in syntrophic dual-culture of Desulfovibrio vulgaris with Methanosarcina barkeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhenhua; Pei, Guangsheng; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen

    2014-12-01

    Microbial syntrophic metabolism has been well accepted as the heart of how methanogenic and other anaerobic microbial communities function. In this work, we applied a single-cell RT-qPCR approach to reveal gene-expression heterogeneity in a model syntrophic system of Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Methanosarcina barkeri, as compared with the D. vulgaris monoculture. Using the optimized primers and single-cell analytical protocol, we quantitatively determine gene-expression levels of 6 selected target genes in each of the 120 single cells of D. vulgaris isolated from its monoculture and dual-culture with M. barkeri. The results demonstrated very significant cell-to-cell gene-expression heterogeneity for the selected D. vulgaris genes in both the monoculture and the syntrophic dual-culture. Interestingly, no obvious increase in gene-expression heterogeneity for the selected genes was observed for the syntrophic dual-culture when compared with its monoculture, although the community structure and cell-cell interactions have become more complicated in the syntrophic dual-culture. In addition, the single-cell RT-qPCR analysis also provided further evidence that the gene cluster (DVU0148-DVU0150) may be involved syntrophic metabolism between D. vulgaris and M. barkeri. Finally, the study validated that single-cell RT-qPCR analysis could be a valuable tool in deciphering gene functions and metabolism in mixed-cultured microbial communities.

  17. Evidence of Meso-Archaean subduction from the Torckler-Tango Layered Complex, Rauer Group, Prydz bay, East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, C. A.; Harley, S. L.

    2010-12-01

    The Archaean Torckler Tango Layered complex (TTLC) of the Rauer Group, East Antarctica, consists of a series of elongate mega-boudins that can be traced over a strike length of 7 km, enclosed within and intruded by c. 2.8 Ga homogeneous tonalitic orthogneisses. Despite later granulite facies metamorphism (860-900°C, 0.7 GPa) original igneous structures and layering features of the TTLC are very well preserved. Graded and cross stratified layering is evident, as are load-cast structures and geopetal structures. Isotopic and LILE signatures indicate that crustal contamination has been negligible and that metamorphic disturbances have been minor. As a result, the whole rock chemistry of the TTLC is considered to reflect its igneous protoliths. This whole rock geochemistry is distinctive, with high MgO (av. 15.8 wt%), high Mg# (av. 79.1) low TiO2 (av.< 0.33 wt%), and high SiO2 (av. 52.5 wt%). The TTLC can be subdivided into two geochemical groupings based upon Al2O3 and Cr abundances, which provide clear evidence for the crystal fractionation and accumulation processes active within the complex. Trace-element and REE element ratios show coherent trends. Based on its systematic major element (Al2O3/TiO2 ~40), trace element ratios Ti/Zr vs. Zr (Ti/Zr ~34-59 at Zr ~15-40 ppm), and negative HSFE anomalies, the TTLC is similar in geochemistry to both modern, neo-Proterozoic and Archaean boninitic rocks. Magmatic zircons define an intrusive age for the TTLC of ca. 3280 ± 22 Ma. HSFE ratios, and whole rock Nd isotope ratios recalculated back to this age, are consistent with a juvenile depleted source for the primary magma. The TTLC is therefore interpreted as the intrusive equivalent of a boninite, produced through the shallow melting of refractory mantle and supportive of the operation of subduction-like processes in the early-mid Archaean.

  18. Tectonic evolvement of metamorphic complexes at Jilin paleocontinental margin during the transition from late Archaean to early Proterozoic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhongshi; DENG Jun; JIANG Yanguo; WANG Jianping; WANG Qingfei; WEI Yanguang

    2004-01-01

    The kinematics and dynamical process of tectonic evolvement of metamorphic complexes at the interim from late Archaean to early Proterozoic is one of the key problems in geosciences. For the disputation on the genesis of metamorphic complexes at the margin of Jilin palaeocontinent, this paper takes the example of Banshigou region, Jilin Province to discuss the dynamical evolution of palaeocontinent during the transition from late Archaean to early Proterozoic (2600-2000 Ma). On the time sequence, from center to palaeocontinental margin, it shows a series of dynamical movements including underplating, horizontal movement, subduction, intraplate extension and separation. And its corresponding sequence of kinematical modes is as follows: vertical movement, horizontal movement, extension and shearing in contact zone,uplift-sliding movement in paleocontinental margin and interformational sliding, resulting in such tectonite sequence, tectonic gneiss, gneissic complex, gneissic complex-mylonite, mylonite and fracture cleavage-mylonite, which consist of the main body of metamorphic complexes. Their palaeostresses are: < 20, 20.40, 21.72, 28.80 and 30.8-69.8 MPa respectively. The deformational metamorphic temperature is between hornblende and low-grade greenschist facies. The general deformational characters of Jilin palaeocontinent reflect a complete dynamic system of crust evolution, which indicates that the formation of the metamorphic complexes and the tectonic evolution are altered from vertical movement to compression to extension. It also indicates a continuous tectonic transformation from deep to shallow, and from ductile to brittle. The transformation between different dynamic mechanisms not only forms tectonic rocks, but also benefits the linking up, exchange and enrichment with rock-forming minerals and ore-forming elements.This research is helpful to classifying regional tectonic events and making further study on the evolution of palaeocontinental dynamics.

  19. Geological constraints on detecting the earliest life on Earth: a perspective from the Early Archaean (older than 3.7 Gyr) of southwest Greenland

    OpenAIRE

    Fedo, Christopher M; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Kamber, Balz S.

    2006-01-01

    At greater than 3.7 Gyr, Earth's oldest known supracrustal rocks, comprised dominantly of mafic igneous with less common sedimentary units including banded iron formation (BIF), are exposed in southwest Greenland. Regionally, they were intruded by younger tonalites, and then both were intensely dynamothermally metamorphosed to granulite facies (the highest pressures and temperatures generally encountered in the Earth's crust during metamorphism) in the Archaean and subsequently at lower grade...

  20. Palaeoproterozoic high-pressure granulite overprint of the Archaean continental crust: evidence for homogeneous crustal thickening (Man Rise, Ivory Coast)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitra, Pavel; Kouamelan, Alain N.; Ballèvre, Michel; Peucat, Jean-Jacques

    2010-05-01

    The character of mountain building processes in the Palaeoproterozoic times is subject to much debate. The local observation of Barrovian-type assemblages and high-pressure granulite relics in the Man Rise (Côte d'Ivoire), led some authors to argue that Eburnean (Palaeoproterozoic) reworking of the Archaean basement was achieved by modern-style thrust-dominated tectonics (e.g., Feybesse & Milési, 1994). However, it has been suggested that crustal thickening and subsequent exhumation of high-pressure crustal rocks can be achieved by virtue of homogeneous, fold-dominated deformation of hot crustal domains even in Phanerozoic orogenic belts (e.g., Schulmann et al., 2002; 2008). We describe a mafic granulite of the Kouibli area (Archaean part of the Man Rise, western Ivory Coast) that displays a primary assemblage (M1) containing garnet, diopsidic clinopyroxene, red-brown pargasitic amphibole, plagioclase (andesine), rutile, ilmenite and quartz. This assemblage is associated with a subvertical regional foliation. Symplectites that develop at the expense of the M1 assemblage contain orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, plagioclase (bytownite), green pargasitic amphibole, ilmenite and magnetite (M2). Multiequilibrium thermobarometric calculations and P-T pseudosections calculated with THERMOCALC suggest granulite-facies conditions of ca. 13 kbar, 850°C and <7 kbar, 700-800°C for M1 and M2, respectively. In agreement with the qualitative information obtained from reaction textures and chemical zoning of minerals, this suggests an evolution dominated by decompression accompanied by moderate cooling. A Sm-Nd garnet - whole-rock age of 2.03 Ga determined on this sample indicates that this evolution occurred during the Palaeoproterozoic. We argue that from the geodynamic point of view the observed features are best explained by homogeneous thickening of the margin of the Archaean craton, re-heated and softened due to the accretion of hot, juvenile Palaeoproterozoic crust, as

  1. Geochemical Evidence for Subduction in the Early Archaean from Quartz-Carbonate-Fuchsite Mineralization, Isua Supracrustal Belt, West Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, E. C.; Rosing, M. T.; Bird, D. K.

    2011-12-01

    Quartz, carbonate and fuchsite (chromian muscovite) is a common metasomatic assemblage observed in orogenic gold systems, both in Phanerozoic convergent margin settings, and within supracrustal and greenstone belts of Precambrian rocks. Geologic and geochemical observations in younger orogenic systems suggest that ore-forming metasomatic fluids are derived from subduction-related devolitilization reactions, implying that orogenic Au-deposits in Archaean and Proterozoic supracrustal rock suites are related to subduction-style plate tectonics beginning early in Earth history. Justification of this metasomatic-tectonic relationship requires that 1) Phanerozoic orogenic Au-deposits form in subduction-zone environments, and 2) the geochemical similarity of Precambrian orogenic deposits to their younger counterparts is the result of having the same petro-genetic origin. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope compositions of fuchsite and quartz from auriferous mineralization in the ca. 3.8 Ga Isua Supracrustal Belt (ISB) in West Greenland, in conjunction with elevated concentrations of CO2, Cr, Al, K and silica relative to protolith assemblages, suggest that this mineralization shares a common petro-tectonic origin with Phanerozoic orogenic deposits and that this type of metasomatism is a unique result of subduction-related processes. Fuchsite from the ISB has a δ18O and δD of +7.7 to +17.9% and -115 to -61%, respectively. δ18O of quartz from the same rocks is between +10.3 and +18.6%. Muscovite-quartz oxygen isotope thermometry indicates that the mineralization occurred at 560 ± 90oC, from fluids with a δD of -73 to -49% and δ18O of +8.8 to +17.2%. Calculation of isotopic fractionation during fluid-rock reactions along hypothetical fluid pathways demonstrates that these values, as well as those in younger orogenic deposits, are the result of seawater-derived fluids liberated from subducting lithosphere interacting with ultramafic rocks in the mantle wedge and lower crust

  2. Structural observations and U-Pb mineral ages from igneous rocks at the Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic boundary in the Salahmi Schist Belt, central Finland: constraints on tectonic evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietikäinen, K.

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The study area in Vieremä, central Finland, contains part of Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic boundary. In the east, the area comprises Archaean gneiss and the Salahmi Schist Belt. The rocks of the schist belt are turbiditic metagreywackes, with well-preserved depositional structures, occurring as Proterozoic wedge-shaped blocks, and staurolite schists, the latter representing higher-strained and metamorphosed equivalents of the metagreywackes. In the west of the area there is an Archaean gneiss block, containing strongly elongated structures, and deformed Svecofennian supracrustal rocks, which are cut by deformed granitoids. These are juxtaposed with the schist belt. The boundaries of these tectonometamorphic blocks are narrow, highly strained mylonites and thrust zones. The metamorphic grade of the supracrustal rocks increases from east to west, the increase being stepwise across the mylonitic block boundaries. The rocks are more deformed from east to west with younger structures overprinting. In the staurolite schists of the Salahmi Schist Belt, the most prominent structure is a lineation (L2 that overprints the bedding and axial plane foliation. In Sorronmäki quarry, at the western boundary of the schist belt, this Palaeoproterozoic lineation dominates all the structures in tonalite gneiss, which gives a U-Pb age of 2731±6 Ma. Southeast of the quarry, at the same boundary, the Salahmi schists have been overturned towards the northeast, suggesting that the Archaean gneiss at Sorronmäki has been thrust towards the northeast over these rocks. In the western part of the study area, the Leppikangas granodiorite that intrudes the Svecofennian supracrustal rocks gives a U-Pb age of 1891+6 Ma. In the granodiorite, a strong lineation formed by the intersection of two foliations, which maybe L2 is associated with thrusting towards the northeast. The monazite age of the Archaean Sorronmäki gneiss is 1817+3 Ma, and the titanite age of the Svecofennian

  3. Selection for Protein Kinetic Stability Connects Denaturation Temperatures to Organismal Temperatures and Provides Clues to Archaean Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Romero, M. Luisa; Risso, Valeria A.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Gaucher, Eric A.; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the denaturation temperatures of proteins (Tm values) and the living temperatures of their host organisms (environmental temperatures: TENV values) is poorly understood. Since different proteins in the same organism may show widely different Tm’s, no simple universal relationship between Tm and TENV should hold, other than Tm≥TENV. Yet, when analyzing a set of homologous proteins from different hosts, Tm’s are oftentimes found to correlate with TENV’s but this correlation is shifted upward on the Tm axis. Supporting this trend, we recently reported Tm’s for resurrected Precambrian thioredoxins that mirror a proposed environmental cooling over long geological time, while remaining a shocking ~50°C above the proposed ancestral ocean temperatures. Here, we show that natural selection for protein kinetic stability (denaturation rate) can produce a Tm↔TENV correlation with a large upward shift in Tm. A model for protein stability evolution suggests a link between the Tm shift and the in vivo lifetime of a protein and, more specifically, allows us to estimate ancestral environmental temperatures from experimental denaturation rates for resurrected Precambrian thioredoxins. The TENV values thus obtained match the proposed ancestral ocean cooling, support comparatively high Archaean temperatures, and are consistent with a recent proposal for the environmental temperature (above 75°C) that hosted the last universal common ancestor. More generally, this work provides a framework for understanding how features of protein stability reflect the environmental temperatures of the host organisms. PMID:27253436

  4. Shear Wave Velocity Structure of Southern African Crust: Evidence for Compositional Heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic Terrains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kgaswane, E M; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Dirks, P H H M; Durrheim, R J; Pasyanos, M E

    2008-11-11

    Crustal structure in southern Africa has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations spanning much of the Precambrian shield of southern Africa. 1-D shear wave velocity profiles obtained from the inversion yield Moho depths that are similar to those reported in previous studies and show considerable variability in the shear wave velocity structure of the lower part of the crust between some terrains. For many of the Archaean and Proterozoic terrains in the shield, S velocities reach 4.0 km/s or higher over a substantial part of the lower crust. However, for most of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain, mean shear wave velocities of {le} 3.9 km/s characterize the lower part of the crust along with slightly ({approx}5 km) thinner crust. These findings indicate that the lower crust across much of the shield has a predominantly mafic composition, except for the southwest portion of the Kaapvaal Craton and western portion of the Zimbabwe Craton, where the lower crust is intermediate-to-felsic in composition. The parts of the Kaapvaal Craton underlain by intermediate-to-felsic lower crust coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, and thus we suggest that the intermediate-to-felsic composition of the lower crust and the shallower Moho may have resulted from crustal melting during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga and concomitant crustal thinning caused by rifting.

  5. The 3.5 Ga Siurua trondhjemite gneiss in the Archaean Pudasjärvi Granulite Belt, northern Finland

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    Tapani Mutanen

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Archaean Pudasjärvi Complex the pyroxene-bearing rocks are considered to form a belt, the Pudasjärvi Granulite Belt (PGB. The major rock types of the PGB are metaigneous mafic and felsic granulites, and trondhjemite gneisses. Red alaskites, white leucogranites and trondhjemitic pegmatoids are locally abundant. Ion microprobe U-Pb analyses on zircons suggest a magmatic age of ca. 3.5 Ga for the trondhjemite gneiss in Siurua, considered the oldest rock so far identified in the Fennoscandian Shield. The old age is supported by the Sm-Nd depleted mantle model age of 3.5 Ga, and by conventional U-Pb zircon data, which have provided a minimum age of 3.32 Ga. The U-Pb sims-data on the Siurua gneiss are, however, heterogeneous and suggest several stages of zircon growth, mostly at 3.5–3.4 Ga. An inherited core in one crystal provided an age of 3.73Ga, whereas the youngest two analyses yield ages of 3.1 and 3.3 Ga. Metamorphic monazite formed in the Siurua gneiss ca. 2.66 Ga ago, roughly contemporaneously with the high-grade metamorphism recorded by zircon in a mafi c granulite. Magmatic zircons from a felsic high-grade rock provide ages of ca. 2.96 Ga, but no zircons coeval with the 2.65 Ga metamorphism were detected by ion-microprobe. As a whole the PGB seems to be a tectonic block-mosaic containing rocks with Sm-Nd crustal formation ages ranging from 3.5 to 2.8 Ga.

  6. The amalgamation of the supercontinent of North China Craton at the end of Neo-Archaean and its breakup during late Palaeoproterozoic and Meso-Proterozoic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟明国; 卞爱国; 赵太平

    2000-01-01

    The most important geological events in the formation and evolution of the North China Craton concentrate at two stages: 2 600-2 400 Ma and 2 000-1 700 Ma (briefly, we call them 2.5 Ga event and 1.8 Ga event respectively in this paper). We propose that the essences of these two events are: Several Archaean micro-continents amalgamated to form one supercontinent according to the plate tectonic principle with a small scale at about 2.5 Ga, and the supercontinent broke down by upwelling of an ancient mantle plume at about 1.8 Ga.

  7. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of high-K "sanukitoids" from the Bulai pluton, Central Limpopo Belt, South Africa: Implications for geodynamic changes at the Archaean-Proterozoic boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Oscar; Martin, Hervé; Doucelance, Régis; Moyen, Jean-François; Paquette, Jean-Louis

    2011-04-01

    The Neoarchaean Bulai pluton is a magmatic complex intrusive in the Central Zone of the Limpopo Belt (Limpopo Province, South Africa). It is made up of large volumes of porphyritic granodiorites with subordinate enclaves and dykes of monzodioritic, enderbitic and granitic compositions. New U-Pb LA-ICP-MS dating on zircon yield pluton-emplacement ages ranging between 2.58 and 2.61 Ga. The whole pluton underwent a high-grade thermal overprint at ~ 2.0 Ga, which did not affect the whole-rock compositions for most of the major and trace-elements, as suggested by a Sm-Nd isochron built up with 16 samples and yielding an age consistent with U-Pb dating. The whole-rock major- and trace-element compositions evidence that the Bulai pluton belongs to a high-K, calc-alkaline to shoshonitic suite, as well as unequivocal affinities with "high-Ti" sanukitoids. Monzodioritic enclaves and enderbites have both "juvenile" affinities and a strongly enriched signature in terms of incompatible trace elements (LREE, HFSE and LILE), pointing to an enriched mantle source. Based on trace-element compositions, we propose the metasomatic agent at their origin to be a melt deriving from terrigenous sediments. We therefore suggest a two-step petrogenetic model for the Bulai pluton: (1) a liquid produced by melting of subducted terrigenous sediments is consumed by reactions with mantle peridotite, producing a metasomatic assemblage; (2) low-degree melting of this metasomatized mantle gives rise to Bulai mafic magmas. Such a model is supported by geochemical modelling and is consistent with previous studies concluding that sanukitoids result from interactions between slab melts and the overlying mantle wedge. Before 2.5 Ga, melting of hydrous subducted metabasalts produced large volumes of TTG (Tonalite-Trondhjemite-Granodiorite) forming most of the volume of Archaean continental crust. By constrast, our geochemical study failed in demonstrating any significant role played by melting of

  8. Asteroids and Archaean crustal evolution: Tests of possible genetic links between major mantle/crust melting events and clustered extraterrestrial bombardments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glikson, A. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Since the oldest intact terrestrial rocks of ca. 4.0 Ga and oldest zircon xenocrysts of ca. 4.3 Ga measured to date overlap with the lunar late heavy bombardment, the early Precambrian record requires close reexamination vis a vis the effects of megaimpacts. The identification of microtektite-bearing horizons containing spinals of chondritic chemistry and Ir anomalies in 3.5-3.4-Ga greenstone belts provides the first direct evidence for large-scale Archaean impacts. The Archaean crustal record contains evidence for several major greenstone-granite-forming episodes where deep upwelling and adiabatic fusion of the mantle was accompanied by contemporaneous crustal anatexis. Isotopic age studies suggest evidence for principal age clusters about 3.5, 3.0, and 2.7 (+/- 0.8) Ga, relics of a ca. 3.8-Ga event, and several less well defined episodes. These peak events were accompanied and followed by protracted thermal fluctuations in intracrustal high-grade metamorphic zones. Interpretations of these events in terms of internal dynamics of the Earth are difficult to reconcile with the thermal behavior of silicate rheologies in a continuously convecting mantle regime. A triggering of these episodes by mantle rebound response to intermittent extraterrestrial asteroid impacts is supported by (1) identification of major Archaean impacts from microtektite and distal ejecta horizons marked by Ir anomalies; (2) geochemical and experimental evidence for mantle upwelling, possibly from levels as deep as the transition zone; and (3) catastrophic adiabatic melting required to generate peridotitic komatites. Episodic differentiation/accretion growth of sial consequent on these events is capable of resolving the volume problem that arises from comparisons between modern continental crust and the estimated sial produced by continuous two-stage mantle melting processes. The volume problem is exacerbated by projected high accretion rates under Archaean geotherms. It is suggested that

  9. Protoliths of enigmatic Archaean gneisses established from zircon inclusion studies: Case study of the Caozhuang quartzite, E. Hebei, China

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    Allen P. Nutman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A diverse suite of Archaean gneisses at Huangbaiyu village in the North China Craton, includes rare fuchsite-bearing (Cr-muscovite siliceous rocks – known as the Caozhuang quartzite. The Caozhuang quartzite is strongly deformed and locally mylonitic, with silica penetration and pegmatite veining common. It contains abundant 3880–3600 Ma and some Palaeoarchaean zircons. Because of its siliceous nature, the presence of fuchsite and its complex zircon age distribution, it has until now been accepted as a (mature quartzite. However, the Caozhuang quartzite sample studied here is feldspathic. The shape and cathodoluminescence petrography of the Caozhuang quartzite zircons show they resemble those found in immature detrital sedimentary rocks of local provenance or in Eoarchaean polyphase orthogneisses, and not those in mature quartzites. The Caozhuang quartzite intra-zircon mineral inclusions are dominated by quartz, with lesser biotite, apatite (7% and alkali-feldspar, and most inclusions are morphologically simple. A Neoarchaean orthogneiss from near Huangbaiyu displays morphologically simple inclusions with much more apatite (73%, as is typical for fresh calc-alkaline granitoids elsewhere. Zircons were also examined from a mature conglomerate quartzite clast and an immature feldspathic sandstone of the overlying weakly metamorphosed Mesoproterozoic Changcheng System. These zircons have oscillatory zoning, showing they were sourced from igneous rocks. The quartzite clast zircons contain only rare apatite inclusions (<1%, with domains with apatite habit now occupied by intergrowths of muscovite + quartz ± Fe-oxides ± baddeleyite. We interpret that these were once voids after apatite inclusions that had dissolved during Mesoproterozoic weathering, which were then filled with clays ± silica and then weakly metamorphosed. Zircons in the immature feldspathic sandstone show a greater amount of preserved apatite (11%, but with petrographic

  10. Protoliths of enigmatic Archaean gneisses established from zircon inclusion studies:Case study of the Caozhuang quartzite, E. Hebei, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Allen P. Nutman; Ronni Maciejowski; Yusheng Wan

    2014-01-01

    A diverse suite of Archaean gneisses at Huangbaiyu village in the North China Craton, includes rare fuchsite-bearing (Cr-muscovite) siliceous rocks e known as the Caozhuang quartzite. The Caozhuang quartzite is strongly deformed and locally mylonitic, with silica penetration and pegmatite veining common. It contains abundant 3880e3600 Ma and some Palaeoarchaean zircons. Because of its siliceous nature, the presence of fuchsite and its complex zircon age distribution, it has until now been accepted as a (mature) quartzite. However, the Caozhuang quartzite sample studied here is feldspathic. The shape and cathodoluminescence petrography of the Caozhuang quartzite zircons show they resemble those found in immature detrital sedimentary rocks of local provenance or in Eoarchaean polyphase orthog-neisses, and not those in mature quartzites. The Caozhuang quartzite intra-zircon mineral inclusions are dominated by quartz, with lesser biotite, apatite (7%) and alkali-feldspar, and most inclusions are morphologically simple. A Neoarchaean orthogneiss from near Huangbaiyu displays morphologically simple inclusions with much more apatite (73%), as is typical for fresh calc-alkaline granitoids elsewhere. Zircons were also examined from a mature conglomerate quartzite clast and an immature feldspathic sandstone of the overlying weakly metamorphosed Mesoproterozoic Changcheng System. These zircons have oscillatory zoning, showing they were sourced from igneous rocks. The quartzite clast zircons contain only rare apatite inclusions (<1%), with domains with apatite habit now occupied by in-tergrowths of muscovite+quartz±Fe-oxides±baddeleyite. We interpret that these were once voids after apatite inclusions that had dissolved during Mesoproterozoic weathering, which were then filled with clays±±silica and then weakly metamorphosed. Zircons in the immature feldspathic sandstone show a greater amount of preserved apatite (11%), but with petrographic evidence of replacement of

  11. Mechanisms for strain localization within Archaean craton: A structural study from the Bundelkhand Tectonic Zone, north-central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Saheli; Patole, Vishal; Saha, Lopamudra; Pati, Jayanta Kumar; Nasipuri, Pritam

    2015-04-01

    The transformation of palaeo-continents involve breakup, dispersal and reassembly of cratonic blocks by collisional suturing that develop a network of orogenic (mobile) belts around the periphery of the stable cratons. The nature of deformation in the orogenic belt depends on the complex interaction of fracturing, plastic deformation and diffusive mass transfer. Additionally, the degree and amount of melting during regional deformation is critical as the presence of melt facilitates the rate of diffusive mass transfer and weakens the rock by reducing the effective viscosity of the deformed zone. The nature of strain localization and formation of ductile shear zones surrounding the cratonic blocks have been correlated with Proterozoic-Palaeozoic supercontinent assembly (Columbia, Rodinia and Gondwana reconstruction). Although, a pre-Columbia supercontinent termed as Kenorland has been postulated, there is no evidence that supports the notion due to lack of the presence of shear zones within the Archaean cratonic blocks. In this contribution, we present the detailed structural analysis of ductile shear zones within the Bundelkhand craton. The ductlile shear zone is termed as Bundelkhand Tectonic Zone (BTZ) that extends east-west for nearly 300 km throughout the craton with a width of two-three kilometer . In the north-central India, the Bundelkhand craton is exposed over an area of 26,000 sq. The craton is bounded by Central Indian Tectonic zone in the south, the Great Boundary fault in the west and by the rocks of Lesser Himalaya in the north. A series of tonalite-trondjhemite-granodiorite gneiss are the oldest rocks of the Bundelkhand craton that also contains a succession of metamorphosed supracrustal rocks comprising of banded iron formation, quartzite, calc-silicate and ultramafic rocks. K-feldspar bearing granites intrude the tonalite-trondjhemite-granodiorite and the supracrustal rocks during the time span of 2.1 to 2.5 Ga. The TTGs near Babina, in central

  12. The stimulating role of subunit F in ATPase activity inside the A1-complex of the Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A1AO ATP synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dhirendra; Sielaff, Hendrik; Sundararaman, Lavanya; Bhushan, Shashi; Grüber, Gerhard

    2016-02-01

    A1AO ATP synthases couple ion-transport of the AO sector and ATP synthesis/hydrolysis of the A3B3-headpiece via their stalk subunits D and F. Here, we produced and purified stable A3B3D- and A3B3DF-complexes of the Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A-ATP synthase as confirmed by electron microscopy. Enzymatic studies with these complexes showed that the M. mazei Gö1 A-ATP synthase subunit F is an ATPase activating subunit. The maximum ATP hydrolysis rates (Vmax) of A3B3D and A3B3DF were determined by substrate-dependent ATP hydrolysis experiments resulting in a Vmax of 7.9 s(-1) and 30.4 s(-1), respectively, while the KM is the same for both. Deletions of the N- or C-termini of subunit F abolished the effect of ATP hydrolysis activation. We generated subunit F mutant proteins with single amino acid substitutions and demonstrated that the subunit F residues S84 and R88 are important in stimulating ATP hydrolysis. Hybrid formation of the A3B3D-complex with subunit F of the related eukaryotic V-ATPase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae or subunit ε of the F-ATP synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis showed that subunit F of the archaea and eukaryotic enzymes are important in ATP hydrolysis.

  13. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15070-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _2742( AE010299 |pid:none) Methanosarcina acetivorans str.... 37 1.9 AJ006017_1( AJ006017 |pid:none) Hamster...in Kilh... 37 2.5 AJ006016_1( AJ006016 |pid:none) Hamster polyomavirus VP2 gene f

  14. Archaean associations of volcanics, granulites and eclogites of the Belomorian province, Fennoscandian Shield and its geodynamic interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabunov, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    An assembly of igneous (TTG-granitoids and S-type leucogranites and calc-alkaline-, tholeiite-, kometiite-, boninite- and adakite-series metavolcanics) and metamorphic (eclogite-, moderate-pressure (MP) granulite- and MP amphibolite-facies rocks) complexes, strikingly complete for Archaean structures, is preserved in the Belomorian province of the Fennoscandian Shield. At least four Meso-Neoarchaean different-aged (2.88-2.82; 2.81-2.78; ca. 2.75 and 2.735-2.72 Ga) calc-alkaline and adakitic subduction-type volcanics were identified as part of greenstone belts in the Belomorian province (Slabunov, 2008). 2.88-2.82 and ca. 2.78 Ga fore-arc type graywacke units were identified in this province too (Bibikova et al., 2001; Mil'kevich et al., 2007). Ca.2.7 Ga volcanics were generated in extension structures which arose upon the collapse of an orogen. The occurrence of basalt-komatiite complexes, formed in most greenstone belts in oceanic plateau settings under the influence of mantle plumes, shows the abundance of these rocks in subducting oceanic slabs. Multiple (2.82-2.79; 2.78-2.76; 2.73-2.72; 2.69-2.64 Ga) granulite-facies moderate-pressure metamorphic events were identified in the Belomorian province (Volodichev, 1990; Slabunov et al., 2006). The earliest (2.82-2.79 Ga) event is presumably associated with accretionary processes upon the formation of an old continental crust block. Two other events (2.78-2.76; 2.73-2.72 Ga) are understood as metamorphic processes in suprasubduction setting. Late locally active metamorphism is attributed to the emplacement of mafic intrusions upon orogen collapse. Three groups of crustal eclogites with different age were identified in the Belomorian province: Mesoarchaean (2.88-2.86 and 2.82-2.80 Ga) eclogites formed from MORB and oceanic plateau type basalts and oceanic high-Mg rocks (Mints et al., 2011; Shchipansky at al., 2012); Neoarchaean (2.72 Ga) eclogites formed from MORB and oceanic plateau type basalts. The formation of

  15. Tetrahydrofolate-specific enzymes in Methanosarcina barkeri and growth dependence of this methanogenic archaeon on folic acid or p-aminobenzoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchenau, Bärbel; Thauer, Rudolf K

    2004-10-01

    Methanogenic archaea are generally thought to use tetrahydromethanopterin or tetrahydrosarcinapterin (H4SPT) rather than tetrahydrofolate (H4F) as a pterin C1 carrier. However, the genome sequence of Methanosarcina species recently revealed a cluster of genes, purN, folD, glyA and metF, that are predicted to encode for H4F-specific enzymes. We show here for folD and glyA from M. barkeri that this prediction is correct: FolD (bifunctional N5,N10-methylene-H4F dehydrogenase/N5,N10-methenyl-H4F cyclohydrolase) and GlyA (serine:H4F hydroxymethyltransferase) were heterologously overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and found to be specific for methylene-H4F and H4F, respectively (apparent Km below 5 microM). Western blot analyses and enzyme activity measurements revealed that both enzymes were synthesized in M. barkeri. The results thus indicate that M. barkeri should contain H4F, which was supported by the finding that growth of M. barkeri was dependent on folic acid and that the vitamin could be substituted by p-aminobenzoic acid, a biosynthetic precursor of H4F. From the p-aminobenzoic acid requirement, an intracellular H4F concentration of approximately 5 M was estimated. Evidence is presented that the p-aminobenzoic acid taken up by the growing cells was not required for the biosynthesis of H4SPT, which was found to be present in the cells at a concentration above 3 mM. The presence of both H4SPT and H4F in M. barkeri is in agreement with earlier isotope labeling studies indicating that there are two separate C1 pools in these methanogens.

  16. The transcriptional activator NrpA is crucial for inducing nitrogen fixation in Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 under nitrogen-limited conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenbach, Katrin; Ehlers, Claudia; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2014-08-01

    With the aim of unraveling their potential involvement in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism in Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1, we characterized five genes that are differentially transcribed in response to changing nitrogen availability and encoding putative transcriptional regulators. Study of the respective mutant strains under nitrogen-limited conditions revealed a growth delay for M. mazei MM0444::pac and MM1708::pac, and strongly reduced diazotrophic growth for MM0872::pac, whereas the absence of MM2441 or MM2525 did not affect growth behaviour. Transcriptome analyses further demonstrated that only MM1708 - encoding a CxxCG zinc finger protein - plays a regulatory role in nitrogen metabolism, most likely by specifically enhancing transcription of the N2 fixation (nif) operon under nitrogen-limited conditions. In agreement with this, a palindromic binding motif was predicted in silico in the nifH promoter region, nine nucleotides upstream of the BRE box, and confirmed to bind purified maltose-binding protein-MM1708 by electromobility shift assays. As MM1708 itself is under the control of the global nitrogen repressor NrpR, this adds a secondary level to the transcriptional regulation of the nif genes, and is most likely crucial for maximal nif induction under nitrogen-limited conditions. This is in accordance with the finding that protein expression of NifH is highly reduced in the absence of MM1708 under nitrogen-limited conditions. On the basis of our findings, we hypothesize that, in M. mazei, nitrogen fixation is controlled by a hierarchical network of two transcriptional regulators, the global nitrogen repressor NrpR, and the newly identified activator NrpA (MM1708), thereby providing tight control of N2 fixation.

  17. Methanosarcina Play an Important Role in Anaerobic Co-Digestion of the Seaweed Ulva lactuca: Taxonomy and Predicted Metabolism of Functional Microbial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, Jamie A.; Allen, Eoin; Wall, David M.; Jackson, Stephen A.; Murphy, Jerry D.; Dobson, Alan D. W.

    2015-01-01

    Macro-algae represent an ideal resource of third generation biofuels, but their use necessitates a refinement of commonly used anaerobic digestion processes. In a previous study, contrasting mixes of dairy slurry and the macro-alga Ulva lactuca were anaerobically digested in mesophilic continuously stirred tank reactors for 40 weeks. Higher proportions of U. lactuca in the feedstock led to inhibited digestion and rapid accumulation of volatile fatty acids, requiring a reduced organic loading rate. In this study, 16S pyrosequencing was employed to characterise the microbial communities of both the weakest (R1) and strongest (R6) performing reactors from the previous work as they developed over a 39 and 27-week period respectively. Comparing the reactor communities revealed clear differences in taxonomy, predicted metabolic orientation and mechanisms of inhibition, while constrained canonical analysis (CCA) showed ammonia and biogas yield to be the strongest factors differentiating the two reactor communities. Significant biomarker taxa and predicted metabolic activities were identified for viable and failing anaerobic digestion of U. lactuca. Acetoclastic methanogens were inhibited early in R1 operation, followed by a gradual decline of hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Near-total loss of methanogens led to an accumulation of acetic acid that reduced performance of R1, while a slow decline in biogas yield in R6 could be attributed to inhibition of acetogenic rather than methanogenic activity. The improved performance of R6 is likely to have been as a result of the large Methanosarcina population, which enabled rapid removal of acetic acid, providing favourable conditions for substrate degradation. PMID:26555136

  18. Methanosarcina Play an Important Role in Anaerobic Co-Digestion of the Seaweed Ulva lactuca: Taxonomy and Predicted Metabolism of Functional Microbial Communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie A FitzGerald

    Full Text Available Macro-algae represent an ideal resource of third generation biofuels, but their use necessitates a refinement of commonly used anaerobic digestion processes. In a previous study, contrasting mixes of dairy slurry and the macro-alga Ulva lactuca were anaerobically digested in mesophilic continuously stirred tank reactors for 40 weeks. Higher proportions of U. lactuca in the feedstock led to inhibited digestion and rapid accumulation of volatile fatty acids, requiring a reduced organic loading rate. In this study, 16S pyrosequencing was employed to characterise the microbial communities of both the weakest (R1 and strongest (R6 performing reactors from the previous work as they developed over a 39 and 27-week period respectively. Comparing the reactor communities revealed clear differences in taxonomy, predicted metabolic orientation and mechanisms of inhibition, while constrained canonical analysis (CCA showed ammonia and biogas yield to be the strongest factors differentiating the two reactor communities. Significant biomarker taxa and predicted metabolic activities were identified for viable and failing anaerobic digestion of U. lactuca. Acetoclastic methanogens were inhibited early in R1 operation, followed by a gradual decline of hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Near-total loss of methanogens led to an accumulation of acetic acid that reduced performance of R1, while a slow decline in biogas yield in R6 could be attributed to inhibition of acetogenic rather than methanogenic activity. The improved performance of R6 is likely to have been as a result of the large Methanosarcina population, which enabled rapid removal of acetic acid, providing favourable conditions for substrate degradation.

  19. Sm-Nd data for mafic-ultramafic intrusions in the Svecofennian (1.88 Ga Kotalahti Nickel Belt, Finland – implications for crustal contamination at the Archaean/Proterozoic boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannu V. Makkonen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Sm-Nd data were determined for eight mafic-ultramafic intrusions from the Svecofennian (1.88 Ga Kotalahti Nickel Belt, Finland. The intrusions represent both mineralized and barren types and are located at varying distances from the Archaean/Proterozoic boundary.The samples for the 23 Sm-Nd isotope analyses were taken mostly from the ultramafic differentiates. Results show a range in initial εNd values at 1880 Ma from -2.4 to +2.0. No relationship can be found between the degree of Ni mineralization and initial εNd values, whilea correlation with the geological domain and country rocks is evident. The Majasaari and Törmälä intrusions, which have positive εNd values, were emplaced within the Svecofennian domain in proximity to 1.92 Ga tonalitic gneisses, which have previously yielded initialεNd values of ca. +3. In contrast, the Luusniemi intrusion, which has an εNd value of -2.4 is situated close to exposed Archaean crust. Excluding two analyses from the Rytky intrusion, all data from the Koirus N, Koirus S, Kotalahti, Rytky and Kylmälahti intrusions, withinerror limits, fall in the range -0.7 ± 0.3. The results support the concept of contamination by Archaean material in proximity to the currently exposed craton margin. The composition of the proposed parental magma for the intrusions is close to EMORB, with initialεNd values near +4.

  20. Greenland from Archaean to Quaternary, Descriptive text to the 1995 Geological Map of Greenland 1:2 500 000, 2nd edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalsbeek, Feiko

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The geological development of Greenland spans a period of nearly 4 Ga, from Eoarchaean to the Quaternary. Greenland is the largest island on Earth with a total area of 2 166 000 km2, but only c. 410 000 km2 are exposed bedrock, the remaining part being covered by a major ice sheet (the Inland Ice reaching over 3 km in thickness. The adjacent offshore areas underlain by continental crust have an area of c. 825 000 km2. Greenland is dominated by crystalline rocks of the Precambrian shield, which formed during a succession of Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic orogenic events and stabilised as a part of the Laurentian shield about 1600 Ma ago. The shield area can be divided into three distinct types of basement provinces: (1 Archaean rocks (3200–2600 Ma old, with local older units up to >3800Ma that were almost unaffected by Proterozoic or later orogenic activity; (2 Archaean terrains reworked during the Palaeoproterozoic around 1900–1750 Ma ago; and (3 terrains mainly composed of juvenile Palaeoproterozoic rocks (2000–1750 Ma in age.Subsequent geological developments mainly took place along the margins of the shield. During the Proterozoic and throughout the Phanerozoic major sedimentary basins formed, notably in North and North-East Greenland, in which sedimentary successions locally reaching 18 km in thickness were deposited. Palaeozoic orogenic activity affected parts of these successions in the Ellesmerian fold belt of North Greenland and the East Greenland Caledonides; the latter also incorporates reworked Precambrian crystalline basement complexes. Late Palaeozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary basins developed along the continent–ocean margins in North, East and West Greenland and are now preserved both onshore and offshore. Their development was closely related to continental break-up with formation of rift basins. Initial rifting in East Greenland in latest Devonian to earliest Carboniferous time and succeeding phases culminated with the

  1. Precambrian crustal evolution and Cretaceous–Palaeogene faulting in West Greenland: A lead isotope study of an Archaean gold prospect in the Attu region, Nagssugtoqidian orogen, West Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stendal, Henrik

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a lead isotope investigation of a gold prospect south of the village Attu in the northern part of the Nagssugtoqidian orogen in central West Greenland. The Attu gold prospect is a replacement gold occurrence, related to a shear/mylonite zone along a contact between orthogneissand amphibolite within the Nagssugtoqidian orogenic belt. The mineral occurrence is small, less than 0.5 m wide, and can be followed along strike for several hundred metres. The mineral assemblage is pyrite, chalcopyrite, magnetite and gold. The host rocks to the gold prospect are granulite facies ‘brown gneisses’ and amphibolites. Pb-isotopic data on magnetite from the host rocks yield an isochron in a 207Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb diagram, giving a date of 3162 ± 43 Ma (MSWD = 0.5. This date is interpreted to represent the age of the rocks in question, and is older than dates obtained from rocks elsewhere within the Nagssugtoqidian orogen. Pb-isotopic data on cataclastic magnetite from the shear zone lie close to this isochron, indicating a similar origin. The Pb-isotopic compositions of the ore minerals are similar to those previously obtained from the close-by ~2650 Ma Rifkol granite, and suggest a genetic link between the emplacement of this granite and the formation of the ore minerals in the shear/mylonite zone. Consequently, the age of the gold mineralisation is interpreted tobe late Archaean.

  2. Late Archaean mantle metasomatism below eastern Indian craton: Evidence from trace elements, REE geochemistry and Sr-Nd-O isotope systematics of ultramafic dykes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhijit Roy; A Sarkar; S Jeyakumar; S K Aggrawal; M Ebihara; H Satoh

    2004-12-01

    Trace, rare earth elements (REE), Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd and O isotope studies have been carried out on ultramafic (harzburgite and lherzolite) dykes belonging to the newer dolerite dyke swarms of eastern Indian craton. The dyke swarms were earlier considered to be the youngest mafic magmatic activity in this region having ages not older than middle to late Proterozoic. The study indicates that the ultramafic members of these swarms are in fact of late Archaean age (Rb-Sr isochron age 2613 ± 177 Ma, Sri ∼0.702 ± 0.004) which attests that out of all the cratonic blocks of India, eastern Indian craton experienced earliest stabilization event. Primitive mantle normalized trace element plots of these dykes display enrichment in large ion lithophile elements (LILE), pronounced Ba, Nb and Sr depletions but very high concentrations of Cr and Ni. Chondrite normalised REE plots exhibit light REE (LREE) enrichment with nearly flat heavy REE (HREE; ( HREE)N ∼ 2-3 times chondrite, (Gd/Yb)N∼1). The Nd(t) values vary from +1.23 to −3.27 whereas 18O values vary from +3.16‰ to +5.29‰ (average +3.97‰ ± 0.75‰) which is lighter than the average mantle value. Isotopic, trace and REE data together indicate that during 2.6 Ga the nearly primitive mantle below the eastern Indian Craton was metasomatised by the fluid (±silicate melt) coming out from the subducting early crust resulting in LILE and LREE enriched, Nb depleted, variable Nd, low Sri(0.702) and low 18O bearing EMI type mantle. Magmatic blobs of this metasomatised mantle were subsequently emplaced in deeper levels of the granitic crust which possibly originated due to the same thermal pulse.

  3. Oceanic plateau model for continental crustal growth in the Archaean: A case study from the Kostomuksha greenstone belt, NW Baltic Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonov, A. V.; Shchipansky, A. A.; Jochum, K. P.; Mezger, K.; Hofmann, A. W.; Puchtel, I. S.

    1998-02-01

    Field studies combined with chemical and isotope data indicate that the Kostomuksha greenstone belt in the NW Baltic Shield consists of two lithotectonic terranes, one mafic igneous and the other sedimentary, separated by a major shear zone. The former contains submarine komatiite-basalt lavas and volcaniclastic lithologies, and the latter is composed of shelf-type rocks and BIF. Komatiitic and basaltic samples yield Sm-Nd and Pb-Pb isochron ages of 2843+/-39 and 2813+/-78 Ma, respectively. Their trace-element compositions resemble those of recent Pacific oceanic flood basalts with primitive-mantle normalized Nb/Th of 1.5-2.1 and Nb/La of 1.0-1.5. This is in sharp contrast with island arc and most continental magmas, which are characterized by Nb/(Th,La)N≪1. Calculated initial Nd-isotope compositions (ɛNd(T)=+2.8 to +3.4) plot close to an evolution line previously inferred for major orogens (``MOMO''), which is also consistent with the compositions of recent oceanic plateaux. The high liquidus temperatures of the komatiite magmas (1550°C) and their Al-depleted nature require an unusually hot (1770°C) mantle source for the lavas (>200°C hotter than the ambient mantle at 2.8 Ga), and are consistent with their formation in a deep mantle plume in equilibrium with residual garnet. This plume had the thermal potential to produce oceanic crust with an average thickness of ~30 km underlain by a permanently buoyant refractory lithospheric mantle keel. Nb/U ratios in the komatiites and basalts calculated on the basis of Th-U-Pb relationships range from 35 to 47 and are thus similar to those observed in modern MORB and OIB. This implies that some magma source regions of the Kostomuksha lavas have undergone a degree of continental material extraction comparable with those found in the modern mantle. The mafic terrane is interpreted as a remnant of the upper crustal part of an Archaean oceanic plateau. When the newly formed plateau reached the active continental margin

  4. Volcanological constraints of Archaean tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, P. C.; Ayres, L. D.

    1986-01-01

    Volcanological and trace element geochemical data can be integrated to place some constraints upon the size, character and evolutionary history of Archean volcanic plumbing, and hence indirectly, Archean tectonics. The earliest volcanism in any greenhouse belt is almost universally tholeitic basalt. Archean mafic magma chambers were usually the site of low pressure fractionation of olivine, plagioclase and later Cpx + or - an oxide phase during evolution of tholeitic liquids. Several models suggest basalt becoming more contaminated by sial with time. Data in the Uchi Subprovince shows early felsic volcanics to have fractionated REE patterns followed by flat REE pattern rhyolites. This is interpreted as initial felsic liquids produced by melting of a garnetiferous mafic source followed by large scale melting of LIL-rich sial. Rare andesites in the Uchi Subprovince are produced by basalt fractionation, direct mantle melts and mixing of basaltic and tonalitic liquids. Composite dikes in the Abitibi Subprovince have a basaltic edge with a chill margin, a rhyolitic interior with no basalt-rhyolite chill margin and partially melted sialic inclusions. Ignimbrites in the Uchi and Abitibi Subprovinces have mafic pumice toward the top. Integration of these data suggest initial mantle-derived basaltic liquids pond in a sialic crust, fractionate and melt sial. The inirial melts low in heavy REE are melts of mafic material, subsequently melting of adjacent sial produces a chamber with a felsic upper part underlain by mafic magma.

  5. The Hadean-Archaean Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Sleep, Norman H.

    2010-01-01

    A sparse geological record combined with physics and molecular phylogeny constrains the environmental conditions on the early Earth. The Earth began hot after the moon-forming impact and cooled to the point where liquid water was present in ∼10 million years Subsequently, a few asteroid impacts may have briefly heated surface environments, leaving only thermophile survivors in kilometer-deep rocks. A warm 500 K, 100 bar CO2 greenhouse persisted until subducted oceanic crust sequestered CO2 in...

  6. Feldspar palaeo-isochrons from early Archaean TTGs: Pb-isotope evidence for a high U/Pb terrestrial Hadean crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamber, B. S.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Moorbath, S.; Collerson, K. D.

    2001-12-01

    Feldspar lead-isotope data for 22 early Archaean (3.80-3.82 Ga) tonalitic gneisses from an area south of the Isua greenstone belt (IGB),West Greenland, define a steep linear trend in common Pb-isotope space with an apparent age of 4480+/-77 Ma. Feldspars from interleaved amphibolites yield a similar array corresponding to a date of 4455+/-540 Ma. These regression lines are palaeo-isochrons that formed during feldspar-whole rock Pb-isotope homogenisation a long time (1.8 Ga) after rock formation but confirm the extreme antiquity (3.81 Ga) of the gneissic protoliths [1; this study]. Unlike their whole-rock counterparts, feldspar palaeo-isochrons are immune to rotational effects caused by the vagaries of U/Pb fractionation. Hence, comparison of their intercept with mantle Pb-isotope evolution models yields meaningful information regarding the source history of the magmatic precursors. The locus of intersection between the palaeo-isochrons and terrestrial mantle Pb-isotope evolution lines shows that the gneissic precursors of these 3.81 Ga gneisses were derived from a source with a substantially higher time-integrated U/Pb ratio than the mantle. Similar requirements for a high U/Pb source have been found for IGB BIF [2], IGB carbonate [3], and particularly IGB galenas [4]. Significantly, a single high U/Pb source that separated from the MORB-source mantle at ca. 4.3 Ga with a 238U/204Pb of ca. 10.5 provides a good fit to all these observations. In contrast to many previous models based on Nd and Hf-isotope evidence we propose that this reservoir was not a mantle source but the Hadean basaltic crust which, in the absence of an operating subduction process, encased the early Earth. Differentiation of the early high U/Pb basaltic crust could have occurred in response to gravitational sinking of cold mantle material or meteorite impact, and produced zircon-bearing magmatic rocks. The subchondritic Hf-isotope ratios of ca. 3.8 Ga zircons support this model [5] provided that

  7. High-K calc-alkaline magmatism at the Archaean-Proterozoic boundary: implications for mantle metasomatism and continental crust petrogenesis. Example of the Bulai pluton (Central Limpopo Belt, South Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Oscar; Martin, Hervé; Doucelance, Régis; Moyen, Jean-François; Paquette, Jean-Louis

    2010-05-01

    The Neoarchaean Bulai pluton, intrusive within the supracrustal granulites of the Central Limpopo Belt (Limpopo Province, South Africa) is made up of large volumes of porphyritic granodiorites with subordinate enclaves and dykes which have monzodioritic and charno-enderbitic compositions. New U-Pb LA-ICP-MS dating on separated zircons yielded pluton emplacement ages ranging between 2.60 and 2.63 Ga, which are slightly older than previous proposed ages (~ 2.57-2.61 Ga). The whole-rock major- and trace-element composition of the Bulai pluton evidences unequivocal affinities with "high-Ti" late-Archaean sanukitoids. It belongs to a high-K calc-alkaline differentiation suite, with metaluminous affinities (0.7 affinities, such as eNd ranging between -0.5 and 0.5, and in addition, are very rich in all incompatible trace elements, which is particularly obvious in monzodioritic enclaves and enderbites where primitive mantle-normalized LILE and LREE contents are up to 300. These characteristics point to an enriched mantle source for the Bulai batholith. Chondrite normalized, REE patterns are strongly fractionated ([La/Yb]N ~ 25-80), mainly due to high LREE contents (LaN ~ 250-630), and chiefly high HFSE contents (Nb ~ 15-45 ppm ; up to 770 ppm Zr) indicate that the metasomatic agent is a silicic melt rather than a hydrous fluid. Moreover, based on high Nb/Ta, Th/Rb, La/Rb and low Sr/Nd and Ba/La, we suggest that the metasomatic agent is a granitic melt generated by melting of terrigenous sediments. Interactions of this melt with mantle peridotites implies that sediments are located under a mantle slice; geometry which is easily achieved in subduction zone settings. This conclusion is supported by the fact that Bulai trace element patterns are very similar to those of sub-actual potassic magmas generated in magmatic arc environments by interactions between mantle and terrigenous sediments (e.g. Sunda arc). Geochemical modeling indicates that the mafic facies of the Bulai

  8. Nonsense and sense suppression abilities of original and derivative Methanosarcina mazei pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase-tRNA(Pyl pairs in the Escherichia coli BL21(DE3 cell strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keturah A Odoi

    Full Text Available Systematic studies of nonsense and sense suppression of the original and three derivative Methanosarcina mazei PylRS-tRNA(Pyl pairs and cross recognition between nonsense codons and various tRNA(Pyl anticodons in the Escherichia coli BL21(DE3 cell strain are reported. tRNA(CUA(Pyl is orthogonal in E. coli and able to induce strong amber suppression when it is co-expressed with pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS and charged with a PylRS substrate, N(ε-tert-butoxycarbonyl-L-lysine (BocK. Similar to tRNA(CUA(Pyl, tRNA(UUA(Pyl is also orthogonal in E. coli and can be coupled with PylRS to genetically incorporate BocK at an ochre mutation site. Although tRNA(UUA(Pyl is expected to recognize a UAG codon based on the wobble hypothesis, the PylRS-tRNA(UUA(Pyl pair does not give rise to amber suppression that surpasses the basal amber suppression level in E. coli. E. coli itself displays a relatively high opal suppression level and tryptophan (Trp is incorporated at an opal mutation site. Although the PylRS-tRNA(UCA(Pyl pair can be used to encode BocK at an opal codon, the pair fails to suppress the incorporation of Trp at the same site. tRNA(CCU(Pyl fails to deliver BocK at an AGG codon when co-expressed with PylRS in E. coli.

  9. Geodynamic evolution of the West Africa between 2.2 and 2 Ga: the Archaean style of the Birimian greenstone belts and the sedimentary basins in northeastern Ivory-Coast; Evolution de l`Afrique de l`Ouest entre 2,2 Ga et 2 Ga: le style archeen des ceintures vertes et des ensembles sedimentaires birimiens du nord-est de la Cote-d`Ivoire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, M.; Pouclet, A. [Orleans Univ., 45 (France); Delor, C. [Bureau de Recherches Geologiques et Minieres (BRGM), 45 - Orleans (France); Simeon, Y. [ANTEA, 45 - Orleans (France); Alric, G. [Etablissements Binou, 27 - Le Mesnil-Fuguet (France)

    1996-12-31

    The litho-structural features of Palaeo-proterozoic terrains of northeastern Ivory-Coast, greenstones belts and then sedimentary (basin Birimian), are similar to those of Archaean terrains. Their early deformation is only voluminal deformation due to granitoid intrusions, mainly between 2.2 and 2.16 Ga. The shortening deformation (main deformation) is expressed by right folds and transcurrent shear zones ca 2.1 Ga. Neither thrust deformation nor high pressure metamorphic assemblages are known. This pattern of flexible and hot crust, at least between 2.2 and 2.16 Ga, is pole apart to a collisional pattern, proposed for West African Craton by some authors. The Archaean/Palaeo-proterozoic boundary would not represent a drastic change of the geodynamic evolution of the crust. (authors). 60 refs., 5 figs., 6 photos.

  10. The archetype gamma-class carbonic anhydrase (Cam) contains iron when synthesized in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macauley, Sheridan R; Zimmerman, Sabrina A; Apolinario, Ethel E; Evilia, Caryn; Hou, Ya-Ming; Ferry, James G; Sowers, Kevin R

    2009-02-10

    A recombinant protein overproduction system was developed in Methanosarcina acetivorans to facilitate biochemical characterization of oxygen-sensitive metalloenzymes from strictly anaerobic species in the Archaea domain. The system was used to overproduce the archetype of the independently evolved gamma-class carbonic anhydrase. The overproduced enzyme was oxygen sensitive and had full incorporation of iron instead of zinc observed when overproduced in Escherichia coli. This, the first report of in vivo iron incorporation for any carbonic anhydrase, supports the need to reevaluate the role of iron in all classes of carbonic anhydrases derived from anaerobic environments.

  11. Trace methane oxidation studied in several Euryarchaeota under diverse conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Moran

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We used 13C-labeled methane to document the extent of trace methane oxidation by Archaeoglobus fulgidus, Archaeoglobus lithotrophicus, Archaeoglobus profundus, Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanosarcina acetivorans. The results indicate trace methane oxidation during growth varied among different species and among methanogen cultures grown on different substrates. The extent of trace methane oxidation by Mb. thermoautotrophicum (0.05 ± 0.04%, ± 2 standard deviations of the methane produced during growth was less than that by M. barkeri (0.15 ± 0.04%, grown under similar conditions with H2 and CO2. Methanosarcina acetivorans oxidized more methane during growth on trimethylamine (0.36 ± 0.05% than during growth on methanol (0.07 ± 0.03%. This may indicate that, in M. acetivorans, either a methyltransferase related to growth on trimethylamine plays a role in methane oxidation, or that methanol is an intermediate of methane oxidation. Addition of possible electron acceptors (O2, NO3–, SO22–, SO32– or H2 to the headspace did not substantially enhance or diminish methane oxidation in M. acetivorans cultures. Separate growth experiments with FAD and NAD+ showed that inclusion of these electron carriers also did not enhance methane oxidation. Our results suggest trace methane oxidized during methanogenesis cannot be coupled to the reduction of these electron acceptors in pure cultures, and that the mechanism by which methane is oxidized in methanogens is independent of H2 concentration. In contrast to the methanogens, species of the sulfate-reducing genus Archaeoglobus did not significantly oxidize methane during growth (oxidizing 0.003 ± 0.01% of the methane provided to A. fulgidus, 0.002 ± 0.009% to A. lithotrophicus and 0.003 ± 0.02% to A. profundus. Lack of observable methane oxidation in the three Archaeoglobus species examined may indicate that methyl-coenzyme M reductase, which is not present in

  12. Geochemistry of Archaean supracrustal belts in SW Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szilas, Kristoffer

    . (3) The Nunatak 1390 area contains ultramafic rocks with geochemical characteristics similar to high-Ti komatiites, but they show geochemical signs of a juvenile slab melt contribution. Their high MgO contents may thus reflect flux-melting of a refractory mantle source, as is the case for boninites......This PhD-thesis investigates the geological formation environment of c. 3200-3000 million-year-old volcanic rocks from SW Greenland, using whole-rock geochemical data in combination with U-Pb, Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf isotope data. The following three supracrustal areas were studied: (1) The Tartoq Group...... geochemical mixing trends between juvenile felsic and mafic end-members. This suggests that partial melting and magma mixing by mafic underplating and slab melt metasomatism of the mantle source region were important in forming rocks of andesitic composition, which is also observed in some modern island arcs...

  13. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U10802-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :none) Burkholderia vietnamiensis G4 ch... 52 5e-11 CP000352_1110( CP000352 |pid:none) Ralstonia metallid...:none) Clostridium botulinum A2 str. K... 67 1e-09 AL939123_131( AL939123 |pid:none) Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) co...:none) Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) com... 194 7e-70 CP000083_2628( CP000083 |pid:none) Colwellia psychrerythrae...:none) Methanosarcina acetivorans str. ... 60 8e-14 CP000036_2527( CP000036 |pid:none) Shigella boydii Sb227, co...:none) Clostridium difficile 630 compl... 60 7e-15 CP001230_873( CP001230 |pid:none) Persephonella marina

  14. A Method for Identification of Selenoprotein Genes in Archaeal Genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingfeng Li; Yanzhao Huang; Yi Xiao

    2009-01-01

    The genetic codon UGA has a dual function: serving as a terminator and encoding selenocysteine. However, most popular gene annotation programs only take it as a stop signal, resulting in misannotation or completely missing selenoprotein genes. We developed a computational method named Asec-Prediction that is specific for the prediction of archaeal selenoprotein genes. To evaluate its effectiveness, we first applied it to 14 archaeal genomes with previously known selenoprotein genes, and Asec-Prediction identified all reported selenoprotein genes without redundant results. When we applied it to 12 archaeal genomes that had not been researched for selenoprotein genes, Asec-Prediction detected a novel selenoprotein gene in Methanosarcina acetivorans. Further evidence was also collected to support that the predicted gene should be a real selenoprotein gene. The result shows that Asec-Prediction is effective for the prediction of archaeal selenoprotein genes.

  15. Stable carbon isotope fractionation of six strongly fractionating microorganisms is not affected by growth temperature under laboratory conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penger, Jörn; Conrad, Ralf; Blaser, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Temperature is the major driving force for many biological as well as chemical reactions and may impact the fractionation of stable carbon isotopes. Thus, a good correlation between temperature and fractionation is observed in many chemical systems that are controlled by an equilibrium isotope effect. In contrast, biological systems that are usually controlled by a kinetic isotope effect are less well studied with respect to temperature effects and have shown contrasting results. We studied three different biological pathways (methylotrophic methanogenesis, hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, acetogenesis by the acetyl-CoA pathway) which are characterized by very strong carbon isotope enrichment factors (-50‰ to -83‰). The microorganisms (Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanosarcina acetivorans, Methanolobus zinderi, Methanothermobacter marburgensis, Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus, Thermoanaerobacter kivui) exhibiting these pathways were grown at different temperatures ranging between 25 and 68 °C, and the fractionation factors were determined from 13C/12C isotope discrimination during substrate depletion and product formation. Our experiments showed that the fractionation factors were different for the different metabolic pathways but were not much affected by the different growth temperatures. Slight variations were well within the standard errors of replication and regression analysis. Our results showed that temperature had no significant effect on the fractionation of stable carbon isotopes during anaerobic microbial metabolism with relatively strong isotope fractionation.

  16. New Perspectives on Acetate and One-Carbon Metabolism in the Methanoarchaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferry, James [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-03-20

    Carbonic anhydrases catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate. Although widespread in prokaryotes of the domains Bacteria and Archaea, few have been investigated and the physiological functions are largely unknown. Carbonic anhydrases are of biotechnological interest for carbon dioxide capture and sequestration at point sources. Prokaryotes encode three independently evolved classes. The alpha-class is restricted to a few pathogens and the other two are uniformly distributed in phylogenetically and physiologically diverse species. Although wide-spread in prokaryotes, only three gamma-class enzymes have been biochemically characterized and the physiological functions have not been investigated. The gamma-class is prominent in anaerobic acetate-utilizing methane-producing species of the genus Methanosarcina that encode three subclasses. Enzymes from two of the subclasses, Cam and CamH from Methanosarcina thermophila, have been characterized and found to utilize iron in the active site which is the first example of an iron-containing carbonic anhydrase. No representative of the third subclass has been isolated, although this subclass constitutes the great majority of the β-class. This grant application proposed to characterize gamma-class carbonic anhydrases from diverse anaerobic prokaryotes from the domains Bacteria and Archaea to broaden the understanding of this enzyme. In particular, the three subclasses present the genetically tractable acetate-utilizing methanogen Methanosarcina acetivorans will be investigated to extend studies of acetate and one-carbon metabolism in this species. A genetic approach will be taken to ascertain the physiological functions. It is also proposed to delve deeper into the mechanism of Cam from M. thermophila, the archetype of the gamma-class, via a high resolution neutron structure and kinetic analysis of site-specific amino acid replacement variants. In the course of the investigation, goals were added to

  17. 产甲烷的常温古细菌和嗜热古细菌的代谢网络比对研究%Studies on the Metabolic Network Alignment of Mesophilic and Thermophilic Methanogenic Archaea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈璟; 须文波

    2015-01-01

    生物网络比对是生物体的结构、功能和进化分析的重要研究手段.以从KFGG数据库获得的产甲烷的常温古细菌Methanosarcina acetivorans(M.acetivorans)和嗜热古细菌Methanopyrus kandleri(M.kandleri)的代谢网络为对象,采用了网络比对算法Matching-based Integrative GRAph Aligner(MI-GRAAL)对它们的全局代谢网络以及hub模块网络进行了比对.比对结果表明采用度、聚集系数以及离心率三个度量参数相结合的网络比对结果明显优于其它度量参数的计算结果,且结果更稳定.同时发现常温产甲烷菌M.acetivorans的hub模块与嗜热产甲烷菌M.kandleri的hub模块相似代谢途径的拓扑基本一致,不相似的代谢网络中有81.8%以上的节点都在嗜热产甲烷菌M.kandleri的最紧密的7-核中,推测嗜热菌的耐热性可能与受到胞内酪氨酸的影响.

  18. A Ferredoxin- and F420H2-Dependent, Electron-Bifurcating, Heterodisulfide Reductase with Homologs in the Domains Bacteria and Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heterodisulfide reductases (Hdr) of the HdrABC class are ancient enzymes and a component of the anaerobic core belonging to the prokaryotic common ancestor. The ancient origin is consistent with the widespread occurrence of genes encoding putative HdrABC homologs in metabolically diverse prokaryotes predicting diverse physiological functions; however, only one HdrABC has been characterized and that was from a narrow metabolic group of obligate CO2-reducing methanogenic anaerobes (methanogens) from the domain Archaea. Here we report the biochemical characterization of an HdrABC homolog (HdrA2B2C2) from the acetate-utilizing methanogen Methanosarcina acetivorans with unusual properties structurally and functionally distinct from the only other HdrABC characterized. Homologs of the HdrA2B2C2 archetype are present in phylogenetically and metabolically diverse species from the domains Bacteria and Archaea. The expression of the individual HdrA2, HdrB2, and HdrB2C2 enzymes in Escherichia coli, and reconstitution of an active HdrA2B2C2 complex, revealed an intersubunit electron transport pathway dependent on ferredoxin or coenzyme F420 (F420H2) as an electron donor. Remarkably, HdrA2B2C2 couples the previously unknown endergonic oxidation of F420H2 and reduction of ferredoxin with the exergonic oxidation of F420H2 and reduction of the heterodisulfide of coenzyme M and coenzyme B (CoMS-SCoB). The unique electron bifurcation predicts a role for HdrA2B2C2 in Fe(III)-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (ANME) by M. acetivorans and uncultured species from ANME environments. HdrA2B2C2, ubiquitous in acetotrophic methanogens, was shown to participate in electron transfer during acetotrophic growth of M. acetivorans and proposed to be essential for growth in the environment when acetate is limiting. PMID:28174314

  19. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of the late Archaean high-K granites in the southern Musoma-Mara Greenstone Belt: Their influence in evolution of Archaean Tanzania Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mshiu, Elisante Elisaimon; Maboko, Makenya A. H.

    2012-05-01

    Musoma-Mara Greenstone Belt (MMGB) is abundantly occupied by the post-orogenic high-K granites which also they mark the end of magmatism in the area. The granites are characterized by high SiO2 and Al2O3 contents that average 74.42% and 13.08% by weight respectively. They have low Na2O content (mean = 3.36 wt.%) and high K2O contents (mean = 4.95 wt.%) which resulted to relatively high K2O/Na2O ratios (mean = 1.50). They also characterized by low Mg# (mean = 33) as well as low contents of transition elements such as Cr and Ni which are below detection limit (<20 ppm). Negative anomalies in Eu (Eu/Eu*, mean = 0.56), Nd, Ta and Ti elements as shown in the chondrite and primitive mantle normalized diagrams indicate MMGB high-K granites originated from a subduction related environments. These high-K granites also characterized by relative enrichment of the LREE compared to HREE as revealed by their high (La/Yb)CN ratio ranging from 8.71 to 50.93 (mean = 26.32). They have relatively flat HREE pattern with (Tb/Yb)CN ratio varying between 0.81 and 2.12 (mean = 1.55). Their linear trend in the variation diagrams of both major and trace elements indicate magmatic differentiation was also an important process during their formation. Conclusively, the geochemical characteristics as well as experimental evidences suggests MMGB high-K granites were formed from partial melting of pre-existing TTG rocks, under low pressure at 15 km depth or less and temperature around 950 °C in which plagioclase minerals were the stable phases in the melt.

