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Sample records for arabinoxylan feruloyl transferase

  1. Hibiscus cannabinus feruloyl-coa:monolignol transferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, Curtis; Ralph, John; Withers, Saunia; Mansfield, Shawn D.

    2016-11-15

    The invention relates to isolated nucleic acids encoding a feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase and feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase enzymes. The isolated nucleic acids and/or the enzymes enable incorporation of monolignol ferulates into the lignin of plants, where such monolignol ferulates include, for example, p-coumaryl ferulate, coniferyl ferulate, and/or sinapyl ferulate. The invention also includes methods and plants that include nucleic acids encoding a feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase enzyme and/or feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase enzymes.

  2. Feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, Curtis; Ralph, John; Withers, Saunia; Mansfield, Shawn D.

    2016-09-13

    The invention relates to nucleic acids encoding a feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase and the feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase enzyme that enables incorporation of monolignol ferulates, for example, including p-coumaryl ferulate, coniferyl ferulate, and sinapyl ferulate, into the lignin of plants.

  3. Feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, Curtis; Ralph, John; Withers, Saunia; Mansfield, Shawn D.

    2016-11-08

    The invention relates to nucleic acids encoding a feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase and the feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase enzyme that enables incorporation of monolignol ferulates, for example, including p-coumaryl ferulate, coniferyl ferulate, and sinapyl ferulate, into the lignin of plants.

  4. Horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed cross-linking of feruloylated arabinoxylans with β-casein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeriu, C.G.; Oudgenoeg, G.; Spekking, W.T.J.; Berendsen, L.B.J.M.; Vancon, L.; Boumans, H.; Gruppen, H.; Berkel, W.J.H. van; Laane, C.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2004-01-01

    Heterologous conjugates of wheat arabinoxylan and β-casein were prepared via enzymatic cross-linking, using sequential addition of the arabinoxylan to a mixture of β-casein, peroxidase, and hydrogen peroxide. The maximal formation of adducts between the β-casein and the feruloylated arabinoxylan was

  5. Feruloylated arabinoxylans are oxidatively cross-linked by extracellular maize peroxidase but not by horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, Sally J; Fry, Stephen C

    2009-09-01

    Covalent cross-linking of soluble extracellular arabinoxylans in living maize cultures, which models the cross-linking of wall-bound arabinoxylans, is due to oxidation of feruloyl esters to oligoferuloyl esters and ethers. The oxidizing system responsible could be H2O2/peroxidase, O2/laccase, or reactive oxygen species acting non-enzymically. To distinguish these possibilities, we studied arabinoxylan cross-linking in vivo and in vitro. In living cultures, exogenous, soluble, extracellular, feruloylated [pentosyl-3H]arabinoxylans underwent cross-linking, beginning abruptly 8 d after sub-culture. Cross-linking was suppressed by iodide, an H2O2 scavenger, indicating dependence on endogenous H2O2. However, exogenous H2O2 did not cause precocious cross-linking, despite the constant presence of endogenous peroxidases, suggesting that younger cultures contained natural cross-linking inhibitors. Dialysed culture-filtrates cross-linked [3H]arabinoxylans in vitro only if H2O2 was also added, indicating a peroxidase requirement. This cross-linking was highly ionic-strength-dependent. The peroxidases responsible were heat-labile, although relatively heat-stable peroxidases (assayed on o-dianisidine) were also present. Surprisingly, added horseradish peroxidase, even after heat-denaturation, blocked the arabinoxylan-cross-linking action of maize peroxidases, suggesting that the horseradish protein was a competing substrate for [3H]arabinoxylan coupling. In conclusion, we show for the first time that cross-linking of extracellular arabinoxylan in living maize cultures is an action of apoplastic peroxidases, some of whose unusual properties we report.

  6. Feruloylated Arabinoxylans Are Oxidatively Cross-Linked by Extracellular Maize Peroxidase but Not by Horseradish Peroxidase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sally J. Burr; Stephen C. Fry

    2009-01-01

    Covalent cross-linking of soluble extraceUular arabinoxylans in living maize cultures, which models the cross-linking of wall-bound arabinoxylans, is due to oxidation of feruloyl esters to oligoferuloyl esters and ethers. The oxidizing system responsible could be H_2O_2/peroxidase, O_2/laccase, or reactive oxygen species acting non-enzymically. To distinguish these possibilities, we studied arabinoxylan cross-linking in vivo and in vitro. In living cultures, exogenous, soluble, extra-cellular, feruloylated [pentosyl-~3H]arabinoxylans underwent cross-linking, beginning abruptly 8 d after sub-culture. Cross-linking was suppressed by iodide, an H_2O_2 scavenger, indicating dependence on endogenous H2O2. However, exogenous H_2O_2 did not cause precocious cross-linking, despite the constant presence of endogenous peroxidases, suggesting that younger cultures contained natural cross-linking inhibitors. Dialysed culture-filtrates cross-linked [~3H]arabinoxylans in vitro only if H_20_2 was also added, indicating a peroxiclase requirement. This cross-linking was highly ionic-strength-dependent. The peroxidases responsible were heat-labile, although relatively heat-stable peroxidases (assayed on o-dianisidine) were also present, Surprisingly, added horseradish peroxidase, even after heat-denaturation, blocked the arabinoxylan-cross-linking action of maize peroxidases, suggesting that the horseradish protein was a competing substrate for [~3H]arabino-xylan coupling. In conclusion, we show for the first time that cross-linking of extracellular arabinoxylan in living maize cultures is an action of apoplastic peroxidases, some of whose unusual properties we report.

  7. Developing Pericarp of Maize: A Model to Study Arabinoxylan Synthesis and Feruloylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chateigner-Boutin, Anne-Laure; Ordaz-Ortiz, José J.; Alvarado, Camille; Bouchet, Brigitte; Durand, Sylvie; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Barrière, Yves; Saulnier, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Cell walls are comprised of networks of entangled polymers that differ considerably between species, tissues and developmental stages. The cell walls of grasses, a family that encompasses major crops, contain specific polysaccharide structures such as xylans substituted with feruloylated arabinose residues. Ferulic acid is involved in the grass cell wall assembly by mediating linkages between xylan chains and between xylans and lignins. Ferulic acid contributes to the physical properties of cell walls, it is a hindrance to cell wall degradability (thus biomass conversion and silage digestibility) and may contribute to pest resistance. Many steps leading to the formation of grass xylans and their cross-linkages remain elusive. One explanation might originate from the fact that many studies were performed on lignified stem tissues. Pathways leading to lignins and feruloylated xylans share several steps, and lignin may impede the release and thus the quantification of ferulic acid. To overcome these difficulties, we used the pericarp of the maize B73 line as a model to study feruloylated xylan synthesis and crosslinking. Using Fourier-transform infra-red spectroscopy and biochemical analyses, we show that this tissue has a low lignin content and is composed of approximately 50% heteroxylans and approximately 5% ferulic acid. Our study shows that, to date, maize pericarp contains the highest level of ferulic acid reported in plant tissue. The detection of feruloylated xylans with a polyclonal antibody shows that the occurrence of these polysaccharides is developmentally regulated in maize grain. We used the genomic tools publicly available for the B73 line to study the expression of genes within families involved or suggested to be involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway, xylan formation, feruloylation and their oxidative crosslinking. Our analysis supports the hypothesis that the feruloylated moiety of xylans originated from feruloylCoA and is transferred by a member

  8. Inhibition of Intestinal α-Glucosidase and Glucose Absorption by Feruloylated Arabinoxylan Mono- and Oligosaccharides from Corn Bran and Wheat Aleurone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovemore Nkhata Malunga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of feruloylated arabinoxylan mono- and oligosaccharides (FAXmo on mammalian α-glucosidase and glucose transporters was investigated using human Caco-2 cells, rat intestinal acetone powder, and Xenopus laevis oocytes. The isolated FAXmo from wheat aleurone and corn bran were identified to have degree of polymerization (DP of 4 and 1, respectively, by HPLC-MS. Both FAXmo extracts were effective inhibitors of sucrase and maltase functions of the α-glucosidase. The IC50 for FAXmo extracts on Caco-2 cells and rat intestinal α-glucosidase was 1.03–1.65 mg/mL and 2.6–6.5 mg/mL, respectively. Similarly, glucose uptake in Caco-2 cells was inhibited up to 40%. The inhibitory effect of FAXmo was dependent on their ferulic acid (FA content (R = 0.95. Sodium independent glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2 activity was completely inhibited by FAXmo in oocytes injected to express GLUT2. Our results suggest that ferulic acid and feruloylated arabinoxylan mono-/oligosaccharides have potential for use in diabetes management.

  9. Inhibition of Intestinal α-Glucosidase and Glucose Absorption by Feruloylated Arabinoxylan Mono- and Oligosaccharides from Corn Bran and Wheat Aleurone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malunga, Lovemore Nkhata; Eck, Peter; Beta, Trust

    2016-01-01

    The effect of feruloylated arabinoxylan mono- and oligosaccharides (FAXmo) on mammalian α-glucosidase and glucose transporters was investigated using human Caco-2 cells, rat intestinal acetone powder, and Xenopus laevis oocytes. The isolated FAXmo from wheat aleurone and corn bran were identified to have degree of polymerization (DP) of 4 and 1, respectively, by HPLC-MS. Both FAXmo extracts were effective inhibitors of sucrase and maltase functions of the α-glucosidase. The IC50 for FAXmo extracts on Caco-2 cells and rat intestinal α-glucosidase was 1.03-1.65 mg/mL and 2.6-6.5 mg/mL, respectively. Similarly, glucose uptake in Caco-2 cells was inhibited up to 40%. The inhibitory effect of FAXmo was dependent on their ferulic acid (FA) content (R = 0.95). Sodium independent glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) activity was completely inhibited by FAXmo in oocytes injected to express GLUT2. Our results suggest that ferulic acid and feruloylated arabinoxylan mono-/oligosaccharides have potential for use in diabetes management.

  10. Arabidopsis Deficient in Cutin Ferulate encodes a transferase required for feruloylation of ω-hydroxy fatty acids in cutin polyester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautengarten, Carsten; Ebert, Berit; Ouellet, Mario; Nafisi, Majse; Baidoo, Edward E K; Benke, Peter; Stranne, Maria; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Keasling, Jay D; Sakuragi, Yumiko; Scheller, Henrik Vibe

    2012-02-01

    The cuticle is a complex aliphatic polymeric layer connected to the cell wall and covers surfaces of all aerial plant organs. The cuticle prevents nonstomatal water loss, regulates gas exchange, and acts as a barrier against pathogen infection. The cuticle is synthesized by epidermal cells and predominantly consists of an aliphatic polymer matrix (cutin) and intracuticular and epicuticular waxes. Cutin monomers are primarily C(16) and C(18) unsubstituted, ω-hydroxy, and α,ω-dicarboxylic fatty acids. Phenolics such as ferulate and p-coumarate esters also contribute to a minor extent to the cutin polymer. Here, we present the characterization of a novel acyl-coenzyme A (CoA)-dependent acyl-transferase that is encoded by a gene designated Deficient in Cutin Ferulate (DCF). The DCF protein is responsible for the feruloylation of ω-hydroxy fatty acids incorporated into the cutin polymer of aerial Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) organs. The enzyme specifically transfers hydroxycinnamic acids using ω-hydroxy fatty acids as acyl acceptors and hydroxycinnamoyl-CoAs, preferentially feruloyl-CoA and sinapoyl-CoA, as acyl donors in vitro. Arabidopsis mutant lines carrying DCF loss-of-function alleles are devoid of rosette leaf cutin ferulate and exhibit a 50% reduction in ferulic acid content in stem insoluble residues. DCF is specifically expressed in the epidermis throughout all green Arabidopsis organs. The DCF protein localizes to the cytosol, suggesting that the feruloylation of cutin monomers takes place in the cytoplasm.

  11. Feruloylation in Grasses: Current and Future Perspectives1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcia M. De O.Buanafina

    2009-01-01

    In the cell walls of forage grasses, ferulic acid is esterified to arabinoxylans and participates with lignin mono-mers in oxidative coupling pathways to generate ferulate-polysaccharide-lignin complexes that cross-link the cell wall. The accumulation of ferulates and the cross-linking of arabinoxylans via diferulate esters are hypothesized to function in various processes in plants. The specific roles of arabinoxylan feruloylation as well as the nature, cellular localization, and substrate for arabinoxylans feruloylation of cell walls are reviewed. The various approaches that have been used for assessing the specific roles of feruloylation are described and assessed. I argue that, until recently, the specific role of feruloylation in these various processes has been established largely by indirect experiments and, although these studies reached similar conclusions about the potential importance of wall feruloylation, they suffer from a common problem: namely they depend on correlations between two processes and do not stem from a detailed understanding of the mech-anisms of feruloylation. I also argue that the nature of arabinoxylan feruloylation remains uncertain.

  12. Enzymatic hydrolysis of corn bran arabinoxylan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Jane

    This thesis concerns enzymatic hydrolysis of corn bran arabinoxylan. The work has focused on understanding the composition and structure of corn bran with specific interest in arabinoxylan with the main purpose of targeting enzymatic hydrolysis for increased yields. Corn bran has been used...... as a model substrate because it represents a readily available agroindustrial side product with upgrading potentials. Corn bran originates from the wet-milling process in corn starch processing, is the outmost layers of the corn kernel and is particularly rich in pentose monosaccharides comprising the major...... components of arabinoxylan. Corn bran is one of the most recalcitrant cereal byproducts with arabinoxylans of particular heterogeneous nature. It is also rich in feruloyl derived substitutions, which are responsible for extensive cross-linking between arabinoxylan molecules and thereby participate...

  13. Feruloyl oligosaccharides stimulate the growth of Bifidobacterium bifidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaoping; Wang, Jing; Yao, Huiyuan

    2005-08-01

    Insoluble dietary fiber from wheat bran contains some feruloyl groups linked to the arabinose residues in the cell wall arabinoxylan. Treatment of wheat bran insoluble dietary fiber with xylanase from Bacillus subtilis yielded feruloyl oligosacchairdes, which were purified with Amberlite XAD-2. Saponification of the feruloyl oligosaccharides released ferulic acid and arabinoxylan oligosaccharides which consist of arabinose and xylose. The effect of the feruloyl oligosacchairdes on the growth of Bifidobacterium bifidum F-35 was investigated in vitro. The B. bifidum produced acid when cultivated anaerobically in TPY broth with 0.5% feruloyl oligosacchairdes as the carbohydrate source. The biomass yield of the B. bifidum increased with increasing the concentration of feruloyl oligosaccharides in TPY broth. The maximum cell growth was increased by 50% in TPY broth supplemented with 0.1% feruloyl oligosaccharides compared to TPY broth. These results indicated that the growth of B. bifidum F-35 was promoted by the feruloyl oligosaccharides from wheat bran insoluble dietary fiber, and not suppressed by the ferulic acid moiety of them.

  14. Arabinoxylan-degrading enzyme system of the fungus Aspergillus awamori: purification and properties of an alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, T M; McCrae, S I

    1996-05-01

    An alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase produced by the fungus Aspergillus awamori had a molecular mass of approximately 64 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and was optimally active at pH 4.6 and 50 degrees C. The enzyme, which chromatographed as a single component on SDS-PAGE, appeared to consist of two isoenzymes of pI 3.6 and 3.2. Acting in isolation, the alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase had only a very limited capacity to release L-arabinose (less than 11%) directly from arabinoxylans that had been extracted from a number of plant cell wall preparations using 18% alkali, but a much higher proportion of the L-arabinose (46%) was released from a wheat straw arabinoxylan that had been isolated by steam treatment. There was a marked synergistic effect between the alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase and an endo-(1 --> 4)-beta-D-xylanase produced by A. awamori in both the rate and extent of the release of L-arabinose from both oat straw and wheat straw arabinoxylans, suggesting that L-arabinose-substituted oligosaccharides generated by the endoxylanase action were better substrates for enzyme action. A novel property of the alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase was its capacity to release a substantial proportion (42%) of feruloyl L-arabinose from intact wheat straw arabinoxylan. The concerted action of the alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase and endoxylanase released 71% of the feruloyl L-arabinose and 69% of the p-coumaroyl L-arabinose substituents from wheat straw arabinoxylan.

  15. Dietary fibers - purification, structure and their health benefits with particular reference to feruloyl arabinoxylans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rao, Shyama Prasad; Muralikrishna, G

    2011-01-01

    The nature of carbohydrates present in the food is growing field of interest within the food industry due to the potential of some of them to help prevent diseases of lifestyle. Non-glycemic carbohydrates, i.e., those carbohydrates (or their components) that are not absorbed in the small intestine...... and, therefore, transit down to become fermented in the colon, have drawn lot of attention. In fact, food carbohydrates can be broadly classified on the basis of their in vivo digestibility into digestible and non-digestible carbohydrates (Table1) (Asp, 1996; Englyst et al., 1992). Non......-digestible carbohydrates have been collectively referred to as ‘dietary fibre’ (Hipsley, 1953). Some of these carbohydrates are of particular interest to the food industry for the purpose of developing ‘functional foods’, i.e., foods that are able to exert positive health effects. Non-digestible oligo...

  16. Maize Arabinoxylan Gels as Protein Delivery Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luisa Martínez-López

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The laccase induced gelation of maize bran arabinoxylans at 2.5% (w/v in the presence of insulin or β-lactoglobulin at 0.1% (w/v was investigated. Insulin and β-lacto-globulin did not modify either the gel elasticity (9 Pa or the cross-links content (0.03 and 0.015 mg di- and triferulic acids/mg arabinoxylan, respectively. The protein release capability of the gel was also investigated. The rate of protein release from gels was dependent on the protein molecular weight. The apparent diffusion coefficient was 0.99 × 10-7 and 0.79 × 10-7 cm2/s for insulin (5 kDa and β-lactoglobulin (18 kDa, respectively. The results suggest that maize bran arabinoxylan gels can be potential candidates for the controlled release of proteins.

  17. Arabinose content of arabinoxylans contributes to flexibility of acetylated arabinoxylan films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stepan, A.M.; Hoïje, A.; Schols, H.A.; Waard, de P.; Gatenholm, P.

    2012-01-01

    Arabinoxylans (AX) from rye were partly debranched by chemical hydrolysis methods, and AXs differing in arabinosyl substitution were acetylated using chemical methods. The resulting materials are film forming, and these films underwent molecular structural analysis and were tested for their material

  18. Pilot-scale bioreactor production and long term stability of feruloyl soy glycerides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean oil was transesterified with ethyl ferulate at 60 °C using the immobilized lipase Candida antartica lipase B (Novozym 435) to produce a mixture of feruloylated monoacylglycerols and feruloylated diacylglycerols homologues, collectively referred to as feruloylated soy glycerides (FSG). A 1-to...

  19. Heterologous production of a feruloyl esterase from Pleurotus sapidus synthesizing feruloyl-saccharide esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelle, Sebastian; Nieter, Annabel; Krings, Ulrich; Zelena, Katerina; Linke, Diana; Berger, Ralf G

    2016-11-01

    The feruloyl esterase (FAE) gene EST1 from the basidiomycete Pleurotus sapidus was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris. Catalytically active recombinant Est1 was secreted using P. pastoris as a host. For expression in P. pastoris, the expression vector pPIC9K was applied. The EST1 gene was cloned with an N-terminal α-mating factor pre-pro sequence and expressed under the control of a methanol inducible alcohol oxidase 1 promotor. Est1 was purified to homogeneity using ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The recombinant Est1 showed optima at pH 5.0 and 50 °C, and released ferulic acid from saccharide esters and from the natural substrate destarched wheat bran. Substrate specificity profile and descriptor-based analysis demonstrated unique properties, showing that Est1 did not fit into the current FAE classification model. Transferuloylation synthesis of feruloyl-saccharide esters was proven for mono- and disaccharides.

  20. Feruloyl Esterases as Biotechnological Tools: Current and Future Perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed E FAZARY; Yi-Hsu JU

    2007-01-01

    Feruloyl esterases represent a diverse group of hydrolases catalyzing the cleavage and formation of ester bonds between plant cell wall polysaccharide and phenolic acid. They are widely distributed in plants and microorganisms. Besides lipases, a considerable number of microbial feruloyl esterases have also been discovered and overexpressed. This review summarizes the latest research on their classification,production, and biophysicochemical properties. Special emphasis is given to the importance of that type of enzyme and their related phenolic ferulic acid compound in biotechnological processes, and industrial and medicinal applications.

  1. Glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, David P; Edwards, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The 55 Arabidopsis glutathione transferases (GSTs) are, with one microsomal exception, a monophyletic group of soluble enzymes that can be divided into phi, tau, theta, zeta, lambda, dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) and TCHQD classes. The populous phi and tau classes are often highly stress inducible and regularly crop up in proteomic and transcriptomic studies. Despite much study on their xenobiotic-detoxifying activities their natural roles are unclear, although roles in defence-related secondary metabolism are likely. The smaller DHAR and lambda classes are likely glutathione-dependent reductases, the zeta class functions in tyrosine catabolism and the theta class has a putative role in detoxifying oxidised lipids. This review describes the evidence for the functional roles of GSTs and the potential for these enzymes to perform diverse functions that in many cases are not "glutathione transferase" activities. As well as biochemical data, expression data from proteomic and transcriptomic studies are included, along with subcellular localisation experiments and the results of functional genomic studies.

  2. Combination of Xylanase and Debranching Enzymes Specific to Wheat Arabinoxylan Improve the Growth Performance and Gut Health of Broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhao; Shao, Yuxin; Yin, Xiaonan; Yin, Dafei; Guo, Yuming; Yuan, Jianmin

    2016-06-22

    Arabinoxylan (AX) is the major antinutritional factor of wheat. This study evaluated the synergistic effects of xylanase and debranching enzymes (arabinofuranosidase [ABF] and feruloyl esterase [FAE]) on AX. During in vitro tests, the addition of ABF or FAE accelerated the hydrolysis of water-soluble AX (WE-AX) and water-insoluble AX (WU-AX) and produced more xylan oligosaccharides (XOS) than xylanase alone. XOS obtained from WE-AX stimulated greater proliferation of Lactobacillus brevis and Bacillus subtilis than did fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) and glucose. During in vivo trials, xylanase increased the average daily growth (ADG), decreased the feed-conversion ratio (FCR), and reduced the digesta viscosity of jejunum and intestinal lesions of broilers fed a wheat-based diet on day 36. ABF or FAE additions further improved these effects. Broilers fed a combination of xylanase, ABF, and FAE exhibited the best growth. In conclusion, the synergistic effects among xylanase, ABF, and FAE increased AX degradation, which improve the growth performance and gut health of broilers.

  3. Concentration and shear rate dependence of solution viscosity for arabinoxylans from different sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabinoxylans are cell wall polysaccharides abundant in plants. Alkaline extraction is commonly used to isolate arabinoxylans from cell wall rich materials, such as cereal brans, crop residues etc. While arabinoxylans from certain sources such as wheat endosperm, corn bran and rye bran have been wid...

  4. Arabinoxylan Microspheres: Structural and Textural Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda López-Franco

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to study the structural and textural characteristics of maize bran arabinoxylan (MBAX microspheres. The laccase-induced cross-linking process was monitored by storage (G' and loss (G'' moduli changes in a 4% (w/v MBAX solution. The G' and G'' values at the plateau region were 215 and 4 Pa, respectively. After gelation, the content of ferulic acid dimers decreased from 0.135 to 0.03 µg/mg MBAX, suggesting the formation of ferulated structures unreleased by mild alkaline hydrolysis. MBAX microspheres presented an average diameter of 531 µm and a swelling ratio value (q of 18 g water/g MBAX. The structural parameters of MBAX microspheres were calculated from equilibrium swelling experiments, presenting an average mesh size of 52 nm. Microstructure and textural properties of dried MBAX microspheres were studied by scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, respectively, showing a heterogeneous mesoporous and macroporous structure throughout the network.

  5. Insect glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketterman, Albert J; Saisawang, Chonticha; Wongsantichon, Jantana

    2011-05-01

    This article is an overview of the current knowledge of insect glutathione transferases. Three major topics are discussed: the glutathione transferase contributions to insecticide resistance, the polymorphic nature of the insect glutathione transferase superfamily, and a summary of the current structure-function studies on insect glutathione transferases.

  6. Quantification of Wheat Grain Arabinoxylans Using a Phloroglucinol Colorimetric Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabinoxylans (AX) play a critical role in end-use quality and nutrition of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). An efficient, accurate method of AX quantification is desirable as AX plays an important role in processing, end use quality and human health. The objective of this work was to evaluate a stand...

  7. Study of new feruloyl esterases to understand lipase evolution: the case of Bacillus flexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-González, Mónica; Blanco-Gámez, Allan; Parra-Saldívar, Roberto; Mateos-Díaz, Juan Carlos; Estrada-Alvarado, María Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the crystal structure of the feruloyl esterase A from Aspergillus niger (AnFaeA) was elucidated. This enzyme displays an α/β hydrolase fold and a catalytic triad similar to that found in fungal lipases (30-37% identity). Surprisingly, AnFaeA showed an overall fold similarity with the Rhizomucor miehei and other related fungal lipases. All these data strongly suggest that the ancestral function (lipase) had shifted, with molecular adaptation leading to a novel enzyme (type-A feruloyl esterase). The discovery of new feruloyl esterases could lead to get insight into the evolutionary pathways of these enzymes and into new possibilities of directed evolution of lipases. In this chapter, the production of Bacillus flexus NJY2 feruloyl esterases is described. Unlike the previously described feruloyl esterases, which mostly belong to eukaryotes (mainly fungus), this unique feruloyl esterases from a prokaryotic alkaliphile microorganism could be the starting point for new discoveries on lipase and feruloyl esterase evolutionary relationships.

  8. Molecular Characterization of Arabinoxylans from Hull-Less Barley Milling Fractions

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Xueling; Li, Limin; Wang, Xiaoxi

    2011-01-01

    Arabinoxylans were prepared from different hull-less barley milling fractions (bran, shorts and flour). The yields of hull-less bran arabinoxylan (HBB-AX), shorts arabinoxylan (HBS-AX) and flour arabinoxylan (HBF-AX) were 8.42%, 4.08% and 2.13% respectively. Sugar composition analysis showed that arabinose and xylose were the main sugars. HBF-AX had the highest Ara/Xyl ratio, followed by HBS-AX and HBB-AX. Size exclusion chromatography analysis (HPSEC) showed that HBF-AX had the highest molec...

  9. Production, partial purification and characterization of feruloyl esterase by Aspergillus awamori in submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazary, Ahmed Eid; Ju, Yi-Hsu

    2008-10-01

    Microbial feruloyl esterases acting on plant cell wall polymers represent key tools for the degradation of plant cell wall. In this paper, we describe in detail the microbial production, partial purification and characterization of feruloyl esterase from a culture medium of Aspergillus awamori strain IFO4033 obtained from a crude hemicellulose preparation of wheat straw, corncobs and wheat germ. Feruloyl esterase was extracted using centrifugation and dialysis, and then purified by ion exchange chromatography and microfiltration to homogeneity, which was checked by SDSPAGE and isoelectric focusing-PAGE. Protein content and activity of the enzyme were measured in each step of extraction and purification. Biomass was determined by the dry weight method. pH and temperature optima of feruloyl esterase enzyme were also determined. The effects of culturing time, and carbon and nitrogen sources on enzyme production were systematically investigated. Finally, enzyme activities under different storage conditions were examined.

  10. Common and Distant Structural Characteristics of Feruloyl Esterase Families from Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udatha, D. B. R. K. Gupta; Mapelli, Valeria; Panagiotou, Gianni

    2012-01-01

    Background: Feruloyl esterases (FAEs) are important biomass degrading accessory enzymes due to their capability of cleaving the ester links between hemicellulose and pectin to aromatic compounds of lignin, thus enhancing the accessibility of plant tissues to cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic enzy...

  11. Prebiotic and other health-related effects of cereal-derived arabinoxylans, arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides, and xylooligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekaert, Willem F; Courtin, Christophe M; Verbeke, Kristin; Van de Wiele, Tom; Verstraete, Willy; Delcour, Jan A

    2011-02-01

    Arabinoxylans (AX) from cereals are cell wall components that constitute an important part of the dietary fiber intake in humans. Enzymatic hydrolysis of AX yields arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides (AXOS), consisting of arabinoxylooligosaccharides and xylooligosaccharides (XOS). This reaction takes place in the production of AXOS and of cereal-derived food products such as bread and beer, as well as in the colon upon ingestion of AX. This review mainly focuses on the available evidence that AXOS and XOS exert prebiotic effects in the colon of humans and animals through selective stimulation of beneficial intestinal microbiota. In addition, in vitro experiments and in vivo intervention studies on animals or humans are discussed that have investigated potential health-related effects resulting from the dietary intake of AX, AXOS, or XOS.

  12. Transferases in Polymer Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vlist, Jeroen; Loos, Katja

    Transferases are enzymes that catalyze reactions in which a group is transferred from one compound to another. This makes these enzymes ideal catalysts for polymerization reactions. In nature, transferases are responsible for the synthesis of many important natural macromolecules. In synthetic polymer chemistry, various transferases are used to synthesize polymers in vitro. This chapter reviews some of these approaches, such as the enzymatic polymerization of polyesters, polysaccharides, and polyisoprene.

  13. Oxidative Gelation of Solvent-Accessible Arabinoxylans occurs during Chlorination of Soft Wheat Flour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabinoxylans and glutenins are two of the critical network-forming biopolymers of wheat flours, functionally related to Arabinoxylans and glutenins are two of the critical network-forming biopolymers of wheat flours, functionally related to mixing and baking performance and baked goods quality. Fo...

  14. Impact of water extractable arabinoxylan from rye bran on the frozen steamed bread dough quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Tao, Han; Jin, Zhengyu; Xu, Xueming

    2016-06-01

    Impact of water extractable arabinoxylan from rye bran on frozen steamed bread dough quality was investigated in terms of the bread characteristics, ice crystallization, yeast activity as well as the gluten molecular weight distribution and glutenin macropolymer content in the present study. Results showed that water extractable arabinoxylan significantly improved bread characteristics during the 60-day frozen storage. Less water was crystallized in the water extractable arabinoxylan dough during storage, which could explain the alleviated yeast activity loss. For all the frozen dough samples, more soluble high molecular weight (Mw ≈ 91,000-688,000) and low molecular weight (Mw ≈ 91,000-16,000) proteins were derived from glutenin macropolymer depolymerization. Nevertheless, water extractable arabinoxylan dough developed higher glutenin macropolymer content with lowered level of soluble low molecular weight proteins throughout the storage. This study suggested water extractable arabinoxylan from rye bran had great potential to be served as an effective frozen steamed bread dough improver.

  15. Transferases in Polymer Chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vlist, Jeroen; Loos, Katja; Palmans, ARA; Heise, A

    2010-01-01

    Transferases are enzymes that catalyze reactions in which a group is transferred from one compound to another. This makes these enzymes ideal catalysts for polymerization reactions. In nature, transferases are responsible for the synthesis of many important natural macromolecules. In synthetic polym

  16. Water Extractable Arabinoxylan Aerogels Prepared by Supercritical CO2 Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Rascón-Chu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Water extractable arabinoxylan (WEAX aerogels were prepared by extracting the solvent from the alcogels (WEAX hydrogels with an alcohol as the solvent with carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions. WEAX aerogels were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and adsorption and desorption nitrogen isotherms. The micrographs indicate a heterogeneous porous network structure in WEAX aerogel. Adsorption/desorption nitrogen isotherms of this material were type IV, which confirm that this material possess a mesoporous structure. WEAX aerogels rehydration capability was evaluated and the water absorption mechanism was determined. The WEAX aerogels water absorption mechanism was non-Fickian (n = 0.54.

  17. Water extractable arabinoxylan aerogels prepared by supercritical CO2 drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez-Escalante, Jorge; Carvajal-Millan, Elizabeth; Miki-Yoshida, Mario; Alvarez-Contreras, Lorena; Toledo-Guillén, Alma Rosa; Lizardi-Mendoza, Jaime; Rascón-Chu, Agustín

    2013-05-14

    Water extractable arabinoxylan (WEAX) aerogels were prepared by extracting the solvent from the alcogels (WEAX hydrogels with an alcohol as the solvent) with carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions. WEAX aerogels were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and adsorption and desorption nitrogen isotherms. The micrographs indicate a heterogeneous porous network structure in WEAX aerogel. Adsorption/desorption nitrogen isotherms of this material were type IV, which confirm that this material possess a mesoporous structure. WEAX aerogels rehydration capability was evaluated and the water absorption mechanism was determined. The WEAX aerogels water absorption mechanism was non-Fickian (n = 0.54).

  18. Microwave-Assisted Extraction of Brewers' Spent Grain Arabinoxylans

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, M. A. M.; Saraiva, J.; Coimbra,M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Brewers´ spent grain (BSG) is a by-product from beer industry that can be exploited as a source of arabinoxylo-oligosaccharides (AXOS) with prebiotic activity. In this study, microwave-assisted extractions were performed during 2 min at 140-210°Cin order to evaluate the feasibility of this extraction technology for quantitative extraction of the arabinoxylans (AX) or AXOS from BSG. The AX yield increasedwith the increase of the temperature in the range used. The best condition...

  19. Application of cross-linked and hydrolyzed arabinoxylans in baking of model rye bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buksa, Krzysztof; Nowotna, Anna; Ziobro, Rafał

    2016-02-01

    The role of water extractable arabinoxylan with varying molar mass and structure (cross-linked vs. hydrolyzed) in the structure formation of rye bread was examined using a model bread. Instead of the normal flour, the dough contained starch, arabinoxylan and protein, which were isolated from rye wholemeal. It was observed that the applied mixes of these constituents result in a product closely resembling typical rye bread, even if arabinoxylan was modified (by cross-linking or hydrolysis). The levels of arabinoxylan required for bread preparation depended on its modification and mix composition. At 3% protein, the maximum applicable level of poorly soluble cross-linked arabinoxylan was 3%, as higher amounts of this preparation resulted in an extensively viscous dough and diminished bread volume. On the other hand highly soluble, hydrolyzed arabinoxylan could be used at a higher level (6%) together with larger amounts of rye protein (3% or 6%). Further addition of arabinoxylan leads to excessive water absorption, resulting in a decreased viscosity of the dough during baking and insufficient gas retention.

  20. Expression in Escherichia coli, refolding and crystallization of Aspergillus niger feruloyl esterase A using a serial factorial approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benoit, Isabelle; Coutard, Bruno; Oubelaid, Rachid; Asther, Marcel; Bignon, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    Hydrolysis of plant biomass is achieved by the combined action of enzymes secreted by microorganisms and directed against the backbone and the side chains of plant cell wall polysaccharides. Among side chains degrading enzymes, the feruloyl esterase A (FAEA) specifically removes feruloyl residues. T

  1. Composite Films of Arabinoxylan and Fibrous Sepiolite: Morphological, Mechanical, and Barrier Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sárossy, Zsuzsa; Blomfeldt, J.O.; Hedenqvist, Mikael S.

    2012-01-01

    in the arabinoxylan films and sepiolite fiber aggregation was not found. FT-IR spectroscopy provided some evidence for hydrogen bonding between sepiolite and arabinoxylan. Consistent with these findings, mechanical testing showed increases in film stiffness and strength with sepiolite addition and the effect of poly(ethylene...... glycol) methyl ether (mPEG) plasticizer addition. Incorporation of sepiolite did not significantly influence the thermal degradation or the gas barrier properties of arabinoxylan films, which is likely a consequence of sepiolite fiber morphology. In summary, sepiolite was shown to have potential...

  2. Kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed cross-linking of feruloylated arabinan from sugar beet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abang Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz; Arnous, Anis; Holck, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    the kinetics of HRP catalyzed cross-linking of FA esterified to α-(1,5)-linked arabinans are affected by the length of the arabinan chains carrying the feruloyl substitutions. The kinetics of the HRP-catalyzed cross-linking of four sets of arabinan samples from sugar beet pulp, having different molecular...... weights and hence different degrees of polymerization, were monitored by the disappearance of FA absorbance at 316 nm. MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS analysis confirmed that the sugar beet arabinans were feruloyl-substituted, and HPLC analysis verified that the amounts of diFAs increased when FA levels decreased...

  3. Debranching of soluble wheat arabinoxylan dramatically enhances recalcitrant binding to cellulose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selig, Michael J.; Thygesen, Lisbeth G.; Felby, Claus;

    2015-01-01

    The presence of xylan is a detriment to the enzymatic saccharification of cellulose in lignocelluloses. The inhibition of the processive cellobiohydrolase Cel7A by soluble wheat arabinoxylan is shown here to increase by 50 % following enzymatic treatment with a commercially-purified α-l-arabinofu......The presence of xylan is a detriment to the enzymatic saccharification of cellulose in lignocelluloses. The inhibition of the processive cellobiohydrolase Cel7A by soluble wheat arabinoxylan is shown here to increase by 50 % following enzymatic treatment with a commercially-purified α...... considerably increased the rate and rigidity of arabinoxylan mass association with cellulose. These data also suggest significant xylan–xylan adlayer formation occurs following initial binding of debranched arabinoxylan. From this, we speculate the inhibitory effects of xylan to cellulases may result from...... reduced enzymatic access via the dense association of xylan with cellulose....

  4. Genome Wide Association Mapping for Arabinoxylan Content in a Collection of Tetraploid Wheats

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Arabinoxylans (AXs) are major components of plant cell walls in bread wheat and are important in bread-making and starch extraction. Furthermore, arabinoxylans are components of soluble dietary fibre that has potential health-promoting effects in human nutrition. Despite their high value for human health, few studies have been carried out on the genetics of AX content in durum wheat. Results The genetic variability of AX content was investigated in a set of 104 tetraploid wheat gen...

  5. Continuous, packed-bed, enzymatic bioreactor production and stability of feruloyl soy glycerides

    Science.gov (United States)

    The synthesis of feruloyl soy glycerides was demonstrated on a pilot-scale (1 metric ton/year) in a continuous, four-column series, packed-bed, enzymatic bioreactor. Ethyl ferulate and soybean oil were combined and converted at 3.5 kg/d over Candida antartica lipase B immobilized on an acrylic rein ...

  6. A monoclonal antibody to feruloylated (1→4)-β-D-galactan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Mads Hartvig; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Willats, William G. T.

    2004-01-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of a monoclonal antibody, designated LM9, against feruloylated-(1-->4)-beta-D-galactan. This epitope is a structural feature of cell wall pectic polysaccharides of plants belonging to the family Amaranthaceae (including the Chenopodiaceae). Immuno...

  7. Production and partial characterisation of feruloyl esterase by Sporotrichum thermophile in solid-state fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topakas, E.; Kalogeris, E.; Kekos, D.;

    2003-01-01

    A number of factors affecting production of feruloyl esterase an enzyme that hydrolyse ester linkages of ferulic acid (FA) in plant cell walls, by the thermophylic fungus Sporotrichum thermophile under solid state fermentation (SSF) were investigated. Initial moisture content and type of carbon...

  8. Solvent-free enzymatic synthesis of feruloylated structured lipids by the transesterification of ethyl ferulate with castor oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shangde; Zhu, Sha; Bi, Yanlan

    2014-09-01

    A novel enzymatic route of feruloylated structured lipids synthesis by the transesterification of ethyl ferulate (EF) with castor oil, in solvent-free system, was investigated. The transesterification reactions were catalysed by Novozym 435, Lipozyme RMIM, and Lipozyme TLIM, among which Novozym 435 showed the best catalysis performance. Effects of feruloyl donors, reaction variables, and ethanol removal on the transesterification were also studied. High EF conversion (∼100%) was obtained under the following conditions: enzyme load 20% (w/w, relative to the weight of substrates), reaction temperature 90 °C, substrate molar ratio 1:1 (EF/castor oil), 72 h, vacuum pressure 10 mmHg, and 200 rpm. Under these conditions, the transesterification product consisted of 62.6% lipophilic feruloylated structured lipids and 37.3% hydrophilic feruloylated lipids.

  9. Identification of a GH62 α-L-arabinofuranosidase specific for arabinoxylan produced by Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Tatsuji; Ogura, Atsuhiro; Inui, Misako; Tokuda, Sayaka; Hosokawa, Sachiko; Ihara, Hideshi; Kasai, Naoya

    2011-04-01

    An arabinoxylan arabinofuranohydrolase (AXS5) was purified from the culture filtrate of Penicillium chrysogenum 31B. A cDNA encoding AXS5 (axs5) was isolated by in vitro cloning using the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the native enzyme as a starting point. The deduced amino acid sequence of the axs5 gene has high similarities with those of arabinoxylan arabinofuranohydrolases of Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus tubingensis, and Aspergillus sojae. Module sequence analysis revealed that a "Glyco_hydro_62" was present at position 28-299 of AXS5. This is a family of α-L-arabinofuranosidases which are all members of glycoside hydrolase family 62. Recombinant AXS5 (rAXS5) expressed in Escherichia coli was highly active on arabinoxylan but not on branched sugar beet arabinan. (1)H-NMR analysis revealed that the rAXS5 cleaved arabinosyl side-chains linked to C-2 and C-3 of single-substituted xylose residues in arabinoxylan. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that expression of the axs5 gene in P. chrysogenum 31B was strongly induced by adding D-xylose and arabinoxylan to the culture medium. Moreover, two binding sites of XlnR, a transcriptional activator that regulates the expression of the genes encoding xylanolytic enzymes, are present in the upstream region of the axs5 gene. These results suggest that AXS5 is involved in xylan degradation.

  10. Covalently Cross-Linked Arabinoxylans Films for Debaryomyces hansenii Entrapment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramsés González-Estrada

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, wheat water extractable arabinoxylans (WEAX were isolated and characterized, and their capability to form covalently cross-linked films in presence of Debaryomyces hansenii was evaluated. WEAX presented an arabinose to xylose ratio of 0.60, a ferulic acid and diferulic acid content of 2.1 and 0.04 µg∙mg−1 WEAX, respectively and a Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FT-IR spectrum typical of WEAX. The intrinsic viscosity and viscosimetric molecular weight values for WEAX were 3.6 dL∙g−1 and 440 kDa, respectively. The gelation of WEAX (1% w/v with and without D. hansenii (1 × 107 CFU∙cm−2 was rheologically investigated by small amplitude oscillatory shear. The entrapment of D. hansenii decreased gel elasticity from 1.4 to 0.3 Pa, probably by affecting the physical interactions between WEAX chains. Covalently cross-linked WEAX films containing D. hansenii were prepared by casting. Scanning electron microscopy images show that WEAX films containing D. hansenii were porous and consisted of granular-like and fibre microstructures. Average tensile strength, elongation at break and Young’s modulus values dropped when D. hansenii was present in the film. Covalently cross-lined WEAX containing D. hansenii could be a suitable as a functional entrapping film.

  11. Feruloyl esterases from Schizophyllum commune to treat food industry side-streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieter, Annabel; Kelle, Sebastian; Linke, Diana; Berger, Ralf G

    2016-11-01

    Agro-industrial side-streams are abundant and renewable resources of hydroxycinnamic acids with potential applications as antioxidants and preservatives in the food, health, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. Feruloyl esterases (FAEs) from Schizophyllum commune were functionally expressed in Pichia pastoris with extracellular activities of 6000UL(-1). The recombinant enzymes, ScFaeD1 and ScFaeD2, released ferulic acid from destarched wheat bran and sugar beet pectin. Overnight incubation of coffee pulp released caffeic (>60%), ferulic (>80%) and p-coumaric acid (100%) indicating applicability for the valorization of food processing wastes and enhanced biomass degradation. Based on substrate specificity profiling and the release of diferulates from destarched wheat bran, the recombinant FAEs were characterized as type D FAEs. ScFaeD1 and ScFaeD2 preferably hydrolyzed feruloylated saccharides with ferulic acid esterified to the O-5 position of arabinose residues and showed an unprecedented ability to hydrolyze benzoic acid esters.

  12. A new feruloyl amide derivative from the fruits of Tribulus terrestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaopo; Wei, Na; Huang, Jian; Tan, Yinfeng; Jin, Dejun

    2012-01-01

    A new feruloyl amide derivative, named tribulusamide C, was isolated from the fruits of Tribulus terrestris. Its structure was determined on the basis of spectroscopic analysis including IR, 1-D-, 2-D-NMR and HR-ESI-MS. The structure of tribulusamide C was characterised by a unit of pyrrolidine-2,5-dione, which distinguished it from other lignanamides previously isolated from the fruits of T. terrestris.

  13. Glutathione transferases in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allocati, Nerino; Federici, Luca; Masulli, Michele; Di Ilio, Carmine

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial glutathione transferases (GSTs) are part of a superfamily of enzymes that play a key role in cellular detoxification. GSTs are widely distributed in prokaryotes and are grouped into several classes. Bacterial GSTs are implicated in a variety of distinct processes such as the biodegradation of xenobiotics, protection against chemical and oxidative stresses and antimicrobial drug resistance. In addition to their role in detoxification, bacterial GSTs are also involved in a variety of distinct metabolic processes such as the biotransformation of dichloromethane, the degradation of lignin and atrazine, and the reductive dechlorination of pentachlorophenol. This review article summarizes the current status of knowledge regarding the functional and structural properties of bacterial GSTs.

  14. Cloning, expression and characterization of a feruloyl esterase C from Penicillium chrysogenum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LV Shan-shan; LI Gui-Iong; YANG Shao-Iong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To clone feruloyl esterase gene C from Penicillium chrysogenum and characterize the general properties of the enzyme. Methods:The feruloyl esterase C gene was amplified by PCR based on the Penicillium chrysogenum feruloyl esterase C gene sequence and cloned into the expression vector pPIC9K, resulting the recombinant plasmid pPIC9K-PcfaeC. The recombiant plasmid was linerized and transformed into P. pastoris by electroporation. The transformants was screened based on the transparent zone technology. The screened transformants was then induced by methanol. the enzymatic properties of the protein were then measured. Results:SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the molecular mass of the enzyme was about 30 kD. The length of the gene was 762 bp. It comprised one open reading framwork(ORF) and annotated to encode 249 amino acid. The optimal temperature and pH was found to be 40℃and 6, respectively. Moreover, the recombinant enzyme was stable at 40-50℃and pH 5-7. Conclusion:The enzyme successfully expressed in P. pastoris could laid theoretical foundation in food, fodder and paper making industry.

  15. Mammalian cytosolic glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourado, Daniel F A R; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino; Ramos, Maria João

    2008-08-01

    Glutathione Transferases (GSTs) are crucial enzymes in the cell detoxification process catalyzing the nucleophilic attack of glutathione (GSH) on toxic electrophilic substrates and producing a less dangerous compound. GSTs studies are of great importance since they have been implicated in the development of drug resistance in tumoral cells and are related to human diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, atherosclerois, liver cirrhosis, aging and cataract formation. In this review we start by providing an evolutionary perspective of the mammalian cytosolic GSTs known to date. Later on we focus on the more abundant classes alpha, mu and pi and their structure, catalysis, metabolic associated functions, drug resistance relation and inhibition methods. Finally, we introduce the recent insights on the GST class zeta from a metabolic perspective.

  16. Different human gut models reveal the distinct fermentation patterns of arabinoxylan versus inulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbeele, P. van den; Venema, K.; Wiele, T. van de; Verstraete, W.; Possemiers, S.

    2013-01-01

    Different in vitro models have been developed to assess how food compounds affect the human gut microbiota. Using two such models (SHIME(R) and TIM-2), we compared how long-chain arabinoxylan (LC-AX), a wheat-derived potentially prebiotic fiber, and inulin (IN), a well-established prebiotic compound

  17. Enzyme kinetics and identification of the rate-limiting step of enzymatic arabinoxylan degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Louise Enggaard; Xu, Cheng; Sørensen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the kinetics of multi-enzymatic degradation of soluble wheat arabinoxylan by monitoring the release of xylose and arabinose during designed treatments with mono-component enzymes at different substrate concentrations. The results of different combinations of α-l-arabinofur...

  18. A novel feruloyl esterase from rumen microbial metagenome: Gene cloning and enzyme characterization in the release of mono- and diferulic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    A feruloyl esterase (FAE) gene was isolated from a rumen microbial metagenome, cloned into E. coli, and expressed in active form. The enzyme (RuFae4) was classified as a Type D feruloyl esterase based on its action on synthetic substrates and ability to release diferulates. The RuFae4 alone releas...

  19. Molecular Cloning of Adenosinediphosphoribosyl Transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-08

    ACCESSION NO.D,. 03261102F 2312 A~5 11. TITLE (include Securqt Classification) 0 Molecular Cloning of Adenosinediphosphoribosyl Transferase 12. PERSONAL...I’:- AFOSR.Tlt. 8 7 - 0 9 8,2 0IL * pi AFOSR- 85 -0377 PROGRESS REPORT Molecular Cloning of Adenosinediphosphoribosyl Transferase 5." Period of...Pharmacology and the Cardiovascular Research Institute September 8, 1987 .’, 5.’- "’S ". -f, AFOSR - 85 -0377 PROGRESS REPORT Molecular Cloning of

  20. Decreased Polysaccharide Feruloylation Compromises Plant Cell Wall Integrity and Increases Susceptibility to Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reem, Nathan T; Pogorelko, Gennady; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Chambers, Lauran; Held, Michael A; Bellincampi, Daniela; Zabotina, Olga A

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of cell wall composition and structure determines the strength, flexibility, and function of the primary cell wall in plants. However, the contribution of the various components to cell wall integrity (CWI) and function remains unclear. Modifications of cell wall composition can induce plant responses known as CWI control. In this study, we used transgenic expression of the fungal feruloyl esterase AnFAE to examine the effect of post-synthetic modification of Arabidopsis and Brachypodium cell walls. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing AnFAE showed a significant reduction of monomeric ferulic acid, decreased amounts of wall-associated extensins, and increased susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea, compared with wild type. Transgenic Brachypodium showed reductions in monomeric and dimeric ferulic acids and increased susceptibility to Bipolaris sorokiniana. Upon infection, transgenic Arabidopsis and Brachypodium plants also showed increased expression of several defense-related genes compared with wild type. These results demonstrate a role, in both monocot and dicot plants, of polysaccharide feruloylation in plant CWI, which contributes to plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens.

  1. Decreased Polysaccharide Feruloylation Compromises Plant Cell Wall Integrity and Increases Susceptibility to Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan T Reem

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of cell wall composition and structure determines the strength, flexibility, and function of the primary cell wall in plants. However, the contribution of the various components to cell wall integrity and function remains unclear. Modifications of cell wall composition can induce plant responses known as Cell Wall Integrity control. In this study, we used transgenic expression of the fungal feruloyl esterase AnFAE to examine the effect of post-synthetic modification of Arabidopsis and Brachypodium cell walls. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing AnFAE showed a significant reduction of monomeric ferulic acid, increased amounts of wall-associated extensins, and increased susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea, compared with wild type. Transgenic Brachypodium showed reductions in monomeric and dimeric ferulic acids and increased susceptibility to Bipolaris sorokiniana. Upon infection, transgenic Arabidopsis and Brachypodium plants also showed increased expression of several defense-related genes compared with wild type. These results demonstrate a role, in both monocot and dicot plants, of polysaccharide feruloylation in plant cell wall integrity, which contributes to plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens.

  2. Homologous expression of the feruloyl esterase B gene from Aspergillus niger and characterization of the recombinant enzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levasseur, Anthony; Benoit, Isabelle; Asther, Michèle; Asther, Marcel; Record, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The faeB gene encoding the feruloyl esterase B (FAEB) was isolated from Aspergillus niger BRFM131 genomic DNA. The faeB gene, with additional sequence coding for a C-terminal histidine tag, was inserted into an expression vector under the control of the gpd promoter and trpC terminator and expressed

  3. Feruloyl esterases as a tool for the release of phenolic compounds from agro-industrial by-products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benoit, Isabelle; Navarro, David; Marnet, Nathalie; Rakotomanomana, Nnjara; Lesage-Meessen, Laurence; Sigoillot, Jean-Claude; Asther, Marcel; Asther, Michèle

    2006-01-01

    Agro-industrial by-products are a potential source of added-value phenolic acids with promising applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Here two purified feruloyl esterases from Aspergillus niger, FAEA and FAEB were tested for their ability to release phenolic acids such as caffeic a

  4. Novel feruloyl esterase from Lactobacillus fermentum NRRL B-1932 and analysis of the recombinant enzyme produced in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using agar plates containing ethyl ferulate as the sole carbon source, 33 Lactobacillus strains were screened for feruloyl esterase (FE) activity. Among a dozen species showing a clearing zone on the opaque plate containing ethyl ferulate, Lactobacillus fermentum NRRL B-1932 demonstrated the stronge...

  5. Design and production in Aspergillus niger of a chimeric protein associating a fungal feruloyl esterase and a clostridial dockerin domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levasseur, A.; Pagès, S.; Fierobe, H.-P.; Navarro, D.; Punt, P.; Belaïch, J.-P.; Asther, M.; Record, E.

    2004-01-01

    A chimeric enzyme associating feruloyl esterase A (FAEA) from Aspergilhis niger and dockerin from Clostridium thermocellum was produced in A. niger. A completely truncated form was produced when the dockerin domain was located downstream of the FAEA (FAEA-Doc), whereas no chimeric protein was produc

  6. Experimental and theoretical study of the influence of water on hydrolyzed product formation during the feruloylation of vegetable oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feruloylated vegetable oil is a valuable green bioproduct that has several cosmeceutical applications associated with its inherent anti-oxidant and UV-absorption properties. Hydrolyzed vegetable oil by-products can influence product quality and consistency. The formation of by-products by residual w...

  7. Release of feruloylated oligosaccharides from wheat bran through submerged fermentation by edible mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chunyan; Wu, Zhiyan; Guo, Hongzhen; Gu, Zhenxin

    2014-07-01

    Wheat bran, a by-product of the flour industry, is believed to be a raw material for the production of feruloylated oligosaccharides (FOs) because of its high content of conjiont ferulic acid (FA). Studies were carried out to identify edible mushrooms that are able to release FOs from wheat bran. All the six tested mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus, Hericium erinaceum, Auricularia auricula, Cordyceps militaris, Agrocybe chaxingu, and Ganoderma lucium) were found to release FOs, and Agrocybe chaxingu had the highest yield, reaching 35.4 µM in wheat bran broth. Enzymes detection showed that these species secreted extracellular enzymes during fermentation, including cellulase and xylanase. Agrocybe chaxingu secreted the significant amount of xylanase (180 mU ml(-1) ), which was responsible for the release of FOs from wheat bran, while Hericium erinaceum secreted FA esterase which could disassemble FOs.

  8. Glutathione transferases and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetti, Anna Paola; Fiorile, Maria Carmela; Primavera, Alessandra; Lo Bello, Mario

    2015-03-01

    There is substantial agreement that the unbalance between oxidant and antioxidant species may affect the onset and/or the course of a number of common diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Many studies suggest a crucial role for oxidative stress in the first phase of aging, or in the pathogenesis of various diseases including neurological ones. Particularly, the role exerted by glutathione and glutathione-related enzymes (Glutathione Transferases) in the nervous system appears more relevant, this latter tissue being much more vulnerable to toxins and oxidative stress than other tissues such as liver, kidney or muscle. The present review addresses the question by focusing on the results obtained by specimens from patients or by in vitro studies using cells or animal models related to Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. In general, there is an association between glutathione depletion and Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. In addition, a significant decrease of glutathione transferase activity in selected areas of brain and in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid was found. For some glutathione transferase genes there is also a correlation between polymorphisms and onset/outcome of neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, there is a general agreement about the protective effect exerted by glutathione and glutathione transferases but no clear answer about the mechanisms underlying this crucial role in the insurgence of neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.) leaves contain hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:tartaric acid hydroxycinnamoyl transferase activity and accumulate hydroxycinnamoyl-tartaric acid esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Michael L

    2014-05-01

    Many plants accumulate hydroxycinnamoyl esters to protect against abiotic and biotic stresses. Caffeoyl esters in particular can be substrates for endogenous polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). Recently, we showed that perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.) leaves contain PPO and identified one PPO substrate, caftaric acid (trans-caffeoyl-tartaric acid). Additional compounds were believed to be cis- and trans-p-coumaroyl tartaric acid and cis- and trans-feruloyl-tartaric acid, but lack of standards prevented definitive identifications. Here we characterize enzymatic activities in peanut leaves to understand how caftaric acid and related hydroxycinnamoyl esters are made in this species. We show that peanut leaves contain a hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:tartaric acid hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HTT) activity capable of transferring p-coumaroyl, caffeoyl, and feruloyl moieties from CoA to tartaric acid (specific activities of 11 ± 2.8, 8 ± 1.8, 4 ± 0.8 pkat mg(-1) crude protein, respectively). The HTT activity was used to make cis- and trans-p-coumaroyl- and -feruloyl-tartaric acid in vitro. These products allowed definitive identification of the corresponding cis- and trans-hydroxycinnamoyl esters extracted from leaves. We tentatively identified sinapoyl-tartaric acid as another major phenolic compound in peanut leaves that likely participates in secondary reactions with PPO-generated quinones. These results suggest hydroxycinnamoyl-tartaric acid esters are made by an acyltransferase, possibly a BAHD family member, in perennial peanut. Identification of a gene encoding HTT and further characterization of the enzyme will aid in identifying determinants of donor and acceptor substrate specificity for this important class of biosynthetic enzymes. An HTT gene could also provide a means by genetic engineering for producing caffeoyl- and other hydroxycinnamoyl-tartaric acid esters in forage crops that lack them.

  10. Extraction and chemical characterization of rye arabinoxylan and the effect of β-glucan on the mechanical and barrier properties of cast arabinoxylan films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sárossy, Zsuzsa; Tenkanen, Maija; Pitkänen, Leena;

    2013-01-01

    Water-extractable hemicellulose (WEH) fractions, containing approximately 65% arabinoxylans (WE-AX) and 20% mixed-linkage b-glucans were isolated from rye bran. In addition, water-extractable mixedlinkage β-glucans (BG) were isolated from oat bran as a reference material. The β-glucan content...... of the rye hemicellulose isolate was reduced to less than 5% by a selective lichenase treatment. Rye hemicelluloses, WEH and WE-AX had arabinose-to-xylose ratios of 0.54 and 0.57 and weight-average molecular weights (Mw) of 270 000 and 232 000 g/mol respectively. The Mw of BG was higher at 386 000 g...

  11. Comparison of different twin-screw extraction conditions for the production of arabinoxylans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemin, Leslie; Mogni, Assad; Zeitoun, Rawan; Guinot, Cécile; Sablayrolles, Caroline; Saulnier, Luc; Pontalier, Pierre-Yves

    2015-02-13

    The aim of this article is to compare two different sets of optimal conditions for twin-screw extraction of xylans and define their influence on the purification steps, combining ultrafiltration and industrial chromatography. Two xylan extracts were obtained by twin-screw extrusion of straw and bran. Condition 1 used a high straw/bran ratio (equal to 6) and high sodium hydroxide content, and condition 2 used a lower straw/bran ratio (equal to 2) and low sodium hydroxide content. Arabinoxylan extraction yields are slightly higher for conditions with low straw content (5.1% versus 4.4%). Nevertheless, these recovery yields remain between 9% and 10%. Ultrafiltration is as efficient as evaporation for polysaccharide concentration, with lower energy consumption, but also demineralizes the solution. The combination of ultrafiltration and chromatography gives partial purification of the extract with a final arabinoxylan purity ranging from 16% to 26%. This is slightly higher than by direct precipitation, but limited because all the large molecules such as proteins and lignins were retained by ultrafiltration.

  12. Enzymatic fingerprinting of arabinoxylan and β-glucan in triticale, barley and tritordeum grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakha, A; Saulnier, L; Aman, P; Andersson, R

    2012-10-15

    Enzymatic fingerprinting of arabinoxylan (AX) and β-glucan using endo-xylanase and lichenase, respectively, helps determine the structural heterogeneity between different cereals and within genotypes of the same cereal. This study characterised the structural features of AX and β-glucan in whole grains of eight triticale cultivars grown at two locations, 20 barley cultivars/lines with wide variation in composition and morphology and five tritordeum breeding lines. Principal component analysis (PCA) resulted in clear clustering of these cereals. In general, barley and tritordeum had a higher relative proportion of highly branched arabinoxylan oligosaccharides (AXOS) than triticale. Subsequent analysis of triticale revealed two clusters based on growing region along principal component (PC) 1, while PC2 explained the genetic variability and was based on mono-substitution and di-substitution in AX fragments. PCA of β-glucan features separated the three cereals based on β-glucan content. The molar ratio of trisaccharide to tetrasaccharide was 2.5-3.4 in triticale, 2.3-3.3 in barley and 2.8-3.4 in tritordeum. Barley showed a strong positive correlation (r=0.86) between β-glucan content and relative proportion of trisaccharide. The results show that structural features of AX and β-glucan vary between and within triticale, barley and tritordeum grains which might be important determinants of end-use quality of grains.

  13. Maize Processing Waste Water Upcycling in Mexico: Recovery of Arabinoxylans for Probiotic Encapsulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Paz-Samaniego

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Maize is a major source of food in Mexico. In order to improve its nutritional value, maize kernel is exposed to an alkali treatment that generates large volumes of waste water containing gelling arabinoxylan. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the capability of maize waste water arabinoxylans (MWAX to encapsulate probiotics. The rheological, structural, and microstructural characteristics of this bio-based material were also investigated. MWAX gels at 10% (w/v were able to encapsulate Bifidobacterium as probiotic model. The MWAX gel containing 1 × 107 CFU/mL of probiotics presented a storage (G′ and loss (G″ moduli of 50 and 11 Pa, respectively. The average mesh size of the MWAX gel was around 11 times smaller than the Bifidobacterium cell magnitude. MWAX gels with or without probiotics were studied using scanning electron microscopy. The interior of the Bifidobacterium loaded gels was composed of a pore-like network of MWAX through which probiotics were distributed. The probiotic encapsulating MWAX gels appeared to be less porous than the empty gels. MWAX capability to encapsulate Bifidobacterium may be important in designing probiotic encapsulating biodegradable gels and could represent an opportunity in sustainable food waste management and utilization through upcycling to value-added products.

  14. Genotype and environment variation for arabinoxylans in hard winter and spring wheats of the U.S. Pacific Northwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of high quality wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) varieties depends on a thorough understanding of the constituents of grain, and their variation due to genetics and environment. Arabinoxylans (pentosans) are key constituents of wheat grain and have broad and far-reaching influences on m...

  15. Production and partial characterization of arabinoxylan-degrading enzymes by Penicillium brasilianum under solid-state fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Granouillet, P.; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2006-01-01

    The production of a battery of arabinoxylan-degrading enzymes by the fungus Penicillium brasilianum grown on brewer's spent grain (BSG) under solid-state fermentation was investigated. Initial moisture content, initial pH, temperature, and nitrogen source content were optimized to achieve maximum...

  16. Arabinoxylans and inulin differentially modulate the mucosal and luminal gut microbiota and mucin-degradation in humanized rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbeele, van den P.; Gerard, P.; Rabot, S.; Bruneau, A.; Aidy, El S.; Derrien, M.M.N.; Kleerebezem, M.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Smidt, H.; Verstraete, W.; Wiele, van der T.; Possemiers, S.

    2011-01-01

    The endogenous gut microbiota affects the host in many ways. Prebiotics should favour beneficial intestinal microbes and thus improve host health. In this study, we investigated how a novel class of potential prebiotic long-chain arabinoxylans (LC-AX) and the well-established prebiotic inulin (IN) m

  17. Production and partial characterization of alkaline feruloyl esterases by Fusarium oxysporum during submerged batch cultivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topakas, E.; Christakopoulos, Paul

    2004-01-01

    (corn cobs) which compared favorably to those reported for the other microorganisms. Use of de-esterified corn cobs as carbon source decreased FAE production by 5.5-fold compared to untreated corn cobs even though ferulic acid (FA) was added to the concentration found in alkali-extracts of corn cobs......Production of feruloyl esterases (FAEs) by Fusarium oxysporum was enhanced by optimization of initial pH of the culture medium, the type and concentration of nitrogen and carbon source. Submerged batch cultivation in a laboratory bioreactor (17 1) produced activity at 82 nkat g(-1) dry substrate....... Production of FAE does not therefore, require FA, however, production is diminished by the removal of esterified FA from the growth substrate. Optimal FAE activity was observed at pH 7 and 50 degreesC with 68 and 55% activity at pH 8 and pH 9, respectively. The esterase was fully stable at pH 5-8 and up...

  18. Rice Bran Feruloylated Oligosaccharides Activate Dendritic Cells via Toll-Like Receptor 2 and 4 Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Chen Lin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the effects of feruloylated oligosaccharides (FOs of rice bran on murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs and the potential pathway through which the effects are mediated. We found that FOs induced phenotypic maturation of DCs, as shown by the increased expression of CD40, CD80/CD86 and MHC-I/II molecules. FOs efficiently induced maturation of DCs generated from C3H/HeN or C57BL/6 mice with normal toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4 or TLR-2 but not DCs from mice with mutated TLR4 or TLR2. The mechanism of action of FOs may be mediated by increased phosphorylation of ERK, p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs and increased NF-kB activity, which are important signaling molecules downstream of TLR-4 and TLR-2. These data suggest that FOs induce DCs maturation through TLR-4 and/or TLR-2 and that FOs might have potential efficacy against tumor or virus infection or represent a candidate-adjuvant approach for application in immunotherapy and vaccination.

  19. Genome Wide Association Mapping for Arabinoxylan Content in a Collection of Tetraploid Wheats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Marcotuli

    Full Text Available Arabinoxylans (AXs are major components of plant cell walls in bread wheat and are important in bread-making and starch extraction. Furthermore, arabinoxylans are components of soluble dietary fibre that has potential health-promoting effects in human nutrition. Despite their high value for human health, few studies have been carried out on the genetics of AX content in durum wheat.The genetic variability of AX content was investigated in a set of 104 tetraploid wheat genotypes and regions attributable to AX content were identified through a genome wide association study (GWAS. The amount of arabinoxylan, expressed as percentage (w/w of the dry weight of the kernel, ranged from 1.8% to 5.5% with a mean value of 4.0%. The GWAS revealed a total of 37 significant marker-trait associations (MTA, identifying 19 quantitative trait loci (QTL associated with AX content. The highest number of MTAs was identified on chromosome 5A (seven, where three QTL regions were associated with AX content, while the lowest number of MTAs was detected on chromosomes 2B and 4B, where only one MTA identified a single locus. Conservation of synteny between SNP marker sequences and the annotated genes and proteins in Brachypodium distachyon, Oryza sativa and Sorghum bicolor allowed the identification of nine QTL coincident with candidate genes. These included a glycosyl hydrolase GH35, which encodes Gal7 and a glucosyltransferase GT31 on chromosome 1A; a cluster of GT1 genes on chromosome 2B that includes TaUGT1 and cisZog1; a glycosyl hydrolase that encodes a CelC gene on chromosome 3A; Ugt12887 and TaUGT1genes on chromosome 5A; a (1,3-β-D-glucan synthase (Gsl12 gene and a glucosyl hydrolase (Cel8 gene on chromosome 7A.This study identifies significant MTAs for the AX content in the grain of tetraploid wheat genotypes. We propose that these may be used for molecular breeding of durum wheat varieties with higher soluble fibre content.

  20. Resistant starch and arabinoxylan augment SCFA absorption, but affect postprandial glucose and insulin responses differently - CORRIGENDUM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Anne Krog; Theil, Peter Kappel; Hedemann, Mette Skou;

    2015-01-01

    adaptation to each diet. The pigs were fed a low DF western style control diet (WSD) and two high DF diets; an arabinoxylan (AXD) and a resistant starch (RSD) enriched diet. The NPF of insulin was lower (P = 0.04) in AXD fed pigs (4.6 nmol/h) compared to RSD fed pigs (10.5 nmol/h), despite the lowest NPF......The effects of increased colonic fermentation of dietary fibres (DF) on net portal flux (NPF) of carbohydrate-derived metabolites (glucose, SCFA and especially butyrate), hormones (insulin, C-peptide, GLP-1, GIP) and NEFA were studied in a healthy catheterised pig model. Six 59 ± 3.8 kg pigs were...... of glucose was observed in RSD fed pigs (203 mmol/h, P = 0.02). The NPF of total SCFA, acetate, propionate, and butyrate were high, intermediate, and low (P

  1. Changes in the arabinoxylan fraction of wheat grain during alcohol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosik, Ondrej; Powers, Stephen J; Chatzifragkou, Afroditi; Prabhakumari, Parvathy Chandran; Charalampopoulos, Dimitris; Hess, Linde; Brosnan, James; Shewry, Peter R; Lovegrove, Alison

    2017-04-15

    Laboratory produced DDGS samples were compared with commercial samples from a distillery and a biofuel plant. Changes in structure, solubility and content of arabinoxylan (AX) was determined. The distillation process results in a relative increase of AX content compared to the starting material. The heating and drying processes involved in the production of DDGS lead to an increased solubility and viscosity of water-extractable AX. Production of DDGS results in structural changes to the AX. There is a decrease in 2- and 3-linked arabinose oligosaccharides, that contributes to around a 50% reduction in arabinosylation in DDGS compared with the starting grains. The current study shows that laboratory-scale DDGS provide an accurate representation of the commercial scale and that the AX composition of DDGS is consistently uniform irrespective of starting material. The uniformity of DDGS and thin stillage makes them a good potential source of AX for production of prebiotics or other novel products.

