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Sample records for archaeal orphans representing

  1. The Korarchaeota: Archaeal orphans representing an ancestral lineage of life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkins, James G.; Kunin, Victor; Anderson, Iain; Barry, Kerrie; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Hedlund, Brian; Hugenholtz, Phil; Kyrpides, Nikos; Graham, David; Keller, Martin; Wanner, Gerhard; Richardson, Paul; Stetter, Karl O.

    2007-05-01

    Based on conserved cellular properties, all life on Earth can be grouped into different phyla which belong to the primary domains Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. However, tracing back their evolutionary relationships has been impeded by horizontal gene transfer and gene loss. Within the Archaea, the kingdoms Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota exhibit a profound divergence. In order to elucidate the evolution of these two major kingdoms, representatives of more deeply diverged lineages would be required. Based on their environmental small subunit ribosomal (ss RNA) sequences, the Korarchaeota had been originally suggested to have an ancestral relationship to all known Archaea although this assessment has been refuted. Here we describe the cultivation and initial characterization of the first member of the Korarchaeota, highly unusual, ultrathin filamentous cells about 0.16 {micro}m in diameter. A complete genome sequence obtained from enrichment cultures revealed an unprecedented combination of signature genes which were thought to be characteristic of either the Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, or Eukarya. Cell division appears to be mediated through a FtsZ-dependent mechanism which is highly conserved throughout the Bacteria and Euryarchaeota. An rpb8 subunit of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was identified which is absent from other Archaea and has been described as a eukaryotic signature gene. In addition, the representative organism possesses a ribosome structure typical for members of the Crenarchaeota. Based on its gene complement, this lineage likely diverged near the separation of the two major kingdoms of Archaea. Further investigations of these unique organisms may shed additional light onto the evolution of extant life.

  2. Orphan drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goločorbin-Kon Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Drugs used for treatment of rare diseases are known worldwide under the term of orphan drugs because pharmaceutical companies have not been interested in ”adopting” them, that is in investing in research, developing and producing these drugs. This kind of policy has been justified by the fact that these drugs are targeted for small markets, that only a small number of patients is available for clinical trials, and that large investments are required for the development of drugs meant to treat diseases whose pathogenesis has not yet been clarified in majority of cases. The aim of this paper is to present previous and present status of orphan drugs in Serbia and other countries. The beginning of orphan drugs development. This problem was first recognized by Congress of the United States of America in January 1983, and when the ”Orphan Drug Act” was passed, it was a turning point in the development of orphan drugs. This law provides pharmaceutical companies with a series of reliefs, both financial ones that allow them to regain funds invested into the research and development and regulatory ones. Seven years of marketing exclusivity, as a type of patent monopoly, is the most important relief that enables companies to make large profits. Conclusion. There are no sufficient funds and institutions to give financial support to the patients. It is therefore necessary to make health professionals much more aware of rare diseases in order to avoid time loss in making the right diagnosis and thus to gain more time to treat rare diseases. The importance of discovery, development and production of orphan drugs lies in the number of patients whose life quality can be improved significantly by administration of these drugs as well as in the number of potential survivals resulting from the treatment with these drugs. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 41012

  3. Archaeal extrachromosomal genetic elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Haina; Peng, Nan; Shah, Shiraz Ali

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY: Research on archaeal extrachromosomal genetic elements (ECEs) has progressed rapidly in the past decade. To date, over 60 archaeal viruses and 60 plasmids have been isolated. These archaeal viruses exhibit an exceptional diversity in morphology, with a wide array of shapes, such as spind......SUMMARY: Research on archaeal extrachromosomal genetic elements (ECEs) has progressed rapidly in the past decade. To date, over 60 archaeal viruses and 60 plasmids have been isolated. These archaeal viruses exhibit an exceptional diversity in morphology, with a wide array of shapes...

  4. Archaeal Enzymes and Applications in Industrial Biocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlechild, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Archaeal enzymes are playing an important role in industrial biotechnology. Many representatives of organisms living in "extreme" conditions, the so-called Extremophiles, belong to the archaeal kingdom of life. This paper will review studies carried by the Exeter group and others regarding archaeal enzymes that have important applications in commercial biocatalysis. Some of these biocatalysts are already being used in large scale industrial processes for the production of optically pure drug intermediates and amino acids and their analogues. Other enzymes have been characterised at laboratory scale regarding their substrate specificity and properties for potential industrial application. The increasing availability of DNA sequences from new archaeal species and metagenomes will provide a continuing resource to identify new enzymes of commercial interest using both bioinformatics and screening approaches.

  5. Archaeal Enzymes and Applications in Industrial Biocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Littlechild

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Archaeal enzymes are playing an important role in industrial biotechnology. Many representatives of organisms living in “extreme” conditions, the so-called Extremophiles, belong to the archaeal kingdom of life. This paper will review studies carried by the Exeter group and others regarding archaeal enzymes that have important applications in commercial biocatalysis. Some of these biocatalysts are already being used in large scale industrial processes for the production of optically pure drug intermediates and amino acids and their analogues. Other enzymes have been characterised at laboratory scale regarding their substrate specificity and properties for potential industrial application. The increasing availability of DNA sequences from new archaeal species and metagenomes will provide a continuing resource to identify new enzymes of commercial interest using both bioinformatics and screening approaches.

  6. Archaeal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed.

  7. Fomepizole (orphan medical).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantson, P

    2001-06-01

    Orphan Medical has developed fomepizole as a potential treatment for both ethylene glycol and methanol poisoning. The drug was launched as Antizol in January 1998 for the treatment of ethylene glycol poisoning [273949] after US marketing approval was grantedin December 1997 [271563]. It has also received US approval for methanol poisoning [393217] and UK approval for ethylene glycol poisoning [329495]. In 1999, Orphan Medical's partner, Cambridge Laboratories, intended to pursue European approval under the mutual recognition procedure [329495]. However, by September 2000, Cambridge Laboratories had discontinued their involvement with fomepizole and IDIS World Medicines had licensed the rights to distribute the drug in the UK [412142]. In February 2000, the Canadian Therapeutic Products Programme (TPP) granted fomepizole Priority Review, provided that an NDA was submitted by March 14, 2000 [354665]. In August 2000, the TPP accepted this NDA and set a target date for approval in the fourth quarter of 2000 [379474]. The TPP granted fomepizole a Notice of Compliance permitting the sale of fomepizole in Canada in December 2000. The company's marketing partner in Canada, Paladin Labs had launched fomepizole by January 2001 [396953]. In June 2000, Tucker Anthony Cleary Gull stated that the Orphan Drug status which Orphan Medical had obtained for fomepizole would provide marketing exclusivity through December 2004. The analysts also stated that fomepizole had accounted for 40% of Orphan Medical's revenue in financial year 1999, although +/- 30% of sales were estimated to be due to stockpiling [409606].

  8. The Detectability of Orphan Afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Piran, E N T

    2002-01-01

    The realization that GRBs release a rather constant amount of energy implies that the post jet-break afterglow evolution would be rather universal and for a given redshift they should be detected up to a fixed observer angle. We estimate the observed magnitude and the implied detectability of orphan afterglows. We show that orphan afterglows would be detectable only up to rather small ($\\sim 10^o$) angles away from the GRB jet axis. Thus a detection orphan afterglow would generally correspond to a "near-miss" of the GRB whose jet was pointing just slightly away from us. Both theoretical and phenomenological estimates of the rate of orphan afterglows suffer from a rather large uncertainty. With our "canonical" parameters we expect a dozen transients that would arise from orphan GRBs in the SDSS and a comparable number of transients in a dedicated 2M class telescope operating full time in an orphan afterglow search.

  9. Shaping the Archaeal Cell Envelope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert F. Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although archaea have a similar cellular organization as other prokaryotes, the lipid composition of their membranes and their cell surface is unique. Here we discuss recent developments in our understanding of the archaeal protein secretion mechanisms, the assembly of macromolecular cell surface structures, and the release of S-layer-coated vesicles from the archaeal membrane.

  10. Orphan regulations for orphan drug development in India

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    D Saikiran Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Through this review article an attempt has been made to put forward the challenges faced by rare disease drug development and the current scenario of orphan drug legislations in India. An orphan drug is a pharmaceutical agent that is used to treat a rare medical condition (viz., glioblastoma multiforme, nocardiosis, Tourette syndrome, etc. Developed countries such as United States (US, Europe, Japan, and Australia have laid down legal framework for combating rare diseases. A path breaking legislation was formulated by the US government way back in 1983, known as "Orphan Drugs Act (ODA." The key purpose of ODA was to incentivize R and D initiatives for such drugs to treat millions of population suffering from "orphan diseases." Though the percentage of patients suffering from "rare diseases" in India is reportedly higher than the world average, unfortunately even today such cases get little help from our government. Indian government should also encourage its domestic pharmaceutical industry to get engaged in research for orphan drugs by putting an "ODA" in place and extending financial support, and regulatory concessions like smaller and shorter clinical trials, without further delay. Thus, India could well-demonstrate that the concept of orphan drugs for orphan diseases is really not orphan in India.

  11. Orphan drugs: the regulatory environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Pedro

    2013-02-01

    The definition of a rare disease is not universal and depends on the legislation and policies adopted by each region or country. The main objective of this article is to describe and discuss the legal framework and the regulatory environment of orphan drugs worldwide. Some reflections and discussions on the need for specific orphan drug legislation or policies are described at length. Furthermore, some aspects of the history of each region in respect of the orphan drug legislation evolution are outlined. This article describes and compares the orphan drug legislation or policies of the following countries or regions: United Sates of America (US), European Union (EU), Japan, Australia, Singapore, Taiwan and Canada. The incentives described in the orphan drug legislations or policies, the criteria for designation of orphan status and the authorisation process of an orphan drug are also described and compared. The legislations and policies are to some extent similar but not the same. It is important to understand the main differences among all available legislative systems to improve the international collaboration in the field of orphan drugs and rare diseases.

  12. Drug repositioning for orphan diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardana, Divya; Zhu, Cheng; Zhang, Minlu; Gudivada, Ranga C; Yang, Lun; Jegga, Anil G

    2011-07-01

    The need and opportunity to discover therapeutics for rare or orphan diseases are enormous. Due to limited prevalence and/or commercial potential, of the approximately 6000 orphan diseases (defined by the FDA Orphan Drug Act as industry. The fact that drug development is complicated, time-consuming and expensive with extremely low success rates only adds to the low rate of therapeutics available for orphan diseases. An alternative and efficient strategy to boost the discovery of orphan disease therapeutics is to find connections between an existing drug product and orphan disease. Drug Repositioning or Drug Repurposing--finding a new indication for a drug--is one way to maximize the potential of a drug. The advantages of this approach are manifold, but rational drug repositioning for orphan diseases is not trivial and poses several formidable challenges--pharmacologically and computationally. Most of the repositioned drugs currently in the market are the result of serendipity. One reason the connection between drug candidates and their potential new applications are not identified in an earlier or more systematic fashion is that the underlying mechanism 'connecting' them is either very intricate and unknown or indirect or dispersed and buried in an ever-increasing sea of information, much of which is emerging only recently and therefore is not well organized. In this study, we will review some of these issues and the current methodologies adopted or proposed to overcome them and translate chemical and biological discoveries into safe and effective orphan disease therapeutics.

  13. AIDS ORPHANS GET SPECIAL VISITOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao visits AIDS orphans in Shangcai County,central China’s Henan Province,on November 30,a day before the 20th World AIDS Day. The region of Shangcai has the highest concentration of people living with HIV/AIDS in China. The Chinese Government has released a package of policies that offer people living with HIV/AIDS free medicine,health checks and consultations,as well as free schooling to AIDS orphans.

  14. The Detectability of Orphan Afterglows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi; Granot, Jonathan

    2002-11-01

    The realization that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) release a constant amount of energy implies that post-jet-break afterglow evolution is largely universal. For a given redshift, all afterglows should be detected up to a fixed observer angle. We estimate the observed magnitude and the implied detectability of orphan afterglows. We show that for reasonable limiting magnitudes (mlim=25), orphan afterglows will typically be detected from small (~10°) angles away from the GRB jet axis. A detected orphan afterglow generally corresponds to a ``near miss'' of a GRB whose jet is pointing just slightly away from us. With our most optimistic parameters, we expect that 15 orphan afterglows will be recorded in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and 35 transients will be recorded in a dedicated 2 m class telescope operating full time for a year in an orphan afterglow search. The rate is smaller by a factor of 15 for our ``canonical'' parameters. We show that for a given facility, an optimal survey should be shallower, covering a larger area, rather than deeper. The limiting magnitude should not be, however, lower than ~23, as in this case, more transients from on-axis GRBs will be discovered than orphan afterglows. About 15% of the transients could be discovered with a second exposure of the same area provided that it follows after 3, 4, and 8 days for mlim=23, 25, and 27, respectively.

  15. Archaeal viruses of the sulfolobales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdmann, Susanne; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2015-01-01

    Infection of archaea with phylogenetically diverse single viruses, performed in different laboratories, has failed to activate spacer acquisition into host CRISPR loci. The first successful uptake of archaeal de novo spacers was observed on infection of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 with an environm......Infection of archaea with phylogenetically diverse single viruses, performed in different laboratories, has failed to activate spacer acquisition into host CRISPR loci. The first successful uptake of archaeal de novo spacers was observed on infection of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2...... in CRISPR loci of Sulfolobus species from a second coinfecting conjugative plasmid or virus (Erdmann and Garrett, Mol Microbiol 85:1044-1056, 2012; Erdmann et al. Mol Microbiol 91:900-917, 2014). Here we describe, firstly, the isolation of archaeal virus mixtures from terrestrial hot springs...

  16. Analyses of in vivo interactions between transcription factors and the archaeal RNA polymerase.

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    Walker, Julie E; Santangelo, Thomas J

    2015-09-15

    Transcription factors regulate the activities of RNA polymerase (RNAP) at each stage of the transcription cycle. Many basal transcription factors with common ancestry are employed in eukaryotic and archaeal systems that directly bind to RNAP and influence intramolecular movements of RNAP and modulate DNA or RNA interactions. We describe and employ a flexible methodology to directly probe and quantify the binding of transcription factors to RNAP in vivo. We demonstrate that binding of the conserved and essential archaeal transcription factor TFE to the archaeal RNAP is directed, in part, by interactions with the RpoE subunit of RNAP. As the surfaces involved are conserved in many eukaryotic and archaeal systems, the identified TFE-RNAP interactions are likely conserved in archaeal-eukaryal systems and represent an important point of contact that can influence the efficiency of transcription initiation.

  17. Shaping the Archaeal Cell Envelope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellen, Albert F.; Zolghadr, Behnam; Driessen, Arnold M. J.; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2010-01-01

    Although archaea have a similar cellular organization as other prokaryotes, the lipid composition of their membranes and their cell surface is unique. Here we discuss recent developments in our understanding of the archaeal protein secretion mechanisms, the assembly of macromolecular cell surface st

  18. Are payers treating orphan drugs differently?

    OpenAIRE

    Joshua P. Cohen; Felix, Abigail

    2014-01-01

    Background: Some orphan drugs can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars annually per patient. As a result, payer sensitivity to the cost of orphan drugs is rising, particularly in light of increased numbers of new launches in recent years. In this article, we examine payer coverage in the United States, England and Wales, and the Netherlands of outpatient orphan drugs approved between 1983 and 2012, as well as the 11 most expensive orphan drugs.Methods: We collected data from drug regulatory ...

  19. Magnetic Au Nanoparticles on Archaeal S-Layer Ghosts as Templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Selenska-Pobell

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell‐ghosts representing empty cells of the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, consisting only of their highly ordered and unusually stable outermost proteinaceous surface layer (S‐layer, were used as templates for Au nanoparticles fabrication. The properties of these archaeal Au nanoparticles differ significantly from those produced earlier by us onto bacterial S‐layer sheets. The archaeal Au nanoparticles, with a size of about 2.5 nm, consist exclusively of metallic Au(0, while those produced on the bacterial S‐layer had a size of about 4 nm and represented a mixture of Au(0 and Au(III in the ratio of 40 to 60 %. The most impressive feature of the archaeal Au nanoparticles is that they are strongly paramagnetic, in contrast to the bacterial ones and also to bulk gold. SQUID magnetometry and XMCD measurements demonstrated that the archaeal Au nanoparticles possess a rather large magnetic moment of about 0.1 µB/atom. HR‐ TEM‐EDX analysis revealed that the archaeal Au nanoparticles are linked to the sulfur atoms of the thiol groups of the amino acid cysteine, characteristic only for archaeal S‐layers. This is the first study demonstrating the formation of such unusually strong magnetic Au nanoparticles on a non‐modified archaeal S‐layer.

  20. Orphan drugs: expensive yet necessary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyry, H I; Roos, J C P; Cox, T M

    2015-04-01

    Whether the prices of certain orphan treatments are justified is highly controversial. One argument is that such therapies should not be funded through the public purse or private health plans because a patient with a rare disease requires more than their 'fair share' of a limited health care budget. Orphan medications can also be denied because they fare poorly in the cost-effectiveness assessments of drugs. This paper takes the unusual line that life-saving treatments should be provided regardless of their cost. This contention is based on the Harvard philosopher John Rawls' theory of justice. We offer three rules to limit the use of cost-effectiveness approaches: efficiency assessments should not be deployed (i) when the choice is between an only treatment and no treatment, or to (ii) prioritise between different patients and patient groups. However a well considered cost efficiency calculation may have its place (iii) where a patient has a choice between two or more equally safe and effective treatments. We rebut potential objections to this analysis, and conclude that there has been a tendency to classify appeals for orphan treatments as a minority interest and in conflict with the aims of public health and society at large. Rawls' concept of societal justice shows that a distinction between the individual and society in this context is bogus. The funding of orphan therapies is as much a matter for public health as the funding of treatments for other conditions. Treatment must not be withheld on economic grounds.

  1. Orphans as agents for change

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    Gjotterud Sigrid Mari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Transformative experiences can happen at unexpected times, in unexpected ways. This paper tells the story of how a gift of a goat can lead to the transformation of a life. Many organisations globally are engaged in a struggle to overcome poverty and injustice by providing livestock as a means for transformation. The animals in themselves are not enough for the transformed lives; they can be a valuable starting point. In the Uluguru Mountains in Tanzania, a Tanzanian and a Norwegian together took one such initiative in order to support teen-age orphans, one of the most vulnerable groups in the community who were struggling to survive. As practitioners and researchers, the four authors had been taking part in the development of the Mgeta Orphan Education Foundation (MOEF, which had developed through action learning/action research. Selected students received a goat and training, and the opportunity to join and develop a network of orphans throughout the region. In this article, we discuss the benefits and challenges the orphaned youngsters face when joining the foundation. How do they benefit from having the goat and what are the challenges, how do they learn and how do they contribute to fellow farmers in their communities? We claim that many of the students have experienced transformation, and provide examples to give evidence of this claim. However, the students are not the only ones who are transforming; so are we who, as co-researchers, have had the opportunity to play a role in and witness their efforts.

  2. "Foreign Mothers" of Chinese Orphans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    Since Shanghai opened to the outside, a large number of foreign wives have lived there. They have organized a charitable association which has attracted people’s attention. They donate money and material goods to the Shanghai Children’s Welfare House, as well as contributing their maternal love to the Chinese orphans. Every week, no matter whether it is raining or windy, they visit, holding the children in their arms and feeding them. Some of them

  3. Unusually High Archaeal Diversity in a Crystallizer Pond, Pomorie Salterns, Bulgaria, Revealed by Phylogenetic Analysis

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    Margarita Kambourova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on archaeal diversity in few salterns have revealed heterogeneity between sites and unique structures of separate places that hinder drawing of generalized conclusions. Investigations on the archaeal community composition in P18, the biggest crystallizer pond in Pomorie salterns (PS (34% salinity, demonstrated unusually high number of presented taxa in hypersaline environment. Archaeal clones were grouped in 26 different operational taxonomic units (OTUs assigned to 15 different genera from two orders, Halobacteriales and Haloferacales. All retrieved sequences were related to culturable halophiles or unculturable clones from saline (mostly hypersaline niches. New sequences represented 53.9% of archaeal OTUs. Some of them formed separate branches with 90% similarity to the closest neighbor. Present results significantly differed from the previous investigations in regard to the number of presented genera, the domination of some genera not reported before in such extreme niche, and the identification of previously undiscovered 16S rRNA sequences.

  4. Orphan drug: Development trends and strategies.

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    Sharma, Aarti; Jacob, Abraham; Tandon, Manas; Kumar, Dushyant

    2010-10-01

    The growth of pharma industries has slowed in recent years because of various reasons such as patent expiries, generic competition, drying pipelines, and increasingly stringent regulatory guidelines. Many blockbuster drugs will loose their exclusivity in next 5 years. Therefore, the current economic situation plus the huge generic competition shifted the focus of pharmaceutical companies from the essential medicines to the new business model - niche busters, also called orphan drugs. Orphan drugs may help pharma companies to reduce the impact of revenue loss caused by patent expiries of blockbuster drugs. The new business model of orphan drugs could offer an integrated healthcare solution that enables pharma companies to develop newer areas of therapeutics, diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, and patient support. Incentives for drug development provided by governments, as well as support from the FDA and EU Commission in special protocols, are a further boost for the companies developing orphan drugs. Although there may still be challenges ahead for the pharmaceutical industry, orphan drugs seem to offer the key to recovery and stability within the market. In our study, we have compared the policies and orphan drug incentives worldwide alongwith the challenges faced by the pharmaceutical companies. Recent developments are seen in orphan drug approval, the various drugs in orphan drug pipeline, and the future prospectives for orphan drugs and diseases.

  5. Observations from One Champion of AIDS Orphans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUJIA

    2004-01-01

    ON December 1, 2003,the CCTV program News Research aired a special feature on AIDS orphans at the Love and Care Family AIDS orphanage. The public attention this raised brought large social donations for the orphanage and signaled greater public efforts to help AIDS orphans.

  6. 78 FR 35117 - Orphan Drug Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-12

    ... from companies and trade associations of companies that are marketing or hope to market orphan drugs... trade associations of companies that are marketing or hope to market orphan drugs. On the whole, the..., sponsors could even potentially ``game'' approvals by seeking successive narrow approvals of a drug...

  7. Unique archaeal assemblages in the Arctic Ocean unveiled by massively parallel tag sequencing.

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    Galand, Pierre E; Casamayor, Emilio O; Kirchman, David L; Potvin, Marianne; Lovejoy, Connie

    2009-07-01

    The Arctic Ocean plays a critical role in controlling nutrient budgets between the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean. Archaea are key players in the nitrogen cycle and in cycling nutrients, but their community composition has been little studied in the Arctic Ocean. Here, we characterize archaeal assemblages from surface and deep Arctic water masses using massively parallel tag sequencing of the V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene. This approach gave a very high coverage of the natural communities, allowing a precise description of archaeal assemblages. This first taxonomic description of archaeal communities by tag sequencing reported so far shows that it is possible to assign an identity below phylum level to most (95%) of the archaeal V6 tags, and shows that tag sequencing is a powerful tool for resolving the diversity and distribution of specific microbes in the environment. Marine group I Crenarchaeota was overall the most abundant group in the Arctic Ocean and comprised between 27% and 63% of all tags. Group III Euryarchaeota were more abundant in deep-water masses and represented the largest archaeal group in the deep Atlantic layer of the central Arctic Ocean. Coastal surface waters, in turn, harbored more group II Euryarchaeota. Moreover, group II sequences that dominated surface waters were different from the group II sequences detected in deep waters, suggesting functional differences in closely related groups. Our results unveiled for the first time an archaeal community dominated by group III Euryarchaeota and show biogeographical traits for marine Arctic Archaea.

  8. World health dilemmas: Orphan and rare diseases, orphan drugs and orphan patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontoghiorghe, Christina N; Andreou, Nicholas; Constantinou, Katerina; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2014-01-01

    According to global annual estimates hunger/malnutrition is the major cause of death (36 of 62 million). Cardiovascular diseases and cancer (5.44 of 13.43 million) are the major causes of death in developed countries, while lower respiratory tract infections, human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, diarrhoeal disease, malaria and tuberculosis (10.88 of 27.12 million) are the major causes of death in developing countries with more than 70% of deaths occurring in children. The majority of approximately 800 million people with other rare diseases, including 100000 children born with thalassaemia annually receive no treatment. There are major ethical dilemmas in dealing with global health issues such as poverty and the treatment of orphan and rare diseases. Of approximately 50000 drugs about 10% are orphan drugs, with annual sales of the latter approaching 100 billion USD. In comparison, the annual revenue in 2009 from the top 12 pharmaceutical companies in Western countries was 445 billion USD and the top drug, atorvastatin, reached 100 billion USD. In the same year, the total government expenditure for health in the developing countries was 410 billion USD with only 6%-7% having been received as aid from developed countries. Drugs cost the National Health Service in the United Kingdom more than 20 billion USD or 10% of the annual health budget. Uncontrollable drug prices and marketing policies affect global health budgets, clinical practice, patient safety and survival. Fines of 5.3 billion USD were imposed on two pharmaceutical companies in the United States, the regulatory authority in France was replaced and clinicians were charged with bribery in order to overcome recent illegal practises affecting patient care. High expenditure for drug development is mainly related to marketing costs. However, only 2 million USD was spent developing the drug deferiprone (L1) for thalassaemia up to the stage of multicentre clinical trials. The

  9. Global analysis of viral infection in an archaeal model system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid S. Maaty

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The origin and evolutionary relationship of viruses is poorly understood. This makes archaeal virus-host of particular interest because the hosts generally root near the base of phylogenetic trees, while some of the viruses have clear structural similarities to those that infect prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Despite the advantageous position for use in evolutionary studies, little is known about archaeal viruses or how they interact with their hosts, compared to viruses of bacteria and eukaryotes. In addition, many archaeal viruses have been isolated from extreme environments and present a unique opportunity for elucidating factors that are important for existence at the extremes.. In this article we focus on virus-host interactions using a proteomics approach to study Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus (STIV infection of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2. Using cultures grown from the ATCC cell stock, a single cycle of STIV infection was sampled 6 times over a 72 hr period. More than 700 proteins were identified throughout the course of the experiments. Seventy one host proteins were found to change by nearly two-fold (p<0.05 with 40 becoming more abundant and 31 less abundant. The modulated proteins represent 30 different cell pathways and 14 COG groups. 2D gel analysis showed that changes in post translational modifications were a common feature of the affected proteins. The results from these studies showed that the prokaryotic antiviral adaptive immune system CRISPR associated proteins (CAS proteins were regulated in response to the virus infection. It was found that regulated proteins come from mRNAs with a shorter than average half-life. In addition, activity-based protein profiling (ABPP profiling on 2D gels showed caspase, hydrolase and tyrosine phosphatase enzyme activity labeling at the protein isoform level. Together, this data provides a more detailed global view of archaeal cellular responses to viral infection, demonstrates the

  10. Hyperthermophilic Archaeal Viruses as Novel Nanoplatforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldahl, Kristine Buch

    of a broad range of genetic and chemical engineering methods, viral research has expanded. Viruses are now emerging as nanoplatforms with applications in materials science and medicine. A great challenge in biomedicine is the targeting of therapeutics to specific locations in the body in order to increase...... nanoplatforms than mammalian viruses because they cannot proliferate in humans and hence are less likely to trigger adverse effects. Another group of viruses that fits this criterion is archaeal viruses yet their potential remains untapped. As a group, archaeal viruses offer distinct advantages such as unique...... hyperthermophilic archaeal viruses, SMV1 and SSV2 and cells of human origin. This chapter provides the first results demonstrating that archaeal viruses can be taken up and internalized by human cells, thus indicating a potential as intracellular delivery agents. Chapter III investigates SMV1 particles as potential...

  11. The UCSC Archaeal Genome Browser: 2012 update

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Patricia P.; Holmes, Andrew D.; Smith, Andrew M.; Tran, Danny; Lowe, Todd M.

    2011-01-01

    The UCSC Archaeal Genome Browser (http://archaea.ucsc.edu) offers a graphical web-based resource for exploration and discovery within archaeal and other selected microbial genomes. By bringing together existing gene annotations, gene expression data, multiple-genome alignments, pre-computed sequence comparisons and other specialized analysis tracks, the genome browser is a powerful aggregator of varied genomic information. The genome browser environment maintains the current look-and-feel of ...

  12. The UCSC Archaeal Genome Browser: 2012 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Patricia P; Holmes, Andrew D; Smith, Andrew M; Tran, Danny; Lowe, Todd M

    2012-01-01

    The UCSC Archaeal Genome Browser (http://archaea.ucsc.edu) offers a graphical web-based resource for exploration and discovery within archaeal and other selected microbial genomes. By bringing together existing gene annotations, gene expression data, multiple-genome alignments, pre-computed sequence comparisons and other specialized analysis tracks, the genome browser is a powerful aggregator of varied genomic information. The genome browser environment maintains the current look-and-feel of the vertebrate UCSC Genome Browser, but also integrates archaeal and bacterial-specific tracks with a few graphic display enhancements. The browser currently contains 115 archaeal genomes, plus 31 genomes of viruses known to infect archaea. Some of the recently developed or enhanced tracks visualize data from published high-throughput RNA-sequencing studies, the NCBI Conserved Domain Database, sequences from pre-genome sequencing studies, predicted gene boundaries from three different protein gene prediction algorithms, tRNAscan-SE gene predictions with RNA secondary structures and CRISPR locus predictions. We have also developed a companion resource, the Archaeal COG Browser, to provide better search and display of arCOG gene function classifications, including their phylogenetic distribution among available archaeal genomes.

  13. Protein Adaptations in Archaeal Extremophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Reed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extremophiles, especially those in Archaea, have a myriad of adaptations that keep their cellular proteins stable and active under the extreme conditions in which they live. Rather than having one basic set of adaptations that works for all environments, Archaea have evolved separate protein features that are customized for each environment. We categorized the Archaea into three general groups to describe what is known about their protein adaptations: thermophilic, psychrophilic, and halophilic. Thermophilic proteins tend to have a prominent hydrophobic core and increased electrostatic interactions to maintain activity at high temperatures. Psychrophilic proteins have a reduced hydrophobic core and a less charged protein surface to maintain flexibility and activity under cold temperatures. Halophilic proteins are characterized by increased negative surface charge due to increased acidic amino acid content and peptide insertions, which compensates for the extreme ionic conditions. While acidophiles, alkaliphiles, and piezophiles are their own class of Archaea, their protein adaptations toward pH and pressure are less discernible. By understanding the protein adaptations used by archaeal extremophiles, we hope to be able to engineer and utilize proteins for industrial, environmental, and biotechnological applications where function in extreme conditions is required for activity.

  14. Orphans in the Dead Sea Scrolls

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    Gideon R. Kotzé

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the literary references to orphans in writings amongst the Qumran texts that were written in Hebrew and can be associated with the sectarian Qumran movement. The study focuses on passages where forms of the word יתום are used. These include the Damascus Document (CD 6:16–17, Hodayot (1QHa 13:22 and Barkhi Nafshia (4Q434 1 i 2. The investigation concludes that the references to orphans in these passages do not have the same rhetorical functions. In CD 6, the wordings of authoritative scriptures are adapted to portray orphans and widows as the victims of wrongdoing. In 1QHa and 4Q434, however, orphans are mentioned in hymns that praise the Lord’s positive treatment of needy people

  15. Rare diseases and orphan drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenica Taruscio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the Regulation (EC N. 141/2000 of the European Parliament and of the Council, rare diseases are life-threatening or chronically debilitating conditions, affecting no more than 5 in 10 000 persons in the European Community. It is estimated that between 6000 to 8000 distinct rare diseases affect up to 6% of the total EU population. Therefore, these conditions can be considered rare if taken individually but they affect a significant proportion of the European population when considered as a single group. Several initiatives have been undertaken at international, European and national level to tackle public health as well as research issues related to the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and surveillance of these diseases. The development of innovative and effective medical products for their diagnosis and treatment is frequently hampered by several factors, including the limited knowledge of their natural history, the difficulties in setting up clinical studies due to the limited numbers of patients affected by a specific disease, the weak interest of sponsors due to the restricted market opportunities. Therefore, incentives and other facilitations have been adopted in many parts of the world, including in the EU, in order to facilitate the development and commercialization of diagnostic tools and treatments devoted to rare diseases. This paper illustrates mainly the European initiatives and will discuss the problematic and controversial aspects surrounding orphan drugs. Finally, activities and measures adopted in Italy are presented.

  16. A Meta-Analysis of the Bacterial and Archaeal Diversity Observed in Wetland Soils

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    Xiaofei Lv

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the bacterial and archaeal diversity from a worldwide range of wetlands soils and sediments using a meta-analysis approach. All available 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered from wetlands in public databases were retrieved. In November 2012, a total of 12677 bacterial and 1747 archaeal sequences were collected in GenBank. All the bacterial sequences were assigned into 6383 operational taxonomic units (OTUs 0.03, representing 31 known bacterial phyla, predominant with Proteobacteria (2791 OTUs, Bacteroidetes (868 OTUs, Acidobacteria (731 OTUs, Firmicutes (540 OTUs, and Actinobacteria (418 OTUs. The genus Flavobacterium (11.6% of bacterial sequences was the dominate bacteria in wetlands, followed by Gp1, Nitrosospira, and Nitrosomonas. Archaeal sequences were assigned to 521 OTUs from phyla Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota. The dominating archaeal genera were Fervidicoccus and Methanosaeta. Rarefaction analysis indicated that approximately 40% of bacterial and 83% of archaeal diversity in wetland soils and sediments have been presented. Our results should be significant for well-understanding the microbial diversity involved in worldwide wetlands.

  17. Composition of bacterial and archaeal communities during landfill refuse decomposition processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Liyan; Wang, Yangqing; Zhao, Heping; Long, David T

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the archaeal and the bacterial diversities in a landfill during different phases of decomposition. In this study, the archaeal and the bacterial diversities of Laogang landfill (Shanghai, China) at two different decomposition phases (i.e., initial methanogenic phase (IMP) and stable methanogenic phase (SMP)), were culture-independently examined using PCR-based 454 pyrosequencing. A total of 47,753 sequences of 16S rRNA genes were retrieved from 69,954 reads and analyzed to evaluate the diversities of the archaeal and bacterial communities. The most predominant types of archaea were hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales, and of bacteria were Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. As might be expected, their abundances varied at decomposition phases. Archaea Methanomicrobiales accounts for 97.6% of total archaeal population abundance in IMP and about 57.6% in SMP. The abundance of archaeal genus Halobacteriale was 0.1% in IMP and was 20.3% in the SMP. The abundance of Firmicutes was 21.3% in IMP and was 4.3% in SMP. The abundance of Bacteroidetes represented 11.5% of total bacterial in IMP and was dominant (49.4%) in SMP. Both the IMP and SMP had unique cellulolytic bacteria compositions. IMP consisted of members of Bacillus, Fibrobacter, and Eubacterium, while SMP harbored groups of Microbacterium. Both phases had Clostridium with different abundance, 4-5 folds higher in SMP.

  18. Archaeal histones: dynamic and versatile genome architects

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    Bram Henneman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome organization and compaction in Archaea involves different chromatin proteins, among which homologues of eukaryotic histones. Archaeal histones are considered the ancestors of their eukaryotic counterparts, which isreflected in the way they position along the genome and wrap DNA. Evolution from the archaeal modes of action to the prototypical eukaryotic nucleosome may be attributed to altered histone-histone interactions and DNA sequence determinants cooperating to yield stable multimeric structures. The identification of a new candidate phylum, proposed to be a missing link between archaea and eukaryotes, Lokiarchaeaota, may be instrumental in addressing this hypothesis.

  19. A survey of orphan enzyme activities

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    Pouliot Yannick

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using computational database searches, we have demonstrated previously that no gene sequences could be found for at least 36% of enzyme activities that have been assigned an Enzyme Commission number. Here we present a follow-up literature-based survey involving a statistically significant sample of such "orphan" activities. The survey was intended to determine whether sequences for these enzyme activities are truly unknown, or whether these sequences are absent from the public sequence databases but can be found in the literature. Results We demonstrate that for ~80% of sampled orphans, the absence of sequence data is bona fide. Our analyses further substantiate the notion that many of these enzyme activities play biologically important roles. Conclusion This survey points toward significant scientific cost of having such a large fraction of characterized enzyme activities disconnected from sequence data. It also suggests that a larger effort, beginning with a comprehensive survey of all putative orphan activities, would resolve nearly 300 artifactual orphans and reconnect a wealth of enzyme research with modern genomics. For these reasons, we propose that a systematic effort to identify the cognate genes of orphan enzymes be undertaken.

  20. Archaeal type IV pili and their involvement in biofilm formation

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    Rianne eEsquivel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Type IV pili are ancient proteinaceous structures present on the cell surface of species in nearly all bacterial and archaeal phyla. These filaments are involved in a diverse array of critical cellular processes. While the core components of the pilus biosynthesis machinery are highly conserved, type IV pilins, the structural subunits of pili, share little sequence homology. However, the conserved structure of the signal peptides of these pilus subunits has allowed the development of prediction programs that accurately detect the processing sites recognized by bacterial and archaeal prepilin peptidases. Using these programs, the genomes of organisms from both prokaryotic domains have been shown to encode a diverse set of putative type IV pilins. Recently, in vivo studies in model archaea representing the euryarchaeal and crenarchaeal kingdoms confirmed that several of these pilins are incorporated into type IV adhesion pili. In addition to facilitating surface adhesion, these in vivo studies also showed that several predicted pilins are required for additional functions that are critical to biofilm formation. Examples include the subunits of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius Ups pili, which are induced by exposure to UV light and promote cell aggregation and conjugation, and a subset of the Haloferax volcanii adhesion pilins, which play a critical role in microcolony formation while other pilins inhibit this process. The recent discovery of novel pilin functions such as the ability of haloarchaeal adhesion pilins to regulate swimming motility rather than being unique to organisms that inhabit high salt environments may point to novel prokaryotic regulatory pathways. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the functional roles played by archaeal type IV adhesion pili and their subunits, with particular emphasis on their involvement in biofilm formation.

  1. Archaeal viruses-novel, diverse and enigmatic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Xu; Garrett, Roger Antony; She, Qunxin

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has revealed a remarkable diversity of viruses in archaeal-rich environments where spindles, spheres, filaments and rods are common, together with other exceptional morphotypes never recorded previously. Moreover, their double-stranded DNA genomes carry very few genes exhibiting...

  2. Turnover of microbial lipids in the deep biosphere and growth of benthic archaeal populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sitan; Lipp, Julius S; Wegener, Gunter; Ferdelman, Timothy G; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2013-04-01

    Deep subseafloor sediments host a microbial biosphere with unknown impact on global biogeochemical cycles. This study tests previous evidence based on microbial intact polar lipids (IPLs) as proxies of live biomass, suggesting that Archaea dominate the marine sedimentary biosphere. We devised a sensitive radiotracer assay to measure the decay rate of ([(14)C]glucosyl)-diphytanylglyceroldiether (GlcDGD) as an analog of archaeal IPLs in continental margin sediments. The degradation kinetics were incorporated in model simulations that constrained the fossil fraction of subseafloor IPLs and rates of archaeal turnover. Simulating the top 1 km in a generic continental margin sediment column, we estimated degradation rate constants of GlcDGD being one to two orders of magnitude lower than those of bacterial IPLs, with half-lives of GlcDGD increasing with depth to 310 ky. Given estimated microbial community turnover times of 1.6-73 ky in sediments deeper than 1 m, 50-96% of archaeal IPLs represent fossil signals. Consequently, previous lipid-based estimates of global subseafloor biomass probably are too high, and the widely observed dominance of archaeal IPLs does not rule out a deep biosphere dominated by Bacteria. Reverse modeling of existing concentration profiles suggest that archaeal IPL synthesis rates decline from around 1,000 pg⋅mL(-1) sediment⋅y(-1) at the surface to 0.2 pg⋅mL(-1)⋅y(-1) at 1 km depth, equivalent to production of 7 × 10(5) to 140 archaeal cells⋅mL(-1) sediment⋅y(-1), respectively. These constraints on microbial growth are an important step toward understanding the relationship between the deep biosphere and the carbon cycle.

  3. Environmental shaping of sponge associated archaeal communities.

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    Aline S Turque

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Archaea are ubiquitous symbionts of marine sponges but their ecological roles and the influence of environmental factors on these associations are still poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compared the diversity and composition of archaea associated with seawater and with the sponges Hymeniacidon heliophila, Paraleucilla magna and Petromica citrina in two distinct environments: Guanabara Bay, a highly impacted estuary in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and the nearby Cagarras Archipelago. For this we used metagenomic analyses of 16S rRNA and ammonia monooxygenase (amoA gene libraries. Hymeniacidon heliophila was more abundant inside the bay, while P. magna was more abundant outside and P. citrina was only recorded at the Cagarras Archipelago. Principal Component Analysis plots (PCA generated using pairwise unweighted UniFrac distances showed that the archaeal community structure of inner bay seawater and sponges was different from that of coastal Cagarras Archipelago. Rarefaction analyses showed that inner bay archaeaoplankton were more diverse than those from the Cagarras Archipelago. Only members of Crenarchaeota were found in sponge libraries, while in seawater both Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota were observed. Although most amoA archaeal genes detected in this study seem to be novel, some clones were affiliated to known ammonia oxidizers such as Nitrosopumilus maritimus and Cenarchaeum symbiosum. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The composition and diversity of archaeal communities associated with pollution-tolerant sponge species can change in a range of few kilometers, probably influenced by eutrophication. The presence of archaeal amoA genes in Porifera suggests that Archaea are involved in the nitrogen cycle within the sponge holobiont, possibly increasing its resistance to anthropogenic impacts. The higher diversity of Crenarchaeota in the polluted area suggests that some marine sponges are able to change the composition

  4. When everyone is an orphan: against adopting a U.S.-styled orphan drug policy in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Putting aside whether diseases that affect only small numbers of people ("rare diseases") should be prioritized over diseases that are otherwise orphaned, in this article I argue that a new approach to rare, orphan diseases is needed. The current model, first signaled by the United States' Orphan Drug Act and subsequently emulated by several other jurisdictions, relies on a set of open-ended criteria and market-based incentives in order to define and encourage drug therapies for rare, orphan diseases. Given a) the biopharmaceutical industries' growing interest in orphan diseases, b) progress in the sphere of personalized medicines enabling more and more common diseases to be reclassified as rare, and c) empirical evidence suggesting that the most orphan drugs target only a limited, lucrative subset of rare diseases, I argue that Canada, which recently announced plans to develop its own "orphan drug framework" should not follow the United States' orphan drug model.

  5. Structure and cell biology of archaeal virus STIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chi-yu; Johnson, Johnson E

    2012-04-01

    Recent investigations of archaeal viruses have revealed novel features of their structures and life cycles when compared to eukaryotic and bacterial viruses, yet there are structure-based unifying themes suggesting common ancestral relationships among dsDNA viruses in the three kingdoms of life. Sulfolobus solfataricus and the infecting virus Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) is one of the well-established model systems to study archaeal virus replication and viral-host interactions. Reliable laboratory conditions to propagate STIV and available genetic tools allowed structural characterization of the virus and viral components that lead to the proposal of common capsid ancestry with PRD1 (bacteriophage), Adenovirus (eukaryotic virus) and PBCV (chlorellavirus). Microarray and proteomics approaches systematically analyzed viral replication and the corresponding host responses. Cellular cryo-electron tomography and thin-section EM studies uncovered the assembly and maturation pathway of STIV and revealed dramatic cellular ultra-structure changes upon infection. The viral-induced pyramid-like protrusions on cell surfaces represent a novel viral release mechanism and previously uncharacterized functions in viral replication.

  6. Archaeal type IV pili and their involvement in biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlschroder, Mechthild; Esquivel, Rianne N

    2015-01-01

    Type IV pili are ancient proteinaceous structures present on the cell surface of species in nearly all bacterial and archaeal phyla. These filaments, which are required for a diverse array of important cellular processes, are assembled employing a conserved set of core components. While type IV pilins, the structural subunits of pili, share little sequence homology, their signal peptides are structurally conserved allowing for in silico prediction. Recently, in vivo studies in model archaea representing the euryarchaeal and crenarchaeal kingdoms confirmed that several of these pilins are incorporated into type IV adhesion pili. In addition to facilitating surface adhesion, these in vivo studies also showed that several predicted pilins are required for additional functions that are critical to biofilm formation. Examples include the subunits of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius Ups pili, which are induced by exposure to UV light and promote cell aggregation and conjugation, and a subset of the Haloferax volcanii adhesion pilins, which play a critical role in microcolony formation while other pilins inhibit this process. The recent discovery of novel pilin functions such as the ability of haloarchaeal adhesion pilins to regulate swimming motility may point to novel regulatory pathways conserved across prokaryotic domains. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the functional roles played by archaeal type IV adhesion pili and their subunits, with particular emphasis on their involvement in biofilm formation.

  7. Archaeal viruses multiply: temporal screening in a solar saltern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasova, Nina S; Demina, Tatiana A; Buivydas, Andrius; Bamford, Dennis H; Oksanen, Hanna M

    2015-04-10

    Hypersaline environments around the world are dominated by archaea and their viruses. To date, very little is known about these viruses and their interaction with the host strains when compared to bacterial and eukaryotic viruses. We performed the first culture-dependent temporal screening of haloarchaeal viruses and their hosts in the saltern of Samut Sakhon, Thailand, during two subsequent years (2009, 2010). Altogether we obtained 36 haloarchaeal virus isolates and 36 archaeal strains, significantly increasing the number of known archaeal virus isolates. Interestingly, the morphological distribution of our temporal isolates (head-tailed, pleomorphic, and icosahedral membrane-containing viruses) was similar to the outcome of our previous spatial survey supporting the observations of a global resemblance of halophilic microorganisms and their viruses. Myoviruses represented the most abundant virus morphotype with strikingly broad host ranges. The other viral morphotypes (siphoviruses, as well as pleomorphic and icosahedral internal membrane-containing viruses) were more host-specific. We also identified a group of Halorubrum strains highly susceptible to numerous different viruses (up to 26). This high virus sensitivity, the abundance of broad host range viruses, and the maintenance of infectivity over a period of one year suggest constant interplay of halophilic microorganisms and their viruses within an extreme environment.

  8. Archaeal Viruses Multiply: Temporal Screening in a Solar Saltern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina S. Atanasova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hypersaline environments around the world are dominated by archaea and their viruses. To date, very little is known about these viruses and their interaction with the host strains when compared to bacterial and eukaryotic viruses. We performed the first culture-dependent temporal screening of haloarchaeal viruses and their hosts in the saltern of Samut Sakhon, Thailand, during two subsequent years (2009, 2010. Altogether we obtained 36 haloarchaeal virus isolates and 36 archaeal strains, significantly increasing the number of known archaeal virus isolates. Interestingly, the morphological distribution of our temporal isolates (head-tailed, pleomorphic, and icosahedral membrane-containing viruses was similar to the outcome of our previous spatial survey supporting the observations of a global resemblance of halophilic microorganisms and their viruses. Myoviruses represented the most abundant virus morphotype with strikingly broad host ranges. The other viral morphotypes (siphoviruses, as well as pleomorphic and icosahedral internal membrane-containing viruses were more host-specific. We also identified a group of Halorubrum strains highly susceptible to numerous different viruses (up to 26. This high virus sensitivity, the abundance of broad host range viruses, and the maintenance of infectivity over a period of one year suggest constant interplay of halophilic microorganisms and their viruses within an extreme environment.

  9. Archaeal Nucleic Acid Ligases and Their Potential in Biotechnology

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    Cecilia R. Chambers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With their ability to catalyse the formation of phosphodiester linkages, DNA ligases and RNA ligases are essential tools for many protocols in molecular biology and biotechnology. Currently, the nucleic acid ligases from bacteriophage T4 are used extensively in these protocols. In this review, we argue that the nucleic acid ligases from Archaea represent a largely untapped pool of enzymes with diverse and potentially favourable properties for new and emerging biotechnological applications. We summarise the current state of knowledge on archaeal DNA and RNA ligases, which makes apparent the relative scarcity of information on in vitro activities that are of most relevance to biotechnologists (such as the ability to join blunt- or cohesive-ended, double-stranded DNA fragments. We highlight the existing biotechnological applications of archaeal DNA ligases and RNA ligases. Finally, we draw attention to recent experiments in which protein engineering was used to modify the activities of the DNA ligase from Pyrococcus furiosus and the RNA ligase from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, thus demonstrating the potential for further work in this area.

  10. On the genealogy of the Orphan Stream

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sales, Laura V.; Helmi, Amina; Starkenburg, Else; Morrison, Heather L.; Engle, Ethan; Harding, Paul; Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.; Sivarani, Thirupathi

    2008-01-01

    We use N-body simulations to explore the origin and a plausible orbit for the Orphan Stream, one of the faintest substructures discovered so far in the outer halo of our Galaxy. We are able to reproduce its position, velocity and distance measurements by appealing to a single wrap of a double-compon

  11. Structure and function of the archaeal exosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evguenieva-Hackenberg, Elena; Hou, Linlin; Glaeser, Stefanie; Klug, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    The RNA-degrading exosome in archaea is structurally very similar to the nine-subunit core of the essential eukaryotic exosome and to bacterial polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase). In contrast to the eukaryotic exosome, PNPase and the archaeal exosome exhibit metal ion-dependent, phosphorolytic activities and synthesize heteropolymeric RNA tails in addition to the exoribonucleolytic RNA degradation in 3' → 5' direction. The archaeal nine-subunit exosome consists of four orthologs of eukaryotic exosomal subunits: the RNase PH-domain-containing subunits Rrp41 and Rrp42 form a hexameric ring with three active sites, whereas the S1-domain-containing subunits Rrp4 and Csl4 form an RNA-binding trimeric cap on the top of the ring. In vivo, this cap contains Rrp4 and Csl4 in variable amounts. Rrp4 confers poly(A) specificity to the exosome, whereas Csl4 is involved in the interaction with the archaea-specific subunit of the complex, the homolog of the bacterial primase DnaG. The archaeal DnaG is a highly conserved protein and its gene is present in all sequenced archaeal genomes, although the exosome was lost in halophilic archaea and some methanogens. In exosome-containing archaea, DnaG is tightly associated with the exosome. It functions as an additional RNA-binding subunit with poly(A) specificity in the reconstituted exosome of Sulfolobus solfataricus and enhances the degradation of adenine-rich transcripts in vitro. Not only the RNA-binding cap but also the hexameric Rrp41-Rrp42 ring alone shows substrate selectivity and prefers purines over pyrimidines. This implies a coevolution of the exosome and its RNA substrates resulting in 3'-ends with different affinities to the exosome.

  12. Structure of the rare archaeal biosphere and seasonal dynamics of active ecotypes in surface coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugoni, Mylène; Taib, Najwa; Debroas, Didier; Domaizon, Isabelle; Jouan Dufournel, Isabelle; Bronner, Gisèle; Salter, Ian; Agogué, Hélène; Mary, Isabelle; Galand, Pierre E

    2013-04-01

    Marine Archaea are important players among microbial plankton and significantly contribute to biogeochemical cycles, but details regarding their community structure and long-term seasonal activity and dynamics remain largely unexplored. In this study, we monitored the interannual archaeal community composition of abundant and rare biospheres in northwestern Mediterranean Sea surface waters by pyrosequencing 16S rDNA and rRNA. A detailed analysis of the rare biosphere structure showed that the rare archaeal community was composed of three distinct fractions. One contained the rare Archaea that became abundant at different times within the same ecosystem; these cells were typically not dormant, and we hypothesize that they represent a local seed bank that is specific and essential for ecosystem functioning through cycling seasonal environmental conditions. The second fraction contained cells that were uncommon in public databases and not active, consisting of aliens to the studied ecosystem and representing a nonlocal seed bank of potential colonizers. The third fraction contained Archaea that were always rare but actively growing; their affiliation and seasonal dynamics were similar to the abundant microbes and could not be considered a seed bank. We also showed that the major archaeal groups, Thaumarchaeota marine group I and Euryarchaeota group II.B in winter and Euryarchaeota group II.A in summer, contained different ecotypes with varying activities. Our findings suggest that archaeal diversity could be associated with distinct metabolisms or life strategies, and that the rare archaeal biosphere is composed of a complex assortment of organisms with distinct histories that affect their potential for growth.

  13. On the genealogy of the Orphan Stream

    CERN Document Server

    Sales, L V; Starkenburg, E; Morrison, H L; Engle, E; Harding, P; Mateo, M; Olszewski, E W; Sivarani, T

    2008-01-01

    We use N-body simulations to explore the origin and a plausible orbit for the Orphan Stream, one of the faintest substructures discovered so far in the outer halo of our Galaxy. We are able to reproduce its position, velocity and distance measurements by appealing to a single wrap of a double-component satellite galaxy. We find that the progenitor of the Orphan Stream could have been an object similar to today's Milky Way dwarfs, such as Carina, Draco, Leo II or Sculptor; and unlikely to be connected to Complex A or Ursa Major II. Our models suggest that such progenitors, if accreted on orbits with apocenters smaller than ~35 kpc, are likely to give rise to very low surface brightness streams, which may be hiding in the outer halo and remain largely undetected with current techniques. The systematic discovery of these ghostly substructures may well require wide field spectroscopic surveys of the Milky Way's outer stellar halo.

  14. Legal and regulatory aspects of orphan drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shani, Segev; Yahalom, Zohar

    2013-11-01

    Rare (orphan) diseases are defined as diseases whose prevalence is significantly low. Many of these diseases are diagnosed at childhood by pediatricians. Rare diseases pose many obstacles for health care systems in general and patients specifically. As they are rare, they are less investigated, there is less knowledge about the disease and less professionals specializing in it. Furthermore, as for most diseases there is no specific treatment, diagnosis is not relevant. From industry perspective, as the market potential is small, there is no financial incentive to invest in developing treatments for rare diseases. All the above led patients, researchers and policymakers around the world to legislate specific laws designated to encourage and provide incentives for researchers and for the pharmaceutical industry to develop scientific and clinical knowledge as well as potential treatments for these diseases. The objective of this article is to describe the initiation and current status of public health policy concerning orphan disease and drugs.

  15. Bioinformatic Analysis Reveals Archaeal tRNATyr and tRNATrp Identities in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahito Mukai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The tRNA identity elements for some amino acids are distinct between the bacterial and archaeal domains. Searching in recent genomic and metagenomic sequence data, we found some candidate phyla radiation (CPR bacteria with archaeal tRNA identity for Tyr-tRNA and Trp-tRNA synthesis. These bacteria possess genes for tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS and tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS predicted to be derived from DPANN superphylum archaea, while the cognate tRNATyr and tRNATrp genes reveal bacterial or archaeal origins. We identified a trace of domain fusion and swapping in the archaeal-type TyrRS gene of a bacterial lineage, suggesting that CPR bacteria may have used this mechanism to create diverse proteins. Archaeal-type TrpRS of bacteria and a few TrpRS species of DPANN archaea represent a new phylogenetic clade (named TrpRS-A. The TrpRS-A open reading frames (ORFs are always associated with another ORF (named ORF1 encoding an unknown protein without global sequence identity to any known protein. However, our protein structure prediction identified a putative HIGH-motif and KMSKS-motif as well as many α-helices that are characteristic of class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS homologs. These results provide another example of the diversity of molecular components that implement the genetic code and provide a clue to the early evolution of life and the genetic code.

  16. Orphan enzymes in ether lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watschinger, Katrin; Werner, Ernst R

    2013-01-01

    Ether lipids are an emerging class of lipids which have so far not been investigated and understood in every detail. They have important roles as membrane components of e.g. lens, brain and testis, and as mediators such as platelet-activating factor. The metabolic enzymes for biosynthesis and degradation have been investigated to some extent. As most involved enzymes are integral membrane proteins they are tricky to handle in biochemical protocols. The sequence of some ether lipid metabolising enzymes has only recently been reported and other sequences still remain obscure. Defined enzymes without assigned sequence are known as orphan enzymes. One of these enzymes with uncharacterised sequence is plasmanylethanolamine desaturase, a key enzyme for the biosynthesis of one of the most abundant phospholipids in our body, the plasmalogens. This review aims to briefly summarise known functions of ether lipids, give an overview on their metabolism including the most prominent members, platelet-activating factor and the plasmalogens. A special focus is set on the description of orphan enzymes in ether lipid metabolism and on the successful strategies how four previous orphans have recently been assigned a sequence. Only one of these four was characterised by classical protein purification and sequencing, whereas the other three required alternative strategies such as bioinformatic candidate gene selection and recombinant expression or development of an inhibitor and multidimensional metabolic profiling.

  17. The Orbit of the Orphan Stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newberg, Heidi Jo; Willett, Benjamin A.; Yanny, Brian; Xu, Yan

    2010-01-01

    We use recent SEGUE spectroscopy and SDSS and SEGUE imaging data to measure the sky position, distance, and radial velocities of stars in the tidal debris stream that is commonly referred to as the 'Orphan Stream.' We fit orbital parameters to the data, and find a prograde orbit with an apogalacticon, perigalacticon, and eccentricity of 90 kpc, 16.4 kpc and e = 0.7, respectively. Neither the dwarf galaxy UMa II nor the Complex A gas cloud have velocities consistent with a kinematic association with the Orphan Stream. It is possible that Segue-1 is associated with the Orphan Stream, but no other known Galactic clusters or dwarf galaxies in the Milky Way lie along its orbit. The detected portion of the stream ranges from 19 to 47 kpc from the Sun and is an indicator of the mass interior to these distances. There is a marked increase in the density of Orphan Stream stars near (l, b) = (253{sup o}; 49{sup o}), which could indicate the presence of the progenitor at the edge of the SDSS data. If this is the progenitor, then the detected portion of the Orphan Stream is a leading tidal tail. We find blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars and F turnoff stars associated with the Orphan Stream. The turnoff color is (g-r){sub 0} = 0.22. The BHB stars have a low metallicity of [Fe/H]{sub WBG} = -2.1. The orbit is best fit to a halo potential with a halo plus disk mass of about 2.6 x 10{sup 11} M{sub {circle_dot}}, integrated to 60 kpc from the Galactic center. Our fits are done to orbits rather than full N-body simulations; we show that if N-body simulations are used, the inferred mass of the galaxy would be slightly smaller. Our best fit is found with a logarithmic halo speed of v{sub halo} = 73 {+-} 24 km s{sup -1}, a disk+bulge mass of M(R < 60 kpc) = 1.3 x 10{sup 11} M{sub {circle_dot}}, and a halo mass of M(R < 60 kpc) = 1.4 x 10{sup 11} M{sub {circle_dot}}. However, we can find similar fits to the data that use an NFW halo profile, or that have smaller disk masses

  18. Archaeal CRISPR-based immune systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garrett, Roger A; Vestergaard, Gisle Alberg; Shah, Shiraz Ali

    2011-01-01

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-based immune systems are essentially modular with three primary functions: the excision and integration of new spacers, the processing of CRISPR transcripts to yield mature CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs), and the targeting and cleavage...... of foreign nucleic acid. The primary target appears to be the DNA of foreign genetic elements, but the CRISPR/Cmr system that is widespread amongst archaea also specifically targets and cleaves RNA in vitro. The archaeal CRISPR systems tend to be both diverse and complex. Here we examine evidence...... of CRISPR loci and the evidence for intergenomic exchange of CRISPR systems....

  19. Relationship Between Family Economic Resources, Psychosocial Well-being, and Educational Preferences of AIDS-Orphaned Children in Southern Uganda: Baseline Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssewamala, Fred M; Nabunya, Proscovia; Ilic, Vilma; Mukasa, Miriam N; Ddamulira, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    This study examines the relationship between economic resources, psychosocial well-being, and educational preferences of AIDS-orphaned children in southern Uganda. We use baseline data from a sample of 1410 AIDS-orphaned children (defined as children who have lost one or both biological parents to AIDS) enrolled in the Bridges to the Future study, a National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) funded study. Analyses from both bivariate and multiple regression analyses indicate the following: 1) despite the well-documented economic and psychosocial challenges AIDS-orphaned children face, many of these children have high educational plans and aspirations; 2) educational aspirations differ by orphanhood status (double orphan vs. single orphan); 3) regardless of orphanhood status, children report similar levels of psychosocial well-being; 4) high levels of family cohesion, positive perceptions of the future, school satisfaction, and lower levels of hopelessness (hopefulness) are associated with high educational aspirations; and 5) reported family economic resources at baseline, all seem to play a role in predicting children's educational preferences and psychosocial well-being. These findings suggest that the focus for care and support of orphaned children should not be limited to addressing their psychosocial needs. Addressing the economic needs of the households in which orphaned children live is equally important. Indeed, in the context of extreme poverty-in which most of the children represented in this study live-addressing structural factors, including poverty, may be a key driver in addressing their psychosocial functioning.

  20. Unexplored Archaeal Diversity in the Great Ape Gut Microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Andrew H.; Goodman, Andrew L.; Ochman, Howard

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Archaea are habitual residents of the human gut flora but are detected at substantially lower frequencies than bacteria. Previous studies have indicated that each human harbors very few archaeal species. However, the low diversity of human-associated archaea that has been detected could be due to the preponderance of bacteria in these communities, such that relatively few sequences are classified as Archaea even when microbiomes are sampled deeply. Moreover, the universal prokaryotic primer pair typically used to interrogate microbial diversity has low specificity to the archaeal domain, potentially leaving vast amounts of diversity unobserved. As a result, the prevalence, diversity, and distribution of archaea may be substantially underestimated. Here we evaluate archaeal diversity in gut microbiomes using an approach that targets virtually all known members of this domain. Comparing microbiomes across five great ape species allowed us to examine the dynamics of archaeal lineages over evolutionary time scales. These analyses revealed hundreds of gut-associated archaeal lineages, indicating that upwards of 90% of the archaeal diversity in the human and great ape gut microbiomes has been overlooked. Additionally, these results indicate a progressive reduction in archaeal diversity in the human lineage, paralleling the decline reported for bacteria. IMPORTANCE Our findings show that Archaea are a habitual and vital component of human and great ape gut microbiomes but are largely ignored on account of the failure of previous studies to realize their full diversity. Here we report unprecedented levels of archaeal diversity in great ape gut microbiomes, exceeding that detected by conventional 16S rRNA gene surveys. Paralleling what has been reported for bacteria, there is a vast reduction of archaeal diversity in humans. Our study demonstrates that archaeal diversity in the great ape gut microbiome greatly exceeds that reported previously and provides the basis

  1. The archaeal Ced system imports DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wolferen, Marleen; Wagner, Alexander; van der Does, Chris; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2016-01-01

    The intercellular transfer of DNA is a phenomenon that occurs in all domains of life and is a major driving force of evolution. Upon UV-light treatment, cells of the crenarchaeal genus Sulfolobus express Ups pili, which initiate cell aggregate formation. Within these aggregates, chromosomal DNA, which is used for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks, is exchanged. Because so far no clear homologs of bacterial DNA transporters have been identified among the genomes of Archaea, the mechanisms of archaeal DNA transport have remained a puzzling and underinvestigated topic. Here we identify saci_0568 and saci_0748, two genes from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius that are highly induced upon UV treatment, encoding a transmembrane protein and a membrane-bound VirB4/HerA homolog, respectively. DNA transfer assays showed that both proteins are essential for DNA transfer between Sulfolobus cells and act downstream of the Ups pili system. Our results moreover revealed that the system is involved in the import of DNA rather than the export. We therefore propose that both Saci_0568 and Saci_0748 are part of a previously unidentified DNA importer. Given the fact that we found this transporter system to be widely spread among the Crenarchaeota, we propose to name it the Crenarchaeal system for exchange of DNA (Ced). In this study we have for the first time to our knowledge described an archaeal DNA transporter. PMID:26884154

  2. Methanopyrus kandleri: an archaeal methanogen unrelated to all other known methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burggraf, S.; Stetter, K. O.; Rouviere, P.; Woese, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of its 16S rRNA sequence shows that the newly discovered hyperthermophilic methanogen, Methanopryus kandleri, is phylogenetically unrelated to any other known methanogen. The organism represents a separate lineage originating near the root of the archaeal tree. Although the 16S rRNA sequence of Mp. kandleri resembles euryarchaeal 16S rRNAs more than it does crenarchaeal, it shows more crenarchaeal signature features than any known euryarchaeal rRNA. Attempts to place it in relation to the root of the archaeal tree show that the Mp. kandleri lineage likely arises from the euryarchaeal branch of the tree. While the existence of so deeply branching a methanogenic lineage brings into question the thesis that methanogenesis evolved from an earlier metabolism similar to that seen in Thermococcus, it at the same time reinforces the notion that the aboriginal [correction of aborginal] archaeon was a thermophile.

  3. Excluding Orphan Drugs from the 340B Drug Discount Program: the Impact on 18 Critical Access Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeline Carpinelli Wallack

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The 340B Drug Pricing Program is a federal program designed to reduce the amount that safety net providers spend on outpatient drugs. The Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care Act of 2010 extended eligibility for 340B to critical access hospitals (CAHs for all drugs except those designated as “orphan.” Because this policy is unprecedented, this study quantifies the gross financial impact that this exemption has on a group of CAHs. Methods: Drug spending for 2010 from 18 CAHs in Minnesota and Wisconsin are reviewed to identify the prevalence of orphan drug purchases and to calculate the price differentials between the 340B price and the hospitals’ current cost. Results: The 18 CAHs’ purchases of orphan drugs comprise an average of 44% of the total annual drug budgets, but only 5% of units purchased, thus representing a very high proportion of their expenditures. In the aggregate, the 18 hospitals would have saved $3.1 million ($171,000 average per hospital had purchases of drugs with orphan designations been made at the 340B price. Because CAH claims for Medicare are reimbursed on a cost-basis, the Federal government is losing an opportunity for savings. Conclusion: The high prevalence of orphan drug use and considerable potential for cost reduction through the 340B program demonstrate the loss of benefit to the hospitals, Federal government and the states.

  4. Nitrification of archaeal ammonia oxidizers in a high- temperature hot spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shun; Peng, Xiaotong; Xu, Hengchao; Ta, Kaiwen

    2016-04-01

    The oxidation of ammonia by microbes has been shown to occur in diverse natural environments. However, the link of in situ nitrification activity to taxonomic identities of ammonia oxidizers in high-temperature environments remains poorly understood. Here, we studied in situ ammonia oxidation rates and the diversity of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) in surface and bottom sediments at 77 °C in the Gongxiaoshe hot spring, Tengchong, Yunnan, China. The in situ ammonia oxidation rates measured by the 15N-NO3- pool dilution technique in the surface and bottom sediments were 4.80 and 5.30 nmol N g-1 h-1, respectively. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) indicated that the archaeal 16S rRNA genes and amoA genes were present in the range of 0.128 to 1.96 × 108 and 2.75 to 9.80 × 105 gene copies g-1 sediment, respectively, while bacterial amoA was not detected. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed high sequence similarity to thermophilic Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii, which represented the most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTU) in both surface and bottom sediments. The archaeal predominance was further supported by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) visualization. The cell-specific rate of ammonia oxidation was estimated to range from 0.410 to 0.790 fmol N archaeal cell-1 h-1, higher than those in the two US Great Basin hot springs. These results suggest the importance of archaeal rather than bacterial ammonia oxidation in driving the nitrogen cycle in terrestrial geothermal environments.

  5. A Method for Identification of Selenoprotein Genes in Archaeal Genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingfeng Li; Yanzhao Huang; Yi Xiao

    2009-01-01

    The genetic codon UGA has a dual function: serving as a terminator and encoding selenocysteine. However, most popular gene annotation programs only take it as a stop signal, resulting in misannotation or completely missing selenoprotein genes. We developed a computational method named Asec-Prediction that is specific for the prediction of archaeal selenoprotein genes. To evaluate its effectiveness, we first applied it to 14 archaeal genomes with previously known selenoprotein genes, and Asec-Prediction identified all reported selenoprotein genes without redundant results. When we applied it to 12 archaeal genomes that had not been researched for selenoprotein genes, Asec-Prediction detected a novel selenoprotein gene in Methanosarcina acetivorans. Further evidence was also collected to support that the predicted gene should be a real selenoprotein gene. The result shows that Asec-Prediction is effective for the prediction of archaeal selenoprotein genes.

  6. 40 Years of archaeal virology: Expanding viral diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jamie C; Bolduc, Benjamin; Young, Mark J

    2015-05-01

    The first archaeal virus was isolated over 40 years ago prior to the recognition of the three domain structure of life. In the ensuing years, our knowledge of Archaea and their viruses has increased, but they still remain the most mysterious of life's three domains. Currently, over 100 archaeal viruses have been discovered, but few have been described in biochemical or structural detail. However, those that have been characterized have revealed a new world of structural, biochemical and genetic diversity. Several model systems for studying archaeal virus-host interactions have been developed, revealing evolutionary linkages between viruses infecting the three domains of life, new viral lysis systems, and unusual features of host-virus interactions. It is likely that the study of archaeal viruses will continue to provide fertile ground for fundamental discoveries in virus diversity, structure and function.