  20. Relationships between anaerobic consortia and removal efficiencies in an UASB reactor degrading 2,4 dichlorophenol (DCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponza, Delia Teresa; Cigal, Canan

    2008-04-01

    To gain more insight into the interactions between anaerobic bacteria and reactor performances (chemical oxygen demand-COD, 2,4 dichlorophenol-2,4 DCP removals, volatile fatty acid-VFA, and methane gas productions) and how they depended on operational conditions the microbial variations in the anaerobic granular sludge from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating 2,4 DCP was studied. The study was composed of two parts. In the first part, the numbers of methanogens and acedogens in the anaerobic granular sludge were counted at different COD removal efficiencies. The relationships between the numbers of methanogens, the methane gas production and VFA production were investigated. The COD removal efficiencies increased to 74% from 30% while the number of total acedogens decreased to 10 from 30 cfu ml(-1). The number of total methanogens and acedogens varied between 11 x 10(3) and 10 x 10(9)MPN g(-1) and 10 and 30 cfu ml(-1) as the 2,4 DCP removal efficiencies were obtained between 60% and 99%, respectively. It was seen that, as the number of total acedogens decreased, the COD removal efficiencies increased. However, the number of total methanogens increased as the COD removal efficiencies increased. Correlations between the bacterial number and with the removal efficiencies obtained in different operational conditions were investigated. From the results presented in this paper a high correlation between the number of bacteria, COD removals, methane gas percentage, 2,4 DCP removals and VFA was observed. In the second part, methanogen bacteria in the anaerobic granular sludge were identified. Microbial observations and biochemical tests were applied to identify the anaerobic microorganisms from the anaerobic granular sludge. In the reactor treating 2,4 DCP, Methanobacterium bryantii, Methanobacterium formicicum, Methanobrevibacter smithii, Methanococcus voltae, Methanosarcina mazei, Methanosarcina acetivorans, Methanogenium bourgense and

  1. The photochemical origins of life and photoreaction of ferrous ion in the archaean oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauzerall, David C.

    1990-01-01

    A general argument is made for the photochemical origins of life. A constant flux of free energy is required to maintain the organized state of matter called life. Solar photons are the unique source of the large amounts of energy probably required to initiate this organization and certainly required for the evolution of life to occur. The completion of this argument will require the experimental determination of suitable photochemical reactions. It is shown that biogenetic porphyrins readily photooxidize substrates and emit hydrogen in the presence of a catalyst. These results are consistent with the Granick hypothesis, which relates a biosynthetic pathway to its evolutionary origin. It has been shown that photoexcitation of ferrous ion at neutral pH with near ultraviolet light produces hydrogen with high quantum yield. This same simple system may reduce carbon dioxide to formaldehyde and further products. These reactions offer a solution to the dilemma confronting the Oparin-Urey-Miller model of the chemical origin of life. If carbon dioxide is the main form of carbon on the primitive earth, the ferrous photoreaction may provide the reduced carbon necessary for the formation of amino acids and other biogenic molecules. These results suggest that this progenitor of modern photosynthesis may have contributed to the chemical origins of life.

  2. Constraints on ocean carbonate chemistry and pCO2 in the Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blättler, C. L.; Kump, L. R.; Fischer, W. W.; Paris, G.; Kasbohm, J. J.; Higgins, J. A.

    2017-01-01

    One of the great problems in the history of Earth’s climate is how to reconcile evidence for liquid water and habitable climates on early Earth with the Faint Young Sun predicted from stellar evolution models. Possible solutions include a wide range of atmospheric and oceanic chemistries, with large uncertainties in boundary conditions for the evolution and diversification of life and the role of the global carbon cycle in maintaining habitable climates. Increased atmospheric CO2 is a common component of many solutions, but its connection to the carbon chemistry of the ocean remains unknown. Here we present calcium isotope data spanning the period from 2.7 to 1.9 billion years ago from evaporitic sedimentary carbonates that can test this relationship. These data, from the Tumbiana Formation, the Campbellrand Platform and the Pethei Group, exhibit limited variability. Such limited variability occurs in marine environments with a high ratio of calcium to carbonate alkalinity. We are therefore able to rule out soda ocean conditions during this period of Earth history. We further interpret this and existing data to provide empirical constraints for carbonate chemistry of the ancient oceans and for the role of CO2 in compensating for the Faint Young Sun.

  3. Constraints on ocean carbonate chemistry and p_(CO_2) in the Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic

    OpenAIRE

    C. L. Blättler; Kump, L.R.; Fischer, W. W.; De Paris, G.; Kasbohm, J. J.; Higgins, J A

    2017-01-01

    One of the great problems in the history of Earth’s climate is how to reconcile evidence for liquid water and habitable climates on early Earth with the Faint Young Sun predicted from stellar evolution models. Possible solutions include a wide range of atmospheric and oceanic chemistries, with large uncertainties in boundary conditions for the evolution and diversification of life and the role of the global carbon cycle in maintaining habitable climates. Increased atmospheric CO_2 is a common...

  4. Carbon isotope evidence for a magmatic origin for Archaean gold-quartz vein ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, D. R.; Wood, P. C.; Spooner, E. T. C.

    1986-01-01

    Sediments from three sites in the Santa Barbara Basin were examined with a 160X power light microscope and TEM equipment to characterize the magnetostatic bacteria (MB) in the samples. Both the free magnetite and the crystals in the MB in the samples had lengths from 40-60 nm in length and increased in size from one end to the next. An intact magnetosome was also observed. Scanning the sediments with saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM) and altering field demagnetization techniques using a SQUID magnetometer yielded coercivity spectra which showed that the primary remanence carrier in the sediments was single domain magnetite. Although it is expected that the predominance of the bacterial magnetite component will decrease with depth in the open ocean basin, single-domain bacteria as old as 50 Myr have been observed in oceanic sediments.

  5. Palaeomagnetism of late Archaean flood basalt terrains : implications for early Earth geodynamics and geomagnetism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strik, Gerardus Henricus Martina Anna

    2004-01-01

    Palaeomagnetic studies are e.g. important for demonstrating and quantifying horizontal movement and rotation of pieces of the Earth's crust. The constant movement and recycling of plates, in other words plate tectonics, is an important mechanism for the Earth to lose its heat. It is generally accept

  6. Paleomagnetism of late Archaean flood basalt terrains : implications for early Earth geodynamics and geomagnetism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strik, G.H.M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Palaeomagnetic studies are e.g. important for demonstrating and quantifying horizontal movement and rotation of pieces of the Earth's crust. The constant movement and recycling of plates, in other words plate tectonics, is an important mechanism for the Earth to lose its heat. It is generally accept

  7. Significance of the late Archaean granulite facies terrain boundaries, Southern West Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, C. R. L.; Nutman, A. P.; Mcgregor, V. R.

    1988-01-01

    Three distinct episodes and occurrences of granulite metamorphism in West Greenland are described: (1) the oldest fragmentary granulites occur within the 3.6-Ga Amitsoq gneisses and appear to have formed 200 Ma after the continental crust in which they lie (Spatially associated rapakivi granites have zircon cores as old as 3.8 Ga, but Rb-Sr, whole-rock Pb-Pb, and all other systems give 3.6 Ga, so these granulites apparently represent a later metamorphic event); (2) 3.0-Ga granulites of the Nordlandet Peninsula NW of Godthaab, developed immediately after crustal formation in hot, dry conditions, are carbonate-free, associated with voluminous tonalite, and formed at peak metamorphic conditions of 800 C and 7 to 8 kbar (Synmetamorphic trondhjemite abounds and the activity of H2O has been indicated by Pilar to have varied greatly); and (3) 2.8-Ga granulites south of Godthaab, lie to the south of retrogressed amphibolite terranes. Prograde amphibolite-granulite transitions are clearly preserved only locally at the southern end of this block, near Bjornesund, south of Fiskenaesset. Progressively deeper parts of the crust are exposed from south to north as a major thrust fault is approached. Characteristic big hornblende pegmatites, which outcrop close to the thrust in the east, have been formed by replacement of orthopyroxene. Comparable features were not seen in South Indian granulites. It was concluded that no one mechanism accounts for the origin of all granulites in West Greenland. Various processes have interacted in different ways, and what happened in individual areas must be worked out by considering all possible processes.

  8. Towards a Computational Model of a Methane Producing Archaeum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R. Peterson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress towards a complete model of the methanogenic archaeum Methanosarcina acetivorans is reported. We characterized size distribution of the cells using differential interference contrast microscopy, finding them to be ellipsoidal with mean length and width of 2.9 μm and 2.3 μm, respectively, when grown on methanol and 30% smaller when grown on acetate. We used the single molecule pull down (SiMPull technique to measure average copy number of the Mcr complex and ribosomes. A kinetic model for the methanogenesis pathways based on biochemical studies and recent metabolic reconstructions for several related methanogens is presented. In this model, 26 reactions in the methanogenesis pathways are coupled to a cell mass production reaction that updates enzyme concentrations. RNA expression data (RNA-seq measured for cell cultures grown on acetate and methanol is used to estimate relative protein production per mole of ATP consumed. The model captures the experimentally observed methane production rates for cells growing on methanol and is most sensitive to the number of methyl-coenzyme-M reductase (Mcr and methyl-tetrahydromethanopterin:coenzyme-M methyltransferase (Mtr proteins. A draft transcriptional regulation network based on known interactions is proposed which we intend to integrate with the kinetic model to allow dynamic regulation.

  9. Isotope fractionation during the anaerobic consumption of acetate by methanogenic and sulfate-reducing microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gövert, D.; Conrad, R.

    2009-04-01

    During the anaerobic degradation of organic matter in anoxic sediments and soils acetate is the most important substrate for the final step in production of CO2 and/or CH4. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and methane-producing archaea both compete for the available acetate. Knowledge about the fractionation of 13C/12C of acetate carbon by these microbial groups is still limited. Therefore, we determined carbon isotope fractionation in different cultures of acetate-utilizing SRB (Desulfobacter postgatei, D. hydrogenophilus, Desulfobacca acetoxidans) and methanogens (Methanosarcina barkeri, M. acetivorans). Including literature values (e.g., Methanosaeta concilii), isotopic enrichment factors (epsilon) ranged between -35 and +2 permil, possibly involving equilibrium isotope effects besides kinetic isotope effects. The values of epsilon were dependent on the acetate-catabolic pathway of the particular microorganism, the methyl or carboxyl position of acetate, and the relative availability or limitation of the substrate acetate. Patterns of isotope fractionation in anoxic lake sediments and rice field soil seem to reflect the characteristics of the microorganisms actively involved in acetate catabolism. Hence, it might be possible using environmental isotopic information to determine the type of microbial metabolism converting acetate to CO2 and/or CH4.

  10. The stepwise evolution of early life driven by energy conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, James G; House, Christopher H

    2006-06-01

    Two main theories have emerged for the origin and early evolution of life based on heterotrophic versus chemoautotrophic metabolisms. With the exception of a role for CO, the theories have little common ground. Here we propose an alternative theory for the early evolution of the cell which combines principal features of the widely disparate theories. The theory is based on the extant pathway for conversion of CO to methane and acetate, largely deduced from the genomic analysis of the archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans. In contrast to current paradigms, we propose that an energy-conservation pathway was the major force which powered and directed the early evolution of the cell. We envision the proposed primitive energy-conservation pathway to have developed sometime after a period of chemical evolution but prior to the establishment of diverse protein-based anaerobic metabolisms. We further propose that energy conservation played the predominant role in the later evolution of anaerobic metabolisms which explains the origin and evolution of extant methanogenic pathways.

  11. Enhancement of bioenergy production from organic wastes by two-stage anaerobic hydrogen and methane production process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-09-01

    The present study investigated a two-stage anaerobic hydrogen and methane process for increasing bioenergy production from organic wastes. A two-stage process with hydraulic retention time (HRT) 3d for hydrogen reactor and 12d for methane reactor, obtained 11% higher energy compared to a single-stage methanogenic process (HRT 15 d) under organic loading rate (OLR) 3 gVS/(L d). The two-stage process was still stable when the OLR was increased to 4.5 gVS/(Ld), while the single-stage process failed. The study further revealed that by changing the HRT(hydrogen):HRT(methane) ratio of the two-stage process from 3:12 to 1:14, 6.7%, more energy could be obtained. Microbial community analysis indicated that the dominant bacterial species were different in the hydrogen reactors (Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum-like species) and methane reactors (Clostridium thermocellum-like species). The changes of substrates and HRT did not change the dominant species. The archaeal community structures in methane reactors were similar both in single- and two- stage reactors, with acetoclastic methanogens Methanosarcina acetivorans-like organisms as the dominant species.

  12. Geochemical evidence for subduction in the early Archaean from quartz-carbonate-fuchsite mineralization, Isua Supracrustal Belt, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pope, Emily Catherine; Rosing, Minik Thorleif; Bird, Dennis K.

    with Phanerozoic orogenic deposits and that this type of metasomatism is a unique result of subduction-related processes. Fuchsite from the ISB has a δ18O and δD of 7.7 to 17.9‰ and -115 to -61‰, respectively. δ18O of quartz from the same rocks is between 10.3 and 18.6‰. Muscovite-quartz oxygen isotope thermometry...

  13. Recognition of > or = 3850 Ma water-lain sediments in West Greenland and their significance for the early Archaean Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutman, A. P.; Mojzsis, S. J.; Friend, C. R.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    A layered body of amphibolite, banded iron formation (BIF), and ultramafic rocks from the island of Akilia, southern West Greenland, is cut by a quartz-dioritic sheet from which SHRIMP zircon 206Pb/207Pb weighted mean ages of 3865 +/- 11 Ma and 3840 +/- 8 Ma (2 sigma) can be calculated by different approaches. Three other methods of assessing the zircon data yield ages of >3830 Ma. The BIFs are interpreted as water-lain sediments, which with a minimum age of approximately 3850 Ma, are the oldest sediments yet documented. These rocks provide proof that by approximately 3850 Ma (1) there was a hydrosphere, supporting the chemical sedimentation of BIF, and that not all water was stored in hydrous minerals, and (2) that conditions satisfying the stability of liquid water imply surface temperatures were similar to present. Carbon isotope data of graphitic microdomains in apatite from the Akilia island BIF are consistent with a bio-organic origin (Mojzsis et al. 1996), extending the record of life on Earth to >3850 Ma. Life and surface water by approximately 3850 Ma provide constraints on either the energetics or termination of the late meteoritic bombardment event (suggested from the lunar cratering record) on Earth.

  14. Radioelemental, petrological and geochemical characterization of the Bundelkhand craton, central India: implication in the Archaean geodynamic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Labani; Nagaraju, P.; Singh, S. P.; Ravi, G.; Roy, Sukanta

    2016-06-01

    We have carried out radioelemental (232Th, 238U, 40K), petrological and geochemical analyses on granitoids and gneisses covering major rock formations of the Bundelkhand craton, central India. Our data reveal that above characteristics are distinct among granitoids (i.e. pink, biotite and grey granitoids) and gneisses (i.e. potassic and sodic types). Pink granitoid is K-feldspar-rich and meta-aluminous to per-aluminous in character. Biotite granitoid is meta-aluminous in character. Grey granitoid is rich in Na-feldspar and mafic minerals, granodiorite to diorite in composition and meta-aluminous in character. Among these granitoids, radioelements (Th, U, K) are highest in pink granitoid (45.0 ± 21.7 ppm, 7.2 ± 3.4 ppm, 4.2 ± 0.4 %), intermediate in biotite granitoid (44.5 ± 28.2 ppm, 5.4 ± 2.8 ppm, 3.4 ± 0.7 %) and lowest in grey granitoid (17.7 ± 4.3 ppm, 4.4 ± 0.6 ppm, 3.0 ± 0.4 %). Among gneisses, potassic-type gneisses have higher radioelements (11.8 ± 5.3 ppm, 3.1 ± 1.2 ppm, 2.0 ± 0.5 %) than the sodic-type gneisses (5.6 ± 2.8 ppm, 1.3 ± 0.5 ppm, 1.4 ± 0.7 %). Moreover, the pink granitoid and the biotite granitoid have higher Th/U (6 and 8, respectively) compared to the grey granitoid (Th/U: 4), implying enrichment of Th in pink and biotite granitoids relative to grey granitoid. K/U among pink, biotite and grey granitoids shows little variation (0.6 × 104, 0.6 × 104, 0.7 × 104, respectively), indicating relatively similar increase in K and U. Therefore, mineralogical and petrological data along with radioelemental ratios suggest that radioelemental variations in these lithounits are mainly related to abundances of the radioactive minerals that have formed by the fractionation of LILE from different magma sources. Based on present data, the craton can be divided into three distinct zones that can be correlated with its evolution in time and space. The central part, where gneisses are associated with metavolcanics of greenstone belt, is characterized by lowest radioelements and is the oldest component. The southern part, dominated by pink granitoid, is characterized by highest radioelements and is the youngest part. The northern part, dominated by grey and biotite granitoid, is characterized by moderate radioelements.

  15. The degassing history of the Earth: Noble gas studies of Archaean cherts and zero age glassy submarine basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, R.; Hogan, L.

    1985-01-01

    Recent noble gas studies suggests the Earth's atmosphere outgassed from the Earth's upper mantle synchronous with sea floor spreading, ocean ridge hydrothermal activity and the formation of continents by partial melting in subduction zones. The evidence for formation of the atmosphere by outgassing of the mantle is the presence of radionuclides H3.-4, Ar-040 and 136 Xe-136 in the atmosphere that were produced from K-40, U and Th in the mantle. How these radionuclides were formed is reviewed.

  16. Extension of the Archaean Madibe-Kraaipan granite-greenstone terrane in southeast Botswana: Constraints from gravity and magnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramotoroko, Calistus D.; Ranganai, Rubeni T.; Nyabeze, Peter

    2016-11-01

    The main goal of this study is to use suitably processed potential field data between longitude 24°E to 26°E and latitude 25°S to 26.5°S to gain a better geological and structural understanding of the extension of the Madibe-Kraaipan granite-greenstone terrane in southeast Botswana. Specifically, 150 new gravity measurements at 2-4 km intervals are reduced and later merged with existing gravity data in Botswana and South Africa for an integrated crustal interpretation with regional aeromagnetic data. Gravity and aeromagnetic anomalies of the region present partly coincident medium to high amplitude regions alternating with low zones. Analysis of the data revealed the existence of relatively narrow Nsbnd S trending rocks of dense and high magnetic intensity extending to the village of Mmathethe, corresponding to the northern extent of the Kraaipan greenstone belt. Much of the north-central area forms a broad magnetic low and gravity high implying Kraaipan metavolcanic rocks are more extensively developed in this area than previously recognized, under a blanket of Kalahari sediments that are ∼55 m thick as indicated by borehole data. The whole area lies within an ENE-trending Pre-Transvaal dyke swarm visible on the regional aeromagnetic data and much clearer on (proprietary) high resolution aeromagnetic data. The derivative and analytic signal techniques applied for both gravity and magnetic data spatially map the greenstone belt and multiple granite plutons very well. Depth estimates obtained by the 3D Euler method in combination with two-dimensional power spectrum technique locate the high magnetic intensity horizon at around 4.0 km. The depths were further confirmed by gravity model results along two profiles across the granite-greenstone terrane in Botswana and South Africa in a W-E direction. The models show generally steep-sided bodies of comparable width with a maximum depth extent of 4.7 km for the greenstones and 4.4 km for the younger plutons. The distribution and configuration of the greenstones and plutons suggest assembly of this Kaapvaal craton western domain by plate tectonic processes. Episodic intrusion of granitoids into Kraaipan greenstone successions led to deformation of the belt with significance to Au and Au-PGE mineralization. The mapped structures could be important for groundwater exploration in this dry farming terrane.

  17. Geochemical and biologic constraints on the Archaean atmosphere and climate – A possible solution to the faint early Sun paradox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosing, Minik Thorleif; Brid, Dennis K.; Sleep, Norman H.

    into account the apparent growth of Earth continents (Collerson and Kamber 1999) and the absence of land vegetation during the Precambrian for the evolution of the surface albedo, and a model for the abundance and properties of clouds that takes into account the lower abundance of biogenic cloud condensation...

  18. Design of carrier tRNAs and selection of four-base codons for efficient incorporation of various nonnatural amino acids into proteins in Spodoptera frugiperda 21 (Sf21) insect cell-free translation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taki, Masumi; Tokuda, Yasunori; Ohtsuki, Takashi; Sisido, Masahiko

    2006-12-01

    Spodoptera frugiperda 21 (Sf21) insect cell-free protein synthesizing system was expanded to include nonnatural amino acids. Orthogonal tRNAs that work as carriers of nonnatural amino acids in the insect system were explored. Four-base codons for assigning the positions of nonnatural amino acids were also selected. Mutated streptavidin mRNAs that contained different four-base codons were prepared and added to the insect cell-free system in the presence of various tRNAs possessing the corresponding four-base anticodons. The tRNAs were chemically aminoacylated with various types of nonnatural amino acids to examine their incorporation efficiencies. Using p-nitrophenylalanine as the nonnatural amino acid and streptavidin as the target protein, tRNA sequences and the types of four-base codons were optimized to maximize the yield of the nonnatural mutant and to minimize production of full-length proteins that do not contain the nonnatural amino acid. Among the tRNA sequences taken from a variety of tRNAs of nonstandard structures, the tRNA derived from Methanosarcina acetivorans tRNA(Pyl) was the most efficient and orthogonal tRNA. Of the CGGN-type four-base codons, CGGA and CGGG were the most efficient ones for assigning the positions of nonnatural amino acids. p-Nitrophenylalanine and 2-naphthylalanine were efficiently incorporated as in the case of Escherichia coli and rabbit reticulocyte cell-free systems. Much less efficient incorporation was observed, however, for other nonnatural amino acids, indicating that the insect system is less tolerant to the structural diversity of amino acids than the E. coli cell-free system.

  19. Betaine: New Oxidant in the Stickland Reaction and Methanogenesis from Betaine and l-Alanine by a Clostridium sporogenes-Methanosarcina barkeri Coculture

    OpenAIRE

    Naumann, Evelyn; Hippe, Hans; Gottschalk, Gerhard

    1983-01-01

    Growing and nongrowing cells of Clostridium sporogenes fermented betaine with l-alanine, l-valine, l-leucine, and l-isoleucine as electron donors in a coupled oxidation-reduction reaction (Stickland reaction). For the substrate combinations betaine and l-alanine and betaine and l-valine balance studies were performed; the results were in agreement with the following fermentation equation: 1 R- CH(NH2)-COOH + 2 betaine + 2 H2O → 1 R-COOH + 1 CO2 + 1 NH3 + 2 trimethylamine + 2 acetate. Growth a...

  20. Pb–Pb zircon ages of Archaean metasediments and gneisses from the Dharwar craton, southern India: Implications for the antiquity of the eastern Dharwar craton

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Maibam; J N Goswami; R Srinivasan

    2011-08-01

    207Pb–206Pb ages of zircons in samples of metasediments as well as ortho- and para-gneisses from both the western and the eastern parts of the Dharwar craton have been determined using an ion microprobe. Detrital zircons in metasedimentary rocks from both yielded ages ranging from 3.2 to 3.5 Ga. Zircons from orthogneisses from the two parts also yielded similar ages. Imprints of younger events have been discerned in the ages of overgrowths on older zircon cores in samples collected throughout the craton. Our data show that the evolution of the southwestern part of eastern Dharwar craton involved a significant amount of older crust (< 3.0 Ga). This would suggest that crust formation in both the western and eastern parts of the Dharwar craton took place over similar time interval starting in the Mesoarchaean at ca. 3.5 Ga and continuing until 2.5 Ga. Our data coupled with geological features and geodynamic setting of the Dharwar craton tend to suggest that the eastern Dharwar craton and the western Dharwar craton formed part of a single terrane.

  1. Biophysical Characterisation of Globins and Multi-Heme Cytochromes Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmet, Filip

    Heme proteins of different families were investigated in this work, using a combination of pulsed and continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, resonance Raman spectroscopy and laser flash photolysis. The first class of proteins that were investigated, were the globins. The globin-domain of the globin-coupled sensor of the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens was studied in detail using different pulsed EPR techniques (HYSCORE and Mims ENDOR). The results of this pulsed EPR study are compared with the results of the optical investigation and the crystal structure of the protein. The second globin, which was studied, is the Protoglobin of Methanosarcina acetivorans, various mutants of this protein were studied using laser flash photolysis and Raman spectroscopy to unravel the link between this protein's unusual structure and its ligand-binding kinetics. In addition to this, the CN -bound form of this protein was investigated using EPR and the influence of the strong deformation of the heme on the unusual low gz values is discussed. Finally, the neuroglobins of three species of fishes, Danio rerio, Dissostichus mawsoni and Chaenocephalus aceratus are studied. The influence of the presence or absence of two cysteine residues in the C-D and D-region of the protein on the EPR spectrum, and the possible formation of a disulfide bond is studied. The second group of proteins that were studied in this thesis belong to the family of the cytochromes. First the Mouse tumor suppressor cytochrome b561 was studied, the results of a Raman and EPR investigation are compared to the Human orthologue of the protein. Secondly, the tonoplast cytochrome b561 of Arabidopsis was investigated in its natural form and in two double-mutant forms, in which the heme at the extravesicular side was removed. The results of this investigation are then compared with two models in literature that predict the localisation of the hemes in this

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-02-0012 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-02-0012 ref|YP_304864.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A1321 [Methanosarcina barker...i str. Fusaro] gb|AAZ70284.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A1321 [Methanosarcina barkeri str. Fusaro] YP_304864.1 0.39 34% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DMEL-02-0058 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DMEL-02-0058 ref|YP_305810.1| leucine-rich-repeat protein [Methanosarcina barker...i str. Fusaro] gb|AAZ71230.1| leucine-rich-repeat protein [Methanosarcina barkeri str. Fusaro] YP_305810.1 6e-19 33% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0874 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0874 ref|YP_305025.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A1490 [Methanosarcina barker...i str. Fusaro] gb|AAZ70445.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A1490 [Methanosarcina barkeri str. Fusaro] YP_305025.1 0.001 21% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-2526 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-2526 ref|YP_306419.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A2944 [Methanosarcina barker...i str. Fusaro] gb|AAZ71839.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Methanosarcina barkeri str. Fusaro] YP_306419.1 0.072 19% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DYAK-02-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DYAK-02-0045 ref|YP_305810.1| leucine-rich-repeat protein [Methanosarcina barker...i str. Fusaro] gb|AAZ71230.1| leucine-rich-repeat protein [Methanosarcina barkeri str. Fusaro] YP_305810.1 2e-18 32% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DSIM-02-0062 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DSIM-02-0062 ref|YP_305810.1| leucine-rich-repeat protein [Methanosarcina barker...i str. Fusaro] gb|AAZ71230.1| leucine-rich-repeat protein [Methanosarcina barkeri str. Fusaro] YP_305810.1 4e-21 34% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0028 ref|YP_305972.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A2479 [Methanosarcina barker...i str. Fusaro] gb|AAZ71392.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A2479 [Methanosarcina barkeri str. Fusaro] YP_305972.1 9e-19 35% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CFAM-29-0004 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CFAM-29-0004 ref|YP_305025.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A1490 [Methanosarcina barker...i str. Fusaro] gb|AAZ70445.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A1490 [Methanosarcina barkeri str. Fusaro] YP_305025.1 1.4 26% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DDIS-04-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DDIS-04-0035 ref|YP_303708.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A0143 [Methanosarcina barker...i str. Fusaro] gb|AAZ69128.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Methanosarcina barkeri str. Fusaro] YP_303708.1 1e-10 42% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DMEL-01-0076 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DMEL-01-0076 ref|YP_306433.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A2958 [Methanosarcina barker...i str. Fusaro] gb|AAZ71853.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Methanosarcina barkeri str. Fusaro] YP_306433.1 3.6 30% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0286 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-0286 ref|YP_304217.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A0658 [Methanosarcina barker...i str. Fusaro] gb|AAZ69637.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Methanosarcina barkeri str. Fusaro] YP_304217.1 0.19 25% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DYAK-02-0000 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DYAK-02-0000 ref|YP_306433.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A2958 [Methanosarcina barker...i str. Fusaro] gb|AAZ71853.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Methanosarcina barkeri str. Fusaro] YP_306433.1 0.029 34% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OPRI-01-1140 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OPRI-01-1140 ref|YP_303598.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A0027 [Methanosarcina barker...i str. Fusaro] gb|AAZ69018.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A0027 [Methanosarcina barkeri str. Fusaro] YP_303598.1 0.078 24% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-1179 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-1179 ref|YP_305972.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A2479 [Methanosarcina barker...i str. Fusaro] gb|AAZ71392.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A2479 [Methanosarcina barkeri str. Fusaro] YP_305972.1 1e-09 31% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-2145 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-2145 ref|YP_305913.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_A2413 [Methanosarcina barker...i str. Fusaro] gb|AAZ71333.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Methanosarcina barkeri str. Fusaro] YP_305913.1 0.12 24% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-1006 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-1006 ref|YP_306263.1| cell surface protein [Methanosarcina barkeri str.... Fusaro] gb|AAZ71683.1| cell surface protein [Methanosarcina barkeri str. Fusaro] YP_306263.1 0.032 22% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0339 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-0339 ref|YP_300087.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_B3757 [Methanosarcina barker...i str. Fusaro] gb|AAZ68991.1| hypothetical protein Mbar_B3757 [Methanosarcina barkeri str. Fusaro] YP_300087.1 1.3 24% ...

  19. Biotic and abiotic dynamics of a high solid-state anaerobic digestion box-type container system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Andreas; Probst, Maraike; Hinterberger, Stephan; Müller, Horst; Insam, Heribert

    2016-03-01

    A solid-state anaerobic digestion box-type container system for biomethane production was observed in 12 three-week batch fermentations. Reactor performance was monitored using physico-chemical analysis and the methanogenic community was identified using ANAEROCHIP-microarrays and quantitative PCR. A resilient community was found in all batches, despite variations in inoculum to substrate ratio, feedstock quality, and fluctuating reactor conditions. The consortia were dominated by mixotrophic Methanosarcina that were accompanied by hydrogenotrophic Methanobacterium, Methanoculleus, and Methanocorpusculum. The relationship between biotic and abiotic variables was investigated using bivariate correlation analysis and univariate analysis of variance. High amounts of biogas were produced in batches with high copy numbers of Methanosarcina. High copy numbers of Methanocorpusculum and extensive percolation, however, were found to negatively correlate with biogas production. Supporting these findings, a negative correlation was detected between Methanocorpusculum and Methanosarcina. Based on these results, this study suggests Methanosarcina as an indicator for well-functioning reactor performance.

  20. Gene Regulation of Methanogenesis from Acetate in the Acetotrophic Methane Producing Archaebacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-27

    planned to use CO dehydrogenase from 6 M. thermophila provided by J.G. Ferry to produce probes for genomic libraries of M. acetivorans on the assumption...regions of the proteins are conserved. 4) Antibody production and screening. M. thermophila genomic libraries were screened with antisera directed...be used in construction of gene shuttle vectors with the evencual goal of developing an gene transformation system, and iii) generation of genomic

  1. Microbial ecology of thermophilic anaerobic digestion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen H. Zinder

    2000-04-15

    This grant supported research on methanogenic archaea. The two major areas that were supported were conversion of acetic acid to methane and nitrogen fixation by Methanosarcina. Among the achievements of this research were the isolation of novel methanogenic cultures, elucidation of the pathways from acetate to methane, description of a specific DNA-binding complex in nitrogen fixing methanogens, and demonstration of an alternative nitrogenase in Methanosarcina.

  2. Threshold Acetate Concentrations for Acetate Catabolism by Aceticlastic Methanogenic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Westermann, Peter; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Mah, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Marked differences were found for minimum threshold concentrations of acetate catabolism by Methanosarcina barkeri 227 (1.180 mM), Methanosarcina mazei S-6 (0.396 mM), and a Methanothrix sp. (0.069 mM). This indicates that the aceticlastic methanogens responsible for the conversion of acetate to methane in various ecosystems might be different, depending on the prevailing in situ acetate concentrations.

  3. 华北克拉通南缘舞阳地区太古代BIF中方解石的微区特征及地质意义研究%Study on Microarea Characteristics of Calcite in Archaean BIF from Wuyang Area in South Margin of North China Craton and Its Geological Significances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李红中; 翟明国; 张连昌; 杨志军; 周永章; 王长乐; 梁锦; 罗安

    2013-01-01

    条带状铁建造(banded iron formation ,BIF)是前寒武纪地层中广泛发育的一类富铁沉积岩,它在华北克拉通内广泛发育。在华北克拉通南缘的舞阳地区,晚太古代太华群铁山庙组BIF包含石英-磁铁矿和辉石-磁铁矿两种组合,前者的绝大部分磁铁矿颗粒均自形程度高、粒度粗大并常常紧密伴生有一定量的方解石。舞阳地区铁山庙组BIF的RAMAN ,SEM ,CL和EDS分析结果表明:石英-磁铁矿矿石中的磁铁矿自形程度最高、石英次之、方解石最低;方解石似条带的RAMAN分析结果指示其有序度、结晶程度沿条带的垂直方向无规律突变,明显不同于裂隙中后期热液流体沉淀形成的方解石脉;方解石发生了塑性流变并最终定位于石英和磁铁矿间的间隙内,其矿物的截面形状和展布特征明显受控于石英和磁铁矿并得到了石英颗粒间微裂隙内方解石的证实;方解石似条带的微区成份存在明显差异,这反映方解石经历了塑性流变及再次汇聚;在磁铁矿颗粒的汇聚及生长过程中,方解石充当了磁铁矿微颗粒迁移的媒介并得到了方解石中磁铁矿微颗粒局部富集现象的证实。%The results of Raman ,SEM ,CL and EDS analysis show that the quartz-type BIF (banded iron formation) in Tieshan-miao formation ,from Wuyang area of south North China Craton mainly contains quartz ,magnetite and a small quantity of cal-cite .In comparison ,magnetites represent the highest automorphic degree ,while calcites contribute to the lowest automorphic degree .In addition ,the automorphic degree of the quartz lies between magnetite and calcite .In the results of Raman analysis , the crystallinity and order degree are quite diverse in the vertical direction of the calcite band-like ,and this is different from the calcite vein precipitating from the upper hydrothermal fluid .There are obvious plastic flow happening to calcite particles .During the process of plastic flow ,the calcites are finally filled in the space between quartz and magnetite .This is the reason why the cross sectional shape and distributional characteristics of calcite aggregate are controlled by the particles of quartz and magnetite , which is also evidenced by the calcite filled into the slight interspace between two particles of quartz .In the Raman analysis , there are apparent differences of microarea component in calcite band-like ,and this denotes that it is produced by the plastic flow and concourse process .What’s more ,the calcite acts as the migration intermedium of tiny magnetite during their concourse and crystallization processes ,which is witnessed by the concentrated particles of magnetite in small size in local parts of the calcites . With the help of calcite ,the small magnetite particles join together to crystallize with bigger size or form aggregate of minerals .

  4. Economic geology: Gold buried by oxygen

    OpenAIRE

    Gaillard, Fabrice; Copard, Y.

    2015-01-01

    International audience; he Witwatersrand Basin in South Africa contains extraordinary amounts of gold. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the gold may have accumulated there in response to a perfect storm of conditions available only during the Archaean.

  5. Final Technical Report for Award # ER64999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalf, William W. [University of Illinois

    2014-10-08

    This report provides a summary of activities for Award # ER64999, a Genomes to Life Project funded by the Office of Science, Basic Energy Research. The project was entitled "Methanogenic archaea and the global carbon cycle: a systems biology approach to the study of Methanosarcina species". The long-term goal of this multi-investigator project was the creation of integrated, multiscale models that accurately and quantitatively predict the role of Methanosarcina species in the global carbon cycle under dynamic environmental conditions. To achieve these goals we pursed four specific aims: (1) genome sequencing of numerous members of the Order Methanosarcinales, (2) identification of genomic sources of phenotypic variation through in silico comparative genomics, (3) elucidation of the transcriptional networks of two Methanosarcina species, and (4) development of comprehensive metabolic network models for characterized strains to address the question of how metabolic models scale with genetic distance.

  6. A Review of the Isotopic and Trace Element Evidence for Mantle and Crustal Processes in the Hadean and Archean: implications for the Onset of Plate Tectonic Subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Katie A.; Tappe, Sebastian; Stern, Richard A.; Webb, Susan J.; Ashwal, Lewis D.

    2016-03-01

    Plate tectonics plays a vital role in the evolution of our planet. Geochemical analysis of Earth’s oldest continental crust suggests that subduction may have begun episodically about 3.8 to 3.2 billion years ago, during the early Archaean or perhaps more than 3.8 billion years ago, during the Hadean. Yet, mantle rocks record evidence for modern-style plate tectonics beginning only in the late Archaean, about 3 billion years ago. Here we analyse the nitrogen abundance, as well as the nitrogen and carbon isotopic signatures of Archaean placer diamonds from the Kaapvaal craton, South Africa, which formed in the upper mantle 3.1 to 3.5 billion years ago. We find that the diamonds have enriched nitrogen contents and isotopic compositions compared with typical mantle values. This nitrogen geochemical fingerprint could have been caused by contamination of the mantle by nitrogen-rich Archaean sediments. Furthermore, the carbon isotopic signature suggests that the diamonds formed by reduction of an oxidized fluid or melt. Assuming that the Archaean mantle was more reduced than the modern mantle, we argue that the oxidized components were introduced to the mantle by crustal recycling at subduction zones. We conclude, on the basis of evidence from mantle-derived diamonds, that modern-style plate tectonics operated as early as 3.5 billion years ago.

  7. Isotopic chronology and geological events of Precambrian complex in Taihangshan region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘树文; 梁海华; 赵国春; 华永刚; 简安华

    2000-01-01

    There are five major geological events in Precambrian complex, Taihangshan region determined by researching into geology and isotopic chronology of the complex. Basaltic magma erupted and quartz-dioritic to tonalitic magma intruded in earlier neo-Archaean, which formed horn-blende-plagiogneiss of Fuping gneiss complex and metamorphic mafic rock enclaves in TTG gneiss complex. Granulite fades metamorphism and emplacement of biotite-plagiogneiss occurred in late neo-Archaean. Extension and uplifting from the end of neo-Archaean to Paleoproterozoic era formed Chengnanzhuang large extensional deformation zones and metamorphic mafic veins emplaced into the deformation zones. Remobilization of Precambrian complex and tectonic uplifting in late Paleoproterozoic era formed Longquanguan ductile shear zone and emplacement of Nanying gneiss. Occurrence of regional granite pegmatite at the end of Paleoproterozoic era means the end of the Luliang movement.

  8. Isotopic chronology and geological events of Precambrian complex in Taihangshan region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    There are five major geological events in Precambrian complex, Taihangshan region determined by researching into geology and isotopic chronology of the complex. Basaltic magma erupted and quartz-dioritic to tonalitic magma intruded in earlier neo-Archaean, which formed hornblende-plagiogneiss of Fuping gneiss complex and metamorphic mafic rock enclaves in TTG gneiss complex. Granulite facies metamorphism and emplacement of biotite-plagiogneiss occurred in late neo-Archaean. Extension and uplifting from the end of neo-Archaean to Paleoproterozoic era formed Chengnanzhuang large extensional deformation zones and metamorphic mafic veins emplaced into the deformation zones. Remobilization of Precambrian complex and tectonic uplifting in late Paleoproterozoic era formed Longquanguan ductile shear zone and emplacement of Nanying gneiss. Occurrence of regional granite pegmatite at the end of Paleoproterozoic era means the end of the Lliang movement.

  9. MУСКОВИТ-МИКРОКЛИНОВЫЕ МЕТАСОМАТИТЫ В ПОРОДАХ АРХЕЙСКОГО КОМПЛЕКСА КОЛЬСКОЙ СВЕРХГЛУБОКОЙ СКВАЖИНЫ: ЭТАПЫ ФОРМИРОВАНИЯ И ИСТОЧНИКИ ВЕЩЕСТВА

    OpenAIRE

    Ветрин, В.; Овчинникова, Г.; Неймарк, Л.; Гороховский, Б.; Смирнов, Ю.

    1998-01-01

    Muscovite-microcline metasomatites on gneisses of the Archaean complex of the Kola superdeep borehole are found out in the bottom part of the section on the depth 12172-12235 m and by the geological position, structure and age are correlated with garnet-like rocks of the metasomatite formation occupying the area not less than 300 km2 in the Archaean rocks of the northern frame of the Pechenga riftogenic structure. The formation of metasomatites occured in conditions of increased potential of ...

  10. Palaeomagnetism and the continental crust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piper, J.D.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to palaeomagnetism offering treatment of theory and practice. It analyzes the palaeomagnetic record over the whole of geological time, from the Archaean to the Cenozoic, and goes on to examine the impact of past geometries and movements of the continental crust at each geological stage. Topics covered include theory of rock and mineral magnetism, field and laboratory methods, growth and consolidation of the continental crust in Archaean and Proterozoic times, Palaeozoic palaeomagnetism and the formation of Pangaea, the geomagnetic fields, continental movements, configurations and mantle convection.

  11. The origin and tectonic setting of precambrian greywacke of Ribandar-Chimbel, Goa, India: Petrological and geochemical evidence

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, G.Q.; Iyer, S.D.; Kotha, M.

    .11- 10.04%, MgO 1.12-4.48%, MnO 0.03- 0.12%, Na2O 2.72- 4.59% and P2O5 0.04-0.16%. The average of the major element data is comparable to that of Archaean greywacke of Fig Tree, Barberton (South Africa) (Toulkeridis et al., 1999), Late Archaean (3.5- 2... of Early Precambrian greywacke from the Fig Tree Group, South Africa. Geological Society of American Bulletin, 81: 2759-2776. Courtillot, V., Besse, J., Vandamme, D., Montigny, R., Jaeger J.J., Cappetta, H., 1986. Deccan flood basalts at the Cretaceous...

  12. Promoting interspecies electron transfer with biochar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla;

    2014-01-01

    to that previously reported for granular activated carbon (GAC). Although the biochars investigated were 1000 times less conductive than GAC, they stimulated DIET in co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens with Geobacter sulfurreducens or Methanosarcina barkeri in which ethanol was the electron donor. Cells were...

  13. The impact of Co and Ni speciation on methanogenesis in sulfidic media - Biouptake versus Metal dissolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S.; Gonzalez-Gil, G.; Leeuwen, van H.P.

    2007-01-01

    The speciation of the trace nutrients Co(II) and Ni(II) in sulfide containing media can control the methanogenic activity of Methanosarcina sp., which is of importance for the optimisation of anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing methanol. To obtain more insight in the mechanistic backgrounds

  14. Thermophilic anaerobic acetate-utilizing methanogens and their metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mladenovska, Zuzana

    Methanosarcina strains required vitamins as growth factor. The isolates differed in cardinal growth pH and temperatures, the kinetic parameters - maximum specific growth rate and half saturation constant - and threshold values during growth on acetate. Analysis of total cell proteins by SDS-page gel...

  15. Role of nickel in high rate methanol degradation in anaerobic granular sludge bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fermoso, F.G.; Collins, G.; Bartacek, J.; O'Flaherty, V.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of nickel deprivation from the influent of a mesophilic (30 degrees C) methanol fed upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor was investigated by coupling the reactor performance to the evolution of the Methanosarcina population of the bioreactor sludge. The reactor was operated at pH 7.

  16. Palaeoclimates: the first two billion years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, James F; Ono, Shuhei

    2006-01-01

    Earth's climate during the Archaean remains highly uncertain, as the relevant geologic evidence is sparse and occasionally contradictory. Oxygen isotopes in cherts suggest that between 3.5 and 3.2 Gyr ago (Ga) the Archaean climate was hot (55–85 °C); however, the fact that these cherts have experienced only a modest amount of weathering suggests that the climate was temperate, as today. The presence of diamictites in the Pongola Supergroup and the Witwatersrand Basin of South Africa suggests that by 2.9 Ga the climate was glacial. The Late Archaean was relatively warm; then glaciation (possibly of global extent) reappeared in the Early Palaeoproterozoic, around 2.3–2.4 Ga. Fitting these climatic constraints with a model requires high concentrations of atmospheric CO2 or CH4, or both. Solar luminosity was 20–25% lower than today, so elevated greenhouse gas concentrations were needed just to keep the mean surface temperature above freezing. A rise in O2 at approximately 2.4 Ga, and a concomitant decrease in CH4, provides a natural explanation for the Palaeoproterozoic glaciations. The Mid-Archaean glaciations may have been caused by a drawdown in H2 and CH4 caused by the origin of bacterial sulphate reduction. More work is needed to test this latter hypothesis. PMID:16754607

  17. Long term biosustainability in a high energy, low diversity crustal biome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, L-H.; Wang, P-L.; Rumble, D.; Lippmann-Pipke, J.; SherwoodLollar, B.; Boice, E.; Pratt, L.; Brodie, E.; Hazen, T.C.; Andersen,G.L.; DeSantis, T.; Moser, D.P.; Kershaw, D.; Onstott, T.

    2006-10-01

    Geochemical, microbiological, and molecular analyses of alkaline saline groundwater at 2.8 kilometers depth in Archaean metabasalt revealed a microbial biome dominated by a single phylotype affiliated with thermophilic sulfate reducers belonging to Firmicutes. These sulfate reducers were sustained by geologically produced sulfate and hydrogen at concentrations sufficient to maintain activities for millions of years with no apparent reliance on photosynthetically derived substrates.

  18. Precambrian crustal evolution and Cretaceous–Palaeogene faulting in West Greenland: Zircon geochronology from the Kangaatsiaq–Qasigiannguit region, the northern part of the 1.9–1.8 Ga Nagssugtoqidian orogen, West Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conelly, James N.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The Kangaatsiaq–Qasigiannguit region in the northern part of the Palaeoproterozoic Nagssugtoqidian orogen of West Greenland consists of poly-deformed orthogneisses and minor occurrences of interleaved, discontinuous supracrustal belts. Laser ablation ICP-MS 207Pb/206Pb analyses of detrital zircons from four metasedimentary rocks (supplemented by ion probe analysis of one sample and igneous zircons from six granitoid rocks cutting metasedimentary units indicate that the supracrustal rocks in the Kangaatsiaq–Qasigiannguit (Christianshåb region are predominantly Archaean in age. Four occurrences of metasedimentary rocks are clearly Archaean, two have equivocal ages, and only one metasedimentary unit, from within the Naternaq (Lersletten supracrustal belt, is demonstrably Palaeoproterozoic and readily defines a large fold complex of this age at Naternaq. The 2.9–2.8 Ga ages of detrital Archaean grains are compatible with derivation from the local basement orthogneisses within the Nagssugtoqidian orogen. The detrital age patterns are similar to those of metasediments within the central Nagssugtoqidian orogen but distinct from age patterns in metasediments of the Rinkian belt to the north, where there is an additional component of pre-2.9 Ga zircons. Synkinematic intrusive granitoid rocks constrain the ages of some Archaean deformation at 2748 ± 19 Ma and some Palaeoproterozoic deformation at 1837 ± 12 Ma.

  19. Polyphase Neoproterozoic orogenesis within the east Africa- Antarctica orogenic belt in central and northern Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, R.M.; Pitfield, P.E.J.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Goodenough, K.M.; Waele, D.; Schofield, D.I.; Bauer, W.; Horstwood, M.S.A.; Styles, M.T.; Conrad, J.; Encarnacion, J.; Lidke, D.J.; O'connor, E. A.; Potter, C.; Smith, R.A.; Walsh, G.J.; Ralison, A.V.; Randriamananjara, T.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Rabarimanana, M.

    2011-01-01

    Our recent geological survey of the basement of central and northern Madagascar allowed us to re-evaluate the evolution of this part of the East Africa-Antarctica Orogen (EAAO). Five crustal domains are recognized, characterized by distinctive lithologies and histories of sedimentation, magmatism, deformation and metamorphism, and separated by tectonic and/or unconformable contacts. Four consist largely of Archaean metamorphic rocks (Antongil, Masora and Antananarivo Cratons, Tsaratanana Complex). The fifth (Bemarivo Belt) comprises Proterozoic meta-igneous rocks. The older rocks were intruded by plutonic suites at c. 1000 Ma, 820-760 Ma, 630-595 Ma and 560-520 Ma. The evolution of the four Archaean domains and their boundaries remains contentious, with two end-member interpretations evaluated: (1) all five crustal domains are separate tectonic elements, juxtaposed along Neoproterozoic sutures and (2) the four Archaean domains are segments of an older Archaean craton, which was sutured against the Bemarivo Belt in the Neoproterozoic. Rodinia fragmented during the early Neoproterozoic with intracratonic rifts that sometimes developed into oceanic basins. Subsequent Mid- Neoproterozoic collision of smaller cratonic blocks was followed by renewed extension and magmatism. The global 'Terminal Pan-African' event (560-490 Ma) finally stitched together the Mid-Neoproterozoic cratons to form Gondwana. ?? The Geological Society of London 2011.

  20. Diversity of burial rates in convergent settings decreased as Earth aged

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoli, Gautier; Moyen, Jean-François; Stevens, Gary

    2016-05-01

    The evolution and the growth of the continental crust is inextricably linked to the evolution of Earth’s geodynamic processes. The detrital zircon record within the continental crust, as well as the isotopic composition of this crust, indicates that the amount of juvenile felsic material decreased with time and that in geologically recent times, the generation of new crust is balanced by recycling of the crust back into the mantle within subduction zones. However it cannot always have been so; yet the nature of the crust and the processes of crustal reworking in the Precambrian Earth are not well constrained. Here we use both detrital zircon ages and metamorphic pressure-temperature-time (P-T-t) information from metasedimentary units deposited in proposed convergent settings from Archaean, Proterozoic and Phanerozoic terrains to characterize the evolution of minimum estimates of burial rate (km.Ma-1) as a function of the age of the rocks. The demonstrated decrease in burial rate correlates positively with a progressive decrease in the production of juvenile felsic crust in the Archaean and Proterozoic. Burial rates are also more diverse in the Archaean than in modern times. We interpret these features to reflect a progressive decrease in the diversity of tectonic processes from Archaean to present, coupled with the emergence of the uniquely Phanerozoic modern-style collision.

  1. 77 FR 51993 - Western Technical College; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ..., concurred with this determination. 1.3.5 National Historic Preservation Act Section 106 of the NHPA, 16 U.S.... Below this layer is Archaean-age basement rock, namely highly metamorphic gneiss, granite, and schists.... Heavy equipment would be limited to cranes sitting on the right embankment, and no access via the...

  2. Diversity of burial rates in convergent settings decreased as Earth aged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoli, Gautier; Moyen, Jean-François; Stevens, Gary

    2016-05-24

    The evolution and the growth of the continental crust is inextricably linked to the evolution of Earth's geodynamic processes. The detrital zircon record within the continental crust, as well as the isotopic composition of this crust, indicates that the amount of juvenile felsic material decreased with time and that in geologically recent times, the generation of new crust is balanced by recycling of the crust back into the mantle within subduction zones. However it cannot always have been so; yet the nature of the crust and the processes of crustal reworking in the Precambrian Earth are not well constrained. Here we use both detrital zircon ages and metamorphic pressure-temperature-time (P-T-t) information from metasedimentary units deposited in proposed convergent settings from Archaean, Proterozoic and Phanerozoic terrains to characterize the evolution of minimum estimates of burial rate (km.Ma(-1)) as a function of the age of the rocks. The demonstrated decrease in burial rate correlates positively with a progressive decrease in the production of juvenile felsic crust in the Archaean and Proterozoic. Burial rates are also more diverse in the Archaean than in modern times. We interpret these features to reflect a progressive decrease in the diversity of tectonic processes from Archaean to present, coupled with the emergence of the uniquely Phanerozoic modern-style collision.

  3. Antiquity and evolutionary status of bacterial sulfate reduction: sulfur isotope evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schidlowski, M

    1979-09-01

    The presently available sedimentary sulfur isotope record for the Precambrian seems to allow the following conclusions: (1) In the Early Archaean, sedimentary delta 34S patterns attributable to bacteriogenic sulfate reduction are generally absent. In particular, the delta 34S spread observed in the Isua banded iron formation (3.7 x 10(9) yr) is extremely narrow and coincides completely with the respective spreads yielded by contemporaneous rocks of assumed mantle derivation. Incipient minor differentiation of the isotope pattersn notably of Archaean sulfates may be accounted for by photosynthetic sulfur bacteria rather than by sulfate reducers. (2) Isotopic evidence of dissimilatory sulfate reduction is first observed in the upper Archaean of the Aldan Shield, Siberia (approximately 3.0 x 10(9) yr) and in the Michipicoten and Woman River banded iron formations of Canada (2.75 x 10(9) yr). This narrows down the possible time of appearance of sulfate respirers to the interval 2.8--3.1 x 10(9) yr. (3) Various lines of evidence indicate that photosynthesis is older than sulfate respiration, the SO4(2-) Utilized by the first sulfate reducers deriving most probably from oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds by photosynthetic sulfur bacteria. Sulfate respiration must, in turn, have antedated oxygen respiration as O2-respiring multicellular eucaryotes appear late in the Precambrian. (4) With the bulk of sulfate in the Archaean oceans probably produced by photosynthetic sulfur bacteria, the accumulation of SO4(2-) in the ancient seas must have preceded the buildup of appreciable steady state levels of free oxygen. Hence, the occurrence of sulfate evaporites in Archaean sediments does not necessarily provide testimony of oxidation weathering on the ancient continents and, consequently, of the existence of an atmospheric oxygen reservoir.

  4. Precambrian crustal evolution and Cretaceous–Palaeogene faulting in West Greenland: Evolution of Neoarchaean supracrustal belts at the northern margin of the North Atlantic Craton, West Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stensgaard, Bo Møller

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The Archaean North Atlantic Craton of West Greenland collided at c. 1.9 Ga with a lesser-known Archaean craton to the north, to form the Nagssugtoqidian orogen. The Palaeoproterozoic metamorphic grade and strain intensity decrease northward through the orogen, allowing investigation of the reworked Archaean components in its northern part. Two Archaean supracrustal belts in this region – the Ikamiut and Kangilinaaq belts – are investigated here using field mapping, aeromagnetic data, zircon geochronology, and geochemistry. Both belts comprise quartzo-feldspathic and pelitic metasedimentary rocks, amphibolite, and minor calc-silicate rocks, anorthosite and ultramafic rocks. Pb-Pb and U-Pb dating of detrital zircons and host orthogneisses suggest deposition at c. 2800 Ma (Kangilinaaq belt and after 2740 Ma (Ikamiut belt; both belts have zircons with Neoarchaean metamorphic rims. Metasedimentary rocks and orthogneisses at Ikamiut share similar steep REE signatures with strong LREE enrichment, consistent with local derivation of the sediment and deposition directly onto or proximal to the regional orthogneiss precursors. Zircon age data from Kangilinaaq indicate both local and distal sources for the sediment there. Geochemical data for Kangilinaaq amphibolites indicate bimodal, mixed felsic–mafic source rocks with island-arc basaltic affinities, consistent with a shelf or arc setting. Both belts experienced a similar tectono-metamorphic history involving Neoarchaean amphibolite facies peak metamorphism at c. 2740–2700 Ma, possibly due to continued emplacement of tonalitic and granodioritic magmas. Nagssugtoqidian lower amphibolite facies metamorphism at c. 1850 Ma was associated with development of the large-scale F2 folds and shear zones that control the present outcrop pattern. The observed differences in the sources of the Kangilinaaq and Ikamiut belts and their shared post-Archaean history suggest they were formed in different

  5. Statistical geochemistry reveals disruption in secular lithospheric evolution about 2.5 Gyr ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, C Brenhin; Schoene, Blair

    2012-05-23

    The Earth has cooled over the past 4.5 billion years (Gyr) as a result of surface heat loss and declining radiogenic heat production. Igneous geochemistry has been used to understand how changing heat flux influenced Archaean geodynamics, but records of systematic geochemical evolution are complicated by heterogeneity of the rock record and uncertainties regarding selection and preservation bias. Here we apply statistical sampling techniques to a geochemical database of about 70,000 samples from the continental igneous rock record to produce a comprehensive record of secular geochemical evolution throughout Earth history. Consistent with secular mantle cooling, compatible and incompatible elements in basalts record gradually decreasing mantle melt fraction through time. Superimposed on this gradual evolution is a pervasive geochemical discontinuity occurring about 2.5 Gyr ago, involving substantial decreases in mantle melt fraction in basalts, and in indicators of deep crustal melting and fractionation, such as Na/K, Eu/Eu* (europium anomaly) and La/Yb ratios in felsic rocks. Along with an increase in preserved crustal thickness across the Archaean/Proterozoic boundary, these data are consistent with a model in which high-degree Archaean mantle melting produced a thick, mafic lower crust and consequent deep crustal delamination and melting--leading to abundant tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite magmatism and a thin preserved Archaean crust. The coincidence of the observed changes in geochemistry and crustal thickness with stepwise atmospheric oxidation at the end of the Archaean eon provides a significant temporal link between deep Earth geochemical processes and the rise of atmospheric oxygen on the Earth.

  6. Population dynamics of biofilm development during start-up of a butyrate-degrading fluidized-bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zellner, G.; Geveke, M.; Diekmann, H. (Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mikrobiologie); Conway de Macario, E. (New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States). Wadsworth Center for Laboratories and Research)

    1991-12-01

    Population dynamics during start-up of a fluidized-bed reactor with butyrate or butyrate plus acetate as sole substrates as well as biofilm development on the sand substratum were studied microbiologically, immunologically and by scanning electron microscopy. An adapted syntrophic consortium consisting of Syntrophospora sp., Methanothrix soehngenii, Methanosarcina mazei and Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus or Methanogenium sp. achieved high-rate butyrate degradation to methane and carbon dioxide. Desulfovibrio sp., Methanocorpusculum sp., and Methanobacterium sp. were also present in lower numbers. Immunological analysis demonstrated methanogens antigenically related to Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1, Methanosarcina mazei S6, M. thermophila TM1, Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus AZ and Methanothrix soehngenii Opfikon in the biofilm. Immunological analysis also showed that the organisms isolated from the butyrate-degrading culture used as a source of inoculum were related to M. soehngenii Opfikon, Methanobacterium formicium MF and Methanospirillum hungatei JF1. (orig.).

  7. Enzymology of acetoclastic methanogenesis. Final technical report, August 1994--July 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragsdale, S.W.

    1997-12-31

    The overall aims of the proposal were to identify intermediates in the process of methane formation from acetate. The specific aims were: (1) to characterize the mechanism of acetyl-CoA conversion to CH{sub 3}-H{sub 4}MPT, CO, and CoA and elucidate the mechanism of CO oxidation by the methanosarcina thermophila CO dehydrogenase/acetyl-CoA synthase (CODH/ACS), and (2) to study the mechanism of methyl-CoM reduction to methane by developing an activation protocol for methyl-CoM reductase (MCR) and identifying intermediates in the MCR mechanism. The authors also made significant progress toward accomplishing two other specific aims that were not included in the original proposal. These were: (1) to characterize the M. thermophila heterodisulfide reductase (HDR), and (2) to characterize the methyltetrahydromethanopterin: Coenzyme M methyltransferase from Methanosarcina mazei strain Goe1 in collaboration with Gerhard Gottschalk`s group. Results from these four studies are summarized.

  8. The evolution of the lithosphere in southern Africa: A perspective on the basic granulite xenoliths from kimberlites in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Ming; Van Calsteren, Peter; Hawkesworth, Chris I.

    1995-12-01

    Major, trace element, and strontium, neodymium, and lead isotope data are presented on mafic granulite xenoliths from the margins of the Kaapvaal Craton in southern Africa. Those from the Markt pipe in the central Cape province preserve good correlations between Cr and Mg#, negative correlations between Co, Sc, Y, and V with Al 2O 3, and positive correlations between Sr, Rb/Sr, and Eu/Eu ∗ with Al 2O 3 Such trends reflect magmatic differentiation and crystal cumulation, and they have not been affected significantly by subsequent metamorphism. Present-day strontium and neodymium isotope ratios range from 0.70411-0.71179 and from 0.51149-0.51294. The lead isotope data from the Markt granulites yield a bulk rock PbPb age of 3.19 ± 0.07 Ga and those from the other Cape province granulites have similar lead isotope ages (3.2 ˜ 3.4 Ga). These ages are supported by two PbPb mineral-whole ages of ˜2.9 Ga, indicating their Archaean origin, even though both SmNd whole rock and mineral errorchrons yield Proterozoic ages. A PbPb errorchron for the granulites from northern Lesotho yields an age of 1.49 ± 0.36 which is indistinguishable from their SmNd errorchron age of 1.24 ± 0.17 Ga. Thus, it is inferred that the granulite xenoliths from northern Lesotho are from Proterozoic lower crust, whereas the granulite xenoliths from the central Cape province are from Archaean lower crust. Most lead isotope data from the granulite xenoliths plot to the left of the Geochron and indicate relatively low U/Pb ratios. Lead isotope ratios in the granulites from Markt correlate with A1 2O 3, and such correlations are considered to be largely due to magmatic processes. The lead isotope trends displayed by the Archaean granulite xenoliths represent μ ( 238U /204Pb ) fractionation during extraction of the Archaean crust from the mantle, as do those preserved in greenstone belt rocks from the southern Kaapvaal Craton. Group 2 kimberlites, mantle xenoliths from Kimberley, and

  9. [Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles: Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinder, S.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this project is to provide an understanding of thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms capable of breaking down acetic acid, the precursor of two-thirds of the methane produced by anaerobic bioreactors. Recent results include: (1) the isolation of Methanothrix strain CALLS-1, which grows much more rapidly than mesophilic strains; (2) the demonstration that thermophilic cultures of Methanosarcina and Methanothrix show minimum thresholds for acetate utilization of 1--2.5 mM and 10--20{mu}m respectively, in agreement with ecological data indicating that Methanothrix is favored by low acetate concentration; (3) the demonstration of high levels of thermostable acetyl-coA synthetase and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase in cell-free extracts of Methanothrix strains CALS-1; (4) the demonstration of methanogenesis from acetate and ATP in cell free extracts of strain CALS-1. (5) the demonstration that methanogenesis from acetate required 2 ATP/methane, and, in contrast to Methanosarcina, was independent of hydrogen and other electron donors; (6) the finding that entropy effects must be considered when predicting the level of hydrogen in thermophilic syntrophic cultures. (7) the isolation and characterization of the Desulfotomaculum thermoacetoxidans. Current research is centered on factors which allow thermophilic Methanothrix to compete with Methanosarcina.

  10. (Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles: Progress report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinder, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to provide an understanding of thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms capable of breaking down acetic acid, the precursor of two-thirds of the methane produced by anaerobic bioreactors. Recent results include: (1) the isolation of Methanothrix strain CALLS-1, which grows much more rapidly than mesophilic strains; (2) the demonstration that thermophilic cultures of Methanosarcina and Methanothrix show minimum thresholds for acetate utilization of 1--2.5 mM and 10--20{mu}m respectively, in agreement with ecological data indicating that Methanothrix is favored by low acetate concentration; (3) the demonstration of high levels of thermostable acetyl-coA synthetase and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase in cell-free extracts of Methanothrix strains CALS-1; (4) the demonstration of methanogenesis from acetate and ATP in cell free extracts of strain CALS-1. (5) the demonstration that methanogenesis from acetate required 2 ATP/methane, and, in contrast to Methanosarcina, was independent of hydrogen and other electron donors; (6) the finding that entropy effects must be considered when predicting the level of hydrogen in thermophilic syntrophic cultures. (7) the isolation and characterization of the Desulfotomaculum thermoacetoxidans. Current research is centered on factors which allow thermophilic Methanothrix to compete with Methanosarcina.

  11. [Community Structure and Succession of Methanogens in Beishenshu Landfill, Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Li-na; Wang, Lei; Xia, Meng-jing; Su, Yue; Li, Zhen-shan

    2015-09-01

    Methanogens are the key microorganisms for landfill stabilization. RT-PCR and qPCR detecting system were employed to determine the types and abundance of methanogens in 2-15 year-old solid wastes that sampled from Beishenshu Landfill, Beijing. The organic components were almost stable and the pH values were in alkaline range, which indicated that the landfill was in the methanogenic process. Methanobacterials, Methanosaeta, and Methanosarcina were detected, among which Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina are acetoclastic, and Methanobacterials are hydrogenotrophic. As landfill processing, within this time range, although the bacterial abundance was significantly decreased, the amount of methanogens was first increased and then decreased, and finally became stable after being landfilled for 9 years. Methanosarcina was the dominate taxa. Significant correlations were found between the methanogens and the volatile fatty acids, but the correlations between methanogens and larger molecular organic matters were relatively weak or even absent. Taken together, our study revealed that the amount of methanogens were affected by substrates, but hardly influenced by the conversion of large molecules in these wastes landfilled for more than 2 years.

  12. Isotope composition and volume of Earth´s early oceans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pope, Emily Catherine; Bird, Dennis K.; Rosing, Minik Thorleif

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of Earth´s seawater are controlled by volatile fluxes among mantle, lithospheric (oceanic and continental crust), and atmospheric reservoirs. Throughout geologic time the oxygen mass budget was likely conserved within these Earth system reservoirs......, but hydrogen´s was not, as it can escape to space. Isotopic properties of serpentine from the approximately 3.8 Ga Isua Supracrustal Belt in West Greenland are used to characterize hydrogen and oxygen isotope compositions of ancient seawater. Archaean oceans were depleted in deuterium [expressed as Î...... in Earth´s oceans. Our calculations predict that the oceans of early Earth were up to 26% more voluminous, and atmospheric CH4 and CO2 concentrations determined from limits on hydrogen escape to space are consistent with clement conditions on Archaean Earth....

  13. Atmospheric oxygenation caused by a change in volcanic degassing pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Fabrice; Scaillet, Bruno; Arndt, Nicholas T

    2011-10-12

    The Precambrian history of our planet is marked by two major events: a pulse of continental crust formation at the end of the Archaean eon and a weak oxygenation of the atmosphere (the Great Oxidation Event) that followed, at 2.45 billion years ago. This oxygenation has been linked to the emergence of oxygenic cyanobacteria and to changes in the compositions of volcanic gases, but not to the composition of erupting lavas--geochemical constraints indicate that the oxidation state of basalts and their mantle sources has remained constant since 3.5 billion years ago. Here we propose that a decrease in the average pressure of volcanic degassing changed the oxidation state of sulphur in volcanic gases, initiating the modern biogeochemical sulphur cycle and triggering atmospheric oxygenation. Using thermodynamic calculations simulating gas-melt equilibria in erupting magmas, we suggest that mostly submarine Archaean volcanoes produced gases with SO(2)/H(2)S atmosphere.

  14. 河南舞阳赵案庄型铁矿成矿特征及矿床成因

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞受鋆

    1983-01-01

    The iron deposit of Zaoanzhnang type occurs in the ultrabasie unit od a late Archaean greenstone belt. It is a late magmatic apatite-titanomagnetite deposit, subusequently enriched by hydrothermal superimposition and regional metamorphism. This deposit is extremely complex in mineralogy, containing 87 kinds of minerals charaeteristie of ultrabasie-alkaline complexes. Mineralization of iron, titanium and phosphorus took place mainly during the magmatic stage, while that of uranium and thorium during the pnenmatolytic-hydrothermal stage.