  2. Application of model bread baking in the examination of arabinoxylan-protein complexes in rye bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buksa, Krzysztof

    2016-09-01

    The changes in molecular mass of arabinoxylan (AX) and protein caused by bread baking process were examined using a model rye bread. Instead of the normal flour, the dough contained starch, water-extractable AX and protein which were isolated from rye wholemeal. From the crumb of selected model breads, starch was removed releasing AX-protein complexes, which were further examined by size exclusion chromatography. On the basis of the research, it was concluded that optimum model mix can be composed of 3-6% AX and 3-6% rye protein isolate at 94-88% of rye starch meaning with the most similar properties to low extraction rye flour. Application of model rye bread allowed to examine the interactions between AX and proteins. Bread baked with a share of AX, rye protein and starch, from which the complexes of the highest molar mass were isolated, was characterized by the strongest structure of the bread crumb.

  3. Common and distant structural characteristics of feruloyl esterase families from Aspergillus oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D B R K Gupta Udatha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Feruloyl esterases (FAEs are important biomass degrading accessory enzymes due to their capability of cleaving the ester links between hemicellulose and pectin to aromatic compounds of lignin, thus enhancing the accessibility of plant tissues to cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic enzymes. FAEs have gained increased attention in the area of biocatalytic transformations for the synthesis of value added compounds with medicinal and nutritional applications. Following the increasing attention on these enzymes, a novel descriptor based classification system has been proposed for FAEs resulting into 12 distinct families and pharmacophore models for three FAE sub-families have been developed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The feruloylome of Aspergillus oryzae contains 13 predicted FAEs belonging to six sub-families based on our recently developed descriptor-based classification system. The three-dimensional structures of the 13 FAEs were modeled for structural analysis of the feruloylome. The three genes coding for three enzymes, viz., A.O.2, A.O.8 and A.O.10 from the feruloylome of A. oryzae, representing sub-families with unknown functional features, were heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris, characterized for substrate specificity and structural characterization through CD spectroscopy. Common feature-based pharamacophore models were developed according to substrate specificity characteristics of the three enzymes. The active site residues were identified for the three expressed FAEs by determining the titration curves of amino acid residues as a function of the pH by applying molecular simulations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings on the structure-function relationships and substrate specificity of the FAEs of A. oryzae will be instrumental for further understanding of the FAE families in the novel classification system. The developed pharmacophore models could be applied for virtual screening of compound databases for

  4. Glutathione transferases: a structural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Aaron

    2011-05-01

    The glutathione transferases (GSTs) are one of the most important families of detoxifying enzymes in nature. The classic activity of the GSTs is conjugation of compounds with electrophilic centers to the tripeptide glutathione (GSH), but many other activities are now associated with GSTs, including steroid and leukotriene biosynthesis, peroxide degradation, double-bond cis-trans isomerization, dehydroascorbate reduction, Michael addition, and noncatalytic "ligandin" activity (ligand binding and transport). Since the first GST structure was determined in 1991, there has been an explosion in structural data across GSTs of all three families: the cytosolic GSTs, the mitochondrial GSTs, and the membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism (MAPEG family). In this review, the major insights into GST structure and function will be discussed.

  5. Optimization of reaction conditions for enzymatic viscosity reduction and hydrolysis of wheat arabinoxylan in an industrial ethanol fermentation residue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.R.; Pedersen, S.; Meyer, Anne Boye Strunge

    2006-01-01

    This study examined enzyme-catalyzed viscosity reduction and evaluated the effects of substrate dry matter concentration on enzymatic degradation of arabinoxylan in a fermentation residue, "vinasse", resulting from industrial ethanol manufacture on wheat. Enzymatic catalysis was accomplished with...... viscosity and that a compromise in the dry matter must be found if enzymatic efficiency must be balanced with monosaccharide yields.......This study examined enzyme-catalyzed viscosity reduction and evaluated the effects of substrate dry matter concentration on enzymatic degradation of arabinoxylan in a fermentation residue, "vinasse", resulting from industrial ethanol manufacture on wheat. Enzymatic catalysis was accomplished...... with increased enzyme dosage and treatment time at pH 5, 50 degrees C, 5 wt % vinasse dry matter. After 24 It of enzymatic treatment, 76-84%, 75-80%, and 43-47%, respectively, of the theoretically maximal arabinose, xylose, and glucose releases were achieved, indicating that the viscosity decrease was a result...

  6. Dependency of the hydrogen bonding capacity of the solvent anion on the thermal stability of feruloyl esterases in ionic liquid systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuner, Birgitte; Ståhlberg, Tim; Nguyen van Buu, Olivier;

    2011-01-01

    Three feruloyl esterases, EC 3.1.1.73, (FAEs), namely FAE A from Aspergillus niger (AnFaeA), FAE C from Aspergillus nidulans (AndFaeC), and the FAE activity in a commercial b-glucanase mixture from Humicola insolens (Ultraflo L) were tested for their ability to catalyse esterification of sinapic ...

  7. Feruloylated and Nonferuloylated Arabino-oligosaccharides from Sugar Beet Pectin Selectively Stimulate the Growth of Bifidobacterium spp. in Human Fecal in Vitro Fermentations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Jesper; Lorentzen, Andrea; Vigsnæs, Louise Kristine

    2011-01-01

    The side chains of the rhamnogalacturonan I fraction in sugar beet pectin are particularly rich in arabinan moieties, which may be substituted with feruloyl groups. In this work the arabinan-rich fraction resulting from sugar beet pulp based pectin production was separated by Amberlite XAD hydrop...

  8. NMR-based identification of the phenolic profile of fruits of Lycium barbarum (goji berries). Isolation and structural determination of a novel N-feruloyl tyramine dimer as the most abundant antioxidant polyphenol of goji berries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forino, Martino; Tartaglione, Luciana; Dell'Aversano, Carmela; Ciminiello, Patrizia

    2016-03-01

    Biological properties of fruits of Lycium barbarum (goji berries) have been ascribed to their high content of nutrients and phenolics. Comprehensive studies aimed at unambiguously identifying the phenolic components in goji berries are still lacking. In this paper, we report on the isolation and NMR-based identification of the major phenolics in commercially available goji berries. Together with already known phenolics, including caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, rutin, scopoletin, N-trans-feruloyl tyramine, and N-cis-feruloyl tyramine, an unreported N-feruloyl tyramine dimer was characterized as the most abundant polyphenol isolated from the berries. Usually divalent molecules show enhanced biological activities than their corresponding monomers.

  9. Sigma-class glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Jack U; Smythe, Mark L

    2011-05-01

    Mammalian cytosolic glutathione transferases (GSTs) can be grouped into seven classes. Of these, the sigma class is also widely distributed in nature, with isoforms found in both vertebrates and invertebrates. It contains examples of proteins that have evolved specialized functions, such as the cephalopod lens S-crystallins, the mammalian hematopoietic prostaglandin D(2) synthase, and the helminth 28-kDa antigen. In mammals, the sigma-class GST has both anti- and proinflammatory functions, depending on the type of immune response, and an immunomodulatory function is also associated with the enzyme from helminth parasites. In the fly, it is associated with a specific detoxication activity toward lipid oxidation products. Mice genetically depleted of the sigma-class GST, or transgenically overexpressing it, have provided insight into the physiological roles of the GST. Inhibitors of the mammalian enzyme developed by structure-based methods are effective in controlling allergic response. This review covers the structure, function, and pharmacology of vertebrate and invertebrate GSTs.

  10. Purification and characterisation of arabinoxylan arabinofuranohydrolase I responsible for the filterability of barley malt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomin; Gao, Fei; Cai, Guolin; Jin, Zhao; Lu, Jian; Dong, Jianjun; Yin, Hua; Yu, Junhong; Yang, Mei

    2015-05-01

    Dan'er is a widely grown malt barley cultivar in China, but its filterability defects have severely impeded its application in beer brewing. Previous investigations have suggested that we should identify the malt filterability correlated proteins, one of which was postulated to be arabinoxylan arabinofuranohydrolase I (AXAH-I). To verify this hypothesis, we purified AXAH-I from Dan'er malt, characterised its enzyme performance, and investigated its influence on filterability by adding different amounts of purified enzyme to the mash. With 6 mU g(-1) malt AXAH-I supplemented, the wort separation rate increased by 31.8%, viscosity decreased by 3.6%, and the endosperm reserve contents declined concomitantly. Unexpectedly, the wort turbidity increased with increasing AXAH-I. We also tried to optimise the use of currently available commercial enzyme products for filterability improvement in beer brewing, by supplementing them with purified AXAH-I and β-amylase. AXAH-I could be a functional component for novel commercial enzyme products in the beer industry.

  11. Entrapment of Probiotics in Water Extractable Arabinoxylan Gels: Rheological and Microstructural Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Morales-Ortega

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to their porous structure, aqueous environment and dietary fiber nature arabinoxylan (AX gels could have potential applications for colon-specific therapeutic molecule delivery. In addition, prebiotic and health related effects of AX have been previously demonstrated. It has been also reported that cross-linked AX can be degraded by bacteria from the intestinal microbiota. However, AX gels have not been abundantly studied as carrier systems and there is no information available concerning their capability to entrap cells. In this regard, probiotic bacteria such as Bifidobacterium longum have been the focus of intense research activity lately. The objective of this research was to investigate the entrapment of probiotic B. longum in AX gels. AX solution at 2% (w/v containing B. longum (1 × 107 CFU/cm formed gels induced by laccase as cross-linking agent. The entrapment of B. longum decreased gel elasticity from 31 to 23 Pa, probably by affecting the physical interactions taking place between WEAX chains. Images of AX gels containing B. longum viewed under a scanning electron microscope show the gel network with the bacterial cells entrapped inside. The microstructure of these gels resembles that of an imperfect honeycomb. The results suggest that AX gels can be potential candidates for the entrapment of probiotics.

  12. Different human gut models reveal the distinct fermentation patterns of Arabinoxylan versus inulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Abbeele, Pieter; Venema, Koen; Van de Wiele, Tom; Verstraete, Willy; Possemiers, Sam

    2013-10-16

    Different in vitro models have been developed to assess how food compounds affect the human gut microbiota. Using two such models (SHIME(R) and TIM-2), we compared how long-chain arabinoxylan (LC-AX), a wheat-derived potentially prebiotic fiber, and inulin (IN), a well-established prebiotic compound, modulate SCFA production and bifidobacteria composition. While both the SHIME and TIM-2 differ in experimental design, they both demonstrated that LC-AX and IN specifically increased the health-promoting metabolites propionate and butyrate, respectively. Furthermore, LC-AX stimulated Bifidobacterium longum, while IN stimulated other bifidobacteria including Bifidobacterium adolescentis. The SHIME experiment also revealed that effects of LC-AX were more persistent during the 2-week wash-out period. These results confirm a recent in vivo study, during which humanized rats were treated with the same LC-AX/IN. In conclusion, results from different human gut models suggest that, besides IN, LC-AX are promising prebiotic candidates with high specificity toward Bifidobacterium longum and a selective propionate increase.

  13. Characterization of water and alkali extractable arabinoxylan from wheat and rye under standardized conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buksa, Krzysztof; Praznik, Werner; Loeppert, Renate; Nowotna, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Arabinoxylans (AXs) are an important component of wheat and rye dough. They bind water, contribute to the formation of viscous dough and improve the quality of bread. For the application of AX fractions in bread making process, it is useful to record a quality profile of wheat fractions compared to the quality profile of rye fractions under standardized conditions. In this work water and alkali extractable AX containing fractions, from wheat- and rye wholemeal, were extracted under standardized conditions and characterized. For analysis of composition, structural features, and molecular dimension a combination of chemical, physicochemical, enzymatic and chromatographic techniques was applied. The molar mass distributions obtained by means of an innovative colorimetric pentose detection in the eluted SEC fractions were comparable for all under standardized conditions extracted AXs. The determined molar masses of AXs extracted both from wheat- and from rye grain were close to 2.0 × 10(5) g/mol for water extractable AXs and 3.0 × 10(5) g/mol for alkali extractable AXs. Different susceptibility to endoxylanase treatment, having been observed as differences in the SEC profiles, may be evidence of structural differences between AXs depending on their origin. The viscosities of AX solutions were strongly influenced by their molar mass and structure; samples being less susceptible to endoxylanase provided solutions of higher viscosity.

  14. Feruloyl esterases as a tool for the release of phenolic compounds from agro-industrial by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Isabelle; Navarro, David; Marnet, Nathalie; Rakotomanomana, Nnjara; Lesage-Meessen, Laurence; Sigoillot, Jean-Claude; Asther, Marcel; Asther, Michèle

    2006-08-14

    Agro-industrial by-products are a potential source of added-value phenolic acids with promising applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Here two purified feruloyl esterases from Aspergillus niger, FAEA and FAEB were tested for their ability to release phenolic acids such as caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid from coffee pulp, apple marc and wheat straw. Their hydrolysis activity was evaluated and compared with their action on maize bran and sugar beet pulp. The specificity of both enzymes against natural and synthetic substrates was evaluated; particular attention was paid to quinic esters and lignin monomers. The efficiency of both enzymes on model substrates was studied. We show the ability of these enzymes to hydrolyze quinic esters and ester linkages between phenolic acids and lignin monomer.

  15. Structural differences among alkali-soluble arabinoxylans from maize (Zea mays), rice (Oryza sativa), and wheat (Triticum aestivum) brans influence human fecal fermentation profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Devin J; Patterson, John A; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2010-01-13

    Human fecal fermentation profiles of maize, rice, and wheat bran and their dietary fiber fractions released by alkaline-hydrogen peroxide treatment (principally arabinoxylan) were obtained with the aim of identifying and characterizing fractions associated with high production of short chain fatty acids and a linear fermentation profile for possible application as a slowly fermentable dietary fiber. The alkali-soluble fraction from maize bran resulted in the highest short chain fatty acid production among all samples tested, and was linear over the 24 h fermentation period. Size-exclusion chromatography and (1)H NMR suggested that higher molecular weight and uniquely substituted arabinose side chains may contribute to these properties. Monosaccharide disappearance data suggest that maize and rice bran arabinoxylans are fermented by a debranching mechanism, while wheat bran arabinoxylans likely contain large unsubstituted xylose regions that are fermented preferentially, followed by poor fermentation of the remaining, highly branched oligosaccharides.

  16. Concentrated Arabinoxylan but Not Concentrated Beta-Glucan in Wheat Bread Has Similar Effects on Postprandial Insulin as Whole-Grain Rye in Porto-arterial Catheterized Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kirstine Lykke; Hedemann, Mette Skou; Lærke, Helle Nygaard;

    2013-01-01

    The acute glycemic effects of concentrated dietary fibers (DF) versus whole-grain rye were studied in portoarterial catheterized pigs. Two white wheat breads with wheat arabinoxylan (AX) or oat beta-glucan (BG), two rye breads with intact rye kernels (RK) or milled rye (GR), and a low DF white...... min postprandial for AX and GR (74.4 and 129 pmol/min for AX and GR, respectively, compared to 738 pmol/min for WF, P effective in improving insulin economy, suggesting that arabinoxylan from wheat and rye induces similar outcomes in the metabolic...

  17. Enzymatic Xylose Release from Pretreated Corn Bran Arabinoxylan: Differential Effects of Deacetylation and Deferuloylation on Insoluble and Soluble Substrate Fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Jane; Viksø-Nielsen, Ander; Meyer, Anne S.

    2010-01-01

    In the present work enzymatic hydrolysis of arabinoxylan from pretreated corn bran (190 °C, 10 min) was evaluated by measuring the release of xylose and arabinose after treatment with a designed minimal mixture of monocomponent enzymes consisting of α-l-arabinofuranosidases, an endoxylanase......, and a β-xylosidase. The pretreatment divided the corn bran material 50:50 into soluble and insoluble fractions having A:X ratios of 0.66 and 0.40, respectively. Addition of acetyl xylan esterase to the monocomponent enzyme mixture almost doubled the xylose release from the insoluble substrate fraction...

  18. Roles for glutathione transferases in antioxidant recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, David P; Steel, Patrick G; Edwards, Robert

    2011-08-01

    Uniquely among the plant glutathione transferases, two classes possess a catalytic cysteine capable of performing glutathione-dependent reductions. These are the dehydroascorbate reductases (DHARs) and the lambda-class glutathione transferases (GSTLs). Using immobilized GSTLs probed with crude plant extracts we have identified flavonols as high affinity ligands and subsequently demonstrated a novel glutathione-dependent role for these enzymes in recycling oxidized quercetin. By comparing the activities of DHARs and GSTLs we now propose a unified catalytic mechanism that suggests oxidized anthocyanidins and tocopherols may be alternative polyphenolic substrates of GSTLs.

  19. [Structure and functions of glutathione transferases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedets, O M

    2014-01-01

    Data about classification, nomenclature, structure, substrate specificity and role of many glutathione transferase's isoenzymes in cell functions have been summarised. The enzyme has been discovered more than 50 years ago. This family of proteins is updated continuously. It has very different composition and will have demand for system analysis for many years.

  20. Mode of endosperm and wholemeal arabinoxylans solubilisation during rye breadmaking: genotypic diversity in the level, substitution degree and macromolecular characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyran, Malgorzata R; Dynkowska, Wioletta M

    2014-02-15

    Insight into solubilisation mechanisms of rye arabinoxylans during breadmaking is important for understanding the biochemical processes that affect bread attributes. Purified ethanol precipitated water-extractable arabinoxylans (WE-AX) and residual unextractable counterparts (WU-AX) were isolated from rye flours and resulting breads. While the endosperm flours had lower endoxylanase activities and higher arabinose-to-xylose ratios of WU-AX than those of corresponding wholemeals, there were not any significant differences between them in the mean amounts of WU-AX hydrolysed during breadmaking. Nevertheless, they were highly affected by rye cultivar used for breadmaking. On average, 42% and 36% of WU-AX were recovered in bread WE-AX fraction, causing its 11% and 8% increase, respectively for endosperm and wholemeal breads. Bread WE-AX, however, had lower molecular weights than those of starting flours, implying chains depolymerisation. Degree of AX solubilisation depends mainly on rye genotype used, determining combined effect of enzymatic and acid hydrolyses, associations and fine structure of AX.

  1. Edible arabinoxylan-based films. 1. Effects of lipid type on water vapor permeability, film structure, and other physical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péroval, Claudine; Debeaufort, Frédéric; Despré, Denis; Voilley, Andrée

    2002-07-01

    Arabinoxylans (AX) are natural fibers extracted from maize bran, an industrial byproduct. To promote this polymer as a food ingredient, development of edible coatings and films had been proposed. Indeed, composite arabinoxylan-based films were prepared by emulsifying a fat: palmitic acid, oleic acid, triolein, or a hydrogenated palm oil (OK35). Lipid effects on water vapor permeability (WVP), surface hydrophobicity (contact angles), lipid particle size, and mechanical properties were investigated. Results showed that OK35-AX emulsion films had the lowest WVP. Emulsified films presented a bimodal particle size distribution; however, the smallest particle mean diameter (0.54 microm) was observed in OK35-AX emulsion films. Contact angles of water comparable to those observed for LDPE films (>90 degrees ) are measured on the OK35-AX film surface. Finally, only triolein-AX emulsion films had elongation higher than films without lipid. These results suggest that OK35 enhances functional properties of AX-based films and should be retained for further research.

  2. A search for synbiotics: effects of enzymatically modified arabinoxylan and Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens on short-chain fatty acids in the cecum content and plasma of rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tina Skau; Jensen, Bent Borg; Purup, Stig;

    2016-01-01

    Identification of dietary strategies to increase large intestinal production and absorption of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), especially butyrate, is of great interest due to the possible health promoting effects. We explored the effect of an enzymatically modified arabinoxylan-rich diet (EAXD...

  3. Effects of Resistant Starch and Arabinoxylan on Parameters Related to Large Intestinal and Metabolic Health in Pigs Fed Fat-Rich Diets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tina Skau; Theil, Peter Kappel; Purup, Stig;

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the effects of a resistant starch (RS)-rich, arabinoxylan (AX)-rich, or low-DF Western-style control diet (all high-fat) on large intestinal gene expression, adiposity, and glycemic response parameters in pigs. Animals were slaughtered after 3 weeks of treatment. Plasma butyra...

  4. Molecular weight changes of arabinoxylans of wheat and rye incurred by the digestion processes in the upper gastrointestinal tract of pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legall, Maud; Eybye, Karin; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    2010-01-01

    Twenty cannulated-pigs were fed wheat flour (WFL), wheat whole grain (WWG), wheat aleurone flour (WAF) and rye aleurone flour (RAF) differing by their arabinoxylans (AX) proportions. After ileal collection of digesta (0800–1800), the soluble phase was extracted. The weight average molecular weight...

  5. Hypoglycemic and Hypotensive Activity of a Root Extract of Smilax aristolochiifolia, Standardized on N-trans-Feruloyl-Tyramine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Arely Botello Amaro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome (MS is a condition consisting of various metabolic abnormalities that are risk factors for developing kidney failure, cardiovascular, vascular and cerebrovascular diseases, among others. The prevalence of this syndrome shows a marked increase. The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacological effect of Smilax aristolochiifolia root on some components of MS and obtain some of the active principle using chromatographic techniques. The compound isolated was N-trans-feruloyl tyramine NTF (1, and its structure was determined by spectroscopic and spectrometric analyses. The whole extract and the standardized fractions were able to control the weight gain around 30%; the fraction rich in NTF was able to decrease the hypertriglyceridemia by 60%. The insulin resistance decreased by approximately 40%; the same happened with blood pressure, since the values of systolic and diastolic pressure fell on average 31% and 37% respectively, to levels comparable to normal value. The treatment also had an immunomodulatory effect on the low-grade inflammation associated with obesity, since it significantly decreased the relative production of pro-inflammatory cytokines regarding anti-inflammatory cytokines, both kidney and adipose tissue. Therefore it can be concluded that the extract and fractions of Smilax aristolochiifolia root with NTF are useful to counteract some symptoms of MS in animal models.

  6. Purification and characterization of the Oligosaccharyl transferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, T.M.

    1990-11-01

    Oligosaccharyl transferase was characterized to be a glycoprotein with at least one saccharide unit that had a D-manno or D- glucopyranose configuration with unmodified hydroxy groups at C-3, C-4 and C-6, using a Concanavalin A affinity column. This afforded a 100 fold increase in the transferase purity in the solubilized microsomal sample and also removed over 90% of the microsomal proteins (the cytosolic ones being removed before solubilization). The detergent, N,N-Dimethyldodecylamine N-oxide (LDAO) was used for solubilization and it yielded a system compatible with the assay and the purification steps. An efficient method for detergent extraction without dilution of sample or protein precipitation was also developed.

  7. Glutathione transferases as targets for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzza, Paolo; Rosato, Antonio; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Floreani, Maura; Quintieri, Luigi

    2009-09-01

    Besides catalyzing the inactivation of various electrophile-producing anticancer agents via conjugation to the tripeptide glutathione, some cytosolic proteins belonging to the glutathione transferase (formerly glutatione-S-transferase; GST) superfamily are emerging as negative modulators of stress/drug-induced cell apoptosis through the interaction with specific signaling kinases. In addition, several data link the overexpression of some GSTs, in particular GSTP1-1, to both natural and acquired resistance to various structurally unrelated anticancer drugs. Tumor overexpression of these proteins has provided a rationale for the search of GST inhibitors and GST-activated cytotoxic prodrugs. In the present review we discuss the current structural and pharmacological knowledge of both types of GST-targeting compounds.

  8. Characterization of arabinoxylan/cellulose nanocrystals gels to investigate fluorescent probes mobility in bioinspired models of plant secondary cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paës, Gabriel; Chabbert, Brigitte

    2012-01-09

    Biomass from lignocellulose (LC) is a highly complex network of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, which is considered to be a sustainable source of fuels, chemicals and materials. To achieve an environmental friendly and efficient LC upgrading, a better understanding of the LC architecture is necessary. We have devised some LC bioinspired model systems, based on arabinoxylan gels, in which mobility of dextrans and BSA grafted with FITC has been studied by FRAP. Our results indicate that the probes diffusion is more influenced by their hydrodynamic radius than by the gel mesh size. The addition of some cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) decreases polymer chain mobility and has low effect on the probes diffusion, suggesting that the gels are better organized in the presence of CNCs, as shown by rheological measurements and scanning electronic microscopy observations. This demonstrates that the FRAP analysis can be a powerful tool to screen the architecture of LC model systems.

  9. SIKLODEKSTRIN GLIKOSIL TRANSFERASE DAN PEMANFAATANNYA DALAM INDUSTRI [Cyclodextrin Glycosyl Transferase and its application in industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budiasih Wahyuntari

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Cyclodextrin glycosyl transferase (CGT-ase is mainly produced by Bacilli. Systematical name of the enzyme is E.C. 2.4.1.19 a-1,4 glucan-4-glycosyl transferase. The enzyme catalyzes hydrolysis of starch intramolecular, and intermolecular transglycosylation of a-1,4, glucan chains. Cyclodextrins are a-1,4 linked cyclic oligosaccharides resulting from enzymatic degradation of starch by cyclodextrin glycosyl transferase through untramolecular transglycosylation. The major cyclodextrins are made up of 6, 7 and 8 glucopyranose units which are known as a-, b-, and y-cyclodextrin. All CGT-ase catalyze three kinds of cyclodextrins, the proportion of the cyclodextrins depends on the enzyme source and reaction conditions. The intermolecular transglycosylation ability of the enzyme has been applied in transfering glycosyl residues into suitable acceptor. Transglycosylation by the enzymes have been tested to improve solubility of some flavonoids and to favor precipitation ci some glycosides.

  10. Glutathione S-transferases in pediatric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen eLuo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The glutathione S-transferases (GSTs are a family of ubiquitously-expressed polymorphic enzymes important for detoxifying endogenous and exogenous compounds. In addition to their classic activity of detoxification by conjugation of compounds with glutathione, many other functions are now found to be associated with GSTs. The associations between GST polymorphisms/functions and human disease susceptibility or treatment outcome, mostly in adults, have been extensively studied and reviewed. This mini review focuses on studies related to GST epidemiology and functions related to pediatric cancer. Opportunities to exploit GST in pediatric cancer therapy are also discussed.

  11. The acute metabolic response to breads with contrasting content and composition of arabinoxylans and ß-glucan - metabolomics analysis of plasma from porto-arterial catheterized pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirstine Lykke; Hedemann, Mette Skou; Lærke, Helle Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    A liquid chromatography–MS (LC-MS) metabolomics analysis of plasma from portal–arterial catheterised pigs fed breads prepared with whole-grain rye or wheat flour with added concentrated arabinoxylan (AX) or β-glucan (BG) was conducted. Comparison of the effects of concentrated fibres with whole...... amino acids in plasma correlated with the protein contents in the breads and leucine uptake significantly affected insulin secretion in the mesenteric artery...

  12. Antibodies with thiol-S-transferase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, E.; Oei, Yoko; Sweet, E.; Uno, Tetsuo; Schultz, P.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-06-12

    A major detoxification pathway used by aerobic organisms involves the conjugation of the tripeptide glutathione (GSH) to the electrophilic center of toxic substances. This reaction is catalyzed by a class of enzymes referred to as the glutathione S-transferases (GST) (EC 2.5.1.18). These enzymes activate the cysteine thiol group of GSH for nucleophilic addition to a variety of substrates, including aryl halides, {alpha}{beta}-unsaturated aldehydes and ketones, and epoxides. Despite the availability of X-ray crystal structures, the mechanism whereby glutathione transferases catalyze these addition reactions remains unclear. In order to gain a greater understanding of this important biological transformation, as well as to generate new detoxification catalysts, we have asked whether antibodies can be generated that catalyze similar nucleophilic addition reactions. Our initial efforts focused on the addition reaction of thiol nucleophiles to the nitro-substituted styrene derivative 1. The ratio of k{sub cat}/K{sub m} reported for the reaction of the isozyme 4-4` of rat liver GST with the good substance, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, is approximately 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} compared to a calculated pseudo-first-order rate constant for the uncatalyzed reaction of approximately 3 x 10{sup -2} s{sup -1} (60 mM GSH, pH = 80). These comparisons suggest that with further improvements in hapten design, catalytic antibodies may prove a good source of detoxification catalysts. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  13. 反胶束萃取阿魏酸酯酶%Purification of Feruloyl Esterase Using Reverse Micelles Extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王镇发; 陈培钦; 邓秩韬; 谢晨; 李夏兰

    2013-01-01

    利用十六烷基三甲基溴化铵(CTAB)/正己醇/异辛烷反胶束萃取阿魏酸酯酶.考察pH值、离子强度、CTAB浓度对阿魏酸酯酶的CTAB/正己醇/异辛烷反胶束萃取及其反萃取的影响.结果表明:萃取的最佳条件为酶液透析24 h,pH值为12,萃取液为25 mmol· L-1 CTAB的正己醇/异辛烷溶液(体积比为1∶5),萃取率接近100%;反萃取的最佳条件为pH值为7的0.20 mol·L-1 KCl溶液,反萃取率可达79%.纯化后比活为356.7μkat·g-1,纯化倍数为6.9,SDS-PAGE电泳显示两条带.%The cetrimonium bromide/hexanol/isooctane reverse micelles extraction and backward extraction were used to purify feruloyl esterase. The effects of pH, ionic strength and cetrimonium bromide (CTAB) concentration on the cetrimonium bromide/hexanol/isooctane reverse micelles extraction and backward extraction were studied. The results showed that the extraction efficiency was nearly 100% when the optimal extraction conditions were used as followed: enzyme dialysis time 24 h, pH 12 and CTAB concentration in hexanol/isooctane solution (volume ratio 1:5) 25 mmol · L-1. The optimal condition of backward extraction was 0. 20 mol · L-1 KCl with pH 7, and the efficiency of backward extraction was 79%. After extraction and backward extraction of the enzyme, specific activity was 356. 7 μkat · g-1, purification fold was 6. 9, and SDS-PAGE electrophoresis showed two bands.

  14. Gelation of wheat arabinoxylans in the presence of Cu(+2) and in aqueous mixtures with cereal β-glucans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skendi, Adriana; Biliaderis, Costas G

    2016-07-15

    The effect of copper ions (0.63-0.16 mM) on the rheological behavior of arabinoxylan (AX) aqueous solutions was investigated. Moreover, the influence of β-glucan addition (BG, 0.5-3% w/v) on the gelation of mixed AX/BG solutions with and without addition of the peroxidase/H2O2 was examined. Generally, gels formed with inclusion of transition metal-ions differed from those obtained by adding peroxidase/H2O2. Copper ions induced viscosity increase of the AX-solutions and form stronger thermoreversible gels with increasing ion-concentration; optimal gelation was at 15 °C. For added β-glucan at levels >1%, the lower the concentration and the higher the molecular weight of β-glucan, the weaker the gelling ability of the mixed AX/BG system treated with peroxidase/H2O2. The polysaccharide-ratio affected both the gelling rate and the network melting temperature, with the β-glucan itself giving the strongest network. Calorimetry provided evidence for existence of β-glucan ordered domains in the mixed gel structures of AX/BG1, indicative of phase separation events.

  15. A Micelle Self-Assembled from Doxorubicin-Arabinoxylan Conjugates with pH-Cleavable Bond for Synergistic Antitumor Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Li, Yanli; Dong, Xia; Wang, Ying; Chong, Xiaodan; Yu, Tai; Zhang, Fulei; Chen, Di; Zhang, Li; Gao, Jie; Yang, Cheng; Han, Jun; Li, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Nanomedicine offers new hope to overcome the low solubility and high side toxicity to normal tissue appeared in traditional chemotherapy. The biocompatibility and intracellular drug accumulation is still a big challenge for the nano-based formulations. Herein, a medical-used biocompatible arabinoxylan (AX) is used to develop to delivery chemodrug doxorubicin (DOX). The solubility of DOX is obviously enhanced via the hydrogen bond formed with AX which results in an amphiphilic AX-DOX. A micelle with pH-cleavable bond is thus self-assembled from such AX-DOX with DOX core and AX shell. The inner DOX can be easily released out at low intracellular pH, which obviously enhanced its in vitro cytotoxicity against breast cancer cells (MCF-7). Interestingly, an unexpected apoptosis is evoked except for the proliferation inhibition. Moreover, the therapeutic effects are further synergistically promoted by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) and intracellular pH-triggered drug release. Consequently, the in vivo intratumor accumulation of DOX, the tumor inhibition was significantly promoted after intravenous administration to the Balb/c nude mice bearing MCF-7 tumors. These in vitro/vivo results indicated that the AX-DOX micellular formulation holds high potential in cancer therapy.

  16. The effects of a galactoglucomannan oligosaccharide-arabinoxylan (GGMO-AX) complex in broiler chicks challenged with Eimeria acervulina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, T A; Dilger, R N; Hopkins, A C; Price, N P; Fahey, G C

    2012-05-01

    Fermentable carbohydrates may enhance the ability of the gastrointestinal tract to defend against pathogenic infection. We hypothesized that a mannose-rich, galactoglucomannan oligosaccharide-arabinoxylan (GGMO-AX) complex would positively impact immune status and prevent weight loss resulting from acute coccidiosis (Eimeria acervulina) infection of chicks. Using a completely randomized design, 1-d-old commercial broiler chicks (n = 160; 4 replications/treatment; 5 chicks/replication) were assigned to one of 4 corn-soybean meal-based diets containing supplemental GGMO-AX (0, 1, 2, or 4%) that replaced dietary cellulose. On d 9 posthatch, an equal number of chicks on each diet were inoculated with either distilled water (sham control) or E. acervulina (1 × 10(6) oocysts). All birds were euthanized on d 7 postinoculation (PI) for collection of cecal contents and duodenal tissue. Overall, BW gain of chicks was not affected by diet PI, whereas infection decreased (P AX resulting in the highest cfu/g of cecal contents (on a DM basis). Messenger RNA expression of all duodenal cytokines evaluated was affected by infection status (P ≤ 0.02) but not by dietary treatment alone. Supplementing 4% GGMO-AX consistently resulted in the greatest fold change in proinflammatory cytokine expression, while inhibiting antiinflammatory cytokine expression, which indicates a more robust innate immune response. Despite decreasing performance, 4% dietary GGMO-AX improved select fermentation indices and the innate intestinal immune response to an acute E. acervulina infection.

  17. Effect of β-glucan-fatty acid esters on microstructure and physical properties of wheat straw arabinoxylan films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Usman; Bijalwan, Vandana; Basu, Santanu; Kesarwani, Atul Kumar; Mazumder, Koushik

    2017-04-01

    Arabinoxylans (AX) was isolated from wheat straw, whereas β-glucan (BG) was extracted from oat flour. The compositional analysis indicated wheat straw AX contained arabinose and xylose as major constituent sugars whereas higher β-glucan content (77%) was found in the extracted material from oat flour. The BG was conjugated with lauric (LA), myristic (MA), palmitic (PA), stearic (SA) and oleic (OA) acid to prepare corresponding β-glucan-fatty acid esters (BGFAs) with nearly similar degree of substitution. The effect of BGFAs to AX films on the water barrier, optical and mechanical properties were investigated. The addition of LABG and MABG to AX formed laminar structures in the composite films which limited water vapor permeability, giving rise to more opacity. Films prepared by blending AX with SABG and OABG were less effective as water vapor barrier due to their non-layer film microstructures; however they were less opaque. The laminar structures also imparted less mechanical strength and flexibility in the composite films. Furthermore, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed that all AX-BGFAs composite films were thermally more stable than pure AX and AX-BG films.

  18. Antioxidant capacity of arabinoxylan oligosaccharide fractions prepared from wheat aleurone using Trichoderma viride or Neocallimastix patriciarum xylanase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malunga, Lovemore Nkhata; Beta, Trust

    2015-01-15

    The effect of xylanase type (Trichoderma viride or Neocallimastix patriciarum) and graded ethanol fractionation on the antioxidant capacity (AOC) of arabinoxylan oligosaccharides (AXOS) obtained from wheat aleurone was investigated. AXOS yields were higher using N. patriciarum (62%) than T. viride (44%). The fraction (F100) collected at >80% ethanol concentration constituted 60% of total recovered AXOS. Degree of substitution ranged from 0.20 to 0.60 for ethanol graded fractions. Ferulic acid (FA) esterified to AXOS (8.0 μg/ mg) was 2-fold lower for the N. patriciarum treatment. The mean AOC (41.6, 183.1, and 394.9 μM TE/mg) of T. viride treated AXOS was >1.4-fold higher than N. patriciarum treatment using DPPH and ABTS and ORAC assays, respectively. Fraction F100 had highest AOC. AOC was influenced by the content of esterified FA (R(2)=0.94). The type of xylanase had a major influence on the AOC of the resultant AXOS rich in FA content.

  19. Effect of heat and drought stress on the structure and composition of arabinoxylan and β-glucan in wheat grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakszegi, Marianna; Lovegrove, Alison; Balla, Krisztina; Láng, László; Bedő, Zoltán; Veisz, Ottó; Shewry, Peter R

    2014-02-15

    The effects of heat (H), drought (D) and H+D (from 12th day after heading for 15 days) on the dietary fiber content and composition (arabinoxylan (AX) and β-glucan) of three winter wheat varieties (Plainsman V, Mv Magma and Fatima 2) were determined. Results showed that H and D stress decreased the TKW, the β-glucan contents of the seeds and the quantity of the DP3+DP4 units, while the protein and AX contents increased. The highest amounts of AX and proteins were in the H+D stressed samples with heat stress also increasing the water extractability (WE) of the AX. However, while the content of AX content was generally increased by all stresses, drought stress had negative effect on the AX content of the drought tolerant Plainsman V. Fatima 2 behaved similarly to Plainsman V as regards to its drought tolerance, but was very sensitive to heat stress, while Mv Magma was the most resistant to heat stress.

  20. Regulation of Signal Transduction by Glutathione Transferases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Pajaud

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione transferases (GST are essentially known as enzymes that catalyse the conjugation of glutathione to various electrophilic compounds such as chemical carcinogens, environmental pollutants, and antitumor agents. However, this protein family is also involved in the metabolism of endogenous compounds which play critical roles in the regulation of signaling pathways. For example, the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE and the prostaglandin 15-deoxy-,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2 are metabolized by GSTs and these compounds are known to influence the activity of transcription factors and protein kinases involved in stress response, proliferation, differentiation, or apoptosis. Furthermore, several studies have demonstrated that GSTs are able to interact with different protein partners such as mitogen activated protein kinases (i.e., c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1 which are also involved in cell signaling. New functions of GSTs, including S-glutathionylation of proteins by GSTs and ability to be a nitric oxide (NO carrier have also been described. Taken together, these observations strongly suggest that GST might play a crucial role during normal or cancer cells proliferation or apoptosis.

  1. The Genetic Architecture of Murine Glutathione Transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Pandey, Ashutosh K; Houseal, M Trevor; Mulligan, Megan K

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes play a protective role against oxidative stress and may influence disease risk and drug pharmacokinetics. In this study, massive multiscalar trait profiling across a large population of mice derived from a cross between C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA2/J (D2)--the BXD family--was combined with linkage and bioinformatic analyses to characterize mechanisms controlling GST expression and to identify downstream consequences of this variation. Similar to humans, mice show a wide range in expression of GST family members. Variation in the expression of Gsta4, Gstt2, Gstz1, Gsto1, and Mgst3 is modulated by local expression QTLs (eQTLs) in several tissues. Higher expression of Gsto1 in brain and liver of BXD strains is strongly associated (P < 0.01) with inheritance of the B6 parental allele whereas higher expression of Gsta4 and Mgst3 in brain and liver, and Gstt2 and Gstz1 in brain is strongly associated with inheritance of the D2 parental allele. Allele-specific assays confirmed that expression of Gsto1, Gsta4, and Mgst3 are modulated by sequence variants within or near each gene locus. We exploited this endogenous variation to identify coexpression networks and downstream targets in mouse and human. Through a combined systems genetics approach, we provide new insight into the biological role of naturally occurring variants in GST genes.

  2. Interactions of glutathione transferases with 4-hydroxynonenal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Larissa M; Atkins, William M

    2011-05-01

    Electrophilic products of lipid peroxidation are important contributors to the progression of several pathological states. The prototypical α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), triggers cellular events associated with oxidative stress, which can be curtailed by the glutathione-dependent elimination of HNE. The glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a major determinate of the intracellular concentration of HNE and can influence susceptibility to toxic effects, particularly when HNE and GST levels are altered in disease states. In this article, we provide a brief summary of the cellular effects of HNE, followed by a review of its GST-catalyzed detoxification, with an emphasis on the structural attributes that play an important role in the interactions with alpha-class GSTs. Some of the key determining characteristics that impart high alkenal activity reside in the unique C-terminal interactions of the GSTA4-4 enzyme. Studies encompassing both kinetic and structural analyses of related isoforms will be highlighted, with additional attention to stereochemical aspects that demonstrate the capacity of GSTA4-4 to detoxify both enantiomers of the biologically relevant racemic mixture while generating a select set of diastereomeric products with subsequent implications. A summary of the literature that examines the interplay between GSTs and HNE in model systems relevant to oxidative stress will also be discussed to demonstrate the magnitude of importance of GSTs in the overall detoxification scheme.

  3. Regulation of signal transduction by glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajaud, Julie; Kumar, Sandeep; Rauch, Claudine; Morel, Fabrice; Aninat, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GST) are essentially known as enzymes that catalyse the conjugation of glutathione to various electrophilic compounds such as chemical carcinogens, environmental pollutants, and antitumor agents. However, this protein family is also involved in the metabolism of endogenous compounds which play critical roles in the regulation of signaling pathways. For example, the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and the prostaglandin 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) are metabolized by GSTs and these compounds are known to influence the activity of transcription factors and protein kinases involved in stress response, proliferation, differentiation, or apoptosis. Furthermore, several studies have demonstrated that GSTs are able to interact with different protein partners such as mitogen activated protein kinases (i.e., c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)) which are also involved in cell signaling. New functions of GSTs, including S-glutathionylation of proteins by GSTs and ability to be a nitric oxide (NO) carrier have also been described. Taken together, these observations strongly suggest that GST might play a crucial role during normal or cancer cells proliferation or apoptosis.

  4. The Genetic Architecture of Murine Glutathione Transferases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Lu

    Full Text Available Glutathione S-transferase (GST genes play a protective role against oxidative stress and may influence disease risk and drug pharmacokinetics. In this study, massive multiscalar trait profiling across a large population of mice derived from a cross between C57BL/6J (B6 and DBA2/J (D2--the BXD family--was combined with linkage and bioinformatic analyses to characterize mechanisms controlling GST expression and to identify downstream consequences of this variation. Similar to humans, mice show a wide range in expression of GST family members. Variation in the expression of Gsta4, Gstt2, Gstz1, Gsto1, and Mgst3 is modulated by local expression QTLs (eQTLs in several tissues. Higher expression of Gsto1 in brain and liver of BXD strains is strongly associated (P < 0.01 with inheritance of the B6 parental allele whereas higher expression of Gsta4 and Mgst3 in brain and liver, and Gstt2 and Gstz1 in brain is strongly associated with inheritance of the D2 parental allele. Allele-specific assays confirmed that expression of Gsto1, Gsta4, and Mgst3 are modulated by sequence variants within or near each gene locus. We exploited this endogenous variation to identify coexpression networks and downstream targets in mouse and human. Through a combined systems genetics approach, we provide new insight into the biological role of naturally occurring variants in GST genes.

  5. Glutathione transferase mimics : Micellar catalysis of an enzymic reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindkvist, Björn; Weinander, Rolf; Engman, Lars; Koetse, Marc; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.; Morgenstern, Ralf

    1997-01-01

    Substances that mimic the enzyme action of glutathione transferases (which serve in detoxification) are described. These micellar catalysts enhance the reaction rate between thiols and activated halogenated nitroarenes as well as alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyls. The nucleophilic aromatic substituti

  6. Glutathione transferases in the bioactivation of azathioprine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modén, Olof; Mannervik, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    The prodrug azathioprine is primarily used for maintaining remission in inflammatory bowel disease, but approximately 30% of the patients suffer adverse side effects. The prodrug is activated by glutathione conjugation and release of 6-mercaptopurine, a reaction most efficiently catalyzed by glutathione transferase (GST) A2-2. Among five genotypes of GST A2-2, the variant A2*E has threefold-fourfold higher catalytic efficiency with azathioprine, suggesting that the expression of A2*E could boost 6-mercaptopurine release and adverse side effects in treated patients. Structure-activity studies of the GST A2-2 variants and homologous alpha class GSTs were made to delineate the determinants of high catalytic efficiency compared to other alpha class GSTs. Engineered chimeras identified GST peptide segments of importance, and replacing the corresponding regions in low-activity GSTs by these short segments produced chimeras with higher azathioprine activity. By contrast, H-site mutagenesis led to decreased azathioprine activity when active-site positions 208 and 213 in these favored segments were mutagenized. Alternative substitutions indicated that hydrophobic residues were favored. A pertinent question is whether variant A2*E represents the highest azathioprine activity achievable within the GST structural framework. This issue was addressed by mutagenesis of H-site residues assumed to interact with the substrate based on molecular modeling. The mutants with notably enhanced activities had small or polar residues in the mutated positions. The most active mutant L107G/L108D/F222H displayed a 70-fold enhanced catalytic efficiency with azathioprine. The determination of its structure by X-ray crystallography showed an expanded H-site, suggesting improved accommodation of the transition state for catalysis.

  7. EVALUATION OF SERUM CHOLESTEROL, AMINO TRANSFERASES

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    Anantha Babu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of red yeast rice (Monascus purpureus-fermented rice in lowering cholesterol in the blood. At the same time, alanine aminotranferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST and gamma-glutamyl transferase (γ-GT were measured for notable side effects in the liver. Possible muscle damage was determined by measuring creatine kinase (CK. METHODS The cholesterol lowering effect in serum of red yeast rice-fed rats were studied over a 42-day feeding period. A total of 16 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomised into 8 per group: control and treated. Treated rats were administered 1.35g/kg/day. Control rats were maintained on ordinary rat chow. RESULTS Serum cholesterol levels were significantly decreased by 19.13% in treated group compared to controls. This treatment also showed increase in serum ALT and AST activities by 41.90% and 21.53%, respectively. Mean CK activity in treated rats showed an increase by 32.32% when compared with control rats. γ-GT is the only enzyme that showed a decrease of 15.16% in sera of treated rats. Body weights of control and treated rats increased significantly by 10% end of feeding period but were not due to treatment. CONCLUSION Red yeast rice significantly decreased serum cholesterol level at a dosage of 1.35g/kg/day. However, the differences in serum enzyme activities between control and treated rats were not significant.

  8. Effects of a wheat bran extract containing arabinoxylan oligosaccharides on gastrointestinal health parameters in healthy adult human volunteers : a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francois, Isabelle E. J. A.; Lescroart, Olivier; Veraverbeke, Wim S.; Marzorati, Massimo; Possemiers, Sam; Evenepoel, Pieter; Hamer, Henrike; Houben, Els; Windey, Karen; Welling, Gjalt W.; Delcour, Jan A.; Courtin, Christophe M.; Verbeke, Kristin; Broekaert, Willem F.

    2012-01-01

    Wheat bran extract (WBE) is a food-grade soluble fibre preparation that is highly enriched in arabinoxylan oligosaccharides. In this placebo-controlled cross-over human intervention trial, tolerance and effects on colonic protein and carbohydrate fermentation were studied. After a 1-week run-in peri

  9. Arabinoxylans and inulin differentially modulate the mucosal and luminal gut microbiota and mucin-degradation in humanized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Abbeele, Pieter; Gérard, Philippe; Rabot, Sylvie; Bruneau, Aurélia; El Aidy, Sahar; Derrien, Muriel; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Smidt, Hauke; Verstraete, Willy; Van de Wiele, Tom; Possemiers, Sam

    2011-10-01

    The endogenous gut microbiota affects the host in many ways. Prebiotics should favour beneficial intestinal microbes and thus improve host health. In this study, we investigated how a novel class of potential prebiotic long-chain arabinoxylans (LC-AX) and the well-established prebiotic inulin (IN) modulate the gut microbiota of humanized rats. Six weeks after axenic rats were inoculated with a human faecal microbiota, their colonic microbiota was similar to this inoculum (∼ 70%), whereas their caecal microbiota was enriched with Verrucomicrobia and Firmicutes concomitant with lower abundance of Bacteroidetes. Moreover, different Bifidobacterium species colonized the lumen (B. adolescentis) and mucus (B. longum and B. bifidum). Both LC-AX and IN increased SCFA levels and induced a shift from acetate towards health-promoting propionate and butyrate respectively. By applying a high-resolution phylogenetic micro-array (HITChip) at the site of fermentation (caecum), IN and LC-AX were shown to stimulate bacterial groups with known butyrate-producers (Roseburia intestinalis, Eubacterium rectale, Anaerostipes caccae) and bifidobacteria (B. longum) respectively. Prebiotic administration also resulted in lower caecal abundances of the mucin-degrading Akkermansia muciniphila and potentially more mucin production by the host. Both factors might explain the increased caecal mucin levels for LC-AX (threefold) and IN (sixfold). These mucins were degraded along the colon, resulting in high faecal abundances of Akkermansia muciniphila for LC-AX and especially IN-treated rats. Finally, the microbial changes caused an adaptation period for the host with less weight gain, after which the host fine-tuned the interaction with this altered microbiota. Our results demonstrate that next to IN, LC-AX are promising prebiotic compounds by stimulating production of health-promoting metabolites by specific microbes in the proximal regions. Further, prebiotic supplementation shifted mucin

  10. Lactobacillus fermentum CRL1446 Ameliorates Oxidative and Metabolic Parameters by Increasing Intestinal Feruloyl Esterase Activity and Modulating Microbiota in Caloric-Restricted Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matias Russo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether the administration of the feruloyl esterase (FE-producing strain Lactobacillus fermentum CRL1446 enhances metabolic and oxidative parameters in caloric-restricted (CR mice. Balb/c male mice were divided into ad libitum fed Group (ALF Group, CR diet Group (CR Group and CR diet plus L. fermentum Group (CR-Lf Group. CR diet was administered during 45 days and CRL1446 strain was given in the dose of 108 cells/mL/day/mouse. FE activity was determined in intestinal mucosa and content at Day 1, 20 and 45. Triglyceride, total cholesterol, glucose, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS levels and glutathione reductase activity were determined in plasma. Gut microbiota was evaluated by high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. At Day 45, total intestinal FE activity in CR-Lf Group was higher (p = 0.020 than in CR and ALF groups and an improvement in both metabolic (reductions in triglyceride (p = 0.0025, total cholesterol (p = 0.005 and glucose (p < 0.0001 levels and oxidative (decrease of TBARS levels and increase of plasmatic glutathione reductase activity (p = 0.006 parameters was observed, compared to ALF Group. CR diet increased abundance of Bacteroidetes and CRL1446 administration increased abundance of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus genus. L. fermentun CRL1446 exerted a bifidogenic effect under CR conditions.

  11. Lactobacillus fermentum CRL1446 Ameliorates Oxidative and Metabolic Parameters by Increasing Intestinal Feruloyl Esterase Activity and Modulating Microbiota in Caloric-Restricted Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Matias; Fabersani, Emanuel; Abeijón-Mukdsi, María C.; Ross, Romina; Fontana, Cecilia; Benítez-Páez, Alfonso; Gauffin-Cano, Paola; Medina, Roxana B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the administration of the feruloyl esterase (FE)-producing strain Lactobacillus fermentum CRL1446 enhances metabolic and oxidative parameters in caloric-restricted (CR) mice. Balb/c male mice were divided into ad libitum fed Group (ALF Group), CR diet Group (CR Group) and CR diet plus L. fermentum Group (CR-Lf Group). CR diet was administered during 45 days and CRL1446 strain was given in the dose of 108 cells/mL/day/mouse. FE activity was determined in intestinal mucosa and content at Day 1, 20 and 45. Triglyceride, total cholesterol, glucose, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels and glutathione reductase activity were determined in plasma. Gut microbiota was evaluated by high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. At Day 45, total intestinal FE activity in CR-Lf Group was higher (p = 0.020) than in CR and ALF groups and an improvement in both metabolic (reductions in triglyceride (p = 0.0025), total cholesterol (p = 0.005) and glucose (p < 0.0001) levels) and oxidative (decrease of TBARS levels and increase of plasmatic glutathione reductase activity (p = 0.006)) parameters was observed, compared to ALF Group. CR diet increased abundance of Bacteroidetes and CRL1446 administration increased abundance of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus genus. L. fermentun CRL1446 exerted a bifidogenic effect under CR conditions. PMID:27399766

  12. Interaction of pleuromutilin derivatives with the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, K. S.; Hansen, L. K.; Jakobsen, L.;

    2006-01-01

    Tiamulin is a pleuromutilin antibiotic that is used in veterinary medicine. The recently published crystal structure of a tiamulin-50S ribosomal subunit complex provides detailed information about how this drug targets the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome. To promote rational design...

  13. Homogentisate solanesyl transferase (HST) cDNA’s in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maize white seedling 3 (w3) has served as a model albino-seedling mutant since its discovery in 1923. We show that the w3 phenotype is caused by disruptions in homogentisate solanesyl transferase (HST), an enzyme that catalyzes the committed step in plastoquinone-9 (PQ9) biosynthesis. This reaction ...

  14. Rational design of an organometallic glutathione transferase inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ang, W.H.; Parker, L.J.; De Luca, A.; Juillerat-Jeanneret, L.; Morton, C.J.; LoBello, M.; Parker, M.W.; Dyson, P.J.; (ISIC)

    2010-08-17

    A hybrid organic-inorganic (organometallic) inhibitor was designed to target glutathione transferases. The metal center is used to direct protein binding, while the organic moiety acts as the active-site inhibitor. The mechanism of inhibition was studied using a range of biophysical and biochemical methods.

  15. The Peroxidase/H2O2 System as a Free Radical-Generating Agent for Gelling Maize Bran Arabinoxylans: Rheological and Structural Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Salas-Muñoz

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative gelation of maize bran arabinoxylans (MBAX using a peroxidase/H2O2 system as a free radical-generating agent was investigated. The peroxidase/H2O2 system led to the formation of dimers and trimer of ferulic acid as covalent cross-link structures in the MBAX network. MBAX gels at 4% (w/v presented a storage modulus of 180 Pa. The structural parameters of MBAX gels were calculated from swelling experiments. MBAX gels presented a molecular weight between two cross-links (Mc, a cross-linking density (ρc and a mesh size (x of 49 × 103 g/mol, 30 × 10−6 mol/cm3 and 193 nm, respectively.

  16. Effects of Arabinoxylan and Resistant Starch on Intestinal Microbiota and Short-Chain Fatty Acids in Subjects with Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomised Crossover Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Stine; Schioldan, Anne Grethe; Moore, Mary E

    2016-01-01

    enriched with arabinoxylan and resistant starch resulted in significant reductions in the total species diversity of the faecal-associated intestinal microbiota but also increased the heterogeneity of bacterial communities both between and within subjects. The proportion of Bifidobacterium was increased......Recently, the intestinal microbiota has been emphasised as an important contributor to the development of metabolic syndrome. Dietary fibre may exert beneficial effects through modulation of the intestinal microbiota and metabolic end products. We investigated the effects of a diet enriched...... and a low-fibre Western-style diet. Faecal samples were collected before and at the end of the interventions for fermentative end-product analysis and 16S ribosomal RNA bacterial gene amplification for identification of bacterial taxa. Faecal carbohydrate residues were used to verify compliance. The diet...

  17. A randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled cross-over study to determine the gastrointestinal effects of consumption of arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides enriched bread in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walton Gemma E

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prebiotics are food ingredients, usually non-digestible oligosaccharides, that are selectively fermented by populations of beneficial gut bacteria. Endoxylanases, altering the naturally present cereal arabinoxylans, are commonly used in the bread industry to improve dough and bread characteristics. Recently, an in situ method has been developed to produce arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides (AXOS at high levels in breads through the use of a thermophilic endoxylanase. AXOS have demonstrated potentially prebiotic properties in that they have been observed to lead to beneficial shifts in the microbiota in vitro and in murine, poultry and human studies. Methods A double-blind, placebo controlled human intervention study was undertaken with 40 healthy adult volunteers to assess the impact of consumption of breads with in situ produced AXOS (containing 2.2 g AXOS compared to non-endoxylanase treated breads. Volatile fatty acid concentrations in faeces were assessed and fluorescence in situ hybridisation was used to assess changes in gut microbial groups. Secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA levels in saliva were also measured. Results Consumption of AXOS-enriched breads led to increased faecal butyrate and a trend for reduced iso-valerate and fatty acids associated with protein fermentation. Faecal levels of bifidobacteria increased following initial control breads and remained elevated throughout the study. Lactobacilli levels were elevated following both placebo and AXOS-breads. No changes in salivary secretory IgA levels were observed during the study. Furthermore, no adverse effects on gastrointestinal symptoms were reported during AXOS-bread intake. Conclusions AXOS-breads led to a potentially beneficial shift in fermentation end products and are well tolerated.

  18. Proton mobilities in crambin and glutathione S-transferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanderlingh, U. N.; Corsaro, C.; Hayward, R. L.; Bée, M.; Middendorf, H. D.

    2003-08-01

    Using a neutron backscattering spectrometer, the temperature dependence of mean-square atomic displacements derived from window-integrated quasielastic spectra was measured for two D 2O-hydrated proteins: crambin and glutathione S-transferase. Analyses show that the anharmonic dynamics observed around and above 200 K is consistent with a description in terms of proton/deuteron jumps within asymmetric double-minimum potentials. Also determined were activation energies along with estimates of effective masses and average oscillator energies.

  19. [Glutathione S-transferase of alpha class from pike liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borvinskaia, E V; Smirnov, L P; Nemova, N N

    2013-01-01

    In this study, glutathione S-transferase (GST) was isolated from the liver of pike Esox lucius, which was homogenous according to SDS-PAGE and isoelectrofocusing. It is a homodimer with subunits mass 25235.36 Da (according to HPLC-MS/MS) and pI about 6.4. Substrate specificity, thermostability, some kinetic characteristics and optimum pH were determined. The enzyme was identified as Alpha class GST.

  20. Suppressive effects of quercetin-3-O-(6″-Feruloyl)-β-D-galactopyranoside on adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes through down-regulation of PPARγ and C/EBPα expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Li, Xiao-Fan; Gao, Lei; Zhang, Ya-Ou; Cai, Guo-Ping

    2012-03-01

    Obesity is a chronic, costly disease, and flavonoids such as quercetin have been proven to play protective roles against it. This study investigated the suppressive effect of quercetin-3-O-(6″-feruloyl)-β-D-galactopyranoside (QFG) on adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Quercetin-3-O-(6″-feruloyl)-β-D-galactopyranoside and quercetin were both extracted from Psidium guajava (Myrtaceae, commonly known as guava) leaves and were evaluated for their suppressive effect on adipogenesis by means of oil red O staining and triglyceride assay. It was shown that QFG inhibited adipogenesis in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and it exerted a stronger effect than did quercetin at the same concentration. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were conducted to further examine the differentiation expression of marker genes and transcriptional factors. Both mRNA and protein expression of the key adipogenic transcriptional factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and CCAAT (cytidine-cytidine-adenosine-adenosine-thymidine)/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα), were inhibited by QFG. Moreover, the mRNA expression patterns of key participants in the Wnt-β-catenin pathway were not altered during the QFG-induced adipogenesis inhibition. These results suggest that QFG effectively suppresses adipogenesis and that it exerts its role mainly through the significant down-regulation of PPARγ and C/EBPα and, probably, via a Wnt-β-catenin independent pathway.

  1. Human cytosolic glutathione transferases: structure, function, and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Baojian; Dong, Dong

    2012-12-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are important detoxifying enzymes that catalyze the conjugation of electrophilic substrates to glutathione. In recent years, GSTs have been of great interest in pharmacology and drug development because of their involvement in many important biological processes such as steroid and prostaglandin biosynthesis, tyrosine catabolism, and cell apoptosis. This review describes crystal structures for cytosolic GSTs and correlates active-site features with enzyme functions (e.g., steroid synthesis, tyrosine degradation, and dehydroascorbate reduction) and substrate selectivity. Use of these crystal structures for the design of specific inhibitors for several GST enzymes is also discussed.

  2. Synergistic degradation of arabinoxylan with alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase, xylanase and beta-xylosidase from soy sauce koji mold, Aspergillus oryzae, in high salt condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Tadaaki; Nakata, Yoshiyuki

    2003-01-01

    This study addresses induction and some properties of alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase from a soy sauce koji mold, Aspergillus oryzae HL15, cultured on solid and liquid media. Alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase was induced by soybean polysaccharide and secreted into media on solid cultivation; the enzyme was associated with mycelium as a cell-wall-bound form in liquid cultivation. A major alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase, which was purified homogeneously on SDS-PAGE, showed highest activity in the presence of 10% of NaCl; also, somewhat higher activity was observed even in 25% NaCl than in the absence of NaCl. Arabinoxylan was synergistically degraded by xylanase, beta-xylosidase, and alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase from A. oryzae HL15 in the condition of imitative pH 5.0 and 15% NaCl concentration of the soy sauce moromi mash. These results suggest that arabinose and xylose, which are closely related to melanoidin formation, can be released by synergistic action of these enzymes in soy sauce moromi mash.

  3. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase in erythrocytes (red blood cells... hereditary disease galactosemia (disorder of galactose metabolism) in infants. (b) Classification. Class II....

  4. Electrochemical evaluation of glutathione S-transferase kinetic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enache, Teodor Adrian; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), are a family of enzymes belonging to the phase II metabolism that catalyse the formation of thioether conjugates between the endogenous tripeptide glutathione and xenobiotic compounds. The voltammetric behaviour of glutathione (GSH), 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), as well as the catalytic conjugation reaction of GSH to CDNB by GST was investigated at room temperature, T=298.15K (25°C), at pH6.5, for low concentration of substrates and enzyme, using differential pulse (DP) voltammetry at a glassy carbon electrode. Only GSH can be oxidized; a sensitivity of 0.14nA/μM and a LOD of 6.4μM were obtained. The GST kinetic parameter electrochemical evaluation, in relation to its substrates, GSH and CDNB, using reciprocal Michaelis-Menten and Lineweaver-Burk double reciprocal plots, was determined. A value of KM~100μM was obtained for either GSH or CDNB, and Vmax varied between 40 and 60μmol/min per mg of GST.

  5. A novel method for screening the glutathione transferase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węgrzyn Grzegorz

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutathione transferases (GSTs belong to the family of Phase II detoxification enzymes. GSTs catalyze the conjugation of glutathione to different endogenous and exogenous electrophilic compounds. Over-expression of GSTs was demonstrated in a number of different human cancer cells. It has been found that the resistance to many anticancer chemotherapeutics is directly correlated with the over-expression of GSTs. Therefore, it appears to be important to find new GST inhibitors to prevent the resistance of cells to anticancer drugs. In order to search for glutathione transferase (GST inhibitors, a novel method was designed. Results Our results showed that two fragments of GST, named F1 peptide (GYWKIKGLV and F2 peptide (KWRNKKFELGLEFPNL, can significantly inhibit the GST activity. When these two fragments were compared with several known potent GST inhibitors, the order of inhibition efficiency (measured in reactions with 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (CDNB and glutathione as substrates was determined as follows: tannic acid > cibacron blue > F2 peptide > hematin > F1 peptide > ethacrynic acid. Moreover, the F1 peptide appeared to be a noncompetitive inhibitor of the GST-catalyzed reaction, while the F2 peptide was determined as a competitive inhibitor of this reaction. Conclusion It appears that the F2 peptide can be used as a new potent specific GST inhibitor. It is proposed that the novel method, described in this report, might be useful for screening the inhibitors of not only GST but also other enzymes.

  6. The omega-class glutathione transferases: structure, function, and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board, Philip G

    2011-05-01

    The omega class of glutathione transferases (GSTs) is a relatively ancient member of the cytosolic GST superfamily, and the omega-class GSTs are found in plants, animals, and some microbial species. The omega-class GSTs exhibit the canonical GST fold, but, unlike other GSTs, the omega-class GSTs have a cysteine residue in their active site. Consequently, the omega-class GSTs catalyze a range of thiol transferase and reduction reactions that are not catalyzed by members of the other classes. Human GSTO1-1 can catalyze the reduction of monomethylarsonic acid (V), but this does not appear to be physiologically important in cases of high environmental arsenic exposure. GSTO1-1 also plays an important role in the biotransformation of reactive α-haloketones to nontoxic acetophenones. Genetic variation is common in the omega-class GST genes, and variants that result in deficiency of GSTO1-1 have been characterized. Genetic linkage studies have discovered associations between GSTO genes and the age at onset of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The mechanism underlying this association with neurological disease may derive from the capacity of omega-class GSTs to mitigate oxidative stress or their role in activating the proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β.

  7. Characterization of glutathione S-transferase of Taenia solium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibanco-Pérez, N; Jiménez, L; Merchant, M T; Landa, A

    1999-06-01

    A Taenia solium glutathione-S-transferase fraction (SGSTF) was isolated from a metacestode crude extract by affinity chromatography on reduced glutathione (GSH)-sepharose. The purified fraction displayed a specific glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity of 2.8 micromol/min/mg and glutathione peroxidase selenium-independent activity of 0.22 micromol/min/mg. Enzymatic characterization of the fraction suggested that the activity was closer to the mammalian mu-class GSTs. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, gel filtration, and enzyme activity analysis showed that the fraction was composed of a major band of Mr = 26 kd and that the active enzyme was dimeric. Immunohistochemical studies using specific antibodies against the major 26-kd band of the SGSTF indicated that GST protein was present in the tegument, parenchyma, protonephridial, and tegumentary cytons of the T. solium metacestode. Antibodies generated against the SGSTF tested in western blot showed cross-reactivity against GSTs purified from Taenia saginata, T. taeniaeformis, and T. crassiceps, but did not react with GSTs from Schistosoma mansoni, or mice, rabbit, and pig liver tissue. Furthermore, immunization of mice with SGSTF reduced the metacestode burden up to 74.2%. Our findings argue in favor of GST having an important role in the survival of T. solium in its hosts.

  8. A glutathione s-transferase confers herbicide tolerance in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingzhang Hu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant glutathione S-transferases (GSTs have been a focus of attention due to their role in herbicide detoxification. OsGSTL2 is a glutathione S-transferase, lambda class gene from rice (Oryza sativa L.. Transgenic rice plants over-expressing OsGSTL2 were generated from rice calli by the use of an Agrobacterium transformation system, and were screened by a combination of hygromycin resistance, PCR and Southern blot analysis. In the vegetative tissues of transgenic rice plants, the over-expression of OsGSTL2 not only increased levels of OsGSTL2 transcripts, but also GST and GPX expression, while reduced superoxide. Transgenic rice plants also showed higher tolerance to glyphosate and chlorsulfuron, which often contaminate agricultural fields. The findings demonstrate the detoxification role of OsGSTL2 in the growth and development of rice plants. It should be possible to apply the present results to crops for developing herbicide tolerance and for limiting herbicide contamination in the food chain.

  9. Expression of polypeptide GalNAc-transferases in stratified epithelia and squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandel, U; Hassan, H; Therkildsen, M H

    1999-01-01

    Mucin-type O-glycosylation is initiated by a large family of UDP-GalNAc: polypeptide N -acetyl-galactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-transferases). Individual GalNAc-transferases appear to have different functions and Northern analysis indicates that they are differently expressed in different organ...

  10. Ghrelin O-Acyl Transferase: Bridging Ghrelin and Energy Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Shlimun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT is a recently identified enzyme responsible for the unique n-acyl modification of ghrelin, a multifunctional metabolic hormone. GOAT structure and activity appears to be conserved from fish to man. Since the acyl modification is critical for most of the biological actions of ghrelin, especially metabolic functions, GOAT emerged as a very important molecule of interest. The research on GOAT is on the rise, and several important results reiterating its significance have been reported. Notable among these discoveries are the identification of GOAT tissue expression patterns, effects on insulin secretion, blood glucose levels, feeding, body weight, and metabolism. Several attempts have been made to design and test synthetic compounds that can modulate endogenous GOAT, which could turn beneficial in favorably regulating whole body energy homeostasis. This paper will focus to provide an update on recent advances in GOAT research and its broader implications in the regulation of energy balance.

  11. Pleiotropic functions of glutathione S-transferase P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Grek, Christina; Ye, Zhi-Wei; Manevich, Yefim; Tew, Kenneth D; Townsend, Danyelle M

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP) is one member of the GST superfamily that is prevalently expressed in mammals. Known to possess catalytic activity through deprotonating glutathione allowing formation of thioether bonds with electrophilic substrates, more recent discoveries have broadened our understanding of the biological roles of this protein. In addition to catalytic detoxification, other properties so far ascribed to GSTP include chaperone functions, regulation of nitric oxide pathways, regulation of a variety of kinase signaling pathways, and participation in the forward reaction of protein S-glutathionylation. The expression of GSTP has been linked with cancer and other human pathologies and more recently even with drug addiction. With respect to human health, polymorphic variants of GSTP may determine individual susceptibility to oxidative stress and/or be critical in the design and development of drugs that have used redox pathways as a discovery platform.