  7. Multi-criteria decision analysis for assessment and appraisal of orphan drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgi Iskrov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Limited resources and expanding expectations push all countries and types of health systems to adopt new approaches in priority setting and resources allocation. Despite best efforts, it is difficult to reconcile all competing interests and trade-offs are inevitable. This is why multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA has played a major role in recent uptake of value-based reimbursement. MCDA framework enables exploration of stakeholders’ preferences, as well as explicit organization of broad range of criteria on which real-world decisions are made.Assessment and appraisal of orphan drugs tend to be one of the most complicated health technology assessment (HTA tasks. Access to market approved orphan therapies remains an issue. Early constructive dialogue among rare disease stakeholders and elaboration of orphan drug-tailored decision support tools could set the scene for ongoing accumulation of evidence, as well as for proper reimbursement decision-making.Objective: The objective of this study was to create a MCDA value measurement model to assess and appraise orphan drugs. This was achieved by exploring the preferences on decision criteria’s weights and performance scores through a stakeholder-representative survey and a focus group discussion that were both organized in Bulgaria.Results/Conclusions: Decision criteria that describe the health technology’s characteristics were unanimously agreed as the most important group of reimbursement considerations. This outcome, combined with the high individual weight of disease severity and disease burden criteria underlined some of the fundamental principles of healthcare – equity and fairness. Our study proved that strength of evidence may be a key criterion in orphan drug assessment and appraisal. Evidence is not only used to shape reimbursement decision-making, but also to lend legitimacy to policies pursued. The need for real-world data on orphan drugs was largely stressed

  8. Some Numbers behind Canada's Decision to Adopt an Orphan Drug Policy: US Orphan Drug Approvals in Canada, 1997-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Matthew; Krahn, Timothy Mark

    2016-05-01

    We examined whether access to US-approved orphan drugs in Canada has changed between 1997 (when Canada chose not to adopt an orphan drug policy) and 2012 (when Canada reversed its policy decision). Specifically, we looked at two dimensions of access to US-approved orphan drugs in Canada: (1) regulatory access; and (2) temporal access. Whereas only 63% of US-approved orphan drugs were granted regulatory approval in 1997, we found that regulatory access to US-approved orphan drugs in Canada increased to 74% between 1997 and 2012. However, temporal access to orphan drugs is slower in Canada: in a head-on comparison of 40 matched drugs, only two were submitted and four were approved first in Canada; moreover, the mean review time in Canada (423 days) was longer than that in the US (mean = 341 days), a statistically significant difference (t[39] = 2.04, p = 0.048). These results raise questions about what motivated Canada's apparent shift in orphan drug policy.

  9. From novice to expert: agroecological competences of children orphaned by AIDS compared to non-orphans in Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price Lisa L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background AIDS has created new vulnerabilities for rural African households due to prime-age adult mortality and is assumed to lead to impairment of the intergenerational transfer of farming knowledge. There has been scant research to date, however, on the impacts of parental death on farming knowledge of children made orphans by AIDS. The question we investigate is if there is a difference in agricultural expertise between AIDS affected and non-affected adults and children. Methods The research was carried out in rural Benin with 77 informants randomly selected according to their AIDS status: 13 affected and 13 non-affected adults; 13 paternal, 13 maternal and 13 double orphans; and 12 non-orphan children. Informants descriptions from pile sorting exercises of maize and cowpea pests were categorized and then aggregated into descriptions based form (morphology and function (utility and used to determine whether the moving from novice to expert is impaired by children orphaned by AIDS. Differences and similarities in responses were determined using the Fischer exact test and the Cochran-Mantzel-Haenszel test. Results No significant differences were found between AIDS affected and non-affected adults. Results of the study do reveal differences in the use of form and function descriptors among the children. There is a statistically significant difference in the use of form descriptors between one-parent orphans and non-orphans and in descriptors of specific damages to maize. One-parent paternal orphans were exactly like non-affected adults in their 50/50 balanced expertise in the use of both form and function descriptors. One-parent orphans also had the highest number of descriptors used by children overall and these descriptors are spread across the various aspects of the knowledge domain relative to non-orphans. Conclusions Rather than a knowledge loss for one-parent orphans, particularly paternal orphans, we believe we are witnessing

  10. The many "small COPDs": COPD should be an orphan disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rennard, Stephen I; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    status, therefore, could facilitate the development of treatments for both phenotypic subsets of COPD patients as well as aid the development of agents to alter the natural history of the disease. Post-drug approval regulations could require that agents approved under the orphan provisions......COPD is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality. Perhaps paradoxically, COPD also should be an orphan disease. Importantly, this could advance the development of treatments for COPD. There are two criteria for orphan status in the United States. Most widely known is the criterion...... groups based on mechanism sets the stage for the rational development of therapeutics. In addition, many candidate treatments may alter the natural history of COPD. Testing them, however, will require large studies for a duration that will compromise the commercial life of any resulting product. Orphan...

  11. Archaeal remains dominate marine organic matter from the early Albian oceanic anoxic event 1b

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuypers, M.M.M.; Blokker, P.; Hopmans, E.C.;

    2002-01-01

    tetraethers) indicates an important contribution of representatives of marine planktonic archaea. The large difference (up to 12 ‰) in C/C ratios between algal biomarkers and the much more abundant planktonic archaea-derived biomarkers indicates that the latter were living chemoautotrophically. This offset......, distinct lamination, C-enrichment of OC) between the black shales of OAE1b and the Cenomanian/Turonian (∼94 Myr) OAE, the origin of the organic matter (archaeal versus phytoplanktonic) and causes for C-enrichment of OC are completely different. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  12. Virus-mediated archaeal hecatomb in the deep seafloor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danovaro, Roberto; Dell’Anno, Antonio; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Rastelli, Eugenio; Cavicchioli, Ricardo; Krupovic, Mart; Noble, Rachel T.; Nunoura, Takuro; Prangishvili, David

    2016-01-01

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities in the world’s oceans, and they play a crucial role in global biogeochemical cycles. In deep-sea ecosystems, archaea and bacteria drive major nutrient cycles, and viruses are largely responsible for their mortality, thereby exerting important controls on microbial dynamics. However, the relative impact of viruses on archaea compared to bacteria is unknown, limiting our understanding of the factors controlling the functioning of marine systems at a global scale. We evaluate the selectivity of viral infections by using several independent approaches, including an innovative molecular method based on the quantification of archaeal versus bacterial genes released by viral lysis. We provide evidence that, in all oceanic surface sediments (from 1000- to 10,000-m water depth), the impact of viral infection is higher on archaea than on bacteria. We also found that, within deep-sea benthic archaea, the impact of viruses was mainly directed at members of specific clades of Marine Group I Thaumarchaeota. Although archaea represent, on average, ~12% of the total cell abundance in the top 50 cm of sediment, virus-induced lysis of archaea accounts for up to one-third of the total microbial biomass killed, resulting in the release of ~0.3 to 0.5 gigatons of carbon per year globally. Our results indicate that viral infection represents a key mechanism controlling the turnover of archaea in surface deep-sea sediments. We conclude that interactions between archaea and their viruses might play a profound, previously underestimated role in the functioning of deep-sea ecosystems and in global biogeochemical cycles. PMID:27757416

  13. Functional analysis of archaeal MBF1 by complementation studies in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siebers Bettina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiprotein-bridging factor 1 (MBF1 is a transcriptional co-activator that bridges a sequence-specific activator (basic-leucine zipper (bZIP like proteins (e.g. Gcn4 in yeast or steroid/nuclear-hormone receptor family (e.g. FTZ-F1 in insect and the TATA-box binding protein (TBP in Eukaryotes. MBF1 is absent in Bacteria, but is well- conserved in Eukaryotes and Archaea and harbors a C-terminal Cro-like Helix Turn Helix (HTH domain, which is the only highly conserved, classical HTH domain that is vertically inherited in all Eukaryotes and Archaea. The main structural difference between archaeal MBF1 (aMBF1 and eukaryotic MBF1 is the presence of a Zn ribbon motif in aMBF1. In addition MBF1 interacting activators are absent in the archaeal domain. To study the function and therefore the evolutionary conservation of MBF1 and its single domains complementation studies in yeast (mbf1Δ as well as domain swap experiments between aMBF1 and yMbf1 were performed. Results In contrast to previous reports for eukaryotic MBF1 (i.e. Arabidopsis thaliana, insect and human the two archaeal MBF1 orthologs, TMBF1 from the hyperthermophile Thermoproteus tenax and MMBF1 from the mesophile Methanosarcina mazei were not functional for complementation of an Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking Mbf1 (mbf1Δ. Of twelve chimeric proteins representing different combinations of the N-terminal, core domain, and the C-terminal extension from yeast and aMBF1, only the chimeric MBF1 comprising the yeast N-terminal and core domain fused to the archaeal C-terminal part was able to restore full wild-type activity of MBF1. However, as reported previously for Bombyx mori, the C-terminal part of yeast Mbf1 was shown to be not essential for function. In addition phylogenetic analyses revealed a common distribution of MBF1 in all Archaea with available genome sequence, except of two of the three Thaumarchaeota; Cenarchaeum symbiosum A and Nitrosopumilus maritimus

  14. Crystal structure of an archaeal actin homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeben, Annette; Kofler, Christine; Nagy, István; Nickell, Stephan; Hartl, F Ulrich; Bracher, Andreas

    2006-04-21

    Prokaryotic homologs of the eukaryotic structural protein actin, such as MreB and ParM, have been implicated in determination of bacterial cell shape, and in the segregation of genomic and plasmid DNA. In contrast to these bacterial actin homologs, little is known about the archaeal counterparts. As a first step, we expressed a predicted actin homolog of the thermophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum, Ta0583, and determined its crystal structure at 2.1A resolution. Ta0583 is expressed as a soluble protein in T.acidophilum and is an active ATPase at physiological temperature. In vitro, Ta0583 forms sheets with spacings resembling the crystal lattice, indicating an inherent propensity to form filamentous structures. The fold of Ta0583 contains the core structure of actin and clearly belongs to the actin/Hsp70 superfamily of ATPases. Ta0583 is approximately equidistant from actin and MreB on the structural level, and combines features from both eubacterial actin homologs, MreB and ParM. The structure of Ta0583 co-crystallized with ADP indicates that the nucleotide binds at the interface between the subdomains of Ta0583 in a manner similar to that of actin. However, the conformation of the nucleotide observed in complex with Ta0583 clearly differs from that in complex with actin, but closely resembles the conformation of ParM-bound nucleotide. On the basis of sequence and structural homology, we suggest that Ta0583 derives from a ParM-like actin homolog that was once encoded by a plasmid and was transferred into a common ancestor of Thermoplasma and Ferroplasma. Intriguingly, both genera are characterized by the lack of a cell wall, and therefore Ta0583 could have a function in cellular organization.

  15. Diversity and subcellular distribution of archaeal secreted proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mechthild ePohlschroder

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Secreted proteins make up a significant percentage of a prokaryotic proteome and play critical roles in important cellular processes such as polymer degradation, nutrient uptake, signal transduction, cell wall biosynthesis and motility. The majority of archaeal proteins are believed to be secreted either in an unfolded conformation via the universally conserved Sec pathway or in a folded conformation via the Twin arginine transport (Tat pathway. Extensive in vivo and in silico analyses of N-terminal signal peptides that target proteins to these pathways have led to the development of computational tools that not only predict Sec and Tat substrates with high accuracy but also provide information about signal peptide processing and targeting. Predictions therefore include indications as to whether a substrate is a soluble secreted protein, a membrane or cell-wall anchored protein, or a surface structure subunit, and whether it is targeted for post-translational modification such as glycosylation or the addition of a lipid. The use of these in silico tools, in combination with biochemical and genetic analyses of transport pathways and their substrates, has resulted in improved predictions of the subcellular localization of archaeal secreted proteins, allowing for a more accurate annotation of archaeal proteomes, and has led to the identification of potential adaptations to extreme environments, as well as archaeal kingdom-specific pathways. A more comprehensive understanding of the transport pathways and post-translational modifications of secreted archaeal proteins will also generate invaluable insights that will facilitate the identification of commercially valuable archaeal enzymes and the development of heterologous systems in which to efficiently express them.

  16. Legal assessment of current situation on orphan patients in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spokiene, Indre

    2008-01-01

    After Lithuania joined the European Union, the Regulation (EC) No. 141/2000 on orphan medicinal products and Commission Regulation (EC) No. 847/2000 came into force as part of national legislation. Member States must adopt specific measures to increase knowledge on rare diseases and to improve their detection, diagnosis, and treatment. The aim of this article was to present and to assess the current legal situation on orphan patients and their treatment in Lithuania, to identify legislation gaps, and to propose some ideas how to facilitate the solution of the existing problems in this field. For this purpose, European Union and Lithuanian legal documents on rare medicinal products are examined using a comparative method. With reference to inventory of Member States' incentives for rare diseases in national level, the most important issues, which orphan patients face to in Lithuania, are singled out. In Lithuania, the situation of orphan patients in terms of protection of patient rights is insufficiently determined. The access to effective health care services or approved therapies in some cases is restricted. Working relationships between genetic services and various clinical specialists as well as with those in primary care are not legally determined; the number of clinical trials aimed at orphan medicinal products is low. These results suggest a need for awareness raising among Lithuanian Government, health care specialists, patient organizations about the importance to improve practical implementation of European Union legislation and progressive experience of some European countries in this field.

  17. The Orphan Gene dauerless Regulates Dauer Development and Intraspecific Competition in Nematodes by Copy Number Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Melanie G; Rödelsperger, Christian; Witte, Hanh; Riebesell, Metta; Sommer, Ralf J

    2015-06-01

    Many nematodes form dauer larvae when exposed to unfavorable conditions, representing an example of phenotypic plasticity and a major survival and dispersal strategy. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the regulation of dauer induction is a model for pheromone, insulin, and steroid-hormone signaling. Recent studies in Pristionchus pacificus revealed substantial natural variation in various aspects of dauer development, i.e. pheromone production and sensing and dauer longevity and fitness. One intriguing example is a strain from Ohio, having extremely long-lived dauers associated with very high fitness and often forming the most dauers in response to other strains' pheromones, including the reference strain from California. While such examples have been suggested to represent intraspecific competition among strains, the molecular mechanisms underlying these dauer-associated patterns are currently unknown. We generated recombinant-inbred-lines between the Californian and Ohioan strains and used quantitative-trait-loci analysis to investigate the molecular mechanism determining natural variation in dauer development. Surprisingly, we discovered that the orphan gene dauerless controls dauer formation by copy number variation. The Ohioan strain has one dauerless copy causing high dauer formation, whereas the Californian strain has two copies, resulting in strongly reduced dauer formation. Transgenic animals expressing multiple copies do not form dauers. dauerless is exclusively expressed in CAN neurons, and both CAN ablation and dauerless mutations increase dauer formation. Strikingly, dauerless underwent several duplications and acts in parallel or downstream of steroid-hormone signaling but upstream of the nuclear-hormone-receptor daf-12. We identified the novel or fast-evolving gene dauerless as inhibitor of dauer development. Our findings reveal the importance of gene duplications and copy number variations for orphan gene function and suggest daf-12 as major target for

  18. The Orphan Gene dauerless Regulates Dauer Development and Intraspecific Competition in Nematodes by Copy Number Variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie G Mayer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many nematodes form dauer larvae when exposed to unfavorable conditions, representing an example of phenotypic plasticity and a major survival and dispersal strategy. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the regulation of dauer induction is a model for pheromone, insulin, and steroid-hormone signaling. Recent studies in Pristionchus pacificus revealed substantial natural variation in various aspects of dauer development, i.e. pheromone production and sensing and dauer longevity and fitness. One intriguing example is a strain from Ohio, having extremely long-lived dauers associated with very high fitness and often forming the most dauers in response to other strains' pheromones, including the reference strain from California. While such examples have been suggested to represent intraspecific competition among strains, the molecular mechanisms underlying these dauer-associated patterns are currently unknown. We generated recombinant-inbred-lines between the Californian and Ohioan strains and used quantitative-trait-loci analysis to investigate the molecular mechanism determining natural variation in dauer development. Surprisingly, we discovered that the orphan gene dauerless controls dauer formation by copy number variation. The Ohioan strain has one dauerless copy causing high dauer formation, whereas the Californian strain has two copies, resulting in strongly reduced dauer formation. Transgenic animals expressing multiple copies do not form dauers. dauerless is exclusively expressed in CAN neurons, and both CAN ablation and dauerless mutations increase dauer formation. Strikingly, dauerless underwent several duplications and acts in parallel or downstream of steroid-hormone signaling but upstream of the nuclear-hormone-receptor daf-12. We identified the novel or fast-evolving gene dauerless as inhibitor of dauer development. Our findings reveal the importance of gene duplications and copy number variations for orphan gene function and suggest daf-12 as

  19. What Can Big Data Offer the Pharmacovigilance of Orphan Drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, John

    2016-12-01

    The pharmacovigilance of drugs for orphan diseases presents problems related to the small patient population. Obtaining high-quality information on individual reports of suspected adverse reactions is of particular importance for the pharmacovigilance of orphan drugs. The possibility of mining "big data" to detect suspected adverse reactions is being explored in pharmacovigilance generally but may have limited application to orphan drugs. Sources of big data such as social media may be infrequently used as communication channels by patients with rare disease or their caregivers or by health care providers; any adverse reactions identified are likely to reflect what is already known about the safety of the drug from the network of support that grows up around these patients. Opportunities related to potential future big data sources are discussed.

  20. Estimation of the detectability of optical orphan afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, Y C; Dai, Z G

    2006-01-01

    Considering two main assumptions: no sideways expansion and the distribution of half-opening angle of jetted ejecta of gamma-ray bursts, we estimate the detectability of optical orphan afterglows. We show that the former assumption leads to more orphans to be detected while the latter greatly depresses the detectability compared with one single opening angle $\\theta_j=0.1$ model. We also consider the influence of other parameters, and find that the effects of ejecta energy $E_j$, post-jet-break temporal index $-\\alpha_2$ and the distribution of half-opening angle of the jet are important while the index of electron energy distribution $p$, electron energy equipartition factor $\\epsilon_e$ and environment density $n$ are insignificant. If the $E_j$ and $\\alpha_2$ are determined by other methods, one can constrain the distribution of half-opening angle of jets by observation of orphan afterglows.

  1. Identification and genomic analysis of transcription factors in archaeal genomes exemplifies their functional architecture and evolutionary origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2010-06-01

    Archaea, which represent a large fraction of the phylogenetic diversity of organisms, are prokaryotes with eukaryote-like basal transcriptional machinery. This organization makes the study of their DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) and their transcriptional regulatory networks particularly interesting. In addition, there are limited experimental data regarding their TFs. In this work, 3,918 TFs were identified and exhaustively analyzed in 52 archaeal genomes. TFs represented less than 5% of the gene products in all the studied species comparable with the number of TFs identified in parasites or intracellular pathogenic bacteria, suggesting a deficit in this class of proteins. A total of 75 families were identified, of which HTH_3, AsnC, TrmB, and ArsR families were universally and abundantly identified in all the archaeal genomes. We found that archaeal TFs are significantly small compared with other protein-coding genes in archaea as well as bacterial TFs, suggesting that a large fraction of these small-sized TFs could supply the probable deficit of TFs in archaea, by possibly forming different combinations of monomers similar to that observed in eukaryotic transcriptional machinery. Our results show that although the DNA-binding domains of archaeal TFs are similar to bacteria, there is an underrepresentation of ligand-binding domains in smaller TFs, which suggests that protein-protein interactions may act as mediators of regulatory feedback, indicating a chimera of bacterial and eukaryotic TFs' functionality. The analysis presented here contributes to the understanding of the details of transcriptional apparatus in archaea and provides a framework for the analysis of regulatory networks in these organisms.

  2. EU marketing authorization review of orphan and non-orphan drugs does not differ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzeist, M; Mantel-Teeuwisse, A K; Llinares, J; Gispen-De Wied, C C; Hoes, A W; Leufkens, H G M

    2013-10-01

    Marketing authorization application dossiers of 17 orphan drugs (ODs) and 51 non-ODs evaluated by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in the period 2009-2010 were compared. We aimed to identify whether any differences existed between ODs and non-ODs in number and type of deficits brought forward during the EMA review, regarding the clinical development plan, clinical outcome and medical need and studied whether these deficits were similarly associated with marketing approval in the EU. In 71% of the ODs dossiers and 65% of the non-ODs dossiers marketing approval was granted. Differences in deficits were found, but similarities in the way ODs and non-ODs were reviewed and marketing approval decisions were taken, underline that regulatory standards are equally high.

  3. Massive activation of archaeal defense genes during viral infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quax, T.E.F.; Voet, M.; Sismeiro, O.; Dillies, M.A.; Jagla, B.; Coppée, J.Y.; Sezonov, G.; Forterre, P.; Oost, van der J.; Lavigne, R.; Prangishvili, D.

    2013-01-01

    Archaeal viruses display unusually high genetic and morphological diversity. Studies of these viruses proved to be instrumental for the expansion of knowledge on viral diversity and evolution. The Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2) is a model to study virus-host interactions in Archaea

  4. Global occurrence of archaeal amoA genes in terrestrial hot springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanlun L; Ye, Qi; Huang, Zhiyong; Li, Wenjun; Chen, Jinquan; Song, Zhaoqi; Zhao, Weidong; Bagwell, Christopher; Inskeep, William P; Ross, Christian; Gao, Lei; Wiegel, Juergen; Romanek, Christopher S; Shock, Everett L; Hedlund, Brian P

    2008-10-01

    Despite the ubiquity of ammonium in geothermal environments and the thermodynamic favorability of aerobic ammonia oxidation, thermophilic ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms belonging to the crenarchaeota kingdom have only recently been described. In this study, we analyzed microbial mats and surface sediments from 21 hot spring samples (pH 3.4 to 9.0; temperature, 41 to 86 degrees C) from the United States, China, and Russia and obtained 846 putative archaeal ammonia monooxygenase large-subunit (amoA) gene and transcript sequences, representing a total of 41 amoA operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 2% identity. The amoA gene sequences were highly diverse, yet they clustered within two major clades of archaeal amoA sequences known from water columns, sediments, and soils: clusters A and B. Eighty-four percent (711/846) of the sequences belonged to cluster A, which is typically found in water columns and sediments, whereas 16% (135/846) belonged to cluster B, which is typically found in soils and sediments. Although a few amoA OTUs were present in several geothermal regions, most were specific to a single region. In addition, cluster A amoA genes formed geographic groups, while cluster B sequences did not group geographically. With the exception of only one hot spring, principal-component analysis and UPGMA (unweighted-pair group method using average linkages) based on the UniFrac metric derived from cluster A grouped the springs by location, regardless of temperature or bulk water pH, suggesting that geography may play a role in structuring communities of putative ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). The amoA genes were distinct from those of low-temperature environments; in particular, pair-wise comparisons between hot spring amoA genes and those from sympatric soils showed less than 85% sequence identity, underscoring the distinctness of hot spring archaeal communities from those of the surrounding soil system. Reverse transcription-PCR showed that amoA genes were

  5. The correlation between HTA recommendations and reimbursement status of orphan drugs in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Kawalec, Paweł; Sagan, Anna; Pilc, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to review and compare types of reimbursement recommendations for orphan drugs issued by eight European health technology assessment (HTA) agencies and the reimbursement status of these drugs in the corresponding countries. Separate calculations were also performed for three sub-groups: ultra-orphan drugs, oncology orphan drugs and other (non-ultra, non-oncology) orphan drugs. Results We reviewed drugs authorized by the European Medicine Agency (EMA) betwee...

  6. Accessing Social Grants to Meet Orphan Children School Needs: Namibia and South Africa Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taukeni, Simon; Matshidiso, Taole

    2013-01-01

    In this comparative paper we interrogate the access of social grants to meet orphan children school needs in Namibia and South Africa. We noted that the two governments are committed to provide orphan children with social grants to enable them to meet the school needs. However, accessing social grant to benefit most vulnerable orphan children…

  7. Orphan drugs expenditure in the Netherlands in the period 2006-2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Kanters (Tim A.); A. Steenhoek (Adri); L. van Hakkaart-van Roijen (Leona)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The relatively low budget impact of orphan drugs is often used as an argument in reimbursement decisions. However, overall, the budget impact of orphan drugs can still be substantial. In this study, we assess the uptake and budget impact of orphan drugs in the Netherlands.Met

  8. The importance of HIV prevention messaging for orphaned youth in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Erica; Singh, Kavita

    2012-01-01

    The AIDS epidemic has contributed to a drastic increase in the number of orphans in Zimbabwe. Female adolescent orphans are particularly in jeopardy of contracting HIV due to disadvantages including extreme poverty, low education, and the absent of parental oversight which can lead to higher risk-taking sexual behaviors. By understanding where girls receive education about HIV and who they rely on for information, organizations can effectively modify existing programs to better target this at-risk population. For this study a household survey was conducted which included 216 orphans and 324 non-orphans (n=540), aged 12-17 years, in the resource-poor setting of Hwange District, Zimbabwe. The aims of this article were to examine the differences between orphans and non-orphans in HIV prevention message exposure, level of motivation for learning about HIV, and communication with caregivers about safe sex. The household survey revealed that younger orphans, aged 12-15 years, were more motivated to learn about HIV and had greater HIV messaging exposure in school than non-orphans. These exposure and differences in the levels of motivation between groups dissipated at older ages. Our research also discovered less caregiver communication among orphans than non-orphans. Our findings suggest that HIV programs targeting orphans need to do a better job at keeping older orphans interested in HIV prevention at a time when it matters most. Furthermore, intervention strategies that provide caregiver support are instrumental in effectively delivering prevention messages to girls at home.

  9. Orphan receptor ligand discovery by pickpocketing pharmacological neighbors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Tony; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Stewart, Alastair G; Coleman, James L J; McRobb, Fiona M; Riek, R Peter; Graham, Robert M; Abagyan, Ruben; Kufareva, Irina; Smith, Nicola J

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the pharmacological similarity of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is paramount for predicting ligand off-target effects, drug repurposing, and ligand discovery for orphan receptors. Phylogenetic relationships do not always correctly capture pharmacological similarity. Previous family-wide attempts to define pharmacological relationships were based on three-dimensional structures and/or known receptor-ligand pairings, both unavailable for orphan GPCRs. Here, we present GPCR-CoINPocket, a novel contact-informed neighboring pocket metric of GPCR binding-site similarity that is informed by patterns of ligand-residue interactions observed in crystallographically characterized GPCRs. GPCR-CoINPocket is applicable to receptors with unknown structure or ligands and accurately captures known pharmacological relationships between GPCRs, even those undetected by phylogeny. When applied to orphan receptor GPR37L1, GPCR-CoINPocket identified its pharmacological neighbors, and transfer of their pharmacology aided in discovery of the first surrogate ligands for this orphan with a 30% success rate. Although primarily designed for GPCRs, the method is easily transferable to other protein families.

  10. Chinese Company Doubles as “Mother” of Orphans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU JIUJIANG; WANG GUILAN

    2011-01-01

    The story goes back to the end of 2007,when Yang Min,Party secretary and deputy chief manager of the Nantong Times Clothing Co.,Ltd.in Rugao,Jiangsu Province,heard what had happened to an orphan in the city.

  11. 77 FR 64555 - Orphan Works and Mass Digitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ... short, the Office concluded that the problem of orphan works is pervasive; it affects a broad cross... potentially at issue, from music to books to film clips. That said, the Report also reflects that a... particularly challenging because they affect a vast variety of images, from historically important...

  12. Archaeal lipids in oral delivery of therapeutic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ann-Christin; Jensen, Sara M; Fricker, Gert;

    2017-01-01

    tetraether lipids. The inherent chemical stability and unique membrane-spanning characteristics of tetraether lipids render them interesting for oral drug delivery purposes. Archaeal lipids form liposomes spontaneously (archaeosomes) and may be incorporated in conventional liposomes (mixed vesicles). Both...... types of liposomes are promising to protect their drug cargo, such as therapeutic peptides, against the acidic environment of the stomach and proteolytic degradation in the intestine. They appear to withstand lipolytic enzymes and bile salts and may thus deliver orally administered therapeutic peptides...... to distant sections of the intestine or to the colon, where they may be absorbed, eventually by the help of absorption enhancers. Archaeal lipids and their semisynthetic derivatives may thus serve as biological source for the next generation oral drug delivery systems. The aim of this review is to present...

  13. An analysis of amino acid sequences surrounding archaeal glycoprotein sequons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Qarn, Mehtap; Eichler, Jerry

    2007-05-01

    Despite having provided the first example of a prokaryal glycoprotein, little is known of the rules governing the N-glycosylation process in Archaea. As in Eukarya and Bacteria, archaeal N-glycosylation takes place at the Asn residues of Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequons. Since not all sequons are utilized, it is clear that other factors, including the context in which a sequon exists, affect glycosylation efficiency. As yet, the contribution to N-glycosylation made by sequon-bordering residues and other related factors in Archaea remains unaddressed. In the following, the surroundings of Asn residues confirmed by experiment as modified were analyzed in an attempt to define sequence rules and requirements for archaeal N-glycosylation.

  14. An analysis of amino acid sequences surrounding archaeal glycoprotein sequons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehtap Abu-Qarn

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite having provided the first example of a prokaryal glycoprotein, little is known of the rules governing the N-glycosylation process in Archaea. As in Eukarya and Bacteria, archaeal N-glycosylation takes place at the Asn residues of Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequons. Since not all sequons are utilized, it is clear that other factors, including the context in which a sequon exists, affect glycosylation efficiency. As yet, the contribution to N-glycosylation made by sequon-bordering residues and other related factors in Archaea remains unaddressed. In the following, the surroundings of Asn residues confirmed by experiment as modified were analyzed in an attempt to define sequence rules and requirements for archaeal N-glycosylation.

  15. Characterization of radioactive orphan sources by gamma spectrometry; Caracterizacion de fuentes huerfanas radiactivas por espectrometria gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz W, H., E-mail: wcruz@ipen.gob.pe [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (PGRR/IPEN), Lima (Peru). Planta de Gestion de Residuos Radiactivos

    2013-07-01

    The sealed radioactive sources are widely applicable in industry. They must have a permanent control and must be registered with the Technical Office of the National Authority (OTAN). However, at times it has identified the presence of abandoned sealed sources unknown to the owner. These sources are called 'orphan sources'. Of course these sources represent a high potential risk because accidents can trigger dire consequences depending on your activity and chemical form in which it presents the radioisotope. This paper describes the process and the actions taken to characterize two orphan radioactive sources from the smelter a Aceros Arequipa. For characterization we used a gamma spectrometry system using a detector NaI(Tl) 3″ x 3″ with a multichannel analyzer Nucleus PCA-II. The radioisotope identified was cesium - 137 ({sup 137}Cs) in both cases. Fortunately, the sources maintained their integrity would otherwise have generated significant pollution considering the chemical form of the radioisotope and easy dispersion. (author)

  16. Pricing and reimbursement of orphan drugs: the need for more transparency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simoens Steven

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pricing and reimbursement of orphan drugs are an issue of high priority for policy makers, legislators, health care professionals, industry leaders, academics and patients. This study aims to conduct a literature review to provide insight into the drivers of orphan drug pricing and reimbursement. Although orphan drug pricing follows the same economic logic as drug pricing in general, the monopolistic power of orphan drugs results in high prices: a orphan drugs benefit from a period of marketing exclusivity; b few alternative health technologies are available; c third-party payers and patients have limited negotiating power; d manufacturers attempt to maximise orphan drug prices within the constraints of domestic pricing and reimbursement policies; and e substantial R&D costs need to be recouped from a small number of patients. Although these conditions apply to some orphan drugs, they do not apply to all orphan drugs. Indeed, the small number of patients treated with an orphan drug and the limited economic viability of orphan drugs can be questioned in a number of cases. Additionally, manufacturers have an incentive to game the system by artificially creating monopolistic market conditions. Given their high price for an often modest effectiveness, orphan drugs are unlikely to provide value for money. However, additional criteria are used to inform reimbursement decisions in some countries. These criteria may include: the seriousness of the disease; the availability of other therapies to treat the disease; and the cost to the patient if the medicine is not reimbursed. Therefore, the maximum cost per unit of outcome that a health care payer is willing to pay for a drug could be set higher for orphan drugs to which society attaches a high social value. There is a need for a transparent and evidence-based approach towards orphan drug pricing and reimbursement. Such an approach should be targeted at demonstrating the relative effectiveness

  17. Pricing and reimbursement of orphan drugs: the need for more transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven

    2011-06-17

    Pricing and reimbursement of orphan drugs are an issue of high priority for policy makers, legislators, health care professionals, industry leaders, academics and patients. This study aims to conduct a literature review to provide insight into the drivers of orphan drug pricing and reimbursement. Although orphan drug pricing follows the same economic logic as drug pricing in general, the monopolistic power of orphan drugs results in high prices: a) orphan drugs benefit from a period of marketing exclusivity; b) few alternative health technologies are available; c) third-party payers and patients have limited negotiating power; d) manufacturers attempt to maximise orphan drug prices within the constraints of domestic pricing and reimbursement policies; and e) substantial R&D costs need to be recouped from a small number of patients. Although these conditions apply to some orphan drugs, they do not apply to all orphan drugs. Indeed, the small number of patients treated with an orphan drug and the limited economic viability of orphan drugs can be questioned in a number of cases. Additionally, manufacturers have an incentive to game the system by artificially creating monopolistic market conditions. Given their high price for an often modest effectiveness, orphan drugs are unlikely to provide value for money. However, additional criteria are used to inform reimbursement decisions in some countries. These criteria may include: the seriousness of the disease; the availability of other therapies to treat the disease; and the cost to the patient if the medicine is not reimbursed. Therefore, the maximum cost per unit of outcome that a health care payer is willing to pay for a drug could be set higher for orphan drugs to which society attaches a high social value. There is a need for a transparent and evidence-based approach towards orphan drug pricing and reimbursement. Such an approach should be targeted at demonstrating the relative effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and

  18. Spatiotemporal variability in archaeal communities of tropical coastal waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singh, S.K.

    (Woese 1987), have changed our perceptions on their bio- diversity, distribution and function in natural marine ecosys- tems. Meticulous and extensive analyses of ribosomal RNA gene sequences from environmental samples have revealed that archaea.... (2001) concluded that there are 1.3×1028 archaeal cells (of which ∼20 % are thaumarchaeotes) and 3.1×1028 bacterial cells in the world oceans. A combination of in-situ hybrid- ization and micro-autoradiography has shown that marine archaea are active...

  19. An analysis of amino acid sequences surrounding archaeal glycoprotein sequons

    OpenAIRE

    Mehtap Abu-Qarn; Jerry Eichler

    2006-01-01

    Despite having provided the first example of a prokaryal glycoprotein, little is known of the rules governing the N-glycosylation process in Archaea. As in Eukarya and Bacteria, archaeal N-glycosylation takes place at the Asn residues of Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequons. Since not all sequons are utilized, it is clear that other factors, including the context in which a sequon exists, affect glycosylation efficiency. As yet, t...

  20. Polyphasic Analyses of Methanogenic Archaeal Communities in Agricultural Biogas Plants▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nettmann, E.; Bergmann, I.; Pramschüfer, S.; Mundt, K; Plogsties, V.; Herrmann, C.; Klocke, M.

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the microbial consortia participating in the generation of biogas, especially in methane formation, is still limited. To overcome this limitation, the methanogenic archaeal communities in six full-scale biogas plants supplied with different liquid manures and renewable raw materials as substrates were analyzed by a polyphasic approach. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was carried out to quantify the methanogenic Archaea in the reactor samples. In addition, quantitative r...

  1. Archaeal Communities in a Heterogeneous Hypersaline-Alkaline Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Noya, Yendi E.; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Sandoval-Yuriar, Alonso; Jiménez-Bueno, Norma G.; Marsch, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    In this study the archaeal communities in extreme saline-alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, with electrolytic conductivities (EC) ranging from 0.7 to 157.2 dS/m and pH from 8.5 to 10.5 were explored. Archaeal communities in the 0.7 dS/m pH 8.5 soil had the lowest alpha diversity values and were dominated by a limited number of phylotypes belonging to the mesophilic Candidatus Nitrososphaera. Diversity and species richness were higher in the soils with EC between 9.0 and 157.2 dS/m. The majority of OTUs detected in the hypersaline soil were members of the Halobacteriaceae family. Novel phylogenetic branches in the Halobacteriales class were detected in the soil, and more abundantly in soil with the higher pH (10.5), indicating that unknown and uncharacterized Archaea can be found in this soil. Thirteen different genera of the Halobacteriaceae family were identified and were distributed differently between the soils. Halobiforma, Halostagnicola, Haloterrigena, and Natronomonas were found in all soil samples. Methanogenic archaea were found only in soil with pH between 10.0 and 10.3. Retrieved methanogenic archaea belonged to the Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales orders. The comparison of the archaeal community structures considering phylogenetic information (UniFrac distances) clearly clustered the communities by pH. PMID:26074731

  2. Archaeal Communities in a Heterogeneous Hypersaline-Alkaline Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yendi E. Navarro-Noya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the archaeal communities in extreme saline-alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, with electrolytic conductivities (EC ranging from 0.7 to 157.2 dS/m and pH from 8.5 to 10.5 were explored. Archaeal communities in the 0.7 dS/m pH 8.5 soil had the lowest alpha diversity values and were dominated by a limited number of phylotypes belonging to the mesophilic Candidatus Nitrososphaera. Diversity and species richness were higher in the soils with EC between 9.0 and 157.2 dS/m. The majority of OTUs detected in the hypersaline soil were members of the Halobacteriaceae family. Novel phylogenetic branches in the Halobacteriales class were detected in the soil, and more abundantly in soil with the higher pH (10.5, indicating that unknown and uncharacterized Archaea can be found in this soil. Thirteen different genera of the Halobacteriaceae family were identified and were distributed differently between the soils. Halobiforma, Halostagnicola, Haloterrigena, and Natronomonas were found in all soil samples. Methanogenic archaea were found only in soil with pH between 10.0 and 10.3. Retrieved methanogenic archaea belonged to the Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales orders. The comparison of the archaeal community structures considering phylogenetic information (UniFrac distances clearly clustered the communities by pH.

  3. Archaeal Communities in a Heterogeneous Hypersaline-Alkaline Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Noya, Yendi E; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Sandoval-Yuriar, Alonso; Jiménez-Bueno, Norma G; Marsch, Rodolfo; Dendooven, Luc

    2015-01-01

    In this study the archaeal communities in extreme saline-alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, with electrolytic conductivities (EC) ranging from 0.7 to 157.2 dS/m and pH from 8.5 to 10.5 were explored. Archaeal communities in the 0.7 dS/m pH 8.5 soil had the lowest alpha diversity values and were dominated by a limited number of phylotypes belonging to the mesophilic Candidatus Nitrososphaera. Diversity and species richness were higher in the soils with EC between 9.0 and 157.2 dS/m. The majority of OTUs detected in the hypersaline soil were members of the Halobacteriaceae family. Novel phylogenetic branches in the Halobacteriales class were detected in the soil, and more abundantly in soil with the higher pH (10.5), indicating that unknown and uncharacterized Archaea can be found in this soil. Thirteen different genera of the Halobacteriaceae family were identified and were distributed differently between the soils. Halobiforma, Halostagnicola, Haloterrigena, and Natronomonas were found in all soil samples. Methanogenic archaea were found only in soil with pH between 10.0 and 10.3. Retrieved methanogenic archaea belonged to the Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales orders. The comparison of the archaeal community structures considering phylogenetic information (UniFrac distances) clearly clustered the communities by pH.

  4. Orphan neuropeptides. Novel neuropeptides modulating sleep or feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shinjae; Civelli, Olivier

    2006-08-01

    Neuropeptides form the largest family of modulators of synaptic transmission. Until 1995 some 60 different neuropeptides had been found. With the recognition that all neuropeptides act by binding to G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), a new approach relying on the use of orphan GPCRs as targets was designed to identify novel neuropeptides. Thirteen new neuropeptide families have since been discovered. In this review we will describe the orphan GPCR-based approach that led to these discoveries and present its impact on two specific physiological responses, feeding and sleep. In particular, we will discuss the modulatory roles of the hypocretins/orexins and of neuropeptide S in sleep and awakening and those of ghrelin and melanin concentrating hormone in food intake.

  5. Duals of Orphan-Free Anisotropic Voronoi Diagrams are Triangulations

    CERN Document Server

    Canas, Guillermo D

    2011-01-01

    We show that, under mild conditions on the underlying metric, duals of appropriately defined anisotropic Voronoi diagrams are embedded triangulations. Furthermore, they always triangulate the convex hull of the vertices, and have other properties that parallel those of ordinary Delaunay triangulations. These results apply to the duals of anisotropic Voronoi diagrams of any set of vertices, so long as the diagram is orphan-free.

  6. Challenges in orphan drug development and regulatory policy in China

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Alice; Xie, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    While regulatory policy is well defined for orphan drug development in the United States and Europe, rare disease policy in China is still evolving. Many Chinese patients currently pay out of pocket for international treatments that are not yet approved in China. The lack of a clear definition and therefore regulatory approval process for rare diseases has, until now, de-incentivized pharmaceutical companies to pursue rare disease drug development in China. In turn, many grassroots movements ...

  7. Representing Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Representing Development presents the different social representations that have formed the idea of development in Western thinking over the past three centuries. Offering an acute perspective on the current state of developmental science and providing constructive insights into future pathways...... and development, addressing their contemporary enactments and reflecting on future theoretical and empirical directions. The first section of the book provides an historical account of early representations of development that, having come from life science, has shaped the way in which developmental science has...... approached development. Section two focuses upon the contemporary issues of developmental psychology, neuroscience and developmental science at large. The final section offers a series of commentaries pointing to the questions opened by the previous chapters, looking to outline the future lines...

  8. Bacterial and archaeal resistance to ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confalonieri, F.; Sommer, S.

    2011-01-01

    Organisms living in extreme environments must cope with large fluctuations of temperature, high levels of radiation and/or desiccation, conditions that can induce DNA damage ranging from base modifications to DNA double-strand breaks. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its resistance to extremely high doses of ionizing radiation and for its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Recently, extreme ionizing radiation resistance was also generated by directed evolution of an apparently radiation-sensitive bacterial species, Escherichia coli. Radioresistant organisms are not only found among the Eubacteria but also among the Archaea that represent the third kingdom of life. They present a set of particular features that differentiate them from the Eubacteria and eukaryotes. Moreover, Archaea are often isolated from extreme environments where they live under severe conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salts or toxic compounds that are lethal for the large majority of living organisms. Thus, Archaea offer the opportunity to understand how cells are able to cope with such harsh conditions. Among them, the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp and several Pyrococcus or Thermococcus species, such as Thermococcus gammatolerans, were also shown to display high level of radiation resistance. The dispersion, in the phylogenetic tree, of radioresistant prokaryotes suggests that they have independently acquired radioresistance. Different strategies were selected during evolution including several mechanisms of radiation byproduct detoxification and subtle cellular metabolism modifications to help cells recover from radiation-induced injuries, protection of proteins against oxidation, an efficient DNA repair tool box, an original pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, a condensed nucleoid that may prevent the dispersion of the DNA fragments and specific radiation-induced proteins involved in

  9. Novel archaeal adhesion pilins with a conserved N terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel, Rianne N; Xu, Rachel; Pohlschroder, Mechthild

    2013-09-01

    Type IV pili play important roles in a wide array of processes, including surface adhesion and twitching motility. Although archaeal genomes encode a diverse set of type IV pilus subunits, the functions for most remain unknown. We have now characterized six Haloferax volcanii pilins, PilA[1-6], each containing an identical 30-amino-acid N-terminal hydrophobic motif that is part of a larger highly conserved domain of unknown function (Duf1628). Deletion mutants lacking up to five of the six pilin genes display no significant adhesion defects; however, H. volcanii lacking all six pilins (ΔpilA[1-6]) does not adhere to glass or plastic. Consistent with these results, the expression of any one of these pilins in trans is sufficient to produce functional pili in the ΔpilA[1-6] strain. PilA1His and PilA2His only partially rescue this phenotype, whereas ΔpilA[1-6] strains expressing PilA3His or PilA4His adhere even more strongly than the parental strain. Most surprisingly, expressing either PilA5His or PilA6His in the ΔpilA[1-6] strain results in microcolony formation. A hybrid protein in which the conserved N terminus of the mature PilA1His is replaced with the corresponding N domain of FlgA1 is processed by the prepilin peptidase, but it does not assemble functional pili, leading us to conclude that Duf1628 can be annotated as the N terminus of archaeal PilA adhesion pilins. Finally, the pilin prediction program, FlaFind, which was trained primarily on archaeal flagellin sequences, was successfully refined to more accurately predict pilins based on the in vivo verification of PilA[1-6].

  10. Polyphasic analyses of methanogenic archaeal communities in agricultural biogas plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettmann, E; Bergmann, I; Pramschüfer, S; Mundt, K; Plogsties, V; Herrmann, C; Klocke, M

    2010-04-01

    Knowledge of the microbial consortia participating in the generation of biogas, especially in methane formation, is still limited. To overcome this limitation, the methanogenic archaeal communities in six full-scale biogas plants supplied with different liquid manures and renewable raw materials as substrates were analyzed by a polyphasic approach. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was carried out to quantify the methanogenic Archaea in the reactor samples. In addition, quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) was used to support and complete the FISH analysis. Five of the six biogas reactors were dominated by hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales. The average values were between 60 to 63% of archaeal cell counts (FISH) and 61 to 99% of archaeal 16S rRNA gene copies (Q-PCR). Within this order, Methanoculleus was found to be the predominant genus as determined by amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis. The aceticlastic family Methanosaetaceae was determined to be the dominant methanogenic group in only one biogas reactor, with average values for Q-PCR and FISH between 64% and 72%. Additionally, in three biogas reactors hitherto uncharacterized but potentially methanogenic species were detected. They showed closest accordance with nucleotide sequences of the hitherto unclassified CA-11 (85%) and ARC-I (98%) clusters. These results point to hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis as a predominant pathway for methane synthesis in five of the six analyzed biogas plants. In addition, a correlation between the absence of Methanosaetaceae in the biogas reactors and high concentrations of total ammonia (sum of NH(3) and NH(4)(+)) was observed.

  11. Electroporation of archaeal lipid membranes using MD simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Andraž; Tarek, Mounir; Tomšič, Matija; Valant, Janez; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar; Jamnik, Andrej; Kramar, Peter; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2014-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to investigate the electroporation of archaeal lipid bilayers when subjected to high transmembrane voltages induced by a charge imbalance, mimicking therefore millisecond electric pulse experiments. The structural characteristics of the bilayer, a 9:91 mol% 2,3-di-O-sesterterpanyl-sn-glicerol-1-phospho-myo-inositol (AI) and 2,3-di-O-sesterterpanyl-sn-glicerol-1-phospho-1'(2'-O-α-D-glucosyl)-myo-inositol (AGI) were compared to small angle X-ray scattering data. A rather good agreement of the electron density profiles at temperatures of 298 and 343 K was found assessing therefore the validity of the protocols and force fields used in simulations. Compared to dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), the electroporation threshold for the bilayer was found to increase from ~2 V to 4.3 V at 323 K, and to 5.2 V at 298 K. Comparing the electroporation thresholds of the archaeal lipids to those of simple diphytanoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) bilayers (2.5 V at 323 K) allowed one to trace back the stability of the membranes to the structure of their lipid head groups. Addition of DPPC in amounts of 50 mol% to the archaeal lipid bilayers decreases their stability and lowers the electroporation thresholds to 3.8 V and 4.1 V at respectively 323 and 298 K. The present study therefore shows how membrane compositions can be selected to cover a wide range of responses to electric stimuli. This provides new routes for the design of liposomes that can be efficiently used as drug delivery carriers, as the selection of their composition allows one to tune in their electroporation threshold for subsequent release of their load.

  12. A putative viral defence mechanism in archaeal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reidun Lillestøl

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Clusters of regularly spaced direct repeats, separated by unconserved spacer sequences, are ubiquitous in archaeal chromosomes and occur in some plasmids. Some clusters constitute around 1% of chromosomal DNA. Similarly structured clusters, generally smaller, also occur in some bacterial chromosomes. Although early studies implicated these clusters in segregation/partition functions, recent evidence suggests that the spacer sequences derive from extrachromosomal elements, and, primarily, viruses. This has led to the proposal that the clusters provide a defence against viral propagation in cells, and that both the mode of inhibition of viral propagation and the mechanism of adding spacer-repeat units to clusters, are dependent on RNAs transcribed from the clusters. Moreover, the putative inhibitory apparatus (piRNA-based may be evolutionarily related to the interference RNA systems (siRNA and miRNA, which are common in eukarya. Here, we analyze all the current data on archaeal repeat clusters and provide some new insights into their diverse structures, transcriptional properties and mode of structural development. The results are consistent with larger cluster transcripts being processed at the centers of the repeat sequences and being further trimmed by exonucleases to yield a dominant, intracellular RNA species, which corresponds approximately to the size of a spacer. Furthermore, analysis of the extensive clusters of Sulfolobus solfataricus strains P1 and P2B provides support for the presence of a flanking sequence adjoining a cluster being a prerequisite for the incorporation of new spacer-repeat units, which occurs between the flanking sequence and the cluster. An archaeal database summarizing the data will be maintained at http://dac.molbio.ku.dk/dbs/SRSR/.

  13. Factors affecting Archaeal Lipid Compositions of the Sulfolobus Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, L.; Han, J.; Wei, Y.; Lin, L.; Wei, Y.; Zhang, C.

    2010-12-01

    Temperature is the best known variable affecting the distribution of the archaeal glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) in marine and freshwater systems. Other variables such as pH, ionic strength, or bicarbonate concentration may also affect archaeal GDGTs in terrestrial systems. Studies of pure cultures can help us pinpoint the specific effects these variables may have on archaeal lipid distribution in natural environments. In this study, three Sulfolobus species (HG4, HB5-2, HB9-6) isolated from Tengchong hot springs (pH 2-3, temperature 73-90°C) in China were used to investigate the effects of temperature, pH, substrate, and type of strain on the composition of GDGTs. Results showed that increase in temperature had negative effects on the relative contents of GDGT-0 (no cyclopentyl rings), GDGT-1 (one cyclopentyl ring), GDGT-2 and GDGT-3 but positive effects on GDGT-4, GDGT-4', GDGT-5 and GDGT-5'. Increase in pH, on the other hand, had negative effects on GDGT-0, GDGT-1, GDGT-4', GDGT-5 and GDGT-5', and positive effects on GDGT-3 and GDGT-4. GDGT-2 remained relatively constant with changing pH. When the HG4 was grown on different substrates, GDGT-5 was five time more abundant in sucrose-grown cultures than in yeast extract- or sulfur- grown cultures, suggesting that carbohydrates may stimulate the production of GDGT-5. For all three species, the ring index (average number of rings) of GDGTs correlated positively with incubation temperature. In HG4, ring index was much lower at optimal pH (3.5) than at other pH values. Ring index of HB5-2 or HB9-6 is higher than that of HG4, suggesting that speciation may affect the degree of cyclization of GDGT of the Sulfolobus. These results indicate that individual archaeal lipids respond differently to changes in environmental variables, which may be also species specific.

  14. Archaeal promoter architecture and mechanism of gene activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Nan; Ao, Xiang; Liang, Yun Xiang;

    2011-01-01

    Sulfolobus solfataricus and Sulfolobus islandicus contain several genes exhibiting D-arabinose-inducible expression and these systems are ideal for studying mechanisms of archaeal gene expression. At sequence level, only two highly conserved cis elements are present on the promoters: a regulatory...... element named ara box directing arabinose-inducible expression and the basal promoter element TATA, serving as the binding site for the TATA-binding protein. Strikingly, these promoters possess a modular structure that allows an essentially inactive basal promoter to be strongly activated. The invoked...

  15. Orphan drugs for rare diseases: is it time to revisit their special market access status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven; Cassiman, David; Dooms, Marc; Picavet, Eline

    2012-07-30

    Orphan drugs are intended for diseases with a very low prevalence, and many countries have implemented legislation to support market access of orphan drugs. We argue that it is time to revisit the special market access status of orphan drugs. Indeed, evidence suggests that there is no societal preference for treating rare diseases. Although society appears to assign a greater value to severity of disease, this criterion is equally relevant to many common diseases. Furthermore, the criterion of equity in access to treatment, which underpins orphan drug legislation, puts more value on health improvement in rare diseases than in common diseases and implies that population health is not maximized. Finally, incentives for the development, pricing and reimbursement of orphan drugs have created market failures, including monopolistic prices and the artificial creation of rare diseases. We argue that, instead of awarding special market access status to orphan drugs, there is scope to optimize research and development (R&D) of orphan drugs and to control prices of orphan drugs by means of, for example, patent auctions, advance purchase commitments, pay-as-you-go schemes and dose-modification studies. Governments should consider carefully the right incentive strategy for R&D of orphan drugs in rare diseases.

  16. Significant Comparative Characteristics between Orphan and Nonorphan Genes in the Rice (Oryza sativa L. Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jiu Guo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellites are short tandem repeats of one to six bases in genomic DNA. As microsatellites are highly polymorphic and play a vital role in gene function and recombination, they are an attractive subject for research in evolution and in the genetics and breeding of animals and plants. Orphan genes have no known homologs in existing databases. Using bioinformatic computation and statistical analysis, we identified 19,26 orphan genes in the rice (Oryza sativa ssp. Japanica cv. Nipponbare proteome. We found that a larger proportion of orphan genes are expressed after sexual maturation and under environmental pressure than nonorphan genes. Orphan genes generally have shorter protein lengths and intron size, and are faster evolving. Additionally, orphan genes have fewer PROSITE patterns with larger pattern sizes than those in nonorphan genes. The average microsatellite content and the percentage of trinucleotide repeats in orphan genes are also significantly higher than in nonorphan genes. Microsatellites are found less often in PROSITE patterns in orphan genes. Taken together, these orphan gene characteristics suggest that microsatellites play an important role in orphan gene evolution and expression.

  17. Orphan Sources and Fresh Fallout: Virtual Exercise in Mobile Measurement (ORPEX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowdall, M. (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, OEsteraas (Norway)); Smethurst, M.A. (Univ. of Exeter and Avalonia Geophysics, Cornwall Campus, Penryn (United Kingdom)); Andersson, K. (Technical Univ. of Denmark. Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark)); Aage, H.K. (Danish Emergency Management Agency, Birkeroed (Denmark)); Palsson, S.E. (Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute, Reykjavik (Iceland))

    2011-10-15

    In recent years carborne gamma spectrometry has expanded from its role as a geological survey platform to serving as a useful asset in the field of emergency response to radiological and nuclear situations. Its two main applications are searching for orphan sources and for surveying in the aftermath of an accident involving the release of radioactive materials. Despite this expansion, the opportunities for gaining practical experience in the field are limited by cost considerations and practicability. These limitations are exacerbated by the fact that data generated and displayed in the field differ significantly from gamma spectral data generated in a laboratory environment. As a means of exercising existing emergency measuring/surveying capability and introducing carborne measurements to a larger group, a virtual exercise was devised. The exercise ORPEX (Orphan Sources and Fresh Fallout Virtual Exercise in Mobile Measurement) featured two typical emergency scenarios in which carborne measuring systems might be deployed: firstly a search for multiple orphan sources and secondly surveying to delineate patchy fallout from a local release point. In the first scenario, synthetic spectral data were generated for imaginary point sources and inserted into genuine carborne measurements from in the Trondheim area of Norway. Participants were presented with a typical software tool and data in a range of typical formats and asked to report the source locations and isotopes within a time limit. In the second scenario, synthetic spectral data representing fallout from a local fire involving radioactive material were added to real carborne data from the Trondheim area. Participants were asked to produce maps that identify and characterise the regions of contamination within the same time limit. Fourteen individual organisations from seven different countries supplied results. Results from participants indicate that for strong sources of isotopes with simple spectra featuring

  18. Methanobacterium Dominates Biocathodic Archaeal Communities in Methanogenic Microbial Electrolysis Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Siegert, Michael

    2015-07-06

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Methane is the primary end product from cathodic current in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) in the absence of methanogenic inhibitors, but little is known about the archaeal communities that develop in these systems. MECs containing cathodes made from different materials (carbon brushes, or plain graphite blocks or blocks coated with carbon black and platinum, stainless steel, nickel, ferrihydrite, magnetite, iron sulfide, or molybdenum disulfide) were inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge and acclimated at a set potential of -600 mV (versus a standard hydrogen electrode). The archaeal communities on all cathodes, except those coated with platinum, were predominated by Methanobacterium (median 97% of archaea). Cathodes with platinum contained mainly archaea most similar to Methanobrevibacter. Neither of these methanogens were abundant (<0.1% of archaea) in the inoculum, and therefore their high abundance on the cathode resulted from selective enrichment. In contrast, bacterial communities on the cathode were more diverse, containing primarily δ-Proteobacteria (41% of bacteria). The lack of a consistent bacterial genus on the cathodes indicated that there was no similarly selective enrichment of bacteria on the cathode. These results suggest that the genus Methanobacterium was primarily responsible for methane production in MECs when cathodes lack efficient catalysts for hydrogen gas evolution. (Figure Presented).

  19. Conceptions of mental health among Ugandan youth orphaned by AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Sheila; Kizza, Ruth; Sebunnya, Joshua; Jack, Susan

    2009-03-01

    The AIDS epidemic has disproportionately affected developing or low-income sub-Saharan African countries. Within the context of the epidemic, children and youth are at risk of losing their parents at an early age. The experience of orphanhood due to AIDS has the potential to negatively impact on a child's mental health. A qualitative study was conducted to comprehensively describe the experience of orphanhood and its impact on mental health from the culturally specific perspective of Ugandan youths. We conducted interviews with a purposeful sample of 13 youths (ages 12 to 18) who had lost one or both parents to AIDS illness and who were also affiliated with a non-governmental organisation providing support to orphans. The orphaned youths experienced significant ongoing emotional difficulties following the death of their parent(s). The youths in this study were unfamiliar with the term 'mental health,' however they easily identified factors associated with good or poor mental health. In general, good mental health was associated with social conduct that is culturally appropriate. Poor mental health was perceived as a form of madness or insanity and it was associated with a loss of basic life necessities, such as access to food, education or shelter. The youths also identified factors that promote more successful orphans. The findings of this study suggest that Western terminologies and symptom constellations in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV may not be applicable in an African cultural context. There are several clinical implications, including the development of a mental health intervention paradigm that emphasises resilience.

  20. Orphan protein function and its relation to glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Ramneek; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Brunak, Søren

    2002-01-01

    , and inference of protein function by exploiting direct sequence similarity indeed goes a long way in describing a proteome’s functional capacity. However, at least 40% of the gene products in newly sequenced genomes typically remain uncharacterised. Proteins without an annotated function are also known...... as orphan proteins since they do not belong to a functionally characterised protein family. Many sequences must, therefore, be compared using their features rather than by direct comparison in the conventional sequence space. Here we focus on one such feature — glycosylation — that is common in eukaryotic...

  1. Children, foundlings and orphans in 19th Century Montevideo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Laura Osta Vázquez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Our aim is to shed light on orphan children in 19th century Montevideo from the vantage points of the history of childhood, the history of concepts, and other methodological perspectives. The first orphanage, called ‘La Inclusa’, was founded in 1818. Its activities revolved around a turnstile system wherein babies were left mostly anonymously, by their parents, relatives, neighbors or midwives. Our goal is to deconstruct concepts commonly used today and to historically contextualize them in relation to such practices. We seek to quantitatively visualize these children, parents and wet nurses through charts based on adoption and vital records. 

  2. Random forest classification of etiologies for an orphan disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speiser, Jaime Lynn; Durkalski, Valerie L; Lee, William M

    2015-02-28

    Classification of objects into pre-defined groups based on known information is a fundamental problem in the field of statistics. Although approaches for solving this problem exist, finding an accurate classification method can be challenging in an orphan disease setting, where data are minimal and often not normally distributed. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the application of the random forest (RF) classification procedure in a real clinical setting and discuss typical questions that arise in the general classification framework as well as offer interpretations of RF results. This paper includes methods for assessing predictive performance, importance of predictor variables, and observation-specific information.

  3. 78 FR 44016 - Exclusion of Orphan Drugs for Certain Covered Entities Under 340B Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 10 RIN 0906-AA94 Exclusion of Orphan Drugs for Certain Covered Entities Under... exclusion requirements. This rule will provide clarity in the marketplace, maintain the 340B savings for... 340B(e) of the PHSA (42 U.S.C. 256b(e)) states the following: EXCLUSION OF ORPHAN DRUGS FOR...

  4. 21 CFR 316.30 - Annual reports of holder of orphan-drug designation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Annual reports of holder of orphan-drug designation. 316.30 Section 316.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... of holder of orphan-drug designation. Within 14 months after the date on which a drug was...

  5. Diversity and mobility in households with children orphaned by AIDS in Couffo, Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fagbemissi, R.C.; Lie, R.; Leeuwis, C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper characterises children orphaned by AIDS in the Couffo region of Benin. A 2006 census conducted for the research revealed a total of 315 such orphans, aged 0 to 14 years, within 88 households. Seventy-one percent of these children were under the care of their mothers or grandmothers, 68% w

  6. Neglect and perceived stigmatization impact psychological distress of orphans in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharin Hermenau

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research has shown that orphans in sub-Saharan Africa are at increased risk for mental health problems. Exposure to maltreatment and HIV/AIDS-related stigmatization are related to orphans’ psychological distress. Yet, researchers stress the need for more research in low-income countries to identify which factors of being an orphan may lead to psychological distress. Objectives: The present study aims to systematically investigate orphans’ experiences of maltreatment and stigmatization to identify factors that relate to their psychological distress. Methods: In total, 89 Tanzanian children who had lost at least one parent were compared to 89 matched non-orphans (mean age: 11 years; 51% boys. We measured exposure to maltreatment and perceived stigmatization as an orphan. Mental health was assessed using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, the Children's Depression Inventory, the UCLA PTSD Index for Children, and the Reactive–Proactive Questionnaire. Results: Orphans reported significantly more experiences of neglect, but not of abuse. A group comparison revealed more depressive symptoms, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and aggressive behavior among orphans. Neglect, abuse, and stigmatization correlated with orphans’ internalizing and externalizing problems, yet only neglect and stigmatization were related to orphans’ depression severity. Perceived stigmatization moderated the relationship between neglect and depression. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that orphans in Tanzania are at increased risk of experiencing neglect. Maltreatment and perceived stigmatization may play a role in orphans’ psychological distress. Culturally appropriate and evidence-based interventions may help to prevent maltreatment and stigmatization of orphans.

  7. Elucidation of primary metabolic pathways in Aspergillus species: Orphaned research in characterizing orphan genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2014-01-01

    of cellular function. However, several methods can be employed to use the metabolic networks in tandem with comparative genomics to accelerate functional assignment of genes in primary metabolism. In particular, gaps in metabolic pathways can be used to assign functions to orphan genes. In this review......Primary metabolism affects all phenotypical traits of filamentous fungi. Particular examples include reacting to extracellular stimuli, producing precursor molecules required for cell division and morphological changes as well as providing monomer building blocks for production of secondary...

  8. A study of descriptive data for orphans and non-orphans on key criteria of economic vulnerability in two municipalities in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Skinner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is generally assumed that orphan status increases the risk to children of a range of negative outcomes. In South Africa, death of parents due to HIV-related illness is contributing to a rapid increase in the prevalence of orphans. This paper presents descriptive data from two South African communities, namely Kopanong, in the Free State and Kanana in the North West province, characterising the differences between orphans (double, maternal and paternal and non-orphans on key criteria of social vulnerability.Objectives: The objective was to obtain a better understanding of how different types of orphans and non-orphans may differ in these key areas as a crucial starting point for addressing the devastating consequences the AIDS epidemic has on these children’s lives. While the study focuses on two specific areas these will provide insight into the general situation of orphans in South Africa.Methods: A cross-sectional census survey was conducted in the two communities of Kopanong, comprising n = 5254 households and Kanana, comprising n = 12 984 households.Results: In Kopanong, 8.2% of children had lost both parents, 19.1% had lost their father and 6.5% their mother only, whilst in Kanana the results were 6.5%, 28.1% and 3.7% respectively. Loss of both parents appeared to have a consistent impact on material need, including access to food, clothing and essential services, whilst loss of a single parent seems to have a more variable impact. At present, there are very few child headed households, but this constitutes a risk in the longer term.Conclusions: Orphans appear to be more vulnerable in terms of material need. Children assessed in this study as being most in need were not accessing adequately many services directed at them. There is a need to extend understanding and measurement of emotional need and abuse. 

  9. A study of descriptive data for orphans and non-orphans on key criteria of economic vulnerability in two municipalities in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Skinner

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is generally assumed that orphan status increases the risk to children of a range of negative outcomes. In South Africa, death of parents due to HIV-related illness is contributing to a rapid increase in the prevalence of orphans. This paper presents descriptive data from two South African communities, namely Kopanong, in the Free State and Kanana in the North West province, characterising the differences between orphans (double, maternal and paternal and non-orphans on key criteria of social vulnerability.Objectives: The objective was to obtain a better understanding of how different types of orphans and non-orphans may differ in these key areas as a crucial starting point for addressing the devastating consequences the AIDS epidemic has on these children’s lives. While the study focuses on two specific areas these will provide insight into the general situation of orphans in South Africa.Methods: A cross-sectional census survey was conducted in the two communities of Kopanong, comprising n = 5254 households and Kanana, comprising n = 12 984 households.Results: In Kopanong, 8.2% of children had lost both parents, 19.1% had lost their father and 6.5% their mother only, whilst in Kanana the results were 6.5%, 28.1% and 3.7% respectively. Loss of both parents appeared to have a consistent impact on material need, including access to food, clothing and essential services, whilst loss of a single parent seems to have a more variable impact. At present, there are very few child headed households, but this constitutes a risk in the longer term. Conclusions: Orphans appear to be more vulnerable in terms of material need. Children assessed in this study as being most in need were not accessing adequately many services directed at them. There is a need to extend understanding and measurement of emotional need and abuse.

  10. The role of globalization in drug development and access to orphan drugs: orphan drug legislation in the US/EU and in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Renée J.G.; Lida Bighash; Alejandro Bryón Nieto; Gabriela Tannus Branco de Araújo; Juan Gabriel Gay-Molina; Federico Augustovski

    2015-01-01

    Compared to a decade ago, nearly three times as many drugs for rare diseases are slated for development. This article addresses the market access issues associated with orphan drug status in Europe and the United States in contrast to the legislation in five Latin American (LA) countries that have made strides in this regard--Mexico, Brazil, Colombia, Chile and Argentina. Based on the success of orphan drug legislation in the EU and US, LA countries should strive to adopt similar strategies w...

  11. Immunogenic properties of archaeal species found in bioaerosols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Blais Lecours

    Full Text Available The etiology of bioaerosol-related pulmonary diseases remains poorly understood. Recently, archaea emerged as prominent airborne components of agricultural environments, but the consequences of airway exposure to archaea remain unknown. Since subcomponents of archaea can be immunogenic, we used a murine model to study the pulmonary immune responses to two archaeal species found in agricultural facilities: Methanobrevibacter smithii (MBS and Methanosphaera stadtmanae (MSS. Mice were administered intranasally with 6.25, 25 or 100 µg of MBS or MSS, once daily, 3 days a week, for 3 weeks. MSS induced more severe histopathological alterations than MBS with perivascular accumulation of granulocytes, pronounced thickening of the alveolar septa, alveolar macrophages accumulation and increased perivascular mononucleated cell accumulation. Analyses of bronchoalveolar lavage fluids revealed up to 3 times greater leukocyte accumulation with MSS compared to MBS. Instillation of 100 µg of MBS or MSS caused predominant accumulation of monocyte/macrophages (4.5×10(5 and 4.8×10(5 cells/ml respectively followed by CD4(+ T cells (1.38×10(5 and 1.94×10(5 cells/ml respectively, B cells (0.73×10(5 and 1.28×10(5 cells/ml respectively, and CD8(+ T cells (0.20×10(5 and 0.31×10(5 cells/ml respectively in the airways. Both archaeal species induced similar titers of antigen-specific IgGs in plasma. MSS but not MBS caused an accumulation of eosinophils and neutrophils in the lungs, which surprisingly, correlated inversely with the size of the inoculum. Stronger immunogenicity of MSS was confirmed by a 3 fold higher accumulation of myeloid dendritic cells in the airways, compared to MBS. Thus, the dose and species of archaea determine the magnitude and nature of the pulmonary immune response. This is the first report of an immunomodulatory role of archaeal species found in bioaerosols.

  12. RNA-Based Assessment of Diversity and Composition of Active Archaeal Communities in the German Bight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Wemheuer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Archaea play an important role in various biogeochemical cycles. They are known extremophiles inhabiting environments such as thermal springs or hydrothermal vents. Recent studies have revealed a significant abundance of Archaea in moderate environments, for example, temperate sea water. Nevertheless, the composition and ecosystem function of these marine archaeal communities is largely unknown. To assess diversity and composition of active archaeal communities in the German Bight, seven marine water samples were taken and studied by RNA-based analysis of ribosomal 16S rRNA. For this purpose, total RNA was extracted from the samples and converted to cDNA. Archaeal community structures were investigated by pyrosequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons generated from cDNA. To our knowledge, this is the first study combining next-generation sequencing and metatranscriptomics to study archaeal communities in marine habitats. The pyrosequencing-derived dataset comprised 62,045 archaeal 16S rRNA sequences. We identified Halobacteria as the predominant archaeal group across all samples with increased abundance in algal blooms. Thermoplasmatales (Euryarchaeota and the Marine Group I (Thaumarchaeota were identified in minor abundances. It is indicated that archaeal community patterns were influenced by environmental conditions.

  13. Formation of a solar Ha filament from orphan penumbrae

    CERN Document Server

    Buehler, D; van Noort, M; Solanki, S K

    2016-01-01

    The formation of an Ha filament in active region (AR) 10953 is described. Observations from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard the Hinode satellite starting on 27th April 2007 until 1st May 2007 were analysed. 20 scans of the 6302A Fe I line pair recorded by SOT/SP were inverted using the SPINOR code. The inversions were analysed together with SOT/BFI G-band and Ca II H and SOT/NFI Ha observations. Following the disappearance of an initial Ha filament aligned along the polarity inversion line (PIL) of the AR, a new Ha filament formed in its place some 20 hours later, which remained stable for at least 1.5 days. The creation of the new Ha filament was driven by the ascent of horizontal magnetic fields from the photosphere into the chromosphere at three separate locations along the PIL. The magnetic fields at two of these locations were situated directly underneath the initial Ha filament and formed orphan penumbrae already aligned along the Ha filament channel. The 700 G orphan penumbrae were stable and ...

