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Sample records for arabidopsis guard cells

  1. Ion channels in guard cells of Arabidopsis thaliana (L) Heynh

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    Roelfsema, MRG; Prins, HBA

    Despite the availability of many mutants for signal transduction, Arabidopsis thaliana guard cells have so far not been used in electrophysiological research. Problems with the isolation of epidermal strips and the small size of A. thaliana guard cells were often prohibiting. In the present study

  2. Isolation of a strong Arabidopsis guard cell promoter and its potential as a research tool

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    Siegel Robert S

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A common limitation in guard cell signaling research is that it is difficult to obtain consistent high expression of transgenes of interest in Arabidopsis guard cells using known guard cell promoters or the constitutive 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter. An additional drawback of the 35S promoter is that ectopically expressing a gene throughout the organism could cause pleiotropic effects. To improve available methods for targeted gene expression in guard cells, we isolated strong guard cell promoter candidates based on new guard cell-specific microarray analyses of 23,000 genes that are made available together with this report. Results A promoter, pGC1(At1g22690, drove strong and relatively specific reporter gene expression in guard cells including GUS (beta-glucuronidase and yellow cameleon YC3.60 (GFP-based calcium FRET reporter. Reporter gene expression was weaker in immature guard cells. The expression of YC3.60 was sufficiently strong to image intracellular Ca2+ dynamics in guard cells of intact plants and resolved spontaneous calcium transients in guard cells. The GC1 promoter also mediated strong reporter expression in clustered stomata in the stomatal development mutant too-many-mouths (tmm. Furthermore, the same promoter::reporter constructs also drove guard cell specific reporter expression in tobacco, illustrating the potential of this promoter as a method for high level expression in guard cells. A serial deletion of the promoter defined a guard cell expression promoter region. In addition, anti-sense repression using pGC1 was powerful for reducing specific GFP gene expression in guard cells while expression in leaf epidermal cells was not repressed, demonstrating strong cell-type preferential gene repression. Conclusion The pGC1 promoter described here drives strong reporter expression in guard cells of Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. It provides a potent research tool for targeted guard cell expression or

  3. Statistical organelle dissection of Arabidopsis guard cells using image database LIPS.

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    Higaki, Takumi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Akita, Kae; Ebine, Kazuo; Ueda, Takashi; Kondo, Noriaki; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2012-01-01

    To comprehensively grasp cell biological events in plant stomatal movement, we have captured microscopic images of guard cells with various organelles markers. The 28,530 serial optical sections of 930 pairs of Arabidopsis guard cells have been released as a new image database, named Live Images of Plant Stomata (LIPS). We visualized the average organellar distributions in guard cells using probabilistic mapping and image clustering techniques. The results indicated that actin microfilaments and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are mainly localized to the dorsal side and connection regions of guard cells. Subtractive images of open and closed stomata showed distribution changes in intracellular structures, including the ER, during stomatal movement. Time-lapse imaging showed that similar ER distribution changes occurred during stomatal opening induced by light irradiation or femtosecond laser shots on neighboring epidermal cells, indicating that our image analysis approach has identified a novel ER relocation in stomatal opening.

  4. Functional Analysis of Cellulose and Xyloglucan in the Walls of Stomatal Guard Cells of Arabidopsis1[OPEN

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    Rui, Yue; Anderson, Charles T.

    2016-01-01

    Stomatal guard cells are pairs of specialized epidermal cells that control water and CO2 exchange between the plant and the environment. To fulfill the functions of stomatal opening and closure that are driven by changes in turgor pressure, guard cell walls must be both strong and flexible, but how the structure and dynamics of guard cell walls enable stomatal function remains poorly understood. To address this question, we applied cell biological and genetic analyses to investigate guard cell walls and their relationship to stomatal function in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using live-cell spinning disk confocal microscopy, we measured the motility of cellulose synthase (CESA)-containing complexes labeled by green fluorescent protein (GFP)-CESA3 and observed a reduced proportion of GFP-CESA3 particles colocalizing with microtubules upon stomatal closure. Imaging cellulose organization in guard cells revealed a relatively uniform distribution of cellulose in the open state and a more fibrillar pattern in the closed state, indicating that cellulose microfibrils undergo dynamic reorganization during stomatal movements. In cesa3je5 mutants defective in cellulose synthesis and xxt1 xxt2 mutants lacking the hemicellulose xyloglucan, stomatal apertures, changes in guard cell length, and cellulose reorganization were aberrant during fusicoccin-induced stomatal opening or abscisic acid-induced stomatal closure, indicating that sufficient cellulose and xyloglucan are required for normal guard cell dynamics. Together, these results provide new insights into how guard cell walls allow stomata to function as responsive mediators of gas exchange at the plant surface. PMID:26729799

  5. The histidine kinase AHK5 integrates endogenous and environmental signals in Arabidopsis guard cells.

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    Radhika Desikan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Stomatal guard cells monitor and respond to environmental and endogenous signals such that the stomatal aperture is continually optimised for water use efficiency. A key signalling molecule produced in guard cells in response to plant hormones, light, carbon dioxide and pathogen-derived signals is hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2. The mechanisms by which H(2O(2 integrates multiple signals via specific signalling pathways leading to stomatal closure is not known.Here, we identify a pathway by which H(2O(2, derived from endogenous and environmental stimuli, is sensed and transduced to effect stomatal closure. Histidine kinases (HK are part of two-component signal transduction systems that act to integrate environmental stimuli into a cellular response via a phosphotransfer relay mechanism. There is little known about the function of the HK AHK5 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we report that in addition to the predicted cytoplasmic localisation of this protein, AHK5 also appears to co-localise to the plasma membrane. Although AHK5 is expressed at low levels in guard cells, we identify a unique role for AHK5 in stomatal signalling. Arabidopsis mutants lacking AHK5 show reduced stomatal closure in response to H(2O(2, which is reversed by complementation with the wild type gene. Over-expression of AHK5 results in constitutively less stomatal closure. Abiotic stimuli that generate endogenous H(2O(2, such as darkness, nitric oxide and the phytohormone ethylene, also show reduced stomatal closure in the ahk5 mutants. However, ABA caused closure, dark adaptation induced H(2O(2 production and H(2O(2 induced NO synthesis in mutants. Treatment with the bacterial pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP flagellin, but not elf peptide, also exhibited reduced stomatal closure and H(2O(2 generation in ahk5 mutants.Our findings identify an integral signalling function for AHK5 that acts to integrate multiple signals via H(2O(2 homeostasis and is independent of ABA

  6. Common and unique elements of the ABA-regulated transcriptome of Arabidopsis guard cells

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    Zhao Zhixin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the presence of drought and other desiccating stresses, plants synthesize and redistribute the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA. ABA promotes plant water conservation by acting on specialized cells in the leaf epidermis, guard cells, which border and regulate the apertures of stomatal pores through which transpirational water loss occurs. Following ABA exposure, solute uptake into guard cells is rapidly inhibited and solute loss is promoted, resulting in inhibition of stomatal opening and promotion of stomatal closure, with consequent plant water conservation. There is a wealth of information on the guard cell signaling mechanisms underlying these rapid ABA responses. To investigate ABA regulation of gene expression in guard cells in a systematic genome-wide manner, we analyzed data from global transcriptomes of guard cells generated with Affymetrix ATH1 microarrays, and compared these results to ABA regulation of gene expression in leaves and other tissues. Results The 1173 ABA-regulated genes of guard cells identified by our study share significant overlap with ABA-regulated genes of other tissues, and are associated with well-defined ABA-related promoter motifs such as ABREs and DREs. However, we also computationally identified a unique cis-acting motif, GTCGG, associated with ABA-induction of gene expression specifically in guard cells. In addition, approximately 300 genes showing ABA-regulation unique to this cell type were newly uncovered by our study. Within the ABA-regulated gene set of guard cells, we found that many of the genes known to encode ion transporters associated with stomatal opening are down-regulated by ABA, providing one mechanism for long-term maintenance of stomatal closure during drought. We also found examples of both negative and positive feedback in the transcriptional regulation by ABA of known ABA-signaling genes, particularly with regard to the PYR/PYL/RCAR class of soluble ABA receptors and

  7. The Arabidopsis guard cell outward potassium channel GORK is regulated by CPK33.

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    Corratgé-Faillie, Claire; Ronzier, Elsa; Sanchez, Frédéric; Prado, Karine; Kim, Jeong-Hyeon; Lanciano, Sophie; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Lacombe, Benoît; Xiong, Tou Cheu

    2017-07-01

    A complex signaling network involving voltage-gated potassium channels from the Shaker family contributes to the regulation of stomatal aperture. Several kinases and phosphatases have been shown to be crucial for ABA-dependent regulation of the ion transporters. To date, the Ca 2+ -dependent regulation of Shaker channels by Ca 2+ -dependent protein kinases (CPKs) is still elusive. A functional screen in Xenopus oocytes was launched to identify such CPKs able to regulate the three main guard cell Shaker channels KAT1, KAT2, and GORK. Seven guard cell CPKs were tested and multiple CPK/Shaker couples were identified. Further work on CPK33 indicates that GORK activity is enhanced by CPK33 and unaffected by a nonfunctional CPK33 (CPK33-K102M). Furthermore, Ca 2+ -induced stomatal closure is impaired in two cpk33 mutant plants. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  8. Overexpression of the Mg-chelatase H subunit in guard cells confers drought tolerance via promotion of stomatal closure in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Tomo eTsuzuki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Mg-chelatase H subunit (CHLH has been shown to mediate chlorophyll biosynthesis, as well as plastid-to-nucleus and abscisic acid (ABA-mediated signaling. A recent study using a novel CHLH mutant, rtl1, indicated that CHLH specifically affects ABA-induced stomatal closure, but also that CHLH did not serve as an ABA receptor in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the molecular mechanism by which CHLH engages in ABA-mediated signaling in guard cells remains largely unknown. In the present study, we examined CHLH function in guard cells and explored whether CHLH expression might influence stomatal aperture. Incubation of rtl1 guard cell protoplasts with ABA induced expression of the ABA-responsive genes RAB18 and RD29B, as also observed in wild-type (WT cells, indicating that CHLH did not affect the expression of ABA-responsive genes. Earlier, ABA was reported to inhibit blue light (BL-mediated stomatal opening, at least in part through dephosphorylating/inhibiting guard cell H+-ATPase (which drives opening. Therefore, we immunohistochemically examined the phosphorylation status of guard cell H+-ATPase. Notably, ABA inhibition of BL-induced phosphorylation of H+-ATPase was impaired in rtl1 cells, suggesting that CHLH influences not only ABA-induced stomatal closure but also inhibition of BL-mediated stomatal opening by ABA. Next, we generated CHLH-GFP-overexpressing plants using CER6 promoter, which induces gene expression in the epidermis including guard cells. CHLH-transgenic plants exhibited a closed stomata phenotype even when brightly illuminated. Moreover, plant growth experiments conducted under water-deficient conditions showed that CHLH transgenic plants were more tolerant of drought than WT plants. In summary, we show that CHLH is involved in the regulation of stomatal aperture in response to ABA, but not in ABA-induced gene expression, and that manipulation of stomatal aperture via overexpression of CHLH in guard cells improves plant

  9. Heterodimerization of Arabidopsis calcium/proton exchangers contributes to regulation of guard cell dynamics and plant defense responses

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    "Arabidopsis thaliana" cation exchangers (CAX1 and CAX3) are closely related tonoplast-localized calcium/proton (Ca(2+)/H+) antiporters that contribute to cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. CAX1 and CAX3 were previously shown to interact in yeast; however, the function of this complex in plants has remain...

  10. Different spectrum of Arabidopsis CHLH/GUN5 protein functions in tetrapyrrole metabolism, plastid signaling and ABA responses in guard cells

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    Harue Ibata

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Expression of Photosynthesis-Associated Nuclear Genes (PhANGs is controlled by environmental stimuli and plastid-derived signals (plastid signals transmitting the developmental and functional status of plastids to the nucleus. Arabidopsis genomes uncoupled (gun mutants exhibit defects in plastid signaling, leading to ectopic expression of PhANGs in the absence of chloroplast development. GUN5 encodes the plastid-localized Mg-chelatase enzyme subunit (CHLH, and recent studies suggest that CHLH is a multifunctional protein involved in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, plastid signaling and ABA responses in guard cells. To understand the basis of CHLH multifunctionality, we investigated fifteen gun5 missense mutant alleles and transgenic lines expressing a series of truncated CHLH proteins in a severe gun5 allele (cch background (tCHLHs, ten different versions. Here, we show that Mg-chelatase function and plastid signaling are generally correlated; in contrast, based on the analysis of the gun5 missense mutant alleles, ABA-regulated stomatal control is distinct from these two other functions. We found that none of the tCHLHs could restore plastid-signaling or Mg-chelatase functions. Additionally, we found that both the C-terminal half and N-terminal half of CHLH function in ABA-induced stomatal movement.

  11. Physiology and Regulation of Calcium Channels in Stomatal Guard Cells

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    Schroeder, Julian I.

    2007-05-02

    Stomatal pores in the epidermis of leaves regulate the diffusion of CO2 into leaves for photosynthetic carbon fixation and control water loss of plants during drought periods. Guard cells sense CO2, water status, light and other environmental conditions to regulate stomatal apertures for optimization of CO2 intake and plant growth under drought stress. The cytosolic second messenger calcium contributes to stomatal movements by transducing signals and regulating ion channels in guard cells. Studies suggest that both plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels and vacuolar/organellar Ca2+ release channels contribute to ABA-induced Ca2+ elevations in guard cells. Recent research in the P.I.'s laboratory has led to identification of a novel major cation-selective Ca2+-permeable influx channel (Ica) in the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis guard cells. These advances will allow detailed characterization of Ica plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels in guard cells. The long term goal of this research project is to gain a first detailed characterization of these novel plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable channel currents in Arabidopsis guard cells. The proposed research will investigate the hypothesis that Ica represents an important Ca2+ influx pathway for ABA and CO2 signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells. These studies will lead to elucidation of key signal transduction mechanisms by which plants balance CO2 influx into leaves and transpirational water loss and may contribute to future strategies for manipulating gas exchange for improved growth of crop plants and for biomass production.

  12. The Arabidopsis arc5 and arc6 mutations differentially affect plastid morphology in pavement and guard cells in the leaf epidermis.

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    Makoto T Fujiwara

    Full Text Available Chloroplasts, or photosynthetic plastids, multiply by binary fission, forming a homogeneous population in plant cells. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the division apparatus (or division ring of mesophyll chloroplasts includes an inner envelope transmembrane protein ARC6, a cytoplasmic dynamin-related protein ARC5 (DRP5B, and members of the FtsZ1 and FtsZ2 families of proteins, which co-assemble in the stromal mid-plastid division ring (FtsZ ring. FtsZ ring placement is controlled by several proteins, including a stromal factor MinE (AtMinE1. During leaf mesophyll development, ARC6 and AtMinE1 are necessary for FtsZ ring formation and thus plastid division initiation, while ARC5 is essential for a later stage of plastid division. Here, we examined plastid morphology in leaf epidermal pavement cells (PCs and stomatal guard cells (GCs in the arc5 and arc6 mutants using stroma-targeted fluorescent proteins. The arc5 PC plastids were generally a bit larger than those of the wild type, but most had normal shapes and were division-competent, unlike mutant mesophyll chloroplasts. The arc6 PC plastids were heterogeneous in size and shape, including the formation of giant and mini-plastids, plastids with highly developed stromules, and grape-like plastid clusters, which varied on a cell-by-cell basis. Moreover, unique plastid phenotypes for stomatal GCs were observed in both mutants. The arc5 GCs rarely lacked chlorophyll-bearing plastids (chloroplasts, while they accumulated minute chlorophyll-less plastids, whereas most GCs developed wild type-like chloroplasts. The arc6 GCs produced large chloroplasts and/or chlorophyll-less plastids, as previously observed, but unexpectedly, their chloroplasts/plastids exhibited marked morphological variations. We quantitatively analyzed plastid morphology and partitioning in paired GCs from wild-type, arc5, arc6, and atminE1 plants. Collectively, our results support the notion that ARC5 is dispensable in the process of

  13. Sensory Transduction of the CO2 Response of Guard Cells

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    Dr. Eduardo Zeiger

    2003-06-30

    Stomata have a key role in the regulation of gas exchange and intercellular CO2 concentrations of leaves. Guard cells sense internal and external signals in the leaf environment and transduce these signals into osmoregulatory processes that control stomatal apertures. This research proposal addresses the characterization of the sensory transduction of the CO2 signal in guard cells. Recent studies have shown that in Vicia leaves kept at constant light and temperature in a growth chamber, changes in ambient CO2 concentrations cause large changes in guard cell zeaxanthin that are linear with CO2-dependent changes in stomatal apertures. Research proposed here will test the hypothesis that zeaxanthin function as a transducer of CO2 signals in guard cells. Three central aspects of this hypothesis will be investigated: CO2 sensing by the carboxylation reaction of Rubisco in the guard cell chloroplast, which would modulate zeaxanthin concentrations via changes in lumen pH; transduction of the CO2 signal by zeaxanthin via a transducing cascade that controls guard cell osmoregulation; and blue light dependence of the CO2 signal transduction by zeaxanthin, required for the formation of an isomeric form of zeaxanthin that is physiologically active as a transducer. The role of Rubisco in CO2 sensing will be investigated in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 in the Arabidopsis mutants R100 and rca-, which have reduced rates of Rubisco-dependent carboxylation. The role of zeaxanthin as a CO2 transducer will be studied in npq1, a zeaxanthin-less mutant. The blue light-dependence of CO2 sensing will be studied in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 under red light. Arabidopsis mutants will also be used in further studies of an acclimation of the stomatal response to CO2, and a possible role of the xanthophyll cycle of the guard cell chloroplast in acclimations of the stomatal response to CO2. Studies on the osmoregulatory role of sucrose in

  14. The Solanum tuberosum KST1 partial promoter as a tool for guard cell expression in multiple plant species.

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    Kelly, Gilor; Lugassi, Nitsan; Belausov, Eduard; Wolf, Dalia; Khamaisi, Belal; Brandsma, Danja; Kottapalli, Jayaram; Fidel, Lena; Ben-Zvi, Batsheva; Egbaria, Aiman; Acheampong, Atiako Kwame; Zheng, Chuanlin; Or, Etti; Distelfeld, Assaf; David-Schwartz, Rakefet; Carmi, Nir; Granot, David

    2017-05-17

    To date, guard cell promoters have been examined in only a few species, primarily annual dicots. A partial segment of the potato (Solanum tuberosum) KST1 promoter (KST1 partial promoter, KST1ppro) has previously been shown to confer guard cell expression in potato, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), citrus [Troyer citrange (C. sinensis×Poncirus trifoliata)], and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here, we describe an extensive analysis of the expression pattern of KST1ppro in eight (previously reported, as well as new) species from five different angiosperm families, including the Solanaceae and the Cucurbitaceae, Arabidopsis, the monocot barley (Hordeum vulgare), and two perennial species: grapevine (Vitis vinifera) and citrus. Using confocal imaging and three-dimensional movies, we demonstrate that KST1ppro drives guard cell expression in all of these species, making it the first dicot-originated guard cell promoter shown to be active in a monocot and the first promoter reported to confer guard cell expression in barley and cucumber (Cucumis sativus). The results presented here indicate that KST1ppro can be used to drive constitutive guard cell expression in monocots and dicots and in both annual and perennial plants. In addition, we show that the KST1ppro is active in guard cells shortly after the symmetric division of the guard mother cell and generates stable expression in mature guard cells. This allows us to follow the spatial and temporal distribution of stomata in cotyledons and true leaves. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  15. Guard Cell and Tropomyosin Inspired Chemical Sensor

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    Jacquelyn K.S. Nagel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sensors are an integral part of many engineered products and systems. Biological inspiration has the potential to improve current sensor designs as well as inspire innovative ones. This paper presents the design of an innovative, biologically-inspired chemical sensor that performs “up-front” processing through mechanical means. Inspiration from the physiology (function of the guard cell coupled with the morphology (form and physiology of tropomyosin resulted in two concept variants for the chemical sensor. Applications of the sensor design include environmental monitoring of harmful gases, and a non-invasive approach to detect illnesses including diabetes, liver disease, and cancer on the breath.

  16. Nitric oxide in guard cells as an important secondary messenger during stomatal closure

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    Gunja eGayatri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available he modulation of guard cell function is the basis of stomatal closure, essential for optimizing water use and CO2 uptake by leaves. Nitric oxide (NO in guard cells plays a very important role as a secondary messenger during stomatal closure induced by effectors, including hormones. For example, exposure to abscisic acid (ABA triggers a marked increase in NO of guard cells, well before stomatal closure. In guard cells of multiple species, like Arabidopsis, Vicia and pea, exposure to ABA or methyl jasmonate or even microbial elicitors (e.g. chitosan induces production of NO as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS. The role of NO in stomatal closure has been confirmed by using NO donors (e.g. SNP and NO scavengers (like cPTIO and inhibitors of NOS (L-NAME or NR (tungstate. Two enzymes: a L-NAME-sensitive, nitric oxide synthase (NOS-like enzyme and a tungstate-sensitive nitrate reductase (NR, can mediate ABA-induced NO rise in guard cells. However, the existence of true NOS in plant tissues and its role in guard cell NO-production are still a matter of intense debate. Guard cell signal transduction leading to stomatal closure involves the participation of several components, besides NO, such as cytosolic pH, ROS, free Ca2+ and phospholipids. Use of fluorescent dyes has revealed that the rise in NO of guard cells occurs after the increase in cytoplasmic pH and ROS. The rise in NO causes an elevation in cytosolic free Ca2+ and promotes the efflux of cations as well as anions from guard cells. Stomatal guard cells have become a model system to study the signalling cascade mechanisms in plants, particularly with NO as a dominant component. The interrelationships and interactions of NO with cytosolic pH, ROS, and free Ca2+ are quite complex and need further detailed examination. While assessing critically the available literature, the present review projects possible areas of further work related to NO-action in stomatal guard cells.

  17. Two Chloroplast Proteins Suppress Drought Resistance by Affecting ROS Production in Guard Cells.

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    Wang, Zhen; Wang, Fuxing; Hong, Yechun; Huang, Jirong; Shi, Huazhong; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-12-01

    Chloroplast as the site for photosynthesis is an essential organelle in plants, but little is known about its role in stomatal regulation and drought resistance. In this study, we show that two chloroplastic proteins essential for thylakoid formation negatively regulate drought resistance in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). By screening a mutant pool with T-DNA insertions in nuclear genes encoding chloroplastic proteins, we identified an HCF106 knockdown mutant exhibiting increased resistance to drought stress. The hcf106 mutant displayed elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in guard cells, improved stomatal closure, and reduced water loss under drought conditions. The HCF106 protein was found to physically interact with THF1, a previously identified chloroplastic protein crucial for thylakoid formation. The thf1 mutant phenotypically resembled the hcf106 mutant and displayed more ROS accumulation in guard cells, increased stomatal closure, reduced water loss, and drought resistant phenotypes compared to the wild type. The hcf106thf1 double mutant behaved similarly as the thf1 single mutant. These results suggest that HCF106 and THF1 form a complex to modulate chloroplast function and that the complex is important for ROS production in guard cells and stomatal control in response to environmental stresses. Our results also suggest that modulating chloroplastic proteins could be a way for improving drought resistance in crops. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Carbonic anhydrases are upstream regulators of CO2-controlled stomatal movements in guard cells

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    Hu, Honghong

    2009-12-13

    The continuing rise in atmospheric CO2 causes stomatal pores in leaves to close and thus globally affects CO2 influx into plants, water use efficiency and leaf heat stress. However, the CO2-binding proteins that control this response remain unknown. Moreover, which cell type responds to CO2, mesophyll or guard cells, and whether photosynthesis mediates this response are matters of debate. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant plants in the beta-carbonic anhydrases betaCA1 and betaCA4 show impaired CO2-regulation of stomatal movements and increased stomatal density, but retain functional abscisic-acid and blue-light responses. betaCA-mediated CO2-triggered stomatal movements are not, in first-order, linked to whole leaf photosynthesis and can function in guard cells. Furthermore, guard cell betaca-overexpressing plants exhibit instantaneous enhanced water use efficiency. Guard cell expression of mammalian alphaCAII complements the reduced sensitivity of ca1 ca4 plants, showing that carbonic anhydrase-mediated catalysis is an important mechanism for betaCA-mediated CO2-induced stomatal closure and patch clamp analyses indicate that CO2/HCO3- transfers the signal to anion channel regulation. These findings, together with ht1-2 (ref. 9) epistasis analysis demonstrate that carbonic anhydrases function early in the CO2 signalling pathway, which controls gas-exchange between plants and the atmosphere.

  19. Starch Biosynthesis in Guard Cells But Not in Mesophyll Cells Is Involved in CO2-Induced Stomatal Closing1[OPEN

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    Stephan, Aaron B.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2016-01-01

    Starch metabolism is involved in stomatal movement regulation. However, it remains unknown whether starch-deficient mutants affect CO2-induced stomatal closing and whether starch biosynthesis in guard cells and/or mesophyll cells is rate limiting for high CO2-induced stomatal closing. Stomatal responses to [CO2] shifts and CO2 assimilation rates were compared in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants that were either starch deficient in all plant tissues (ADP-Glc-pyrophosphorylase [ADGase]) or retain starch accumulation in guard cells but are starch deficient in mesophyll cells (plastidial phosphoglucose isomerase [pPGI]). ADGase mutants exhibited impaired CO2-induced stomatal closure, but pPGI mutants did not, showing that starch biosynthesis in guard cells but not mesophyll functions in CO2-induced stomatal closing. Nevertheless, starch-deficient ADGase mutant alleles exhibited partial CO2 responses, pointing toward a starch biosynthesis-independent component of the response that is likely mediated by anion channels. Furthermore, whole-leaf CO2 assimilation rates of both ADGase and pPGI mutants were lower upon shifts to high [CO2], but only ADGase mutants caused impairments in CO2-induced stomatal closing. These genetic analyses determine the roles of starch biosynthesis for high CO2-induced stomatal closing. PMID:27208296

  20. 14-3-3 proteins in guard cell signaling

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    Valérie eCotelle

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Guard cells are specialized cells located at the leaf surface delimiting pores which control gas exchanges between the plant and the atmosphere. To optimize the CO2 uptake necessary for photosynthesis while minimizing water loss, guard cells integrate environmental signals to adjust stomatal aperture. The size of the stomatal pore is regulated by movements of the guard cells driven by variations in their volume and turgor. As guard cells perceive and transduce a wide array of environmental cues, they provide an ideal system to elucidate early events of plant signaling. Reversible protein phosphorylation events are known to play a crucial role in the regulation of stomatal movements. However, in some cases, phosphorylation alone is not sufficient to achieve complete protein regulation, but is necessary to mediate the binding of interactors that modulate protein function. Among the phosphopeptide-binding proteins, the 14-3-3 proteins are the best characterized in plants. The 14-3-3s are found as multiple isoforms in eukaryotes and have been shown to be involved in the regulation of stomatal movements. In this review, we describe the current knowledge about 14-3-3 roles in the regulation of their binding partners in guard cells: receptors, ion pumps, channels, protein kinases and some of their substrates. Regulation of these targets by 14-3-3 proteins is discussed and related to their function in guard cells during stomatal movements in response to abiotic or biotic stresses.

  1. DOF-binding sites additively contribute to guard cell-specificity of AtMYB60 promoter

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    Cominelli Eleonora

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously demonstrated that the Arabidopsis thaliana AtMYB60 protein is an R2R3MYB transcription factor required for stomatal opening. AtMYB60 is specifically expressed in guard cells and down-regulated at the transcriptional levels by the phytohormone ABA. Results To investigate the molecular mechanisms governing AtMYB60 expression, its promoter was dissected through deletion and mutagenesis analyses. By studying different versions of AtMYB60 promoter::GUS reporter fusions in transgenic plants we were able to demonstrate a modular organization for the AtMYB60 promoter. Particularly we defined: a minimal promoter sufficient to confer guard cell-specific activity to the reporter gene; the distinct roles of different DOF-binding sites organised in a cluster in the minimal promoter in determining guard cell-specific expression; the promoter regions responsible for the enhancement of activity in guard cells; a promoter region responsible for the negative transcriptional regulation by ABA. Moreover from the analysis of single and multiple mutants we could rule out the involvement of a group of DOF proteins, known as CDFs, already characterised for their involvement in flowering time, in the regulation of AtMYB60 expression. Conclusions These findings shed light on the regulation of gene expression in guard cells and provide new promoter modules as useful tools for manipulating gene expression in guard cells, both for physiological studies and future biotechnological applications.

  2. DOF-binding sites additively contribute to guard cell-specificity of AtMYB60 promoter

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    2011-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated that the Arabidopsis thaliana AtMYB60 protein is an R2R3MYB transcription factor required for stomatal opening. AtMYB60 is specifically expressed in guard cells and down-regulated at the transcriptional levels by the phytohormone ABA. Results To investigate the molecular mechanisms governing AtMYB60 expression, its promoter was dissected through deletion and mutagenesis analyses. By studying different versions of AtMYB60 promoter::GUS reporter fusions in transgenic plants we were able to demonstrate a modular organization for the AtMYB60 promoter. Particularly we defined: a minimal promoter sufficient to confer guard cell-specific activity to the reporter gene; the distinct roles of different DOF-binding sites organised in a cluster in the minimal promoter in determining guard cell-specific expression; the promoter regions responsible for the enhancement of activity in guard cells; a promoter region responsible for the negative transcriptional regulation by ABA. Moreover from the analysis of single and multiple mutants we could rule out the involvement of a group of DOF proteins, known as CDFs, already characterised for their involvement in flowering time, in the regulation of AtMYB60 expression. Conclusions These findings shed light on the regulation of gene expression in guard cells and provide new promoter modules as useful tools for manipulating gene expression in guard cells, both for physiological studies and future biotechnological applications. PMID:22088138

  3. Metabolomic Responses of Guard Cells and Mesophyll Cells to Bicarbonate

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    Misra, Biswapriya B.; de Armas, Evaldo; Tong, Zhaohui; Chen, Sixue

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 presently at 400 ppm is expected to reach 550 ppm in 2050, an increment expected to affect plant growth and productivity. Paired stomatal guard cells (GCs) are the gate-way for water, CO2, and pathogen, while mesophyll cells (MCs) represent the bulk cell-type of green leaves mainly for photosynthesis. We used the two different cell types, i.e., GCs and MCs from canola (Brassica napus) to profile metabolomic changes upon increased CO2 through supplementation with bicarbonate (HCO3 -). Two metabolomics platforms enabled quantification of 268 metabolites in a time-course study to reveal short-term responses. The HCO3 - responsive metabolomes of the cell types differed in their responsiveness. The MCs demonstrated increased amino acids, phenylpropanoids, redox metabolites, auxins and cytokinins, all of which were decreased in GCs in response to HCO3 -. In addition, the GCs showed differential increases of primary C-metabolites, N-metabolites (e.g., purines and amino acids), and defense-responsive pathways (e.g., alkaloids, phenolics, and flavonoids) as compared to the MCs, indicating differential C/N homeostasis in the cell-types. The metabolomics results provide insights into plant responses and crop productivity under future climatic changes where elevated CO2 conditions are to take center-stage. PMID:26641455

  4. Patterning of stomata in the moss Funaria: a simple way to space guard cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merced, Amelia; Renzaglia, Karen S

    2016-05-01

    Studies on stomatal development and the molecular mechanisms controlling patterning have provided new insights into cell signalling, cell fate determination and the evolution of these processes in plants. To fill a major gap in knowledge of stomatal patterning, this study describes the pattern of cell divisions that give rise to stomata and the underlying anatomical changes that occur during sporophyte development in the moss Funaria. Developing sporophytes at different stages were examined using light, fluorescence and electron microscopy; immunogold labelling was used to investigate the presence of pectin in the newly formed cavities. Substomatal cavities are liquid-filled when formed and drying of spaces is synchronous with pore opening and capsule expansion. Stomata in mosses do not develop from a self-generating meristemoid as in Arabidopsis, but instead they originate from a protodermal cell that differentiates directly into a guard mother cell. Epidermal cells develop from protodermal or other epidermal cells, i.e. there are no stomatal lineage ground cells. Development of stomata in moss occurs by differentiation of guard mother cells arranged in files and spaced away from each other, and epidermal cells that continue to divide after stomata are formed. This research provides evidence for a less elaborated but effective mechanism for stomata spacing in plants, and we hypothesize that this operates by using some of the same core molecular signalling mechanism as angiosperms. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Guard cell photosynthesis is critical for stomatal turgor production, yet does not directly mediate CO2 - and ABA-induced stomatal closing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay-Shemer, Tamar; Palomares, Axxell; Bagheri, Andisheh; Israelsson-Nordstrom, Maria; Engineer, Cawas B; Bargmann, Bastiaan O R; Stephan, Aaron B; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-08-01

    Stomata mediate gas exchange between the inter-cellular spaces of leaves and the atmosphere. CO2 levels in leaves (Ci) are determined by respiration, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and atmospheric [CO2 ]. [CO2 ] in leaves mediates stomatal movements. The role of guard cell photosynthesis in stomatal conductance responses is a matter of debate, and genetic approaches are needed. We have generated transgenic Arabidopsis plants that are chlorophyll-deficient in guard cells only, expressing a constitutively active chlorophyllase in a guard cell specific enhancer trap line. Our data show that more than 90% of guard cells were chlorophyll-deficient. Interestingly, approximately 45% of stomata had an unusual, previously not-described, morphology of thin-shaped chlorophyll-less stomata. Nevertheless, stomatal size, stomatal index, plant morphology, and whole-leaf photosynthetic parameters (PSII, qP, qN, FV '/FM' ) were comparable with wild-type plants. Time-resolved intact leaf gas-exchange analyses showed a reduction in stomatal conductance and CO2 -assimilation rates of the transgenic plants. Normalization of CO2 responses showed that stomata of transgenic plants respond to [CO2 ] shifts. Detailed stomatal aperture measurements of normal kidney-shaped stomata, which lack chlorophyll, showed stomatal closing responses to [CO2 ] elevation and abscisic acid (ABA), while thin-shaped stomata were continuously closed. Our present findings show that stomatal movement responses to [CO2 ] and ABA are functional in guard cells that lack chlorophyll. These data suggest that guard cell CO2 and ABA signal transduction are not directly modulated by guard cell photosynthesis/electron transport. Moreover, the finding that chlorophyll-less stomata cause a 'deflated' thin-shaped phenotype, suggests that photosynthesis in guard cells is critical for energization and guard cell turgor production. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Exploring emergent properties in cellular homeostasis using OnGuard to model K+ and other ion transport in guard cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, Michael R; Wang, Yizhou; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Hills, Adrian

    2014-05-15

    It is widely recognized that the nature and characteristics of transport across eukaryotic membranes are so complex as to defy intuitive understanding. In these circumstances, quantitative mathematical modeling is an essential tool, both to integrate detailed knowledge of individual transporters and to extract the properties emergent from their interactions. As the first, fully integrated and quantitative modeling environment for the study of ion transport dynamics in a plant cell, OnGuard offers a unique tool for exploring homeostatic properties emerging from the interactions of ion transport, both at the plasma membrane and tonoplast in the guard cell. OnGuard has already yielded detail sufficient to guide phenotypic and mutational studies, and it represents a key step toward 'reverse engineering' of stomatal guard cell physiology, based on rational design and testing in simulation, to improve water use efficiency and carbon assimilation. Its construction from the HoTSig libraries enables translation of the software to other cell types, including growing root hairs and pollen. The problems inherent to transport are nonetheless challenging, and are compounded for those unfamiliar with conceptual 'mindset' of the modeler. Here we set out guidelines for the use of OnGuard and outline a standardized approach that will enable users to advance quickly to its application both in the classroom and laboratory. We also highlight the uncanny and emergent property of OnGuard models to reproduce the 'communication' evident between the plasma membrane and tonoplast of the guard cell. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  7. OnGuard, a Computational Platform for Quantitative Kinetic Modeling of Guard Cell Physiology1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Adrian; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Amtmann, Anna; Blatt, Michael R.; Lew, Virgilio L.

    2012-01-01

    Stomatal guard cells play a key role in gas exchange for photosynthesis while minimizing transpirational water loss from plants by opening and closing the stomatal pore. Foliar gas exchange has long been incorporated into mathematical models, several of which are robust enough to recapitulate transpirational characteristics at the whole-plant and community levels. Few models of stomata have been developed from the bottom up, however, and none are sufficiently generalized to be widely applicable in predicting stomatal behavior at a cellular level. We describe here the construction of computational models for the guard cell, building on the wealth of biophysical and kinetic knowledge available for guard cell transport, signaling, and homeostasis. The OnGuard software was constructed with the HoTSig library to incorporate explicitly all of the fundamental properties for transporters at the plasma membrane and tonoplast, the salient features of osmolite metabolism, and the major controls of cytosolic-free Ca2+ concentration and pH. The library engenders a structured approach to tier and interrelate computational elements, and the OnGuard software allows ready access to parameters and equations ‘on the fly’ while enabling the network of components within each model to interact computationally. We show that an OnGuard model readily achieves stability in a set of physiologically sensible baseline or Reference States; we also show the robustness of these Reference States in adjusting to changes in environmental parameters and the activities of major groups of transporters both at the tonoplast and plasma membrane. The following article addresses the predictive power of the OnGuard model to generate unexpected and counterintuitive outputs. PMID:22635116

  8. The K+ channel KZM2 is involved in stomatal movement by modulating inward K+ currents in maize guard cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yong-Qiang; Wu, Wei-Hua; Wang, Yi

    2017-11-01

    Stomata are the major gates in plant leaf that allow water and gas exchange, which is essential for plant transpiration and photosynthesis. Stomatal movement is mainly controlled by the ion channels and transporters in guard cells. In Arabidopsis, the inward Shaker K + channels, such as KAT1 and KAT2, are responsible for stomatal opening. However, the characterization of inward K + channels in maize guard cells is limited. In the present study, we identified two KAT1-like Shaker K + channels, KZM2 and KZM3, which were highly expressed in maize guard cells. Subcellular analysis indicated that KZM2 and KZM3 can localize at the plasma membrane. Electrophysiological characterization in HEK293 cells revealed that both KZM2 and KZM3 were inward K + (K in ) channels, but showing distinct channel kinetics. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, only KZM3, but not KZM2, can mediate inward K + currents. However, KZM2 can interact with KZM3 forming heteromeric K in channel. In oocytes, KZM2 inhibited KZM3 channel conductance and negatively shifted the voltage dependence of KZM3. The activation of KZM2-KZM3 heteromeric channel became slower than the KZM3 channel. Patch-clamping results showed that the inward K + currents of maize guard cells were significantly increased in the KZM2 RNAi lines. In addition, the RNAi lines exhibited faster stomatal opening after light exposure. In conclusion, the presented results demonstrate that KZM2 functions as a negative regulator to modulate the K in channels in maize guard cells. KZM2 and KZM3 may form heteromeric K in channel and control stomatal opening in maize. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Outward-Rectifying K^+ Channels in Stomatal Guard Cell Protoplasts

    OpenAIRE

    Shigeru, Hosoi; Moritoshi, Iino; Ken-ichiro, Shimazaki; Tsukuba Research Laboratory, Hamamatsu Photonics; Department of Biology, Tokyo Metropolitan University; Division of Environmental Biology, National Institute for Environmental Studies

    1988-01-01

    Ion channels in stomatal guard cell protoplasts from Vicia faba were examined using the patch-clamp technique. Most ion channels having unit conductance ranging between 10 and 30 pS showed clear outward-rectification in symmetrical 50 mM KCl. The large inside-out membranes contained these outward-rectifiers as the major and relatively stable channels. The channels were K^+ ion-selective. Kinetic analysis revealed that the channels have three conductance states: open, closed and inactivated. T...

  10. Longevity of guard cell chloroplasts in falling leaves: implication for stomatal function and cellular aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiger, E.; Schwartz, A.

    1982-11-12

    Guard cell chloroplasts in senescing leaves from 12 species of perennial trees and three species of annual plants survived considerably longer than their mesophyll counterparts. In Ginkgo biloba, stomata from yellow leaves opened during the day and closed at night; guard cell chloroplasts from these leaves showed fluorescence transients associated with electron transport and photophosphorylation. These findings indicate that guard cell chloroplasts are highly conserved throughout the life-span of the leaf and that leaves retain stomatal control during senescence.

  11. Overexpression of plasma membrane H+-ATPase in guard cells promotes light-induced stomatal opening and enhances plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yin; Noguchi, Ko; Ono, Natsuko; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Terashima, Ichiro; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2014-01-07

    Stomatal pores surrounded by a pair of guard cells in the plant epidermis control gas exchange between plants and the atmosphere in response to light, CO2, and the plant hormone abscisic acid. Light-induced stomatal opening is mediated by at least three key components: the blue light receptor phototropin (phot1 and phot2), plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, and plasma membrane inward-rectifying K(+) channels. Very few attempts have been made to enhance stomatal opening with the goal of increasing photosynthesis and plant growth, even though stomatal resistance is thought to be the major limiting factor for CO2 uptake by plants. Here, we show that transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing H(+)-ATPase using the strong guard cell promoter GC1 showed enhanced light-induced stomatal opening, photosynthesis, and plant growth. The transgenic plants produced larger and increased numbers of rosette leaves, with ∼42-63% greater fresh and dry weights than the wild type in the first 25 d of growth. The dry weights of total flowering stems of 45-d-old transgenic plants, including seeds, siliques, and flowers, were ∼36-41% greater than those of the wild type. In addition, stomata in the transgenic plants closed normally in response to darkness and abscisic acid. In contrast, the overexpression of phototropin or inward-rectifying K(+) channels in guard cells had no effect on these phenotypes. These results demonstrate that stomatal aperture is a limiting factor in photosynthesis and plant growth, and that manipulation of stomatal opening by overexpressing H(+)-ATPase in guard cells is useful for the promotion of plant growth.

  12. Genetic analysis of differences in stomatal guard cell lengths of bread wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталия Петровна Ламари

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Variation in stomatal guard cell length of parental cultivars and its inheritance in F1 and F2 hybrids have been studied after crossing between contrast genotypes of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.. Analysis of F2 populations has shown the action of three non-allelic genes in control of stomatal guard cell length of parental cultivars

  13. Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Deepa; Choi, Hyunju; Huh, Sung Un; Bassin, Barbara; Kim, Jeongsik; Martinoia, Enrico; Sohn, Kee Hoon; Paek, Kyung-Hee; Lee, Youngsook

    2017-07-11

    Plant pathogens cause huge yield losses. Plant defense often depends on toxic secondary metabolites that inhibit pathogen growth. Because most secondary metabolites are also toxic to the plant, specific transporters are needed to deliver them to the pathogens. To identify the transporters that function in plant defense, we screened Arabidopsis thaliana mutants of full-size ABCG transporters for hypersensitivity to sclareol, an antifungal compound. We found that atabcg34 mutants were hypersensitive to sclareol and to the necrotrophic fungi Alternaria brassicicola and Botrytis cinerea AtABCG34 expression was induced by A brassicicola inoculation as well as by methyl-jasmonate, a defense-related phytohormone, and AtABCG34 was polarly localized at the external face of the plasma membrane of epidermal cells of leaves and roots. atabcg34 mutants secreted less camalexin, a major phytoalexin in A thaliana , whereas plants overexpressing AtABCG34 secreted more camalexin to the leaf surface and were more resistant to the pathogen. When treated with exogenous camalexin, atabcg34 mutants exhibited hypersensitivity, whereas BY2 cells expressing AtABCG34 exhibited improved resistance. Analyses of natural Arabidopsis accessions revealed that AtABCG34 contributes to the disease resistance in naturally occurring genetic variants, albeit to a small extent. Together, our data suggest that AtABCG34 mediates camalexin secretion to the leaf surface and thereby prevents A brassicicola infection.

  14. Analysis of Guard Cell Viability and Action in Senescing Leaves of Nicotiana glauca (Graham), Tree Tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuna, R; Yera, R; Ortega, K; Tallman, G

    1985-09-01

    In an attempt to determine whether low epidermal conductances to water vapor diffusion of senescing leaves were caused by internal changes in guard cells or by factors external to guard cells, stomatal behavior was examined in intact senescing and nonsenescing leaves of Nicotiana glauca (Graham), tree tobacco, grown in the field or in an environmental chamber. Conductances of senescing leaves were 5 to 10% of the maximum conductances of nonsenescing leaves of the same plant, yet guard cell duplexes isolated from epidermal peels of senescing leaves developed full turgor in the light in solutions containing KCl, and sodium cobaltinitrite staining showed that K(+) accumulated as turgor developed. Ninety-five per cent of the guard cells isolated from senescing leaves concentrated neutral red and excluded trypan blue. Intercellular leaf CO(2) concentrations of senescing and nonsenescing leaves of chamber-grown plants were not significantly different (about 240 microliters per liter), but the potassium contents of adaxial and abaxial epidermes of senescing leaves taken from plants grown in the field were less than half those of nonsenescing leaves. We conclude that guard cells do not undergo the orderly senescence process that characteristically takes place in mesophyll tissue during whole-leaf senescence and that the reduced conductances of senescing leaves are produced by factors external to guard cells.

  15. The Guard Cell Metabolome: Functions in Stomatal Movement and Global Food Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswapriya eMisra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Guard cells represent a unique single cell-type system for the study of cellular responses to abiotic and biotic perturbations that affect stomatal movement. Decades of effort through both classical physiological and functional genomics approaches have generated an enormous amount of information on the roles of individual metabolites in stomatal guard cell function and physiology. Recent application of metabolomics methods has produced a substantial amount of new information on metabolome control of stomatal movement. In conjunction with other ‘omics’ approaches, the knowledge-base is growing to reach a systems-level description of this single cell-type. Here we summarize current knowledge of the guard cell metabolome and highlight critical metabolites that bear significant impact on future engineering and breeding efforts to generate plants/crops that are resistant to environmental challenges and produce high yield and quality products for food and energy security.

  16. Guard Cell Signal Transduction Network: Advances in Understanding Abscisic Acid, CO2, and Ca2+ Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Tae-Houn

    2010-05-04

    Stomatal pores are formed by pairs of specialized epidermal guard cells and serve as major gateways for both CO2 influx into plants from the atmosphere and transpirational water loss of plants. Because they regulate stomatal pore apertures via integration of both endogenous hormonal stimuli and environmental signals, guard cells have been highly developed as a model system to dissect the dynamics and mechanisms of plant-cell signaling. The stress hormone ABA and elevated levels of CO2 activate complex signaling pathways in guard cells that are mediated by kinases/phosphatases, secondary messengers, and ion channel regulation. Recent research in guard cells has led to a new hypothesis for how plants achieve specificity in intracellular calcium signaling: CO2 and ABA enhance (prime) the calcium sensitivity of downstream calcium-signaling mechanisms. Recent progress in identification of early stomatal signaling components are reviewed here, including ABA receptors and CO2-binding response proteins, as well as systems approaches that advance our understanding of guard cell-signaling mechanisms.

  17. Differentiation of mucilage secretory cells of the Arabidopsis seed coat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western, T L; Skinner, D J; Haughn, G W

    2000-02-01

    In some plant species, including Arabidopsis, fertilization induces the epidermal cells of the outer ovule integument to differentiate into a specialized seed coat cell type with a unique morphology and containing large quantities of polysaccharide mucilage (pectin). Such seed coat mucilage cells are necessary for neither viability nor germination under normal laboratory conditions. Thus, the Arabidopsis seed coat offers a unique system with which to use genetics to identify genes controlling cell morphogenesis and complex polysaccharide biosynthesis and secretion. As a first step in the application of this system, we have used microscopy to investigate the structure and differentiation of Arabidopsis seed coat mucilage cells, including cell morphogenesis and the synthesis, secretion, and extrusion of mucilage. During seed coat development in Arabidopsis, the epidermal cells of the outer ovule integument grow and differentiate into cells that produce large quantities of mucilage between the primary cell wall and plasma membrane. Concurrent with mucilage production, the cytoplasm is shaped into a column in the center of the cell. Following mucilage secretion the cytoplasmic column is surrounded by a secondary cell wall to form a structure known as the columella. Thus, differentiation of the seed coat mucilage cells involves a highly regulated series of events including growth, morphogenesis, mucilage biosynthesis and secretion, and secondary cell wall synthesis.

  18. Actin filaments regulate the adhesion between the plasma membrane and the cell wall of tobacco guard cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qin; Ren, Jing-Jing; Kong, Lan-Jing; Wang, Xiu-Ling

    2018-01-01

    During the opening and closing of stomata, guard cells undergo rapid and reversible changes in their volume and shape, which affects the adhesion of the plasma membrane (PM) to the cell wall (CW). The dynamics of actin filaments in guard cells are involved in stomatal movement by regulating structural changes and intracellular signaling. However, it is unclear whether actin dynamics regulate the adhesion of the PM to the CW. In this study, we investigated the relationship between actin dynamics and PM-CW adhesion by the hyperosmotic-induced plasmolysis of tobacco guard cells. We found that actin filaments in guard cells were depolymerized during mannitol-induced plasmolysis. The inhibition of actin dynamics by treatment with latrunculin B or jasplakinolide and the disruption of the adhesion between the PM and the CW by treatment with RGDS peptide (Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser) enhanced guard cell plasmolysis. However, treatment with latrunculin B alleviated the RGDS peptide-induced plasmolysis and endocytosis. Our results reveal that the actin depolymerization is involved in the regulation of the PW-CW adhesion during hyperosmotic-induced plasmolysis in tobacco guard cells.

  19. Actin Filaments in Mature Guard Cells Are Radially Distributed and Involved in Stomatal Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M.; Hepler, P. K.; Eun, S. O.; Ha, K. S.; Lee, Y.

    1995-11-01

    Stomatal movements, which regulate gas exchange in plants, involve pronounced changes in the shape and volume of the guard cell. To test whether the changes are regulated by actin filaments, we visualized microfilaments in mature guard cells and examined the effects of actin antagonists on stomatal movements. Immunolocalization on fixed cells and microinjection of fluorescein isothiocyanate-phalloidin into living guard cells of Commelina communis L. showed that cortical microfilaments were radially distributed, fanning out from the stomatal pore site, resembling the known pattern of microtubules. Treatment of epidermal peels with phalloidin prior to stabilizing microfilaments with m-maleimidobenzoyl N-hydroxysuccimimide caused dense packing of radial microfilaments and an accumulation of actin around many organelles. Both stomatal closing induced by abscisic acid and opening under light were inhibited. Treatment of guard cells with cytochalasin D abolished the radial pattern of microfilaments; generated sparse, poorly oriented arrays; and caused partial opening of dark-closed stomata. These results suggest that microfilaments participate in stomatal aperture regulation.

  20. Oryza sativa H+-ATPase (OSA) is Involved in the Regulation of Dumbbell-Shaped Guard Cells of Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Yosuke; Wang, Yin; Takahashi, Akira; Kawai, Yuya; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamaji, Naoki; Feng Ma, Jian; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-06-01

    The stomatal apparatus consists of a pair of guard cells and regulates gas exchange between the leaf and atmosphere. In guard cells, blue light (BL) activates H(+)-ATPase in the plasma membrane through the phosphorylation of its penultimate threonine, mediating stomatal opening. Although this regulation is thought to be widely adopted among kidney-shaped guard cells in dicots, the molecular basis underlying that of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocots remains unclear. Here, we show that H(+)-ATPases are involved in the regulation of dumbbell-shaped guard cells. Stomatal opening of rice was promoted by the H(+)-ATPase activator fusicoccin and by BL, and the latter was suppressed by the H(+)-ATPase inhibitor vanadate. Using H(+)-ATPase antibodies, we showed the presence of phosphoregulation of the penultimate threonine in Oryza sativa H(+)-ATPases (OSAs) and localization of OSAs in the plasma membrane of guard cells. Interestingly, we identified one H(+)-ATPase isoform, OSA7, that is preferentially expressed among the OSA genes in guard cells, and found that loss of function of OSA7 resulted in partial insensitivity to BL. We conclude that H(+)-ATPase is involved in BL-induced stomatal opening of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocotyledon species. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists.

  1. Distinct fluorescent pattern of KAT1::GFP in the plasma membrane of Vicia faba guard cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homann, Ulrike; Meckel, Tobias; Hewing, Jennifer; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten; Hurst, Annette C

    2007-08-01

    The organisation of membrane proteins into certain domains of the plasma membrane (PM) has been proposed to be important for signalling in yeast and animal cells. Here we describe the formation of a very distinct pattern of the K(+) channel KAT1 fused to the green fluorescent protein (KAT1::GFP) when transiently expressed in guard cells of Vicia faba. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy we observed a radially striped pattern of KAT1::GFP fluorescence in the PM in about 70% of all transfected guard cells. This characteristic pattern was found to be cell type and protein specific and independent of the stomatal aperture and the cytoskeleton. Staining of the cell wall of guard cells with Calcofluor White revealed a great similarity between the arrangement of cellulose microfibrils and the KAT1::GFP pattern. Furthermore, the radial pattern of KAT1::GFP immediately disappeared when turgor pressure was strongly decreased by changing from hypotonic to hypertonic conditions. The pattern reappeared within 15 min upon reestablishment of high turgor pressure in hypotonic solution. Evaluation of the staining pattern by a mathematical algorithm further confirmed this reversible abolishment of the radial pattern during hypertonic treatment. We therefore conclude that the radial organisation of KAT1::GFP depends on the close contact between the PM and cell wall in turgid guard cells. These results offer the first indication for a role of the cell wall in the localisation of ion channels. We propose a model in which KAT1 is located in the cellulose fibrils intermediate areas of the PM and discuss the physiological role of this phenomenon.

  2. Does Arabidopsis thaliana DREAM of cell cycle control?

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Martin; DeCaprio, James A

    2015-01-01

    Strict temporal control of cell cycle gene expression is essential for all eukaryotes including animals and plants. DREAM complexes have been identified in worm, fly, and mammals, linking several distinct transcription factors to coordinate gene expression throughout the cell cycle. In this issue of The EMBO Journal, Kobayashi et al (2015) identify distinct activator and repressor complexes for genes expressed during the G2 and M phases in Arabidopsis that can be temporarily separated during ...

  3. [14C]-Sucrose uptake by guard cell protoplasts of pisum sativum, argenteum mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrig, K.; Raschke, K.

    1991-01-01

    Guard cells rely on import for their supply with reduced carbon. The authors tested by silicone oil centrifugation the ability of guard cell protoplasts to accumulated [ 14 C]-sucrose. Uptake rates were corrected after measurement of 14 C-sorbitol and 3 H 2 O spaces. Sucrose uptake followed biphasic kinetics, with a high-affinity component below 1 mM external sucrose (apparent K m 0.8 mM at 25C) and a low-affinity nonsaturable component above. Uptake depended on pH (optimum at pH 5.0). Variations in the concentrations of external KCl, CCCP, and valinomycin indicated that about one-half of the sucrose uptake rate could be related to an electrochemical gradient across the plasmalemma. Total uptake rates measured at 5 mM external sucrose seem to be sufficient to replenish emptied plastids with starch within a few hours

  4. The grapevine guard cell-related VvMYB60 transcription factor is involved in the regulation of stomatal activity and is differentially expressed in response to ABA and osmotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conti Lucio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Under drought, plants accumulate the signaling hormone abscisic acid (ABA, which induces the rapid closure of stomatal pores to prevent water loss. This event is trigged by a series of signals produced inside guard cells which finally reduce their turgor. Many of these events are tightly regulated at the transcriptional level, including the control exerted by MYB proteins. In a previous study, while identifying the grapevine R2R3 MYB family, two closely related genes, VvMYB30 and VvMYB60 were found with high similarity to AtMYB60, an Arabidopsis guard cell-related drought responsive gene. Results Promoter-GUS transcriptional fusion assays showed that expression of VvMYB60 was restricted to stomatal guard cells and was attenuated in response to ABA. Unlike VvMYB30, VvMYB60 was able to complement the loss-of-function atmyb60-1 mutant, indicating that VvMYB60 is the only true ortholog of AtMYB60 in the grape genome. In addition, VvMYB60 was differentially regulated during development of grape organs and in response to ABA and drought-related stress conditions. Conclusions These results show that VvMYB60 modulates physiological responses in guard cells, leading to the possibility of engineering stomatal conductance in grapevine, reducing water loss and helping this species to tolerate drought under extreme climatic conditions.

  5. Rapid Structural Changes and Acidification of Guard Cell Vacuoles during Stomatal Closure Require Phosphatidylinositol 3,5-Bisphosphate[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Gwangbae; Lee, Eun-Jung; Lee, Yuree; Kato, Mariko; Segami, Shoji; Sze, Heven; Maeshima, Masayoshi; Hwang, Jae-Ung; Lee, Youngsook

    2013-01-01

    Rapid stomatal closure is essential for water conservation in plants and is thus critical for survival under water deficiency. To close stomata rapidly, guard cells reduce their volume by converting a large central vacuole into a highly convoluted structure. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this change are poorly understood. In this study, we used pH-indicator dyes to demonstrate that vacuolar convolution is accompanied by acidification of the vacuole in fava bean (Vicia faba) guard cells during abscisic acid (ABA)–induced stomatal closure. Vacuolar acidification is necessary for the rapid stomatal closure induced by ABA, since a double mutant of the vacuolar H+-ATPase vha-a2 vha-a3 and vacuolar H+-PPase mutant vhp1 showed delayed stomatal closure. Furthermore, we provide evidence for the critical role of phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(3,5)P2] in changes in pH and morphology of the vacuole. Single and double Arabidopsis thaliana null mutants of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate 5-kinases (PI3P5Ks) exhibited slow stomatal closure upon ABA treatment compared with the wild type. Moreover, an inhibitor of PI3P5K reduced vacuolar acidification and convolution and delayed stomatal closure in response to ABA. Taken together, these results suggest that rapid ABA-induced stomatal closure requires PtdIns(3,5)P2, which is essential for vacuolar acidification and convolution. PMID:23757398

  6. Stomatal responses to CO/sub 2/ in Paphiopedilum and Phragmipedium: role of the guard cell chloroplast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assmann, S.M.; Zeiger, E.

    1985-02-01

    A role of the guard cell chloroplasts in the CO/sub 2/ response of stomata was investigated through a comparison of the leaf gas exchange characteristics of two closely related orchids: Paphiopedilum harrisianum, which lacks guard cell chloroplasts and Phragmipedium longifolium, which has chlorophyllous guard cells. Leaves of both species had an apparent quantum yield for assimilation of about 0.05, with photosynthesis saturating at 0.300 to 0.400 millimoles per square meter per second. The response of assimilation to changes in CO/sub 2/ was similar in the two species, but the response of conductance was consistently weaker in Paphiopedilum than in Phragmipedium. The data suggest involvement of guard cell chloroplasts in the stomatal response to CO/sub 2/ and in the coupling of assimilation and conductance in the intact leaf.

  7. Analysis of Guard Cell Viability and Action in Senescing Leaves of Nicotiana glauca (Graham), Tree Tobacco 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuna, Richard; Yera, Ramon; Ortega, Kim; Tallman, Gary

    1985-01-01

    In an attempt to determine whether low epidermal conductances to water vapor diffusion of senescing leaves were caused by internal changes in guard cells or by factors external to guard cells, stomatal behavior was examined in intact senescing and nonsenescing leaves of Nicotiana glauca (Graham), tree tobacco, grown in the field or in an environmental chamber. Conductances of senescing leaves were 5 to 10% of the maximum conductances of nonsenescing leaves of the same plant, yet guard cell duplexes isolated from epidermal peels of senescing leaves developed full turgor in the light in solutions containing KCl, and sodium cobaltinitrite staining showed that K+ accumulated as turgor developed. Ninety-five per cent of the guard cells isolated from senescing leaves concentrated neutral red and excluded trypan blue. Intercellular leaf CO2 concentrations of senescing and nonsenescing leaves of chamber-grown plants were not significantly different (about 240 microliters per liter), but the potassium contents of adaxial and abaxial epidermes of senescing leaves taken from plants grown in the field were less than half those of nonsenescing leaves. We conclude that guard cells do not undergo the orderly senescence process that characteristically takes place in mesophyll tissue during whole-leaf senescence and that the reduced conductances of senescing leaves are produced by factors external to guard cells. PMID:16664404

  8. Does Arabidopsis thaliana DREAM of cell cycle control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Martin; DeCaprio, James A

    2015-08-04

    Strict temporal control of cell cycle gene expression is essential for all eukaryotes including animals and plants. DREAM complexes have been identified in worm, fly, and mammals, linking several distinct transcription factors to coordinate gene expression throughout the cell cycle. In this issue of The EMBO Journal, Kobayashi et al (2015) identify distinct activator and repressor complexes for genes expressed during the G2 and M phases in Arabidopsis that can be temporarily separated during proliferating and post‐mitotic stages of development. The complexes incorporate specific activator and repressor MYB and E2F transcription factors and indicate the possibility of the existence of multiple DREAM complexes in plants.

  9. Convergence and Divergence of Signaling Events in Guard Cells during Stomatal Closure by Plant Hormones or Microbial Elicitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGURLA SRINIVAS

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic regulation of stomatal aperture is essential for plants to optimize water use and CO2 uptake. Stomatal opening or closure is accompanied by the modulation of guard cell turgor. Among the events leading to stomatal closure by plant hormones or microbial elicitors, three signaling components stand out as the major converging points. These are reactive oxygen species (ROS, cytosolic free Ca2+ and ion channels. Once formed, the ROS and free Ca2+ of guard cells regulate both downstream and upstream events. A major influence of ROS is to increase the levels of NO and cytosolic free Ca2+ in guard cells. Although the rise in NO is an important event during stomatal closure, the available evidences do not support the description of NO as the point of convergence. The rise in ROS and NO would cause an increase of free Ca2+ and modulate ion channels, through a network of events, in such a way that the guard cells lose K+/Cl-/anions. The efflux of these ions decreases the turgor of guard cells and leads to stomatal closure. Thus, ROS, NO and cytosolic free Ca2+ act as points of divergence. The other guard cell components, which are modulated during stomatal closure are G-proteins, cytosolic pH, phospholipids and sphingolipids. However, the current information on the role of these components is not convincing so as to assign them as the points of convergence or divergence. The interrelationships and interactions of ROS, NO, cytosolic pH, and free Ca2+ are quite complex and need further detailed examination. Our review is an attempt to critically assess the current status of information on guard cells, while emphasizing the convergence and divergence of signaling components during stomatal closure. The existing gaps in our knowledge are identified to stimulate further research.

  10. Live cell imaging of Arabidopsis root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Root hairs are tubular extensions from the root surface that expand by tip growth. This highly focused type of cell expansion, combined with position of root hairs on the surface of the root, makes them ideal cells for microscopic observation. This chapter describes the method that is routinely used

  11. Structure and organ specificity of an anionic peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, L; Abelskov, A K; Mattsson, O

    1996-01-01

    The predominant peroxidase (pI 3.5) (E.C. 1.11.1.7) of an Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture was purified and partially sequenced. Oligonucleotides were designed and a specific probe was obtained. A cDNA clone was isolated from an Arabidopsis cell suspension cDNA library and completely...

  12. Metabolomics and Proteomics of Brassica napus Guard Cells in Response to Low CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sisi Geng

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Stomatal guard cell response to various stimuli is an important process that balances plant carbon dioxide (CO2 uptake and water transpiration. Elevated CO2 induces stomatal closure, while low CO2 promotes stomatal opening. The signaling process of elevated CO2 induced stomatal closure has been extensively studied in recent years. However, the mechanism of low CO2 induced stomatal opening is not fully understood. Here we report metabolomic and proteomic responses of Brassica napus guard cells to low CO2 using hyphenated mass spectrometry technologies. A total of 411 metabolites and 1397 proteins were quantified in a time-course study of low CO2 effects. Metabolites and proteins that exhibited significant changes are overrepresented in fatty acid metabolism, starch and sucrose metabolism, glycolysis and redox regulation. Concomitantly, multiple hormones that promote stomatal opening increased in response to low CO2. Interestingly, jasmonic acid precursors were diverted to a branch pathway of traumatic acid biosynthesis. These results indicate that the low CO2 response is mediated by a complex crosstalk between different phytohormones.

  13. Multimodal nonlinear imaging of arabidopsis thaliana root cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Bumjoon; Lee, Sung-Ho; Woo, Sooah; Park, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Myeong Min; Park, Seung-Han

    2017-07-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy has enabled the possibility to explore inside the living organisms. It utilizes ultrashort laser pulse with long wavelength (greater than 800nm). Ultrashort pulse produces high peak power to induce nonlinear optical phenomenon such as two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) and harmonic generations in the medium while maintaining relatively low average energy pre area. In plant developmental biology, confocal microscopy is widely used in plant cell imaging after the development of biological fluorescence labels in mid-1990s. However, fluorescence labeling itself affects the sample and the sample deviates from intact condition especially when labelling the entire cell. In this work, we report the dynamic images of Arabidopsis thaliana root cells. This demonstrates the multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy is an effective tool for long-term plant cell imaging.

  14. Autophagic components contribute to hypersensitive cell death in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofius, Daniel; Schultz-Larsen, Torsten; Joensen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy has been implicated as a prosurvival mechanism to restrict programmed cell death (PCD) associated with the pathogen-triggered hypersensitive response (HR) during plant innate immunity. This model is based on the observation that HR lesions spread in plants with reduced autophagy gene...... expression. Here, we examined receptor-mediated HR PCD responses in autophagy-deficient Arabidopsis knockout mutants (atg), and show that infection-induced lesions are contained in atg mutants. We also provide evidence that HR cell death initiated via Toll/Interleukin-1 (TIR)-type immune receptors through...... the defense regulator EDS1 is suppressed in atg mutants. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PCD triggered by coiled-coil (CC)-type immune receptors via NDR1 is either autophagy-independent or engages autophagic components with cathepsins and other unidentified cell death mediators. Thus, autophagic cell death...