  12. Glutathione analogue sorbents selectively bind glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, V M; Kelley, M K; Engqvist-Goldstein, A; Kauvar, L M

    1993-06-01

    Novel affinity sorbents for glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) were created by binding glutathione (GSH) analogues to Sepharose 6B. The GSH molecule was modified at the glycine moiety and at the group attached to the sulphur of cysteine. When tested by affinity chromatography in a flow-through microplate format, several of these sorbents selectively bound GST isoenzymes. gamma E-C(Hx)-phi G (glutathione with a hexyl moiety bound to cysteine and phenylglycine substituted for glycine) specifically bound rat GST 7-7, the Pi-class isoenzyme, from liver, kidney and small intestine. gamma E-C(Bz)-beta A (benzyl bound to cysteine and beta-alanine substituted for glycine) was highly selective for rat subunits 3 and 4, which are Mu-class isoenzymes. By allowing purification of the isoenzymes under mild conditions that preserve activity, the novel sorbents should be useful in characterizing the biological roles of GSTs in both normal animal and cancer tissues.

  13. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions: Part 2. Transferases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert N.; Tewari, Yadu B.

    1994-07-01

    Equilibrium constants and enthalpy changes for reactions catalyzed by the transferase class of enzymes have been compiled. For each reaction the following information is given: the reference for the data; the reaction studied; the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number; the method of measurement; the conditions of measurement [temperature, pH, ionic strength, and the buffer(s) and cofactor(s) used]; the data and an evaluation of it; and, sometimes, commentary on the data and on any corrections which have been applied to it or any calculations for which the data have been used. The data from 285 references have been examined and evaluated. Chemical Abstract Service registry numbers are given for the substances involved in these various reactions. There is a cross reference between the substances and the Enzyme Commission numbers of the enzymes used to catalyze the reactions in which the substances participate.

  14. Glutathione transferases: emerging multidisciplinary tools in red and green biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronopoulou, Evangelia G; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2009-01-01

    Cytosolic glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a diverse family of enzymes involved in a wide range of biological processes, many of which involve the conjugation of the tripeptide glutathione (GSH) to an electrophilic substrate. Detailed studies of GSTs are justified because of the considerable interest of these enzymes in medicine, agriculture and analytical biotechnology. For example, in medicine, GSTs are explored as molecular targets for the design of new anticancer drugs as a plausible means to sensitize drug-resistant tumors that overexpress GSTs. In agriculture, GSTs are exploited in the development of transgenic plants with increased resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Recently, selected isoenzymes of GSTs have found successful applications in the development of enzyme biosensors for the direct monitoring of environmental pollutants, such as herbicides and insecticides. This review article summarizes recent representative patents related to GSTs and their applications in biotechnology.

  15. Inhibition of human glutathione transferases by dinitronaphthalene derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Hilary; Lee, Moses; Patil, Pravin; Josephy, P David

    2014-08-01

    Glutathione transferase (GST) enzymes catalyze the conjugation of glutathione with reactive functional groups of endogenous compounds and xenobiotics, including halonitroaromatics. 1-Chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) is one of the most commonly used substrates for GST activity assays. We have studied the interactions of dinitronaphthalene analogues of CDNB with recombinant human GST enzymes (Alpha, Mu, and Pi classes) expressed in Escherichia coli. Dinitronaphthalene derivatives were found to be GST inhibitors. The highest potency of inhibition was observed towards Mu-class GSTs, M1-1 and M2-2; IC50 values for 1-methoxy- and 1-ethoxy-2,4-dinitronaphthalene were in the high nanomolar to low micromolar range. Inhibition accompanies the formation, at the enzyme active site, of very stable Meisenheimer complex intermediates.

  16. Experimental conditions affecting functional comparison of highly active glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedulova, Natalia; Mannervik, Bengt

    2011-06-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) possess multiple functions and have potential applications in biotechnology. Direct evidence of underestimation of activity of human GST A3-3 and porcine GST A2-2 measured at submicromolar enzyme concentrations is reported here for the first time. The combination of time-dependent and enzyme concentration-dependent loss of activity and the choice of the organic solvent for substrates were found to cause irreproducibility of activity measurements of GSTs. These effects contribute to high variability of activity values of porcine GST A2-2 and human Alpha-class GSTs reported in the literature. Adsorption of GSTs to surfaces was found to be the main explanation of the observed phenomena. Several approaches to improved functional comparison of highly active GSTs are proposed.

  17. From glutathione transferase to pore in a CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Cromer, B A; Morton, C J; Parker, M W; 10.1007/s00249-002-0219-1

    2002-01-01

    Many plasma membrane chloride channels have been cloned and characterized in great detail. In contrast, very little is known about intracellular chloride channels. Members of a novel class of such channels, called the CLICs (chloride intracellular channels), have been identified over the last few years. A striking feature of the CLIC family of ion channels is that they can exist in a water- soluble state as well as a membrane-bound state. A major step forward in understanding the functioning of these channels has been the recent crystal structure determination of one family member, CLIC1. The structure confirms that CLICs are members of the glutathione S- transferase superfamily and provides clues as to how CLICs can insert into membranes to form chloride channels. (69 refs).

  18. MOF Acetyl Transferase Regulates Transcription and Respiration in Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Aindrila; Seyfferth, Janine; Lucci, Jacopo; Gilsbach, Ralf; Preissl, Sebastian; Böttinger, Lena; Mårtensson, Christoph U; Panhale, Amol; Stehle, Thomas; Kretz, Oliver; Sahyoun, Abdullah H; Avilov, Sergiy; Eimer, Stefan; Hein, Lutz; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Becker, Thomas; Akhtar, Asifa

    2016-10-20

    A functional crosstalk between epigenetic regulators and metabolic control could provide a mechanism to adapt cellular responses to environmental cues. We report that the well-known nuclear MYST family acetyl transferase MOF and a subset of its non-specific lethal complex partners reside in mitochondria. MOF regulates oxidative phosphorylation by controlling expression of respiratory genes from both nuclear and mtDNA in aerobically respiring cells. MOF binds mtDNA, and this binding is dependent on KANSL3. The mitochondrial pool of MOF, but not a catalytically deficient mutant, rescues respiratory and mtDNA transcriptional defects triggered by the absence of MOF. Mof conditional knockout has catastrophic consequences for tissues with high-energy consumption, triggering hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and cardiac failure in murine hearts; cardiomyocytes show severe mitochondrial degeneration and deregulation of mitochondrial nutrient metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation pathways. Thus, MOF is a dual-transcriptional regulator of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes connecting epigenetics and metabolism.

  19. Hemicelluloses of ragi (finger millet, Eleusine coracana, Indaf-15): isolation and purification of an alkali-extractable arabinoxylan from native and malted hemicellulose B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subba Rao, M V S S T; Muralikrishna, G

    2006-03-22

    Hemicelluloses (A and B) were isolated from an Indo-African hybrid variety of finger millet (ragi, Eleusine coracana) by extracting the starch-free residue with 10% sodium hydroxide under a continuous stream of nitrogen, and changes in their sugar composition during malting for 96 h were studied. Hemicellulose B, obtained in higher yield from both native (N) and malted (M) flours, was found to be completely soluble in water, richer in uronic acid, and more viscogenic than hemicelullose A. Fractional precipitation of hemicellulose B by ammonium sulfate resulted in four precipitable fractions (F-60, F-70, F-80, and F-100) and a nonprecipitable (NP) fraction varying in their yield and arabinose, xylose, galactose, and glucose contents. A progressive increase in the pentose-to-hexose ratio (P:H) from 0.42:1.0 in F-60 to 1.94:1.0 in NP was observed in native hemicellulose B fractions; however, in malted hemicellulose B the P:H ratio increased from 0.43:1.0 in F-60 to 1.56:1.0 in F-80 and then decreased to 1.13:1.0 in NP. The major fraction, F-70 (N, 44.5%; M, 38.5%), was separated into eight subfractions on DEAE-cellulose by successive elution with water, ammonium carbonate (AC) (0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 M AC), and sodium hydroxide (0.1 and 0.2 M) differing in their yield and neutral sugar composition. The purity of the major glucuronoarabinoxylan fraction (0.1 M AC eluted) was ascertained by Sepharose CL-4B, HPSEC, cellulose acetate, and capillary electrophoresis methods. A significant decrease in the molecular mass of arabinoxylan from 1200 to 1120 kDa upon malting for 96 h is an indication of cell wall degradation by the inducible cell wall degrading enzymes.

  20. Ingestion of a novel galactoglucomannan oligosaccharide-arabinoxylan (GGMO-AX) complex affected growth performance and fermentative and immunological characteristics of broiler chicks challenged with Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, T A; Dilger, R N; Iakiviak, M; Hopkins, A C; Price, N P; Fahey, G C

    2012-09-01

    Fermentable carbohydrates may enhance the ability of the gastrointestinal tract to defend against a pathogenic infection. We hypothesized that a galactoglucomannan oligosaccharide-arabinoxylan (GGMO-AX) complex would positively affect immune status and prevent colonization and shedding in Salmonella typhimurium-infected chicks. Using a completely randomized design, 1-d-old commercial broiler chicks (n = 240 chicks; 4 replications/treatment; 5 chicks/replication) were assigned to 1 of 6 dietary treatments differing in concentration of GGMO-AX (0, 1, 2, or 4%) or containing 2% Safmannan or 2% short-chain fructooligosaccharides. Cellulose was used to make diets iso-total dietary fiber. On d 10 posthatch, an equal number of chicks on each diet were inoculated with either phosphate-buffered saline (sham control) or Salmonella typhimurium (1 × 10(8) cfu). All birds were euthanized on d 10 postinoculation (PI) for collection of intestinal contents and select tissues. Body weight gain and feed intake of chicks were greater (P AX-fed chicks having the lowest. The GGMO-AX substrate demonstrated effects similar to a prebiotic substrate as indicated by increased cecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations, decreased cecal pH, and increased populations of Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacteria spp. as dietary GGMO-AX concentration increased. Excreta Salmonella typhimurium populations on d 5 and 10 PI, and ileal and cecal Salmonella typhimurium populations, tended to be affected (P AX had similar expressions of IFN-γ and IL-1β, regardless of infection, suggesting that Salmonella typhimurium virulence was suppressed. Dietary supplementation with GGMO-AX resulted in prebiotic-like effects but did not limit Salmonella typhimurium intestinal colonization or shedding, but possibly decreased the virulence of Salmonella typhimurium within the digestive tract.

  1. 结构预测及分子对接方法研究几种水解产物对新阿魏酸酯酶的抑制作用%Structure Prediction and Molecular Docking Studies on the Inhibitory Effect of Several Hydrolyzate on a Novel Feruloyl Esterase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程凡升; 张茂秋; 程凡杰; 生吉萍; 陈婧雨; 郑鄢燕; 申琳

    2012-01-01

    Feruloyl esterases, one of the key enzymes in biomass degradation, show great prospects in food, textile, forge and pulp industries. In this study, a feruloyl esterase with low sequence identity was studied, which was originated from China Holstein cow rumen metagenomic library. Possible catalytic mechanisms were discussed based on conserved domains and tertiary structure modelling. Molecular docking studies show that the predicted affinity energy exhibits liner relations to experimental Vmax values and hydrogen bond may play a key role on catalytic efficiency. In addition, molecular docking study indicates that L-arabinobiose, D-xylose, D-glucose and trans-ferulic acid may have inhibitory effect on feruloyl esterase activity and the inhibition studies verify this hypothesis. This study may pave a way on rational design of feruloyl esterase and provide guidance on ferulic acid production from lignocellulose materials.%应用基于生物信息学的蛋白质结构预测方法,探讨了来源于荷斯坦奶牛瘤胃宏基因组文库的一个新型阿魏酸酯酶( FAE-SH1)的结构及可能的催化机制.同时通过对该酶的预测结构与4种模式底物的对接研究发现,实验所测得酶促反应动力参数Vmax与对接的亲和能存在线性关系,底物与酶形成的氢键可能是影响催化效率的关键因素.同时,本研究发现D-木糖、L-阿拉伯糖、D-葡萄糖及阿魏酸能够对FAE-SH1的水解反应产生抑制作用,并对其进行了验证.

  2. Purification and characterization of the commercialized, cloned Bacillus megaterium. alpha. -amylase. Pt. 2. Transferase properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumm, P.J.; Hebeda, R.E.; Teague, W.M.

    1991-08-01

    Using an assay procedure based on reduction of iodine binding to starch, Bacillus megaterium, {alpha}-amylase (BMA) demonstrated transferase activity using a wide range of acceptors. The enzyme had an absolute requirement for glucose or glucosides for acceptor molecules. Maltose acted as a transferase acceptor at low concentrations and as an inhibitor of starch hydrolysis at high concentrations. Kinetic analysis indicated that, in the presence of a suitable acceptor, the mechanism of starch hydrolysis is Ping Pong Bi Bi. The products of the transferase reaction have been determined using p-nitro-{alpha}-D-glucopyranoside as acceptor combined with a novel HPLC-based system for product detection. (orig.).

  3. Benzene oxide is a substrate for glutathione S-transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarth, Adam T; Murphy, Sharon E; Hecht, Stephen S

    2015-12-01

    Benzene is a known human carcinogen which must be activated to benzene oxide (BO) to exert its carcinogenic potential. BO can be detoxified in vivo by reaction with glutathione and excretion in the urine as S-phenylmercapturic acid. This process may be catalyzed by glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), but kinetic data for this reaction have not been published. Therefore, we incubated GSTA1, GSTT1, GSTM1, and GSTP1 with glutathione and BO and quantified the formation of S-phenylglutathione. Kinetic parameters were determined for GSTT1 and GSTP1. At 37 °C, the putative Km and Vmax values for GSTT1 were 420 μM and 450 fmol/s, respectively, while those for GSTP1 were 3600 μM and 3100 fmol/s. GSTA1 and GSTM1 did not exhibit sufficient activity for determination of kinetic parameters. We conclude that GSTT1 is a critical enzyme in the detoxification of BO and that GSTP1 may also play an important role, while GSTA1 and GSTM1 seem to be less important.

  4. New substrates and activity of Phanerochaete chrysosporium Omega glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meux, Edgar; Morel, Mélanie; Lamant, Tiphaine; Gérardin, Philippe; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Dumarçay, Stéphane; Gelhaye, Eric

    2013-02-01

    Omega glutathione transferases (GSTO) constitute a family of proteins with variable distribution throughout living organisms. It is notably expanded in several fungi and particularly in the wood-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium, raising questions concerning the function(s) and potential redundancy of these enzymes. Within the fungal families, GSTOs have been poorly studied and their functions remain rather sketchy. In this study, we have used fluorescent compounds as activity reporters to identify putative ligands. Experiments using 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate as a tool combined with mass analyses showed that GSTOs are able to cleave ester bonds. Using this property, we developed a specific activity-based profiling method for identifying ligands of PcGSTO3 and PcGSTO4. The results suggest that GSTOs could be involved in the catabolism of toxic compounds like tetralone derivatives. Biochemical investigations demonstrated that these enzymes are able to catalyze deglutathionylation reactions thanks to the presence of a catalytic cysteine residue. To access the physiological function of these enzymes and notably during the wood interaction, recombinant proteins have been immobilized on CNBr Sepharose and challenged with beech wood extracts. Coupled with GC-MS experiments this ligand fishing method allowed to identify terpenes as potential substrates of Omega GST suggesting a physiological role during the wood-fungus interactions.

  5. Inactivation of Anopheles gambiae Glutathione Transferase ε2 by Epiphyllocoumarin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patience Marimo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione transferases (GSTs are part of a major family of detoxifying enzymes that can catalyze the reductive dehydrochlorination of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT. The delta and epsilon classes of insect GSTs have been implicated in conferring resistance to this insecticide. In this study, the inactivation of Anopheles gambiae GSTε2 by epiphyllocoumarin (Tral 1 was investigated. Recombinant AgGSTε2 was expressed in Escherichia coli cells containing a pET3a-AGSTε2 plasmid and purified by affinity chromatography. Tral 1 was shown to inactivate GSTε2 both in a time-dependent manner and in a concentration-dependent manner. The half-life of GSTε2 in the presence of 25 μM ethacrynic acid (ETA was 22 minutes and with Tral 1 was 30 minutes, indicating that Tral 1 was not as efficient as ETA as an inactivator. The inactivation parameters kinact and KI were found to be 0.020 ± 0.001 min−1 and 7.5 ± 2.1 μM, respectively, after 90 minutes of incubation. Inactivation of GSTε2 by Tral 1 implies that Tral 1 covalently binds to this enzyme in vitro and would be expected to exhibit time-dependent effects on the enzyme in vivo. Tral 1, therefore, would produce irreversible effects when used together with dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT in malaria control programmes where resistance is mediated by GSTs.

  6. Glutathione Transferase GSTπ In Breast Tumors Evaluated By Three Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Molina

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The glutathione transferases are involved in intracellular detoxification reactions. One of these, GSTπ, is elevated in some breast cancer cells, particularly cells selected for resistance to anticancer agents. We evaluated GSTπ expression in 60 human breast tumors by three techniques, immunohistochemistry, Northern hybridization, and Western blot analysis. There was a significant positive correlation between the three methods, with complete concordance seen in 64% of the tumors. There was strong, inverse relationship between GSTπ expression and steroid receptor status with all of the techniques utili zed. [n addition, there was a trend toward higher GSTπ expression in poorly differentiated tumors, but no correlation was found between tumor GSTπ content and DNA ploidy or %S-phase. GSTπ expression was also detected in adjacent benign breast tissue as well as infiltrating lymphocytes; this expression may contribute to GSTπ measurements using either Northern hybridization or Western blot analysis. These re sults suggest that immunohistochemistry is the method of choice for measuring GSTπ in breast tumors.

  7. Glutathione S-transferase, incense burning and asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, I-J; Tsai, C-H; Chen, C-H; Tung, K-Y; Lee, Y L

    2011-06-01

    Incense burning is a popular practice in many family homes and temples. However, little is known about the effects of indoor incense burning and genetic polymorphisms on asthma. This study evaluated the effects of indoor incense burning and glutathione S-transferase (GST) genetic polymorphisms on asthma and wheeze. In 2007, 3,764 seventh-grade schoolchildren (mean±sd age 12.42±0.65 yrs) were evaluated using a standard questionnaire for information about respiratory symptoms and environmental exposures. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to assess the association between GST polymorphisms and incense burning frequency on asthma and wheeze, after adjusting for potential confounders. The frequency of incense burning at home was associated with increased risk of current asthma (p=0.05), medication use (p=0.03) and exercise wheeze (p=0.001). GST1 (GSTT1) null genotypes were associated with current asthma (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.00-2.04) and medication use (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.01-2.22). GSTT1 showed a significant interactive effect with incense burning on current asthma, current wheeze and nocturnal wheeze. The frequency of incense burning was associated with increased risk of current asthma, medication use, lifetime wheeze, nocturnal wheeze and exercise wheeze in an exposure-response manner among children with GSTT1 null genotype (pIncense burning is a risk factor for asthma and wheezing, especially in GSTT1 genetically susceptible children.

  8. Serum fucosyl transferase activity and serum fucose levels as diagnostic tools in malignancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen,Umi

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available Glycoproteins play a significant role in neoplastic transformations. Both the levels of fucose and the activity of fucosyl transferase, which mediates the assembly of the oligosaccharide moieties of the glycoprotein chains, have been found to be elevated in neoplastic conditions. Since these elevations are common features of a variety of neoplastic cells, these two have been designated as non-specific markers of malignancy. In the present study, the fucose level and fucosyl transferase activity were determined in the sera of cancer patients and an attempt was made to establish a relationship between the two. It was found that both the fucose levels and fucosyl transferase activities showed considerable elevation in the five cancer groups studied, establishing them as useful diagnostic parameters. However, it was also observed that the rate of increased fucosyl transferase activity was not fully reflected in the resulting serum fucose levels in a few cases.

  9. Glutathione transferase classes alpha, pi, and mu: GSH activation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourado, Daniel F A R; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino; Ramos, Maria João

    2010-10-14

    Since the early 1960s, glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been described as detoxification enzymes. In fact, GSTs are the most important enzymes involved in the metabolism of electrophilic xenobiotic/endobiotic compounds. These enzymes are able to catalyze the nucleophilic addition of glutathione (GSH) sulfur thiolate to a wide range of electrophilic substrates, building up a less toxic and more soluble compound. Cytosolic classes alpha, pi, and mu are the most extensively studied GSTs. However, many of the catalytic events are still poorly understood. In the present work, we have resorted to density functional theory (DFT) and to potential of mean force (PMF) calculations to determine the GSH activation mechanism of GSTP1-1 and GSTM1-1 isoenzymes. For the GSTP1-1 enzyme, we have demonstrated that a water molecule, after an initial conformational rearrangement of GSH, can assist a proton transfer between the GSH cysteine thiol (GSH-SH) and the GSH glutamate alpha carboxylate (GSH-COO(-)) groups. The energy barrier associated with the proton transfer is 11.36 kcal·mol(-1). The GSTM1-1 enzyme shows a completely different behavior from the previous isoenzyme. In this case, two water molecules, positioned between the GSH-SH and the ξ N atom of His107, working like a bridge, are able to promote the proton transfer between these two active groups with an energy barrier of 7.98 kcal·mol(-1). All our results are consistent with all the enzymes kinetics and mutagenesis experimental studies.

  10. Multiple roles for plant glutathione transferases in xenobiotic detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Ian; Dixon, David P; Freitag-Pohl, Stefanie; Skipsey, Mark; Edwards, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Discovered 40 years ago, plant glutathione transferases (GSTs) now have a well-established role in determining herbicide metabolism and selectivity in crops and weeds. Within the GST superfamily, the numerous and plant-specific phi (F) and tau (U) classes are largely responsible for catalyzing glutathione-dependent reactions with xenobiotics, notably conjugation leading to detoxification and, more rarely, bioactivating isomerizations. In total, the crystal structures of 10 plant GSTs have been solved and a highly conserved N-terminal glutathione binding domain and structurally diverse C-terminal hydrophobic domain identified, along with key coordinating residues. Unlike drug-detoxifying mammalian GSTs, plant enzymes utlilize a catalytic serine in place of a tyrosine residue. Both GSTFs and GSTUs undergo changes in structure during catalysis indicative of an induced fit mechanism on substrate binding, with an understanding of plant GST structure/function allowing these proteins to be engineered for novel functions in detoxification and ligand recognition. Several major crops produce alternative thiols, with GSTUs shown to use homoglutathione in preference to glutathione, in herbicide detoxification reactions in soybeans. Similarly, hydroxymethylglutathione is used, in addition to glutathione in detoxifying the herbicide fenoxaprop in wheat. Following GST action, plants are able to rapidly process glutathione conjugates by at least two distinct pathways, with the available evidence suggesting these function in an organ- and species-specific manner. Roles for GSTs in endogenous metabolism are less well defined, with the enzymes linked to a diverse range of functions, including signaling, counteracting oxidative stress, and detoxifying and transporting secondary metabolites.

  11. Regulation of the cardiac muscle ryanodine receptor by glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulhunty, Angela F; Hewawasam, Ruwani; Liu, Dan; Casarotto, Marco G; Board, Philip G

    2011-05-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are generally recognized for their role in phase II detoxification reactions. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that members of the GST family also have a diverse range of other functions that are, in general, unrelated to detoxification. One such action is a specific inhibition of the cardiac isoform of the ryanodine receptor (RyR2) intracellular Ca(2+) release channel. In this review, we compare functional and physical interactions between members of the GST family, including GSTO1-1, GSTA1-1, and GSTM2-2, with RyR2 and with the skeletal isoform of the ryanodine receptor (RyR1). The active part of the muscle-specific GSTM2-2 is localized to its nonenzymatic C-terminal α-helical bundle, centered around α-helix 6. The GSTM2-2 binding site is in divergent region 3 (DR3 region) of RyR2. The sequence differences between the DR3 regions of RyR1 and RyR2 explain the specificity of the GSTs for one isoform of the protein. GSTM2-2 is one of the few known endogenous inhibitors of the cardiac RyR and is likely to be important in maintaining low RyR2 activity during diastole. We discuss interactions between a nonenzymatic member of the GST structural family, the CLIC-2 (type 2 chloride intracellular channel) protein, which inhibits both RyR1 and RyR2. The possibility that the GST and CLIC2 proteins bind to different sites on the RyR, and that different structures within the GST and CLIC proteins bind to RyR channels, is discussed. We conclude that the C-terminal part of GSTM2-2 may provide the basis of a therapeutic compound for use in cardiac disorders.

  12. Role of glutathione transferases in the mechanism of brostallicin activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzola, Silvia; Antonini, Giovanni; Geroni, Cristina; Beria, Italo; Colombo, Maristella; Broggini, Massimo; Marchini, Sergio; Mongelli, Nicola; Leboffe, Loris; MacArthur, Robert; Mozzi, Alessia Francesca; Federici, Giorgio; Caccuri, Anna Maria

    2010-01-12

    Brostallicin is a novel and unique glutathione transferase-activated pro-drug with promising anticancer activity, currently in phase I and II clinical evaluation. In this work, we show that, in comparison with the parental cell line showing low GST levels, the cytotoxic activity of brostallicin is significantly enhanced in the human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cell line, transfected with either human GST-pi or GST-mu. Moreover, we describe in detail the interaction of brostallicin with GSH in the presence of GSTP1-1 and GSTM2-2, the predominant GST isoenzymes found within tumor cells. The experiments reported here indicate that brostallicin binds reversibly to both isoenzymes with K(d) values in the micromolar range (the affinity being higher for GSTM2-2). Direct evidence that both GSTP1-1 and GSTM2-2 isoenzymes catalyze the Michael addition reaction of GSH to brostallicin has been obtained both by an HPLC-MS technique and by a new fluorometric assay. We also saw the rapid formation of an intermediate reactive species, which is slowly converted into the final products. This intermediate, identified as the alpha-chloroamido derivative of the GSH-brostallicin adduct, is able to alkylate DNA in a sequence-specific manner and appears to be the active form of the drug. The kinetic behavior of the reaction between brostallicin and GSH, catalyzed by GSTP1-1, has been studied in detail, and a minimum kinetic scheme that suitably describes the experimental data is provided. Overall, these data fully support and extend the findings that brostallicin could be indicated for the treatment of tumor overexpressing the pi or mu class GST.

  13. Prediction of substrates for glutathione transferases by covalent docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guang Qiang; Calhoun, Sara; Fan, Hao; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Branch, Megan C; Mashiyama, Susan T; London, Nir; Jacobson, Matthew P; Babbitt, Patricia C; Shoichet, Brian K; Armstrong, Richard N; Sali, Andrej

    2014-06-23

    Enzymes in the glutathione transferase (GST) superfamily catalyze the conjugation of glutathione (GSH) to electrophilic substrates. As a consequence they are involved in a number of key biological processes, including protection of cells against chemical damage, steroid and prostaglandin biosynthesis, tyrosine catabolism, and cell apoptosis. Although virtual screening has been used widely to discover substrates by docking potential noncovalent ligands into active site clefts of enzymes, docking has been rarely constrained by a covalent bond between the enzyme and ligand. In this study, we investigate the accuracy of docking poses and substrate discovery in the GST superfamily, by docking 6738 potential ligands from the KEGG and MetaCyc compound libraries into 14 representative GST enzymes with known structures and substrates using the PLOP program [ Jacobson Proteins 2004 , 55 , 351 ]. For X-ray structures as receptors, one of the top 3 ranked models is within 3 Å all-atom root mean square deviation (RMSD) of the native complex in 11 of the 14 cases; the enrichment LogAUC value is better than random in all cases, and better than 25 in 7 of 11 cases. For comparative models as receptors, near-native ligand-enzyme configurations are often sampled but difficult to rank highly. For models based on templates with the highest sequence identity, the enrichment LogAUC is better than 25 in 5 of 11 cases, not significantly different from the crystal structures. In conclusion, we show that covalent docking can be a useful tool for substrate discovery and point out specific challenges for future method improvement.

  14. Analysis of Arabidopsis glutathione-transferases in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewski, Matthias P; Kanawati, Basem; Fekete, Agnes; Kowalski, Natalie; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Grill, Erwin

    2013-07-01

    The genome of Arabidopsis thaliana encodes 54 functional glutathione transferases (GSTs), classified in seven clades. Although plant GSTs have been implicated in the detoxification of xenobiotics, such as herbicides, extensive redundancy within this large gene family impedes a functional analysis in planta. In this study, a GST-deficient yeast strain was established as a system for analyzing plant GSTs that allows screening for GST substrates and identifying substrate preferences within the plant GST family. To this end, five yeast genes encoding GSTs and GST-related proteins were simultaneously disrupted. The resulting yeast quintuple mutant showed a strongly reduced conjugation of the GST substrates 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and 4-chloro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-Cl). Consistently, the quintuple mutant was hypersensitive to CDNB, and this phenotype was complemented by the inducible expression of Arabidopsis GSTs. The conjugating activity of the plant GSTs was assessed by in vitro enzymatic assays and via analysis of exposed yeast cells. The formation of glutathione adducts with dinitrobenzene was unequivocally verified by stable isotope labeling and subsequent accurate ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry (ICR-FTMS). Analysis of Arabidopsis GSTs encompassing six clades and 42 members demonstrated functional expression in yeast by using CDNB and NBD-Cl as model substrates. Subsequently, the established yeast system was explored for its potential to screen the Arabidopsis GST family for conjugation of the fungicide anilazine. Thirty Arabidopsis GSTs were identified that conferred increased levels of glutathionylated anilazine. Efficient anilazine conjugation was observed in the presence of the phi, tau, and theta clade GSTs including AtGSTF2, AtGSTF4, AtGSTF6, AtGSTF8, AtGSTF10, and AtGSTT2, none of which had previously been known to contribute to fungicide detoxification. ICR-FTMS analysis of yeast extracts allowed the simultaneous detection and

  15. Roles for glutathione transferases in plant secondary metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, David P; Skipsey, Mark; Edwards, Robert

    2010-03-01

    Plant glutathione transferases (GSTs) are classified as enzymes of secondary metabolism, but while their roles in catalysing the conjugation and detoxification of herbicides are well known, their endogenous functions are largely obscure. Thus, while the presence of GST-derived S-glutathionylated xenobiotics have been described in many plants, there is little direct evidence for the accumulation of similarly conjugated natural products, despite the presence of a complex and dichotomous metabolic pathway which processes these reaction products. The conservation in glutathione conjugating and processing pathways, the co-regulation of GSTs with inducible plant secondary metabolism and biochemical studies showing the potential of these enzymes to conjugate reactive natural products are all suggestive of important endogenous functions. As a framework for addressing these enigmatic functions we postulate that either: (a) the natural reaction products of GSTs are unstable and undergo reversible S-glutathionylation; (b) the conjugation products of GSTs are very rapidly processed to derived metabolites; (c) GSTs do not catalyse conventional conjugation reactions but instead use glutathione as a cofactor rather than co-substrate; or (d) GSTs are non-catalytic and function as transporter proteins for secondary metabolites and their unstable intermediates. In this review, we describe how enzyme biochemistry and informatics are providing clues as to GST function allowing for the critical evaluation of each of these hypotheses. We also present evidence for the involvement of GSTs in the synthesis of sulfur-containing secondary metabolites such as volatiles and glucosinolates, and the conjugation, transport and storage of reactive oxylipins, phenolics and flavonoids.

  16. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Wheat Arabinoxylan by a Recombinant "Minimal" Enzyme Cocktail Containing beta-Xylosidase and Novel endo-1,4-beta-Xylanase and alpha-L-Arabinofuranosidase Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hanne R.; Pedersen, Sven; Jørgensen, Christel T.;

    2007-01-01

    24 h at pH 5, 50 degrees C. A 10%:40%:50% mixture of Abf II, Abf III, and beta-xyl released 56 mg of arabinose and 91 mg of xylose per gram of vinasse dry matter after 24 h at pH 5, 50 degrees C. The optimal dosages of the "minimal" enzyme cocktails were determined to be 0.4, 0.3, and 0.2 g enzyme......This study describes the identification of the key enzyme activities required in a "minimal" enzyme cocktail able to catalyze hydrolysis of water-soluble and water-insoluble wheat arabinoxylan and whole vinasse, a fermentation effluent resulting from industrial ethanol manufacture from wheat...

  17. Characterization of glutathione-S-transferases in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glisic, Branka; Mihaljevic, Ivan; Popovic, Marta; Zaja, Roko; Loncar, Jovica; Fent, Karl; Kovacevic, Radmila; Smital, Tvrtko

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) are one of the key enzymes that mediate phase II of cellular detoxification. The aim of our study was a comprehensive characterization of GSTs in zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an important vertebrate model species frequently used in environmental research. A detailed phylogenetic analysis of GST superfamily revealed 27 zebrafish gst genes. Further insights into the orthology relationships between human and zebrafish GSTs/Gsts were obtained by the conserved synteny analysis. Expression of gst genes in six tissues (liver, kidney, gills, intestine, brain and gonads) of adult male and female zebrafish was determined using qRT-PCR. Functional characterization was performed on 9 cytosolic Gst enzymes after overexpression in E. coli and subsequent protein purification. Enzyme kinetics was measured for GSH and a series of model substrates. Our data revealed ubiquitously high expression of gstp, gstm (except in liver), gstr1, mgst3a and mgst3b, high expression of gsto2 in gills and ovaries, gsta in intestine and testes, gstt1a in liver, and gstz1 in liver, kidney and brain. All zebrafish Gsts catalyzed the conjugation of GSH to model GST substrates 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and monochlorobimane (MCB), apart from Gsto2 and Gstz1 that catalyzed GSH conjugation to dehydroascorbate (DHA) and dichloroacetic acid (DCA), respectively. Affinity toward CDNB varied from 0.28 mM (Gstp2) to 3.69 mM (Gstm3), while affinity toward MCB was in the range of 5 μM (Gstt1a) to 250 μM (Gstp1). Affinity toward GSH varied from 0.27 mM (Gstz1) to 4.45 mM (Gstt1a). Turnover number for CDNB varied from 5.25s(-1) (Gstt1a) to 112s(-1) (Gstp2). Only Gst Pi enzymes utilized ethacrynic acid (ETA). We suggest that Gstp1, Gstp2, Gstt1a, Gstz1, Gstr1, Mgst3a and Mgst3b have important role in the biotransformation of xenobiotics, while Gst Alpha, Mu, Pi, Zeta and Rho classes are involved in the crucial physiological processes. In summary, this study provides the

  18. Alteration of glutathione S-transferase properties during the development of Micromelalopha troglodyta larvae (Lepidoptera: Notodontidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Fang; ZHANG Xiu-bo; LIU Yu-sheng; GAO Xi-wu

    2011-01-01

    Micromelalopha troglodyta (Graeser) is an important pest ofpoplar in China. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are known to beresponsible for adaptation mechanisms of M. Troglodyta. The activitiesand kinetic constants of glutathione S-transferases in M. Troglodyta werestudied. Significant differences in glutathione S-transferase activity andkinetic characteristics were observed among five instars of M. Troglodytalarvae. Furthermore, the inhibition of glutathione S-transferase activity infive instars by 24 inhibitors was conducted. The results show the inhibi-tion of GST activity of different instars by 24 inhibitors was different.For GST activity in the 1st instar chlorpyrifos, lambda-cyhalothrin,endosulfan, abamectin, fipronil and pyridaben were the best inhibitorstested, and for GST activity in the 2nd instar, tannic acid and quercetinwere the most potent inhibitors tested, and for GST activity in the 3rdinstar, the inhibitory effects of quercetin, chlorpyrifos andlambda-cyhalothrin were the highest, and for GST activity in the 4thinstar, quercetin and lambda-cyhalothrin were the best inhibitors, and theinhibitory effect of pboxim was the highest for GST activity in the 5thinstar. Our results show that glutathione S-transferases in different iustarsare qualitatively different in isozyme composition and thus different insensitivity to inhibitors.

  19. IDENTIFYING GENES CONTROLLING FERULATE CROSS-LINKING FORMATION IN GRASS CELL WALLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de O Buanafina, Marcia Maria

    2013-10-16

    formation or genes encoding transcription factors that control feruloylation. So it will require further investigations to confirm if we have a mutation on the ferulloyltransferase gene(s). We have also identified severe phenotypes which showed a significant change in the level of cell wall ferulates and sugars and have not survived. As this genotype did not reach flowering stage there was no seed production and so further analysis could not be done. 3. Candidate Gene Approach: Because of the likely long time expected to generate and identify candidate with mutation(s) on the feruloyltransferase gene, from our screening, we have in addition taken a bioinformatics approach in order to try to identify candidates gene(s) involved in feruloylation. Homologues of the rice feruloyl transferase genes belonging to Pfam PF02458 family were identified in Brachypodium distachyon by blasting EST sequences of putative rice arabinoxylan feruloyl transferase genes against Brachypodium and homologous sequences identified were tested for their expression level in Brachypodium. Sequences of the two Brachypodium genes, which showed highest expression and similarity to rice sequences, were used to design primers for construction of RNAi and over-expression vectors. These were transformed into Brachypodium using Agrobacterium transformation and plants generated have been analyzed for levels of cell wall ferulates and diferulates over generations T0 to T2 or T3. Our data shows a significant reduction if ferulates monomers and dimers from plants generated from RNAi::BdAT2 over 2-3 generations indicating that this gene might be a positive candidate for feruloylation in Brachypodium. However when BdAT2 was up regulated there was not much increase in the level of ferulates as would be expected. This lack of effect on the level of cell wall ferulates could be due to the CaMV::35S promoter used to drive the expression of the putative BdAT2 gene. We have shown previously that Aspergillus FAEA

  20. Nuclear translocation of glutathione transferase omega is a progression marker in Barrett's esophagus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piaggi, Simona; Marchi, Santino; Ciancia, Eugenio

    2009-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) represents a major risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma (AC). For this reason, patients with BE are subjected to a systematic endoscopic surveillance to detect initial evolution towards non-invasive neoplasia (NiN) and cancer, that eventually occurs only in a small f...... fraction of BE patients. This study was aimed to investigate the possible role of glutathione-S-transferase-omega 1 (GSTO1), a recently discovered member of the glutathione-S-transferase family, as a progression marker in the Barrett's disease in order to improve the diagnosis of Ni...... equally divided between nuclear, cytoplasmic and diffuse staining (2 each, respectively). Experiments in vitro showed that in human HeLa cancer cells, GSTO1 translocates into the nucleus as a consequence of heath shock. These findings suggested that the nuclear translocation of glutathione-S-transferase-omega...

  1. Glutathione transferases and development of new principles to overcome drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sau, Andrea; Pellizzari Tregno, Francesca; Valentino, Francesco; Federici, Giorgio; Caccuri, Anna Maria

    2010-08-15

    Chemoresistance is a multifactorial phenomenon and many studies clearly show that a coordinated expression of efflux transporter proteins and phase II conjugating enzymes in tumor cells is linked to the development of the multidrug resistance phenotype. In particular, the overexpression of glutathione S-transferases and efflux pumps in tumors may reduce the reactivity of various anticancer drugs. In recent years it has become evident that glutathione S-transferases are also involved in the control of apoptosis through the inhibition of the JNK signaling pathway. As such, the glutathione S-transferase superfamily has become the focus of extensive pharmaceutical research in attempt to generate more efficient anticancer agents. Here we present an overview of the GST inhibitors and the GST-activated pro-drugs utilized to date to overcome drug resistance.

  2. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to arabinoxylan produced from wheat endosperm and reduction of post-prandial glycaemic responses (ID 830) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to provide a scientific opinion on a list of health claims pursuant to Article 13 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006. This opinion addresses the scientific substantiation of a health...... claim in relation to arabinoxylan produced from wheat endosperm and reduction of post-prandial glycaemic responses. The scientific substantiation is based on the information provided by the Member States in the consolidated list of Article 13 health claims and references that EFSA has received from...... Member States or directly from stakeholders. The food constituent that is the subject of the health claim is “wheat grain fibre”. From the references and information provided, the Panel assumes that the food constituent that is responsible for the claimed effect is arabinoxylan from wheat endosperm...

  3. Mapping of amino acid substitutions conferring herbicide resistance in wheat glutathione transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Sridhar; Mannervik, Bengt; Silverman, Joshua A; Wright, Kathy; Regitsky, Drew; Hegazy, Usama; Purcell, Thomas J; Welch, Mark; Minshull, Jeremy; Gustafsson, Claes

    2015-03-20

    We have used design of experiments (DOE) and systematic variance to efficiently explore glutathione transferase substrate specificities caused by amino acid substitutions. Amino acid substitutions selected using phylogenetic analysis were synthetically combined using a DOE design to create an information-rich set of gene variants, termed infologs. We used machine learning to identify and quantify protein sequence-function relationships against 14 different substrates. The resulting models were quantitative and predictive, serving as a guide for engineering of glutathione transferase activity toward a diverse set of herbicides. Predictive quantitative models like those presented here have broad applicability for bioengineering.

  4. Origin and evolution of the Peptidyl Transferase Center from proto-tRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sávio T. Farias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis of Tamura (2011 [3] that molecules of tRNA gave origin to ribosomes, particularly to the Peptidyl Transferase Center (PTC of the 23S ribosomal RNA. We reconstructed the ancestral sequences from all types of tRNA and compared them in their sequences with the current PTC of 23S ribosomal RNA from different organisms. We built an ancestral sequence of proto-tRNAs that showed a remarkable overall identity of 50.53% with the catalytic site of PTC. We conclude that the Peptidyl Transferase Center was indeed originated by the fusion of ancestral sequences of proto-tRNA.

  5. Activity Detection of GalNAc Transferases by Protein-Based Fluorescence Sensors In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lina; Bachert, Collin; Linstedt, Adam D

    2016-01-01

    Mucin-type O-glycosylation occurring in the Golgi apparatus is an important protein posttranslational modification initiated by up to 20 GalNAc-transferase isozymes with largely distinct substrate specificities. Regulation of this enzyme family affects a vast array of proteins transiting the secretory pathway and misregulation causes human diseases. Here we describe the use of protein-based fluorescence sensors that traffic in the secretory pathway to monitor GalNAc-transferase activity in living cells. The sensors can either be "pan" or isozyme specific.

  6. Cholesterol oxides inhibit cholesterol esterification by lecithin: cholesterol acyl transferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder de Carvalho Pincinato

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol oxides are atherogenic and can affect the activity of diverse important enzymes for the lipidic metabolism. The effect of 7β-hydroxycholesterol, 7-ketocholesterol, 25-hydroxycholesterol, cholestan-3β,5α,6β-triol,5,6β-epoxycholesterol, 5,6α-epoxycholesterol and 7α-hydroxycholesterol on esterification of cholesterol by lecithin:cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT, EC 2.3.1.43 and the transfer of esters of cholesterol oxides from high density lipoprotein (HDL to low density lipoproteins (LDL and very low density lipoproteins (VLDL by cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP was investigated. HDL enriched with increasing concentrations of cholesterol oxides was incubated with fresh plasma as source of LCAT. Cholesterol and cholesterol oxides esterification was followed by measuring the consumption of respective free sterol and oxysterols. Measurements of cholesterol and cholesterol oxides were done by gas-chromatography. 14C-cholesterol oxides were incorporated into HDL2 and HDL3 subfractions and then incubated with fresh plasma containing LCAT and CETP. The transfer of cholesterol oxide esters was followed by measuring the 14C-cholesterol oxide-derived esters transferred to LDL and VLDL. All the cholesterol oxides studied were esterified by LCAT after incorporation into HDL particles, competing with cholesterol by LCAT. Cholesterol esterification by LCAT was inversely related to the cholesterol oxide concentration. The esterification of 14C-cholesterol oxides was higher in HDL3 and the transfer of the derived esters was greater from HDL2 to LDL and VLDL. The results suggest that cholesterol esterification by LCAT is inhibited in cholesterol oxide-enriched HDL particles. Moreover, the cholesterol oxides-derived esters are efficiently transferred to LDL and VLDL. Therefore, we suggest that cholesterol oxides may exert part of their atherogenic effect by inhibiting cholesterol esterification on the HDL surface and thereby disturbing

  7. Purification and Biochemical Characterization of Glutathione S-Transferase from Down Syndrome and Normal Children Erythrocytes: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Ragaa R.; Maharem, Tahany M.; Abdel-Meguid, Nagwa; Sabry, Gilane M.; Abdalla, Abdel-Monem; Guneidy, Rasha A.

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the phenotypic manifestation of trisomy 21. Our study was concerned with the characterization and purification of glutathione S-transferase enzyme (GST) from normal and Down syndrome (DS) erythrocytes to illustrate the difference in the role of this enzyme in the cell. Glutathione S-transferase and glutathione (GSH) was…

  8. Purification of human hepatic glutathione S-transferases and the development of a radioimmunoassay for their measurement in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, J.D.; Gilligan, D.; Beckett, G.J. (Edinburgh Univ. (UK). Dept. of Clinical Chemistry); Chapman, B.J. (Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh (UK))

    1983-10-31

    A purification scheme is described for six human hepatic glutathione S-transferases from a single liver. Five of the transferases comprised Ya monomers and had a molecular mass of 44000. The remaining enzyme comprised Yb monomers and had a molecular mass of 47000. Data are presented demonstrating that there are at least two distinct Ya monomers. A radioimmunoassay has been developed that has sufficient precision and sensitivity to allow direct measurement of glutathione S-transferase concentrations in unextracted plasma. A comparison of aminotransferase and glutathione S-transferase levels, in three patients who had taken a paracetamol overdose, indicated that glutathione S-transferase measurements provided a far more sensitive index of hepatocellular integrity than the more conventional aminotransferase measurements.

  9. Antibiotic inhibition of the movement of tRNA substrates through a peptidyl transferase cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, B T; Rodriguez-Fonseca, C; Leviev, I;

    1996-01-01

    The present review attempts to deal with movement of tRNA substrates through the peptidyl transferase centre on the large ribosomal subunit and to explain how this movement is interrupted by antibiotics. It builds on the concept of hybrid tRNA states forming on ribosomes and on the observed movem...

  10. Maize white seedling 3 results from disruption of homogentisate solanesyl transferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maize white seedling 3 (w3) has served as a model albino-seedling mutant since its discovery in 1923. We show here that the w3 phenotype is caused by disruptions in homogentisate solanesyl transferase (HST), an enzyme that catalyzes the committed step in plastoquinone-9 (PQ9) biosynthesis. This re...

  11. Development of isoform-specific sensors of polypeptide GalNAc-transferase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Lina; Bachert, Collin; Schjoldager, Katrine T

    2014-01-01

    Humans express up to 20 isoforms of GalNAc-transferase (herein T1-T20) that localize to the Golgi apparatus and initiate O-glycosylation. Regulation of this enzyme family affects a vast array of proteins transiting the secretory pathway and diseases arise upon misregulation of specific isoforms...

  12. Glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes in relation to their role in detoxification of xenobiotics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, R.M.E.

    1989-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferases (GST) are a family of isoenzymes serving a major part in the biotransformation of many reactive compounds. The isoenzymes from rat, man and mouse are divided into three classes, alpha, mu and pi, on the basis of similar structural and enzymatic properties.

  13. Functional characterization of glutathione S-transferases associated with insecticide resistance in Tetranychus urticae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlidi, N.; Tseliou, V.; Riga, M.; Nauen, R.; Van Leeuwen, T.; Labrou, N.E.; Vontas, J.

    2015-01-01

    The two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae is one of the most important agricultural pests world-wide. It is extremely polyphagous and develops resistance to acaricides. The overexpression of several glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) has been associated with insecticide resistance. Here, we fun

  14. Inhibition of human glutathione S-transferase P1-1 by the flavonoid quercetin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanden, J.J. van; Hamman, O.B.; Iersel, M.L.P.S. van; Boeren, S.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Lo Bello, M.; Vervoort, J.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2003-01-01

    In the present study, the inhibition of human glutathione S-transferase P1-1 (GSTP1-1) by the flavonoid quercetin has been investigated. The results show a time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of GSTP1-1 by quercetin. GSTP1-1 activity is completely inhibited upon 1 h incubation with 100 μM q

  15. Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase deficiency is not associated with Mullerian aplasia in Dutch patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, R.; Hartog, F.E.; Wevers, R.A.; Wanders, R.J.; Willemsen, W.N.P.

    2009-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To study whether a deficiency in galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) activity of mothers was an explanation for the occurrence of Mullerian aplasia of their daughters. DESIGN: A case control study. SETTING: The patients were selected from the outpatient clinic of the Uni

  16. Puromycin-rRNA interaction sites at the peptidyl transferase center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez-Fonseca, Christina; Phan, Hien; Long, Katherine Sarah

    2000-01-01

    The binding site of puromycin was probed chemically in the peptidyl-transferase center of ribosomes from Escherichia coli and of puromycin-hypersensitive ribosomes from the archaeon Haloferax gibbonsii. Several nucleotides of the 23S rRNAs showed altered chemical reactivities in the presence of p...

  17. Acetate:succinate CoA-transferase in the hydrogenosomes of Trichomonas vaginalis: Identification and characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.W.A. Grinsven; S. Rosnowsky (Silke); S.W.H. van Weelden (Susanne); S. Pütz (Simone); M. van der Giezen (Mark); W. Martin (William); J.J. van Hellemond (Jaap); A.G.M. Tielens (Aloysius); K. Henze (Katrin)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAcetate:succinate CoA-transferases (ASCT) are acetate-producing enzymes in hydrogenosomes, anaerobically functioning mitochondria and in the aerobically functioning mitochondria of trypanosomatids. Although acetate is produced in the hydrogenosomes of a number of anaerobic microbial euka

  18. 21 CFR 573.130 - Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho- transferase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... genetically modified cotton, oilseed rape, and tomatoes in accordance with the following prescribed conditions... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aminoglycoside 3â²-phospho- transferase II. 573.130 Section 573.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  19. The phosphopantetheinyl transferases: catalysis of a post-translational modification crucial for life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beld, Joris; Sonnenschein, Eva; Vickery, Christopher R.;

    2013-01-01

    Covering: up to 2013 Although holo-acyl carrier protein synthase, AcpS, a phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPTase), was characterized in the 1960s, it was not until the publication of the landmark paper by Lambalot et al. in 1996 that PPTases garnered wide-spread attention being classified as a d...

  20. Glutathione S-transferase polymorphisms in allergic contact dermatitis to xenobiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pot, L.M.; Alizadeh, B.Z.; Laizane, D.; Coenraads, P.J.; Snieder, H.; Blömeke, B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Xenobiotics, such as para-phenylenediamine (PPD), are thought to be detoxified by phase II enzymes, like the Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). The human cytosolic GSTs display polymorphisms which are likely to contribute to interindividual differences in responses to xenobiotics. By per

  1. Effect of glutathione S-transferases on the survival of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Judith; Hokland, Peter; Pedersen, Lars;

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of genetic polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferases (GST) on the survival of acute myeloid leukaemia patients receiving adriamycin induction therapy. A total of 89 patients were included in the study. Patients who carried at least one GSTM...

  2. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of glutathione transferase zeta 1 (GSTZ1a-1a)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, Christopher D.; Zhong, Guo; Smeltz, Marci; James, Margaret O., E-mail: mojames@ufl.edu; McKenna, Robert, E-mail: mojames@ufl.edu

    2014-01-21

    Crystals of glutathione transferase zeta 1 were grown and shown to diffract X-rays to 3.1 Å resolution. They belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.0, b = 49.6, c = 54.6 Å, α = 82.9, β = 69.9, γ = 73.4°.

  3. A practical fluorogenic substrate for high-throughput screening of glutathione S-transferase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Yuuta; Morisaki, Fumika; Ogura, Asami; Morohashi, Kana; Enya, Sora; Niwa, Ryusuke; Goto, Shinji; Kojima, Hirotatsu; Okabe, Takayoshi; Nagano, Tetsuo; Inoue, Hideshi

    2015-07-21

    We report a new fluorogenic substrate for glutathione S-transferase (GST), 3,4-DNADCF, enabling the assay with a low level of nonenzymatic background reaction. Inhibitors against Noppera-bo/GSTe14 from Drosophila melanogaster were identified by high throughput screening using 3,4-DNADCF, demonstrating the utility of this substrate.

  4. Inhibition of rat, mouse, and human glutathione S-transferase by eugenol and its oxidation products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rompelberg, C.J.M.; Ploemen, J.H.T.M.; Jespersen, S.; Greef, J. van der; Verhagen, H.; Bladeren, P.J. van

    1996-01-01

    The irreversible and reversible inhibition of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) by eugenol was studied in rat, mouse and man. Using liver cytosol of human, rat and mouse, species differences were found in the rate of irreversible inhibition of GSTs by eugenol in the presence of the enzyme tyrosinase

  5. Molecular cloning and expression of several new Anopheles cracens epsilon class glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongtrakul, Jeerang; Wongsantichon, Jantana; Vararattanavech, Ardcharaporn; Leelapat, Posri; Prapanthadara, La-aied; Ketterman, Albert J

    2009-01-01

    Glutathione transferases, GSTs, are detoxification proteins that are found in most organisms. The acGSTE3-3 had the ability to conjugate 4-hydroxynonenal, a cytotoxic lipid peroxidation product. Although other Epsilon GSTs showed roles in insecticide metabolism, the acGSTE3-3 appeared to have a major role in detoxifying lipid peroxidation products conferring protection against oxidative damage.

  6. Chromosomal localization of the gene for the human Theta class glutathione transferase (GSTT1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, G.; Vaska, V. [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Goggan, M.; Board, P. [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia)

    1996-04-01

    Two loci encoding Theta class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been identified in humans. In situ hybridization studies have localized the GSTT1 gene to 22q11.2. This is the same band to which we previously localized the GSTT2 gene. This finding confirms the trend for human GST genes to be found in class-specific clusters. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Glutathione transferase activity and oocyte development in copepods exposed to toxic phytoplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozlowsky-Suzuki, Betina; Koski, Marja; Hallberg, Eric;

    2009-01-01

    Organisms present a series of cellular mechanisms to avoid the effects of toxic compounds. Such mechanisms include the increase in activity of detoxification enzymes [e.g., 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) and glutathione S-transferase (GST)I, which could explain the low retention of ingeste...

  8. Development of isoform-specific sensors of polypeptide GalNAc-transferase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lina; Bachert, Collin; Schjoldager, Katrine T; Clausen, Henrik; Linstedt, Adam D

    2014-10-31

    Humans express up to 20 isoforms of GalNAc-transferase (herein T1-T20) that localize to the Golgi apparatus and initiate O-glycosylation. Regulation of this enzyme family affects a vast array of proteins transiting the secretory pathway and diseases arise upon misregulation of specific isoforms. Surprisingly, molecular probes to monitor GalNAc-transferase activity are lacking and there exist no effective global or isoform-specific inhibitors. Here we describe the development of T2- and T3-isoform specific fluorescence sensors that traffic in the secretory pathway. Each sensor yielded little signal when glycosylated but was strongly activated in the absence of its glycosylation. Specificity of each sensor was assessed in HEK cells with either the T2 or T3 enzymes deleted. Although the sensors are based on specific substrates of the T2 and T3 enzymes, elements in or near the enzyme recognition sequence influenced their activity and required modification, which we carried out based on previous in vitro work. Significantly, the modified T2 and T3 sensors were activated only in cells lacking their corresponding isozymes. Thus, we have developed T2- and T3-specific sensors that will be valuable in both the study of GalNAc-transferase regulation and in high-throughput screening for potential therapeutic regulators of specific GalNAc-transferases.

  9. Protease-induced solubilisation of carbohydrates from brewers' spent grain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faulds, C.B.; Collins, S.; Robertson, J.A.; Treimo, J.; Eijsink, V.G.H.; Hinz, S.W.A.; Schols, H.A.; Buchert, J.; Waldron, K.W.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of microbial proteases on the release of carbohydrates from BSG was studied. The proteases were able to release the non-cellulosic glucose, a portion of feruloylated arabinoxylan and over 50% of the protein from brewers' spent grain (BSG) after 24 h hydrolysis. The non-cellulosic glucose

  10. In vitro fermentation patterns of rice bran components by human gut microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice bran is a rich source of bioactive components that can promote gastrointestinal health. However, bran is removed during polishing. Among those, feruloylated arabinoxylan oligosaccharides (FAXO) and rice bran polyphenolics (RBPP) are hypothesized to have positive impacts on human gut microbiota ...

  11. GalNAc-transferase specificity prediction based on feature selection method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lin; Niu, Bing; Zhao, Jun; Liu, Liang; Lu, Wen-Cong; Liu, Xiao-Jun; Li, Yi-Xue; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2009-02-01

    GalNAc-transferase can catalyze the biosynthesis of O-linked oligosaccharides. The specificity of GalNAc-transferase is composed of nine amino acid residues denoted by R4, R3, R2, R1, R0, R1', R2', R3', R4'. To predict whether the reducing monosaccharide will be covalently linked to the central residue R0(Ser or Thr), a new method based on feature selection has been proposed in our work. 277 nonapeptides from reference [Chou KC. A sequence-coupled vector-projection model for predicting the specificity of GalNAc-transferase. Protein Sci 1995;4:1365-83] are chosen for training set. Each nonapeptide is represented by hundreds of amino acid properties collected by Amino Acid Index database (http://www.genome.jp/aaindex) and transformed into a numeric vector with 4554 features. The Maximum Relevance Minimum Redundancy (mRMR) method combining with Incremental Feature Selection (IFS) and Feature Forward Selection (FFS) are then applied for feature selection. Nearest Neighbor Algorithm (NNA) is used to build prediction models. The optimal model contains 54 features and its correct rate tested by Jackknife cross-validation test reaches 91.34%. Final feature analysis indicates that amino acid residues at position R3' play the most important role in the recognition of GalNAc-transferase specificity, which were confirmed by the experiments [Elhammer AP, Poorman RA, Brown E, Maggiora LL, Hoogerheide JG, Kezdy FJ. The specificity of UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase as inferred from a database of in vivo substrates and from the in vitro glycosylation of proteins and peptides. J Biol Chem 1993;268:10029-38; O'Connell BC, Hagen FK, Tabak LA. The influence of flanking sequence on the O-glycosylation of threonine in vitro. J Biol Chem 1992;267:25010-8; Yoshida A, Suzuki M, Ikenaga H, Takeuchi M. Discovery of the shortest sequence motif for high level mucin-type O-glycosylation. J Biol Chem 1997;272:16884-8]. Our method can be used as a tool for predicting O

  12. UDP-N-acetyl-alpha-D-galactosamine:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase. Identification and separation of two distinct transferase activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, T; White, T; Wandall, H H;

    1995-01-01

    Using a defined acceptor substrate peptide as an affinity chromatography ligand we have developed a purification scheme for a unique human polypeptide, UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GalNAc-transferase) (White, T., Bennett, E.P., Takio, K., Sørensen, T., Bonding, N......., and Clausen, H. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 24156-24165). Here we report detailed studies of the acceptor substrate specificity of GalNAc-transferase purified by this scheme as well as the Gal-NAc-transferase activity, which, upon repeated affinity chromatography, evaded purification by this affinity ligand...

  13. 机械预处理对酶解啤酒糟提取阿魏酰低聚糖的影响%Effect of mechanical pretreatment on extraction of feruloyl oligosaccharides from brewer's spent grain by enzymatic hydrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张秋培; 尤梦竹; 蔡国林; 曹钰

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical pretreatment of brewer's spent grain (BSG) can change its tightness and the particle size,thus affecting enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency.With the increase of degree of crushing,enzymatic efficiency increase.The yield of feruloyl oligosaccharides (FOs) from untreated BSG by xylanase and cellulase were 31.89% and 33.41%,respectively.And after the synergy of xylanase and cellulase,the yield of FOs increased to 47.01%.The yield of FOs from mechanical treated BSG hydrolyzed by xylanase and cellulase were 39.49% and 50.36%,respectively.And after the synergy of xylanase and cellulase,the yield of FOs increased to 64.00%.The results indicated that pretreatment could improve the' efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis,and the presence of cellulase and β-glucanase was beneficial to the effect of xylanase,thus improved the extraction efficiency of FOs from BSG and initially realized the high-value utilization of BSG.%啤酒糟经预处理后可以改变其紧密度以及粒径大小,从而影响酶解效率,随着粉碎程度的增加,酶解效率增加,其中,啤酒糟原样经木聚糖酶和纤维素酶水解后,阿魏酰低聚糖(FOs)的得率分别为31.89%和33.41%,木聚糖酶和纤维素酶协同作用后,FOs的得率为47.01%;刀片粉碎后球磨30 min的啤酒糟,经木聚糖酶和纤维素酶水解后,FOs的得率分别为39.49%和50.36%,而经木聚糖酶和纤维素酶协同作用后,FOs的得率增加到了64.00%.实验结果表明,预处理可以提高酶解效率,纤维素酶和β-葡聚糖酶的存在有利于木聚糖酶的作用,从而在一定程度上提高从啤酒糟中提取FOs的效率,初步实现啤酒糟的高值化利用.

  14. Utilization of feruloyl esterase and xylanase for the degradation of brewers' spent grain%阿魏酸酯酶和木聚糖酶协同降解麦糟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李夏兰; 程珊影; 杨道秀; 方柏山

    2012-01-01

    橘青霉以麦糟为唯一碳源培养时,阿魏酸酯酶的最佳发酵时间为60 h,其酶活力可达40.8 mU/mL。在pH值为5.0、45℃、料液比1∶30(g∶mL)条件下,取47.5 U/mL的木聚糖酶粗酶液15 mL,加入1.0 g麦糟的乙醇不溶物,反应12 h后,加入40.8 U/mL的阿魏酸酯酶粗酶液15 mL再反应12 h,阿魏酸和低聚木糖释放率分别为54.1%和161 mg/g(麦糟的乙醇不溶物)。实验结果还表明,阿魏酸酯酶与木聚糖酶存在协同作用,能极大提高麦糟中阿魏酸及低聚木糖的释放率,有利于麦糟的降解。%The optimal fermentation time ofPenicillium citrinum feruloyl esterase ( PcFAE ) was 60 h and its activity was 40.8 mU/mL when the Brewers' Spent Grain ( BSG ) was used as the sole carbon source for Penicillium citrinum. One gram of alcohol-insoluble residue ( AIR ) of Brewers'spent grain ( BSG ) was processed by the solution of crude xylanase ( XG180 ) ( 47.5 U/mL, 15 mL ) for 12 hours at the condition of the material-liquid ratio 1 : 30( W/V ), pH 5.0 and 45 ℃, respectively. And then the solution of crude PcFAE ( 40.8 mU/mL )was added and the sample was processed for another 12 h. The maximum release rate of Ferulic acid ( FA ) was 54.1% and the release amount of xylooligosaccharide (XOS) was 161 mg/g (BSG-AIR), respectively. The results of our experiments showed that the release rate of FA and XOS from BSG-AIR increased significantly as the PcFAE could coordinate with the xylanase and enzymolysis process was also conducive to the degradation of BSG.

  15. Preparation of feruloyl esterase and application in feed of broiler%阿魏酸酯酶的制备及在肉鸡饲料中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨道秀; 许文江; 王林林; 蔡婀娜; 李夏兰

    2013-01-01

    为了降低饲料中非淀粉多糖质量抗营养因子,提高肉鸡对饲料养分的利用,本文研究了固态发酵阿魏酸酯酶的工艺及其对饲料养分利用率的影响。结果表明:在麦麸与麦糟质量比为2∶8、蛋白胨与酵母粉质量比为2∶4、含水量为40%、接种量为10%、培养时间为6天、培养温度为33℃条件下,阿魏酸酯酶的酶活达到了29.49 U/g,较未优化前提高了5.11倍。将浓缩后的酶液与溢多酶AF831添加入肉鸡饲料中,发现添加溢多酶及阿魏酸酯酶可以提高干物质、粗蛋白、粗灰分、酸性洗涤纤维等利用率,但作用不明显,对中性洗涤纤维改善效果极显著(P<0.01)。%To reduce non-starch polysaccharides anti-nutritional factor in feed and promote intake of nutrient,the solid-state fermentation technology of feruloyl esterase (FAE) and the influence on nutrient utilization rate were studied. Under optimized conditions of 2∶8 of the ratio for wheat bran and brewers’ spent grain (BSG),2∶4 of the ratio for peptone and yeast,40%of water content,10%of inoculum,6 days of incubation and 33 ℃ of incubation temperature,the activity of FAE was improved to five times compared to unoptimized conditions and the maximum activity was 29.49 U/g. The combination of FAE and Yiduoli enzyme was mixed in feed for broiler. FAE and Yiduoli enzyme could improve the utilization of dry matter,crude protein,crude ash,acidic detergent fiber,but the improvement was limited. The utilization of neutral detergent fiber increased markedly (P<0.01).

  16. MODE OF ACTION OF LANTANA CAMARA EXTRACTS ON ENZYMES ASPARTATE AMINO TRANSFERASE AND ALANINE AMINO TRANSFERASE ACTIVITY IN TARGET AND NONTARGET ORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIVYA RAJAN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The plant Lantana camara on the basis of study conducted found to show effective larvicidal activity. The presentstudy deals with the mode of action of Lantana camara extract on enzymes, Aspartate Amino Transferase andAlanine Amino Transferase activity in target and non-target organisms. The major transaminase system of the bodysuch as AsAT and AlAT were significantly inhibited by the plant extract. A significant decrease in the activity ofabove two enzyme systems were observed from the fourth h of incubation onwards. The transaminase system ofmosquito larvae was more sensitive to Lantana camara extract than that of vertebrate system such as Anabastestudineus and Rana hexadactyla which are the non-target organisms seen in the aquatic habitat. The majortransaminase systems of the body such as AsAT and AlAT were inhibited in a dose dependent manner under bothinvitro and invivo conditions. The change of pH from alkaline (normal larvae to acidic (intoxicated larvae, mayalso be sufficient for inhibiting or blocking most of the enzymatic reactions leading to the death of the organisms.The results of this experiment indicated that the shrub Lantana camara could be studied further in detail and itsbenificial effects to the control of vector bron diseases could be utilised for healthy environments

  17. Three-dimensional structure of a Bombyx mori Omega-class glutathione transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Suzuki, Mamoru; Higashiura, Akifumi; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2013-09-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are major phase II detoxification enzymes that play central roles in the defense against various environmental toxicants as well as oxidative stress. Here we report the crystal structure of an Omega-class glutathione transferase of Bombyx mori, bmGSTO, to gain insight into its catalytic mechanism. The structure of bmGSTO complexed with glutathione determined at a resolution of 2.5Å reveals that it exists as a dimer and is structurally similar to Omega-class GSTs with respect to its secondary and tertiary structures. Analysis of a complex between bmGSTO and glutathione showed that bound glutathione was localized to the glutathione-binding site (G-site). Site-directed mutagenesis of bmGSTO mutants indicated that amino acid residues Leu62, Lys65, Lys77, Val78, Glu91 and Ser92 in the G-site contribute to catalytic activity.

  18. Structural characterization of the catalytic site of a Nilaparvata lugens delta-class glutathione transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Higashiura, Akifumi; Hossain, Md Tofazzal; Yamada, Naotaka; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2015-01-15

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a major class of detoxification enzymes that play a central role in the defense against environmental toxicants and oxidative stress. Here, we studied the crystal structure of a delta-class glutathione transferase from Nilaparvata lugens, nlGSTD, to gain insights into its catalytic mechanism. The structure of nlGSTD in complex with glutathione, determined at a resolution of 1.7Å, revealed that it exists as a dimer and its secondary and tertiary structures are similar to those of other delta-class GSTs. Analysis of a complex between nlGSTD and glutathione showed that the bound glutathione was localized to the glutathione-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of nlGSTD mutants indicated that amino acid residues Ser11, His52, Glu66, and Phe119 contribute to catalytic activity.

  19. Isolation and characterization of Phi class glutathione transferase partial gene from Iranian barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Mohabatkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione transferases are multifunctional proteins involved in several diverse intracellular events such as primary and secondary metabolisms, signaling and stress metabolism. These enzymes have been subdivided into eight classes in plants. The Phi class, being plant specific, is the most represented. In the present study, based on the sequences available at GenBank, different primers were designed for amplifying the Phi class of glutathione transferase gene in the genome and transcriptome of Iranian barley, Karoun cultivar. After extraction of DNA and total RNA, Phi class was amplified and sequenced. Bioinformatics analysis predicted that the deduced protein sequence has two ß-sheets, eight α-helices and some intermediate loops in its secondary structure. Consequently, the sequences were submitted to NCBI GenBank with GS262333 and GW342614 accession numbers. Phylogenic relationships of the sequences were compared with existing sequences in GenBank.

  20. Lectin Domains of Polypeptide GalNAc Transferases Exhibit Glycopeptide Binding Specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Johannes W; Bennett, Eric P; Schjoldager, Katrine T-B G;

    2011-01-01

    UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide a-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-Ts) constitute a family of up to 20 transferases that initiate mucin-type O-glycosylation. The transferases are structurally composed of catalytic and lectin domains. Two modes have been identified for the selection...... of glycosylation sites by GalNAc-Ts: confined sequence recognition by the catalytic domain alone, and concerted recognition of acceptor sites and adjacent GalNAc-glycosylated sites by the catalytic and lectin domains, respectively. Thus far, only the catalytic domain has been shown to have peptide sequence...... on sequences of mucins MUC1, MUC2, MUC4, MUC5AC, MUC6, and MUC7 as well as a random glycopeptide bead library, we examined the binding properties of four different lectin domains. The lectin domains of GalNAc-T1, -T2, -T3, and -T4 bound different subsets of small glycopeptides. These results indicate...

  1. Human liver morphine UDP-glucuronyl transferase enantioselectivity and inhibition by opioid congeners and oxazepam.

    OpenAIRE

    Wahlström, A; Pacifici, G. M.; Lindström, B; Hammar, L.; Rane, A.