  14. Orphan Sources. Extending Radiological Protection outside the Regulatory Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eugenio Gil [Deputy Director for Emergency, Spanish Nuclear Safety Council (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Radioactive sources that are not under appropriate regulatory control-Orphan sources- can result in a number of undesirable consequences including human health impacts, socio-psychological impacts, political and economic impacts, as well as environmental impacts. Many countries are now in the process of introducing the necessary measures to regain an appropriate level of control over them. For a variety of historical and economic reasons, there could already be sources in any specific country that are not within the usual regulatory system. Some of these may be known about, others may not. Therefore a national strategy is needed to ascertain the likelihood and magnitude of the issue of radioactive source control problem within a country and the priorities necessary to address the problems identified. A well-developed plan for improving control over all relevant radioactive sources tailored to the national situation will ensure optimum use of resources such as time, money and personnel. It will allow these limited resources to be allocated appropriately to ensure that control is first regained over those sources presenting the highest risks. This lecture shows a way to develop an appropriate national strategy for regaining control over orphan sources. The methodology described in this lecture is basically based in the IAEA Recommendations. (author)

  15. Unveiling the population of orphan Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ghirlanda, G; Campana, S; Vergani, S D; Japelj, J; Bernardini, M G; Burlon, D; D'Avanzo, P; Melandri, A; Gomboc, A; Nappo, F; Paladini, R; Pescalli, A; Salafia, O S; Tagliaferri, G

    2015-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts are detectable in the gamma-ray band if their jets are oriented towards the observer. However, for each GRB with a typical theta_jet, there should be ~2/theta_jet^2 bursts whose emission cone is oriented elsewhere in space. These off-axis bursts can be eventually detected when, due to the deceleration of their relativistic jets, the beaming angle becomes comparable to the viewing angle. Orphan Afterglows (OA) should outnumber the current population of bursts detected in the gamma-ray band even if they have not been conclusively observed so far at any frequency. We compute the expected flux of the population of orphan afterglows in the mm, optical and X-ray bands through a population synthesis code of GRBs and the standard afterglow emission model. We estimate the detection rate of OA by on-going and forthcoming surveys. The average duration of OA as transients above a given limiting flux is derived and described with analytical expressions: in general OA should appear as daily transients in o...

  16. Gender Differences in Maladaptive Cognitive Schema in Orphans in Dakahlia, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Hady El-Gilany

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the gender differences of maladaptive cognitive schema among orphans in Dakahlia governorate orphanages. A cross-sectional comparative study included 152 orphan boys and 48 orphan girls in all orphanages homes in Dakahlia governorate, Egypt. Data collection tools included a structured interview questionnaire for personal data; early maladaptive schema questionnaire-short form (EMSQ-SF. The mean score of the total YSQ and all the subscales, except self-sacrifice and unrelenting standards, are significantly higher among females than males. Attention should be given to the psychological care of the orphans especially security, trust, confidence, and autonomy with more attention to orphan girls.

  17. Orphan drug development: an economically viable strategy for biopharma R&D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meekings, Kiran N; Williams, Cory S M; Arrowsmith, John E

    2012-07-01

    Orphan drug incentives have stimulated research into diseases with significant unmet medical need. Although the targeting of orphan diseases is seen by industry as an attractive strategy, there are limited economic data available to support its use. In this paper we show that the revenue-generating potential of orphan drugs is as great as for non-orphan drugs, even though patient populations for rare diseases are significantly smaller. Moreover, we suggest that orphan drugs have greater profitability when considered in the full context of developmental drivers including government financial incentives, smaller clinical trial sizes, shorter clinical trial times and higher rates of regulatory success. The data support the targeting of rare diseases as an important component of a successful biopharma R&D strategy.

  18. The experiences of AIDS orphans living in a township

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmeralda Ricks

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available An overwhelming challenge to health-care professionals today, is the rendering of care services to AIDS orphans. This article is based on a study that explored and described the lived experiences of AIDS orphans in a township in order to understand their ‘life world’ as AIDS orphans. A further purpose was to provide information to primary health-care nurses (PHCNs, related professionals and partners involved in the care of these children, so that they could plan a care response to meet the orphans’ unique needs. A qualitative research design that used an explorative, descriptive, contextual and phenomenological strategy of inquiry was employed. Data were collected by means of in-depth interviews from a purposively selected sample, and were analysed according to the steps of qualitative data analysis proposed by Tesch (Creswell 1994. Guba’s model was used to ensure the trustworthiness of the qualitative data. Two main themes and their sub-themes were identified. The first theme was that children experience devastating changes in their life circumstances when they become AIDS orphans. The second theme highlighted how the participants rediscovered hope to persevere. Recommendations directed at nursing practice, education and research, were made based upon the findings.

    Opsomming

    ‘n Uitdaging wat professionele gesondheidswerkers huidiglik oorweldig, is dienslewering aan VIGS weeskinders. Die doel van die studie was om die geleefde ervaring van kinders wat in dorpsgebiede woon en VIGS weeskinders geword het, te verken en te beskryf ten einde hul leefwêreld te verstaan. Hierdie inligting kan deur Primêre Gesondheidsorg Verpleegkundiges (PVGs, verwante beroepslui en vennote betrokke by die versorging van hierdie kinders, gebruik word as basis om versorging te beplan wat in die kinders se unieke behoeftes sal voorsien. ‘n Kwalitatiewe navorsingsontwerp met verkennende, beskrywende, kontekstuele en fenomologiese

  19. The prevalence and cost of unapproved uses of top-selling orphan drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron S Kesselheim

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The Orphan Drug Act encourages drug development for rare conditions. However, some orphan drugs become top sellers for unclear reasons. We sought to evaluate the extent and cost of approved and unapproved uses of orphan drugs with the highest unit sales. METHODS: We assessed prescription patterns for four top-selling orphan drugs: lidocaine patch (Lidoderm approved for post-herpetic neuralgia, modafinil (Provigil approved for narcolepsy, cinacalcet (Sensipar approved for hypercalcemia of parathyroid carcinoma, and imatinib (Gleevec approved for chronic myelogenous leukemia and gastrointestinal stromal tumor. We pooled patient-specific diagnosis and prescription data from two large US state pharmaceutical benefit programs for the elderly. We analyzed the number of new and total patients using each drug and patterns of reimbursement for approved and unapproved uses. For lidocaine patch, we subcategorized approved prescriptions into two subtypes of unapproved uses: neuropathic pain, for which some evidence of efficacy exists, and non-neuropathic pain. RESULTS: We found that prescriptions for lidocaine patch, modafinil, and cinacalcet associated with non-orphan diagnoses rose at substantially higher rates (average monthly increases in number of patients of 14.6, 1.45, and 1.58 than prescriptions associated with their orphan diagnoses (3.12, 0.24, and 0.03, respectively (p75%. Increases in lidocaine patch use for non-neuropathic pain far exceeded neuropathic pain (10.2 vs. 3.6 patients, p<0.001. DISCUSSION: In our sample, three of four top-selling orphan drugs were used more commonly for non-orphan indications. These orphan drugs treated common clinical symptoms (pain and fatigue or laboratory abnormalities. We should continue to monitor orphan drug use after approval to identify products that come to be widely used for non-FDA approved indications, particularly those without adequate evidence of efficacy.

  20. Children, AIDS and the politics of orphan care in Ethiopia: the extended family revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe, Tatek; Aase, Asbjorn

    2007-05-01

    The astounding rise in the number of orphans due to the HIV/AIDS epidemic has left many Ethiopian families and communities with enormous childcare problems. Available studies on the capacity and sustainability of the extended family system, which culturally performs the role of care for children in need, suggest two competing theories. The first is grounded in the social rupture thesis and assumes that the traditional system of orphan care is stretched by the impact of the epidemic, and is actually collapsing. By contrast, the second theory counter-suggests that the flexibility and strength of the informal childcare practise, if supported by appropriate interventions, can still support a large number of orphans. Based on a seven-month period of child-focused, qualitative research fieldwork in Ethiopia involving observations; in-depth interviews with orphans (42), social workers (12) and heads of households (18); focus group discussions with orphans (8), elderly people and community leaders (6); and story-writing by children in school contexts, this article explores the trade-offs and social dynamics of orphan care within extended family structures in Ethiopia. It argues that there is a rural-urban divide in the capacity to cater for orphans that emanates from structural differences as well as the socio-cultural and economic values associated with children. The care of orphans within extended family households is also characterised by multiple and reciprocal relationships in care-giving and care-receiving practices. By calling for a contextual understanding of the 'orphan burden', the paper concludes that interventions for orphans may consider care as a continuum in the light of four profiles of extended families, namely rupturing, transient, adaptive, and capable families.

  1. Inverse association of natural mentoring relationship with distress mental health in children orphaned by AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munakata Tsunetsugu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The magnitude of the AIDS-orphaned children crisis in sub-Saharan Africa has so overstretched the resource of most families that the collapse of fostering in the sub-region seems imminent (UNICEF, 2003, fueling the need for a complementary/alternative care. This paper examines the probability of the natural mentoring care to ameliorate distress mental health in children orphaned by AIDS. Methods 952 children, mean age about 14 years, from local community schools and child-care centers in Kampala (Uganda and Mafikeng/Klerksdorp (South Africa towns participated in the study. The design has AIDS-orphaned group (n = 373 and two control groups: Other-causes orphaned (n = 287 and non-orphaned (n = 290 children. We use measures of child abuse, depression, social discrimination, anxiety, parental/foster care, self-esteem, and social support to estimate mental health. Natural mentoring care is measured with the Ragins and McFarlin (1990 Mentor Role Instrument as adapted. Results AIDS-orphaned children having a natural mentor showed significant decreased distress mental health factors. Similar evidence was not observed in the control groups. Also being in a natural mentoring relationship inversely related to distress mental health factors in the AIDS-orphaned group, in particular. AIDS-orphaned children who scored high mentoring relationship showed significant lowest distress mental health factors that did those who scored moderate and low mentoring relationship. Conclusions Natural mentoring care seems more beneficial to ameliorate distress mental health in AIDS-orphaned children (many of whom are double-orphans, having no biological parents than in children in the control groups.

  2. Useful scars: Physics of the capsids of archaeal viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, L. E.; Dharmavaram, S.; Klug, W. S.; Marian, J.; Rudnick, J.; Bruinsma, R. F.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a physical model for the capsids of tailed archaeal viruses as viscoelastic membranes under tension. The fluidity is generated by thermal motion of scarlike structures that are an intrinsic feature of the ground state of large particle arrays covering surfaces with nonzero Gauss curvature. The tension is generated by a combination of the osmotic pressure of the enclosed genome and an extension force generated by filamentous structure formation that drives the formation of the tails. In continuum theory, the capsid has the shape of a surface of constant mean curvature: an unduloid. Particle arrays covering unduloids are shown to exhibit pronounced subdiffusive and diffusive single-particle transport at temperatures that are well below the melting temperature of defect-free particle arrays on a surface with zero Gauss curvature.

  3. Familial relationships in hyperthermo- and acidophilic archaeal viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Happonen, Lotta Johanna; Redder, Peter; Peng, Xu;

    2010-01-01

    Archaea often live in extreme, harsh environments such as acidic hot springs and hypersaline waters. To date, only two icosahedrally symmetric, membrane-containing archaeal viruses, SH1 and Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV), have been described in detail. We report the sequence and three......-dimensional structure of a third such virus isolated from a hyperthermoacidophilic crenarchaeon, Sulfolobus strain G4ST-2. Characterization of this new isolate revealed it to be similar to STIV on the levels of genome and structural organization. The genome organization indicates that these two viruses have diverged...... from a common ancestor. Interestingly, the prominent surface turrets of the two viruses are strikingly different. By sequencing and mass spectrometry, we mapped several large insertions and deletions in the known structural proteins that could account for these differences and showed that both viruses...

  4. Characterization of Olkiluoto bacterial and archaeal communities by 454 pyrosequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bomberg, M.; Nyyssoenen, M.; Itaevaara, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-06-15

    Recent advancement in sequencing technologies, 'Next Generation Sequencing', such as FLX 454 pyrosequencing has made it possible to obtain large amounts of sequence data where previously only few sequences could be obtained. This technique is especially useful for the study of community composition of uncultured microbial populations in environmental samples. In this project, the FLX 454 pyrosequencing technique was used to obtain up to 20 000 16S rRNA sequences or 10 000 mRNA sequences from each sample for identification of the microbial species composition as well as for comparison of the microbial communities between different samples. This project focused on the characterization of active microbial communities in the groundwater at the final disposal site of high radioactive wastes in Olkiluoto by FLX 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial and archaeal ribosomal RNA as well as of the mRNA transcripts of the dsrB gene and mcrA gene of sulphate reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea, respectively. Specific emphasis was put on studying the relationship of active and latent sulphate reducers and methanogens by qPCR due to their important roles in deep geobiochemical processes connected to copper corrosion. Seven packered boreholes were sampled anaerobically in Olkiluoto during 2009-2010. Groundwater was pumped from specific depths and the microbial cells werecollected by filtration on a membrane. Active microbial communities were studied based on RNA extracted from the membranes and translated to copy DNA, followed by sequencing by 454 Tag pyrosequencing. A total of 27 different bacterial and 17 archaeal taxonomic groups were detected.

  5. Drivers of archaeal ammonia-oxidizing communities in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna eZhalnina

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA are highly abundant and play an important role in the nitrogen cycle. In addition, AOA have a significant impact on soil quality. AOA may cause nitrogen loss from soils, and the nitrate produced by AOA can lead to ground and surface water contamination, water eutrophication, and soil subsidence. The ammonia-oxidizing archaea discovered to date are classified in the phylum Thaumarchaeota. Only a few archaeal genomes are available in databases. As a result, AOA genes are not well annotated, and it is difficult to mine and identify archaeal genes within metagenomic libraries. Nevertheless, 16S rRNA and comparative analysis of ammonia monooxygenase sequences show that soils can vary greatly in the relative abundance of AOA. In some soils, AOA can comprise more than 10% of the total prokaryotic community. In other soils, AOA comprise less than 0.5% of the community. Many approaches have been used to measure the abundance and diversity of this group including DGGE, T-RFLP, q-PCR, and DNA sequencing. AOA have been studied across different soil types and various ecosystems from the Antarctic dry valleys to the tropical forests of South America to the soils near Mount Everest. Different studies have identified multiple soil factors that trigger the abundance of AOA. These factors include pH, concentration of available ammonia, organic matter content, moisture content, nitrogen content, clay content, as well as other triggers. Land use management appears to have a major effect on the abundance of AOA in soil, which may be the result of nitrogen fertilizer used in agricultural soils. This review summarizes the published results on this topic and suggests future work that will increase our understanding of how soil management and edaphoclimatic factors influence AOA.

  6. The Role of Multiple Transcription Factors In Archaeal Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles J. Daniels

    2008-09-23

    Since the inception of this research program, the project has focused on two central questions: What is the relationship between the 'eukaryal-like' transcription machinery of archaeal cells and its counterparts in eukaryal cells? And, how does the archaeal cell control gene expression using its mosaic of eukaryal core transcription machinery and its bacterial-like transcription regulatory proteins? During the grant period we have addressed these questions using a variety of in vivo approaches and have sought to specifically define the roles of the multiple TATA binding protein (TBP) and TFIIB-like (TFB) proteins in controlling gene expression in Haloferax volcanii. H. volcanii was initially chosen as a model for the Archaea based on the availability of suitable genetic tools; however, later studies showed that all haloarchaea possessed multiple tbp and tfb genes, which led to the proposal that multiple TBP and TFB proteins may function in a manner similar to alternative sigma factors in bacterial cells. In vivo transcription and promoter analysis established a clear relationship between the promoter requirements of haloarchaeal genes and those of the eukaryal RNA polymerase II promoter. Studies on heat shock gene promoters, and the demonstration that specific tfb genes were induced by heat shock, provided the first indication that TFB proteins may direct expression of specific gene families. The construction of strains lacking tbp or tfb genes, coupled with the finding that many of these genes are differentially expressed under varying growth conditions, provided further support for this model. Genetic tools were also developed that led to the construction of insertion and deletion mutants, and a novel gene expression scheme was designed that allowed the controlled expression of these genes in vivo. More recent studies have used a whole genome array to examine the expression of these genes and we have established a linkage between the expression of

  7. Non-extremophilic 'extremophiles' - Archaeal dominance in the subsurface and their implication for life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitschuler, Christoph; Lins, Philipp; Illmer, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Archaea - besides bacteria and eukaryota constituting the third big domain of life - were so far regarded as typical inhabitants of extreme environments, as indicated by the name (Archaeon, Greek: 'original', 'primal'). Previous research and cultivation successes were basically carried out in habitats characterized by extreme temperature, pH and salinity regimes. Such extreme conditions, as expected at the beginning of the Earth's evolution, are occasionally also prevalent on extraterrestrial planets and moons and make the Archaeal domain a key group to be studied concerning life's evolution and the most likely pioneer organisms to colonize environments that are regarded as hostile. However, in recent years it became obvious that Archaea, in particular non-extremophilic species, can be found almost ubiquitously in marine, freshwater, terrestrial and also subsurface habitats and occasionally outnumber other microbial domains and hold key positions in globally relevant energy and nutrient cycles. Besides extreme environments - the big question remains how to define a parameter as extreme - subsurface and cave environments present a window to the past, where adaptions to early life's conditions can be studied and how microbiomes may be structured in a habitat that represents a refugium on extraterrestrial celestial bodies, were surface conditions might be at first sight too extreme for life. The lower part of the alpine Hundsalm cave in Tyrol (Austria) offered a unique opportunity to study an almost pristine cave habitat, which is separated from the touristic part of the ice cave. The main focus of our research was laid on the microbial communities that were supposed to be in connection with secondary carbonate precipitations ('moonmilk'). For the ascertainment of these so far poorly evaluated structures a multiple approach assessment was chosen to generate a virtually complete picture of these subsurface microbiomes. Thereby, a combination of different cultivation

  8. Effect of soil properties and hydrology on Archaeal community composition in three temperate grasslands on peat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Conrad, Ralf; Petersen, Søren O

    2013-01-01

    Grasslands established on drained peat soils are regarded as negligible methane (CH4) sources; however, they can still exhibit considerable soil CH4 dynamics. We investigated archaeal community composition in two different fen peat soils and one bog peat soil under permanent grassland in Denmark....... We used terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) fingerprinting and clone libraries to characterize the soils' archaeal community composition to gain a better understanding of relationships between peat properties and land use, respectively, and CH4 dynamics. Samples were taken...... at three different depths and at four different seasons. Archaeal community composition varied considerably between the three peatlands and, to a certain degree, also with peat depth, but seemed to be quite stable at individual sampling depths throughout the year. Archaeal community composition was mainly...

  9. Some Information about the Opening of Erzincan Orphan School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galip EKEN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The necessity of answering the orphan children’s material andspiritual needs which had increased at important measureduring the World War I become an important social problem inthat era. Not ignoring that important problem did the Ottomanstate opened many orphanages in many province and cities inAnatolia especially in Istanbul. One of them was established inErzincan in 1918. Establishing an orphanage in which the girlsand boys could have live together safely and which had 500beds had started with a decision taken by the central government.In this article some of the ranks about supplying of thefinancial source of the orphanage and the efforts spent for theproviding of the available built shed lights on.

  10. Cholesterol and male fertility: what about orphans and adopted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqdasy, Salwan; Baptissart, Marine; Vega, Aurélie; Baron, Silvère; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A; Volle, David H

    2013-04-10

    The link between cholesterol homeostasis and male fertility has been clearly suggested in patients who suffer from hyperlipidemia and metabolic syndrome. This has been confirmed by the generation of several transgenic mouse models or in animals fed with high cholesterol diet. Next to the alteration of the endocrine signaling pathways through steroid receptors (androgen and estrogen receptors); "orphan" and "adopted" nuclear receptors, such as the Liver X Receptors (LXRs), the Proliferating Peroxisomal Activated Receptors (PPARs) or the Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (LRH-1), have been involved in this cross-talk. These transcription factors show distinct expression patterns in the male genital tract, explaining the large panel of phenotypes observed in transgenic male mice and highlighting the importance of lipid homesostasis and the complexity of the molecular pathways involved. Increasing our knowledge of the roles of these nuclear receptors in male germ cell differentiation could help in proposing new approaches to either treat infertile men or define new strategies for contraception.

  11. The impact of the declining extended family support system on the education of orphans in Lesotho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanga, Pius T

    2013-09-01

    This paper examines the impact of the weakening of the extended family on the education of double orphans in Lesotho through in-depth interviews with participants from 3 of the 10 districts in Lesotho. The findings reveal that in Lesotho the extended family has not yet disintegrated as the literature suggests. However, it shows signs of rupturing, as many orphans reported that they are being taken into extended family households, the incentive for these households being, presumably, the financial and other material assistance that they receive from the government and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) which supplements household income and material wellbeing. The findings show that financial and other assistance given by the government and NGOs have resulted in conflict between the orphans and caregivers. This has also prompted many extended families to shift responsibilities to the government and NGOs. Most of the extended households provided the orphans with poor living conditions, such as unhygienic houses, poor nutrition, and little or no provision of school materials, which has had a negative impact on the education of the orphans. The combined effects of economic crisis and HIV and AIDS have resulted in extended families not being able to care for the needs of the orphans adequately, whilst continuing to accept them into their households. It is recommended that although extended families are still accepting orphans, the government should strengthen and recognise the important role played by families and the communities in caring for these vulnerable children. The government should also introduce social grants for orphans and other vulnerable children and review the current meagre public assistance (R100) it provides for orphans and vulnerable children in Lesotho. Other stakeholders should concentrate on strengthening the capacity of families and communities through programmes and projects which could be more sustainable than the current handouts given by

  12. AIDS orphans and vulnerable children in India: problems, prospects, and concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anant

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews and discusses the problems, responses, and concerns of orphans and vulnerable children in India. The article shows that HIV/AIDS programs and interventions are vital for survival and welfare of orphan and vulnerable children, but they have reached only to a small fraction of the most vulnerable children. The article suggests a number of measures that government and civil society could take to address the problems and emphasizes the need to learn from other countries' experience and initiatives in developing appropriate policy and programmes for orphan and vulnerable children.

  13. Community-based capital cash transfer to support orphans in Western Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovdal, Morten; Mwasiaji, W.; Morrison, J.;

    2008-01-01

    Various types of 'cash transfer' are currently receiving much attention as a way of helping orphans and vulnerable children in Africa. Drawing on a qualitative study conducted in Western Kenya, this paper points to the strategy of community-based capital cash transfers (CCCT) as a particularly...... promising method of supporting orphans and carers. Qualitative data were obtained from 15 orphans and 26 caregivers in Bondo District, Kenya, beneficiaries of a CCCT programme run by a partnership between the community, the government social services department and a foreign donor. Our findings suggest...

  14. The biogeography of soil archaeal communities on the eastern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu; Adams, Jonathan M.; Ni, Yingying; Yang, Teng; Jing, Xin; Chen, Litong; He, Jin-Sheng; Chu, Haiyan

    2016-12-01

    The biogeographical distribution of soil bacterial communities has been widely investigated. However, there has been little study of the biogeography of soil archaeal communities on a regional scale. Here, using high-throughput sequencing, we characterized the archaeal communities of 94 soil samples across the eastern Tibetan Plateau. Thaumarchaeota was the predominant archael phylum in all the soils, and Halobacteria was dominant only in dry soils. Archaeal community composition was significantly correlated with soil moisture content and C:N ratio, and archaeal phylotype richness was negatively correlated with soil moisture content (r = ‑0.47, P community pattern. These results indicate that soil moisture and C:N ratio are the key factors structuring soil archaeal communities on the eastern Tibetan Plateau. Our findings suggest that archaeal communities have adjusted their distributions rapidly enough to reach range equilibrium in relation to past environmental changes e.g. in water availability and soil nutrient status. This responsiveness may allow better prediction of future responses of soil archaea to environmental change in these sensitive ecosystems.

  15. Archaeal S-layer glycoproteins: Post-translational modification in the face of extremes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry eEichler

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Corresponding to the sole or basic component of the surface (S-layer surrounding the archaeal cell in most known cases, S-layer glycoproteins are in direct contact with the harsh environments that characterize niches where Archaea can thrive. Accordingly, early work examining archaeal S-layer glycoproteins focused on identifying those properties that allow members of this group of proteins to maintain their structural integrity in the face of extremes of temperature, pH and salinity, as well as other physical challenges. However, with expansion of the list of archaeal strains serving as model systems, as well as growth in the number of molecular tools available for the manipulation of these strains, studies on archaeal S-layer glycoproteins are currently more likely to consider the various post-translational modifications these polypeptides undergo. For instance, archaeal S-layer glycoproteins can undergo proteolytic cleavage, both N- and O-glycosylation, lipid-modification and oligomerization. In this mini-review, recent findings related to the post-translational modification of archaeal S-layer glycoproteins are considered.

  16. Orphans of the AIDS epidemic? The extent, nature and circumstances of child-headed households in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meintjes, Helen; Hall, Katharine; Marera, Double-Hugh; Boulle, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    There is widespread concern that the number of children living in "child-headed households" is rapidly increasing as a result of AIDS-related adult mortality in much of sub-Saharan Africa. Based on analyses of data from several representative national surveys over the period 2000-2007, this paper examines the extent to which this is the case in South Africa. It explores trends in the number of children living in child-only households and characterises these children relative to children living in households with adults (mixed-generation households). The findings indicate that the proportion of child-only households is relatively small (0.47% in 2006) and does not appear to be increasing. In addition, the vast majority (92.1%) of children resident in child-only households have a living parent. The findings raise critical questions about the circumstances leading to the formation of child-only households and highlight that they cannot for the main part be ascribed to HIV orphaning. Nonetheless, the number of children living in this household form is not insignificant, and their circumstances, when compared with children in mixed-generation households, indicate a range of challenges, including greater economic vulnerability and inadequate service access. We argue that a solitary focus on the HIV epidemic and its related orphaning as the cause of child-only households masks other important issues for consideration in addressing their needs, and risks the development of inappropriate policies, programmes and interventions.

  17. Archaeal populations in two distinct sedimentary facies of the subsurface of the Dead Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C; Ionescu, D; Ariztegui, D

    2014-10-01

    Archaeal metabolism was studied in aragonitic and gypsum facies of the Dead Sea subsurface using high-throughput DNA sequencing. We show that the communities are well adapted to the peculiar environment of the Dead Sea subsurface. They harbor the necessary genes to deal with osmotic pressure using high- and low-salt-in strategies, and to cope with unusually high concentrations of heavy metals. Methanogenesis was identified for the first time in the Dead Sea and appears to be an important metabolism in the aragonite sediment. Fermentation of residual organic matter, probably performed by some members of the Halobacteria class is common to both types of sediments. The latter group represents more than 95% of the taxonomically identifiable Archaea in the metagenome of the gypsum sediment. The potential for sulfur reduction has also been revealed and is associated in the sediment with EPS degradation and Fe-S mineralization as revealed by SEM imaging. Overall, we show that distinct communities of Archaea are associated with the two different facies of the Dead Sea, and are adapted to the harsh chemistry of its subsurface, in different ways.

  18. Assembly of the Complex between Archaeal RNase P Proteins RPP30 and Pop5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L. Crowe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available RNase P is a highly conserved ribonucleoprotein enzyme that represents a model complex for understanding macromolecular RNA-protein interactions. Archaeal RNase P consists of one RNA and up to five proteins (Pop5, RPP30, RPP21, RPP29, and RPP38/L7Ae. Four of these proteins function in pairs (Pop5-RPP30 and RPP21–RPP29. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC to characterize the interaction between Pop5 and RPP30 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu. NMR backbone resonance assignments of free RPP30 (25 kDa indicate that the protein is well structured in solution, with a secondary structure matching that observed in a closely related crystal structure. Chemical shift perturbations upon the addition of Pop5 (14 kDa reveal its binding surface on RPP30. ITC experiments confirm a net 1 : 1 stoichiometry for this tight protein-protein interaction and exhibit complex isotherms, indicative of higher-order binding. Indeed, light scattering and size exclusion chromatography data reveal the complex to exist as a 78 kDa heterotetramer with two copies each of Pop5 and RPP30. These results will inform future efforts to elucidate the functional role of the Pop5-RPP30 complex in RNase P assembly and catalysis.

  19. Evolution and Cultural Significance of "Orphan" Story%论“赵氏孤儿”故事演变及其文化意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉

    2012-01-01

    从《左传》、《史记》开始,至元杂剧、明传奇、各地方剧种、当代戏剧和电影,"赵氏孤儿"的故事一直被当作经典题材而改编。由于时代和作者的不同,"赵氏孤儿"故事在流传发展过程中也产生了不同程度的变化。以若干具有代表性的历史和文学作品为对象,考察"赵氏孤儿"故事的演变及其文化意义。%"Zuo Zhuan", "Historical Records", Yuan Dynasty, Ming legend of local operas, contemporary theaterand film, the story of "Orphan" has always been as a classic theme and adapted. "Orphan" story spread development process due to the times of the different changes of varying degrees. This paper tries to historical and literaryworks of several representative objects to study the evolution and cultural significance of the "orphan" story.

  20. Systematic review of available evidence on 11 high-priced inpatient orphan drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Kanters (Tim A.); C. de Sonneville (Caroline); W.K. Redekop (Ken); L. van Hakkaart-van Roijen (Leona)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ __Background__: Attention for Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) is growing, but evidence for orphan drugs is argued to be limited and inferior. This study systematically reviews the available evidence on clinical effectiveness, costeffectiveness and budget impact for orph

  1. 78 FR 35277 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Orphan Drugs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed... document. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jonna Capezzuto, Office of Information Management, Food and Drug... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Orphan Drugs; Common EMA/FDA Application Form...

  2. 76 FR 3910 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Orphan Drugs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed... document. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jonna Capezzuto, Office of Information Management, Food and Drug... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. ] Orphan Drugs; Common EMA/FDA Application Form...

  3. Identification of an archaeal mercury regulon by chromatin immunoprecipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudrappa, Deepak; Yao, Andrew I; White, Derrick; Pavlik, Benjamin J; Singh, Raghuveer; Facciotti, Marc T; Blum, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Mercury is a heavy metal and toxic to all forms of life. Metal exposure can invoke a response to improve survival. In archaea, several components of a mercury response system have been identified, but it is not known whether metal transport is a member of this system. To identify such missing components, a peptide-tagged MerR transcription factor was used to localize enriched chromosome regions by chromosome immunoprecipitation combined with DNA sequence analysis. Such regions could serve as secondary regulatory binding sites to control the expression of additional genes associated with mercury detoxification. Among the 31 highly enriched loci, a subset of five was pursued as potential candidates based on their current annotations. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis of these regions with and without mercury treatment in WT and mutant strains lacking merR indicated significant regulatory responses under these conditions. Of these, a Family 5 extracellular solute-binding protein and the MarR transcription factor shown previously to control responses to oxidation were most strongly affected. Inactivation of the solute-binding protein by gene disruption increased the resistance of mutant cells to mercury challenge. Inductively coupled plasma-MS analysis of the mutant cell line following metal challenge indicated there was less intracellular mercury compared with the isogenic WT strain. Together, these regulated genes comprise new members of the archaeal MerR regulon and reveal a cascade of transcriptional control not previously demonstrated in this model organism.

  4. Comparative structural biology of eubacterial and archaeal oligosaccharyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maita, Nobuo; Nyirenda, James; Igura, Mayumi; Kamishikiryo, Jun; Kohda, Daisuke

    2010-02-12

    Oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) catalyzes the transfer of an oligosaccharide from a lipid donor to an asparagine residue in nascent polypeptide chains. In the bacterium Campylobacter jejuni, a single-subunit membrane protein, PglB, catalyzes N-glycosylation. We report the 2.8 A resolution crystal structure of the C-terminal globular domain of PglB and its comparison with the previously determined structure from the archaeon Pyrococcus AglB. The two distantly related oligosaccharyltransferases share unexpected structural similarity beyond that expected from the sequence comparison. The common architecture of the putative catalytic sites revealed a new catalytic motif in PglB. Site-directed mutagenesis analyses confirmed the contribution of this motif to the catalytic function. Bacterial PglB and archaeal AglB constitute a protein family of the catalytic subunit of OST along with STT3 from eukaryotes. A structure-aided multiple sequence alignment of the STT3/PglB/AglB protein family revealed three types of OST catalytic centers. This novel classification will provide a useful framework for understanding the enzymatic properties of the OST enzymes from Eukarya, Archaea, and Bacteria.

  5. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-09-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies.

  6. Community-based capital cash transfer to support orphans in Western Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovdal, Morten; Mwasiaji, W.; Morrison, J.

    2008-01-01

    Various types of 'cash transfer' are currently receiving much attention as a way of helping orphans and vulnerable children in Africa. Drawing on a qualitative study conducted in Western Kenya, this paper points to the strategy of community-based capital cash transfers (CCCT) as a particularly...... that the programme not only increased food availability, but also enhanced social capital. Further research is needed to explore the potential of CCCT in supporting orphans and vulnerable children in countries with high orphanhood rates....

  7. Grow Together under the Sunshine——The 4th Summer Camp for AIDS Orphaned Children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NING LILI

    2007-01-01

    @@ The 4th summer camp for AIDS-orphaned children was held in Beijing from August 2-8,2007.Co-sponsored by the China Youth Concern Commission and China Foundation for the Prevention and Control of STDs (sexually transmitted disease) and AIDS,the event was attended by 80 AIDS-orphaned children aged 8-16 from 18 counties and cities of 8 provinces of Shanxi,Yunnan,Henan,Jilin,Liaoning,Guizhou,Sichuan and Anhui.

  8. Oral lesions and dental status among institutionalized orphans in Yemen: A matched case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeq Ali Al-Maweri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions (OMLs and dental caries and to evaluate oral health practices among institutionalized orphan-children in Sana′a city, Yemen. Subjects and Methods: A sample of 202 institutionalized male-orphan-children in the main orphanage in Sana′a city, were matched to 202 non-orphan schoolchildren. Clinical examination included assessment of OMLs based on standard international diagnostic criteria and evaluation of dental status using the Decayed/decayed, Missed/missed and Filled/filled (DMFT/dmft index according to World Health Organization recommendations. Demographic data and oral hygiene practices were obtained by interviewing each subject using special questionnaire form. Results: Majority of children were in the 12-15 year age group. Nine types of lesions were reported among orphans; the most common lesions were fissured tongue (24.3%, herpes labialis (7.9% and traumatic ulcers (2.5%. The occurrence of herpes labialis was found to be significantly higher in orphans than in controls (P < 0.01. The prevalence of dental caries was insignificantly lower among the orphans (84.7% compared with the non-orphans (89.61%; P = 0.136. The mean dmft score was significantly lower in orphans than in controls (2.28 vs. 3.82; P = 0.001. Conclusions: The institutionalized children in this orphanage had a high prevalence of OMLs but low prevalence of dental caries, though they revealed poor oral hygiene practices. Effective oral health promotion strategies need to be implemented to improve the oral health and oral health practices of children living in orphanages.

  9. An orphan chemotaxis sensor regulates virulence and antibiotic tolerance in the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Pearl McLaughlin

    Full Text Available The synthesis of virulence factors by pathogenic bacteria is highly regulated and occurs in response to diverse environmental cues. An array of two component systems (TCSs serves to link perception of different cues to specific changes in gene expression and/or bacterial behaviour. Those TCSs that regulate functions associated with virulence represent attractive targets for interference in anti-infective strategies for disease control. We have previously identified PA2572 as a putative response regulator required for full virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the opportunistic human pathogen, to Galleria mellonella (Wax moth larvae. Here we have investigated the involvement of candidate sensors for signal transduction involving PA2572. Mutation of PA2573, encoding a probable methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, gave rise to alterations in motility, virulence, and antibiotic resistance, functions which are also controlled by PA2572. Comparative transcriptome profiling of mutants revealed that PA2572 and PA2573 regulate expression of a common set of 49 genes that are involved in a range of biological functions including virulence and antibiotic resistance. Bacterial two-hybrid analysis indicated a REC-dependent interaction between PA2572 and PA2573 proteins. Finally expression of PA2572 in the PA2573 mutant background restored virulence to G. mellonella towards wild-type levels. The findings indicate a role for the orphan chemotaxis sensor PA2573 in the regulation of virulence and antibiotic tolerance in P. aeruginosa and indicate that these effects are exerted in part through signal transduction involving PA2572.

  10. The evolving drug development landscape: from blockbusters to niche busters in the orphan drug space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Kakkar, Ashish; Dahiya, Neha

    2014-06-01

    Strategy, Management and Health Policy Large pharmaceutical companies have traditionally focused on the development of blockbuster drugs that target disease states with large patient populations. However, with large-scale patent expirations and competition from generics and biosimilars, anemic pipelines, escalating clinical trial costs, and global health-care reform, the blockbuster model has become less viable. Orphan drug initiatives and the incentives accompanied by these have fostered renewed research efforts in the area of rare diseases and have led to the approval of more than 400 orphan products. Despite targeting much smaller patient populations, the revenue-generating potential of orphan drugs has been shown to be huge, with a greater return on investment than non-orphan drugs. The success of these "niche buster" therapeutics has led to a renewed interest from "Big Pharma" in the rare disease landscape. This article reviews the key drivers for orphan drug research and development, their profitability, and issues surrounding the emergence of large pharmaceutical firms into the orphan drug space.

  11. The Burden of Orphans and Vulnerable Children Due to HIV/AIDS in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsagha, Dickson S; Bissek, Anne-Cécile Zk; Nsagha, Sarah M; Assob, Jules-Clement N; Kamga, Henri-Lucien F; Njamnshi, Dora M; Njunda, Anna L; Obama, Marie-Thérèse O; Njamnshi, Alfred K

    2012-01-01

    HIV/AIDS is a major public health problem in Cameroon and Africa, and the challenges of orphans and vulnerable children are a threat to child survival, growth and development. The HIV prevalence in Cameroon was estimated at 5.1% in 2010. The objective of this study was to assess the burden of orphans and vulnerable children due to HIV/AIDS in Cameroon. A structured search to identify publications on orphans and other children made vulnerable by AIDS was carried out. A traditional literature search on google, PubMed and Medline using the keywords: orphans, vulnerable children, HIV/AIDS and Cameroon was conducted to identify potential AIDS orphans publications, we included papers on HIV prevalence in Cameroon, institutional versus integrated care of orphans, burden of children orphaned by AIDS and projections, impact of AIDS orphans on Cameroon, AIDS orphans assisted through the integrated care approach, and comparism of the policies of orphans care in the central African sub-region. We also used our participatory approach working experience with traditional rulers, administrative authorities and health stakeholders in Yaounde I and Yaounde VI Councils, Nanga Eboko Health District, Isangelle and Ekondo Titi Health Areas, Bafaka-Balue, PLAN Cameroon, the Pan African Institute for Development-West Africa, Save the orphans Foundation, Ministry of Social Affairs, and the Ministry of Public Health. Results show that only 9% of all OVC in Cameroon are given any form of support. AIDS death continue to rise in Cameroon. In 1995, 7,900 people died from AIDS in the country; and the annual number rose to 25,000 in 2000. Out of 1,200,000 orphans and vulnerable children in Cameroon in 2010, 300,000(25%) were AIDS orphans. Orphans and the number of children orphaned by AIDS has increased dramatically from 13,000 in 1995 to 304,000 in 2010. By 2020, this number is projected to rise to 350,000. These deaths profoundly affect families, which often are split up and left without any

  12. Geographical Distribution of Methanogenic Archaea in Nine Representative Paddy Soils in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Qianhui; Zhong, Linghao; Deng, Ye; Shi, Yu; Wang, Baozhan; Jia, Zhongjun; Lin, Xiangui; Feng, Youzhi

    2016-01-01

    Paddy field methanogenic archaea are responsible for methane (CH4) production and contribute significantly to climate change. The information regarding the spatial variations in the abundance, the diversity and the composition of such ecologically important microbes, however, is quite limited at large scale. In this investigation, we studied the abundance, alpha diversity and geographical distribution of methanogenic archaeal communities in nine representative paddy sites, along a large latitudinal gradient in China, using pyrosequencing and real-time quantitative PCR. It is found that all paddy soils harbor constant methanogenic archaeal constituents, which is dominated by family Methanocellaceae (37.3%), Methanobacteriaceae (22.1%), Methanosaetaceae (17.2%), and Methanosarcinaceae (9.8%). Methanogenic archaeal abundance is primarily influenced by soil C (R = 0.612, P = 0.001) and N (R = 0.673, P = 0.001) contents, as well as alpha diversity by soil pH (PD: R = -0.552, P = 0.006; Chao1: R = -0.615, P = 0.002). Further exploration revealed that both spatial distance (R = 0.3469, P = 0.001, partial mental test) and soil chemical variables mainly about soil C and N (R = 0.2847, P = 0.001) are the two major factors affecting methanogenic archaeal community composition distribution in paddy soils. This finding will allow us to develop a better picture of the biogeographic ranges of these ecologically important microbes and get deeper insights into their ecology. PMID:27679621

  13. Exiling children, creating orphans: when immigration policies hurt citizens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayas, Luis H; Bradlee, Mollie H

    2014-04-01

    Citizen-children born in the United States to undocumented immigrants have become collateral damage of immigration enforcement. These children suffer the effects of immigration laws designed to deport large numbers of people. In removal proceedings, parents often must decide to either leave their citizen-children behind in the care of others or take them to a country the child may have never known. Accordingly, immigration policy frequently creates two de facto classes of children: exiles and orphans. In discussing these classes, the authors offer a summary of how U.S. citizen-children come into contact with the immigration enforcement system. The article explores the impact of detention and deportation on the health, mental health, and developmental trajectories of citizen-children and argues for reforms in policy and practice that will adhere to the highest standards of child welfare practice. By integrating these children into the immigration discourse, practitioners and policymakers will be better able to understand the effects of immigration enforcement, reduce harm to children, and provide for the protection of their rights.

  14. Cutting-edge technology may yield elephants in Orphan basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, W.

    2006-10-15

    Controlled source electromagnetic survey (CSEM) technology may soon supply vital information to oil companies about Newfoundland's offshore basins. The technology shoots low-frequency electromagnetic signals at the sea-floor to measure resistivity. Natural gas, crude oil and water each have a particular strength to resist the power of an electromagnetic signal, and leave a unique signature. To collect data, the electromagnetic pulse emitter is towed back and forth over an area of seabed potentially holding hydrocarbons. Connected to the ship by a long tether, the emitter hangs approximately 30 to 50 m above the ocean floor, and reaches depths of 2.4 km. The sea floor has 36 receivers anchored to it in a grid of concrete blocks that dissolve within 3 months of installation. The test blocks are first dropped overboard to verify current speed and strength in order to calculate exactly where on the water's surface the concrete blocks will be lowered. The Canada Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board (CNLOPB) has deemed the technology environmentally safe. Eight land parcels have now been leased for exploration in the Orphan Basin and are expected to receive approval for seismic and electromagnetic surveys. Industry players have shown unusual optimism about the basin's potential, which is estimated to contain 4 oilfields containing a billion barrels of oil each. 2 figs.

  15. Preeclampsia – Will Orphan Drug Status Facilitate Innovative Biological Therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Sinuhe

    2015-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the development of novel therapies to treat pregnancy-related disorders, such as preeclampsia, is hampered by the paucity of research funding. Hence, it is with great interest to become aware of at least three novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this disorder: exploiting either the anticoagulant activity of antithrombin, the free radical scavenging activity of alpha-1-microglobulin, or the regenerative capacity of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells. As these projects are being carried out by small biotech enterprises, the question arises of how they are able to fund such undertakings. A novel strategy adopted by two of these companies is that they successfully petitioned US and EU agencies in order that preeclampsia is accepted in the register of rare or orphan diseases. This provides a number of benefits including market exclusivity, assistance with clinical trials, and dedicated funding schemes. Other strategies to supplement meager research funds, especially to test novel approaches, could be crowdfunding, a venture that relies on intimate interaction with advocacy groups. In other words, preeclampsia meets Facebook. Perhaps similar strategies can be adopted to examine novel therapies targeting either the imbalance in pro- or anti-angiogenic growth factors, complement activation, reduced levels of placenta protein 13, or excessive neutrophil activation evident in preeclampsia. PMID:25767802

  16. Preeclampsia - will orphan drug status facilitate innovative biological therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Sinuhe

    2015-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the development of novel therapies to treat pregnancy-related disorders, such as preeclampsia, is hampered by the paucity of research funding. Hence, it is with great interest to become aware of at least three novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this disorder: exploiting either the anticoagulant activity of antithrombin, the free radical scavenging activity of alpha-1-microglobulin, or the regenerative capacity of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells. As these projects are being carried out by small biotech enterprises, the question arises of how they are able to fund such undertakings. A novel strategy adopted by two of these companies is that they successfully petitioned US and EU agencies in order that preeclampsia is accepted in the register of rare or orphan diseases. This provides a number of benefits including market exclusivity, assistance with clinical trials, and dedicated funding schemes. Other strategies to supplement meager research funds, especially to test novel approaches, could be crowdfunding, a venture that relies on intimate interaction with advocacy groups. In other words, preeclampsia meets Facebook. Perhaps similar strategies can be adopted to examine novel therapies targeting either the imbalance in pro- or anti-angiogenic growth factors, complement activation, reduced levels of placenta protein 13, or excessive neutrophil activation evident in preeclampsia.

  17. Preeclampsia – will Orphan Drug Status facilitate innovative biological therapies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinuhe eHahn

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that development of novel therapies to treat pregnancy-relates disorders, such as preeclampsia, is hampered to the paucity of research funding. Hence, it is with great interest to become aware of at least three novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this disorder, exploiting either the anticoagulant activity of antithrombin, the free radical scavenging activity of alpha-1-microglobulin, or the regenerative capacity of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells. As these projects are being carried out by small biotech enterprises, the question arises of how they are able to fund such undertakings. A novel strategy adopted by two of these companies is that they successfully petitioned US and EU agencies in order that preeclampsia be accepted in the register of rare or orphan diseases. This provides a number of benefits including market exclusivity, assistance with clinical trials and dedicated funding schemes. Other strategies to supplement meager research funds, especially to test novel approaches, could be crowdfunding, a venture which relies on intimate interaction with advocacy groups. In other words, preeclampsia meets Facebook. Perhaps similar strategies can be adopted to examine novel therapies targeting either the imbalance in angiogenic growth factors, complement activation, reduced levels of placenta protein 13 or excessive neutrophil activation evident in preeclampsia.

  18. pH dominates variation in tropical soil archaeal diversity and community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Binu M; Kim, Mincheol; Lai-Hoe, Ang; Shukor, Nor A A; Rahim, Raha A; Go, Rusea; Adams, Jonathan M

    2013-11-01

    Little is known of the factors influencing soil archaeal community diversity and composition in the tropics. We sampled soils across a range of forest and nonforest environments in the equatorial tropics of Malaysia, covering a wide range of pH values. DNA was PCR-amplified for the V1-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene, and 454-pyrosequenced. Soil pH was the best predictor of diversity and community composition of Archaea, being a stronger predictor than land use. Archaeal OTU richness was highest in the most acidic soils. Overall archaeal abundance in tropical soils (determined by qPCR) also decreased at higher pH. This contrasts with the opposite trend previously found in temperate soils. Thaumarcheota group 1.1b was more abundant in alkaline soils, whereas group 1.1c was only detected in acidic soils. These results parallel those found in previous studies in cooler climates, emphasizing niche conservatism among broad archaeal groups. Among the most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs), there was clear evidence of niche partitioning by pH. No individual OTU occurred across the entire range of pH values. Overall, the results of this study show that pH plays a major role in structuring tropical soil archaeal communities.

  19. Effect of soil properties and hydrology on archaeal community composition in three temperate grasslands on peat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Conrad, Ralf; Petersen, Søren O

    2013-08-01

    Grasslands established on drained peat soils are regarded as negligible methane (CH4 ) sources; however, they can still exhibit considerable soil CH4 dynamics. We investigated archaeal community composition in two different fen peat soils and one bog peat soil under permanent grassland in Denmark. We used terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) fingerprinting and clone libraries to characterize the soils' archaeal community composition to gain a better understanding of relationships between peat properties and land use, respectively, and CH4 dynamics. Samples were taken at three different depths and at four different seasons. Archaeal community composition varied considerably between the three peatlands and, to a certain degree, also with peat depth, but seemed to be quite stable at individual sampling depths throughout the year. Archaeal community composition was mainly linked to soil pH. No methanogens were detected at one fen site with soil pH ranging from 3.2 to 4.4. The methanogenic community of the bog (soil pH 3.9-4.6) was dominated by hydrogenotrophs, whereas the second fen site (soil pH 5.0-5.3) comprised both aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Overall, there seemed to be a significant coupling between peat type and archaeal community composition, with local hydrology modifying the strength of this coupling.

  20. Abundance and diversity of archaeal accA gene in hot springs in Yunnan Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhao-Qi; Wang, Li; Wang, Feng-Ping; Jiang, Hong-Chen; Chen, Jin-Quan; Zhou, En-Min; Liang, Feng; Xiao, Xiang; Li, Wen-Jun

    2013-09-01

    It has been suggested that archaea carrying the accA gene, encoding the alpha subunit of the acetyl CoA carboxylase, autotrophically fix CO2 using the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate pathway in low-temperature environments (e.g., soils, oceans). However, little new information has come to light regarding the occurrence of archaeal accA genes in high-temperature ecosystems. In this study, we investigated the abundance and diversity of archaeal accA gene in hot springs in Yunnan Province, China, using DNA- and RNA-based phylogenetic analyses and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that archaeal accA genes were present and expressed in the investigated Yunnan hot springs with a wide range of temperatures (66-96 °C) and pH (4.3-9.0). The majority of the amplified archaeal accA gene sequences were affiliated with the ThAOA/HWCG III [thermophilic ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA)/hot water crenarchaeotic group III]. The archaeal accA gene abundance was very close to that of AOA amoA gene, encoding the alpha subunit of ammonia monooxygenase. These data suggest that AOA in terrestrial hot springs might acquire energy from ammonia oxidation coupled with CO2 fixation using the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate pathway.

  1. Post-marketing access to orphan drugs: a critical analysis of health technology assessment and reimbursement decision-making considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iskrov G

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Georgi Iskrov, Rumen Stefanov Department of Social Medicine and Public Health, Medical University of Plovdiv, Plovdiv, Bulgaria Abstract: This study aims to explore the current rationale of post-marketing access to orphan drugs. As access to orphan medicinal products depends on assessment and appraisal by health authorities, this article is focused on health technology assessment (HTA and reimbursement decision-making considerations for orphan drugs. A critical analysis may identify important factors that could predetermine the combined outcomes of these two processes. Following this objective, an analytical framework was developed, comprising three overlaying issues: to outline what is currently done and what needs to be done in the field of HTA of orphan drugs, to synthesize important variables relevant to the reimbursement decision-making about orphan drugs, and to unveil relationships between theory and practice. Methods for economic evaluation, cost-effectiveness threshold, budget impact, uncertainty of evidence, criteria in reimbursement decision-making, and HTA research agenda are all explored and discussed from an orphan drug perspective. Reimbursement decision-making for orphan drugs is a debate of policy priorities, health system specifics, and societal attitudes. Health authorities need to pursue a multidisciplinary analysis on a range of criteria, ensuring an explicit understanding of the trade-offs for decisions related to eligibility for reimbursement. The only reasonable way to accept a higher valuation of orphan drug benefits is if these are demonstrated empirically. Rarity means that the quality of orphan drug evidence is not the same as for conventional therapies. Closing this gap is another crucial point for the timely access to these products. The generation of evidence goes far beyond pre-market authorization trials and requires transnational cooperation and coordination. Early constructive dialogue among orphan drug

  2. Specific bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities in tidal-flat sediments along a vertical profile of several meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilms, Reinhard; Sass, Henrik; Köpke, Beate; Köster, Jürgen; Cypionka, Heribert; Engelen, Bert

    2006-04-01

    The subsurface of a tidal-flat sediment was analyzed down to 360 cm in depth by molecular and geochemical methods. A community structure analysis of all three domains of life was performed using domain-specific PCR followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis and sequencing of characteristic bands. The sediment column comprised horizons easily distinguishable by lithology that were deposited in intertidal and salt marsh environments. The pore water profile was characterized by a subsurface sulfate peak at a depth of about 250 cm. Methane and sulfate profiles were opposed, showing increased methane concentrations in the sulfate-free layers. The availability of organic carbon appeared to have the most pronounced effect on the bacterial community composition in deeper sediment layers. In general, the bacterial community was dominated by fermenters and syntrophic bacteria. The depth distribution of methanogenic archaea correlated with the sulfate profile and could be explained by electron donor competition with sulfate-reducing bacteria. Sequences affiliated with the typically hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales were present in sulfate-free layers. Archaea belonging to the Methanosarcinales that utilize noncompetitive substrates were found along the entire anoxic-sediment column. Primers targeting the eukaryotic 18S rRNA gene revealed the presence of a subset of archaeal sequences in the deeper part of the sediment cores. The phylogenetic distance to other archaeal sequences indicates that these organisms represent a new phylogenetic group, proposed as "tidal-flat cluster 1." Eukarya were still detectable at 360 cm, even though their diversity decreased with depth. Most of the eukaryotic sequences were distantly related to those of grazers and deposit feeders.

  3. What makes orphans in Kigali, Rwanda, non-adherent to antiretroviral therapy? Perspectives of their caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimiyo Kikuchi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Every year, approximately 260,000 children are infected with HIV in low- and middle-income countries. The timely initiation and high level of maintenance of antiretroviral therapy (ART are crucial to reducing the suffering of HIV-positive children. We need to develop a better understanding of the background of children's ART non-adherence because it is not well understood. The purpose of this study is to explore the background related to ART non-adherence, specifically in relation to the orphan status of children in Kigali, Rwanda. Methods: We conducted 19 focus group discussions with a total of 121 caregivers of HIV-positive children in Kigali. The primary data for analysis were verbatim transcripts and socio-demographic data. A content analysis was performed for qualitative data analysis and interpretation. Results: The study found several contextual factors that influenced non-adherence: among double orphans, there was psychological distance between the caregivers and children, whereas economic burden was the primary issue among paternal orphans. The factors promoting adherence also were unique to each orphan status, such as the positive attitude about disclosing serostatus to the child by double orphans’ caregivers, and feelings of guilt about the child's condition among non-orphaned caregivers. Conclusions: Knowledge of orphan status is essential to elucidate the factors influencing ART adherence among HIV-positive children. In this qualitative study, we identified the orphan-related contextual factors that influenced ART adherence. Understanding the social context is important in dealing with the challenges to ART adherence among HIV-positive children.

  4. Cbln1 and the δ2 glutamate receptor--an orphan ligand and an orphan receptor find their partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Keiko; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2012-03-01

    Cerebellin was originally discovered as a Purkinje cell-specific peptide more than two decades ago. Later, its precursor protein precerebellin (Cbln1) was found to be produced in cerebellar granule cells. It has become increasingly clear that although the cerebellin peptide may have certain functions, Cbln1 is an actual signaling molecule that belongs to the C1q family. However, the precise function of Cbln1 has been unresolved. Cbln1 is released from granule cells, and disruption of the cbln1 gene in mice causes a severe reduction in the number of synapses between Purkinje cells and parallel fibers (PFs; axons of granule cells) and results in cerebellar ataxia. The glutamate receptor δ2 (GluD2) is highly expressed on Purkinje cells' dendritic spines which make synapses with PFs. Although GluD2 was identified as a member of the ionotropic glutamate receptors more than 15 years ago, it has been referred to as an orphan receptor because its endogenous ligands are unclear. Interestingly, GluD2-null mice phenocopy cbln1-null mice precisely. Cbln1 and GluD2 have therefore been thought to participate in a common signaling pathway that is required for the formation of PF synapses. We recently established a direct ligand-receptor relationship between Cbln1 and GluD2. The Cbln1-GluD2 complex is located at the cleft of PF-Purkinje cell synapses and bidirectionally regulates both presynaptic and postsynaptic differentiation.

  5. Liquid but Durable: Molecular Dynamics Simulations Explain the Unique Properties of Archaeal-Like Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugunov, Anton O.; Volynsky, Pavel E.; Krylov, Nikolay A.; Boldyrev, Ivan A.; Efremov, Roman G.

    2014-12-01

    Archaeal plasma membranes appear to be extremely durable and almost impermeable to water and ions, in contrast to the membranes of Bacteria and Eucaryota. Additionally, they remain liquid within a temperature range of 0-100°C. These are the properties that have most likely determined the evolutionary fate of Archaea, and it may be possible for bionanotechnology to adopt these from nature. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to assess at the atomistic level the structure and dynamics of a series of model archaeal membranes with lipids that have tetraether chemical nature and ``branched'' hydrophobic tails. We conclude that the branched structure defines dense packing and low water permeability of archaeal-like membranes, while at the same time ensuring a liquid-crystalline state, which is vital for living cells. This makes tetraether lipid systems promising in bionanotechnology and material science, namely for design of new and unique membrane nanosystems.

  6. Differences in the Composition of Archaeal Communities in Sediments from Contrasting Zones of Lake Taihu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xianfang; Xing, Peng

    2016-01-01

    In shallow lakes, different primary producers might impact the physiochemical characteristics of the sediment and the associated microbial communities. Until now, little was known about the features of sediment Archaea and their variation across different primary producer-dominated ecosystems. Lake Taihu provides a suitable study area with cyanobacteria- and macrophyte-dominated zones co-occurring in one ecosystem. The composition of the sediment archaeal community was assessed using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing technology, based on which the potential variation with respect to the physiochemical characteristics of the sediment was analyzed. Euryarchaeota (30.19% of total archaeal sequences) and Bathyarchaeota (28.00%) were the two most abundant phyla, followed by Crenarchaeota (11.37%), Aigarchaeota (10.24%) and Thaumarchaeota (5.98%). The differences found in the composition of the archaeal communities between the two zones was significant (p = 0.005). Sediment from macrophyte-dominated zones had high TOC and TN content and an abundance of archaeal lineages potentially involved in the degradation of complex organic compounds, such as the order Thermoplasmatales. In the area dominated by Cyanobacteria, archaeal lineages related to sulfur metabolism, for example, Sulfolobales and Desulfurococcales, were significantly enriched. Among Bathyarchaeota, subgroups MCG-6 and MCG-15 were significantly accumulated in the sediment of areas dominated by macrophytes whereas MCG-4 was consistently dominant in both type of sediments. The present study contributes to the knowledge of sediment archaeal communities with different primary producers and their possible biogeochemical functions in sediment habitats. PMID:27708641

  7. Crystal structure of a novel archaeal AAA+ ATPase SSO1545 from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qingping; Rife, Christopher L.; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Krishna, S. Sri; Elsliger, Marc-André; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Hale, Joanna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kumar, Abhinav; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; van den Bedem, Henry; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.; (Scripps); (SSR); (SSRL); (JCSG); (UCSD)

    2009-08-28

    Signal transduction ATPases with numerous domains (STAND), a large class of P-loop NTPases, belong to AAA+ ATPases. They include AP(apoptotic)-ATPases (e.g., animal apoptosis regulators CED4/Apaf-1, plant disease resistance proteins, and bacterial AfsR-like transcription regulators), NACHT NTPases (e.g. CARD4, NAIP, Het-E-1, TLP1), and several other less well-characterized families. STAND differ from other P-loop NTPases by their unique sequence motifs, which include an hhGRExE (h, hydrophobic; x, any residue) motif at the N-terminal region, a GxP/GxxP motif at the C-terminal region of the NTPase domain, in addition to a C-terminal helical domain and additional domains such as WD40, TPR, LRR or catalytic modules. Despite significant biological interests, structural coverage of STAND proteins is very limited and only two other structures are currently known: the cell death regulators Apaf-1 and CED-4. Here, we report the crystal structure of SSO1545 from Sulfolobus solfataricus, which was determined using the semi-automated, high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG; http://www.jcsg.org), as part of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences' Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). SSO1545 (NP-342973.1), a representative of the archaeal STANDs, is a member of Pfam PF01637 and encodes a protein of 356 residues with calculated molecular weight and isoelectric point of 41.7 kD and 8.2, respectively.

  8. Pyrosequencing-derived bacterial, archaeal, and fungal diversity of spacecraft hardware destined for Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Duc, Myron T; Vaishampayan, Parag; Nilsson, Henrik R; Torok, Tamas; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2012-08-01

    Spacecraft hardware and assembly cleanroom surfaces (233 m(2) in total) were sampled, total genomic DNA was extracted, hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene (bacteria and archaea) and ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region (fungi) were subjected to 454 tag-encoded pyrosequencing PCR amplification, and 203,852 resulting high-quality sequences were analyzed. Bioinformatic analyses revealed correlations between operational taxonomic unit (OTU) abundance and certain sample characteristics, such as source (cleanroom floor, ground support equipment [GSE], or spacecraft hardware), cleaning regimen applied, and location about the facility or spacecraft. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) cleanroom floor and GSE surfaces gave rise to a larger number of diverse bacterial communities (619 OTU; 20 m(2)) than colocated spacecraft hardware (187 OTU; 162 m(2)). In contrast to the results of bacterial pyrosequencing, where at least some sequences were generated from each of the 31 sample sets examined, only 13 and 18 of these sample sets gave rise to archaeal and fungal sequences, respectively. As was the case for bacteria, the abundance of fungal OTU in the GSE surface samples dramatically diminished (9× less) once cleaning protocols had been applied. The presence of OTU representative of actinobacteria, deinococci, acidobacteria, firmicutes, and proteobacteria on spacecraft surfaces suggests that certain bacterial lineages persist even following rigorous quality control and cleaning practices. The majority of bacterial OTU observed as being recurrent belonged to actinobacteria and alphaproteobacteria, supporting the hypothesis that the measures of cleanliness exerted in spacecraft assembly cleanrooms (SAC) inadvertently select for the organisms which are the most fit to survive long journeys in space.

  9. Utilizing the Antarctic Master Directory to find orphan datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonczkowski, J.; Carbotte, S. M.; Arko, R. A.; Grebas, S. K.

    2011-12-01

    While most Antarctic data are housed at an established disciplinary-specific data repository, there are data types for which no suitable repository exists. In some cases, these "orphan" data, without an appropriate national archive, are served from local servers by the principal investigators who produced the data. There are many pitfalls with data served privately, including the frequent lack of adequate documentation to ensure the data can be understood by others for re-use and the impermanence of personal web sites. For example, if an investigator leaves an institution and the data moves, the link published is no longer accessible. To ensure continued availability of data, submission to long-term national data repositories is needed. As stated in the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs (NSF/OPP) Guidelines and Award Conditions for Scientific Data, investigators are obligated to submit their data for curation and long-term preservation; this includes the registration of a dataset description into the Antarctic Master Directory (AMD), http://gcmd.nasa.gov/Data/portals/amd/. The AMD is a Web-based, searchable directory of thousands of dataset descriptions, known as DIF records, submitted by scientists from over 20 countries. It serves as a node of the International Directory Network/Global Change Master Directory (IDN/GCMD). The US Antarctic Program Data Coordination Center (USAP-DCC), http://www.usap-data.org/, funded through NSF/OPP, was established in 2007 to help streamline the process of data submission and DIF record creation. When data does not quite fit within any existing disciplinary repository, it can be registered within the USAP-DCC as the fallback data repository. Within the scope of the USAP-DCC we undertook the challenge of discovering and "rescuing" orphan datasets currently registered within the AMD. In order to find which DIF records led to data served privately, all records relating to US data within the AMD were parsed. After

  10. Orphan drugs in development for urea cycle disorders: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Häberle J

    2014-09-01

    therapy, are reviewed. Keywords: urea cycle disorders, inherited hyperammonemias, orphan drugs, phenylbutyrate, N-carbamyl-l-glutamate

  11. Haitian orphan population and protective factors against caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madelyn Rea

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective In Haiti, families were torn apart and children were left orphans after the 2010 earthquake. In the aftermath of this natural disaster many children were relocated to orphanages across the country and adopted internationally. Years later these children find themselves catching up in growth physically, mentally and emotionally after an extremely traumatic event during a crucial time in their health development. Another important marker of development is the primary dentition and the presence of caries.  We report estimates of early childhood caries (ECC frequency, risk factors and quality of health among Haitian children. Methods Medical and dental professionals conducted a descriptive cross sectional study through the Pittsburgh Kids Foundation and their partnership with IDADEE children’s home, EBAC orphanage and New Vision Children’s home. Vital signs were taken and recorded to create a health/growth history for each child. Brief dental screenings were conducted and topical fluoride treatments were administered. Risk factors and quality of health information was obtained from discussions with the caregivers present. The children and caregivers were given oral hygiene education and supplies (i.e. toothbrushes, toothpaste, floss.  Results Physical exams and dental screenings were conducted on the 40 children ages 3-10 years of age living in the IDADEE children’s home. Two children had cavitated teeth. Eight children had teeth that were stained. Four children had evidence of dental trauma. 26 out of the 40 children had otherwise healthy dentition. Conclusion The IDADEE children’s home and New Vision Children’s home have hopes to expand their capacity with new construction scheduled to be finished in 2016. As more children enter these homes action is needed to educate caregivers on ways to identify high-risk children to prevent ECC and ways they can be treated before irreversible damage is done to the developing permanent

  12. Metagenomic analysis of bacterial and archaeal assemblages in the soil-mousse surrounding a geothermal spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonu Bhatia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The soil-mousse surrounding a geothermal spring was analyzed for bacterial and archaeal diversity using 16S rRNA gene amplicon metagenomic sequencing which revealed the presence of 18 bacterial phyla distributed across 109 families and 219 genera. Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and the Deinococcus-Thermus group were the predominant bacterial assemblages with Crenarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota as the main archaeal assemblages in this largely understudied geothermal habitat. Several metagenome sequences remained taxonomically unassigned suggesting the presence of a repertoire of hitherto undescribed microbes in this geothermal soil-mousse econiche.

  13. Hunting the parent of the Orphan stream. II. The first high-resolution spectroscopic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Andrew R.; Keller, Stefan C.; Da Costa, Gary; Maunder, Elizabeth [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Frebel, Anna, E-mail: andrew.casey@anu.edu.au [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    We present the first high-resolution spectroscopic study on the Orphan stream for five stream candidates, observed with the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle spectrograph on the Magellan Clay telescope. The targets were selected from the low-resolution catalog of Casey et al.: three high-probability members, one medium, and one low-probability stream candidate were observed. Our analysis indicates that the low- and medium-probability targets are metal-rich field stars. The remaining three high-probability targets range over ∼1 dex in metallicity, and are chemically distinct compared to the other two targets and all standard stars: low [α/Fe] abundance ratios are observed, and lower limits are ascertained for [Ba/Y], which sit well above the Milky Way trend. These chemical signatures demonstrate that the undiscovered parent system is unequivocally a dwarf spheroidal galaxy, consistent with dynamical constraints inferred from the stream width and arc. As such, we firmly exclude the proposed association between NGC 2419 and the Orphan stream. A wide range in metallicities adds to the similarities between the Orphan stream and Segue 1, although the low [α/Fe] abundance ratios in the Orphan stream are in tension with the high [α/Fe] values observed in Segue 1. Open questions remain before Segue 1 could possibly be claimed as the 'parent' of the Orphan stream. The parent system could well remain undiscovered in the southern sky.

  14. Rapid identification of sequences for orphan enzymes to power accurate protein annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R Ramkissoon

    Full Text Available The power of genome sequencing depends on the ability to understand what those genes and their proteins products actually do. The automated methods used to assign functions to putative proteins in newly sequenced organisms are limited by the size of our library of proteins with both known function and sequence. Unfortunately this library grows slowly, lagging well behind the rapid increase in novel protein sequences produced by modern genome sequencing methods. One potential source for rapidly expanding this functional library is the "back catalog" of enzymology--"orphan enzymes," those enzymes that have been characterized and yet lack any associated sequence. There are hundreds of orphan enzymes in the Enzyme Commission (EC database alone. In this study, we demonstrate how this orphan enzyme "back catalog" is a fertile source for rapidly advancing the state of protein annotation. Starting from three orphan enzyme samples, we applied mass-spectrometry based analysis and computational methods (including sequence similarity networks, sequence and structural alignments, and operon context analysis to rapidly identify the specific sequence for each orphan while avoiding the most time- and labor-intensive aspects of typical sequence identifications. We then used these three new sequences to more accurately predict the catalytic function of 385 previously uncharacterized or misannotated proteins. We expect that this kind of rapid sequence identification could be efficiently applied on a larger scale to make enzymology's "back catalog" another powerful tool to drive accurate genome annotation.

  15. Database identifies FDA-approved drugs with potential to be repurposed for treatment of orphan diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kui; Coté, Timothy R

    2011-07-01

    Facing substantial obstacles to developing new therapies for rare diseases, some sponsors are looking to 'repurpose' drugs already approved for other conditions and use those therapies to treat rare diseases. In an effort to facilitate such repurposing and speed the delivery of new therapies to people who need them, we have established a new resource, the Rare Disease Repurposing Database (RDRD). The advantages of repurposed compounds include their demonstrated efficacy (in some clinical contexts), their observed toxicity profiles and their clearly described manufacturing controls. To create the RDRD, we matched the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) orphan designation database to FDA drug and biological product approval lists. The RDRD lists 236 products that have received orphan status designation--that is, were found to be 'promising' for the treatment of a rare disease--and though not yet approved for marketing for that rare disease, they are already approved for marketing to treat some other disease or condition. The RDRD contains three tables: Orphan-designated products with at least one marketing approval for a common disease indication (N = 109); orphan-designated products with at least one marketing approval for a rare disease indication (N = 76); and orphan-designated products with marketing approvals for both common and rare disease indications (N = 51). While the data included in the database is a re-configuration/cross-indexing of information already released by the FDA, it offers sponsors a new tool for finding special opportunities to develop niche therapies for rare disease patients.