  15. [Guard cell biochemistry: Response to environmental stimuli causing changes in gas exchange]: Progress report and introduction to experimental rationale and methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Procedures are described for microbiochemistry of individual guard cells. Specifically, studies are described for the determination of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) in single cells, electrophoresis of the protein complement of small number of cells, the cellular location of abscisic acid, measurement of the photosynthetically driven electron transport in guard cells, and the role of malate in regulation of PEPC. 19 figs., 1 tab. (DT)

  16. Molecule mechanism of stem cells in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjin; Yu, Rongming

    2014-07-01

    Plants possess the ability to continually produce new tissues and organs throughout their life. Unlike animals, plants are exposed to extreme variations in environmental conditions over the course of their lives. The vitality of plants is so powerful that they can survive several hundreds of years or even more making it an amazing miracle that comes from plant stem cells. The stem cells continue to divide to renew themselves and provide cells for the formation of leaves, stems, and flowers. Stem cells are not only quiescent but also immortal, pluripotent and homeostatic. Stem cells are the magic cells that repair tissues and regenerate organs. During the past decade, scholars around the world have paid more and more attention toward plant stem cells. At present, the major challenge is in relating molecule action mechanism to root apical meristem, shoot apical meristem and vascular system. The coordination between stem cells maintenance and differentiation is critical for normal plant growth and development. Elements such as phytohormones, transcription factors and some other known or unknown genes cooperate to balance this process. In this review, Arabidopsis thaliana as a pioneer system, we highlight recent developments in molecule modulating, illustrating how plant stem cells generate new mechanistic insights into the regulation of plants growth and development.

  17. Artificial NO and Light Cooperative Nanofluidic Diode Inspired by Stomatal Closure of Guard Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruirui; Sui, Xin; Li, Chao; Jiang, Jiaqiao; Zhai, Jin; Gao, Longcheng

    2018-01-31

    Gas messenger molecule (NO) plays important roles in K + nanochannels of guard cells by binding directly to the heme-containing enzymes. Inspired by this natural phenomenon, we developed artificial K + nanochannels modified with ferroporphyrin, where NO triggered the nanochannels to turn "ON" states from the ferroporphyrin blocked "OFF" states. The mechanism relies on the fact that NO has higher affinity with ferroporphyrin compared to carboxyl groups on the nanochannel surface. The synergistic effect of the released carboxyl groups and the conically asymmetric shape leads the ion transportation to be diode-like. However, the nanofluidic diode properties vanished after illumination with light to remove NO from the ferroporphyrin-NO complex. This NO and light cooperative nanofluidic diode possesses excellent stability and reversibility, which shows great promise for use in gas detection and remote control of mass delivery.

  18. Nuclear and cellular expression data from the whole 16-cell stage Arabidopsis thaliana embryo and a cell type-specific expression atlas of the early Arabidopsis embryo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palovaara, J.P.J.

    2017-01-01

    SuperSeries contain expression data from the nuclei of cell types involved in patterning events, with focus on root apical stem cell formation, at 16-cell stage, early globular stage and late globular stage in the early Arabidopsis embryo (atlas). Expression data comparing nuclear and cellular RNA

  19. Diclofenac in Arabidopsis cells: Rapid formation of conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiuguo; Ye, Qingfu; Zhang, Jianbo; Richards, Jaben; Borchardt, Dan; Gan, Jay

    2017-03-01

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) are continuously introduced into the soil-plant system, through practices such as agronomic use of reclaimed water and biosolids containing these trace contaminants. Plants may accumulate PPCPs from soil, serving as a conduit for human exposure. Metabolism likely controls the final accumulation of PPCPs in plants, but is in general poorly understood for emerging contaminants. In this study, we used diclofenac as a model compound, and employed 14 C tracing, and time-of-flight (TOF) and triple quadruple (QqQ) mass spectrometers to unravel its metabolism pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana cells. We further validated the primary metabolites in Arabidopsis seedlings. Diclofenac was quickly taken up into A. thaliana cells. Phase I metabolism involved hydroxylation and successive oxidation and cyclization reactions. However, Phase I metabolites did not accumulate appreciably; they were instead rapidly conjugated with sulfate, glucose, and glutamic acid through Phase II metabolism. In particular, diclofenac parent was directly conjugated with glutamic acid, with acyl-glutamatyl-diclofenac accounting for >70% of the extractable metabolites after 120-h incubation. In addition, at the end of incubation, >40% of the spiked diclofenac was in the non-extractable form, suggesting extensive sequestration into cell matter. The rapid formation of non-extractable residue and dominance of diclofenac-glutamate conjugate uncover previously unknown metabolism pathways for diclofenac. In particular, the rapid conjugation of parent highlights the need to consider conjugates of emerging contaminants in higher plants, and their biological activity and human health implications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Promoter DNA hypermethylation and gene repression in undifferentiated Arabidopsis cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Berdasco

    Full Text Available Maintaining and acquiring the pluripotent cell state in plants is critical to tissue regeneration and vegetative multiplication. Histone-based epigenetic mechanisms are important for regulating this undifferentiated state. Here we report the use of genetic and pharmacological experimental approaches to show that Arabidopsis cell suspensions and calluses specifically repress some genes as a result of promoter DNA hypermethylation. We found that promoters of the MAPK12, GSTU10 and BXL1 genes become hypermethylated in callus cells and that hypermethylation also affects the TTG1, GSTF5, SUVH8, fimbrin and CCD7 genes in cell suspensions. Promoter hypermethylation in undifferentiated cells was associated with histone hypoacetylation and primarily occurred at CpG sites. Accordingly, we found that the process specifically depends on MET1 and DRM2 methyltransferases, as demonstrated with DNA methyltransferase mutants. Our results suggest that promoter DNA methylation may be another important epigenetic mechanism for the establishment and/or maintenance of the undifferentiated state in plant cells.

  1. A SCARECROW-RETINOBLASTOMA Protein Network Controls Protective Quiescence in the Arabidopsis Root Stem Cell Organizer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruz-Ramirez, A.; Diaz Trivino, S.; Wachsman, G.; Du, Y.; Arteága-Vázquez, M.; Zhang Hongtao,; Benjamins, R.; Blilou, I.; Neef, A.B.; Chandler, V.; Scheres, B.

    2013-01-01

    Quiescent long-term somatic stem cells reside in plant and animal stem cell niches. Within the Arabidopsis root stem cell population, the Quiescent Centre (QC), which contains slowly dividing cells, maintains surrounding short-term stem cells and may act as a long-term reservoir for stem cells. The

  2. The Arabidopsis synaptotagmin SYTA regulates the cell-to-cell movement of diverse plant viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asako eUchiyama

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Synaptotagmins are a large gene family in animals that have been extensively characterized due to their role as calcium sensors to regulate synaptic vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis in neurons, and dense core vesicle exocytosis for hormone secretion from neuroendocrine cells. Thought to be exclusive to animals, synaptotagmins have recently been characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana, in which they comprise a five gene family. Using infectivity and leaf-based functional assays, we have shown that Arabidopsis SYTA regulates endocytosis and marks an endosomal vesicle recycling pathway to regulate movement protein-mediated trafficking of the Begomovirus Cabbage leaf curl virus (CaLCuV and the Tobamovirus Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV through plasmodesmata (Lewis and Lazarowitz, 2010. To determine whether SYTA has a central role in regulating the cell-to-cell trafficking of a wider range of diverse plant viruses, we extended our studies here to examine the role of SYTA in the cell-to-cell movement of additional plant viruses that employ different modes of movement, namely the Potyvirus Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV, the Caulimovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV and the Tobamovirus Turnip vein clearing virus (TVCV, which in contrast to TMV does efficiently infect Arabidopsis. We found that both TuMV and TVCV systemic infection, and the cell-to-cell trafficking of the their movement proteins, were delayed in the Arabidopsis Col-0 syta-1 knockdown mutant. In contrast, CaMV systemic infection was not inhibited in syta-1. Our studies show that SYTA is a key regulator of plant virus intercellular movement, being necessary for the ability of diverse cell-to-cell movement proteins encoded by Begomoviruses (CaLCuV MP, Tobamoviruses (TVCV and TMV 30K protein and Potyviruses (TuMV P3N-PIPO to alter PD and thereby mediate virus cell-to-cell spread.

  3. Actin polymerization drives polar growth in Arabidopsis root hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Luis Alfredo Bañuelos; Sanchez, Rosana; Hernandez-Barrera, Alejandra; Zepeda-Jazo, Isaac; Sánchez, Federico; Quinto, Carmen; Torres, Luis Cárdenas

    2014-01-01

    In plants, the actin cytoskeleton is a prime regulator of cell polarity, growth, and cytoplasmic streaming. Tip growth, as observed in root hairs, caulonema, and pollen tubes, is governed by many factors, including calcium gradients, exocytosis and endocytosis, reactive oxygen species, and the cytoskeleton. Several studies indicate that the polymerization of G-actin into F-actin also contributes to tip growth. The structure and function of F-actin within the apical dome is variable, ranging from a dense meshwork to sparse single filaments. The presence of multiple F-actin structures in the elongating apices of tip-growing cells suggests that this cytoskeletal array is tightly regulated. We recently reported that sublethal concentrations of fluorescently labeled cytochalasin could be used to visualize the distribution of microfilament plus ends using fluorescence microscopy, and found that the tip region of the growing root hair cells of a legume plant exhibits a clear response to the nodulation factors secreted by Rhizobium. (1) In this current work, we expanded our analysis using confocal microscopy and demonstrated the existence of highly dynamic fluorescent foci along Arabidopsis root hair cells. Furthermore, we show that the strongest fluorescence signal accumulates in the tip dome of the growing root hair and seems to be in close proximity to the apical plasma membrane. Based on these findings, we propose that actin polymerization within the dome of growing root hair cells regulates polar growth.

  4. Arabidopsis FH1 Formin Affects Cotyledon Pavement Cell Shape by Modulating Cytoskeleton Dynamics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rosero, A.; Oulehlová, Denisa; Stillerová, L.; Schiebertová, P.; Gunt, M.; Žárský, Viktor; Cvrčková, F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 3 (2016), s. 488-504 ISSN 0032-0781 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * Confocal microscopy * Cotyledon pavement cells Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.760, year: 2016

  5. Bird guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Dana M [Armour, SD

    2010-03-02

    The bird guard provides a device to protect electrical insulators comprising a central shaft; a clamp attached to an end of the shaft to secure the device to a transmission tower; a top and bottom cover to shield transmission tower insulators; and bearings to allow the guard to rotate in order to frighten birds away from the insulators.

  6. Exploring Arabidopsis thaliana Root Endophytes via Single-Cell Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, Derek; Woyke, Tanja; Tringe, Susannah; Dangl, Jeff

    2014-03-19

    Land plants grow in association with microbial communities both on their surfaces and inside the plant (endophytes). The relationships between microbes and their host can vary from pathogenic to mutualistic. Colonization of the endophyte compartment occurs in the presence of a sophisticated plant immune system, implying finely tuned discrimination of pathogens from mutualists and commensals. Despite the importance of the microbiome to the plant, relatively little is known about the specific interactions between plants and microbes, especially in the case of endophytes. The vast majority of microbes have not been grown in the lab, and thus one of the few ways of studying them is by examining their DNA. Although metagenomics is a powerful tool for examining microbial communities, its application to endophyte samples is technically difficult due to the presence of large amounts of host plant DNA in the sample. One method to address these difficulties is single-cell genomics where a single microbial cell is isolated from a sample, lysed, and its genome amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA) to produce enough DNA for genome sequencing. This produces a single-cell amplified genome (SAG). We have applied this technology to study the endophytic microbes in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Extensive 16S gene profiling of the microbial communities in the roots of multiple inbred A. thaliana strains has identified 164 OTUs as being significantly enriched in all the root endophyte samples compared to their presence in bulk soil.

  7. Profilin Plays a Role in Cell Elongation, Cell Shape Maintenance, and Flowering in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramachandran, S.; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager; Ishimaru, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Profilin (PFN) is an ubiquitous, low-M-r, actin-binding protein involved in the organization of the cytoskeleton of eukaryotes including higher plants. PFNs are encoded by a multigene family in Arabidopsis. We have analyzed in vivo functions of Arabidopsis PFN by generating transgenic plants....... Compared with equivalent cells in WT, most cells in PFN-U hypocotyls and roots were shorter, but more isodiametric, and microscopic observations of etiolated PFN-U hypocotyls revealed a rough epidermal surface. In contrast, light-grown seedlings overexpressing PFN had longer roots and root hair although...... etiolated seedlings overexpressing PFN were either the same size or slightly longer than WT seedlings. Transgenic seedlings harboring a PFN-1-GUS transgene directed expression in root and root hair and in a ring of cells at the elongating zone of the root tip. As the seedlings matured PFN-1-GUS was mainly...

  8. An Arabidopsis kinase cascade influences auxin-responsive cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Tara A; Frick, Elizabeth M; Strader, Lucia C

    2017-10-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MPK) cascades are conserved mechanisms of signal transduction across eukaryotes. Despite the importance of MPK proteins in signaling events, specific roles for many Arabidopsis MPK proteins remain unknown. Multiple studies have suggested roles for MPK signaling in a variety of auxin-related processes. To identify MPK proteins with roles in auxin response, we screened mpk insertional alleles and identified mpk1-1 as a mutant that displays hypersensitivity in auxin-responsive cell expansion assays. Further, mutants defective in the upstream MAP kinase kinase MKK3 also display hypersensitivity in auxin-responsive cell expansion assays, suggesting that this MPK cascade affects auxin-influenced cell expansion. We found that MPK1 interacts with and phosphorylates ROP BINDING PROTEIN KINASE 1 (RBK1), a protein kinase that interacts with members of the Rho-like GTPases from Plants (ROP) small GTPase family. Similar to mpk1-1 and mkk3-1 mutants, rbk1 insertional mutants display auxin hypersensitivity, consistent with a possible role for RBK1 downstream of MPK1 in influencing auxin-responsive cell expansion. We found that RBK1 directly phosphorylates ROP4 and ROP6, supporting the possibility that RBK1 effects on auxin-responsive cell expansion are mediated through phosphorylation-dependent modulation of ROP activity. Our data suggest a MKK3 • MPK1 • RBK1 phosphorylation cascade that may provide a dynamic module for altering cell expansion. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Embryo-patterning genes and reinforcement cues determine cell fate in the Arabidopsis thaliana root

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, B.J.G.

    1996-01-01

    The majority of plant organs arise from groups of continuously dividing cells, the meristems. Little is known about mechanisms of cell specification in meristems. Within the Arabidopsis root meristem, the fate of every cell can be predicted accurately, and the origin of these cells during the

  10. The barley anion channel, HvALMT1, has multiple roles in guard cell physiology and grain metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Muyun; Gruber, Benjamin D; Delhaize, Emmanuel; White, Rosemary G; James, Richard A; You, Jiangfeng; Yang, Zhenming; Ryan, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    The barley (Hordeum vulgare) gene HvALMT1 encodes an anion channel in guard cells and in certain root tissues indicating that it may perform multiple roles. The protein localizes to the plasma membrane and facilitates malate efflux from cells when constitutively expressed in barley plants and Xenopus oocytes. This study investigated the function of HvALMT1 further by identifying its tissue-specific expression and by generating and characterizing RNAi lines with reduced HvALMT1 expression. We show that transgenic plants with 18-30% of wild-type HvALMT1 expression had impaired guard cell function. They maintained higher stomatal conductance in low light intensity and lost water more rapidly from excised leaves than the null segregant control plants. Tissue-specific expression of HvALMT1 was investigated in developing grain and during germination using transgenic barley lines expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) with the HvALMT1 promoter. We found that HvALMT1 is expressed in the nucellar projection, the aleurone layer and the scutellum of developing barley grain. Malate release measured from isolated aleurone layers prepared from imbibed grain was significantly lower in the RNAi barley plants compared with control plants. These data provide molecular and physiological evidence that HvALMT1 functions in guard cells, in grain development and during germination. We propose that HvALMT1 releases malate and perhaps other anions from guard cells to promote stomatal closure. The likely roles of HvALMT1 during seed development and grain germination are also discussed. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  11. Arabidopsis thaliana cells: a model to evaluate the virulence of Pectobacterium carotovorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terta, Meriam; Kettani-Halabi, Mohamed; Ibenyassine, Khadija; Tran, Daniel; Meimoun, Patrice; M'hand, Raja Ait; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Val, Florence; Ennaji, M Mustapha; Bouteau, François

    2010-02-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum are economically important plant pathogens that cause plant soft rot. These enterobacteria display high diversity world-wide. Their pathogenesis depends on production and secretion of virulence factors such as plant cell wall-degrading enzymes, type III effectors, a necrosis-inducing protein, and a secreted virulence factor from Xanthomonas spp., which are tightly regulated by quorum sensing. Pectobacterium carotovorum also present pathogen-associated molecular patterns that could participate in their pathogenicity. In this study, by using suspension cells of Arabidopsis thaliana, we correlate plant cell death and pectate lyase activities during coinfection with different P. carotovorum strains. When comparing soft rot symptoms induced on potato slices with pectate lyase activities and plant cell death observed during coculture with Arabidopsis thaliana cells, the order of strain virulence was found to be the same. Therefore, Arabidopsis thaliana cells could be an alternative tool to evaluate rapidly and efficiently the virulence of different P. carotovorum strains.

  12. Cell-Fate Specification in Arabidopsis Roots Requires Coordinative Action of Lineage Instruction and Positional Reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiaozhi; Li, Pengxue; Liang, Nengsong; Wang, Hong; Xu, Meizhi; Wu, Shuang

    2017-10-01

    Tissue organization and pattern formation within a multicellular organism rely on coordinated cell division and cell-fate determination. In animals, cell fates are mainly determined by a cell lineage-dependent mechanism, whereas in plants, positional information is thought to be the primary determinant of cell fates. However, our understanding of cell-fate regulation in plants mostly relies on the histological and anatomical studies on Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) roots, which contain a single layer of each cell type in nonvascular tissues. Here, we investigate the dynamic cell-fate acquisition in modified Arabidopsis roots with additional cell layers that are artificially generated by the misexpression of SHORT-ROOT ( SHR ). We found that cell-fate determination in Arabidopsis roots is a dimorphic cascade with lineage inheritance dominant in the early stage of pattern formation. The inherited cell identity can subsequently be removed or modified by positional information. The instruction of cell-fate conversion is not a fast readout during root development. The final identity of a cell type is determined by the synergistic contribution from multiple layers of regulation, including symplastic communication across tissues. Our findings underline the collaborative inputs during cell-fate instruction. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Coast Guard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    The 11-million gallon Exxon Valdez oil spill highlighted deficiencies in the nation's ability to contain and recover spilled oil. The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 represents a major effort by Congress to address these deficiencies and to clarify the roles and responsibilities of the private sector and the federal government in preventing, preparing for, and responding to oil spills. This report examines the Coast Guard's efforts to avoid unnecessary and wasteful duplication by coordinating with the private sector and others, including federal and state agencies, its plans to buy oil spill response equipment and the new responsibilities the act places on the private sector and the Coast Guard and if these responsibilities call for a shift in emphasis in Coast Guard oil spill response activities

  14. Seed coat mucilage cells of Arabidopsis thaliana as a model for plant cell wall research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsovski, Andrej A; Haughn, George W; Western, Tamara L

    2010-07-01

    Plant cells are encased within a complex polysaccharide wall that strengthens the cell and has key roles in all aspects of plant cell growth, differentiation, and interaction with the environment. This dynamic structure is under continual modification during plant development, and its synthesis and modification require the activity of a myriad of enzymes. The mucilage secretory cells (MSCs) of the Arabidopsis thaliana seed coat provide a model for the discovery of novel genes involved in the synthesis, secretion and modification of cell wall components, particularly pectin. These cells synthesize copious amounts of pectinaceous mucilage during development and, upon hydration of the desiccated seed, the mucilage rapidly swells, bursts from the MSCs and surrounds the seed in a gelatinous capsule. Several genes affecting MSC differentiation, pectin synthesis, and mucilage release have been identified and additional genes involved in these and related processes including pectin secretion and the mechanical alteration of cell walls await to be discovered.

  15. SHORT-ROOT and SCARECROW regulate leaf growth in Arabidopsis by stimulating S-phase progression of the cell cycle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Dhondt; F. Coppens; F. de Winter; K. Swarup; R.M.H. Merks (Roeland); D. Inze; M.J. Bennett; G.T.S. Beemster

    2010-01-01

    htmlabstractSHORT-ROOT (SHR) and SCARECROW (SCR) are required for stem cell maintenance in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) root meristem, ensuring its indeterminate growth. Mutation of SHR and SCR genes results in disorganization of the quiescent center and loss of stem cell activity,

  16. Cell fate in the Arabidopsis root epidermis is determined by competition between WEREWOLF and CAPRICE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sang-Kee; Ryu, Kook Hui; Kang, Yeon Hee; Song, Jae Hyo; Cho, Young-Hee; Yoo, Sang-Dong; Schiefelbein, John; Lee, Myeong Min

    2011-11-01

    The root hair and nonhair cells in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) root epidermis are specified by a suite of transcriptional regulators. Two of these are WEREWOLF (WER) and CAPRICE (CPC), which encode MYB transcription factors that are required for promoting the nonhair cell fate and the hair cell fate, respectively. However, the precise function and relationship between these transcriptional regulators have not been fully defined experimentally. Here, we examine these issues by misexpressing the WER gene using the GAL4-upstream activation sequence transactivation system. We find that WER overexpression in the Arabidopsis root tip is sufficient to cause epidermal cells to adopt the nonhair cell fate through direct induction of GLABRA2 (GL2) gene expression. We also show that GLABRA3 (GL3) and ENHANCER OF GLABRA3 (EGL3), two closely related bHLH proteins, are required for the action of the overexpressed WER and that WER interacts with these bHLHs in plant cells. Furthermore, we find that CPC suppresses the WER overexpression phenotype quantitatively. These results show that WER acts together with GL3/EGL3 to induce GL2 expression and that WER and CPC compete with one another to define cell fates in the Arabidopsis root epidermis.

  17. NO and H2O2 contribute to SO2 toxicity via Ca2+ signaling in Vicia faba guard cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Min; Bai, Heli; Xue, Meizhao; Yi, Huilan

    2017-04-01

    NO and H 2 O 2 have been implicated as important signals in biotic and abiotic stress responses of plants to the environment. Previously, we have shown that SO 2 exposure increased the levels of NO and H 2 O 2 in plant cells. We hypothesize that, as signaling molecules, NO and H 2 O 2 mediate SO 2 -caused toxicity. In this paper, we show that SO 2 hydrates caused guard cell death in a concentration-dependent manner in the concentration range of 0.25 to 6 mmol L -1 , which was associated with elevation of intracellular NO, H 2 O 2 , and Ca 2+ levels in Vicia faba guard cells. NO donor SNP enhanced SO 2 toxicity, while NO scavenger c-PTIO and NO synthesis inhibitors L-NAME and tungstate significantly prevented SO 2 toxicity. ROS scavenger ascorbic acid (AsA) and catalase (CAT), Ca 2+ chelating agent EGTA, and Ca 2+ channel inhibitor LaCl 3 also markedly blocked SO 2 toxicity. In addition, both c-PTIO and AsA could completely block SO 2 -induced elevation of intracellular Ca 2+ level. Moreover, c-PTIO efficiently blocked SO 2 -induced H 2 O 2 elevation, and AsA significantly blocked SO 2 -induced NO elevation. These results indicate that extra NO and H 2 O 2 are produced and accumulated in SO 2 -treated guard cells, which further activate Ca 2+ signaling to mediate SO 2 toxicity. Our findings suggest that both NO and H 2 O 2 contribute to SO 2 toxicity via Ca 2+ signaling.

  18. Coronatine inhibits stomatal closure through guard cell-specific inhibition of NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Toum

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbes trigger stomatal closure through microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs. The bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst synthesizes the polyketide toxin coronatine, which inhibits stomatal closure by MAMPs and the hormone abscisic acid (ABA. The mechanism by which coronatine, a jasmonic acid-isoleucine analog, achieves this effect is not completely clear. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are essential second messengers in stomatal immunity, therefore we investigated the possible effect of coronatine on their production. We found that coronatine inhibits NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production induced by ABA, and by the flagellin-derived peptide flg22. This toxin also inhibited NADPH oxidase-dependent stomatal closure induced by darkness, however it failed to prevent stomatal closure by exogenously applied H2O2 or by salicylic acid, which induces ROS production through peroxidases. Contrary to what was observed on stomata, coronatine did not affect the oxidative burst induced by flg22 in leaf discs. Additionally, we observed that in NADPH oxidase mutants atrbohd and atrbohd/f, as well as in guard cell ABA responsive but flg22 insensitive mutants mpk3, mpk6, npr1-3 and lecrk-VI.2-1, the inhibition of ABA stomatal responses by both coronatine and the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium was markedly reduced. Interestingly, coronatine still impaired ABA-induced ROS synthesis in mpk3, mpk6, npr1-3 and lecrk-VI.2-1, suggesting a possible feedback regulation of ROS on other guard cell ABA signalling elements in these mutants. Altogether our results show that inhibition of NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS synthesis in guard cells plays an important role during endophytic colonization by Pst through stomata.

  19. Suppression of cell expansion by ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis SUPERMAN gene in transgenic petunia an tobacco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kater, M.M.; Franken, J.; Aelst, van A.; Angenent, G.C.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular and genetic analyses have shown that the Arabidopsis thaliana gene SUPERMAN (SUP) has at least two functions in Arabidopsis flower development. SUP is necessary to control the correct distribution of cells with either a stamen or carpel fate, and is essential for proper outgrowth of the

  20. Induction of cell death by graphene in Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia ecotype) T87 cell suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begum, Parvin; Fugetsu, Bunshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • This study was set up to explore potential influence of graphene on T87 cells. • Fragmented nuclei, membrane damage, mitochondrial dysfunction were observed. • ROS increased, ROS are key mediators in the cell death signaling pathway. • Translocation of graphene into cells and an endocytosis-like structure was observed. • Graphene entering into the cells by endocytosis. -- Abstract: The toxicity of graphene on suspensions of Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia ecotype) T87 cells was investigated by examining the morphology, mitochondrial dysfunction, reactive oxygen species generation (ROS), and translocation of graphene as the toxicological endpoints. The cells were grown in Jouanneau and Péaud-Lenoel (JPL) media and exposed to graphene at concentrations 0–80 mg/L. Morphological changes were observed by scanning electron microscope and the adverse effects such as fragmented nuclei, membrane damage, mitochondrial dysfunction was observed with fluorescence microscopy by staining with Hoechst 33342/propidium iodide and succinate dehydrogenase (mitochondrial bioenergetic enzyme). Analysis of intracellular ROS by 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate demonstrated that graphene induced a 3.3-fold increase in ROS, suggesting that ROS are key mediators in the cell death signaling pathway. Transmission electron microscopy verified the translocation of graphene into cells and an endocytosis-like structure was observed which suggested graphene entering into the cells by endocytosis. In conclusion, our results show that graphene induced cell death in T87 cells through mitochondrial damage mediated by ROS

  1. CYCP2;1 integrates genetic and nutritional information to promote meristem cell division in Arabidopsis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peng, L.; Skylar, A.; Chang, P.L.; Bišová, Kateřina; Wu, X.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 393, č. 2 (2014), s. 160-170 ISSN 0012-1606 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR M200201205 Grant - others:NSF(US) MCB-1122213 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : cell cycle * arabidopsis * meristem Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.547, year: 2014

  2. High Concentration of Melatonin Regulates Leaf Development by Suppressing Cell Proliferation and Endoreduplication in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiannan; An, Bang; Shi, Haitao; Luo, Hongli; He, Chaozu

    2017-05-05

    N -acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine (Melatonin), as a crucial messenger in plants, functions in adjusting biological rhythms, stress tolerance, plant growth and development. Several studies have shown the retardation effect of exogenous melatonin treatment on plant growth and development. However, the in vivo role of melatonin in regulating plant leaf growth and the underlying mechanism are still unclear. In this study, we found that high concentration of melatonin suppressed leaf growth in Arabidopsis by reducing both cell size and cell number. Further kinetic analysis of the fifth leaves showed that melatonin remarkably inhibited cell division rate. Additionally, flow cytometic analysis indicated that melatonin negatively regulated endoreduplication during leaf development. Consistently, the expression analysis revealed that melatonin regulated the transcriptional levels of key genes of cell cycle and ribosome. Taken together, this study suggests that high concentration of melatonin negatively regulated the leaf growth and development in Arabidopsis , through modulation of endoreduplication and the transcripts of cell cycle and ribosomal key genes.

  3. Vascular Cell Induction Culture System Using Arabidopsis Leaves (VISUAL) Reveals the Sequential Differentiation of Sieve Element-Like Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yuki; Nurani, Alif Meem; Saito, Chieko; Ichihashi, Yasunori; Saito, Masato; Yamazaki, Kyoko; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2016-01-01

    Cell differentiation is a complex process involving multiple steps, from initial cell fate specification to final differentiation. Procambial/cambial cells, which act as vascular stem cells, differentiate into both xylem and phloem cells during vascular development. Recent studies have identified regulatory cascades for xylem differentiation. However, the molecular mechanism underlying phloem differentiation is largely unexplored due to technical challenges. Here, we established an ectopic induction system for phloem differentiation named Vascular Cell Induction Culture System Using Arabidopsis Leaves (VISUAL). Our results verified similarities between VISUAL-induced Arabidopsis thaliana phloem cells and in vivo sieve elements. We performed network analysis using transcriptome data with VISUAL to dissect the processes underlying phloem differentiation, eventually identifying a factor involved in the regulation of the master transcription factor gene APL. Thus, our culture system opens up new avenues not only for genetic studies of phloem differentiation, but also for future investigations of multidirectional differentiation from vascular stem cells. PMID:27194709

  4. Cell size and growth regulation in the Arabidopsis thaliana apical stem cell niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Lisa; Refahi, Yassin; Wightman, Raymond; Landrein, Benoit; Teles, José; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Meyerowitz, Elliot M.

    2016-01-01

    Cell size and growth kinetics are fundamental cellular properties with important physiological implications. Classical studies on yeast, and recently on bacteria, have identified rules for cell size regulation in single cells, but in the more complex environment of multicellular tissues, data have been lacking. In this study, to characterize cell size and growth regulation in a multicellular context, we developed a 4D imaging pipeline and applied it to track and quantify epidermal cells over 3–4 d in Arabidopsis thaliana shoot apical meristems. We found that a cell size checkpoint is not the trigger for G2/M or cytokinesis, refuting the unexamined assumption that meristematic cells trigger cell cycle phases upon reaching a critical size. Our data also rule out models in which cells undergo G2/M at a fixed time after birth, or by adding a critical size increment between G2/M transitions. Rather, cell size regulation was intermediate between the critical size and critical increment paradigms, meaning that cell size fluctuations decay by ∼75% in one generation compared with 100% (critical size) and 50% (critical increment). Notably, this behavior was independent of local cell–cell contact topologies and of position within the tissue. Cells grew exponentially throughout the first >80% of the cell cycle, but following an asymmetrical division, the small daughter grew at a faster exponential rate than the large daughter, an observation that potentially challenges present models of growth regulation. These growth and division behaviors place strong constraints on quantitative mechanistic descriptions of the cell cycle and growth control. PMID:27930326

  5. A laser microsurgical method of cell wall removal allows detection of large-conductance ion channels in the guard cell plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miedema, H.; Henriksen, G. H.; Assmann, S. M.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Application of patch clamp techniques to higher-plant cells has been subject to the limitation that the requisite contact of the patch electrode with the cell membrane necessitates prior enzymatic removal of the plant cell wall. Because the wall is an integral component of plant cells, and because cell-wall-degrading enzymes can disrupt membrane properties, such enzymatic treatments may alter ion channel behavior. We compared ion channel activity in enzymatically isolated protoplasts of Vicia faba guard cells with that found in membranes exposed by a laser microsurgical technique in which only a tiny portion of the cell wall is removed while the rest of the cell remains intact within its tissue environment. "Laser-assisted" patch clamping reveals a new category of high-conductance (130 to 361 pS) ion channels not previously reported in patch clamp studies on plant plasma membranes. These data indicate that ion channels are present in plant membranes that are not detected by conventional patch clamp techniques involving the production of individual plant protoplasts isolated from their tissue environment by enzymatic digestion of the cell wall. Given the large conductances of the channels revealed by laser-assisted patch clamping, we hypothesize that these channels play a significant role in the regulation of ion content and electrical signalling in guard cells.

  6. Catalase and NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 promote autophagy-dependent cell death in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hackenberg, Thomas; Juul, Trine; Auzina, Aija

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death often depends on generation of reactive oxygen species, which can be detoxified by antioxidative enzymes, including catalases. We previously isolated catalase-deficient mutants (cat2) in a screen for resistance to hydroxyurea-induced cell death. Here, we identify...... an Arabidopsis thaliana hydroxyurea-resistant autophagy mutant, atg2, which also shows reduced sensitivity to cell death triggered by the bacterial effector avrRpm1. To test if catalase deficiency likewise affected both hydroxyurea and avrRpm1 sensitivity, we selected mutants with extremely low catalase...... activities and showed that they carried mutations in a gene that we named NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 (NCA1). nca1 mutants showed severely reduced activities of all three catalase isoforms in Arabidopsis, and loss of NCA1 function led to strong suppression of RPM1-triggered cell death. Basal and starvation...

  7. A cell type-specific view on the translation of mRNAs from ROS-responsive genes upon paraquat treatment of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benina, Maria; Ribeiro, Dimas Mendes; Gechev, Tsanko S; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Schippers, Jos H M

    2015-02-01

    Oxidative stress causes dramatic changes in the expression levels of many genes. The formation of a functional protein through successful mRNA translation is central to a coordinated cellular response. To what extent the response towards reactive oxygen species (ROS) is regulated at the translational level is poorly understood. Here we analysed leaf- and tissue-specific translatomes using a set of transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines expressing a FLAG-tagged ribosomal protein to immunopurify polysome-bound mRNAs before and after oxidative stress. We determined transcript levels of 171 ROS-responsive genes upon paraquat treatment, which causes formation of superoxide radicals, at the whole-organ level. Furthermore, the translation of mRNAs was determined for five cell types: mesophyll, bundle sheath, phloem companion, epidermal and guard cells. Mesophyll and bundle sheath cells showed the strongest response to paraquat treatment. Interestingly, several ROS-responsive transcription factors displayed cell type-specific translation patterns, while others were translated in all cell types. In part, cell type-specific translation could be explained by the length of the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) and the presence of upstream open reading frames (uORFs). Our analysis reveals insights into the translational regulation of ROS-responsive genes, which is important to understanding cell-specific responses and functions during oxidative stress. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Chloroplast Dysfunction Causes Multiple Defects in Cell Cycle Progression in the Arabidopsis crumpled leaf Mutant

    KAUST Repository

    Hudik, Elodie

    2014-07-18

    The majority of research on cell cycle regulation is focused on the nuclear events that govern the replication and segregation of the genome between the two daughter cells. However, eukaryotic cells contain several compartmentalized organelles with specialized functions, and coordination among these organelles is required for proper cell cycle progression, as evidenced by the isolation of several mutants in which both organelle function and overall plant development were affected. To investigate how chloroplast dysfunction affects the cell cycle, we analyzed the crumpled leaf (crl) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is deficient for a chloroplastic protein and displays particularly severe developmental defects. In the crl mutant, we reveal that cell cycle regulation is altered drastically and that meristematic cells prematurely enter differentiation, leading to reduced plant stature and early endoreduplication in the leaves. This response is due to the repression of several key cell cycle regulators as well as constitutive activation of stress-response genes, among them the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED5. One unique feature of the crl mutant is that it produces aplastidic cells in several organs, including the root tip. By investigating the consequence of the absence of plastids on cell cycle progression, we showed that nuclear DNA replication occurs in aplastidic cells in the root tip, which opens future research prospects regarding the dialogue between plastids and the nucleus during cell cycle regulation in higher plants.

  9. Inhibition of cell proliferation, cell expansion and differentiation by the Arabidopsis SUPERMAN gene in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereterbide, A; Hernould, M; Castera, S; Mouras, A

    2001-11-01

    Plant development depends upon the control of growth, organization and differentiation of cells derived from shoot and root meristems. Among the genes involved in flower organ determination, the cadastral gene SUPERMAN controls the boundary between whorls 3 and 4 and the growth of the adaxial outer ovule integument by down-regulating cell divisions. To determine the precise function of this gene we overexpressed ectopically the Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. SUPERMAN gene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). The transgenic plants exhibited a dwarf phenotype. Histologically and cytologically detailed analyses showed that dwarfism is correlated with a reduction in cell number, which is in agreement with the SUPERMAN function in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, a reduction in cell expansion and an impairment of cell differentiation were observed in tobacco organs. These traits were observed in differentiated vegetative and floral organs but not in meristem structures. A potential effect of the SUPERMAN transcription factor in the control of gibberellin biosynthesis is discussed.

  10. Calcium dynamics in root cells of Arabidopsis thaliana visualized with selective plane illumination microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Costa

    Full Text Available Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM is an imaging technique particularly suited for long term in-vivo analysis of transparent specimens, able to visualize small organs or entire organisms, at cellular and eventually even subcellular resolution. Here we report the application of SPIM in Calcium imaging based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing the genetically encoded-FRET-based Ca(2+ probe Cameleon, in the cytosol or nucleus, were used to demonstrate that SPIM enables ratiometric fluorescence imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution, both at tissue and single cell level. The SPIM-FRET technique enabled us to follow nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+ dynamics in Arabidopsis root tip cells, deep inside the organ, in response to different stimuli. A relevant physiological phenomenon, namely Ca(2+ signal percolation, predicted in previous studies, has been directly visualized.

  11. Circadian Stress Regimes Affect the Circadian Clock and Cause Jasmonic Acid-Dependent Cell Death in Cytokinin-Deficient Arabidopsis Plants[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitschke, Silvia; Cortleven, Anne; Iven, Tim; Havaux, Michel; Schmülling, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock helps plants measure daylength and adapt to changes in the day-night rhythm. We found that changes in the light-dark regime triggered stress responses, eventually leading to cell death, in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with reduced cytokinin levels or defective cytokinin signaling. Prolonged light treatment followed by a dark period induced stress and cell death marker genes while reducing photosynthetic efficiency. This response, called circadian stress, is also characterized by altered expression of clock and clock output genes. In particular, this treatment strongly reduced the expression of CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY). Intriguingly, similar changes in gene expression and cell death were observed in clock mutants lacking proper CCA1 and LHY function. Circadian stress caused strong changes in reactive oxygen species- and jasmonic acid (JA)-related gene expression. The activation of the JA pathway, involving the accumulation of JA metabolites, was crucial for the induction of cell death, since the cell death phenotype was strongly reduced in the jasmonate resistant1 mutant background. We propose that adaptation to circadian stress regimes requires a normal cytokinin status which, acting primarily through the AHK3 receptor, supports circadian clock function to guard against the detrimental effects of circadian stress. PMID:27354555

  12. Circadian Stress Regimes Affect the Circadian Clock and Cause Jasmonic Acid-Dependent Cell Death in Cytokinin-Deficient Arabidopsis Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitschke, Silvia; Cortleven, Anne; Iven, Tim; Feussner, Ivo; Havaux, Michel; Riefler, Michael; Schmülling, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The circadian clock helps plants measure daylength and adapt to changes in the day-night rhythm. We found that changes in the light-dark regime triggered stress responses, eventually leading to cell death, in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with reduced cytokinin levels or defective cytokinin signaling. Prolonged light treatment followed by a dark period induced stress and cell death marker genes while reducing photosynthetic efficiency. This response, called circadian stress, is also characterized by altered expression of clock and clock output genes. In particular, this treatment strongly reduced the expression of CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY). Intriguingly, similar changes in gene expression and cell death were observed in clock mutants lacking proper CCA1 and LHY function. Circadian stress caused strong changes in reactive oxygen species- and jasmonic acid (JA)-related gene expression. The activation of the JA pathway, involving the accumulation of JA metabolites, was crucial for the induction of cell death, since the cell death phenotype was strongly reduced in the jasmonate resistant1 mutant background. We propose that adaptation to circadian stress regimes requires a normal cytokinin status which, acting primarily through the AHK3 receptor, supports circadian clock function to guard against the detrimental effects of circadian stress. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  13. Metabolism of ibuprofen in higher plants: A model Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maršík, Petr; Šíša, Miroslav; Lacina, O.; Moťková, Kateřina; Langhansová, Lenka; Rezek, Jan; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 220, JAN (2017), s. 383-392 ISSN 0269-7491 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22593S Grant - others:European Regional Development Fund(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24014 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * Ibuprofen * Metabolism * Plant cells * Sequestration Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 5.099, year: 2016

  14. Affinity Purification and Characterization of Functional Tubulin from Cell Suspension Cultures of Arabidopsis and Tobacco1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Satoshi; Uchimura, Seiichi; Noguchi, Masahiro; Demura, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules assemble into several distinct arrays that play important roles in cell division and cell morphogenesis. To decipher the mechanisms that regulate the dynamics and organization of this versatile cytoskeletal component, it is essential to establish in vitro assays that use functional tubulin. Although plant tubulin has been purified previously from protoplasts by reversible taxol-induced polymerization, a simple and efficient purification method has yet to be developed. Here, we used a Tumor Overexpressed Gene (TOG) column, in which the tubulin-binding domains of a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) TOG homolog are immobilized on resin, to isolate functional plant tubulin. We found that several hundred micrograms of pure tubulin can readily be purified from cell suspension cultures of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The tubulin purified by the TOG column showed high assembly competence, partly because of low levels of polymerization-inhibitory phosphorylation of α-tubulin. Compared with porcine brain tubulin, Arabidopsis tubulin is highly dynamic in vitro at both the plus and minus ends, exhibiting faster shrinkage rates and more frequent catastrophe events, and exhibits frequent spontaneous nucleation. Furthermore, our study shows that an internal histidine tag in α-tubulin can be used to prepare particular isotypes and specifically engineered versions of α-tubulin. In contrast to previous studies of plant tubulin, our mass spectrometry and immunoblot analyses failed to detect posttranslational modification of the isolated Arabidopsis tubulin or detected only low levels of posttranslational modification. This novel technology can be used to prepare assembly-competent, highly dynamic pure tubulin from plant cell cultures. PMID:26747285

  15. Arabidopsis EST1/SMG7-like protein is a novel regulator of meiotic cell cycle progression

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riehs, N.; Akimcheva, S.; Bulánková, P.; Idol, R.; Široký, Jiří; Shippen, D.; Schweizer, D.; Říha, K.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 274, č. 1 (2007), s. 71 ISSN 1742-464X. [32nd FEBS Congress - Molecular Machines. 07.07.2007-12.07.2007, Vienna] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA522/06/0380 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : meiosis * Arabidopsis * cell cycle Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  16. PHB3 Maintains Root Stem Cell Niche Identity through ROS-Responsive AP2/ERF Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangpei Kong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The root stem cell niche, which is composed of four mitotically inactive quiescent center (QC cells and the surrounding actively divided stem cells in Arabidopsis, is critical for growth and root development. Here, we demonstrate that the Arabidopsis prohibitin protein PHB3 is required for the maintenance of root stem cell niche identity by both inhibiting proliferative processes in the QC and stimulating cell division in the proximal meristem (PM. PHB3 coordinates cell division and differentiation in the root apical meristem by restricting the spatial expression of ethylene response factor (ERF transcription factors 115, 114, and 109. ERF115, ERF114, and ERF109 mediate ROS signaling, in a PLT-independent manner, to control root stem cell niche maintenance and root growth through phytosulfokine (PSK peptide hormones in Arabidopsis.

  17. Loss of CDKC;2 increases both cell division and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lina; Li, Yaqiong; Xie, Qi; Wu, Yaorong

    2017-09-01

    Drought stress is one of the abiotic stresses that limit plant growth and agricultural productivity. To further understand the mechanism of drought tolerance and identify the genes involved in this process, a genetic screen for altered drought response was conducted in Arabidopsis. One mutant with enhanced drought tolerance was isolated and named Arabidopsis drought tolerance mutant 1 (atdtm1), which has larger lateral organs, prolonged growth duration, increased relative water content and a reduced leaf stomatal density compared with the wild type. The loss of AtDTM1 increases cell division during leaf development. The phenotype is caused by the loss of a T-DNA tagged gene encoding CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE C;2 (CDKC;2), which functions in the regulation of transcription by influencing the phosphorylation status of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). Here, we show that CDKC;2 affects the transcription of downstream genes such as cell cycle genes and genes involved in stomatal development, resulting in altered plant organ size as well as drought tolerance of the plant. These results reveal the crucial role of CDKC;2 in modulating both cell division and the drought response in Arabidopsis. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Knockin' on pollen's door: live cell imaging of early polarization events in germinating Arabidopsis pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Frank; Konrad, Sebastian S. A.; Sprunck, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Pollen tubes are an excellent system for studying the cellular dynamics and complex signaling pathways that coordinate polarized tip growth. Although several signaling mechanisms acting in the tip-growing pollen tube have been described, our knowledge on the subcellular and molecular events during pollen germination and growth site selection at the pollen plasma membrane is rather scarce. To simultaneously track germinating pollen from up to 12 genetically different plants we developed an inexpensive and easy mounting technique, suitable for every standard microscope setup. We performed high magnification live-cell imaging during Arabidopsis pollen activation, germination, and the establishment of pollen tube tip growth by using fluorescent marker lines labeling either the pollen cytoplasm, vesicles, the actin cytoskeleton or the sperm cell nuclei and membranes. Our studies revealed distinctive vesicle and F-actin polarization during pollen activation and characteristic growth kinetics during pollen germination and pollen tube formation. Initially, the germinating Arabidopsis pollen tube grows slowly and forms a uniform roundish bulge, followed by a transition phase with vesicles heavily accumulating at the growth site before switching to rapid tip growth. Furthermore, we found the two sperm cells to be transported into the pollen tube after the phase of rapid tip growth has been initiated. The method presented here is suitable to quantitatively study subcellular events during Arabidopsis pollen germination and growth, and for the detailed analysis of pollen mutants with respect to pollen polarization, bulging, or growth site selection at the pollen plasma membrane. PMID:25954283

  19. Cell wall heterogeneity in root development of Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Somssich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signalling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modelling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes.

  20. Redox Changes During the Cell Cycle in the Embryonic Root Meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Simone, Ambra; Hubbard, Rachel; de la Torre, Natanael Viñegra; Velappan, Yazhini; Wilson, Michael; Considine, Michael J; Soppe, Wim J J; Foyer, Christine H

    2017-12-20

    The aim of this study was to characterize redox changes in the nuclei and cytosol occurring during the mitotic cell cycle in the embryonic roots of germinating Arabidopsis seedlings, and to determine how redox cycling was modified in mutants with a decreased capacity for ascorbate synthesis. Using an in vivo reduction-oxidation (redox) reporter (roGFP2), we show that transient oxidation of the cytosol and the nuclei occurred at G1 in the synchronized dividing cells of the Arabidopsis root apical meristem, with reduction at G2 and mitosis. This redox cycle was absent from low ascorbate mutants in which nuclei were significantly more oxidized than controls. The cell cycle-dependent increase in nuclear size was impaired in the ascorbate-deficient mutants, which had fewer cells per unit area in the root proliferation zone. The transcript profile of the dry seeds and size of the imbibed seeds was strongly influenced by low ascorbate but germination, dormancy release and seed aging characteristics were unaffected. These data demonstrate the presence of a redox cycle within the plant cell cycle and that the redox state of the nuclei is an important factor in cell cycle progression. Controlled oxidation is a key feature of the early stages of the plant cell cycle. However, sustained mild oxidation restricts nuclear functions and impairs progression through the cell cycle leading to fewer cells in the root apical meristem. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 1505-1519.

  1. Developmental changes in guard cell wall structure and pectin composition in the moss Funaria: implications for function and evolution of stomata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merced, Amelia; Renzaglia, Karen

    2014-10-01

    In seed plants, the ability of guard cell walls to move is imparted by pectins. Arabinan rhamnogalacturonan I (RG1) pectins confer flexibility while unesterified homogalacturonan (HG) pectins impart rigidity. Recognized as the first extant plants with stomata, mosses are key to understanding guard cell function and evolution. Moss stomata open and close for only a short period during capsule expansion. This study examines the ultrastructure and pectin composition of guard cell walls during development in Funaria hygrometrica and relates these features to the limited movement of stomata. Developing stomata were examined and immunogold-labelled in transmission electron microscopy using monoclonal antibodies to five pectin epitopes: LM19 (unesterified HG), LM20 (esterified HG), LM5 (galactan RG1), LM6 (arabinan RG1) and LM13 (linear arabinan RG1). Labels for pectin type were quantitated and compared across walls and stages on replicated, independent samples. Walls were four times thinner before pore formation than in mature stomata. When stomata opened and closed, guard cell walls were thin and pectinaceous before the striated internal and thickest layer was deposited. Unesterified HG localized strongly in early layers but weakly in the thick internal layer. Labelling was weak for esterified HG, absent for galactan RG1 and strong for arabinan RG1. Linear arabinan RG1 is the only pectin that exclusively labelled guard cell walls. Pectin content decreased but the proportion of HG to arabinans changed only slightly. This is the first study to demonstrate changes in pectin composition during stomatal development in any plant. Movement of Funaria stomata coincides with capsule expansion before layering of guard cell walls is complete. Changes in wall architecture coupled with a decrease in total pectin may be responsible for the inability of mature stomata to move. Specialization of guard cells in mosses involves the addition of linear arabinans. © The Author 2014

  2. Patterning of stomata in the moss Funaria: a simple way to space guard cells

    OpenAIRE

    Merced, Amelia; Renzaglia, Karen S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Studies on stomatal development and the molecular mechanisms controlling patterning have provided new insights into cell signalling, cell fate determination and the evolution of these processes in plants. To fill a major gap in knowledge of stomatal patterning, this study describes the pattern of cell divisions that give rise to stomata and the underlying anatomical changes that occur during sporophyte development in the moss Funaria.

  3. The Arabidopsis ARGOS-LIKE gene regulates cell expansion during organ growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuxin; Poh, Huay Mei; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2006-07-01

    Cell expansion, and its coordination with cell division, plays a critical role in the growth and development of plant organs. However, the genes controlling cell expansion during organogenesis are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that a novel Arabidopsis gene, ARGOS-LIKE (ARL), which has some sequence homology to the ARGOS gene, is involved in this process. Reduced expression or overexpression of ARL in Arabidopsis results in smaller or larger cotyledons and leaves as well as other lateral organs, respectively. Anatomical examination of cotyledons and leaves in ARL transgenic plants demonstrates that the alteration in size can be attributed to changes in cell size rather than cell number, indicating that ARL plays a role in cell expansion-dependent organ growth. ARL is upregulated by brassinosteroid (BR) and this induction is impaired in the BR-insensitive mutant bri1, but not in the BR-deficient mutant det2. Ectopic expression of ARL in bri1-119 partially restores cell growth in cotyledons and leaves. Our results suggest that ARL acts downstream of BRI1 and partially mediates BR-related cell expansion signals during organ growth.

  4. Biosynthesis of camalexin from tryptophan pathway intermediates in cell-suspension cultures of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, M

    1998-12-01

    Camalexin (3-thiazol-2'-yl-indole) is the principal phytoalexin that accumulates in Arabidopsis after infection by fungi or bacteria. Camalexin accumulation was detectable in Arabidopsis cell-suspension cultures 3 to 5 h after inoculation with Cochliobolus carbonum (Race 1), and then increased rapidly from 7 to 24 h after inoculation. Levels of radioactivity incorporated into camalexin during a 1.5-h pulse labeling with [14C]anthranilate also increased with time after fungal inoculation. The levels of radioactive incorporation into camalexin increased rapidly between 7 and 18 h after inoculation, and then decreased along with camalexin accumulation. Relatively low levels of radioactivity from [14C]anthranilate incorporated into camalexin in the noninoculated controls. Autoradiographic analysis of the accumulation of chloroform-extractable metabolites labeled with [14C]anthranilate revealed a transient increase in the incorporation of radioactivity into indole in fungus-inoculated Arabidopsis cell cultures. The time-course measurement of radioactive incorporation into camalexin during a 1.5-h pulse labeling with [14C]indole was similar to that with [14C]anthranilate. These data suggest that indole destined for camalexin synthesis is produced by a separate enzymatic reaction that does not involve tryptophan synthase.

  5. Biosynthesis of Camalexin from Tryptophan Pathway Intermediates in Cell-Suspension Cultures of Arabidopsis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Camalexin (3-thiazol-2′-yl-indole) is the principal phytoalexin that accumulates in Arabidopsis after infection by fungi or bacteria. Camalexin accumulation was detectable in Arabidopsis cell-suspension cultures 3 to 5 h after inoculation with Cochliobolus carbonum (Race 1), and then increased rapidly from 7 to 24 h after inoculation. Levels of radioactivity incorporated into camalexin during a 1.5-h pulse labeling with [14C]anthranilate also increased with time after fungal inoculation. The levels of radioactive incorporation into camalexin increased rapidly between 7 and 18 h after inoculation, and then decreased along with camalexin accumulation. Relatively low levels of radioactivity from [14C]anthranilate incorporated into camalexin in the noninoculated controls. Autoradiographic analysis of the accumulation of chloroform-extractable metabolites labeled with [14C]anthranilate revealed a transient increase in the incorporation of radioactivity into indole in fungus-inoculated Arabidopsis cell cultures. The time-course measurement of radioactive incorporation into camalexin during a 1.5-h pulse labeling with [14C]indole was similar to that with [14C]anthranilate. These data suggest that indole destined for camalexin synthesis is produced by a separate enzymatic reaction that does not involve tryptophan synthase. PMID:9847113

  6. Identification of novel transcription factors regulating secondary cell wall formation in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua eCassan-Wang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of lignin in secondary cell walls (SCW is a major factor preventing hydrolytic enzymes from gaining access to cellulose, thereby limiting the saccharification potential of plant biomass. To understand how lignification is regulated is a prerequisite for selecting plant biomass better adapted to bioethanol production. Because transcriptional regulation is a major mechanism controlling the expression of genes involved in lignin biosynthesis, our aim was to identify novel transcription factors dictating lignin profiles in the model plant Arabidopsis. To this end, we have developed a post-genomic approach by combining four independent in-house SCW-related transcriptome datasets obtained from (i the fiber cell wall-deficient wat1 Arabidopsis mutant, (ii Arabidopsis lines over-expressing either the master regulatory activator EgMYB2 or (iii the repressor EgMYB1 and finally (iv Arabidopsis orthologs of Eucalyptus xylem-expressed genes. This allowed us to identify 502 up- or down-regulated transcription factors. We preferentially selected those present in more than one dataset and further analyzed their in silico expression patterns as an additional selection criteria. This selection process led to 80 candidates. Notably, 16 of them were already proven to regulate SCW formation, thereby validating the overall strategy. Then, we phenotyped 43 corresponding mutant lines focusing on histological observations of xylem and interfascicular fibers. This phenotypic screen revealed six mutant lines exhibiting altered lignification patterns. Two of them (blh6 and a zinc finger transcription factor presented hypolignified SCW. Three others (myb52, myb-like TF, hb5 showed hyperlignified SCW whereas the last one (hb15 showed ectopic lignification. In addition, our meta-analyses highlighted a reservoir of new potential regulators adding to the gene network regulating SCW but also opening new avenues to ultimately improve SCW composition for biofuel

  7. Stomatal guard cells co-opted an ancient ABA-dependent desiccation survival system to regulate stomatal closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Christof; Dreyer, Ingo; López-Sanjurjo, Enrique J; von Meyer, Katharina; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kohchi, Takayuki; Lang, Daniel; Zhao, Yang; Kreuzer, Ines; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Ronne, Hans; Reski, Ralf; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Geiger, Dietmar; Hedrich, Rainer

    2015-03-30

    During the transition from water to land, plants had to cope with the loss of water through transpiration, the inevitable result of photosynthetic CO2 fixation on land [1, 2]. Control of transpiration became possible through the development of a new cell type: guard cells, which form stomata. In vascular plants, stomatal regulation is mediated by the stress hormone ABA, which triggers the opening of the SnR kinase OST1-activated anion channel SLAC1 [3, 4]. To understand the evolution of this regulatory circuit, we cloned both ABA-signaling elements, SLAC1 and OST1, from a charophyte alga, a liverwort, and a moss, and functionally analyzed the channel-kinase interactions. We were able to show that the emergence of stomata in the last common ancestor of mosses and vascular plants coincided with the origin of SLAC1-type channels capable of using the ancient ABA drought signaling kinase OST1 for regulation of stomatal closure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Proteomic characterization of golgi membranes enriched from Arabidopsis suspension cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sara Fasmer; Ebert, Berit; Rautengarten, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The plant Golgi apparatus has a central role in the secretory pathway and is the principal site within the cell for the assembly and processing of macromolecules. The stacked membrane structure of the Golgi apparatus along with its interactions with the cytoskeleton and endoplasmic reticulum has...... from an Arabidopsis cell suspension culture that can be used to investigate the proteome of this organelle. We also provide a useful workflow for the examination of proteomic data as the result of multiple analyses. Finally, we highlight a simple technique to validate the subcellular localization...

  9. Role of chromatin factors in Arabidopsis root stem cell maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornet, N.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311445713

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells replenish the cells present in an organism throughout its lifetime and sustain growth. They have unique characteristics: the capability to self-renew and the potential to differentiate into several cell types. Recently, it has become clear that chromatin factors support these unique

  10. Arabidopsis and Tobacco superman regulate hormone signalling and mediate cell proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nibau, Candida; Di Stilio, Verónica S; Wu, Hen-Ming; Cheung, Alice Y

    2011-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana superman (SUP) plays an important role during flower development by maintaining the boundary between stamens and carpels in the inner two whorls. It was proposed that SUP maintains this boundary by regulating cell proliferation in both whorls, as loss-of-function superman mutants produce more stamens at the expense of carpels. However, the cellular mechanism that underlies SUP function remains unknown. Here Arabidopsis or tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) SUP was overexpressed in tobacco plants to substantiate SUP's role as a regulator of cell proliferation and boundary definition and provide evidence that its biological role may be mediated via hormonal changes. It was found that moderate levels of SUP stimulated cell growth and proliferation, whereas high levels were inhibitory. SUP stimulated auxin- and cytokinin-regulated processes, and cells overexpressing SUP displayed reduced hormone dependency for proliferation and regeneration into plants. SUP also induced proliferation of female traits in the second and third flower whorls and promoted differentiation of petaloid properties in sepals, further supporting a role for SUP as a boundary regulator. Moreover, cytokinin suppressed stamen development and promoted differentiation of carpeloid tissues, suggesting that SUP may regulate male and female development via its effect on cytokinin signalling. Taken together, these observations suggest a model whereby the effect of SUP on cell growth and proliferation involves the modulation of auxin- and cytokinin-regulated processes. Furthermore, differential SUP expression or different sensitivities of different cell types to SUP may determine whether SUP stimulates or suppresses their proliferation.

  11. Embryonic control of epidermal cell patterning in the root and hypocotyl of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y; Schiefelbein, J

    2001-10-01

    A position-dependent pattern of epidermal cell types is produced during the development of the Arabidopsis seedling root and hypocotyl. To understand the origin and regulation of this patterning mechanism, we have examined the embryonic expression of the GLABRA2 (GL2) gene, which encodes a cell-type-specific transcription factor. Using in situ RNA hybridization and a sensitive GL2::GFP reporter, we discovered that a position-dependent pattern of GL2 expression is established within protodermal cells at the heart stage and is maintained throughout the remainder of embryogenesis. In addition, we show that an exceptional GL2 expression character and epidermal cell pattern arises during development of the root-hypocotyl junction, which represents an anatomical transition zone. Furthermore, we find that two of the genes regulating seedling epidermal patterning, TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA (TTG) and WEREWOLF (WER), also control the embryonic GL2 pattern, whereas the CAPRICE (CPC) and GL2 genes are not required to establish this pattern. These results indicate that position-dependent patterning of epidermal cell types begins at an early stage of embryogenesis, before formation of the apical meristems and shortly after the cellular anatomy of the protoderm and outer ground tissue layer is established. Thus, epidermal cell specification in the Arabidopsis seedling relies on the embryonic establishment of a patterning mechanism that is perpetuated postembryonically.

  12. A quantitative analysis of stem cell homeostasis in the Arabidopsis columella root cap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jing Han; Chu, Huangwei; Zhang, Chen; Ghosh, Dipanjana; Gong, Ximing; Xu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The Lugol's staining method has been widely used to detect changes in the maintenance of stem cell fate in the columella root cap of Arabidopsis roots since the late 1990s. However, various limitations of this method demand for additional or complementary new approaches. For instance, it is unable to reveal the division rate of columella root cap stem cells. Here we report that, by labeling dividing stem cells with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), the number and distribution of their labeled progeny can be studied so that the division rate of stem cells can be measured quantitatively and in addition, that the progression of stem cell progeny differentiation can be assessed in combination with Lugol's staining. EdU staining takes few hours and visualization of the stain characteristics of columella root cap can be performed easily under confocal microscopes. This simple technology, when used together with Lugol's staining, provides a novel quantitative method to study the dynamics of stem cell behavior that govern homeostasis in the Arabidopsis columella root cap.

  13. A Quantitative Analysis of Stem Cell Homeostasis in the Arabidopsis Columella Root Cap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Han eHong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Lugol’s staining method has been widely used to detect changes in the maintenance of stem cell fate in the columella root cap of Arabidopsis roots since the late ‘90s. However, various limitations of this method demand for additional or complementary new approaches. For instance, it is unable to reveal the division rate of columella root cap stem cells. Here we report that, by labelling dividing stem cells with 5-ethynyl-2´-deoxyuridine (EdU, the number and distribution of their labeled progeny can be studied so that the division rate of stem cells can be measured quantitatively and in addition, that the progression of stem cell progeny differentiation can be assessed in combination with Lugol’s staining. EdU staining takes few hours and visualization of the stain characteristics of columella root cap can be performed easily under confocal microscopes. This simple technology, when used together with Lugol’s staining, provides a novel quantitative method to study the dynamics of stem cell behaviour that govern homeostasis in the Arabidopsis columella root cap.

  14. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors and epidermal cell fate determination in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongtao; Li, Xia; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-12-01

    Cell fate determination is an important process in multicellular organisms. Plant epidermis is a readily-accessible, well-used model for the study of cell fate determination. Our knowledge of cell fate determination is growing steadily due to genetic and molecular analyses of root hairs, trichomes, and stomata, which are derived from the epidermal cells of roots and aerial tissues. Studies have shown that a large number of factors are involved in the establishment of these cell types, especially members of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) superfamily, which is an important family of transcription factors. In this mini-review, we focus on the role of bHLH transcription factors in cell fate determination in Arabidopsis.

  15. Molecule mechanism of stem cells in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Wenjin Zhang; Rongming Yu

    2014-01-01

    Plants possess the ability to continually produce new tissues and organs throughout their life. Unlike animals, plants are exposed to extreme variations in environmental conditions over the course of their lives. The vitality of plants is so powerful that they can survive several hundreds of years or even more making it an amazing miracle that comes from plant stem cells. The stem cells continue to divide to renew themselves and provide cells for the formation of leaves, stems, and flowers. S...

  16. Xyloglucan Deficiency Disrupts Microtubule Stability and Cellulose Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis, Altering Cell Growth and Morphogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Chaowen; Zhang, Tian; Zheng, Yunzhen; Cosgrove, Daniel J.; Anderson, Charles T.

    2015-11-02

    Xyloglucan constitutes most of the hemicellulose in eudicot primary cell walls and functions in cell wall structure and mechanics. Although Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) xxt1 xxt2 mutants lacking detectable xyloglucan are viable, they display growth defects that are suggestive of alterations in wall integrity. To probe the mechanisms underlying these defects, we analyzed cellulose arrangement, microtubule patterning and dynamics, microtubule- and wall-integrity-related gene expression, and cellulose biosynthesis in xxt1 xxt2 plants. We found that cellulose is highly aligned in xxt1 xxt2 cell walls, that its three-dimensional distribution is altered, and that microtubule patterning and stability are aberrant in etiolated xxt1 xxt2 hypocotyls. We also found that the expression levels of microtubule-associated genes, such as MAP70-5 and CLASP, and receptor genes, such as HERK1 and WAK1, were changed in xxt1 xxt2 plants and that cellulose synthase motility is reduced in xxt1 xxt2 cells, corresponding with a reduction in cellulose content. Our results indicate that loss of xyloglucan affects both the stability of the microtubule cytoskeleton and the production and patterning of cellulose in primary cell walls. These findings establish, to our knowledge, new links between wall integrity, cytoskeletal dynamics, and wall synthesis in the regulation of plant morphogenesis.

  17. Cell death patterns in Arabidopsis cells subjected to four physiological stressors indicate multiple signalling pathways and cell cycle phase specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathirana, Ranjith; West, Phillip; Hedderley, Duncan; Eason, Jocelyn

    2017-03-01

    Corpse morphology, nuclear DNA fragmentation, expression of senescence-associated genes (SAG) and cysteine protease profiles were investigated to understand cell death patterns in a cell cycle-synchronised Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture treated with four physiological stressors in the late G2 phase. Within 4 h of treatment, polyethylene glycol (PEG, 20 %), mannose (100 mM) and hydrogen peroxide (2 mM) caused DNA fragmentation coinciding with cell permeability to Evans Blue (EB) and produced corpse morphology corresponding to apoptosis-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD) with cytoplasmic retraction from the cell wall. Ethylene (8 mL per 250-mL flask) caused permeability of cells to EB without concomitant nuclear DNA fragmentation and cytoplasmic retraction, suggesting necrotic cell death. Mannose inducing glycolysis block and PEG causing dehydration resulted in relatively similar patterns of upregulation of SAG suggesting similar cell death signalling pathways for these two stress factors, whereas hydrogen peroxide caused unique patterns indicating an alternate pathway for cell death induced by oxidative stress. Ethylene did not cause appreciable changes in SAG expression, confirming necrotic cell death. Expression of AtDAD, BoMT1 and AtSAG2 genes, previously shown to be associated with plant senescence, also changed rapidly during AL-PCD in cultured cells. The profiles of nine distinct cysteine protease-active bands ranging in size from ca. 21.5 to 38.5 kDa found in the control cultures were also altered after treatment with the four stressors, with mannose and PEG again producing similar patterns. Results also suggest that cysteine proteases may have a role in necrotic cell death.

  18. A rapid chemical method for lysing Arabidopsis cells for protein analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takano Tetsuo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein extraction is a frequent procedure in biological research. For preparation of plant cell extracts, plant materials usually have to be ground and homogenized to physically break the robust cell wall, but this step is laborious and time-consuming when a large number of samples are handled at once. Results We developed a chemical method for lysing Arabidopsis cells without grinding. In this method, plants are boiled for just 10 minutes in a solution containing a Ca2+ chelator and detergent. Cell extracts prepared by this method were suitable for SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analysis. This method was also applicable to genomic DNA extraction for PCR analysis. Our method was applied to many other plant species, and worked well for some of them. Conclusions Our method is rapid and economical, and allows many samples to be prepared simultaneously for protein analysis. Our method is useful not only for Arabidopsis research but also research on certain other species.