  15. Chromium isotope fractionation during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes

    the Archaean and Protoerozoic, needs careful assessment of the signal robustness and necessitates a thorough understanding of the Cr cycle in Earth system processes. We conducted experiments testing the incorporation and isotopic fractionation of chromate into the calcite lattice. Our experiments indicate...... et al., 2007, Water Air Soil Poll. 179, 381-390. [2] Sánchez-Pastor et al., 2011, Cryst. Growth Des. 11, 3081-3089....

  16. Earth's first stable continents did not form by subduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tim E; Brown, Michael; Gardiner, Nicholas J; Kirkland, Christopher L; Smithies, R Hugh

    2017-03-09

    The geodynamic environment in which Earth's first continents formed and were stabilized remains controversial. Most exposed continental crust that can be dated back to the Archaean eon (4 billion to 2.5 billion years ago) comprises tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite rocks (TTGs) that were formed through partial melting of hydrated low-magnesium basaltic rocks; notably, these TTGs have 'arc-like' signatures of trace elements and thus resemble the continental crust produced in modern subduction settings. In the East Pilbara Terrane, Western Australia, low-magnesium basalts of the Coucal Formation at the base of the Pilbara Supergroup have trace-element compositions that are consistent with these being source rocks for TTGs. These basalts may be the remnants of a thick (more than 35 kilometres thick), ancient (more than 3.5 billion years old) basaltic crust that is predicted to have existed if Archaean mantle temperatures were much hotter than today's. Here, using phase equilibria modelling of the Coucal basalts, we confirm their suitability as TTG 'parents', and suggest that TTGs were produced by around 20 per cent to 30 per cent melting of the Coucal basalts along high geothermal gradients (of more than 700 degrees Celsius per gigapascal). We also analyse the trace-element composition of the Coucal basalts, and propose that these rocks were themselves derived from an earlier generation of high-magnesium basaltic rocks, suggesting that the arc-like signature in Archaean TTGs was inherited from an ancestral source lineage. This protracted, multistage process for the production and stabilization of the first continents-coupled with the high geothermal gradients-is incompatible with modern-style plate tectonics, and favours instead the formation of TTGs near the base of thick, plateau-like basaltic crust. Thus subduction was not required to produce TTGs in the early Archaean eon.

  17. Oxygen free period in the history of Earth and life in it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Георгій Ілліч Рудько

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of Earth in the context of its formation as also emergence of the original atmosphere and hydrosphere are presented in the article. Main stages of the atmosphere evolution have occurred in the Archaean. The mechanisms of life origin, their impact on environmental development and changes are described as well. A brief description of the most ancient sediments composed by the archaebacteria and cyanobacteria is considered.

  18. Genomics and Metagenomics of Extreme Acidophiles in Biomining Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Over 160 draft or complete genomes of extreme acidophiles (pH models of the ecophysiology of biomining environments and provide insight into the gene and genome evolution of extreme acidophiles. Additionally, since most of these acidophiles are also chemoautolithotrophs that use minerals as energy sources or electron sinks, their genomes can be plundered for clues about the evolution of cellular metabolism and bioenergetic pathways during the Archaean abiotic/biotic transition on early Earth. Acknowledgements: Fondecyt 1130683.

  19. Composition of Short-Period Regional Phases Inferred From Fennoscandian Array Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Pn amplitudes are relatively large. Lateral velocity variations appear to be associated with the Lapland Granulite region and the Polmak-Pasvik...is located in the oldest, Archaean, part of the Baltic Shield (Figure 3), just west of the Proterozoic, Lapland Granulite Belt. The granulite belt is...Fennolora profile runs just west of ARCESS (Galson and Mueller, 1986; Guggisberg et al., 1991; Lund, 1987) and the Polar profile, crosses the Granulite

  20. Earth's air pressure 2.7 billion years ago constrained to less than half of modern levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Sanjoy M.; Buick, Roger; Hagadorn, James W.; Blake, Tim S.; Perreault, John M.; Harnmeijer, Jelte P.; Catling, David C.

    2016-06-01

    How the Earth stayed warm several billion years ago when the Sun was considerably fainter is the long-standing problem of the `faint young Sun paradox'. Because of negligible O2 and only moderate CO2 levels in the Archaean atmosphere, methane has been invoked as an auxiliary greenhouse gas. Alternatively, pressure broadening in a thicker atmosphere with a N2 partial pressure around 1.6-2.4 bar could have enhanced the greenhouse effect. But fossilized raindrop imprints indicate that air pressure 2.7 billion years ago (Gyr) was below twice modern levels and probably below 1.1 bar, precluding such pressure enhancement. This result is supported by nitrogen and argon isotope studies of fluid inclusions in 3.0-3.5 Gyr rocks. Here, we calculate absolute Archaean barometric pressure using the size distribution of gas bubbles in basaltic lava flows that solidified at sea level ~2.7 Gyr in the Pilbara Craton, Australia. Our data indicate a surprisingly low surface atmospheric pressure of Patm = 0.23 +/- 0.23 (2σ) bar, and combined with previous studies suggests ~0.5 bar as an upper limit to late Archaean Patm. The result implies that the thin atmosphere was rich in auxiliary greenhouse gases and that Patm fluctuated over geologic time to a previously unrecognized extent.

  1. Increased subaerial volcanism and the rise of atmospheric oxygen 2.5 billion years ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kump, Lee R; Barley, Mark E

    2007-08-30

    The hypothesis that the establishment of a permanently oxygenated atmosphere at the Archaean-Proterozoic transition (approximately 2.5 billion years ago) occurred when oxygen-producing cyanobacteria evolved is contradicted by biomarker evidence for their presence in rocks 200 million years older. To sustain vanishingly low oxygen levels despite near-modern rates of oxygen production from approximately 2.7-2.5 billion years ago thus requires that oxygen sinks must have been much larger than they are now. Here we propose that the rise of atmospheric oxygen occurred because the predominant sink for oxygen in the Archaean era-enhanced submarine volcanism-was abruptly and permanently diminished during the Archaean-Proterozoic transition. Observations are consistent with the corollary that subaerial volcanism only became widespread after a major tectonic episode of continental stabilization at the beginning of the Proterozoic. Submarine volcanoes are more reducing than subaerial volcanoes, so a shift from predominantly submarine to a mix of subaerial and submarine volcanism more similar to that observed today would have reduced the overall sink for oxygen and led to the rise of atmospheric oxygen.

  2. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U10274-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :none) Burkholderia vietnamiensis G4 c... 75 2e-12 CR378672_161( CR378672 |pid...:none) Methanosarcina mazei strain Goe1... 89 1e-16 CP000053_198( CP000053 |pid:none) Rickettsia felis URRWXCal2, co...romyxobacter sp. K, complete... 87 7e-16 AL939131_102( AL939131 |pid:none) Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) co... 3500... 79 1e-13 AL939112_114( AL939112 |pid:none) Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) co....la str. Sg (Schizaphis graminum)... 44 7.1 1 >( C94358 ) Dictyostelium discoideum slug

  3. Development of methanogenic consortia in fluidized-bed batches using sepiolite of different particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, J M; Rodríguez, F; Valle, L; Muñoz, M A; Moriñigo, M A; Borrego, J J

    1996-09-01

    The addition of support materials, such as sepiolite, to fluidized-bed anaerobic digesters enhances the methane production by increasing the colonization by syntrophic microbiota. However, the efficiency in the methanogenesis depends on the particle size of the support material, the highest level of methane production being obtained by the smaller particle size sepiolite. Because of the porosity and physico-chemical characteristics of these support materials, the anaerobic microbial consortia formed quickly (after one week of incubation). The predominant methanogenic bacteria present in the active granules, detected both by immunofluorescence using specific antibodies and by scanning electron microscopy, were acetoclastic methanogens, mainly Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta.

  4. Trace elements induce predominance among methanogenic activity in anaerobic digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babett Wintsche

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Trace elements play an essential role in all organisms due to their functions in enzyme complexes. In anaerobic digesters, control and supplementation of trace elements lead to stable and more efficient methane production processes while trace element deficits cause process imbalances. However, the underlying metabolic mechanisms and the adaptation of the affected microbial communities to such deficits are not yet fully understood. Here, we investigated the microbial community dynamics and resulting process changes induced by trace element deprivation. Two identical lab-scale continuous stirred tank reactors fed with distiller’s grains and supplemented with trace elements (cobalt, molybdenum, nickel, tungsten and a commercial iron additive were operated in parallel. After 72 weeks of identical operation, the feeding regime of one reactor was changed by omitting trace element supplements and reducing the amount of iron additive. Both reactors were operated for further 21 weeks. Various process parameters (biogas production and composition, total solids and volatile solids, trace element concentration, volatile fatty acids, total ammonium nitrogen, total organic acids/alkalinity ratio, and pH and the composition and activity of the microbial communities were monitored over the total experimental time. While the methane yield remained stable, the concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, total ammonia nitrogen, and acetate increased in the trace element-depleted reactor compared to the well-supplied control reactor. Methanosarcina and Methanoculleus dominated the methanogenic communities in both reactors. However, the activity ratio of these two genera was shown to depend on trace element supplementation explainable by different trace element requirements of their energy conservation systems. Methanosarcina dominated the well-supplied anaerobic digester, pointing to acetoclastic methanogenesis as the dominant methanogenic pathway. Under trace element

  5. There is a baby in the bath water: AcrB contamination is a major problem in membrane-protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veesler, David; Blangy, Stéphanie; Cambillau, Christian; Sciara, Giuliano

    2008-10-01

    In the course of a crystallographic study of the Methanosarcina mazei CorA transporter, the membrane protein was obtained with at least 95% purity and was submitted to crystallization trials. Small crystals (contaminating protein, acriflavine resistance protein B (AcrB), that was present at less than 5% in the protein preparations. AcrB contamination is a major problem when expressing membrane proteins in E. coli since it binds naturally to immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) resins. Here, the structure is compared with previously deposited AcrB structures and strategies are proposed to avoid this contamination.

  6. A detailed phylogeny for the Methanomicrobiales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouviere, P.; Mandelco, L.; Winker, S.; Woese, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    The small subunit rRNA sequence of twenty archaea, members of the Methanomicrobiales, permits a detailed phylogenetic tree to be inferred for the group. The tree confirms earlier studies, based on far fewer sequences, in showing the group to be divided into two major clusters, temporarily designated the "methanosarcina" group and the "methanogenium" group. The tree also defines phylogenetic relationships within these two groups, which in some cases do not agree with the phylogenetic relationships implied by current taxonomic names--a problem most acute for the genus Methanogenium and its relatives. The present phylogenetic characterization provides the basis for a consistent taxonomic restructuring of this major methanogenic taxon.

  7. Microbes in biological processes for municipal landfill leachate treatment: Community, function and interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Duoying; Vahala, Riku; Wang, Yu;

    2016-01-01

    Landfill leachate (LFL) contains high strength of ammonium and complex organic substances including biodegradable volatile fatty acids (VFAs), refractory aquatic humic substances (AHS) and micro-scale xenobiotic organic chemicals (XOCs), which promotes the diverse microbial community in LFL....... High ammonium loading, low DO (bacteria (AnAOB). In anaerobic LFL treatment bioreactors, Methanosaeta...... and Methanosarcina can outcompete sulfur reducing bacteria and homoacetogens to be the dominant Archaea. Nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB), heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria and AnAOB compete nitrite and influenced each other. How to manage NOB, heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria and AnAOB in good cooperation...

  8. Integrating geologic and satellite radar data for mapping dome-and-basin patterns in the In Ouzzal Terrane, Western Hoggar, Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroin, Jean-Paul; Djemai, Safouane; Bendaoud, Abderrahmane; Brahmi, Boualem; Ouzegane, Khadidja; Kienast, Jean-Robert

    2014-11-01

    The In Ouzzal Terrane (IOT) located in the north-western part of the Tuareg Shield forms an elongated N-S trending block, more than 400 km long and 80 km wide. It involves an Archaean crust remobilized during a very high-temperature metamorphic event related to the Palaeoproterozoic orogeny. The IOT largely crops out in the rocky and sandy desert of Western Hoggar. It corresponds mainly to a flat area with some reliefs composed of Late Panafrican granites, dyke networks or Cambrian volcanic rocks. These flat areas are generally covered by thin sand veneers. They are favorable for discriminating bedrock geological units using imaging radar, backscattering measurements, and field checking, because the stony desert is particularly sensitive to the radar parameters such as wavelength or polarization. The main radar data used are those obtained with the ALOS-PALSAR sensor (L-band), in ScanSAR mode (large swath) and Fine Beam modes. The PALSAR sensor has been also compared to ENVISAT-ASAR and to optical imagery. Detailed mapping of some key areas indicates extensive Archaean dome-and-basin patterns. In certain parts, the supracrustal synforms and orthogneiss domes exhibit linear or circular features corresponding to shear zones or rolling structures, respectively. The geological mapping of these dome-and-basin structures, and more generally of the Archaean and Proterozoic lithological units, is more accurate with the SAR imagery, particularly when using the L-band, than with the optical imagery. A quantitative approach is carried out in order to estimate the backscatter properties of the main rock types. Due to the large variety of configurations, radar satellite imagery such as ALOS PALSAR represents a key tool for geological mapping in arid region at different scales from the largest (e.g., 1:500,000) to the smallest (e.g., 1:50,000).

  9. Expansion of the granitic post-orogenic magmatism in the formation of Serrinha (Northeastern Bahia, B R), Sao Francisco craton; Expansao do magmatismo granitico pos-orogenico no nucleo Serrinha (NE Bahia), craton do Sao Francisco: idade U-Pb do Macico Granitico Pedra Vermelha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, Debora Correia; Conceicao, Herbet; Rosa, Maria de Lourdes da Silva; Marinho, Moacyr Moura [Bahia Univ., Salvador, BA (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisa em Geofisica e Geologia. Lab. de Petrologia Aplicada a Pesquisa Mineral]. E-mail: debora@cpgg.ufba.br; herbet@ufba.br; lourdes@cpgg.ufba.br; cbpmdt@cbpm.com.br; Davis, Donaldo Wayne [University of Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Geology. Earth Sciences Centre]. E-mail: dond@geology.utoronto.ca

    2005-09-15

    The Pedra Vermelha Granitic Massif, located at the North area of Serrinha Nucleus, presents a circular shape, being intrusive at the Archaean geoscience-magmatic basement rocks and the Paleoproterozoic volcano sedimentary sequences. The single zircon U-Pb dating yield a crystallization age of 2080 {+-} 8 Ma. The geological, petrographic al and litogeochemical characteristics of the studied rocks are similar to those of the Morro do Lopes granitic magmatism (2076 {+-} 6 a 2071 {+-} 6 Ma), which is located at the South area of this nucleus. These allow us to infer that those post-orogenic alkaline bodies are widespread throughout the Serrinha Nucleus and constitute its last Paleoproterozoic magmatic expression. (author)

  10. Atmospheric oxygenation caused by a change in volcanic degassing pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Gaillard, Fabrice; Scaillet, Bruno; Arndt, Nicholas T.

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The Precambrian history of our planet is marked by two major events: a pulse of continental crust formation at the end of the Archaean eon and a weak oxygenation of the atmosphere (the Great Oxidation Event) that followed, at 2.45 billion years ago. This oxygenation has been linked to the emergence of oxygenic cyanobacteria1,2 and to changes in the compositions of volcanic gases3,4, but not to the composition of erupting lavas--geochemical constraints indicate that the...

  11. Early Life on Earth: the Ancient Fossil Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westall, F.

    2004-07-01

    The evidence for early life and its initial evolution on Earth is lin= ked intimately with the geological evolution of the early Earth. The environment of the early Earth would be considered extreme by modern standards: hot (50-80=B0C), volcanically and hydrothermally active, a= noxic, high UV flux, and a high flux of extraterrestrial impacts. Habitats = for life were more limited until continent-building processes resulted in= the formation of stable cratons with wide, shallow, continental platforms= in the Mid-Late Archaean. Unfortunately there are no records of the first appearance of life and the earliest isotopic indications of the exist= ence of organisms fractionating carbon in ~3.8 Ga rocks from the Isua greenst= one belt in Greenland are tenuous. Well-preserved microfossils and micro= bial mats (in the form of tabular and domical stromatolites) occur in 3.5-= 3.3 Ga, Early Archaean, sedimentary formations from the Barberton (South Afri= ca) and Pilbara (Australia) greenstone belts. They document life forms that = show a relatively advanced level of evolution. Microfossil morphology inclu= des filamentous, coccoid, rod and vibroid shapes. Colonial microorganism= s formed biofilms and microbial mats at the surfaces of volcaniclastic = and chemical sediments, some of which created (small) macroscopic microbi= alites such as stromatolites. Anoxygenic photosynthesis may already have developed. Carbon, nitrogen and sulphur isotopes ratios are in the r= ange of those for organisms with anaerobic metabolisms, such as methanogenesi= s, sulphate reduction and photosynthesis. Life was apparently distribute= d widely in shallow-water to littoral environments, including exposed, evaporitic basins and regions of hydrothermal activity. Biomass in t= he early Archaean was restricted owing to the limited amount of energy t= hat could be produced by anaerobic metabolisms. Microfossils resembling o= xygenic photosynthesisers, such as cyanobacteria, probably first occurred in

  12. Hyperspectral imaging spectroscopy of a Mars analogue environment at the North Pole Dome, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Adrian J; Cudahy, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A visible and near infrared (VNIR) to shortwave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral dataset of the Early Archaean North Pole Dome, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia, has been analysed for indications of hydrothermal alteration. Occurrence maps of hydrothermal alteration minerals were produced. It was found that using a spatial resolution on the ground of approximately 5 m and spectral coverage from 0.4 to 2.5 mm was sufficient to delineate several hydrothermal alteration zones and associated veins, including phyllic, serpentinitic and chloritic alteration. These results suggest this level of spectral and spatial resolution would be ideal for localising shallow epithermal activity, should such activity have existed, on the surface of Mars.

  13. Effect of the Organic Loading Rate Increase and the Presence of Zeolite on Microbial Community Composition and Process Stability During Anaerobic Digestion of Chicken Wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziganshina, Elvira E; Belostotskiy, Dmitry E; Ilinskaya, Olga N; Boulygina, Eugenia A; Grigoryeva, Tatiana V; Ziganshin, Ayrat M

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates the effect of the organic loading rate (OLR) increase from 1.0 to 3.5 g VS L(-1) day(-1) at constant hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 35 days on anaerobic reactors' performance and microbial diversity during mesophilic anaerobic digestion of ammonium-rich chicken wastes in the absence/presence of zeolite. The effects of anaerobic process parameters on microbial community structure and dynamics were evaluated using a 16S ribosomal RNA gene-based pyrosequencing approach. Maximum 12 % of the total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) was efficiently removed by zeolite in the fixed zeolite reactor (day 87). In addition, volatile fatty acids (VFA) in the fixed zeolite reactor accumulated in lower concentrations at high OLR of 3.2-3.5 g VS L(-1) day(-1). Microbial communities in the fixed zeolite reactor and reactor without zeolite were dominated by various members of Bacteroidales and Methanobacterium sp. at moderate TAN and VFA levels. The increase of the OLR accompanied by TAN and VFA accumulation and increase in pH led to the predominance of representatives of the family Erysipelotrichaceae and genera Clostridium and Methanosarcina. Methanosarcina sp. reached relative abundances of 94 and 57 % in the fixed zeolite reactor and reactor without zeolite at the end of the experimental period, respectively. In addition, the diminution of Synergistaceae and Crenarchaeota and increase in the abundance of Acholeplasmataceae in parallel with the increase of TAN, VFA, and pH values were observed.

  14. Effect of ferrihydrite biomineralization on methanogenesis in an anaerobic incubation from paddy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Li; Xu, Jielong; Tang, Jia; Zhou, Shungui

    2015-05-01

    Microbial reduction of Fe(III) can be one of the major factors controlling methane production from anaerobic sedimentary environments, such as paddy soils and wetlands. Although secondary iron mineralization following Fe(III) reduction is a process that occurs naturally over time, it has not yet been considered in methanogenic systems. This study performed a long-term anaerobic incubation of a paddy soil and ferrihydrite-supplemented soil cultures to investigate methanogenesis during ferrihydrite biomineralization. The results revealed that the long-term effect of ferrihydrite on methanogenesis may be enhancement rather than suppression documented in previous studies. During initial microbial ferrihydrite reduction, methanogenesis was suppressed; however, the secondary minerals of magnetite formation was simultaneous with facilitated methanogenesis in terms of average methane production rate and acetate utilization rate. In the phase of magnetite formation, microbial community analysis revealed a strong stimulation of the bacterial Geobacter, Bacillus, and Sedimentibacter and the archaeal Methanosarcina in the ferrihydrite-supplemented cultures. Direct electric syntrophy between Geobacter and Methanosarcina via conductive magnetite is the plausible mechanism for methanogenesis acceleration along with magnetite formation. Our data suggested that a change in iron mineralogy might affect the conversion of anaerobic organic matter to methane and might provide a fresh perspective on the mitigation of methane emissions from paddy soils by ferric iron fertilization.

  15. Similar evolution in delta 13CH4 and model-predicted relative rate of aceticlastic methanogenesis during mesophilic methanization of municipal solid wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilin, V A; Qu, X; Qu, X; Mazéas, L; Lemunier, M; Duquennoi, C; Mouchel, J M; He, P; Bouchez, T

    2009-01-01

    Similar evolution was obtained for the stable carbon isotope signatures delta (13)CH(4) and the model-predicted relative rate of aceticlastic methanogenesis during mesophilic methanization of municipal solid wastes. In batch incubations, the importance of aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis changes in time. Initially, hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis dominated, but increasing population of Methanosarcina sp. enhances aceticlastic methanogenesis. Later, hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis intensified again. A mathematical model was developed to evaluate the relative contribution of hydrogenotrophic and aceticlastic pathways of methane generation during mesophilic batch anaerobic biodegradation of the French and the Chinese Municipal Solid Wastes (FMSW and CMSW). Taking into account molecular biology analysis reported earlier three groups of methanogens including strictly hydrogenotrophic methanogens, strictly aceticlastic methanogens (Methanosaeta sp.) and Methanosarcina sp., consuming both acetate and H(2)/H(2)CO(3) were considered in the model. The total organic and inorganic carbon concentrations, methane production volume, methane and carbon dioxide partial pressures values were used for the model calibration and validation. Methane isotopic composition (delta (13)CH(4)) evolution during the incubations was used to independently validate the model results. The model demonstrated that only the putrescible solid waste was totally converted to methane.

  16. Molecular Biology and Genetics of the Acetate-Utilizing Methanogenic Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert P. Gunsalus

    2003-07-21

    Methane biosynthesis by the Methanosarcina species, in contrast to other methanogens, occurs from the full range of methanogenic substrates that include acetate, methanol, tri-methyl, di-methyl, and methyl-amine, methyl-sulfides, and in limited instances, H2/CO2. The Methanosarcina are also versatile in their ability to adapt and grow in habitats of varying osmolarity ranging from fresh water environments, marine environments, and to hyper saline environments (ca to 1.2 M NaCl). To facilitate studies that address the biochemistry, molecular biology and physiology of these organisms, we have constructed a whole-genome microarray to identify classes of differentially expressed genes in M. mazei strain Goe1. We propose to further identify and examine how genes and their proteins involved in the synthesis and transport of osmolytes in the cell are regulated. These compounds include N-epsilon-acetyl-beta-lysine, alpha-glutamate, betaine, and potassium whose levels within the cell are modulated in order to provide appropriate osmotic balance. We will identify differentially expressed genes involved in hydrogen and carbon dioxide sequestration since M. mazei strain Goe1 is currently the only practical model for such study. Finally, we will explore the essential roles of two metals, molybdate and tungstate, in methanogen regulation and metabolism of these environmentally essential organsims. The above studies will advance our general understanding of how methanogens respond to their environmental signals, and adapt by adjusting their physiology to thrive in changing anaerobic habitats whether natural or man-made.

  17. Effect of Nickel Levels on Hydrogen Partial Pressure and Methane Production in Methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2) consumption and methane (CH4) production in pure cultures of three different methanogens were investigated during cultivation with 0, 0.2 and 4.21 μM added nickel (Ni). The results showed that the level of dissolved Ni in the anaerobic growth medium did not notably affect CH4 production in the cytochrome-free methanogenic species Methanobacterium bryantii and Methanoculleus bourgensis MAB1, but affected CH4 formation rate in the cytochrome-containing Methanosarcina barkeri grown on H2 and CO2. Methanosarcina barkeri also had the highest amounts of Ni in its cells, indicating that more Ni is needed by cytochrome-containing than by cytochrome-free methanogenic species. The concentration of Ni affected threshold values of H2 partial pressure (pH2) for all three methanogen species studied, with M. bourgensis MAB1 reaching pH2 values as low as 0.1 Pa when Ni was available in amounts used in normal anaerobic growth medium. To our knowledge, this is the lowest pH2 threshold recorded to date in pure methanogen culture, which suggests that M.bourgensis MAB1 have a competitive advantage over other species through its ability to grow at low H2 concentrations. Our study has implications for research on the H2-driven deep subsurface biosphere and biogas reactor performance. PMID:27992585

  18. Biomethanation and microbial community changes in a digester treating sludge from a brackish aquaculture recirculation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuedong; Tao, Yu; Hu, Jianmei; Liu, Gang; Spanjers, Henri; van Lier, Jules B

    2016-08-01

    Using a high-salinity-adapted inoculum and a moderate stepwise-increased organic loading rate (OLR), a stable digester performance was achieved in treating sludge from a brackish aquaculture recirculation system. The specific methane yield was distinctly enhanced, reaching 0.203LCH4/gCODadded, compared to literature values (0.140-0.154LCH4/gCODadded) from the salty sludges. OLR adjustment and the fecal substrate substantially influenced population changes in the digester. Within the bacterial subpopulations, the relative abundance of Bacillus and Bacteroides declined, accompanied by the increase of Clostridium and Trigonala over time. The results show Trigonala was derived from the substrate and accumulated inside the digester. The most abundant methanogen was Methanosarcina in the inoculum and the digestates. The Methanosarcina proliferation can be ascribed to its metabolic versatility, probably a feature of crucial importance for high-salinity environments. Other frequently observed methanogens were outcompeted. The population similarity at the genus level between inoculum and digestates declined during the initial stage and afterwards increased.

  19. High-rate, High Temperature Acetotrophic Methanogenesis Governed by a Three Population Consortium in Anaerobic Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Dang; Jensen, Paul; Gutierrez-Zamora, Maria-Luisa; Beckmann, Sabrina; Manefield, Mike; Batstone, Damien

    2016-01-01

    A combination of acetate oxidation and acetoclastic methanogenesis has been previously identified to enable high-rate methanogenesis at high temperatures (55 to 65°C), but this capability had not been linked to any key organisms. This study combined RNA–stable isotope probing on 13C-labelled acetate and 16S amplicon sequencing to identify the active micro-organisms involved in high-rate methanogenesis. Active biomass was harvested from three bench-scale thermophilic bioreactors treating waste activated sludge at 55, 60 and 65°C, and fed with 13-C labelled and 12C-unlabelled acetate. Acetate uptake and cumulative methane production were determined and kinetic parameters were estimated using model-based analysis. Pyrosequencing performed on 13C- enriched samples indicated that organisms accumulating labelled carbon were Coprothermobacter (all temperatures between 55 and 65°C), acetoclastic Methanosarcina (55 to 60°C) and hydrogenotrophic Methanothermobacter (60 to 65°C). The increased relative abundance of Coprothermobacter with increased temperature corresponding with a shift to syntrophic acetate oxidation identified this as a potentially key oxidiser. Methanosarcina likely acts as both a hydrogen utilising and acetoclastic methanogen at 55°C, and is replaced by Methanothermobacter as a hydrogen utiliser at higher temperatures. PMID:27490246

  20. Anaerobic treatment performance and microbial population of thermophilic upflow anaerobic filter reactor treating awamori distillery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yue-Qin; Fujimura, Yutaka; Shigematsu, Toru; Morimura, Shigeru; Kida, Kenji

    2007-10-01

    Distillery wastewater from awamori making was anaerobically treated for one year using thermophilic upflow anaerobic filter (UAF) reactors packed with pyridinium group-containing nonwoven fabric material. The microbial structure and spatial distribution of microorganisms on the support material were characterized using molecular biological methods. The reactor steadily achieved a high TOC loading rate of 18 g/l/d with approximately 80% TOC removal efficiency when non-diluted wastewater was fed. The maximum TOC loading rate increased to 36 g/l/d when treating thrice-diluted wastewater. However, the TOC removal efficiency and gas evolution rate decreased compared with that when non-diluted wastewater was used. Methanogens closely related to Methanosarcina thermophila and Methanoculleus bourgensis and bacteria in the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were predominant methanogens and bacteria in the thermophilic UFA reactor, as indicated by 16S rRNA gene clone analysis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) results showed that a large quantity of bacterial cells adhered throughout the whole support, and Methanosarcina-like methanogens existed mainly in the relative outside region while Methanoculleus cells were located in the relative inner part of the support. The support material used proved to be an excellent carrier for microorganisms, and a UAF reactor using this kind of support can be used for high-rate treatment of awamori/shochu distillery wastewater.

  1. Presence of an unusual methanogenic bacterium in coal gasification waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomei, F A; Rouse, D; Maki, J S; Mitchell, R

    1988-12-01

    Methanogenic bacteria growing on a pilot-scale, anaerobic filter processing coal gasification waste were enriched in a mineral salts medium containing hydrogen and acetate as potential energy sources. Transfer of the enrichments to methanol medium resulted in the initial growth of a strain of Methanosarcina barkeri, but eventually small cocci became dominant. The cocci growing on methanol produced methane and exhibited the typical fluorescence of methanogenic bacteria. They grew in the presence of the cell wall synthesis-inhibiting antibiotics d-cycloserine, fosfomycin, penicillin G, and vancomycin as well as in the presence of kanamycin, an inhibitor of protein synthesis in eubacteria. The optimal growth temperature was 37 degrees C, and the doubling time was 7.5 h. The strain lysed after reaching stationary phase. The bacterium grew poorly with hydrogen as the energy source and failed to grow on acetate. Morphologically, the coccus shared similarities with Methanosarcina sp. Cells were 1 mum wide, exhibited the typical thick cell wall and cross-wall formation, and formed tetrads. Packets and cysts were not formed.

  2. [Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles]. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinder, S.H.

    1994-02-01

    Acetate is the precursor of approximately two-thirds of the methane produced by anaerobic bioreactors and many other methanogenic habitats. Besides their intrinsic interest, thermophilic acetotrophic methanogenic cultures usually grow at least twice as fast as their mesophilic counterparts, making them more amenable to study. In recent years, attention has been mainly focused on the thermophilic acetate utilizing methanogen Methanothrix strain CALS-1. Methanothrix, also called Methanosaeta, is one of only two methanogenic genera known to convert acetate to methane, the other being Methanosarcina. The faster-growing more versatile Methanosarcina has been better studied. However, when one examines anaerobic digestor contents, Methanothrix is often the dominant acetate-utilizing methanogen. As described in previous progress reports, the authors have achieved methanogenesis from acetate in cell-free extracts of Methanothrix strain CALS-1 grown in a pH auxostat. Using these cell extracts, specific activities for methanogenesis from acetate and ATP of 100--300 nmol/min were routinely obtained, levels comparable to the rate in whole cells, which is not usually the case in methanogenic extracts. Recently obtained results are given and discussed for the following: Methanogenesis in crude extracts; Role of the cell membrane in methanogenesis from acetate; Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase; Novel thermophilic cultures converting acetate to methane; and Methanol-utilizing methanogen.

  3. In situ isotopic analyses of U and Pb in zircon by remotely operated SHRIMP II, and Hf by LA-ICP-MS: an example of dating and genetic evolution of zircon by {sup 176}Hf/{sup 177}Hf from the Ita Quarry in the Atuba Complex, SE, Brazil; Analises in situ de U e Pb em zircao por SRIMP II por controle remoto e de Hf por LA-ICP-MS: um exemplo de datacao e da evolucao genetica de zircao atraves da razao {sup 176}Hf/{sup 177} em amostra da Pedreira Ita no Complexo Atuba, SE, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Siga Junior, Oswaldo; McReath, Ian; Sproesser, Walter; Basei, Miguel Angelo Stipp [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Centro de Pesquisas Geocronologicas], e-mail: keisato@usp.br, e-mail: osigajr@usp.br, e-mail: ianmcr@usp.br, e-mail: wmspres@usp.br, e-mail: baseimas@usp.br; Silva, Josiane Aline da [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Geoquimica e Geotectonica; Dunyi, Liu [Institute of Geology, Beijing (China); Iizuka, Takafumi; Rino, Shuji; Hirata, Takafumi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-10-15

    Remotely-operated SHRIMP dating of zircon is an interesting alternative for dating of zircon crystals. Although it does not represent any technical progress of the geochronological method using the U-Pb system in zircon it is a very useful and cheap facility. The procedure was first used for mass spectrometric analyses involving two international laboratories in Sao Paulo, Brazil and Beijing, China. It was applied to samples of three gneiss-migmatitic rocks from the Ita quarry in the Atuba Complex (located between the Luis Alves and the Apiai Domain) to test previous controversial hypotheses about its evolution. The presence of important archaean and paleo proterozoic components in the complex is confirmed by analyses of zircon found in probably neo proterozoic leucosomes. Diorite intrusion also occurred during the neo proterozoic, associated with the 0.6Ga continental collisions involved in the assembly of Gondwana. The determination of Hf isotope ratios by LA-ICP/MS represents a new option for checking the relative importance of mantle ({epsilon}{sub Hf} > 0) and crustal contributions (({epsilon}{sub Hf} < 0) during the growth of the zircon crystals. While the archaean component in the complex was derived from the mantle ({epsilon}{sub Hf} + 1.5 to + 8.7) the paleo proterozoic component had a crustal contribution ({epsilon}{sub Hf} - 9.1 to -10.1). (author)

  4. Knowledge-based discovery for designing CRISPR-CAS systems against invading mobilomes in thermophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellapandi, P; Ranjani, J

    2015-09-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) are direct features of the prokaryotic genomes involved in resistance to their bacterial viruses and phages. Herein, we have identified CRISPR loci together with CRISPR-associated sequences (CAS) genes to reveal their immunity against genome invaders in the thermophilic archaea and bacteria. Genomic survey of this study implied that genomic distribution of CRISPR-CAS systems was varied from strain to strain, which was determined by the degree of invading mobiloms. Direct repeats found to be equal in some extent in many thermopiles, but their spacers were differed in each strain. Phylogenetic analyses of CAS superfamily revealed that genes cmr, csh, csx11, HD domain, devR were belonged to the subtypes of cas gene family. The members in cas gene family of thermophiles were functionally diverged within closely related genomes and may contribute to develop several defense strategies. Nevertheless, genome dynamics, geological variation and host defense mechanism were contributed to share their molecular functions across the thermophiles. A thermophilic archaean, Thermococcus gammotolerans and thermophilic bacteria, Petrotoga mobilis and Thermotoga lettingae have shown superoperons-like appearance to cluster cas genes, which were typically evolved for their defense pathways. A cmr operon was identified with a specific promoter in a thermophilic archaean, Caldivirga maquilingensis. Overall, we concluded that knowledge-based genomic survey and phylogeny-based functional assignment have suggested for designing a reliable genetic regulatory circuit naturally from CRISPR-CAS systems, acquired defense pathways, to thermophiles in future synthetic biology.

  5. Spreading continents kick-started plate tectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Patrice F; Coltice, Nicolas; Flament, Nicolas

    2014-09-18

    Stresses acting on cold, thick and negatively buoyant oceanic lithosphere are thought to be crucial to the initiation of subduction and the operation of plate tectonics, which characterizes the present-day geodynamics of the Earth. Because the Earth's interior was hotter in the Archaean eon, the oceanic crust may have been thicker, thereby making the oceanic lithosphere more buoyant than at present, and whether subduction and plate tectonics occurred during this time is ambiguous, both in the geological record and in geodynamic models. Here we show that because the oceanic crust was thick and buoyant, early continents may have produced intra-lithospheric gravitational stresses large enough to drive their gravitational spreading, to initiate subduction at their margins and to trigger episodes of subduction. Our model predicts the co-occurrence of deep to progressively shallower mafic volcanics and arc magmatism within continents in a self-consistent geodynamic framework, explaining the enigmatic multimodal volcanism and tectonic record of Archaean cratons. Moreover, our model predicts a petrological stratification and tectonic structure of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle, two predictions that are consistent with xenolith and seismic studies, respectively, and consistent with the existence of a mid-lithospheric seismic discontinuity. The slow gravitational collapse of early continents could have kick-started transient episodes of plate tectonics until, as the Earth's interior cooled and oceanic lithosphere became heavier, plate tectonics became self-sustaining.

  6. Zircon U-Pb Ages from an Ultra-High Temperature Metapelite, Rauer Group, East Antarctica: Implications for Overprints by Grenvillian and Pan-African Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanbin; Tong, Laixi; Liu, Dunyi

    2007-01-01

    SHRIMP U-Pb dating of zircon from an ultra-high temperature (UHT, ~1000 °C) granulite-facies metapelite from the Rauer Group, Mather Peninsula, east Antarctica, has yielded evidence for two episodes of metamorphic zircon growth, at ~1.00 Ga and ~530 Ma, and two episodes of magmatism in the source region for the protolith sediment, at ~2.53 and ~2.65 Ga, were identified from the zircon cores. Successive zircon growth at ~1.00 Ga and ~530 Ma records a sequence of distinct, widely spaced high-temperature metamorphic and/or anatectic events related to Grenvillian and Pan-African orogenesis. This study presents the first robust geochronological evidence for the timing of UHT metamorphism of the Rauer Group, supporting arguments that the peak UHT metamorphic event occurred at ~1.00 Ga and was overprinted by a separate high-grade event at ~530 Ma. The new age data indicate that the UHT granulites of the Rauer Group experienced a complex, multi-stage tectonothermal history, which cannot simply be explained via a single Pan-African (~500 Ma) high-grade tectonic event. This is critical in understanding the role of the eastern Prydz Bay region during the assembly of the east Gondwana supercontinent, and the newly recognized inherited Archaean ages (~2.53 and ~2.65 Ga) suggest a close tectonic relationship between the Rauer Group and the adjacent Archaean of the Vestfold Hills

  7. Emergence of blueschists on Earth linked to secular changes in oceanic crust composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palin, Richard M.; White, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The oldest blueschists--metamorphic rocks formed during subduction--are of Neoproterozoic age, and 0.7-0.8 billion years old. Yet, subduction of oceanic crust to mantle depths is thought to have occurred since the Hadean, over 4 billion years ago. Blueschists typically form under cold geothermal gradients of less than 400 °C GPa-1, so their absence in the ancient rock record is typically attributed to hotter pre-Neoproterozoic mantle prohibiting such low-temperature metamorphism; however, modern analogues of Archaean subduction suggest that blueschist-facies metamorphic conditions are attainable at the slab surface. Here we show that the absence of blueschists in the ancient geological record can be attributed to the changing composition of oceanic crust throughout Earth history, which is a consequence of secular cooling of the mantle since the Archaean. Oceanic crust formed on the hot, early Earth would have been rich in magnesium oxide (MgO). We use phase equilibria calculations to show that blueschists do not form in high-MgO rocks under subduction-related geothermal gradients. Instead, the subduction of MgO-rich oceanic crust would have created greenschist-like rocks--metamorphic rocks formed today at low temperatures and pressures. These ancient metamorphic products can hold about 20% more water than younger metamorphosed oceanic crust, implying that the global hydrologic cycle was more efficient in the deep geological past than today.

  8. Isotope composition and volume of Earth's early oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Emily C; Bird, Dennis K; Rosing, Minik T

    2012-03-20

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of Earth's seawater are controlled by volatile fluxes among mantle, lithospheric (oceanic and continental crust), and atmospheric reservoirs. Throughout geologic time the oxygen mass budget was likely conserved within these Earth system reservoirs, but hydrogen's was not, as it can escape to space. Isotopic properties of serpentine from the approximately 3.8 Ga Isua Supracrustal Belt in West Greenland are used to characterize hydrogen and oxygen isotope compositions of ancient seawater. Archaean oceans were depleted in deuterium [expressed as δD relative to Vienna standard mean ocean water (VSMOW)] by at most 25 ± 5‰, but oxygen isotope ratios were comparable to modern oceans. Mass balance of the global hydrogen budget constrains the contribution of continental growth and planetary hydrogen loss to the secular evolution of hydrogen isotope ratios in Earth's oceans. Our calculations predict that the oceans of early Earth were up to 26% more voluminous, and atmospheric CH(4) and CO(2) concentrations determined from limits on hydrogen escape to space are consistent with clement conditions on Archaean Earth.

  9. Provenance and tectonic significance of the Palaeoproterozoic metasedimentary successions of central and nothern Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waele, B.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Macey, P.H.; Horstwood, M.S.A.; Tucker, R.D.; Pitfield, P.E.J.; Schofield, D.I.; Goodenough, K.M.; Bauer, W.; Key, R.M.; Potter, C.J.; Armstrong, R.A.; Miller, J.A.; Randriamananjara, T.; Ralison, V.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Rabarimanana, M.; Bejoma, M.

    2011-01-01

    New detrital zircon U–Pb age data obtained from various quartzite units of three spatially separated supracrustal packages in central and northern Madagascar, show that these units were deposited between 1.8 and 0.8 Ga and have similar aged provenances. The distribution of detrital zircon ages indicates an overwhelming contribution of sources with ages between 2.5 and 1.8 Ga. Possible source rocks with an age of 2.5 Ga are present in abundance in the crustal segments (Antananarivo, Antongil and Masora Domains) either side of a purported Neoproterozoic suture ("Betsimisaraka Suture Zone"). Recently, possible source rocks for the 1.8 Ga age peak have been recognised in southern Madagascar. All three supracrustal successions, as well as the Archaean blocks onto which they were emplaced, are intruded by mid-Neoproterozoic magmatic suites placing a minimum age on their deposition. The similarities in detrital pattern, maximum and minimum age of deposition in the three successions, lend some support to a model in which all of Madagascar's Archaean blocks form a coherent crustal entity (the Greater Dharwar Craton), rather than an amalgamate of disparate crustal blocks brought together only during Neoproterozoic convergence. However, potential source terranes exist outside Madagascar and on either side of the Neoproterozoic sutures, so that a model including a Neoproterozoic suture in Madagascar cannot be dispelled outright.

  10. The iodine-plutonium-xenon age of the Moon-Earth system revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avice, G; Marty, B

    2014-09-13

    Iodine-plutonium-xenon isotope systematics have been used to re-evaluate time constraints on the early evolution of the Earth-atmosphere system and, by inference, on the Moon-forming event. Two extinct radionuclides ((129)I, T1/2=15.6 Ma and (244)Pu, T1/2=80 Ma) have produced radiogenic (129)Xe and fissiogenic (131-136)Xe, respectively, within the Earth, the related isotope fingerprints of which are seen in the compositions of mantle and atmospheric Xe. Recent studies of Archaean rocks suggest that xenon atoms have been lost from the Earth's atmosphere and isotopically fractionated during long periods of geological time, until at least the end of the Archaean eon. Here, we build a model that takes into account these results. Correction for Xe loss permits the computation of new closure ages for the Earth's atmosphere that are in agreement with those computed for mantle Xe. The corrected Xe formation interval for the Earth-atmosphere system is [Formula: see text] Ma after the beginning of Solar System formation. This time interval may represent a lower limit for the age of the Moon-forming impact.

  11. Dating the cyanobacterial ancestor of the chloroplast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcón, Luisa I; Magallón, Susana; Castillo, Amanda

    2010-06-01

    Cyanobacteria have had a pivotal role in the history of life on Earth being the first organisms to perform oxygenic photosynthesis, which changed the atmospheric chemistry and allowed the evolution of aerobic Eukarya. Chloroplasts are the cellular organelles of photoautotrophic eukaryotes in which most portions of photosynthesis occur. Although the initial suggestion that cyanobacteria are the ancestors of chloroplasts was greeted with skepticism, the idea is now widely accepted. Here we attempt to resolve and date the cyanobacterial ancestry of the chloroplast using phylogenetic analysis and molecular clocks. We found that chloroplasts form a monophyletic lineage, are most closely related to subsection-I, N(2)-fixing unicellular cyanobacteria (Order Chroococcales), and heterocyst-forming Order Nostocales cyanobacteria are their sister group. Nostocales and Chroococcales appeared during the Paleoproterozoic and chloroplasts appeared in the mid-Proterozoic. The capability of N(2) fixation in cyanobacteria may have appeared only once during the late Archaean and early Proterozoic eons. Furthermore, we found that oxygen-evolving cyanobacteria could have appeared in the Archaean. Our results suggest that a free-living cyanobacterium with the capacity to store starch through oxygenic CO(2) fixation, and to fix atmospheric N(2), would be a very important intracellular acquisition, which, as can be recounted today from several lines of evidence, would have become the chloroplast by endosymbiosis.

  12. Warming the early Earth - CO2 reconsidered

    CERN Document Server

    Von Paris, P; Grenfell, L; Patzer, B; Hedelt, P; Stracke, B; Trautmann, T; Schreier, F

    2008-01-01

    Despite a fainter Sun, the surface of the early Earth was mostly ice-free. Proposed solutions to this so-called "faint young Sun problem" have usually involved higher amounts of greenhouse gases than present in the modern-day atmosphere. However, geological evidence seemed to indicate that the atmospheric CO2 concentrations during the Archaean and Proterozoic were far too low to keep the surface from freezing. With a radiative-convective model including new, updated thermal absorption coefficients, we found that the amount of CO2 necessary to obtain 273 K at the surface is reduced up to an order of magnitude compared to previous studies. For the late Archaean and early Proterozoic period of the Earth, we calculate that CO2 partial pressures of only about 2.9 mb are required to keep its surface from freezing which is compatible with the amount inferred from sediment studies. This conclusion was not significantly changed when we varied model parameters such as relative humidity or surface albedo, obtaining CO2 ...

  13. Ocean productivity before about 1.9 Gyr ago limited by phosphorus adsorption onto iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerrum, Christian J; Canfield, Donald E

    2002-05-09

    After the evolution of oxygen-producing cyanobacteria at some time before 2.7 billion years ago, oxygen production on Earth is thought to have depended on the availability of nutrients in the oceans, such as phosphorus (in the form of orthophosphate). In the modern oceans, a significant removal pathway for phosphorus occurs by way of its adsorption onto iron oxide deposits. Such deposits were thought to be more abundant in the past when, under low sulphate conditions, the formation of large amounts of iron oxides resulted in the deposition of banded iron formations. Under these circumstances, phosphorus removal by iron oxide adsorption could have been enhanced. Here we analyse the phosphorus and iron content of banded iron formations to show that ocean orthophosphate concentrations from 3.2 to 1.9 billion years ago (during the Archaean and early Proterozoic eras) were probably only approximately 10-25% of present-day concentrations. We suggest therefore that low phosphorus availability should have significantly reduced rates of photosynthesis and carbon burial, thereby reducing the long-term oxygen production on the early Earth--as previously speculated--and contributing to the low concentrations of atmospheric oxygen during the late Archaean and early Proterozoic.

  14. An ion microprobe U-Th- Pb study of zircon xenocrysts from the Lahtojoki kimberlite pipe, eastern Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petri Peltonen

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Eleven relatively large (diameter 1–2 mm zircon grains extracted from the Lahtojoki kimberlite pipe (Eastern Finland Kimberlite Province have been analysed by the ion microprobe NORDSIM for their U- and Pb- isotopic composition. The 207Pb/206Pb ages fall into two concordant age groups: 2.7 Ga and 1.8 Ga. Discordant ages between these two groups are believed to result from partial resetting of Archaean grains in the 1.8 Ga thermal event. Since other datingmethods imply that kimberlites emplaced c. 0.6 Ga ago it is clear that the analysed zircons are xenocrysts inherited from older sources and do not provide the age of the kimberlite magmatism. Their unusual size and morphology, together with very low U- and Pb-concentrations, suggest, however, that these zircon grains are not derived from typical Archaean gneisses. More likely, they originate from lower crustal mafic pegmatites and from hydrous coarse-grained veins within the uppermost lithospheric mantle. The predominance of 1.8 Ga old xenocrystic grains, together with the recovery of mafic granulite xenoliths of similar age in the kimberlites (Hölttä et al. 2000, emphasises the importance of post-collisional lower crustal growth and reworking in central Fennoscandia.

  15. Ca isotope fingerprints of early crust-mantle evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreissig, K.; Elliott, T.

    2005-01-01

    The utility of 40Ca/ 44Ca as a tracer of pre-existing crustal contributions in early Archaean cratons has been explored to identify traces of Hadean crust and to assess the style of continental growth. The relatively short half-life of 40K (˜1.3 Gy) means that its decay to 40Ca occurs dominantly during early Earth History. If Archaean crust had a significant component derived from a more ancient protolith, as anticipated by "steady state" crustal evolution models, this should be clearly reflected in radiogenic 40Ca/ 44Ca ratios (or positive initial ɛ Ca) in different Archaean cratons. A high precision thermal ionisation technique has been used to analyse the 40Ca/ 44Ca ratios of plagioclase separates and associated whole rocks in ˜3.6 Ga (early Archaean) samples from Zimbabwe and West Greenland. Three out of four tonalite, trondhjemite, granodiorite (TTG) suite samples from Zimbabwe display initial 40Ca/ 44Ca ratios indistinguishable from our measured modern MORB value (i.e., ɛ Ca(3.6) ˜ 0). Greenland samples, however, are very diverse ranging from ɛ Ca(3.7) = 0.1 in mafic pillow lavas and felsic sheets from the Isua supracrustal belt, up to very radiogenic signatures (ɛ Ca(3.7) = 2.9) in both mafic rocks of the Akilia association and felsic TTG from the coastal Amîtsoq gneisses. At face value, these results imply the Zimbabwe crust is juvenile whereas most Greenland samples include an earlier crustal component. Yet the west Greenland craton, as with many Archaean localities, has experienced a complex geological history and the interpretation of age-corrected initial isotope values requires great care. Both felsic and mafic samples from Greenland display ɛ Ca(3.7) so radiogenic that they are not readily explained by crustal growth scenarios. The presence of such radiogenic 40Ca/ 44Ca found in low K/Ca plagioclases requires Ca isotope exchange between plagioclase and whole rock during later metamorphic event(s). In addition the unexpectedly radiogenic Ca

  16. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09302-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :none) Burkholderia vietnamiensis G4 ch... 48 0.001 AC116984_135( AC116984 |pid:none) Dictyostelium discoid...:none) Nocardia farcinica IFM 10152 DN... 70 3e-10 AL939126_180( AL939126 |pid:none) Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) co...for suc... 47 0.002 AJ243803_2( AJ243803 |pid:none) Streptomyces coelicolor glgA and g... 47 0.002 A75059( A...( CP000263 ) Buchnera aphidicola str. Cc (Cinara cedri), compl... 32 0.20 17 ( AA312281 ) EST18297 Kidney I ...08384_2106( AE008384 |pid:none) Methanosarcina mazei strain Goe... 52 7e-05 AP008231_2193( AP008231 |pid:none) Synechococcus el

  17. Link between capacity for current production and syntrophic growth in Geobacter species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Woodard, Trevor; Nevin, Kelly;

    2015-01-01

    -culture with Methanosarcina barkeri, which is capable of direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET), but not with Methanospirillium hungatei capable only of H2 or formate transfer. Conductive granular activated carbon (GAC) stimulated metabolism of the G. hydrogenophilus - M. barkeri co-culture, consistent with electron......Electrodes are unnatural electron acceptors, and it is yet unknown how some Geobacter species evolved to use electrodes as terminal electron acceptors. Analysis of different Geobacter species revealed that they varied in their capacity for current production. G. metallireducens and G....... hydrogenophilus generated high current densities (ca. 0.05 mA/cm2), comparable to G. sulfurreducens. G. bremensis, G. chapellei, G. humireducens, and G. uranireducens, produced much lower currents (ca. 0.05 mA/cm2) and G. bemidjiensis was previously found to not produce current. There was no correspondence...

  18. Evaluation of marine sediments as microbial sources for methane production from brown algae under high salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Toyokazu; Kita, Akihisa; Okamura, Yoshiko; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2014-10-01

    Various marine sediments were evaluated as promising microbial sources for methane fermentation of Saccharina japonica, a brown alga, at seawater salinity. All marine sediments tested produced mainly acetate among volatile fatty acids. One marine sediment completely converted the produced volatile fatty acids to methane in a short period. Archaeal community analysis revealed that acetoclastic methanogens belonging to the Methanosarcina genus dominated after cultivation. Measurement of the specific conversion rate at each step of methane production under saline conditions demonstrated that the marine sediments had higher conversion rates of butyrate and acetate than mesophilic methanogenic granules. These results clearly show that marine sediments can be used as microbial sources for methane production from algae under high-salt conditions without dilution.

  19. Methane production potentials, pathways, and communities of methanogens in vertical sediment profiles of river Sitka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Václav; Blaser, Martin B; Claus, Peter; Chaudhary, Prem P; Rulík, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Biological methanogenesis is linked to permanent water logged systems, e.g., rice field soils or lake sediments. In these systems the methanogenic community as well as the pathway of methane formation are well-described. By contrast, the methanogenic potential of river sediments is so far not well-investigated. Therefore, we analyzed (a) the methanogenic potential (incubation experiments), (b) the pathway of methane production (stable carbon isotopes and inhibitor studies), and (c) the methanogenic community composition (terminal restriction length polymorphism of mcrA) in depth profiles of sediment cores of River Sitka, Czech Republic. We found two depth-related distinct maxima for the methanogenic potentials (a) The pathway of methane production was dominated by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis (b) The methanogenic community composition was similar in all depth layers (c) The main TRFs were representative for Methanosarcina, Methanosaeta, Methanobacterium, and Methanomicrobium species. The isotopic signals of acetate indicated a relative high contribution of chemolithotrophic acetogenesis to the acetate pool.

  20. Methanogenic burst in the end-Permian carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Daniel H; Fournier, Gregory P; French, Katherine L; Alm, Eric J; Boyle, Edward A; Cao, Changqun; Summons, Roger E

    2014-04-15

    The end-Permian extinction is associated with a mysterious disruption to Earth's carbon cycle. Here we identify causal mechanisms via three observations. First, we show that geochemical signals indicate superexponential growth of the marine inorganic carbon reservoir, coincident with the extinction and consistent with the expansion of a new microbial metabolic pathway. Second, we show that the efficient acetoclastic pathway in Methanosarcina emerged at a time statistically indistinguishable from the extinction. Finally, we show that nickel concentrations in South China sediments increased sharply at the extinction, probably as a consequence of massive Siberian volcanism, enabling a methanogenic expansion by removal of nickel limitation. Collectively, these results are consistent with the instigation of Earth's greatest mass extinction by a specific microbial innovation.

  1. Reducing gas content of coal deposits by means of bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godlewska-Lipowa, A.A.; Kozlowski, B.

    1981-07-01

    This paper discusses the results of experiments carried out in Poland under laboratory conditions on efficiency of methane control using bacteria from Methanosarcina and Methanomonas groups. Malashenko and Whittenburry culture mediums were used. Bacteria growth in an atmosphere of air and methane (48.2%, 8.6% and 5.21%) was observed. Temperature ranged from 19 to 20 C. Investigations show that the bacteria are characterized by high oxidation activity. Depending on methane concentration in the air the bacteria consume from 75% to 100% of methane during biosynthesis. The bacteria reduce methane and oxygen content and increase carbon dioxide content in the air. Using bacteria methane concentration in the air was reduced from 48.2% to 12.3%, from 8.6% to 0.0% and from 5.21% to 0.01%. (7 refs.) (In Polish)

  2. Changes of the microbial population structure in an overloaded fed-batch biogas reactor digesting maize silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampmann, Kristina; Ratering, Stefan; Geißler-Plaum, Rita; Schmidt, Michael; Zerr, Walter; Schnell, Sylvia

    2014-12-01

    Two parallel, stable operating biogas reactors were fed with increasing amounts of maize silage to monitor microbial community changes caused by overloading. Changes of microorganisms diversity revealed by SSCP (single strand conformation polymorphism) indicating an acidification before and during the pH-value decrease. The earliest indicator was the appearance of a Methanosarcina thermophila-related species. Diversity of dominant fermenting bacteria within Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and other Bacteria decreased upon overloading. Some species became dominant directly before and during acidification and thus could be suitable as possible indicator organisms for detection of futurity acidification. Those bacteria were related to Prolixibacter bellariivorans and Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius. An early detection of community shifts will allow better feeding management for optimal biogas production.

  3. Biological treatment of TMAH (tetra-methyl ammonium hydroxide) in a full-scale TFT-LCD wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tai-Ho; Whang, Liang-Ming; Liu, Pao-Wen Grace; Hung, Yu-Ching; Chen, Hung-Wei; Lin, Li-Bin; Chen, Chia-Fu; Chen, Sheng-Kun; Hsu, Shu Fu; Shen, Wason; Fu, Ryan; Hsu, Romel

    2012-06-01

    This study evaluated biological treatment of TMAH in a full-scale methanogenic up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) followed by an aerobic bioreactor. In general, the UASB was able to perform a satisfactory TMAH degradation efficiency, but the effluent COD of the aerobic bioreactor seemed to increase with an increased TMAH in the influent wastewater. The batch test results confirmed that the UASB sludge under methanogenic conditions would be favored over the aerobic ones for TMAH treatment due to its superb ability of handling high strength of TMAH-containing wastewaters. Based on batch experiments, inhibitory chemicals present in TFT-LCD wastewater like surfactants and sulfate should be avoided to secure a stable methanogenic TMAH degradation. Finally, molecular monitoring of Methanomethylovorans hollandica and Methanosarcina mazei in the full-scale plant, the dominant methanogens in the UASB responsible for TMAH degradation, may be beneficial for a stable TMAH treatment performance.

  4. Reduction of the hydraulic retention time at constant high organic loading rate to reach the microbial limits of anaerobic digestion in various reactor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziganshin, Ayrat M; Schmidt, Thomas; Lv, Zuopeng; Liebetrau, Jan; Richnow, Hans Hermann; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Nikolausz, Marcell

    2016-10-01

    The effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) reduction at constant high organic loading rate on the activity of hydrogen-producing bacteria and methanogens were investigated in reactors digesting thin stillage. Stable isotope fingerprinting was additionally applied to assess methanogenic pathways. Based on hydA gene transcripts, Clostridiales was the most active hydrogen-producing order in continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), fixed-bed reactor (FBR) and anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), but shorter HRT stimulated the activity of Spirochaetales. Further decreasing HRT diminished Spirochaetales activity in systems with biomass retention. Based on mcrA gene transcripts, Methanoculleus and Methanosarcina were the predominantly active in CSTR and ASBR, whereas Methanosaeta and Methanospirillum activity was more significant in stably performing FBR. Isotope values indicated the predominance of aceticlastic pathway in FBR. Interestingly, an increased activity of Methanosaeta was observed during shortening HRT in CSTR and ASBR despite high organic acids concentrations, what was supported by stable isotope data.

  5. Molecular analysis of methanogens involved in methanogenic degradation of tetramethylammonium hydroxide in full-scale bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whang, Liang-Ming; Hu, Tai-Ho; Liu, Pao-Wen Grace; Hung, Yu-Ching; Fukushima, Toshikazu; Wu, Yi-Ju; Chang, Shao-Hsiung

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated methanogenic communities involved in degradation of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) in three full-scale bioreactors treating TMAH-containing wastewater. Based on the results of terminal-restriction fragment-length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and quantitative PCR analyses targeting the methyl-coenzyme M reductase alpha subunit (mcrA) genes retrieved from three bioreactors, Methanomethylovorans and Methanosarcina were the dominant methanogens involved in the methanogenic degradation of TMAH in the bioreactors. Furthermore, batch experiments were conducted to evaluate mcrA messenger RNA (mRNA) expression during methanogenic TMAH degradation, and the results indicated that a higher level of TMAH favored mcrA mRNA expression by Methansarcina, while Methanomethylovorans could only express considerable amount of mcrA mRNA at a lower level of TMAH. These results suggest that Methansarcina is responsible for methanogenic TMAH degradation at higher TMAH concentrations, while Methanomethylovorans may be important at a lower TMAH condition.

  6. Localization of Methyl-Coenzyme M Reductase as Metabolic Marker for Diverse Methanogenic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Wrede

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methyl-Coenzyme M reductase (MCR as key enzyme for methanogenesis as well as for anaerobic oxidation of methane represents an important metabolic marker for both processes in microbial biofilms. Here, the potential of MCR-specific polyclonal antibodies as metabolic marker in various methanogenic Archaea is shown. For standard growth conditions in laboratory culture, the cytoplasmic localization of the enzyme in Methanothermobacter marburgensis, Methanothermobacter wolfei, Methanococcus maripaludis, Methanosarcina mazei, and in anaerobically methane-oxidizing biofilms is demonstrated. Under growth limiting conditions on nickel-depleted media, at low linear growth of cultures, a fraction of 50–70% of the enzyme was localized close to the cytoplasmic membrane, which implies “facultative” membrane association of the enzyme. This feature may be also useful for assessment of growth-limiting conditions in microbial biofilms.

  7. iTRAQ quantitative proteomic analysis reveals the pathways for methanation of propionate facilitated by magnetite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jing, Yuhang; Wan, Jingjing; Angelidaki, Irini

    2017-01-01

    by around 44% in batch experiments, and both direct interspecies electron transfer and interspecies H2 transfer were thermodynamically feasible with the addition of magnetite. The methanation of propionate facilitated by magnetite was also demonstrated in a long-term operated continuous reactor. The methane...... enriched with the addition of magnetite. iTRAQ quantitative proteomic analysis, which was used in mixed culture for the first time, showed that magnetite induced the changes of protein expression levels involved in various pathways during the methanation of propionate. The up-regulation of proteins...... electron transfer considering its up-regulation with the addition of magnetite and origination from Thauera. Most of the up-regulated proteins in methane metabolism were originated from Methanosaeta, while most of the enzymes with down-regulated proteins were originated from Methanosarcina. However, the up-regulated...

  8. Application of a novel microtitre plate-based assay for the discovery of new inhibitors of DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James A; Mitchenall, Lesley A; Rejzek, Martin; Field, Robert A; Maxwell, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are highly exploited targets for antimicrobial drugs. The spread of antibiotic resistance represents a significant threat to public health and necessitates the discovery of inhibitors that target topoisomerases in novel ways. However, the traditional assays for topoisomerase activity are not suitable for the high-throughput approaches necessary for drug discovery. In this study we validate a novel assay for screening topoisomerase inhibitors. A library of 960 compounds was screened against Escherichia coli DNA gyrase and archaeal Methanosarcina mazei DNA topoisomerase VI. Several novel inhibitors were identified for both enzymes, and subsequently characterised in vitro and in vivo. Inhibitors from the M. mazei topoisomerase VI screen were tested for their ability to inhibit Arabidopsis topoisomerase VI in planta. The data from this work present new options for antibiotic drug discovery and provide insight into the mechanism of topoisomerase VI.

  9. Hydrogen and methane production from desugared molasses using a two‐stage thermophilic anaerobic process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongjan, Prawit; O-Thong, Sompong; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen and methane production from desugared molasses by a two‐stage thermophilic anaerobic process was investigated in a series of two up‐flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors. The first reactor that was dominated with hydrogen‐producing bacteria of Thermoanaerobacterium...... thermosaccharolyticum and Thermoanaerobacterium aciditolerans could generate a high hydrogen production rate of 5600 mL H2/day/L, corresponding to a yield of 132 mL H2/g volatile solid (VS). The effluent from the hydrogen reactor was further converted to methane in the second reactor with the optimal production rate...... of 3380 mL CH4/day/L, corresponding to a yield of 239 mL CH4/g VS. Aceticlastic Methanosarcina mazei was the dominant methanogen in the methanogenesis stage. This work demonstrates that biohydrogen production can be very efficiently coupled with a subsequent step of methane production using desugared...

  10. Geochronology of the Palaeoproterozoic Kautokeino Greenstone Belt, Finnmark, Norway, in its Fennoscandian context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingen, Bernard; Solli, Arne; Viola, Giulio; Sverre Sandstad, Jan; Torgersen, Espen; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Skår, Øyvind; Nasuti, Aziz

    2016-04-01

    The northeastern part of the Fennoscandian Shield consists of Archaean cratonic blocks alternating with Palaeoproterozoic greenstone belts ranging in age from c. 2500 to 1950 Ma. Traditionally, the greenstones are interpeted as evidence for rifting of the Archaean continent(s) although it remains unclear whether modern-style oceanic lithosphere developed, followed by a Wilson-cycle-type closure during the Svecokarelian orogeny. Existing geological, isotopic and geochronological data show that the exposed basins hosting the greenstones have distinct lithostratigraphies and geological evolutions and are pericontinental rather than oceanic. A diversity of Palaeoproterozoic mafic mantle derived magmatic rocks show a secular increase of Nd value with time, from EpsilonNd =-2 at 2500 Ma (Shalskiy dikes, Onega, Russia) to EpsilonNd =+4.4 at 2090 Ma (Jouttiaapa basalts, Peräpohja, Finland), suggesting that the regional asthenospheric mantle was less depleted than the model MORB-producing depleted mantle before 2090 Ma. In this work, we report new zircon U-Pb geochronological data in 19 samples from Finnmarkvidda, Norway, to constrain the evolution of the Palaeoproterozoic high-strain Kautokeino Greenstone Belt and its relations with the neighbouring felsic Jergul and Ráiseatnu gneiss complexes. The Jergul complex is an Archaean, low heat flow, TTG cratonic bloc of Karelian affinity formed between 2975 ±10 and 2776 ±6 Ma. The Masi formation, at the base of the Kautokeino Greenstone Belt, is a typical Jatulian quartzite unconformably overlying the Archean basement. An albite-magnetite-rich mafic sill, similar to the Haaskalehto intrusion in Finland, provides a minimum age of 2220 ±7 Ma for the deposition of the quartzite. The Likčá and Čáskejas formations represent the main basaltic volcanism. Direct evidence of an oceanic setting or oceanic suture is lacking. A probably synvolcanic gabbro sill gives an age of 2137 ±5 Ma. Published Sm-Nd whole-rock data on

  11. Geological evolution of the Neoproterozoic Bemarivo Belt, northern Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ronald J.; De Waele, B.; Schofield, D.I.; Goodenough, K.M.; Horstwood, M.; Tucker, R.; Bauer, W.; Annells, R.; Howard, K. J.; Walsh, G.; Rabarimanana, M.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Ralison, A.V.; Randriamananjara, T.