  16. Rapid identification of sequences for orphan enzymes to power accurate protein annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkissoon, Kevin R; Miller, Jennifer K; Ojha, Sunil; Watson, Douglas S; Bomar, Martha G; Galande, Amit K; Shearer, Alexander G

    2013-01-01

    The power of genome sequencing depends on the ability to understand what those genes and their proteins products actually do. The automated methods used to assign functions to putative proteins in newly sequenced organisms are limited by the size of our library of proteins with both known function and sequence. Unfortunately this library grows slowly, lagging well behind the rapid increase in novel protein sequences produced by modern genome sequencing methods. One potential source for rapidly expanding this functional library is the "back catalog" of enzymology--"orphan enzymes," those enzymes that have been characterized and yet lack any associated sequence. There are hundreds of orphan enzymes in the Enzyme Commission (EC) database alone. In this study, we demonstrate how this orphan enzyme "back catalog" is a fertile source for rapidly advancing the state of protein annotation. Starting from three orphan enzyme samples, we applied mass-spectrometry based analysis and computational methods (including sequence similarity networks, sequence and structural alignments, and operon context analysis) to rapidly identify the specific sequence for each orphan while avoiding the most time- and labor-intensive aspects of typical sequence identifications. We then used these three new sequences to more accurately predict the catalytic function of 385 previously uncharacterized or misannotated proteins. We expect that this kind of rapid sequence identification could be efficiently applied on a larger scale to make enzymology's "back catalog" another powerful tool to drive accurate genome annotation.

  17. Identifying ligands at orphan GPCRs: current status using structure-based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Tony; Kufareva, Irina; Coleman, James Lj; Graham, Robert M; Abagyan, Ruben; Smith, Nicola J

    2016-10-01

    GPCRs are the most successful pharmaceutical targets in history. Nevertheless, the pharmacology of many GPCRs remains inaccessible as their endogenous or exogenous modulators have not been discovered. Tools that explore the physiological functions and pharmacological potential of these 'orphan' GPCRs, whether they are endogenous and/or surrogate ligands, are therefore of paramount importance. Rates of receptor deorphanization determined by traditional reverse pharmacology methods have slowed, indicating a need for the development of more sophisticated and efficient ligand screening approaches. Here, we discuss the use of structure-based ligand discovery approaches to identify small molecule modulators for exploring the function of orphan GPCRs. These studies have been buoyed by the growing number of GPCR crystal structures solved in the past decade, providing a broad range of template structures for homology modelling of orphans. This review discusses the methods used to establish the appropriate signalling assays to test orphan receptor activity and provides current examples of structure-based methods used to identify ligands of orphan GPCRs. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein-Coupled Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v173.20/issuetoc.

  18. Grieving experiences amongst adolescents orphaned by AIDS: Analysis from event history calendars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Thupayagale-Tshweneagae

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mental health is an essential component of adolescent health and wellbeing. Mental health practitioners assess adolescents’ mental health status to identify possible issues that may lead to mental health problems. However, very few of the tools used to assess the mental health status of adolescents include assessment for grieving and coping patterns. The current tools used for assessing an individual’s mental health are lengthy and not comprehensive. The purpose of this study was to assess grieving patterns of adolescents orphaned by AIDS and to appraise the sefulness of an event history calendar as an assessment tool for identifying grieving experiences, in order to guide and support these adolescents through the grieving process. One hundred and two adolescents aged 14–18 years, who had been orphaned by AIDS, completed an event history calendar, reviewed it with the researcher and reported their perceptions of it. Thematic analysis of the event history calendar content revealed that it is an effective, time-efficient, adolescent-friendly tool that facilitated identification and discussion of the orphaned adolescents’ grieving patterns. Crying, isolation, silence and violent outbursts were the main grieving patterns reported by adolescents orphaned by AIDS. The researcher recommends use of the event history calendar for identification of orphaned adolescents’ grieving experiences. Early identification would enable mental health practitioners to support them in order to prevent the occurrence of mental illness due to maladaptive grieving.

  19. Grieving experiences amongst adolescents orphaned by AIDS: Analysis from event history calendars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thupayagale-Tshweneagae, Gloria

    2012-09-07

    Mental health is an essential component of adolescent health and wellbeing. Mental health practitioners assess adolescents' mental health status to identify possible issues that may lead to mental health problems. However, very few of the tools used to assess the mental health status of adolescents include assessment for grieving and coping patterns. The current tools used for assessing an individual's mental health are lengthy and not comprehensive. The purpose of this study was to assess grieving patterns of adolescents orphaned by AIDS and to appraise the usefulness of an event history calendar as an assessment tool for identifying grieving experiences, in order to guide and support these adolescents through the grieving process. One hundred and two adolescents aged 14-18 years, who had been orphaned by AIDS, completed an event history calendar, reviewed it with the researcher and reported their perceptions of it. Thematic analysis of the event history calendar content revealed that it is an effective, time-efficient, adolescent-friendly tool that facilitated identification and discussion of the orphaned adolescents' grieving patterns. Crying, isolation, silence and violent outbursts were the main grieving patterns reported by adolescents orphaned by AIDS. The researcher recommends use of the event history calendar for identification of orphaned adolescents' grieving experiences. Early identification would enable mental health practitioners to support them in order to prevent the occurrence of mental illness due to maladaptive grieving.

  20. Comparative Analysis of the Orphan CRISPR2 Locus in 242 Enterococcus faecalis Strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Hullahalli

    Full Text Available Clustered, Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats and their associated Cas proteins (CRISPR-Cas provide prokaryotes with a mechanism for defense against mobile genetic elements (MGEs. A CRISPR locus is a molecular memory of MGE encounters. It contains an array of short sequences, called spacers, that generally have sequence identity to MGEs. Three different CRISPR loci have been identified among strains of the opportunistic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis. CRISPR1 and CRISPR3 are associated with the cas genes necessary for blocking MGEs, but these loci are present in only a subset of E. faecalis strains. The orphan CRISPR2 lacks cas genes and is ubiquitous in E. faecalis, although its spacer content varies from strain to strain. Because CRISPR2 is a variable locus occurring in all E. faecalis, comparative analysis of CRISPR2 sequences may provide information about the clonality of E. faecalis strains. We examined CRISPR2 sequences from 228 E. faecalis genomes in relationship to subspecies phylogenetic lineages (sequence types; STs determined by multilocus sequence typing (MLST, and to a genome phylogeny generated for a representative 71 genomes. We found that specific CRISPR2 sequences are associated with specific STs and with specific branches on the genome tree. To explore possible applications of CRISPR2 analysis, we evaluated 14 E. faecalis bloodstream isolates using CRISPR2 analysis and MLST. CRISPR2 analysis identified two groups of clonal strains among the 14 isolates, an assessment that was confirmed by MLST. CRISPR2 analysis was also used to accurately predict the ST of a subset of isolates. We conclude that CRISPR2 analysis, while not a replacement for MLST, is an inexpensive method to assess clonality among E. faecalis isolates, and can be used in conjunction with MLST to identify recombination events occurring between STs.

  1. Molecular pathways: the role of NR4A orphan nuclear receptors in cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mohan, Helen M

    2012-06-15

    Nuclear receptors are of integral importance in carcinogenesis. Manipulation of classic ligand-activated nuclear receptors, such as estrogen receptor blockade in breast cancer, is an important established cancer therapy. Orphan nuclear receptors, such as nuclear family 4 subgroup A (NR4A) receptors, have no known natural ligand(s). These elusive receptors are increasingly recognized as molecular switches in cell survival and a molecular link between inflammation and cancer. NR4A receptors act as transcription factors, altering expression of downstream genes in apoptosis (Fas-ligand, TRAIL), proliferation, DNA repair, metabolism, cell migration, inflammation (interleukin-8), and angiogenesis (VEGF). NR4A receptors are modulated by multiple cell-signaling pathways, including protein kinase A\\/CREB, NF-κB, phosphoinositide 3-kinase\\/AKT, c-jun-NH(2)-kinase, Wnt, and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. NR4A receptor effects are context and tissue specific, influenced by their levels of expression, posttranslational modification, and interaction with other transcription factors (RXR, PPAR-Υ). The subcellular location of NR4A "nuclear receptors" is also important functionally; novel roles have been described in the cytoplasm where NR4A proteins act both indirectly and directly on the mitochondria to promote apoptosis via Bcl-2. NR4A receptors are implicated in a wide variety of malignancies, including breast, lung, colon, bladder, and prostate cancer; glioblastoma multiforme; sarcoma; and acute and\\/or chronic myeloid leukemia. NR4A receptors modulate response to conventional chemotherapy and represent an exciting frontier for chemotherapeutic intervention, as novel agents targeting NR4A receptors have now been developed. This review provides a concise clinical overview of current knowledge of NR4A signaling in cancer and the potential for therapeutic manipulation.

  2. Psychosocial support and parents' social life determine the self-esteem of orphan children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erango, Markos Abiso; Ayka, Zikie Ataro

    2015-01-01

    Parental death affects the life of children in many ways, one of which is self-esteem problems. Providing psychosocial support and equipping orphans play a vital role in their lifes. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 7-18-year-old orphans at 17 local districts of Gamo Gofa Zone, Southern Regional State of Ethiopia. From a total of 48,270 orphans in these areas, 4,368 were selected using stratified simple random sampling technique. Data were collected with a designed questionnaire based on the Rosenberg's rating scale to measure their self-esteem levels. Self-esteem with a score less than or equal to an average score was considered to be low self-esteem in the analysis. Binary logistic regression model was used to analyze the data using the SPSS software. The results of the study revealed that the probability of orphans suffering from low self-esteem was 0.59. Several risk factors were found to be significant at the level of 5%. Psychosocial support (good guidance, counseling and treatment, physical protection and amount of love shared, financial and material support, and fellowship with other children), parents living together before death, strong relationship between parents before death, high average monthly income, voluntary support, and consideration from the society are some of the factors that decrease the risk of being low in self-esteem. There are many orphans with low self-esteem in the study areas. The factors negatively affecting the self-esteem of orphans include the lack of psychosocial support, poor social life of parents, and death of parents due to AIDS. Society and parents should be aware of the consequences of these factors which can influence their children's future self-esteem.

  3. Tectono-stratigraphic evolution and crustal architecture of the Orphan Basin during North Atlantic rifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouiza, Mohamed; Hall, Jeremy; Welford, J. Kim

    2016-06-01

    The Orphan Basin is located in the deep offshore of the Newfoundland margin, and it is bounded by the continental shelf to the west, the Grand Banks to the south, and the continental blocks of Orphan Knoll and Flemish Cap to the east. The Orphan Basin formed in Mesozoic time during the opening of the North Atlantic Ocean between eastern Canada and western Iberia-Europe. This work, based on well data and regional seismic reflection profiles across the basin, indicates that the continental crust was affected by several extensional episodes between the Jurassic and the Early Cretaceous, separated by events of uplift and erosion. The preserved tectono-stratigraphic sequences in the basin reveal that deformation initiated in the eastern part of the Orphan Basin in the Jurassic and spread towards the west in the Early Cretaceous, resulting in numerous rift structures filled with a Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous syn-rift succession and overlain by thick Upper Cretaceous to Cenozoic post-rift sediments. The seismic data show an extremely thinned crust (4-16 km thick) underneath the eastern and western parts of the Orphan Basin, forming two sub-basins separated by a wide structural high with a relatively thick crust (17 km thick). Quantifying the crustal architecture in the basin highlights the large discrepancy between brittle extension localized in the upper crust and the overall crustal thinning. This suggests that continental deformation in the Orphan Basin involved, in addition to the documented Jurassic and Early Cretaceous rifting, an earlier brittle rift phase which is unidentifiable in seismic data and a depth-dependent thinning of the crust driven by localized lower crust ductile flow.

  4. Effectiveness of the Group Play Therapy on the Insecure Attachment and Social Skills of Orphans in Ahvaz City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Bahareh; Safarzadeh, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of the group play therapy on the insecure attachment and social skills of orphans in Ahvaz city. Statistical population included all orphans in Ahvaz city, of whom 30 students were selected whose scores in insecure attachment and in social skills were one standard deviation higher and one standard…

  5. Bending elasticity modulus of giant vesicles composed of aeropyrum pernix k1 archaeal lipid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Julia; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Iglič, Aleš; Bivas, Isak

    2015-03-26

    Thermally induced shape fluctuations were used to study elastic properties of giant vesicles composed of archaeal lipids C25,25-archetidyl (glucosyl) inositol and C25,25-archetidylinositol isolated from lyophilised Aeropyrum pernix K1 cells. Giant vesicles were created by electroformation in pure water environment. Stroboscopic illumination using a xenon flash lamp was implemented to remove the blur effect due to the finite integration time of the camera and to obtain an instant picture of the fluctuating vesicle shape. The mean weighted value of the bending elasticity modulus kc of the archaeal membrane determined from the measurements meeting the entire set of qualification criteria was (1.89 ± 0.18) × 10-19 J, which is similar to the values obtained for a membrane composed of the eukaryotic phospholipids SOPC (1.88 ± 0.17) × 10-19 J and POPC (2.00 ± 0.21) ´ 10-19 J. We conclude that membranes composed of archaeal lipids isolated from Aeropyrum pernix K1 cells have similar elastic properties as membranes composed of eukaryotic lipids. This fact, together with the importance of the elastic properties for the normal circulation through blood system, provides further evidence in favor of expectations that archaeal lipids could be appropriate for the design of drug delivery systems.

  6. Identification of archaeal proteins that affect the exosome function in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palhano Fernando L

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The archaeal exosome is formed by a hexameric RNase PH ring and three RNA binding subunits and has been shown to bind and degrade RNA in vitro. Despite extensive studies on the eukaryotic exosome and on the proteins interacting with this complex, little information is yet available on the identification and function of archaeal exosome regulatory factors. Results Here, we show that the proteins PaSBDS and PaNip7, which bind preferentially to poly-A and AU-rich RNAs, respectively, affect the Pyrococcus abyssi exosome activity in vitro. PaSBDS inhibits slightly degradation of a poly-rA substrate, while PaNip7 strongly inhibits the degradation of poly-A and poly-AU by the exosome. The exosome inhibition by PaNip7 appears to depend at least partially on its interaction with RNA, since mutants of PaNip7 that no longer bind RNA, inhibit the exosome less strongly. We also show that FITC-labeled PaNip7 associates with the exosome in the absence of substrate RNA. Conclusions Given the high structural homology between the archaeal and eukaryotic proteins, the effect of archaeal Nip7 and SBDS on the exosome provides a model for an evolutionarily conserved exosome control mechanism.

  7. Archaeal and bacterial diversity in hot springs on the Tibetan Plateau, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiuyuan; Dong, Christina Z; Dong, Raymond M; Jiang, Hongchen; Wang, Shang; Wang, Genhou; Fang, Bin; Ding, Xiaoxue; Niu, Lu; Li, Xin; Zhang, Chuanlun; Dong, Hailiang

    2011-09-01

    The diversity of archaea and bacteria was investigated in ten hot springs (elevation >4600 m above sea level) in Central and Central-Eastern Tibet using 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis. The temperature and pH of these hot springs were 26-81°C and close to neutral, respectively. A total of 959 (415 and 544 for bacteria and archaea, respectively) clone sequences were obtained. Phylogenetic analysis showed that bacteria were more diverse than archaea and that these clone sequences were classified into 82 bacterial and 41 archaeal operational taxonomic units (OTUs), respectively. The retrieved bacterial clones were mainly affiliated with four known groups (i.e., Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Chloroflexi), which were similar to those in other neutral-pH hot springs at low elevations. In contrast, most of the archaeal clones from the Tibetan hot springs were affiliated with Thaumarchaeota, a newly proposed archaeal phylum. The dominance of Thaumarchaeota in the archaeal community of the Tibetan hot springs appears to be unique, although the exact reasons are not yet known. Statistical analysis showed that diversity indices of both archaea and bacteria were not statistically correlated with temperature, which is consistent with previous studies.

  8. Metagenomic evaluation of bacterial and archaeal diversity in the geothermal hot springs of manikaran, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sonu; Batra, Navneet; Pathak, Ashish; Green, Stefan J; Joshi, Amit; Chauhan, Ashvini

    2015-02-19

    Bacterial and archaeal diversity in geothermal spring water were investigated using 16S rRNA gene amplicon metagenomic sequencing. This revealed the dominance of Firmicutes, Aquificae, and the Deinococcus-Thermus group in this thermophilic environment. A number of sequences remained taxonomically unresolved, indicating the presence of potentially novel microbes in this unique habitat.

  9. Characterization of archaeal community in contaminated and uncontaminated surface stream sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porat, Iris; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Mosher, Jennifer J; Brandt, Craig C; Yang, Zamin K; Brooks, Scott C; Liang, Liyuan; Drake, Meghan M; Podar, Mircea; Brown, Steven D; Palumbo, Anthony V

    2010-11-01

    Archaeal communities from mercury and uranium-contaminated freshwater stream sediments were characterized and compared to archaeal communities present in an uncontaminated stream located in the vicinity of Oak Ridge, TN, USA. The distribution of the Archaea was determined by pyrosequencing analysis of the V4 region of 16S rRNA amplified from 12 streambed surface sediments. Crenarchaeota comprised 76% of the 1,670 archaeal sequences and the remaining 24% were from Euryarchaeota. Phylogenetic analysis further classified the Crenarchaeota as a Freshwater Group, Miscellaneous Crenarchaeota group, Group I3, Rice Cluster VI and IV, Marine Group I and Marine Benthic Group B; and the Euryarchaeota into Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales, Methanobacteriales, Rice Cluster III, Marine Benthic Group D, Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vent Euryarchaeota 1 and Eury 5. All groups were previously described. Both hydrogen- and acetate-dependent methanogens were found in all samples. Most of the groups (with 60% of the sequences) described in this study were not similar to any cultivated isolates, making it difficult to discern their function in the freshwater microbial community. A significant decrease in the number of sequences, as well as in the diversity of archaeal communities was found in the contaminated sites. The Marine Group I, including the ammonia oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus, was the dominant group in both mercury and uranium/nitrate-contaminated sites. The uranium-contaminated site also contained a high concentration of nitrate, thus Marine Group I may play a role in nitrogen cycle.

  10. Many nonuniversal archaeal ribosomal proteins are found in conserved gene clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiachen Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The genomic associations of the archaeal ribosomal proteins, (r-proteins, were examined in detail. The archaeal versions of the universal r-protein genes are typically in clusters similar or identical and to those found in bacteria. Of the 35 nonuniversal archaeal r-protein genes examined, the gene encoding L18e was found to be associated with the conserved L13 cluster, whereas the genes for S4e, L32e and L19e were found in the archaeal version of the spc operon. Eleven nonuniversal protein genes were not associated with any common genomic context. Of the remaining 19 protein genes, 17 were convincingly assigned to one of 10 previously unrecognized gene clusters. Examination of the gene content of these clusters revealed multiple associations with genes involved in the initiation of protein synthesis, transcription or other cellular processes. The lack of such associations in the universal clusters suggests that initially the ribosome evolved largely independently of other processes. More recently it likely has evolved in concert with other cellular systems. It was also verified that a second copy of the gene encoding L7ae found in some bacteria is actually a homolog of the gene encoding L30e and should be annotated as such.

  11. Archaeal rRNA operons, intron splicing and homing endonucleases, RNA polymerase operons and phylogeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garrett, Roger Antony; Aagaard, Claus Sindbjerg; Andersen, Morten;

    1994-01-01

    Over the past decade our laboratory has had a strong interest in defining the phylogenetic status of the archaea. This has involved determining and analysing the sequences of operons of both rRNAs and RNA polymerases and it led to the discovery of the first archaeal rRNA intron. What follows...

  12. Archaeal communities associated with roots of the common reed (Phragmites australis) in Beijing Cuihu Wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yin; Li, Hong; Liu, Qun Fang; Li, Yan Hong

    2015-05-01

    The richness, phylogeny and composition of archaeal community associated with the roots of common reed (Phragmites australis) growing in the Beijing Cuihu Wetland, China was investigated using a 16S rDNA library. In total, 235 individual sequences were collected, and a phylogenetic analysis revealed that 69.4 and 11.5 % of clones were affiliated with the Euryarchaeota and the Crenarchaeota, respectively. In Euryarchaeota, the archaeal community was dominated by species in following genera: Methanobacterium in the order Methanobacteriales (60.7 %); Methanoregula and Methanospirillum in the order Methanomicrobiales (20.2 %), and Methanomethylovorans, Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta in the order Methanosarcinales (17.2 %). Of 27 sequences assigned to uncultured Crenarchaeota, 22 were grouped into Group 1.3, and five grouped into Group 1.1b. Hence, the archaeal communities associated with reed roots are largely involved in methane production, and, to a lesser extent, in ammonia oxidization. Quantification of the archaeal amoA gene indicated that ammonia oxidizing archaea were more numerous in the rhizosphere soil than in the root tissue or surrounding water. A total of 19.1 % of the sequences were unclassified, suggesting that many unidentified archaea are probably involved in the reed wetland ecosystem.

  13. Drying effects on archaeal community composition and methanogenesis in bromeliad tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Franziska B; Martinson, Guntars O; Pommerenke, Bianca; Pump, Judith; Conrad, Ralf

    2015-02-01

    Tank bromeliads are highly abundant epiphytes in neotropical forests and form a unique canopy wetland ecosystem which is involved in the global methane cycle. Although the tropical climate is characterized by high annual precipitation, the plants can face periods of restricted water. Thus, we hypothesized that water is an important controller of the archaeal community composition and the pathway of methane formation in tank bromeliads. Greenhouse experiments were established to investigate the resident and active archaeal community targeting the 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA in the tank slurry of bromeliads at three different moisture levels. Archaeal community composition and abundance were determined using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and quantitative PCR. Release of methane and its stable carbon isotopic signature were determined in a further incubation experiment under two moisture levels. The relative abundance of aceticlastic Methanosaetaceae increased up to 34% and that of hydrogenotrophic Methanobacteriales decreased by more than half with decreasing moisture. Furthermore, at low moisture levels, methane production was up to 100-fold lower (≤0.1-1.1 nmol gdw(-1) d(-1)) than under high moisture levels (10-15 nmol gdw(-1) d(-1)). The rapid response of the archaeal community indicates that the pathway of methane formation in bromeliad tanks may indeed be strongly susceptible to periods of drought in neotropical forest canopies.

  14. Orphans and Vulnerable Children Affected by Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Malcolm; Beard, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    In Sub-Saharan Africa, 15.1 million children have been orphaned because of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). They face significant vulnerabilities, including stigma and discrimination, trauma and stress, illness, food insecurity, poverty, and difficulty accessing education. Millions of additional children who have living parents are vulnerable because their parents or other relatives are infected. This article reviews the current situation of orphans and vulnerable children, explores the underlying determinants of vulnerability and resilience, describes the response by the global community, and highlights the challenges as the HIV pandemic progresses through its fourth decade.

  15. The Roles of Orphan Nuclear Receptors in the Development and Function of the Immune System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ivan Dzhagalov; Nu Zhang; You-Wen He

    2004-01-01

    Hormones and their receptors regulate cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis and also play important roles in immune function. Recent studies on the subfamily of the orphan nuclear receptors known as retinoid-acid related orphan receptors (ROR) have shed important insights on the roles of this group of nuclear proteins in the development and function of the immune system. RORα regulates inflammatory cytokine production in both innate and adaptive immune system while RORγ regulates the normal development of T lymphocyte repertoire and secondary lymphoid organs. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(6):401-407.

  16. The Roles of Orphan Nuclear Receptors in the Development and Function of the Immune System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    IvanDzhagalov; NuZhang; You-WenHe

    2004-01-01

    Hormones and their receptors regulate cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis and also play important roles in immune function. Recent studies on the subfamily of the orphan nuclear receptors known as retinoid-acid related orphan receptors (ROR) have shed important insights on the roles of this group of nuclear proteins in the development and function of the immune system. RORα regulates inflammatory cytokine production in both innate and adaptive immune system while RORγ, regulates the normal development of T lymphocyte repertoire and secondary lymphoid organs. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(6):401-407.

  17. The role of globalization in drug development and access to orphan drugs: orphan drug legislation in the US/EU and in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Renée J G; Bighash, Lida; Bryón Nieto, Alejandro; Tannus Branco de Araújo, Gabriela; Gay-Molina, Juan Gabriel; Augustovski, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Compared to a decade ago, nearly three times as many drugs for rare diseases are slated for development. This article addresses the market access issues associated with orphan drug status in Europe and the United States in contrast to the legislation in five Latin American (LA) countries that have made strides in this regard--Mexico, Brazil, Colombia, Chile and Argentina. Based on the success of orphan drug legislation in the EU and US, LA countries should strive to adopt similar strategies with regard to rare diseases and drug development. With the implementation of new targeted regulations, reimbursement strategies, and drug approvals, accessibility to treatment will be improved for people afflicted with rare diseases in these developing countries.

  18. [Clinical evaluation of new drugs against orphan diseases in oncology - the current situation in Europe and in our country].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stěrba, Jaroslav; Stěrbová, Sylva; Kodytková, Daniela; Valík, Dalibor; Demlová, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Cancer represents one of the main causes of death among diseases across the age spectrum. Tumors in children, however, represent less than 1% of the total number of cancers in the population and in terms of the definition of orphan diseases in Europe are all children's cancers considered as orphan diseases. This is the reason why the research and development of new agents against cancer in childhood stands outside of the main interest. Every year around 30,000 new cases of cancer in children and adolescents are diagnosed in the European Unioun (EU) and approximately 80% of them achieve long-term remission using mainly conventional methods of treatment. However, almost 6,000 children and adolescents die every year of malignant tumors therefore cancer remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Consequently, there is a demand for new and safe drugs for children suffering from cancer which would lead to improved survival and to risk reduction of late adverse effects of cancer treatment. In the past 10 years in the EU, more in the EU-15 than in our country, 20 performed oncology trials in phase I involving adults account for only one trial in pediatric patients. The issue of new drugs clinical testing in rare cancers is very complex, complicated and for current unsatisfactory situation might be responsible various aspects. These aspects contain the legislative field, the problem of determining the correct dose of testing drug as a single agent or in combination therapy, the use of testing drug in advanced disease or already in de novo diagnosed patients, as well as equity (equal) access to new drugs being tested, the goal set for each molecule/drug in clinical trials, the conflict of interest balanced with sufficient professionalism and last but not least, the need for new methodologies and statistical approaches. The aim of this article is to describe the issue complexity of incorporation of new, modern drug for cancer patients with orphan diseases, including

  19. Temporal changes in soil bacterial and archaeal communities with different fertilizers in tea orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Yang, Shao-hui; Yang, Jing-ping; Lv, Ya-min; Zhao, Xing; Pang, Ji-liang

    2014-11-01

    It is important to understand the effects of temporal changes in microbial communities in the acidic soils of tea orchards with different fertilizers. A field experiment involving organic fertilizer (OF), chemical fertilizer (CF), and unfertilized control (CK) treatments was arranged to analyze the temporal changes in the bacterial and archaeal communities at bimonthly intervals based on the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiling. The abundances of total bacteria, total archaea, and selected functional genes (bacterial and archaeal amoA, bacterial narG, nirK, nirS, and nosZ) were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results indicate that the structures of bacterial and archaeal communities varied significantly with time and fertilization based on changes in the relative abundance of dominant T-RFs. The abundancy of the detected genes changed with time. The total bacteria, total archaea, and archaeal amoA were less abundant in July. The bacterial amoA and denitrifying genes were less abundant in September, except the nirK gene. The OF treatment increased the abundance of the observed genes, while the CF treatment had little influence on them. The soil temperature significantly affected the bacterial and archaeal community structures. The soil moisture was significantly correlated with the abundance of denitrifying genes. Of the soil chemical properties, soil organic carbon was the most important factor and was significantly correlated with the abundance of the detected genes, except the nirK gene. Overall, this study demonstrated the effects of both temporal alteration and organic fertilizer on the structures of microbial communities and the abundance of genes involved in the nitrogen cycle.

  20. Psychological well-being and socio-economic hardship among AIDS orphans and other vulnerable children in Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delva, Wim; Vercoutere, An; Loua, Catherine; Lamah, Jonas; Vansteelandt, Stijn; De Koker, Petra; Claeys, Patricia; Temmerman, Marleen; Annemans, Lieven

    2009-12-01

    Over the past decade, the effects of AIDS-related parental death on children's socio-economic, educational and psychological well-being have become apparent. Most studies, however, have compared the plight of so-called AIDS orphans with non-orphaned children only. Consequently, such study designs are unable to establish if the AIDS-related cause of death of the parents confers effects additional to those of parent-bereavement. We therefore conducted a cross-sectional survey to assess the psychological well-being and socio-economic hardship among 140 non-orphaned children, 133 children orphaned by causes other than AIDS (O) and 124 children orphaned by AIDS (O-A) in Conakry, N'Zerekore and the villages around N'Zerekore, Guinea. Multi-way analysis of variance and multiple (ordinal) logistic regression models were applied to measure the association between the orphan status and psychological well-being, school attendance, economic activities, frequency of going to bed hungry and sleeping commodity. After adjustment for confounding factors, the psychological well-being score (PWS) was significantly lower among AIDS-orphaned children than among O (Pchildren were more likely to be engaged in economic activities (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 3.04; 95% CI: 1.45-6.36) and to go to bed hungry on a daily basis (AOR = 2.73; 95% CI: 1.24-6.02) than other orphans. The differences in school attendance and the proportion of children with a bed or couch to sleep between AIDS-orphaned children and O were not statistically significant. This situation calls for sustainable and holistic approaches to ensure the psychological and socio-economic stability of AIDS orphans and other vulnerable children.

  1. The orphaning experience: descriptions from Ugandan youth who have lost parents to HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ssebunnya Joshua

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The HIV/AIDS epidemic has continued to pose significant challenges to countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. Millions of African children and youth have lost parents to HIV/AIDS leaving a generation of orphans to be cared for within extended family systems and communities. The experiences of youth who have lost parents to the HIV/AIDS epidemic provide an important ingress into this complex, evolving, multi-dimensional phenomenon. A fundamental qualitative descriptive study was conducted to develop a culturally relevant and comprehensive description of the experiences of orphanhood from the perspectives of Ugandan youth. A purposeful sample of 13 youth who had lost one or both parents to HIV/AIDS and who were affiliated with a non-governmental organization providing support to orphans were interviewed. Youth orphaned by HIV/AIDS described the experience of orphanhood beginning with parental illness, not death. Several losses were associated with the death of a parent including lost social capitol, educational opportunities and monetary assets. Unique findings revealed that youth experienced culturally specific stigma and conflict which was distinctly related to their HIV/AIDS orphan status. Exploitation within extended cultural family systems was also reported. Results from this study suggest that there is a pressing need to identify and provide culturally appropriate services for these Ugandan youth prior to and after the loss of a parent(s.

  2. Molecular pharmacological phenotyping of EBI2. An orphan seven-transmembrane receptor with constitutive activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; Benned-Jensen, Tau; Holst, Peter J;

    2006-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-induced receptor 2 (EBI2) is an orphan seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptor originally identified as the most up-regulated gene (>200-fold) in EBV-infected cells. Here we show that EBI2 signals with constitutive activity through Galpha(i) as determined by a receptor-mediate...

  3. Educating Orphaned and Vulnerable Children in Elgeyo-Marakwet County, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepkemboi, Grace; Jolly, Pauline; Gillyard, KaNesha; Lissanu, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    According to UNICEF, 13.3 million children (0-17 years) worldwide have lost one or both parents to AIDS. Nearly 12 million of these children live in sub-Saharan Africa. Together, with other children who have been severely impacted by the AIDS pandemic, these orphaned and vulnerable children (OVC) are at higher risk of missing out on schooling,…

  4. Educational Support for Orphans and Vulnerable Children in Primary Schools: Challenges and Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwoma, Teresa; Pillay, Jace

    2016-01-01

    Educational status is an important indicator of children's wellbeing and future life opportunities. It can predict growth potential and economic viability of a state. While this is an ideal situation for all children, the case may be different for orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) due to the challenges they go through on a daily basis. This…

  5. "Orphan" $\\gamma$-ray Flares and Stationary Sheaths of Blazar Jets

    CERN Document Server

    MacDonald, Nicholas R; Marscher, Alan P

    2016-01-01

    Blazars exhibit flares across the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Many $\\gamma$-ray flares are highly correlated with flares detected at longer wavelengths; however, a small subset appears to occur in isolation, with little or no correlated variability at longer wavelengths. These "orphan" $\\gamma$-ray flares challenge current models of blazar variability, most of which are unable to reproduce this type of behavior. Macdonald et al. have developed the Ring of Fire model to explain the origin of orphan $\\gamma$-ray flares from within blazar jets. In this model, electrons contained within a blob of plasma moving relativistically along the spine of the jet inverse-Compton scatter synchrotron photons emanating off of a ring of shocked sheath plasma that enshrouds the jet spine. As the blob propagates through the ring, the scattering of the ring photons by the blob electrons creates an orphan $\\gamma$-ray flare. This model was successfully applied to modeling a prominent orphan $\\gamma$-ray flare observed in the ...

  6. Education and Nutritional Status of Orphans and Children of HIV-Infected Parents in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vinod; Arnold, Fred; Otieno, Fredrick; Cross, Anne; Hong, Rathavuth

    2007-01-01

    We examined whether orphaned and fostered children and children of HIV-infected parents are disadvantaged in schooling, nutrition, and health care. We analyzed data on 2,756 children aged 0-4 years and 4,172 children aged 6-14 years included in the 2003 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey, with linked anonymous HIV testing, using multivariate…

  7. Examining Why the Canadian Federal Government Placed an Orphan Drug Strategy on Their Decision Agenda Now

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Gary Embrett

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The Ministry of Health’s announcement of a National Orphan Drug Framework on 3 October 2012 was the first federal public acknowledgement of orphan drugs since the 1997 Drugs Directorate (DD policy statement. The reform primarily announced an Orphan Drug Policy for Canada. This paper explains why the government decided to make this announcement now. Media and Parliamentary documents were analyzed for their use of symbols, numbers, and language in causal stories told by political actors. The initial story was that Canada’s population was too small and the cost too high for an orphan drug policy. Over the next fifteen years, a powerful interest group, the Canadian Organization for Rare Disorders (CORD, mobilized the rare disease community into a cooperative effort that generated collective action. They redefined the DD story from one of natural causes, to inadvertence, and finally to intentional causation. Their story invoked a federal response because it blamed the government directly for not acting on behalf of the 3 million Canadians with rare diseases, when patients in other countries were receiving better care.

  8. Tracing the Orphan Stream to 55 kpc with RR Lyrae Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sesar, Branimir; Cohen, Judith G; Bellm, Eric C; Bhalerao, Varun B; Levitan, David; Laher, Russ R; Ofek, Eran O; Surace, Jason A; Tang, Sumin; Waszczak, Adam; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Prince, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    We report positions, velocities and metallicities of 50 ab-type RR Lyrae (RRab) stars observed in the vicinity of the Orphan stellar stream. Using about 30 RRab stars classified as being likely members of the Orphan stream, we study the metallicity and the spatial extent of the stream. We find that RRab stars in the Orphan stream have a wide range of metallicities, from -1.5 dex to -2.7 dex. The average metallicity of the stream is -2.1 dex, identical to the value obtained by Newberg et al. (2010) using blue horizontal branch stars. We find that the most distant parts of the stream (40-50 kpc from the Sun) are about 0.3 dex more metal-poor than the closer parts (within ~30 kpc), suggesting a possible metallicity gradient along the stream's length. We have extended the previous studies and have mapped the stream up to 55 kpc from the Sun. Even after a careful search, we did not identify any more distant RRab stars that could plausibly be members of the Orphan stream. If confirmed with other tracers, this resul...

  9. The influence of the European paediatric regulation on marketing authorisation of orphan drugs for children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreeftmeijer-Vegter, Annemarie Rosan; de Boer, Anthonius; van der Vlugt-Meijer, Roselinda H; de Vries, Peter J; Dep Farmaceutische wetenschappen; Sub Pharmacotherapy, Theoretical

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Drug development for rare diseases is challenging, especially when these orphan drugs (OD) are intended for children. In 2007 the EU Paediatric Drug Regulation was enacted to improve the development of high quality and ethically researched medicines for children through the establishment

  10. Limitations of drug registries to evaluate orphan medicinal products for the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollak, C.E.M.; Aerts, J.M.F.G.; Aymé, S.; Manuel, J.

    2011-01-01

    Orphan drugs are often approved under exceptional circumstances, requiring submission of additional data on safety and effectiveness through registries. These registries are mainly focused on one drug only and data is frequently incomplete. Some registries also address phenotypic heterogeneity and n

  11. Art Therapy with Orphaned Children: Dynamics of Early Relational Trauma and Repetition Compulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshcheryakova, Ksenia

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the dynamics of orphaned children's engagement with art therapy in a group of preadolescent children living in a Russian orphanage. The phenomenon of repetition compulsion (i.e., origins in past traumatic experiences, destructive consequences, and protective psychic function) is discussed with respect to the children's…

  12. A review and update on orphan drugs for the treatment of noninfectious uveitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Caiyun; Sahawneh, Haitham F; Ma, Lina; Kubaisi, Buraa; Schmidt, Alexander; Foster, C Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Uveitis, a leading cause of preventable blindness around the world, is a critically underserved disease in regard to the medications approved for use. Multiple immunomodulatory therapy (IMT) drugs are appropriate for uveitis therapy but are still off-label. These IMT agents, including antimetabolites, calcineurin inhibitors, alkylating agents, and biologic agents, have been designated as “orphan drugs” and are widely used for systemic autoimmune diseases or organ transplantation. Area covered The purpose of this paper is to comprehensively review and summarize the approved orphan drugs and biologics that are being used to treat systemic diseases and to discuss drugs that have not yet received approval as an “orphan drug for treating uveitis” by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Our perspective IMT, as a steroid-sparing agent for uveitis patients, has shown promising clinical results. Refractory and recurrent uveitis requires combination IMT agents. IMT is continued for a period of 2 years while the patient is in remission before considering tapering medication. Our current goals include developing further assessments regarding the efficacy, optimal dose, and safety in efforts to achieve FDA approval for “on-label” use of current IMT agents and biologics more quickly and to facilitate insurance coverage and expand access to the products for this orphan disease. PMID:28203051

  13. Exploring emerging technologies using metaphors--a study of orphan drugs and pharmacogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Wouter; Moors, Ellen

    2008-05-01

    Due to uncertainties of several aspects of emerging health technologies, there is a need to anticipate these developments early. A first step would be to gather information and develop future visions about the technology. This paper introduces metaphor analysis as a novel way to do this. Specifically, we study the future of pharmacogenomics by comparing this technology with orphan drugs, which are more established and often act as a model with comparable (economic, research organisation, etc.) characteristics. The analysis consists of describing the dominant metaphors used and structurally exploring (dis)similarities between pharmacogenomics and orphan drugs developments. This comparison leads to lessons that can be learnt for the emerging pharmacogenomics future. We carried out a comprehensive literature review, extracting metaphors in a structured way from different areas of the drug research and development pipeline. The paper argues that (1) there are many similarities between orphan drugs and pharmacogenomics, especially in terms of registration, and social and economic impacts; (2) pharmacogenomics developments are regarded both as a future 'poison' and a 'chance', whereas orphan drugs are seen as a 'gift', and at the same time as a large 'problem'; and (3) metaphor analysis proves to be a tool for creating prospective images of pharmacogenomics and other emerging technologies.

  14. Education and nutritional status of orphans and children of HIV-infected parents in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vinod; Arnold, Fred; Otieno, Fredrick; Cross, Anne; Hong, Rathavuth

    2007-10-01

    We examined whether orphaned and fostered children and children of HIV-infected parents are disadvantaged in schooling, nutrition, and health care. We analyzed data on 2,756 children aged 0-4 years and 4,172 children aged 6-14 years included in the 2003 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey, with linked anonymous HIV testing, using multivariate logistic regression. Results indicate that orphans, fostered children, and children of HIV-infected parents are significantly less likely to attend school than non-orphaned/non-fostered children of HIV-negative parents. Children of HIV-infected parents are more likely to be underweight and wasted, and less likely to receive medical care for ARI and diarrhea. Children of HIV-negative single mothers are also disadvantaged on most indicators. The findings highlight the need to expand child welfare programs to include not only orphans but also fostered children, children of single mothers, and children of HIV-infected parents, who tend to be equally, if not more, disadvantaged.

  15. Children as Ethnographers: Reflections on the Importance of Participatory Research in Assessing Orphans' Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Kristen E.

    2011-01-01

    Critiques of child participation within aid programming suggest that it is superficial and insubstantive for the fulfilment of children's rights. By employing former child research participants as youth research assistants, the collaborative research design developed for my research project on the survival strategies of African orphans and…

  16. The Socioemotional Development of Orphans in Orphanages and Traditional Foster Care in Iraqi Kurdistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Abdulbaghi; Mohamad, Kirmanj

    1996-01-01

    A one-year follow-up study of children who had lost both parents and were placed in orphanages (n=19) or foster homes (n=18) in Iraqi Kurdistan investigated the orphans' situation and development. The children in orphanages were found to have higher frequency of post-traumatic stress disorder than the foster care children. (Author/CR)

  17. The psychological well-being of children orphaned by AIDS in Cape Town, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cluver Lucie

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An estimated 2 million children are parentally bereaved by AIDS in South Africa. Little is known about mental health outcomes for this group. Methods This study aimed to investigate mental health outcomes for urban children living in deprived settlements in Cape Town. 30 orphaned children and 30 matched controls were compared using standardised questionnaires (SDQ on emotional and behavioural problems, peer and attention difficulties, and prosocial behaviour. The orphan group completed a modified version of a standardised questionnaire (IES-8, measuring Post-Traumatic Stress symptoms. Group differences were tested using t-tests and Pearson's chi-square. Results Both groups scored highly for peer problems, emotional problems and total scores. However, orphans were more likely to view themselves as having no good friends (p = .002, to have marked concentration difficulties (p = .03, and to report frequent somatic symptoms (p = .05, but were less likely to display anger through loss of temper (p = .03. Orphans were more likely to have constant nightmares (p = .01, and 73% scored above the cut-off for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Conclusion Findings suggest important areas for larger-scale research for parentally-bereaved children.

  18. TRACING THE ORPHAN STREAM TO 55 kpc WITH RR LYRAE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sesar, Branimir; Cohen, Judith G.; Bellm, Eric C.; Levitan, David; Tang, Sumin; Waszczak, Adam; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Prince, Thomas A. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Grillmair, Carl J.; Laher, Russ R.; Surace, Jason A. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bhalerao, Varun B. [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Ofek, Eran O., E-mail: bsesar@astro.caltech.edu [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel)

    2013-10-10

    We report positions, velocities, and metallicities of 50 ab-type RR Lyrae (RRab) stars observed in the vicinity of the Orphan stellar stream. Using about 30 RRab stars classified as being likely members of the Orphan stream, we study the metallicity and the spatial extent of the stream. We find that RRab stars in the Orphan stream have a wide range of metallicities, from –1.5 dex to –2.7 dex. The average metallicity of the stream is –2.1 dex, identical to the value obtained by Newberg et al. using blue horizontal branch stars. We find that the most distant parts of the stream (40-50 kpc from the Sun) are about 0.3 dex more metal-poor than the closer parts (within ∼30 kpc), suggesting a possible metallicity gradient along the stream's length. We have extended the previous studies and have mapped the stream up to 55 kpc from the Sun. Even after a careful search, we did not identify any more distant RRab stars that could plausibly be members of the Orphan stream. If confirmed with other tracers, this result would indicate a detection of the end of the leading arm of the stream. We have compared the distances of Orphan stream RRab stars with the best-fit orbits obtained by Newberg et al. We find that model 6 of Newberg et al. cannot explain the distances of the most remote Orphan stream RRab stars, and conclude that the best fit to distances of Orphan stream RRab stars and to the local circular velocity is provided by potentials where the total mass of the Galaxy within 60 kpc is M{sub 60} ∼ 2.7 × 10{sup 11} M{sub ☉}, or about 60% of the mass found by previous studies. More extensive modeling that would consider non-spherical potentials and the possibility of misalignment between the stream and the orbit is highly encouraged.

  19. Psychosocial support and parents' social life determine the self-esteem of orphan children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erango MA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Markos Abiso Erango,1 Zikie Ataro Ayka2 1School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, Department of Applied Statistics, Hawassa University, Hawassa, 2Department of Biology, Arba Minch University, Arba Minch, Ethiopia Abstract: Parental death affects the life of children in many ways, one of which is self-esteem problems. Providing psychosocial support and equipping orphans play a vital role in their lifes. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 7–18-year-old orphans at 17 local districts of Gamo Gofa Zone, Southern Regional State of Ethiopia. From a total of 48,270 orphans in these areas, 4,368 were selected using stratified simple random sampling technique. Data were collected with a designed questionnaire based on the Rosenberg's rating scale to measure their self-esteem levels. Self-esteem with a score less than or equal to an average score was considered to be low self-esteem in the analysis. Binary logistic regression model was used to analyze the data using the SPSS software. The results of the study revealed that the probability of orphans suffering from low self-esteem was 0.59. Several risk factors were found to be significant at the level of 5%. Psychosocial support (good guidance, counseling and treatment, physical protection and amount of love shared, financial and material support, and fellowship with other children, parents living together before death, strong relationship between parents before death, high average monthly income, voluntary support, and consideration from the society are some of the factors that decrease the risk of being low in self-esteem. There are many orphans with low self-esteem in the study areas. The factors negatively affecting the self-esteem of orphans include the lack of psychosocial support, poor social life of parents, and death of parents due to AIDS. Society and parents should be aware of the consequences of these factors which can influence their children's future self

  20. A review and update on orphan drugs for the treatment of noninfectious uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You C

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Caiyun You,1–3 Haitham F Sahawneh,1,2 Lina Ma,1,2 Buraa Kubaisi,1,2 Alexander Schmidt,1,2 C Stephen Foster1,2,4 1Massachusetts Eye Research and Surgery Institution (MERSI, Waltham, 2Ocular Immunology and Uveitis Foundation, Weston, MA, USA; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China; 4Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Introduction: Uveitis, a leading cause of preventable blindness around the world, is a critically underserved disease in regard to the medications approved for use. Multiple immunomodulatory therapy (IMT drugs are appropriate for uveitis therapy but are still off-label. These IMT agents, including antimetabolites, calcineurin inhibitors, alkylating agents, and biologic agents, have been designated as “orphan drugs” and are widely used for systemic autoimmune diseases or organ transplantation.Area covered: The purpose of this paper is to comprehensively review and summarize the approved orphan drugs and biologics that are being used to treat systemic diseases and to discuss drugs that have not yet received approval as an “orphan drug for treating uveitis” by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA.Our perspective: IMT, as a steroid-sparing agent for uveitis patients, has shown promising clinical results. Refractory and recurrent uveitis requires combination IMT agents. IMT is continued for a period of 2 years while the patient is in remission before considering tapering medication. Our current goals include developing further assessments regarding the efficacy, optimal dose, and safety in efforts to achieve FDA approval for “on-label” use of current IMT agents and biologics more quickly and to facilitate insurance coverage and expand access to the products for this orphan disease. Keywords: immunomodulatory, orphan drug, steroid sparing, uveitis

  1. Thirty Years of Orphan Drug Legislation and the Development of Drugs to Treat Rare Seizure Conditions: A Cross Sectional Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Georg F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is a serious chronic health condition with a high morbidity impairing the life of patients and afflicted families. Many epileptic conditions, especially those affecting children, are rare disorders generating an urgent medical need for more efficacious therapy options. Therefore, we assessed the output of the US and European orphan drug legislations. Methods Quantitative analysis of the FDA and EMA databases for orphan drug designations according to STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) criteria. Results Within the US Orphan Drug Act 40 designations were granted delivering nine approvals, i.e. clobazam, diazepam viscous solution for rectal administration, felbamate, fosphenytoin, lamotrigine, repository corticotropin, rufinamide, topiramate, and vigabatrin. Since 2000 the EMA granted six orphan drug designations whereof two compounds were approved, i.e. rufinamide and stiripentol. In the US, two orphan drug designations were withdrawn. Orphan drugs were approved for conditions including Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, infantile spasms, Dravet syndrome, and status epilepticus. Comparing time to approval for rufinamide, which was approved in the US and the EU to treat rare seizure conditions, the process seems faster in the EU (2.2 years) than in the US (4.3 years). Conclusion Orphan drug development in the US and in the EU delivered only few molecular entities to treat rare seizure disorders. The development programs focused on already approved antiepileptic drugs or alternative pharmaceutical formulations. Most orphan drugs approved in the US are not approved in the EU to treat rare seizures although some were introduced after 2000 when the EU adopted the Orphan Drug Regulation. PMID:27557111

  2. Structure and genome organization of AFV2, a novel archaeal lipothrixvirus with unusual terminal and core structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Häring, Monika; Vestergaard, Gisle Alberg; Brügger, Kim;

    2005-01-01

    A novel filamentous virus, AFV2, from the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Acidianus shows structural similarity to lipothrixviruses but differs from them in its unusual terminal and core structures. The double-stranded DNA genome contains 31,787 bp and carries eight open reading frames homologou...... to those of other lipothrixviruses, a single tRNA(Lys) gene containing a 12-bp archaeal intron, and a 1,008-bp repeat-rich region near the center of the genome....

  3. Methane metabolism in the archaeal phylum Bathyarchaeota revealed by genome-centric metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Paul N; Parks, Donovan H; Chadwick, Grayson L; Robbins, Steven J; Orphan, Victoria J; Golding, Suzanne D; Tyson, Gene W

    2015-10-23

    Methanogenic and methanotrophic archaea play important roles in the global flux of methane. Culture-independent approaches are providing deeper insight into the diversity and evolution of methane-metabolizing microorganisms, but, until now, no compelling evidence has existed for methane metabolism in archaea outside the phylum Euryarchaeota. We performed metagenomic sequencing of a deep aquifer, recovering two near-complete genomes belonging to the archaeal phylum Bathyarchaeota (formerly known as the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group). These genomes contain divergent homologs of the genes necessary for methane metabolism, including those that encode the methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) complex. Additional non-euryarchaeotal MCR-encoding genes identified in a range of environments suggest that unrecognized archaeal lineages may also contribute to global methane cycling. These findings indicate that methane metabolism arose before the last common ancestor of the Euryarchaeota and Bathyarchaeota.

  4. A human CCT5 gene mutation causing distal neuropathy impairs hexadecamer assembly in an archaeal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Wonki; Angileri, Francesca; Luo, Haibin; Lauria, Antonino; Shanmugasundaram, Maruda; Almerico, Anna Maria; Cappello, Francesco; de Macario, Everly Conway; Lednev, Igor K; Macario, Alberto J L; Robb, Frank T

    2014-10-27

    Chaperonins mediate protein folding in a cavity formed by multisubunit rings. The human CCT has eight non-identical subunits and the His147Arg mutation in one subunit, CCT5, causes neuropathy. Knowledge is scarce on the impact of this and other mutations upon the chaperone's structure and functions. To make progress, experimental models must be developed. We used an archaeal mutant homolog and demonstrated that the His147Arg mutant has impaired oligomeric assembly, ATPase activity, and defective protein homeostasis functions. These results establish for the first time that a human chaperonin gene defect can be reproduced and studied at the molecular level with an archaeal homolog. The major advantage of the system, consisting of rings with eight identical subunits, is that it amplifies the effects of a mutation as compared with the human counterpart, in which just one subunit per ring is defective. Therefore, the slight deficit of a non-lethal mutation can be detected and characterized.

  5. Quantification of bacterial and archaeal symbionts in high and low microbial abundance sponges using real-time PCR

    KAUST Repository

    Bayer, Kristina

    2014-07-09

    In spite of considerable insights into the microbial diversity of marine sponges, quantitative information on microbial abundances and community composition remains scarce. Here, we established qPCR assays for the specific quantification of four bacterial phyla of representative sponge symbionts as well as the kingdoms Eubacteria and Archaea. We could show that the 16S rRNA gene numbers of Archaea, Chloroflexi, and the candidate phylum Poribacteria were 4-6 orders of magnitude higher in high microbial abundance (HMA) than in low microbial abundance (LMA) sponges and that actinobacterial 16S rRNA gene numbers were 1-2 orders higher in HMA over LMA sponges, while those for Cyanobacteria were stable between HMA and LMA sponges. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of Aplysina aerophoba tissue sections confirmed the numerical dominance of Chloroflexi, which was followed by Poribacteria. Archaeal and actinobacterial cells were detected in much lower numbers. By use of fluorescence-activated cell sorting as a primer- and probe-independent approach, the dominance of Chloroflexi, Proteobacteria, and Poribacteria in A. aerophoba was confirmed. Our study provides new quantitative insights into the microbiology of sponges and contributes to a better understanding of the HMA/LMA dichotomy. The authors quantified sponge symbionts in eight sponge species from three different locations by real time PCR targetting 16S rRNA genes. Additionally, FISH was performed and diversity and abundance of singularized microbial symbionts from Aplysina aerophoba was determined for a comprehensive quantification work. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  6. Structure and regulatory role of the C-terminal winged helix domain of the archaeal minichromosome maintenance complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Christoph; Szambowska, Anna; Häfner, Sabine; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Gührs, Karl-Heinz; Görlach, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The minichromosome maintenance complex (MCM) represents the replicative DNA helicase both in eukaryotes and archaea. Here, we describe the solution structure of the C-terminal domains of the archaeal MCMs of Sulfolobus solfataricus (Sso) and Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (Mth). Those domains consist of a structurally conserved truncated winged helix (WH) domain lacking the two typical ‘wings’ of canonical WH domains. A less conserved N-terminal extension links this WH module to the MCM AAA+ domain forming the ATPase center. In the Sso MCM this linker contains a short α-helical element. Using Sso MCM mutants, including chimeric constructs containing Mth C-terminal domain elements, we show that the ATPase and helicase activity of the Sso MCM is significantly modulated by the short α-helical linker element and by N-terminal residues of the first α-helix of the truncated WH module. Finally, based on our structural and functional data, we present a docking-derived model of the Sso MCM, which implies an allosteric control of the ATPase center by the C-terminal domain. PMID:25712103

  7. Quantification of bacterial and archaeal symbionts in high and low microbial abundance sponges using real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Kristina; Kamke, Janine; Hentschel, Ute

    2014-09-01

    In spite of considerable insights into the microbial diversity of marine sponges, quantitative information on microbial abundances and community composition remains scarce. Here, we established qPCR assays for the specific quantification of four bacterial phyla of representative sponge symbionts as well as the kingdoms Eubacteria and Archaea. We could show that the 16S rRNA gene numbers of Archaea, Chloroflexi, and the candidate phylum Poribacteria were 4-6 orders of magnitude higher in high microbial abundance (HMA) than in low microbial abundance (LMA) sponges and that actinobacterial 16S rRNA gene numbers were 1-2 orders higher in HMA over LMA sponges, while those for Cyanobacteria were stable between HMA and LMA sponges. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of Aplysina aerophoba tissue sections confirmed the numerical dominance of Chloroflexi, which was followed by Poribacteria. Archaeal and actinobacterial cells were detected in much lower numbers. By use of fluorescence-activated cell sorting as a primer- and probe-independent approach, the dominance of Chloroflexi, Proteobacteria, and Poribacteria in A. aerophoba was confirmed. Our study provides new quantitative insights into the microbiology of sponges and contributes to a better understanding of the HMA/LMA dichotomy.

  8. A site-specific endonuclease encoded by a typical archaeal intron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Jacob; Garrett, Roger Antony; Belfort, Malene

    1993-01-01

    The protein encoded by the archaeal intron in the 23S rRNA gene of the hyperthermophile Desulfurococcus mobilis is a double-strand DNase that, like group I intron homing endonucleases, is capable of cleaving an intronless allele of the gene. This enzyme, I-Dmo I, is unusual among the intron...... of endonucleases and intron core elements and are consistent with the invasive potential of endonuclease genes....

  9. Significance of archaeal nitrification in hypoxic waters of the Baltic Sea

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) of the phylum Thaumarchaeota are widespread, and their abundance in many terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems suggests a prominent role in nitrification. AOA also occur in high numbers in oxygen-deficient marine environments, such as the pelagic redox gradients of the central Baltic Sea; however, data on archaeal nitrification rates are scarce and little is known about the factors, for example sulfide, that regulate nitrification in this system. In the present wo...

  10. Ori-Finder 2, an integrated tool to predict replication origins in the archaeal genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao eLuo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication is one of the most basic processes in all three domains of cellular life. With the advent of the post-genomic era, the increasing number of complete archaeal genomes has created an opportunity for exploration of the molecular mechanisms for initiating cellular DNA replication by in vivo experiments as well as in silico analysis. However, the location of replication origins (oriCs in many sequenced archaeal genomes remains unknown. We present a web-based tool Ori-Finder 2 to predict oriCs in the archaeal genomes automatically, based on the integrated method comprising the analysis of base composition asymmetry using the Z-curve method, the distribution of Origin Recognition Boxes (ORBs identified by FIMO tool, and the occurrence of genes frequently close to oriCs. The web server is also able to analyze the unannotated genome sequences by integrating with gene prediction pipelines and BLAST software for gene identification and function annotation. The result of the predicted oriCs is displayed as an HTML table, which offers an intuitive way to browse the result in graphical and tabular form. The software presented here is accurate for the genomes with single oriC, but it does not necessarily find all the origins of replication for the genomes with multiple oriCs. Ori-Finder 2 aims to become a useful platform for the identification and analysis of oriCs in the archaeal genomes, which would provide insight into the replication mechanisms in archaea. The web server is freely available at http://tubic.tju.edu.cn/Ori-Finder2/.

  11. Biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community in mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, D; Kurola, J M; Lähde, K; Kymäläinen, M; Sinkkonen, A; Romantschuk, M

    2014-10-01

    Over 258 Mt of solid waste are generated annually in Europe, a large fraction of which is biowaste. Sewage sludge is another major waste fraction. In this study, biowaste and sewage sludge were co-digested in an anaerobic digestion reactor (30% and 70% of total wet weight, respectively). The purpose was to investigate the biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community composition in the anaerobic digestion reactor under meso- (35-37 °C) and thermophilic (55-57 °C) processes and an increasing organic loading rate (OLR, 1-10 kg VS m(-3) d(-1)), and also to find a feasible compromise between waste treatment capacity and biogas production without causing process instability. In summary, more biogas was produced with all OLRs by the thermophilic process. Both processes showed a limited diversity of the methanogenic archaeal community which was dominated by Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales (e.g. Methanosarcina) in both meso- and thermophilic processes. Methanothermobacter was detected as an additional dominant genus in the thermophilic process. In addition to operating temperatures, the OLRs, the acetate concentration, and the presence of key substrates like propionate also affected the methanogenic archaeal community composition. A bacterial cell count 6.25 times higher than archaeal cell count was observed throughout the thermophilic process, while the cell count ratio varied between 0.2 and 8.5 in the mesophilic process. This suggests that the thermophilic process is more stable, but also that the relative abundance between bacteria and archaea can vary without seriously affecting biogas production.

  12. Archaeal RibL: a new FAD synthetase that is air sensitive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashhadi, Zahra; Xu, Huimin; Grochowski, Laura L; White, Robert H

    2010-10-12

    FAD synthetases catalyze the transfer of the AMP portion of ATP to FMN to produce FAD and pyrophosphate (PP(i)). Monofunctional FAD synthetases exist in eukaryotes, while bacteria have bifunctional enzymes that catalyze both the phosphorylation of riboflavin and adenylation of FMN to produce FAD. Analyses of archaeal genomes did not reveal the presence of genes encoding either group, yet the archaea contain FAD. Our recent identification of a CTP-dependent archaeal riboflavin kinase strongly indicated the presence of a monofunctional FAD synthetase. Here we report the identification and characterization of an archaeal FAD synthetase. Methanocaldococcus jannaschii gene MJ1179 encodes a protein that is classified in the nucleotidyl transferase protein family and was previously annotated as glycerol-3-phosphate cytidylyltransferase (GCT). The MJ1179 gene was cloned and its protein product heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The resulting enzyme catalyzes the adenylation of FMN with ATP to produce FAD and PP(i). The MJ1179-derived protein has been designated RibL to indicate that it follows the riboflavin kinase (RibK) step in the archaeal FAD biosynthetic pathway. Aerobically isolated RibL is active only under reducing conditions. RibL was found to require divalent metals for activity, the best activity being observed with Co(2+), where the activity was 4 times greater than that with Mg(2+). Alkylation of the two conserved cysteines in the C-terminus of the protein resulted in complete inactivation. RibL was also found to catalyze cytidylation of FMN with CTP, making the modified FAD, flavin cytidine dinucleotide (FCD). Unlike other FAD synthetases, RibL does not catalyze the reverse reaction to produce FMN and ATP from FAD and PP(i). Also in contrast to other FAD synthetases, PP(i) inhibits the activity of RibL.

  13. Archaeal Community Changes Associated with Cultivation of Amazon Forest Soil with Oil Palm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiva Domenech Tupinambá

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared soil archaeal communities of the Amazon forest with that of an adjacent area under oil palm cultivation by 16S ribosomal RNA gene pyrosequencing. Species richness and diversity were greater in native forest soil than in the oil palm-cultivated area, and 130 OTUs (13.7% were shared between these areas. Among the classified sequences, Thaumarchaeota were predominant in the native forest, whereas Euryarchaeota were predominant in the oil palm-cultivated area. Archaeal species diversity was 1.7 times higher in the native forest soil, according to the Simpson diversity index, and the Chao1 index showed that richness was five times higher in the native forest soil. A phylogenetic tree of unclassified Thaumarchaeota sequences showed that most of the OTUs belong to Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group. Several archaeal genera involved in nutrient cycling (e.g., methanogens and ammonia oxidizers were identified in both areas, but significant differences were found in the relative abundances of Candidatus Nitrososphaera and unclassified Soil Crenarchaeotic Group (prevalent in the native forest and Candidatus Nitrosotalea and unclassified Terrestrial Group (prevalent in the oil palm-cultivated area. More studies are needed to culture some of these Archaea in the laboratory so that their metabolism and physiology can be studied.

  14. Bacterial and archaeal diversities in Yunnan and Tibetan hot springs, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhao-Qi; Wang, Feng-Ping; Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Chen, Jin-Quan; Zhou, En-Min; Liang, Feng; Xiao, Xiang; Tang, Shu-Kun; Jiang, Hong-Chen; Zhang, Chuanlun L; Dong, Hailiang; Li, Wen-Jun

    2013-04-01

    Thousands of hot springs are located in the north-eastern part of the Yunnan-Tibet geothermal zone, which is one of the most active geothermal areas in the world. However, a comprehensive and detailed understanding of microbial diversity in these hot springs is still lacking. In this study, bacterial and archaeal diversities were investigated in 16 hot springs (pH 3.2-8.6; temperature 47-96°C) in Yunnan Province and Tibet, China by using a barcoded 16S rRNA gene-pyrosequencing approach. Aquificae, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Deinococcus-Thermus and Bacteroidetes comprised the large portion of the bacterial communities in acidic hot springs. Non-acidic hot springs harboured more and variable bacterial phyla than acidic springs. Desulfurococcales and unclassified Crenarchaeota were the dominated groups in archaeal populations from most of the non-acidic hot springs; whereas, the archaeal community structure in acidic hot springs was simpler and characterized by Sulfolobales and Thermoplasmata. The phylogenetic analyses showed that Aquificae and Crenarchaeota were predominant in the investigated springs and possessed many phylogenetic lineages that have never been detected in other hot springs in the world. Thus findings from this study significantly improve our understanding of microbial diversity in terrestrial hot springs.

  15. Archaeal community structures in the solfataric acidic hot springs with different temperatures and elemental compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Tomoko; Watanabe, Keiko; Yamamoto, Hideo; Yamamoto, Shuichi; Kurosawa, Norio

    2013-01-01

    Archaeal 16S rRNA gene compositions and environmental factors of four distinct solfataric acidic hot springs in Kirishima, Japan were compared. The four ponds were selected by differences of temperature and total dissolved elemental concentration as follows: (1) Pond-A: 93°C and 1679 mg L(-1), (2) Pond-B: 66°C and 2248 mg L(-1), (3) Pond-C: 88°C and 198 mg L(-1), and (4) Pond-D: 67°C and 340 mg L(-1). In total, 431 clones of 16S rRNA gene were classified into 26 phylotypes. In Pond-B, the archaeal diversity was the highest among the four, and the members of the order Sulfolobales were dominant. The Pond-D also showed relatively high diversity, and the most frequent group was uncultured thermoacidic spring clone group. In contrast to Pond-B and Pond-D, much less diverse archaeal clones were detected in Pond-A and Pond-C showing higher temperatures. However, dominant groups in these ponds were also different from each other. The members of the order Sulfolobales shared 89% of total clones in Pond-A, and the uncultured crenarchaeal groups shared 99% of total Pond-C clones. Therefore, species compositions and biodiversity were clearly different among the ponds showing different temperatures and dissolved elemental concentrations.

  16. Archaeal Community Changes Associated with Cultivation of Amazon Forest Soil with Oil Palm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupinambá, Daiva Domenech; Cantão, Maurício Egídio; Costa, Ohana Yonara Assis; Bergmann, Jessica Carvalho; Kruger, Ricardo Henrique; Kyaw, Cynthia Maria; Barreto, Cristine Chaves; Quirino, Betania Ferraz

    2016-01-01

    This study compared soil archaeal communities of the Amazon forest with that of an adjacent area under oil palm cultivation by 16S ribosomal RNA gene pyrosequencing. Species richness and diversity were greater in native forest soil than in the oil palm-cultivated area, and 130 OTUs (13.7%) were shared between these areas. Among the classified sequences, Thaumarchaeota were predominant in the native forest, whereas Euryarchaeota were predominant in the oil palm-cultivated area. Archaeal species diversity was 1.7 times higher in the native forest soil, according to the Simpson diversity index, and the Chao1 index showed that richness was five times higher in the native forest soil. A phylogenetic tree of unclassified Thaumarchaeota sequences showed that most of the OTUs belong to Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group. Several archaeal genera involved in nutrient cycling (e.g., methanogens and ammonia oxidizers) were identified in both areas, but significant differences were found in the relative abundances of Candidatus Nitrososphaera and unclassified Soil Crenarchaeotic Group (prevalent in the native forest) and Candidatus Nitrosotalea and unclassified Terrestrial Group (prevalent in the oil palm-cultivated area). More studies are needed to culture some of these Archaea in the laboratory so that their metabolism and physiology can be studied.

  17. Assessment of Ruminal Bacterial and Archaeal Community Structure in Yak (Bos grunniens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhenming; Fang, Lei; Meng, Qingxiang; Li, Shengli; Chai, Shatuo; Liu, Shujie; Schonewille, Jan Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the microbial community composition in the rumen of yaks under different feeding regimes. Microbial communities were assessed by sequencing bacterial and archaeal 16S ribosomal RNA gene fragments obtained from yaks (Bos grunniens) from Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China. Samples were obtained from 14 animals allocated to either pasture grazing (Graze), a grazing and supplementary feeding regime (GSF), or an indoor feeding regime (Feed). The predominant bacterial phyla across feeding regimes were Bacteroidetes (51.06%) and Firmicutes (32.73%). At genus level, 25 genera were shared across all samples. The relative abundance of Prevotella in the graze and GSF regime group were significantly higher than that in the feed regime group. Meanwhile, the relative abundance of Ruminococcus was lower in the graze group than the feed and GSF regime groups. The most abundant archaeal phylum was Euryarchaeota, which accounted for 99.67% of the sequences. Ten genera were detected across feeding regimes, seven genera were shared by all samples, and the most abundant was genus Methanobrevibacter (91.60%). The relative abundance of the most detected genera were similar across feeding regime groups. Our results suggest that the ruminal bacterial community structure differs across yak feeding regimes while the archaeal community structures are largely similar. PMID:28223980

  18. Solution structure of an archaeal DNA binding protein with an eukaryotic zinc finger fold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Guillière

    Full Text Available While the basal transcription machinery in archaea is eukaryal-like, transcription factors in archaea and their viruses are usually related to bacterial transcription factors. Nevertheless, some of these organisms show predicted classical zinc fingers motifs of the C2H2 type, which are almost exclusively found in proteins of eukaryotes and most often associated with transcription regulators. In this work, we focused on the protein AFV1p06 from the hyperthermophilic archaeal virus AFV1. The sequence of the protein consists of the classical eukaryotic C2H2 motif with the fourth histidine coordinating zinc missing, as well as of N- and C-terminal extensions. We showed that the protein AFV1p06 binds zinc and solved its solution structure by NMR. AFV1p06 displays a zinc finger fold with a novel structure extension and disordered N- and C-termini. Structure calculations show that a glutamic acid residue that coordinates zinc replaces the fourth histidine of the C2H2 motif. Electromobility gel shift assays indicate that the protein binds to DNA with different affinities depending on the DNA sequence. AFV1p06 is the first experimentally characterised archaeal zinc finger protein with a DNA binding activity. The AFV1p06 protein family has homologues in diverse viruses of hyperthermophilic archaea. A phylogenetic analysis points out a common origin of archaeal and eukaryotic C2H2 zinc fingers.

  19. Archaeal communities of Arctic methane-containing permafrost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakova, Victoria; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka; Ryzhmanova, Yana; Taguchi, Yukihiro; Segawa, Takahiro; Oshurkova, Victoria; Rivkina, Elizaveta

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, we used culture-independent methods to investigate the diversity of methanogenic archaea and their distribution in five permafrost samples collected from a borehole in the Kolyma River Lowland (north-east of Russia). Total DNA was extracted from methane-containing permafrost samples of different age and amplified by PCR. The resulting DNA fragments were cloned. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences showed the presence of archaea in all studied samples; 60%-95% of sequences belonged to the Euryarchaeota. Methanogenic archaea were novel representatives of Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales, Methanobacteriales and Methanocellales orders. Bathyarchaeota (Miscellaneous Crenarchaeota Group) representatives were found among nonmethanogenic archaea in all the samples studied. The Thaumarchaeota representatives were not found in the upper sample, whereas Woesearchaeota (formerly DHVEG-6) were found in the three deepest samples. Unexpectedly, the greatest diversity of archaea was observed at a depth of 22.3 m, probably due to the availability of the labile organic carbon and/or due to the migration of the microbial cells during the freezing front towards the bottom.