  19. ERECTA Regulates Cell Elongation by Activating Auxin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoya Qu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The ERECTA family genes, ERECTA (ER, ERECTA-LIKE1 (ERL1, and ERECTA-LIKE2 (ERL2, encode leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases in Arabidopsis thaliana. Knocking out these three genes can cause severe phenotypes, which indicates that they play significant roles in plant growth and development. However, the molecular mechanism within remains unclear. Here we show that the short hypocotyl phenotypes of er erl1 erl2 mutants are mainly due to the defects of cell elongation rather than the cell division. In contrast, in the ERECTA overexpression transgenic plants, the hypocotyl length is increased with elongated cells. Moreover, we show that the er erl1 erl2 triple mutant contains a low level of auxin, and the expression levels of the key auxin biosynthesis genes are significantly reduced. Consistent with this observation, increasing exogenous or endogenous auxin levels could partially rescue the cell elongation defects of the er erl1 erl2 triple mutant. Therefore, our results provide a molecular basis for auxin mediated ERECTA control of the hypocotyl length in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  20. Molecular and Genetic Analysis of Hormone-Regulated Differential Cell Elongation in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecker, Joseph R.

    2005-09-15

    We have utilized the response of Arabidopsis seedlings to the plant hormone ethylene to identify new genes involved in the regulation of ethylene biosynthesis, perception, signal transduction and differential cell growth. In building a genetic framework for the action of these genes, we have developed a molecular model that has facilitated our understanding of the molecular requirements of ethylene for cell elongation processes. The ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis appears to be primarily linear and is defined by the genes: ETR1, ETR2, ERS1, ERS2, EIN4, CTR1, EIN2, EIN3, EIN5, EIN6, and EIN. Downstream branches identified by the HLS1, EIR1, and AUX1 genes involve interactions with other hormonal (auxin) signals in the process of differential cell elongation in the hypocotyl hook. Cloning and characterization of HLS1 (and three HLL genes) and ETO1 (and ETOL genes) in my laboratory has been supported under this award. HLS1 is required for differential elongation of cells in the hypocotyl and may act in the establishment of hormone gradients. Also during the previous period, we have identified and characterized a gene that genetically acts upstream of the ethylene receptors. ETO1 encodes negative regulators of ethylene biosynthesis.

  1. Molecular and Genetic Analysis of Hormone-Regulated Differential Cell Elongation in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecker, Joseph R.

    2002-12-03

    The authors have utilized the response of Arabidopsis seedlings to the plant hormone ethylene to identify new genes involved in the regulation of ethylene biosynthesis, perception, signal transduction and differential cell growth. In building a genetic framework for the action of these genes, they developed a molecular model that has facilitated the understanding of the molecular requirements of ethylene for cell elongation processes. The ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis appears to be primarily linear and is defined by the genes: ETR1, ETR2, ERS1, ERS2, EIN4, CTR1, EIN2, EIN3, EIN5 EIN6, and EIN. Downstream branches identified by the HLS1, EIR1, and AUX1 genes involve interactions with other hormonal (auxin) signals in the process of differential cell elongation in the hypocotyl hook. Cloning and characterization of HLS1 and three HLS1-LIKE genes in the laboratory has been supported under this award. HLS1 is required for differential elongation of cells in the hypocotyl and may act in the establishment of hormone gradients. Also during the award period, they have identified and begun preliminary characterization of two genes that genetically act upstream of the ethylene receptors. ETO1 and RAN1 encode negative regulators of ethylene biosynthesis and signaling respectively. Progress on the analysis of these genes along with HOOKLESS1 is described.

  2. Steroids are required for epidermal cell fate establishment in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppusamy, Kavitha T; Chen, Andrew Y; Nemhauser, Jennifer L

    2009-05-12

    The simple structure of Arabidopsis roots provides an excellent model system to study epidermal cell fate specification. Epidermal cells in contact with 2 underlying cortical cells differentiate into hair cells (H cells; trichoblasts), whereas cells that contact only a single cortical cell differentiate into mature hairless cells (N cells; atrichoblasts). This position-dependent patterning, in combination with the constrained orientation of cell divisions, results in hair and nonhair cell files running longitudinally along the root epidermis. Here, we present strong evidence that steroid hormones called brassinosteroids (BRs) are required to maintain position-dependent fate specification in roots. We show that BRs are required for normal expression levels and patterns of WEREWOLF (WER) and GLABRA2 (GL2), master regulators of epidermal patterning. Loss of BR signaling results in loss of hair cells in H positions, likely as a consequence of reduced expression of CAPRICE (CPC), a direct downstream target of WER. Our observations demonstrate that in addition to their well-known role in cell expansion, BRs play an essential role in directing cell fate.

  3. Automated Arabidopsis plant root cell segmentation based on SVM classification and region merging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzo, Monica; Quelhas, Pedro; Campilho, Ana; Mendonça, Ana Maria; Campilho, Aurélio

    2009-09-01

    To obtain development information of individual plant cells, it is necessary to perform in vivo imaging of the specimen under study, through time-lapse confocal microscopy. Automation of cell detection/marking process is important to provide research tools in order to ease the search for special events, such as cell division. In this paper we discuss an automatic cell detection approach for Arabidopsis thaliana based on segmentation, which selects the best cell candidates from a starting watershed-based image segmentation and improves the result by merging adjacent regions. The selection of individual cells is obtained using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier, based on a cell descriptor constructed from the shape and edge strength of the cells' contour. In addition we proposed a novel cell merging criterion based on edge strength along the line that connects adjacent cells' centroids, which is a valuable tool in the reduction of cell over-segmentation. The result is largely pruned of badly segmented and over-segmented cells, thus facilitating the study of cells. When comparing the results after merging with the basic watershed segmentation, we obtain 1.5% better coverage (increase in F-measure) and up to 27% better precision in correct cell segmentation.

  4. Investigation of roles for LRR-RLKs PNL1 and PNL2 in asymmetric cell division in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Maiti Celina

    2008-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division is a vital component of plant development. It enables cell differentiation and cell diversity. A key component of asymmetric cell division is cell signaling. Signals are believed to control polarization and orientation of asymmetric divisions during stomatal development. The findings of this report suggest that PNL1 and PNL2, two LRR-RLKs found in Arabidopsis and closely related to maize PAN1 LRR-RLK, are possibly involved in the signaling events occurring during the ...

  5. The role of callose in guard-cell wall differentiation and stomatal pore formation in the fern Asplenium nidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolakos, P; Livanos, P; Nikolakopoulou, T L; Galatis, B

    2009-12-01

    The pattern of callose deposition was followed in developing stomata of the fern Asplenium nidus to investigate the role of this polysaccharide in guard cell (GC) wall differentiation and stomatal pore formation. Callose was localized by aniline blue staining and immunolabelling using an antibody against (1 --> 3)-beta-d-glucan. The study was carried out in stomata of untreated material as well as of material treated with: (1) 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DDG) or tunicamycin, which inhibit callose synthesis; (2) coumarin or 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (dichlobenil), which block cellulose synthesis; (3) cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), which disturbs cytoplasmic Ca(2+) homeostasis; and (d) cytochalasin B or oryzalin, which disintegrate actin filaments and microtubules, respectively. In post-cytokinetic stomata significant amounts of callose persisted in the nascent ventral wall. Callose then began degrading from the mid-region of the ventral wall towards its periphery, a process which kept pace with the formation of an 'internal stomatal pore' by local separation of the partner plasmalemmata. In differentiating GCs, callose was consistently localized in the developing cell-wall thickenings. In 2-DDG-, tunicamycin- and CPA-affected stomata, callose deposition and internal stomatal pore formation were inhibited. The affected ventral walls and GC wall thickenings contained membranous elements. Stomata recovering from the above treatments formed a stomatal pore by a mechanism different from that in untreated stomata. After coumarin or dichlobenil treatment, callose was retained in the nascent ventral wall for longer than in control stomata, while internal stomatal pore formation was blocked. Actin filament disintegration inhibited internal stomatal pore formation, without any effect on callose deposition. In A. nidus stomata the time and pattern of callose deposition and degradation play an essential role in internal stomatal pore formation, and callose participates in deposition of the

  6. Cell Fate in the Arabidopsis Root Epidermis Is Determined by Competition between WEREWOLF and CAPRICE1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sang-Kee; Ryu, Kook Hui; Kang, Yeon Hee; Song, Jae Hyo; Cho, Young-Hee; Yoo, Sang-Dong; Schiefelbein, John; Lee, Myeong Min

    2011-01-01

    The root hair and nonhair cells in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) root epidermis are specified by a suite of transcriptional regulators. Two of these are WEREWOLF (WER) and CAPRICE (CPC), which encode MYB transcription factors that are required for promoting the nonhair cell fate and the hair cell fate, respectively. However, the precise function and relationship between these transcriptional regulators have not been fully defined experimentally. Here, we examine these issues by misexpressing the WER gene using the GAL4-upstream activation sequence transactivation system. We find that WER overexpression in the Arabidopsis root tip is sufficient to cause epidermal cells to adopt the nonhair cell fate through direct induction of GLABRA2 (GL2) gene expression. We also show that GLABRA3 (GL3) and ENHANCER OF GLABRA3 (EGL3), two closely related bHLH proteins, are required for the action of the overexpressed WER and that WER interacts with these bHLHs in plant cells. Furthermore, we find that CPC suppresses the WER overexpression phenotype quantitatively. These results show that WER acts together with GL3/EGL3 to induce GL2 expression and that WER and CPC compete with one another to define cell fates in the Arabidopsis root epidermis. PMID:21914815

  7. Reduced Wall Acetylation Proteins Play Vital and Distinct Roles in Cell Wall O-Acetylation in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manabe, Yuzuki; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Gille, Sascha

    2013-01-01

    The Reduced Wall Acetylation (RWA) proteins are involved in cell wall acetylation in plants. Previously, we described a single mutant, rwa2, which has about 20% lower level of O-acetylation in leaf cell walls and no obvious growth or developmental phenotype. In this study, we generated double......, triple, and quadruple loss-of-function mutants of all four members of the RWA family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In contrast to rwa2, the triple and quadruple rwa mutants display severe growth phenotypes revealing the importance of wall acetylation for plant growth and development...

  8. Telomerase-independent cell survival in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Watson, Matthew J.; Bulánková, Petra; Říha, Karel; Shippen, Dorothy E.; Vyskot, Boris

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 43, - (2005), s. 662-674 ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA6004304 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : in vitro cell culture * telomere * genome instability Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 6.969, year: 2005

  9. Different myrosinase and idioblast distribution in Arabidopsis and Brassica napus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasson, Erik; Jørgensen, Lise Bolt; Höglund, Anna-Stina

    2001-01-01

    Arabidopsis, Brassica napus, Myrosinase, Myrosinase Binding Protein, Glucosinolates, Myrosin Cell, Immunocytochemistry......Arabidopsis, Brassica napus, Myrosinase, Myrosinase Binding Protein, Glucosinolates, Myrosin Cell, Immunocytochemistry...

  10. JACKDAW controls epidermal patterning in the Arabidopsis root meristem through a non-cell-autonomous mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Hala; Scheres, Ben; Blilou, Ikram

    2010-05-01

    In Arabidopsis, specification of the hair and non-hair epidermal cell types is position dependent, in that hair cells arise over clefts in the underlying cortical cell layer. Epidermal patterning is determined by a network of transcriptional regulators that respond to an as yet unknown cue from underlying tissues. Previously, we showed that JACKDAW (JKD), a zinc finger protein, localizes in the quiescent centre and the ground tissue, and regulates tissue boundaries and asymmetric cell division by delimiting SHORT-ROOT movement. Here, we provide evidence that JKD controls position-dependent signals that regulate epidermal-cell-type patterning. JKD is required for appropriately patterned expression of the epidermal cell fate regulators GLABRA2, CAPRICE and WEREWOLF. Genetic interaction studies indicate that JKD operates upstream of the epidermal patterning network in a SCRAMBLED (SCM)-dependent fashion after embryogenesis, but acts independent of SCM in embryogenesis. Tissue-specific induction experiments indicate non-cell-autonomous action of JKD from the underlying cortex cell layer to specify epidermal cell fate. Our findings are consistent with a model where JKD induces a signal in every cortex cell that is more abundant in the hair cell position owing to the larger surface contact of cells located over a cleft.

  11. Analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence reveals stage specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells during Arabidopsis embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RICARDO I TEJOS

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic body plan of a plant is established early in embryogenesis when cells differentiate, giving rise to the apical and basal regions of the embryo. Using chlorophyll fluorescence as a marker for chloroplasts, we have detected specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells at specific stages of embryogenesis. Non-randomly distributed chloroplast-containing cells are seen as early as the globular stage of embryogenesis in Arabidopsis. In the heart stage of embryogenesis, chloroplast containing cells are detected in epidermal cells as well as a central region of the heart stage embryo, forming a triangular septum of chloroplast-containing cells that divides the embryo into three equal sectors. Torpedo stage embryos have chloroplast-containing epidermal cells and a central band of chloroplast-containing cells in the cortex layer, just below the shoot apical meristem. In the walking-stick stage of embryogenesis, chloroplasts are present in the epidermal, cortex and endodermal cells. The chloroplasts appear reduced or absent from the provascular and columella cells of walking-stick stage embryos. These results suggest that there is a tight regulation of plastid differentiation during embryogenesis that generates specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells in specific cell layers at specific stages of embryogenesis.

  12. Analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence reveals stage specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells during Arabidopsis embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejos, Ricardo I; Mercado, Ana V; Meisel, Lee A

    2010-01-01

    The basic body plan of a plant is established early in embryogenesis when cells differentiate, giving rise to the apical and basal regions of the embryo. Using chlorophyll fluorescence as a marker for chloroplasts, we have detected specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells at specific stages of embryogenesis. Non-randomly distributed chloroplast-containing cells are seen as early as the globular stage of embryogenesis in Arabidopsis. In the heart stage of embryogenesis, chloroplast containing cells are detected in epidermal cells as well as a central region of the heart stage embryo, forming a triangular septum of chloroplast-containing cells that divides the embryo into three equal sectors. Torpedo stage embryos have chloroplast-containing epidermal cells and a central band of chloroplast-containing cells in the cortex layer, just below the shoot apical meristem. In the walking-stick stage of embryogenesis, chloroplasts are present in the epidermal, cortex and endodermal cells. The chloroplasts appear reduced or absent from the provascular and columella cells of walking-stick stage embryos. These results suggest that there is a tight regulation of plastid differentiation during embryogenesis that generates specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells in specific cell layers at specific stages of embryogenesis.

  13. Chloride-inducible transient apoplastic alkalinizations induce stomata closure by controlling abscisic acid distribution between leaf apoplast and guard cells in salt-stressed Vicia faba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geilfus, Christoph-Martin; Mithöfer, Axel; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Zörb, Christian; Muehling, Karl H

    2015-11-01

    Chloride stress causes the leaf apoplast transiently to alkalize, an event that is presumed to contribute to the ability of plants to adapt to saline conditions. However, the initiation of coordinated processes downstream of the alkalinization is unknown. We hypothesize that chloride-inducible pH dynamics are a key chemical feature modulating the compartmental distribution of abscisic acid (ABA) and, as a consequence, affecting stomata aperture. Apoplastic pH and stomata aperture dynamics in intact Vicia faba leaves were monitored by microscopy-based ratio imaging and porometric measurements of stomatal conductance. ABA concentrations in leaf apoplast and guard cells were compared with pH dynamics by gas-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid-chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results demonstrate that, upon chloride addition to roots, an alkalizing factor that initiates the pH dynamic propagates from root to leaf in a way similar to xylem-distributed water. In leaves, it induces a systemic transient apoplastic alkalinization that causes apoplastic ABA concentration to increase, followed by an elevation of endogenous guard cell ABA. We conclude that the transient alkalinization, which is a remote effect of chloride stress, modulates the compartmental distribution of ABA between the leaf apoplast and the guard cells and, in this way, is instrumental in inducing stomata closure during the beginning of salinity. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Central functions of bicarbonate in S-type anion channel activation and OST1 protein kinase in CO 2 signal transduction in guard cell

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Shaowu

    2011-03-18

    Plants respond to elevated CO(2) via carbonic anhydrases that mediate stomatal closing, but little is known about the early signalling mechanisms following the initial CO(2) response. It remains unclear whether CO(2), HCO(3)(-) or a combination activates downstream signalling. Here, we demonstrate that bicarbonate functions as a small-molecule activator of SLAC1 anion channels in guard cells. Elevated intracellular [HCO(3)(-)](i) with low [CO(2)] and [H(+)] activated S-type anion currents, whereas low [HCO(3)(-)](i) at high [CO(2)] and [H(+)] did not. Bicarbonate enhanced the intracellular Ca(2+) sensitivity of S-type anion channel activation in wild-type and ht1-2 kinase mutant guard cells. ht1-2 mutant guard cells exhibited enhanced bicarbonate sensitivity of S-type anion channel activation. The OST1 protein kinase has been reported not to affect CO(2) signalling. Unexpectedly, OST1 loss-of-function alleles showed strongly impaired CO(2)-induced stomatal closing and HCO(3)(-) activation of anion channels. Moreover, PYR/RCAR abscisic acid (ABA) receptor mutants slowed but did not abolish CO(2)/HCO(3)(-) signalling, redefining the convergence point of CO(2) and ABA signalling. A new working model of the sequence of CO(2) signalling events in gas exchange regulation is presented.

  15. Early effects of altered gravity environments on plant cell growth and cell proliferation: characterization of morphofunctional nucleolar types in an Arabidopsis cell culture system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manzano, A.I.; Herranz, R.; Manzano, A.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Medina, F.J.

    Changes in the cell growth rate of an in vitro cellular system in Arabidopsis thaliana induced by short exposure to an altered gravity environment have been estimated by a novel approach. The method consisted of defining three structural nucleolar types which are easy and reliable indicators of the

  16. Investigating the Molecular Mechanism of TSO1 Function in Arabidopsis cell division and meristem development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhongchi Liu

    2004-10-01

    Unlike animals, plants are constantly exposed to environmental mutagens including ultraviolet light and reactive oxygen species. Further, plant cells are totipotent with highly plastic developmental programs. An understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the ability of plants to monitor and repair its DNA and to eliminate damaged cells are of great importance. Previously we have identified two genes, TSO1 and TSO2, from a flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutations in these two genes cause callus-like flowers, fasciated shoot apical meristems, and abnormal cell division, indicating that TSO1 and TSO2 may encode important cell cycle regulators. Previous funding from DOE led to the molecular cloning of TSO1, which was shown to encode a novel nuclear protein with two CXC domains suspected to bind DNA. This DOE grant has allowed us to characterize and isolate TSO2 that encodes the small subunit of the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). RNR comprises two large subunits (R1) an d two small subunits (R2), catalyzes a rate-limiting step in the production of deoxyribonucleotides needed for DNA replication and repair. Previous studies in yeast and mammals indicated that defective RNR often led to cell cycle arrest, growth retardation and p53-dependent apoptosis while abnormally elevated RNR activities led to higher mutation rates. Subsequently, we identified two additional R2 genes, R2A and R2B in the Arabidopsis genome. Using reverse genetics, mutations in R2A and R2B were isolated, and double and triple mutants among the three R2 genes (TSO2, R2A and R2B) were constructed and analyzed. We showed that Arabidopsis tso2 mutants, with reduced dNTP levels, were more sensitive to UV-C. While r2a or r2b single mutants did not exhibit any phenotypes, tso2 r2b double mutants were embryonic lethal and tso2 r2a double mutants were seedling lethal indicating redundant functions among the three R2 genes. Furthermore, tso2 r2a double mutants exhibited increased DNA dam age

  17. Inhibition by acrolein of light-induced stomatal opening through inhibition of inward-rectifying potassium channels in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Moshiul; Ye, Wenxiu; Matsushima, Daiki; Khokon, Md Atiqur Rahman; Munemasa, Shintaro; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Acrolein is a reactive α,β-unsaturated aldehyde derived from lipid peroxides, which are produced in plants under a variety of stress. We investigated effects of acrolein on light-induced stomatal opening using Arabidopsis thaliana. Acrolein inhibited light-induced stomatal opening in a dose-dependent manner. Acrolein at 100 μM inhibited plasma membrane inward-rectifying potassium (Kin) channels in guard cells. Acrolein at 100 μM inhibited Kin channel KAT1 expressed in a heterologous system using Xenopus leaves oocytes. These results suggest that acrolein inhibits light-induced stomatal opening through inhibition of Kin channels in guard cells.

  18. Genetic ablation of root cap cells in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Tsugeki, Ryuji; Fedoroff, Nina V.

    1999-01-01

    The root cap is increasingly appreciated as a complex and dynamic plant organ. Root caps sense and transmit environmental signals, synthesize and secrete small molecules and macromolecules, and in some species shed metabolically active cells. However, it is not known whether root caps are essential for normal shoot and root development. We report the identification of a root cap-specific promoter and describe its use to genetically ablate root caps by directing root cap-specific expression of...

  19. Cell pattern in the Arabidopsis root epidermis determined by lateral inhibition with feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myeong Min; Schiefelbein, John

    2002-03-01

    In the root epidermis of Arabidopsis, hair and nonhair cell types are specified in a distinct position-dependent pattern. Here, we show that transcriptional feedback loops between the WEREWOLF (WER), CAPRICE (CPC), and GLABRA2 (GL2) genes help to establish this pattern. Positional cues bias the expression of the WER MYB gene, leading to the induction of CPC and GL2 in cells located in a particular position (N) and adoption of the nonhair fate. The truncated MYB encoded by CPC mediates a lateral inhibition mechanism to negatively regulate WER, GL2, and its own gene in the alternative position (H) to induce the hair fate. These results provide a molecular genetic framework for understanding the determination of a cell-type pattern in plants.

  20. The transcription factor Runx3 guards cytotoxic CD8+effector T cells against deviation towards follicular helper T cell lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Qiang; Zeng, Zhouhao; Xing, Shaojun; Li, Fengyin; Hartwig, Stacey M; Gullicksrud, Jodi A; Kurup, Samarchith P; Van Braeckel-Budimir, Natalija; Su, Yao; Martin, Matthew D; Varga, Steven M; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Harty, John T; Peng, Weiqun; Badovinac, Vladimir P; Xue, Hai-Hui

    2017-08-01

    Activated CD8 + T cells differentiate into cytotoxic effector (T EFF ) cells that eliminate target cells. How T EFF cell identity is established and maintained is not fully understood. We found that Runx3 deficiency limited clonal expansion and impaired upregulation of cytotoxic molecules in T EFF cells. Runx3-deficient CD8 + T EFF cells aberrantly upregulated genes characteristic of follicular helper T (T FH ) cell lineage, including Bcl6, Tcf7 and Cxcr5. Mechanistically, the Runx3-CBFβ transcription factor complex deployed H3K27me3 to Bcl6 and Tcf7 genes to suppress the T FH program. Ablating Tcf7 in Runx3-deficient CD8 + T EFF cells prevented the upregulation of T FH genes and ameliorated their defective induction of cytotoxic genes. As such, Runx3-mediated Tcf7 repression coordinately enforced acquisition of cytotoxic functions and protected the cytotoxic lineage integrity by preventing T FH -lineage deviation.

  1. Hydrogen Peroxide-induced Cell Death in Arabidopsis : Transcriptional and Mutant Analysis Reveals a Role of an Oxoglutarate-dependent Dioxygenase Gene in the Cell Death Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gechev, Tsanko S.; Minkov, Ivan N.; Hille, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a major regulator of plant programmed cell death (PCD) but little is known about the downstream genes from the H2O2-signaling network that mediate the cell death. To address this question, a novel system for studying H2O2-induced programmed cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana was

  2. Cell-specific vacuolar calcium storage mediated by "CAX1" regulates apoplastic calcium concentration, gas exchange, and plant productivity in "Arabidopsis"

    Science.gov (United States)

    The physiological role and mechanism of nutrient storage within vacuoles of specific cell types is poorly understood. Transcript profiles from "Arabidopsis thaliana" leaf cells differing in calcium concentration ([Ca], epidermis 60 mM) were compared using a microarray screen...

  3. A feedback mechanism controlling SCRAMBLED receptor accumulation and cell-type pattern in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Su-Hwan; Schiefelbein, John

    2008-12-23

    Cellular pattern formation in the root epidermis of Arabidopsis occurs in a position-dependent manner, generating root-hair (H) cells contacting two underlying cortical cells and nonhair (N) cells contacting one cortical cell. SCRAMBLED (SCM), a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR-RLK), mediates this process through its effect on a downstream transcription factor regulatory network. After perception of a positional cue, the SCM signaling pathway is proposed to preferentially repress WEREWOLF (WER) transcription factor expression in H cells and thereby bias the outcome of mutual lateral inhibition acting between H and N cells. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for this preferential SCM signaling is unknown. Here, we analyze the distribution of the SCM receptor and the biological effect of altering its accumulation pattern. We find that SCM expression and accumulation in the epidermal cell layer is necessary and sufficient to direct the cell-type pattern. Further, SCM preferentially accumulates in H cells, and this accumulation pattern is dependent on the downstream transcription factors. Thus, SCM participates in an autoregulatory feedback loop, enabling cells engaged in SCM signaling to maintain high levels of SCM receptor, which provides a simple mechanism for reinforcing a bias in receptor-mediated signaling to ensure robust pattern formation.

  4. Metabolic labeling and membrane fractionation for comparative proteomic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Witold G; Kierszniowska, Sylwia; Schulze, Waltraud X

    2013-09-28

    Plasma membrane microdomains are features based on the physical properties of the lipid and sterol environment and have particular roles in signaling processes. Extracting sterol-enriched membrane microdomains from plant cells for proteomic analysis is a difficult task mainly due to multiple preparation steps and sources for contaminations from other cellular compartments. The plasma membrane constitutes only about 5-20% of all the membranes in a plant cell, and therefore isolation of highly purified plasma membrane fraction is challenging. A frequently used method involves aqueous two-phase partitioning in polyethylene glycol and dextran, which yields plasma membrane vesicles with a purity of 95% (1). Sterol-rich membrane microdomains within the plasma membrane are insoluble upon treatment with cold nonionic detergents at alkaline pH. This detergent-resistant membrane fraction can be separated from the bulk plasma membrane by ultracentrifugation in a sucrose gradient (2). Subsequently, proteins can be extracted from the low density band of the sucrose gradient by methanol/chloroform precipitation. Extracted protein will then be trypsin digested, desalted and finally analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Our extraction protocol for sterol-rich microdomains is optimized for the preparation of clean detergent-resistant membrane fractions from Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures. We use full metabolic labeling of Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cell cultures with K(15)NO3 as the only nitrogen source for quantitative comparative proteomic studies following biological treatment of interest (3). By mixing equal ratios of labeled and unlabeled cell cultures for joint protein extraction the influence of preparation steps on final quantitative result is kept at a minimum. Also loss of material during extraction will affect both control and treatment samples in the same way, and therefore the ratio of light and heave peptide will remain constant. In the proposed method either labeled or

  5. Close correspondence between the action spectra for the blue light responses of the guard cell and coleoptile chloroplasts, and the spectra for blue light-dependent stomatal opening and coleoptile phototropism.

    OpenAIRE

    Quiñones, M A; Lu, Z; Zeiger, E

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterize blue light responses from chloroplasts of adaxial guard cells from Pima cotton (Gossypium barbadense) and coleoptile tips from corn (Zea mays). The chloroplast response to blue light was quantified by measurements of the blue light-induced enhancement of a red light-stimulated quenching of chlorophyll a fluorescence. In adaxial (upper) guard cells, low fluence rates of blue light applied under saturating fluence rates of red light enhanced th...

  6. Arabidopsis AAL-toxin-resistant mutant atr1 shows enhanced tolerance to programmed cell death induced by reactive oxygen species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gechev, Tsanko S.; Ferwerda, MargFiet A.; Mehterov, Nikolay; Laloi, Christophe; Qureshi, Muhammad K.; Hille, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    The fungal AAL-toxin triggers programmed cell death (PCD) through perturbations of sphingolipid metabolism in AAL-toxin-sensitive plants. While Arabidopsis is relatively insensitive to the toxin, the loh2 mutant exhibits increased Susceptibility to AAL-toxin due to the knockout of a gene involved in

  7. Unstable F-actin specifies the area and microtubule direction of cell expansion in Arabidopsis root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, M.J.; Ruijter, de N.C.A.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2003-01-01

    Plant cells expand by exocytosis of wall material contained in Golgi-derived vesicles. We examined the role of local instability of the actin cytoskeleton in specifying the exocytosis site in Arabidopsis root hairs. During root hair growth, a specific actin cytoskeleton configuration is present in

  8. A pharmacological study of Arabidopsis cell fusion between the persistent synergid and endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motomura, Kazuki; Kawashima, Tomokazu; Berger, Frédéric; Kinoshita, Tetsu; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Maruyama, Daisuke

    2018-01-29

    Cell fusion is a pivotal process in fertilization and multinucleate cell formation. A plant cell is ubiquitously surrounded by a hard cell wall, and very few cell fusions have been observed except for gamete fusions. We recently reported that the fertilized central cell (the endosperm) absorbs the persistent synergid, a highly differentiated cell necessary for pollen tube attraction. The synergid-endosperm fusion (SE fusion) appears to eliminate the persistent synergid from fertilized ovule in Arabidopsis thaliana Here, we analyzed the effects of various inhibitors on SE fusion in an in vitro culture system. Different from other cell fusions, neither disruption of actin polymerization nor protein secretion impaired SE fusion. However, transcriptional and translational inhibitors decreased the SE fusion success rate and also inhibited endosperm division. Failures of SE fusion and endosperm nuclear proliferation were also induced by roscovitine, an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK). These data indicate unique aspects of SE fusion such as independence of filamentous actin support and the importance of CDK-mediated mitotic control. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Arabidopsis R-SNARE proteins VAMP721 and VAMP722 are required for cell plate formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell plate formation during plant cytokinesis is facilitated by SNARE complex-mediated vesicle fusion at the cell-division plane. However, our knowledge regarding R-SNARE components of membrane fusion machinery for cell plate formation remains quite limited. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the in vivo function of Arabidopsis VAMP721 and VAMP722, two closely sequence-related R-SNAREs, in cell plate formation. Double homozygous vamp721vamp722 mutant seedlings showed lethal dwarf phenotypes and were characterized by rudimentary roots, cotyledons and hypocotyls. Furthermore, cell wall stubs and incomplete cytokinesis were frequently observed in vamp721vamp722 seedlings. Confocal images revealed that green fluorescent protein-tagged VAMP721 and VAMP722 were preferentially localized to the expanding cell plates in dividing cells. Drug treatments and co-localization analyses demonstrated that punctuate organelles labeled with VAMP721 and VAMP722 represented early endosomes overlapped with VHA-a1-labeled TGN, which were distinct from Golgi stacks and prevacuolar compartments. In addition, protein traffic to the plasma membrane, but not to the vacuole, was severely disrupted in vamp721vamp722 seedlings by subcellular localization of marker proteins. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations suggest that VAMP721 and VAMP722 are involved in secretory trafficking to the plasma membrane via TGN/early endosomal compartment, which contributes substantially to cell plate formation during plant cytokinesis.

  10. Arabidopsis FH1 Formin Affects Cotyledon Pavement Cell Shape by Modulating Cytoskeleton Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosero, Amparo; Oulehlová, Denisa; Stillerová, Lenka; Schiebertová, Petra; Grunt, Michal; Žárský, Viktor; Cvrčková, Fatima

    2016-03-01

    Plant cell morphogenesis involves concerted rearrangements of microtubules and actin microfilaments. We previously reported that FH1, the main Arabidopsis thaliana housekeeping Class I membrane-anchored formin, contributes to actin dynamics and microtubule stability in rhizodermis cells. Here we examine the effects of mutations affecting FH1 (At3g25500) on cell morphogenesis and above-ground organ development in seedlings, as well as on cytoskeletal organization and dynamics, using a combination of confocal and variable angle epifluorescence microscopy with a pharmacological approach. Homozygous fh1 mutants exhibited cotyledon epinasty and had larger cotyledon pavement cells with more pronounced lobes than the wild type. The pavement cell shape alterations were enhanced by expression of the fluorescent microtubule marker GFP-microtubule-associated protein 4 (MAP4). Mutant cotyledon pavement cells exhibited reduced density and increased stability of microfilament bundles, as well as enhanced dynamics of microtubules. Analogous results were also obtained upon treatments with the formin inhibitor SMIFH2 (small molecule inhibitor of formin homology 2 domains). Pavement cell shape in wild-type (wt) and fh1 plants in some situations exhibited a differential response towards anti-cytoskeletal drugs, especially the microtubule disruptor oryzalin. Our observations indicate that FH1 participates in the control of microtubule dynamics, possibly via its effects on actin, subsequently influencing cell morphogenesis and macroscopic organ development. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. [Ultrastructure of statocytes and cells of distal elongation zone of Arabidopsis thaliana under clinorotation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanchuk, S M

    2010-01-01

    Results of the electron-microscopic investigation of root apices of Arabidopsis thaliana 3-, 5- and 7-days-old seedlings grown in the stationary conditions and under clinorotation are presented. It was shown the similarity in the root apex cell ultrastructure in control and under clinorotation. At the same time there were some differences in the ultrastructure of statocytes and the distal elongation zone under clinorotation. For the first time the sensitivity of ER-bodies, which are derivatives of GER and contain beta-glucosidase, to the influence of simulated microgravity was demonstrated by increased quantity and area of ER-bodies at the cell section as well as by higher variability of their form under clinorotation. A degree of these changes correlated with the duration of clinorotation. On the basis of experimental data a protective role of ER-bodies in adaptation of plants to microgravity is supposed.

  12. Quantitative proteome changes in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells in response to plant natriuretic peptides

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2015-06-30

    Proteome changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells in response to the A. thaliana plant natriuretic peptide (PNP), AtPNP-A (At2g18660) were assessed using quantitative proteomics employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). In this study, we characterized temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM AtPNP-A at 0, 10 and 30 min post-treatment. Both concentrations we found to yield a distinct differential proteome signature. The data shown in this article are associated with the article “Plant natriuretic peptides induce a specific set of proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to abiotic stress” by Turek et al. (Front. Plant Sci. 5 (2014) 661) and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001386.

  13. Lignin monomer composition affects Arabidopsis cell-wall degradability after liquid hot water pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladisch Michael

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lignin is embedded in the plant cell wall matrix, and impedes the enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulosic feedstocks. To investigate whether enzymatic digestibility of cell wall materials can be improved by altering the relative abundance of the two major lignin monomers, guaiacyl (G and syringyl (S subunits, we compared the degradability of cell wall material from wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana with a mutant line and a genetically modified line, the lignins of which are enriched in G and S subunits, respectively. Results Arabidopsis tissue containing G- and S-rich lignins had the same saccharification performance as the wild type when subjected to enzyme hydrolysis without pretreatment. After a 24-hour incubation period, less than 30% of the total glucan was hydrolyzed. By contrast, when liquid hot water (LHW pretreatment was included before enzyme hydrolysis, the S-lignin-rich tissue gave a much higher glucose yield than either the wild-type or G-lignin-rich tissue. Applying a hot-water washing step after the pretreatment did not lead to a further increase in final glucose yield, but the initial hydrolytic rate was doubled. Conclusions Our analyses using the model plant A. thaliana revealed that lignin composition affects the enzymatic digestibility of LHW pretreated plant material. Pretreatment is more effective in enhancing the saccharification of A. thaliana cell walls that contain S-rich lignin. Increasing lignin S monomer content through genetic engineering may be a promising approach to increase the efficiency and reduce the cost of biomass to biofuel conversion.

  14. Atkinesin-13A modulates cell-wall synthesis and cell expansion in Arabidopsis thaliana via the THESEUS1 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ushio Fujikura

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Growth of plant organs relies on cell proliferation and expansion. While an increasingly detailed picture about the control of cell proliferation is emerging, our knowledge about the control of cell expansion remains more limited. We demonstrate here that the internal-motor kinesin AtKINESIN-13A (AtKIN13A limits cell expansion and cell size in Arabidopsis thaliana, with loss-of-function atkin13a mutants forming larger petals with larger cells. The homolog, AtKINESIN-13B, also affects cell expansion and double mutants display growth, gametophytic and early embryonic defects, indicating a redundant role of the two genes. AtKIN13A is known to depolymerize microtubules and influence Golgi motility and distribution. Consistent with this function, AtKIN13A interacts genetically with ANGUSTIFOLIA, encoding a regulator of Golgi dynamics. Reduced AtKIN13A activity alters cell wall structure as assessed by Fourier-transformed infrared-spectroscopy and triggers signalling via the THESEUS1-dependent cell-wall integrity pathway, which in turn promotes the excess cell expansion in the atkin13a mutant. Thus, our results indicate that the intracellular activity of AtKIN13A regulates cell expansion and wall architecture via THESEUS1, providing a compelling case of interplay between cell wall integrity sensing and expansion.

  15. The WEREWOLF MYB protein directly regulates CAPRICE transcription during cell fate specification in the Arabidopsis root epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Kook Hui; Kang, Yeon Hee; Park, Young-hwan; Hwang, Ildoo; Schiefelbein, John; Lee, Myeong Min

    2005-11-01

    The Arabidopsis root epidermis is composed of two types of cells, hair cells and non-hair cells, and their fate is determined in a position-dependent manner. WEREWOLF (WER), a R2R3 MYB protein, has been shown genetically to function as a master regulator to control both of the epidermal cell fates. To directly test the proposed role of WER in this system, we examined its subcellular localization and defined its transcriptional activation properties. We show that a WER-GFP fusion protein is functional and accumulates in the nucleus of the N-position cells in the Arabidopsis root epidermis, as expected for a transcriptional regulator. We also find that a modified WER protein with a strong activation domain (WER-VP16) promotes the formation of both epidermal cell types, supporting the view that WER specifies both cell fates. In addition, we used the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) inducible system to show that CPC transcription is regulated directly by WER. Using EMSA, we found two WER-binding sites (WBSs; WBSI and WBSII) in the CPC promoter. WER-WBSI binding was confirmed in vivo using the yeast one-hybrid assay. Binding between the WER protein and both WBSs (WBSI and WBSII), and the importance of the two WBSs in CPC promoter activity were confirmed in Arabidopsis. These results provide experimental support for the proposed role of WER as an activator of gene transcription during the specification of both epidermal cell fates.

  16. An extensive microarray analysis of AAL-toxin-induced cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana brings new insights into the complexity of programmed cell death in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gechev, T.S.; Gadjev, I.Z.; Hille, J.

    2004-01-01

    A T-DNA knockout of the Arabidopsis homologue of the tomato disease resistance gene Asc was obtained. The asc gene renders plants sensitive to programmed cell death (PCD) triggered by the fungal AAL toxin. To obtain more insights into the nature of AAL-toxin-induced cell death and to identify genes

  17. Ascorbic acid deficiency activates cell death and disease resistance responses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavet, Valeria; Olmos, Enrique; Kiddle, Guy; Mowla, Shaheen; Kumar, Sanjay; Antoniw, John; Alvarez, María E; Foyer, Christine H

    2005-11-01

    Programmed cell death, developmental senescence, and responses to pathogens are linked through complex genetic controls that are influenced by redox regulation. Here we show that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) low vitamin C mutants, vtc1 and vtc2, which have between 10% and 25% of wild-type ascorbic acid, exhibit microlesions, express pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins, and have enhanced basal resistance against infections caused by Pseudomonas syringae. The mutants have a delayed senescence phenotype with smaller leaf cells than the wild type at maturity. The vtc leaves have more glutathione than the wild type, with higher ratios of reduced glutathione to glutathione disulfide. Expression of green fluorescence protein (GFP) fused to the nonexpressor of PR protein 1 (GFP-NPR1) was used to detect the presence of NPR1 in the nuclei of transformed plants. Fluorescence was observed in the nuclei of 6- to 8-week-old GFP-NPR1 vtc1 plants, but not in the nuclei of transformed GFP-NPR1 wild-type plants at any developmental stage. The absence of senescence-associated gene 12 (SAG12) mRNA at the time when constitutive cell death and basal resistance were detected confirms that elaboration of innate immune responses in vtc plants does not result from activation of early senescence. Moreover, H2O2-sensitive genes are not induced at the time of systemic acquired resistance execution. These results demonstrate that ascorbic acid abundance modifies the threshold for activation of plant innate defense responses via redox mechanisms that are independent of the natural senescence program.

  18. Effect of amino acid substitution of CAPRICE on cell-to-cell movement ability in Arabidopsis root epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga-Wada, Rumi; Wada, Takuji

    2018-03-01

    An R3-type MYB transcription factor, CAPRICE (CPC), is known to promote root hair cell differentiation in Arabidopsis root epidermis. The CPC protein moves from non-hair cells to the neighboring cells, and acts as an inducer of root hair formation. In contrast, we previously showed that the CPC homolog, ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC1 (ETC1), does not move between the root epidermal cells. To clarify the critical difference in the cell-to-cell movement ability of CPC and ETC1 proteins, we generated five different chimeras of CPC and ETC1. As expected, four of the five chimeric proteins with substitution of CPC amino acids with those of ETC1 induced many root hair and no-trichome phenotype, like CPC. These chimeric proteins essentially maintained the cell-to-cell movement ability of CPC. However, one chimeric protein in which ETC1 was sandwiched between the CPC-specific movement motifs of S1 and S2 did not induce ectopic root hair formation. This chimeric protein did not move between the cells. These results indicate that the maintenance of not only the S1 and S2 motifs but also the precise structure of CPC protein might be necessary for the cell-to-cell movement of CPC. Our results should help in further unraveling of the roles of these MYB transcription factors in root hair formation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dynamics of vegetative cytoplasm during generative cell formation and pollen maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, A.; Musgrave, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    Ultrastructural changes of pollen cytoplasm during generative cell formation and pollen maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana were studied. The pollen cytoplasm develops a complicated ultrastructure and changes dramatically during these stages. Lipid droplets increase after generative cell formation and their organization and distribution change with the developmental stage. Starch grains in amyloplasts increase in number and size during generative and sperm cell formation and decrease at pollen maturity. The shape and membrane system of mitochondria change only slightly. Dictyosomes become very prominent, and numerous associated vesicles are observed during and after sperm cell formation. Endoplasmic reticulum appears extensively as stacks during sperm cell formation. Free and polyribosomes are abundant in the cytoplasm at all developmental stages although they appear denser at certain stages and in some areas. In mature pollen, all organelles are randomly distributed throughout the vegetative cytoplasm and numerous small particles appear. Organization and distribution of storage substances and appearance of these small particles during generative and sperm cell formation and pollen maturation are discussed.

  20. Single-cell telomere-length quantification couples telomere length to meristem activity and stem cell development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-García, Mary-Paz; Pavelescu, Irina; Canela, Andrés; Sevillano, Xavier; Leehy, Katherine A; Nelson, Andrew D L; Ibañes, Marta; Shippen, Dorothy E; Blasco, Maria A; Caño-Delgado, Ana I

    2015-05-12

    Telomeres are specialized nucleoprotein caps that protect chromosome ends assuring cell division. Single-cell telomere quantification in animals established a critical role for telomerase in stem cells, yet, in plants, telomere-length quantification has been reported only at the organ level. Here, a quantitative analysis of telomere length of single cells in Arabidopsis root apex uncovered a heterogeneous telomere-length distribution of different cell lineages showing the longest telomeres at the stem cells. The defects in meristem and stem cell renewal observed in tert mutants demonstrate that telomere lengthening by TERT sets a replicative limit in the root meristem. Conversely, the long telomeres of the columella cells and the premature stem cell differentiation plt1,2 mutants suggest that differentiation can prevent telomere erosion. Overall, our results indicate that telomere dynamics are coupled to meristem activity and continuous growth, disclosing a critical association between telomere length, stem cell function, and the extended lifespan of plants. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Combination of Synthetic Chemistry and Live-Cell Imaging Identified a Rapid Cell Division Inhibitor in Tobacco and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambo, Masakazu; Kurihara, Daisuke; Yamada, Tomomi; Nishiwaki-Ohkawa, Taeko; Kadofusa, Naoya; Kimata, Yusuke; Kuwata, Keiko; Umeda, Masaaki; Ueda, Minako

    2016-11-01

    Cell proliferation is crucial to the growth of multicellular organisms, and thus the proper control of cell division is important to prevent developmental arrest or overgrowth. Nevertheless, tools for controlling cell proliferation are still poor in plant. To develop novel tools, we focused on a specific compound family, triarylmethanes, whose members show various antiproliferative activities in animals. By combining organic chemistry to create novel and diverse compounds containing the triarylmethyl moiety and biological screens based on live-cell imaging of a fluorescently labeled tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) culture cell line (Nicotiana tabacum), we isolated (3-furyl)diphenylmethane as a strong but partially reversible inhibitor of plant cell division. We also found that this agent had efficient antiproliferative activity in developing organs of Arabidopsis thaliana without causing secondary defects in cell morphology, and induced rapid cell division arrest independent of the cell cycle stage. Given that (3-furyl)diphenylmethane did not affect the growth of a human cell line (HeLa) and a budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), it should act specifically on plants. Taking our results together, we propose that the combination of desired chemical synthesis and detailed biological analysis is an effective tool to create novel drugs, and that (3-furyl)diphenylmethane is a specific antiproliferative agent for plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. METACASPASE9 modulates autophagy to confine cell death to the target cells during Arabidopsis vascular xylem differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacha Escamez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We uncovered that the level of autophagy in plant cells undergoing programmed cell death determines the fate of the surrounding cells. Our approach consisted of using Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures capable of differentiating into two different cell types: vascular tracheary elements (TEs that undergo programmed cell death (PCD and protoplast autolysis, and parenchymatic non-TEs that remain alive. The TE cell type displayed higher levels of autophagy when expression of the TE-specific METACASPASE9 (MC9 was reduced using RNAi (MC9-RNAi. Misregulation of autophagy in the MC9-RNAi TEs coincided with ectopic death of the non-TEs, implying the existence of an autophagy-dependent intercellular signalling from within the TEs towards the non-TEs. Viability of the non-TEs was restored when AUTOPHAGY2 (ATG2 was downregulated specifically in MC9-RNAi TEs, demonstrating the importance of autophagy in the spatial confinement of cell death. Our results suggest that other eukaryotic cells undergoing PCD might also need to tightly regulate their level of autophagy to avoid detrimental consequences for the surrounding cells.

  3. Identification of the arabidopsis RAM/MOR signalling network: adding new regulatory players in plant stem cell maintenance and cell polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zermiani, Monica; Begheldo, Maura; Nonis, Alessandro; Palme, Klaus; Mizzi, Luca; Morandini, Piero; Nonis, Alberto; Ruperti, Benedetto

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The RAM/MOR signalling network of eukaryotes is a conserved regulatory module involved in co-ordination of stem cell maintenance, cell differentiation and polarity establishment. To date, no such signalling network has been identified in plants. Methods Genes encoding the bona fide core components of the RAM/MOR pathway were identified in Arabidopsis thaliana (arabidopsis) by sequence similarity searches conducted with the known components from other species. The transcriptional network(s) of the arabidopsis RAM/MOR signalling pathway were identified by running in-depth in silico analyses for genes co-regulated with the core components. In situ hybridization was used to confirm tissue-specific expression of selected RAM/MOR genes. Key Results Co-expression data suggested that the arabidopsis RAM/MOR pathway may include genes involved in floral transition, by co-operating with chromatin remodelling and mRNA processing/post-transcriptional gene silencing factors, and genes involved in the regulation of pollen tube polar growth. The RAM/MOR pathway may act upstream of the ROP1 machinery, affecting pollen tube polar growth, based on the co-expression of its components with ROP-GEFs. In silico tissue-specific co-expression data and in situ hybridization experiments suggest that different components of the arabidopsis RAM/MOR are expressed in the shoot apical meristem and inflorescence meristem and may be involved in the fine-tuning of stem cell maintenance and cell differentiation. Conclusions The arabidopsis RAM/MOR pathway may be part of the signalling cascade that converges in pollen tube polarized growth and in fine-tuning stem cell maintenance, differentiation and organ polarity. PMID:26078466

  4. Guarded Type Promotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Johnni

    2011-01-01

    In Java, explicit casts are ubiquitous since they bridge the gap between compile-time and runtime type safety. Since casts potentially throw a ClassCastException, many programmers use a defensive programming style of guarded casts. In this programming style casts are protected by a preceding...... in a Java 6 compiler. Through our extensive testing of real-life code we show that guarded casts account for approximately one fourth of all casts and that Guarded Type Promotion can eliminate the need for 95 percent of these guarded casts....

  5. Transcriptional characteristics and differences in Arabidopsis stigmatic papilla cells pre- and post-pollination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Tomoki; Matsushima, Mai; Nabemoto, Moe; Osaka, Masaaki; Sakazono, Satomi; Masuko-Suzuki, Hiromi; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Nakazono, Mikio; Iwano, Megumi; Takayama, Seiji; Shimizu, Kentaro K; Okumura, Katsuzumi; Suzuki, Go; Watanabe, Masao; Suwabe, Keita

    2015-04-01

    Pollination is an important early step in sexual plant reproduction. In Arabidopsis thaliana, sequential pollination events, from pollen adhesion onto the stigma surface to pollen tube germination and elongation, occur on the stigmatic papilla cells. Following successful completion of these events, the pollen tube penetrates the stigma and finally fertilizes a female gametophyte. The pollination events are thought to be initiated and regulated by interactions between papilla cells and pollen. Here, we report the characterization of gene expression profiles of unpollinated (UP), compatible pollinated (CP) and incompatible pollinated (IP) papilla cells in A. thaliana. Based on cell type-specific transcriptome analysis from a combination of laser microdissection and RNA sequencing, 15,475, 17,360 and 16,918 genes were identified as expressed in UP, CP and IP papilla cells, respectively, and, of these, 14,392 genes were present in all three data sets. Differentially expressed gene (DEG) analyses identified 147 and 71 genes up-regulated in CP and IP papilla cells, respectively, and 115 and 46 genes down-regulated. Gene Ontology and metabolic pathway analyses revealed that papilla cells play an active role as the female reproductive component in pollination, particularly in information exchange, signal transduction, internal physiological changes and external morphological modification. This study provides fundamental information on the molecular mechanisms involved in pollination in papilla cells, furthering our understanding of the reproductive role of papilla cells. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Dynamics of defense responses and cell fate change during Arabidopsis-Pseudomonas syringae interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safae Hamdoun

    Full Text Available Plant-pathogen interactions involve sophisticated action and counteraction strategies from both parties. Plants can recognize pathogen derived molecules, such as conserved pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and effector proteins, and subsequently activate PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI and effector-triggered immunity (ETI, respectively. However, pathogens can evade such recognitions and suppress host immunity with effectors, causing effector-triggered susceptibility (ETS. The differences among PTI, ETS, and ETI have not been completely understood. Toward a better understanding of PTI, ETS, and ETI, we systematically examined various defense-related phenotypes of Arabidopsis infected with different Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola ES4326 strains, using the virulence strain DG3 to induce ETS, the avirulence strain DG34 that expresses avrRpm1 (recognized by the resistance protein RPM1 to induce ETI, and HrcC(- that lacks the type three secretion system to activate PTI. We found that plants infected with different strains displayed dynamic differences in the accumulation of the defense signaling molecule salicylic acid, expression of the defense marker gene PR1, cell death formation, and accumulation/localization of the reactive oxygen species, H2O2. The differences between PTI, ETS, and ETI are dependent on the doses of the strains used. These data support the quantitative nature of PTI, ETS, and ETI and they also reveal qualitative differences between PTI, ETS, and ETI. Interestingly, we observed the induction of large cells in the infected leaves, most obviously with HrcC(- at later infection stages. The enlarged cells have increased DNA content, suggesting a possible activation of endoreplication. Consistent with strong induction of abnormal cell growth by HrcC(-, we found that the PTI elicitor flg22 also activates abnormal cell growth, depending on a functional flg22-receptor FLS2. Thus, our study has revealed a comprehensive

  7. Human GLTP and mutant forms of ACD11 suppress cell death in the Arabidopsis acd11 mutant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nikolaj H T; McKinney, Lea V; Pike, Helen

    2008-01-01

    The Arabidopsis acd11 mutant exhibits runaway, programmed cell death due to the loss of a putative sphingosine transfer protein (ACD11) with homology to mammalian GLTP. We demonstrate that transgenic expression in Arabidopsis thaliana of human GLTP partially suppressed the phenotype of the acd11...... null mutant, resulting in delayed programmed cell death development and plant survival. Surprisingly, a GLTP mutant form impaired in glycolipid transfer activity also complemented the acd11 mutants. To understand the relationship between functional complementarity and transfer activity, we generated...... site-specific mutants in ACD11 based on homologous GLTP residues required for glycolipid transfer. We show that these ACD11 mutant forms are impaired in their in vitro transfer activity of sphingolipids. However, transgenic expression of these mutant forms fully complemented acd11 mutant cell death...

  8. An Arabidopsis Homolog of the Bacterial Cell Division Inhibitor SulA Is Involved in Plastid DivisionW⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, Cécile; Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Perennes, Claudette; Bergounioux, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    Plastids have evolved from an endosymbiosis between a cyanobacterial symbiont and a eukaryotic host cell. Their division is mediated both by proteins of the host cell and conserved bacterial division proteins. Here, we identified a new component of the plastid division machinery, Arabidopsis thaliana SulA. Disruption of its cyanobacterial homolog (SSulA) in Synechocystis and overexpression of an AtSulA-green fluorescent protein fusion in Arabidopsis demonstrate that these genes are involved in cell and plastid division, respectively. Overexpression of AtSulA inhibits plastid division in planta but rescues plastid division defects caused by overexpression of AtFtsZ1-1 and AtFtsZ2-1, demonstrating that its role in plastid division may involve an interaction with AtFtsZ1-1 and AtFtsZ2-1. PMID:15208387

  9. Differential Growth in Periclinal and Anticlinal Walls during Lobe Formation in Arabidopsis Cotyledon Pavement Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, William J; Barton, Deborah A; Law, Andrew M K; Overall, Robyn L

    2015-09-01

    Lobe development in the epidermal pavement cells of Arabidopsis thaliana cotyledons and leaves is thought to take place via tip-like growth on the concave side of lobes driven by localized concentrations of actin filaments and associated proteins, with a predicted role for cortical microtubules in establishing the direction of restricted growth at the convex side. We used homologous landmarks fixed to the outer walls of pavement cells and thin-plate spline analysis to demonstrate that lobes form by differential growth of both the anticlinal and periclinal walls. Most lobes formed within the first 24 h of the cotyledons unfurling, during the period of rapid cell expansion. Cortical microtubules adjacent to the periclinal wall were persistently enriched at the convex side of lobes during development where growth was anisotropic and were less concentrated or absent at the concave side where growth was promoted. Alternating microtubule-enriched and microtubule-free zones at the periclinal wall in neighboring cells predicted sites of new lobes. There was no particular arrangement of cortical actin filaments that could predict where lobes would form. However, drug studies demonstrate that both filamentous actin and microtubules are required for lobe formation. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  10. Exploring Cell Wall Composition and Modifications During the Development of the Gynoecium Medial Domain in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Herrera-Ubaldo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In Arabidopsis, the gynoecium, the inner whorl of the flower, is the female reproductive part. Many tissues important for fertilization such as the stigma, style, transmitting tract, placenta, ovules, and septum, comprising the medial domain, arise from the carpel margin meristem. During gynoecium development, septum fusion occurs and tissues form continuously to prepare for a successful pollination and fertilization. During gynoecium development, cell wall modifications take place and one of the most important is the formation of the transmitting tract, having a great impact on reproductive competence because it facilitates pollen tube growth and movement through the ovary. In this study, using a combination of classical staining methods, fluorescent dyes, and indirect immunolocalization, we analyzed cell wall composition and modifications accompanying medial domain formation during gynoecium development. We detected coordinated changes in polysaccharide distribution through time, cell wall modifications preceding the formation of the transmitting tract, mucosubstances increase during transmitting tract formation, and a decrease of mannan distribution. Furthermore, we also detected changes in lipid distribution during septum fusion. Proper cell wall composition and modifications are important for postgenital fusion of the carpel (septum fusion and transmitting tract formation, because these tissues affect plant reproductive competence.

  11. A theoretical model for ROP localisation by auxin in Arabidopsis root hair cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J H Payne

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Local activation of Rho GTPases is important for many functions including cell polarity, morphology, movement, and growth. Although a number of molecules affecting Rho-of-Plants small GTPase (ROP signalling are known, it remains unclear how ROP activity becomes spatially organised. Arabidopsis root hair cells produce patches of ROP at consistent and predictable subcellular locations, where root hair growth subsequently occurs.We present a mathematical model to show how interaction of the plant hormone auxin with ROPs could spontaneously lead to localised patches of active ROP via a Turing or Turing-like mechanism. Our results suggest that correct positioning of the ROP patch depends on the cell length, low diffusion of active ROP, a gradient in auxin concentration, and ROP levels. Our theory provides a unique explanation linking the molecular biology to the root hair phenotypes of multiple mutants and transgenic lines, including OX-ROP, CA-rop, aux1, axr3, tip1, eto1, etr1, and the triple mutant aux1 ein2 gnom(eb.We show how interactions between Rho GTPases (in this case ROPs and regulatory molecules (in this case auxin could produce characteristic subcellular patterning that subsequently affects cell shape. This has important implications for research on the morphogenesis of plants and other eukaryotes. Our results also illustrate how gradient-regulated Turing systems provide a particularly robust and flexible mechanism for pattern formation.

  12. Suppression of cell expansion by ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis SUPERMAN gene in transgenic petunia and tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kater, M M; Franken, J; van Aelst, A; Angenent, G C

    2000-08-01

    Molecular and genetic analyses have shown that the Arabidopsis thaliana gene SUPERMAN (SUP) has at least two functions in Arabidopsis flower development. SUP is necessary to control the correct distribution of cells with either a stamen or carpel fate, and is essential for proper outgrowth of the ovule outer integument. Both these functions indicate a role for SUP in cell proliferation. To study the function of the Arabidopsis SUP gene in more detail, we over-expressed the SUP gene in petunia and tobacco in a tissue-specific manner. The petunia FLORAL BINDING PROTEIN 1 (FBP1) gene promoter was used to restrict the expression of SUP to petals and stamens. The development of petals and stamens was severely affected in both petunia and tobacco plants over-expressing SUP. Petals remained small and did not unfold, resulting in closed flowers. Stamen filaments were thin and very short. Detailed analysis of these floral organs from the petunia transformants showed that cell expansion was dramatically reduced without affecting cell division. These results reveal a novel activity for SUP as a regulator of cell expansion.

  13. The TCP4 transcription factor of Arabidopsis blocks cell division in yeast at G1 → S transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Pooja; Padmanabhan, Bhavna; Bhat, Abhay; Sarvepalli, Kavitha; Sadhale, Parag P.; Nath, Utpal

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → TCP4 is a class II TCP transcription factor, that represses cell division in Arabidopsis. → TCP4 expression in yeast retards cell division by blocking G1 → S transition. → Genome-wide expression studies and Western analysis reveals stabilization of cell cycle inhibitor Sic1, as possible mechanism. -- Abstract: The TCP transcription factors control important aspects of plant development. Members of class I TCP proteins promote cell cycle by regulating genes directly involved in cell proliferation. In contrast, members of class II TCP proteins repress cell division. While it has been postulated that class II proteins induce differentiation signal, their exact role on cell cycle has not been studied. Here, we report that TCP4, a class II TCP protein from Arabidopsis that repress cell proliferation in developing leaves, inhibits cell division by blocking G1 → S transition in budding yeast. Cells expressing TCP4 protein with increased transcriptional activity fail to progress beyond G1 phase. By analyzing global transcriptional status of these cells, we show that expression of a number of cell cycle genes is altered. The possible mechanism of G1 → S arrest is discussed.

  14. Fluorescence kinetic parameters and cyclic electron transport in guard cell chloroplasts of chlorophyll-deficient leaf tissues from variegated weeping fig (Ficus benjamina L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysenko, Vladimir

    2012-05-01

    Residual chlorophyll in chlorophyll-deficient (albino) areas of variegated leaves of Ficus benjamina originates from guard cell chloroplasts. Photosynthetic features of green and albino sectors of F. benjamina were studied by imaging the distribution of the fluorescence decrease ratio Rfd within a leaf calculated from maximum (Fm) and steady-state leaf chlorophyll fluorescence (Fs) at 690 and 740 nm. Local areas of albino sectors demonstrated an abnormally high Rfd(740)/Rfd(690) ratio. Fluorescence transients excited in albino sectors at red (640 and 690 nm) wavelengths showed an abrupt decrease of the Rfd values (0.4 and 0.1, correspondingly) as compared with those excited at blue wavelengths (1.7-2.4). This "Red Drop" was not observed for green sectors. Normal and chlorophyll-deficient leaf sectors of F. benjamina were also tested for linear and cyclic electron transport in thylakoids. The tests have been performed studying fluorescence at a steady-state phase with CO(2)-excess impulse feeding, photoacoustic signal generated by pulse light source at wavelengths selectively exciting PSI, fluorescence kinetics under anaerobiosis and fluorescence changes observed by dual-wavelength excitation method. The data obtained for albino sectors strongly suggest the possibility of a cyclic electron transport simultaneously occurring in guard cell thylakoids around photosystems I and II under blue light, whereas linear electron transport is absent or insufficient.

  15. Live imaging of companion cells and sieve elements in Arabidopsis leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayla, Thibaud; Batailler, Brigitte; Le Hir, Rozenn; Revers, Frédéric; Anstead, James A; Thompson, Gary A; Grandjean, Olivier; Dinant, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The phloem is a complex tissue composed of highly specialized cells with unique subcellular structures and a compact organization that is challenging to study in vivo at cellular resolution. We used confocal scanning laser microscopy and subcellular fluorescent markers in companion cells and sieve elements, for live imaging of the phloem in Arabidopsis leaves. This approach provided a simple framework for identifying phloem cell types unambiguously. It highlighted the compactness of the meshed network of organelles within companion cells. By contrast, within the sieve elements, unknown bodies were observed in association with the PP2-A1:GFP, GFP:RTM1 and RTM2:GFP markers at the cell periphery. The phloem lectin PP2-A1:GFP marker was found in the parietal ground matrix. Its location differed from that of the P-protein filaments, which were visualized with SEOR1:GFP and SEOR2:GFP. PP2-A1:GFP surrounded two types of bodies, one of which was identified as mitochondria. This location suggested that it was embedded within the sieve element clamps, specific structures that may fix the organelles to each another or to the plasma membrane in the sieve tubes. GFP:RTM1 was associated with a class of larger bodies, potentially corresponding to plastids. PP2-A1:GFP was soluble in the cytosol of immature sieve elements. The changes in its subcellular localization during differentiation provide an in vivo blueprint for monitoring this process. The subcellular features obtained with these companion cell and sieve element markers can be used as landmarks for exploring the organization and dynamics of phloem cells in vivo.

  16. Live imaging of companion cells and sieve elements in Arabidopsis leaves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaud Cayla

    Full Text Available The phloem is a complex tissue composed of highly specialized cells with unique subcellular structures and a compact organization that is challenging to study in vivo at cellular resolution. We used confocal scanning laser microscopy and subcellular fluorescent markers in companion cells and sieve elements, for live imaging of the phloem in Arabidopsis leaves. This approach provided a simple framework for identifying phloem cell types unambiguously. It highlighted the compactness of the meshed network of organelles within companion cells. By contrast, within the sieve elements, unknown bodies were observed in association with the PP2-A1:GFP, GFP:RTM1 and RTM2:GFP markers at the cell periphery. The phloem lectin PP2-A1:GFP marker was found in the parietal ground matrix. Its location differed from that of the P-protein filaments, which were visualized with SEOR1:GFP and SEOR2:GFP. PP2-A1:GFP surrounded two types of bodies, one of which was identified as mitochondria. This location suggested that it was embedded within the sieve element clamps, specific structures that may fix the organelles to each another or to the plasma membrane in the sieve tubes. GFP:RTM1 was associated with a class of larger bodies, potentially corresponding to plastids. PP2-A1:GFP was soluble in the cytosol of immature sieve elements. The changes in its subcellular localization during differentiation provide an in vivo blueprint for monitoring this process. The subcellular features obtained with these companion cell and sieve element markers can be used as landmarks for exploring the organization and dynamics of phloem cells in vivo.

  17. Oxidative DNA Damage Bypass in Arabidopsis thaliana Requires DNA Polymerase λ and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen 2[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoroso, Alessandra; Concia, Lorenzo; Maggio, Caterina; Raynaud, Cécile; Bergounioux, Catherine; Crespan, Emmanuele; Cella, Rino; Maga, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    The oxidized base 7,8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G) is the most common DNA lesion generated by reactive oxygen species. This lesion is highly mutagenic due to the frequent misincorporation of A opposite 8-oxo-G during DNA replication. In mammalian cells, the DNA polymerase (pol) family X enzyme DNA pol λ catalyzes the correct incorporation of C opposite 8-oxo-G, together with the auxiliary factor proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana DNA pol λ, the only member of the X family in plants, is as efficient in performing error-free translesion synthesis past 8-oxo-G as its mammalian homolog. Arabidopsis, in contrast with animal cells, possesses two genes for PCNA. Using in vitro and in vivo approaches, we observed that PCNA2, but not PCNA1, physically interacts with DNA pol λ, enhancing its fidelity and efficiency in translesion synthesis. The levels of DNA pol λ in transgenic plantlets characterized by overexpression or silencing of Arabidopsis POLL correlate with the ability of cell extracts to perform error-free translesion synthesis. The important role of DNA pol λ is corroborated by the observation that the promoter of POLL is activated by UV and that both overexpressing and silenced plants show altered growth phenotypes. PMID:21325140

  18. Endogenous TasiRNAs mediate non-cell autonomous effects on gene regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Schwab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Different classes of small RNAs (sRNAs refine the expression of numerous genes in higher eukaryotes by directing protein partners to complementary nucleic acids, where they mediate gene silencing. Plants encode a unique class of sRNAs, called trans-acting small interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs, which post-transcriptionally regulate protein-coding transcripts, as do microRNAs (miRNAs, and both sRNA classes control development through their targets. TasiRNA biogenesis requires multiple components of the siRNA pathway and also miRNAs. But while 21mer siRNAs originating from transgenes can mediate silencing across several cell layers, miRNA action seems spatially restricted to the producing or closely surrounding cells. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have previously described the isolation of a genetrap reporter line for TAS3a, the major locus producing AUXIN RESPONS FACTOR (ARF-regulating tasiRNAs in the Arabidopsis shoot. Its activity is limited to the adaxial (upper side of leaf primordia, thus spatially isolated from ARF-activities, which are located in the abaxial (lower side. We show here by in situ hybridization and reporter fusions that the silencing activities of ARF-regulating tasiRNAs are indeed manifested non-cell autonomously to spatially control ARF activities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Endogenous tasiRNAs are thus mediators of a mobile developmental signal and might provide effective gene silencing at a distance beyond the reach of most miRNAs.