    2009-01-01

    The broadly east-west trending, Late Neoproterozoic Bemarivo Belt in northern Madagascar has been re-surveyed at 1:100 000 scale as part of a large multi-disciplinary World Bank-sponsored project. The work included acquisition of 14 U-Pb zircon dates and whole-rock major and trace element geochemical data of representative rocks. The belt has previously been modelled as a juvenile Neoproterozoic arc and our findings broadly support that model. The integrated datasets indicate that the Bemarivo Belt is separated by a major ductile shear zone into northern and southern "terranes", each with different lithostratigraphy and ages. However, both formed as Neoproterozoic arc/marginal basin assemblages that were translated southwards over the north-south trending domains of "cratonic" Madagascar, during the main collisional phase of the East African Orogeny at ca. 540 Ma. The older, southern terrane consists of a sequence of high-grade paragneisses (Sahantaha Group), which were derived from a Palaeoproterozoic source and formed a marginal sequence to the Archaean cratons to the south. These rocks are intruded by an extensive suite of arc-generated metamorphosed plutonic rocks, known as the Antsirabe Nord Suite. Four samples from this suite yielded U-Pb SHRIMP ages at ca. 750 Ma. The northern terrane consists of three groups of metamorphosed supracrustal rocks, including a possible Archaean sequence (Betsiaka Group: maximum depositional age approximately 2477 Ma) and two volcano-sedimentary sequences (high-grade Milanoa Group: maximum depositional age approximately 750 Ma; low grade Daraina Group: extrusive age = 720-740 Ma). These supracrustal rocks are intruded by another suite of arc-generated metamorphosed plutonic rocks, known as the Manambato Suite, 4 samples of which gave U-Pb SHRIMP ages between 705 and 718 Ma. Whole-rock geochemical data confirm the calc-alkaline, arc-related nature of the plutonic rocks. The volcanic rocks of the Daraina and Milanoa groups also

  12. Early mantle differentiation: constraint from {sup 146}Sm-{sup 142}Nd systematics; Radioactivite eteinte du {sup 146}Sm et differenciation precoce du manteau terrestre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, G

    2005-07-15

    We present new ultra-high precision {sup 142}Nd/{sup 144}Nd measurements of early Archaean rocks using the new generation thermal ionization mass spectrometer TRITON. Repeated measurements of the Ames Nd standard demonstrate that the {sup 142}Nd/{sup 144}Nd ratio can be determined with external precision of 2 ppm (2s), allowing confident resolution of anomalies as small as 5 ppm. A major analytical improvement lies in the elimination of the double normalization procedure required to correct our former measurements from a secondary mass fractionation effect. Our new results indicate that metasediments, meta-basalts and orthogneisses from the 3.6 - 3.8 Ga West Greenland craton display positive {sup 142}Nd anomalies ranging from 8 to 15 ppm. Using a simple two-stage model with initial e{sup 143}Nd value of 1.9 {+-} 0.6 e-units, coupled {sup 147}Sm-{sup 143}Nd and {sup 146}Sm-{sup 142}Nd chronometry constrains mantle differentiation to 50 to 200 Ma after formation of the solar system. This chronological constraint is consistent with differentiation of the Earth's mantle during the late stage of crystallization of a magma ocean. We have developed a two-box model describing {sup 142}Nd and {sup 143}Nd isotopic evolution of depleted mantle during the subsequent evolution of the crust-mantle system. Our results indicate that early terrestrial proto-crust had a lifetime of ca. 500 Ma in order to produce the observed Nd isotope signature of Archaean rocks. In the context of this two box mantle-crust system, we model the evolution of isotopic and chemical heterogeneity of depleted mantle as a function of the mantle stirring time. Using the dispersion of {sup 142}Nd/{sup 144}Nd and {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd ratios observed in early Archaean rocks, we constrain the stirring time of early Earth's mantle to 100 - 150 Ma, a factor of 5 to 10 shorter than stirring time inferred from modern oceanic basalts. (author)

  13. Meta-igneous (non-gneissic) tonalites and quartz-diorites from an extensive ca. 3800 Ma terrain south of the Isua supracrustal belt, southern West Greenland: constraints on early crust formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutman, Allen P.; Bennett, Vickie C.; Friend, Clark R. L.; Norman, Marc D.

    In the Itsaq Gneiss Complex south of the Isua supracrustal belt (West Greenland) some areas of early Archaean tonalite and quartz-diorite are non-gneissic, free of pegmatite veins, and in rarer cases are undeformed with relict igneous textures and hence were little modified by heterogeneous ductile deformation under amphibolite facies conditions in several Archaean events. Such well-preserved early Archaean rocks are extremely rare. Tonalites are high Al, and have bulk compositions close to experimental liquids. Trace element abundances and modelling suggest that they probably originated as melts derived from basaltic compositions at sufficiently high pressures to require residual garnet + amphibolites +/- clinopyroxene in the source. The major element characteristics of the quartz-diorites suggest these were derived from more mafic magmas than the tonalites, and underwent either igneous differentiation or mixing with crustal material. As in modern arc magmas, high relative abundances of Sr, Ba, Pb, and alkali elements cannot be generated simply from a basaltic source formed by large degrees of melting of a depleted mantle. This may indicate an important role for fluids interacting with mafic rocks in generating the earliest preserved continental crust. The high Ba/Th, Ba/Nb, La/Nb and low Nb/Th, Ce/Pb, and Rb/Cs ratios of these tonalites are also observed in modern arc magmas. SHRIMP U-Pb zircon geochronology was undertaken on seven tonalites, one quartz-diorite, a thin pegmatitic vein and a thin diorite dyke. Cathodoluminescence images show the zircon populations of the quartz-diorite and tonalites are dominated by single-component oscillatory-zoned prismatic grains, which gave ages of 3806+/-5 to 3818+/-8Ma (2σ) (quartz-diorite and 5 tonalites) and 3795+/-3Ma (1 tonalite). Dating of recrystallised domains cutting oscillatory-zoned zircon indicates disturbance as early as 3800-3780Ma. There are rare ca. 3600Ma and 3800-3780Ma (very high U and low Th/U)<=20

  14. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeikus, J.G.; Jain, M.

    1993-12-31

    The project deals with understanding the fundamental biochemical mechanisms that physiologically control and regulate carbon and electron flow in anaerobic chemosynthetic bacteria that couple metabolism of single carbon compounds and hydrogen to the production of organic acids (formic, acetic, butyric, and succinic) or methane. The authors compare the regulation of carbon dioxide and hydrogen metabolism by fermentation, enzyme, and electron carrier analysis using Butyribacterium methylotrophicum, Anaeroblospirillum succiniciproducens, Methanosarcina barkeri, and a newly isolated tri-culture composed of a syntrophic butyrate degrader strain IB, Methanosarcina mazei and Methanobacterium formicicum as model systems. To understand the regulation of hydrogen metabolism during butyrate production or acetate degradation, hydrogenase activity in B. methylotrophicum or M. barkeri is measured in relation to growth substrate and pH; hydrogenase is purified and characterized to investigate number of hydrogenases; their localization and functions; and, their sequences are determined. To understand the mechanism for catabolic CO{sub 2} fixation to succinate the PEP carboxykinase enzyme and gene of A. succiniciproducens are purified and characterized. Genetically engineered strains of Escherichia coli containing the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase gene are examined for their ability to produce succinate in high yield. To understand the mechanism of fatty acid degradation by syntrophic acetogens during mixed culture methanogenesis formate and hydrogen production are characterized by radio tracer studies. It is intended that these studies provide strategies to improve anaerobic fermentations used for the production of organic acids or methane and, new basic understanding on catabolic CO{sub 2} fixation mechanisms and on the function of hydrogenase in anaerobic bacteria.

  15. Biodegradability potential of two experimental landfills in Brazil Potencial de biodegrabilidade de dois aterros sanitários experimentais no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Filomena Vazoller

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Solid wastes anaerobic biodegradability, methane production potential and microbiological composition of two experimental sanitary landfills in Brazil, running for one year, were evaluated. The two landfills showed a similar organic matter stabilization during the methane production phase, despite the high heterogeneity of the solid wastes. Both landfills presented the same level of methane (around 91.5 L CH4 / kg Volatile Total Solids and organic acids, mainly acetic and butyric acids, in the leachate. Bacterial isolates belonged to genera Megasphaera, Selenomonas, Methanobacterium, Methanobrevibacter and Methanosarcina.Durante um ano foi realizado o monitoramento da biodegradabilidade anaeróbia de resíduos sólidos, do potencial de geração de metano e da composição microbiológica de dois aterros sanitários experimentais. Observou-se que, apesar da grande heterogeneidade dos resíduos sólidos, os resultados em termos de estabilização de matéria orgânica durante a fase de produção de metano foram similares para os dois aterros. Ambos os sistemas apresentaram as mesmas faixas de produção de metano (91.5 L CH4 / kg STV - sólidos totais voláteis e de ácidos orgânicos, principalmente ácidos acético e butírico. Isolou-se ainda, culturas bacterianas dos gêneros Megasphaera, Selenomonas, Methanobacterium, Methanobrevibacter and Methanosarcina.

  16. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction under Fermentative Conditions with Lactate Stimulated Native Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somenahally, Anil C [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Yuan, Tong [University of Oklahoma; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL; Hazen, Terry C [ORNL; Arkin, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Van Nostrand, Dr. Joy D. [Oklahoma University; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Microbial reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in-situ is a plausible bioremediation strategy in electron-acceptor limited environments. However, higher [Cr(VI)] may impose stress on syntrophic communities and impact community structure and function. The study objectives were to understand the impacts of Cr(VI) concentrations on community structure and on the Cr(VI)-reduction potential of groundwater communities at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were used to grow native communities enriched with lactate (30 mM) and continuously amended with Cr(VI) at 0.0 (No-Cr), 0.1 (Low-Cr) and 3.0 (High-Cr) mg/L. Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI), 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI) levels were below detection from week 1 until week 15. With lactate enrichment, native bacterial diversity substantially decreased as Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., became the dominant groups, but did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. The Archaea diversity also substantially decreased after lactate enrichment from Methanosaeta (35%), Methanosarcina (17%) and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%). Methane production was lower in High-Cr reactors suggesting some inhibition of methanogens. Several key functional genes were distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant microbes, Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI) reduction, and as a result 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI) did not impact the overall bacterial community structure.

  17. Hexavalent chromium reduction under fermentative conditions with lactate stimulated native microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somenahally, Anil C; Mosher, Jennifer J; Yuan, Tong; Podar, Mircea; Phelps, Tommy J; Brown, Steven D; Yang, Zamin K; Hazen, Terry C; Arkin, Adam P; Palumbo, Anthony V; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Jizhong; Elias, Dwayne A

    2013-01-01

    Microbial reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in-situ is a plausible bioremediation strategy in electron-acceptor limited environments. However, higher [Cr(VI)] may impose stress on syntrophic communities and impact community structure and function. The study objectives were to understand the impacts of Cr(VI) concentrations on community structure and on the Cr(VI)-reduction potential of groundwater communities at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were used to grow native communities enriched with lactate (30 mM) and continuously amended with Cr(VI) at 0.0 (No-Cr), 0.1 (Low-Cr) and 3.0 (High-Cr) mg/L. Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI), 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI) levels were below detection from week 1 until week 15. With lactate enrichment, native bacterial diversity substantially decreased as Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., became the dominant groups, but did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. The Archaea diversity also substantially decreased after lactate enrichment from Methanosaeta (35%), Methanosarcina (17%) and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%). Methane production was lower in High-Cr reactors suggesting some inhibition of methanogens. Several key functional genes were distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant microbes, Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI) reduction, and as a result 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI) did not impact the overall bacterial community structure.

  18. Influence of hexavalent chromium on lactate-enriched Hanford groundwater microbial communities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somenahally, Anil C [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Yuan, Tong [University of Oklahoma; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL; Hazen, Terry C [ORNL; Arkin, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Microbial reduction and immobilization of chromate (Cr(VI)) is a plausible bioremediation strategy. However, higher Cr(VI) concentrations may impose stress on native Cr-reducing communities. We sought to determine if Cr(VI) would influence the lactate enriched native microbial community structure and function in groundwater from the Cr contaminated site at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were amended with lactate and Cr(VI) (0.0, 0.1 and 3.0 mg/L). Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI) concentrations, 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition in bioreactors were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and some differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI) was reduced in the bioreactors. With lactate enrichment, the native communities did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. Native bacterial communities were diverse, whereas after lactate enrichment, Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., were the most predominant groups in all bioreactors. Similarly, the Archaea diversity significantly decreased from Methanosaeta (35%), Methanosarcina (17%), Halobacteriales (12%), Methanoregula (8%) and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%) after lactate enrichment. Composition of several key functional genes was distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant probes (chrA), Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI) reduction, and as a result the 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI) did not appear to give chromate reducing strains a competitive advantage for proliferation or for increasing Cr-reduction.

  19. Hexavalent chromium reduction under fermentative conditions with lactate stimulated native microbial communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil C Somenahally

    Full Text Available Microbial reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI in-situ is a plausible bioremediation strategy in electron-acceptor limited environments. However, higher [Cr(VI] may impose stress on syntrophic communities and impact community structure and function. The study objectives were to understand the impacts of Cr(VI concentrations on community structure and on the Cr(VI-reduction potential of groundwater communities at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were used to grow native communities enriched with lactate (30 mM and continuously amended with Cr(VI at 0.0 (No-Cr, 0.1 (Low-Cr and 3.0 (High-Cr mg/L. Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI, 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI levels were below detection from week 1 until week 15. With lactate enrichment, native bacterial diversity substantially decreased as Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., became the dominant groups, but did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. The Archaea diversity also substantially decreased after lactate enrichment from Methanosaeta (35%, Methanosarcina (17% and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%. Methane production was lower in High-Cr reactors suggesting some inhibition of methanogens. Several key functional genes were distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant microbes, Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI reduction, and as a result 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI did not impact the overall bacterial community structure.

  20. Effects of temperature and hydraulic retention time on acetotrophic pathways and performance in high-rate sludge digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Dang; Jensen, Paul; Batstone, Damien

    2014-06-01

    High-rate anaerobic digestion of organic solids requires rapid hydrolysis and enhanced methanogenic growth rates, which can be achieved through elevated temperature (>55 °C) at short hydraulic retention times (HRT). This study assesses the effect of temperatures between 55 °C and 65 °C and HRTs between 2 and 4 days on process performance, microbial community structure, microbial capability, and acetotrophic pathways in thermophilic anaerobic reactors. Increasing the temperature did not enhance volatile solids (VS) destruction above the base value of 37% achieved at 55 °C and 4 days HRT. Stable isotopic signatures (δ13C) revealed that elevated temperature promoted syntrophic acetate oxidation, which accounted for 60% of the methane formation at 55 °C, and increasing substantially to 100% at 65 °C. The acetate consumption capacity dropped with increasing temperature (from 0.69-0.81 gCOD gVS(-1) d(-1) at 55 °C to 0.21-0.35 gCOD gVS(-1) d(-1) at 65 °C), based on specific activity testing of reactor contents. Community analysis using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing revealed the dominance of Methanosarcina at 55-60 °C. However, a further increase to 65 °C resulted in loss of Methanosarcina, with an accumulation of organic acids and reduced methane production. Similar issues were observed when reducing the HRT to 2 days, indicating that temperature3 days are critical to operate these systems stably.

  1. Laser spectroscopic real time measurements of methanogenic activity under simulated Martian subsurface analog conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmack, Janosch; Böhm, Michael; Brauer, Chris; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Möhlmann, Diedrich; Wagner, Dirk

    2014-08-01

    On Earth, chemolithoautothrophic and anaerobic microorganisms such as methanogenic archaea are regarded as model organisms for possible subsurface life on Mars. For this reason, the methanogenic strain Methanosarcina soligelidi (formerly called Methanosarcina spec. SMA-21), isolated from permafrost-affected soil in northeast Siberia, has been tested under Martian thermo-physical conditions. In previous studies under simulated Martian conditions, high survival rates of these microorganisms were observed. In our study we present a method to measure methane production as a first attempt to study metabolic activity of methanogenic archaea during simulated conditions approaching conditions of Mars-like environments. To determine methanogenic activity, a measurement technique which is capable to measure the produced methane concentration with high precision and with high temporal resolution is needed. Although there are several methods to detect methane, only a few fulfill all the needed requirements to work within simulated extraterrestrial environments. We have chosen laser spectroscopy, which is a non-destructive technique that measures the methane concentration without sample taking and also can be run continuously. In our simulation, we detected methane production at temperatures down to -5 °C, which would be found on Mars either temporarily in the shallow subsurface or continually in the deep subsurface. The pressure of 50 kPa which we used in our experiments, corresponds to the expected pressure in the Martian near subsurface. Our new device proved to be fully functional and the results indicate that the possible existence of methanogenic archaea in Martian subsurface habitats cannot be ruled out.

  2. Pb Isotope Study of Some Nonferrous Metallic Deposits in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on Pb-Pb isochron data of more than 40 Precambrian polymetallic deposits, the authors consider that there are four mineralization periods for the Precambrian copper deposits in China, and the major copper deposits were formed at about 1800 Ma; there are three mineralization periods for gold deposits formed from Archaean to Proterozoic. By studying hundreds of lead isotope data from some Mesozoic continental subvolcanic Cu and Ag polymetallic deposits and fine-disseminated gold deposits, the authors found that the calculation based on the lead single-stage evolution model or two-stage evolution model cannot give the true ore-forming ages but can provide more information about mineralization and material sources of the deposits.

  3. Carbonatite ring-complexes explained by caldera-style volcanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Magnus; Malehmir, Alireza; Troll, Valentin R; Dehghannejad, Mahdieh; Juhlin, Christopher; Ask, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Carbonatites are rare, carbonate-rich magmatic rocks that make up a minute portion of the crust only, yet they are of great relevance for our understanding of crustal and mantle processes. Although they occur in all continents and from Archaean to present, the deeper plumbing system of carbonatite ring-complexes is usually poorly constrained. Here, we show that carbonatite ring-complexes can be explained by caldera-style volcanism. Our geophysical investigation of the Alnö carbonatite ring-complex in central Sweden identifies a solidified saucer-shaped magma chamber at ~3 km depth that links to surface exposures through a ring fault system. Caldera subsidence during final stages of activity caused carbonatite eruptions north of the main complex, providing the crucial element to connect plutonic and eruptive features of carbonatite magmatism. The way carbonatite magmas are stored, transported and erupt at the surface is thus comparable to known emplacement styles from silicic calderas.

  4. Spatial greenstone-gneiss relationships: Evidence from mafic-ultramafic xenolith distribution patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glikson, A. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution patterns of mafic-ultramafic xenoliths within Archaean orthogneiss terrain furnish an essential key for the elucidation of granite-greenstone relations. Most greenstone belts constitute mega-xenoliths rather than primary basin structures. Transition along strike and across strike between stratigraphically low greenstone sequences and xenolith chains demonstrate their contemporaneity. These terrains represent least deformed cratonic islands within an otherwise penetratively foliated deformed gneiss-greenstone crust. Whereas early greenstone sequences are invariably intruded by tonalitic/trondhjemitic/granodioritic gneisses, stratigraphically higher successions may locally overlap older gneiss terrains and their entrained xenoliths unconformably. The contiguity of xenolith patterns suggests their derivation as relics of regional mafic-ultramafic volcanic crustal units and places limits on horizontal movements between individual crustal blocks.

  5. Global Carbon Cycle of the Precambrian Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiewióra, Justyna

    to investigate carbon fluxes between Precambrian Earth’s mantle and crust and to trace the evolution of life in the Eoarchaean oceans. The world’s desire for diamonds gives us a unique opportunity to obtain insight into the nature of metasomatic fluids affecting the subcratonic lithospheric mantle (SCLM) beneath...... derived from surface water. Partitioning of carbon between 13C-rich oxidized and 13C-poor reduced species indicates that life in the early ocean had to be well evolved before 3.8 Ga. Therefore, the Isua ultramafic rocks may be considered as an indirect biomarker for ancient life.......The carbon isotopic composition of distinct Archaean geological records provides information about the global carbon cycle and emergence of life on early Earth. We utilized carbon isotopic records of Greenlandic carbonatites, diamonds, graphites, marbles, metacarbonates and ultramafic rocks...

  6. Crustal architecture and tectonic evolution of the Cauvery Suture Zone, southern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, T. R. K.; Yellappa, T.; Santosh, M.

    2016-11-01

    The Cauvery suture zone (CSZ) in southern India has witnessed multiple deformations associated with multiple subduction-collision history, with incorporation of the related accretionary belts sequentially into the southern continental margin of the Archaean Dharwar craton since Neoarchean to Neoproterozoic. The accreted tectonic elements include suprasubduction complexes of arc magmatic sequences, high-grade supracrustals, thrust duplexes, ophiolites, and younger intrusions that are dispersed along the suture. The intra-oceanic Neoarchean-Neoproterozoic arc assemblages are well exposed in the form of tectonic mélanges dominantly towards the eastern sector of the CSZ and are typically subjected to complex and multiple deformation events. Multi-scale analysis of structural elements with detailed geological mapping of the sub-regions and their structural cross sections, geochemical and geochronological data and integrated geophysical observations suggest that the CSZ is an important zone that preserves the imprints of multiple cycles of Precambrian plate tectonic regimes.

  7. Biological Membranes in Extreme Conditions: Simulations of Anionic Archaeal Tetraether Lipid Membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Felipe Pineda De Castro

    Full Text Available In contrast to the majority of organisms that have cells bound by di-ester phospholipids, archaeal membranes consist of di- and tetraether phospholipids. Originating from organisms that withstand harsh conditions (e.g., low pH and a wide range of temperatures such membranes have physical properties that make them attractive materials for biological research and biotechnological applications. We developed force-field parameters based on the widely used Generalized Amber Force Field (GAFF to enable the study of anionic tetraether membranes of the model archaean Sulfolobus acidocaldarius by computer simulations. The simulations reveal that the physical properties of these unique membranes depend on the number of cyclopentane rings included in each lipid unit, and on the size of cations that are used to ensure charge neutrality. This suggests that the biophysical properties of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius cells depend not only on the compositions of their membranes but also on the media in which they grow.

  8. Biological Membranes in Extreme Conditions: Simulations of Anionic Archaeal Tetraether Lipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda De Castro, Luis Felipe; Dopson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the majority of organisms that have cells bound by di-ester phospholipids, archaeal membranes consist of di- and tetraether phospholipids. Originating from organisms that withstand harsh conditions (e.g., low pH and a wide range of temperatures) such membranes have physical properties that make them attractive materials for biological research and biotechnological applications. We developed force-field parameters based on the widely used Generalized Amber Force Field (GAFF) to enable the study of anionic tetraether membranes of the model archaean Sulfolobus acidocaldarius by computer simulations. The simulations reveal that the physical properties of these unique membranes depend on the number of cyclopentane rings included in each lipid unit, and on the size of cations that are used to ensure charge neutrality. This suggests that the biophysical properties of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius cells depend not only on the compositions of their membranes but also on the media in which they grow. PMID:27167213

  9. Evolution of the thermopsin peptidase family (A5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil D Rawlings

    Full Text Available Thermopsin is a peptidase from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius that is active at low pH and high temperature. From reversible inhibition with pepstatin, thermopsin is thought to be an aspartic peptidase. It is a member of the only family of peptidases to be restricted entirely to the archaea, namely peptidase family A5. Evolution within this family has been mapped, using a taxonomic tree based on the known classification of archaea. Homologues are found only in archaeans that are both hyperthermophiles and acidophiles, and this implies lateral transfer of genes between archaea, because species with homologues are not necessarily closely related. Despite the remarkable stability and activity in extreme conditions, no tertiary structure has been solved for any member of the family, and the catalytic mechanism is unknown. Putative catalytic residues have been predicted here by examination of aligned sequences.

  10. Granites petrology, structure, geological setting, and metallogeny

    CERN Document Server

    Nédélec, Anne; Bowden, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Granites are emblematic rocks developed from a magma that crystallized in the Earth’s crust. They ultimately outcrop at the surface worldwide. This book, translated and updated from the original French edition Pétrologie des Granites (2011) is a modern presentation of granitic rocks from magma genesis to their crystallization at a higher level into the crust. Segregation from the source, magma ascent and shapes of granitic intrusions are also discussed, as well as the eventual formation of hybrid rocks by mingling/mixing processes and the thermomechanical aspects in country rocks around granite plutons. Modern techniques for structural studies of granites are detailed extensively. Granites are considered in their geological spatial and temporal frame, in relation with plate tectonics and Earth history from the Archaean eon. A chapter on granite metallogeny explains how elements of economic interest are concentrated during magma crystallization, and examples of Sn, Cu, F and U ore deposits are presented. Mi...

  11. Kabbaldurga-type charnockitization: A local phenomenon in the granulite to amphibolite grade transition zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raith, M.; Staehle, H. J.; Hoernes, S.

    1988-01-01

    In the deeply eroded Precambrian crust of South India and Sri Lanka, a series of spectacular exposures shows progressive development of coarse-grained charnockite through dehydration of amphibolite grade gneisses in different arrested stages. At Kabbaldurga, charnockitization of Archaean grey biotite-hornblende gneisses occurred about 2.5 Ga ago and evidently was induced by the influx of external carbonic fluids along a system of ductile shears and the foliation planes. The results of oxygen isotope thermometry and of geothermobarometry in adjacent areas indicate a P-T regime of 700 to 750 C and 5 to 7 kb. The decrease of water activity in the fluid infiltrated zones caused an almost complete breakdown of hornblende and biotite and the new growth of hypersthene. Detailed petrographic and geochemical studies revealed marked changes in mineralogy and chemistry from granodioritic to granitic which document the metasomatic nature of the process.

  12. Magma underplating and Hannuoba present crust-mantle transitional zone composition: Xenolith petrological and geochemical evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Qicheng; ZHANG Hongfu; SUI Jianli; ZHAI Mingguo; SUN Qian; LI Ni

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of mineral assemblage, mineralogy, petrology, and major, trace elemental and isotopic geochemistry of the underplated granulite- and eclogite-facies accumulate, peridotite and pyroxenite xenoliths entrained in Hannuoba Cenozoic basalts, this work constrained the petrological constituents for the crust-mantle transitional zone, which is supported by the results of high-temperature and pressure velocity experiments on rocks and geophysics deep survey. Present lower part of lower crust is mainly composed of granulite-facies mafic accumulates (dominantly plagioclase websterite) and crust-mantle transitional zone dominantly composed of eclogite-facies pyroxenites with or without garnet and spinel lherzolites; Archaean terrain granulite is only nominally early lower crust. Magma underplating in the crust-mantle boundary led to the crustal vertical accretion and the formation of the crust-mantle transitional zone, which is a significant mechanism for the chemical adjustment of the crust-mantle boundary since the Phanerozoic.

  13. Heat flow, heat generation and crustal thermal structure of the northern block of the South Indian Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mohan L.; Sharma, S. R.; Sundar, A.

    1988-01-01

    Heat flow values and heat generation data calculated from the concentration of heat producing radioactive elements, U, Th and K in surface rocks were analyzed. The South Indian Craton according to Drury et al., can be divided into various blocks, separated by late Proterozoic shear belts. The northern block comprises Eastern and Western Dharwar Cratons of Rogers (1986), Naqvi and Rogers (1987) and a part of the South Indian granulite terrain up to a shear system occupying the Palghat-Cauvery low lands. The geothermal data analysis clearly demonstrates that the present thermal characteristics of the above two Archaean terrains of the Indian and Australian Shields are quite similar. Their crustal thermal structures are likely to be similar also.

  14. On the valency state of radiogenic lead in zircon and its consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramers, J.; Frei, Robert; Newville, M.

    2009-01-01

    at this temperature, show age effects that should have been observed in SIMS dating. Further, in zircon evaporation as well as in leaching experiments, common Pb is generally released preferentially to radiogenic Pb. After removal of less radiogenic Pb, the evaporation record generally shows pure radiogenic Pb during...... not resemble that of PbO2. The arguments why radiogenic Pb should be tetravalent are based on analogies with studies relating to the tetravalent state of 234Th and the hexavalent state of 234U, which show that a-recoil in silicates generates a strongly oxidizing environment at the site where the recoiling......-recoil damaged sites could be leached out by any electrolyte solution that reduces it to the divalent state, making it both incompatible and soluble. Thus, discordia can be generated in weathering. The curious observation that discordant Archaean zircon suites generally define trends to lower intercepts at up...

  15. Charnockitic magmatism in southern India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H M Rajesh; M Santosh

    2004-12-01

    Large charnockite massifs cover a substantial portion of the southern Indian granulite terrain. The older (late Archaean to early Proterozoic) charnockites occur in the northern part and the younger (late Proterozoic) charnockites occur in the southern part of this high-grade terrain. Among these, the older Biligirirangan hill, Shevroy hill and Nilgiri hill massifs are intermediate charnockites, with Pallavaram massif consisting dominantly of felsic charnockites. The charnockite massifs from northern Kerala and Cardamom hill show spatial association of intermediate and felsic charnockites, with the youngest Nagercoil massif consisting of felsic charnockites. Their igneous parentage is evident from a combination of features including field relations, mineralogy, petrography, thermobarometry, as well as distinct chemical features. The southern Indian charnockite massifs show similarity with high-Ba–Sr granitoids, with the tonalitic intermediate charnockites showing similarity with high-Ba–Sr granitoids with low K2O/Na2 ratios, and the felsic charnockites showing similarity with high-Ba–Sr granitoids with high K2O/Na2O ratios. A two-stage model is suggested for the formation of these charnockites. During the first stage there was a period of basalt underplating, with the ponding of alkaline mafic magmas. Partial melting of this mafic lower crust formed the charnockitic magmas. Here emplacement of basalt with low water content would lead to dehydration melting of the lower crust forming intermediate charnockites. Conversely, emplacement of hydrous basalt would result in melting at higher fH2O favoring production of more siliceous felsic charnockites. This model is correlated with two crustal thickening phases in southern India, one related to the accretion of the older crustal blocks on to the Archaean craton to the north and the other probably related to the collision between crustal fragments of East and West Gondwana in a supercontinent framework.

  16. Ancient hydrothermal ecosystems on earth: a new palaeobiological frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, M R

    1996-01-01

    Thermal springs are common in the oceans and on land. Early in the history of the Earth they would have been even more abundant, because of a higher heat flow. A thermophilic lifestyle has been proposed for the common ancestor of extant life, and hydrothermal ecosystems can be expected to have existed on Earth since life arose. Though there has been a great deal of recent research on this topic by biologists, palaeobiologists have done little to explore ancient high temperature environments. Exploration geologists and miners have long known the importance of hydrothermal systems, as they are sources for much of our gold, silver, copper, lead and zinc. Such systems are particularly abundant in Archaean and Proterozoic successions. Despite the rarity of systematic searches of these by palaeobiologists, already 12 fossiliferous Phanerozoic deposits are known. Five are 'black smoker' type submarine deposits that formed in the deep ocean and preserve a vent fauna like that in the modern oceans; the oldest is Devonian. Three are from shallow marine deposits of Carboniferous age. As well as 'worm tubes', several of these contain morphological or isotopic evidence of microbial life. The oldest well established fossiliferous submarine thermal spring deposit is Cambro-Ordovician; microorganisms of at least three or four types are preserved in this. One example each of Carboniferous and Jurassic sub-lacustrine fossiliferous thermal springs are known. There are two convincing examples of fossiliferous subaerial hydrothermal deposits. Both are Devonian. Several known Proterozoic and Archaean deposits are likely to preserve a substantial palaeobiological record, and all the indications are that there must be numerous deposits suitable for study. Already it is demonstrable that in ancient thermal spring deposits there is a record of microbial communities preserved as stromatolites, microfossils, isotope distribution patterns and hydrocarbon biomarkers.

  17. Palaeoproterozoic continental arc magmatism, and Neoproterozoic metamorphism in the Aravalli-Delhi orogenic belt, NW India: New constraints from in situ zircon U-Pb-Hf isotope systematics, monazite dating and whole-rock geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Parampreet; Zeh, Armin; Chaudhri, Naveen

    2017-04-01

    Presently, the extent, origin and petrogenesis of late Palaeoproterozoic (ca. 1.85 Ga) magmatism in the north-central Aravalli-Delhi orogenic belt, NW India and subsequent metamorphic overprints are poorly constrained. Results of new in situ zircon U-Pb-Hf isotope analyses in combination with whole-rock elemental and isotopic data provide the first hard evidence that granitoid magmatism occurred in a continental magmatic arc setting between 1.86 and 1.81 Ga. The Hf-Nd model ages of 3.0-2.6 Ga and inherited zircon grains of 3.3-2.5 Ga indicate abundant reworking of Archaean crust. Flat HREE patterns with negative Eu anomalies furthermore reveal that the granitoids were generated from garnet-free and plagioclase-rich sources at shallow depths. Significant isotope variation among granitoid samples (εHft = -3.7 to -9.0; εNdt = -4.8 to -7.9) indicate that the reworked Archaean crust was not completely homogenised during the Palaeoproterozoic. This is best reflected by zircon Hf-isotope variation of ca. 9.5 epsilon units within the oldest granitoid sample. Zircon grains from this sample define three discrete Hf-isotope groups at εHf1.86Ga = -8.9, -4.8 and -1.6. These are interpreted to result from mixing of zircon-saturated magmas derived from three distinct sources within the crust prior to solidification. A monazite U-Pb isochron age of 868 ± 4 Ma from one of the granitoid samples furthermore indicates that the Aravalli fold belt was affected by an important post-magmatic overprint, perhaps related to the widespread metasomatic, granulite metamorphic and/or magmatic events during the same time span.

  18. Stable Ni Isotope Fractionation In Systems Relevant To Banded Iron-Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, H.; Spivak-Birndorf, L.; Newkirk, D.; Wasylenki, L. E.

    2013-12-01

    An important event in the evolution of life was the rise of atmospheric oxygen during the Proterozoic. Preceding the rise in O2 was a decline in atmospheric methane concentrations, likely due to decreased productivity of methanogenic Archaea. Based on Ni concentrations in banded iron formations (BIF), Konhauser et al. (2009) hypothesized that mantle cooling during the Archaean reduced the amount of Ni present in igneous rocks and in oceans, causing a Ni shortage for methanogens. Methanogens use Ni for cofactor F430, a catalyst during methanogenesis. To confirm Konhauser's hypothesis, a proxy for methanogen productivity in the rock record is necessary, in order to determine whether a decline in methanogen populations correlated with the observed decrease in maximum Ni contents in rocks from the Archaean. Ni isotope ratios recorded in BIF (oceanic sediments consisting of layered iron oxides and cherts) may provide evidence of a decline in methane production. Cameron et al. (2009) have shown that methanogens preferentially assimilate light Ni isotopes. Thus Ni isotopes in BIF have potential use as biomarkers for methanogenesis. Ferrihydrite was almost certainly the dominant Fe-oxide phase precipitating during BIF deposition. Ferrihydrite nanoparticles have large surface areas and are able to remove aqueous metals from solution through multiple sorption mechanisms. Thus we investigated experimentally the relationship between Ni isotopes in solution and Ni associated with ferrihydrite. We experimented with two different sorption mechanisms: adsorption of aqueous Ni onto surfaces of synthetic ferrihydrite and coprecipitation of aqueous Ni with ferrihydrite. Preliminary results indicate that light isotopes are preferentially associated with ferrihydrite in both adsorption and coprecipitation experiments, with an average fractionation of 0.3‰ in terms of δ60/58 Ni. Future experiments will investigate whether the observed isotope fractionations reflect kinetics or

  19. Trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope geochemistry of Rungwe Volcanic Province, Tanzania: Implications for a superplume source for East Africa Rift magmatism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paterno R Castillo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The recently discovered high, plume-like 3He/4He ratios at Rungwe Volcanic Province (RVP in southern Tanzania, similar to those at the Main Ethiopian Rift in Ethiopia, strongly suggest that magmatism associated with continental rifting along the entire East African Rift System (EARS has a deep mantle contribution (Hilton et al., 2011. New trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data for high 3He/4He lavas and tephras from RVP can be explained by binary mixing relationships involving Early Proterozoic (+/- Archaean lithospheric mantle, present beneath the southern EARS, and a volatile-rich carbonatitic plume with a limited range of compositions and best represented by recent Nyiragongo lavas from the Virunga Volcanic Province also in the Western Rift. Other lavas from the Western Rift and from the southern Kenya Rift can also be explained through mixing between the same endmember components. In contrast, lavas from the northern Kenya and Main Ethiopian rifts can be explained through variable mixing between the same mantle plume material and the Middle to Late Proterozoic lithospheric mantle, present beneath the northern EARS. Thus, we propose that the bulk of EARS magmatism is sourced from mixing among three endmember sources: Early Proterozoic (+/- Archaean lithospheric mantle, Middle to Late Proterozoic lithospheric mantle and a volatile-rich carbonatitic plume with a limited range of compositions. We propose further that the African Superplume, a large, seismically anomalous feature originating in the lower mantle beneath southern Africa, influences magmatism throughout eastern Africa with magmatism at RVP and Main Ethiopian Rift representing two different heads of a single mantle plume source. This is consistent with a single mantle plume origin of the coupled He-Ne isotopic signatures of mantle-derived xenoliths and/or lavas from all segments of the EARS (Halldorsson et al., 2014.

  20. Precambrian crustal evolution and Cretaceous–Palaeogene faulting in West Greenland: Magnetic anomalies and metamorphic boundaries in the southern Nagssugtoqidian orogen, West Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korstgård, John A.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the southern Nagssugtoqidian orogen in West Greenland metamorphic terrains of both Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic ages occur with metamorphic grade varying from low amphibolites facies to granulite facies. The determination of the relative ages of the different metamorphic terrains is greatly aided by the intrusion of the 2 Ga Kangâmiut dyke swarm along a NNE trend. In Archaean areas dykes cross-cut gneiss structures, and the host gneisses are in amphibolite to granulite facies. Along Itilleq strong shearing in an E–W-oriented zone caused retrogression of surrounding gneisses to low amphibolite facies. Within this Itivdleq shear zone Kangâmiut dykes follow the E–W shear fabrics giving the impression that dykes were reoriented by the shearing. However, the dykes remain largely undeformed and unmetamorphosed, indicating that the shear zone was established prior to dyke emplacement and that the orientation of the dykes here was governed by the shear fabric. Metamorphism and deformation north of Itilleq involve both dykes and host gneisses, and the metamorphic grade is amphibolite facies increasing to granulite facies at the northern boundary of the southern Nagssugtoqidian orogen. Here a zone of strong deformation, the Ikertôq thrust zone, coincides roughly with the amphibolite–granulite facies transition. Total magnetic field intensity anomalies from aeromagnetic data coincide spectacularly with metamorphic boundaries and reflect changes in content of the magnetic minerals at facies transitions. Even the nature of facies transitions is apparent. Static metamorphic boundaries are gradual whereas dynamic boundaries along deformation zones are abrupt.

  1. Garnet granulite xenoliths from the Northern Baltic shield- The underplated lower crust of a palaeoproterozoic large igneous province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempton, P.D.; Downes, H.; Neymark, L.A.; Wartho, J.A.; Zartman, R.E.; Sharkov, E.V.

    2001-01-01

    Garnet granulite facies xenoliths hosted in Devonian lamprophyres from the Kola Peninsula are interpreted to represent the high-grade metamorphic equivalents of continental flood tholeiites, emplaced into the Baltic Shield Archaean lower crust in early Proterozoic time. Geochronological data and similarities in major and trace element geochemistry suggest that the xenoliths formed during the same plume-related magmatic event that created a widespread Palaeoproterozoic large igneous province (LIP) at 2.4-2.5 Ga. They are, thus, the first samples of the lower crust of a Palaeo-proterozoic LIP to be studied in petrological detail. The suite includes mafic granulites (gar + cpx + rutile ?? plag ?? opx ?? phlog ?? amph), felsic granulites (plag + gar + cpx + rutile ?? qtz ?? Kspar ?? phlog ?? amph) and pyroxenites (?? phlog ?? amph), but mafic garnet granulites predominate. Although some samples are restites, there is no evidence for a predominance of magmatic cumulates, as is common for Phanerozoic lower-crustal xenolith suites. Metasediments are also absent. Phlogopite and/or amphibole occur in xenoliths of all types and are interpreted to be metasomatic in origin. The K-rich metasomatic event occurred at ?????0 Ga, and led to substantial enrichment in Rb, K, LREE/HREE, Th/U, Th/Pb and, to a lesser extent, Nb and Ti. The fluids responsible for this metasomatism were probably derived from a second plume that arrived beneath the region at this time. Evidence for partial melting of mafic crust exists in the presence of migmatitic granulites. The timing of migmatization overlaps that of metasomatism, and it is suggested that migmatization was facilitated by the metasomatism. The metamorphism, metasomatism and migmatization recorded in the Kola granulite xenoliths may be representative of the processes responsible for converting Archaean LIP-generated proto-continents into continental crust.

  2. Mass Independent Fractionation of Sulphur Isotopes in Precambrian Sedimentary Rocks: Indicator for Changes in Atmospheric Composition and the Operation of the Global Sulphur Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, M.; Farquhar, J.; Strauss, H.

    2005-12-01

    Large mass independent fractionation (MIF) of sulphur isotopes in sedimentary rocks older than 2.3 Ga and the absence of this isotopic anomaly in younger rocks seem to be the consequence of a change in Earth's atmospheric composition from essentially oxygen-free or to oxygen-rich conditions. MIF is produced by photochemical reactions of volcanogenic sulphur dioxide with UV radiation in the absence of an ozone shield. The products of such processes are elemental sulphur with positive and sulphate with negative Δ33S values. Here we present isotope data (32S, 33S, 34S) for sedimentary pyrites from Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic rocks of the Kaapvaal Craton (South Africa), the Pilbara Craton (Australia) and the Greenland Shield (Isua Supercrustal Belt). Their ages range from 3.85 to 2.47 Ga. Large positive Δ33S values up to +9.13 ‰ in several Archaean units from the Kapvaal and Pilbara Cratons are attributed to low atmospheric oxygen at that time. Interestingly, very low Δ33S values between -0.28 and +0.57 ‰ appear to characterize the Witwatersrand succession of South Africa (3.0 Ga). This rather small MIF signature was previously detected in rocks of the same age in Western Australia (OHMOTO et al., 2005). The signature is interpreted as a global signal, which could be the consequence of a shielding effect induced by one or more atmospheric components. The most probable chemical compounds for this process are methane and carbon dioxide. Rocks of the Kameeldoorns Fm. (2.71 Ga), Kaapvaal Craton, display also low values between -0.46 and +0.33 ‰, which are consistent with the small (absent) MIF signal in rocks of the Hardey Fm. (2.76 Ga) of Western Australia (OHMOTO et al., 2005). Very low carbon isotope values between -51 and -40 ‰ in late Archaean kerogens (2.6 - 2.8 Ga) indicate a high concentration of methane in the atmosphere (PAVLOV et al., 2001). This high methane level could produce an organic haze, which absorbed most of the UV radiation and prevented

  3. Variation of stable silicon isotopes. Analytical developments and applications in Precambrian geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, Kathrin

    2010-05-28

    regarded as the most likely source of silica for the silicification process. Calculations show that classical water-rock interaction can not influence the silicon isotope variation due to the very low concentration of Si in seawater (49 ppm). The data are consistent with a two end-member component mixture between basalt and chert. The secular increase in chert isotope composition through time is confirmed by the present data. Possible factors that could account for different gradients of δ{sup 30}Si vs. δ{sup 18}O are changes of seawater isotope signature, the water temperature or secondary alteration. The last section describes potential changes in the source of Granitoids in the Archaean: the Si isotope perspective. Sodic tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) intrusive units make up large components of the Archaean crust. In contrast, today's continental crust is more potassic in composition (GMS group: granite-monzonite-syenite). Processes that lead to this changeover from ''sodic'' to ''potassic'' crust are the subject of this section. Silicon isotope measurements were combined with major and trace element analyses on different generations of TTG and GMS group intrusive units from 3.55 to 3.10 Ga from the study area. δ{sup 30}Si-values show a slight temporal increase during different pluton generations, with sodic intrusive units demonstrating the lowest Si-isotope composition. The small increase in silicon isotope composition with time might be due to different temperature conditions in the source of granitoids, with Na-rich, light δ{sup 30}Si granitoids emerging at higher temperatures. A similarity in δ{sup 30}Si between Archaean K-rich plutons and Phanerozoic K-rich plutons is confirmed.

  4. Silica enrichment, graphic granite and aquamarine growth: a new exploration guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. BHASKARA RAO

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Granitic pegmatites are traditionally known to contain graphic, perthitic and myrmekitic intergrowths related to quartz and K- and Na- feldspars. They are further considered to characterise the pegmatite types distinguishing them from the granites and other related plutonic rock types. Graphic granite is accepted also as a synonym to granitic pegmatite. Systematic studies, by the author and colleagues, on the granitic pegmatite gem deposits have permitted the definition of two aquamarine gem provinces in ENE Brazil, one in the NeoProterozoic and the other in the Archaean sequences. Potash feldspars in the pegmatites in the former show perthitic intergrowths, whereas in the latter graphic intergrowth dominates with anomalously coarse centimetric quartz along the cleavages of K-feldspar. Several granitic pegmatites hosted in Archaean complex, in Lages Pintadas Aquamarine Province, Santa Cruz, RN State, present this texture-structure. Graphic intergrowth is attributed to the eutectic crystallization, succeeded by hydrothermal fluids with silica enrichment permitting the growth through diffusion and nucleation of quartz and along cleavages of potash feldspar. In the Archaean terrain, the abundance of recycled chert forming metapsammitic migmatites traversed by numerous quartz veins and coarse graphic granites, has contributed to the growth of beryl and also the aquamarines.Pegmatitos graníticos são tradicionalmente conhecidos por terem intercrescimentos gráficos, pertíticos e mirmequíticos, relacionados a quartzo e feldspatos potássicos e sódicos. Também são considerados para caracterizar os tipos de pegmatitos, distinguindo-os dos granitos e outros tipos de rochas plutônicas relacionadas. Granito gráfico é aceito como sinônimo do pegmatito granítico. Estudos sistemáticos, do autor e seus colegas, sobre depósitos de pegmatitos graníticos de gemas permitiram a definição de duas províncias de gemas águas marinhas no ENE do Brasil

  5. Growth and Evolution of the Kerala Khondalite Belt, Southern India: Mineral and Whole rock Chemical Evidence for Intracrustal Melting and Magmatic Petrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlupet Rangasetty, R.; Chettootty, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Kerala Khondalite Belt (KKB) constitutes an important lower crustal segment in the southern Indian granulite terrain. Dominant rock types, except sillimanite bearing gneisses, are classified as sodic and potassic granitoids and a general supracrustal origin is ascribed to these rocks. We present here new results from our studies on mineral and whole rock major- and trace-element and REE systematic of major litho units of the belt. We address the petrogenesis, physical conditions during crystallization and tectonic setting of KKB rocks. Granitoids (gneiss and variants of charnockites) makeup more than 70% of exposed rock types in KKB. They are classified as sodic and potassic groups based on K2O/Na2O ratios. Mineral chemical analysis of granitoids, especially biotites from different groups document igneous parentage and as potential indicator of nature of the magma. Biotites from sodic group are Mg2+-rich (XMg:0.47-0.63), denote calc-alkaline host in contrast to those from potassic groups, which are Fe2+-types with much lower XMg (0.37-0.44) and suggest an alkaline host. Biotites in potassic group are poorer in A12O3 than sodic, indicating evolved nature of the magmatic protolith. Decrease in ΣAl with increasing Fe/(Fe+Mg) values of biotites indicate progressive oxidising condition during magma evolution. Compositional variation of biotite allow us to speculate that the host magmas of sodic charnockites as calc-alkaline, arc-type with features typical of Archaean TTGs and potassic groups as partial melts of meta-igneous lower crust with little mantle contribution. The sodic group has geochemical affinity to Archaean tonalities with low-K, calc-alkaline, metaluminous to peraluminous chemistry. Compositionally contrasting K-rich rocks are essentially of granitic composition. Most oxides in both the groups, with exceptions of K2O and Na2O, show negative correlation with SiO2. The sodic group is enriched in Sr and depleted in Rb and Th. They exhibit geochemical

  6. Mesoclimatic imprints on palaeoclimate records from rift graben sediments: Implications from stable and radiogenic isotope data from mammalian tooth enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachert, Thomas; Brügmann, Gerhard; Mertz, Dieter F.; Kullmer, Ottmar; Schrenk, Friedemann; Ssemmanda, Immaculate; Taubald, Herbert

    2010-05-01

    within the habitat of the hippopotamids and implies increasing evaporation of lake waters in the Albertine Rift. The variation in the Sr isotopic composition documents variable Sr fluxes from the Albertine Rift catchments composed of radiogenic Archaean, less radiogenic Proterozoic crustal rocks and unradiogenic Neogene mantle derived volcanic rocks. Lake Albert is located in Archaean rocks. Therefore, the most radiogenic strontium isotopic composition at 2 Ma implies contributions of meteoric waters draining dominantly Archaean crust and maximum isolation of the lake. This is consistent with its maximum evaporation state reflected in 18O/16O values and vegetation change inferred from 13C/12C. Our data show that mesoclimate variation induced by graben formation and rift shoulder uplift must be taken into account when interpreting rift floor related climate archives such as palaeosols.

  7. Unexpected DNA-fingerprinting pattern in a deep peat bog: evidence for methanotrophs at the bottom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, P.; Rossi, P.; Huon, S.; Eilrich, B.; Casati, S.

    2003-04-01

    With the goal of a better understanding of the fate of methane in the deep layers of peat bogs, we analysed the microbial 16S rDNA gene pool and measured the stable carbon isotope composition of bulk peat of a deep (6 m) peat bog profile (Etang de la Gruyère, Switzerland). Both Bacterial and Archaean communities were assessed using respectively TTGE (Temporal Temperature Gradient Electrophoresis) and SSCP (Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism), with fragments of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rDNA gene. The "relative diversity" shown in the TTGE AND SSCP gel patterns is presented using indices and band numbers per sample (Simpson evenness). PCA was calculated on the basis of the intensities of all bands found in the TTGE and SSCP fingerprinting profiles. These DNA fingerprinting patterns reveal the presence of a structured microbial community throughout the whole depth profile. Clear differences can be observed between the communities found in the near surface layers and those found at depth. Surprisingly, for both Archaean and Bacterial communities, the deepest samples display a high similarity level with those found in the first 20 centimeters. The δ13C values of the peat are relatively constant from the surface of the bog down to a depth of 5 m (values between 25.5 ppm and 26.5 ppm). Below 5 m the values decrease considerably with depth ( 28.5 ppm). As a working hypothesis to explain the two observations, we consider the possibility of the presence of methanotrophs in the deepest parts of the bogs. The electron acceptors needed for methane oxidation could be derived from lateral advection of less reducing groundwater. However, available pore water analyses suggest that neither molecular oxygen, nor sulfate or nitrate are present. One possible oxidising agent would be trivalent iron (solid or colloidal). Indeed are the iron concentrations in the deeper pore waters are elevated. Such deep methanotrophic microbial community could be similar to those found near

  8. Cover sequences at the northern margin of the Antongil Craton, NE Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, W.; Walsh, G.J.; De Waele, B.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Horstwood, M.S.A.; Bracciali, L.; Schofield, D.I.; Wollenberg, U.; Lidke, D.J.; Rasaona, I.T.; Rabarimanana, M.H.

    2011-01-01

    The island of Madagascar is a collage of Precambrian, generally high-grade metamorphic basement domains, that are locally overlain by unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks and poorly understood low-grade metasediments. In the Antalaha area of NE Madagascar, two distinct cover sequences rest on high-grade metamorphic and igneous basement rocks of the Archaean Antongil craton and the Neoproterozoic Bemarivo belt. The older of these two cover sequences, the Andrarona Group, consists of low-grade metasedimentary rocks. The younger sequence, the newly defined Ampohafana Formation, consists of unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks. The Andrarona Group rests on Neoarchaean granites and monzogranites of the Antongil craton and consists of a basal metagreywacke, thick quartzites and an upper sequence of sericite-chlorite meta-mudstones, meta-sandstones and a volcaniclastic meta-sandstone. The depositional age of the volcaniclastic meta-sandstone is constrained in age by U–Pb laser-ablation ICP-MS analyses of euhedral zircons to 1875 ± 8 Ma (2σ). Detrital zircons of Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic age represent an input from the Antongil craton and a newly defined Palaeoproterozoic igneous unit, the Masindray tonalite, which underlies the Andrarona Group, and yielded a U–Pb zircon age of 2355 ± 11 Ma (2σ), thus constraining the maximum age of deposition of the basal part of the Andrarona Group. The Andrarona Group shows a low-grade metamorphic overprint in the area near Antalaha; illite crystallinity values scatter around 0.17°Δ2Θ CuKα, which is within the epizone. The Ampohafana Formation consists of undeformed, polymict conglomerate, cross-bedded sandstone, and red mudstone. An illite crystallinity value of >0.25°Δ2Θ CuKα obtained from the rocks is typical of the diagenetic zone. Occurrences of rhyodacite pebbles in the Ampohafana Formation and the intrusion of a basaltic dyke suggest a deposition in a WSW-ENE-trending graben system during the opening of the Indian

  9. Liquid Immiscibility of Boninite in Xiangcheng, Southwestern China, and Its implication to Genetic Relationship between Boninite and Komatiitic Basalt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Boninitic rocks and associated high-magnesian basalt and high-iron tholeiite in the Xiangcheng area constitute the basal horizon of the arc volcanic sequence in the Triassic Yidun Island-Arc, southwestern China. The boninite occurs as pillow, massive and ocellar lavas; the last one possesses well-developed globular structure and alternates with the former two. The boninite is characterized by the absence of phenocrysts of olivine and low-Ca pyroxenes and by low CaO/Al2O3 ratios (1000 ppm) and Ni (>250 ppm). The normalized abundance patterns (NAP) of trace elements to primitive mantle are similar to the NAP of low-Ca modern boninites and SHMB in the Archaean and Proterozoic. As a mechanism of ocellar texture, liquid immiscibility in boninite is supported by the following lines of evidence: (a) sharp contact between ocelli and matrix, (b) constant volumetric ratios of ocelli/matrix and common coalescence of ocelli in ocellar rocks, (c) identical micro-spinifex textures and mineral assemblages with different modal mineral contents in ocelli-matrix pairs, (d) bubbles and acicular clinopyroxene crystal strand over the boundary between ocelli and matrix, and (e) chemical compositions of ocelli and matrix corresponding to high-Mg andesite and komatiitic basalt, respectively. The close association and geochemical similarities between ocellar boninites and pillow boninite/massive boninite suggest that these are comagmatic rocks. The primary features of the ocellar boninite indicated by high Mg/(Mg+Fe2+) ratio and high Cr and Ni abundance show that liquid immiscibility took place in the early evolution stage of the boninitic magma. The miscibility gap in boninite which is smaller than that in tholeiite is likely to be due to the low FeO*/MgO+FeO* ratio and high MgO content of the boninitic magma. The association of komatiite-komatiitic basalt-boninite (or SHMB) and the immiscibility phenomenon in high-Mg lavas in some Archaean greenstone belts and ophiolites is also

  10. Age, origin, and thermal evolution of the ultra-fresh 1.9 Ga Winnipegosis Komatiites, Manitoba, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterton, Pedro; Pearson, D. Graham; Kjarsgaard, Bruce; Hulbert, Larry; Locock, Andrew; Parman, Stephen; Davis, Bill

    2017-01-01

    The Proterozoic spans the longest portion of earth's history, yet in contrast to the Archaean, the record of komatiites and related high MgO igneous rocks from this Eon is sparse. This paper describes the pristine Palaeoproterozoic Winnipegosis Komatiites, from Manitoba, Canada, which form part of the Circum-Superior Belt large igneous province. We present a comprehensive petrographical investigation, mineral and bulk rock geochemistry, and Al-in-olivine thermometry for the Winnipegosis Komatiites, along with new U-Pb SHRIMP dating of zircons from a mafic unit, which yield an age of 1870.3 ± 7.1 Ma for the Winnipegosis Komatiite Belt. The komatiites are Al-undepleted and dominated by massive olivine porphyritic flows with a median thickness of 6 m. Differentiated flows containing layers of olivine spinifex are present, but rare. Trace element data indicate the komatiites were derived from depleted mantle, and subsequently contaminated with 2-3% continental crust. Temperatures from Al-in-olivine thermometry are consistent with a nominally dry melt, and combined with olivine-melt Mg-Fe partitioning, suggest a parental melt with 24 wt% MgO and a liquidus (olivine) temperature of 1501 °C, approximately 100 °C cooler than their hottest Archaean counterparts. At 1424 °C chromite joined olivine as a crystallising phase. Olivine and chromite phenocrysts were re-mixed with residual melt shortly before or during komatiite eruption, which occurred by the time the magma had cooled to 1321 °C. Combined geochemical and geological evidence requires that the Winnipegosis Komatiites erupted onto rifting continental crust. Their high liquidus temperatures require anomalously hot mantle. Considering the Winnipegosis Komatiites in the context of the broader Circum-Superior Belt, we suggest that these magmas formed from a mantle plume that was deflected towards the margins of the Superior craton by strong gradients in lithospheric thickness. This interpretation of the mode of

  11. Assessment of microbial communities associated with fermentative-methanogenic biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in groundwater contaminated with a biodiesel blend (B20).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Débora Toledo; da Silva, Márcio Luís Busi; Nossa, Carlos Wolfgang; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Corseuil, Henry Xavier

    2014-09-01

    A controlled field experiment was conducted to assess the potential for fermentative-methanogenic biostimulation (by ammonium-acetate injection) to enhance biodegradation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in groundwater contaminated with biodiesel B20 (20:80 v/v soybean biodiesel and diesel). Changes in microbial community structure were assessed by pyrosequencing 16S rRNA analyses. BTEX and PAH removal began 0.7 year following the release, concomitantly with the increase in the relative abundance of Desulfitobacterium and Geobacter spp. (from 5 to 52.7 % and 15.8 to 37.3 % of total Bacteria 16S rRNA, respectively), which are known to anaerobically degrade hydrocarbons. The accumulation of anaerobic metabolites acetate and hydrogen that could hinder the thermodynamic feasibility of BTEX and PAH biotransformations under fermentative/methanogenic conditions was apparently alleviated by the growing predominance of Methanosarcina. This suggests the importance of microbial population shifts that enrich microorganisms capable of interacting syntrophically to enhance the feasibility of fermentative-methanogenic bioremediation of biodiesel blend releases.

  12. Expanding the Diet for DIET: Electron Donors Supporting Direct Interspecies Electron Transfer (DIET in Defined Co-Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-YIng eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET has been recognized as an alternative to interspecies H2 transfer as a mechanism for syntrophic growth, but previous studies on DIET with defined co-cultures have only documented DIET with ethanol as the electron donor in the absence of conductive materials. Co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens and Geobacter sulfurreducens metabolized propanol, butanol, propionate, and butyrate with the reduction of fumarate to succinate. G. metallireducens utilized each of these substrates whereas only electrons available from DIET supported G. sulfurreducens respiration. A co-culture of G. metallireducens and a strain of G. sulfurreducens that could not metabolize acetate oxidized acetate with fumarate as the electron acceptor, demonstrating that acetate can also be syntrophically metabolized via DIET. A co-culture of G. metallireducens and Methanosaeta harundinacea previously shown to syntrophically convert ethanol to methane via DIET metabolized propanol or butanol as the sole electron donor, but not propionate or butyrate. The stoichiometric accumulation of propionate or butyrate in the propanol- or butanol-fed cultures demonstrated that M. harundinaceae could conserve energy to support growth solely from electrons derived from DIET. Co-cultures of G. metallireducens and Methanosarcina barkeri could also incompletely metabolize propanol and butanol and did not metabolize propionate or butyrate as sole electron donors. These results expand the range of substrates that are known to be syntrophically metabolized through DIET, but suggest that claims of propionate and butyrate metabolism via DIET in mixed microbial communities warrant further validation.

  13. Thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of garbage, screened swine and dairy cattle manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Tang, Yue-Qin; Matsui, Toru; Morimura, Shigeru; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Kida, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Methane fermentation characteristics of garbage, swine manure (SM), dairy cattle manure (DCM) and mixtures of these wastes were studied. SM and DCM showed much lower volatile total solid (VTS) digestion efficiencies and methane yield than those of garbage. VTS digestion efficiency of SM was significantly increased when it was co-digested with garbage (Garbage: SM=1:1). Co-digestion of garbage, SM and DCM with respect to the relative quantity of each waste discharged in the Kikuchi (1: 16: 27) and Aso (1: 19: 12) areas indicated that co-digestion with garbage would improve the digestion characteristic of SM and DCM as far as the ratio of DCM in the wastes was maintained below a certain level. When the mixed waste (Garbage: SM: DCM=1:19:12) was treated using a thermophilic UAF reactor, methanogens responsible for the methane production were Methanoculleus and Methanosarcina species. Bacterial species in the phylum Firmicutes were dominant bacteria responsible for the digestion of these wastes. As the percentage of garbage in the mixed wastes used in this study was low (2-3%) and the digestion efficiency of DCM was obviously improved, the co-digestion of SM and DCM with limited garbage was a prospective method to treat the livestock waste effectively and was an attractive alternative technology for the construction of a sustainable environment and society in stock raising area.

  14. Characteristic microbial community of a dry thermophilic methanogenic digester: its long-term stability and change with feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yue-Qin; Ji, Pan; Hayashi, Junpei; Koike, Yoji; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Kida, Kenji

    2011-09-01

    Thermophilic dry anaerobic digestion of sludge for cellulose methanization was acclimated at 53 °C for nearly 5 years using a waste paper-based medium. The stability of the microbial community structure and the microbial community responsible for the cellulose methanization were studied by 16S rRNA gene-based clone library analysis. The microbial community structure remained stable during the long-term acclimation period. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens dominated in methanogens and Methanothermobacter, Methanobacterium, Methanoculleus, and Methanosarcina were responsible for the methane production. Bacteria showed relatively high diversity and distributed mainly in the phyla Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Synergistetes. Ninety percent of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were affiliated with the phylum Firmicutes, indicating the crucial roles of this phylum in the digestion. Relatives of Clostridium stercorarium, Clostridium thermocellum, and Halocella cellulosilytica were dominant cellulose degraders. The acclimated stable sludge was used to treat garbage stillage discharged from a fuel ethanol production process, and the shift of microbial communities with the change of feed was analyzed. Both archaeal and bacterial communities had obviously changed: Methanoculleus spp. and Methanothermobacter spp. and the protein- and fatty acid-degrading bacteria became dominant. Accumulation of ammonia as well as volatile fatty acids led to the inhibition of microbial activity and finally resulted in the deterioration of methane fermentation of the garbage stillage.

  15. Microbial Ecology of Anaerobic Digesters: The Key Players of Anaerobiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Shah, Fayyaz; Mahmood, Qaisar; Maroof Shah, Mohammad; Pervez, Arshid; Ahmad Asad, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is the method of wastes treatment aimed at a reduction of their hazardous effects on the biosphere. The mutualistic behavior of various anaerobic microorganisms results in the decomposition of complex organic substances into simple, chemically stabilized compounds, mainly methane and CO2. The conversions of complex organic compounds to CH4 and CO2 are possible due to the cooperation of four different groups of microorganisms, that is, fermentative, syntrophic, acetogenic, and methanogenic bacteria. Microbes adopt various pathways to evade from the unfavorable conditions in the anaerobic digester like competition between sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and methane forming bacteria for the same substrate. Methanosarcina are able to use both acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic pathways for methane production. This review highlights the cellulosic microorganisms, structure of cellulose, inoculum to substrate ratio, and source of inoculum and its effect on methanogenesis. The molecular techniques such as DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) utilized for dynamic changes in microbial communities and FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) that deal with taxonomy and interaction and distribution of tropic groups used are also discussed. PMID:24701142

  16. Stimulation of methane generation from nonproductive coal by addition of nutrients or a microbial consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elizabeth J.P.; Voytek, Mary A.; Corum, Margo D.; Orem, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Biogenic formation of methane from coal is of great interest as an underexploited source of clean energy. The goal of some coal bed producers is to extend coal bed methane productivity and to utilize hydrocarbon wastes such as coal slurry to generate new methane. However, the process and factors controlling the process, and thus ways to stimulate it, are poorly understood. Subbituminous coal from a nonproductive well in south Texas was stimulated to produce methane in microcosms when the native population was supplemented with nutrients (biostimulation) or when nutrients and a consortium of bacteria and methanogens enriched from wetland sediment were added (bioaugmentation). The native population enriched by nutrient addition included Pseudomonas spp., Veillonellaceae, and Methanosarcina barkeri. The bioaugmented microcosm generated methane more rapidly and to a higher concentration than the biostimulated microcosm. Dissolved organics, including long-chain fatty acids, single-ring aromatics, and long-chain alkanes accumulated in the first 39 days of the bioaugmented microcosm and were then degraded, accompanied by generation of methane. The bioaugmented microcosm was dominated by Geobacter sp., and most of the methane generation was associated with growth of Methanosaeta concilii. The ability of the bioaugmentation culture to produce methane from coal intermediates was confirmed in incubations of culture with representative organic compounds. This study indicates that methane production could be stimulated at the nonproductive field site and that low microbial biomass may be limiting in situ methane generation. In addition, the microcosm study suggests that the pathway for generating methane from coal involves complex microbial partnerships.

  17. Microbial composition and characterization of prevalent methanogens and acetogens isolated from syntrophic methanogenic granules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Weimin (Michigan Biotechnology Inst., Lansing, MI (United States) Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States) Dept. of Biochemistry, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (United States)); Jain, M.K. (Michigan Biotechnology Inst., Lansing, MI (United States) Dept. of Animal Science, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)); Conway de Macario, E. (Wadsworth Center for Laboratories and Research, New York State Dept. of Health, and School of Public Health, State Univ. of New York, NY (United States)); Thiele, J.H. (Michigan Biotechnology Inst., Lansing, MI (United States) Dept. of Biochemistry, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)); Zeikus, J.G. (Michigan Biotechnology Inst., Lansing, MI (United States) Dept. of Biochemistry, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States) Dept. of Microbiology and Public Health, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States))

    1992-11-01

    The microbial species composition of methanogenic granules developed on an acetate-propionate-butyrate mixture was characterized. The granules contained high numbers of adhesive methanogens (10[sup 12]/g dry weight) and butyrate-, isobutyrate-, and propionate-degrading synthrophic acetogens (10[sup 11]/g dry weight), but low numbers of hydrolytic-fermentative bacteria (10[sup 9]/g dry weight). Prevalent methanogens in the granules included: Methanobacterium formicicum strain T1N and RF, Methanosarcina mazei strain T18, Methanospirillum hungatei strain BD, and a non-filamentous, bamboo-shaped rod species, Methanothrix/Methanosaeta-like strain M7. Prevalent syntrophic acetogens included: A butyrate-degrading Syntrophospora bryantii-like strain BH, a butyrate-isobutyrate degrading non-spore-forming rod, strain IB, a propionate-degrading spore-forming oval-shaped species, strain PT, and a propionate-degrading non-spore-forming sulfate-reducing rod species, strain PW, which was able to grow syntrophically with an H[sub 2]-utilizing methanogen. Sulfate-reducing bacteria did not play a significant role in the metabolism of H[sub 2], formate, acetate and butyrate but they were involved in propionate degradation. (orig.).