  20. Safety and Security of Radioactive Sealed and Disused/Orphan Sources in Ukraine - German Contribution - 13359

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brasser, Thomas; Hertes, Uwe; Meyer, Thorsten; Uhlenbruck, Hermann [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit - GRS mbH, Theodor-Heuss-Str. 4, 38122 Braunschweig (Germany); Shevtsov, Alexey [Ukrainian State Production Company IZOTOP 152, Gorky str., 03680 Kiev (Ukraine)

    2013-07-01

    Within the scope of 'Nuclear Security of Radioactive Sources', the German government implemented the modernization of Ukrainian State Production Company's transport and storage facility for radioactive sources (TSF) in Kiev. The overall management of optimizing the physical protection of the storage facility (including the construction of a hot cell for handling the radioactive sources) is currently carried out by the German Federal Foreign Office (AA). AA jointly have assigned Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Germany's leading expert institution in the area of nuclear safety and waste management, to implement the project and to ensure transparency by financial and technical monitoring. Sealed radioactive sources are widely used in industry, medicine and research. Their life cycle starts with the production and finally ends with the interim/long-term storage of the disused sources. In Ukraine, IZOTOP is responsible for all radioactive sources throughout their life cycle. IZOTOP's transport and storage facility (TSF) is the only Ukrainian storage facility for factory-fresh radioactive sources up to an activity of about 1 million Ci (3.7 1016 Bq). The TSF is specially designed for the storage and handling of radioactive sources. Storage began in 1968, and is licensed by the Ukrainian state authorities. Beside the outdated state of TSF's physical protection and the vulnerability of the facility linked with it, the lack of a hot cell for handling and repacking radioactive sources on the site itself represents an additional potential hazard. The project, financed by the German Federal Foreign Office, aims to significantly improve the security of radioactive sources during their storage and handling at the TSF site. Main tasks of the project are a) the modernization of the physical protection of the TSF itself in order to prevent any unauthorized access to radioactive sources as well as b) the construction of a hot

  1. Characterization of an archaeal two-component system that regulates methanogenesis in Methanosaeta harundinacea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs are a major mechanism used by bacteria in response to environmental changes. Although many sequenced archaeal genomes encode TCSs, they remain poorly understood. Previously, we reported that a methanogenic archaeon, Methanosaeta harundinacea, encodes FilI, which synthesizes carboxyl-acyl homoserine lactones, to regulate transitions of cellular morphology and carbon metabolic fluxes. Here, we report that filI, the cotranscribed filR2, and the adjacent filR1 constitute an archaeal TCS. FilI possesses a cytoplasmic kinase domain (histidine kinase A and histidine kinase-like ATPase and its cognate response regulator. FilR1 carries a receiver (REC domain coupled with an ArsR-related domain with potential DNA-binding ability, while FilR2 carries only a REC domain. In a phosphorelay assay, FilI was autophosphorylated and specifically transferred the phosphoryl group to FilR1 and FilR2, confirming that the three formed a cognate TCS. Through chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (ChIP-qPCR using an anti-FilR1 antibody, FilR1 was shown to form in vivo associations with its own promoter and the promoter of the filI-filR2 operon, demonstrating a regulatory pattern common among TCSs. ChIP-qPCR also detected FilR1 associations with key genes involved in acetoclastic methanogenesis, acs4 and acs1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed the in vitro tight binding of FilR1 to its own promoter and those of filI-filR2, acs4, and mtrABC. This also proves the DNA-binding ability of the ArsR-related domain, which is found primarily in Archaea. The archaeal promoters of acs4, filI, acs1, and mtrABC also initiated FilR1-modulated expression in an Escherichia coli lux reporter system, suggesting that FilR1 can up-regulate both archaeal and bacterial transcription. In conclusion, this work identifies an archaeal FilI/FilRs TCS that regulates the methanogenesis of M. harundinacea.

  2. Poverty and psychological health among AIDS-orphaned children in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluver, Lucie; Gardner, Frances; Operario, Don

    2009-06-01

    This study examined associations between AIDS-orphanhood status, poverty indicators, and psychological problems (depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, peer problems, delinquency, conduct problems) among children and adolescents in townships surrounding Cape Town, South Africa. One thousand and twenty-five children and adolescents completed standardized and culturally sensitive cross-sectional surveys. Children orphaned by AIDS had more psychological problems including depression, peer problems, post-traumatic stress, and conduct problems. Specific poverty indicators including food security, access to social welfare grants, employment in the household and access to school were associated with better psychological health. Poverty indicators mediated associations of AIDS-orphanhood with psychological problems. Food security showed the most consistent association with reduced psychological problems. Poverty alleviation measures have the potential to improve psychological health for AIDS-orphaned children in South African townships.

  3. Neotenic formation in laboratory colonies of the termite Coptotermes gestroi after orphaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Costa-Leonardo

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The termite Coptotermes gestroi (Wasmann, 1896 (Rhinotermitidae: Coptotermitinae is an exotic species in Brazil and information concerning its reproductive developmental biology is scarce. We induced the formation of neotenics in laboratory colonies through orphaning experiments. Orphaning experiments were conducted in three-year old colonies of C. gestroi kept under laboratory conditions. After three months, eight nymphoid neotenics were observed in one colony after queen removal. Histological analysis showed that these neotenics were non-functional. The results suggest that these individuals may have arisen from the first nymphal instar (N1 or from an early N1 instar after one or two larval moults. Neotenics also were recorded on two incipient colonies of C. gestroi that lost the queen naturally.

  4. The health burden of orphan zoonotic disease in the United Kingdom, 2005-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsby, K D; Walsh, A L; Smith, R; Said, B; Kirkbride, H; Smyth, B; Browning, L; Larkin, L; Morgan, D

    2014-02-01

    'Orphan' zoonotic diseases attract disproportionately low scientific and public health attention for the impact that they can have. This article pulls together information on their health burden in the UK from routine and enhanced data sources. These diseases are heterogeneous in nature; some have very low case numbers (e.g. hydatid disease), whilst others affect hundreds of patients each year (e.g. toxoplasmosis). The number of deaths attributed to orphan zoonoses is relatively low, and the majority recorded in this article were caused by toxoplasmosis. There is a clear issue of under-reporting and under-diagnosis in the data sets presented, and further work should be carried out to obtain more accurate estimates of the prevalence of zoonotic infections. Joint human and veterinary studies are especially important for these diseases.

  5. Orphan γ-ray flares from relativistic blobs encountering luminous stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banasiński, P.; Bednarek, W.; Sitarek, J.

    2016-11-01

    We propose that {\\gamma} -rays in blazars can be produced during encounters of relativistic blobs of plasma with radiation field produced by luminous stars within (or close to) the jet. The blob is expected to contain relativistic electrons which comptonize stellar radiation to the GeV-TeV energies. Produced {\\gamma} -rays can initiate the Inverse Compton e+/- pair cascade in the stellar radiation. We propose that such a scenario can be responsible for the appearance of the so-called orphan {\\gamma} -ray flares. We show that the relativistic blob/luminous star collision model can explain the appearance of the extreme orphan {\\gamma} -ray flare observed in the GeV and sub-TeV energy range from the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 1222+21.

  6. Health promotion needs of Hammanskraal families with adolescents orphaned by HIV/AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    N.C. van Wyk; M.D. Peu; A DH Botha

    2008-01-01

    Health promotion is regarded as the cornerstone of good health. It is the action expected from individuals and families in order to better their own health situation. Health promotion is an art and science (Edelman & Mandle, 2002:16) that is integrated into the primary health care to reduce existing health problems. The purpose of the research on which this article is reporting, was to explore and describe the health promotion needs of families with adolescents orphaned by human immu...

  7. Child work and labour among orphaned and abandoned children in five low and middle income countries

    OpenAIRE

    Pence Brian; Whetten Kathryn; Ostermann Jan; Messer Lynne; Whetten Rachel; Buckner Megan; Thielman Nathan; O'Donnell Karen

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The care and protection of the estimated 143,000,000 orphaned and abandoned children (OAC) worldwide is of great importance to global policy makers and child service providers in low and middle income countries (LMICs), yet little is known about rates of child labour among OAC, what child and caregiver characteristics predict child engagement in work and labour, or when such work infers with schooling. This study examines rates and correlates of child labour among OAC and ...

  8. An orphan gyrB in the Mycobacterium smegmatis genome uncovered by comparative genomics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P. Jain; V. Nagaraja

    2002-11-01

    DNA gyrase is an essential topoisomerase found in all bacteria. It is encoded by gyrB and gyrA genes. These genes are organized differently in different bacteria. Direct comparison of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis genomes reveals presence of an additional gyrB in M. smegmatis flanked by novel genes. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of GyrB from different organisms suggests that the orphan GyrB in M. smegmatis may have an important cellular role.

  9. An orphan LuxR homolog of Sinorhizobium meliloti affects stress adaptation and competition for nodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, Arati V; González, Juan E

    2009-02-01

    The Sin/ExpR quorum-sensing system of Sinorhizobium meliloti plays an important role in the symbiotic association with its host plant, Medicago sativa. The LuxR-type response regulators of the Sin system include the synthase (SinI)-associated SinR and the orphan regulator ExpR. Interestingly, the S. meliloti Rm1021 genome codes for four additional putative orphan LuxR homologs whose regulatory roles remain to be identified. These response regulators contain the characteristic domains of the LuxR family of proteins, which include an N-terminal autoinducer/response regulatory domain and a C-terminal helix-turn-helix domain. This study elucidates the regulatory role of one of the orphan LuxR-type response regulators, NesR. Through expression and phenotypic analyses, nesR was determined to affect the active methyl cycle of S. meliloti. Moreover, nesR was shown to influence nutritional and stress response activities in S. meliloti. Finally, the nesR mutant was deficient in competing with the wild-type strain for plant nodulation. Taken together, these results suggest that NesR potentially contributes to the adaptability of S. meliloti when it encounters challenges such as high osmolarity, nutrient starvation, and/or competition for nodulation, thus increasing its chances for survival in the stressful rhizosphere.

  10. Inactivation of the Nuclear Orphan Receptor COUP-TFII by Small Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guével, Rémy; Oger, Frédérik; Martinez-Jimenez, Celia P; Bizot, Maud; Gheeraert, Céline; Firmin, François; Ploton, Maheul; Kretova, Miroslava; Palierne, Gaëlle; Staels, Bart; Barath, Peter; Talianidis, Iannis; Lefebvre, Philippe; Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Salbert, Gilles

    2017-01-13

    Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII/NR2F2) is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors whose activities are modulated upon binding of small molecules into an hydrophobic ligand-binding pocket (LBP). Although the LBP of COUP-TFII is filled with aromatic amino-acid side chains, alternative modes of ligand binding could potentially lead to regulation of the orphan receptor. Here, we screened a synthetic and natural compound library in a yeast one-hybrid assay and identified 4-methoxynaphthol as an inhibitor of COUP-TFII. This synthetic inhibitor was able to counteract processes either positively or negatively regulated by COUP-TFII in different mammalian cell systems. Hence, we demonstrate that the true orphan receptor COUP-TFII can be targeted by small chemicals which could be used to study the physiological functions of COUP-TFII or to counteract detrimental COUP-TFII activities in various pathological conditions.

  11. Could the Wein fireball be associated to the "orphan" TeV flares ?

    CERN Document Server

    Fraija, Nissim

    2015-01-01

    TeV $\\gamma$-ray detections in flaring states without activity in X-rays from blazars have attracted much attention due to the irregularity of these "orphan" flares. Although the synchrotron self-Compton model has been very successful in explaining the spectral energy distribution and spectral variability of these sources, it has not been able to describe these atypical flaring events. On the other hand, an electron-positron pair plasma at the base of the AGN jet was proposed as the mechanism of bulk acceleration of relativistic outflows. This plasma in quasi-themal equilibrium called Wein fireball emits radiation at MeV-peak energies serving as target of accelerated protons. In this work we describe the "orphan" TeV flares presented in blazars 1ES 1959+650 and Mrk421 assuming geometrical considerations in the jet and evoking the interactions of Fermi-accelerated protons and MeV-peak target photons coming from the Wein fireball. After describing successfully these "orphan" TeV flares, we correlate the TeV $\\g...

  12. List of Accredited Representatives

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — VA accreditation is for the sole purpose of providing representation services to claimants before VA and does not imply that a representative is qualified to provide...

  13. Orphans of the HIV epidemic: the challenges from toddlerhood to adolescence and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamatha M Lala

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This presentation focuses on the challenges and practical issues faced each day by orphans of the HIV epidemic and the holistic care that can be provided, as they continue to grow from toddlerhood to adolescence and beyond. An HIV Research Trust Scholarship enabled me to spend quality time in a sub-Saharan African province worst hit by the HIV epidemic and to interact with local experts and learn from mutual clinical experience. It was an immensely useful exercise as the clinical spectra of the diseases are very similar to ours and they have ongoing active research programs very relevant to our setting. India is arguably home to the largest number of orphans of the HIV epidemic. The responsibility of caring for orphaned children overwhelms and pushes many extended families beyond their ability to cope. Many countries are experiencing large increases in the number of families headed by women and grandparents, or even young children. These households are often unable to meet basic needs, and so the number of children living on the streets is rising. Orphaned children are disadvantaged in many devastating ways. In addition to the trauma of witnessing the sickness and death of one or both parents and perhaps siblings, they lack the necessary parental guidance through crucial life-stages of identity formation and transition into adulthood. They are more likely to suffer damage to their cognitive and emotional development and be subjected to; exploitation in terms of labour, social exclusion, extreme economic uncertainty, physical and sexual abuse, illiteracy, malnutrition and illness. Education remains a distant dream. With stigma and discrimination, they lack legal protection, lose inheritance rights, access to essential services available to other community members and professional help from doctors, teachers and lawyers. The implications for these unfortunate children are extraordinarily grave but governments, international agencies, non

  14. Orphans of the HIV epidemic: the challenges from toddlerhood to adolescence and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lala, Mamatha M

    2014-01-01

    This presentation focuses on the challenges and practical issues faced each day by orphans of the HIV epidemic and the holistic care that can be provided, as they continue to grow from toddlerhood to adolescence and beyond. An HIV Research Trust Scholarship enabled me to spend quality time in a sub-Saharan African province worst hit by the HIV epidemic and to interact with local experts and learn from mutual clinical experience. It was an immensely useful exercise as the clinical spectra of the diseases are very similar to ours and they have ongoing active research programs very relevant to our setting. India is arguably home to the largest number of orphans of the HIV epidemic. The responsibility of caring for orphaned children overwhelms and pushes many extended families beyond their ability to cope. Many countries are experiencing large increases in the number of families headed by women and grandparents, or even young children. These households are often unable to meet basic needs, and so the number of children living on the streets is rising. Orphaned children are disadvantaged in many devastating ways. In addition to the trauma of witnessing the sickness and death of one or both parents and perhaps siblings, they lack the necessary parental guidance through crucial life-stages of identity formation and transition into adulthood. They are more likely to suffer damage to their cognitive and emotional development and be subjected to; exploitation in terms of labour, social exclusion, extreme economic uncertainty, physical and sexual abuse, illiteracy, malnutrition and illness. Education remains a distant dream. With stigma and discrimination, they lack legal protection, lose inheritance rights, access to essential services available to other community members and professional help from doctors, teachers and lawyers. The implications for these unfortunate children are extraordinarily grave but governments, international agencies, non-governmental organizations

  15. Bacterial and archaeal communities in the deep-sea sediments of inactive hydrothermal vents in the Southwest India Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Likui; Kang, Manyu; Xu, Jiajun; Xu, Jian; Shuai, Yinjie; Zhou, Xiaojian; Yang, Zhihui; Ma, Kesen

    2016-05-01

    Active deep-sea hydrothermal vents harbor abundant thermophilic and hyperthermophilic microorganisms. However, microbial communities in inactive hydrothermal vents have not been well documented. Here, we investigated bacterial and archaeal communities in the two deep-sea sediments (named as TVG4 and TVG11) collected from inactive hydrothermal vents in the Southwest India Ridge using the high-throughput sequencing technology of Illumina MiSeq2500 platform. Based on the V4 region of 16S rRNA gene, sequence analysis showed that bacterial communities in the two samples were dominated by Proteobacteria, followed by Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. Furthermore, archaeal communities in the two samples were dominated by Thaumarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Comparative analysis showed that (i) TVG4 displayed the higher bacterial richness and lower archaeal richness than TVG11; (ii) the two samples had more divergence in archaeal communities than bacterial communities. Bacteria and archaea that are potentially associated with nitrogen, sulfur metal and methane cycling were detected in the two samples. Overall, we first provided a comparative picture of bacterial and archaeal communities and revealed their potentially ecological roles in the deep-sea environments of inactive hydrothermal vents in the Southwest Indian Ridge, augmenting microbial communities in inactive hydrothermal vents.

  16. Representing properties locally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, K O; Barsalou, L W

    2001-09-01

    Theories of knowledge such as feature lists, semantic networks, and localist neural nets typically use a single global symbol to represent a property that occurs in multiple concepts. Thus, a global symbol represents mane across HORSE, PONY, and LION. Alternatively, perceptual theories of knowledge, as well as distributed representational systems, assume that properties take different local forms in different concepts. Thus, different local forms of mane exist for HORSE, PONY, and LION, each capturing the specific form that mane takes in its respective concept. Three experiments used the property verification task to assess whether properties are represented globally or locally (e.g., Does a PONY have mane?). If a single global form represents a property, then verifying it in any concept should increase its accessibility and speed its verification later in any other concept. Verifying mane for PONY should benefit as much from having verified mane for LION earlier as from verifying mane for HORSE. If properties are represented locally, however, verifying a property should only benefit from verifying a similar form earlier. Verifying mane for PONY should only benefit from verifying mane for HORSE, not from verifying mane for LION. Findings from three experiments strongly supported local property representation and ruled out the interpretation that object similarity was responsible (e.g., the greater overall similarity between HORSE and PONY than between LION and PONY). The findings further suggest that property representation and verification are complicated phenomena, grounded in sensory-motor simulations.

  17. Representing and Performing Businesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    2014-01-01

    and MacKenzie’s idea of performativity. Based on these two approaches, the article demonstrates that the segmentation model represents and performs the businesses as it makes up certain new ways to be a business and as the businesses can be seen as moving targets. Inspired by MacKenzie the argument......This article investigates a segmentation model used by the Danish Tax and Customs Administration to classify businesses’ motivational postures. The article uses two different conceptualisations of performativity to analyse what the model’s segmentations do: Hacking’s notion of making up people...... is that the segmentation model embodies cleverness in that it simultaneously alters what it represents and then represents this altered reality to confirm the accuracy of its own model of the businesses’ postures. Despite the cleverness of the model, it also has a blind spot. The model assumes a world wherein everything...

  18. Plant genotype-specific archaeal and bacterial endophytes but similar Bacillus antagonists colonize Mediterranean olive trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry eMueller

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Endophytes have an intimate and often symbiotic interaction with their hosts. Less is known about the composition and function of endophytes in trees. In order to evaluate our hypothesis that plant genotype and origin have a strong impact on both, endophytes of leaves from 10 Olea europaea L. cultivars from the Mediterranean basin growing at a single agricultural site in Spain and from nine wild olive trees located in natural habitats in Greece, Cyprus and on Madeira Island were studied. The composition of the bacterial endophytic communities as revealed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and the subsequent PCoA analysis showed a strong correlation to the plant genotypes. The bacterial distribution patterns were congruent with the plant origins in Eastern and Western areas of the Mediterranean basin. Subsequently, the endophytic microbiome of wild olives was shown to be closely related to those of cultivated olives of the corresponding geographic origins. The olive leaf endosphere harbored mostly Proteobacteria, followed by Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The detection of a high portion of archaeal taxa belonging to the phyla Thaumarchaeota, Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota in the amplicon libraries was an unexpected discovery, which was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR revealing an archaeal portion of up to 35.8%. Although the function of these Archaea for their host plant remains speculative, this finding suggests a significant relevance of archaeal endophytes for plant-microbe interactions. In addition, the antagonistic potential of culturable endophytes was determined; all isolates with antagonistic activity against the olive-pathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae Kleb. belong to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. In contrast to the specific global structural diversity, BOX-fingerprints of the antagonistic Bacillus isolates were highly similar and independent of the olive genotype from which they were isolated.

  19. Land-use systems affect Archaeal community structure and functional diversity in western Amazon soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acácio Aparecido Navarrete

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of the ecology of soil microbial communities at relevant spatial scales is primordial in the wide Amazon region due to the current land use changes. In this study, the diversity of the Archaea domain (community structure and ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (richness and community composition were investigated using molecular biology-based techniques in different land-use systems in western Amazonia, Brazil. Soil samples were collected in two periods with high precipitation (March 2008 and January 2009 from Inceptisols under primary tropical rainforest, secondary forest (5-20 year old, agricultural systems of indigenous people and cattle pasture. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA (PCR-DGGE using the 16S rRNA gene as a biomarker showed that archaeal community structures in crops and pasture soils are different from those in primary forest soil, which is more similar to the community structure in secondary forest soil. Sequence analysis of excised DGGE bands indicated the presence of crenarchaeal and euryarchaeal organisms. Based on clone library analysis of the gene coding the subunit of the enzyme ammonia monooxygenase (amoA of Archaea (306 sequences, the Shannon-Wiener function and Simpson's index showed a greater ammonia-oxidizing archaeal diversity in primary forest soils (H' = 2.1486; D = 0.1366, followed by a lower diversity in soils under pasture (H' = 1.9629; D = 0.1715, crops (H' = 1.4613; D = 0.3309 and secondary forest (H' = 0.8633; D = 0.5405. All cloned inserts were similar to the Crenarchaeota amoA gene clones (identity > 95 % previously found in soils and sediments and distributed primarily in three major phylogenetic clusters. The findings indicate that agricultural systems of indigenous people and cattle pasture affect the archaeal community structure and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea in western Amazon soils.

  20. Response of Archaeal communities in beach sediments to spilled oil and bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röling, Wilfred F M; de Brito Couto, Ivana R; Swannell, Richard P J; Head, Ian M

    2004-05-01

    While the contribution of Bacteria to bioremediation of oil-contaminated shorelines is well established, the response of Archaea to spilled oil and bioremediation treatments is unknown. The relationship between archaeal community structure and oil spill bioremediation was examined in laboratory microcosms and in a bioremediation field trial. 16S rRNA gene-based PCR and denaturing gradient gel analysis revealed that the archaeal community in oil-free laboratory microcosms was stable for 26 days. In contrast, in oil-polluted microcosms a dramatic decrease in the ability to detect Archaea was observed, and it was not possible to amplify fragments of archaeal 16S rRNA genes from samples taken from microcosms treated with oil. This was the case irrespective of whether a bioremediation treatment (addition of inorganic nutrients) was applied. Since rapid oil biodegradation occurred in nutrient-treated microcosms, we concluded that Archaea are unlikely to play a role in oil degradation in beach ecosystems. A clear-cut relationship between the presence of oil and the absence of Archaea was not apparent in the field experiment. This may have been related to continuous inoculation of beach sediments in the field with Archaea from seawater or invertebrates and shows that the reestablishment of Archaea following bioremediation cannot be used as a determinant of ecosystem recovery following bioremediation. Comparative 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed that the majority of the Archaea detected (94%) belonged to a novel, distinct cluster of group II uncultured Euryarchaeota, which exhibited less than 87% identity to previously described sequences. A minor contribution of group I uncultured Crenarchaeota was observed.

  1. Comparative analysis of the mosaic genomes of tailed archaeal viruses and proviruses suggests common themes for virion architecture and assembly with tailed viruses of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupovic, Mart; Forterre, Patrick; Bamford, Dennis H

    2010-03-19

    Tailed double-stranded DNA viruses (order Caudovirales) represent the dominant morphotype among viruses infecting bacteria. Analysis and comparison of complete genome sequences of tailed bacterial viruses provided insights into their origin and evolution. Structural and genomic studies have unexpectedly revealed that tailed bacterial viruses are evolutionarily related to eukaryotic herpesviruses. Organisms from the third domain of life, Archaea, are also infected by viruses that, in their overall morphology, resemble tailed viruses of bacteria. However, high-resolution structural information is currently unavailable for any of these viruses, and only a few complete genomes have been sequenced so far. Here we identified nine proviruses that are clearly related to tailed bacterial viruses and integrated into chromosomes of species belonging to four different taxonomic orders of the Archaea. This more than doubled the number of genome sequences available for comparative studies. Our analyses indicate that highly mosaic tailed archaeal virus genomes evolve by homologous and illegitimate recombination with genomes of other viruses, by diversification, and by acquisition of cellular genes. Comparative genomics of these viruses and related proviruses revealed a set of conserved genes encoding putative proteins similar to virion assembly and maturation, as well as genome packaging proteins of tailed bacterial viruses and herpesviruses. Furthermore, fold prediction and structural modeling experiments suggest that the major capsid proteins of tailed archaeal viruses adopt the same topology as the corresponding proteins of tailed bacterial viruses and eukaryotic herpesviruses. Data presented in this study strongly support the hypothesis that tailed viruses infecting archaea share a common ancestry with tailed bacterial viruses and herpesviruses.

  2. Exploring the biotechnologial applications in the archaeal domain Explorando as aplicações biotecnológicas do domínio archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M.C. Alquéres

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Archaea represent a considerable fraction of the prokaryotic world in marine and terrestrial ecosystems, indicating that organisms from this domain might have a large impact on global energy cycles. The extremophilic nature of many archaea has stimulated intense efforts to understand the physiological adaptations for living in extreme environments. Their unusual properties make them a potentially valuable resource in the development of novel biotechnological processes and industrial applications as new pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, nutritional supplements, molecular probes, enzymes, and fine chemicals. In the present mini-review, we show and discuss some exclusive characteristics of Archaea domain and the current knowledge about the biotechnological uses of the archaeal enzymes. The topics are: archaeal characteristics, phylogenetic division, biotechnological applications, isolation and cultivation of new microbes, achievements in genomics, and metagenomic.As arqueas representam uma considerável fração dos procariotos nos ecossistemas marinhos e terrestes, indicando que estes organismos devem possuir um grande impacto nos ciclos energéticos. A natureza extremofílica de muitas arqueas tem estimulado intensos esforços para compreender sua adaptação fisiológica a ambientes extremos. Suas propriedades incomus as tornam uma fonte valiosa no desenvolvimento de novos processos biotecnológicos e aplicações industriais como novos fármacos, cosméticos, suplementos nutricionais, sondas moleculares, enzimas e reagentes. Na presente mini-revisão, mostramos e discutimos algumas de suas características exclusivas correlacionando-as com seu potencial biotecnológico e aplicação industrial. Os tópicos são: características das arqueas, divisão filogenética, aplicações biotecnológicas, isolamento e cultivo de novos microrganismos, genoma e metagenoma.

  3. Role of traditional healers in psychosocial support in caring for the orphans: A case of Dar-es Salaam City, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massila Mariam

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Orphans are an increasing problem in developing countries particularly in Africa; due to the HIV/AIDS pandemic; and needs collective effort in intervention processes by including all stakeholders right from the grass roots level. This paper attempts to present the role of traditional healers in psychosocial support for orphan children in Dar-es-Salaam City with special focus on those whose parents have died because of HIV/AIDS. Six traditional healers who were involved in taking care of orphans were visited at their "vilinge" (traditional clinics. In total they had 72 orphans, 31 being boys and 41 being girls with age range from 3 years to 19. It was learned that traditional healers, besides providing remedies for illnesses/diseases of orphans, they also provided other basic needs. Further, they even provided psychosocial support allowing children to cope with orphan hood life with ease. Traditional healers are living within communities at the grass roots level; and appear unnoticed hidden forces, which are involved in taking care of orphans. This role of traditional healers in taking care of orphans needs to be recognised and even scaling it up by empowering them both in financial terms and training in basic skills of psychosocial techniques in how to handle orphans, in order to reduce discrimination and stigmatisation in the communities where they live.

  4. An archaeal tRNA-synthetase complex that enhances aminoacylation under extreme conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka; Jaric, Jelena; Hausmann, Corinne D;

    2011-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play an integral role in protein synthesis, functioning to attach the correct amino acid with its cognate tRNA molecule. AaRSs are known to associate into higher-order multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complexes (MSC) involved in archaeal and eukaryotic translation...... in the catalytic efficiency of serine attachment to tRNA, but had no effect on the activity of MtArgRS. Further, the most pronounced improvements in the aminoacylation activity of MtSerRS induced by MtArgRS were observed under conditions of elevated temperature and osmolarity. These data indicate that formation...

  5. Archaeal Viruses Contribute to the Novel Viral Assemblage Inhabiting Oceanic, Basalt-Hosted Deep Subsurface Crustal Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, O. D.; Rappe, M. S.; Jungbluth, S.; Lin, H. T.; Steward, G.

    2015-12-01

    Fluids contained in the basalt-hosted deep subsurface of the world's oceans represent one of the most inaccessible and understudied biospheres on earth. Recent improvements in sampling infrastructure have allowed us to collect large volumes of crustal fluids (~104 L) from Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kits (CORKs) placed in boreholes located on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR). We detected viruses within these fluids by TEM and epifluorescence microscopy in samples collected from 2010 to 2014. Viral abundance, determined by epifluorescence counts, indicated that concentrations of viruses in subsurface basement fluids (~105 ml-1) are lower than the overlying seawater, but are higher in abundance than microbial cells in the same samples. Analysis of TEM images revealed distinct viral morphologies (rod and spindle-shaped) that resemble the morphologies of viral families infecting archaea. There are very few, if any, direct observations of these viral morphologies in marine samples, although they have been observed in enrichment cultures and their signature genes detected in metagenomic studies from hydrothermal vents and marine sediments. Analysis of metagenomes from the JdFR crustal fluids revealed sequences with homology to archaeal viruses from the rudiviridae, bicaudaviridae and fuselloviridae. Prokaryotic communities in fluids percolating through the basaltic basement rock of the JdFR flank are distinct from those inhabiting the overlying sediments and seawater. Similarly, our data support the idea that the viral assemblage in these fluids is distinct from viral assemblages in other marine and terrestrial aquatic environments. Our data also suggest that viruses contribute to the mortality of deep subsurface prokaryotes through cell lysis, and viruses may alter the genetic potential of their hosts through the processes of lysogenic conversion and horizontal gene transfer.

  6. Archaeal and bacterial diversity in an arsenic-rich shallow-sea hydrothermal system undergoing phase separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Edward Price

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Phase separation is a ubiquitous process in seafloor hydrothermal vents, creating a large range of salinities. Toxic elements (e.g., arsenic partition into the vapor phase, and thus can be enriched in both high and low salinity fluids. However, investigations of microbial diversity at sites associated with phase separation are rare. We evaluated prokaryotic diversity in arsenic-rich shallow-sea vents off Milos Island (Greece by comparative analysis of 16S rRNA clone sequences from two vent sites with similar pH and temperature but marked differences in salinity. Clone sequences were also obtained for aioA-like functional genes (AFGs. Bacteria in the surface sediments (0 to 1.5 cm at the high salinity site consisted of mainly Epsilonproteobacteria (Arcobacter sp., which transitioned to almost exclusively Firmicutes (Bacillus sp. at ~10 cm depth. However, the low salinity site consisted of Bacteroidetes (Flavobacteria in the surface and Epsilonproteobacteria (Arcobacter sp. at ~10 cm depth. Archaea in the high salinity surface sediments were dominated by the orders Archaeoglobales and Thermococcales, transitioning to Thermoproteales and Desulfurococcales (Staphylothermus sp. in the deeper sediments. In contrast, the low salinity site was dominated by Thermoplasmatales in the surface and Thermoproteales at depth. Similarities in gas and redox chemistry suggest that salinity and/or arsenic concentrations may select for microbial communities that can tolerate these parameters. Many of the archaeal 16S rRNA sequences contained inserts, possibly introns, including members of the Euryarchaeota. Clones containing AFGs affiliated with either Alpha- or Betaproteobacteria, although most were only distantly related to published representatives. Most clones (89% originated from the deeper layer of the low salinity, highest arsenic site. This is the only sample with overlap in 16S rRNA data, suggesting arsenotrophy as an important metabolism in similar

  7. The Histamine H4 Receptor: From Orphan to the Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin L. Thurmond

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The histamine H4 receptor (H4R was first noted as a sequence in genomic databases that had features of a G-protein coupled receptor. This putative receptor was found to bind histamine consistent with its homology to other histamine receptors and thus became the fourth member of the histamine receptor family. Due to the previous success of drugs that target the H1 and H2 receptors, an effort was made to understand the function of this receptor and determine if it represented a drug target. Taking advantage of the vast literature on histamine, a search for histamine activity that did not appear to be mediated by the other three histamine receptors was undertaken. From this asthma and pruritus emerged as areas of particular interest. Histamine has long been suspected to play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma, but antihistamines that target the H1 and H2 receptors have not been shown to be effective for this condition. The use of selective ligands in animal models of asthma has now potentially filled this gap by showing a role for the H4R in mediating lung function and inflammation. A similar story exists for chronic pruritus associated with conditions such as atopic dermatitis. Antihistamines that target the H1 receptor are effective in reducing acute pruritus, but are ineffective in pruritus experienced by patients with atopic dermatitis. As for asthma, animal models have now suggested a role for the H4R in mediating pruritic responses, with antagonists to the H4R reducing pruritus in a number of different conditions. The anti-pruritic effect of H4R antagonists has recently been shown in human clinical studies, validating the preclinical findings in the animal models. A selective H4R antagonist inhibited histamine-induced pruritus in health volunteers and reduced pruritus in patients with atopic dermatitis. The history to date of the H4R provides an excellent example of the deorphanization of a novel receptor and the translation of this into

  8. Co-expression and co-purification of archaeal and eukaryal box C/D RNPs.

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    Yu Peng

    Full Text Available Box C/D ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs are 2'-O-methylation enzymes required for maturation of ribosomal and small nuclear RNA. Previous biochemical and structural studies of the box C/D RNPs were limited by the unavailability of purified intact RNPs. We developed a bacterial co-expression strategy based on the combined use of a multi-gene expression system and a tRNA-scaffold construct that allowed the expression and purification of homogeneous archaeal and human box C/D RNPs. While the co-expressed and co-purified archaeal box C/D RNP was found to be fully active in a 2'-O-methylation assay, the intact human U14 box C/D RNP showed no detectable catalytic activity, consistent with the earlier findings that assembly of eukaryotic box C/D RNPs is nonspontaneous and requires additional protein factors. Our systems provide a means for further biochemical and structural characterization of box C/D RNPs and their assembly factors.

  9. S-Layer Glycoproteins and Flagellins: Reporters of Archaeal Posttranslational Modifications

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    Ken F. Jarrell

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many archaeal proteins undergo posttranslational modifications. S-layer proteins and flagellins have been used successfully to study a variety of these modifications, including N-linked glycosylation, signal peptide removal and lipid modification. Use of these well-characterized reporter proteins in the genetically tractable model organisms, Haloferax volcanii, Methanococcus voltae and Methanococcus maripaludis, has allowed dissection of the pathways and characterization of many of the enzymes responsible for these modifications. Such studies have identified archaeal-specific variations in signal peptidase activity not found in the other domains of life, as well as the enzymes responsible for assembly and biosynthesis of novel N-linked glycans. In vitro assays for some of these enzymes have already been developed. N-linked glycosylation is not essential for either Hfx. volcanii or the Methanococcus species, an observation that allowed researchers to analyze the role played by glycosylation in the function of both S-layers and flagellins, by generating mutants possessing these reporters with only partial attached glycans or lacking glycan altogether. In future studies, it will be possible to consider questions related to the heterogeneity associated with given modifications, such as differential or modulated glycosylation.

  10. Diversity in prokaryotic glycosylation: an archaeal-derived N-linked glycan contains legionaminic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandiba, Lina; Aitio, Olli; Helin, Jari; Guan, Ziqiang; Permi, Perttu; Bamford, Dennis H; Eichler, Jerry; Roine, Elina

    2012-05-01

    VP4, the major structural protein of the haloarchaeal pleomorphic virus, HRPV-1, is glycosylated. To define the glycan structure attached to this protein, oligosaccharides released by β-elimination were analysed by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Such analyses showed that the major VP4-derived glycan is a pentasaccharide comprising glucose, glucuronic acid, mannose, sulphated glucuronic acid and a terminal 5-N-formyl-legionaminic acid residue. This is the first observation of legionaminic acid, a sialic acid-like sugar, in an archaeal-derived glycan structure. The importance of this residue for viral infection was demonstrated upon incubation with N-acetylneuraminic acid, a similar monosaccharide. Such treatment reduced progeny virus production by half 4 h post infection. LC-ESI/MS analysis confirmed the presence of pentasaccharide precursors on two different VP4-derived peptides bearing the N-glycosylation signal, NTT. The same sites modified by the native host, Halorubrum sp. strain PV6, were also recognized by the Haloferax volcanii N-glycosylation apparatus, as determined by LC-ESI/MS of heterologously expressed VP4. Here, however, the N-linked pentasaccharide was the same as shown to decorate the S-layer glycoprotein in this species. Hence, N-glycosylation of the haloarchaeal viral protein, VP4, is host-specific. These results thus present additional examples of archaeal N-glycosylation diversity and show the ability of Archaea to modify heterologously expressed proteins.

  11. Archaeal membrane-associated proteases: insights on Haloferax volcanii and other haloarchaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, María I; Cerletti, Micaela; De Castro, Rosana E

    2015-01-01

    The function of membrane proteases range from general house-keeping to regulation of cellular processes. Although the biological role of these enzymes in archaea is poorly understood, some of them are implicated in the biogenesis of the archaeal cell envelope and surface structures. The membrane-bound ATP-dependent Lon protease is essential for cell viability and affects membrane carotenoid content in Haloferax volcanii. At least two different proteases are needed in this archaeon to accomplish the posttranslational modifications of the S-layer glycoprotein. The rhomboid protease RhoII is involved in the N-glycosylation of the S-layer protein with a sulfoquinovose-containing oligosaccharide while archaeosortase ArtA mediates the proteolytic processing coupled-lipid modification of this glycoprotein facilitating its attachment to the archaeal cell surface. Interestingly, two different signal peptidase I homologs exist in H. volcanii, Sec11a and Sec11b, which likely play distinct physiological roles. Type IV prepilin peptidase PibD processes flagellin/pilin precursors, being essential for the biogenesis and function of the archaellum and other cell surface structures in H. volcanii.

  12. Archaeal membrane-associated proteases: insights on Haloferax volcanii and other haloarchaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ines Giménez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The function of membrane proteases range from general house-keeping to regulation of cellular processes. Although the biological role of these enzymes in archaea is poorly understood, some of them are implicated in the biogenesis of the archaeal cell envelope and surface structures. The membrane-bound ATP-dependent Lon protease is essential for cell viability and affects membrane carotenoid content in Haloferax volcanii. At least two different proteases are needed in this archaeon to accomplish the posttranslational modifications of the S-layer glycoprotein. The rhomboid protease RhoII is involved in the N-glycosylation of the S-layer protein with a sulfoquinovose-containing oligosaccharide while archaeosortase ArtA mediates the proteolytic processing coupled-lipid modification of this glycoprotein facilitating its attachment to the archaeal cell surface. Interestingly, two different signal peptidase I homologs exist in H. volcanii, Sec11a and Sec11b, which likely play distinct physiological roles. Type IV prepilin peptidase PibD processes flagellin/pilin precursors, being essential for the biogenesis and function of the archaellum and other cell surface structures in H. volcanii.

  13. Archaeal and bacterial diversity in acidic to circumneutral hot springs in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiuyuan; Jiang, Hongchen; Briggs, Brandon R; Wang, Shang; Hou, Weiguo; Li, Gaoyuan; Wu, Geng; Solis, Ramonito; Arcilla, Carlo A; Abrajano, Teofilo; Dong, Hailiang

    2013-09-01

    The microbial diversity was investigated in sediments of six acidic to circumneutral hot springs (Temperature: 60-92 °C, pH 3.72-6.58) in the Philippines using an integrated approach that included geochemistry and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Both bacterial and archaeal abundances were lower in high-temperature springs than in moderate-temperature ones. Overall, the archaeal community consisted of sequence reads that exhibited a high similarity (nucleotide identity > 92%) to phyla Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, and unclassified Archaea. The bacterial community was composed of sequence reads moderately related (nucleotide identity > 90%) to 17 phyla, with Aquificae and Firmicutes being dominant. These phylogenetic groups were correlated with environmental conditions such as temperature, dissolved sulfate and calcium concentrations in spring water, and sediment properties including total nitrogen, pyrite, and elemental sulfur. Based on the phylogenetic inference, sulfur metabolisms appear to be key physiological functions in these hot springs. Sulfobacillus (within phylum Firmicutes) along with members within Sulfolobales were abundant in two high-temperature springs (> 76 °C), and they were hypothesized to play an important role in regulating the sulfur cycling under high-temperature conditions. The results of this study improve our understanding of microbial diversity and community composition in acidic to circumneutral terrestrial hot springs and their relationships with geochemical conditions.

  14. Archaeal diversity and a gene for ammonia oxidation are coupled to oceanic circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galand, Pierre E; Lovejoy, Connie; Hamilton, Andrew K; Ingram, R Grant; Pedneault, Estelle; Carmack, Eddy C

    2009-04-01

    Evidence of microbial zonation in the open ocean is rapidly accumulating, but while the distribution of communities is often described according to depth, the other physical factors structuring microbial diversity and function remain poorly understood. Here we identify three different water masses in the North Water (eastern Canadian Arctic), defined by distinct temperature and salinity characteristics, and show that they contained distinct archaeal communities. Moreover, we found that one of the water masses contained an increased abundance of the archaeal alpha-subunit of the ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA) and accounted for 70% of the amoA gene detected overall. This indicates likely differences in putative biogeochemical capacities among different water masses. The ensemble of our results strongly suggest that the widely accepted view of depth stratification did not explain microbial diversity, but rather that parent water masses provide the framework for predicting communities and potential microbial function in an Arctic marine system. Our results emphasize that microbial distributions are strongly influenced by oceanic circulation, implying that shifting currents and water mass boundaries resulting from climate change may well impact patterns of microbial diversity by displacing whole biomes from their historic distributions. This relocation could have the potential to establish a substantially different geography of microbial-driven biogeochemical processes and associated oceanic production.

  15. Phylogeny of bacterial and archaeal genomes using conserved genes: supertrees and supermatrices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Morgan Lang

    Full Text Available Over 3000 microbial (bacterial and archaeal genomes have been made publically available to date, providing an unprecedented opportunity to examine evolutionary genomic trends and offering valuable reference data for a variety of other studies such as metagenomics. The utility of these genome sequences is greatly enhanced when we have an understanding of how they are phylogenetically related to each other. Therefore, we here describe our efforts to reconstruct the phylogeny of all available bacterial and archaeal genomes. We identified 24, single-copy, ubiquitous genes suitable for this phylogenetic analysis. We used two approaches to combine the data for the 24 genes. First, we concatenated alignments of all genes into a single alignment from which a Maximum Likelihood (ML tree was inferred using RAxML. Second, we used a relatively new approach to combining gene data, Bayesian Concordance Analysis (BCA, as implemented in the BUCKy software, in which the results of 24 single-gene phylogenetic analyses are used to generate a "primary concordance" tree. A comparison of the concatenated ML tree and the primary concordance (BUCKy tree reveals that the two approaches give similar results, relative to a phylogenetic tree inferred from the 16S rRNA gene. After comparing the results and the methods used, we conclude that the current best approach for generating a single phylogenetic tree, suitable for use as a reference phylogeny for comparative analyses, is to perform a maximum likelihood analysis of a concatenated alignment of conserved, single-copy genes.

  16. Bacterial and archaeal community structures in the Arctic deep-sea sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; LIU Qun; LI Chaolun; DONG Yi; ZHANG Wenyan; ZHANG Wuchang; XIAO Tian

    2015-01-01

    Microbial community structures in the Arctic deep-sea sedimentary ecosystem are determined by organic matter input, energy availability, and other environmental factors. However, global warming and earlier ice-cover melting are affecting the microbial diversity. To characterize the Arctic deep-sea sediment microbial diversity and its rela-tionship with environmental factors, we applied Roche 454 sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons from Arctic deep-sea sediment sample. Both bacterial and archaeal communities’ richness, compositions and structures as well as tax-onomic and phylogenetic affiliations of identified clades were characterized. Phylotypes relating to sulfur reduction and chemoorganotrophic lifestyle are major groups in the bacterial groups;while the archaeal community is domi-nated by phylotypes most closely related to the ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota (96.66%) and methanogenic Euryarchaeota (3.21%). This study describes the microbial diversity in the Arctic deep marine sediment (>3 500 m) near the North Pole and would lay foundation for future functional analysis on microbial metabolic processes and pathways predictions in similar environments.

  17. Archaeal Life on Tangkuban Perahu- Sampling and Culture Growth in Indonesian Laboratories

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    SRI HANDAYANI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the expedition to Tangkuban Perahu, West Java was to obtain archaeal samples from the solfatara fields located in Domas crater. This was one of the places, where scientists from the University of Regensburg Germany had formerly isolated Indonesian archaea, especially Thermoplasma and Sulfolobus species but not fully characterized. We collected five samples from mud holes with temperatures from 57 to 88 oC and pH of 1.5-2. A portion of each sample was grown at the University of Regensburg in modified Allen’s medium at 80 oC. From four out of five samples enrichment cultures were obtained, autotrophically on elemental sulphur and heterotrophically on sulfur and yeast extract; electron micrographs are presented. In the laboratories of Universitas Indonesia the isolates were cultured at 55-60 oC in order to grow tetraetherlipid synthesizing archaea, both Thermoplasmatales and Sulfolobales. Here, we succeeded to culture the same type of archaeal cells, which had been cultured in Regensburg, probably a Sulfolobus species and in Freundt’s medium, Thermoplasma species. The harvested cells are documented by phase contrast microscope equipped with a digital camera. Our next steps will be to further characterize genetically the cultured cells from Tangkuban Perahu isolates.

  18. Archaeal populations in hypersaline sediments underlying orange microbial mats in the Napoli mud volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; L'haridon, Stéphane; Pignet, Patricia; Toffin, Laurent

    2011-05-01

    Microbial mats in marine cold seeps are known to be associated with ascending sulfide- and methane-rich fluids. Hence, they could be visible indicators of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and methane cycling processes in underlying sediments. The Napoli mud volcano is situated in the Olimpi Area that lies on saline deposits; from there, brine fluids migrate upward to the seafloor. Sediments associated with a brine pool and microbial orange mats of the Napoli mud volcano were recovered during the Medeco cruise. Based on analysis of RNA-derived sequences, the "active" archaeal community was composed of many uncultured lineages, such as rice cluster V or marine benthic group D. Function methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) genes were affiliated with the anaerobic methanotrophic Archaea (ANME) of the ANME-1, ANME-2a, and ANME-2c groups, suggesting that AOM occurred in these sediment layers. Enrichment cultures showed the presence of viable marine methylotrophic Methanococcoides in shallow sediment layers. Thus, the archaeal community diversity seems to show that active methane cycling took place in the hypersaline microbial mat-associated sediments of the Napoli mud volcano.

  19. Archaeal Genome Guardians Give Insights into Eukaryotic DNA Replication and Damage Response Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Shin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the third domain of life, archaea, like the eukarya and bacteria, must have robust DNA replication and repair complexes to ensure genome fidelity. Archaea moreover display a breadth of unique habitats and characteristics, and structural biologists increasingly appreciate these features. As archaea include extremophiles that can withstand diverse environmental stresses, they provide fundamental systems for understanding enzymes and pathways critical to genome integrity and stress responses. Such archaeal extremophiles provide critical data on the periodic table for life as well as on the biochemical, geochemical, and physical limitations to adaptive strategies allowing organisms to thrive under environmental stress relevant to determining the boundaries for life as we know it. Specifically, archaeal enzyme structures have informed the architecture and mechanisms of key DNA repair proteins and complexes. With added abilities to temperature-trap flexible complexes and reveal core domains of transient and dynamic complexes, these structures provide insights into mechanisms of maintaining genome integrity despite extreme environmental stress. The DNA damage response protein structures noted in this review therefore inform the basis for genome integrity in the face of environmental stress, with implications for all domains of life as well as for biomanufacturing, astrobiology, and medicine.

  20. The Evolution of Orphan Regions in Genomes of a Fungal Pathogen of Wheat

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    Clémence Plissonneau

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fungal plant pathogens rapidly evolve virulence on resistant hosts through mutations in genes encoding proteins that modulate the host immune responses. The mutational spectrum likely includes chromosomal rearrangements responsible for gains or losses of entire genes. However, the mechanisms creating adaptive structural variation in fungal pathogen populations are poorly understood. We used complete genome assemblies to quantify structural variants segregating in the highly polymorphic fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici. The genetic basis of virulence in Z. tritici is complex, and populations harbor significant genetic variation for virulence; hence, we aimed to identify whether structural variation led to functional differences. We combined single-molecule real-time sequencing, genetic maps, and transcriptomics data to generate a fully assembled and annotated genome of the highly virulent field isolate 3D7. Comparative genomics analyses against the complete reference genome IPO323 identified large chromosomal inversions and the complete gain or loss of transposable-element clusters, explaining the extensive chromosomal-length polymorphisms found in this species. Both the 3D7 and IPO323 genomes harbored long tracts of sequences exclusive to one of the two genomes. These orphan regions contained 296 genes unique to the 3D7 genome and not previously known for this species. These orphan genes tended to be organized in clusters and showed evidence of mutational decay. Moreover, the orphan genes were enriched in genes encoding putative effectors and included a gene that is one of the most upregulated putative effector genes during wheat infection. Our study showed that this pathogen species harbored extensive chromosomal structure polymorphism that may drive the evolution of virulence.

  1. Child work and labour among orphaned and abandoned children in five low and middle income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pence Brian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The care and protection of the estimated 143,000,000 orphaned and abandoned children (OAC worldwide is of great importance to global policy makers and child service providers in low and middle income countries (LMICs, yet little is known about rates of child labour among OAC, what child and caregiver characteristics predict child engagement in work and labour, or when such work infers with schooling. This study examines rates and correlates of child labour among OAC and associations of child labour with schooling in a cohort of OAC in 5 LMICs. Methods The Positive Outcomes for Orphans (POFO study employed a two-stage random sampling survey methodology to identify 1480 single and double orphans and children abandoned by both parents ages 6-12 living in family settings in five LMICs: Cambodia, Ethiopia, India, Kenya, and Tanzania. Regression models examined child and caregiver associations with: any work versus no work; and with working Results The majority of OAC (60.7% engaged in work during the past week, and of those who worked, 17.8% (10.5% of the total sample worked 28 or more hours. More than one-fifth (21.9%; 13% of the total sample met UNICEF's child labour definition. Female OAC and those in good health had increased odds of working. OAC living in rural areas, lower household wealth and caregivers not earning an income were associated with increased child labour. Child labour, but not working fewer than 28 hours per week, was associated with decreased school attendance. Conclusions One in seven OAC in this study were reported to be engaged in child labour. Policy makers and social service providers need to pay close attention to the demands being placed on female OAC, particularly in rural areas and poor households with limited income sources. Programs to promote OAC school attendance may need to focus on the needs of families as well as the OAC.

  2. РSYCHOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF ORPHANS AND CHILDREN WITHOUT PARENTAL CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Н. А. Киселева

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the psychological and psychophy-siological characteristics of children living in the Children’s Village-SOS and in the Children’s Home. Particular emotional and cognitive areas, self image, creativity, mental stress and neurotic tendencies in orphans and children without parental care are characterized in the article. Age and gender differences in the parameters studied are detected.Purpose. The purpose is to discoverage and gender aspects of the psychological and psychophysiological characteristics of children of orphans and children without parental care living in the Children’s Village-SOS and in the Children’s Home.Methodology. Empirical research of gender particular features of psychic state of alarmness of adopted children with the help of testing.Results. The significant gender differences in terms of phobias and fears were revealed; the significant gender differences on the scale of the emotional content of images were revealed; the study revealed the trends toward significant difference by gender in the manifestation of sleep disorders and autonomic dysfunction;the significant age-related differences in terms of increased anxiety, autonomic dysfunction, eating disorders were revealed.Practical implications. The results are of interest to the science workers of age psychology, gender psychology, social psychology, to the workers of the children’s institutions and to the organizations occupied with medical-social-psychological-pedagogycal maintenance of orphans and children without parental care.Purchase on Elibrary.ru > Buy now

  3. Impact of domestic care environment on trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder among orphans in western Kenya.

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    Lukoye Atwoli

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the impact of the domestic care environment on the prevalence of potentially traumatic events (PTEs and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD among orphaned and separated children in Uasin Gishu County, western Kenya.A total of 1565 (55.5% male orphaned and separated adolescents aged 10-18 years (mean 13.8 years, sd 2.2, were assessed for PTSD and PTEs including bullying, physical abuse and sexual abuse. In this sample, 746 lived in extended family households, 746 in Charitable Children's Institutions (CCIs, and 73 on the street. Posttraumatic stress symptom (PTSS scores and PTSD were assessed using the Child PTSD Checklist.Bullying was the commonest PTE in all domestic care environments, followed by physical and sexual abuse. All PTEs were commonest among the street youth followed by CCIs. However, sexual abuse was more prevalent in households than in CCIs. Prevalence of PTSD was highest among street youth (28.8%, then households (15.0% and CCIs (11.5%. PTSS scores were also highest among street youth, followed by CCIs and households. Bullying was associated with higher PTSS scores and PTSD odds than either sexual or physical abuse.This study demonstrated differences in distribution of trauma and PTSD among orphaned and separated children in different domestic care environments, with street youth suffering more than those in CCIs or households. Interventions are needed to address bullying and sexual abuse, especially in extended family households. Street youth, a heretofore neglected population, are urgently in need of dedicated mental health services and support.

  4. Role of Orphan Nuclear Receptor DAX-1/NR0B1 in Development, Physiology, and Disease

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    Enzo Lalli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available DAX-1/NR0B1 is an unusual orphan receptor that has a pivotal role in the development and function of steroidogenic tissues and of the reproductive axis. Recent studies have also indicated that this transcription factor has an important function in stem cell biology and in several types of cancer. Here I critically review the most important findings on the role of DAX-1 in development, physiology, and disease of endocrine tissues since the cloning of its gene twenty years ago.

  5. Determinants for successful marketing authorisation of orphan medicinal products in the EU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzeist, Michelle; Heemstra, Harald E; Garcia, Jordi Llinares; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K; Gispen-De Wied, Christine C; Hoes, Arno W; Leufkens, Hubert G M

    2012-04-01

    In 2010, the European Regulation for Orphan Medicinal Products (OMPs) was in force for ten years. In this study we assessed possible determinants of applications for OMPs in the EU since 2000 that are associated with a successful marketing authorisation. Our analysis shows that clinical trial characteristics such as demonstrating convincing evidence of a beneficial effect on the primary endpoint, the selection of a clinically relevant endpoint, providing RCT data as pivotal study evidence and the submission of sound dose finding data are critical success factors. In addition, high medical need seems to counterweigh uncertainties about the scientific evidence in the benefit-risk assessment of OMPs.

  6. Birth of Archaeal Cells: Molecular Phylogenetic Analyses of G1P Dehydrogenase, G3P Dehydrogenases, and Glycerol Kinase Suggest Derived Features of Archaeal Membranes Having G1P Polar Lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria and Eukarya have cell membranes with sn-glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), whereas archaeal membranes contain sn-glycerol-1-phosphate (G1P). Determining the time at which cells with either G3P-lipid membranes or G1P-lipid membranes appeared is important for understanding the early evolution of terrestrial life. To clarify this issue, we reconstructed molecular phylogenetic trees of G1PDH (G1P dehydrogenase; EgsA/AraM) which is responsible for G1P synthesis and G3PDHs (G3P dehydrogenase; GpsA and GlpA/GlpD) and glycerol kinase (GlpK) which is responsible for G3P synthesis. Together with the distribution of these protein-encoding genes among archaeal and bacterial groups, our phylogenetic analyses suggested that GlpA/GlpD in the Commonote (the last universal common ancestor of all extant life with a cellular form, Commonote commonote) acquired EgsA (G1PDH) from the archaeal common ancestor (Commonote archaea) and acquired GpsA and GlpK from a bacterial common ancestor (Commonote bacteria). In our scenario based on this study, the Commonote probably possessed a G3P-lipid membrane synthesized enzymatically, after which the archaeal lineage acquired G1PDH followed by the replacement of a G3P-lipid membrane with a G1P-lipid membrane.

  7. Are female orphans at risk for early marriage, early sexual debut, and teen pregnancy? Evidence from sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Tia; Peterman, Amber

    2009-06-01

    Female orphans are widely cited as being at risk for early marriage, early childbearing, and risky sexual behavior; however, to date no studies have examined these linkages using population-level data across multiple countries. This study draws from recent Demographic and Health Surveys from ten sub-Saharan African countries to examine the relationship between orphanhood status and measures of early marriage, early sexual debut, and teen pregnancy among adolescent girls aged 15 to 17. Results indicate that, overall, little association is found between orphanhood and early marriage or teen pregnancy, whereas evidence from seven countries supports associations between orphanhood and early sexual debut. Findings are sensitive to the use of multivariate models, type of orphan, and country setting. Orphanhood status alone may not be a sufficient targeting mechanism for addressing these outcomes in many countries; a broader, multidimensional targeting scheme including orphan type, schooling, and poverty measures would be more robust in identifying and aiding young women at risk.

  8. Representing distance, consuming distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunvor Riber

    to mobility and its social context. Such an understanding can be approached through representations, as distance is being represented in various ways, most noticeably in maps and through the notions of space and Otherness. The question this talk subsequently asks is whether these representations of distance...... are being consumed in the contemporary society, in the same way as places, media, cultures and status are being consumed (Urry 1995, Featherstone 2007). An exploration of distance and its representations through contemporary consumption theory could expose what role distance plays in forming...... are present in theoretical and empirical elaborations on mobility, but these remain largely implicit and unchallenged (Bauman 1998). This talk will endeavour to unmask distance as a theoretical entity by exploring ways in which distance can be understood and by discussing distance through its representations...

  9. Linking the composition of bacterial and archaeal communities to characteristics of soil and flora composition in the Atlantic rainforest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lima-Perim, Julia Elidia; Romagnoli, Emiliana Manesco; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Durrer, Ademir; Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Andreote, Fernando Dini

    2016-01-01

    The description of microbiomes as intrinsic fractions of any given ecosystem is an important issue, for instance, by linking their compositions and functions with other biotic and abiotic components of natural systems and hosts. Here we describe the archaeal and bacterial communities from soils of t

  10. Structural and genomic properties of the hyperthermophilic archaeal virus ATV with an extracellular stage of the reproductive cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili, David; Vestergaard, Gisle Alberg; Häring, Monika;

    2006-01-01

    A novel virus, ATV, of the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Acidianus has the unique property of undergoing a major morphological development outside of, and independently of, the host cell. Virions are extruded from host cells as lemon-shaped tail-less particles, after which they develop long...

  11. A nested PCR approach for improved recovery of archaeal 16S rRNA gene fragments from freshwater samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, E.W.; Bodelier, P.L.E.; Muyzer, G.; Laanbroek, R.

    2009-01-01

    In a survey on the presence of archaea in a number of European lakes, it was found that known archaeal primer sets for PCR were not suited for use in freshwater environment, as some lack selectivity, while others were too selective. A nested PCR was developed for denaturing gradient gel electrophore

  12. Detection and analysis of elusive members of a novel and diverse archaeal community within a thermal spring streamer consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Daniel R; Thomas, Raquela; Maas, Kendra R; Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina D

    2015-03-01

    Recent metagenomic analyses of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) thermal spring communities suggested the presence of minor archaeal populations that simultaneous PCR-based assays using traditional 'universal' 16S rRNA gene primers failed to detect. Here we use metagenomics to identify PCR primers effective at detecting elusive members of the Archaea, assess their efficacy, and describe the diverse and novel archaeal community from a circum-neutral thermal spring from the Bechler region of YNP. We determined that a less commonly used PCR primer, Arch349F, captured more diversity in this spring than the widely used A21F primer. A search of the PCR primers against the RDP 16S rRNA gene database indicated that Arch349F also captured the largest percentage of Archaea, including 41 % more than A21F. Pyrosequencing using the Arch349F primer recovered all of the phylotypes present in the clone-based portion of the study and the metagenome of this spring in addition to several other populations of Archaea, some of which are phylogenetically novel. In contrast to the lack of amplification with traditional 16S rRNA gene primers, our comprehensive analyses suggested a diverse archaeal community in the Bechler spring, with implications for recently discovered groups such as the Geoarchaeota and other undescribed archaeal groups.

  13. Influence of phenylacetic acid pulses on anaerobic digestion performance and archaeal community structure in WWTP sewage sludge digesters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabrol, L.; Urra, J.; Rosenkranz, F.; Kroff, P.A.; Plugge, C.M.; Lesty, Y.; Chamy, R.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of phenylacetic acid (PAA) pulses on anaerobic digestion (AD) performance and archaeal community structure was evaluated in anaerobic digesters treating sewage sludge from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Four pilot-scale continuous stirred tank reactors were set up at a full-scale mu

  14. Cleavage of model substrates by archaeal RNase P: role of protein cofactors in cleavage-site selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinapah, Sylvie; Wu, Shiying; Chen, Yu; Pettersson, B M Fredrik; Gopalan, Venkat; Kirsebom, Leif A

    2011-02-01

    RNase P is a catalytic ribonucleoprotein primarily involved in tRNA biogenesis. Archaeal RNase P comprises a catalytic RNase P RNA (RPR) and at least four protein cofactors (RPPs), which function as two binary complexes (POP5•RPP30 and RPP21• RPP29). Exploiting the ability to assemble a functional Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) RNase P in vitro, we examined the role of RPPs in influencing substrate recognition by the RPR. We first demonstrate that Pfu RPR, like its bacterial and eukaryal counterparts, cleaves model hairpin loop substrates albeit at rates 90- to 200-fold lower when compared with cleavage by bacterial RPR, highlighting the functionally comparable catalytic cores in bacterial and archaeal RPRs. By investigating cleavage-site selection exhibited by Pfu RPR (±RPPs) with various model substrates missing consensus-recognition elements, we determined substrate features whose recognition is facilitated by either POP5•RPP30 or RPP21•RPP29 (directly or indirectly via the RPR). Our results also revealed that Pfu RPR + RPP21•RPP29 displays substrate-recognition properties coinciding with those of the bacterial RPR-alone reaction rather than the Pfu RPR, and that this behaviour is attributable to structural differences in the substrate-specificity domains of bacterial and archaeal RPRs. Moreover, our data reveal a hierarchy in recognition elements that dictates cleavage-site selection by archaeal RNase P.

  15. Archaeal ammonia oxidation in volcanic grassland soils of Iceland. Effects of elevated temperature and N availability on processes and organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daebeler, A.

    2014-01-01

    Thaumarchaea are recognized today as the most abundant and ubiquitously dis­tributed archaeal organisms, especially in the oceans and soil. Their phylogenetic placement as a phylum, the capability of all cultivated Thaumarchaea to oxidize ammonia for energy conservation as well as many further aspec

  16. An Orphan LuxR Homolog of Sinorhizobium meliloti Affects Stress Adaptation and Competition for Nodulation▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Patankar, Arati V.; González, Juan E.

    2008-01-01

    The Sin/ExpR quorum-sensing system of Sinorhizobium meliloti plays an important role in the symbiotic association with its host plant, Medicago sativa. The LuxR-type response regulators of the Sin system include the synthase (SinI)-associated SinR and the orphan regulator ExpR. Interestingly, the S. meliloti Rm1021 genome codes for four additional putative orphan LuxR homologs whose regulatory roles remain to be identified. These response regulators contain the characteristic domains of the L...

  17. SOCIAL RIGHT AND ITS APPLICATION FOR MARTYR'S WIDOW, ORPHAN AND WAR VETERAN-VICTIM WHO NEEDED SPECIAL CARE AND PROTECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent KARA

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In respect to social state principle, the 61’ st article of the Constitution is allocated for disadvantaged people. Because of special situations of Turkey, social rights of the casualties, the orphans and the widows, the handicapped and the veterans were determined and organized in this article. The main aim of this study is to evaluate the laws, policies and problems of the casualties, the orphans and the widows, the handicapped and the veterans who were preserved by the Constitution and some laws.

  18. Government-NGO collaboration and sustainability of orphans and vulnerable children projects in southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Alana; Hartwig, Kari; Merson, Michael

    2008-02-01

    Given current donor attention to orphans and children made vulnerable by HIV/AIDS, and the need for a new framework that recognizes the complementary roles of nations and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), this analysis reviews NGO-operated community-based orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) projects in Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia, South Africa, and Swaziland. There has been a lack of attention within the field of evaluation to inter-organizational relationships, specifically those with government agencies, as a factor in sustainability. We analyzed evaluations of nine OVC projects funded by the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation for the influence of government-NGO collaboration on project sustainability. For eight of the nine projects, evaluations provided evidence of the importance of the government partnership for sustainability. Government collaboration was important in projects designed to help families access government grants, initiate community-based solutions, and advocate for OVC rights through legislation. Government partnerships were also critical to the sustainability of two projects involved in placing children in foster care, but these showed signs of tension with government partners. In addition to the more common factors associated with sustainability, such as organizational characteristics, donors and NGOs should concentrate on developing strong partnerships with local and national government agencies for the sustainability of their projects.

  19. The orphan nuclear receptor SHP regulates PGC-1alpha expression and energy production in brown adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Liu, Jun; Saha, Pradip; Huang, Jiansheng; Chan, Lawrence; Spiegelman, Bruce; Moore, David D

    2005-10-01

    Brown adipocytes increase energy production in response to induction of PGC-1alpha, a dominant regulator of energy metabolism. We have found that the orphan nuclear receptor SHP (NR0B2) is a negative regulator of PGC-1alpha expression in brown adipocytes. Mice lacking SHP show increased basal expression of PGC-1alpha, increased energy expenditure, and resistance to diet-induced obesity. Increased PGC-1alpha expression in SHP null brown adipose tissue is not due to beta-adrenergic activation, since it is also observed in primary cultures of SHP(-/-) brown adipocytes that are not exposed to such stimuli. In addition, acute inhibition of SHP expression in cultured wild-type brown adipocytes increases basal PGC-1alpha expression, and SHP overexpression in SHP null brown adipocytes decreases it. The orphan nuclear receptor ERRgamma is expressed in BAT and its transactivation of the PGC-1alpha promoter is potently inhibited by SHP. We conclude that SHP functions as a negative regulator of energy production in BAT.

  20. The small SLC43 family: facilitator system l amino acid transporters and the orphan EEG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodoy, Susanna; Fotiadis, Dimitrios; Stoeger, Claudia; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Palacín, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The SLC43 family is composed of only three genes coding for the plasma membrane facilitator system l amino acid transporters LAT3 (SLC43A1; TC 2.A.1.44.1) and LAT4 (SLC43A2; TC 2.A.1.44.2), and the orphan protein EEG1 (SLC43A3; TC 2.A.1.44.3). Besides the known mechanism of transport of LAT3 and LAT4, their physiological roles still remain quite obscure. Morphants suggested a role of LAT3 in renal podocyte development in zebrafish. Expression in liver and skeletal muscle, and up-regulation by starvation suggest a role of LAT3 in the flux of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) from liver and skeletal muscle to the bloodstream. Finally, LAT3 is up-regulated in androgen-dependent cancers, suggesting a role in mTORC1 signaling in this type of tumors. In addition, LAT4 might contribute to the transfer of BCAAs from mother to fetus. Unfortunately, the EEG1 mouse model (EEG1(Y221∗)) described here has not yet offered a clue to the physiological role of this orphan protein.

  1. Fatal herpesvirus hemorrhagic disease in wild and orphan asian elephants in southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, Arun; Zong, Jian-Chao; Long, Simon Y; Latimer, Erin M; Heaggans, Sarah Y; Richman, Laura K; Hayward, Gary S

    2013-04-01

    Up to 65% of deaths of young Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) between 3 mo and 15 yr of age in Europe and North America over the past 20 yr have been attributed to hemorrhagic disease associated with a novel DNA virus called elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV). To evaluate the potential role of EEHV in suspected cases of a similar lethal acute hemorrhagic disease occurring in southern India, we studied pathologic tissue samples collected from field necropsies. Nine cases among both orphaned camp and wild Asian elephants were identified by diagnostic PCR. These were subjected to detailed gene subtype DNA sequencing at multiple PCR loci, which revealed seven distinct strains of EEHV1A and one of EEHV1B. Two orphan calves that died within 3 days of one another at the same training camp had identical EEHV1A DNA sequences, indicating a common epidemiologic source. However, the high level of EEHV1 subtype genetic diversity found among the other Indian strains matches that among over 30 EEHV1 strains that have been evaluated from Europe and North America. These results argue against the previous suggestions that this is just a disease of captive elephants and that the EEHV1 virus has crossed recently from African elephant (Loxodonta africana) hosts to Asian elephants. Instead, both the virus and the disease are evidently widespread in Asia and, despite the disease severity, Asian elephants appear to be the ancient endogenous hosts of both EEHV1A and EEHV1B.

  2. Extremely Soft X-ray Flash as the indicator of off-axis orphan GRB afterglow

    CERN Document Server

    Urata, Yuji; Yamazaki, Ryo; Sakamoto, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    We verified the off-axis jet model of X-ray flashes (XRFs) and examined a discovery of off-axis orphan gamma-ray burst (GRBs) afterglows. The XRF sample was selected on the basis of the following three factors: (1) a constraint on the lower peak energy of the prompt spectrum $E^{src}_{obs}$, (2) redshift measurements, and (3) multi-color observations of an earlier (or brightening) phase. XRF020903 was the only sample selected basis of these criteria. A complete optical multi-color afterglow light curve of XRF020903 obtained from archived data and photometric results in literature showed an achromatic brightening around 0.7 days. An off-axis jet model with a large observing angle (0.21 rad, which is twice the jet opening half-angle, $\\theta_{jet}$) can naturally describe the achromatic brightening and the prompt X-ray spectral properties. This result indicates the existence of off-axis orphan GRB afterglow light curves. Events with a larger viewing angle ($>\\sim2\\theta_{jet}$) could be discovered using an 8-m ...