  19. ANGUSTIFOLIA mediates one of the multiple SCRAMBLED signaling pathways regulating cell growth pattern in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Su-Hwan; Song, Sang-Kee; Lee, Myeong Min; Schiefelbein, John

    2015-09-25

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, an atypical leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase, SCRAMBLED (SCM), is required for multiple developmental processes including root epidermal cell fate determination, silique dehiscence, inflorescence growth, ovule morphogenesis, and tissue morphology. Previous work suggested that SCM regulates these multiple pathways using distinct mechanisms via interactions with specific downstream factors. ANGUSTIFOLIA (AN) is known to regulate cell and tissue morphogenesis by influencing cortical microtubule arrangement, and recently, the AN protein was reported to interact with the SCM protein. Therefore, we examined whether AN might be responsible for mediating some of the SCM-dependent phenotypes. We discovered that both scm and an mutant lines cause an abnormal spiral or twisting growth of roots, but only the scm mutant affected root epidermal patterning. The siliques of the an and scm mutants also exhibited spiral growth, as previously reported, but only the scm mutant altered silique dehiscence. Interestingly, we discovered that the spiral growth of roots and siliques of the scm mutant is rescued by a truncated SCM protein that lacks its kinase domain, and that a juxtamembrane domain of SCM was sufficient for AN binding in the yeast two-hybrid analysis. These results suggest that the AN protein is one of the critical downstream factors of SCM pathways specifically responsible for mediating its effects on cell/tissue morphogenesis through cortical microtubule arrangement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Impairment of Cellulose Synthases Required for Arabidopsis Secondary Cell Wall Formation Enhances Disease Resistance[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Blanco, Camilo; Feng, Dong Xin; Hu, Jian; Sánchez-Vallet, Andrea; Deslandes, Laurent; Llorente, Francisco; Berrocal-Lobo, Marta; Keller, Harald; Barlet, Xavier; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara; Anderson, Lisa K.; Somerville, Shauna; Marco, Yves; Molina, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Cellulose is synthesized by cellulose synthases (CESAs) contained in plasma membrane–localized complexes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, three types of CESA subunits (CESA4/IRREGULAR XYLEM5 [IRX5], CESA7/IRX3, and CESA8/IRX1) are required for secondary cell wall formation. We report that mutations in these proteins conferred enhanced resistance to the soil-borne bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum and the necrotrophic fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina. By contrast, susceptibility to these pathogens was not altered in cell wall mutants of primary wall CESA subunits (CESA1, CESA3/ISOXABEN RESISTANT1 [IXR1], and CESA6/IXR2) or POWDERY MILDEW–RESISTANT5 (PMR5) and PMR6 genes. Double mutants indicated that irx-mediated resistance was independent of salicylic acid, ethylene, and jasmonate signaling. Comparative transcriptomic analyses identified a set of common irx upregulated genes, including a number of abscisic acid (ABA)–responsive, defense-related genes encoding antibiotic peptides and enzymes involved in the synthesis and activation of antimicrobial secondary metabolites. These data as well as the increased susceptibility of ABA mutants (abi1-1, abi2-1, and aba1-6) to R. solanacearum support a direct role of ABA in resistance to this pathogen. Our results also indicate that alteration of secondary cell wall integrity by inhibiting cellulose synthesis leads to specific activation of novel defense pathways that contribute to the generation of an antimicrobial-enriched environment hostile to pathogens. PMID:17351116

  1. Involvement of Arabidopsis Hexokinase1 in Cell Death Mediated by Myo -Inositol Accumulation

    KAUST Repository

    Bruggeman, Quentin

    2015-06-05

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is essential for several aspects of plant life, including development and stress responses. We recently identified the mips1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, which is deficient for the enzyme catalyzing the limiting step of myo-inositol (MI) synthesis. One of the most striking features of mips1 is the light-dependent formation of lesions on leaves due to salicylic acid (SA)-dependent PCD. Here, we identified a suppressor of PCD by screening for mutations that abolish the mips1 cell death phenotype. Our screen identified the hxk1 mutant, mutated in the gene encoding the hexokinase1 (HXK1) enzyme that catalyzes sugar phosphorylation and acts as a genuine glucose sensor. We show that HXK1 is required for lesion formation in mips1 due to alterations in MI content, via SA-dependant signaling. Using two catalytically inactive HXK1 mutants, we also show that hexokinase catalytic activity is necessary for the establishment of lesions in mips1. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses revealed a restoration of the MI content in mips1 hxk1 that it is due to the activity of the MIPS2 isoform, while MIPS3 is not involved. Our work defines a pathway of HXK1-mediated cell death in plants and demonstrates that two MIPS enzymes act cooperatively under a particular metabolic status, highlighting a novel checkpoint of MI homeostasis in plants. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  2. Programmed cell death induced by high levels of cytokinin in Arabidopsis cultured cells is mediated by the cytokinin receptor CRE1/AHK4

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vescovi, M.; Riefler, M.; Gessuti, M.; Novák, Ondřej; Schmülling, T.; Lo Schiavo, F.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 7 (2012), s. 2825-2832 ISSN 0022-0957 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Arabidopsis cultured cells * cytokinin * histidine kinase cytokinin receptors Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.242, year: 2012

  3. MALDI-TOF MS and CE-LIF Fingerprinting of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharide Digests as a Screening Tool for Arabidopsis Cell Wall Mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westphal, Y.; Schols, H.A.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Gruppen, H.

    2010-01-01

    Cell wall materials derived from leaves and hypocotyls of Arabidopsis mutant and wild type plants have been incubated with a mixture of pure and well-defined pectinases, hemicellulases, and cellulases. The resulting oligosaccharides have been subjected to MALDI-TOF MS and CE-LIF analysis. MALDI-TOF

  4. Arabidopsis Seed Coat Mucilage is a Specialized Cell Wall that Can be Used as a Model for Genetic Analysis of Plant Cell Wall Structure and Function

    OpenAIRE

    Haughn, George W.; Western, Tamara L.

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis seed coat epidermal cells produce a large quantity of mucilage that is extruded upon exposure to water. Chemical analyses and cell biological techniques suggest that this mucilage represents a specialized type of secondary cell wall composed primarily of pectin with lesser amounts of cellulose and xyloglucan. Once extruded, the mucilage capsule has a distinctive structure with an outer non-adherent layer that is easily removed by shaking in water, and an inner adherent layer that ...

  5. Regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana red pap1-D cells metabolically programmed by auxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong; Shi, Ming-Zhu; Xie, De-Yu

    2014-04-01

    Red pap1-D cells of Arabidopsis thaliana have been cloned from production of anthocyanin pigmentation 1-Dominant (pap1-D) plants. The red cells are metabolically programmed to produce high levels of anthocyanins by a WD40-bHLH-MYB complex that is composed of the TTG1, TT8/GL3 and PAP1 transcription factors. Here, we report that indole 3-acetic acid (IAA), naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) regulate anthocyanin biosynthesis in these red cells. Seven concentrations (0, 0.2, 0.4, 2.2, 9, 18 and 27 μM) were tested for the three auxins. IAA and 2,4-D at 2.2-27 μM reduced anthocyanin levels. NAA at 0-0.2 μM or above 9 μM also decreased anthocyanin levels, but from 0.4 to 9 μM, it increased them. HPLC-ESI-MS analysis identified seven cyanin molecules that were produced in red pap1-D cells, and their levels were affected by auxins. The expression levels of ten genes, including six transcription factors (TTG1, EGL3, MYBL2, TT8, GL3 and PAP1) and four pathway genes (PAL1, CHS, DFR and ANS) involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis were analyzed upon various auxin treatments. The resulting data showed that 2,4-D, NAA and IAA control anthocyanin biosynthesis by regulating the expression of TT8, GL3 and PAP1 as well as genes in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway, such as DFR and ANS. In addition, the expression of MYBL2, PAL1 and CHS in red pap1-D and wild-type cells differentially respond to the three auxins. Our data demonstrate that the three auxins regulate anthocyanin biosynthesis in metabolically programmed red cells via altering the expression of transcription factor genes and pathway genes.

  6. Male germ line development in Arabidopsis. duo pollen mutants reveal gametophytic regulators of generative cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbarry, Anjusha; Vizir, Igor; Twell, David

    2005-01-01

    Male germ line development in flowering plants is initiated with the formation of the generative cell that is the progenitor of the two sperm cells. While structural features of the generative cell are well documented, genetic programs required for generative cell cycle progression are unknown. We describe two novel Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants, duo pollen1 (duo1) and duo pollen2 (duo2), in which generative cell division is blocked, resulting in the formation of bicellular pollen grains at anthesis. duo1 and duo2 map to different chromosomes and act gametophytically in a male-specific manner. Both duo mutants progress normally through the first haploid division at pollen mitosis I (PMI) but fail at distinct stages of the generative cell cycle. Mutant generative cells in duo1 pollen fail to enter mitosis at G2-M transition, whereas mutant generative cells in duo2 enter PMII but arrest at prometaphase. In wild-type plants, generative and sperm nuclei enter S phase soon after inception, implying that male gametic cells follow a simple S to M cycle. Mutant generative nuclei in duo1 complete DNA synthesis but bypass PMII and enter an endocycle during pollen maturation. However, mutant generative nuclei in duo2 arrest in prometaphase of PMII with a 2C DNA content. Our results identify two essential gametophytic loci required for progression through different phases of the generative cell cycle, providing the first evidence to our knowledge for genetic regulators of male germ line development in flowering plants.

  7. Male Germ Line Development in Arabidopsis. duo pollen Mutants Reveal Gametophytic Regulators of Generative Cell Cycle Progression1[w

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbarry, Anjusha; Vizir, Igor; Twell, David

    2005-01-01

    Male germ line development in flowering plants is initiated with the formation of the generative cell that is the progenitor of the two sperm cells. While structural features of the generative cell are well documented, genetic programs required for generative cell cycle progression are unknown. We describe two novel Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants, duo pollen1 (duo1) and duo pollen2 (duo2), in which generative cell division is blocked, resulting in the formation of bicellular pollen grains at anthesis. duo1 and duo2 map to different chromosomes and act gametophytically in a male-specific manner. Both duo mutants progress normally through the first haploid division at pollen mitosis I (PMI) but fail at distinct stages of the generative cell cycle. Mutant generative cells in duo1 pollen fail to enter mitosis at G2-M transition, whereas mutant generative cells in duo2 enter PMII but arrest at prometaphase. In wild-type plants, generative and sperm nuclei enter S phase soon after inception, implying that male gametic cells follow a simple S to M cycle. Mutant generative nuclei in duo1 complete DNA synthesis but bypass PMII and enter an endocycle during pollen maturation. However, mutant generative nuclei in duo2 arrest in prometaphase of PMII with a 2C DNA content. Our results identify two essential gametophytic loci required for progression through different phases of the generative cell cycle, providing the first evidence to our knowledge for genetic regulators of male germ line development in flowering plants. PMID:15618418

  8. Arabidopsis LEAFY COTYLEDON1 controls cell fate determination during post-embryonic development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mingkun; Hu, Yilong; Liu, Xu; Li, Yuge; Hou, Xingliang

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1) transcription factor is a master regulator that shapes plant embryo development and post-embryonic seedling establishment. Loss-of-function of LEC1 alters the cotyledon identity, causing the formation of ectopic trichomes, which does not occur in wild-type seedlings, implying that LEC1 might regulate embryonic cell fate determination during post-embryonic development. To test this hypothesis, we compared the expression of trichome development-related genes between the wild-type and the lec1 mutant. We observed that transcripts of GLABROUS1 (GL1), GL2, and GL3, genes encoding the positive regulators in trichome development, were significantly upregulated, while the TRICHOMELESS1 (TCL2), ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC1 (ETC1), and ETC2 genes, encoding the negative regulators in trichome development, were downregulated in the lec1 mutant. Furthermore, overexpression of LEC1 activated the expressions of TCL2, CAPPICE (CPC), and ETC1, resulting in production of cotyledonary leaves with no or fewer trichomes during vegetative development. In addition, we demonstrated that LEC1 interacts with TCL2 in yeast and in vitro. A genetic experiment showed that loss-of-function of GL2 rescued the ectopic trichome formation in the lec1 mutant. These findings strongly support that LEC1 regulates trichome development, providing direct evidence for the role of LEC1 in cell fate determination during post-embryonic development. PMID:26579186

  9. Intracellular Calcium Decreases Upon Hyper Gravity-Treatment of Arabidopsis Thaliana Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neef, Maren; Denn, Tamara; Ecke, Margret; Hampp, Rüdiger

    2016-06-01

    Cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana ( A. t.) respond to changes in the gravitational field strength with fluctuations of the amount of cytosolic calcium (Ca2+). In parabolic flight experiments, where hyper- and μg phases follow each other, μg clearly increased Ca2+, while hyper-g caused a slight reduction. Since the latter observation had not been reported before, we studied this effect in more detail. Using a special centrifuge for heavy items (ZARM, Bremen, Germany), we determined the hyper-g-dependent intracellular Ca2+ level with transgenic cell lines expressing the Ca2+ sensor, cameleon. This sensor exhibits a shift in fluorescence from 480 to 530 nm in response to Ca2+ binding. The data show a drop in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration with a threshold gravity of around 3 g. This is above hypergravity levels achieved during parabolic flights (1.8 g). The use of mutants with different sub-cellular targets of cameleon expression (nucleus, tonoplast, plasma membrane) gave the same results, i.e. Ca2+ is obviously exported from several intracellular compartments.

  10. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Response to Zinc, Magnesium, and Calcium Deficiency in Specific Cell Types of Arabidopsis Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichiro Fukao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteome profiles of specific cell types have recently been investigated using techniques such as fluorescence activated cell sorting and laser capture microdissection. However, quantitative proteomic analysis of specific cell types has not yet been performed. In this study, to investigate the response of the proteome to zinc, magnesium, and calcium deficiency in specific cell types of Arabidopsis thaliana roots, we performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics using GFP-expressing protoplasts collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Protoplasts were collected from the pGL2-GFPer and pMGP-GFPer marker lines for epidermis or inner cell lines (pericycle, endodermis, and cortex, respectively. To increase the number of proteins identified, iTRAQ-labeled peptides were separated into 24 fractions by OFFGFEL electrophoresis prior to high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, 1039 and 737 proteins were identified and quantified in the epidermal and inner cell lines, respectively. Interestingly, the expression of many proteins was decreased in the epidermis by mineral deficiency, although a weaker effect was observed in inner cell lines such as the pericycle, endodermis, and cortex. Here, we report for the first time the quantitative proteomics of specific cell types in Arabidopsis roots.

  11. ARABIDOPSIS HOMOLOG of TRITHORAX1 (ATX1) is required for cell production, patterning, and morphogenesis in root development

    OpenAIRE

    Napsucialy-Mendivil, Selene; Alvarez-Venegas, Raúl; Shishkova, Svetlana; Dubrovsky, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    ARABIDOPSIS HOMOLOG of TRITHORAX1 (ATX1/SDG27), a known regulator of flower development, encodes a H3K4histone methyltransferase that maintains a number of genes in an active state. In this study, the role of ATX1 in root development was evaluated. The loss-of-function mutant atx1-1 was impaired in primary root growth. The data suggest that ATX1 controls root growth by regulating cell cycle duration, cell production, and the transition from cell proliferation in the root apical meristem (RAM)...

  12. The MYB23 gene provides a positive feedback loop for cell fate specification in the Arabidopsis root epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yeon Hee; Kirik, Victor; Hulskamp, Martin; Nam, Kyoung Hee; Hagely, Katherine; Lee, Myeong Min; Schiefelbein, John

    2009-04-01

    The specification of cell fates during development requires precise regulatory mechanisms to ensure robust cell type patterns. Theoretical models of pattern formation suggest that a combination of negative and positive feedback mechanisms are necessary for efficient specification of distinct fates in a field of differentiating cells. Here, we examine the role of the R2R3-MYB transcription factor gene, AtMYB23 (MYB23), in the establishment of the root epidermal cell type pattern in Arabidopsis thaliana. MYB23 is closely related to, and is positively regulated by, the WEREWOLF (WER) MYB gene during root epidermis development. Furthermore, MYB23 is able to substitute for the function of WER and to induce its own expression when controlled by WER regulatory sequences. We also show that the MYB23 protein binds to its own promoter, suggesting a MYB23 positive feedback loop. The localization of MYB23 transcripts and MYB23-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein, as well as the effect of a chimeric MYB23-SRDX repressor construct, links MYB23 function to the developing non-hair cell type. Using mutational analyses, we find that MYB23 is necessary for precise establishment of the root epidermal pattern, particularly under conditions that compromise the cell specification process. These results suggest that MYB23 participates in a positive feedback loop to reinforce cell fate decisions and ensure robust establishment of the cell type pattern in the Arabidopsis root epidermis.

  13. Plasma Membrane Proteomics of Arabidopsis Suspension-Cultured Cells Associated with Growth Phase Using Nano-LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Takahashi, Daisuke; Kawamura, Yukio; Uemura, Matsuo

    2018-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells (T87 line) are important model system for studies of responses to biotic and abiotic stresses at the cellular level in vitro since the cells have certain advantages compared with the whole plant system. However, the physiological and morphological characteristics of the cells are influenced by the progress of the growth phase of cells, which may result in different stress tolerance. To obtain comprehensive proteome profiles of the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana T87 suspension-cultured cells at the lag, log, or stationary growth phase, a shotgun proteomics method using nano-LC-MS/MS is used. The results obtained indicate that proteome profiles of the plasma membrane with the progress of the growth phase of cells dynamically changed, which may be associated with the physiological and morphological characteristics of the plasma membrane of the suspension-cultured cells. The proteomics results are further applied to explain different responsive patterns in the plasma membrane to cold acclimation and ABA treatment, which lead to understanding of different freezing tolerance associated with the growth phase of the cells.

  14. Guarded Cubical Type Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Lars; Bizjak, Aleš; Clouston, Ranald

    2016-01-01

    terms. CTT provides a computational interpretation of functional extensionality, enjoys canonicity for the natural numbers type, and is conjectured to support decidable type-checking. Our new type theory, guarded cubical type theory (GCTT), provides a computational interpretation of extensionality......This paper improves the treatment of equality in guarded dependent type theory (GDTT), by combining it with cubical type theory (CTT). GDTT is an extensional type theory with guarded recursive types, which are useful for building models of program logics, and for programming and reasoning...... with coinductive types. We wish to implement GDTT with decidable type checking, while still supporting non-trivial equality proofs that reason about the extensions of guarded recursive constructions. CTT is a variation of Martin-L\\"of type theory in which the identity type is replaced by abstract paths between...

  15. AMIODARONE INDUCES THE SYNTHESIS OF HSPS IN SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE AND ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyatrikas D.V.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Many biotic and abiotic stresses cause an increase of cytosolic Ca2+ level in cells. Calcium is one of the most important second messengers, regulating many various activities in the cell and was known to affect expression of stress activated genes. Mild heat shock induces the expression of heat shock proteins (Hsps which protect cell from drastic heat shock exposure. There are some literature data permitting to suggest that transient elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ level in plant cells is important for activation of Hsps expression. On the other hand mitochondria are known to regulate the intracellular calcium and reactive oxygen species signaling. It has been shown recently that mild heat shock induces hyperpolarization of inner mitochondrial membrane in plant and yeast cells and this event is critically important for activation of Hsps expression. To reveal the relationship between mitochondrial activity, intracellular calcium homeostasis and Hsps expression an antiarrhythmic drug amiodarone (AMD have been used. AMD is known to cause transient increase of cytosolic Ca2+ level in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Obtained results have showed that AMD treatment induced the synthesis of Hsp104p in S. cerevisiae cells and Hsp101p in A. thaliana cell culture. Induction of Hsp104p synthesis leads to enhanced yeast capability to survive lethal heat shock exposure. Development of S. cerevisiae thermotolerance depended significantly on the presence of Hsp104p. Elevation of Hsp104p level in the result of AMD treatment was shown to be governed by activity of Msn2p and Msn4p transcription factors. Deletion of the MSN2 and MSN4 genes abrogated the AMD ability to induce Hsp104p synthesis. Mild heat shock and AMD treatment induced the hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane in yeast and Arabidopsis cells which accompanied by HSP synthesis and development of thermotolerance. It was suggested that increase of cytosolic Ca2+ level after AMD treatment

  16. A Genetic Screen for Mutations Affecting Cell Division in the Arabidopsis thaliana Embryo Identifies Seven Loci Required for Cytokinesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Stewart Gillmor

    Full Text Available Cytokinesis in plants involves the formation of unique cellular structures such as the phragmoplast and the cell plate, both of which are required to divide the cell after nuclear division. In order to isolate genes that are involved in de novo cell wall formation, we performed a large-scale, microscope-based screen for Arabidopsis mutants that severely impair cytokinesis in the embryo. We recovered 35 mutations that form abnormally enlarged cells with multiple, often polyploid nuclei and incomplete cell walls. These mutants represent seven genes, four of which have previously been implicated in phragmoplast or cell plate function. Mutations in two loci show strongly reduced transmission through the haploid gametophytic generation. Molecular cloning of both corresponding genes reveals that one is represented by hypomorphic alleles of the kinesin-5 gene RADIALLY SWOLLEN 7 (homologous to tobacco kinesin-related protein TKRP125, and that the other gene corresponds to the Arabidopsis FUSED ortholog TWO-IN-ONE (originally identified based on its function in pollen development. No mutations that completely abolish the formation of cross walls in diploid cells were found. Our results support the idea that cytokinesis in the diploid and haploid generations involve similar mechanisms.

  17. TCS1, a Microtubule-Binding Protein, Interacts with KCBP/ZWICHEL to Regulate Trichome Cell Shape in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangliang Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available How cell shape is controlled is a fundamental question in developmental biology, but the genetic and molecular mechanisms that determine cell shape are largely unknown. Arabidopsis trichomes have been used as a good model system to investigate cell shape at the single-cell level. Here we describe the trichome cell shape 1 (tcs1 mutants with the reduced trichome branch number in Arabidopsis. TCS1 encodes a coiled-coil domain-containing protein. Pharmacological analyses and observations of microtubule dynamics show that TCS1 influences the stability of microtubules. Biochemical analyses and live-cell imaging indicate that TCS1 binds to microtubules and promotes the assembly of microtubules. Further results reveal that TCS1 physically associates with KCBP/ZWICHEL, a microtubule motor involved in the regulation of trichome branch number. Genetic analyses indicate that kcbp/zwi is epistatic to tcs1 with respect to trichome branch number. Thus, our findings define a novel genetic and molecular mechanism by which TCS1 interacts with KCBP to regulate trichome cell shape by influencing the stability of microtubules.

  18. Coordinated Regulations of mRNA Synthesis and Decay during Cold Acclimation in Arabidopsis Cells.

    KAUST Repository

    Arae, Toshihiro

    2017-04-18

    Plants possess a cold acclimation system to acquire freezing tolerance through pre-exposure to non-freezing low temperatures. The transcriptional cascade of C-repeat binding factors (CBFs)/dehydration response element-binding factors (DREBs) is considered a major transcriptional regulatory pathway during cold acclimation. However, little is known regarding the functional significance of mRNA stability regulation in the response of gene expression to cold stress. The actual level of individual mRNAs is determined by a balance between mRNA synthesis and degradation. Therefore, it is important to assess the regulatory steps to increase our understanding of gene regulation. Here, we analyzed temporal changes in mRNA amounts and half-lives in response to cold stress in Arabidopsis cell cultures based on genome-wide analysis. In this mRNA decay array method, mRNA half-life measurements and microarray analyses were combined. In addition, temporal changes in the integrated value of transcription rates were estimated from the above two parameters using a mathematical approach. Our results showed that several cold-responsive genes, including Cold-regulated 15a, were relatively destabilized, whereas the mRNA amounts were increased during cold treatment by accelerating the transcription rate to overcome the destabilization. Considering the kinetics of mRNA synthesis and degradation, this apparently contradictory result supports that mRNA destabilization is advantageous for the swift increase in CBF-responsive genes in response to cold stress.

  19. Allocation of Heme is Differentially Regulated by Ferrochelatase Isoforms in Arabidopsis Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nino Asuela Espinas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Heme is involved in various biological processes as a cofactor of hemoproteins located in various organelles. In plant cells, heme is synthesized by two isoforms of plastid-localized ferrochelatase, FC1 and FC2. In this study, by characterizing Arabidopsis T-DNA insertional mutants, we showed that the allocation of heme is differentially regulated by ferrochelatase isoforms in plant cells. Analyses of weak (fc1-1 and null (fc1-2 mutants suggest that FC1-producing heme is required for initial growth of seedling development. In contrast, weak (fc2-1 and null (fc2-2 mutants of FC2 showed pale green leaves and retarded growth, indicating that FC2-producing heme is necessary for chloroplast development. During the initial growth stage, FC2 deficiency caused reduction of plastid cytochromes. In addition, although FC2 deficiency marginally affected the assembly of photosynthetic reaction center complexes, it caused relatively larger but insufficient light-harvesting antenna to reaction centers, resulting in lower efficiency of photosynthesis. In the later vegetative growth, however, fc2-2 recovered photosynthetic growth, showing that FC1-producing heme may complement the FC2 deficiency. On the other hand, reduced level of cytochromes in microsomal fraction was discovered in fc1-1, suggesting that FC1-producing heme is mainly allocated to extraplastidic organelles. Furthermore, the expression of FC1 is induced by the treatment of an elicitor flg22 while that of FC2 was reduced, and fc1-1 abolished the flg22-dependent induction of FC1 expression and peroxidase activity. Consequently, our results clarified that FC2 produces heme for the photosynthetic machinery in the chloroplast, while FC1 is the housekeeping enzyme providing heme cofactor to the entire cell. In addition, FC1 can partly complement FC2 deficiency and is also involved in defense against stressful conditions.

  20. Computational analysis of live cell images of the Arabidopsis thaliana plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Alexandre; Tarr, Paul T; Roeder, Adrienne H K; Altinok, Alphan; Mjolsness, Eric; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative studies in plant developmental biology require monitoring and measuring the changes in cells and tissues as growth gives rise to intricate patterns. The success of these studies has been amplified by the combined strengths of two complementary techniques, namely live imaging and computational image analysis. Live imaging records time-lapse images showing the spatial-temporal progress of tissue growth with cells dividing and changing shape under controlled laboratory experiments. Image processing and analysis make sense of these data by providing computational ways to extract and interpret quantitative developmental information present in the acquired images. Manual labeling and qualitative interpretation of images are limited as they don't scale well to large data sets and cannot provide field measurements to feed into mathematical and computational models of growth and patterning. Computational analysis, when it can be made sufficiently accurate, is more efficient, complete, repeatable, and less biased. In this chapter, we present some guidelines for the acquisition and processing of images of sepals and the shoot apical meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana to serve as a basis for modeling. We discuss fluorescent markers and imaging using confocal laser scanning microscopy as well as present protocols for doing time-lapse live imaging and static imaging of living tissue. Image segmentation and tracking are discussed. Algorithms are presented and demonstrated together with low-level image processing methods that have proven to be essential in the detection of cell contours. We illustrate the application of these procedures in investigations aiming to unravel the mechanical and biochemical signaling mechanisms responsible for the coordinated growth and patterning in plants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Real-time Recording of Cytosolic Calcium Levels in Arabidopsis thaliana Cell Cultures during Parabolic Flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neef, Maren; Ecke, Margret; Hampp, Rüdiger

    2015-07-01

    In plants, like in other organisms, calcium (Ca2+) is an important second messenger which participates in the conversion of environmental signals into molecular responses. There is increasing evidence, that sensing of changes in gravitation or reorientation of tissues is an example for such signaling cascades in which Ca2+ is involved. In order to determine g-dependent changes in the cytosolic calcium (Ca^{2+}_{ {cyt}}) concentration of plant cells, semisolid transgenic callus cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana (A.t.), expressing the calcium sensor YC3.6 (cameleon), were exposed to g-forces between 1.8 g and μ g during parabolic flights. Using such cells, intracellular calcium transients can be monitored by FRET in vivo and in real-time. Interestingly we observed a slight decrease of the Ca^{2+}_{ {cyt}} level during the hypergravity phases of a parabola but a significant increase of the Ca^{2+}_{ {cyt}} concentration during microgravity. Application of known Ca2+ inhibitors and antagonists yielded the following effects: nifedipine (Ca2+ channel blocker) showed no effect, whereas LaCl3, GdCl3 (both inhibitors of uptake at the plasma membrane), DPI (inhibitor of NADP oxidase), and DMSO (solvent) diminished the gravity-alteration-related Ca^{2+}_{ {cyt}} response. EGTA (binding of Ca2+) and eosin yellow (inhibitor of a plasma membrane-located Ca2+ pump) suppressed the respective Ca^{2+}_{ {cyt}} changes entirely. We thus conclude that the significant increase in Ca^{2+}_{ {cyt}} under microgravity is largely due to extracellular Ca2+ sources.

  2. Crosstalks between myo-inositol metabolism, programmed cell death and basal immunity in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Hong Meng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although it is a crucial cellular process required for both normal development and to face stress conditions, the control of programmed cell death in plants is not fully understood. We previously reported the isolation of ATXR5 and ATXR6, two PCNA-binding proteins that could be involved in the regulation of cell cycle or cell death. A yeast two-hybrid screen using ATXR5 as bait captured AtIPS1, an enzyme which catalyses the committed step of myo-inositol (MI biosynthesis. atips1 mutants form spontaneous lesions on leaves, raising the possibility that MI metabolism may play a role in the control of PCD in plants. In this work, we have characterised atips1 mutants to gain insight regarding the role of MI in PCD regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: - lesion formation in atips1 mutants depends of light intensity, is due to PCD as evidenced by TUNEL labelling of nuclei, and is regulated by phytohormones such as salicylic acid - MI and galactinol are the only metabolites whose accumulation is significantly reduced in the mutant, and supplementation of the mutant with these compounds is sufficient to prevent PCD - the transcriptome profile of the mutant is extremely similar to that of lesion mimic mutants such as cpr5, or wild-type plants infected with pathogens. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our results provide strong evidence for the role of MI or MI derivatives in the regulation of PCD. Interestingly, there are three isoforms of IPS in Arabidopsis, but AtIPS1 is the only one harbouring a nuclear localisation sequence, suggesting that nuclear pools of MI may play a specific role in PCD regulation and opening new research prospects regarding the role of MI in the prevention of tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, the significance of the interaction between AtIPS1 and ATXR5 remains to be established.

  3. Tissue organization and cell ultrastructure in the roots of three Arabidopsis species grown at different zinc concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Čiamporová

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be heavy metal-sensitive in contrast to its relative species A. arenosa and A. halleri classified as pseudometallophytes. Quantitative differences in primary root anatomy previously found between A. thaliana and the non-metallicolous (NM and metallicolous (M populations of the non-model Arabidopsis species necessitated further research at cellular and ultrastructural levels. Seedlings of A. thaliana, ecotype Columbia and a natural population Ratkovo, the NM and M populations of A. arenosa and A. halleri were grown on agar medium containing 10 μM (control and 1000 μM Zn2+ for 5 days. Light microscopy confirmed the higher number of cells in the endodermal, cortical and epidermal layers and a higher incidence of additional cell tiers, the so-called middle cortex (MC in the tolerant genotypes. Such differences were present in untreated plants and even more pronounced in plants exposed to excess of zinc (Zn. Electron microscopy of the root tissues at comparable distances from the root tip showed Casparian bands only in the radial cell walls of endodermis of A. halleri M population originating from severely (Cu, Cd and Pb contaminated site. Casparian bands were not differentiated yet in the roots of the other species and populations, and they were not formed in the cell walls between endodermis and MC cells. In the apical cytoplasm of trichoblast bulges, autophagic vacuoles were found only in the sensitive A. thaliana and small vacuoles in the other genotypes. The enhanced concentration of Zn confirmed the higher metal sensitivity of the model species and did not substantially disturb the root cell ultrastructure of the tolerant Arabidopsis species.

  4. A peroxidase-dependent apoplastic oxidative burst in cultured Arabidopsis cells functions in MAMP-elicited defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jose A; Daudi, Arsalan; Finch, Paul; Butt, Vernon S; Whitelegge, Julian P; Souda, Puneet; Ausubel, Frederick M; Bolwell, G Paul

    2012-04-01

    Perception by plants of so-called microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) such as bacterial flagellin, referred to as pattern-triggered immunity, triggers a rapid transient accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We previously identified two cell wall peroxidases, PRX33 and PRX34, involved in apoplastic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here, we describe the generation of Arabidopsis tissue culture lines in which the expression of PRX33 and PRX34 is knocked down by antisense expression of a heterologous French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) peroxidase cDNA construct. Using these tissue culture lines and two inhibitors of ROS generation, azide and diphenylene iodonium, we found that perxoxidases generate about half of the H2O2 that accumulated in response to MAMP treatment and that NADPH oxidases and other sources such as mitochondria account for the remainder of the ROS. Knockdown of PRX33/PRX34 resulted in decreased expression of several MAMP-elicited genes, including MYB51, CYP79B2, and CYP81F2. Similarly, proteomic analysis showed that knockdown of PRX33/PRX34 led to the depletion of various MAMP-elicited defense-related proteins, including the two cysteine-rich peptides PDF2.2 and PDF2.3. Knockdown of PRX33/PRX34 also led to changes in the cell wall proteome, including increases in enzymes involved in cell wall remodeling, which may reflect enhanced cell wall expansion as a consequence of reduced H2O2-mediated cell wall cross-linking. Comparative metabolite profiling of a CaCl2 extract of the PRX33/PRX34 knockdown lines showed significant changes in amino acids, aldehydes, and keto acids but not fatty acids and sugars. Overall, these data suggest that PRX33/PRX34-generated ROS production is involved in the orchestration of pattern-triggered immunity in tissue culture cells.

  5. Evaluation of cell wall preparations for proteomics: a new procedure for purifying cell walls from Arabidopsis hypocotyls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canut Hervé

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ultimate goal of proteomic analysis of a cell compartment should be the exhaustive identification of resident proteins; excluding proteins from other cell compartments. Reaching such a goal closely depends on the reliability of the isolation procedure for the cell compartment of interest. Plant cell walls possess specific difficulties: (i the lack of a surrounding membrane may result in the loss of cell wall proteins (CWP during the isolation procedure, (ii polysaccharide networks of cellulose, hemicelluloses and pectins form potential traps for contaminants such as intracellular proteins. Several reported procedures to isolate cell walls for proteomic analyses led to the isolation of a high proportion (more than 50% of predicted intracellular proteins. Since isolated cell walls should hold secreted proteins, one can imagine alternative procedures to prepare cell walls containing a lower proportion of contaminant proteins. Results The rationales of several published procedures to isolate cell walls for proteomics were analyzed, with regard to the bioinformatic-predicted subcellular localization of the identified proteins. Critical steps were revealed: (i homogenization in low ionic strength acid buffer to retain CWP, (ii purification through increasing density cushions, (iii extensive washes with a low ionic strength acid buffer to retain CWP while removing as many cytosolic proteins as possible, and (iv absence of detergents. A new procedure was developed to prepare cell walls from etiolated hypocotyls of Arabidopsis thaliana. After salt extraction, a high proportion of proteins predicted to be secreted was released (73%, belonging to the same functional classes as proteins identified using previously described protocols. Finally, removal of intracellular proteins was obtained using detergents, but their amount represented less than 3% in mass of the total protein extract, based on protein quantification. Conclusion The

  6. 3D Plant cell architecture of Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae) using focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhawana; Miller, Joyce L; Cahoon, A Bruce

    2014-06-01

    Focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) combines the ability to sequentially mill the sample surface and obtain SEM images that can be used to create 3D renderings with micron-level resolution. We have applied FIB-SEM to study Arabidopsis cell architecture. The goal was to determine the efficacy of this technique in plant tissue and cellular studies and to demonstrate its usefulness in studying cell and organelle architecture and distribution. • Seed aleurone, leaf mesophyll, stem cortex, root cortex, and petal lamina from Arabidopsis were fixed and embedded for electron microscopy using protocols developed for animal tissues and modified for use with plant cells. Each sample was sectioned using the FIB and imaged with SEM. These serial images were assembled to produce 3D renderings of each cell type. • Organelles such as nuclei and chloroplasts were easily identifiable, and other structures such as endoplasmic reticula, lipid bodies, and starch grains were distinguishable in each tissue. • The application of FIB-SEM produced 3D renderings of five plant cell types and offered unique views of their shapes and internal content. These results demonstrate the usefulness of FIB-SEM for organelle distribution and cell architecture studies.

  7. 3D Plant Cell Architecture of Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae Using Focused Ion Beam–Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawana

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Focused ion beam–scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM combines the ability to sequentially mill the sample surface and obtain SEM images that can be used to create 3D renderings with micron-level resolution. We have applied FIB-SEM to study Arabidopsis cell architecture. The goal was to determine the efficacy of this technique in plant tissue and cellular studies and to demonstrate its usefulness in studying cell and organelle architecture and distribution. Methods: Seed aleurone, leaf mesophyll, stem cortex, root cortex, and petal lamina from Arabidopsis were fixed and embedded for electron microscopy using protocols developed for animal tissues and modified for use with plant cells. Each sample was sectioned using the FIB and imaged with SEM. These serial images were assembled to produce 3D renderings of each cell type. Results: Organelles such as nuclei and chloroplasts were easily identifiable, and other structures such as endoplasmic reticula, lipid bodies, and starch grains were distinguishable in each tissue. Discussion: The application of FIB-SEM produced 3D renderings of five plant cell types and offered unique views of their shapes and internal content. These results demonstrate the usefulness of FIB-SEM for organelle distribution and cell architecture studies.

  8. Arabidopsis brassinosteroid biosynthetic mutant dwarf7-1 exhibits slower rates of cell division and shoot induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulz Burkhard

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant growth depends on both cell division and cell expansion. Plant hormones, including brassinosteroids (BRs, are central to the control of these two cellular processes. Despite clear evidence that BRs regulate cell elongation, their roles in cell division have remained elusive. Results Here, we report results emphasizing the importance of BRs in cell division. An Arabidopsis BR biosynthetic mutant, dwarf7-1, displayed various characteristics attributable to slower cell division rates. We found that the DWARF4 gene which encodes for an enzyme catalyzing a rate-determining step in the BR biosynthetic pathways, is highly expressed in the actively dividing callus, suggesting that BR biosynthesis is necessary for dividing cells. Furthermore, dwf7-1 showed noticeably slower rates of callus growth and shoot induction relative to wild-type control. Flow cytometric analyses of the nuclei derived from either calli or intact roots revealed that the cell division index, which was represented as the ratio of cells at the G2/M vs. G1 phases, was smaller in dwf7-1 plants. Finally, we found that the expression levels of the genes involved in cell division and shoot induction, such as PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN2 (PCNA2 and ENHANCER OF SHOOT REGENERATION2 (ESR2, were also lower in dwf7-1 as compared with wild type. Conclusions Taken together, results of callus induction, shoot regeneration, flow cytometry, and semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis suggest that BRs play important roles in both cell division and cell differentiation in Arabidopsis.

  9. Catalase and NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 Promote Autophagy-Dependent Cell Death in Arabidopsis[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenberg, Thomas; Juul, Trine; Auzina, Aija; Gwiżdż, Sonia; Małolepszy, Anna; Van Der Kelen, Katrien; Dam, Svend; Bressendorff, Simon; Lorentzen, Andrea; Roepstorff, Peter; Lehmann Nielsen, Kåre; Jørgensen, Jan-Elo; Hofius, Daniel; Breusegem, Frank Van; Petersen, Morten; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death often depends on generation of reactive oxygen species, which can be detoxified by antioxidative enzymes, including catalases. We previously isolated catalase-deficient mutants (cat2) in a screen for resistance to hydroxyurea-induced cell death. Here, we identify an Arabidopsis thaliana hydroxyurea-resistant autophagy mutant, atg2, which also shows reduced sensitivity to cell death triggered by the bacterial effector avrRpm1. To test if catalase deficiency likewise affected both hydroxyurea and avrRpm1 sensitivity, we selected mutants with extremely low catalase activities and showed that they carried mutations in a gene that we named NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 (NCA1). nca1 mutants showed severely reduced activities of all three catalase isoforms in Arabidopsis, and loss of NCA1 function led to strong suppression of RPM1-triggered cell death. Basal and starvation-induced autophagy appeared normal in the nca1 and cat2 mutants. By contrast, autophagic degradation induced by avrRpm1 challenge was compromised, indicating that catalase acted upstream of immunity-triggered autophagy. The direct interaction of catalase with reactive oxygen species could allow catalase to act as a molecular link between reactive oxygen species and the promotion of autophagy-dependent cell death. PMID:24285797

  10. Deciphering the Responses of Root Border-Like Cells of Arabidopsis and Flax to Pathogen-Derived Elicitors1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plancot, Barbara; Santaella, Catherine; Jaber, Rim; Kiefer-Meyer, Marie Christine; Follet-Gueye, Marie-Laure; Leprince, Jérôme; Gattin, Isabelle; Souc, Céline; Driouich, Azeddine; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté

    2013-01-01

    Plant pathogens including fungi and bacteria cause many of the most serious crop diseases. The plant innate immune response is triggered upon recognition of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) such as flagellin22 and peptidoglycan. To date, very little is known of MAMP-mediated responses in roots. Root border cells are cells that originate from root caps and are released individually into the rhizosphere. Root tips of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and flax (Linum usitatissimum) release cells known as “border-like cells.” Whereas root border cells of pea (Pisum sativum) are clearly involved in defense against fungal pathogens, the function of border-like cells remains to be established. In this study, we have investigated the responses of root border-like cells of Arabidopsis and flax to flagellin22 and peptidoglycan. We found that both MAMPs triggered a rapid oxidative burst in root border-like cells of both species. The production of reactive oxygen species was accompanied by modifications in the cell wall distribution of extensin epitopes. Extensins are hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins that can be cross linked by hydrogen peroxide to enhance the mechanical strength of the cell wall. In addition, both MAMPs also caused deposition of callose, a well-known marker of MAMP-elicited defense. Furthermore, flagellin22 induced the overexpression of genes involved in the plant immune response in root border-like cells of Arabidopsis. Our findings demonstrate that root border-like cells of flax and Arabidopsis are able to perceive an elicitation and activate defense responses. We also show that cell wall extensin is involved in the innate immunity response of root border-like cells. PMID:24130195

  11. Putrescine Alleviates Iron Deficiency via NO-Dependent Reutilization of Root Cell-Wall Fe in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao Fang; Wang, Bin; Song, Wen Feng; Zheng, Shao Jian; Shen, Ren Fang

    2016-01-01

    Plants challenged with abiotic stress show enhanced polyamines levels. Here, we show that the polyamine putrescine (Put) plays an important role to alleviate Fe deficiency. The adc2-1 mutant, which is defective in Put biosynthesis, was hypersensitive to Fe deficiency compared with wild type (Col-1 of Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana]). Exogenous Put decreased the Fe bound to root cell wall, especially to hemicellulose, and increased root and shoot soluble Fe content, thus alleviating the Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis. Intriguingly, exogenous Put induced the accumulation of nitric oxide (NO) under both Fe-sufficient (+Fe) and Fe-deficient (-Fe) conditions, although the ferric-chelate reductase (FCR) activity and the expression of genes related to Fe uptake were induced only under -Fe treatment. The alleviation of Fe deficiency by Put was diminished in the hemicellulose-level decreased mutant-xth31 and in the noa1 and nia1nia2 mutants, in which the endogenous NO levels are reduced, indicating that both NO and hemicellulose are involved in Put-mediated alleviation of Fe deficiency. However, the FCR activity and the expression of genes related to Fe uptake were still up-regulated under -Fe+Put treatment compared with -Fe treatment in xth31, and Put-induced cell wall Fe remobilization was abolished in noa1 and nia1nia2, indicating that Put-regulated cell wall Fe reutilization is dependent on NO. From our results, we conclude that Put is involved in the remobilization of Fe from root cell wall hemicellulose in a process dependent on NO accumulation under Fe-deficient condition in Arabidopsis. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  12. AtDOF5.4/OBP4, a DOF Transcription Factor Gene that Negatively Regulates Cell Cycle Progression and Cell Expansion in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peipei; Chen, Haiying; Ying, Lu; Cai, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to animals, plant development involves continuous organ formation, which requires strict regulation of cell proliferation. The core cell cycle machinery is conserved across plants and animals, but plants have developed new mechanisms that precisely regulate cell proliferation in response to internal and external stimuli. Here, we report that the DOF transcription factor OBP4 negatively regulates cell proliferation and expansion. OBP4 is a nuclear protein. Constitutive and inducible overexpression of OBP4 reduced the cell size and number, resulting in dwarf plants. Inducible overexpression of OBP4 in Arabidopsis also promoted early endocycle onset and inhibited cell expansion, while inducible overexpression of OBP4 fused to the VP16 activation domain in Arabidopsis delayed endocycle onset and promoted plant growth. Furthermore, gene expression analysis showed that cell cycle regulators and cell wall expansion factors were largely down-regulated in the OBP4 overexpression lines. Short-term inducible analysis coupled with in vivo ChIP assays indicated that OBP4 targets the CyclinB1;1, CDKB1;1 and XTH genes. These results strongly suggest that OBP4 is a negative regulator of cell cycle progression and cell growth. These findings increase our understanding of the transcriptional regulation of the cell cycle in plants. PMID:27297966

  13. Guarded Cubical Type Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Lars; Bizjak, Aleš; Clouston, Ranald

    2016-01-01

    types. This further expands the foundations of CTT as a basis for formalisation in mathematics and computer science. We present examples to demonstrate the expressivity of our type theory, all of which have been checked using a prototype type-checker implementation, and present semantics in a presheaf......This paper improves the treatment of equality in guarded dependent type theory (GDTT), by combining it with cubical type theory (CTT). GDTT is an extensional type theory with guarded recursive types, which are useful for building models of program logics, and for programming and reasoning...... with coinductive types. We wish to implement GDTT with decidable type-checking, while still supporting non-trivial equality proofs that reason about the extensions of guarded recursive constructions. CTT is a variation of Martin-L\\"of type theory in which the identity type is replaced by abstract paths between...

  14. WEREWOLF, a MYB-related protein in Arabidopsis, is a position-dependent regulator of epidermal cell patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M M; Schiefelbein, J

    1999-11-24

    The formation of the root epidermis of Arabidopsis provides a simple and elegant model for the analysis of cell patterning. A novel gene, WEREWOLF (WER), is described here that is required for position-dependent patterning of the epidermal cell types. The WER gene encodes a MYB-type protein and is preferentially expressed within cells destined to adopt the non-hair fate. Furthermore, WER is shown to regulate the position-dependent expression of the GLABRA2 homeobox gene, to interact with a bHLH protein, and to act in opposition to the CAPRICE MYB. These results suggest a simple model to explain the specification of the two root epidermal cell types, and they provide insight into the molecular mechanisms used to control cell patterning.

  15. Multi-omics analysis identifies genes mediating the extension of cell walls in the Arabidopsis thaliana root elongation zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Michael H; Holman, Tara J; Sørensen, Iben

    2015-01-01

    Plant cell wall composition is important for regulating growth rates, especially in roots. However, neither analyses of cell wall composition nor transcriptomes on their own can comprehensively reveal which genes and processes are mediating growth and cell elongation rates. This study reveals...... the benefits of carrying out multiple analyses in combination. Sections of roots from five anatomically and functionally defined zones in Arabidopsis thaliana were prepared and divided into three biological replicates. We used glycan microarrays and antibodies to identify the major classes of glycans......)cellular localization of many epitopes. Extensins were localized in epidermal and cortex cell walls, while AGP glycans were specific to different tissues from root-hair cells to the stele. The transcriptome analysis found several gene families peaking in the REZ. These included a large family of peroxidases (which...

  16. Drp1 guarding of the mitochondrial network is important for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Florian; Schultz, Julia; Waterstradt, Rica; Baltrusch, Simone, E-mail: simone.baltrusch@med.uni-rostock.de

    2016-06-10

    Mitochondria form a tubular network in mammalian cells, and the mitochondrial life cycle is determined by fission, fusion and autophagy. Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) has a pivotal role in these processes because it alone is able to constrict mitochondria. However, the regulation and function of Drp1 have been shown to vary between cell types. Mitochondrial morphology affects mitochondrial metabolism and function. In pancreatic beta cells mitochondrial metabolism is a key component of the glucose-induced cascade of insulin secretion. The goal of the present study was to investigate the action of Drp1 in pancreatic beta cells. For this purpose Drp1 was down-regulated by means of shDrp1 in insulin-secreting INS1 cells and mouse pancreatic islets. In INS1 cells reduced Drp1 expression resulted in diminished expression of proteins regulating mitochondrial fusion, namely mitofusin 1 and 2, and optic atrophy protein 1. Diminished mitochondrial dynamics can therefore be assumed. After down-regulation of Drp1 in INS1 cells and spread mouse islets the initially homogenous mitochondrial network characterised by a moderate level of interconnections shifted towards high heterogeneity with elongated, clustered and looped mitochondria. These morphological changes were found to correlate directly with functional alterations. Mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP generation were significantly reduced in INS1 cells after Drp1down-regulation. Finally, a significant loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was demonstrated in INS1 cells and mouse pancreatic islets. In conclusion, Drp1 expression is important in pancreatic beta cells to maintain the regulation of insulin secretion. -- Highlights: •Down-regulation of Drp1 in INS1 cells reduces mitochondrial fusion protein expression. •Mitochondrial membrane potential in INS1 cells is diminished after Drp1 down-regulation. •Mitochondria become elongated after down-regulation of Drp1 in beta cells. •Down-regulation of

  17. The Arabidopsis PARAQUAT RESISTANT2 gene encodes an S-nitrosoglutathione reductase that is a key regulator of cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruiqiang; Sun, Shulan; Wang, Chun; Li, Yansha; Liang, Yan; An, Fengying; Li, Chao; Dong, Haili; Yang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jian; Zuo, Jianru

    2009-12-01

    Metabolism of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), a major biologically active nitric oxide (NO) species, is catalyzed by the evolutionally conserved GSNO reductase (GSNOR). Previous studies showed that the Arabidopsis GSNOR1/HOT5 gene regulates salicylic acid signaling and thermotolerance by modulating the intracellular S-nitrosothiol level. Here, we report the characterization of the Arabidopsis paraquat resistant2-1 (par2-1) mutant that shows an anti-cell death phenotype. The production of superoxide in par2-1 is comparable to that of wild-type plants when treated by paraquat (1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium dichloride), suggesting that PAR2 acts downstream of superoxide to regulate cell death. PAR2, identified by positional cloning, is shown to be identical to GSNOR1/HOT5. The par2-1 mutant carries a missense mutation in a highly conserved glycine, which renders the mutant protein unstable. Compared to wild type, par2-1 mutant has a higher NO level, as revealed by staining with 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate. Consistent with this result, wild-type plants treated with an NO donor display resistance to paraquat. Interestingly, the GSNOR1/HOT5/PAR2 protein level, other than its steady-state mRNA level, is induced by paraquat, but is reduced by NO donors. Taken together, these results suggest that GSNOR1/HOT5/PAR2 plays an important role in regulating cell death in plant cells through modulating intracellular NO level.

  18. Arabidopsis JACKDAW and MAGPIE zinc finger proteins delimit asymmetric cell division and stabilize tissue boundaries by restricting SHORT-ROOT action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welch, D.; Hassan, H.; Blilou, I.; Immink, G.H.; Heidstra, R.

    2007-01-01

    In the Arabidopsis root, the SHORT-ROOT transcription factor moves outward to the ground tissue from its site of transcription in the stele and is required for the specification of the endodermis and the stem cell organizing quiescent center cells. In addition, SHORT-ROOT and the downstream

  19. Arabidopsis JACKDAW and MAGPIE zinc finger proteins delimit asymmetric cell division and stabilize tissue boundaries by restricting SHORT-ROOT action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welch, D.R.; Hassan, H.B.M.; Blilou, I.; Immink, R.; Heidstra, R.; Scheres, B.J.G.

    2007-01-01

    In the Arabidopsis root, the SHORT-ROOT transcription factor moves outward to the ground tissue from its site of transcription in the stele and is required for the pecification of the endodermis and the stem cell organizing quiescent center cells. In addition, SHORT-ROOT and the downstream

  20. Rapid and dynamic subcellular reorganization following mechanical stimulation of Arabidopsis epidermal cells mimics responses to fungal and oomycete attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takemoto Daigo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant cells respond to the presence of potential fungal or oomycete pathogens by mounting a basal defence response that involves aggregation of cytoplasm, reorganization of cytoskeletal, endomembrane and other cell components and development of cell wall appositions beneath the infection site. This response is induced by non-adapted, avirulent and virulent pathogens alike, and in the majority of cases achieves penetration resistance against the microorganism on the plant surface. To explore the nature of signals that trigger this subcellular response and to determine the timing of its induction, we have monitored the reorganization of GFP-tagged actin, microtubules, endoplasmic reticulum (ER and peroxisomes in Arabidopsis plants – after touching the epidermal surface with a microneedle. Results Within 3 to 5 minutes of touching the surface of Arabidopsis cotyledon epidermal cells with fine glass or tungsten needles, actin microfilaments, ER and peroxisomes began to accumulate beneath the point of contact with the needle. Formation of a dense patch of actin was followed by focusing of actin cables on the site of contact. Touching the cell surface induced localized depolymerization of microtubules to form a microtubule-depleted zone surrounding a dense patch of GFP-tubulin beneath the needle tip. The concentration of actin, GFP-tubulin, ER and peroxisomes remained focused on the contact site as the needle moved across the cell surface and quickly dispersed when the needle was removed. Conclusion Our results show that plant cells can detect the gentle pressure of a microneedle on the epidermal cell surface and respond by reorganizing subcellular components in a manner similar to that induced during attack by potential fungal or oomycete pathogens. The results of our study indicate that during plant-pathogen interactions, the basal defence response may be induced by the plant's perception of the physical force exerted by the

  1. Engineering of red cells of Arabidopsis thaliana and comparative genome-wide gene expression analysis of red cells versus wild-type cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ming-Zhu; Xie, De-Yu

    2011-04-01

    We report metabolic engineering of Arabidopsis red cells and genome-wide gene expression analysis associated with anthocyanin biosynthesis and other metabolic pathways between red cells and wild-type (WT) cells. Red cells of A. thaliana were engineered for the first time from the leaves of production of anthocyanin pigment 1-Dominant (pap1-D). These red cells produced seven anthocyanin molecules including a new one that was characterized by LC-MS analysis. Wild-type cells established as a control did not produce anthocyanins. A genome-wide microarray analysis revealed that nearly 66 and 65% of genes in the genome were expressed in the red cells and wild-type cells, respectively. In comparison with the WT cells, 3.2% of expressed genes in the red cells were differentially expressed. The expression levels of 14 genes involved in the biosynthetic pathway of anthocyanin were significantly higher in the red cells than in the WT cells. Microarray and RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that the TTG1-GL3/TT8-PAP1 complex regulated the biosynthesis of anthocyanins. Furthermore, most of the genes with significant differential expression levels in the red cells versus the WT cells were characterized with diverse biochemical functions, many of which were mapped to different metabolic pathways (e.g., ribosomal protein biosynthesis, photosynthesis, glycolysis, glyoxylate metabolism, and plant secondary metabolisms) or organelles (e.g., chloroplast). We suggest that the difference in gene expression profiles between the two cell lines likely results from cell types, the overexpression of PAP1, and the high metabolic flux toward anthocyanins.

  2. A conserved function for Arabidopsis SUPERMAN in regulating floral-whorl cell proliferation in rice, a monocotyledonous plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, A K; Kushalappa, K; Prasad, K; Vijayraghavan, U

    2000-02-24

    Studies of floral organ development in two dicotyledonous plants, Arabidopsis thaliana and Antirrhinum majus, have shown that three sets of genes (A, B and C) can pattern sepals, petals, stamens and carpels [1] [2]. Mechanisms that define boundaries between these floral whorls are unclear, however. The Arabidopsis gene SUPERMAN (SUP), which encodes a putative transcription factor, maintains the boundary between stamens and carpels [3] [4] [5], possibly by regulating cell proliferation. By overexpressing SUP cDNA in rice, we examined whether its effects on whorl boundaries are conserved in a divergent monocotyledonous species. High-level ectopic SUP expression in transgenic rice resulted in juvenile death or dwarf plants with decreased axillary growth. Plants with lower levels of SUP RNA were vegetatively normal, but the flowers showed ubiquitous ventral carpel expansion. This was often coupled with reduced stamen number, or occurrence of third-whorl stamen-carpel mosaic organs. Additionally, proliferation of second-whorl ventral cells produced adventitious lodicules, and flowers lost the asymmetry that is normally inherent to this whorl. We predict that SUP is a conserved regulator of floral whorl boundaries and that it affects cell proliferation.

  3. Plant-specific Histone Deacetylases HDT½ Regulate GIBBERELLIN 2-OXIDASE 2 Expression to Control Arabidopsis Root Meristem Cell Number

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huchen

    2017-08-31

    Root growth is modulated by environmental factors and depends on cell production in the root meristem (RM). New cells in the meristem are generated by stem cells and transit-amplifying cells, which together determine RM cell number. Transcription factors and chromatin-remodelling factors have been implicated in regulating the switch from stem cells to transit-amplifying cells. Here we show that two Arabidopsis thaliana paralogs encoding plant-specific histone deacetylases, HDT1 and HDT2, regulate a second switch from transit-amplifying cells to expanding cells. Knockdown of HDT½ (hdt1,2i) results in an earlier switch and causes a reduced RM cell number. Our data show that HDT½ negatively regulate the acetylation level of the C19-GIBBERELLIN 2-OXIDASE 2 (GA2ox2) locus and repress the expression of GA2ox2 in the RM and elongation zone. Overexpression of GA2ox2 in the RM phenocopies the hdt1,2i phenotype. Conversely, knockout of GA2ox2 partially rescues the root growth defect of hdt1,2i. These results suggest that by repressing the expression of GA2ox2, HDT½ likely fine-tune gibberellin metabolism and they are crucial for regulating the switch from cell division to expansion to determine RM cell number. We propose that HDT½ function as part of a mechanism that modulates root growth in response to environmental factors.

  4. Arabidopsis seed coat mucilage is a specialized cell wall that can be used as a model for genetic analysis of plant cell wall structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Wentzel Haughn

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis seed coat epidermal cells produce a large quantity of mucilage that is extruded upon exposure to water. Chemical analyses and cell biological techniques suggest that this mucilage represents a specialized type of secondary cell wall composed primarily of pectin with lesser amounts of cellulose and xyloglucan. Once extruded, the mucilage capsule has a distinctive structure with an outer non-adherent layer that is easily removed by shaking in water, and an inner adherent layer that can only be removed with strong acid or base. Most of the cellulose in the mucilage is present in the inner layer and is responsible at least in part for its adherence to the seed. There are also differences in the pectin composition between the two layers that could contribute to the difference in adherence. The Arabidopsis seed coat epidermis and its mucilage are not essential for seed viability or germination. This dispensability, combined with the fact that the epidermal cells synthesize an accessible pectin-rich cell wall at a specific time in development, makes them well suited as a genetic model for studying cell wall biogenesis, function and regulation. Mutants defective in seed mucilage identified by both forward and reverse genetic analyses are proving useful in establishing connections between carbohydrate structure and cell wall properties in vivo. In the future, genetic engineering of seed coat mucilage carbohydrates should prove useful for testing hypotheses concerning cell wall structure and function.

  5. Arabidopsis Seed Coat Mucilage is a Specialized Cell Wall that Can be Used as a Model for Genetic Analysis of Plant Cell Wall Structure and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughn, George W; Western, Tamara L

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis seed coat epidermal cells produce a large quantity of mucilage that is extruded upon exposure to water. Chemical analyses and cell biological techniques suggest that this mucilage represents a specialized type of secondary cell wall composed primarily of pectin with lesser amounts of cellulose and xyloglucan. Once extruded, the mucilage capsule has a distinctive structure with an outer non-adherent layer that is easily removed by shaking in water, and an inner adherent layer that can only be removed with strong acid or base. Most of the cellulose in the mucilage is present in the inner layer and is responsible at least in part for its adherence to the seed. There are also differences in the pectin composition between the two layers that could contribute to the difference in adherence. The Arabidopsis seed coat epidermis and its mucilage are not essential for seed viability or germination. This dispensability, combined with the fact that the epidermal cells synthesize an accessible pectin-rich cell wall at a specific time in development, makes them well suited as a genetic model for studying cell wall biogenesis, function, and regulation. Mutants defective in seed mucilage identified by both forward and reverse genetic analyses are proving useful in establishing connections between carbohydrate structure and cell wall properties in vivo. In the future, genetic engineering of seed coat mucilage carbohydrates should prove useful for testing hypotheses concerning cell wall structure and function.

  6. Cyclic programmed cell death stimulates hormone signaling and root development in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xuan, Wei; Band, Leah R.; Kumpf, Robert P.; Rybel, De Bert

    2016-01-01

    The plant root cap, surrounding the very tip of the growing root, perceives and transmits environmental signals to the inner root tissues. In Arabidopsis thaliana, auxin released by the root cap contributes to the regular spacing of lateral organs along the primary root axis. Here, we show that

  7. Arabidopsis RETINOBLASTOMA RELATED directly regulates DNA damage responses through functions beyond cell cycle control

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horvath, B.M.; Kourová, Hana; Nagy, S.; Nemeth, E.; Magyar, Z.; Papdi, C.; Ahmad, Z.; Sanchez-Perez, G.F.; Perilli, S.; Blilou, I.; Pettko-Szandtner, A.; Darula, Z.; Meszaros, T.; Binarová, Pavla; Bogre, L.; Scheres, B.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 9 (2017), s. 1261-1278 ISSN 0261-4189 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-11657S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Arabidopsis * BRCA1 * DNA damage response Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 9.792, year: 2016

  8. Sr36- and Sr5-Mediated Resistance Response to Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici Is Associated with Callose Deposition in Wheat Guard Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; McCallum, B D; Fetch, T; Bakkeren, G; Saville, B J

    2015-06-01

    Race-specific resistance of wheat to Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici is primarily posthaustorial and often involves the induction of a hypersensitive response (HR). The aim of this study was to investigate host defense responses induced in interactions between P. graminis f. sp. tritici races and wheat lines carrying different race-specific stem rust resistance (Sr) genes. In incompatible interactions between wheat lines carrying Sr36 in three genetic backgrounds (LMPG, Prelude, or W2691) and avirulent P. graminis f. sp. tritici races MCCFC or RCCDM, callose accumulated within 24 h in wheat guard cells contacted by a P. graminis f. sp. tritici appressorium, and P. graminis f. sp. tritici ingress was inhibited following appressorium formation. Accordingly, the expression of transcripts encoding a callose synthase increased in the incompatible interaction between LMPG-Sr36 and avirulent P. graminis f. sp. tritici race MCCFC. Furthermore, the inhibition of callose synthesis through the infiltration of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (DDG) increased the ability of P. graminis f. sp. tritici race MCCFC to infect LMPG-Sr36. A similar induction of callose deposition in wheat guard cells was also observed within 24 h after inoculation (hai) with avirulent P. graminis f. sp. tritici race HKCJC on LMPG-Sr5 plants. In contrast, this defense response was not induced in incompatible interactions involving Sr6, Sr24, or Sr30. Instead, the induction of an HR and cellular lignification were noted. The manifestation of the HR and cellular lignification was induced earlier (24 hai) and was more extensive in the resistance response mediated by Sr6 compared with those mediated by Sr24 or Sr30. These results indicate that the resistance mediated by Sr36 is similar to that mediated by Sr5 but different from those triggered by Sr6, Sr24, or Sr30. Resistance responses mediated by Sr5 and Sr36 are prehaustorial, and are a result of very rapid recognition of molecules derived from avirulent isolates of

  9. Sequence and function of basic helix-loop-helix proteins required for stomatal development in Arabidopsis are deeply conserved in land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAlister, Cora A; Bergmann, Dominique C

    2011-01-01

    Stomata are a broadly conserved feature of land plants with a crucial role regulating transpiration and gas exchange between the plant and atmosphere. Stereotyped cell divisions within a specialized cell lineage of the epidermis generate stomata and define the pattern of their distribution. The behavior of the stomatal lineage varies in its detail among different plant groups, but general features include asymmetric cell divisions and an immediate precursor (the guard mother cell [GMC]) that divides symmetrically to form the pair of cells that will differentiate into the guard cells. In Arabidopsis, the closely related basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) subgroup Ia transcription factors SPEECHLESS, MUTE, and FAMA promote asymmetric divisions, the acquisition of GMC identity and guard cell differentiation, respectively. Genome sequence data indicate that these key positive regulators of stomatal development are broadly conserved among land plants. While orthologies can be established among individual family members within the angiosperms, more distantly related groups contain subgroup Ia bHLHs of unclear affinity. We demonstrate group Ia members from the moss Physcomitrella patens can partially complement MUTE and FAMA and recapitulate gain of function phenotypes of group Ia genes in multiple steps in the stomatal lineage in Arabidopsis. Our data are consistent with a mechanism whereby a multifunctional transcription factor underwent duplication followed by specialization to provide the three (now nonoverlapping) functions of the angiosperm stomatal bHLHs. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an Arabidopsis T87 cell suspension culture during long-term cultivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Zebrowski, Jacek; Oklejewicz, Bernadetta; Czarnik, Justyna; Halibart-Puzio, Joanna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A decrease in proliferation rate during long-term cultivation of Arabidopsis cells. • Age-dependent increase in senescence-associated gene expression in Arabidopsis cells. • Age-related increase in DNA methylation, H3K9me2, and H3K27me3 in Arabidopsis cells. • High potential of photosynthetic efficiency of long-term cultured Arabidopsis cells. - Abstract: Plant cell suspension cultures represent good model systems applicable for both basic research and biotechnological purposes. Nevertheless, it is widely known that a prolonged in vitro cultivation of plant cells is associated with genetic and epigenetic instabilities, which may limit the usefulness of plant lines. In this study, the age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an asynchronous Arabidopsis T87 cell culture were examined. A prolonged cultivation period was found to be correlated with a decrease in the proliferation rate and a simultaneous increase in the expression of senescence-associated genes, indicating that the aging process started at the late growth phase of the culture. In addition, increases in the heterochromatin-specific epigenetic markers, i.e., global DNA methylation, H3K9 dimethylation, and H3K27 trimethylation, were observed, suggesting the onset of chromatin condensation, a hallmark of the early stages of plant senescence. Although the number of live cells decreased with an increase in the age of the culture, the remaining viable cells retained a high potential to efficiently perform photosynthesis and did not exhibit any symptoms of photosystem II damage

  11. Conserved CDC20 cell cycle functions are carried out by two of the five isoforms in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Kevei

    Full Text Available The CDC20 and Cdh1/CCS52 proteins are substrate determinants and activators of the Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C E3 ubiquitin ligase and as such they control the mitotic cell cycle by targeting the degradation of various cell cycle regulators. In yeasts and animals the main CDC20 function is the destruction of securin and mitotic cyclins. Plants have multiple CDC20 gene copies whose functions have not been explored yet. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are five CDC20 isoforms and here we aimed at defining their contribution to cell cycle regulation, substrate selectivity and plant development.Studying the gene structure and phylogeny of plant CDC20s, the expression of the five AtCDC20 gene copies and their interactions with the APC/C subunit APC10, the CCS52 proteins, components of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC and mitotic cyclin substrates, conserved CDC20 functions could be assigned for AtCDC20.1 and AtCDC20.2. The other three intron-less genes were silent and specific for Arabidopsis. We show that AtCDC20.1 and AtCDC20.2 are components of the MCC and interact with mitotic cyclins with unexpected specificity. AtCDC20.1 and AtCDC20.2 are expressed in meristems, organ primordia and AtCDC20.1 also in pollen grains and developing seeds. Knocking down both genes simultaneously by RNAi resulted in severe delay in plant development and male sterility. In these lines, the meristem size was reduced while the cell size and ploidy levels were unaffected indicating that the lower cell number and likely slowdown of the cell cycle are the cause of reduced plant growth.The intron-containing CDC20 gene copies provide conserved and redundant functions for cell cycle progression in plants and are required for meristem maintenance, plant growth and male gametophyte formation. The Arabidopsis-specific intron-less genes are possibly "retrogenes" and have hitherto undefined functions or are pseudogenes.