    1988-01-01

    1. Morphine uridine diphosphate glucuronyl transferase (UDP-GT) was studied in human liver microsomes. The (-)- and (+)-morphine enantiomers were used as substrates and inhibitors, such as oxazepam and various opioid congeners were employed to characterize the different glucuronidation pathways. The kinetics of the oxazepam inhibition were studied in the rat liver. 2. The overall glucuronidation of (+)-morphine was higher than that of (-)-morphine. The morphine congeners tested, potently inhi...

  2. Nourseothricin N-acetyl transferase: a positive selection marker for mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bose S Kochupurakkal

    Full Text Available Development of Nourseothricin N-acetyl transferase (NAT as a selection marker for mammalian cells is described. Mammalian cells are acutely susceptible to Nourseothricin, similar to the widely used drug Puromycin, and NAT allows for quick and robust selection of transfected/transduced cells in the presence of Nourseothricin. NAT is compatible with other selection markers puromycin, hygromycin, neomycin, blasticidin, and is a valuable addition to the repertoire of mammalian selection markers.

  3. Correlation Between Iron and alpha and pi Glutathione-S-Transferase Levels in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    including duodenal crypt cells and macrophages . Several well characterized mutations in this gene have been shown to increase iron levels.16 Of...genotoxic products of lipid peroxication. (1998) Biochem. J. 330:174-179. 4Townsend DM, Tew KD. “The role of glutathione-S-transferase in anti- cancer ...and ferritin.” Semin Hematol. (1998) 35:35-54. 12Iancu TC. “ Ultrastructural aspects of iron storage, transport, and metabolism.” J Neural Transm

  4. Structural insight into the active site of a Bombyx mori unclassified glutathione transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Tofazzal; Yamamoto, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are major detoxification enzymes that play central roles in the defense against various environmental toxicants as well as oxidative stress. Here, we identify amino acid residues of an unclassified GST from Bombyx mori, bmGSTu-interacting glutathione (GSH). Site-directed mutagenesis of bmGSTu mutants indicated that amino acid residues Asp103, Ser162, and Ser166 contribute to catalytic activity.

  5. Summarize of Glutathione S-transferases%谷胱甘肽S-转移酶综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张飚; 李永清; 高轩

    2006-01-01

    谷胱甘肽S-转移酶(glutathioneS-transferases,GSTs)是由多个基因编码、具有多种功能的超基因家族酶,是多种生物体内的主要解毒系统.本文综述了GSTs的分型、结构等方面的研究进展.

  6. Role of glutathione, glutathione transferase, and glutaredoxin in regulation of redox-dependent processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinina, E V; Chernov, N N; Novichkova, M D

    2014-12-01

    Over the last decade fundamentally new features have been revealed for the participation of glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes (glutathione transferase and glutaredoxin) in cell proliferation, apoptosis, protein folding, and cell signaling. Reduced glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in maintaining cellular redox status by participating in thiol-disulfide exchange, which regulates a number of cell functions including gene expression and the activity of individual enzymes and enzyme systems. Maintaining optimum GSH/GSSG ratio is essential to cell viability. Decrease in the ratio can serve as an indicator of damage to the cell redox status and of changes in redox-dependent gene regulation. Disturbance of intracellular GSH balance is observed in a number of pathologies including cancer. Consequences of inappropriate GSH/GSSG ratio include significant changes in the mechanism of cellular redox-dependent signaling controlled both nonenzymatically and enzymatically with the participation of isoforms of glutathione transferase and glutaredoxin. This review summarizes recent data on the role of glutathione, glutathione transferase, and glutaredoxin in the regulation of cellular redox-dependent processes.

  7. Structural evidence for conformational changes of Delta class glutathione transferases after ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C; Ketterman, Albert J

    2012-05-01

    We report four new crystal structures for Delta class glutathione transferases from insects. We compare these new structures as well as several previously reported structures to determine that structural transitions can be observed with ligand binding. These transitions occurred in the regions around the active site entrance, including alpha helix 2, C-terminus of alpha helix 4 including the loop to helix 5 and the C-terminus of helix 8. These structural movements have been reported or postulated to occur for several other glutathione transferase classes; however, this is the first report showing structural evidence of all these movements occurring, in this case in Delta class glutathione transferases. These fluctuations also can be observed occurring within a single structure as there is ligand bound in only one subunit and each subunit is undergoing different conformational transitions. The structural comparisons show reorganizations occur both pre- and post-GSH ligand binding communicated through the subunit interface of the quaternary assembly. Movements of these positions would allow 'breathing' of the active site for substrate entrance, topological rearrangement for varying substrate specificity and final product release.

  8. Characterization of Affinity-Purified Isoforms of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1 Glutathione Transferases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Soon Chee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione transferases (GST were purified from locally isolated bacteria, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1, by glutathione-affinity chromatography and anion exchange, and their substrate specificities were investigated. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the purified GST resolved into a single band with a molecular weight (MW of 23 kDa. 2-dimensional (2-D gel electrophoresis showed the presence of two isoforms, GST1 (pI 4.5 and GST2 (pI 6.2 with identical MW. GST1 was reactive towards ethacrynic acid, hydrogen peroxide, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, and trans,trans-hepta-2,4-dienal while GST2 was active towards all substrates except hydrogen peroxide. This demonstrated that GST1 possessed peroxidase activity which was absent in GST2. This study also showed that only GST2 was able to conjugate GSH to isoproturon, a herbicide. GST1 and GST2 were suggested to be similar to F0KLY9 (putative glutathione S-transferase and F0KKB0 (glutathione S-transferase III of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain PHEA-2, respectively.

  9. Characterization of affinity-purified isoforms of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1 glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Chin-Soon; Tan, Irene Kit-Ping; Alias, Zazali

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GST) were purified from locally isolated bacteria, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1, by glutathione-affinity chromatography and anion exchange, and their substrate specificities were investigated. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the purified GST resolved into a single band with a molecular weight (MW) of 23 kDa. 2-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis showed the presence of two isoforms, GST1 (pI 4.5) and GST2 (pI 6.2) with identical MW. GST1 was reactive towards ethacrynic acid, hydrogen peroxide, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, and trans,trans-hepta-2,4-dienal while GST2 was active towards all substrates except hydrogen peroxide. This demonstrated that GST1 possessed peroxidase activity which was absent in GST2. This study also showed that only GST2 was able to conjugate GSH to isoproturon, a herbicide. GST1 and GST2 were suggested to be similar to F0KLY9 (putative glutathione S-transferase) and F0KKB0 (glutathione S-transferase III) of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain PHEA-2, respectively.

  10. Euphorbia characias latex: micromorphology of rubber particles and rubber transferase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanò, Delia; Pintus, Francesca; Esposito, Francesca; Loche, Danilo; Floris, Giovanni; Medda, Rosaria

    2015-02-01

    We have recently characterized a natural rubber in the latex of Euphorbia characias. Following that study, we here investigated the rubber particles and rubber transferase in that Mediterranean shrub. Rubber particles, observed by scanning electron microscopy, are spherical in shape with diameter ranging from 0.02 to 1.2 μm. Washed rubber particles exhibit rubber transferase activity with a rate of radiolabeled [(14)C]IPP incorporation of 4.5 pmol min(-1)mg(-1). Denaturing electrophoresis profile of washed rubber particles reveals a single protein band of 37 kDa that is recognized in western blot analysis by antibodies raised against the synthetic peptide whose sequence, DVVIRTSGETRLSNF, is included in one of the five regions conserved among cis-prenyl chain elongation enzymes. The cDNA nucleotide sequence of E. characias rubber transferase (GenBank JX564541) and the deduced amino acid sequence appear to be highly homologous to the sequence of several plant cis-prenyltransferases.

  11. 小麦系统粉中阿拉伯木聚糖与β-木糖苷酶研究%Study on arabinoxylan andβ-xylosidase in system powder flour

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄振华; 苏东民; 苏东海; 时雨晴; 白瑞

    2014-01-01

    小麦系统粉因其出粉部位不同导致不同系统粉的各项指标具有一定的差异。该文研究了面粉中阿拉伯木聚糖(AX)、β-木糖苷酶的分布规律,及其与系统粉理化、质构指标之间的相关性。AX含量和β-木糖苷酶活性在小麦胚乳中的分布都是由内到外逐渐增加的,即1B<2B<3B,1M<2M<3M。在ρ<0.01水平上,AX与灰分为极显著相关,AX与水分、拉伸阻力显著相关;β-木糖苷酶与AX、灰分均呈显著性相关。%Wheat system flour has certain difference qualities indicators in different parts. This paper studied the distribution of arabinoxylan(abbreviated AX)andβ-xylosidase in system flour,and the correlation with flour physicochemical,texture index. AX content andβ-xylosidase activity distribution in wheat endosperm is gradually increased from the inside to the outside,1B<2B<3B,1M<2M<3M. On theρ<0.01 level,AX and ash significantly correlated,AX and water,extension resistance was positively correlated;β-xylosidase and AX,ash showed correlation.

  12. Glutathione transferase from Trichoderma virens enhances cadmium tolerance without enhancing its accumulation in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prachy Dixit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cadmium (Cd is a major heavy metal pollutant which is highly toxic to plants and animals. Vast agricultural areas worldwide are contaminated with Cd. Plants take up Cd and through the food chain it reaches humans and causes toxicity. It is ideal to develop plants tolerant to Cd, without enhanced accumulation in the edible parts for human consumption. Glutathione transferases (GST are a family of multifunctional enzymes known to have important roles in combating oxidative stresses induced by various heavy metals including Cd. Some GSTs are also known to function as glutathione peroxidases. Overexpression/heterologous expression of GSTs is expected to result in plants tolerant to heavy metals such as Cd. RESULTS: Here, we report cloning of a glutathione transferase gene from Trichoderma virens, a biocontrol fungus and introducing it into Nicotiana tabacum plants by Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. Transgenic nature of the plants was confirmed by Southern blot hybridization and expression by reverse transcription PCR. Transgene (TvGST showed single gene Mendelian inheritance. When transgenic plants expressing TvGST gene were exposed to different concentrations of Cd, they were found to be more tolerant compared to wild type plants, with transgenic plants showing lower levels of lipid peroxidation. Levels of different antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione transferase, superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, guiacol peroxidase and catalase showed enhanced levels in transgenic plants expressing TvGST compared to control plants, when exposed to Cd. Cadmium accumulation in the plant biomass in transgenic plants were similar or lower than wild-type plants. CONCLUSION: The results of the present study suggest that transgenic tobacco plants expressing a Trichoderma virens GST are more tolerant to Cd, without enhancing its accumulation in the plant biomass. It should be possible to extend the present results to crop plants for

  13. Inherited glutathione-S-transferase deficiency is a risk factor for pulmonary asbestosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C M; Kelsey, K T; Wiencke, J K; Leyden, K; Levin, S; Christiani, D C

    1994-09-01

    Pulmonary diseases attributable to asbestos exposure constitute a significant public health burden, yet few studies have investigated potential genetic determinants of susceptibility to asbestos-related diseases. The glutathione-S-transferases are a family of conjugating enzymes that both catalyze the detoxification of a variety of potentially cytotoxic electrophilic agents and act in the generation of sulfadipeptide leukotriene inflammatory mediators. The gene encoding glutathione-S-transferase class mu (GSTM-1) is polymorphic; approximately 50% of Caucasian individuals have a homozygous deletion of this gene and do not produce functional enzyme. Glutathione-S-transferase mu (GST-mu) deficiency has been previously reported to be associated with smoking-induced lung cancer. We conducted a cross-sectional study to examine the prevalence of the homozygous deletion for the GSTM-1 gene in members of the carpentry trade occupationally exposed to asbestos. Members of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America attending their 1991 National Union conference were invited to participate. Each participant was offered a chest X-ray and was asked to complete a comprehensive questionnaire and have their blood drawn. All radiographs were assessed for the presence of pneumoconiosis in a blinded fashion by a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health-certified International Labor Office "B" reader. Individual GSTM-1 status was determined using polymerase chain reaction methods. Six hundred fifty-eight workers were studied. Of these, 80 (12.2%) had X-ray abnormalities associated with asbestos exposure. Individuals genetically deficient in GST-mu were significantly more likely to have radiographic evidence of nonmalignant asbestos-related disease than those who were not deficient (chi 2 = 5.0; P < 0.03).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Functional Diversification of Fungal Glutathione Transferases from the Ure2p Class

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Thuillier; Ngadin, Andrew A.; Cécile Thion; Patrick Billard; Jean-Pierre Jacquot; Eric Gelhaye; Mélanie Morel

    2011-01-01

    The glutathione-S-transferase (GST) proteins represent an extended family involved in detoxification processes. They are divided into various classes with high diversity in various organisms. The Ure2p class is especially expanded in saprophytic fungi compared to other fungi. This class is subdivided into two subclasses named Ure2pA and Ure2pB, which have rapidly diversified among fungal phyla. We have focused our analysis on Basidiomycetes and used Phanerochaete chrysosporium as a model to c...

  15. Mechanism of activation of mouse liver microsomal glutations S—transferase by paracetamol treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhenY; LouYJ

    2002-01-01

    Microsomal glutathion S-transferase(mGST) is one of the important detoxifcation enzymes in vivo,its modifying activation by drugs has been paid more attention to in pertinent field recently.This study was to explore the influence of paracetamol(Par) on mGST and its possible mechanism in vivo,and to further reveal the biological significance.Par is metabolized to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine(NAPQI) by CYP2E1 and mGST is activated by sulfhydryl modification.

  16. Glutathione-binding site of a bombyx mori theta-class glutathione transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M D Tofazzal; Yamada, Naotaka; Yamamoto, Kohji

    2014-01-01

    The glutathione transferase (GST) superfamily plays key roles in the detoxification of various xenobiotics. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a silkworm protein belonging to a previously reported theta-class GST family. The enzyme (bmGSTT) catalyzes the reaction of glutathione with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, 1,2-epoxy-3-(4-nitrophenoxy)-propane, and 4-nitrophenethyl bromide. Mutagenesis of highly conserved residues in the catalytic site revealed that Glu66 and Ser67 are important for enzymatic function. These results provide insights into the catalysis of glutathione conjugation in silkworm by bmGSTT and into the metabolism of exogenous chemical agents.

  17. Glutathione transferases as mediators of signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborde, E

    2010-09-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are enzymes that catalyze the conjugation of glutathione (GSH) to a variety of electrophilic substances. Their best known role is as cell housekeepers engaged in the detoxification of xenobiotics. Recently, GSTs have also been shown to act as modulators of signal transduction pathways that control cell proliferation and cell death. Their involvement in cancer cell growth and differentiation, and in the development of resistance to anticancer agents, has made them attractive drug targets. This review is focused on the inhibition of GSTs, in particular GSTP1-1, as a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer and other diseases associated with aberrant cell proliferation.

  18. Micronuclei rate and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase mutation in radon-exposed rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengmei Cui; Saijun Fan; Mingjiang Hu; Jihua Nie; Hongmei Li; Jian Tong

    2008-01-01

    The genetic changes in rats with radon exposure were studied by the micronucleus technology and detection of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) mutations.The rate of the micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes and tracheal-bronchial epithelial cells in the radon-inhaled rats was higher than that of the controls (P < 0.05).A similar result was obtained from the hprt assay,which showed a higher mutation frequency in radon-exposed rats.Our results suggested that micronuclei rate and hprt deficiency could be used as biomarkers for the genetic changes with radon exposure.

  19. Rescue of Drosophila Melanogaster l(2)35Aa lethality is only mediated by polypeptide GalNAc-transferase pgant35A, but not by the evolutionary conserved human ortholog GalNAc-transferase-T11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Eric P; Chen, Ya-Wen; Schwientek, Tilo;

    2010-01-01

    conserved family of genes encoding polypeptide GalNAc-transferases. Phylogenetic and functional analyses have proposed that subfamilies of orthologous GalNAc-transferase genes are conserved in species, suggesting that they serve distinct functions in vivo. Based on sequence alignments, pgant35A and human......)35Aa lethality. By use of genetic "domain swapping" experiments we demonstrate, that lack of rescue was not caused by inappropriate sub-cellular targeting of functionally active GalNAc-T11. Collectively our results show, that fly embryogenesis specifically requires functional pgant35A......, and that the presence of this gene product during fly embryogenesis is functionally distinct from other Drosophila GalNAc-transferase isoforms and from the proposed human ortholog GALNT11....

  20. Riboswitch control of induction of aminoglycoside resistance acetyl and adenyl-transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Weizhi; Zhang, Xuhui; Zhang, Jun; Jia, Xu; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Wenxia; Jiang, Hengyi; Chen, Dongrong; Murchie, Alastair I H

    2013-08-01

    The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by human pathogens poses a significant threat to public health. The mechanisms that control the proliferation and expression of antibiotic resistance genes are not yet completely understood. The aminoglycosides are a historically important class of antibiotics that were introduced in the 1940s. Aminoglycoside resistance is conferred most commonly through enzymatic modification of the drug or enzymatic modification of the target rRNA through methylation or through the overexpression of efflux pumps. In our recent paper, we reported that expression of the aminoglycoside resistance genes encoding the aminoglycoside acetyl transferase (AAC) and aminoglycoside adenyl transferase (AAD) enzymes was controlled by an aminoglycoside-sensing riboswitch RNA. This riboswitch is embedded in the leader RNA of the aac/aad genes and is associated with the integron cassette system. The leader RNA can sense and bind specific aminoglycosides such that the binding causes a structural transition in the leader RNA, which leads to the induction of aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance. Specific aminoglycosides induce reporter gene expression mediated by the leader RNA. Aminoglycoside RNA binding was measured directly and, aminoglycoside-induced changes in RNA structure monitored by chemical probing. UV cross-linking and mutational analysis identified potential aminoglycoside binding sites on the RNA.

  1. Selective inhibitors of glutathione transferase P1 with trioxane structure as anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bräutigam, Maria; Teusch, Nicole; Schenk, Tobias; Sheikh, Miriam; Aricioglu, Rocky Z; Borowski, Swantje H; Neudörfl, Jörg-Martin; Baumann, Ulrich; Griesbeck, Axel G; Pietsch, Markus

    2015-04-01

    The response to chemotherapy in cancer patients is frequently compromised by drug resistance. Although chemoresistance is a multifactorial phenomenon, many studies have demonstrated that altered drug metabolism through the expression of phase II conjugating enzymes, including glutathione transferases (GSTs), in tumor cells can be directly correlated with resistance against a wide range of marketed anticancer drugs. In particular, overexpression of glutathione transferase P1 (GSTP1) appears to be a factor for poor prognosis during cancer therapy. Former and ongoing clinical trials have confirmed GSTP1 inhibition as a principle for antitumor therapy. A new series of 1,2,4-trioxane GSTP1 inhibitors were designed via a type II photooxygenation route of allylic alcohols followed by acid-catalyzed peroxyacetalization with aldehydes. A set of novel inhibitors exhibit low micromolar to high nanomolar inhibition of GSTP1, revealing preliminary SAR for further lead optimization. Importantly, high selectivity over another two human GST classes (GSTA1 and GSTM2) has been achieved. The trioxane GSTP1 inhibitors may therefore serve as a basis for the development of novel drug candidates in overcoming chemoresistance.

  2. Substrate profiling of glutathione S-transferase with engineered enzymes and matched glutathione analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shan; Zhang, Lei; Adilijiang, Gulishana; Liu, Jieyuan; Luo, Minkui; Deng, Haiteng

    2014-07-01

    The identification of specific substrates of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) is important for understanding drug metabolism. A method termed bioorthogonal identification of GST substrates (BIGS) was developed, in which a reduced glutathione (GSH) analogue was developed for recognition by a rationally engineered GST to label the substrates of the corresponding native GST. A K44G-W40A-R41A mutant (GST-KWR) of the mu-class glutathione S-transferases GSTM1 was shown to be active with a clickable GSH analogue (GSH-R1) as the cosubstrate. The GSH-R1 conjugation products can react with an azido-based biotin probe for ready enrichment and MS identification. Proof-of-principle studies were carried to detect the products of GSH-R1 conjugation to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and dopamine quinone. The BIGS technology was then used to identify GSTM1 substrates in the Chinese herbal medicine Ganmaocongji.

  3. Binding properties of ferrocene-glutathione conjugates as inhibitors and sensors for glutathione S-transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos-Maldonado, Manuel C; Casas-Solvas, Juan M; Téllez-Sanz, Ramiro; Mesa-Valle, Concepción; Quesada-Soriano, Indalecio; García-Maroto, Federico; Vargas-Berenguel, Antonio; García-Fuentes, Luís

    2012-02-01

    The binding properties of two electroactive glutathione-ferrocene conjugates that consist in glutathione attached to one or both of the cyclopentadienyl rings of ferrocene (GSFc and GSFcSG), to Schistosoma japonica glutathione S-transferase (SjGST) were studied by spectroscopy fluorescence, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Such ferrocene conjugates resulted to be competitive inhibitors of glutathione S-transferase with an increased binding affinity relative to the natural substrate glutathione (GSH). We found that the conjugate having two glutathione units (GSFcSG) exhibits an affinity for SjGST approximately two orders of magnitude higher than GSH. Furthermore, it shows negative cooperativity with the affinity for the second binding site two orders of magnitude lower than that for the first one. We propose that the reason for such negative cooperativity is steric since, i) the obtained thermodynamic parameters do not indicate profound conformational changes upon GSFcSG binding and ii) docking studies have shown that, when bound, part of the first bound ligand invades the second site due to its large size. In addition, voltammetric measurements show a strong decrease of the peak current upon binding of ferrocene-glutathione conjugates to SjGST and provide very similar K values than those obtained by ITC. Moreover, the sensing ability, expressed by the sensitivity parameter shows that GSFcSG is much more sensitive than GSFc, for the detection of SjGST.

  4. Indication for joint replacement and glutathione s-transferases M1 and T1 genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Torsten; Selinski, Silvia; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    In most patients with osteoarthritis (OA), therapy-resistant pain is the indication for hip or knee replacement. Glutathione S-transferases, particularly glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1), are involved in metabolism of highly reactive metabolites that may be generated by inflammatory processes. In total, 148 patients with indication for hip or knee replacement and 129 patients of the same hospital without indication for joint replacement were genotyped for GSTM1 and GSTT1 and interviewed by a newly developed questionnaire for occupational and nonoccupational risk factors of hip and/or knee osteoarthritis. Mean age was 70.9 yr in OA cases and 67.4 yr in controls. The frequency of GSTM1 negative in the OA case group was (45%) in the lower range compared to values in Caucasian general population (approximately 50%), whereas the frequency in the controls was normal (51%). The frequency of GSTT1 negative genotype in OA cases and controls was normal. The normal distribution of the GSTM1 negative genotype in patients with indication for hip or knee replacement indicates that the role GSTM1 in these patients is different from that in other aseptic inflammatory diseases such as ozone-related inflammatory reactions of the respiratory tract.

  5. Miners compensated for pneumoconiosis and glutathione s-transferases M1 and T1 genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Anna; Ebbinghaus, Rainer; Prager, Hans-Martin; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inhalation of quartz-containing dust produces reversible inflammatory changes in lungs resulting in irreversible fibrotic changes termed pneumoconiosis. Due to the inflammatory process in the lungs, highly reactive substances are released that may be detoxified by glutathione S-transferases. Therefore, 90 hard coal miners with pneumoconiosis as a recognized occupational disease (in Germany: Berufskrankheit BK 4101) were genotyped for glutathione S-transferases M1 (GSTM1) and T1 (GSTT1) according to standard methods. Furthermore, occupational exposure and smoking habits were assessed by questionnaire. Changes in a chest x-ray were classified according to ILO classification 2000. Of the investigated hard coal miners 43% were GSTM1 negative whereas 57% were GSTM1 positive. The arithmetic mean of the age at time of investigation was 74.2 yr (range: 42-87 yr). Seventy-four percent of the hard coal miners reported being ever smokers, while 26% denied smoking. All hard coal miners provided pneumoconiosis-related changes in the chest x-ray. The observed frequency of GSTM1 negative hard coal miners was not different from frequencies reported for general Caucasian populations and in agreement with findings reported for Chinese coal miners. In contrast, in a former study, 16 of 19 German hard coal miners (84%) with urinary bladder cancer displayed a GSTM1 negative genotype. The outcome of this study provides evidence that severely occupationally exposed Caucasian hard coal miners do not present an elevated level of GSTM1 negative individuals.

  6. Characterization of glutathione S-transferase from dwarf pine needles (Pinus mugo Turra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, P; Rennenberg, H

    1992-09-01

    Glutathione S-transferase activity conjugating xenobiotics with glutathione (GSH) was found in extracts from needles of dwarf pine (Pinus mugo Turra). In vivo incubation of needle segments with the herbicide fluorodifen at 25 degrees C resulted in conversion of the xenobiotic to water-soluble products at initial rates of 0.7 nmol h(-1) g(fw) (-1). At 15 degrees C, the initial rate of product formation was decreased to 0.1 nmol h(-1) g(fw) (-1). In vitro conjugation studies with chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB) as model substrates gave apparent K(m) values of 0.5 mM GSH and 1.14 mM CDNB in the GSH/CDNB system and 0.3 mM GSH and 0.44 mM DCNB in the GSH/DCNB system. The pH optimum was between 7.7 and 7.9 for both the GSH/CDNB and the GSH/DCNB systems. The temperature optimum for these model substrates was between 30 and 35 degrees C, and only minute amounts of enzyme activity were detected at 15 degrees C. The activation energy in the temperature range of 15 to 30 degrees C was 46 kJ mol(-1). Dwarf pine glutathione S-transferase exhibited an approximate molecular weight of 52 kD.

  7. Evolutionary divergence of Ure2pA glutathione transferases in wood degrading fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roret, Thomas; Thuillier, Anne; Favier, Frédérique; Gelhaye, Eric; Didierjean, Claude; Morel-Rouhier, Mélanie

    2015-10-01

    The intracellular systems of detoxification are crucial for the survival of wood degrading fungi. Within these systems, glutathione transferases could play a major role since this family of enzymes is specifically extended in lignolytic fungi. In particular the Ure2p class represents one third of the total GST number in Phanerochaete chrysosporium. These proteins have been phylogenetically split into two subclasses called Ure2pA and Ure2pB. Ure2pB can be classified as Nu GSTs because of shared structural and functional features with previously characterized bacterial isoforms. Ure2pA can rather be qualified as Nu-like GSTs since they exhibit a number of differences. Ure2pA possess a classical transferase activity, a more divergent catalytic site and a higher structural flexibility for some of them, compared to Nu GSTs. The characterization of four members of this Ure2pA subclass (PcUre2pA4, PcUre2pA5, PcUre2pA6 and PcUre2pA8) revealed specific functional and structural features, suggesting that these enzymes have rapidly evolved and differentiated, probably to adapt to the complex chemical environment associated with wood decomposition.

  8. Catalytic and structural diversity of the fluazifop-inducible glutathione transferases from Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronopoulou, Evangelia; Madesis, Panagiotis; Asimakopoulou, Basiliki; Platis, Dimitrios; Tsaftaris, Athanasios; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2012-06-01

    Plant glutathione transferases (GSTs) comprise a large family of inducible enzymes that play important roles in stress tolerance and herbicide detoxification. Treatment of Phaseolus vulgaris leaves with the aryloxyphenoxypropionic herbicide fluazifop-p-butyl resulted in induction of GST activities. Three inducible GST isoenzymes were identified and separated by affinity chromatography. Their full-length cDNAs with complete open reading frame were isolated using RACE-RT and information from N-terminal amino acid sequences. Analysis of the cDNA clones showed that the deduced amino acid sequences share high homology with GSTs that belong to phi and tau classes. The three isoenzymes were expressed in E. coli and their substrate specificity was determined towards 20 different substrates. The results showed that the fluazifop-inducible glutathione transferases from P. vulgaris (PvGSTs) catalyze a broad range of reactions and exhibit quite varied substrate specificity. Molecular modeling and structural analysis was used to identify key structural characteristics and to provide insights into the substrate specificity and the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes. These results provide new insights into catalytic and structural diversity of GSTs and the detoxifying mechanism used by P. vulgaris.

  9. Expression of glutathione transferases in corneal cell lines, corneal tissues and a human cornea construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölln, Christian; Reichl, Stephan

    2016-06-15

    Glutathione transferase (GST) expression and activity were examined in a three-dimensional human cornea construct and were compared to those of excised animal corneas. The objective of this study was to characterize phase II enzyme expression in the cornea construct with respect to its utility as an alternative to animal cornea models. The expression of the GSTO1-1 and GSTP1-1 enzymes was investigated using immunofluorescence staining and western blotting. The level of total glutathione transferase activity was determined using 1-chloro-2,4- dinitrobenzene as the substrate. Furthermore, the levels of GSTO1-1 and GSTP1-1 activity were examined using S-(4-nitrophenacyl)glutathione and ethacrynic acid, respectively, as the specific substrates. The expression and activity levels of these enzymes were examined in the epithelium, stroma and endothelium, the three main cellular layers of the cornea. In summary, the investigated enzymes were detected at both the protein and functional levels in the cornea construct and the excised animal corneas. However, the enzymatic activity levels of the human cornea construct were lower than those of the animal corneas.

  10. Structural determinants of glutathione transferases with azathioprine activity identified by DNA shuffling of alpha class members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtovic, Sanela; Modén, Olof; Shokeer, Abeer; Mannervik, Bengt

    2008-02-01

    A library of alpha class glutathione transferases (GSTs), composed of chimeric enzymes derived from human (A1-1, A2-2 and A3-3), bovine (A1-1) and rat (A2-2 and A3-3) cDNA sequences was constructed by the method of DNA shuffling. The GST variants were screened in bacterial lysates for activity with the immunosuppressive agent azathioprine, a prodrug that is transformed into its active form, 6-mercaptopurine, by reaction with the tripeptide glutathione catalyzed by GSTs. Important structural determinants for activity with azathioprine were recognized by means of primary structure analysis and activities of purified enzymes chosen from the screening. The amino acid sequences could be divided into 23 exchangeable segments on the basis of the primary structures of 45 chosen clones. Segments 2, 20, 21, and 22 were identified as primary determinants of the azathioprine activity representing two of the regions forming the substrate-binding H-site. Segments 21 and 22 are situated in the C-terminal helix characterizing alpha class GSTs, which is instrumental in their catalytic function. The study demonstrates the power of DNA shuffling in identifying segments of primary structure that are important for catalytic activity with a targeted substrate. GSTs in combination with azathioprine have potential as selectable markers for use in gene therapy. Knowledge of activity-determining segments in the structure is valuable in the protein engineering of glutathione transferase for enhanced or suppressed activity.

  11. Mitochondrial glutathione transferases involving a new function for membrane permeability transition pore regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniya, Yoko; Imaizumi, Naoki

    2011-05-01

    The mitochondria in mammalian cells are a predominant resource of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are produced during respiration-coupled oxidative metabolism or various chemical stresses. End-products from membrane-lipid peroxidation caused by ROS are highly toxic, thereby their elimination/scavenging are protective of mitochondria and cells against oxidative damages. In mitochondria, soluble (kappa, alpha, mu, pi, zeta) and membrane-bound glutathione transferases (GSTs) (MGST1) are distributed. Mitochondrial GSTs display both glutathione transferase and peroxidase activities that detoxify such harmful products through glutathione (GSH) conjugation or GSH-mediated peroxide reduction. Some GST isoenzymes are induced by oxidative stress, an adaptation mechanism for the protection of cells from oxidative stress. Membrane-bound MGST1 is activated through the thiol modification in oxidative conditions. Protective action of MGST1 against oxidative stress has been confirmed using MCF7 cells highly expressed of MGST1. In recent years, mitochondria have been recognized as a regulator of cell death via both apoptosis and necrosis, where oxidative stress-induced alteration of the membrane permeability is an important step. Recent studies have shown that MGST1 in the inner mitochondrial membrane could interact with the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) regulator proteins, such as adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) and/or cyclophilin D, and could contribute to oxidant-induced MPT pores. Interaction of GST alpha with ANT has also been shown. In this review, functions of the mitochondrial GSTs, including a new role for mitochondria-mediated cell death, are described.

  12. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Harshavardhanan; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Kim, HyeRan; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-07-27

    Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Currently, understanding of their function(s) during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST) and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible) under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT) and cold susceptible (CS) lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants.

  13. Isoenzyme profile of glutathione transferases in transitional cell carcinoma of upper urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matic, Marija; Simic, Tatjana; Dragicevic, Dejan; Mimic-Oka, Jasmina; Pljesa-Ercegovac, Marija; Savic-Radojevic, Ana

    2010-05-01

    Upregulated glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) plays an important role in the resistance to apoptosis in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder (UB) and represents a potential target for chemotherapeutic agents. Our aim was to perform a systematic investigation of a glutathione S-transferase (GST) isoenzyme profile (GSTM, GSTP1, and GSTT1) in the upper urinary tract (UUT) TCC and compare it with the GST isoenzyme pattern of the UB TCC and normal urothelium. We examined GST activity spectrophotometrically by using substrates for the overall GST activity, GSTP1, and GSTT1 in the cytosolic fraction. GSTP1 and GSTM expression was analyzed by Western blotting. The results obtained have shown that the overall GST activity was significantly higher in UUT TCC in comparison with urothelium (P0.05). We conclude that 3 major cytosolic GST classes, GSTM, GSTP1, and GSTT1, are expressed in the UUT TCC. The isoenzyme profile of GST in the UUT TCC is similar to that observed in the UB TCC; it shows essentially the same alteration of the GST phenotype in the course of cancerization. The association of GSTT1 and GSTP1 upregulation with the malignant phenotype of the UUT TCC might result in resistances to both chemotherapy and apoptosis.

  14. Functional Diversification of Fungal Glutathione Transferases from the Ure2p Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Thuillier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The glutathione-S-transferase (GST proteins represent an extended family involved in detoxification processes. They are divided into various classes with high diversity in various organisms. The Ure2p class is especially expanded in saprophytic fungi compared to other fungi. This class is subdivided into two subclasses named Ure2pA and Ure2pB, which have rapidly diversified among fungal phyla. We have focused our analysis on Basidiomycetes and used Phanerochaete chrysosporium as a model to correlate the sequence diversity with the functional diversity of these glutathione transferases. The results show that among the nine isoforms found in P. chrysosporium, two belonging to Ure2pA subclass are exclusively expressed at the transcriptional level in presence of polycyclic aromatic compounds. Moreover, we have highlighted differential catalytic activities and substrate specificities between Ure2pA and Ure2pB isoforms. This diversity of sequence and function suggests that fungal Ure2p sequences have evolved rapidly in response to environmental constraints.

  15. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshavardhanan Vijayakumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18 are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS. Currently, understanding of their function(s during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT and cold susceptible (CS lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants.

  16. Functional diversification of fungal glutathione transferases from the ure2p class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuillier, Anne; Ngadin, Andrew A; Thion, Cécile; Billard, Patrick; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Gelhaye, Eric; Morel, Mélanie

    2011-01-01

    The glutathione-S-transferase (GST) proteins represent an extended family involved in detoxification processes. They are divided into various classes with high diversity in various organisms. The Ure2p class is especially expanded in saprophytic fungi compared to other fungi. This class is subdivided into two subclasses named Ure2pA and Ure2pB, which have rapidly diversified among fungal phyla. We have focused our analysis on Basidiomycetes and used Phanerochaete chrysosporium as a model to correlate the sequence diversity with the functional diversity of these glutathione transferases. The results show that among the nine isoforms found in P. chrysosporium, two belonging to Ure2pA subclass are exclusively expressed at the transcriptional level in presence of polycyclic aromatic compounds. Moreover, we have highlighted differential catalytic activities and substrate specificities between Ure2pA and Ure2pB isoforms. This diversity of sequence and function suggests that fungal Ure2p sequences have evolved rapidly in response to environmental constraints.

  17. Lectin domains of polypeptide GalNAc transferases exhibit glycopeptide binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Johannes W; Bennett, Eric P; Schjoldager, Katrine T-B G; Meldal, Morten; Holmér, Andreas P; Blixt, Ola; Cló, Emiliano; Levery, Steven B; Clausen, Henrik; Wandall, Hans H

    2011-09-16

    UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide α-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-Ts) constitute a family of up to 20 transferases that initiate mucin-type O-glycosylation. The transferases are structurally composed of catalytic and lectin domains. Two modes have been identified for the selection of glycosylation sites by GalNAc-Ts: confined sequence recognition by the catalytic domain alone, and concerted recognition of acceptor sites and adjacent GalNAc-glycosylated sites by the catalytic and lectin domains, respectively. Thus far, only the catalytic domain has been shown to have peptide sequence specificity, whereas the primary function of the lectin domain is to increase affinity to previously glycosylated substrates. Whether the lectin domain also has peptide sequence selectivity has remained unclear. Using a glycopeptide array with a library of synthetic and recombinant glycopeptides based on sequences of mucins MUC1, MUC2, MUC4, MUC5AC, MUC6, and MUC7 as well as a random glycopeptide bead library, we examined the binding properties of four different lectin domains. The lectin domains of GalNAc-T1, -T2, -T3, and -T4 bound different subsets of small glycopeptides. These results indicate an additional level of complexity in the initiation step of O-glycosylation by GalNAc-Ts.

  18. High yield production of myristoylated Arf6 small GTPase by recombinant N-myristoyl transferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padovani, Dominique; Zeghouf, Mahel; Traverso, José A.; Giglione, Carmela; Cherfils, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Small GTP-binding proteins of the Arf family (Arf GTPases) interact with multiple cellular partners and with membranes to regulate intracellular traffic and organelle structure. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms requires in vitro biochemical assays to test for regulations and functions. Such assays should use proteins in their cellular form, which carry a myristoyl lipid attached in N-terminus. N-myristoylation of recombinant Arf GTPases can be achieved by co-expression in E. coli with a eukaryotic N-myristoyl transferase. However, purifying myristoylated Arf GTPases is difficult and has a poor overall yield. Here we show that human Arf6 can be N-myristoylated in vitro by recombinant N-myristoyl transferases from different eukaryotic species. The catalytic efficiency depended strongly on the guanine nucleotide state and was highest for Arf6-GTP. Large-scale production of highly pure N-myristoylated Arf6 could be achieved, which was fully functional for liposome-binding and EFA6-stimulated nucleotide exchange assays. This establishes in vitro myristoylation as a novel and simple method that could be used to produce other myristoylated Arf and Arf-like GTPases for biochemical assays. PMID:23319116

  19. Characterisation of the Candida albicans Phosphopantetheinyl Transferase Ppt2 as a Potential Antifungal Drug Target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine S Dobb

    Full Text Available Antifungal drugs acting via new mechanisms of action are urgently needed to combat the increasing numbers of severe fungal infections caused by pathogens such as Candida albicans. The phosphopantetheinyl transferase of Aspergillus fumigatus, encoded by the essential gene pptB, has previously been identified as a potential antifungal target. This study investigated the function of its orthologue in C. albicans, PPT2/C1_09480W by placing one allele under the control of the regulatable MET3 promoter, and deleting the remaining allele. The phenotypes of this conditional null mutant showed that, as in A. fumigatus, the gene PPT2 is essential for growth in C. albicans, thus fulfilling one aspect of an efficient antifungal target. The catalytic activity of Ppt2 as a phosphopantetheinyl transferase and the acyl carrier protein Acp1 as a substrate were demonstrated in a fluorescence transfer assay, using recombinant Ppt2 and Acp1 produced and purified from E.coli. A fluorescence polarisation assay amenable to high-throughput screening was also developed. Therefore we have identified Ppt2 as a broad-spectrum novel antifungal target and developed tools to identify inhibitors as potentially new antifungal compounds.

  20. Structure of Human O-GlcNAc Transferase and its Complex with a Peptide Substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Lazarus; Y Nam; J Jiang; P Sliz; S Walker

    2011-12-31

    The essential mammalian enzyme O-linked {beta}-N-acetylglucosamine transferase (O-GlcNAc transferase, here OGT) couples metabolic status to the regulation of a wide variety of cellular signalling pathways by acting as a nutrient sensor. OGT catalyses the transfer of N-acetylglucosamine from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) to serines and threonines of cytoplasmic, nuclear and mitochondrial proteins, including numerous transcription factors, tumour suppressors, kinases, phosphatases and histone-modifying proteins. Aberrant glycosylation by OGT has been linked to insulin resistance, diabetic complications, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's. Despite the importance of OGT, the details of how it recognizes and glycosylates its protein substrates are largely unknown. We report here two crystal structures of human OGT, as a binary complex with UDP (2.8 {angstrom} resolution) and as a ternary complex with UDP and a peptide substrate (1.95 {angstrom}). The structures provide clues to the enzyme mechanism, show how OGT recognizes target peptide sequences, and reveal the fold of the unique domain between the two halves of the catalytic region. This information will accelerate the rational design of biological experiments to investigate OGT's functions; it will also help the design of inhibitors for use as cellular probes and help to assess its potential as a therapeutic target.

  1. Conductimetric assays for the hydrolase and transferase activities of phospholipase D enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezna, M; Lawrence, A J

    1994-05-01

    Measurement of solution electrical conductance (conductimetry) is a simple direct assay method for the protogenic, hydrolytic reactions catalyzed by all phospholipase enzymes. The technique is especially suitable for assay of phospholipase D (PLD) enzymes where cleavage of zwitterionic substrates reinforces the pH dependent conductance change and allows the method to be used over a much wider pH range than the equivalent titrimetric assay. The ability to detect zwitterion cleavage enables the method to assay reactions in which phospholipase D transfers neutral, or anionic, alcohol species to the zwitterionic substrates phosphatidyl choline and phosphatidyl ethanolamine. The method can follow the sequential attack by different phospholipases and provides a simple technique for investigating the effect of substrate structure on susceptibility to various phospholipase enzymes. The results confirm that PLD from Streptomyces chromofuscus can attack lysophospholipids, but cannot transfer primary alcohols to the phosphatidyl residue, while the PLD from savoy cabbage is an efficient transferase, but cannot attack lysophospholipids. The data suggest that the bacterial PLD fails to act as a transferase because it hydrolyzes the transphosphatidylation products. Some phosphatidyl alcohols are more highly susceptible to PLA2 attack than the parent phosphatidyl choline derivatives.

  2. IDENTIFYING GENES CONTROLLING FERULATE CROSS-LINKING FORMATION IN GRASS CELL WALLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de O Buanafina, Marcia Maria

    2013-10-16

    formation or genes encoding transcription factors that control feruloylation. So it will require further investigations to confirm if we have a mutation on the ferulloyltransferase gene(s). We have also identified severe phenotypes which showed a significant change in the level of cell wall ferulates and sugars and have not survived. As this genotype did not reach flowering stage there was no seed production and so further analysis could not be done. 3. Candidate Gene Approach: Because of the likely long time expected to generate and identify candidate with mutation(s) on the feruloyltransferase gene, from our screening, we have in addition taken a bioinformatics approach in order to try to identify candidates gene(s) involved in feruloylation. Homologues of the rice feruloyl transferase genes belonging to Pfam PF02458 family were identified in Brachypodium distachyon by blasting EST sequences of putative rice arabinoxylan feruloyl transferase genes against Brachypodium and homologous sequences identified were tested for their expression level in Brachypodium. Sequences of the two Brachypodium genes, which showed highest expression and similarity to rice sequences, were used to design primers for construction of RNAi and over-expression vectors. These were transformed into Brachypodium using Agrobacterium transformation and plants generated have been analyzed for levels of cell wall ferulates and diferulates over generations T0 to T2 or T3. Our data shows a significant reduction if ferulates monomers and dimers from plants generated from RNAi::BdAT2 over 2-3 generations indicating that this gene might be a positive candidate for feruloylation in Brachypodium. However when BdAT2 was up regulated there was not much increase in the level of ferulates as would be expected. This lack of effect on the level of cell wall ferulates could be due to the CaMV::35S promoter used to drive the expression of the putative BdAT2 gene. We have shown previously that Aspergillus FAEA

  3. A cytosolic glutathione s-transferase, GST-theta from freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii: molecular and biochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arockiaraj, Jesu; Gnanam, Annie J; Palanisamy, Rajesh; Bhatt, Prasanth; Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Chaurasia, Mukesh Kumar; Pasupuleti, Mukesh; Ramaswamy, Harikrishnan; Arasu, Abirami; Sathyamoorthi, Akila

    2014-08-10

    Glutathione S-transferases play an important role in cellular detoxification and may have evolved to protect cells against reactive oxygen metabolites. In this study, we report the molecular characterization of glutathione s-transferase-theta (GST-θ) from freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. A full length cDNA of GSTT (1417 base pairs) was isolated and characterized bioinformatically. Exposure to virus (white spot syndrome baculovirus or M. rosenbergii nodovirus), bacteria (Aeromonas hydrophila or Vibrio harveyi) or heavy metals (cadmium or lead) significantly increased the expression of GSTT (Prosenbergii GST-θ in detoxification and possibly conferring immune protection.

  4. A study of the prognostic role of serum fucose and fucosyl transferase in cancer of the uterine cervix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen,Urmi

    1985-04-01

    Full Text Available Serum fucose levels and fucosyl transferase activities have been designated as nonspecific markers of malignancy, and play an important role in the diagnosis of different types of malignancies. In the present study, attempts were made to determine the prognostic significance of these markers in patients with cancer of the uterine cervix after therapy. It was found that both serum fucose and fucosyl transferase, which were elevated in untreated patients declined significantly in patients responsive to therapy at different follow-up intervals, but not in patients unresponsive to therapy.

  5. Crystal structure of Glycine max glutathione transferase in complex with glutathione: investigation of the mechanism operating by the Tau class glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axarli, Irene; Dhavala, Prathusha; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2009-08-13

    Cytosolic GSTs (glutathione transferases) are a multifunctional group of enzymes widely distributed in Nature and involved in cellular detoxification processes. The three-dimensional structure of GmGSTU4-4 (Glycine max GST Tau 4-4) complexed with GSH was determined by the molecular replacement method at 2.7 A (1 A=0.1 nm) resolution. The bound GSH is located in a region formed by the beginning of alpha-helices H1, H2 and H3 in the N-terminal domain of the enzyme. Significant differences in the G-site (GSH-binding site) as compared with the structure determined in complex with Nb-GSH [S-(p-nitrobenzyl)-glutathione] were found. These differences were identified in the hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic interaction pattern and, consequently, GSH was found bound in two different conformations. In one subunit, the enzyme forms a complex with the ionized form of GSH, whereas in the other subunit it can form a complex with the non-ionized form. However, only the ionized form of GSH may form a productive and catalytically competent complex. Furthermore, a comparison of the GSH-bound structure with the Nb-GSH-bound structure shows a significant movement of the upper part of alpha-helix H4 and the C-terminal. This indicates an intrasubunit modulation between the G-site and the H-site (electrophile-binding site), suggesting that the enzyme recognizes the xenobiotic substrates by an induced-fit mechanism. The reorganization of Arg111 and Tyr107 upon xenobiotic substrate binding appears to govern the intrasubunit structural communication between the G- and H-site and the binding of GSH. The structural observations were further verified by steady-state kinetic analysis and site-directed mutagenesis studies.

  6. Response of Glutathione and Glutathione S-transferase in Rice Seedlings Exposed to Cadmium Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chun-hua; GE Ying

    2008-01-01

    A hydroponic culture experiment was done to investigate the effect of Cd stress on glutathione content(GSH)and glutathione S-transferase(GST,EC 2.5.1.18)activity in rice seedlings.The rice growth was severely inhibited when Cd level in the solution was higher than 10 mg/L.In rice shoots,GSH content and GST activity increased with the increasing Cd level,while in roots,GST was obviously inhibited by Cd treatments.Compared with shoots,the rice roots had higher GSH content and GST activity,indicating the ability of Cd detoxification was much higher in roots than in shoots.There was a significant correlation between Cd level and GSH content or GST activity,suggesting that both parameters may be used as biomarkers of Cd stress in rice.

  7. Differential roles of tau class glutathione S-transferases in oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilili, Kimiti G; Atanassova, Neli; Vardanyan, Alla

    2004-01-01

    . The different LeGSTUs exhibited varied substrate specificity and showed activity against oxidative stress by-products, indicating that their prooxidant protective function is likely related to the minimization of oxidative damage. Taken together, these results indicate that Tau class GSTs participate in a broad......The plant glutathione S-transferase BI-GST has been identified as a potent inhibitor of Bax lethality in yeast, a phenotype associated with oxidative stress and disruption of mitochondrial functions. Screening of a tomato two-hybrid library for BI-GST interacting proteins identified five homologous...... Tau class GSTs, which readily form heterodimers between them and BI-GST. All six LeGSTUs were found to be able to protect yeast cells from prooxidant-induced cell death. The efficiency of each LeGSTU was prooxidant-specific, indicating a different role for each LeGSTU in the oxidative stress...

  8. Rab geranylgeranyl transferase β subunit is essential for male fertility and tip growth in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutkowska, Malgorzata; Wnuk, Marta; Nowakowska, Julita; Lichocka, Malgorzata; Stronkowski, Michal M; Swiezewska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Rab proteins, key players in vesicular transport in all eukaryotic cells, are post-translationally modified by lipid moieties. Two geranylgeranyl groups are attached to the Rab protein by the heterodimeric enzyme Rab geranylgeranyl transferase (RGT) αβ. Partial impairment in this enzyme activity in Arabidopsis, by disruption of the AtRGTB1 gene, is known to influence plant stature and disturb gravitropic and light responses. Here it is shown that mutations in each of the RGTB genes cause a tip growth defect, visible as root hair and pollen tube deformations. Moreover, FM 1-43 styryl dye endocytosis and recycling are affected in the mutant root hairs. Finally, it is demonstrated that the double mutant, with both AtRGTB genes disrupted, is non-viable due to absolute male sterility. Doubly mutated pollen is shrunken, has an abnormal exine structure, and shows strong disorganization of internal membranes, particularly of the endoplasmic reticulum system.

  9. Glutathione-binding site of a bombyx mori theta-class glutathione transferase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M D Tofazzal Hossain

    Full Text Available The glutathione transferase (GST superfamily plays key roles in the detoxification of various xenobiotics. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a silkworm protein belonging to a previously reported theta-class GST family. The enzyme (bmGSTT catalyzes the reaction of glutathione with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, 1,2-epoxy-3-(4-nitrophenoxy-propane, and 4-nitrophenethyl bromide. Mutagenesis of highly conserved residues in the catalytic site revealed that Glu66 and Ser67 are important for enzymatic function. These results provide insights into the catalysis of glutathione conjugation in silkworm by bmGSTT and into the metabolism of exogenous chemical agents.

  10. Urinary gamma-glutamyl transferase as an indicator of acute nephrotoxicity in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierickx, P.J.

    1981-06-01

    A series of nephrotoxic compounds dissolved in 0.9% NaCl was given to groups of five male Wistar rats in a single i.p. injection. Mercuric acetate and mercuric trifluoroacetate at 1 mg Hg/kg induced a sharp increase in urinary gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) activity on day 1, followed by a decrease below control values on day 3. Sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate induced a relatively small urinary GGT increase, explained by its low Hg-bioavailability. An increased urinary GGT activity was noted after treatment with the aminoglycoside antibiotics kanamycin, neomycin, paramomycin, and streptomycin, ammonium fluoride, potassium bichromate, sodium tetrathionate, and cis-diamminedichloroplatinum. This was lower than for the mercury compounds, but clearly different from the controls. The urinary GGT increase was an acute phenomenon. It is concluded that the measurement of urinary GGT can be used as an indicator of acute nephrotoxicity.

  11. Atypical features of a Ure2p glutathione transferase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuillier, Anne; Roret, Thomas; Favier, Frédérique; Gelhaye, Eric; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Didierjean, Claude; Morel-Rouhier, Mélanie

    2013-07-11

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are known to transfer glutathione onto small hydrophobic molecules in detoxification reactions. The GST Ure2pB1 from Phanerochaete chrysosporium exhibits atypical features, i.e. the presence of two glutathione binding sites and a high affinity towards oxidized glutathione. Moreover, PcUre2pB1 is able to efficiently deglutathionylate GS-phenacylacetophenone. Catalysis is not mediated by the cysteines of the protein but rather by the one of glutathione and an asparagine residue plays a key role in glutathione stabilization. Interestingly PcUre2pB1 interacts in vitro with a GST of the omega class. These properties are discussed in the physiological context of wood degrading fungi.

  12. Pharmacogenetics of azathioprine in inflammatory bowel disease: a role for glutathione-S-transferase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocco, Gabriele; Pelin, Marco; Franca, Raffaella; De Iudicibus, Sara; Cuzzoni, Eva; Favretto, Diego; Martelossi, Stefano; Ventura, Alessandro; Decorti, Giuliana

    2014-04-01

    Azathioprine is a purine antimetabolite drug commonly used to treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In vivo it is active after reaction with reduced glutathione (GSH) and conversion to mercaptopurine. Although this reaction may occur spontaneously, the presence of isoforms M and A of the enzyme glutathione-S-transferase (GST) may increase its speed. Indeed, in pediatric patients with IBD, deletion of GST-M1, which determines reduced enzymatic activity, was recently associated with reduced sensitivity to azathioprine and reduced production of azathioprine active metabolites. In addition to increase the activation of azathioprine to mercaptopurine, GSTs may contribute to azathioprine effects even by modulating GSH consumption, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Therefore, genetic polymorphisms in genes for GSTs may be useful to predict response to azathioprine even if more in vitro and clinical validation studies are needed.

  13. Glutathione S-transferases of 28kDa as major vaccine candidates against schistosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Riveau

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available For the development of vaccine strategies to generate efficient protection against chronic infections such as parasitic diseases, and more precisely schistosomiasis, controlling pathology could be more relevant than controlling the infection itself. Such strategies, motivated by the need for a cost-effective complement to existing control measures, should focus on parasite molecules involved in fecundity, because in metazoan parasite infections pathology is usually linked to the output of viable eggs. In numerous animal models, vaccination with glutathione S-transferases of 28kDa has been shown to generate an immune response strongly limiting the worm fecundity, in addition to the reduction of the parasite burden. Recent data on acquired immunity directed to 28GST in infected human populations, and new development to draw adapted vaccine formulations, are presented.

  14. Glutathione transferases immobilized on nanoporous alumina: flow system kinetics, screening, and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellander, Marcus; Mazari, Aslam M A; Boman, Mats; Mannervik, Bengt; Johansson, Gunnar

    2014-02-01

    The previously uncharacterized Drosophila melanogaster Epsilon-class glutathione transferases E6 and E7 were immobilized on nanoporous alumina. The nanoporous anodized alumina membranes were derivatized with 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane, and the amino groups were activated with carbonyldiimidazole to allow coupling of the enzymes via ε-amino groups. Kinetic analyses of the immobilized enzymes were carried out in a circulating flow system using CDNB (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene) as substrate, followed by specificity screening with alternative substrates. A good correlation was observed between the substrate screening data for immobilized enzyme and corresponding data for the enzyme in solution. A limited kinetic study was also carried out on immobilized human GST S1-1 (also known as hematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase). The stability of the immobilized enzymes was virtually identical to that of enzymes in solution, and no leakage of enzyme from the matrix could be observed.

  15. Theoretical Study on GSH Activation Mechanism of a New Type of Glutathione Transferase Gtt2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xue; WU Yun-jian; LI Zhuo; CHU Wen-ting; ZHANG Hong-xing; ZHENG Qing-chuan

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione transferases(GSTs) play an important role in the detoxification of xenobiotic/endobiotic toxic compounds.The a-,π-,and μ-classes of cytosolic GSTs have been studied extensively,while Gtt2 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae,a novel atypical GST,is still poorly understood.In the present study,we investigated the glutathione(GSH) activation mechanism of Gtt2 using the density functional theory(DFT) with the hybrid functional B3LYP.The computational results show that a water molecule could assist a proton transfer between the GSH thiol and the N atom of His133.The energy barrier of proton transfer is 46.0 kJ/mol.The GSH activation mechanism and the characteristics of active site are different from those of classic cytosolic GSTs.

  16. Glutathione transferases are structural and functional outliers in the thioredoxin fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Holly J; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2009-11-24

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are ubiquitous scavengers of toxic compounds that fall, structurally and functionally, within the thioredoxin fold suprafamily. The fundamental catalytic capability of GSTs is catalysis of the nucleophilic addition or substitution of glutathione at electrophilic centers in a wide range of small electrophilic compounds. While specific GSTs have been studied in detail, little else is known about the structural and functional relationships between different groupings of GSTs. Through a global analysis of sequence and structural similarity, it was determined that variation in the binding of glutathione between the two major subgroups of cytosolic (soluble) GSTs results in a different mode of glutathione activation. Additionally, the convergent features of glutathione binding between cytosolic GSTs and mitochondrial GST kappa are described. The identification of these structural and functional themes helps to illuminate some of the fundamental contributions of the thioredoxin fold to catalysis in the GSTs and clarify how the thioredoxin fold can be modified to enable new functions.

  17. Diversification of fungal specific class a glutathione transferases in saprotrophic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Yann; Prosper, Pascalita; Favier, Frédérique; Harvengt, Luc; Didierjean, Claude; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Morel-Rouhier, Mélanie; Gelhaye, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) form a superfamily of multifunctional proteins with essential roles in cellular detoxification processes and endogenous metabolism. The distribution of fungal-specific class A GSTs was investigated in saprotrophic fungi revealing a recent diversification within this class. Biochemical characterization of eight GSTFuA isoforms from Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Coprinus cinereus demonstrated functional diversity in saprotrophic fungi. The three-dimensional structures of three P. chrysosporium isoforms feature structural differences explaining the functional diversity of these enzymes. Competition experiments between fluorescent probes, and various molecules, showed that these GSTs function as ligandins with various small aromatic compounds, derived from lignin degradation or not, at a L-site overlapping the glutathione binding pocket. By combining genomic data with structural and biochemical determinations, we propose that this class of GST has evolved in response to environmental constraints induced by wood chemistry.

  18. Diversification of fungal specific class a glutathione transferases in saprotrophic fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Mathieu

    Full Text Available Glutathione transferases (GSTs form a superfamily of multifunctional proteins with essential roles in cellular detoxification processes and endogenous metabolism. The distribution of fungal-specific class A GSTs was investigated in saprotrophic fungi revealing a recent diversification within this class. Biochemical characterization of eight GSTFuA isoforms from Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Coprinus cinereus demonstrated functional diversity in saprotrophic fungi. The three-dimensional structures of three P. chrysosporium isoforms feature structural differences explaining the functional diversity of these enzymes. Competition experiments between fluorescent probes, and various molecules, showed that these GSTs function as ligandins with various small aromatic compounds, derived from lignin degradation or not, at a L-site overlapping the glutathione binding pocket. By combining genomic data with structural and biochemical determinations, we propose that this class of GST has evolved in response to environmental constraints induced by wood chemistry.

  19. Chemical proteomics with sulfonyl fluoride probes reveals selective labeling of functional tyrosines in glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Christian; Shannon, D Alexander; Colby, Tom; Wang, Zheming; Shabab, Mohammed; Kumari, Selva; Villamor, Joji Grace; McLaughlin, Christopher J; Weerapana, Eranthie; Kaiser, Markus; Cravatt, Benjamin F; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2013-04-18

    Chemical probes have great potential for identifying functional residues in proteins in crude proteomes. Here we studied labeling sites of chemical probes based on sulfonyl fluorides (SFs) on plant and animal proteomes. Besides serine proteases and many other proteins, SF-based probes label Tyr residues in glutathione transferases (GSTs). The labeled GSTs represent four different GST classes that share less than 30% sequence identity. The targeted Tyr residues are located at similar positions in the promiscuous substrate binding site and are essential for GST function. The high selectivity of SF-based probes for functional Tyr residues in GSTs illustrates how these probes can be used for functional studies of GSTs and other proteins in crude proteomes.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of glutathione transferases from cyanobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feil, Susanne C.; Tang, Julian; Hansen, Guido; Gorman, Michael A.; Wiktelius, Eric; Stenberg, Gun; Parker, Michael W.; (SVIMR-A); (Uppsala)

    2009-05-08

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a group of multifunctional enzymes that are found in animals, plants and microorganisms. Their primary function is to remove toxins derived from exogenous sources or the products of metabolism from the cell. Mammalian GSTs have been extensively studied, in contrast to bacterial GSTs which have received relatively scant attention. A new class of GSTs called Chi has recently been identified in cyanobacteria. Chi GSTs exhibit a high glutathionylation activity towards isothiocyanates, compounds that are normally found in plants. Here, the crystallization of two GSTs are presented: TeGST produced by Thermosynechococcus elongates BP-1 and SeGST from Synechococcus elongates PCC 6301. Both enzymes formed crystals that diffracted to high resolution and appeared to be suitable for further X-ray diffraction studies. The structures of these GSTs may shed further light on the evolution of GST catalytic activity and in particular why these enzymes possess catalytic activity towards plant antimicrobial compounds.

  1. Irreversible Inhibition of Glutathione S-Transferase by Phenethyl Isothiocyanate (PEITC), a Dietary Cancer Chemopreventive Phytochemical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Vandana; Dyba, Marzena A.; Holland, Ryan J.; Liang, Yu-He; Singh, Shivendra V.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary isothiocyanates abundant as glucosinolate precursors in many edible cruciferous vegetables are effective for prevention of cancer in chemically-induced and transgenic rodent models. Some of these agents, including phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), have already advanced to clinical investigations. The primary route of isothiocyanate metabolism is its conjugation with glutathione (GSH), a reaction catalyzed by glutathione S-transferase (GST). The pi class GST of subunit type 1 (hGSTP1) is much more effective than the alpha class GST of subunit type 1 (hGSTA1) in catalyzing the conjugation. Here, we report the crystal structures of hGSTP1 and hGSTA1 each in complex with the GSH adduct of PEITC. We find that PEITC also covalently modifies the cysteine side chains of GST, which irreversibly inhibits enzymatic activity. PMID:27684484

  2. Molybdenum and tungsten oxygen transferases--and functional diversity within a common active site motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushie, M Jake; Cotelesage, Julien J; George, Graham N

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum and tungsten are the only second and third-row transition elements with a known function in living organisms. The molybdenum and tungsten enzymes show common structural features, with the metal being bound by a pyranopterin-dithiolene cofactor called molybdopterin. They catalyze a variety of oxygen transferase reactions coupled with two-electron redox chemistry in which the metal cycles between the +6 and +4 oxidation states usually with water, either product or substrate, providing the oxygen. The functional roles filled by the molybdenum and tungsten enzymes are diverse; for example, they play essential roles in microbial respiration, in the uptake of nitrogen in green plants, and in human health. Together, the enzymes form a superfamily which is among the most prevalent known, being found in all kingdoms of life. This review discusses what is known of the active site structures and the mechanisms, together with some recent insights into the evolution of these important enzyme systems.

  3. Biochemical properties of an omega-class glutathione S-transferase of the silkmoth, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Nagaoka, Sumiharu; Banno, Yutaka; Aso, Yoichi

    2009-05-01

    A cDNA encoding an omega-class glutathione S-transferase of the silkmoth, Bombyx mori (bmGSTO), was cloned by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The resulting clone was sequenced and deduced for amino acid sequence, which revealed 40, 40, and 39% identities to omega-class GSTs from human, pig, and mouse, respectively. A recombinant protein (rbmGSTO) was functionally overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells in a soluble form and purified to homogeneity. rbmGSTO was able to catalyze the biotranslation of glutathione with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, a model substrate for GST, as well as with 4-hydroxynonenal, a product of lipid peroxidation. This enzyme was shown to have high affinity for organophosphorus insecticide and was present abundantly in silkmoth strain exhibiting fenitrothion resistance. These results indicate that bmGSTO could be involved in the increase in level of insecticide resistance for lepidopteran insects.

  4. Catalysis of Silver catfish Major Hepatic Glutathione Transferase proceeds via rapid equilibrium sequential random Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodele O. Kolawole

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fish hepatic glutathione transferases are connected with the elimination of intracellular pollutants and detoxification of organic micro-pollutants in their aquatic ecosystem. The two-substrate steady state kinetic mechanism of Silver catfish (Synodontis eupterus major hepatic glutathione transferases purified to apparent homogeneity was explored. The enzyme was dimeric enzyme with a monomeric size of 25.6 kDa. Initial-velocity studies and Product inhibition patterns by methyl glutathione and chloride with respect to GSH-CDNB; GSH-ρ-nitrophenylacetate; and GSH-Ethacrynic acid all conforms to a rapid equilibrium sequential random Bi Bi kinetic mechanism rather than steady state sequential random Bi Bi kinetic. α was 2.96 ± 0.35 for the model. The pH profile of Vmax/KM (with saturating 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and variable GSH concentrations showed apparent pKa value of 6.88 and 9.86. Inhibition studies as a function of inhibitor concentration show that the enzyme is a homodimer and near neutral GST. The enzyme poorly conjugates 4-hydroxylnonenal and cumene hydroperoxide and may not be involved in oxidative stress protection. The seGST is unique and overwhelmingly shows characteristics similar to those of homodimeric class Pi GSTs, as was indicated by its kinetic mechanism, substrate specificity and inhibition studies. The rate- limiting step, probably the product release, of the reaction is viscosity-dependent and is consequential if macro-viscosogen or micro-viscosogen.

  5. A glutathione transferase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens reveals a novel class of bacterial GST superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skopelitou, Katholiki; Dhavala, Prathusha; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, we report a novel class of glutathione transferases (GSTs) originated from the pathogenic soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58, with structural and catalytic properties not observed previously in prokaryotic and eukaryotic GST isoenzymes. A GST-like sequence from A. tumefaciens C58 (Atu3701) with low similarity to other characterized GST family of enzymes was identified. Phylogenetic analysis showed that it belongs to a distinct GST class not previously described and restricted only in soil bacteria, called the Eta class (H). This enzyme (designated as AtuGSTH1-1) was cloned and expressed in E. coli and its structural and catalytic properties were investigated. Functional analysis showed that AtuGSTH1-1 exhibits significant transferase activity against the common substrates aryl halides, as well as very high peroxidase activity towards organic hydroperoxides. The crystal structure of AtuGSTH1-1 was determined at 1.4 Å resolution in complex with S-(p-nitrobenzyl)-glutathione (Nb-GSH). Although AtuGSTH1-1 adopts the canonical GST fold, sequence and structural characteristics distinct from previously characterized GSTs were identified. The absence of the classic catalytic essential residues (Tyr, Ser, Cys) distinguishes AtuGSTH1-1 from all other cytosolic GSTs of known structure and function. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that instead of the classic catalytic residues, an Arg residue (Arg34), an electron-sharing network, and a bridge of a network of water molecules may form the basis of the catalytic mechanism. Comparative sequence analysis, structural information, and site-directed mutagenesis in combination with kinetic analysis showed that Phe22, Ser25, and Arg187 are additional important residues for the enzyme's catalytic efficiency and specificity.

  6. A glutathione transferase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens reveals a novel class of bacterial GST superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katholiki Skopelitou

    Full Text Available In the present work, we report a novel class of glutathione transferases (GSTs originated from the pathogenic soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58, with structural and catalytic properties not observed previously in prokaryotic and eukaryotic GST isoenzymes. A GST-like sequence from A. tumefaciens C58 (Atu3701 with low similarity to other characterized GST family of enzymes was identified. Phylogenetic analysis showed that it belongs to a distinct GST class not previously described and restricted only in soil bacteria, called the Eta class (H. This enzyme (designated as AtuGSTH1-1 was cloned and expressed in E. coli and its structural and catalytic properties were investigated. Functional analysis showed that AtuGSTH1-1 exhibits significant transferase activity against the common substrates aryl halides, as well as very high peroxidase activity towards organic hydroperoxides. The crystal structure of AtuGSTH1-1 was determined at 1.4 Å resolution in complex with S-(p-nitrobenzyl-glutathione (Nb-GSH. Although AtuGSTH1-1 adopts the canonical GST fold, sequence and structural characteristics distinct from previously characterized GSTs were identified. The absence of the classic catalytic essential residues (Tyr, Ser, Cys distinguishes AtuGSTH1-1 from all other cytosolic GSTs of known structure and function. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that instead of the classic catalytic residues, an Arg residue (Arg34, an electron-sharing network, and a bridge of a network of water molecules may form the basis of the catalytic mechanism. Comparative sequence analysis, structural information, and site-directed mutagenesis in combination with kinetic analysis showed that Phe22, Ser25, and Arg187 are additional important residues for the enzyme's catalytic efficiency and specificity.