  3. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor TR4 Is a Vitamin A-activated Nuclear Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X. Edward; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Xu, Yong; Chan, Cee-Wah; Tanabe, Osamu; Kruse, Schoen W.; Reynolds, Ross; Engel, James Douglas; Xu, H. Eric (Michigan-Med); (Van Andel)

    2015-11-30

    Testicular receptors 2 and 4 (TR2/4) constitute a subgroup of orphan nuclear receptors that play important roles in spermatogenesis, lipid and lipoprotein regulation, and the development of the central nervous system. Currently, little is known about the structural features and the ligand regulation of these receptors. Here we report the crystal structure of the ligand-free TR4 ligand binding domain, which reveals an autorepressed conformation. The ligand binding pocket of TR4 is filled by the C-terminal half of helix 10, and the cofactor binding site is occupied by the AF-2 helix, thus preventing ligand-independent activation of the receptor. However, TR4 exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity on multiple promoters, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, or ligand binding substantially reduce the transcriptional activity of this receptor. Importantly, both retinol and retinoic acid are able to promote TR4 to recruit coactivators and to activate a TR4-regulated reporter. These findings demonstrate that TR4 is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor and suggest that retinoids might have a much wider regulatory role via activation of orphan receptors such as TR4.

  4. The orphan nuclear receptor TR4 is a vitamin A-activated nuclear receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X Edward; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Xu, Yong; Chan, Cee-Wah; Tanabe, Osamu; Kruse, Schoen W; Reynolds, Ross; Engel, James Douglas; Xu, H Eric

    2011-01-28

    Testicular receptors 2 and 4 (TR2/4) constitute a subgroup of orphan nuclear receptors that play important roles in spermatogenesis, lipid and lipoprotein regulation, and the development of the central nervous system. Currently, little is known about the structural features and the ligand regulation of these receptors. Here we report the crystal structure of the ligand-free TR4 ligand binding domain, which reveals an autorepressed conformation. The ligand binding pocket of TR4 is filled by the C-terminal half of helix 10, and the cofactor binding site is occupied by the AF-2 helix, thus preventing ligand-independent activation of the receptor. However, TR4 exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity on multiple promoters, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, or ligand binding substantially reduce the transcriptional activity of this receptor. Importantly, both retinol and retinoic acid are able to promote TR4 to recruit coactivators and to activate a TR4-regulated reporter. These findings demonstrate that TR4 is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor and suggest that retinoids might have a much wider regulatory role via activation of orphan receptors such as TR4.

  5. Comparative survey of bacterial and archaeal communities in high arsenic shallow aquifers using 454 pyrosequencing and traditional methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Jiang, Dawei; Li, Bing; Dai, Xinyue; Wang, Yanhong; Jiang, Zhou; Wang, Yanxin

    2014-12-01

    A survey of bacterial and archaeal community structure was carried out in 10 shallow tube wells in a high arsenic groundwater system located in Hetao Basin, Inner Mongolia by 16S rRNA gene based two-step nested PCR-DGGE, clone libraries and 454 pyrosequencing. 12 bacterial and 18 archaeal DGGE bands and 26-136 species-level OTUs were detected for all the samples. 299 bacterial and 283 archaeal 16S rRNA gene clones for two typical samples were identified by phylogenetic analysis. Most of the results from these different methods were consistent with the dominant bacterial populations. But the proportions of the microbial populations were mostly different and the bacterial communities in most of these samples from pyrosequencing were both more abundant and more diverse than those from the traditional methods. Even after quality filtering, pyrosequencing revealed some populations including Alishewanella, Sulfuricurvum, Arthrobacter, Sporosarcina and Algoriphagus which were not detected with traditional techniques. The most dominant bacterial populations in these samples identified as some arsenic, iron, nitrogen and sulfur reducing and oxidizing related populations including Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Brevundimonas, Massilia, Planococcus, and Aquabacterium and archaeal communities Nitrosophaera and Methanosaeta. Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas were distinctly abundant in most of these samples. Methanogens were found as the dominant archeal population with three methods. From the results of traditional methods, the dominant archaeal populations apparently changed from phylum Thaumarchaeota to Euryarchaeota with the arsenic concentrations increasing. But this structure dynamic change was not revealed with pyrosequencing. Our results imply that an integrated approach combining the traditional methods and next generation sequencing approaches to characterize the microbial communities in high arsenic groundwater is recommended.

  6. Forest strata drive spatial structure of bacterial and archaeal communities and microbial methane cycling in neotropical bromeliad wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Guntars; Brandt, Franziska; Conrad, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Several thousands of tank bromeliads per hectare of neotropical forest create a unique wetland ecosystem that harbors diverse communities of archaea and bacteria and emit substantial amounts of methane. We studied spatial distribution of archaeal and bacterial communities, microbial methane cycling and their environmental drivers in tank bromeliad wetlands. We selected tank bromeliads of different species and functional types (terrestrial and canopy bromeliads) in a neotropical montane forest of Southern Ecuador and sampled the organic tank slurry. Archaeal and bacterial communities were characterized using terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and Illumina MiSeq sequencing, respectively, and linked with physico-chemical tank-slurry properties. Additionally, we performed tank-slurry incubations to measure methane production potential, stable carbon isotope fractionation and pathway of methane formation. Archaeal and bacterial community composition in bromeliad wetlands was dominated by methanogens and by Alphaproteobacteria, respectively, and did not differ between species but between functional types. Hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales were the dominant methanogens among all bromeliads but the relative abundance of aceticlastic Methanosaetaceae increased in terrestrial bromeliads. Complementary, hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was the dominant pathway of methane formation but the relative contribution of aceticlastic methanogenesis increased in terrestrial bromeliads and led to a concomitant increase in total methane production. Rhodospirillales were characteristic for canopy bromeliads, Planctomycetales and Actinomycetalis for terrestrial bromeliads. While nitrogen concentration and pH explained 32% of the archaeal community variability, 29% of the bacterial community variability was explained by nitrogen, acetate and propionate concentrations. Our study demonstrates that bromeliad functional types, associated with different forest strata

  7. Archaeal abundance across a pH gradient in an arable soil and its relationship to bacterial and fungal growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtson, Per; Sterngren, Anna E; Rousk, Johannes

    2012-08-01

    Soil pH is one of the most influential factors for the composition of bacterial and fungal communities, but the influence of soil pH on the distribution and composition of soil archaeal communities has yet to be systematically addressed. The primary aim of this study was to determine how total archaeal abundance (quantitative PCR [qPCR]-based estimates of 16S rRNA gene copy numbers) is related to soil pH across a pH gradient (pH 4.0 to 8.3). Secondarily, we wanted to assess how archaeal abundance related to bacterial and fungal growth rates across the same pH gradient. We identified two distinct and opposite effects of pH on the archaeal abundance. In the lowest pH range (pH 4.0 to 4.7), the abundance of archaea did not seem to correspond to pH. Above this pH range, there was a sharp, almost 4-fold decrease in archaeal abundance, reaching a minimum at pH 5.1 to 5.2. The low abundance of archaeal 16S rRNA gene copy numbers at this pH range then sharply increased almost 150-fold with pH, resulting in an increase in the ratio between archaeal and bacterial copy numbers from a minimum of 0.002 to more than 0.07 at pH 8. The nonuniform archaeal response to pH could reflect variation in the archaeal community composition along the gradient, with some archaea adapted to acidic conditions and others to neutral to slightly alkaline conditions. This suggestion is reinforced by observations of contrasting outcomes of the (competitive) interactions between archaea, bacteria, and fungi toward the lower and higher ends of the examined pH gradient.

  8. Biological Membranes in Extreme Conditions: Simulations of Anionic Archaeal Tetraether Lipid Membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Felipe Pineda De Castro

    Full Text Available In contrast to the majority of organisms that have cells bound by di-ester phospholipids, archaeal membranes consist of di- and tetraether phospholipids. Originating from organisms that withstand harsh conditions (e.g., low pH and a wide range of temperatures such membranes have physical properties that make them attractive materials for biological research and biotechnological applications. We developed force-field parameters based on the widely used Generalized Amber Force Field (GAFF to enable the study of anionic tetraether membranes of the model archaean Sulfolobus acidocaldarius by computer simulations. The simulations reveal that the physical properties of these unique membranes depend on the number of cyclopentane rings included in each lipid unit, and on the size of cations that are used to ensure charge neutrality. This suggests that the biophysical properties of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius cells depend not only on the compositions of their membranes but also on the media in which they grow.

  9. Biological Membranes in Extreme Conditions: Simulations of Anionic Archaeal Tetraether Lipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda De Castro, Luis Felipe; Dopson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the majority of organisms that have cells bound by di-ester phospholipids, archaeal membranes consist of di- and tetraether phospholipids. Originating from organisms that withstand harsh conditions (e.g., low pH and a wide range of temperatures) such membranes have physical properties that make them attractive materials for biological research and biotechnological applications. We developed force-field parameters based on the widely used Generalized Amber Force Field (GAFF) to enable the study of anionic tetraether membranes of the model archaean Sulfolobus acidocaldarius by computer simulations. The simulations reveal that the physical properties of these unique membranes depend on the number of cyclopentane rings included in each lipid unit, and on the size of cations that are used to ensure charge neutrality. This suggests that the biophysical properties of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius cells depend not only on the compositions of their membranes but also on the media in which they grow. PMID:27167213

  10. MED: a new non-supervised gene prediction algorithm for bacterial and archaeal genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yi-Fan

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite a remarkable success in the computational prediction of genes in Bacteria and Archaea, a lack of comprehensive understanding of prokaryotic gene structures prevents from further elucidation of differences among genomes. It continues to be interesting to develop new ab initio algorithms which not only accurately predict genes, but also facilitate comparative studies of prokaryotic genomes. Results This paper describes a new prokaryotic genefinding algorithm based on a comprehensive statistical model of protein coding Open Reading Frames (ORFs and Translation Initiation Sites (TISs. The former is based on a linguistic "Entropy Density Profile" (EDP model of coding DNA sequence and the latter comprises several relevant features related to the translation initiation. They are combined to form a so-called Multivariate Entropy Distance (MED algorithm, MED 2.0, that incorporates several strategies in the iterative program. The iterations enable us to develop a non-supervised learning process and to obtain a set of genome-specific parameters for the gene structure, before making the prediction of genes. Conclusion Results of extensive tests show that MED 2.0 achieves a competitive high performance in the gene prediction for both 5' and 3' end matches, compared to the current best prokaryotic gene finders. The advantage of the MED 2.0 is particularly evident for GC-rich genomes and archaeal genomes. Furthermore, the genome-specific parameters given by MED 2.0 match with the current understanding of prokaryotic genomes and may serve as tools for comparative genomic studies. In particular, MED 2.0 is shown to reveal divergent translation initiation mechanisms in archaeal genomes while making a more accurate prediction of TISs compared to the existing gene finders and the current GenBank annotation.

  11. Seasonality and resource availability control bacterial and archaeal communities in soils of a temperate beech forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasche, Frank; Knapp, Daniela; Kaiser, Christina; Koranda, Marianne; Kitzler, Barbara; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Richter, Andreas; Sessitsch, Angela

    2011-03-01

    It was hypothesized that seasonality and resource availability altered through tree girdling were major determinants of the phylogenetic composition of the archaeal and bacterial community in a temperate beech forest soil. During a 2-year field experiment, involving girdling of beech trees to intercept the transfer of easily available carbon (C) from the canopy to roots, members of the dominant phylogenetic microbial phyla residing in top soils under girdled versus untreated control trees were monitored at bimonthly intervals through 16S rRNA gene-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiling and quantitative PCR analysis. Effects on nitrifying and denitrifying groups were assessed by measuring the abundances of nirS and nosZ genes as well as bacterial and archaeal amoA genes. Seasonal dynamics displayed by key phylogenetic and nitrogen (N) cycling functional groups were found to be tightly coupled with seasonal alterations in labile C and N pools as well as with variation in soil temperature and soil moisture. In particular, archaea and acidobacteria were highly responsive to soil nutritional and soil climatic changes associated with seasonality, indicating their high metabolic versatility and capability to adapt to environmental changes. For these phyla, significant interrelations with soil chemical and microbial process data were found suggesting their potential, but poorly described contribution to nitrification or denitrification in temperate forest soils. In conclusion, our extensive approach allowed us to get novel insights into effects of seasonality and resource availability on the microbial community, in particular on hitherto poorly studied bacterial phyla and functional groups.

  12. Strategies for Supporting Orphans and Vulnerable Children: An Exploratory Study of an Exemplary Model of Care in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mears, Melynda; Singletary, Jon; Rogers, Rob

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the extent to which programs in a religiously affiliated agency in Kenya incorporate 12 internationally sanctioned strategies for supporting orphans and vulnerable children in Sub-Saharan Africa (Olson, Knight, & Foster, 2006). The results indicated that all 12 strategies were being employed, though to varying…

  13. Search campaign orphan sources conducted by Enresa; Campana de busqueda de fuentes huerfanas llevada a cabo por Enresa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaide Tranas, E.; Ortiz Ramis, T.; Orta Navarro, M. C.; Rueda Fresnedo, C.

    2011-07-01

    This paper sets out the requirements for the control of high activity sources and the possibility of a campaign to recover orphan sources. National authorities undertook this campaign to the National Company for Radioactive Waste (ENRESA) and grown for three years (2007-2009).

  14. Differential transcription of the orphan receptor RORbeta in nuclear extracts derived from Neuro2A and HeLa cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gawlas, K.; Stunnenberg, H.G.

    2001-01-01

    An important model system for studying the process leading to productive transcription is provided by the superfamily of nuclear receptors, which are for the most part ligand-controlled transcription factors. Over the past years several 'orphan' nuclear receptors have been isolated for which no liga

  15. Hubble Space Telescope Proper Motions of Individual Stars in Stellar Streams: Orphan, Sagittarius, Lethe, and the New "Parallel’ Stream"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Sangmo Tony; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Kallivayalil, Nitya; Majewski, Steven R.; Besla, Gurtina; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Law, David R.; Siegel, Michael H.; Anderson, Jay

    2016-12-01

    We present a multi-epoch Hubble Space Telescope (HST) study of stellar proper motions (PMs) for four fields along the Orphan Stream. We determine absolute PMs of several individual stars per target field using established techniques that utilize distant background galaxies to define a stationary reference frame. Five Orphan Stream stars are identified in one of the four fields based on combined color-magnitude and PM information. The average PM is consistent with the existing model of the Orphan Stream by Newberg et al. In addition to the Orphan Stream stars, we detect stars that likely belong to other stellar streams. To identify which stellar streams these stars belong to, we examine the 2d bulk motion of each group of stars on the sky by subtracting the PM contribution of the solar motion (which is a function of position on the sky and distance) from the observed PMs, and comparing the vector of net motion with the spatial extent of known stellar streams. By doing this, we identify candidate stars in the Sagittarius and Lethe streams, and a newly found stellar stream at a distance of ˜17 kpc, which we tentatively name the “Parallel Stream.” Together with our Sagittarius stream study, this work demonstrates that even in the Gaia era, HST will continue to be advantageous in measuring PMs of old stellar populations on a star-by-star basis, especially for distances beyond ˜10 kpc.

  16. Grief-Processing-Based Psychological Intervention for Children Orphaned by AIDS in Central China: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiuyun; Fang, Xiaoyi; Chi, Peilian; Li, Xiaoming; Chen, Wenrui; Heath, Melissa Allen

    2014-01-01

    A group of 124 children orphaned by AIDS (COA), who resided in two orphanages funded by the Chinese government, participated in a study investigating the efficacy of a grief-processing-based psychological group intervention. This psychological intervention program was designed to specifically help COA process their grief and reduce their…

  17. 78 FR 51732 - The Food and Drug Administration/European Medicines Agency Orphan Product Designation and Grant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration The Food and Drug Administration/European Medicines Agency Orphan Product Designation and Grant Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and...

  18. 77 FR 52744 - Food and Drug Administration/European Medicines Agency Orphan Product Designation and Grant Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/European Medicines Agency Orphan Product Designation and Grant Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of meeting. The Food and Drug Administration's...

  19. Hubble Space Telescope Proper Motions of Individual Stars in Stellar Streams: Orphan, Sagittarius, Lethe, and the New "Parallel" Stream

    CERN Document Server

    Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Kallivayalil, Nitya; Majewski, Steven R; Besla, Gurtina; Carlin, Jeffrey L; Law, David R; Siegel, Michael H; Anderson, Jay

    2016-01-01

    We present a multi-epoch Hubble Space Telescope (HST) study of stellar proper motions (PMs) for four fields along the Orphan Stream. We determine absolute PMs of several individual stars per target field using established techniques that utilize distant background galaxies to define a stationary reference frame. Five Orphan Stream stars are identified in one of the four fields based on combined color-magnitude and PM information. The average PM is consistent with the existing model of the Orphan stream by Newberg et al. In addition to the Orphan stream stars, we detect stars that likely belong to other stellar streams. To identify which stellar streams these stars belong to, we examine the 2-d bulk motion of each group of stars on the sky by subtracting the PM contribution of the solar motion (which is a function of position on the sky and distance) from the observed PMs, and comparing the vector of net motion with the spatial extent of known stellar streams. By doing this, we identify candidate stars in the ...

  20. Novel Agonist Bioisosteres and Common Structure-Activity Relationships for The Orphan G Protein-Coupled Receptor GPR139

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shehata, Mohamed A; Jensen, Anne Cathrine Nøhr; Lissa, Delphine;

    2016-01-01

    GPR139 is an orphan class A G protein-coupled receptor found mainly in the central nervous system. It has its highest expression levels in the hypothalamus and striatum, regions regulating metabolism and locomotion, respectively, and has therefore been suggested as a potential target for obesity...

  1. Rates of trauma spectrum disorders and risks of posttraumatic stress disorder in a sample of orphaned and widowed genocide survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Schaal

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available During the Rwandan genocide of 1994, nearly one million people were killed within a period of 3 months.The objectives of this study were to investigate the levels of trauma exposure and the rates of mental health disorders and to describe risk factors of posttraumatic stress reactions in Rwandan widows and orphans who had been exposed to the genocide.Trained local psychologists interviewed orphans (n=206 and widows (n=194. We used the PSS-I to assess posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, the Hopkins Symptom Checklist to assess depression and anxiety symptoms, and the M.I.N.I. to assess risk of suicidality.Subjects reported having been exposed to a high number of different types of traumatic events with a mean of 11 for both groups. Widows displayed more severe mental health problems than orphans: 41% of the widows (compared to 29% of the orphans met symptom criteria for PTSD and a substantial proportion of widows suffered from clinically significant depression (48% versus 34% and anxiety symptoms (59% versus 42% even 13 years after the genocide. Over one-third of respondents of both groups were classified as suicidal (38% versus 39%. Regression analysis indicated that PTSD severity was predicted mainly by cumulative exposure to traumatic stressors and by poor physical health status. In contrast, the importance given to religious/spiritual beliefs and economic variables did not correlate with symptoms of PTSD.While a significant portion of widows and orphans continues to display severe posttraumatic stress reactions, widows seem to constitute a particularly vulnerable survivor group. Our results point to the chronicity of mental health problems in this population and show that PTSD may endure over time if not addressed by clinical intervention. Possible implications of poor mental health and the need for psychological intervention are discussed.

  2. The paediatric rheumatologist and orphan disease - a story without happy ending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkiewicz, Justyna; Biernacka-Zielińska, Małgorzata; Smolewska, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    Orphan diseases are not a common challenge in the everyday practice of the rheumatologist. Despite their extremely rare occurrence one of the patients under our care developed one of them - neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, the most frequent neurodegenerative disease observed in the paediatric population. We report a case of 2-year-old girl diagnosed with oligoarticular form of juvenile idiopathic arthritis treated in our Department with steroids and methotrexate and staying in the stage of disease remission. During routine checkups at Outpatient Clinic we observed progressive deterioration of girls neurological condition resulting in ataxia, gait disturbances with no rheumatological cause behind and speech impairment. The appearance of the symptoms was accompanied by frequent episodes of epileptic seizures, with little clinical improvement on combined antiepileptic treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging that we performed showed a picture highly suggestive of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis - atrophy of the patients cerebrum and cerebellum. Genetic testing conducted resulted in the diagnosis of late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (LINCL).

  3. Essential Regulation of Lung Surfactant Homeostasis by the Orphan G Protein-Coupled Receptor GPR116

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Young Yang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available GPR116 is an orphan seven-pass transmembrane receptor whose function has been unclear. Global disruption of the Gpr116 gene in mice revealed an unexpected, critical role for this receptor in lung surfactant homeostasis, resulting in progressive accumulation of surfactant lipids and proteins in the alveolar space, labored breathing, and a reduced lifespan. GPR116 expression analysis, bone marrow transplantation studies, and characterization of conditional knockout mice revealed that GPR116 expression in ATII cells is required for maintaining normal surfactant levels. Aberrant packaging of surfactant proteins with lipids in the Gpr116 mutant mice resulted in compromised surfactant structure, function, uptake, and processing. Thus, GPR116 plays an indispensable role in lung surfactant homeostasis with important ramifications for the understanding and treatment of lung surfactant disorders.

  4. Cbln1 is a ligand for an orphan glutamate receptor delta2, a bidirectional synapse organizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Keiko; Miura, Eriko; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Kakegawa, Wataru; Emi, Kyoichi; Narumi, Sakae; Fukazawa, Yugo; Ito-Ishida, Aya; Kondo, Tetsuro; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2010-04-16

    Cbln1, secreted from cerebellar granule cells, and the orphan glutamate receptor delta2 (GluD2), expressed by Purkinje cells, are essential for synapse integrity between these neurons in adult mice. Nevertheless, no endogenous binding partners for these molecules have been identified. We found that Cbln1 binds directly to the N-terminal domain of GluD2. GluD2 expression by postsynaptic cells, combined with exogenously applied Cbln1, was necessary and sufficient to induce new synapses in vitro and in the adult cerebellum in vivo. Further, beads coated with recombinant Cbln1 directly induced presynaptic differentiation and indirectly caused clustering of postsynaptic molecules via GluD2. These results indicate that the Cbln1-GluD2 complex is a unique synapse organizer that acts bidirectionally on both pre- and postsynaptic components.

  5. X-ray Observations of Disrupted Recycled Pulsars: No Refuge for Orphaned Central Compact Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Gotthelf, E V; Allen, B; Knispel, B

    2013-01-01

    We present a Chandra X-ray survey of the disrupted recycled pulsars (DRPs), isolated radio pulsars with P > 20 ms and B_s 1E4 - 1E5 yr, roughly 10 times the ages of the approximately 10 known CCOs in a similar volume of the Galaxy. The order of a hundred CCO descendants that could be detected by this method are thus either intrinsically radio quiet, or occupy a different region of (P,B_s) parameter space from the DRPs. This motivates a new X-ray search for orphaned CCOs among radio pulsars with larger B-fields, which could verify the theory that their fields are buried by fall-back of supernova ejecta, but quickly regrow to join the normal pulsar population.

  6. FROM UNREAL TO POETIC: AZARIAS, AN ORPHAN CHILD ON THE WINGS OF THE NDLATI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth da Silva Mendonça

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The breadth of the concept of post-colonialism welcome some literary crit­icism made from the productions of Nations previously colonized by West­ern metropolises. Thinking in the formulations of Appiah (2007, on the plea that the post-colonial narratives earlier, in name of an ethical-human­ist universalism, we can observe the literature of Mia Couto, in the story “O dia em que explodiu Mabata-bata” from the book Vozes Anoitecidas, as a literary project that can unite the aesthetic and the politician. The entire southern Mozambican cultural tradition is presented to narrate the story of an orphaned child, abandoned by his relative and rescued by their own imagination, a brutal death.

  7. Development of novel silicon-containing inverse agonists of retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Hirozumi; Nakamura, Masaharu; Nakamura, Masahiko; Matsumoto, Yotaro; Nakagomi, Madoka; Hashimoto, Yuichi

    2014-03-15

    Retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-related orphan receptors (RORs) regulate a variety of physiological processes, including hepatic gluconeogenesis, lipid metabolism, circadian rhythm and immune function. The RAR agonist: all-trans retinoic acid was reported to be an RORβ inverse agonist, but no information is available regarding ROR activity of its synthetic analogue Am580. Therefore, we screened Am580 and some related tetramethyltetrahydronaphthalene derivatives and carried out structural development studies, including substitution of carbon atoms with silicon, with the aim of creating a potent ROR transcriptional inhibitor. The phenyl amide disila compound 22 showed the most potent ROR-inhibitory activity among the compounds examined. Its activity towards RORα, RORβ and RORγ was increased compared to that of Am580. The IC₅₀ values for RORα, RORβ and RORγ are 1.3, >10 and 4.5 μM, respectively.

  8. Identification and evolution of the orphan genes in the domestic silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Zhao, Xin-Wei; Zhang, Ze

    2015-09-14

    Orphan genes (OGs) which have no recognizable homology to any sequences in other species could contribute to the species specific adaptations. In this study, we identified 738 OGs in the silkworm genome. About 31% of the silkworm OGs is derived from transposable elements, and 5.1% of the silkworm OGs emerged from gene duplication followed by divergence of paralogs. Five de novo silkworm OGs originated from non-coding regions. Microarray data suggested that most of the silkworm OGs were expressed in limited tissues. RNA interference experiments suggested that five de novo OGs are not essential to the silkworm, implying that they may contribute to genetic redundancy or species-specific adaptation. Our results provide some new insights into the evolutionary significance of the silkworm OGs.

  9. Searching for a family of orphan sequences with SAMBA, a parallel hardware dedicated to biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerdoux-Jamet, P; Risler, J L

    1996-01-01

    A significant proportion of coding sequences or open reading frames discovered in the course of sequencing projects do not show any similarity with other sequences deposited with the protein databanks. In such cases the search for similarities must be performed with as many comparison algorithms as possible, so as to increase the chance of finding weak relationships. A specialised parallel hardware (SAMBA) implementing the Smith & Waterman algorithm has been developed at the 'Institut de Recherche en Informatique et Systèmes Aléatoìres' (IRISA). It makes it possible to scan protein databanks at a speed comparable with that of BLAST or FASTA. We report here a study performed with SAMBA on 814 orphan sequences from S cerevisiae and compare the results with those from BLAST and FASTA.

  10. Orphan G protein receptor GPR55 as an emerging target in cancer therapy and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyva-Illades D

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dinorah Leyva-Illades,1–3 Sharon DeMorrow1–3 1Digestive Disease Research Center, Scott and White Hospital, Temple, TX, USA; 2Department of Internal MedicineTexas A&M Health Science Center, Temple, TX, USA; 3Research Service, Central Texas Veterans Health Care System, Temple, TX, USA Abstract: G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs modulate a vast array of cellular processes. The current review gives an overview of the general characteristics of GPCRs and their role in physiological conditions. In addition, it describes the current knowledge of the physiological and pathophysiological functions of GPR55, an orphan GPCR, and how it can be exploited as a therapeutic target to combat various cancers. Keywords: GPR55, cancer, GPCR, endocannabinoids

  11. An orphan gene is necessary for preaxial digit formation during salamander limb development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anoop; Gates, Phillip B; Czarkwiani, Anna; Brockes, Jeremy P

    2015-10-26

    Limb development in salamanders differs from other tetrapods in that the first digits to form are the two most anterior (preaxial dominance). This has been proposed as a salamander novelty and its mechanistic basis is unknown. Salamanders are the only adult tetrapods able to regenerate the limb, and the contribution of preaxial dominance to limb regeneration is unclear. Here we show that during early outgrowth of the limb bud, a small cohort of cells express the orphan gene Prod1 together with Bmp2, a critical player in digit condensation in amniotes. Disruption of Prod1 with a gene-editing nuclease abrogates these cells, and blocks formation of the radius and ulna, and outgrowth of the anterior digits. Preaxial dominance is a notable feature of limb regeneration in the larval newt, but this changes abruptly after metamorphosis so that the formation of anterior and posterior digits occurs together within the autopodium resembling an amniote-like pattern.

  12. Psychological characteristics of adolescent orphans with no experience of socialization in the family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.I. Shulga

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We present the study results of psychological characteristics of adolescent orphans living outside the family and having a violation of socialization at the micro level. It was assumed that children experiencing total maternal deprivation from birth, have difficulties in adapting to life. It was revealed that in this group of adolescents the level of motivational tendencies is higher, reflecting a fear of rejection, and the level of suspicion. They are more than their peers convinced that other people are plotting something evil and can cause harm to demonstrate high degree of irritability, ready to show negative feelings at the slightest excitation (short temper, rudeness, stress, anger. These features are important to understand by specialists to create an educational system that allows to correct the negative aspects, prepare the child for substitute family, provide support and maintenance for a period of adaptation, to help prospective parents.

  13. QQS orphan gene regulates carbon and nitrogen partitioning across species via NF-YC interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Zheng, Wenguang; Zhu, Yanbing; Ye, Huaxun; Tang, Buyun; Arendsee, Zebulun W; Jones, Dallas; Li, Ruoran; Ortiz, Diego; Zhao, Xuefeng; Du, Chuanlong; Nettleton, Dan; Scott, M Paul; Salas-Fernandez, Maria G; Yin, Yanhai; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    2015-11-24

    The allocation of carbon and nitrogen resources to the synthesis of plant proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids is complex and under the control of many genes; much remains to be understood about this process. QQS (Qua-Quine Starch; At3g30720), an orphan gene unique to Arabidopsis thaliana, regulates metabolic processes affecting carbon and nitrogen partitioning among proteins and carbohydrates, modulating leaf and seed composition in Arabidopsis and soybean. Here the universality of QQS function in modulating carbon and nitrogen allocation is exemplified by a series of transgenic experiments. We show that ectopic expression of QQS increases soybean protein independent of the genetic background and original protein content of the cultivar. Furthermore, transgenic QQS expression increases the protein content of maize, a C4 species (a species that uses 4-carbon photosynthesis), and rice, a protein-poor agronomic crop, both highly divergent from Arabidopsis. We determine that QQS protein binds to the transcriptional regulator AtNF-YC4 (Arabidopsis nuclear factor Y, subunit C4). Overexpression of AtNF-YC4 in Arabidopsis mimics the QQS-overexpression phenotype, increasing protein and decreasing starch levels. NF-YC, a component of the NF-Y complex, is conserved across eukaryotes. The NF-YC4 homologs of soybean, rice, and maize also bind to QQS, which provides an explanation of how QQS can act in species where it does not occur endogenously. These findings are, to our knowledge, the first insight into the mechanism of action of QQS in modulating carbon and nitrogen allocation across species. They have major implications for the emergence and function of orphan genes, and identify a nontransgenic strategy for modulating protein levels in crop species, a trait of great agronomic significance.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of school support for orphan girls to prevent HIV infection in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ted; Hallfors, Denise; Cho, Hyunsan; Luseno, Winnie; Waehrer, Geetha

    2013-10-01

    This cost-effectiveness study analyzes the cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained in a randomized controlled trial that tested school support as a structural intervention to prevent HIV risk factors among Zimbabwe orphan girl adolescents. The intervention significantly reduced early marriage, increased years of schooling completed, and increased health-related quality of life. By reducing early marriage, the literature suggests the intervention reduced HIV infection. The intervention yielded an estimated US$1,472 in societal benefits and an estimated gain of 0.36 QALYs per orphan supported. It cost an estimated US$6/QALY gained, about 1 % of annual per capita income in Zimbabwe. That is well below the maximum price that the World Health Organization (WHO) Commission on Macroeconomics and Health recommends paying for health gains in low and middle income countries. About half the girls in the intervention condition were boarded when they reached high school. For non-boarders, the intervention's financial benefits exceeded its costs, yielding an estimated net cost savings of $502 per pupil. Without boarding, the intervention would yield net savings even if it were 34 % less effective in replication. Boarding was not cost-effective. It cost an additional $1,234 per girl boarded (over the 3 years of the study, discounted to present value at a 3 % discount rate) but had no effect on any of the outcome measures relative to girls in the treatment group who did not board. For girls who did not board, the average cost of approximately 3 years of school support was US$973.

  15. Community interventions providing care and support to orphans and vulnerable children: a review of evaluation evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Katie D

    2009-07-01

    Children affected by HIV in their families and communities face multiple risks to their health, education and psychosocial wellbeing. Community interventions for children who have been orphaned or rendered vulnerable take many forms, including educational assistance, home-based care, legal protection and psychosocial support. Despite a recent influx of funding for programme implementation, there exists little evidence to inform policymakers about whether their investments are improving the lives of vulnerable children and meeting key benchmarks including the Millennium Development Goals. This paper reviews the current evidence base on evaluations of community interventions for orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) in high HIV-prevalence African settings, focusing on studies' methodologies. Sources reviewed include published research studies and evidence from the unpublished programmatic "grey literature" located through database and internet searches. A total of 21 studies, varying in scope and generalisability, were identified. Interventions reviewed address children's wellbeing through various strategies within their communities. Evaluation methodologies reflect quantitative and qualitative approaches, including surveys (with and without baseline or comparison data), costing studies, focus groups, interviews, case studies, and participatory review techniques. Varied study methodologies reflect diverse research questions, various intervention types, and the challenges associated with evaluating complex interventions; highlighting the need to broaden the research paradigm in order to build the evidence base by including quasi-experimental and process evaluation approaches, and seeking further insights through participatory qualitative methodologies and costing studies. Although findings overall indicate the value of community interventions in effecting measurable improvements in child and family wellbeing, the quality and rigour of evidence is varied. A strategic

  16. Do ultra-orphan medicinal products warrant ultra-high prices? A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Picavet E

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Eline Picavet,1 David Cassiman,2 Steven Simoens1 1Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; 2Department of Hepatology, University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium Abstract: Ultra-orphan medicinal products (ultra-OMPs are intended for the treatment, prevention, or diagnosis of ultra-rare diseases, ie, life-threatening or chronically debilitating diseases that affect less than one per 50,000 individuals. Recently, high prices for ultra-OMPs have given rise to debate on the sustainability and justification of these prices. The aim of this article is to review the international scientific literature on the pricing of ultra-OMPs and to provide an overview of the current knowledge on the drivers of ultra-OMP pricing. The pricing process of ultra-OMPs is a complex and nontransparent issue. Evidence in the literature seems to indicate that ultra-OMPs are priced according to rarity and what the manufacturer believes the market will bear. Additionally, there appears to be a trend between the price of an ultra-OMP and the number of available alternatives. Patients, third-party payers, and pharmaceutical companies could benefit from more transparent pricing strategies. With a view to containing health care costs, it is likely that cost-sharing strategies, such as performance-based risk sharing arrangements, will become increasingly more important. However, it is vital that any measures for price control are consistent with the intended goals of the incentives to promote the development of new OMPs. Ideally, a balance must be struck between attaining affordable prices for ultra-OMPs and securing a realistic return on investment for the pharmaceutical industry. Keywords: ultra-orphan medicinal product, ultra-rare disease, pricing

  17. Orphan receptor GPR15/BOB is up-regulated in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Alison; Schmutz, Caroline; Askari, Ayman; Kuiper, Jan-Herman; Middleton, Jim

    2014-06-01

    Chemokine receptors on leukocytes mediate the recruitment and accumulation of these cells within affected joints in chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Identification of involved receptors offers potential for development of therapeutic interventions. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of orphan receptor GPR15/BOB in the synovium of RA and non-RA patients and in peripheral blood of RA patients and healthy donors. GPR15/BOB protein and messenger RNA expression were examined in RA and non-RA synovium by immunofluorescence and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) respectively. GPR15/BOB expression on peripheral blood leukocytes was analysed by flow cytometry and GPR15/BOB messenger RNA was examined in peripheral blood monocytes by RT-PCR. GPR15/BOB protein was observed in CD68+ and CD14+ macrophages in synovia, with greater expression in RA synovia. GPR15/BOB protein was expressed in all patient synovia whereas in non-RA synovia expression was low or absent. Similarly GPR15/BOB messenger RNA was detected in all RA and a minority of non-RA synovia. GPR15/BOB protein was expressed on peripheral blood leukocytes from RA and healthy individuals with increased expression by monocytes and neutrophils in RA. GPR15/BOB messenger RNA expression was confirmed in peripheral blood monocytes. In conclusion GPR15/BOB is expressed by macrophages in synovial tissue and on monocytes and neutrophils in peripheral blood, and expression is up-regulated in RA patients compared to non-RA controls. This orphan receptor on monocytes/macrophages and neutrophils may play a role in RA pathophysiology.

  18. Domain structures and inter-domain interactions defining the holoenzyme architecture of archaeal d-family DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Ikuo; Matsui, Eriko; Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Yokoyama, Hideshi

    2013-07-05

    Archaea-specific D-family DNA polymerase (PolD) forms a dimeric heterodimer consisting of two large polymerase subunits and two small exonuclease subunits. According to the protein-protein interactions identified among the domains of large and small subunits of PolD, a symmetrical model for the domain topology of the PolD holoenzyme is proposed. The experimental evidence supports various aspects of the model. The conserved amphipathic nature of the N-terminal putative α-helix of the large subunit plays a key role in the homodimeric assembly and the self-cyclization of the large subunit and is deeply involved in the archaeal PolD stability and activity. We also discuss the evolutional transformation from archaeal D-family to eukaryotic B-family polymerase on the basis of the structural information.

  19. Domain Structures and Inter-Domain Interactions Defining the Holoenzyme Architecture of Archaeal D-Family DNA Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideshi Yokoyama

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Archaea-specific D-family DNA polymerase (PolD forms a dimeric heterodimer consisting of two large polymerase subunits and two small exonuclease subunits. According to the protein-protein interactions identified among the domains of large and small subunits of PolD, a symmetrical model for the domain topology of the PolD holoenzyme is proposed. The experimental evidence supports various aspects of the model. The conserved amphipathic nature of the N-terminal putative α-helix of the large subunit plays a key role in the homodimeric assembly and the self-cyclization of the large subunit and is deeply involved in the archaeal PolD stability and activity. We also discuss the evolutional transformation from archaeal D-family to eukaryotic B-family polymerase on the basis of the structural information.

  20. Fecal pollution source tracking in waters intended for human supply based on archaeal and bacterial genetic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Kayo; Barreto, Camila; Oliveira, Samara Sant'Anna; Pinto, Leonardo Henriques; Albano, Rodolpho Mattos; Miranda, Catia Chaia; Clementino, Maysa Mandetta

    2015-12-01

    The determination of fecal pollution sources in aquatic ecosystems is essential to estimate associated health risks. In this study, we evaluate eight microbial source tracking (MST) markers including host-specific Bacteroidales and Methanobrevibacter spp. for discrimination between human, bovine, equine, and swine fecal contamination in waters intended for human supply. Overall, the novel host-specific archaeal and bacterial primers proposed in this study demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity. Markers for the Archaea domain were more prevalent in the fecal and water samples studied. We conclude that the investigations regarding the sources of fecal pollution in public water supplies can contribute to improve the quality of human health. To our knowledge, this is the first analysis using both archaeal and bacterial fecal MST markers on tropical water bodies of Rio de Janeiro city, Brazil.

  1. Crystal structure of the S. solfataricus archaeal exosome reveals conformational flexibility in the RNA-binding ring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changrui Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The exosome complex is an essential RNA 3'-end processing and degradation machinery. In archaeal organisms, the exosome consists of a catalytic ring and an RNA-binding ring, both of which were previously reported to assume three-fold symmetry. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report an asymmetric 2.9 A Sulfolobus solfataricus archaeal exosome structure in which the three-fold symmetry is broken due to combined rigid body and thermal motions mainly within the RNA-binding ring. Since increased conformational flexibility was also observed in the RNA-binding ring of the related bacterial PNPase, we speculate that this may reflect an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to accommodate diverse RNA substrates for degradation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study clearly shows the dynamic structures within the RNA-binding domains, which provides additional insights on mechanism of asymmetric RNA binding and processing.

  2. Archaeal phylogeny: reexamination of the phylogenetic position of Archaeoglobus fulgidus in light of certain composition-induced artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woese, C. R.; Achenbach, L.; Rouviere, P.; Mandelco, L.

    1991-01-01

    A major and too little recognized source of artifact in phylogenetic analysis of molecular sequence data is compositional difference among sequences. The problem becomes particularly acute when alignments contain ribosomal RNAs from both mesophilic and thermophilic species. Among prokaryotes the latter are considerably higher in G + C content than the former, which often results in artificial clustering of thermophilic lineages and their being placed artificially deep in phylogenetic trees. In this communication we review archaeal phylogeny in the light of this consideration, focusing in particular on the phylogenetic position of the sulfate reducing species Archaeoglobus fulgidus, using both 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA sequences. The analysis shows clearly that the previously reported deep branching of the A. fulgidus lineage (very near the base of the euryarchaeal side of the archaeal tree) is incorrect, and that the lineage actually groups with a previously recognized unit that comprises the Methanomicrobiales and extreme halophiles.

  3. Structural diversity of archaeal ether lipid and phylogenetic relationship; Ko saikin eteru shishitsu no tayosei to keito kankei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Y. [Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu (Japan)

    1997-05-20

    Existence of ether lipids is not limited in archaea, however, ether lipids are characteristic market of archaea. Archaeal ether lipids have diverse structures and unusual features not found in other organisms. Archaeal lipids have saturated isoprenoid hydrocarbon chain ether-linked to glycerol. Tetraether type lipids with two polar groups on two sides of hydrocarbon chains are found in archaea widely. Core lipids of non-methanogenic thermophilic archaea are mainly tetraether type lipids containing inositol as a phosphate-containing polar head group. Lipids of extreme halophilic archaea are composed of diether type and glycerophosphate as polar head groups. The feature of methanogenic archaeral lipids is nitrogen-containing polar head groups. Distribution of lipid constituents is used as a chemotaxonomic marker of extreme halophiles and methanogens. The most fundamental phenotypic difference between archaea and Eubacteria is enantiomeric difference at C-2 position of glycerophosphate backbone, that is archaea have G-1-P configuration. 31 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Responses of bacterial and archaeal communities to nitrate stimulation after oil pollution in mangrove sediment revealed by Illumina sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Xu; Zheng, Tian-Ling

    2016-08-15

    This study aimed to investigate microbial responses to nitrate stimulation in oiled mangrove mesocosm. Both supplementary oil and nitrate changed the water and sediment chemical properties contributing to the shift of microbial communities. Denitrifying genes nirS and nirK were increased several times by the interaction of oil spiking and nitrate addition. Bacterial chao1 was reduced by oil spiking and further by nitrate stimulation, whereas archaeal chao1 was only inhibited by oil pollution on early time. Sampling depth explained most of variation and significantly impacted bacterial and archaeal communities, while oil pollution only significantly impacted bacterial communities (pmangrove. The findings demonstrate the impacts of environmental factors and their interactions in shaping microbial communities during nitrate stimulation. Our study suggests introducing genera Desulfotignum and Marinobacter into oiled mangrove for bioaugmentation.

  5. Bacterial and Archaeal Communities Variability Associated with Upwelling and Anthropogenic Pressures in the Protection Area of Arraial do Cabo (Cabo Frio region - RJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SERGIO A. COELHO-SOUZA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTUpwelling systems contain a high diversity of pelagic microorganisms and their composition and activity are defined by factors like temperature and nutrient concentration. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE technique was used to verify the spatial and temporal genetic variability of Bacteria and Archaea in two stations of the Arraial do Cabo coastal region, one under upwelling pressure and another under anthropogenic pressure. In addition, biotic and abiotic variables were measured in surface and deep waters from three other stations between these stations. Six samplings were done during a year and adequately represented the degrees of upwelling and anthropogenic pressures to the system. Principal Component Analysis (PCA showed negative correlations between the concentrations of ammonia and phosphorous with prokaryotic secondary production and the total heterotrophic bacteria. PCA also showed negative correlation between temperature and the abundance of prokaryotic cells. Bacterial and archaeal compositions were changeable as were the oceanographic conditions, and upwelling had a regional pressure while anthropogenic pressure was punctual. We suggest that the measurement of prokaryotic secondary production was associated with both Bacteria and Archaea activities, and that substrate availability and temperature determine nutrients cycling.

  6. Widespread distribution of archaeal reverse gyrase in thermophilic bacteria suggests a complex history of vertical inheritance and lateral gene transfers

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    Céline Brochier-Armanet

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse gyrase, an enzyme of uncertain funtion, is present in all hyperthermophilic archaea and bacteria. Previous phylogenetic studies have suggested that the gene for reverse gyrase has an archaeal origin and was transferred laterally (LGT to the ancestors of the two bacterial hyperthermophilic phyla, Thermotogales and Aquificales. Here, we performed an in-depth analysis of the evolutionary history of reverse gyrase in light of genomic progress. We found genes coding for reverse gyrase in the genomes of several thermophilic bacteria that belong to phyla other than Aquificales and Thermotogales. Several of these bacteria are not, strictly speaking, hyperthermophiles because their reported optimal growth temperatures are below 80 °C. Furthermore, we detected a reverse gyrase gene in the sequence of the large plasmid of Thermus thermophilus strain HB8, suggesting a possible mechanism of transfer to the T. thermophilus strain HB8 involving plasmids and transposases. The archaeal part of the reverse gyrase tree is congruent with recent phylogenies of the archaeal domain based on ribosomal proteins or RNA polymerase subunits. Although poorly resolved, the complete reverse gyrase phylogeny suggests an ancient acquisition of the gene by bacteria via one or two LGT events, followed by its secondary distribution by LGT within bacteria. Finally, several genes of archaeal origin located in proximity to the reverse gyrase gene in bacterial genomes have bacterial homologues mostly in thermophiles or hyperthermophiles, raising the possibility that they were co-transferred with the reverse gyrase gene. Our new analysis of the reverse gyrase history strengthens the hypothesis that the acquisition of reverse gyrase may have been a crucial evolutionary step in the adaptation of bacteria to high-temperature environments. However, it also questions the role of this enzyme in thermophilic bacteria and the selective advantage its presence could provide.

  7. Quantitative and phylogenetic study of the Deep Sea Archaeal Group in sediments of the arctic mid-ocean spreading ridge

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    Steffen Leth eJørgensen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In marine sediments archaea often constitute a considerable part of the microbial community, of which the Deep Sea Archaeal Group (DSAG is one of the most predominant. Despite their high abundance no members from this archaeal group have so far been characterized and thus their metabolism is unknown. Here we show that the relative abundance of DSAG marker genes can be correlated with geochemical parameters, allowing prediction of both the potential electron donors and acceptors of these organisms. We estimated the abundance of 16S rRNA genes from Archaea, Bacteria and DSAG in 52 sediment horizons from two cores collected at the slow-spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge, using qPCR. The results indicate that members of the DSAG make up the entire archaeal population in certain horizons and constitute up to ~ 50% of the total microbial community. The quantitative data were correlated to 30 different geophysical and geochemical parameters obtained from the same sediment horizons. We observed a significant correlation between the relative abundance of DSAG 16S rRNA genes and the content of organic carbon (p < 0.0001. Further, significant co-variation with iron oxide, and dissolved iron and manganese (all p < 0.0000, indicated a direct or indirect link to iron and manganese cycling. Neither of these parameters correlated with the relative abundance of archaeal or bacterial 16S rRNA genes, nor did any other major electron donor or acceptor measured. Phylogenetic analysis of DSAG 16S rRNA gene sequences reveals three monophyletic lineages with no apparent habitat-specific distribution. In this study we support the hypothesis that members of the DSAG are tightly linked to the content of organic carbon and directly or indirectly involved in the cycling of iron and/or manganese compounds. Further, we provide a molecular tool to assess their abundance in environmental samples and enrichment cultures.

  8. Revealing the essentiality of multiple archaeal pcna genes using a mutant propagation assay based on an improved knockout method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Changyi; Guo, Li; Deng, Ling;

    2010-01-01

    Organisms belonging to the Crenarchaeota lineage contain three PCNA subunits (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) while those in Euryarchaeota have only one as for Eukarya. To study the mechanism of archaeal sliding clamps, we sought to generate knockouts for each pcna gene in Sulfolobus islandic...... genes are absolutely required for host cell viability. Because the only prerequisite for this assay is to generate a MID transformant, this approach can be applied generally to any microorganisms proficient in homologous recombination....

  9. Simultaneous amplicon sequencing to explore co-occurrence patterns of bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic microorganisms in rumen microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittelmann, Sandra; Seedorf, Henning; Walters, William A; Clemente, Jose C; Knight, Rob; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Janssen, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    Ruminants rely on a complex rumen microbial community to convert dietary plant material to energy-yielding products. Here we developed a method to simultaneously analyze the community's bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes, ciliate 18S rRNA genes and anaerobic fungal internal transcribed spacer 1 genes using 12 DNA samples derived from 11 different rumen samples from three host species (Ovis aries, Bos taurus, Cervus elephas) and multiplex 454 Titanium pyrosequencing. We show that the mixing ratio of the group-specific DNA templates before emulsion PCR is crucial to compensate for differences in amplicon length. This method, in contrast to using a non-specific universal primer pair, avoids sequencing non-targeted DNA, such as plant- or endophyte-derived rRNA genes, and allows increased or decreased levels of community structure resolution for each microbial group as needed. Communities analyzed with different primers always grouped by sample origin rather than by the primers used. However, primer choice had a greater impact on apparent archaeal community structure than on bacterial community structure, and biases for certain methanogen groups were detected. Co-occurrence analysis of microbial taxa from all three domains of life suggested strong within- and between-domain correlations between different groups of microorganisms within the rumen. The approach used to simultaneously characterize bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic components of a microbiota should be applicable to other communities occupying diverse habitats.

  10. Phylogenetic and Functional Analysis of Metagenome Sequence from High-Temperature Archaeal Habitats Demonstrate Linkages between Metabolic Potential and Geochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inskeep, William P; Jay, Zackary J; Herrgard, Markus J; Kozubal, Mark A; Rusch, Douglas B; Tringe, Susannah G; Macur, Richard E; Jennings, Ryan deM; Boyd, Eric S; Spear, John R; Roberto, Francisco F

    2013-01-01

    Geothermal habitats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an unparalleled opportunity to understand the environmental factors that control the distribution of archaea in thermal habitats. Here we describe, analyze, and synthesize metagenomic and geochemical data collected from seven high-temperature sites that contain microbial communities dominated by archaea relative to bacteria. The specific objectives of the study were to use metagenome sequencing to determine the structure and functional capacity of thermophilic archaeal-dominated microbial communities across a pH range from 2.5 to 6.4 and to discuss specific examples where the metabolic potential correlated with measured environmental parameters and geochemical processes occurring in situ. Random shotgun metagenome sequence (∼40-45 Mb Sanger sequencing per site) was obtained from environmental DNA extracted from high-temperature sediments and/or microbial mats and subjected to numerous phylogenetic and functional analyses. Analysis of individual sequences (e.g., MEGAN and G + C content) and assemblies from each habitat type revealed the presence of dominant archaeal populations in all environments, 10 of whose genomes were largely reconstructed from the sequence data. Analysis of protein family occurrence, particularly of those involved in energy conservation, electron transport, and autotrophic metabolism, revealed significant differences in metabolic strategies across sites consistent with differences in major geochemical attributes (e.g., sulfide, oxygen, pH). These observations provide an ecological basis for understanding the distribution of indigenous archaeal lineages across high-temperature systems of YNP.

  11. Biosynthesis of ribose-5-phosphate and erythrose-4-phosphate in archaea: a phylogenetic analysis of archaeal genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Soderberg

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A phylogenetic analysis of the genes encoding enzymes in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP, the ribulose monophosphate (RuMP pathway, and the chorismate pathway of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, employing data from 13 complete archaeal genomes, provides a potential explanation for the enigmatic phylogenetic patterns of the PPP genes in archaea. Genomic and biochemical evidence suggests that three archaeal species (Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Thermoplasma acidophilum and Thermoplasma volcanium produce ribose-5-phosphate via the nonoxidative PPP (NOPPP, whereas nine species apparently lack an NOPPP but may employ a reverse RuMP pathway for pentose synthesis. One species (Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 lacks both the NOPPP and the RuMP pathway but may possess a modified oxidative PPP (OPPP, the details of which are not yet known. The presence of transketolase in several archaeal species that are missing the other two NOPPP genes can be explained by the existence of differing requirements for erythrose-4-phosphate (E4P among archaea: six species use transketolase to make E4P as a precursor to aromatic amino acids, six species apparently have an alternate biosynthetic pathway and may not require the ability to make E4P, and one species (Pyrococcus horikoshii probably does not synthesize aromatic amino acids at all.

  12. Recognition of extremophilic archaeal viruses by eukaryotic cells: a promising nanoplatform from the third domain of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uldahl, Kristine Buch; Wu, Linping; Hall, Arnaldur; Papathanasiou, Pavlos; Peng, Xu; Moghimi, Seyed Moein

    2016-11-28

    Viruses from the third domain of life, Archaea, exhibit unusual features including extreme stability that allow their survival in harsh environments. In addition, these species have never been reported to integrate into human or any other eukaryotic genomes, and could thus serve for exploration of novel medical nanoplatforms. Here, we selected two archaeal viruses Sulfolobus monocaudavirus 1 (SMV1) and Sulfolobus spindle shaped virus 2 (SSV2) owing to their unique spindle shape, hyperthermostable and acid-resistant nature and studied their interaction with mammalian cells. Accordingly, we followed viral uptake, intracellular trafficking and cell viability in human endothelial cells of brain (hCMEC/D3 cells) and umbilical vein (HUVEC) origin. Whereas SMV1 is efficiently internalized into both types of human cells, SSV2 differentiates between HUVECs and hCMEC/D3 cells, thus opening a path for selective cell targeting. On internalization, both viruses localize to the lysosomal compartments. Neither SMV1, nor SSV2 induced any detrimental effect on cell morphology, plasma membrane and mitochondrial functionality. This is the first study demonstrating recognition of archaeal viruses by eukaryotic cells which provides good basis for future exploration of archaeal viruses in bioengineering and development of multifunctional vectors.

  13. Phylogenetic and functional analysis of metagenome sequence from high-temperature archaeal habitats demonstrate linkages between metabolic potential and geochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P. Inskeep

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal habitats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP provide an unparalled opportunity to understand the environmental factors that control the distribution of archaea in thermal habitats. Here we describe, analyze and synthesize metagenomic and geochemical data collected from seven high-temperature sites that contain microbial communities dominated by archaea relative to bacteria. The specific objectives of the study were to use metagenome sequencing to determine the structure and functional capacity of thermophilic archaeal-dominated microbial communities across a pH range from 2.5 to 6.4 and to discuss specific examples where the metabolic potential correlated with measured environmental parameters and geochemical processes occurring in situ. Random shotgun metagenome sequence (~40-45 Mbase Sanger sequencing per site was obtained from environmental DNA extracted from high-temperature sediments and/or microbial mats and subjected to numerous phylogenetic and functional analyses. Analysis of individual sequences (e.g., MEGAN and G+C content and assemblies from each habitat type revealed the presence of dominant archaeal populations in all environments, 10 of whose genomes were largely reconstructed from the sequence data. Analysis of protein family occurrence, particularly of those involved in energy conservation, electron transport and autotrophic metabolism, revealed significant differences in metabolic strategies across sites consistent with differences in major geochemical attributes (e.g., sulfide, oxygen, pH. These observations provide an ecological basis for understanding the distribution of indigenous archaeal lineages across high temperature systems of YNP.

  14. Archaeal diversity and abundance within different layers of summer sea-ice and seawater from Prydz Bay, Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jifei; DU Zongjun; LUO Wei; YU Yong; ZENG Yixin; CHEN Bo; LI Huirong

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) and 16S rRNA gene clone library analyses were used to determine the abundance and diversity of archaea in Prydz Bay, Antarctica. Correlation analysis was also performed to assess links between physicochemical parameters and archaeal abundance and diversity within the sea-ice. Samples of sea-ice and seawater were collected during the 26th Chinese National Antarctic Research Expedition. The results of FISH showed that archaea were relatively abundant within the top layer of the sea-ice, and correlation analysis suggested that the concentration of 4NH+ might be one of the main factors underlying this distribution pattern. However, using 16S rRNA gene libraries, archaea were not detected in the top and middle layers of the sea-ice. All archaeal clones obtained from the bottom layer of the sea-ice were grouped into the Marine Group I Crenarchaeota while the archaeal clones from seawater were assigned to Marine Group I Crenarchaeota, Marine Group II Euryarchaeota, and Marine Group III Euryarchaeota. Overall, the ifndings of this study showed that the diversity of archaea in the sea-ice in Prydz Bay was low.

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of the archaeal community in an alkaline-saline soil of the former lake Texcoco (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Neria-González, Isabel; Alcántara-Hernández, Rocio J; Enríquez-Aragón, J Arturo; Estrada-Alvarado, Isabel; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Dendooven, Luc; Marsch, Rodolfo

    2008-03-01

    The soil of the former lake Texcoco is an extreme environment localized in the valley of Mexico City, Mexico. It is highly saline and alkaline, where Na+, Cl(-), HCO3(-) and CO3(2-) are the predominant ions, with a pH ranging from 9.8 to 11.7 and electrolytic conductivities in saturation extracts from 22 to 150 dS m(-1). Metagenomic DNA from the archaeal community was extracted directly from soil and used as template to amplify 16S ribosomal gene by PCR. PCR products were used to construct gene libraries. The ribosomal library showed that the archaeal diversity included Natronococcus sp., Natronolimnobius sp., Natronobacterium sp., Natrinema sp., Natronomonas sp., Halovivax sp., "Halalkalicoccus jeotgali" and novel clades within the family of Halobacteriaceae. Four clones could not be classified. It was found that the archaeal diversity in an alkaline-saline soil of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, was low, but showed yet uncharacterized and unclassified species.

  16. Monitoring bacterial and archaeal community shifts in a mesophilic anaerobic batch reactor treating a high-strength organic wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changsoo; Kim, Jaai; Shin, Seung Gu; Hwang, Seokhwan

    2008-09-01

    Shifts in bacterial and archaeal communities, associated with changes in chemical profiles, were investigated in an anaerobic batch reactor treating dairy-processing wastewater prepared with whey permeate powder. The dynamics of bacterial and archaeal populations were monitored by quantitative real-time PCR and showed good agreement with the process data. A rapid increase in bacterial populations and a high rate of substrate fermentation were observed during the initial period. Growth and regrowth of archaeal populations occurred with biphasic production of methane, corresponding to the diauxic consumption of acetate and propionate. Bacterial community structure was examined by denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) targeting 16S rRNA genes. An Aeromonas-like organism was suggested to be mainly responsible for the rapid fermentation of carbohydrate during the initial period. Several band sequences closely related to the Clostridium species, capable of carbohydrate fermentation, lactate or ethanol fermentation, and/or homoacetogenesis, were also detected. Statistical analyses of the DGGE profiles showed that the bacterial community structure, as well as the process performance, varied with the incubation time. Our results demonstrated that the bacterial community shifted, reflecting the performance changes and, particularly, that a significant community shift corresponded to a considerable process event. This suggested that the diagnosis of an anaerobic digestion process could be possible by monitoring bacterial community shifts.

  17. The role of globalization in drug development and access to orphan drugs: orphan drug legislation in the US/EU and in Latin America [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3ix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renée J.G. Arnold

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Compared to a decade ago, nearly three times as many drugs for rare diseases are slated for development. This article addresses the market access issues associated with orphan drug status in Europe and the United States in contrast to the legislation in five Latin American (LA countries that have made strides in this regard--Mexico, Brazil, Colombia, Chile and Argentina. Based on the success of orphan drug legislation in the EU and US, LA countries should strive to adopt similar strategies with regard to rare diseases and drug development. With the implementation of new targeted regulations, reimbursement strategies, and drug approvals, accessibility to treatment will be improved for people afflicted with rare diseases in these developing countries.

  18. Structure of the archaeal pab87 peptidase reveals a novel self-compartmentalizing protease family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Delfosse

    Full Text Available Self-compartmentalizing proteases orchestrate protein turnover through an original architecture characterized by a central catalytic chamber. Here we report the first structure of an archaeal member of a new self-compartmentalizing protease family forming a cubic-shaped octamer with D(4 symmetry and referred to as CubicO. We solved the structure of the Pyrococcus abyssi Pab87 protein at 2.2 A resolution using the anomalous signal of the high-phasing-power lanthanide derivative Lu-HPDO3A. A 20 A wide channel runs through this supramolecular assembly of 0.4 MDa, giving access to a 60 A wide central chamber holding the eight active sites. Surprisingly, activity assays revealed that Pab87 degrades specifically d-amino acid containing peptides, which have never been observed in archaea. Genomic context of the Pab87 gene showed that it is surrounded by genes involved in the amino acid/peptide transport or metabolism. We propose that CubicO proteases are involved in the processing of d-peptides from environmental origins.

  19. Microbial Diversity Analysis of the Bacterial and Archaeal Population in Present Day Stromatolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Maya C.

    2011-01-01

    Stromatolites are layered sedimentary structures resulting from microbial mat communities that remove carbon dioxide from their environment and biomineralize it as calcium carbonate. Although prevalent in the fossil record, stromatolites are rare in the modem world and are only found in a few locations including Highbome Cay in the Bahamas. The stromatolites found at this shallow marine site are analogs to ancient microbial mat ecosystems abundant in the Precambrian period on ancient Earth. To understand how stromatolites form and develop, it is important to identify what microorganisms are present in these mats, and how these microbes contribute to geological structure. These results will provide insight into the molecular and geochemical processes of microbial communities that prevailed on ancient Earth. Since stromatolites are formed by lithifying microbial mats that are able to mineralize calcium carbonate, understanding the biological mechanisms involved may lead to the development of carbon sequestration technologies that will be applicable in human spaceflight, as well as improve our understanding of global climate and its sustainability. The objective of my project was to analyze the archaeal and bacterial dIversity in stromatolites from Highborn Cay in the Bahamas. The first step in studying the molecular processes that the microorganisms carry out is to ascertain the microbial complexity within the mats, which includes identifying and estimating the numbers of different microbes that comprise these mats.

  20. Complete architecture of the archaeal RNA polymerase open complex from single-molecule FRET and NPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Julia; Grohmann, Dina; Cheung, Alan C. M.; Schulz, Sarah; Smollett, Katherine; Werner, Finn; Michaelis, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The molecular architecture of RNAP II-like transcription initiation complexes remains opaque due to its conformational flexibility and size. Here we report the three-dimensional architecture of the complete open complex (OC) composed of the promoter DNA, TATA box-binding protein (TBP), transcription factor B (TFB), transcription factor E (TFE) and the 12-subunit RNA polymerase (RNAP) from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. By combining single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer and the Bayesian parameter estimation-based Nano-Positioning System analysis, we model the entire archaeal OC, which elucidates the path of the non-template DNA (ntDNA) strand and interaction sites of the transcription factors with the RNAP. Compared with models of the eukaryotic OC, the TATA DNA region with TBP and TFB is positioned closer to the surface of the RNAP, likely providing the mechanism by which DNA melting can occur in a minimal factor configuration, without the dedicated translocase/helicase encoding factor TFIIH.

  1. Comparative metagenomic and rRNA microbial diversity characterization using archaeal and bacterial synthetic communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakya, Migun; Quince, Christopher; Campbell, James H; Yang, Zamin K; Schadt, Christopher W; Podar, Mircea

    2013-06-01

    Next-generation sequencing has dramatically changed the landscape of microbial ecology, large-scale and in-depth diversity studies being now widely accessible. However, determining the accuracy of taxonomic and quantitative inferences and comparing results obtained with different approaches are complicated by incongruence of experimental and computational data types and also by lack of knowledge of the true ecological diversity. Here we used highly diverse bacterial and archaeal synthetic communities assembled from pure genomic DNAs to compare inferences from metagenomic and SSU rRNA amplicon sequencing. Both Illumina and 454 metagenomic data outperformed amplicon sequencing in quantifying the community composition, but the outcome was dependent on analysis parameters and platform. New approaches in processing and classifying amplicons can reconstruct the taxonomic composition of the community with high reproducibility within primer sets, but all tested primers sets lead to significant taxon-specific biases. Controlled synthetic communities assembled to broadly mimic the phylogenetic richness in target environments can provide important validation for fine-tuning experimental and computational parameters used to characterize natural communities.

  2. Plant nitrogen-use strategy as a driver of rhizosphere archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidiser abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thion, Cécile E; Poirel, Jessica D; Cornulier, Thomas; De Vries, Franciska T; Bardgett, Richard D; Prosser, James I

    2016-07-01

    The influence of plants on archaeal (AOA) and bacterial (AOB) ammonia oxidisers (AO) is poorly understood. Higher microbial activity in the rhizosphere, including organic nitrogen (N) mineralisation, may stimulate both groups, while ammonia uptake by plants may favour AOA, considered to prefer lower ammonia concentration. We therefore hypothesised (i) higher AOA and AOB abundances in the rhizosphere than bulk soil and (ii) that AOA are favoured over AOB in the rhizosphere of plants with an exploitative strategy and high N demand, especially (iii) during early growth, when plant N uptake is higher. These hypotheses were tested by growing 20 grassland plants, covering a spectrum of resource-use strategies, and determining AOA and AOB amoA gene abundances, rhizosphere and bulk soil characteristics and plant functional traits. Joint Bayesian mixed models indicated no increase in AO in the rhizosphere, but revealed that AOA were more abundant in the rhizosphere of exploitative plants, mostly grasses, and less abundant under conservative plants. In contrast, AOB abundance in the rhizosphere and bulk soil depended on pH, rather than plant traits. These findings provide a mechanistic basis for plant-ammonia oxidiser interactions and for links between plant functional traits and ammonia oxidiser ecology.

  3. An archaeal immune system can detect multiple protospacer adjacent motifs (PAMs) to target invader DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Susan; Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Stoll, Britta; Brendel, Jutta; Fischer, Eike; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Dyall-Smith, Mike; Marchfelder, Anita

    2012-09-28

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system provides adaptive and heritable immunity against foreign genetic elements in most archaea and many bacteria. Although this system is widespread and diverse with many subtypes, only a few species have been investigated to elucidate the precise mechanisms for the defense of viruses or plasmids. Approximately 90% of all sequenced archaea encode CRISPR/Cas systems, but their molecular details have so far only been examined in three archaeal species: Sulfolobus solfataricus, Sulfolobus islandicus, and Pyrococcus furiosus. Here, we analyzed the CRISPR/Cas system of Haloferax volcanii using a plasmid-based invader assay. Haloferax encodes a type I-B CRISPR/Cas system with eight Cas proteins and three CRISPR loci for which the identity of protospacer adjacent motifs (PAMs) was unknown until now. We identified six different PAM sequences that are required upstream of the protospacer to permit target DNA recognition. This is only the second archaeon for which PAM sequences have been determined, and the first CRISPR group with such a high number of PAM sequences. Cells could survive the plasmid challenge if their CRISPR/Cas system was altered or defective, e.g. by deletion of the cas gene cassette. Experimental PAM data were supplemented with bioinformatics data on Haloferax and Haloquadratum.

  4. Bacterial, archaeal and fungal succession in the forefield of a receding glacier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumsteg, Anita; Luster, Jörg; Göransson, Hans; Smittenberg, Rienk H; Brunner, Ivano; Bernasconi, Stefano M; Zeyer, Josef; Frey, Beat

    2012-04-01

    Glacier forefield chronosequences, initially composed of barren substrate after glacier retreat, are ideal locations to study primary microbial colonization and succession in a natural environment. We characterized the structure and composition of bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities in exposed rock substrates along the Damma glacier forefield in central Switzerland. Soil samples were taken along the forefield from sites ranging from fine granite sand devoid of vegetation near the glacier terminus to well-developed soils covered with vegetation. The microbial communities were studied with genetic profiling (T-RFLP) and sequencing of clone libraries. According to the T-RFLP profiles, bacteria showed a high Shannon diversity index (H) (ranging from 2.3 to 3.4) with no trend along the forefield. The major bacterial lineages were Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Firmicutes and Cyanobacteria. An interesting finding was that Euryarchaeota were predominantly colonizing young soils and Crenarchaeota mainly mature soils. Fungi shifted from an Ascomycota-dominated community in young soils to a more Basidiomycota-dominated community in old soils. Redundancy analysis indicated that base saturation, pH, soil C and N contents and plant coverage, all related to soil age, correlated with the microbial succession along the forefield.

  5. The potential impact of a cataract surgery programme on the care of orphans and vulnerable children in Swaziland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, J; Mapham, W E; Newsome, B; Myer, L; Anderson, R; Courtright, P; Cook, C

    2012-02-23

    We aimed to evaluate the potential impact of a cataract surgery programme at the Good Shepherd Hospital, Siteki, Swaziland, on the care of orphans and vulnerable children in Swaziland. We studied consecutive patients aged 50 years and older undergoing surgery for age-related cataract who reported having children living in their household. Of 131 subjects recruited, 65 (49.6%) were the primary caregivers for the child(ren) in their household. Visual acuities measured 2 weeks after surgery significantly improved. Four weeks after surgery, there was a sizable increase in the proportions of subjects who were able to undertake self-care activities, attend to activities of daily living, undertake income-generating activities and care for children. Cataract surgery on elderly visually impaired patients has the potential to impact positively on the care of orphans and vulnerable children.

  6. Improving the lives of vulnerable children: implications of Horizons research among orphans and other children affected by AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Katie D; Michaelis, Annie; Sapiano, Tobey Nelson; Brown, Lisanne; Weiss, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    From 1997 through 2007, the Horizons program conducted research to inform the care and support of children who had been orphaned and rendered vulnerable by acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in sub-Saharan Africa. Horizons conducted studies in Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda, South Africa, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Research included both diagnostic studies exploring the circumstances of families and communities affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and evaluations of pioneering intervention strategies. Interventions found to be supportive of families included succession planning for families with an HIV-positive parent, training and supporting youth as caregivers, and youth mentorship for child-headed households. Horizons researchers developed tools to assess the psychosocial well-being of children affected by HIV and outlined key ethical guidelines for conducting research among children. The design, implementation, and evaluation of community-based interventions for orphans and vulnerable children continue to be a key gap in the evidence base.