  18. Microbial community dynamics in continuous microbial fuel cells fed with synthetic wastewater and pig slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotres, Ana; Tey, Laura; Bonmatí, August; Viñas, Marc

    2016-10-01

    Two-chambered microbial fuel cells (MFCs) operating with synthetic wastewater and pig slurry were assessed. Additionally, the use of 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES-Inh) was studied. The synthetic wastewater-fed MFC (MFCSW) showed a maximum power density (PDmax) of 2138mWm(-3), and the addition of BES-Inh (10mM) did not show any improvement in its performance (PDmax=2078mWm(-3)). When pig slurry was used as feed (MFCPS), PDmax increased up to 5623mWm(-3). The microbial community composition was affected by the type of substrate used. While, Pseudomonadaceae and Clostridiaceae were the most representative families within the acetate-based medium, Flavobacteriaceae, Chitinophagaceae, Comamonadaceae and Nitrosomonadaceae were predominant when pig slurry was used as feed. Otherwise, only the Eubacterial microbial community composition was strongly modified when adding BES-Inh, thus leading to an enrichment of the Bacteroidetes phylum. Oppositely, the Archaeal community was less affected by the addition of BES-Inh, and Methanosarcina sp., arose as the predominant family in both situations. Despite all the differences in microbial communities, 6 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to Bacteroidetes (Porphyromonadaceae and Marinilabiaceae) and Firmicutes (Clostridiales) were found to be common to both MFCs, also for different contents of COD and N-NH4(+), and therefore could be considered as the bioanode core microbiome.

  19. Characterization of the COD removal, electricity generation, and bacterial communities in microbial fuel cells treating molasses wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Yeong; Kim, Tae G; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2016-11-09

    The chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, electricity generation, and microbial communities were compared in 3 types of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) treating molasses wastewater. Single-chamber MFCs without and with a proton exchange membrane (PEM), and double-chamber MFC were constructed. A total of 10,000 mg L(-1) COD of molasses wastewater was continuously fed. The COD removal, electricity generation, and microbial communities in the two types of single-chamber MFCs were similar, indicating that the PEM did not enhance the reactor performance. The COD removal in the single-chamber MFCs (89-90%) was higher than that in the double-chamber MFC (50%). However, electricity generation in the double-chamber MFC was higher than that in the single-chamber MFCs. The current density (80 mA m(-2)) and power density (17 mW m(-2)) in the double-chamber MFC were 1.4- and 2.2-times higher than those in the single-chamber MFCs, respectively. The bacterial community structures in single- and double-chamber MFCs were also distinguishable. The amount of Proteobacteria in the double-chamber MFC was 2-3 times higher than those in the single-chamber MFCs. For the archaeal community, Methanothrix (96.4%) was remarkably dominant in the single-chamber MFCs, but Methanobacterium (35.1%), Methanosarcina (28.3%), and Methanothrix (16.2%) were abundant in the double-chamber MFC.

  20. Impact of different antibiotics on methane production using waste-activated sludge: mechanisms and microbial community dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Nurul Asyifah; Sakai, Kenji; Shirai, Yoshihito; Maeda, Toshinari

    2016-11-01

    Anaerobic digestion is an effective method for reducing the by-product of waste-activated sludge (WAS) from wastewater treatment plants and for producing bioenergy from WAS. However, only a limited number of studies have attempted to improve anaerobic digestion by targeting the microbial interactions in WAS. In this study, we examined whether different antibiotics positively, negatively, or neutrally influence methane fermentation by evaluating changes in the microbial community and functions in WAS. Addition of azithromycin promoted the microbial communities related to the acidogenic and acetogenic stages, and a high concentration of soluble proteins and a high activity of methanogens were detected. Chloramphenicol inhibited methane production but did not affect the bacteria that contribute to the hydrolysis, acidogenesis, and acetogenesis digestion stages. The addition of kanamycin, which exhibits the same methane productivity as a control (antibiotic-free WAS), did not affect all of the microbial communities during anaerobic digestion. This study demonstrates the simultaneous functions and interactions of diverse bacteria and methanogenic Archaea in different stages of the anaerobic digestion of WAS. The ratio of Caldilinea, Methanosarcina, and Clostridium may correspond closely to the trend of methane production in each antibiotic. The changes in microbial activities and function by antibiotics facilitate a better understanding of bioenergy production.

  1. Characterization of wheat straw-degrading anaerobic alkali-tolerant mixed cultures from soda lake sediments by molecular and cultivation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porsch, Katharina; Wirth, Balázs; Tóth, Erika M; Schattenberg, Florian; Nikolausz, Marcell

    2015-09-01

    Alkaline pretreatment has the potential to enhance the anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic biomass to biogas. However, the elevated pH of the substrate may require alkalitolerant microbial communities for an effective digestion. Three mixed anaerobic lignocellulolytic cultures were enriched from sediments from two soda lakes with wheat straw as substrate under alkaline (pH 9) mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions. The gas production of the three cultures ceased after 4 to 5 weeks, and the produced gas was composed of carbon dioxide and methane. The main liquid intermediates were acetate and propionate. The physiological behavior of the cultures was stable even after several transfers. The enrichment process was also followed by molecular fingerprinting (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism) of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and of the mcrA/mrtA functional gene for methanogens. The main shift in the microbial community composition occurred between the sediment samples and the first enrichment, whereas the structure was stable in the following transfers. The bacterial communities mainly consisted of Sphingobacteriales, Clostridiales and Spirochaeta, but differed at genus level. Methanothermobacter and Methanosarcina genera and the order Methanomicrobiales were predominant methanogenes in the obtained cultures. Additionally, single cellulolytic microorganisms were isolated from enrichment cultures and identified as members of the alkaliphilic or alkalitolerant genera. The results show that anaerobic alkaline habitats harbor diverse microbial communities, which can degrade lignocellulose effectively and are therefore a potential resource for improving anaerobic digestion.

  2. Conductive Fe3O4 nanoparticles accelerate syntrophic methane production from butyrate oxidation in two different lake sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianchao Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Syntrophic methanogenesis is an essential link in the global carbon cycle and a key bioprocess for the disposal of organic waste and production of biogas. Recent studies suggest direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET is involved in electron exchange in methanogenesis occurring in paddy soils, anaerobic digesters and specific co-cultures with Geobacter. In this study, we evaluate the possible involvement of DIET in the syntrophic oxidation of butyrate in the enrichments from two lake sediments (an urban lake and a natural lake. The results showed that the production of CH4 was significantly accelerated in the presence of conductive nanoscale Fe3O4 or carbon nanotubes (CNTs in the sediment enrichments. Observations made with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and scanning electron microscope (SEM indicated that microbial aggregates were formed in the enrichments. It appeared that the average cell-to-cell distance in aggregates in nanomaterial-amended enrichments was larger than that in aggregates in the non-amended control. These results suggested that DIET-mediated syntrophic methanogenesis could occur in the lake sediments in the presence of conductive materials. Microbial community analysis of the enrichments revealed that the genera of Syntrophomonas, Sulfurospirillum, Methanosarcina and Methanoregula were responsible for syntrophic oxidation of butyrate in lake sediment samples. The mechanism for the conductive-material-facilitated DIET in butyrate syntrophy deserves further investigation.

  3. Conductive Fe3O4 Nanoparticles Accelerate Syntrophic Methane Production from Butyrate Oxidation in Two Different Lake Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianchao; Lu, Yahai

    2016-01-01

    Syntrophic methanogenesis is an essential link in the global carbon cycle and a key bioprocess for the disposal of organic waste and production of biogas. Recent studies suggest direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is involved in electron exchange in methanogenesis occurring in paddy soils, anaerobic digesters, and specific co-cultures with Geobacter. In this study, we evaluate the possible involvement of DIET in the syntrophic oxidation of butyrate in the enrichments from two lake sediments (an urban lake and a natural lake). The results showed that the production of CH4 was significantly accelerated in the presence of conductive nanoscale Fe3O4 or carbon nanotubes in the sediment enrichments. Observations made with fluorescence in situ hybridization and scanning electron microscope indicated that microbial aggregates were formed in the enrichments. It appeared that the average cell-to-cell distance in aggregates in nanomaterial-amended enrichments was larger than that in aggregates in the non-amended control. These results suggested that DIET-mediated syntrophic methanogenesis could occur in the lake sediments in the presence of conductive materials. Microbial community analysis of the enrichments revealed that the genera of Syntrophomonas, Sulfurospirillum, Methanosarcina, and Methanoregula were responsible for syntrophic oxidation of butyrate in lake sediment samples. The mechanism for the conductive-material-facilitated DIET in butyrate syntrophy deserves further investigation. PMID:27597850

  4. Microbial Ecology of Anaerobic Digesters: The Key Players of Anaerobiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayyaz Ali Shah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion is the method of wastes treatment aimed at a reduction of their hazardous effects on the biosphere. The mutualistic behavior of various anaerobic microorganisms results in the decomposition of complex organic substances into simple, chemically stabilized compounds, mainly methane and CO2. The conversions of complex organic compounds to CH4 and CO2 are possible due to the cooperation of four different groups of microorganisms, that is, fermentative, syntrophic, acetogenic, and methanogenic bacteria. Microbes adopt various pathways to evade from the unfavorable conditions in the anaerobic digester like competition between sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB and methane forming bacteria for the same substrate. Methanosarcina are able to use both acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic pathways for methane production. This review highlights the cellulosic microorganisms, structure of cellulose, inoculum to substrate ratio, and source of inoculum and its effect on methanogenesis. The molecular techniques such as DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis utilized for dynamic changes in microbial communities and FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization that deal with taxonomy and interaction and distribution of tropic groups used are also discussed.

  5. Methane production and microbial community structure for alkaline pretreated waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui; Xing, Defeng; Jia, Jianna; Zhou, Aijuan; Zhang, Lu; Ren, Nanqi

    2014-10-01

    Alkaline pretreatment was studied to analyze the influence on waste activated sludge (WAS) reduction, methane production and microbial community structure during anaerobic digestion. Methane production from alkaline pretreated sludge (A-WAS) (pH = 12) increased from 251.2 mL/Ld to 362.2 mL/Ld with the methane content of 68.7% compared to raw sludge (R-WAS). Sludge reduction had been improved, and volatile suspended solids (VSS) removal rate and protein reduction had increased by ∼ 10% and ∼ 35%, respectively. The bacterial and methanogenic communities were analyzed using 454 pyrosequencing and clone libraries of 16S rRNA gene. Remarkable shifts were observed in microbial community structures after alkaline pretreatment, especially for Archaea. The dominant methanogenic population changed from Methanosaeta for R-WAS to Methanosarcina for A-WAS. In addition to the enhancement of solubilization and hydrolysis of anaerobic digestion of WAS, alkaline pretreatment showed significant impacts on the enrichment and syntrophic interactions between microbial communities.

  6. Thermo-alkaline pretreatment of waste activated sludge at low-temperatures: effects on sludge disintegration, methane production, and methanogen community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaai; Yu, Youngseob; Lee, Changsoo

    2013-09-01

    Low-temperature thermo-alkaline pretreatment of waste activated sludge (WAS) was studied, within the region of 0-0.2 M NaOH and 60-90°C, for the effects of NaOH concentration and temperature on sludge degradability in anaerobic digestion (AD). Significant disintegration of sludge solids (up to 75.6%) and an increase in methane production (up to 70.6%) were observed in the pretreatment trials. Two quadratic models were successfully generated by response surface analysis (R(2)>0.9, pmethane production (MP) respond to changes in the pretreatment conditions. The maximum responses of SD (77.8%) and MP (73.9% increase over the control) were shown at [0.16 M NaOH, 90°C] and [0.10 M NaOH, 73.7°C], respectively. NaOH addition showed a significant influence on the evolution of methanogen community structure during AD, whereas temperature did not. Aceticlastic Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina speceies were likely the major methanogens.

  7. Temperature impacts differentially on the methanogenic food web of cellulose-supplemented peatland soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Oliver; Horn, Marcus A; Kolb, Steffen; Drake, Harold L

    2015-03-01

    The impact of temperature on the largely unresolved intermediary ecosystem metabolism and associated unknown microbiota that link cellulose degradation and methane production in soils of a moderately acidic (pH 4.5) fen was investigated. Supplemental [(13) C]cellulose stimulated the accumulation of propionate, acetate and carbon dioxide as well as initial methane production in anoxic peat soil slurries at 15°C and 5°C. Accumulation of organic acids at 15°C was twice as fast as that at 5°C. 16S rRNA [(13) C]cellulose stable isotope probing identified novel unclassified Bacteria (79% identity to the next cultured relative Fibrobacter succinogenes), unclassified Bacteroidetes (89% identity to Prolixibacter bellariivorans), Porphyromonadaceae, Acidobacteriaceae and Ruminococcaceae as main anaerobic degraders of cellulose-derived carbon at both 15°C and 5°C. Holophagaceae and Spirochaetaceae were more abundant at 15°C. Clostridiaceae dominated the degradation of cellulose-derived carbon only at 5°C. Methanosarcina was the dominant methanogenic taxa at both 15°C and 5°C. Relative abundance of Methanocella increased at 15°C whereas that of Methanoregula and Methanosaeta increased at 5°C. Thaumarchaeota closely related to Nitrosotalea (presently not known to grow anaerobically) were abundant at 5°C but absent at 15°C indicating that Nitrosotalea sp. might be capable of anaerobic growth at low temperatures in peat.

  8. Shifts in methanogenic community composition and methane fluxes along the degradation of discontinuous permafrost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebner, Susanne; Ganzert, Lars; Kiss, Andrea; Yang, Sizhong; Wagner, Dirk; Svenning, Mette M

    2015-01-01

    The response of methanogens to thawing permafrost is an important factor for the global greenhouse gas budget. We tracked methanogenic community structure, activity, and abundance along the degradation of sub-Arctic palsa peatland permafrost. We observed the development of pronounced methane production, release, and abundance of functional (mcrA) methanogenic gene numbers following the transitions from permafrost (palsa) to thaw pond structures. This was associated with the establishment of a methanogenic community consisting both of hydrogenotrophic (Methanobacterium, Methanocellales), and potential acetoclastic (Methanosarcina) members and their activity. While peat bog development was not reflected in significant changes of mcrA copy numbers, potential methane production, and rates of methane release decreased. This was primarily linked to a decline of potential acetoclastic in favor of hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Although palsa peatland succession offers similarities with typical transitions from fen to bog ecosystems, the observed dynamics in methane fluxes and methanogenic communities are primarily attributed to changes within the dominant Bryophyta and Cyperaceae taxa rather than to changes in peat moss and sedge coverage, pH and nutrient regime. Overall, the palsa peatland methanogenic community was characterized by a few dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs). These OTUs seem to be indicative for methanogenic species that thrive in terrestrial organic rich environments. In summary, our study shows that after an initial stage of high methane emissions following permafrost thaw, methane fluxes, and methanogenic communities establish that are typical for northern peat bogs.

  9. The effect of managing nutrients in the performance of anaerobic digesters of municipal wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirer, Sibel Uludag; Taskin, Bilgin; Demirer, Goksel N; Duran, Metin

    2013-09-01

    Is it possible to create conditions in the anaerobic digesters to control nutrients without changing the performance of a reactor? This study investigates an answer for this question. To this purpose, anaerobic reactors are operated at high concentrations of Mg(2+) ion to harvest the nutrient ions (NH4 (+) and PO4 (3-)) in the form of struvite, that is, magnesium ammonium phosphate. The effects of this modification on the anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge were investigated in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and cumulative CH4 production as well as the changes in the biological diversity. The results showed that approximately 50 % of the nutrients (NH4 (+) and PO4 (3-)) were removed regardless of the method adopted for the addition of Mg(2+) ion, slug or daily dosing. The numbers of Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina in the samples withdrawn prior to and after the addition of Mg(2+) did not show significant difference according to the results obtained from qPCR analyses. The research results showed that the addition of Mg(2+) into the anaerobic digesters in municipal wastewater treatment facilities may help to remove the nutrients from the effluent while recovering in their solid forms.

  10. The microbial community of a passive biochemical reactor treating arsenic, zinc and sulfate-rich seepage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Anne Baldwin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sulfidogenic biochemical reactors for metal removal that use complex organic carbon have been shown to be effective in laboratory studies, but their performance in the field is highly variable. Successful operation depends on the types of microorganisms supported by the organic matrix, and factors affecting the community composition are unknown. A molecular survey of a field-based biochemical reactor that had been removing zinc and arsenic for over six years revealed that the microbial community was dominated by methanogens related to Methanocorpusculum sp. and Methanosarcina sp., which co-occurred with Bacteroidetes environmental groups, such as Vadin HA17, in places where the organic matter was more degraded. The metabolic potential for organic matter decomposition by Ruminococcaceae was prevalent in samples with more pyrolysable carbon. Rhodobium- and Hyphomicrobium-related genera within the Rhizobiales Order that have the metabolic potential for dark hydrogen fermentation and methylotrophy, and unclassified Comamonadaceae were the dominant Proteobacteria. The unclassified environmental group Sh765B-TzT-29 was an important Delta-Proteobacteria group in this BCR, that co-occurred with the dominant Rhizobiales OTUs. Organic matter degradation is one driver for shifting the microbial community composition and therefore possibly the performance of these bioreactors over time.

  11. Microwave radiation and reactor design influence microbial communities during methane fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka; Zieliński, Marcin; Jaranowska, Paulina

    2012-09-01

    The effect of reactor design and method of heating on the efficiency of methane fermentation and composition of microbial communities, especially methanogenic Archaea, were determined. The research was carried out using submerge- and trickling-bed reactors fed with wastewater and the heat supply into the reactors included a convection heating method and microwave radiation. The polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and relative real-time PCR were used in order to assess the biofilm communities. The best fermentation results and the highest abundance of methanogenic Archaea in biomass were observed in microwave heated trickling-bed reactors. The research proved that in reactors of identical design, the application of microwaves enabled a higher fermentation efficiency to be obtained and simultaneously increased the diversity of methanogenic Archaea communities that favors process stability. All the identified sequences of Archaea belonged to Methanosarcina sp., suggesting that species from this genera are susceptible to non-thermal effects of microwaves. There were no effects from microwaves on the bacterial communities in both types of reactors, however, the bacterial species composition varied in the reactors of different design.

  12. Utilization of high-strength wastewater for the production of biogas as a renewable energy source using hybrid upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (HUASB) reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shivayogimath, C.B.; Ramanujam, T.K.

    1998-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion of distillery spentwash, a high-strength wastewater, was studied using a hybrid upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (HUASB) reactor for 240 days under ambient conditions. The HUASB reactor combined an open volume in the bottom two-thirds of the reactor for sludge blanket and polypropylene pall rings packing in the upper one-third of the reactor. The aim of the study was to achieve optimum biogas production and waste treatment. Using non-granular anaerobic sewage sludge as seed, the start-up of the HUASB reactor was successfully completed, with the production of active bacterial granules of 1--2 mm size, within 90 days. Examination of the bacterial granules under scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed that Methanothrix like microorganisms were the dominant species besides Methanosarcina. An organic loading of 24 kg COD/m{sup 3}d at a low hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 6 hours was achieved with 82% reduction in COD. Biogas with high methane content (80%) was produced at these loadings. The specific biogas yield was 0.36 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg COD. Packing in the upper third of the reactor was very efficient as a gas-solid separator (GSS); and in addition it retained the biomass.

  13. Effect of increasing total solids contents on anaerobic digestion of food waste under mesophilic conditions: performance and microbial characteristics analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yi

    Full Text Available The total solids content of feedstocks affects the performances of anaerobic digestion and the change of total solids content will lead the change of microbial morphology in systems. In order to increase the efficiency of anaerobic digestion, it is necessary to understand the role of the total solids content on the behavior of the microbial communities involved in anaerobic digestion of organic matter from wet to dry technology. The performances of mesophilic anaerobic digestion of food waste with different total solids contents from 5% to 20% were compared and the microbial communities in reactors were investigated using 454 pyrosequencing technology. Three stable anaerobic digestion processes were achieved for food waste biodegradation and methane generation. Better performances mainly including volatile solids reduction and methane yield were obtained in the reactors with higher total solids content. Pyrosequencing results revealed significant shifts in bacterial community with increasing total solids contents. The proportion of phylum Chloroflexi decreased obviously with increasing total solids contents while other functional bacteria showed increasing trend. Methanosarcina absolutely dominated in archaeal communities in three reactors and the relative abundance of this group showed increasing trend with increasing total solids contents. These results revealed the effects of the total solids content on the performance parameters and the behavior of the microbial communities involved in the anaerobic digestion of food waste from wet to dry technologies.

  14. Performance of a three-stage membrane bioprocess treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste and evolution of its archaeal and bacterial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzcinski, Antoine P; Ray, Michael J; Stuckey, David C

    2010-03-01

    A novel three-stage bioprocess achieved 75% volatile solids (VS) removal at an organic loading rate (OLR) of 4g VSL(-1)day, a solids retention time (SRT) of 66days, a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 20days, at a temperature of 35 degrees C. The bioprocess consisted of an anaerobic hydrolytic reactor (HR) where the solids and liquid fractions of the Organic Fraction of the Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW) were separated with a mesh. The leachate was pumped to a Submerged Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor (SAMBR) and the treated permeate was polished in an Aerobic Membrane Bioreactor (AMBR). Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) and DNA sequencing analyses indicated that the increase in methane content in the HR caused by the excess sludge recycle from the SAMBR was associated with an increase in the number of hydrogenotrophic species, mainly Methanobrevibacter sp., Methanobacterium formicicum and Methanosarcina sp. At 20 degrees C VS removal dropped to 50% in the HR and some DGGE bands disappeared when compared to 35 degrees C samples, while some bands such as the one corresponding to Ruminococcus flavefaciens were reduced in intensity. The species associated with the COD-polishing properties of the AMBR correspond to the genera Pseudomonas, Hyphomonas and Hyphomicrobiaceae. These results highlight the positive effect of recycling the excess sludge from the SAMBR to re-inoculate the HR with hydrogenotrophic species.

  15. Functionally redundant but dissimilar microbial communities within biogas reactors treating maize silage in co-fermentation with sugar beet silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Susanne G; Ahmed, Sharif; Einfalt, Daniel; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Kazda, Marian

    2015-09-01

    Numerous observations indicate a high flexibility of microbial communities in different biogas reactors during anaerobic digestion. Here, we describe the functional redundancy and structural changes of involved microbial communities in four lab-scale continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs, 39°C, 12 L volume) supplied with different mixtures of maize silage (MS) and sugar beet silage (SBS) over 80 days. Continuously stirred tank reactors were fed with mixtures of MS and SBS in volatile solid ratios of 1:0 (Continuous Fermenter (CF) 1), 6:1 (CF2), 3:1 (CF3), 1:3 (CF4) with equal organic loading rates (OLR 1.25 kgVS m(-3)  d(-1) ) and showed similar biogas production rates in all reactors. The compositions of bacterial and archaeal communities were analysed by 454 amplicon sequencing approach based on 16S rRNA genes. Both bacterial and archaeal communities shifted with increasing amounts of SBS. Especially pronounced were changes in the archaeal composition towards Methanosarcina with increasing proportion of SBS, while Methanosaeta declined simultaneously. Compositional shifts within the microbial communities did not influence the respective biogas production rates indicating that these communities adapted to environmental conditions induced by different feedstock mixtures. The diverse microbial communities optimized their metabolism in a way that ensured efficient biogas production.

  16. Dynamic variation of the microbial community structure during the long-time mono-fermentation of maize and sugar beet silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klang, Johanna; Theuerl, Susanne; Szewzyk, Ulrich; Huth, Markus; Tölle, Rainer; Klocke, Michael

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the development of the microbial community during a long-term (337 days) anaerobic digestion of maize and sugar beet silage, two feedstocks that significantly differ in their chemical composition. For the characterization of the microbial dynamics, the community profiling method terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) in combination with a cloning-sequencing approach was applied. Our results revealed a specific adaptation of the microbial community to the supplied feedstocks. Based on the high amount of complex compounds, the anaerobic conversion rate of maize silage was slightly lower compared with the sugar beet silage. It was demonstrated that members from the phylum Bacteroidetes are mainly involved in the degradation of low molecular weight substances such as sugar, ethanol and acetate, the main compounds of the sugar beet silage. It was further shown that species of the genus Methanosaeta are highly sensitive against sudden stress situations such as a strong decrease in the ammonium nitrogen (NH₄(+)-N) concentration or a drop of the pH value. In both cases, a functional compensation by members of the genera Methanoculleus and/or Methanosarcina was detected. However, the overall biomass conversion of both feedstocks proceeded efficiently as a steady state between acid production and consumption was recorded, which further resulted in an equal biogas yield.

  17. Low Pressure Tolerance by Methanogens in an Aqueous Environment: Implications for Subsurface Life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickol, R. L.; Kral, T. A.

    2016-09-01

    The low pressure at the surface of Mars (average: 6 mbar) is one potentially biocidal factor that any extant life on the planet would need to endure. Near subsurface life, while shielded from ultraviolet radiation, would also be exposed to this low pressure environment, as the atmospheric gas-phase pressure increases very gradually with depth. Few studies have focused on low pressure as inhibitory to the growth or survival of organisms. However, recent work has uncovered a potential constraint to bacterial growth below 25 mbar. The study reported here tested the survivability of four methanogen species (Methanothermobacter wolfeii, Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanobacterium formicicum, Methanococcus maripaludis) under low pressure conditions approaching average martian surface pressure (6 mbar - 143 mbar) in an aqueous environment. Each of the four species survived exposure of varying length (3 days - 21 days) at pressures down to 6 mbar. This research is an important stepping-stone to determining if methanogens can actively metabolize/grow under these low pressures. Additionally, the recently discovered recurring slope lineae suggest that liquid water columns may connect the surface to deeper levels in the subsurface. If that is the case, any organism being transported in the water column would encounter the changing pressures during the transport.

  18. Potential Role of Acetyl-CoA Synthetase (acs) and Malate Dehydrogenase (mae) in the Evolution of the Acetate Switch in Bacteria and Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, Elliott P; McClure, Marcella A; Johnson, Kiki; Cleveland, Sean; Hunt, Kristopher A; Fields, Matthew W

    2015-08-03

    Although many Archaea have AMP-Acs (acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase) and ADP-Acs, the extant methanogenic genus Methanosarcina is the only identified Archaeal genus that can utilize acetate via acetate kinase (Ack) and phosphotransacetylase (Pta). Despite the importance of ack as the potential urkinase in the ASKHA phosphotransferase superfamily, an origin hypothesis does not exist for the acetate kinase in Bacteria, Archaea, or Eukarya. Here we demonstrate that Archaeal AMP-Acs and ADP-Acs contain paralogous ATPase motifs previously identified in Ack, which demonstrate a novel relation between these proteins in Archaea. The identification of ATPase motif conservation and resulting structural features in AMP- and ADP-acetyl-CoA synthetase proteins in this study expand the ASKHA superfamily to include acetyl-CoA synthetase. Additional phylogenetic analysis showed that Pta and MaeB sequences had a common ancestor, and that the Pta lineage within the halophilc archaea was an ancestral lineage. These results suggested that divergence of a duplicated maeB within an ancient halophilic, archaeal lineage formed a putative pta ancestor. These results provide a potential scenario for the establishment of the Ack/Pta pathway and provide novel insight into the evolution of acetate metabolism for all three domains of life.

  19. Acid resistance of methanogenic bacteria in a two-stage anaerobic process treating high concentration methanol Wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xuefei; REN Nanqi

    2007-01-01

    In this study,the two-stage upflow anaerobic sludge blanket(UASB)system and batch experiments were employed to evaluate the performance of anaerobic digestion for the treatment of high concentration methanol wastewater.The acid resistance of granular sludge and methanogenic bacteria and their metabolizing activity were investigated.The results show that the pH of the first UASB changed from 4.9 to 5.8 and 5.5 to 6.2 for the second reactor.Apparently,these were not the advisable pH levels that common metha nogenic bacteria could accept.The methanogenic bacteria of the system,viz.Methanosarcina barkeri,had some acid resistance and could still degrade methanol at pH 5.0.If the methanogenic bacteria were trained further,their acid resistance would be improved somewhat.Granular sludge of the system could protect the methanogenic bacteria within its body against the impact of the acidic environment and make them degrade methanol at pH 4.5.The performance of granular sludge was attributed to its structure,bacteria species,and the distribution of bacterium inside the granule.

  20. Digestion performance and microbial community in full-scale methane fermentation of stillage from sweet potato-shochu production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Tang, Yueqin; Urakami, Toyoshi; Morimura, Shigeru; Kida, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    Sweet potato shochu is a traditional Japanese spirit produced mainly in the South Kyushu area in Japan. The amount of stillage reaches approximately 8 x 10(5) tons per year. Wastewater mainly containing stillage from the production of sweet potato-shochu was treated thermophilically in a full-scale treatment plant using fixed-bed reactors (8 reactors x 283 m3). Following the addition of Ni2+ and Co2+, the reactors have been stably operated for six years at a high chemical oxygen demand (COD) loading rate of 14 kg/(m3 x day). Analysis of coenzyme content and microbial communities indicated that similar microbial communities were present in the liquid phase and on the fiber carriers installed in reactors. Bacteria in the phyla Firmicutes as well as Bacteroidetes were dominant bacteria, and Methanosarcina thermophila as well as Methanothermobacter crinale were dominant methanogens in the reactors. This study reveals that stillage from sweet potato-shochu production can be treated effectively in a full-scale fixed-bed reactor under thermophilic conditions with the help of Ni2+ and Co2+. The high diversity of bacterial community and the coexistence of both aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens contributed to the excellent fermentation performance.

  1. A Thermodynamically-consistent FBA-based Approach to Biogeochemical Reaction Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, B.; Jin, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial rates are critical to understanding biogeochemical processes in natural environments. Recently, flux balance analysis (FBA) has been applied to predict microbial rates in aquifers and other settings. FBA is a genome-scale constraint-based modeling approach that computes metabolic rates and other phenotypes of microorganisms. This approach requires a prior knowledge of substrate uptake rates, which is not available for most natural microbes. Here we propose to constrain substrate uptake rates on the basis of microbial kinetics. Specifically, we calculate rates of respiration (and fermentation) using a revised Monod equation; this equation accounts for both the kinetics and thermodynamics of microbial catabolism. Substrate uptake rates are then computed from the rates of respiration, and applied to FBA to predict rates of microbial growth. We implemented this method by linking two software tools, PHREEQC and COBRA Toolbox. We applied this method to acetotrophic methanogenesis by Methanosarcina barkeri, and compared the simulation results to previous laboratory observations. The new method constrains acetate uptake by accounting for the kinetics and thermodynamics of methanogenesis, and predicted well the observations of previous experiments. In comparison, traditional methods of dynamic-FBA constrain acetate uptake on the basis of enzyme kinetics, and failed to reproduce the experimental results. These results show that microbial rate laws may provide a better constraint than enzyme kinetics for applying FBA to biogeochemical reaction modeling.

  2. Quantitative and qualitative transitions of methanogen community structure during the batch anaerobic digestion of cheese-processing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changsoo; Kim, Jaai; Shin, Seung Gu; O'Flaherty, Vincent; Hwang, Seokhwan

    2010-08-01

    Qualitative and quantitative shifts in methanogen community structure, associated with process performance data, were investigated during the batch anaerobic digestion of a cheese-processing wastewater, whey permeate. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and real-time PCR techniques were applied to obtain qualitative and quantitative microbial data sets, respectively, based on methanogen 16S rRNA genes. Throughout the operation, dynamic variations in both qualitative and quantitative community structures were observed, with repeated shifts in dominance between the aceticlastic Methanosarcinaceae (suggested mainly by the detection of a Methanosarcina-like population) and the hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales (suggested mainly by the detection of a Methanofollis-like population). This trend corresponded well to the diauxic utilization of acetate and longer-chain fatty acids (C(3)-C(6)), mainly propionate. Joint-plot non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMS) analysis demonstrated that the qualitative and quantitative community shifts had significant correlations with the composition of residual organic acids and the methane production rate, respectively. This suggests the potential use of microbial community shift analysis as an indicative tool for diagnosing anaerobic digestion processes. The results suggest that more attention should be directed to quantitative, as well as qualitative, approaches for a better understanding of anaerobic digestion, particularly in terms of biogas production efficiency, under dynamic and transitional conditions.

  3. Electromicrobiology: Electron Transfer via Biowires in Nature and Practical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovley Derek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most exciting developments in the field of electromicrobiology has been the discovery of electrically conductive pili (e-pili in Geobacter species that transport electrons with a metallic-like mechanism. The e-pili are essential for extracellular electron transport to Fe(III oxides and longrange electron transport through the conductive biofilms that form on the anodes of microbial fuel cells. The e-pili also facilitate direct interspecies electron transfer between Geobacter and Methanosaeta or Methanosarcina species. Metatranscriptomic studies have demonstrated that Geobacter/Methanosaeta DIET is an important process in anaerobic digesters converting brewery wastes to methane. Increasing e-pili expression through genetic modification of regulatory systems or adaptive evolution yields strains with enhanced rates of extracellular electron transfer. Measurement of the conductivity of individual e-pili has demonstrated that they have conductivities higher than those of a number of synthetic conducting organic polymers. Multiple lines of evidence have demonstrated that aromatic amino acids play an important role in the electron transport along e-pili, suggesting opportunities to tune e-pili conductivity via genetic manipulation of the amino acid composition of e-pili. It is expected that e-pili will be harnessed to improve microbe-electrode processes such as microbial electrosynthesis and for the development of novel biosensors. Also, e-pili show promise as a sustainable ‘green’ replacement for electronic materials that contain toxic components and/or are produced with harsh chemicals.

  4. Cloning and sequencing of the genes coding for the A and B subunits of vacuolar-type Na(+)-ATPase from Enterococcus hirae. Coexistence of vacuolar- and F0F1-type ATPases in one bacterial cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, K; Yamato, I; Kakinuma, Y

    1993-06-05

    The eubacterium Enterococcus hirae ATCC 9790 possesses a H(+)-translocating ATPase, and the deduced amino acid sequences of the genes coding for this enzyme have indicated that it is a typical F0F1-type ATPase (Shibata, C., Ehara, T., Tomura, K., Igarashi, K., and Kobayashi, H. (1992) J. Bacteriol. 174, 6117-6124). We cloned the ntpA and ntpB genes coding for the A and B subunits, respectively, of Na(+)-translocating ATPase from the same bacterium, and the full amino acid sequences of the two subunits were deduced from the nucleotide sequence. The A (593 amino acid residues) and B (458 amino acid residues) subunits were highly homologous (48-60% identical) to the A (large or alpha) and the B (small or beta) subunits, respectively, of vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPases which have been found in eukaryotic endomembrane systems (Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, and carrot) and archaebacterial cell membranes (Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Methanosarcina barkeri). The A and B subunits of Na(+)-ATPase showed about 23-28% identities with the beta and alpha subunits of E. hirae F1-ATPase and of Escherichia coli F1-ATPase, respectively. These results indicate that E. hirae Na(+)-ATPase belongs to the vacuolar-type ATPase. This is the first demonstration that both genes for V- and F-type ATPases are functionally expressed in one bacterial cell.

  5. Pretreatment of coking wastewater using anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bing; SUN Ying-lan; LI Yu-ying

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory-scale anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) was used to pretreat coking wastewater. Inoculated anaerobic granular biomass was acclimated for 225 d to the coking wastewater, and then the biochemical methane potential (BMP)of the coking wastewater in the acclimated granular biomass was measured. At the same time, some fundamental technological factors, such as the filling time and the reacting time ratio (tf/tr), the mixing intensity and the intermittent mixing mode, that affect anaerobic pretreatment of coking wastewater with ASBR, were evaluated through orthogonal tests. The COD removal efficiency reached 38%~50% in the stable operation period with the organic loading rate of 0.37~0.54 kg COD/(m3.d) at the optimum conditions of tf/tr, the mixing intensity and the intermittent mixing mode. In addition, the biodegradability of coking wastewater distinctly increased after the pretreatment using ASBR. At the end of the experiment, the microorganism forms on the granulated sludge in the ASBR were observed using SEM (scanning electron microscope) and fluoroscope. The results showed that the dominant microorganism on the granular sludge was Methanosaeta instead of Methanosarcina dominated on the inoculated sludge.

  6. Model of a DNA-protein complex of the architectural monomeric protein MC1 from Euryarchaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Paquet

    Full Text Available In Archaea the two major modes of DNA packaging are wrapping by histone proteins or bending by architectural non-histone proteins. To supplement our knowledge about the binding mode of the different DNA-bending proteins observed across the three domains of life, we present here the first model of a complex in which the monomeric Methanogen Chromosomal protein 1 (MC1 from Euryarchaea binds to the concave side of a strongly bent DNA. In laboratory growth conditions MC1 is the most abundant architectural protein present in Methanosarcina thermophila CHTI55. Like most proteins that strongly bend DNA, MC1 is known to bind in the minor groove. Interaction areas for MC1 and DNA were mapped by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR data. The polarity of protein binding was determined using paramagnetic probes attached to the DNA. The first structural model of the DNA-MC1 complex we propose here was obtained by two complementary docking approaches and is in good agreement with the experimental data previously provided by electron microscopy and biochemistry. Residues essential to DNA-binding and -bending were highlighted and confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that the Arg25 side-chain was essential to neutralize the negative charge of two phosphates that come very close in response to a dramatic curvature of the DNA.

  7. Stereochemical studies of acyclic isoprenoids-XII. Lipids of methanogenic bacteria and possible contributions to sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risatti, J.B.; Rowland, S.J.; Yon, D.A.; Maxwell, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Abundant volatile lipids of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and Methanosarcina barkeri include isoprenoid hydrocarbons (??? C30), and C15, C20 and C25 isoprenoid alcohols. M. barkeri contains 2,6,10,15,19-pentamethyleicosane, whose relative stereochemistry is the same as found in marine sediments, indicating that it is a marker of methanogenic activity. The C20, C30 and C25 alkenes in M. thermoautotrophicum also have a preferred sterochemistry; the latter have the 2,6,10,14,18-pentamethyleicosanyl skeleton, suggesting that the alkane in marine sediments may derive from methanogens. The stereochemistry of squalane in a marine sediment is also compatible with an origin in methanogens; in contrast, the stereochemistry of pristane in M. thermoautotrophicum indicates a fossil fuel contaminant origin, suggesting that this and certain other alkanes reported in archaebacteria might also be of contaminant origin. There is, therefore, little evidence at present that the pristane in immature marine sediments originates in methanogens. The C15 and C20 saturated alcohols in M. thermoautotrophicum have mainly the all-R configuration. If this is generally true for methanogens, the C20 alcohol in the Messel shale may originate mainly from methanogens, whereas that in the Green River shale may originate mainly from photosynthetic organisms. ?? 1984.

  8. Archaeal communities associated with roots of the common reed (Phragmites australis) in Beijing Cuihu Wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yin; Li, Hong; Liu, Qun Fang; Li, Yan Hong

    2015-05-01

    The richness, phylogeny and composition of archaeal community associated with the roots of common reed (Phragmites australis) growing in the Beijing Cuihu Wetland, China was investigated using a 16S rDNA library. In total, 235 individual sequences were collected, and a phylogenetic analysis revealed that 69.4 and 11.5 % of clones were affiliated with the Euryarchaeota and the Crenarchaeota, respectively. In Euryarchaeota, the archaeal community was dominated by species in following genera: Methanobacterium in the order Methanobacteriales (60.7 %); Methanoregula and Methanospirillum in the order Methanomicrobiales (20.2 %), and Methanomethylovorans, Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta in the order Methanosarcinales (17.2 %). Of 27 sequences assigned to uncultured Crenarchaeota, 22 were grouped into Group 1.3, and five grouped into Group 1.1b. Hence, the archaeal communities associated with reed roots are largely involved in methane production, and, to a lesser extent, in ammonia oxidization. Quantification of the archaeal amoA gene indicated that ammonia oxidizing archaea were more numerous in the rhizosphere soil than in the root tissue or surrounding water. A total of 19.1 % of the sequences were unclassified, suggesting that many unidentified archaea are probably involved in the reed wetland ecosystem.

  9. Impact of aluminum chloride on process performance and microbial community structure of granular sludge in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor for natural rubber processing wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh, Nguyen Thi; Watari, Takahiro; Thao, Tran Phuong; Hatamoto, Masashi; Tanikawa, Daisuke; Syutsubo, Kazuaki; Fukuda, Masao; Tan, Nguyen Minh; Anh, To Kim; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Huong, Nguyen Lan

    In this study, granular sludge formation was carried out using an aluminum chloride supplement in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating natural rubber processing wastewater. Results show that during the first 75 days after the start-up of the UASB reactor with an organic loading rate (OLR) of 2.65 kg-COD·m(-3)·day(-1), it performed stably with a removal of 90% of the total chemical oxygen demand (COD) and sludge still remained in small dispersed flocs. However, after aluminum chloride was added at a concentration of 300 mg·L(-1) and the OLR range was increased up to 5.32 kg-COD·m(-3)·day(-1), the total COD removal efficiency rose to 96.5 ± 2.6%, with a methane recovery rate of 84.9 ± 13.4%, and the flocs began to form granules. Massively parallel 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the sludge retained in the UASB reactor showed that total sequence reads of Methanosaeta sp. and Methanosarcina sp., reported to be the key organisms for granulation, increased after 311 days of operation. This indicates that the microbial community structure of the retained sludge in the UASB reactor at the end of the experiment gave a good account of itself in not only COD removal, but also granule formation.

  10. Microbial Community Succession During Lactate Amendment of Chromium Contaminated Groundwater Reveals a Predominance of Pelosinus spp.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Drake, Meghan M [ORNL; Campbell, James H [ORNL; Moberly, James G [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Hazen, Terry [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Arkin, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Faybishenko, Boris A [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Microbial community structure and metabolism in contaminated ecosystems are potentially controlled not only by the different populations within the community, but a myriad of dynamic physicochemical parameters as well. The goal of the current work was to determine the impact of organic acid enrichment, in this case lactate, on the succession of the native microbial community from a contaminated groundwater aquifer. Triplicate anaerobic, continuous-flow glass reactors were inoculated with Hanford 100-H groundwater and incubated for 95 days to obtain a stable, enriched community. The microbial community experienced a shift in the population dynamics over time to eventually form a community with far less diversity than the original. The final community was dominated by Pelosinus spp. and to a lesser degree, Acetobacterium spp. with small amounts of other bacteria and archaea including methanogens. The resultant diversity was far decreased from 63 genera within 12 phyla to 11 bacterial genera (from three phyla) and 2 archaeal genera (from one phylum). Isolation efforts were successful in attaining new species of Pelosinus and known members of Methanosarcina barkerii along with several sulfate- and Fe(III)- reducing consortia members. The continuous-flow reactors allowed for testing physiochemical factors with microbial community dynamics on a smaller, replicable, scale while also facilitating the isolation of several previously uncultured community members. These lab-scale simulations will presumably allow for a deeper understanding of the community metabolism with specific carbon amendments that can inform future in situ efforts.

  11. Chemical shifts assignments of the archaeal MC1 protein and a strongly bent 15 base pairs DNA duplex in complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Karine; Landon, Céline; Paquet, Françoise

    2015-04-01

    MC1 is the most abundant architectural protein present in Methanosarcina thermophila CHTI55 in laboratory growth conditions and is structurally unrelated to other DNA-binding proteins. MC1 functions are to shape and to protect DNA against thermal denaturation by binding to it. Therefore, MC1 has a strong affinity for any double-stranded DNA. However, it recognizes and preferentially binds to bent DNA, such as four-way junctions and negatively supercoiled DNA minicircles. Combining NMR data, electron microscopy data, biochemistry, molecular modelisation and docking approaches, we proposed recently a new type of DNA/protein complex, in which the monomeric protein MC1 binds on the concave side of a strongly bent 15 base pairs DNA. We present here the NMR chemical shifts assignments of each partner in the complex, (1)H (15)N MC1 protein and (1)H (13)C (15)N bent duplex DNA, as first step towards the first experimental 3D structure of this new type of DNA/protein complex.

  12. Methanogenic community dynamics in anaerobic co-digestion of fruit and vegetable waste and food waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Lin; Jiane Zuo; Ruofan Ji; Xiaojie Chen; Fenglin Liu; Kaijun Wang; Yunfeng Yang

    2012-01-01

    A lab-scale continuously-stirred tank reactor (CSTR),used for anaerobic co-digestion of fruit and vegetable waste (FVW) and food waste (FW) at different mixture ratios,was operated for 178 days at the organic loading rate of 3 kg VS (volatile solids)/(m3.day).The dynamics of the Archaeal community and the correlations between environmental variables and methanogenic community structure were analyzed by polymerase chain reactions - denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and redundancy analysis (RDA),respectively.PCR-DGGE results demonstrated that the mixture ratio of FVW to FW altered the community composition of Aachaea.As the FVW/FW ratio increased,Methanoculleus,Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina became the predominant methanogens in the community.Redundancy analysis results indicated that the shift of the methanogenic community was significantly correlated with the composition of acidogenic products and methane production yield.Different mixture ratios of substrates led to different compositions of intermediate metabolites,which may affect the methanogenic community.These results suggested that the analysis of microbial communities could be used to diagnose anaerobic processes.

  13. Biogas production from coumarin-rich plants--inhibition by coumarin and recovery by adaptation of the bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Denny; Schrader, Steffi; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Harms, Hauke; Sträuber, Heike

    2015-09-01

    Plants like sweet clover (Melilotus spp.) are not suitable as fodder for cattle because of harmful effects of the plant secondary metabolite coumarin. As an alternative usage, the applicability of coumarin-rich plants as substrates for biogas production was investigated. When coumarin was added to continuous fermentation processes codigesting grass silage and cow manure, it caused a strong inhibition noticeable as decrease of biogas production by 19% and increase of metabolite concentrations to an organic acids/alkalinity ratio higher than 0.3(gorganic acids) gCaCO3 (-1). Microbial communities of methanogenic archaea were dominated by the genera Methanosarcina (77%) and Methanoculleus (11%). This community composition was not influenced by coumarin addition. The bacterial community analysis unraveled a divergence caused by coumarin addition correlating with the anaerobic degradation of coumarin and the recovery of the biogas process. As a consequence, biogas production resumed similar to the coumarin-free control with a biogas yield of 0.34 LN g(volatile solids) (-1) and at initial metabolite concentrations (∼ 0.2 g(organic acids) gCaCO3 (-1)). Coumarin acts as inhibitor and as substrate during anaerobic digestion. Hence, coumarin-rich plants might be suitable for biogas production, but should only be used after adaptation of the microbial community to coumarin.

  14. Stimulation of methane generation from nonproductive coal by addition of nutrients or a microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elizabeth J P; Voytek, Mary A; Corum, Margo D; Orem, William H

    2010-11-01

    Biogenic formation of methane from coal is of great interest as an underexploited source of clean energy. The goal of some coal bed producers is to extend coal bed methane productivity and to utilize hydrocarbon wastes such as coal slurry to generate new methane. However, the process and factors controlling the process, and thus ways to stimulate it, are poorly understood. Subbituminous coal from a nonproductive well in south Texas was stimulated to produce methane in microcosms when the native population was supplemented with nutrients (biostimulation) or when nutrients and a consortium of bacteria and methanogens enriched from wetland sediment were added (bioaugmentation). The native population enriched by nutrient addition included Pseudomonas spp., Veillonellaceae, and Methanosarcina barkeri. The bioaugmented microcosm generated methane more rapidly and to a higher concentration than the biostimulated microcosm. Dissolved organics, including long-chain fatty acids, single-ring aromatics, and long-chain alkanes accumulated in the first 39 days of the bioaugmented microcosm and were then degraded, accompanied by generation of methane. The bioaugmented microcosm was dominated by Geobacter sp., and most of the methane generation was associated with growth of Methanosaeta concilii. The ability of the bioaugmentation culture to produce methane from coal intermediates was confirmed in incubations of culture with representative organic compounds. This study indicates that methane production could be stimulated at the nonproductive field site and that low microbial biomass may be limiting in situ methane generation. In addition, the microcosm study suggests that the pathway for generating methane from coal involves complex microbial partnerships.

  15. Dynamic variation of the microbial community structure during the long-time mono-fermentation of maize and sugar beet silage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klang, Johanna; Theuerl, Susanne; Szewzyk, Ulrich; Huth, Markus; Tölle, Rainer; Klocke, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the development of the microbial community during a long-term (337 days) anaerobic digestion of maize and sugar beet silage, two feedstocks that significantly differ in their chemical composition. For the characterization of the microbial dynamics, the community profiling method terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) in combination with a cloning-sequencing approach was applied. Our results revealed a specific adaptation of the microbial community to the supplied feedstocks. Based on the high amount of complex compounds, the anaerobic conversion rate of maize silage was slightly lower compared with the sugar beet silage. It was demonstrated that members from the phylum Bacteroidetes are mainly involved in the degradation of low molecular weight substances such as sugar, ethanol and acetate, the main compounds of the sugar beet silage. It was further shown that species of the genus Methanosaeta are highly sensitive against sudden stress situations such as a strong decrease in the ammonium nitrogen (NH4+-N) concentration or a drop of the pH value. In both cases, a functional compensation by members of the genera Methanoculleus and/or Methanosarcina was detected. However, the overall biomass conversion of both feedstocks proceeded efficiently as a steady state between acid production and consumption was recorded, which further resulted in an equal biogas yield. PMID:25712194

  16. Functionally redundant but dissimilar microbial communities within biogas reactors treating maize silage in co-fermentation with sugar beet silage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Susanne G; Ahmed, Sharif; Einfalt, Daniel; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Kazda, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Numerous observations indicate a high flexibility of microbial communities in different biogas reactors during anaerobic digestion. Here, we describe the functional redundancy and structural changes of involved microbial communities in four lab-scale continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs, 39°C, 12 L volume) supplied with different mixtures of maize silage (MS) and sugar beet silage (SBS) over 80 days. Continuously stirred tank reactors were fed with mixtures of MS and SBS in volatile solid ratios of 1:0 (Continuous Fermenter (CF) 1), 6:1 (CF2), 3:1 (CF3), 1:3 (CF4) with equal organic loading rates (OLR 1.25 kgVS m−3 d−1) and showed similar biogas production rates in all reactors. The compositions of bacterial and archaeal communities were analysed by 454 amplicon sequencing approach based on 16S rRNA genes. Both bacterial and archaeal communities shifted with increasing amounts of SBS. Especially pronounced were changes in the archaeal composition towards Methanosarcina with increasing proportion of SBS, while Methanosaeta declined simultaneously. Compositional shifts within the microbial communities did not influence the respective biogas production rates indicating that these communities adapted to environmental conditions induced by different feedstock mixtures. The diverse microbial communities optimized their metabolism in a way that ensured efficient biogas production. PMID:26200922

  17. Vertical profiles of community abundance and diversity of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and bacteria in a simple waste landfill in north China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jun; Ding, Linjie; Wang, Xu; Chi, Zifang; Lei, Jiansen

    2015-03-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) is considered to be an important sink of CH4 in habitats as marine sediments. But, few studies focused on AMO in landfills which may be an important sink of CH4 derived from waste fermentation. To show evidence of AMO and to uncover function anaerobic methanotroph (ANME) community in landfill, different age waste samples were collected in Jinqianpu landfill located in north China. Through high-throughput sequencing, Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales archaea associated with ANME and reverse methanogenic archaea of Methanosarcina and Methanobacterium were detected. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) (Desulfobulbus and Desulfococcus) which could couple with ANME-conducting AMO were also found. But, the community structure of ANME had no significant difference with depths. From the results of investigation, we can come to a conclusion that sulfate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (SR-DAMO) would be the dominant AMO process in the landfill, while iron-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (M/IR-DAMO) process was weak though concentration of ferric iron was large in the landfill. Denitrification-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (NR-DAMO) was negative because of lack of nitrate and relevant function microorganisms in the landfill. Results also indicate that CH4 mitigation would have higher potential by increasing electron acceptor contents and promoting the growth of relevant function microorganisms.

  18. Syntrophic microbial communities on straw as biofilm carrier increase the methane yield of a biowaste-digesting biogas reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank R. Bengelsdorf

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Biogas from biowaste can be an important source of renewable energy, but the fermentation process of low-structure waste is often unstable. The present study uses a full-scale biogas reactor to test the hypothesis that straw as an additional biofilm carrier will increase methane yield; and this effect is mirrored in a specific microbial community attached to the straw. Better reactor performance after addition of straw, at simultaneously higher organic loading rate and specific methane yield confirmed the hypothesis. The microbial communities on straw as a biofilm carrier and of the liquid reactor content were investigated using 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing by means of 454 pyrosequencing technology. The results revealed high diversity of the bacterial communities in the liquid reactor content as well as the biofilms on the straw. The most abundant archaea in all samples belonged to the genera Methanoculleus and Methanosarcina. Addition of straw resulted in a significantly different microbial community attached to the biofilm carrier. The bacterium Candidatus Cloacamonas acidaminovorans and methanogenic archaea of the genus Methanoculleus dominated the biofilm on straw. Syntrophic interactions between the hydrogenotrophic Methanoculleus sp. and members of the hydrogen-producing bacterial community within biofilms may explain the improved methane yield. Thus, straw addition can be used to improve and to stabilize the anaerobic process in substrates lacking biofilm-supporting structures.

  19. Enhanced waste activated sludge digestion using a submerged anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor: performance, sludge characteristics and microbial community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongguang; Wang, Zhiwei; Wu, Zhichao; Zhu, Chaowei

    2016-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) plays an important role in waste activated sludge (WAS) treatment; however, conventional AD (CAD) process needs substantial improvements, especially for the treatment of WAS with low solids content and poor anaerobic biodegradability. Herein, we propose a submerged anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor (AnDMBR) for simultaneous WAS thickening and digestion without any pretreatment. During the long-term operation, the AnDMBR exhibited an enhanced sludge reduction and improved methane production over CAD process. Moreover, the biogas generated in the AnDMBR contained higher methane content than CAD process. Stable carbon isotopic signatures elucidated the occurrence of combined methanogenic pathways in the AnDMBR process, in which hydrogenotrophic methanogenic pathway made a larger contribution to the total methane production. It was also found that organic matter degradation was enhanced in the AnDMBR, thus providing more favorable substrates for microorganisms. Pyrosequencing revealed that Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were abundant in bacterial communities and Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta in archaeal communities, which played an important role in the AnDMBR system. This study shed light on the enhanced digestion of WAS using AnDMBR technology.

  20. Biogas by two-stage microbial anaerobic and semi-continuous digestion of Chinese cabbage waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoying Dong; Lijie Shao; Yan Wang; Wei Kou; Yanxin Cao; Dalei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of Chinese cabbage waste was investigated through a pilot-scale two-stage digester at a mesophilic temperature of 37 °C. In the acidification digester, the main product was acetic acid, with the maxi-mum concentration of 4289 mg·L-1 on the fourth day, accounting for 50.32%of total volatile fatty acids. The oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and NH4+-N level decreased gradual y with hydraulic retention time (HRT) of acidification. In the second digestion phase, the maximum methanogenic bacterial concentration reached 9.6 × 1010 ml-1 at the organic loading rate (OLR) of 3.5–4 kg VS·m-3, with corresponding HRT of 12–16 days. Accordingly, the optimal biogas production was 0.62 m3·(kg VS)-1, with methane content of 65%–68%. ORP and NH4+-N levels in the methanizer remained between-500 and-560 mV and 2000–4500 mg·L-1, respec-tively. Methanococcus and Methanosarcina served as the main methanogens in the anaerobic digester.

  1. Diversity of prokaryotes at a shallow submarine vent of Panarea Island (Italy by high-throughput sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa L. Maugeri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To determine microbial community composition and possible key microbial processes in the shallow-sea hydrothermal vent system off Panarea Island (Italy, we examined bacterial and archaeal communities of sediment and fluid samples from a hot vent by 16S rDNA Illumina sequencing technique. Both high abundant (>1% of total sequences, low abundant (from 0.1 to <1% and rare (< 0.1% phylogenetic groups were responsible for the distinct prokaryotic communities characterizing the heated sediment and fluid. The bacterial and archaeal communities from sediment were dominated by sequences affiliated with Rhodovulum genus (Alphaproteobacteria, including phototrophic ferrous-iron-oxidizing purple bacteria, Thiohalospira and Thiomicrospira (Gammaproteobacteria, typically involved in the sulphur cycle, and Methanococcus (Euryarchaeota. Fluid communities were dominated by anoxygenic phototrophic members of Chlorobium, followed by Thiomicrospira (Gammaproteobacteria, Sulfurimonas, Arcobacter and Sulfurospirillum (Epsilonproteobacteria, and Methanosarcina (Euryarchaeota. Obtained sequences were affiliated with prokaryotes taking a key part in the carbon, iron and sulphur cycling at the shallow hydrothermal system off Panarea Island. Despite the huge sequencing efforts, a great number of Bacteria and Archaea still remains unaffiliated at genus level, indicating that Black Point vent represents a hotspot of prokaryotic diversity.

  2. Biogas production and microbial community shift through neutral pH control during the anaerobic digestion of pig manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Fenwu; Yong, Xiaoyu; Wu, Xiayuan; Zheng, Tao; Jiang, Min; Jia, Honghua

    2016-10-01

    Laboratory-scale reactors, in which the pH could be auto-adjusted, were employed to investigate the mesophilic methane fermentation with pig manure (7.8% total solids) at pH 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0. Results showed that the performance of anaerobic digestion was strongly dependent on pH value. Biogas production and methane content at neutral pH 7.0 were significantly higher (16,607mL, 51.81%) than those at pH 6.0 (6916mL, 42.9%) and 8.0 (9739mL, 35.6%). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting and Shannon's index indicated that the samples contained highly diverse microbial communities. The major genus at pH 7.0 was Methanocorpusculum, compared with that was Methanosarcina at both pH 6.0 and 8.0. Our research revealed that cultures maintained at pH 7.0 could support increased biogas production, which has significant implications for the scale-up biogas engineering.

  3. Potential and existing mechanisms of enteric methane production in ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyi Qiao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Enteric methane (CH4 emissions in ruminants have attracted considerable attention due to their impact on greenhouse gases and the contribution of agricultural practices to global warming. Over the last two decades, a number of approaches have been adopted to mitigate CH4 emissions. However, the mechanisms of methanogenesis have still not been fully defined. According to the genome sequences of M. ruminantium in the rumen and of M. AbM4 in the abomasum, the pathways of carbon dioxide (CO2 reduction and formate oxidation to CH4 have now been authenticated in ruminants. Furthermore, in the light of species or genera description of methanogens, the precursors of methanogenesis discovered in the rumen and research advances in related subjects, pathways of acetate dissimilation via Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta as well as metabolism of methanol to CH4 might be present in the rumen, although neither process has yet been experimentally demonstrated in the rumen. Herein the research advances in methanogenesic mechanisms including existing and potential mechanisms are reviewed in detail. In addition, further research efforts to understand the methanogenesis mechanism should focus on isolation and identification of more specific methanogens, and their genome sequences. Such increased knowledge will provide benefits in terms of improved dietary energy utilization and a reduced contribution of enteric CH4 emissions to total global greenhouse gas emissions from the ruminant production system.

  4. Improved Monitoring of Semi-Continuous Anaerobic Digestion of Sugarcane Waste: Effects of Increasing Organic Loading Rate on Methanogenic Community Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athaydes Francisco Leite

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic digestion of filter cake and its co-digestion with bagasse, and the effect of gradual increase of the organic loading rate (OLR from start-up to overload were investigated. Understanding the influence of environmental and technical parameters on the development of particular methanogenic pathway in the biogas process was an important aim for the prediction and prevention of process failure. The rapid accumulation of volatile organic acids at high OLR of 3.0 to 4.0 gvs·L−1·day−1 indicated strong process inhibition. Methanogenic community dynamics of the reactors was monitored by stable isotope composition of biogas and molecular biological analysis. A potential shift toward the aceticlastic methanogenesis was observed along with the OLR increase under stable reactor operating conditions. Reactor overloading and process failure were indicated by the tendency to return to a predominance of hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis with rising abundances of the orders Methanobacteriales and Methanomicrobiales and drop of the genus Methanosarcina abundance.

  5. Improved Monitoring of Semi-Continuous Anaerobic Digestion of Sugarcane Waste: Effects of Increasing Organic Loading Rate on Methanogenic Community Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Athaydes Francisco; Janke, Leandro; Lv, Zuopeng; Harms, Hauke; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Nikolausz, Marcell

    2015-01-01

    The anaerobic digestion of filter cake and its co-digestion with bagasse, and the effect of gradual increase of the organic loading rate (OLR) from start-up to overload were investigated. Understanding the influence of environmental and technical parameters on the development of particular methanogenic pathway in the biogas process was an important aim for the prediction and prevention of process failure. The rapid accumulation of volatile organic acids at high OLR of 3.0 to 4.0 gvs·L−1·day−1 indicated strong process inhibition. Methanogenic community dynamics of the reactors was monitored by stable isotope composition of biogas and molecular biological analysis. A potential shift toward the aceticlastic methanogenesis was observed along with the OLR increase under stable reactor operating conditions. Reactor overloading and process failure were indicated by the tendency to return to a predominance of hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis with rising abundances of the orders Methanobacteriales and Methanomicrobiales and drop of the genus Methanosarcina abundance. PMID:26404240

  6. Impact of the substrate loading regime and phosphoric acid supplementation on performance of biogas reactors and microbial community dynamics during anaerobic digestion of chicken wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belostotskiy, Dmitry E; Ziganshina, Elvira E; Siniagina, Maria; Boulygina, Eugenia A; Miluykov, Vasili A; Ziganshin, Ayrat M

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluates the effects of increasing organic loading rate (OLR) and decreasing hydraulic retention time (HRT) as well as phosphoric acid addition on mesophilic reactors' performance and biogas production from chicken wastes. Furthermore, microbial community composition in reactors was characterized by a 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing analysis. Each step of increasing OLR impacted on the activity of microorganisms what caused a temporary decrease in biogas production. The addition of phosphoric acid resulted in the increased biogas production with values between 361 and 447 mL g(VS)(-1) from day 61 to day 74 compared to control reactor (309-350 mL g(VS)(-1)). With reactors' operation, Bacteroidetes phylotypes were noticeably replaced with Firmicutes representatives, and significant increase of Clostridium sp. was identified. Within Euryarchaeota, Methanosarcina sp. dominated in all analyzed samples, in which high ammonium levels were detected (3.4-4.9 NH4(+)-N g L(-1)). These results can help in better understanding the anaerobic digestion process of simultaneously ammonium/phosphate-rich substrates.

  7. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens dominate in biogas reactors fed with defined substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampmann, K; Ratering, S; Baumann, R; Schmidt, M; Zerr, W; Schnell, S

    2012-09-01

    Methanogenic communities in 200L biogas reactors containing liquid manure were investigated for 33 d. The reactors were consecutively fed with casein, starch and cream. Real-time PCR with primers targeting the gene for methyl coenzyme-M reductase (mcrA) resulted in copy numbers of up to 2.1×10(9) g dry mass(-1). Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis revealed a stable community consisting of few hydrogenotrophic methanogens. One of the two most abundant species was closely related to Methanospirillum hungatei, whereas the other one was only distantly related to other methanogens, with Methanopyrus kandleri being the closest cultivated relative. Most probable number (MPN) cultivations were accomplished with a sample from a 600 m(3) reactor from which all manures used in the experiments originated, and equal cell counts of ca. 10(9) g dry mass(-1) were found for cultivations with acetate, H(2) and methanol. SSCP analysis of these samples and sequencing of the DNA bands identified different hydrogenotrophic methanogens in all samples, and acetoclastic methanogens closely related to Methanosarcina mazei in the samples cultivated with acetate and methanol. As the acetoclastic species were not found in any other SSCP sample, it was supposed that the ammonia values in the manure of the laboratory biogas reactor, which ranged from 2.48 to 3.61 g NH(4)-NL(-1), inhibited the growth of the acetoclastic methanogens.

  8. Performance and microbial community analysis of two-stage process with extreme thermophilic hydrogen and thermophilic methane production from hydrolysate in UASB reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongjan, Prawit; O-Thong, Sompong; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-03-01

    The two-stage process for extreme thermophilic hydrogen and thermophilic methane production from wheat straw hydrolysate was investigated in up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors. Specific hydrogen and methane yields of 89 ml-H(2)/g-VS (190 ml-H(2)/g-sugars) and 307 ml-CH(4)/g-VS, respectively were achieved simultaneously with the overall VS removal efficiency of 81% by operating with total hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4 days . The energy conversion efficiency was dramatically increased from only 7.5% in the hydrogen stage to 87.5% of the potential energy from hydrolysate, corresponding to total energy of 13.4 kJ/g-VS. Dominant hydrogen-producing bacteria in the H(2)-UASB reactor were Thermoanaerobacter wiegelii, Caldanaerobacter subteraneus, and Caloramator fervidus. Meanwhile, the CH(4)-UASB reactor was dominated with methanogens of Methanosarcina mazei and Methanothermobacter defluvii. The results from this study suggest the two stage anaerobic process can be effectively used for energy recovery and for stabilization of hydrolysate at anaerobic conditions.

  9. Magnetic anomalies across Bastar craton and Pranhita–Godavari basin in south of central India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I V Radhakrishna Murthy; S Bangaru Babu

    2009-02-01

    Aeromagnetic anomalies over Bastar craton and Pranhita –Godavari (P –G)basin in the south of central India could be attributed to NW –SE striking mafic intrusives in both the areas at variable depths.Such intrusions can be explained considering the collision of the Bastar and Dharwar cratons by the end of the Archaean and the development of tensile regimes that followed in the Paleoproterozoic,facilitating intrusions of mafic dykes into the continental crust.The P –G basin area,being a zone of crustal weakness along the contact of the Bastar and Dharwar cratons, also experienced extensional tectonics.The inferred remanent magnetization of these dykes dips upwards and it is such that the dykes are oriented towards the east of the magnetic north at the time of their formation compared to their present NW –SE strike.Assuming that there was no imprint of magnetization of a later date,it is concluded that the Indian plate was located in the southern hemisphere,either independently or as part of a supercontinent,for some span of time during Paleoproterozoic and was involved in complex path of movement and rotation subsequently. The paper presents a case study of the utility of aeromagnetic anomalies in qualitatively deducing the palaeopositions of the landmasses from the interpreted remanent magnetism of buried intrusive bodies.

  10. Genetically Engineering Entomopathogenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H; Lovett, B; Fang, W

    2016-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi have been developed as environmentally friendly alternatives to chemical insecticides in biocontrol programs for agricultural pests and vectors of disease. However, mycoinsecticides currently have a small market share due to low virulence and inconsistencies in their performance. Genetic engineering has made it possible to significantly improve the virulence of fungi and their tolerance to adverse conditions. Virulence enhancement has been achieved by engineering fungi to express insect proteins and insecticidal proteins/peptides from insect predators and other insect pathogens, or by overexpressing the pathogen's own genes. Importantly, protein engineering can be used to mix and match functional domains from diverse genes sourced from entomopathogenic fungi and other organisms, producing insecticidal proteins with novel characteristics. Fungal tolerance to abiotic stresses, especially UV radiation, has been greatly improved by introducing into entomopathogens a photoreactivation system from an archaean and pigment synthesis pathways from nonentomopathogenic fungi. Conversely, gene knockout strategies have produced strains with reduced ecological fitness as recipients for genetic engineering to improve virulence; the resulting strains are hypervirulent, but will not persist in the environment. Coupled with their natural insect specificity, safety concerns can also be mitigated by using safe effector proteins with selection marker genes removed after transformation. With the increasing public concern over the continued use of synthetic chemical insecticides and growing public acceptance of genetically modified organisms, new types of biological insecticides produced by genetic engineering offer a range of environmentally friendly options for cost-effective control of insect pests.