  12. CCR1, an enzyme required for lignin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis, mediates cell proliferation exit for leaf development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Jingshi; Luo, Dexian; Xu, Deyang

    2015-01-01

    development is as yet poorly understood. By genetic screening and characterization of Arabidopsis mutants defective in exit from cell proliferation, we show that the product of the CINNAMOYL CoA REDUCTASE (CCR1) gene, which is required for lignin biosynthesis, participates in the process of cell proliferation...... exit in leaves. CCR1 is expressed basipetally in the leaf, and ccr1 mutants exhibited multiple abnormalities, including increased cell proliferation. The ccr1 phenotypes are not due to the reduced lignin content, but instead are due to the dramatically increased level of ferulic acid (Fe......A), an intermediate in lignin biosynthesis. FeA is known to have antioxidant activity, and the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in ccr1 were markedly reduced. We also characterized another double mutant in CAFFEIC ACID O-METHYLTRANSFERASE (comt) and CAFFEOYL CoA 3-O-METHYLTRANSFERASE (ccoaomt), in which the Fe...

  13. The Companion Cell-Specific Arabidopsis Disaccharide Carrier AtSUC2 Is Expressed in Nematode-Induced Syncytia1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juergensen, Katja; Scholz-Starke, Joachim; Sauer, Norbert; Hess, Paul; van Bel, Aart J.E.; Grundler, Florian M.W.

    2003-01-01

    Cyst nematodes induce a metabolically highly active syncytial cell complex in host roots. The syncytia are symplastically isolated. Because they form a strong sink, assimilates must be imported via the apoplast, thus suggesting that specific membrane-bound sugar transport proteins are expressed and activated. To identify possible candidate genes, transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing different reporter genes under the control of different promoters from Arabidopsis sugar transporter genes were infected with the beet cyst nematode (Heterodera schachtii). With polymerase chain reaction, 13 additional sugar transporters were tested for their presence in the syncytia through the use of a syncytium-specific cDNA library. Analysis of the infected roots showed that the promoter of the sucrose (Suc) transporter AtSUC2 gene that codes for a companion cell-specific Suc transporter in noninfected plants was found to be expressed in syncytia. Its expression patterns in β-glucuronidase and green fluorescent protein plants were monitored. Syncytium-specific gene expression was confirmed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results support the idea that AtSUC2 mediates the transmembrane transfer of Suc. AtSUC2 is the first disaccharide carrier described to be activated by pathogens. PMID:12529515

  14. Wall ingrowth deposition in phloem parenchyma transfer cells in Arabidopsis: Heteroblastic variations and a potential role in pathogen defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Suong T T; McCurdy, David W

    2017-06-03

    Transfer cell (TCs) develop unique wall ingrowth networks which amplify plasma membrane surface area and thus maximize nutrient transporter density at key anatomic sites for nutrient exchange within plants and their external environment. These sites fall into 4 main groups corresponding to 4 categories of trans-membrane flux: absorption/secretion of solutes from or to the external environment, and absorption/secretion of solutes from or to internal, extra-cytoplasmic compartments. Research on TC biology over recent decades has demonstrated correlations between wall ingrowth deposition in TCs and enhanced transport capacity in many major agricultural species such as pea, fava bean, cotton and maize. Consequently, there is general consensus that the existence of wall ingrowth morphology implies an augmentation in membrane transport capacity. However, this may not be entirely applicable for phloem parenchyma (PP) TCs in Arabidopsis. Our recent survey of PP TC abundance and distribution in Arabidopsis veins indicated that PP TC development reflects heteroblastic status. A consequence of this observation is the suggestion that PP TCs, or at least wall ingrowth deposition in these cells, potentially act as a physical barrier to defend access of invading pathogens to sugar-rich sieve elements rather than solely in facilitating the export of photoassimilate from collection phloem in leaves.

  15. Co-localisation studies of Arabidopsis SR splicing factors reveal different types of speckles in plant cell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorkovic, Zdravko J.; Hilscher, Julia; Barta, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    SR proteins are multidomain splicing factors which are important for spliceosome assembly and for regulation of alternative splicing. In mammalian nuclei these proteins localise to speckles from where they are recruited to transcription sites. By using fluorescent protein fusion technology and different experimental approaches it has been shown that Arabidopsis SR proteins, in addition to diffuse nucleoplasmic staining, localise into an irregular nucleoplasmic network resembling speckles in mammalian cells. As Arabidopsis SR proteins fall into seven conserved sub-families we investigated co-localisation of members of the different sub-families in transiently transformed tobacco protoplast. Here we demonstrate the new finding that members of different SR protein sub-families localise into distinct populations of nuclear speckles with no, partial or complete co-localisation. This is particularly interesting as we also show that these proteins do interact in a yeast two-hybrid assay as well as in pull-down and in co-immunopreciptiation assays. Our data raise the interesting possibility that SR proteins are partitioned into distinct populations of nuclear speckles to allow a more specific recruitment to the transcription/pre-mRNA processing sites of particular genes depending on cell type and developmental stage

  16. Blue light-dependent changes in loosely bound calcium in Arabidopsis mesophyll cells: an X-ray microanalysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łabuz, Justyna; Samardakiewicz, Sławomir; Hermanowicz, Paweł; Wyroba, Elżbieta; Pilarska, Maria; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-06-01

    Calcium is involved in the signal transduction pathway from phototropins, the blue light photoreceptor kinases which mediate chloroplast movements. The chloroplast accumulation response in low light is controlled by both phot1 and phot2, while only phot2 is involved in avoidance movement induced by strong light. Phototropins elevate cytosolic Ca(2+) after activation by blue light. In higher plants, both types of chloroplast responses depend on Ca(2+), and internal calcium stores seem to be crucial for these processes. Yet, the calcium signatures generated after the perception of blue light by phototropins are not well understood. To characterize the localization of calcium in Arabidopsis mesophyll cells, loosely bound (exchangeable) Ca(2+) was precipitated with potassium pyroantimonate and analyzed by transmission electron microscopy followed by energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. In dark-adapted wild-type Arabidopsis leaves, calcium precipitates were observed at the cell wall, where they formed spherical structures. After strong blue light irradiation, calcium at the apoplast prevailed, and bigger, multilayer precipitates were found. Spherical calcium precipitates were also detected at the tonoplast. After red light treatment as a control, the precipitates at the cell wall were smaller and less numerous. In the phot2 and phot1phot2 mutants, calcium patterns were different from those of wild-type plants. In both mutants, no elevation of calcium after blue light treatment was observed at the cell periphery (including the cell wall and a fragment of cytoplasm). This result confirms the involvement of phototropin2 in the regulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis in mesophyll cells. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  17. Blue light-dependent changes in loosely bound calcium in Arabidopsis mesophyll cells: an X-ray microanalysis study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łabuz, Justyna; Samardakiewicz, Sławomir; Hermanowicz, Paweł; Wyroba, Elżbieta; Pilarska, Maria; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Calcium is involved in the signal transduction pathway from phototropins, the blue light photoreceptor kinases which mediate chloroplast movements. The chloroplast accumulation response in low light is controlled by both phot1 and phot2, while only phot2 is involved in avoidance movement induced by strong light. Phototropins elevate cytosolic Ca2+ after activation by blue light. In higher plants, both types of chloroplast responses depend on Ca2+, and internal calcium stores seem to be crucial for these processes. Yet, the calcium signatures generated after the perception of blue light by phototropins are not well understood. To characterize the localization of calcium in Arabidopsis mesophyll cells, loosely bound (exchangeable) Ca2+ was precipitated with potassium pyroantimonate and analyzed by transmission electron microscopy followed by energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. In dark-adapted wild-type Arabidopsis leaves, calcium precipitates were observed at the cell wall, where they formed spherical structures. After strong blue light irradiation, calcium at the apoplast prevailed, and bigger, multilayer precipitates were found. Spherical calcium precipitates were also detected at the tonoplast. After red light treatment as a control, the precipitates at the cell wall were smaller and less numerous. In the phot2 and phot1phot2 mutants, calcium patterns were different from those of wild-type plants. In both mutants, no elevation of calcium after blue light treatment was observed at the cell periphery (including the cell wall and a fragment of cytoplasm). This result confirms the involvement of phototropin2 in the regulation of Ca2+ homeostasis in mesophyll cells. PMID:26957564

  18. Coast Guard SOF

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    Independence in 1783 and the beginning of the Quasi-War with France in 1798. Acts of Congress in 1790, 1797, and 1799 indexed Revenue-Marine pay to that of...undeclared war with France until a new program of battleship construction could be completed. As depicted in Figure 1, the Coast Guard again conducted...Embassy. ITD members serve as advisers to the Panamanian Servicio Maritima Nacional (National Maritime Service), an agency modeled after the US

  19. Transcriptional changes in powdery mildew infected wheat and Arabidopsis leaves undergoing syringolin-triggered hypersensitive cell death at infection sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Kathrin; Abderhalden, Olaf; Bruggmann, Rémy; Dudler, Robert

    2006-11-01

    Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici, the causal agent of powdery mildew in wheat, is an obligate biotrophic fungus that exclusively invades epidermal cells. As previously shown, spraying of a solution of syringolin A, a circular peptide derivative secreted by the phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae, triggers hypersensitive cell death at infection sites in powdery mildew infected wheat. Thus, the fungus is essentially eradicated. Here we show that syringolin A also triggers hypersensitive cell death in Arabidopsis infected with the powdery mildew fungus Erysiphe cichoracearum. To monitor transcriptional changes associated with this effect, we cloned 307 cDNA clones representing 158 unigenes from powdery mildew infected, syringolin A sprayed wheat leaves by a suppression subtractive hybridization cloning procedure. These cDNAs were microarrayed onto glass slides together with 1088 cDNA-AFLP clones from powdery mildew-infected wheat. Microarray hybridization experiments were performed with probes derived from leaves, epidermal tissue, and mesophyll preparations of mildewed or uninfected wheat plants after syringolin A or control treatment. Similar experiments were performed in Arabidopsis using the Affymetrix ATH1 whole genome GeneChip. The results indicate a conserved mode of action of syringolin A as similar gene groups are induced in both species. Prominent groups include genes associated with the proteasomal degradation pathway, mitochondrial and other heat shock genes, genes involved in mitochondrial alternative electron pathways, and genes encoding glycolytic and fermentative enzymes. Surprisingly, in both species the observed transcriptional response to syringolin A was considerably weaker in infected plants as compared to uninfected plants. The results lead to the working hypothesis that cell death observed at infection sites may result from a parasite-induced suppression of the transcriptional response and thus to insufficient production

  20. MAPK phosphatase AP2C3 induces ectopic proliferation of epidermal cells leading to stomata development in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julija Umbrasaite

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In plant post-embryonic epidermis mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling promotes differentiation of pavement cells and inhibits initiation of stomata. Stomata are cells specialized to modulate gas exchange and water loss. Arabidopsis MAPKs MPK3 and MPK6 are at the core of the signaling cascade; however, it is not well understood how the activity of these pleiotropic MAPKs is constrained spatially so that pavement cell differentiation is promoted only outside the stomata lineage. Here we identified a PP2C-type phosphatase termed AP2C3 (Arabidopsis protein phosphatase 2C that is expressed distinctively during stomata development as well as interacts and inactivates MPK3, MPK4 and MPK6. AP2C3 co-localizes with MAPKs within the nucleus and this localization depends on its N-terminal extension. We show that other closely related phosphatases AP2C2 and AP2C4 are also MAPK phosphatases acting on MPK6, but have a distinct expression pattern from AP2C3. In accordance with this, only AP2C3 ectopic expression is able to stimulate cell proliferation leading to excess stomata development. This function of AP2C3 relies on the domains required for MAPK docking and intracellular localization. Concomitantly, the constitutive and inducible AP2C3 expression deregulates E2F-RB pathway, promotes the abundance and activity of CDKA, as well as changes of CDKB1;1 forms. We suggest that AP2C3 downregulates the MAPK signaling activity to help maintain the balance between differentiation of stomata and pavement cells.

  1. An Arabidopsis lipid flippase is required for timely recruitment of defenses to the host-pathogen interface at the plant cell surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deposition of cell wall-reinforcing papillae is an integral component of the plant immune response. The Arabidopsis PENETRATION 3 (PEN3) ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter plays a role in defense against numerous pathogens and is recruited to sites of pathogen detection where it accumulates with...

  2. Involvement of YODA and mitogen activated protein kinase 6 in Arabidopsis post-embryogenic root development through auxin up-regulation and cell division plane orientation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smékalová, V.; Luptovčiak, I.; Komis, G.; Šamajová, O.; Ovečka, M.; Doskočilová, A.; Takáč, T.; Vadovič, P.; Novák, Ondřej; Pechan, T.; Ziemann, A.; Košútová, P.; Šamaj, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 203, č. 4 (2014), s. 1175-1193 ISSN 0028-646X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Arabidopsis * cell division plane * MAP65-1 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.672, year: 2014

  3. The monosaccharide transporter gene, AtSTP4, and the cell-wall invertase, Atbetafruct1, are induced in Arabidopsis during infection with the fungal biotroph Erysiphe cichoracearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotopoulos, Vasileios; Gilbert, Martin J; Pittman, Jon K; Marvier, Alison C; Buchanan, Aram J; Sauer, Norbert; Hall, J L; Williams, Lorraine E

    2003-06-01

    Powdery mildew fungi are biotrophic pathogens that form a complex interface, the haustorium, between the host plant and the parasite. The pathogen acts as an additional sink, competing with host sinks, resulting in considerable modification of photoassimilate production and partitioning within the host tissue. Here, we examine the factors that may contribute to these changes. We show for the first time in one biotrophic interaction (Arabidopsis/Erysiphe cichoracearum) all of the following responses: Glc uptake in host tissues is enhanced after fungal infection; this coincides with the induction of expression of the monosaccharide transporter gene, Arabidopsis sugar transport protein 4 (AtSTP4), in infected leaves; invertase activity and transcript levels for a cell wall invertase, Atbetafruct1, increase substantially in Arabidopsis during attack by this pathogen. Before infection, Arabidopsis plants transformed with an AtSTP4 promoter-beta-glucuronidase construct show expression mainly in sink tissues such as roots; after infection, AtSTP4 expression is induced in the mature leaves and increases over the 6-d time period. Sections of infected leaves stained for beta-glucuronidase show that AtSTP4 expression is not confined to infected epidermal cells but is also evident in a wider range of cells, including those of the vascular tissue. The results are discussed in relation to the possible coordinated expression of hexose transporters and cell wall invertase in the host response to powdery mildew infection.

  4. Joint European Partial-G Parabolic Flight Campaign-Calcium Analysis in Arabidopsis Thaliana Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neef, Maren; Fengler, Svenja; Ecke, Margret; Hausmann, Niklas; Hampp, Rudiger

    2013-02-01

    Callus cells derived from stem tissue suspension cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana (cv. Columbia) were exposed to parabolic flights on board of an Airbus A300 (Novespace). The cells were either wild type or expressed a fluorescent probe for the quantification of cytosolic calcium (green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based Cameleon). The wild type cells were used for both, fluorescence background control, and the analysis of gene expression. With respect to fluorescence measurements, changes in the amounts of Ca2+, an important component of signalling chains, could be assayed in vivo in real time. The technique used takes advantage of a shift in fluorescence from 480 to 535 nm with increasing Ca2+ content. During the experiment, fluorescence data were monitored at Mars, Moon and micro gravity producing flight profiles, each at 1g, pull up (1.8g), about 20 to 26 s of mars (0.36g), moon (0.16g) or micro gravity, and pull out (1.8g) for 12/12/6 consecutive parabolas at different days. Transition from hypergravity to microgravity resulted in a typical increase in cytosolic Ca2+. The flight profile “Moon” (0.16g) exhibited a very similar behaviour as microgravity, whereas simulation of “Mars” gravitation (0.36) resulted in a weaker signal. This can also be deduced from minimal/maximal values of the ratio between hyper-g and onset of reduced g. Obviously, the threshold gravitation for a Ca2+ response is above 0.36g. Increasing gravity by centrifugation, in contrast, induced a decrease in cytosolic calcium. Here, a threshold in response was obvious between 3 and 4g. In order to assay changes in gene expression, we additionally quenched parabolic flight samples by the injection of RNAlater. A microarray analysis of these samples showed a clear impact of the different profiles. Both Moon and Mars profiles exhibited less response than the μg profile. However, the latter responded also less compared to previous “μg only” flights. In those we had much higher numbers of

  5. Uncoupling salicylic acid-dependent cell death and defense-related responses from disease resistance in the Arabidopsis mutant acd5.

    OpenAIRE

    Greenberg, J T; Silverman, F P; Liang, H

    2000-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is required for resistance to many diseases in higher plants. SA-dependent cell death and defense-related responses have been correlated with disease resistance. The accelerated cell death 5 mutant of Arabidopsis provides additional genetic evidence that SA regulates cell death and defense-related responses. However, in acd5, these events are uncoupled from disease resistance. acd5 plants are more susceptible to Pseudomonas syringae early in development and show spontaneou...

  6. A General G1/S-Phase Cell-Cycle Control Module in the Flowering Plant Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin'Ai; Harashima, Hirofumi; Dissmeyer, Nico; Pusch, Stefan; Weimer, Annika K.; Bramsiepe, Jonathan; Bouyer, Daniel; Rademacher, Svenja; Nowack, Moritz K.; Novak, Bela; Sprunck, Stefanie; Schnittger, Arp

    2012-01-01

    The decision to replicate its DNA is of crucial importance for every cell and, in many organisms, is decisive for the progression through the entire cell cycle. A comparison of animals versus yeast has shown that, although most of the involved cell-cycle regulators are divergent in both clades, they fulfill a similar role and the overall network topology of G1/S regulation is highly conserved. Using germline development as a model system, we identified a regulatory cascade controlling entry into S phase in the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana, which, as a member of the Plantae supergroup, is phylogenetically only distantly related to Opisthokonts such as yeast and animals. This module comprises the Arabidopsis homologs of the animal transcription factor E2F, the plant homolog of the animal transcriptional repressor Retinoblastoma (Rb)-related 1 (RBR1), the plant-specific F-box protein F-BOX-LIKE 17 (FBL17), the plant specific cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors KRPs, as well as CDKA;1, the plant homolog of the yeast and animal Cdc2+/Cdk1 kinases. Our data show that the principle of a double negative wiring of Rb proteins is highly conserved, likely representing a universal mechanism in eukaryotic cell-cycle control. However, this negative feedback of Rb proteins is differently implemented in plants as it is brought about through a quadruple negative regulation centered around the F-box protein FBL17 that mediates the degradation of CDK inhibitors but is itself directly repressed by Rb. Biomathematical simulations and subsequent experimental confirmation of computational predictions revealed that this regulatory circuit can give rise to hysteresis highlighting the here identified dosage sensitivity of CDK inhibitors in this network. PMID:22879821

  7. iTRAQ Mitoproteome Analysis Reveals Mechanisms of Programmed Cell Death in Arabidopsis thaliana Induced by Ochratoxin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ochratoxin A (OTA is one of the most common and dangerous mycotoxins in the world. Previous work indicated that OTA could elicit spontaneous HR-like lesions formation Arabidopsis thaliana, reactive oxygen species (ROS play an important role in OTA toxicity, and their major endogenous source is mitochondria. However, there has been no evidence as to whether OTA induces directly PCD in plants until now. In this study, the presence of OTA in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves triggered accelerated respiration, increased production of mitochondrial ROS, the opening of ROS-dependent mitochondrial permeability transition pores and a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential as well as the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. There were 42 and 43 significantly differentially expressed proteins identified in response to exposure to OTA for 8 and 24 h, respectively, according to iTRAQ analysis. These proteins were mainly involved in perturbation of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, interfering with ATP synthesis and inducing PCD. Digital gene expression data at transcriptional level was consistent with the cell death induced by OTA being PCD. These results indicated that mitochondrial dysfunction was a prerequisite for OTA-induced PCD and the initiation and execution of PCD via a mitochondrial-mediated pathway.

  8. Genetic Analysis of Ca2+ Priming in Arabidopsis Guard Cell Stomatal Closure in Response to the Drought Hormone Abscisic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan, Aaron B. [Life Sciences Research Foundation, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-11-01

    A primary objective of modern agriculture and biofuel production is to utilize arable land to its fullest potential. However, sub-optimal growing conditions—arising from abiotic stresses such as drought, soil salinity, low humidity, cold, and heat—reduce crop yield and quality. Optimal yield under both stressed and non-stressed conditions requires the plant to activate coping mechanisms at a level commensurate with the severity of the drought stress. The osmotic sensors and associated regulatory mechanisms that initiate drought- and salt-tolerance responses in plants are largely unknown. This research aimed to identify and characterize these initial sensory components.

  9. Sticking to cellulose: exploiting Arabidopsis seed coat mucilage to understand cellulose biosynthesis and cell wall polysaccharide interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Jonathan S; North, Helen M

    2017-05-01

    The cell wall defines the shape of cells and ultimately plant architecture. It provides mechanical resistance to osmotic pressure while still being malleable and allowing cells to grow and divide. These properties are determined by the different components of the wall and the interactions between them. The major components of the cell wall are the polysaccharides cellulose, hemicellulose and pectin. Cellulose biosynthesis has been extensively studied in Arabidopsis hypocotyls, and more recently in the mucilage-producing epidermal cells of the seed coat. The latter has emerged as an excellent system to study cellulose biosynthesis and the interactions between cellulose and other cell wall polymers. Here we review some of the major advances in our understanding of cellulose biosynthesis in the seed coat, and how mucilage has aided our understanding of the interactions between cellulose and other cell wall components required for wall cohesion. Recently, 10 genes involved in cellulose or hemicellulose biosynthesis in mucilage have been identified. These discoveries have helped to demonstrate that xylan side-chains on rhamnogalacturonan I act to link this pectin directly to cellulose. We also examine other factors that, either directly or indirectly, influence cellulose organization or crystallization in mucilage. © 2017 INRA. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. Identification of genes involved in the ACC-mediated control of root cell elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markakis Marios

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Along the root axis of Arabidopsis thaliana, cells pass through different developmental stages. In the apical meristem repeated cycles of division increase the numbers of cells. Upon leaving the meristem, these cells pass the transition zone where they are physiologically and mechanically prepared to undergo subsequent rapid elongation. During the process of elongation epidermal cells increase their length by 300% in a couple of hours. When elongation ceases, the cells acquire their final size, shape and functions (in the differentiation zone. Ethylene administered as its precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC is capable of inhibiting elongation in a concentration-dependent way. Using a microarray analysis, genes and/or processes involved in this elongation arrest are identified. Results Using a CATMA-microarray analysis performed on control and 3h ACC-treated roots, 240 differentially expressed genes were identified. Quantitative Real-Time RT-PCR analysis of the 10 most up and down regulated genes combined with literature search confirmed the accurateness of the analysis. This revealed that inhibition of cell elongation is, at least partly, caused by restricting the events that under normal growth conditions initiate elongation and by increasing the processes that normally stop cellular elongation at the end of the elongation/onset of differentiation zone. Conclusions ACC interferes with cell elongation in the Arabidopsis thaliana roots by inhibiting cells from entering the elongation process and by immediately stimulating the formation of cross-links in cell wall components, diminishing the remaining elongation capacity. From the analysis of the differentially expressed genes, it becomes clear that many genes identified in this response, are also involved in several other kind of stress responses. This suggests that many responses originate from individual elicitors, but that somewhere in the downstream

  11. The cell wall-localized atypical β-1,3 glucanase ZERZAUST controls tissue morphogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaddepalli, Prasad; Fulton, Lynette; Wieland, Jennifer; Wassmer, Katrin; Schaeffer, Milena; Ranf, Stefanie; Schneitz, Kay

    2017-06-15

    Orchestration of cellular behavior in plant organogenesis requires integration of intercellular communication and cell wall dynamics. The underlying signaling mechanisms are poorly understood. Tissue morphogenesis in Arabidopsis depends on the receptor-like kinase STRUBBELIG. Mutations in ZERZAUST were previously shown to result in a strubbelig -like mutant phenotype. Here, we report on the molecular identification and functional characterization of ZERZAUST We show that ZERZAUST encodes a putative GPI-anchored β-1,3 glucanase suggested to degrade the cell wall polymer callose. However, a combination of in vitro , cell biological and genetic experiments indicate that ZERZAUST is not involved in the regulation of callose accumulation. Nonetheless, Fourier-transformed infrared-spectroscopy revealed that zerzaust mutants show defects in cell wall composition. Furthermore, the results indicate that ZERZAUST represents a mobile apoplastic protein, and that its carbohydrate-binding module family 43 domain is required for proper subcellular localization and function whereas its GPI anchor is dispensable. Our collective data reveal that the atypical β-1,3 glucanase ZERZAUST acts in a non-cell-autonomous manner and is required for cell wall organization during tissue morphogenesis. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Null mutants of individual RABA genes impact the proportion of different cell wall components in stem tissue of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lunn

    Full Text Available In Arabidopsis, and other plants, the RABA GTPases (orthologous to the Rab11a of mammals have expanded in number and diversity and have been shown to belong to eight sub clades, some of which have been implicated in controlling vesicles that traffic cell wall polymers and enzymes that synthesise or modify them to the cell wall. In order to investigate this, we have investigated whether T-DNA insertion knockouts of individual RABA genes belonging to different sub clades, impact on the composition of the plant cell wall. Single gene knockouts of the RABA1, RABA2 and RABA4 sub clades primarily affected the percentage composition of pectin, cellulose and hemicellulose within the cell wall, respectively, despite having no obvious phenotype in the whole plant. We hypothesise that vesicles carrying specific types of cargoes from the Golgi to the cell surface may be regulated by particular sub types of RABA proteins, a finding that could have wider implications for how trafficking systems work and could be a useful tool in cell wall research and other fields of plant biology.

  13. Exe-Guard Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Rhett [Schweitzer Engineering Lab., Inc., Pullman, WA (United States); Marshall, Tim [Dominion Virginia Power, Richmond, VA (United States); Chavez, Adrian [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Bratus, Sergey [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)

    2016-01-30

    The exe-Guard Project is an alliance between Dominion Virginia Power (DVP), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Dartmouth University, and Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories (SEL). SEL is primary recipient on this project. The exe-Guard project was selected for award under DE-FOA-0000359 with CFDA number 81.122 to address Topic Area of Interest 4: Hardened platforms and Systems. The exe-Guard project developed an antivirus solution for control system embedded devices to prevent the execution of unauthorized code and maintain settings and configuration integrity. This project created a white list antivirus solution for control systems capable of running on embedded Linux® operating systems. White list antivirus methods allow only credible programs to run through the use of digital signatures and hash functions. Once a system’s secure state is baselined, white list antivirus software denies deviations from that state because of the installation of malicious code as this changes hash results. Black list antivirus software has been effective in traditional IT environments but has negative implications for control systems. Black list antivirus uses pattern matching and behavioral analysis to identify system threats while relying on regular updates to the signature file and recurrent system scanning. Black list antivirus is vulnerable to zero day exploits which have not yet been incorporated into a signature file update. System scans hamper the performance of high availability applications, as revealed in NIST special publication 1058 which summarizes the impact of blacklist antivirus on control systems: Manual or “on-demand” scanning has a major effect on control processes in that they take CPU time needed by the control process (Sometimes close to 100% of CPU time). Minimizing the antivirus software throttle setting will reduce but not eliminate this effect. Signature updates can also take up to 100% of CPU time, but for a much shorter period than a typical

  14. Arabidopsis homolog of trithorax1 (ATX1) is required for cell production, patterning, and morphogenesis in root development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napsucialy-Mendivil, Selene; Alvarez-Venegas, Raúl; Shishkova, Svetlana; Dubrovsky, Joseph G

    2014-12-01

    Arabidopsis homolog of trithorax1 (ATX1/SDG27), a known regulator of flower development, encodes a H3K4histone methyltransferase that maintains a number of genes in an active state. In this study, the role of ATX1 in root development was evaluated. The loss-of-function mutant atx1-1 was impaired in primary root growth. The data suggest that ATX1 controls root growth by regulating cell cycle duration, cell production, and the transition from cell proliferation in the root apical meristem (RAM) to cell elongation. In atx1-1, the quiescent centre (QC) cells were irregular in shape and more expanded than those of the wild type. This feature, together with the atypical distribution of T-divisions, the presence of oblique divisions, and the abnormal cell patterning in the RAM, suggests a lack of coordination between cell division and cell growth in the mutant. The expression domain of QC-specific markers was expanded both in the primary RAM and in the developing lateral root primordia of atx1-1 plants. These abnormalities were independent of auxin-response gradients. ATX1 was also found to be required for lateral root initiation, morphogenesis, and emergence. The time from lateral root initiation to emergence was significantly extended in the atx1-1 mutant. Overall, these data suggest that ATX1 is involved in the timing of root development, stem cell niche maintenance, and cell patterning during primary and lateral root development. Thus, ATX1 emerges as an important player in root system architecture. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  15. YUCCA-mediated auxin biogenesis is required for cell fate transition occurring during de novo root organogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lyuqin; Tong, Jianhua; Xiao, Langtao; Ruan, Ying; Liu, Jingchun; Zeng, Minhuan; Huang, Hai; Wang, Jia-Wei; Xu, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Many plant organs have the ability to regenerate a new plant after detachment or wounding via de novo organogenesis. During de novo root organogenesis from Arabidopsis thaliana leaf explants, endogenic auxin is essential for the fate transition of regeneration-competent cells to become root founder cells via activation of WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX 11 (WOX11). However, the molecular events from leaf explant detachment to auxin-mediated cell fate transition are poorly understood. In this study, we used an assay to determine the concentration of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to provide direct evidence that auxin is produced after leaf explant detachment, a process that involves YUCCA (YUC)-mediated auxin biogenesis. Inhibition of YUC prevents expression of WOX11 and fate transition of competent cells, resulting in the blocking of rooting. Further analysis showed that YUC1 and YUC4 act quickly (within 4 hours) in response to wounding after detachment in both light and dark conditions and promote auxin biogenesis in both mesophyll and competent cells, whereas YUC5, YUC8, and YUC9 primarily respond in dark conditions. In addition, YUC2 and YUC6 contribute to rooting by providing a basal auxin level in the leaf. Overall, our study indicates that YUC genes exhibit a division of labour during de novo root organogenesis from leaf explants in response to multiple signals. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  16. Transient gibberellin application promotes Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyl cell elongation without maintaining transverse orientation of microtubules on the outer tangential wall of epidermal cells

    KAUST Repository

    Sauret-Güeto, Susanna

    2011-11-25

    The phytohormone gibberellin (GA) promotes plant growth by stimulating cellular expansion. Whilst it is known that GA acts by opposing the growth-repressing effects of DELLA proteins, it is not known how these events promote cellular expansion. Here we present a time-lapse analysis of the effects of a single pulse of GA on the growth of Arabidopsis hypocotyls. Our analyses permit kinetic resolution of the transient growth effects of GA on expanding cells. We show that pulsed application of GA to the relatively slowly growing cells of the unexpanded light-grown Arabidopsis hypocotyl results in a transient burst of anisotropic cellular growth. This burst, and the subsequent restoration of initial cellular elongation rates, occurred respectively following the degradation and subsequent reappearance of a GFP-tagged DELLA (GFP-RGA). In addition, we used a GFP-tagged α-tubulin 6 (GFP-TUA6) to visualise the behaviour of microtubules (MTs) on the outer tangential wall (OTW) of epidermal cells. In contrast to some current hypotheses concerning the effect of GA on MTs, we show that the GA-induced boost of hypocotyl cell elongation rate is not dependent upon the maintenance of transverse orientation of the OTW MTs. This confirms that transverse alignment of outer face MTs is not necessary to maintain rapid elongation rates of light-grown hypocotyls. Together with future studies on MT dynamics in other faces of epidermal cells and in cells deeper within the hypocotyl, our observations advance understanding of the mechanisms by which GA promotes plant cell and organ growth. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Overexpression of the carbohydrate binding module of strawberry expansin2 in Arabidopsis thaliana modifies plant growth and cell wall metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Cristina F; Villarreal, Natalia M; Rossi, Franco R; Martínez, Santiago; Martínez, Gustavo A; Civello, Pedro M

    2015-05-01

    Several cell wall enzymes are carbohydrate active enzymes that contain a putative Carbohydrate Binding Module (CBM) in their structures. The main function of these non-catalitic modules is to facilitate the interaction between the enzyme and its substrate. Expansins are non-hydrolytic proteins present in the cell wall, and their structure includes a CBM in the C-terminal that bind to cell wall polymers such as cellulose, hemicelluloses and pectins. We studied the ability of the Expansin2 CBM (CBMFaEXP2) from strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa, Duch) to modify the cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana. Plants overexpressing CBMFaEXP2 were characterized phenotypically and biochemically. Transgenic plants were taller than wild type, possibly owing to a faster growth of the main stem. Cell walls of CBMFaEXP2-expressing plants were thicker and contained higher amount of pectins. Lower activity of a set of enzymes involved in cell wall degradation (PG, β-Gal, β-Xyl) was found, and the expression of the corresponding genes (AtPG, Atβ-Gal, Atβ-Xyl5) was reduced also. In addition, a decrease in the expression of two A. thaliana Expansin genes (AtEXP5 and AtEXP8) was observed. Transgenic plants were more resistant to Botrytis cinerea infection than wild type, possibly as a consequence of higher cell wall integrity. Our results support the hypothesis that the overexpression of a putative CBM is able to modify plant cell wall structure leading to modulation of wall loosening and plant growth. These findings might offer a tool to controlling physiological processes where cell wall disassembly is relevant, such as fruit softening.

  18. The effectiveness of shin guards used by football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatar, Yasar; Ramazanoglu, Nusret; Camliguney, Asiye Filiz; Saygi, Evrim Karadag; Cotuk, Hasan Birol

    2014-01-01

    In football, injuries from opponent contact occur commonly in the lower extremities. FIFA the world's governing body for football requires players to wear shin guards. The aim of this study was to compare the protective effectiveness of polypropylene based shin guards with custom-made carbon fiber ones. Three commercial polypropylene shin guards (Adidas Predator™, Adidas UCL™, and Nike Mercurial™) and two custom-made carbon fiber shin guards were examined. The experimental setup had the following parts: 1) A pendulum attached a load cell at the tip (CAS Corp., Korea) and a fixed prosthetic foot equipped with a cleat to simulate an attacker's foot. 2) An artificial tibia prepared by condensed foam and reinforced by carbon fibers protected with soft clothing. 3) A multifunctional sensor system (Tekscan Corp., F-Socket System, Turkey) to record the impact on the tibia. In the low impact force trials, only 2.79-9.63 % of the load was transmitted to the sensors. When comparing for mean force, peak force and impulse, both carbon fiber shin guards performed better than the commercial ones (Adidas Predator™, Adidas UCL™, and Nike Mercurial™) (p = 0.000). Based on these same parameters, the Nike Mercurial™ provided better protection than the Adidas Predator™ and the Adidas UCL™ (p = 0.000). In the high impact force trials, only 5.16-10.90 % of the load was transmitted to the sensors. For peak force and impulse, the carbon fiber shin guards provided better protection than all the others. Carbon fiber shin guards possess protective qualities superior to those of commercial polypropylene shin guards. Key PointsShin guards decrease the risk of serious injuries.Carbon shin guards provide sufficient protection against high impact forces.Commercially available Polypropylene based shin guards do not provide sufficient protection against high impact forces.

  19. A multidirectional non-cell autonomous control and a genetic interaction restricting tobacco etch virus susceptibility in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Gopalan

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Viruses constitute a major class of pathogens that infect a variety of hosts. Understanding the intricacies of signaling during host-virus interactions should aid in designing disease prevention strategies and in understanding mechanistic aspects of host and pathogen signaling machinery.An Arabidopsis mutant, B149, impaired in susceptibility to Tobacco etch virus (TEV, a positive strand RNA virus of picoRNA family, was identified using a high-throughput genetic screen and a counterselection scheme. The defects include initiation of infection foci, rate of cell-to-cell movement and long distance movement.The defect in infectivity is conferred by a recessive locus. Molecular genetic analysis and complementation analysis with three alleles of a previously published mutant lsp1 (loss of susceptibility to potyviruses indicate a genetic interaction conferring haploinsufficiency between the B149 locus and certain alleles of lsp1 resulting in impaired host susceptibility. The pattern of restriction of TEV foci on leaves at or near the boundaries of certain cell types and leaf boundaries suggest dysregulation of a multidirectional non-cell autonomous regulatory mechanism. Understanding the nature of this multidirectional signal and the molecular genetic mechanism conferring it should potentially reveal a novel arsenal in the cellular machinery.

  20. Amino acid substitution converts WEREWOLF function from an activator to a repressor of Arabidopsis non-hair cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga-Wada, Rumi; Nukumizu, Yuka; Wada, Takuji

    2012-02-01

    Root hair cell or non-hair cell fate determination in Arabidopsis thaliana root epidermis is model system for plant cell development. Two types of MYB transcription factors, the R2R3-type MYB, WEREWOLF (WER), and an R3-type MYB, CAPRICE (CPC), are involved in this cell fate determination process. To study the molecular basis of this process, we analyzed the functional relationship of WER and CPC. WER-CPC chimeric constructs were made from WER where all or parts of the MYB R3 region were replaced with the corresponding regions from CPC R3, and the constructs were introduced into the cpc-2 mutant. Although, the WER gene did not rescue the cpc-2 mutant 'small number of root hairs' phenotype, the WER-CPC chimera with two amino acids substitution (WC6) completely rescued the cpc-2 mutant phenotype. Furthermore, the WER-CPC chimera with 37 amino acids substitution (WC5) excessively rescued the cpc-2 mutant and induced 2.5 times more root hairs than wild-type. Consistent with this phenotype, GL2 gene expression was strongly reduced in WC5 in a cpc-2 background. Our results suggest that swapping at least two amino acids is sufficient to convert WER to CPC function. Therefore, these key residues may have strongly contributed to the selection of these important functions over evolution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. MUM ENHANCERS are important for seed coat mucilage production and mucilage secretory cell differentiation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsovski, Andrej A; Villota, Maria M; Rowland, Owen; Subramaniam, Rajagopal; Western, Tamara L

    2009-01-01

    Pollination triggers not only embryo development but also the differentiation of the ovule integuments to form a specialized seed coat. The mucilage secretory cells of the Arabidopsis thaliana seed coat undergo a complex differentiation process in which cell growth is followed by the synthesis and secretion of pectinaceous mucilage. A number of genes have been identified affecting mucilage secretory cell differentiation, including MUCILAGE-MODIFIED4 (MUM4). mum4 mutants produce a reduced amount of mucilage and cloning of MUM4 revealed that it encodes a UDP-L-rhamnose synthase that is developmentally up-regulated to provide rhamnose for mucilage pectin synthesis. To identify additional genes acting in mucilage synthesis and secretion, a screen for enhancers of the mum4 phenotype was performed. Eight mum enhancers (men) have been identified, two of which result from defects in known mucilage secretory cell genes (MUM2 and MYB61). Our results show that, in a mum4 background, mutations in MEN1, MEN4, and MEN5 lead to further reductions in mucilage compared to mum4 single mutants, suggesting that they are involved in mucilage synthesis or secretion. Conversely, mutations in MEN2 and MEN6 appear to affect mucilage release rather than quantity. With the exception of men4, whose single mutant exhibits reduced mucilage, none of these genes have a single mutant phenotype, suggesting that they would not have been identified outside the compromised mum4 background.

  2. The observation research of the differences in cell death and reactive oxygen species in the process of infecting Arabidopsis with avirulent strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, HuaBin; Chen, WenLi

    2012-03-01

    Objective: To observe the differences of cell death and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the process of infecting Arabidopsis with avirulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (avrB, avrRps4), it will be of great importance to research the role of plant disease resistance and defense response. Methods: Using WT, AtrbohD and AtrbohF mutant as experimental materials, we discuss the impact of cell death and ROS on the leaves of Arabidopsis infected with avirulent Pst DC3000 (avrB, avrRps4), observed by spectral analysis and visualized by DAB and trypan blue stain. Results: When infected with avirulent Pst DC3000, both WT and AtrbohF mutant line behaved resistance that exhibited burst of ROS and HR occur, limit senescence and pathogen induced chlorotic cell death. Paradoxically, AtrbohD mutant behaved susceptible characters that exhibited a small quantity of ROS accumulated and enhanced cell death. Conclusion: After infection of Arabidopsis with avirulent Pst DC3000, WT exhibited more ROS accumulation than AtrbohF, and AtrbohD eliminated the majority of total ROS production. Although both WT and AtrbohF mutant exhibited HR occur, enhanced cell death in AtrbohD mutant.

  3. Reference: 208 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available oshiteru et al. 2005 Jul. Plant Cell Physiol. 46(7):1165-72. We isolated an Arabidopsis albino and pale gree... in histidine biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. 7 1165-72 15870096 2005 Jul Plant & cell physiology Ito Takuya|Noutoshi Yoshiteru|Shinozaki Kazuo

  4. Reference: 537 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ukika et al. 2007 Mar. Plant Cell Physiol. 48(3):555-61. Gibberellin levels in imbibed Arabidopsis thaliana ...uppression of germination of dark-imbibed Arabidopsis thaliana seeds. 3 555-61 17289793 2007 Mar Plant & cell physio

  5. Dysfunction of Arabidopsis MACPF domain protein activates programmed cell death via tryptophan metabolism in MAMP-triggered immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Satoshi; Sogame, Miho; Hata, Masaki; Singkaravanit-Ogawa, Suthitar; Piślewska-Bednarek, Mariola; Onozawa-Komori, Mariko; Nishiuchi, Takumi; Hiruma, Kei; Saitoh, Hiromasa; Terauchi, Ryohei; Kitakura, Saeko; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Bednarek, Paweł; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Takano, Yoshitaka

    2017-01-01

    Plant immune responses triggered upon recognition of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) typically restrict pathogen growth without a host cell death response. We isolated two Arabidopsis mutants, derived from accession Col-0, that activated cell death upon inoculation with nonadapted fungal pathogens. Notably, the mutants triggered cell death also when treated with bacterial MAMPs such as flg22. Positional cloning identified NSL1 (Necrotic Spotted Lesion 1) as a responsible gene for the phenotype of the two mutants, whereas nsl1 mutations of the accession No-0 resulted in necrotic lesion formation without pathogen inoculation. NSL1 encodes a protein of unknown function containing a putative membrane-attack complex/perforin (MACPF) domain. The application of flg22 increased salicylic acid (SA) accumulation in the nsl1 plants derived from Col-0, while depletion of isochorismate synthase 1 repressed flg22-inducible lesion formation, indicating that elevated SA is needed for the cell death response. nsl1 plants of Col-0 responded to flg22 treatment with an RBOHD-dependent oxidative burst, but this response was dispensable for the nsl1-dependent cell death. Surprisingly, loss-of-function mutations in PEN2, involved in the metabolism of tryptophan (Trp)-derived indole glucosinolates, suppressed the flg22-induced and nsl1-dependent cell death. Moreover, the increased accumulation of SA in the nsl1 plants was abrogated by blocking Trp-derived secondary metabolite biosynthesis, whereas the nsl1-dependent hyperaccumulation of PEN2-dependent compounds was unaffected when the SA biosynthesis pathway was blocked. Collectively, these findings suggest that MAMP-triggered immunity activates a genetically programmed cell death in the absence of the functional MACPF domain protein NSL1 via Trp-derived secondary metabolite-mediated activation of the SA pathway. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Changes in Gene Expression of Arabidopsis Thaliana Cell Cultures Upon Exposure to Real and Simulated Partial- g Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fengler, Svenja; Spirer, Ina; Neef, Maren; Ecke, Margret; Hauslage, Jens; Hampp, Rüdiger

    2016-06-01

    Cell cultures of the plant model organism Arabidopsis thaliana were exposed to partial- g forces during parabolic flight and clinostat experiments (0.16 g, 0.38 g and 0.5 g were tested). In order to investigate gravity-dependent alterations in gene expression, samples were metabolically quenched by the fixative RNA later Ⓡ to stabilize nucleic acids and used for whole-genome microarray analysis. An attempt to identify the potential threshold acceleration for the gravity-dependent response showed that the smaller the experienced g-force, the greater was the susceptibility of the cell cultures. Compared to short-term μ g during a parabolic flight, the number of differentially expressed genes under partial- g was lower. In addition, the effect on the alteration of amounts of transcripts decreased during partial- g parabolic flight due to the sequence of the different parabolas (0.38 g, 0.16 g and μ g). A time-dependent analysis under simulated 0.5 g indicates that adaptation occurs within minutes. Differentially expressed genes (at least 2-fold up- or down-regulated in expression) under real flight conditions were to some extent identical with those affected by clinorotation. The highest number of homologuous genes was detected within seconds of exposure to 0.38 g (both flight and clinorotation). To a considerable part, these genes deal with cell wall properties. Additionally, responses specific for clinorotation were observed.

  7. Plant, cell, and molecular mechanisms of abscisic-acid regulation of stomatal apertures. A new mechanism for the regulation of stomatal-aperture size in intact leaves: Accumulation of mesophyll-derived sucrose in the guard-cell wall of Vicia faba L.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, P.; Outlaw, W.H. Jr.; Smith, B.G.; Freed, G.A.

    1996-12-31

    At various times after pulse labeling Vicia faba L. leaflets with {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, whole-leaf pieces and rinsed epidermal peels were harvested and subsequently processed for histochemical analysis. Cells dissected from whole leaf retained apoplastic contents whereas those from rinsed peels contained only cytoplastic contents. Sucrose specific radioactivity peaked in palisade cells, 111 GBq{center_dot}mol{sup {minus}1}, at 20 min. In contrast, the {sup 14}C content and sucrose specific radioactivity were very low in guard cells for 20 min, implying little CO{sub 2} incorporation; both then peaked at 40 min. The guard-cell apoplast had a high maximum sucrose specific radioactivity and a high sucrose influx rate. These and other comparisons implied the presence of (a) multiple sucrose pools in mesophyll cells, (b) a localized mesophyll-apoplast region that exchanges with phloem and stomata, and (c) mesophyll-derived sucrose in guard-cell walls sufficient to diminish stomatal opening by {approximately} 4 {micro}m. Factors expected to enhance sucrose accumulation in guard-cell walls are (a) high transpiration rate, which closes stomata, and (b) high apoplastic sucrose concentration, which is elevated when mesophyll-sucrose efflux exceeds translocation. Therefore, multiple physiological factors are integrated in the attenuation of stomatal-aperture size by this previously unrecognized mechanism.

  8. Reference: 297 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is (Arabidopsis thaliana) mineral responses. Confocal microscopic studies localiz...nder normal growth conditions, it significantly altered the expression patterns of WAKL4 under various conditions of miner...oter complemented the phenotypes. Our results suggest versatile roles for WAKL4 in Arabidopsis mineral nutri...tion responses. Involvement of a cell wall-associated kinase, WAKL4, in Arabidopsis mineral responses. 4 170

  9. Simulation of Fungal-Mediated Cell Death by Fumonisin B1 and Selection of Fumonisin B1–Resistant (fbr) Arabidopsis Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Julie M.; Heard, Jacqueline E.; Asai, Tsuneaki; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2000-01-01

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1), a programmed cell death–eliciting toxin produced by the necrotrophic fungal plant pathogen Fusarium moniliforme, was used to simulate pathogen infection in Arabidopsis. Plants infiltrated with 10 μM FB1 and seedlings transferred to agar media containing 1 μM FB1 develop lesions reminiscent of the hypersensitive response, including generation of reactive oxygen intermediates, deposition of phenolic compounds and callose, accumulation of phytoalexin, and expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. Arabidopsis FB1-resistant (fbr) mutants were selected directly by sowing seeds on agar containing 1 μM FB1, on which wild-type seedlings fail to develop. Two mutants chosen for further analyses, fbr1 and fbr2, had altered PR gene expression in response to FB1. fbr1 and fbr2 do not exhibit differential resistance to the avirulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv maculicola (ES4326) expressing the avirulence gene avrRpt2 but do display enhanced resistance to a virulent isogenic strain that lacks the avirulence gene. Our results demonstrate the utility of FB1 for high-throughput isolation of Arabidopsis defense-related mutants and suggest that pathogen-elicited programmed cell death of host cells may be an important feature of compatible plant–pathogen interactions. PMID:11041878

  10. Impaired Chloroplast Biogenesis in Immutans, an Arabidopsis Variegation Mutant, Modifies Developmental Programming, Cell Wall Composition and Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady V Pogorelko

    Full Text Available The immutans (im variegation mutation of Arabidopsis has green- and white- sectored leaves due to action of a nuclear recessive gene. IM codes for PTOX, a plastoquinol oxidase in plastid membranes. Previous studies have revealed that the green and white sectors develop into sources (green tissues and sinks (white tissues early in leaf development. In this report we focus on white sectors, and show that their transformation into effective sinks involves a sharp reduction in plastid number and size. Despite these reductions, cells in the white sectors have near-normal amounts of plastid RNA and protein, and surprisingly, a marked amplification of chloroplast DNA. The maintenance of protein synthesis capacity in the white sectors might poise plastids for their development into other plastid types. The green and white im sectors have different cell wall compositions: whereas cell walls in the green sectors resemble those in wild type, cell walls in the white sectors have reduced lignin and cellulose microfibrils, as well as alterations in galactomannans and the decoration of xyloglucan. These changes promote susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Enhanced susceptibility can also be explained by repressed expression of some, but not all, defense genes. We suggest that differences in morphology, physiology and biochemistry between the green and white sectors is caused by a reprogramming of leaf development that is coordinated, in part, by mechanisms of retrograde (plastid-to-nucleus signaling, perhaps mediated by ROS. We conclude that variegation mutants offer a novel system to study leaf developmental programming, cell wall metabolism and host-pathogen interactions.

  11. Synthesis and degradation of long-chain base phosphates affect fumonisin B1-induced cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Daiki; Ishikawa, Toshiki; Imai, Hiroyuki

    2017-05-01

    Fumonisin B 1 (FB 1 ), an inducer of cell death, disrupts sphingolipid metabolism; large accumulations of de novo synthesized free long-chain bases (LCBs) are observed. However, it remains unclear whether tolerance to FB 1 toxicity in plants is connected with preventing the accumulation of free LCBs through their phosphorylation. Here a workflow for the extraction, detection and quantification of LCB phosphates (LCBPs) in Arabidopsis thaliana was developed. We studied the effect of expression of genes for three enzymes involved in the synthesis and degradation of LCBPs, LCB kinase (LCBK1), LCBP phosphatase (SPP1) and lyase (DPL1) on FB 1 -induced cell death. As expected, large accumulations of saturated free LCBs, dihydrosphingosine and phytosphingosine, were observed in the FB 1 -treated leaves. On the other hand, a high level of sphingenine phosphate was found in the FB 1 -treated leaves even though free sphingenine was found in low amounts in these leaves. In comparison of WT and spp1 plants, the LCBP/LCB ratio is likely to be correlated with the degree of FB 1 -induced cell death determined by trypan blue staining. The FB 1 -treated leaves in dpl1 plants showed severe cell death and the elevation of free LCBs and LCBPs. LCBK1-OX and -KD plants showed resistance and sensitivity to FB 1 , respectively, whereas free LCB and LCBP levels in FB 1 -treated LCBK1-OX and -KD plants were moderately different to those in FB 1 -treated WT plants. Overall, the findings described here suggest that LCBP/LCB homeostasis is an important topic that participates in the tolerance of plant cells to FB 1 .

  12. Atomic force microscopy of photosystem II and its unit cell clustering quantitatively delineate the mesoscale variability in Arabidopsis thylakoids.

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    Bibiana Onoa

    Full Text Available Photoautotrophic organisms efficiently regulate absorption of light energy to sustain photochemistry while promoting photoprotection. Photoprotection is achieved in part by triggering a series of dissipative processes termed non-photochemical quenching (NPQ, which depend on the re-organization of photosystem (PS II supercomplexes in thylakoid membranes. Using atomic force microscopy, we characterized the structural attributes of grana thylakoids from Arabidopsis thaliana to correlate differences in PSII organization with the role of SOQ1, a recently discovered thylakoid protein that prevents formation of a slowly reversible NPQ state. We developed a statistical image analysis suite to discriminate disordered from crystalline particles and classify crystalline arrays according to their unit cell properties. Through detailed analysis of the local organization of PSII supercomplexes in ordered and disordered phases, we found evidence that interactions among light-harvesting antenna complexes are weakened in the absence of SOQ1, inducing protein rearrangements that favor larger separations between PSII complexes in the majority (disordered phase and reshaping the PSII crystallization landscape. The features we observe are distinct from known protein rearrangements associated with NPQ, providing further support for a role of SOQ1 in a novel NPQ pathway. The particle clustering and unit cell methodology developed here is generalizable to multiple types of microscopy and will enable unbiased analysis and comparison of large data sets.

  13. The Arabidopsis peptide kiss of death is an inducer of programmed cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Blanvillain, Robert; Young, Bennett; Cai, Yao-min; Hecht, Valérie; Varoquaux, Fabrice; Delorme, Valérie; Lancelin, Jean-Marc; Delseny, Michel; Gallois, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    This study identifies a novel regulator of cell death in plants and shows that the 25-amino-acid peptide kiss of death regulates programmed cell death at an early step in the cell death-signalling cascade.

  14. Auxin Import and Local Auxin Biosynthesis Are Required for Mitotic Divisions, Cell Expansion and Cell Specification during Female Gametophyte Development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneesh Panoli

    Full Text Available The female gametophyte of flowering plants, called the embryo sac, develops from a haploid cell named the functional megaspore, which is specified after meiosis by the diploid sporophyte. In Arabidopsis, the functional megaspore undergoes three syncitial mitotic divisions followed by cellularization to form seven cells of four cell types including two female gametes. The plant hormone auxin is important for sporophytic developmental processes, and auxin levels are known to be regulated by biosynthesis and transport. Here, we investigated the role of auxin biosynthetic genes and auxin influx carriers in embryo sac development. We find that genes from the YUCCA/TAA pathway (YUC1, YUC2, YUC8, TAA1, TAR2 are expressed asymmetrically in the developing ovule and embryo sac from the two-nuclear syncitial stage until cellularization. Mutants for YUC1 and YUC2 exhibited defects in cell specification, whereas mutations in YUC8, as well as mutations in TAA1 and TAR2, caused defects in nuclear proliferation, vacuole formation and anisotropic growth of the embryo sac. Additionally, expression of the auxin influx carriers AUX1 and LAX1 were observed at the micropylar pole of the embryo sac and in the adjacent cells of the ovule, and the aux1 lax1 lax2 triple mutant shows multiple gametophyte defects. These results indicate that both localized auxin biosynthesis and auxin import, are required for mitotic divisions, cell expansion and patterning during embryo sac development.

  15. Reference: 504 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available o et al. 2007 Feb. Plant Cell Physiol. 48(2):375-80. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes a small family ... 17202180 2007 Feb Plant & cell physiology Iwama Ayako|Kakimoto Tatsuo|Kato Tomoh

  16. Transcriptional response of Arabidopsis seedlings during spaceflight reveals peroxidase and cell wall remodeling genes associated with root hair development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Taegun; Sparks, J Alan; Nakashima, Jin; Allen, Stacy N; Tang, Yuhong; Blancaflor, Elison B

    2015-01-01

    • Plants will be an important component of advanced life support systems during space exploration missions. Therefore, understanding their biology in the spacecraft environment will be essential before they can be used for such systems.• Seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana were grown for 2 wk in the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) hardware on board the second to the last mission of the space shuttle Discovery (STS-131). Transcript profiles between ground controls and space-grown seedlings were compared using stringent selection criteria.• Expression of transcripts associated with oxidative stress and cell wall remodeling was repressed in microgravity. These downregulated genes were previously shown to be enriched in root hairs consistent with seedling phenotypes observed in space. Mutations in genes that were downregulated in microgravity, including two uncharacterized root hair-expressed class III peroxidase genes (PRX44 and PRX57), led to defective polar root hair growth on Earth. PRX44 and PRX57 mutants had ruptured root hairs, which is a typical phenotype of tip-growing cells with defective cell walls and those subjected to stress.• Long-term exposure to microgravity negatively impacts tip growth by repressing expression of genes essential for normal root hair development. Whereas changes in peroxidase gene expression leading to reduced root hair growth in space are actin-independent, root hair development modulated by phosphoinositides could be dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. These results have profound implications for plant adaptation to microgravity given the importance of tip growing cells such as root hairs for efficient nutrient capture. © 2015 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  17. Bipolar Plasma Membrane Distribution of Phosphoinositides and Their Requirement for Auxin-Mediated Cell Polarity and Patterning in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejos, Ricardo; Sauer, Michael; Vanneste, Steffen; Palacios-Gomez, Miriam; Li, Hongjiang; Heilmann, Mareike; van Wijk, Ringo; Vermeer, Joop E M; Heilmann, Ingo; Munnik, Teun; Friml, Jiří

    2014-05-01

    Cell polarity manifested by asymmetric distribution of cargoes, such as receptors and transporters, within the plasma membrane (PM) is crucial for essential functions in multicellular organisms. In plants, cell polarity (re)establishment is intimately linked to patterning processes. Despite the importance of cell polarity, its underlying mechanisms are still largely unknown, including the definition and distinctiveness of the polar domains within the PM. Here, we show in Arabidopsis thaliana that the signaling membrane components, the phosphoinositides phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P 2 ] as well as PtdIns4P 5-kinases mediating their interconversion, are specifically enriched at apical and basal polar plasma membrane domains. The PtdIns4P 5-kinases PIP5K1 and PIP5K2 are redundantly required for polar localization of specifically apical and basal cargoes, such as PIN-FORMED transporters for the plant hormone auxin. As a consequence of the polarity defects, instructive auxin gradients as well as embryonic and postembryonic patterning are severely compromised. Furthermore, auxin itself regulates PIP5K transcription and PtdIns4P and PtdIns(4,5)P 2 levels, in particular their association with polar PM domains. Our results provide insight into the polar domain-delineating mechanisms in plant cells that depend on apical and basal distribution of membrane lipids and are essential for embryonic and postembryonic patterning. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  18. The MYB23 Gene Provides a Positive Feedback Loop for Cell Fate Specification in the Arabidopsis Root Epidermis[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yeon Hee; Kirik, Victor; Hulskamp, Martin; Nam, Kyoung Hee; Hagely, Katherine; Lee, Myeong Min; Schiefelbein, John

    2009-01-01

    The specification of cell fates during development requires precise regulatory mechanisms to ensure robust cell type patterns. Theoretical models of pattern formation suggest that a combination of negative and positive feedback mechanisms are necessary for efficient specification of distinct fates in a field of differentiating cells. Here, we examine the role of the R2R3-MYB transcription factor gene, AtMYB23 (MYB23), in the establishment of the root epidermal cell type pattern in Arabidopsis thaliana. MYB23 is closely related to, and is positively regulated by, the WEREWOLF (WER) MYB gene during root epidermis development. Furthermore, MYB23 is able to substitute for the function of WER and to induce its own expression when controlled by WER regulatory sequences. We also show that the MYB23 protein binds to its own promoter, suggesting a MYB23 positive feedback loop. The localization of MYB23 transcripts and MYB23-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein, as well as the effect of a chimeric MYB23-SRDX repressor construct, links MYB23 function to the developing non-hair cell type. Using mutational analyses, we find that MYB23 is necessary for precise establishment of the root epidermal pattern, particularly under conditions that compromise the cell specification process. These results suggest that MYB23 participates in a positive feedback loop to reinforce cell fate decisions and ensure robust establishment of the cell type pattern in the Arabidopsis root epidermis. PMID:19395683

  19. Antisense reduction of thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase in Arabidopsis enhances paraquat-induced photooxidative stress and nitric oxide-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, Delia; Vannini, Candida; Bracale, Marcella; Campa, Manuela; Soave, Carlo; Murgia, Irene

    2005-08-01

    The production and characterization of Arabidopsis plants containing a transgene in which the Arabidopsis tAPX is inserted in antisense orientation, is described. tAPX activity in these transgenic tAPX plants is around 50% of control level. The tAPX antisense plants are phenotypically indistinguishable from control plants under normal growth conditions; they show, however, enhanced sensitivity to the O2- -generating herbicide, Paraquat. Interestingly, the tAPX antisense plants show enhanced symptoms of damage when cell death is triggered through treatment with the nitric oxide-donor, SNP. These results are in accordance with the ones recently obtained with transgenic plants overexpressing tAPX; altogether, they suggest that tAPX, besides the known ROS scavenging role, is also involved in the fine changes of H2O2 concentration during signaling events.

  20. Singlet oxygen triggers chloroplast rupture and cell death in the zeaxanthin epoxidase defective mutant aba1 of Arabidopsis thaliana under high light stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Corrionero, Álvaro; Sánchez-Vicente, Inmaculada; González-Pérez, Sergio; Corrales, Ascensión; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Lorenzo, Óscar; Arellano, Juan B

    2017-09-01

    The two Arabidopsis thaliana mutants, aba1 and max4, were previously identified as sharing a number of co-regulated genes with both the flu mutant and Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures exposed to high light (HL). On this basis, we investigated whether aba1 and max4 were generating high amounts of singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 ) and activating 1 O 2 -mediated cell death. Thylakoids of aba1 produced twice as much 1 O 2 as thylakoids of max4 and wild type (WT) plants when illuminated with strong red light. 1 O 2 was measured using the spin probe 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone hydrochloride. 77-K chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra of thylakoids revealed lower aggregation of the light harvesting complex II in aba1. This was rationalized as a loss of connectivity between photosystem II (PSII) units and as the main cause for the high yield of 1 O 2 generation in aba1. Up-regulation of the 1 O 2 responsive gene AAA-ATPase was only observed with statistical significant in aba1 under HL. Two early jasmonate (JA)-responsive genes, JAZ1 and JAZ5, encoding for two repressor proteins involved in the negative feedback regulation of JA signalling, were not up-regulated to the WT plant levels. Chloroplast aggregation followed by chloroplast rupture and eventual cell death was observed by confocal imaging of the fluorescence emission of leaf cells of transgenic aba1 plants expressing the chimeric fusion protein SSU-GFP. Cell death was not associated with direct 1 O 2 cytotoxicity in aba1, but rather with a delayed stress response. In contrast, max4 did not show evidence of 1 O 2 -mediated cell death. In conclusion, aba1 may serve as an alternative model to other 1 O 2 -overproducing mutants of Arabidopsis for investigating 1 O 2 -mediated cell death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. New Arabidopsis thaliana cytochrome c partners: a look into the elusive role of cytochrome c in programmed cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Fábregas, Jonathan; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; González-Arzola, Katiuska; Janocha, Simon; Navarro, José A; Hervás, Manuel; Bernhardt, Rita; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; De la Rosa, Miguel Á

    2013-12-01

    Programmed cell death is an event displayed by many different organisms along the evolutionary scale. In plants, programmed cell death is necessary for development and the hypersensitive response to stress or pathogenic infection. A common feature in programmed cell death across organisms is the translocation of cytochrome c from mitochondria to the cytosol. To better understand the role of cytochrome c in the onset of programmed cell death in plants, a proteomic approach was developed based on affinity chromatography and using Arabidopsis thaliana cytochrome c as bait. Using this approach, ten putative new cytochrome c partners were identified. Of these putative partners and as indicated by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, nine of them bind the heme protein in plant protoplasts and human cells as a heterologous system. The in vitro interaction between cytochrome c and such soluble cytochrome c-targets was further corroborated using surface plasmon resonance. Taken together, the results obtained in the study indicate that Arabidopsis thaliana cytochrome c interacts with several distinct proteins involved in protein folding, translational regulation, cell death, oxidative stress, DNA damage, energetic metabolism, and mRNA metabolism. Interestingly, some of these novel Arabidopsis thaliana cytochrome c-targets are closely related to those for Homo sapiens cytochrome c (Martínez-Fábregas et al., unpublished). These results indicate that the evolutionarily well-conserved cytosolic cytochrome c, appearing in organisms from plants to mammals, interacts with a wide range of targets on programmed cell death. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000280.