  7. Serum glutathione transferase does not respond to indole-3-carbinol: A pilot study

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    Daniel R McGrath

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Daniel R McGrath1, Hamid Frydoonfar2, Joshua J Hunt3, Chris J Dunkley3, Allan D Spigelman41Ipswich Hospital, Ipswich, UK; 2Hunter Pathology Service, New South Wales; 3Royal Newcastle Centre, Newcastle; 4St Vincent’s Clinical School, Sydney, AustraliaBackground: Despite the well recognized protective effect of cruciferous vegetables against various cancers, including human colorectal cancers, little is known about how this effect is conferred. It is thought that some phytochemicals found only in these vegetables confer the protection. These compounds include the glucosinolates, of which indole-3-carbinol is one. They are known to induce carcinogen-metabolizing (phase II enzymes, including the glutathione S-transferase (GST family. Other effects in humans are not well documented. We wished to assess the effect of indole-3-carbinol on GST enzymes.Methods: We carried out a placebo-controlled human volunteer study. All patients were given 400 mg daily of indole-3-carbinol for three months, followed by placebo. Serum samples were tested for the GSTM1 genotype by polymerase chain reaction. Serum GST levels were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western Blot methodologies.Results: Forty-nine volunteers completed the study. GSTM1 genotypes were obtained for all but two volunteers. A slightly greater proportion of volunteers were GSTM1-positive, in keeping with the general population. GST was detected in all patients. Total GST level was not affected by indole-3-carbinol dosing compared with placebo. Although not statistically significant, the GSTM1 genotype affected the serum GST level response to indole-3-carbinol.Conclusion: Indole-3-carbinol does not alter total serum GST levels during prolonged dosing.Keywords: pilot study, colorectal cancer, glutathione transferase, human, indole-3-carbinol

  8. ANALISIS ENZIM ALANIN AMINO TRANSFERASE (ALAT, ASPARTAT AMINO TRANSFERASE (ASAT, UREA DARAH, DAN HISTOPATOLOGIS HATI DAN GINJAL TIKUS PUTIH GALUR Sprague-Dawley SETELAH PEMBERIAN ANGKAK [The Effects of Angkak Administration in Sprague-Dawley White Rats on Alanine Amino Transferase (ALAT and Aspartic Amino Transferase (ASAT Enzyme, Blood Urea, and Liver and Kidney Histopathology Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HASIM DANURI

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute toxicity of angkak had been tested on 2 months aged male Sprague-Dawley white rats. Twenty five rats were divided into 5 groups; control, 2.5 g/kg body weight (bw, 5 g/kg bw, 10 g/kg bw and 15 g/kg bw, and each group was administered by angkak in water orally. The toxic effect of angkak to liver and kidney were tested by biochemical analysis for the activity of enzyme alanin amino transferase (ALAT/ EC 2.6.1.2, enzyme aspartate amino transferase (ASAT/ EC 2.6.1.1 and the level of urea in blood at one day before (H-1 and after (H+1 the treatment, as well as 6 days after the treatment (H+6. The mortality rate and clinical symptoms were observed after 24 hours until 6 days after treatment. The rats were necropsied to observe the lesion of liver and kidney both macroscopically and microscopically.The result shows that all rats still survived since 24 hours to 6 days after the test. During the treatment with ad libitum rat chow contained 18% protein, the body weight of the rats were unsignificantly increased (P>0.05. There were no changed of the appetite, eyes condition, fur, and behaviour of the rats. However, the feces of the rats which were treated with angkak are reddish. The activity of ALAT, ASAT enzyme as well as the urea level in blood were significantly increased as shown on H+1 compared to H-1 within all treatment groups, after that there were no significant changes in those parameter on H+6 compared to H+1. The histopathological result due to angkak on kidney shows less lesions and these lesions were reversible.

  9. Systemic catechol-O-methyl transferase inhibition enables the D1 agonist radiotracer R-[11C]SKF 82957

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palner, Mikael; McCormick, Patrick; Parkes, Jun;

    2010-01-01

    R-[(11)C]-SKF 82957 is a high-affinity and potent dopamine D(1) receptor agonist radioligand, which gives rise to a brain-penetrant lipophilic metabolite. In this study, we demonstrate that systemic administration of catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) inhibitors blocks this metabolic pathway...

  10. The glutathione-S-transferase Mu 1 null genotype modulates ozone-induced airway inflammation in humans*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The Glutathione-S-Transferase Mu 1 null genotype has been reported to be a risk factor for acute respiratory disease associated with increases in ambient air ozone. Ozone is known to cause an immediate decrease in lung function and increased airway inflammation. Howev...

  11. Tet Proteins Connect the O-Linked N-acetylglucosamine Transferase Ogt to Chromatin in Embryonic Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vella, Pietro; Scelfo, Andrea; Jammula, Sriganesh;

    2013-01-01

    O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase (Ogt) activity is essential for embryonic stem cell (ESC) viability and mouse development. Ogt is present both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of different cell types and catalyzes serine and threonine glycosylation. We have characterized...

  12. Characterization of the hydrophobic substrate-binding site of the bacterial beta class glutathione transferase from Proteus mirabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Luca; Masulli, Michele; Di Ilio, Carmine; Allocati, Nerino

    2010-09-01

    Since their discovery, bacterial glutathione (GSH)transferases have been characterized in terms of their ability to catalyse a variety of different reactions on a large set of toxic molecules of xenobiotic or endobiotic origin. Furthermore the contribution of different residues in the GSH-binding site to GSH activation has been extensively investigated. Little is known, however, about the contribution to catalysis and overall stability of single residues shaping the hydrophobic co-substrate binding site (H-site). Here we tackle this problem by site-directed mutagenesis of residues facing the H-site in the bacterial beta class GSH transferase from Proteus mirabilis. We investigate the behaviour of these mutants under a variety of conditions and analyse their activity against several co-substrates, representative of the different reactions catalyzed by bacterial GSH transferases. Our work shows that mutations at the H-site can be used to modulate activity at the level of the different catalytic mechanisms operating on the chosen substrates, each mutation showing a different fingerprint. This work paves the way for future studies aimed at improving the catalytic properties of beta class GSH transferases against selected substrates for bioremediation purposes.

  13. Function and phylogeny of bacterial butyryl-CoA:acetate transferases and their diversity in the proximal colon of swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studying the host-associated butyrate-producing bacterial community is important because butyrate is essential for colonic homeostasis and gut health. Previous research has identified the butyryl-coA:acetate transferase (2.3.8.3) as a the main gene for butyrate production in intestinal ecosystems; h...

  14. CT-GalNAc transferase overexpression in adult mice is associated with extrasynaptic utrophin in skeletal muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durko, Margaret; Allen, Carol; Nalbantoglu, Josephine; Karpati, George

    2010-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetic muscle disease characterized by the absence of sub-sarcolemmal dystrophin that results in muscle fibre necrosis, progressive muscle wasting and is fatal. Numerous experimental studies with dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, an animal model for the disease, have demonstrated that extrasynaptic upregulation of utrophin, an analogue of dystrophin, can prevent muscle fibre deterioration and reduce or negate the dystrophic phenotype. A different approach for ectopic expression of utrophin relies on augmentation of CT-GalNAc transferase in muscle fibre. We investigated whether CT-GalNAc transferase overexpression in adult mice influence appearance of utrophin in the extrasynaptic sarcolemma. After electrotransfer of plasmid DNA carrying an expression cassette of CT-GalNAc transferase into tibialis anterior muscle of wild type and dystrophic mice, muscle sections were examined by immunofluorescence. CT-GalNAc transgene expression augmented sarcolemmal carbohydrate glycosylation and was accompanied by extrasynaptic utrophin. A 6-week time course study showed that the highest efficiency of utrophin overexpression in a plasmid harboured muscle fibres was 32.2% in CD-1 and 52% in mdx mice, 2 and 4 weeks after CT-GalNAc gene transfer, respectively. The study provides evidence that postnatal CT-GalNAc transferase overexpression stimulates utrophin upregulation that is inherently beneficial for muscle structure and strength restoration. Thus CT-GalNAc may provide an important therapeutic molecule for treatment of dystrophin deficiency in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  15. Selection of Arabidopsis mutants overexpressing genes driven by the promoter of an auxin-inducible glutathione S-transferase gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kop, D.A.M. van der; Schuyer, M.; Pinas, J.E.; Zaal, B.J. van der; Hooykaas, P.J.J.

    1999-01-01

    Transgenic arabidopsis plants were isolated that contained a T-DNA construct in which the promoter of an auxin-inducible glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene from tobacco was fused to the kanamycin resistance (nptII) as well as to the β-glucuronidase (gusA) reporter gene. Subsequently, seeds were tr

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of a novel series of farnesyl protein transferase inhibitors as non-peptidic CAAX tetrapeptide analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Michel; Maraval, Catherine; Dumond, Stephan; Lamothe, Marie; Schambel, Philippe; Etiévant, Chantal; Hill, Bridget

    2003-04-17

    A novel series of compounds, derived from 4-amino-phenyl piperazine, has been designed to selectively inhibit farnesyl protein transferase (FPTase) as CAAX tetrapeptide analogues. Certain of these compounds were shown to possess low nanomolar inhibitory activity both against the isolated enzyme and in cultured cells.

  17. Common genotypic polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferases in mild and severe falciparum malaria in Tanzanian children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kavishe, R.A.; Bousema, T.; Shekalaghe, S.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Mosha, F.W.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Russel, F.G.M.; Koenderink, J.B.

    2009-01-01

    Malaria infection induces oxidative stress in the host cells. Antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are responsible for fighting reactive oxygen species and reduction of oxidative stress. Common GST polymorphisms have been associated with susceptibility to different diseases

  18. QTL Mapping for Arabinoxylans Content and Its Relationship with Processing Quality in Common Wheat%小麦阿拉伯木聚糖含量的QTL分析及其与品质性状的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨莉; 黄玉莲; 常萍; 阎俊; 张业伦; 夏先春; 田宇兵; 何中虎; 张勇

    2014-01-01

    Arabinoxylans (AX) are the hydrophilic nonstarch polysaccharides in wheat grain, and they play a critical role in food processing and nutrition quality. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for water-extractable (WE-AX) and total AX (TOT-AX) contents were identified and mapped using 240 recombinant inbred lines (RILs, F2:6) derived from the cross between PH82-2 and Neixiang 188. Besides, relationships between WE-AX and TOT-AX contents and protein content, Mixograph and Rapid Viscosity Analyzer (RVA) parameters were evaluated. Inclusive composite interval mapping identified five QTLs for TOT-AX content on chromo-somes 1B, 4B, 5B, 5D, and 6B, which explained 5.6%-18.7%of the phenotypic variations. Five QTLs associated with WE-AX content were mapped on chromosomes 1A, 1B, 5B, 6B, and 7A, explaining 4.3%-34.9%of the phenotypic variation. QTLs for TOT-AX content on chromosomes 1B, 5B, and 6B shared identical marker intervals with those for WE-AX content. 1BL/1RS translocation affected both TOT-AX and WE-AX contents, whereas, grain hardness only affected WE-AX content. TOT-AX con-tent had significant correlations with RVA parameters including peak viscosity, breakdown, final viscosity, setback, and Chinese White Salted Noodle quality traits (springness and flavor), but the correlation coefficients were influenced by 1BL/1RS transloca-tion and the type of grain hardness.%阿拉伯木聚糖是小麦中最重要的非淀粉多糖,对营养和加工品质有重要影响。采用 IciMapping 软件,对PH82-2/内乡188重组自交系群体(F2:6)的水溶性和总阿拉伯木聚糖含量进行QTL分析,在1B、4B、5B、5D和6B染色体上定位5个控制总阿拉伯木聚糖含量的QTL,分别解释5.6%~18.7%的表型变异;在1A、1B、5B、6B和7A染色体上定位5个控制水溶性阿拉伯木聚糖含量的QTL,分别解释4.3%~34.9%的表型变异。其中,1B、5B和6B染色体上影响水溶性和总阿拉伯木聚糖含量的QTL位于同一标记区间。1BL/1RS

  19. Heterologous expression and functional characterization of avian mu-class glutathione S-transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunderson, Brett R; Kim, Ji Eun; Croasdell, Amanda; Mendoza, Kristelle M; Reed, Kent M; Coulombe, Roger A

    2013-08-01

    Hepatic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs: EC2.5.1.1.8) catalyze the detoxification of reactive electrophilic compounds, many of which are toxic and carcinogenic intermediates, via conjugation with the endogenous tripeptide glutathione (GSH). Glutathione S-transferase (GST)-mediated detoxification is a critical determinant of species susceptibility to the toxic and carcinogenic mycotoxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), which in resistant animals efficiently detoxifies the toxic intermediate produced by hepatic cytochrome P450 bioactivation, the exo-AFB1-8,9-epoxide (AFBO). Domestic turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) are one of the most sensitive animals known to AFB1, a condition associated with a deficiency of hepatic GST-mediated detoxification of AFBO. We have recently shown that unlike their domestic counterparts, wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris), which are relatively resistant, express hepatic GST-mediated detoxification activity toward AFBO. Because of the importance of GSTs in species susceptibility, and to explore possible GST classes involved in AFB1 detoxification, we amplified, cloned, expressed and functionally characterized the hepatic mu-class GSTs tGSTM3 (GenBank accession no. JF340152), tGSTM4 (JF340153) from domestic turkeys, and a GSTM4 variant (ewGSTM4, JF340154) from Eastern wild turkeys. Predicted molecular masses of tGSTM3 and two tGSTM4 variants were 25.6 and 25.8kDa, respectively. Multiple sequence comparisons revealed four GSTM motifs and the mu-loop in both proteins. tGSTM4 has 89% amino acid sequence identity to chicken GSTM2, while tGSTM3 has 73% sequence identity to human GSTM3 (hGSTM3). Specific activities of Escherichia coli-expressed tGSTM3 toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and peroxidase activity toward cumene hydroperoxide were five-fold greater than tGSTM4 while tGSTM4 possessed more than three-fold greater activity toward 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB). The two enzymes displayed equal activity toward ethacrynic acid (ECA

  20. Orotate phosphoribosyl transferase mRNA expression and the response of cholangiocarcinoma to 5-fluorouracil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chariya Hahnvajanawong; Jariya Chaiyagool; Wunchana Seubwai; Vajarabhongsa Bhudhisawasdi; Nisana Namwat; Narong Khuntikeo; Banchob Sripa

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To determine whether expression of certain enzymes related to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) metabolism predicts 5-FU chemosensitivity in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA).METHODS:The histoculture drug response assay (HDRA) was performed using surgically resected CCA tissues.Tumor cell viability was determined morphologically with hematoxylin and eosin-and terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling-stained tissues.The mRNA expression of thymidine phosphorylase (TP),orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRT),thymidylate synthase (TS),and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) was determined with realtime reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction.The levels of gene expression and the sensitivity to 5-FU were evaluated.RESULTS:Twenty-three CCA tissues were obtained from patients who had been diagnosed with intrahepatic CCA and who underwent surgical resection at Srinagarind Hospital,Khon Kaen University from 2007 to 2009.HDRA was used to determine the response of these CCA tissues to 5-FU.Based on the dose-response curve,200 μg/mL 5-FU was selected as the test concentration.The percentage of inhibition index at the median point was selected as the cut-off point to differentiate the responding and non-responding tumors to 5-FU.When the relationship between TP,OPRT,TS and DPD mRNA expression levels and the sensitivity of CCA tissues to 5-FU was examined,only OPRT mRNA expression was significantly correlated with the response to 5-FU.The mean expression level of OPRT was significantly higher in the responder group compared to the non-responder group (0.41 ± 0.25 vs 0.22 ± 0.12,P < 0.05).CONCLUSION:OPRT mRNA expression may be a useful predictor of 5-FU chemosensitivity of CCA.Whether OPRT mRNA could be used to predict the success of 5-FU chemotherapy in CCA patients requires confirmation in patients.

  1. Thiamine diphosphate adenylyl transferase from E. coli: functional characterization of the enzyme synthesizing adenosine thiamine triphosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brans Alain

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently identified a new thiamine derivative, adenosine thiamine triphosphate (AThTP, in E. coli. In intact bacteria, this nucleotide is synthesized only in the absence of a metabolizable carbon source and quickly disappears as soon as the cells receive a carbon source such as glucose. Thus, we hypothesized that AThTP may be a signal produced in response to carbon starvation. Results Here we show that, in bacterial extracts, the biosynthesis of AThTP is carried out from thiamine diphosphate (ThDP and ADP or ATP by a soluble high molecular mass nucleotidyl transferase. We partially purified this enzyme and characterized some of its functional properties. The enzyme activity had an absolute requirement for divalent metal ions, such as Mn2+ or Mg2+, as well as for a heat-stable soluble activator present in bacterial extracts. The enzyme has a pH optimum of 6.5–7.0 and a high Km for ThDP (5 mM, suggesting that, in vivo, the rate of AThTP synthesis is proportional to the free ThDP concentration. When ADP was used as the variable substrate at a fixed ThDP concentration, a sigmoid curve was obtained, with a Hill coefficient of 2.1 and an S0.5 value of 0.08 mM. The specificity of the AThTP synthesizing enzyme with respect to nucleotide substrate is restricted to ATP/ADP, and only ThDP can serve as the second substrate of the reaction. We tentatively named this enzyme ThDP adenylyl transferase (EC 2.7.7.65. Conclusion This is the first demonstration of an enzyme activity transferring a nucleotidyl group on thiamine diphosphate to produce AThTP. The existence of a mechanism for the enzymatic synthesis of this compound is in agreement with the hypothesis of a non-cofactor role for thiamine derivatives in living cells.

  2. Structural snapshots along the reaction pathway of Yersinia pestis RipA, a putative butyryl-CoA transferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Rodrigo; Lan, Benson; Latif, Yama; Chim, Nicholas [UC Irvine, 2212 Natural Sciences I, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Goulding, Celia W., E-mail: celia.goulding@uci.edu [UC Irvine, 2212 Natural Sciences I, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); UC Irvine, 2302 Natural Sciences I, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The crystal structures of Y. pestis RipA mutants were determined to provide insights into the CoA transferase reaction pathway. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague, is able to survive in both extracellular and intracellular environments within the human host, although its intracellular survival within macrophages is poorly understood. A novel Y. pestis three-gene rip (required for intracellular proliferation) operon, and in particular ripA, has been shown to be essential for survival and replication in interferon γ-induced macrophages. RipA was previously characterized as a putative butyryl-CoA transferase proposed to yield butyrate, a known anti-inflammatory shown to lower macrophage-produced NO levels. RipA belongs to the family I CoA transferases, which share structural homology, a conserved catalytic glutamate which forms a covalent CoA-thioester intermediate and a flexible loop adjacent to the active site known as the G(V/I)G loop. Here, functional and structural analyses of several RipA mutants are presented in an effort to dissect the CoA transferase mechanism of RipA. In particular, E61V, M31G and F60M RipA mutants show increased butyryl-CoA transferase activities when compared with wild-type RipA. Furthermore, the X-ray crystal structures of E61V, M31G and F60M RipA mutants, when compared with the wild-type RipA structure, reveal important conformational changes orchestrated by a conserved acyl-group binding-pocket phenylalanine, Phe85, and the G(V/I)G loop. Binary structures of M31G RipA and F60M RipA with two distinct CoA substrate conformations are also presented. Taken together, these data provide CoA transferase reaction snapshots of an open apo RipA, a closed glutamyl-anhydride intermediate and an open CoA-thioester intermediate. Furthermore, biochemical analyses support essential roles for both the catalytic glutamate and the flexible G(V/I)G loop along the reaction pathway, although further research is required to fully

  3. Induction of Epoxide Hydrolase, Glucuronosyl Transferase, and Sulfotransferase by Phenethyl Isothiocyanate in Male Wistar Albino Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Faizal Abdull Razis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC is an isothiocyanate found in watercress as the glucosinolate (gluconasturtiin. The isothiocyanate is converted from the glucosinolate by intestinal microflora or when contacted with myrosinase during the chopping and mastication of the vegetable. PEITC manifested protection against chemically-induced cancers in various tissues. A potential mechanism of chemoprevention is by modulating the metabolism of carcinogens so as to promote deactivation. The principal objective of this study was to investigate in rats the effect of PEITC on carcinogen-metabolising enzyme systems such as sulfotransferase (SULT, N-acetyltransferase (NAT, glucuronosyl transferase (UDP, and epoxide hydrolase (EH following exposure to low doses that simulate human dietary intake. Rats were fed for 2 weeks diets supplemented with PEITC at 0.06 µmol/g (low dose, i.e., dietary intake, 0.6 µmol/g (medium dose, and 6.0 µmol/g (high dose, and the enzymes were monitored in rat liver. At the Low dose, no induction of the SULT, NAT, and EH was noted, whereas UDP level was elevated. At the Medium dose, only SULT level was increased, whereas at the High dose marked increase in EH level was observed. It is concluded that PEITC modulates carcinogen-metabolising enzyme systems at doses reflecting human intake thus elucidating the mechanism of its chemoprevention.

  4. Purification and Identification of Glutathione S-transferase in Rice Root under Cadmium Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chun-hua; WU Ze-ying; JU Ting; GE Ying

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) contamination in paddy soils poses a serious threat to the production and quality of rice.Among various biochemical processes related to Cd detoxification in rice,glutathione S-transferase (GST) plays an important role,catalyzing Cd complexation with glutathione (GSH) and scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells.In this study,a hydroponic experiment was conducted to investigate the response of GST isozymes in rice roots upon Cd exposure.Results showed that the GST activity in rice roots was clearly enhanced by 50 μmol/L Cd treatment for 7 d.The GST isozymes were purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation,gel filtration chromatography and affinity chromatography.After being separated by SDS-PAGE and visualized by silver staining,GSTU6 was identified by in-gel digestion,MALDI-TOF-MS analysis and peptide mass fingerprint.The results confirm the vital function of tau class rice GST in Cd detoxification.

  5. Genetic Variations of Glutathione S-Transferase Influence on Blood Cadmium Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitchaphat Khansakorn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The glutathione S-transferases (GSTs are involved in biotransformation and detoxification of cadmium (Cd. Genetic polymorphisms in these genes may lead to interindividual variation in Cd susceptibility. The objective of this study was to assess the association of GSTs (GSTT1, GSTM1, and GSTP1 Val105Ile polymorphisms with blood Cd concentrations in a nonoccupationally exposed population. The 370 blood samples were analyzed for Cd concentration and polymorphisms in GSTs genes. Geometric mean of blood Cd among this population was 0.46±0.02 μg/L (with 95% CI; 0.43–0.49 μg/L. Blood Cd concentrations in subjects carrying GSTP1 Val/Val genotype were significantly higher than those with Ile/Ile and Ile/Val genotypes. No significant differences in blood Cd concentrations among individual with gene deletions of GSTT1 and GSTM1 were observed. GSTP1/GSTT1 and GSTP1/GSTM1 combinations showed significantly associated with increase in blood Cd levels. This study indicated that polymorphisms of GSTP1 combined with GSTT1 and/or GSTM1 deletion are likely to influence on individual susceptibility to cadmium toxicity.

  6. Purification and characterization of a glutathione S-transferase from Mucor mucedo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Ragaa R; Abu-Shady, Mohamed R; El-Beih, Fawkia M; Abdalla, Abdel-Monem A; Afifi, Ola M

    2005-01-01

    An intracellular glutathione transferase was purified to homogenity from the fungus, Mucor mucedo, using DEAE-cellulose ion-exchange and glutathione affinity chromatography. Gel filtration chromatography and SDS-PAGE revealed that the purified GST is a homodimer with approximate native and subunit molecular mass of 53 kDa and 23.4 kDa, respectively. The enzyme has a pI value of 4.8, a pH optimum at pH 8.0 and apparent activation energy (Ea) of 1.42 kcal mol(-1). The purified GST acts readily on CDNB with almost negligible peroxidase activity and the activity was inhibited by Cibacron Blue (IC50 0.252 microM) and hematin (IC50 3.55 microM). M. mucedo GST displayed a non-Michaelian behavior. At low (0.1-0.3 mM) and high (0.3-2 mM) substrate concentration, Km (GSH) was calculated to be 0.179 and 0.65 mM, whereas Km(CDNB) was 0.531 and 11 mM and k(cat) was 39.8 and 552 s(-1), respectively. The enzyme showed apparent pKa values of 6-6.5 and 8.0.

  7. Cefadroxil potency as cancer co-therapy candidate by glutathione s-transferase mechanism

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    Tri Yuliani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs havean important role in the detoxification of electrophiles,such as some anticancer drugs. Compounds with phenolicand/or α,b-unsaturated carbonyl group have been knownas GSTs inhibitor in vitro. Cefadroxil in vitro decreasedGST-Pi activity but not GSTs in rat kidney cytosol.GST inhibitor in a specific organ and of a specific classis needed for safety in cancer chemotherapy. The studyaims to observe the effect of cefadroxil on GSTs in vivoin rat kidney cytosol and then compare it to those seenfor liver, lung, and spleen in vivo.Methods: Cefadroxil was given twice a day byforcefeeding for five days. Rat kidney cytosol was thenprepared and its protein concentration was determined.Cytosolic total GST, GST-Mu and GST-Pi activitieswere monitored by a continuous spectrophotometricmethod using the following substrates: 1-chloro,2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB (non-specific substrate,1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB for GST-Mu, andethacrynic acid (EA for GST-Pi.Results: The data showed that cefadroxil significantlyincreased the activity of GSTs, GST-Mu, and GSTPiin rat kidney cytosol (8.75%, 47.81%, and 6.67%respectively.Conclusion: Cefadroxil did not inhibit GSTs, GST-Mu,and GST-Pi in rat kidney in vivo indicating that it doesnot inhibit chemotherapy detoxification by GSTs, GSTMu,and GST-Pi in normal kidney cells.

  8. Effects of Catechol O-Methyl Transferase Inhibition on Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Luteolin Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sang Keun; Lee, Jin-Ah; Cho, Eun Jung; Choi, Inwook

    2017-02-01

    Although luteolin is known to have potent anti-inflammatory activities, much less information has been provided on such activities of its hepatic metabolites. Luteolin was subjected to hepatic metabolism in HepG2 cells either without or with catechol O-methyl transferase (COMT) inhibitor. To identify hepatic metabolites of luteolin without (luteolin metabolites, LMs) or with COMT inhibitor (LMs+CI), metabolites were treated by β-glucuronidase and sulfatase, and found that they were composed of glucuronide and sulfate conjugates of diosmetin in LMs or these conjugates of luteolin in LMs+CI. LMs and LMs+CI were examined for their anti-inflammatory activities on LPS stimulated Raw 264.7 cells. Expression of iNOS and production of nitric oxide and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were suppressed more effectively by the treatment with LMs+CI than LMs. Our data provide a new insight on possible improvement in functional properties of luteolin on target cells by modifying their metabolic pathway in hepatocytes.

  9. Erythrocyte glutathione transferase: a general probe for chemical contaminations in mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocedi, A; Fabrini, R; Lai, O; Alfieri, L; Roncoroni, C; Noce, A; Pedersen, JZ; Ricci, G

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are enzymes devoted to the protection of cells against many different toxins. In erythrocytes, the isoenzyme (e-GST) mainly present is GSTP1-1, which is overexpressed in humans in case of increased blood toxicity, as it occurs in nephrophatic patients or in healthy subjects living in polluted areas. The present study explores the possibility that e-GST may be used as an innovative and highly sensitive biomarker of blood toxicity also for other mammals. All distinct e-GSTs from humans, Bos taurus (cow), Sus scrofa (pig), Capra hircus (goat), Equus caballus (horse), Equus asinus (donkey) and Ovis aries (sheep), show very similar amino acid sequences, identical kinetics and stability properties. Reference values for e-GST in all these mammals reared in controlled farms span from 3.5±0.2 U/gHb in the pig to 17.0±0.9 U/gHb in goat; such activity levels can easily be determined with high precision using only a few microliters of whole blood and a simple spectrophotometric assay. Possibly disturbing factors have been examined to avoid artifact determinations. This study provides the basis for future screening studies to verify if animals have been exposed to toxicologic insults. Preliminary data on cows reared in polluted areas show increased expression of e-GST, which parallels the results found for humans. PMID:27551520

  10. Differential expression of two glutathione S-transferases identified from the American dog tick, Dermacentor variabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreher-Lesnick, S M; Mulenga, A; Simser, J A; Azad, A F

    2006-08-01

    Reciprocal signalling and gene expression play a cardinal role during pathogen-host molecular interactions and are prerequisite to the maintenance of balanced homeostasis. Gene expression repertoire changes during rickettsial infection and glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) were among the genes found up-regulated in Rickettsia-infected Dermacentor variabilis. GSTs are well known to play an important part in cellular stress responses in the host. We have cloned two full-length GSTs from D. variabilis (DvGST1 and DvGST2). Comparison of these two DvGST molecules with those of other species indicate that DvGST1 is related to the mammalian class theta and insect class delta GSTs, while DvGST2 does not seem to fall in the same family. Northern blotting analyses revealed differential expression patterns, where DvGST1 and DvGST2 transcripts are found in the tick gut, with DvGST2 transcripts also present in the ovaries. Both DvGST transcripts are up-regulated upon tick feeding. Challenge of fed adult ticks with Escherichia coli injection showed decreased transcript amounts compared with ticks injected with phosphate-buffered saline (sham) and naïve ticks.

  11. Evaluation of gamma gluthamyl transferase and uric acid levels in arsenic exposed subject

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    Ceylan Bal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Arsenic is a metal with a widespread industrial usage and causing oxidative stress. Studies shows serum uric acid and gamma gluthamyl transferase (GGT levels are increasing in oxidative stress. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of arsenic exposure on serum uric acid and GGT levels. Methods: 500 patients who refer to Ankara Occupational Disease Hospital between 2010 to 2014 for periodic examination and urinary arsenic, serum uric acid and serum GGT levels assessed are included in this study. 268 patients with urinary arsenic levels over 35μg/L are defined as exposed and below 35μg/L are controls. Results: Data of 500 patients were analysed. 268 of them had high urine arsenic levels and 232 had normal urine arsenic levels. In the high urine arsenic level group the median serum uric acid level was 5.4 (2.60-7.20 and median serum GGT level was 27 (10-51 in the other group with normal urine arsenic levels the median serum uric acid level was 4.9 (2.5-7 and median serum GGT level was 22 (10-52. The difference between two groups was statistically significant (p value: 0.002 and <0.001 respectively Conclusion: Arsenic exposure may be associated with hyperuricemia and high levels of GGT and with prospective studies the causal relationship between arsenic exposure and hyperuricemia and GGT can be revealed.

  12. Glutathione S-Transferase Ω 1 variation does not influence age at onset of Huntington's disease

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    Saft Carsten

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease (HD is a fully penetrant, autosomal dominantly inherited disorder associated with abnormal expansions of a stretch of perfect CAG repeats in the 5' part of the IT15 gene. The number of repeat units is highly predictive for the age at onset (AO of the disorder. But AO is only modestly correlated with repeat length when intermediate HD expansions are considered. Circumstantial evidence suggests that additional features of the HD course are based on genetic traits. Therefore, it may be possible to investigate the genetic background of HD, i.e. to map the loci underlying the development and progression of the disease. Recently an association of Glutathione S-Transferase Ω 1 (GSTO1 and possibly of GSTO2 with AO was demonstrated for, both, Alzheimer's (AD and Parkinson's disease (PD. Methods We have genotyped the polymorphisms rs4925 GSTO1 and rs2297235 GSTO2 in 232 patients with HD and 228 controls. Results After genotyping GSTO1 and GSTO2 polymorphisms, firstly there was no statistically significant difference in AO for HD patients, as well as secondly for HD patients vs. controls concerning, both, genotype and allele frequencies, respectively. Conclusion The GSTO1 and GSTO2 genes flanked by the investigated polymorphisms are not comprised in a primary candidate region influencing AO in HD.

  13. Role of Carnitine Acetyl Transferase in Regulation of Nitric Oxide Signaling in Pulmonary Arterial Endothelial Cells

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    Stephen M. Black

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart defects with increased pulmonary blood flow (PBF result in pulmonary endothelial dysfunction that is dependent, at least in part, on decreases in nitric oxide (NO signaling. Utilizing a lamb model with left-to-right shunting of blood and increased PBF that mimics the human disease, we have recently shown that a disruption in carnitine homeostasis, due to a decreased carnitine acetyl transferase (CrAT activity, correlates with decreased bioavailable NO. Thus, we undertook this study to test the hypothesis that the CrAT enzyme plays a major role in regulating NO signaling through its effect on mitochondrial function. We utilized the siRNA gene knockdown approach to mimic the effect of decreased CrAT activity in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC. Our data indicate that silencing the CrAT gene disrupted cellular carnitine homeostasis, reduced the expression of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase-and resulted in an increase in oxidative stress within the mitochondrion. CrAT gene silencing also disrupted mitochondrial bioenergetics resulting in reduced ATP generation and decreased NO signaling secondary to a reduction in eNOS/Hsp90 interactions. Thus, this study links the disruption of carnitine homeostasis to the loss of NO signaling observed in children with CHD. Preserving carnitine homeostasis may have important clinical implications that warrant further investigation.

  14. Antioxidant Effect of Selenium-containing Glutathione S-Transferase in Rat Cardiomyocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Li; HAN Xiao; YU Yang; GUO Xiao; REN Li-qun; FANG Jing-qi; LIU Zhi-yi; YAN Gang-lin; WEI Jing-yan

    2012-01-01

    As one of the most important antioxidant enzymes,glutathione peroxidase(GPX) protects cells and tissues from oxidative damage,and plays an important role in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular injuries induced by oxidative stress.The antioxidant effect of selenium-containing glutathione S-transferase(Se-GST),a mimic of GPX was investigated on rat cardiomyocytes.To explore the protection function of Se-GST in hydrogen peroxide(H2O2) challenged rat cardiomyocytes,we examined malondialdehyde(MDA),lactate dehydrogenase(LDH),superoxide dismutase(SOD) and cell apoptosis.The results demonstrate exposure of rat cardiomyocytes to H2O2 for 6 and 12 h induced the significant increases of MDA,LDH and apoptosis rate of cardiomyocytes,but pretreatment of rat cardiomyocytes with Se-GST at 0.0005 or 0.001 unit/mL prevents oxidative stress induced by H2O2 with the decreases of cell apoptosis.All the results him Se-GST has antioxidant activity for oxidative stress challenged rat cardiomyocytes.

  15. Expression profiling of selected glutathione transferase genes in Zea mays (L.) seedlings infested with cereal aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sytykiewicz, Hubert; Chrzanowski, Grzegorz; Czerniewicz, Paweł; Sprawka, Iwona; Łukasik, Iwona; Goławska, Sylwia; Sempruch, Cezary

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to evaluate the expression patterns of selected glutathione transferase genes (gst1, gst18, gst23 and gst24) in the tissues of two maize (Zea mays L.) varieties (relatively resistant Ambrozja and susceptible Tasty Sweet) that were colonized with oligophagous bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi L.) or monophagous grain aphid (Sitobion avenae L.). Simultaneously, insect-triggered generation of superoxide anion radicals (O2•-) in infested Z. mays plants was monitored. Quantified parameters were measured at 1, 2, 4, 8, 24, 48 and 72 h post-initial aphid infestation (hpi) in relation to the non-infested control seedlings. Significant increases in gst transcript amounts were recorded in aphid-stressed plants in comparison to the control seedlings. Maximal enhancement in the expression of the gst genes in aphid-attacked maize plants was found at 8 hpi (gst23) or 24 hpi (gst1, gst18 and gst24) compared to the control. Investigated Z. mays cultivars formed excessive superoxide anion radicals in response to insect treatments, and the highest overproduction of O2•- was noted 4 or 8 h after infestation, depending on the aphid treatment and maize genotype. Importantly, the Ambrozja variety could be characterized as having more profound increments in the levels of gst transcript abundance and O2•- generation in comparison with the Tasty Sweet genotype.

  16. Mitochondrion as a Novel Site of Dichloroacetate Biotransformation by Glutathione Transferase ζ1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjun; McKenzie, Sarah C.; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Liu, Chen; Stacpoole, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) is a potential environmental hazard and an investigational drug. Repeated doses of DCA result in reduced drug clearance, probably through inhibition of glutathione transferase ζ1 (GSTZ1), a cytosolic enzyme that converts DCA to glyoxylate. DCA is known to be taken up by mitochondria, where it inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, its major pharmacodynamic target. We tested the hypothesis that the mitochondrion was also a site of DCA biotransformation. Immunoreactive GSTZ1 was detected in liver mitochondria from humans and rats, and its identity was confirmed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the tryptic peptides. Study of rat submitochondrial fractions revealed GSTZ1 to be localized in the mitochondrial matrix. The specific activity of GSTZ1-catalyzed dechlorination of DCA was 2.5- to 3-fold higher in cytosol than in whole mitochondria and was directly proportional to GSTZ1 protein expression in the two compartments. Rat mitochondrial GSTZ1 had a 2.5-fold higher AppKm for glutathione than cytosolic GSTZ1, whereas the AppKm values for DCA were identical. Rats administered DCA at a dose of 500 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks showed reduced hepatic GSTZ1 activity and expression of ∼10% of control levels in both cytosol and mitochondria. We conclude that the mitochondrion is a novel site of DCA biotransformation catalyzed by GSTZ1, an enzyme colocalized in cytosol and mitochondrial matrix. PMID:20884751

  17. Mitochondrion as a novel site of dichloroacetate biotransformation by glutathione transferase zeta 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjun; James, Margaret O; McKenzie, Sarah C; Calcutt, Nigel A; Liu, Chen; Stacpoole, Peter W

    2011-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) is a potential environmental hazard and an investigational drug. Repeated doses of DCA result in reduced drug clearance, probably through inhibition of glutathione transferase ζ1 (GSTZ1), a cytosolic enzyme that converts DCA to glyoxylate. DCA is known to be taken up by mitochondria, where it inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, its major pharmacodynamic target. We tested the hypothesis that the mitochondrion was also a site of DCA biotransformation. Immunoreactive GSTZ1 was detected in liver mitochondria from humans and rats, and its identity was confirmed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the tryptic peptides. Study of rat submitochondrial fractions revealed GSTZ1 to be localized in the mitochondrial matrix. The specific activity of GSTZ1-catalyzed dechlorination of DCA was 2.5- to 3-fold higher in cytosol than in whole mitochondria and was directly proportional to GSTZ1 protein expression in the two compartments. Rat mitochondrial GSTZ1 had a 2.5-fold higher (App)K(m) for glutathione than cytosolic GSTZ1, whereas the (App)K(m) values for DCA were identical. Rats administered DCA at a dose of 500 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks showed reduced hepatic GSTZ1 activity and expression of ∼10% of control levels in both cytosol and mitochondria. We conclude that the mitochondrion is a novel site of DCA biotransformation catalyzed by GSTZ1, an enzyme colocalized in cytosol and mitochondrial matrix.

  18. Preliminary studies on the renaturation of denatured catfish (Clarias gariepinus) glutathione transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojopagogo, Yetunde Adedolapo; Adewale, Isaac Olusanjo; Afolayan, Adeyinka

    2013-12-01

    Purified juvenile catfish (Clarias gariepinus) glutathione transferase (cgGST) was denatured in vitro and renatured in the absence and presence of different concentrations of endogenous or xenobiotic model substrates. Protein transitions during unfolding and refolding were monitored by activity measurement as well as changes in protein conformation using UV difference spectra at 230 nm. Gdn-HCl at 0.22 M caused 50 % inactivation of the enzyme and at 1.1 M, the enzyme was completely unfolded. Refolding of cgGST main isozyme was not completely reversible at higher concentrations of Gdn-HCl and is dependent on protein concentration. An enzyme concentration of 30 μg/ml yielded 40 % percentage residual activity in the presence of glutathione (GSH), regardless of the concentration that was present as opposed to 30 % obtained in its absence. The xenobiotic model substrate, lindane, appears to have no effect on the refolding of the enzyme. In summary, our results show that GSH assists in the refolding of cgGST in a concentration-independent manner and may be involved in the same function in vivo whereas the xenobiotic model substrate does not.

  19. Association between herbivore stress and glutathione S-transferase expression in Pinus brutia Ten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semiz, A; Çelik-Turgut, G; Semiz, G; Özgün, Ö; Şen, A

    2016-03-31

    Plants have developed mechanisms to defend themselves against many factors including biotic stress such as herbivores and pathogens. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) is a glutathione-dependent detoxifying enzyme and plays critical roles in stress tolerance and detoxification metabolism in plants. Pinus brutia Ten. is a prominent native forest tree species in Turkey, due to both its economic and ecological assets. One of the problems faced by P. brutia afforestation sites is the attacks by pine processionary moth (Thaumetopoea wilkinsoni Tams.). In this study, we investigated the changes in activity and mRNA expression of GST in pine samples taken from both resistant and susceptible clones against T. wilkinsoni over a nine month period in a clonal seed orchard. It was found that the average cytosolic GST activities of trees in March and July were significantly higher than the values obtained in November. November was considered to be the control since trees were not under stress yet. In addition, RT-PCR results clearly showed that levels of GST transcripts in March and July samples were significantly higher as compared to the level seen in November. These findings strongly suggest that GST activity from P. brutia would be a valuable marker for exposure to herbivory stress.

  20. Studies on interactions between plant secondary metabolites and glutathione transferase using fluorescence quenching method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian; Cheng, Xinsheng; Wang, Chuanqin; Xue, Zechun; Yang, Liwen; Xi, Zheng

    2007-04-01

    The interactions between plant secondary metabolites (tannic acid, rutin, cinnamic acid and catechin) and glutathione transferase (GST) were investigated by fluorescence and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. Intrinsic fluorescence of GST was measured by selectively exciting their tryptophan (Trp) residues and quenching constants were determined using the Stern-Volmer equation. The binding affinity was found to be strongest for tannic acid and ranked in the order tannic acid>rutin>cinnamic acid>catechin. The pH values in the range of 6.7-7.9, except for tannic acid, did not affect significantly the affinity of rutin, cinnamic acid and catechin with GST. Results showed that the fluorescence quenching of GST was a static_quenching. Fluorescence quenching and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy suggested that only the tannic acid changed the microenvironment of the Trp residues. Furthermore, the number of binding sites and binding constants at different pH values showed that tannic acid had strongest affinity towards GST and hydrogen bonding played an important role in the affinity between GST and the metabolites.

  1. Recognition and Detoxification of the Insecticide DDT by Drosophila melanogaster Glutathione S-Transferase D1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Low, Wai Yee; Feil, Susanne C.; Ng, Hooi Ling; Gorman, Michael A.; Morton, Craig J.; Pyke, James; McConville, Malcolm J.; Bieri, Michael; Mok, Yee-Foong; Robin, Charles; Gooley, Paul R.; Parker, Michael W.; Batterham, Philip (SVIMR-A); (Melbourne)

    2010-06-14

    GSTD1 is one of several insect glutathione S-transferases capable of metabolizing the insecticide DDT. Here we use crystallography and NMR to elucidate the binding of DDT and glutathione to GSTD1. The crystal structure of Drosophila melanogaster GSTD1 has been determined to 1.1 {angstrom} resolution, which reveals that the enzyme adopts the canonical GST fold but with a partially occluded active site caused by the packing of a C-terminal helix against one wall of the binding site for substrates. This helix would need to unwind or be displaced to enable catalysis. When the C-terminal helix is removed from the model of the crystal structure, DDT can be computationally docked into the active site in an orientation favoring catalysis. Two-dimensional {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence NMR experiments of GSTD1 indicate that conformational changes occur upon glutathione and DDT binding and the residues that broaden upon DDT binding support the predicted binding site. We also show that the ancestral GSTD1 is likely to have possessed DDT dehydrochlorinase activity because both GSTD1 from D. melanogaster and its sibling species, Drosophila simulans, have this activity.

  2. Biochemical characterization and distribution of glutathione S-transferases in leaping mullet (Liza saliens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, A; Kirikbakan, A

    2004-09-01

    In this study, feral leaping mullet (Liza saliens) liver cytosolic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) were investigated and characterized using 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and ethacrynic acid (EA) as substrates. The average GST activities towards CDNB and EA were found to be 1365 +/- 41 and 140 +/- 20 nmol/min per mg protein, respectively. The effects of cytosolic protein amount and temperature ranging from 4 to 70 degrees C on enzyme activities were examined. While both activities towards CDNB and EA showed similar dependence on protein amount, temperature optima were found as 37 and 42 degrees C, respectively. In addition, the effects of pH on GST-CDNB and -EA activities were studied and different pH activity profiles were observed. For both substrates, GST activities were found to obey Michaelis-Menten kinetics with apparent V(max) and K(m) values of 1661 nmol/min per mg protein and 0.24 mM and 157 nmol/min per mg protein and 0.056 mM for CDNB and EA, respectively. Distribution of GST in Liza saliens tissues was investigated and compared with other fish species. Very high GST activities were measured in tissues from Liza saliens such as liver, kidney, testis, proximal intestine, and gills. Moreover, our results suggested that GST activities from Liza saliens would be a valuable biomarker for aquatic pollution.

  3. Increased transcription of Glutathione S-transferases in acaricide exposed scabies mites

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    Currie Bart J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence suggests that Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis mites collected from scabies endemic communities in northern Australia show increasing tolerance to 5% permethrin and oral ivermectin. Previous findings have implicated detoxification pathways in developing resistance to these acaricides. We investigated the contribution of Glutathione S-transferase (GST enzymes to permethrin and ivermectin tolerance in scabies mites using biochemical and molecular approaches. Results Increased in vitro survival following permethrin exposure was observed in S. scabiei var. hominis compared to acaricide naïve mites (p in vitro permethrin susceptibility, confirming GST involvement in permethrin detoxification. Assay of GST enzymatic activity in mites demonstrated that S. scabiei var. hominis mites showed a two-fold increase in activity compared to naïve mites (p S. scabiei var. canis- mu 1 (p S. scabiei var. hominis mites collected from a recurrent crusted scabies patient over the course of ivermectin treatment. Conclusions These findings provide further support for the hypothesis that increased drug metabolism and efflux mediate permethrin and ivermectin resistance in scabies mites and highlight the threat of emerging acaricide resistance to the treatment of scabies worldwide. This is one of the first attempts to define specific genes involved in GST mediated acaricide resistance at the transcriptional level, and the first application of such studies to S. scabiei, a historically challenging ectoparasite.

  4. A test for adequate wastewater treatment based on glutathione S transferase isoenzyme profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammou, A; Samaras, P; Papadimitriou, C; Papadopoulos, A I

    2013-04-01

    Discharge to the environment of treated or non-treated municipal wastewater imposes several threats to coastal and estuarine ecosystems which are difficult to assess. In our study we evaluate the use of the isoenzyme profile of glutathione S transferase (GST) in combination with the kinetic characteristics of the whole enzyme and of heme peroxidase, as a test of adequate treatment of municipal wastewater. For this reason, Artemia nauplii were incubated in artificial seawater prepared by wastewater samples, such as secondary municipal effluents produced by a conventional activated sludge unit and advanced treated effluents produced by the employment of coagulation, activated carbon adsorption and chlorination as single processes or as combined ones. Characteristic changes of the isoenzyme pattern and the enzymes' kinetic properties were caused by chlorinated secondary municipal effluent or by secondary non-chlorinated effluent. Advanced treatment by combination of coagulation and/or carbon adsorption resulted to less prominent changes, suggesting more adequate treatment. Our results suggest that GST isoenzyme profile in combination with the kinetic properties of the total enzyme family is a sensitive test for the evaluation of the adequateness of the treatment of reclaimed wastewater and the reduction of potentially harmful compounds. Potentially, it may offer a 'fingerprint' characteristic of a particular effluent and probably of the treatment level it has been subjected.

  5. Sulphonamide-based bombesin prodrug analogues for glutathione transferase, useful in targeted cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axarli, I; Labrou, N E; Petrou, C; Rassias, N; Cordopatis, P; Clonis, Y D

    2009-05-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are enzymes involved in cellular detoxification by catalysing the nucleophilic attack of glutathione (GSH) on the electrophilic centre of a number of toxic compounds and xenobiotics, including certain chemotherapeutic drugs. The encountered chemotherapeutic resistant of tumour cells, thus, has been associated with the increase of total GST expression. GSTs, in addition to GSH-conjugating activity, exhibit sulphonamidase activity, catalyzing the GSH-mediated hydrolysis of sulphonamide bonds. Such reactions are of interest as potential tumour-directed prodrug activation strategies. In the present work we report the design and synthesis of novel chimaeric sulphonamide derivatives of bombesin, able to be activated by the model human isoenzyme GSTA1-1 (hGSTA1-1). These derivatives bear a peptidyl-moiety (analogues of bombesin peptide: R-[Lue(13)]-bombesin, R-[Phe(13)]-bombesin and R-[Ser(3),Arg(10),Phe(13)]-bombesin, where R=C(6)H(5)SO(2)NH-) as molecular recognition element for targeting the drug selectively to tumour cells. The released S-alkyl-glutathione, after hGSTA1-1-mediated cleavage of the sulphonamide bond, provides an inhibitor of varied strength against GSTs from different sources. These prodrugs are envisaged as a plausible means to sensitize drug-resistant tumours that overexpress GSTs.

  6. Characterization of Discrete Phosphopantetheinyl Transferases in Streptomyces tsukubaensis L19 Unveils a Complicate Phosphopantetheinylation Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue-Yue; Zhang, Xiao-Sheng; Luo, Hong-Dou; Ren, Ni-Ni; Jiang, Xin-Hang; Jiang, Hui; Li, Yong-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTases) play essential roles in both primary metabolisms and secondary metabolisms via post-translational modification of acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) and peptidyl carrier proteins (PCPs). In this study, an industrial FK506 producing strain Streptomyces tsukubaensis L19, together with Streptomyces avermitilis, was identified to contain the highest number (five) of discrete PPTases known among any species thus far examined. Characterization of the five PPTases in S. tsukubaensis L19 unveiled that stw ACP, an ACP in a type II PKS, was phosphopantetheinylated by three PPTases FKPPT1, FKPPT3, and FKACPS; sts FAS ACP, the ACP in fatty acid synthase (FAS), was phosphopantetheinylated by three PPTases FKPPT2, FKPPT3, and FKACPS; TcsA-ACP, an ACP involved in FK506 biosynthesis, was phosphopantetheinylated by two PPTases FKPPT3 and FKACPS; FkbP-PCP, an PCP involved in FK506 biosynthesis, was phosphopantetheinylated by all of these five PPTases FKPPT1-4 and FKACPS. Our results here indicate that the functions of these PPTases complement each other for ACPs/PCPs substrates, suggesting a complicate phosphopantetheinylation network in S. tsukubaensis L19. Engineering of these PPTases in S. tsukubaensis L19 resulted in a mutant strain that can improve FK506 production. PMID:27052100

  7. Serum γ-Glutamyl Transferase Is Inversely Associated with Bone Mineral Density Independently of Alcohol Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Seok Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Backgroundγ-Glutamyl transferase (GGT is a well-known marker of chronic alcohol consumption or hepatobiliary diseases. A number of studies have demonstrated that serum levels of GGT are independently associated with cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. The purpose of this study was to test if serum GGT levels are associated with bone mineral density (BMD in Korean adults.MethodsA total of 462 subjects (289 men and 173 women, who visited Severance Hospital for medical checkup, were included in this study. BMD was measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Cross-sectional association between serum GGT and BMD was evaluated.ResultsAs serum GGT levels increased from the lowest tertile (tertile 1 to the highest tertile (tertile 3, BMD decreased after adjusting for confounders such as age, body mass index, amount of alcohol consumed, smoking, regular exercise, postmenopausal state (in women, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia. A multiple linear regression analysis showed a negative association between log-transformed serum GGT levels and BMD. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, tertile 3 of serum GGT level was associated with an increased risk for low bone mass compared to tertile 1 (odds ratio, 2.271; 95% confidence interval, 1.340 to 3.850; P=0.002.ConclusionSerum GGT level was inversely associated with BMD in Korean adults. Further study is necessary to fully elucidate the mechanism of the inverse relationship.

  8. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of glutathione S-transferase from Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Motohiko; Harada, Shigeharu; Satow, Yoshinori; Inoue, Hideshi; Takahashi, Kenji

    1996-10-01

    Crystals of glutathione S-transferase from Escherichia coli have been obtained by use of polyethylene glycol 6000 as a precipitant. The crystallization was performed in the presence of a glutathione sulfonate inhibitor under the acidic condition, with combination of the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion and the macro-seeding procedures. The crystals are of a thin-plate shape with typical sizes of 1.0 × 0.5 × 0.1 mm, and are stable against X-ray irradiation. They belong to the space group P2 12 12 1 with cell parameters of a = 90.47 Å, b = 93.87 Å and c = 51.10 Å, and diffract X-rays at least up to 2.3 Å resolution. The solvent content is 48% in volume, when a homodimeric molecule of the enzyme is assumed to occupy an asymmetric unit of the crystal. The crystals are suitable for three-dimensional structural studies. Diffraction data of the native crystal have been collected.

  9. Immunohistochemical localization of glutathione S-transferase-pi in human colorectal polyps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the distribution of the placental form of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) in colon polyps in order to evaluate the role of GST-pi in these tissues. METHODS: Sixteen polyp tissues removed at colon- oscopy were examined. Tissues were investigated his- tologicaUy and ultrastructurally. GST-pi expression was also analysed immunohistochemically, using peroxidase anti-peroxidase (PAP) method and immunogold label- ling method, for light and electron microscope respec- tively. RESULTS: All polyp tissues examined were adenoma of low, mild and high- grade dysplasia as shown in the histopathological reports. Nevertheless, the examina- tion of the above specimens with electron microscope revealed that 3 of 9 adenoma of mild dysplasia had ultrastuctural features similar to high-grade dysplasia adenoma. GST-pi was variably expressed in adenoma, with the lowest relative levels occurring in low-grade adenoma and the highest levels found in high-grade adenoma. GST-pi was located mainly in undifferentiat- ed epithelial cells. GST-pi positive particles were found in the cytoplasm and especially in the nucleus adjacent to the nuclear membrane of these cells. CONCLUSION: The overexpression of GST-pi in mild- grade adenomas with significant subcellular changes and in the majority of high-grade dysplasia adenoma suggests that this might be related to the carcinogenetic proceeding. Immunohistochemical localization of GST-pi in combination with ultrastructural changes indicate that GST-pi might be a sensitive agent for the detection of preneoplastic transformations in adenoma.

  10. A glutathione S-transferase gene associated with antioxidant properties isolated from Apis cerana cerana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuchang; Liu, Feng; Jia, Haihong; Yan, Yan; Wang, Hongfang; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2016-06-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are an important family of multifunctional enzymes in aerobic organisms. They play a crucial role in the detoxification of exogenous compounds, especially insecticides, and protection against oxidative stress. Most previous studies of GSTs in insects have largely focused on their role in insecticide resistance. Here, we isolated a theta class GST gene designated AccGSTT1 from Apis cerana cerana and aimed to explore its antioxidant and antibacterial attributes. Analyses of homology and phylogenetic relationships suggested that the predicted amino acid sequence of AccGSTT1 shares a high level of identity with the other hymenopteran GSTs and that it was conserved during evolution. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that AccGSTT1 is most highly expressed in adult stages and that the expression profile of this gene is significantly altered in response to various abiotic stresses. These results were confirmed using western blot analysis. Additionally, a disc diffusion assay showed that a recombinant AccGSTT1 protein may be roughly capable of inhibiting bacterial growth and that it reduces the resistance of Escherichia coli cells to multiple adverse stresses. Taken together, these data indicate that AccGSTT1 may play an important role in antioxidant processes under adverse stress conditions.

  11. Metabolic engineering of Clostridium tyrobutyricum for n-butanol production: effects of CoA transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Le; Zhao, Jingbo; Xu, Mengmeng; Dong, Jie; Varghese, Saju; Yu, Mingrui; Tang, I-Ching; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2015-06-01

    The overexpression of CoA transferase (ctfAB), which catalyzes the reaction: acetate/butyrate + acetoacetyl-CoA → acetyl/butyryl-CoA + acetoacetate, was studied for its effects on acid reassimilation and butanol biosynthesis in Clostridium tyrobutyricum (Δack, adhE2). The plasmid pMTL007 was used to co-express adhE2 and ctfAB from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. In addition, the sol operon containing ctfAB, adc (acetoacetate decarboxylase), and ald (aldehyde dehydrogenase) was also cloned from Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 and expressed in C. tyrobutyricum (Δack, adhE2). Mutants expressing these genes were evaluated for their ability to produce butanol from glucose in batch fermentations at pH 5.0 and 6.0. Compared to C. tyrobutyricum (Δack, adhE2) without expressing ctfAB, all mutants with ctfAB overexpression produced more butanol, with butanol yield increased to 0.22 - 0.26 g/g (vs. 0.10 - 0.13 g/g) and productivity to 0.35 g/l h (vs. 0.13 g/l h) because of the reduced acetate and butyrate production. The expression of ctfAB also resulted in acetone production from acetoacetate through a non-enzymatic decarboxylation.

  12. Glutathione S-transferase P influences redox and migration pathways in bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available To interrogate why redox homeostasis and glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP are important in regulating bone marrow cell proliferation and migration, we isolated crude bone marrow, lineage negative and bone marrow derived-dendritic cells (BMDDCs from both wild type (WT and knockout (Gstp1/p2(-/- mice. Comparison of the two strains showed distinct thiol expression patterns. WT had higher baseline and reactive oxygen species-induced levels of S-glutathionylated proteins, some of which (sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2(+-ATPase regulate Ca(2+ fluxes and subsequently influence proliferation and migration. Redox status is also a crucial determinant in the regulation of the chemokine system. CXCL12 chemotactic response was stronger in WT cells, with commensurate alterations in plasma membrane polarization/permeability and intracellular calcium fluxes; activities of the downstream kinases, ERK and Akt were also higher in WT. In addition, expression levels of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its associated phosphatase, SHP-2, were higher in WT. Inhibition of CXCR4 or SHP2 decreased the extent of CXCL12-induced migration in WT BMDDCs. The differential surface densities of CXCR4, SHP-2 and inositol trisphosphate receptor in WT and Gstp1/p2(-/- cells correlated with the differential CXCR4 functional activities, as measured by the extent of chemokine-induced directional migration and differences in intracellular signaling. These observed differences contribute to our understanding of how genetic ablation of GSTP causes different levels of myeloproliferation and migration [corrected

  13. Characterization of Intersubunit Communication in the Virginiamycin trans-Acyl Transferase Polyketide Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorival, Jonathan; Annaval, Thibault; Risser, Fanny; Collin, Sabrina; Roblin, Pierre; Jacob, Christophe; Gruez, Arnaud; Chagot, Benjamin; Weissman, Kira J

    2016-03-30

    Modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) direct the biosynthesis of clinically valuable secondary metabolites in bacteria. The fidelity of chain growth depends on specific recognition between successive subunits in each assembly line: interactions mediated by C- and N-terminal "docking domains" (DDs). We have identified a new family of DDs in trans-acyl transferase PKSs, exemplified by a matched pair from the virginiamycin (Vir) system. In the absence of C-terminal partner (VirA (C)DD) or a downstream catalytic domain, the N-terminal DD (VirFG (N)DD) exhibits multiple characteristics of an intrinsically disordered protein. Fusion of the two docking domains results in a stable fold for VirFG (N)DD and an overall protein-protein complex of unique topology whose structure we support by site-directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), the positions of the flanking acyl carrier protein and ketosynthase domains have been identified, allowing modeling of the complete intersubunit interface.

  14. Targeted label-free approach for quantification of epoxide hydrolase and glutathione transferases in microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Yu, Longjiang; Peng, Zhihong

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and organ distribution of cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes, microsomal epoxide hydrolase (MEH), and microsomal glutathione-S-transferase (MGST 1, 2, 3) in human liver, lung, intestinal, and kidney microsomes by targeted peptide-based quantification using nano liquid chromatography-tandem multiple reaction monitoring (nano LC-MRM). Applying this method, we analyzed 16 human liver microsomes and pooled lung, kidney, and intestine microsomes. Nine of the CYP450s (CYP1A2, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, 3A4, 3A5) could be quantified in liver. Except for CYP3A4 and 3A5 existing in intestine, other CYP450s had little content (<0.1 pmol/mg protein) in extrahepatic tissues. MEH and MGSTs could be quantified both in hepatic and in extrahepatic tissues. The highest concentrations of MEH and MGST 1, 2 were found in liver; conversely MGST 3 was abundant in human kidney and intestine compared to liver. The targeted proteomics assay described here can be broadly and efficiently utilized as a tool for investigating the targeted proteins. The method also provides novel CYP450s, MEH, and MGSTs expression data in human hepatic and extrahepatic tissues that will benefit rational approaches to evaluate metabolism in drug development.

  15. Glutathione S-transferase P1 ILE105Val polymorphism in occupationally exposed bladder cancer cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopps, Silke; Angeli-Greaves, Miriam; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Prager, Hans-Martin; Roemer, Hermann C; Lohlein, Dietrich; Weistenhofer, Wobbeke; Bolt, Hermann M; Golka, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    The genotype glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) influences the risk for bladder cancer among Chinese workers occupationally exposed to benzidine. Studies of Caucasian bladder cancer cases without known occupational exposures showed conflicting results. Research was thus conducted to define the role of GSTP1 genotypes in Caucasian bladder cancer cases with an occupational history of exposure to aromatic amines. DNA from 143 cases reported to the Industrial Professional Associations (Berufsgenossenschaften) in Germany from 1996 to 2004, who had contracted urothelial cancer due to occupational exposure, and 196 patients from one Department of Surgery in Dortmund, without known malignancy in their medical history, were genotyped using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (LightCycler) in relation to GSTP1 A1578G (Ile105Val) polymorphism. Among the subjects with bladder cancer, 46% presented the AA genotype, 39% the AG genotype, and 15% the GG genotype. In the surgical (noncancer) control group analyzed, 42% presented the AA genotype, 42% the AG genotype, and 16% the GG genotype. A subgroup of bladder cancer cases, represented by 46 painters, showed a distribution of 41% of the AA genotype, 48% of the AG genotype, and 11% of the GG genotype. Data indicated that in Caucasians exposed to aromatic amines the GSTP1 A1578G polymorphism did not appear to play a significant role as a predisposing factor for bladder cancer incidence.

  16. Molecular characterization of zeta class glutathione S-transferases from Pinus brutia Ten.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E. Oztetik; F. Kockar; M. Alper; M. Iscan

    2015-09-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs; EC 2.5.1.18) play important roles in stress tolerance and metabolic detoxification in plants. In higher plants, studies on GSTs have focussed largely on agricultural plants. There is restricted information about molecular characterization of GSTs in gymnosperms. To date, only tau class GST enzymes have been characterized from some pinus species. For the first time, the present study reports cloning and molecular characterization of two zeta class GST genes, namely PbGSTZ1 and PbGSTZ2 from Pinus brutia Ten., which is an economically important pine native to the eastern Mediterranean region and have to cope with several environmental stress conditions. The PbGSTZ1 gene was isolated from cDNA, whereas PbGSTZ2 was isolated from genomic DNA. Sequence analysis of PbGSTZ1 and PbGSTZ2 revealed the presence of an open reading frame of 226 amino acids with typical consensus sequences of the zeta class plant GSTs. Protein and secondary structure prediction analysis of two zeta class PbGSTZs have shared common features of other plant zeta class GSTs. Genomic clone, PbGSTZ2 gene, is unexpectedly intronless. Extensive sequence analysis of PbGSTZ2, with cDNA clone, PbGSTZ1, revealed 87% identity at nucleotide and 81% identity at amino acid levels with 41 amino acids differences suggesting that genomic PbGSTZ2 gene might be an allelic or a paralogue version of PbGSTZ1.

  17. PLLA-PCys co-electrospun fibers for capture and elution of glutathione S-transferase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The copolymer poly(L-lactic acid)-b-poly(L-cysteine) (PLA-b-PCys) was co-electrospun with PLGA into ultrafine fibers. The reduced glutathione (GSH) was conjugated to the fiber surfaces via disulfide bonds. The glutathione S-transferase (GST) was captured onto the GSH fibers via specific substrate-enzyme interaction between the bound GSH and GST. The captured GST was eluted with free GSH aqueous solution and lyophilized to get pure GST powders. The results show that the GSH moieties on the fiber surface retain the bioactivity of the free GSH and thus they can bind specifically with GST and the GST in solution is captured onto the fiber surface. In addition, the bound GSH is not as active as free GSH so that the captured GST can be eluted off from the fiber by free GSH aqueous solution. Based on this principle, GST itself or its fused proteins can be separated and purified very easily. The preliminary purification efficiency is 6.5 mg·(gPCys)-1. Further improvements are undertaken.

  18. Transcriptional Responses of Glutathione Transferase Genes in Ruditapes philippinarum Exposed to Microcystin-LR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Reis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione Transferases (GSTs are phase II detoxification enzymes known to be involved in the molecular response against microcystins (MCs induced toxicity. However, the individual role of the several GST isoforms in the MC detoxification process is still unknown. In this study, the time-dependent changes on gene expression of several GST isoforms (pi, mu, sigma 1, sigma 2 in parallel with enzymatic activity of total GST were investigated in gills and hepatopancreas of the bivalve Ruditapes philippinarum exposed to pure MC-LR (10 and 100 µg/L. No significant changes in GST enzyme activities were found on both organs. In contrast, MC-LR affected the transcriptional activities of these detoxification enzymes both in gills and hepatopancreas. GST transcriptional changes in gills promoted by MC-LR were characterized by an early (12 h induction of mu and sigma 1 transcripts. On the other hand, the GST transcriptional changes in hepatopancreas were characterized by a later induction (48 h of mu transcript, but also by an early inhibition (6 h of the four transcripts. The different transcription patterns obtained for the tested GST isoforms in this study highlight the potential divergent physiological roles played by these isoenzymes during the detoxification of MC-LR.

  19. Characterization of recombinant human nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferase (NMNAT), a nuclear enzyme essential for NAD synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, M; Hennig, K; Lerner, F; Niere, M; Hirsch-Kauffmann, M; Specht, T; Weise, C; Oei, S L; Ziegler, M

    2001-03-09

    Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferase (NMNAT) is an essential enzyme in all organisms, because it catalyzes a key step of NAD synthesis. However, little is known about the structure and regulation of this enzyme. In this study we established the primary structure of human NMNAT. The human sequence represents the first report of the primary structure of this enzyme for an organism higher than yeast. The enzyme was purified from human placenta and internal peptide sequences determined. Analysis of human DNA sequence data then permitted the cloning of a cDNA encoding this enzyme. Recombinant NMNAT exhibited catalytic properties similar to the originally purified enzyme. Human NMNAT (molecular weight 31932) consists of 279 amino acids and exhibits substantial structural differences to the enzymes from lower organisms. A putative nuclear localization signal was confirmed by immunofluorescence studies. NMNAT strongly inhibited recombinant human poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1, however, NMNAT was not modified by poly(ADP-ribose). NMNAT appears to be a substrate of nuclear kinases and contains at least three potential phosphorylation sites. Endogenous and recombinant NMNAT were phosphorylated in nuclear extracts in the presence of [gamma-(32)P]ATP. We propose that NMNAT's activity or interaction with nuclear proteins are likely to be modulated by phosphorylation.

  20. Population pharmacokinetics of melphalan and glutathione S-transferase polymorphisms in relation to side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühne, A; Sezer, O; Heider, U; Meineke, I; Muhlke, S; Niere, W; Overbeck, T; Hohloch, K; Trümper, L; Brockmöller, J; Kaiser, R

    2008-05-01

    Melphalan is associated with severe side effects such as mucositis, diarrhea, and myelosuppression. We investigated how much the individual severity of these side effects is predicted by pharmacokinetics. In addition, we studied glutathione S-transferase GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 polymorphisms in relation to adverse events. A high interindividual pharmacokinetic variability was observed in 84 patients. There was a linear correlation between creatinine and melphalan clearance (P=0.0004). Patients treated with a dose > or = 70 mg/m(2) had a 23-fold increased risk to develop mucositis (P<0.001) and a 12-fold increased risk to develop diarrhea (P<0.001) compared with lower doses. The GSTP1 codon 105 polymorphism may be relevant for development of mucositis and the GSTT1 deletion may predict diarrhea, but these findings require confirmation. Melphalan-induced side effects were significantly dependent only on dose. Therapeutic drug monitoring or genotyping for GST does not appear to be very helpful in optimizing therapy with melphalan.

  1. Ablation of Arg-tRNA-protein transferases results in defective neural tube development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Kim, Seonmu; Lee, Jung Hoon; Kwon, Yong Tae; Lee, Min Jae

    2016-08-01

    The arginylation branch of the N-end rule pathway is a ubiquitin-mediated proteolytic system in which post-translational conjugation of Arg by ATE1-encoded Arg-tRNA-protein transferase to N-terminal Asp, Glu, or oxidized Cys residues generates essential degradation signals. Here, we characterized the ATE1-/- mice and identified the essential role of N-terminal arginylation in neural tube development. ATE1-null mice showed severe intracerebral hemorrhages and cystic space near the neural tubes. Expression of ATE1 was prominent in the developing brain and spinal cord, and this pattern overlapped with the migration path of neural stem cells. The ATE1-/- brain showed defective G-protein signaling. Finally, we observed reduced mitosis in ATE1-/- neuroepithelium and a significantly higher nitric oxide concentration in the ATE1-/- brain. Our results strongly suggest that the crucial role of ATE1 in neural tube development is directly related to proper turn-over of the RGS4 protein, which participate in the oxygen-sensing mechanism in the cells. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(8): 443-448].

  2. Biochemical analysis of a recombinant glutathione transferase from the cestode Echinococcus granulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harispe, Laura; García, Gabriela; Arbildi, Paula; Pascovich, Leticia; Chalar, Cora; Zaha, Arnaldo; Fernandez, Cecilia; Fernandez, Veronica

    2010-04-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are believed to be a major detoxification system in helminths. We describe the expression and functional analysis of EgGST, a cytosolic GST from Echinococcus granulosus, related to the Mu-class of mammalian enzymes. EgGST was produced as an enzymatically active dimeric protein (rEgGST), with highest specific activity towards the standard substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB; 2.5 micromol min(-1)mg(-1)), followed by ethacrynic acid. Interestingly, rEgGST displayed glutathione peroxidase activity (towards cumene hydroperoxide), and conjugated reactive carbonyls (trans-2-nonenal and trans,trans-2,4-decadienal), indicating that it may intercept damaging products of lipid peroxidation. In addition, classical GST inhibitors (cybacron blue, triphenylthin chloride and ellagic acid) and a number of anthelmintic drugs (mainly, hexachlorophene and rafoxanide) were found to interfere with glutathione-conjugation to CDNB; suggesting that they may bind to EgGST. Considered globally, the functional properties of rEgGST are similar to those of putative orthologs from Echinococcus multilcularis and Taenia solium, the other medically important cestodes. Interestingly, our results also indicate that differences exist between these closely related cestode GSTs, which probably reflect specific biological functions of the molecules in each parasitic organism.