  11. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope evidence for a temperate climate 3.42 billion years ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hren, M T; Tice, M M; Chamberlain, C P

    2009-11-12

    Stable oxygen isotope ratios (delta(18)O) of Precambrian cherts have been used to establish much of our understanding of the early climate history of Earth and suggest that ocean temperatures during the Archaean era ( approximately 3.5 billion years ago) were between 55 degrees C and 85 degrees C (ref. 2). But, because of uncertainty in the delta(18)O of the primitive ocean, there is considerable debate regarding this conclusion. Examination of modern and ancient cherts indicates that another approach, using a combined analysis of delta(18)O and hydrogen isotopes (deltaD) rather than delta(18)O alone, can provide a firmer constraint on formational temperatures without independent knowledge of the isotopic composition of ambient waters. Here we show that delta(18)O and deltaD sampled from 3.42-billion-year-old Buck Reef Chert rocks in South Africa are consistent with formation from waters at varied low temperatures. The most (18)O-enriched Buck Reef Chert rocks record the lowest diagenetic temperatures and were formed in equilibrium with waters below approximately 40 degrees C. Geochemical and sedimentary evidence suggests that the Buck Reef Chert was formed in shallow to deep marine conditions, so our results indicate that the Palaeoarchaean ocean was isotopically depleted relative to the modern ocean and far cooler (

  12. 华北克拉通~2.5Ga地壳再造事件:来自中条山TTG质片麻岩的证据%Crustal reworking in the North China Craton at ~ 2.5Ga: Evidence from zircon UPb ages, Hf isotopes and whole-rock geochemistry of the TTG gneisses in the Zhongtiao Mountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张瑞英; 张成立; 孙勇

    2013-01-01

    华北克拉通中部中条山区涑水杂岩是华北克拉通新太古代TTG质片麻岩地体之一.为了探讨华北克拉通新太古代构造-岩浆事件的性质及早前寒武纪地壳的形成和演化,选择涑水杂岩中TTG质岩石进行研究.研究表明这套TTG质岩石富Na、高Al、Sr,低Y、Cr、Ni含量.稀土元素配分曲线右倾,富Rb、Ba等大离子亲石元素,强烈亏损Nb、Ta等高场强元素.LA-ICP-MS锆石U-Pb定年结果表明,这套TTG质片麻岩形成于2553 ~ 2561Ma,属新太古代晚期产物.锆石Lu-Hf同位素分析结果显示εHf(t)为正值,两阶段模式年龄集中在2.7 ~2.8Ga.结合涑水杂岩中TTG质片麻岩的岩石地球化学特征,认为这套TTG片麻岩可能主要来自2.7 ~2.8Ga的下地壳镁铁质岩石在新太古代晚期的部分熔融,可能有少量的地幔物质加入.考虑同期发育大量花岗质岩石的事实,说明新太古代晚期在华北克拉通中部并不存在大规模的俯冲作用,华北克拉通在新太古代晚期已经基本成型.结合前人研究成果和本文锆石Lu-Hf同位素分析结果,提出中条山区~2.5Ga岩浆事件代表一期重要的陆壳再造事件.%The Sushui Complex in the Zhongtiao Mountain,located in the central NCC,is one of the reprehensive TTG gneisses in Late Archaean of North China Craton.In order to study the tectono-magmatic thermal event of the North China Craton during Late Archaean and the formation and evolution of the Early Precambrian continental crust,we choose the TTG gneisses of Sushui complex as the research object.The results show that the TTG gneisses are characterized by high Na,Al and Sr contents,but low Y,Cr,Ni contents.The TTG rocks are rich in LREE,and chondrite normalized REE patterns are characterized by right inclining type.And their trace elements display the features of enrichment of large ion lithophile elements (such as Rb and Ba) and strongly depleted in high field strength elements (Nb and Ta

  13. Estimating the distribution of strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr in the Precambrian of Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Kaislaniemi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A method to estimate the 87Sr/86Sr ratio of a rock based on its age and Rb/Sr ratio is presented. This method, together with data from the Rock Geochemical Database of Finland (n=6544 is used to estimate the 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the Precambrian of Finland and in its different major units. A generalization to cover the whole area of Finland is achieved by smoothing of estimation points. The estimation method is evaluated by comparing its results to published Rb-Sr isotope analyses (n=138 obtained on the Finnish Precambrian. The results show correspondence to different geological units of Finland,but no systematic difference between Archaean and younger areas is evident. Evaluation of the method shows that most of the estimates are reliable and accurate to be used as background material for provenance studies in archaeology, paleontology and sedimentology. However, some granitic rocks may have large (>1.0 % relative errors.Strontium concentration weighted average of the estimates differs only by 0.001 from the average 87Sr/86Sr ratio (0.730 of the rivers on the Fennoscandian shield.

  14. Prediction and functional analysis of native disorder in proteins from the three kingdoms of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, J J; Sodhi, J S; McGuffin, L J; Buxton, B F; Jones, D T

    2004-03-26

    An automatic method for recognizing natively disordered regions from amino acid sequence is described and benchmarked against predictors that were assessed at the latest critical assessment of techniques for protein structure prediction (CASP) experiment. The method attains a Wilcoxon score of 90.0, which represents a statistically significant improvement on the methods evaluated on the same targets at CASP. The classifier, DISOPRED2, was used to estimate the frequency of native disorder in several representative genomes from the three kingdoms of life. Putative, long (>30 residue) disordered segments are found to occur in 2.0% of archaean, 4.2% of eubacterial and 33.0% of eukaryotic proteins. The function of proteins with long predicted regions of disorder was investigated using the gene ontology annotations supplied with the Saccharomyces genome database. The analysis of the yeast proteome suggests that proteins containing disorder are often located in the cell nucleus and are involved in the regulation of transcription and cell signalling. The results also indicate that native disorder is associated with the molecular functions of kinase activity and nucleic acid binding.

  15. Precambrian clastic sedimentation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, P. G.; Condie, K. C.; Tirsgaard, H.; Mueller, W. U.; Altermann, W.; Miall, A. D.; Aspler, L. B.; Catuneanu, O.; Chiarenzelli, J. R.

    1998-09-01

    The unique and evolving nature of the Precambrian geological environment in many ways was responsible for significant differences between Precambrian clastic sedimentary deposits and their Phanerozoic-modern equivalents. Some form of plate tectonics, with rapid microplate collisions and concomitant volcanic activity, is inferred to have led to the formation of greenstone belts. Explosive volcanism promoted common gravity-flow deposits within terrestrial greenstone settings, with braided alluvial, wave/storm-related and tidal coastline sediments also being preserved. Late Archaean accretion of greenstone terranes led to emergence of proto-cratons, where cratonic and rift sedimentary assemblages developed, and these became widespread in the Proterozoic as cratonic plates stabilised. Carbonate deposition was restricted by the paucity of stable Archaean terranes. An Early Precambrian atmosphere characterised by greenhouse gases, including CO 2, in conjunction with a faster rotation of the Earth and reduced albedo, provide a solution to the faint young Sun paradox. As emergent continental crust developed, volcanic additions of CO 2 became balanced by withdrawal due to weathering and a developing Palaeoproterozoic microbial biomass. The reduction in CO 2, and the photosynthetic production of O 2, led to aerobic conditions probably being achieved by about 2 Ga. Oceanic growth was allied to atmospheric development, with approximately 90% of current ocean volume being reached by about 4 Ga. Warm Archaean and warm, moist Palaeoproterozoic palaeoclimates appear to have become more arid after about 2.3 Ga. The 2.4-2.3 Ga Huronian glaciation event was probably related to continental growth, supercontinent assembly and weathering-related CO 2 reduction. Despite many analogous features among both Precambrian and younger sedimentary deposits, there appear to be major differences as well. Two pertinent examples are rare unequivocal aeolian deposits prior to about 1.8 Ga and an

  16. Gold mobility during Palaeoarchaean submarine alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Axel; Pitcairn, Iain; Wilson, Allan

    2017-03-01

    Seafloor alteration provides large amounts of solutes to the hydrosphere. In order to investigate gold mobility during water-rock interaction prior to 3-billion-years ago, low detection limit analysis of Au concentrations was carried out on rocks from marine alteration zones. Stratiform zones recording low-temperature (≤150 °C) seafloor alteration are a characteristic feature of greenstone belts older than 3.0 Ga. Hydrothermal processes were operating on, and immediately below, the seafloor, giving rise to extensive silicification of sub-seafloor volcanic rocks and silicification of seafloor sediments. In order to investigate gold mobility during silicification, unaltered and variably silicified volcanic rocks and associated cherts from Palaeoarchaean greenstone successions (c. 3.4 Ga) of South Africa were analyzed. Results show mobility of gold during silicification of mafic/ultramafic rocks and transfer to the Archaean ocean. Some gold was incorporated into carbonaceous marine sediments overlying the alteration zones. A combination of pervasive silicification, rarity of black shales, and low gold content in komatiites can explain the low mineralization potential of Palaeoarchaean greenstone belts for orogenic gold deposits.

  17. Application of remote sensing and GIS analysis for identifying groundwater potential zone in parts of Kodaikanal Taluk, South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagyaraj, Murugesan; Ramkumar, Thirunavukkarasu; Venkatramanan, Senapathi; Gurugnanam, Balasubramanian

    2013-03-01

    Groundwater potential zones were demarcated with the help of remote sensing and Geographic Information System (GIS) techniques. The study area is composed rocks of Archaean age and charnockite dominated over others. The parameters considered for identifying the groundwater potential zone of geology slope, drainage density, geomorphic units and lineament density were generated using the resource sat (IRS P6 LISS IV MX) data and survey of India (SOI) toposheets of scale 1:50000 and integrated them with an inverse distance weighted (IDW) model based on GIS data to identify the groundwater potential of the study area. Suitable weightage factors were assigned for each category of these parameters. For the various geomorphic units, weightage factors were assigned based on their capability to store ground-water. This procedure was repeated for all the other layers and resultant layers were reclassified. The reclassified layers were then combined to demarcate zones as very good, good, moderate, low, and poor. This groundwater potentiality information could be used for effective identification of suitable locations for extraction of potable water for rural populations.

  18. Application of remote sensing and GIS analysis for identifying groundwater potential zone in parts of Kodaikanal Taluk,South India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Murugesan BAGYARAJ; Thirunavukkarasu RAMKUMAR; Senapathi VENKATRAMANAN; Balasubramanian GURUGNANAM

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater potential zones were demarcated with the help of remote sensing and Geographic Information System (GIS) techniques.The study area is composed rocks of Archaean age and chamockite dominated over others.The parameters considered for identifying the groundwater potential zone of geology slope,drainage density,geomorphic units and lineament density were generated using the resource sat (IRS P6 LISS IV MX) data and survey of India (SOI) toposheets of scale 1∶50000and integrated them with an inverse distance weighted (IDW) model based on GIS data to identify the groundwater potential of the study area.Suitable weightage factors were assigned for each category of these parameters.For the various geomorphic units,weightage factors were assigned based on their capability to store ground-water.This procedure was repeated for all the other layers and resultant layers were reclassified.The reclassified layers were then combined to demarcate zones as very good,good,moderate,low,and poor.This groundwater potentiality information could be used for effective identification of suitable locations for extraction of potable water for rural populations.

  19. Petrology and physical conditions of metamorphism of calcsilicate rocks from low- to high-grade transition area, Dharmapuri District, Tamil Nadu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, B. L.; Natarajan, R.; Govil, P. K.

    1988-01-01

    Calc-silicate rocks comprising quartz, plagioclase, diopside, sphene, scapolite, grossularite-andradite and wollastonite occur as lensoid enclaves within the greasy migmatitic and charnockitic gneisses of the Archaean amphibolite- to granulite-facies transition zone in Dharmapuri district, Tamil Nadu. The calc-silicate rocks are characterized by the absence of K-feldspar and primary calcite, presence of large modal quartz and plagioclase and formation of secondary garnet and zoisite rims around scapolite and wollastonite. The mineral distributions suggest compositional layering. The chemical composition and mineralogy of the calc-silicate rocks indicate that they were derived from impure silica-rich calcareous sediments whose composition is similar to that of pelite-limestone mixtures. From the mineral assemblages the temperature, pressure and fluid composition during metamorphism were estimated. The observed mineral reaction sequences require a range of X sub CO2 values demonstrating that an initially CO2-rich metamorphic fluid evolved with time towards considerably more H2O-rich compositions. These variations in fluid composition suggest that there were sources of water-rich fluids external to the calc-silicate rocks and that mixing of these fluids with those of calc-silicate rocks was important in controlling fluid composition in calc-silicate rocks and some adjacent rock types as well.

  20. Prodigious degassing of a billion years of accumulated radiogenic helium at Yellowstone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, J B; Evans, W C; Bergfeld, D; Hunt, A G

    2014-02-20

    Helium is used as a critical tracer throughout the Earth sciences, where its relatively simple isotopic systematics is used to trace degassing from the mantle, to date groundwater and to time the rise of continents. The hydrothermal system at Yellowstone National Park is famous for its high helium-3/helium-4 isotope ratio, commonly cited as evidence for a deep mantle source for the Yellowstone hotspot. However, much of the helium emitted from this region is actually radiogenic helium-4 produced within the crust by α-decay of uranium and thorium. Here we show, by combining gas emission rates with chemistry and isotopic analyses, that crustal helium-4 emission rates from Yellowstone exceed (by orders of magnitude) any conceivable rate of generation within the crust. It seems that helium has accumulated for (at least) many hundreds of millions of years in Archaean (more than 2.5 billion years old) cratonic rocks beneath Yellowstone, only to be liberated over the past two million years by intense crustal metamorphism induced by the Yellowstone hotspot. Our results demonstrate the extremes in variability of crustal helium efflux on geologic timescales and imply crustal-scale open-system behaviour of helium in tectonically and magmatically active regions.

  1. Continental crust generated in oceanic arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazel, Esteban; Hayes, Jorden L.; Hoernle, Kaj; Kelemen, Peter; Everson, Erik; Holbrook, W. Steven; Hauff, Folkmar; van den Bogaard, Paul; Vance, Eric A.; Chu, Shuyu; Calvert, Andrew J.; Carr, Michael J.; Yogodzinski, Gene M.

    2015-04-01

    Thin oceanic crust is formed by decompression melting of the upper mantle at mid-ocean ridges, but the origin of the thick and buoyant continental crust is enigmatic. Juvenile continental crust may form from magmas erupted above intra-oceanic subduction zones, where oceanic lithosphere subducts beneath other oceanic lithosphere. However, it is unclear why the subduction of dominantly basaltic oceanic crust would result in the formation of andesitic continental crust at the surface. Here we use geochemical and geophysical data to reconstruct the evolution of the Central American land bridge, which formed above an intra-oceanic subduction system over the past 70 Myr. We find that the geochemical signature of erupted lavas evolved from basaltic to andesitic about 10 Myr ago--coincident with the onset of subduction of more oceanic crust that originally formed above the Galápagos mantle plume. We also find that seismic P-waves travel through the crust at velocities intermediate between those typically observed for oceanic and continental crust. We develop a continentality index to quantitatively correlate geochemical composition with the average P-wave velocity of arc crust globally. We conclude that although the formation and evolution of continents may involve many processes, melting enriched oceanic crust within a subduction zone--a process probably more common in the Archaean--can produce juvenile continental crust.

  2. Characterization of the PH1704 protease from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 and the critical functions of Tyr120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Dongling; Bai, Aixi; Yu, Lei; Han, Weiwei; Feng, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The PH1704 protease from hyperthermophilic archaean Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 is a member of DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily with diverse functional subclasses. The recombinant PH1704 was efficiently purified and was systematically characterized by a combination of substrate specificity analysis, steady-state kinetics study and molecular docking research. The homogeneous protease was obtained as a presumed dodecamer with molecular weight of ∼240 kDa. Iodoacetamide strongly inhibited the peptidase activity, confirming that Cys100 is a nucleophilic residue. The recombinant protein was identified as both an aminopeptidase and an endopeptidase. Experimental data showed that L-R-amc was the best substrate of PH1704. Structural interaction fingerprint analysis (SIFt) indicated the binding pose of PH1704 and showed that Tyr120 is important in substrate binding. Kinetic parameters Kcat and Kcat/Km of the Y120P mutant with L-R-amc was about 7 and 7.8 times higher than that of the wild type (WT). For the endopeptidase Y120P with AAFR-amc, Kcat and Kcat/Km is 10- and 21-fold higher than that of WT. Experimental data indicate the important functions of Tyr120: involvement in enzyme activity to form a hydrogen bond with Cys100 and as an entrance gate of the substrate with Lys43. The results of this study can be used to investigate the DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily.

  3. Strontium hydrogeochemistry of thermal groundwaters from Baikal and Xinzhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王焰新; 沈照理

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports our work on the strontium hydrogeochemistry of thermal groundwa-ters in the Baikal Rift System (BRS) in Russia and Mongolia and the Xinzhou basin of the Shanxi Rift System (SRS) in northern China. Though similar in geological background, groundwaters from the BRS and the Xinzhou basin have different strontium isotope compositions. Both the strontium contents and the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of thermal water samples from Xinzhou are higher than those of most samples from Baikal. The major reason is the difference in hostrock geochemistry. The hos-trocks of the Xinzhou waters are Archaean metamorphic rocks, while those of the Baikal waters except the Kejielikov spring are Proterozoic or younger rocks. In the study areas, cold groundwaters usually show lower 87Sr/86Sr ratio due to shorter water-rock interaction history and lower equilibration degree. Strontium hydrogeochemistry often provides important information about mixing processes. Ca/Sr ratio can be used as an important hydrogeochemical pa

  4. Paragenesis of Cr-rich muscovite and chlorite in green-mica quartzites of Saigaon–Palasgaon area, Western Bastar Craton, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K R Randive; M M Korakoppa; S V Muley; A M Varade; H W Khandare; S G Lanjewar; R R Tiwari; K K Aradhi

    2015-02-01

    Green mica (fuchsite or chromian-muscovite) is reported worldwide in the Archaean metasedimentary rocks, especially quartzites. They are generally associated with a suite of heavy minerals and a range of phyllosilicates. We report the occurrence of green-mica quartzites in the Saigaon–Palasgaon area within Bastar Craton in central India. Mineralogical study has shown that there are two types of muscovites; the chromium-containing muscovite (Cr2O3 0.84–1.84%) and muscovite (Cr2O3 0.00–0.22%). Chlorites are chromium-containing chlorites (Cr2O3 3.66–5.39%) and low-chromium-containing chlorites (Cr2O3 0.56–2.62%), and as such represent ripidolite–brunsvigite varieties. Back scattered electron images and EPMA data has revealed that chlorite occurs in two forms, viz., parallel to subparallel stacks in the form of intergrowth with muscovite and independent crystals within the matrix. The present study indicates that the replacement of chromium-containing chlorite by chromium-containing muscovite is found to be due to increasing grade of metamorphism of chromium-rich sediments. However, the absence of significant compositional gap between aforementioned varieties indicates disparate substitution of cations, especially chromium, within matrix chlorites. The chromium-containing muscovite and muscovite are two separate varieties having distinct paragenesis.

  5. Water-rock interactions, orthopyroxene growth, and Si-enrichment in the mantle: evidence in xenoliths from the Colorado Plateau, southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas; Alexis Riter, J. C.; Mertzman, Stanley A.

    1999-01-01

    Water-rock interactions and consequent orthopyroxene growth are documented by mantle xenoliths from opposite margins of the Colorado Plateau province. The interactions are inferred from a distinctive texture plus composition of orthopyroxene in spinel peridotite, in which porphyroblasts of orthopyroxene with inclusions of resorbed olivine are zoned to interiors exceptionally low in Al 2O 3 (Bandera Crater, New Mexico, in the southeastern margin of the Colorado Plateau, extending the known distribution from the northwestern margin (Grand Canyon field). Evidence that Si-enrichment locally accompanied movement of aqueous fluid is provided by an orthopyroxenite xenolith that is about 95% enstatite. The enstatite occurs in curved laths to 25 mm long, and the texture and composition (Al 2O 3 1 to 2 wt%, Mg/(Mg + Fe) 0.92) are attributed to growth during subsolidus interaction between peridotite and hydrous fluid. Modal orthopyroxene calculated from 4 bulk rock analyses of peridotite xenoliths from the Grand Canyon field ranges from 26 to 29%, more than in comparably depleted oceanic mantle. The mantle root of the Colorado Plateau may have formed from accreted ocean lithosphere and subsequently been enriched in Si by aqueous metasomatism at widely distributed sites. Similar fluid-rock interaction may have contributed to the orthopyroxene-enrichment characteristic of some mantle xenoliths from roots of Archaean cratons.

  6. [CO2-Concentrating Mechanism and Its Traits in Haloalkaliphilic Cyanobacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriyanova, E V; Samylina, O S

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are a group of oxygenic phototrophs existing for at least 3.5 Ga. Photosynthetic CO2 assimilation by cyanobacteria occurs via the Calvin cycle, with RuBisCO, its key enzyme, having very low affinity to CO2. This is due to the fact that atmospheric CO2 concentration in Archaean, when the photosynthetic apparatus evolved, was several orders higher than now. Later, in the epoch of Precambrian microbial communities, CO2 content in the atmosphere decreased drastically. Thus, present-day phototrophs, including cyanobacteria, require adaptive mechanisms for efficient photosynthesis. In cyanobacterial cells, this function is performed by the CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), which creates elevated CO2 concentrations in the vicinity of RuBisCO active centers, thus significantly increasing the rate of CO2 fixation in the Calvin cycle. CCM has been previously studied only for freshwater and marine cyanobacteria. We were the first to investigate CCM in haloalkaliphilic cyanobacteria from soda lakes. Extremophilic haloalkaliphilic cyanobacteria were shown to possess a well-developed CCM with the structure and functional principles similar to those of freshwater and marine strains. Analysis of available data suggests that regulation of the amount of inorganic carbon transported into the cell is probably the general CCM function under these conditions.

  7. Origins of life: An operational definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischaker, Gail Raney

    1990-03-01

    Two very different models are used for the scientific study of life's origins: in the Troland-Muller model, life is molecular and its defining characteristic is gene function; in the Oparin-Haldane model, life is cellular and its defining characteristic is metabolic function. While each of these models implicitly defines the living, neither provides criteria by which theemergence of life could be recognized in the laboratory. Anoperational definition of the living makes explicit the system logic of metabolic self-production: (1) that whatever form it may take, life is a function of its biochemical processes; (2) that no single biochemical process has integrity apart from an entire network of processes; (3) that a network of processes can have continuity only by being enclosed within a boundary structure, i.e., by the selective partition of a microenvironment as a domain for the bioenergetic-biosynthetic network; and (4) that life is a single phenomenon, distinct in its continuity of capture and storage of energy in such networks, driving the processes that produce its material constituents. This paper presentsautopoiesis as life-defining and discusses the utility of its criteria in our search for the origins of life on Earth. Enactment of the autopoietic criteria would result in aminimal cell and would demonstrate the experimental recapitulation of life's Archaean origins.

  8. Evidence for low sulphate and anoxia in a mid-Proterozoic marine basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanan; Knoll, Andrew H; Walter, Malcolm R

    2003-06-05

    Many independent lines of evidence document a large increase in the Earth's surface oxidation state 2,400 to 2,200 million years ago, and a second biospheric oxygenation 800 to 580 million years ago, just before large animals appear in the fossil record. Such a two-staged oxidation implies a unique ocean chemistry for much of the Proterozoic eon, which would have been neither completely anoxic and iron-rich as hypothesized for Archaean seas, nor fully oxic as supposed for most of the Phanerozoic eon. The redox chemistry of Proterozoic oceans has important implications for evolution, but empirical constraints on competing environmental models are scarce. Here we present an analysis of the iron chemistry of shales deposited in the marine Roper Basin, Australia, between about 1,500 and 1,400 million years ago, which record deep-water anoxia beneath oxidized surface water. The sulphur isotopic compositions of pyrites in the shales show strong variations along a palaeodepth gradient, indicating low sulphate concentrations in mid-Proterozoic oceans. Our data help to integrate a growing body of evidence favouring a long-lived intermediate state of the oceans, generated by the early Proterozoic oxygen revolution and terminated by the environmental transformation late in the Proterozoic eon.

  9. Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations before 2.2 billion years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye, R.; Kuo, P. H.; Holland, H. D.

    1995-01-01

    The composition of the Earth's early atmosphere is a subject of continuing debate. In particular, it has been suggested that elevated concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide would have been necessary to maintain normal surface temperatures in the face of lower solar luminosity in early Earth history. Fossil weathering profiles, known as palaeosols, have provided semi-quantitative constraints on atmospheric oxygen partial pressure (pO2) before 2.2 Gyr ago. Here we use the same well studied palaeosols to constrain atmospheric pCO2 between 2.75 and 2.2 Gyr ago. The observation that iron lost from the tops of these profiles was reprecipitated lower down as iron silicate minerals, rather than as iron carbonate, indicates that atmospheric pCO2 must have been less than 10(-1.4) atm--about 100 times today's level of 360 p.p.m., and at least five times lower than that required in one-dimensional climate models to compensate for lower solar luminosity at 2.75 Gyr. Our results suggest that either the Earth's early climate was much more sensitive to increases in pCO2 than has been thought, or that one or more greenhouse gases other than CO2 contributed significantly to the atmosphere's radiative balance during the late Archaean and early Proterozoic eons.

  10. The Santa Barbara Basin is a symbiosis oasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, J M; Buck, K R; Farmer, M A; Bowser, S S

    2000-01-06

    It is generally agreed that the origin and initial diversification of Eucarya occurred in the late Archaean or Proterozoic Eons when atmospheric oxygen levels were low and the risk of DNA damage due to ultraviolet radiation was high. Because deep water provides refuge against ultraviolet radiation and early eukaryotes may have been aerotolerant anaerobes, deep-water dysoxic environments are likely settings for primeval eukaryotic diversification. Fossil evidence shows that deep-sea microbial mats, possibly of sulphur bacteria similar to Beggiatoa, existed during that time. Here we report on the eukaryotic community of a modern analogue, the Santa Barbara Basin (California, USA). The Beggiatoa mats of these severely dysoxic and sulphidic sediments support a surprisingly abundant protistan and metazoan meiofaunal community, most members of which harbour prokaryotic symbionts. Many of these taxa are new to science, and both microaerophilic and anaerobic taxa appear to be represented. Compared with nearby aerated sites, the Santa Barbara Basin is a 'symbiosis oasis' offering a new source of organisms for testing symbiosis hypotheses of eukaryogenesis.

  11. The Activity of H2O, Fugacity of O2 and Variation of Their Chemical Potential During Metamorphic Peak of the Granulite Complex Near Taipingzhai-Louzishan Region,East Hebei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢良兆; 董永胜; 周喜文

    2001-01-01

    The thermodynamic calculation of dehydration reacton suggests very low activity of H2O during metamorphic peak of the Archaean granulite complex in the region studied. The aH2o values for Al-rich gneiss and hypersthene biotite gneiss-granulite in the Taipingzhai region are usually between 0.10 and 0.20, and those in the Louzishan region are 0.15 - 0.25. The fugacity of O2 in terms of lgfo2 in the whole region ranges from - 8 to - 14. The average co- 1.60 respectively, and those in the Louzishan region are - 0. 364 and - 1. 420. The activity of H2O is very low in the whole region, but its values and other data mentioned above are considerably constant from place to place within a given region, even in rocks of different lithological characters. However, they show a certain gradient between different regions. Such characteristics are compatible with the genetic mechanism known as "carbonic metamorphism" put forward by Newton et al., i. e., the a H2o during the peak stage is controlled by permeation of pervasive CO2 influx of the mantle source, and shows features of external buffering.

  12. Evolution of Migmatitic Granulite Complexes: implications from Lapland Granulite Belt, Part I: metamorphic geology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekka Tuisku

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Palaeoproterozoic Lapland granulite belt was juxtaposed between Archaean and Proterozoic terrains in the NE part of the Fennoscandian Shield concurrently with the accretion of Svecofennian arc complexes at ~1.9 Ga. The belt consists mainly of aluminous migmatiticmetagreywackes. Abundant noritic to enderbitic magmas were intruded concordantly into the metasediments and were probably an important heat source for metamorphism, which took place during the crystallization of the magmas. This is supported by structural and contact relations of metasediments and igneous rocks, and by the lack progressive metamorphic reaction textures in the igneous rock series. The peak of metamorphism took place above the dehydration melting temperature of the biotite-sillimanite-plagioclase-quartz assemblageat 750−850°C and 5−8.5 kbar which lead to formation of a restitic palaeosome and peraluminous granitic melt in metapelites. Subsequently, the rocks were decompressed and cooled below the wet melting temperature of pelitic rocks (650°C under the stability field of andalusite coexisting with potassium feldspar (2−3 kbar. Cooling was accompanied by the crystallization of the neosomes, often carrying aluminium-rich phases. Postmetamorphic duplexing of the LGB is clearly seen in the distribution of calculated PT conditions.

  13. Precambrian crustal evolution and Cretaceous–Palaeogene faulting in West Greenland: Pre-Nagssugtoqidian crustal evolution in West Greenland: geology, geochemistry and deformation of supracrustal and granitic rocks north-east of Kangaatsiaq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watt, Gordon R.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The area north-east of Kangaatsiaq features polyphase grey orthogneisses, supracrustal rocks and Kangaatsiaq granite exposed within a WSW–ENE-trending synform. The supracrustal rocks are comprised of garnet-bearing metapelites, layered amphibolites and layered, likewise grey biotite paragneisses. Their association and geochemical compositions are consistent with a metamorphosed volcano-sedimentary basin (containing both tholeiitic and calc-alkali lavas and is similar to other Archaean greenstone belts. The Kangaatsiaq granite forms a 15 × 3 km flat, subconcordant body of deformed,pink, porphyritic granite occupying the core of the supracrustal synform, and is demonstrably intrusive into the amphibolites. The granite displays a pronounced linear fabric (L or L > S. Thepost-granite deformation developed under lower amphibolite facies conditions (400 ± 50°C, and is characterised by a regular, NE–SW-trending subhorizontal lineation and an associated irregular foliation, whose poles define a great circle; together they are indicative of highly constrictional strain. The existence of a pre-granite event is attested by early isoclinal folds and a foliation within the amphibolites that is not present in the granite, and by the fact that the granite cuts earlier structures in the supracrustal rocks. This early event, preserved only in quartz-free lithologies, resulted in high-temperature fabrics being developed under upper amphibolite to granulite facies conditions.

  14. The Activity of H2O,Fugacity of O2 and Variation of Their Chemical Potential During Metamorphic Peak of the Granulite Complex Near Taipingzhai—Louzishan Region,East Hebei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢良兆; 董永胜; 等

    2001-01-01

    The thermodynamic calculation of dehydration reacton suggests very low activity of H2O during metamorphic peak of the Archaean granulite complex in the region studied.The αH2O values for Al-rich gneiss and hypersthene biotite gneiss-granulite in the Taipingzhai region are usually between 0.10 and 0.20,and those in the Louzishan region are 0.15-0.25.The fugacity of O2 in terms of lgf O2 in whole region ranges form-8to-14.The average coefficients of (δμH2O/δHMgBt)and(δμO2/δXMgBt)in the Taipingzhai region are-0.293 and-1.60 respectively,and those in the Louzishan region are-0.364and-1.420.The activity of H2O is very low in the whole region,but its values and other data mentioned above are considerably constant from place to place within a given region,even in rocks of dirrerent lithological characters.However,they show a certain gradient between different regions.Such characteristics are compatible with the genetic mechanism known as“carbonic metamorphism” put forward by Newton et al.,i.e.,the α H2O during the peak stage is controlled by permeation of pervasive CO2 influx of the mantle source,and shows features of external buffering.

  15. Petrology and geochemistry of the high-pressure Nilgiri Granulite Terrane, Southern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikantappa, C.; Ashamanjari, K. G.; Raith, M.

    1988-01-01

    The Nilgiri granulite terrane in Southern India is predominantly composed of late Archaean medium- to coarse-grained enderbitic to charnockitic rocks. The dominant regional foliation strikes N60 to 70E with generally steep dips. Tight minor isoclinal folds have been observed in places. Granoblastic polygonal micro-structures are common and indicate thorough post-kinematic textural and chemical equilibration at conditions of the granulite facies (2.5 Ga ago). Late compressional deformation in connection with the formation of the Moyar and Bhavani shear zones to the north and south of the Nilgiri block, resulted in wide-spread development of weakly to strongly strained fabrics and was accompanied by minor rehydration. Enderbites and charnockites range from tonalitic to granodioritic in composition. A magmatogenic origin of the protoliths is inferred from their chemical characteristics which resemble those of the andesitic to dacitic members of Cordillera-type calc-alkaline igneous suites. A significant lithological feature of the Nilgiri granulite terrane are numerous extended bodies, lenses and pods of gabbroic and pyroxenitic rocks which are aligned conformable to the foliation of the enderbite-charnockite complex and which have also been deformed and metamorphosed at granulite facies conditions.

  16. Precambrian crustal contribution to the Variscan accretionary prism of the Kaczawa Mountains (Sudetes, SW Poland): evidence from SHRIMP dating of detrital zircons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryza, Ryszard; Zalasiewicz, Jan; Mazur, Stanisław; Aleksandrowski, Paweł; Sergeev, Sergey; Larionov, Alexander

    2007-11-01

    SHRIMP dating of detrital zircons from sandstones of the Gackowa Formation (Kaczawa Complex, Sudetes, SW Poland) indicates input from late (550-750 Ma) and early Proterozoic to Archaean sources (˜2.0-3.4 Ga, the latter being the oldest recorded age from the Sudetic region). These dates preclude within-terrane derivation from seemingly correlatory acid volcanic rocks of early Palaeozoic age. Rather, they indicate provenance from Cadomian and older rocks that currently form part of other, geographically distant terranes; the most likely source identified to date is the Lusatian Block in the Saxothuringian Zone. Hence, the Gackowa Formation may be late Proterozoic rather than early Palaeozoic in depositional age, possibly coeval with the late Proterozoic (pre-Cadomian) greywackes of Lusatia, being subsequently tectonically interleaved with early Palaeozoic volcanic rocks into the Kaczawa accretionary prism during the Variscan orogeny. However, correlation with the lithologically similar early Ordovician Dubrau Quartzite of Saxothuringia, and so assignation to the early Paleozoic (post-Cadomian) rift succession deposited at the northern margin of Gondwana, cannot yet be precluded.

  17. Evolution of the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, J F

    1998-01-01

    Planetary atmospheres depend fundamentally upon their geochemical inventory, temperature and the ability of their gravitational field to retain gases. In the case of Earth and other inner planets, early outgassing released mainly carbon dioxide and water vapour. The secondary veneer of comets and meteorites added further volatiles. Photodissociation caused secondary changes, including the production of traces of oxygen from water. Earth's gravity cannot retain light gases, including hydrogen. but retains oxygen. Water vapour generally does not pass the cold trap at the stratopause. In the archaean, early evolution of life, probably in hydrothermal vents, and the subsequent development of photosynthesis in surface waters, produced oxygen, at 3500 Ma or even earlier, becoming a significant component of the atmosphere from about 2000 Ma. Thereafter banded iron formations became rare, and iron was deposited in oxidized red beds. Atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide and oxygen have varied during the Phanerozoic: major changes may have caused extinctions. particularly the Permian/Triassic. The declining greenhouse effect due to the long-term decrease in carbon dioxide has largely offset increasing solar luminosity, and changes in carbon dioxide levels relate strongly to cycles of glaciation.

  18. Assessment of trace metal contamination in a historical freshwater canal (Buckingham Canal), Chennai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakash, M; Nagarajan, R; Velmurugan, P M; Sathiyamoorthy, J; Krishnamurthy, R R; Urban, B

    2012-12-01

    The present study was done to assess the sources and the major processes controlling the trace metal distribution in sediments of Buckingham Canal. Based on the observed geochemical variations, the sediments are grouped as South Buckingham Canal and North Buckingham Canal sediments (SBC and NBC, respectively). SBC sediments show enrichment in Fe, Ti, Mn, Cr, V, Mo, and As concentrations, while NBC sediments show enrichment in Sn, Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni, and Hg. The calculated Chemical Index of Alteration and Chemical Index of Weathering values for all the sediments are relatively higher than the North American Shale Composite and Upper Continental Crust but similar to Post-Archaean Average Shale, and suggest a source area with moderate weathering. Overall, SBC sediments are highly enriched in Mo, Zn, Cu, and Hg (geoaccumulation index (I(geo)) class 4-6), whereas NBC sediments are enriched in Sn, Cu, Zn, and Hg (I(geo) class 4-6). Cu, Ni, and Cr show higher than Effects-Range Median values and hence the biological adverse effect of these metals is 20%; Zn, which accounts for 50%, in the NBC sediments, has a more biological adverse effect than other metals found in these sediments. The calculated I(geo), Enrichment Factor, and Contamination Factor values indicate that Mo, Hg, Sn, Cu, and Zn are highly enriched in the Buckingham Canal sediments, suggesting the rapid urban and industrial development of Chennai Metropolitan City have negatively influenced on the surrounding aquatic ecosystem.

  19. Decrease in oceanic crustal thickness since the breakup of Pangaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Avendonk, Harm J. A.; Davis, Joshua K.; Harding, Jennifer L.; Lawver, Lawrence A.

    2017-01-01

    Earth's mantle has cooled by 6-11 °C every 100 million years since the Archaean, 2.5 billion years ago. In more recent times, the surface heat loss that led to this temperature drop may have been enhanced by plate-tectonic processes, such as continental breakup, the continuous creation of oceanic lithosphere at mid-ocean ridges and subduction at deep-sea trenches. Here we use a compilation of marine seismic refraction data from ocean basins globally to analyse changes in the thickness of oceanic crust over time. We find that oceanic crust formed in the mid-Jurassic, about 170 million years ago, is 1.7 km thicker on average than crust produced along the present-day mid-ocean ridge system. If a higher mantle temperature is the cause of thicker Jurassic ocean crust, the upper mantle may have cooled by 15-20 °C per 100 million years over this time period. The difference between this and the long-term mantle cooling rate indeed suggests that modern plate tectonics coincide with greater mantle heat loss. We also find that the increase of ocean crustal thickness with plate age is stronger in the Indian and Atlantic oceans compared with the Pacific Ocean. This observation supports the idea that upper mantle temperature in the Jurassic was higher in the wake of the fragmented supercontinent Pangaea due to the effect of continental insulation.

  20. Modélisation magnétotellurique de la structure géologique profonde de l’unité granulitique de l’In Ouzzal (Hoggar occidental)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzid, Abderrezak; Akacem, Nouredine; Hamoudi, Mohamed; Ouzegane, Khadidja; Abtout, Abdeslam; Kienast, Jean-Robert

    2008-11-01

    Magnetotelluric modeling of the deep geologic structure of In Ouzzal Granulitic Unit (western Hoggar). The In Ouzzal Granulitic Unit (IOGU) or In Ouzzal Terrane (IOT) is an Archaean block belonging to the Hoggar terrane mosaic. It has been reworked during the Eburnean and is characterized by ultrahigh temperature metamorphism of the structures, which are likely to be old dome and basin structures. The aim of this study, based on a survey of 12 magnetotelluric (MT) soundings, was to characterize the IOGU deep lateral boundaries and to see if it is possible to reconstruct some of these old dome and basin structures after their transformation by metamorphism and deformation. MT data analysis and modeling show that IOGU boundaries extend downwards, at least down to the crust's basement, and may represent suture zones. Inside the terrane, the MT observations do not allow separation between dome and basin structures, because these features are severely stretched. However, the main MT transverse response feature is a deeply rooted great accident, which may be interpreted as a major fault that separates IOGU into two compartments.

  1. The isolation and characterization of new C. thermocellum strains and the evaluation of multiple anaerobic digestion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wen

    with system performances. Methanosarcina and Methanobacterium were the most important methanogenic genera in the digesters where intense hydrolysis/acidogenesis and methanogenesis occurred, while Methanosaeta established itself in the mesophilic digesters with sufficient retention time and low concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFA). The populations of all the quantified methanogen genera (Methanobacterium, Methanosarcina, Methanosaeta , and Methanoculleus) were inversely correlated or associated with high concentrations of VFA. The results of DGGE and qPCR were confirmed and improved by the pyrosequencing data (Chapter 8). Different operation conditions led to the development of different microbial communities that resulted in the functional differences among AD systems. The bacterial community tended to be more diverse in the digesters with more lenient conditions. Firmicutes was a major phylum in each AD system and might be associated with system performance. Chloroflexi was a major phylum in each thermophilic digester with balanced hydrolysis/acidogenesis and methanogenesis, so it might be indicative of efficient operations of thermophilic digesters. Thermotogae only appeared as a major phylum in the AT-TPAD system and might be important to its performance. The results of my studies had impacts on the development of renewable bioenergy. On one hand, the two new thermophilic cellulolytic isolates may be further evaluated for development of CBP strains. On the other hand, the series of comparative and integrated studies of different AD systems provided new knowledge that may guide future research and development of AD systems, particularly TPAD systems. Furthermore, the correlation between system performances and microbial communities may help improve design and operation of AD in general.

  2. 海岸带沉积物环境中甲烷代谢菌的富集培养及混合菌群分析%Enrichment cultivation of methane metabolic bacteria in the environment of sediments from the coastal zones and analysis of mixed bacteria communities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于丽波; 姜丽晶; 汤熙翔

    2011-01-01

    结合Hungate无氧分离技术,对海岸带沉积物中甲烷代谢菌进行了富集培养,分别为珠江口的甲烷产生菌和九龙江口的甲烷氧化菌及其他甲基氧化菌.其研究结果表明:在珠江口淇澳岛海岸带沉积物中,甲烷八叠球菌属(Methanosarcina)为优势菌株,分布于沉积物的上、中、下3个层位,并发现了部分序列与不可培养的泉古菌门( Crenarchaeota)的杂色泉古菌(miscellaneous crenarchaeotic group,MCG)的相似度为90% ~99%.在九龙江口的海岸带沉积物环境中,噬甲基菌属(Methylophaga)为优势菌群,在富集产物菌群多样性中占60% ~99%;还有一些相似度较低(为95% ~97%)的菌群,为潜在的新种.%Methane ( CH4 ) is one of the main " greenhouse gases" responsible for global wanning. Most methane in the atmosphere is the result of the interaction between Methanogens and Methanotrophs. Therefore, it is of great significance for both energy and environment to research Methanogens and Methanotrophs. In this study, enrichment and biodiversity analyses were conducted on bacteria related to methane metabolism from the coastal zone sediments. The Methanogens from Qi' ao Island in the Pearl River Estuary, China and the Methanotrophs and other methyl-oxidizing bacteria from the Jiulongjiang River Estuary, China were cultivated. The main experimental methods included the Hungate anaerobic technique for enrichment and isolation as well as a molecular biological technique for biodiversity analysis was made on the enrichment products. The current study indicated that Methanosarcina was the predominant genus identified throughout the three layers of sediments found in the seashore area of Qi' ao Island in Pearl River Estuary. These bacteria could utilize propionate and lactate as substrates in addition to utilizing methanol, H2/CO2, mono-methylamine ( MM A) , double-methyla-mine( DMA) , trimethylamine( TMA) , as previously reported. The uncultured

  3. 升流式厌氧污泥床和连续流搅拌槽式反应器的废水处理效能及产甲烷菌群组成的对比分析%Comparative Analysis of the Efficiency and the Methanogens Composition in Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket and Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张立国; 李建政; 班巧英; 许一平

    2012-01-01

    分别运行升流式厌氧污泥床(UASB)反应器和连续流搅拌槽式反应器(CSTR)并使其达到稳定运行状态,在有机负荷率(OLR)均为6.0kg·m-3·d-1的条件下,对比分析了二者在稳定期的运行特性和产甲烷菌群的组成.结果表明,UASB的化学需氧量(COD)去除率为95%,显著高于CSTR的COD去除率(84%).然而,CSTR系统中的活性污泥的比产甲烷速率(315L·kg-1·d-1)和比COD去除率(0.85kg·kg-1·d-1)则显著高于UASB的260L·kg-1·d-1和0.67kg·kg-1·d-1.采用聚合酶链式反应-变性梯度凝胶电泳(PCR-DGGE)指纹分析技术对系统稳定期的活性污泥进行分析的结果表明,UASB系统的优势产甲烷菌为Methanosaeta concilii 和 Methanospirillum hungatei,而CSTR系统中的优势产甲烷菌为Methanosarcina mazeii和Methanobacterium formicicum.污泥微生物群落组成及其代谢特征的不同是造成厌氧处理系统效能差异的内在原因.UASB和CSTR在COD去除效能和污泥比活性方面各有所长,在实际应用中,须根据废水水质和预期处理程度合理选用.%The efficiency and the methanogens composition in an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor and a Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor (CSTR) are investigated after achieving steady states at the same Organic Loading Rate (OLR) of 6.0kg· m-3 · d-1. The results show that the average removal rate of COD reaches 95% in the UASB, significantly higher than 84% of the CSTR. However, the specific methane production rate and the specific COD removal rate of the activated sludge are SlSL·kg-1·d-1 and 0.85kg·kg-1·d-1, respectively, in the CSTR, notably higher than those of the UASB of 260L·kg-1·d-1 and 0.67kg· kg-1·d-1, respectively. The analysis of the methanogens composition of the activated sludge by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) indicates that Methanosaeta concilii and Methanospirillum hungatei are the dominant methanogens in the UASB, while

  4. Development of biofilm in anaerobic reactors treating wastewater from coffee grain processing Desenvolvimento de biofilme em reatores anaeróbios tratando água residuária do processamento dos frutos do cafeeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima R. L. Fia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades the use of anaerobic fixed bed reactors has been established in Brazil for the treatment of different effluents. As the capability of retaining microorganisms by support media (fixed bed is a factor influencing the performance of these reactors, the present study aims at evaluating the influence of three fixed bed on the effectiveness of treating an effluent with high pollution potential: wastewater from coffee grain processing (WCP, with organic matter concentrations varying from 812 to 5320 mg L-1 in the form of chemical oxygen demand (COD. Support media used for the immobilization of biomass were: blast furnace slag, polyurethane foam and #2 crushed stone with porosities of 53, 95 and 48%, respectively. The mean efficiency of COD removal in the reactor filled with polyurethane foam was 80%, attributed to its higher porosity index, which also provided greater retention and fixation of biomass which, when quantified as total volatile solids, was found to be 1301 mg g-1 of foam. The biofilm was made up of various microorganisms, including rod, curved rods, cocci, filaments and morphologies similar to Methanosaeta sp. and Methanosarcina sp.Nas últimas décadas tem-se registrado, no Brasil, o uso de reatores anaeróbios de leito fixo para o tratamento de diversos tipos de efluentes. Uma vez que a capacidade de retenção de micro-organismos pelo meio suporte (leito fixo é fator de influência no desempenho desses reatores, buscou-se, com a realização do presente estudo, avaliar a influência do leito fixo na eficiência de três unidades tratando um efluente com elevado potencial poluidor: água residuária do processamento dos frutos do cafeeiro (ARC, com concentração de matéria orgânica variando entre 812 e 5.320 mg L-1 na forma de DQO. Os tipos de suporte utilizados na imobilização da biomassa foram: escória de alto-forno, espuma de poliuretano e brita nº 2, com índice de vazios de 53, 95 e 48%, respectivamente. A

  5. Structural basis of the oxidative activation of the carboxysomal [gamma]-carbonic anhydrase, CcmM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peña, Kerry L.; Castel, Stephane E.; de Araujo, Charlotte; Espie, George S.; Kimber, Matthew S. (Guelph); (Toronto)

    2010-04-26

    Cyanobacterial RuBisCO is sequestered in large, icosahedral, protein-bounded microcompartments called carboxysomes. Bicarbonate is pumped into the cytosol, diffuses into the carboxysome through small pores in its shell, and is then converted to CO{sub 2} by carbonic anhydrase (CA) prior to fixation. Paradoxically, many {beta}-cyanobacteria, including Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1, lack the conventional carboxysomal {beta}-CA, ccaA. The N-terminal domain of the carboxysomal protein CcmM is homologous to {gamma}-CA from Methanosarcina thermophila (Cam) but recombinant CcmM derived from ccaA-containing cyanobacteria show no CA activity. We demonstrate here that either full length CcmM from T. elongatus, or a construct truncated after 209 residues (CcmM209), is active as a CA - the first catalytically active bacterial {gamma}-CA reported. The 2.0 {angstrom} structure of CcmM209 reveals a trimeric, left-handed {beta}-helix structure that closely resembles Cam, except that residues 198-207 form a third {alpha}-helix stabilized by an essential Cys194-Cys200 disulfide bond. Deleting residues 194-209 (CcmM193) results in an inactive protein whose 1.1 {angstrom} structure shows disordering of the N- and C-termini, and reorganization of the trimeric interface and active site. Under reducing conditions, CcmM209 is similarly partially disordered and inactive as a CA. CcmM protein in fresh E. coli cell extracts is inactive, implying that the cellular reducing machinery can reduce and inactivate CcmM, while diamide, a thiol oxidizing agent, activates the enzyme. Thus, like membrane-bound eukaryotic cellular compartments, the {beta}-carboxysome appears to be able to maintain an oxidizing interior by precluding the entry of thioredoxin and other endogenous reducing agents.

  6. Sensitivity and adaptability of methanogens to perchlorates: Implications for life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Timothy A.; Goodhart, Timothy H.; Harpool, Joshua D.; Hearnsberger, Christopher E.; McCracken, Graham L.; McSpadden, Stanley W.

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, the Mars Phoenix Lander discovered perchlorate at its landing site, and in 2012, the Curiosity rover confirmed the presence of perchlorate on Mars. The research reported here was designed to determine if certain methanogens could grow in the presence of three different perchlorate salt solutions. The methanogens tested were Methanothermobacter wolfeii, Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanobacterium formicicum and Methanococcus maripaludis. Media were prepared containing 0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 2%, 5% and 10% wt/vol magnesium perchlorate, sodium perchlorate, or calcium perchlorate. Organisms were inoculated into their respective media followed by incubation at each organism's growth temperature. Methane production, commonly used to measure methanogen growth, was measured by gas chromatography of headspace gas samples. Methane concentrations varied with species and perchlorate salt tested. However, all four methanogens produced substantial levels of methane in the presence of up to 1.0% perchlorate, but not higher. The standard procedure for growing methanogens typically includes sodium sulfide, a reducing agent, to reduce residual molecular oxygen. However, the sodium sulfide may have been reducing the perchlorate, thus allowing for growth of the methanogens. To investigate this possibility, experiments were conducted where stainless steel nails were used instead of sodium sulfide as the reducing agent. Prior to the addition of perchlorate and inoculation, the nails were removed from the liquid medium. Just as in the prior experiments, the methanogens produced methane at comparable levels to those seen with sodium sulfide as the reductant, indicating that sodium sulfide did not reduce the perchlorate to any significant extent. Additionally, cells metabolizing in 1% perchlorate were transferred to 2%, cells metabolizing in 2% were transferred to 5%, and finally cells metabolizing in 5% were transferred to 10%. All four species produced methane at 2% and 5%, but not 10

  7. Link Between Capacity for Current Production and Syntrophic Growth in Geobacter species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia-Elena eRotaru

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Electrodes are unnatural electron acceptors, and it is yet unknown how some Geobacter species evolved to use electrodes as terminal electron acceptors. Analysis of different Geobacter species revealed that they varied in their capacity for current production. G. metallireducens and G. hydrogenophilus generated high current densities (ca. 0.05 mA/cm2, comparable to G. sulfurreducens. G. bremensis, G. chapellei, G. humireducens, and G. uranireducens, produced much lower currents (ca. 0.05 mA/cm2 and G. bemidjiensis was previously found to not produce current. There was no correspondence between the effectiveness of current generation and Fe(III oxide reduction rates. Some high-current-density strains (G. metallireducens and G. hydrogenophilus reduced Fe(III-oxides as fast as some low-current-density strains (G. bremensis, G. humireducens, and G. uranireducens whereas other low-current-density strains (G. bemidjiensis and G. chapellei reduced Fe(III oxide as slowly as G. sulfurreducens, a high-current-density strain. However, there was a correspondence between the ability to produce higher currents and the ability to grow syntrophically. G. hydrogenophilius was found to grow in co-culture with Methanosarcina barkeri, which is capable of direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET, but not with Methanospirillium hungatei capable only of H2 or formate transfer. Conductive granular activated carbon (GAC stimulated metabolism of the G. hydrogenophilus - M. barkeri co-culture, consistent with electron exchange via DIET. These findings, coupled with the previous finding that G. metallireducens and G. sulfurreducens are also capable of DIET, suggest that evolution to optimize DIET has fortuitiously conferred the capability for high-density current production to some Geobacter species.

  8. Field Evidence for Magnetite Formation by a Methanogenic Microbial Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossbach, S.; Beaver, C. L.; Williams, A.; Atekwana, E. A.; Slater, L. D.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Lund, A.

    2015-12-01

    The aged, subsurface petroleum spill in Bemidji, Minnesota, has been surveyed with magnetic susceptibility (MS) measurements. High MS values were found in the free-product phase around the fluctuating water table. Although we had hypothesized that high MS values are related to the occurrence of the mineral magnetite resulting from the activity of iron-reducing bacteria, our microbial analysis pointed to the presence of a methanogenic microbial community at the locations and depths of the highest MS values. Here, we report on a more detailed microbial analysis based on high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene of sediment samples from four consecutive years. In addition, we provide geochemical data (FeII/FeIII concentrations) to refine our conceptual model of methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation at aged petroleum spills and demonstrate that the microbial induced changes of sediment properties can be monitored with MS. The methanogenic microbial community at the Bemidji site consisted mainly of the syntrophic, hydrocarbon-degrading Smithella and the hydrogenotrophic, methane-generating Methanoregula. There is growing evidence in the literature that not only Bacteria, but also some methanogenic Archaea are able to reduce iron. In fact, a recent study reported that the methanogen Methanosarcina thermophila produced magnetite during the reduction of ferrihydrite in a laboratory experiment when hydrogen was present. Therefore, our finding of high MS values and the presence of magnetite in the methanogenic zone of an aged, subsurface petroleum spill could very well be the first field evidence for magnetite formation during methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation.

  9. Laboratory-scale bioaugmentation relieves acetate accumulation and stimulates methane production in stalled anaerobic digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, Jennifer R; Dumonceaux, Tim J

    2016-01-01

    An imbalance between acidogenic and methanogenic organisms during anaerobic digestion can result in increased accumulation of volatile fatty acids, decreased reactor pH, and inhibition of methane-producing Archaea. Most commonly the result of organic input overload or poor inoculum selection, these microbiological and biochemical changes severely hamper reactor performance, and there are a few tools available to facilitate reactor recovery. A small, stable consortium capable of catabolizing acetate and producing methane was propagated in vitro and evaluated as a potential bioaugmentation tool for stimulating methanogenesis in acidified reactors. Replicate laboratory-scale batch digesters were seeded with a combination of bioethanol stillage waste and a dairy manure inoculum previously observed to result in high volatile fatty acid accumulation and reactor failure. Experimental reactors were then amended with the acetoclastic consortium, and control reactors were amended with sterile culture media. Within 7 days, bioaugmented reactors had significantly reduced acetate accumulation and the proportion of methane in the biogas increased from 0.2 ± 0 to 74.4 ± 9.9 % while control reactors showed no significant reduction in acetate accumulation or increase in methane production. Organisms from the consortium were enumerated using specific quantitative PCR assays to evaluate their growth in the experimental reactors. While the abundance of hydrogenotrophic microorganisms remained stable during the recovery period, an acetoclastic methanogen phylogenetically similar to Methanosarcina sp. increased more than 100-fold and is hypothesized to be the primary contributor to reactor recovery. Genomic sequencing of this organism revealed genes related to the production of methane from acetate, hydrogen, and methanol.

  10. Performances of microbial fuel cells fed with rejected wastewater from BioCH4 and BioH2 processes treating molasses wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Yeong; Kim, Tae G; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2016-01-01

    An integrated process involving conventional anaerobic digestion and microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has attracted attention recently to produce sustainable energy and to treat wastewater efficiently. To evaluate the possibility of CH4-producing process (BioCH4)-MFC or H2-producing process (BioH2)-MFC integrating systems, the MFC performances were investigated using rejected wastewater from a BioCH4 reactor (RWCH4) or BioH2 reactor (RWH2) treating molasses wastewater. When RWCH4 or RWH2 was fed into a single-chamber MFC reactor (designated as AC-MFCCH4 and AC-MFCH2, respectively) at different hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 1-7 d, both MFC systems showed maximum electricity production efficiencies at a HRT of 3 d. In the AC-MFCCH4 reactor, the average current density and average power density were 60.5 mA·m(-2) and 8.8 mW·m(-2), respectively. The AC-MFCH2 reactor generated an average current density of 71.4 mA·m(-2) and an average power density of 12.0 mW·m(-2). The COD removal rates were 45.7% in the AC-MFCCH4 reactor and 90.3% in the AC-MFCH2 reactor. There were no significant differences of the eubacterial community structures between the MFC systems, where Proteobacteria was remarkably dominant in both MFC systems. However, the archaeal community structures were significantly different where Methanothrix (89.3%) was remarkably dominant in the AC-MFCCH4 system, while Methanothrix (52.5%) and Methanosarcina (33.5%) were abundant in the AC-MFCH2 system. These findings demonstrate that the utilization of MFCs after the BioCH4 or BioH2 process is advantageous for energy recovery as well as COD removal from molasses wastewater.

  11. Activation of methanogenesis in arid biological soil crusts despite the presence of oxygen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roey Angel

    Full Text Available Methanogenesis is traditionally thought to occur only in highly reduced, anoxic environments. Wetland and rice field soils are well known sources for atmospheric methane, while aerated soils are considered sinks. Although methanogens have been detected in low numbers in some aerated, and even in desert soils, it remains unclear whether they are active under natural oxic conditions, such as in biological soil crusts (BSCs of arid regions. To answer this question we carried out a factorial experiment using microcosms under simulated natural conditions. The BSC on top of an arid soil was incubated under moist conditions in all possible combinations of flooding and drainage, light and dark, air and nitrogen headspace. In the light, oxygen was produced by photosynthesis. Methane production was detected in all microcosms, but rates were much lower when oxygen was present. In addition, the δ(13C of the methane differed between the oxic/oxygenic and anoxic microcosms. While under anoxic conditions methane was mainly produced from acetate, it was almost entirely produced from H(2/CO(2 under oxic/oxygenic conditions. Only two genera of methanogens were identified in the BSC-Methanosarcina and Methanocella; their abundance and activity in transcribing the mcrA gene (coding for methyl-CoM reductase was higher under anoxic than oxic/oxygenic conditions, respectively. Both methanogens also actively transcribed the oxygen detoxifying gene catalase. Since methanotrophs were not detectable in the BSC, all the methane produced was released into the atmosphere. Our findings point to a formerly unknown participation of desert soils in the global methane cycle.

  12. Power Stroke Angular Velocity Profiles of Archaeal A-ATP Synthase Versus Thermophilic and Mesophilic F-ATP Synthase Molecular Motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielaff, Hendrik; Martin, James; Singh, Dhirendra; Biuković, Goran; Grüber, Gerhard; Frasch, Wayne D

    2016-12-02

    The angular velocities of ATPase-dependent power strokes as a function of the rotational position for the A-type molecular motor A3B3DF, from the Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A-ATP synthase, and the thermophilic motor α3β3γ, from Geobacillus stearothermophilus (formerly known as Bacillus PS3) F-ATP synthase, are resolved at 5 μs resolution for the first time. Unexpectedly, the angular velocity profile of the A-type was closely similar in the angular positions of accelerations and decelerations to the profiles of the evolutionarily distant F-type motors of thermophilic and mesophilic origins, and they differ only in the magnitude of their velocities. M. mazei A3B3DF power strokes occurred in 120° steps at saturating ATP concentrations like the F-type motors. However, because ATP-binding dwells did not interrupt the 120° steps at limiting ATP, ATP binding to A3B3DF must occur during the catalytic dwell. Elevated concentrations of ADP did not increase dwells occurring 40° after the catalytic dwell. In F-type motors, elevated ADP induces dwells 40° after the catalytic dwell and slows the overall velocity. The similarities in these power stroke profiles are consistent with a common rotational mechanism for A-type and F-type rotary motors, in which the angular velocity is limited by the rotary position at which ATP binding occurs and by the drag imposed on the axle as it rotates within the ring of stator subunits.

  13. Comprehensive microbial analysis of combined mesophilic anaerobic-thermophilic aerobic process treating high-strength food wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun Min; Ha, Jeong Hyub; Park, Jong Moon; Kim, Mi-Sun; Sommer, Sven G

    2015-04-15

    A combined mesophilic anaerobic-thermophilic aerobic process was used to treat high-strength food wastewater in this study. During the experimental period, most of solid residue from the mesophilic anaerobic reactor (R1) was separated by centrifugation and introduced into the thermophilic aerobic reactor (R2) for further digestion. Then, thermophilic aerobically-digested sludge was reintroduced into R1 to enhance reactor performance. The combined process was operated with two different Runs: Run I with hydraulic retention time (HRT) = 40 d (corresponding OLR = 3.5 kg COD/m(3) d) and Run II with HRT = 20 d (corresponding OLR = 7 kg COD/m(3)). For a comparison, a single-stage mesophilic anaerobic reactor (R3) was operated concurrently with same OLRs and HRTs as the combined process. During the overall digestion, all reactors showed high stability without pH control. The combined process demonstrated significantly higher organic matter removal efficiencies (over 90%) of TS, VS and COD and methane production than did R3. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) results indicated that higher populations of both bacteria and archaea were maintained in R1 than in R3. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed relatively high abundance of phylum Actinobacteria in both R1 and R2, and a predominance of phyla Synergistetes and Firmicutes in R3 during Run II. Furthermore, R1 and R2 shared genera (Prevotella, Aminobacterium, Geobacillus and Unclassified Actinobacteria), which suggests synergy between mesophilic anaerobic digestion and thermophilic aerobic digestion. For archaea, in R1 methanogenic archaea shifted from genus Methanosaeta to Methanosarcina, whereas genera Methanosaeta, Methanobacterium and Methanoculleus were predominant in R3. The results demonstrated dynamics of key microbial populations that were highly consistent with an enhanced reactor performance of the combined process.

  14. Effects of Spartina alterniflora invasion on the communities of methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria in estuarine marsh sediments

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    Jemaneh eZeleke

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of plant invasion on the microorganisms of soil sediments is very important for estuary ecology. The community structures of methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB as a function of Spartina alterniflora invasion in Phragmites australis-vegetated sediments of the Dongtan wetland in the Yangtze River estuary, China, were investigated using 454 pyrosequencing and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR of the methyl coenzyme M reductase A (mcrA and dissimilatory sulfite-reductase (dsrB genes. Sediment samples were collected from two replicate locations, and each location included three sampling stands each covered by monocultures of P. australis, S. alterniflora and both plants (transition stands, respectively. qPCR analysis revealed higher copy numbers of mcrA genes in sediments from S. alterniflora stands than P. australis stands (5- and 7.5-fold more in the spring and summer, respectively, which is consistent with the higher methane flux rates measured in the S. alterniflora stands (up to 8.01 ± 5.61 mg m-2 h-1. Similar trends were observed for SRB, and they were up to two orders of magnitude higher than the methanogens. Diversity indices indicated a lower diversity of methanogens in the S. alterniflora stands than the P. australis stands. In contrast, insignificant variations were observed in the diversity of SRB with the invasion. Although Methanomicrobiales and Methanococcales, the hydrogenotrophic methanogens, dominated in the salt marsh, Methanomicrobiales displayed a slight increase with the invasion and growth of S. alterniflora, whereas the later responded differently. Methanosarcina, the metabolically diverse methanogens, did not vary with the invasion of, but Methanosaeta, the exclusive acetate utilizers, appeared to increase with S. alterniflora invasion. In SRB, sequences closely related to the families Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae dominated in the salt marsh, although they displayed minimal changes with the S

  15. Comparative fecal metagenomics unveils unique functional capacity of the swine gut

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    Martinson John

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uncovering the taxonomic composition and functional capacity within the swine gut microbial consortia is of great importance to animal physiology and health as well as to food and water safety due to the presence of human pathogens in pig feces. Nonetheless, limited information on the functional diversity of the swine gut microbiome is available. Results Analysis of 637, 722 pyrosequencing reads (130 megabases generated from Yorkshire pig fecal DNA extracts was performed to help better understand the microbial diversity and largely unknown functional capacity of the swine gut microbiome. Swine fecal metagenomic sequences were annotated using both MG-RAST and JGI IMG/M-ER pipelines. Taxonomic analysis of metagenomic reads indicated that swine fecal microbiomes were dominated by Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes phyla. At a finer phylogenetic resolution, Prevotella spp. dominated the swine fecal metagenome, while some genes associated with Treponema and Anareovibrio species were found to be exclusively within the pig fecal metagenomic sequences analyzed. Functional analysis revealed that carbohydrate metabolism was the most abundant SEED subsystem, representing 13% of the swine metagenome. Genes associated with stress, virulence, cell wall and cell capsule were also abundant. Virulence factors associated with antibiotic resistance genes with highest sequence homology to genes in Bacteroidetes, Clostridia, and Methanosarcina were numerous within the gene families unique to the swine fecal metagenomes. Other abundant proteins unique to the distal swine gut shared high sequence homology to putative carbohydrate membrane transporters. Conclusions The results from this metagenomic survey demonstrated the presence of genes associated with resistance to antibiotics and carbohydrate metabolism suggesting that the swine gut microbiome may be shaped by husbandry practices.