  2. Reference: 322 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available neko et al. 2006 Feb. Plant Physiol. 140(2):591-602. Hypocotyl segments of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana...gene, ROOT PRIMORDIUM DEFECTIVE 1, is required for the maintenance of active cell proliferation. 2 591-602 16407439 2006 Feb Plant physiology Konishi Mineko|Sugiyama Munetaka

  3. Novel proteins, putative membrane transporters, and an integrated metabolic network are revealed by quantitative proteomic analysis of Arabidopsis cell culture peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eubel, Holger; Meyer, Etienne H; Taylor, Nicolas L; Bussell, John D; O'Toole, Nicholas; Heazlewood, Joshua L; Castleden, Ian; Small, Ian D; Smith, Steven M; Millar, A Harvey

    2008-12-01

    Peroxisomes play key roles in energy metabolism, cell signaling, and plant development. A better understanding of these important functions will be achieved with a more complete definition of the peroxisome proteome. The isolation of peroxisomes and their separation from mitochondria and other major membrane systems have been significant challenges in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) model system. In this study, we present new data on the Arabidopsis peroxisome proteome obtained using two new technical advances that have not previously been applied to studies of plant peroxisomes. First, we followed density gradient centrifugation with free-flow electrophoresis to improve the separation of peroxisomes from mitochondria. Second, we used quantitative proteomics to identify proteins enriched in the peroxisome fractions relative to mitochondrial fractions. We provide evidence for peroxisomal localization of 89 proteins, 36 of which have not previously been identified in other analyses of Arabidopsis peroxisomes. Chimeric green fluorescent protein constructs of 35 proteins have been used to confirm their localization in peroxisomes or to identify endoplasmic reticulum contaminants. The distribution of many of these peroxisomal proteins between soluble, membrane-associated, and integral membrane locations has also been determined. This core peroxisomal proteome from nonphotosynthetic cultured cells contains a proportion of proteins that cannot be predicted to be peroxisomal due to the lack of recognizable peroxisomal targeting sequence 1 (PTS1) or PTS2 signals. Proteins identified are likely to be components in peroxisome biogenesis, beta-oxidation for fatty acid degradation and hormone biosynthesis, photorespiration, and metabolite transport. A considerable number of the proteins found in peroxisomes have no known function, and potential roles of these proteins in peroxisomal metabolism are discussed. This is aided by a metabolic network analysis that reveals a

  4. Yeast cell wall extract induces disease resistance against bacterial and fungal pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica crop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Narusaka

    Full Text Available Housaku Monogatari (HM is a plant activator prepared from a yeast cell wall extract. We examined the efficacy of HM application and observed that HM treatment increased the resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa leaves to bacterial and fungal infections. HM reduced the severity of bacterial leaf spot and anthracnose on A. thaliana and Brassica crop leaves with protective effects. In addition, gene expression analysis of A. thaliana plants after treatment with HM indicated increased expression of several plant defense-related genes. HM treatment appears to induce early activation of jasmonate/ethylene and late activation of salicylic acid (SA pathways. Analysis using signaling mutants revealed that HM required SA accumulation and SA signaling to facilitate resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. In addition, HM-induced resistance conferred chitin-independent disease resistance to bacterial pathogens in A. thaliana. These results suggest that HM contains multiple microbe-associated molecular patterns that activate defense responses in plants. These findings suggest that the application of HM is a useful tool that may facilitate new disease control methods.

  5. Acyl chains of phospholipase D transphosphatidylation products in Arabidopsis cells: a study using multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Rainteau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phospholipases D (PLD are major components of signalling pathways in plant responses to some stresses and hormones. The product of PLD activity is phosphatidic acid (PA. PAs with different acyl chains do not have the same protein targets, so to understand the signalling role of PLD it is essential to analyze the composition of its PA products in the presence and absence of an elicitor. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Potential PLD substrates and products were studied in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells treated with or without the hormone salicylic acid (SA. As PA can be produced by enzymes other than PLD, we analyzed phosphatidylbutanol (PBut, which is specifically produced by PLD in the presence of n-butanol. The acyl chain compositions of PBut and the major glycerophospholipids were determined by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM mass spectrometry. PBut profiles of untreated cells or cells treated with SA show an over-representation of 160/18:2- and 16:0/18:3-species compared to those of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine either from bulk lipid extracts or from purified membrane fractions. When microsomal PLDs were used in in vitro assays, the resulting PBut profile matched exactly that of the substrate provided. Therefore there is a mismatch between the acyl chain compositions of putative substrates and the in vivo products of PLDs that is unlikely to reflect any selectivity of PLDs for the acyl chains of substrates. CONCLUSIONS: MRM mass spectrometry is a reliable technique to analyze PLD products. Our results suggest that PLD action in response to SA is not due to the production of a stress-specific molecular species, but that the level of PLD products per se is important. The over-representation of 160/18:2- and 16:0/18:3-species in PLD products when compared to putative substrates might be related to a regulatory role of the heterogeneous distribution of glycerophospholipids in membrane sub-domains.

  6. Water-polysaccharide interactions in the primary cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana from polarization transfer solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Paul B; Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Hong, Mei

    2014-07-23

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are hydrated under functional conditions, but the molecular interactions between water and polysaccharides in the wall have not been investigated. In this work, we employ polarization transfer solid-state NMR techniques to study the hydration of primary-wall polysaccharides of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. By transferring water (1)H polarization to polysaccharides through distance- and mobility-dependent (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings and detecting it through polysaccharide (13)C signals, we obtain information about water proximity to cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins as well as water mobility. Both intact and partially extracted cell wall samples are studied. Our results show that water-pectin polarization transfer is much faster than water-cellulose polarization transfer in all samples, but the extent of extraction has a profound impact on the water-polysaccharide spin diffusion. Removal of calcium ions and the consequent extraction of homogalacturonan (HG) significantly slowed down spin diffusion, while further extraction of matrix polysaccharides restored the spin diffusion rate. These trends are observed in cell walls with similar water content, thus they reflect inherent differences in the mobility and spatial distribution of water. Combined with quantitative analysis of the polysaccharide contents, our results indicate that calcium ions and HG gelation increase the amount of bound water, which facilitates spin diffusion, while calcium removal disrupts the gel and gives rise to highly dynamic water, which slows down spin diffusion. The recovery of spin diffusion rates after more extensive extraction is attributed to increased water-exposed surface areas of the polysaccharides. Water-pectin spin diffusion precedes water-cellulose spin diffusion, lending support to the single-network model of plant primary walls in which a substantial fraction of the cellulose surface is surrounded by pectins.

  7. An improved method for preparing Agrobacterium cells that simplifies the Arabidopsis transformation protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ülker Bekir

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Agrobacterium vacuum (Bechtold et al 1993 and floral-dip (Clough and Bent 1998 are very efficient methods for generating transgenic Arabidopsis plants. These methods allow plant transformation without the need for tissue culture. Large volumes of bacterial cultures grown in liquid media are necessary for both of these transformation methods. This limits the number of transformations that can be done at a given time due to the need for expensive large shakers and limited space on them. Additionally, the bacterial colonies derived from solid media necessary for starting these liquid cultures often fail to grow in such large volumes. Therefore the optimum stage of plant material for transformation is often missed and new plant material needs to be grown. Results To avoid problems associated with large bacterial liquid cultures, we investigated whether bacteria grown on plates are also suitable for plant transformation. We demonstrate here that bacteria grown on plates can be used with similar efficiency for transforming plants even after one week of storage at 4°C. This makes it much easier to synchronize Agrobacterium and plants for transformation. DNA gel blot analysis was carried out on the T1 plants surviving the herbicide selection and demonstrated that the surviving plants are indeed transgenic. Conclusion The simplified method works as efficiently as the previously reported protocols and significantly reduces the workload, cost and time. Additionally, the protocol reduces the risk of large scale contaminations involving GMOs. Most importantly, many more independent transformations per day can be performed using this modified protocol.

  8. Inhibitor-induced oxidation of the nucleus and cytosol in Arabidopsis thaliana: implications for organelle to nucleus retrograde signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpinska, Barbara; Alomrani, Sarah Owdah; Foyer, Christine H

    2017-09-26

    Concepts of organelle-to-nucleus signalling pathways are largely based on genetic screens involving inhibitors of chloroplast and mitochondrial functions such as norflurazon, lincomycin (LINC), antimycin A (ANT) and salicylhydroxamic acid. These inhibitors favour enhanced cellular oxidation, but their precise effects on the cellular redox state are unknown. Using the in vivo reduction-oxidation (redox) reporter, roGFP2, inhibitor-induced changes in the glutathione redox potentials of the nuclei and cytosol were measured in Arabidopsis thaliana root, epidermal and stomatal guard cells, together with the expression of nuclear-encoded chloroplast and mitochondrial marker genes. All the chloroplast and mitochondrial inhibitors increased the degree of oxidation in the nuclei and cytosol. However, inhibitor-induced oxidation was less marked in stomatal guard cells than in epidermal or root cells. Moreover, LINC and ANT caused a greater oxidation of guard cell nuclei than the cytosol. Chloroplast and mitochondrial inhibitors significantly decreased the abundance of LHCA1 and LHCB1 transcripts. The levels of WHY1 , WHY3 and LEA5 transcripts were increased in the presence of inhibitors. Chloroplast inhibitors decreased AOXA1 mRNA levels, while mitochondrial inhibitors had the opposite effect. Inhibitors that are used to characterize retrograde signalling pathways therefore have similar general effects on cellular redox state and gene expression.This article is part of the themed issue 'Enhancing photosynthesis in crop plants: targets for improvement'. © 2017 The Authors.

  9. Recruitment of glutathione into the nucleus during cell proliferation adjusts whole-cell redox homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana and lowers the oxidative defence shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, Pedro Diaz; Dong, Yingping; Ziegler, Kerstin; Markovic, Jelena; Pallardó, Federico V; Pellny, Till K; Verrier, Paul J; Foyer, Christine H

    2010-12-01

    Cellular redox homeostasis and signalling are important in progression of the eukaryotic cell cycle. In animals, the low-molecular-weight thiol tripeptide glutathione (GSH) is recruited into the nucleus early in the cell proliferation cycle. To determine whether a similar process occurs in plants, we studied cell proliferation in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that GSH co-localizes with nuclear DNA during the proliferation of A. thaliana cells in culture. Moreover, GSH localization in the nucleus was observed in dividing pericycle cells of the lateral root meristem. There was pronounced accumulation of GSH in the nucleus at points in the growth cycle at which a high percentage of the cells were in G(1) phase, as identified by flow cytometry and marker transcripts. Recruitment of GSH into the nucleus led to a high abundance of GSH in the nucleus (GSHn) and severe depletion of the cytoplasmic GSH pool (GSHc). Sequestration of GSH in the nucleus was accompanied by significant decreases in transcripts associated with oxidative signalling and stress tolerance, and an increase in the abundance of hydrogen peroxide, an effect that was enhanced when the dividing cells were treated with salicylic acid. Total cellular GSH and the abundance of GSH1 and GSH2 transcripts increased after the initial recruitment of GSH into the nucleus. We conclude that GSH recruitment into the nucleus during cell proliferation has a profound effect on the whole-cell redox state. High GSHn levels trigger redox adjustments in the cytoplasm, favouring decreased oxidative signalling and enhanced GSH synthesis. © 2010 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. The development and geometry of shape change in Arabidopsis thaliana cotyledon pavement cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halsey Leah E

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The leaf epidermis is an important architectural control element that influences the growth properties of underlying tissues and the overall form of the organ. In dicots, interdigitated pavement cells are the building blocks of the tissue, and their morphogenesis includes the assembly of specialized cell walls that surround the apical, basal, and lateral (anticlinal cell surfaces. The microtubule and actin cytoskeletons are highly polarized along the cortex of the anticlinal wall; however, the relationships between these arrays and cell morphogenesis are unclear. Results We developed new quantitative tools to compare population-level growth statistics with time-lapse imaging of cotyledon pavement cells in an intact tissue. The analysis revealed alternating waves of lobe initiation and a phase of lateral isotropic expansion that persisted for days. During lateral isotropic diffuse growth, microtubule organization varied greatly between cell surfaces. Parallel microtubule bundles were distributed unevenly along the anticlinal surface, with subsets marking stable cortical domains at cell indentations and others clearly populating the cortex within convex cell protrusions. Conclusions Pavement cell morphogenesis is discontinuous, and includes punctuated phases of lobe initiation and lateral isotropic expansion. In the epidermis, lateral isotropic growth is independent of pavement cell size and shape. Cortical microtubules along the upper cell surface and stable cortical patches of anticlinal microtubules may coordinate the growth behaviors of orthogonal cell walls. This work illustrates the importance of directly linking protein localization data to the growth behavior of leaf epidermal cells.

  11. Regulation of cell fate and meristem maintenance in Arabidopsis root development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Hove, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division is an essential and universal mechanism for generating diversity and pattern in multicellular organisms. Divisions generating daughter cells different in size, shape, identity and function are fundamental to many developmental processes including fate specification, tissue

  12. Arabidopsis VARIEGATED 3 encodes a chloroplast-targeted, zinc-finger protein required for chloroplast and palisade cell development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næsted, Henrik; Holm, Agnethe; Jenkins, Tom

    2004-01-01

    The stable, recessive Arabidopsis variegated 3 (var3) mutant exhibits a variegated phenotype due to somatic areas lacking or containing developmentally retarded chloroplasts and greatly reduced numbers of palisade cells. The VAR3 gene, isolated by transposon tagging, encodes the 85.9 kDa VAR3 pro...... that pigment profiles are qualitatively similar in wild type and var3, although var3 accumulates lower levels of chlorophylls and carotenoids. These results indicate that VAR3 is a part of a protein complex required for normal chloroplast and palisade cell development....

  13. Classic myrosinase-dependent degradation of indole glucosinolate attenuates fumonisin B1-induced programmed cell death in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanting; Wang, Jiansheng; Liu, Yuanyuan; Miao, Huiying; Cai, Congxi; Shao, Zhiyong; Guo, Rongfang; Sun, Bo; Jia, Chengguo; Zhang, Liping; Gigolashvili, Tamara; Wang, Qiaomei

    2015-03-01

    The mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1) causes the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which then leads to programmed cell death (PCD) in Arabidopsis. In the process of studying FB1-induced biosynthesis of glucosinolates, we found that indole glucosinolate (IGS) is involved in attenuating FB1-induced PCD. Treatment with FB1 elevates the expression of genes related to the biosynthesis of camalexin and IGS. Mutants deficient in aliphatic glucosinolate (AGS) or camalexin biosynthesis display similar lesions to Col-0 upon FB1 infiltration; however, the cyp79B2 cyp79B3 double mutant, which lacks induction of both IGS and camalexin, displays more severe lesions. Based on the fact that the classic myrosinase β-thioglucoside glucohydrolase (TGG)-deficient double mutant tgg1 tgg2, rather than atypical myrosinase-deficient mutant pen2-2, is more sensitive to FB1 than Col-0, and the elevated expression of TGG1, but not of PEN2, correlates with the decrease in IGS, we conclude that TGG-dependent IGS hydrolysis is involved in FB1-induced PCD. Indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN) and indole-3-carbinol (I3C), the common derivatives of IGS, were used in feeding experiments, and this rescued the severe cell death phenotype, which is associated with reduced accumulation of ROS as well as increased activity of antioxidant enzymes and ROS-scavenging ability. Despite the involvement of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in restricting FB1-induced PCD, feeding of IAN and I3C attenuated FB1-induced PCD in the IAA receptor mutant tir1-1 just as in Col-0. Taken together, our results indicate that TGG-catalyzed breakdown products of IGS decrease the accumulation of ROS by their antioxidant behavior, and attenuate FB1 induced PCD in an IAA-independent way. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Identification of transcription factors linked to cell cycle regulation in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Dehghan Nayeri, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Cell cycle is an essential process in growth and development of living organisms consists of the replication and mitotic phases separated by 2 gap phases; G1 and G2. It is tightly controlled at the molecular level and especially at the level of transcription. Precise regulation of the cell cycle is of central significance for plant growth and development and transcription factors are global regulators of gene expression playing essential roles in cell cycle regulation. This study has uncovere...

  15. Transcript Profiling Identifies NAC-Domain Genes Involved in Regulating Wall Ingrowth Deposition in Phloem Parenchyma Transfer Cells of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzhou Wu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Transfer cells (TCs play important roles in facilitating enhanced rates of nutrient transport at key apoplasmic/symplasmic junctions along the nutrient acquisition and transport pathways in plants. TCs achieve this capacity by developing elaborate wall ingrowth networks which serve to increase plasma membrane surface area thus increasing the cell's surface area-to-volume ratio to achieve increased flux of nutrients across the plasma membrane. Phloem parenchyma (PP cells of Arabidopsis leaf veins trans-differentiate to become PP TCs which likely function in a two-step phloem loading mechanism by facilitating unloading of photoassimilates into the apoplasm for subsequent energy-dependent uptake into the sieve element/companion cell (SE/CC complex. We are using PP TCs in Arabidopsis as a genetic model to identify transcription factors involved in coordinating deposition of the wall ingrowth network. Confocal imaging of pseudo-Schiff propidium iodide-stained tissue revealed different profiles of temporal development of wall ingrowth deposition across maturing cotyledons and juvenile leaves, and a basipetal gradient of deposition across mature adult leaves. RNA-Seq analysis was undertaken to identify differentially expressed genes common to these three different profiles of wall ingrowth deposition. This analysis identified 68 transcription factors up-regulated two-fold or more in at least two of the three experimental comparisons, with six of these transcription factors belonging to Clade III of the NAC-domain family. Phenotypic analysis of these NAC genes using insertional mutants revealed significant reductions in levels of wall ingrowth deposition, particularly in a double mutant of NAC056 and NAC018, as well as compromised sucrose-dependent root growth, indicating impaired capacity for phloem loading. Collectively, these results support the proposition that Clade III members of the NAC-domain family in Arabidopsis play important roles in

  16. Exogenous auxin alleviates cadmium toxicity in Arabidopsis thaliana by stimulating synthesis of hemicellulose 1 and increasing the cadmium fixation capacity of root cell walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiao Fang [Key Laboratory of Conservation Biology for Endangered Wildlife of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); State Key Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Wang, Zhi Wei [Key Laboratory of Conservation Biology for Endangered Wildlife of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Dong, Fang; Lei, Gui Jie [State Key Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Shi, Yuan Zhi [The Key Laboratory of Tea Chemical Engineering, Ministry of Agriculture, Yunqi Road 1, Hangzhou 310008 (China); Li, Gui Xin, E-mail: guixinli@zju.edu.cn [College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zheng, Shao Jian [Key Laboratory of Conservation Biology for Endangered Wildlife of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); State Key Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Cd reduces endogenous auxin levels in Arabidopsis. • Exogenous applied auxin NAA increases Cd accumulation in the roots but decreases in the shoots. • NAA increases cell wall hemicellulose 1 content. • Hemicellulose 1 retains Cd and makes it difficult to be translocated to shoots. • NAA rescues Cd-induced chlorosis. -- Abstract: Auxin is involved in not only plant physiological and developmental processes but also plant responses to abiotic stresses. In this study, cadmium (Cd{sup 2+}) stress decreased the endogenous auxin level, whereas exogenous auxin (α-naphthaleneacetic acid, NAA, a permeable auxin analog) reduced shoot Cd{sup 2+} concentration and rescued Cd{sup 2+}-induced chlorosis in Arabidopsis thaliana. Under Cd{sup 2+} stress conditions, NAA increased Cd{sup 2+} retention in the roots and most Cd{sup 2+} in the roots was fixed in hemicellulose 1 of the cell wall. NAA treatment did not affect pectin content and its binding capacity for Cd{sup 2+}, whereas it significantly increased the content of hemicellulose 1 and the amount of Cd{sup 2+} retained in it. There were highly significant correlations between Cd{sup 2+} concentrations in the root, cell wall and hemicellulose 1 when the plants were subjected to Cd{sup 2+} or NAA + Cd{sup 2+} treatment for 1 to 7 d, suggesting that the increase in hemicellulose 1 contributes greatly to the fixation of Cd{sup 2+} in the cell wall. Taken together, these results demonstrate that auxin-induced alleviation of Cd{sup 2+} toxicity in Arabidopsis is mediated through increasing hemicellulose 1 content and Cd{sup 2+} fixation in the root, thus reducing the translocation of Cd{sup 2+} from roots to shoots.

  17. Exogenous auxin alleviates cadmium toxicity in Arabidopsis thaliana by stimulating synthesis of hemicellulose 1 and increasing the cadmium fixation capacity of root cell walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Xiao Fang; Wang, Zhi Wei; Dong, Fang; Lei, Gui Jie; Shi, Yuan Zhi; Li, Gui Xin; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Cd reduces endogenous auxin levels in Arabidopsis. • Exogenous applied auxin NAA increases Cd accumulation in the roots but decreases in the shoots. • NAA increases cell wall hemicellulose 1 content. • Hemicellulose 1 retains Cd and makes it difficult to be translocated to shoots. • NAA rescues Cd-induced chlorosis. -- Abstract: Auxin is involved in not only plant physiological and developmental processes but also plant responses to abiotic stresses. In this study, cadmium (Cd 2+ ) stress decreased the endogenous auxin level, whereas exogenous auxin (α-naphthaleneacetic acid, NAA, a permeable auxin analog) reduced shoot Cd 2+ concentration and rescued Cd 2+ -induced chlorosis in Arabidopsis thaliana. Under Cd 2+ stress conditions, NAA increased Cd 2+ retention in the roots and most Cd 2+ in the roots was fixed in hemicellulose 1 of the cell wall. NAA treatment did not affect pectin content and its binding capacity for Cd 2+ , whereas it significantly increased the content of hemicellulose 1 and the amount of Cd 2+ retained in it. There were highly significant correlations between Cd 2+ concentrations in the root, cell wall and hemicellulose 1 when the plants were subjected to Cd 2+ or NAA + Cd 2+ treatment for 1 to 7 d, suggesting that the increase in hemicellulose 1 contributes greatly to the fixation of Cd 2+ in the cell wall. Taken together, these results demonstrate that auxin-induced alleviation of Cd 2+ toxicity in Arabidopsis is mediated through increasing hemicellulose 1 content and Cd 2+ fixation in the root, thus reducing the translocation of Cd 2+ from roots to shoots

  18. Cellulose-Pectin Spatial Contacts Are Inherent to Never-Dried Arabidopsis Primary Cell Walls: Evidence from Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Hong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    The structural role of pectins in plant primary cell walls is not yet well understood because of the complex and disordered nature of the cell wall polymers. We recently introduced multidimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to characterize the spatial proximities of wall polysaccharides. The data showed extensive cross peaks between pectins and cellulose in the primary wall of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), indicating subnanometer contacts between the two polysaccharides. This result was unexpected because stable pectin-cellulose interactions are not predicted by in vitro binding assays and prevailing cell wall models. To investigate whether the spatial contacts that give rise to the cross peaks are artifacts of sample preparation, we now compare never-dried Arabidopsis primary walls with dehydrated and rehydrated samples. One-dimensional 13C spectra, two-dimensional 13C-13C correlation spectra, water-polysaccharide correlation spectra, and dynamics data all indicate that the structure, mobility, and intermolecular contacts of the polysaccharides are indistinguishable between never-dried and rehydrated walls. Moreover, a partially depectinated cell wall in which 40% of homogalacturonan is extracted retains cellulose-pectin cross peaks, indicating that the cellulose-pectin contacts are not due to molecular crowding. The cross peaks are observed both at −20°C and at ambient temperature, thus ruling out freezing as a cause of spatial contacts. These results indicate that rhamnogalacturonan I and a portion of homogalacturonan have significant interactions with cellulose microfibrils in the native primary wall. This pectin-cellulose association may be formed during wall biosynthesis and may involve pectin entrapment in or between cellulose microfibrils, which cannot be mimicked by in vitro binding assays. PMID:26036615

  19. Transcript Profiling Identifies NAC-Domain Genes Involved in Regulating Wall Ingrowth Deposition in Phloem Parenchyma Transfer Cells ofArabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuzhou; Hou, Jiexi; Yu, Fen; Nguyen, Suong T T; McCurdy, David W

    2018-01-01

    Transfer cells (TCs) play important roles in facilitating enhanced rates of nutrient transport at key apoplasmic/symplasmic junctions along the nutrient acquisition and transport pathways in plants. TCs achieve this capacity by developing elaborate wall ingrowth networks which serve to increase plasma membrane surface area thus increasing the cell's surface area-to-volume ratio to achieve increased flux of nutrients across the plasma membrane. Phloem parenchyma (PP) cells of Arabidopsis leaf veins trans -differentiate to become PP TCs which likely function in a two-step phloem loading mechanism by facilitating unloading of photoassimilates into the apoplasm for subsequent energy-dependent uptake into the sieve element/companion cell (SE/CC) complex. We are using PP TCs in Arabidopsis as a genetic model to identify transcription factors involved in coordinating deposition of the wall ingrowth network. Confocal imaging of pseudo-Schiff propidium iodide-stained tissue revealed different profiles of temporal development of wall ingrowth deposition across maturing cotyledons and juvenile leaves, and a basipetal gradient of deposition across mature adult leaves. RNA-Seq analysis was undertaken to identify differentially expressed genes common to these three different profiles of wall ingrowth deposition. This analysis identified 68 transcription factors up-regulated two-fold or more in at least two of the three experimental comparisons, with six of these transcription factors belonging to Clade III of the NAC-domain family. Phenotypic analysis of these NAC genes using insertional mutants revealed significant reductions in levels of wall ingrowth deposition, particularly in a double mutant of NAC056 and NAC018 , as well as compromised sucrose-dependent root growth, indicating impaired capacity for phloem loading. Collectively, these results support the proposition that Clade III members of the NAC-domain family in Arabidopsis play important roles in regulating wall

  20. Arabidopsis Lectin Receptor Kinases LecRK-IX.1 and LecRK-IX.2 Are Functional Analogs in Regulating Phytophthora Resistance and Plant Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Cordewener, Jan H G; America, Antoine H P; Shan, Weixing; Bouwmeester, Klaas; Govers, Francine

    2015-09-01

    L-type lectin receptor kinases (LecRK) are potential immune receptors. Here, we characterized two closely-related Arabidopsis LecRK, LecRK-IX.1 and LecRK-IX.2, of which T-DNA insertion mutants showed compromised resistance to Phytophthora brassicae and Phytophthora capsici, with double mutants showing additive susceptibility. Overexpression of LecRK-IX.1 or LecRK-IX.2 in Arabidopsis and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana increased Phytophthora resistance but also induced cell death. Phytophthora resistance required both the lectin domain and kinase activity, but for cell death, the lectin domain was not needed. Silencing of the two closely related mitogen-activated protein kinase genes NbSIPK and NbNTF4 in N. benthamiana completely abolished LecRK-IX.1-induced cell death but not Phytophthora resistance. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of protein complexes coimmunoprecipitated in planta with LecRK-IX.1 or LecRK-IX.2 as bait, resulted in the identification of the N. benthamiana ABC transporter NbPDR1 as a potential interactor of both LecRK. The closest homolog of NbPDR1 in Arabidopsis is ABCG40, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that ABCG40 associates with LecRK-IX.1 and LecRK-IX.2 in planta. Similar to the LecRK mutants, ABCG40 mutants showed compromised Phytophthora resistance. This study shows that LecRK-IX.1 and LecRK-IX.2 are Phytophthora resistance components that function independent of each other and independent of the cell-death phenotype. They both interact with the same ABC transporter, suggesting that they exploit similar signal transduction pathways.

  1. Cell edges accumulate gamma tubulin complex components and nucleate microtubules following cytokinesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Ambrose

    Full Text Available Microtubules emanate from distinct organizing centers in fungal and animal cells. In plant cells, by contrast, microtubules initiate from dispersed sites in the cell cortex, where they then self-organize into parallel arrays. Previous ultrastructural evidence suggested that cell edges participate in microtubule nucleation but so far there has been no direct evidence for this. Here we use live imaging to show that components of the gamma tubulin nucleation complex (GCP2 and GCP3 localize at distinct sites along the outer periclinal edge of newly formed crosswalls, and that microtubules grow predominantly away from these edges. These data confirm a role for cell edges in microtubule nucleation, and suggest that an asymmetric distribution of microtubule nucleation factors contributes to cortical microtubule organization in plants, in a manner more similar to other kingdoms than previously thought.

  2. AtLa1 protein initiates IRES-dependent translation of WUSCHEL mRNA and regulates the stem cell homeostasis of Arabidopsis in response to environmental hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yuchao; Rao, Shaofei; Chang, Beibei; Wang, Xiaoshuang; Zhang, Kaidian; Hou, Xueliang; Zhu, Xueyi; Wu, Haijun; Tian, Zhaoxia; Zhao, Zhong; Yang, Chengwei; Huang, Tao

    2015-10-01

    Plant stem cells are hypersensitive to environmental hazards throughout their life cycle, but the mechanism by which plants safeguard stem cell homeostasis in response to environmental hazards is largely unknown. The homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS) protein maintains the stem cell pool in the shoot apical meristem of Arabidopsis. Here, we demonstrate that the translation of WUS mRNA is directed by an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) located in the 5'-untranslated region. The AtLa1 protein, an RNA-binding factor, binds to the 5'-untranslated region and initiates the IRES-dependent translation of WUS mRNA. Knockdown of AtLa1 expression represses the WUS IRES-dependent translation and leads to the arrest of growth and development. The AtLa1 protein is mainly located in the nucleoplasm. However, environmental hazards promote the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic translocation of the AtLa1 protein, which further enhances the IRES-dependent translation of WUS mRNA. Genetic evidence indicates that the WUS protein increases the tolerance of the shoot apical meristem to environmental hazards. Based on these results, we conclude that the stem cell niche in Arabidopsis copes with environmental hazards by enhancing the IRES-dependent translation of WUS mRNA under the control of the AtLa1 protein. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A mechanically sensitive cell layer regulates the physical properties of the Arabidopsis seed coat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creff, Audrey; Brocard, Lysiane; Ingram, Gwyneth

    2015-02-23

    Endogenous mechanical stresses regulate plant growth and development. Tensile stress in epidermal cells affects microtubule reorientation and anisotropic cell wall deposition, and mechanical stimulus at the meristem regulates trafficking and polar localization of auxin transporters. However, the mechanical regulation of other plant growth regulators has not been demonstrated. Here we propose that during seed growth, mechanical stress exerted by the expanding embryo and endosperm is perceived by a specific mechanosensitive cell layer in the seed coat. We show that the adaxial epidermis of the outer integument thickens its cell wall in a mechanosensitive fashion, demonstrates microtubule dynamics consistent with mechanical stress perception and shows mechanosensitive expression of ELA1, a regulator of seed size and gibberellic acid (GA) metabolism. By exploiting physical and genetic compartmentalization, and combining genetic and surgical techniques, we propose a mechanistic link between mechanical stress and GA accumulation that regulates seed development.

  4. Enhancement of cell wall protein SRPP expression during emergent root hair development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Hiroshi; Tanaka-Takada, Natsuki; Sato, Ryosuke; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2017-10-03

    SRPP is a protein expressed in seeds and root hairs and is significantly induced in root hairs under phosphate (Pi)-deficient conditions. Root hairs in the knockout mutant srpp-1 display defects, i.e., suppression of cell growth and cell death. Here, we analyzed the expression profile of SRPP during cell elongation of root hairs and compared the transcript levels in several mutants with short root hairs. The mRNA level was increased in wild-type plants and decreased in mutants with short root hairs. Induction of SRPP expression by Pi starvation occurred one or two days later than induction of Pi-deficient sensitive genes, such as PHT1 and PHF1. These results indicate that the expression of SRPP is coordinated with root hair elongation. We hypothesize that SRPP is essential for structural robustness of the cell walls of root hairs.

  5. In vivo FRET-FLIM reveals cell-type-specific protein interactions in Arabidopsis roots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, Yuchen; Stahl, Yvonne; Weidtkamp-Peters, Stefanie; Postma, Marten; Zhou, Wenkun; Goedhart, Joachim; Sánchez-Pérez, María Isabel; Gadella, Theodorus W.J.; Simon, Rüdiger; Scheres, Ben; Blilou, Ikram

    2017-01-01

    During multicellular development, specification of distinct cell fates is often regulated by the same transcription factors operating differently in distinct cis-regulatory modules, either through different protein complexes, conformational modification of protein complexes, or combinations of both.

  6. Multiple abiotic stress tolerance of the transformants yeast cells and the transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a novel durum wheat catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feki, Kaouthar; Kamoun, Yosra; Ben Mahmoud, Rihem; Farhat-Khemakhem, Ameny; Gargouri, Ali; Brini, Faiçal

    2015-12-01

    Catalases are reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes involved in response to abiotic and biotic stresses. In this study, we described the isolation and functional characterization of a novel catalase from durum wheat, designed TdCAT1. Molecular Phylogeny analyses showed that wheat TdCAT1 exhibited high amino acids sequence identity to other plant catalases. Sequence homology analysis showed that TdCAT1 protein contained the putative calmodulin binding domain and a putative conserved internal peroxisomal targeting signal PTS1 motif around its C-terminus. Predicted three-dimensional structural model revealed the presence of four putative distinct structural regions which are the N-terminal arm, the β-barrel, the wrapping and the α-helical domains. TdCAT1 protein had the heme pocket that was composed by five essential residues. TdCAT1 gene expression analysis showed that this gene was induced by various abiotic stresses in durum wheat. The expression of TdCAT1 in yeast cells and Arabidopsis plants conferred tolerance to several abiotic stresses. Compared with the non-transformed plants, the transgenic lines maintained their growth and accumulated more proline under stress treatments. Furthermore, the amount of H2O2 was lower in transgenic lines, which was due to the high CAT and POD activities. Taken together, these data provide the evidence for the involvement of durum wheat catalase TdCAT1 in tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in crop plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. The Effectiveness of Shin Guards Used by Football Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasar Tatar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In football, injuries from opponent contact occur commonly in the lower extremities. FIFA the world’s governing body for football requires players to wear shin guards. The aim of this study was to compare the protective effectiveness of polypropylene based shin guards with custom-made carbon fiber ones. Three commercial polypropylene shin guards (Adidas Predator™, Adidas UCL™, and Nike Mercurial™ and two custom-made carbon fiber shin guards were examined. The experimental setup had the following parts: 1 A pendulum attached a load cell at the tip (CAS Corp., Korea and a fixed prosthetic foot equipped with a cleat to simulate an attacker’s foot. 2 An artificial tibia prepared by condensed foam and reinforced by carbon fibers protected with soft clothing. 3 A multifunctional sensor system (Tekscan Corp., F-Socket System, Turkey to record the impact on the tibia. In the low impact force trials, only 2.79-9.63 % of the load was transmitted to the sensors. When comparing for mean force, peak force and impulse, both carbon fiber shin guards performed better than the commercial ones (Adidas Predator™, Adidas UCL™, and Nike Mercurial™ (p = 0.000. Based on these same parameters, the Nike Mercurial™ provided better protection than the Adidas Predator™ and the Adidas UCL™ (p = 0.000. In the high impact force trials, only 5.16-10.90 % of the load was transmitted to the sensors. For peak force and impulse, the carbon fiber shin guards provided better protection than all the others. Carbon fiber shin guards possess protective qualities superior to those of commercial polypropylene shin guards.

  8. Chloroplasts activity and PAP-signaling regulate programmed cell death in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Bruggeman, Quentin

    2016-01-09

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a crucial process both for plant development and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. There is accumulating evidence that chloroplasts may play a central role during plant PCD as for mitochondria in animal cells, but it is still unclear whether they participate in PCD onset, execution, or both. To tackle this question, we have analyzed the contribution of chloroplast function to the cell death phenotype of the myoinositol phosphate synthase1 (mips1) mutant that forms spontaneous lesions in a light-dependent manner. We show that photosynthetically active chloroplasts are required for PCD to occur in mips1, but this process is independent of the redox state of the chloroplast. Systematic genetic analyses with retrograde signaling mutants reveal that 3’-phosphoadenosine 5’-phosphate, a chloroplast retrograde signal that modulates nuclear gene expression in response to stress, can inhibit cell death and compromises plant innate immunity via inhibition of the RNA-processing 5’-3’ exoribonucleases. Our results provide evidence for the role of chloroplast-derived signal and RNA metabolism in the control of cell death and biotic stress response. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  9. A role for arabinogalactan-proteins in plant cell expansion: evidence from studies on the interaction of ß-glucosyl Yariv reagent with seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willats, William George Tycho; Knox, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana were germinated and grown in medium containing ß-glucosyl Yariv reagent (ßGlcY), a synthetic phenyl glycoside that interacts specifically with arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs), a class of plant cell surface proteoglycans. The effect of ßGlcY on the seedlings...... was to reduce the overall growth of both the root and the shoot. ßGlcY only accumulated in the root tissues and the reduced growth of the shoot appeared to be an indirect effect of impaired root growth. Reduced root growth was a consequence of a reduction in cell elongation during the postproliferation phase...... suspension-cultured cells that had been induced to elongate rather than proliferate, cell elongation was inhibited. The AGP-unreactive a-galactosyl Yariv reagent (aGalY) had no biological activity in either of these systems....

  10. Reference: 368 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al. 2006 May. Plant Cell 18(5):1213-25. To investigate how and when sister chromatid cohesion is released f...rom chromosomes in plants, we isolated the Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of separase (AESP) and investigated

  11. Reference: 241 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available development of Arabidopsis thaliana. 9 2473-85 16024589 2005 Sep The Plant cell Bevan Mike|Calderon-Villalobos Luz I A|Dohmann Esther M N|Kuhnle Carola|Li Hanbing|Schwechheimer Claus

  12. Expression of the Arabidopsis high-affinity hexose transporter STP13 correlates with programmed cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørholm, Morten Helge Hauberg; Nour-Eldin, Hussam H; Brodersen, Peter

    2006-01-01

    GFP expression only in the vascular tissue in emerging petals under non-stressed conditions. Quantitative PCR and the pSTP13-GFP plants show induction of STP13 in programmed cell death (PCD) obtained by treatments with the fungal toxin fumonisin B1 and the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. A role for STP......13 in PCD is supported by microarray data from e.g. plants undergoing senescence and a strong correlation between STP13 transcripts and the PCD phenotype in different accelerated cell death (acd11) mutants....

  13. Three pectin methylesterase inhibitors protect cell wall integrity for arabidopsis immunity to Botrytis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lionetti, Vincenzo; Fabri, Eleonora; Caroli, Monica De

    2017-01-01

    Infection by necrotrophs is a complex process that starts with the breakdown of the cell wall (CW) matrix initiated by CW-degrading enzymes and results in an extensive tissue maceration. Plants exploit induced defense mechanisms based on biochemical modification of the CW components to protect th...... integrity maintenance in plant immunity....

  14. The zinc finger protein ZAT11 modulates paraquat-induced programmed cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qureshi, Muhammad Kamran; Sujeeth, Neerakkal; Gechev, Tsanko S.; Hille, Jacques

    Plants use programmed cell death (PCD) as a tool in their growth and development. PCD is also involved in defense against different kinds of stresses including pathogen attack. In both types of PCD, reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role. ROS is not only a toxic by-product but also

  15. A temperature-sensitive allele of a putative mRNA splicing helicase down-regulates many cell wall genes and causes radial swelling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howles, Paul A; Gebbie, Leigh K; Collings, David A; Varsani, Arvind; Broad, Ronan C; Ohms, Stephen; Birch, Rosemary J; Cork, Ann H; Arioli, Tony; Williamson, Richard E

    2016-05-01

    The putative RNA helicase encoded by the Arabidopsis gene At1g32490 is a homolog of the yeast splicing RNA helicases Prp2 and Prp22. We isolated a temperature-sensitive allele (rsw12) of the gene in a screen for root radial swelling mutants. Plants containing this allele grown at the restrictive temperature showed weak radial swelling, were stunted with reduced root elongation, and contained reduced levels of cellulose. The role of the protein was further explored by microarray analysis. By using both fold change cutoffs and a weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) to investigate coexpression of genes, we found that the radial swelling phenotype was not linked to genes usually associated with primary cell wall biosynthesis. Instead, the mutation has strong effects on expression of secondary cell wall related genes. Many genes potentially associated with secondary walls were present in the most significant WGCNA module, as were genes coding for arabinogalactans and proteins with GPI anchors. The proportion of up-regulated genes that possess introns in rsw12 was above that expected if splicing was unrelated to the activity of the RNA helicase, suggesting that the helicase does indeed play a role in splicing in Arabidopsis. The phenotype may be due to a change in the expression of one or more genes coding for cell wall proteins.

  16. Unidirectional Movement of Cellulose Synthase Complexes in Arabidopsis Seed Coat Epidermal Cells Deposit Cellulose Involved in Mucilage Extrusion, Adherence, and Ray Formation1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Patricia; Young, Robin; DeBolt, Seth

    2015-01-01

    CELLULOSE SYNTHASE5 (CESA5) synthesizes cellulose necessary for seed mucilage adherence to seed coat epidermal cells of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The involvement of additional CESA proteins in this process and details concerning the manner in which cellulose is deposited in the mucilage pocket are unknown. Here, we show that both CESA3 and CESA10 are highly expressed in this cell type at the time of mucilage synthesis and localize to the plasma membrane adjacent to the mucilage pocket. The isoxaben resistant1-1 and isoxaben resistant1-2 mutants affecting CESA3 show defects consistent with altered mucilage cellulose biosynthesis. CESA3 can interact with CESA5 in vitro, and green fluorescent protein-tagged CESA5, CESA3, and CESA10 proteins move in a linear, unidirectional fashion around the cytoplasmic column of the cell, parallel with the surface of the seed, in a pattern similar to that of cortical microtubules. Consistent with this movement, cytological evidence suggests that the mucilage is coiled around the columella and unwinds during mucilage extrusion to form a linear ray. Mutations in CESA5 and CESA3 affect the speed of mucilage extrusion and mucilage adherence. These findings imply that cellulose fibrils are synthesized in an ordered helical array around the columella, providing a distinct structure to the mucilage that is important for both mucilage extrusion and adherence. PMID:25926481

  17. Unidirectional movement of cellulose synthase complexes in Arabidopsis seed coat epidermal cells deposit cellulose involved in mucilage extrusion, adherence, and ray formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Jonathan S; Šola, Krešimir; Kushwaha, Rekha; Lam, Patricia; Tateno, Mizuki; Young, Robin; Voiniciuc, Cătălin; Dean, Gillian; Mansfield, Shawn D; DeBolt, Seth; Haughn, George W

    2015-06-01

    Cellulose synthase5 (CESA5) synthesizes cellulose necessary for seed mucilage adherence to seed coat epidermal cells of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The involvement of additional CESA proteins in this process and details concerning the manner in which cellulose is deposited in the mucilage pocket are unknown. Here, we show that both CESA3 and CESA10 are highly expressed in this cell type at the time of mucilage synthesis and localize to the plasma membrane adjacent to the mucilage pocket. The isoxaben resistant1-1 and isoxaben resistant1-2 mutants affecting CESA3 show defects consistent with altered mucilage cellulose biosynthesis. CESA3 can interact with CESA5 in vitro, and green fluorescent protein-tagged CESA5, CESA3, and CESA10 proteins move in a linear, unidirectional fashion around the cytoplasmic column of the cell, parallel with the surface of the seed, in a pattern similar to that of cortical microtubules. Consistent with this movement, cytological evidence suggests that the mucilage is coiled around the columella and unwinds during mucilage extrusion to form a linear ray. Mutations in CESA5 and CESA3 affect the speed of mucilage extrusion and mucilage adherence. These findings imply that cellulose fibrils are synthesized in an ordered helical array around the columella, providing a distinct structure to the mucilage that is important for both mucilage extrusion and adherence. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Light-regulated, tissue-specific, and cell differentiation-specific expression of the Arabidopsis Fe(III)-chelate reductase gene AtFRO6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Haizhong; An, Fengying; Zhang, Suzhi; Ji, Zhendong; Ling, Hong-Qing; Zuo, Jianru

    2006-04-01

    Iron is an essential element for almost all living organisms, actively involved in a variety of cellular activities. To acquire iron from soil, strategy I plants such as Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) must first reduce ferric to ferrous iron by Fe(III)-chelate reductases (FROs). FRO genes display distinctive expression patterns in several plant species. However, regulation of FRO genes is not well understood. Here, we report a systematic characterization of the AtFRO6 expression during plant growth and development. AtFRO6, encoding a putative FRO, is specifically expressed in green-aerial tissues in a light-dependent manner. Analysis of mutant promoter-beta-glucuronidase reporter genes in transgenic Arabidopsis plants revealed the presence of multiple light-responsive elements in the AtFRO6 promoter. These light-responsive elements may act synergistically to confer light responsiveness to the AtFRO6 promoter. Moreover, no AtFRO6 expression was detected in dedifferentiated green calli of the korrigan1-2 (kor1-2) mutant or undifferentiated calli derived from wild-type explants. Conversely, AtFRO6 is expressed in redifferentiated kor1-2 shoot-like structures and differentiating calli of wild-type explants. In addition, AtFRO7, but not AtFRO5 and AtFRO8, also shows a reduced expression level in kor1-2 green calli. These results suggest that whereas photosynthesis is necessary but not sufficient, both light and cell differentiation are necessary for AtFRO6 expression. We propose that AtFRO6 expression is light regulated in a tissue- or cell differentiation-specific manner to facilitate the acquisition of iron in response to distinctive developmental cues.

  19. UV-B inhibition of hypocotyl growth in etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings is a consequence of cell cycle arrest initiated by photodimer accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biever, Jessica J.; Brinkman, Doug; Gardner, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is an important constituent of sunlight that determines plant morphology and growth. It induces photomorphogenic responses but also causes damage to DNA. Arabidopsis mutants of the endonucleases that function in nucleotide excision repair, xpf-3 and uvr1-1, showed hypersensitivity to UV-B (280–320nm) in terms of inhibition of hypocotyl growth. SOG1 is a transcription factor that functions in the DNA damage signalling response after γ-irradiation. xpf mutants that carry the sog1-1 mutation showed hypocotyl growth inhibition after UV-B irradiation similar to the wild type. A DNA replication inhibitor, hydroxyurea (HU), also inhibited hypocotyl growth in etiolated seedlings, but xpf-3 was not hypersensitive to HU. UV-B irradiation induced accumulation of the G2/M-specific cell cycle reporter construct CYCB1;1-GUS in wild-type Arabidopsis seedlings that was consistent with the expected accumulation of photodimers and coincided with the time course of hypocotyl growth inhibition after UV-B treatment. Etiolated mutants of UVR8, a recently described UV-B photoreceptor gene, irradiated with UV-B showed inhibition of hypocotyl growth that was not different from that of the wild type, but they lacked UV-B-specific expression of chalcone synthase (CHS), as expected from previous reports. CHS expression after UV-B irradiation was not different in xpf-3 compared with the wild type, nor was it altered after HU treatment. These results suggest that hypocotyl growth inhibition by UV-B light in etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings, a photomorphogenic response, is dictated by signals originating from UV-B absorption by DNA that lead to cell cycle arrest. This process occurs distinct from UVR8 and its signalling pathway responsible for CHS induction. PMID:24591052

  20. Signaling requirements for Erwinia amylovora-induced disease resistance, callose deposition, and cell growth in the nonhost Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwinia amylovora is the causal agent of the fire blight disease in some plants of the Rosaceae family. The nonhost plant Arabidopsis serves as a powerful system to dissect mechanisms of resistance to E. amylovora. Although not yet known to mount gene-for-gene resistance to E. amylovora, we found ...

  1. Function of type-2 Arabidopsis hemoglobin in the auxin-mediated formation of embryogenic cells during morphogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elhiti, Mohamed; Hebelstrup, Kim; Wang, Aiming

    2013-01-01

    Suppression of the Arabidopsis GLB2, a type-2 nonsymbiotic hemoglobin, enhances somatic embryogenesis by increasing auxin production. In the glb2 knock-out line (GLB2 -/-) polarization of PIN1 proteins and auxin maxima occurred at the base of the cotyledons of the zygotic explants, which are the ...... undescribed functions for plant hemoglobins....

  2. Senescence-inducible cell wall and intracellular purple acid phosphatases: implications for phosphorus remobilization in Hakea prostrata (Proteaceae) and Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Michael W; Stigter, Kyla; Fedosejevs, Eric T; Plaxton, William C

    2014-11-01

    Despite its agronomic importance, the metabolic networks mediating phosphorus (P) remobilization during plant senescence are poorly understood. Highly efficient P remobilization (~85%) from senescing leaves and proteoid roots of harsh hakea (Hakea prostrata), a native 'extremophile' plant of south-western Australia, was linked with striking up-regulation of cell wall-localized and intracellular acid phosphatase (APase) and RNase activities. Non-denaturing PAGE followed by in-gel APase activity staining revealed senescence-inducible 120kDa and 60kDa intracellular APase isoforms, whereas only the 120kDa isoform was detected in corresponding cell wall fractions. Kinetic and immunological properties of the 120kDa and 60kDa APases partially purified from senescing leaves indicated that they are purple acid phosphatases (PAPs). Results obtained with cell wall-targeted hydrolases of harsh hakea were corroborated using Arabidopsis thaliana in which an ~200% increase in cell wall APase activity during leaf senescence was paralleled by accumulation of immunoreactive 55kDa AtPAP26 polypeptides. Senescing leaves of an atpap26 T-DNA insertion mutant displayed a >90% decrease in cell wall APase activity. Previous research established that senescing leaves of atpap26 plants exhibited a similar reduction in intracellular (vacuolar) APase activity, while displaying markedly impaired P remobilization efficiency and delayed senescence. It is hypothesized that up-regulation and dual targeting of PAPs and RNases to the cell wall and vacuolar compartments make a crucial contribution to highly efficient P remobilization that dominates the P metabolism of senescing tissues of harsh hakea and Arabidopsis. To the best of the authors' knowledge, the apparent contribution of cell wall-targeted hydrolases to remobilizing key macronutrients such as P during senescence has not been previously suggested. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for

  3. Breaking the silence: three bHLH proteins direct cell-fate decisions during stomatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillitteri, Lynn Jo; Torii, Keiko U

    2007-09-01

    Stomata are microscopic pores on the surface of land plants used for gas and water vapor exchange. A pair of highly specialized guard cells surround the pore and adjust pore size. Studies in Arabidopsis have revealed that cell-cell communication is essential to coordinate the asymmetric cell divisions required for proper stomatal patterning. Initial research in this area identified signaling molecules that negatively regulate stomatal differentiation. However, genes promoting cell-fate transition leading to mature guard cells remained elusive. Now, three closely related basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins, SPEECHLESS, MUTE and FAMA have been identified as positive regulators that direct three consecutive cell-fate decisions during stomatal development. The identification of these genes opens a new direction to investigate the evolution of stomatal development and the conserved functions of bHLH proteins in cell type differentiation adopted by plants and animals.

  4. Security Guards for the Future Web

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reed, Nancy; Bryson, Dave; Garriss, James; Gosnell, Steve; Heaton, Brook; Huber, Gary; Jacobs, David; Pulvermacher, Mary; Semy, Salim; Smith, Chad; Standard, John

    2004-01-01

    .... Guard technology needs to keep pace with the evolving Web environment. The authors conjectured that a family of security guard services would be needed to provide the full range of functionality necessary to support the future Web...

  5. Reference: 23 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sis was found to strongly reduce outwardly rectifying K(+) channel activity in the guard cell membrane, and disruption...pidermal peels revealed that disruption of GORK activity resulted in impaired stomatal closure in response t

  6. Extraction and Characterization of Extracellular Proteins and Their Post-Translational Modifications from Arabidopsis thaliana Suspension Cell Cultures and Seedlings: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Ghahremani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Proteins secreted by plant cells into the extracellular space, consisting of the cell wall, apoplastic fluid, and rhizosphere, play crucial roles during development, nutrient acquisition, and stress acclimation. However, isolating the full range of secreted proteins has proven difficult, and new strategies are constantly evolving to increase the number of proteins that can be detected and identified. In addition, the dynamic nature of the extracellular proteome presents the further challenge of identifying and characterizing the post-translational modifications (PTMs of secreted proteins, particularly glycosylation and phosphorylation. Such PTMs are common and important regulatory modifications of proteins, playing a key role in many biological processes. This review explores the most recent methods in isolating and characterizing the plant extracellular proteome with a focus on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, highlighting the current challenges yet to be overcome. Moreover, the crucial role of protein PTMs in cell wall signalling, development, and plant responses to biotic and abiotic stress is discussed.

  7. Cell wall targeted in planta iron accumulation enhances biomass conversion and seed iron concentration in Arabidopsis and rice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Haibing [Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion Of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio), Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Horticulture, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Wei, Hui [Biosciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO USA; Ma, Guojie [Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion Of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio), Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Horticulture, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Antunes, Mauricio S. [Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion Of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio), Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Vogt, Stefan [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL USA; Cox, Joseph [Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion Of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio), Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Horticulture, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Zhang, Xiao [Department of Horticulture, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Liu, Xiping [Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion Of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio), Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Horticulture, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Bu, Lintao [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO USA; Gleber, S. Charlotte [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL USA; Carpita, Nicholas C. [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Makowski, Lee [Department of Bioengineering, Northeastern University, Boston MA USA; Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University, Boston MA USA; Himmel, Michael E. [Biosciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO USA; Tucker, Melvin P. [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL USA; McCann, Maureen C. [Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion Of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio), Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Murphy, Angus S. [Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion Of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio), Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Horticulture, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Maryland, College Park MD USA; Peer, Wendy A. [Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion Of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio), Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Horticulture, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Maryland, College Park MD USA; Department of Environmental Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park MD USA

    2016-04-07

    Conversion of nongrain biomass into liquid fuel is a sustainable approach to energy demands as global population increases. Previously, we showed that iron can act as a catalyst to enhance the degradation of lignocellulosic biomass for biofuel production. However, direct addition of iron catalysts to biomass pretreatment is diffusion-limited, would increase the cost and complexity of biorefinery unit operations and may have deleterious environmental impacts. Here, we show a new strategy for in planta accumulation of iron throughout the volume of the cell wall where iron acts as a catalyst in the deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass. We engineered CBM-IBP fusion polypeptides composed of a carbohydrate-binding module family 11 (CBM11) and an iron-binding peptide (IBP) for secretion into Arabidopsis and rice cell walls. CBM-IBP transformed Arabidopsis and rice plants show significant increases in iron accumulation and biomass conversion compared to respective controls. Further, CBM-IBP rice shows a 35% increase in seed iron concentration and a 40% increase in seed yield in greenhouse experiments. CBM-IBP rice potentially could be used to address iron deficiency, the most common and widespread nutritional disorder according to the World Health Organization.

  8. A Phenotyping Method of Giant Cells from Root-Knot Nematode Feeding Sites by Confocal Microscopy Highlights a Role for CHITINASE-LIKE 1 in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Javier; Olmo, Rocio; Ruiz-Ferrer, Virginia; Hermans, Christian; Martinez-Argudo, Isabel; Escobar, Carolina

    2018-01-01

    Most effective nematicides for the control of root-knot nematodes are banned, which demands a better understanding of the plant-nematode interaction. Understanding how gene expression in the nematode-feeding sites relates to morphological features may assist a better characterization of the interaction. However, nematode-induced galls resulting from cell-proliferation and hypertrophy hinders such observation, which would require tissue sectioning or clearing. We demonstrate that a method based on the green auto-fluorescence produced by glutaraldehyde and the tissue-clearing properties of benzyl-alcohol/benzyl-benzoate preserves the structure of the nematode-feeding sites and the plant-nematode interface with unprecedented resolution quality. This allowed us to obtain detailed measurements of the giant cells’ area in an Arabidopsis line overexpressing CHITINASE-LIKE-1 (CTL1) from optical sections by confocal microscopy, assigning a role for CTL1 and adding essential data to the scarce information of the role of gene repression in giant cells. Furthermore, subcellular structures and features of the nematodes body and tissues from thick organs formed after different biotic interactions, i.e., galls, syncytia, and nodules, were clearly distinguished without embedding or sectioning in different plant species (Arabidopsis, cucumber or Medicago). The combination of this method with molecular studies will be valuable for a better understanding of the plant-biotic interactions. PMID:29389847

  9. Distinct UV-B and UV-A/blue light signal transduction pathways induce chalcone synthase gene expression in Arabidopsis cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, J.M.; Jenkins, G.I.

    1996-01-01

    UV and blue light control the expression of flavonoid biosynthesis genes in a range of higher plants. To investigate the signal transduction processes involved in the induction of chalcone synthase (CHS) gene expression by UV-B and UV-A/blue light, we examined the, effects of specific agonists and inhibitors of known signaling components in mammalian systems in a photomixotrophic Arabidopsis cell suspension culture. CHS expression is induced specifically by these wavelengths in the cell culture, in a manner similar to that in mature Arabidopsis leaf tissue. Both the UV-B and UV-A/blue phototransduction processes involve calcium, although the elevation of cytosolic calcium is insufficient on its own to stimulate CHS expression. The UV-A/blue light induction of CHS expression does not appear to involve calmodulin, whereas the UV-B response does; this difference indicates that the signal transduction pathways are, at least in part, distinct. We provide evidence that both pathways involve reversible protein phosphorylation and require protein synthesis. The UV-B and UV-A/blue light signaling pathways are therefore different from the phytochrome signal transduction pathway regulating CHS expression in other species

  10. The Simbox Experiment with Arabidopsis Thaliana Cell Cultures: Hardware-Tests and First Resutls from the German-Chinese satellite Mission Shenzhou 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fengler, Svenja; Neef, Maren; Ecke, Margret; Hampp, Ruediger

    2013-02-01

    The Simbox experiment was the first joint German-Chinese space project. In this context Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures were exposed to microgravity for a 17-day period. To carry out a successful space mission, diverse hardware tests were performed in advance. Due to the limited oxygen supply inside the hardware units, cells were fixed after 5 days under microgravity conditions. As a control, samples were exposed in an on-board 1g reference centrifuge. To investigate the space effect, a ground-based study was performed with the same hardware and identical experimental procedures. As we were able to obtain high quality RNA from the RNAlater quenched samples, we used the Affymetrix Arabidopsis genome array for a transcriptome analysis. Our experiment aimed at the identification of plant genes that were differentially expressed after long-term exposure to microgravity. Pair-wise comparison of flight samples with 1g controls revealed the largest differences between space 1g and ground 1g controls.

  11. A mutation in the GTP hydrolysis site of Arabidopsis dynamin-related protein 1E confers enhanced cell death in response to powdery mildew infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dingzhong; Ade, Jules; Frye, Catherine A; Innes, Roger W

    2006-07-01

    We screened for mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana that displayed enhanced disease resistance to the powdery mildew pathogen Erysiphe cichoracearum and identified the edr3 mutant, which formed large gray lesions upon infection with E. cichoracearum and supported very little sporulation. The edr3-mediated disease resistance and cell death phenotypes were dependent on salicylic acid signaling, but independent of ethylene and jasmonic acid signaling. In addition, edr3 plants displayed enhanced susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, but showed normal responses to virulent and avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. The EDR3 gene was isolated by positional cloning and found to encode Arabidopsis dynamin-related protein 1E (DRP1E). The edr3 mutation caused an amino acid substitution in the GTPase domain of DRP1E (proline 77 to leucine) that is predicted to block GTP hydrolysis, but not GTP binding. A T-DNA insertion allele in DRP1E did not cause powdery mildew-induced lesions, suggesting that this phenotype is caused by DRP1E being locked in the GTP-bound state, rather than by a loss of DRP1E activity. Analysis of DRP1E-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins revealed that DRP1E is at least partially localized to mitochondria. These observations suggest a mechanistic link between salicylic acid signaling, mitochondria and programmed cell death in plants.

  12. Spatiotemporal relationships between growth and microtubule orientation as revealed in living root cells of Arabidopsis thaliana transformed with green-fluorescent-protein gene construct GFP-MBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, C. L.; Cyr, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana plants were transformed with GFP-MBD (J. Marc et al., Plant Cell 10: 1927-1939, 1998) under the control of a constitutive (35S) or copper-inducible promoter. GFP-specific fluorescence distributions, levels, and persistence were determined and found to vary with age, tissue type, transgenic line, and individual plant. With the exception of an increased frequency of abnormal roots of 35S GFP-MBD plants grown on kanamycin-containing media, expression of GFP-MBD does not appear to affect plant phenotype. The number of leaves, branches, bolts, and siliques as well as overall height, leaf size, and seed set are similar between wild-type and transgenic plants as is the rate of root growth. Thus, we conclude that the transgenic plants can serve as a living model system in which the dynamic behavior of microtubules can be visualized. Confocal microscopy was used to simultaneously monitor growth and microtubule behavior within individual cells as they passed through the elongation zone of the Arabidopsis root. Generally, microtubules reoriented from transverse to oblique or longitudinal orientations as growth declined. Microtubule reorientation initiated at the ends of the cell did not necessarily occur simultaneously in adjacent neighboring cells and did not involve complete disintegration and repolymerization of microtubule arrays. Although growth rates correlated with microtubule reorientation, the two processes were not tightly coupled in terms of their temporal relationships, suggesting that other factor(s) may be involved in regulating both events. Additionally, microtubule orientation was more defined in cells whose growth was accelerating and less stringent in cells whose growth was decelerating, indicating that microtubule-orienting factor(s) may be sensitive to growth acceleration, rather than growth per se.

  13. High-contrast three-dimensional imaging of the Arabidopsis leaf enables the analysis of cell dimensions in the epidermis and mesophyll

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Granier Christine

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the wide spread application of confocal and multiphoton laser scanning microscopy in plant biology, leaf phenotype assessment still relies on two-dimensional imaging with a limited appreciation of the cells' structural context and an inherent inaccuracy of cell measurements. Here, a successful procedure for the three-dimensional imaging and analysis of plant leaves is presented. Results The procedure was developed based on a range of developmental stages, from leaf initiation to senescence, of soil-grown Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heynh. Rigorous clearing of tissues, made possible by enhanced leaf permeability to clearing agents, allowed the optical sectioning of the entire leaf thickness by both confocal and multiphoton microscopy. The superior image quality, in resolution and contrast, obtained by the latter technique enabled the three-dimensional visualisation of leaf morphology at the individual cell level, cell segmentation and the construction of structural models. Image analysis macros were developed to measure leaf thickness and tissue proportions, as well as to determine for the epidermis and all layers of mesophyll tissue, cell density, volume, length and width. For mesophyll tissue, the proportion of intercellular spaces and the surface areas of cells were also estimated. The performance of the procedure was demonstrated for the expanding 6th leaf of the Arabidopsis rosette. Furthermore, it was proven to be effective for leaves of another dicotyledon, apple (Malus domestica Borkh., which has a very different cellular organisation. Conclusions The pipeline for the three-dimensional imaging and analysis of plant leaves provides the means to include variables on internal tissues in leaf growth studies and the assessment of leaf phenotypes. It also allows the visualisation and quantification of alterations in leaf structure alongside changes in leaf functioning observed under environmental constraints. Data

  14. Approximation algorithms for guarding holey polygons ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guarding edges of polygons is a version of art gallery problem.The goal is finding the minimum number of guards to cover the edges of a polygon. This problem is NP-hard, and to our knowledge there are approximation algorithms just for simple polygons. In this paper we present two approximation algorithms for guarding ...

  15. Unravelling the potential of a new uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) from Arabidopsis thaliana in sensitizing HeLa cells towards 5-fluorouracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sharmila; Sanpui, Pallab; Sahoo, Lingaraj; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar

    2016-10-01

    In silico studies with uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtUPRT) revealed its lower binding energies for uracil and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as compared to those of bacterial UPRT indicating the prospective of AtUPRT in gene therapy implications. Hence, AtUPRT was cloned and stably expressed in cervical cancer cells (HeLa) to investigate the effect of prodrug 5-FU on these transfected cancer cells. The treatment of AtUPRT-expressing HeLa (HeLa-UPP) cells with 5-FU for 72h resulted in significant decrease in cell viability. Moreover, 5-FU was observed to induce apoptosis and perturb mitochondrial membrane potential in HeLa-UPP cells. While cell cycle analysis revealed significant S-phase arrest as a result of 5-FU treatment in HeLa-UPP cells, quantitative gene expression analysis demonstrated simultaneous upregulation of important cell cycle related genes, cyclin D1 and p21. The survival fractions of non-transfected, vector-transfected and AtUPRT-transfected HeLa cells, following 5-FU treatment, were calculated to be 0.425, 0.366 and 0.227, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Pectin-induced changes in cell wall mechanics underlie organ initiation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peaucelle, Alexis; Braybrook, Siobhan A; Le Guillou, Laurent; Bron, Emeric; Kuhlemeier, Cris; Höfte, Herman

    2011-10-25

    Tissue mechanics have been shown to play a key role in the regulation of morphogenesis in animals [1-4] and may have an equally important role in plants [5-9]. The aerial organs of plants are formed at the shoot apical meristem following a specific phyllotactic pattern [10]. The initiation of an organ from the meristem requires a highly localized irreversible surface deformation, which depends on the demethylesterification of cell wall pectins [11]. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate whether these chemical changes lead to changes in tissue mechanics. By mapping the viscoelasticity and elasticity in living meristems, we observed increases in tissue elasticity, correlated with pectin demethylesterification, in primordia and at the site of incipient organs. Measurements of tissue elasticity at various depths showed that, at the site of incipient primordia, the first increases occurred in subepidermal tissues. The results support the following causal sequence of events: (1) demethylesterification of pectin is triggered in subepidermal tissue layers, (2) this contributes to an increase in elasticity of these layers-the first observable mechanical event in organ initiation, and (3) the process propagates to the epidermis during the outgrowth of the organ. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Differential TOR activation and cell proliferation in Arabidopsis root and shoot apexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojuan; Cai, Wenguo; Liu, Yanlin; Li, Hui; Fu, Liwen; Liu, Zengyu; Xu, Lin; Liu, Hongtao; Xu, Tongda; Xiong, Yan

    2017-03-07

    The developmental plasticity of plants relies on the remarkable ability of the meristems to integrate nutrient and energy availability with environmental signals. Meristems in root and shoot apexes share highly similar molecular players but are spatially separated by soil. Whether and how these two meristematic tissues have differential activation requirements for local nutrient, hormone, and environmental cues (e.g., light) remain enigmatic in photosynthetic plants. Here, we report that the activation of root and shoot apexes relies on distinct glucose and light signals. Glucose energy signaling is sufficient to activate target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase in root apexes. In contrast, both the glucose and light signals are required for TOR activation in shoot apexes. Strikingly, exogenously applied auxin is able to replace light to activate TOR in shoot apexes and promote true leaf development. A relatively low concentration of auxin in the shoot and high concentration of auxin in the root might be responsible for this distinctive light requirement in root and shoot apexes, because light is required to promote auxin biosynthesis in the shoot. Furthermore, we reveal that the small GTPase Rho-related protein 2 (ROP2) transduces light-auxin signal to activate TOR by direct interaction, which, in turn, promotes transcription factors E2Fa,b for activating cell cycle genes in shoot apexes. Consistently, constitutively activated ROP2 plants stimulate TOR in the shoot apex and cause true leaf development even without light. Together, our findings establish a pivotal hub role of TOR signaling in integrating different environmental signals to regulate distinct developmental transition and growth in the shoot and root.