  7. Community-based mental health support for orphans and vulnerable children in South Africa: A triangulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais, Lochner; Sharp, Carla; Pappin, Michelle; Rani, Kholisa; Skinner, Donald; Lenka, Molefi; Cloete, Jan; Serekoane, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Community-based care is receiving increasing global attention as a way to support children who are orphaned or vulnerable due to the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Using both qualitative and quantitative methodology, this study assesses community-based responses to the well-being of orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) and compares these responses with the actual mental health of OVC in order to evaluate the South African government's approach of funding community-based organisations (CBOs) that support and care for OVC. The study results show that the activities of CBOs mainly extend government services and address poverty. Although this should not be seen as insignificant, the paper argues that CBOs give very little attention to the mental health of OVC.

  8. Health promotion needs of Hammanskraal families with adolescents orphaned by HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N C van Wyk

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Health promotion is regarded as the cornerstone of good health. It is the action expected from individuals and families in order to better their own health situation. Health promotion is an art and science (Edelman & Mandle, 2002:16 that is integrated into the primary health care to reduce existing health problems. The purpose of the research on which this article is reporting, was to explore and describe the health promotion needs of families with adolescents orphaned by human immunodeficiency virus or acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS. The research was located within a qualitative paradigm that is both exploratory and descriptive. Eight families who were purposely selected participated in the research process. Qualitative methods, such as group interviews and field notes were utilised to collect data. The health promotion needs of the families with adolescents orphaned by HIV/AIDS were explored and described. Tesch’s analysis process, which entails a series of steps, was followed (Creswell, 2003:192. Themes, categories and subcategories that form the central focus of health promotion needs emerged during the data analysis. These themes,categories and subcategories are used to develop guidelines for health promotion. Opsomming Die bevordering van gesondheid is die hoeksteen van gesondheid. Dit is die aksie wat van individue en familie verwag word, sodat hulle hul eie gesondheidstoestand kan verbeter. Die bevordering van gesondheid is ‘n kuns en ‘n wetenskap, wat geïntegreer is in primêre gesondheidsorg, om bestaande gesondheidsprobleme te verminder (Edelman & Mandle, 2002:16. Die doel van die navorsing, waarna in hierdie artikel verwys word, was om uit te vind wat die gesondheidsorgbehoeftes van families, met adolessente wat wees gelaat is as gevolg van menslike immunogebrek virus of verworve immuungebrek sindroom (MIV/VIGS, is, en dit te beskryf. Die navorsing was binne die raamwerk van ‘n kwalitatiewe paradigma, wat

  9. Orphan receptor GPR110, an oncogene overexpressed in lung and prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Channa Namitha

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GPR110 is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor--a receptor without a known ligand, a known signaling pathway, or a known function. Despite the lack of information, one can assume that orphan receptors have important biological roles. In a retroviral insertion mutagenesis screen in the mouse, we identified GPR110 as an oncogene. This prompted us to study the potential isoforms that can be gleaned from known GPR110 transcripts, and the expression of these isoforms in normal and transformed human tissues. Methods Various epitope-tagged isoforms of GPR110 were expressed in cell lines and assayed by western blotting to determine cleavage, surface localization, and secretion patterns. GPR110 transcript and protein levels were measured in lung and prostate cancer cell lines and clinical samples, respectively, by quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results We found four potential splice variants of GPR110. Of these variants, we confirmed three as being expressed as proteins on the cell surface. Isoform 1 is the canonical form, with a molecular mass of about 100 kD. Isoforms 2 and 3 are truncated products of isoform 1, and are 25 and 23 kD, respectively. These truncated isoforms lack the seven-span transmembrane domain characteristic of GPR proteins and thus are not likely to be membrane anchored; indeed, isoform 2 can be secreted. Compared with the median gene expression of ~200 selected genes, GPR110 expression was low in most tissues. However, it had higher than average gene expression in normal kidney tissue and in prostate tissues originating from older donors. Although identified as an oncogene in murine T lymphomas, GPR110 is greatly overexpressed in human lung and prostate cancers. As detected by immunohistochemistry, GPR110 was overexpressed in 20 of 27 (74% lung adenocarcinoma tissue cores and in 17 of 29 (59% prostate adenocarcinoma tissue cores. Additionally, staining with a GPR110 antibody enabled us to

  10. Health information, what happens when there isn't any? Information literacy and the challenges for rare and orphan diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Hannah

    2014-09-01

    This feature looks at the challenges for information literacy in rare and orphan diseases. In particular, it focuses on the information difficulties faced by those living with a rare condition or awaiting a diagnosis, and also those of the health professionals in charge of their care. The feature also highlights some of the key issues that library and information professionals need to be aware of when providing information support in such circumstances.

  11. Securing the metal recycling chain for the steel industry by detecting orphan radioactive sources in scrap metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesente, S.; Vanini, S.; Benettoni, M.; Bonomi, G.; Calvini, P.; Checchia, P.; Conti, E.; Gonella, F.; Nebbia, G.; Squarcia, S.; Viesti, G.; Zenoni, A.; Zumerle, G.

    2010-08-01

    Experimental tests are reported for the detection of the heavy metal shielding of orphan sources hidden inside scrap metal by using a recently developed muon tomography system. Shielded sources do not trigger alarm in radiation portal commonly employed at the entrance of steel industry using scrap metal. Future systems integrating radiation portals with muon tomography inspection gates will substantially reduce the possibility of accidental melting of radioactive sources securing the use of recycled metal.

  12. Archaeal and Bacterial Communities Associated with the Surface Mucus of Caribbean Corals Differ in Their Degree of Host Specificity and Community Turnover Over Reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frade, Pedro R; Roll, Katharina; Bergauer, Kristin; Herndl, Gerhard J

    2016-01-01

    Comparative studies on the distribution of archaeal versus bacterial communities associated with the surface mucus layer of corals have rarely taken place. It has therefore remained enigmatic whether mucus-associated archaeal and bacterial communities exhibit a similar specificity towards coral hosts and whether they vary in the same fashion over spatial gradients and between reef locations. We used microbial community profiling (terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism, T-RFLP) and clone library sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to compare the diversity and community structure of dominant archaeal and bacterial communities associating with the mucus of three common reef-building coral species (Porites astreoides, Siderastrea siderea and Orbicella annularis) over different spatial scales on a Caribbean fringing reef. Sampling locations included three reef sites, three reef patches within each site and two depths. Reference sediment samples and ambient water were also taken for each of the 18 sampling locations resulting in a total of 239 samples. While only 41% of the bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) characterized by T-RFLP were shared between mucus and the ambient water or sediment, for archaeal OTUs this percentage was 2-fold higher (78%). About half of the mucus-associated OTUs (44% and 58% of bacterial and archaeal OTUs, respectively) were shared between the three coral species. Our multivariate statistical analysis (ANOSIM, PERMANOVA and CCA) showed that while the bacterial community composition was determined by habitat (mucus, sediment or seawater), host coral species, location and spatial distance, the archaeal community composition was solely determined by the habitat. This study highlights that mucus-associated archaeal and bacterial communities differ in their degree of community turnover over reefs and in their host-specificity.

  13. Ugandan HIV/AIDS orphans in charge of their households speak out: a study of their health-related worries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satzinger, F; Kipp, W; Rubaale, T

    2012-01-01

    The number of children orphaned due to HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa was estimated in 2007 by UNAIDS at upwards of 12 million. In Uganda alone, 800,000 of the estimated 1.6 million orphans are said to be orphaned due to this cause. These children suffer life-long consequences from the loss of their parents. This study explores the situation of children living in child-headed households in Uganda's western Kabarole district. Through qualitative research, including in-depth interviews with 20 child heads of households, the health concerns of these children are documented. The interview data were analysed using qualitative research techniques. The study reveals that the psychological and physical effects of orphanhood are magnified for those living in child-headed households. In particular, it highlights the fears of theft and abuse which are a constant source of anxiety for these children. It reports that illness episodes among younger siblings are also particularly worrisome for child heads of households. The article concludes with recommendations for addressing this urgent problem in sub-Saharan Africa.

  14. ONRLDB--manually curated database of experimentally validated ligands for orphan nuclear receptors: insights into new drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanduri, Ravikanth; Bhutani, Isha; Somavarapu, Arun Kumar; Mahajan, Sahil; Parkesh, Raman; Gupta, Pawan

    2015-01-01

    Orphan nuclear receptors are potential therapeutic targets. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor Ligand Binding Database (ONRLDB) is an interactive, comprehensive and manually curated database of small molecule ligands targeting orphan nuclear receptors. Currently, ONRLDB consists of ∼11,000 ligands, of which ∼6500 are unique. All entries include information for the ligand, such as EC50 and IC50, number of aromatic rings and rotatable bonds, XlogP, hydrogen donor and acceptor count, molecular weight (MW) and structure. ONRLDB is a cross-platform database, where either the cognate small molecule modulators of a receptor or the cognate receptors to a ligand can be searched. The database can be searched using three methods: text search, advanced search or similarity search. Substructure search, cataloguing tools, and clustering tools can be used to perform advanced analysis of the ligand based on chemical similarity fingerprints, hierarchical clustering, binning partition and multidimensional scaling. These tools, together with the Tree function provided, deliver an interactive platform and a comprehensive resource for identification of common and unique scaffolds. As demonstrated, ONRLDB is designed to allow selection of ligands based on various properties and for designing novel ligands or to improve the existing ones. Database URL: http://www.onrldb.org/.

  15. Discussion on the Tragic Pleasure of Zhao's Orphan%论《赵氏孤儿》的悲剧快感

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈小刚

    2014-01-01

    《赵氏孤儿》是著名的古典悲剧,给人带来悲的世界,但这种悲不是绝望的悲,是一种给人奋发向上的悲。悲剧中既有痛感的体现,也有一种快感在其中。讨论《赵氏孤儿》戏剧的悲剧快感,主要从韩厥两难处境、屠岸贾的过场作用对《赵氏孤儿》加以审美的分析和提炼,从艺术自身的角度看待《赵氏孤儿》方能体会到它长久不衰的魅力。%Zhao's Orphan is a famous classical tragedy,which brings us a world of huge grief. However,the grief is not a despair but an inspiration. The tragedy is a mixture of the pain and the pleasure. This paper discusses the tragic pleasure of Zhao's Orphan, mainly from the dilemma of Han Jue and the interlude role of Tu An-gu. Only by analyzing and refining the text from aesthetic vision and loo-king on Zhao's Orphan from art perspective, can we experience its everlasting charm.

  16. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes.

  17. The oncoprotein BCL11A binds to orphan nuclear receptor TLX and potentiates its transrepressive function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara B Estruch

    Full Text Available Nuclear orphan receptor TLX (NR2E1 functions primarily as a transcriptional repressor and its pivotal role in brain development, glioblastoma, mental retardation and retinopathologies make it an attractive drug target. TLX is expressed in the neural stem cells (NSCs of the subventricular zone and the hippocampus subgranular zone, regions with persistent neurogenesis in the adult brain, and functions as an essential regulator of NSCs maintenance and self-renewal. Little is known about the TLX social network of interactors and only few TLX coregulators are described. To identify and characterize novel TLX-binders and possible coregulators, we performed yeast-two-hybrid (Y2H screens of a human adult brain cDNA library using different TLX constructs as baits. Our screens identified multiple clones of Atrophin-1 (ATN1, a previously described TLX interactor. In addition, we identified an interaction with the oncoprotein and zinc finger transcription factor BCL11A (CTIP1/Evi9, a key player in the hematopoietic system and in major blood-related malignancies. This interaction was validated by expression and coimmunoprecipitation in human cells. BCL11A potentiated the transrepressive function of TLX in an in vitro reporter gene assay. Our work suggests that BCL11A is a novel TLX coregulator that might be involved in TLX-dependent gene regulation in the brain.

  18. The paediatric rheumatologist and orphan disease – a story without happy ending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkiewicz, Justyna; Biernacka-Zielińska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Orphan diseases are not a common challenge in the everyday practice of the rheumatologist. Despite their extremely rare occurrence one of the patients under our care developed one of them – neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, the most frequent neurodegenerative disease observed in the paediatric population. We report a case of 2-year-old girl diagnosed with oligoarticular form of juvenile idiopathic arthritis treated in our Department with steroids and methotrexate and staying in the stage of disease remission. During routine checkups at Outpatient Clinic we observed progressive deterioration of girls neurological condition resulting in ataxia, gait disturbances with no rheumatological cause behind and speech impairment. The appearance of the symptoms was accompanied by frequent episodes of epileptic seizures, with little clinical improvement on combined antiepileptic treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging that we performed showed a picture highly suggestive of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis – atrophy of the patients cerebrum and cerebellum. Genetic testing conducted resulted in the diagnosis of late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (LINCL). PMID:27504025

  19. Social interactions and their connection to aggression and ovarian development in orphaned worker bumblebees (Bombus impatiens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbald, E D; Plowright, C M S

    2014-03-01

    This study examines the social dynamics of reproductive conflict. Orphaned worker bumblebees (Bombus impatiens) with comparatively high or low levels of social activity were paired to determine whether aggression and reproduction could be traced to earlier social interactions. The workers were paired according to their levels of social activity (a socially active+another socially active worker, socially active+socially inactive, and two socially inactive workers). The presence or absence of brood was also manipulated. The absence of brood increased both aggression and ovarian development, suggesting that aggression and reproduction are associated or that there is a third variable that affects both. Socially active pairs were significantly more aggressive: here, social activity can be taken as an early indicator of aggression. No such effect, however, was obtained on ovarian development as the socially active pairs did not differ on their degree of ovarian development compared to the others. Within the socially active+socially inactive pairs, the socially active worker did not have more developed ovaries and was not more aggressive than her socially inactive partner. Results highlight that environmental conditions (the absence of brood) can predict ovarian development and although social activity can be observed prior to aggression, differences in aggression do not translate into differences in ovarian development under these conditions.

  20. Multi-domain proteins in the three kingdoms of life: orphan domains and other unassigned regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Diana; Björklund, Asa K; Frey-Skött, Johannes; Elofsson, Arne

    2005-04-22

    Comparative studies of the proteomes from different organisms have provided valuable information about protein domain distribution in the kingdoms of life. Earlier studies have been limited by the fact that only about 50% of the proteomes could be matched to a domain. Here, we have extended these studies by including less well-defined domain definitions, Pfam-B and clustered domains, MAS, in addition to Pfam-A and SCOP domains. It was found that a significant fraction of these domain families are homologous to Pfam-A or SCOP domains. Further, we show that all regions that do not match a Pfam-A or SCOP domain contain a significantly higher fraction of disordered structure. These unstructured regions may be contained within orphan domains or function as linkers between structured domains. Using several different definitions we have re-estimated the number of multi-domain proteins in different organisms and found that several methods all predict that eukaryotes have approximately 65% multi-domain proteins, while the prokaryotes consist of approximately 40% multi-domain proteins. However, these numbers are strongly dependent on the exact choice of cut-off for domains in unassigned regions. In conclusion, all eukaryotes have similar fractions of multi-domain proteins and disorder, whereas a high fraction of repeating domain is distinguished only in multicellular eukaryotes. This implies a role for repeats in cell-cell contacts while the other two features are important for intracellular functions.

  1. The orphan nuclear receptor SHP is a positive regulator of osteoblastic bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Byung-Chul; Lee, Yong-Soo; Bae, In-Ho; Lee, Chul-Ho; Shin, Hong-In; Ha, Hyun Jung; Franceschi, Renny T; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Koh, Jeong-Tae

    2010-02-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP; NR0B2) interacts with a diverse array of transcription factors and regulates a variety of cellular events such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and metabolism. However, the role of SHP in bone formation has not yet been elucidated. SHP expression is significantly increased during osteoblast differentiation, and its expression is partially regulated by bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), which plays an important role in bone formation. In our study, inhibition of SHP expression significantly repressed BMP-2-induced osteoblast differentiation and ectopic bone formation. In accordance with these in vitro and in vivo results, osteoblast differentiation in SHP(-/-) mice primary osteoblasts was significantly repressed, and the mice showed decreased bone mass resulting from decreased numbers of osteoblasts. Finally, SHP physically interacts and forms a complex with runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) on the osteocalcin gene promoter, and overexpression of SHP increased Runx2 transactivity via competition with histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4), an enzyme that inhibits DNA binding of Runx2 to its target genes. Taken together, these results indicate that SHP acts as a novel positive regulator of bone formation by augmenting osteoblast differentiation through regulation of the transcriptional activity of Runx2.

  2. Regioselective oxidation of lauric acid by CYP119, an orphan cytochrome P450 from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Young-Ran; Eun, Chang-Yong; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Han, Songhee; Han, Jung-Soo; Cho, Kyoung Sang; Chun, Young-Jin; Kim, Donghak

    2010-03-01

    Archaebacteria Sulfolobus acidocaldarius contains the highly thermophilic cytochrome P450 enzyme (CYP119). CYP119 possesses stable enzymatic activity at up to 85 degrees C. However, this enzyme is still considered as an orphan P450 without known physiological function with endogenous or xenobiotic substrates. We characterized the regioselectivity of lauric acid by CYP119 using the auxiliary redox partner proteins putidaredoxin (Pd) and putidaredoxin reductase (PdR). Purified CYP119 protein showed a tight binding affinity to lauric acid (K(d)=1.1+/-0.1 microM) and dominantly hydroxylated (omega-1) position of lauric acid. We determined the steady-state kinetic parameters; k(cat) was 10.8 min(-1) and K(m) was 12 microM. The increased ratio to omega-hydroxylated production of lauric acid catalyzed by CYP119 was observed with increase in the reaction temperature. These studies suggested that the regioselectivity of CYP119 provide the critical clue for the physiological enzyme function in this thermophilic archaebacteria. In addition, regioselectivity control of CYP119 without altering its thermostability can lead to the development of novel CYP119-based catalysts through protein engineering.

  3. Citric acid cycle intermediates as ligands for orphan G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Weihai; Miao, Frederick J-P; Lin, Daniel C-H; Schwandner, Ralf T; Wang, Zhulun; Gao, Jinhai; Chen, Jin-Long; Tian, Hui; Ling, Lei

    2004-05-13

    The citric acid cycle is central to the regulation of energy homeostasis and cell metabolism. Mutations in enzymes that catalyse steps in the citric acid cycle result in human diseases with various clinical presentations. The intermediates of the citric acid cycle are present at micromolar concentration in blood and are regulated by respiration, metabolism and renal reabsorption/extrusion. Here we show that GPR91 (ref. 3), a previously orphan G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), functions as a receptor for the citric acid cycle intermediate succinate. We also report that GPR99 (ref. 4), a close relative of GPR91, responds to alpha-ketoglutarate, another intermediate in the citric acid cycle. Thus by acting as ligands for GPCRs, succinate and alpha-ketoglutarate are found to have unexpected signalling functions beyond their traditional roles. Furthermore, we show that succinate increases blood pressure in animals. The succinate-induced hypertensive effect involves the renin-angiotensin system and is abolished in GPR91-deficient mice. Our results indicate a possible role for GPR91 in renovascular hypertension, a disease closely linked to atherosclerosis, diabetes and renal failure.

  4. The nuclear orphan receptor COUP-TFII is required for limb and skeletal muscle development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christopher T; Li, Luoping; Takamoto, Norio; Martin, James F; Demayo, Francesco J; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Tsai, Sophia Y

    2004-12-01

    The nuclear orphan receptor COUP-TFII is widely expressed in multiple tissues and organs throughout embryonic development, suggesting that COUP-TFII is involved in multiple aspects of embryogenesis. Because of the early embryonic lethality of COUP-TFII knockout mice, the role of COUP-TFII during limb development has not been determined. COUP-TFII is expressed in lateral plate mesoderm of the early embryo prior to limb bud formation. In addition, COUP-TFII is also expressed in the somites and skeletal muscle precursors of the limbs. Therefore, in order to study the potential role of COUP-TFII in limb and skeletal muscle development, we bypassed the early embryonic lethality of the COUP-TFII mutant by using two methods. First, embryonic chimera analysis has revealed an obligatory role for COUP-TFII in limb bud outgrowth since mutant cells are unable to contribute to the distally growing limb mesenchyme. Second, we used a conditional-knockout approach to ablate COUP-TFII specifically in the limbs. Loss of COUP-TFII in the limbs leads to hypoplastic skeletal muscle development, as well as shorter limbs. Taken together, our results demonstrate that COUP-TFII plays an early role in limb bud outgrowth but not limb bud initiation. Also, COUP-TFII is required for appropriate development of the skeletal musculature of developing limbs.

  5. Lessons from writing sessions: a school-based randomized trial with adolescent orphans in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Unterhitzenberger

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatments for adolescents affected by long-term loss in low- and middle-income countries are lacking. As school-based interventions are cost-efficient and easy to disseminate, an evaluation of this treatment setting for adolescents is worthwhile. Objective: Examining the effect of a school-based unstructured emotional writing intervention (sensu Pennebaker, group 1 about the loss of a parent to reduce adaptation problems to loss, compared to writing about a hobby (group 2, and non-writing (group 3. Method: We randomly assigned 14–18-year-old Rwandan orphans to one of the three conditions (n=23 per condition. Before and after the intervention, subjects completed the Prolonged Grief Questionnaire for Adolescents and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview for Children and Adolescents, Part A, on depression as self-report measures of long-term effects of early parental loss. Results: Repeated measures analyses of variance showed no differential effect for any of the three conditions but revealed a significant effect of time at posttest regarding grief severity. Reduction of grief symptoms was significantly higher in subjects with elevated grief. Depressive symptoms showed no significant change from pre- to posttest in the emotional writing condition, whereas they significantly decreased in the control condition. Conclusions: Results imply that unstructured, brief emotional writing might not be indicated in adolescents affected by early parental loss who show severe and long-term distress; a more structured approach seems recommendable.

  6. Shifts of tundra bacterial and archaeal communities along a permafrost thaw gradient in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jie; Gu, Yunfu; Zhang, Jin; Xue, Kai; Qin, Yujia; Yuan, Mengting; Yin, Huaqun; He, Zhili; Wu, Liyou; Schuur, Edward A G; Tiedje, James M; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the response of permafrost microbial communities to climate warming is crucial for evaluating ecosystem feedbacks to global change. This study investigated soil bacterial and archaeal communities by Illumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons across a permafrost thaw gradient at different depths in Alaska with thaw progression for over three decades. Over 4.6 million passing 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained from a total of 97 samples, corresponding to 61 known classes and 470 genera. Soil depth and the associated soil physical-chemical properties had predominant impacts on the diversity and composition of the microbial communities. Both richness and evenness of the microbial communities decreased with soil depth. Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Alpha- and Gamma-Proteobacteria dominated the microbial communities in the upper horizon, whereas abundances of Bacteroidetes, Delta-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes increased towards deeper soils. Effects of thaw progression were absent in microbial communities in the near-surface organic soil, probably due to greater temperature variation. Thaw progression decreased the abundances of the majority of the associated taxa in the lower organic soil, but increased the abundances of those in the mineral soil, including groups potentially involved in recalcitrant C degradation (Actinomycetales, Chitinophaga, etc.). The changes in microbial communities may be related to altered soil C sources by thaw progression. Collectively, this study revealed different impacts of thaw in the organic and mineral horizons and suggests the importance of studying both the upper and deeper soils while evaluating microbial responses to permafrost thaw.

  7. CoBaltDB: Complete bacterial and archaeal orfeomes subcellular localization database and associated resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucchetti-Miganeh Céline

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The functions of proteins are strongly related to their localization in cell compartments (for example the cytoplasm or membranes but the experimental determination of the sub-cellular localization of proteomes is laborious and expensive. A fast and low-cost alternative approach is in silico prediction, based on features of the protein primary sequences. However, biologists are confronted with a very large number of computational tools that use different methods that address various localization features with diverse specificities and sensitivities. As a result, exploiting these computer resources to predict protein localization accurately involves querying all tools and comparing every prediction output; this is a painstaking task. Therefore, we developed a comprehensive database, called CoBaltDB, that gathers all prediction outputs concerning complete prokaryotic proteomes. Description The current version of CoBaltDB integrates the results of 43 localization predictors for 784 complete bacterial and archaeal proteomes (2.548.292 proteins in total. CoBaltDB supplies a simple user-friendly interface for retrieving and exploring relevant information about predicted features (such as signal peptide cleavage sites and transmembrane segments. Data are organized into three work-sets ("specialized tools", "meta-tools" and "additional tools". The database can be queried using the organism name, a locus tag or a list of locus tags and may be browsed using numerous graphical and text displays. Conclusions With its new functionalities, CoBaltDB is a novel powerful platform that provides easy access to the results of multiple localization tools and support for predicting prokaryotic protein localizations with higher confidence than previously possible. CoBaltDB is available at http://www.umr6026.univ-rennes1.fr/english/home/research/basic/software/cobalten.

  8. Archaeal community diversity and abundance changes along a natural salinity gradient in estuarine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Gordon; O'Sullivan, Louise A; Meng, Yiyu; Williams, Angharad S; Sass, Andrea M; Watkins, Andrew J; Parkes, R John; Weightman, Andrew J

    2015-02-01

    Archaea are widespread in marine sediments, but their occurrence and relationship with natural salinity gradients in estuarine sediments is not well understood. This study investigated the abundance and diversity of Archaea in sediments at three sites [Brightlingsea (BR), Alresford (AR) and Hythe (HY)] along the Colne Estuary, using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) of 16S rRNA genes, DNA hybridization, Archaea 16S rRNA and mcrA gene phylogenetic analyses. Total archaeal 16S rRNA abundance in sediments were higher in the low-salinity brackish sediments from HY (2-8 × 10(7) 16S rRNA gene copies cm(-3)) than the high-salinity marine sites from BR and AR (2 × 10(4)-2 × 10(7) and 4 × 10(6)-2 × 10(7) 16S rRNA gene copies cm(-3), respectively), although as a proportion of the total prokaryotes Archaea were higher at BR than at AR or HY. Phylogenetic analysis showed that members of the 'Bathyarchaeota' (MCG), Thaumarchaeota and methanogenic Euryarchaeota were the dominant groups of Archaea. The composition of Thaumarchaeota varied with salinity, as only 'marine' group I.1a was present in marine sediments (BR). Methanogen 16S rRNA genes from low-salinity sediments at HY were dominated by acetotrophic Methanosaeta and putatively hydrogentrophic Methanomicrobiales, whereas the marine site (BR) was dominated by mcrA genes belonging to methylotrophic Methanococcoides, versatile Methanosarcina and methanotrophic ANME-2a. Overall, the results indicate that salinity and associated factors play a role in controlling diversity and distribution of Archaea in estuarine sediments.

  9. Light-Dependent Expression of Four Cryptic Archaeal Circadian Gene Homologs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eManiscalco

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are important biological signals that have been found in almost all major groups of life from bacteria to man, yet it remains unclear if any members of the second major prokaryotic domain of life, the Archaea, also possess a biological clock. To investigate this question, we examined the regulation of four cyanobacterial-like circadian gene homologs present in the genome of the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii. These genes, designated cirA, cirB, cirC, and cirD, display similarity to the KaiC-family of cyanobacterial clock proteins, which act to regulate rhythmic gene expression and to control the timing of cell division. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis was used to examine the expression of each of the four cir genes in response to 12 h light/12 h dark cycles (LD 12:12 during balanced growth in H. volcanii. Our data reveal that there is an approximately two to sixteen-fold increase in cir gene expression when cells are shifted from light to constant darkness and this pattern of gene expression oscillates with the light conditions in a rhythmic manner. Targeted single- and double-gene knockouts in the H. volcanii cir genes results in disruption of light-dependent, rhythmic gene expression, although it does not lead to any significant effect on growth under these conditions. Restoration of light-dependent, rhythmic gene expression was demonstrated by introducing, in trans, a wild-type copy of individual cir genes into knockout strains. These results are noteworthy as this is the first attempt to characterize the transcriptional expression and regulation of the ubiquitous kaiC homologs found among archaeal genomes.

  10. Paying for the Orphan Drug System: break or bend? Is it time for a new evaluation system for payers in Europe to take account of new rare disease treatments?

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes-Wilson Wills; Palma Ana; Schuurman Ad; Simoens Steven

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Since its enactment in 2000, the European Orphan Medicinal Products Regulation has allowed the review and approval of approaching 70 treatments for some 55 different conditions in Europe. Success does not come without a price, however. Many of these so-called “orphan drugs” have higher price points than treatments for more common diseases. This has been raising debate as to whether the treatments are worth it, which, in turn risks blocking patient access to treatment. To date, orphan...

  11. Crystal structure of archaeal photolyase from Sulfolobus tokodaii with two FAD molecules: implication of a novel light-harvesting cofactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihashi, Masahiro; Numoto, Nobutaka; Kobayashi, Yukiko; Mizushima, Akira; Tsujimura, Masanari; Nakamura, Akira; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Miki, Kunio

    2007-01-26

    UV exposure of DNA molecules induces serious DNA lesions. The cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) photolyase repairs CPD-type - lesions by using the energy of visible light. Two chromophores for different roles have been found in this enzyme family; one catalyzes the CPD repair reaction and the other works as an antenna pigment that harvests photon energy. The catalytic cofactor of all known photolyases is FAD, whereas several light-harvesting cofactors are found. Currently, 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate (MTHF), 8-hydroxy-5-deaza-riboflavin (8-HDF) and FMN are the known light-harvesting cofactors, and some photolyases lack the chromophore. Three crystal structures of photolyases from Escherichia coli (Ec-photolyase), Anacystis nidulans (An-photolyase), and Thermus thermophilus (Tt-photolyase) have been determined; however, no archaeal photolyase structure is available. A similarity search of archaeal genomic data indicated the presence of a homologous gene, ST0889, on Sulfolobus tokodaii strain7. An enzymatic assay reveals that ST0889 encodes photolyase from S. tokodaii (St-photolyase). We have determined the crystal structure of the St-photolyase protein to confirm its structural features and to investigate the mechanism of the archaeal DNA repair system with light energy. The crystal structure of the St-photolyase is superimposed very well on the three known photolyases including the catalytic cofactor FAD. Surprisingly, another FAD molecule is found at the position of the light-harvesting cofactor. This second FAD molecule is well accommodated in the crystal structure, suggesting that FAD works as a novel light-harvesting cofactor of photolyase. In addition, two of the four CPD recognition residues in the crystal structure of An-photolyase are not found in St-photolyase, which might utilize a different mechanism to recognize the CPD from that of An-photolyase.

  12. Archaeal and bacterial communities in three alkaline hot springs in Heart Lake Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara Bowen De León

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Heart Lake Geyser Basin (HLGB is remotely located at the base of Mount Sheridan in southern Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA and is situated along Witch Creek and the northwestern shore of Heart Lake. Likely because of its location, little is known about the microbial community structure of springs in the HLGB. Bacterial and archaeal populations were monitored via small subunit (SSU rRNA gene pyrosequencing over 3 years in 3 alkaline (pH 8.5 hot springs with varying temperatures (44°C, 63°C, 75°C. The bacterial populations were generally stable over time, but varied by temperature. The dominant bacterial community changed from moderately thermophilic and photosynthetic members (Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi at 44°C to a mixed photosynthetic and thermophilic community (Deinococcus-Thermus at 63°C and a non-photosynthetic thermophilic community at 75°C. The archaeal community was more variable across time and was predominantly a methanogenic community in the 44°C and 63°C springs and a hyperthermophilic community in the 75°C spring. The 75°C spring demonstrated large shifts in the archaeal populations and was predominantly Candidatus Nitrosocaldus, an ammonia-oxidizing crenarchaeote, in the 2007 sample, and almost exclusively Thermofilum or Candidatus Caldiarchaeum in the 2009 sample, depending on SSU rRNA gene region examined. The majority of sequences were dissimilar (≥10% different to any known organisms suggesting that HLGB possesses numerous new phylogenetic groups that warrant cultivation efforts.

  13. Archaeal and bacterial communities in three alkaline hot springs in Heart Lake Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen De León, Kara; Gerlach, Robin; Peyton, Brent M; Fields, Matthew W

    2013-01-01

    The Heart Lake Geyser Basin (HLGB) is remotely located at the base of Mount Sheridan in southern Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming, USA and is situated along Witch Creek and the northwestern shore of Heart Lake. Likely because of its location, little is known about the microbial community structure of springs in the HLGB. Bacterial and archaeal populations were monitored via small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene pyrosequencing over 3 years in 3 alkaline (pH 8.5) hot springs with varying temperatures (44°C, 63°C, 75°C). The bacterial populations were generally stable over time, but varied by temperature. The dominant bacterial community changed from moderately thermophilic and photosynthetic members (Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi) at 44°C to a mixed photosynthetic and thermophilic community (Deinococcus-Thermus) at 63°C and a non-photosynthetic thermophilic community at 75°C. The archaeal community was more variable across time and was predominantly a methanogenic community in the 44 and 63°C springs and a thermophilic community in the 75°C spring. The 75°C spring demonstrated large shifts in the archaeal populations and was predominantly Candidatus Nitrosocaldus, an ammonia-oxidizing crenarchaeote, in the 2007 sample, and almost exclusively Thermofilum or Candidatus Caldiarchaeum in the 2009 sample, depending on SSU rRNA gene region examined. The majority of sequences were dissimilar (≥10% different) to any known organisms suggesting that HLGB possesses numerous new phylogenetic groups that warrant cultivation efforts.

  14. Controls on bacterial and archaeal community structure and greenhouse gas production in natural, mined, and restored Canadian peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan eBasiliko

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Northern peatlands are important global C reservoirs, largely because of their slow rates of microbial C mineralization. Particularly in sites that are heavily influenced by anthropogenic disturbances, there is scant information about microbial ecology and whether or not microbial community structure influences greenhouse gas production. This work characterized communities of bacteria and archaea using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and functional genes across eight natural, mined, or restored peatlands in two locations in eastern Canada. Correlations were explored among chemical properties of peat, bacterial and archaeal community structure, and carbon dioxide and methane production rates under oxic and anoxic conditions. Bacteria and archaea similar to those found in other peat soil environments were detected. In contrast to other reports, methanogen diversity was low in our study, with only 2 groups of known or suspected methanogens. Although mining and restoration affected substrate availability and microbial activity, these land-uses did not consistently affect bacterial or archaeal community composition. In fact, larger differences were observed between the two locations and between oxic and anoxic peat samples than between mined and restored sites, with anoxic samples characterized by less detectable bacterial diversity and stronger dominance by members of the phylum Acidobacteria. There were also no apparent strong linkages between prokaryote community structure and methane or carbon dioxide production, suggesting that different organisms exhibit functional redundancy and/or that the same taxa function at very different rates when exposed to different peat substrates. In contrast to other earlier work focusing on fungal communities across similar mined and restored peatlands, bacterial and archaeal communities appeared to be more resistant or resilient to peat substrate changes brought

  15. Archaeal and anaerobic methane oxidizer communities in the Sonora Margin cold seeps, Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneron, Adrien; Cruaud, Perrine; Pignet, Patricia; Caprais, Jean-Claude; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Godfroy, Anne; Toffin, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    Cold seeps, located along the Sonora Margin transform fault in the Guaymas Basin, were extensively explored during the 'BIG' cruise in June 2010. They present a seafloor mosaic pattern consisting of different faunal assemblages and microbial mats. To investigate this mostly unknown cold and hydrocarbon-rich environment, geochemical and microbiological surveys of the sediments underlying two microbial mats and a surrounding macrofaunal habitat were analyzed in detail. The geochemical measurements suggest biogenic methane production and local advective sulfate-rich fluxes in the sediments. The distributions of archaeal communities, particularly those involved in the methane cycle, were investigated at different depths (surface to 18 cm below the sea floor (cmbsf)) using complementary molecular approaches, such as Automated method of Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA), 16S rRNA libraries, fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction with new specific primer sets targeting methanogenic and anaerobic methanotrophic lineages. Molecular results indicate that metabolically active archaeal communities were dominated by known clades of anaerobic methane oxidizers (archaeal anaerobic methanotroph (ANME)-1, -2 and -3), including a novel 'ANME-2c Sonora' lineage. ANME-2c were found to be dominant, metabolically active and physically associated with syntrophic Bacteria in sulfate-rich shallow sediment layers. In contrast, ANME-1 were more prevalent in the deepest sediment samples and presented a versatile behavior in terms of syntrophic association, depending on the sulfate concentration. ANME-3 were concentrated in small aggregates without bacterial partners in a restricted sediment horizon below the first centimetres. These niche specificities and syntrophic behaviors, depending on biological surface assemblages and environmental availability of electron donors, acceptors and carbon substrates, suggest that ANME could support

  16. Bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic diversity of a cold sulfur-rich spring on the shoreline of Lake Erie, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, A.; Haack, S.K.; Duris, J.W.; Marsh, T.L.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of sulfidic springs have provided new insights into microbial metabolism, groundwater biogeochemistry, and geologic processes. We investigated Great Sulphur Spring on the western shore of Lake Erie and evaluated the phylogenetic affiliations of 189 bacterial and 77 archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences from three habitats: the spring origin (11-m depth), bacterial-algal mats on the spring pond surface, and whitish filamentous materials from the spring drain. Water from the spring origin water was cold, pH 6.3, and anoxic (H2, 5.4 nM; CH4, 2.70 ??M) with concentrations of S2- (0.03 mM), SO42- (14.8 mM), Ca2+ (15.7 mM), and HCO3- (4.1 mM) similar to those in groundwater from the local aquifer. No archaeal and few bacterial sequences were >95% similar to sequences of cultivated organisms. Bacterial sequences were largely affiliated with sulfur-metabolizing or chemolithotrophic taxa in Beta-, Gamma-, Delta-, and Epsilonproteobacteria. Epsilonproteobacteria sequences similar to those obtained from other sulfidic environments and a new clade of Cyanobacteria sequences were particularly abundant (16% and 40%, respectively) in the spring origin clone library. Crenarchaeota sequences associated with archaeal-bacterial consortia in whitish filaments at a German sulfidic spring were detected only in a similar habitat at Great Sulphur Spring. This study expands the geographic distribution of many uncultured Archaea and Bacteria sequences to the Laurentian Great Lakes, indicates possible roles for epsilonproteobacteria in local aquifer chemistry and karst formation, documents new oscillatorioid Cyanobacteria lineages, and shows that uncultured, cold-adapted Crenarchaeota sequences may comprise a significant part of the microbial community of some sulfidic environments. Copyright ?? 2009, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic diversity of a cold sulfur-rich spring on the shoreline of Lake Erie, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Anita; Haack, Sheridan Kidd; Duris, Joseph W; Marsh, Terence L

    2009-08-01

    Studies of sulfidic springs have provided new insights into microbial metabolism, groundwater biogeochemistry, and geologic processes. We investigated Great Sulphur Spring on the western shore of Lake Erie and evaluated the phylogenetic affiliations of 189 bacterial and 77 archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences from three habitats: the spring origin (11-m depth), bacterial-algal mats on the spring pond surface, and whitish filamentous materials from the spring drain. Water from the spring origin water was cold, pH 6.3, and anoxic (H(2), 5.4 nM; CH(4), 2.70 microM) with concentrations of S(2-) (0.03 mM), SO(4)(2-) (14.8 mM), Ca(2+) (15.7 mM), and HCO(3)(-) (4.1 mM) similar to those in groundwater from the local aquifer. No archaeal and few bacterial sequences were >95% similar to sequences of cultivated organisms. Bacterial sequences were largely affiliated with sulfur-metabolizing or chemolithotrophic taxa in Beta-, Gamma-, Delta-, and Epsilonproteobacteria. Epsilonproteobacteria sequences similar to those obtained from other sulfidic environments and a new clade of Cyanobacteria sequences were particularly abundant (16% and 40%, respectively) in the spring origin clone library. Crenarchaeota sequences associated with archaeal-bacterial consortia in whitish filaments at a German sulfidic spring were detected only in a similar habitat at Great Sulphur Spring. This study expands the geographic distribution of many uncultured Archaea and Bacteria sequences to the Laurentian Great Lakes, indicates possible roles for epsilonproteobacteria in local aquifer chemistry and karst formation, documents new oscillatorioid Cyanobacteria lineages, and shows that uncultured, cold-adapted Crenarchaeota sequences may comprise a significant part of the microbial community of some sulfidic environments.

  18. A sensitive, support-vector-machine method for the detection of horizontal gene transfers in viral, archaeal and bacterial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Rigoutsos, Isidore

    2005-01-01

    In earlier work, we introduced and discussed a generalized computational framework for identifying horizontal transfers. This framework relied on a gene's nucleotide composition, obviated the need for knowledge of codon boundaries and database searches, and was shown to perform very well across a wide range of archaeal and bacterial genomes when compared with previously published approaches, such as Codon Adaptation Index and C + G content. Nonetheless, two considerations remained outstanding: we wanted to further increase the sensitivity of detecting horizontal transfers and also to be able to apply the method to increasingly smaller genomes. In the discussion that follows, we present such a method, Wn-SVM, and show that it exhibits a very significant improvement in sensitivity compared with earlier approaches. Wn-SVM uses a one-class support-vector machine and can learn using rather small training sets. This property makes Wn-SVM particularly suitable for studying small-size genomes, similar to those of viruses, as well as the typically larger archaeal and bacterial genomes. We show experimentally that the new method results in a superior performance across a wide range of organisms and that it improves even upon our own earlier method by an average of 10% across all examined genomes. As a small-genome case study, we analyze the genome of the human cytomegalovirus and demonstrate that Wn-SVM correctly identifies regions that are known to be conserved and prototypical of all beta-herpesvirinae, regions that are known to have been acquired horizontally from the human host and, finally, regions that had not up to now been suspected to be horizontally transferred. Atypical region predictions for many eukaryotic viruses, including the alpha-, beta- and gamma-herpesvirinae, and 123 archaeal and bacterial genomes, have been made available online at http://cbcsrv.watson.ibm.com/HGT_SVM/.

  19. Rumen bacterial, archaeal, and fungal diversity of dairy cows in response to ingestion of lauric or myristic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristov, A N; Callaway, T R; Lee, C; Dowd, S E

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this experiment, part of a larger study, was to investigate changes in rumen bacterial, archaeal, and fungal diversity in cows fed medium-chain saturated fatty acids. In the main study, 6 lactating dairy cows were dosed intraruminally with 240 g/(cow · d) of stearic (SA, control), lauric (LA), or myristic (MA) acid in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design trial. Experimental periods were 28 d, and cows were transfaunated between periods. Lauric acid decreased protozoal counts in the rumen by 96% compared with SA and MA (compared with SA, MA had no effect on ruminal protozoa). Whole ruminal contents samples were collected 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 14, 18, and 24 h after the morning feeding on d 23 of each experimental period, stored frozen, and later composited by cow and period for microbial profile analyses, which involved tag-encoded flexible (FLX) amplicon pyrosequencing to provide diversity analyses of gastrointestinal bacterial, archaeal, and fungal populations of the cattle. The LA treatment, either directly or through its effect on protozoa, had a profound effect on the microbial ecology of the rumen. Ruminal populations of Prevotella, Bacteroides, and Enterorhabdus were decreased (P = 0.04 to P < 0.001) by more than 2-fold in LA treatments compared with SA, and Clostridium populations were decreased (P = 0.01) in LA- compared with MA-treated cows. The proportion of Ruminococcus was not affected by treatment, although the LA treatment had the least proportion of Ruminococcus. Proportions of Eubacterium, Butyrivibrio, Olsenella, and Lactobacillus genera were increased (P = 0.03 to 0.01) by LA compared with MA or SA. The LA treatment, possibly through its effect on protozoa physically associated with archaea, resulted in an increase (P = 0.01) in the archaeal methanogenic genus Methanosphaera and a decrease (P = 0.01) in Methanobrevibacter. Few changes in fungal populations caused by treatment were detected. Collectively, results indicate that LA

  20. The archaeal “7 kDa DNA-binding” proteins: extended characterization of an old gifted family

    OpenAIRE

    Valentina Kalichuk; Ghislaine Béhar; Axelle Renodon-Cornière; Georgi Danovski; Gonzalo Obal; Jacques Barbet; Barbara Mouratou; Frédéric Pecorari

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The " 7 kDa DNA-binding " family, also known as the Sul7d family, is composed of chromatin proteins from the Sulfolobales archaeal order. Among them, Sac7d and Sso7d have been the focus of several studies with some characterization of their properties. Here, we studied eleven other proteins alongside Sac7d and Sso7d under the same conditions. The dissociation constants of the purified proteins for binding to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) were determined in phosphate-buff...

  1. Plant insecticide L-canavanine repels Drosophila via the insect orphan GPCR DmX.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Mitri

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available For all animals, the taste sense is crucial to detect and avoid ingesting toxic molecules. Many toxins are synthesized by plants as a defense mechanism against insect predation. One example of such a natural toxic molecule is L-canavanine, a nonprotein amino acid found in the seeds of many legumes. Whether and how insects are informed that some plants contain L-canavanine remains to be elucidated. In insects, the taste sense relies on gustatory receptors forming the gustatory receptor (Gr family. Gr proteins display highly divergent sequences, suggesting that they could cover the entire range of tastants. However, one cannot exclude the possibility of evolutionarily independent taste receptors. Here, we show that L-canavanine is not only toxic, but is also a repellent for Drosophila. Using a pharmacogenetic approach, we find that flies sense food containing this poison by the DmX receptor. DmXR is an insect orphan G-protein-coupled receptor that has partially diverged in its ligand binding pocket from the metabotropic glutamate receptor family. Blockade of DmXR function with an antagonist lowers the repulsive effect of L-canavanine. In addition, disruption of the DmXR encoding gene, called mangetout (mtt, suppresses the L-canavanine repellent effect. To avoid the ingestion of L-canavanine, DmXR expression is required in bitter-sensitive gustatory receptor neurons, where it triggers the premature retraction of the proboscis, thus leading to the end of food searching. These findings show that the DmX receptor, which does not belong to the Gr family, fulfills a gustatory function necessary to avoid eating a natural toxin.

  2. Saving lives for a lifetime: supporting orphans and vulnerable children impacted by HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Beverly J; Yates, Dee Dee; Lovich, Ronnie; Coulibaly-Traore, Djeneba; Sherr, Lorraine; Thurman, Tonya Renee; Sampson, Anita; Howard, Brian

    2012-08-15

    President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR's) response to the millions of children impacted by HIV/AIDS was to designate 10% of its budget to securing their futures, making it the leading supporter of programs reaching orphan and vulnerable children (OVC) programs globally. This article describes the evolution of PEPFAR's OVC response based on programmatic lessons learned and an evergrowing understanding of the impacts of HIV/AIDS. In launching this international emergency effort and transitioning it toward sustainable local systems, PEPFAR helped establish both the technical content and the central importance of care and support for OVC as a necessary complement to biomedical efforts to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Critical services are reaching millions of HIV-affected children and families through vast networks of community-based responders and strengthened national systems of care. But rapid program scale-up has at times resulted in inconsistent responses, failure to match resources to properly assessed needs, and a dearth of rigorous program evaluations. Key investments should continue to be directed toward more sustainable and effective responses. These include greater attention to children's most significant developmental stages, a focus on building the resilience of families and communities, a proper balance of government and civil society investments, and more rigorous evaluation and research to ensure evidence-based programming. Even as HIV prevalence declines and medical treatment improves and expands, the impacts of HIV/AIDS on children, families, communities, economies, and societies will continue to accumulate for generations. Protecting the full potential of children-and thus of societies-requires sustained and strategic global investments aligned with experience and science.

  3. ORPHANS IN EASTERN AZOV DURING WORLD WAR II AND THE EARLY POSTWAR YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. CHAIKA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to one of the most important problems, the elimination of child homelessness in the Krasnodar Territory in 1941-1950 years. It was found that the Kuban from the first months of the war was one of the regions where the population is evacuated from the occupied territories of the USSR. Analyze the process of evacuation of children in orphanages in the summer of 1942 it demonstrated that even before the complete liberation of Krasnodar region from the Nazi invaders in its territory began to revive children's institutions. The author investigated the damage caused to children's homes occupiers of their financial situation during the war years; it showed the difficulties faced by students in the study period. The researcher concluded that during the war the main form of struggle against children's homelessness in the East Sea of Azov and other areas of the Krasnodar Territory was an orphanage. The country's leaders, using pre-war forms and methods of elimination of child neglect. In the early postwar years, financial status of children's institutions in the Kuban region in comparison with the military over the years has improved somewhat. Funding for children's homes was carried out in full, improved nutrition students. Despite the presence of local constraints on material maintenance of children's homes. In general, the existing system of social protection of orphans has fulfilled its function in the short term has been eliminated homeless children throughout the territory of Krasnodar region. The article shows the role of the party and government bodies in ensuring the conditions for the functioning of orphanages. For the opening theme used a variety of sources, some of which are introduced into scientific circulation for the first time.

  4. ANTIOXIDANT ENZYME ACTIVITY AMONG ORPHANS INFECTED WITH INTESTINAL PARASITES IN PATHUM THANI PROVINCE, THAILAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahittikorn, Aongart; Prasertbun, Rapeepan; Mori, Hirotake; Popruk, Supaluk

    2014-11-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections can negatively impact growth and nutrition in children. The infections can induce oxidative stress, resulting in a variety of illnesses. We measured antioxidant enzyme levels in orphan children infected with intestinal parasites to investigate the influence of nutritional status on antioxidant enzymes. This cross sectional study was conducted at an orphanage in Thailand. Stool samples were obtained from each subject and examined for intestinal parasites. Anthropometric measurements, complete blood count and biochemical parameters, including serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels, were obtained from studied subjects. One hundred twenty-eight children were included in the study. Intestinal parasites were found on microscopic examination of the stools in 36.7% (47/128); 18% (23/128) had a mixed parasite infection. Intestinal protozoa were found in 34.4% of subjects and intestinal helminthes were found in 2.3%. The median GPx level in children infected with intestinal parasites (2.3 ng/ml) was significantly lower than in non-infected children (7.7 ng/ml) (p parasites, 2) non-pathogenic parasites and 3) no intestinal parasite infection, GPx levels differed significantly among three groups (2.2 ng/ml, 2.4 ng/ml and 7.7 ng/ml, respectively) (p parasites (107.2 ng/ml) was significantly higher than in underweight children infected with non-pathogenic parasites (68.6 ng/ml) and without intestinal parasite infections (72.2 ng/ml). The present study identified two key findings: low GPx levels in children with intestinal parasitic infections, and the potential impact of malnutrition on some antioxidants.

  5. Regulation of sialidase production in Clostridium perfringens by the orphan sensor histidine kinase ReeS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Hiscox

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens is ubiquitous in nature and is often found as a commensal of the human and animal gastrointestinal tract. It is the primary etiological agent of clostridial myonecrosis, or gas gangrene, a serious infection that results in extensive tissue necrosis due to the action of one or more potent extracellular toxins. α-toxin and perfringolysin O are the major extracellular toxins involved in the pathogenesis of gas gangrene, but histotoxic strains of C. perfringens, such as strain 13, also produce many degradative enzymes such as collagenases, hyaluronidases, sialidases and the cysteine protease, α-clostripain. The production of many of these toxins is regulated either directly or indirectly by the global VirSR two-component signal transduction system. By isolating a chromosomal mutant and carrying out microarray analysis we have identified an orphan sensor histidine kinase, which we have named ReeS (regulator of extracellular enzymes sensor. Expression of the sialidase genes nanI and nanJ was down-regulated in a reeS mutant. Since complementation with the wild-type reeS gene restored nanI and nanJ expression to wild-type levels, as shown by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and sialidase assays we concluded that ReeS positively regulates the expression of these sialidase genes. However, mutation of the reeS gene had no significant effect on virulence in the mouse myonecrosis model. Sialidase production in C. perfringens has been previously shown to be regulated by both the VirSR system and RevR. In this report, we have analyzed a previously unknown sensor histidine kinase, ReeS, and have shown that it also is involved in controlling the expression of sialidase genes, adding further complexity to the regulatory network that controls sialidase production in C. perfringens.

  6. Neuroanatomical distribution of the orphan GPR50 receptor in adult sheep and rodent brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batailler, M; Mullier, A; Sidibe, A; Delagrange, P; Prévot, V; Jockers, R; Migaud, M

    2012-05-01

    GPR50, formerly known as melatonin-related receptor, is one of three subtypes of the melatonin receptor subfamily, together with the MT(1) and MT(2) receptors. By contrast to these two high-affinity receptor subtypes and despite its high identity with the melatonin receptor family, GPR50 does not bind melatonin or any other known ligand. Specific and reliable immunological tools are therefore needed to be able to elucidate the physiological functions of this orphan receptor that are still largely unknown. We have generated and validated a new specific GPR50 antibody against the ovine GPR50 and used it to analyse the neuroanatomical distribution of the GPR50 in sheep, rat and mouse whole brain. We demonstrated that GPR50-positive cells are widely distributed in various regions, including the hypothalamus and the pars tuberalis of the pituitary, in all the three species studied. GPR50 expressing cells are abundant in the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus, the periventricular nucleus and the median eminence. In rodents, immunohistochemical studies revealed a broader distribution pattern for the GPR50 protein. GPR50 immunoreactivity is found in the medial preoptic area (MPA), the lateral septum, the lateral hypothalamic area, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the vascular organ of the laminae terminalis and several regions of the amygdala, including the medial nuclei of amygdala. Additionally, in the rat brain, GPR50 protein was localised in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer of the dorsal hippocampus. In mice, moderate to high numbers of GPR50-positive cells were also found in the subfornical organ. Taken together, these results provide an enlarged distribution of GPR50 protein, give further insight into the organisation of the melatoninergic system, and may lay the framework for future studies on the role of the GPR50 in the brain.

  7. Analysis and Comparison of Foreign and Domestic Orphan Drug Registration Policies%国内外孤儿药注册制度比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    信枭雄; 管晓东; 陈敬; 史录文

    2013-01-01

    目的 借鉴部分发达国家与地区针对孤儿药注册管理的先进经验,探求适用于我国的孤儿药注册制度.方法 对美国、日本、欧盟、澳大利亚、中国台湾等地所采取的孤儿药注册制度进行研究和对比,并且对我国孤儿药注册管理的历史和现状进行总结.结果 国际上针对孤儿药注册普遍采用“身份认定+上市审批”的方式,这种方式切实有效地推动了各国及地区孤儿药产业的发展,提高了孤儿药的可及性.结论 我国有关部门应借鉴先进经验,尽快建立起孤儿药制度体系并不断完善其注册制度.%OBJECTIVE To learn from several developed countries and regions about their experience of orphan drug registration management and to explore appropriate orphan drug registration policy for China.METHODS The orphan drug registration policies of America,Japan,EU,Australia and Taiwan were analyze and compared,and the history and current situation of the orphan drug registration in China were summarized.RESULTS It has been a common trend in the world to use "designation of drugs + market approval" pattern for orphan drug registration,which has promoted the development of orphan drugs and increased the accessibility of orphan drugs in the above-mentioned countries and regions.CONCLUSION Related government departments in China should learn the advanced experience and establish our orphan drug system as soon as possible,at the same time,we should keep improving the orphan drug registration policy in China.

  8. Promoting uptake of child HIV testing: an evaluation of the role of a home visiting program for orphans and vulnerable children in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Tonya R; Luckett, Brian; Taylor, Tory; Carnay, Melissa

    2016-03-01

    HIV counseling and testing (HCT) is critical for children in generalized epidemic settings, but significant shortfalls in coverage persist, notably among orphans and others at disproportionate risk of infection. This study investigates the impact of a home visiting program in South Africa on orphaned and vulnerable children's uptake of HCT. Using propensity score matching, survey data for children receiving home visits from trained community-based care workers were compared to data from children living in similar households that had not yet received home visits (n = 1324). Home visits by community-based care workers increased the odds of a child being tested by 97% (OR = 1.97, 95% CI = 1.34-2.92). The home visitation program had an especially pronounced effect on orphans, more than doubling their odds of being tested (OR = 2.12, 95% CI = 1.00-4.47) compared to orphans living in similar households that did not receive home visits. Orphan status alone had no effect on HCT independent of program exposure, suggesting that the program was uniquely able to increase testing in this subgroup. Results highlight the potential for increasing HCT access among children at high risk through targeted community-based initiatives.

  9. [Shift of focus in the financing of Hungarian drugs. Reimbursement for orphan drugs for treating rare diseases: financing of enzyme replacement therapy in Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szegedi, Márta; Molnár, Mária Judit; Boncz, Imre; Kosztolányi, György

    2014-11-01

    Focusing on the benefits of patients with rare disease the authors analysed the aspects of orphan medicines financed in the frame of the Hungarian social insurance system in 2012 in order to make the consumption more rational, transparent and predictable. Most of the orphan drugs were financed in the frame of compassionate use by the reimbursement system. Consequently, a great deal of crucial problems occurred in relation to the unconventional subsidized method, especially in the case of the highest cost enzyme replacement therapies. On the base of the findings, proposals of the authors are presented for access to orphan drugs, fitting to the specific professional, economical and ethical aspects of this unique field of the health care system. The primary goal is to provide a suitable subsidized method for the treatment of rare disease patients with unmet medical needs. The financial modification of orphans became indispensible in Hungary. Professionals from numerous fields dealing with rare disease patients' care expressed agreement on the issue. Transforming the orphan medicines' financial structure has been initiated according to internationally shared principles.

  10. The Formation of the Dilemma and Resolution Path of Orphan Works' Copyright%孤儿作品的版权困境及解决路径

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马海群; 高思静

    2011-01-01

    解析孤儿作品的含义和形成原因,指出解决孤儿作品版权困境的必要性,在此基础上介绍分析国外解决孤儿作品版权问题的方案,最后提出版权管理信息、认证许可模式、延伸性集体管理、强制许可模式、责任限制制度、版权例外模式的6项建议,以期更好地解决我国孤儿作品的版权困境问题。%By analyzing the definition of orphan works and discussing the formation of orphan works, this paper proposes the necessity of solutions to the dilemma of orphan works, and then analyzes programs of solving orphan works' copyright issues from ahroad. This paper expects to resolve the orphan werks' copyright dilemma by proposing the following six adviees, including to rights management information,creative commons license, extended collective licensing,compulsory license,limited liability and statutory limitation.

  11. Free energy simulations of a GTPase: GTP and GDP binding to archaeal initiation factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpati, Priyadarshi; Clavaguéra, Carine; Ohanessian, Gilles; Simonson, Thomas

    2011-05-26

    Archaeal initiation factor 2 (aIF2) is a protein involved in the initiation of protein biosynthesis. In its GTP-bound, "ON" conformation, aIF2 binds an initiator tRNA and carries it to the ribosome. In its GDP-bound, "OFF" conformation, it dissociates from tRNA. To understand the specific binding of GTP and GDP and its dependence on the ON or OFF conformational state of aIF2, molecular dynamics free energy simulations (MDFE) are a tool of choice. However, the validity of the computed free energies depends on the simulation model, including the force field and the boundary conditions, and on the extent of conformational sampling in the simulations. aIF2 and other GTPases present specific difficulties; in particular, the nucleotide ligand coordinates a divalent Mg(2+) ion, which can polarize the electronic distribution of its environment. Thus, a force field with an explicit treatment of electronic polarizability could be necessary, rather than a simpler, fixed charge force field. Here, we begin by comparing a fixed charge force field to quantum chemical calculations and experiment for Mg(2+):phosphate binding in solution, with the force field giving large errors. Next, we consider GTP and GDP bound to aIF2 and we compare two fixed charge force fields to the recent, polarizable, AMOEBA force field, extended here in a simple, approximate manner to include GTP. We focus on a quantity that approximates the free energy to change GTP into GDP. Despite the errors seen for Mg(2+):phosphate binding in solution, we observe a substantial cancellation of errors when we compare the free energy change in the protein to that in solution, or when we compare the protein ON and OFF states. Finally, we have used the fixed charge force field to perform MDFE simulations and alchemically transform GTP into GDP in the protein and in solution. With a total of about 200 ns of molecular dynamics, we obtain good convergence and a reasonable statistical uncertainty, comparable to the force

  12. Evaluation of 16S rRNA Gene Primer Pairs for Monitoring Microbial Community Structures Showed High Reproducibility within and Low Comparability between Datasets Generated with Multiple Archaeal and Bacterial Primer Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Martin A; Güllert, Simon; Neulinger, Sven C; Streit, Wolfgang R; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2016-01-01

    The application of next-generation sequencing technology in microbial community analysis increased our knowledge and understanding of the complexity and diversity of a variety of ecosystems. In contrast to Bacteria, the archaeal domain was often not particularly addressed in the analysis of microbial communities. Consequently, established primers specifically amplifying the archaeal 16S ribosomal gene region are scarce compared to the variety of primers targeting bacterial sequences. In this study, we aimed to validate archaeal primers suitable for high throughput next generation sequencing. Three archaeal 16S primer pairs as well as two bacterial and one general microbial 16S primer pairs were comprehensively tested by in-silico evaluation and performing an experimental analysis of a complex microbial community of a biogas reactor. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that comparability of community profiles established using different primer pairs is difficult. 16S rRNA gene data derived from a shotgun metagenome of the same reactor sample added an additional perspective on the community structure. Furthermore, in-silico evaluation of primers, especially those for amplification of archaeal 16S rRNA gene regions, does not necessarily reflect the results obtained in experimental approaches. In the latter, archaeal primer pair ArchV34 showed the highest similarity to the archaeal community structure compared to observed by the metagenomic approach and thus appears to be the appropriate for analyzing archaeal communities in biogas reactors. However, a disadvantage of this primer pair was its low specificity for the archaeal domain in the experimental application leading to high amounts of bacterial sequences within the dataset. Overall our results indicate a rather limited comparability between community structures investigated and determined using different primer pairs as well as between metagenome and 16S rRNA gene amplicon based community structure analysis

  13. Combined monitoring of changes in delta13CH4 and archaeal community structure during mesophilic methanization of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xian; Mazéas, Laurent; Vavilin, Vasily A; Epissard, Jonathan; Lemunier, Mélanie; Mouchel, Jean-Marie; He, Pin-jing; Bouchez, Théodore

    2009-05-01

    Reconstituted municipal solid waste (MSW) with varying contents of putrescible and cellulosic waste was incubated anaerobically under mesophilic conditions. Standard physicochemical parameters were monitored, together with stable isotopic signatures of produced CH(4) and CO(2). delta(13)C values for CH(4) indicated a change of methanogenic metabolism with time. CH(4) was predominantly produced from H(2)/CO(2) at the beginning of the incubations. This period was associated with important shifts in archaeal communities monitored by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) and FISH of oligonucleotidic probes targeting specifically 16S rRNA gene of various methanogenic groups. The onset of the active methane generation phase was characterized by an increase of CH(4)delta(13)C, indicating a progressive shift toward an aceticlastic metabolism. When the methane production levelled off, a decrease in the isotopic signature was observed toward values characteristics of hydrogenotrophic metabolism. ARISA profiles were, however, found to be stable from the beginning of the active methane generation phase until the end of the experiment. FISH observation indicated that members of the family Methanosarcinaceae were predominant in the archaeal community during this period, suggesting that these methanogens might exhibit a high metabolic versatility during methanization of waste.

  14. Dark matter in archaeal genomes: a rich source of novel mobile elements, defense systems and secretory complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Kira S; Wolf, Yuri I; Forterre, Patrick; Prangishvili, David; Krupovic, Mart; Koonin, Eugene V

    2014-09-01

    Microbial genomes encompass a sizable fraction of poorly characterized, narrowly spread fast-evolving genes. Using sensitive methods for sequences comparison and protein structure prediction, we performed a detailed comparative analysis of clusters of such genes, which we denote "dark matter islands", in archaeal genomes. The dark matter islands comprise up to 20% of archaeal genomes and show remarkable heterogeneity and diversity. Nevertheless, three classes of entities are common in these genomic loci: (a) integrated viral genomes and other mobile elements; (b) defense systems, and (c) secretory and other membrane-associated systems. The dark matter islands in the genome of thermophiles and mesophiles show similar general trends of gene content, but thermophiles are substantially enriched in predicted membrane proteins whereas mesophiles have a greater proportion of recognizable mobile elements. Based on this analysis, we predict the existence of several novel groups of viruses and mobile elements, previously unnoticed variants of CRISPR-Cas immune systems, and new secretory systems that might be involved in stress response, intermicrobial conflicts and biogenesis of novel, uncharacterized membrane structures.

  15. Functional characterization of a conserved archaeal viral operon revealing single-stranded DNA binding, annealing and nuclease activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Yang; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt; White, Malcolm F.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of archaeal viral genes are of unknown function hindering our understanding of the virus life cycle and viral interactions with their host. Here, we first describe functional characterization of ORF131b (gp17) and ORF436 (gp18) of Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2), bot...... for rudiviruses and the close interaction among the ssDNA binding, annealing and nuclease proteins strongly point to a role of the gene operon in genome maturation and/or DNA recombination that may function in viral DNA replication/repair.......The majority of archaeal viral genes are of unknown function hindering our understanding of the virus life cycle and viral interactions with their host. Here, we first describe functional characterization of ORF131b (gp17) and ORF436 (gp18) of Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2), both...... encoding proteins of unknown function and forming an operon with ORF207 (gp19). SIRV2 gp17 was found to be a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein different in structure from all previously characterized ssDNA binding proteins. Mutagenesis of a few conserved basic residues suggested a U...

  16. Correlates of poor health among orphans and abandoned children in less wealthy countries: the importance of caregiver health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Thielman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: More than 153 million children worldwide have been orphaned by the loss of one or both parents, and millions more have been abandoned. We investigated relationships between the health of orphaned and abandoned children (OAC and child, caregiver, and household characteristics among randomly selected OAC in five countries. METHODOLOGY: Using a two-stage random sampling strategy in 6 study areas in Cambodia, Ethiopia, India, Kenya, and Tanzania, the Positive Outcomes for Orphans (POFO study identified 1,480 community-living OAC ages 6 to 12. Detailed interviews were conducted with 1,305 primary caregivers at baseline and after 6 and 12 months. Multivariable logistic regression models describe associations between the characteristics of children, caregivers, and households and child health outcomes: fair or poor child health; fever, cough, or diarrhea within the past two weeks; illness in the past 6 months; and fair or poor health on at least two assessments. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Across the six study areas, 23% of OAC were reported to be in fair or poor health; 19%, 18%, and 2% had fever, cough, or diarrhea, respectively, within the past two weeks; 55% had illnesses within the past 6 months; and 23% were in fair or poor health on at least two assessments. Female gender, suspected HIV infection, experiences of potentially traumatic events, including the loss of both parents, urban residence, eating fewer than 3 meals per day, and low caregiver involvement were associated with poorer child health outcomes. Particularly strong associations were observed between child health measures and the health of their primary caregivers. CONCLUSIONS: Poor caregiver health is a strong signal for poor health of OAC. Strategies to support OAC should target the caregiver-child dyad. Steps to ensure food security, foster gender equality, and prevent and treat traumatic events are needed.

  17. Platelet function and Isoprostane biology. Should Isoprostanes be the newest member of the Orphan-ligand family?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khasawneh Fadi T

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While there have been many reports investigating the biological activity and signaling mechanisms of isoprostanes, their role in biology, particularly in platelets, appears to still be underestimated. Moreover, whether these lipids have their own receptors is still debated, despite multiple reports that discrete receptors for isporpstanes do exist on platelets, vascular tissues, amongst others. This paper provides a review of the important literature of isoprostanes and provides reasoning that isoprostanes should be classified as orphan ligands until their receptor(s is/are identified.

  18. Cloning and characterization of a human orphan family C G-protein coupled receptor GPRC5D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, H; Jensen, A A; Sheppard, P O

    2001-01-01

    predicted to encode an additional subtype. The full length coding regions of mouse mGprc5d and human GPRC5D were cloned and shown to contain predicted open reading frames of 300 and 345 amino acids, respectively. GPRC5D has seven putative transmembrane segments and is expressed in the cell membrane...... intestine, whereas other organs only express a subset of the genes. In an attempt to delineate the signal transduction pathway(s) of the orphan receptors, a series of chimeric receptors containing the amino terminal domain of the calcium sensing receptor or metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1...

  19. Role of G protein-coupled orphan receptors in intestinal inflammation: novel targets in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, Andrzej; Storr, Martin; Zielińska, Marta; Fichna, Jakub

    2015-03-01

    A large number of proteins were classified into the family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Based on their characteristic serpentine domain, they are called 7 TM receptors. Presently, their ligands and physiological functions remain unknown. In this review, we summarize what is known on these receptors and discuss the potential use of these orphan GPCRs (GPRs) in the induction or maintenance of remission in inflammatory bowel diseases. We focus on GPRs 30, 41, 43, 55, 119, and 120, where scientific evidence supports a potential role in intestinal inflammation.

  20. Marc Treib: Representing Landscape Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braae, Ellen Marie

    2008-01-01

    The editor of Representing Landscape Architecture, Marc Treib, argues that there is good reason to evaluate the standard practices of representation that landscape architects have been using for so long. In the rush to the promised land of computer design these practices are now in danger of being...... left by the wayside. The 14 often both fitting and well crafted contributions of this publication offer an approach to how landscape architecture has been and is currently represented; in the design study, in presentation, in criticism, and in the creation of landscape architecture....

  1. Representative process sampling - in practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbensen, Kim; Friis-Pedersen, Hans Henrik; Julius, Lars Petersen

    2007-01-01

    Didactic data sets representing a range of real-world processes are used to illustrate "how to do" representative process sampling and process characterisation. The selected process data lead to diverse variogram expressions with different systematics (no range vs. important ranges; trends and....../or periodicity; different nugget effects and process variations ranging from less than one lag to full variogram lag). Variogram data analysis leads to a fundamental decomposition into 0-D sampling vs. 1-D process variances, based on the three principal variogram parameters: range, sill and nugget effect...