  16. Towards Reassignment of the Methionine Codon AUG to Two Different Noncanonical Amino Acids in Bacterial Translation

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    Alessandro De Simone

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic encoding of noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs through sense codon reassignment is an efficient tool for expanding the chemical functionality of proteins. Incorporation of multiple ncAAs, however, is particularly challenging. This work describes the first attempts to reassign the sense methionine (Met codon AUG to two different ncAAs in bacterial protein translation. Escherichia coli methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS charges two tRNAs with Met: tRNAfMet initiates protein synthesis (starting AUG codon, whereas elongator tRNAMet participates in protein elongation (internal AUG codon(s. Preliminary in vitro experiments show that these tRNAs can be charged with the Met analogues azidohomoalanine (Aha and ethionine (Eth by exploiting the different substrate specificities of EcMetRS and the heterologous MetRS / tRNAMet pair from the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, respectively. Here, we explored whether this configuration would allow a differential decoding during in vivo protein initiation and elongation. First, we eliminated the elongator tRNAMet from a methionine auxotrophic E. coli strain, which was then equipped with a rescue plasmid harboring the heterologous pair. Although the imported pair was not fully orthogonal, it was possible to incorporate preferentially Eth at internal AUG codons in a model protein, suggesting that in vivo AUG codon reassignment is possible. To achieve full orthogonality during elongation, we imported the known orthogonal pair of Methanosarcina mazei pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS / tRNAPyl and devised a genetic selection system based on the suppression of an amber stop codon in an important glycolytic gene, pfkA, which restores enzyme functionality and normal cellular growth. Using an evolved PylRS able to accept Met analogues, it should be possible to reassign the AUG codon to two different ncAAs by using directed evolution. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

  17. Characterization of Sac10a, a hyperthermophile DNA-binding protein from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Stephen P; Kahsai, Mebrahtu A; Gupta, Ramesh; Shriver, John W

    2004-10-19

    Sac10a is a member of a group of basic DNA-binding proteins thought to be important in chromatin structure and regulation in the archaeon Sulfolobus. We describe here the isolation, gene identification, and biophysical characterization of native Sac10a. The protein exists as a 23.8 kDa homodimer at pH 7 and unfolds with a T degrees of 122 degrees C. Dissociation of the dimer into folded globular subunits is promoted by decreased pH and salt concentration. Thermal unfolding of the monomeric subunits occurred with two transitions, indicating two independent domains. The dimer demonstrated a high affinity for duplex poly(dAdT) with a K(D) of 5 x 10(-)(10) M and a site size of 17 bp (in 0.15 M KCl, pH 7), with only weak binding (K(D) > 5 x 10(-)(6) M) to poly(dA)-poly(dT), poly(dGdC), poly(dG)-poly(dC), and Escherichia coli DNA under similar conditions. Binding to poly(dAdT) resulted in distortions in the DNA duplex that were consistent with overwinding as indicated by inversion of the CD spectrum of the DNA. The monomeric subunits are predicted to adopt a winged helix DNA-binding motif which dimerizes through formation of a two-stranded coiled coil involving an extended C-terminal helix with more than four heptad repeats (about 45 A in length). This is the first example of the conserved archaeal transcription regulator domain COG3432 to be characterized. Sequences for homologous proteins containing both COG3432 and predicted coiled coil domains occur in the genomes of both crenarchaeota (Sulfolobus, Pyrobaculum, Aeropyrum) and euryarchaeota (Methanosarcina, Methanococcus, Archaeoglobus, Thermoplasma), with multiple genes in some species. Sac10a shows no sequence similarity to the other Sulfolobus chromatin proteins Sac7d, Sac8, Sso10b2, and Alba.

  18. Evaluation biogas production performance and dynamics of the microbial community in different straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Liu, Yan-Hua; Zhang, Xin; Ge, Chang-Ming; Piao, Ren-Zhe; Wang, Wei-Dong; Zong, Jun-Cui; Zhao, Hong-Yan

    2016-11-04

    The development and utilization of crop straw biogas resources can effectively alleviate the shortage of energy, environmental pollution, and other issues. This study performed a continuous batch test at 35°C to assess methane production potential and volatile organic acid contents using the modified Gompertz equation. Illumina MiSeq platform sequencing, which is a sequencing method based on sequencing-by-synthesis, was used to compare archaeal community diversity, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to analyze bacterial community diversity in rice straw, dry maize straw, silage maize straw, and tobacco straw. The results show that cumulative gas production values for silage maize straw, rice straw, dry maize straw, and tobacco straw were 4870, 4032.5, 3907.5, and 3628.3 mL/g ·VS , respectively, after 24 days. Maximum daily gas production values of silage maize straw and rice straw were 1025 and 904.17 mL/g middot;VS, respectively, followed by tobacco straw and dry maize straw. The methane content of all four kinds of straws was > 60%, particularly that of silage maize straw, which peaked at 67.3%. Biogas production from the four kinds of straw was in the order silage maize straw > rice straw > dry maize straw > tobacco straw, and the values were 1166.7, 1048.4, 890, and 637.4 mL/g middot;VS, respectively. The microbial community analysis showed that metabolism was mainly carried out by acetate-utilizing methanogens, and that Methanosarcina was the dominant archaeal genus in the four kinds of straw, and the DGGE bands belonged to the phyla Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Chloroflexi. Silage maize is useful for biogas production because it contains four kinds of straw.

  19. Metabolic engineering for the high-yield production of isoprenoid-based C₅ alcohols in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Kevin W; Thompson, Mitchell G; Kang, Aram; Baidoo, Edward; Wang, George; Chan, Leanne Jade G; Adams, Paul D; Petzold, Christopher J; Keasling, Jay D; Lee, Taek Soon

    2015-06-08

    Branched five carbon (C5) alcohols are attractive targets for microbial production due to their desirable fuel properties and importance as platform chemicals. In this study, we engineered a heterologous isoprenoid pathway in E. coli for the high-yield production of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 3-methyl-1-butanol, three C5 alcohols that serve as potential biofuels. We first constructed a pathway for 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, where metabolite profiling identified NudB, a promiscuous phosphatase, as a likely pathway bottleneck. We achieved a 60% increase in the yield of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol by engineering the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of nudB, which increased protein levels by 9-fold and reduced isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) accumulation by 4-fold. To further optimize the pathway, we adjusted mevalonate kinase (MK) expression and investigated MK enzymes from alternative microbes such as Methanosarcina mazei. Next, we expressed a fusion protein of IPP isomerase and the phosphatase (Idi1~NudB) along with a reductase (NemA) to diversify production to 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol and 3-methyl-1-butanol. Finally, we used an oleyl alcohol overlay to improve alcohol recovery, achieving final titers of 2.23 g/L of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol (~70% of pathway-dependent theoretical yield), 150 mg/L of 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 300 mg/L of 3-methyl-1-butanol.

  20. Spatial variations of community structures and methane cycling across a transect of Lei-Gong-Hou mud volcanoes in eastern Taiwan

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    Pei-Ling eWang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed cored sediments retrieved from sites distributed across a transect of the Lei-Gong-Hou mud volcanoes in eastern Taiwan to uncover the spatial distributions of biogeochemical processes and community assemblages involved in methane cycling. The profiles of methane concentration and carbon isotopic composition revealed various orders of the predominance of specific methane-related metabolisms along depth. At a site proximal to the bubbling pool, the methanogenic zone was sandwiched by the anaerobic methanotrophic zones. For two sites distributed toward the topographic depression, the methanogenic zone overlaid the anaerobic methanotrophic zone. The predominance of anaerobic methanotrophy at specific depth intervals is supported by the enhanced copy numbers of the ANME-2a 16S rRNA gene and coincides with high dissolved Fe/Mn concentrations and copy numbers of the Desulfuromonas/Pelobacter 16S rRNA gene. Assemblages of 16S rRNA and mcrA genes revealed that methanogenesis was mediated by Methanococcoides and Methanosarcina. pmoA genes and a few 16S rRNA genes related to aerobic methanotrophs were detected in limited numbers of subsurface samples. While dissolved Fe/Mn signifies the presence of anaerobic metabolisms near the surface, the correlations between geochemical characteristics and gene abundances, and the absence of aerobic methanotrophs in top sediments suggest that anaerobic methanotrophy is potentially dependent on iron/manganese reduction and dominates over aerobic methanotrophy for the removal of methane produced in situ or from a deep source. Near-surface methanogenesis contributes to the methane emissions from mud platform. The alternating arrangements of methanogenic and methanotrophic zones at different sites suggest that the interactions between mud deposition, evaporation, oxidation and fluid transport modulate the assemblages of microbial communities and methane cycling in different compartments of terrestrial

  1. The Genome Sequence of the psychrophilic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii: the Role of Genome Evolution in Cold-adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Michelle A.; Lauro, Federico M.; Williams, Timothy J.; Burg, Dominic; Siddiqui, Khawar S.; De Francisci, David; Chong, Kevin W.Y.; Pilak, Oliver; Chew, Hwee H.; De Maere, Matthew Z.; Ting, Lily; Katrib, Marilyn; Ng, Charmaine; Sowers, Kevin R.; Galperin, Michael Y.; Anderson, Iain J.; Ivanova, Natalia; Dalin, Eileen; Martinez, Michelle; Lapidus, Alla; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Thomas, Torsten; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2009-04-01

    Psychrophilic archaea are abundant and perform critical roles throughout the Earth's expansive cold biosphere. Here we report the first complete genome sequence for a psychrophilic methanogenic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii. The genome sequence was manually annotated including the use of a five tiered Evidence Rating system that ranked annotations from Evidence Rating (ER) 1 (gene product experimentally characterized from the parent organism) to ER5 (hypothetical gene product) to provide a rapid means of assessing the certainty of gene function predictions. The genome is characterized by a higher level of aberrant sequence composition (51%) than any other archaeon. In comparison to hyper/thermophilic archaea which are subject to selection of synonymous codon usage, M. burtonii has evolved cold adaptation through a genomic capacity to accommodate highly skewed amino acid content, while retaining codon usage in common with its mesophilic Methanosarcina cousins. Polysaccharide biosynthesis genes comprise at least 3.3% of protein coding genes in the genome, and Cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis COG genes are over-represented. Likewise, signal transduction (COG category T) genes are over-represented and M. burtonii has a high 'IQ' (a measure of adaptive potential) compared to many methanogens. Numerous genes in these two over-represented COG categories appear to have been acquired from {var_epsilon}- and {delta}-proteobacteria, as do specific genes involved in central metabolism such as a novel B form of aconitase. Transposases also distinguish M. burtonii from other archaea, and their genomic characteristics indicate they play an important role in evolving the M. burtonii genome. Our study reveals a capacity for this model psychrophile to evolve through genome plasticity (including nucleotide skew, horizontal gene transfer and transposase activity) that enables adaptation to the cold, and to the biological and physical changes that have

  2. Metabolic flexibility as a major predictor of spatial distribution in microbial communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Carbonero

    Full Text Available A better understand the ecology of microbes and their role in the global ecosystem could be achieved if traditional ecological theories can be applied to microbes. In ecology organisms are defined as specialists or generalists according to the breadth of their niche. Spatial distribution is often used as a proxy measure of niche breadth; generalists have broad niches and a wide spatial distribution and specialists a narrow niche and spatial distribution. Previous studies suggest that microbial distribution patterns are contrary to this idea; a microbial generalist genus (Desulfobulbus has a limited spatial distribution while a specialist genus (Methanosaeta has a cosmopolitan distribution. Therefore, we hypothesise that this counter-intuitive distribution within generalist and specialist microbial genera is a common microbial characteristic. Using molecular fingerprinting the distribution of four microbial genera, two generalists, Desulfobulbus and the methanogenic archaea Methanosarcina, and two specialists, Methanosaeta and the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfobacter were analysed in sediment samples from along a UK estuary. Detected genotypes of both generalist genera showed a distinct spatial distribution, significantly correlated with geographic distance between sites. Genotypes of both specialist genera showed no significant differential spatial distribution. These data support the hypothesis that the spatial distribution of specialist and generalist microbes does not match that seen with specialist and generalist large organisms. It may be that generalist microbes, while having a wider potential niche, are constrained, possibly by intrageneric competition, to exploit only a small part of that potential niche while specialists, with far fewer constraints to their niche, are more capable of filling their potential niche more effectively, perhaps by avoiding intrageneric competition. We suggest that these counter-intuitive distribution

  3. Quantitative microbiological analysis of bacterial community shifts in a high-rate anaerobic bioreactor treating sulfite evaporator condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ney, U; Macario, A J; Conway de Macario, E; Aivasidis, A; Schoberth, S M; Sahm, H

    1990-08-01

    The bacterial population of a high-rate, anaerobic, fixed-bed loop reactor treating sulfite evaporator condensate from the pulp industry was studied over a 14-month period. This period was divided into seven cycles that included a startup at the beginning of each cycle. Some 82% of the total biomass was immobilized on and between the porous glass rings filling the reactor. The range of the total number of microorganisms in these biofilms was 2 x 10 to 7 x 10 cells per ml. Enumeration and characterization by microbiological methods and by phase-contrast, epifluorescence, and electron microscopy showed that the samples consisted mainly of the following methanogens: a Methanobacterium sp., a Methanosarcina sp., a Methanobrevibacter sp., and a Methanothrix sp., as well as furfural-degrading sulfate-reducing bacteria resembling Desulfovibrio furfuralis. Viable counts of hydrogenotrophic methanogens were relatively stable (mostly within the range of 3.2 x 10 to 7.5 x 10 cells per ml), but Methanobrevibacter cells increased from fixed bed into a second reactor vessel. Acetotrophic methanogens reached their highest numbers of 1.3 x 10 to 2.6 x 10 cells per ml in the last fermentation cycles. They showed a morphological shift from sarcinalike packets in early samples to single coccoid forms in later phases of the fermentation. Furfural-degrading sulfate reducers reached counts of 1 x 10 to 5.8 x 10 cells per ml. The distribution of the chief metabolic groups between free fluid and biofilms was analyzed in the fifth fermentation cycle: 4.5 times more furfural degraders were found in the free fluid than in the biofilms. In contrast, 5.8 times more acetotrophic and 16.6 times more hydrogenotrophic methanogens were found in the biofilms than in the free liquid. The data concerning time shifts of morphotypes among the trophic groups of methanogens corroborated the trends observed by using immunological assays on the same samples.

  4. Bromeliad catchments as habitats for methanogenesis in tropical rainforest canopies

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    Shana K. Goffredi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Tropical epiphytic plants within the family Bromeliaceae are unusual in that they possess foliage capable of retaining water and impounded material. This creates an acidic (pH 3.5-6.5 and anaerobic (< 1 ppm O2 environment suspended in the canopy. Results from a Costa Rican rainforest show that most bromeliads (n = 75/86 greater than ~20 cm in plant height or ~4-5 cm tank depth, showed presence of methanogens within the lower anoxic horizon of the tank. Archaea were dominated by methanogens (77-90% of recovered ribotypes and community structure, although variable, was generally comprised of a single type, closely related to either hydrogenotrophic Methanoregula or Methanocella, a specific clade of aceticlastic Methanosaeta, or Methanosarcina. Juvenile bromeliads, or those species, such as Guzmania, with shallow tanks, generally did not possess methanogens, as assayed by PCR specific for methanogen 16S rRNA genes, nor did artificial catchments (~ 100 ml volume, in place 6-12 months prior to sample collection. Methanogens were not detected in soil (n = 20, except in one case, in which the dominant ribotype was different from nearby bromeliads. Recovery of methyl coenzyme M reductase genes supported the occurrence of hydrogenotrophic and aceticlastic methanogens within bromeliad tanks, as well as the trend, via QPCR analysis of mcrA, of increased methanogenic capacity with increased plant height. Methane production rates of up to 300 nmol CH4 ml tank water -1 day-1 were measured in microcosm experiments. These results suggest that bromeliad-associated archaeal communities may play an important role in the cycling of carbon in neotropical forests.

  5. Effects of feeding time and organic loading in an anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (ASBBR) treating diluted whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasceno, Leonardo H S; Rodrigues, José A D; Ratusznei, Suzana M; Zaiat, Marcelo; Foresti, Eugênio

    2007-12-01

    An investigation was carried out on the performance of an anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (ASBBR) treating diluted cheese whey when submitted to different feed strategies and volumetric organic loads (VOL). Polyurethane foam cubes were used as support for biomass immobilization and stirring was provided by helix impellers. The reactor with a working volume of 3 L treated 2 L of wastewater in 8-h cycles at 500 rpm and 30 degrees C. The organic loads applied were 2, 4, 8 and 12 g COD L(-1) d(-1), obtained by increasing the feed concentration. Alkalinity was supplemented at a ratio of 50% NaHCO(3)/COD. For each organic load applied three feed strategies were tested: (a) batch operation with 8-h cycle; (b) 2-h fed-batch operation followed by 6-h batch; and (c) 4-h fed-batch followed by 4-h batch. The 2-h fed-batch operation followed by 6-h batch presented the best results for the organic loads of 2 and 4 g COD L(-1) d(-1), whereas the 4-h fed-batch operation followed by 4-h batch presented results slightly inferior for the same organic loads and the best results at organic loads of 8 and 12 g COD L(-1) d(-1). The concentration of total volatile acids varied with fill time. For the higher fill times maximum concentrations were obtained at the end of the cycle. Moreover, no significant difference was detected in the maximum concentration of total volatile acids for any of the investigated conditions. However, the maximum values of propionic acid tended to decrease with increasing fill time considering the same organic load. Microbiological analyses revealed the presence of Methanosaeta-like structures and methanogenic hydrogenotrophic-like fluorescent bacilli. No Methanosarcina-like structures were observed in the samples.

  6. Archaeal community diversity and abundance changes along a natural salinity gradient in estuarine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Gordon; O'Sullivan, Louise A; Meng, Yiyu; Williams, Angharad S; Sass, Andrea M; Watkins, Andrew J; Parkes, R John; Weightman, Andrew J

    2015-02-01

    Archaea are widespread in marine sediments, but their occurrence and relationship with natural salinity gradients in estuarine sediments is not well understood. This study investigated the abundance and diversity of Archaea in sediments at three sites [Brightlingsea (BR), Alresford (AR) and Hythe (HY)] along the Colne Estuary, using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) of 16S rRNA genes, DNA hybridization, Archaea 16S rRNA and mcrA gene phylogenetic analyses. Total archaeal 16S rRNA abundance in sediments were higher in the low-salinity brackish sediments from HY (2-8 × 10(7) 16S rRNA gene copies cm(-3)) than the high-salinity marine sites from BR and AR (2 × 10(4)-2 × 10(7) and 4 × 10(6)-2 × 10(7) 16S rRNA gene copies cm(-3), respectively), although as a proportion of the total prokaryotes Archaea were higher at BR than at AR or HY. Phylogenetic analysis showed that members of the 'Bathyarchaeota' (MCG), Thaumarchaeota and methanogenic Euryarchaeota were the dominant groups of Archaea. The composition of Thaumarchaeota varied with salinity, as only 'marine' group I.1a was present in marine sediments (BR). Methanogen 16S rRNA genes from low-salinity sediments at HY were dominated by acetotrophic Methanosaeta and putatively hydrogentrophic Methanomicrobiales, whereas the marine site (BR) was dominated by mcrA genes belonging to methylotrophic Methanococcoides, versatile Methanosarcina and methanotrophic ANME-2a. Overall, the results indicate that salinity and associated factors play a role in controlling diversity and distribution of Archaea in estuarine sediments.

  7. Detoxification of tar water by anaerobic treatment in an UASB reactor - A study of the degradation of phenolic compounds in a combined denitrifying and anaerobic UASB reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skibsted Mogensen, A.; Schmidt, J.E.; Ahring, B.K. [Technical Univ., Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1998-08-01

    The digestion of pyrolysis condensate (PC) in two combined anaerobic and denitrifying upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors was studied. A COD removal of 80% was achieved with an influent concentration of 1.43% PC{sub pH}. When the reactor was fed with 100% PC during a period of 10 days good reactor operation was observed. Despite less than one retention time of operation, the results indicated clearly, that PC could be used as substrate in the biogas process, even in very high concentrations. A combined anaerobic and denitrifying UASB reactor was successfully digesting 5.5% of wet oxidised PC, but further loading increments deteriorated the anaerobic digestion process. The detoxification of PC was studied by determining the degradation of phenols during reactor operation and the toxicity of PC was decreased more than 77 times witnessed through decreased inhibition of the nitrification process. Phenol, methyl and dimethyl phenols along with methoxyphenols were shown to be degraded within the reactor systems. Degradation rates for phenol and substituted phenols were determined by the reactor experiment indicating that the biomass was selective towards the substrates. Maximum growth rates and half saturation constants for phenol, 4-Methylphenol and 2-Methoxy-4-methylphenol were determined in batch experiments. The degradation rates of phenols determined in batches were significantly higher compared to degradation rates observed in the reactor systems digesting pyrolysis condensate. Determination of the population of methanogens revealed, that Methanosarcina was found only in one reactor, while Methanobacterium and Methanosaeta were found in reactors and inoculum. A UASB reactor was designed for the treatment of pyrolysis condensate at the gasification plant at Harbooere, Denmark. (au) 35 refs.

  8. Microbial community structures in an integrated two-phase anaerobic bioreactor fed by fruit vegetable wastes and wheat straw

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong Wang; Jiane Zuo; Xiaojie Chen; Wei Xing; Linan Xing; Peng Li; Xiangyang Lu

    2014-01-01

    The microbial community structures in an integrated two-phase anaerobic reactor (ITPAR) were investigated by 16S rDNA clone library technology.The 75 L reactor was designed with a 25 L rotating acidogenic unit at the top and a 50 L conventional upflow methanogenic unit at the bottom,with a recirculation connected to the two units.The reactor had been operated for 21 stages to co-digest fruit/vegetable wastes and wheat straw,which showed a very good biogas production and decomposition of cellulosic materials.The results showed that many kinds of cellulose and glycan decomposition bacteria related with Bacteroidales,Clostridiales and Syntrophobacterales were dominated in the reactor,with more bacteria community diversities in the acidogenic unit.The methanogens were mostly related with Methanosaeta,Methanosarcina,Methanoculleus,Methanospirillum and Methanobacterium; the predominating genus Methanosaeta,accounting for 40.5%,54.2%,73.6% and 78.7% in four samples from top to bottom,indicated a major methanogenesis pathway by acetoclastic methanogenesis in the methanogenic unit.The beta diversity indexes illustrated a more similar distribution of bacterial communities than that of methanogens between acidogenic unit and methanogenic unit.The differentiation of methanogenic community composition in two phases,as well as pH values and volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations confirmed the phase separation of the ITPAR.Overall,the results of this study demonstrated that the special designing of ITPAR maintained a sufficient number of methanogens,more diverse communities and stronger syntrophic assodations among microorganisms,which made two phase anaerobic digestion of cellulosic materials more efficient.

  9. Wetland restoration and methanogenesis: the activity of microbial populations and competition for substrates at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Jerman

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Ljubljana marsh in Slovenia is a 16 000 ha area of partly drained fen, intended to be flooded to restore its ecological functions. The resultant water-logging may create anoxic conditions, eventually stimulating production and emission of methane, the most important greenhouse gas next to carbon dioxide. We examined the upper layer (~30 cm of Ljubljana marsh soil for microbial processes that would predominate in water-saturated conditions, focusing on the potential for iron reduction, carbon mineralization (CO2 and CH4 production, and methane emission. Methane emission from water-saturated microcosms was near minimum detectable levels even after extended periods of flooding (>5 months. Methane production in anoxic soil slurries started only after a lag period and was inversely related to iron reduction, which suggested that iron reduction out-competed methanogenesis for electron donors, such as H2 and acetate. Methane production was observed only in samples incubated at 14–38°C. At the beginning of methanogenesis, acetoclastic methanogenesis dominated. In accordance with the preferred substrate, most (91% mcrA (encoding the methyl coenzyme-M reductase, a key gene in methanogenesis clone sequences could be affiliated to the acetoclastic genus Methanosarcina. No methanogens were detected in the original soil. However, a diverse community of iron-reducing Geobacteraceae was found. Our results suggest that methane emission can remain transient and low if water-table fluctuations allow re-oxidation of ferrous iron, sustaining iron reduction as the most important process in terminal carbon mineralization.

  10. Wetland restoration and methanogenesis: the activity of microbial populations and competition for substrates at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Jerman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Ljubljana marsh in Slovenia is a 16 000 ha area of partly drained fen, intended to be flooded to restore its ecological functions. The resultant water-logging may create anoxic conditions, eventually stimulating production and emission of methane, the most important greenhouse gas next to carbon dioxide. We examined the upper layer (~30 cm of Ljubljana marsh soil for microbial processes that would predominate in water-saturated conditions, focusing on the potential for iron reduction, carbon mineralization (CO2 and CH4 production, and methane emission. Methane emission from water-saturated microcosms was near minimum detectable levels even after extended periods of flooding (>5 months. Methane production in anoxic soil slurries started only after a lag period of 84 d at 15°C and a minimum of 7 d at 37°C, the optimum temperature for methanogenesis. This lag was inversely related to iron reduction, which suggested that iron reduction out-competed methanogenesis for electron donors, such as H2 and acetate. Methane production was observed only in samples incubated at 14–38°C. At the beginning of methanogenesis, acetoclastic methanogenesis dominated. In accordance with the preferred substrate, most (91% mcrA (encoding the methyl coenzyme-M reductase, a key gene in methanogenesis clone sequences could be affiliated to the acetoclastic genus Methanosarcina. No methanogens were detected in the original soil. However, a diverse community of iron-reducing Geobacteraceae was found. Our results suggest that methane emission can remain transient and low if water-table fluctuations allow re-oxidation of ferrous iron, sustaining iron reduction as the most important process in terminal carbon mineralization.

  11. Comparing mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of chicken manure: Microbial community dynamics and process resilience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Qigui; Takemura, Yasuyuki; Kubota, Kengo [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering Tohoku University, 6-6-06 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Li, Yu-You, E-mail: yyli@epl1.civil.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering Tohoku University, 6-6-06 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Key Lab of Northwest Water Resource, Environment and Ecology, MOE, Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi’an (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Microbial community dynamics and process functional resilience were investigated. • The threshold of TAN in mesophilic reactor was higher than the thermophilic reactor. • The recoverable archaeal community dynamic sustained the process resilience. • Methanosarcina was more sensitive than Methanoculleus on ammonia inhibition. • TAN and FA effects the dynamic of hydrolytic and acidogenic bacteria obviously. - Abstract: While methane fermentation is considered as the most successful bioenergy treatment for chicken manure, the relationship between operational performance and the dynamic transition of archaeal and bacterial communities remains poorly understood. Two continuous stirred-tank reactors were investigated under thermophilic and mesophilic conditions feeding with 10%TS. The tolerance of thermophilic reactor on total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) was found to be 8000 mg/L with free ammonia (FA) 2000 mg/L compared to 16,000 mg/L (FA1500 mg/L) of mesophilic reactor. Biomethane production was 0.29 L/gV S{sub in} in the steady stage and decreased following TAN increase. After serious inhibition, the mesophilic reactor was recovered successfully by dilution and washing stratagem compared to the unrecoverable of thermophilic reactor. The relationship between the microbial community structure, the bioreactor performance and inhibitors such as TAN, FA, and volatile fatty acid was evaluated by canonical correspondence analysis. The performance of methanogenic activity and substrate removal efficiency were changed significantly correlating with the community evenness and phylogenetic structure. The resilient archaeal community was found even after serious inhibition in both reactors. Obvious dynamics of bacterial communities were observed in acidogenic and hydrolytic functional bacteria following TAN variation in the different stages.

  12. EFFECT OF SULPHATE ON LOW-TEMPERATURE ANAEROBIC DIGESTION

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    Padhraig eMadden

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sulphate addition on the stability of, and microbial community behaviour in, low-temperature anaerobic expanded granular sludge bed-based bioreactors was investigated at 15°C. Efficient bioreactor performance was observed, with chemical oxygen demand removal efficiencies of >90%, and a mean SO42- removal rate of 98.3%. In situ methanogensis appeared unaffected at a COD:SO42- influent ratio of 8:1, and subsequently of 3:1, and was impacted marginally only when the COD: SO42- ratio was 1:2. . Specific methanogenic activity assays indicated a complex set of interactions between sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB, methanogens and homoacetogenic bacteria. SO42- addition resulted in predominantly acetoclastic, rather than hydrogenotrophic, methanogenesis until >600 days of SO42--influenced bioreactor operation. Temporal microbial community development was monitored by denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE of 16S rRNA genes. Fluorescence in situ hybridisations (FISH, qPCR and microsensor analysis were combined to investigate the distribution of microbial groups, and particularly SRB and methanogens, along the structure of granular biofilms. qPCR data indicated that sulphidogenic genes were present in methanogenic and sulfidogenic biofilms, indicating the potential for sulphate reduction even in bioreactors not exposed to SO42-. Although the architecture of methanogenic and sulphidogenic granules was similar, indicating the presence of SRB even in methanogenic systems, FISH with rRNA targets found that the SRB were more abundant in the sulphidogenic biofilms. Methanosaeta species were the predominant, keystone members of the archaeal community, with the complete absence of the Methanosarcina species in the experimental bioreactor by trial conclusion. Microsensor data suggested the ordered distribution of sulphate reduction and sulphide accumulation, even in methanogenic granules.

  13. Effect of sulfate on low-temperature anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Pádhraig; Al-Raei, Abdul M; Enright, Anne M; Chinalia, Fabio A; de Beer, Dirk; O'Flaherty, Vincent; Collins, Gavin

    2014-01-01

    The effect of sulfate addition on the stability of, and microbial community behavior in, low-temperature anaerobic expanded granular sludge bed-based bioreactors was investigated at 15°C. Efficient bioreactor performance was observed, with chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies of >90%, and a mean SO(2-) 4 removal rate of 98.3%. In situ methanogensis appeared unaffected at a COD: SO(2-) 4 influent ratio of 8:1, and subsequently of 3:1, and was impacted marginally only when the COD: SO(2-) 4 ratio was 1:2. Specific methanogenic activity assays indicated a complex set of interactions between sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), methanogens and homoacetogenic bacteria. SO(2-) 4 addition resulted in predominantly acetoclastic, rather than hydrogenotrophic, methanogenesis until >600 days of SO(2-) 4-influenced bioreactor operation. Temporal microbial community development was monitored by denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA genes. Fluorescence in situ hybridizations (FISH), qPCR and microsensor analysis were combined to investigate the distribution of microbial groups, and particularly SRB and methanogens, along the structure of granular biofilms. qPCR data indicated that sulfidogenic genes were present in methanogenic and sulfidogenic biofilms, indicating the potential for sulfate reduction even in bioreactors not exposed to SO(2-) 4. Although the architecture of methanogenic and sulfidogenic granules was similar, indicating the presence of SRB even in methanogenic systems, FISH with rRNA targets found that the SRB were more abundant in the sulfidogenic biofilms. Methanosaeta species were the predominant, keystone members of the archaeal community, with the complete absence of the Methanosarcina species in the experimental bioreactor by trial conclusion. Microsensor data suggested the ordered distribution of sulfate reduction and sulfide accumulation, even in methanogenic granules.

  14. Metabolic engineering for the high-yield production of isoprenoid-based C5 alcohols in E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Kevin W.; Thompson, Mitchell G.; Kang, Aram; Baidoo, Edward; Wang, George; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Adams, Paul D.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Keasling, Jay D.; Soon Lee, Taek

    2015-06-01

    Branched five carbon (C5) alcohols are attractive targets for microbial production due to their desirable fuel properties and importance as platform chemicals. In this study, we engineered a heterologous isoprenoid pathway in E. coli for the high-yield production of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 3-methyl-1-butanol, three C5 alcohols that serve as potential biofuels. We first constructed a pathway for 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, where metabolite profiling identified NudB, a promiscuous phosphatase, as a likely pathway bottleneck. We achieved a 60% increase in the yield of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol by engineering the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of nudB, which increased protein levels by 9-fold and reduced isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) accumulation by 4-fold. To further optimize the pathway, we adjusted mevalonate kinase (MK) expression and investigated MK enzymes from alternative microbes such as Methanosarcina mazei. Next, we expressed a fusion protein of IPP isomerase and the phosphatase (Idi1~NudB) along with a reductase (NemA) to diversify production to 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol and 3-methyl-1-butanol. Finally, we used an oleyl alcohol overlay to improve alcohol recovery, achieving final titers of 2.23 g/L of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol (~70% of pathway-dependent theoretical yield), 150 mg/L of 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 300 mg/L of 3-methyl-1-butanol.

  15. Mechanistic enzymology of CO dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum. Progress report, August 15, 1993--March 24, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragsdale, S.W.

    1992-11-01

    The final steps in acetyl-CoA biosynthesis by anaerobic bacteria are performed by carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH), a nickel/iron-sulfur protein. An important achievement was to establish conditions under which acetyl-CoA synthesis by purified enzymes equals the in vivo rate of acetate synthesis. Under these optimized conditions we established that the rate limiting step in the synthesis of acetyl-CoA from methyl-H{sub 4}folate, CO and CoA is likely to be the methylation of CODH by the methylated corrinoid/iron-sulfur protein. We then focused on stopped flow studies of this rate limiting transmethylation reaction and established its mechanism. We have studied the carbonylation of CODH by infrared and resonance Raman spectroscopy and determined that the [Ni-Fe{sup 3-4}S{sub 4}]-CO species which has been characterized by magnetic resonance methods can be described as [Ni-X-Fe{sub 3-4}S{sub 4}]-C{equivalent_to}O. We showed that this species is the catalytically competent precursor of the carbonyl group of acetyl-CoA. We have made progress in the synthesis of seleno-coenzyme A, which we will use to probe the binding of CoA to CODH. We also have compared the CODH from Methanosarcina thermophila with the C. thermoaceticum enzyme by EPR and electrochemical methods and found that the metal sites of these enzymes are remarkably similar given the evolutionary separation between archaea and bacteria domains.

  16. The Effect of Higher Sludge Recycling Rate on Anaerobic Treatment of Palm Oil Mill Effluent in a Semi-Commercial Closed Digester for Renewable Energy

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    Alawi Sulaiman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: A 500 m3 semi-commercial closed anaerobic digester was constructed for Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME treatment and methane gas capture for renewable energy. During the start-up operation period, the Volatile Fatty Acids (VFA accumulation could not be controlled and caused instability on the system. Approach: A settling tank was installed and sludge was recycled as to provide a balanced microorganisms population for the treatment of POME and methane gas production. The effect of sludge recycling rate was studied by applying Organic Loading Rates (OLR (between 1.0 and 10.0 kgCOD m-3 day-1 at different sludge recycling rates (6, 12 and 18 m3 day-1. Results: At sludge recycling rate of 18 m3 day-1, the maximum OLR was 10.0 kgCOD m-3 day-1 with biogas and methane productivity of 1.5 and 0.9 m3 m-3 day-1, respectively. By increasing the sludge recycling rate the VFA concentration was controlled below its inhibitory limit (1000 mg L-1 and the COD removal efficiency recorded was above 95% which indicated good treatment performance for the digester. Two methanogens species (Methanosarcina sp. and Methanosaeta concilii had been identified from sludge samples obtained from the digester and recycled stream. Conclusion: By increasing the sludge recycling rate upon higher application of OLR, the treatment process was kept stable with high COD removal efficiency. The biogas and methane productivity were initially improved but reduced once OLR and recycling rate were increased to 10.0 kg COD m3 day-1 and 18 m3 day-1 respectively.

  17. Groundwater ecosystem resilience to organic contaminations: microbial and geochemical dynamics throughout the 5-year life cycle of a surrogate ethanol blend fuel plume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Nossa, Carlos W; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2015-09-01

    The capacity of groundwater ecosystem to recover from contamination by organic chemicals is a vital concern for environmental scientists. A pilot-scale aquifer system was used to investigate the long-term dynamics of contaminants, groundwater geochemistry, and microbial community structure (by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and quantitative real-time PCR) throughout the 5-year life cycle of a surrogate ethanol blend fuel plume (10% ethanol + 50 mg/L benzene + 50 mg/L toluene). Two-year continuous ethanol-blended release significantly changed the groundwater geochemistry (resulted in anaerobic, low pH, and organotrophic conditions) and increased bacterial and archaeal populations by 82- and 314-fold respectively. Various anaerobic heterotrophs (fermenters, acetogens, methanogens, and hydrocarbon degraders) were enriched. Two years after the release was shut off, all contaminants and their degradation byproducts disappeared and groundwater geochemistry completely restored to the pre-release states (aerobic, neutral pH, and oligotrophic). Bacterial and archaeal populations declined by 18- and 45-fold respectively (relative to the time of shut off). Microbial community structure reverted towards the pre-release states and alpha diversity indices rebounded, suggesting the resilience of microbial community to ethanol blend releases. We also found shifts from O2-sensitive methanogens (e.g., Methanobacterium) to methanogens that are not so sensitive to O2 (e.g., Methanosarcina and Methanocella), which is likely to contribute to the persistence of methanogens and methane generation following the source removal. Overall, the rapid disappearance of contaminants and their metabolites, rebound of geochemical footprints, and resilience of microbial community unequivocally document the natural capacity of groundwater ecosystem to attenuate and recover from a large volume of catastrophic spill of ethanol-based biofuel.

  18. Comparative genomic analyses of nickel, cobalt and vitamin B12 utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelfand Mikhail S

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nickel (Ni and cobalt (Co are trace elements required for a variety of biological processes. Ni is directly coordinated by proteins, whereas Co is mainly used as a component of vitamin B12. Although a number of Ni and Co-dependent enzymes have been characterized, systematic evolutionary analyses of utilization of these metals are limited. Results We carried out comparative genomic analyses to examine occurrence and evolutionary dynamics of the use of Ni and Co at the level of (i transport systems, and (ii metalloproteomes. Our data show that both metals are widely used in bacteria and archaea. Cbi/NikMNQO is the most common prokaryotic Ni/Co transporter, while Ni-dependent urease and Ni-Fe hydrogenase, and B12-dependent methionine synthase (MetH, ribonucleotide reductase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase are the most widespread metalloproteins for Ni and Co, respectively. Occurrence of other metalloenzymes showed a mosaic distribution and a new B12-dependent protein family was predicted. Deltaproteobacteria and Methanosarcina generally have larger Ni- and Co-dependent proteomes. On the other hand, utilization of these two metals is limited in eukaryotes, and very few of these organisms utilize both of them. The Ni-utilizing eukaryotes are mostly fungi (except saccharomycotina and plants, whereas most B12-utilizing organisms are animals. The NiCoT transporter family is the most widespread eukaryotic Ni transporter, and eukaryotic urease and MetH are the most common Ni- and B12-dependent enzymes, respectively. Finally, investigation of environmental and other conditions and identity of organisms that show dependence on Ni or Co revealed that host-associated organisms (particularly obligate intracellular parasites and endosymbionts have a tendency for loss of Ni/Co utilization. Conclusion Our data provide information on the evolutionary dynamics of Ni and Co utilization and highlight widespread use of these metals in the three

  19. Spatial variations of community structures and methane cycling across a transect of Lei-Gong-Hou mud volcanoes in eastern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Ling; Chiu, Yi-Ping; Cheng, Ting-Wen; Chang, Yung-Hsin; Tu, Wei-Xain; Lin, Li-Hung

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed cored sediments retrieved from sites distributed across a transect of the Lei-Gong-Hou mud volcanoes in eastern Taiwan to uncover the spatial distributions of biogeochemical processes and community assemblages involved in methane cycling. The profiles of methane concentration and carbon isotopic composition revealed various orders of the predominance of specific methane-related metabolisms along depth. At a site proximal to the bubbling pool, the methanogenic zone was sandwiched by the anaerobic methanotrophic zones. For two sites distributed toward the topographic depression, the methanogenic zone overlaid the anaerobic methanotrophic zone. The predominance of anaerobic methanotrophy at specific depth intervals is supported by the enhanced copy numbers of the ANME-2a 16S rRNA gene and coincides with high dissolved Fe/Mn concentrations and copy numbers of the Desulfuromonas/Pelobacter 16S rRNA gene. Assemblages of 16S rRNA and mcrA genes revealed that methanogenesis was mediated by Methanococcoides and Methanosarcina. pmoA genes and a few 16S rRNA genes related to aerobic methanotrophs were detected in limited numbers of subsurface samples. While dissolved Fe/Mn signifies the presence of anaerobic metabolisms near the surface, the correlations between geochemical characteristics and gene abundances, and the absence of aerobic methanotrophs in top sediments suggest that anaerobic methanotrophy is potentially dependent on iron/manganese reduction and dominates over aerobic methanotrophy for the removal of methane produced in situ or from a deep source. Near-surface methanogenesis contributes to the methane emissions from mud platform. The alternating arrangements of methanogenic and methanotrophic zones at different sites suggest that the interactions between mud deposition, evaporation, oxidation and fluid transport modulate the assemblages of microbial communities and methane cycling in different compartments of terrestrial mud volcanoes.

  20. Changing Feeding Regimes To Demonstrate Flexible Biogas Production: Effects on Process Performance, Microbial Community Structure, and Methanogenesis Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulat, Daniel Girma; Jacobi, H Fabian; Feilberg, Anders; Adamsen, Anders Peter S; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Nikolausz, Marcell

    2015-10-23

    Flexible biogas production that adapts biogas output to energy demand can be regulated by changing feeding regimes. In this study, the effect of changes in feeding intervals on process performance, microbial community structure, and the methanogenesis pathway was investigated. Three different feeding regimes (once daily, every second day, and every 2 h) at the same organic loading rate were studied in continuously stirred tank reactors treating distiller's dried grains with solubles. A larger amount of biogas was produced after feeding in the reactors fed less frequently (once per day and every second day), whereas the amount remained constant in the reactor fed more frequently (every 2 h), indicating the suitability of the former for the flexible production of biogas. Compared to the conventional more frequent feeding regimes, a methane yield that was up to 14% higher and an improved stability of the process against organic overloading were achieved by employing less frequent feeding regimes. The community structures of bacteria and methanogenic archaea were monitored by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA and mcrA genes, respectively. The results showed that the composition of the bacterial community varied under the different feeding regimes, and the observed T-RFLP patterns were best explained by the differences in the total ammonia nitrogen concentrations, H2 levels, and pH values. However, the methanogenic community remained stable under all feeding regimes, with the dominance of the Methanosarcina genus followed by that of the Methanobacterium genus. Stable isotope analysis showed that the average amount of methane produced during each feeding event by acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was not influenced by the three different feeding regimes.

  1. Effect of organic loading on the microbiota in a temperature-phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD) system co-digesting dairy manure and waste whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueh-Fen; Abraham, Christopher; Nelson, Michael C; Chen, Po-Hsu; Graf, Joerg; Yu, Zhongtang

    2015-10-01

    Temperature-phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD) has gained increasing attention because it provides the flexibility to operate digesters under conditions that enhance overall digester performance. However, research on impact of organic overloading rate (OLR) to microbiota of TPAD systems was limited. In this study, we investigated the composition and successions of the microbiota in both the thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters of a laboratory-scale TPAD system co-digesting dairy manure and waste whey before and during organic overloading. The thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters were operated at 50 and 35 °C, respectively, with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 10 days for each digester. High OLR (dairy manure with 5 % total solid and waste whey of ≥60.4 g chemical oxygen demand (COD)/l/day) resulted in decrease in pH and in biogas production and accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in the thermophilic digester, while the mesophilic digester remained unchanged except a transient increase in biogas production. Both denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and Illumina sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplicons showed dramatic change in microbiota composition and profound successions of both bacterial and methanogenic communities. During the overloading, Thermotogae was replaced by Proteobacteria, while Methanobrevibacter and archaeon classified as WCHD3-02 grew in predominance at the expense of Methanoculleus in the thermophilic digester, whereas Methanosarcina dominated the methanogenic community, while Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter became less predominant in the mesophilic digester. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) revealed that digester temperature and pH were the most influential environmental factors that explained much of the variations of the microbiota in this TPAD system when it was overloaded.

  2. Biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community in mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, D; Kurola, J M; Lähde, K; Kymäläinen, M; Sinkkonen, A; Romantschuk, M

    2014-10-01

    Over 258 Mt of solid waste are generated annually in Europe, a large fraction of which is biowaste. Sewage sludge is another major waste fraction. In this study, biowaste and sewage sludge were co-digested in an anaerobic digestion reactor (30% and 70% of total wet weight, respectively). The purpose was to investigate the biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community composition in the anaerobic digestion reactor under meso- (35-37 °C) and thermophilic (55-57 °C) processes and an increasing organic loading rate (OLR, 1-10 kg VS m(-3) d(-1)), and also to find a feasible compromise between waste treatment capacity and biogas production without causing process instability. In summary, more biogas was produced with all OLRs by the thermophilic process. Both processes showed a limited diversity of the methanogenic archaeal community which was dominated by Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales (e.g. Methanosarcina) in both meso- and thermophilic processes. Methanothermobacter was detected as an additional dominant genus in the thermophilic process. In addition to operating temperatures, the OLRs, the acetate concentration, and the presence of key substrates like propionate also affected the methanogenic archaeal community composition. A bacterial cell count 6.25 times higher than archaeal cell count was observed throughout the thermophilic process, while the cell count ratio varied between 0.2 and 8.5 in the mesophilic process. This suggests that the thermophilic process is more stable, but also that the relative abundance between bacteria and archaea can vary without seriously affecting biogas production.

  3. Wood ash amendment to biogas reactors as an alternative to landfilling? A preliminary study on changes in process chemistry and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podmirseg, Sabine M; Seewald, Martin S A; Knapp, Brigitte A; Bouzid, Ourdia; Biderre-Petit, Corinne; Peyret, Pierre; Insam, Heribert

    2013-08-01

    Wood ash addition to biogas plants represents an alternative to commonly used landfilling by improving the reactor performance, raising the pH and alleviating potential limits of trace elements. This study is the first on the effects of wood ash on reactor conditions and microbial communities in cattle slurry-based biogas reactors. General process parameters [temperature, pH, electrical conductivity, ammonia, volatile fatty acids, carbon/nitrogen (C/N), total solids (TS), volatile solids, and gas quantity and quality] were monitored along with molecular analyses of methanogens by polymerase chain reaction- denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and modern microarrays (archaea and bacteria). A prompt pH rise was observed, as was an increase in C/N ratio and volatile fatty acids. Biogas production was inhibited, but recovered to even higher production rates and methane concentration after single amendment. High sulphur levels in the wood ash generated hydrogen sulphide and potentially hampered methanogenesis. Methanosarcina was the most dominant methanogen in all reactors; however, diversity was higher in ash-amended reactors. Bacterial groups like Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria were favoured, which could improve the hydrolytic efficiency of the reactors. We recommend constant monitoring of the chemical composition of the used wood ash and suggest that ash amendment is adequate if added to the substrate at a rate low enough to allow adaptation of the microbiota (e.g. 0.25 g g(-1) TS). It could further help to enrich digestate with important nutrients, for example phosphorus, calcium and magnesium, but further experiments are required for the evaluation of wood ash concentrations that are tolerable for anaerobic digestion.

  4. Geochronology and Nd isotope geochemistry of the Gameleira Cu-Au deposit, Serra dos Carajás, Brazil: 1.8-1.7 Ga hydrothermal alteration and mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Márcio M.; Lindenmayer, Zara G.; Laux, Jorge H.; Armstrong, Richard; de Araújo, Janice Caldas

    2003-01-01

    The Gameleira deposit is one of several important Cu-Au deposits associated with the late Archean (ca. 2.7 Ga) volcanic rocks of the Itacaiúnas supergroup in the Carajás mineral province, southeastern Pará. It comprises mainly biotite- and sulphide-rich veins and quartz-grunerite-biotite-gold hydrothermal veins that cut andesitic rocks. It is interpreted as representative of the Fe oxide Cu-Au class of deposit. Sm-Nd isotopic data indicate an age of 2719±80 Ma (MSWD=3.0) and ɛNd( T) of -1.4 for the host meta-andesites. Metavolcanic rocks and cogenetic gabbros give an age of 2757±81 Ma (1 σ) with ɛNd( T) of -0.8. This is considered the best estimate for the crystallization age of the Gameleira volcanic and subvolcanic rocks. Negative ɛNd( T) and Archean TDM model ages (mostly between 2.8 and 3.1 Ga) suggest some contamination with older crustal material. The andesitic/gabbroic rocks are cut by two generations of granite dykes. The older has striking petrographic and geochemical similarities to the ca. 1.87 Ga alkali-rich Pojuca granite, which is exposed a few kilometers to the northwest of the deposit. The younger is a leucogranite with a U-Pb SHRIMP age of 1583+9/-7 Ma. Neodymium isotopic analyses of the two generations of granites indicate a strong crustal affinity and possible derivation from reworking of the Archean crust. The quartz-grunerite-gold hydrothermal vein yields a Sm-Nd isochron (MSWD=.83) age of 1839±15 Ma (1 σ) with ɛNd( T) of -9.2. Pervasive potassic alteration, represented by the widespread formation of biotite in the country rocks, is dated by Ar-Ar at 1734±8 Ma, and a similar age of 1700±31 Ma (1 σ) is indicated by the Sm-Nd isochron for the biotite-sulphide veins. Similar to that for the quartz-grunerite vein, the ɛNd( T) value for the sulphide-rich veins is strongly negative (-8.2), thereby suggesting that the original fluids percolated through, leached, or were derived from igneous rocks with an Archaean Nd isotopic signature

  5. Metallogeny and geodynamics of the Aktiuz Boordu Mining District, Northern Tien Shan, Kyrgyzstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djenchuraeva, R. D.; Borisov, F. I.; Pak, N. T.; Malyukova, N. N.

    2008-03-01

    The Aktiuz-Boordu Mining District is located in the Northern Tien Shan in the eastern part of Kyrgyzstan. The region is characterized by nappe-folding structures and comprises strongly deformed Precambrian and Lower Paleozoic sedimentary, volcano-sedimentary, and metamorphic sequences. Metamorphic rocks are represented by crystalline schists, para- and orthogneisses, marble, migmatite, amphibolite and eclogite lenses. These rocks are thought to be the oldest in the Northern Tien Shan. The 2780-Ma Aktiuz complex has a total thickness of 2800-2900 m. Available U-Pb zircon age data for the Kemin Group migmatites yield ages of 2200 ± 50 Ma. Based upon their geological setting, multistage metamorphism and isotopic ages of retrograde metamorphism (1.1-1.9 Ga), these rocks reach a few kilometers in thickness and are subdivided into Archaean and Paleoproterozoic. The Archaean and Paleoproterozoic basement metamorphic rocks contain mineralization of various ages and types, including porphyry Cu, Au-sulphide, Au-Bi, barite, epithermal base metal and Au-Ag, REE and rare-metals. Two ore fields have been identified within the Aktiuz-Boordu Mining District, they are: (1) Taldybulak-Boordu, with Au, base metal, and porphyry Cu systems; (2) Aktiuz, with REE, rare- and base-metal deposits. Within the Paleozoic Taldybulak-Boordu volcanic structure, deposits and occurrences of Au are present at Taldybulak Levoberezhny, Chimbulak Zapadny, Karamoko and Kuranjailyau; of Pb at Boordu, Taldybulak Stary, Chimbulak Vostochny and Chimbulak Zapadny; of Mo at Karabulak, and of Cu at Berkut-Kashka. Almost all are found along the periphery of deeply eroded volcanoes. Rock types in the Taldybulak-Boordu ore field mainly comprise chlorite-amphibole and amphibole schists, amphibolites, and migmatites of the Paleoproterozoic Kuperlisay suite. The younger Paleoproterozoic Kokbulak and Kapchigay suites are represented by mica schists and granite gneisses, which are separated from the Kuperlisay suite

  6. Issues of oxygen excess in the crust and upper mantle lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashov, Y. A.; Martynov, E. V.

    2012-04-01

    Application of a new geochemical buffer, 'CeB' - Ce+4/Ce+3 for zircons, is promising for oxygen fugacity (FO2) estimation in crust and mantle. Absence of Ce+4 and Eu+2-enriched zircons are typical of the lower lithosphere. Reducing setting dominate in mantle rocks. Subduction adds oxidized substance for lithosphere into deeper mantle (Balashov ea, 2011-2012). The zircons in upper lithosphere are oxidized. Peridotites minerals show increased H2O and OH- preserves to 150-160 km at ΔFMQ -1.4 - -0.1 (Babushkina et al, 2009) comparable with CeB 2.2 - 3.9. Increasing oceanic mass in the geological time controls water efflux and oxidation of upper the lithosphere. Oxygen source in crust and upper mantle is the most important, yet outstanding issues in geochemistry of Earth's upper shells. Oxygen excess in atmosphere correlating with long-term emergence and evolution of Earth's biosphere is an approach reflected in the schemes of cycle- and phase-wise biosphere evolution (Dobretsov et al, 2006; Sorokhtin et al, 2010). The both schemes demonstrate ideas for oxygen evolution of atmosphere, but are not confirmed by geochronology. Applying these outlines an actual picture FO2 evolution. Precambrian granitoids, detrital zircons and upper mantle lithosphere have similar CeB. The initial data include Australian Hadean and Archaean detrital zircons (Peck et al, 2001), CeB: 27.1 -1.96, and Eu+2/Eu+3: 0.015-0.12 (Balashov, Skublov, 2011). Greenland tonalities (3813 Ma) and granodiorite (3638 Ma) (Whitehouse, Kamber, 2002) CeB: 34 - 0.5. In oldest crust rocks dominated zircons with generation under high and heterogeneous FO2. Zircons in younger mantle-crustal rocks of S. American subduction zones (Ballard et al, 2002; Hoskin et al, 2000, etc.) show the same. Upper mantle lithosphere and crust represent continuously interacted with oxygen. If Progressively oxygen increase from Hadean to modern state (Dobretsov ea, 2006; Sorokhtin ea, 2010), contradicts with actual Archaean data. We

  7. Formation, obduction and provenance of the Støren-Bymarka-Løkken ophiolite, Central Norwegian Caledonides; constraints from geochronology, geochemistry, Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagstad, T.; Pin, C.; Roberts, D.; Kirkland, C. L.; Grenne, T.; Dunning, G.; Sauer, S.; Andersen, T.

    2012-04-01

    deposited unconformably on the eroded, metamorphosed ophiolite, indicating obduction between 480 and 470 Ma, either onto a microcontinent close to Baltica at intermediate to high latitudes or directly onto Laurentia. By Late Arenig (Dapingian) time, the sediments were hosting Laurentian faunas, and detrital zircon data from these rocks reveal a significant Archaean component, unlike tectonostratigraphically lower allochthonous, parautochthonous and autochthonous sedimentary rocks that generally lack Archaean input. This suggests that the volcaniclastic succession and its ophiolite base had reached the equatorial latitudes of Laurentia by this stage. At 469-467 Ma, the ophiolite and its sedimentary cover was intruded by trondhjemite dykes and calc-alkaline volcanic rocks with intermediate isotopic compositions. We interpret this magmatism to reflect the establishment of a magmatic arc close to the continental margin of Laurentia at this time. Data from other parts of the Central Norwegian Caledonides suggest this arc might have been active until Late Silurian collision between Laurentia and Baltica.

  8. Evidences of inclined transpression at the contact between Vinjamuru group and Udayagiri group of Nellore Schist Belt, Andhra Pradesh, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sankha Das; Devasheesh Shukla; S K Mitra

    2016-07-01

    The Nellore Schist Belt (NSB) is a curvilinear Archaean schist belt, approximately 350 km long and 8–50 km wide. The Nellore Schist Belt is considered to be Neoarchean in age and stratigraphically NSB is classified as the western Udayagiri group (dominated by metasediments) and underlying eastern Vinjamuru group (dominated by metabasalts). There is a long controversy regarding the contact relationship between Udayagiri and Vinjamuru groups. Earlier researchers regarded the contact between two groups as tectonic on the basis of metamorphism. A shear zone and a possible thrust contact between the two groups have also been reported. On the basis of present study, an NNW–SSE trending, westerly dipping inclined transpressional zone is found at the contact between Udayagiri and Vinjamuru groups in the central western part of the NSB. Kinematic analysis of both the hanging wall and foot wall of the westerly dipping thrust zone shows presence of strong S1 schistosity, shear bands and S-C fabric in both strike and dip section along with east-verging overturned fold, westerly dipping inverted beds, suggesting partitioning of non-coaxial deformation in strike-slip and dip-slip component along with a pure shear component. Strike-slip is more prominent in the northern part of the contact than the southern part. The presence of steep to moderate northerly plunging non-orthogonal stretching/mineral elongation lineation all along the contact and clockwise shift of plot of the same in stereo net from its orthogonal position and presence of other kinematic indicators in plan suggests a right lateral strike-slip component. As a whole, it is suggested that Udayagiri group is thrusted over Vinjamuru group along a westerly dipping thrust plane with a right lateral strike-slip motion and simultaneous E–W contraction.

  9. The Arequipa Massif of Peru: New SHRIMP and isotope constraints on a Paleoproterozoic inlier in the Grenvillian orogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casquet, C.; Fanning, C. M.; Galindo, C.; Pankhurst, R. J.; Rapela, C. W.; Torres, P.

    2010-01-01

    The enigmatic Arequipa Massif of southwestern Peru is an outcrop of Andean basement that underwent Grenville-age metamorphism, and as such it is important for the better constraint of Laurentia-Amazonia ties in Rodinia reconstruction models. U-Pb SHRIMP zircon dating has yielded new evidence on the evolution of the Massif between Middle Paleoproterozoic and Early Paleozoic. The oldest rock-forming events occurred in major orogenic events between ca. 1.79 and 2.1 Ga (Orosirian to Rhyacian), involving early magmatism (1.89-2.1 Ga, presumably emplaced through partly Archaean continental crust), sedimentation of a thick sequence of terrigenous sediments, UHT metamorphism at ca. 1.87 Ga, and late felsic magmatism at ca. 1.79 Ga. The Atico sedimentary basin developed in the Late-Mesoproterozoic and detrital zircons were fed from a source area similar to the high-grade Paleoproterozoic basement, but also from an unknown source that provided Mesoproterozoic zircons of 1200-1600 Ma. The Grenville-age metamorphism was of low- P type; it both reworked the Paleoproterozoic rocks and also affected the Atico sedimentary rocks. Metamorphism was diachronous: ca. 1040 Ma in the Quilca and Camaná areas and in the San Juán Marcona domain, 940 ± 6 Ma in the Mollendo area, and between 1000 and 850 Ma in the Atico domain. These metamorphic domains are probably tectonically juxtaposed. Comparison with coeval Grenvillian processes in Laurentia and in southern Amazonia raises the possibility that Grenvillian metamorphism in the Arequipa Massif resulted from extension and not from collision. The Arequipa Massif experienced Ordovician-Silurian magmatism at ca. 465 Ma, including anorthosites formerly considered to be Grenvillian, and high-T metamorphism deep within the magmatic arc. Focused retrogression along shear zones or unconformities took place between 430 and 440 Ma.

  10. Aerobic bacterial pyrite oxidation and acid rock drainage during the Great Oxidation Event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konhauser, Kurt O; Lalonde, Stefan V; Planavsky, Noah J; Pecoits, Ernesto; Lyons, Timothy W; Mojzsis, Stephen J; Rouxel, Olivier J; Barley, Mark E; Rosìere, Carlos; Fralick, Phillip W; Kump, Lee R; Bekker, Andrey

    2011-10-19

    The enrichment of redox-sensitive trace metals in ancient marine sedimentary rocks has been used to determine the timing of the oxidation of the Earth's land surface. Chromium (Cr) is among the emerging proxies for tracking the effects of atmospheric oxygenation on continental weathering; this is because its supply to the oceans is dominated by terrestrial processes that can be recorded in the Cr isotope composition of Precambrian iron formations. However, the factors controlling past and present seawater Cr isotope composition are poorly understood. Here we provide an independent and complementary record of marine Cr supply, in the form of Cr concentrations and authigenic enrichment in iron-rich sedimentary rocks. Our data suggest that Cr was largely immobile on land until around 2.48 Gyr ago, but within the 160 Myr that followed--and synchronous with independent evidence for oxygenation associated with the Great Oxidation Event (see, for example, refs 4-6)--marked excursions in Cr content and Cr/Ti ratios indicate that Cr was solubilized at a scale unrivalled in history. As Cr isotope fractionations at that time were muted, Cr must have been mobilized predominantly in reduced, Cr(III), form. We demonstrate that only the oxidation of an abundant and previously stable crustal pyrite reservoir by aerobic-respiring, chemolithoautotrophic bacteria could have generated the degree of acidity required to solubilize Cr(III) from ultramafic source rocks and residual soils. This profound shift in weathering regimes beginning at 2.48 Gyr ago constitutes the earliest known geochemical evidence for acidophilic aerobes and the resulting acid rock drainage, and accounts for independent evidence of an increased supply of dissolved sulphate and sulphide-hosted trace elements to the oceans around that time. Our model adds to amassing evidence that the Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic boundary was marked by a substantial shift in terrestrial geochemistry and biology.

  11. Potential of thermal emissivity for mapping of greenstone rocks and associated granitoids of Hutti Maski Schist belt, Karnataka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, A.; Vinod Kumar, K.

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, different temperature-emissivity separation algorithms were used to derive emissivity images based on processing of ASTER( Advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection radiometer) thermal bands. These emissivity images have been compared with each other in terms of geological information for mapping of major rock types in Hutti Maski schist Belt and its associated granitoids. Thermal emissivity images are analyzed conjugately with thermal radiance image, radiant temperature image and albedo image of ASTER bands to understand the potential of thermal emissivity in delineating different rock types of Archaean Greenstone belt. The emissivity images derived using different emissivity extraction algorithms are characterised with poor data dimensionality and signal to noise ratio. Therefore, Inverse MNF false-colour composites(FCC) are derived using bands having better signal to noise(SNR)ratio to enhance the contrast in emissivity. It has been observed that inverse-MNF of emissivity image; which is derived using emissivity-normalisation method is suitable for delineating silica variations in granite and granodioritic gneiss in comparison to other inverse- MNF-emissivity composites derived using other emissivity extraction algorithms(reference channel and alpha residual method). Based on the analysis of ASTER derived emissivity spectra of each rocks, band ratios are derived(band 14/12,band 10/12) and these ratios are used to delineate the rock types based on index based FCC image. This FCC image can be used to delineate granitoids with different silica content. The geological information derived based on processing of ASTER thermal images are further compared with the image analysis products derived using ASTER visible-near-infrared(VNIR) and shortwave infrared(SWIR) bands. It has been observed that delineation of different mafic rocks or greenstone rocks(i.e. separation between chlorite schist and metabasalt) are better in SWIR composites

  12. Structural diversity of eukaryotic 18S rRNA and its impact on alignment and phylogenetic reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qiang; Lin, Jinzhong; Qin, Yan; Zhou, Jianfu; Bu, Wenjun

    2011-02-01

    Ribosomal RNAs are important because they catalyze the synthesis of peptides and proteins. Comparative studies of the secondary structure of 18S rRNA have revealed the basic locations of its many length-conserved and length-variable regions. In recent years, many more sequences of 18S rDNA with unusual lengths have been documented in GenBank. These data make it possible to recognize the diversity of the secondary and tertiary structures of 18S rRNAs and to identify the length-conserved parts of 18S rDNAs. The longest 18S rDNA sequences of almost every known eukaryotic phylum were included in this study. We illustrated the bioinformatics-based structure to show that, the regions that are more length-variable, regions that are less length-variable, the splicing sites for introns, and the sites of A-minor interactions are mostly distributed in different parts of the 18S rRNA. Additionally, this study revealed that some length-variable regions or insertion positions could be quite close to the functional part of the 18S rRNA of Foraminifera organisms. The tertiary structure as well as the secondary structure of 18S rRNA can be more diverse than what was previously supposed. Besides revealing how this interesting gene evolves, it can help to remove ambiguity from the alignment of eukaryotic 18S rDNAs and to improve the performance of 18S rDNA in phylogenetic reconstruction. Six nucleotides shared by Archaea and Eukaryota but rarely by Bacteria are also reported here for the first time, which might further support the supposed origin of eukaryote from archaeans.

  13. Geochemistry of the Neoarchaean Volcanic Rocks of the Kilimafedha Greenstone Belt, Northeastern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles W. Messo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Neoarchaean volcanic rocks of the Kilimafedha greenstone belt consist of three petrological types that are closely associated in space and time: the predominant intermediate volcanic rocks with intermediate calc-alkaline to tholeiitic affinities, the volumetrically minor tholeiitic basalts, and rhyolites. The tholeiitic basalts are characterized by slightly depleted LREE to nearly flat REE patterns with no Eu anomalies but have negative anomalies of Nb. The intermediate volcanic rocks exhibit very coherent, fractionated REE patterns, slightly negative to absent Eu anomalies, depletion in Nb, Ta, and Ti in multielement spidergrams, and enrichment of HFSE relative to MORB. Compared to the other two suites, the rhyolites are characterized by low concentrations of TiO2 and overall low abundances of total REE, as well as large negative Ti, Sr, and Eu anomalies. The three suites have a εNd (2.7 Ga values in the range of −0.51 to +5.17. The geochemical features of the tholeiitic basalts are interpreted in terms of derivation from higher degrees of partial melting of a peridotite mantle wedge that has been variably metasomatized by aqueous fluids derived from dehydration of the subducting slab. The rocks showing intermediate affinities are interpreted to have been formed as differentiates of a primary magma formed later by lower degrees of partial melting of a garnet free mantle wedge that was strongly metasomatized by both fluid and melt derived from the subducting oceanic slab. The rhyolites are best interpreted as having been formed by shallow level fractional crystallization of the intermediate volcanic rocks involving plagioclase and Ti-rich phases like ilmenite and magnetite as well as REE-rich phases like apatite, zircon, monazite, and allanite. The close spatial association of the three petrological types in the Kilimafedha greenstone belt is interpreted as reflecting their formation in an evolving late Archaean island arc.

  14. Protolith ages and timing of peak and retrograde metamorphism of the high-pressure granulites in the Shandong Peninsula, eastern North China Craton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinghua Liu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available High-pressure (HP granulites widely occur as enclaves within tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG gneisses of the Early Precambrian metamorphic basement in the Shandong Peninsula, southeast part of the North China Craton (NCC. Based on cathodoluminescence (CL, laser Raman spectroscopy and in-situ U-Pb dating, we characterize the zircons from the HP granulites and group them into three main types: inherited (magmatic zircon, HP metamorphic zircon and retrograde zircon. The inherited zircons with clear or weakly defined magmatic zoning contain inclusions of apatites, and 207Pb/206Pb ages of 2915–2890 Ma and 2763–2510 Ma, correlating with two magmatic events in the Archaean basement. The homogeneous HP metamorphic zircons contain index minerals of high-pressure metamorphism including garnet, clinopyroxene, plagioclase, quartz, rutile and apatite, and yield 207Pb/206Pb ages between 1900 and 1850 Ma, marking the timing of peak HP granulite facies metamorphism. The retrograde zircons contain inclusions of orthopyroxene, plagioclase, quartz, apatite and amphibole, and yield the youngest 207Pb/206Pb ages of 1840–1820 Ma among the three groups, which we correlate to the medium to low-pressure granulite facies retrograde metamorphism. The data presented in this study suggest subduction of Meso- and Neoarchean magmatic protoliths to lower crust depths where they were subjected to HP granulite facies metamorphism during Palaeoproterozoic (1900–1850 Ma. Subsequently, the HP granulites were exhumated to upper crust levels, and were overprinted by medium to low-pressure granulite and amphibolite facies retrograde event at ca. 1840–820 Ma.

  15. Creating global comparative analyses of tectonic rifts, monogenetic volcanism and inverted relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    I have been all around the world, and to other planets and have travelled from the present to the Archaean and back to seek out the most significant tectonic rifts, monogenetic volcanoes and examples of inverted relief. I have done this to provide a broad foundation of the comparative analysis for the Chaîne des Puys - Limagne fault nomination to UNESCO world Heritage. This would have been an impossible task, if not for the cooperation of the scientific community and for Google Earth, Google Maps and academic search engines. In preparing global comparisons of geological features, these quite recently developed tools provide a powerful way to find and describe geological features. The ability to do scientific crowd sourcing, rapidly discussing with colleagues about features, allows large numbers of areas to be checked and the open GIS tools (such as Google Earth) allow a standardised description. Search engines also allow the literature on areas to be checked and compared. I will present a comparative study of rifts of the world, monogenetic volcanic field and inverted relief, integrated to analyse the full geological system represented by the Chaîne des Puys - Limagne fault. The analysis confirms that the site is an exceptional example of the first steps of continental drift in a mountain rift setting, and that this is necessarily seen through the combined landscape of tectonic, volcanic and geomorphic features. The analysis goes further to deepen the understanding of geological systems and stresses the need for more study on geological heritage using such a global and broad systems approach.