  18. The Monosaccharide Transporter Gene, AtSTP4, and the Cell-Wall Invertase, Atβfruct1, Are Induced in Arabidopsis during Infection with the Fungal Biotroph Erysiphe cichoracearum1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotopoulos, Vasileios; Gilbert, Martin J.; Pittman, Jon K.; Marvier, Alison C.; Buchanan, Aram J.; Sauer, Norbert; Hall, J.L.; Williams, Lorraine E.

    2003-01-01

    Powdery mildew fungi are biotrophic pathogens that form a complex interface, the haustorium, between the host plant and the parasite. The pathogen acts as an additional sink, competing with host sinks, resulting in considerable modification of photoassimilate production and partitioning within the host tissue. Here, we examine the factors that may contribute to these changes. We show for the first time in one biotrophic interaction (Arabidopsis/Erysiphe cichoracearum) all of the following responses: Glc uptake in host tissues is enhanced after fungal infection; this coincides with the induction of expression of the monosaccharide transporter gene, Arabidopsis sugar transport protein 4 (AtSTP4), in infected leaves; invertase activity and transcript levels for a cell wall invertase, Atβfruct1, increase substantially in Arabidopsis during attack by this pathogen. Before infection, Arabidopsis plants transformed with an AtSTP4 promoter-β-glucuronidase construct show expression mainly in sink tissues such as roots; after infection, AtSTP4 expression is induced in the mature leaves and increases over the 6-d time period. Sections of infected leaves stained for β-glucuronidase show that AtSTP4 expression is not confined to infected epidermal cells but is also evident in a wider range of cells, including those of the vascular tissue. The results are discussed in relation to the possible coordinated expression of hexose transporters and cell wall invertase in the host response to powdery mildew infection. PMID:12805612

  19. Disruption of the Vacuolar Calcium-ATPases in Arabidopsis Results in the Activation of a Salicylic Acid-Dependent Programmed Cell Death Pathway1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boursiac, Yann; Lee, Sang Min; Romanowsky, Shawn; Blank, Robert; Sladek, Chris; Chung, Woo Sik; Harper, Jeffrey F.

    2010-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signals regulate many aspects of plant development, including a programmed cell death pathway that protects plants from pathogens (hypersensitive response). Cytosolic Ca2+ signals result from a combined action of Ca2+ influx through channels and Ca2+ efflux through pumps and cotransporters. Plants utilize calmodulin-activated Ca2+ pumps (autoinhibited Ca2+-ATPase [ACA]) at the plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum, and vacuole. Here, we show that a double knockout mutation of the vacuolar Ca2+ pumps ACA4 and ACA11 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) results in a high frequency of hypersensitive response-like lesions. The appearance of macrolesions could be suppressed by growing plants with increased levels (greater than 15 mm) of various anions, providing a method for conditional suppression. By removing plants from a conditional suppression, lesion initials were found to originate primarily in leaf mesophyll cells, as detected by aniline blue staining. Initiation and spread of lesions could also be suppressed by disrupting the production or accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), as shown by combining aca4/11 mutations with a sid2 (for salicylic acid induction-deficient2) mutation or expression of the SA degradation enzyme NahG. This indicates that the loss of the vacuolar Ca2+ pumps by itself does not cause a catastrophic defect in ion homeostasis but rather potentiates the activation of a SA-dependent programmed cell death pathway. Together, these results provide evidence linking the activity of the vacuolar Ca2+ pumps to the control of a SA-dependent programmed cell death pathway in plants. PMID:20837703

  20. Disruption of the vacuolar calcium-ATPases in Arabidopsis results in the activation of a salicylic acid-dependent programmed cell death pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boursiac, Yann; Lee, Sang Min; Romanowsky, Shawn; Blank, Robert; Sladek, Chris; Chung, Woo Sik; Harper, Jeffrey F

    2010-11-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) signals regulate many aspects of plant development, including a programmed cell death pathway that protects plants from pathogens (hypersensitive response). Cytosolic Ca(2+) signals result from a combined action of Ca(2+) influx through channels and Ca(2+) efflux through pumps and cotransporters. Plants utilize calmodulin-activated Ca(2+) pumps (autoinhibited Ca(2+)-ATPase [ACA]) at the plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum, and vacuole. Here, we show that a double knockout mutation of the vacuolar Ca(2+) pumps ACA4 and ACA11 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) results in a high frequency of hypersensitive response-like lesions. The appearance of macrolesions could be suppressed by growing plants with increased levels (greater than 15 mm) of various anions, providing a method for conditional suppression. By removing plants from a conditional suppression, lesion initials were found to originate primarily in leaf mesophyll cells, as detected by aniline blue staining. Initiation and spread of lesions could also be suppressed by disrupting the production or accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), as shown by combining aca4/11 mutations with a sid 2 (for salicylic acid induction-deficient2) mutation or expression of the SA degradation enzyme NahG. This indicates that the loss of the vacuolar Ca(2+) pumps by itself does not cause a catastrophic defect in ion homeostasis but rather potentiates the activation of a SA-dependent programmed cell death pathway. Together, these results provide evidence linking the activity of the vacuolar Ca(2+) pumps to the control of a SA-dependent programmed cell death pathway in plants.

  1. An essential role for the VASt domain of the Arabidopsis VAD1 protein in the regulation of defense and cell death in response to pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khafif, Mehdi; Balagué, Claudine; Huard-Chauveau, Carine; Roby, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Several regulators of programmed cell death (PCD) have been identified in plants which encode proteins with putative lipid-binding domains. Among them, VAD1 (Vascular Associated Death) contains a novel protein domain called VASt (VAD1 analog StAR-related lipid transfer) still uncharacterized. The Arabidopsis mutant vad1-1 has been shown to exhibit a lesion mimic phenotype with light-conditional appearance of propagative hypersensitive response-like lesions along the vascular system, associated with defense gene expression and increased resistance to Pseudomonas strains. To test the potential of ectopic expression of VAD1 to influence HR cell death and to elucidate the role of the VASt domain in this function, we performed a structure-function analysis of VAD1 by transient over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana and by complementation of the mutant vad1-1. We found that (i) overexpression of VAD1 controls negatively the HR cell death and defense expression either transiently in Nicotiana benthamania or in Arabidopsis plants in response to avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae, (ii) VAD1 is expressed in multiple subcellular compartments, including the nucleus, and (iii) while the GRAM domain does not modify neither the subcellular localization of VAD1 nor its immunorepressor activity, the domain VASt plays an essential role in both processes. In conclusion, VAD1 acts as a negative regulator of cell death associated with the plant immune response and the VASt domain of this unknown protein plays an essential role in this function, opening the way for the functional analysis of VASt-containing proteins and the characterization of novel mechanisms regulating PCD.

  2. An essential role for the VASt domain of the Arabidopsis VAD1 protein in the regulation of defense and cell death in response to pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Khafif

    Full Text Available Several regulators of programmed cell death (PCD have been identified in plants which encode proteins with putative lipid-binding domains. Among them, VAD1 (Vascular Associated Death contains a novel protein domain called VASt (VAD1 analog StAR-related lipid transfer still uncharacterized. The Arabidopsis mutant vad1-1 has been shown to exhibit a lesion mimic phenotype with light-conditional appearance of propagative hypersensitive response-like lesions along the vascular system, associated with defense gene expression and increased resistance to Pseudomonas strains. To test the potential of ectopic expression of VAD1 to influence HR cell death and to elucidate the role of the VASt domain in this function, we performed a structure-function analysis of VAD1 by transient over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana and by complementation of the mutant vad1-1. We found that (i overexpression of VAD1 controls negatively the HR cell death and defense expression either transiently in Nicotiana benthamania or in Arabidopsis plants in response to avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae, (ii VAD1 is expressed in multiple subcellular compartments, including the nucleus, and (iii while the GRAM domain does not modify neither the subcellular localization of VAD1 nor its immunorepressor activity, the domain VASt plays an essential role in both processes. In conclusion, VAD1 acts as a negative regulator of cell death associated with the plant immune response and the VASt domain of this unknown protein plays an essential role in this function, opening the way for the functional analysis of VASt-containing proteins and the characterization of novel mechanisms regulating PCD.

  3. Mre11 Deficiency in Arabidopsis Is Associated with Chromosomal Instability in Somatic Cells and Spo11-Dependent Genome Fragmentation during Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puizina, Jasna; Siroky, Jiri; Mokros, Petr; Schweizer, Dieter; Riha, Karel

    2004-01-01

    The Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 complex is involved in many aspects of chromosome metabolism. Aberrant function of the complex is associated with defects in the DNA checkpoint, double-strand break repair, meiosis, and telomere maintenance. In this article, we report the consequences of Mre11 dysfunction for the stability of mitotic and meiotic chromosomes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Although plants homozygous for a T-DNA insertion in a conserved region of the MRE11 gene are viable, they exhibit growth defects and are infertile. Analysis of mitotic chromosomes prepared from the mutant plants revealed abundant dicentric chromosomes and chromosomal fragments. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that anaphase bridges are often formed by homologous chromosome arms. The frequency of chromosome fusions was not reduced in mre11 ku70 double mutants, suggesting that plants possess DNA end-joining activities independent of the Ku70/80 and Mre11 complexes. Cytogenetic examination of pollen mother cells revealed massive chromosome fragmentation and the absence of synapsis in the initial stages of meiosis. The fragmentation was substantially suppressed in mre11 spo11-1 double mutants, indicating that Mre11 is required for repair but not for the induction of Spo11-dependent meiotic DNA breaks in Arabidopsis. PMID:15258261

  4. An abscisic acid-independent oxylipin pathway controls stomatal closure and immune defense in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montillet, Jean-Luc; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Mondy, Samuel; Tranchimand, Sylvain; Rumeau, Dominique; Boudsocq, Marie; Garcia, Ana Victoria; Douki, Thierry; Bigeard, Jean; Laurière, Christiane; Chevalier, Anne; Castresana, Carmen; Hirt, Heribert

    2013-01-01

    Plant stomata function in innate immunity against bacterial invasion and abscisic acid (ABA) has been suggested to regulate this process. Using genetic, biochemical, and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate that (i) the Arabidopsis thaliana nine-specific-lipoxygenase encoding gene, LOX1, which is expressed in guard cells, is required to trigger stomatal closure in response to both bacteria and the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide flg22; (ii) LOX1 participates in stomatal defense; (iii) polyunsaturated fatty acids, the LOX substrates, trigger stomatal closure; (iv) the LOX products, fatty acid hydroperoxides, or reactive electrophile oxylipins induce stomatal closure; and (v) the flg22-mediated stomatal closure is conveyed by both LOX1 and the mitogen-activated protein kinases MPK3 and MPK6 and involves salicylic acid whereas the ABA-induced process depends on the protein kinases OST1, MPK9, or MPK12. Finally, we show that the oxylipin and the ABA pathways converge at the level of the anion channel SLAC1 to regulate stomatal closure. Collectively, our results demonstrate that early biotic signaling in guard cells is an ABA-independent process revealing a novel function of LOX1-dependent stomatal pathway in plant immunity.

  5. An abscisic acid-independent oxylipin pathway controls stomatal closure and immune defense in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc Montillet

    Full Text Available Plant stomata function in innate immunity against bacterial invasion and abscisic acid (ABA has been suggested to regulate this process. Using genetic, biochemical, and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate that (i the Arabidopsis thaliana nine-specific-lipoxygenase encoding gene, LOX1, which is expressed in guard cells, is required to trigger stomatal closure in response to both bacteria and the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide flg22; (ii LOX1 participates in stomatal defense; (iii polyunsaturated fatty acids, the LOX substrates, trigger stomatal closure; (iv the LOX products, fatty acid hydroperoxides, or reactive electrophile oxylipins induce stomatal closure; and (v the flg22-mediated stomatal closure is conveyed by both LOX1 and the mitogen-activated protein kinases MPK3 and MPK6 and involves salicylic acid whereas the ABA-induced process depends on the protein kinases OST1, MPK9, or MPK12. Finally, we show that the oxylipin and the ABA pathways converge at the level of the anion channel SLAC1 to regulate stomatal closure. Collectively, our results demonstrate that early biotic signaling in guard cells is an ABA-independent process revealing a novel function of LOX1-dependent stomatal pathway in plant immunity.

  6. An Abscisic Acid-Independent Oxylipin Pathway Controls Stomatal Closure and Immune Defense in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondy, Samuel; Tranchimand, Sylvain; Rumeau, Dominique; Boudsocq, Marie; Garcia, Ana Victoria; Douki, Thierry; Bigeard, Jean; Laurière, Christiane; Chevalier, Anne; Castresana, Carmen; Hirt, Heribert

    2013-01-01

    Plant stomata function in innate immunity against bacterial invasion and abscisic acid (ABA) has been suggested to regulate this process. Using genetic, biochemical, and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate that (i) the Arabidopsis thaliana nine-specific-lipoxygenase encoding gene, LOX1, which is expressed in guard cells, is required to trigger stomatal closure in response to both bacteria and the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide flg22; (ii) LOX1 participates in stomatal defense; (iii) polyunsaturated fatty acids, the LOX substrates, trigger stomatal closure; (iv) the LOX products, fatty acid hydroperoxides, or reactive electrophile oxylipins induce stomatal closure; and (v) the flg22-mediated stomatal closure is conveyed by both LOX1 and the mitogen-activated protein kinases MPK3 and MPK6 and involves salicylic acid whereas the ABA-induced process depends on the protein kinases OST1, MPK9, or MPK12. Finally, we show that the oxylipin and the ABA pathways converge at the level of the anion channel SLAC1 to regulate stomatal closure. Collectively, our results demonstrate that early biotic signaling in guard cells is an ABA-independent process revealing a novel function of LOX1-dependent stomatal pathway in plant immunity. PMID:23526882

  7. Growth increase of Arabidopsis by forced expression of rice 45S rRNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makabe, So; Motohashi, Reiko; Nakamura, Ikuo

    2017-02-01

    Forced expression of rice 45S rRNA gene conferred ca. 2-fold increase of above-ground growth in transgenic Arabidopsis . This growth increase was probably brought by cell proliferation, not by cell enlargement. Recent increase in carbon dioxide emissions is causing global climate change. The use of plant biomass as alternative energy source is one way to reduce these emissions. Therefore, reinforcement of plant biomass production is an urgent key issue to overcome both depletion of fossil energies and emission of carbon dioxide. Here, we created transgenic Arabidopsis with a 2-fold increase in above-ground growth by forced expression of the rice 45S rRNA gene using the maize ubiquitin promoter. Although the size of guard cells and ploidy of leaf-cells were similar between transgenic and control plants, numbers of stomata and pavement cells were much increased in the transgenic leaf. This data suggested that cell number, not cell expansion, was responsible for the growth increase, which might be brought by the forced expression of exogenous and full-length 45S rRNA gene. The expression level of rice 45S rRNA transcripts was very low, possibly triggering unknown machinery to enhance cell proliferation. Although microarray analysis showed enhanced expression of ethylene-responsive transcription factors, these factors might respond to ethylene induced by abiotic/biotic stresses or genomic incompatibility, which might be involved in the expression of species-specific internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences within rice 45S rRNA transcripts. Further analysis of the mechanism underlying the growth increase will contribute to understanding the regulation of the cell proliferation and the mechanism of hybrid vigor.

  8. Building a hair: tip growth in Arabidopsis thaliana root hairs.

    OpenAIRE

    Carol, Rachel J; Dolan, Liam

    2002-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana root hair is used as a model for studying tip growth in plants. We review recent advances, made using physiological and genetic approaches, which give rise to different, yet compatible, current views of the establishment and maintenance of tip growth in epidermal cells. For example, an active calcium influx channel localized at the tip of Arabidopsis root hairs has been identified by patch-clamp measurements. Actin has been visualized in vivo in Arabidopsis root hairs...

  9. The manipulation of auxin in the abscission zone cells of Arabidopsis flowers reveals that indoleacetic acid signaling is a prerequisite for organ shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Manojit M; González-Carranza, Zinnia H; Azam-Ali, Sayed; Tang, Shouya; Shahid, Ahmad Ali; Roberts, Jeremy A

    2013-05-01

    A number of novel strategies were employed to examine the role of indoleacetic acid (IAA) in regulating floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Analysis of auxin influx facilitator expression in β-glucuronidase reporter plants revealed that AUXIN RESISTANT1, LIKE AUX1, and LAX3 were specifically up-regulated at the site of floral organ shedding. Flowers from mutants where individual family members were down-regulated exhibited a reduction in the force necessary to bring about petal separation; however, the effect was not additive in double or quadruple mutants. Using the promoter of a polygalacturonase (At2g41850), active primarily in cells undergoing separation, to drive expression of the bacterial genes iaaL and iaaM, we have shown that it is possible to manipulate auxin activity specifically within the floral organ abscission zone (AZ). Analysis of petal breakstrength reveals that if IAA AZ levels are reduced, shedding takes place prematurely, while if they are enhanced, organ loss is delayed. The At2g41850 promoter was also used to transactivate the gain-of-function AXR3-1 gene in order to disrupt auxin signaling specifically within the floral organ AZ cells. Flowers from transactivated lines failed to shed their sepals, petals, and anthers during pod expansion and maturity, and these organs frequently remained attached to the plant even after silique desiccation and dehiscence had taken place. These observations support a key role for IAA in the regulation of abscission in planta and reveal, to our knowledge for the first time, a requirement for a functional IAA signaling pathway in AZ cells for organ shedding to take place.

  10. The polyadenylation factor subunit CLEAVAGE AND POLYADENYLATION SPECIFICITY FACTOR30: A key factor of programmed cell death and a regulator of immunity in arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Bruggeman, Quentin

    2014-04-04

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is essential for several aspects of plant life, including development and stress responses. Indeed, incompatible plant-pathogen interactions are well known to induce the hypersensitive response, a localized cell death. Mutational analyses have identified several key PCD components, and we recently identified the mips1 mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is deficient for the key enzyme catalyzing the limiting step of myoinositol synthesis. One of the most striking features of mips1 is the light-dependent formation of lesions on leaves due to salicylic acid (SA)-dependent PCD, revealing roles for myoinositol or inositol derivatives in the regulation of PCD. Here, we identified a regulator of plant PCD by screening for mutants that display transcriptomic profiles opposing that of the mips1 mutant. Our screen identified the oxt6 mutant, which has been described previously as being tolerant to oxidative stress. In the oxt6 mutant, a transfer DNA is inserted in the CLEAVAGE AND POLYADENYLATION SPECIFICITY FACTOR30 (CPSF30) gene, which encodes a polyadenylation factor subunit homolog. We show that CPSF30 is required for lesion formation in mips1 via SA-dependent signaling, that the prodeath function of CPSF30 is not mediated by changes in the glutathione status, and that CPSF30 activity is required for Pseudomonas syringae resistance. We also show that the oxt6 mutation suppresses cell death in other lesion-mimic mutants, including lesion-simulating disease1, mitogen-activated protein kinase4, constitutive expressor of pathogenesis-related genes5, and catalase2, suggesting that CPSF30 and, thus, the control of messenger RNA 3′ end processing, through the regulation of SA production, is a key component of plant immune responses. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  11. The Polyadenylation Factor Subunit CLEAVAGE AND POLYADENYLATION SPECIFICITY FACTOR30: A Key Factor of Programmed Cell Death and a Regulator of Immunity in Arabidopsis1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggeman, Quentin; Garmier, Marie; de Bont, Linda; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Mazubert, Christelle; Benhamed, Moussa; Raynaud, Cécile; Bergounioux, Catherine; Delarue, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is essential for several aspects of plant life, including development and stress responses. Indeed, incompatible plant-pathogen interactions are well known to induce the hypersensitive response, a localized cell death. Mutational analyses have identified several key PCD components, and we recently identified the mips1 mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is deficient for the key enzyme catalyzing the limiting step of myoinositol synthesis. One of the most striking features of mips1 is the light-dependent formation of lesions on leaves due to salicylic acid (SA)-dependent PCD, revealing roles for myoinositol or inositol derivatives in the regulation of PCD. Here, we identified a regulator of plant PCD by screening for mutants that display transcriptomic profiles opposing that of the mips1 mutant. Our screen identified the oxt6 mutant, which has been described previously as being tolerant to oxidative stress. In the oxt6 mutant, a transfer DNA is inserted in the CLEAVAGE AND POLYADENYLATION SPECIFICITY FACTOR30 (CPSF30) gene, which encodes a polyadenylation factor subunit homolog. We show that CPSF30 is required for lesion formation in mips1 via SA-dependent signaling, that the prodeath function of CPSF30 is not mediated by changes in the glutathione status, and that CPSF30 activity is required for Pseudomonas syringae resistance. We also show that the oxt6 mutation suppresses cell death in other lesion-mimic mutants, including lesion-simulating disease1, mitogen-activated protein kinase4, constitutive expressor of pathogenesis-related genes5, and catalase2, suggesting that CPSF30 and, thus, the control of messenger RNA 3′ end processing, through the regulation of SA production, is a key component of plant immune responses. PMID:24706550

  12. Cell wall-associated ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10, a proline-rich receptor-like kinase, is a negative modulator of Arabidopsis root hair growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Youra; Lee, Hyodong; Lee, Young-Sook; Cho, Hyung-Taeg

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell growth is restricted by the cell wall, and cell wall dynamics act as signals for the cytoplasmic and nuclear events of cell growth. Among various receptor kinases, ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10 (RHS10) belongs to a poorly known receptor kinase subfamily with a proline-rich extracellular domain. Here, we report that RHS10 defines the root hair length of Arabidopsis thaliana by negatively regulating hair growth. RHS10 modulates the duration of root hair growth rather than the growth rate. As poplar and rice RHS10 orthologs also showed a root hair-inhibitory function, this receptor kinase-mediated function appears to be conserved in angiosperms. RHS10 showed a strong association with the cell wall, most probably through its extracellular proline-rich domain (ECD). Deletion analysis of the ECD demonstrated that a minimal extracellular part, which includes a few proline residues, is required for RHS10-mediated root hair inhibition. RHS10 suppressed the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the root, which are necessary for root hair growth. A yeast two-hybrid screening identified an RNase (RNS2) as a putative downstream target of RHS10. Accordingly, RHS10 overexpression decreased and RHS10 loss increased RNA levels in the hair-growing root region. Our results suggest that RHS10 mediates cell wall-associated signals to maintain proper root hair length, at least in part by regulating RNA catabolism and ROS accumulation. PMID:26884603

  13. The Arabidopsis leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase MIK2/LRR-KISS connects cell wall integrity sensing, root growth and response to abiotic and biotic stresses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieuwertje Van der Does

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Plants actively perceive and respond to perturbations in their cell walls which arise during growth, biotic and abiotic stresses. However, few components involved in plant cell wall integrity sensing have been described to date. Using a reverse-genetic approach, we identified the Arabidopsis thaliana leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase MIK2 as an important regulator of cell wall damage responses triggered upon cellulose biosynthesis inhibition. Indeed, loss-of-function mik2 alleles are strongly affected in immune marker gene expression, jasmonic acid production and lignin deposition. MIK2 has both overlapping and distinct functions with THE1, a malectin-like receptor kinase previously proposed as cell wall integrity sensor. In addition, mik2 mutant plants exhibit enhanced leftward root skewing when grown on vertical plates. Notably, natural variation in MIK2 (also named LRR-KISS has been correlated recently to mild salt stress tolerance, which we could confirm using our insertional alleles. Strikingly, both the increased root skewing and salt stress sensitivity phenotypes observed in the mik2 mutant are dependent on THE1. Finally, we found that MIK2 is required for resistance to the fungal root pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. Together, our data identify MIK2 as a novel component in cell wall integrity sensing and suggest that MIK2 is a nexus linking cell wall integrity sensing to growth and environmental cues.

  14. Functional analysis of the cellulose synthase-like genes CSLD1, CSLD2 and CSLD4 in tip-growing arabidopsis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernal Giraldo, Adriana Jimena; Yoo, Cheol-Min; Mutwil, Marek

    2008-01-01

    A reverse genetic approach was used to investigate the functions of three members of the cellulose synthase superfamily in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), CELLULOSE SYNTHASE-LIKE D1 (CSLD1), CSLD2, and CSLD4. CSLD2 is required for normal root hair growth but has a different role from that pre......A reverse genetic approach was used to investigate the functions of three members of the cellulose synthase superfamily in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), CELLULOSE SYNTHASE-LIKE D1 (CSLD1), CSLD2, and CSLD4. CSLD2 is required for normal root hair growth but has a different role from...... that previously described for CSLD3 (KOJAK). CSLD2 is required during a later stage of hair development than CSLD3, and CSLD2 mutants produce root hairs with a range of abnormalities, with many root hairs rupturing late in development. Remarkably, though, it was often the case that in CSLD2 mutants, tip growth...... a specialized structural role in the cell walls of tip-growing cells....

  15. 2012 National Guard Bureau Posture Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    will complement and enhance the existing civil-support structure in National Guard units across the nation. The National Guard seeks to provide...million annually in juvenile corrections costs, while keeping youth off federal assistance. Investment in the National Guard is a great value for...not necessarily a deployment problem, because 60 percent have not deployed. It is not an unemployment problem, because only 10-15 percent were

  16. Chromatin dynamics in Pollen Mother Cells underpin a common scenario at the somatic-to-reproductive fate transition of both the male and female lineages in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing eShe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Unlike animals, where the germline is established early during embryogenesis, plants set aside their reproductive lineage late in development in dedicated floral organs. The specification of pollen mother cells (PMCs committed to meiosis takes place in the sporogenous tissue in anther locules and marks the somatic-to-reproductive cell fate transition towards the male reproductive lineage. Here we show that Arabidopsis PMCs differentiation is accompanied by large-scale changes in chromatin organization. This is characterized by significant increase in nuclear volume, chromatin decondensation, reduction in heterochromatin, eviction of linker histones and the H2AZ histone variant. These structural alterations are accompanied by dramatic, quantitative changes in histone modifications levels compared to that of surrounding somatic cells that do not share a sporogenic fate. All these changes are highly reminiscent of those we have formerly described in female megaspore mother cells (MMCs. This indicates that chromatin reprogramming is a common underlying scenario in the somatic-to-reproductive cell fate transition in both male and female lineages.

  17. Arabidopsis group Ie formins localize to specific cell membrane domains, interact with actin-binding proteins and cause defects in cell expansion upon aberrant expression

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Deeks, M.J.; Cvrčková, F.; Machesky, M. L.; Mikitova, V.; Ketelaar, T.; Žárský, Viktor; Davies, B.; Hussey, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 168, č. 3 (2005), s. 529-540 ISSN 0028-646X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/02/1461; GA ČR GA204/05/0268 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : actin * Arabidopsis * cytoskeleton Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.285, year: 2005

  18. The expression pattern of the Picea glauca Defensin 1 promoter is maintained in Arabidopsis thaliana, indicating the conservation of signalling pathways between angiosperms and gymnosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Hugo; Lachance, Denis; Pelletier, Gervais; Fossdal, Carl Gunnar; Solheim, Halvor; Séguin, Armand

    2012-01-01

    A 1149 bp genomic fragment corresponding to the 5' non-coding region of the PgD1 (Picea glauca Defensin 1) gene was cloned, characterized, and compared with all Arabidopsis thaliana defensin promoters. The cloned fragment was found to contain several motifs specific to defence or hormonal response, including a motif involved in the methyl jasmonate reponse, a fungal elicitor responsive element, and TC-rich repeat cis-acting element involved in defence and stress responsiveness. A functional analysis of the PgD1 promoter was performed using the uidA (GUS) reporter system in stably transformed Arabidopsis and white spruce plants. The PgD1 promoter was responsive to jasmonic acid (JA), to infection by fungus and to wounding. In transgenic spruce embryos, GUS staining was clearly restricted to the shoot apical meristem. In Arabidopsis, faint GUS coloration was observed in leaves and flowers and a strong blue colour was observed in guard cells and trichomes. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing the PgD1::GUS construct were also infiltrated with the hemibiotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. It caused a suppression of defensin expression probably resulting from the antagonistic relationship between the pathogen-stimulated salicylic acid pathway and the jasmonic acid pathway. It is therefore concluded that the PgD1 promoter fragment cloned appears to contain most if not all the elements for proper PgD1 expression and that these elements are also recognized in Arabidopsis despite the phylogenetic and evolutionary differences that separates them.

  19. Line Heat-Source Guarded Hot Plate

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description:The 1-meter guarded hot-plate apparatus measures thermal conductivity of building insulation. This facility provides for absolute measurement of thermal...

  20. The National Guard State Partnership Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ross, Gail

    2004-01-01

    Several states within the National Guard are participating in the State Partnership Program an international affairs mission to promote regional stability and civil-military relationships in support...

  1. Indole-3-butyric acid promotes adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis thaliana thin cell layers by conversion into indole-3-acetic acid and stimulation of anthranilate synthase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattorini, L; Veloccia, A; Della Rovere, F; D'Angeli, S; Falasca, G; Altamura, M M

    2017-07-11

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and its precursor indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), control adventitious root (AR) formation in planta. Adventitious roots are also crucial for propagation via cuttings. However, IBA role(s) is/are still far to be elucidated. In Arabidopsis thaliana stem cuttings, 10 μM IBA is more AR-inductive than 10 μM IAA, and, in thin cell layers (TCLs), IBA induces ARs when combined with 0.1 μM kinetin (Kin). It is unknown whether arabidopsis TCLs produce ARs under IBA alone (10 μM) or IAA alone (10 μM), and whether they contain endogenous IAA/IBA at culture onset, possibly interfering with the exogenous IBA/IAA input. Moreover, it is unknown whether an IBA-to-IAA conversion is active in TCLs, and positively affects AR formation, possibly through the activity of the nitric oxide (NO) deriving from the conversion process. Revealed undetectable levels of both auxins at culture onset, showing that arabidopsis TCLs were optimal for investigating AR-formation under the total control of exogenous auxins. The AR-response of TCLs from various ecotypes, transgenic lines and knockout mutants was analyzed under different treatments. It was shown that ARs are better induced by IBA than IAA and IBA + Kin. IBA induced IAA-efflux (PIN1) and IAA-influx (AUX1/LAX3) genes, IAA-influx carriers activities, and expression of ANTHRANILATE SYNTHASE -alpha1 (ASA1), a gene involved in IAA-biosynthesis. ASA1 and ANTHRANILATE SYNTHASE -beta1 (ASB1), the other subunit of the same enzyme, positively affected AR-formation in the presence of exogenous IBA, because the AR-response in the TCLs of their mutant wei2wei7 was highly reduced. The AR-response of IBA-treated TCLs from ech2ibr10 mutant, blocked into IBA-to-IAA-conversion, was also strongly reduced. Nitric oxide, an IAA downstream signal and a by-product of IBA-to-IAA conversion, was early detected in IAA- and IBA-treated TCLs, but at higher levels in the latter explants. Altogether, results showed that IBA induced

  2. Bipolar Plasma Membrane Distribution of Phosphoinositides and Their Requirement for Auxin-Mediated Cell Polarity and Patterning in Arabidopsis[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejos, Ricardo; Sauer, Michael; Vanneste, Steffen; Palacios-Gomez, Miriam; Li, Hongjiang; Heilmann, Mareike; van Wijk, Ringo; Vermeer, Joop E.M.; Heilmann, Ingo; Munnik, Teun; Friml, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Cell polarity manifested by asymmetric distribution of cargoes, such as receptors and transporters, within the plasma membrane (PM) is crucial for essential functions in multicellular organisms. In plants, cell polarity (re)establishment is intimately linked to patterning processes. Despite the importance of cell polarity, its underlying mechanisms are still largely unknown, including the definition and distinctiveness of the polar domains within the PM. Here, we show in Arabidopsis thaliana that the signaling membrane components, the phosphoinositides phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] as well as PtdIns4P 5-kinases mediating their interconversion, are specifically enriched at apical and basal polar plasma membrane domains. The PtdIns4P 5-kinases PIP5K1 and PIP5K2 are redundantly required for polar localization of specifically apical and basal cargoes, such as PIN-FORMED transporters for the plant hormone auxin. As a consequence of the polarity defects, instructive auxin gradients as well as embryonic and postembryonic patterning are severely compromised. Furthermore, auxin itself regulates PIP5K transcription and PtdIns4P and PtdIns(4,5)P2 levels, in particular their association with polar PM domains. Our results provide insight into the polar domain–delineating mechanisms in plant cells that depend on apical and basal distribution of membrane lipids and are essential for embryonic and postembryonic patterning. PMID:24876254

  3. Cell wall modifications of two Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes, Col and Sha, in response to sub-optimal growth conditions: An integrative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duruflé, Harold; Hervé, Vincent; Ranocha, Philippe; Balliau, Thierry; Zivy, Michel; Chourré, Josiane; San Clemente, Hélène; Burlat, Vincent; Albenne, Cécile; Déjean, Sébastien; Jamet, Elisabeth; Dunand, Christophe

    2017-10-01

    With the global temperature change, plant adaptations are predicted, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying them. Arabidopsis thaliana is a model plant adapted to various environmental conditions, in particular able to develop along an altitudinal gradient. Two ecotypes, Columbia (Col) growing at low altitude, and Shahdara (Sha) growing at 3400m, have been studied at optimal and sub-optimal growth temperature (22°C vs 15°C). Macro- and micro-phenotyping, cell wall monosaccharides analyses, cell wall proteomics, and transcriptomics have been performed in order to accomplish an integrative analysis. The analysis has been focused on cell walls (CWs) which are assumed to play roles in response to environmental changes. At 15°C, both ecotypes presented characteristic morphological traits of low temperature growth acclimation such as reduced rosette diameter, increased number of leaves, modifications of their CW composition and cuticle reinforcement. Altogether, the integrative analysis has allowed identifying several candidate genes/proteins possibly involved in the cell wall modifications observed during the temperature acclimation response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Ethylene Antagonizes Salt-Induced Growth Retardation and Cell Death Process via Transcriptional Controlling of Ethylene-, BAG- and Senescence-Associated Genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ya-Jie; Liu, Ling; Lin, Ying-Chao; Zu, Yuan-Gang; Li, Lei-Peng; Tang, Zhong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The existing question whether ethylene is involved in the modulation of salt-induced cell death to mediate plant salt tolerance is important for understanding the salt tolerance mechanisms. Here, we employed Arabidopsis plants to study the possible role of ethylene in salt-induced growth inhibition and programmed cell death (PCD) profiles. The root length, DNA ladder and cell death indicated by Evan's blue detection were measured by compared to the control or salt-stressed seedlings. Secondly, the protoplasts isolated from plant leaves and dyed with Annexin V-FITC were subjected to flow cytometric (FCM) assay. Our results showed that ethylene works effectively in seedling protoplasts, antagonizing salt-included root retardation and restraining cell death both in seedlings or protoplasts. Due to salinity, the entire or partial insensitivity of ethylene signaling resulted in an elevated levels of cell death in ein2-5 and ein3-1 plants and the event were amended in ctr1-1 plants after salt treatment. The subsequent experiment with exogenous ACC further corroborated that ethylene could modulate salt-induced PCD process actively. Plant Bcl-2-associated athanogene (BAG) family genes are recently identified to play an extensive role in plant PCD processes ranging from growth, development to stress responses and even cell death. Our result showed that salinity alone significantly suppressed the transcripts of BAG6, BAG7 and addition of ACC in the saline solution could obviously re-activate BAG6 and BAG7 expressions, which might play a key role to inhibit the salt-induced cell death. In summary, our research implies that ethylene and salinity antagonistically control BAG family-, ethylene-, and senescence-related genes to alleviate the salt-induced cell death.

  5. The paralogous genes RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 and SIMILAR TO RCD ONE1 have partially redundant functions during Arabidopsis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teotia, Sachin; Lamb, Rebecca S

    2009-09-01

    RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 (RCD1) and SIMILAR TO RCD ONE1 (SRO1) are the only two proteins encoded in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome containing both a putative poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase catalytic domain and a WWE protein-protein interaction domain, although similar proteins have been found in other eukaryotes. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases mediate the attachment of ADP-ribose units from donor NAD(+) molecules to target proteins and have been implicated in a number of processes, including DNA repair, apoptosis, transcription, and chromatin remodeling. We have isolated mutants in both RCD1 and SRO1, rcd1-3 and sro1-1, respectively. rcd1-3 plants display phenotypic defects as reported for previously isolated alleles, most notably reduced stature. In addition, rcd1-3 mutants display a number of additional developmental defects in root architecture and maintenance of reproductive development. While single mutant sro1-1 plants are relatively normal, loss of a single dose of SRO1 in the rcd1-3 background increases the severity of several developmental defects, implying that these genes do share some functions. However, rcd1-3 and sro1-1 mutants behave differently in several developmental events and abiotic stress responses, suggesting that they also have distinct functions. Remarkably, rcd1-3; sro1-1 double mutants display severe defects in embryogenesis and postembryonic development. This study shows that RCD1 and SRO1 are at least partially redundant and that they are essential genes for plant development.

  6. Design of a trial evaluating myocardial cell protection with cariporide, an inhibitor of the transmembrane sodium-hydrogen exchanger: the Guard During Ischemia Against Necrosis (GUARDIAN trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schroeder John S

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Synopsis Background Direct myocardial cell protection in patients with unstable angina or evolving myocardial infarction (MI could prevent cell necrosis or reduce its extent, and minimize the risk of MI and death associated with percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs and coronary artery bypass surgery. The myocardial NHE plays a critical role in mediating the progression of ischemia to necrosis by promoting intracellular accumulation of sodium and calcium in exchange for hydrogen. Blockage of the system in various experimental models of ischemia and reperfusion had a strong antinecrotic effect. The present paper describes a trial that was intended to investigate the potential clinical benefit of cariporide, a potent and selective inhibitor of the NHE, in a large spectrum of at-risk patients. Trial design The GUARDIAN trial was a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, four-arm trial that compared three cariporide dosages with placebo in patients with unstable angina and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (UA/NSTEMI and in patients undergoing a high-risk PCI or coronary artery bypass surgery. A total of 11 590 patients with one of the three possible entry diagnoses were enroled in 23 countries. The trial was designed as a combined phase 2/phase 3 study. The primary objective was to evaluate the efficacy of cariporide in reducing all-cause mortality and/or MI across the various entry populations 36 days after randomization. Three different doses of cariporide were compared with placebo. Secondary end-points were death or non-fatal MI at 10 days and 6 months, and cardiac events related to left ventricular dysfunction. The extent of MI was also assessed by peak elevation in creatinine kinase (CK-MB and a ratio of peak elevation to normal values. The sample size was driven by a total event rate of 1200 patients experiencing a primary end-point, powered to detect a 25% risk reduction in any of the three treatment groups compared with

  7. the state president's unit in its capacity asceremonial guard

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    THE STATE PRESIDENT'S UNIT IN ITS. CAPACITY ASCEREMONIAL GUARD. The most important function of the State Presi- dent's Guard is that of acting as home guard for the State President and of acting as guard of honour at ceremonial occasions. Members of such a special guard not only had to meet speci-.

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK071591 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK071591 J023105C08 At2g29570.1 proliferating cell nuclear antigen 2 (PCNA2) identi...cal to SP|Q9ZW35 Proliferating cell nuclear antigen 2 (PCNA 2) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; nearly identical to SP|Q43124 Proliferating... cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) {Brassica napus}; contains Pfam profiles PF00705: Proliferating... cell nuclear antigen N-terminal domain, PF02747: Proliferating cell nuclear antigen C-terminal domain 1e-132 ...

  9. Reference: 677 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ae et al. 2007 Dec. Plant Cell Physiol. 48(12):1713-23. Methionine residues of proteins are a major target f... in cold acclimation in Arabidopsis. 12 1713-23 17956860 2007 Dec Plant & cell physiology Bae Min Seok|Cho Eun Ju|Kwon Soon Il|Kwon Sun Jae|Park Ohkmae K

  10. Reference: 43 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iam L et al. 2003 Sep. Development 130(18):4249-58. The mechanisms regulating cell layer organisation in dev...guments. Insertion mutations show that ARABIDOPSIS CRINKLY4 is required for regulation of cellular organisation...e plays a role in cell layer organisation during ovule integument and sepal margin development. 18 4249-58 1

  11. Volunteers in the Danish Home Guard 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fridberg, Torben; Larsen, Mona

    This report maps the composition of a group of volunteer members of the Home Guard, as well as their opinions and expectations of the Home Guard and their own voluntary efforts. The report is a follow-up to two previous surveys completed in 2007 and 2011 and it therefore also highlights changes...... from 2007 to 2011 and 2016. Based on a questionnaire survey, the report paints a picture of who the volunteers are, what motivates them and how they perceive their surrounding environment’s view of them as members of the Home Guard. The report also focuses on the volunteers’ view of the Home Guard......’s tasks and activities both in Denmark and abroad. Finally, the report describes the volunteers’ perception of the Home Guards’ communication and campaigns. The report was commissioned and financed by the Danish Home Guard Command....

  12. SUV2, which encodes an ATR-related cell cycle checkpoint and putative plant ATRIP, is required for aluminium-dependent root growth inhibition in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjogren, Caroline A; Larsen, Paul B

    2017-09-01

    A suppressor mutagenesis screen was conducted in order to identify second site mutations that could reverse the extreme hypersensitivity to aluminium (Al) seen for the Arabidopsis mutant, als3-1. From this screen, it was found that a loss-of-function mutation in the previously described SUV2 (SENSITIVE TO UV 2), which encodes a putative plant ATRIP homologue that is a component of the ATR-dependent cell checkpoint response, reversed the als3-1 phenotype. This included prevention of hallmarks associated with als3-1 including Al-dependent terminal differentiation of the root tip and transition to endoreduplication. From this analysis, SUV2 was determined to be required for halting cell cycle progression and triggering loss of the quiescent centre (QC) following exposure to Al. In conjunction with this, SUV2 was found to have a similar role as ATR, ALT2 and SOG1 in Al-dependent stoppage of root growth, all of which are required for promotion of expression of a suite of genes that likely are part of an Al-dependent DNA damage transcriptional response. This work argues that these Al response factors work together to detect Al-dependent damage and subsequently activate a DNA damage response pathway that halts the cell cycle and subsequently promotes QC differentiation and entrance into endocycling. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The Cysteine Protease CEP1, a Key Executor Involved in Tapetal Programmed Cell Death, Regulates Pollen Development in Arabidopsis[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Liu, Di; Lv, Xiaomeng; Wang, Ying; Xun, Zhili; Liu, Zhixiong; Li, Fenglan; Lu, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Tapetal programmed cell death (PCD) is a prerequisite for pollen grain development in angiosperms, and cysteine proteases are the most ubiquitous hydrolases involved in plant PCD. We identified a papain-like cysteine protease, CEP1, which is involved in tapetal PCD and pollen development in Arabidopsis thaliana. CEP1 is expressed specifically in the tapetum from stages 5 to 11 of anther development. The CEP1 protein first appears as a proenzyme in precursor protease vesicles and is then transported to the vacuole and transformed into the mature enzyme before rupture of the vacuole. cep1 mutants exhibited aborted tapetal PCD and decreased pollen fertility with abnormal pollen exine. A transcriptomic analysis revealed that 872 genes showed significantly altered expression in the cep1 mutants, and most of them are important for tapetal cell wall organization, tapetal secretory structure formation, and pollen development. CEP1 overexpression caused premature tapetal PCD and pollen infertility. ELISA and quantitative RT-PCR analyses confirmed that the CEP1 expression level showed a strong relationship to the degree of tapetal PCD and pollen fertility. Our results reveal that CEP1 is a crucial executor during tapetal PCD and that proper CEP1 expression is necessary for timely degeneration of tapetal cells and functional pollen formation. PMID:25035401

  14. Heterologous expression of a novel Zoysia japonica salt-induced glycine-rich RNA-binding protein gene, ZjGRP, caused salt sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Ke; Tan, Penghui; Xiao, Guozeng; Han, Liebao; Chang, Zhihui; Chao, Yuehui

    2017-01-01

    A novel Zoysia japonica salt-induced glycine-rich RNA-binding protein gene was cloned in this study and its overexpression caused salt sensitivity in transgenic Arabidopsis. Glycine-rich RNA-binding proteins (GRPs) play crucial roles in diverse plant developmental processes. However, the mechanisms and functions of GRPs in salinity stress responses remain largely unknown. In this study, rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE) PCR methods was adopted to isolate ZjGRP from Zosyia japonica, a salt-tolerant grass species. ZjGRP cDNA was 456 bp in length, corresponding to 151 amino acids. ZjGRP was localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm, and was found particularly abundantly in stomatal guard cells. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that ZjGRP was expressed in the roots, stems, and leaves of Zoysia japonica, with the greatest expression seen in the fast-growing leaves. Furthermore, expression of ZjGRP was strongly induced by treatment with NaCl, ABA, MeJA, and SA. Overexpression of ZjGRP in Arabidopsis reduced the rate of germination and retarded seedling growth. ZjGRP-overexpressing Arabidopsis thaliana exhibited weakened salinity tolerance, likely as a result of effects on ion transportation, osmosis, and antioxidation. This study indicates that ZjGRP plays an essential role in inducing salt sensitivity in transgenic plants.

  15. Cell wall-associated ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10, a proline-rich receptor-like kinase, is a negative modulator of Arabidopsis root hair growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Youra; Lee, Hyodong; Lee, Young-Sook; Cho, Hyung-Taeg

    2016-03-01

    Plant cell growth is restricted by the cell wall, and cell wall dynamics act as signals for the cytoplasmic and nuclear events of cell growth. Among various receptor kinases, ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10 (RHS10) belongs to a poorly known receptor kinase subfamily with a proline-rich extracellular domain. Here, we report that RHS10 defines the root hair length of Arabidopsis thaliana by negatively regulating hair growth. RHS10 modulates the duration of root hair growth rather than the growth rate. As poplar and rice RHS10 orthologs also showed a root hair-inhibitory function, this receptor kinase-mediated function appears to be conserved in angiosperms. RHS10 showed a strong association with the cell wall, most probably through its extracellular proline-rich domain (ECD). Deletion analysis of the ECD demonstrated that a minimal extracellular part, which includes a few proline residues, is required for RHS10-mediated root hair inhibition. RHS10 suppressed the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the root, which are necessary for root hair growth. A yeast two-hybrid screening identified an RNase (RNS2) as a putative downstream target of RHS10. Accordingly, RHS10 overexpression decreased and RHS10 loss increased RNA levels in the hair-growing root region. Our results suggest that RHS10 mediates cell wall-associated signals to maintain proper root hair length, at least in part by regulating RNA catabolism and ROS accumulation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  16. 46 CFR 190.25-15 - Guards in dangerous places.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 190.25-15 Guards in dangerous places. (a) Suitable hand covers, guards, or rails shall be installed in way of all exposed and dangerous places such as gears, machinery...

  17. 46 CFR 177.960 - Guards for exposed hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.960 Guards for exposed hazards. An exposed hazard, such as gears or rotating machinery, must be properly protected by a cover, guard, or rail. ...

  18. 46 CFR 92.25-15 - Guards in dangerous places.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 92.25-15 Guards in dangerous places. (a) Suitable hand covers, guards, or rails shall be installed in way of all exposed and dangerous places such as gears, machinery...

  19. 46 CFR 169.331 - Guards in hazardous locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.331 Guards in hazardous locations. Each exposed hazard, such as gears or machinery, must be properly protected with covers, guards, or rails. ...

  20. A R2R3-MYB transcription factor that is specifically expressed in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fibers affects secondary cell wall biosynthesis and deposition in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiang; Gong, Si-Ying; Nie, Xiao-Ying; Li, Yang; Li, Wen; Huang, Geng-Qing; Li, Xue-Bao

    2015-07-01

    Secondary cell wall (SCW) is an important industrial raw material for pulping, papermaking, construction, lumbering, textiles and potentially for biofuel production. The process of SCW thickening of cotton fibers lays down the cellulose that will constitute the bulk (up to 96%) of the fiber at maturity. In this study, a gene encoding a MYB-domain protein was identified in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and designated as GhMYBL1. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that GhMYBL1 was specifically expressed in cotton fibers at the stage of secondary wall deposition. Further analysis indicated that this protein is a R2R3-MYB transcription factor, and is targeted to the cell nucleus. Overexpression of GhMYBL1 in Arabidopsis affected the formation of SCW in the stem xylem of the transgenic plants. The enhanced SCW thickening also occurred in the interfascicular fibers, xylary fibers and vessels of the GhMYBL1-overexpression transgenic plants. The expression of secondary wall-associated genes, such as CesA4, CesA7, CesA8, PAL1, F5H and 4CL1, were upregulated, and consequently, cellulose and lignin biosynthesis were enhanced in the GhMYBL1 transgenic plants. These data suggested that GhMYBL1 may participate in modulating the process of secondary wall biosynthesis and deposition of cotton fibers. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  1. Manipulation of Guaiacyl and Syringyl Monomer Biosynthesis in an Arabidopsis Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase Mutant Results in Atypical Lignin Biosynthesis and Modified Cell Wall Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Nickolas A.; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Ciesielski, Peter N.; Ximenes, Eduardo; Ralph, John; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Ladisch, Michael; Chapple, Clint

    2015-08-01

    Modifying lignin composition and structure is a key strategy to increase plant cell wall digestibility for biofuel production. Disruption of the genes encoding both cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases (CADs), including CADC and CADD, in Arabidopsis thaliana results in the atypical incorporation of hydroxycinnamaldehydes into lignin. Another strategy to change lignin composition is downregulation or overexpression of ferulate 5-hydroxylase (F5H), which results in lignins enriched in guaiacyl or syringyl units, respectively. Here, we combined these approaches to generate plants enriched in coniferaldehyde-derived lignin units or lignins derived primarily from sinapaldehyde. The cadc cadd and ferulic acid hydroxylase1 (fah1) cadc cadd plants are similar in growth to wild-type plants even though their lignin compositions are drastically altered. In contrast, disruption of CAD in the F5H-overexpressing background results in dwarfism. The dwarfed phenotype observed in these plants does not appear to be related to collapsed xylem, a hallmark of many other lignin-deficient dwarf mutants. cadc cadd, fah1 cadc cadd, and cadd F5H-overexpressing plants have increased enzyme-catalyzed cell wall digestibility. Given that these CAD-deficient plants have similar total lignin contents and only differ in the amounts of hydroxycinnamaldehyde monomer incorporation, these results suggest that hydroxycinnamaldehyde content is a more important determinant of digestibility than lignin content.

  2. Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase show increased resistance to Paraquat-induced photooxidative stress and to nitric oxide-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, Irene; Tarantino, Delia; Vannini, Candida; Bracale, Marcella; Carravieri, Sara; Soave, Carlo

    2004-06-01

    Ascorbate peroxidases (APX), localized in the cytosol, peroxisomes, mitochondria and chloroplasts of plant cells, catalyze the reduction of H(2)O(2) to water by using ascorbic acid (ASA) as specific electron donor. The chloroplastic isoenzymes of APX are involved in the water-water cycle, which contributes to the photophosphorylation coupled to the photosynthetic electron transport. In order to better clarify the contribution of thylakoidal APX (tAPX) to the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activity, as well as to the fine modulation of ROS for signaling, we produced Arabidopsis lines overexpressing tAPX. These lines show an increased resistance to treatment with the O(2)(-) generating herbicide Paraquat (Pq). However, when challenged with photoinhibitory treatments at high light or low temperature, or with iron (Fe) or copper (Cu) overload, the tAPX-overexpressing lines show no increased resistance with respect to controls, indicating that in such experimental conditions, tAPX overexpression does not reinforce plant defenses against the oxidative stresses tested. Interestingly, the nitric oxide (NO)-donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) represses accumulation of tAPX transcript; SNP also partially inhibits tAPX enzymatic activity. After treatment with SNP, the tAPX-overexpressing lines show reduced symptoms of damage with respect to control plants treated with SNP. These transgenic lines confirm that H(2)O(2) acts in partnership with NO in causing cell death and highlight the important role of tAPX in the fine modulation of H(2)O(2) for signaling.

  3. Revealing the roles of GORK channels and NADPH oxidase in acclimation to hypoxia in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feifei; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Xiaohui; Colmer, Timothy D; Shabala, Lana; Salih, Anya; Zhou, Meixue; Shabala, Sergey

    2017-06-01

    Regulation of root cell K+ is essential for acclimation to low oxygen stress. The potential roles of GORK (depolarization-activated guard cell outward-rectifying potassium) channels and RBOHD (respiratory burst oxidase homologue D) in plant adaptive responses to hypoxia were investigated in the context of tissue specificity (epidermis versus stele; elongation versus mature zone) in roots of Arabidopsis. The expression of GORK and RBOHD was down-regulated by 2- to 3-fold within 1 h and 24 h of hypoxia treatment in Arabidopsis wild-type (WT) roots. Interestingly, a loss of the functional GORK channel resulted in a waterlogging-tolerant phenotype, while rbohD knockout was sensitive to waterlogging. To understand their functions under hypoxia stress, we studied K+, Ca2+, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) distribution in various root cell types. gork1-1 plants had better K+ retention ability in both the elongation and mature zone compared with the WT and rbohD under hypoxia. Hypoxia induced a Ca2+ increase in each cell type after 72 h, and the increase was much less pronounced in rbohD than in the WT. In most tissues except the elongation zone in rbohD, the H2O2 concentration had decreased after 1 h of hypoxia, but then increased significantly after 24 h of hypoxia in each zone and tissue, further suggesting that RBOHD may shape hypoxia-specific Ca2+ signatures via the modulation of apoplastic H2O2 production. Taken together, our data suggest that plants lacking functional GORK channels are more capable of retaining K+ for their better performance under hypoxia, and that RBOHD is crucial in hypoxia-induced Ca2+ signalling for stress sensing and acclimation mechanism. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  4. Impact resistance of guards on grinding machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, Detlef; Mewes, Olaf; Herbst, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Guards on machine tools are meant to protect persons from injuries caused by parts ejected with high kinetic energy from the machine's working zone. With respect to stationary grinding machines, Standard No. EN 13218:2002, therefore, specifies minimum wall thicknesses for guards. These values are mainly based on estimations and experience instead of systematic experimental investigations. This paper shows to what extent simple impact tests with standardizable projectiles can be used as basis for the evaluation of the impact resistance of guards, provided that not only the kinetic energy of the projectiles used but also, among others, their geometry corresponds to the abrasive product fragments to be expected.

  5. Ion Exchangers NHX1 and NHX2 Mediate Active Potassium Uptake into Vacuoles to Regulate Cell Turgor and Stomatal Function in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barragán, Verónica; Leidi, Eduardo O.; Andrés, Zaida; Rubio, Lourdes; De Luca, Anna; Fernández, José A.; Cubero, Beatriz; Pardo, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular NHX proteins are Na+,K+/H+ antiporters involved in K+ homeostasis, endosomal pH regulation, and salt tolerance. Proteins NHX1 and NHX2 are the two major tonoplast-localized NHX isoforms. Here, we show that NHX1 and NHX2 have similar expression patterns and identical biochemical activity, and together they account for a significant amount of the Na+,K+/H+ antiport activity in tonoplast vesicles. Reverse genetics showed functional redundancy of NHX1 and NHX2 genes. Growth of the double mutant nhx1 nhx2 was severely impaired, and plants were extremely sensitive to external K+. By contrast, nhx1 nhx2 mutants showed similar sensitivity to salinity stress and even greater rates of Na+ sequestration than the wild type. Double mutants had reduced ability to create the vacuolar K+ pool, which in turn provoked greater K+ retention in the cytosol, impaired osmoregulation, and compromised turgor generation for cell expansion. Genes NHX1 and NHX2 were highly expressed in guard cells, and stomatal function was defective in mutant plants, further compromising their ability to regulate water relations. Together, these results show that tonoplast-localized NHX proteins are essential for active K+ uptake at the tonoplast, for turgor regulation, and for stomatal function. PMID:22438021

  6. On semantics and applications of guarded recursion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizjak, Aleš

    2016-01-01

    In this dissertation we study applications and semantics of guarded recursion, which is a method for ensuring that self-referential descriptions of objects define a unique object. The first two chapters are devoted to applications. We use guarded recursion, first in the form of explicit step...... chapter we study a simply typed calculus with additional "later" and "constant" modalities and a guarded fixed-point combinator. These are used for encoding and working with guarded recursive and coinductive types in a modular way. We develop a normalising operational semantics, provide an adequate...... denotational model and a logic for reasoning about program equivalence. In the last three chapters we study syntax and semantics of a dependent type theory with a family of later modalities indexed by the set of clocks, and clock quantifiers. In the fourth and fifth chapters we provide two model constructions...

  7. Probabilistic role models and the guarded fragment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    We propose a uniform semantic framework for interpreting probabilistic concept subsumption and probabilistic role quantification through statistical sampling distributions. This general semantic principle serves as the foundation for the development of a probabilistic version of the guarded fragm...

  8. Probabilistic Role Models and the Guarded Fragment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Manfred

    2004-01-01

    We propose a uniform semantic framework for interpreting probabilistic concept subsumption and probabilistic role quantification through statistical sampling distributions. This general semantic principle serves as the foundation for the development of a probabilistic version of the guarded fragm...

  9. U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This layer is a polygonal dataset that represents land and maritime boundaries for each representative United States Coast Guard district, which includes district 1,...

  10. Patterning and lifetime of plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthase is dependent on actin organization in Arabidopsis interphase cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampathkumar, A.; Gutierrez, R.; McFarlane, H.E.; Bringmann, M.; Lindeboom, J.J.; Emons, A.M.C.; Samuels, L.; Ketelaar, T.; Ehrhardt, D.W.; Persson, S.

    2013-01-01

    The actin and microtubule cytoskeletons regulate cell shape across phyla, from bacteria to metazoans. In organisms with cell walls, the wall acts as a primary constraint of shape, and generation of specific cell shape depends on cytoskeletal organization for wall deposition and/or cell expansion. In

  11. An auxin transport independent pathway is involved in phosphate stress-induced root architectural alterations in Arabidopsis. Identification of BIG as a mediator of auxin in pericycle cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bucio, José; Hernández-Abreu, Esmeralda; Sánchez-Calderón, Lenin; Pérez-Torres, Anahí; Rampey, Rebekah A; Bartel, Bonnie; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2005-02-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants display a number of root developmental responses to low phosphate availability, including primary root growth inhibition, greater formation of lateral roots, and increased root hair elongation. To gain insight into the regulatory mechanisms by which phosphorus (P) availability alters postembryonic root development, we performed a mutant screen to identify genetic determinants involved in the response to P deprivation. Three low phosphate-resistant root lines (lpr1-1 to lpr1-3) were isolated because of their reduced lateral root formation in low P conditions. Genetic and molecular analyses revealed that all lpr1 mutants were allelic to BIG, which is required for normal auxin transport in Arabidopsis. Detailed characterization of lateral root primordia (LRP) development in wild-type and lpr1 mutants revealed that BIG is required for pericycle cell activation to form LRP in both high (1 mm) and low (1 microm) P conditions, but not for the low P-induced alterations in primary root growth, lateral root emergence, and root hair elongation. Exogenously supplied auxin restored normal lateral root formation in lpr1 mutants in the two P treatments. Treatment of wild-type Arabidopsis seedlings with brefeldin A, a fungal metabolite that blocks auxin transport, phenocopies the root developmental alterations observed in lpr1 mutants in both high and low P conditions, suggesting that BIG participates in vesicular targeting of auxin transporters. Taken together, our results show that auxin transport and BIG function have fundamental roles in pericycle cell activation to form LRP and promote root hair elongation. The mechanism that activates root system architectural alterations in response to P deprivation, however, seems to be independent of auxin transport and BIG.

  12. Flavone Glucoside Uptake into Barley Mesophyll and Arabidopsis Cell Culture Vacuoles. Energization Occurs by H+-Antiport and ATP-Binding Cassette-Type Mechanisms1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangne, Nathalie; Eggmann, Thomas; Koblischke, Carsten; Weissenböck, Gottfried; Martinoia, Enrico; Klein, Markus

    2002-01-01

    In many cases, secondary plant products accumulate in the large central vacuole of plant cells. However, the mechanisms involved in the transport of secondary compounds are only poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the transport mechanisms for the major barley (Hordeum vulgare) flavonoid saponarin (apigenin 6-C-glucosyl-7-O-glucoside) are different in various plant species: Uptake into barley vacuoles occurs via a proton antiport and is competitively inhibited by isovitexin (apigenin 6-C-glucoside), suggesting that both flavone glucosides are recognized by the same transporter. In contrast, the transport into vacuoles from Arabidopsis, which does not synthesize flavone glucosides, displays typical characteristics of ATP-binding cassette transporters. Transport of saponarin into vacuoles of both the species is saturable with a Km of 50 to 100 μm. Furthermore, the uptake of saponarin into vacuoles from a barley mutant exhibiting a strongly reduced flavone glucoside biosynthesis is drastically decreased when compared with the parent variety. Thus, the barley vacuolar flavone glucoside/H+ antiporter could be modulated by the availability of the substrate. We propose that different vacuolar transporters may be responsible for the sequestration of species-specific/endogenous and nonspecific/xenobiotic secondary compounds in planta. PMID:11842175

  13. Cytosolic Calcium, hydrogen peroxide, and related gene expression and protein modulation in Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures respond immediately to altered gravitation: Parabolic flight data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampp, Ruediger; Hausmann, Niklas; Neef, Maren; Fengler, Svenja

    Callus cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana (cv. Columbia) were exposed to parabolic flights in order to assess molecular short-term responses to altered gravity fields. Using transgenic cell lines, hydrogen peroxide and cytosolic Ca2+ were continuously monitored. In parallel, the metabolism of samples was chemically quenched (RNAlater, Ambion, for RNA; acid/base for NADPH, NADP) at typical stages of a parabola (1g before pull up; end of pull up (1.8 g), end of microgravity (µg, 20 sec), and end of pull out (1.8 g)). Cells exhibited an increase of both Ca2+ and hydrogen peroxide with the onset of µg, and a decline thereafter. This behaviour was accompanied by a decrease of the NADPH/NADP redox ratio, indicating a Ca2+-dependent activation of a NADPH oxidase. Microarray analyses revealed concomitant expression profiles. At the end of the microgravity phase, 396 transcripts were specifically up-, while 485 were down-regulated. Up-regulation was dominated by Ca2+- and ROS(reactive oxygen species)-related gene products. The same material was also used for the analysis of phosphopeptides by 2D SDS PAGE. Relevant spots were identified by liquid chromatography-MS. With the exception of a chaperone (HSP 70-3), hypergravity (1.8 g) and microgravity modified different sets of proteins. These are partly involved in primary metabolism (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, citrate cycle) and detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Taken together, these data show that both gene expression and protein modulation jointly respond within seconds to alterations in the gravity field, with a focus on metabolic adaptation, signalling and control of ROS.

  14. In vitro culture of Arabidopsis embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Michael; Friml, Jirí

    2008-01-01

    Embryogenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana follows a nearly invariant cell division pattern and provides an ideal system for studies of early plant development. However, experimental manipulation with embryogenesis is difficult, as the embryo develops deeply inside maternal tissues. Here, we present a method to culture zygotic Arabidopsis embryos in vitro. It enables culturing for prolonged periods of time from the first developmental stages on. The technique omits excision of the embryo by culturing the entire ovule, which facilitates the manual procedure. It allows pharmacological manipulation of embryo development and does not interfere with standard techniques for localizing gene expression and protein localization in the cultivated embryos.