  3. Optical biosensor consisting of glutathione-S-transferase for detection of captan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Young-Kee; Song, Sun-Young; Lee, In-ho; Lee, Won-Hong

    2003-10-15

    The optical biosensor consisting of a glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-immobilized gel film was developed to detect captan in contaminated water. The sensing scheme was based on the decrease of yellow product, s-(2,4-dinitrobenzene) glutathione, produced from substrates, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and glutathione (GSH), due to the inhibition of GST reaction by captan. Absorbance of the product as the output of enzyme reaction was detected and the light was guided through the optical fibers. The enzyme reactor of the sensor system was fabricated by the gel entrapment technique for the immobilized GST film. The immobilized GST had the maximum activity at pH 6.5. The optimal concentrations of substrates were determined with 1 mM for both of CDNB and GSH. The optimum concentration of enzyme was also determined with 100 microg/ml. The activity of immobilized enzyme was fairly sustained during 30 days. The proposed biosensor could successfully detect the captan up to 2 ppm and the response time to steady signal was about 15 min.

  4. Glutathione s-transferase M1 and T1 genetic polymorphisms in Iranian patients with glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Kazemi Safa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness and it is related to oxidative stress based on numerous studies. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs are members of multigenic family, which have important role in cells as an antioxidant. In the present study, we examined the polymorphism of GSTT1 and GSTM1 deletion genotypes (T0M1, T1M0, and T0M0 in 100 Glaucoma patients (41with primary open angle glaucoma (PCAG, and 59 with primary closed angle glaucoma (POAG compared to 100 healthy subjects. Materials and Methods: GSTM1and GSTT1 polymorphisms were determined by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Results: GSTM1 and GSTT1 null deletions genotypes were determined in 22 (53.7% and 7 (17.1% patients with PCAG and 34 (34% and 15 (15% in healthy subjects[VAIO1] . Comparison between patients and healthy subjects regarding GSTM1 and GSTT1 genotypes revealed increase of GSTM1 null deletions genotypes in patients with PCAG (P=0.03. Conclusion: It was concluded that the increased frequencies of GSTM1 null in patients with PCAG could be a risk factor for incidence of PCAG in the Iranian population.  

  5. Distribution of glutathione transferases in Gram-positive bacteria and Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allocati, Nerino; Federici, Luca; Masulli, Michele; Di Ilio, Carmine

    2012-03-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been widely studied in Gram-negative bacteria and the structure and function of several representatives have been elucidated. Conversely, limited information is available about the occurrence, classification and functional features of GSTs both in Gram-positive bacteria and in Archaea. An analysis of 305 fully-sequenced Gram-positive genomes highlights the presence of 49 putative GST genes in the genera of both Firmicutes and Actinobacteria phyla. We also performed an analysis on 81 complete genomes of the Archaea domain. Eleven hits were found in the Halobacteriaceae family of the Euryarchaeota phylum and only one in the Crenarchaeota phylum. A comparison of the identified sequences with well-characterized GSTs belonging to both Gram-negative and eukaryotic GSTs sheds light on their putative function and the evolutionary relationships within the large GST superfamily. This analysis suggests that the identified sequences mainly cluster in the new Xi class, while Beta class GSTs, widely distributed in Gram-negative bacteria, are under-represented in Gram-positive bacteria and absent in Archaea.

  6. Quantitative and selective polymerase chain reaction analysis of highly similar human alpha-class glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Emilia; Mannervik, Bengt; Raffalli-Mathieu, Françoise

    2011-05-01

    Alpha-class glutathione transferases (GSTs) found expressed in human tissues constitute a family of four homologous enzymes with contrasting enzyme activities. In particular, GST A3-3 has been shown to contribute to the biosynthesis of steroid hormones in human cells and is selectively expressed in steroidogenic tissues. The more ubiquitous GST A1-1, GST A2-2, and GST A4-4 appear to be primarily involved in detoxification processes and are expressed at higher levels than GST A3-3. We are interested in studying the cell and tissue expression of the GST A3-3 gene, yet the existence of highly expressed sequence-similar homologs and of several splice variants is a serious challenge for the specific detection of unique transcript species. We found that published polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers for GST A3-3 lack the specificity required for reliable quantitative analysis. Therefore, we designed quantitative PCR (qPCR) primers with greatly increased discrimination power for the human GSTA3 full-length transcript. The improved primers allow accurate discrimination between GST A3-3 and the other alpha-class GSTs and so are of great value to studies of the expression of the GSTA3 gene. The novel primers were used to quantify GSTA3 transcripts in human embryonic liver and steroidogenic cell lines.

  7. Structure, function and disease relevance of Omega-class glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board, Philip G; Menon, Deepthi

    2016-05-01

    The Omega-class cytosolic glutathione transferases (GSTs) have distinct structural and functional attributes that allow them to perform novel roles unrelated to the functions of other GSTs. Mammalian GSTO1-1 has been found to play a previously unappreciated role in the glutathionylation cycle that is emerging as significant mechanism regulating protein function. GSTO1-1-catalyzed glutathionylation or deglutathionylation of a key signaling protein may explain the requirement for catalytically active GSTO1-1 in LPS-stimulated pro-inflammatory signaling through the TLR4 receptor. The observation that ML175 a specific GSTO1-1 inhibitor can block LPS-stimulated inflammatory signaling has opened a new avenue for the development of novel anti-inflammatory drugs that could be useful in the treatment of toxic shock and other inflammatory disorders. The role of GSTO2-2 remains unclear. As a dehydroascorbate reductase, it could contribute to the maintenance of cellular redox balance and it is interesting to note that the GSTO2 N142D polymorphism has been associated with multiple diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, age-related cataract and breast cancer.

  8. Identification of novel glutathione transferases in Echinococcus granulosus. An evolutionary perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriarte, Andrés; Arbildi, Paula; La-Rocca, Silvana; Musto, Héctor; Fernández, Verónica

    2012-09-01

    Glutathione transferase enzymes (GSTs) constitute a major detoxification system in helminth parasites and have been related to the modulation of host immune response mechanisms. At least three different GSTs classes have been described in Platyhelminthes: Mu, Sigma and Omega. Mining the genome of Echinococcus multilocularis and the ESTs databases of Taenia solium and E. granulosus identified two new GSTs from the cestode E. granulosus, named EgGST2 and EgGST3. It also revealed that the Omega class of GSTs was absent from the Taenidae family. EgGST2 and EgGST3 are actively expressed in the parasite. In order to know the origin of these new GSTs, in silico analyses were performed. While EgGST2 is classified as belonging to the Sigma class, the data obtained for EgGST3 allowed a less clear interpretation. The study of the evolutionary relatedness based on the C-terminal domain sequence, gene structure conservation and three-dimensional structure predictions, suggests that EgGST3 is derived from the Platyhelminthes' Sigma-class cluster. Interestingly, the N-terminal domain displays some characteristic Omega-class residues, including a Cys residue that is likely to be involved in the catalytic mechanism. We discuss different evolutionary scenarios that could explain the observed patterns.

  9. Selective binding of glutathione conjugates of fatty acid derivatives by plant glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, David P; Edwards, Robert

    2009-08-07

    Proteomic studies with Arabidopsis thaliana have revealed that the plant-specific Tau (U) class glutathione transferases (GSTs) are selectively retained by S-hexylglutathione affinity supports. Overexpression of members of the Arabidopsis GST superfamily in Escherichia coli showed that 25 of the complement of 28 GSTUs caused the aberrant accumulation of acylated glutathione thioesters in vivo, a perturbation that was not observed with other GST classes. Each GSTU caused a specific group of fatty acyl derivatives to accumulate, which varied in chain length (C(6) to C(18)), additional oxygen content (0 or 1), and desaturation (0 or 1). Thioesters bound tightly to recombinant GSTs (K(d) approximately 1 microm), explaining their accumulation. Transient expression of GSTUs in Nicotiana benthamiana followed by recovery by Strep-tag affinity chromatography allowed the respective plant ligands to be extracted and characterized. Again, each GST showed a distinct profile of recovered metabolites, notably glutathionylated oxophytodienoic acid and related oxygenated fatty acids. Similarly, the expression of the major Tau protein GSTU19 in the endogenous host Arabidopsis led to the selective binding of the glutathionylated oxophytodienoic acid-glutathione conjugate, with the enzyme able to catalyze the conjugation reaction. Additional ligands identified in planta included other fatty acid derivatives including divinyl ethers and glutathionylated chlorogenic acid. The strong and specific retention of various oxygenated fatty acids by each GSTU and the conservation in binding observed in the different hosts suggest that these proteins have selective roles in binding and conjugating these unstable metabolites in vivo.

  10. Structural insights into the dehydroascorbate reductase activity of human omega-class glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huina; Brock, Joseph; Liu, Dan; Board, Philip G; Oakley, Aaron J

    2012-07-13

    The reduction of dehydroascorbate (DHA) to ascorbic acid (AA) is a vital cellular function. The omega-class glutathione transferases (GSTs) catalyze several reductive reactions in cellular biochemistry, including DHA reduction. In humans, two isozymes (GSTO1-1 and GSTO2-2) with significant DHA reductase (DHAR) activity are found, sharing 64% sequence identity. While the activity of GSTO2-2 is higher, it is significantly more unstable in vitro. We report the first crystal structures of human GSTO2-2, stabilized through site-directed mutagenesis and determined at 1.9 Å resolution in the presence and absence of glutathione (GSH). The structure of a human GSTO1-1 has been determined at 1.7 Å resolution in complex with the reaction product AA, which unexpectedly binds in the G-site, where the glutamyl moiety of GSH binds. The structure suggests a similar mode of ascorbate binding in GSTO2-2. This is the first time that a non-GSH-based reaction product has been observed in the G-site of any GST. AA stacks against a conserved aromatic residue, F34 (equivalent to Y34 in GSTO2-2). Mutation of Y34 to alanine in GSTO2-2 eliminates DHAR activity. From these structures and other biochemical data, we propose a mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis of DHAR activity.

  11. Expression of Candida albicans glutathione transferases is induced inside phagocytes and upon diverse environmental stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcerá, Ana; Casas, Celia; Herrero, Enrique

    2010-06-01

    Candida albicans has four ORFs for glutathione transferases (GSTs) of the GTT classes, and another one coding for an Omega class member. Under laboratory conditions, only GTT11 (GTT1/2 class) and GTO1 (Omega class) are expressed significantly in exponentially growing cells, particularly when these are subjected to diverse environmental stresses, including oxidative stress. They also become transitorily upregulated at the early stationary phase. Accordingly, the levels of the CaGto1 and CaGtt11 proteins increase after treatment with oxidants and upon osmotic stress, in addition to the early stationary phase. GTT11 and GTO1 transcription shows a complex dependence on the Hog1 and Cap1 factors upon different stresses. Purified CaGtt11 and CaGto1 proteins display enzyme activities similar to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologues. Thus, CaGtt11 has activity against standard GST substrates and is also active as peroxidase, while CaGto1 displays thiol oxidoreductase and dehydroascorbate reductase activities. Fluorescence microscopy and subfractionation studies indicate that CaGto1 is cytosolic, while CaGtt11 is associated with a particulate fraction. Under ex vivo conditions, CaGto1 and CaGtt11 become transitorily upregulated inside macrophages and neutrophils. Under these conditions, the promoter of GTT14 (GTT1/2 class) also becomes activated. These observations point to the importance of C. albicans GSTs in the defence against phagocytes.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of a series of highly fluorogenic substrates for glutathione transferases, a general strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Shibata, Aya; Ito, Mika; Shuto, Satoshi; Ito, Yoshihiro; Mannervik, Bengt; Abe, Hiroshi; Morgenstern, Ralf

    2011-09-07

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are used in biotechnology applications as fusion partners for facile purification and are also overexpressed in certain tumors. Consequently, there is a need for sensitive detection of the enzymes. Here we describe a general strategy for the synthesis and characterization of novel fluorogenic substrates for GSTs. The substrates were synthesized by introducing an electrophilic sulfonamide linkage to fluorescent molecules containing an amino group [e.g., 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonamide (DNs) derivatives of coumarin, cresyl violet, and rhodamine]. The derivatives were essentially nonfluorescent, and upon GST catalyzed cleavage of the dinitrobenzenesulfonamide, free fluorophore is released (and 1-glutathionyl-2,4-dinitrobenzene + SO(2)). All the coumarin-, cresyl violet- and rhodamine-based fluorogenic probes turned out to be good substrates for most GSTs, especially for GSTA(1-1), in terms of strong fluorescence increases (71-1200-fold), high k(cat)/K(m) values (10(4)-10(7) M(-1) s(-1)) and significant rate enhancements (10(6)-10(9)-fold). The substrates were successfully applied to quantitate very low levels of GST activity in cell extracts and DNs-cresyl violet was also successfully applied to the imaging of microsomal MGST(1) activity in living cells. The cresyl violet stained cells retained their fluorescence after fixation, which is a very useful property. In summary, we describe a general and versatile strategy to generate fluorogenic GST substrates, some of them providing the most sensitive assays so far described for GSTs.

  13. Developmental studies on the Sigma and Delta-1 glutathione transferases of Lucilia cuprina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Ramavati; Sanil, Nitasha; Clark, Alan

    2012-03-01

    The glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a large group of enzymes having both detoxication roles and specialist metabolic functions. The present work represents an initial approach to identifying some of these roles by examining the variation of specific members of the family under differing conditions. The GSTs from Lucilia cuprina have been partially purified, members of two families being isolated, by the use of glutathione immobilised on epichlorhydrin-activated Sepharose 6B. The GSTs were separated by 2D SDS-PAGE and characterised by MALDI-TOF analysis of tryptic peptides. The mass fragments were then matched against the corresponding Drosophila melanogaster and Musca domestica sequences. GSTs were identified as coming from only the Sigma and Delta classes. The multiple Delta zones appear all to be derived from the Lucilia GSTD1 isoform. The distribution of these GST proteins has been studied during different developmental stages of the insect. Delta isoforms were present in all developmental stages of L. cuprina. The Sigma GST was not detectable in the egg, was just detectable in the larval and pupal stages and was the major GST isolated in the adult. Sigma and Delta isoforms were both found in all body segments of the insect. Both isoforms appear to undergo extensive post-translational modification. Activities of the two types of protein with model substrates have been determined.

  14. Diverging catalytic capacities and selectivity profiles with haloalkane substrates of chimeric alpha class glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtovic, Sanela; Shokeer, Abeer; Mannervik, Bengt

    2008-05-01

    Six homologous Alpha class glutathione transferases of human, bovine, and rat origins were hybridized by means of DNA shuffling. The chimeric mutants were compared with the parental enzymes in their activities with several alkyl iodides. In order to facilitate a multivariate analysis of relationships between substrates and enzyme activities, three descriptors were introduced: 'specific catalytic capacity', 'substrate selectivity', and 'unit-scaled substrate selectivity'. In some cases the purified mutants showed higher specific activity with a certain alkyl iodide than any of the parental enzymes. However, the overriding effect of DNA shuffling was the generation of chimeras with altered substrate selectivity profiles and catalytic capacities. The altered substrate selectivity profiles of some mutants could be rationalized by changes of the substrate-binding residues in the active site of the enzyme. However, in four of the isolated mutants all active-site residues were found identical with those of rat GST A2-2, even though their substrate specificity profiles were significantly different. Clearly, amino acid residues distant from first-sphere interactions with the substrate influence the catalytic activity. These results are relevant both to the understanding how functional properties may develop in natural enzyme evolution and in the tailoring of novel functions in protein engineering.

  15. Glutathione transferases from Anguilla anguilla liver: identification, cloning and functional characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carletti, Erminia; Sulpizio, Marilisa; Bucciarelli, Tonino; Del Boccio, Piero; Federici, Luca; Di Ilio, Carmine

    2008-10-20

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) constitute a class of detoxifying enzymes involved in Phase II metabolism. Using GSH-affinity chromatografy followed by HPLC analysis, two GST isoforms were isolated from the Anguilla anguilla liver cytosol. The major GST belongs to the piscine-specific rho class and accounted for about 59% of total GST affinity eluted fraction, while the remaining 41% was represented by a Pi class GST. Both isoforms were cloned, heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and their enzyme activities were characterized with respect to a broad spectrum of well-known GST substrates. Our data indicate that only a fraction of prototypical GST substrates are conjugated by these enzymes and that Pi class GST has higher specific activity than rho class GST against 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), ethracrynic acid, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide and p-nitrophenyl acetate while trans-2-nonenal is detoxified more efficiently by rho class GST. Analysis of the kinetics parameters of the conjugation against CDNB indicated that the utilization ratio K(cat)/K(m) is slightly higher for rho class GST with respect to pi class GSTs. Finally, to determine the potential for environmental inhibition of the GST isoforms, we examined the effect of the widely used herbicide atrazine as an inhibitor of catalytic activity. The inhibition studies revealed that atrazine was an effective inhibitor of GST-CDNB catalytic activities of both isoforms at micromolar concentrations, suggesting the sensitivity of these isoforms to pesticide inhibition at environmentally relevant concentrations.

  16. Effect of acaricides on the activity of glutathione transferases from the parasitic mite Sarcoptes scabiei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molin, E U; Mattsson, J G

    2008-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a family of multifunctional enzymes with fundamental roles in cellular detoxication. Here we report the molecular characterization of 3 recombinant GSTs belonging to the mu- and delta-class from the parasitic mite Sarcoptes scabiei. Kinetic constants were determined, and the effect of acaricides, including organothiophosphates, pyrethroid esters, a formamidine, a macrocyclic lactone, an organochlorine as well as a bridged diphenyl acaricide, on the activity of the GSTs were tested using 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as model substrate. Our results showed that enzymes from the same class and with high amino acid sequence identity have significantly different kinetic properties. For instance, one mu-class GST lost more than 50% of its activity in the presence of one of the organothiophosphates while the activity of the second mu-class GST was only slightly reduced under identical conditions. Tertiary structure modulations indicated that structural differences were the crucial factor for the different kinetic patterns observed. Genome analysis showed that the two mu-class GSTs are organized in tandem in the S. scabiei genome. Taken together these results show that GSTs might be involved in the metabolism of acaricides in S. scabiei.

  17. Immunoprophylactic potential of filarial glutathione-s-transferase in lymphatic filariaisis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BalM; MandalN; AcharyKG; DasMK; KarSK

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To elucidates the immunoprophylactic potential of glutathion-s-transferase (GST) from cattle filarial parasite Setaria digitata (S. digitata) against lymphatic filariasis. Methods:GST was purified through affinity chromatography (SdGST) and chacterized by SDS-PAGE and Nano-LC MS/MS analysis. Antibody isotypes to SdGST were measured by ELISA. Antibody dependant cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) was performed in vitro using sera from immunized animals and immune individuals. T-cell proliferation and cytokine response to SdGST in different groups of filariasis were measured. Immunoprophylactic potential of SdGST was evaluate in animal model. Results: SdGST exhibited 30-fold enhancement of enzyme activity over crude parasitic extract. It was found to be 26 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Nano LC-MS/MS analysis followed by blast search showed 100%homology with Dirofilaria immitis (D. immitis) and only 43%with Homo sapiens (H. sapiens). Immunoblotting analysis showed putatively immune individuals carry significant level of antibodies to SdGST as compared with microfilaraemics. Immunized sera and sera endemic normal could neutralize the enzymatic activity of SdGST and inducing in vitro cytotoxicity of microfilariae. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from endemic normals upon stimulation with SdGST showed a mixed type of Th1/Th2 response. SdGST immunization clear microfilariae from circulation in S. digitata implanted mastomys. Conclusions:The heterologous GST could be potentially developed as a vaccine candidate against lymphatic filarial parasite.

  18. Novel derivatives of aclacinomycin A block cancer cell migration through inhibition of farnesyl transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magi, Shigeyuki; Shitara, Tetsuo; Takemoto, Yasushi; Sawada, Masato; Kitagawa, Mitsuhiro; Tashiro, Etsu; Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Imoto, Masaya

    2013-03-01

    In the course of screening for an inhibitor of farnesyl transferase (FTase), we identified two compounds, N-benzyl-aclacinomycin A (ACM) and N-allyl-ACM, which are new derivatives of ACM. N-benzyl-ACM and N-allyl-ACM inhibited FTase activity with IC50 values of 0.86 and 2.93 μM, respectively. Not only ACM but also C-10 epimers of each ACM derivative failed to inhibit FTase. The inhibition of FTase by N-benzyl-ACM and N-allyl-ACM seems to be specific, because these two compounds did not inhibit geranylgeranyltransferase or geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) synthase up to 100 μM. In cultured A431 cells, N-benzyl-ACM and N-allyl-ACM also blocked both the membrane localization of H-Ras and activation of the H-Ras-dependent PI3K/Akt pathway. In addition, they inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced migration of A431 cells. Thus, N-benzyl-ACM and N-allyl-ACM inhibited EGF-induced migration of A431 cells by inhibiting the farnesylation of H-Ras and subsequent H-Ras-dependent activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway.

  19. Characterization and evolutionary implications of the triad Asp-Xxx-Glu in group II phosphopantetheinyl transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue-Yue; Li, Yu-Dong; Liu, Jian-Bo; Ran, Xin-Xin; Guo, Yuan-Yang; Ren, Ni-Ni; Chen, Xin; Jiang, Hui; Li, Yong-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTases), which play an essential role in both primary and secondary metabolism, are magnesium binding enzymes. In this study, we characterized the magnesium binding residues of all known group II PPTases by biochemical and evolutionary analysis. Our results suggested that group II PPTases could be classified into two subgroups, two-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases containing the triad Asp-Xxx-Glu and three-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases containing the triad Asp-Glu-Glu. Mutations of two three-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases and one two-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTase indicate that the first and the third residues in the triads are essential to activities; the second residues in the triads are non-essential. Although variations of the second residues in the triad Asp-Xxx-Glu exist throughout the whole phylogenetic tree, the second residues are conserved in animals, plants, algae, and most prokaryotes, respectively. Evolutionary analysis suggests that: the animal group II PPTases may originate from one common ancestor; the plant two-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases may originate from one common ancestor; the plant three-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases may derive from horizontal gene transfer from prokaryotes.

  20. Legionella shows a diverse secondary metabolism dependent on a broad spectrum Sfp-type phosphopantetheinyl transferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Tobias

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Several members of the genus Legionella cause Legionnaires’ disease, a potentially debilitating form of pneumonia. Studies frequently focus on the abundant number of virulence factors present in this genus. However, what is often overlooked is the role of secondary metabolites from Legionella. Following whole genome sequencing, we assembled and annotated the Legionella parisiensis DSM 19216 genome. Together with 14 other members of the Legionella, we performed comparative genomics and analysed the secondary metabolite potential of each strain. We found that Legionella contains a huge variety of biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs that are potentially making a significant number of novel natural products with undefined function. Surprisingly, only a single Sfp-like phosphopantetheinyl transferase is found in all Legionella strains analyzed that might be responsible for the activation of all carrier proteins in primary (fatty acid biosynthesis and secondary metabolism (polyketide and non-ribosomal peptide synthesis. Using conserved active site motifs, we predict some novel compounds that are probably involved in cell-cell communication, differing to known communication systems. We identify several gene clusters, which may represent novel signaling mechanisms and demonstrate the natural product potential of Legionella.

  1. Phenylalanine-induced leucopenia in genetic and dichloroacetic acid generated deficiency of glutathione transferase Zeta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoratos, Angelo; Tu, Wen Juan; Cappello, Jean; Blackburn, Anneke C; Matthaei, Klaus; Board, Philip G

    2009-04-15

    Glutathione transferase Zeta (GSTZ1-1) is identical to maleylacetoacetate isomerase and catalyses a significant step in the catabolism of phenylalanine and tyrosine. Exposure of GSTZ1-1 deficient mice to high dietary phenylalanine causes a rapid loss of circulating white blood cells (WBCs). The loss was significant (P<0.05) after 2 days and total WBCs were reduced by 60% after 6 days. The rapid loss of WBCs was attributed to the accumulation of the catabolic intermediates maleylacetoacetate or maleylacetone (MA) in the circulation. Serum from GSTZ1-1 deficient mice treated with phenylalanine was cytotoxic to splenocytes from normal BALB/c mice and direct incubation of normal splenocytes with MA caused a rapid loss of viability. Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) has been used therapeutically to treat lactic acidosis and is potentially of use in cancer chemotherapy. Since DCA can inactivate GSTZ1-1 there is a possibility that long-term treatment of patients with DCA could cause GSTZ1-1 deficiency and susceptibility to oxidative stress and phenylalanine/tyrosine-induced WBC loss. However, although we found that DCA at 200mg/(kg day) causes a severe loss of hepatic GSTZ1-1 activity in BALB/c mice, it did not induce WBC cytotoxicity when combined with high dietary phenylalanine.

  2. Measurement of mouse liver glutathione S-transferase activity by the integrated method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖飞; 李甲初; 康格非; 曾昭淳; 左渝萍

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The integrated method was investigated to measure Vm/Km of mouse liver glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity on GSH and 7-Cl-4-nitrobenzofurazozan. Methods: Presetting concentration of one substrate twenty-fold above the others and taking maximum product absorbance Am as parameter while Km as constant, Vm/Km was obtained by nonlinear fitting of GST reaction curve to the integrated Michaelis-Menten equation ln [Am/(Am-Ai)]+Ai/(ε×Km)=(Vm/Km)×ti (1). Results: Vm/Km for GST showed slight dependence on initial substrate concentration and data range, but it was resistant to background absorbance, error in reaction origin and small deviation in presetting Km. Vm/Km was proportional to the amount of GST with upper limit higher than that by initial rate. There was close correlation between Vm/Km and initial rate of the same GST. Consistent results were obtained by this integrated method and classical initial rate method for the measurement of mouse liver GST. Conclusion: With the concentration of one substrate twenty-fold above the others, this integrated method was reliable to measure the activity of enzyme on two substrates, and substrate concentration of the lower one close to its apparent Km was able to be used.

  3. Action of glycosyl transferases upon "Bombay" (Oh) erythrocytes. Conversion to cells showing blood-group H and A specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkel-Brunner, H; Prohaska, R; Tuppy, H

    1975-08-15

    Individuals of the rare "Bombay" (Oh) blood-group phenotype lacking, due to a genetic defect, the alpha(1-2)fucosyl transferase, which is responsible for converting blood-group H precursor substances to H-specific structures. Treatment with GDP-fucose and alpha(1-2)fucosyl transferase prepared from gastric mucosa of O individuals to transform native or ficin-treated "Bombay" erythrocytes into cells phenotypically resembling O cells. The transformation was achieved, however, after prior incubation of the "Bombay" erythrocytes with neuraminidase, indicating that blood-group H precursor molecules on the surface of these cells are masked by sialyl residues. Blood-group A specificity was conferred upon neuraminidase-treated "Bombay" cells by enzymatic transfer of alpha-N-acetylgalactosamine residues, in addition to alpha-fucose residues.

  4. Effects of glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1 deletions on epilepsy risk among a Tunisian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chbili, Chahra; B'chir, Fatma; Ben Fredj, Maha; Saguem, Bochra-Nourhène; Ben Amor, Sana; Ben Ammou, Sofiene; Saguem, Saad

    2014-09-01

    Glutathione-S-transferases enzymes are involved in the detoxification of several endogenous and exogenous substances. In this present study, we evaluated the effects of two glutathione-S-transferase polymorphisms, (GSTM1 and GSTT1) on epilepsy risk susceptibility in a Tunisian population. These polymorphisms were analyzed in 229 healthy subjects and 98 patients with epilepsy, using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Odds ratio (ORs) was used for analyzing results. The study results demonstrated that individuals with the GSTM1 null genotype were at an increased risk of developing epilepsy [OR=3.80, 95% confidence interval (CI) (2.15-4.78)], whereas no significant effects were observed between individuals with GSTT1 null genotype and epilepsy risk [OR=1.15, 95% CI (0.62-2.12)]. These genotyping finding revealed that the absence of GSTM1 activity could be contributor factor for the development of epilepsy disease.

  5. The pleuromutilin drugs tiamulin and valnemulin bind to the RNA at the peptidyl transferase centre on the ribosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, S M; Karlsson, M; Johansson, L B;

    2001-01-01

    The pleuromutilin antibiotic derivatives, tiamulin and valnemulin, inhibit protein synthesis by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit of bacteria. The action and binding site of tiamulin and valnemulin was further characterized on Escherichia coli ribosomes. It was revealed that these drugs are st...... results that tiamulin and valnemulin interact with the rRNA in the peptidyl transferase slot on the ribosomes in which they prevent the correct positioning of the CCA-ends of tRNAs for peptide transfer....

  6. Distinct and cooperative activities of HESO1 and URT1 nucleotidyl transferases in microRNA turnover in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Tu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available 3' uridylation is increasingly recognized as a conserved RNA modification process associated with RNA turnover in eukaryotes. 2'-O-methylation on the 3' terminal ribose protects micro(miRNAs from 3' truncation and 3' uridylation in Arabidopsis. Previously, we identified HESO1 as the nucleotidyl transferase that uridylates most unmethylated miRNAs in vivo, but substantial 3' tailing of miRNAs still remains in heso1 loss-of-function mutants. In this study, we found that among nine other potential nucleotidyl transferases, UTP:RNA uridylyltransferase 1 (URT1 is the single most predominant nucleotidyl transferase that tails miRNAs. URT1 and HESO1 prefer substrates with different 3' end nucleotides in vitro and act cooperatively to tail different forms of the same miRNAs in vivo. Moreover, both HESO1 and URT1 exhibit nucleotidyl transferase activity on AGO1-bound miRNAs. Although these enzymes are able to add long tails to AGO1-bound miRNAs, the tailed miRNAs remain associated with AGO1. Moreover, tailing of AGO1-bound miRNA165/6 drastically reduces the slicing activity of AGO1-miR165/6, suggesting that tailing reduces miRNA activity. However, monouridylation of miR171a by URT1 endows the miRNA the ability to trigger the biogenesis of secondary siRNAs. Therefore, 3' tailing could affect the activities of miRNAs in addition to leading to miRNA degradation.

  7. Glutathione S-transferase Ya subunit gene: identification of regulatory elements required for basal level and inducible expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Telakowski-Hopkins, C A; King, R. G.; Pickett, C B

    1988-01-01

    The function of the 5'-flanking region of a rat glutathione S-transferase Ya subunit structural gene has been examined in homologous and heterologous cells. By using the 5'-flanking region of the Ya subunit gene fused to the structural gene encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, we have identified two cis-acting regulatory elements in the upstream region of the Ya gene. One element is required for maximum basal level expression in homologous cells, whereas maximum basal level expression ...

  8. A fluorescent assay amenable to measuring production of beta-D-glucuronides produced from recombinant UDP-glycosyl transferase enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, O V; Shaw, P M

    1999-05-01

    Beta-glucuronidase cleavage of 4-methylumbelliferyl beta-D-glucuronide generates the highly fluorescent compound, 4-methylumbelliferone. We show that other beta-D-glucuronide compounds act as competitors in this assay. The 4-methylumbelliferyl beta-D-glucuronide cleavage assay can easily be adapted to high throughput formats to detect the presence of beta-D glucuronides generated using recombinant glycosyl transferase preparations.

  9. Relationship between gamma-glutamyl transferase and glucose intolerance in first degree relatives of type 2 diabetics patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sassan Haghighi; Massoud Amini; Zahra Pournaghshband; Peyvand Amini; Silva Hovsepian

    2011-01-01

    Background: Considering that serum gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) activity could reflect several different processes relevant to diabetes pathogenesis and the increasing rate of type 2 diabetes worldwide, the aim of this study was to assess the association between serum GGT concentrations and glucose intolerance, in the first-degree relatives (FDR) of type 2 diabetic patients. Methods: In this descriptive study, 30-80 years old, non diabetic FDRs of type 2 diabetic patients were studie...

  10. Effect of trans-acting factor on rat glutathione S-transferase P1 gene transcription regulation in tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘东远; 廖名湘; 左瑾; 方福德

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of trans-acting factor(s) on rat glutathione S-transferase P1 gene (rGSTP1) transcription regulation in tumor cells. Methods The binding of trans-acting factor(s) to two enhancers of the rGSTP1 gene, glutathione S-transferase P enhancer Ⅰ (GPEI) and glutathione S-transferase P enhancer Ⅱ-1 (GPEⅡ-1), was identified by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). The molecular weight of trans-acting factor was measured in a UV cross-linking experiment. Results Trans-acting factor interacting with the core sequence of GPEI (cGPEI) were found in human cervical adenocarcinoma cell line (HeLa) and rat hepatoma cell line (CBRH7919). These proteins were not expressed in normal rat liver. Although specific binding proteins that bound to GPEⅡ-1 were detected in all three cell types, a 64 kDa binding protein that exists in HeLa and CBRH7919 cells was absent in normal rat liver. Conclusion cGPEI, GPEII specific binding proteins expressed in HeLa and CBRH7919 cells may play an important role in the high transcriptional level of the rGSTP1 gene in tumor cells.

  11. Partial purification and characterization of a mannosyl transferase involved in O -linked mannosylation of glycoproteins in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Flores, Blanca L; Calvo-Méndez, Carlos; Flores-Carreón, Arturo; López-Romero, Everardo

    2004-04-01

    Incubation of a mixed membrane fraction of C. albicans with the nonionic detergents Nonidet P-40 or Lubrol solubilized a fraction that catalyzed the transfer of mannose either from endogenously generated or exogenously added dolichol-P-[14C]Man onto endogenous protein acceptors. The protein mannosyl transferase solubilized with Nonidet P-40 was partially purified by a single step of preparative nondenaturing electrophoresis and some of its properties were investigated. Although transfer activity occurred in the absence of exogenous mannose acceptors and thus depended on acceptor proteins isolated along with the enzyme, addition of the protein fraction obtained after chemical de-mannosylation of glycoproteins synthesized in vitro stimulated mannoprotein labeling in a concentration-dependent manner. Other de-mannosylated glycoproteins, such as yeast invertase or glycoproteins extracted from C. albicans, failed to increase the amount of labeled mannoproteins. Mannosyl transfer activity was not influenced by common metal ions such as Mg(2+), Mn(2+) and Ca(2+), but it was stimulated up to 3-fold by EDTA. Common phosphoglycerides such as phosphatidylglycerol and, to a lower extent, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine enhanced transfer activity. Interestingly, coupled transfer activity between dolichol phosphate mannose synthase, i.e., the enzyme responsible for Dol-P-Man synthesis, and protein mannosyl transferase could be reconstituted in vitro from the partially purified transferases, indicating that this process can occur in the absence of cell membranes.

  12. An alternate pathway of arsenate resistance in E. coli mediated by the glutathione S-transferase GstB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysostomou, Constantine; Quandt, Erik M; Marshall, Nicholas M; Stone, Everett; Georgiou, George

    2015-03-20

    Microbial arsenate resistance is known to be conferred by specialized oxidoreductase enzymes termed arsenate reductases. We carried out a genetic selection on media supplemented with sodium arsenate for multicopy genes that can confer growth to E. coli mutant cells lacking the gene for arsenate reductase (E. coli ΔarsC). We found that overexpression of glutathione S-transferase B (GstB) complemented the ΔarsC allele and conferred growth on media containing up to 5 mM sodium arsenate. Interestingly, unlike wild type E. coli arsenate reductase, arsenate resistance via GstB was not dependent on reducing equivalents provided by glutaredoxins or a catalytic cysteine residue. Instead, two arginine residues, which presumably coordinate the arsenate substrate within the electrophilic binding site of GstB, were found to be critical for transferase activity. We provide biochemical evidence that GstB acts to directly reduce arsenate to arsenite with reduced glutathione (GSH) as the electron donor. Our results reveal a pathway for the detoxification of arsenate in bacteria that hinges on a previously undescribed function of a bacterial glutathione S-transferase.

  13. Neuroantibodies (NAB) in African-American Children: Associations with Gender, Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST)Pi Polymorphisms (SNP) and Heavy Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    CONTACT (NAME ONLY): Hassan El-Fawal Abstract Details PRESENTATION TYPE: Platform or Poster CURRENT CATEGORY: Neurodegenerative Disease | Biomarkers | Neurotoxicity, Metals KEYWORDS: Autoantibodies, Glutathione-S-Transferase, DATE/TIME LAST MODIFIED: DATE/TIME SUBMITTED: Abs...

  14. Glutathione S-transferase P protects against cyclophosphamide-induced cardiotoxicity in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conklin, Daniel J., E-mail: dj.conklin@louisville.edu [Diabetes and Obesity Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Institute of Molecular Cardiology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Haberzettl, Petra; Jagatheesan, Ganapathy; Baba, Shahid [Diabetes and Obesity Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Institute of Molecular Cardiology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Merchant, Michael L. [Diabetes and Obesity Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Prough, Russell A. [Diabetes and Obesity Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Williams, Jessica D. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Internal Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Prabhu, Sumanth D. [Division of Cardiovascular Disease, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Bhatnagar, Aruni [Diabetes and Obesity Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Institute of Molecular Cardiology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    High-dose chemotherapy regimens using cyclophosphamide (CY) are frequently associated with cardiotoxicity that could lead to myocyte damage and congestive heart failure. However, the mechanisms regulating the cardiotoxic effects of CY remain unclear. Because CY is converted to an unsaturated aldehyde acrolein, a toxic, reactive CY metabolite that induces extensive protein modification and myocardial injury, we examined the role of glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP), an acrolein-metabolizing enzyme, in CY cardiotoxicity in wild-type (WT) and GSTP-null mice. Treatment with CY (100–300 mg/kg) increased plasma levels of creatine kinase-MB isoform (CK·MB) and heart-to-body weight ratio to a significantly greater extent in GSTP-null than WT mice. In addition to modest yet significant echocardiographic changes following acute CY-treatment, GSTP insufficiency was associated with greater phosphorylation of c-Jun and p38 as well as greater accumulation of albumin and protein–acrolein adducts in the heart. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed likely prominent modification of albumin, kallikrein-1-related peptidase, myoglobin and transgelin-2 by acrolein in the hearts of CY-treated mice. Treatment with acrolein (low dose, 1–5 mg/kg) also led to increased heart-to-body weight ratio and myocardial contractility changes. Acrolein induced similar hypotension in GSTP-null and WT mice. GSTP-null mice also were more susceptible than WT mice to mortality associated with high-dose acrolein (10–20 mg/kg). Collectively, these results suggest that CY cardiotoxicity is regulated, in part, by GSTP, which prevents CY toxicity by detoxifying acrolein. Thus, humans with low cardiac GSTP levels or polymorphic forms of GSTP with low acrolein-metabolizing capacity may be more sensitive to CY toxicity. - Graphical abstract: Cyclophosphamide (CY) treatment results in P450-mediated metabolic formation of phosphoramide mustard and acrolein (3-propenal). Acrolein is either metabolized and

  15. Association of catechol-o-methyl transferase gene polymorphism with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mir davood omrani

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: A single nucleotide variation within  atechol-o-methyl transferase (COMT gene may alter the COMT enzyme activity level. Polymorphism of Val158Met in the COMT gene has been related to malignancy. In this regard, a study was carried out to find a possible association between the COMT gene polymorphism in patients with sporadic prostate cancer (PCa and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH.
    • METHODS: All types of COMT158 Val/Met polymorphism were carried out using ASO-PCR method in 41 patients with prostate cancer, 193 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and 107 healthy male individuals.
    • RESULTS: The results of this study showed that the frequency of low producer allele A at codon 158 of the  OMT gene is significantly different in BPH group compared to normal male control group (OR, 95% CI, p value 1.95: 1.46, 2.44, 0.021, respectively. However no significant difference was noticed when the comparison was made between prostate cancer group and normal male control group and also between BPH and PCa groups.
    • CONCLUSIONS: Decreased level of catechol-o-methyl transferase gene

    • Farnesyl transferase inhibitors induce extended remissions in transgenic mice with mature B cell lymphomas

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Refaeli Yosef

      2008-05-01

      Full Text Available Abstract Background We have used a mouse model based on overexpression of c-Myc in B cells genetically engineered to be self-reactive to test the hypothesis that farnesyl transferase inhibitors (FTIs can effectively treat mature B cell lymphomas. FTIs are undergoing clinical trials to treat both lymphoid and non-lymphoid malignancies and we wished to obtain evidence to support the inclusion of B cell lymphomas in future trials. Results We report that two FTIs, L-744,832 and SCH66336, blocked the growth of mature B cell lymphoma cells in vitro and in vivo. The FTI treatment affected the proliferation and survival of the transformed B cells to a greater extent than naïve B cells stimulated with antigen. In syngeneic mice transplanted with the transgenic lymphoma cells, L-744,832 treatment prevented the growth of the tumor cells and the morbidity associated with the resulting lymphoma progression. Tumors that arose from transplantation of the lymphoma cells regressed with as little as three days of treatment with L-744,832 or SCH66336. Treatment of these established lymphomas with L-744,832 for seven days led to long-term remission of the disease in approximately 25% of animals. Conclusion FTI treatment can block the proliferation and survival of self-reactive transformed B cells that overexpress Myc. In mice transplanted with mature B cell lymphomas, we found that FTI treatment led to regression of disease. FTIs warrant further consideration as therapeutic agents for mature B cell lymphomas and other lymphoid tumors.

    • Structural analysis of an epsilon-class glutathione transferase from housefly, Musca domestica.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Nakamura, Chihiro; Yajima, Shunsuke; Miyamoto, Toru; Sue, Masayuki

      2013-01-25

      Glutathione transferases (GSTs) play an important role in the detoxification of insecticides, and as such, they are a key contributor to enhanced resistance to insecticides. In the housefly (Musca domestica), two epsilon-class GSTs (MdGST6A and MdGST6B) that share high sequence homology have been identified, which are believed to be involved in resistance against insecticides. The structural determinants controlling the substrate specificity and enzyme activity of MdGST6s are unknown. The aim of this study was to crystallize and perform structural analysis of the GST isozyme, MdGST6B. The crystal structure of MdGST6B complexed with reduced glutathione (GSH) was determined at a resolution of 1.8 Å. MdGST6B was found to have a typical GST folding comprised of N-terminal and C-terminal domains. Arg113 and Phe121 on helix 4 were shown to protrude into the substrate binding pocket, and as a result, the entrance of the substrate binding pocket was narrower compared to delta- and epsilon-class GSTs from Africa malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, agGSTd1-6 and agGSTe2, respectively. This substrate pocket narrowing is partly due to the presence of a π-helix in the middle of helix 4. Among the six residues that donate hydrogen bonds to GSH, only Arg113 was located in the C-terminal domain. Ala substitution of Arg113 did not have a significant effect on enzyme activity, suggesting that the Arg113 hydrogen bond does not play a crucial role in catalysis. On the other hand, mutation at Phe108, located just below Arg113 in the binding pocket, reduced the affinity and catalytic activity to both GSH and the electrophilic co-substrate, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene.

    • Glutathione transferases and glutathionylated hemoglobin in workers exposed to low doses of 1,3-butadiene.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Primavera, Alessandra; Fustinoni, Silvia; Biroccio, Antonino; Ballerini, Sabrina; Urbani, Andrea; Bernardini, Sergio; Federici, Giorgio; Capucci, Enrico; Manno, Maurizio; Lo Bello, Mario

      2008-11-01

      We evaluated glutathione transferase (GST) activities and the levels of glutathionylated hemoglobin in the RBC of 42 workers exposed to 1,3-butadiene in a petrochemical plant, using 43 workers not exposed to 1,3-butadiene and 82 foresters as internal and external controls, respectively. Median 1,3-butadiene exposure levels were 1.5, 0.4, and 0.1 microg/m3 in 1,3-butadiene-exposed workers, in workers not directly exposed to 1,3-butadiene, and in foresters, respectively. In addition, we determined in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of the same individuals the presence of GST polymorphic genes GSTT1 and GSTM1 and the distribution of GSTP1 allelic variants. Comparing the mean values observed in petrochemical workers with those of control foresters, we found a marked decrease of GST enzymatic activity and a significant increase of glutathionylated hemoglobin in the petrochemical workers. A weak but significant negative correlation was found between levels of 1,3-butadiene exposure and GST activity, whereas a positive correlation was found between 1,3-butadiene exposure and glutathionylated hemoglobin. A negative correlation was also observed between GST activity and glutathionylated hemoglobin. No influence of confounders was observed. Using a multiple linear regression model, up to 50.6% and 41.9% of the variability observed in glutathionylated hemoglobin and GST activity, respectively, were explained by 1,3-butadiene exposure, working setting, and GSTT1 genotype. These results indicate that occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene induces an oxidative stress that impairs the GST balance in RBC, and suggest that GST activity and glutathionylated hemoglobin could be recommended as promising biomarkers of effect in petrochemical workers.

    • Functional characterization of alpha-class glutathione s-transferases from the Turkey (meleagris gallopavo).

      Science.gov (United States)

      Kim, Ji Eun; Bunderson, Brett R; Croasdell, Amanda; Coulombe, Roger A

      2011-11-01

      Six Alpha-class glutathione S-transferase (GST) subunits were cloned from domestic turkey livers, which are one of the most susceptible animals known to the carcinogenic mycotoxin aflatoxin B₁. In most animals, GST dysfunction is a risk factor for susceptibility toward AFB₁, and we have shown that turkeys lack GSTs with affinity toward the carcinogenic intermediate exo-aflatoxin B(1)-8-9-epoxide (AFBO). Conversely, mice are resistant to AFB₁ carcinogenesis, due to high constitutive expression of mGSTA3 that has high affinity toward AFBO. When expressed in Escherichia coli, all six tGSTA subunits possessed conjugating activities toward substrates 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB), ethacrynic acid (ECA), and cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) with tGSTA1.2 appearing most active. Interestingly, tGSTA1.1, which lacks one of the four Alpha-class signature motifs, possessed enzymatic activities toward all substrates. All had comparable activities toward AFBO conjugation, an activity absent in turkey liver cytosols. E. coli-expressed mGSTA3 conjugated AFBO with more than 3-fold greater activity than that of tGSTAs and had higher activity toward GST prototype substrates. Mouse hepatic cytosols had approximately 900-fold higher catalytic activity toward AFBO compared with those from turkey. There was no apparent amino acid profile in tGSTAs that might correspond to specificity toward AFBO, although tGSTA1.2, which had slightly higher AFBO-trapping ability, shared Tyr¹⁰⁸ with mGSTA3, a residue postulated to be critical for AFBO trapping activity in mammalian systems. The observation that recombinant tGSTAs detoxify AFBO, whereas their hepatic forms do not, implies that the hepatic forms of these enzymes are silenced by one or more regulatory mechanisms.

    • Functional characterization of glutathione S-transferases associated with insecticide resistance in Tetranychus urticae.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Pavlidi, Nena; Tseliou, Vasilis; Riga, Maria; Nauen, Ralf; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Labrou, Nikolaos E; Vontas, John

      2015-06-01

      The two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae is one of the most important agricultural pests world-wide. It is extremely polyphagous and develops resistance to acaricides. The overexpression of several glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) has been associated with insecticide resistance. Here, we functionally expressed and characterized three GSTs, two of the delta class (TuGSTd10, TuGSTd14) and one of the mu class (TuGSTm09), which had been previously associated with striking resistance phenotypes against abamectin and other acaricides/insecticides, by transcriptional studies. Functional analysis showed that all three GSTs were capable of catalyzing the conjugation of both 1-chloro-2,4 dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene(DCNB) to glutathione (GSH), as well as exhibiting GSH-dependent peroxidase activity toward Cumene hydroperoxide (CumOOH). The steady-state kinetics of the T. urticae GSTs for the GSH/CDNB conjugation reaction were determined and compared with other GSTs. The interaction of the three recombinant proteins with several acaricides and insecticides was also investigated. TuGSTd14 showed the highest affinity toward abamectin and a competitive type of inhibition, which suggests that the insecticide may bind to the H-site of the enzyme. The three-dimensional structure of the TuGSTd14 was predicted based on X-ray structures of delta class GSTs using molecular modeling. Structural analysis was used to identify key structural characteristics and to provide insights into the substrate specificity and the catalytic mechanism of TuGSTd14.

  1. Organisation and structural evolution of the rice glutathione S-transferase gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soranzo, N; Sari Gorla, M; Mizzi, L; De Toma, G; Frova, C

    2004-06-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) comprise a large family of key defence enzymes against xenobiotic toxicity. Here we describe the comprehensive characterisation of this important multigene family in the model monocot species rice [ Oryza sativa(L.)]. Furthermore, we investigate the molecular evolution of the family based on the analysis of (1) the patterns of within-genome duplication, and (2) the phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary divergence among rice, Arabidopsis, maize and soybean GSTs. By in-silico screening of the EST and genome divisions of the Genbank/EMBL/DDBJ database we have isolated 59 putative genes and two pseudogenes, making this the largest plant GST family characterised to date. Of these, 38 (62%) are represented by genomic and EST sequences and 23 (38%) are known only from their genomic sequences. A preliminary survey of EST collections shows a large degree of variability in gene expression between different tissues and environmental conditions, with a small number of genes (13) accounting for 80% of all ESTs. Rice GSTs are organised in four main phylogenetic classes, with 91% of all rice genes belonging to the two plant-specific classes Tau (40 genes) and Phi (16 genes). Pairwise identity scores range between 17 and 98% for proteins of the same class, and 7 and 21% for interclass comparisons. Rapid evolution by gene duplication is suggested by the discovery of two large clusters of 7 and 23 closely related genes on chromosomes 1 and 10, respectively. A comparison of the complete GST families in two monocot and two dicot species suggests a monophyletic origin for all Theta and Zeta GSTs, and no more than three common ancestors for all Phi and Tau genes.

  2. Effects of Local Heart Irradiation in a Glutathione S-Transferase Alpha 4-Null Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerma, Marjan; Singh, Preeti; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tripathi, Preeti; Sharma, Sunil; Singh, Sharda P

    2015-06-01

    Glutathione S-transferase alpha 4 (GSTA4-4) is one of the enzymes responsible for the removal of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), an electrophilic product of lipid peroxidation in cellular membranes during oxidative stress. 4-HNE is a direct activator of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), a transcription factor with many target genes encoding antioxidant and anti-electrophile enzymes. We have previously shown that Gsta4-null mice on a 129/Sv background exhibited increased activity of Nrf2 in the heart. Here we examined the sensitivity of this Gsta4-null mouse model towards cardiac function and structure loss due to local heart irradiation. Male Gsta4-null and wild-type mice were exposed to a single X-ray dose of 18 Gy to the heart. Six months after irradiation, immunohistochemical staining for respiratory complexes 2 and 5 indicated that radiation exposure had caused most pronounced alterations in mitochondrial morphology in Gsta4-null mice. On the other hand, wild-type mice showed a decline in cardiac function and an increase in plasma levels of troponin-I, while no such changes were observed in Gsta4-null mice. Radiation-induced Nrf2-target gene expression only in Gsta4-null mice. In conclusion, although loss of GSTA4-4 led to enhanced susceptibility of cardiac mitochondria to radiation-induced loss of morphology, cardiac function was preserved in Gsta4-null mice. We propose that this protection against cardiac function loss may occur, at least in part, by upregulation of the Nrf2 pathway.

  3. Glutathione S-transferase M1 null genotype related to poor prognosis of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shushan; Wang, Zengfang; Wang, Zengyan; Duan, Quanhong; Wang, Xiaochen; Li, Jun; Sun, Beicheng

    2016-08-01

    Published studies showed controversial findings about the relationship between glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) null genotype and clinical outcomes of patients with colorectal cancer. We performed a meta-analysis to quantitatively assess the association between GSTM1 null genotype and prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer. We systematically searched Pubmed, Embase, and Web of Science to identify prospective or retrospective cohort studies assessing the association of GSTM1 null genotype with overall survival (OS) or disease-free survival (DFS) in colorectal cancer. The hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CIs) were used to assess the association of GSTM1 null genotype with OS or DFS. Finally, 15 studies from 14 publications with 4326 colorectal cancer patients were included into the meta-analysis. There was no heterogeneity in the meta-analysis relating OS (I (2) = 0 %) and DFS (I (2) = 0 %). Overall, GSTM1 null genotype was significantly associated with poor OS in patients with colorectal cancer (HR = 1.18, 95 % CI 1.07-1.30, P = 0.001). In addition, GSTM1 null genotype was also significantly associated with poor DFS in patients with colorectal cancer (HR = 1.15, 95 % CI 1.03-1.28, P = 0.015). No obvious risk of publication bias was observed. GSTM1 null genotype is significantly associated with poor OS and DFS in patients with colorectal cancer, which suggests that GSTM1 null genotype confers poor effect on the prognosis of colorectal cancer.

  4. Characterization and functional analysis of four glutathione S-transferases from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Guohua; Jia, Miao; Liu, Ting; Zhang, Xueyao; Guo, Yaping; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play an important role in detoxification of xenobiotics in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. In this study, four GSTs (LmGSTd1, LmGSTs5, LmGSTt1, and LmGSTu1) representing different classes were identified from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria. These four proteins were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli as soluble fusion proteins, purified by Ni(2+)-nitrilotriacetic acid agarose column and biochemically characterized. LmGSTd1, LmGSTs5, and LmGSTu1 showed high activities with 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), detectable activity with p-nitro-benzyl chloride (p-NBC) and 1, 2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB), whereas LmGSTt1 showed high activity with p-NBC and detectable activity with CDNB. The optimal pH of the locust GSTs ranged between 7.0 to 9.0. Ethacrynic acid and reactive blue effectively inhibited all four GSTs. LmGSTs5 was most sensitive to heavy metals (Cu(2+) and Cd(2+)). The maximum expression of the four GSTs was observed in Malpighian tubules and fat bodies as evaluated by western blot. The nymph mortalities after carbaryl treatment increased by 28 and 12% after LmGSTs5 and LmGSTu1 were silenced, respectively. The nymph mortalities after malathion and chlorpyrifos treatments increased by 26 and 18% after LmGSTs5 and LmGSTu1 were silenced, respectively. These results suggest that sigma GSTs in L. migratoria play a significant role in carbaryl detoxification, whereas some of other GSTs may also involve in the detoxification of carbaryl and chlorpyrifos.

  5. Effects of chlorpyrifos on glutathione S-transferase in migratory locust, Locusta migratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Guohua; Liu, Ting; Guo, Yaping; Zhang, Xueyao; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2014-02-01

    Chlorpyrifos is a typical organophosphate pesticide and is among the most widely used worldwide. The objective of the present investigation was to assess the effect of chlorpyrifos exposure on glutathione S-transferase in Locusta migratoria. In the present study, chlorpyrifos (0.1, 0.2, and 0.4mgg(-1) body weight) was topically applied in the abdomen of locusts. The GST activity, mRNA levels of ten L. migratoria GSTs and protein levels of four representative GSTs were detected. The results showed that chlorpyrifos treatment caused significant decrease of 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB) and p-nitro-benzyl chloride (p-NBC) activities, whereas 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) activity was not altered in locusts. The mRNA levels of seven L. migratoria GSTs, including LmGSTs2, LmGSTs3, LmGSTs4, LmGSTs5, LmGSTs6, LmGSTt1, and LmGSTu1, were decreased after chlorpyrifos exposure. The protein levels of LmGSTs5, LmGSTt1 and LmGSTu1 were significantly decreased at higher doses of chlorpyrifos. However, chlorpyrifos elevated the mRNA and protein expression of LmGSTd1. It indicated that LmGSTd1 might contribute to the resistance of locust to organophosphate pesticides such as chlorpyrifos, whereas the decrease in other GSTs might be an economic compensation by the insect to differentially regulate the expression of enzymes involved in the detoxification of insecticides on the expense of those that are not.

  6. Characterization and functional analysis of four glutathione S-transferases from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Qin

    Full Text Available Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs play an important role in detoxification of xenobiotics in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. In this study, four GSTs (LmGSTd1, LmGSTs5, LmGSTt1, and LmGSTu1 representing different classes were identified from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria. These four proteins were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli as soluble fusion proteins, purified by Ni(2+-nitrilotriacetic acid agarose column and biochemically characterized. LmGSTd1, LmGSTs5, and LmGSTu1 showed high activities with 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB, detectable activity with p-nitro-benzyl chloride (p-NBC and 1, 2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB, whereas LmGSTt1 showed high activity with p-NBC and detectable activity with CDNB. The optimal pH of the locust GSTs ranged between 7.0 to 9.0. Ethacrynic acid and reactive blue effectively inhibited all four GSTs. LmGSTs5 was most sensitive to heavy metals (Cu(2+ and Cd(2+. The maximum expression of the four GSTs was observed in Malpighian tubules and fat bodies as evaluated by western blot. The nymph mortalities after carbaryl treatment increased by 28 and 12% after LmGSTs5 and LmGSTu1 were silenced, respectively. The nymph mortalities after malathion and chlorpyrifos treatments increased by 26 and 18% after LmGSTs5 and LmGSTu1 were silenced, respectively. These results suggest that sigma GSTs in L. migratoria play a significant role in carbaryl detoxification, whereas some of other GSTs may also involve in the detoxification of carbaryl and chlorpyrifos.

  7. Cloning and characterization of two glutathione S-transferases from pyrethroid resistant Culex pipiens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samra, Aman I; Kamita, Shizuo G; Yao, Hong-Wei; Cornel, Anthony J; Hammock, Bruce D

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Marin strain of Culex pipiens Say is a pyrethroid-resistant population that was collected in Marin County, California, in 2001 and subsequently maintained in the laboratory under regular permethrin exposure. RESULTS In this study, two genes, CpGSTd1 and CpGSTd2, encoding glutathione S-transferase (GST) were cloned from Cx. pipiens Marin. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences, CpGSTD1 and CpGSTD2, of these genes indicated that they belong to the Delta class of insect GSTs. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of CpGSTd1 and CpGSTd2 were 59% and 48% identical, respectively. CpGSTD1 and CpGSTD2 were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. The recombinant GSTs exhibited unique selectivity towards the general GST substrates CDNB and DCNB, and also differed in their sensitivity to known inhibitors of GSTs. CpGSTD1 exhibited peroxidase activity with cumene hydroperoxide, while CpGSTD2 appeared to lack this activity. CpGSTD1 was able to metabolize DDT, while DDT metabolism by CpGSTD2 was not detectable. CpGSTD1 and CpGSTD2 showed no detectable metabolism of permethrin. Gene expression of CpGSTd1 and CpGSTd2 in Marin mosquitoes was elevated by about 2-fold in comparison to that found in a pyrethroid-sensitive mosquito strain. CONCLUSION Our results indicated that CpGSTD1 and CpGSTD2 have unique biochemical characteristics but they did not appear to play major roles in permethrin resistance in Marin mosquitoes. PMID:22290868

  8. Biochemical characterization of Drosophila glutathione S-transferases D1 and D21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, A H; Tu, C P

    1994-11-11

    The genomic DNA for the two Drosophila genes, gstD1 and gstD21, were engineered for expression in Escherichia coli by polymerase chain reaction using a pair of specially designed primers. This newly designed expression system produced consistently high yields of the recombinant glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), which were purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by S-hexyl-GSH affinity chromatography. Consistent with their differences in size, GST D1 and GST D21 displayed different mobilities on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Circular dichroism spectrometry revealed some differences in the protein secondary structural organization between the two GST D isozymes. Polyclonal antibodies against GST D1 and GST D21 revealed that they are immunologically distinct from each other. The GST D1 antiserum cross-reacted weakly with GST D21, but the GST D21 antiserum had no detectable cross-reactivity with GST D1. The amino acid sequences of GST D1 and GST D21 have 70% identity. GST D1 is active toward CDNB with 17% of the catalytic efficiency of the human alpha GST121, whereas CDNB is a poor substrate for GST D21. Both GST D1 and GST D21 have similar levels of GSH peroxidase activity against cumene hydroperoxide. Another major difference in substrate specificities between GST D1 and GST D21 is in the activity of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis-(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) dehydrochlorinase, which exists only in the GST D1 isozyme. This is the first definitive demonstration that DDT dehydrochlorinase activity is an intrinsic property of a Drosophila GST. Our results suggest that GST D1 may play a role in DDT metabolism in Drosophila.

  9. Key role for a glutathione transferase in multiple-herbicide resistance in grass weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Ian; Wortley, David J; Sabbadin, Federico; He, Zhesi; Coxon, Christopher R; Straker, Hannah E; Sellars, Jonathan D; Knight, Kathryn; Edwards, Lesley; Hughes, David; Kaundun, Shiv Shankhar; Hutchings, Sarah-Jane; Steel, Patrick G; Edwards, Robert

    2013-04-09

    Multiple-herbicide resistance (MHR) in black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides) and annual rye-grass (Lolium rigidum) is a global problem leading to a loss of chemical weed control in cereal crops. Although poorly understood, in common with multiple-drug resistance (MDR) in tumors, MHR is associated with an enhanced ability to detoxify xenobiotics. In humans, MDR is linked to the overexpression of a pi class glutathione transferase (GSTP1), which has both detoxification and signaling functions in promoting drug resistance. In both annual rye-grass and black-grass, MHR was also associated with the increased expression of an evolutionarily distinct plant phi (F) GSTF1 that had a restricted ability to detoxify herbicides. When the black-grass A. myosuroides (Am) AmGSTF1 was expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana, the transgenic plants acquired resistance to multiple herbicides and showed similar changes in their secondary, xenobiotic, and antioxidant metabolism to those determined in MHR weeds. Transcriptome array experiments showed that these changes in biochemistry were not due to changes in gene expression. Rather, AmGSTF1 exerted a direct regulatory control on metabolism that led to an accumulation of protective flavonoids. Further evidence for a key role for this protein in MHR was obtained by showing that the GSTP1- and MDR-inhibiting pharmacophore 4-chloro-7-nitro-benzoxadiazole was also active toward AmGSTF1 and helped restore herbicide control in MHR black-grass. These studies demonstrate a central role for specific GSTFs in MHR in weeds that has parallels with similar roles for unrelated GSTs in MDR in humans and shows their potential as targets for chemical intervention in resistant weed management.

  10. Characterization of Ser73 in Arabidopsis thaliana Glutathione S-transferase zeta class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are ubiquitous detoxifying superfamily enzymes. The zeta class GST from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtGSTZ) can efficiently degrade dichloroacetic acid (DCA), which is a common carcinogenic contaminant in drinking water. Ser73 in AtGSTZ is a conserved residue at Glutathione binding site (G-site). Compared with the equivalent residues in other GSTs, the catalytic and structural properties of Ser73 were poorly investigated. In this article, site-saturation mutagenesis was performed to characterize the detailed role of Ser73. The DCA de.chlorinating (DCA-DC) activity showed that most of the mutants had less than 3% of the wild-type activity, except S73T and $73A showing 43.48% and 21.62% of the wild-type activity, respectively, indicating that position 73 in AtGSTZ showed low mutational substitutability. Kinetic experiments revealed that mutants S73T, $73A, and S73G showed low binding affinity and catalytic efficiency toward DCA, 1.8-, 3.1-, and 10.7- fold increases in KmDcA values and 4.0-, 9.6-, and 34.1- fold decreases in KcatDCA/KmDCA values, respectively, compared to the wild type. Thermostability and refolding experiments showed that the wild type maintalned more thermostability and recovered activity. These results demonstrated the important role of Set73 in catalytic activity and structural stability of the enzyme. Such properties of Set73 could be particularly crucial to the molecular evolution of AtGSTZ and might,therefore, help explain why Ser73 is conserved in all GSTs. This conclusion might provide insights into the directed evolution of the DCA-DC activity of AtGSTZ.

  11. A role for glutathione transferase Omega 1 (GSTO1-1) in the glutathionylation cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Deepthi; Board, Philip G

    2013-09-01

    The glutathionylation of intracellular protein thiols can protect against irreversible oxidation and can act as a redox switch regulating metabolic pathways. In this study we discovered that the Omega class glutathione transferase GSTO1-1 plays a significant role in the glutathionylation cycle. The catalytic activity of GSTO1-1 was determined in vitro by assaying the deglutathionylation of a synthetic peptide by tryptophan fluorescence quenching and in T47-D epithelial breast cancer cells by both immunoblotting and the direct determination of total glutathionylation. Mutating the active site cysteine residue (Cys-32) ablated the deglutathionylating activity of GSTO1-1. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the expression of GSTO1-1 in T47-D cells that are devoid of endogenous GSTO1-1 resulted in a 50% reduction in total glutathionylation levels. Mass spectrometry and immunoprecipitation identified β-actin as a protein that is specifically deglutathionylated by GSTO1-1 in T47-D cells. In contrast to the deglutathionylation activity, we also found that GSTO1-1 is associated with the rapid glutathionylation of cellular proteins when the cells are exposed to S-nitrosoglutathione. The common A140D genetic polymorphism in GSTO1 was found to have significant effects on the kinetics of both the deglutathionylation and glutathionylation reactions. Genetic variation in GSTO1-1 has been associated with a range of diseases, and the discovery that a frequent GSTO1-1 polymorphism affects glutathionylation cycle reactions reveals a common mechanism where it can act on multiple proteins and pathways.

  12. Trimeric microsomal glutathione transferase 2 displays one third of the sites reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shabbir; Thulasingam, Madhuranayaki; Palombo, Isolde; Daley, Daniel O; Johnson, Kenneth A; Morgenstern, Ralf; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes

    2015-10-01

    Human microsomal glutathione transferase 2 (MGST2) is a trimeric integral membrane protein that belongs to the membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism (MAPEG) family. The mammalian MAPEG family consists of six members where four have been structurally determined. MGST2 activates glutathione to form a thiolate that is crucial for GSH peroxidase activity and GSH conjugation reactions with electrophilic substrates, such as 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). Several studies have shown that MGST2 is able to catalyze a GSH conjugation reaction with the epoxide LTA4 forming the pro-inflammatory LTC4. Unlike its closest homologue leukotriene C4 synthase (LTC4S), MGST2 appears to activate its substrate GSH using only one of the three potential active sites [Ahmad S, et al. (2013) Biochemistry. 52, 1755-1764]. In order to demonstrate and detail the mechanism of one-third of the sites reactivity of MGST2, we have determined the enzyme oligomeric state, by Blue native PAGE and Differential Scanning Calorimetry, as well as the stoichiometry of substrate and substrate analog inhibitor binding to MGST2, using equilibrium dialysis and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry, respectively. Global simulations were used to fit kinetic data to determine the catalytic mechanism of MGST2 with GSH and CDNB (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene) as substrates. The best fit was observed with 1/3 of the sites catalysis as compared with a simulation where all three sites were active. In contrast to LTC4S, MGST2 displays a 1/3 the sites reactivity, a mechanism shared with the more distant family member MGST1 and recently suggested also for microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1.

  13. Resistance to acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in glutathione S-transferase Mu 1-null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Shingo; Maejima, Takanori; Fujimoto, Kazunori; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Yagi, Masae; Sugiura, Tomomi; Atsumi, Ryo; Yamazoe, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the role of glutathione S-transferases Mu 1 (GSTM1) in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity using Gstm1-null mice. A single oral administration of APAP resulted in a marked increase in plasma alanine aminotransferase accompanied by hepatocyte necrosis 24 hr after administration in wild-type mice, but its magnitude was unexpectedly attenuated in Gstm1-null mice. Therefore, it is suggested that Gstm1-null mice are resistant to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. To examine the mechanism of this resistance in Gstm1-null mice, we measured phosphorylation of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which mediates the signal of APAP-induced hepatocyte necrosis, by Western blot analysis 2 and 6 hr after APAP administration. A marked increase in phosphorylated JNK was observed in wild-type mice, but the increase was markedly suppressed in Gstm1-null mice. Therefore, it is suggested that suppressed phosphorylation of JNK may be a main mechanism of the resistance to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in Gstm1-null mice, although other possibilities of the mechanism cannot be eliminated. Additionally, phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4, which are upstream kinases of JNK in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, were also suppressed in Gstm1-null mice. A decrease in liver total glutathione 2 hr after APAP administration, which is an indicator for exposure to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine, the reactive metabolite of APAP, were similar in wild-type and Gstm1-null mice. In conclusion, Gstm1-null mice are considered to be resistant to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity perhaps by the suppression of JNK phosphorylation. This study indicates the novel role of GSTM1 as a factor mediating the cellular signal for APAP-induced hepatotoxicity.

  14. Glutathione S-transferase genotypes modify lung function decline in the general population: SAPALDIA cohort study

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    Ackermann-Liebrich Ursula

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the environmental and genetic risk factors of accelerated lung function decline in the general population is a first step in a prevention strategy against the worldwide increasing respiratory pathology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Deficiency in antioxidative and detoxifying Glutathione S-transferase (GST gene has been associated with poorer lung function in children, smokers and patients with respiratory diseases. In the present study, we assessed whether low activity variants in GST genes are also associated with accelerated lung function decline in the general adult population. Methods We examined with multiple regression analysis the association of polymorphisms in GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 genes with annual decline in FEV1, FVC, and FEF25–75 during 11 years of follow-up in 4686 subjects of the prospective SAPALDIA cohort representative of the Swiss general population. Effect modification by smoking, gender, bronchial hyperresponisveness and age was studied. Results The associations of GST genotypes with FEV1, FVC, and FEF25–75 were comparable in direction, but most consistent for FEV1. GSTT1 homozygous gene deletion alone or in combination with GSTM1 homozygous gene deletion was associated with excess decline in FEV1 in men, but not women, irrespective of smoking status. The additional mean annual decline in FEV1 in men with GSTT1 and concurrent GSTM1 gene deletion was -8.3 ml/yr (95% confidence interval: -12.6 to -3.9 relative to men without these gene deletions. The GSTT1 effect on the FEV1 decline comparable to the observed difference in FEV1 decline between never and persistent smoking men. Effect modification by gender was statistically significant. Conclusion Our results suggest that genetic GSTT1 deficiency is a prevalent and strong determinant of accelerated lung function decline in the male general population.