  16. Magnetic petrology of the Água Azul and Água Limpa granodiorites, southern portion of the Carajás Domain – Pará

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleilson Oliveira Gabriel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Água Azul and Água Limpa granodiorites (AAGrd and ALGrd, respectively outcrop in the extreme southern of the Carajás Domain as two elongated bodies following the EW regional trend and were previously included in the Xingu Complex. The ALGrd consists mainly of biotite-amphibole granodiorites and muscovite-biotite granodiorites, with subordinate amphibole-biotite tonalites; the AAGrd contains dominant epidote-amphibole-biotite granodiorites, epidote-amphibole-biotite tonalite and restricted (amphibole-epidote-biotite monzogranites. These rocks show geochemical signatures like of archaean sanukitoids. The magnetic susceptibility (MS values obtained in the ALGrd (average 17.54 × 10-4 SIv and AAGrd (average 4.19 × 10-4 SIv are relatively low. The main opaque minerals are magnetite and hematite, and ilmenite is lacking in these rocks. The ALGrd contains titanite associated with magnetite, while the AAGrd contains pyrite, chalcopyrite, and goethite. In the ALGrd, magnetite is more developed and large than in the AAGrd, justifying its highest values of MS. The oxidation of magnetite (martitization and the alteration of sulfides to goethite, occurred at low temperatures. The positive correlation between MS values and the modal content of opaque, amphibole, epidote + allanite and quartz + K-feldspar, as well as the negative correlation of MS with biotite and mafic observed in these units, reveal a trend of MS increasing in the direction: amphibole tonalites/amphibole granodiorites à biotite granodiorites/biotite monzogranites. The geochemical data confirm this fact, with a negative correlation between the MS values and Fe2O3T, FeO, and MgO, reflecting, for the two units, an upward trend in MS values parallel to magmatic differentiation. The geochemical and mineralogical affinities between these rocks and sanukitoids of the Rio Maria Domain suggest conditions of the oxygen fugacity between HM and FMQ buffers for the studied granitoids

  17. Elemental composition of extant microbialites: mineral and microbial carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdespino-Castillo, P. M.; Falcón, L. I.; Holman, H. Y. N.; Merino-Ibarra, M.; García-Guzmán, M.; López-Gómez, L. M. D. R.; Martínez, J.; Alcantara-Hernandez, R. J.; Beltran, Y.; Centeno, C.; Cerqueda-Garcia, D.; Pi-Puig, T.; Castillo, F. S.

    2015-12-01

    Microbialites are the modern analogues of ancient microbial consortia. Their existence extends from the Archaean (~3500 mya) until present and their lithified structure evidences the capacity of microbial communities to mediate mineral precipitation. Living microbialites are a useful study model to test the mechanisms involved in carbonates and other minerals precipitation. Here, we studied the chemical composition, the biomass and the microbial structure of extant microbialites. All of these were found in Mexico, in water systems of different and characteristic ionic firms. An elemental analysis (C:N) of microbial biomass was performed and total P was determined. To explore the chemical composition of microbialites as a whole, X-ray diffraction analyses were performed over dry microbialites. While overall inorganic carbon content (carbonates) represented >70% of the living layer, a protocol of inorganic carbon elimination was performed for each sample resulting in organic matter contents between 8 and 16% among microbialites. Stoichiometric ratios of C:N:P in microbialite biomass were different among samples, and the possibility of P limitation was suggested mainly for karstic microbialites, N limitation was suggested for all samples and, more intensively, for soda system microbialites. A differential capacity for biomass allocation among microbialites was observed. Microbialites showed, along the biogeographic gradient, a diverse arrangement of microbial assemblages within the mineral matrix. While environmental factors such as pH and nitrate concentration were the factors that defined the general structure and diversity of these assemblages, we intend to test if the abundance of major ions and trace metals are also defining microbialite characteristics (such as microbial structure and biomass). This work contributes to define a baseline of the chemical nature of extant microbial consortia actively participating in mineral precipitation processes.

  18. Geodynamic evolution and crustal growth of the central Indian Shield: Evidence from geochemistry of gneisses and granitoids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Faruque Hussain; M E A Mondal; Talat Ahmad

    2004-12-01

    The rare earth element patterns of the gneisses of Bastar and Bundelkhand are marked by LREE enrichment and HREE depletion with or without Eu anomaly. The spidergram patterns for the gneisses are characterized by marked enrichment in LILE with negative anomalies for Ba, P and Ti. The geochemical characteristics exhibited by the gneisses are generally interpreted as melts generated by partial melting of a subducting slab. The style of subduction was flat subduction, which was most common in the Archean. The rare earth patterns and the multi-element diagrams with marked enrichment in LILE and negative anomalies for Ba, P and Ti of the granitoids of both the cratons indicate interaction between slab derived melts and the mantle wedge. The subduction angle was high in the Proterozoic. Considering the age of emplacement of the gneisses and granitoids that differs by ∼ 1 Ga, it can be assumed that these are linked to two independent subduction events: one during Archaean (flat subduction) that generated the precursor melts for the gneisses and the other during the Proterozoic (high angle subduction) that produced the melts for the granitoids. The high values of Mg#, Ni, Cr, Sr and low values of SiO2 in the granitoids of Bastar and Bundelkhand cratons compared to the gneisses of both the cratons indicate melt-mantle interaction in the generation of the granitoids. The low values of Mg#, Ni, Cr, Sr and high values of SiO2 in the gneisses in turn overrules such melt-mantle interaction.

  19. The Fazenda Gavião granodiorite and associated potassic plutons as evidence for Palaeoproterozoic arc-continent collision in the Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Felipe G.; Oliveira, Elson P.; McNaughton, Neal J.

    2011-08-01

    Several granitic plutons have intruded the Palaeoproterozoic Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt, São Francisco craton, Brazil, in the time interval 2163-2080 Ma, but their tectonic significance is poorly understood. The Fazenda Gavião granodiorite (FGG) is one of a set of plutons emplaced along the western boundary of the greenstone belt with Archaean migmatite-gneiss basement. The pluton is mostly composed of hornblende granodiorite, occasionally crosscut by syn-plutonic mafic dykes. The FGG is metaluminous, medium- to high-K calc-alkaline with relatively constant silica abundances (SiO2 ˜ 63-66 wt%), high Sr (900-800 ppm) and high Ba (1000-1500 ppm). The associated mafic dykes are ultrapotassic, with high abundances of Ba, Sr, MgO, Ni, Cr, and light rare earth elements, suggesting derivation from partial melts of an enriched mantle source. The FGG originated probably by fractional crystallization from a primitive K-rich mafic magma that interacted with crustal melts. Its zircon U-Pb SHRIMP age of 2106 ± 6 Ma indicates that the FGG is younger than the early (2163-2127 Ma) tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) and calc-alkaline arc plutons of the greenstone belt, and is closely related in time and space with potassic to ultrapotassic plutons (ca. 2110-2105 Ma). The negative ɛNd(t) of FGG and coeval K-rich plutons of the Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt contrasts markedly with the positive ɛNd(t) of the older arc plutons, indicating a major change of isotope signatures in granites of the Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt with time. This isotope shift may be related to magma contamination with older continental material and/or derivation of the parental potassic magma from enriched lithospheric mantle sources. We suggest that the K-rich plutons were emplaced during or shortly after Palaeoproterozoic arc-continent collision.

  20. A window for plate tectonics in terrestrial planet evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Craig; Lenardic, Adrian; Weller, Matthew; Moresi, Louis; Quenette, Steve; Zhang, Siqi

    2016-06-01

    The tectonic regime of a planet depends critically on the contributions of basal and internal heating to the planetary mantle, and how these evolve through time. We use viscoplastic mantle convection simulations, with evolving core-mantle boundary temperatures, and radiogenic heat decay, to explore how these factors affect tectonic regime over the lifetime of a planet. The simulations demonstrate (i) hot, mantle conditions, coming out of a magma ocean phase of evolution, can produce a "hot" stagnant-lid regime, whilst a cooler post magma ocean mantle may begin in a plate tectonic regime; (ii) planets may evolve from an initial hot stagnant-lid condition, through an episodic regime lasting 1-3 Gyr, into a plate-tectonic regime, and finally into a cold, senescent stagnant lid regime after ∼10 Gyr of evolution, as heat production and basal temperatures wane; and (iii) the thermal state of the post magma ocean mantle, which effectively sets the initial conditions for the sub-solidus mantle convection phase of planetary evolution, is one of the most sensitive parameters affecting planetary evolution - systems with exactly the same physical parameters may exhibit completely different tectonics depending on the initial state employed. Estimates of the early Earth's temperatures suggest Earth may have begun in a hot stagnant lid mode, evolving into an episodic regime throughout most of the Archaean, before finally passing into a plate tectonic regime. The implication of these results is that, for many cases, plate tectonics may be a phase in planetary evolution between hot and cold stagnant states, rather than an end-member.

  1. Oceanic nickel depletion and a methanogen famine before the Great Oxidation Event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konhauser, Kurt O; Pecoits, Ernesto; Lalonde, Stefan V; Papineau, Dominic; Nisbet, Euan G; Barley, Mark E; Arndt, Nicholas T; Zahnle, Kevin; Kamber, Balz S

    2009-04-09

    It has been suggested that a decrease in atmospheric methane levels triggered the progressive rise of atmospheric oxygen, the so-called Great Oxidation Event, about 2.4 Gyr ago. Oxidative weathering of terrestrial sulphides, increased oceanic sulphate, and the ecological success of sulphate-reducing microorganisms over methanogens has been proposed as a possible cause for the methane collapse, but this explanation is difficult to reconcile with the rock record. Banded iron formations preserve a history of Precambrian oceanic elemental abundance and can provide insights into our understanding of early microbial life and its influence on the evolution of the Earth system. Here we report a decline in the molar nickel to iron ratio recorded in banded iron formations about 2.7 Gyr ago, which we attribute to a reduced flux of nickel to the oceans, a consequence of cooling upper-mantle temperatures and decreased eruption of nickel-rich ultramafic rocks at the time. We measured nickel partition coefficients between simulated Precambrian sea water and diverse iron hydroxides, and subsequently determined that dissolved nickel concentrations may have reached approximately 400 nM throughout much of the Archaean eon, but dropped below approximately 200 nM by 2.5 Gyr ago and to modern day values ( approximately 9 nM) by approximately 550 Myr ago. Nickel is a key metal cofactor in several enzymes of methanogens and we propose that its decline would have stifled their activity in the ancient oceans and disrupted the supply of biogenic methane. A decline in biogenic methane production therefore could have occurred before increasing environmental oxygenation and not necessarily be related to it. The enzymatic reliance of methanogens on a diminishing supply of volcanic nickel links mantle evolution to the redox state of the atmosphere.

  2. Paleoenvironmental signals and paleoclimatic condition of the Early Maastrichtian oil shales from Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathy, Douaa; Wagreich, Michael; Zaki, Rafat; Mohamed, Ramadan S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Early Maastrichtian oil shales are hosted in the Duwi Formation of the Central Eastern Desert, Egypt. The examined member represents up to 20% of the total Duwi Formation. This interval is mainly composed of siliciclastic facies, phosphorites facies and carbonate facies. Oil shales microfacies is mainly composed of smectite, kaolinite, calcite, fluorapatite, quartz and pyrite. They are enriched in a number of major elements and trace metals in particular Ca, P, V, Ni, Cr, Sr, Zn, Mo, Nb, U and Y compared to the post-Archaean Australian shale (PAAS). Chondrite-normalized REEs patterns of oil shales for the studied area display light rare earth elements enrichment relatively to heavy rare earth elements with negative Ce/Ce* and Eu/Eu* anomalies. The most remarkable indicators for redox conditions are enrichments of V, Mo, Ni, Cr, U content and depletion of Mn content. Besides, V/V+Ni, V/Ni, U/Th, Ni/Co, authigentic uranium ratios with presence of framboidal shape of pyrite and its size are reflecting the deposition of these shales under marine anoxic to euxinic environmental conditions. Additionally, the ratio of Strontium (Sr) to Barium (Ba) Sr/Ba reflected highly saline water during deposition. Elemental ratios critical to paleoclimate and paleoweathering (Rb /Sr, Al2O3/TiO2), CIA values, binary diagram between (Al2O3+K2O+Na2O) and SiO2 and types of clay minerals dominated reflect warm to humid climate conditions prevailing during the accumulation of these organic-rich petroleum source rocks.

  3. Chiral Biomarkers and Microfossils in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    Homochirality of the biomolecules (D-sugars of DNA and RNA and L-amino acids of proteins) is a fundamental property of all life on Earth. Abiotic mechanisms yield racemic mixtures (D/L=1) of chiral molecules and after the death of an organism, the enantiopure chiral biomolecules slowly racemize. Several independent investigators have now established that the amino acids present in CI1 and CM2 carbonaceous meteorites have a moderate to strong excess of the L-enantiomer. Stable isotope data have established that these amino acids are both indigenous and extraterrestrial. Carbonaceous meteorites also contain many other strong chemical biomarkers including purines and pyrimidines (nitrogen heterocycles of nucleic acids); pristine and phytane (components of the chlorophyll pigment) and morphological biomarkers (microfossils of filamentous cyanobacteria). Energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis reveals that nitrogen is below the detectability level in most of the meteorite filaments as well as in Cambrian Trilobites and filaments of 2.7 Gya Archaean cyanobacteria from Karelia. The deficiency of nitrogen in the filaments and the total absence of sugars, of twelve of the life-critical protein amino acids, and two of the nucleobases of DNA and RNA provide clear and convincing evidence that these filaments are not modern biological contaminants. This paper reviews the chiral, chemical biomarkers morphological biomarkers and microfossils in carbonaceous meteorites. This paper reviews chiral and morphological biomarkers and discusses the missing nitrogen, sugars, protein amino acids, and nucleobases as ?bio-discriminators? that exclude modern biological contaminants as a possible explanation for the permineralized cyanobacterial filaments found in the meteorites.

  4. Review of recent results from continental deep seismic profiling in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goleby, Bruce R.; Drummond, Barry J.; Korsch, Russell J.; Willcox, J. Barry; O'Brien, Geoffrey W.; Wake-Dyster, Kevin D.

    1994-04-01

    The Australian Geological Survey Organisation regularly collects 450-500 km of onshore deep seismic reflection data and up to 4500 km offshore each year in Australia. These recordings are made in a wide range of tectonic provinces, including, in the last few years, late Palaeozoic-Mesozoic intracontinental and Palaeozoic-Mesozoic-Cenozoic continental margin extensional basins, moderately deformed Palaeozoic transtensional basins and compressional fold belts, and Archaean greenstone terranes. Several of these provinces are major petroleum exploration provinces, whereas others contain significant mineral deposits. The primary purpose of the deep seismic profiling program is to resolve the tectonic history of the Australian continent, and thereby to encourage exploration for hydrocarbons and mineral resources in Australia. On the northwest Australian continental margin, major basin systems including the Bonaparte Basin, formed as a result of complex interactions since the Carboniferous, involving episodes of extension followed by strike-slip movements and inversion, which reactivated both the primary extensional and ancient basement structures. Off southeastern Australia, basins such as the Gippsland Basin formed as part of a linked transtensional system related to movement on a common mid-crustal detachment complex. On continental Australia, the Bowen Basin, in the northeast, was deformed by thrust faults that root in a major E-dipping detachment that flattens in the middle crust. The Cobar Basin, in the southeast, is a case where the seismic data support a detachment model in which the upper plate displacement vector can be calculated by plate reconstructions linking the geometry of the detachment surface with that of the basin. The greenstone terranes within the Eastern Goldfields region of Western Australia show crustal-scale fault systems that are planar and steep dipping, more in keeping with those interpreted in data from other Precambrian provinces rather than

  5. Biomineral formation as a biosignature for microbial activities Precambrian cherts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón Tomás, Blanca; Mühlen, Dominik; Hoppert, Michael; Reitner, Joachim

    2015-04-01

    In recent anoxic sediments manganese(II)carbonate minerals (e.g., rhodochrosite, kutnohorite) derive mainly from the reduction of manganese(IV) compounds by microbial anaerobic respiration. Small particles of rhodochrosite in stromatolite-like features in the Dresser chert Fm (Pilbara supergroup, W-Australia), associated with small flakes of kerogen, account for biogenic formation of the mineral in this early Archaean setting. Contrastingly, the formation of huge manganese-rich (carbonate) deposits requires effective manganese redox cycling, also conducted by various microbial processes, mainly requiring conditions of the early and late Proterozoic (Kirschvink et al., 2000; Nealson and Saffrani 1994). However, putative anaerobic pathways like microbial nitrate-dependent manganese oxidation (Hulth et al., 1999), anoxygenic photosynthesis (Johnson et al., 2013) and oxidation in UV light may facilitate manganese cycling even in a reducing atmosphere. Thus manganese redox cycling might have been possible even before the onset of oxygenic photosynthesis. Hence, there are several ways how manganese carbonates could have been formed biogenically and deposited in Precambrian sediments. Thus, the minerals may be suitable biosignatures for microbial redox processes in many respects. The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum islandicum produces rhodochrosite during growth on hydrogen and organic compounds and may be a putative model organism for the reduction of Mn(IV). References Hulth S, Aller RC, Gilbert F. (1999) Geochim Cosmochim Acta, 63, 49-66. Johnson JE, Webb SM, Thomas K, Ono S, Kirschvink JL, Fischer WW. (2013) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 110, 11238-11243. Kirschvink JL, Gaidos EJ, Bertani LE, Beukes NJ, Gutzmer J, Maepa LN, Steinberger LE. (2000) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 97, 1400-1405. Nealson KH, Saffarini D. (1994). Annu Rev Microbiol, 48, 311-343.

  6. Regulation of nif expression in Methanococcus maripaludis: roles of the euryarchaeal repressor NrpR, 2-oxoglutarate, and two operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, Thomas J; Wood, Gwendolyn E; Leigh, John A

    2005-02-18

    The methanogenic archaean Methanococcus maripaludis can use ammonia, alanine, or dinitrogen as a nitrogen source for growth. The euryarchaeal nitrogen repressor NrpR controls the expression of the nif (nitrogen fixation) operon, resulting in full repression with ammonia, intermediate repression with alanine, and derepression with dinitrogen. NrpR binds to two tandem operators in the nif promoter region, nifOR(1) and nifOR(2). Here we have undertaken both in vivo and in vitro approaches to study the way in which NrpR, nifOR(1), nifOR(2), and the effector 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) combine to regulate nif expression, leading to a comprehensive understanding of this archaeal regulatory system. We show that NrpR binds as a dimer to nifOR(1) and cooperatively as two dimers to both operators. Cooperative binding occurs only with both operators present. nifOR(1) has stronger binding and by itself can mediate the repression of nif transcription during growth on ammonia, unlike the weakly binding nifOR(2). However, nifOR(2) in combination with nifOR(1) is critical for intermediate repression during growth on alanine. Accordingly, NrpR binds to both operators together with higher affinity than to nifOR(1) alone. NrpR responds directly to 2OG, which weakens its binding to the operators. Hence, 2OG is an intracellular indicator of nitrogen deficiency and acts as an inducer of nif transcription via NrpR. This model is upheld by the recent finding (J. A. Dodsworth and J. A. Leigh, submitted for publication) in our laboratory that 2OG levels in M. maripaludis vary with growth on different nitrogen sources.

  7. P-wave receiver function study of crustal structure in Scandinavia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makushkina, Anna; Thybo, Hans; Vinnik, Lev; Youssof, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    In this study we present preliminary results on the structure of the continental crust in northern Scandinavia. The research area consists of three geologically different domains: the Archaean Domain in the north-east, the Palaeoproterozoic Svecofennian Domain in the east and the Caledonian Deformed Domain in the west (Gorbatschev and Bogdanova,1993). We present results based on data collected by 60 seismic stations during 2-4 years of deployment in the ScanArray experiment, which is an international collaboration between Scandinavian, German and British universities. We use the receiver function (RF) technique in the LQT ray-oriented coordinate system (Vinnik, 1977). Receiver function analysis has rather high vertical resolution of the depth to seismic discontinuities which cause transformation between P- and S-waves. The whole dataset is uniformly filtered and deconvolved records are stacked using appropriate moveout corrections. We have used events with a magnitude ≥ 5.5 Mw, with epicentral distances range from 30° to 95°. The technique allows us to constrain crustal structure and determine the Moho depth around stations by analyzing the PS converted phases generated at discontinuities in particular the Moho. We present preliminary interpretation of P-wave RF analysis in terms of the complex tectonic and geodynamic evolution of the Baltic Shield. Further studies will include joint P and S receiver function analysis of this area as well as investigations of the upper mantle. References: Vinnik L.P. (1977) Detection of waves converted from P to SV in the mantle. Phys. Earth planet. Inter. 15, 39-45 Gorbatschev R., Bogdanova, S. (1993) Frontiers in the Baltic Shield. Precambrian Res. 64, 3-21

  8. Ultramafic Terranes and Associated Springs as Analogs for Mars and Early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David; Schulte, Mitch; Cullings, Ken; DeVincezi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Putative extinct or extant Martian organisms, like their terrestrial counterparts, must adopt metabolic strategies based on the environments in which they live. In order for organisms to derive metabolic energy from the natural environment (Martian or terrestrial), a state of thermodynamic disequilibrium must exist. The most widespread environment of chemical disequilibrium on present-day Earth results from the interaction of mafic rocks of the ocean crust with liquid water. Such environments were even more pervasive and important on the Archean Earth due to increased geothermal heat flow and the absence of widespread continental crust formation. The composition of the lower crust and upper mantle of the Earth is essentially the-same as that of Mars, and the early histories of these two planets are similar. It follows that a knowledge of the mineralogy, water-rock chemistry and microbial ecology of Earth's oceanic crust could be of great value in devising a search strategy for evidence of past or present life on Mars. In some tectonic regimes, cross-sections of lower oceanic crust and upper mantle are exposed on land as so-called "ophiolite suites." Such is the case in the state of California (USA) as a result of its location adjacent to active plate margins. These mafic and ultramafic rocks contain numerous springs that offer an easily accessible field laboratory for studying water/rock interactions and the microbial communities that are supported by the resulting geochemical energy. A preliminary screen of Archaean biodiversity was conducted in a cold spring located in a presently serpentinizing ultramafic terrane. PCR and phylogenetic analysis of partial 16s rRNA, sequences were performed on water and sediment samples. Archaea of recent phylogenetic origin were detected with sequences nearly identical to those of organisms living in ultra-high pH lakes of Africa.

  9. Sulfate-Reducing Prokaryotes from North Sea Oil reservoirs; organisms, distribution and origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeder, Janiche

    1996-12-31

    During oil production in the North Sea, anaerobic seawater is pumped in which stimulates the growth of sulphate-reducing prokaryotes that produce hydrogen sulphide. This sulphide causes major health hazards, economical and operational problems. As told in this thesis, several strains of sulphate reducers have been isolated from North Sea oil field waters. Antibodies have been produced against these strains and used to investigate the distribution of sulphate reducers in a North Sea oil reservoir. The result showed a high diversity among sulphate reducers, with different strains belonging to different parts of the reservoir. Some of these strains have been further characterized. The physiological and phylogenetic characterization showed that strain 7324 was an archaean. Strain A8444 was a bacterium, representing a new species of a new genus. A benzoate degrading sulphate reducing bacterium was isolated from injection water, and later the same strain was detected in produced water. This is the first field observations indicating that sulphate reducers are able to penetrate an oil reservoir. It was found that the oil reservoir contains a diverse population of thermophilic sulphate reducers able to grow on carbon sources in the oil reservoir, and to live and grow in this extreme environment of high temperature and pressure. The mesophilic sulphate reducers are established in the injection water system and in the reservoir near the injection well during oil production. The thermophilic sulphate reducers are able to grow in the reservoir prior to, as well as during production. It appears that the oil reservoir is a natural habitat for thermophilic sulphate reducers and that they have been present in the reservoir long before production started. 322 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs.

  10. Effects of differentiation on the geodynamics of the early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolo, Andrea; Kaus, Boris; White, Richard; Johnson, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Archean geodynamic processes are not well understood, but there is general agreement that the mantle potential temperature was higher than present, and that as a consequence significant amounts of melt were produced both in the mantle and any overlying crust. This has likely resulted in crustal differentiation. An early attempt to model the geodynamic effects of differentiation was made by Johnson et al. (2014), who used numerical modeling to investigate the crust production and recycling in conjunction with representative phase diagrams (based on the inferred chemical composition of the primary melt in accordance with the Archean temperature field). The results of the simulations show that the base of the over-thickened primary basaltic crust becomes gravitational unstable due to the mineral assemblage changes. This instability leads to the dripping of dense material into the mantle, which causes an asthenospheric return flow, local partial melting and new primary crust generation that is rapidly recycled in to mantle. Whereas they gave important insights, the previous simulations were simplified in a number of aspects: 1) the rheology employed was viscous, and both elasticity and pressure-dependent plasticity were not considered; 2) extracted mantle melts were 100% transformed into volcanic rocks, whereas on the present day Earth only about 20-30% are volcanic and the remainder is plutonic; 3) the effect of a free surface was not studied in a systematic manner. In order to better understand how these simplifications affect the geodynamic models, we here present additional simulations to study the effects of each of these parameters. Johnson, T.E., Brown, M., Kaus, B., and VanTongeren, J.A., 2014, Delamination and recycling of Archaean crust caused by gravitational instabilities: Nature Geoscience, v. 7, no. 1, p. 47-52, doi: 10.1038/NGEO2019.

  11. 湖北某地石英-正长岩中的铁硅钛铈矿

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张如柏; 范良明

    1976-01-01

    Iron ehevkinite reported in this paper was discovered in a quartz syenite, which had intruded into Archaean marble, from a certain district in Hubei Province. It occurs as globular masses whose maximum weight can be as great as 1 kg. Iron ehevkinite has a black or pitch blaee color, with subconchoidal fracture. Specific gravity is 4.53±0.05. Microhardness 466.33-583.80kg/mm2. Refractive index 2.02.It is metamiet, and the conversion temperature from metamiet state to erystallinity is 825℃. Chemical analyses give the following formula: (TR1/47Fe0.0952+Th0.09Ca0.31U0.009Na0.11K0.01 Mn0.001)2.94(Ti1.44Fe0.573+Ta0.009Nb0.01)2.029(Si1.94Al0.06)2[O10.92(OH)1.05]12. It's chemical composition is characterized by a higher iron content (FeO+Fe2O3=17.58) in comparison with that in normal ehevkinite. Rare earth eontents, except for Ce, are also high, notably neodymium and lanthanum. The oxidation of Fe2+ in iron chevkinite is caused by the water that had been subjected to irradiation and then found its way through fine cracks into the mineral The change in ionic radii involved in the oxidation of iron may be responsible for the metamietization of the mineral This interpretation accounts also for the eonstant association of a certain amount of water with metamiet minerals.

  12. 气激发极化法在河北杨树沟银多金属矿的找矿应用%The results of the application of induced polarization method in Yangshugou silver-polymetal mining area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑宗来; 高启凤; 康利祥; 唐谷清

    2012-01-01

    Work area is located in Cao mill on the west side of the outer contact zone of granite in the body .the layer of the Archaean dantazi group, mainly for a syncline,a north east direction. The metallogenic hydrothermal activity, tectonic belt, fracture development in this area, ore controlling role. Geophysical prospecting work primarily in the IP intermediate gradient scanning and Wenner sounding, wherein the IP intermediate gradient scanning delineated the tectonic location, Wenner sounding accurate determination of mineralized body space forms. The combination of the two methods in the area to identify the distribution regularity of ore controlling structure,purpose,to achieve the best geological exploration results.%工作区位于曹碾沟花岗岩体西侧外接触带,区内地层为太古界单塔子群,主要为一向斜构造,呈北东向展布.该区成矿热液活动频繁,构造带、裂隙带发育,对本区成矿控矿作用显著.物探工作主要投入了激电中梯扫面和温纳测深工作,其中激电中梯扫面圈定了构造带的位置,温纳测深准确测定了矿化体的空间赋存形态.这两种方法相结合在该区达到了查明矿体分布规律、控矿构造的目的,取得最佳的地质勘查效果.

  13. Stochastic developmental variation, an epigenetic source of phenotypic diversity with far-reaching biological consequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Günter Vogt

    2015-03-01

    This article reviews the production of different phenotypes from the same genotype in the same environment by stochastic cellular events, nonlinear mechanisms during patterning and morphogenesis, and probabilistic self-reinforcing circuitries in the adult life. These aspects of phenotypic variation are summarized under the term‘stochastic developmental variation’ (SDV) in the following. In the past, SDV has been viewed primarily as a nuisance, impairing laboratory experiments, pharmaceutical testing, and true-to-type breeding. This article also emphasizes the positive biological effects of SDV and discusses implications for genotype-to-phenotype mapping, biological individuation, ecology, evolution, and applied biology. There is strong evidence from experiments with genetically identical organisms performed in narrowly standardized laboratory set-ups that SDV is a source of phenotypic variation in its own right aside from genetic variation and environmental variation. It is obviouslymediated bymolecular and higher-order epigeneticmechanisms. Comparison of SDV in animals, plants, fungi, protists, bacteria, archaeans, and viruses suggests that it is a ubiquitous and phylogenetically old phenomenon. In animals, it is usually smallest for morphometric traits and highest for life history traits and behaviour. SDV is thought to contribute to phenotypic diversity in all populations but is particularly relevant for asexually reproducing and genetically impoverished populations, where it generates individuality despite genetic uniformity. In each generation, SDV produces a range of phenotypes around a well-adapted target phenotype, which is interpreted as a bet-hedging strategy to cope with the unpredictability of dynamic environments. At least some manifestations of SDV are heritable, adaptable, selectable, and evolvable, and therefore, SDV may be seen as a hitherto overlooked evolution factor. SDV is also relevant for husbandry, agriculture, and medicine because most

  14. Geochemistry of PGE in mafic rocks of east Khasi Hills, Shillong Plateau, NE India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sampa Hazra; Jyotisankar Ray; C Manikyamba; Abhishek Saha; S S Sawant

    2015-03-01

    The mafic rocks of east Khasi Hills of the Meghalaya Plateau, northeastern India, occur as an intrusive body which cut across the weakly metamorphosed Shillong Group of rocks. Other than Shillong Group of rocks, high grade Archaean gneissic rocks and younger porphyritic granites are also observed in the study area. The studied mafic rocks of east Khasi Hills cover an area of about 4 km2 and represent structurally controlled intrusion and varying grades of deformation. Structurally, these mafic rocks can be divided into massive type of mafic rocks, which are more or less deformation free and foliated type of mafic rocks that experienced deformation. Petrographically, this massive type can be classified as leuco-hornblende-gabbro whereas foliated type can be designated as amphibolite. On the basis of major oxide geochemistry, the investigated mafic rocks can be discriminated into high titanium (HT) (TiO2 > 2 wt%) and low titanium (LT) types (TiO2 < 2 wt%). Use of several geochemical variation diagrams, consideration of chondrite-normalized and mantle-normalized REE and PGE plots suggest role of magmatic differentiation (with almost no role of plagioclase fractionation) in a subduction controlled tectonic environment. The PGE trends of the studied rocks suggest relative enrichment of palladium group of PGE (PPGE) compared to iridium group PGE (IPGE). Critical consideration of Sm vs. La, Cu vs. La, Pd vs. La and Cu/Pd vs. La/Sm plots strongly favours generation of the parent magma at a columnar melting regime with batch melting of cylindrical column of the parent mantle to the tune of ∼25%. The characteristic PGE behaviours of the presently investigated mafic rocks of east Khasi Hills can be typically corroborated as `orogenic' (discordant) type. These rocks have an enriched mantle affinity with a co-magmatic lineage and they have been generated by slab-dehydration, wedge-melting and assimilation fractional crystallization process at a continental margin arc setting.

  15. U-Pb (LA-PIMMS) Ages of Inherited Zircons from Early Palaeozoic Granitoids of the W Sudetes, N Bohemian Massif, Central Europe: Implications for Neoproterozoic Continental Reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Q. G.; Patocka, F.; Kachlík, V.

    2003-04-01

    A U-Pb laser ablation plasma ionisation multi-collector mass spectrometry (LA-PIMMS) geochronological study of zircons from early Palaeozoic (meta)granitoids of the Czech W Sudetes (E Saxothuringian Zone), NW Bohemian Massif, was carried out in order to determine the range of inherited age spectra preserved in these lithologies. Backscattered SEM images indicate that many zircons have distinct cores and rims. The majority of inherited zircon components yield concordant U-Pb ages that fall into the following age ranges: (1) 520-770 Ma, (2) 1.9-2.2 Ga and (3) ca. 3.0 Ga. These three age populations are typical of the W African Craton and the Armorican Terrane Assemblage of Europe. The age spectra correspond to Cadomian, Birimian / Icartian / Eburnean / Burkinian and Leonian events respectively. Some previous Pb-Pb zircon and whole rock Nd studies of similar lithologies from the W Sudetes (e.g. Hegner &Kröner, 2000) have attributed the presence of Mesoproterozoic 207Pb/206Pb ages to a peri-Amazonian provenance. Although some zircons from this study have yielded apparent Mesoproterozoic ages, they are discordant and can be resolved into early Palaeozoic to Neoproterozoic lower intercept and Palaeoproterozoic to Archaean upper intercept components. This unequivocally proves that an inherited Grenvillian component does not exist in these lithologies. We therefore favour derivation of the Saxothuringian zone and associated members of the Armorican Terrane Assemblage from a W African Craton Gondwanan setting. References: Hegner, E, &Kröner, A. 2000. Review of Nd data and xenocrystic and detrital ages from the pre-Variscan basement in the Eastern Bohemian Massif: speculations on palinspastic reconstructions. In: Franke, W., Altherr, R., Haak, V. &Oncken, O. (eds.), Orogenic Processes: Quantification and Modelling in the Variscan Belt of Central Europe Geological Society of London Special Publication, 179, 113-129.

  16. Metatranscriptomic analysis of a high-sulfide aquatic spring reveals insights into sulfur cycling and unexpected aerobic metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Spain

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Zodletone spring is a sulfide-rich spring in southwestern Oklahoma characterized by shallow, microoxic, light-exposed spring water overlaying anoxic sediments. Previously, culture-independent 16S rRNA gene based diversity surveys have revealed that Zodletone spring source sediments harbor a highly diverse microbial community, with multiple lineages putatively involved in various sulfur-cycling processes. Here, we conducted a metatranscriptomic survey of microbial populations in Zodletone spring source sediments to characterize the relative prevalence and importance of putative phototrophic, chemolithotrophic, and heterotrophic microorganisms in the sulfur cycle, the identity of lineages actively involved in various sulfur cycling processes, and the interaction between sulfur cycling and other geochemical processes at the spring source. Sediment samples at the spring’s source were taken at three different times within a 24-h period for geochemical analyses and RNA sequencing. In depth mining of datasets for sulfur cycling transcripts revealed major sulfur cycling pathways and taxa involved, including an unexpected potential role of Actinobacteria in sulfide oxidation and thiosulfate transformation. Surprisingly, transcripts coding for the cyanobacterial Photosystem II D1 protein, methane monooxygenase, and terminal cytochrome oxidases were encountered, indicating that genes for oxygen production and aerobic modes of metabolism are actively being transcribed, despite below-detectable levels (<1 µM of oxygen in source sediment. Results highlight transcripts involved in sulfur, methane, and oxygen cycles, propose that oxygenic photosynthesis could support aerobic methane and sulfide oxidation in anoxic sediments exposed to sunlight, and provide a viewpoint of microbial metabolic lifestyles under conditions similar to those seen during late Archaean and Proterozoic eons.

  17. Evidences of inclined transpression at the contact between Vinjamuru group and Udayagiri group of Nellore Schist Belt, Andhra Pradesh, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sankha; Shukla, Devasheesh; Mitra, S. K.

    2016-07-01

    The Nellore Schist Belt (NSB) is a curvilinear Archaean schist belt, approximately 350 km long and 8-50 km wide. The Nellore Schist Belt is considered to be Neoarchean in age and stratigraphically NSB is classified as the western Udayagiri group (dominated by metasediments) and underlying eastern Vinjamuru group (dominated by metabasalts). There is a long controversy regarding the contact relationship between Udayagiri and Vinjamuru groups. Earlier researchers regarded the contact between two groups as tectonic on the basis of metamorphism. A shear zone and a possible thrust contact between the two groups have also been reported. On the basis of present study, an NNW-SSE trending, westerly dipping inclined transpressional zone is found at the contact between Udayagiri and Vinjamuru groups in the central western part of the NSB. Kinematic analysis of both the hanging wall and foot wall of the westerly dipping thrust zone shows presence of strong S1 schistosity, shear bands and S-C fabric in both strike and dip section along with east-verging overturned fold, westerly dipping inverted beds, suggesting partitioning of non-coaxial deformation in strike-slip and dip-slip component along with a pure shear component. Strike-slip is more prominent in the northern part of the contact than the southern part. The presence of steep to moderate northerly plunging non-orthogonal stretching/mineral elongation lineation all along the contact and clockwise shift of plot of the same in stereo net from its orthogonal position and presence of other kinematic indicators in plan suggests a right lateral strike-slip component. As a whole, it is suggested that Udayagiri group is thrusted over Vinjamuru group along a westerly dipping thrust plane with a right lateral strike-slip motion and simultaneous E-W contraction.

  18. Metatranscriptomic analysis of a high-sulfide aquatic spring reveals insights into sulfur cycling and unexpected aerobic metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshahed, Mostafa S.; Najar, Fares Z.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2015-01-01

    Zodletone spring is a sulfide-rich spring in southwestern Oklahoma characterized by shallow, microoxic, light-exposed spring water overlaying anoxic sediments. Previously, culture-independent 16S rRNA gene based diversity surveys have revealed that Zodletone spring source sediments harbor a highly diverse microbial community, with multiple lineages putatively involved in various sulfur-cycling processes. Here, we conducted a metatranscriptomic survey of microbial populations in Zodletone spring source sediments to characterize the relative prevalence and importance of putative phototrophic, chemolithotrophic, and heterotrophic microorganisms in the sulfur cycle, the identity of lineages actively involved in various sulfur cycling processes, and the interaction between sulfur cycling and other geochemical processes at the spring source. Sediment samples at the spring’s source were taken at three different times within a 24-h period for geochemical analyses and RNA sequencing. In depth mining of datasets for sulfur cycling transcripts revealed major sulfur cycling pathways and taxa involved, including an unexpected potential role of Actinobacteria in sulfide oxidation and thiosulfate transformation. Surprisingly, transcripts coding for the cyanobacterial Photosystem II D1 protein, methane monooxygenase, and terminal cytochrome oxidases were encountered, indicating that genes for oxygen production and aerobic modes of metabolism are actively being transcribed, despite below-detectable levels (oxygen in source sediment. Results highlight transcripts involved in sulfur, methane, and oxygen cycles, propose that oxygenic photosynthesis could support aerobic methane and sulfide oxidation in anoxic sediments exposed to sunlight, and provide a viewpoint of microbial metabolic lifestyles under conditions similar to those seen during late Archaean and Proterozoic eons. PMID:26417542

  19. Acritarchs in carbonaceous meteorites and terrestrial rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanov, Alexei Y.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2013-10-01

    Acritarchs are a group of organic-walled, acid-resistant microfossils of uncertain or unknown origin. Some are thought to represent the cysts or resting stages of unicellular protists (possibly dinoflagellates), chrysophytes (green algae) or other planktonic eukaryotic algae. Acritarchs are found throughout the geologic column extending back as far at 3.2 Ga. The presence of large sphaeromorphs in the Archaean provides evidence that the eukaryotic lineage extends much farther back in time than previously thought possible. Acritarchs are abundant in the Paleoproterozoic shales (1.9-1.6 Ga) of the former Soviet Union and they have been extensively used for the investigation of Proterozoic and Paleozoic biostratigraphy and paleoenvironmental parameters. Scanning Electron Microscope studies have revealed the fossilized remains of organic-walled microfossils of unknown origin and exhibiting characteristics of acritarchs in a variety of carbonaceous meteorites. In many cases, these remains are black or brown in color and have Carbon/Oxygen ratios suggesting they have been diagenetically converted into kerogen. It is not feasible that the fossilized remains of organicwalled microfossils such as acritarchs represent biological contaminant that invaded and became embedded in the rock matrix of carbonaceous meteorites within the short time periods of their residence on Earth. Consequently, these groups of microfossils are considered to provide an additional line for the existence of indigenous extraterrestrial microbial remains in meteorites. This paper presents a brief review of acritarchs in terrestrial rocks and provides images of a number of similar morphotypes of uncertain origin found in freshly fractured samples of carbonaceous meteorites.

  20. Qinling Orogenic Belt: Its Palaeozoic- Mesozoic Evolution and Metallogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The formation, development and evolution of the Qinling orogenic belt can be divided into three stages: (1) formation and development of Precambrian basement in the Late Archaean- Palaeoproterozoic (3.0- 1.6 Ga), (2) plate evolution (0.8- 0.2 Ga), and (3) intracontinental orogeny and tectonic evolution in the Mesozoic. The Devonian (D) and Triassic (T) were the key transition period of the tectonic evolution of the Qinling orogenic belt. That is to say, in the Devonian, the Qinling micro-plate was separated from the northern margin of the Yangtze plate (passive continental margin). This period witnessed transition of the micro-plate from the compressional to extensional state, and consequently three types of sedimentary basins were formed, namely, the rift hydrothermal basin in the micro-plate, restricted ocean basin in the south, and residual ocean basin resulting from collision on the northern margin. In the Triassic the Qinling area was turned into the intracontinental orogen.The Devonian and Triassic were the main periods of enrichment of large amounts of metals. In the Devonian, many sedex-type massive Pb-Zn- (Cu)-Ag deposits were formed in the hydrothermal basins. In the Triassic (Indosinian-Yanshanian movements), many sediment-hosted disseminated gold deposits and reworked sedimentary type Pb-Zn-Hg-Sb (Au) deposits were formed in the rift hydrothermal basins. Many ductile shear zone-related gold deposits were formed in the restricted ocean basins and residual ocean basins on the two sides of the Qinling micro-plate. The above-mentioned discussion indicates that metallogenesis is not only consistent with geological events, but also controlled by them.

  1. Re-using terrane boundaries in supercontinent cycles -evaluating an Indo-Antarctica contact in Rodinia and Gondwanaland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, A. D.; Gupta, S.; Mohanty, W. K.

    2015-12-01

    The Eastern Ghats Province (EGP) of India is a granulite belt that was continuous with the Rayner Province in East Antarctica in the supercontinent Rodinia. An E-W trending lineament, now known to be a strike-slip shear zone, separates the EGP from the Archaean Indian craton to the north which is characterised by penetrative 2.8 Ga granulite foliation. In contrast, the penetrative granulite foliation in the EGP is 1.0 Ga in age; in places along the contact zone, both granulite foliations are overprinted by a greenschist facies mylonitic fabric related to a later dextral strike-slip motion along the lineament. Identification of a sub-surface, sub-vertical structural discontinuity along the lineament through field gravity-magnetic studies further confirms that craton-mobile belt boundary continues in the sub-surface. The northern side of the lineament shows no overprint of the 1 Ga fabric on the 2.8 Ga fabric, implying that the presently juxtaposed 2.8 Ga and 1 Ga terranes in the Indian shield may not have been juxtaposed during the 1 Ga event. Kinematic analysis of the contact shear zone by using strain gradients across the width of the domain, confirms that a dominantly strike-slip deformation brought the terranes together. 40Ar-39Ar ages of ~490-470 Ma have been reported from deformed micas within the shear zone, and this is suggested to correspond to the age of this mobilization. This lineament can be traced into the Rauer Group in East Antarctica that separates similarly aged domains, suggesting that it represents a site preferred for terrane amalgamation during assembly of temporally disparate supercontinents. Whether the lineament developed during the last dextral strike-slip movement or it is a reactivated 1.0 Ga, 2.8 Ga or even older discontinuity, remains unclear.

  2. Assessing the utility of trace and rare earth elements as biosignatures in microbial iron oxyhydroxides

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    Christine eHeim

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbial iron oxyhydroxides are common deposits in natural waters, recent sediments and mine drainage systems and often contain significant accumulations of trace and rare earth elements (TREE. TREE patterns are widely used to characterize minerals and rocks, and to elucidate their evolution and origin. Whether and which characteristic TREE signatures distinguish between a biological and an abiological origin of iron minerals is still not well understood. Long-term flow reactor studies were performed in the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory to investigate the development of microbial mats dominated by iron-oxidizing bacteria, namely Mariprofundus sp. and Gallionella sp. The experiments investigated the accumulation and fractionation of TREE under controlled conditions and enabled us to assess potential biosignatures evolving within the microbial iron oxyhydroxides. Concentrations of Be, Y, Zn, Zr, Hf, W, Th, Pb, and U in the microbial mats were 1e3- to 1e5-fold higher than in the feeder fluids whereas the rare earth elements and Y (REE+Y contents were 1e4 and 1e6 fold enriched. Except for a hydrothermally induced Eu anomaly, the normalized REE+Y patterns of the microbial iron oxyhydroxides were very similar to published REE+Y distributions of Archaean Banded Iron Formations. The microbial iron oxyhydroxides from the flow reactors were compared to iron oxyhydroxides that were artificially precipitated from the same feeder fluid. These abiotic and inorganic iron oxyhydroxides show the same REE+Y distribution patterns. Our results indicate that the REE+Y mirror quite exactly the water chemistry, but they do not allow to distinguish microbially mediated from inorganic iron precipitates. All TREE studied showed an overall similar fractionation behavior in biogenic, abiotic and inorganic iron oxyhydroxides. Exceptions are Ni and Tl, which were only accumulated in the microbial iron oxyhydroxides and may point to a potential usage of these elements as

  3. Precambrian crustal evolution and Cretaceous–Palaeogene faulting in West Greenland: Origin and evolution of the Kangâmiut mafic dyke swarm, West Greenland

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    Lesher, Charkes E.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The Kangâmiut dyke swarm in West Greenland intruded Archaean terrains at 2.04 Ga, and its northern portion was subsequently metamorphosed to granulite facies during the Nagssugtoqidian orogeny(c. 1.8 Ga. Mineral and whole-rock major and trace element compositions show that the parental magmas for the dyke swarm differentiated by the fractionation of olivine, clinopyroxene, plagioclase and late stage Fe-Ti oxides. Petrographical observations and the enrichment of K2O during differentiation argue that hornblende was not an important fractionating phase. Field observations suggest emplacement at crustal levels above the brittle–ductile transition, and clinopyroxene geothermobarometry constrains dyke emplacement depths to less than 10 km. Granulite facies metamorphism of the Kangâmiut dykes and their host rocks in the northern portion of the swarm requires subsequent burial to c. 30 km, related to roughly 20 km of crustal thickening between the time of dyke emplacement and peak metamorphism during the Nagssugtoqidian orogeny. Kangâmiut dykes are characterised by low Ba/La ratios (12 ±5, and high Nb/La ratios (0.8 ±0.2, compared to subduction relatedbasalts (Ba/La c. 25; Nb/La c. 0.35. These geochemical characteristics argue that the Kangâmiut dykes are not related to subduction processes. Forward modelling of rare-earth element data requires that primitive magmas for the Kangâmiut dykes originated from a moderately depleted mantle source with a mantle potential temperature of c. 1420°C. The inferred potential temperature is consistent with potential temperature estimates for ambient mantle at 2.0 Ga derived from secular cooling models and continental freeboard constraints. The geochemistry and petrology of the Kangâmiut dykes support a model that relates the dyke activity to passive rifting of the proposed Kenorland supercontinent rather than to mantle plume activity or subduction.

  4. Thermobarometric studies on the Levack Gneisses: Footwall rocks to the Sudbury Igneous Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, R. S.; Peredery, W.; Sweeny, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Granulite and amphibolite facies gneisses and migmatites of the Levack Gneiss Complex occupy a zone up to 8 km wide around the northern part of the Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC). Orthopyroxene- and garnet-bearing tonalitic and semipelitic assemblages of granulite facies grade occur within 3 km of the SIC together with lenses of mafic and pyroxenitic rock compositions normally represented by an amphibole +/- cpx-rich assemblage; amphibolite facies assemblages dominate elsewhere in this terrain. These 2.711-Ga gneisses were introduced by (1) the Cartier Granite Batholith during late Archaean to early Proterozoic time and (2) the SIC, at 1.85 Ga, which produced a contact aureole 1-1.5 km wide in which pyroxene hornfelses are common within 200-300 m of the contact. A suite of 12 samples including both the opx-gt and amphibole-rich rock compositions have been studied. Garnets in the semipelitic gneisses are variably replaced by a plg-bio assemblage. Thermobarometric calculations using a variety of barometers and thermometers reported in the literature suggest that the granulite facies assemblages formed at depths in the 21-28 km range (6-8 kbar). Textures and mineral chemistry in the garnet-bearing semipelitic rocks indicate that this terrain underwent a second metamorphic event during uplift to depth in the 5-11 km range (2-3 kbar) and at temperatures as low as 500-550 C. This latter event is distinct from thermal recrystallization caused by the emplacement of the SIC; it probably represents metamorphism attributable to intrusion of the Cartier Granite Batholith. These data allow two interpretations for the crustal uplift of the Levack Gneisses: (1) The gneisses were tectonically uplifted prior to the Sudbury Event (due to intrusion of the Cartier Batholith); or (2) the gneisses were raised to epizonal levels as a result of meteorite impact at 1.85 Ga.

  5. Computation of groundwater resources and recharge in Chithar River Basin, South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, T; Babu, Savithri; Elango, L

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater recharge and available groundwater resources in Chithar River basin, Tamil Nadu, India spread over an area of 1,722 km(2) have been estimated by considering various hydrological, geological, and hydrogeological parameters, such as rainfall infiltration, drainage, geomorphic units, land use, rock types, depth of weathered and fractured zones, nature of soil, water level fluctuation, saturated thickness of aquifer, and groundwater abstraction. The digital ground elevation models indicate that the regional slope of the basin is towards east. The Proterozoic (Post-Archaean) basement of the study area consists of quartzite, calc-granulite, crystalline limestone, charnockite, and biotite gneiss with or without garnet. Three major soil types were identified namely, black cotton, deep red, and red sandy soils. The rainfall intensity gradually decreases from west to east. Groundwater occurs under water table conditions in the weathered zone and fluctuates between 0 and 25 m. The water table gains maximum during January after northeast monsoon and attains low during October. Groundwater abstraction for domestic/stock and irrigational needs in Chithar River basin has been estimated as 148.84 MCM (million m(3)). Groundwater recharge due to monsoon rainfall infiltration has been estimated as 170.05 MCM based on the water level rise during monsoon period. It is also estimated as 173.9 MCM using rainfall infiltration factor. An amount of 53.8 MCM of water is contributed to groundwater from surface water bodies. Recharge of groundwater due to return flow from irrigation has been computed as 147.6 MCM. The static groundwater reserve in Chithar River basin is estimated as 466.66 MCM and the dynamic reserve is about 187.7 MCM. In the present scenario, the aquifer is under safe condition for extraction of groundwater for domestic and irrigation purposes. If the existing water bodies are maintained properly, the extraction rate can be increased in future about 10% to 15%.

  6. Age, provenance and tectonic setting of the high-grade Jequitinhonha Complex, Araçuaí Orogen, eastern Brazil

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    Tatiana Gonçalves Dias

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The Jequitinhonha Complex of the northeastern Araçuaí orogen is an extensive sedimentary unit metamorphosed in the amphibolite-granulite facies transition around 580-545 Ma. The unit consists of Al-rich (kinzigitic paragneisses with decametric intercalations of graphite gneisses and quartzites, and centimetric to metric lenses of calcsilicate rocks. A new detrital zircon U-Pb age spectrum is reported for a sample of quartzite, and whole-rock geochemical (major and trace elements, 9 samples and Sm-Nd isotope data (10 samples for Jequitinhonha Complex paragneiss. Together with published data these show that: (1 the geochemistry of paragneiss samples of the Jequitinhonha Complex are similar to those of passive margin sedimentary protoliths; (2 detrital zircon data yield U-Pb age populations between ca. 0.9 and 2.5 Ga; and (3 Sm-Nd TDM model ages range from 1.6 to 1.8 Ga and εNd(575 Ma around -7.5. The data reveal a mixture of Cryogenian to Mesoproterozoic rift-related igneous rocks with the Palaeoproterozoic-Archaean basement rocks of the São Francisco-Congo palaeocontinent as the main source areas, and also support the correlation between the Jequitinhonha Complex and the passive margin units of the upper Macaúbas Group, constituting the precursor basin of the orogen. Our results, with the absence of ophiolites in the Jequitinhonha Complex, reinforce the interpretation that the São Francisco-Congo palaeocontinent was not divided to the north of the focused region, suggesting an ensialic termination of a gulf during the Neoproterozoic.

  7. The geology and petrogenesis of the southern closepet granite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayananda, M.; Mahabaleswar, B.; Oak, K. A.; Friend, C. R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The Archaean Closepet Granite is a polyphase body intruding the Peninsular Gneiss Complex and the associated supracrustal rocks. The granite out-crop runs for nearly 500 km with an approximate width of 20 to 25 km and cut across the regional metamorphic structure passing from granulite facies in the South and green schist facies in the north. In the amphibolite-granulite facies transition zone the granite is intimately mixed with migmatites and charnockite. Field observations suggests that anatexis of Peninsular gneisses led to the formation of granite melt, and there is a space relationship between migmatite formation, charnockite development and production and emplacement of granite magma. Based on texture and cross cutting relationships four major granite phases are recognized: (1) Pyroxene bearing dark grey granite; (2) Porphyritec granite; (3) Equigranular grey granite; and (4) Equigranular pink granite. The granite is medium to coarse grained and exhibit hypidiomorphic granular to porphyritic texture. The modal composition varies from granite granodiorite to quartz monzonite. Geochemical variation of the granite suite is consistent with either fractional crystallization or partial melting, but in both the cases biotite plus feldspar must be involved as fractionating or residual phases during melting to account trace element chemistry. The trace element data has been plotted on discriminant diagrams, where majority of samples plot in volcanic arc and within plate, tectonic environments. The granite show distinct REE patterns with variable total REE content. The REE patterns and overall abundances suggests that the granite suite represents a product of partial melting of crustal source in which fractional crystallization operated in a limited number of cases.

  8. Biogenicity of an Early Quaternary iron formation, Milos Island, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi Fru, E; Ivarsson, M; Kilias, S P; Frings, P J; Hemmingsson, C; Broman, C; Bengtson, S; Chatzitheodoridis, E

    2015-05-01

    A ~2.0-million-year-old shallow-submarine sedimentary deposit on Milos Island, Greece, harbours an unmetamorphosed fossiliferous iron formation (IF) comparable to Precambrian banded iron formations (BIFs). This Milos IF holds the potential to provide clues to the origin of Precambrian BIFs, relative to biotic and abiotic processes. Here, we combine field stratigraphic observations, stable isotopes of C, S and Si, rock petrography and microfossil evidence from a ~5-m-thick outcrop to track potential biogeochemical processes that may have contributed to the formation of the BIF-type rocks and the abrupt transition to an overlying conglomerate-hosted IF (CIF). Bulk δ(13) C isotopic compositions lower than -25‰ provide evidence for biological contribution by the Calvin and reductive acetyl-CoA carbon fixation cycles to the origin of both the BIF-type and CIF strata. Low S levels of ~0.04 wt.% combined with δ(34) S estimates of up to ~18‰ point to a non-sulphidic depository. Positive δ(30) Si records of up to +0.53‰ in the finely laminated BIF-type rocks indicate chemical deposition on the seafloor during weak periods of arc magmatism. Negative δ(30) Si data are consistent with geological observations suggesting a sudden change to intense arc volcanism potentially terminated the deposition of the BIF-type layer. The typical Precambrian rhythmic rocks of alternating Fe- and Si-rich bands are associated with abundant and spatially distinct microbial fossil assemblages. Together with previously proposed anoxygenic photoferrotrophic iron cycling and low sedimentary N and C potentially connected to diagenetic denitrification, the Milos IF is a biogenic submarine volcano-sedimentary IF showing depositional conditions analogous to Archaean Algoma-type BIFs.

  9. Age constraints on felsic intrusions, metamorphism and gold mineralisation in the Palaeoproterozoic Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt, NE Bahia State, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, E.F.; Xavier, R.P.; McNaughton, N.J.; Hagemann, S.G.; Fletcher, I.; Snee, L.

    2006-01-01

    U-Pb sensitive high resolution ion microprobe mass spectrometer (SHRIMP) ages of zircon, monazite and xenotime crystals from felsic intrusive rocks from the Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt show two development stages between 2,152 and 2,130 Ma, and between 2,130 and 2,080 Ma. The older intrusions yielded ages of 2,152??6 Ma in monazite crystals and 2,155??9 Ma in zircon crystals derived from the Trilhado granodiorite, and ages of 2,130??7 Ma and 2,128??8 Ma in zircon crystals derived from the Teofila??ndia tonalite. The emplacement age of the syntectonic Ambro??sio dome as indicated by a 2,080??2-Ma xenotime age for a granite dyke probably marks the end of the felsic magmatism. This age shows good agreement with the Ar-Ar plateau age of 2,080??5 Ma obtained in hornblendes from an amphibolite and with a U-Pb SHRIMP age of 2,076??10 Ma in detrital zircon crystals from a quartzite, interpreted as the age of the peak of the metamorphism. The predominance of inherited zircons in the syntectonic Ambro??sio dome suggests that the basement of the supracrustal rocks was composed of Archaean continental crust with components of 2,937??16, 3,111??13 and 3,162??13 Ma. Ar-Ar plateau ages of 2,050??4 Ma and 2,054??2 Ma on hydrothermal muscovite samples from the Fazenda Brasileiro gold deposit are interpreted as minimum ages for gold mineralisation and close to the true age of gold deposition. The Ar-Ar data indicate that the mineralisation must have occurred less than 30 million years after the peak of the metamorphism, or episodically between 2,080 Ma and 2,050 Ma, during uplift and exhumation of the orogen. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  10. Precambrian crustal evolution and Cretaceous–Palaeogene faulting in West Greenland: 207Pb-206Pb dating of magnetite, monazite and allanite in the central and northern Nagssugtoqidian orogen, West Greenland

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    Frei, Robert

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Pb-isotopic data for magnetite from amphibolites in the Nagssugtoqidian orogen, central West Greenland, have been used to trace their source characteristics and the timing of metamorphism. Analyses of the magnetite define a Pb-Pb isochron age of 1726 ± 7 Ma. The magnetite is metamorphic in origin, and the 1726 Ma age is interpreted as a cooling age through the closing temperature of magnetite at ~600°C. Some of the amphibolites in this study come from the Naternaq supracrustal rocks in the northern Nagssugtoqidian orogen, which host the Naternaq sulphide deposit and may be part ofthe Nordre Strømfjord supracrustal suite, which was deposited at around 1950 Ma ago.Pb-isotopic signatures of magnetite from the Arfersiorfik quartz diorite in the central Nagssugtoqidian orogen are compatible with published whole-rock Pb-isotopic data from this suite; previous work has shown that it is a product of subduction-related calc-alkaline magmatism between 1920 and 1870 Ma. Intrusion of pegmatites occurred at around 1800 Ma in both the central and the northernparts of the orogen. Pegmatite ages have been determined by Pb stepwise leaching analyses of allanite and monazite, and source characteristics of Pb point to an origin of the pegmatites by melting of the surrounding late Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic country rocks. Hydrothermal activity took place after pegmatite emplacement and continued below the closure temperature of magnetite at 1800–1650 Ma. Because of the relatively inert and refractory nature of magnetite, Pb-isotopic measurements from this mineral may be of help to understand the metamorphic evolution of geologicallycomplex terrains.

  11. Natural Seismicity in NW Australia: Another Look at Continental Intraplate Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revets, S. A.; Keep, M.; Kennett, B. L.

    2007-12-01

    Northwestern Australia hosts a considerable number of smaller seismic events, but also Australia's largest earthquake on record (Meeberrie, 1941, M7.9). In 2005 we deployed a small network of seismometers to record natural seismicity in the region, to understand the amount, magnitude, nature and distribution of these events, and to interpret these events within a tectonic and neotectonic context. The region is largely underlain by Precambrian material, ranging from Archaean craton to Proterozoic mobile belts, and truncated to the west by the lithospheric-scale Darling Fault. This fault separates the Precambrian crustal elements from the younger Palaeozoic-Mesozoic Carnarvon Basin to the east, has a strike length of over 1400 km. It is thought to have been active since at least the Proterozoic. Estimates of slip on some southerly sections of this fault exceed 12 km. We believe that these various crustal elements (basins, cratons, mobile belts) respond differently to seismicity based on their rheology, thickness and deformation history. We supplemented data from our network with traces from some of the instruments of the national network of Australia. This data set proved adequate for the calculation of fault-plane solutions of some 13 mini- and micro- events in the region. The eventsrecorded occurred along or close to known faults, although field data for movement or reactivation on these faults is sparse. Most of our calculated events occur in close proximity to mechanical boundaries between crustal elements, indicating that the mechanical response of these elements controls the location of seismicity. The transitional tectonic setting of this part of the Australian margin---a passive margin sandwiched between two active margin segments---indicates that the term "intraplate" may be an inappropriate description of these seismic events.

  12. Hafnium isotope evidence for a transition in the dynamics of continental growth 3.2 Gyr ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Næraa, T; Scherstén, A; Rosing, M T; Kemp, A I S; Hoffmann, J E; Kokfelt, T F; Whitehouse, M J

    2012-05-30

    Earth's lithosphere probably experienced an evolution towards the modern plate tectonic regime, owing to secular changes in mantle temperature. Radiogenic isotope variations are interpreted as evidence for the declining rates of continental crustal growth over time, with some estimates suggesting that over 70% of the present continental crustal reservoir was extracted by the end of the Archaean eon. Patterns of crustal growth and reworking in rocks younger than three billion years (Gyr) are thought to reflect the assembly and break-up of supercontinents by Wilson cycle processes and mark an important change in lithosphere dynamics. In southern West Greenland numerous studies have, however, argued for subduction settings and crust growth by arc accretion back to 3.8 Gyr ago, suggesting that modern-day tectonic regimes operated during the formation of the earliest crustal rock record. Here we report in situ uranium-lead, hafnium and oxygen isotope data from zircons of basement rocks in southern West Greenland across the critical time period during which modern-like tectonic regimes could have initiated. Our data show pronounced differences in the hafnium isotope-time patterns across this interval, requiring changes in the characteristics of the magmatic protolith. The observations suggest that 3.9-3.5-Gyr-old rocks differentiated from a >3.9-Gyr-old source reservoir with a chondritic to slightly depleted hafnium isotope composition. In contrast, rocks formed after 3.2 Gyr ago register the first additions of juvenile depleted material (that is, new mantle-derived crust) since 3.9 Gyr ago, and are characterized by striking shifts in hafnium isotope ratios similar to those shown by Phanerozoic subduction-related orogens. These data suggest a transitional period 3.5-3.2 Gyr ago from an ancient (3.9-3.5 Gyr old) crustal evolutionary regime unlike that of modern plate tectonics to a geodynamic setting after 3.2 Gyr ago that involved juvenile crust generation by plate

  13. Studying local earthquakes in the area Baltic-Bothnia Megashear using the data of the POLENET/LAPNET temporary array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usoltseva, Olga; Kozlovskaya, Elena

    2016-07-01

    Earthquakes in areas within continental plates are still not completely understood, and progress on understanding intraplate seismicity is slow due to a short history of instrumental seismology and sparse regional seismic networks in seismically non-active areas. However, knowledge about position and depth of seismogenic structures in such areas is necessary in order to estimate seismic hazard for such critical facilities such as nuclear power plants and nuclear waste deposits. In the present paper we address the problem of seismicity in the intraplate area of northern Fennoscandia using the information on local events recorded by the POLENET/LAPNET (Polar Earth Observing Network) temporary seismic array during the International Polar Year 2007-2009. We relocate the seismic events using the program HYPOELLIPS (a computer program for determining local earthquake hypocentral parameters) and grid search method. We use the first arrivals of P waves of local events in order to calculate a 3-D tomographic P wave velocity model of the uppermost crust (down to 20 km) for a selected region inside the study area and show that the velocity heterogeneities in the upper crust correlate well with known tectonic units. We compare the position of the velocity heterogeneities with the seismogenic structures delineated by epicentres of relocated events and demonstrate that these structures generally do not correlate with the crustal units formed as a result of crustal evolution in the Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic. On the contrary, they correlate well with the postglacial faults located in the area of the Baltic-Bothnia Megashear (BBMS). Hypocentres of local events have depths down to 30 km. We also obtain the focal mechanism of a selected event with good data quality. The focal mechanism is of oblique type with strike-slip prevailing. Our results demonstrate that the Baltic-Bothnia Megashear is an important large-scale, reactivated tectonic structure that has to be taken into

  14. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic community structure in field and cultured microbialites from the alkaline Lake Alchichica (Mexico.

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    Estelle Couradeau

    Full Text Available The geomicrobiology of crater lake microbialites remains largely unknown despite their evolutionary interest due to their resemblance to some Archaean analogs in the dominance of in situ carbonate precipitation over accretion. Here, we studied the diversity of archaea, bacteria and protists in microbialites of the alkaline Lake Alchichica from both field samples collected along a depth gradient (0-14 m depth and long-term-maintained laboratory aquaria. Using small subunit (SSU rRNA gene libraries and fingerprinting methods, we detected a wide diversity of bacteria and protists contrasting with a minor fraction of archaea. Oxygenic photosynthesizers were dominated by cyanobacteria, green algae and diatoms. Cyanobacterial diversity varied with depth, Oscillatoriales dominating shallow and intermediate microbialites and Pleurocapsales the deepest samples. The early-branching Gloeobacterales represented significant proportions in aquaria microbialites. Anoxygenic photosynthesizers were also diverse, comprising members of Alphaproteobacteria and Chloroflexi. Although photosynthetic microorganisms dominated in biomass, heterotrophic lineages were more diverse. We detected members of up to 21 bacterial phyla or candidate divisions, including lineages possibly involved in microbialite formation, such as sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria but also Firmicutes and very diverse taxa likely able to degrade complex polymeric substances, such as Planctomycetales, Bacteroidetes and Verrucomicrobia. Heterotrophic eukaryotes were dominated by Fungi (including members of the basal Rozellida or Cryptomycota, Choanoflagellida, Nucleariida, Amoebozoa, Alveolata and Stramenopiles. The diversity and relative abundance of many eukaryotic lineages suggest an unforeseen role for protists in microbialite ecology. Many lineages from lake microbialites were successfully maintained in aquaria. Interestingly, the diversity detected in aquarium microbialites was higher than

  15. Petrology and geochemistry of charnockites (felsic ortho-granulites) from the Kerala Khondalite Belt, Southern India: Evidence for intra-crustal melting, magmatic differentiation and episodic crustal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindra Kumar, G. R.; Sreejith, C.

    2016-10-01

    The Kerala Khondalite Belt (KKB) of the southern India encompasses volumetrically significant magmatic components. Among these, orthopyroxene-bearing, felsic ortho-granulites, popularly known as charnockites in Indian context, constitute an important lithology. In contrast to the well-known phenomena of arrested charnockitization, the geochemical characteristics and