  15. Reference: 727 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available epigenetic control of gene expression during plant development. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis SET domain protein, SDG...h, thus affecting fertilization. Using an SDG4-GFP fusion construct, the chromosomal localization of SDG4 wa...s established in tobacco BY-2 cells. In Arabidopsis, sdg4 knockout showed reproductive defects. Tissue-speci...fic expression analyses indicated that SDG4 is the major ASH1-related gene expres...sed in the pollen. Immunological analyses demonstrated that SDG4 was involved in the methylation of histone

  16. Reference: 56 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Y et al. 2003 Nov. Plant Physiol. 133(3):1170-80. Mutations in the QUARTET loci in Arabidopsis result in fai...cell wall degradation. 3 1170-80 14551328 2003 Nov Plant physiology Osborne Erin|Poindexter Patricia D|Rhee Seung Y|Somerville Chris R

  17. Reference: 386 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available drea et al. 2006 Jul. Plant Physiol. 141(3):942-56. In many plant species, a subset of the genes of the chlo...d mesophyll cell proliferation in Arabidopsis. 3 942-56 16698900 2006 Jul Plant physiology Hricová Andrea|Micol José Luis|Quesada Victor

  18. Reference: 763 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ín M Carmen et al. 2008 Jun. Plant Physiol. 147(2):562-72. Plant cells contain different O-acetylserine(thio...footprints of mutant plants had predicted functions associated with various physiological responses that are...f the cytosol to maintain discrete concentrations of hydrogen peroxide in Arabidopsis. 2 562-72 18441224 2008 Jun Plant physio

  19. Divergent regulation of Arabidopsis SAUR genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourik, van Hilda; Dijk, van Aalt D.J.; Stortenbeker, Niek; Angenent, Gerco C.; Bemer, Marian

    2017-01-01

    Background: Small Auxin-Upregulated RNA (SAUR) genes encode growth regulators that induce cell elongation. Arabidopsis contains more than 70 SAUR genes, of which the growth-promoting function has been unveiled in seedlings, while their role in other tissues remained largely unknown. Here, we

  20. Reference: 749 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available former mutant had decreased electron transport rates, a lower DeltapH gradient across the grana membranes, r...the PSII particles of these plants were organized in unusual two-dimensional arrays in the grana membranes. ...d the electron transport rate in grana membranes of Arabidopsis. 4 1012-28 18381925 2008 Apr The Plant cell

  1. Reference: 81 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 81 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u15075397i Culligan Kevin...le checkpoint in Arabidopsis thaliana. 5 1091-104 15075397 2004 May The Plant cell Britt Anne|Culligan Kevin|Tissier Alain

  2. Reference: 223 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 223 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u15923347i Dohmann Es... cause the cop/det/fus mutant phenotype in Arabidopsis. 7 1967-78 15923347 2005 Jul The Plant cell Dohmann Esther M N|Kuhnle Carola|Schwechheimer Claus

  3. Reference: 389 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 389 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16716192i Jolivet Sy...of the Ski8/Rec103 homolog in Arabidopsis. 6 615-22 16716192 2006 Jun Genes to cells Froger Nicole|Jolivet Sylvie|Mercier Raphaël|Vezon Daniel

  4. Dehydration induced loss of photosynthesis in Arabidopsis leaves during senescence is accompanied by the reversible enhancement in the activity of cell wall β-glucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patro, Lichita; Mohapatra, Pranab Kishor; Biswal, Udaya Chand; Biswal, Basanti

    2014-08-01

    The physiology of loss of photosynthetic production of sugar and the consequent cellular sugar reprogramming during senescence of leaves experiencing environmental stress largely remains unclear. We have shown that leaf senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana causes a significant reduction in the rate of oxygen evolution and net photosynthetic rate (Pn). The decline in photosynthesis is further aggravated by dehydration. During dehydration, primary photochemical reaction of thylakoids and net photosynthesis decrease in parallel with the increase in water deficit. Senescence induced loss in photosynthesis is accompanied by a significant increase in the activity of cell wall hydrolyzing enzyme such as β-glucosidase associated with cell wall catabolism. The activity of this enzyme is further enhanced when the senescing leaves experience dehydration stress. It is possible that both senescence and stress separately or in combination result in the loss in photosynthesis which could be a signal for an enhancement in the activity of β-glucosidase that breaks down cell wall polysaccharides to sugar to sustain respiration for metabolic activities of plants experiencing stress. Thus dehydration response of cell wall hydrolases of senescing leaves is considered as plants' strategy to have cell wall polysaccharides as an alternative energy source for completion of energy requiring senescence process, stress survival and maintenance of recovery potential of energy deficit cells in the background of loss in photosynthesis. Withdrawal of stress (rehydration) distinctly exhibits recovery of photosynthesis and suppression of enzyme activity. Retention of the signaling for sugar reprogramming through breakdown of cell wall polysaccharides in the senescing leaves exposed to severe drought stress suggests that senescing leaves like mature ones possess potential for stress recovery. The precise mechanism of stress adaptation of senescing leaves is yet to be known. A significant

  5. COBRA-LIKE2, a Member of the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored COBRA-LIKE Family, Plays a Role in Cellulose Deposition in Arabidopsis Seed Coat Mucilage Secretory Cells1,2[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Tov, Daniela; Abraham, Yael; Stav, Shira; Thompson, Kevin; Loraine, Ann; Elbaum, Rivka; de Souza, Amancio; Pauly, Markus; Kieber, Joseph J.; Harpaz-Saad, Smadar

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of the maternally derived seed coat epidermal cells into mucilage secretory cells is a common adaptation in angiosperms. Recent studies identified cellulose as an important component of seed mucilage in various species. Cellulose is deposited as a set of rays that radiate from the seed upon mucilage extrusion, serving to anchor the pectic component of seed mucilage to the seed surface. Using transcriptome data encompassing the course of seed development, we identified COBRA-LIKE2 (COBL2), a member of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored COBRA-LIKE gene family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), as coexpressed with other genes involved in cellulose deposition in mucilage secretory cells. Disruption of the COBL2 gene results in substantial reduction in the rays of cellulose present in seed mucilage, along with an increased solubility of the pectic component of the mucilage. Light birefringence demonstrates a substantial decrease in crystalline cellulose deposition into the cellulosic rays of the cobl2 mutants. Moreover, crystalline cellulose deposition into the radial cell walls and the columella appears substantially compromised, as demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy and in situ quantification of light birefringence. Overall, the cobl2 mutants display about 40% reduction in whole-seed crystalline cellulose content compared with the wild type. These data establish that COBL2 plays a role in the deposition of crystalline cellulose into various secondary cell wall structures during seed coat epidermal cell differentiation. PMID:25583925

  6. 49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than three-eighths of an inch. (b) If repairs...

  7. 33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard emblem. 23.10 Section... DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.10 Coast Guard emblem. (a) The distinctive emblem of the Coast Guard shall be as follows: On a disc the shield of the Coat of Arms of the United...

  8. Head-neck domain of Arabidopsis myosin XI, MYA2, fused with GFP produces F-actin patterns that coincide with fast organelle streaming in different plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holweg Carola L

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cytoskeletal mechanisms that underlie organelle transport in plants are intimately linked to acto-myosin function. This function is mediated by the attachment of myosin heads to F-actin and the binding of cargo to the tails. Acto-myosin also powers vigorous cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. Class XI myosins exhibit strikingly fast velocities and may have extraordinary roles in cellular motility. Studies of the structural basis of organelle transport have focused on the cargo-binding tails of myosin XI, revealing a close relationship with the transport of peroxisomes, mitochondria, and Golgi-vesicles. Links between myosin heads and F-actin-based motility have been less investigated. To address this function, we performed localization studies using the head-neck domain of AtMYA2, a myosin XI from Arabidopsis. Results We expressed the GFP-fused head-neck domain of MYA2 in epidermal cells of various plant species and found that it associated with F-actin. By comparison to other markers such as fimbrin and talin, we revealed that the myosin-labeled F-actin was of a lower quality and absent from the fine microfilament arrays at the cell cortex. However, it colocalized with cytoplasmic (transvacuolar F-actin in areas coinciding with the tracks of fast organelles. This observation correlates well with the proposed function of myosin XI in organelle trafficking. The fact that organelle streaming was reduced in cells expressing the GFP-MYA2-head6IQ indicated that the functionless motor protein inhibits endogenous myosins. Furthermore, co-expression of the GFP-MYA2-head6IQ with other F-actin markers disrupted its attachment to F-actin. In nuclei, the GFP-myosin associated with short bundles of F-actin. Conclusion The localization of the head of MYA2 in living plant cells, as investigated here for the first time, suggests a close linkage between this myosin XI and cytoplasmic microfilaments that support the rapid streaming of

  9. Reference: 667 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available family of plant calcium sensors that relay signals by interacting with a family ...noticeable alterations in ABA content in the plant. We identified the calcium sensors CBL1 and CBL9 as CIPK2... stomatal guard cells. Two calcineurin B-like calcium sensors, interacting with protein kinase CIPK23, regul

  10. Reference: 498 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Lynn Jo et al. 2007 Feb. Nature 445(7127):501-5. Stomata consist of a pair of guard cells that mediate gas ...a. 7127 501-5 17183267 2007 Feb Nature Bogenschutz Naomi L|Pillitteri Lynn Jo|Sloan Daniel B|Torii Keiko U

  11. Phenotype-gene: 471 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available itivity toward in organ named guard cell under influence of abscisic acid for AT1G30270 Cheong Yong Hwa et a...eased sensitivity toward in organ named guard cell under influence of abscisic acid http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u1ria224u878i AT1G30270

  12. 49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... corresponding location of the tread portion of the track structure. ER22JN98.006 ER22JN98.007 ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.143 Frog guard rails... prescribed in the following table— Class of track Guard check gageThe distance between the gage line of a...

  13. Peroxynitrite (ONOO−) is endogenously produced in arabidopsis peroxisomes and is overproduced under cadmium stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpas, Francisco J.; Barroso, Juan B.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Peroxisomes are subcellular compartments involved in multiple cellular metabolic pathways. Peroxynitrite (ONOO−) is a nitric oxide-derived molecule which is a nitrating species that causes nitration of proteins. This study used cell biology techniques to explore the potential presence of peroxynitrite in peroxisomes and evaluated its content under stress conditions (excess cadmium). Methods Peroxynitrite, nitric oxide and superoxide anion were studied using cell-permeable specific fluorescent probes by confocal laser scanning microscopy in Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic plants expressing cyan fluorescent protein through the addition of peroxisomal targeting signal 1 (PTS1), which enables peroxisomes to be visualized in vivo. Key Results When no stress was applied, peroxynitrite was clearly localized in the peroxisomes of roots and stomatal guard cells. Under cadmium (150 μm) stress, the generation of peroxynitrite, nitric oxide and the superoxide anion (O2·–) increased and was localized in peroxisomes and the cytosol, participating in the generation of nitro-oxidative stress. Conclusions The results show that peroxisomes are an endogenous source of peroxynitrite, which is over-produced under cadmium stress, suggesting that the metabolism of reactive nitrogen species in peroxisomes could participate in the mechanism of the response to this heavy metal. PMID:24232384

  14. Armed guards on vessels : insurance and liability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mišo Mudrić

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Paper examines the insurance and liability issues resulting from the use of armed guards on board vessels. The study begins with an overview of the available data on key economic fi gures representing the projected overall annual costs of modern piracy. The focus is then shifted to the issue of public versus private security, where possible dangers of private-based security options are discussed in general. After explaining why the Somalia region deserves a closer attention when compared to other pirate-infested waters, a brief summary of the international effort to combat piracy threat is presented, followed by a structured overview of the use of private maritime security options in the maritime sector in general. One security option is the use of armed guards on board vessels. This option is explored both from the political (the acceptance by stakeholders and legal standpoint (legal issues arising from the use of armed guards. An important remedy for the shipping companies/ operators threatened by the piracy hazard is the existence of affordable and effective (specialized marine insurance. A study of available piracy insurance policies is presented, followed by an analysis of case law and other legal issues arising from piracy attacks, which could prove important when considering the legal implications of armed guards employment. Finally, a simplifi ed economic analysis of available security options is presented, followed by the final assessment of benefi ts derived from the use of armed guards.

  15. Loss of nitrate reductases NIA1 and NIA2 impairs stomatal closure by altering genes of core ABA signaling components in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chenchen; Cai, Shengguan; Wang, Yizhou; Chen, Zhong-Hua

    2016-06-02

    Nitrate reductases NIA1 and NIA2 determine NO production in plants and are critical to abscisic acid (ABA)-induced stomatal closure. However, the role for NIA1 and NIA2 in ABA signaling has not been paid much attention in nitrate reductase loss-of-function mutant nia1nia2. Recently, we have demonstrated that ABA-inhibited K(+)in current and ABA-enhanced slow anion current were absent in nia1nia2. Exogenous NO restored regulation of these channels for stomatal closure in nia1nia2. In this study, we found that mutating NIA1 and NIA2 impaired nearly all the key components of guard cell ABA signaling pathway in Arabidopsis. We also propose a simplified model for ABA signaling in the nia1nia2 mutant.

  16. Characterization of Plant Growth under Single-Wavelength Laser Light Using the Model Plant Arabidopsis Thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Ooi, Amanda

    2016-12-01

    Indoor horticulture offers a promising solution for sustainable food production and is becoming increasingly widespread. However, it incurs high energy and cost due to the use of artificial lighting such as high-pressure sodium lamps, fluorescent light or increasingly, the light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The energy efficiency and light quality of currently available lighting is suboptimal, therefore less than ideal for sustainable and cost-effective large-scale plant production. Here, we demonstrate the use of high-powered single-wavelength lasers for indoor horticulture. Lasers are highly energy-efficient and can be remotely guided to the site of plant growth, thus reducing on-site heat accumulation. Besides, laser beams can be tailored to match the absorption profiles of different plants. We have developed a prototype laser growth chamber and demonstrate that laser-grown plants can complete a full growth cycle from seed to seed with phenotypes resembling those of plants grown under LEDs. Importantly, the plants have lower expression of proteins diagnostic for light and radiation stress. The phenotypical, biochemical and proteomic data show that the singlewavelength laser light is suitable for plant growth and therefore, potentially able to unlock the advantages of this next generation lighting technology for highly energy-efficient horticulture. Furthermore, stomatal movement partly determines the plant productivity and stress management. Abscisic acid (ABA) induces stomatal closure by promoting net K+-efflux from guard cells through outwardrectifying K+ (K+ out) channels to regulate plant water homeostasis. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana guard cell outward-rectifying K+ (ATGORK) channel is a direct target for ABA in the regulation of stomatal aperture and hence gas exchange and transpiration. Addition of (±)-ABA, but not the biologically inactive (−)-isomer, increases K+ out channel activity in Vicia faba guard cell protoplast. A similar ABA

  17. Bipolar Plasma Membrane Distribution of Phosphoinositides and Their Requirement for Auxin-Mediated Cell Polarity and Patterning in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tejos, R.; Sauer, M.; Vanneste, S.; Palacios-Gomez, M.; Li, H.; Heilmann, M.; van Wijk, R.; Vermeer, J.E.M.; Heilmann, I.; Munnik, T.; Friml, J.

    2014-01-01

    Cell polarity manifested by asymmetric distribution of cargoes, such as receptors and transporters, within the plasma membrane (PM) is crucial for essential functions in multicellular organisms. In plants, cell polarity (re)establishment is intimately linked to patterning processes. Despite the

  18. Metacaspase-8 Modulates Programmed Cell Death Induced by Ultraviolet Light and H2O2 in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, R.; Drury, G.E.; Rotari, V.I.; Gordon, A.; Willer, M.; Farzaneh, T.; Woltering, E.J.; Gallois, P.

    2008-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically controlled cell death that is regulated during development and activated in response to environmental stresses or pathogen infection. The degree of conservation of PCD across kingdoms and phylum is not yet clear; however, whereas caspases are proteases

  19. Plastidic phosphoglucose isomerase is an important determinant of starch accumulation in mesophyll cells, growth, photosynthetic capacity, and biosynthesis of plastidic cytokinins in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellatif Bahaji

    Full Text Available Phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI catalyzes the reversible isomerization of glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate. It is involved in glycolysis and in the regeneration of glucose-6-P molecules in the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP. In chloroplasts of illuminated mesophyll cells PGI also connects the Calvin-Benson cycle with the starch biosynthetic pathway. In this work we isolated pgi1-3, a mutant totally lacking pPGI activity as a consequence of aberrant intron splicing of the pPGI encoding gene, PGI1. Starch content in pgi1-3 source leaves was ca. 10-15% of that of wild type (WT leaves, which was similar to that of leaves of pgi1-2, a T-DNA insertion pPGI null mutant. Starch deficiency of pgi1 leaves could be reverted by the introduction of a sex1 null mutation impeding β-amylolytic starch breakdown. Although previous studies showed that starch granules of pgi1-2 leaves are restricted to both bundle sheath cells adjacent to the mesophyll and stomata guard cells, microscopy analyses carried out in this work revealed the presence of starch granules in the chloroplasts of pgi1-2 and pgi1-3 mesophyll cells. RT-PCR analyses showed high expression levels of plastidic and extra-plastidic β-amylase encoding genes in pgi1 leaves, which was accompanied by increased β-amylase activity. Both pgi1-2 and pgi1-3 mutants displayed slow growth and reduced photosynthetic capacity phenotypes even under continuous light conditions. Metabolic analyses revealed that the adenylate energy charge and the NAD(PH/NAD(P ratios in pgi1 leaves were lower than those of WT leaves. These analyses also revealed that the content of plastidic 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP-pathway derived cytokinins (CKs in pgi1 leaves were exceedingly lower than in WT leaves. Noteworthy, exogenous application of CKs largely reverted the low starch content phenotype of pgi1 leaves. The overall data show that pPGI is an important determinant of photosynthesis, energy

  20. Lazarus1, a DUF300 Protein, Contributes to Programmed Cell Death Associated with Arabidopsis acd11 and the Hypersensitive Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinovsky, F.G.; Brodersen, P.; Fiil, B.K.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Programmed cell death (PCD) is a necessary part of the life of multi-cellular organisms. A type of plant PCD is the defensive hypersensitive response (HR) elicited via recognition of a pathogen by host resistance (R) proteins. The lethal, recessive accelerated cell death 11 (acd11...... associated with the HR, in addition to its role in acd11-related death. Furthermore, the similar topology of a plant and human DUF300 proteins suggests similar functions in PCD across the eukaryotic kingdoms, although a direct role for TMEM34 in cell death control remains to be established. Finally...... with functions in plant PCD, which may also have implications for deciphering cell death mechanisms in other organisms....

  1. EDR2 negatively regulates salicylic acid-based defenses and cell death during powdery mildew infections of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishimura Marc

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hypersensitive necrosis response (HR of resistant plants to avirulent pathogens is a form of programmed cell death in which the plant sacrifices a few cells under attack, restricting pathogen growth into adjacent healthy tissues. In spite of the importance of this defense response, relatively little is known about the plant components that execute the cell death program or about its regulation in response to pathogen attack. Results We isolated the edr2-6 mutant, an allele of the previously described edr2 mutants. We found that edr2-6 exhibited an exaggerated chlorosis and necrosis response to attack by three pathogens, two powdery mildew and one downy mildew species, but not in response to abiotic stresses or attack by the bacterial leaf speck pathogen. The chlorosis and necrosis did not spread beyond inoculated sites suggesting that EDR2 limits the initiation of cell death rather than its spread. The pathogen-induced chlorosis and necrosis of edr2-6 was correlated with a stimulation of the salicylic acid defense pathway and was suppressed in mutants deficient in salicylic acid signaling. EDR2 encodes a novel protein with a pleckstrin homology and a StAR transfer (START domain as well as a plant-specific domain of unknown function, DUF1336. The pleckstrin homology domain binds to phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate in vitro and an EDR2:HA:GFP protein localizes to endoplasmic reticulum, plasma membrane and endosomes. Conclusion EDR2 acts as a negative regulator of cell death, specifically the cell death elicited by pathogen attack and mediated by the salicylic acid defense pathway. Phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate may have a role in limiting cell death via its effect on EDR2. This role in cell death may be indirect, by helping to target EDR2 to the appropriate membrane, or it may play a more direct role.

  2. Volunteers in the Danish Home Guard 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fridberg, Torben; Damgaard, Malene

    This report describes the composition of the Home Guard’s volunteer members and their attitudes to and expectations for the Home Guard. A similar survey was carried out in 2007, and the present report therefore also examines the trends from 2007 to 2011. Among other things, the report shows...... voluntary work than the population as a whole. The report also shows that one in three active members of the Home Guard would like to be deployed on international operations to support the armed forces. The young members are especially willing – and these members have increased in recent years. This report...

  3. Reference: 788 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available f PCD by chaperoning and inhibiting Cys proteases during their trafficking to vacuoles...es become the de facto lytic vacuoles that mediate PCD. Arabidopsis protein disulfi...de isomerase-5 inhibits cysteine proteases during trafficking to vacuoles before ... before PCD of the endothelial cells. During this transitional phase of endothelial cell development, the protein storage vacuol...apse of protein storage vacuoles, lytic vacuole shrinkage and degradation, and nuclear condensation and frag

  4. Reference: 125 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available et al. 2004 Nov. Plant Physiol. 136(3):3616-27. The actin cytoskeleton mediates cellular processes through t...AP and AtPIR participate in a variety of growth and developmental processes. Mutations in AtNAP and AtPIR ca...ting trichome cell growth. Arabidopsis NAP and PIR regulate actin-based cell morphogenesis and multiple developmental processes

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243048 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243048 J100010D20 At2g29570.1 68415.m03591 proliferating cell nuclear antigen 2 (...PCNA2) identical to SP|Q9ZW35 Proliferating cell nuclear antigen 2 (PCNA 2) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; nearly i...dentical to SP|Q43124 Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) {Brassica napus}; contains Pfam profiles PF00705: Proliferating... cell nuclear antigen N-terminal domain, PF02747: Proliferating cell nuclear antigen C-terminal domain 1e-132 ...

  6. CHDS Launches Army National Guard Certificate Program

    OpenAIRE

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security

    2007-01-01

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security, PRESS RELEASES The Naval Postgraduate School’s (NPS) Center for Homeland Defense and Security (CHDS) has launched a certificate program in Homeland Defense and Security (HD/S) specifically for the National Guard (NG). The...

  7. Guarded Dependent Type Theory with Coinductive Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizjak, Ales; Grathwohl, Hans Bugge; Clouston, Ranald

    2016-01-01

    , type based, way. Clock quantifiers are used for controlled elimination of the later modality and for encoding coinductive types using guarded recursive types. Key to the development of gDTT are novel type and term formers involving what we call ‘delayed substitutions’. These generalise the applicative...

  8. 29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... swinging beyond the front or back edges of the table. (4) Inverted swing cutoff saws shall have hoods... prevent travel of radial saw blades beyond the table's edge; (4) Radial saws shall be installed so that... hand-fed circular crosscut table saws. Unless fixed or manually adjustable enclosures or guarding...

  9. SRPP, a Cell Wall Protein is Involved in Development and Protection of Seeds and Root Hairs in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Natsuki; Uno, Hiroshi; Okuda, Shohei; Gunji, Shizuka; Ferjani, Ali; Aoyama, Takashi; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2017-04-01

    Enhancement of root hair development in response to phosphate (Pi) deficit has been reported extensively. Root hairs are involved in major root functions such as the absorption of water, acquisition of nutrients and secretion of organic acids and enzymes. Individual root hair cells maintain these functions and appropriate structure under various physiological conditions. We carried out a study to identify protein(s) which maintain the structure and function of root hairs, and identified a protein (SEED AND ROOT HAIR PROTECTIVE PROTEIN, SRPP) that was induced in root hairs under Pi-deficient conditions. Promoter assay and mRNA quantification revealed that SRPP was expressed in root hairs and seeds. A knockout mutant, srpp-1, consistently displayed defects in root hairs and seeds. Root hairs in srpp-1 were short and the phenotypes observed under Pi-deficient conditions were also detected in ethylene-treated srpp-1 plants. Propidium iodide stained most root hairs of srpp-1 grown under Pi-deficient conditions, suggesting cell death. In addition to root hairs, most srpp-1 seeds were withered and their embryos were dead. SRPP tagged with green fluorescent protein was detected in the cell wall. Electron microscopy showed abnormal morphology of the cell wall. Wild-type phenotypes were restored when the SRPP gene was expressed in srpp-1. These data strongly suggest that SRPP contributes to the construction of robust cell walls, whereby it plays a key role in the development of root hairs and seeds. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Reciprocal Responses in the Interaction between Arabidopsis and the Cell-Content-Feeding Chelicerate Herbivore Spider Mite1[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhurov, Vladimir; Navarro, Marie; Bruinsma, Kristie A.; Arbona, Vicent; Santamaria, M. Estrella; Cazaux, Marc; Wybouw, Nicky; Osborne, Edward J.; Ens, Cherise; Rioja, Cristina; Vermeirssen, Vanessa; Rubio-Somoza, Ignacio; Krishna, Priti; Diaz, Isabel; Schmid, Markus; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Van de Peer, Yves; Grbić, Miodrag; Clark, Richard M.; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Grbić, Vojislava

    2014-01-01

    Most molecular-genetic studies of plant defense responses to arthropod herbivores have focused on insects. However, plant-feeding mites are also pests of diverse plants, and mites induce different patterns of damage to plant tissues than do well-studied insects (e.g. lepidopteran larvae or aphids). The two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae) is among the most significant mite pests in agriculture, feeding on a staggering number of plant hosts. To understand the interactions between spider mite and a plant at the molecular level, we examined reciprocal genome-wide responses of mites and its host Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Despite differences in feeding guilds, we found that transcriptional responses of Arabidopsis to mite herbivory resembled those observed for lepidopteran herbivores. Mutant analysis of induced plant defense pathways showed functionally that only a subset of induced programs, including jasmonic acid signaling and biosynthesis of indole glucosinolates, are central to Arabidopsis’s defense to mite herbivory. On the herbivore side, indole glucosinolates dramatically increased mite mortality and development times. We identified an indole glucosinolate dose-dependent increase in the number of differentially expressed mite genes belonging to pathways associated with detoxification of xenobiotics. This demonstrates that spider mite is sensitive to Arabidopsis defenses that have also been associated with the deterrence of insect herbivores that are very distantly related to chelicerates. Our findings provide molecular insights into the nature of, and response to, herbivory for a representative of a major class of arthropod herbivores. PMID:24285850

  11. Responses to Iron-Deficiency in Arabidopsis-Thaliana - The Turbo Iron Reductase does not depend on the Formation of Root Hairs and Transfer Cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moog, P.R.; Van der Kooij, T.A.W.; Bruggemann, W.; Schiefelbein, J.W.; Kuiper, P.J.C.

    Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Columbia wild type and a root hair-less mutant RM57 were grown on iron-containing and iron-deficient nutrient solutions. In both genotypes, ferric chelate reductase (FCR) of intact roots was induced upon iron deficiency and followed a Michaelis-Menten kinetic with a

  12. Guarding America: Security Guards and U.S. Critical Infrastructure Protection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parfomak, Paul W

    2004-01-01

    The Bush Administration's 2003 National Strategy for the Physical Protection of Critical Infrastructures and Key Assets indicates that security guards are an important source of protection for critical facilities...

  13. US Coast Guard Stations in Louisiana, Geographic NAD83, USCG [coast_guard_stations_USCG_1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is is a point dataset for the locations and attributes of eight US Coast Guard stations in Louisiana. The attributes include name, address, latitude (NAD27),...

  14. AtERF38 (At2g35700), an AP2/ERF family transcription factor gene from Arabidopsis thaliana, is expressed in specific cell types of roots, stems and seeds that undergo suberization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasserre, Eric; Jobet, Edouard; Llauro, Christel; Delseny, Michel

    2008-12-01

    An inverse genetic approach was used to gain insight into the role of AP2/ERF-type transcription factors genes during plant development in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we show that the expression pattern of AtERF38, which is, among the organs tested, more intensively expressed in mature siliques and floral stems, is closely associated with tissues that undergo secondary cell wall modifications. Firstly, public microarray data sets analysis indicates that AtERF38 is coregulated with several genes involved in secondary wall thickening. Secondly, this was experimentally confirmed in different types of cells expressing a Pro(AtERF38)::GUS fusion: histochemical analysis revealed strong and specific GUS activity in outer integument cells of mature seeds, endodermal cells of the roots in the primary developmental stage and some sclerified cells of mature inflorescence stems. All of these cells are known or shown here to be characterized by a reinforced wall. The latter, which have not been well characterized to date in Arabidopsis and may be suberized, could benefit of the use of AtERF38 as a specific marker. We were not able to detect any phenotype in an insertion line in which ectopic expression of AtERF38 is caused by the insertion of a T-DNA in its promoter. Nevertheless, AtERF28 may be considered as a candidate regulator of secondary wall metabolism in particular cell types that are not reinforced by the typical deposition of lignin and cellulose, but that have at least in common accumulation of suberin-like lipid polyesters in their walls.

  15. Arabidopsis Regenerating Protoplast: A Powerful Model System for Combining the Proteomics of Cell Wall Proteins and the Visualization of Cell Wall Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryusuke Yokoyama

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of a range of sub-proteomic approaches to the plant cell wall has identified many of the cell wall proteins. However, it remains difficult to elucidate the precise biological role of each protein and the cell wall dynamics driven by their actions. The plant protoplast provides an excellent means not only for characterizing cell wall proteins, but also for visualizing the dynamics of cell wall regeneration, during which cell wall proteins are secreted. It therefore offers a unique opportunity to investigate the de novo construction process of the cell wall. This review deals with sub-proteomic approaches to the plant cell wall through the use of protoplasts, a methodology that will provide the basis for further exploration of cell wall proteins and cell wall dynamics.

  16. Regional Alignment of Army National Guard Brigades: Employing the Guard for Success in Building Partner Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    12 42 GEN Ray Odierno blog 43 GEN Craig R. McKinley, The National Guard: A Great Value for America, July 2010, 7. 44 An Agribusiness Development...Team (ADT) composed of Army National Guard soldiers with backgrounds and expertise in various sectors of the agribusiness field has been formed to...The ARNG has employed the Agribusiness Development Team (ADT) concept successfully in Central America for approximately 20 years. (2008 Army Posture

  17. Coast Guard Polar Icebreaker Modernization: Background and Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-27

    subcommittee of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, Vice Admiral John P. Currier, the Vice Commandant of the Coast Guard, testified...55 Calvin Biesecker, “Coast Guard Requests Information On Heavy Polar Icebreaker,” Defense...

  18. 46 CFR 116.960 - Guards for exposed hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 116.960 Guards for exposed hazards. An exposed hazard, such as gears or...

  19. 46 CFR 108.223 - Guards on exposed equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Rails § 108.223 Guards on exposed equipment. Each unit must have hand covers, guards, or rails installed on all belts, gears, shafts, pulleys, sprockets, spindles...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK063098 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK063098 001-111-C03 At1g07370.1 proliferating cell nuclear antigen 1 (PCNA1) ident...ical to SP|Q9M7Q7 Proliferating cellular nuclear antigen 1 (PCNA 1) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; nearly identical to SP|Q43124 Proliferati...ng cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) {Brassica napus}; contains Pfam profiles PF00705: Proliferating... cell nuclear antigen N-terminal domain, PF02747: Proliferating cell nuclear antigen C-terminal domain 7e-88 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243048 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243048 J100010D20 At1g07370.1 68414.m00786 proliferating cell nuclear antigen 1 (...PCNA1) identical to SP|Q9M7Q7 Proliferating cellular nuclear antigen 1 (PCNA 1) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; near...ly identical to SP|Q43124 Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) {Brassica napus}; contains Pfam profiles PF00705: Proliferating... cell nuclear antigen N-terminal domain, PF02747: Proliferating cell nuclear antigen C-terminal domain 1e-131 ...

  2. 46 CFR 50.10-25 - Coast Guard Symbol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard Symbol. 50.10-25 Section 50.10-25 Shipping... Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-25 Coast Guard Symbol. (a) The term Coast Guard Symbol... impression of the Coast Guard Symbol for stamping nameplates and specimens is shown in Figure 50.10-25(b...

  3. AhDGR2, an amaranth abiotic stress-induced DUF642 protein gene, modifies cell wall structure and composition and causes salt and ABA hyper-sensibility in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeros-Suárez, Paola A; Massange-Sánchez, Julio A; Sánchez-Segura, Lino; Martínez-Gallardo, Norma A; Espitia Rangel, Eduardo; Gómez-Leyva, Juan F; Délano-Frier, John P

    2017-03-01

    An amaranth DGR gene, induced under abiotic stress, modifies cell wall structure and causes hypersensitivity to ABA and salt when overexpressed in Arabidopsis. DUF642 is a highly conserved plant-specific family of unknown cell wall-associated proteins. The AhDGR2 gene, coding for a DUF642 protein, was significantly induced in grain amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) plants subjected to water-deficit and salinity stress, thereby suggesting its participation in abiotic stress tolerance in this plant. A role in development was also inferred from the higher AhDGR2 expression rates detected in young tissues. Subsequent overexpression of AhDGR2 in transgenic Arabidopsis plants (OE-AhDGR2) supported its possible role in development processes. Thus, OE-AhDGR2 plants generated significantly longer roots when grown in normal MS medium. However, they showed a hypersensitivity to increasing concentrations of abscisic acid or NaCl in the medium, as manifested by shorter root length, smaller and slightly chlorotic rosettes, as well as highly reduced germination rates. Contrary to expectations, OE-AhDGR2 plants were intolerant to abiotic stress. Moreover, cell walls in transgenic plants were thinner, in leaves, and more disorganized, in roots, and had significantly modified pectin levels. Lower pectin methylesterase activity detected in leaves of OE-AhDGR2 plants, but not in roots, was contrary to previous reports associating DUF642 proteins and decreased pectin esterification levels in cell walls. Nonetheless, microarray data identified candidate genes whose expression levels explained the phenotypes observed in leaves of OE-AhDGR2 plants, including several involved in cell wall integrity and extension, growth and development, and resistance to abiotic stress. These results support the role of DUF642 proteins in cell wall-related processes and offer novel insights into their possible role(s) in plants.

  4. 46 CFR 177.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 177.940 Section 177.940... TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a vessel authorized to carry one or more vehicles, suitable chains, cables, or other barriers must be installed at the...

  5. 46 CFR 116.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 116.940 Section 116.940... ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 116.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a vessel authorized to carry one or more vehicles, suitable chains, cables, or other barriers must be installed at the end of each vehicle runway...

  6. What is a "good" encoding of guarded choice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nestmann, Uwe

    2000-01-01

    into the latter that preserves divergence-freedom and symmetries. This paper argues that there are nevertheless "good" encodings between these calculi. In detail, we present a series of encodings for languages with (1) input-guarded choice, (2) both input and output-guarded choice, and (3) mixed-guarded choice...

  7. 46 CFR 58.01-20 - Machinery guards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Machinery guards. 58.01-20 Section 58.01-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-20 Machinery guards. Gears, couplings, flywheels and all machinery capable of injuring personnel...

  8. Collector/collector guard ring balancing circuit eliminates edge effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieb, D. P.

    1966-01-01

    Circuit in which an emitter is maintained opposite a concentric collector and guard structure is achieved by matching the temperature and potential of the guard with that of the collector over the operating range. This control system is capable of handling up to 100 amperes in the guard circuit and 200 amperes in the collectors circuit.

  9. 46 CFR 64.37 - Valve and fitting guard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valve and fitting guard. 64.37 Section 64.37 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.37 Valve and fitting guard. Each valve and fitting must...

  10. Effects of chemical inhibitors and apyrase enzyme further document a role for apyrases and extracellular ATP in the opening and closing of stomates in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Greg; Darwin, Cameron; Mehta, Viraj; Jackobs, Faith; Perry, Tyler; Hougaard, Katia; Roux, Stan

    2013-11-01

    In Arabidopsis leaves there is a bi-phasic dose-response to applied nucleotides; i.e., lower concentrations induce stomatal opening, while higher concentrations induce closure. Two mammalian purinoceptor antagonists, PPADS and RB2, block both nucleotide-induced stomatal opening and closing. These antagonists also partially block ABA-induced stomatal closure and light-induced stomatal opening. There are two closely related Arabidopsis apyrases, AtAPY1 and AtAPY2, which are both expressed in guard cells. Here we report that low levels of apyrase chemical inhibitors can induce stomatal opening in the dark, while apyrase enzyme blocks ABA-induced stomatal closure. We also demonstrate that high concentrations of ATP induce stomatal closure in the light. Application of ATPγS and chemical apyrase inhibitors at concentrations that have no effect on stomatal closure can lower the threshold for ABA-induced closure. The closure induced by ATPγS was not observed in gpa1-3 loss-of-function mutants. These results further confirm the role of extracellular ATP in regulating stomatal apertures.

  11. Reference: 567 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Tamara et al. 2007 Mar. Plant Cell 19(3):831-46. Arabidopsis thaliana seedling growth with pure oxylipins r...oic acid (9-HOT) was a potent inducer of root waving. Studies with noxy2 (for nonresponding to oxylipin...ive) revealed at least three signaling cascades mediating the oxylipin actions. Treatment with 9-HOT resulte...ing genes are consistent with mechanistic links among these processes. The nature of the changes detected suggests that oxylipin

  12. Reference: 295 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 295 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16284313i Fujita Yas...ng that enhances drought stress tolerance in Arabidopsis. 12 3470-88 16284313 200...5 Dec The Plant cell Fujita Miki|Fujita Yasunari|Hiratsu Keiichiro|Maruyama Kyonoshin|Ohme-Takagi Masaru|Par

  13. Reference: 584 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ing in Arabidopsis thaliana shoot and root stem cell organizers. 7137 811-4 17429400 2007 Apr Nature Hashimo...nda K et al. 2007 Apr. Nature 446(7137):811-4. Throughout the lifespan of a plant, which in some cases can l... 584 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u17429400i Sarkar Ana

  14. Coast Guard AHLTA Technology Business Case Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-27

    TISCOM-approved Citrix client software product found standard on the Workstation III. A local system management console is used to perform system...Coast Guard is dedicated to the Citrix solution, and new thin terminals have been installed in all clinics offices and are being installed in all clinic...Network will be made available by TISCOM for Citrix AHLTA placement and be robust enough to transmit AHLTA. 4. TISCOM will require the DOD network

  15. A single arabidopsis gene encodes two differentially targeted geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase isoforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Águila Ruiz-Sola, M.; Barja, M.V.; Manzano, David; Llorente, Briardo; Schipper, Bert; Beekwilder, Jules; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    A wide diversity of isoprenoids is produced in different plant compartments. Most groups of isoprenoids synthesized in plastids, and some produced elsewhere in the plant cell derive from geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) synthesized by GGPP synthase (GGPPS) enzymes. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis

  16. Arabidopsis phospholipase Dδ is involved in basal defense and nonhost resistance to powdery mildew fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinosa, Francesco; Buhot, Nathalie; Kwaaitaal, Mark Adrianus Cornelis J

    2013-01-01

    and biotic stress signaling. In this study, the involvement of PLD in the interaction between Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and the barley powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh) was investigated. This nonadapted pathogen is normally resisted by a cell wall-based defense, which stops...

  17. Expression pattern of the Arabidopsis thaliana AtEP3/AtchitIV endocitinase gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passarinho, P.A.; Hengel, van A.J.; Fransz, P.F.; Vries, de S.C.

    2001-01-01

    The carrot (Daucus carota L.) EP3 chitinase was shown to be essential for somatic embryo formation in a carrot mutant cell line. We identified the Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. ortholog of the carrot EP3-3 chitinase gene, designated as AtEP3/AtchitIV and analyzed its expression in Arabidopsis by

  18. Sensitive detection and measurement of oligogalacturonides in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela ePontiggia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Oligogalacturonides (OGs are pectin fragments derived from the partial hydrolysis of the plant cell wall pectin; they are elicitors of various defense responses. While their activity is well documented, the detection of OGs produced in planta is still a challenging task.A protocol has been developed for the extraction and analysis of OGs from small samples of Arabidopsis tissues by using fluorescent labelled OGs, which allowed to monitor the efficiency of extraction. An efficient recovery was obtained by using a combination of calcium chelating agents at acidic pH. Off-line coupling of HPAEC with MALDI-TOF-MS or nanoESI-Orbitrap-MS/MS was used for the identification and characterization of oligosaccharides. The protocol was successfully applied to detect OGs by using low amounts (50 mg of Arabidopsis leaves and very low amounts (30 mg of senescent leaves. The protocol was also successfully used to detect OGs in Arabidopsis cell wall material digested with pectinases.The proposed extraction protocol followed by sensitive and high-resolution analysis methods allowed detection of OGs released from the cell wall in Arabidopsis tissues by using minimal sample material. The protocol may be useful to study OG-triggered plant immunity and cell wall remodeling during Arabidopsis growth and development.

  19. Sensitive detection and measurement of oligogalacturonides in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontiggia, Daniela; Ciarcianelli, Jacopo; Salvi, Gianni; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia; Mattei, Benedetta

    2015-01-01

    Oligogalacturonides (OGs) are pectin fragments derived from the partial hydrolysis of the plant cell wall pectin; they are elicitors of various defense responses. While their activity is well documented, the detection of OGs produced in planta is still a challenging task. A protocol has been developed for the extraction and analysis of OGs from small samples of Arabidopsis tissues by using fluorescent labeled OGs, which allowed to monitor the efficiency of extraction. An efficient recovery was obtained by using a combination of calcium chelating agents at acidic pH. Off-line coupling of high performance anion exchange chromatography with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization- time of flight-mass spectrometryor nanoESI-Orbitrap-MS/MS was used for the identification and characterization of oligosaccharides. The protocol was successfully applied to detect OGs by using low amounts (50 mg) of Arabidopsis leaves and very low amounts (30 mg) of senescent leaves. The protocol was also successfully used to detect OGs in Arabidopsis cell wall material digested with pectinases. The proposed extraction protocol followed by sensitive and high-resolution analysis methods allowed detection of OGs released from the cell wall in Arabidopsis tissues by using minimal sample material. The protocol may be useful to study OG-triggered plant immunity and cell wall remodeling during Arabidopsis growth and development. PMID:25954288

  20. The role of oxytocin and vasopressin in conditioned mate guarding behavior in the female rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Amanda; Bellevue, Shannon; Vosberg, Daniel; Wenzel, Kerstin; Roorda, Sieger; Pfaus, James G

    2015-05-15

    We have shown previously that female rats given their first copulatory experiences with the same male rat display mate guarding behavior in the presence of that male provided a female competitor is also present. Females given access to the familiar male show more Fos induction within regions of the brain that contain oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) cell bodies, notably the supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular nuclei (PVN) relative to females given sexual experience with different males. The present experiments examined whether the Fos induction we previously observed within the SON and PVN occurred within OT and/or AVP neurons, and whether exogenous administration of OT or AVP prior to female rats first sexual experience could potentiate the acquisition of mate guarding behavior. Female rats that display conditioned mate guarding had significantly more double-labeled Fos/OT neurons in both SON and PVN, and significantly more Fos/AVP neurons in the PVN. Peripheral administration of OT or AVP prior to their first sexual experience with the familiar male facilitated different aspects of mate guarding: OT augmented affiliative behaviors and presenting responses whereas AVP augmented interference behavior. These results indicate that female rats' first experiences with sexual reward when paired with the same male induce changes to bonding networks in the brain. Moreover peripheral administration of OT or AVP during their first sexual experience can augment different aspects of mate guarding behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 49 CFR 571.223 - Standard No. 223; Rear impact guards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) of this section. S5.2.2 Guard Energy Absorption. A guard, other than a hydraulic guard, shall absorb... the guard manufacturer's installation instructions. Hydraulic guard means a guard designed to use... must be met no matter how small an amount of energy is absorbed by the rigid test fixture. S5...

  2. Regulatory Proteolysis in Arabidopsis-Pathogen Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogány, Miklós; Dankó, Tamás; Kámán-Tóth, Evelin; Schwarczinger, Ildikó; Bozsó, Zoltán

    2015-09-24

    Approximately two and a half percent of protein coding genes in Arabidopsis encode enzymes with known or putative proteolytic activity. Proteases possess not only common housekeeping functions by recycling nonfunctional proteins. By irreversibly cleaving other proteins, they regulate crucial developmental processes and control responses to environmental changes. Regulatory proteolysis is also indispensable in interactions between plants and their microbial pathogens. Proteolytic cleavage is simultaneously used both by plant cells, to recognize and inactivate invading pathogens, and by microbes, to overcome the immune system of the plant and successfully colonize host cells. In this review, we present available results on the group of proteases in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana whose functions in microbial pathogenesis were confirmed. Pathogen-derived proteolytic factors are also discussed when they are involved in the cleavage of host metabolites. Considering the wealth of review papers available in the field of the ubiquitin-26S proteasome system results on the ubiquitin cascade are not presented. Arabidopsis and its pathogens are conferred with abundant sets of proteases. This review compiles a list of those that are apparently involved in an interaction between the plant and its pathogens, also presenting their molecular partners when available.

  3. Knockout of Arabidopsis accelerated-cell-death11 encoding a sphingosine transfer protein causes activation of programmed cell death and defense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Peter; Petersen, Morten; Pike, Helen M

    2002-01-01

    by avirulent pathogens. Global transcriptional changes during programmed cell death (PCD) and defense activation in acd11 were monitored by cDNA microarray hybridization. The PCD and defense pathways activated in acd11 are salicylic acid (SA) dependent, but do not require intact jasmonic acid or ethylene...

  4. 49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... running rail, or corresponding location of the tread portion of the track structure. ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Train Operations at Track Classes 6 and... shall be within the limits prescribed in the following table— Class of track Guard check gage—The...

  5. Characterization Of Laccase T-DNA Mutants In Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe R; Asp, Torben; Mansfield, Shawn

    Laccases (P-diphenol:O2 oxidoreductase; EC 1.10.3.2), also termed laccase-like multicopper oxidases, are blue copper-containing oxidases which comprise multigene families in plants. In the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, 17 laccase genes (LAC1 to LAC17) have been annotated. To identify laccases...... involved in cell wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis primary stems we have developed homozygous T-DNA mutants for 14 individual laccases. Six laccases are highly expressed in the wild type primary stem, four of which (LAC2, LAC4, LAC12, and LAC17) show correlated gene expression with one to several genes (e...... different and distinct biochemical pathways and that laccases might be involved in polymerization of both polysaccharides and monolignols in the Arabidopsis cell wall....

  6. The Arabidopsis thiamin-deficient mutant pale green1 lacks thiamin monophosphate phosphatase of the vitamin B1 biosynthesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Wei-Yu; Liao, Jo-Chien; Wang, Hsin-Tzu; Hung, Tzu-Huan; Tseng, Ching-Chih; Chung, Tsui-Yun; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun

    2017-07-01

    Thiamin diphosphate (TPP, vitamin B 1 ) is an essential coenzyme present in all organisms. Animals obtain TPP from their diets, but plants synthesize TPPde novo. We isolated and characterized an Arabidopsis pale green1 (pale1) mutant that contained higher concentrations of thiamin monophosphate (TMP) and less thiamin and TPP than the wild type. Supplementation with thiamin, but not the thiazole and pyrimidine precursors, rescued the mutant phenotype, indicating that the pale1 mutant is a thiamin-deficient mutant. Map-based cloning and whole-genome sequencing revealed that the pale1 mutant has a mutation in At5g32470 encoding a TMP phosphatase of the TPP biosynthesis pathway. We further confirmed that the mutation of At5g32470 is responsible for the mutant phenotypes by complementing the pale1 mutant with constructs overexpressing full-length At5g32470. Most plant TPP biosynthetic enzymes are located in the chloroplasts and cytosol, but At5g32470-GFP localized to the mitochondrion of the root, hypocotyl, mesophyll and guard cells of the 35S:At5g32470-GFP complemented plants. The subcellular localization of a functional TMP phosphatase suggests that the complete vitamin B1 biosynthesis pathway may involve the chloroplasts, mitochondria and cytosol in plants. Analysis of PALE1 promoter-uidA activity revealed that PALE1 is mainly expressed in vascular tissues of Arabidopsis seedlings. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of TPP biosynthesis genes and genes encoding the TPP-dependent enzymes pyruvate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and transketolase revealed that the transcript levels of these genes were upregulated in the pale1 mutant. These results suggest that endogenous levels of TPP may affect the expression of genes involved in TPP biosynthesis and TPP-dependent enzymes. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Coast Guard Strategic Management: Law Enforcement in the 1990s

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    Di NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL. Monterey, California In 0 SRDDTIC S ELECTE MARO 11991 THESIS B . . COAST GUARD STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT : LAW ENFORCEMENT IN...NUMBERS PROGRAM PROJECT TASK WORK UNIT ELEMENT NO NO NO ACCESSION NO. 11 TITLE (Include Security Classification) COAST GUARD STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT : LAW...GROUP SUB-GROUP 8oas Guar strategy; Coast Guara Strategc Management; Coast Guard Strategic Management -- Law Enforcement 19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse

  8. [Imprinting genes and it's expression in Arabidopsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Yu; Xu, Pei-Zhou; Yang, Hua; Wu, Xian-Jun

    2010-07-01

    Genomic imprinting refers to the phenomenon that the expression of a gene copy depends on its parent of origin. The Arabidopsis imprinted FIS (Fertilisation-independent seed) genes, mea, fis2, and fie, play essential roles in the repression of central cell and the regulation of early endosperm development. fis mutants display two phenotypes: autonomous diploid endosperm development when fertilization is absent and un-cellularised endosperm formation when fertilization occurs. The FIS Polycomb protein complex including the above three FIS proteins catalyzes histone H3 K27 tri-methylation on target loci. DME (DEMETER), a DNA glycosylase, and AtMET1 (Methyltransferase1), a DNA methyltransferase, are involved in the regulation of imprinted expression of both mea and fis2. This review summarizes the studies on the Arabidopsis imprinted FIS genes and other related genes. Recent works have shown that the insertion of transposons may affect nearby gene expression, which may be the main driving force behind the evolution of genomic imprinting. This summary covers the achievements on Arabidopsis imprinted genes will provide important information for studies on genomic imprinting in the important crops such as rice and maize.

  9. The Future Army National Guard: Easing Contemporary Challenges of Transformation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fuhr, Daniel J

    2006-01-01

    .... However, deliberate efforts can bring about timely, positive adaptation. This paper explores the factors bearing on cultural changes that will speed effective transformation in the Army National Guard...

  10. UV-B induced generation of reactive oxygen species promotes formation of BFA-induced compartments in cells of Arabidopsis root apices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken eYokawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available UV-B radiation is an important part of the electromagnetic spectrum emitted by the sun. For much of the period of biological evolution organisms have been exposed to UV radiation, and have developed diverse mechanisms to cope with this potential stress factor. Roots are usually shielded from exposure to UV by the surrounding soil, but may nevertheless be exposed to high energy radiationon the soil surface. Due to their high sensitivity to UV-B radiation, plant roots need to respond rapidly in order to minimize exposure on the surface. In addition to root gravitropism, effective light perception by roots has recently been discovered to be essential for triggering negative root phototropism in Arabidopsis. However, it is not fully understood how UV-B affects root growth and phototropism. Here, we report that UV-B induces rapid generation of reactive oxygen species which in turn promotes the formation of BFA-induced compartments in the Arabidopsis root apex. During unilateral UV-B irradiation of roots changes in auxin concentration on the illuminated side have been recorded. In conclusion, UV-B-induced and ROS-mediated stimulation of vesicle recycling promotes root growth and induces negative phototropism.

  11. An Arabidopsis callose synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Lars; Petersen, Morten; Mattsson, Ole

    2002-01-01

    in the Arabidopsis mpk4 mutant which exhibits systemic acquired resistance (SAR), elevated beta-1,3-glucan synthase activity, and increased callose levels. In addition, AtGsl5 is a likely target of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent SAR, since AtGsl5 mRNA accumulation is induced by SA in wild-type plants, while...... expression of the nahG salicylate hydroxylase reduces AtGsl5 mRNA levels in the mpk4 mutant. These results indicate that AtGsl5 is likely involved in callose synthesis in flowering tissues and in the mpk4 mutant....

  12. Radiation guard for x-ray table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collica, C.; Epifano, L.; Farella, R.

    1976-01-01

    A radiation guard suitable for use in conjunction with a diagnostic table and penetrable by the hands of an operator to facilitate moving or examining a patient positioned on a table. In accordance with the invention there is provided a supportive frame mountable at about an edge of the table so as to extend vertically from about the edge, the frame comprising at least a pair of spaced bars. A plurality of strips of flexible radiation shielding material are mounted across the bars in closely spaced relationship, the strips being mounted sufficiently close together to prevent substantial radiation leakage through the frame. The hands of an operator can be inserted between the adjacent strips to manually reposition or examine a patient while protecting most of the operator's body from substantial radiation. 9 claims, 4 drawing figures

  13. Identification of proteins interacting with Arabidopsis ACD11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Joensen, Jan; McKinney, Lea V

    2009-01-01

    The Arabidopsis ACD11 gene encodes a sphingosine transfer protein and was identified by the accelerated cell death phenotype of the loss of function acd11 mutant, which exhibits heightened expression of genes involved in the disease resistance hypersensitive response (HR). We used ACD11 as bait...... in a yeast two-hybrid screen of an Arabidopsis cDNA library to identify ACD11 interacting proteins. One interactor identified is a protein of unknown function with an RNA recognition motif (RRM) designated BPA1 (binding partner of ACD11). Co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed the ACD11-BPA1...

  14. Proteomic identification of S-nitrosylated proteins in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindermayr, C.; Saalbach, G.; Durner, J.

    2005-01-01

    Although nitric oxide (NO) has grown into a key signaling molecule in plants during the last few years, less is known about how NO regulates different events in plants. Analyses of NO-dependent processes in animal systems have demonstrated protein S-nitrosylation of cysteine (Cys) residues to be ...... to be one of the dominant regulation mechanisms for many animal proteins. For plants, the principle of S-nitrosylation remained to be elucidated. We generated S-nitrosothiols by treating extracts from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cell suspension cultures with the NO-donor S...

  15. The Arabidopsis cytosolic proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ito, Jun; Parsons, Harriet Tempé; Heazlewood, Joshua L.

    2014-01-01

    compartments. However, a detailed study of enriched cytosolic fractions from Arabidopsis cell culture has been performed only recently, with over 1,000 proteins reproducibly identified by mass spectrometry. The number of proteins allocated to the cytosol nearly doubles to 1,802 if a series of targeted...... proteomic characterizations of complexes is included. Despite this, few groups are currently applying advanced proteomic approaches to this important metabolic space. This review will highlight the current state of the Arabidopsis cytosolic proteome since its initial characterization a few years ago....

  16. Differential effects of carbohydrates on arabidopsis pollen germination

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hirsche, J.; Fernández, J. M. G.; Stabentheiner, E.; Großkinsky, D.K.; Roitsch, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 4 (2017), s. 691-701 ISSN 0032-0781 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * Carbohydrates * Metabolic regulation * Pollen germination * Signaling * Structure-function relationship Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 4.760, year: 2016

  17. The influences of Hygromycin B on growth of Arabidopsis thaliana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article, growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling cotyledon and leaf were evidently affected by Hygromycin B. As compared to the control, cotyledon of seedling on Murashige and Skoog (MS) with Hygromycin B was very small and its leaf was not formed. Along with increase in culture time, cells in the ...

  18. Arabidopsis MYB68 in development and responses to environmental cues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Caiping; Andreasson, E.; Maslak, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Arabidopsis MYB68 gene encodes a MYB family protein with N-terminal R2R3 DNA-binding domains. Analyses of MYB68 expression by RNA blot and a transposant gene-trap MYB68::GUS reporter indicated that MYB68 is expressed specifically in root pericycle cells. Root cultures of the myb68 mutant, cau...

  19. Control of Arabidopsis lateral root primordium boundaries by MYB36

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Marcos, María; Desvoyes, Bénédicte; Manzano, Concepción; Liberman, Louisa M.; Benfey, Philip N.; del Pozo, Juan C.; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2016-01-01

    Root branching in plants relies on the de novo formation of lateral roots (LRs). These are initiated from founder cells, triggering new formative divisions that generate lateral root primordia (LRP). The LRP size and shape depends on the balance between positive and negative signals that control cell proliferation.The mechanisms controlling proliferation potential of LRP cells remains poorly understood. We found that Arabidopsis thaliana MYB36, which have been previously shown to regulate gen...

  20. 30 CFR 77.510 - Resistors; location and guarding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resistors; location and guarding. 77.510 Section 77.510 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.510 Resistors; location and guarding. Resistors, heaters...

  1. 30 CFR 77.509 - Transformers; installation and guarding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transformers; installation and guarding. 77.509... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.509 Transformers; installation and guarding. (a) Transformers shall be of the totally enclosed type, or shall be placed at least 8 feet above the ground, or...

  2. Managing the Army National Guard Full-Time Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wampler, Bryan

    2003-01-01

    .... With the increased operational tempo and deployment of the Army National Guard (ARNG), and the impact that the full-time Guard person has upon both recruiting and retention, it is crucial to hire and retain only the best full-time employees...

  3. United States Coast Guard: Officer Corps Military Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    captain relieved of command after viewing porn on computer,‖ 10 July 2010, http://www.thenewstribune.com/2010/07/ 10/1259108/portland-coast-guard...Coast Guard captain relieved of command after viewing porn on computer,‖ 10 July 2010. http://www.thenewstribune.com/2010/07/ 10/1259108/portland

  4. Female mating strategy during precopulatory mate guarding in spider mites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oku, K.

    2009-01-01

    In some taxa, females choose their mates indirectly by using male combat. In the Kanzawa spider mite, Tetranychus kanzawai, adult males guard prereproductive quiescent females. In a dual choice experiment, more males first approached females already guarded by a conspecific male than approached

  5. 28 CFR 97.14 - Guard-to-prisoner ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guard-to-prisoner ratio. 97.14 Section 97.14 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR PRIVATE ENTITIES PROVIDING PRISONER OR DETAINEE SERVICES § 97.14 Guard-to-prisoner ratio. Companies covered under this part must...

  6. 46 CFR 72.40-20 - Guards in dangerous places.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guards in dangerous places. 72.40-20 Section 72.40-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND... shall be installed in way of all exposed and dangerous places such as gears, machinery, etc. (b) ...

  7. 46 CFR 127.330 - Guards in dangerous places.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guards in dangerous places. 127.330 Section 127.330 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND... be installed on each exposed and dangerous place, such as gears of rotating machinery, and hot...

  8. Photorepair mutants of Arabidopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, C.Z.; Yee, J.; Mitchell, D.L.; Britt, A.B.

    1997-01-01

    UV radiation induces two major DNA damage products, the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and, at a lower frequency, the pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidinone dimer (6-4 product). Although Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae produce a CPD-specific photolyase that eliminates only this class of dimer, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, Crotalus atrox, and Xenopus laevis have recently been shown to photoreactivate both CPDs and 6-4 products. We describe the isolation and characterization of two new classes of mutants of Arabidopsis, termed uvr2 and uvr3, that are defective in the photoreactivation of CPDs and 6-4 products, respectively. We demonstrate that the CPD photolyase mutation is genetically linked to a DNA sequence encoding a type II (metazoan) CPD photolyase. In addition, we are able to generate plants in which only CPDs or 6-4 products are photoreactivated in the nuclear genome by exposing these mutants to UV light and then allowing them to repair one or the other class of dimers. This provides us with a unique opportunity to study the biological consequences of each of these two major UV-induced photoproducts in an intact living system

  9. Arabidopsis peroxisome proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Bussell

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The analytical depth of investigation of the peroxisomal proteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana has not yet reached that of other major cellular organelles such as chloroplasts or mitochondria. This is primarily due to the difficulties associated with isolating and obtaining purified samples of peroxisomes from Arabidopsis. So far only a handful of research groups have been successful in obtaining such fractions. To make things worse, enriched peroxisome fractions frequently suffer from significant organellar contamination, lowering confidence in localization assignment of the identified proteins. As with other cellular compartments, identification of peroxisomal proteins forms the basis for investigations of the dynamics of the peroxisomal proteome. It is therefore not surprising that, in terms of functional analyses by proteomic means, there remains a considerable gap between peroxisomes and chloroplasts or mitochondria. Alternative strategies are needed to overcome the obstacle of hard-to-obtain organellar fractions. This will help to close the knowledge gap between peroxisomes and other organelles and provide a full picture of the physiological pathways shared between organelles. In this review we briefly summarize the status quo and discuss some of the methodological alternatives to classic organelle proteomic approaches.

  10. Programmed cell death in the leaves of the Arabidopsis spontaneous necrotic spots (sns-D) mutant correlates with increased expression of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4B2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaussand, G.M.D.J.-M; Jia, Q.; van der Graaff, E.; Lamers, G.E.M.; Fransz, P.F.; Hooykaas, P.J.J.; de Pater, S.

    2011-01-01

    From a pool of transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants harboring an activator T-DNA construct, one mutant was identified that developed spontaneous necrotic spots (sns-D) on the rosette leaves under aseptic conditions. The sns-D mutation is dominant and homozygous plants are embryo

  11. A Model of PCF in Guarded Type Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paviotti, Marco; Møgelberg, Rasmus Ejlers; Birkedal, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Guarded recursion is a form of recursion where recursive calls are guarded by delay modalities. Previous work has shown how guarded recursion is useful for constructing logics for reasoning about programming languages with advanced features, as well as for constructing and reasoning about element...... adequate. The model construction is related to Escardo's metric model for PCF, but here everything is carried out entirely in type theory with guarded recursion, including the formulation of the operational semantics, the model construction and the proof of adequacy....... of coinductive types. In this paper we investigate how type theory with guarded recursion can be used as a metalanguage for denotational semantics useful both for constructing models and for proving properties of these. We do this by constructing a fairly intensional model of PCF and proving it computationally...

  12. Issues related to choosing a guard force structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbach, C.; Cusack, J.; Green, L.; Higinbotham, W.; Indusi, J.; Marcuse, W.; Weinstock, E.

    1975-01-01

    The establishment of a federal security force has been suggested as an additional step to protect nuclear material. The force would be given the responsibility for guarding nuclear facilities and shipments of nuclear materials. A study to identify the issues that are relevant to choosing between the private guard forces that are presently employed by industry or a guard force under federal authority is summarized. To examine the issues which would be relevant, three possible types of security force structures were selected for comparison: a federal force under central authority, a private guard force employed by or under contract to a facility, and a private arrangement to employ local police officers similar to the arrangement for armed guards at airports. The issues were divided into seven categories: (1) legal considerations, (2) liability, (3) staffing and operations, (4) costs, (5) relationship to off-site forces, (6) management and control, and (7) transportation. (U.S.)

  13. Shoplifter faces 27 years in prison for biting security guard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-03-05

    A Pennsylvania man was sentenced to 13.5 to 27 years in prison following a biting incident after he was caught shoplifting at a Wal-Mart. [Name removed] was convicted of aggravated assault for attempting to inflict serious bodily harm on a security guard by "knowingly exposing her to an infectious disease". [Name removed] bit the guard who detained him and told the guard repeatedly that he had AIDS. A blood test later confirmed his HIV status. The prosecution argued that the guard did not have to show that she had a serious injury, only that [name removed] had placed her at risk. The prosecutor and defense attorneys had earlier agreed to a plea bargain with a sentence of no more than 27 months, but the judge rejected the plea, citing the seriousness of the offense and the defendant's long criminal record. The guard has tested negative.

  14. Assessing the transcriptional regulation of L-CYSTEINE DESULFHYDRASE 1 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Laureano-Marín

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide is an important signaling molecule that functions as a physiological gasotransmitter of comparable importance to NO and CO in mammalian systems. In plants, numerous studies have shown that sulfide increases tolerance/resistance to stress conditions and regulates essential processes. The endogenous production of hydrogen sulfide in the cytosol of Arabidopsis thaliana occurs by the enzymatic desulfuration of L-cysteine, which is catalyzed by the L-cysteine desulfhydrase enzyme DES1. To define the functional role of DES1 and the role that the sulfide molecule may play in the regulation of physiological processes in plants, we studied the localization of the expression of this gene at the tissue level. Transcriptional data reveal that DES1 is expressed at all developmental stages and is more abundant at the seedling stage and in mature plants. At the tissue level, we analyzed the expression of a GFP reporter gene fused to promoter of DES1. The GFP fluorescent signal was detected in the cytosol of both epidermal and mesophyll cells, including the guard cells. GFP fluorescence was highly abundant around the hydathode pores and inside the trichomes. In mature plants, fluorescence was detected in floral tissues; a strong GFP signal was detected in sepals, petals and pistils. When siliques were examined, the highest GFP fluorescence was observed at the bases of the siliques and the seeds. The location of GFP expression, together with the identification of regulatory elements within the DES1 promoter, suggests that DES1 is hormonally regulated. An increase in DES1 expression in response to ABA was recently demonstrated; in the present work, we observe that in vitro auxin treatment significantly repressed the expression of DES1.

  15. Reference: 538 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available d A et al. 2007 Apr. Plant Physiol. 143(4):1576-89. Membrane proteins within the sieve element-companion cel...RS6, selected from hybridomas raised against sieve elements isolated from Califor...psis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ecotype Columbia that is associated specifically with the plasma membrane of sieve... elements, but not companion cells, and accumulates at the earliest stages of sieve...ch domain, and carboxy-terminal hydrophobic domain. The amino- and carboxy-terminal domains of the 21.5-kD sieve

  16. Reference: 423 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ed T-DNA knockouts to Arabidopsis FAAH (AtFAAH; At5g64440) and generated plants overexpressing AtFAAH. Here ...d seedling growth was hypersensitive to exogenously applied NAE. On the other hand, seeds and seedlings of AtFAAH overexpress...ssors displayed enhanced seedling growth and increased cell size. AtFAAH expression...s fatty acid amide hydrolase expression modifies plant growth and sensitivity to N-acylethanolamines. 32 121...ors had lower endogenous NAE content, and seedlings were less sensitive to exogenous NAE. Moreover, AtFAAH overexpre

  17. Reference: 453 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctor. We demonstrate that this protein functions as a transcriptional repressor in vivo. The express...ion of all members of the CYCLINA2 (CYCA2) family was reduced in an ILP1 overexpressing l...ine, and the mouse (Mus musculus) homolog of ILP1 repressed cyclin A2 expression in mouse NIH3T3 cells. T-DN...A insertion mutants of ILP1 showed reduced polyploidy and upregulated all CYCA2 express...ion. Furthermore, loss of CYCA2;1 expression induces an increase in polyploidy in Arabidopsis. We demo

  18. Reference: 595 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available t critical for ring formation or positioning despite its conservation. atftsZ1-1(D159N) and atftsZ1-1(G366A)...hese mutants. However, atftsZ1-1(D159N) exhibits loss of proper midplastid FtsZ positioning...1 are related to its in vivo function. Effects of mutations in Arabidopsis FtsZ1 on plastid division, FtsZ ring formation and positio...ning, and FtsZ filament morphology in vivo. 6 775-91 17468127 2007 Jun Plant & cell

  19. Constitutively active Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 3 triggers defense responses involving salicylic acid and SUMM2 resistance protein

    KAUST Repository

    Genot, Baptiste

    2017-04-12

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are important regulators of plant immunity. Most of the knowledge about the function of these pathways is derived from loss-of-function approaches. Using a gain-of-function approach, we investigated the responses controlled by a constitutively active (CA) MPK3 in Arabidopsis thaliana. CA-MPK3 plants are dwarfed and display a massive de-repression of defense genes associated with spontaneous cell death as well as accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), phytoalexins and the stress-related hormones ethylene and salicylic acid (SA). Remarkably CA-MPK3/sid2 and CA-MPK3/ein2-50 lines which are impaired in SA synthesis and ethylene signaling, respectively, retain most of the CA-MPK3-associated phenotypes, indicating that constitutive activity of MPK3 can bypass SA and ethylene signaling to activate defense responses. A comparative analysis of the molecular phenotypes of CA-MPK3 and mpk4 autoimmunity suggested convergence between the MPK3 and MPK4-guarding modules. In support of this model, CA-MPK3 crosses with summ1 and summ2, two known suppressors of mpk4, resulted in a partial reversion of the CA-MPK3 phenotypes. Overall, our data unravel a novel mechanism by which the MAPK signaling network contributes to a robust defense response system.

  20. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.