  15. Ethnicity and glutathione S-transferase (GSTM1/GSTT1 polymorphisms in a Brazilian population

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    G.J.F. Gattás

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of polymorphisms related to glutathione S-transferases (GST has been described in different populations, mainly for white individuals. We evaluated the distribution of GST mu (GSTM1 and theta (GSTT1 genotypes in 594 individuals, by multiplex PCR-based methods, using amplification of the exon 7 of CYP1A1 gene as an internal control. In São Paulo, 233 whites, 87 mulattos, and 137 blacks, all healthy blood-donor volunteers, were tested. In Bahia, where black and mulatto populations are more numerous, 137 subjects were evaluated. The frequency of the GSTM1 null genotype was significantly higher among whites (55.4% than among mulattos (41.4%; P = 0.03 and blacks (32.8%; P < 0.0001 from São Paulo, or Bahian subjects in general (35.7%; P = 0.0003. There was no statistically different distribution among any non-white groups. The distribution of GSTT1 null genotype among groups did not differ significantly. The agreement between self-reported and interviewer classification of skin color in the Bahian group was low. The interviewer classification indicated a gradient of distribution of the GSTM1 null genotype from whites (55.6% to light mulattos (40.4%, dark mulattos (32.0% and blacks (28.6%. However, any information about race or ethnicity should be considered with caution regarding the bias introduced by different data collection techniques, specially in countries where racial admixture is intense, and ethnic definition boundaries are loose. Because homozygous deletions of GST gene might be associated with cancer risk, a better understanding of chemical metabolizing gene distribution can contribute to risk assessment of humans exposed to environmental carcinogens.

  16. Identification and evolution of a plant cell wall specific glycoprotein glycosyl transferase, ExAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Svenning Rune; Yi, Xueying; Velásquez, Silvia Melina; Gille, Sascha; Hansen, Pernille Louise Munke; Poulsen, Christian P.; Olsen, Carl Erik; Rejzek, Martin; Parsons, Harriet; Zhang, Yang; Wandall, Hans H.; Clausen, Henrik; Field, Robert A.; Pauly, Markus; Estevez, Jose M.; Harholt, Jesper; Ulvskov, Peter; Petersen, Bent Larsen

    2017-01-01

    Extensins are plant cell wall glycoproteins that act as scaffolds for the deposition of the main wall carbohydrate polymers, which are interlocked into the supramolecular wall structure through intra- and inter-molecular iso-di-tyrosine crosslinks within the extensin backbone. In the conserved canonical extensin repeat, Ser-Hyp4, serine and the consecutive C4-hydroxyprolines (Hyps) are substituted with an α-galactose and 1–5 β- or α-linked arabinofuranoses (Arafs), respectively. These modifications are required for correct extended structure and function of the extensin network. Here, we identified a single Arabidopsis thaliana gene, At3g57630, in clade E of the inverting Glycosyltransferase family GT47 as a candidate for the transfer of Araf to Hyp-arabinofuranotriose (Hyp-β1,4Araf-β1,2Araf-β1,2Araf) side chains in an α-linkage, to yield Hyp-Araf4 which is exclusively found in extensins. T-DNA knock-out mutants of At3g57630 showed a truncated root hair phenotype, as seen for mutants of all hitherto characterized extensin glycosylation enzymes; both root hair and glycan phenotypes were restored upon reintroduction of At3g57630. At3g57630 was named Extensin Arabinose Deficient transferase, ExAD, accordingly. The occurrence of ExAD orthologs within the Viridiplantae along with its’ product, Hyp-Araf4, point to ExAD being an evolutionary hallmark of terrestrial plants and charophyte green algae. PMID:28358137

  17. The Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase (CPT) System and Possible Relevance for Neuropsychiatric and Neurological Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virmani, Ashraf; Pinto, Luigi; Bauermann, Otto; Zerelli, Saf; Diedenhofen, Andreas; Binienda, Zbigniew K; Ali, Syed F; van der Leij, Feike R

    2015-10-01

    The carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT) system is a multiprotein complex with catalytic activity localized within a core represented by CPT1 and CPT2 in the outer and inner membrane of the mitochondria, respectively. Two proteins, the acyl-CoA synthase and a translocase also form part of this system. This system is crucial for the mitochondrial beta-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids. CPT1 has two well-known isoforms, CPT1a and CPT1b. CPT1a is the hepatic isoform and CPT1b is typically muscular; both are normally utilized by the organism for metabolic processes throughout the body. There is a strong evidence for their involvement in various disease states, e.g., metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, and in diabetes mellitus type 2. Recently, a new, third isoform of CPT was described, CPT1c. This is a neuronal isoform and is prevalently localized in brain regions such as hypothalamus, amygdala, and hippocampus. These brain regions play an important role in control of food intake and neuropsychiatric and neurological diseases. CPT activity has been implicated in several neurological and social diseases mainly related to the alteration of insulin equilibrium in the brain. These pathologies include Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and schizophrenia. Evolution of both Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease is in some way linked to brain insulin and related metabolic dysfunctions with putative links also with the diabetes type 2. Studies show that in the CNS, CPT1c affects ceramide levels, endocannabionoids, and oxidative processes and may play an important role in various brain functions such as learning.

  18. Glutathione S Transferases Polymorphisms Are Independent Prognostic Factors in Lupus Nephritis Treated with Cyclophosphamide.

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    Alexandra Audemard-Verger

    Full Text Available To investigate association between genetic polymorphisms of GST, CYP and renal outcome or occurrence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs in lupus nephritis (LN treated with cyclophosphamide (CYC. CYC, as a pro-drug, requires bioactivation through multiple hepatic cytochrome P450s and glutathione S transferases (GST.We carried out a multicentric retrospective study including 70 patients with proliferative LN treated with CYC. Patients were genotyped for polymorphisms of the CYP2B6, CYP2C19, GSTP1, GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes. Complete remission (CR was defined as proteinuria ≤0.33g/day and serum creatinine ≤124 µmol/l. Partial remission (PR was defined as proteinuria ≤1.5g/day with a 50% decrease of the baseline proteinuria value and serum creatinine no greater than 25% above baseline.Most patients were women (84% and 77% were Caucasian. The mean age at LN diagnosis was 41 ± 10 years. The frequency of patients carrying the GST null genotype GSTT1-, GSTM1-, and the Ile→105Val GSTP1 genotype were respectively 38%, 60% and 44%. In multivariate analysis, the Ile→105Val GSTP1 genotype was an independent factor of poor renal outcome (achievement of CR or PR (OR = 5.01 95% CI [1.02-24.51] and the sole factor that influenced occurrence of ADRs was the GSTM1 null genotype (OR = 3.34 95% CI [1.064-10.58]. No association between polymorphisms of cytochrome P450s gene and efficacy or ADRs was observed.This study suggests that GST polymorphisms highly impact renal outcome and occurrence of ADRs related to CYC in LN patients.

  19. Interaction of glutathione transferase P1-1 with captan and captafol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Ilio, C; Sacchetta, P; Angelucci, S; Bucciarelli, T; Pennelli, A; Mazzetti, A P; Lo Bello, M; Aceto, A

    1996-07-12

    Glutathione transferase (GST, EC 2.5.1.18) P1-1 was strongly inhibited by captan and captafol in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The IC50 values for captan and captafol were 5.8 microM and 1.5 microM, respectively. Time-course inactivation of GSTP1-1 by two pesticides was prevented by 3 microM of hexyl-glutathione, but not by methylglutathione. The fact that the inactivated enzyme recovered all the 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) titrable thiol groups, with concomitant recovery of all its original activity after treatment with 100 microM dithiothreitol, suggested that captan and captafol were able to induce the formation of disulfide bonds. That the inactivation of GSTP1-1 by captan and captafol involves the formation of disulfide bonds between the four cysteinil groups of the enzymes was confirmed by the SDS-PAGE experiments on nondenaturant conditions. In fact, on SDS-PAGE, GSTP1-1 as well as the cys47ala, cys101ala, and cys47ala/cys101ala GSTP1-1 mutants treated with captan and captafol showed several extra bands, with apparent molecular masses higher and lower than the molecular mass of native GSTP1-1 (23.5 kDa), indicating that both intra- and inter-subunit disulfide bonds were formed. These extra bands returned to the native 23.5 kDa band with concomitant restoration of activity when treated with dithiothreitol.

  20. The Anopheles gambiae glutathione transferase supergene family: annotation, phylogeny and expression profiles

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    Rossiter Louise C

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Twenty-eight genes putatively encoding cytosolic glutathione transferases have been identified in the Anopheles gambiae genome. We manually annotated these genes and then confirmed the annotation by sequencing of A. gambiae cDNAs. Phylogenetic analysis with the 37 putative GST genes from Drosophila and representative GSTs from other taxa was undertaken to develop a nomenclature for insect GSTs. The epsilon class of insect GSTs has previously been implicated in conferring insecticide resistance in several insect species. We compared the expression level of all members of this GST class in two strains of A. gambiae to determine whether epsilon GST expression is correlated with insecticide resistance status. Results Two A. gambiae GSTs are alternatively spliced resulting in a maximum number of 32 transcripts encoding cytosolic GSTs. We detected cDNAs for 31 of these in adult mosquitoes. There are at least six different classes of GSTs in insects but 20 of the A. gambiae GSTs belong to the two insect specific classes, delta and epsilon. Members of these two GST classes are clustered on chromosome arms 2L and 3R respectively. Two members of the GST supergene family are intronless. Amongst the remainder, there are 13 unique introns positions but within the epsilon and delta class, there is considerable conservation of intron positions. Five of the eight epsilon GSTs are overexpressed in a DDT resistant strain of A. gambiae. Conclusions The GST supergene family in A. gambiae is extensive and regulation of transcription of these genes is complex. Expression profiling of the epsilon class supports earlier predictions that this class is important in conferring insecticide resistance.

  1. Enhanced tolerance and remediation of anthracene by transgenic tobacco plants expressing a fungal glutathione transferase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixit, Prachy; Mukherjee, Prasun K.; Sherkhane, Pramod D.; Kale, Sharad P. [Nuclear Agriculture and Biotechnology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Eapen, Susan, E-mail: eapenhome@yahoo.com [Nuclear Agriculture and Biotechnology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Transgenic plants expressing a TvGST gene were tested for tolerance, uptake and degradation of anthracene. {yields} Transgenic plants were more tolerant to anthracene and take up more anthracene from soil and solutions compared to control plants. {yields} Using in vitro T{sub 1} seedlings, we showed that anthracene-a three fused benzene ring compound was phytodegraded to naphthalene derivatives, having two benzene rings. {yields} This is the first time that a transgenic plant was shown to have the potential to phytodegrade anthracene. - Abstract: Plants can be used for remediation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, which are known to be a major concern for human health. Metabolism of xenobiotic compounds in plants occurs in three phases and glutathione transferases (GST) mediate phase II of xenobiotic transformation. Plants, although have GSTs, they are not very efficient for degradation of exogenous recalcitrant xenobiotics including polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Hence, heterologous expression of efficient GSTs in plants may improve their remediation and degradation potential of xenobiotics. In the present study, we investigated the potential of transgenic tobacco plants expressing a Trichoderma virens GST for tolerance, remediation and degradation of anthracene-a recalcitrant polyaromatic hydrocarbon. Transgenic plants with fungal GST showed enhanced tolerance to anthracene compared to control plants. Remediation of {sup 14}C uniformly labeled anthracene from solutions and soil by transgenic tobacco plants was higher compared to wild-type plants. Transgenic plants (T{sub 0} and T{sub 1}) degraded anthracene to naphthalene derivatives, while no such degradation was observed in wild-type plants. The present work has shown that in planta expression of a fungal GST in tobacco imparted enhanced tolerance as well as higher remediation potential of anthracene compared to wild-type plants.

  2. Biochemical warfare on the reef: the role of glutathione transferases in consumer tolerance of dietary prostaglandins.

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    Kristen E Whalen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the profound variation among marine consumers in tolerance for allelochemically-rich foods, few studies have examined the biochemical adaptations underlying diet choice. Here we examine the role of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs in the detoxification of dietary allelochemicals in the digestive gland of the predatory gastropod Cyphoma gibbosum, a generalist consumer of gorgonian corals. Controlled laboratory feeding experiments were used to investigate the influence of gorgonian diet on Cyphoma GST activity and isoform expression. Gorgonian extracts and semi-purified fractions were also screened to identify inhibitors and possible substrates of Cyphoma GSTs. In addition, we investigated the inhibitory properties of prostaglandins (PGs structurally similar to antipredatory PGs found in high concentrations in the Caribbean gorgonian Plexaura homomalla. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cyphoma GST subunit composition was invariant and activity was constitutively high regardless of gorgonian diet. Bioassay-guided fractionation of gorgonian extracts revealed that moderately hydrophobic fractions from all eight gorgonian species examined contained putative GST substrates/inhibitors. LC-MS and NMR spectral analysis of the most inhibitory fraction from P. homomalla subsequently identified prostaglandin A(2 (PGA(2 as the dominant component. A similar screening of commercially available prostaglandins in series A, E, and F revealed that those prostaglandins most abundant in gorgonian tissues (e.g., PGA(2 were also the most potent inhibitors. In vivo estimates of PGA(2 concentration in digestive gland tissues calculated from snail grazing rates revealed that Cyphoma GSTs would be saturated with respect to PGA(2 and operating at or near physiological capacity. SIGNIFICANCE: The high, constitutive activity of Cyphoma GSTs is likely necessitated by the ubiquitous presence of GST substrates and/or inhibitors in this consumer's gorgonian diet. This

  3. S-glutathionyl-(chloro)hydroquinone reductases: a new class of glutathione transferases functioning as oxidoreductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belchik, Sara M; Xun, Luying

    2011-05-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are best known for transferring glutathione (GSH) to hydrophobic organic compounds, making the conjugates more soluble. However, the omega-class GSTs of animals and the lambda-class GSTs and dehydroascorbate reductases (DHARs) of plants have little or no activity for GSH transfer. Instead, they catalyze GSH-dependent oxidoreductions. The lambda-class GSTs reduce disulfide bonds, the DHARs reduce the disulfide bonds and dehydroascorbate, and the omega-class GSTs can reduce more substrates, including disulfide bonds, dehydroascorbate, and dimethylarsinate. Glutathionyl-(chloro)hydroquinone reductases (GS-HQRs) are the newest class of GSTs that mainly catalyze oxidoreductions. Besides the activities of the other three classes, GS-HQRs also reduce GS-hydroquinones, including GS-trichloro-p-hydroquinone, GS-dichloro-p-hydroquinone, GS-2-hydroxy-p-hydroquinone, and GS-p-hydroquinone. They are conserved and widely distributed in bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and plants, but not in animals. The four classes are phylogenetically more related to each other than to other GSTs, and they share a Cys-Pro motif at the GSH-binding site. Hydroquinones are metabolic intermediates of certain aromatic compounds. They can be auto-oxidized by O(2) to benzoquinones, which spontaneously react with GSH to form GS-hydroquinones via Michael's addition. GS-HQRs are expected to channel GS-hydroquinones, formed spontaneously or enzymatically, back to hydroquinones. When the released hydroquinones are intermediates of metabolic pathways, GS-HQRs play a maintenance role for the pathways. Further, the common presence of GS-HQRs in plants, green algae, cyanobacteria, and halobacteria suggest a beneficial role in the light-using organisms.

  4. Monomer-dimer equilibrium in glutathione transferases: a critical re-examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrini, Raffaele; De Luca, Anastasia; Stella, Lorenzo; Mei, Giampiero; Orioni, Barbara; Ciccone, Sarah; Federici, Giorgio; Lo Bello, Mario; Ricci, Giorgio

    2009-11-03

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are dimeric enzymes involved in cell detoxification versus many endogenous toxic compounds and xenobiotics. In addition, single monomers of GSTs appear to be involved in particular protein-protein interactions as in the case of the pi class GST that regulates the apoptotic process by means of a GST-c-Jun N-terminal kinase complex. Thus, the dimer-monomer transition of GSTs may have important physiological relevance, but many studies reached contrasting conclusions both about the modality and extension of this event and about the catalytic competence of a single subunit. This paper re-examines the monomer-dimer question in light of novel experiments and old observations. Recent papers claimed the existence of a predominant monomeric and active species among pi, alpha, and mu class GSTs at 20-40 nM dilution levels, reporting dissociation constants (K(d)) for dimeric GST of 5.1, 0.34, and 0.16 microM, respectively. However, we demonstrate here that only traces of monomers could be found at these concentrations since all these enzymes display K(d) values of <1 nM, values thousands of times lower than those reported previously. Time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence anisotropy experiments, two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, kinetic studies, and docking simulations have been used to reach such conclusions. Our results also indicate that there is no clear evidence of the existence of a fully active monomer. Conversely, many data strongly support the idea that the monomeric form is scarcely active or fully inactive.

  5. The still mysterious roles of cysteine-containing glutathione transferases in plants

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    Pierre-Alexandre eLallement

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione transferases (GSTs represent a widespread multigenic enzyme family able to modify a broad range of molecules. These notably include secondary metabolites and exogenous substrates often referred to as xenobiotics, usually for their detoxification, subsequent transport or export. To achieve this, these enzymes can bind non-substrate ligands (ligandin function and/or catalyze the conjugation of glutathione onto the targeted molecules, the latter activity being exhibited by GSTs having a serine or a tyrosine as catalytic residues. Besides, other GST members possess a catalytic cysteine residue, a substitution that radically changes enzyme properties. Instead of promoting GSH-conjugation reactions, cysteine-containing GSTs (Cys-GSTs are able to perform deglutathionylation reactions similarly to glutaredoxins but the targets are usually different since glutaredoxin substrates are mostly oxidized proteins and Cys-GST substrates are metabolites. The Cys-GSTs are found in most organisms and form several classes. While Beta and Omega GSTs and chloride intracellular channel proteins are not found in plants, these organisms possess microsomal ProstaGlandin E-Synthase type 2, glutathionyl hydroquinone reductases, Lambda, Iota and Hemerythrin GSTs and dehydroascorbate reductases (DHARs, the four last classes being restricted to the green lineage. In plants, whereas the role of DHARs is clearly associated to the reduction of dehydroascorbate to ascorbate, the physiological roles of other Cys-GSTs remain largely unknown. In this context, a genomic and phylogenetic analysis of Cys-GSTs in photosynthetic organisms provides an updated classification that is discussed in the light of the recent literature about the functional and structural properties of Cys-GSTs. Considering the antioxidant potencies of phenolic compounds and more generally of secondary metabolites, the connection of GSTs with secondary metabolism may be interesting from a

  6. The still mysterious roles of cysteine-containing glutathione transferases in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallement, Pierre-Alexandre; Brouwer, Bastiaan; Keech, Olivier; Hecker, Arnaud; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) represent a widespread multigenic enzyme family able to modify a broad range of molecules. These notably include secondary metabolites and exogenous substrates often referred to as xenobiotics, usually for their detoxification, subsequent transport or export. To achieve this, these enzymes can bind non-substrate ligands (ligandin function) and/or catalyze the conjugation of glutathione onto the targeted molecules, the latter activity being exhibited by GSTs having a serine or a tyrosine as catalytic residues. Besides, other GST members possess a catalytic cysteine residue, a substitution that radically changes enzyme properties. Instead of promoting GSH-conjugation reactions, cysteine-containing GSTs (Cys-GSTs) are able to perform deglutathionylation reactions similarly to glutaredoxins but the targets are usually different since glutaredoxin substrates are mostly oxidized proteins and Cys-GST substrates are metabolites. The Cys-GSTs are found in most organisms and form several classes. While Beta and Omega GSTs and chloride intracellular channel proteins (CLICs) are not found in plants, these organisms possess microsomal ProstaGlandin E-Synthase type 2, glutathionyl hydroquinone reductases, Lambda, Iota and Hemerythrin GSTs and dehydroascorbate reductases (DHARs); the four last classes being restricted to the green lineage. In plants, whereas the role of DHARs is clearly associated to the reduction of dehydroascorbate to ascorbate, the physiological roles of other Cys-GSTs remain largely unknown. In this context, a genomic and phylogenetic analysis of Cys-GSTs in photosynthetic organisms provides an updated classification that is discussed in the light of the recent literature about the functional and structural properties of Cys-GSTs. Considering the antioxidant potencies of phenolic compounds and more generally of secondary metabolites, the connection of GSTs with secondary metabolism may be interesting from a pharmacological

  7. Detection of anti-oxidant enzymatic activities and purification of glutathione transferases from Angiostrongylus cantonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morassutti, Alessandra L; Pinto, Paulo M; Dutra, Bibiana K; Oliveira, Guendalina Turcato; Ferreira, Henrique B; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos

    2011-02-01

    There are several anti-oxidant enzyme families that play pivotal roles in facilitating the survival of parasites. Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are members of the anti-oxidant family that can detoxify a broad range of exogenous or endogenous compounds including reactive oxidative species. GSTs have been studied as vaccine candidates, immunodiagnostic markers and as treatment targets. Helminths of the genus Angiostrongylus live inside arteries of vertebrates and two main species are associated with accidental human infections: Angiostrongylus costaricensis adult worms live inside the mesenteric arteries and larvae of Angiostrongylus cantonensis become trapped in the central nervous system vasculature. Since the interactions between angiostrongylid nematodes and their vertebrate hosts are poorly understood, this study characterized the anti-oxidant enzymatic activities of A. cantonensis from female worms by collecting excreted and secreted (ES) and total extract (TE) molecules. Catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were found both in the ES and TE while glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and GST were found only in the TE. GSTs were purified by glutathione agarose affinity column (AcGST) and the pool of eluted GSTs was analyzed by mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and de novo sequencing (Masslynx software). Sequences from two peptides (AcGSTpep1 and AcGSTpep2) present high identity to the N-terminal and C-terminal from sigma class GSTs of nematodes. It is known that these GST enzymes are associated with host immune regulation. Furthermore, understanding the role of parasite-derived anti-oxidant molecules is important in understanding host-parasite interactions.

  8. Structural basis for featuring of steroid isomerase activity in alpha class glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tars, Kaspars; Olin, Birgit; Mannervik, Bengt

    2010-03-19

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are abundant enzymes catalyzing the conjugation of hydrophobic toxic substrates with glutathione. In addition to detoxication, human GST A3-3 displays prominent steroid double-bond isomerase activity; e.g. transforming Delta(5)-androstene-3-17-dione into Delta(4)-androstene-3-17-dione (AD). This chemical transformation is a crucial step in the biosynthesis of steroids, such as testosterone and progesterone. In contrast to GST A3-3, the homologous GST A2-2 does not show significant steroid isomerase activity. We have solved the 3D structures of human GSTs A2-2 and A3-3 in complex with AD. In the GST A3-3 crystal structure, AD was bound in an orientation suitable for the glutathione (GSH)-mediated catalysis to occur. In GST A2-2, however, AD was bound in a completely different orientation with its reactive double bond distant from the GSH-binding site. The structures illustrate how a few amino acid substitutions in the active site spectacularly alter the binding mode of the steroid substrate in relation to the conserved catalytic groups and an essentially fixed polypeptide chain conformation. Furthermore, AD did not bind to the GST A2-2-GSH complex. Altogether, these results provide a first-time structural insight into the steroid isomerase activity of any GST and explain the 5000-fold difference in catalytic efficiency between GSTs A2-2 and A3-3. More generally, the structures illustrate how dramatic diversification of functional properties can arise via minimal structural alterations. We suggest a novel structure-based mechanism of the steroid isomerization reaction.

  9. Glutathione S-transferase activity in follicular fluid from women undergoing ovarian stimulation: role in maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijide, Susana; Hernández, M Luisa; Navarro, Rosaura; Larreategui, Zaloa; Ferrando, Marcos; Ruiz-Sanz, José Ignacio; Ruiz-Larrea, M Begoña

    2014-10-01

    Female infertility involves an emotional impact for the woman, often leading to a state of anxiety and low self-esteem. The assisted reproduction techniques (ART) are used to overcome the problem of infertility. In a first step of the in vitro fertilization therapy women are subjected to an ovarian stimulation protocol to obtain mature oocytes, which will result in competent oocytes necessary for fertilization to occur. Ovarian stimulation, however, subjects the women to a high physical and psychological stress, thus being essential to improve ART and to find biomarkers of dysfunction and fertility. GSH is an important antioxidant, and is also used in detoxification reactions, catalysed by glutathione S-transferases (GST). In the present work, we have investigated the involvement of GST in follicular maturation. Patients with fertility problems and oocyte donors were recruited for the study. From each woman follicles at two stages of maturation were extracted at the preovulatory stage. Follicular fluid was separated from the oocyte by centrifugation and used as the enzyme source. GST activity was determined based on its conjugation with 3,4-dichloronitrobenzene and the assay was adapted to a 96-well microplate reader. The absorbance was represented against the incubation time and the curves were adjusted to linearity (R(2)>0.990). Results showed that in both donors and patients GST activity was significantly lower in mature oocytes compared to small ones. These results suggest that GST may play a role in the follicle maturation by detoxifying xenobiotics, thus contributing to the normal development of the oocyte. Supported by FIS/FEDER (PI11/02559), Gobierno Vasco (Dep. Educación, Universiades e Investigación, IT687-13), and UPV/EHU (CLUMBER UFI11/20 and PES13/58). The work was approved by the Ethics Committee of the UPV/EHU (CEISH/96/2011/RUIZLARREA), and performed according to the UPV/EHU and IVI-Bilbao agreement (Ref. 2012/01).

  10. Expression and characterisation of a Psoroptes ovis glutathione S-transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alison J; Huntley, John; Van den Broek, Adri; Coates, David; Isaac, R Elwyn

    2002-04-19

    The astigmatid mite Psoroptes ovis is the causative agent of sheep scab, a highly contagious parasitic disease of sheep. Infection causes severe allergic dermatitis, resulting in damage to the fleece and hide, loss of condition and occasional mortality. Interest in the P. ovis allergens led us to characterise a glutathione S-transferase (GST) which displays homology to GST allergens isolated from the house dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and the cockroach, Blatella germanica. A cDNA encoding a mu-class GST from P. ovis was expressed in Escherichia coli and the recombinant protein purified for biochemical analysis. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the purified product was homogeneous and had an apparent molecular weight of 30 kDa. The recombinant GST (rGST) is active towards the substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), whereas 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB) is a poor substrate. The recombinant protein was also tested for recognition by IgE and IgG antibodies in serum from P. ovis naïve and P. ovis infested sheep. Neither IgE nor IgG antibodies were detected to the rGST. Prausnitz--Küstner testing with rGST did not provoke a characteristic weal and flare response. Biopsies collected at the PK test sites were stained for eosinophils, neutrophils, mast cells and basophils. Neutrophil, mast cell and basophil counts were not significantly different to the controls. Eosinophil numbers were significantly higher than controls, but were not due to an IgE response.

  11. Tunicamycin-induced inhibition of a glycolipid:GalNAc-transferase in guinea pig tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, K.K.; Basu, M.; Basu, S.

    1986-05-01

    It is not known how many glycosyltransferases are glycoprotein or phosphoprotein in nature. Post-translational modification of the glycosyltransferases and their regulation in normal and tumor cells are of the present interest. Recently, the authors established the biosynthesis in vitro of GbOse4Cer and GbOse5Cer from GbOse3Cer by two different GalNAc-transferases (GalNAcT-2 and GalNAcT-3) isolated from chemically transformed guinea pig tumor cells (104Cl and 106B). When these cells were incubated in the presence of tunicamycin (0.2-2 ..mu..g/ml), the activity of GalNAcT-2 (UDP-GalNAc:GbOse3Cer(..beta..1-3)GalNAcT) was inhibited (90%), whereas GalT-4 (UDP-Gal:LcOse3Cer(..beta..1-4)GalT) and GalT-5 (UDP-Gal:LcOse5Cer(..cap alpha..1-3)GalT) remained unchanged. The effect of tunicamycin was minimal within 6 hrs of treatment. However, 50% and 75% inhibition was observed after treatment of these cells for 12 and 24 hr, respectively. The inhibitory effect of tunicamycin on GalNAcT-2 can be reversed after 12-24 hr of its removal from the medium. The incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-leucine in total protein remained unchanged during tunicamycin treatment. The inhibition of glycoproteins was further confirmed by the inhibition (95%) of (2-/sup 3/H)Man incorporation in the acid precipitable material. When cells were grown in the presence of insulin, the GalNAcT-2 activity increased 2-fold. Involvement of a glycoprotein catalytic subunit or a modifier protein in the GalNAcT-2 catalyzed reaction is under investigation.

  12. Overexpression of GalNAc-transferase GalNAc-T3 promotes pancreatic cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniuchi, K; Cerny, R L; Tanouchi, A; Kohno, K; Kotani, N; Honke, K; Saibara, T; Hollingsworth, M A

    2011-12-01

    O-linked glycans of secreted and membrane-bound proteins have an important role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer by modulating immune responses, inflammation and tumorigenesis. A critical aspect of O-glycosylation, the position at which proteins are glycosylated with N-acetyl-galactosamine on serine and threonine residues, is regulated by the substrate specificity of UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyl-transferases (GalNAc-Ts). Thus, GalNAc-Ts regulate the first committed step in O-glycosylated protein biosynthesis, determine sites of O-glycosylation on proteins and are important for understanding normal and carcinoma-associated O-glycosylation. We have found that one of these enzymes, GalNAc-T3, is overexpressed in human pancreatic cancer tissues and suppression of GalNAc-T3 significantly attenuates the growth of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, suppression of GalNAc-T3 induces apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. Our results indicate that GalNAc-T3 is likely involved in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Modification of cellular glycosylation occurs in nearly all types of cancer as a result of alterations in the expression levels of glycosyltransferases. We report guanine the nucleotide-binding protein, α-transducing activity polypeptide-1 (GNAT1) as a possible substrate protein of GalNAc-T3. GalNAc-T3 is associated with O-glycosylation of GNAT1 and affects the subcellular distribution of GNAT1. Knocking down endogenous GNAT1 significantly suppresses the growth/survival of PDAC cells. Our results imply that GalNAc-T3 contributes to the function of O-glycosylated proteins and thereby affects the growth and survival of pancreatic cancer cells. Thus, substrate proteins of GalNAc-T3 should serve as important therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancers.

  13. Genetic polymorphism in three glutathione s-transferase genes and breast cancer risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woldegiorgis, S.; Ahmed, R.C.; Zhen, Y.; Erdmann, C.A.; Russell, M.L.; Goth-Goldstein, R.

    2002-04-01

    The role of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) enzyme family is to detoxify environmental toxins and carcinogens and to protect organisms from their adverse effects, including cancer. The genes GSTM1, GSTP1, and GSTT1 code for three GSTs involved in the detoxification of carcinogens, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and benzene. In humans, GSTM1 is deleted in about 50% of the population, GSTT1 is absent in about 20%, whereas the GSTP1 gene has a single base polymorphism resulting in an enzyme with reduced activity. Epidemiological studies indicate that GST polymorphisms increase the level of carcinogen-induced DNA damage and several studies have found a correlation of polymorphisms in one of the GST genes and an increased risk for certain cancers. We examined the role of polymorphisms in genes coding for these three GST enzymes in breast cancer. A breast tissue collection consisting of specimens of breast cancer patients and non-cancer controls was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence or absence of the GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes and for GSTP1 single base polymorphism by PCR/RFLP. We found that GSTM1 and GSTT1 deletions occurred more frequently in cases than in controls, and GSTP1 polymorphism was more frequent in controls. The effective detoxifier (putative low-risk) genotype (defined as presence of both GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes and GSTP1 wild type) was less frequent in cases than controls (16% vs. 23%, respectively). The poor detoxifier (putative high-risk) genotype was more frequent in cases than controls. However, the sample size of this study was too small to provide conclusive results.

  14. The poplar phi class glutathione transferase: expression, activity and structure of GSTF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henri ePégeot

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione transferases (GSTs constitute a superfamily of enzymes with essential roles in cellular detoxification and secondary metabolism in plants as in other organisms. Several plant GSTs, including those of the Phi class (GSTFs, require a conserved catalytic serine residue to perform glutathione (GSH-conjugation reactions. Genomic analyses revealed that terrestrial plants have around 10 GSTFs, 8 in the Populus trichocarpa genome, but their physiological functions and substrates are mostly unknown. Transcript expression analyses showed a predominant expression of all genes both in reproductive (female flowers, fruits, floral buds and vegetative organs (leaves, petioles. Here, we show that the recombinant poplar GSTF1 (PttGSTF1 possesses peroxidase activity towards cumene hydroperoxide and GSH-conjugation activity towards model substrates such as 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene, benzyl and phenetyl isothiocyanate, 4-nitrophenyl butyrate and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal but interestingly not on previously identified GSTF-class substrates. In accordance to analytical gel filtration data, crystal structure of PttGSTF1 showed a canonical dimeric organization with bound GSH or MES molecules. The structure of these protein-substrate complexes allowed delineating the residues contributing to both the G and H sites that form the active site cavity. In sum, the presence of GSTF1 transcripts and proteins in most poplar organs especially those rich in secondary metabolites such as flowers and fruits, together with its GSH-conjugation activity and its documented stress-responsive expression suggest that its function is associated with the catalytic transformation of metabolites and/or peroxide removal rather than with ligandin properties as previously reported for other GSTFs.

  15. Effects of heavy metals and nitroaromatic compounds on horseradish glutathione S-transferase and peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepovím, Ales; Podlipná, Radka; Soudek, Petr; Schröder, Peter; Vanek, Tomás

    2004-11-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) and peroxidase (POX) activities have a direct relation to the effect of stress on plant metabolism. Changes in the activities of the enzymes were therefore studied. Horseradish hairy roots were treated by selected bivalent ions of heavy metals (HMs) and nitroaromatic compounds (NACs). We have shown differences in GST activity when assayed with substrates 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB). The conjugation of DCNB catalysed by GST was inhibited in all roots treated with HMs as compared to non-treated roots, whereas NACs caused induction of the activity in dependence on the exposition time and concentration of compounds. The conjugation of CDNB by GST was not affected to the same extent. The increase of GST activity was determined in cultures treated by nickel (0.1 mM) and diaminonitrotoluenes (DANTs, 0.1 mM) for 6 h, whereas the roots treated by 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (ADNT) and dinitrotoluene (DNT, 1.0 mM) needed 27 h treatment to induce the activity. The POX activity of cultures treated by HMs was inhibited to 17-35% in comparison to non-treated cultures. The POX activity of roots treated by TNT (0.1 and 1.0 mM) for 6 and 27 h and by ADNT (0.1 and 1.0 mM) for 6 h was inhibited. A partial increase of POX activity was measured in roots treated by all NACs for 27 h. The content of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and reduced glutathione (GSH) in the roots differed significantly. It was followed as a symptom of the stress reaction of the plant metabolism to the effect of NACs and HMs.

  16. Glutathione-S-transferase profiles in the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarapu, Swapna Priya; Mittapalli, Omprakash

    2013-05-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire is a recently discovered invasive insect pest of ash, Fraxinus spp. in North America. Glutathione-S-transferases (GST) are a multifunctional superfamily of enzymes which function in conjugating toxic compounds to less toxic and excretable forms. In this study, we report the molecular characterization and expression patterns of different classes of GST genes in different tissues and developmental stages plus their specific activity. Multiple sequence alignment of all six A. planipennis GSTs (ApGST-E1, ApGST-E2, ApGST-E3, ApGST-O1, ApGST-S1 and ApGST-μ1) revealed conserved features of insect GSTs and a phylogenetic analysis grouped the GSTs within the epsilon, sigma, omega and microsomal classes of GSTs. Real time quantitative PCR was used to study field collected samples. In larval tissues high mRNA levels for ApGST-E1, ApGST-E3 and ApGST-O1 were obtained in the midgut and Malpighian tubules. On the other hand, ApGST-E2 and ApGST-S1 showed high mRNA levels in fat body and ApGST-μ1 showed constitutive levels in all the tissues assayed. During development, mRNA levels for ApGST-E2 were observed to be the highest in feeding instars, ApGST-S1 in prepupal instars; while the others showed constitutive patterns in all the developmental stages examined. At the enzyme level, total GST activity was similar in all the tissues and developmental stages assayed. Results obtained suggest that A. planipennis is potentially primed with GST-driven detoxification to metabolize ash allelochemicals. To our knowledge this study represents the first report of GSTs in A. planipennis and also in the family of wood boring beetles.

  17. "STUDY ON GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE INHIBITION ASSAY BY TRICLABENDAZOLE ON FASCIOLA spp. "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jalali M. R. Esharghian

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione S-transferase (GST represents the major class of detoxification enzymes from helminth parasites such as Fasciola hepatica and F. gigantica and it is a candidate for chemotherapeutic and vaccine design. Therefore, GST enzyme of Fasciola spp. could be a target for evaluation of drugs such as triclabendazole (C14H9Cl3N2OS. For this purpose, GST enzymes were purified from Fasciola spp. and sheep liver tissue by glutathione affinity chromatography using a wash-batch method and subsequently their SDS-PAGE pattern was detected. Afterward, GST specific activity levels were assayed in the whole extract and purified solutions spectrophotometrically at 30°C with reduced glutathione (GSH and 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzen (CDNB substrate. Finally, GST inhibition assay was investigated in the solutions by powder and bolus forms of triclabendazole. GST fraction as a 26 kDa (MW band was obtained on sodium dodecyl sulfate- polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. The level of GST specific activity in purified solutions was detected 18.14 µmol/min/mg proteins for Fasciola hepatica, 35.04 for F. gigantica and 37.84 µmol/min/mg protein for liver tissue. Comparison of the effect of powder and bolus of triclabendazole in solutions revealed inhibition concentration (IC50 8.36 and 9.05 µg/ml for Fasciola hepatica GSTs and 7.20 and 10.80 for F. gigantica GSTs and 8.65 and 9.70 µg/ml for liver tissue GSTs, respectively. These findings suggest the possibility of selective inhibition of Fasciola spp. GSTs by triclabendazole in vitro and use of these results for understanding of its effect in vivo and qualification of manufacturing bolus form of drug in comparison with original powder.

  18. Labeling embryonic stem cells with enhanced green fluorescent protein on the hypoxanthineguanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕路; 孟国良; 刑阳; 尚克刚; 王小珂; 顾军

    2003-01-01

    Objective To label embryonic stem (ES) cells with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGF P) on the hypoxanthineguanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene locus for t he first time to provide a convenient and efficient way for cell tracking and ma nipulation in the studies of transplantation and stem cell therapy.Methods Homologous fragments were obtained by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), from whic h the gene targeting vector pHPRT-EGFP was constructed. The linearized vector was introduced into ES cells by electroporation. The G418r6TGr cell clones were obtained after selection with G418 and 6TG media. The integration patterns of these resistant cell clones were identified with Southern blotting.Results EGFP expressing ES cells on the locus of HPRT were successfu lly generated. They have normal properties, such as karyotype, viability and di fferentiation ability. The green fluorescence of EGFP expressing cells was main tained in propagation of the ES cells for more than 30 passages and in different iated cells. Cultured in suspension, the "green" ES cells aggregated and forme d embryoid bodies, retaining the green fluorescence at varying developmental sta ges. The "green" embryoid bodies could expand and differentiate into various t ypes of cells, exhibiting ubiquitous green fluorescence. Conclusions This generation of "green" targeted ES cells is described in an efficient proto col for obtaining the homologous fragments by PCR. Introducing the marker gene in the genome of ES cells, we should be able to manipulate them in vitro and use them as vehicles in cell-replacement therapy as well as for other biomedical a nd research purposes.

  19. Rescue of Drosophila Melanogaster l(2)35Aa lethality is only mediated by polypeptide GalNAc-transferase pgant35A, but not by the evolutionary conserved human ortholog GalNAc-transferase-T11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Eric P; Chen, Ya-Wen; Schwientek, Tilo; Mandel, Ulla; Schjoldager, Katrine ter-Borch Gram; Cohen, Stephen M; Clausen, Henrik

    2010-05-01

    The Drosophila l(2)35Aa gene encodes a UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine: Polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase, essential for embryogenesis and development (J. Biol. Chem. 277, 22623-22638; J. Biol. Chem. 277, 22616-22). l(2)35Aa, also known as pgant35A, is a member of a large evolutionarily conserved family of genes encoding polypeptide GalNAc-transferases. Phylogenetic and functional analyses have proposed that subfamilies of orthologous GalNAc-transferase genes are conserved in species, suggesting that they serve distinct functions in vivo. Based on sequence alignments, pgant35A and human GALNT11 are thought to belong to a distinct subfamily. Recent in vitro studies have shown that pgant35A and pgant7, encoding enzymes from different subfamilies, prefer different acceptor substrates, whereas the orthologous pgant35A and human GALNT11 gene products possess, 1) conserved substrate preferences and 2) similar acceptor site preferences in vitro. In line with the in vitro pgant7 studies, we show that l(2)35Aa lethality is not rescued by ectopic pgant7 expression. Remarkably and in contrast to this observation, the human pgant35A ortholog, GALNT11, was shown not to support rescue of the l(2)35Aa lethality. By use of genetic "domain swapping" experiments we demonstrate, that lack of rescue was not caused by inappropriate sub-cellular targeting of functionally active GalNAc-T11. Collectively our results show, that fly embryogenesis specifically requires functional pgant35A, and that the presence of this gene product during fly embryogenesis is functionally distinct from other Drosophila GalNAc-transferase isoforms and from the proposed human ortholog GALNT11.

  20. Proteomic and immunochemical characterization of glutathione transferase as a new allergen of the nematode Ascaris lumbricoides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Acevedo

    Full Text Available Helminth infections and allergy have evolutionary and clinical links. Infection with the nematode Ascaris lumbricoides induces IgE against several molecules including invertebrate pan-allergens. These antibodies influence the pathogenesis and diagnosis of allergy; therefore, studying parasitic and non-parasitic allergens is essential to understand both helminth immunity and allergy. Glutathione transferases (GSTs from cockroach and house dust mites are clinically relevant allergens and comparative studies between them and the GST from A. lumbricoides (GSTA are necessary to evaluate their allergenicity. We sought to analyze the allergenic potential of GSTA in connection with the IgE response to non-parasitic GSTs. IgE to purified GSTs from Ascaris (nGSTA and rGSTA, house dust mites (rDer p 8, nBlo t 8 and rBlo t 8, and cockroach (rBla g 5 was measured by ELISA in subjects from Cartagena, Colombia. Also, multidimensional proteomic approaches were used to study the extract of A. lumbricoides and investigate the existence of GST isoforms. We found that among asthmatics, the strength of IgE levels to GSTA was significantly higher than to mite and cockroach GSTs, and there was a strong positive correlation between IgE levels to these molecules. Specific IgE to GSTA was found in 13.2% of controls and 19.5% of asthmatics. In addition nGSTA induced wheal and flare in skin of sensitized asthmatics indicating that it might be of clinical relevance for some patients. Frequency and IgE levels to GSTA were higher in childhood and declined with age. At least six GST isoforms in A. lumbricoides bind human IgE. Four isoforms were the most abundant and several amino acid substitutions were found, mainly on the N-terminal domain. In conclusion, a new allergenic component of Ascaris has been discovered; it could have clinical impact in allergic patients and influence the diagnosis of mite and cockroach allergy in tropical environments.

  1. Proteomic and immunochemical characterization of glutathione transferase as a new allergen of the nematode Ascaris lumbricoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Nathalie; Mohr, Jens; Zakzuk, Josefina; Samonig, Martin; Briza, Peter; Erler, Anja; Pomés, Anna; Huber, Christian G; Ferreira, Fatima; Caraballo, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Helminth infections and allergy have evolutionary and clinical links. Infection with the nematode Ascaris lumbricoides induces IgE against several molecules including invertebrate pan-allergens. These antibodies influence the pathogenesis and diagnosis of allergy; therefore, studying parasitic and non-parasitic allergens is essential to understand both helminth immunity and allergy. Glutathione transferases (GSTs) from cockroach and house dust mites are clinically relevant allergens and comparative studies between them and the GST from A. lumbricoides (GSTA) are necessary to evaluate their allergenicity. We sought to analyze the allergenic potential of GSTA in connection with the IgE response to non-parasitic GSTs. IgE to purified GSTs from Ascaris (nGSTA and rGSTA), house dust mites (rDer p 8, nBlo t 8 and rBlo t 8), and cockroach (rBla g 5) was measured by ELISA in subjects from Cartagena, Colombia. Also, multidimensional proteomic approaches were used to study the extract of A. lumbricoides and investigate the existence of GST isoforms. We found that among asthmatics, the strength of IgE levels to GSTA was significantly higher than to mite and cockroach GSTs, and there was a strong positive correlation between IgE levels to these molecules. Specific IgE to GSTA was found in 13.2% of controls and 19.5% of asthmatics. In addition nGSTA induced wheal and flare in skin of sensitized asthmatics indicating that it might be of clinical relevance for some patients. Frequency and IgE levels to GSTA were higher in childhood and declined with age. At least six GST isoforms in A. lumbricoides bind human IgE. Four isoforms were the most abundant and several amino acid substitutions were found, mainly on the N-terminal domain. In conclusion, a new allergenic component of Ascaris has been discovered; it could have clinical impact in allergic patients and influence the diagnosis of mite and cockroach allergy in tropical environments.

  2. Cloning and characterization of a biotic-stress-inducible glutathione transferase from Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronopoulou, Evangelia; Madesis, Panagiotis; Tsaftaris, Athanasios; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous proteins in plants that play important roles in stress tolerance and in the detoxification of toxic chemicals and metabolites. In this study, we systematically examined the catalytic diversification of a GST isoenzyme from Phaseolus vulgaris (PvGST) which is induced under biotic stress treatment (Uromyces appendiculatus infection). The full-length cDNA of this GST isoenzyme (termed PvGSTU3-3) with complete open reading frame, was isolated using RACE-RT and showed that the deduced amino acid sequence shares high homology with the tau class plant GSTs. PvGSTU3-3 catalyzes several different reactions and exhibits wide substrate specificity. Of particular importance is the finding that the enzyme shows high antioxidant catalytic function and acts as hydroperoxidase, thioltransferase, and dehydroascorbate reductase. In addition, its K m for GSH is about five to ten times lower compared to other plant GSTs, suggesting that PvGSTU3-3 is able to perform efficient catalysis under conditions where the concentration of reduced glutathione is low (e.g., oxidative stress). Its ability to conjugate GSH with isothiocyanates may provide an additional role for this enzyme to act as a regulator of the released isothiocyanates from glucosinolates as a response of biotic stress. Molecular modeling showed that PvGSTU3-3 shares the same overall fold and structural organization with other plant cytosolic GSTs, with major differences at their hydrophobic binding sites (H-sites) and some differences at the level of C-terminal domain and the linker between the C- and N-terminal domains. PvGSTU3-3, in general, exhibits restricted ability to bind xenobiotics in a nonsubstrate manner, suggesting that the biological role of PvGSTU3-3, is restricted mainly to the catalytic function. Our findings highlight the functional and catalytic diversity of plant GSTs and demonstrate their pivotal role for addressing biotic stresses in Phaseolus

  3. Human glutathione transferases catalyzing the conjugation of the hepatoxin microcystin-LR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, Franca M; Scardala, Simona; Funari, Enzo; Testai, Emanuela

    2011-06-20

    Many cyanobacterial species are able to produce cyanotoxins as secondary metabolites. Among them, microcystins (MC) are a group of around 80 congeners of toxic cyclic heptapeptides. MC-LR is the most studied MC congener, in view of its high acute hepatotoxicity and tumor promoting activity. Humans may be exposed to cyanotoxins through several routes, the oral one being the most important. The accepted pathway for MC-LR detoxication and excretion in the urine is GSH conjugation. The GSH adduct (GS-MCLR) formation has been shown to occur spontaneously and enzymatically, catalyzed by glutathione transferases (GSTs). The enzymatic reaction has been reported but not characterized both in vitro and in vivo in animal and plant species. No data are available on humans. In the present work, the MC-LR conjugation with GSH catalyzed by five recombinant human GSTs (A1-1, A3-3, M1-1, P1-1, and T1-1) has been characterized for the first time. All GSTs are able to catalyze the reaction; kinetic parameters K(m), k(cat), and their relative specific activities to form GS-MCLR were derived (T1-1 > A1-1 > M1-1 > A3-3 ≫ P1-1). In the range of MC tested concentrations used (0.25-50 μM) GSTT1-1 and A1-1 showed a typical saturation curve with similar affinity for MC-LR (≈80 μM; k(cat) values 0.18 and 0.10 min(-1), respectively), A3-3 and M1-1 were linear, whereas GSTP1-1 showed a temperature-dependent sigmoidal allosteric curve with a k(cat) = 0.11 min(-1). The enzymes mainly expressed in the liver and gastrointestinal tract, GSTA1-1, T1-1, and M1-1, seemed to be mainly involved in the MC-LR detoxification after oral exposure, whereas P1-1 kinetics and location in the skin suggest a role related to dermal exposure. Considering the high frequency of some GST polymorphism, especially M1 and T1 gene deletion, with complete loss in activity, this information could be the first step to identify groups of individual at higher risk associated with MC exposure.

  4. S-Glutathionyl-(chloro)hydroquinone reductases: a novel class of glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xun, Luying; Belchik, Sara M; Xun, Randy; Huang, Yan; Zhou, Huina; Sanchez, Emiliano; Kang, Chulhee; Board, Philip G

    2010-05-27

    Sphingobium chlorophenolicum completely mineralizes PCP (pentachlorophenol). Two GSTs (glutathione transferases), PcpC and PcpF, are involved in the degradation. PcpC uses GSH to reduce TeCH (tetrachloro-p-hydroquinone) to TriCH (trichloro-p-hydroquinone) and then to DiCH (dichloro-p-hydroquinone) during PCP degradation. However, oxidatively damaged PcpC produces GS-TriCH (S-glutathionyl-TriCH) and GS-DiCH (S-glutathionyl-TriCH) conjugates. PcpF converts the conjugates into TriCH and DiCH, re-entering the degradation pathway. PcpF was further characterized in the present study. It catalysed GSH-dependent reduction of GS-TriCH via a Ping Pong mechanism. First, PcpF reacted with GS-TriCH to release TriCH and formed disulfide bond between its Cys53 residue and the GS moiety. Then, a GSH came in to regenerate PcpF and release GS-SG. A TBLASTN search revealed that PcpF homologues were widely distributed in bacteria, halobacteria (archaea), fungi and plants, and they belonged to ECM4 (extracellular mutant 4) group COG0435 in the conserved domain database. Phylogenetic analysis grouped PcpF and homologues into a distinct group, separated from Omega class GSTs. The two groups shared conserved amino acid residues, for GSH binding, but had different residues for the binding of the second substrate. Several recombinant PcpF homologues and two human Omega class GSTs were produced in Escherichia coli and purified. They had zero or low activities for transferring GSH to standard substrates, but all had reasonable activities for GSH-dependent reduction of disulfide bond (thiol transfer), dehydroascorbate and dimethylarsinate. All the tested PcpF homologues reduced GS-TriCH, but the two Omega class GSTs did not. Thus PcpF homologues were tentatively named S-glutathionyl-(chloro)hydroquinone reductases for catalysing the GSH-dependent reduction of GS-TriCH.

  5. Regulatory and functional interactions of plant growth regulators and plant glutathione S-transferases (GSTs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moons, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Plant glutathioneS-transferases (GSTs) are a heterogeneous superfamily of multifunctional proteins, grouped into six classes. The tau (GSTU) and phi (GSTF) class GSTs are the most represented ones and are plant-specific, whereas the smaller theta (GSTT) and zeta (GSTZ) classes are also found in animals. The lambda GSTs (GSTL) and the dehydroascorbate reductases (DHARs) are more distantly related. Plant GSTs perform a variety of pivotal catalytic and non-enzymatic functions in normal plant development and plant stress responses, roles that are only emerging. Catalytic functions include glutathione (GSH)-conjugation in the metabolic detoxification of herbicides and natural products. GSTs can also catalyze GSH-dependent peroxidase reactions that scavenge toxic organic hydroperoxides and protect from oxidative damage. GSTs can furthermore catalyze GSH-dependent isomerizations in endogenous metabolism, exhibit GSH-dependent thioltransferase safeguarding protein function from oxidative damage and DHAR activity functioning in redox homeostasis. Plant GSTs can also function as ligandins or binding proteins for phytohormones (i.e., auxins and cytokinins) or anthocyanins, thereby facilitating their distribution and transport. Finally, GSTs are also indirectly involved in the regulation of apoptosis and possibly also in stress signaling. Plant GST genes exhibit a diversity of expression patterns during biotic and abiotic stresses. Stress-induced plant growth regulators (i.e., jasmonic acid [JA], salicylic acid [SA], ethylene [ETH], and nitric oxide [NO] differentially activate GST gene expression. It is becoming increasingly evident that unique combinations of multiple, often interactive signaling pathways from various phytohormones and reactive oxygen species or antioxidants render the distinct transcriptional activation patterns of individual GSTs during stress. Underestimated post-transcriptional regulations of individual GSTs are becoming increasingly evident and roles

  6. In vivo induction of phase II detoxifying enzymes, glutathione transferase and quinone reductase by citrus triterpenoids

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    Ahmad Hassan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several cell culture and animal studies demonstrated that citrus bioactive compounds have protective effects against certain types of cancer. Among several classes of citrus bioactive compounds, limonoids were reported to prevent different types of cancer. Furthermore, the structures of citrus limonoids were reported to influence the activity of phase II detoxifying enzymes. The purpose of the study was to evaluate how variations in the structures of citrus limonoids (namely nomilin, deacetyl nomilin, and isoobacunoic acid and a mixture of limonoids would influence phase II enzyme activity in excised tissues from a mouse model. Methods In the current study, defatted sour orange seed powder was extracted with ethyl acetate and subjected to silica gel chromatography. The HPLC, NMR and mass spectra were used to elucidate the purity and structure of compounds. Female A/J mice were treated with three limonoids and a mixture in order to evaluate their effect on phase II enzymes in four different tissues. Assays for glutathione S-transferase and NAD(PH: quinone reductase (QR were used to evaluate induction of phase II enzymatic activity. Results The highest induction of GST against 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB was observed in stomach (whole, 58% by nomilin, followed by 25% isoobacunoic acid and 19% deacetyl nomilin. Deacetyl nomilin in intestine (small as well as liver significantly reduced GST activity against CDNB. Additionally isoobacunoic acid and the limonoid mixture in liver demonstrated a significant reduction of GST activity against CDNB. Nomilin significantly induced GST activity against 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO, intestine (280% and stomach (75% while deacetyl nomilin showed significant induction only in intestine (73%. Induction of GST activity was also observed in intestine (93% and stomach (45% treated with the limonoid mixture. Finally, a significant induction of NAD(PH: quinone reductase (QR activity was

  7. Genetic polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferase T1 affect the surgical outcome of varicocelectomies in infertile patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kentaro Ichioka; Kanji Nagahama; Kazutoshi Okubo; Takeshi Soda; Osamu Ogawa; Hiroyuki Nishiyama

    2009-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) are anti-oxidant enzyme genes. Polymorphisms of GSTs, SOD2 and NQO1 have been reported to influence individual susceptibility to various diseases. In an earlier study, we obtained preliminary findings that a subset of glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1)-wt patients with varicocele may exhibit good response to varicocelectomy. In this study, we extended the earlier study to determine the distribution of genotype of each gene in the infertile population and to evaluate whether polymorphism of these genes affects the results of surgical treatment of varicocele. We analyzed 72 infertile varicocele patients, 202 infertile patients without varicocele and 101 male controls. Genotypes of GSTs were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Genotyping of SOD2 and NQO1 was performed using the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. A significantly better response to varicocelectomy was found in patients with the GSTTI-wt genotype (63.2%) and NQO1-Ser/Ser genotype (80.0%) than in those with GSTT1-null genotype (35.3%) and NQO1-Pro/Pro or NQO1-Pro/Ser genotype (45.2%), respectively. The frequencies of glutathione S-transferase M1/T1, SOD2 and NQO1 genotypes did not differ significantly among the varicocele patients, idiopathic infertile patients and male controls. GSTT1 genotype is associated with improvement of semen parameters after varicocelectomy. As the number of patients with NQO1-Ser/Ser genotype was not sufficient to reach definite conclusions, the association of NQO1 genotype with varicoceleetomy requires further investigation.

  8. Glutathione S-transferases gene polymorphisms and risk of male idiopathic infertility: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Pan, Jinhong; Liu, Qigui; Xiong, Enqing; Chen, Zhiwen; Zhou, Zhansong; Su, Yongping; Lu, Gensheng

    2013-03-01

    The Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) polymorphisms have been implicated in susceptibility to male idiopathic infertility, but study results are still controversial. To investigate the genetic associations between GSTs polymorphisms and risk of male idiopathic infertility, a systematic review and meta-analysis were performed. Meta-analysis was performed by pooling odds ratio (OR) with its corresponding 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) form studies in electronic databases up to March 16, 2012. Glutathione S-transferase M 1 (GSTM1) null genotype, Glutathione S-transferase T 1 (GSTT1) null genotype, and dual null genotype of GSTM1/GSTT1 were analyzed independently. 14 eligible studies with a total of 1,845 idiopathic infertility males and 1,729 controls were included. There were 13 studies on GSTM1 polymorphism, 10 ones on GSTT1 polymorphism and 5 ones on GSTM1-GSTT1 interaction analysis. Meta-analyses of total relevant studies showed GSTM1 null genotype was significantly associated with an increased risk of male idiopathic infertility (OR = 1.40, 95 % CI 1.07-1.84, P OR = 0.015). The GSTM1-GSTT1 interaction analysis showed dual null genotype of GSTM1/GSTT1 was also significantly associated with increased risk of male idiopathic infertility (OR = 1.85, 95 % CI 1.07-3.21, P OR = 0.028). Subgroup analyses by ethnicity showed the associations above were still statistically significant in Caucasians (For GSTM1, OR = 1.51, 95 % CI 1.11-2.05, P OR = 0.009; For GSTM1/GSTT1, OR = 2.10, 95 % CI 1.51-2.91, P OR < 0.001). This meta-analysis suggests GSTM1 null genotype contributes to increased risk of male idiopathic infertility in Caucasians, and males with dual null genotype of GSTM1/GSTT1 are particularly susceptible to developing idiopathic infertility.

  9. Comparative study on glutathione transferases of rat brain and testis under the stress of phenobarbitol and beta-methylcholanthrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyagaraju, K; Hemavathi, B; Vasundhara, K; Rao, A D; Devi, K N

    2005-08-01

    A comparative study was made on the tissue specific expression of glutathione transferases (GST) in brain and testis after exposure of rat to phenobarbitol (PB) and b-methylcholanthrene (MC). Glutathione transferases, a family of multifunctional proteins are involved in intracellular transport processes and in detoxication of electrophilic xenobiotics by catalyzing reactions such as conjugation, isomerization, reduction and thiolysis. On purification, the yield of GST proteins by affinity chromatography was 39% in testis and 32% in brain. The affinity purified testis GSTs were resolved by chromatofocusing into six anionic and four cationic isozymes, and in brain glutathione transferases were resolved into four anionic and three cationic isozymes, suggesting the presence of multiple isozymes with Yc, Yb, Ybeta and Ydelta in both of them. In testis and brain, these isozymes at identical pI values showed variable functions with a battery of substrates and the cationic isozymes of brain and testis showed identical properties in CHP (cumene hydroperoxide) at pH values of above 7.0. Substrate specificity studies and immunoblot analysis of testis and brain proteins revealed that they play a predominant role in the detoxication of phenobarbitol or beta-methylcholanthrene. Expression of the isozymes in testis and brain on exposure to PB and MC indicated elevated subunit variation. In both testis and brain, Ydelta of pi class was expressed on PB treatment and Yc of alpha class and Ybeta of mu class was expressed in MC treated testis and only Yc was predominantly expressed in MC treated brain. Thus these subunits expression is considered as markers for carcinogenesis and specific to chemical toxicity under phenobarbitol and beta-methylcholanthrene stress.

  10. Phosphoethanolamine Transferase LptA in Haemophilus ducreyi Modifies Lipid A and Contributes to Human Defensin Resistance In Vitro.

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    Michael P Trombley

    Full Text Available Haemophilus ducreyi resists the cytotoxic effects of human antimicrobial peptides (APs, including α-defensins, β-defensins, and the cathelicidin LL-37. Resistance to LL-37, mediated by the sensitive to antimicrobial peptide (Sap transporter, is required for H. ducreyi virulence in humans. Cationic APs are attracted to the negatively charged bacterial cell surface. In other gram-negative bacteria, modification of lipopolysaccharide or lipooligosaccharide (LOS by the addition of positively charged moieties, such as phosphoethanolamine (PEA, confers AP resistance by means of electrostatic repulsion. H. ducreyi LOS has PEA modifications at two sites, and we identified three genes (lptA, ptdA, and ptdB in H. ducreyi with homology to a family of bacterial PEA transferases. We generated non-polar, unmarked mutants with deletions in one, two, or all three putative PEA transferase genes. The triple mutant was significantly more susceptible to both α- and β-defensins; complementation of all three genes restored parental levels of AP resistance. Deletion of all three PEA transferase genes also resulted in a significant increase in the negativity of the mutant cell surface. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that LptA was required for PEA modification of lipid A; PtdA and PtdB did not affect PEA modification of LOS. In human inoculation experiments, the triple mutant was as virulent as its parent strain. While this is the first identified mechanism of resistance to α-defensins in H. ducreyi, our in vivo data suggest that resistance to cathelicidin LL-37 may be more important than defensin resistance to H. ducreyi pathogenesis.

  11. Phosphoethanolamine Transferase LptA in Haemophilus ducreyi Modifies Lipid A and Contributes to Human Defensin Resistance In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombley, Michael P; Post, Deborah M B; Rinker, Sherri D; Reinders, Lorri M; Fortney, Kate R; Zwickl, Beth W; Janowicz, Diane M; Baye, Fitsum M; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M; Bauer, Margaret E

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi resists the cytotoxic effects of human antimicrobial peptides (APs), including α-defensins, β-defensins, and the cathelicidin LL-37. Resistance to LL-37, mediated by the sensitive to antimicrobial peptide (Sap) transporter, is required for H. ducreyi virulence in humans. Cationic APs are attracted to the negatively charged bacterial cell surface. In other gram-negative bacteria, modification of lipopolysaccharide or lipooligosaccharide (LOS) by the addition of positively charged moieties, such as phosphoethanolamine (PEA), confers AP resistance by means of electrostatic repulsion. H. ducreyi LOS has PEA modifications at two sites, and we identified three genes (lptA, ptdA, and ptdB) in H. ducreyi with homology to a family of bacterial PEA transferases. We generated non-polar, unmarked mutants with deletions in one, two, or all three putative PEA transferase genes. The triple mutant was significantly more susceptible to both α- and β-defensins; complementation of all three genes restored parental levels of AP resistance. Deletion of all three PEA transferase genes also resulted in a significant increase in the negativity of the mutant cell surface. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that LptA was required for PEA modification of lipid A; PtdA and PtdB did not affect PEA modification of LOS. In human inoculation experiments, the triple mutant was as virulent as its parent strain. While this is the first identified mechanism of resistance to α-defensins in H. ducreyi, our in vivo data suggest that resistance to cathelicidin LL-37 may be more important than defensin resistance to H. ducreyi pathogenesis.

  12. Comparative study on glutathione transferases of rat brain and testis under the stress of phenobarbitol and β-methylcholanthrene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    THYAGARAJU K.; HEMAVATHI B.; VASUNDHARA K.; RAO A.D.; DEVI K.N.

    2005-01-01

    A comparative study was made on the tissue specific expression of glutathione transferases (GST) in brain and testis after exposure of rat to phenobarbitol (PB) and 3-methylcholanthrene (MC). Glutathione transferases, a family of multifunctional proteins are involved in intracellular transport processes and in detoxication of electrophilic xenobiotics by catalyzing reactions such as conjugation, isomerization, reduction and thiolysis. On purification, the yield of GST proteins by affinity chromatography was 39% in testis and 32% in brain. The affinity purified testis GSTs were resolved by chromatofocusing into six anionic and four cationic isozymes, and in brain glutathione transferases were resolved into four anionic and three cationic isozymes, suggesting the presence of multiple isozymes with Yc, Yb, Y3 and Yδ in both of them. In testis and brain, these isozymes at identical pI values showed variable functions with a battery of substrates and the cationic isozymes of brain and testis showed identical properties in CHP (cumene hydroperoxide) at pH values of above 7.0. Substrate specificity studies and immunoblot analysis of testis and brain proteins revealed that they play a predominant role in the detoxication of phenobarbitol or 3-methylcholanthrene. Expression of the isozymes in testis and brain on exposure to PB and MC indicated elevated subunit variation. In both testis and brain, Yδ ofπclass was expressed on PB treatment and Yc of α class and Y3 of μ class was expressed in MC treated testis and only Yc was predominantly expressed in MC treated brain. Thus these subunits expression is considered as markers for carcinogenesis and specific to chemical toxicity under phenobarbitol and 13-methylcholanthrene stress.

  13. Alterations at the peptidyl transferase centre of the ribosome induced by the synergistic action of the streptogramins dalfopristin and quinupristin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fucini Paola

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterial ribosome is a primary target of several classes of antibiotics. Investigation of the structure of the ribosomal subunits in complex with different antibiotics can reveal the mode of inhibition of ribosomal protein synthesis. Analysis of the interactions between antibiotics and the ribosome permits investigation of the specific effect of modifications leading to antimicrobial resistances. Streptogramins are unique among the ribosome-targeting antibiotics because they consist of two components, streptogramins A and B, which act synergistically. Each compound alone exhibits a weak bacteriostatic activity, whereas the combination can act bactericidal. The streptogramins A display a prolonged activity that even persists after removal of the drug. However, the mode of activity of the streptogramins has not yet been fully elucidated, despite a plethora of biochemical and structural data. Results The investigation of the crystal structure of the 50S ribosomal subunit from Deinococcus radiodurans in complex with the clinically relevant streptogramins quinupristin and dalfopristin reveals their unique inhibitory mechanism. Quinupristin, a streptogramin B compound, binds in the ribosomal exit tunnel in a similar manner and position as the macrolides, suggesting a similar inhibitory mechanism, namely blockage of the ribosomal tunnel. Dalfopristin, the corresponding streptogramin A compound, binds close to quinupristin directly within the peptidyl transferase centre affecting both A- and P-site occupation by tRNA molecules. Conclusions The crystal structure indicates that the synergistic effect derives from direct interaction between both compounds and shared contacts with a single nucleotide, A2062. Upon binding of the streptogramins, the peptidyl transferase centre undergoes a significant conformational transition, which leads to a stable, non-productive orientation of the universally conserved U2585. Mutations of this r

  14. Labeling of double-stranded DNA by ROX-dideoxycytosine triphosphate using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase and separation by capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figeys, D.; Renborg, A.; Dovichi, N.J. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada))

    1994-12-01

    Terminal transferase is used to add a single fluorescently labeled dideoxynucleotide to double-stranded DNA prepared by restriction endonuclease action on a bacteriophage. The product is separated by capillary electrophoresis with both hydroxypropylmethylcellulose and non-cross-linked polyacrylamide. The reaction products generate single peaks for each fragment with hydroxypropylmethylcellulose. However, the higher resolution separation produced by non-cross-linked polyacrylamide shows that the product contains two components for each restriction digest fragment. This labeling technique should be useful in restriction fragment length polymorphism studies. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Inhibition of the ribosomal peptidyl transferase reaction by the mycarose moiety of the antibiotics carbomycin, spiramycin and tylosin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, S M; Kofoed, C; Vester, B

    2000-01-01

    investigated by chemical probing of domains II and V of 23 S rRNA. The common binding site is around position A2058, while effects on U2506 depend on the presence of the mycarose sugar. Also, protection at position A752 indicates that a mycinose moiety at position 14 in 16-member ring macrolides interact...... transferase reaction bind to the ribosomes concurrently with hygromycin A. Data are presented to argue that a disaccharide at position 5 in the lactone ring of macrolides is essential for inhibition of peptide bond formation and that the mycarose moiety is placed near the conserved U2506 in the central loop...