  2. 罕用药新品种开发及临床评价%Development and clinical evaluation of orphan drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁芳; 沈舜义

    2011-01-01

    The research and development of orphan drugs has been concerned gradually in recent years. The experience of developed countries in this field is a good reference to our country. This review describes the orphan drugs development policy in the United States and other developed countries, especially focuses on the recent listed orphan drugs and their clinical evaluation.%我国罕用药的研发近年逐步引起关注,目前我国对于罕见病的研究以及罕用药的开发主要参照国际发达因家的经验.本义简要回顾美国等发达国家鼓励罕用药开发的相关政策,重点介绍近期上市的儿种罕用药新品种及其临床评价.

  3. Ser/Thr/Tyr protein phosphorylation in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum--a representative of the third domain of life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalis Aivaliotis

    Full Text Available In the quest for the origin and evolution of protein phosphorylation, the major regulatory post-translational modification in eukaryotes, the members of archaea, the "third domain of life", play a protagonistic role. A plethora of studies have demonstrated that archaeal proteins are subject to post-translational modification by covalent phosphorylation, but little is known concerning the identities of the proteins affected, the impact on their functionality, the physiological roles of archaeal protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation, and the protein kinases/phosphatases involved. These limited studies led to the initial hypothesis that archaea, similarly to other prokaryotes, use mainly histidine/aspartate phosphorylation, in their two-component systems representing a paradigm of prokaryotic signal transduction, while eukaryotes mostly use Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation for creating highly sophisticated regulatory networks. In antithesis to the above hypothesis, several studies showed that Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation is also common in the bacterial cell, and here we present the first genome-wide phosphoproteomic analysis of the model organism of archaea, Halobacterium salinarum, proving the existence/conservation of Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation in the "third domain" of life, allowing a better understanding of the origin and evolution of the so-called "Nature's premier" mechanism for regulating the functional properties of proteins.

  4. 欧美孤儿药的研究与开发现状%Current situation of orphan drug research and development in the Europe and America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田圆圆; 张象麟; 董江萍

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzed the current situation of the orphan drug development in the Europe and A-merica. There are many difficulties in orphan drug research and development; however, current regulations, stimulating measures and other opportunity give the orphan drug impetus to develop, and promote the treatment of the patients with rare diseases. In fact, the perfect policies and reasonable measures of the government can solve the barriers of the orphan drug and ensure availability of new treatment to patients. The successful experience of orphan drug development in Europe and America can contribute to the establishment of the orphan drug management policies in China.%文中对欧美孤儿药开发现状进行了分析.孤儿药研发尽管面临众多困难,但在欧美孤儿药现有制度法规、优惠措施及其他机遇的推动下,取得了较好的成果,促进了对罕见病患者的医疗救治.事实证明,政府完善的政策和采取合理的措施和方法,可解决当前孤儿药研发面临的诸多障碍,保证患者对新治疗方法的可获得性.欧美孤儿药的研发成功经验可为我国孤儿药管理政策和制度的建立提供一定的借鉴.

  5. The CanOE strategy: integrating genomic and metabolic contexts across multiple prokaryote genomes to find candidate genes for orphan enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Alexander Thil Smith

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Of all biochemically characterized metabolic reactions formalized by the IUBMB, over one out of four have yet to be associated with a nucleic or protein sequence, i.e. are sequence-orphan enzymatic activities. Few bioinformatics annotation tools are able to propose candidate genes for such activities by exploiting context-dependent rather than sequence-dependent data, and none are readily accessible and propose result integration across multiple genomes. Here, we present CanOE (Candidate genes for Orphan Enzymes, a four-step bioinformatics strategy that proposes ranked candidate genes for sequence-orphan enzymatic activities (or orphan enzymes for short. The first step locates "genomic metabolons", i.e. groups of co-localized genes coding proteins catalyzing reactions linked by shared metabolites, in one genome at a time. These metabolons can be particularly helpful for aiding bioanalysts to visualize relevant metabolic data. In the second step, they are used to generate candidate associations between un-annotated genes and gene-less reactions. The third step integrates these gene-reaction associations over several genomes using gene families, and summarizes the strength of family-reaction associations by several scores. In the final step, these scores are used to rank members of gene families which are proposed for metabolic reactions. These associations are of particular interest when the metabolic reaction is a sequence-orphan enzymatic activity. Our strategy found over 60,000 genomic metabolons in more than 1,000 prokaryote organisms from the MicroScope platform, generating candidate genes for many metabolic reactions, of which more than 70 distinct orphan reactions. A computational validation of the approach is discussed. Finally, we present a case study on the anaerobic allantoin degradation pathway in Escherichia coli K-12.

  6. Archaeal and bacterial diversity in two hot springs from geothermal regions in Bulgaria as demostrated by 16S rRNA and GH-57 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanova, Katerina; Tomova, Iva; Tomova, Anna; Radchenkova, Nadja; Atanassov, Ivan; Kambourova, Margarita

    2015-12-01

    Archaeal and bacterial diversity in two Bulgarian hot springs, geographically separated with different tectonic origin and different temperature of water was investigated exploring two genes, 16S rRNA and GH-57. Archaeal diversity was significantly higher in the hotter spring Levunovo (LV) (82°C); on the contrary, bacterial diversity was higher in the spring Vetren Dol (VD) (68°C). The analyzed clones from LV library were referred to twenty eight different sequence types belonging to five archaeal groups from Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. A domination of two groups was observed, Candidate Thaumarchaeota and Methanosarcinales. The majority of the clones from VD were referred to HWCG (Hot Water Crenarchaeotic Group). The formation of a group of thermophiles in the order Methanosarcinales was suggested. Phylogenetic analysis revealed high numbers of novel sequences, more than one third of archaeal and half of the bacterial phylotypes displayed similarity lower than 97% with known ones. The retrieved GH-57 gene sequences showed a complex phylogenic distribution. The main part of the retrieved homologous GH-57 sequences affiliated with bacterial phyla Bacteroidetes, Deltaproteobacteria, Candidate Saccharibacteria and affiliation of almost half of the analyzed sequences is not fully resolved. GH-57 gene analysis allows an increased resolution of the biodiversity assessment and in depth analysis of specific taxonomic groups. [Int Microbiol 18(4):217-223 (2015)].

  7. [Archaeal diversity in permafrost deposits of Bunger Hills Oasis and King George Island (Antarctica) according to the 16S rRNA gene sequencing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaevskaia, E S; Demchenko, L S; Demidov, N É; Rivkina, E M; Bulat, S A; Gilichinskiĭ, D A

    2014-01-01

    Archaeal communities of permafrost deposits of King George Island and Bunger Hills Oasis (Antarctica) differing in the content of biogenic methane were analyzed using clone libraries of two 16S rRNA gene regions. Phylotypes belonging to methanogenic archaea were identified in all horizons.

  8. Comparison of Fecal Methanogenic Archaeal Community Between Erhualian and Landrace Pigs Using Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Real-Time PCR Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Y.; Smidt, H.; Zhu, W.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Erhualian and Landrace breeds are typical genetically obese and lean pigs, respectively. To compare the fecal methanogenic Archaeal community between these two pig breeds, fecal samples from different growth phase pigs were collected and used for PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) wi

  9. Effect of supplementing coconut or krabok oil, rich in medium-chain fatty acids on ruminal fermentation, protozoa and archaeal population of bulls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panyakaew, P.; Boon, N.; Goel, G.; Yuangklang, C.; Schonewille, J.T.; Hendriks, W.H.; Fievez, V.

    2013-01-01

    Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA), for example, capric acid (C10:0), myristic (C14:0) and lauric (C12:0) acid, have been suggested to decrease rumen archaeal abundance and protozoal numbers. This study aimed to compare the effect of MCFA, either supplied through krabok (KO) or coconut (CO) oil, on rum

  10. Phylogenetic diversity of archaeal 16S rRNA and ammonia monooxygenase genes from tropical estuarine sediments on the central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singh, S.K.; Verma, P.; Ramaiah, N; Anil, A; Shouche, Y.S.

    Phylogenetic diversity analyses of archaeal 16S rRNA and ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (AamoA) genes were carried out on sediment samples from the Mandovi and Zuari estuaries, Goa, on the central west coast of India. The 16S rRNA gene libraries...

  11. Segregated Planktonic and Bottom-Dwelling Archaeal Communities in High-Temperature Acidic/Sulfuric Ponds of the Tatun Volcano Group, Northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Wen Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal environments are characterized by dynamic redox and temperature fluctuations inherited from the exposure of deeply-sourced, hot, reducing fluids to low-temperature, oxidizing ambient environments. To investigate whether microbial assemblages shifted in response to the changes of a redox state within acidic hot ponds, we collected three paired water and sediment samples from the Tatun Volcano Group, assessed metabolic roles of community members, and correlated their functional capabilities with geochemical factors along depth. Molecular analyses revealed that Sulfolobus spp., Acidianus spp. and Vulcanisaeta spp. capable of respiring elemental sulfur under oxic and/or low-oxygen conditions were the major archaeal members in planktonic communities. In contrast, obligate anaerobic Caldisphaera spp. dominated over others in bottom-dwelling communities. Bacteria were only detected in one locality wherein the majority was affiliated with microaerophilic Hydrogenobaculum spp. Cluster analyses indicated that archaeal communities associated with sediments tended to cluster together and branch off those with water. In addition, the quantities of dissolved oxygen within the water column were substantially less than those in equilibrium with atmospheric oxygen, indicating a net oxygen consumption most likely catalyzed by microbial processes. These lines of evidence suggest that the segregation of planktonic from bottom-dwelling archaeal assemblages could be accounted for by the oxygen affinities inherited in individual archaeal members. Community assemblages in geothermal ecosystems would be often underrepresented without cautious sampling of both water and sediments.

  12. Comparative analysis of fecal DNA extraction methods with phylogenetic microarray: Effective recovery of bacterial and archaeal DNA using mechanical cell lysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salonen, A.; Nikkilä, J.; Jalanka-Tuovinen, J.; Immonen, O.; Rajilic-Stojanovic, M.; Kekkonen, R.A.; Palva, A.; Vos, de W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Several different protocols are used for fecal DNA extraction, which is an integral step in all phylogenetic and metagenomic approaches to characterize the highly diverse intestinal ecosystem. We compared four widely used methods, and found their DNA yields to vary up to 35-fold. Bacterial, archaeal

  13. PEPFAR's support for orphans and vulnerable children: some beneficial effects, but too little data, and programs spread thin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Malcolm; Beard, Jennifer; Sabin, Lora; Brooks, Mohamad I; Scott, Nancy; Larson, Bruce A; Biemba, Godfrey; Miller, Candace; Simon, Jonathon

    2012-07-01

    Sixteen million children in developing and middle-income countries have been orphaned by HIV/AIDS, and at least another million children per year are rendered vulnerable by parental HIV/AIDS-related illness. Since 2003 the US government has provided approximately $1.6 billion to give four million of these children care and support through the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). We conducted five studies to evaluate the effectiveness of PEPFAR's interventions for such children in East Africa and southern Africa. We found evidence of beneficial changes in school enrollment rates and on the psychosocial well-being of children. However, we could not demonstrate empirically the impact of most of the PEPFAR initiatives that we examined, primarily because of a lack of baseline data and clear outcome and impact indicators. We also found that many programs were spread so thin across a vulnerable population that little in the way of services actually reached beneficiaries, which raises questions about whether PEPFAR funds are sufficient, or if the program is attempting to do much with too few resources. We offer several recommendations, including better measuring the effect of programs for orphans and vulnerable children by collecting baseline data and conducting well-designed, rigorous outcome and impact evaluations.

  14. Orphan Toxin OrtT (YdcX of Escherichia coli Reduces Growth during the Stringent Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Islam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxin/antitoxin (TA systems are nearly universal in prokaryotes; toxins are paired with antitoxins which inactivate them until the toxins are utilized. Here we explore whether toxins may function alone; i.e., whether a toxin which lacks a corresponding antitoxin (orphan toxin is physiologically relevant. By focusing on a homologous protein of the membrane-damaging toxin GhoT of the Escherichia coli GhoT/GhoS type V TA system, we found that YdcX (renamed OrtT for orphan toxin related to tetrahydrofolate is toxic but is not part of TA pair. OrtT is not inactivated by neighboring YdcY (which is demonstrated to be a protein, nor is it inactivated by antitoxin GhoS. Also, OrtT is not inactivated by small RNA upstream or downstream of ortT. Moreover, screening a genomic library did not identify an antitoxin partner for OrtT. OrtT is a protein and its toxicity stems from membrane damage as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy and cell lysis. Furthermore, OrtT reduces cell growth and metabolism in the presence of both antimicrobials trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole; these antimicrobials induce the stringent response by inhibiting tetrahydrofolate synthesis. Therefore, we demonstrate that OrtT acts as an independent toxin to reduce growth during stress related to amino acid and DNA synthesis.

  15. Judgments of and by Representativeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-15

    probably agree that John Updike is a more representative American writer than Norman Mailer. rlearly, such a judgment does not have a frequentistic...example, in an early study we presented people with the following description, " John is 27 years old, with an outgoing personality. At college he was an...outstanding athlete but did not show much ability or interest in in- tellectual matters". We found that John was judged to be more likely to be "a gym

  16. Representing culture in interstellar messages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakoch, Douglas A.

    2008-09-01

    As scholars involved with the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) have contemplated how we might portray humankind in any messages sent to civilizations beyond Earth, one of the challenges they face is adequately representing the diversity of human cultures. For example, in a 2003 workshop in Paris sponsored by the SETI Institute, the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) SETI Permanent Study Group, the International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology (ISAST), and the John Templeton Foundation, a varied group of artists, scientists, and scholars from the humanities considered how to encode notions of altruism in interstellar messages art_science/2003>. Though the group represented 10 countries, most were from Europe and North America, leading to the group's recommendation that subsequent discussions on the topic should include more globally representative perspectives. As a result, the IAA Study Group on Interstellar Message Construction and the SETI Institute sponsored a follow-up workshop in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA in February 2005. The Santa Fe workshop brought together scholars from a range of disciplines including anthropology, archaeology, chemistry, communication science, philosophy, and psychology. Participants included scholars familiar with interstellar message design as well as specialists in cross-cultural research who had participated in the Symposium on Altruism in Cross-cultural Perspective, held just prior to the workshop during the annual conference of the Society for Cross-cultural Research . The workshop included discussion of how cultural understandings of altruism can complement and critique the more biologically based models of altruism proposed for interstellar messages at the 2003 Paris workshop. This paper, written by the chair of both the Paris and Santa Fe workshops, will explore the challenges of communicating concepts of altruism that draw on both biological and cultural models.

  17. Semantic Representatives of the Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena N. Tsay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article concept as one of the principle notions of cognitive linguistics is investigated. Considering concept as culture phenomenon, having language realization and ethnocultural peculiarities, the description of the concept “happiness” is presented. Lexical and semantic paradigm of the concept of happiness correlates with a great number of lexical and semantic variants. In the work semantic representatives of the concept of happiness, covering supreme spiritual values are revealed and semantic interpretation of their functioning in the Biblical discourse is given.

  18. Phylogenetic and Functional Analysis of Metagenome Sequence from High-Temperature Archaeal Habitats Demonstrate Linkages between Metabolic Potential and Geochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inskeep, William P; Jay, Zackary J; Herrgard, Markus

    2013-01-01

    from the sequence data. Analysis of protein family occurrence, particularly of those involved in energy conservation, electron transport, and autotrophic metabolism, revealed significant differences in metabolic strategies across sites consistent with differences in major geochemical attributes (e.......4 and to discuss specific examples where the metabolic potential correlated with measured environmental parameters and geochemical processes occurring in situ. Random shotgun metagenome sequence (∼40-45 Mb Sanger sequencing per site) was obtained from environmental DNA extracted from high-temperature sediments and....../or microbial mats and subjected to numerous phylogenetic and functional analyses. Analysis of individual sequences (e.g., MEGAN and G + C content) and assemblies from each habitat type revealed the presence of dominant archaeal populations in all environments, 10 of whose genomes were largely reconstructed...

  19. Phylogenetic and Functional Analysis of Metagenome Sequence from High-Temperature Archaeal Habitats Demonstrate Linkages between Metabolic Potential and Geochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inskeep, William P; Jay, Zackary J; Herrgard, Markus;

    2013-01-01

    Geothermal habitats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an unparalleled opportunity to understand the environmental factors that control the distribution of archaea in thermal habitats. Here we describe, analyze, and synthesize metagenomic and geochemical data collected from seven high......-temperature sites that contain microbial communities dominated by archaea relative to bacteria. The specific objectives of the study were to use metagenome sequencing to determine the structure and functional capacity of thermophilic archaeal-dominated microbial communities across a pH range from 2.5 to 6.......4 and to discuss specific examples where the metabolic potential correlated with measured environmental parameters and geochemical processes occurring in situ. Random shotgun metagenome sequence (∼40-45 Mb Sanger sequencing per site) was obtained from environmental DNA extracted from high-temperature sediments and...

  20. Archaeal diversity and the extent of iron and manganese pyritization in sediments from a tropical mangrove creek (Cardoso Island, Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, X. L.; Lucheta, A. R.; Ferreira, T. O.; Huerta-Díaz, M. A.; Lambais, M. R.

    2014-06-01

    Even though several studies on the geochemical processes occurring in mangrove soils and sediments have been performed, information on the diversity of Archaea and their functional roles in these ecosystems, especially in subsurface environments, is scarce. In this study, we have analyzed the depth distribution of Archaea and their possible relationships with the geochemical transformations of Fe and Mn in a sediment core from a tropical mangrove creek, using 16S rRNA gene profiling and sequential extraction of different forms of Fe and Mn. A significant shift in the archaeal community structure was observed in the lower layers (90-100 cm), coinciding with a clear decrease in total organic carbon (TOC) content and an increase in the percentage of sand. The comparison of the archaeal communities showed a dominance of methanogenic Euryarchaeota in the upper layers (0-20 cm), whereas Crenarchaeota was the most abundant taxon in the lower layers. The dominance of methanogenic Euryarchaeota in the upper layer of the sediment suggests the occurrence of methanogenesis in anoxic microenvironments. The concentrations of Fe-oxyhydroxides in the profile were very low, and showed positive correlation with the concentrations of pyrite and degrees of Fe and Mn pyritization. Additionally, a partial decoupling of pyrite formation from organic matter concentration was observed, suggesting excessive Fe pyritization. This overpyritization of Fe can be explained either by the anoxic oxidation of methane by sulfate and/or by detrital pyrite tidal transportation from the surrounding mangrove soils. The higher pyritization levels observed in deeper layers of the creek sediment were also in agreement with its Pleistocenic origin.

  1. Distribution of ether lipids and composition of the archaeal community in terrestrial geothermal springs: impact of environmental variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Zhang, Chuanlun L; Wang, Jinxiang; Chen, Yufei; Zhu, Yuanqing; de la Torre, José R; Dong, Hailiang; Hartnett, Hilairy E; Hedlund, Brian P; Klotz, Martin G

    2015-05-01

    Archaea can respond to changes in the environment by altering the composition of their membrane lipids, for example, by modification of the abundance and composition of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs). Here, we investigated the abundance and proportions of polar GDGTs (P-GDGTs) and core GDGTs (C-GDGTs) sampled in different seasons from Tengchong hot springs (Yunnan, China), which encompassed a pH range of 2.5-10.1 and a temperature range of 43.7-93.6°C. The phylogenetic composition of the archaeal community (reanalysed from published work) divided the Archaea in spring sediment samples into three major groups that corresponded with spring pH: acidic, circumneutral and alkaline. Cluster analysis showed correlation between spring pH and the composition of P- and C-GDGTs and archaeal 16S rRNA genes, indicating an intimate link between resident Archaea and the distribution of P- and C-GDGTs in Tengchong hot springs. The distribution of GDGTs in Tengchong springs was also significantly affected by temperature; however, the relationship was weaker than with pH. Analysis of published datasets including samples from Tibet, Yellowstone and the US Great Basin hot springs revealed a similar relationship between pH and GDGT content. Specifically, low pH springs had higher concentrations of GDGTs with high numbers of cyclopentyl rings than neutral and alkaline springs, which is consistent with the predominance of high cyclopentyl ring-characterized Sulfolobales and Thermoplasmatales present in some of the low pH springs. Our study suggests that the resident Archaea in these hot springs are acclimated if not adapted to low pH by their genetic capacity to effect the packing density of their membranes by increasing cyclopentyl rings in GDGTs at the rank of community.

  2. Archaeal Haloarcula californiae Icosahedral Virus 1 Highlights Conserved Elements in Icosahedral Membrane-Containing DNA Viruses from Extreme Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana A. Demina

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite their high genomic diversity, all known viruses are structurally constrained to a limited number of virion morphotypes. One morphotype of viruses infecting bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes is the tailless icosahedral morphotype with an internal membrane. Although it is considered an abundant morphotype in extreme environments, only seven such archaeal viruses are known. Here, we introduce Haloarcula californiae icosahedral virus 1 (HCIV-1, a halophilic euryarchaeal virus originating from salt crystals. HCIV-1 also retains its infectivity under low-salinity conditions, showing that it is able to adapt to environmental changes. The release of progeny virions resulting from cell lysis was evidenced by reduced cellular oxygen consumption, leakage of intracellular ATP, and binding of an indicator ion to ruptured cell membranes. The virion contains at least 12 different protein species, lipids selectively acquired from the host cell membrane, and a 31,314-bp-long linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA. The overall genome organization and sequence show high similarity to the genomes of archaeal viruses in the Sphaerolipoviridae family. Phylogenetic analysis based on the major conserved components needed for virion assembly—the major capsid proteins and the packaging ATPase—placed HCIV-1 along with the alphasphaerolipoviruses in a distinct, well-supported clade. On the basis of its virion morphology and sequence similarities, most notably, those of its core virion components, we propose that HCIV-1 is a member of the PRD1-adenovirus structure-based lineage together with other sphaerolipoviruses. This addition to the lineage reinforces the notion of the ancient evolutionary links observed between the viruses and further highlights the limits of the choices found in nature for formation of a virion.

  3. Representative mass reduction in sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars; Esbensen, Harry Kim; Dahl, Casper Kierulf

    2004-01-01

    We here present a comprehensive survey of current mass reduction principles and hardware available in the current market. We conduct a rigorous comparison study of the performance of 17 field and/or laboratory instruments or methods which are quantitatively characterized (and ranked) for accuracy...... always be representative in the full Theory of Sampling (TOS) sense. This survey also allows empirical verification of the merits of the famous ??Gy?s formula?? for order-of-magnitude estimation of the Fundamental Sampling Error (FSE).......We here present a comprehensive survey of current mass reduction principles and hardware available in the current market. We conduct a rigorous comparison study of the performance of 17 field and/or laboratory instruments or methods which are quantitatively characterized (and ranked) for accuracy...... dividers, the Boerner Divider, the ??spoon method??, alternate/fractional shoveling and grab sampling. Only devices based on riffle splitting principles (static or rotational) passes the ultimate representativity test (with minor, but significant relative differences). Grab sampling, the overwhelmingly...

  4. 8th European Conference on Rare Diseases & Orphan Products (ECRD 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schlander

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Table of contents O1 The European Social Preferences Measurement (ESPM study project: social cost value analysis, budget impact, commercial life cycle revenue management, and the economics of biopharmaceutical Research & Development (R&D Michael Schlander, Søren Holm, Erik Nord, Jeff Richardson, Silvio Garattini, Peter Kolominsky-Rabas, Deborah Marshall, Ulf Persson, Maarten Postma, Steven Simoens, Oriol de Solà Morales, Keith Tolley, Mondher Toumi, Harry Telser O2 Newborn Screening: the potential and the challenges James R Bonham O3 Untreatable disease outcomes - how would we measure them? Helmut Hintner, Anja Diem, Martin Laimer O4 Taking Integrated Care Forward: Experiences from Canada to inspire service provision for people living with rare disease in Europe Réjean Hébert O5 Listening to the patient’s voice: social media listening for safety and benefits in rare diseases Nabarun Dasgupta, Carrie E. Pierce, Melissa Jordan O6 Via Opta: Mobile apps making visually impaired patients’ lives easier Barbara Bori, Mohanad Fors, Emilie Prazakova O7 A report of the IRDiRC “Small Population Clinical Trial” Task Force Simon Day O8 HAE patient identification and diagnosis: An innovative, ‘game changing’ collaboration Thomas J. Croce Jr. O9 Co-creating with the community: primary packaging & administration for people with haemophilia Jonas Fransson, Philip Wood O10 Go with Gaucher, taking forward the next generation. How to involve young people to create a new generation of patient advocates Anne-Grethe Lauridsen, Joanne Higgs, Vesna Stojmirova Aleksovska P1 ODAK – Orphan Drug for Acanthamoeba Keratitis Christina Olsen, Ritchie Head, Antonio Asero, Vincenzo Papa, Christa van Kan, Loic Favennec, Silvana Venturella, Michela Salvador, Alan Krol P5 Rare Navigators help people living with rare diseases to manage the social – and healthcare systems Stephanie J. Nielsen, Birthe B. Holm P6 The eAcademy for Tay-Sachs & Sandhoff disease app

  5. Access to information supporting availability of medicines for patients suffering from rare diseases looking for possible treatments: the EuOrphan Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakisaitis, Donatas; Spokiene, Indre; Juskevicius, Jonas; Valuckas, Konstantinas Povilas; Baiardi, Paola

    2007-01-01

    Currently in Europe, approximately 30 million people suffer from rare diseases, and a major problem is that many patients do not have access to quality healthcare for their disorders. Moreover, there is also a lack of quality information and a networking system aimed at supporting interaction among patients, clinicians, researchers, pharmaceutical industries, and governmental bodies. The purpose of this article is to inform physicians, public health care professionals, and other health care providers about EuOrphan service, the aim of which is to ensure easier access to quality information on rare diseases and their treatment. A set of web-based services is available at www.euorphan.com where information for target-users on treatments and products available worldwide for rare disease care as well as indications about healthcare centers are provided. Moreover, the service aims at providing consultancies for pharmaceutical companies to ultimately support the European legislation in bringing new drugs of a high ethical standard to the market and to exert a positive impact on the large population of patients suffering from rare diseases in Europe. The services provided by EuOrphan can facilitate concrete networking among patients, patient associations, doctors, and companies and also support the organization of clinical trials. In this perspective, EuOrphan could become a very valuable tool for globalizing the information about the availability of treatment (authorized or under development) of orphan patients.

  6. Cumulative effects of HIV illness and caring for children orphaned by AIDS on anxiety symptoms among adults caring for children in HIV-endemic South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Caroline; Cluver, Lucie; Casale, Marisa; Lane, Tyler

    2014-06-01

    Adults caring for children in HIV-endemic communities are at risk for poor psychological outcomes. However, we still have a limited understanding of how various HIV impacts--including caregiver's own HIV illness, responsibilities of caring for a child orphaned by AIDS, or both--affect psychological outcomes among caregivers. Furthermore, few studies have explored the relationship between stigma, HIV, and psychological outcomes among caregivers of children in HIV-endemic communities. A cross-sectional survey conducted from 2009 to 2010 assessed anxiety among 2477 caregivers of children in HIV-endemic South Africa. Chi-square tested differences in anxiety among caregivers living with HIV, caregivers of a child orphaned by AIDS, and caregivers affected with both conditions. Multivariate logistic regressions identified whether the relationship between HIV impacts and anxiety remained after controlling for socio-demographic co-factors. Mediation analysis tested the relationship between stigma, HIV, and anxiety. The odds of meeting threshold criteria for clinically relevant anxiety symptoms were two and a half times greater among caregivers living with HIV compared to nonaffected caregivers. The odds of meeting threshold criteria for clinically relevant anxiety symptoms were greatest among caregivers living with HIV and caring for a child orphaned by AIDS. Exposure to AIDS-related stigma partially mediated the relationship between HIV and anxiety. Interventions are needed to address caregiver psychological health, particularly among caregivers affected with both conditions of living with HIV and caring for a child orphaned by AIDS.

  7. The impact on orchid species abundance of gathering their edible tubers by HIV/AIDS orphans : a case of three villages in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Challe, J.F.X.; Struik, P.C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the gathering of wild orchids and its effect on orchid species diversity and abundance in rural communities with high prevalence of HIV/AIDS and high numbers of orphans. The study was conducted in three villages in the Makete District of Tanzania. The study used a triangulation o

  8. "We Have to Do Something for Ourselves": Using Photovoice and Participatory Action Research to Assess the Barriers to Caregiving for Abandoned and Orphaned Children in Sierra Leone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ashley; Early, Jody

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative participatory action research study was multi-fold: first, to identify the ecological factors which impede and promote health and well-being among orphaned and abandoned children in Sierra Leone; second, to facilitate Photovoice, a participatory action research method, among NGO workers to identify barriers to…

  9. 中国艾滋病孤儿心理健康的研究现状%Research on mental health of AIDS orphans in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金权; 金岳龙

    2011-01-01

    艾滋病孤儿是社会中的弱势群体,他们不仅承担着生活重负,而且还承受着无形的心理压力.国内外多项研究显示,艾滋病孤儿存在孤独、自卑、自我封闭和偏激逆反等不良的心理问题,若不能给予足够的重视和有效的干预,该群体势必将成为严重的社会和公共卫生问题.全社会都应加大对艾滋病孤儿的关注,开展更多的心理关怀活动,促进艾滋病孤儿全面健康成长.%AIDS orphans are the most vulnerable groups in society as they bear not only the burden of life but also the intangible psychological stress. Studies have shown that AIDS orphans have solitude, low self-esteem, self-isolation,bias to the society and other psychological problems, which might become a serious social and public health issue if not given enough attention and effective intervention. The whole community, including the government should increase the care of AIDS orphans and do more psychological care activities to promote healthy growth of AIDS orphans.

  10. LOCALIZATION OF TRANSCRIPTS OF THE RELATED NUCLEAR ORPHAN RECEPTORS COUP-TF-I AND ARP-1 IN THE ADULT-MOUSE BRAIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DASILVA, SL; COX, JJ; JONK, LJC; KRUIJER, W; BURBACH, JPH

    1995-01-01

    The chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor, COUP-TF I, and the protein ARP-1 (COUP-TF II) are two highly homologous orphan receptors of the nuclear hormone receptor family. In this study we investigated their expression patterns in the adult nervous system of the mouse. In situ hyb

  11. “You are back home!”——On Premier Wen Jiabao’s Meeting with Japanese Orphans Delegation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>Beijing,November 11,2009 The sky was exceptionally blue after the first snow.The temperature was low,but people could feel the bright sunshine’s warmth.For the members of the Japanese orphans delegation, they felt especially so because they would soon meet Premier Wen Jiabao whom they had been longing to see.

  12. Representing Conversations for Scalable Overhearing

    CERN Document Server

    Gutnik, G; 10.1613/jair.1829

    2011-01-01

    Open distributed multi-agent systems are gaining interest in the academic community and in industry. In such open settings, agents are often coordinated using standardized agent conversation protocols. The representation of such protocols (for analysis, validation, monitoring, etc) is an important aspect of multi-agent applications. Recently, Petri nets have been shown to be an interesting approach to such representation, and radically different approaches using Petri nets have been proposed. However, their relative strengths and weaknesses have not been examined. Moreover, their scalability and suitability for different tasks have not been addressed. This paper addresses both these challenges. First, we analyze existing Petri net representations in terms of their scalability and appropriateness for overhearing, an important task in monitoring open multi-agent systems. Then, building on the insights gained, we introduce a novel representation using Colored Petri nets that explicitly represent legal joint conv...

  13. Community Composition and Abundance of Bacterial, Archaeal and Nitrifying Populations in Savanna Soils on Contrasting Bedrock Material in Kruger National Park, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rughöft, Saskia; Herrmann, Martina; Lazar, Cassandre S.; Cesarz, Simone; Levick, Shaun R.; Trumbore, Susan E.; Küsel, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Savannas cover at least 13% of the global terrestrial surface and are often nutrient limited, especially by nitrogen. To gain a better understanding of their microbial diversity and the microbial nitrogen cycling in savanna soils, soil samples were collected along a granitic and a basaltic catena in Kruger National Park (South Africa) to characterize their bacterial and archaeal composition and the genetic potential for nitrification. Although the basaltic soils were on average 5 times more nutrient rich than the granitic soils, all investigated savanna soil samples showed typically low nutrient availabilities, i.e., up to 38 times lower soil N or C contents than temperate grasslands. Illumina MiSeq amplicon sequencing revealed a unique soil bacterial community dominated by Actinobacteria (20–66%), Chloroflexi (9–29%), and Firmicutes (7–42%) and an increase in the relative abundance of Actinobacteria with increasing soil nutrient content. The archaeal community reached up to 14% of the total soil microbial community and was dominated by the thaumarchaeal Soil Crenarchaeotic Group (43–99.8%), with a high fraction of sequences related to the ammonia-oxidizing genus Nitrosopshaera sp. Quantitative PCR targeting amoA genes encoding the alpha subunit of ammonia monooxygenase also revealed a high genetic potential for ammonia oxidation dominated by archaea (~5 × 107 archaeal amoA gene copies g−1 soil vs. mostly < 7 × 104 bacterial amoA gene copies g−1 soil). Abundances of archaeal 16S rRNA and amoA genes were positively correlated with soil nitrate, N and C contents. Nitrospira sp. was detected as the most abundant group of nitrite oxidizing bacteria. The specific geochemical conditions and particle transport dynamics at the granitic catena were found to affect soil microbial communities through clay and nutrient relocation along the hill slope, causing a shift to different, less diverse bacterial and archaeal communities at the footslope. Overall, our

  14. Crystallographic Identification and Functional Characterization of Phospholipids as Ligands for the Orphan Nuclear Receptor Steroidogenic Factor-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yong; Choi, Mihwa; Cavey, Greg; Daugherty, Jennifer; Suino, Kelly; Kovach, Amanda; Bingham, Nathan C.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Xu, H.Eric (Van Andel); (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2010-11-10

    The orphan nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) regulates the differentiation and function of endocrine glands. Although SF-1 is constitutively active in cell-based assays, it is not known whether this transcriptional activity is modulated by ligands. Here, we describe the 1.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of the SF-1 ligand binding domain in complex with an LXXLL motif from a coregulator protein. The structure reveals the presence of a phospholipid ligand in a surprisingly large pocket ({approx}1600 {angstrom}{sup 3}), with the receptor adopting the canonical active conformation. The bound phospholipid is readily exchanged and modulates SF-1 interactions with coactivators. Mutations designed to reduce the size of the SF-1 pocket or to disrupt hydrogen bonds with the phospholipid abolish SF-1/coactivator interactions and significantly reduce SF-1 transcriptional activity. These findings provide evidence that SF-1 is regulated by endogenous ligands and suggest an unexpected relationship between phospholipids and endocrine development and function.

  15. Orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 is required for the differentiation of C6 glioma cells induced by cholera toxin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong XU; Yi-jun HUANG; Yan LI; Wei YIN; Guang-mei YAN

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To investigate a possible regulator gene involved in the cholera toxin-induced differentiation of rat C6 glioma cells. Methods: The global changes in the mRNA expression pattern induced by cholera toxin were analyzed using gene chip microarray. The selected gene was then silenced by RNA interference or overexpressed with an ORF plasmid to determine its necessity in this process. Results: Nur77, a member of the orphan nuclear receptor family (NR4A), was markedly up-regulated during the process of differentiation. Furthermore, RNAi of nur77 attenuated the induction effect of cholera toxin on C6 cells, whereas overexpression of nur77 led to similarly differentiated behavior, including morphologic and biomarker changes, as well as cell cycle arrest. Conclusion: Nur77 participated actively and essentially as an important regulator in the cholera toxin-induced differentiation of C6 cells.

  16. The Orphan Receptor Tie1 Controls Angiogenesis and Vascular Remodeling by Differentially Regulating Tie2 in Tip and Stalk Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savant, Soniya; La Porta, Silvia; Budnik, Annika; Busch, Katrin; Hu, Junhao; Tisch, Nathalie; Korn, Claudia; Valls, Aida Freire; Benest, Andrew V; Terhardt, Dorothee; Qu, Xianghu; Adams, Ralf H; Baldwin, H Scott; Ruiz de Almodóvar, Carmen; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Augustin, Hellmut G

    2015-09-22

    Tie1 is a mechanistically poorly characterized endothelial cell (EC)-specific orphan receptor. Yet, Tie1 deletion is embryonic lethal and Tie1 has been implicated in critical vascular pathologies, including atherosclerosis and tumor angiogenesis. Here, we show that Tie1 does not function independently but exerts context-dependent effects on the related receptor Tie2. Tie1 was identified as an EC activation marker that is expressed during angiogenesis by a subset of angiogenic tip and remodeling stalk cells and downregulated in the adult quiescent vasculature. Functionally, Tie1 expression by angiogenic EC contributes to shaping the tip cell phenotype by negatively regulating Tie2 surface presentation. In contrast, Tie1 acts in remodeling stalk cells cooperatively to sustain Tie2 signaling. Collectively, our data support an interactive model of Tie1 and Tie2 function, in which dynamically regulated Tie1 versus Tie2 expression determines the net positive or negative effect of Tie1 on Tie2 signaling.

  17. CELO病毒与包涵体肝炎%Chicken embryo lethal orphan virus and inclusion body hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王凤雪; 王云峰

    2005-01-01

    CELO病毒(Chicken Embryo Lethal Orphan Virus,CELOV)即鸡胚致死孤儿病毒,属于腺病毒科,禽腺病毒属,鸡腺病毒Ⅰ型,归于腺病毒A群。1954年Yates等人首次报告从鸡胚中分离到一种新病毒,并于1957年命名为鸡胚致死孤儿病毒,简称CELO病毒。由于CELO病毒具有禽腺病毒属各种的主要生物学特性及抗原特性,1982年国际病毒学分类委员会(ICTV)第四次报告把CELO病毒确定为禽腺病毒属的代表种。

  18. Effectiveness of a Motivation and Practical Skills Development Methods on the Oral Hygiene of Orphans Children in Kaunas, Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta Markeviciute

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a motivation and practical skills development methods on the oral hygiene of orphans. Material and Methods: Sixty eight orphans aged between 7 and 17 years from two orphanages in Kaunas were divided into two groups: practical application group and motivation group. Children were clinically examined by determining their oral hygiene status using Silness-Löe plaque index. Questionnaire was used to estimate the oral hygiene knowledge and practices at baseline and after 3 months. Statistical analysis included: Chi-square test (χ2, Fisher‘s exact test, Student‘s t-test, nonparametric Mann-Whitney test, Spearman’s rho correlation coefficient and Kappa coefficient. Results: All children had a plaque on at least one tooth in both groups: motivation 1.14 (SD 0.51, practical application 1.08 (SD 0.4 (P = 0.58. Girls in both groups showed significantly better oral hygiene than boys (P < 0.001. After 3 months educational program oral hygiene status improved in both groups significantly 0.4 (SD 0.35 (P < 0.001. Significantly better oral hygiene was determined in practical application group 0.19 (SD 0.27 in comparison with motivation group 0.55 (SD 0.32 (P < 0.001. By comparing results of first and second questionnaire surveys on use of soft drinks, the statistically significant decline of their use was in both groups (P = 0.004. Conclusions: Educational programs are effective in improving oral hygiene, especially when they’re based on practical skills training.

  19. Three-year change in the wellbeing of orphaned and separated children in institutional and family-based care settings in five low- and middle-income countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Whetten

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With more than 2 million children living in group homes, or "institutions", worldwide, the extent to which institution-based caregiving negatively affects development and wellbeing is a central question for international policymakers. METHODS: A two-stage random sampling methodology identified community representative samples of 1,357 institution-dwelling orphaned and separated children (OSC and 1,480 family-dwelling OSC aged 6-12 from 5 low and middle income countries. Data were collected from children and their primary caregivers. Survey-analytic techniques and linear mixed effects models describe child wellbeing collected at baseline and at 36 months, including physical and emotional health, growth, cognitive development and memory, and the variation in outcomes between children, care settings, and study sites. FINDINGS: At 36-month follow-up, institution-dwelling OSC had statistically significantly higher height-for-age Z-scores and better caregiver-reported physical health; family-dwelling OSC had fewer caregiver-reported emotional difficulties. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups on other measures. At both baseline and follow-up, the magnitude of the differences between the institution- and family-dwelling groups was small. Relatively little variation in outcomes was attributable to differences between sites (11-27% of total variation or care settings within sites (8-14%, with most variation attributable to differences between children within settings (60-75%. The percent of variation in outcomes attributable to the care setting type, institution- versus family-based care, ranged from 0-4% at baseline, 0-3% at 36-month follow-up, and 0-4% for changes between baseline and 36 months. INTERPRETATION: These findings contradict the hypothesis that group home placement universally adversely affects child wellbeing. Without substantial improvements in and support for family settings, the removal

  20. Archaeal community structure in leachate and solid waste is correlated to methane generation and volume reduction during biodegradation of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Xunchang; Zekkos, Dimitrios; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2015-02-01

    Duplicate carefully-characterized municipal solid waste (MSW) specimens were reconstituted with waste constituents obtained from a MSW landfill and biodegraded in large-scale landfill simulators for about a year. Repeatability and relationships between changes in physical, chemical, and microbial characteristics taking place during the biodegradation process were evaluated. Parameters such as rate of change of soluble chemical oxygen demand in the leachate (rsCOD), rate of methane generation (rCH4), rate of specimen volume reduction (rVt), DNA concentration in the leachate, and archaeal community structures in the leachate and solid waste were monitored during operation. The DNA concentration in the leachate was correlated to rCH4 and rVt. The rCH4 was related to rsCOD and rVt when waste biodegradation was intensive. The structures of archaeal communities in the leachate and solid waste of both simulators were very similar and Methanobacteriaceae were the dominant archaeal family throughout the testing period. Monitoring the chemical and microbial characteristics of the leachate was informative of the biodegradation process and volume reduction in the simulators, suggesting that leachate monitoring could be informative of the extent of biodegradation in a full-scale landfill.

  1. Novel archaeal macrocyclic diether core membrane lipids in a methane-derived carbonate crust from a mud volcano in the Sorokin Trough, NE Black Sea

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    Alina Stadnitskaia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A methane-derived carbonate crust was collected from the recently discovered NIOZ mud volcano in the Sorokin Trough, NE Black Sea during the 11th Training-through-Research cruise of the R/V Professor Logachev. Among several specific bacterial and archaeal membrane lipids present in this crust, two novel macrocyclic diphytanyl glycerol diethers, containing one or two cyclopentane rings, were detected. Their structures were tentatively identified based on the interpretation of mass spectra, comparison with previously reported mass spectral data, and a hydrogenation experiment. This macrocyclic type of archaeal core membrane diether lipid has so far been identified only in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent methanogen Methanococcus jannaschii. Here, we provide the first evidence that these macrocyclic diethers can also contain internal cyclopentane rings. The molecular structure of the novel diethers resembles that of dibiphytanyl tetraethers in which biphytane chains, containing one and two pentacyclic rings, also occur. Such tetraethers were abundant in the crust. Compound-specific isotope measurements revealed δ13C values of –104 to –111‰ for these new archaeal lipids, indicating that they are derived from methanotrophic archaea acting within anaerobic methane-oxidizing consortia, which subsequently induce authigenic carbonate formation.

  2. Effects of oxytetracycline on archaeal community, and tetracycline resistance genes in anaerobic co-digestion of pig manure and wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Pan, Hongjia; Gu, Jie; Qian, Xun; Gao, Hua; Qin, Qingjun

    2016-12-01

    In this study, the effects of different concentrations of oxytetracycline (OTC) on biogas production, archaeal community structure, and the levels of tetracycline resistance genes (TRGs) were investigated in the anaerobic co-digestion products of pig manure and wheat straw. PCR denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) (PCR) were used to detect the archaeal community structure and the levels of four TRGs: tet(M), tet(Q), tet(W), and tet(C). The results showed that anaerobic co-digestion with OTC at concentrations of 60, 100, and 140 mg/kg (dry weight of pig manure) reduced the cumulative biogas production levels by 9.9%, 10.4%, and 14.1%, respectively, compared with that produced by the control, which lacked the antibiotic. The addition of OTC substantially modified the structure of the archaeal community. Two orders were identified by phylogenetic analysis, that is, Pseudomonadales and Methanomicrobiales, and the methanogen present during anaerobic co-digestion with OTC may have been resistant to OTC. The abundances of tet(Q) and tet(W) genes increased as the OTC concentration increased, whereas the abundances of tet(M) and tet(C) genes decreased as the OTC concentration increased.

  3. Paying for the Orphan Drug System: break or bend? Is it time for a new evaluation system for payers in Europe to take account of new rare disease treatments?

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    Hughes-Wilson Wills

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Since its enactment in 2000, the European Orphan Medicinal Products Regulation has allowed the review and approval of approaching 70 treatments for some 55 different conditions in Europe. Success does not come without a price, however. Many of these so-called “orphan drugs” have higher price points than treatments for more common diseases. This has been raising debate as to whether the treatments are worth it, which, in turn risks blocking patient access to treatment. To date, orphan drugs have only accounted for a small percentage of the overall drug budget. It would appear that, with increasing numbers of orphan drugs, governments are concerned about the future budget impact and their cost-effectiveness in comparison with other healthcare interventions. Orphan drugs are under the spotlight, something that is likely to continue as the economic crisis in Europe takes hold and governments respond with austerity measures that include cuts to healthcare expenditures. Formally and informally, governments are looking at how they are going to handle orphan drugs in the future. Collaborative proposals between EU governments to better understand the value of orphan drugs are under consideration. In recent years there has been increasing criticism of behaviours in the orphan drug field, mainly centring on two key perceptions of the system: the high prices of orphan drugs and their inability to meet standard cost-effectiveness thresholds; and the construct of the system itself, which allows companies to gain the benefits that accrue from being badged as an orphan drug. The authors hypothesise that, by examining these criticisms individually, one might be able to turn these different “behaviours” into criteria for the creation of a system to evaluate new orphan drugs coming onto the market. It has been acknowledged that standard methodologies for Health Technology Assessments (HTA will need to be tailored to take into account the

  4. Effect of supplementing coconut or krabok oil, rich in medium-chain fatty acids on ruminal fermentation, protozoa and archaeal population of bulls.

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    Panyakaew, P; Boon, N; Goel, G; Yuangklang, C; Schonewille, J Th; Hendriks, W H; Fievez, V

    2013-12-01

    Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA), for example, capric acid (C10:0), myristic (C14:0) and lauric (C12:0) acid, have been suggested to decrease rumen archaeal abundance and protozoal numbers. This study aimed to compare the effect of MCFA, either supplied through krabok (KO) or coconut (CO) oil, on rumen fermentation, protozoal counts and archaeal abundance, as well as their diversity and functional organization. KO contains similar amounts of C12:0 as CO (420 and 458 g/kg FA, respectively), but has a higher proportion of C14:0 (464 v. 205 g/kg FA, respectively). Treatments contained 35 g supplemental fat per kg DM: a control diet with tallow (T); a diet with supplemental CO; and a diet with supplemental KO. A 4th treatment consisted of a diet with similar amounts of MCFA (i.e. C10:0+C12:0+C14:0) from CO and KO. To ensure isolipidic diets, extra tallow was supplied in the latter treatment (KO+T). Eight fistulated bulls (two bulls per treatment), fed a total mixed ration predominantly based on cassava chips, rice straw, tomato pomace, rice bran and soybean meal (1.5% of BW), were used. Both KO and CO increased the rumen volatile fatty acids, in particular propionate and decreased acetate proportions. Protozoal numbers were reduced through the supplementation of an MCFA source (CO, KO and KO+T), with the strongest reduction by KO. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays based on archaeal primers showed a decrease in abundance of Archaea when supplementing with KO and KO+T compared with T and CO. The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles of the rumen archaeal population did not result in a grouping of treatments. Richness indices were calculated from the number of DGGE bands, whereas community organization was assessed from the Pareto-Lorenz evenness curves on the basis of DGGE band intensities. KO supplementation (KO and KO+T treatments) increased richness and evenness within the archaeal community. Further research including methane

  5. Pyrosequencing reveals the influence of elevated atmospheric CO2 on the composition of archaeal communities in the rhizosphere of C3 and C4 crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D. M.; Cann, I. K.; Mackie, R. I.

    2008-12-01

    The projected increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations throughout the 21st century is likely to increase aboveground and belowground plant productivity and cause changes in the quantity and quality of plant root exudates, although plants using C4 photosynthesis are likely to be only affected during times of drought (Leakey et al., 2006, Plant Physiology, 140, 779). Evidence is emerging from molecular tools that these changes may influence the abundance and composition of soil microbial communities that regulate key soil processes, such as nitrogen cycling (Lesaulnier et al., 2008, Environmental Microbiology, 10, 926). However, most molecular tools are not well-suited for comparing multiple samples at great sequencing depth, which is critical when considering soil microbial communities of high diversity. To overcome these limitations we used pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR (qPCR) of two genes (the V3 region of 16S rDNA and the amoA gene) to examine intra- and inter-treatment variability in the abundance and composition of microbial communities in the rhizosphere of soybean (C3) and maize (C4) grown in field conditions under ambient (~380 ppm) and elevated (~550 ppm) CO2 using FACE (free-air concentration enrichment) technology during the 2006 growing season in central Illinois. We specifically focused on archaeal communities because of their key role in nitrification (Leininger et al., 2006, Nature, 442, 806). The majority (>97%) of recovered sequences were from members of the phylum Crenarchaeota. Principle component analysis of sequence results from the V3 and amoA genes indicated significant (p<0.05) differences in the composition of rhizosphere archaeal communities between ambient and elevated CO2 beneath soybean, but not maize. qPCR suggested no significant difference in the abundance of archaea between treatments for soybean and maize. The lack of response of archaeal community composition beneath maize to elevated CO2 is consistent with relatively high

  6. Strangers in the archaeal world: osmostress-responsive biosynthesis of ectoine and hydroxyectoine by the marine thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widderich, Nils; Czech, Laura; Elling, Felix J; Könneke, Martin; Stöveken, Nadine; Pittelkow, Marco; Riclea, Ramona; Dickschat, Jeroen S; Heider, Johann; Bremer, Erhard

    2016-04-01

    Ectoine and hydroxyectoine are compatible solutes widely synthesized by members of the Bacteria to cope with high osmolarity surroundings. Inspection of 557 archaeal genomes revealed that only 12 strains affiliated with the Nitrosopumilus, Methanothrix or Methanobacterium genera harbour ectoine/hydroxyectoine gene clusters. Phylogenetic considerations suggest that these Archaea have acquired these genes through horizontal gene transfer events. Using the Thaumarchaeon 'Candidatus Nitrosopumilus maritimus' as an example, we demonstrate that the transcription of its ectABCD genes is osmotically induced and functional since it leads to the production of both ectoine and hydroxyectoine. The ectoine synthase and the ectoine hydroxylase were biochemically characterized, and their properties resemble those of their counterparts from Bacteria. Transcriptional analysis of osmotically stressed 'Ca. N. maritimus' cells demonstrated that they possess an ectoine/hydroxyectoine gene cluster (hyp-ectABCD-mscS) different from those recognized previously since it contains a gene for an MscS-type mechanosensitive channel. Complementation experiments with an Escherichia coli mutant lacking all known mechanosensitive channel proteins demonstrated that the (Nm)MscS protein is functional. Hence, 'Ca. N. maritimus' cells cope with high salinity not only through enhanced synthesis of osmostress-protective ectoines but they already prepare themselves simultaneously for an eventually occurring osmotic down-shock by enhancing the production of a safety-valve (NmMscS).

  7. Archaeal signal transduction: impact of protein phosphatase deletions on cell size, motility, and energy metabolism in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Julia; Esser, Dominik; Orell, Alvaro; Amman, Fabian; Pham, Trong Khoa; Noirel, Josselin; Lindås, Ann-Christin; Bernander, Rolf; Wright, Phillip C; Siebers, Bettina; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the in vitro and in vivo functions of the only two identified protein phosphatases, Saci-PTP and Saci-PP2A, in the crenarchaeal model organism Sulfolobus acidocaldarius were investigated. Biochemical characterization revealed that Saci-PTP is a dual-specific phosphatase (against pSer/pThr and pTyr), whereas Saci-PP2A exhibited specific pSer/pThr activity and inhibition by okadaic acid. Deletion of saci_pp2a resulted in pronounced alterations in growth, cell shape and cell size, which could be partially complemented. Transcriptome analysis of the three strains (Δsaci_ptp, Δsaci_pp2a and the MW001 parental strain) revealed 155 genes that were differentially expressed in the deletion mutants, and showed significant changes in expression of genes encoding the archaella (archaeal motility structure), components of the respiratory chain and transcriptional regulators. Phosphoproteome studies revealed 801 unique phosphoproteins in total, with an increase in identified phosphopeptides in the deletion mutants. Proteins from most functional categories were affected by phosphorylation, including components of the motility system, the respiratory chain, and regulatory proteins. In the saci_pp2a deletion mutant the up-regulation at the transcript level, as well as the observed phosphorylation pattern, resembled starvation stress responses. Hypermotility was also observed in the saci_pp2a deletion mutant. The results highlight the importance of protein phosphorylation in regulating essential cellular processes in the crenarchaeon S. acidocaldarius.

  8. S-layers at second glance? Altiarchaeal grappling hooks (hami resemble archaeal S-layer proteins in structure and sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Kristin Perras

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The uncultivated Ca. Altiarchaeum hamiconexum (formerly known as SM1 Euryarchaeon carries highly specialized nano-grappling hooks (hami on its cell surface. Until now little is known about the major protein forming these structured fibrous cell surface appendages, the genes involved or membrane anchoring of these filaments. These aspects were analyzed in depth in this study using environmental transcriptomics combined with imaging methods. Since a laboratory culture of this archaeon is not yet available, natural biofilm samples with high Ca. A. hamiconexum abundance were used for the entire analyses. The filamentous surface appendages spanned both membranes of the cell, which are composed of glycosyl-archaeol. The hami consisted of multiple copies of the same protein, the corresponding gene of which was identified via metagenome-mapped transcriptome analysis. The hamus subunit proteins, which are likely to self-assemble due to their predicted beta sheet topology, revealed no similiarity to known microbial flagella-, archaella-, fimbriae- or pili-proteins, but a high similarity to known S-layer proteins of the archaeal phylum at their N-terminal region (47-44% identity. Our results provide new insights into the structure of the unique hami and their major protein and indicate their divergent evolution with S-layer proteins.

  9. S-layers at second glance? Altiarchaeal grappling hooks (hami) resemble archaeal S-layer proteins in structure and sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perras, Alexandra K; Daum, Bertram; Ziegler, Christine; Takahashi, Lynelle K; Ahmed, Musahid; Wanner, Gerhard; Klingl, Andreas; Leitinger, Gerd; Kolb-Lenz, Dagmar; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Auerbach, Anna; Mora, Maximilian; Probst, Alexander J; Bellack, Annett; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The uncultivated "Candidatus Altiarchaeum hamiconexum" (formerly known as SM1 Euryarchaeon) carries highly specialized nano-grappling hooks ("hami") on its cell surface. Until now little is known about the major protein forming these structured fibrous cell surface appendages, the genes involved or membrane anchoring of these filaments. These aspects were analyzed in depth in this study using environmental transcriptomics combined with imaging methods. Since a laboratory culture of this archaeon is not yet available, natural biofilm samples with high Ca. A. hamiconexum abundance were used for the entire analyses. The filamentous surface appendages spanned both membranes of the cell, which are composed of glycosyl-archaeol. The hami consisted of multiple copies of the same protein, the corresponding gene of which was identified via metagenome-mapped transcriptome analysis. The hamus subunit proteins, which are likely to self-assemble due to their predicted beta sheet topology, revealed no similiarity to known microbial flagella-, archaella-, fimbriae- or pili-proteins, but a high similarity to known S-layer proteins of the archaeal domain at their N-terminal region (44-47% identity). Our results provide new insights into the structure of the unique hami and their major protein and indicate their divergent evolution with S-layer proteins.

  10. Substrate promiscuity: AglB, the archaeal oligosaccharyltransferase, can process a variety of lipid-linked glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Rosenzweig, Chen; Guan, Ziqiang; Shaanan, Boaz; Eichler, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Across evolution, N-glycosylation involves oligosaccharyltransferases that transfer lipid-linked glycans to selected Asn residues of target proteins. While these enzymes catalyze similar reactions in each domain, differences exist in terms of the chemical composition, length and degree of phosphorylation of the lipid glycan carrier, the sugar linking the glycan to the lipid carrier, and the composition and structure of the transferred glycan. To gain insight into how oligosaccharyltransferases cope with such substrate diversity, the present study analyzed the archaeal oligosaccharyltransferase AglB from four haloarchaeal species. Accordingly, it was shown that despite processing distinct lipid-linked glycans in their native hosts, AglB from Haloarcula marismortui, Halobacterium salinarum, and Haloferax mediterranei could readily replace their counterpart from Haloferax volcanii when introduced into Hfx. volcanii cells deleted of aglB. As the four enzymes show significant sequence and apparently structural homology, it appears that the functional similarity of the four AglB proteins reflects the relaxed substrate specificity of these enzymes. Such demonstration of AglB substrate promiscuity is important not only for better understanding of N-glycosylation in Archaea and elsewhere but also for efforts aimed at transforming Hfx. volcanii into a glycoengineering platform.

  11. Impacts of temperature and pH on the distribution of archaeal lipids in Yunnan hot springs, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weiyan; Zhang, Chuanlun L; Wang, Huanye; He, Liu; Li, Wenjun; Dong, Hailiang

    2013-01-01

    In culture experiments and many low temperature environments, the distribution of isoprenoid glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) commonly shows a strong correlation with temperature; however, this is often not the case in hot springs. We studied 26 hot springs in Yunnan, China, in order to determine whether temperature or other factors control the distribution of GDGTs in these environments. The hot springs ranged in temperature from 39.0 to 94.0°C, and in pH from 2.35 to 9.11. Water chemistry including nitrogen-, sulfur-, and iron species was also determined. Lipids from the samples were analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Distributions of GDGTs in these hot springs were examined using cluster analysis, which resulted in two major groups. Group 1 was characterized by the lack of dominance of any individual GDGTs, while Group 2 was defined by the dominance of GDGT-0 or thaumarchaeol. Temperature was the main control on GDGT distribution in Group 1, whereas pH played an important role in the distribution of GDGTs in Group 2. However, no correlations were found between the distribution of GDGTs and any of the nitrogen-, sulfur-, or iron species. Results of this study indicate the dominance of temperature or pH control on archaeal lipid distribution, which can be better evaluated in the context of lipid classification.

  12. Impacts of temperature and pH on the distribution of archaeal lipids in Yunnan hot springs, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiyan eWu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In culture experiments and many low temperature environments, the distribution of isoprenoid glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs commonly shows a strong correlation with temperature; however, this is often not the case in hot springs. We studied 26 hot springs in Yunnan, China, in order to determine whether temperature or other factors control the distribution of GDGTs in these environments. The hot springs ranged in temperature from 39°C to 94°C, and in pH from 2.35 to 9.11. Water chemistry including nitrogen-, sulfur- and iron species was also determined. Lipids from the samples were analyzed using LC-MS (liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Distributions of GDGTs in these hot springs were examined using cluster analysis, which resulted in two major groups. Group 1 was characterized by the lack of dominance of any individual GDGTs, while Group 2 was defined by the dominance of GDGT-0 or thaumarchaeol. Temperature was the main control on GDGT distribution in Group 1, whereas pH played an important role in the distribution of GDGTs in Group 2. However, no correlations were found between the distribution of GDGTs and any of the nitrogen-, sulfur- or iron species. Results of this study indicate the predominance of temperature or pH control on archaeal lipid distribution, which can be better evaluated in the context of lipid classification.

  13. Archaeal Diversity in Biofilm Technologies Applied to Treat Urban and Industrial Wastewater: Recent Advances and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús González-López

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Biological wastewater treatment (WWT frequently relies on biofilms for the removal of anthropogenic contaminants. The use of inert carrier materials to support biofilm development is often required, although under certain operating conditions microorganisms yield structures called granules, dense aggregates of self-immobilized cells with the characteristics of biofilms maintained in suspension. Molecular techniques have been successfully applied in recent years to identify the prokaryotic communities inhabiting biofilms in WWT plants. Although methanogenic Archaea are widely acknowledged as key players for the degradation of organic matter in anaerobic bioreactors, other biotechnological functions fulfilled by Archaea are less explored, and research on their significance and potential for WWT is largely needed. In addition, the occurrence of biofilms in WWT plants can sometimes be a source of operational problems. This is the case for membrane bioreactors (MBR, an advanced technology that combines conventional biological treatment with membrane filtration, which is strongly limited by biofouling, defined as the undesirable accumulation of microbial biofilms and other materials on membrane surfaces. The prevalence and spatial distribution of archaeal communities in biofilm-based WWT as well as their role in biofouling are reviewed here, in order to illustrate the significance of this prokaryotic cellular lineage in engineered environments devoted to WWT.

  14. Human settlement as driver of bacterial, but not of archaeal, ammonia oxidizers abundance and community structure in tropical stream sediments

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    Mariana De Paula Reis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB are a diverse and functionally important group in the nitrogen cycle. Nevertheless, AOA and AOB communities driving this process remain uncharacterized in tropical freshwater sediment. Here, the effect of human settlement on the AOA and AOB diversity and abundance have been assessed by phylogenetic and quantitative PCR analyses, using archaeal and bacterial amoA and 16S rRNA genes. Overall, each environment contained specific clades of amoA and 16S rRNA genes sequences, suggesting that selective pressures lead to AOA and AOB inhabiting distinct ecological niches. Human settlement activities, as derived from increased metal and mineral nitrogen contents, appear to cause a response among the AOB community, with Nitrosomonas taking advantage over Nitrosospira in impacted environments. We also observed a dominance of AOB over AOA in mining-impacted sediments, suggesting that AOB might be the primary drivers of ammonia oxidation in these sediments. In addition, ammonia concentrations demonstrated to be the driver for the abundance of AOA, with an inversely proportional correlation between them. Our findings also revealed the presence of novel ecotypes of Thaumarchaeota, such as those related to the obligate acidophilic Nitrosotalea devanaterra at ammonia-rich places of circumneutral pH. These data add significant new information regarding AOA and AOB from tropical freshwater sediments, albeit future studies would be required to provide additional insights into the niche differentiation among these microorganisms.

  15. Response of the rumen archaeal and bacterial populations to anti-methanogenic organosulphur compounds in continuous-culture fermenters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Fernández, Gonzalo; Abecia, Leticia; Martín-García, A Ignacio; Ramos-Morales, Eva; Denman, Stuart E; Newbold, Charles J; Molina-Alcaide, Eduarda; Yáñez-Ruiz, David R

    2015-08-01

    Study of the efficacy of methanogenesis inhibitors in the rumen has given inconsistent results, mainly due to poorly understood effects on the key microbial groups involved in pathways for methane (CH4) synthesis. The experiment described in this report was designed to assess the effect of propyl propane thiosulfinate (PTS), diallyl disulfide (DDS) and bromochloromethane (BCM) on rumen fermentation, methane production and microbial populations in continuous culture fermenters. No effects on total volatile fatty acids (VFA) were observed with PTS or DDS, but VFA were decreased with BCM. Amylase activity increased with BCM as compared with the other treatments. A decrease in methane production was observed with PTS (48%) and BCM (94%) as compared with control values. The concentration of methanogenic archaea decreased with BCM from day 4 onward and with PTS on days 4 and 8. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed that PTS and BCM decreased the relative abundance of Methanomicrobiales and increased that of Methanobrevibacter and Methanosphaera. The total concentration of bacteria was not modified by any treatment, although treatment with BCM increased the relative abundance of Prevotella and decreased that of Ruminococcus. These results suggest that the inhibition of methane production in the rumen by PTS and BCM is associated with a shift in archaeal biodiversity and changes in the bacterial community with BCM.

  16. Construction of higher-ordered monolayer membranes derived from archaeal membrane lipid-inspired cyclic lipids with longer alkyl chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Makoto; Goto, Rie; Tadokoro, Toshio; Shibakami, Motonari

    2007-06-15

    A series of artificial cyclic lipids that mimic archaeal membrane ones has been synthesized. The structural features of these molecules include a longer cyclic framework, in which the alkyl chain length ranges from 24 to 32 in carbon number, which is longer than our first analogous molecule with 20-carbon long alkyl chains [K. Miyawaki, T. Takagi, M. Shibakami, Synlett 8 (2002) 1326]. Microscopic observation reveals that these molecules have a self-assembling ability: hydration of the lipids yields multilamellar vesicles in aqueous solution and monolayer sheets on solid supports. High-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry (24- and 28-carbon alkyl chain lipids) indicates that (i) the alkyl chain length affects their phase behavior and (ii) the enthalpies of endothermic peaks accompanied by phase transition were considerably lower than those of their monomeric phospholipid analogs. Fluorescence polarization measurements suggest that the membranes made from the 24-carbon alkyl chain lipid have a higher polarization factor than membranes composed of DMPC and DMPC plus cholesterol. These findings imply that the cyclic lipids containing 24- and 28-carbon alkyl chain construct well-organized monolayer membranes and, in particular, that the molecular order of the 24-carbon alkyl chain lipid is higher than that of bilayer membranes in the liquid-ordered phase.

  17. 10 CFR 63.332 - Representative volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Representative volume. 63.332 Section 63.332 Energy... Protection Standards § 63.332 Representative volume. (a) The representative volume is the volume of ground... radionuclides released from the Yucca Mountain disposal system that will be in the representative volume....

  18. Common polymorphisms within the NR4A3 locus, encoding the orphan nuclear receptor Nor-1, are associated with enhanced β-cell function in non-diabetic subjects

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    Kuusisto Johanna

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuron-derived orphan receptor (Nor 1, nuclear receptor (Nur 77, and nuclear receptor-related protein (Nurr 1 constitute the NR4A family of orphan nuclear receptors which were recently found to modulate hepatic glucose production, insulin signalling in adipocytes, and oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. In this study, we assessed whether common genetic variation within the NR4A3 locus, encoding Nor-1, contributes to the development of prediabetic phenotypes, such as glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, or β-cell dysfunction. Methods We genotyped 1495 non-diabetic subjects from Southern Germany for the five tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs rs7047636, rs1526267, rs2416879, rs12686676, and rs10819699 (minor allele frequencies ≥ 0.05 covering 100% of genetic variation within the NR4A3 locus (with D' = 1.0, r2 ≥ 0.9 and assessed their association with metabolic data derived from the fasting state, an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, and a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (subgroup, N = 506. SNPs that revealed consistent associations with prediabetic phenotypes were subsequently genotyped in a second cohort (METSIM Study; Finland; N = 5265 for replication. Results All five SNPs were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (p ≥ 0.7, all. The minor alleles of three SNPs, i.e., rs1526267, rs12686676, and rs10819699, consistently tended to associate with higher insulin release as derived from plasma insulin at 30 min(OGTT, AUCC-peptide-to-AUCGluc ratio and the AUCIns30-to-AUCGluc30 ratio with rs12686676 reaching the level of significance (p ≤ 0.03, all; additive model. The association of the SNP rs12686676 with insulin secretion was replicated in the METSIM cohort (p ≤ 0.03, additive model. There was no consistent association with glucose tolerance or insulin resistance in both study cohorts. Conclusion We conclude that common genetic variation within the NR4A3 locus determines insulin secretion. Thus, NR4A3

  19. NR4A orphan nuclear receptors influence retinoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid signaling via up-regulation of fatty acid binding protein 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volakakis, Nikolaos; Joodmardi, Eliza [Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research Ltd., Box 240, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Perlmann, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.perlmann@licr.ki.se [Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research Ltd., Box 240, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); The Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institute, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-12-25

    The orphan nuclear receptor (NR) Nurr1 is expressed in the developing and adult nervous system and is also induced as an immediate early gene in a variety of cell types. In silico analysis of human promoters identified fatty acid binding protein 5 (FABP5), a protein shown to enhance retinoic acid-mediated PPAR{beta}/{delta} signaling, as a potential Nurr1 target gene. Nurr1 has previously been implicated in retinoid signaling via its heterodimerization partner RXR. Since NRs are commonly involved in cross-regulatory control we decided to further investigate the regulatory relationship between Nurr1 and FABP5. FABP5 expression was up-regulated by Nurr1 and other NR4A NRs in HEK293 cells, and Nurr1 was shown to activate and bind to the FABP5 promoter, supporting that FABP5 is a direct downstream target of NR4A NRs. We also show that the RXR ligand docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) can induce nuclear translocation of FABP5. Moreover, via up-regulation of FABP5 Nurr1 can enhance retinoic acid-induced signaling of PPAR{beta}/{delta} and DHA-induced activation of RXR. We also found that other members of the NR4A orphan NRs can up-regulate FABP5. Thus, our findings suggest that NR4A orphan NRs can influence signaling events of other NRs via control of FABP5 expression levels.

  20. Multiple acquisitions via sequential transfer of orphan spin polarization (MAeSTOSO): How far can we push residual spin polarization in solid-state NMR?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, T.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2016-06-01

    Conventional multidimensional magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (ssNMR) experiments detect the signal arising from the decay of a single coherence transfer pathway (FID), resulting in one spectrum per acquisition time. Recently, we introduced two new strategies, namely DUMAS (DUal acquisition Magic Angle Spinning) and MEIOSIS (Multiple ExperIments via Orphan SpIn operatorS), that enable the simultaneous acquisitions of multidimensional ssNMR experiments using multiple coherence transfer pathways. Here, we combined the main elements of DUMAS and MEIOSIS to harness both orphan spin operators and residual polarization and increase the number of simultaneous acquisitions. We show that it is possible to acquire up to eight two-dimensional experiments using four acquisition periods per each scan. This new suite of pulse sequences, called MAeSTOSO for Multiple Acquisitions via Sequential Transfer of Orphan Spin pOlarization, relies on residual polarization of both 13C and 15N pathways and combines low- and high-sensitivity experiments into a single pulse sequence using one receiver and commercial ssNMR probes. The acquisition of multiple experiments does not affect the sensitivity of the main experiment; rather it recovers the lost coherences that are discarded, resulting in a significant gain in experimental time. Both merits and limitations of this approach are discussed.