  16. Does occupational exposure to solvents and pesticides in association with glutathione S-transferase A1, M1, P1, and T1 polymorphisms increase the risk of bladder cancer? The Belgrade case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija G Matic

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We investigated the role of the glutathione S-transferase A1, M1, P1 and T1 gene polymorphisms and potential effect modification by occupational exposure to different chemicals in Serbian bladder cancer male patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A hospital-based case-control study of bladder cancer in men comprised 143 histologically confirmed cases and 114 age-matched male controls. Deletion polymorphism of glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1 was identified by polymerase chain reaction method. Single nucleotide polymorphism of glutathione S-transferase A1 and P1 was identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism method. As a measure of effect size, odds ratio (OR with corresponding 95% confidence interval (95%CI was calculated. RESULTS: The glutathione S-transferase A1, T1 and P1 genotypes did not contribute independently toward the risk of bladder cancer, while the glutathione S-transferase M1-null genotype was overrepresented among cases (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.1-4.2, p = 0.032. The most pronounced effect regarding occupational exposure to solvents and glutathione S-transferase genotype on bladder cancer risk was observed for the low activity glutathione S-transferase A1 genotype (OR = 9.2, 95% CI = 2.4-34.7, p = 0.001. The glutathione S-transferase M1-null genotype also enhanced the risk of bladder cancer among subjects exposed to solvents (OR = 6,5, 95% CI = 2.1-19.7, p = 0.001. The risk of bladder cancer development was 5.3-fold elevated among glutathione S-transferase T1-active patients exposed to solvents in comparison with glutathione S-transferase T1-active unexposed patients (95% CI = 1.9-15.1, p = 0.002. Moreover, men with glutathione S-transferase T1-active genotype exposed to pesticides exhibited 4.5 times higher risk in comparison with unexposed glutathione S-transferase T1-active subjects (95% CI = 0.9-22.5, p = 0.067. CONCLUSION: Null or low-activity genotypes of the

  17. Cantharidin Impedes Activity of Glutathione S-Transferase in the Midgut of Helicoverpa armigera Hübner

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    Ya Lin Zhang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous investigations have implicated glutathione S-transferases (GSTs as one of the major reasons for insecticide resistance. Therefore, effectiveness of new candidate compounds depends on their ability to inhibit GSTs to prevent metabolic detoxification by insects. Cantharidin, a terpenoid compound of insect origin, has been developed as a bio-pesticide in China, and proves highly toxic to a wide range of insects, especially lepidopteran. In the present study, we test cantharidin as a model compound for its toxicity, effects on the mRNA transcription of a model Helicoverpa armigera glutathione S-transferase gene (HaGST and also for its putative inhibitory effect on the catalytic activity of GSTs, both in vivo and in vitro in Helicoverpa armigera, employing molecular and biochemical methods. Bioassay results showed that cantharidin was highly toxic to H. armigera. Real-time qPCR showed down-regulation of the HaGST at the mRNA transcript ranging from 2.5 to 12.5 folds while biochemical assays showed in vivo inhibition of GSTs in midgut and in vitro inhibition of rHaGST. Binding of cantharidin to HaGST was rationalized by homology and molecular docking simulations using a model GST (1PN9 as a template structure. Molecular docking simulations also confirmed accurate docking of the cantharidin molecule to the active site of HaGST impeding its catalytic activity.

  18. In-house preparation of hydrogels for batch affinity purification of glutathione S-transferase tagged recombinant proteins

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    Buhrman Jason S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many branches of biomedical research find use for pure recombinant proteins for direct application or to study other molecules and pathways. Glutathione affinity purification is commonly used to isolate and purify glutathione S-transferase (GST-tagged fusion proteins from total cellular proteins in lysates. Although GST affinity materials are commercially available as glutathione immobilized on beaded agarose resins, few simple options for in-house production of those systems exist. Herein, we describe a novel method for the purification of GST-tagged recombinant proteins. Results Glutathione was conjugated to low molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA via thiol-ene “click” chemistry. With our in-house prepared PEGDA:glutathione (PEGDA:GSH homogenates, we were able to purify a glutathione S-transferase (GST green fluorescent protein (GFP fusion protein (GST-GFP from the soluble fraction of E. coli lysate. Further, microspheres were formed from the PEGDA:GSH hydrogels and improved protein binding to a level comparable to purchased GSH-agarose beads. Conclusions GSH containing polymers might find use as in-house methods of protein purification. They exhibited similar ability to purify GST tagged proteins as purchased GSH agarose beads.

  19. Lipoprotein N-acyl transferase (Lnt1) is dispensable for protein O-mannosylation by Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova-Dávalos, Laura Elena; Espitia, Clara; González-Cerón, Gabriela; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto; Soberón-Chávez, Gloria; Servín-González, Luis

    2014-01-01

    A protein glycosylation system related to that for protein mannosylation in yeast is present in many actinomycetes. This system involves polyprenyl phosphate mannose synthase (Ppm), protein mannosyl transferase (Pmt), and lipoprotein N-acyl transferase (Lnt). In this study, we obtained a series of mutants in the ppm (sco1423), lnt1 (sco1014), and pmt (sco3154) genes of Streptomyces coelicolor, which encode Ppm, Lnt1, and Pmt, to analyze their requirement for glycosylation of the heterologously expressed Apa glycoprotein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The results show that both Ppm and Pmt were required for Apa glycosylation, but that Lnt1 was dispensable for both Apa and the bacteriophage φC31 receptor glycosylation. A bacterial two-hybrid assay revealed that contrary to M. tuberculosis, Lnt1 of S. coelicolor does not interact with Ppm. The D2 catalytic domain of M. tuberculosisPpm was sufficient for complementation of an S. coelicolor double mutant lacking Lnt1 and Ppm, both for Apa glycosylation and for glycosylation of φC31 receptor. On the other hand, M. tuberculosisPmt was not active in S. coelicolor, even when correctly localized to the cytoplasmic membrane, showing fundamental differences in the requirements for Pmt activity in these two species.

  20. An indigenous posttranscriptional modification in the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center confers resistance to an array of protein synthesis inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Seok-Ming; Mankin, Alexander S.

    2017-01-01

    A number of nucleotide residues in ribosomal RNA undergo specific posttranscriptional modification. The roles of most modifications are unclear, but their clustering in the functionally-important regions of rRNA suggest that they might either directly affect the activity or assembly of the ribosome or modulate its interactions with ligands. Of the 25 modified nucleotides in E. coli 23S rRNA, 14 are located in the peptidyl transferase center, the main antibiotic target in the large ribosomal subunit. Since nucleotide modifications have been closely associated with both antibiotic sensitivity and antibiotic resistance, the loss of some of these posttranscriptional modifications may affect the susceptibility of bacteria to antibiotics. We investigated the antibiotic sensitivity of E. coli cells in which the genes of eight rRNA modifying enzymes targeting the PTC were individually inactivated. The lack of pseudouridine at position 2504 of 23S rRNA was found to significantly increase the susceptibility of bacteria to peptidyl transferase inhibitors. Therefore, this indigenous posttranscriptional modification may have evolved as an intrinsic resistance mechanism protecting bacteria against natural antibiotics. PMID:18554609

  1. A simple colorimetric assay for specific detection of glutathione-S transferase activity associated with DDT resistance in mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Morou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insecticide-based methods represent the most effective means of blocking the transmission of vector borne diseases. However, insecticide resistance poses a serious threat and there is a need for tools, such as diagnostic tests for resistance detection, that will improve the sustainability of control interventions. The development of such tools for metabolism-based resistance in mosquito vectors lags behind those for target site resistance mutations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed and validated a simple colorimetric assay for the detection of Epsilon class Glutathione transferases (GST-based DDT resistance in mosquito species, such as Aedes aegypti, the major vector of dengue and yellow fever worldwide. The colorimetric assay is based on the specific alkyl transferase activity of Epsilon GSTs for the haloalkene substrate iodoethane, which produces a dark blue colour highly correlated with AaGSTE2-2-overexpression in individual mosquitoes. The colour can be measured visually and spectrophotometrically. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The novel assay is substantially more sensitive compared to the gold standard CDNB assay and allows the discrimination of moderate resistance phenotypes. We anticipate that it will have direct application in routine vector monitoring as a resistance indicator and possibly an important impact on disease vector control.

  2. Glutathione transferase (GST) as a candidate molecular-based biomarker for soil toxin exposure in the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaCourse, E. James, E-mail: james.la-course@liverpool.ac.u [Institute of Biological, Environmental, and Rural Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3DA (United Kingdom); Hernandez-Viadel, Mariluz; Jefferies, James R. [Institute of Biological, Environmental, and Rural Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3DA (United Kingdom); Svendsen, Claus; Spurgeon, David J. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Huntingdon PE28 2LS (United Kingdom); Barrett, John [Institute of Biological, Environmental, and Rural Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3DA (United Kingdom); John Morgan, A.; Kille, Peter [Biosciences, University of Cardiff, Cardiff CF10 3TL (United Kingdom); Brophy, Peter M. [Institute of Biological, Environmental, and Rural Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3DA (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    The earthworm Lumbricus rubellus (Hoffmeister, 1843) is a terrestrial pollution sentinel. Enzyme activity and transcription of phase II detoxification superfamily glutathione transferases (GST) is known to respond in earthworms after soil toxin exposure, suggesting GST as a candidate molecular-based pollution biomarker. This study combined sub-proteomics, bioinformatics and biochemical assay to characterise the L. rubellus GST complement as pre-requisite to initialise assessment of the applicability of GST as a biomarker. L. rubellus possesses a range of GSTs related to known classes, with evidence of tissue-specific synthesis. Two affinity-purified GSTs dominating GST protein synthesis (Sigma and Pi class) were cloned, expressed and characterised for enzyme activity with various substrates. Electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) following SDS-PAGE were superior in retaining subunit stability relative to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). This study provides greater understanding of Phase II detoxification GST superfamily status of an important environmental pollution sentinel organism. - This study currently provides the most comprehensive view of the Phase II detoxification enzyme superfamily of glutathione transferases within the important environmental pollution sentinel earthworm Lumbricus rubellus.

  3. Glutathione transferases of Phanerochaete chrysosporium: S-glutathionyl-p-hydroquinone reductase belongs to a new structural class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meux, Edgar; Prosper, Pascalita; Ngadin, Andrew; Didierjean, Claude; Morel, Mélanie; Dumarçay, Stéphane; Lamant, Tiphaine; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Favier, Frédérique; Gelhaye, Eric

    2011-03-18

    The white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium, a saprophytic basidiomycete, possesses a large number of cytosolic glutathione transferases, eight of them showing similarity to the Omega class. PcGSTO1 (subclass I, the bacterial homologs of which were recently proposed, based on their enzymatic function, to constitute a new class of glutathione transferase named S-glutathionyl-(chloro)hydroquinone reductases) and PcGSTO3 (subclass II related to mammalian homologs) have been investigated in this study. Biochemical investigations demonstrate that both enzymes are able to catalyze deglutathionylation reactions thanks to the presence of a catalytic cysteinyl residue. This reaction leads to the formation of a disulfide bridge between the conserved cysteine and the removed glutathione from their substrate. The substrate specificity of each isoform differs. In particular PcGSTO1, in contrast to PcGSTO3, was found to catalyze deglutathionylation of S-glutathionyl-p-hydroquinone substrates. The three-dimensional structure of PcGSTO1 presented here confirms the hypothesis that it belongs not only to a new biological class but also to a new structural class that we propose to name GST xi. Indeed, it shows specific features, the most striking ones being a new dimerization mode and a catalytic site that is buried due to the presence of long loops and that contains the catalytic cysteine.

  4. Expression Patterns of Glutathione Transferase Gene (GstI in Maize Seedlings Under Juglone-Induced Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Sytykiewicz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Juglone (5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone has been identified in organs of many plant species within Juglandaceae family. This secondary metabolite is considered as a highly bioactive substance that functions as direct oxidant stimulating the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS in acceptor plants. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, E.C.2.5.1.18 represent an important group of cytoprotective enzymes participating in detoxification of xenobiotics and limiting oxidative damages of cellular macromolecules. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of tested allelochemical on growth and development of maize (Zea mays L. seedlings. Furthermore, the effect of juglone-induced oxidative stress on glutathione transferase (GstI gene expression patterns in maize seedlings was recorded. It was revealed that 4-day juglone treatment significantly stimulated the transcriptional activity of GstI in maize seedlings compared to control plants. By contrast, at the 6th and 8th day of experiments the expression gene responses were slightly lower as compared with non-stressed seedlings. Additionally, the specific gene expression profiles, as well as the inhibition of primary roots and coleoptile elongation were proportional to juglone concentrations. In conclusion, the results provide strong molecular evidence that allelopathic influence of juglone on growth and development of maize seedlings may be relevant with an induction of oxidative stress in acceptor plants.

  5. Mitogen-activated protein kinase p38b interaction with delta class glutathione transferases from the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongtrakul, Jeerang; Sukittikul, Suchada; Saisawang, Chonticha; Ketterman, Albert J

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a family of multifunctional enzymes involved in xenobiotic biotransformation, drug metabolism, and protection against oxidative damage. The p38b mitogen-activated protein kinase is involved in cellular stress response. This study screened interactions between Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Diptera: Drosophilidae) Delta class glutathione transferases (DmGSTs) and the D. melanogaster p38b MAPK. Therefore, 12 DmGSTs and p38b kinase were obtained as recombinant proteins. The study showed that DmGSTD8 and DmGSTD11b significantly increased p38b activity toward ATF2 and jun, which are transcription factor substrates. DmGSTD3 and DmGSTD5 moderately increased p38b activity for jun. In addition, GST activity in the presence of p38b was also measured. It was found that p38b affected substrate specificity toward CDNB (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene) and DCNB (1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene) of several GST isoforms, i.e., DmGSTD2, DmGSTD5, DmGSTD8, and DmGSTD11b. The interaction of a GST and p38b can affect the substrate specificity of either enzyme, which suggests induced conformational changes affecting catalysis. Similar interactions do not occur for all the Delta enzymes and p38b, which suggests that these interactions could be specific.

  6. Meat consumption, N-acetyl transferase 1 and 2 polymorphism and risk of breast cancer, in Danish postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Rikke; Olsen, Anja; Autrup, Herman;

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether polymorphisms in N-acetyl transferase 1 and 2 modify the association between meat consumption and risk of breast cancer. A nested case-control study was conducted among 24697 postmenopausal women included in the 'Diet, Cancer and Health' cohort stu...... a modifying effect on the association, indicating that the association is confined to only genetically susceptible women.......The aim of this study was to investigate whether polymorphisms in N-acetyl transferase 1 and 2 modify the association between meat consumption and risk of breast cancer. A nested case-control study was conducted among 24697 postmenopausal women included in the 'Diet, Cancer and Health' cohort study...... (1993-2000). Three hundred and seventy-eight breast cancer cases were identified and matched to 378 controls. The incidence rate ratio (95% confidence interval) for breast cancer was 1.09 (1.02-1.17) for total meat, 1.15 (1.01-1.31) for red meat and 1.23 (1.04-1.45) for processed meat per 25 g daily...

  7. Complete coding sequence, sequence analysis and transmembrane topology modelling of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense putative oligosaccharyl transferase (TbOST II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baticados, Waren N; Inoue, Noboru; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Nagasawa, Hideyuki; Baticados, Abigail M

    2011-01-01

    The partial nucleotide sequence of putative Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense oligosaccharyl transferase gene was previously reported. Here, we describe the determination of its full-length nucleotide sequence by Inverse PCR (IPCR), subsequent biological sequence analysis and transmembrane topology modelling. The full-length DNA sequence has an Open Reading Frame (ORF) of 2406 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 801 amino acid residues. Protein and DNA sequence analyses revealed that homologues within the genome of other kinetoplastid and various origins exist. Protein topology analysis predicted that Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense putative oligosaccharyl transferase clone II (TbOST II) is a transmembrane protein with transmembrane helices in probably an N(cytosol)-C(cytosol) orientation. Data from the GenBank database assembly and sequence analyses in general clearly state that TbOST II is the STT3 subunit of OST in T.b. rhodesiense that necessitates further characterisation and functional studies with RNAi. TbOST II sequence had been deposited in the GenBank (accession number GU245937).

  8. The role of human demographic history in determining the distribution and frequency of transferase-deficient galactosaemia mutations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flanagan, J M

    2010-02-01

    Classical or transferase-deficient galactosaemia is an inherited metabolic disorder caused by mutation in the human Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) gene. Of some 170 causative mutations reported, fewer than 10% are observed in more than one geographic region or ethnic group. To better understand the population history of the common GALT mutations, we have established a haplotyping system for the GALT locus incorporating eight single nucleotide polymorphisms and three short tandem repeat markers. We analysed haplotypes associated with the three most frequent GALT gene mutations, Q188R, K285N and Duarte-2 (D2), and estimated their age. Haplotype diversity, in conjunction with measures of genetic diversity and of linkage disequilibrium, indicated that Q188R and K285N are European mutations. The Q188R mutation arose in central Europe within the last 20 000 years, with its observed east-west cline of increasing relative allele frequency possibly being due to population expansion during the re-colonization of Europe by Homo sapiens in the Mesolithic age. K285N was found to be a younger mutation that originated in Eastern Europe and is probably more geographically restricted as it arose after all major European population expansions. The D2 variant was found to be an ancient mutation that originated before the expansion of Homo sapiens out of Africa.

  9. Effect of municipal waste water effluent upon the expression of Glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes of brine shrimp Artemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammou, Athina; Papadimitriou, Chrisa; Samaras, Peter; Vasara, Eleni; Papadopoulos, Athanasios I

    2011-06-01

    Multiple isoenzymes of the detoxification enzyme family Glutathione S-transferase are expressed in the brine shrimp Artemia. The number of the major ones detected in crude extract by means of chromatofocusing varied between three and four, depending on the age. Two isoenzymes, one alkaline and one neutral (with corresponding isoelectric points of 8.5 and 7.2) appear to be dominant in all three developmental stages studied, (24, 48, and 72 h after hatching). Culturing Artemia for 48 h after hatching, in artificial sea water prepared by municipal wastewater effluent resulted to significant alterations of the isoenzyme profile. In comparison to organisms cultured for the same period of time in artificial sea water prepared by filtered tap water, the expression of the alkaline isoenzyme decreased by 62% while that of the neutral isoenzyme increased by 58%. Furthermore, the enzyme activity of the major isoenzyme of the acidic area increased by more than two folds. It is worth mentioning that although the specific activity of the total enzyme in the whole body homogenate was elevated, no statistically significant alteration of the Km value was observed. These findings suggest that study of the isoenzyme profile of Glutathione S-transferase may offer high sensitivity in detecting environmental pollution and needs to be further investigated.

  10. Chemical engineering of the peptidyl transferase center reveals an important role of the 2'-hydroxyl group of A2451.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlacher, Matthias D; Lang, Kathrin; Shankaran, Nisha; Wotzel, Brigitte; Hüttenhofer, Alexander; Micura, Ronald; Mankin, Alexander S; Polacek, Norbert

    2005-01-01

    The main enzymatic reaction of the large ribosomal subunit is peptide bond formation. Ribosome crystallography showed that A2451 of 23S rRNA makes the closest approach to the attacking amino group of aminoacyl-tRNA. Mutations of A2451 had relatively small effects on transpeptidation and failed to unequivocally identify the crucial functional group(s). Here, we employed an in vitro reconstitution system for chemical engineering the peptidyl transferase center by introducing non-natural nucleosides at position A2451. This allowed us to investigate the peptidyl transfer reaction performed by a ribosome that contained a modified nucleoside at the active site. The main finding is that ribosomes carrying a 2'-deoxyribose at A2451 showed a compromised peptidyl transferase activity. In variance, adenine base modifications and even the removal of the entire nucleobase at A2451 had only little impact on peptide bond formation, as long as the 2'-hydroxyl was present. This implicates a functional or structural role of the 2'-hydroxyl group at A2451 for transpeptidation.

  11. Some physicochemical properties of two major soluble hepatic glutathione transferases of tilapia (Tilapia zilli).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamidele, Olufemi S; Kolawole, Ayodele O; Ajele, Joshua O

    2012-05-15

    Two distinct glutathione transferases from the liver of adult Tilapia zilli were identified and purified to apparent homogeneity by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and by gel filtration on Sephadex G-150. These major GST forms labeled tzGST1 and tzGST2 accounted for approximately 42% of the activity detectable with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as a typical electrophilic substrate. Apparent subunit and molecular mass values, substrate specificities and sensitivity to inhibitors as well as kinetic studies were used to differentiate the GST forms. SDS/PAGE indicated subunit molecular masses of 22.0 kDa (tzGST1) and 26.1 kDa (tzGST2) while native molecular weight by gel-filtration on sephadex G-100 indicated native molecular masses of 46.8 kDa and 48.0 kDa for tzGST1 and tzGST2 respectively. They appeared to be homodimers. Inhibition studies showed that tzGST1 was more sensitive to ethacrynic acid (EA), hematin, tributyltinacetate (TBTA), triethyltinbromide (TETB), and triphenyltinchloride (TPTC) than tzGST2 with TPTC being the most potent inhibitor. T. zilli GSTs could conjugate CDNB, DCNB, ρ-NBC, and EA with GSH but displayed no observable conjugating activity with NBDCl. The K(m) and V(max) for tzGST1 and tzGST2 with CDNB were 0.56 ± 0.05 mM; 0.24 ± 0.03 μmol/min/ml and 0.91 ± 0.07 mM; 0.14 ± 0.05 μmol/min/ml respectively while K(m) and V(max) with GSH were 0.46 ± 0.02 mM; 0.19 ± 0.20 μmol/min/ml and 1.32 ± 0.15 mM; 0.21 ± 0.07 μmol/min/ml respectively. Denaturation and renaturation studies with guanidine hydrochloride (Gdn-HCl) revealed that concentration of 4.0 M Gdn-HCl completely denatured tzGST1 and the possible isoenzyme was able to renature to 92% of the original activity. The renaturation process was dependent on temperature. The outcome of this study indicated that tzGSTs are possible GST isoenzymes actively present and involve in the detoxification process in the liver of tilapia when the subject is exposed to chemical

  12. Glutathione S transferase polymorphisms influence on iron overload in β-thalassemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Sclafani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In patients with β-thalassemia iron overload that leads to damage to vital organs is observed. Glutathione S transferase (GST enzymes have an antioxidant role in detoxification processes of toxic substances. This role is determined genetically. In this study, we correlated GSTT1 and GSTM1 genotypes with iron overload measured with direct and indirect non-invasive methods; in particular, we used serum ferritin and signal intensity of the magnetic resonance image (MRI in 42 patients with β-thalassemia, which were regularly subjected to chelation and transfusion therapy. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the genotype. The loss of both alleles leads to a decreased value of liver and heart MRI-signal intensity with a consequent iron accumulation in these organs; the loss of only one allele doesn’t lead to relevant overload. Serum ferritin doesn’t appear to be correlated to iron overload instead. 对于β-地中海贫血患者,由于铁过量而造成重要器官受损的情况也在观察之中。谷胱甘肽S转移酶(GST 酶类在对有毒物质进行解毒的过程中有着抗氧化剂的作用。该作用是由基因决定的。 在这份研究中,我们运用了直接和间接非侵入性的方法对基因型铁过量GSTT1 和GSTM1进行了相关性测量;特别地,我们对42位定期接受螯合和输血治疗的β-地中海贫血患者进行了血清铁蛋白和磁共振强度图像(MRI 的测试。 多重聚合酶链反应的测试也被运用来确定该基因型。 该两种等位基因的缺失,导致了肝功能减损及心脏磁共振强度的下降,并造成了在这些器官中铁含量的积累;其中一种等位基因的缺失并不会导致过度的铁含量。血清蛋白和铁过量之间,看起来并不存在相关性。

  13. UV-induced modifications in the peptidyl transferase loop of 23S rRNA dependent on binding of the streptogramin B antibiotic, pristinamycin IA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, B T; Kirillov, S V; Awayez, M J;

    1999-01-01

    the functionally important peptidyl transferase loop of 23S rRNA at positions m2A2503/psi2504 and G2061/A2062. The modification yields are influenced strongly, and differentially, by P-site-bound tRNA and strongly by some of the peptidyl transferase antibiotics tested, with chloramphenicol producing a shift...... the sequence Cm-C-U-C-G-m2A-psi-G2505 are important for pristinamycin IA binding and/or the antibiotic-dependent modification of 23S rRNA....

  14. Epsilon glutathione transferases possess a unique class-conserved subunit interface motif that directly interacts with glutathione in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C; Ketterman, Albert J

    2015-10-20

    Epsilon class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been shown to contribute significantly to insecticide resistance. We report a new Epsilon class protein crystal structure from Drosophila melanogaster for the glutathione transferase DmGSTE6. The structure reveals a novel Epsilon clasp motif that is conserved across hundreds of millions of years of evolution of the insect Diptera order. This histidine-serine motif lies in the subunit interface and appears to contribute to quaternary stability as well as directly connecting the two glutathiones in the active sites of this dimeric enzyme.

  15. STUDY OF THE DELETION MUTATION OF GLUTATHIONE S TRANSFERASE M1 GENE AND ITS ROLE IN SUSCEPTIBILITY TO HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA; Yun

    2001-01-01

    [1]Guengerich FP, Shimada T, Raney KD, et al. Elucidation of catalytic specificities of human cytochrome P450 and glutathione S-transferase enzymes and relevance to molecular epidemiology [J]. Envir Health Perspectives 1992; 98:75.[2]Salagoric J, Kalina I, Stubna J, et al. Genetic polymorphism of glutathione S-transferases M1 and T1 as a risk factor in lung and bladder cancers [J]. Neoplasma 1998; 45:312.[3]Comstock KE, Sanderson BJ.S, Claflin SG, et al. GST1 gene deletion determined by polymerase chain reaction [J]. Nucleic Acids Research 1990; 18:3670.[4]Ma Yun, Deng Zhuolin, Le Chenyi, et al. The comparative study on mutational hot spot of p53 gene in hepatocellular carcinoma from AFB1 high and low risk area in Guangxi [J]. J Clin Exp Pthol 1997; 13:302.[5]McGlyNN KA, Rosvold EA, Lustbader ED, et al. Susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma is associated with genetic variation in the enzymatic detoxification of aflatoxin B1 [J]. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1995; 92:2384..[6]Chen CJ, Yu MW, Liaw YF. Epidemiological characteristics and factors of hepatocellular carcinoma [J]. J Gastroenterol Hepatol 1997; 12:294.[7]Hu Ying, Shen Fumin. Association between GSTM1 gene polymorphism of primary hepatocellular carcinoma and mutation of p53 codon 249 [J]. Chin J Med Genet 1997; 14:76.[8]Hsieh LL, Huang RC, Yu MW, et al. L-myc, GSTM1 genetic polymorphism and hepatocellular carcinoma risk among hepatitis B carriers [J]. Cancer Lett 1996; 103:171.[9]Dong Chuanhui, Zi Xiaolin, Yu Shunzhang, et al. Relationship between deletion of glutathione S-transferase gene and susceptibility to primary hepatocellular carcinoma [J]. Chin J Public Health 1997; 16:141.[10]Chomarat P, Rice JM, Slagle BL, et al. Hepatitis B virus induced liver injury and altered expression of carcinogen metabolising enzymes: the role of the HBx protein [J]. Toxicol Lett 1998; 28:595.

  16. Glutathione and glutathione S-transferases A1-1 and P1-1 in seminal plasma may play a role in protecting against oxidative damage to spermatozoa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raijmakers, M.; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Steegers, E.A.P.; Steegers-Theunissen, R.P.M.; Mulder, T.P.J.; Knapen, M.F.C.M.; Wong, W.Y.; Peters, W.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the levels of glutathione, glutathione S-transferase A1-1, and glutathione S-transferase P1-1 in seminal fluid of fertile and subfertile men. DESIGN: Retrospective case-control study. SETTING: Departments of gastroenterology, obstetrics and gynecology, and epidemiology and biosta

  17. Yeast One-hybrid System Used to Identify the Binding Proteins for Rat Glutathione S-transferase P Enhancer I

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    To detect the trans-factors specifically binding to the strong enhancer element (GPEI) in the upstream of rat glutathione S-transferase P (GST-P) gene. Methods Yeast one-hybrid system was used to screen rat lung MATCHMAKER cDNA library to identify potential trans-factors that can interact with core sequence of GPEI(cGPEI).Electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA) was used to analyze the binding of transfactors to cGPEI. Results cDNA fragments coding for the C-terminal part of the transcription factor c-Jun and rat adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) were isolated, The binding of c-Jun and ANT to GPEI core sequence were confirmed. Conclusions Rat c-jun transcriptional factor and ANT may interact with cGPEI. They could play an important role in the induced expression of GST-P gene.

  18. Genetic polymorphism of human glutathione S-transferase A1 gene in mainland Chinese and its association with phenotype

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JiePING; HuiWANG

    2005-01-01

    AIM Human glutathione S-transferase A1 (GSTA1) is an important phase Ⅱ metabolizing enzyme involved in the metabolism of many therapeutic drugs and is responsible for the metabolic detoxification of numerous promutagens and procarcinogens. The genetic polymorphism of GSTA1 has important implications for drug efficacy and cancer susceptibility. In this study, we determined the distribution of GSTA1 genetic polymorphism in Mainland Chinese. And we also investigated whether there exists the potential phenotype alterations caused by the genetic polymorphism in human. METHODS Genomic DNA was ex-tracted from peripheral blood of 140 Chinese people and 16 liver tissues obtained from non-liverish patients who underwent partial hepatectomy. And then the genotypes of human GSTA1 gene were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restricted fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP).

  19. Micro-plasticity of genomes as illustrated by the evolution of glutathione transferases in 12 Drosophila species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chonticha Saisawang

    Full Text Available Glutathione transferases (GST are an ancient superfamily comprising a large number of paralogous proteins in a single organism. This multiplicity of GSTs has allowed the copies to diverge for neofunctionalization with proposed roles ranging from detoxication and oxidative stress response to involvement in signal transduction cascades. We performed a comparative genomic analysis using FlyBase annotations and Drosophila melanogaster GST sequences as templates to further annotate the GST orthologs in the 12 Drosophila sequenced genomes. We found that GST genes in the Drosophila subgenera have undergone repeated local duplications followed by transposition, inversion, and micro-rearrangements of these copies. The colinearity and orientations of the orthologous GST genes appear to be unique in many of the species which suggests that genomic rearrangement events have occurred multiple times during speciation. The high micro-plasticity of the genomes appears to have a functional contribution utilized for evolution of this gene family.

  20. Genetic Polymorphisms Analysis of Glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1 in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王军; 张利; 冯建飞; 王宏; 朱绍先; 胡豫; 李玉香

    2004-01-01

    Summary: The relationship between glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) M1, T1 genotype and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was investigated. GSTM1 and GSTT1 genotypes in genomic DNA from 67 children with ALL and 146 healthy controls were analyzed by using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The frequencies of GSTM1, M1-T1 null genotypes in ALL children were significantly higher than in the healthy controls (76.12 % versus 52.74 %, OR=2.856, P<0.001;50. 74 % versus 24. 66 %, OR=3. 148, P<0.001, respectively). However,there was no significant relationship between GSTT1 null genotype and ALL of children (61.19 %versus 49.32 %, OR=1. 621, P>0.05). It was suggested that GSTM1 null genotype might be a risk genotype of childhood ALL, while there as no correlation between GSTT1 null genotype and childhood ALL.

  1. Association between polymorphisms of the dopamine receptor D2 and catechol-o-methyl transferase genes and cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Jennifer L; Marioni, Riccardo E; Deary, Ian J; Harris, Sarah E; Stewart, Marlene C; Murray, Gordon D; Fowkes, F Gerry R; Price, Jackie F

    2010-09-01

    The dopaminergic neurotransmitter system of the brain is involved in working memory and other cognitive functions. Studies suggest an important role for dopamine synthesis and uptake in modulation of human cognitive processes. We studied the association between polymorphisms in the catechol-o-methyl transferase (COMT) and dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) genes and general cognitive ability in a secondary analysis of 2091 men and women, aged 55-80 years living in Scotland. General cognitive ability 'g' was derived from five cognitive tests of different domains. COMT was not associated with cognitive ability in this population. The DRD2 C:C genotype of rs6277 was associated with decreased general cognitive ability 'g' (p = 0.003), and DRD2 rs1800497 heterozygotes had lowest mean general cognitive ability 'g' (p = 0.007). There was an indication of a potential interaction between the DRD2 SNPs.

  2. Movement of the 3'-end of tRNA through the peptidyl transferase centre and its inhibition by antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirillov, Stanislav; Porse, Bo Torben; Vester, Birthe;

    1997-01-01

    Determining how antibiotics inhibit ribosomal activity requires a detailed understanding of the interactions and relative movement of tRNA, mRNA and the ribosome. Recent models for the formation of hybrid tRNA binding sites during the elongation cycle have provided a basis for re-evaluating earlier......RNA-ribosome binding. Nevertheless, these relatively weak interactions determine the unidirectional movement of tRNAs through the ribosome and, moreover, they appear to be particularly susceptible to perturbation by antibiotics. Here we summarise current ideas relating particularly to the movement of the 3'-ends of t......RNA through the ribosome and consider possible inhibitory mechanisms of the peptidyl transferase antibiotics....

  3. Identification of the nuclear localisation signal of O-GlcNAc transferase and its nuclear import regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyeon Gyu; Kim, Han Byeol; Kang, Min Jueng; Ryum, Joo Hwan; Yi, Eugene C.; Cho, Jin Won

    2016-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) attaches a single GlcNAc to hydroxyl groups of serine and threonine residues. Although the cellular localisation of OGT is important to regulate a variety of cellular processes, the molecular mechanisms regulating the nuclear localisation of OGT is unclear. Here, we characterised three amino acids (DFP; residues 451–453) as the nuclear localisation signal of OGT and demonstrated that this motif mediated the nuclear import of non-diffusible β-galactosidase. OGT bound the importin α5 protein, and this association was abolished when the DFP motif of OGT was mutated or deleted. We also revealed that O-GlcNAcylation of Ser389, which resides in the tetratricopeptide repeats, plays an important role in the nuclear localisation of OGT. Our findings may explain how OGT, which possesses a NLS, exists in the nucleus and cytosol simultaneously. PMID:27713473

  4. Clonning and sequence analysis of the 26 kDa glutathiones-transferase gene of Schistosoma mekongi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichasri-Grams, S; Grams, R; Korge, G; Viyanant, V; Upatham, E S

    1997-09-01

    The number of genomic DNA or cDNA sequences of Schistosoma mekongi accessible in Genbank or EMBL is very limited up to now. Recently, two reports have appeared on the molecular phylogeny of Schistosoma species inferred from partial sequence data of rRNA genes; no further sequence data of S. mekongi is available yet. Knowledge of the molecular structure of protein coding genes of S. mekongi will provide a better understanding of gene function in the genus Schistosoma. A cDNA library of S. mekongi adult male was constructed and a cDNA encoding the 26 kDa glutathione S-transferase protein of this species was cloned. Sequence analysis of this cDNA confirmed the close phylogenetic relationship of S. mekongi to S. japonicum.

  5. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, and comparative analysis with five additional insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Houxia; Pei, Lianghong; Gu, Shasha; Zhu, Shicheng; Wang, Yanyun; Zhang, Yi; Li, Bin

    2012-11-01

    Glutathione S-transferases are important detoxification enzymes involved in insecticide resistance. Sequencing the Tribolium castaneum genome provides an opportunity to investigate the structure, function, and evolution of GSTs on a genome-wide scale. Thirty-six putative cytosolic GSTs and 5 microsomal GSTs have been identified in T. castaneum. Furthermore, 40, 35, 13, 23, and 32 GSTs have been discovered the other insects, Drosophila, Anopheles, Apis, Bombyx, and Acyrthosiphon, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that insect-specific GSTs, Epsilon and Delta, are the largest species-specific expanded GSTs. In T. castaneum, most GSTs are tandemly arranged in three chromosomes. Particularly, Epsilon GSTs have an inverted long-fragment duplication in the genome. Other four widely distributed classes are highly conserved in all species. Given that GSTs specially expanded in Tribolium castaneum, these genes might help to resist poisonous chemical environments and produce resistance to kinds of different insecticides.

  6. Glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1 genotypes and endometriosis risk: a case-controlled study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林俊; 张信美; 钱羽力; 叶英辉; 石一复; 徐开红; 徐键云

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlation between glutathione S-transferase (GST) M1 and T1 genotypes and endometriosis risk (EM). Methods Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to detect the presence or absence of the GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes in genomic DNA isolated from the blood samples of 68 Han Chinese women with endometriosis and 28 without endometriosis. Results The frequencies of GSTM1 and GSTT1 null genotypes in women with endometriosis were 0.721 (49/68) and 0.779 (53/68), respectively, and in women without endometriosis were 0.429 (12/28) and 0.321 (9/28), respectively. There was a significant difference with regard to the frequencies of GSTM1 and GSTT1 null genotypes between the women with and without endometriosis (P0.05). Conclusion GSTM1 and GSTT1 null genotypes may be risk factors for the development of endometriosis.

  7. Glutathione S-transferases interact with AMP-activated protein kinase: evidence for S-glutathionylation and activation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Anna; Zorman, Sarah; Berthier, Alexandre; Polge, Cécile; Ramirez, Sacnicte; Michelland, Sylvie; Sève, Michel; Vertommen, Didier; Rider, Mark; Lentze, Nicolas; Auerbach, Daniel; Schlattner, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cellular and whole body energy sensor with manifold functions in regulating energy homeostasis, cell morphology and proliferation in health and disease. Here we apply multiple, complementary in vitro and in vivo interaction assays to identify several isoforms of glutathione S-transferase (GST) as direct AMPK binding partners: Pi-family member rat GSTP1 and Mu-family members rat GSTM1, as well as Schistosoma japonicum GST. GST/AMPK interaction is direct and involves the N-terminal domain of the AMPK β-subunit. Complex formation of the mammalian GSTP1 and -M1 with AMPK leads to their enzymatic activation and in turn facilitates glutathionylation and activation of AMPK in vitro. GST-facilitated S-glutathionylation of AMPK may be involved in rapid, full activation of the kinase under mildly oxidative physiological conditions.

  8. Polymorphisms in the glutathione S-transferase theta and mu genes and susceptibility to myeloid leukemia in Brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Lima Souza

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The null genotype for glutathione S-transferase (GST, EC 2.5.1.18 gene polymorphisms is considered a risk factor for leukemia in different populations. In this work we investigated the GSTT1 and GSTM1 polymorphisms using multiplex PCR in 53 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, 23 with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL and 304 apparently healthy controls. In this association study we found that the GSTT1null genotype was more frequent in our group of APL patients than in the control group [OR = 2.75 (95% CI = 1.10-6.88], providing evidence that a deletion in the GSTT1 gene could be a risk factor for this type of leukemia.

  9. Micro-plasticity of genomes as illustrated by the evolution of glutathione transferases in 12 Drosophila species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saisawang, Chonticha; Ketterman, Albert J

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GST) are an ancient superfamily comprising a large number of paralogous proteins in a single organism. This multiplicity of GSTs has allowed the copies to diverge for neofunctionalization with proposed roles ranging from detoxication and oxidative stress response to involvement in signal transduction cascades. We performed a comparative genomic analysis using FlyBase annotations and Drosophila melanogaster GST sequences as templates to further annotate the GST orthologs in the 12 Drosophila sequenced genomes. We found that GST genes in the Drosophila subgenera have undergone repeated local duplications followed by transposition, inversion, and micro-rearrangements of these copies. The colinearity and orientations of the orthologous GST genes appear to be unique in many of the species which suggests that genomic rearrangement events have occurred multiple times during speciation. The high micro-plasticity of the genomes appears to have a functional contribution utilized for evolution of this gene family.

  10. Dynamic interplay between catalytic and lectin domains of GalNAc-transferases modulates protein O-glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lira-Navarrete, Erandi; de Las Rivas, Matilde; Compañón, Ismael;

    2015-01-01

    Protein O-glycosylation is controlled by polypeptide GalNAc-transferases (GalNAc-Ts) that uniquely feature both a catalytic and lectin domain. The underlying molecular basis of how the lectin domains of GalNAc-Ts contribute to glycopeptide specificity and catalysis remains unclear. Here we present...... the first crystal structures of complexes of GalNAc-T2 with glycopeptides that together with enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate a cooperative mechanism by which the lectin domain enables free acceptor sites binding of glycopeptides into the catalytic domain. Atomic force microscopy...... and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments further reveal a dynamic conformational landscape of GalNAc-T2 and a prominent role of compact structures that are both required for efficient catalysis. Our model indicates that the activity profile of GalNAc-T2 is dictated by conformational heterogeneity...

  11. S-Glutathionylation of Keap1: a new role for glutathione S-transferase pi in neuronal protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Andreia Neves; Marques, Carla; Guedes, Rita C; Castro-Caldas, Margarida; Rodrigues, Elsa; van Horssen, Jack; Gama, Maria João

    2016-05-01

    Oxidative stress is a key pathological feature of Parkinson's disease (PD). Glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTP) is a neuroprotective antioxidant enzyme regulated at the transcriptional level by the antioxidant master regulator nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Here, we show for the first time that upon MPTP-induced oxidative stress, GSTP potentiates S-glutathionylation of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), an endogenous repressor of Nrf2, in vivo. S-glutathionylation of Keap1 leads to Nrf2 activation and subsequently increases expression of GSTP. This positive feedback regulatory loop represents a novel mechanism by which GSTP elicits antioxidant protection in the brain.

  12. Increase of gluthatione S-transferase, carboxyl esterase and carbonyl reductase in Fasciola hepatica recovered from triclabendazole treated sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarcella, S; Solana, M V; Fernandez, V; Lamenza, P; Ceballos, L; Solana, H

    2013-10-01

    Fasciolasis is a zoonotic parasitic disease caused by Fasciola hepatica and its control is mainly based on the use of triclabendazole (TCBZ). Parasite resistance to different anthelmintics is growing worldwide, including the resistance of F. hepatica to TCBZ. In the present work we evaluate "in vivo" the activity of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes of phase I (carboxyl esterases) and phase II (glutathione S-transferases and carbonyl reductases) recovered of flukes from sheep treated with TCBZ. All three enzymes showed increased activity in TCBZ flukes returning 60h post-treatment at similar to baseline unexposed flukes. TCBZ action may induce secondary oxidative stress, which may explain the observed increment in activities of the analyzed enzymes as a defensive mechanism. The enzymes analyzed are candidates to participate actively in the development of resistance at TCBZ in F. hepatica.

  13. Selection of Arabidopsis mutants overexpressing genes driven by the promoter of an auxin-inducible glutathione S-transferase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kop, D A; Schuyer, M; Pinas, J E; van der Zaal, B J; Hooykaas, P J

    1999-03-01

    Transgenic arabidopsis plants were isolated that contained a T-DNA construct in which the promoter of an auxin-inducible glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene from tobacco was fused to the kanamycin resistance (nptII) as well as to the beta-glucuronidase (gusA) reporter gene. Subsequently, seeds were treated with EMS to obtain mutants in which both reporter gene fusions were up-regulated. Northern analysis showed that the mRNA level of a related, endogenous auxin-inducible GST gene of Arabidopsis was increased in some of these mutants as well. Two of the gup (GST up-regulated) mutants were characterized in more detail and roughly mapped. Both had epinastic cotyledons and leaves, a phenotype that turned out to be linked to the gup mutation.

  14. Characterization of an omega-class glutathione S-transferase in the stress response of the silkmoth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K; Teshiba, S; Shigeoka, Y; Aso, Y; Banno, Y; Fujiki, T; Katakura, Y

    2011-06-01

    The glutathione S-transferase (GST) superfamily is involved in detoxification of various xenobiotics. Using real-time PCR, mRNA encoding an omega-class GST of Bombyx mori (bmGSTO) was shown to be induced after exposure to various environmental stresses. A soluble form of recombinant protein (rbmGSTO) was functionally overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells and purified to homogeneity. Cys 38 and Pro 39 were found to be highly conserved in omega-class GSTs, and their roles were investigated by site-directed mutagenesis/kinetic analysis. Mutations of Cys 38 and Pro 39 residues affected the catalytic efficiency of enzymes, indicating that the presence of Cys 38 and Pro 39 residues is important for bmGSTO activity. Thus, bmGSTO could contribute to increasing the environmental stress resistance of lepidopteran insects.

  15. Evaluation of hepatic glutathione transferase Mu 1 and Theta 1 activities in humans and mice using genotype information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Shingo; Fujimoto, Kazunori; Kato, Ayako; Endo, Seiko; Fukahori, Aiko; Shinagawa, Akira; Fischer, Thomas; Mueller, Juergen; Takasaki, Wataru

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the impact of glutathione transferases Mu 1 (GSTM1)- and glutathione transferase Theta 1 (GSTT1)-null genotypes on hepatic GST activities in humans and compared the results with those of Gstm1- and Gstt1-null mice. In liver with GSTM1/Gstm1-null genotype, GST activity toward p-nitrobenzyl chloride (NBC) was significantly decreased in both humans and mice. In addition, in liver with GSTT1/Gstt1-null genotype, GST activity toward dichloromethane (DCM) was significantly decreased in both humans and mice. Therefore, null genotypes of GSTM1/Gstm1 and GSTT1/Gstt1 are considered to decrease hepatic GST activities toward NBC and DCM, respectively, in both humans and mice. This observation shows the functional similarity between humans and mice for GSTM1 and GSTT1 toward some substrates. In the case of NBC and DCM, Gst-null mice would be relevant models for humans with GST-null genotype. In addition, decreases in GST activities toward 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene, trans-4-phenyl-3-buten-2-one, and 1-chloro-2,4,-dinitrobenzene were observed in Gstm1-null mice, and a decrease in GST activity toward 1,2-epoxy-3-(p-nitrophenoxy)propane was observed in Gstt1-null mice. However, an impact of GST-null genotypes on GST activities toward these substrates was not observed in humans. In the case of these mouse-specific substrates, Gst-null mice may be relevant models for humans regardless of GST genotype, because GST activities, which are higher in wild-type mice than in humans, were eliminated in Gst-null mice. This study shows that comparison of hepatic GST activities between humans and mice using genotype information would be valuable in using Gst-null mice as human models.

  16. GSTP1 Polymorphisms and their Association with Glutathione Transferase and Peroxidase Activities in Patients with Motor Neuron Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewska, Beata; Kaźmierczak, Beata; Kuźma-Kozakiewicz, Magdalena; Jamrozik, Zygmunt; Barańczyk-Kuźma, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTP1) is a crucial enzyme in detoxification of electrophilic compounds and organic peroxides. Together with Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GSHPx) it protects cells against oxidative stress which may be a primary factor implicated in motor neuron disease (MND) pathogenesis. We investigated GSTP1 polymorphisms and their relationship with GST and Se-GSTPx activities in a cohort of Polish patients with MND. Results were correlated with clinical phenotypes. The frequency of genetic variants for GSTP1 exon 5 (I105V) and exon 6 (A114V) was studied in 104 patients and 100 healthy controls using real-time polymerase chain reaction. GST transferase activity was determined in serum with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, its peroxidase activity with cumene hydroperoxide, and Se-GSHPx activity with hydrogen peroxide. There were no differences in the prevalence of GSTP1 polymorphism I105V and A114V between MND and controls, however the occurrence of CT variant in codon 114 was associated with a higher risk for MND. GSTP1 polymorphisms were less frequent in classic ALS than in progressive bulbar palsy. In classic ALS C* (heterozygous I /V and A /V) all studied activities were significantly lower than in classic ALS A* (homozygous I /I and A/A). GST peroxidase activity and Se-GSHPx activity were lower in classic ALS C* than in control C*, but in classic ALS A* Se-GSHPx activity was significantly higher than in control A*. It can be concluded that the presence of GSTP1 A114V but not I105V variant increases the risk of MND, and combined GSTP1 polymorphisms in codon 105 and 114 may result in lower protection of MND patients against the toxicity of electrophilic compounds, organic and inorganic hydroperoxides.

  17. Association between glutathione S-transferase M1 null genotype and risk of gallbladder cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong-Li; Han, Bing; Zhai, Hong-Peng; Cheng, Xin-Hua; Ma, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a family of enzymes which are involved in the detoxification of potential carcinogens. Glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) null genotype can impair the enzyme activity of GSTs and is suspected to increase the susceptibility to gallbladder cancer. Previous studies investigating the association between GSTM1 null genotype and risk of gallbladder cancer reported inconsistent findings. To quantify the association between GSTM1 null genotype and risk of gallbladder cancer, we performed a meta-analysis of published studies. We searched PubMed, Embase, and Wanfang databases for all possible studies. We estimated the pooled odds ratio (OR) with its 95% confidence interval (95% CI) to assess the association. Meta-analysis of total included studies showed that GSTM1 null genotype was not associated with gallbladder cancer risk (OR = 1.13, 95% CI 0.88-1.46, P = 0.332). Subgroup analysis by ethnicity showed that there was no association between GSTM1 null genotype and risk of gallbladder cancer in both Caucasians and Asians. However, meta-analysis of studies with adjusted estimations showed that GSTM1 null genotype was associated with increased risk of gallbladder cancer (OR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.02-2.09, P = 0.038). Thus, this meta-analysis shows that GSTM1 null genotype is likely to be associated with risk of gallbladder cancer. More studies with well design and large sample size are needed to further validate the association between GSTM1 null genotype and gallbladder cancer.

  18. Identification and suppression of the p-coumaroyl CoA:hydroxycinnamyl alcohol transferase in Zea mays L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marita, Jane M; Hatfield, Ronald D; Rancour, David M; Frost, Kenneth E

    2014-06-01

    Grasses, such as Zea mays L. (maize), contain relatively high levels of p-coumarates (pCA) within their cell walls. Incorporation of pCA into cell walls is believed to be due to a hydroxycinnamyl transferase that couples pCA to monolignols. To understand the role of pCA in maize development, the p-coumaroyl CoA:hydroxycinnamyl alcohol transferase (pCAT) was isolated and purified from maize stems. Purified pCAT was subjected to partial trypsin digestion, and peptides were sequenced by tandem mass spectrometry. TBLASTN analysis of the acquired peptide sequences identified a single full-length maize cDNA clone encoding all the peptide sequences obtained from the purified enzyme. The cDNA clone was obtained and used to generate an RNAi construct for suppressing pCAT expression in maize. Here we describe the effects of suppression of pCAT in maize. Primary screening of transgenic maize seedling leaves using a new rapid analytical platform was used to identify plants with decreased amounts of pCA. Using this screening method, mature leaves from fully developed plants were analyzed, confirming reduced pCA levels throughout plant development. Complete analysis of isolated cell walls from mature transgenic stems and leaves revealed that lignin levels did not change, but pCA levels decreased and the lignin composition was altered. Transgenic plants with the lowest levels of pCA had decreased levels of syringyl units in the lignin. Thus, altering the levels of pCAT expression in maize leads to altered lignin composition, but does not appear to alter the total amount of lignin present in the cell walls.

  19. Novel functional association of rat testicular membrane-associated cytosolic glutathione S transferases and cyclooxygenase in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Neeraja; B. Ramakrishna; A. S. Sreenath; G. V. Reddy; P. R. K. Reddy; P. Reddanna

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the role of cytosolic glutathione S-transferases (cGSTs) and membrane-associated cytosolic GSTs (macGSTs) in prostaglandin biosynthesis and to evaluate the possible interaction between glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and cyclooxygenase (COX) in vitro. Methods: SDS-PAGE analysis was undertaken for characterization of GSTs, thin layer chromatography (TLC) to monitor the effect of GSTs on prostaglandin biosynthesis from arachidonic acid (AA) and spectrophotometric assays were done for measuring activity levels of COX and GSTs. Results:SDS-PAGE analysis indicates that macGSTs have molecular weights in the range of 25-28 kDa. In a coupled assay involving GSTs, arachidonic acid and cyclooxygenase-1, rat testicular macGSTs produced prostaglandin E2 and F2α,while the cGSTs caused the generation of prostaglandin D2, E2 and F2α. In vitro interaction studies on GSTs and COX at the protein level have shown dose-dependent inhibition of COX activity by macGSTs and vice versa. This effect,however, is not seen with cGSTs. The inhibitory effect of COX on macGST activity was relieved with increasing concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) but not with 1-chloro 2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). The inhibition of COX by macGSTs, on the other hand, was potentiated by glutathione. Conclusion: We isolated and purified macGSTs and cGSTs from rat testis and analyzed their involvement in prostaglandin biosynthesis. These studies reveal a reversible functional interaction between macGSTs and COX in vitro, with possible interactions between them at the GSH binding site of macGSTs.

  20. Functional characterization of UDP-glucose:undecaprenyl-phosphate glucose-1-phosphate transferases of Escherichia coli and Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kinnari B; Toh, Evelyn; Fernandez, Ximena B; Hanuszkiewicz, Anna; Hardy, Gail G; Brun, Yves V; Bernards, Mark A; Valvano, Miguel A

    2012-05-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 WcaJ and the Caulobacter crescentus HfsE, PssY, and PssZ enzymes are predicted to initiate the synthesis of colanic acid (CA) capsule and holdfast polysaccharide, respectively. These proteins belong to a prokaryotic family of membrane enzymes that catalyze the formation of a phosphoanhydride bond joining a hexose-1-phosphate with undecaprenyl phosphate (Und-P). In this study, in vivo complementation assays of an E. coli K-12 wcaJ mutant demonstrated that WcaJ and PssY can complement CA synthesis. Furthermore, WcaJ can restore holdfast production in C. crescentus. In vitro transferase assays demonstrated that both WcaJ and PssY utilize UDP-glucose but not UDP-galactose. However, in a strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium deficient in the WbaP O antigen initiating galactosyltransferase, complementation with WcaJ or PssY resulted in O-antigen production. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) revealed the attachment of both CA and O-antigen molecules to lipid A-core oligosaccharide (OS). Therefore, while UDP-glucose is the preferred substrate of WcaJ and PssY, these enzymes can also utilize UDP-galactose. This unexpected feature of WcaJ and PssY may help to map specific residues responsible for the nucleotide diphosphate specificity of these or similar enzymes. Also, the reconstitution of O-antigen synthesis in Salmonella, CA capsule synthesis in E. coli, and holdfast synthesis provide biological assays of high sensitivity to examine the sugar-1-phosphate transferase specificity of heterologous proteins.

  1. High-throughput genotyping of copy number variation in glutathione S-transferases M1 and T1 using real-time PCR in 20,687 individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norskov, M.S.; Frikke-Schmidt, R.; Loft, S.;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Characteristic for the genes encoding glutathione S-transferase (GST) M1 and GSTT1 is a null allele, suggested to increase susceptibility to chronic diseases. We report an optimized method for the determination of copy number variation (CNV) in GST genes. DESIGN AND METHODS: Real-time...

  2. Differential transcription of cytochrome P450s and glutathione S transferases in DDT-susceptible and resistant Drosophila melanogaster strains in response to DDT and oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic DDT resistance in Drosophila melanogaster has previously been associated with constitutive over-transcription of cytochrome P450s. Increased P450 activity has also been associated with increased oxidative stress. In contrast, over-transcription of glutathione S transferases (GSTs) has been...

  3. Succinyl-CoA:acetoacetate transferase deficiency : identification of a new patient with a neonatal onset and review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niezen-Koning, K E; Wanders, R J; Ruiter, J P; Ijlst, L; Visser, G; Reitsma-Bierens, W C; Heijmans, Hugo; Reijngoud, D J; Smit, G P

    1997-01-01

    UNLABELLED: We describe the clinical symptoms and biochemical findings of a patient with succinyl-CoA:acetoacetate transferase deficiency who presented in the neonatal period and review the current literature on this subject. Our patient was initially suspected to have distal renal tubular acidosis,

  4. Succinyl-CoA : acetoacetate transferase deficiency: identification of a new patient with a neonatal onset and review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NiezenKoning, KE; Ijlst, L; Visser, G; ReitsmaBierens, WCC; Heymans, HSA; Reijngoud, DJ; Smit, GPA; Ruiter, Jos P. N.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the clinical symptoms and biochemical findings of a patient with succinyl-CoA:acetoacetate transferase deficiency who presented in the neonatal period and review the current literature on this subject. Our patient was initially suspected to have distal renal tubular acidosis, and subsequ

  5. Copy number variation in glutathione S-transferases M1 and T1 and ischemic vascular disease: four studies and meta-analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Marianne S; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Loft, Steffen;

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) M1 and T1 detoxify products of oxidative stress and may protect against atherosclerosis and ischemic vascular disease (IVD). We tested the hypothesis that copy number variation (CNV) in GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes, known to be associated with stepwise decreases...

  6. Aedes aegypti juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase, the ultimate enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of juvenile hormone III, exhibits substrate control

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report on the cloning, sequencing, characterization, 3D modeling and docking of Aedes aegypti juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase (AeaJHAMT), the enzyme that converts juvenile hormone acid (JHA) into juvenile hormone (JH). Purified recombinant AeaJHAMT was extensively characterized for enzym...

  7. Pooled analysis and meta-analysis of glutathione S-transferase M1 and bladder cancer: A HuGE review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engel, Lawrence S.; Taioli, Emanuela; Pfeiffer, Ruth;

    2002-01-01

    Smoking is a known risk factor for bladder cancer. The product of the GSTM1 gene, glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1), is involved in the detoxification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons found in tobacco smoke; a homozygous deletion of this gene in approximately 50% of Caucasians and Asians re...

  8. Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Free Energy Simulations of the Glutathione S-Transferase (M1-1) Reaction with Phenanthrene 9,10-Oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, L.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Vervoort, J.J.M.; Mulholland, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play an important role in the detoxification of xenobiotics in mammals. They catalyze the conjugation of glutathione to a wide range of electrophilic compounds. Phenanthrene 9,10-oxide is a model substrate for GSTs, representing an important group of epoxide substra

  9. INDUCTION OF DNA-PROTEIN CROSSLINKS BY THE METABOLISM OF DICHLOROMETHANE IN V79 CELL LINES TRANSFECTED WITH THE MURINE GLUTATHIONE-S-TRANSFERASE THETA 1 GENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichloromethane (DCM) is considered a probable human carcinogen. Laboratory studies have shown an increased incidence of lung and liver cancer in mice but not in rats or hamsters. Despite the correlation between metabolism of DCM by the glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pathway and...

  10. Identification of a novel UDP-N-acetylglucosamine enolpyruvyl transferase (MurA) from Vibrio fischeri that confers high fosfomycin resistance in Escherichia coli

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kumar, S.; Parvathi, A; Hernandez, R.L.; Cadle, K.M.; Varela, M.F.

    MurA [UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-NAG) enolpyruvyl transferase] is a key enzyme involved in bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan synthesis and a target for the antimicrobial agent fosfomycin, a structural analog of the MurA substrate phosphoenol...

  11. The role of the glutathione S-transferase genes GSTT1, GSTM1, and GSTP1 in acetaminophen-poisoned patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchard, Anders; Eefsen, Martin; Semb, Synne;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess if genetic variants in the glutathione-S-transferase genes GST-T1, M1, and P1 reflect risk factors in acetaminophen (APAP)-poisoned patients assessed by investigation of the relation to prothrombin time (PT), which is a sensitive marker of survival in these pat...

  12. Cold sensitivity in rice (Oryza sativa L.) is strongly correlated with a naturally occurring I99V mutation in the multifunctional glutathione transferase isoenzyme GSTZ2

    Science.gov (United States)

    GSTZs (zeta class glutathione transferases) belong to a highly conserved subfamily of soluble GSTs found in species ranging from fungi and plants to animals. GSTZ is identical to MAAI (maleylacetoacetate isomerase), which functions in tyrosine catabolism by catalyzing the isomerization of MAA (maley...

  13. Pleiotropic effects of polymorphism of the gene diacylglycerol-O-transferase 1 (DGAT1) in the mammary gland tissue of dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mach Casellas, N.; Blum, Y.; Bannink, A.; Causeur, D.; Houee-Bigot, M.; Lagarrigue, S.; Smits, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Microarray analysis was used to identify genes whose expression in the mammary gland of Holstein-Friesian dairy cows was affected by the nonconservative Ala to Lys amino acid substitution at position 232 in exon VIII of the diacylglycerol-O-transferase 1 (DGAT1) gene. Mammary gland biopsies of 9 hom

  14. Correlation of Rutin Accumulation with 3-O-Glucosyl Transferase and Phenylalanine Ammonia-lyase Activities During the Ripening of Tomato Fruit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capanoglu, E.; Beekwilder, J.; Matros, A.; Boyacioglu, D.; Hall, R.D.; Mock, H.P.

    2012-01-01

    In tomato, the predominant flavonoid is quercetin-3-rutinoside (rutin). In this study, we aim to investigate the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and the quercetin-3-O-glucosyl transferase (3-GT) reactions in the formation of rutin during tomato fruit ripening. Tomatoes of the Moneymaker variety at

  15. Glutathione S-transferase phenotypes in relation to genetic variation and fruit and vegetable consumption in an endoscopy-based population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijhuis, M.J.; Visker, M.H.P.W.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Peters, W.H.M.; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Camp, op den E.B.G.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Boerboom, A.M.J.F.; Nagengast, F.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2007-01-01

    High glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity may contribute to colorectal cancer prevention. Functional polymorphisms are known in the GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTA1 and GSTP1 genes. The influence of these GST polymorphisms and recent fruit and vegetable consumption on GST levels and activity has not been inv

  16. Addition of Rice Bran Arabinoxylan to Curcumin Therapy May Be of Benefit to Patients With Early-Stage B-Cell Lymphoid Malignancies (Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance, Smoldering Multiple Myeloma, or Stage 0/1 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia): A Preliminary Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombick, Terry; Diamond, Terrence H; Manoharan, Arumugam; Ramakrishna, Rajeev

    2016-06-01

    Hypothesis Prior studies on patients with early B-cell lymphoid malignancies suggest that early intervention with curcumin may lead to delay in progressive disease and prolonged survival. These patients are characterized by increased susceptibility to infections. Rice bran arabinoxylan (Ribraxx) has been shown to have immunostimulatory, anti-inflammatory, and proapoptotic effects. We postulated that addition of Ribraxx to curcumin therapy may be of benefit. Study design Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS)/smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) or stage 0/1 chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients who had been on oral curcumin therapy for a period of 6 months or more were administered both curcumin (as Curcuforte) and Ribraxx. Methods Ten MGUS/SMM patients and 10 patients with stage 0/1 CLL were administered 6 g of curcumin and 2 g Ribraxx daily. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 2-month intervals for a period of 6 months, and various markers were monitored. MGUS/SMM patients included full blood count (FBC); paraprotein; free light chains/ratio; C-reactive protein (CRP)and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR); B2 microglobulin and immunological markers. Markers monitored for stage 0/1 CLL were FBC, CRP and ESR, and immunological markers. Results Of 10 MGUS/SMM patients,5 (50%) were neutropenic at baseline, and the Curcuforte/Ribraxx combination therapy showed an increased neutrophil count, varying between 10% and 90% among 8 of the 10 (80%) MGUS/SMM patients. An additional benefit of the combination therapy was the potent effect in reducing the raised ESR in 4 (44%) of the MGUS/SMM patients. Conclusion Addition of Ribraxx to curcumin therapy may be of benefit to patients with early-stage B-cell lymphoid malignancies.

  17. Association of genetic polymorphism of glutathione S-transferase (GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1) with bladder cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarinejad, Mohammad Reza; Safarinejad, Saba; Shafiei, Nayyer; Safarinejad, Shiva

    2013-10-01

    The glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) comprise a class of enzymes that detoxify carcinogenic compounds by conjugating glutathione to facilitate their removal. Polymorphisms in GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 genes have been related to risk for bladder cancer. Studies focusing on GSTs gene variants relationship with the risk of bladder cancer have produced conflicting and inconsistent results. We examine the association between genetic polymorphism of glutathione S-transferase P1, GSTM1, GSTT1 genes and development of bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). The study population consisted of 166 histologically confirmed male bladder TCC cases and 332 healthy male controls. Genotyping was done using the polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method and also investigated combined gene interactions. The GSTP1 Val/Val genotype was significantly associated with bladder cancer (OR = 4.32, 95% CI: 2.64-6.34), whereas the association observed for GSTM1 null (OR = 1.32, 95% CI: 0.82-2.62; P = 0.67) and GSTT1 null genotype (OR = 1.18, 95% CI: 0.79-1.67; P = 0.74) did not reach statistical significance. There was a significant multiple interaction between GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 genotypes in risk of bladder cancer (P for interaction = 0.02). The risk associated with the concurrent presence of GSTM1 positive and GSTP1 Ile/Val or Val/Val (OR = 3.71, 95% CI: 2.34-5.54) and GSTT1 positive and GSTP1 Ile/Val or Val/Val (OR = 2.66, 95% CI: 1.54-4.72) was statistically significant. Patients carrying GSTP1 Val/Val genotype were at increased risk for developing high-grade (OR = 7.68, 95% CI: 4.73-19.25) and muscle invasive (OR = 10.67, 95% CI: 6.34-21.75) bladder cancer. High risk for bladder TCC also was observed with respect to combined GSTT1 null/GSTP1 Ile/Val or Val/Val (OR = 4.76, 95% CI: 2.68-18.72) and GSTM1 null/GSTT1 null/GSTP1 Ile/Val or Val/Val (OR = 6.42, 95% CI: 4.76-14.72) genotype variant. This study suggests that the GSTP1 polymorphism

  18. Chloromycetin resistance of clinically isolated E coli is conversed by using EGS technique to repress the chloromycetin acetyl transferase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei-Ying Gao; Chuan-Rui Xu; Ru Chen; Shou-Gui Liu; Jiang-Nan Feng

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the possibility of repression of chloromycetin (Cm) acyl transferase by using external guided sequence (EGS) in order to converse the clinical Ecoli isolates from Cm- resistant to Cm- sensitive.METHODS: EGS directed against chloromycetin acetyl transferase gene (cat) was cloned to vector pEGFP-C1 which contains the kanamycin (Km) resistance gene.The recombinant plasmid pEGFP-C1+EGScat1+cat2 was constructed and the blank vector without EGS fragment was used as control plasmids. By using the CaCl2 transformation method, the recombinant plasmids were introduced into the clinically isolated Cm resistant but Km sensitive E colistrains. Transformants were screened on LB agar plates containing Km. Extraction of plasmids and PCR were applied to identify the positive clones.The growth curve of EGS transformed bacteria cultured in broth with Cm resistance was determined by using spectrophotometer at A600. Drug sensitivity was tested in solid culture containing Cm by using KB method.RESULTS: Transformation studies were carried out on 16 clinically isolated Cm-resistant (250 μg/mLof Cm) E colistrains by using pEGFP-C1-EGScat1cat2 recombinant plasmid. Transformants were screened on LB-agar plates containing Km after the transformation using EGS.Of the 16 tested strains, 4 strains were transformed successfully. Transformants with EGS plasmid showed growth inhibition when grown in liquid broth culture containing 200 μg/mL of Cm. In drug sensitivity test,these strains were sensitive to Cm on LB-agar plates containing 200 μg/mL of Cm. Extraction of plasmids and PCR amplification showed the existence of EGS plasmids in these four transformed strains. These results indicated that the Cat of the four clinical isolates had been suppressed and the four strains were converted to Cm sensitive ones.CONCLUSION: The EGS directed against Cat is able to inhibit the expression of Cat, and hence convert Cmresistant bacteria to Cm-sensitive ones. Thus, the EGS has the

  19. Comparison of epsilon- and delta-class glutathione S-transferases: the crystal structures of the glutathione S-transferases DmGSTE6 and DmGSTE7 from Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scian, Michele; Le Trong, Isolde; Mazari, Aslam M A; Mannervik, Bengt; Atkins, William M; Stenkamp, Ronald E

    2015-10-01

    Cytosolic glutathione transferases (GSTs) comprise a large family of enzymes with canonical structures that diverge functionally and structurally among mammals, invertebrates and plants. Whereas mammalian GSTs have been characterized extensively with regard to their structure and function, invertebrate GSTs remain relatively unstudied. The invertebrate GSTs do, however, represent potentially important drug targets for infectious diseases and agricultural applications. In addition, it is essential to fully understand the structure and function of invertebrate GSTs, which play important roles in basic biological processes. Invertebrates harbor delta- and epsilon-class GSTs, which are not found in other organisms. Drosophila melanogaster GSTs (DmGSTs) are likely to contribute to detoxication or antioxidative stress during development, but they have not been fully characterized. Here, the structures of two epsilon-class GSTs from Drosophila, DmGSTE6 and DmGSTE7, are reported at 2.1 and 1.5 Å resolution, respectively, and are compared with other GSTs to identify structural features that might correlate with their biological functions. The structures of DmGSTE6 and DmGSTE7 are remarkably similar; the structures do not reveal obvious sources of the minor functional differences that have been observed. The main structural difference between the epsilon- and delta-class GSTs is the longer helix (A8) at the C-termini of the epsilon-class enzymes.

  20. Transcriptional profiles of glutathione-S-Transferase isoforms, Cyp, and AOE genes in atrazine-exposed zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glisic, Branka; Hrubik, Jelena; Fa, Svetlana; Dopudj, Nela; Kovacevic, Radmila; Andric, Nebojsa

    2016-02-01

    Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) superfamily consists of multiple members involved in xenobiotic metabolism. Expressional pattern of the GST isoforms in adult fish has been used as a biomarker of exposure to environmental chemicals. However, GST transcriptional responses vary across organs, thus requiring a cross-tissue examination of multiple mRNAs for GST profiling in an animal after chemical exposure. Zebrafish embryos express all GST isoforms as adult fish and could therefore represent an alternative model for identification of biomarkers of exposure. To evaluate such a possibility, we studied a set of cytosolic and microsomal GST isoform-specific expression profiles in the zebrafish embryos after exposure to atrazine, a widely used herbicide. Expression of the GST isoforms was compared with that of CYP genes involved in the phase I of xenobiotic metabolism and antioxidant enzyme (AOE) genes. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we showed dynamic changes in the expressional pattern of twenty GST isoforms, cyp1a, cyp3a65, ahr2, and four AOEs in early development of zebrafish. Acute (48 and 72 h) exposure of 24 h-old embryos to atrazine, from environmentally relevant (0.005 mg/L) to high (40 mg/L) concentrations, caused a variety of transient, albeit minor changes (atrazine (5 and 40 mg/L). In summary, an analysis of the response of multiple systems in the zebrafish embryos provided a comprehensive understanding of atrazine toxicity and its potential impact on biological processes.